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NEWS & EVENTS

McMaster argued that the United States should invest in cyberinfrastructure to protect data against espionage, sabotage and threat. He associated political polarization with identity politics and the phenomenon of people becoming more connected electronically, but less connected socially. He shared his conviction that we “need to regain confidence in our common identity as Americans.” “Strategic confidence is the fountainhead of protecting American democracy from Russian new generation warfare,” he said. Following McMaster’s lecture, Penn Law professor and director of the Penn Law Center for Ethics and the Rule of Law (CERL) Claire Finkelstein moderated a question and answer session during which he discussed the role of social media in spreading Russian influence and creating fractures in American democracy. Professor Finkelstein posed a final question to McMaster: “Will American democracy survive and recover from these foreign threats?” “Absolutely,” McMaster replied. “We all have a responsibility for bringing our society together and engaging in an informed discussion about the future of American democracy.”

Paul George, Who Led Biddle Law Library for 17 Years, Praised for His ‘Laser-Like Focus on Service’ Years ago, former Penn Law Dean Mike Fitts was in Biddle Law Library when he overheard a librarian explain to a visitor that this is the library and over there is the Law School. Fitts said he remembers being taken aback by the comment. During 17 years as head librarian for Biddle Law Library, Paul George changed that perception by addressing the isolation of the library from the rest of the law school campus.

IT IS DIFFICULT TO SEE A CORNER OF THE ENTERPRISE THAT HAS NOT BEEN TOUCHED BY PAUL’S COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE IN LEGAL EDUCATION AND HIS LASER-LIKE FOCUS ON SERVICE.” THEODOR E RUGER

Dean and Bernard G. Segal Professor of Law

“I give Paul full credit for integrating Biddle Law Library wholesale into the cloth of the Penn Law community,” said Jo-Ann Verrier L’83, GED’10, vice dean of administrative services, noting that the library today contains offices, classrooms, and space for various academic projects. George, who retired at the end of June as associate dean for curriculum development and director of Biddle Law Library, is also credited by his colleagues and administrators for service and innovation. Among his accomplishments, he encouraged collaboration by working with librarians to develop expertise in areas related to the law in order to assist faculty and students with interdisciplinary research, employing a level of service that is rare at law schools. To that end, he established one of the largest legal scholarship depositories in the country, one that has seen nearly five million

downloads in the last several years. He also increased the number of librarians teaching legal research and moved more of the collection from print to digital. Separately, George expanded the adjunct faculty and course offerings within the law school curriculum. “It is difficult to see a corner of the enterprise that has not been touched by Paul’s commitment to excellence in legal education and his laser-like focus on service,” said Ted Ruger, Penn Law Dean and Bernard G. Segal Professor of Law. “His creative approach will leave a lasting impression at Penn Law.” Verrier sounded a similar note about George’s service ethos, explaining that he instituted a system in which all faculty members had a librarian assigned to them. The notion of service went well beyond that, she said, extending to departments such as Career Planning &

Paul George recently retired as associate dean for curriculum development and director of Biddle Law Library.

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Profile for Penn Law

Penn Law Journal Summer 2019  

Penn Law Journal Summer 2019