Page 1

PENINSULA

NEWS

Established 1912

To be, or not to be

To market, to market

A teen girl plays Hamlette in a Parkland showcase play tomorrow, page A15

Sidney Summer Market a hot topic this winter, as businesses ask to change its setup, page A5

Watch for breaking news at www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

First steps of a winter race About 630 people take off from the start line in the 33rd annual Prairie Inn Harriers Pioneer 8K race at Saanich Fairgrounds on Sunday, Jan. 8. Steve Osaduik, a Nanaimo native, was first to cross the finish line, followed by Jim Finlayson (centre, green singlet). Lucy Smith (right, red singlet) was the top woman runner in the pack. For more photos, see page A3 and peninsulanewsreview.com. Erin Cardone/News staff

Tsartlip community mourns loss of brother, dancer “He was a really good powwow dancer and he’s been dancing in the community since he was four years old.� – Joni Olsen

Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

The Tsartlip community is remembering an uncle, brother and man who loved to dance. Wilfred Joseph Henry, 44, died in a Dec. 29 trailer fire on Tsartlip Drive. “In the community, one thing lots of people remember is he was

a really good powwow dancer and he’s been dancing in the community since he was four years old,� said Joni Olsen, a Tsartlip band councillor. “He was very good and you could tell he loved doing it.� Known as Joe Henry Jr., he’s remembered by members of the Tsartlip community as a brother, an uncle and “the nicest man.�

“He was a very kind, loving guy,� Olsen said. “We’re doing everything possible [to help those left homeless]. There’s never enough that can be done,� said Chief Wayne Morris. “Within our community we don’t have extra housing, we don’t have housing to go around to all of our members.� Morris has spent the week since

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Wednesday,January January11, 11,2012 2012- -PENINSULA PENINSULANEWS NEWSREVIEW REVIEW Wednesday,

Man found safe after family’s scare

Firefighters lend a hand Firefighters and the Day family stop for a photo during the hectic tree chipping event at the North Saanich fire hall on Saturday, Jan. 7. The department’s annual tree chipping and open house raised about $2,200, half of which will go to Chris Day and his family to help keep him mobile with the use of a specialized wheelchair as he battles multiple sclerosis. The other half goes Santas Anonymous.

A man whose car was found abandoned at the Swartz Bay ferry terminal approached police to report that he is alive and well. Demetrios Konstadinos Rokanas was reported missing by his family before Christmas. He had last been seen on Nov. 28 in Parksville, with the car that was later found abandoned. He had parked his car at the terminal on Dec. 8 and Ferries staff called RCMP about it on Dec. 16. Rokanas contacted police on the Lower Mainland on Jan. 4, in response to media coverage of his disappearance, to announce he was safe. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

North Saanich fire photo

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Local volunteers and community organizations may want to keep an eye on their mailboxes. That’s because hundreds of invitations and nomination forms have been mailed out, encouraging people to submit nominations for the 14th annual Hearts of the Community Volunteer Awards. Co-sponsored by the Peninsula News Review and Beacon Community Services, the awards honour individuals and groups for exemplary volunteer service on the Saanich Peninsula. Nominations are accepted in six categories: service to seniors; service to children and families; overall service to the community; outstanding youth volunteer; lifetime service award; and community service or project by a group. The outstanding youth volunteer receives a $1,000 scholarship. Although nomination forms have been mailed to some community members, anyone can nominate a candidate before nominations close on Jan. 30. Nomination forms are online at www.beaconcs. ca. They’re also available at the Peninsula News Review office at 6-9843 Second St. and at Beacon Community Services, at 9860 Third St., its Peninsula thrift stores and its Shoal Activity Centre volunteer office. All nominees will be honoured at a free public ceremony and luncheon on Feb. 16. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 11, 2012 

COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF

12 kg of coke found in car

Sidney North Saanich RCMP officers hauled 12 kilograms of cocaine from a vehicle on Thursday, Jan. 5. Officers got information that a vehicle on the Tsawwassen-Swartz Bay ferry route might be carrying drugs. Just after the ferry landed in Swartz Bay at about 4:30 p.m., officers stopped a driver on the Pat Bay Highway. Two Saanich men in their 20s were arrested and the drugs were seized. The suspects could be charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking. Cpl. Chris Swain said 12 kilograms of cocaine is worth about $630,000 on the streets.

NS man stopped for trafficking

Photos by Erin Cardone Colourful shoes were the order of the day for many of the more than 600 runners who participated in the Pioneer 8K on Jan. 8.

Osaduik victorious Nanaimo runner Steve Osaduik continues to top rankings by winning last weekend’s Harriers Pioneer 8K race Near-perfect conditions graced the 628 runners who finished Sunday’s Pioneer 8K race. The Prairie Inn Harriers race started and finished at the Saanich Fairgrounds, where more than 100 spectators cheered on the runners. There was no wind and barely any rain as the athletes made the eight kilometre run in Central Saanich. Steve Osaduik was first to cross the finish line, at 24 minutes, 46 seconds, well ahead of the second-place finisher, Jim Finlayson, who had a time of 25 minutes, three seconds. Lucy Smith was the first woman to finish the race, at 28 minutes, 30 seconds. Registration was down slightly from last year, which had 647 finishers. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

RCMP finished 2011 arresting a North Saanich man for drug trafficking – for the second time. On Dec. 29, Sidney North Saanich RCMP searched a residence in the 1400 block of Hillgrove Road in North Saanich and seized a large quantity of cocaine and cash. A 38-year-old resident was arrested nearby in a vehicle, which also contained cocaine. “The suspect was sent to court the following day on drug trafficking charges and has been remanded in custody until his next court date on Jan. 11,” said Swain. RCMP arrested the man under similar circumstances on May 18, 2011.

Left: Lucy Smith, who runs with the Harriers club, crosses the finish line on Sunday with a time of 28:30. Below: Race director Bob Reid calls out names as runners finish the eight kilometre race. Top right: Steve Osaduik wins the Pioneer 8K, crossing the finish line at 24:46. Below right: Racers share a laugh after finishing the eight kilometre run.

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In the event of a snowfall, the Town of Sidney will keep major arterial and collector streets open and will clear snow and ice from as many local streets as possible, particularly those in the downtown area. In addition, snow and ice will be cleared from the sidewalks at intersections and bus stops, with general priority given to locations serving higher pedestrian volumes. Residents, property owners and businesses are reminded that Section 47 of the Town’s “Streets and Traffic Regulation Bylaw� (Bylaw No. 1966) requires every person being an occupant or owner of any property, to clear snow and ice from the sidewalk in front of or abutting their property. A fine of $75.00 may also be imposed for non-compliance under the Municipal Ticket Information Bylaw (Bylaw No. 1975). This does not include any potential third party civil action that could be brought for non-compliance resulting in injury, damage, loss etc. The Town is, therefore, requesting consideration and co-operation from all property owners and occupants in this matter to ensure the safety and convenience of the public at large. Please remember your elderly or disabled neighbours who would appreciate your assistance. Your efforts to make Sidney a safer all-weather community are greatly appreciated. P. Harrison Manager of Operations

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Donations taken for family left homeless Continued from page A1

“They’ve lost all their clothing, they’ve lost all their belongings.� Donations including household goods and cash will be accepted for Henry’s wife, his brother and the small children who lost their home to the blaze. Donations can be dropped off at the band office at the end of Boat Ramp Road. Central Saanich firefighters doused the fire that started around 4 p.m. and left the home gutted. “We’ve determined that the fire started in the kitchen area of the trailer,� said fire chief Ron French. “It

Dangerous living From Dec. 29 to Jan. 2 seven people lost their lives in five separate fires in B.C. Three of the fires and five deaths occurred in mobile homes or travel trailers being used as homes. Escape from mobile home fires is more difficult because the space is smaller, which puts the occupant closer to combustibles. They do not ventilate as readily and there is often just one exit, according to the B.C. Coroners Service and the Office of the Fire Commissionner.

District of North Saanich Notice Of Public Hearing Official Community Plan Amendment By-Law NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all persons who believe their interest in property may be affected by an amendment to the “District of North Saanich Official Community Plan By-law No. 1130, (2007)�, by By-law No. 1279, shall be afforded an opportunity to be heard or to present written submissions at a PUBLIC HEARING to be held in the Council Chambers of the Municipal Hall, 1620 Mills Road, North Saanich, B.C. on Monday, January 16, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The lands subject to this bylaw are identified in Map No. 3. In general terms, the purpose of “North Saanich Official Community Plan By-law No. 1130 (2007), Amendment By-law No. 1279 (2011)�, is to amend Development Permit Area No. 3 Wildfire Hazard, and Map No. 3 Wildfire Hazard.

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is still an undetermined cause.â&#x20AC;? Henry lived in the trailer with his wife and other family members. As well as being leader of the community, Morris knew Henry on a personal level. Henry was the son of Morrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cousin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joe Jr. was always friendly and supportive and helping wherever he can. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the loss that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had,â&#x20AC;? the chief said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was supporting, he would support families that were in need in any way he could. Whether it be cultural or a circumstance weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in today, he was always dependable.â&#x20AC;? reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Publication: Oak Bay News (BCNG) Size: 4.3125â&#x20AC;? x 8â&#x20AC;? (1/4 page) All ,QVHUWLRQGDWH relevant documentation pertaining to this bylaw may -DQXDU\ be inspected at the North Saanich Municipal Hall, 1620 Mills Road, North Saanich, B.C., weekdays between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday, Publication: Saanich Newsto(BCNG) excluding Size: statutory 4.3125â&#x20AC;? x 8â&#x20AC;? (1/4 page) holidays. ,QVHUWLRQGDWH -DQXDU\ Curt Kingsley Manager of Corporate Services Publication: Victoria News (BCNG)

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SIDNE Y WATERMAIN FLUSHING

The Town of Sidney will commence the annual flushing of watermains on February 01, 2012 with completion anticipated by the end of March 2012. Flushing will (BCNG)begin in the southern areas of Sidney and proceed north. Temporary discolouration of water and/or low water pressure may occur as a result of this activity. This discolouration is not a health hazard. To clear your water lines, turn on your cold water tap until the water is clear. Upon request, we will provide advance warning of flushing in your vicinity for those persons with special requirements for water clarity. Please contact the Public Works Department at 250-6561034 if you require notification. The Town of Sidney does not accept any responsibility for damage caused by low water pressure or the use of discoloured water. We therefore advise consumers to be on the alert for reduced water pressure and/or temporary discolouration of water. More information may be found on our website at www.sidney.ca under Notices. Brad Thomas Foreman of Underground Utilities


www.peninsulanewsreview.com www.peninsulanewsreview.com •• A5 A5

PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW -- Wednesday, Wednesday, January January 11, 11, 2012 2012 

