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University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design


The Weitzman School prepares students to address complex sociocultural and environmental issues through thoughtful inquiry, creative expression, and innovation. As a diverse community of scholars and practitioners, we are committed to advancing the public good —both locally and globally­­­— through art, design, planning, and preservation.


WORK BY HAO ZHENG AND ZHEN MENG.


Contents

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WEITZMAN SCHOOL

The Faculty

A NOTE FROM THE DEAN

Making History

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STUDIO SPOTLIGHT

Students Tackle Disaster Recovery Planning and Design in Puerto Rico


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THE CITY

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

PROGRAMS

Architecture City and Regional Planning Fine Arts Historic Preservation Landscape Architecture

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RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT

Robotics Lab Pushes Boundaries of Design and Construction for Siteless House Prototype

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DEGREES C E R T I F I C AT E S DUAL DEGREES DIVERSITY ADMISSIONS


Architecture City and Regional Planning Fine Arts Historic Preservation Landscape Architecture Weitzman School

Fritz Steiner (MRP’77, MA’86, PhD’86) Dean and Paley Professor FASLA, FAAR, RAAR, SITES AP

Winka Dubbeldam

Miller Professor and Chair of Architecture; Director, Advanced Research and Innovation Lab

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Lisa Servon

Kevin and Erica Penn Presidential Professor and Chair of City and Regional Planning; Director, Penn Planning Equity Initiative


WEITZMAN SCHOOL Standing and Associated Faculty Masoud Akbarzadeh

Sonja Dümpelmann

Mark Alan Hughes

Randall Mason

Megan Ryerson

Domenic Vitiello

Francesca Russello Ammon

Homa Farjadi

Simon Kim

Frank Matero

Cindy Sanders

Marion Weiss

Richard Farley

Ferda Kolatan

Anuradha Mathur

Andrew Saunders

Richard Weller

Annette Fierro

John Landis

Thom Mayne

Lisa Servon

Richard Wesley

David Gouverneur

Allison Lassiter

Karen M’Closkey

Frederick Steiner

Aaron Wunsch

Erick Guerra

David Leatherbarrow

Valerio Morabito

Robert Stuart-Smith

Robert Yaro

David Hartt

Zhongjie Lin

Joshua Mosley

Marilyn Jordan Taylor

Pamela Hawkes

Michelle Lopez

Ellen Neises

Orkan Telhan

Sharon Hayes

Ken Lum

Ali Rahim

Jackie Tileston

Michael Henry

Christopher Marcinkoski

Vincent Reina

Dana Tomlin

Sarah Rottenberg

Franca Trubiano

Daniel Barber Eugenie Birch Matthijs Bouw William Braham Sean Burkholder Tom Daniels Sophie Debiasi Hochhäusl Winka Dubbeldam

Ken Lum

David Hollenberg

Marilyn Jordan Taylor Presidential Professor and Chair of Fine Arts; Director, Center for Public Art and Space

Frank G. Matero

Professor of Architecture; Chair of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation; Director, The Center for Architectural Conservation

Richard Weller

Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture; Martin and Margy Meyerson Chair of Urbanism; Co-Executive Director, The Ian L. McHarg Center for Urbanism and Ecology

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INVE STIGATE


E PHOTO BY SARAH A. WILLIG

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A NOTE FROM THE DEAN

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01 03 Artist Andy Warhol and his first solo museum exhibition at ICA featured in the Penn Comment, October 1965, Vol. II, No. 2. Photo Š Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. 04 Professor Ian McHarg at Earth Week, Independence Mall, Philadelphia.

01 Louis Kahn with students at the Fisher Fine Arts Library, Louis I. Kahn Collection, Architectural Archives of the University of Pennsylvania 02 Julian Francis Abele (18811950) earned a BS in Architecture in 1902. Photo courtesy University Archives of the University of Pennsylvania

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Making History Fifty years ago, a group of students in the landscape architecture and regional planning program at Penn began organizing Earth Week. Their mentor, Professor Ian McHarg, had just published Design With Nature. Together, they helped birth the environmental movement and revolutionized the practice of landscape architecture and planning. Design With Nature was not the first time history was made by our faculty or students, nor was it the last. Just as McHarg became legend at Penn for inviting anthropologists, biologists, and other scientists into the conversation on design with nature, our school’s sphere of influence today isn’t confined to the built environment. Consider the 30+ degrees and certificates that we now offer, several in collaboration with our colleagues at the Wharton School, the School of Law, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of Social Policy and Practice. From our work in robotics and bio-art to big data and remote sensing, we continue to invent new forms of expression and interpretation for architects, landscape architects, planners, preservationists, and artists. Consider the efforts of PennPraxis or Monument Lab, at the Center for Public Art and Space, to make design more inclusive.

The Weitzman School’s mission goes beyond giving our professions new tools. We are working to make them more representative of our communities. Consider the activities of the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy to support a just and efficient transition to sustainable energy around the world, or the resources of the Architectural Archives, which ground our innovations in centuries of human ingenuity and challenge us to look at history anew.

08 Sharon Hayes, If They Should Ask, installation at Rittenhouse Square for Monument Lab, 2017. Photo by Steve Weinik courtesy Mural Arts. 09 Weiss/Manfredi, Seattle Art Museum: Olympic Sculpture Park, 2007. Photo by Ben Benschneider courtesy Weiss/ Manfredi.

