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pentaprism m a g a z i n e

Me and my monkey | Mario Grobenski

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www.pentaprism.ning.com Pentaprism-showcase pentaprismphcommunity@gmail.com

April 2014

PENTAPRISM MAGAZINE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TEXT AND PHOTOS PUBLISHED BECAUSE THEY ARE PROPERTY OF THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS. ANY COPY IS FORBIDDEN BY THE LAW.


PENTAPRISM Pentaprism is born by a common idea of a group of friends who love good photography. A sort of a bet for many of us, because we knew the difficulties facing us in opening a photo community in 2013 with so many established photo websites. The purpose was, and still is, to build an easy-to-use platform offering a high quality view, open to all photographic and artistic expressions and using the most popular social networks to showcase the work featured in the gallery: Pentaprism gives you the possibility to publish your images at the best quality chosen by the authors, without any algorithm that reduces the resolution. Selected and invited experienced photographers are shown together alongside entry level photographers, allowing everyone a dedicated space whereby they can present their photography. This magazine is an extension of the activity in the site to highlight and give a deeper insight of the photographer’s vision.


index


x 6 INTERVIEW WITH MARIO GROBENSKI 22 BLACK&WHITE 32 THE ART OF PORTRAIT 44 FINE ART NUDE 54 CREATIVE EDIT 66 CONCEPTUAL 76 STREET 88 ARCHITECTURE 100 LANDSCAPE 112 WILDLIFE 1 24 MACROWORLD 136 REPORTAGE: ICELAND 1 55 PENTAPRISM CONTEST WINNERS 162 REPORTAGE: CLOWN THERAPY 168 BOOK REVIEW


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interview MARIO GROBENSKI

Born in 1967, in Croatia and currently work for a danish firm Hartmann. I dedicated my whole life to listening to music and making photographs. That is why I somehow always try to combine the two. For many years, I worked with my trusty old Minolta, developing my own black and white films at home. Some of the band photos that I took were used as album covers or book covers (mostly for books about rock music, ‘’The secret history of Rock’’ for the Croatian distribution by Roni Sarig). In the past 5 years, I went from analog to digital and kind of drifted away from making only rock photography. I put on several independent exhibitions in Croatia and one at 29. International Photo exhibition in Esbjerg, Denmark 2012. (Various authors). MARIO GROBENSKI


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First of all, Mario, it’s a pleasure for us to do this interview with you. The first question is: what kind of music do you like? Because when looking at your pictures, their relationship with music is evident. I’m really glad that you noticed that. Music has always had a major impact in my life so it is natural to me to reproduce it in my photos. I like classic sixties rock: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, Jimmy Hendrix etc, but the most important bands for me are The Velvet Underground, The Stooges, and many punk rock bands like Ramones, The Clash, Joy Division. I also have to mention Tom Waits, Nick Cave, Lou Reed, Pixies, David Bowie, Patti Smith, R.E.M. Etc. What is the imaginary place where the room exists that is the location of your photos? After many years of photographing rock concerts (Ramones, Iggy Pop, Nirvana, Sex Pistols…) and small club concerts I started searching for abandoned houses near my hometown. This particular room where I take most of my photos is in one of the 3 houses which were part of a concentration camp Danica, established in 1941. Did you ever “come out” from that room? Well of course I did, but unwillingly. Sometimes when I have idea crisis for shooting in this room, I try to shoot in other locations, just to do anything. Or when the weather is really bad, so I can’t come near the house. I have to admit that those situations are my nightmare.I am the happiest when I am shooting in this room. That is my special little world there. The subjects of your images seem to be, most of all, characters of a “novel”. Tell us something about the idea and the execution behind your shots. I constantly attempt to adapt my characters to location and the fourth dimension. Sometimes I get the ideas from books, series, films or songs. Mainly I work alone and I am a photographer and model at the same time. That’s why I use a tripod for the camera. It can be difficult to find „models“ for my picture stories (people don’t like posing, they don’t have suitable clothes, they don’t have time or they are just not in the mood) but from time to time I manage to arrange some shooting sessions with my friends. All my photos were shot under the daylight and I always use a wide angle lens which is my favorite.