Summer Market stuck in the middle

Several cougars spotted on Peninsula

Two sides want to see different setup for summer staple

News staff

Did you know? � The Sidney Summer Market happens every Thursday, starting in June � Vendors each pay $50 per week for their stands � Sidney Business Association makes about $30,000 from the market each year. Meanwhile, the Town of Sidney takes more than $15,000 of that to recuperate costs, such as policing and garbage disposal

Erin Cardone News staff

Some merchants in Sidney have their fingers crossed the Sidney Summer Market might look different this year. Erin Middlebrooks, owner of Dragon Horse on Beacon Avenue, said the weekly market is “catastrophic” to her business. The tents and activity on the street outside block shoppers from her door. “From three o’clock till closing we might as well go home,” she said. “I thought, somebody has to do something.” She and other merchants approached the town to draft a new model for the market after she collected 48 signatures on a petition that suggests a change to the model. Currently, vendor stalls line each side of Beacon Avenue, which is closed to traffic at 4:30 p.m. The backs of the stalls face the businesses, many of which close at 5 or 5:30 p.m., and the market starts at 5 p.m. The town produced a diagram that shows the stalls back to back

file photo

While some Beacon Avenue businesses hope to see the Sidney Summer Market’s vendors line up in the middle of the street, the Sidney Business Association says it won’t fly. down the middle of Beacon. “It’s not possible. It’s a logistical nightmare,” said Edward Connor, president of the Sidney Business Association, which runs the market, referring to the downthe-middle plan. As vendors are setting up, they park their cars along Beacon until the market starts. Under the current format, there is room for cars to pass in the street. Were the vendors to split the road, a single parked car would block traffic,

halting the set-up process. Randy Humble, the town’s director of development services, is helping create a feasibility study on the proposed change. “It appears it could be manageable,” he said. “It really comes to the logistics of it, how it would be set up. It’s preliminary. We’re still looking at the configuration of the report. We think there’s potential there in terms of feasibility.”

“This would go onto Bevan [Avenue] quite well,” Connor suggested. “There’s not many businesses on there. You ask the merchants do they want to be there and they say no.” Middlebrooks said she hopes council approves the change. “Business in Sidney is hurting. We do want to work with [the business association] but we can’t afford to keep quiet anymore, literally, in a financial sense. This is a recipe for success. I think it’s a win-win for everyone.” Sidney council discussed the proposed changes at Monday’s meeting, after the News Review’s deadline. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

Christine van Reeuwyk Central Saanich police are warning residents to be watchful after two officers tracked a cougar into Brentwood Bay early on Jan. 5. The officers were on routine patrol on West Saanich Road just after midnight when they saw the cougar cross the road in front of their police cars. “The officers followed the cougar into a small retail area on the east side of West Saanich Road near Clarke Road,” said Cpl. Pat Bryant of Central Saanich police. “The cat eluded the officers and was last seen [heading] northbound from the 7100 block of West Saanich Road in Brentwood Bay.” Police notified B.C. Conservation of the sighting. Saanich police are also advising residents to be vigilant after a series of cougar sightings in that municipality. Early in the morning of Friday, Jan. 6, a cougar was spotted in the area of Arbutus. On Jan. 4, there were two cougar sightings near the Quadra-McKenzie area. There were at least two other sightings reported last week in Saanich, on Tuesdsay and Wednesday. If you see a cougar, call a conservation officer at 1-877-952-7277 or 911 in an emergency. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

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Wednesday, Wednesday, January January 11, 11, 2012 2012 -- PENINSULA PENINSULA

EDITORIAL

NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW

Jim Parker Publisher Erin Cardone Editor Victoria Calvo Production Manager Bruce Hogarth Circulation Manager

The Peninsula News Review is published by Black Press Ltd. | #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 | Phone: 250-656-1151 • Fax: 250-656-5526 • Web: www.peninsulanewsreview.com

OUR VIEW

Lessons taken from vandalism Whether the spray-painting of swastikas on headstones at Victoria’s Emanu-El Cemetery was driven by ignorance or hatred, the act led to an outpouring of support for the Jewish community. Hundreds gathered at the burial ground Sunday to help let the region’s Jewish community know that tolerance and understanding is in greater supply in Disgusting act the Capital Region shows hateful than intolerance and mentality remains bigotry. There may be no simple answer as to why the graves were marked with the symbol of the Jews’ Second World War-era oppressors, the German Nazis – those buried were Holocaust survivors, a fact perhaps unknown to the vandals. Victoria police are treating the case as a hate crime. Proclaiming the act to be driven by hatred is one thing, proving it in court, of course, may be something altogether different. It may be naive to think the vandalism of headstones is likely the act of a young person or people with a rudimentary sense of history trying to get a rise out of some adults; or perhaps someone with a sick sense of humour. If the act was driven by ethnic intolerance, we hope it proves to be an isolated stunt carried out by someone who is mentally unstable and not a planned effort by one or more people who carry such insensitivity in their hearts and minds. One thing the actions proved is that memories of the Holocaust and their lasting effect more than 70 years later remain close to the surface, not only for our Jewish community but for anyone with a sense of empathy. For certain, something positive has already come from the situation. The community at large closed ranks and offered support, the way Greater Victorians are prone to do. We hope it also keeps conversations going about the Holocaust among our younger generations and why it’s important to learn from that horrible chapter in human history. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com or fax 250-656-5526. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Peninsula News Review is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2010

Progress Board served B.C. well and glossed over the findings. How is B.C.’s economy doing? The key flaw with the Progress This question occupies a great Board turned out to be its emphasis deal of time in our political debate. on provincial rankings. B.C. ranked But since that debate is mostly first for the entire 10 years in health an exercise in selecting facts and and environmental conditions, passing blame back and forth, it’s and near the bottom in a complex difficult to tell. Former premier Gordon Campbell measure of “social condition” that was often oversimplified as poverty. set out to change that in 2001 with In most measures, the establishment of including economic the B.C. Progress Board. ones, the rankings barely Independent directors changed in a decade. established six “core In his final report, targets,” environmental, board chair Gerry health and social Martin noted that indicators as well as B.C.’s improvements economic measures, and in economic output tracked them annually and income were with comparisons to other significant, but didn’t provinces. move them up the This created a 10-year Tom Fletcher rankings because other database that doesn’t B.C. Views provinces had similar exist anywhere else. But success. Big recoveries in it hasn’t exactly been Saskatchewan and Newfoundland flattering, a sign that it has been meant that B.C. sometimes slipped kept free of political interference. in the relative rankings despite Premier Christy Clark’s recent major gains. decision to replace the Progress Martin noted that on crime, Board has sparked another round “initial performance was so of political blame-storming. The poor that B.C.’s best-in-country NDP opposition was accustomed improvements over several years to jumping on the annual rankings were needed just to move B.C. and trumpeting the ones that cast to about average.” (There’s an the B.C. Liberals in a bad light. example of how independent this Predictably, they portrayed the board has been.) remake of the board as an effort to Crime is part of the board’s sweep embarrassing results under “Social Condition Index,” along with the rug. low-birth-weight babies and longMedia often focus on the political term unemployment. This has been horse race rather than details of a favourite of opposition critics, dull old policy. When the board’s because B.C. started low and annual reports came out, they slipped lower. typically covered the political fight

But they won’t tell you the whole story, through the NDP 1990s as well as the B.C. Liberal 2000s: “B.C. ranked sixth in the Social Condition Index in 1990, improved to third in 1993, but deteriorated through the rest of the 1990s and into the next decade such that it sank to last place for 2001 and 2002,” the final report says. “Improvements between 2002 and 2007 saw B.C. reach fifth place in 2006 and 2007, but rank changes on low birth weights and long-term unemployment brought B.C. to seventh in 2008 and ninth in 2009.” Does this mean the NDP government of the 1990s did a bad job, or that the B.C. Liberals did better and then screwed up? It could be spun that way, but there are external factors involved. The B.C. Progress Board didn’t just do rankings. Its policy suggestions were implemented in regulatory reform, energy selfsufficiency, creating community courts and UBC Okanagan, and proceeding with the Site C dam. Martin notes that the successor organization, the Jobs and Investment Board, will carry on the performance monitoring and “hold government’s feet to the fire,” in particular on its ability to attract investment. It’s time to stop arguing about the level of poverty and find new ways to alleviate it. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘B.C. sometimes slipped in the relative rankings despite major gains.’


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 11, 2012 PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 11, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A7 www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A7



LETTERS Criticism aside, North Saanich bloc was elected fairly Since the recent municipal elections, I’ve read numerous letters to the editor that find fault with several of the newly elected North Saanich councillors on a number of issues, but especially the Sandown proposal. For those of you who disagree with the position taken by these four councillors, please note that Dunstan Browne, Craig Mearns, Conny McBride and Ted Daly won this election by obtaining a majority of votes in a democratic election. It is to their credit that they are seeking more information on the Sandown proposal, because that is exactly what they all said they would do in their respective election platforms, and that is why they are North Saanich councillors today. It is quite refreshing to see elected officials at any level of government keeping their election promises. So a big thank you to Dunstan, Craig, Conny and Ted for showing the integrity to withstand the harsh criticism from those folks whose personal positions differ from their own. Keep up the good work. And thank you, Team North Saanich, for the informative ad, “Report to the Community Re: Sandown Racetrack” appearing in the Peninsula News Review on Jan. 4. S. Andrews North Saanich

Finall’s leadership will protect land for future In response to the paid advertisement by Team North Saanich, I find it very unfortunate that the few, who now have the voting power on council, have a motto that rings of paranoia: “Off your back, out of your wallet, and off your property.”

