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Annual Report 2012 | 2013

PENNSYLVANIA HIGHLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE


Table of Contents Message from the President ........................................................................................................................ 2 Mission, Vision, and Core Values ................................................................................................................. 3 The College’s Strategic Plan ......................................................................................................................... 5 The Strategic Plan, 2010-2015 ......................................................................................................... 5 Perpetual Improvement Model ...................................................................................................... 8 Strategic Priorities - Goals and Accomplishments ........................................................................... 9 Office of External Relations, Progress Summary....................................................................................... 14 College Data................................................................................................................................................ 18 Student Enrollment and Demographics......................................................................................... 19 Annual Enrollment................................................................................................................... 19 Unduplicated Headcount ........................................................................................................ 19 Credit Enrollment by Semester ............................................................................................... 19 Student Demographics ............................................................................................................. 19-21 Gender ..................................................................................................................................... 20 Ethnicity ................................................................................................................................... 20 Age ........................................................................................................................................... 21 County of Residence ................................................................................................................ 21 Program Enrollment.................................................................................................................. 21-23 Program Headcount and FTEs ............................................................................................ 22-23 Program Type .......................................................................................................................... 23 Graduates.................................................................................................................................. 23-24 Degrees/Awards by Program ............................................................................................. 23-24 Degrees/Awards by Program Type .......................................................................................... 24 Institutional Resources ......................................................................................................................... 24-26 Employee Data ............................................................................................................................... 24 Category and Employment Status ........................................................................................... 24 Gender and Ethnicity ............................................................................................................... 24 Facilities Data ................................................................................................................................. 25 Finance Data ............................................................................................................................. 25-26 Revenues and Expenses ..................................................................................................... 25-26 Operating Fund Sources .......................................................................................................... 26 Tuition and Fees ............................................................................................................................. 26


Message from the President

Dear College Community: Once again, we have completed another successful year as the community college for the Southern Alleghenies, and our growth has been significant. We are rapidly approaching the 2,000 full-time-equivalent (FTE) enrollment mark for credit students, and our continuing education department is now a multi-dimensional and entrepreneurial enterprise that’s destined to be a significant source of revenue. Our Somerset and Huntingdon Centers have grown better than our plans projected, and the Ebensburg Center has been transformed from ‘money pit’ to moneymaker. The much anticipated Blair County Center has opened in the Logan Valley Mall. The Blair Center is expected to grow rapidly, making it the ‘sister site’ to the Richland campus, and we are exploring the possibility of adding a center in Mifflin. It’s likely that it will be as far as our geographic expansion goes – at least for a few years. Our focus will shift from growing our service area to growing our enrollment. I would like to see us reach 2,500 FTE before my retirement some three to five years from now. We have become a prime economic development engine for Cambria County, bringing more than $12 million through our own operations. The overall economic impact we have on the region is in excess of $50 million due to the increased level of employment and financial stability of our graduates, most of whom remain in our area after graduation. We finished the academic year with some national notoriety as we were listed as the 28th in the nation for net affordability of two-year public colleges. We were the best overall for public two-year colleges in Pennsylvania. This status may be challenged, however, as we go forward as the Cambria County Commissioners have assigned a portion of the dedicated millage to another project. This new cut in our sponsorship dollars combined with the incredibly low tuition rate paid by in-county residents creates a shortfall. Our Cambria County students pay a tuition and fees amount that is less than what’s required to provide their education. Our out-of-county students pay tuition and fees that are sufficient to cover the costs, but we should not depend on them to bridge the financial gap for other students. My priority goal over the next few years is to build our financial resources to the levels needed to provide the highly-skilled faculty and staff that are essential to being a high-quality community college. The residents of our region deserve the best service possible. I know we can get there together. Our administration, faculty, and staff are one of the best teams working together in Pennsylvania. Let’s do this. Sincerely,

Walter J. Asonevich, President

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Mission, Vision and Core Values of Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Mission Pennsylvania Highlands Community College provides quality, affordable opportunities for learning that meet regional needs in a supportive, student-oriented environment.

Vision Pennsylvania Highlands Community College will be a nurturing, dynamic center for teaching and learning. We will be a model for individual development and a catalyst for regional renewal.

