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Copyright © 2011 University of Pennsylvania School of Design All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper Design by Pentagram Printed by Finlay Bros. The primary typeface is Union, designed by Jeremy Mickel The supporting typefaces are Knockout, Chronicle, Verlag, Vitesse, Didot, Mercury, Saracen, Ziggurat, Requiem, Tungsten, Leviathan, Sentinel, Archer, Whitney, Gestalt, Topaz, Schneidler, Acropolis, Giant, and Champion designed by Hoefler Frere-Jones Published by University of Pennsylvania School of Design Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 All work, including illustrations and photographs, is used by permission. “UrbanSHED” ©2009 UrbanSHED ISBN 978-0-9833581-0-7


penndesign/now:

Copyright © 2011 University of Pennsylvania School of Design All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper Design by Pentagram Printed by Finlay Bros. The primary typeface is Fulton, designed by Jeremy Mickel The supporting typefaces are Knockout, Chronicle, Verlag, Vitesse, Didot, Mercury, Saracen, Ziggurat, Requiem, Tungsten, Leviathan, Sentinel, Archer, Whitney, Gestalt, Topaz, Schneidler, Acropolis, Giant, and Champion designed by Hoefler Frere-Jones Published by University of Pennsylvania School of Design Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 All work, including illustrations and photographs, is used by permission. “UrbanSHED” ©2009 UrbanSHED ISBN 978-0-9833581-0-7


penndesign/now: PennDesign is an inventive place of learning where the many fields of architecture, planning, preservation, landscape and the fine arts come together on shared ground. At PennDesign, we are dedicated to design that is creative in nature and transformative in impact. In a collaborative environment that fosters inquiry and experimentation, faculty and students seek to recast the distinction between theory and practice, expand knowledge and invention through research, and contribute works of value and beauty. PennDesign now.


penndesign/now: perspective/ 8–9

Amy Gutmann

action/

ideas/ 18–19

Fumihiko Maki

32–33

University President 20–21 10–11

Zaha Hadid

Marilyn Jordan Taylor Dean, PennDesign

22–23

Eduardo Glandt

24–25

48–49

Inspired by a

Rail Work in the

Anuradha Mathur,

Midsummer’s

Northeast

Dilip da Cunha

Night Dream

Megaregion

Simon Kim and

Robert Yaro,

Mark Yim

Marilyn Taylor

Ben’s House:

42–43

Frank Matero

Barry Bergdoll

T.C. Chan Center

50–51

List of Lectures

36–37

Symposium:

Ali Malkawi 44–45

Studio Slavonice

experience/ 72–73

Laurie Olin

UrbanSHED M.Arch ’11, with

64–65

Sense and Non-sense

Sarah Khan and

David Leatherbarrow

Andres Cortes

Kotor, Montenegro

74–75

Randall Mason

Design Awards

Schuylkill Watershed

A Tribute to

Address

Michael Nairn,

Dean, School

Professor

Peter Brown

Harris Steinberg

of Nursing

John Dixon Hunt 52–53

Unspoken Boarders 2010 Conference: Rebuilding Communities after Disaster Black Student Alliance

54–55

PennPraxis Green2015: An Action Plan for 500 New Acres of Open Space Andrew Goodman

56–57

List of studios

68–69

dread Joshua Mosley

people/ 80–81

Graduates

82–87

Donors

88

Faculty

Young-Hwan Choi,

Bernice Elza Homes Richard Wesley

A Framework for

Afaf Meleis

Laurie Olin

60–63

Schuylkill Green: Resiliency within the

28–29

beauty/

66–67

and Applied Science 14–15

Making High-Speed

in an Estuary

at Franklin Court 26–27

The Robot Etudes:

policy/

Designing History

Thom Mayne

Dean, School of Engineering

40–41

Narciso Rodriguez 34–35

12–13

SOAK: Mumbai

energy/

76–77

Aging in Africa, Matthias Hollwich


perspective/gutmann:

Amy Gutmann President

University of Pennsylvania 2010

President Amy Gutmann is a forceful advocate for the urban university and its role in shaping the communities it serves. When she became the university’s eighth president in 2004, she implemented The

Penn Compact, her vision for making Penn both a global leader in teaching, research, and professional practice, and shepherded its physical and social realization through PennConnects. In compelling faculty,

students, and staff at Penn to see the University as a dynamic agent of social, economic, and civic progress, she is superb in her ability to be a client and a steward for design that matters.

Design matters. The phrase that’s gaining currency in the design world has particular relevance here at Penn. More than adescription, it’s an assertion—of the vital role that art and design can play in shaping the conversation around today’s most pressing issues and in formulating the solutions to them... Design matters. The phrase that’s gaining currency

Biennale before captivating local audiences at the ICA.

in the design world has particular relevance here at

  The same vision is also informing the School’s

Penn. More than a description, it’s an assertion—of

involvement in a web of novel interdisciplinary

the vital role that art and design can play in shaping the

partnerships. Indeed, PennDesign is ground zero

conversation around today’s most pressing issues and

for some of the most fascinating collaborations

in formulating the solutions to them. And it captures

going on at this University today.  Take LabStudio,

perfectly the conviction and the urgency fueling

which joins faculty and students from the Schools of

everyone connected to PennDesign now.

Medicine, Design, and Engineering to apply design

From the school’s dean, to its faculty, to its students,

theories to biological matter and systems. Producing

to its alumni working in every corner of the globe—

stunning graphic representations of these dynamic

PennDesign is leading the way in creating a new vision

processes, their utterly unique work opens a whole new

of art and design professionals as a positive force for

dimension for understanding disease processes.

change in society.

  It’s just one of many new dimensions that PennDesign

That vision is what’s powering a dazzling array of

is opening—not only for its students and faculty

high-profile projects that are engaging PennDesign

but for all of Penn.With research and projects that

students and faculty on a local, national, and global

reach deeply into communities across the globe and

level. Just this year, Penn Praxis, a PennDesign

into disciplines across the University, and a strong

initiative that brings students and faculty together

desire to share its work with a wider audience than

to consult with communities throughout the world

ever, PennDesign is initiating all of us into a new

on design projects, was retained by the Philadelphia

understanding of the power of art and design.

Parks and Recreation Commission to help create

—Amy Gutmann

500 acres of green space city-wide. Also this year,

PennDesign faculty and students, as part of a studio

exploring the potential for a national high-speed rail network, developed a plan for a Northeast system so extraordinary that they were invited to present

their ideas to Vice President Joe Biden. Interim Fine

Arts Chair and Associate Professor of Animation and

Digital Media, Joshua Mosley, is catalyzing fresh ways of seeing things—most recently with his animated installation, dread, which premiered at the Venice

8

9


perspective/taylor:

Marilyn Jordan Taylor Dean, PennDesign

University of Pennsylvania 2010

Since becoming Dean in 2008, Marilyn Jordan Taylor has connected with students across disciplines, elevated research and scholarship among faculty, and embraced

the legacy and future of PennDesign. As a professional, her reputation was built on leadership, large-scale urban projects —from New York’s Moynihan Station to

Hong Kong International Airport’s SkyCity—and an indomitable vivacity and compassion for the world of design.

We are committed to longevity based on integrity over trend. PennDesign/Now puts into print what cannot be

of short essays for John Dixon Hunt, spoke strongly on

captured on paper. The events, words, images,

behalf of saving Ben’s House, and went to Montenegro

provocations, propositions, actions and experiences

to preserve the heritage of Kotor. We boldly advocated

of a thriving school, an inventive place of learning, in a

high-speed rail and stalked the Schuykill River watershed

great urban research university, in a city of legacy and

from its headwaters to the Delaware. Humans from

promise, are recorded here as a prompt to memory and

the Pig Iron Theater Company and robots from the

an impetus toward action.

imaginative minds of design and engineering students

The year 2010 sat midstream between the shock

danced in the woods and fell in love at the Prince Theater.

of slow recovery and the disappearance, at all levels

The beauty of place, history, words and animation filled

of government, of the resources with which to

our house and spilled outside. We urged each other to

rebuild. With characteristic verve the University of

cross the “unspoken borders” of bias that impact design

Pennsylvania began the construction of Penn Park, a

and community.

glorious green swath of playing fields and planted berms

While much of the year is documented in photographs,

designed for connecting university and community.

PennDesign/Now also preserves the words that

The City of Philadelphia launched a comprehensive

stirred our souls or, in some cases, invaded our calm.

planning effort, the first in decades, while also setting

Curator Barry Bergdoll spoke of architecture rather

an objective of putting a park within a ten-minute walk

than architects, City Council member Peter Brown

of every city resident. The Tea Party cheered their

underlined the role of cities in creating wealth for all,

impending victories and prepared to shelve billions

and Professor David Leatherbarrow talked about sense

of federal initiative dollars. Snow fell in near-record

and non-sense in design. Landscape architect Laurie

amounts and stayed around in the winter chill.

Olin was, as always, our voice for the quality of beauty.

We’re trained to know that context—political,

At PennDesign we believe in the power and artistry of

economic, social and environmental—affects us, yet

design and in the importance of design to the policies,

in the academic year that stretched from July 2009 to

investments, and public will of the future.

June 2010, context did not define or limit the range of

In Anu Mathur’s Mumbai: City in an Estuary and in

our imagination. Students and faculty at the School of

Matthias’ Hollwich’s Aging in Africa, we set the table for

Design warmly welcomed Fumihiko Maki, Zaha Hadid,

the year ahead in 2011.

and Thom Mayne for star turns on the Meyerson

—Marilyn Jordan Taylor

stage, and listened closely as Narcisco Rodriguez and John Hoke questioned one another about sources of inspiration for material designs. We created a “Fest”

10

11


perspective/glandt:

Eduardo Glandt Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science

University of Pennsylvania 2010

With more than 35 years at Penn, globetrotting Buenos Aires native Eduardo Glandt—Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences since 1999—has

The intersection of engineering and design is driving new frontiers of possibility at Penn.

seen the transformation of the school from the birthplace of ENIAC to the front lines of nanotechnology, where designers and engineers often work hand in hand.

When this collaboration is at its best, the results can be not just technically brilliant but engagingly beautiful.

Integrated Product Design, the interdisciplinary program that combines the teaching of practical engineering problems with the challenge of design, is broadening the disciplines of engineering, design, and business. ipd trains students in a uniquely multidisciplinary method, melding traditional fields of study in a collaborative and scholarly setting. Students and faculty are encouraged to think outside of traditional professional lines to anticipate rising issues and develop strategic answers. The environment provided by Program Director Mark Yim, Gabel Family Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Simon Kim, Assistant Professor of Architecture, and other PennDesign faculty serves to prepare students in complex reasoning and practical decision-making.

My association with world-renowned architects and PennDesign faculty Stephen Kieran and James Timberlake began with the commission of Levine Hall, home of Computer and Information Science. Their design features an elegant random lattice façade, reminiscent of the geometric painting of the noted Dutch artist Piet Mondrian. Since that time, my partnership with Stephen and James, as well as PennDesign, has been nurtured by our common concern that the solutions produced by design have a large impact on the people and programs housed in these buildings. Their collaborative presentation of robots in action and humans in response shines light on the potential of robotic intelligence and crosscultural communication. —Eduardo Glandt

12

13


perspective/meleis:

Afaf Meleis Dean, School of Nursing

University of Pennsylvania 2010

Dean Afaf Meleis came to head the School of Nursing in 2002, after almost 35 years on the faculty at UCLA. Having spent much of her career working on

As urban populations continue to expand at an unprecedented rate, the demand for our communities to be responsive and adaptive to inhabitants’ health needs is greater than ever.

international nursing, health and women’s issues, she understands how important good design is to promoting healthy environments and communities. A native

of Egypt and graduate of the University of Alexandria, she knows the challenges of a rapidly globalizing world.

On their surfaces, the School of Nursing and the

infrastructure, safety threats and reduced access

School of Design have little in common—nursing

to health care and other resources can conflate to

focuses on the application of science to patients and

produce dire health outcomes.  

their families, design focuses on the development

Women play critical and multiple roles in societies

of cities, housing, transportation, and the systems

as mothers, leaders, students, decision-makers, voters

that allow us to navigate the world. Only at Penn

and workers.  They are the backbone of families and

would this unlikely pairing come together to inform

communities. Health research combined with design

the debate on issues surrounding women’s health

practice and other areas of study and expertise here

and empowerment. In 2010, I had the opportunity

at Penn are creating an increasingly influential body

to work with Dean Marilyn Jordan Taylor and City

of study that can serve to aid and empower not only

Planning Professor Genie Birch when Penn Nursing

women, but the individuals and families they care for

partnered with the International Council on Women’s

and the communities in which they live.

Health Issues (icowhi) to host its 18th conference

—Afaf Meleis

entitled Cities and Women’s Health: Global Perspectives. The conference attracted over 350 participants from more than 30 countries and proved fertile ground for the exchange of research and cross-pollination of ideas for which the University of Pennsylvania is renowned. PennDesign’s collaborative infrastructure powerfully contributes to the important dialogue on issues women face in cities that impact their health and life experiences. As urban populations continue to expand at an unprecedented rate, the demand for our communities to be responsive and adaptive to inhabitants’ health needs is greater than ever. This urgent need for intervention is both health-related and dependent on the fundamental systemic needs of things like human shelter and clean drinking water. The impact of urban living is especially felt by women as gender biases, economic disparities, outmoded

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15


ideas/maki:

Fumihiko Maki

Lecture

Fumihiko Maki’s structures are transformative space with their abundance of natural light and white. More than just design elements, their composition breaks

5 November 2009

“the building is a

small city”

18

down walls between inside and outside, and alter one’s experience with a building as moving from interior and exterior, and back again. Stunning examples of this

were shared of this element during Maki’s 2009 lecture, from the Shimane Museum of Ancient Izumo to Penn’s new Annenberg Public Policy Center.

