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FEATURE: General Conference Sermon — David K. Bernard

A TRIBUTE TO

J.L. HALL

June 5, 1933 — October 28, 2011


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E D I T OR IAL

IS ACTS 2:38 OUT OF DATE? SIMEON YOUNG SR.

“Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost. For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call.” —Acts 2:38-39

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everal years ago I saw a bumper sticker that read, “Acts 2:38—It’s a matter of life and death.” I did a double take, not because I questioned the necessity of obeying Peter’s words in Acts 2:38 but because I had never seen such a message on a bumper sticker. In this postmodern era of relativism, which absolutely rejects all absolutes (except that one absolute), the notion that any part of God’s Word is necessary smacks of ignorance and arrogance. But what about those who believe the Bible to be God’s inspired Word yet reject the Acts 2:38 message of salvation? Many years ago my father told a

relative that she should read and obey Acts 2:38. She said, “Acts 2:38 is not in my Bible.” When Dad assured her that it was she said, “No, it’s not because I tore it out.” But of course Acts 2:38 cannot be disposed of as easily as that. Skipping it, tearing it out of a Bible, arguing against it, twisting it, making fun of it, refusing to obey it, or saying that it’s not necessary does not cancel Peter’s instructions in Acts 2:38. Peter’s confrontational message on the Day of Pentecost accused the listeners of crucifying Jesus with wicked hands, cut them to the heart, and caused them to cry out, “What shall we do?” Peter answered, “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.” Peter’s answer was a simple and direct answer to a simple and direct question. His answer offered more than a mere suggestion; it rang with the clear note of a command! But do those familiar words of Acts 2:38 still carry as much weight in the twenty-first century as they carried in the first century?

Is Acts 2:38 really “a matter of life and death,” as the bumper sticker proclaimed? While I was serving as assistant pastor for O.W. Williams in Houston, Texas, in the late sixties I witnessed to a young couple and explained to them the biblical truth of water baptism in Jesus’ name. I told them that the earliest Christian converts were baptized in Jesus’ name and that the Trinitarian mode for baptism was a later practice. The husband—a lawyer— said, “I see what you’re saying, and I believe you, but I will never change.” Luke said that there were, “things … most surely believed among us” (Luke 1:1). The Acts 2:38 message of salvation is one of the things I still surely believe. Is Acts 2:38 out of date? No, it is still up to date. PH Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

Peter’s confrontational message on the Day of Pentecost accused the listeners of crucifying Jesus with wicked hands, cut them to the heart, and caused them to cry out, “What shall we do?” FEBRUARY 2012

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UNITED FOR A MISSION F E B R UAR Y 2 0 1 2

THEME ARTICLES 12 Growing Together P. DANIEL BUFORD

18 A Tree Worth Saving DAVID FAUSS

22 How Wide Are Your Roots SCOTT GRAHAM

26 Mission of the Church JAMES A. LITTLES JR.

30 Associate in Missions JAMES C. MARSE

38 United or Untied NATE TURNER

PENTECOSTAL LIFE ARTICLES 35 A Tribute to J.L. Hall ROBIN JOHNSTON

42 The Real McCoy: Ordinary Students Doing Extraordinary Things MATTHEW JOHNSON

47 Seeing the Glory of God FLO SHAW

FEATURE 7

Seeing the Invisible (General Conference Sermon) DAVID K. BERNARD

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COLUMNS 3

Editorial SIMEON YOUNG SR.

15 My Hope Radio TIFFANI COUNTAWAY

17 New Start CARLTON COON

21 Worldline BRYAN D. ABERNATHY

29 Faith & Culture EUGENE WILSON

33 Multicultural Ministries SORLE STANLEY DIIH

37 Health DR. CLAY JACKSON

41 Teacher of the Month DONJA WEATHERFORD

51 Letters to the Editor

FUNDAMENTAL DOCTRINE The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

THE ONE TRUE GOD We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

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PENTECOSTAL HERALD / FEBRUARY 2012 EDITOR Simeon Young Sr. PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Rebecca Miller PROOFREADER Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2011 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $ 1.75 for 6 or more copies; $2.25 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $ 2.50 for 6 or more copies; $3.00 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $ 3.50 for 6 or more copies; $4.00 each for 2-5 copies An international publication published monthly. VOL. 88, NO. 2. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional offices. Official publication of the UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL Our Vision: The Pentecostal Herald in every Pentecostal home Our Mission: To publish an Apostolic magazine that strengthens the hands of Apostolic pastors, encourages and challenges Apostolic believers, and reaches beyond the doors of Apostolic churches Disclaimer: The Pentecostal Herald (or UPCI) assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of claims of advertisers or for the quality of their service or products. HOW TO REACH US: Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299, Telephone: 1.314.837.7300 Extension 411 Email: bmiller@upci.org, main@upci.org. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com

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EXECUTIVE BOARD GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney GENERAL SECRETARY Jerry Jones GENERAL DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell GENERAL DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton Coon NORTHEAST REGION David Hudson SOUTHEAST REGION David Elms SOUTHWEST REGION Rick Keyes EASTERN ZONE C. Patton Williams NORTHWEST REGION Clifford Barnett NORTH CENTRAL REGION Bryan Parkey SOUTH CENTRAL REGION Anthony Mangun WESTERN ZONE Stephen Willeford CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE Raymond Woodward GENERAL PRESBYTERS Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony, Dan Batchelor, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steve L. Cannon, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton Coon, Floyd E. Covill, Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Alonzo Dummitt, David T. Elms, Daniel Fleming, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, Bruce A. Howell, Robin Johnston, J. Mark Jordan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Shay Mann, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Ronnie Mullings, Arthur Naylor, Gordon Parrish, John E. Putnam, David A. Robinson, D.R. Russo, William J. Singleton, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, Melvin Thacker, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, H.E. Wheatly, Steve Willeford, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

HONORARY PRESBYTERS J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, James Kelley, Carrol Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John Mean, James Merrick, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, J.M. Russell, H.E. Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts

EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

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G E N E R A L

C O N F E R E N C E

S E R M O N

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SEEING THE INVISIBLE DAVID K. BERNARD “And when the servant of the man of God was risen early, and gone forth, behold, an host compassed the city both with horses and chariots. And his servant said unto him, Alas, my master! how shall we do? And he answered, Fear not: for they that be with us are more than they that be with them. And Elisha prayed, and said, LORD, I pray thee, open his eyes, that he may see. And the LORD opened the eyes of the young man; and he saw: and, behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha.” —II Kings 6:15-17

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here is an invisible world. We can become so absorbed in life and its problems that we fail to recognize the invisible world. But the invisible world is

more real than the visible world. Our awareness of the invisible world is what ultimately will determine our destiny both here and for eternity. In II Kings 6, the Syrian king was determined to raid Israel, but every time he sent an invading band the Israelites would anticipate the attack and counter it. This happened so often until the king decided there must be a spy among his advisors. They explained, however, that God was revealing the king’s plans to the Israelite prophet Elisha. When we can see the invisible world, we can defeat the strategy of the enemy. No matter what comes against the church, the truth, or the will of God, if we keep our eyes upon the invisible world we can defeat the enemy. When we see the invisible world, we realize that the

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power on our side is greater than the power against us. When we look at our circumstances, resources, and abilities, we will fail. But when we look with eyes of faith, we can be victorious. In other words, we must learn to see things as God sees them. The Syrian king persisted in carnal reasoning and decided to send an army to capture Elisha. He didn’t consider that God could reveal to Elisha this plan also. Sure enough, Elisha discerned what was happening and prayed. God struck the Syrian soldiers with blindness, and Elisha led them to the king of Israel, who captured them. If we are blind to the invisible world, the result will be blindness and defeat in the visible world. If we don’t develop and maintain sensitivity to the things of God, we will live

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in defeat when we could live in victory. We will miss opportunities God has given us. But if we can see the invisible, we can have victory. We must be faithful to God’s plan, and we must expect the miraculous. We cannot succeed by our own foresight, ingenuity, genius, education, philosophy, or reasoning. All these things have their place, but the church of the living God will not be successful merely by depending on human abilities. We must have the move of God. We must have the gifts of the Spirit and the mighty outpouring of the Holy Ghost. The key to revival and growth is not new methods or approaches. We ought to do things with excellence, and we ought to be on the cutting edge. But we will never find spiritual answers merely by looking with our physical eyes. We need to see the invisible. We need to see the armies of the living God. New Wine in New Wineskins Jesus said, “No one puts new wine into old wineskins; or else the new wine bursts the wineskins, the wine is spilled, and the wineskins are ruined. But new wine must be put into new wineskins” (Mark 2:22, NKJV). In the context, Jesus spoke about the new covenant. The new wine is the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. The new wineskins are the practices of the church in the Book of Acts. In other words, under the new covenant God’s people could not operate according to the traditions of

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the past but needed to walk in the new way of the Spirit. What was new about the New Testament church? First, there was the miraculous demonstration of the Holy Spirit for every believer. “In the last days,” said God, “I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh: your sons and daughters shall prophesy; your old men shall dream dreams; your young men shall see visions.” (See Acts 2:17.) The work of the Spirit became the norm for all of God’s people.