Core Values Pennsylvania Highlands Community College strives to be a community of learners where every student, employee and community member is respected and supported. As such, the College is deeply committed to the following values:

Student Success Creating a student-centered environment where individuals are challenged, encouraged, and supported to achieve their educational, professional and personal goals while developing a spirit of intellectual curiosity and a commitment to lifelong learning.

Quality and Accountability Establishing performance standards throughout the institution, developing measures to document effectiveness and committing to continuous improvement in pursuit of excellence.

Integrity and Ethics Holding each member of the organization to high professional and personal standards. These principles are also embodied in the Statement on Professional Ethics adopted by the College’s Faculty.

Collaboration and Collegiality Informing and involving members of the College community in discussion and problem solving at all levels in an atmosphere marked by civility and cordiality conducted with respect for personal and professional differences remember as well the value of humor and humility.

Responsiveness to Diverse and Changing Community Needs Developing innovative and creative responses to the region’s dynamic economic, workforce and social needs based on interactions with all segments of the community.

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Strategic Plan

2012 | 2013


The Strategic Plan, 2010-2015 The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College has been using various strategic planning processes since its inception in 1994. Each strategic planning process has involved various levels of interactivity on behalf of the Board of Trustees, administration and staff. Over the years several key elements have been difficult to incorporate into the planning process; the use of measurable institutional data to gauge results and tying the planning process to the institution’s budget.

In 2009-2010, a five-year strategic plan will be developed by the President’s Cabinet with input from each of the Board Committees. The five-year plan will serve as the basis for the development of the annual action items which will support the goals and objectives of the plan. The following are the Priorities, Goals, and Objective for FY 2012 to FY 2015. 

Priority: Assess Institutional Effectiveness o Goal: To improve the overall institutional effectiveness assessment plan and implement the plan based on assessment data o Goal: To determine student satisfaction  Establish a schedule to survey students once every three years beginning in FY2012 o Goal: To determine employee satisfaction  Establish a schedule to survey employees every three years beginning in FY2012 o Goal: To provide professional development opportunities to non-faculty employees  Develop and implement a new employee orientation program by fall 2012  Hire a professional development coordinator by FY2013 o Goal: To determine the effectiveness of College regionalization  Conduct first five-year comprehensive review of all additional locations in FY2015 o Goal: To assure the quality of academic programs  Full implementation of comprehensive academic assessment plan by FY2012  Achieve National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accreditation by FY2013

Priority: Achieve Regionalization o Goal: To build and pursue the multi-campus map for regionalization  Hire full-time director for Huntingdon additional location by FY2012  Decide whether to add Clearfield to College’s service area by end of FY2012  Full implementation of regional political support plan by FY2012  Lease facility and hire staff for Blair County additional location by FY2014 o Goal: To leverage diverse workforce needs in program development in the College’s service area  Develop marketing plan to disseminate information on workforce training options across the 6-county region by FY2012  Locate training sites in all service area locations by FY2013  Implement workforce training marketing plan by FY2013 o Goal: To establish community relationships throughout College service area

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 

Increase involvement with municipal leadership in all locations by FY2012 Have 100% involvement of cabinet-level staff on external boards in our service areas by FY2013 Priority: Improve Academic Services o Goal: To improve academic programs.  Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three additional programs by fall 2012  Implement new program in engineering technology by FY2012  Create Associate of Science (A.S.) or Associate of Arts (A.A) versions of three additional programs by fall 2013  Create two single-semester certificate programs each year for five-years. o Goal: To increase first-time/full-time retention fall-to-fall and spring-to-spring  Revamp current FYE curriculum to adhere to nationally-recognized FYE programs by FY2012  Develop a career development office by FY2013  Add two new 200-level general education courses each year for five years  Build a Fine Arts Department and Fine Arts (A.A.) program by FY2015 o Goal: To increase the matriculation rate of part-time to full-time students  Eliminate incentives that allow part-time students to remain in part-time nonmatriculated status by FY2012  Redesign catalog to optimize transfer options within General Studies and Liberal Arts areas by FY2012  Provide training to all academic advisors on transfer flexibility of College’s programs by FY2013  Redesign catalog to optimize search-ability through online content by FY2013 o

