Penn Nursing UPfront: Fall 2012

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WOMEN’S HEALTH ABROAD AND AT HOME Women’s Health Abroad and at Home 4

10 Years of a Penn-Botswana Partnership 9

Joining Forces with the White House 13

RNs & MDs – Meeting of the Minds 19

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THE WORLD. ®


HEALTHY CITIES : HEALTHY WOMEN November 28, 2012 Los Angeles and Urban Women’s Health featuring Halle Berry, Jonathan Fielding, and Robert Ross Loews Hollywood Hotel (formerly the Renaissance Hollywood Hotel) 1755 N. Highland Avenue, Hollywood, CA 90028

Today over 3.5 billion people – more than half the world’s population – live in urban areas. It is increasingly evident that urban living is having a negative impact on the health of women and girls. We must better understand the complex relationship between urban living and the health of women with the goal of developing innovative solutions that make cities universally safer, cleaner, and more livable, not only for women and girls, but for entire communities. Participants will hear from nonprofit and city leaders, healthcare experts, and educators; and be empowered to effect change in their own neighborhoods and communities around the world. For more information, please visit www.nursing.upenn.edu/healthywomen

Board of Overseers Dean Kehler, W’79, Chair Rosemarie Greco, Immediate Past Chair Nancy Adelson, Nu’78 Mark Baiada Phyllis W. Beck Carolyn Bennett, Nu’91 Cornelius Bond (emeritus) Carol Lefkowitz Boas, Nu’77 Lillian S. Brunner (emerita), HUP’40, Ed’45, HON’85 Gilbert F. Casellas, L’77 Eleanor L. Davis, Nu’82 Kim Dickstein, W’87 William Floyd, Jr., C’67, WG’69 Seth Ginns, C’00 Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91 (ex officio) Stephen J. Heyman, W’59 Daniel Hilferty

Ellen R. Kapito, Nu’79 Gail Kass Eunice King, Nu’71 Andrea Berry Laporte, Nu’69 Wendy Hurst Levine Patricia Martín, M’85 Barbara Nichols Melanie Nussdorf, CW’71 Vivian W. Piasecki (chair emerita) Krista Pinola, Nu’86 Marjorie O. Rendell, CW’69 Ralph F. Reynolds, W’84 Robert D. Roy, W’59 Sandy Samberg, Nu’94, GNu’95 Marie A. Savard, HUP’70, Nu’72, M’76 Martin J. Silverstein, GL’08 Patricia B. Silverstein, C’81 Susan Drossman Sokoloff, C’84 Carol Elizabeth Ware, Nu’73 Michael Wert

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Dean Afaf I. Meleis, PhD, DrPS (hon), FAAN, FRCN Director of Marketing and Communications Joy McIntyre Vice Dean of Institutional Advancement Wylie A. Thomas Editor Jennifer Baldino Bonett Online Editor Barbara McAleese Editorial Assistant Victoria Smith Contributors Lisa Bain, Monica Salvia, Katie Siegmann, and Victoria Smith Photography I. George Bilyk, Sarah Bloom, Ellen Brodrick, Desirée Carr, Justin Cohen, Dawn Durain, Karen Gowen, Wendy Grube, Felice Macera, Lynn Sommers Design Dale Parenti Design Printing Pearl Pressman Liberty Advisory Board Christina Costanzo Clark, Academic and Student Affairs; Patricia D’Antonio, Faculty; Carol Ladden, Admissions and Financial Aid; Eileen Lake, Faculty; Eileen Sullivan-Marx, Faculty; Yvonne Paterson, Faculty; Jennifer Pinto-Martin, Faculty; Wylie A. Thomas, Institutional Advancement www.nursing.upenn.edu Admissions 215.898.4271 | admissions@nursing.upenn.edu Alumni Relations 215.898.4841 | nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu Marketing and Communications 215.898.5074 | joymc@nursing.upenn.edu UPfront is a bi-annual publication of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. The magazine chronicles the research and leadership of Penn Nursing faculty and students.

Printed on Chorus Art Silk, 80 lb. Text and 100 lb. Cover


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A Force for Health Worldwide A message from Dean Afaf I. Meleis

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Women’s Health Abroad and at Home The new Center for Global Women’s Health anchors Penn Nursing’s worldwide efforts.

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Botswana – The Hope of Sub-Saharan Africa A decade of collaboration between Penn and the University of Botswana has nursing at its center.

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12 Notes from the Field

Students blog about their study abroad experiences. 13 Joining Forces

When First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden sought to focus attention on post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury in military service members, they turned to Penn Nursing. 16 How I Care to Change the World

Lt. Cmdr. Pamela Herbig Wall, GNu’05, GR’15, serves her country through mental health nursing. 18 Game On!

Penn Nursing led interdisciplinary teams to address healthcare issues using gaming technology. 19 Nurses and Physicians: Meeting of the Minds

A Penn Nursing symposium shows what interprofessionalism looks like.

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22 Penn Nursing Science in Action 26 Tales of a Broken Heart

Dr. Barbara J. Riegel spoke on her pioneering approaches to managing heart failure in the 10th Claire M. Fagin lecture. 28 Penn Nursing News 34 Alumni Connections 43 Penn Nursing Faculty Grants, Publications, and Awards 64 Breaking News

APRN education initiative to launch at Penn Nursing. On the Cover: Penn President Amy Gutmann, First Lady Michelle Obama, Dr. Jill Biden, and Dean Afaf Meleis brought together the nation’s nursing leaders on April 11 to announce a White House initiative to support the health of military personnel and veterans. Story on page 13. (Cover photo courtesy of The White House)

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A Force for Health Worldwide “Nurses get things done.” – First Lady Michelle Obama Yes! Nurses do get things done, so I was thrilled and honored – but not completely surprised – when First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden came to Penn Nursing in April to announce a major, nurse-led initiative. For the health component of their national effort, Joining Forces, Mrs. Obama and Dr. Biden called on nurses to meet the unique health needs of service members, veterans, and their families. Because we are America’s largest healthcare workforce and most trusted professionals, they charged us with educating current and future nurses to identify and treat post-traumatic stress, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other combat-related issues. We certainly are up to the challenge. You will learn more about Joining Forces, the White House visit, and next steps for nursing starting on page 13. In that special section, we are proud to highlight our faculty conducting essential research that meets the objectives of Joining Forces and our stellar doctoral student, Lt. Cmdr. Pamela Herbig Wall, who is studying gender differences in the mental health of servicewomen.

(right) Joining Forces: Backstage with the First Lady

A Force for Vulnerable Populations and Nurses Penn Nursing’s leadership role in Joining Forces is emblematic of our School’s global health reach. This and our special focus on the health of women led us to create a new Center for Global Women’s Health, directed by the accomplished Dr. Lynn Sommers (page 4). Dr. Sommers and dozens of our faculty and students conduct research, launch educational initiatives, and provide healthcare in countries around the world. Our global efforts aim to empower vulnerable populations and build on the growing strength of nurses – two sides of the same coin. The work of Dr. Linda Aiken who measures quality, safety, and satisfaction in the nursing profession; the research of Dr. Barbra Mann Wall who gives voice to nuns who are nurses and healthcare leaders; and the leadership of our midwifery faculty who are teaching women in underdeveloped countries

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how to achieve safe birth are key examples of how our faculty bring the vital element of empowerment to global health efforts. Of particular significance is Penn Nursing’s longstanding relationship with our peers in Botswana, under the guidance of Dr. Marjorie Muecke. On page 9, you’ll read how Penn Nursing is a vital part of the Botswana-UPenn Partnership, which just marked its 10th anniversary. On the heels of a February visit from Dr. Motshedisi B. Sabone, head of the school of nursing at the University of Botswana, we welcomed five of the country’s nurse leaders here as visiting scholars. With our faculty, they developed a pilot clinical approach to improve the care of surgical patients at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone. Their work together is ongoing.

A Force for Healthcare Reform and Novel Approaches to Health Of course one of the biggest stories of the summer was the Supreme Court’s decision on the Affordable Care Act. The role of nurses in the implementation of the ACA cannot be underestimated. Penn Nursing, in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania Health System, will set the course to increase the number of advanced practice nurses – and therefore the base of primary care providers – in the United States through the Graduate Nurse Demonstration project. I encourage you to read page 64 to learn more. Equally important is the role of interprofessionalism – bringing health professions together to respond to a need, much as Penn has done in Botswana – in educating healthcare providers and in clinical settings. A symposium at Penn Nursing (see page 19) co-hosted with my colleague Dr. J. Larry Jameson, dean of Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, demonstrated that we do not – and cannot – continue to have business as usual. Then again, Penn Nursing has never been about business as usual. In these pages, you will find pathbreakers like Dr. Barbara Riegel (on page 26) who gave the Claire M. Fagin Lecture on her pioneering approach to heart failure; pacesetters like Dr. Joan Lynaugh (on page 33) who co-founded the Barbara Bates Center for the


(Photo courtesy of The White House)

Study of the History of Nursing; and technological innovators who developed games and apps for healthcare (page 18). We continue to care to change the world, support leadership development, inspire innovations, stimulate research that translates to policy, and nurture environments that promote health and well-being. Thank you all for helping us while we continue working to achieve our strategic goals and meet our mission, all while maintaining the core values of Penn Nursing.

Together, we are a force for women’s health … and health around the world.

AFAF I. MELEIS, PhD, DrPS (hon), FAAN, FRCN; the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing; Counsel General Emerita, International Council on Women’s Health Issues; and International Council of Nurses Global Ambassador for the Girl Child

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WOMEN’S HEALTH ABROAD The new Center for Global Women’s Health anchors Penn Nursing’s worldwide efforts.

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From the coal towns of Appalachia to rural Greece to the villages of South Africa, Penn Nursing faculty find new ways to improve the health, and the lives, of women. The new Center for Global Women’s Health brings together this interdisciplinary collection of faculty and students who collaborate on women’s health scholarship, education, and clinical practice on global issues.

said Director Marilyn Sommers, Nu’72, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Lillian S. Brunner Professor of MedicalSurgical Nursing. “Our faculty have depth and breadth of work in global research, practice, and education promoting the health of women and girls in Philadelphia, in the U.S., and around the globe. The Center is a focal point for the generation and translation of that research.”

“This Center gives a shape and structure to Penn Nursing's rich history in global women's health,”

Dr. Sommers’ own landmark research focuses on risk taking, injury, and violence in vulnerable

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… AND AT HOME populations. She has changed the paradigm of the forensic sexual assault examination with her finding that skin injury prevalence after rape is higher in women with light as compared to dark skin, regardless of race or ethnicity. This discovery has illuminated new areas of science for elucidating the role of injury in women after sexual assault. Her current work in Greece with Penn Nursing colleague Maureen George, GNu’86, Gr’03, PhD, RN, AE-C, FAAN, expands this effort to identify injury and toxic exposure among the country’s rural, medically underserved women and children. Finding and strengthening research connections is at the core of the Center for Global Women’s Health – the seventh research center at Penn Nursing. CGWH officially launched with the symposium “Empowerment, Safety, and Health: A Global Mandate for Women and Girls” during Alumni Weekend in May. CGWH is Penn Nursing’s “home for dynamic research that will change the lives of women, their families, communities, and the world, and will provide a fruitful environment for the next generation of scholars,” said Dean Afaf I. Meleis in her opening remarks. Women most often are the link to healthcare for their families, yet women themselves remain an underserved and high-risk population. But despite the challenges women face, said Dean Meleis, “the world has seen the incredible power of women to make a difference in their families, their communities, and their world. Across the globe, scientists, healthcare providers, community leaders, politicians, and

Dr. Marilyn Sommers, director of the Center for Global Women’s Health, is an expert in injury science.

philanthropists have recognized that improving the health, safety, and economics of our world starts with women.” Tonda Hughes, PhD, RN, of the University of Chicago, who spoke on the social determinants of sexual minority women’s health, said the Center “is magnifying that focus on [health] differences that exist,” not only between men and women, but among heterosexual and homosexual women. Penn Nursing has a long history of dedication to global women’s health. In the early 1900s Jane Delano, a leader in the HUP School of Nursing, had assumed leadership of the newly created United States Army Nurse Corps, the Red Cross Nursing Service, and the American Nurses Association. “Jane Delano assured vigorous and effective nursing responses across the United States to disasters, epidemics, and emergencies and, by 1914, war,” said nursing historian Patricia D’Antonio, GRN’92, PhD, RN, FAAN, chair of Family and Community Health and the Killebrew-Centis Endowed Term Chair in Undergraduate Education. “When the U.S. entered World War I

“This Center gives a shape and structure to Penn Nursing’s rich history in global women’s health.” DR. MARILYN SOMMERS

(left) Making global connections: Zainab Salbi, founder of Women for Women International

View “Why Focus on Women’s Health” (5:07)

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The Center for Global Women’s Health is Penn Nursing’s “home for dynamic research that will change the lives of women, their families, communites, and the world, and will provide a fruitful environment for the next generation of scholars.” DEAN AFAF MELEIS

Women’s Health in …

APPALACHIA

They built it, but no one came. Health clinics in West Virginia were not drawing women for free PAP smears. “They kept building more and more clinics,” says Practice Assistant Professor Wendy Grube, GNu’82, Gr’10, PhD, CRNP, “but no one thought to ask the women ‘Why don’t you come?’” One of the highest rates of occurrence of cervical cancer in the U.S. is in West Virginia. In its rural and medically underserved Appalachia region, Dr. Grube set out to change that. “I got to know the people and the cultural context – context is everything,” she said. In a program that has earned funding from the Centers for Disease Control because of its success, nurses make the difference. Through twice-yearly visits to this lumber-and-coal region, Dr. Grube and her colleagues have built up confidence with the matriarchs of the community. “They trust nurses,” she says. “They don’t care how much you know, but how much you care.” Dr. Grube considers the relationship “true community collaboration. It’s not our agenda, it’s theirs.” That agenda has grown to include door-to-door education about cervical cancer and confidential discussions about such life issues as child-rearing and alcoholism. The team added prostate exams and a reproductive health class 6

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for the men of West Virginia. Their wives convinced them to go. “There’s no male analog to ob/gyn,” says Dr. Grube. “STDs, unplanned pregnancies … these affect women and men. Part of competency in women’s health is men’s health.” Working with Dr. Grube is Penn Nursing student Jennifer Schockemoehl, Nu’13, GNu’15. Her

comparative study on the scope of practice of nurses working in West Virginia and rural Thailand is funded by an undergraduate grant from the Helene Fuld Health Trust, HSBC Bank USA, N.A. “When nurses are farther from the city and large hospitals,” she asks, “do they have different roles and responsibilities and differences in how they acquire their skills?” And her larger question: “Without access to large healthcare facilities in rural communities, how do people get the care they need?” The answer, she asserts, is registered nurses, many with additional training to meet the needs of their specific communities. Ms. Schockemoehl credits Penn Nursing with fostering her spirit of inquiry. “This is research in the broad sense – the expectation that you ask questions and, if you don’t have the answers, you search to find them.”

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THAILAND

in 1917, Ms. Delano had already recruited and mobilized the nurses needed for military service. She was devoted to the nurses – then the only women allowed to serve their country.” She died in 1919 in France while on an inspection tour of Red Cross facilities. In recognition of her leadership, Delano posthumously received the Distinguished Service Medal for her exceptional service to the U.S. government. Throughout the 20th century, HUP and Penn Nursing alumnae served in every major war and on medical missions abroad. Today, Penn Nursing students like Lt. Cmdr. Pamela Herbig Wall, GNu’05, Gr’15, conduct research on gender differences among military women under stress. (See page 16.) (The CGWH offers funding for pre- and postdoctoral research training in health equity and health disparities research to promote health in vulnerable populations. Dr. Sommers is the principal investigator on the grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research. In addition, five senior fellows from schools across Penn’s campus mark the “beginning of a major interdisciplinary effort to support women and girls” through innovative research and practice, said Dr. Sommers.) In April 2010, Penn Nursing hosted the annual conference of the International Council on Women’s Health Issues (ICOWHI). “Change in this arena will require strong will, enlightened leadership, experimentation, a commitment of resources from local home governments, nonprofits, and the international community,” said Dean Meleis at the conference. There, ICOWHI issued a proclamation urging the establishment


Women’s Health in …

HAITI

In countries like Haiti where doctors are few and far between and many mothers deliver in their homes without a birth attendant, midwives are critical to the reproductive health of women, and often to their primary health as well. In their ongoing efforts to prepare nurse midwives, Penn Nursing’s midwifery faculty are shaping curricula for developing countries. Their work is funded by a grant from the Office of the University of Pennsylvania Provost. “One model is unlikely to work in all countries,” says Mamie Guidera, MSN, CNM. “However, the World Health Organization has said that it’s not the place that dictates the outcome, it’s the provider. Every woman should have a skilled birth attendant with her when she delivers. We are grateful for the opportunity to share our skills in a place so in need.”

On a recent trip, Ms. Guidera and Penn Nursing colleague Ellen Brodrick, CNM, ANP-C, MSN, offered workshops to midwifery teachers, and midwifery alumnae Carol Wong, Nu’08, GNu’11, and Amy Goh, C’01, GNu’11, conducted research interviews with students, faculty, and practicing midwives about midwifery education in Haiti. Nurse midwife faculty and students also provide education and academic consultations in Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, and Trinidad. “We’re working together to learn what makes a good program in these countries and if you can practice the way you were taught,” says Ms. Guidera.

With midwifery program director William McCool, C’76, PhD, CNM, Ms. Guidera travelled to

Haiti after the 2010 earthquake to assist with midwifery education. Penn midwives worked side-byside with 12 students and two faculty members to provide prenatal care, deliver babies, and care for women and their infants.

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GUATEMALA www.nursing.upenn.edu

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of a United Nations agency for women. In July 2010, after years of negotiation between UN Member States and advocacy by the global women’s movement, the General Assembly voted unanimously to create a new umbrella agency, the UN Entity for Gender Equity and the Empowerment of Women – known as UN Women – to “accelerate progress in meeting the needs of women and girls worldwide.”

Women’s Health in …

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

How does religion affect healthcare practice and policy? Associate Professor Barbra Mann Wall, PhD, RN, FAAN,

studies this question through the words and writings of Catholic missionary nuns around the world. Dr. Wall, the Evan C. Thompson Endowed Term Chair for Excellence in Teaching and associate director of the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, revealed new perspectives on religion and health policy with her book American Catholic Hospitals: A Century of Changing Markets and Missions, and she now is extending this analysis in her work on sub-Saharan Africa. She is guiding two Penn Nursing students in their related research. Lauren Johnson, Nu’13, Gr’18, is a Hillman Scholar in Nursing Innovation, on a trajectory from BSN to PhD. Long interested in maternal health, this doula-trained student is researching the impact of Catholic missionary sisters on maternal healthcare services in Africa. With an undergraduate research grant from the Helene Fuld Health Trust, HSBC Bank USA, N.A., Ms. Johnson aims to dispel the myth that interactions between missionaries and the indigenous population of African countries were “imperialist” in manner and intention. “There is another side to the story,” as Ms. Johnson is finding in her research in the Bates Center. “The 8

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literature shows that the sisters listened to the voices of these women, took their concerns seriously, and really tried to work for them. I’m interested to know how they were able to work within native cultures to negotiate these partnerships.” When Madeline Reckart, Nu ’15, started at Penn Nursing, conducting research was far from her mind. But, inspired by Dr. Wall’s work, Ms. Reckart is developing a literature review on sisters who are medical missionaries in Africa. “This is totally surprising to me,” she says. “I thought I only liked the clinical aspects of nursing, but historical research is fascinating.” Ms. Reckart is studying oral histories and writings from orders of nuns during wartime in Nigeria and Uganda to learn how the sisters were able to practice and how they were able to connect with the local people even during times of threat to their own safety. “Oral history tells us what experiences mean to the people themselves,” explains Dr. Wall. “It’s so important to get these stories that reflect the biomedical model but through a spiritual lens. Our research on Catholic sisters and healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa tells a larger, nuanced story that is not all about religion, though. It is also about local, national, and international partnerships.”

Moving forward, CGWH will tell the “truth that is in all of our stories,” said keynote speaker Zainab Salbi, founder of Women for Women International. Since its inception in 1993, Women for Women International has helped more than 315,000 women survivors of war to rebuild their lives with social and economic opportunities. As a woman who initially shared her story of rape and an abusive marriage only tentatively, Ms. Salbi learned that “to open my secrets to the world … was an act of courage” – one that more women need to make, she said. “The act of breaking silence starts by each of us breaking our individual silence.” Working with women survivors of war, Ms. Salbi has found that they crave inspiration and disdain pity. “Stop saving us please,” they say. “Start saving yourself and come meet us as sisters.” Quite simply, said Ms. Salbi, “Women are the emerging market of the emerging market, the force behind health, education, and happiness. The Center is part of the story and part of the solutions.”

The Center for Global Women’s Health will tell the “truth that is in all of our stories.” ZAINAB SALBI


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Photo: Ndalama African Deserts Crafts

The Hope of Sub-Saharan Africa A decade of collaboration between Penn and the University of Botswana has nursing at its center. Botswana is a country about the size of Texas with a population of some two million people. This is a land where diamonds and natural beauty have existed alongside the devastation of HIV/AIDS. Ten years ago, the University of Pennsylvania began a program training nurses and doctors treating HIV/AIDS patients. After a decade, the BotswanaUPenn Partnership includes research, an array of academic opportunities, and telemedicine. Ongoing research projects, education, and healthcare efforts in HIV, TB, pediatrics, and women’s health include Penn Nursing and schools across Penn’s campus: the Perelman School of Medicine, Arts and Sciences, Law, Veterinary Medicine, Dental Medicine, and Wharton. Nearly 40 Penn Nursing undergraduates have had clinical experiences in community nursing in Botswana through the University of Botswana School of Nursing and as part of the BotswanaUPenn Partnership. This fall, seven Penn Nursing students will travel with faculty member Lucille B. Pilling, EdD, MPH, RN, as part of N341: Community Nursing in Botswana. In this exchange, Penn students work in governmental and nongovernmental community health facilities.

Transcultural Education “Our nursing students are the ones who truly benefit. They learn about cultural norms, about being resourceful, and about how people with fewer resources than we have at our disposal are doing some things even better than we are – the learning is reciprocal with our partners abroad,” says Marjorie A. Muecke, PhD, RN, FAAN, assistant dean for global health affairs and associate director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Nursing and Midwifery Leadership. “Students who come to our Global Health Affairs office usually tell us that the School’s global engagement is one of the reasons they come to Penn Nursing and that it prepares them for 21st century nursing and the importance of cultural competence.” In a blog entry about their experience, several students posted: “… we can all learn from … our observations of Botswana nurses and value the cross-cultural ability of a nurse to recognize and respond to a patient’s physical, emotional, or spiritual needs to maximize quality of life at unique moments in time.” (For more student observations on global nursing, see page 12.)

“Our nursing students are the ones who truly benefit. They learn about cultural norms, about being resourceful, and about how people with fewer resources … are doing some things even better than we are.” DR. MARJORIE MUECKE

Botswana’s nurse leaders (from left): Dr. Lakshmi Rajeswaran, Kefalotse S. Dithole, Margaret Lentlogile Molefi, Sheila Sebopelo, and Patricia Mampane.

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“Students tell us that our global engagement is one of the reasons they come to Penn Nursing.” DR. MARJORIE MUECKE

Penn Nursing faculty collaborate with nursing faculty at the University of Botswana on a range of health initiatives and studies: Dr. Charlene Compher, Nu’80, Gr’99, GNC’01, is the

primary investigator of a multidisciplinary team from the University of Botswana studying the prevalence of adolescent obesity (sidebar); Dr. Loretta Sweet Jemmott, GNu’82, Gr’87, works on

the prevention of adolescent HIV/AIDS; Dr. Mary Ersek conducted a national workshop on

palliative care which led to an article co-authored by faculty here and at the University of Botswana School of Nursing; Dr. Victoria Rich has worked with the Botswana-

UPenn Partnership since 2006, bringing clinical professionals to consult on such areas as nursing leadership and hospital management; Dr. Anne Teitelman is developing programs for

women and teens to address safe sex; And Drs. Linda Hoke, Marjorie Muecke, Rosemary Polomano, HUP’74, Nu’76, GNu’79, and Marilyn Stringer, GNu’91, Gr’95, GNC’97, are collaborating with nurse partners in policy, education, and practice in Botswana to enhance nursing practice and patient care at Princess Marina Hospital in the capital city of Gaborone. As part of the reciprocity between Penn Nursing and the University of Botswana, Dr. Motshedisi Sabone, the head of the School of Nursing at the University of Botswana, visited Fagin Hall as a

Dean’s Distinguished International Scholar during Global Health Reflections week in February. Addressing Botswana’s healthcare issues in a cultural context is critical to developing successful approaches, particularly in HIV/AIDS, she said. Although deaths from HIV/AIDS have decreased dramatically, the prevalence of the disease in Botswana is the highest in the world at 17.7 percent of the population. “I cannot just come here and say I am addressing AIDS, because AIDS occurs in a context,” said Dr. Sabone. “African countries must agree to seek AIDS funding that addresses the comprehensive health system and development rather than that which addresses narrowly defined HIV and AIDS progress.” She recommended transcultural research with local citizens to glean an accurate understanding of meanings behind current health practices. “Sometimes we wonder how people with HIV keep on having children,” she said. “We must understand their behavior. Life for these patients is not easy. HIV has dynamics, dilemmas, and complexities. Perhaps we can assist people if we know where they are coming from.” Much of that responsibility falls to nurses, says Dr. Muecke. There are 700 nurses at Princess Marina Hospital and 10,000 nurses throughout Botswana. Princess Marina hospital has a nursepatient ratio as high as 1:40 with some patients on “floor beds.” Improving care and outcomes is a priority.

Nutrition in Botswana: A Double Burden The population of Botswana is in the midst of a “nutrition transition,” shifting from an undernourished population to one that is increasingly overweight and obese. The people of Botswana are moving to cities in greater numbers and reaching higher socioeconomic status, yielding overweight or obesity rates of 22 percent in men and 58 percent in women. Addressing obesity raises the larger issue of noncommunicable diseases, but they are so far in the shadow of HIV that they are barely described in South African countries. On the rise there are high blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiac disorders, all tied to obesity. 10

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Since achieving independence in 1966, Botswana has transitioned from one of the poorest countries in the world to an uppermiddle income country. The nutrition transition there has meant a widespread change from a healthier traditional diet of sorghum, samp (chopped and dehulled dried maize and corn kernels), maize, beans, groundnuts, green leaves, and meat to Westernized foods such as bread, savory snacks, sweet beverages, and candies. The changing lifestyle also requires less physical activity because of increased vehicle transportation and decreased manual labor.

Native crop: Sorghum


“Our efforts in helping our Botswana colleagues with their project will continue to support evidence-based, team-based, multidisciplinary strategies and expansion to other units.” DR. MARILYN STRINGER

The Botswana Nursing Collaborative To that end, five nursing leaders from Botswana came to Penn Nursing in June to develop an evidence-based model for nurse-patient communication, care, and outcomes through the newly established Botswana Nursing Collaborative. The visiting scholars were: Margaret Lentlogile Molefi, senior nursing officer of the Botswana Ministry of Health; Sheila Sebopelo, infection control officer of Princess Marina Hospital; Patricia Mampane, a nurse manager at Princess Marina Hospital; and University of Botswana nursing faculty members Kefalotse S. Dithole and Dr. Lakshmi Rajeswaran. The nurses worked with Penn Nursing’s Rosemary Polomano, PhD, RN, FAAN, associate professor of pain practice; Marilyn Stringer, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, professor of women’s health nursing; and clinical nurse specialist and adjunct faculty member Linda Hoke, PhD, RN, to design a clinical strategy to improve care of surgical patients at Princess Marina Hospital. In a pilot study, the nurse leaders will employ a team-based, multidisciplinary approach called “Rapid Results” on a post-surgical unit to improve the quality of recovery. Beginning with pre-operative patient education and structured nursing care following surgery, the project team will share accountability for overseeing care and collecting outcomes for activity, nutrition, prevention of wound infection, and pain management. The project team also will

“The prevalence of obesity is increasing markedly in countries like Botswana that are undergoing rapid social and economic development,” said Charlene Compher, PhD, RD, professor of nutrition science. Yet the percentage of the population that is underweight is still significant: 20 percent of men and 15 percent of women, creating what Dr. Compher calls the “double burden of nutritional disease.” As a Fulbright scholar in 2010, Dr. Compher was part of the international pediatric research group that conducted the first study to provide

collaborate to identify, develop, and ensure that the needed resources are available to clinicians to promote better surgical outcomes for their patients. A long-term goal is for this model to translate to other patient populations. “Penn Nursing’s research and expertise in models of using evidence to guide nursephysician collaborative practice informs this endeavor to improve patient health outcomes,” says Dr. Stringer. “Our efforts in helping our Botswana colleagues with their project will continue to support evidence-based, team-based, multidisciplinary strategies and expansion to other units.” This fall, Drs. Polomano and Stringer will travel to Botswana to help the team move the project forward and to teach classes in research, evidence-based practice, health promotion, palliative care, and interprofessional collaboration at the University of Botswana. Dr. Hoke, at the request of the Botswana nurse partners, will provide education to the nurses at Princess Marina hospital on such clinical skills as cardiopulmonary resuscitation and wound care. “During our visit, we plan to introduce innovative teaching and learning methods so that educators and clinicians can work together in bridging partnerships to advance their teaching and practice missions,” says Dr. Stringer. “We will devote our efforts to assisting our Botswana nurse visiting scholars to translate what they have learned from the experiences at Penn into their academic and practice settings.”

empirical evidence of a nutrition transition in Botswana. Among secondary school students in Botswana, the team found that students in private schools and those with more assets had a higher prevalence of being overweight and obese than public school students. In two studies co-conducted with faculty from the University of Botswana, Dr. Compher addressed cultural differences between African and Western approaches to nutrition and obesity. Data on 706 adolescents demonstrated the cultural shift toward snack foods in convenient “tuck shops” in the schools and the social

cachet of purchasing snacks. Gathering collective wisdom from school personnel, Dr. Compher and colleagues from the University of Botswana are developing culturally based interventions to prevent obesity including a physical education initiative. “From an Afro-centric orientation,” the authors wrote, “[school] administrators suggested that the programs should promote a sense of community and teamwork rather than Westernstyle individual achievement and competition.”

