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SCHWANZ:

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The $94,850 settlement includes attorney fees and costs of $10,267 to be paid to Samuel J. Larabee; a $100 statutory redemption fee to the State of Michigan; and $5,277.58 to be placed in trust to Larabee to cover a Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan amount which was paid to Schwanz prior to the settlement. Schwanz will receive $79,304.45 in the settlement order reached by both sides. The amount is identified on the redemption order as an allocated rate of $222.10 a month, based on Schwanz’s remaining life expectancy of 29.62 years. Schwanz was contacted by the EagleHerald Friday and she said she could not comment on the settlement because she was bound to the terms of a confidentiality statement the city of Menominee required her to sign.

“The only thing I know is I will continue to do everything I can as a citizen to make sure taxing and assessing is done correctly,” she said. City Attorney/Interim Manager Rob Jamo said the settlement agreement ends the city’s legal involvement with its former assessor. “The settlement is a compromise of a disputed claim, with no admission of liability by either the city or its carrier,” Jamo said. The city council met in closed session June 30 with the attorney from MML Worker’s Compensation Fund, as well as attorney Susan MacGregor of Kitch Drutchas Wagner Valitutti & Sherbrook’s Marquette, Mich., office, who had been retained by the city when Schwanz filed claims regarding Civil Rights violations and safety concerns. No action was taken after the council met with the attorneys and returned

to open session June 30, Jamo said, “because in this case, the city council was not required to make a decision. The matter was settled without a financial contribution from the city of Menominee.” The city does have other costs associated with the Schwanz matter, including attorney fees from hiring MacGregor. The EagleHerald requested a breakdown of those costs under Michigan’s Freedom of Information law, and has been told by Jamo that they will be available next week. Larabee, who represented Schwanz throughout the process, said Friday the settlement concludes all legal matters his client has pending with the city. Larabee is an attorney with Clark, Bray, Cameron & Larabee P.C. — Upper Michigan Law, of Escanaba, Mich. He specializes as a workers’ compensation and personal injury lawyer.

Special to the EagleHerald/Crystal Hendrick

UW-Marinette Associate Professor Crystal Hendrick’s son (middle) plays with other children at the play-in for climate change at Upper Senate Park in Washington D.C. on July 13.

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futures,” the organization’s website said. “That’s why mom’s across the country want to see meaningful action on climate change. “On July 13, parents and kids from across the country rallied at Upper Senate Park to call for climate change. The family-friendly protest against the air pollution that causes dangerous climate change will showcase exactly

TRUMP:

was behind the resignation. His father didn’t want to be “distracted by whatever things Paul was dealing with,” the younger Trump told Fox News. Campaign spokesman Jason Miller said Gates would remain part of the campaign with a new role as liaison to the Republican National Committee, which has had a turbulent relationship with its nominee this year. Clinton’s campaign called the resignation an admission of the Trump campaign’s “disturbing” connections with allies of Russian President Vladimir Putin in Russia and Ukraine. “You can get rid of Manafort, but that doesn’t end the odd bromance Trump has with Putin,” campaign manager Robby Mook said in a statement. But the Clinton camp also found itself on the defensive for the first time in weeks. Trump’s visit to southern Louisiana

LOCHTE:

His memorable props — diamond grills on his teeth on the medal podium, crazily colored high-tops, sunglasses bearing his favorite made-up expression of “Jeah!” — and easygoing, goofy nature has made him a popular and relatable star with the public and his teammates. “I think that is why I do so many different things with the hair, the grills, the crazy shoes,” he said in Rio, “It’s just my personality coming out there.” Lochte’s success led to his own 2013 reality TV show called “What Would Ryan Lochte Do?” It had a short run and left some viewers with the impression that its star was nothing more than a good-looking dim bulb. Still, lines for his autograph sessions at meets routinely stretch longer than anyone else’s. As hard as he plays, Lochte works hard, too. His 12 Olympic medals are second only to Michael Phelps among U.S. male Olympians. This time Lochte was only a small part of the show. He finished fifth in his only individual event and swam on

what’s at stake as temperatures and sea levels rise: our kids. We showed our support for slashing carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. “We showed our support for slashing methane emissions from oil and gas operations. We called for a renewable energy future. Moms know that kids can’t sit still, so we ditched a traditional sit-in — and had our third annual Play-In for Climate Action.”