The second new thing was the preaching of Jesus. We must always have Jesus at the center of everything we do. We must not exalt the preacher, the choir, or the program. We should not try to attract people merely by what we can offer them. Instead, we must preach Jesus Christ and Him crucified. (See I Corinthians 2:2.) The early church poured the new wine into the new wineskins of the Spirit’s work, the preaching of Jesus, prayer, worship, and a separated life. These new wineskins were flexible so they could expand with the re-

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lease of the Spirit. We need to go back to this New Testament pattern. We don’t need anything newer. We shouldn’t disparage other religious groups, but we are different from them, and we can use this parable to illustrate why. Too often, traditional denominations have old wine in old wineskins. They are not filled with the Spirit, and they operate by traditional forms. The charismatic movement arose in an attempt to have new wine. Many people received a genuine experience with God, but too often they poured it into old wineskins by retaining old doctrines and old lifestyles. That method doesn’t work. Eventually the old wineskins will crack and most of the new wine will be lost. Recently we have seen another development called the emergent movement. Realizing that traditional church was not reaching our generation effectively, people began to seek new methods. Since our postmodern culture challenges authority and rejects absolute truth, they tried to repackage the Christian message by downplaying authority and truth. They used new methods in an attempt to be culturally relevant. In other words, they sought new wineskins. This is not bad in itself, but the problem is that we need new wine. No matter how relevant or attractive we try to be, if we do not have the new wine of the Holy Ghost along with the new wineskins of apostolic methods and life, we will not succeed. There are basically two ways to plant churches. Many ministers


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today follow an “attraction model,” which focuses on how to relate to people and address their perceived needs and wants. We certainly need to make a good impression, to strive for excellence, and to make our services and messages understandable to new people. But there is a danger in trying to build a church based on what people like. This approach can lead to an accommodation of our teachings of righteousness, holiness, and Christian disciplines, to a downplaying of Jesus Name baptism, and perhaps even to a lessened emphasis on speaking in tongues. The approach we need to use is a “conversion model.” Yes, we want to attract people, but we also need to realize that they will probably find our preaching and worship somewhat unusual. We should also expect them to experience the presence of God. Our goal is not to accommodate to them, but to show them something they cannot see at first. We want them to be transformed by the power of God. New methods have their place, but if we want to be relevant the most important thing we can do is to preach to the real needs of people. We need to present God to people who don’t know Him, to preach healing, deliverance, restoration of family and marriage, and the outpouring of the Holy Ghost. If we will have a genuine move of God, we can build a relevant church that reaches all generations and all people. We must look beyond what visitors can see and beyond what they appear to be now. We need to see what they can be in God’s plan. We need to see the church and its future as God sees it. I grew up in Korea, where my parents were the first United Pentecostal missionaries. I saw my parents build a church not based on American culture or Korean culture but on the Word of God. I saw over five

hundred people baptized at one time in the early 1970s, which was unheard of, and I saw hundreds receive the Holy Ghost in a few nights. I saw miracles of healing and casting out of demons. My parents endured great trials, much opposition, and even some physical persecution. Nevertheless, I saw the apostolic message work even under adverse circumstances. As a church planter in Austin, Texas, I faced the struggle of winning and discipling people contrary to the prevailing culture. Many times it would have been easy to minimize some teachings in order to win or retain people. But I could not get away from the example of my parents, from the Word of God, and from my own experience. Over the years we saw agnostics, Muslims, Buddhists, Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Catholics, Protestants, Charismatics, and Pentecostals baptized in Jesus’ name, filled with the Spirit, growing in the Lord, and seeking a life of holiness. We experienced new wine poured into new wineskins. We saw things that didn’t exist, and then saw them come to pass. If We Can See the Invisible, We Can Do the Impossible Hebrews 11:27 records the example of Moses: “By faith he forsook Egypt, not fearing the wrath of the king: for he endured, as seeing him who is invisible.” Moses faced the impossible task of demanding that Pharaoh release the Israelites from slavery. Once Moses was convinced of his calling, he didn’t consider what the society around him said or what the political leadership said. Instead, he looked at the One who is invisible and fulfilled his mission. If we can see the invisible, we can do the impossible. If we can see the vision that God wants to give us, we can do what God calls us to do. We need to stop thinking the task is im-

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possible, trying to be like everyone else, comparing ourselves to others, or trying to be “successful” in the world’s terms. Instead, let’s be who God called us to be and do what He has told us to do. We need to see what nobody else sees. We need to face the enemy, step into the miraculous, and do the impossible. Let me give you some contemporary examples of people who saw what others could not see. In 2010 under the leadership of Missionary Philip Tolstad, the church in Uganda, Africa, added 431 churches and preaching points. It more than doubled in one year. A boy named Simon saw soldiers come to his home and murder his father because he criticized the government. Another boy, Peter, was kidnapped by rebels and was forced to participate in unspeakable atrocities as a child soldier. Most people would say they could never overcome this type of psychological trauma, but today both are ministers in the Ugandan church. Pastor Larry Garcia, a home missionary in Kankakee, Illinois, converted a medical doctor from Cuba, Omar Garcia, who was a communist and atheist. Today they have started a medical clinic and a community garden to minister to their city. Patrick Dotson, a graduate of Urshan Graduate School of Theology, was chosen as the community minister at Grand Canyon National Park. He recently had his first baptism in the Colorado River, and after prayer a woman in his group was delivered from cancer. On Easter Sunday he ministered to eight hundred people from all over the world. Louisiana is seeing great revival in rural areas and small towns as well as cities. Here are some recent examples: • Denham Springs, Pastor W.R. Johnson, sixty-five filled with the Holy Spirit in four months

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• Breaux Bridge, Pastor Jonathan Haygood, one hundred and nine in two months • Leblanc, Pastor Alfred Gibson, forty-one in eleven weeks • Indian Village UPC, Kinder, Pastor Terry Bushnell, seventeen, including eight backsliders • Tickfaw, Pastor Adriene Spikes, twenty-four in two months plus thirty backsliders • Delhi, Pastor Steve Lester, ten in two months In Tickfaw a young man broke into the church and stole equipment. The pastor saw an opportunity to extend grace and minister to a soul. As a result, his whole family is in church

today. In another town, an AfricanAmerican man asked the Caucasian pastor, “Are people like us welcome to come here?” The pastor said, “Sure.” In a short time, about thirty African-Americans were won to the Lord, doubling the church. See by Faith, Then Act in Faith God told Joshua, “I have given Jericho into your hand, but you’ve got to see it.” (See Joshua 6:2.) At God’s command, the Israelites marched around the city once a day for six days and seven times on the seventh day. No doubt they were hot, dusty, and weary as they marched around and around. Each time they saw no progress. There were no signs of vic-

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K_\9Xkk\i\[JkXb\ A compilation of J.T. Pugh’s writings. J.T. Pugh had a heart and a vision for Home Missions.

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JkXe[`e^Fek_\J_flc[\ijF]>`Xekj Compiled by historian, Dan Scott, the electronic version details the history of our early church planters.

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tory and no preliminary results. On the last time, they shouted in faith and the walls fell down. They had to see by faith and then act in faith to receive their victory. Yes, we want more money, more buildings, and successful programs. But what we really need is vision. Elisha didn’t pray, “Send more chariots, more horsemen, and more armaments.” He just said, “Lord, open his eyes.” Once we see what God sees, everything else comes into perspective. What does God want us to see? What God is doing in your country, your state or province, your city? Seek God for a fresh vision. Pray to see the invisible. Look for what no one else sees. Look for what God sees. There are 40,000 churches and preaching points worldwide in the United Pentecostal Church International. I see 50,000 churches within a couple of years. If the Lord tarries a few more years, 100,000 churches is not unreasonable. We have 4,300 churches in the U.S. and Canada. On the horizon I see 5,000. If the Lord tarries, I see 10,000 churches, daughter works, and preaching points. Can you see what I see? Yes, there are problems all around. Those are what I work on, but those are not what I see. I see revival, souls, new churches, miracles, signs, and wonders. I see revival in your church. I see revival around the world. What do you see? Lord, open our eyes that we may see! PH David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International.


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GROWING TOGETHER P. DANIEL BUFORD

The unity of the body of Christ is like my Unity tree—one root system but multiple trunks. Each individual believer is a trunk on the root system of the universal church. We draw our nutrients through the root system of the church. We produce fruit, based upon our relationship with the root system of the church.

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re Apostolic believers growing simultaneously, side-by-side, and at the same time? Or, are we growing blended, one with another, joined as one? Charles Preston Mitchell, my father-in-law, passed away in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1997. After the funeral we brought the beautiful floral arrangements and plants to my wife’s sister’s home. The siblings

then began considering who should get which flower arrangement or plant. After a while they looked at me and asked what plant I wanted. I pointed to a large, multi-trunked, five-foottall Ficus benjamina tree and said, “That one.” My wife looked at me in amazement and said, “We can’t get that tall tree with all of its trunks into our car. It’s too big.” “Oh yes we can. With your blessings, I will make a