The property we call ours is on loan to us for a short term. It really belongs to future generations. Where would we be with no management for the long term? Mayor Alice Finall has proven to be fiscally responsible in her past term, her actions well thought out and in the best interests of the future of North Saanich. As a longtime resident, I strongly support Mayor Finall representing our municipality on the Capital Regional District board and continuing to work with council, staff and Sandown owner Bill Randall to accept the forward thinking offer of the Sandown property. G.L. Greenwood North Saanich

Daly was upfront about his actions in CRD vote Re: Daly seems to flip-flop on decisions when it’s convenient (Letters, Dec. 21) Here is the real reason Coun. Ted Daly voted against his own motion regarding the CRD appointments: Coun. Daly informed the mayor that he did not want his offer of compromise to be imposed upon her. If it was to pass, he wanted her to be supportive and not feel that she was forced into it. He informed her that to accomplish that he might be forced to vote against his own motion. When the vote was called, the three members of Team North Saanich voted in favour of the motion. Had Coun. Daly voted with them, the majority would have prevailed, the issue would have been over and the mayor’s vote would not have counted. To give the mayor the opportunity to cast the deciding vote, Coun. Daly voted against his own motion, as he said he

would, thus creating a 3-3 tie, and affording the mayor the opportunity of casting the deciding vote. The mayor voted to reject Coun. Daly’s offer of compromise. There was no flip-flop; Coun. Daly did exactly as he said he would do, and that was to allow the mayor to cast the determining vote. Letter writers have neglected to mention that the truth about this issue is available to anyone by watching the webcast of the meeting available on the North Saanich website. I wonder why. Mike Stanlake North Saanich

Crowd control issues not unique to Coun. McMurphy North Saanich is now a community at war with itself and like all wars, the first casualty is truth. In a recent letter to the editor, Sheilah Fea (McMurphy showed little crowd control at rowdy meeting, Letters, Dec. 28) wrote that Coun. Elsie McMurphy “barely made an attempt to control the chamber, allowing an air of disrespect, intimidation” and “unrestrained bullying.” I was there and that picture is just not true. Yes, there was applause and vocal disapproval by citizens of the actions of some councillors – but welcome to the real world of 2012. People worldwide are demonstrating that they are fed up with being lied to, taken for granted and told to show respect for people who have failed to earn it. I saw no intimidation or bullying by the citizens present, nor fear and Coun. McMurphy called for order several times. The letter also says that when he was

mayor, Ted Daly “prevented this kind of behaviour” and describes the citizens and taxpayers at the Dec. 12 meeting as “a mob of unruly citizens” – which is untrue. If councillors are going to inflame the passions of citizens by their actions, they have only themselves to blame, and in a democracy, if you can’t take the heat you should stay out of the kitchen. People have short memories. In May 2007 I wrote to council, expressing concern about municipal finances and spoke to the issue at the council meeting on June 4, 2007. Here is what happened, as recorded by me in letters to council on June 7 and 13, 2007. This is a matter of public record and the correspondence was copied to the News Review’s editor of the day. “I was publicly subjected by Coun. [Bob] Shaw, the mayor [Daly] and to a lesser extent Coun. Fea, to negative, humiliating and discourteous treatment including hectoring by the mayor.” So let’s all stick to the facts, earn respect instead of just demanding it, and long live robust democracy and engagement of the people. David Olsen North Saanich

Christmas headline instigated a good chuckle In 40-plus years of reading Canadian community newspapers, no single headline has made me laugh more than this Jan. 4 bit on page A5: “Man pukes on Christmas.” Regrettably, however, you fail to report whether his car sports a Darwin fish or not. Keep bringing up more headline yuks in 2012, News Review. W. Baird Blackstone Tsawwassen

BeefsAndBouquets I would like to thank the gentleman in line in front of me at the Sidney Thrifty Foods on the evening of Tuesday, Jan. 3. You purchased a Smile Card and asked the cashier to pass it along to the next person in line. This random act of kindness absolutely made my day and reminded me that there really are good people out there. Jenny Comer Heartfelt thanks and season’s best wishes to the Sidney Thrifty Foods supermarket cashier who turned in my wallet and contents on Dec. 15 and to the service desk attendant who phoned to inform me even before I realized its absence. Such honest and kindness are hallmarks of Sidney townsfolk in general, and the Thrifty’s staff in particular. Name withheld by request A great big bouquet to all the Secret Santas. Individuals, families and businesses, in partnership with the Sidney North Saanich RCMP, generously provided gifts, opportunities and selfless affection to bring extra cheer to 28 families throughout the Peninsula this Christmas. The donations were warmly

received by all families. Thank you all for a second year of support. Const. Elf (Ravi) The Saanich Historical Artifact Foundation wishes to express a sincere thank you to the public who came out to Christmas in the Village. Your response to this event was the best we have had to date and we will now be able to assist the Saanich Historical Artifacts Society with some of the projects they have planned for the 2012 season. Donna Hunter The Grinch who stole Christmas from a single mother and her two children should feel thoroughly ashamed. How could anyone have done this cruel deed to a young, struggling family at this time of goodwill? A hand-sewn black quilt with hockey logos of red and white specially made for her son who comes from Ontario for Christmas, along with all family gifts, were stolen from my granddaughter’s van on Christmas Eve. A reward is being offered to anyone for the recovery of this hockey quilt. Caroline E.Whitehead

The staff at CIBC would like to thank the Sidney Bakery and Serious Coffee for donating cookies and coffee so that we could raise money to help the Sidney Lions Food Bank at the Christmas parade on Dec. 3. Janice Brown A big thank you to everyone who donated their spare change to Parkland secondary school’s Spread the Net team during the Sidney Sparkles parade. With your help, we raised $440. When added to the proceeds we made this year through other fundraisers, we now have a grand total of $640, meaning we can buy 64 nets that will protect up to 320 African children from the spread of malaria. What a generous community we live in. Alli Rickson and Helen Roy On behalf of the Sidney fire department, thank you to the residents of the Town of Sidney for their overwhelming support in our annual Christmas food drive. 2011 was the biggest success yet. We are very proud to serve such a kind and generous community. Sidney fire department

Established 1912

This week in history � 1916: Old timers say the present severe storm is the worst experienced on Vancouver Island since 1898. “The snow drifts continued to impede the milkman, butcher and baker, who are compelled to be abroad no matter what the weather.” � 1933: A funeral is held for Andrew James Smith of Salt Spring Island. He came to Salt Spring Island in 1903 where he took up dairy farming and built up a herd of purebred Jersey cattle. He was 59. � 1941: Shooting on Sundays is disallowed in North Saanich, as well as shooting from the roadside on any day of the week.

Send your beefs or bouquets to us at 6-9843 Second Street, Sidney, fax 250-656-5526 or email editor@peninsulanews review.com. Beefs and Bouquets is a free service provided by the News Review.


A8 â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Hundreds Expected to Cash In Today by Selling Silver & Gold Coins During Record High Market! By DAVID MORGAN STAFF WRITER

ICC will be placing ads in newspapers, radio and running television spots this week asking people to bring in any old silver and gold coins made before 1968 and U.S. coins made before 1970. Those that bring in their coins will be able to speak with collectors one on one and have their coins looked at by a specialist. With the help of these ICC members, offers will be made to those that have coins made before 1968. Offers will be made based on silver or gold content and the rarity of the coins. All coins made before 1968 will be examined and purchased including gold coins, silver coins, silver dollars, all types of nickels and pennies. Those that decide to sell their coins will be paid on the spot. If you are like a lot of people you might have a few old coins or even a coffee can full lying around. If you have ever wondered what they are worth now might be your chance to find out and even sell them if you choose. They could be worth a lot according to the International Coin Collectors also known as ICC. Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins and currency for their collections. If it is rare enough, one coin could be worth over $100,000 according to Eric Helms, coin collector and ICC member. One ultra rare dime, an 1894S Barber, sold for a record $1.9 million to a collector in July of 2007. While that is an extreme example, many rare and valuable coins are stashed away in dresser drawers or lock boxes around the country. The ICC and its collector members have organized a traveling event in search of all types of coins and currency. Even common coins can be worth a significant amount due to the high price of silver and gold, says Helms. Washington quarters and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many times their face value. Recent silver markets have driven the price up on common coins made of silver. Helms explains that all U.S. half dollars, quarters and dimes made before 1970 contain 90% silver and are sought after any time silver prices rise. Right now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sellers market he said. The rarest coins these collectors are looking for include $20, $10, $5 and $2 1/2 gold coins and any coin made before 1850. These coins always bring big premiums according to the ICC. Silver dollars are also very sought after nowadays. Other types of items the ICC will be purchasing during this event include U.S. currency, gold bullion, investment gold, silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc. Even foreign coins are sought after and will be purchased.

Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s How It Works: Also at this event anyone can sell their gold jewellery, dental gold or anything made of gold on the spot. Gold is currently trading at record high prices. Bring anything you think might be gold and the collectors will examine, test and price it for free. If you decide to sell, you will be paid on the spot â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it has been an unknown fact that coin dealers have always paid more for jewellery and scrap gold than other jewelers and pawn brokers. So whether you have one coin you think might be valuable or a large collection you recently inherited, you can talk to these collectors for free. If yourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky you may have a rarity worth thousands. Either way there is nothing to lose and it sounds like fun!

t(BUIFSJUFNTPGJOUFSFTUGSPNZPVSBUUJD  TBGFEFQPTJUCPY HBSBHF CBTFNFOU FUD 5IFSFJTOPMJNJUUPUIFBNPVOUPGJUFNT ZPVDBOCSJOH t/PBQQPJOUNFOUOFDFTTBSZ t*GJOUFSFTUFEJOTFMMJOH XFXJMMDPOTVMU PVSDPMMFDUPSTEBUBCBTFUPTFFJGBCVZFS FYJTUTPGBMMJUFNTIBWFPGGFSTJOPVS EBUBCBTF t5IFPGGFSJTNBEFPOUIFTQPUPOCFIBMG PGPVSDPMMFDUPSTNBLJOHUIFPGGFS t*GZPVEFDJEFUPBDDFQUUIFPGGFS XFXJMM QBZZPVPOUIFTQPU t:PVHFUPGUIFPGGFS XJUIOPIJEEFOGFFT

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www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A9

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A12 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com A12 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 - PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW Wednesday, January 11, 2012 - PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW

Legal aid funding increases, but not enough, lawyers say Taxpayers question accountability Natalie North News staff

Legal aid in B.C. received a $2.1-million boost this month, but it’s not nearly enough said the president of the Victoria Bar Association. “It’s just a drop in the bucket compared to [previous] cuts and there’s much more funding needed before legal aid will be helpful for the people who need to rely on it, particularly in the family law area,” said bar association president Kay Melbye. The additional funding from

the Ministry of Attorney General brings annual legal aid funding in B.C. to $68.6 million. The new money goes to the Legal Services Society, B.C.’s administrators of legal services to low income individuals. The announcement comes in the midst of a legal aid awareness campaign launched by the B.C. branch of the Canadian Bar Association. “The reality is that the public needs to be engaged on the topic of legal aid and demand [access to legal aid] from the government so that they fund it properly,” said Sharon Matthews, president of the B.C. branch of the Canadian Bar Association, creators of WeNeedLegalAid.com.