Hendrick and her family also had the opportunity to speak with a representative from Sen. Ron Johnson’s, R - Wis., office, along with Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D - Wis., herself. “We had the opportunity to talk to our representatives to make them aware of how pollution and climate change is effecting our children,” she said. “We also heard their stance on the matters as well.”

put pressure on Clinton. Even as she kicked off a fundraising blitz, Clinton emailed supporters asking them to contribute to the relief effort and noted that she had spoken with Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat whose spokesman blasted Trump’s visit as “a photo op.” In a clear swipe at her rival, Clinton added: “The relief effort can’t afford any distractions. The very best way this team can help is to make sure Louisianans have the resources they need.” Trump’s trip was a striking detour for a candidate who has largely stuck to boisterous rallies and phone-in interviews to appeal to voters. The businessman and his running mate, Mike Pence, drove past piles of ripped-up carpet, furniture and personal belongings discarded on curbs. Trump consoled residents — even hugging two — as several Louisianans noted they have felt left out of the national spotlight. In East Baton Rouge Parish, residents emerged from their homes to

wave at Trump’s motorcade, some with gloved hands dirty from their house-gutting work. At a Baptist church later, a woman screamed “We knew you would be here for us!” as he and Pence sat down with volunteers. When a woman thanked him for coming, rather than playing golf like the president has been doing during his New England vacation, Trump replied, “Somebody is, somebody is that shouldn’t be.” With pressure mounting, the White House said after Trump’s appearance that Obama would visit Louisiana on Tuesday to survey the damage. Aides have noted Obama is receiving regular updates on the conditions. Trump’s visit was one of his first steps under new campaign leadership. Earlier this week, he tapped Stephen Bannon, a combative conservative media executive, as his new campaign chief. The decision suggested to some that Trump might ramp up the divisive rhetoric that has angered minorities and alienated large swaths of the electorate.

the victorious 4x200-meter freestyle relay. Instead, the biggest memory of the 32-yearold swimmer in Rio will be the grainy security video of him and teammates Gunnar Bentz, Jack Conger and Jimmy Feigen exiting the gas station restroom and sitting on the ground, some with hands up. Like other pro swimmers, Lochte is reliant on sponsors to foot his bills so he can focus on year-round training and travel to meets

without having to hold a regular job. His sponsors, including Speedo, Ralph Lauren and airweave premium bedding, have been in no hurry to cut ties with him, though have said they are monitoring the situation. The incident feeds a lot of American clichés of the bad-boy athlete, and while it was relatively minor, it is “unsavory,” says Thomas Ordahl, chief strategy officer at the brand consulting firm

A3 Saturday, August 20, 2016

Zika found in South Beach

MIAMI (AP) — South Beach has been identified as a second site of Zika transmission by mosquitoes on the U.S. mainland, and containing it there will be difficult because high-rise buildings and strong winds make it impractical to spray the neighborhood from the air, officials said Friday. Five cases of Zika have been connected to mosquitoes in Miami Beach, bringing the state’s caseload to 36 infections not related to travel outside the U.S., Florida’s governor and health department announced Friday. The discovery prompted the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to announce that it was expanding its travel warning for pregnant women to include an area in Miami Beach known for nightclubs, pedestrian thoroughfares and beaches. Zika infection can cause severe brain-related birth defects, including a dangerously small head, if women are infected during pregnancy. The virus’s apparent spread from a Miami neighborhood popular for day trips to the South Beach streets where many tourists sleep has rattled the tourism industry, even in the slower summer season. Gov. Rick Scott has directed Florida’s health department to offer mosquito spraying and related services at no cost to Miami-Dade County’s hotels, restaurants and tourist attractions. More than 15.5 million people made overnight visits to Miami and nearby beaches in 2015, with an impact of $24.4 billion, according to figures from the Greater Miami Convention and Visitors Bureau. The CDC previously warned pregnant women to avoid the Wynwood arts district in Miami. In its statement Friday, the agency said pregnant women may also want to consider postponing nonessential travel throughout Miami-Dade County if they’re concerned about potential exposure to the mosquito-borne virus. “We’re in the midst of mosquito season and expect more Zika infections in the days and months to come,” said CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden. “It is difficult to predict how long active transmission will continue.” Aerial spraying and doorto-door operations on the ground have cut mosquito populations in Wynwood by up to 90 percent, but Zika may be continuing as mosquitoes breed, Frieden told reporters Friday. “The mosquitoes are persistent and we won’t know for a couple of weeks wheth-

Landor. Ordahl believes it’s probably a good idea for companies to hold off on making decisions until the issue surrounding the dispute is sorted out. But he suspects that eventually, sponsors will probably drop Lochte. “The truth is that there are enough celebrities to be attached to without bringing that kind of baggage with you,” said Robert Passikoff, president and founder of the research firm Brand Keys.

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er these aggressive measures have worked,” Frieden said. Aerial spraying isn’t practical over South Beach because of the height of its buildings and strong winds over the narrow island city, Frieden said. Officials will be limited to spraying for mosquitoes at ground level in the highly populated area. “Miami Beach does have a series of characteristics that make it particularly challenging,” Frieden said. Two of the people infected in Miami Beach are MiamiDade County residents, and three are tourists, including one man and two women, Scott said. The tourists are residents of New York, Texas and Taiwan. The new area of infection in South Beach is roughly 1.5 square miles between 8th and 28th streets, according to Florida’s Department of Health. Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine said during a news conference Friday afternoon that the Zika reports certainly aren’t ideal for tourism, but he expects the long-term impact to be relatively minor. He said city workers are trying to get rid of standing water and foliage that might attract the virus-spreading insects, while the county begins a fumigation program to kill the bugs. “Between our efforts and the county’s spraying efforts, the last thing I’d ever want to be on Miami Beach is a mosquito,” Levine said.

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