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clump-style bonsai specimen out of it. I will cut it back from five feet tall to about eighteen inches tall and start growing it smaller.” Some people just have strange hobbies. We made it. I cut the tree back severely in Baton Rouge, packed it in the car to bring it home to St. Louis, did some root pruning on it, repotted it, and prayed it would survive. And survive it did. Now, over fourteen years later, it is only twenty-four inches tall. It looks great, even if the squirrels did eat off some of its aerial roots several years ago. Slowly they are coming back. The Ficus benjamina tree was five feet tall when we first got it and it had multiple trunks—multiple trunks, but only one root system. It was not a forest of trees with several independent trees, each having its own root system, but it was a single-root-system tree with several individual trunks growing from it. In a forest, one tree can die and the others can remain alive. But with a multi-trunked tree, the whole tree is a system; while an individual trunk may be wounded and die, the tree lives on. I named the tree “Unity.” One of the training and aesthetic processes I have used on Unity is to begin growing the trunks together in various places. I cut away a bit of the outer bark and the inner bark (or phloem) on two adjacent trunks, exposing the cambium cell layer. This layer is the growing part of the trunk, producing new bark and new wood. After cutting away the layers of bark I pulled the two trunks together, binding them tightly with pruning tape. As the two trunks grew together, they shared the bark layers, and they each benefited from the other’s phloem and the nutrients that pass through it to feed the entire tree. Through the years I have fused several of the trunks together, enabling the various trunks to share their connections to the root system. The unity of the body of Christ is like my Unity tree— one root system but multiple trunks. Each individual believer is a trunk on the root system of the universal church. We draw our nutrients through the root system of the church. We produce fruit, based upon our relationship with the root system of the church. The Spirit of God flows through the church, nourishing the entire church and every individual believer. Unity is valuable. According to Winston Churchill, “If we are together nothing is impossible. If we are divided all will fail.” He was not the only person thinking about

the value of unity and being bound together as one body. In 1977 Bob Gilman wrote a wonderful song about unity. His message in song declared there is only one God, only one King, only one body, and that is why I sing, “Bind us together, Lord . . . with cords that cannot be broken; bind us together, Lord, . . . with love.” Even in the Old Testament, unity was a valued commodity. Understanding the effectiveness of unity, the psalmist David wrote, “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity” (Psalm 133:1). In the New Testament, Paul wrote to the Ephesians, encouraging them “to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace” (Ephesians 4:3). He continued in verse 13, “Till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ.” In 1945, W.T. Witherspoon, understanding the value of unity, blended the two verses together and wrote the Fundamental Doctrine, which now appears in the Articles of Faith in the manual of the United Pentecostal Church International. It states in part, “We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.” May we as individual believers grow up as multiple trunks on the common root system of God’s church. May we be fed through the common root system. May our roots be one, with our trunks even growing together, fused into solidarity and common cause as we do His work in our generation. PH P. Daniel Buford is the associate editor of Word Aflame Publications (UPCI).

May we as individual believers grow up as multiple trunks on the common root system of God’s church. May we be fed through the common root system.

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MY HOPE RADIO

INTERVIEW WITH CHRISTY CLARK TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Tell us about your family. I grew up in the greater Lexington, Kentucky, area where my grandfather, Leonard Plowman, was my pastor for many years. When he resigned to become a missionary to Australia, my uncle, William McGraw, was voted in and still serves as pastor today. My mother, Harlena McFarland, was the choir director and pianist while my stepdad, Rob McFarland, led our worship services. After I married Jason Clark, we moved to Evansville, Indiana, and sat under David Bayer for a couple of years before becoming a daughter work in a small town called Oakland City, Indiana, where we are today. We received the very first Church in a Day in Indiana, and are currently in a capital campaign to raise funds for our next building. We have twin daughters who are nine years old and a six-year-old boy. Describe your spiritual journey. I was baptized at age eight and received the Holy Ghost at a Kentucky Junior Youth Camp after hearing the message “Advertising for Jesus.” As I grew up, I remained involved in the music department of my church. I remember lying on the floor many times in our sanctuary overwhelmed by the presence of God, just sobbing.

I remember one particular moment when it finally clicked in my mind that there were many talented people in the world, most of whom could sing and play better than I ever would, but who seemed to be so empty when they performed. I developed an intense desire for God to anoint me so that regardless of how good I was He would still be able to use me. The focus of my prayers is that I will never be guilty of performing, but always be found giving glory to God. I am still developing as a child of God and I am learning every day that His grace is enough and that I can trust in it. What is your favorite verse in the Bible? Hebrews 10:35 is one of my favorite verses. Another favorite is Psalm 101:3: “I will set no wicked thing before mine eyes: I hate the work of them that turn aside.” In this hour when people are walking away from all they know to be true, I am reminded that I must not turn aside from serving God. He’s been too good to me to turn back now! What is your music background? I sang my first solo when I was eight (“Build My Mansion” by the Rambos). As I mentioned, my mom played the piano and taught me how to play by ear. My dad, Roger Teague, plays the guitar, electric

bass, drums, and recently the harmonica and djembe. My husband, who is unstoppable on the guitar, also has a musical family. What is your favorite song to sing? Why is it your favorite? Probably my current favorite to sing is one of my own: “Before Your Need.” I wrote the song and it has a strong message of encouragement in the lyrics: Who told you you couldn’t make it? Who told you you couldn’t take it? Shake yourself, wake yourself, try again, Get ready to rise again. Everyone can relate to having needs that are overwhelming and can realize all over again, “I can make it!” PH Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com. NOTE: You can read the complete interview by going to: www.myhoperadio.com.

I was baptized at age eight and received the Holy Ghost at a Kentucky Junior Youth Camp after hearing the message “Advertising for Jesus.”

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N E W START

FOCUS AND REFOCUS CARLTON COON

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n the mid-1950s, the United Pentecostal Church created the General Home Missions Division—a strategic effort to bring attention to how under-evangelized North America was. The General Home Missions Division served with a singular focus: communicating the need for new churches in North America, training church planters, assisting in funding North American missionaries. Five years ago, our research indicated that the average Sunday attendance in a UPCI church less than five-years old is 38.6. That is an increase from zero to thirty-nine in a five-year time period. This statistic is more meaningful if one compares increase to increase. The thirty-nine indicates an increase of thirty-nine people who have been added to a church—not a counting of people who have accumulated through the decades. How many existing churches having eighty attendees five years ago now average one hundred nineteen? How many existing churches that had five hundred attendees five years ago now average five hundred nineteen? Church plants produce the greatest kingdom growth of any effort in North America. Our almost three hundred seventy-five church plants (not including preaching points) will have over 14,000 people in church next Sunday. Researchers say that 60 to 80 percent of those attendees did not regularly attend any church before the new church was

planted. The intended work of Home Missions is effective. General Home Missions also birthed significant ministries. Native American evangelism was first. Efforts like Pentecost Sunday, Crusade Evangelism, the Apostolic Association of Retired Christians, Church Growth, Spanish Evangelism, the Spanish Training Institute and Multicultural Ministry were birthed in Home Missions. The division grew to over forty different ministries. Every ministry, those mentioned or not, has value. Focus Beginning in 2009 the fifteen members of the Home Missions Administrative Committee examined the work output of our division. The review concluded that the majority of effort was being spent on important things that were not the original evangelistic church planting purpose of the division. Since then, as projects were considered the question was, “This needs to be done, but are we the ones to do it?” Jim Collins’ book, Good to Great, shows that a trait of great organizations is the ability to focus on what matters most. Collins says focus comes by determining the answer to three questions: (1) What makes money? Where is the greatest return on the investment? Our answer: No other effort of our work in North America will so effectively add disciples to the body of Christ as new church plants. Church plants have

always given return on investment; (2) What can you be best at in the world? Our answer: We start soulwinning, disciple-making Apostolic churches better than anybody in the world; (3) What lights your fire? Our answer: Evangelism! Souls! Disciples! Missionaries sent! Refocus At the beginning of 2012, several things happened: (1) By General Board action, several ministries launched in Home Missions have grown to the point of being released to an effort known as Church Advancement. These ministries are not being eliminated but repositioned for continued growth; (2) The General Home Missions Division was relabeled North American Missions. North American Missions is focused on moving from “good to great” at our business of helping plant additional churches. The changes allow us a laser-beam focus on our mission. We renew the cause of unchurched communities as varied as Quebec City, Quebec, and Kearney, Nebraska. Missionary families need your support! A cry goes up for someone to come with this gospel. North American Missions is focused on raising up church planters to answer those cries. Will you join us in the cause of North American Missions? Pray! Give! Go! Carlton Coon is the general director of North American Missions.

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A TREE WORTH SAVING DAVID L. FAUSS A few days after the storm, to my amazement, I saw several pieces of heavy equipment positioned around the oak. Upon closer observation I was surprised to find them carefully raising the two splintered halves of this massive tree back together! Someone had decided this was a tree worth saving. At great expense and effort, tree experts placed massive bolts and cables to bring the tree upright again and hold the splintered parts back together.