Matthews spent much of the last year travelling the province and meeting with community groups to garner support for the campaign. She says nine out of 10 British Columbians believe people who face a serious legal crisis should have a lawyer and that, if they can’t afford one, the government should pay for legal aid. “People in British Columbia are particularly concerned that women and children are adversely affected by the lack of legal aid,” she said. “What our campaign is trying to do is give voice to that public opinion that exists.” Veteran lawyer Leonard Doust incited Matthews’ recent work when he presented nine recommendations for how the system

can be made more accessible. His recommendations include re-establishing regional aid offices and making legal aid an essential service. All of the $47 million in suggested changes have been supported by the B.C. branch of the Canadian Bar Association. Doust leads the Public Commission on Legal Aid, an independent group representing six legal bodies, including the Victoria Bar Association. Jordan Bateman, B.C. director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, questions the independence of Doust’s report. Bateman notes that the Public Commission on Legal Aid is funded by the B.C. branch of the Canadian Bar Association, the Law Society of B.C.,

Vision Matters

RECEIVERSHIP AUCTION

A long established wholesaler of fine Persian: Eastern imported handmade wool and silk carpets has seized by creditors. Their assets are ordered to be sold by auction liquidations.

PUBLIC AUCTION 2 PM • VIEW FROM 1 PM Dr. Paul Neumann

Healthy Eyes. Doctor Delivered.

How to get the most out of your eye exam

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15

Masterpieces of wealth caliber LARGE WOOL AND SILK • PERSIAN: EASTERN CARPETS

Plus many more from other corporate contracts: Turkoman, Large Silk Tabriz, Kashan, Shiraz Gashgai, Antique Sirjan, Saroug, Meimehi, Chobi, Fine Nain, Qum, Triabal Balouch, Moud, One Of A Kind Village Rugs, Runners, Oversized And Many Large Dining, Living Room Sizes.

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thank you ...for the donations to the

Peninsula Christmas Dinner 2011 The three major food stores; Fairway Market, Safeway and Thrifty Foods contribute equally for this event. Peninsula News Review, Art Knapp Nursery Victoria, Brown’s the Florist, Sidney, Art Finlayson, Toast Coffee Shop, Donald G. Newton, Doug Wedman - Wedman Management Services, Salvador and Davis & Co., Scotia Bank, Bob Haney, Sidney Home Hardware, Floral Centers by volunteers, Breadstuff Bakery; Dale Carter and Rita Cooney, Marjory MacNeill for the teddy bears, Lions Food Bank, Scotiabank, John Mackelson, Clara Knight Catering,. Richard Holmes, Mr. Joan Dear, Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Sparke and all those that donated on the day. To volunteers who assisted on the day of the dinner and the day before to set up; Bill Lushaw’s staff; Mary Winspear Centre Kitchen crew; Clara Knight, John Mackelson, Harry Atkinson and Sylvia, Darlene Kisalbach, Patrick Zanichelli, Janet and Peter Remmer, Paul Pearcy, Linda and John McGowan. Volunteer Co-ordinator; Isabelle Yoxall, Reservation co-ordinator; Wendy Warshawski, check in; Lindy Deas, Gwen Kenner, Shirley Lewis Drivers; Jim Dunn, Bob Philipchalk, Brian Dunik, Jillian Dunik Santa & Mrs Clause; Gerry Martin & Gay Desserts; Dale Carter and Rita Cooney of Breadstuffs Bakery Dinning room crew; Vi Howe, Doug Kenner, Pasiley Thurm, Shelby Titian Gwen Mackay, Nell Courville, Sandra Raffeny and Mary Cully, Sandy Thompson, Michelle Dunne, Terry White, Sheila Hill, Marjory MacNeil, Tara Rothwell.,. Musicians; Sunshine Singers, Dan Rowbotham and the Flying Fish group, Water in the Crawl Space Co-chair; Special thanks to; Wendy Warshawski for all her work.

Jeannette Hughes

Ah yes, a New Year and all those resolutions you don’t keep. Attending to your eye health is one resolution you should keep. A complete eye examination is your most valuable tool in ensuring a lifetime of healthy eyes and clear vision. To provide you with the best eye and vision care, your Optometrist needs to know a few things about your health, how you use your eyes, and any unusual symptoms you may be experiencing. Make it clear what you want or what is bothering you at the beginning of the exam. Some people wait until the very end of the exam to mention what is really worrying them. Perhaps this is from embarrassment or the feeling that the complaint is trivial, but the Optometrist will be better able to give the problem the time and attention it requires if it is mentioned early. Few complaints are silly and even minor symptoms can be important. Know your medications or, even better, bring a list. Knowledge of your family history of eye disorders is extremely helpful. If you have a complaint like a headache, try to describe it as accurately as possible: time of onset, duration, frequency etc. Be able to describe your work environment. Knowing the distance to your computer or desk makes it much easier to prescribe and design the appropriate spectacle lens. Consider the hobbies and sports in which you participate. You may use your eyes differently for recreational activities than you do for your job, or you may require suitable eye protection. Don’t forget to bring the glasses that you wear every day along with any old ones that you still may use. Any other old glasses may be brought in and donated for use in third world countries. Do not wear a lot of eye makeup. If you wear contact lenses, inquire if the optometrist will want you to wear them to the exam. This varies from one optometrist to another and with the purpose of the visit. Ask if your eyes will be dilated. If the answer is “yes”, avoid driving yourself to the examination and consider bringing sunglasses. And finally, relax! Eye examinations are not painful, and can even be fun.

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Crown Counsel Association of B.C., the Law Foundation of B.C. and the Vancouver and Victoria bar associations. “These folks have a vested interest in seeing more money go into defence law,” Bateman said. “I don’t think law firms are hurting for cash.” The taxpayers federation would prefer to see the shift come from lawyers, who Bateman said should bear more pro bono work to repair cracks in the system. “Let’s be realistic here. [Lawyers are] already receiving quite a bit of money. Perhaps if lawyers were better at being efficient with that money we’d be more interested in giving them more,” he said. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Warring neighbours needed for TV show Casting underway for Neighbourhood vs Neighbour Erin McCracken News staff

Problems between you and your neighbours could pay off if you don’t mind airing those issues on the small screen. A Saanich production company is searching for neighbours who are not only at war, but interested in peace, for a TV show it is developing called Neighbourhood vs Neighbour. Showcasing issues plaguing neighbours would be a unique addition to reality television, said Erin Skillen, vice-president of May Street Productions. The show would also feature a conflict-resolution specialist or psychologist -– the hunt is on for one on the Island, Vancouver and Seattle – who will work on-camera with the warring neighbours. “We are genuinely looking to help people, not exploit them,” said Skillen. “Some reality shows come in and they really mess with people and manipulate them, and we aren’t interested in doing that.” Victoria casting director Annie Klein is looking for neighbours from Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands to film a demo over one or two days in the next two months. Only one neighbour needs to apply. The opposing neighbours would be contacted later, if producers are interested. Skillen will begin pitching the concept to Canadian and U.S. television broadcasters later this month. Neighbours starring in the show won’t be paid because the producers don’t want people to perform for the camera, said Skillen. For details or to apply, contact Klein at casting callvic@gmail.com or 250-217-9006 by Jan. 19. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. emccracken@vicnews.com

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PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW -- Wednesday, Wednesday,January January11, 11,2012 2012 PENINSULA

A13 www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A13

Peninsula’s priciest properties revealed Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

Private islands aside, a Central Saanich property leads the list of the five most expensive residential properties on the Saanich Peninsula according to a list released by B.C. Assessment. All the properties from the three municipalities that make up the Saanich Peninsula are waterfront. The home at 8408 Lawrence Rd. is assessed at nearly $9.3 million. McPhail Road holds the next two highest with 8100 McPhail assessed at just over $8.2 million and 8150 at $5.7 million.

The highest valued in North Saanich is just under $7 million for 670 Lands End Rd. Nearby 872 Lands End came in near $5 million. Sidney properties round out the lower end of the spectrum, with a pair of waterfront properties on Allbay Road in the top two: 10493 Allbay is just over $3.6 million and 10487 Allbay is just over $2.5 million. James Island expectedly leads the islands with an assessed value of more than $46 million. Domville, Forest, Brethour and Goudge islands range from $8.1 million to $9.8 million. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Making the list Here’s a list of the highest-assessed properties on the Peninsula and their assessed values. � 8408 Lawrence Rd. $9,256,941.60

� 9740 Glynnwood Park Rd. $3,935,300.54

� 8100 McPhail Rd. $8,203,833.64

� 528 Lands End Rd. $3,840,482.48

� 8150 McPhail Rd. $5,725,664.40

� 10493 Allbay Rd. $3,631,533.40

� 8244 West Saanich Rd. $5,616,380.17

� James Island $46,403,565.21

� 8338 West Saanich Rd. $5,586,479.63

� Domville Island $9,861,523.49

� 670 Lands End Rd. $6,946,736.33

� Forest Island $9,528,378.23

� 872 Lands End Rd. $4,962,832.03

� Brethour Island $8,284,063.38

� 9088 Ardmore Dr. $4,287,010.06

� Goudge Island $8,167,469.80

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submitted photo

Solemn occasion Central Saanich firefighters pose for a photo while in Enderby last week for the funeral of Daniel Botkin, an 25-year-old Enderby firefighter killed while on duty Dec. 29.

