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PENINSULA

NEWS

Established 1912

Happy

New Year Watch for breaking news at www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Celebrating a

century

This year, the Peninsula News Review celebrates a milestone, one that few people and even fewer newspapers will ever see. This year, your community newspaper turns 100. What started as the Sidney and Islands Review in 1912 was integral to the development of the Peninsula. At the time, the streets of the settlement on the Erin Cardone north end of the A message from Saanich Peninsula the editor were unpaved, the sidewalks barely existed and many buildings didn’t have electricity. In fact, the paper was the voice that for decades pushed the provincial government to incorporate Sidney as a town. It pushed for rail lines to run through Sidney. Later, the Review advocated for ferry service to Vancouver Island and made sure B.C. Electric Co. provided electricity to light the streets of the village. To this day, the paper strives to be a member of the community, just as much as its other residents and businesses. Through different incarnations of the paper’s name – the Saanich Peninsula and Gulf Islands Review, the Peninsula Review, and now the Peninsula News Review – the goal has been the same: to

about people, deliver sstories tories abou out tthe he pe eop ople ople e events and issues that matter to the Saanich Peninsula. The first edition of the review was printed on Dec. 13, 1912 and was a four-page publication. The only copy of that first paper still hangs in the News Review’s office on Second Street and serves as a reminder of how far we’ve come over the past century and that our roots are truly grounded in this community. For the next year, you’ll notice a special element on our paper’s front page flag – a design borrowed from the paper’s flag in the 1950s. We’ll also publish, on a weekly basis a section called This Week in History, which you can find on our letters to the editor page every Wednesday. Later this year, the News Review will host a celebration to commemorate the century gone by and the role we’ve played in the community’s progress. We’d be happy to hear any suggestions you would like to provide for how that celebration might look. Most of all, we’d like to thank our loyal readers and advertisers for supporting community news on the Peninsula these past 100 years. Without you, we certainly wouldn’t have made it this far. Here’s to 100 years of history on the Saanich Peninsula, and to the next 100 years. Who knows what they will bring. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

A photo of the first ever edition of the Review, published Dec. 13, 1912. It hangs in the Peninsula News Review office. Black Press image

Be a part of our history Tell us your thoughts on the Peninsula News Review’s 100th anniversary or send ideas about what kind of public celebration you’d like to see. Email editor@ peninsulanewsreview. com or comment on this story online, at peninsulanewsreview. com.

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Wednesday, January January 4, 4, 2012 2012 -- PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW Wednesday,

Tsartlip man perishes in fire Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

Christine van Reeuwyk/News staff

Central Saanich firefighters battle the blaze in a trailer near Brentwood Bay that claimed the life of a Tsartlip man the evening of Dec. 29.

A Tsartlip First Nation family is in mourning after a fire Thursday afternoon claimed the life of a resident there. Central Saanich fire were called to the fully engulfed trailer on Tsartlip Drive around 4 p.m. on Dec. 29. Police confirmed Friday that Wilfred Joseph

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Henry, 44, died in the fire. Henry lived in the trailer with his wife and other family members. Not long after the fire started, the flames were extinguished by firefighters, but all that remained of the trailer was its empty, charred shell parked in the yard of a nearby house. No other buildings or vehicles were affected by the fire. Emergency services were called in to aid the extended family, some of whom live in a home just steps away from the fire. Sgt. Wayne Conley of Sidney North Saanich RCMP was on the scene at the fire. “Unfortunately the tragedy here is there is a male … deceased in the fire tonight,” he said. “We’re just trying to gather some information about what took place and I expect that we’ll be here for quite some time gathering information from family and other people that were here at the residence.” “I do believe there is only the one person in the trailer that is deceased. … There were other people in the area that we have other officers speaking to.” Neighbours tried to get the man out, but the heat and intensity of the fire thwarted their efforts. “I understand there were efforts by a neighbour and other people who live in the house nearby, but I believe because of the heat and the extent of the fire when it was discovered they were not able to enter. That’s what I learned by talking to a few people.” Central Saanich fire, RCMP forensic identification and the B.C. Coroners Service were on scene the scene that night and again the next day investigating the fire. “It’s believed the fire started in the kitchen area,” Conley said. Though specific cause is not yet determined, police are calling it a non-suspicious fire. Tsartlip Chief Wayne Morris could not be reached for comment. Around 750 people live on the Tsartlip First Nation. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -Wednesday, January 4, 2012 

Cultivating

culture

A young SENCOTEN woman is ensuring younger generations are immersed in their native culture by helping launch a new language program at LÁU,WELNEW Tribal School Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

S

I,OLTENOT (Madeline) Bartleman looks forward to immersing toddlers in culture this January. The Peninsula teacher got her name SI,OLTENOT (see-el-te-not) which means simply calm lady, from her greatgrandmother Madeline James. The Peninsula woman was recognized with a B.C. Aboriginal Student Award, a $3,500 scholarship to help further her studies at the University of Victoria. That recognition, she says, stems from her family and building a dream they held. “Our ancestors fought so hard for our school here,” she said, sitting in the multipurpose room at LÁU,WELNEW Tribal School on West Saanich Road. “I want to carry on what so many of our elders worked for.” Bartleman grew up at Pauquachin and attended LÁU,WELNEW from kindergarten through Grade 9, then finished high school at Stelly’s. Now students can attend secondary studies at the tribal school on West Saanich Road, a sign of the growth toward the goal. “Our whole vision for WSA’NEC’ is to