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here is little that symbolizes strength and endurance better than the massive oak tree. Oak trees are slow-growing and very hearty. Because of their large root system they are resistant to drought and the cycles of unusual weather. Throughout the United States, it is common to see gigantic oaks that are over a century in age. Their value to the landscape of a city or home is incalculable. Such an oak stands in Orange, Texas. This tree stands majestically in the center of the landscape of the largest building in the city, the hospital. So prominent is this tree that it actually became part of the logo of the hospital in advertising and publications for many years. Every Christmas this tree was decorated with thousands of lights, and many times while I lived there I took my young daughter to see those lights. During my many visits to the hospital I would pause just to gaze at its massive, spreading boughs. In January 1997, it was no small tragedy for our city when, under the weight of ice from a winter storm, the tree split in two. The wide boughs of this treasure lay seemingly lifeless on the grass. I, like so many others in Orange, was brokenhearted. Although I passed this tree many times a day, I did not realize how important it was to all of us until it broke apart. I found myself

driving out of the way just to lament over this tree. I now realized the value of such a tree. How can a tree that takes decades to grow be replaced? Once it was removed, what could fill the huge void that would be left? As the cleanup from the ice storm progressed around town, I expected to see workers with chainsaws cutting this iconic tree up to be discarded like so much other debris left in the aftermath of this ice storm. A few days after the storm, to my amazement, I saw several pieces of heavy equipment positioned around the oak. Upon closer observation I was surprised to find them carefully raising the two splintered halves of this massive tree back together! Someone had decided this was a tree worth saving. At great expense and effort, tree experts placed massive bolts and cables to bring the tree upright again and hold the splintered parts back together. There was considerable speculation from all who watched as to whether this would actually save the tree. Some thought it was a hopeless situation and that the tree would die no matter what was done. Most people, like me, were hoping that this extreme effort would pay off and save our tree. We watched the leaves, waiting for the telltale signs of either life or death. Only time would tell. Because someone realized the great value of this oak to the landscape of this community, it continues to stand

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prominently in the front of the hospital today … still growing. The bolts and cables holding it together are now partially buried deep underneath the bark. From the street they are hidden beneath the foliage and would not be noticed. Now almost fifteen years later the city of Orange still has this wonderful tree, which could have become just so much firewood. There are times when even a mighty oak needs the help of those who appreciate its value and import to help it continue to live. I have been gone from Orange for many years, but I still wonder who was responsible for deciding to save the tree. It was a good move. Just like the tree, there are objects in the landscape of our lives that are extremely valuable. At some time, storms will come. However, when the storm passes and good weather returns, care should be given to restore those things worth saving. In 1945, men of faith from two organizations who shared their love for the truth came together at what we now call the “Merger Conference.” They joined hands forming the United Pentecostal Church. They knew this God-directed move would enable them to do more than they could possibly do separately. Since then, this belief has been proven true many times over. These men of vision planted the tree that has become the central banner of our movement. This is our reason for existence. The logo of the United Pentecostal Church International today symbolizes it. The motto says, “The Whole Gospel to the Whole World, by the Whole Church.”

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It is on every piece of stationery and every business card of every official. It appears prominently in all our publications. The UPCI is reaching the world with this gospel! The UPCI, through Global Missions and North American Missions, like a huge oak tree, is reaching farther than ever. As we rush through the twenty-first century we know there is still much more left to do. We are constantly attempting to develop new programs and departments, as we should. This tree that was firmly planted in truth and holiness continues to grow. However, I never want to lose sight of what really makes us what we are. Through missions we are advancing this glorious gospel literally around the world at a quickening pace. This is our purpose. It is without a doubt priority number one. As the majestic oak tree, our mission to reach the world stands wide, tall, and strong today. I am committed to it. There is no amount of expense or effort that should be spared to keep this tree prominently in the forefront of our landscape. If ever a storm should come that would harm it, bend it, or break it, let’s decide now that it will never be discarded or cut down. No matter the high cost or extreme effort, this is a tree worth saving! PH David L Fauss serves as pastor at Bethel Tabernacle, Houston, Texas. He has held ministerial credentials with the United Pentecostal Church for forty years. He presently serves as a committee member for the Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism.

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WOR LDLINE

THANK YOU FROM GLOBAL MISSIONS BRYAN D. ABERNATHY

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hat a blessing it is to be part of the United Pentecostal Church International! This church was formed out of a need and desire to see the true gospel of Jesus Christ reach the uttermost parts of the earth through the unity of the brethren. I am glad to say the vision and effort are still clear and true. We are seeing souls all over the globe come to the knowledge of the truth from every tribe, nation, and tongue. To God be the glory! I am overwhelmed by the generosity of this great church and its donors. Because of your selfless giving, sacrifice, and consistency many souls are being added daily to the Kingdom. Our people have a heart to give and it has shown last year in the midst of economic downturn. May the Lord richly bless everyone involved in this furtherance of His great Kingdom! We want to say a special THANK YOU from Global Missions to everyone responsible in helping send five missionaries back

to their fields of labor at the last General Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. Without your tremendous giving, this would not have been possible. What a great victory it was not to have to raise all of the PIMs from the floor and to dedicate the greater portion of time to the ministry of the Word. We are planning to do this again next year, so please say a big “count me in” to this needed cause. I am thankful for God’s anointing at our General Conference service last year. There was an unction of the Spirit and people began to respond to the call and stepped out by faith, giving to the cause. Our General Conference theme of “Let’s Have Church” was a return to a powerful move each night with incredible and soul stirring preaching. We are most thankful to Paul Mooney for ministering in the Global Missions service and blessing us with a tremendous message and a heartfelt altar call that brought us all to consecration and commitment. Last, but most assuredly not least, we saw God reach down and heal, perform miracles, and supply

answers to the prayers of souls who gathered around the altar in faith and sacrifice at the end of the service. I want to give a special thanks to every district superintendent and district board for the open doors at your district conferences and special meetings in helping our missionary families with finances and support. Because of your selfless response, over one hundred ninety-five nations around the world are hearing this great message of truth.! We are praying for every church, pastor, and donor this year that our great God would continue to supply your needs according to His riches in glory. As we see the days of His coming draw nigh, I pray we give, go, and do more than ever before. PH Bryan D. Abernathy is the director of promotions for Global Missions.

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YOUR ROOTS? SCOTT GRAHAM The park ranger said, “Though the roots only go down for about three feet, they go outward for up to a mile.”

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t seems at times that my mind is the designated resting place of apparently useless bits of information. This same brain that sometimes struggles to safely file away where I parked my car, has a collection of factoids and informational nuggets that rarely serve any valuable purpose. My family and I were on a trip to California some time back when one such tidbit sprang to mind. Having grown up in the Midwest, I happened to have read (and to have remembered for some strange reason) that the hardwood trees that grow in our region have on average as much wood below the ground as above. In general, if soil conditions permit it, a fifty-foot oak tree will have roots that go down fifty feet. It is this deep root system that provides their stability against the forces of nature. Knowing that, I could only marvel as my wife and children and I walked through Muir Woods just north of San Francisco and viewed with wonder the majestic redwoods that grow there. These behemoths are the most massive living things on the planet, towering in some cases well over three hundred feet tall and nearing a diameter of thirty feet in thickness. As I craned my neck to stare in awe at the tops of these beautiful gifts from our Creator, I remember thinking what an incredible root structure they must have to sustain them against the laws of physics inflicted by the coastal winds catching their branches some thirty stories above the forest floor. I tried to imagine

roots pressing down some three hundred feet into the soil. That is, until I learned differently! Along one of the marked trails was an informational sign that read, “The roots of the average redwood go down only three feet into the soil”! I could hardly believe it! Surely, I thought, this must be a misprint! There is simply no way that a tree of this magnitude could possibly be supported by roots that don’t reach deeper than that. Any little wind would be able to topple such a poorly anchored tree. It would have no hope of survival! And so I went in search of an answer. I located a park ranger and explained to him my question about the accuracy of the sign I had read. He assured me that the information posted was factual, but then he offered me the explanation that absolutely stunned me. “You see,” he said, “though the roots only go down for about three feet, they go outward for up to a mile. And over and over again in that mile they find the roots of other redwoods, and they weave their roots together in this soil. “Soon,” he explained, “the wind is no longer blowing on just one tree. It is blowing against the whole forest! It is the width of the roots and not the depth that lets these trees stand!” As I turned to walk away with my mind spinning, this park ranger stopped me. “In fact,” he added, “there have been times when there have been trees in this grove that from all appearances were dying if not dead. Had it been left to the inexperienced observer, they would have long

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since been cut down. But if you’d see them today, you’d never know it. Today they are healthy again, because all those around them just would not let them go!” What an amazing picture of the strength and blessing of unity within the body of Christ! When the wind blows against one of us, it is really blowing against us all! Paul taught just such a principle to the church in Corinth. “Whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it. Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular” (I Corinthians 12:26–27). I will have times of weakness, and so will each of us. Storms will batter and life will happen to us all. In such seasons, it is a rich comfort to know that I have placed my roots in common soil with other Apostolic believers who will cling to me even when circumstances and observable indicators might suggest letting go. I can stand because others stand with me! And it is a symbiotic relationship! The more stubbornly I cling to others within the framework of truth, the more securely I am held in the same. As I weave my life, my family, and my home into the fabric of the church, the stability of the church becomes ours. The same channels through which I offer my strength and support to others, become the channels of the same resources to flow back to me.

I suppose there’s something to be said for the oak, whose roots go so deeply into the soil that it needs no other tree to stand. It bravely and grimly faces every blast of wind and rain with self-assurance and a bulldog grip on its anchoring points. But I kind of think that the redwood better reflects God’s will for His people—a community of believers clinging tightly to one another as we reach higher and higher toward Him. If you’re ever in California, I encourage you to visit one of the many redwood groves for they are well worth seeing. If you have that chance, I promise that as you walk through the splendor, your natural inclination will be to look upward. But perhaps for just a moment you can look down and remember that, like the redwood, our greatest blessing just might not be in the depth of our roots, but in their breadth. PH Scott Graham is the pastor of The Sanctuary in Hazelwood, Missouri.


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Sometimes we are preoccupied by what we do not have. We could do so much more with additional money and material resources. The foundation of the church’s peace mission is to realize the One who sends us, the One we represent is the same One who will sustain us.