“Natural light which is the most important parameter for experiencing a space, but also materiality is important because the texture of a building will be defined by the materials we use.” 19


ideas /hadid:

Zaha Hadid

Lecture

22 March 2010

One look at certain architectural forms, and the viewer knows they could come only from the hand of Zaha Hadid. An international leader in large-scale design,

the first female Pritzker Architecture Prize winner treated the PennDesign community to an entertaining spring 2010 lecture that was a tour de force of her vast,

undulating structures whose shocking shapes and daring angles challenge every architecture convention in the book.

“I don’t think we should repeat ourselves, but I am also not someone who wants to jump around everyday wearing a new outfit. Maybe for my clothes, but not in my work.” 20

21


ideas/rodriguez & hoke:

Narciso Rodriguez with John Hoke III

Lecture

7 April 2010

A conversation between two friends bore an intimate look into the minds of two designers regarded for their work with the tactile and the identifiable—fashion

designer Narciso Rodriguez and John Hoke III (MArch ’92), Vice President of Nike Design. Rodriguez, whose fluid garments exude beautiful structure

both inside and out, and the globallyrecognized innovator Hoke showed that wide appeal need not be based on a compromise in vision.

“I got to sit at the end of the master’s desk and learn from there... I WORK hard...to find new ways to do the same old thing.” 22

23


ideas/mayne:

Thom Mayne

Lecture

22 April 2010

Thom Mayne likes to argue. But not just for argument’s sake—his architectural style comes from a commitment to dialogue and the natural provocation

that arises. That belief in conflict combines with a committed sense of urbanism and a brave willingness to disrupt typical systems in order to

create urban form. And the results— on wide display in the four decades since he started his own firm—challenge designers to do better.

I am fascinated with architecture as a manifestation of a From very early on, I had some sort of instinct of chance dialogue. It’s concretizing the way we behave within behavior, incomplete disruption, not as a radical act, but psychological, personal terms and the way we behave as a normative condition. I see that as the world we live in. politically within a democratic, egalitarian society. 24

25


ideas/bergdoll:

It

is a great honor to have been invited to speak to you at this important threshold in your personal and professional lives. Personally, of course, I am delighted to be invited back to my home town—where I discovered my passion for architecture and for cities—to share this moment with you; but all the more, professionally, as I feel that in a way we have traversed an unexpected set of challenges together, ones in which the centrality of the design professions has become again manifestly clear even if larger forces, in which architects are themselves all too often complicit, are enormous in acting to marginalize the disciplines of architecture, landscape, and urban planning and design. Many of you enrolled in the degree programs of the School of Design three years ago just as I embarked, in 2007, on my own journey of discovering, venturing out of the academy to take the reins of the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art. For the past three years, thus, we have not only been learning new professions—me architecture curator, you architecture, city planning, landscape design, historic preservation, and urban analytics, and I hope, as you have done so, side by side the cooperative interdisciplinary approaches that are fundamental to the future vitality of the design professions. In School of Design and Museum, then, we have been trying to discover meaningful positions and prospects; even as the design professions have been jolted as almost never before into discussion of just where the moral compass should be set. I trust that you share with me, and so many others around the world, the sense that the horizon of expectations, the matrix in which decisions were made and values assessed, back in 2007, seems now quite distant—distant from the uncertainties that accompany passage into the second decade of this now

26

not so new century. Even what seemed like the emerging new paradigms three years ago—the rapid maturation of digital fabrication, an explosion of new materials, a wide spread acceptance of the priority of sustainability, a slowly reawakening ethos of social responsibility, are —and need to be—submitted, to intensive questioning and exploration from perspectives that are gaining daily in urgency. In 2007 the overlapping worlds of architecture and design were very much, perhaps like the worlds of politics and of finance, and thus of building and of spatial development, persuaded that old laws of cycles and periods had definitively yielded to new models of uninterrupted growth, limitless possibilities, and perhaps even the transcendence of the disruptive paradigm of the cyclical, and sometimes, violent, swings of economic growth and building demand. In 2010 that mood seems hard to recapture. The neologism “Starchitect”— which did little service even to the handful of design talents whose work was regarded largely from a very superficial set of criteria of relevance largely to the affluent citizens of the G20 countries—has lost much of its luster. Certainly I don’t image it is, in 2010, a viable role model for future designers, since along with the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the sub-prime mortgage crisis, and now the sovereign debt crisis emerging in Europe, has come an equally impressive crash of new commissions for expensive private houses and showy museum additions, the prime building types that sustained that attention. A few years ago it seemed that the reduction of the range of tasks for architecture was in direct relationship to the small percentage of the profession who could hope to excel within the paradigms of early twenty-first century media culture. Of course there were other outlets, some of the most innovative

Barry Bergdoll

design work even entered in a rarified way into public discourse through limited edition objects for sales in the overheated art market. Research seemed limited to the academy, a rift between academy and profession had widened. Clearly this is not a model for the interface between design and the world that is sustainable, if it ever was. I am not among those who believe that what we are currently experiencing is a temporary downturn; nor that that we need simply to wait it out. I am no economist, political scientist, or financial analyst; but I think it is now abundantly clear to any of us following the historical information revealed by each new excavation of our assumptions brought on by the crisis, that there were ample signs that that euphoria was un-tethered long before the band ceased to play, that many of the causes are structural rather than ephemeral. It seems to me that we are living through a paradigm shift as fundamental as that launched thirty years ago, when the dual doctrines of unregulated markets and the winnowing of government’s role in large scale planning and intervention for the public good (even as the public sector, in fact, never ceased to grow), was set into motion by the Regan and Thatcher revolutions in the English-speaking world. These doctrines have become an international paradigm with the accelerated march of globalization in the wake of the sudden thawing of the Cold War, almost exactly twenty years ago. What is certain is that we need to be thinking of new ways of intervening in the world, rather than wait for things to return to a normal that is now a historical artifact, and this is no where more true than in architecture and design. But happily—for me and for you—I have not been invited to the Wharton School, but rather the Penn School of Design, a school that has distinguished itself over and over again as a leader in innovation from the days of Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, Romaldo Giurgola and Ian

Commencement

As the 2010 graduation speaker, Barry Bergdoll addressed the seismic shift occurring in design—and the world over—as a result of the global economic

17 May 2010

unconventionally. From the first I gave McHarg, to the current generation of your myself the mandate of making the museum teachers who are exploring diverse new a platform for the stakes of architecture as paradigms for the delivery of design in the it is practiced now, a platform where public digital age, along with interdisciplinary and professionals alike could confront connections between landscape and the process that is “design thinking,” architecture, between regional planning and economic analysis, between design and rather than merely observing end results. the current demographic crisis, all of which Beautiful buildings displayed divorced of the contextual framework of their genesis, make Penn one of the most interesting is an old art museum paradigm that runs laboratories of design potential anywhere ever the risk of reducing architecture to in the world. It seems to me that as a result so many consumer or media objects, no you are particularly well placed to move matter what the intent of their makers on to the practice of design in emerging or clients. That was the intent in 2008 new paradigms, not waiting for them to of “Home Delivery,” with its complex come into focus clearly enough for you presentation of the stakes of digital to see where the opportunities lie, but fabrication read against the larger history building those very opportunities through of the multiple replications of architectural the continuation of the exploration and solutions in the dream of pre-fabrication the challenges that you have embraced since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. here into the demanding but very needy This will be the profile of my colleague environment out there for designers. If Andres Lepik’s “Small Scale, Big Change” one thing is clear it is that the various which opens in September and presents professions taught here will only prosper, the work of architects around the world and have the transformative power that is who define a task and invent the way their potential, when practiced in taught of getting it done for the betterment of dialogue and collaboration. local populations rather than waiting for This is the role that parallels the challenges I have posed for myself, and it is a competition or a commission to come one that I have tried to facilitate in my own along that might serve as an occasion; I think that the coupling of superb innovative redefinition of curatorial practice. In 2007 architecture with wholly new ways of I was hired to guide the architecture and transforming an urban or social situation design program of a museum still in the throes of one of the great expansions of the will be a revelation for many. In such exhibitions, visitors are shown a profile of last generation with ambitious plans for a the architect as an interdisciplinary, artistic second expansion in less than a decade; a and intellectual entrepreneur, rather than year later I found myself negotiating with simply as the artist who can give brilliant my colleagues a museum with reduced budgets, eroded endowments, and a smaller and memorable forms to briefs written by others. In avoiding frequent monographic staff. Happily with the Mies van der Rohe displays, we are determined to promote not archive as one of our greatest assets we individual architects but rather architecture, were well placed to face a new age of “Less landscape, and design as such and the full is More;” and to do so not with the idea range of their centrality in our public realm, that the challenges represented so many a task all the more important in a period in problems to solve but that they must be which the public posting of private wish lists embraced as new opportunities to think on social media sites often passes as a form of public discourse.

I don’t intend here—as an art historian crippled by the lack of images—to explicate in details the innovative interdisciplinary design thinking that faces the challenges of climate change on view currently in “Rising Currents,” but I do want to take up Dean Marilyn Taylor’s invitation to make that exhibition my main subject in the short time I have left this afternoon. And that in order to sketch in some of the ways in which I think that that project’s claims for the role of the design professions in our society are relevant to you as you leave the laboratory of the university to engage in professions that may, at first, seem ill prepared to absorb your energies and talents. Even if you have not yet seen it I hope by now the attention it has garnered has made you aware of the premise: namely to respond to the long term challenges posed by climate change and accompanying sea level rise as it plays out in the continent’s largest metropolis. This is not an urgency in which design has often been seen as central, but our self-given mandate was to reveal the contrary. The approach is glocal, an attitude towards acting locally on issues shared planet-wide which has been gaining increasing traction in the face of the uncritical acceptance of globalizing normalization. In 2010 for the first time more than half the world’s population lives in large cities, and of the 20 largest metropolises on the planet, 15 of them lie substantially in floodable zones that will be remodeled by climate change even without design intervention. Even as the workshops were underway last winter at MoMA’s transformed school house PSl, the estimates of sea level rise were adjusted radically upward with evidence of more rapid polar ice cap melt. The specific challenge posed to the five interdisciplinary teams of architects, landscape designers, ecologists, engineers, and other designers who accepted our invitation to a residency at PS1 was to respond to the Latrobe team report led by engineer Guy Nordenson, landscape designer Catherine Seavitt, and

architect Adam Yarinsky, for a radical expansion of the palette of techniques for intervention.

We are determined to promote not individual architects but rather architecture, landscape, and design as such, a task all the more important in a period in which [posting on] social media sites often passes as a form of public discourse.

Implicit was a critique of the ruling doctrine of both the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the developers who have made a bee line for New York City’s waterfront, to include not only traditional hard infrastructure approaches, but also a whole range of “soft” infrastructure techniques and design interventions which are multi-functional, protective as well as energy producing. At a time when the national debate on infrastructure and new energy sources are focused on “shovel-ready” projects that will stimulate the economy, it seemed to me vital to demonstrate, even on the modest scale of a small set of case studies, or soundings, that we now have an important opportunity to foster new research and fresh thinking about the use of urban coastlines, about the collaborative designs of architects and landscape designers, about the fact that design is a form for imagining wholly new solutions rather than a way of decorating solutions found by others. Rather than running from the rising sea levels and leaving the problem solving to engineers who will build the defenses, we sought to harness the new interdisciplinary experiments that have been emerging in the design world to embrace the coastline, mediate the environmental challenges, and provide both solutions and images for thinking of mid-21st century urban life differently. The audiences are multi-fold, as they must be for an architectural gallery inside one of the world’s most visited and popular museums of art: the general public, government policy makers who de facto form the physical fabric of the region, and the design professions themselves in a period when the economic recession provides challenges not experienced for two generations. Attendance has been beyond our wildest hopes, even if the level of exchange on the accompanying web site—perhaps you could raise the stakes here when you are next on the internet—

crisis. Seeing opportunity amid the debris, Bergdoll, the MoMA’s Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design and Professor at Columbia University,

delivered of bounding and timely message on responsibility, engagement and hope to PennDesign’s newest graduates.