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Parents Parents and and preschoolers preschoolers (3 (3 years years and and up) up) are are invited invited to to visit visit their their neighbourhood neighbourhood school. school. Tour Tour the the school. school. Participate Participate in in fun, fun, hands-on hands-on learning learning activities. activities. Learn Learn ways ways to to help help your your child child get get aa great great start start for for kindergarten. kindergarten.

 Join Join us us at at the the school school near near you. you. We We can’t can’t wait wait to to meet meet you! you! Tuesday, Tuesday, January January 17, 17, 3:15-6pm 3:15-6pm Cordova Cordova Bay Bay Elementary Elementary –– 250.658.5315 250.658.5315 Lochside Lochside Elementary Elementary –– 250.658.5238 250.658.5238 Prospect Prospect Lake Lake Elementary Elementary –– 250.727.3314 250.727.3314

Wednesday, January 18, 18, 3:15-6pm 3:15-6pm Wednesday, January Sidney Sidney Elementary Elementary –– 250.656.3958 250.656.3958 KELSET KELSET Elementary Elementary –– 250.655.4648 250.655.4648 Deep Deep Cove Cove Elementary Elementary –– 250.656.7254 250.656.7254 Keating Keating Elementary Elementary –– 250.652.9261 250.652.9261 Brentwood Brentwood Elementary Elementary –– 250.652.3996 250.652.3996

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A14 A14 •• www.peninsulanewsreview.com www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, Wednesday, January January 11, 11, 2012 2012 -- PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW

HEALTHY LIFESTYLES

Resolve to check your prostate health this year Hearing Solutions for Active Lifestyles Digital Hearing Instruments Comprehensive Hearing Tests

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It’s a well-known fact that men put off seeing their doctors. But with one in seven Canadian men having prostate cancer during his lifetime, it’s important for men to start taking charge of their health in 2012 and talk to their doctor about prostate cancer prevention and screening options. A recent survey commissioned by Mayo Clinic revealed a general lack of knowledge regarding the prostate-specific antigen test, or PSA, a screening option used by physicians to determine a patient’s potential risk of developing prostate cancer. The test measures the amount of PSA, a protein produced by cells of the prostate gland, in the patient’s blood. A surprising 50 per cent of men aged 20-49 do not know what the PSA test is. One hotly debated question has been the PSA test’s accuracy as a predictor of the need for a biopsy and future development of low-risk cancer. A Mayo Clinic study released in October found a clear link between the test and next steps in the prostate cancer continuum of care. “The decision to get a PSA test done is best made by the patient in consultation with their doctor, as there isn’t always an easy answer,” said Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes, urologist at the Mayo Clinic. While screening tests are typically considered at the age of 40 and over, there are steps most Canadian men can take now. Everyday actions like drinking more green tea, and adding fish and soy to their meals have been linked to keeping the prostate healthy. Interestingly, 73 per cent of men have not considered adding soy to their diets to help reduce risks.

Volunteer Awards

Help us recognize outstanding volunteers in our community! Nominations requested by January 30th Please take a few minutes to nominate a special volunteer in one, or more, of these six categories:

� Service to Seniors

2x6 thriftys

For service by an individual that helps improve the quality of life for seniors living on the Saanich Peninsula

� Service to Children & Families

For service by an individual to children, youth, and/or their families living on the Saanich Peninsula

Our Vitamins & More Department offers

� Overall Service to the Community

a wide selection of vitamins and minerals,

For outstanding efforts by an individual in a variety of volunteer activities in the Saanich Peninsula community

� Outstanding Youth Volunteer

care and sports nutrition products to

� Community Service/Project by a Group

complement your active lifestyle.

� Lifetime Service Award

Our knowledgeable staff is here to answer

For an individual contributing exemplary volunteer service in the Saanich Peninsula community over a lifetime Note: Eligible nominees are Peninsula residents and groups, as well as those outside the area, who do/have done beneficial volunteer work on the Saanich Peninsula. If nominating a group, please identify one individual to represent the group.

Nomination forms are available at www.beaconcs.ca The Peninsula News Review office, Beacon Community Services’ Third Street office, SHOAL Activity Centre and Beacon’s Peninsula Thrift Stores. A special panel will select a winner in each category to be honoured, along with all nominees, at the

2012 Hearts of the Community Volunteer Awards Ceremony & Luncheon Thursday, February 16th - 11 am at the Mary Winspear Centre For information on nominating and free event tickets, please call 250-656-0134

Source: www.newscanada.com

Reduce the risk If you want to reduce your risk of prostate cancer, consider: � Choosing a low-fat diet � Eating more fat from plants than from animals � Consuming more fruits and vegetables � Eating fatty fish � Drinking green tea � Drinking alcohol in moderation � Maintaining a healthy weight � Exercising most days of the week

PENINSULA

Church Services

herbal remedies, teas, natural body

For a youth, age 14 - 19, who provides exemplary volunteer service in their school and/or the Saanich Peninsula community (youth also receives a $1,000 education scholarship) For a service/project by a group which benefits the Saanich Peninsula community

There’s an important nutrient in soy called isoflavones, which has been linked to fighting prostate cancer. If eating tofu isn’t appealing, try adding peanuts, kidney beans, chickpeas and lentils to meals – all these foods contain isoflavones. More health-related information is available at www.mayoclinic.org/canada.

all of your questions and provide the best customer service possible. Come in and see for yourself!

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Saturday Worship ..........................11:00 “Everyone Welcome” Sidney 9810 Seventh Avenue 250 656 0946 Central Saanich 7860 Wallace Drive 250 544 0980 visit thriftyfoods.com

10:00 a.m.............................Worship SUNDAY SCHOOL & NURSERY A Warm Welcome Awaits You!

Rev. Irwin Cunningham 250-656-2241

ST. PAUL’S UNITED CHURCH

Sunday Worship & Children’s Program at 10:30 am Minister: Rev. David Drake Music: Mary Lou Day Fifth & Malaview, Sidney

250-656-3213 www.stpauluc.com

Come Worship With Us - Everyone Welcome Christmas Eve Service 7pm 9300 Willingdon Road, North Saanich Pastor Travis Stewart T: 250-885-7133 E:peninsulamission@shaw.ca www.peninsulamission.org


www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A15 www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A15

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 11, 2012  PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 11, 2012

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Girl leads Parkland Hamlette Students from Parkland’s acting 11-12 class will show two public performances that touch on topical modern themes. The two one-act plays, Hamlette and Censorbleep, are directed by and star Grade 11 and 12 students. “It’s been a challenge, but also a lot of fun directing Hamlette,” Grade 12 student Ryan O’Keefe said. “It’s not always easy keeping everyone focused, but we’ve pulled it together for the show and it’s a really hilarious play.” Hamlette, written by Allison Williams, is a re-interpretation of the classic Shakespearean play with a female in the lead role. Played by Madison Gordon, Hamlette tries to convince the rest of the cast that she is really female, but the others aren’t going along for the ride. “This role is great, as I get to play comedy but also tragedy,” Gordon said. “People have certain expectations about the character and the play, so it’s fun to try to approach it from a different angle.” Censorbleep, written by Lindsay Price, deals with the issues of censorship and conformity. It’s a look at how students are pressured into fitting in at school and altering their ideas and personalities. “It’s a bit more experimental,” said Grade 11 student Kiera Karlenzig, who plays Mandy, one of the Bleep Bleep girls.

Homeglow Heat Products

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Walk-In Denture Clinic WHY WAIT? WE CAN HELP NOW! file photo

Lego creations draw thousands of visitors to Sidney Museum.

Lego lure returns

submitted photo

Madison Gordon will play the lead in Parkland’s presentation of Hamlette tomorrow evening in the school theatre. “My character has to choose whether she wants to fit in, or to stand up to be the person she wants to be.” While this is their final public performance for the semester, the class has been busy for the past five months working on character development, improvisation, movement, mime, script exploration, team building and, earlier in the semester, their production of Snow White. “It’s been a busy and exciting semester,” teacher Joan Saunders said. “I’ve been impressed

with how much the class has come together, with how much they have learned and, as well, with how they have always been willing to explore ideas and characters in their scenes. I really find that acting class does bring out the best in people and lets them learn so much about themselves and what they are capable of.” The showcase starts at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow (Jan. 12) at the Parkland secondary school theatre, 10640 McDonald Park Rd. Admission is by donation. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

Sidney Museum’s most visited exhibit is back for its seventh year. The annual Lego exhibit is on now to the end of March. This year the feature star is 1.2 metre-long Star Wars Executor Super Star Destroyer. Other display models include the ship Black Pearl from Pirates of the Caribbean, the Taj Mahal, Eiffel Tower and London Bridge. Pirates, castles, race cars and construction vehicles plus several new models are among more than 250 in the exhibit. Sidney Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by donation. Call 250-655-6355 or visit www.sidneymuseum.ca for details.

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A16 â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulanewsreview.com A16 www.peninsulanewsreview.com

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FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS IN MEMORIAM Hague, Lola Dec 27, 2011 One last journey, our dear sweet Lola. Ever smiling, ever giving, always loving unconditionally. Forever held in our hearts. Loving you always. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My life has been a tapestry of rich and royal hue An everlasting vision of the ever changing view A wondrous woven magic in bits of blue and gold A tapestry to feel and see, impossible to holdâ&#x20AC;? Carole King. The family would like to thank Dr. G. Wray and the Drs. and nursing staff of VGH. There will be no service as Lola wished.

DEATHS

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW Wed, Jan 11, 2012, Peninsula News Review

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMING EVENTS

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

HELP WANTED

INCOME OPPORTUNITY

TRADES, TECHNICAL

stoptheviolencebc.ca & coopgroop.ca are partnering for Discussion and Medical Marijuana Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market in Victoria or Nanaimo. Seeking Registered Charities with venue to host 1-day event for 15% of gross sales. (10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of thousands$?) Health Canada license. Info: coopgroop.ca

BE YOUR Own boss with Great Canadian Dollar Store. Franchise opportunities now available. Call today for details 1-877-388-0123 ext. 229 or visit our website: www.dollarstores.com

Alberta earthmoving company requires a Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanic. You will work in a modern shop and also have mechanics truck for field work. The job is at Edson, Alberta. We require that you have experience on Cat crawlers and or Deere excavators. Call Lloyd at (780)723-5051.