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ometimes the recognition of the simplest need results in a great invention and even greater wealth. Wite-Out® and Post-it® notes are two such inventions. I think most people have daydreamed about solving some simple need and reaping the benefits for years to come. The need to cover up the mistakes or to make a temporary note is far eclipsed by the needs and challenges faced by the world today. Our world has so much division, pain, and hopelessness; no quick fix will solve the problem. In His wisdom God has chosen to send the church into the world just as He sent Jesus. (See John 17:18.) As Jesus prepared to leave the world He commissioned His church to make disciples. The church fulfills its mission by baptizing and teaching people to observe all His commands. (See Matthew 28:19-20.) An examination of Luke 10 provides key insights for the church as it seeks to be God’s mission in the world today. Case 1: The Seventy on a Mission of Peace Jesus did not build a commune or building to attract needy people to a divine offer of hope. Instead He sent

His disciples into the world. They became living examples of new possibilities rather than hiding behind an attractive sign and waiting for people to find them. Just as He had sent the twelve disciples in Luke 9, Jesus sent the seventy in Luke 10. The thirty-five ministry teams were sent into the harvest field in front of Jesus. Since Jesus would serve as a lamb in His mission, He felt confident in sending them as lambs among wolves. They had everything they needed to successfully witness to the coming Messiah—they had both the words and deeds of peace. They were able both to preach about the coming Kingdom and heal the sick as evidence that the Prince of Peace was on His way! Sometimes we are preoccupied by what we do not have. We could do so much more with additional money and material resources. The foundation of the church’s peace mission is to realize the One who sends us, the One we represent is the same One who will sustain us. The church can fulfill its evangelistic mandate in the world today just as the seventy fulfilled theirs. Case 2: The Good Samaritan on a Mission of Service When asked about the greatest commandment, the core

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of God’s revelation and teaching for humanity, Jesus quickly agreed with the lawyer. The core calling for humanity is to love God and to love their neighbors as they love themselves. This profound love is made possible by the love of God as seen in Christ. This love beyond compare serves as the primary witness that the church has actually become disciples of Jesus. (See John 13:35.) Just as speaking in tongues serves as a sign of Spirit infilling (see Acts 10:44-46 for an example), love in action serves as a sign that people are Christ’s disciples. Paul reminds us of the central location of real love in his exposition of spiritual gifts in I Corinthians 12-14. The church’s mission is not primarily about going to and participating in corporate worship services. The priest and Levite’s single-minded focus on the corporate event kept them from actually doing the work of God’s witness in the world. The principle for the church is to be aware of people in need and doing something about it. Corporate worship services are the foundation for the church’s mission, rather than the mission itself. The Lord has gifted the church with leadership for the express purpose of fulfilling this mission—the work of the saints. (See Ephesians 4:11-12.) We should not be surprised by the inclusion of serving others in the church’s mission. After all the One who sends the church came to serve those in need. Jesus told the lawyer to go and show mercy like the Samaritan. Today’s church can do no less as it lives out the twin commandments. Case 3: Discipleship as the Missionary Foundation How many times have you heard someone say, “There is an app for that!”? Ever-present smart phones and iPads provide easy access to thousands of handy apps to help you accomplish whatever you need to do. Martha’s number one app would have been a to-do list. She was “cumbered about [with] much serving.” She had the gift of seeing needs and not resting until all was completed. She did not realize the work could not be completed in this world. She could not find time to be a disciple. Perhaps she believed her world’s appraisal that some people, like women, children, and Samaritans, were excluded from being a disciple. Mary

found that good thing—she was able to be at Jesus’ feet as a disciple. Worshiping Jesus and hearing His voice is never wasted time. The church’s call to make disciples is fulfilled by leading people to Jesus’ feet so they can walk as Jesus walked. Frenetic work schedules and development of new programs can never be a substitute for continual growth as a disciple. Conclusion What an opportunity the church has today! Just as God was in Christ reconciling the world unto Himself, the church has received both the deeds and words of reconciliation. (See II Corinthians 5:18-20.) Only when the church is recognizing the needs of the world and the wonder of God’s abiding Spirit in the church today is she actually on the mission. Living as peacemakers, salt, and light (see Matthew 5) can be done only in relationship with the world. Rather than being overcome with despair about the darkness of the world, the church should celebrate the wonderful opportunity to shine ever more brightly as she worships and serves on her mission. God has entrusted His divine plan to the church. In his book, Living Like Jesus, Ron Sider tells of a hypothetical conversation between Archangel Gabriel and Jesus. Upon observing the condition of both the world and the church, the angel asks Jesus if He has an alternative plan. Now that the world has passed seven billion people and so many are without the new birth experience, surely God will reveal His backup plan. So many cannot be lost! Ron Sider is right in his assessment; Jesus does not have an alternative—His mission will be fulfilled only through the church. PH James A. Littles Jr. is a disciple currently serving as professor of practical theology at Urshan Graduate School of Theology. He attends The Sanctuary UPC in Hazelwood, Missouri, with his wonderful wife, Sherri.

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F AI T H & CULTURE

MOVING FORWARD EUGENE WILSON

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he sentence caught my eye. It was from some poor soul searching for help. I think I may have come across it on Yahoo! Answers, a website dedicated to finding solutions to everyday problems. It said, “Today I put my car in drive but it doesn’t move forward.” I paused to consider the thought, Is this what God thinks about us? Could it be that He wants us to move forward but we are stuck? God’s plan for the children of Israel was for them to exit Egypt and enter into the Promised Land. Nothing was to stop them. Pharaoh and his army were not to stop them. The Red Sea was not to stop them. Yet when confronted by these obstacles Moses told the children of Israel to “stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord” (Exodus 14:13). Stand still. Don’t move. But that is not what God said. God did not tell Moses to instruct the children of Israel to stand still. God told Moses, “Tell the children of Israel to go forward” (14:15, NKJV). Likewise, God wants us to move forward. Some people refrain from moving forward until they see the com-

plete picture. But we should not move forward based on what we see; our forward momentum should be based on faith. (See II Corinthians 5:7.) Not moving forward until you can see the complete picture is like waiting for your car’s headlights to shine all the way to your destination before pulling out of your driveway. But your car’s headlights shine only three hundred and fifty feet in front of you. It is only by moving forward that you can get to where you need to go. Unfortunately, some people live their lives standing still while God is waiting for them to move forward. According to foresight experts, fear is a major trend that is reshaping our world. Fear is a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger, evil, pain, and so forth, whether the threat is real or imagined. Fear keeps people from doing what God places in their heart. Fear keeps people from moving forward. Fear is what the bully wants his victims to feel. He wants to intimidate. This is the tactic of our adversary; he is like a roaring lion. (See I Peter 5:8.) He wants to instill fear in the hearts of people. But God has not given us the spirit of fear. (See II Timothy 1:7.) He does not want our lives to be gov-

erned by fear. God wants us to move forward. When confronted with fear we must not allow it to paralyze us. Fear may describe our world but we are not to allow this world and its system—its way of thinking—to become our way of thinking. Instead, we are to be transformed by the renewing of our mind. (See Romans 12:2.) We are to think differently. The feeling of fear is a deciding factor for many; it must not be the deciding factor for us. We must not allow fear to cause us to stand still. Instead we must move forward. Right before they entered into the Promised Land, the word of the Lord came to the children of Israel saying, “Be strong and of good courage; do not be afraid, nor be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go” (Joshua 1:9, NKJV). This word is pertinent for us today. Move forward. Do not be afraid. God is with you. PH Eugene Wilson serves on the pastoral staff at The Pentecostal Church in Memphis, Tennessee. Terry Black is the pastor.

Some people refrain from moving forward until they see the complete picture. But we should not move forward based on what we see; our forward momentum should be based on faith. FEBRUARY 2012

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MISSIONS JAMES C. MARSE The work is not always glamorous. Your nails may get grimy as you work with cement, your arms may get tired from shoveling dirt, or your hands may start to cramp from cutting out letters for signs. There is a wide variety of jobs that must be done in the field and AIMers can help the missionaries carry the workload.

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t was June 2006 when we arrived in Bolivia for the first time. Brother and Sister Collins, the missionaries at that time in Bolivia, met us at the airport in Santa Cruz. He had forgotten his cell phone at the hotel and asked me to jump in a taxi and ride back to the hotel with him. We walked out of the airport, climbed into a dirty, beat up taxi with four balding tires and raced toward the hotel. This was my first encounter with the streets and people of this South American country. Owing to the fact that I had never traveled outside of the United States, I was amazed at everything I saw. For the next two and a half months, we lived in a different culture, experiencing a different world. In May 2008, we landed in Bolivia to start our second AIM trip. This time we lived there for thirteen and a half months. We attended language school and had the opportunity to visit other parts of the country. We traveled to the Yungas, a tropical area of the country, with one of the pastors. We saw the lowlands of the east, the mountains in the west, and experienced the mild climate of the south. We visited ruins that pre-dated the Incas, and stood on the shores of Lake Titicaca, the world’s highest navigable lake. While the natural beauty of the country is stunning, what excited us most were some of the church services

we were a part of in the different cities. We experienced an incredible conference in the capital city of La Paz and witnessed an amazing children’s service. In the city of Cochabamba, we were part of a three-day Holy Ghost campaign where God filled forty-four people with His Spirit and dozens were baptized in Jesus’ name. We traveled to the southern city of Tarija for another conference and saw twenty-eight baptized in a hotel swimming pool. However, our most amazing experiences came in Villa Satelite, a small church on the outskirts of the city of Cochabamba. In January 2009, Robert Dame, the current missionary of Bolivia, gave us the opportunity to work as interim pastors in this particular church. On one of the national holidays, we had the equivalent of a barbecue cookout and spent the day having fellowship with the church members and playing soccer. We celebrated Mother’s Day at the church and the youth performed a drama about the influence that mothers have in their children’s lives. Bolivia’s national kid’s day fell on Sunday, April 12, that year so we celebrated it with puppets, skits, cake, candy, and balloons. In a church building that measured about fifteen feet by thirty-five feet, we packed in almost eighty children and about fifteen adults. We repaired a broken down property wall and later hosted a youth service under several tarps that we had to tie together.