reveals that we all still have a long way to go together, we might agree that that form of engagement is the most viable posture for to bridge the gap between speaking to one a design professional as the 21st century another as designers, and to the vital task enters its second decade with a sense of of claiming a central place at the national anxiety definitely much more founded than public debate about infrastructure, climate structure, post sub prime crisis development, that which eleven years ago accompanied the ephemeral Y2K threat, a momentary and other a myriad of other urgent issues where design should be at the table from the blimp in the unthinking faith in technology. Since then the digital forces of the globe menu planning. Some are bewildered by this new use of the have revealed themselves capable of causing radical destruction and shifts of museum not as a sanctuary for continually wealth in automatically programmed sales relaunching a battle in a war won long ago, and purchases of stocks by mega computers namely the status of architecture as art, but malfunctioning for a nanosecond, even as rather the posture of the museum as a form of advocacy. I insist that this critique—most computer driven armaments fail to reach real targets. There is indeed real cause for recently voiced in the surprising setting anxiety, and new crises continue to emerge, of a presentation of the project to students but it seems to me that the most pertinent and critics at the University of Caracas in stance as you translate the wealth of Hugo Chavez’s Venezuela—arrives rather research in which you have engaged in this belatedly. MoMA was founded within days school and venture outside the academy is of the stock market crash of 1929 and came further activist engagement. Your challenge of age in the Depression. From the first is to convert the daily stakes you took on its agenda was multi-fold. Even if most here into new research opportunities, and architectural histories have preferred to to advocate for the central role of design retain the aesthetic manifesto of Philip in the robustness of the societies where Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock’s you elect to practice as a central part of seminal “International Style” exhibition of any national agenda. But this it seems 1932; but the most sustained activity of the to me is something that you can only do, department’s first decade was exhibitions once you have calibrated your own ethical and programs advocating for better public compass, set a standard for what it means housing. These had direct impacts on the to act as a designer, and engage to work creation of the New York City Housing collaboratively with the other disciplines Authority in 1934 and on the passage of the that have been trained here side by side Federal Housing Act of 1937, much of this with you, and with the issues that the fast due to the activism of the young Catherine changing global situation is bringing us Bauer and the advocacy of Lewis Mumford, every day. The architecture of the future who went on to teach here in this school for many years. It is the renewal of this advocacy will not be a new set of formal experiments, but rather a new approach to working role that has seemed to me increasingly together to craft a meaningful public urgent in defining the role for a Department of Architecture & Design not only as a mirror realm resilient to the challenges already manifestly evident before us. of the range of invention, innovation, and artistry to be found in the design professions, Thank you so much for allowing me to share part of this great ceremony with you. but also as an instrument, even an agent, for —Barry Bergdoll the engagement of the design professions with the most pressing issues of the day. I hope that I am right in my premise that having lived through the last three years 27


ideas/lectures:

PennDesign

Lecture Series

2009—2010

The classroom is just the appetizer. PennDesign’s ongoing lecture series and symposia bring professionals and academics from the tops of their fields to

Meyerson Hall, where they engage not just by imparting knowledge, but frequently guiding and critiquing studio work. Students enjoy up-close-and-personal

access to the people shaping today’s design world—and get a taste of what it will be like to shape tomorrow’s themselves.

JON CALAME, Minerva Partners, Divided Cities: Beirut, Belfast, Jerusalem, Mostar and Nicosia; STEPHEN KIERAN, Kieran Timberlake Associates, Dwelling; NINA KATCHADOURIAN, Fine Arts Senior Critic; TRENT LETHCO, Arup, Reshaping the City: New Visions for Urban Transport; NICK GIANOPULOS, JOHN MILNER, DENISE SCOTT BROWN, and ROBERT VENTURI: Franklin Court: A Conversation; JOÃO GOMES DA SILVA , Atelier Global, Recent Work; JOHN YAU, Visiting Fine Arts Critic; ELLEN DUNHAM-JONES, Georgia Institute of Technology, Retrofitting Suburbia; EELCO HOOFTMAN, Gross.Max, Land / Scape / Architecture; AN-MY Lê, Senior Critic; JASON JOHNSON, Future Cities Lab; PHILADELPHIA MODERN: PRESERVING BETH SHOLOM, David De Long, Emily Cooperman, Gunny Harboe, Michael Henry, Dorothy Krotzer, Derek Trelstad; PAOLO BÜRGI, Studio Bürgi, The Landscape Project: Between Rediscovery and Intervention; JOHN DIXON HUNT, Honoring John Dixon Hunt, Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture, Essays, Tributes and Images in Honor of Professor John Dixon Hunt’s Contributions to the History and Theory of Landscape Architecture; FUMIHIKO MAKI, Maki and Associates; NEW FORMS OF PUBLIC SPACE, James Corner, Julie Beckman, Matthew Ritchie, Dean Marilyn Jordan Taylor, and Michael Larice; MATTHEW RITCHIE; BJARKE INGELS; RANDALL MASON, The Once and Future New York: Historic Preservation and the Modern City, GARY LAWRENCE, ARUP, Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience: Preparation for a Chaotic Climate Future, GEOFF MANAUGH, BLDGBLOG, Wired Magazine, The Turbulence Biennial; OLAF BREUNING, Visiting Artist; JOSEPH RYKWERT, What Makes Your Eye Judicious?, JERRY VAN EYCK, West 8, West 8: Urban (and) Landscape; NICHOLAS NEGROPONTE, MIT Media Lab, Integrated Product Design Seminar; DAVID HUMPHREY,Visiting Artist; DAVID LEATHERBARROW, Sense and Non-Sense in Contemporary Architecture; CHARLES ATLAS, Film artist; MILER LAGOS, Visiting Artist; CONVERSATIONS: THE NEW BARNES FOUNDATION, Billie Tsien, Tod Williams, David Leatherbarrow, Derek Gillman, and others; SAM DURANT, Multimedia Artist; FRANKLIN COURT: A CONVERSATION, Nick Gianopulos, John Milner, Denise Scott Brown, Robert Venturi; KEN SMITH, Ken Smith Landscape Architect, biglittleskipthemiddle; ELEANOR ANITN, Photographer; NTIN; GREGG PASQUARELLI, SHoP Architects; MARCEL SMETS, State Architect to the Flemish Government, Infrastructure Design in the Contemporary Landscape; TAKAHARU TEZUKA , Tezuka Architects; DOMINIQUE PERRAULT, Dominique Perrault Architecture; CORNELIA OBERLANDER AND ROSA KLIASS, Fifty Years of North|South Axis Landscape Architecture Practice; The Annual Ian l. McHarg Lecture; ANTHONY VIDLER; Dean of the School of Architecture, The Cooper Union; JOAN FITZGERALD, Director, Law, Policy and Society Program; Director, Urban Studies Undergraduate Minor, Northeastern University, Emerald Cities:Urban Sustainability and Economic Development; JONATHAN ROSE, Jonathan Rose Companies, MARTIN REIN- CANO; TOPOTEK 1, Personal Public Space, ZAHA HADID, Integrated Product Design Lecture; STAN ALLEN, Princeton University, Stan Allen Architect; JUN KANEKO; MICHAEL BIERUT in conversation with CHEE PEARLMAN; JOÃO NUNES PROAP, New Landscapes, ROBERT NICHOLLS, University of Southampton, TIMUR GALEN, Goldman Sachs; EDUARDO ROJAS, Inter-American Development Bank, Sustaining the Preservation of Historic Centers; NARCISO RODRIGUEZ and JOHN HOKE III, Nike; DAVID SCOTT, Arup; DANA SCHULTZ; ETHAN CARR, University of Virginia; GARY HILL; THOM MAYNE, Morphosis; SOAK: MUMBAI IN AN ESTUARY, Book Launch and Panel Discussion, Teddy Cruz, Nina-Marie Lister, Lindsay Bremner with Anuradha Mathur, Dilip da Cunha and others... 28

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action/soak:

SOAK

Exhibition and Publication

26 April 2010

Soak is a new visualization of Mumbai’s terrain. It presents

Coastline

Mumbai in an estuary, a fluid threshold between land and

The first section of Soak looks at the build up to war against the

sea. It encourages design interventions that hold monsoon

monsoon as rooted in a belief that land can be separated from the

waters rather than channel them out to sea; that work with the

sea. It traces the drawing of the coast line; its tentative if artful

gradient of an estuary; that accommodate uncertainty through

beginnings in early European maps and its pursuit in the “fair

resilience, not overcome it with prediction. It moves Mumbai out

weather season” by English marine and land surveyors in the 18th

of the language of flood and the widely accepted trajectory of

and 19th centuries.

Landscapes are living phenomena that need to be negotiated, not controlled. SOAK: Mumbai in an Estuary is a book and exhibition by Anuradha Mathur and Dilip

Da Cunha that explores design and artistic expression in a natural world that, despite your best intentions, has its own ideas. The earth breathes; lands flood; nature

decides. It’s up to designers to welcome the environment not as a challenge but as an opportunity.

war with the sea and monsoon that this language perpetuates. It recovers the world of soak. Soak is about making peace with

Estuary

the sea; about designing with the monsoon in an estuary. There

The second section of Soak draws out landscapes that survive

are three sections to SOAK:

beyond the delineating eye of the surveyor and pervasive colonial descriptions, both appreciative and critical, that begin by seeing Mumbai’s terrain divided into objects in geographic space. These landscapes, which include swamps, oarts, talaos, and bazaars, occupy the fluid and open gradient of an estuary, a terrain that operates more as a filter between land and sea than a line between them. They demand a different way of seeing and a different mode of representation through section, horizon and time. Projects The third section of Soak proposes 12 initiations in a terrain that reaches from the hills of Salsette in the north, with their commanding access to the sea all around, to the five historic forts of Worli, Mahim, Rewa, Sion and Sewri that were once waterfront sentinels of Mumbai’s estuary. Each initiation works to resolve the problem of flood not by enforcing lines but by transforming Mumbai into a place that absorbs the monsoon and sea, a place that accommodates soak. —Anuradha Mathur, MLA ’93, HOM ’02, and Dilip da Cunha

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action/ben’s house:

Ben’s House

Architectural Archives

Historians have reconstructed the Penn founder’s life so many times, that the only way to get a fresh perspective on the man is through deconstruction. Designers of Franklin Court, an exhibit and

2009–2010

Since the excavations of Pompeii, archaeological sites have

of mediation between the past and the present, preservation

Franklin’s House in Philadelphia and part of Independence

long been a part of heritage and tourism, certainly before the

determines what we see, experience, and know about the

National Historical Park, a team of designers, engineers,

use of the term “heritage” and the formal study of tourism.

past. Increasingly, contemporary practice has moved toward

and archaeologists, and archeologists led by Philadelphia’s

Archaeological sites exist in a state rarely imagined by their

finding an acceptable balance between protecting the

brilliant team, Robert Venturi, HON’80, and Denise Scott

makers. Their fragmentation, dereliction, and abandonment are

historical and aesthetic values inherent in the form and

Brown, MCP’60, MArch’65, HON’94, offered a revolutionary

further modified through subsequent practices of excavation

fabric of the existing built environment, including evidence

solution during America’s Bicentennial in 1976 by revealing the

and display— the latter intended to reveal and give evidence

of age through weathering and subsequent alterations. Such

site’s historical and aesthetic authenticities through real and

of history and experience. The anticipation of preservation as

concerns have been fundamental to preservation theory

exaggerated elements. The result was the construction of a

an integral part of the archaeological project began in the 18th

and practice since at least the mid-19th century. Yet the

spatial montage that never confuses the present with the past

century with the belief in and contemplation of nature and the

tension inherent in this dialectic defines the very nature of

yet allows visitors an open-ended experience of history, memory,

solace that could be derived from a ruin. The ruin stimulated

conservation as the push and pull between the emotional and

and time. Earlier plans in the 1950s to celebrate Franklin on

and exercised the onlooker; the effect sometimes enhanced by

humanistic on the one hand, and the rational and scientific,

the site of his house included building a memorial park or

selective destruction and cultivated vegetation. The pleasure

on the other. At Franklin Court, the site of Benjamin

architectural reconstruction. They were rejected despite the use

conversation led by Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, did just that, allowing the frame of his “ghost house” to serve as a reminder — both of his larger-than-life

presence, which we can feel even when we don’t see it, and that no matter how much we read about him, some details we’ll never unearth.

of a ruin was to reconstruct in the mind’s eye the structure in its original state. The better one understood the ruin, the better the imaginative reconstruction. Site preservation is a critical act that results in the conscious production of place. As an activity

WILL THE MEMORIAL BE SAVED TO ILLUMINATE THE EXPERIENCE OF LOST HISTORY?

of both approaches within the National Park Service (NPS) and the nation in general since the 1920s. The alternative solution proved that interpretation and somatic experience could be achieved together through the skillful combination and display of above—and below—ground archaeology as well as reconstruction, twoand three-dimensional historic space as a hidden urban court and garden, an abstract house plan and volume. —Frank G. Matero

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John Dixon Hunt

Symposium

29–30 October 2009

John Dixon Hunt

action/hunt:

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In the age of instantaneous recognition, Professor Emeritus John Dixon Hunt’s name and influence on the field of landscape architecture endures. Accolades and

accomplishments abounding, the author, editor, and professor to countless enrapt students (and his indelible work) were given rousing tribute by a most appreciative

JDH Has Been a Mentor to Us All A Tribute to John Dixon Hunt What is remarkable is that within so brief a period of time JDH, as he has been known somewhat affectionately since arriving here at Penn, moved from a seemingly periphery situation on the edge of the landscape architecture community. He then went on to be the Head of the Garden Library at Dumbarton Oaks to the Chairmanship of one of the most influential Departments of Landscape Architecture in the World, all the while editing two international journals (one of which he founded), Word and Image and Studies in the History of Gardens and Designed landscapes, and initiating and editing the University of Pennsylvania Press Series in Landscape Architecture. In that same period he has organized conferences, curriculum, delivered papers, published a flurry of important and authoritative books on landscape history and theory, while functioning as a communications interchange in English, French, German, and Dutch for leading scholars and practitioners in a half a dozen countries on several continents. John has changed and enlarged the literature and scholarly life of our field enormously and I for one am deeply grateful and indebted to him for it. When I went to Harvard in 1982 there were no trained landscape historians on the faculty there nor at Penn, Berkeley or much of anywhere. Mostly what there was were occasional visitors who were historians such as Al Fein. Landscape architects that had traveled some and had read a bit taught history, usually using Norman Newton’s Design on the Land, which was as out of date by then as it is now.