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How long has photography already been a language for you? I have been practicing photography as a language for the last 4 years, actually when I started shooting in abandoned houses. What is photography for you? For me photography is another universe where I can tell stories in my own style,express myself and be creative. What intrigues you? I am not interested in stereotypes. Everything out of the ordinary, surreal and with a bit of dark atmosphere intrigues me. I am inspired by D. Lynch, E.A. Poe, F. Woodman and J.Saudek. What types of photography, different from yours, are you interested in? I am interested in rock ‘n’roll, documentary and street photography and my favourite photographers are Ed Van der Elsken, Henry Cartier-Bresson, Anders Petersen, Robert Frank and Andy Warhol. Film or digital photography? I love film (analog) photography and nothing can beat it, but unfortunately I don’t have so much time anymore and it is quite expensive. I still miss the smell of film developer. Now I am into digital photography only. And I love it too. Thanks a lot Mario, greetings from the staff. Thank you. It means a lot to me. Greetings from Croatia.


Black&white

“It has always been my desire to receive, from an observer, the big question: “Why?”. It implies an interest to my mind, to my way of thinking and interpreting photography, life, and reality. It raises a question of artistic nature and demands profound answers that leads to debate or simple exchanges of opinion. Unfortunately, the recurring question I hear is “How?”, which is much more obvious and relegated to mere technical choices. As an artist I am inexorably degraded, with a simple word, to the status of a artisan. An equally worthy profession but without the faintest ambition. The few times that this wish has come true, I remember that my choice was determined by the technique of using black and white.” Max Ferrero

Photography in black and white cannot be improvised. When working directly in monochrome or converting a colour image into B&W, you exclude one aspect of reality. In doing so, greater attention is given to the content, form and use of light. Light and shadows have more influence in adding or removing “importance” to the image. It is no longer just a reproduction of reality, but an immersion in creativity and search for artistic expression. The world of reality, as Ralph Gibson said “exists in three dimensions, 100% scale and in living color. A black and white photograph reduces the world into two dimensions, considerably reduces the scale of reality down to the size of a print and also subtracts color. The Color, being only two steps abstracted from reality.” There is something nostalgic, emotive and dramatic in B&W photography. Many photographers choose to work exclusively in B&W for this reason and because it strips the image down to its pure essence of form and light. Here a few images taken from Pentaprism gallery.


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Shade | Roby Bon


The boy with his cat | Abi Danial

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A Walk in the Fog | Marco Romani


Untitled | Stella Trasforini


Bridge at fog | Alper Uke


THE ART OF PORTRAIT

A look, an expression, the light, a concept. The capability to merge all these elements and obtain a synthesis of them can make an image of a visage more than a simple photograph. A portrait should create a relationship between the subject and the observer, so you can see the point of view of the photographer, his way of interpreting the moment in actuality. By doing so, he becomes the hidden subject of the image and his presence should be tangible. Here you will find a selection of our best portrait images which tributes to the human feelings.


Coco | Malgorzata Fober


Untitled | Curly

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The Piano Man | Ezra Wolfinger


I’m Devil | Phoenix

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Sophisticated Lady | Andrzej Ĺ azarz

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Usia | Dmitry Nevlad

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fine art nude

Since ancient times, artists have used the representation of the nude to express ideas and feelings. Although history has changed the ideas and expressions, the nude must appear respectfully, must merge the form and the beauty as natural as possible to not cross the thin threshold that conduces to eroticism. “Art is never chaste” Pablo Picasso said “when it is chaste is not art anymore”. The secret of a good nude image is the simplicity. A concept not easy to achieve.


Dorka | Markus C. Keller


Untitled | Maurizio Melozzi


Untitled | Thomas Holm


Russian watercolor | Pavel Ryzhenkov


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Janka II | Ľubomír Drápal


CREATIVE EDIT

Elements and ideas of Romanticism blend to a dreamlike vision of reality to generate surreal locations. A genre in continuous evolution that opens the door to research, experimentation, new perspectives on the representation of man and his environment. The man changed in appearance from its spiritual content and the space becomes anthropomorphic opening a dialogue with those who inhabit it. The feeling of grandeur that nature arouses in its human viewers. The imagery of Friedrich and deformations of De Chirico. Romanticism and Symbolism condensed into images so far removed from reality as to be faithful portrait of its essence.