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We enjoyed some incredible services in that small church. During those six months, we watched the average attendance almost double. On Thursday nights we had Bible study and I spent about three months teaching on the new birth experience. One night a young man named Richard, who already had the Holy Ghost, approached me and confessed, “Pastor, I need to be baptized in Jesus’ name.” We made arrangements to baptize him the following Sunday. When he arrived Sunday night to be baptized, he told me, “I have a problem. My mom wants to be baptized tonight too. Will that be OK?” Both Richard and his mother were baptized in the name of Jesus. Around this time, Richard’s sister, Elizabet, began attending. One Sunday night Missionary Dame preached and Elizabet received the Holy Ghost. We baptized her two weeks before we left the country. Allow me to switch gears and say that Associates in Missions (AIM) is an important program of the UPCI and those who participate in the AIM program can be a tremendous help to the missionaries laboring in their appointed fields. I encourage both young and old who have an interest in missions to prayerfully consider a short-term AIM trip. The work is not always glamorous. Your nails may get grimy as you work with cement, your arms may get tired from shoveling dirt, or

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your hands may start to cramp from cutting out letters for signs. There is a wide variety of jobs that must be done in the field and AIMers can help the missionaries carry the workload. A few years ago, I preached at a church in the States, and afterward an older gentleman approached me and explained, “When I was a young man, God called me to be a missionary to China, but I refused the call. I regret that I didn’t go and have suffered for it.” How sad to live with such a regret hanging over the end of your life. God may not be calling you to be a lifetime missionary, but He may be calling you to be a temporary help to a missionary standing waist deep in a ripe field. I believe that somewhere this morning as I write these words a missionary is on his or her knees praying that the Lord of the harvest will send out more laborers and helpers. My question to you today is, why not be a shortterm laborer in another field? Join the AIM program and you may become a missionary’s answered prayer to a short-term need. PH James, his wife Stacy, and their two children have spent the last thirteen years in New Waverly, Texas, where they have attended Greater Christian Life pastored by O.L. Powell Sr. They have made two AIM trips to Bolivia and were recently appointed as missionaries to that country.

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MULT I CULTURAL MINISTRIES

A LIFE-CHANGING EXPERIENCE SORLE STANLEY DIIH

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boarded a Balkan Bulgarian airline flight from Lagos, Nigeria, for Sofia, Bulgaria, at 2200 hours on October 29, 1989, in transit to Athens, Greece, to begin my college journey at the University of Athens. Prior to my departure for Greece, I had been attending a small church in Nigeria, my native country, since I was eleven and I wondered if there would be an English-speaking church in Athens. Little did I know that the Lord Jesus was patiently waiting for me at the Crossroads International Christian Center in Athens, Greece. On my first Sunday in Athens, I walked a short distance to a public transportation hub near my school, looked up toward Heaven, and told the Lord that I would accompany the first person I saw with a Bible to whatever church that person was going. Less than fifteen minutes after my prayers, a gentleman approached the tram stop with a Bible in his left hand. He came and stood next to me, giving me a warm, friendly response. I also had a Bible in my left hand, and we immediately struck up a conversation. He told me he was on his way to church. I requested to accompany him. He promptly and excitedly agreed. Shortly thereafter, a tram came, and off we went to The Crossroads.

When we got there I realized that the Lord had led me to the Crossroads International Christian Center, otherwise known as The Crossroads United Pentecostal Church of Athens. On my first day, I was received with open arms. On my second Sunday at the church, the pastor said he would like us to meet in his office after the morning service. He shook my hand as soon as I walked in, provided me with a seat, and sat next to me. He then informed me that he was impressed by the fervency of my prayers during the service and would like to know a little more about me. I told him I attended church regularly in my home country and was baptized at age eleven in a small church near my village. He then asked me how I was baptized, and I told him that I was baptized according to Matthew 28:19. He asked me to repeat the Lord’s instruction on baptism in that verse. I told him that the Lord instructed His disciples to baptize and be baptized in the “name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.” He then asked me to read that verse again and I did. He told me to read it again and I did. He asked me to read it a third time and I did. Immediately after the third reading, I exclaimed, “I get it! I get it!” The pastor said, “Get what?” I told him that Mathew 28:19

says “in the name” and not names. He then showed me some Scriptures that prove that Jesus is the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. I was baptized in Jesus’ name that Sunday afternoon and was filled anew with the Holy Ghost. The Lord changed my life and my destiny in a multicultural church on a global missions field pastored by Brother Alan Demos. The church has Filipinos, Nigerians, and people from many continents, including Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Many of these people are now in their own countries and other parts of the globe to pioneer new churches. Thank God for global missions and multicultural ministries. PH Sorle Stanley Diih is a criminologist and lieutenant with the New York Police Department. He and his wife, Annetta, have been married for over twenty years. They have three children. The Diihs are members of the New Life Apostolic Church in Ozone Park (Queens), New York. Scotty Teats is the pastor.

The Lord changed my life and my destiny in a multicultural church on a foreign missions field pastored by Brother Alan Demos.

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for giving to Mothers Memorial 2011! Offfering total: $2,064,793.30 Top T op Twenty Twenty Church C Offerings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

entecostal Church/Klamath Randdy Langley ................... $31,292.00 United Pentecostal Church/Klama Falls, OR – Randy wn UPC/Columbia, MS – James Carney ............................................. 20,155.00 Woodlawn entecostals of Alexandria/Alexandria, LA – Anthony Mangun/TTerr erry ry Shock ...... 19,500.00 Pentecostals aith/Racine, WI – James Schumacher ........................................... 16,732.00 Apostolic Faith/Racine, United Pentecostal entecostal Church/Whitehall, AR – A. D. Hill ..................................... 16,111.00 1st Pentecostal entecostal Church/P Church/Panama City, FL – Allen Crabtree............................... 14,777.83 United Pentecostal entecostal Church/Oregon City, City OR – Garry Gleason .......................... 14,002.38 st 1 Pentecostal entecostal Church/Ba Church/Baton Rouge, LA – Dan Davis Da ................................... 13,350.00 st 1 Apostolic postolic Church/T Church/Toledo, OH – J. Mark Jordan.......................................... 13,292.55 Pentecostal Assembly/Eau Claire, WI – Paul Bennett ..................................... 12,867.40 Mt. Zion Apostolic postolic Church/Goshen, CA – Harvey Cantrell ............................... 12,850.00 Calvaryy Gospel/Madison, WI – John Grant .................................................... 12,521.16 South Flint Tabernac Tab abernacle/Flint, MI – Robert Henson .......................................... 11,531.45 United Pentecostal entecostal Church/Bourbon, IN – Mark Cottrill.................................. 11,111.11 1st Pentecostal entecostal Church/Bastrop, LA – Dwight Fulton/A.J. Fulton ...................... 10,536.00 st 1 UPC/Leesville, LA – Mark Christian ........................................................... 10,500.00 Pentecostal entecostal Church of DeQuinc DeQuincy/DeQuincy, LA – Wayne Neyland .................. 10,200.00 Calvary Tabernac Tabern abernacle/Indianapolis, IN – Paul Mooney ....................................... 10,041.00 Parkway Apostolic postolic Church/Oak Creek, WI – Anthony Anthon Tamel ............................. 9,875.00 st 1 Pentecostal entecostal Church/Bossier City City, LA – Jerry ry Dean ...................................... 9,407.48

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A TRIBUTE TO J.L. HALL JIMMY LOUIS HALL: JUNE 5, 1933 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; OCTOBER 28, 2011

ROBIN JOHNSTON

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ike many Pentecostals, I grew up comfortable with the idea of loving God with all my heart. The sermons I heard, the songs I sang, and the role models I followed underscored the importance of feeling after God. Much of the direction of my life was set during emotionally charged altar services, youth camps, and prayer meetings. It was not until I was a young adult that I first became aware that I could also love the Lord with my mind and that should not only love God passionately but I should also think deeply about Him. W. C. Parkey, who was the president of the Bible college I attended, first pointed me in that direction. Throughout most of my adult life, J. L. Hall modeled this approach to God. I first met him when he moved to St. Louis to serve as the editor for Word Aflame Publications. He married his love for the English language and his commitment to the Apostolic message, and out of that union grew an editorial eye honed to look for both good writing and biblically sound content. After a short tenure as Word Aflame editor he was appointed the editor in chief for the United Pentecostal Church International and for more than two decades he committed both his heart and his mind to this task. Under his leadership the output of Word Aflame Press soared. He nurtured writers who produced books that defined the

contours of the Apostolic faith. And occasionally he penned books that helped with this task. He helped the Oneness movement mature into adulthood. He initiated the first symposium on Oneness Pentecostalism. This forum encouraged Apostolic believers to think hard about their faith so they could better defend the faith and also refine it to remove inconsistencies. It was at one of those early symposiums that he introduced me to Pentecostal historiography. A paper he presented on why the restoration impulse was the best lens through which to view the development of the Oneness Pentecostal movement set the trajectory of my development as a historian. His love for Pentecostal history was infectious. During his long tenure as a member of the General Board his knowledge of parliamentary procedure and organizational leadership helped shape that entity so it became more productive. Leaders from across the fellowship sought his guidance as they negotiated the often tricky waters of progress and the change it necessitates. On October 28, 2011, this soldier of the Cross was called home to meet in another setting the One whom he loved with all his heart and his mind. PH Robin Johnston is the editor in chief for the United Pentecostal Church International.