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Notes from the Field Introduced to global health as early as freshman year, Penn Nursing students can study abroad through programs in eight countries. Students reflect on their experiences through journals and blogging. We went to an elementary school to deliver anti-parasite medication to the children and give a little lesson to go along with it. The medication was donated to this school by volunteers, like a lot of other things here. We read and acted out a story of a girl who never washed her hands, never washed her food, didn’t wear shoes anywhere, drank water from the lake, and went to the bathroom wherever she wanted. Then, she got a parasite, and the doctor and nurse treated her and taught her all the things she can do to stay clean and healthy. This story is very pertinent to the community here. … People have to boil water in order to drink it, wash the fruits and vegetables thoroughly, always use soap and water, etc., and many children get sick just like the girl in the story. We learn all the time in nursing school how important patient education is, and here we’re seeing the huge variety of patient education, not only in the hospital setting. Alison Ercole, Nu’11, GNu’14; Andrea Leverkus, Nu’08, GNu’12; Rachael Starnes, GNu’12; Sarah Chipps, GNu’11, India

Yesterday I was on labor and delivery. This has been my favorite day of clinical ever. Often when I tell someone that I want to be a midwife, they asked if I have ever witnessed a birth, as a way of checking to see if I know what I am getting myself into, I guess. Well, now I have seen a few and I still want to be a midwife, more than ever. When we got there, our preceptor for the day, Dafna, told us about her two patients. One was having her sixth child and the other was having her second. We met them both and did a few things like straight cathing one to empty her bladder and put a new IV in the other. Within an hour of arriving on the floor, the mother who was having her sixth child was fully dilated and ready to push! Margaret Haviland, Nu’12, GNu’16, Israel

One issue that made me increasingly uncomfortable during our trip was the lack of motor vehicle safety in Thailand. I think this is a huge area that the Ministry of Public Health could tackle to reduce the incidence of accidental injury and death. It doesn’t seem to be in the culture to worry about helmets and seatbelts, as evidenced by children riding on the fronts of motorcycles with no helmets and in vehicles with no safety belts. This really bothered me. We had witnessed many people who were paralyzed or injured in accidents at the rehabilitation center at the Thungbopaen Temple and children who lost parents in accidents at the Viengping Children’s Home. Meredith Davis, Nu’13, GNu’15, Thailand

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When we visited the rehab center at the Thungbopaen Temple, I was amazed by – and frankly a bit jealous of – the facility. I felt like this center was revolutionary in the sense that it was taking into account a patient’s support system. The family structure in Thailand is such an important part of the culture and part of the responsibility of healthcare is placed on family members’ shoulders. Visiting this rehab center made me feel a bit ashamed that this was such a foreign concept to us. Why do we not incorporate family members into the healing of a patient? Why do we put our elders in nursing homes instead of learning how to take care of them? Why do we just take care of the patient for the short period of time that they are in our hospital beds and then send them on their way without any means of a followthrough? Visiting the rehab center raised more questions for me than it gave answers, and that’s okay as long as I continue to examine how we can improve our own system. Lindsay Jodoin, Nu’14, Thailand


JOINING FORCES When First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden sought to focus attention on post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury in military service members, they turned to Penn Nursing. On April 11 at Penn Nursing with Dean Afaf I. Meleis, First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden announced a commitment from more than 150 of America’s leading nursing organizations and more than 450 nursing schools in 50 states and territories to ensure the nation’s nurses are

prepared to help meet the unique health needs of service members, veterans, and their families. Through the White House’s Joining Forces initiative, these nursing leaders have committed to educating current and future nurses on how to recognize and care for service people suffering

Photo: Justin Cohen | The Daily Pennsylvanian www.nursing.upenn.edu

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from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and other combat-related issues. Collectively, this effort will reach more than three million nurses in nearly every healthcare setting and every community in America. “[Q]uite simply, nurses are the front line of America’s healthcare system. Every day, with your hard work, with your skill, your compassion, nurses determine the quality of care that we all receive,” said Mrs. Obama. “We are all so thrilled to be announcing this commitment as we celebrate the one-year anniversary of Joining Forces. This was excellent timing. Because the fact is, your work is more critical for our veterans and military families than ever before. … While the majority of our troops and veterans return home with few or no mental health challenges at all – and that’s important to note – many do experience the so-called ’invisible wounds of war’.” Introducing Dr. Jill Biden, Dean Meleis said nurses are up to the challenge. “Through Joining Forces, we extend our reach to embrace your courage and forward-thinking ideas. We pledge that we can and will do it,” she said to the 1,100 nurses, military personnel, and academic leaders in Penn’s Irvine Auditorium. “We are uniquely prepared and

positioned to meet healthcare needs in war time and peace time, in hospitals and communities, for minorities and majorities, for women and men, for individuals and families. We commend you for turning to nurses to improve the care of our military, our veterans, and their families. You have come to the right partners.” Since 2001, more than two million U.S. troops have been deployed in Afghanistan and Iraq. Military suicide rates have increased by 80 percent since the start of the Iraq war. Veterans with PTSD often feel out of place, are unable to relate to others, feel emotionally numb, and experience such problems as hypervigilance, avoidance, and re-experiencing the trauma. PTSD places enormous stress on veterans and their family members. “We have asked a lot of our servicemen and women since September 11, 2001,” said Dr. Biden. “They and their families have responded to the need for more frequent and longer deployments. As they have done in the past, these troops and their families have stepped up with no complaint. … Making sure that they get the care they need is a priority for this administration and for Joining Forces.”

“Quite simply, nurses are the front line of America’s healthcare system. Every day, with your hard work, with your skill, your compassion, nurses determine the quality of care that we all receive.” FIRST LADY MICHELLE OBAMA

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Penn Nursing Experts in PTSD, Pain, and Trauma Military psychiatric nurse and Penn Nursing doctoral student Pamela Herbig Wall, GNu’05, GR’15, said that she and her nurse colleagues “are seeing many more occurrences of physical wounds, pain, traumatic brain injury, posttraumatic stress, and other mental health issues in our service members and veterans. That is why it is so critical that America’s nurses get the education and information they need.” (For more on Lt. Cmdr. Wall, see page 16.)

Rosemary C. Polomano, PhD, RN, is an expert in pain management, conducting innovative research on the perceptions of pain among military personnel and on battlefield analgesia. Her findings showed that regional nerve blocks and epidurals shortly after injury led to a statistically significant decrease in pain intensity and have the potential to reduce chronic pain, a crucial finding given the high correlation between chronic pain and PTSD.

Following the Joining Forces announcement, more than 80 nursing leaders gathered for a summit in Fagin Hall to shape the profession’s commitment to the initiative and to generate new ideas about ways to support the efforts. They pledged to:

Therese Richmond, PhD, CRNP, is a leader in

• Educate future nurses to care for U.S. veterans, service members, and their families facing PTSD, TBI, depression, and other healthcare issues. • Ensure evidence-based best practices. • Disseminate the most current information related to PTSD and other health conditions. • Add to the current body of knowledge to improve care. • Lead the healthcare community in achieving the Joining Forces health goals. Dean Meleis urged those present to “continue the conversation that our First Lady and Dr. Biden started. We were approached by the White House because of our numbers and our science. As nurse leaders, as nurse educators, we must take these steps to heal the visible and invisible wounds that wars and trauma inflict on our troops, our military nurses, and their families.”

injury science, conducting pioneering research on the psychological effects of injury and how to address those effects. In a National Institutes of Health-funded study, she found that even among patients who had relatively minor injuries, a substantial number had PTSD and depression, which is a precursor to PTSD, a year or more after the injury. Marilyn Stringer, PhD, CRNP, an expert in women’s health, is expanding the understanding of the care of female service people and families in a nation at war. As associate editor of the Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing, Dr. Stringer published a special section on the leadership of military nurses in advancing science and practice in women’s health, including gender differences in PTSD. Mary Ersek, PhD, RN, specializes in pain and palliative care in older adults. Her work with the NIH’s Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) program and her leadership in the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) curriculum are improving end-of-life care for U.S. veterans. Salimah Meghani, PhD, CRNP, addresses pain management in low-income and minority patients. Her focus on racial and ethnic disparities in pain treatment can benefit active military personnel, veterans, and civilians.

View the “Joining Forces” video (4:35)

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Committed to educating nurses to identify and treat PTSD and TBI: Darlene Curley, executive director of the Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence; Penn Nursing researcher Dr. Therese Richmond, a mentor to Lt. Cmdr. Wall (center); Dr. Ada Sue Hinshaw, dean of the graduate school of nursing at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; and Dr. Beverly Malone, CEO of the National League for Nursing.

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LIEUTENANT COMMANDER PAMELA HERBIG WALL, GNu’05, GR’15 Combining a warrior ethos with compassionate care, Lt. Cmdr. Wall serves her country through mental health nursing and introduced the First Lady’s effort to combat PTSD. Soon after earning her master’s degree at Penn Nursing, Lt. Cmdr. Pamela Herbig Wall, GNu’05, GR’15, saw a young service member, deployed for the third time, in her clinic. He had experienced a flashback after watching a training video of an improvised explosive device attack. On his previous deployment, the serviceman explained, he had been wounded by an explosive device while driving his Humvee and was sent stateside for treatment of his physical wounds. “This young service member did not identify any symptoms of traumatic stress until watching the video one year later,” explained Lt. Cmdr. Wall, NC, USN, PMHNP-BC, PMHCNS-BC. “It was important to him that his treatment would not interfere with his mission. I used the clinical training that I had received from my mentor at the 16

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Philadelphia Veterans Administration Hospital and was able to educate him about the neurobiological correlates of a stress reaction and treat him for it.” As a member of the United States Navy Nurse Corps for the past 16 years and as a psychiatric nurse practitioner, Lt. Cmdr. Wall has cared for hundreds of military service members and their families. “Military nursing combines a warrior ethos with compassionate care, enabling us to treat our nation’s wounded, ill, and injured,” she said. “The specialty of psychiatric nursing chose me. There was a need and my superiors identified me to fill it.” As part of a combat mental health stress team, Lt. Cmdr. Wall helped the young serviceman in her clinic (and many like him) understand that his


     “Because I had a targeted education, I was able to offer this young man the help that he needed. Without this training, I could easily have misdiagnosed him or responded in a way that was not sensitive to his needs within a military organization.” LT. CMDR. WALL

flashback was an expected response to his traumatic experiences. She and her team provided cognitive and behavioral interventions, while maintaining him on full duty as he had requested. “Because I had a targeted education, I was able to offer this young man the help that he needed,” she said. “Without this training, I could easily have misdiagnosed him or responded in a way that was not sensitive to his needs within a military organization.” Lt. Cmdr. Wall recounted this story at the launch of the White House’s Joining Forces nursing initiative at Penn Nursing where she introduced First Lady Michelle Obama. Through Joining Forces, nursing leaders committed to educate nurses on recognizing and caring for service people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and other combat-related issues. (For more on Joining Forces, see page 13.) “The new Joining Forces initiative is so critically important,” Lt. Cmdr. Wall told the audience of nurses, military personnel, and academic leaders at the April 11 event. “The nurses who serve in the military and in other facilities across America are healers of mind, body, and spirit, ambassadors of hope, and respected health professionals.” As of press time, more than two million service members have been deployed to Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn. Almost half of those have been deployed more than once. Many have seen intense ground combat or have been providers taking care of patients with multiple traumatic wounds. “Nurses like myself in federal healthcare facilities, community clinics, hospitals, and doctors’ offices are seeing many more occurrences of physical wounds, pain, TBI, PTSD, and other mental health issues in our service members and veterans,” said Lt. Cmdr. Wall. “That is why it is so critical that America’s nurses get the education and information they need to recognize and treat these conditions.” Since 2008, Lt. Cmdr. Wall has been program director and assistant professor in the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner program of the

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. A certified compassion fatigue therapist and educator, she served as department head and psychiatric nurse practitioner at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., with a focus on PTSD and TBI. Lt. Cmdr. Wall is a member of the Congressionally appointed Family Caregiver Panel, responsible for development of the curriculum “A Caregiver’s Guide to Traumatic Brain Injury” for the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center. She is also a member of the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps Professional Review Board. Preparing nurses to recognize and treat PTSD and TBI is crucial, said Lt. Cmdr. Wall: “I have seen first-hand the difference this kind of training can make in the care that our veterans and military families receive.”

View Lt. Cmdr. Wall's interview on PBS (4:01)

PTSD Hits Home in Healthcare Despite their growing numbers in the U.S. military, little has been published on healthcare providers or female service members from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Lieutenant Commander Pamela Herbig Wall is strengthening that area of study. As a Penn Nursing pre-doctoral student, she published in the Journal of Women’s Health on gender differences in response to deployment among military healthcare providers in Afghanistan and Iraq, showing that they were more likely than their male counterparts to show significant, stress-induced psychological difficulties. In the Journal of Traumatic Stress, Lt. Cmdr. Wall and colleagues reported on gender differences in stress, coping, and mental health-seeking behaviors among military personnel, finding that the reluctance of women to seek mental healthcare may be related more with concern over career than personal well-being. The authors concluded that “results indicate the need for provider awareness concerning mental health-seeking behavior and sensitivity toward gender differences that contribute to unique manifestations of [stress].” www.nursing.upenn.edu

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GAME ON! Top left: First-place winners – the MyDiaText Team Top right: Games champion Nancy Hanrahan Bottom right: Game developer Shannon Richmond

Penn Nursing students combined nursing knowhow, scientific savvy, and gaming technologies to solve pressing healthcare problems in a year-long competition called Game Solutions for Healthcare. As part of the University’s Year of Games, Penn Nursing led interdisciplinary teams of students, faculty, and staff to create mobile health tools and applications to address healthcare issues using gaming technology. Ten teams took their ideas from promise to prototype, hoping to win the inaugural competition, with winners announced at a symposium at Penn Nursing on April 19. The team members crisscrossed the campus with partners in biotechnology, systems engineering, education, communication, law, medicine, and at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “The winning entries bring fresh approaches health issues,” said Nancy P. Hanrahan, Gr’04, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Dr. Lenore H. Kurlowicz Term Associate Professor of Nursing who led the initiative. “Gaming can promote health education, awareness and treatment, and innovative nurse entrepreneurs are finding ways include gaming in research and care.” Taking first place was MyDiaText, a text message system for children aged 10 to 16 to learn to manage their Type I diabetes. A team of students from Penn Nursing, Engineering, and Wharton, under the guidance of Penn Nursing faculty, created the app to motivate children with diabetes to practice healthy behaviors. MyDiaText is on track for use in the Diabetes Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “Studies have shown that text messaging has worked well in other populations, and 90 percent of teenagers who own cellphones text regularly,” said Terri H. Lipman, GNu’83, GRN’91, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition

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and professor of nursing of children. “With the growing population of adolescents with diabetes, a technology-based intervention may prove more effective than traditional diabetes education alone.” In second place was Trigger Busters, a videogame-style app to help children and their families learn about asthma. In third place was Healthy Cities: Healthy Women, an interactive game designed to raise awareness of urban women’s health issues. Earning the Dean’s Social Impact Award was Mission Reintegration, a discussion-starter game for military personnel to prompt PTSD symptom recognition and management. (See Joining Forces on page 13.) Shannon Richmond, GNu’12, MSN, had the idea for

the game after she completed her clinical requirement at the Veterans Administration, where she met Vietnam War veterans who, after decades, were finally recognizing their own PTSD symptoms and seeking treatment. “I have so much faith in the game and the process,” Ms. Richmond added. “Because of the Nursing School’s healthcare initiative, I can turn it into something instrumental, something real.” The success of Game Solutions for Healthcare has led to the development of a Penn Nursing technology and innovation lab for emerging nurse entrepreneurs and a related year-long course called “Innovation and Technology in Healthcare,” both to be led by Dr. Hanrahan in partnership with faculty from Penn Engineering and the Wharton School. And students are already warming up for a 2012-13 health technology competition and symposium.


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Nurses and Physicians: Meeting of the Minds In the global 21st century, how will healthcare providers work better together? A symposium at Penn Nursing demonstrated what interprofessionalism looks like. While healthcare providers have long made efforts toward teamwork, it has remained just out of reach. However, Victoria Rich, PhD, RN, FAAN, chief nursing executive of the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, with physician colleague Patrick J. Brennan, MD, has turned the ambition into a reality. It’s happening on a complex acute care unit at the internationally renowned Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), where many Penn Nursing students take their clinicals and eventually practice. At HUP, Drs. Rich and Brennan established a new interprofessional paradigm, called unit-based clinical leadership (UBCL), to improve quality and patient safety. UBCL, used on every HUP unit, has reduced hospital-acquired bloodstream infections up to 100 percent throughout the hospital.

interprofessionalism, to determine whether it can live up to the promise of better outcomes.” While the concept of interprofessionalism dates back to a 1965 report on medical education (sidebar), there is a “brewing enthusiasm for interprofessional education as the gateway for team care,” said Dr. Jordan J. Cohen, president emeritus of the Association of American Medical Colleges and co-author of the Lancet/IOM report. “Team care is the pathway to better outcomes,” he said in his keynote remarks at the symposium. “It will reduce errors, the overuse of resources, and patient and provider dissatisfaction.”

Nurses, physicians, and quality managers go on rounds together and meet regularly to discuss patient progress and discharge plans. Decisions about patient care happen in real time, informed jointly by this interprofessional team.

But, he asked, why is interprofessionalism so challenging? “Barriers to fully implementing interprofessionalism are huge,” said Dr. Cohen, “particularly in the current model of siloed, mono-professional clinical sites and crucibles of individualism – doctors with unquestionable authority; nurses with little authority; and pharmacists and others as ’slaves’ to doctors’ orders.”

This is a model for a new era, as called for in a 2010 report from The Lancet and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on the imperative of interprofessional education and practice in healthcare.

The key to changing this landscape, he said, is converting health sciences education “from crucibles of individualism to cradles of interprofessionalism.”

Penn Nursing Dean Afaf I. Meleis, who co-authored the report, is pursuing its objectives, co-hosting two events with Penn Perelman School of Medicine Dean J. Larry Jameson in 2011-12: A lecture by Dr. Richard Horton, editor-in-chief of The Lancet last November (see upFront, spring 2012) and the symposium “Partners in Education and Practice: Stronger Teams, Better Health” in April at Penn Nursing.

Leaders from four health institutions reported on how they are changing what Dr. Cohen called “adversarial relationships” in an “entrenched culture” through innovative clinical efforts and educational programs.

“Discovering, rewarding, and imitating best practices is essential,” wrote Dr. Jameson in Penn Medicine. “So is making sure we have the best structures and the right people in place. Along with Dean Meleis, I am committed to exploring

“We are at a very different place than we ever have been before with different tools than we ever had before,” said panel moderator Mary D. Naylor, GNu’73, Gr’82, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Marian S. Ware Professor in Gerontology and director of the NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health. HUP is the first hospital in the nation using UBCL. “We act the way we need to be thinking,” said Dr. Rich, who is assistant dean of clinical practice

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Best practices: Interprofessionalism can lead to better health outcomes, explains Chief Nursing Executive Dr. Victoria Rich, pictured below with Dr. Mary Naylor of Penn Nursing. Facing page: The nursing and medical teams convene on an acute care unit at HUP.

said Dr. Cohen of the AAMC, health educators are identifying complementary opportunities for interprofessionalism rooted in educational programs. Among them are the University of Washington, at its Institute for Simulation and Interprofessional Studies, and New York University (with its school of nursing now led by Eileen Sullivan-Marx, HUP’72, Nu’76, Gr’95, PhD, CRNP, FAAN), both with presentations at the symposium. at Penn Nursing and associate professor of nursing administration. She explained that UBCL aims to build greater trust among healthcare providers, have them learn each other’s expertise, and improve communication. The results are tangible. Units throughout the hospital have seen infections decrease and cost savings increase. On HUP unit Founders 14, reduced infections have yielded a cost savings of nearly $500,000. Using models like this, “it’s time to bring up a new cadre, a new generation of practitioners,” said Dr. Brennan, who is chief medical officer and senior vice president of Penn’s health system. Healthcare professionals around the country seem primed for interprofessionalism. Efforts at the Academic Health Sciences Center at East Tennessee State University are considered “such change agents that they have others at our university begging for the interprofessional experience,” said Michael A. Crouch, associate dean for academic affairs and professional education at ETSU’s Gatton College of Pharmacy. Yet, unquestionably, interprofessionalism “is hard work, not ’let’s get together on a Monday afternoon to talk about it,’” said Dr. George Thibault, president of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, which has supported interprofessional programs. “It’s not just cosmetic: It’s real work with real goals.” But the “triple aim” of better care, better health, and lower cost is worth the effort, suggested Dr. Thibault. “Interprofessionalism should be part of preparing students to move out of the classroom and enter the real world of practice.” While “interprofessionalism isn’t a substitute for traditional, in-depth, discipline-specific education,”

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This kind of “reverse engineering,” in the words of Dr. Steven Wartman, president and CEO of the Association of Academic Health Centers, warrants more study for its potential to break down such long-standing barriers to interprofessionalism in education and practice. He pointed to a persistent “guild mentality” in individual health disciplines, current standards of regulation and accreditation, and “the misaligned incentives of the U.S. healthcare system.” The time is ripe for change, said Dr. Meleis, in closing the conference. “We don’t have business as usual anymore,” she said. “This conversation should not stop.” The IOM Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education, co-chaired by Drs. Meleis and Cohen, indeed is keeping the conversation going. This international effort aims to cultivate new ideas through ongoing global, multidisciplinary collaboratives with formal partnerships among university-based health institutions that are undertaking recommendations put forward in the 2010 Lancet Commission report and the Future of Nursing report. The four innovation collaboratives are located in Canada, India, South Africa, and Uganda.


A Brief Look at the Long History of Interprofessionalism The 1965 Royal Commission on Medical Education report in Great Britain suggested that “co-operation of teachers from nonmedical faculties in pre-clinical courses is a welcome and practical inspiration,” and an Institute of Medicine (IOM) conference in 1972 included “educating for the health team.” Through the decades, while other reports made similar recommendations and several health sciences schools around October 2010 The Future of Nursing report from a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation initiative at the IOM calls for nurses to be “full partners, with physicians and other healthcare professionals, in redesigning healthcare in the United States.”

November 2010 The Lancet publishes “Health Professionals for a New Century: Transforming Education to Strengthen Health Systems in an Interdependent World,” the report of a global independent commission, including Dean Afaf Meleis.

the country made efforts at interprofessional education and practice, the concept took the spotlight in 2010 when the World Health Organization defined interprofessional education as: “When students from two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes.”

May 2011 The Interprofessional Education Collaborative, composed of six academic health associations, produces Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice.

November 2011 Dr. Richard Horton, editor-in-chief of The Lancet, gives the Deans’ Distinguished Lecture “A Bonfire of the Professions: Prospects for Global Health,” co-hosted by Penn Nursing and Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine.

March 2012 The IOM establishes the Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education, co-chaired by Dean Afaf Meleis and Dr. Jordan Cohen.

April 2012 The symposium “Partners in Education and Practice: Stronger Teams, Better Health,” brings together experts in interprofessional education and practice, co-hosted by Penn Nursing and Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine.

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SCIENCE IN ACTION Magnet Hospitals: A Life-or-Death Difference Choosing the right hospital may make the difference between life and death for very low birthweight infants, according to Penn Nursingled research reported in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Chair in Nursing & Healthy Policy. Babies born in for-profit hospitals showed higher rates of infection, which doubles the infants’ chances of dying; brain hemorrhage results in a six times greater risk of death.

In a study of 72,235 infants born in 558 U.S. hospitals, the researchers found that babies cared for in magnet hospitals were less likely to die, acquire a hospital-based infection, or suffer severe brain hemorrhage. While only 1.5 percent of births nationally are very low birthweight babies, weighing between 1 pound and 3.3 pounds, they account for more than half of all infant deaths.

“In absolute terms, the outcomes are 1 to 2 percentage points lower in magnet hospitals, which translates to 300 infants each year who could be spared each of these severe consequences,” said Dr. Lake. “Access to magnet hospitals can literally make a life or death difference.” The magnet designation, determined by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, recognizes quality patient care, nursing excellence, and nursing innovation.

“Babies born in magnet hospitals had 13 percent lower odds of death within the first week of life, 14 percent lower odds of infection, and 12 percent lower odds of hemorrhage,” said lead author Eileen Lake, G’96, GNu’97, Gr’99, CGS’01, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Jessie M. Scott Term

Violence Prevention Keeps It Real for Girls and Boys Briana and Damon, a pair of digitally animated, street-smart characters, star in videos aimed at reducing urban youth violence. Working with members of the West Philadelphia community, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, and the Philadelphia Collaborative Violence Prevention Center created Briana and Damon to communicate antiviolence messages grounded in community-

based research. The researchers reported their findings in the American Journal of Community Psychology and launched the Briana and Damon videos on Facebook. “Our question was: How do we get research back to the community?” said senior and corresponding author Therese Richmond, GRN’95, GNC’97, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, the Andrea B. Laporte Endowed Term Associate Professor. “Community-based participatory research enables us to develop strategies for violence prevention side-by-side with members of the affected community.” The researchers and community partners developed stories directly from research findings to bring them to life. Each of the five, one-minute videos has a single, distinct message: avoiding peer pressure, working hard, keeping calm, finding a role model, and deciding against retribution.

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View Dr. Richmond’s video (3:32)


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A Global View of Quality and Safety Problems in Hospitals In one of the largest studies of its kind, a consortium of investigators from 13 countries led by Penn Nursing in the U.S. and the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, in Europe, found that nurses who reported better working conditions in hospitals and less likelihood of leaving also had patients who were more satisfied with their hospital stay and rated their hospitals more highly. Published in the British Medical Journal, the massive study – which in some countries involved every hospital – surveyed 61,168 bedside nurses and 131,318 patients in more than 1,000 hospitals internationally over the course of three years. The study found that in those hospitals with better work environments and fewer patients in each nurse’s workload, patients and nurses both reported higher standards of care and more satisfied patients. “Patients in European and U.S. hospitals with better work environments were more likely to rate their hospital highly and to recommend their hospital” to others, wrote Linda H. Aiken, PhD, RN, the Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor in Nursing, professor of sociology, and director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research.

However, the majority of nurses in every country expressed a lack of confidence that hospital management would resolve problems in patient care. Specifically the researchers found that: • High nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction were common among hospital nurses in Europe and the U.S. • On average, only 60 percent of patients were satisfied with their hospital care. • Nurses reporting high levels of burnout (notably in Greece and England) also reported an intention to leave their current positions.

years

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countries

1,000 hospitals

• Each additional patient added to a nurse’s workload increased the odds of a nurse reporting poor or fair quality of care.

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• Patients were less satisfied with their hospital stay in those hospitals that had higher percentages of burnt-out or dissatisfied nurses.

patients

Policy implications for the findings suggest that despite the differences among the healthcare systems studied, particularly in terms of organization and financing, all countries encountered problems of “hospital quality, safety, and nurse burnout and dissatisfaction.”

61,168

nurses

In the U.S., just 14 percent of nurses reported their intentions to leave their current positions, possibly due to increased efforts in the U.S. to improve hospital nurse staffing levels. Having fewer patients per nurse has been linked to better outcomes for patients, including lower rates of death following common surgeries.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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SCIENCE IN ACTION Food Stamps and Farmers’ Markets Current food stamp programs at urban farmers’ markets attempting to bring fresh produce to economically stressed city dwellers are so complicated for the shopper and expensive for the farmer that fewer people are taking advantage of the federal program designed to help them, according to research at Penn Nursing.

However, the costs associated with such systems may put them out of reach for farmers, reported Assistant Professor Alison M. Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, and colleagues, in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Vendors told us, and we confirmed with a costbenefit analysis, that they would not be able to break even on sales after paying the associated costs,” Dr. Buttenheim said. “Our study highlights the need for an equitable approach to subsidizing electronic benefits transfer fees at farmers’ markets.”

Photo: The Food Trust

Record numbers of Americans are receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, as food stamps are now known, and many SNAP participants live in neighborhoods with little or no access to healthy food. A study conducted at the Clark

Park Farmers’ Market in Philadelphia found that making it easier for vendors to collect SNAP payments with electronic point-of-sale systems increased fresh produce sales to SNAP recipients by 38 percent.

Patient Benefits and Burdens in Cancer Clinical Trials In one of the first studies of its kind, Penn Nursing researchers identified what cancer patients consider the “benefits and burdens” of participating in clinical research trials. From their findings, the researchers developed a model of the five elements of decision-making (physical, psychological, economic, familial, and social) that patients with cancer use to determine whether to participate or remain in a clinical trial.

These findings can help researchers address factors leading to participation in clinical trials and in ensuring voluntary, informed consent, explained Connie M. Ulrich, PhD, RN, FAAN, in The American Journal of Bioethics Primary Research. “Understanding the benefit-burden balance involved in the voluntary consent of human subjects is a fundamental tenet of research and important to ensure that subjects have made an informed decision regarding participation in clinical research,” said Dr. Ulrich, associate professor of nursing and bioethics. This study showed that both benefit and burden influence research participation, including recruitment and retention, in clinical trials. For some, wrote Dr. Ulrich, this “added burden” may not be acceptable while for others, participation is a way to “actively take control of a situation that is perceived to be out of control.”

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Better Together – The RN and the EHR Electronic health records (EHRs) are rapidly becoming part of the daily practice of hospital nurses. In the first large study of its kind, researchers at the Penn Nursing determined that nurses working with EHRs consistently reported more improvements to nursing care and better health outcomes for patients than nurses working in hospitals without this technology. A study of more than 16,000 nurses working at 316 hospitals in four states indicates that “implementation of an EHR may result in improved and more efficient nursing care, better care coordination, and patient safety,” wrote Assistant Professor Ann Kutney-Lee, GNu’04, Gr’07, PhD, RN, in the Journal of Nursing Administration.

At the same time, she wrote, “it is important to note that having a basic EHR was associated with better outcomes independently of nurse staffing, indicating that they both play an important role in quality of care.” Nurses in hospitals with fully implemented basic EHRs were significantly less likely to report unfavorable patient safety issues, frequent medication errors, and low quality of care. These findings suggest that the level of detail available in the EHR may allow for more comprehensive unit transfer reports and discharge summaries to outside healthcare providers.

Supermarkets and the War on Obesity

Findings suggest that in-store marketing strategies can promote healthful eating through increasing availability, affordability, prominence, and promotion of healthful foods and restricting or not marketing unhealthy foods. “Supermarkets are strategic and critical allies in the fight to prevent obesity,” said Dr. Glanz. “Grocery stores can provide critical opportunities to increase access to healthy foods, including fresh fruits, vegetables, and lean meats, potentially improving health and

curtailing the rise in obesity. The next step is for key results of this research to be adapted and tested in real-world, in-store settings.” Dr. Glanz, a Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) professor with appointments in Nursing and Medicine, is conducting a second study in several Philadelphia supermarkets where these methods are being instituted and monitored.

Photo: Hoag Levins/LDI

Using low-key strategies, supermarket chains and corner grocery stores can “nudge” consumers toward healthier purchases, reported Karen Glanz, PhD, MPH, the George A. Weiss University Professor and professor of epidemiology and nursing, in the Journal of Preventive Medicine.

View Dr. Glanz’s video (5:27) www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Tales of a Broken Heart On the 10th anniversary of the Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Research Award, Penn Nursing scientist Barbara J. Riegel, DNSc, RN, FAAN, FAHA, spoke on her pioneering approaches to managing heart failure. This piece is drawn from her Fagin Lecture on April 5. Dr. Riegel is professor of nursing, Edith Clemmer Steinbright Chair of Gerontology, and director of the Biobehavioral Research Center at Penn Nursing. trouble finding subjects for my studies. So that was getting my attention. Although cardiovascular disease continues to be the primary cause of death in men and women, there has been a decline in acute coronary events with all the treatment innovations that we’ve put in place over the past 50-plus years. That is, most people with coronary disease are treated successfully and live to develop heart failure. Further, problems such as hypertension occur at a young age. The symptoms are insidious and sometimes ignored, so those people end up with heart failure after years of poorly controlled blood pressure. I put my career into this huge patient population. The reality of heart failure is grim. One in every nine deaths is due to this progressive disease. Quality of life is horrible. Symptoms are burdensome. The cognition issues, the fatigue, the shortness of breath – there are so many issues in these patients that really deserve our attention as researchers. And yet it’s astounding to me that we know so little about how to help heart failure patients help themselves. A European study of 8,000 lay people in 2005 showed that most didn’t realize that the symptom profile of heart failure represented something serious. Most of them thought it was just a normal part of aging. It’s not a normal part of aging. It’s something we can prevent.

Sick at Heart Acute myocardial infarction was very prevalent in the 1990s, when I was starting my career. My dissertation topic in 1991 was looking at patients with acute myocardial infarction. But when I got into my research career, I was actually having

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There is a very consistent picture among this group of patients with heart failure: Symptom recognition is poor. There is a dichotomy between what patients experience and what they actually recognize as a sign of heart failure. We asked patients: “In the last month, did you have this symptom and how quickly did you recognize it as a symptom of heart failure?” Sixty-five percent of subjects said, “Yes, I had that in the last month.” But only 43 percent of those said, “And when I had it, I knew it was my heart failure.” And of course that is the issue. Patients have these symptoms and they just don’t put the pieces together. They don’t realize that they need to do something about the symptoms.

Heart Signals If we compare patients who are rehospitalized for heart failure and those who are not, their weights are basically the same until about a month before they’re hospitalized. That’s when the group that gets rehospitalized gains a little bit of weight – just one to two pounds from fluid retention – and they call that their new norm. Then they go along for a


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period of time, they’re not really seeing any changes, and they’re thinking everything is fine. Right around two weeks before they’re admitted to the hospital, their weight crawls up. And by the time they’re admitted, they’re just a few pounds more than the people who kept their weight stable by limiting salt and fluids or taking an extra water pill, and then they wind up in the hospital. It’s a subtle change. Maybe it’s the subtlety that is making it so difficult to get across to patients. We kept asking ourselves: “Why is self-care so hard in these patients?” Self-care involves the choice of behaviors that maintain physiologic stability (or maintenance) and the response to symptoms when they occur (and that is management). Patients practicing self-care maintenance live a healthy lifestyle, adhere to the treatment regimen, and monitor symptoms. Symptom monitoring is essential to making decisions in response to them (management). Self-care management is an active, deliberate process that begins with recognizing a change in signs or symptoms (such as shortness of breath or edema), evaluating the change, deciding to take action, implementing a treatment strategy (such as taking an extra diuretic dose), and evaluating the treatment that was implemented (considering if it worked well enough to try again). The beginning of self-care management is situation awareness, as in “I have begun to retain fluid.” If patients are adept at this aspect, they begin to think through and simulate the actions: “Well, if I gain another pound tomorrow morning, here’s what I think I’ll do.”