A number of scholars trained in art history, architecture history, and geography were gravitating to landscape study. The few art historians working particularly with gardens such as David Coffin at Princeton or Elizabeth MacDougal at Dumbarton Oaks had very little exposure to or connection with either the students or practitioners in the field of landscape architecture. JDH stood out then, as he does today, for his great knowledge and ability to position physical design within its cultural setting and for a gregarious nature which led him to engage those who actually make the work he has studied with

enthusiasm and skill. Unlike many historians, he is an enthusiastic observer of the actual products of his study with exceptional visual acuity, which he combines with a love of physically being in the landscape and moving about in it. An avid hiker and skier for much of his life, he has personal experience of the differences and gradients between the natural world and that of design, and seems to relish both. John has been a mentor to us all. His emphasis and development of an ever evolving and changing series of topics in a sequence of theory courses has been his way of dealing with the problem of having American format lecture classes with little in the way of the English tutorial method in which to work. In so doing he has striven to raise the level of critical thought of both our faculty and students. I have been extremely fortunate to participate in these courses for a number of years, sharing the lectures and resulting discussion with him and the students. It has been more than stimulating.

landscape and design and PennDesign community. Much like the man himself, the symposium gathered far across disciplines and specialties to demonstrate what it means to truly possess great effect.

John managed to do something I’d yearned for, first as a student in architecture, then as a young faculty member here, and as a practitioner, which was to get us all to read more, to learn as much about the world and what has been accomplished, thought, known and imagined about gardens and the landscape, and how it has or might shape our own work. There were moments in our class when I felt my role was to play Judy to his Punch—the idiot savant practitioner—but always, it was clear that he was keenly aware of the enormous number of issues and dilemmas facing those of us in practice. He was sympathetic, curious, and appreciative, and continually absorbing, understanding, and processing an enormous amount from us while we in turn were being sharpened, educated and strengthened by him. The Department of Landscape Architecture at Penn became world famous under the leadership of Ian McHarg. A few years after his retirement and the Chairmanship of Anne Spirn, one of Ian’s protoges, our search committee pondered what to do next. Ian was a hard act to follow, and the discussion centered upon what to do if we were to continue to lead the field and to set new goals for the profession as well as its pedagogy. The committee wisely decided that we needed to reinforce the social engagement of our field, especially as a humanist art and not merely as an applied social science—not instead of ecology, but in conjunction with it. Our committee concluded we needed someone to help develop and push history and theory. Thus we asked John to join us. The result has been a dramatic success. Under John’s leadership Penn continued as a beacon of thought and innovation for the field, continuing to produce leading practitioners and educators who have fanned out to all portions of the globe. Partly as a result of the litany of works I reeled off above, and his unwavering efforts in the classroom and school faculty our school and the field have gained significantly. John it has been a great run, and I am grateful, as I know my colleagues and your students are. I will truly miss you. —Laurie Olin

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energy/


OBOT TUDES

energy/robot etudes:

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Robot Etudes

Annenberg Center Harold Prince Theater

15 May 2010

Mechatronic devices interacting with actors on stage at the Pig Iron Theatre Company elicit expressive forms of relationship—this is far from a forbidding

destiny once imagined in science fiction between robotics and humans. Seemingly disparate, oddly complementary, the Robot Etudes struck a treaty of methods and

The Robot Etudes was the product of three discrete traditions—architecture, engineering, and theater—in the understanding that the collaboration as a whole would be greater than the overlap of its parts. Professors Mark Yim from Modular Robotics and Simon Kim from PennDesign, with the Pig Iron Theater Company, took one semester to deliver an experimental approach to the forest depicted within Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Working with students from both disciplines, and the actors and production crew, various robotic prototypes and networked machines were designed to perform and engage human actors in an integrated, reactive environment. The Robot Etudes played to a full audience in the spring of 2010 at the Harold Prince Theater at the Annenberg Center for Performing Arts. —Simon Kim

The Robot Etudes offered a surprising glimpse into the interaction between men and machines. The teams of robotic inventions developed by teams of architecture and engineering students became equal participants in the re-representation of Midsummer Night’s Dream. Among the most delightful scenes were between human and robot actors, with the sometimes peculiar and sometimes subtle gestures of the robots leading both to remarkable interactions and hilarious misunderstandings. I was there with a nine year old, who was captivated by a set of giant, artificial wings that responded to the least variation in the breathing of the actor who wore them, and became wholly organic extensions. —Dr. William W. Braham, MArch ’95, PhD’04

practice, among disciplines classic and futuristic, to deliver the most unexpected twist of them all—a wonder of possibilities.

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energy/malkawi:

T.C. Chan Center

Research Consulting Communication

Philadelphia Beijing

Created and led by Professor Ali Malkawi, HOM ’05, the T.C. Chan Center for Building Simulation and Energy Studies works across continents to develop new

knowledge, technologies and processes for energy efficiency, from buildings to cities. With projects in countries from Qatar to Korea to Mexico, the Center

performs collaborative research, consulting and education with members across the engineering and design fields, and in the process builds a more sustainable planet.

The goal is to create healthier, productive, energy efficient strategies that will lead to high performance buildings and sustain(able) environments. 42

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energy/brown: Design Matters, Planning Matters, Politics Matters

Peter Brown

Awards Ceremony

Peter Brown, FAIA, has embodied the ways a PennDesign education can serve both public and private sectors. He worked in architecture and city planning for years,

16 May 2010

starting his own firm after returning to his native Houston in the ’80s. Then in 2005, he was elected to an at-large seat on Houston’s City Council. These combined

experiences formed the basis of Brown’s memorable address to 2010’s PennDesign award recipients.

I am very happy to be back at Penn. The critical interdisciplinary

Urban character is what excites people. Whether it is in the city

Urban Architecture

importance of architecture, city planning and design—the reason

core, a small town main street, a village center, or a Transit-oriented

Good urbanism creates the site, the setting for exceptional

I chose to attend U.of P. in the first place—is thriving.

Development (tod ) in the suburbs, urban character will determine

The Re-urbanization of the American City

architecture, like the Metropolitan Museum on Fifth Avenue, the

the successful cities of the 21st century—walkable, mixed-use,

This is the really exciting news—big city mayors, citizen action groups,

The New Age, the Age of Cities.

Library of the uva , the Philadelphia City Hall, the pma as the focal

compact urbanism, served by rail transit, energized by great schools

and private developers are driving the re-urbanization of the central

point of the Franklin Parkway. I worry about Gehry’s Disney Hall,

The 19th century was the age of Empires; the 20th century the age

and centers of the arts and culture, with vibrant public places and

city—people are moving back; what urban sociologist Robert Fishman calls

which seems to fight with its context, although a fascinating, stunning

of nation states; the 21st century the Age of Great Cities. It is in cities

street life. Many cities have pockets of walkable urbanism—but

“the Fifth Great Migration” (following the wave of European immigrants,

building. There is certainly a place for architecture which creates its

that we must stake our claim as the planners and designers, the

it needs to become the norm rather than the exception. This

the settling of the west, the migration to the northern industrial cities, and

own context, like the Kimball Museum and the Salk Center.

form-givers and innovators of a sustainable, livable urban environment.

expanded role of cities in shaping a better planet presents exciting

the white flight to the suburbs). This is happening in spite of struggling

The advances taking place in cities, in the arts, sciences, education,

opportunities for those who want to make the world a better place.

Our Role in Shaping the Future

and just plain innovation in general, will make a smarter planet.

Placemaking

I ran for City Council in Houston, because I felt that one of the fastest

It is all about creativity and innovation . I wish I could say that

Essentially we are talking about “the European Model” (sustainable

growing cities in America needed a clear vision, a plan (“blueprint”)

there are advances in politics as well—the failings in Washington,

development, backed by comprehensive planning and outcomes-

to realize that vision, and outcomes-driven development standards to

and in regional coordination, must be off-set by a new partnership

driven regulations), which 10 years ago the Brookings Institution

shape the built environment. I ran a very competitive race for Mayor

between city governments and the private sector.

said would never catch on in the U.S. But with the growing scarcity

in 2009, and now I serve as the Mayor’s Chairman for International

of resources, global warming, an excessive carbon footprint , and

Trade and Development.

Five purposes of cities:

high energy costs, it’s pretty clear, most cities are competing, even

PennDesign graduates—it is your world. Carpe Diem. I am a living

1. To create of wealth.

in a weak economy, to embrace the European model. This is good

example—international business development and tod projects in

2. To maximize exchange, and minimize travel time.

news for all of us. Placemaking is a multi-disciplinary enterprise—

Houston, including our first “modern streetcar” line. I am helping the

3. To build the middle class.

where architecture, sensitive to its context and relationship to the

capitol city of Lithuania to decide on its new transit system. Previously

4. To foster creativity, innovation

surrounding built environment, serves to define, to shape, an exciting

I worked on the master plan for Riga, Latvia, and St. Petersburg’s first

5. To inform us what it means to be human,

public realm, whether a vibrant park, square or street.

zoning ordinance. As well, I am assisting two neglected neighborhoods

research, health care, energy conservation, advanced technology,

in an increasingly diverse society; the advancement of the public good.

We need to pay much more attention to the street as a key element

schools, and physical deterioration. The re-emergence of the central city depends on gifted, passionate people, committed to change, getting involved—in new business startups, in politics, in city government, in design firms, civic clubs, and in their neighborhood, committed to changing the world. Shaping the future, rather than letting it shape us—that’s what we do. My advice, is to get involved an “Go for it!” —Peter Brown, BArch’64, MArch’66, MCP’66, Cert’66

in Houston to create a tifz (tax-increment financing zone) based on an

of placemaking. Urban form and character are critical—recognizing

innovative master plan for neighborhood revitalization.

that the nature of the built environment has an enormous impact on

I have started a new non-profit, called BetterHouston.org to

human behavior, individual and collective, and thus plays a huge role

promote livable neighborhoods and walkable transit-served urbanism,

in shaping the future.

backed by better planning and urban design. We are promoting 10 great streets, 10 great projects, and 10 great neighborhoods, with a web site and monthly Bulletin. I have also started a Political Action Committee, the Build Houston Better pac , a non-partisan civic betterment group to screen, endorse and finance candidates.

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policy/transportation:

High-Speed Rail Studio

Led by Professors Bob Yaro and Marilyn Taylor, this second-year planning studio took up President Obama’s challenge to design a high-speed rail network for the 21st century—one that would unite the

Northeast and help realize the region’s full economic potential. Their plan is a new alignment connecting the corridor from D.C. to Boston, with speeds rivaling international competitors. Perhaps not surprisingly,

If the United States Northeast Megaregion is to grow and prosper, its cities and states must work together to become a single, globally competitive economic powerhouse. 48

City Planning

Spring 2010

it caught the attention and accolades of the White House and emboldened Amtrak to raise its aspirations in a service that transforms the economy of the Northeast Megaregion.

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policy/schuylkill:

THE H IDDE N RI VE R Schuylkill Green Studio

City Planning

Spring 2010

Led by Harris Steinberg and Michael Nairn, the Schuylkill Green studio combined careful GIS analysis with smart approaches to governance and

implementation, envisioning a resilient watershed where serious investment in ecological infrastructure results in long-term improvements in health, equity, economic

security, and social vibrancy. With all the right sticks and carrots, the plan preserved natural resources, created a connected network, and shaped a sense of place.

Philadelphia and its metropolitan region are tied together through ecological infrastructure, which second-year graduate planning students explored in the spring 2010 studio Schuylkill Green. The so-called “Hidden River” carries issues of politics, governance, economics, transportation and land use in its currents; Schuylkill Green plumbed the many ecological services necessary for a resilient region, from the green tops of the state forests in the Schuylkill Highlands of Berks County to the green roofs of Philadelphia 130 miles downstream. Stretching over 11 counties, the Schuylkill wends through former industrial towns, across some of the most fertile non-irrigated farmland in the United States, past suburban development along the peri-urban fringe before entering Philadelphia, where the Lower Schuylkill River (below the dam at the Art Museum) is a postindustrial no-man’s land. The watershed covers 2,000 square miles and provides drinking water for 1.75 million people. The river’s upper reaches are within the vast Marcellus Shale deposit — natural gas that lies beneath two-thirds of Pennsylvania and threatens water quality throughout the region. The studio mapped development trends, pollution sources, population growth, transportation, tree cover, governance and ecological assets. Students created GIS conservation and restoration models, and conducted in-depth research and analysis of the political and policy implications of a regional growth management strategy. They called for a Register of Natural Capital — a regional land conservation registry with a governing commission empowered with reviewing and approving any development that threatens protected natural capital. In so doing, they learned the politics and policies required to ensure that environmental planning has a seat at the development table. —Michael Nairn, MLA’85 and Harris Steinberg, BA’78, MArch’82

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policy/unspoken borders:

Black Student Alliance

Unspoken Borders Conference

The Black Student Alliance plays an important role in the

These questions, along with many others, highlight a growing

PennDesign community by convening an annual conference

need to evaluate the social conditions, historical precedents and

called “Unspoken Borders.” This year’s conference, “Rebuilding

design decisions that have led to today’s conditions. The Unspoken

Communities after Disaster,” examined successes and failures of

Borders 2010 conference identified contemporary approaches

strategically designed redevelopment efforts.

that are confronting the current power structure, and ones that

Recent years have seen a series of natural disasters that have

are seeking to establish new, justice-oriented design strategies

changed the physical and social landscape of cities worldwide.

that begin rebuilding communities with intentions to include all

In addition, American’s rust belt has been dying for years, leaving

residents and not to remove those in lower-income brackets.

a string of troubled city districts across the country. Previous

—PennDesign Black Student Alliance

mistakes in planning and design have proven to be difficult to fix, due to the lack of synergy and collaboration between politicians, designers, planners, economists, businesses, and residents. The recent downturn in the economy has provided yet another blow,

23-24 April 2010

Elijah Anderson, PhD Elijah Anderson is the William K. Lanman Professor of Sociology at Yale University and is one of the most respected scholars in the field of urban inequality.