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HE ALT H

SCRIPTURE AND PET SCANS DR. CLAY JACKSON

Q. One of my favorite topics that we discuss is the insight into scriptural principles that can be gained from scientific discoveries. Do you know of any recent studies that have piqued your interest? A. Well, my thoughts lately have centered on neurobiology and neurotheology—two exciting fields of study that are yielding fascinating results that may have important applications for how scriptural instructions may benefit our lives. Q. Can you give an example? A. Consider Psalm 1:1, which tells us that there is blessing in avoiding the words of ungodly people, or surrounding ourselves with those who oppose God’s law or are “scornful.” Q. I agree with the concepts, but what does that have to do with neurobiology? A. We’ve always taught that surroundings make a difference, and that we should choose our influences carefully. Recent sociologic and neurologic research gives us some depth to that instruction. For instance, the climate of mood seems to behave more like a contagious disease than a feeling.

Q. What do you mean?

about five times the emotive and biologic punch as positive words.

A.. In the Framingham study, a large epidemiologic study of multiple health variables, researchers plotted geographically the chronic mood states of people (divided into happy and sad). Lo and behold, the “happy” people and the “sad” people clustered. Q. Misery loves company? A. Apparently. And not only does misery love company, it may actually affect company in a negative way. Research subjects who had unhappy friends tended to be less likely to be happy themselves (by about 7 percent).

Q. Sounds like we need to be careful what we say. A. And how we look!Studies show that our brains are exquisitely tuned to respond to the expressions of the human face. When we see angry or hostile faces, our own brains mimic the neurologic components of anger and hostility, within seconds. Q. So who I hang around can affect my own mental state? A. Absolutely—and can actually change the way your brain functions. PH

Q. Do we know how that happens? A. We know that speech is very important, and has a profound effect on those around us. It may be that those who project negative speech have a deeper impact than those with positive speech. Q. Solomon said,“Death and life are in the power of the tongue” (Proverbs 18:21).

Dr. Clay Jackson practises in Memphis, Tennessee. He attends The Pentecostal Church in Memphis. Terry Black is the pastor. NOTE: The contents of this article are intended to convey information, and should not be interpreted as medical advice.

A. Exactly. And it looks like (from psychologic and neurologic research) that negative words pack

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COHESION IN DIVERSITY NATE TURNER

On a global scale, just as the whole body is best served by a diversity of offices and operations, the power of missions is most effectively brought to bear through diversity.

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very believer is called to be a missionary. Whether we engage locally, globally. or somewhere in between, our mission is Jesus’ mission. In his book Missions in the 21st Century, missions thinker Tom Telford writes of “missions not as just another program in the church, vying for the people’s attention and resources, but as the umbrella under which all the other ministries work.” Missions is about pushing out all the boundaries of the church by seeking and saving that which was lost right here in our own churched city and beyond. On a global scale, just as the whole body is best served by a diversity of offices and operations, the power of missions is most effectively brought to bear through diversity. This is true not only in the obvious sense of cultural and racial diversity, nor only in the sense of these gifts and of-

fices. The value of diversity also holds true with regard to missionary methods. Usually in the UPCI, one missionary may be supported by hundreds of local churches and individuals, each generally contributing a portion of the missionary’s budget. In turn, one local church may support scores or even hundreds of missionaries commissioned by the organization. This approach has moved Global Missions forward for forty-two years. No doubt it will continue to fruitfully bear the weight of our missions support strategy. However, it can be challenging to keep up with all of these partnerships, much less to maintain personal interaction with the missionaries. If people feel no real responsibility beyond finances and prayer connecting them to the work of missions, the danger is that they can begin to view their role in the impersonal terms of dollar amount per soul. We all understand that giving is truly a way of

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going. At the same time, there is nothing like personal, grass-roots initiative. When this energy is fully tapped and appropriately directed, the ceiling is removed from what is possible. Obeying the commission to preach the everlasting gospel of Jesus Christ to every nation, tribe, tongue, and people will always cost local churches and individuals in terms of their support of missionaries, their sending of missionaries, and their going as missionaries. However, there are methods already in place that can help the cost to be more effective. Especially in fields more recently opened and less developed, losing the missionary every four years for long deputations creates obvious challenges. For my friends Tony and Shasta Miller, associate missionaries in Lithuania, the breakthrough for their church plant came during their fifth year. Because they did not have to leave, their labor is bearing great fruit. As a fellowship, we can expand our support mechanism by taking advantage of a growing choice of diverse methods. Whatever connects people more directly to global missions will fire their enthusiasm. Whatever eliminates a chunk of time away from vulnerable new works may be one key to shift missions work in developing fields to the next level of explosive and sustained growth. The blessing of diversity is synergy. We’ve all heard about horse pulling, where a team pulls 25 percent more than what the same horses have individually pulled. There is no question as to the enormous benefit of joining together in unity and organizing to do the work of the church. Two are definitely better than one. One of the main reasons for church organizations to exist is the cause of global missions, which is too overwhelming for any one assembly to adequately tackle alone. The UPCI, itself, was formed with missions as a central component of its glue. Missions writer Bruce Camp highlights a powerful new conception of local church missions commitment through what he calls the synergistic paradigm. This model emphasizes deeper personal relationships with the missionaries a church supports. Technology enables frequent personal communication. Churches encourage members to visit the mission field and empower members to become directly involved in missions. It is a proactive approach that cooperates with the missions agency. Rather than just trying to support as many fields as possible and

keeping each investment equal, a church taking this approach may have many partners, but it concentrates on a few of them in order to make a maximum impact in those fields. How does something like this look in practice? Pastor Chester Mitchell made a decision with his church in 2009 to strategically partner with us. This partnership included sponsoring an extraordinary percent of our overall missions budget and keeping Estonia before the church’s attention. The church has helped us with technical expertise, like launching a website. Last summer a team of staff and members came to Estonia for evangelism. As a result we had twenty-five new kids in Sunday school that weekend and twenty-eight adult visitors. Two received the Holy Ghost, several were healed, and many new contacts signed up for Bible studies. My wife Ingunn’s home pastor, Randy Briggs, and the church from Kristiansand, Norway, made us their first long-term missions partner and sacrificially give a large percent of our budget. They sent Silje Hauge, a young lady from the church, to work with us for more than a year, and have sent a steady stream of several missions teams every year since 2007. Even before we had finished deputation and moved to Estonia, the church’s teams were making contacts, discipling them, praying them through, and baptizing them—right on the field! Bringing these intensive partnerships to the table has not only blessed the field here in Estonia with direct, hands-on labor alongside the missionaries, but has saved us months of deputation travel. This translates to less time without a pastor for the church here. We are blessed by the faithfulness of tremendous partners in North America and Europe. It takes every partner to get the job done—not only these kinds of intensive partnerships. One size does not fit all. While it can add complexity, diversity is not threatening to the work here. Having more than one option on the table helps hold the work together and keeps things moving forward. The result? The whole body of Christ wins. PH Nate was raised by missionaries William and Elizabeth Turner and has served in global missions himself since 1998. He and his wife Ingunn are missionaries to Estonia. They pastor in the city of Tallinn, where they live with their two boys Christopher and Michael.

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TEACHER OF THE MON T H

MAY 24 - 26, 2012

REVIVAL & GROWTH CONFERENCE

DONJA WEATHERFORD

Donja Weatherford teaches the second grade class at Woodlawn United PenteCarlton Coon Sr.

Jerry Dillon

Jimmy Toney

Paul Graham

costal Church in Columbia, Mississippi. Specific direction, anointed ministry, practical solutions and new inspiration to rise to the challenge of planting, growing and developing churches in the great Northwest. THURSDAY Evening Service 7:00pm

FRIDAY Focused Prayer 9:00am Practical Sessions & Q&A 9:30am – 12:00pm Evening Service 7:00pm

SATURDAY Practical Sessions & Panel Discussion 9:00am – 1:00pm

Her pastor is James Carney. She began teaching when she was seventeen years old and just out of high school. She has

CONFERENCE & LODGING LOCATION DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Seattle Airport

been teaching for the past thirty-three years.

18740 International Boulevard Seattle, WA 98188 1 800 222 TREE Room block: United Pentecostal Church

She likes to make sure when teaching the lesson and doing student activities

Sea-Tac Airport: Shuttle service from baggage area every 20 mins I-5 Interstate: Take the 188th St exit to International Boulevard Parking: $10 per day

that things continue to flow so that any one task does not take up too much time. She gives awards to her students for Bible verse memorization, participation, and good conduct.

TRAVIS MILLER North American Missions – Secretary tmiller@upci.org | 1 314 837 7300 ext 366 RUSSELL GARRETT NW Conference Administrative Assistant CONTACT protocol@shaw.ca | 1 778 229 6657

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ORDINARY STUDENTS DOING 2010 iStockphoto © Candy Frangella

EXTRAORDINARY

THINGS MATTHEW JOHNSON

“As I listened to the message, I began to think about the lost souls that were waiting to hear the truth,” Loren said. “I was excited about getting a new car but suddenly my attention was drawn toward the fields that were ripe to harvest. I weighed my need for a new vehicle in the balance against the need for souls to hear the gospel. Suddenly my needs seemed rather petty.”