Whether you find inspiration in the work of Julian Abele or Lou Kahn, Marion Weiss or Sharon Hayes, I invite you to join us in giving form to “design with nature now”—really, building the kind of future we want to live in. We’ve been doing this work for over 150 years, and we’re just getting started. / / F R I T Z S T E I N E R (MRP’77, MA’86, PHD’86)

Dean and Paley Professor FASLA, FAAR, RAAR, SITES AP

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05 B | reactor, a biological design platform developed by Orkan Telhan, associate professor of fine arts (emerging design) and Karen Hogan, Biorealize Inc. 06 Work by MUSA students Andrew Renninger, Dhruvi Kothari, Lufeng Lin, Sagari Datta. 07 PennPraxis design fellows present design proposals at a community gathering in South Whitehall Township, Pennsylvania.

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STUDIO SPOTLIGHT

Studios Tackle Disaster Recovery Planning and Design in Puerto Rico Originally Published in Design Weekly, the Weitzman School’s e-news digest, in September of 2018. Subscribe at www. design.upenn.edu/signup.

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How can city planners and landscape architects contribute to disaster recovery efforts like those that consumed Puerto Rico after two hurricanes wreaked havoc on the island territory? The answer, according to Weitzman faculty members who led four interdisciplinary design studios in the fall of 2018, starts with recognizing that the disaster began unfolding long before hurricanes Irma and Maria made landfall.

Master’s students in the City and Regional Planning and Landscape Architecture programs collected research around the problems facing Puerto Rico in the aftermath of the deadly 2017 hurricane season. Two studios, one in planning and the other in landscape architecture, were focused on three overlapping sites on the island: settlements surrounding the San Jose Lagoon in San Juan, the mountain town of Utuado, and the coastal town of Naguabo, which is adjacent to a former military base, a national forest, and a wind farm badly damaged during Hurricane Maria. A third studio in planning was focused on the 75-acre Luis Llorens Torres public housing project in San Juan, and a fourth planning studio looked at

the Puerto Rican diaspora in Philadelphia, which grew as residents were evacuated or displaced from the island. The studios were united in their approach: Bringing long-range, systems-oriented thinking to a host of ongoing environmental, economic, infrastructural and spatial problems that were exacerbated but not caused by the hurricanes’ devastation. “When you’re redeveloping after a storm and the situation before was so bad, what are you really redeveloping to?” said Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning Allison Lassiter, who is co-teaching one of the planning studios with Associate Professor of Practice David Gouverneur. “You don’t actually want to restore the previous conditions. So you have to figure out how to grow into a better condition.”  After an initial research phase, all four stu-

dios traveled to Puerto Rico to meet with partners at the Universidad Politécnica, architecture faculty at the University of Puerto Rico, the Puerto Rican Planning Board, the Center for Hydro-generated Urbanism at the University of Florida, invited experts, and local residents. Students in


PHOTO BY KATIE LEVESQUE. PAGE 9 (TOP TO BOTTOM): A REVIEW IN THE DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE; WORK BY ZHIYU WEI; A STUDIO REVIEW IN PUERTO RICO; INSTALLING FOR A STUDIO REVIEW IN PUERTO RICO.

the studio led by Lassiter and Gouverneur students take away a better understanding focused on interrelated aspects such as soof the geopolitical and socio-economic issues cio-economic drivers, biophysical systems, in Puerto Rico,’ Micale said. “And then, economic diversification, infrastructural second, for the students focused on [the components, infrastructural risk and failure, Llorens Torres site], is how to think more flooding risk and seismic risk, effects of creatively about the systems approach to sea-level rise, secure energy, food security, redevelopment and particularly redevelopand disaster response. ment that has income mixing as the central They also worked closely with students goal of the project.”  in the landscape architecture studio led by Lecturer Nicholas Pevzner, a senior And the flight of Puerto Ricans from the island lecturer in the Department of Landscape to the mainland U.S. has led to growth in Architecture. Pevzner’s studio focused on Puerto Rican communities here in Philadelenergy infrastructure and the promise of phia. Ariel Vazquez, acting project architect more resilient landscape-driven developat Blackney Hayes Architects, led a studio ment frameworks. focusing on diaspora issues in several North “After Maria, the centralized energy grid Philadelphia neighborhoods, including completely failed, and the blackout drove Fairhill, Juniata, Kensington and Hunting so many Park. “There are other inter“You don’t actually want plenty of chalconnected lenges already in to restore the previous infrastructural those neighborfailures: loss conditions. So you have hoods,” Vazquez of drinksaid. “They tend to figure out how to grow ing water, to have lower flood-control into a better condition.” income brackets pumps, comthan other neighmunications, critical hospital equipment,” borhoods in the city, and they tend to have said Pevzner, whose studio is also being supsome of the highest crime rates and drugported by the Kleinman Center for Energy use rates, so we need to understand how we Policy at the Weitzman School. “We’re can connect them back to some economic studying the relationship between these sys- development that can help them change tems, how they failed, and the potential for from the current situation they’re in.”  resilient community-based power to support Moreover, the Philly-based studio sought the delivery of critical services while also ways to provide housing for Puerto Ricans addressing long-standing systemic inequaldisplaced from the island. Students worked ities.”  with a panel of leaders in community The matrix of planning problems is development, representing organizations further complicated by population loss in like Asociación Puertorriqueños en Marcha, Puerto Rico, which accelerated since the Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Concilio de hurricanes hit in 2017. Half a million people Organizaciones Hispanas, HACE, and LISC.  left the island during the decade before Irma “You have to develop an understandand Maria, and at least another 200,000 ing and ability to read into the sites and have left since, according to Lassiter and discover what is relevant in each one of Gouverneur’s syllabus. That trend makes them, raise relevant questions, and address housing and economic development issues them,” said Gouverneur. “I think that’s the especially urgent, alongside planning for main challenge. The other real challenge is sea-level rise and reimagining the island’s that, in post-recovery planning, we aren’t centralized power grid.  dealing with normal situations. People have lost their relatives, they’ve lost their homes, Students in Lecturer Nando Micale’s design they’re stressed financially, their health is studio studied the possible redevelopment of impacted. So we can’t just fool around. We the Llorens Torres public housing complex, have to be cutting-edge in the ideas, but we a site that was prone to flooding even before try to provide solutions that make sense, the hurricanes arrived. The studio considthat are very implementable.”  ered the possibility of a mixed-income redevelopment of the site, taking into account The studios were devised to complement the the housing needs of its existing residents.  many recovery and planning efforts already “I think, in general, we all hope that all the under way, considerations that impacted