Rodney Leon Rodney Leon is founder and principal of Rodney Leon Architects PLLC. He is the designer of the African Burial Ground Memorial in New York City—the only National Monument dedicated Randall Mason to the contributions Randall Mason is an of people of African Associate Professor descent. and Chair of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at PennDesign.

Student-run conferences and symposia give PennDesigners the opportunity to both participate in and steer the design conversation. The annual Unspoken Borders conference, convened by the

Black Student Alliance, explores the nexus between race, space and class, and in the process, students and faculty alike uncover how latent biases can affect their work.

Anuradha Mathur Anuradha Mathur is an Associate Professor in the Landscape Architecture Department of PennDesign. Mathur, along with her partner Dilip da Cunha, has focused her artistic and design expertise for the past decade on cultural and ecological issues of contentious landscapes.

Lawrence Vale Lawrence Vale is Ford Professor of Urban Design and Planning at M.I.T.

Brian Phillips Brian Phillips, MArch’96, is founding principal of ISA, a Philadelphia-based architecture and research office. ISA views projects as unique and complex networks of relationships that are subject to a broad range of constituents, challenges and opportunities.

The most recent incarnation was themed “Rebuilding Communities After Disaster,” lending a timely urgency to the real-world problems the event tackles every year.

Laura Wolf-Powers Laura Wolf-Powers teaches several courses in the Community and Economic Development concentration of the Department of City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. .

exacerbating many social and economic issues. It is now clear that something must be done to target the disenfranchised in most cities while creating new development to help stabilize the housing and job markets. Looking at post-event recovery plans and actions, how has the design community responded and conceived innovative ways to rebuild? Taking into account models from Hurricane Katrina; the Asian Tsunami; terrorist bombings in New York City, London, and Mumbai; the civil wars in Africa, and now the earthquakes in Haiti and Chile; how will the design and planning fields contribute to healing these locations? Should it commemorate what came before or inspire a new way of living? How will these tragedies influence the way we practice in the future, in terms of safety, durability, and sustainability? Examining issues facing cities such as Detroit and Philadelphia, what can be done to breathe new life into these disinvested locales?

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policy/land use:

PennPraxis

Green2015 Plan

Philadelphia

It doesn’t all have to be Central Park—or even Fairmount Park. PennPraxis’ Green2015 shows how to improve the health and well-being of all Philadelphians by

creating neighborhood-scaled green spaces within walking distance of everyone, with a goal of 500 new acres by 2015. Through collaboration, partnerships and smart

utilization of already-city-owned land, Philadelphia can create a parks network that threads green open space through every pocket of the city.

In 2010, PennPraxis worked with Philadelphia Department of Parks and Recreation to develop an action plan for creating 500 acres of new park space in Philadelphia by 2015 — a goal set in Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter’s sustainability plan, Greenworks Philadelphia. The ensuing report Green2015: An Action Plan for the First 500 Acres outlines a strategy to affordably and efficiently transform underused spaces to green locations. Providing walkable access to park space for all Philadelphia residents, the 500 acre goal is a minimum target advancing the objective of making Philadelphia more equitable, livable, and competitive. Green2015 aims to unite city government and neighborhood residents to transform vacant or underused land in Philadelphia into safe and stimulating parks for neighbors to enjoy. Most of the land that can be greened is already publicly owned and therefore requires no money to acquire. The planning, implementation, and maintenance of these parks will be a collaborative effort among many partners, including neighbors, businesses, nonprofits, developers, and the city. —Andrew Goodman, BA’06, MCP’07

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studios/2009–2010:

PennDesign

Graduate Studios

2009–2010

Upper-level studios at PennDesign are much more than just an opportunity for students to try their hands at international projects in far-flung locales from Mexico

City to Florence, nationally in New Orleans, or build on their artistic integrity locally in Philadelphia. When working for clients with vexing concerns that often demand

creative solutions, Penn’s students in all departments encounter real-world challenges that prepare them to work just about anywhere.

AR C H P R E P S T U D I O / S T U DY AB R OAD : M E X I C O C I T Y / S T U DY AB R OAD : PAR I S / D E S I G N S T U D I O I / D E S I G N S T U D I O I I I / M I G R AT I N G F O R M AT I O N S : V E RT I C AL U R B AN I S M F O R N E W Y O R K C I T Y / T H E AM PAR O M U S E U M : A N E W AN T H R O P O L O G I CAL W I N G . P U E B L A , M E X I C O / R I N C O N D E L A V I E JA , G U AN AC A S T E , C OS TA R I CA / AG E -T E C T U R E / D E S I G N S T U D I O V / D E S I G N S T U D I O : AR C H I T E CT U R AL A S S O C I AT I O N, L O N D O N / P OS T- P R O F D E S I G N S T U D I O / F R O M AVAN T- G AR D E T O H E R I TAG E : W H AT T O D O W I T H P H I L I P J O H N S O N ’ S T E N T O F T O M O R R OW AN D T H E N E W Y O R K S TAT E PAV I L I O N / U R B AN D E S I G N S T U D I O / G R ADU AT E S T U D I O I : PAI N T I N G / G R ADU AT E S T U D I O I : S C U L P T U R E / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I : P R I N T M AK I N G / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I : P H OT O G R AP H Y / G R ADU AT E S T U D I O I I I : PAI N T I N G / G R ADU AT E S T U D I O I I I : S C U L P T U R E / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I I I : P R I N T M AK I N G / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I I I : P H OT O G R AP H Y / S T U D I O / S T U D I O I : T R AV E R S I N G L AN DS C AP E : T H E S C H U Y L K I L L R I V E R T R AI L / S T U D I O I I I : U R B AN T R AN S F O R M AT I O N AN D T H E M AK I N G O F S U S TAI N AB L E D I S T R I C T S / S T U D I O I I I : U R B AN T R AN S F O R M AT I O N AN D T H E M AK I N G O F C O M M U N I T I E S / S T U D I O V: V I L AD E CAN S, B AR C E L O N A / S T U D I O V: S I G N S O F L I F E : R E S U R FAC I N G T H E S T R I P, L A S V E G A S / S T U D I O V: PAR C O D E L L A P I AN A , S E S T O F I O R E N T I N O, F L O R E N C E / S T U D I O V: L I S B O N { H I } S T O RY, C I T Y R E AL I T Y. D E S I G N V I S I O N S / D E S I G N S T U D I O I I / D E S I G N S T U D I O I V / I N T E R I O R I T I E S : AN U R B AN C LU B F O R T O KY O / B OTAN I C E C O L O G I E S : C U LT I VAT E D I N F R A S T RU C T U R E S / E C O L O GY— D E S I G N — S Y N E R GY / R E S E AR C H S T U D I O / C O M P L E X P H E N O M E N A : D E V E L O P I N G N O N - L I N E AR M ET H O D O L O G I E S / F O R M S O F I S O M O R P H S : M AT E R I AL S PAC E / AL M OS T N OT H I N G / M AR I N E S I M U L AT I O N L AB AN D AQ UAR I U M AT L AK E T E XC O C O / F I N I T E VAR I AT I O N S : T H E S CAL I N G O F FAB R I CAT I O N / I N D E P E N D E N T T H E S I S / P L AN N I N G S T U D I O : M AK I N G H I G H S P E E D R AI L W O R K F O R T H E N O RT H E A S T M E G AR E G I O N / P L AN N I N G S T U D I O : D E S I G N I N G T R AN S P O RTAT I O N AN D E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T I N T H E C E N T R AL F L O R I DA —TAM PA B AY S U P E R R E G I O N / P L AN N I N G S T U D I O : S OU T H E A S T E R N P E N N S Y LVAN I A G R E E N I N F R A S T RU C T U R E S T U D I O / P L AN N I N G S T U D I O : AF F O R DAB L E H OU S I N G T R AN S F O R M AT I O N S T U D I O / S T U D I O : P O L I CY AN D P R O J E CT E VALUAT I O N S T U D I O / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I I : PAI N T I N G / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I I : S C U L P T U R E / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I I : P R I N T M AK I N G / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I I : P H OT O G R AP H Y / G R ADU AT E S T U D I O I V: PAI N T I N G / G R ADU AT E S T U D I O I V: S C U L P T U R E / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I V: P R I N T M AK I N G / G R ADUAT E S T U D I O I V: P H OT O G R AP H Y / S T U D I O I I : G R OU N DW O R K— A PAR K F O R TAC O N Y, PA / S T U D I O I V: S L AV O N I C E , CZ E C H R E P U B L I C I I / S T U D I O I V: T R AFAR I A , AL M ADA , P O RT U G AL / S T U D I O V I : C R E E K F O RT S : AN C H O R S & E V E N T S — M U M B AI , I N D I A / S T U D I O V I : B O G OTA S T U D I O : 3 D E PART M E N T S + M U LT I P L E E X P L O R AT I O N S / S T U D I O V I : M E G A S T RU CT U R AL L AN DS C AP E S L I N E AR C I T Y—T O KY O B AY P R O J E C T, JAPAN / S T U D I O V I : ( ) T H E S PAC E B ET W E E N —T O R O N T O, CAN ADA / AR C H P R E P S T U D I O / S T U DY AB R OAD : M E X I C O C I T Y / S T U DY AB R OAD : PAR I S / A N D M O R E . . . 56

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beauty/slavonice:

Slavonice Studio

Landscape Architecture

Spring 2010

Studio Slavonice, a landscape architecture workshop led by OLIN Partners Laurie Olin and Hallie Boyce at PennDesign, matches the talent of graduate landscape architecture students with real-world

design problems. The immersive and continuing project, centered in the medieval Czech city Slavonice, focuses on urban and rural design issues identified as urgent by the Slavonice City Council.

The students’ solutions — beautiful in form, practical in application — and the integrative exercise prove academic settings conform to no borders.

Studio Slavonice a landscape architecture workshop led by OLIN Partners Laurie Olin and Hallie Boyce at the PennDesign, explores sustainable development of the Green Belt, an area of the former Iron Curtain containing some of the most significant habitats for biodiversity in Europe. Olin and Boyce, along with 15 of their students, travelled to Slavonice to present the results of the workshop with the local community at the Centre for the Future, an organization that promotes research directed toward a sustainable and diverse future.—Laurie Olin

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beauty/slavonice: Our predecessors have been driven to record their encounters and feelings regarding land, whether the fading sunlight on the granite peaks of the Sierra, the wind through the snow-covered branches of pines north of Xian, the advancing shadows from live oaks across the Roman Campagna, or the animate sleeping forms of eroded mesas near Abiqiu. Yet, to what purpose? As animals we have a sense of being of the world, that part of being alive is to sense the living nature of our environment. As creatures of society we also are invested with ideas and concepts, values and habits, memory and history, regarding the world, our struggles, and endeavors regarding the land. Landscapes, whether natural or contrived, normally exceed our ability to absorb or understand them in one glance. They contain a surfeit of detail, extending beyond our ability to count or measure. They stimulate our senses: the movement of leaves and clouds; the sparkling, shifting and shimmering of light on the surface of water; the shadows and light playing upon the ground nearby or distant hills; the heft and weight of the bones of the earth; the smell and color of the earth; the distant glint of light on a peak or bend in a river; birds scudding overhead; a train or traffic crawling up an incline; a patch of yellow aspen leaves amid the dark spruce. Beauty is a surplus of gratuitous stimulus and pleasure. We are unable to possess and hold it; its fugitive and ephemeral nature engenders a sharp sense of the moment, and frequently thereby one of incipient loss. So much of what has been painted records nostalgia for disappearing places and scenes. Beauty has an eternal and timeless nature, so one understands the recurrent and atavistic themes of people wandering and reposing in nature and landscapes, of an emphasis upon mountains and water, ancient trees and agricultural scenes. Beauty is serious, it is deep, and it has great value for sentient humans. While there are many manifestations, one of the most accessible remains to be found in land, whether natural or designed. A loss or diminution in our interest or comprehension of beauty regarding land or landscape would indeed be a great loss. —Laurie Olin

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Land and Beauty

Slavonice, Czech Republic

Spring 2010

Laurie Olin, Professor of Landscape Architecture, led an immersive, multi-year studio to the medieval Czech city Slavonice. Laurie’s philosophy of practice, which

shaped the studio, comes through clearly in his “Land and Beauty” speech originally given to The Philosophical Society of Texas, excerpted here.