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When Adam was 7 | Grodner Buchholz

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Hear | Blackie Chong


Africa | Dr Feelgood

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Thought Provoking Moments | Perocan Bal

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Andavi 01 | Ruadh DeLone

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Conceptual

“In conceptual art the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work. When an artist uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes a machine that makes the art.” Sol LeWitt, 1967

Conceptual photography has its birthplace in Conceptual art of the 60s. Its primary method is a staged or preconceived photograph representing the photographer’s idea, concept and vision. Modern photo editing software has opened up the world of possibilities in terms of manipulating images and combining layers of different elements both from abstract and reality to create the final desired image or ‘concept. The essence of Conceptual photography is capturing a story with meaning and using various techniques to create the mood, emotions and overall message of the work, which might be a political or social statement, or a work of fine art with a personal message to create a psychological impact with the viewer.


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Escape | Paola Mischiatti


Afraid Of Falling | Anja Matko

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February | Natalia Drepina

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Home | Lara Zankoul

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The time on me | Rendy Oktareza Blazquez

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STREET IN THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT MOMENT

To talk about street photography is like talking about the birth of photography and at the same time of the desire to document or freeze a significant moment. A concept which Henri Cartier-Bresson, the father of modern photojournalism called ‘The Decisive Moment’; that there is a creative fraction of a second when taking a picture where your eye must see a composition or an expression that life offers you and you must know with intuition when to press the shutter and how it is at that moment the photographer is truly creative. Street photography must be unstaged. Capturing a moment in time in a public place where you can find a person, a group of people or a scene bereft of people, capturing just the urban environment alone with the aim of representing a static or dynamic elements of a specific time and place and the events and drama that unfold there. So many great photographers of the genre have left an indelible mark on the history of photography, examples that can only give a cue but never copied due to the fact that the basic characteristic of the street is to be unique , having its essence in the unique moment. It is hard to define what makes a good street photograph but the ability to see, and better yet, to feel and anticipate situations is the essence of a good street photograph. Here are some wonderful photos on Pentaprism sections, urban, street, reportage.


Fun | Marta SmolÄ…g


Disguise | Ümmü Nisan KANDİLCİOĞLU


Fans | Hans Severin

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Good morning India! | Javier Chor


Il coraggio delle proprie scelte | Claudio Simon


Untitled | Francis Giudice


ARCHITECTURE

Some might ask why photographing architecture? At the end of the day, it’s just steel, glass and stones, it’s not natural. Most people can connect with a tree, an animal and people, but not with a building or a bridge. As the great Le Corbusier said once: “Architecture is a thing of art, a phenomenon of the emotions, lying outside questions of construction and beyond them. The purpose of construction is to make things hold together; of architecture to move us”. It takes a special kind of photographer to perfectly capture that emotional intensity which is the soul of all great architecture and to evoke the true character of a building. The images selected here are perfect examples of architectural dream like visions created by some of the best fine art photographers.


Glass Ladies I ~ Vertical Tension | Mabry Campbell


Skyway II | Dennis Ramos


K+Ă‚ln - Kranhaus | Arnd Gottschalk

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CHCG II | John Kosmopoulos


ND2 | Julian Escardo

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Shinjuku Monologue | Dr. Akira Takaue


landscape BLACK AND WHITE

“The whole world is, to me, very much “alive” - all the little growing things, even the rocks. I can’t look at a swell bit of grass and earth, for instance, without feeling the essential life - the things going on - within them. The same goes for a mountain, or a bit of the ocean, or a magnificent piece of old wood. Ansel Adams


Dancing silhouettes | Alexandre Manuel


Past and Present | Xose Casal


Things Encountered | Nathan Wirth

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An ode to the old pier | Abi Danial