their selection of sites. Ultimately, Gouverneur hoped, local partners would benefit from the School’s experience working in regions impacted by natural disasters and its previous Latin American work, including studios in Chile and Ecuador. “We have a tradition of addressing very complex sites and post-recovery issues,” Gouverneur said. “Systemic thinking—that’s what we bring. That’s our contribution.”  // For more stories about Weitzman students and faculty in the world, visit www.design. upenn.edu/signup.

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COLLABO RATE 12


OE

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Architecture

“We aim to prepare our students to be the next generation of leaders, ready to evolve the discipline.”

Statement from the Chair: Department of Architecture At the Department of Architecture, we value our identity as a laboratory for ideas, expertise, and innovations, as a think tank for exchange and debate across disciplinary boundaries, and as a broadcast center engaging a growing audience and international network.

We do this by encouraging collaboration among our various programs, with other departments, and with external experts in the field. We aim to prepare our students to be the next generation of leaders, ready to evolve the discipline and renew its capacity to be an important player in addressing the complex problems that we face today. In 2018, we participated again in the Architecture Biennale in Venice. Practice Professor Ferda Kolatan curated an exhibition, 12 Objects & 12 Images, featuring work from the design studios of faculty members Kutan Ayata, Hina Jamelle, Simon Kim, Ferda Kolatan, Ali Rahim, and Robert StuartSmith. The exhibition was up for the duration of the Biennale in Palazzo Mora, Strada Nuova 3659, Venice, Italy. In the Biennale’s Arsenale we also found Graham Chair Professor of Architecture Marion Weiss and partner Michael Manfredi with a new immersive installation Lines of Movement. We expanded our research capabilities by establishing the Advanced Research and Innovation Lab (ARI), which is committed to progressing design-research and education by focusing on new design methodologies and manufacturing approaches, including cutting edge digital design, scripting, and robotics. We recently opened a new Robotics Lab with several large robotic arms that give students the capacity to test conceptual designs in the real world and translate ideas from the virtual to the physical. 14

Architecture is experiencing an extraordinary

renaissance in its practice, fueled by many different sources: new technologies and materials; information technology; advances in engineering and manufacturing; globalization of culture, education and practice; crossovers with the sciences, visual arts and other design fields; a growing audience for design culture in general, and ecological architecture in particular; and a focus on creativity and innovation in leading schools around the world. We also initiated a new series of Master of Science in Design [MSD] degree programs, including an MSD-AAD [Advanced Architectural Design], an MSD-EBD [Environmental Building Design], and an upcoming MSD-RAS [Robotics and Autonomous Systems] in 2020. These new programs will provide students with opportunities to build skills in robotic manufacturing, artificial intelligence, vision technologies, environmental building design, and design excellence while increasing the School’s potential to secure research funding aligned with industry and government investment in new building technologies. Our goal is to be at the forefront of advanced

research and design while also focusing on social awareness and responsibility. We instigate critical exchanges and advanced debates within and across disciplinary boundaries. We aim to be a connective device between academics and architectural practitioners, who we engage in lectures, symposia, and publications in order to grow an international collaborative network of design leaders. // WINK A DUBBE LDAM

Miller Professor and Chair of Architecture; Director, Advanced Research and Innovation Lab


ARCH

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Architecture Summer Institute review; work by Fangzhou Sun, Wenzhao Xu, and Hang Zhang; work by Yi Lu and Carla Bonilla-Huaroc; work by Calvin Vannoy and Xiaoqing Meng.

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City and Regional Planning “Our work in and out of the classroom focuses on equity and social justice.�

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CPLN Statement from the Chair: Department of City and Regional Planning It’s never been a more exciting and important time to study planning, and our City and Regional Planning program is the place to do it. Climate change, inequality, and globalization are just a few of the issues that have made our world more complex and planners’ skills more necessary.

Our dynamic, engaged faculty includes academics and practitioners who work across the range of specializations we offer: land use and environmental planning, community development, transportation and infrastructure planning, public-private development, and urban design. Our curriculum provides a mix of cutting edge theory and ground level practice that prepares our graduates to grapple with the pressing challenges of our time. You’ll learn to think about and analyze these problems through intimate seminars, studios that rely on design thinking, and applied, real-world projects. The fact that we are part of a world class university provides our students with access to a universe of other courses and joint degree programs. In addition to our city planning degrees, we also offer a Master of Urban Spatial Analytics (MUSA) degree. The goal of the MUSA program is to provide analytical and domain-specific skills that will help you compete in an increasingly data-driven job market. Graduates from our program will have gained new skills in spatial analysis, machine learning, data science, visualization, statistics, and web-based mapping. More importantly, they will be able to ask interesting and important questions of their data in order to inform relevant public policy, environmental, and business questions. They go on to jobs and internships ranging from city government to private data science firms and software development companies. We are committed to working toward a more

just world. Our work in and out of the classroom focuses on equity and social justice. // LISA SE RVON