Image: Laurie Olin

Beauty is serious, it is deep, and it has great value for sentient humans. 63


beauty/leatherbarrow:

Sense and Non-Sense

Architecture

The aim of this lecture is to describe the sense and non-sense

forgotten that common understanding and agreement are real

of architecture in our time—which is to say the architecture

possibilities for architecture.

of the past decade or so. The words sense and non-sense

If it is obvious that the two concepts���sense and non-sense—

were used in their common meanings: things have or make

should be considered together, the next point will probably

sense when they are intelligible or sensible, when they answer

need some explanation. Insofar as sense is the aim of meaning

expectations and meet desires. Windows in a wall, for instance,

formation, non-sense is intrinsic to its beginning. This does not

make sense when they provide light, air, and desired views,

mean that disorientation and ambiguity are desired, just required

much like words in a sentence become sensible when they

in both project making and architectural experience. With only

convey intelligible meaning or the kinds of behavior that suit

this first assertion, this apology for non-sense, one might feel

a given situation. Knowing what is sensible does not require

and fear that this argument is about to enter difficult terrain. Yes

reflective thought either (that comes later); more important

and no. While the topic is not simple it is not unfamiliar. Those

is memory, especially cultural memory, and even more so

involved in design know that architectural creativity requires

emotions and perception—with the eyes, ears, hands and feet,

a transition from possible realities to real possibilities; from

the whole body in fact.

interesting but indefinite indications to persuasive proposals.

Nonsense, by contrast, is what we suffer when places,

Projects begin with conditions that appear senseless and end

actions, or things are unclear, ungraspable, or out of place

with solutions that seem right precisely because they expand

and character. Sense, on this account, would seem to be

the limits of what has been taken to be sensible. As Louis I.

positive; non-sense negative. That evaluation, however, is

Kahn recommended, “A great building must begin with the

far too categorical. Although it might be entertaining to

un-measurable, go through measurable means when it is

list examples under each heading, more interesting is the

designed, and in the end must be un-measurable.”

question concerning the basis on which these assessments

—David Leatherbarrow, HOM’91

7 December 2009

Continuing the dialogue of what the normative paradigms in architecture are informs how we understand and interact with contemporary design. Contemplative

and rigorous, Professor and Associate Dean David Leatherbarrow explores the philosophical reasoning between logic (and its mirror illogic) in architecture,

as well as their contextual implications for comprehension. The meaning is immediate. The application—evolving. Sure enough, we may one day awake to find ourselves on common ground.

are made. This includes not only the choices each of us makes individually, but those we might agree on—works that communicate common sense. Despite all the signs to the contrary, architecture is still a public art, the results of which are known and felt commonly as the framework and image of our lives. Because concern for architecture is shared, some measure of agreement about any given work’s quality and sense should be possible. Perhaps this question about sense arises out of concern that these days we seem to have

S E N S E & N O N- S E N S E 64

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beauty/conservation: On choosing Kotor as the studio location We look for a convergence of a couple different things when we think about sites for the European Conservation Course. One, it’s got to be a place of great significance and prominence in its heritage value--that’s one of the first considerations. Kotor is a very old place that has been extremely well conserved over the years, despite wars, political change, and earthquakes. It is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The World Heritage Site is actually the landscape within which the town sits. That’s sort of a sideline--we don’t work in places just because they are World Heritage Sites. We work in places that are complex, important and have a lot of significance. You have to have big challenges for our students because the students really want that. Second ingredient, and sort of implied by the European Conservation Course name, the site has to be in Europe, partly because that is the hearth of the conservation field. A lot of the first theories, practices, and projects grew up in Western Europe and then were exported all over the world. Understanding how conservation is practiced in Europe is a different educational experience and that is why there is a whole course organized around it. The third ingredient is having local partners, which are the most important conduit for local knowledge. For any particular place, whether it is Kotor, or Italy, or China, you can read some stuff on it in English and you can go there as a tourist

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and understand it on a certain level. But to go there and get the deep understanding that is required for meaningful conservation work, you have got to have other avenues to understanding the place. Local partners are key and translators are the hinges to that process. We’ve got a couple great partners in Kotor, one of whom lives and grew up there, and teaches at the University of Montenegro. I was a visiting scholar there several years ago. Through that, we hatched the idea of doing some sort of project in Kotor around some of the specific challenges that they are facing, which in the last few years have been lots of tourism, pressure of more and different kinds of tourism, like cruise ships, lots of second home purchasing before the crash. There was an earthquake about 20 or 30 years ago which is an obvious threat that they have responded to really well. There are these fortifications that define and distinguish the place. They are a remarkable set of fortifications. They are not really well invested in and well taken care of. We are trying to address that and address how the different pieces of it fit together.

On defining studio work To define the problem is a part of the studio. Here is this place, here is why it is significant, here are the issues characterizing the problems, define in scope what the solution paths are. So the students had to, in understanding the place, get an understanding of what the issues are and how they can be addressed. We are doing it for two years. We did one last summer, and we will go back next summer. The first summer we focused on some larger scale issues. How the landscape is managed and planned so that the overriding significance of the whole region—this remarkable bay and the towns that grew up around it—how that can be protected, and understood and conserved. Focusing in on smaller scales, how the whole town and this whole system of public spaces work. It’s more of an urban conservation question. How was the development on the two sides of the town but outside the walls of the historic city, how did those effect the appreciation of the historic town itself. Another that we began to get into is the issue of the fortifications themselves, which spread up this really dramatic hillside and give you an incredible view of the whole region. There are all these issues of how to keep it from falling down, how to manage it, how to get people into it, how to interpret it. All urban conservation and landscape conservation issues, large scale things, were all preface to the second summer where we will work on smaller scale issues. How to reuse or restore a particular building because there are a number of vacant buildings in town. How to address the material conservation and architectural issues with fortifications because in some places they are threatened or are falling down, invasive plants are degrading them, etc.

Kotor Studio

Historic Preservation

On site context To understand the place as a cultural landscape, which is a term of art that we often use, means to understand how people shape the natural world to their human ends. Why is the town where it is? Why does it have the particular shape that it does? What did people do for a living? Why is there this big, fancy Venetian town, hundreds of miles from Venice on the other side of the water? All these questions of how to understand the building, the town, and the use of the land come from understanding the historical connection between the shape of the land, the geography of the place, and what people did there. Those things in the cultural landscape frame are assumed to be connected, not separate things that have to be connected. To understand the scenery is to also understand its history. They are all really one in the same, if you frame it that way. There is no denying the charisma of the place, but I care about that we do preservation and conservation in not just charismatic places. It’s the analog in the preservation world is that it’s not all about pandas and Siberian tigers. What about the slugs and algae and swamps which are just as important to the overall functioning of the natural and cultural system?

Summer 2010

Embraced by ancient fortifications and under the shadow of St. John’s Hill, the rustic red tiles of Kotor, Montenegro seemingly tumble down to blue edge of

Boka Kotorska Bay. The impacts of tourism, natural disaster, and economy are also evident—an ancient city with very modern issues. Observing Kotor’s cultural, landscape,

and built heritage, students in Historic Preservation’s European Conservation class aimed for solutions to keep Kotor’s unique character intact for years to come.

We were looking for both the charismatic and the everyday. One of the remarkable things to me, and I think you would hear this from some of the students who worked there last summer, is that one of the restaurants that we went to a lot was owned by a guy whose family, and himself, were local fishing captains. Fishing is traditionally a really important way of life in the bay. So there is this great fish restaurant in a tiny back alley in the town. The pictures that are inside of it and the stories that you get from it are about his family’s fishing heritage. The sardines he’ll bring out will be prepared the way they used to be prepared with enough salt to make your arms fall off. There are other kinds of uncharismatic but deeply meaningful cultural expressions. They are really important part of understanding a place and responding as conservation professionals to the architecture. It’s not just all professionalism we take to it. It all has to be tempered by opening yourself to learning about a place in other ways. You can’t substitute one for the other. —Randall F. Mason

koto r mon tenegro

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beauty/mosley:

dread

Institute of Contemporary Art

Associate Professor Joshua Mosley’s digital film, shown at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Spring 2009, contemplates an imagined encounter

16 January — 29 March, 2009

between the astute philosophical minds Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Blaise Pascal. Contemplating creation among nature, the thought turns to the central questions of

being and truth. Within the deliberation of the human relationship with the divine and secular rises a quiet knowing of what is gained by answers unknown.

T H E D I A L O G U E I N T H E A N I M AT I O N D R E A D I S L O O S E LY B A S E D O N M Y R E A D I N G O F PA S C A L ’ S P E N S É E S A N D R O U S S E A U ’ S E M I L E . B O T H T E X T S P R E S E N T T H E D I F F I C U LT Y O F R E S O LV I N G T H E H U M A N R E L AT I O N S H I P T O N AT U R E A N D E X I S T E N C E W H I L E A L S O A C C E P T I N G G O D A S T H E C R E AT O R . T H E H I N T S O F M O N S T R O U S PA R T S I N T H E F I G U R E S O F C O W A N D D R E A D I N D I C AT E T H AT T H E A N I M A L S H AV E N E A R LY E V O LV E D T O T H E I R NORMAL FORMS. THE DOG HAS ONE HEAD INSTEAD OF THREE, AND T H E C O W D O E S N O T H AV E F O U R H U M A N F I G U R E S E M E R G I N G F R O M H E R B A C K . T H E F O R M O F D R E A D , A N D H I S N A M E , TA K E S A F T E R T H E D O G S U B J E C T O F E A D W E A R D M U Y B R I D G E ’ S P H O T O G R A P H I C M O T I O N S T U D Y. I N PA S T W O R K S , I ’ V E C H O S E N A P H Y S I C A L M AT E R I A L F O R T H E P U P P E T S A N D A F L AT F L I C K E R I N G H A N D - T R E AT E D S U R F A C E F O R T H E L A N D S C A P E . T H I S C O M B I N AT I O N S E E M E D T O C R E AT E A S E PA R AT I O N B E T W E E N T H E B O D I E S O F T H E C H A R AC T E R S A N D T H E T H O U G H T S I N T H E I R M I N D . E AC H BAC KG RO U N D I N D R E A D C O N S I S T S O F I R R E G U L A R C YC L E S O F S I X D I G I TA L P H O T O G R A P H S . T H E P H O T O S W E R E E N H A N C E D I N T H E T R A N S L AT I O N F R O M C O L O R T O B L A C K - A N D - W H I T E S O T H AT S M A L L E L E M E N T S A P P E A R MO R E N U M E RO U S . MY M E T H O D O F C OM P O S I N G T H E M U S I C R E L AT E S T O T H E S A M P L I N G P R O C E S S O F T H E A N I M AT I O N ; I N E S S E N C E , I T I S A N I N T R I C AT E A S S E M B LY O F S H O R T R E C O R D I N G S O F S I N G L E N OT E S . T H E C L A Y A N D R E S I N F I G U R E S W E R E 3 D S C A N N E D F O R T H E A N I M AT I O N C A P T U R I N G T H E H A N D - M O D E L E D S U R FAC E , T H E N C A S T I N B R O N Z E T O M A K E A F I X E D P H Y S I C A L I M P R E S S I O N . T H E N U M E R I C F I G U R AT I V E M E S H E S T H AT R E S U LT E D F R O M T H E S C A N N I N G S E E M E D T O S U G G E S T T O M E T H AT T H E C H A R A C T E R S ’ M I N D S W O U L D N O T N E E D T O B E P R E S S U R I Z E D I N T H E I R B O D I E S , I N S T E A D T H E M I N D S C O U L D B E E Q U A L LY PRESENT IN THE LANDSCAPE.

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Image: Joshua Mosley

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experience/UrbanSHED:

UrbanSHED

International Design Competition

Using the New York City sidewalk as a canvas, first-year architecture student Young Hwan Choi, with the New York-based design firm Agencie

New York City, NY

Group’s Sarrah Khan and Andres Cortes, developed the winning design for the UrbanSHED competition. Selected from 164 applicants, the innovative Urban

Umbrella will cover 6,000 sites in the city and a once-bulky facet of urban life now makes the city more beautiful from the ground up.

In my State of the City speech, I talked about the innovation and enterprise that fuels our city, and today we are showing off of that entrepreneurial spirit. Sidewalk sheds are a part of New York life—reflecting the face of a city that is constantly changing—yet the sheds themselves haven’t evolved at all during the past four decades, and it’s time to bring them into the 21st century. The new structures will complement the City’s architectural beauty rather than take it away from it, while increasing space and safety for pedestrians and reducing the impact of construction on businesses and building owners. —Michael Bloomberg

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experience/bernice elza homes:

H 74

O

Bernice Elza Homes

Dedication 21 October 2009

M

What is shared responsibility merged with real-world educational practice? At Bernice Elza Homes, safe housing options for six young families. The multi-year collaboration between a PennDesign team led by Richard

Wesley and local social service agencies expanded the meaning of whole architecture to a new level. More than an affordable housing project, Bernice Elza Homes is an

E

expressive outcome that gives consideration to a community’s cultural, economic, user and social needs in the realm of forward-thinking design elements.