Drift-Away | David Hixon

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Watermill | Carlos F. Turienzo


wildlife

The most simplistic definition for ‘wildlife’ is wild animals living in nature. A broader definition, though, encompasses all living things (except people) that are undomesticated, which includes everything from vegetation, plants and flowers to all creatures great and small found on land and in water whether in their natural habitat or in captivity; as far as animals go, the line is drawn to exclude those that have been tamed as pets, raised as livestock, or work on a farm. For the purpose of this introduction the focus is on wild (as opposed to domesticated) animals, we have selected some photos that for us are examples of great wildlife photography, which has not been an easy task seeing as there are many fine examples to be found on the Pentaprism website. As wildlife photographer, you should to focus mainly on capturing something of the subject’s personality, whether that be by way of a facial expression or something that shows them displaying natural behaviour. In either case what you should attempt to do is capture a frame that others will find themselves drawn primarily to the animal subject in a way that they will hopefully feel some connection on an emotional level. The following images are great examples of this, though as suggested above there are many more to be found on Pentaprism.


Wild Fox | Milan Kapusta


An Arctic Duel for Kings by | Chase Dekker


Mother and Kid | Sergey Agapov


Mountain Gorilla Infant | Nelis Wolmarans


Zebras’ Party | Sergio Pessolano


Pelcan | Georgi Kocakov


macroworld

By exploring the world starting from the its smallest elements we become a minuscule observer of the power of nature, discovering the fascinating, almost visible things that exist all around us and under our often careless looks. Macrophotography shows the beauty of what is not usually visible. It highlights details that our eyes can’t see in our field of vision, revealing a parallel reality filled with an extraordinary richness of life and organisms of things that are part of the apparently infinite greatness of this world called Earth. In the following pages some great examples of macro photographs from our community gallery.

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oOOo | Andy Ubex


Tulipano | Maurizio Angelin


Endromis versicolora | Luis Manuel Iglesias Núùez


Delicate | Joanna RzeĹşnikowska

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Cahaya Emas | Heri Wijaya


Dragon smile | Regayip


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Narrow is... | Bragi Ingibergsson - BRIN


iceland reportage Curated by

ÞORSTEINN H. INGIBERGSSON AND BRAGI J. INGIBERGSSON

Iceland is great destination for landscape photography. It has a unique and very varied landscape with beautiful subjects everywhere. Such as magnificent mountains, peaceful fjords, gigantic glaciers, wonderful waterfalls, spouting geysers, glittering lights of the Aurora Borealis and beautiful flora and fauna. The light is also very special and different, especially in the bright summer nights when the nature is still and fresh and the colours are so wonderful and spectacular. The weather in Iceland is unpredictable which makes it both a big challenge and great fun to get the most out of it; to use the variation of the weather to make a good image where the weather and light play a big role in the photo. Iceland is therefore a paradise for a landscape and nature photographers like us Ingibergsson brothers. We have travelled all around the country photographing beautiful and interesting places. We recommend to those photographers planning a trip to Iceland to be well prepared not at least in the light of the Icelandic circumstances and weather conditions. The land and weather can be rough and you don’t always get the light that you want -everything can happen. There are many places or areas we could suggest for landscape photographers coming to Iceland – but here in this article we will only show few examples in photos from popular places we have photographed. But of course there are also many pictorial places not so famous in Iceland worth visiting. Many foreign photographers we know have taken a good time going the road around the country and have seen many places on that trip, but keep coming back because there are always something new to see and photograph. Firstly is an image from a place not so known and visited by photographers or other tourists. It is taken in the afternoon on an autumn day in a wonderful light. An old path leads to a small rural church named “Breidabolstadarkirkja” located on Snæfellsnes peninsula in western Iceland which is a great area for landscape photographers.


Rocky Beach | Ăžorsteinn H. Ingibergsson


L贸ndrangar are a pair of single sharp and steep cliffs, or volcanic plugs of basalt, that have been hewn out from softer surrounding rock by erosion. At 75 m and 61 m respectively, they are a singular sight, rising above and outside the ocean front due east across from Malarrif and some 10 km from Hellnar, on the southern coast of Sn忙fellsnes peninsula. History has it so that the taller of the cliffs was ascended in 1735, while the smaller one was left alone longer and not climbed until 1938, or so the story goes.