Kevin and Erica Penn Presidential Professor and Chair of City and Regional Planning; Director, Penn Planning Equity Initiative

PREVIOUS PAGE Planning students at 3401 Walnut Street; work by Jessica Arias, Emily Galfond, Brett Harris, Danielle Lake, Huang Wang, Tong Wu, Alexandra Zazula, and Baiwei Zhang. TOP TO BOTTOM Work by Scott Betz, Emily Galfond, Brett Harris, Terry Hogan, Anagha Jayaprakasan, Ellyse Murphy, Benjamin Palevsky, Zhongyuan Zeng, and Huijuan Zhao; work by Yue Guo, Huiling He, Heike Jacob, Jessica Klion, Anqi Li, Lufeng Lin, Kefan Long, Rongzhi Mai, Ian Schwarzenberg, and Jonathan Yuan; work by Jessica Arias, Emily Galfond, Brett Harris, Danielle Lake, Huang Wang, Tong Wu, Alexandra Zazula, and Baiwei Zhang.

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Fine Arts


FNAR

“The MFA program is foremost concerned with looking at art from diversely critical and intellectual discourses.”

ABOVE MFA student Zach Hill in his studio at the Morgan Building. PREVIOUS PAGE Work by Xiaoxuan Liu (top left) and Danielle Kovalski (bottom).

Statement from the Chair: Department of Fine Arts The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree program focuses on the theory and practice of art necessary for the development of artists. The program emphasizes the importance of new experiences and believes strongly that each experience will inform the work of art that the student makes by testing the limits of their creativity in different ways.

The MFA program is comprised of seminar courses and studio production with the aim of fostering critical responses to the world. These creative responses form the basis for the individual and group studio critiques led by a renowned faculty and a roster of internationally recognized senior critics, visiting artists, curators, and writers. The program is foremost concerned with looking at art from diversely critical and intellectual discourses that grapple with real world concerns of identity and social formations. Housed within the Stuart Weitzman School of Design, the MFA program provides graduate students the opportunity for concerted exchange with the Departments of Architecture, City and Regional Planning, Historic Preservation, and Landscape Architecture. All MFA students are allotted their own indi-

vidual studio with 24-hour access. A wide

range of facilities for art fabrication and installation setup are also at their disposal. Specialists expert in various technologies from photography and painting to digital fabrication and sculpture are available to assist students. Seminar topic courses tailored for the MFA student are offered by the Department of Fine Arts, but students may also take senior undergraduate and graduate level courses offered by other Penn departments. On campus, students can associate with the Institute of Contemporary Art and the Arthur Ross Gallery as interns or docents. Throughout the academic year, the Department of Fine Arts is proud to present an extensive program of presentations by world leading artists and creative thinkers, held at the Institute of Contemporary Art as well as other campus sites. In addition, there are numerous art-related events that are offered throughout the year by the Philadelphia area’s many world-class museums, art galleries and cultural venues. At its core, the MFA program is driven by two

related questions: What meanings exist under the surface of things? And how does one grapple with these meanings through art? // KEN LUM

Marilyn Jordan Taylor Presidential Professor and Chair of Fine Arts; Director, Center for Public Art and Space

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Historic Preservation

“We work collaboratively to demonstrate the power of preservation to contribute to the public good.” Statement from the Chair: Graduate Program in Historic Preservation Conservation in its broadest environmental and cultural contexts takes on renewed urgency in these times of great and unprecedented change, so the idea and practice of historic preservation has never been more important.

Heritage is often celebrated and always contested. Every society interprets and cares for its inherited environments in its own way. How do we remember? What is our notion of sustainable settlement? How do we manage the built environment to reflect our individual and collective values while insisting on social equity? How can the material past be preserved, represented and activated to have relevance in contemporary society? These are some of the core issues facing our field today. As with the other disciplines at the Weitzman School, historic preservation takes on the complex, long-term challenges of understanding, designing, imagining, and managing built environments. First among them is retaining and revealing the cultural significance of buildings, archaeological sites, and landscapes so that the building blocks of social well-being—attachment to collective memory, access to public spaces, shared and sustainable stewardship of environments—are provided. In the historic preservation program, faculty

and students pursue all aspects of preservation. As scholars, we are dedicated to advancing knowledge for our field. As practitioners, we take on projects where important heritage is at risk, we test new methodologies and ideas, and we work collaboratively to demonstrate the power of preservation to contribute to the public good. Our work finds us involved in our own backyard here in Philadelphia, across the country with colleagues in the national preservation movement, and in international circles of practice and scholarship. Exposure to international heritage debates and con20

servation practices is a cornerstone of our program. Since its creation in 1981, the program has seen enormous growth and development in all areas of thought and practice. Continuing James Marston Fitch’s concept of historic preservation as a true cross-disciplinary field requiring a ‘synoptic approach’, we have created a full complement of courses that provide a framework for the program’s “concentrations” in response to the specialized knowledge and skills required for professional engagement. Our faculty define the most diverse and accomplished graduate preservation program in the country and a leader among the most respected institutions in the international arena. Our graduates continue to define and shape contemporary preservation thought and practice. Research has been a cornerstone of the

historic preservation program and we have grown exponentially in sponsored research, studios, and theses. The Center for Architectural Conservation and The Center for Research on Preservation and Society have expanded the program’s reach and influence, providing a dynamic complement to teaching through preservation praxis and research. Our partnerships with national and international institutions have fixed our ability to collaborate locally and globally on the most pressing issues while providing students with field-based experience through our summer internships and third year post-graduate externships. Finally, the creation of our new MSD with a concentration in preservation for professionals, under the leadership of Practice Professor Pamela W. Hawkes, promises to influence the next generation of designers as the field pays greater attention to the importance of heritage places worldwide. / / F R A N K G . M AT E R O