HOME BASED Business. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

INDEPENDENT ELECTRIC & Controls Ltd. Hiring immediately, Western Canada locations: Electrical/Instrumentation; Journeyman/Apprentices. Oilfield/Industrial experience an asset. Standard safety tickets required. Email resume: careers@iecgroup.ca referencing job # CAJIJE003.

INFORMATION ATTENTION RESIDENTIAL School Survivors! If you received the CEP (Common Experience Payment), you may be eligible for further Cash Compensation. To see if you qualify, phone toll free 1-877988-1145 now. Free service!

PERSONALS HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: APPLE device Jan. 1 while walking near Robertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bay in Sidney. 250-656-2516. FOUND. CALICO Cat, about 2 yrs old. Arrived Xmas eve, North Saanich. (250)656-2829

LIEUTENANT COLONEL JACK WILLIAM KAISER JUNE 28, 1924DECEMBER 2, 2011 It is with much sadness we announce the passing of our father, Jack Kaiser. Please see the Victoria Times Colonist for full obituary Memorial service January 14th, 2012 1pm, Cadetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hall, 1979 Anson, Saanich, BC. RSVP Gary at sifu990@hotmail.com

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGALS WAREHOUSEMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIEN ACT Notice is hereby given that Kustom Towing, (2009) Ltd, 3297 Douglas St, Victoria, BC, V8Z 3K9 will be selling: 1984 BMW 733i WBAFF8405E9283156 Owner D. Ritchie Will be sold on Jan. 25, 2012. At 647B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10am-2pm 1992 BMW 318i WBACA42090AL28877 Owner T. Hansen Will be sold on Jan. 25, 2012. At 647 B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10-2pm. 1988 Honda Civic JHMED9365JS800537 Owner K. Gordon Will be sold on Jan. 25, 2012. At 647 B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10-2pm.

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE ON THE WEB

LOST: GOLD locket, (Filigree on front), Amethyst in centre, no chain, Sidney area, Jan. 2. Call 250-477-2484.

TRAVEL GETAWAYS LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ.Storm watchers 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299. Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

TIMESHARE CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No Risk Program. Stop mortgage & maintenance payments today. 100% Money back guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL BRING THE family! Sizzling specials at Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best beach! New Smyrna Beach, Florida. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166

CHILDREN CHILDCARE AVAILABLE NEW FAMILY Daycare in Sidney. Open Feb. 1st. Learn through play environment. ECE with 30 yrs exp. Call (250)656-3525.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS

TRADES, TECHNICAL

ALL CDL Drivers Wanted: Excellent mileage pay + bonuses. Require valid passport. Deliver new & used vehicles long haul in U.S. & Canada. Piggyback training available. Toll-Free 1-855-781-3787.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS AIRLINES ARE Hiring- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783. Become a Psychiatric Nurse - train locally via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month program is recognized by the CRPNBC. Govâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t funding may be available. Toll-free 1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, Free to Try!!! 1-877297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #4011 or 1888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1 Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #4010. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+). DOG LOVERS! Enjoy a healthy, profitable career as a professional dog trainer. Government accredited program student loans and grants. Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs. www.wonderdogs.bc.ca/careers/

or 1-800-961-6616.

THE SINGLE PARENT RESOURCE CENTRE is seeking caring individuals for a 12 session Peer Helper for Single Parents volunteer training. Successful candidates will receive training to provide one-on-one support for parents. Training will be three hours per week starting mid-February and ending mid-April. Interested individuals please contact Cheryl Dyck at:

Horticultural Labourer needed at Eurosa Farms,

Brentwood Bay. Duties include picking and packing flowers and crop maintenance. No experience necessary. $9.79/hr. 40+ hrs/week. 5-6 days/week Work available in 2012: Mar 1- Nov 1. Send resume to Fax: 250-652-6949 E-mail: p_bulk@yahoo.ca

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD

HARWOOD FORD SALES, needs Licensed Automotive Technicians, 1 hours from Calgary, Alberta. New Millenium Ford Dealership, state-ofthe-art technical equipment. 14 service bays, unlimited flat rate hours, in the heart of oil country. Send resume Joel Nichols, Fax 403-362-2921 Email: j-nich70@dealeremail.com gregharty09@gmail.com

PERSONAL SERVICES ART/MUSIC/DANCING PIANO LESSONS by Linda Sheraton. Grade 8. Toronto Conservatory. Brentwood Bay. $20/40mins. (250)532-4123.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

THAI CORNER Rest. Reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2 F/T Thai Food Cook, 3 to 5 yrs Exp. $3000/mo. Please email: r.chalermwat@hotmail.com or mail apply to: 2231 Bradford Ave., Sidney, B.C., V8L 2C8.

M I L LW R I G H T / M E C H A N I C REQUIRED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Full time position. Vancouver Island Chip Plant. Welding experience an asset. Union wage, full benefit package. Please contact joanne.stone @dctchambers.com

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

GIFT SUCCEED. STUDY.WORK. S U . O

THE

OF EDUCATION

Register for any Sprott-Shaw Community College program between Dec. 1, 2011 - Feb. 29, 2012 and receive up to $1000* towards tuition. Learn more at sprottshaw.com/gift *Some conditions apply

TRAIN TO BE A HEALTHCARE ASSISTANT IN VICTORIA TODAY!

cheryl@singleparent victoria.ca or phone 250-385-1114 for more info.

FARM WORKERS

Healthcare Assistants are prepared to work in both healthcare facilities and community agencies. HCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s provide & maintain the health, safety, independence, comfort & well-being of individuals & families. Train locally for the skills necessary in this rewarding career ď&#x192;&#x17E;eld.

SUN WING GREENHOUSES LTD. 6070Oldfield Rd,Victoria,BC Farm workers req. from Apr 1 Sept10/2012, Duties incl. picking/packing/crop maintenance. No exp. needed $9.79/hr.40+hrs/wk, 5-6 days/wk. Fax resume to 2506525757 or email to sunwingfarm@shaw.ca

FORESTRY REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY: Long log trucks for the winter season in Fort St James, BC local haul. Contact: Steve @ Newland Enterprises: 250996-8838. Good rates, good haul.

Looking for a NEW job? .com

to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

SproUStt-S ha w JOIN ON:

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

250.384.8121 www.sprottshaw.com

CALL VICTORIA:


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 11, 2012 Peninsula News Review Wed, Jan 11, 2012 PERSONAL SERVICES FINANCIAL SERVICES

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A17 www.peninsulanewsreview.com A17



MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

FUEL/FIREWOOD

HOUSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

GORGE VIEW APT 258 Gorge Road East Stes avail. - Some Immed. 1 Bdrm $860; 2 Bdrms $1120; 2 Bdrm & den $1125. Amenities incl’s indoor pool, fitness facilities, above grnd and parkade pkg, on site laundry. Onsite staff avail. Please call Sue or Elena 250-380-6566 Email: gvapts@shaw.ca

MEDICAL SUPPLIES CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991

PARK WEST APTS 55 Bay Street Stes avail. - some immed. 1 Bdrms from $875; 2 bdrms from $1125. Close to Victoria downtown, Save-On, Starbucks & transportation. Please Call Wendy 250-590-7505 Email: pw@ramco.ca

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

DROWNING IN Debts? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1-877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161. M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE BUILDING SUPPLIES

BIG BUILDING Sale. Clearance sale you don’t want to miss! 20X26 $4995. 25X34 $6460. 30X44 $9640. 40X70 $17,945. 47X90 $22,600. One end included. Pioneer Steel: 1800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca CAN’T GET Up your stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help! No obligation consultation. Comprehensive warranty. Can be installed in less than 1 hour. Call now 1-866-981-6591. MATTRESS & B/Spr. sets from $169., 39”, 54”, Queen & King-Size; Wardrobes, Armoires, Ent. Centres, TV Stands, Hall-Trees, Desks, Bookcases, Storewide Clearance Up to 50% OFF! B/R & D/R Furnishings; Leather or Microfibre Sofa, Love & Chair $1199.; Lamps from $10., Accent Tables, Magazine Racks $9.95, 72” Hat/Coat Rack $15. BUY & SAVE 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca We Buy, Sell, Trade. Visa, M/C PANASONIC KX-T7433C Digital Phone System; Complete with 19 handsets. Excellent condition, perfect for start-up office. Will accept best offer. 604-363-1397. PAWN SHOP Online: Get cash fast! Sell or get a loan for your watch, jewelry, gold, diamonds, art or collectibles from home! Toll-Free: 1-888435-7870 or online: |www.pawnup.com

FREE ITEMS

WE BUY HOUSES

FREE: CANNING jars, various sizes. Call 250-655-1943.

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

FRIENDLY FRANK $80

obo.

BEAR MTN Athletic Club 10visit pass gym/pool/fitness classes. $134 value; $95. 250-391-6430. NEW BLENDER $34, new coffee machine $34. Desk atlas $24. (778)440-6628. NEW ENCHANTRESS pantyhose, large, misty grey. 6 pair, $30. (250)383-4578. PANASONIC MICROWAVE, good shape, works well, $25. Call 250-656-2156.

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

APARTMENT/CONDO FERNWOOD AREA Apt, large 2 bdrm, $930/mo. Avail now. Call 250-370-2226 for viewing.

bcclassified.com EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

CARS

$50-$1000 CASH

SIDNEY- 1 bdrm + studio. Indoor cat OK. Sep entrance, N/S. $800. (250)812-4154.

858-5865

SUITES, UPPER

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

DOWNTOWN SIDNEY lge sunny 2bdrm, 1.5bath, modern open kitchen, 1 blk to ocean/main St. Garden, sunroom/den, FP, parking, NS, $1240 mo incls W/D, Feb. 1. Hugo at 403-259-1870 or call (evenings) at 403-253-5285.

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted! We BUY Scrap Batteries from Cars, Trucks etc. $4.00/ea. & up! Free pick-up Island Wide. Min. 10 (1)604.866.9004 Ask for Brad

QUADRA/MACKENZIE: 3 bdrms, $1250+ 50% utils, sun deck, laundry, St. prkg. Avail immed, 250-516-5556.

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING

NORTH SAANICHEnjoy views of farm lands from this lrg 1bdrm upper lvl suite, shared laundry, N/S, $800+ util’s. Call (250)652-7707.