Goal: To improve course/program transferability  Produce a partnership catalog by FY2012 o Goal: To increase number of specialized accreditations of College programs  National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accreditation by FY2013  Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accreditation by FY2014  National Association for the Education of young Children (NAEYC) accreditation by FY2014 o Goal: To improve developmental education  Create a developmental department by FY2012  Develop and implement course alignment between developmental courses and 100level courses by FY2013 o Goal To increase and improve continuing education offerings and associated revenues  Hire a Dean of Continuing Education by FY2013  Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years Priority: Strengthen Fiscal Stability and Remain Affordable

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o o o o

Goal: To develop and implement the five-year financial plan for expansion  Identify staffing needs for each additional location over the next five-years by FY2012 Goal: To develop and implement a comprehensive facilities master plan  Identify and hire a firm to produce the facilities master plan by FY2015 Goal: To develop and implement a five-year staffing plan Goal: To achieve permanent ownership of a main campus facility

The accomplishments of various departments are outlined beginning on page 15.

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Objective

Lead Officers

Status

Priority: Assess Institutional Effectiveness Goal: Improve overall institutional effectiveness assessment plan and implement the plan based on assessment data Program advisory VP for Academic Training was conducted during the All-College committees trained in Affairs & Student Advisory Committee meeting on November 1, using data for assessment Services 2012. (Title III) Goal: To provide professional development opportunities to non-faculty employees Develop and implement a new employee orientation program by the fall of 2012

AVP of Human Resources

Research was conducted through SHRM and CUPA for best-practices. First new employee orientation was held in January, 2013.

Goal: To assure the quality of academic programs Full implementation of comprehensive academic assessment plan by FY2013

VP for Academic New Assessment Plan was developed and Affairs & Student endorsed by Faculty Senate. It was approved Services by the Board at the meeting on February 28, 2012 and is fully implemented.

Implement Academic Master Plan as part of Title III first-year goal

VP for Academic Academic Master Plan implemented in the Fall Affairs & Student of 2012. Services

Priority: Achieve Regionalization Goal: To build and pursue the multi-campus map for regionalization Lease facility and hire staff for Blair County additional location by FY2013.

President & Executive Cabinet

The Blair Center located in the Logan Valley Mall was substantially finished with construction on June 30, 2013 with classes scheduled to begin in the Fall of 2013. The Blair Center Director was hired and began recruiting during the Spring of 2013 from the Ebensburg location.

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Investigate opportunities for expansion in to Mifflin County and the Northern Tier Counties

President & Executive Cabinet

In progress. Several meetings were held with county business leaders and legislators to discuss possible locations and training needs.

Goal: To leverage diverse workforce needs in program development in the College’s service area Locate training sites in all AVP for Training sites were identified and a list is onlocations of service area Continuing file for locations throughout our service area. by FY2013 Education Implement workforce training marketing plan by FY2013 Implement Healthcare IT Specialist Program (TAACCCT Grant)

AVP for Continuing Education

A marketing plan has been created and will be updated annually as part of the budget preparation process.

VP for Academic The program was launched in the Fall of 2012 Affairs & Student with 19 student enrolled. Services

Goal: To establish community relationships throughout College service area Involve 100% of cabinetlevel staff on external boards in our service area by FY2013

Outreach to businesses to establish career placement and internship opportunities per Title III grant

Cabinet

Dr. Walter Asonevich: Johnstown/Cambria County Chamber of Commerce, JARI (Second Vice Chair), Somerset County Economic Development Council, Southern Alleghenies Workforce Investment Board, Cambria County Alliance for Business and Industry (Chair); Dr. Ted Nichols: Westmont Family Counseling Ministries (President); Lorraine Donahue: Learning Lamp; Trish Corle: Policy Council for Early Head Start Program (Treasurer); Barb Zaborowski: American Association of University Women, Johnstown (President), PA Library Association (Vice President), The Steeples Project; Grace Markum: JARI Board, Junior Achievement-Cambria County Leadership Council.