Professor of Architecture; Chair of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation; Director, The Center for Architectural Conservation


HSPV

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Students at Fort Union, photo by John Hinchman; at the Center for Architectural Conservation; student Dorcas Corchado at Powderham Castle with Frank G. Matero, Chair of Historic Preservation and Laura C. Keim, lecturer; Work for Tactical Preservation in Detroit by Lauren Aguilar, Lillian Candela, Ashley Losco, Justin Lynch, Mia Maloney, Evelyn Pae, Santiago Preciado Ovalle, Sarah Scott, Amanda Stevens, Jacob Torkelson, and Ran Wei.; Caroline Dickensheets at Wupatki National Monument, Arizona.

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Landscape Architecture

“We can build a new identity for society as a constructive part of nature.”

Statement from the Chair: Department of Landscape Architecture For over 100 years, Penn has been a leader in the field of landscape architecture.

In 1966, on behalf of the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF), the department’s chairman at the time, Ian McHarg, drafted “the landscape declaration,” a mission statement for the profession. In 2016 this Declaration was redrafted by Penn faculty and the LAF Board to suit the challenges of the 21st century. It serves as a quintessential statement of the values underpinning the education of a landscape architect. “After centuries of mistakenly believing we

could exploit nature without consequence, we have now entered an age of extreme climate change marked by rising seas, resource depletion, desertification and unprecedented rates of species extinction. Set against the global phenomena of accelerating consumption, urbanization and inequity, these influences disproportionately affect the poor and will impact everyone, everywhere. Simultaneously, there is profound hope for the future. As we begin to understand the true complexity and holistic nature of the earth system and as we begin to appreciate humanity’s role as integral to its stability and productivity, we can build a new identity for society as a constructive part of nature. The urgent challenge before us is to redesign our communities in the context of their bioregional landscapes enabling them to adapt to climate change and mitigate its root causes. As designers versed in both environmental and cultural systems, landscape 22

architects are uniquely positioned to bring related professions together into new alliances to address complex social and ecological problems. Landscape architects bring different and often competing interests together so as to give artistic physical form and integrated function to the ideals of equity, sustainability, resiliency and democracy.” At Penn, you will learn the personal and professional skills you need to design places that critically encapsulate these values. We have organized the curriculum to ensure a balance between the acquisition of technical skill and deep immersion in artistic experimentation. With leading figures in the field, using both analog and digital techniques, you will be exposed to a range of different approaches and ideas and encouraged to develop your own vision. The curriculum enables you to specialize or to undertake interdisciplinary studies, and you will travel extensively to engage creatively with real communities and real issues. You will be challenged and supported to exceed your potential as a designer, and you will become part of the Penn alumni community who are at the forefront of the profession world-wide. Because of its exceptional faculty and students, Penn is renowned as one of the world’s very best landscape architecture programs. If you want to be part of its remarkable legacy and aim to play a leading role in the profession of landscape architecture in the future, then we welcome your application. // RICHARD WELLER

Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture; Martin and Margy Meyerson Chair of Urbanism; Co-Executive Director, The Ian L. McHarg Center for Urbanism and Ecology


LARP

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT Work by Dorothy Jacobs; work by Lindsay Burnette; studio review; work by Mingchen Cui.

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INNOVATE 24


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DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE 701 STUDIO VISIT TO CEMEX GLOBAL R&D, SWITZERLAND, PHOTO BY ENRIQUE TERRADO.


STUDIO SPOTLIGHT

Robotics Lab Pushes Boundaries of Design and Construction for Siteless House Prototype Originally Published in Design Weekly, the Weitzman School’s e-news digest, in September of 2018. Subscribe at www.design.upenn.edu/signup.

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The prototype, when it’s finished, will be a one-to-one scale model of a tiny house, with the entire building envelope under 400 square feet. It will be made of concrete, with all finishes and furnishings—from sinks to shelving—built into the form. It will consist of about ten total pieces, which can be assembled and disassembled. Each piece will be cast inside a mold that will be cut by a robot in the ARI Robotics Lab, located in the basement of Meyerson Hall.

prototype to be displayed and open to the public. They’ve taught a seminar and a studio and enlisted more than two dozen student researchers in the project. If they’re successful, the final result—they haven’t committed to a completion date yet—will open a new chapter for housing that could be developed anywhere. “It’s a siteless house, so it’s a prototype that’s designed for disassembly and relocation,” says Stuart-Smith.