After years of design and construction, Bernice Elza Homes is complete. Located on the corner of 38th and Brandywine Street inthe Mantua neighborhood of West Philadelphia, Bernice Elza Homes provides permanent supportive rental housing for six special needs teenage mothers and their children. The project was dedicated on Wednesday, October 21 by Philadelphia Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell and People’s Emergency Center President Gloria Guard. Bernice Elza Homes is named for Blackwell’s mother, Bernice C. Brooks, and Guard’s mother, Elza Marques Guard. The project is the result of a successful collaboration between the People’s Emergency Center Community Development Corporation (PEC-CDC) and PennDesign. The project was designed by students and faculty in PennDesign’s undergraduate program in architecture and funded by a Community Outreach Partnership Center Futures Grant through the Office of Community Partnerships in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Design. As the development partner for Bernice Elza Homes, PEC-CDC acquired the land, secured financing, and constructed the project under the direction of PEC’s Kira Strong, senior project manager, and Matthew Bear, project manager. The City of Philadelphia’s Office of Housing and Community Development assisted PEC with securing construction financing —Richard Wesley

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experience/sub-saharan africa:

Aging in Africa

Architecture

Cote D’Ivoire

In Sub Saharan Africa, potential is found in how we address the opportunities and challenges that are paramount to a global aging population. Considered

with graceful dynamism by Hollwich Kushner, the firm of Matthias Hollwich, PennDesign instructor, their expressive form answers distinctive community needs

with a derivation in cultural and physical settings. Moreover, Aging in Africa is equally a gentle reminder that even within our most existential considerations and

The project, set on a sliver of land between the Atlantic and an inland lagoon, is organized like a typical Cote D’Ivoire village around a central spine, which stretches North/South from existing streets to capture the site’s prevailing winds. Perforations along the perimeter let the natural vegetation grow into the village and capitalize on the stunning views towards the water. Single-story residential buildings frame the village’s spine and submerge into nature at their back-ends to facilitate Image: Mattias Hollwich

drainage and to blend the site’s edge with the environment.

Aging in Africa sets out to be the first age-valued community

The project’s public buildings are centered on the village axis to

on the African continent where the elderly can maintain a

reinforce their communal function. Based on simple geometries,

meaningful and healthy lifestyle in a comfortable and safe

the building shapes tilt and fold in relationship to each other, yet

environment. It is a retirement community for Catholic priests

with an individual expression. The peaks of the church employ a

that are excluded from the traditional, family-based, model

simple geometry that yields an iconic form that is at once a novel

of elder care in Cote D’Ivoire. The architecture is shaped by

and familiar type of sacred space.

deploying a holistic set of social, economic and environmentally

—Mattias Hollwich

sustainable theories pertaining to elder living and care. It is about architecture that does not just house caring, it is architecture as the caring device. Our hope is that it is an inspiration for a new breed of community that values the efficacy of spirit over efficiency of care.

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people/


people/graduates: Architecture Master of Architecture Christopher James Allen Colin Applegate Nidhi Dinesh Urmil Arya Alexa M Baker Rui Bao Richard B. Baxley Ana Carolina Blomeier James Robert Gordon Bowman Marcia Budet Alvarado Benjamin G Callam Carrie Chan Hui Ying Candy Chan Jacob Allen Chandler David C. Chen Qi Chen Chen Yao Justin Chitwood Matt Chin Soon Choot Kittiya Choowanthanapakorn Tiffany Masako Dahlen Chi Lien Dang Subhajit Das Jason James DeMarco Ian Michael Doherty Weijia Dora Dong Florina Dutt Dwight A. Engel Joshua Michael Evans Chun Fang Kuan-Ting Fang Emaan Farhoud Gera Star Feigon Adam Michael Fettig Rebecca Fuchs Aroussiak Gabrielian Karen Elizabeth Glik Andrea Lauren Gulyas Julio Guzman Ji Su Han Peter Bolton Hanby Andrew William Haney Andrea Lynn Miyoko Hansen Peng Hong Adam Ward Hostetler Riziki S. House Jae Hun Hur Gregory William Hurcomb John Alstan Jakubiec Nakita Ann Johnson Olga S. Karnatova Erick Hill Katzenstein Jonathan Frederic Kayton Hyunsoo Kim Nicolas Emmanuel Koff Alexander L. Lee Hajung Lee Hye-Seung Lee Thabo P. M. Lenneiye Cheng-Wei Lin Joseph Michael Littrell Ding Liu

80

PennDesign

Graduating Class

City Planning Johanna Luise Lofstrom Marta Mackiewicz Katherine Whitney Mandel Liwen Mao Jamie Mastro Crista A. McDonald Melinda McMillan Virginia Melnyk Ginna Claire Nguyen Kimberly Ann Nofal Joo Hyung Oh Raphael Jose Osuna Segarra Jeffrey M. Palitsch Changsoon Park Jinkyung Park Rebecca S. Popowsky James Leslie Poulin Jieyu Pu Danielle Zoe Rivera Juliane Roberts Margaux Schindler Becky Doran Shoemaker Julie Ting Fung Siu Riggs Pearson Skepnek Jason M. Smith Kristen Smith Qiao Song Yu-Han Annabelle Su So Sugita Dale Parker Suttle III Janine Sutton Andrew James Swartzell Kar Yee Tam Han Tang Jaclynn M. Treat Lily Trinh Jennifer L. Trumble Steven M. Tucker Ana Luisa Untiveros-Ferrel Keiko Sumikawa Vuong Xuedong Wang Yang Wang Yiqin Wang Wei Ziyue Sean Louis Williams Tya C. Winn Karen L Wong Yoon Jihyoon Jessica Danielle Yubas Wenqing Zhang Jingyi Zhao Master of Science John R. Brilla III Bret Andrew Taboada

Master of City Planning Mathew S. Abramsky Olayemi Adediji David W. Aiken Christopher Anthony Alexander Lacey Allison Babcock Jeffrey Howard Barg James Mark Bennett Amy D. Bernknopf Cassidy Ann Boulan Jeffrey Larson Bumgardner Trinity Nicolle Busch Natalie Frances Cheng Theodore Dayton Clement Aron Gabriel Cohen Lucy Evans Corbett Diana Michelle Cornely John Seamus Curran Ethan Hoyt Daniels Andrew Graham Dawson Elizabeth Jean Dow Anna Pauline Ellis Leah Rae Fiasca Susanne Fogt Judith Hogan Frankel Christian Bruce Gass David M. Gest Allison Gillum James Edward Granger Zachary Alan Guren Xue Han Matthew Andrew Handel Bruce Jay Hansen Linying He Victoria Pereira Hershey Damian Holynskyj Joshua L. Hooper Liyuan Huang Lou Huang Yirui Huang Lisa B. Jacobson Dae Hyun Kang Katherine M. Keller Aaron Kelley Christopher David Khorey Patrick William Kidd Zlata Kobzantsev Gloria Lau Erika Michelle Lindsey Reuben S MacMartin Tiffany Marcelle McCann Mason Reidt McClellan Bethany Ann McKellips Colin Richard McLean

Michael Wyn Miller Luke Aaron Mitchell Daniel O’Shaughnessy Nicole Ashley Parillo Nelson Zhuojian Peng John Christopher Robinson Bryan Evan Rodda Laura Lederer Sagues Matthew Craig Sargenti William Stephen Scott Cara Elizabeth Seabury Paul Shabsis Thethan Soe Gretchen Claire Sweeney Noah Michael Swistak Kevin Michael Thomas Paul S. Thompson Jeffrey Philip Tiell Danae Tilghman Eliza Shaw Valk Christopher White Selina Alys Zapata Chenghao Zhang Feng Zhu Master of Arts Stephanie R. Ryberg Doctor of Philosophy Rong-Syh Huang Daniel A. Moscovici Stephanie R. Ryberg Nicholas L. Stapp Khaled Aly Tarabieh

2009–2010

Fine Arts

Historic Preservation

Master of Fine Arts Marc Edmund Blumthal Tay Cha Hsuan Ju Susan Fang Kurt Aloysius Freyer Nsenga Knight Chris Lawrence Jiwon Lee Liby Norman Pedroso Limoso Kyle LoPinto Joseph A. Ovelman III Maria Rajewski Heather Ramsdale Jacolby T. Satterwhite Ramon Carlos Urenia Leigh Kathryn Van Duzer Christie Mae Whisman Nathan Thomas Wilson Cay Yoon

Master of Science in Historic Preservation Lindsey Elaine Allen Elvan Cobb Meaghan Colahan Mark Edward Donofrio Sarah Elizabeth Hawes Helen Grace Johnson Nakita Ann Johnson Patrick William Kidd Charles W Lawrence Johanna Luise Lofstrom Valerie Herzfeld Magolan Crystal Leah Medler Katie Milgrim Marissa Jean Moshier Tiffani Lee Simple Jayne O. Spector Lauren Elizabeth Vollono Natalie Weinberger Christine Wells Jacqueline R. Wiese Katharine Helene Woodman

Master of Landscape Architecture Donghyouk Ahn Francisco Allard Jane Earlene Anderson James Mark Bennett Marisa S. Bernstein Bret O Betnar Jessica Hope Brown Megan Murphy Burke Jing Cai Ho Ling Chang Rong Chen Hang Cheng JiSu Choi YoungJoon Choi Aron Gabriel Cohen Rebecca Fuchs Aroussiak Gabrielian Marguerite Landrum Graham Peter Bolton Hanby Jessica M. Henson Biyoung Heo Vivian Ying Hu Xiaohan Jie Janelle Louise Johnson Elizabeth Glennon Keary Nicolas Emmanuel Koff Joseph A. Kubik Gloria Lau Jinwook Lee Lauren Nicole Mandel Melinda McMillan Michael Wyn Miller Anna Park Rebecca S. Popowsky Sookyung Shin Riggs Pearson Skepnek Lily Trinh Steven M. Tucker Stephanie Michelle Ulrich Eliza Shaw Valk Emily Vogler Yitian Wang Sean Louis Williams Keyu Yan Yin Yu

Urban Spatial Analytics

Certificate Programs

Master of Urban and Spatial Analytics Eugene Brusilovskiy Hsing-Chia Cheng Christopher Carlton Clarke Sarah Elaine Cordivano Calum Ben Davey Kimberly A. Edmunds Melissa Alexandra Larsen David William O’Malley Charles Philip Racsa Kenneth Steif Gregory W. Young

Advanced Conservation and Site Management Marlene Lauren Goeke Ecological Architecture Gera Star Feigon Zachary Alan Guren Nakita Ann Johnson Crista A. McDonald Geographical Information Systems Feng Zhu Graphic Design James Leslie Poulin Leigh Kathryn Van Duzer Historic Preservation Janelle Louise Johnson Mason Reidt McClellan John Viking Nelson Nicole Ashley Parillo Jaclynn M. Treat Imogen Wirth-Granlund Xi Yang Land Preservation Lacey Allison Babcock Trinity Nicolle Busch Elizabeth Jean Dow Allison Gillum Landscape Studies Aaron Kelley Luke Aaron Mitchell Raphael Jose Osuna Segarra Chenghao Zhang

Real Estate Design and Development Mathew S. Abramsky Diana Michelle Cornely Ian Michael Doherty Weijia Dora Dong Andrea Lauren Gulyas Xue Han Matthew Andrew Handel Victoria Pereira Hershey Yirui Huang Zlata Kobzantsev Katie Milgrim Laura Lederer Sagues Julie Ting Fung Siu Kar Yee Tam Jessica Danielle Yubas Time-Based Interactive Media Hsuan Ju Susan Fang Chris Lawrence Liby Norman Pedroso Limoso Joseph A. Ovelman III Jacolby T. Satterwhite Ramon Carlos Urenia Cay Yoon Urban Design Marcia Budet Alvarado Jing Cai Olga S. Karnatova Gloria Lau Hye-Seung Lee Marta Mackiewicz Jinkyung Park Nelson Zhuojian Peng William Stephen Scott Gretchen Claire Sweeney Keiko Sumikawa Vuong Tya C. Winn

Doctor of Philosophy Peter Louis Laurence Grace Shuenhwa Ong Yan Tania Calovi Pereira Esra Sahin

81


people/donors: Halpern-Rogath Fine Arts Travelling

Kelly Family Studio Arts Initiatives

McHarg Professorship: Landscape

Penn Design Annual Special Projects

Don Prowler Endowment Fund

Howard A. Silverstein & Patricia Bleznak

Fellowship

Nancy Lee B. Kelly

Architecture

AnneMarie F. Corner WG’89

Marshal James Compton MArch’87

Silverstein Photography Program Term Fund

Leslee B. Halpern-Rogath CW’73

Paul K. Kelly C’62, WG’64

Steven Huang C’99, MCP’00

James Corner MLA’86, CERT’86

Mary Ida Compton G’86

Howard A. Silverstein W’69

Patricia Anne Lemmerman MLA’86

Barbara D. Kroiz

Howard Katz

Patricia B. Silverstein C’81

Kohn Endowed Fellowship in Architecture

George P. Mitchell

Harvey E. Kroiz

in memory of Don Prowler

Robert and Susan Heidenberg Endowed

A. Eugene Kohn BArch’53, MArch’57

Edward T. Overton, Jr. MRP’83

Toby D. Lewis CW’56

Martha Wood Subber MArch’86

Howard A. Silverstein & Patricia

Fellowship Fund

Barbara Shattuck Kohn

William L. Rohrer MRP’75

Sara Liebowitz

Carolyn J. Wennblom C’87

Bleznak Silverstein Photography

Robert S. Turner MRP’77, PhD’83

Ted Liebowitz

Berton E. Korman Fund

Amy Karen Wolfe C’77, MRP’80, PhD’86

John LiftonZoline

Robin M. Beckett Discretionary Fund

Howard A. Silverstein W’69

Berton E. Korman BArch’55

James H. Wolford

for Laurie Olin’s Studio Trip

at the School of Design

Patricia B. Silverstein C’81

Pamela LiftonZoline

Robin M. Beckett MCP’75

David Rogath

Robert Heidenberg C’80 Susan Heidenberg Lisa Roberts & David Seltzer IPD (Integrated

Sallie G. Korman

Product Design) Lecture Series through “Poor Richard’s Charitable Trust”

Lachs-Adler Fund Undergrad Fine Arts

Program Endowed Fund

Undergraduate Fine Arts Director’s

Ottawa Animation Festival Term Fund

for Laurie Olin’s Studio Trip

Anonymous

Laurie D. Olin

Romanach Memorial Fellowship

Discretionary Fund

for Olin Partnership

Foster D. Dale MArch’85

Anonymous

Lisa S. Roberts CW’74

Dean Stewart Adler, Esquire W’79, L’83

David W. Seltzer WG’76

Susanna E. Lachs, Esquire CW’74, ASC’76

Penn Design Gift Suspense

Lucinda R. Sanders MLA’89

Logan P. Hottle WEV’75, WG’76

Laise Fine Arts Scholarship Fund

Anonymous (2)

for John Dixon Hunt Symposium

Willard D. Hottle MArch’65

Jane Marrow Fellowship

Estate of Clemens A. Laise CHE’08

Van Alen Traveling Fellowships Gift Fund

Victoria Steiger Olin CW’75, MLA’77 for Olin Partnership

Shedd Fund for Architectural Archives

Antonymous (2)

Richard H. Wesley

Peter Shedd Reed G’83, PhD’89

Cassandra V. Ludington

G.H. Perkins Distinguished Visiting

Shedd Fund for Landscape Studies

Warren Powers Laird Myers Fund

Christopher Leland Lyon Memorial Fund

Professorship

Peter Shedd Reed G’83, PhD’89

Warren P. Myers

Leland H. Lyon, Jr.