Taking Self-Care to Heart Getting on a self-care program and having patients do what we are asking them to do through symptom recognition, symptom evaluation, treatment implementation, and cycling back to “that really worked, I think I’ll do it again” really is an important process in people who have repeated symptoms. But it’s not a linear or simple process. Following the treatment is really the foundation. From there, the real skill of it is making decisions about symptoms when they occur, and that’s where I think the crux of the process is for these patients. Now understanding this, we created the Self-Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI, pronounced “skiffy”)

in the 1990s and updated it in 2009. This tool allows researchers to measure patients’ views of health maintenance, symptom management, and confidence in their own self-care. Today this instrument, in the public domain, is used worldwide and has at least 25 translations. We recently did a study of how biomarkers change in response to self-care plans. The study showed that heart failure patients who followed advice on self-care had lowered levels of myocardial stress and systemic inflammation, thought to be associated with greater risk of mortality. The results support our long-standing hypothesis that evaluating, teaching, and promoting self-care in patients can protect the heart against myocardial stress, systemic inflammation, and early death. Self-care works.

The Restless Heart

Could excessive daytime sleepiness be interfering with patients’ abilities to care for themselves? In her ongoing research of heart failure, Dr. Riegel is using an R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the effects of sleepiness on heart failure self-care. In a longitudinal study of sleepy and nonsleepy cohorts, each with and without cognitive impairment, Dr. Riegel found that about 22 percent reported significant sleep dysfunction and nonrestorative sleep and 23.6 percent reported excessive daytime sleepiness. “If you think about what’s going on with heart failure, it’s a neurohormonal phenomenon with catecholamine release, which inhibits sleepiness,” said Dr. Riegel. “Usually if you have a lot of circulating catecholamines, you won’t be taking a nap anytime soon.” However, patients noted factors that impair sleep, including waking to use the bathroom, pain, feeling too hot or too cold, coughing, snoring, bad dreams, and difficulty breathing.

Dr. Riegel found that sleepiness significantly affected medication adherence. “About 22 percent of patients really had significant problems with medication-taking, with a steep decline in adherence,” said Dr. Riegel. “The patients with a steep decline had excessive daytime sleepiness, lapses in attention, and were taking two or more medication doses per day. As former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said, ’Drugs don’t work in patients who don’t take them.’ Of all the types of self-care that we measured, medication-taking appears to be most influenced by daytime sleepiness.” Research shows that about half of all heart failure patients have trouble adhering to their medication regimens, leading to more emergency room visits, rehospitalizations, higher mortality rates, and higher healthcare costs. Said Dr. Riegel: “The role of sleepiness appears to be a significant link in this particular issue.”

View Dr. Riegel’s video (2:21) www.nursing.upenn.edu

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PENN NURSING NEWS Two New Faculty Members Join Penn Nursing Assistant Professor Bridgette Brawner, GNu’05, Gr’09, PhD, APRN, researches biobehavioral approaches to sexual health risks and promotion in disenfranchised populations and develops comprehensive, evidence-based sexual health promotion strategies. Her research plans include integrating biological and behavioral science to prevent HIV/STIs among clinically depressed African-American adolescent females and conducting a comparative analysis of determinants of HIV/AIDS among AfricanAmerican Philadelphians. From 2009 to 2012, Dr. Brawner was the first distinguished postdoctoral fellow at Penn. In 2011, she was a visiting research fellow at Yale University’s Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS and has published nine peer-reviewed articles. Dr. Brawner won a 2011 Department of Community and Family Health award for teaching excellence as a Penn Nursing lecturer and mentor. She has served on the School’s research committee and the task force on diversity. Sharon Irving, GNu’93, GrNu’11, PhD, CRNP, an assistant professor in the clinician educator track, conducts

research on nutritional support during pediatric critical illness. She will retain her appointment as a nurse practitioner in critical care medicine at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Other researchers frequently reference her paper “Defining the Role of the Pediatric Critical Care Nurse Practitioner in a Tertiary Care Center.” Dr. Irving has received an Early Independent Investigator Award from the National Institutes of Health where she will be principal investigator on a study of nutritional practices for critically ill children. She has published nine articles, three book chapters, and six abstracts. As a lecturer at Penn Nursing, Dr. Irving has been part of a well-received innovative team-teaching approach in N220: Care of Children and has been a guest lecturer for the pediatric critical care nurse practitioner program. She was the 2011 invited international nurse lecturer for the annual intensive care meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society/Australian College of Critical Care Nurses, an invitation extended to outstanding clinicians or clinician scientists.

Dean Meleis Advises NIH on Women’s Health Penn Nursing Dean Afaf I. Meleis has been named to the National Institutes of Health advisory committee on research on women’s health for a four-year term. This committee helps guide the director of the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health to ensure that women’s health and sex differences research are part of the NIH scientific framework and that women and minorities are included in clinical research. Dean Meleis also directs Penn Nursing’s World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Nursing and Midwifery Leadership and co-chairs the Lancet-Harvard School of Public Health Commission on Women and Health. She is the global ambassador for the Girl Child Initiative of the International Council of Nurses, and is president and counsel general emerita of the International Council on Women’s Health Issues.

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Autism Specialization for Nurses Penn Nursing has established the first academic program in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) specifically for nurses. The program, designed for nurses who focus on pediatrics, school nursing, psychiatric health, and family care, offers academic preparation and practical experience in designing and delivering comprehensive nursing care for this unique, vulnerable population. In the program, nurses will develop skills to screen and diagnose children with ASD; provide comprehensive care for concurrent behavioral, medical, and psychiatric conditions; and develop innovate approaches to integrate nursing care for ASD patients across the lifespan. The program consists of three graduate level courses and a clinical experience. Bachelor’s- or master’s- prepared nurses can earn a certificate and Penn students can earn a minor. Directing the program are autism experts Jennifer Pinto-Martin, PhD, MPH, the Viola MacInnes/ Independence Professor of Nursing and chair of the Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences, and Assistant Professor Margaret Souders, Nu’81, GNu’96, Gr’08, PhD, CRNP. She is a pediatric nurse practitioner with appointments in the Clinical Genetics Center and in the Center for Autism Research at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Pinto-Martin is director and Dr. Souders is a member of the Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE) at Penn Nursing, one of six such centers funded by the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to work collaboratively to understand the causes of autism and the reasons for its recent increase in prevalence nationwide. Dr. Pinto-Martin recently established the groundbreaking link between low birth weight and children diagnosed with ASD. Dr. Souders has just completed a study describing a strong relationship between insomnia and anxiety in children and adolescents with ASD. “Nurses are in a key position to help families with the care of their children on the autism spectrum, care that can be complex and confusing,” said Dr. Pinto-Martin. “Nurses are trusted members of the healthcare team and their advice is always valued when families are facing decisions about health and medical care. This unique program will help prepare nurses to translate the most current research on autism spectrum disorders to effective care for the children with this disorder.” Autism expert Dr. Margaret Souders mentors Penn Nursing student Whitney Eriksen, who is studying cognitive dysfunction and autism. With Dr. Jennifer Pinto-Martin, Dr. Souders will lead the nation’s first academic program in autism spectrum disorder designed specifically for nurses.

“Nurses are in a key position to help families with the care of their children on the autism spectrum, care that can be complex and confusing. … their advice is always valued when families are facing decisions about health and medical care.” JENNIFER PINTO-MARTIN

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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PENN NURSING NEWS Getting Hospital Discharge Right Discharge Decision Support System (D2S2), a software tool to improve healthcare outcomes based on research conducted at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, has won the Janssen Connected Care Challenge and a $100,000 prize, awarded by California-based Janssen Healthcare Innovation. D2S2 software helps healthcare providers reduce hospital readmissions by assembling and scoring key data upon hospital admission to identify patients who should be referred to post-acute-care services upon discharge. The software was developed by a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health at Penn Nursing led by Kathryn H. Bowles, Gr’96, PhD, RN, FAAN, who holds the Ralston House Endowed Term Chair in Gerontological Nursing. Through Penn’s UpStart program, Dr. Bowles and co-inventor Mary D. Naylor, GNu’73, Gr’82, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Marian S. Ware Professor in Gerontology and director of the NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health, licensed D2S2 to RightCare Solutions, a company co-founded by Penn, Dr. Bowles, and Wharton MBA graduate Eric Heil, who serves as the company’s CEO. A panel of judges selected the project as the winner from more than 100 submissions to the challenge. It also was recognized with a $50,000 award for being one of the top three finalists in the challenge. In addition, RightCare Solutions earned a $30,000 prize plus legal and accounting services as the winner of the Wharton Business Plan Competition in April. D2S2 is based on a decade of research by Dr. Bowles’ team. A successful first case study at a major academic hospital demonstrated a significant reduction in 30-day re-admissions when the software was used to inform discharge planning. “Discharge planners are overwhelmed with the volume of complex patients churning through our hospitals,” said Dr. Bowles, who directs the Center for Integrative Science in Aging at Penn Nursing. “We are eager to support their decision making with tools like the D2S2 so our patients get the right care and achieve improved outcomes.” The prize money will support further development of D2S2 and additional studies at four hospitals.

Penn Alzheimer’s Summit Addresses Care-to-Cure More than 50 of the world’s leaders in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research and care convened at Penn in June for the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program Invitational Summit. At the two-day meeting, they addressed the multiple dimensions of this complex, challenging, and growing health problem, including drug discovery, biomarkers, clinical care and health services, and ethics and economics. AD often is complicated by multiple other chronic conditions and depression, and these and other factors affect the experience of both the individual with AD and family caregivers. Yet, explains summit co-chair Mary D. Naylor, GNu’73, Gr’82, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Marian S. Ware Professor in Gerontology and director of the NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health at Penn Nursing, today’s fragmented care system is ill-suited for such complexity. Additionally, the group noted that the science underpinning the transformation of the healthcare system needs much greater investment. To meet the call of the recently released U.S. National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease, the experts framed their recommendations to be responsive to the needs of patients and family caregivers. “Scholars, healthcare leaders, and policy makers need to simultaneously pursue multiple paths to accelerate progress in preventing AD while assuring that those afflicted and their family caregivers receive the highest quality care,” said Dr. Naylor. In pursuit of this goal, participants crafted a broad set of recommendations to advance the delivery of care and scientific discovery, in part by shifting resources, care delivery, social interventions, research, and training to the community and home. 30

UPfront | Fall 2012

View Dr. Naylor’s video (5:48)


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HEARD IN FAGIN HALL

“We try to convince them to understand the truth as we know it, but they have their own truth.” Dr. Moteshedi Sabone, head of the School of Nursing at the University of Botswana, on the intersection between traditional medicine and modern healthcare, during Global Health Reflections Week in February

“Midwives have changed the survival rate of women wherever they work.” Dr. Edna Adan Ismail, director and founder of the Edna Maternity Hospital in Hargeisa, Somaliland, on improving access to maternity care in Somaliland, during Global Health Reflections Week in February

“Now, when you think about it, it’s not surprising that America’s nurses came through in this way, because we all know that nurses get things done.” First Lady Michelle Obama, announcing the Joining Forces effort to address PTSD among veterans and their families at Penn Nursing on April 11

“This [commitment] is absolutely essential to ensuring our returning service members and their families receive the care they deserve.” Dr. Jill Biden, on the Joining Forces collaboration with more than 500 nursing schools and 150 nursing organizations on April 11

“While interprofessional education is not a substitute for traditional, in-depth, discipline-specific education, there is brewing enthusiasm for interprofessional education as a gateway to team care.” Dr. Jordan J. Cohen, president emeritus of the Association of American Medical Colleges, at the symposium on interprofessional education and practice on April 17

“A strong heart is not the warrior’s heart. A strong heart is a happy heart because when you have a happy heart, you can go to the heart of darkness and come out intact.” Ms. Zainab Salbi, founder of Women for Women International, at the Center for Global Women’s Health inaugural symposium on May 11

“The novelty isn’t in the solution, but in the identification of the need.” Dr. Karl T. Ulrich, vice dean of innovation at Penn’s Wharton School, at the inaugural symposium of Game Solutions for Healthcare on April 19

“You have a remarkable institution at Penn, an institution like no other I have been at. … I’ve never seen the collaborative spirit that I’ve seen here between different professions in health. It is truly unique, what you have.”

“The path to greatness is likely to be hidden in the nooks and crannies of everyday life. … Nursing trailblazers before you found their paths by paying attention to small signals – areas of need where no one else was focusing.” Dr. Karen Daley, president of the American Nurses Association, at Penn Nursing’s commencement on May 14

Dr. Richard Horton, editor-in-chief of The Lancet, from his lecture “A Bonfire of the Professions: Prospects for Global Health” on November 9

“The Arab nurse as a professional was usually rejected by her society for religious and social reasons but surfaced, from the 1950s onward, as a participant in her society’s process of modernization and improvement of women’s status – a process that has gathered strength in recent decades. … Today, Arabs are prominent among the 57,609 male and female nurses in Israel, including those in managerial positions, and about one-third of working nurses in Israel are Arab women.” Nira Bartal, RN, PhD, of the Henrietta Szold Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Nursing in Jerusalem in a seminar on 20th century nursing care and midwifery in Arab-Israeli communities at the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing www.nursing.upenn.edu

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PENN NURSING NEWS

Sounds of West Philadelphia The singular sounds of Brazilian beats, hip-hop, percussion, and reggae drummed up some 500 attendees for the second annual West Philadelphia Wellness Day at LIFE, the Living Independently For Elders practice of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. It was a Philadelphia street party with a twist: The second annual event featured health checks, mini-massages, and zumba alongside the music, face-painting, and a moonbounce. With LIFE and Penn Nursing, Wellness Day was hosted by Philadelphia Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, Penn’s Office of Government and Community Affairs, the Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, and the University of Pennsylvania Health System. LIFE, the first such program to be owned and operated by a school of nursing, is internationally recognized for helping seniors lead independent lives in their own communities and homes while receiving healthcare and having social opportunities at the LIFE center.

“Wellness Day strengthens the special relationship Penn Nursing has with our West Philadelphia neighbors.” LIFE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DANIEL DRAKE

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Joan Lynaugh: History Keeper Courtesy of The Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing

It grew from an idea on a road trip to New Orleans more than 25 years ago and turned into one of the greatest nursing history centers in the world. This past April, nurse historians, scholars, and students gathered to celebrate the legacy of Joan Lynaugh, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor emerita and the 25th anniversary of the center she co-founded at Penn Nursing, The Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing. Dr. Lynaugh had begun her career in nursing when she received her BSN in 1961 and her master’s in 1968 from the University of Rochester, where she first met historian Barbara Bates, who would become a life-long collaborator. While working toward her doctorate, Dr. Lynaugh came to Penn Nursing to establish the primary care family nurse practitioner program, and history was set in motion. “On a trip with Barbara in 1984, we talked about work, history, and the desire of active alumnae at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and at Philadelphia General Hospital to preserve their own materials and data,” Dr. Lynaugh said. “We didn’t know what we were doing and had to make it up and with that, the general form of the center emerged: preserving documents, doing research, and teaching new generations of scholars.” With co-founders Ellen Baer, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Karen Buhler-Wilkerson, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Center formally opened in 1988. As news of it spread, the interest in advancing and disseminating nursing historical knowledge grew. The caliber of doctoral students and their understanding of how nursing history and healthcare affect the current nursing world became an integral part of the Center. “As Joan has noted, ’What happens in the present is not an accident. It has a past.’ The past in effect anchors these modern issues in a framework broader than the here-and-now,” said Julie Fairman, GNu’80, GRN’92, PhD, RN, FAAN, director of the Barbara Bates Center and Nightingale Professor of Nursing. “That is what Joan is so good at – helping fledgling historians and even those of us with experience to see that history is about finding the data, constructing meanings, and accepting the absence of absolutes.” Dr. Lynaugh’s connections across disciplines and around the world set the stage for the symposium in April, bringing together nurse historians, scholars, and current students. The 120 attendees focused on nursing’s role in the larger contexts of healthcare and policy history, challenges to the current state of the nursing field, the professional growth of nurse historians, and the role that Dr. Lynaugh has had in providing a rich home for historians’ work. Today, the Bates Center is the largest repository of primary source materials and rare books about the history of nursing in the United States. The Center has more than 1,900 linear feet of glass slides, textbooks, pamphlets, photographs, and audio tapes that have provided the building blocks for dissertation topics, books, and articles. “Joan’s understanding of history as part of the ’cultural DNA’ of the profession has influenced an entire generation of students, scholars, and clinicians here and abroad,” said Dr. Fairman.

Laura Kind McKenna, GNu’81 (left), and Susan Beidler, GNu’81, GGS’02, Gr’02 (right), with honoree Dr. Joan Lynaugh.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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From the Penn Nursing Alumni Board President Recently, I hosted an alumni networking event in Los Angeles. I was surprised when a Nursing alumnus introduced himself, then quickly apologized that he was not practicing in a traditional nursing role. We welcomed him, and he began to describe two businesses that he started and owns, sharing that the skills he learned at Penn Nursing were instrumental to his entrepreneurial success. His Penn Nursing degree taught him to take risks, to see possibilities instead of barriers, and most notably, the importance of networks. In preparation for my 20th reunion, I served as reunion class representative for the Class of 1991 with my classmate and dear friend, Kate Moore-Martin. Through our outreach, I learned that a significant number of our classmates chose to stop practicing nursing to raise families, and because of this, some were ambivalent about coming back to campus. I share these two stories to illustrate a point: Whether you are a stay-athome mom, working in a nontraditional role, practicing in a clinical setting, writing health policy, building innovative technology solutions to improve health, educating students, or conducting research, your Penn Nursing education played a critical role and remains a resource as you grow personally and professionally. As I assume the presidency of the Alumni Board, my top goal is to increase engagement with our alumni everywhere, from bachelor’s graduates through doctoral programs, including HUP alumni. All members of the Penn Nursing alumni community are having an impact on healthcare around the globe, and we encourage your involvement.

We want to hear from you. We welcome your input and encourage your participation at nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu or phone 215.898.9773.

There are many ways for alumni to give back to the school. You may want to volunteer as a preceptor for students, be a panel member during Homecoming, mentor current students, give to the annual fund, be the class representative for your reunion during Alumni Weekend, or talk with students about job opportunities and interview skills. Penn Nursing’s legacy is the result of not only our outstanding faculty, but also the amazing accomplishments of our alumni. It is the quality of our graduates with each passing class that increases the value of our Penn Nursing degrees. Each has made valuable contributions. The Penn Nursing Alumni Board is here for YOU – enabling you to reconnect with fellow alumni and augment your relationship with the School. I encourage each of you to do so. Please explore the pages of our website, www.nursing.upenn.edu/alumni, to find ways to become involved and to reconnect. Join us as we strive to create a sense of community where our great tradition continues! Go, Quakers! Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91

Scan this QR code with your smartphone to go directly to the Penn Nursing Alumni website.

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UPfront | Fall 2012

President, Penn Nursing Alumni Board


From the HUP Nursing Alumni Association President This issue of UPfront draws our attention to the many ways that Penn Nursing is engaged around the world. I am proud to say that I believe this legacy of global-mindedness started with the HUP School of Nursing. From our school’s early years, HUP graduates took their education around the world, on the mission field, to both world wars and other times of conflict, and in better periods – like Betty Irwin, HUP’50, who shared the skills she learned from HUP with a volunteer role in the Peace Corps. Our global experiences are rich and varied, and today’s Penn Nursing students gain unique insights by learning about our experiences. Whether you worked overseas or spent your entire career at HUP, please take a moment to share your story – by sending a letter, emailing us at HUPAlum@nursing.upenn.edu, or joining us at an event. As another way of carrying forward our legacy, your HUP Alumni Board has also been busy since my last letter! New board members were installed at the spring luncheon, held on April 28th. Our friends from Penn Nursing, including Dean Meleis and Naomi Higuchi, past president of the Penn Nursing Alumni Board, attended the lunch along with several dozen HUP alumni. We were thrilled that the Class of 1967 used the occasion to hold a mini reunion. The HUP spring newsletter detailed all the events of the 125th reunion replete with wonderful pictures from the celebration. Special thanks to Julia Davis, HUP’73, for putting it together. If you are not receiving the HUP alumni newsletter and would like to, please contact us. Betty Irwin and I, a.k.a. “Florence Nightingale,” participated in the student spirit celebration of 125 years of Nursing at Penn on campus on April 18th. It was great to see both undergrads and graduates so interested in our history.

Scan this QR code with your smartphone to go directly to the HUP Nursing Alumni website.

Last but not least, many HUP board members attended the “Legacy Breakfast” with Dean Meleis at Alumni Weekend in May and shared stories from the good old days. Our own Kathy Shaver, HUP’76, received the School’s Legacy Award and a number of HUP alumni took part throughout the weekend. I encourage our members to attend next year and feel the excitement and pride in being such an important part of Nursing at Penn. I look forward to connecting with you at our activities this fall and throughout the year. Sincerely, Candace Stiklorius, HUP’66, Nu’71, GNu’83

President, HUP Nursing Alumni Association

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Class Notes

 Antoinette (Toni) DiLeo Finn, Nu’54, has been

diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Her husband, Michael Finn, cared for her for four years. She is now in a dementia facility in Pa. Classmates may contact Mr. Finn for more details at tonimike@comcast.net or 717.464.1014.

 Mary E. Greipp, GNu’63, has been awarded

the Rutgers School of Nursing Alumni Nursing Excellence Award for her “extraordinary and enduring contributions to the nursing profession as a leader, scholar, and educator/clinician.” She is professor emerita at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Joan Kelly, GNu’65, will retire from Lourdes Hospital this year, after a 50-year career in nursing. She started out as a nurse at West Jersey Hospital in Camden. She later worked at Cooper Hospital as a pediatric nurse for 13 years. She then went on to teach nursing at the University of Delaware, Rutgers University, and Newman College. She has taught pediatric nursing and summer medical-surgical nursing at Lourdes for the last 22 years. Ms. Kelly is looking forward to spending more time with her family.

 Marie Savard, HUP’70, Nu’72, M’76, joined the

Philadelphia office of Diversified Search, one of the top ten executive search firms in the United States, as a managing director in the healthcare practice. Dr. Savard is a parttime contributor for ABC News and has been featured in national media outlets throughout her career for her opinion on various health issues. She is the former corporate medical director of NewCourtland, a provider of affordable senior housing, nursing homes, and community services. Currently, she is a member of the Penn Board of Trustees and the Board of Overseers at Penn Nursing.

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UPfront | Fall 2012

Vicki D. Lachman, Nu’72, GNu’74, CGS’02,

Joanne Knee Coleman, GNu’80, is now a

has been promoted to clinical professor at Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions. She also was inducted into the Academy of Nursing as a fellow, received the President’s Award from the International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses for her leadership and dedication to the organization, and became chairperson of the Board at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Ms. Lachman serves on the American Nurses Association Center for Ethics and Human Rights advisory board and two of its ethics committees. She also writes a quarterly column on ethics, policy, and law in MEDSURG Nursing.

professional artist, who paints “contemporary impressionism.”

Lynne C. Pompetti, HUP’72, has been selected one of the “Dallas-Fort Worth Great 100 Nurses” for 2012. This year marks Ms. Pompetti’s 40th year practicing nursing. Eileen Sullivan-Marx, HUP’72, Nu’76, Gr’95, former

professor of scholarly practice and the Shearer Endowed Term Chair for Healthy Community Practices at Penn Nursing, is the new dean of the New York University College of Nursing, effective July 1, 2012. Dr. SullivanMarx served as associate dean for practice and community affairs at Penn Nursing since 2003. She was instrumental in the growth and success of the School’s Living Independently For Elders (LIFE) program, the Penn Nursing Consultation Service, and the School’s Center for Professional Development. Her research on outcomes of care for frail older adults and sustaining models of care using advanced practice nurses continues to affect health policy on local and national levels.

 Susan Weiss Behrend, Nu’80, GNu’86, served as the

2011 Health Manpower Development Programme nurse expert at the National Cancer Center in Singapore. Ms. Behrend presented a program on radiation oncology nursing. She currently serves as an oncology clinical nurse specialist at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

Steven Rabinowitz, Nu’80, GNu’84, writes of the recent arrival of his fourth grandchild, Chloe Lynn, in Surfside, S.C., joining brother Jonathan, and cousins Halie and Shawn of Henrico, Va. He works as a certified registered nurse anesthetist at the University of Virginia Health Systems. His beekeeping hobby yielded 40 lbs. of honey this year. Debra Censits Donnally, Nu’81, GNu’83, was inducted in Penn’s Athletic Hall of Fame on May 5. She was joined at the ceremony by her husband, Andrew J. Donnally, W’81, and her sons Matthew R. Donnally, C’08; Timothy S. Donnally, ENG’11; and Conor J. Donnally. Ms. Donally earned varsity letters in field hockey and women’s lacrosse all four of her years at Penn. She was the first Penn Nursing student to compete in four years of varsity athletics in either of those sports. She was a four-starter in field hockey and earned firstteam All-Ivy selections her junior and senior years. Ms. Donnally earned second-team AllIvy selections in lacrosse those years as well. At defense, she helped lead the Quakers to the Final Four in lacrosse in 1980, where they finished in third place. This remains the program’s best defensive season to date. Valerie Teaford Cotter, GNu’83, was appointed

program director of the newly combined adultgerontology primary care nurse practitioner program at Penn Nursing. She is an advanced senior lecturer in the Biobehavioral Health Sciences Department and has served in progressive leadership capacities within the adult health and gerontology nurse practitioner programs since 1986. Dr. Cotter is certified as a nurse practitioner in adult health primary care and in gerontology and is a fellow in the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She is also a past recipient of the Penn Provost’s Award for Distinguished Teaching.


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Beth Ann Swan, GNu’83, GRN’96, was appointed dean of the Jefferson School of Nursing at Thomas Jefferson University. She had been serving as the acting dean of the school since July 2011. She has served on various Jefferson committees, including the distance learning working group, support strategic planning committee, the university web presence steering committee, and the educational mission strategic planning committee. Dr. Swan is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and was named a Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow from 2007-2010. She received the Nightingale Award of Pennsylvania for Excellence in Nursing Research in 2009. She currently serves as a primary mentor for the RWJ Nurse Faculty Scholars program and is a member of the

editorial board of the Journal of Nursing Education and the MEDSURG Nursing manuscript review panel. Andrea Lampert, Nu’84, was appointed director of client services for Pinstripe Healthcare. Pinstripe provides recruitment outsourcing for the healthcare industry and is located in Brookfield, Wis. Ms. Lampert was previously vice president of talent acquisition and corporate human resources for RehabCare Group in St. Louis. Mary Zemyan Polito, GNu’86, received her doctorate in nursing practice from Duquesne University summa cum laude. Dr. Polito is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown. She and her husband, Dr. Joseph Polito, have two daughters, Sara and Catherine.

Diane Spatz, Nu’86, GNu’89, Gr’95, a Penn Nursing faculty member and national expert on breastfeeding met Dr. Nicholas Alipui, director of UNICEF Programmes, at the Fourth Annual Summit on Breastfeeding in Washington, D.C., in June. Divina G. Grossman, GRN’89, was elected in

January to a two-year term as chairwoman of the board of directors for the Health Foundation of South Florida, a nonprofit grantmaking organization focused on improving health for residents in Broward, Miami-Dade, and Monroe Counties. On April 19, Dr. Grossman was appointed chancellor of the University of Massachusetts’s Dartmouth campus. Previously, she served as the vice president of engagement at Florida International University.

SUPPORTING STUDENTS “Every day we see the impact of nurses on the health and lives of the patients we serve. The Friends of Penn Nursing scholarship program allows us to support tomorrow’s nurses through financial aid. What a wonderful gift to the future… helping make a Penn Nursing education possible for a deserving student ready to make a difference in the world.”

Mark and Ann Baiada Bayada Home Health Care® 2012 Chairs of the Friends of Penn Nursing program The Baiada family with Dean Afaf Meleis in Bayada Plaza, leading to Fagin Hall.

The Friends of Penn Nursing program provides financial aid to Penn Nursing undergraduate and graduate students each year. For more information on how you can support students, contact Desirée Carr at 215.898.1665 or carrd@nursing.upenn.edu 37


Penn Nursing Alumni Board members and 2012 Alumni Weekend representatives with Penn President Amy Gutmann at the Penn Nursing tent.

Janine Winant Cooper, Nu’03, and Jon

 Roberta Lorene Waite, GNu’93, was appointed to a

three-year term on the board of Catholic Health East, beginning February 2012. She is an associate professor of nursing and assistant dean of faculty integration and evaluation of community programs for Drexel University’s College of Nursing and Health and associate faculty in the Center for Health Equity in Drexel’s School of Public Health. Joanne P. Robinson, G’94, Gr’95, was

appointed the first dean of the Rutgers University School of Nursing in Camden, effective December 19, 2011. She had been serving as acting dean since July 1, 2011. Previously, she was chairwoman of RutgersCamden’s Department of Nursing, the predecessor to the nursing school. Kathryn G. Bowles, Gr’96, has been appointed the director of the Center for Integrative Science in Aging at Penn Nursing. Dr. Bowles is the Ralston House Endowed Term Chair Professor at the School. A story on her recent work appears on page 30.

Cooper, C’03, WG’09, welcomed the birth of their first son, Gilbert Alexander Cooper, on February 5, 2012. They now reside in Denver, where Janine completed her MSN, and now works as a nurse practitioner in psychiatric nursing. Lt. Leigh Courtney Bastable, Nu’05, was married to Lt. Edward Scott Poitevent on September 24, 2011, at the Chapel of the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. Following graduation in 2005, Mrs. Poitevent entered the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps. She has had two tours in the Middle East, and her husband has had five deployments in the Middle East. They will both begin graduate programs at the University of Virginia this fall. Lt. Amanda Turney Mosko, Nu’07, lost her

husband, Lt. Christopher E. Mosko, in an improvised explosive device (IED) attack in Afghanistan on April 26. He was serving as a Navy Explosives Ordinance Demolition Officer, part of a special forces team tasked with disconnecting roadside bombs.

J. Margo Brooks Carthon, GR’08, was awarded a grant

from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to conduct a national survey of minority student recruitment and retention efforts in nursing schools across the U.S. She is an assistant professor at Penn Nursing and is among a select group of junior investigators from the RWJF New Connections program to receive this two-year $75,000 grant. Meredith D. Boehm, Nu’09, C’09, was recently engaged to John Palusci, C’09. Ms. Boehm is a critical care nurse in the heart and vascular intensive care unit at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The couple lives in the Fitler Square neighborhood of Philadelphia and currently performs with the Pennsylvania Symphonic Winds, a premiere wind ensemble in the Philadelphia area. A June wedding is planned at the Lyman Estate in Waltham, Ma.

 Regina Hendricks-Halliday, Nu’01, GNu’06,

and her husband Scott, welcomed the birth of their daughter, Charlotte Ruth Halliday, on November 14, 2011. She joins their two other children, Scott (four years old) and Micheal (two years old).

Dean Afaf Meleis met with Penn alumni in San Diego, including alumni club president Robby Foss, C’92, GEd’92 (left of Dean Meleis), in July.

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UPfront | Fall 2012

 James Calderwood, Nu’12, W’12, has been

selected as a Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholar for 2012. One of 15 individuals selected for this honor, Mr. Calderwood will spend 11 weeks in Washington, D.C., where he will learn firsthand about health policy and the policymaking process. He will work in Congressional offices, complete a health policy analysis project, and participate in events sponsored by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, which established the Barbara Jordan Scholars Program in 2000.


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In Memoriam

 Rose Costa Brown, NEd’37, Newcastle, Calif. During World War II, Ms. Brown served twoand-a-half years aboard the Navy Hospital ship U.S.S. Consolation with the rank of Lieutenant Junior Grade in the Nurse Corps. Ms. Brown then worked as a school nurse in the Auburn Union Elementary School District for 33 years until her retirement in 1979. She and her husband Stephen, who preceded her in death in October 2000, were married for 54 years. Ms. Brown is survived by her sister Amelia DiGirolamo and many nephews and nieces.

children: Frank S. Oyer, Jr. (Nancy); Sharon Henegan; Katherine Oyer; and Nancy Blum (Fred). She is also survived by six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. M. Elizabeth Schwab Burke, Ed’44, GEd’55,

Malvern, Pa. Ruth Rowan Wallace, Ed’44, Upper Darby, Pa.