VP for Academic This effort is ongoing and the metrics for Affairs & Student measuring the success of this goal are under Services development. The new Director of Career Planning was hired in March of 2013.

Priority: Improve Academic Services Goal: To improve academic programs

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Create two singlesemester certificate programs each year for five years

Develop new program in Computer Science by FY2013, ready for implementation in Fall of 2013 Implement new program in Engineering Technology by FY2013

VP for Academic In-process. There are issues with Gainful Affairs & Student Employment and the level of education Services required for the developed certificates. Because 16 credits are required for financial aid, the single-semester objective may need to be modified. VP for Academic The new Computer Science program begins in Affairs & Student the Fall of 2013. Services

VP for Academic The Pre-Engineering transfer program was Affairs & Student approved at the Board meeting in May of Services 2013.

Goal: To increase first-time/full-time retention fall-to-fall and spring-to-spring Add two new 200-level general education courses every year for five years

VP for Academic ENG 260 (Monsters in Literature) and ENG 271 Affairs & Student (World Literature) were added in the Spring of Services 2013.

Create a Career Development Office by FY2013

VP for Academic The office (Career Planning and Employer Affairs & Student Services) is fully operational. Services

Implement new orientation strategies to increase retention (Title III)

VP for Academic The orientations held in the Fall of 2012 and Affairs & Student Spring of 2013 were modified to incorporate Services suggestions from the FYE Summit and Planning Committee. Revisions will be made as data and feedback are received. Goal: To increase the matriculation rate of part-time to full-time students

Provide training to all academic advisors on transfer flexibility of the College’s programs by FY2013

VP for Academic Affairs & Student Services

Training was conducted during both the Fall and Spring semesters.

Redesign catalog to optimize search function through online content by FY2013

VP for Academic Completed. Fewer printed copies of the Affairs & Student catalog will be generated. Updates to the Services, AVP for catalog will be featured on the College’s web External page. The new web page will provide easy Relations access to the digital catalog. Goal: To increase the number of specialized accreditations for College programs

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Obtain National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) accreditation

VP for Academic Application submitted June 30th. Affairs & Student Services Goal: To improve developmental education

Implement course alignment between developmental and 100level courses by FY2013

VP for Academic The alignment of developmental courses in Affairs & Student Reading, English, and Math were all Services successfully completed.

Goal: To increase and improve continuing education offerings and associated revenues Hire an AVP of Continuing Education by FY2013

President

The AVP of Continuing Education was hired in 2011.

Increase continuing education offerings at additional locations by 3% each year for five years

AVP for Continuing Education

Physical classes held by site for FY2013: Richland, 183; Somerset, 20; Ebensburg, 19; Huntingdon, 4

Priority: Strengthen Fiscal Stability and Remain Affordable Meet match requirements for the Title III Grant

President & AVP for External Relations

The match for 2013-2013 has been met; sources are being sought for FY 2013

Pursue more EITC funds to offset the operating costs of the ACE program

President & AVP for External Relations

End FY2013 with a deficit in Continuing Education of less than $60,000; EMS programs will generate profit

President & AVP for Continuing Education

Donations were requested for the 2012-2013 academic year via letter. Several local businesses contributed for the first time or increased their donations. The effort continues into the 2013-2014 academic year. In progress.

Additional Goals and Accomplishments

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Bring EMS training revenue to the level required to hire a fulltime coordinator

Bring the College into compliance with Title IX requirements by Spring 2013 Facility maintenance

President & AVP for Continuing Education

A full-time position has been created for an EMS program coordinator.

AVP for External Relations

Employee training was begun during the Spring of 2013; investigators were trained and ATIXA certified in June of 2013.

VP of Finance & Administration

A roof assessment was completed for the Richland Campus as a first-step in replacement of the roof at that facility.