Here is still another image from the Snæfellsnes peninsula - and now from a famous spot at least among landscape photographers. This mountain “Kirkjufell” (i.e. Church mountain) is very beautiful and pictorial - it is maybe one of the most famous mountain in Iceland. It has a triangular form and is located in a beautiful surroundings that give photographers various and different possibilities while photographing regarding the point of view and selection of foreground. This photo is taken on an October afternoon when the sun is setting, some clouds where dancing in the sky and partly blocked the last rays so it is just like the light is embracing the mountain. 140 PENTAPRISM


Embrace | Bragi Ingibergsson - BRIN


Námaskarð is a geothermal area in the northern part of Iceland close to Mývatn. It lies at the foot of Námafjall (482 m) with numerous bubbling and steaming sulfur springs. Up to 100 degree heat, the mud pots, and especially the bright points can easily break. For centuries this has been reduced sulfur, which is in Europe for the manufacture of gunpowder used. About the area is characterized by a strong sulfur odor.


Solfatara | Ăžorsteinn H. Ingibergsson


When driving around the country it is possible to see some beautiful places from the ring road. On the next image you can see one of them, the waterfall “Seljalandsfoss� located on the south part of Iceland. It is one of many famous waterfalls in Iceland and probably one of the most visited by photographers. The waterfall is 60 meters (200 ft) high and it is possible to walk behind it. So it gives many opportunities for making beautiful photos. This picture is taken in the springtime when the greenish tones ar beginning to show their touch in the nature. It is in the afternoon when the sun is nearly setting, shining through some thin clouds and makes a wonderful light on the waterfall and surroundings.


Nature Study | Bragi Ingibergsson - BRIN


And on the next image is another beautiful waterfall. Dynjandi (also known as Fjallfoss) is a set of waterfalls located in the Westfjords, Iceland. The waterfalls have a cumulative height of 100 metres (330 ft).


Solfatara | Ăžorsteinn H. Ingibergsson


You can find the rock “Hvitserkur“ on the north coast of Iceland. It looks a lot like a dinosaur or rhino and is located in Hunafjordur. Its name “Hvitserkur” means “white shirt” and is probably derived from the white bird droppings that cover the rock. Hvítserkur is 15 meters (50 feet) high. It is a beautiful and magnificent rock standing alone by the beach and just waiting to be photographed. But it doesn’t have to wait much because tourists are visiting it all the year around, not at least in the wintertime hoping to catch it with some Northern lights.

Hvitserkur | Bragi Ingibergsson - BRIN


Eystrahorn is a mountain (756 m)in Hvalnes, south east Iceland. Eystrahorn is a very steep mountain and various metals such as gold, silver and mercury have been found in the mountain.


Tranquillity | Ăžorsteinn H. Ingibergsson


Visits to Iceland have increased a lot in the wintertime the last few years - and most of the visitors have the goal to see the northern lights (Aurora Borealis) and to photograph them if possible. It is a great experience - no doubt about that - and maybe once in a life time for people that don’t live in the areas where the lights show up. It is possible to see them in the winter when the conditions are right which is not every night, so it can be a bit of a lottery. And to photograph is not always easy either. It is a challenge, both to catch good lights and also to be on the right spot when they show up to have some interesting subject in the foreground and to make some decent composition. This photo is taken in Iceland’s most precious and holy place “Thingvellir” where “Althing” the Icelandic legislative assembly was founded. “Thingvellir is now a national park. This photo was taken on a cold January night; the lights where outstanding and the surroundings covered with snow very beautiful. It is the river “Öxará” in the foreground.


Aurora Borealis | Bragi Ingibergsson - BRIN


So we will end in the area where we started. This wreck is one of my favorite and it is located at Þingvellir which is very near the town Stykkishólmur in the western part of Iceland, to the north of the Snæfellsnes peninsula.