Jane Pickett, HUP’42, Vineland, N.J.

Reba Hewitt Thompson, HUP’45, Rogers, Ark. Ms. Thompson was a member of the Cadet Nurse Corps during World War II, and later graduated from Loyola University in Chicago with a BSN in Public Health. She served as head nurse of the Tuberculosis Control Department of Chicago, before moving to Webster City, Il., to become the administrator of Public Health Nurse Service in Hamilton County. She later completed postgraduate work at the University of Iowa to become a pediatric nurse practitioner. Ms. Thompson also participated in Public Health Seminars in the U.S.S.R. in 1979. She retired in 1984 and moved to Arkansas with her husband. She remained an avid traveler and an active member of the Community Church in Bella Vista and other community organizations until her death. She is survived by her daughter, Mary Beth Link; son, Bruce L. Thompson; and grandchildren, David Link, and Brian and Beth Thompson.

Lillian Popovich, NEd’42, Johnstown, Pa.

Ann Hansen Burley, Ed’46, Seattle, Wash.

Thelma Thornberg, HUP’42, Houston, Texas

Mary A. Dooner, NEd’47, Trenton, N.J.

Grayce M. Duncan, Ed’43, Kingsport, Tenn.

Alberta Martin, Ed’47, GEd’48, Collegeville, Pa. Ms. Martin grew up with eight siblings in South Carolina and North Philadelphia. She graduated from William Penn High School in 1936 and graduated from Mercy-Douglass Hospital School of Nursing in Philadelphia in 1942. In March 1945, she was commissioned as a lieutenant and was one of 20 black nurses to serve in an integrated unit in Fort Meade, Md. She went on to receive her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing from Penn. She was the author of numerous articles and book reviews in nursing journals. After retiring in 1978, she was a volunteer teacher’s aide at the Emlen School and tutored at LankenauGermantown Motivation School. She is survived by nieces and nephews.

Lois Knodel Edelmann, NEd’37, Juno Beach,

Fla. Dorothy Peters, HUP’39, Coal Township, Pa. Mary Beaman Wilgus, NEd’39, Milwaukee, Wis. Ms. Wilgus was born in Philadelphia, Pa., and raised in Winchendon, Mass. After retiring from the Lutheran Home as assistant director of nursing in 1980, she traveled widely and enjoyed many years with her friends and the caring staff at Luther Haven.

 Bessie Mae Fulton Wittstrom, HUP’41,

Louisville, Colo.

Mary R. Lau, Ed’43, York, Pa. Marion Oyer, HUP’44, Stroudsburg, Pa. Ms. Oyer was a nurse at Pocono Medical Center in East Stroudsburg for more than 20 years, and after retiring, she worked part-time at Laurel Manor Nursing Home in Stroudsburg. While at Penn, she answered the call of Army recruiters who urged her to serve her country as an Army nurse. She enlisted as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps soon after graduation and was stationed at the U.S. Army Hospital in the Panama Canal Zone where many wounded soldiers from the Pacific front were sent to recover. She served until honorably discharged in 1946. Ms. Oyer is survived by four of her

Jean Lauer Myers, HUP’47, Elizabethtown, Pa. She is survived by her brother, Jerry B. Lauer; her three children, Jean C. Ulmer, HUP’68; Cyndi L. Callen; and Jerry L. Callen; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Her sister-in-law, Anne Warrington Lauer, HUP’47, writes, “She was my classmate and dear friend for life, having introduced me to her brother who married me in 1949. She was the most caring person and truly loved nursing. She was born to help people be healthy and happy. Her nursing career was never interrupted for long, having worked as a school nurse, in a doctor’s office, hospital, and nursing home. She was active in her church, as a lifelong Lutheran and had friends everywhere. Her family gave her great joy and she was always fun with her contagious sense of humor. … I’m one of many who miss her.”

Jean Lauer Myers, HUP’47 (right) with daughter Jean Callen Ulmer, HUP’68

Pollyanna Schaeffer (Parsons) Peters, HUP’47, Allentown, Pa. Ms. Peters owned and

operated the Quiet Woman Antiques for 30 years before her retirement. She was preceded in death by her husband, Dr. Ray F. Peters, Jr., a practicing dentist in Allentown for over 50 years. Ms. Peters was an active member of the St. James United Church of Christ in Allentown, served on the board of the Lehigh County Historical Society and was president of Cotillion Club. She was also a member of the Emmaus and Lower Macungie Historical Societies. She enjoyed playing the piano, gardening, collecting antiques, and spending time with her family. She is survived by her sons; Dr. Ray F. Peters, III (Gretchen); Captain Andrew D. Peters, DC, USN (Cindy); daughter, Jennifer S. Weiss; sister, Constance Kavounas; Gloria Bollendorf; brother, Richard Huebner; and 3 grandchildren.

www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Esther R. Shroyer, HUP’47, Wayne, Pa.

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Anne M. Nager, HUP’55, Daphne, Ala.

Arline (Patton) Towne, HUP’47, Ocean Isle Beach, N.C. Mrs. Towne is survived by her sons, William F. Towne (Ann), and Jeffrey R. Towne (Barb); two daughters, Sarah P. Towne and Bonny T. Reinert; brother, Alan R. Patton (Carol); seven grandchildren, and five greatgrandchildren.

MaryAnn C. Buerkle, Ed’50, Warren, Pa.

Ruth B. Daniels, Nu’57, GEd’61, Harrisburg, Pa.

Ida Levin Engel, NEd’48, Charleston, S.C.

Mrs. Engel was a graduate of the Albert Einstein Medical Center School of Nursing in Philadelphia, Pa., and she served in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps during World War II. She retired from the Medical University of South Carolina as a registered nurse and was a member of Synagogue Emanu-El. She is survived by her husband; daughter Francine Engel Robin; sons Dr. Michael J. Engel and Dr. Andrew I. Engel; and eight grandchildren. Sarah Mcculloch, HUP’48, Longmont, Colo. Helen V. Foerst, Ed’49, Rockville, Md. Ms.

Foerst, a World War II veteran, served 36 years as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service and retired in 1991. She served in the Nursing Education and Mental Health programs of the Department of Health and Human Services. A New Jersey native, Mrs. Foerst graduated from the Jersey City Medical Center School of Nursing. She went on to receive her bachelor’s degree from Penn and a master’s degree from New York University, specializing in nursing education and public health nursing. Her awards include the Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal and Meritorious Service Medal. Mrs. Foerst is survived by sisters Anna Taborn and Ruth Foerst; brother Robert J. Foerst; and nephews and nieces. Miriam F. Kyle, Ed’49, Laurel Springs, N.J.

Mrs. Buerkle graduated from Sheffield High School in 1943, and Hamot Hospital’s School of Nursing in 1946, before attending Penn. She worked as a teaching nurse at the Warren State Hospital, the Illinois State Mental Hospital in Chicago, and as a school nurse for the Warren County School District. In 1998, she received the Community Service Award from the Warren County Chamber of Commerce. Mrs. Buerkle is survived by daughters Lynn Sears (Robert); Jean Reynolds (R. Kim); Lois Buerkle (Richard Brodkin); and son, Donald Buerkle (Minnie). She is also survived by 13 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; two sisters-in-law; one aunt; and several nieces, nephews, and cousins.

 Dorothy Fanning Cherney, Nu’60, Newark, N.Y. Valene P. Ciesluk Komorowski, HUP’60,

Mrs. Thomsson is survived by her husband Arne; two sons, David Thomsson (Patricia) and Eric Thomsson (Ann); daughter, Laura Thomsson; sister, Eleanor Chworowsky; and three grandchildren. Jeanne Depew Attenborough, NEd’53, Palo

Anne Trinkle Baker, Nu’64, Pottsville, Pa.

Alto, Calif. Mrs. Attenborough was trained as a nurse at Moses Taylor Hospital and Penn. After obtaining her RN certification, she worked as a visiting nurse in Scranton. In 1956, she married her high school sweetheart, Dick Attenborough. They moved to East Orange, N.J., where she joined the Visiting Nurse Association of Elizabeth, N.J. Following the birth of their daughter, Suzanne, Mrs. Attenborough retired from nursing. She completed her bachelor’s degree in nursing at Wilkes College, taking summer classes. She is survived by her daughter; son-in-law, Jack Berg; and granddaughter, Cally Berg.

Thelma J. Smith, GNu’64, Lansdowne, Pa.

Barbara Thomsson, HUP’50, Monroe, N.J.

Pauline H. Hardin, HUP’53, Nu’60, Little Rock,

Ark.

Ruth Denn Ellsworth, Ed’49, GEd’58, Fort

Dorothy Jenkins Kaufmann, Nu’53,

Myers, Fla.

Manassas, Va. Cora Miller, NEd’53, Honey Brook, Pa.

UPfront | Fall 2012

Betty Weil, Nu’57, Palm Beach, Fla.

Lewes, Del. She spent the majority of her nursing career as the school nurse of the Shenandoah Valley School District. Mrs. Komorowski also taught the medical assistant program at SIBT in Pottsville, Pa. She was an avid world traveler and a cancer survivor for the past 30 years. She is survived by her daughter, Kimberly Ann Kufro; her granddaughter, Amber Dominitis; her sister, Vivian Paulikonis (Jack); her brother-in law Lee Komorowski (Laura); her niece, Stephanie; sister-in-law, Clare Cieslukowski, and her daughters, Vivian Beck and Antoinette; and friends Sally Malocu and Joseph Alshon.

Alice Cope Uchno, Ed’49, Honey Brook, Pa.

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Geraldine L. Ellis, GEd’57, Altamonte Springs,

Fla.

Lorraine M. McGill, Nu’66, Parkville, Md. Kathryn Tash Seeger, Nu’66, Broomall, Pa. Lorraine C. Campbell, GNu’67, Farmingdale,

N.J. Ida Ellis, Nu’67, Pittston, Pa. Mrs. Ellis

graduated in 1945 from Tunkhannock High School and then went on to receive her RN from the Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing before studying at Penn Nursing. She spent most of her career employed at Hahnemann Hospital in Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center. Mrs. Ellis is survived by sisters, Helen Biles, Esther Alt (Ted), and Mildred Ellis; her brothers, Albert Ellis (Charlotte); Bud Ellis (Ann); and nieces and nephews.


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Nancy Guardino Safer, Nu’68, Higganum, Conn. After studying at Penn Nursing, Ms. Safer earned her master’s degree from Rush University. Mrs. Safer devoted her career to nursing education and healthcare quality improvement. She is survived by her children, Meredith Safer Guardino and Peter Safer, and extended family and friends.

graduate of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, went on to earn her bachelor’s degree from Penn Nursing and became a certified nurse practitioner. She is survived by brother Masahiro Iwata (Carolyn); and sisters Misao Walck (Roger), Michi Muchisky (Thomas), and Misono Miller (Ronald); 10 nephews and nieces, and 16 great-nephews and great-nieces.

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Ira Burgess Lawson, Nu’73, Wharton, Texas.

Virginia Beyer Ives, Nu’71, Wilmington, Del. Mrs. Ives was an alumna of Avon Grove High School, Thomas Jefferson University, as well as Penn. She was an RN in quality management and retired from the Veterans Affairs Hospital. Mrs. Ives enjoyed reading mysteries and experiencing new places, and she valued academics, nature, and public broadcasting. She was also a longtime member of the Unitarian Universalist Church. Mrs. Ives is survived by two daughters, Varesha Mauney (Jay), and Alisia Ives; two grandchildren; sisters, Alisanne Beyer and Edithanne Wilhide (Wayne); stepbrother, Robert Buzzard (Candace); and stepsister Cynthia Harrell (Haywood).

Gwendolyn S. Nissel, Nu’73, Los Angeles,

Irene B. Pentecost, GNu’71, Troy, N.Y. Evelyn S. Schlager, Nu’71, Cape Coral, Fla. Mrs. Schlager was born in Philadelphia and graduated from the Mount Sinai School of Nursing. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Penn Nursing while raising two children, and went on to become the first director of nurses at the then-new JFK Hospital in South New Jersey, where she helped create the nursing program. Mrs. Schlager enjoyed reading, and volunteered to write Braille books for the blind, filed with the Library of Congress. She is preceded in death by her husband of 64 years, Martin Schlager. Mrs. Schlager is survived by her two sons, Robert (Reina) and Louis (Sandi), and three grandchildren. Miki Iwata, Nu’72, Saint Louis, Miss. Retired from the U.S. Naval Nurse Corps, Captain Iwata had enlisted in the Navy in 1966 and served in Vietnam on the U.S.S. Sanctuary and on the U.S.S. Yosemite, among the first women to serve on a Navy ship. Capt. Iwata, a

Calif.

 M. Bernadette Hogan, GNu’80, West Pittston, Pa. Born in 1921, Mrs. Hogan was a graduate of Coughlin High School and Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. She served as a nurse in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Mrs. Hogan earned her bachelor’s degree at Misericordia College in Dallas, Pa., where she later became a professor. In addition to her master’s degree from Penn Nursing, Mrs. Hogan went on to receive a master’s degree in guidance from the University of Scranton. She is survived by her sons, Joseph and John Hogan; daughters, Dr. Bernadette Hogan, Margaret Ann Connolly, Marie Barron, Patricia Whaley, Michele Duffy, and Helene Dougherty; 17 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren. Debra L. Hein, GNu’81, West Hartford, Conn.

Mrs. Hein passed away at age 59, after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. She was a certified nurse midwife who practiced for many years at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. She dedicated her work to midwifery, obstetrics, and gynecology, and delivered more than a thousand babies over the course of her career. Mrs. Hein was committed to her family, her patients, and the advancement of medicine and healing. She donated her body for research to the department of anatomy at the University of Connecticut. Mrs. Hein is survived by her sons, Douglas and Daniel Hein; brothers Arthur Hein and George Hein (Kay Wygal); and many family members and friends. Elizabeth L. Dickason, GNu’83, Wallingford, Pa.

 Margaret S. Lawler, GNu’92, Ridley Park, Pa. Mrs. Lawler was a longtime parishioner of St. Matthew’s Roman Catholic Parish in Conshohocken and an active member of the Plymouth Country Club. She graduated from St. Matthew’s High School, where she also attended the sewing school. Mrs. Lawler enjoyed spending time with her family, reading, gardening, and vacationing in Avalon, N.J. She is preceded in death by her husband, Joseph J. Lawler, Sr. She is survived by two sons, Joseph, Jr. (Kathleen Byrnes) and Michael (Valere Marmarou); a daughter, Patricia (John Fielder); a sister, Dorothy Casey Savaso; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

 Katherine M. Bayer, Nu’08, GNu’10,

Philadelphia, Pa. Ms. Bayer passed away after a long battle with leukemia. In addition to her degrees from Penn Nursing, she graduated with honors from Vassar College with a degree in cognitive science. Ms. Bayer enjoyed writing stories, making pottery, and poetry. She was also an avid swimmer and cyclist. Ms. Bayer leaves behind many devoted family members and friends.

 Dulcy Sacan, GNu’11, Drexel Hill, Pa. Ms. Sacan earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Ohio State University and a master’s degree in midwifery and women’s healthcare from Penn Nursing. Ms. Sacan was also a fabric artist and was pursuing certification in massage therapy. She is survived by her husband, Ahmet; daughter Kayra; her mother, Heidi Nemeth; sisters Summer (Eugene Rhee) and Audrey Nemeth; brother, Paul Nemeth; and niece Alyssa Rhee. She also leaves behind grandparents Peggy Hirz, John Robert “Opa” Stock, and Irene and Charles Portt.

This listing reflects notifications received between December 1, 2011 and June 1, 2012. To submit an Alumni Note or an In Memoriam listing, please send your text and photos to nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu. Submissions will be edited for space and style considerations. www.nursing.upenn.edu

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          

Penn Nursing Alumni Board The Penn Nursing Alumni Board represents you in planning activities, programs, and professional opportunities. The board is always looking for alumni interested in giving back and advancing their professional networks by involvement on the board. For information on joining the board or a project-focused committee, please email nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu or call 215.898.9773. Meet the 2012-2013 Penn Nursing Alumni Board:

Fall 2012 - Spring 2013 Events Calendar October 4

Dean’s annual State of the School Address October 5

Doctoral Program Open House jkatzenb@nursing.upenn.edu

President

Nominating Committee Members

Terri Cox Glassen, Nu’91

Kate Bowles, Nu’07 Sarah Farkash, Nu’06, GNu’10 Pamela Mack-Brooks, GNu’96 Ellen McCabe, Nu’88, GNu ’91 Kathryn Sugerman, Nu’91, GNu’93

October 18, 3-5pm

Recent Graduate Representatives

October 26-27

Katelin Hoskins, Nu’07, GNu’08, GNu’12 Meredith Mooney-Levin, Nu’11 Angela Nguyen, Nu’12 Lorelei Phillips, Nu’12 Sharon “Ainsley” Sutton, Nu’12

Homecoming featuring Arts & Culture Weekend, the Penn v. Brown football game, and Nurse Networking from 11am-12pm, October 27.

Past President

Naomi H. Higuchi, Nu’86, GNu’92, GNu’97 Secretary

Brian Bixby, GNu’97 Vice President for Alumni Support

Open Vice President for Student & School Support

Ashley Zampini, Nu’07, GNu’10 Board of Directors

Jacob Bevilacqua, Nu’09 Maya N. Clark, Nu’03, GNu’06 Mary Walton, Nu’74, GNu’81 Young Alumni Representatives

Kelley Baumgartel, N’06, GNu’08 Amelia Cataldo, Nu’11 Stephanie Chu, Nu’05, GNu’08 Geebin Mak, Nu’04

Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy featuring the inaugural recipient, Dr. Terri Lipman of Penn Nursing

November 3 Ex-Officio Member

HUP Alumni President Candace Stiklorius, HUP’66, Nu’71, GNu’83

Graduate Programs Open House jkatzenb@nursing.upenn.edu November 28

Ad Hoc Member

Katherine P. Gallagher, GNu’96

Healthy Cities: Healthy Women, Los Angeles featuring Halle Berry; Dean Afaf Meleis; Jonathan Fielding, Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health; and Robert Ross, President and Chief Executive Officer, The California Endowment December 31

Conclusion of Penn’s Making History Campaign April 4

Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Lecture and Award April 19-20 Penn’s first BSN class, 1957 graduates, with University President Amy Gutmann and Dean Afaf Meleis, celebrate 125 years of Nursing during Alumni Weekend 2012.

2012 Alumni Award Winners honored at Alumni Weekend Congratulations to the following alumni award winners who were honored along with faculty award winners during Alumni Weekend 2012. Several winners flew from across the country to attend the ceremony! Outstanding Alumni Award for Leadership in Nursing

Mary Rubin, Nu’74, GNu’82, GRN’92 Expert Alumni Award for Clinical Excellence

Noreen Compas Thompson, Nu’72, GNu’76 Recent Alumni Award for Clinical Excellence

Jamille Nagtalon-Ramos, GNu’03 Lillian Sholtis Brunner Alumni Award for Innovative Practice

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Preview Weekend for admitted high school seniors and their families. smithmar@nursing.upenn.edu April 19

Penn’s “Making History” Campaign Celebration at Penn Park

Alumni Legacy Award

Kathleen Shaver, HUP’76 Student Alumni Award

Angela Nguyen, Nu’12 Honorary Nursing Alumni Award

Rosemarie Greco Midwifery and Women’s Health Master’s Program Award Winners

Ruth York, Nu’73 and Joyce Thompson In recognition of innovative and outstanding contributions to advanced nursing practice in women’s health

Save the Date! May 10-12 Alumni Weekend 2013

Penn Nursing Alumni Weekend featuring a Healthcare Administration Master’s Program Reunion, the Faculty and Alumni Awards program, legacy breakfast, and the traditional picnic and parade. nursalum@pobox.upenn.edu or 215.898.4841


FACULTY NEWS Faculty Honors Katherine Abbott Faculty Research Award, Penn Nursing Linda H. Aiken Elected Member, John Morgan Society, University of Pennsylvania; Dean’s Award for Exemplary Citizenship, Penn Nursing Kathryn H. Bowles Barbara J. Lowery DSO Faculty Award, Penn Nursing; Biobehavioral Health System Department Award for Faculty Mentorship Christine K. Bradway Fellow, American Academy of Nursing

Jane Kaufman Faculty Excellence Award and invited graduation speaker, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing Lisa M. Lewis Fellow, American Academy of Nursing Jianghong Liu Fellow, American Academy of Nursing William F. McCool Dean’s Award for Exemplary Professional Practice, Penn Nursing; the Joan Lynaugh Faculty Mentorship Award, Penn Nursing

Faculty Appointments and Promotions Appointment of Deborah E. Becker to Assistant Dean for Innovations in Simulation Promotion of Joseph I. Boullata to Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing Promotion of Kathryn H. Bowles to Professor of Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing and appointed as the Ralston House Endowed Term Chair in Gerontological Nursing and director of the Center for Integrative Science in Aging

Cynthia A. Connolly Dean’s Award for Exemplary Teaching, Penn Nursing

Matthew D. McHugh Nurse Faculty Scholar, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Doctoral Student Mentored Research Award, Penn Nursing; Undergraduate Student Mentored Research Award, Penn Nursing; Dean’s Award for Undergraduate Scholarly Mentorship, Penn Nursing; Fellow, American Academy of Nursing

Valerie T. Cotter Appreciation Award, Alzheimer’s Association

Salimah H. Meghani Fellow, American Academy of Nursing

Martha A. Q. Curley Elizabeth McWilliams Founders Award for Excellence in Research, Sigma Theta Tau International; Distinguished Research Lecturer Award, American Association of Critical Care Nurses; Distinguished Investigator Award, American College of Critical Care Medicine

Afaf I. Meleis Elected Member, John Morgan Society, University of Pennsylvania: Founding Board Member, Academy of Women’s Health; Member of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Advisory Committee on Research on Women’s Health; Co-Chair of the Lancet-Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) Commission on Women and Health

Appointment of Martha A.Q. Curley, Professor of Nursing, as the Ellen and Robert Kapito Professor of Nursing Science

Jamille K. Nagtalon-Ramos Recent Alumni Award for Clinical Excellence, Penn Nursing Alumni Association

Appointment of Julie A. Fairman, Professor of Nursing, as the Nightingale Professor in Nursing

Charlene W. Compher Doctoral Student Mentored Research Award, Penn Nursing

Patricia D’Antonio Penn Fellow, University of Pennsylvania; Lavinia Dock Award from the American Association for the History of Nursing for American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority, and the Meaning of Work; Killebrew-Censtis Endowed Term Chair in Undergraduate Education, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing; Lavinia Dock Award from the American Association for the History of Nursing for American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority, and the Meaning of Work; Relationship-Based Care, Nursing Excellence Award, Pennsylvania Hospital Department of Nursing for American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority, and the Meaning of Work; American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year (History and Public Policy) for American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority and the Meaning of Work; Fellow, College of Physicians of Philadelphia Dawn C. Durain Award for Teaching Excellence by Non-Standing Faculty, Penn Nursing; Award for Excellence in Teaching, American College of Nurse Midwives Mary Ersek Dean’s Award for Exemplary Teaching, Penn Nursing; Fellow, Palliative Care Nursing-Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association; Faculty Research Award, Penn Nursing Lois K. Evans Award for Pioneering Contributions to Geropsychiatric Nursing, Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association Julie A. Fairman Elected Member, John Morgan Society, University of Pennsylvania

Mary D. Naylor Elected Member, John Morgan Society, University of Pennsylvania Ann L. O’Sullivan Member, Board of Directors, National Council of State Boards of Nursing Barbara Reale Fellow, American College of Nurse Midwives

Promotion of Christine K. Bradway to Associate Professor of Gerontological Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing Appointment of Anne Marie Walsh Brennan to Practice Associate Professor of Nursing Promotion of Charlene W. Compher to Professor of Nutrition Science in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing

Appointment of Patricia D’Antonio, Associate Professor of Nursing, as the Killebrew-Censits Term Chair in Undergraduate Education

Promotion of Wendy Grube to Practice Assistant Professor of Nursing Appointment of Eun-Ok Im, Professor of Nursing, as the Marjorie O. Rendell Endowed Professor in Healthy Nursing Transitions Appointment of Eileen V. Lake, Associate Professor of Nursing, as the Jessie M. Scott Term Chair in Nursing and Health Policy

Lorie Reilly Editorial Board Member, Journal of Radiology Nursing

Promotion of Jianghong Liu to Associate Professor of Nursing with tenure in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing

Therese Richmond Doctoral Student Mentored Research Award, Penn Nursing

Promotion of Salimah H. Meghani to Associate Professor of Nursing with tenure in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing

Barbara J. Riegel Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award; Elected Member, John Morgan Society, University of Pennsylvania

Promotion of Therese S. Richmond to Andrea B. Laporte Endowed Term Professor of Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing

Marilyn Sawyer Sommers Elected Member, John Morgan Society, University of Pennsylvania Carol A. Vincent Caroline Langstadter Mentor/Preceptor Award for Excellence in Nursing, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Alfred Giosa, Jr. Undergraduate Award for Teaching, Penn Nursing

Barbra Mann Wall Evan C. Thompson Endowed Term Chair of Excellence in Teaching, Penn Nursing; Award for Excellence in Advising, Trustees Council of Penn Women’s 25th Anniversary Award

Loretta Sweet Jemmott Helen O. Dickens Lifetime Achievement Award, Women of Color at Penn

Victoria Weill Outstanding Nurse Educator Award, Graduate Student Organization, Penn Nursing

Appointment of Barbara J. Riegel, Professor of Nursing, as the Edith Clemmer Steinbright Chair of Gerontology Promotion of Diane L. Spatz to Professor of Perinatal Nursing in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing Promotion of Anne M. Teitelman to Associate Professor of Nursing with tenure in the Standing Faculty of the School of Nursing and appointed as Patricia Bleznak Silverstein and Howard A. Silverstein Endowed Term Chair in Global Women’s Health

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Research Grants Katherine Abbott Social networks in long-term care: Pilot testing novel approaches to measurement Francis E. Parker Memorial Home 7/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Katherine Abbott Assessing longitudinal changes in social networks & health related quality of life among longterm services and support recipients School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Katherine Abbott Linda H. Aiken RN4CAST: Nurse forecasting: Human resources planning in nursing European Commission 1/1/2009–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Linda H. Aiken Norway project–RN4CAST Norwegian Knowledge Center for the Health Services 6/1/2010–5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Linda H. Aiken Nursing and quality of hospital care in United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates Ministry of Health 6/1/2010–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Linda H. Aiken Nursing impact on care outcomes for chronically ill and minority patients National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR004513) 6/1/2010–5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Linda H. Aiken Co-Investigators: Matthew McHugh, Ann Kutney-Lee, Douglas Sloane Policy-relevant evidence to advance the future of nursing The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 4/15/2012–4/14/2013 Principal Investigator: Linda H. Aiken Kamila Alexander A grounded theory of sexuality and sexual safety among Black emerging adult women Sigma Theta Tau 6/1/2011–9/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Kamila Alexander Joseph I. Boullata A long term, open label study with teduglutide for subjects with parenteral nutrition dependent short bowel syndrome who completed study Cl0600-020 NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 7/1/2009–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Joseph I. Boullata Drug compatibility and stability in enteral nutrition A.S.P.E.N. Rhoads Research Foundation 1/1/2011–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Joseph I. Boullata Co-Investigator: Juan Muniz Kathryn H. Bowles Getting the right care for the right patient: Breaking the cycle of heart failure readmissions Edna G. Kynett Memorial Foundation, Inc. 11/1/2010–10/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Kathryn H. Bowles

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Decision support: Optimizing post-acute referrals and effect on patient outcomes National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR007674) 9/29/2010–6/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Kathryn H. Bowles Co-Investigators: Mary D. Naylor, John Holmes, Sarah Ratcliffe

J. Margo Brooks Carthon Nurse practice environment influences in reducing disparities in hospital outcome National Institute of Nursing Research (K01-NR012006) 7/1/2010–5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon Mentor: Linda Aiken

Patient and provider perspectives on reasons for hospital readmission Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute 2012–2015 Principal Investigator: Stephen Kimmel Co-Investigator: Kathryn H. Bowles

Defining a set of nursing performance measures to reduce hospital readmissions among older adults School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/1/2012–4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Ann M. Kutney-Lee Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon

Comparative effectiveness of intensive home health and MD visits in heart failure Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (RO1HS020257) 9/30/11–3/31/14 Principal Investigator: Christopher Murtaugh Co-Investigator: Kathryn H. Bowles

Christopher Lance Coleman Help us, save us! HIV/STI prevention intervention for high risk Black men National Institutes of Mental Health (R01-MH079739) 4/1/2007–3/31/2012 Principal Investigator: John Jemmott Co-Investigators: Christopher Lance Coleman, Loretta Sweet Jemmott

Comparative effectiveness of intensive home health and MD visits in heart failure Visiting Nurse Service of New York 9/30/11–9/29/12 Principal Investigator: Kathryn H. Bowles Barriers and facilitators to implementation and adoption of EHR in home care Drexel University 9/30/2011–9/29/2012 Co-Principal Investigator: Kathryn H. Bowles Christine K. Bradway Nurse Staffing Requirements for the Care of Obese and Non-Obese Nursing Home Residents Frank Morgan Jones Fund/Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence 7/1/2011–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Christine K. Bradway Bridgette Brawner Community-based HIV education research program for diverse racial & ethnic groups Yale University (R25-MH087217) 10/1/2011–6/30/2012 Co-Principal Investigator: Bridgette Brawner HIV/STI prevention among Black adolescents with mental illnesses Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U01PS0033004) 1/1/2012–12/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Bridgette Brawner Co-Investigator: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Alison M. Buttenheim Preliminary studies to increase uptake of oral rehydration therapy through a behavioral economic mHealth intervention University of Pennsylvania-University Peruana Cayetano Heredia Collaborative Pilot Grant Program 1/1/12–12/31/12 Co-Principal Investigator: Alison M. Buttenheim Pilot studies to improve participation in Chagas Disease vector control programs University Research Foundation 3/1/2012–2/28/2013 Principal Investigator: Alison M. Buttenheim

Charlene W. Compher The effect of teduglutide cessation on parenteral nutrition (PN) requirements in SBS: A follow-up of the CL006-004 and CL006-005 patients NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 7/1/2008–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Charlene W. Compher Pesticide residue analysis Drexel University 3/1/2012–8/31/2012 Co-Principal Investigator: Charlene W. Compher Institutional Clinical Translational and Science Award National Center for Research Resources (KL2RR024132) 9/30/2006–6/30/2016 Principal Investigator: Garrett Fitzgerald Co-Investigators: Charlene W. Compher, Karen Glanz, Barbara Medoff-Cooper The magnesium and metabolic syndrome trial– Administrative Supplement National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R21-DK078368-01A2S1) 1/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Stella L. Volpe Co-Investigators: Charlene W. Compher, Justine Shults, Richard Dunbar, Joseph I. Boullata, Winifred Connerton Americans abroad - How nurses represented the country, the women and the national mission Rockefeller Archive Center 3/1/2011–2/28/2012 Principal Investigator: Winifred Connerton Cynthia A. Connolly State(s) of health: The Commonwealth Fund, child development and preventive care program, 1999–2011 Commonwealth Fund 6/1/2011–5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Cynthia A. Connolly A prescription for a healthy childhood: A history of children and pharmaceuticals in the United States Investigator Award in Health Policy Research The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 6/1/2010–5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Cynthia A. Connolly


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Ruth Masterson Creber Tailoring self-care interventions Edna G. Kynett Memorial Foundation 7/1/2011–10/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Barbara J. Riegel Principal Investigator: Ruth Masterson Creber Martha A.Q. Curley Sedation management in pediatric patients with acute respiratory failure study National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U01-HL086622) 4/1/2008–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Martha A.Q. Curley Children’s Hospital Boston Center of Quality Measurement Children’s Hospital of Boston 3/1/2011–2/29/2015 Principal Investigator: Mark Schuster Co-Investigator: Martha A.Q. Curley HALF-PINT: Heart and lung failure-Pediatric Insulin Titration trial National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R01HL108028) 2011–2016 Principal Investigator: Michael Agus *Principal Investigator: Vinay Nadkarni Co-Investigator: Martha A.Q. Curley Patricia D’Antonio Nursing history review American Association for the History of Nursing 1/1/1992–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Patricia D’Antonio A history of health demonstration projects in New York City, 1920–1940 University of Pennsylvania, University Research Foundation 3/1/2011–2/29/2012 Principal Investigator: Patricia D’Antonio A history of health demonstration projects in the United States, 1920–1940 Rockefeller Archive Center 3/1/2011–2/28/2012 Principal Investigator: Patricia D’Antonio Routledge Handbook of the Global History of Nursing Routledge Press 1/1/2010–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Patricia O’Brien D’Antonio Co-Investigators: Julie A. Fairman, Jean Whelan Rethinking the global history of nursing Rockefeller Archive Center 1/1/2010–12/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Patricia O’Brien D’Antonio Co-Investigator: Julie A. Fairman A History of Health Demonstration Projects in the United States, 1920 –1940: The Perspective of the New York City Department of Health American Association for the History of Nursing 8/2012–7/2013 Principal Investigator: Patricia D’Antonio Janet A. Deatrick Quality of life of adolescent and young adult survivors of brain tumors Oncology Nursing Society 4/1/2009–9/15/2011 Principal Investigator: Janet A. Deatrick