Employee evaluation

VP of Finance & Administration

Budgeting

VP of Finance & Administration

Office processes

VP of Finance & Administration

Student communication

VP of Finance & Administration

Technology

VP of Finance & Administration

Appraisal Smart, a new online performance management system was implemented and used successfully to complete 2012-2013 employee performance evaluations. Adaptive Planning, a new budgeting tool was implemented to help streamline the increasingly complicated budgeting process. Modifications/improvements were made in the Bursar’s Office related to processing the payment plan, financial aid refunds, and electronic communications. Implemented the mass notification system OneCallNow to help the Bursar’s Office communicate with groups of students. The Financial Aid Office has also been able to leverage the use of OneCallNow. The local area network was upgraded to 10 gigabytes to provide faster access to network services; the College entered a 2year agreement to join the KINBER/PennREN statewide broadband network. The network is intended to foster collaboration and innovative use of technology; we will also use the connection for off-site back-ups and disaster recovery.

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Outreach

2012 | 2013


The Pennsylvania Highlands Community College Office of External Relations Progress Summary, 2012-2013

Government and Community Relations The College continues to see the positive development of government and community relationships as a key component of our growth and success. Our regional development has been a direct result of our exposure to the local leaders in these communities and our ability to engage with local legislators and politicians in conversation related to our services. We accomplish this goal in a variety of ways. Our annual legislative reception provides our Administration and Board members an opportunity to meet with our state legislators to discuss the impact of the College on the region. We also attend a variety of Chamber events, speak at local group meetings such as Lions and Rotary Clubs, hold open houses at our locations and sponsor events for other community partners. We are also very involved with our regional Advisory Councils. These Councils are made up of local business and community leaders that have an interest in helping to advance the development of the centers. We value their input and look to these members to help us shape the academic offerings of the centers by providing insight into the employment needs of each particular region. This year, our students, faculty, and staff combined to donate over $30,000 to local charities and provided over 1,000 hours of community service. This is the result of creating a culture and atmosphere that promotes giving and engaging with local not for profit organizations. We are very proud of these efforts and look to surpass them next year.

Marketing and Media Relations The College continues to engage in the latest technologies available to enhance our marketing. Utilizing social media, electronic bill boards and advertising on local web pages has resulted in an increase in visibility. Current and future students are welcomed to connect with the College through contests on both Facebook and twitter. We are able to provide more varied messages by utilizing electronic billboards to change our advertising frequently. We are in the process of creating a new website design which will be more user friendly for staff and students as well as the community at large. Our annual Presidents State of the College Address has been very well received by the local media. This informational gathering includes Students, Faculty and Staff as well as Trustees and aligns with the President’s goal of creating a more transparent operation. The College logo received an overhaul during this year with input from the marketing workgroup. It is currently featured on all advertising and will be utilized in a new letterhead design very soon.

Foundation

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The PHCC Foundation continues to work toward providing meaningful financial assistance to the development of the College. Working with a Board of Directors, the Foundation has set a goal of obtaining $1 million in assets by the end of the 2016 fiscal year. These assets are garnered through annual campaign donations, special fundraising events and the development of scholarship funds for our students. This years’ annual campaign raised just over $50,000 with our fundraising events bringing in an additional $14,000. The Foundation has also benefited from the College’s Title III grant that was awarded in September 2012. This grant includes an opportunity for the Foundation to raise funds that will then be matched by the grant. During the first year of the 5 year grant award, the Foundation received $15,000 in matching funds. The remaining four years should bring in an additional $172,000 in grant and matching funds. These funds will be placed into an endowment that will be held by the College and utilized to further development academic programs and enhance professional development opportunities for faculty and staff. We are excited about our efforts in Huntingdon County as we are working with our Huntingdon County Advisory board members to visit local business owners and engage them in the continued development of that campus through our annual campaign. This is an approach that will be utilized in Somerset and other regional locations.

EMPLOYEE (105 full-time employees) Participants Total donations

75 $13,290.00

COMMUNITY/BOARD (26 total board members) Board Members

20

Businesses/Individuals

25

Total donations

Designations Unrestricted

$42,820.00

Amount $40,026.00

One Book

$6133.00

Asonevich Scholarship

$3641.00

Mangarella Scholarship

$500.00

Phi Theta Kappa AAUW Scholarship

$1059.00 -

Valenty Scholarship

$75.00

NAIFA Scholarship

$26.00

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Huntingdon

$4550.00

Total

$56,110.00

Grants We are pleased to have been awarded a number of local grants during this year. These grants provide the College with the best opportunity to enhance programs and enrollment and lead to improved relationships with funding organizations throughout the region.