Final Place | Þorsteinn H. Ingibergsson


PENTAPRISM CONTEST

“INTO THE WILD” IN THE FOLLOWING PAGES THE WINNERS PHOTOS OF OUR LATEST CONTESTS CHOSEN BY OUR MEMBERS


A large migration of Wildebeest | Sergey Agapov 1st Classified contest: Into the wild


The Vulture | Mario Moreno 2nd Classified contest: Into the wild


Walking on the Savannah | Jackson Carvalho de Albuquerque 3rd Classified contest: Into the wild


CLOWN THERAPY PROJECT Curated by

SIMONE ZAROTTI

A SMILE IN THe AISLE In the last few years, photography has strongly captured and monopolized my attention changing the way I look at the world and things around me. I soon realized that what fascinates me the most is being able to tell a story through my photographs. From the outset my aim has been to convey, through my shots, feelings and emotions that life gives me every day. Over the years I have learned how to translate a story into images, studying the context, the location, the subjects, acting discretely and with the utmost respect for those who are in front of my lens without invading the set with my presence. This can also mean spending the whole day with the protagonists of my stories without even shooting a single frame but simply observing my subjects trying to become invisible to their eyes. In this way I am sure to catch all their spontaneity when taking the picture. For all these reasons it has been an incredible honor for me when, after a long negotiation, I obtained the permission to follow the work of a group of clowns volunteering around the hospitals in my area. It is a group of boys and girls who devote good part of their leisure time to those who have lost the joy of smiling because of their suffering. Once worn red noses, wigs, false glasses and armed with toy balloons, magic little balls and invisible dogs to the leash, these marvelous guys cross the aisle of the hospital with a purpose: to alleviate the sufferings of patients of any age giving them a smile. It is unbelievable to find out how these few moments of joy can improve their mood. While the image in front of my camera was interesting and exciting, I also had to deal with a primary need: the respect for the patient. This was the biggest challenge that I had to face. I didn’t mean to surrender to the rhetoric or to the trivial search of the result through the representation of other people’s suffering. So I preferred to focus on the job of the clowns because the patient’s smile is reflected in the smile of the volunteers, the suffering remains in the background. As I wrote at the beginning of this brief article, my aim is to spread and convey emotions through my works. Looking back at what all these wonderful people are capable of doing, I really hope to have adequately translated into images the immense value of their actions.


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books Curated by

PIETRO COLLINI

LA PHOTOGRAPHIE

CONTEMPORAINE

Author: MICHEL POIVERT Publischer: Flammarion (Paris) Year: 2002

The book deals surgically with all aspects of photography from the 80s to today. The common thread is a ruthless, but seriously realistic, critical analysis of the aspects of the photographic art, illustrating new modes of expression and by analyzing the crisis of contemporary works in the context of indexicality document, covering both artistic expression and focusing on the credibility of the critic today. Rich iconographic references are used as examples of its analysis. The book should be in every library of an amateur photographer, who rather than be just a mere passive assimilator of an image, wants to emerge deeper, understand with greater insight and who is committed to photographic culture.


ACCORDING TO OUR PHILOSOPHY PENTAPRISM IS AND WILL REMAIN AVAILABLE FREE OF CHARGE FOR EVERYONE, BUT THE PLATFORM HAS ITS COSTS. A SMALL CONTRIBUTION WOULD BE A GREAT HELP TO CONTINUE TO OFFER THE ESTABLISHED TOOLS AND FUNCTIONS OF PENTAPRISM AND TO ENSURE A PROGRESSING DEVELOPMENT. IN ORDER TO KEEP YOUR PENTAPRISM CLEAN, WE DECIDED TO AVOID ANY KIND OF ADVERTISING. SUPPORT US WITH A DONATION FREE OF CONSTRAINTS. YOUR CONTRIBUTION WILL BE USED EXCLUSIVELY TO MAINTAIN AND IMPROVE PENTAPRISM. THANKS

GRAPHIC DESIGN : ELENA BOVO CONTRIBUTORS: RICCARDO ROSSINI, ROBERTO BON, AMEDEO FRAGIACOMO, LARA KANTARDJIAN, MARCO NOSIGLIA, MIHAI FLOREA, DAVIDE GIONGO, ASHLEY VINCENT, CHRISTOPHER SCHLAF, KLAUS-PETER KUBIK.


IN THE NEXT ISSUE INTERVIEW WITH

SERGEY SMIRNOV

Pentaprism magazine#3  
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