But that’s about all that Robert StuartSmith and Masoud Akbarzadeh can say about the design at the moment. Stuart-Smith and Akbarzadeh are both assistant professors of architecture at the Weitzman School. Each runs a research group—the Autonomous Manufacturing Lab in Stuart-Smith’s case, and the Polyhedral Structures Lab in Akbarzadeh’s—that falls under the umbrella Advanced Research and Innovation Lab, led by Miller Professor and Chair of Architecture Winka Dubbeldam. Starting last year, with a gift from Penn alumnus Hanley Bodek (C’77) to support hands-on design and construction experience for students, Stuart-Smith and Akbarzadeh began work on a tiny house

Working with complex formed cavity con-

crete and robot technology to develop more efficient methods of both design and fabrication, the team hopes to model a type of construction that has lower costs for both labor and material. “We’re trying to test principles that we think can reduce the cost and environmental impact of building and could be applied to many other buildings,” Stuart-Smith explains. “And a small house is a good, economical way to explore those ideas.” But rock-bottom affordability isn’t the goal. And aesthetic considerations have been factored into every design decision they’ve made. “We’re not so much concerned with competing with the cost of a regular tiny house,” says Stuart-Smith. “We’re more interested in


Research Centers at the Weitzman School Advanced Research and Innovation Lab (ARI)

PREVIOUS PAGE: WORK BY YI DAZHONG. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: WORK BY HAN XUANHAO, IAN PANGBURN, AND DI XIAO; WORK BY MUSAB BADAHDAH AND ALI GHOMI; STUDENT RESEARCH IN THE ARI ROBOTICS LAB; THE ARI ROBOTICS LAB IN MEYERSON HALL.

developing a higher-quality method of building that would be competitive at cost in general for building construction. It’s also an opportunity to produce a state-of-the-art design that is not so easy to achieve without robotic fabrication.” The tiny house typology allows the team to

experiment with fabrication techniques, assembly, and aesthetics all at once, says Akbarzadeh. And the formal design is meant to be guided by the fabrication process. “We can fabricate almost anything— almost any type of geometry in terms of complexity,” Akbarzadeh says. “But one of the constraints of the design was to only restrict ourselves to ruled surfaces—that means the geometry that can be generated using one wire cutting the volume.” Ian Pangburn (MArch’19) and Mariana Righi (MArch’18) began working on the project in the studio and seminar offered by Akbarzadeh and Stuart-Smith. Righi had worked on housing projects before in her native Argentina, but on a neighborhood scale—never at the scale of a single tiny house. She began working on design and fabrication of one detailed corner of the house, and the project has been an exercise in finding a geometry for the design that is beautiful as well as rational, she says.

“We don’t want something that could be built with other techniques,” says Righi. “We’re trying to express this new construction.” The design process has involved a lot of trial

and error, says Pangburn. Every time the team meets, they critique the current digital model for “its ability to work and its ability to be beautiful to some capacity.” They’re trying to create something that can be fully functional as a bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and living space, with all the modern amenities—something that’s efficient and pleasant to occupy. And the biggest obstacle, Pangburn says, is doing all that in a structure that can be put together and taken apart any number of times. He’s worked on apartment designs before, but never refined anything to this degree. “This project has the potential to create something that’s architecturally interesting on a low budget,” Pangburn says. “Finding ways to bring high design to basically every corner of society—it’s a really old goal for modern design, but I think it’s one that’s still important.” // For more stories about Weitzman students and faculty, visit www.design.upenn.edu/ signup.

Architectural Archives Center for Architectural Conservation Center for Environmental Building and Design Center for Public Art and Space Center for Research on Preservation and Society Kleinman Center for Energy Policy The Ian L. McHarg Center for Urbanism and Ecology Penn Planning Equity Initiative PennPraxis More Art, Design, and Planning Resources at Penn Common Press Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) Penn Institute for Urban Research (Penn IUR) Penn Museum

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THE CITY OF

B R O T H E R LY L O V E

6th Largest City in the U.S.

Top 10 Best Art Cities for Creatives, Makers and More // ARTIST S MAGA ZINE

PHILAD Home to Myriad Arts & Culture INDEPENDENCE HALL AND THE LIBERTY BELL FIVE MAJOR SPORTS TEAMS PHILLIES (BASEBALL) 76RS (BASKETBALL) F LY E R S ( H O C K E Y )

E AGLE S (FOOTBALL) UNION (SOCCER)

MORE THAN 3,600 OUTDOOR MURALS // MURAL ARTS PHILADELPHIA

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O N LY 2 H O U R S F R O M

New York City & Washington, D.C.

DELPHIA A City of Firsts An Enviable Lifestyle

F I R S T W O R L D H E R I TA G E C I T Y IN THE U. S.

O N E O F A M E R I C A’ S G R E AT E S T E AT I N G C I T I E S

FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN

// BON APPETIT

CHURCH, MOTHER BETHEL AME

O N E O F T H E O L D E S T A N D L A R G E S T M U N I C I PA L

FIRST FINE ART MUSEUM

PA R K S Y S T E M S I N T H E U . S .

AND SCHOOL IN THE U. S.,

T O P 2 0 C I T I E S I N T H E U . S . F O R PA R K A C C E S S

OF FINE ARTS

P E N N S Y LV A N I A A C A D E M Y

PHOTO COURTNEY SMYTH.

AND QUALIT Y

/ / T R U S T F O R P U B L I C L A N D PA R K S C O R E ® R A N K E D N O. 2 A M O N G “ B E ST P L AC E S TO V I S I T IN THE U. S.”