Carol R. Todd

Louis I. Kahn Archives Fund

Caroline G. Lyon

Thomas A. Todd MArch’59, MCP’59

June Goldfinger

Sara Jane Lyon

Arts Award Fund

Myron H. Goldfinger BArch’55

Gayl L. Maness

Lawrence Shprintz CHE’50

Gordon H. Bemis Landscape Architecture Fellowship Fund Louis I. Kahn Architecture Professorship

Wendy E. Powell MLA’61

Robin D. Dripps MArch’66 Lucia B. Phinney

Lawrence Shprintz Fine

in memory of Chris Lyon Jason Eric Travers MFA’98

Gary & Barbara Siegler Special Projects

in memory of Chris Lyon

Fund in Landscape Architecture Barbara Siegler Gary N. Siegler W’83

84

85


people/donors: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SOCIETY

Ted Liebowitz

PENNDESIGN ANNUAL FUND

Daryl M. Rosenblatt MArch’78

Sandra L. Garz MCP’75 *

Scott W. Schoellkopf MFA’92

John LiftonZoline

AND PENN FUND

David A. Ross MCP’80

D. Wylie Greig MCP’72, WG’72

WooGab Shim MArch’72 *

Julie F. Rothenstein C’77

James S. Higgins MS’01, CERT’01

David Roland Smith MArch’90 *

Ambassador ($25,000 and above)

for Laurie Olin’s Studio Trip

David G. Henderson MArch’54

Pamela LiftonZoline

Dean’s Circle ($1,000 to $2,499)

William S. Saslow C’63, MArch’68 *

Paul M. Hirshorn C’62, MCP’64, MArch’72 *

Ruth S. Spector MD W’82

for Laurie Olin’s Studio Trip

Stephen N. Abend MArch’65 *

Robert G. Shaw

Richard W. Huffman

Beth B. Steffian

Founder ($10,000 to $24,999)

Laurie D. Olin

Diane Frost Boston MArch’93 *

in memory of Frank T. Shaw

Anonymous (2)

for Olin Partnership

Janine A. CoslettYass MCP’90

Brian D. Snyder MD C’80, EE’80, GEE’82, M’86, PhD’91

Susan M. Huffman MCP’70 *

Stanley P. Tang C’74 MArch’77

AnneMarie F. Corner WG’89

Erica J. Penn

Steven M. Goldberg MArch’62

Sharon Brown Snyder MFA’83 *

G. Frank Karreman C’80, MArch’85

Carol R. Todd

James Corner MLA’86 CERT’86,

Kevin S. Penn W’83

Michael E. Hickok C’72

Samuel G. White MArch’75

in honor of Murry Romanach

Thomas A. Todd MArch’59, MCP’59 *

Stephen L. Glascock MArch’88 *

Lucinda R. Sanders MLA’89 *

Mary Keefe WG’81

C. Lawrence Whitman MArch’74

Frank D. Kavanagh MArch’95 *

Peter F. Vieira, Jr. MArch’96

Dorian S. Goldman CW’72, BFA’73, MFA’77

for John Dixon Hunt Symposium

Daniel Kelley

Jeffrey Yass

Emanuel Kelly FAIA

Ellis G. Wachs

Fern Karesh Hurst MCP’70

Lisa M. Sardegna MS’05

Richard I. Knapp MCP’82

for Unspoken Borders Conference

Peggy Brenner Wachs, Esquire

Marvin J. Israelow W’69

Prof. John Ames Steffian BArch’57

Alex T. Krueger ENG’96, W’96

Chairman’s Society ($500 to $999)

Peter Kirby BArch’51

CW’59, MCP’75, L’86 *

Toby D. Lewis CW’56

Victoria Steiger Olin CW’75, MLA’77

Leander G. Krueger MArch’00

Scott Parker Allman MArch’94

Meryl P. LessingerBely, V.M.D. V’79

John T. Warren C’87, MCP’88 *

Katherine Roloson

for Olin Partnership

Elisabeth L. Lyon MCP’70 *

Charles E. Bailey MArch’61 *

Nikolaj LessingerBely MFA’76

William B. Washburn BArch’60

William R. B. McCullough MArch’92

Katherine R. Bailey

Henry Jonas Magaziner BArch’36

Joan White

Robert M. Roloson MArch’61 *

BArch’63, MArch’67, MCP’67, CERT’67 *

Peter Steffian BArch’59

Daniel & Joanna Rose Fund

Associate ($2,500 to $4,999)

Dennis C. McGlade MLA’69 *

Joyce W. Bolchover MArch’65 *

Darrell C. Meyer MRP’71 *

Perry J. White MRP’72

for PennDesign London Studio

Young Kyoon Jeong MArch’89

David E. Merrill

William C. Bourne, Jr. MArch’64, MCP’64, CERT’64 *

Theodore L. Oldham MArch’65

James D. Wilner C’64, MFA’70

Spring Semester

Anne Margulies

Winky Miller Merrill C’78

Mark N. Brosseau MFA’01 *

Mark Pollak, Esquire L’71 MCP’72 *

Janet L. Wilson

Katherine Sachs CW’69

Marc Margulies C’75, MArch’79 *

Margy Ellin Meyerson G’93

for Silent Auction 12/03/2009

Arnold H. Robinson

Edward Z. Wronsky, Jr. MArch’63 *

Keith L. Sachs W’67

John D. Morris II C’67, MArch’70 *

Susan J. Miller

John H. Burris MArch’59

in memory of Charles I. Wolf

Marilyn Jordan Taylor

Susan B. Morris MCP’70 *

Patricia Mcadams Nagel NU’70

Steven M. Davis MArch’85

Lester Paul Salwen MD C’74, M’80

Barbara van Beuren MArch’87 *

Arthur S. Pier III C’75, MArch’78 *

Ralph J. Nagel MArch’71, MCP’71, MFA’71

in memory of Lewis Davis

John A. van Beuren MArch’77 *

Caroline A. Piven

Louis J. Delosso C’72, MArch’75

Thomas G. Weatherwax BArch’48

Peter A. Piven MArch’63 *

Michael D. Garz MArch’78 *

Fellow ($5,000 to $9,999) Caroline M. Bentley

Stephen S. Reichstein MCP’61 *

Gregory S. Bentley W’76, WG’77

Susan Mainwaring Roberts CW’72, G’76

Edward C. Friedrichs III MArch’68

George R. Rolfe MArch’68, MCP’68, CERT’68

John W. Gross BArch’43, MArch’48

Richard M. Rosan MArch’67

Robert Heidenberg C’80 Susan Heidenberg Sara Liebowitz

86

87


people/faculty:

PennDesign

Faculty

2009—2010

Terry Adkins

Joseph Elliott

Keith Kaseman

John Milner

Domenic Vitiello

Mohamad Al Khayer

Scott Erdy

Deborah Katz

Valerio Morabito

Frederick Wahl

Charles Arena

Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto

Richard Kennedy

Joshua Mosley

Shira Walinsky

Cecil Balmond

Homa Farjadi

Stephen Kieran

Deirdre Murphy

Rachel Weinberger

Jonathan Barnett

Richard Farley

Simon Kim

Enrique Norten

Marion Weiss

Julie Beckman

Annette Fierro

Mehmet Kolatan

Cora Olgyay

Joshua Weiss

Eugenie Birch

Keith Fledderman

Benjamin Krone

Laurie Olin

Richard Wesley

Hanley Bodek

Jonathan Fogelson

Diane Lachman

David Ostrich

Scott White

William Braham

Matthew Freedman

John Landis

Brian Phillips

Anna Wolf-Powers

Suzanne Brandt

Joshua Freese

Michael Larice

Ali Rahim

Jackie Wong

Lasha Brown

Helene Furjan

David Leatherbarrow

Christopher Reed

Aaron Wunsch

Jessica Brown

Michael Gallagher

Jason Lempieri

Scotty Reifsnyder

Robert Yaro

Eugene Brusilovskiy

Mark Gardner

Paul Levy

Karen Rodewald

Yun Yi

Benjamin Bryant

Christopher Gianunzio

Christopher Mackowiak

Witold Rybczynski

Michael Bryant

Jane Golden Heriza

Sumi Maeshima

Lucinda Sanders

Lauren Carelli

Jordan Goldstein

Ali Malkawi

Alexandra Schmidt-Ullrich

Jose Castillo

David Gouverneur

Kristina Manis

Kristen Smith

Chin Choot

Ryan Greenheck

Douglas Martenson

Roland Snooks

Ann Christensen

Gary Hack

Virgil Marti Jr.

Adrienne Stinger

Hanna Cohan

Erinn Hagerty

Gabriel Martinez

Ivanco Talevski

David Comberg

Michael Henry

Randall Mason

Marilyn Taylor

Gavin Cooper

Anthony Heriza

Frank Matero

Jackie Tileston

James Corner

Amy Hillier

Anuradha Mathur

James Timberlake

Todd Costain

Phu Hoang

Robert Matthews

Charles Tomlin

Matthew Courtney

Matthias Hollwich

Karen M’closkey

Tricia Treacy

Joan Curran

Jeremy Holmes

Franca Trubiano

Dilip Da Cunha

Adam Hostetler

Emory Van Cleve

Thomas Daniels

Yuin-Jen Hsu

Keith Vandersys

Manuel Delanda

Pernot Hudson

Kazys Varnelis

Jamie Diamond

Sharka Hyland

Cathrine Veikos

Winka Dubbeldam

Hina Jamelle

Nick Vidnovic

88

PennDesign’s standing faculty brings experience, training and expertise from renowned firms and companies, government and studios, in countless

countries. The school’s unique crossdisciplinary structure allows these design experts to learn from each other, working to create, build and innovate at levels

unseen in public or private practice. As they grow professionally, students and the school rise in equal measure.

89


Credits Page 18–19 Fumihiko Maki photos: —Annenberg Center —Toshiharu Kitajima —Maki and Associates —Jeff Totaro —Anton Grassl Page 20–21 Zaha Hadid photo: Steve Double Page 24–25 Thom Mayne photo: Reiner Zettl Cooper Union photo: Iwan Baan Page 34–35 Ben’s House photos/illustrations: Venturi, Scott Brown, and Associates Page 64–65 Sense and Non-sense photos: Sverre Fehn, Hamar Bispegaard Museum Sverre Fehn, Norwegian Museum of Architecture Eric Parry Architects, The Spa at the Mandarin Oriental Leonardo da Vinci, The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne Max Ernst, La mer et la pluie (The Sea and Rain) Foster + Partners, Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts Page 72–73 UrbanSHED photos: Courtesy of urbanSHED International Design Competition. Urban Umbrella design by Young Hwan Choi, with Andrés Cortés, AIA, and Sarrah Khan, PE, of Agencie Group. Design team members also include Will Robinette, Todd Montgomery and Zachary Colbert. Page 76–77 Aging in Africa: Location: Lagoon Aby, Cote D’Ivoire Architect: HOLLWICH KUSHNER, LLC (HWKN) Client: IBASHO, Emi Kiyota and Foundation Saint Joseph d’Arimathie Scope: Concept Design, Schematic Design, Design Development Status: Schematic Design Completed Fall 2009; Start construction scheduled beginning of 2011 Project Team: Matthias Hollwich, Marc Kushner, Robert May, Marc Perrotta, and KimByung Kyun Page 89 UrbanSHED image: Courtesy of urbanSHED International Design Competition. Urban Umbrella design by Young Hwan Choi, with Andrés Cortés, AIA, and Sarrah Khan, PE, of Agencie Group. Design team members also include Will Robinette, Todd Montgomery and Zachary Colbert. All other content provided by PennDesign.



PennDesign Now: 2010