Grant

Amount

Fend Foundation/ACE

$11,000.00

Fend Foundation

Purpose

Scholarships for ACE students in the 5 Greater Johnstown area School Districts Scholarships for incoming freshmen from the 5 Greater $7000.00 Johnstown Area School Districts

Lee Initiatives

$1,350.00 To be used in Public Safety Courses

Lee Initiatives

$2,496.00 To be used in the Biology Department

Title III

$15,000.00 To create an endowment

Total Grants Received

$36,846.00

EITC The Colleges Educational Improvement Tax Credit Program raises funds that support our Accelerated College Education (ACE ) Program. The College utilizes these donations to ensure that the tuition rate for this project remains affordable for everyone involved. The total amount donated for this year was $62,634.30. Scholarships The College added five new scholarships during this fiscal year. They include: Stan and Helen Westbrook Scholarship, Huntingdon Hope Scholarship, Krishan Bhatia Scholarship, Griffith Family Scholarship and American Legion Home Association of Ebensburg Scholarship. These scholarships and those that were previously held brought in $53,096.80 in donations and promises to give.

Total funds generated by the Foundation this year on behalf of the institution were $225,703.85.

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College Data

2012 | 2013


Student Enrollment and Demographic Information Annual Enrollment Unduplicated Headcount Credit Non-Credit 1,871 Credit Enrollment by Semester Fall, 2012 Headcount 3,047 Credits 24,687 FTE’s 2,057.25

Spring, 2013 1,966 16,657 1,388.083

Summer, 2013 742 3,995 332.92

Enrollment Type Type of Student Accelerated College Education (The Accelerated College Education (ACE) program (also known as Dual or Concurrent Enrollment) is a partnership between school districts and the College which allows high school students to earn Pennsylvania Highlands' credits while in high school.)

ACE Dual Enrollment Associates in HS Total

Fall, 2012 1538 103 1641

Spring, 2013 325 101 426

Program Headcount and FTE Information Program BAHS GNHS

Business Administration, AA in High School General Studies, AA in High School

Enrollment Type Type of Student Core New Returning Total Core

Fall, 2012

Spring, 2013

401 933 1,334

140 1,222 1,362

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Fall, 2012 Headcount FTE 2 0.75 101 45.33

Spring, 2013 Headcount FTE 2 0.75 89 27.92


Non-Core Conemaugh Nursing Conemaugh Radiology Conemaugh Histotechnology First Energy JWF

Fall, 2012 55

Spring, 2013 129

16

19

0

6

0 2

0 23

Degree-Seeking Status of CORE students Fall, 2012 Spring, 2013 Degree Seeking 1,238 1,207 Non-Degree Seeking 96 155

Full-Time / Part-Time Status - % of CORE students Fall, 2012 Spring, 2013 Full-Time 68.22% 60.87% Part-Time 31.78% 39.13%

Gender - % of CORE students Fall, 2012 Male Female

42.50% 57.50%

Ethnicity - % of CORE students Fall, 2012 Caucasian 88.99% African American 5.25% Hispanic 0.60% Asian or Pacific 0.22% Islander American Indian or 0.37% Alaska Native Unknown 4.57%

Spring, 2013 41.04% 58.96%

Spring, 2013 89.06% 4.84% 0.37% 0.37% 0.37% 4.99%

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Age - % of CORE students Under 18 18-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-49 50-64 65+ Unknown Non-Traditional (25+)

Fall, 2012 1.05% 67.17% 9.60% 5.55% 6.37% 6.67% 2.77% 0.22% 0.60% 31.78%

Spring, 2013 3.45% 65.71% 9.18% 5.80% 5.87% 5.95% 3.16% 0.22% 0.66% 30.84%

County of Residence - % of CORE students Fall, 2012 Spring, 2013 Bedford 0.82% 0.88% Blair 2.10% 2.79% Cambria 75.41% 72.39% Fulton 0.00% 0.00% Huntingdon 3.07% 3.01% Somerset 15.29% 15.71% All Other Counties 3.31% 5.22%