// U. S. NE WS & WORLD RE PORT

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Degrees The comprehensive Master of Architecture* program, which is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board, prepares graduates for the full range of activities in the profession. An intensive sequence in design studios constitutes the focus of the program and thorough training is also provided in history, theory, technology, ecology, society, and professional practice. Studios and courses are supported by a rigorous sequence in visual studies that develops skills in digital and new media. The Master of Science in Design with a concentration in Advanced Architectural Design* (MSD-AAD) is a post-professional program offering students a three-semester studio-based sequence aimed at innovation in architectural design. The program allows students to pursue an individually directed course of study by choosing from a wide range of options in advanced design studios and elective courses. The advanced, three-semester Master of Science in Design with a concentration in Environmental Building Design* (MSD-EBD) is designed for architects seeking new skills and competitive advantage in the growing field of sustainable design. 30

The one-year Master of Science in Design with a concentration in Historic Preservation* (MSD-HP) complements the long-standing two-year MSHP degree by addressing the needs of practicing design professionals seeking post-professional training, specialization, or change in career path. The Master of Science in Design with a concentration in Robotics and Autonomous Systems* (MSD-RAS) is a post-professional program offering students a one-year (two-semester) sequence that explores avenues for re-situating the role of architectural design within present day autonomous technologies. The program aims to critically develop novel approaches to manufacturing, construction, occupation, demolition and re-use, through creative engagement with robotics, material systems, and design-computation, primarily operating through prototypical design research. The Master of Science in Architecture is a one-year non-professional researchbased degree program for students who wish to pursue a self-directed program of study at the advanced level.

The two-year Master of Fine Arts program focuses on the professional development of studio artists. Through studio work, seminar courses, international residency opportunities, and interactions with vital working artists, the program provides an open intellectual framework to foster critical awareness and independent methods of artistic research. The program encourages exploration, extending studies into other disciplines within the School and the university-at-large with a rich selection of outside electives. The Master of Science in Historic Preservation* provides an integrated approach for architects, landscape architects, planners, historians, archaeologists, conservators, managers, and other professionals to understand, sustain, and transform the existing environment. The program combines rigorous intellectual training with practical foundational skills needed for professional practice. Four concentrations are offered: Architectural Conservation, Preservation Design, Preservation Planning, and Public History of the Built Environment.


The two-year Master of City Planning* program, accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board, gives students the knowledge and skills to solve the most vexing problems facing the world today. The program teaches the quantitative, qualitative, and digital skills needed to analyze complex problems and visualize alternative futures for communities. Students gain in-depth knowledge in at least one of six areas of concentration: Community and Economic Development: studying how planners and policy leaders influence the social and economic factors shaping metropolitan economies and urban neighborhoods. Land Use and Environmental Planning: exploring new ways to accommodate population and economic growth while strengthening existing cities and towns and preserving precious and irreplaceable farm and resource lands. Public and Private Development: learning the planning, design, entrepreneurial, and financing principles of developing for-profit and community-oriented housing and commercial development projects. Smart Cities: giving students the skills and abilities they will need to develop a new generation of planning applications that seamlessly combine user-friendly data retrieval and modeling procedures with individual and collaborative urban planning and design tools.

Sustainable Transportation and Infrastructure Planning: exploring the roles of transportation and other capital infrastructure systems in shaping urban and metropolitan development patterns in the U.S. and around the world. Urban Design: focusing on understanding the links between the physical form and structure of cities and regions and the economic, social and political forces that shape them.

The Master of Landscape Architecture* first professional degree, designed for students with an undergraduate degree in a field other than landscape architecture or architecture and second professional degree, designed for students with a professional degree, are both committed to innovative design as informed by ecology, the history of ideas, techniques of construction, new media, and contemporary urbanism. The Master of Urban Spatial Analytics* is a two-semester graduate program that teaches students how to use spatial analysis and data science to address the most pressing public policy and city planning conundrums of our day.

The Ph.D. in Architecture program is one of the oldest in the country and is widely regarded as preeminent in the fields of theory, technology and representation. Its goal is to produce scholars engaged in the history of the architecture and associated fields, with attention to how these histories bear on the present. The Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning program offers access to a broad, multi-disciplinary faculty and all the resources of a first-rate urban research university—an ideal setting in which to study the serious problems that face our metropolitan areas today and the broad spectrum of responses to meet those challenges.    

*STEM eligible

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Certificates

Dual Degrees

Ecological Architecture

Master of Architecture and Master of City Planning

Ecological Planning Emerging Design and Research Environmental Building Design Energy Management and Policy GIS and Spatial Analysis Historic Preservation Integrated Product Design Land Preservation Landscape Studies Real Estate Design and Development Time-Based and Interactive Media Urban Design Urban Redevelopment Urban Resilience

Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture Master of Architecture and Master of Science in Historic Preservation Master of City Planning and Master of Landscape Architecture Master of City Planning and Master of Science in Historic Preservation Master of City Planning and Master of Urban Spatial Analytics Master of Landscape Architecture and Master of Urban Spatial Analytics Master of Fine Arts and Master of Landscape Architecture Master of Fine Arts and Master of Social Work (Social Policy and Practice) Master of Science in Historic Preservation and Master of Landscape Architecture

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Master of Architecture and Master of Science in Engineering (Integrated Product Design/IPD) Master of City Planning and Juris Doctor (Law) Master of City Planning and Master of Social Work (Social Policy and Practice) Master of Architecture, Master of City Planning, Master of Science in Historic Preservation or Master of Landscape Architecture and Master of Business Administration (Wharton) The Weitzman School partners with the Wharton School and the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) on the Master of Integrated Product Design (M:IPD) and the Master of Science in Engineering in Integrated Product Design (MSE:IPD). Both degrees are granted by SEAS.


Accreditation The Master of Architecture program is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board.

WORK BY XIAOXUAN LIU.

The Master of City Planning program is fully accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. The Master of Landscape Architecture program is fully accredited by the American Society of Landscape Architecture.

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Non-Discrimination Policy Statement

Notice of Availability of Crime Information

The University of Pennsylvania values diversity and seeks talented students, faculty and staff from diverse backgrounds. The University of Pennsylvania does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, age, disability, veteran status or any other legally protected class status in the administration of its admissions, financial aid, educational or athletic programs, or other University-administered programs or in its employment practices.

The federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, as amended, requires colleges and universities to provide information related to security policies and procedures and specific statistics for criminal incidents, arrests, and disciplinary referrals to students and employees, and to make the information and statistics available to prospective students and employees upon request.

Questions or complaints regarding this policy should be directed to the Executive Director of the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Programs, Franklin Building, 3451 Walnut Street, Suite 421, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6106; or 215.898.6993 (Voice).  

Federal law requires institutions with on-campus housing to share with the campus community an annual fire report. In addition, the Uniform Crime Reporting Act requires Pennsylvania colleges and universities to provide information related to security policies and procedures to students, employees and applicants; to provide certain crime statistics to students and employees, and to make those statistics available to applicants and prospective employees upon request. You may view the report online at www.publicsafety.upenn.edu/clery/ annual-security-fire-safety-report/ or request a paper copy of the report by calling the Division of Public Safety’s Office of the Vice President a 215.898.7515 .

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Diversity and Inclusion Shortly after his appointment in the summer of 2016, Dean Steiner formed a Faculty Diversity Work Group to advise him on strategies to (1) increase the diversity of the School’s faculty, staff, and student body; (2) promote a more inclusive community; and (3) and foster a learning environment that encourages and celebrates difference.

offerings addressing specific topics of diversity, an all-school conversation about gender-inclusivity in the academic environment, and a workshop for search committee members regarding implicit bias.

The Weitzman School is home to The Penn Planning Equity Initiative, which aims to (1) redefine planning research and In 2017, the Group presented a practice (capacity-building); (2) detailed report on recommenda- promote action research and tions for continuing these efforts its application (understanding and the Dean convened a formal and addressing inequality); and Diversity Committee with faculty, (3) stimulate public dialogue staff, and student representa(disseminating new knowltion to carry forth the Group’s edge). A related initiative led recommendations. In late by the Department of City and 2017, Dean Steiner appointed Regional Planning, the Moelis the School’s first Diversity Scholars Program, trains Coordinator. This position African-American and Latinx helps to implement the recom- students to be the next genermendations of the School’s ation of leaders in the field of Diversity Committee, organize urban planning. Prospective events, coordinate trainings and students who intend to pursue discussions on diversity-recareers in public/private devellated issues, and track and opment or community and report the Weitzman School’s economic development are progress toward goals outlined particularly encouraged to apply. in the Faculty Diversity Plan. Student Organizations The activities organized by Dedicated to Inclusion the Diversity Work Group and and Diversity the Diversity Committee have included: a school-wide faculty // Inclusion in Design discussion regarding resources // Design in Latin America for diversity within course // Women in Architecture content, a student diversity // Women in Planning town hall, an event for students // Queer Design highlighting studio and elective // Urban China Collective

Our Commitment to Diversity The Stuart Weitzman School of Design is committed to creating an educational setting in which all students, faculty members, and staff members are valued. We strive to create an inclusive culture that celebrates difference and is strengthened by contributions from people of all races, religions, countries of origin, genders, ages, sexual orientations, physical abilities, learning differences, and socioeconomic backgrounds. We aspire to support and retain a student body, faculty and staff who are representative of the multiple communities and publics with which we collaborate and work.  A diverse community enhances our ability to prepare the next generation of artists, architects, landscape architects, planners, and preservationists to become leaders and innovators in a multicultural society. Read more about the Weitzman School’s efforts to advance diversity and inclusion in our community at www.design.upenn.edu/diversity.

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ADMISSIONS

Applying General Application Requirements

Application Deadlines

Financial Aid

// Online Application

// December 16 MS in Architecture

We offer scholarships based on merit and/or need. In addition, our Office of Student Financial Services will consider all US citizens and permanent residents for Federal loans and work-study.

// $80 Application Fee // Personal Statement // Three Letters of Recommendation // Official Transcripts from US Colleges/Universities Attended, or a BASIC Course-by-Course Evaluation (Non-US Institutions) // Resume // GRE Scores (required for all but MFA applicants) // TOEFL or IELTS Scores (required for some applicants for whom English is not their first language) Some programs require portfolios and/or writing samples. For more detailed information, go to www.design.upenn.edu/graduateadmissions/how-to-apply

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PhD in Architecture PhD in City and Regional Planning // January 2 Master of Architecture MSD (Advanced Architectural Design, Environmental Building Design, Robotics and Autonomous Systems) // January 9 Master of City Planning Master of Fine Arts Master of Science in Historic Preservation MSD (Historic Preservation Master of Landscape Architecture Master of Urban Spatial Analytics Certificate Programs

US citizens and permanent residents should file a FAFSA; international students should submit an International Financial Aid Form. These should be submitted no later than February 1 for financial need to be considered when awarding scholarships. For up-to-date information on tuition and the cost of attendance, please go to www.design.upenn. edu/graduate-admissions/tuitionand-financial-aid.


Get to Know Us We welcome the chance to connect with you. We are here to provide you with more information and answer any of your questions about the School, individual programs, admissions, and financial aid. Contact Us admissions@design.upenn.edu 215.898.6520 or come visit!

FAC E B O O K TWITTER I N S TA G R A M FLICKR VIMEO


GLOBAL NETWORK WEITZMAN GRADUATES TRAVEL STUDIOS 2013-2019


Viewbook 2019  

The University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design enrolls students from nearly 40 countries in graduate programs in architectu...

Viewbook 2019  

The University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design enrolls students from nearly 40 countries in graduate programs in architectu...