SIDNEY: OCEAN view, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, close to town, $1950/mo. 1-877-353-5552 or info@whitetreecondos.com

SHARED ACCOMMODATION COLWOOD, UNFURN’D room available, incls all utils, $450. (Avail immed). 250-858-6930.

SUITES, LOWER CAREY RD. area, 2 bdrm bsmt, laundry, all utils incl’d, $1100, (Immed) 250-386-8365

SIDNEY: CLOSE to Beacon & waterfront. Comfortable grnd floor apt. 2 bdrms, 2 baths, 5 appls, parking. $1200./mo + hydro. (250)656-1444. QUADRA: 2 bdrm apt., 2 bath, 3pc appl’s, h/w floors, NS/NP, close to everything. $1250. (250)216-5090, (250)386-6523

Classifieds can find your friend!

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

Call us today

TRUCKS & VANS

• 388-3535 •

$0-$1000 CASH

For Junk Cars/Trucks

Will tow away any car or truck in 45 mins. FREE!

TowPimp.com

ADVERTISING

250-588-7172

toll free 1-888-588-7172

The Key To Success

250-656-1151

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Goldstream News Gazette

HOMES FOR RENT

SIDNEY AREA: Close to all amens, 4 bdrm, radiant heat, gas fire, garage, 5 appl’s, games room, office and more. $2300, Feb. 1. 250-656-6448.

Call: 1-250-616-9053

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE

SUITES, LOWER

Reporter

SIDNEY- 2006 1 level 3 bdrm, 2 bath executive home attached dbl garage, like new cond., $2500 incld’s lawn services. Call (250)652-7707.

www.webuyhomesbc.com

Your Community

GORDON HEAD, 1-bedroom. Close to University, bus routes. Separate entrance, kitchenette and shared laundry. Quiet. No pets/smokers. Damage deposit and references required. $675/month. Free wi-fi, heat and hydro. Available Feb 1st. 250-727-2230.

RENTALS

REAL ESTATE HOMES WANTED

TRANSPORTATION

SEAGATE APTS 707 Esquimalt Road Stes avail. - some immed. 1 bdrm $875 & up; 2 bdrms $1010 & up. Indoor pool, exercise rm and many other fitness amenities. Full view of Strait of Juan de Fuca. Please call Sylvia 250-383-1731 Email: sea@ramco.ca

STEEL BUILDINGS End of season deals! Overstock must go - make an offer! Free delivery to most areas. Call to check inventory and free brochure 1-800-668-5111 ext 170

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

36” RCA TV (250)479-9160.

WETHERBY APTS FOR SENIORS ONLY 55+ Spacious stes Avail. - some immed. Bach $750; 1 bdrm $890; 2 bdrms $1075 & up. Close to buses, Hillside Mall, doctors, dentists all within walking distance. Seniors lifestyle of convenience & comfort. On site laundry, social room. Staff available. Please call Bonny 250-598-1650 Email: weth@ramco.ca

RENTALS

CAREY ROAD- spilt level 1 bdrm suite. Close to bus. F/P, deck, lots of parking, shared W/D. Includes hydro, water, basic cable. N/S, no dogs. $1000./mo. Call 250-727-3089 after 6pm. COLWOOD- 1 bdrm, shared laundry, priv ent, NS/NP. $795 incls utils, quiet, 250-391-7915

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc FREE CASH Back with $0 down at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or bad credit call Stephanie 1-877792-0599 DLN 30309. Free delivery www.autocreditfast.ca WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Treat yourself this Christmas to $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. 1-888593-6095 www.creditdrivers.ca

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID

FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

BEATERS UNDER $1000

C. SAANICH, 1 bdrm bsmt, all utils incl, priv ent, shared W/D, N/S, N/P, $750/mo, avail immed, call 250-213-8852.

ROCKLAND AREA Apt, large 1 bdrm, incls heat & hot water, $800/mo. Avail immed. Call 250-370-2226 for viewing.

SAANICHTON LARGE 1 bdrm, priv entrance, shared laundry. NS/NP. $800 mo incls utils. Call (250)544-8007.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

The Goldstream News Gazette has an immediate opening for a full-time news journalist. Goldstream is located minutes from Victoria, B.C. Reporting to the editor, the successful candidate will provide news stories, photos and video for our awardwinning, twice-weekly newspaper and website. The ideal candidate will have a passion for print and online journalism and possess superior news judgment. The proven ability to write clean, interesting copy, adhere to stringent deadlines and be able to work both independently as well as part of a team are required. The candidate will be comfortable with all aspects of multimedia journalism, and have a track record of turning around well-written, fact-based, concise, and well-produced content quickly, for posting online that day, along with photos and video. Evening and weekend work is required. A car and driver’s licence is required for this position. Knowledge of Canadian Press style is important as is the ability to take and carry out instructions in a timely fashion. Knowledge of InDesign, Photoshop and social media (Facebook, Twitter) would be considered an asset. Interested candidates should send resume, clippings and cover letter by January 25, 2012 to: Kevin Laird Editorial Director-Greater Victoria Black Press 818 Broughton Street Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 or e-mail: klaird@blackpress.ca (No phone calls, please) Thank you for your interest. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE www.blackpress.ca

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY

A18 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com A18 www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW Wed, Jan 11, 2012, Peninsula News Review

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES HAULING AND SALVAGE

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

FENCING

HANDYPERSONS

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. QUALITY CEDAR fencing, decks and installation, pressure washing. For better prices & quotes call Westcoast Fencing. 250-588-5920.

DRYWALL

FURNITURE REFINISHING

AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601 PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

CARPENTRY

MUD on the RUN. Small drywall repairs, textures & renovations. Ross (250)812-4879.

ELECTRICAL

CUSTOM PLANER- (Fir, cedar) baseboards, casings, crown molding (any shape). Call (250)588-5920. DEEP COVE Renovations. General Contracting. Specializing in finish carpentry. Honest , Reliable. (250) 882-0897. I’M YOUR man for all types of Renovations. 28 years experience. Call Phil 250-595-3712. QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

CLEANING SERVICES CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869 QUALITY HOUSECLEANER or caregiver, very reliable. Call (250)656-3362 after 6pm. SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, Efficient. (250)508-1018

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519. COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

GARDENING PREPARATION FOR Fall, Winter & Spring. Professional garden & landscape services. Maintenance, design & installations. Call (250)474-4373.

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. References, affordable, experienced. Les (250)880-2002.

SENIOR HANDYMANHousehold repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

HAULING AND SALVAGE $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BOBCAT for hire. Landscaping, drainage, topsoil placement, barks, aggregates, snow clearing, etc. W or W/O operator. Lowest rates. Free pick-up & delivery. (250)812-4447. RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

FENCING AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. References, affordable, experienced. Les (250)880-2002.

A1 -DIAMOND DAVE Gutter cleaning, repairs, gutter guard, power washing, window washing, roof de-mossing. Free no obligation est. 250-889-5794. GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323. GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades & maintenance. WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440.

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com

LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127. NORM’S PAINTING- 15% offQuality work. Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347.

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

LANDSCAPING

SAFEWAY PAINTING

AURICLE LAWNS- Hedge, tree pruning, winter clean, pwr wash, snow rmvl. 882-3129

CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

PLUMBING PRICED BY the job. No surprises. Guaranteed. 25 yrs, 2nd generation Master Plumber. 778-922-0334 Visa/MC.

PAINTING

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

MOVING & STORAGE

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694.

HANDYMAN SERVICES. Lawns, fences, pruning, flooring, painting, drywall, small renos. Mike/Chris 250-656-8961

CBS MASONRY BBB A+. Chimney, Fireplaces, Rock, Flagstone, Concrete, Pavers, Repair, Rebuild, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee.” Free Competitive Est’s. Call (250) 294-9942/589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton, 5 ton. Prices starting at $75/hr. 250-220-0734.

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

UPHOLSTERY

WINDOW CLEANING

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

BLAINE’S WINDOW WASHING. Serving Sidney & Brentwood since 1983. Average house $35. 250-656-1475

YOUR PERSONAL Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. (250)886-6446.

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190.

PLUMBING

WINDOWS

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

ww

Available

Paper Routes

Positions Open For FT/PT Carriers, Sub Carriers & FT/PT Drivers. All Age Groups Welcome!

DEAN PARK

Route 6567 - Barrett Dr. (odd&even), East Saanich Rd. (even), Lowe Rd. Route 6551 - Pender Pk. Dr. (odd&even), Orcas Pk. Terr. (odd&even), Salish Dr. (odd&even)

SAANICHTON

Route 6218 - Hermwood Rd., Mt. Newton X Rd., Sloping Pines, Jovi Rd. Route 6220 - Arthur Dr. (odd&even), Lochside Dr. (odd), Lancelot Pl., James Island Rd. (odd&even), Turgoose Terr. Route 6221 -Panaview Heights, Veyaness Rd. (odd&even), Stellys X Rd., East Saanich Rd.

BRENTWOOD

Route 6003 - Stellys X Rd. (odd), West Saanich Rd., Kristen Pl. Route 6004 - Verdier Ave., Enid Pl., Dignan Rd., Meadowlark Lane, Tantalon Pl., Early Pl. (odd&even), Stelly’s X Rd.