Program Headcount and FTE Information Fall, 2012 Headcount FTE 11 10.08 9 8.42 34 32.25 5 4.50 30 26.58 4 3.75 87 69.17 7 4.50 7 6.25 2 1.50 64 56.83 48 46.25

Program AC ACAS ACDT AO BAAS BIOT BM BMO CDA CDAS CDC CDD CJ CJAS

Accounting, AAS Accounting- Associate of Science Architectural/Civil: CAD & Design, AAS Administrative Office Assistant Business Administration Biotechnology Business Management, AAS Business Management Online, AAS Child Development, AA Child Development, AAS Child Development, CERT Child Development, DIP Criminal Justice, AAS Criminal Justice – AS Degree

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Spring, 2013 Headcount FTE 12 9.00 14 12.67 32 28.17 5 4.50 30 26.08 4 3.83 88 68.92 15 11.00 1 1.00 9 7.50 1 0.50 1 1.00 53 46.50 52 50.75


CM CMST CTNA CTTC CUL ECAA ECML EE EUT GN GNO HC HCTS HIST HS HSGN HSGR ISA LA MC MDAT MO MPR NM OA PARA PH PM PREN PRPI PSY RCM RT TECH TECHN TM TP WAN WELD

Communication, AA Communication Studies CICT – Network Administration, AAS CICT – Telecommunications, AAS Culinary Arts, AAS Early Childhood Education, AA Early Childhood Mgmt. Leadership, CERT Early Childhood Education, AAS Electric Utilities Technology, AAS General Studies, AGS General Studies Online, AGS Health Care Management, AAS Healthcare Tech Specialist Health Professions: Histotechnology Human Services Human Services – Generalist, AAS Human Services – Gerontology, AAS Information Security and Analysis Liberal Arts, AA Medical Coding Specialist, DIP Medical Assisting Technology, AAS Medical Office Specialist, DIP Media Production Non-Matriculating Administrative Office Assistant Health Professions: Paramedic Pharmacy Technician, CERT Pre-Communications/Media, AA Pre-Engineering Professional Pilot Psychology, AA Restaurant / Culinary Management Radiologic Technology, AAS Technology Studies, AAS Technology Studies: Nanotechnology Technology Management Teacher Education, AA WAN/CISCO Networking Welding Technology, AAS

1 1 59 1 31 5 22 502 1 18 2 52 1 2 5 35 96 1 1629 1 17 1 2 7 15 3 1 5 20 11 22

0.25 1.00 55.58 1.00 28.67 4.33 18.33 454.83 0.50 16.08 1.25 45.92 0.50 0.75 2.92 26.75 86.00 0.25 699.50 0.75 15.42 0.50 1.58 5.75 7.08 3.00 1.00 3.67 19.25 9.75 19.67

1 64 28 7 9 21 471 20 8 1 37 1 1 3 34 91 1 603 2 18 1 4 6 2 1 20 3 1 5 19 10 17

0.08 59.92 26.08 5.33 4.00 17.58 417.08 16.92 2.58 0.75 33.33 0.25 0.33 2.75 25.17 80.50 1.00 179.25 1.42 14.33 0.58 2.42 5.58 2.00 0.25 6.58 3.00 1.00 3.33 17.67 8.08 14.42

Note: Several programs have been discontinued, combined with other programs, or renamed in the 2011-2012 academic year.

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Program Type and FTE Information Program AAS AS AA CERT DIP

Associate of Applied Science Associate of Science Associate of Arts Certificate Diploma

Degrees/Awards conferred by Program Program AC Accounting, AAS ACDT Architectural/Civil: CAD & Design, AAS AO Administrative Office Assistant BAAS Business Administration BM Business Management, AAS BMO Business Management Online, AAS CJ Criminal Justice, AAS CJAS Criminal Justice – AS Degree CTNA CICT – Network Administration, AAS CTTC CICT – Telecommunications, AAS CUL Culinary Arts, AAS ECML Early Childhood Mgmt. Leadership, CERT EE Early Childhood Education, AAS GN General Studies, AA HC Health Care Management, AAS HIST Health Professions: Histotechnology HSGN Human Services – Generalist, AAS ISA Information Security and Analysis LA Liberal Arts, AA MC Medical Coding Specialist, DIP MDAT Medical Assisting Technology, AAS PARA Health Professions: Paramedic PH Pharmacy Technician, CERT RT Radiologic Technology, AAS TECH Technology Management, AAS TM Technology Management TP Teacher Education, AA WAN WAN/CISCO Networking WELD Welding Technology, AAS