H

e was just another young person trying to save up for a new car. He would clock in, work a long shift, and then clock out. Day after day he labored with one goal in mind: a new car. Finally it was time to make the purchase—the vehicle down payment had

been saved. It was on the following Sunday that Loren Brown, of Tualatin, Oregon, headed to church and listened as the minister preached passionately about making sacrifices for the kingdom of God. As Loren began to think about the missionaries who needed a vehicle to reach the lost, conviction gripped his heart.

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“As I listened to the message, I began to think about the lost souls that were waiting to hear the truth,” Loren said. “I was excited about getting a new car but suddenly my attention was drawn toward the fields that were ripe to harvest. I weighed my need for a new vehicle in the balance against the need for souls to hear the gospel. Suddenly my needs seemed rather petty.” Instead of making the down payment on a car, Loren made the decision to give to Sheaves For Christ. A decision he said was not difficult at all. Loren is an ordinary student who made an extraordinary sacrifice. Making a decision that seemed to make no sense at all. Loren is one of twenty-three students from North America who were recently recognized by the General Youth Division as a Real McCoy. The Real McCoy contest requires a student to raise a minimum of $1,000 for Sheaves For Christ and be approved by

their district youth president. Once the district candidates are chosen, they are flown to St. Louis for a celebration weekend with the General Youth Division executives and their families. “I was excited about being a part of the Real McCoy weekend but had no idea how life changing it would be! I made lots of new friends who feel passionately about giving to missions,” Loren said. Loren and the other twenty-two Real McCoys raised more than $42K for Sheaves For Christ this year. On average, that’s $1,826 per student. Brittany Covill, of the Canadian Plains District, raised the most individually with more than $3,900 given. How did they raise these large amounts? These students received sponsors for move-a-thons, held bake sales or dinners, or used whatever talent they had. What types of talents? Brett Brua from California worked with his dad, a beekeeper, to pollinate and sell honey for SFC. Destiny

These students received sponsors for move-a-thons, held bake sales or dinners, or used whatever talent they had. What types of talents? Brett Brua from California worked with his dad, a beekeeper, to pollinate and sell honey for SFC. Destiny Coots of Maryland took on the job of sanding furniture for SFC.

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Coots of Maryland took on the job of sanding furniture for SFC. Briana Mathews went with her dad to the shores of Maine to harvest lobsters. Ordinary students doing extraordinary things for God. The General Youth Division salutes the efforts of the 2011 Real McCoys! Learn more about the students by going to www.sheavesforchrist.com.and clicking on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Real McCoy Contest.â&#x20AC;? May the efforts of these

students encourage young people everywhere to give to the worthy cause of Sheaves For Christ. (go to www.sheavesforchrist.com) PH Matthew Johnson is the director of promotion for the General Youth Division of the UPCI.


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New Missionaries:

Dwayne D wayne & LLinday inday A Abernathy bernathy

Trecina Tre cina Anderson Anderson

Keith K eith & Elizabeth Elizabeth Ikerd Ikerrd d

Intermediate Missionary to Belize

Intermediate Missionary to Spain

Intermediate Missionary to Namibia

John Jo hn & A Aurelia urelia Hopkins

James Ja mes & S Stacy tacy M Marse arse

Daniel Da niel & Monica Monica Rushing Rushing

Intermediate Missionary to Bolivia

Intermediate Missionary to South Korea

J John & Aurelia Hopkins forr 32 yyears of missioniona missionionary ry ser service. rvice.

globalmissions.com

David & Yo D Yonda Schwarz as newly appointed ap ppointed Regional Director of the Central Ce entral A America/Caribbean merica/Caribbean region. r

United Pentecostal Church International 8855 Dunn Rd David Da vid & Yonda Yonda Y Schwarz Schw warzz

Hazelwood, MO 63042 Mark 16:15


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SEEING TH E G L O R Y O F

GOD FLO SHAW

Prayer is a vital key in our endeavor to see the glory of God manifested today. The supreme purpose of prayer from God’s vantage point is to accomplish His perfect will in His kingdom, in our lives, and in the lives of others.

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s the coming of the Lord approaches, now is the time to move from the natural to the supernatural. During Israel’s wilderness wanderings, God led His people by a pillar of cloud by day and fire by night. (See Exodus 13:21.) He

is still leading us today by His Spirit. (See John 16:13.) Prayer is a vital key in our endeavor to see the glory of God manifested today. The supreme purpose of prayer from God’s vantage point is to accomplish His perfect will in His kingdom, in our lives, and in

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Positioning Yourself to Always Obey the Voice of God Get in one mind and one accord with the Spirit of God. Obey His Word. Worship Him. Get into alignment with God. Get into fellowship with other believers to reap the harvest. Choose to be a vital link of prayer that unites rather than being part of a chain of prayerlessness that binds. As we unite in prayer, believing in one God, one church, and one mission, nothing will be impossible.

the lives of others. Some key components to helping us see the glory of God are: Putting God First and Practicing Self-discipline in Prayer We must wake up and realize that the time is short; we must watch and pray. We should endeavor to fulfill God’s great purpose on earth in our lives. Practicing a Consecrated Lifestyle and Living a Crucified Life in Christ We must “put on Christ” and commit totally to Him. The more we crucify the flesh by prayer and fasting, the more we will see the supernatural. 2012 IiStockphoto: © Christopher Futcher When we love God and one another and allow the fruit of the Spirit to operate we will see God’s glory manifested. Praying the Will of God in All Situations Many people are so busy telling God how they want Him to answer that they never allow Him to reveal how He wants them to pray. Find out what God’s will is, pray it with faith, and it will be done.

Permitting the Spirit of God to Flow and His Glory to Be Manifested in Your Life Allow God’s Spirit to prevail in prayer. Do not be limited by programs or protocols, but allow His Spirit to move. God responds to the prayers of His people. In the Book of Acts prayer preceded great demonstrations of God’s glory; we must go back to the foundation of prayer to see a great end-time harvest. Because their prayers in the past were not answered to their satisfaction, some may ask, “What is the use

Many people are so busy telling God how they want Him to answer that they never allow Him to reveal how He wants them to pray.

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of praying?” The Bible says that Elijah “prayed again” (James 5:18). If he had not prayed again he would not have seen the downpour of rain. So is it with us—we must be persistent in prayer. Paul said, “Pray without ceasing”(I Thessalonians 5:17). World Network of Prayer is available to provide prayer resources to encourage prayer

in any setting. For more information, go to wnop.org and kidsprayer.com. Our Summons to Sacrifice 2012 International Prayer Conference (“Experience the Supernatural”) is scheduled for June 7-9, 2012. There also will be services for children and youth. PH Flo Shaw serves as the director of World Network of Prayer. 2012 IiStockphoto: © Christopher Futcher

Your

adoption journey For over 20 years, New Beginnings International Children’s and Family Services, Inc., has been building families through domestic and international adoption of children of all ages. Our compassionate, experienced staff is completely prepared to guide your family through the process. New Beginnings announces an exciting new partnership with Adoption Associates, Inc., a prominent, Christian, Hagueaccredited agency with a long history of facilitating adoptions from Russia and China.

New Beginnings provides adoption services in the United States, Russia, China and other countries. Applications from all 50 states are welcome.

www.NewBeginningsAdoptions.org • adopt@newbeginningsadoptions.org • 662.213.0369

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R E ACHING FUTURE GENERATIONS

“These two little girls climbed up in this chair in our foyer and enjoyed the Pentecostal Herald together. The photo wasn't posed. The girl on the left is Aubry Thompson. The one on the right is Chloe Bruce. Chloe is the niece of missionary Steve Willoughby.” Doug Ellingsworth Finley Pentecostal Church Finley, Tennessee


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LE T T E RS TO THE EDITOR

“WE ENJOY THE MAGAZINE… “ One of our readers alerted us to the article “The Palmyra Principle” by Scott Graham published in the November 2011 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. We would like to seek permission to reprint the article to give our readers an opportunity to read an outside and interesting perspective on a very well known local historical event. The Palmyra Spectator is a weekly newspaper. —Mark Cheffey, Publisher Palmyra Spectator

the piano and old songbook covered with insulation. —Judy Bentley The article “Life Lessons from My Grandfathers” in the September 2011

Thank you so much for the timely article (“A Plea for Discernment”) in the December 2011 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. —Jeff Stroud Upon reading only the opening paragraphs of the editorial (“A Plea For Discernment”) in the December 2011 edition of the Pentecostal Herald I was soon weeping openly and shouting for joy. Your observations are absolutely spot on! —Donald L. Evans

Mr. Cheffey, You have our permission to reprint one time in the The Palmyra Spectator, as long as it is not edited in any way and if the Pentecostal Herald is credited. —Editor I just read Nathan Elms’ article “Going to General Conference—by Faith” in the October 2011 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. I laughed at his comments about his sister and brother, and fought back tears as I read about how his dad exercised faith in going to General Conference and how it impacted his family. Excellent article. —Eugene Wilson Just wanted to tell you how much I like the picture layout on Mom’s article (“Trusting God When I Don’t Understand”) in the November 2011 issue. Very cleverly done with

while reading article after article. I have been so blessed to know and hear the great ministers (the ones mentioned in the November issue) preach God’s Word. —Jackie Duck

The Pentecostal Herald is a first class publication. —James W. Hinkle

issue of the Pentecostal Herald is a great article. —Carlton Coon

Text Message Great editorial on discernment in the December 2011 issue. —Dr. Clay Jackson

Enclosed is my check for $17.50 for ten additional copies of the November 2011 Pentecostal Herald. We enjoy the magazine very much. We especially enjoyed the November issue. We are going to pass it on to friends. I cried and was so blessed

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