Route 6039 - Garden Gate, Torin Rd. Route 6042 - Wallace Dr., Grieg

SIDNEY Route 6352 - Melville Dr. (odd&even), Courser Dr. (odd&even), Linda Pl. (odd&even)

Call... Arlene 250-656-1151


www.peninsulanewsreview.com www.peninsulanewsreview.com â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ A19 A19

PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW -- Wednesday, Wednesday, January January 11, 11, 2012 2012 

Winterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s veggies a tasty treat Suddenly we are faced with cleaning up after the festivities. What a melancholy time this is â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all the fun and games over for another year, but what nice memories (I hope). My family gave me a wonderful birthday party, and no, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not telling you, or anyone else, my age, but my birthday is shared by someone very special (and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean you, Don, although you are very nice, and we do share the same birthday, but this man is someone so remarkable he has been remembered and loved for more than 2,000 years). Since I now live in a condominium, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a living Christmas tree, so I made do with a 10-inch ceramic tree sitting on the window sill. Not quite the same as our former trees, which were live Christmas trees now growing handsomely on Melissa Street, and probably 40 feet tall. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let me get started on living trees â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still brokenhearted that those lovely trees across the street went under the axe last week. Werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Sidneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s street decorations lovely this year (as usual)? One of my daughters drove us through the dark streets in the surrounding area to see all the

beautifully decorated houses, trees and fences. People go to a lot of trouble to beautify their homes and to make the holiday sparkle, and they were successful. It was a lovely drive. Now I hope people will leave at least some of the Christmas lights on for a while longer. January is so bleak, and they are so cheerful. However there is the matter of Hydro to be considered, although Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m told that the new LED lights are supposed to use practically no power at all. Now thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a happy thought. On a recent morning, one of my daughters left for her home in the Kamloops area, to be replaced this afternoon by another daughter who will be living with me for some time, while she gets her life together. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to keep up with the sheets. A couple of days ago, while tenderly hilling up a still blooming geranium, I unearthed a crocus bulb with roots and a green shoot almost an inch long. Lovely sign of an advancing spring. Mind you we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really had any winter yet, but there it was, a token of things to come. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have noticed how expensive vegetables have become. Brussels sprouts are one example. In Vancouver they

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Helen Lang

Over the Garden Fence were more than $2 a pound. I used to buy a whole stem of sprouts at a farm on Island View Road for $1, keep

Recess decision approaches

would all be inside in a warm cupboard, just waiting their turn to grace the dinner table. John A. brought me several handsome winter squash (a couple of butternut and two acorn), one of which has been baked with lashings of butter and eaten with considerable relish. Thank you to the As. Helen Lang has been the Peninsula News Reviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden columnist for more than 30 years.

its cut end in a bucket outside holding several inches of water, and eat delicious fresh sprouts for nearly a month. You can still find fresh veggies at local farms and they do taste so good. At times like this I really miss my vegetable garden, where there would be carrots, turnips, beets, parsnips (Himselfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favourite) and possibly some shallots still available. The winter squash

Saanich school board will revisit recess at its Jan. 18 meeting. The issue came up in December and the board opted to use additional non-union staff for supervision duties (including speech and language pathologists, psychologists and First Nations assistants) during the ongoing administrative strike by teachers. In Saanich, teacher contracts contain a stipulation of how long each week a teacher will participate in out of class supervision. Currently administrative and management staff are filling the roles for before and after school, as well as recess supervision. The school district is considering moving recess to the end of the day to create only two slots to be filled. The school board is slated to again discuss that option at its Jan. 18 meeting at 7 p.m. at the board office, 2125 Keating X Rd. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Roadshow is coming back to Langford: 5 Days Only! TERRY INKLER Canadian Collectors Roadshow Staff Writer After very successful shows in Richmond and Aldergrove, The Roadshow is returning to Langford. So you had better search through your attics and garages, go through your lock boxes and jewellery, because you may be sitting on a small fortune and not even know it! Roadshow experts are here to examine all your antiques, collectibles, gold and silver.

-PDBM3PBETIPX&YQFSU &YBNJOFT4PNF(PME+FXFMMFSZ

065 D0/5.*44

5 Days Only!

noticed a substantial increase in the amount of precious metals such as gold and silver coming to the Roadshow, which makes sense considering how high itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s currently trading at. He added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Roadshow is great because it puts money in peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pockets, especially during such hard times. Lots of items that are just sitting around collecting dust in basements and jewellery boxes can be exchanged for money, on the spot!â&#x20AC;?

At another Roadshow event, a woman, named Mira Kovalchek, walked in with a tin full of hundreds of old coins that During a show near Toronto, a woman were given to her as a young child by her came in with a jewellery box that she grandfather. She ďŹ nally decided to come had just inherited from her late aunt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I in to the Roadshow and see what he donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear jewellery,â&#x20AC;? explained Barbara had given her. She was ecstatic to learn Engles, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so it was an easy decision to she had coins dating back to the late come down to the Roadshow to sell itâ&#x20AC;?. 1800â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, some of which were extremely She was very excited when she was able rare. Roadshow consultant Perry Bruce to walk away with a cheque for over explains â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had uncovered an 1871 $2,100 for jewellery she was never going Queen Victoria 50 Cent piece, valued at to wear anyway. over $2,000!! She had a nice assortment of coins that were not rare dates, but Expert Elijah Gold explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have

5x10

she was able to sell them for their silver contentâ&#x20AC;?. She explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never would have thought that my old tin of coins was worth so much! I can ďŹ nally afford to renovate my kitchenâ&#x20AC;?. Perry Bruce continued, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Canadian coins prior to 1967, and American coins prior to 1964 are all made with silver, and we have noticed a large increase of customers coming to the Roadshow with coins and cashing them in for their silver valueâ&#x20AC;?. Experts at the Roadshow will evaluate and examine your items, FREE OF CHARGE, as well as educate you on them. The Roadshow sees hundreds of people during a one week event, and they have been travelling across Canada to different cities and towns, searching for your forgotten treasures. Trains, dolls, toys, old advertising signs, pocket watches, porcelain and bisque dolls, pretty much everything can be sold at the Roadshow. Any early edition Barbieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are sought after by the Roadshow collectors, as well as a variety of

Dinky Toys and Matchbox cars. Lionel Trains and a variety of tin toys can also fetch a price, especially if they are in their original box or in mint condition. If a collector is looking for one of your collectibles, they can always make an offer to buy it. A man brought in a 1950â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marx Tin Toy Robot, in fairly good condition, still in its original box. They were able to locate a collector for that speciďŹ c toy within minutes, and that gentleman went home with over $700 for his Toy Robot and a few other small toys. So whether you have an old toy car, a broken gold chain, or a Barbie sitting in the closet, bring it down to the Roadshow, they will take a look at it for FREE and it could put money in your pocket!

See you at the roadshow!

canadian collectors

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In Langford: January 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 Four Points by Sheraton, 829 McCallum Rd., Victoria (Langford) CANADIAN COLLECTORS ROADSHOW: 1-877-810-4653 9:00 am - 6:00 pm FYDFQU4VOEBZ +BOUI BNQN

Bring in your old unwanted or broken jewelry, coins, antiques & collectibles for the cash you need to help pay off those holiday season bills.

)&3&4)08 *5803,4 tGather all your collectibles and bring them in tFREE admission t Free Appraisal tNO appointment necessary tWe will make offers on the spot if there is interest in the item tAccept the offer & get paid immediately tFREE coffee tFully heated indoor facility t FREE House Calls

501*5&.450#3*/( Gold Jewellery, Gold Coins, Silver Coins, Sterling Silver, Collectibles

5)&*5&.48&.",&"/0''&30/.":*/$-6%& t 4*-7&3 Any silver items such as flatware, tea

t */7&45.&/5(0-% Canadian

sets, charm bracelets, jewellery & anything

Maple Leaf, Double Eagle, Gold Bars,

marked Sterling or 925

Kruggerands, Pandas, etc

t $0*/4Any coins before 1967 (Silver Dollars,

t4$3"1(0-% All broken gold, used

Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,

jewellery, any missing pieces (Earrings,

Nickels, Large Cents and all others) collectible

Charms, gold Links etc), Dental Gold,

foreign coins, rare coins & entire collections

Class Rings, Charm Bracelets, etc

t GOLD$0*/4 All denominations from all parts of the world including Gold Olympic coins

t 1-"5*/6.: Jewellery, Dental, Wiring and anything else made of Platinum

t 8"3*5&.4WWI, WWII, War Medals, Swords, Daggers, Bayonets, Civil War Memorabilia, etc. t +&8&--&3: Diamond Rings, Bracelets, Earrings, loose Diamonds, etc. t 1"1&3 .0/&:All denominations made before 1930, Confederation bills, Large Bills t 05)&3 $0--&$5*#-&4Toys, Train Sets, Dolls, Advertising, Cast Iron Banks, Pottery, etc.

(0-%*5&.40'*/5&3&454$3"1(0-%t(0-%$0*/4t(0-%06/$&4t(0-%1300'4&54t%&/5"-(0-% /05463&*'*54(0-% #SJOHJUJOBOEPOFPGPVSFYQFSUTXJMMCFHMBEUPFYBNJOFJUGPSZPV

We represent thousands of collectors who are all looking for a variety of collectibles! We have purchased a wide selection of items for our group of collectors. The CCG (Canadian Collectors Group) are a private group of collectors who are looking for unique items in a wide variety of categories.

(0-%t$0--&$503430"%4)08$"


A20 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 11, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

You’ll feel like family!

C O French Bread U N 97¢ T R SOUP Y V $697 A L Whole Pork Shoulder U Blade Roasts E FRESH BAKED IN STORE

White or Whole Wheat

454 g Limit 6 Total

B.C. GROWN B.C. TREEFRUITS

Granny Smith Apples

2

$ 97

5 lb bag

HABITANT

Light Fruit Spread

2/ 5

$ 00

CAMPBELL'S

BIOFLAME

• Mushroom • Tomato • Vegetable • Chicken Noodle

$ 97

Case of 12/284 ml Limit 2 Total

FRESH CANADIAN

1

$ 77 FLYER lb Bone In EVERY FRIDAY Watch for our

in select Saanich News, Victoria News, Goldstream Newss Gazette Gazeette & Peninsula Peniinsula News News Review Review

$3.90 kg

500 ml Limit 4 Total

Firelog Briquettes

3

16 Brick Limit 3

GRACE

Coconut Water

99

¢

520 ml Limit 12

PUFFS

Facial Tissue

4

$ 97

6x132's While Stocks Last

CALIFORNIA PREMIUM QUALITY

Broccoli Crowns

97

¢

Asian Cut $2.14 kg

Proud Prou ud to be serv serving Victoria ictoria si ssince incee 1984 1 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday Jan 11th - Saturday Jan 14th, 2012

4420 West Saanich Rd, Royal Oak • 1153 Esquimalt alt Rd, Rd, Victoria Victor Vi oria Open Op O pen D Daily aily 8a 8 8am am - 110pm 0pm pm

Offers valid at Royal Oak and Esquimalt Country G Gro Groc Grocer cer lo llocations ocattions o only. nlly.

Peninsula News Review  

Complete January 11, 2012 issue of the Peninsula News Review as it appeared in print. For more online see www.peninsulanewsreview.com