Identifying strategies to increase engagement in clinical trials in pediatric SCD The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (RC1MD004418) 9/24/2009–7/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Larnia Barakat Co-Investigator: Janet A. Deatrick Mothers’ and fathers’ perspectives: Family management of young adult survivors of childhood brain tumors Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation 1/3/2011–1/2/2013 Principal Investigator: Janet A. Deatrick Co-Investigator: Wendy Hobbie Transition readiness of adolescent/young adult survivors of childhood cancer The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 1/1/2011–12/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Lisa Schwartz Co-Investigator: Janet A. Deatrick Bart C. De Jonghe The role of inflammation in chemotherapy-induced malaise and neuronal activation McCabe Fund 2012–2013 Principal Investigator: Bart C. De Jonghe The role of obesity in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Behavioral Research Center 2012–2013 Principal Investigator: Bart C. De Jonghe Neural Mechanism of Glucagon-Like-Peptide-1 Receptor-Mediated Nausea/Malaise National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R03-DK093874) 2012–2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew Hayes Co-Investigator: Bart C. De Jonghe Mary Ersek Nursing home pain management algorithm clinical trial Swedish Health Services (R01-NR009100) 7/1/2005–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek Pain assessment and management in residents with dementia using web-based education and informatics in rural nursing homes New York Department of Health 1/1/2008–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek Co-Investigator: Christie Teigland

Development of a Multidimensional Pain Measure for Persons with Dementia Veterans Health Administration HSR&D Merit Review Award (I01-HX000507) Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek Principal Investigator: Lynn Snow Janine Everett Skin elasticity: Explaining health disparity and differences in skin injury following sexual assault American Nurse Foundation 9/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Janine Everett Julie A. Fairman Practice politics: History of nursing 1975 to the present The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 6/1/2007–5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Julie A. Fairman Campaign for Action Research Manager The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 4/15/2012–4/14/2013 Principal Investigator: Julie A. Fairman Maureen George Patient-provider communication: CAM beliefs, attitudes, and practices National Institutes of Health (K23-AT003907) 5/1/2008–4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Maureen George Karen Glanz Enhanced evaluation of Philadelphia CPPW Obesity Initiatives Philadelphia Department of Health 9/16/2010–7/18/2012 Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz Telephone e-health communication for improving Glaucoma treatment compliance National Eye Institute (R01-EY016997) 10/1/2006–8/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Karen Glanz Developing interactive technologies to improve research and health behavior National Institute on Aging (RC2-AG036592) 9/30/2009–9/30/2012 Principal Investigator: David Asch Principal Investigator: Kevin Volpp Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz Comparative effectiveness in genomic medicine National Cancer Institute (RC-CA148310) 9/30/2009–8/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Katrina Armstrong Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz

Veteran’s Administration comprehensive end-of-life care’s Promise Center Department of Veterans Affairs 7/1/2012–9/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek

Advancing measurement and modeling of healthy food and activity U.S. Department of Agriculture (2010-85215-20659) 4/1/2010–3/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Karen Glanz

Validation of Pain Behavior and Painful Conditions and Treatments Measures School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 4/1/2011–3/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Mary Ersek

Social goals and individual incentives to promote walking in older adults The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 4/1/2012–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Karen Glanz Principal Investigator: Jason Karlawish

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Objective integrated measures of the built environment, location, and behavior National Cancer Institute 7/1/2012–6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Karen Glanz Testing the effects of anti-sugary beverage Public Service Advertisements on youth and adult audiences The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 2012 Principal Investigator: Amy Jordan Co-Investigator: Karen Glanz Pilot Testing Food Marketing Interventions in Supermarkets The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 11/01/10–10/31/12 Principal Investigator: Karen Glanz Allen Glicksman Walkability’s Impact on Senior Health National Institute of Nursing Research 2/2011–1/2013 Principal Investigator: Allen Glicksman Mary (Mamie) K. Guidera Educating Nurse-Midwives in Developing Nations: Identifying Best Practices University Research Foundation 7/1/11–12/31/12 Principal Investigator: William F. McCool Principal Investigator: Mary (Mamie) K. Guidera Nancy P. Hanrahan Organizational quality of patient care settings, nurse staffing, and nurse outcomes in psychiatric hospitals The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 9/1/2008–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Nancy P. Hanrahan Advanced practice psychiatric nurse-transitional care model to improve the quality of health care for individuals with serious mental illness The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 11/1/2010–4/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Nancy P. Hanrahan Linda Hatfield Parental attitudes regarding the participation of healthy infants in genetic research Sigma Theta Tau 6/1/2011–5/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Linda Hatfield Karen B. Hirschman Palliative needs of cognitively impaired patients during health care transitions National Institute on Aging (R03-AG040320) 9/1/2011–8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Karen B. Hirschman Co-Investigator: Alexandra L. Hanlon Eun-Ok Im Ethnic-specific Midlife Women’s Attitudes toward Physical Activity National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR010568) 6/1/2011–5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Eun-Ok Im

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Olga Jarrin Understanding the role of nursing factors in home care patient outcomes John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc. 7/1/2012–6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Olga Jarrin

Individual differences in children’s susceptibility to overeating National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R03-DK091492) 4/1/2011–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral

Evidence for a pathway to excellence in home health care American Nurse Foundation 9/1/2011–8/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Olga Jarrin

Comparison of the satiating properties of egg- versus cereal grain-based breakfasts for appetite and energy control in 8- to 10-year-old children American Egg Board 12/5/2011–12/4/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral

Loretta Sweet Jemmott Molecular and cellular biology of HIV encephalopathy National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (P01-NS027405) 8/19/2005–7/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Francisco Gonzalez-Scarano Co-Investigator: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Help us, save us! HIV/STI prevention intervention for high risk Black men National Institutes of Mental Health (R01-MH079739) 4/1/2007–3/31/2012 Principal Investigator: John Jemmott Co-Investigators: Loretta Sweet Jemmott, Christopher Lance Coleman Barbershop-based HIV/STD risk reduction for African American young men National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01-HD061061) 8/1/2009–5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Co-Investigators: John Jemmott, Christopher Lance Coleman Lorraine Katz Management of Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (U01DK061239) 9/1/2001–2/28/2012 Principal Investigator: Lorraine Katz Co-Investigator: Terri H. Lipman Treatment options for Type 2 Diabetes in adolescents and youth: Post intervention protocol The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (NIH-NIDDKU01-DK061239) 3/1/2011–2/28/2013 Principal Investigator: Lorraine Katz Co-Investigator: Terri H. Lipman Jinyoung Kim An objective snoring index and its association with carotid atherosclerosis National Institute of Nursing Research (K99NR013177) 9/28/2011–7/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Jinyoung Kim Co-Investigators: Barbara J. Riegel, Julio Chirinos, Ankit Jain, Alexandra L. Hanlon, Allan Pack, Kathy Culpepper Richards Tanja Kral Eating behaviors among weight-discordant siblings National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K01-DK078601) 4/1/2008–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral

Dietary intake, child feeding practices, and weight status in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Children and their caregivers School of Nursing, Biobehavioral Research Center 2/1/2012–1/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral Principal Investigator: Margaret C. Souders Co-Investigator: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Ann M. Kutney-Lee Change in hospital care organization and outcomes Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (K08HS018534) 9/30/2009–7/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Ann M. Kutney-Lee Mentor: Linda Aiken Defining a set of nursing performance measures to reduce hospital readmissions among older adults School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/1/2012–4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Ann M. Kutney-Lee Principal Investigator: J. Margo Brooks Carthon Eileen V. Lake Hospital nursing resource configurations and labor market contexts Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics 1/1/2011–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Eileen V. Lake Hospital nursing resource configuration and labor market contexts University of Pennsylvania, University Research Foundation 3/1/2011–2/29/2012 Principal Investigator: Eileen V. Lake The effect of nursing on NICU patient outcomes University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey 6/1/2008–3/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Jeanette Rogowksi Co-Investigator: Eileen V. Lake Lisa M. Lewis Spiritual vignettes to increase medication adherence among hypertensive Black church members Edna G. Kynett Memorial Foundation, Inc. 6/1/2011–5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Lisa M. Lewis Joseph R. Libonati Exercise and the Engraftment of Exogenously Infused Bone Marrow Cells University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Behavioral Research Center 2/1/2012–1/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Joseph R. Libonati


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Can Exercise and Bone Marrow Infusions Improve Cardiac Function in Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity? Transdisciplinary Research in Energetics and Cancer (TREC) pilot grant 6/1/12–6/1/13 National Cancer Institute (U54-CA155850) Principal Investigator: Kathryn Schmitz Co-Investigator: Joseph R. Libonati Terri H. Lipman Overcoming disparities in growth evaluations The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (R01HD057037) 7/1/2009–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Adda Grimberg Co-Investigator: Terri H. Lipman Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth: Post Intervention Protocl The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (U01-DK061239) 3/1/2011–2/29/2012 Principal Investigator: Lorraine Katz Co-Investigator: Terri H. Lipman Increasing activity in the community: Dance for health University of Pennsylvania Center for Public Health Initiatives 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Terri H. Lipman Co-investigators: Carolyn Cannuscio, Alexandra Hanlon, Joseph Libonati Increasing activity in the community: Dance for health Netter Center for Community Partnerships 6/1/2011–5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Terri H. Lipman Co-Investigator: Janet Deatrick Jianghong Liu Environmental toxicity, malnutrition, and children’s externalizing behavior National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (K01-ES015877) 9/1/2009–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Jianghong Liu

Kathleen McCauley Implementation of practice standards for ECG monitoring Yale University (R01-HL081642) 5/15/2008–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Marjorie Funk Co-Investigator: Kathleen McCauley

Barbara Medoff-Cooper Sleep patterns and maternal stress: Mothering infants with Congenital Heart Disease The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 9/1/2009–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Co-Investigators: Alexandra L. Hanlon, Sharon Irving

William F. McCool Educating Nurse-Midwives in Developing Nations: Identifying Best Practices University Research Foundation 7/1/11-12/31/12 Principal Investigator: William F. McCool Principal Investigator: Mary (Mamie) K. Guidera

Randomized clinical trial of high vs. standard-calorie formula for Methadone exposure University of Pittsburgh 7/1/2010–6/30/2012 Co-Principal Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Director: Charles Branas Co-Director: Therese Richmond

A Women’s Health and Maternity Care Center in Urban Philadelphia: A Feasibility Study 2012 Principal Investigator: William McCool Co-Investigators: Mary (Mamie) K. Guidera, Janet Lewis, Dulcy Sulcan

Transitional telehealth home care: REACH The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 9/1/2011–6/30/2016 Principal Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Co-Investigator: Kathryn Bowles

Matthew D. McHugh Nurse staffing policy, hospital occupancy, market structure, and patient outcomes Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (K08HS017551) 9/30/2008–9/29/2011 Principal Investigator: Matthew D. McHugh Mentor: Linda Aiken Hospital care environment, neighborhood characteristics, and racial disparities in outcomes for older adults The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars pilot grant 3/1/11–8/31/11 Principal Investigator: Matthew D. McHugh The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars Program The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 9/1/2011–8/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew D. McHugh

Lead exposure, externalizing behavior, and neurobiological mediating factors National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (R01-ES018858) 9/8/2010–4/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Jianghong Liu Co-Investigators: Adrian Raine, Alexandra L. Hanlon

Hospital care environment, neighborhood, and racial disparities in elder outcomes National Institute on Aging (R01-AG041099) 9/15/2011–8/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew D. McHugh Co-Investigator: Charles Branas, Douglas Sloane, Herbert Smith, Rachel Werner, Linda H. Aiken

Lead exposure, externalizing behavior, and neurobiological mediating factors - Supplement National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (R01-ES018858-02S1) 6/1/11–8/31/11 Principal Investigator: Jianghong Liu

The effect of nursing on hospital efficiency and outcomes among older adults with heart failure Frank Morgan Jones Fund 2/15/11–2/14/12 Principal Investigator: Matthew D. McHugh

Mechanisms that mediate the link between lead exposure and child behavior problems National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (K02-ES019878) 9/1/2011–5/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Jianghong Liu

Lea Ann Matura Proinflammatory Cytokines, Symptoms and Symptom Clusters in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Biobehavioral Research Center 7/1/2012–6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Lea Ann Matura Co-Investigator: Steven Kawut

Matthew Lucas Caregiver functional expectations for survivors of childhood brain tumors American Cancer Society 7/1/2012–6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Matthew Lucas

Feeding/transition to home for preterms at social risk National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01-HD050738) 9/21/2007–7/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Rosemary White-Traut Co-Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Home feeding study (NCE) Cardiac Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 9/1/2008–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Developmental care in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Heart to Heart Foundation 9/1/2009–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Using community collaborative methods to decrease inter-stage mortality in infants with Complex Congenital Heart Disease University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Investing in the Future 9/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Barbara Medoff-Cooper Salimah H. Meghani A novel approach to elucidate mechanisms for disparity in cancer pain outcomes National Institute of Nursing Research (RC1NR011591) 9/25/2009–7/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Salimah H. Meghani Co-Investigators: Deborah Watkins Bruner, Alexandra L. Hanlon, Barbara J. Riegel Juan Muniz Pregnancy health among Florida farmworkers Emory University 1/1/2011–8/31/2011 Co-Principal Investigator: Juan Muniz Prevent and reduce adverse health effects of pesticides on indigenous farmworkers Oregon Law Center (R25-MD002798) 9/6/2008–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Nargess Shadbeh Co-Investigator: Juan Muniz

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Mary D. Naylor Hospital to home: Cognitively impaired elders/caregivers National Institute on Aging (R01-AG023116) 9/15/2005–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Mary D. Naylor Co-Investigators: Kathryn H. Bowles, Christine K. Bradway, Karen B. Hirschman, Kathleen McCauley Health related quality of life (HRQoL): Elders in longterm care National Institute on Aging (R01-AG025524) 9/1/2006–5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Mary D. Naylor Co-Investigators: Katherine Abbott, Kathryn H. Bowles, Alexandra L. Hanlon, Karen B. Hirschman, Cynthia Zubritsky Marian S. Ware Alzheimer’s Program–Continuity of care component University of Pennsylvania Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program 4/1/2009–6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary D. Naylor Co-Investigators: Kathryn H. Bowles, Karen B. Hirschman, Kathleen McCauley Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI) The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 10/1/2005–9/30/2013 National Program Director: Mary D. Naylor Co-Program Director: Mark Pauly IFN Support–Implementation Phase The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 10/1/2010–3/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Mary D. Naylor Co-Investigator: Mark Pauly Effects of patient centered medical home plus transitional care for complex older adults Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation 7/1/2011–6/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary D. Naylor Co-Investigators: Ronald Barg, Kathryn H. Bowles, Alexandra L. Hanlon, Karen B. Hirschman, Kathleen McCauley, Mark Pauly New care delivery model for older adults with multiple chronic conditions Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 8/1/2011–7/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary D. Naylor New care delivery model for older adults with multiple chronic conditions Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation 8/4/2011–7/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Mary D. Naylor Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Neuro-developmental disabilities among children in India: An Inclen study Inclen, Inc. 9/30/2007–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin

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Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research & Epidemiology (CADDRE): Study to explore early development Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U10DD000182) 7/1/2011–6/30/2016 Principal Investigator: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Early autism risk: Longitudinal investigation (EARLI) network Drexel University (R01-ES016443) 4/1/2008–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Craig Newschaffer Co-Investigator: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Rosemary C. Polomano Reiki for Management of Neuropathic Pain in Soldiers with Extremity Trauma Tri Service Nursing Research Program, Novice Scientist Award 09/01/2012–08/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Petra Goodman Mentor: Rosemary C. Polomano Penn Center for Excellence in Pain Education NIH Pain Consortium 06/01/2012–08/30/2014 Principal Investigator: John Farrar Co-Principal Investigator: Rosemary C. Polomano Co-Principal Investigator: Elliot Hersh “Regional Anesthesia for Combat Injury Improves Pain Disability Outcomes” – RAMBPOS (Regional Anesthesia Military Battlefield Pain Outcomes Study Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs and Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management (DVCIPM) 10/01/2012–09/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Rollin Gallagher Co-Investigators: Chester Buckenmaier, III; John Farrar, Wensheng Guo, David Oslin, Rosemary C. Polomano Therese Richmond UPACE: The Philadelphia Collaborative Violence Prevention Center The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 9/1/2006–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Joel Fein Co-Investigator: Therese Richmond Trauma Recovery: Identified Priorities by Stakeholders (TRIPS) National Critical Care & Trauma Response Centre/Queensland Government 5/1/2011–4/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Leanne Aitken Co-Investigator: Therese Richmond The contribution of the built environment & social interventions to reduce violence & enhance health in low income at-risk urban families University of Pennsylvania Center for Public Health Initiatives 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond Alcohol and injury in adolescents, their families, and their neighborhoods National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R01-AA016187) 4/15/2008–3/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Charles Branas Co-Investigator: Therese Richmond

Biosocial prediction and intervention on childhood aggression Pennsylvania Department of Health/Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement (C.U.R.E.) Program 6/1/2008–5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Ruben Gur Principal Investigator: Rose Cheney Principal Investigator: Adrian Raine Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond Co-Investigator: Jianghong Liu Injury and trauma research training for Guatemala NIH Fogarty International Center (D43-TW008972) 4/1/2011–3/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Charles Branas Co-Principal Investigator/Co-Director: Therese Richmond Barbara J. Riegel Implementation of Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for at-risk families National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R18HL107217) 8/18/2011–7/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Benjamin Abella Co-Investigator: Barbara J. Riegel CBT by technology to reduce stress in family caregivers of heart failure patients: Pilot study School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/01/2012–4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Barbara J. Riegel CBT by technology to reduce stress in family caregivers of heart failure patients: Pilot study Center for Therapeutic Effectiveness Research, University of Pennsylvania 7/1/12–6/31/13 Principal Investigator: Barbara J. Riegel Tailoring self-care interventions Edna G. Kynett Memorial Foundation 7/1/2011–10/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Barbara J. Riegel Principal Investigator: Ruth Masterson Creber Valerie Rogers Comparative measurement of periodic limb movements in sleep between polysomnography & actigraphy in children with Sickle Cell Disease American Nurse Foundation 9/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Valerie Rogers Mary Lou de Leon Siantz Developing educational strengths: Promoting individual reproductive teen awareness Office of Minority Health 1/24/2011–1/23/2012 Principal Investigator: Mary Lou de Leon Siantz Julie A. Sochalski Market competition and the quality of home health services National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R01HL088586) 8/1/2008–7/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Daniel Polsky Co-Investigator: Julie A. Sochalski Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Injury from sexual assault: Addressing health disparity National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR005352) 6/1/2007–3/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers


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Injury from sexual assault: Addressing health disparity–Supplement National Institute of Nursing Research (R01NR005352-06S1) 7/17/2009–5/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Co-Investigator: Carla Clements Injury in Latina women after sexual assault: Moving toward health care equity National Institute of Nursing Research (R01-NR011589) 9/30/2009–6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Co-Investigators: David Margolis, Connie M. Ulrich, Konstantinos Daniilidis, Kathleen Brown, Yadira Regueira, Jamison Fargo An RCT of brief intervention for problem drinking and partner violence National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R01-AA018705) 9/1/2010–5/31/2015 Principal Investigator: Karin Rhodes Co-Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Margaret C. Souders 2/2 brain, behavior and genetic studies of the 22q11 deletion studies The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 9/10/2010–10/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Margaret C. Souders Dietary intake, child feeding practices, and weight status in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their caregivers University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Behavioral Research Center 2/1/2012–1/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Margaret C. Souders Principal Investigator: Tanja Kral Co-Investigator: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Marilyn Stringer Domestic violence shelters and health living Verizon Foundation 1/1/2010–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Marilyn Stringer Co-Investigator: Pamela Mack-Brooks Neville E. Strumpf Resource Center for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR) National Institute on Aging (P30-AG031043) 9/30/2007–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Neville E. Strumpf Principal Investigator: Jerry Johnson Co-Investigator: Lois K. Evans Eileen Sullivan-Marx Visiting Nurse Service of New York Scholars Program Visiting Nurse Service of New York 9/1/2003–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Eileen Sullivan-Marx Co-Investigator: Kathryn H. Bowles Anne M. Teitelman HIV prevention and partner abuse: Developing an intervention for adolescent girls National Institute of Mental Health (K01-MH080649) 1/5/2008–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Teitelman

Economic abuse in adolescent partner relationships University of Pennsylvania Center for Public Health Initiatives 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Teitelman The role of ‘Money-Power-Respect’ in teen dating violence University of Pennsylvania Center for Public Health Initiatives 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Teitelman Principal Investigator: Shelah Harper Co-Investigators: Susan Sorenson, Julia Bohinski Step up to prevention: A nurse-practitioner guided health promotion intervention American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Foundation 12/31/2011–12/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Anne M. Teitelman Co-Investigator: Marilyn Stringer Nancy C. Tkacs Juvenile hypoglycemia and loss of hypoglycemic arousal Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 9/1/2007–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Nancy C. Tkacs Connie M. Ulrich Respondent burden and retention in cancer clinical trials National Institute of Nursing Research (R21-NR010259) 1/15/2008–9/30/2011 Principal Investigator: Connie M. Ulrich Co-Investigators: Deborah Watkins Bruner, Sarah Ratcliffe, Therese Richmond Applying Genomic Sequencing in Pediatrics National Human Genome Research Institute (U01HG006546) 2/1/11–1/31/15 Principal Investigator: Ian Krantz Co-Investigator: Connie M. Ulrich Barbra Mann Wall A comparative history of twentieth-century Catholic hospitals National Library of Medicine (G13-LM009691) 9/1/2008–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Barbra Mann Wall Knowledge translation and the changing meaning of missionary nursing and medicine in Africa, 1940–2000 University of Pennsylvania Research Foundation 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Barbra Mann Wall Clash and compromise: Catholic hospitals, secularization, and the state in 20th century America American Association for the History of Nursing 1/1/2009–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Barbra Mann Wall

Institutional Training Grants Linda H. Aiken Advanced Training in Nursing Outcomes Research National Institute of Nursing Research (T32-NR007104) 6/1/1999–3/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Linda H. Aiken Joseph I. Boullata Graduate education in Occupational Environmental Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (T01OH008417) 7/1/2002–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Joseph I. Boullata Co-Investigator: Jianghong Liu Lois K. Evans John A. Hartford geropsychiatric nursing collaborative American Academy of Nursing 1/1/2008–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Lois K. Evans Margaret J. Griffiths Undergraduate Nursing Scholarships Independence Blue Cross Foundation 1/1/2012–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Graduate Nursing Scholarships Independence Blue Cross Foundation 1/1/2012–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Scholarship Program - New Careers in Nursing The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 9/1/2010–8/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Nursing education grant supplemental block grant Pennsylvania Higher Education Foundation 9/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths IBC Nurse Scholars Program Pennsylvania Higher Education Foundation 9/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths New careers in nursing The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 9/1/2010–8/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Nurse Anesthetist Traineeships Health Resources and Services Administration 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Scholarship for Disadvantaged Students Health Resources and Services Administration 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Andrew Binns Co-Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Kathleen McCauley Jonas Nursing Scholars Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 4/1/2012–3/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Jonas Nurse Leaders Program Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 7/1/2010–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Co-Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Expanding enrollment in NP and NMW programs Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) 9/30/2010–9/29/2015 Principal Investigator: Kathleen McCauley Co-Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Mary D. Naylor Individualized care for at-risk older adults National Institute of Nursing Research (T32-NR009356) 7/1/2007–6/30/2012 Director: Mary D. Naylor Co-Directors: Kathryn H. Bowles, Eileen SullivanMarx Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Summer mentorship in environmental health sciences for high school and undergraduate students National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (R25-ES016146) 1/1/2008–11/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Therese Richmond The Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation 7/1/2011–6/30/2015 Principal Investigator: Therese Richmond Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Research on vulnerable women, children, and families National Institute of Nursing Research (T32-NR007100) 7/1/2009–6/30/2014 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Co-Directors: Loretta Jemmott, Janet Deatrick Research Training to Promote Health in Vulnerable Women, Children, and Families: Scholars Training in Interdisciplinary Methods, Analytic Techniques and Technologies (STIMULATE) National Institute of Nursing Research (T32-NR007100-14S1) 2012–2014 Principal Investigator: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Co-Directors: Barbara Medoff-Cooper, Eun-Ok Im, Therese Richmond Eileen Sullivan-Marx Comprehensive Geriatric Education Program Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) (D62-HP01912) 7/1/2009–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Eileen Sullivan-Marx Renewing the commitment for innovative leadership development and capacity building in geriatrics John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc. 1/1/2011–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Kathy Culpepper Richards Co-Investigators: Eileen Sullivan-Marx, Mary Ersek Connie M. Ulrich Dartmouth/UPENN Research ethics training and program development for Tanzania NIH Fogarty International Center (R25-TW007693) 6/1/2011–5/31/2016 Principal Investigator: Jon Merz Principal Investigator: Richard Waddell Co-Investigator: Connie M. Ulrich

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Athena Zuppa Impact of pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics on the duration of mechanical ventilation in pediatric patients with acute respiratory failure The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (R01-HL098087) 5/31/2010–5/31/2013 Principal Investigator: Athena Zuppa Co-Investigator: Martha A.Q. Curley

Conference Grants Charlene W. Compher ASPEN Research Workshop on Clinical Nutrition American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (U13-DK064190) 4/1/2008–3/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Charlene W. Compher Cynthia A. Connolly The Future of Health Care’s Past: A Conference in honor of Joan E. Lynaugh University of Pennsylvania University Research Foundation 3/1/2012–2/28/2013 Principal Investigator: Cynthia A. Connolly

Fellowship Awards Kamila Alexander A grounded theory of sexuality and sexual safety among Black emerging adult women National Institutes of Health (F31-NR-013121) 9/1/2011–8/31/2013 Mentor: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Fellow: Kamila Alexander Barbara Beacham Children with chronic health conditions: Perspectives of family management National Institutes of Health (F31-NR011524) 7/1/2010–6/30/2012 Mentor: Janet A. Deatrick Mentor: Kathleen Knafl Fellow: Barbara Beacham Eeeseung Byun Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2010–6/30/2012 Mentor: Lois K. Evans Fellow: Eeeseung Byun Joan Carpenter Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2011–6/30/2013 Mentor: Mary Ersek Fellow: Joan Carpenter Ruth Masterson Creber Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2012–6/30/2014 Mentor: Barbara Riegel Fellow: Ruth Masterson Creber Janine Everett Skin elasticity and skin color: Understanding health disparity in sexual assault National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR011106) 1/1/2009–12/31/2012 Mentor: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Fellow: Janine Everett

Nancy Ho Role of Corticosterone on Hippocampal Cell Proliferation in Mice with Diabetes National Institute of Nursing Research (F31NR010853) 1/2009–7/2011 Co-Mentor: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Fellow: Nancy Ho Sara Jacoby Experiences of black trauma patients: Why are there disparate racial outcomes? National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013599) 6/1/2012–5/31/2015 Mentor: Therese Richmond Mentor: Loretta Sweet Jemmott Fellow: Sara Jacoby Matthew Lucas Caregiver functional expectations for survivors of childhood brain tumors National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013091) 9/1/2011–8/31/2014 Mentor: Lamia Barakat Mentor: Janet A. Deatrick Fellow: Matthew Lucas M. Melanie Lyons A novel treatment, TAT-HSP70, in attenuating lung injury in sepsis induced ARDS National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR02100) 5/1/2010–4/30/2013 Mentor: Nancy Tkacs Fellow: M. Melanie Lyons Susan Lysaght Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2010–6/30/2012 Mentor: Mary Ersek Fellow: Susan Lysaght Prospective exploration of transitions in settings of care within hospice National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013103) 8/1/2011–12/31/2012 Mentor: Mary Ersek Fellow: Susan Lysaght Lauren Massimo Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2011–6/30/2013 Mentor: Lois K. Evans Fellow: Lauren Massimo The cognitive and neural basis of apathy in frontotemporal degeneration National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR013306) 1/1/2012–6/30/2014 Mentor: Lois K. Evans Mentor: Murray Grossman Fellow: Lauren Massimo Catherine McDonald Promoting teen health: A web-based intervention to prevent risky driving National Institute of Nursing Research (K99-NR013548) 8/1/2012–7/31/2017 Mentors: Marilyn Sommers, Flaura Winston Fellow: Catherine McDonald


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Kim Mooney-Doyle Exploring family decision-making in pediatric palliative care National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR011533) 1/1/2011–12/31/2013 Mentor: Connie M. Ulrich Mentor: Janet A. Deatrick Fellow: Kim Mooney-Doyle Melissa O’Connor Impact of length of stay and number of home nursing visits on hospitalization National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR012090) 7/1/2010–6/30/2012 Mentor: Kathryn H. Bowles Fellow: Melissa O’Connor Victoria Pak Assessing workplace Phthalate exposure among massage therapy students National Institute of Nursing Research (F31-NR011385) 8/1/2009–7/31/2012 Mentor: Jennifer A. Pinto-Martin Fellow: Victoria Pak Aditi Rao Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2011–6/30/2013 Mentor: Lois K. Evans Fellow: Aditi Rao Justine Sefcik The Jonas/Hartford Predoctoral Scholarship Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence 9/1/2010–8/31/2012 Mentor: Pamela Cacchione Fellow: Justine Sefcik Melissa Wachterman End-of-Life decision making in seriously ill patients: The case of ESRD National Institute of Nursing Research (F32-NR012872) 9/21/2011–9/20/2012 Mentor: Mary Ersek Fellow: Melissa Wachterman

Other Grants Sarah Abboud Understanding Virginity from the Perspectives of Arab Women School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 5/1/2012–4/30/2013 Mentors: Loretta Sweet Jemmott, Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Principal Investigator: Sarah Abboud Jane H. Barnsteiner Quality and safety education for nurses: Enhancing faculty capacity American Association of Colleges of Nursing 2/15/2009–2/14/2012 Principal Investigator: Jane Barnsteiner Julia Bohinski Mother-daughter communication and teen dating violence victimization University of Pennsylvania, Ortner Center on Family Violence 4/1/2011–3/31/2012 Mentor: Anne M. Teitelman Principal Investigator: Julia Bohinski

Christine K. Bradway The transition of care of morbidly obese patients: What are the challenges? School of Nursing Faculty Research Award 5/1/2012–4/30/2013 Principal Investigator: Christine K. Bradway Corbett Brown The consumer food environment surrounding secondary schools and adolescent obesity in urban and rural Botswana School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Charlene W. Compher Principal Investigator: Corbett Brown Eeeseung Byun Caregiver Uncertainty and Stress in Response to a Loved One’s Health Crisis: The Case of Stroke Survivor Caregivers Sigma Theta Tau, Xi Chapter 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Lois K. Evans Principal Investigator: Eeeseung Byun The effects of early uncertainty on caregiver stress and psychological outcomes Neuroscience Nursing Foundation 10/1/2011–9/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Eeeseung Byun Marissa DeCesaris Experience of Recovering from a Mental Illness Positive Undergraduate Research Program (PURP) at the Positive Psychology Center (PPC) 1/1/2012–12/31/2012 Principal Investigator: Marissa DeCesaris Mentor: Nancy P. Hanrahan Patricia D’Antonio Barbara Bates Center preservation project National Endowment for the Humanities 1/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Patricia D’Antonio Magdaline Diaz Latino food choices: Relationship to income, access and culture School of Nursing Undergraduate Student Mentored Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Terri H. Lipman Principal Investigator: Magdaline Diaz Margaret J. Griffiths Nursing Faculty Loan Program Bureau of Health Professions/HRSA/DHHS 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Margaret J. Griffiths Sunny G. Hallowell Influence of the Nurse Work Environment on Human Milk Provision and Breastfeeding Support in the NICU School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 5/1/2012–4/30/2013 Mentor: Eileen V. Lake Principal Investigator: Sunny G. Hallowell Nancy Ho Diabetes and neurobehavioral complications: The role of hippocampal neurogenesis American Nurse Foundation 9/1/2009–8/31/2011 Mentor: Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers Principal Investigator: Nancy Ho