Fall, 2012 Headcount FTE 544 478.25 94 87 537 484.66 19 16.17 39 29.25

Awards 4 17 1 2 22 1 11 6 10 1 3 7 14 35 1 1 18 1 4 15 22 1 13 18 2 2 2 1 4

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Spring, 2013 Headcount FTE 550 457.41 106 97.50 504 445.49 28 18.66 36 26.67


Program Type and Degrees/Awards Conferred Program Type AAS Associate of Applied Science AA Associate of Arts AGS Associate of General Studies CERT Certificate DIP Diploma Total

Awards 162 28 13 21 15 239

Institutional Resources Employee Data, Fall of 2012 Category and Employment Status Instructors Executive/Administrative Other Professionals, Support Services Technical & Paraprofessionals Clerical & Secretarial Service & Maintenance Total

Full-Time 27 38 13

Part-Time 92 0 1

Total 119 38 14

0

0

0

18 9 105

14 1 108

32 10 213

Employment Status, Gender and Ethnicity Full-Time Male Female Caucasian 44 60 African American 0 1 Hispanic 0 0 Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0 American Indian or 0 0 Alaska Native Unknown 0 0 Total 44 61

Part-Time Male Female 47 60 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 47

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0 61

Male 91 0 0 0 0 0 91

Total Female 120 2 0 0 0 0 122


Facilities Data Square Feet Richland Ebensburg Somerset-West Main St Huntingdon Somerset-Georgian Place Blair Total

128,967 24,651 3,759 3,258 3,868 4,343 168,846

Assignable Square Feet 99,205 19,248 2,959 1,638 1,994 2,490 127,534

Finance Data Revenue and Expenses, 2011-2012 College

Foundation

REVENUES Operating Revenues Student Tuition & Fees Government Grants Government Grants - Capital Auxiliary Enterprise In-kind Revenues Contributions Fundraising State Appropriations: Operating Mandated Other Appropriations County Appropriations Private Gifts Interest and Dividends Unrealized Gains and Losses Other Non-Operating Revenue / (Expenses) Total Operating Revenues

85,506 18,540,932

202,517

EXPENSES Education & General: Instruction Academic Support Student Services Institutional Support

3,365,583 1,639,000 1,796,872 1,947,761

12,756

6,402,235 7,199,707 4,446 95,210 43,912 130,625 19,611 2,461,267 871,897 208,908 1,205,000 6,756 13,253 (4,884)

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Operations & Facility Maintenance Government Grants Provision for Uncollectible Accounts Depreciation Grants to PHCC Fundraising In-kind Expenses Interest Total Operating Expenses

1,616,988 6,592,802 51,518 996,966

32,350

151,705 18,159,195

118,920

Change in Net Assets Net Assets – Beginning of the Year Current Year Net Income (Loss) Net Assets – End of the Year

9,929,489 381,737 10,311,226

436,081 83,597 519,678

25,376 4,526 43,912

Operating Fund Sources (as of June, 2012) Source Amount Tuition 6,402,235 State 3,542,072 Local (Cambria County) 1,205,000 Other 187,472 Total 11,336,779

% of Operating Funds 56% 31% 11% 2% 100%

Tuition, 2012-2013 Per-Credit Tuition Fall 2012 In-County

Regional

Out of County

Out of State

Full-Time Tuition

$1,465.00

$2,637.00

$2,930.00

$4,395.00

Per-Credit Tuition

$97.00

$175.00

$194.00

$291.00

Regional

Out of County

Out of State

Note: Does not include course fees.

Spring 2013 and Summer 2013 In-County Full-Time Tuition

$1,450.00

$2,610.00

$2,900.00

$4,350.00

Per-Credit Tuition

$96.00

$173.00

$192.00

$288.00

Note: Does not include course fees.

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Annual Report | 2012-2013