Xiao Kang Nurse job satisfaction, burnout, and quality of care in China School of Nursing Undergraduate Student Mentored Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Matthew D. McHugh Principal Investigator: Xiao Kang Lisa Marie Kohr Promoting health for high risk infants: A cardiac ICU environmental care bundle School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Martha A. Q. Curley Principal Investigator: Lisa Marie Kohr M. Melanie Lyons A novel treatment, TAT-HSP70, in attenuating lung injury in Sepsis Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Sigma Theta Tau, Xi Chapter 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Nancy Tkacs Principal Investigator: M. Melanie Lyons Chenjuan Ma The effect of hospital discharge preparation on patient readmission: Two different perspectives School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Matthew D. McHugh Principal Investigator: Chenjuan Ma Linda Maldonado I told them, “Leave it Alone: It’s Our Center”: Midwives’ collaborative activism towards infant mortality in two U.S. cities, 1970–1990 Sigma Theta Tau, Xi Chapter 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Julie A. Fairman Principal Investigator: Linda Maldonado Midwives’ Collaborative Activism in Two U.S. Cities, 1970–1990 School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 5/1/12–4/30/13 Mentor: Barbra Mann Wall Principal Investigator: Linda Maldonado Janan McCormick Development of normative vaginal length data with the vaginal sound School of Nursing Undergraduate Student Mentored Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Deborah Watkins Bruner Principal Investigator: Janan McCormick Afaf I. Meleis Penn Nursing/Helene Fuld Health Trust partnership for the future of nursing Helene Fuld Health Trust 3/1/2011–5/31/2014 Principal Investigator: Afaf I. Meleis Lit Ng Do physiological responses in the ICU predict psychological health upon discharge in ICU survivors of injury? School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Therese Richmond Principal Investigator: Lit Ng

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Melissa O’Connor Impact of length of stay in home care and number of nursing visits on rehospitalization American Academy of Nursing 7/1/2010–6/30/2012 Mentor: Kathryn H. Bowles Principal Investigator: Melissa O’Connor Sarah Al Sawah Exploring the relationship between vitamin D status and blood glucose control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Role of inflammatory mediators Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society 5/1/2010–4/30/2012 Mentors: Terri H. Lipman, Taku Kambayashi Principal Investigator: Sarah Al Sawah Trish Suplee Identifying the healthcare needs of women and children from a church community in Camden, NJ Sigma Theta Tau, Xi Chapter 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Principal Investigator: Trish Suplee Maxim Topaz Translation of Heart Failure Clinical Practice Guidelines for Home Care Electronic Health Record using Standardized Nursing Terminology School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 5/1/2012–4/30/2013 Mentor: Kathryn H. Bowles Principal Investigator: Maxim Topaz Jill Vanak Association of Transplant Center and Nursing Workforce Factors on Patient Outcomes after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Four-State Sample School of Nursing Doctoral Student Research Award 5/1/2012–4/30/2013 Mentor: Eileen V. Lake Principal Investigator: Jill Vanak Carol Vincent Family and self care management of HIV infected women and their HIV infected children Sigma Theta Tau, Xi Chapter 7/1/2011–6/30/2012 Mentor: Janet A. Deatrick Principal Investigator: Carol Vincent Nicole Ward Tailoring interventions to promote healthy relationships for urban adolescents University of Pennsylvania Provost’s Undergraduate Research Mentorship 2/1/2011–12/31/2011 Mentor: Anne M. Teitelman Fellow: Nicole Ward Canhua Xiao Identifying symptom clusters in patients with head and neck cancer post radiation therapy American Nurse Foundation 9/1/2010–8/31/2011 Mentor: Deborah Watkins Bruner Principal Investigator: Canhua Xiao

Practice Grant Eileen Sullivan-Marx Rural Nurse Managed Health Clinic LKP Center for Technologies in Public Health 1/1/2009–12/31/2011 Principal Investigator: Eileen Sullivan-Marx

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Faculty, Student, and Staff Publications Abbott, Katherine Toles, M., Abbott, K.M., Hirschman, K.B., Naylor, M.D. (2012, in press). Transitions in Care among Older Adults Receiving Long Term Services and Supports. Journal of Gerontological Nursing. Abbott, K.M., Prvu Bettger J., Hanlon A., Hirschman K.B. (2012, in press). Factors associated with health discussion network size and composition among elderly recipients of long-term services and supports. Health Communication. Zubritsky, Cynthia, Abbott, Katherine, Hirschman, Karen, Bowles, Kathryn, Foust, Janice, Naylor, Mary (2012). Health related quality of life: Expanding a conceptual framework to include older adults who receive long-term services and supports. The Gerontologist. doi: 10.1093/geront/gns093

Bruyneel L, Li B, Aiken, L.H., Lesaffre, E., Van den Heede, K, Sermeus, W. (in press). A multi-country perspective on nurses’ tasks below their skill level: Reports from domestically trained and foreign trained nurses from developing countries. International Journal of Nursing Studies. Cho, E., Lee, H., Choi, M., Park, S.H., Yoo, I.Y., Aiken, L.H. (in press). Factors associated with needlestick and sharp injuries among hospital nurses: A cross sectional questionnaire study in South Korea. International Journal of Nursing Studies. Li, B., Lesaffre, E., Bruyeel, L, Aiken, L.H., Van den Heede, K., Matawick, K., Sermeus, W. (in press). Group-level impact of work environment dimensions on burnout experiences among nurses: A multivariate multilevel probit model. International Journal of Nursing Studies.

Aiken, Linda Aiken, L.H. Nurses for the future. (2011). New England Journal of Medicine. 364 (3): 196-198.

Liu, K., You, L.M., Chen S.X., Hao, Y.T., Zhu, X.W., Zhang, L.F., Aiken, L.H. (2012). The relationship between hospital work environment and nurse outcomes in Guangdong, China: A nurse questionnaire survey. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 21, 1476–1485.

Aiken, L.H., Cimiotti, J., Sloane, D.M., Smith, H.L., Flynn, L., Neff, D. (2011). The effects of nurse staffing and nurse education on patient deaths in hospitals with different nurse work environments. Medical Care, 49, 1047–1053.

Schubert, M., Clarke, S., Aiken, L.H., De Geest, S. (2012). Association between rationing of nursing care and inpatient mortality in Swiss hospitals. International Journal for Quality in Health Care. doi: 10.1093/intqhc/mzs229

Cimiotti, J.P., Aiken, L.H., Sloane, D.M. (2012). Nurse staffing, burnout, and healthcare-associated infection. American Journal of Infection Control. doi:10.1016/j.ajic.2012.02.029

Shang, J., Friese, C., Wu, E., Aiken, L.H. (in press). Nursing practice environment and outcomes for oncology nursing. Cancer Nursing.

Aiken, L.H., Sloane, D.M., Clarke, S., Poshosyan, L., Cho, E., You, L., Finlayson, M., Kanai-Pak, M. Aungsuroch, Y. (2011). Importance of work environments on hospital outcomes in 9 countries. International Journal of Quality in Health Care, 23, 357–364. Choi, J., Flynn, L., Aiken, L.H. (2012). Nursing practice environments and registered nurses’ job satisfaction in nursing homes. The Gerontologist, 52(4):484-492. Nantsupawat, A., Srisuphan, W., Kunaviktikul, W., Wichaikhum, O., Angsuroch, Y., Aiken, L.H. (2011). Impact of nurse work environment and staffing on hospital nurse outcomes and quality of care in Thailand. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 43, 426–433. Sermeus, W., Aiken, L.H., Van den Heede, K., Rafferty, A.M., Griffiths, P., Moreno-Casbas, M.T., Busse, R., Lindqvist, R., Scott, A.P., Bruyneel, L., Brzostek, T., Kinnunen, J., Schubert, M., Schoonhoven, L., Zikos, D. (2011). Nurse forecasting in Europe (RN4CAST): Rationale, design, and methodology. BMC Nursing, 10, 6. Van den Heede, K., Florquin, M., Bruyneel, L., Aiken, L., Diya, L., Lesaffre, E., Sermeus, W. (2012). Effective strategies for nurse retention in acute hospitals: A mixed method study. International Journal of Nursing Studies. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2011.12.001 Aiken, L.H. (2012). Improving health care outcomes through research. Part 2. Reflections on Nursing Leadership, 38, Published online 1/27/2012. http://www.reflectionsonnursingleadership.org/Pages/ Vol38_1_Aiken_Morin_PartTwo.aspx Aiken, L.H. (2012). Improving health care outcomes through research. Part 1. http://www.reflectionsonnursingleadership.org/Pages/ Vol38_1_Aiken_Morin.aspx. Reflections on Nursing Leadership, 38, Published online 1/26/2012.

Squires, A., Aiken, L.H., Van den Heede, K., Sermeus, W., et al (2012). A systematic survey instrument translation process for multi-country, comparative health workforce studies. International Journal of Nursing Studies, March 23, 2012. doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.02.015 You, L.M., Aiken, L.H., Sloane, D.M., Liu, K., et al. (2012). Hospital nursing, care quality, and patient satisfaction: Cross-sectional surveys of nurses and patients in hospitals in China and Europe. International Journal of Nursing Studies, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ij Alexander, Kamila Alexander, K., Dovydaitis, T., Beacham, B., Bohinski, J., Brawner, B., Clements, C., Everett, J., Gomes, M., Harner, H., McDonald, C., Pinkston, E., & Sommers, M.S. (2011). Learning health equity frameworks within a community of scholars. Journal of Nursing Education, 50, 569–574. Barton, Sharon Cimiotti, J., Barton, S.J., Gorman, K., Sloane, D., Aiken, L.H. (in press). Nurse reports on resource adequacy in hospitals that care for acutely ill children. Journal for Healthcare Quality. Boullata, Joseph Boullata, J.I. (2012). Overview of the parenteral nutrition use process. Journal of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition, 36(2 supp), 10S–13S. Boullata, J.I., & Hudson, L.M. (2012). Drug-nutrient interactions: A broad view with implications for practice. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 112(4), 506–517.


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Bowles, Kathryn Bowles, K.H., Hanlon, A.L., Glick, H.A., Naylor, M.D., O’Connor, M., Riegel, B., et al. (2011). Clinical effectiveness, access to, and satisfaction with care using a telehomecare substitution intervention: A randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, 2011(540138), 1–13. Holland, D.E., Rhudy, L.M., Vanderboom, C.E., Bowles, K.H. Feasibility of Discharge Planning in Intensive Care Units: A Pilot Study. American Journal of Critical Care 2012 Jul;21(4):e94-e101. PMID 22751377 Sockolow, PS, Bowles, KH, Lehmann, HP, Abbott, PA, Weiner, JP. (2012). Community-based, interdisciplinary geriatric care team satisfaction with an electronic health record: A Multi-method study. Computers Informatics Nursing. Advance online publication. PMID 22411417 Steis, M., Prabhu, V. V., Kolanowski, A., Kang, Y, Bowles, K.H., Fick, D., Evans, L. (2012). Detection of Delirium in community-dwelling persons with dementia. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics. 16(1). Available at http://ojni.org/issues/?p=1274 Holland, DE, Knafl, G, Bowles, KH. (in press). Targeting Hospitalized Patients for Early Discharge Planning Intervention. Journal of Clinical Nursing. Steis, M. R., Prabhu, V. V., Kang, Y., Kolanowski, A. M., Bowles, K. H., Fick, D. M., & Evans, L. (in press). eCare for eldercare: Detection of delirium in community-dwelling persons with dementia. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics. Monsen KA, Martin KS, Bowles KH. Omaha System Partnership for Knowledge Discovery and Healthcare Quality: Nursing Terminology in Action. Computers Informatics Nursing. (1):6–7. PMID: 22240562 Holland, DE, Bowles, KH, (2012). Standardized Discharge Planning Assessments: Impact on Patient Outcomes. Journal of Nursing Care Quality. Advance online publication. PMID: 22437249 Bradway, Christine Bradway, C. (2011). Balancing safety and privacy: Considerations for urology patients and providers. Urologic Nursing, 31, 136–137. Bradway, C., Trotta, R., Bixby, M.B., McPartland, E., Wollman, M.C., Kapustka, H., McCauley, K., & Naylor, M.D. (2012). Qualitative analysis of an advanced practice nurse: Directed transitional care model intervention. Gerontologist, 52, 394–407. Dowling-Castronovo, A. & Bradway, C. (2012). Urinary incontinence. In M. Boltz, E. Capezuti, T. Fulmer, & D. Zwicker (Eds.), Evidence Based Geriatric Nursing Protocols for Best Practice (4th Ed.). (pp. 363–387). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company. Paniagua, M., Bradway, C., & Eskildsen, M. (2012). Hospital discharge to the nursing home. In S. McKean, J. Ross, D. Dressler, D. Brotman, & J. Ginsberg (Eds.), The Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine. (1414–1420). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. Brooks Carthon, J. Margo Brooks Carthon, J.M. (2011). Life and death in Philadelphia’s Black Belt: A tale of an urban tuberculosis campaign, 1900–1930. Nursing History Review, 19(1), 29–52.

Sumpter, D., & Brooks Carthon, J.M. (2011). Lost in translation: Student perceptions of cultural competence in undergraduate and graduate curricula. Journal of Professional Nursing: Official Journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), 27, 43–49.

Mueller, C., Compher, C., Druyan, M.E., & American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Board of Directors (2011). A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: Nutrition screening, assessment, and intervention in adults. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 35(1), 16–24.

Brooks Carthon, J.M., Kutney-Lee, A., Jarrin, O., Sloane, D.M., & Aiken, L.H. (2012). Nurse staffing and postsurgical outcomes in Black adults. Journal of American Geriatrics Society, 60, 1078–1084.

Arsenault, D., Brenn, M., Gura, K.M., Compher, C., Simpser, E., & Puder, M. (2012). Hyperglycemia in the newborn–Correctly reported. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 36(4), 379.

Buttenheim, Alison Buttenheim, A.M., Alderman, H., & Friedman, J. (2011). Impact evaluation of school feeding programs in Lao People’s Democratic Republic. Journal of Development Effectiveness, 3(4), 520–542.

Beckman, L.M., Earthman C.P., Thomas, W., Compher C.W., Muniz J., Sibley, S.D. (in press). Factors Predicting Change in Serum 25-OH Vitamin D Concentration after Gastric Bypass Surgery. Obesity.

Ullman, S.H., Buttenheim, A.M., Goldman, N., Pebley, A.M., & Wong, R. (2011). Socioeconomic differences in obesity among Mexican adolescents. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 6(2–2), e373-e380. Buttenheim, A.M., Jones, M., Baras, Y. (2012). Exposure to personal belief exemptions from mandated school entry vaccinations among California kindergarteners. American Journal of Public Health. 102(8): e59-e67. Buttenheim, A.M., Asch, D.A. (2012). Behavioral economics: The key to closing the gap on maternal, newborn and child survival for Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Maternal and Child Health Journal. May 22: 10.1007/s10995-012-1042-7 Buttenheim, A.M., Havassy, J., Fang, M., Glyn, J., Karpyn, A. Increasing SNAP/EBT sales at farmers markets with vendor-operated wireless point-of-sale terminals. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the Journal of the American Dietetic Association) 112(5):636–641.

Arsenault, D., Brenn, M., Kim, S., Gura, K., Compher, C., Simpser, E., et al. (2012). A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in the neonate receiving parenteral nutrition. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 36(1), 81–95. Compher, C. (2012). Clinical guidelines: What’s the difference. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 36(3), 259–260. Compher, C.W., Hanlon, A., Kang, Y., Elkin, L., & Williams, N.N. (2012). Attendance at clinical visits predicts weight loss after gastric bypass surgery. Obesity Surgery, 22(6), 927–934. Druyan, M.E., Compher, C., Boullata, J.I., Braunschweig, C.L., George, D.E., Simpser, E., et al. (2012). Clinical guidelines for the use of parenteral and enteral nutrition in adult and pediatric patients: Applying the GRADE system to development of A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 36(1), 77–80.

Buzby, Marianne Buzby, M. (2012). Endocrine physiology. In K. ReuterRice & B.N. Bolick (Eds.). Pediatric Acute Care, 364–369.

Fallon, E.M., Nehra, D., Potemkin, A.K., Gura, K.M., Simpser, E., Compher, C., et al. (2012). A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: Nutrition support of neonatal patients at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Jun 29. Advance online publication.

Coleman, Christopher Lance Coleman, C.L. (2011). “You better listen to my son. You see, he is a nurse!” Reflections on Nursing Leadership, 37, 1–3.

Holsten, J., & Compher, C. (2012). Children’s food store, restaurant and home food environments and their relationship with body mass index: A pilot study. Ecology of Food and Nutrition, 51(1), 58–78.

Nokes, K.M., Coleman, C.L., Hamilton, M.J., Corless, I.G., Sefcik, E., Kirksey, K.M., Eller, L.S., Kemppainen, J. (2011). Age related effects on symptom status and health related quality of life in persons with HIV/AIDS. Applied Nursing Research, 24(1), 10–16.

McMahon, M.M., Nystrom, E., Braunschweig, C., Miles, J., Compher, C., American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Board of Directors (2012). A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: Nutrition support of adult patients with hyperglycemia. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, June 29. Advance online publication.

Compher, Charlene Compher, C., Gilroy, R., Pertkiewicz, M., Ziegler, T.R., Ratcliffe, S.J., Joly, F., Rochling, F., Messing, B. (2011). Maintenance of parenteral nutrition volume reduction, without weight loss, after stopping teduglutide in a subset of patients with short bowel syndrome. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 35(5), 603–609.

Shaibu, S., Holsten, J.E., Stettler, N., Maruapula, S.D., Jackson, J.C., Compher, C., et al. (2012). Adolescent obesity prevention in Botswana: Beliefs and recommendations of school personnel. Journal of School Nursing, 28(3), 220–229.

Holsten, J.E., Morssink, C., & Compher, C.W. (in press). Exploring the socio-ecological context of overnutrition in rural Cameroon: A qualitative descriptive study. African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development.

Wrotniak, B.H., Malete, L., Maruapula, S.D., Jackson, J., Shaibu, S., Compher, C., et al. (2012). Association between socioeconomic status indicators and obesity in adolescent students in Botswana, an African country in rapid nutrition transition. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 7(2), e9– e13.

Maruapula, S.D., Jackson, J.C., Holsten, J., Shaibu, S., Malete, L., Wrotniak, B., …Compher, C. (2011). Socioeconomic status and urbanization are linked to snacks and obesity in adolescents in Botswana. Public Health Nutrition, Aug 2, 1–8. Advance online publication.

Connolly, Cynthia Connolly, C.A. (2011). Classics in Pediatrics: Pneumococcic meningitis: Complete recovery of a six month old infant treated with penicillin. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 165, 385– 387.

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Connolly, C.A. & Gibson, M.E. (2011). The “White Plague” and color: Children, race, and tuberculosis in Virginia 1900-1935. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 26, 230-238. Connolly, C.A. & Golden, J. (2011). Remarkable improvement: Sulfa drugs and pediatric meningococcal meningitis, 1937– 1949. Pediatrics, 127, 1011– 1013. Connolly, C.A., Golden, J., & Schneider, B. (2012). “A startling new chemotherapeutic agent”: Pediatric infectious disease and the introduction of sulfonamides at Baltimore’s Sydenham Hospital. Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 86, 66– 93. Cotter, Valerie Cotter, V.T., & Smith-Glasgow, M. (2012). Student drug testing in nursing education. Journal of Professional Nursing: Official Journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), 28 (3), 186– 189. Smith, C., & Cotter, V.T. (2012). Age-related changes in health. In Boltz, M., Capezuti, E., Fulmer, T.T., Zwicker, D., & O’Meara, A. (Eds.), Evidence-based geriatric nursing protocols for best practice (4th Ed.). (23– 47). New York, NY: Springer. Creber, Ruth Masterson Creber, Ruth Masterson, Polomano, R., Farrar, J., & Riegel, B. (in press). Psychometric properties of the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ). European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. Curley, Martha A. Q. Galvin, P.A., Curley, M.A.Q., (in press). The Braden Q+P: a Pediatric Perioperative Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment and Intervention Tool. AORN Journal. Kohr, L.M., Hickey, P.A., Curley, M.A.Q., (in press). Building a Nursing Productivity Measure Based on the Synergy Model– First Steps. American Journal of Critical Care. November. Moloney-Harmon, P.A., Curley, M. A. Q. (in press). Chapter 6: Pediatric critical care nursing foundations. In M.L.G. Pedreira (Ed.), Critical Care Nursing Foundations: Neonate, Children and Adult. (msp. 28). Green, M., Curley, M. A. Q.,Arnold, J. A. (2012). Chapter 24: Prone positioning in Acute Lung Injury. In P. Rimensberger (Ed.), Pediatric and Neonatal Mechanical Ventilation (msp. 29). Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. Grant, M.J.C., Scoppettuolo, L.A., Wypij, D. Curley, M.A.Q. (2012). Prospective evaluation of sedationrelated adverse events in pediatric patients ventilated for acute respiratory failure. Critical Care Medicine, 40(4), 1317–1323. PMID: 22425823 Franck, L.S., Scoppettuolo, L.A., Wypij, D., Curley, M.A.Q. (2012). Validity and generalizability of the Withdrawal Assessment Tool-1 (WAT-1) for monitoring iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome in pediatric patients. Pain, 153(1), 142–148. PMID: 22093817 Curley, M.A.Q. (2011). Respiratory research– Why is it so difficult? Respiratory Care, 56(9), 1247– 1254 PMID: 21944679 Noonan, C., Quigley, S., & Curley, M.A.Q. (2011). Using Braden Q Scale to predict pressure ulcer risk in pediatric patients. Pediatric Nursing, 26(6), 566– 75. PMID: 3192414 Moloney-Harmon, P.A. & Curley, M.A.Q. (2011). Chapter 4: The nurse in pediatric critical care. In B.P. Fuhrman & J.J. Zimmerman (Eds.), Pediatric Critical Care (4th Ed.). (pp. 30). Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier.

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Everett, Janine S. Everett, J.S., & Sommers, M.S. (in press). Skin viscoelasticity: Physiologic mechanisms, measurement issues, and application to nursing science. Biological Research for Nursing. Everett, J.S., Budescu, M., & Sommers, M.S. (in press). Making sense of skin color in clinical care. Clinical Nursing Research. Fairman, Julie Fairman, J.A. & Okoye, S.M. (2011). Nursing for the future, from the past: Two reports on nursing from the Institute of Medicine. Journal of Nursing Education, 50, 305–311. Fairman, J.A. (2012). The Right to Write: Nurse Practitioners and Prescription. In Watkins, E.S. & Greene, J. (Eds.), Prescribed: Writing, Filling, Using, and Abusing the Prescription in Modern America. (117–133). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Press. Foust, Janice B. Foust, J.B., Naylor, M.D., Bixby, M.B., & Ratcliffe, S.J. (2012). Medication problems occurring at hospital discharge among older adults with heart failure. Research in Gerontological Nursing, 5(1), 25–33. George, Maureen George, M. & Fletcher, M (2011). Pulmonary rehabilitation in the management of COPD: More than one way to skin a cat. Invited editorial to accompany nurse-led multidisciplinary programme for patients with COPD in primary health care. Primary Care Respiratory Journal, 20 (4), 355. Townsend, K. & George, M. (2011). What is the evidence that environmental remediation programs are effective in urban children with allergic asthma? An integrated review. Journal of Asthma and Allergy Educators, 2(6), 295–305. George, M. (2012). Something old, something new: Spirometry and exhaled nitric oxide as biomarkers of airflow obstruction. Journal of Asthma and Allergy Educators, 3(2), 64–72. George, M. & Stoloff, S. (2012). Teaching patients the critical components of asthma self-management. Journal of Asthma and Allergy Educators, 3, 10–19. doi10.1177/2150129711427 Glanz, Karen Burke, L.E., Styn, M.A., Sereika, S.M., Conroy, M.B., Ye, L., Glanz, K., Sevick, M.A., & Ewing, L.J. (2012). Using mHealth Technology to Enhance Self-Monitoring for Weight Loss: A Randomized Trial. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 43, 20–26. Carvalho, M., Honeycutt, S., Escoffery, C., Glanz, K., Sabbs, D., & Kegler, M.C. (in press). Balancing fidelity and adaptation: Implementing evidence-based chronic disease prevention programs. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. Escoffery C., Kegler M.C., Glanz K., Graham T., Blake S., Shapiro J.A., Mullen P.D., Fernandez M.E. (2012). Use of Evidence-Based Recruitment Strategies by the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 42, 235–341. Frank, L.D., Saelens, B.E., Chapman, J., Sallis, J.F., Kerr, J., Glanz, K., …Cain, C. (in press). Objective assessment of obesogenic environments in youth: GIS methods and spatial findings from the Neighborhood Impact on Kids (NIK) Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Glanz, K., Bader, M.D., & Iyer, S. (2012). Retail grocery store marketing strategies and obesity: An integrative review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 42(5), 503–512. Glanz, K., Beck, A.D., Bundy, L., Primo, S., Lynn, M.J., Cleveland, J., Wold, J.A., & Echt, K.V. (in press). Impact of a health communication intervention to improve glaucoma treatment adherence: Results of the I-SIGHT Trial. Archives of Opthalmology. Hiemstra, M., Glanz, K., Nehl, E. (2012). Changes in sunburn and tanning attitudes among lifeguards over a summer season. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 66, 430–437. Zook, J.B., Lu, Y., Glanz K., & Zimring C. (2012). Design and pedestrianism in a smart growth development. Environment and Behavior, 44, 216–234. Kegler, M.C., Alcantara, I., Veluswamy, J.K., Haardorfer, R., Hotz, J.A., & Glanz, K. (in press). Gender- and ethnic-specific associations with obesity: Individual and neighborhood-level factors. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action. Kerr, J., Frank, L.D., Sallis, J.F., Saelens, B.E., Glanz, K., & Chapman, J. (in press). Predictors of trips to food destinations. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. Kerr, J., Sallis, J.F., Bromby, E., & Glanz, K. (in press). Assessing food promotions in grocery stores: Reliability and validity of the GroPromo audit tool. Journal of Nutrition, Education and Behavior. Kim, B.H., Newton, R.A., Sachs, M.L., Glutting, J.J., & Glanz, K. (in press). Effect of guided relaxation and imagery on falls self-efficacy: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of American Geriatrics Society. Mamtani, R., Haynes, K., Bilker, W., Vaughn, D., Strom, B., Glanz, K., & Lewis, J. (in press). Long-term therapy with thiazolidinediones may be associated with increased incidence of bladder cancer: A cohort study. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Sabatino, S.A., Lawrence, B., Elder, R., Mercer, S.L., Wilson, K.M., DeVinney, B., …Glanz, K., & the Community Preventive Services Task Force. (in press). Effectiveness of Interventions to Increase Screening for Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancers: Nine Updated Systematic Reviews for The Guide To Community Preventive Services. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Saelens, B,E., Sallis, J.F., Frank, L.D., Couch, S.C., Zhou, C., Colburn, …Glanz, K. (in press). Obesogenic neighborhood environments related to child and parent obesity: The Neighborhood Impact on Kids (NIK) Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Voss, C., Klein, S., Clawson, M., Glanz, K. (in press). Nutrition Environment Measures-Vending (NEMS-V): Development, reliability, and dissemination. Health Promotion Practice. Yano, E.M., Green, L.W., Glanz, K., Ayanian, J.Z., Mittman, B.S., Chollette, V., Rubenstein, L.V. (2012). Implementation and spread of interventions into the multilevel context of routine practice and policy: Implications for the cancer care continuum. Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs, 44, 86–99. Ziegler-Johnson, C., Weber, A., Glanz, K., Spangler, E., Rebbeck, T. (in press). Gender- and ethnic-specific associations with obesity: Individual and neighborhood-level factors. Journal of the National Medical Association. www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Glanz, K., Steffen, A.D., Schoenfeld, E., & Tappe, K.A. Randomized Trial of Tailored Skin Cancer Prevention for Children: The Project SCAPE Family Study. (in press). Journal of Health Communication. Kim, B., Glanz, K., & Nehl, E. Vitamin D Beliefs and Associations with Sunburns, Sun Exposure, and Sun Protection. (in press). International Journal of Environmental Public Health. Saelens, B.E., Nelson, Y., Chan, N., Krieger, J., Boles, M., Colburn, T., Glanz K, …Bruemmer, B. The impact of nutrition labeling regulation on restaurant environments. (in press). American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Kegler, M.C., Swan, D., Alcantara, I., Wrensford, L., & Glanz K. (in press). Environmental Influences on Physical Activity in Rural Adults: The Relative Contributions of Home, Church, and Work Settings. In Press, Journal of Physical Activity and Health. Vargo, J., Stone, B., & Glanz, K. Google Walkability: A free and ready-to-use tool for local healthy planning? (in press). Journal of Physical Activity and Health. Ding, D., Sallis, J.F., Norman, G.J., Saelens, B.E., Harris, S.K., Kerr, J., …Glanz K. Community food environment, home food environment, and fruit and vegetable intake of children and adolescents. (in press). Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. Honeycutt, S., Carvalho, M., Glanz, K., Daniel, S.D., & Kegler, M.C. Research to reality: A process evaluation of a mini-grants program to disseminate evidencebased nutrition programs to rural churches and worksites. (in press). Journal of Public Health Management and Policy. Glanz, K., Hersey, J., Cates, S., Muth, M., Creel, D., Nicholls, J., …Zaripheh, S. Impact of a nutrient rich foods consumer education program: Results from the Nutrition Advice Study. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly Journal of the American Dietetic Association), 112: 56–63, 2012. Pignone, M., Winquist, A., Schild, L.A., Lewis, C., Scott, T., Hawley, J., …Glanz K. Effectiveness of a patient and practice-level colorectal cancer screening intervention in health plan members: The CHOICE Trial. (2011). Cancer, 117: 3352–3362. Hillier, A., Cannuscio, C., Karpyn, A., McLaughlin, J., Chilton, M., & Glanz, K. How far do low-income parents travel to shop for food? Evidence from two urban neighborhoods. (2011). Urban Geography, 23: 712–729. Tandon, P., Zhou, C., Chan, N.L., Lozano, P., Couch, S.C., Glanz, K., …Saelens BE. The impact of menu labeling on fast food purchases for children and parents– Results of a natural experiment. (2011). American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 41: 434-438. Gimotty, P.A., & Glanz K. (2011). Sunscreen and melanoma: What is the evidence? (Editorial). Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29:249-250. Cerin ,E., Frank, L.D., Sallis, J.F., Saelens, B.E., Conway, T.L., Chapman, J.E., & Glanz K. From neighborhood design and food options to residents’ weight status. (2011). Appetite, 56: 693-703. Hall, D.M., Kline, M., & Glanz, K. Analysis of participatory photojournalism in a widely disseminated skin cancer prevention program. (2011). Health Promotion Practice, 12(5): 666-672. PMCID: PMC2992089

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Burke, L.A., Froelich, R.A., Zheng, Y., & Glanz, K. Current theoretical bases for nutrition intervention and their uses. In: A.M. Coulson & C.J. Boushey (Eds.), Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease, 3rd Edition. (in press). Elsevier Publishers. Glanz, K. Application of social and behavioral theories in public health interventions. For OBSSR e-source online resource for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. (2011). National Institutes of Health, Office of Behavioral & Social Sciences Research, http://www.esourceresearch.org/ eSourceBook/SocialandBehavioralTheories/1LearningO bjectives/tabid/724/Default.aspx Glanz, K. (in press). Skin cancer prevention and sun protection. In M. Gellman & A. Christensen (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer Publishing. Patrick, H., Glanz, K. (in press). Cancer Prevention for Women. In M. Goldman, K. Rexrode , & R. Troisi (Eds.), Women and Health, 2nd Edition. Glanz, K. (in press). A conceptual framework for behavior change. In S. Kahan, A. Gielen, L.W. Green (Eds.), Health Behavior Change in Populations: The State of the Evidence and Roles for Key Stakeholders. Johns Hopkins University Press. Glanz, K. (in press). Skin cancer prevention. In , L.W. Green (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies Online Public Health; Oxford Bibliographies Online. New York: Oxford University Press. Cannuscio, C., Glanz, K. (2011). Food environments and agriculture. In A. Dannenberg, H. Frumkin , & R. Jackson (Eds.), Making Healthy Places: A Built Environment for Health, Well-Being, and Sustainability (pp 50-62). Island Press. Glanz, K., & Kegler, M.C. (in press).Process of behavior change. In A.S. Baum, T.A. Revenson, & J.E. Singer (Eds.), Handbook of Health Psychology, 2nd ed. Psychology Press, Taylor and Francis Group. Glicksman, Allen Glicksman, A., Ring, L., Kleban, M., & Hoffman, C. (in press). Is “walkability” a useful concept for gerontology? Journal of Housing for the Elderly. Glicksman, A., Clark, K., Kleban, M.,, Ring, L., & Hoffman, C. (in press). Building an integrated, research/policy-planning, age-friendly agenda. Journal of Aging and Social Policy. Wang, D. & Glicksman, A. (in press). Being grounded: Benefits of gardening for older adults in low-income housing. Journal of Housing for the Elderly. Clark, K., & Glicksman, A. (2012). Age-friendly Philadelphia (AfP): Bringing Diverse Networks together around Aging Issues. For special issue of Journal of Housing for the Elderly entitled: “Environmental Gerontology: What Now? 26:1–3, 290–307. Norstrand, J., Glicksman, A., Lubben, J., & Kleban, M. (2012). The role of the social environment on physical and mental health of older adult [Special issue]. Journal of Housing for the Elderly Environmental Gerontology: What Now? 26:1–3, 121–136

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Im, E.O. (2012). Development of situation-specific theories: An integrative approach. In P.G. Reed, & N.B.C Shearer (Eds.), Perspectives on Nursing Theory (6th Ed.). (pp. 289–300). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Im, E. O., Chang, S. J., Chee, W., & Chee, E. (in press). Midlife women’s attitudes toward Web-based interventions for physical activity promotion. Journal of Telemedicine and Telehealth. Im, E. O., & Chee, W. (in press). Qualitative online forums: Practical guidelines. Computers, Informatics, Nursing: CIN. Im, E. O., & Chang, S. J. (in press). A systematic integrated literature review of systematic integrated literature reviews in nursing. Journal of Nursing Education. Im, E. O., Chang, S. J., Ko, Y., Chee, W., Stuifbergen, A., & Walker, L. (in press). A national Internet survey on ethnic differences in midlife women’s attitudes toward physical activity. Nursing Research. Im, E. O., Ko, Y., & Chee, W. (in press). Clusters of cancer patients with cancer pain among multi-ethnic groups in the U.S. Palliative and Supportive Care. Walker, L. O., Im, E. O., & Vaughan, M. W. (in press). New mothers’ interest in Web-base health promotion: Association with health care barriers, risk status, and user characteristics. Telemedicine and e-Health. Im, E. O., Ko, Y., Hwang, H., Chee, W., Stuifbergen, A., Lee, H., & Chee, E. (2012). Asian American midlife women’s attitudes toward physical activity. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/j.15526909.2012.01392.x Walker, L. O., Im, E. O., & Tyler, D. (2012). Maternal health needs and interest in screening for depression and health behaviors during pediatric visits. Journal of Pediatric Health Care. Advance online publication. Im, E. O., Ko, Y., Hwang, H., & Chee, W. (2012). “Symptom-Specific or Holistic”: Menopausal Symptom Management. Health Care for Women International. 33(6), 575– 592. doi:10.1080/07399332.2011.646371

Brawner, B.M., Gomes, M., Jemmott, L.S., Deatrick, J., & Coleman, C. (2012). Clinical depression and HIV risk related sexual behaviors among African American adolescent females: Unmasking the numbers. AIDS Care: Psychological and Socio-medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, 24(5), 618–625. PMID: 22292603. doi:10.1080/09540121.2011.630344 Baker, J. L., Brawner, B. M., Cederbaum, J., Davis, Z., White, S., Brawner, W. & Jemmott, L.S. (2012). Barbershops as venues to assess and intervene in HIV/STI risk among young, heterosexual African American men. American Journal of Men’s Health, Available online first, 1–15. PMID: 22398991. doi: 10.1177/1557988312437239 Baker, J. L., Brawner, B. M., Leader, A., Voytek, C., Jemmott, L.S., & Frank, I. (2012). Incorporating community-based participatory research principles for the development of a HPV prevention program for African American adolescent females and their parents/guardians. American Journal of Health Studies, 27(1), 1–7 O’Leary, A., Jemmott, J. B. III, Jemmott, L. S., Bellamy, S.L., Ngwane, Z., & Icard, L.D. (in press). Moderation and mediation of an efficacious sexual risk-reduction intervention for South African adolescents. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. Jemmott, J. B. III, Jemmott, L.S., O’Leary, A., Ngwane, Z., Icard, L. D., Bellamy, S. L., …Makiwane, M. B. (2011). Cognitive-behavioural health-promotion intervention increases fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity among South African adolescents: a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Psychology & Health, 26(2), 167–185. dol:10.1080/08870446.2011.531573 El Bassel, N., Jemmott, J. B. III, Landis, R., Pequegnat, W., Wingood, G., Wyatt, G., …The NIMH Multisite HIV/STD Prevention Trial for African American Couples Group. (2011). Intervention to influence behaviors linked to risk of chronic diseases: a multisite randomized controlled trial with African American HIV serodiscordant heterosexual couples. Archives of Internal Medicine, 171(8), 728–736.

Im, E. O. & Chang, S. J. (2012). Current Trends in Nursing Theories. Journal of Nursing Scholarship. 44(2), 156–164. doi: 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2012.01440.x

Kaufman, Jane Kaufman, J.S. (2011). Nursing management: Obstructive pulmonary diseases. (8th Ed.). In S. Lewis, M. Heitkemper, & S. Dirksen: St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.

Iorianni-Cimbak, Angela Darcy Mahoney, A.E., Hancock, L., Iorianni-Cimbak, A., & Curley, M.A.Q., (2012). Using high-fidelity simulation to bridge clinical and classroom learning in undergraduate pediatric nursing. Nurse Education Today.

Kral, Tanja Kral, T.V.E., Whiteford, L.M., Heo, M., & Faith, M.S. (2011). Effects of eating breakfast compared with skipping breakfast on ratings of appetite and intake at subsequent meals in 8- to 10-year -old children. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 93, 284–291.

Jemmott, Loretta Sweet Jemmott, J. B. III, Heeren, G. A., Ngwane, Z., Jemmott, L.S., Shell, R., & O’Leary, A. (in press). Theory of planned behavior predictors of intention to use condoms among Xhosa adolescents. AIDS Care.

Miller, P.E., Moore, R.H., & Kral, T.V.E. (2011). Children’s daily fruit and vegetable intake: Associations with maternal intake and child weight status. Journal of Nutrition, Education and Behavior, 43(5), 396–400.

Walker, L.O., Im, E.O., & Vaughan, M.W. (2012). Communication technologies and maternal interest in health promotion information about postpartum weight and parenting practices. Journal of Obstetric Gynecological and Neonatal Nursing, 41, 201–215.

Cederbaum, J. A., Hutchinson, M.K., Duan, L., & Jemmott, L.S. (in press) The influence of maternal HIV serostatus on mother-daughter sexual risk communication and adolescent engagement in HIV risk behaviors.

Im, E.O. (2012). The situation-specific theory of pain experience for Asian American cancer patients. In P.G. Reed & N.B.C. Shearer (Eds.), Perspectives on Nursing Theory (6th Ed.). (pp. 101–110). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Jemmott, J. B. III, Jemmott, L.S., & Stevens, R. (in press). Statistical power, multiple comparisons, and comparative efficacy in evaluating HIV/STD riskreduction strategies. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

Faith, M.S., Van Horn, L., Appel, L.J., Burke, L.E., Carson, J.A., …Kral, T.V.E., …Wylie-Rosett, J. (2012). Evaluating parents and adult caregivers as “agents of change” for treating obese children: Evidence for parent behavior change strategies and research gaps: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. Circulation, 125(9), 1186–1207.

Im, E.O., Lee, S.H., & Chee, W. (2011). Be conditioned, but empowered: Asian American midlife women in menopausal transition. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 22(3), 290–299. Im, E.O. (2012). Theory and research: editorial. Nursing Research, 61(2), 77. Im, E.O., Ko, Y., Hwang, H., Yoo, K., Chee, W., Stuifbergen, A., Walker, L., Brown, A., McPeek, C., & Chee, E. (2012). Physical activity as a luxury: African American midlife women’s attitudes toward physical activity. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 34(3), 317–339.

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Kral, T.V.E., Heo, M., Whiteford, L.M., & Faith, M.S. (2012). Effects on cognitive performance of eating compared to omitting breakfast in elementary school children. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 33, 9–16. Mathias, K.C., Rolls, B.J., Birch, L.L., Kral, T.V.E., Hanna, E.L., Davey, A., & Fisher, J.O. (2012). Serving larger portions of fruits and vegetables together at dinner promotes intake of both foods among young children. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 112(2), 266–270.

Libonati, Joseph Anderson Sr., D.W., & Libonati, J.R. (2011). Physical activity and body mass perception. Clinical Nursing Research, Oct 31. Advance online publication.

Liu, J., Ai, Y.X., Hanlon, A., Shi, Z., Dickerman, B., & Compher, C. (2011). Micronutrient deficiency and associated sociodemographic factors in Chinese children. World Journal of Pediatrics, 7(3), 217–223.

Libonati, J.R. (2011). Cardiac remodeling and function following exercise and angiotensin II receptor antagonism. European Journal of Applied Physiology, Dec 6. Advance online publication.

Liu, J., & Graves, N. (2011). Childhood bullying: A review of constructs, contexts, and nursing implications. Public Health Nursing, 28(6), 556–568.

Libonati, J.R. (2011). Cardiac remodeling and exercise training in hypertension. Current Hypertension Reviews, 7, 20–28.

Kral, T.V.E., & Rolls, B.J. (2011). Portion size and the obesity epidemic. In J. Cawley (Ed.), The Handbook of the Social Science of Obesity. (367–384). New York, NY: Oxford University Press, Inc.

Libonati, J.R., Sabri, A., Xiao, C., MacDonnell, S.M., & Renna, B.F. (2011). Exercise training improves systolic function in hypertensive myocardium. Journal of Applied Physiology, 111(16), 1637–1643.

Walters-Bugbee, S., McClure, K.S., Kral, T.V.E., & Sarwer, D.B. Maternal eating behaviors and child feeding practices of women with extreme obesity and women who have undergone bariatric surgery. (in press). Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.

Lipman, Terri Lipman, T.H. (in press). TODAY study group. Clinical trial to maintain glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes. The New England Journal of Medicine, epub 10,1056/, NEJMoa1109333.

Kral, T.V.E., Allison, D.B., Birch, L.L., Stallings, V.A., Moore, R., & Faith, M.S. Caloric compensation and eating in the absence of hunger in 5- to 12-year-old weight-discordant siblings. (in press). American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Kutney-Lee, Ann Kutney-Lee, A., Wu, E., Sloane, D.M, & Aiken, L.H. (in press). Effect of changes in hospital work environments on nurse job outcomes: An analysis of panel data. International Journal of Nursing Studies. Kutney-Lee, A. & Kelly, D. (2011). The effect of hospital electronic health record adoption on nurseassessed quality of care and patient safety. Journal of Nursing Administration (JONA), 41(11), 466–472. Lake, Eileen Lake, E.T., et al. (2012) Association between hospitals recognized for nursing excellence and outcomes of very low-birth-weight infants. JAMA, 307,1709–1716. Shekelle, P., Pronovost, P., Wachter, R., Taylor, S., Dy, S…. Lake, E., …Walshe, K. (2011). Advancing the science of patient safety. Annals of Internal Medicine, 154, 693–696. Lebet, Ruth Schell, K., Briening, E., Lebet, R., Pruden, K., Rawheiser, S. & Jackson, B. (2011). Comparison of arm and calf automatic noninvasive blood pressures in pediatric intensive care patients. The Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 26(1), 3–12. Briening, E., & Lebet, R. (2012). Measuring blood pressure in infants and children: Points to ponder. DNA Reporter, 1(9), ISSN: 0418–5412. Lewis, Lisa Lewis, L.M. (2011). Medication adherence and spiritual perspectives among older African American adults diagnosed with hypertension: A qualitative study. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 37(6), 34–41. Lewis, L.M. (2012). Factors associated with medication adherence in hypertensive blacks: A review of the literature. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 27(3), 208–219. Lewis, L.M., Schoenthaler, A., & Ogedegbe, G. (2012). Patient factors, but not provider and health care system factors, predict medication adherence in hypertensive black men. Journal of Clinical Hypertension, 14(4), 250–255.

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Lord, K., Keashen, R., Ginsburg, K.R., Murphy, K.M., & Lipman, T.H. (2012). The focus is on the families: Racial differences in parents’ perception of diabetes care. Diabetes, 61 (suppl 1), 828-P. Moser, J.T., Finkel, R., Ratcliffe, S., Langdon, D.R., Rearson, M.A., Foley, L.R., & Lipman, T.H. Peripheral neuropathy in youth with type 1 diabetes Diabetes, 61 (suppl 1), 1260-P. Klingensmith, G.J., Miller, K.M., Beck, R.W., Cruz, E., Laffel, L.M., Lipman, T.H., …Willi S.M. T1D Exchange Clinic Network. Racial disparities in insulin pump therapy and hemoglobin A1c (A1c) among T1D Exchange participants. Diabetes, 61 (suppl 1), 1377-P. Lipman, T.H., Willi, S., Miller, K.M., & Beck, R.W. (2011). Racial disparities in insulin pump therapy and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) enrolled in the T1D exchange clinic registry. Pediatric Diabetes. 12, (s15), 22. Lipman, T.H. (2012). Toward evidence-based practice. American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing (MCN,) 37 (3), 204–206. Cannuscio, C.C., Alley, D.E., Pagan, J.A., Soldo, B, Krasny, S, Shardell, M, … Lipman, TH. Housing strain, mortgage foreclosure and health. (2021). Nursing Outlook. 60 (3), 134–142. Lipman, T.H., Murphy, K.M., Kumanyika, S.K., Jawad, A., Ratcliffe, S.J., & Ginsburg, K.R. (in press). Racial differences in parents’ perceptions of factors important for children to live well with diabetes. The Diabetes Educator. 38(1):101–107. Lipman, T.H. (2012) Racial disparities in the incidence of diabetes in Canada. Evidence-Based Nursing, 15 (1), 32. Lipman, T.H. (2011). Ensuring equitable access to rhGH therapy for all eligible pediatric patients. Vindico: Thorofare, NJ: Endocrine Today. Liu, Jianghong Liu, J., Leung, P., Sun, R., & Li, H. (2012). CrossCultural application of achenbach system of empirically based assessment (ASEBA): Process of instrument translation in Chinese, challenges, and future directions. World Journal of Pediatrics, 8, 1, 5–10.

Liu, J., Ai, Y, McCauley, L., Pinto-Martin, J., Yan, C., Shen, X. & Needleman, H. (2011). Blood Lead Levels and associated socio-demographic factors among preschool children in the southeastern region of China. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 26, 61–69. Liu, J., Ai, Y.X., Hanlon, A., Shi, Z., Dickerman, B., & Compher, C. (2011). Micronutrients deficiency and associated sociodemographic factors in Chinese children. World Journal of Pediatrics, 7(3), 217-223. Liu, J., Chen, X., & Lewis, G. (2011). Childhood internalizing behavior: Analysis and implications. Journal of Psychosocial Mental Health Nursing, 18, 884–894. Liu, J., Cheng, H., & Leung, P.W. (2011). The application of the preschool child behavior checklist and the caregiver-teacher report form to mainland Chinese children: Syndrome structure, gender differences, country effects, and inter-informant agreement. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 39, 251–264. PMID: 20821258 Liu, J., McCauley, L., Leung, P., Wang, B., Yan, C., Shen, X., & Pinto-Martin, J.; Jintan Cohort Group. (2011). Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to study children’s health in china: Experiences and reflections. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 48(7), 904–13. Rescorla, L. A., Liu, J., Verhulst, F.C. (2011). International comparisons of behavioral and emotional problems in preschool children: Parents’ reports from 24 societies. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology , 40(3), 456–67. Schug, R.A., Yang, Y., Raine, A., Han, C., Liu, J., & Li, L. (2011). Resting EEG deficits in accused murderers with schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 194(1), 85–94. Ai, Y., Zhao, S.R., Zhou, G., Ma, X., & Liu, J. (2012). Hemoglobin status associate with performance IQ but not verbal IQ in Chinese pre-school children. Pediatrics International. PMID:, 22507306 Hendricks, K., & Liu, J. (2012). Childbearing depression and childhood aggression: Literature review. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 37(4), 253–261. Liu, J., & Schelar, E. (2012). Pesticide exposure and child neurodevelopment: Summary and implications. Workplace Health & Safety, 60(5), 235–242. Liu, J., McCauley, L., Pinto-Martin, J., Yan, C., Shen, X., & Needleman, H. (2012). Low blood lead levels and hemoglobin concentrations in preschool children in China. Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry, 94(2), 423–426. Liu, J., Portnoy, J., & Raine, A. (2012). Association between a marker for prenatal testosterone exposure and externalizing behavior problems in children. Development and Psychopathology, 24(3), 771–782. Liu, J., Yang, H., Li, L., Chen, T., & Lynn, R. (2012). An increase of intelligence measured by the WPPSI in China, 1984–2006. Intelligence, 40, 139–144.


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Kelly, L., McHugh, M.D., & Aiken, L.H. (2011). Nurse outcomes in Magnet® and non-Magnet® hospitals. Journal of Nursing Administration, 41(10), 428–433. Lee, J., Kelly, D., & McHugh, M.D. (2012). Health reform and the constitutionality of the individual mandate. Policy, Politics, and Nursing Practice, 12(4): 236–244. McHugh M.D., Brooks Carthon, M., Wu, E., Kelly, L., Sloane, D., & Aiken, L.H. (2012). Impact of nurse staffing mandates on safety-net hospitals: Lessons from California. The Milbank Quarterly, 90, 160–186. Medoff-Cooper, Barbara Williams, R.V., Zak, V., Ravishankar, C., Altmann, K., Anderson, J.B., …Medoff-Cooper, B, …Hsu, D. T., for the Pediatric Heart Network Investigators (in press). Factors impacting growth in infants with single ventricle physiology in the first year of life: Pediatric heart network infant single ventricle trial. Pediatrics.

McDonough, A., Matura, L.A., & Carroll, D.L. (2011). Symptom experience of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients. Clinical Nursing Research, 20, 120–134.

Bromiker, R., Hammerman, C., Kaplan, M., Schimmel, M., Einav, S., Medoff-Cooper, B. (in press). Sucking Improvements Following Blood Transfusion for Anemia of Prematurity. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

Matura, L.A., McDonough, A. & Carroll, D.L. (2012). Cluster Analysis of Symptoms in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 11, 51-61.

Medoff-Cooper, B., & Holditch-Davis, D. (in press). Neurobehavioral development. In J. Fitzpatrick (Ed.), Encyclopedia of nursing research. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

Matura, L.A., McDonough, A. & Carroll, D.L. (2012). Predictors of health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 14(4), 283– 292.

Meghani, Salimah Barth, K.S., Becker, W.C., Wiedemer, N.L., Mavandadi, S., Oslin, D.W., Meghani, S.H., & Gallagher, R.M. (2011). Association between urine drug test results and treatment outcome in high-risk chronic pain patients on opioids. Journal of Addictions Medicine, 4(3), 167– 173.

McCool, William McCool, W., Guidera, M., Reale, B., Smith, A. (in press). Professional issues related to obstacles to midwifery practice in the Americas: A pilot survey. Midwifery. McCool, W., Guidera, M., Smith, A., & Koucoi, J. (in press.). A pilot survey of midwives in the Americas on professional issues in midwifery practice. Midwifery. Fouly, H., McCool, W., & Koucoi, J. (in press.). Ancient Egyptian women’s health care in relation to modern Egyptian practices: An overview. International Journal of Childbirth. McCool, W., & Durain, D. (in press.). Common diagnoses in women’s gynecological health. In J. Kriebs, C. Gegor, & J. Fahey (Eds.), Varney’s Midwifery (5th ed.). McDonald, Catherine C. McDonald, C.C., Deatrick, J., Kassam-Adams, N., & Richmond, T.S. (2011). Community violence exposure and positive youth development in urban youth. Journal of Community Health, April 2. Advance online publication. McDonald, C.C., Wiebe, D.J., Guerra, T., Thomas, N., & Richmond, T.S. (2011). The importance of family to youth living in violent communities. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 18(7), 653–656. McHugh, Matthew McHugh, M.D., Kelly, L., Sloane, D. M., & Aiken, L.H. (2011). Contradicting fears, California’s nurse-topatient staffing mandate did not reduce the skill level of the nursing workforce in hospitals. Health Affairs, 30, 1299–1306.

Meghani, S.H., & Bruner, D. (2011). A pilot study to identify correlates of intentional versus unintentional nonadherence to analgesic treatment for cancer pain. Pain Management Nursing. Advance online publication. doi:10.1016/j.pmn.2011.03.003 Meghani, S.H., & Rajput, V. (2011). Perspective: The need for practice socialization of international medical graduates–An exemplar from pain medicine. Academic Medicine, 86(5), 571–574. Buck, H., & Meghani, S. (2012). Spiritual expressions of African Americans and Whites in cancer pain. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 30(2), 107–116. Buck, H.G., Meghani, S., Prvu Bettger, J.A., Byun, E., Fachko, M.J., O’Connor, M., et al. (2012). The use of comorbidities among adults experiencing care transitions: A systematic review and evolutionary analysis of empirical literature. Chronic Illness, Apr 18. Advance online publication. Campbell, L.C., Robinson, K., Meghani, S.H., Vallerand, A., Schatman, M., & Sonty, N. (2012). Challenges and opportunities in advancing pain management disparities research: Implications for clinical practice, advocacy and policy. Journal of Pain, 13(7), 611–619. Meghani, S.H., Byun, E., & Gallagher, R.M. (2012). Time to take stock: A meta-analysis and systematic review of pain treatment disparities in the United States. Pain Medicine, 13, 150–174. Meghani, S.H., Polomano, R., Tait, R., Vallerand, A., Anderson, K., & Gallagher, R.M. (2012). Advancing a national agenda to eliminate disparities in pain care: Directions for health policy, education, practice, and research. Pain Medicine, 13, 5–28.

Meleis, Afaf Davidson, P.M., …Meleis, A.I., …Teitelman, A., … Sommers, M.S., … Stringer, M., Sampselle, C., …& Covan, E.K. (2011). The health of women and girls determines the health and well-being of our modern world: A white paper from the international council on women’s health issues. Health Care for Women International, 32(10), 870–886. doi: 10.1080/07399332.2011.603872 Meleis, A.I., & Topaz, M. (2011). Nursing theory of the future: Situation-specific theories. Pflege, 24(6), 345–347. Meleis, A.I. (2011). Education of Health Professionals for the 21st Century and its significance for nursing. Nursing and Midwifery, 2175-4144: 5-8. Davidson, P.M., Sindhu, S., Meleis, A.I. (2012) Women’s health is now core business and a global health issue (Editorial). Collegian, 19(1), pp 1-3. Meleis, A.I., Glickman, C.G. (2012). Empowering Expatriate Nurses: Challenges and Opportunities – A Commentary. Nursing Outlook. Advance online publication. Meleis, A.I. People of Egyptian Heritage. (2012). In Larry D. Purnell & Betty J.Paulanka (Eds.). Transcultural health care: A culturally competent approach, Fourth Edition. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis. (pp. 157-174). Nagtalon-Ramos, Jamille Nagtalon-Ramos, J. (2011). Counseling pregnant patients at high risk for a preterm birth. Women’s Health Care, 10(9), 21–27. Yehuda, I., Nagtalon-Ramos, J., & Trout, K. (2011). Fetal growth scans and amniotic fluid assessments in pregestational and gestational diabetes. Journal of Obstetric Gynecological and Neonatal Nursing, 40(5), 603–616. Naylor, Mary Naylor, M.D. (2012). Advancing high value transitional care: the central role of nursing and its leadership. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 36(2), 115–126. Naylor, M.D., Kurtzman, E.T., Grabowski, D.C., Harrington, C., McClellan, M., & Reinhard, S.C. (2012). Unintended consequences of steps to cut readmissions and reform payment may threaten care of vulnerable older adults. Health Affairs, 31(7), 1–11. Trojanowski, J.Q., Arnold, S.E., Karlawish, J.H., Naylor, M.D., Brunden, K.R., & Lee, VM-Y. (in press). A model for improving the treatment and care of Alzheimer patients through interdisciplinary research. Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of Alzheimer’s Association. Ng, Lit Ng, L.S., & Curley, M.A.Q. (2012).”One more thing to think about” Cognitive burden experienced by intensive care unit nurses when implementing a tight glucose control protocol. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 6(1), 58–64. Paterson, Yvonne Lasaro, M.O., Sazonovich, M., Giles-Davies, W., Mrass, P., … Y.X., Weninger, W., Paterson, Y. & Ertl, H. C. J. (2011). Active immunotherapy combined with a blockade of a co-inhibitory pathway achieves regression of large tumor masses in cancer-prone mice. Molecular Therapy, 19, 1727–1736. Wood, L. M., Pan, Z. K., Guirnalda, P., Tsai, P., Seavey, M. M., & Paterson, Y. (in press). Targeting tumor vasculature with novel listeria-based vaccines directed against CD105. Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy.

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Pinto-Martin, Jennifer Kaplan, H.C., Lorch, S.A., Pinto-Martin, J., Putt, M., & Silber, J.H. (2011). Assessment of surfactant use in preterm infants as a marker of neonatal intensive care unit quality. BMC Health Services Research, 11, 22. Pak, V.M., McCauley, L.A., & Pinto-Martin, J. (2011). Phthalate exposures and human health concerns: A review and implications for practice. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Journal, 59(5), 228–33. Pinto-Martin, J.A., Levy, S.E., Feldman, J.F., Lorenz, J.M., Paneth N., & Whitaker, A.H. (2011). Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in adolescents born weighing <2000 grams. Pediatrics, 128(5), 883–91. Whitaker, A.H., Feldman, J.F., Lorenz, J.M., McNicholas, F., Fisher P.W., …Pinto-Martin J., & Shaffer D, Paneth N. (2011). Neonatal head ultrasound abnormalities in preterm infants and adolescent psychiatric disorders. Archives of General Psychiatry, 68(7), 742–52. Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network Surveillance Year 2008 Principal Investigators, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012). Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders – Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 14 sites, United States, 2008. MMWR Surveillance Summary, 61(3), 1–19. Schendel, D.E., …Pinto-Martin, J., …Levenseller, B., … Souders, M., Thompson, P.A., Young, L., & Yeargin-Allsopp, M. (in press).The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED): A multisite epidemiologic study of autism by the Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE) Network. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2012 Feb 17. Advance online publication. Piper, Letty Piper, L., & Czekanski, K. (2012). Use of a simulated administrative decision making exercise in an online master’s nursing administration course. Journal of Nursing Education , 51 (6), 343–4. Polomano, Rosemary Xiao, C., Polomano, R.C., & Bruner, D.W. (in press). Comparison between patient-reported and clinicianobserved symptoms in oncology. Cancer Nursing. Polomano, R.C., Chisholm, E., Anton, T.M., Kwon, N. Mahoney, P., & Buckenmaier, C. (in press). Survey of military health professionals’ perceptions of an acute pain service at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Pain Medicine. Buckenmaier, C., Mahoney, P.F., Anton, T., Kwon, N., & Polomano, R.C. (in press). Impact of an acute pain service on pain outcomes with combat injured soldiers at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Pain Medicine. Galloway, K.T., Buckenmaier III, C.C., & Polomano, R.C. (2011). Understanding pain and pain mechanisms. American Nurse Today, Sept (suppl), 3–7. Galloway, K.T., Buckenmaier III, C.C., Gallagher, R.M., & Polomano, R.C. (2011). Multimodal and multidisciplinary therapy for pain management. American Nurse Today, Sept (suppl), 13–18. Jarzyna, D., Jungquist, C.R., Pasero, C., Willens, J.S., Nisbet, A., Oakes, L., …Polomano, R.C. (2011). American Society for Pain Management nursing guidelines on monitoring for opioid-induced sedation and respiratory depression. Pain Management Nursing, 12(3), 118–145. PMID: 21893302

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Polomano, R.C., & Stringer, M. (2012). Narrowing the gaps in research for women in the military and veterans. Journal of Obstetric Gynecological and Neonatal Nursing, 41, 157–159.

Buck, H.G., & Riegel, B. (2011). The impact of frailty on health related quality of life in heart failure. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 10(3), 159–166.

Pasero, C., Polomano, R.C., McCaffrey, M., & Portenoy, R.K. (2011). Adjuvant analgesics. In C. Pasero & M. McCaffery (Eds.), Pain: Assessment and pharmacological management. (623–818). New York, NY: Elsevier.

De Jong, M.J., Chung, M.L., Wu, J.R., Riegel, B., Rayens, M.K., & Moser, D.K. (2011). Linkages between anxiety and outcomes in heart failure. Heart & Lung, 40(5), 393–404.

Quigley, Beth Townsend, K., Corry, J., Hogan-Quigley, B., & George, M. (2012). A feasibility study of Q-sort to determine recall of skin test results and environmental remediation education. Journal of Asthma. Hogan-Quigley, B., Palm, M.L., & Bickley, L. (2012). Bates Nursing Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking (1st Ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Radhakrishnan, Kavita Radhakrishnan, K., Jacelon, C.S., Bigelow, C., Roche, J.P., Marquard, J.L. & Bowles, K.H. (in press) Use of a homecare Electronic Health Record (EHR) to find associations between patient characteristics and hospitalizations for heart failure patients using telehealth services. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare. Radhakrishnan, K., Jacelon, C.S., Bigelow, C., Roche, J.P., Marquard, J.L., & Bowles, K.H. (2012). Association of co-morbidities with home care service utilization of patients with heart failure while receiving telehealth. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. Advance online publication. PMID: 22580628 Ratcliffe, Sarah J. Song, M., Ratcliffe, S.J., Tkacs, N.C., & Riegel, B. (2011). Self-care and health outcomes of diabetes mellitus. Clinical Nursing Research, Sep 16. Advance online publication. Richmond, Therese Branas, C.C., Richmond, T.S., Ten Have, T.R., & Wiebe, D.J. (2011). Acute alcohol consumption, alcohol outlets, and gun suicide. Substance Use & Misuse, 46(13), 1592–1603. Richmond, T.S., & Aitken, L. (2011). A model to advance nursing science in trauma practice and injury outcomes research. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 67, 2741–2753. Richmond, T.S., Ruzek, J., Ackerson, T., Wiebe, D.J., Winston, F., & Kassam-Adams, N. (2011). Predicting the future development of depression or PTSD after injury. General Hospital Psychiatry, 33, 327–335. Wiener, J., Richmond, T.S., Conigliaro, J., & Wiebe, D.J. (2011). Military veteran mortality following a survived suicide attempt. BMC Public Health, 11, 374. Vaughn, N.A., Jacoby, S.F., Williams, T., Guerra, T., Thomas, N.A., & Richmond, T.S. (2012). Digital animation as a method to disseminate research findings to the community using a community-based participatory approach. American Journal of Community Psychology, Mar 7. Advance online publication. Riegel, Barbara Riegel, B., Sawyer, A.M., & Libonati, J. (2011). The lesser of two evils. Sleep, 34(12), 1621–1622. Riegel, B., Lee, C.S., & Dickson, V.V. (2011). Self-care patients with chronic heart failure. Nature Reviews Cardiology, 8(11), 644–654.

Doering, L.V., McKinley, S., Riegel, B., Moser, D.K., Meischke, H., Pelter, M., & Dracup, K. (2011). Genderspecific characteristics of individuals with depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease. Heart & Lung, 40(3), e4–14. Driscoll, A., Tonkin, A., Stewart, A., Thompson, D.R., Worrall-Carter, L., Riegel, B., et al. (2011). Development of an evidence-based scoring system (HFIS) to assess the quality of heart failure programmes for patients postdischarge from hospital. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 20(21-22), 3011–3019. Driscoll, A., Worrall-Carter, L., Hare, D.L., Davidson, P.M., Riegel, B., Tonkin, A., et al. (2011). Evidencebased chronic heart-failure management programmes: Reality or myth. BMJ Quality and Safety, 20(1), 31–37. Moser, D.K., McKinley, S., Riegel, B., Doering, L.V., Meischke, H., Pelter, M., et al. (2011). Relationship of persistent symptoms of anxiety to morbidity and mortality outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease. Psychosomatic Medicine, 73(9), 803–809. Riegel, B., Elmi, A., Moser, D.K., McKinley, S., Meischke, H., Doering, L.V., et al. (2011). Who listens to our advice? A secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial testing an intervention designed to decrease delay in seeking treatment for acute coronary syndrome. Patient Education and Counseling, 85, e33-e38. Riegel, B., Lee, C.S., Albert, N., Lennie, T., Chung, M., Song, E.K., et al. (2011). From novice to expert: Confidence and activity status determine heart failure self-care performance. Nursing Research, 60(2), 132–138. Riegel, B., Moelter, S.T., Ratcliffe, S.J., Pressler, S.J., DeGeest, S., Potashnik, S., et al. (2011). Excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with poor medication adherence in adults with heart failure. Journal of Cardiac Failure, 17(4), 340–348. Riegel, B., Ratcliffe, S.J., Sayers, S.L., Potashnik, S., Buck, H.G., Jurkovitz, C., et al. (2011). Determinants of excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue in adults with heart failure. Clinical Nursing Research, Aug 30. Advance online publication. Wu, J.R., Moser, D.K., Riegel, B., McKinley, S., & Doering, L.V. (2011). Impact of pre-hospital delay in treatment seeking on in-hospital complications after myocardial infarction. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 26(3), 184–193. Allen, L.A., Stevenson, L.W., Grady, K.L., Goldstein, N.E., Matlock, D.D., Riegel, B., et al. (2012). Decision making in advanced heart failure: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 125(15), 1928–1952. Blewer, A.L., Leary, M., Esposito, E.C., Gonzalez, M., Riegel, B., Bobrow, B.J., & Abella, B.S. (2012). Continuous chest compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation training promotes rescuer self-confidence and increased secondary training: A hospital-based randomized controlled trial. Critical Care Medicine, 40(3), 787–792.


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Brostrom, A., Sunnergren, O., Arestedt, K., Johansson, P., Ulander, M., Riegel, B., et al. (2012). Factors associated with undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensive primary care patients. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 30(2), 107–113.

Vellone, E., Riegel, B., Cocchieri, A., Barbaranelli, C., D’Agostino, F., Glaser, D., et al (2012). Validity and reliability of the caregiver contribution to Self-care of Heart Failure Index. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Jun 29. Advance online publication.

Buck, H.G., Lee, C.S., Moser, D.K., Albert, N., Lennie, T., Riegel, B., et al. (2012). Relationship between selfcare and health related quality of life in older adults with moderate to advanced heart failure. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 27(1), 8–15.

Wongkongkam, K., Thosingha, O., Riegel, B., Utriyaprasit, K., Ruangsetakit, C., & Viwatwongkasem, C. (2012). Factors influencing the presence of peripheral arterial disease among Thai patients with type 2 diabetes. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 11(1), 70–76.

Cao, X., Cao, Y., Salamonson, Y., Digiacomo, M., Chen, Y., Riegel, B., et al. (2012). Translation and validation of the Chinese version of the Acute Coronary Syndrome Response Index (C-ACSRI). International Journal of Nursing Studies, May 8. Advance online publication. Carlson, B., Pozehl, B., Hertzog, M., Zimmerman, L., & Riegel, B. (2012). Predictors of overall perceived health in patients with heart failure. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Apr 9. Advance online publication. Eastwood, J.A., Moser, D.K., Riegel, B.J., Albert, N.M., Pressler, S., Chung, M.L., et al. (2012). Commonalities and differences in correlates of depressive symptoms in men and women with heart failure. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Mar 13. Advance online publication. McKinley, S., Fien, M., Riegel, B., Meischke, H., Aburuz, M.E., Lennie, T.A., et al. (2012). Complications after acute coronary syndrome are reduced by perceived control of cardiac illness. Journal of Advanced Nursing, Jan 1. Advance online publication. Moser, D.K., McKinley, S., Riegel, B., Doering, L.V., Meischke, H., Pelter, M., et al. (2012). The impact on anxiety of a short one-on-one nursing intervention designed to decrease treatment-seeking delay in people with coronary heart disease. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 11(2), 160–167. Pelter, M.M., Riegel, B., McKinley, S., Moser, D.K., Doering, L.V., Meischke, H., et al. (2012). Are there symptom differences in patients with coronary artery disease presenting to the emergency department ultimately diagnosed with or without acute coronary syndrome. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, May 23. Advance online publication. Reed, S.D., Li, Y., Kamble, S., Polsky, D., Graham, F.L., Riegel, B., et al. (2012). Introduction to the tolls for economic analysis of patient management interventions in heart failure costing tool: A userfriendly spreadsheet program to estimate costs of providing patient-centered interventions. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, 5(1), 113–119. Riegel, B., Jaarsma, T., & Stromberg, A. (2012). A middle-range theory of self-care of chronic illness. Advances in Nursing Science, Jun 26 . Advance online publication. Riegel, B., Lee, C.S., Ratcliffe, S.J., DeGeest, S., Potashnik, S., Patey, M., et al. (2012). Predictors of objectivity measured medication nonadherence in adults with heart failure. Circulation, May 30. Advance online publication. Riegel, B., Ratcliffe, S.J., Weintraub, W.S., Sayers, S.L., Goldberg, L.R., Potashnik, S., et al. (2012). Double jeopardy: The influence of excessive daytime sleepiness and impaired cognition on health-related quality of life in adults with heart failure. European Journal of Heart Failure, 14(7), 730–736. Stromberg, A., Jaarsma, T., & Riegel, B. (2012). Selfcare: Who cares. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 11(2), 133–134.

Roman, J.M. Roman, J.M. (Ed.) Chapter 13. (2012). Revisiting therapeutic relationship in psychiatric-mental health nursing: Toward a relational ethic. Indianapolis, IN: Sigma Theta Tau International.

Hallowell, S.G., & Spatz, D.L. (2012). The relationship of brain development and breastfeeding in the late preterm infant. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 27(2), 154–162. Spatz, D.L. (2012). Innovations in the provision of lactation support for infants requiring intensive care. Journal of Obstetric Gynecological and Neonatal Nursing, 41(1), 138–143. Spatz, D.L. (2012). Breastfeeding is the cornerstone of childhood nutrition. Journal of Obstetric Gynecological and Neonatal Nursing, 41(1., doi10:1111 Spatz, D.L., Raphael, L., & Froh, E. (2012). Breastfeeding the infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia post extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Neonatal Network: The Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 31(1), 31–38.

Sefcik, Justine S. Sefcik J.S., Rao A., & Ersek M. (in press). What models exist for delivering hospice and palliative care in nursing homes? In N. Goldstein & R.S. Morrison (Eds.), Evidence-based practice of palliative medicine. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.

Spatz, D.L. (2012). Lactivism and breastfeeding advocacy in the United States. In D.J. Mason, J.K. Leavitt, & M.W. Chaffee (Eds.), Policy and politics in nursing and health care (6th Ed.). (pp.700-705). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders.

Bakerjian, D., Prevost, S.S., Herr, K., Swafford, K., & Ersek, M. (2012). Challenges in making a business case for effective pain management in nursing homes. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 20, 42–52.

Stringer, Marilyn Quinones, J.N., Odibo, A.O., Stringer, M., Rochon M.L., & Macones, G.A. (2011). Determining a threshold for amniotic fluid as a predictor of perinatal outcome at term. Journal of Maternal Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. doi: 10.3109/14767058.2011.632453

Sochalski, Julie A. Prvu Better, J.A., Sochalski, J., Foust, J., Zubritsky, C., Hirschman, K., Abbott, K., & Naylor, M.D. (in press). Measuring nursing care in long-term care: One size does not fit all. The Journal of Nursing Research, 20(3). Sommers, Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Whitmer, K., Barford, B., Turner, M., Sullivan, D., & Sommers, M.S. (2011). Digital image analysis of facial erythema over time in persons with varied skin pigmentations. Skin Research and Technology, 17, 348–352. Wood, S., & Sommers, M.S. (2011). Consequences of intimate partner violence on child witnesses: A systematic review of the literature. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 24, 223–236. Coopersmith, C.M., Wunsch, H., Fink, M.P., LindeZwirble, W.T., Olsen, K.M., Sommers, M.S., … Deutschman, C.S. (2012). A comparison of critical care research funding and the financial burden of critical illness in the United States. Critical Care Medicine, 40, 1072–1079. PMID:22202712

Stringer, M. (2011). Healthy women lead to healthy cities. Journal of Obstetric Gynecological and Neonatal Nursing, 40(5), 667–668. Stringer, M., Mack-Brooks, Averbuch, T., & Jemmott, L. (2011). Response to homeless childbearing women’s health care learning needs. Clinical Nursing Research. doi: 10.1177/1054773811420769 Sullivan-Marx, Eileen Gupta, N., Muthukkanu, T., Nadimuthu, A., Thiyagarajan, I., & Sullivan-Marx, E. M. (2011). Preventing waterborne diseases: analysis of a community health worker program in rural Tamil Nadu, India. Journal of Community Health. September 16, 2011 online ISSN 15733610. Sullivan-Marx, E. M., Mangione, K., Ackerson, T., Sidorov, I., Maislin, G., Volpe, S. L., & Craik, R. (2011). Recruitment and retention strategies among older African-American women enrolled in an exercise study at a PACE Program. The Gerontologist. 51: S73–S81

Sommers, M.S., Brown, K.M., Buschur, C., Everett, J.S., Fargo, J.D., Fisher, …Zink, T.M. (2012). Injuries from intimate partner and sexual violence: Significance and classification systems. Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, 19, 250–263.

Teitelman, Anne Teitelman, A.T., Stringer, M., Nguyen, G.T., Hanlon, A. L., Averbuch, T., & Stimpfel, A. (2011). Social cognitive and clinical factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation among urban, economically disadvantaged women. Journal of Obstetric Gynecological and Neonatal Nursing, 38 (5), 69–80.

Souders, Margaret Souders, M.C. & Sharp, K.T. (2012). Complex autism: Is it rare or a family affair? In Springer Publishing Company (Eds.), Autism Spectrum Disorders: Integrative Nursing Care Across The Lifespan. (pp. 131–150). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

Teitelman, A.M., Tenille, J., Bohinski, J.M., Jemmott, L.S., Jemmott, J.B III (2011). Unwanted unprotected sex: Condom coercion by male partners and self-silencing of condom negotiation among adolescent girls. Advances in Nursing Science, 34 (3), 243–259.

Spatz, Diane Duran, M.S., & Spatz, D.L. (2011). A mother with glandular hypoplasia and a late preterm infant. Journal of Human Lactation, 27(4), 394–397.

Tkacs, Nancy Lee, C.S., Moser, D.K., Lennie, T.A., Tkacs, N.C., Margulies, K.B., & Riegel, B. (2011). Biomarkers of myocardial stress and systemic inflammation in patients who engage in heart failure self-care management. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 26(4), 321–328.

Spatz, D.L. (2011). The Surgeon General’s call to breastfeeding action–Policy and practice implications for nurses. Nursing Outlook, 59 (3), 174–176.

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Topaz, Maxim Topaz, M., Radhakrishnan K., Masterson-Creber R., & Bowles K.H. (June 2012). Putting evidence to work: using Standardized Terminologies to incorporate clinical practice guidelines within homecare electronic health records. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics (OJNI), 16 (2), Available at http://ojni.org/issues/?p= 1694 Ulrich, Connie Ulrich, C.M., Zhou, Q., Ratcliffe, S.J., Ye, L., Grady, C., & Watkins-Bruner, D. (2012). Nurse practitioners’ attitudes about cancer clinical trials and willingness to recommend research participation. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 33, 76–84. Ulrich, C.M., Knafl, K.A., Ratcliffe, S., Richmond, T.S., Grady, C., Miller-Davis, C., et al. (2012). Developing a model of the benefits and burdens of research participation in cancer clinical trials. American Journal of Bioethics, 3(2), 10–23. Ulrich, C. (2012). Nursing ethics in everyday practice. Sigma Theta Tau International. Ulrich, C., & Grady, C. (in press). D. Fontaine & P. Morton (Eds.), Ethical issues in critical care. Wall, Barbra Mann Wall, B.M. (2011). Catholics in a secular marketplace. Ethics and Medics, 36(6), 1. Wall, B.M. (2011). History of Catholic nursing in the United States. In M. Fowler, et al., (Eds.), Religions in Nursing: Ethical, Theoretical, and Empirical Perspectives. (pp. 151–171). New York: Springer Publishing Company. Walsh Brennan, Ann Marie Walsh Brennan, A.M., Barnsteiner, J., Cotter, V.T., de Leon Siantz, M.L., & Everett, J. (2012). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered or intersexed content for nursing curricula. Journal of Professional Nursing: Official Journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), 28(2), 96–104. Whelan, Jean Whelan, J.C. (2012). When the business of nursing was the nursing business: The private duty registry system, 1900–1935. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 17, N0.2. doi: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol17No02Man06 Wiltse Nicely, Kelly Wiltse Nicely, K.L. & Lynn, R.R. (2012). Unanticipated dispositions after ambulatory surgery: an important topic with multiple factors. Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, 24(2), 87–88.

Keynotes, Invited Lectures, and International Presentations Linda H. Aiken Podium Presentation, Impact of nursing on hospital surgical mortality in Europe, Academy Health Annual Research Meeting. Orlando, FL, June 23–26, 2012. Keynote speaker, Strategic Investments for Nursing in China, 100th anniversary of Xiangya School of Nursing, Central South University, Changsha, China, October, 14, 2011.

Drug-Nutrient Interaction, Asociacion Colombiana de Nutricion Clinica, Annual Clinical Congress: Advances in Metabolism & Nutrition Support, Medellín, Colombia. April 2012. Safety of Parenteral Nutrition, Asociacion Colombiana de Nutricion Clinica, Annual Clinical Congress: Advances in Metabolism & Nutrition Support, Medellín, Colombia. April 2012. Kathryn H. Bowles Bowles, KH, Holland, DE, & Potashnik, S. (2012). Implementation and Testing of Interdisciplinary Decision Support Tools to Standardize Discharge Planning, NI 2012: Advancing Global Health Through Informatics, Montreal, Canada. Sockolow, PS, Liao, C, Chittams, JL, Bowles, KH. (2012). Evaluating the Impact of Electronic Health Records on Nurse Clinical Process at Two Community Health Sites, NI 2012: Advancing Global Health Through Informatics, Montreal, Canada. Monsen, KA, Kerr, MJ, Secginli, S, Poulsen, JK, Martin, KS, & Bowles, KH. (2012). A Nursing Informatics Research Network: The Omaha System Partnership for Knowledge Discovery and Health Care Quality. NI 2012: Advancing Global Health Through Informatics, Montreal, Canada Evidence-based Solutions for Transitional and Post Acute Care, Knowledge in Motion: Interdisciplinary Evidence-based Care 2011 Conference. Meridian Health. New Brunswick, NJ. Bowles, KH. & Naylor, M.D. Evidence-Based Strategies for Discharge Planning and Transitional Care, 2011 Emory Healthcare Quality Conference, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA. Evidence-based Strategies for Discharge Planning and Transitional Care. (2011). Visiting Nurse Association of Atlanta Annual Quality Conference. Atlanta, GA. Martha A.Q. Curley Plenary: Challenges to conducting multicenter clinical research; Assessing pain and sedation critically ill infants and children. World Federation of Critical Care Nurses. Sibenik, Croatia. April 2012. Plenary: The Braden Q Today; Education Course: The risk on the modern era: Clinical evidence (with Sandy Quigley). 1st ISPEW International Symposium on Pediatric Wound Care. Rome, Italy. October 2011. Distinguished Research Lecture 2012: Together, Stronger, Bolder Clinical Research. Clinical judgment; Clinical inquiry, CCNS review course; Caring and ethical practice, Pediatric CCRN Review course. 2012 National Teaching Institute, Orlando, FL. May. Novel Approaches to the Nursing Management of the Child with Acute Lung Injury; Research and the Advanced Practice Nurse, Building Measures to Illuminate Your Practice and Securing Funding (with Marilyn Hravnak PhD, RN). Society of Critical Care Medicine’s 41st Critical Care Conference, Houston, TX. 2012.

Plenary Speaker, Organizational Behaviors and Patient Safety. International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua). Hong Kong, September 15, 2011.

Scientific Speaker: RESTORE – multisite clinical trial testing nurse-implemented goal-directed sedation in pediatric critical care. National Institute of Nursing Research 25th Anniversary Concluding Symposium, Bringing Science to Life A Healthier Tomorrow, Washington, D.C. October 2011.

Joseph I. Boullata Risk Management in Parenteral Nutrition: the US Perspective, the Digestive Diseases Federation Conference, Liverpool, UK. June 2012.

Patricia D’Antonio Broadening the Dialogue: What Makes a Global Conversation? International Academy of Nurse Editors, Montreal, Canada. August 2012.

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Nursing: The Past, the Present, and the Future, 2011 ANCC National Magnet Conference, Baltimore, MD. American Nursing and the Meaning of Diversity, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, May 2012. How to …Understand the Historical Diversity of Nursing Practice, Research, and Teaching, Second Annual Nursing Research Symposium, Pennsylvania Hospital. September 2011. Bart De Jonghe The Physiological Control of Energy Balance, Annual Science Forum of the Grocery Manufacturers Association. Washington, D.C., April 2012. Julie A. Fairman Update on Future of Nursing Report, Board on Global Health Global, Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education, Institute of Medicine, Washington, D.C. 2012. Karen Glanz Obesity and the built environment, University of Botswana, Gabarone, Botswana. July 2011. Mary (Mamie) K. Guidera Lessons Learned From the National Practitioner Data Bank and Closed Claims Analysis. Premier Session at the annual meeting of the American College of Nurse Midwives. Long Beach, CA. June 2012. Wendy Grube Male Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare American Academy of Family Physicians. Troy, MI. April 13, 2012. Nancy P. Hanrahan Psychiatric Nurses Do Influence Patient Outcomes and Quality of Care Delivery, (Keynote), Psychiatric Nursing 2012 Contemporary Forums. Philadelphia, PA. April 2012. Readmission Reduction and Behavioral Health Patients, (Keynote/webinar), sponsored by the Agency for Health Research & Quality. September 2011. Effect of the Practice Environment and Psychiatric Nurse Staffing levels on Patient Outcomes, American Psychiatric Nurses Association Annual Conference. Anaheim, CA. October 2011. The Philadelphia Story Continues: A Panel Presentation on Building a Recovery-Oriented System of Care (ROSC), a Fully Collaborative Model of Integrated Care. Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, 13th Annual Conference. Philadelphia, PA. October 2011. Transitional Care Model for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness: Results from a Random Controlled Trial. Southeastern Regional Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committee of HealthChoices. Philadelphia, PA. November, 2011. Translating the Transitional Care Model for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness. Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI) National Conference. July 2011. Eun-Ok Im Keynote Speaker, Reflection on Ethnic Minority Health Research through A Multiethnic Internet Study on Menopausal Symptoms, the 9th Annual National Conference, the Asian American Pacific Islander Nurses Association. Las Vegas, NV. Loretta Sweet Jemmott Nursing Research: The Transformative Variable, Sigma Theta Tau Regional Conference. Virginia Beach, VA. April 2012. Collective Work and Responsibility in Celebrating Diversity, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Diversity Conference Ujima Celebration. Boston, MA. April 2012.


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HIV Prevention in Women and Girls: Integrating Research into Practice, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Women and AIDS Conference. March 2012. Addressing the Impact of Social, Cultural, and Economic Factors in Designing Effective HIV Prevention Programs for Women of Color, Duke University. Women of Color & HIV: 5th Annual Community Forum. March 2012. Translational Research with Proven Results in Reducing Health Disparities: A Model for Translating Effective HIV Prevention Programs, Health Disparities 5th Annual National Conference. December 2011.

William F. McCool An Update from the Professional Liability Section: Lessons Learned from Closed Claims Analysis and the National Practitioner Data Bank. 57th Annual Meeting of the American College of Nurse-Midwives. Long Beach, CA. June 2012. Nursing: The Future of Health Care Is in Your Hands. Stockton College Nursing Program Graduation, Galloway, NJ. May 2012.

Demographic Profiles of Families and Children Enrolled in SEED. Presented at the 2012 International Meeting For Autism Research, Di Guiseppi C, Schendel DE, Croen L, Pinto-Martin J. Toronto, Canada. May 2012. Phenotypic Profiles of Children with and without an Autism Spectrum Disorder in SEED, Wiggins L, Levy S, Schendel D, Pinto-Martin J. Presented at the 2012 International Meeting For Autism Research. Toronto, Canada. May 2012.

Matthew D. McHugh Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia. (Podium presentation with Ma, C.) Academy Health Annual Research Meeting. Orlando, FL. June 2012.

Barbara J. Riegel Tales of a Broken Heart, Claire M. Fagin Award Distinguished Researcher Lecture, University of Pennsylvania. April 5, 2012.

Nursing Leadership in an Era of Reform, (Keynote Address). Gwynedd-Mercy College School of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society Induction, GwyneddMercy College, Gwynedd-Valley, PA. 2012.

Marilyn Sawyer Sommers Understanding health disparities and sexual assault: Detecting trauma to skin, Henrietta Szold HadassahHebrew University, Faculty of Medicine. Jerusalem, Israel.

Translating and Adapting an Evidenced-Based HIV Prevention Program for Women–Sister to Sister–for Use in Kenya. USAID Kenya HIV Prevention Meeting. October 2011.

Afaf I. Meleis Being a Woman Faculty Member: Challenges and Opportunities, Trustees’ Council of Penn Women 25th Anniversary Conference, University of Pennsylvania. April 2012.

Keynote. When woman and girls are healthy, a nation is healthy: Making a global difference, 2011 Great Issues in Medicine and Global Health Symposium, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Hanover, NH.

Tanja V.E. Kral Individual differences in children’s susceptibility to overeating in obesogenic environments. Annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB). Zürich, Switzerland

Our Global Mission: Opportunities and Challenges, First International Programs Institute, Office of International Programs, University of Pennsylvania. February 2012.

Taking Science to the Streets: Designing & Translating Effective HIV Prevention Programs, John Hopkins University School of Nursing – LEAH Seminar Series. November 2011. Theory & Core Elements of Effective HIV/STI and Pregnancy Prevention Interventions, Department of Health and Human Services. Oakland, CA. October 2011.

Joseph R. Libonati Keeping Your Heart Healthy: Why You Should and How You Can. Folkways at Gwynedd. Gwynedd, PA. 2012. Exercise Increases Myocardial Retention of Exogenously Infused Bone Marrow-Derived Cells. International Society for Heart Research Meeting. Philadelphia, PA., JMCC. 2011 Terri H. Lipman Racial Disparities in Insulin Pump Therapy and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among Children with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Enrolled in the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry. 37th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD). Miami Beach, FL. October 21, 2011. Increasing Activity in the Community: Dance for Health. International Congress of Endocrinology. Florence, Italy. May 8, 2012 Methods for Pediatric Nursing Research. University of Sao Paulo, School of Nursing. Sao Paulo, Brazil. June 4, 2012. Pediatric Physical Assessment and Clinical Decision Making. (Keynote) Meeting of Pediatric Nursing: The child and the adolescent with chronic illness. Sao Paulo, Brazil. June 4, 2012. Needle Anxiety in Children and Parents Living with Type 1 Diabetes. Meeting of Pediatric Nursing: The child and the adolescent with chronic illness. Sao Paulo, Brazil. June 5, 2012. Weighing in: A Look at Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. (Keynote) 7th Meeting in Diabetes: Updating for Nurses. Sao Paulo, Brazil. June 6, 2012. Writing for Publication. Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society Convention.Orlando, FL. April, 26, 2012. Conflict Resolution: A Critical Skill for PENS Nurses, Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society Convention. Orlando, FL. April 28, 2012. Peripheral Neuropathy in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes. 72nd Annual Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association. Philadelphia, PA. June 9, 2012.

Transitions: A Journey Toward Integration of Knowledge, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, UMass 5-Campus PhD Forum. Shrewsbury, MA. October 2011. Healthy Transitions: From Theory to Practice, 1st NUSNUH International Nursing Conference. Singapore. November 2011. On Cultural Competence: Patient- and Family-Centered Care, HUP Nursing Competence Committee Biennial Symposium, University of Pennsylvania Health System. November 2011. Global Health: School of Nursing and School of Medicine Collaborations, Institute on Aging External Advisory Board, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. November 2011. Keynote Presentation: An Empowerment Model for Leadership: Education for the Future, 11th Iberoamerican Conference on Nursing Education of ALADEFE. Coimbra, Portugal. September 2011. Keynote: Globalization and Women’s Health: Challenges and Opportunities, UK Leadership Committee of Penn Alumni Meeting. London. September 2011. Jennifer Pinto-Martin Relationship of Neonatal Head Ultrasound Abnormalities to Adult Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Low Birthweight Population, Movsas, T, Levy, SE, Lorenz, JM, Pinto-Martin, J. Presented at the 2012 International Meeting For Autism Research. Toronto, Canada. May 2012. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Low Birthweight Cohort: Evidence for a Shared Familial Risk Factor, Christman CB, Whitaker AH, Feldman JF, Pinto-Martin J. Presented at the 2012 International Meeting For Autism Research. Toronto, Canada. May 2012. The Study to Explore Early Development: Study Design and Implementation, Schendel DE. Di Guiseppi C. Croen L., Pinto-Martin J., et al. Presented at the 2012 International Meeting For Autism Research. Toronto, Canada. May 2012.

The Art and Science of Heart Failure Self-Care, The John & Nora Darby Endowed Lecture. Ashland, OR. April 16, 2012.

Developing nursing science: from the hospital to the nation. University’ Degli Studi di Udine. Udine, Italy. International collaborations in women’s health. Center for Social Advancement, Disease Prevention and Medical Research, Ormylia. Chalkidiki, Greece. May 24, 2012. Partnership to promote global women’s health. Center for Social Advancement, Disease Prevention and Medical Research. Ormylia, Chalkidiki, Greece, May 24, 2012. Cultural challenges of providing high-quality health care. Dorothy M. Smith Nursing Leadership Conference, University of Florida School of Nursing. Gainesville, FL. February 2, 2012. Skin injury and skin color: Studying women after consensual sexual intercourse to understand injury from sexual assault. Bringing Science to Life: 25th Anniversary of the National Institute of Nursing Research’s Concluding Symposium: A Healthier Tomorrow. Washington, D.C., October 13, 2011. Barbra Mann Wall Beyond the imperial narrative: catholic missionary nursing and medicine in Africa, 1880– 1990. Conference on Humanitarianism, Nursing and Missions: How to Study Knowledge Exchanges in a Historical, Transnational Perspective.Bergen, Norway. Knowledge translation and the construction of global modernity; Catholic sisters in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1940-2000, History care in Africa Conference. Basel, Switzerland. Victoria Weill Keynote Speaker, The Consensus Model: It Will Affect Your Practice. Pennsylvania Coalition of Nurse Practitioners. Pittsburgh, PA. November 4, 2011. Jean C. Whelan Caring Images, Images of Caring: Analyzing Historic Pictures of Nursing from the Photographic Collection of the Philadelphia General Hospital School of Nursing, International Nursing Conference: Nursing: Caring to Know, Knowing to Care. June 6, 2012. Jerusalem, Israel. State of the Art: Nursing History in the United States, Past Trends, Current Status and Future Perspectives, International Nursing Conference: Nursing: Caring to Know, Knowing to Care, Nursing Interest Group, June 4, 2012. Jerusalem, Israel. www.nursing.upenn.edu

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Penn Nursing Innovation to Educate More Advance Practice Nurses Penn Nursing has partnered with the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to become one of five sites to be funded under the Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration, a national program to educate more advanced practice nurses (APRNs), who are a crucial component to the success of the Affordable Care Act. The research that was instrumental to including the demonstration project in the Affordable Care Act came largely from Penn Nursing researchers. Increasing the number of advanced practice nurses is an important way to increase the base of primary care providers in the United States. APRNs – nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives – play a pivotal role in providing primary and preventive care to the public. In the past, the cost of clinical training has limited the ability of hospitals and other healthcare providers to accept more APRN students into their settings for clinical training. Supported by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), five hospitals are partnering with accredited schools of nursing and nonhospital community-based care settings as clinical sites for APRN education. The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, the largest clinical site for Penn Nursing, is among the hospitals selected. Under the Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration, CMS will provide the partner hospitals with payments of up to $50 million annually over four years to cover the clinical training of APRNs as part of the demonstration. Payments to the

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participating hospitals will be linked directly to the number of additional APRNs the hospitals and their partners are able to train as a result of their participation in the demonstration. “The demonstration provides funding for the first time to clinical sites to offset their costs of clinical education of advanced practice nurses,” said Linda H. Aiken, PhD, RN, FAAN, FRCN, an architect of the Penn proposal for the Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration with Victoria L. Rich, PhD, RN, FAAN. Dr. Aiken directs Penn Nursing’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research and Dr. Rich is assistant dean of clinical practice at Penn Nursing and chief nurse executive of the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Said Dr. Aiken: “The funds are also an incentive for schools of nursing to expand graduations from APRN programs.” In the demonstration, half of all clinical training is required to take place in non-hospital settings in the community and will provide APRNs with the primary care, preventive care, transitional care, and the chronic care management skills needed to provide effective and well-coordinated care. Students receiving training funded by the demonstration help fill gaps in non-hospital, community-based settings, including in underserved areas. The demonstration program also establishes the Graduate Nurse Education Consortium of Greater Philadelphia which encompasses all nine local schools of nursing that offer advanced practice nursing education and their affiliated health systems and primary care sites in Philadelphia. Another important innovation is an agreement between Penn Nursing and Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine that APRN students and fourthyear medical students will have preceptorships in pairs to foster interprofessional education. “The number and caliber of APRNs who will come through the Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration are critical elements to the success of the Affordable Care Act and so to the health of all Americans,” said Penn Nursing Dean Afaf I. Meleis. “Penn nurses will continue to be ahead of the curve.”


The Norma M. Lang Distinguished Award for Scholarly Practice and Policy honors the dean emerita of the School of Nursing for her eminent contributions to health and science.

Dr. Terri Lipman is the Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition and Professor of Nursing of Children at Penn Nursing. Renowned as a researcher, teacher, and clinician, she is an expert in children with diabetes and endocrine disorders.

2012 Award Recipient

Terri H. Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN Inaugural Lecture

Hitch Your Wagon to a Star: A Roadmap for Promoting the Health of Children with Endocrine Disorders Thursday, October 18, 2012 – 3:00-5:00pm

Ann L. Roy Auditorium Claire M. Fagin Hall – School of Nursing Reception immediately following – Carol Elizabeth Ware Lobby RSVP: 215.898.8283 or http://langlecture.eventbrite.com


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage P A I D Permit #2563 Phila., PA

Claire M. Fagin Hall 418 Curie Boulevard Philadelphia, PA 19104-4217 www.nursing.upenn.edu

Penn Nursing Faculty Care to Change the World through Research Around the Globe

Afghanistan

Egypt

Rosemary Polomano Pain management

Marilyn Stringer Cervical cancer prevention and screening

Africa

Greece

Charlene Compher Nutrition

Kathleen Brown, Maureen George, and Marilyn Sommers Sexual assault and injury and children’s environmental health

Karen Glanz Obesity prevention Loretta Sweet Jemmott Prevention of HIV/AIDS and STDs

Israel

Anne Teitelman Prevention of HIV/AIDS and STDs

Lisa Lewis Spiritual-cultural practices and cardiovascular health

Africa India Marjorie Muecke Nursing research and practice development

Caribbean Central America

Australia Guatemala

Ellen Brodrick, Dawn Durain, Mamie Guidera, William McCool, Barbara Reale Midwifery

Therese Richmond Trauma

China Jianghong Liu Early health risk factors in children

China Europe United Arab Emirates Linda Aiken Nurse staffing

Denmark Ireland South Africa Barbra Mann Wall Nursing history

Barbara Medoff-Cooper Maternal caregiving

Israel and Puerto Rico Marilyn Sommers Sexual assault and injury and women’s health

Italy and Sweden Barbara Riegel Heart failure and self-care

Peru Alison Buttenheim Mobile health and behavioral economic strategies

Tanzania Connie Ulrich Ethics training and program development

Thailand Wendy Grube Comparative health


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