“Our ancestors fought so hard for our school here. I want to carry on what so many of our elders worked for.” – SI,OLTENOT Bartlemen have our whole school in immersion,” she explained. A new program LENNONET SCULHA’UTW, starting in January, will see three- and four-year-olds in preschool immersed in the SENCOTEN language. Bartleman, who is in her third year of a SENCOTEN apprenticeship, will be among the leaders of the program. Many of the students at the school are already immersed in the language of their ancestors and that’s what drives, and warms, Bartleman. “To see the improvement in the kids’ language is amazing,” she said. “All of the kids probably know over 100 phrases.” But she aspires to see more and continues her work to help the school grow. Last year she completed her certificate in aboriginal language revitalization. Now she’s working on a diploma in language revitalization

Christine van Reeuwyk/News staff

SI,OLTENOT (Madeline) Bartleman offers a welcoming smile next to a welcoming sign at LÁU,WELNEW Tribal School at Tsartlip. and in three years aspires to have her bachelor of education in aboriginal language. For her apprenticeship, alongside other members of the UVic WSA’NEC’ cohort, Bartleman spends five hours a week, on top of being a student and mother of four, with a fluent speaking elder. Currently she visits with elder Anne Jimmy, and they just hang out, converse and occasionally transcribe and translate old recordings of the language. “It’s pure SENCOTEN,” Bartleman said. “She’s amazing and knows what they’re talking about.” reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Did you know? ■ First opened in 1989, LÁU,WELNEW Tribal School is supported by the four Peninsula bands. About 185 students, nursery (preschool) to Grade 9 are bused to school each day and for special events. ■ The school’s name is derived from the name of the Saanich People’s sacred mountain, LÁU,WELNEW – a spiritual place where the Saanich People found refuge after the great flood.

B.C. braces for Japan tsunami debris Bottles, containers washing ashore at Tofino, Alaska, Washington Tom Fletcher Black Press

With scattered reports of light debris already arriving on the west coast of North America, B.C. officials are bracing for thousands of tonnes of material to wash ashore from the March 2011 tsunami in Japan. Tofino residents have begun reporting increased Japanese

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material washing ashore at Long Beach and other western coastal areas of Vancouver Island. There are reports from both Washington State and Alaska of plastic floats identified as being from a Japanese oyster farm, and lumber and other light objects have been reported showing up along the coast nine months after the disaster. Canadian federal, provincial and local officials are setting up a task force to deal with the material that washes ashore in B.C. Part of the job will be identifying hazardous materials that may make it across the ocean. The tsunami struck Japan on

March 11, triggered by a 9.0 magnitude megathrust earthquake centred off the coast of the Tokuhu region of Japan. As the debris field was tracked moving across the Pacific Ocean, scientists in Hawaii estimated in October that as much as 18 million tonnes of material could be carried along. Appliances, television sets, boats and structures were seen floating in a patch 3,000 kilometres long. The initial estimate was that it could take until 2014 for debris to cross the ocean. But experts have since indicated that buoyant objects can be pushed by winds and arrive much earlier.

Light objects with Japanese labels have become frequent finds on B.C. beaches. CTV image

In November, the B.C. and federal governments announced $4.5 million in reconstruction aid for the Tokuhu region of Japan. Governments provided $2 million each, and Canada’s forest industry contributed the other $500,000. The funds will go toward a school, care facility or other public project to demonstrate the value of wood construction in

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earthquake zones. Governments and industry have a similar program in China. The Canadian and B.C. governments previously gave $1.5 million to the Red Cross for immediate disaster relief in Japan. Private cash and in-kind donations from Canadian individuals and corporations reached $40 million. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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Wednesday, Wednesday, January January 4, 4, 2012 2012 -- PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW

North Saanich lawyer recognized with prestigious designation Five Greater Victoria lawyers chosen for Queen’s Counsel roster recently Erin McCracken New staff

Diane Turner, a practising lawyer who lives in North Saanich and works in Victoria, is among five Greater Victoria lawyers and 28 lawyers in B.C. who were honoured with a prestigious and highly coveted Queen’s Counsel designation recently. “It’s certainly very significant to me to think that there’s a certain element of the legal world that has confidence in the contribution that I’ve made, because I really have tried to contribute,” said Turner, a partner at Kelliher and Turner law firm. The former Crown prosecutor, who was called to the bar in 1984, is an associate faculty member at Royal Roads University in Colwood and teaches law at The Hague University in the Netherlands.

There was a lengthy selection process involved leading up to the announcement by Attorney General Shirley Bond. Candidates must be recommended before their appointments can made by the provincial cabinet through an order in council. The honour recognizes exceptional merit, contribution, professional integrity and good character. Eric (Jack) Woodward is a leading expert in aboriginal law, an instructor and adjunct professor in aboriginal law at the University of Victoria. He founded the Woodward and Company law firm in Victoria in 1988. Diane Raven made history when she was appointed associate dean of UVic’s faculty of law in 2009, making her the first aboriginal person to become a senior administrator in a Canadian common law faculty. Mary Mouat a is founding partner of the Quadra Legal Centre and is considered a leading family law practitioner, and Craig Jones is supervising counsel of the constitutional and administrative law group at the Ministry of Attorney General. emccracken@vicnews.com

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Central Saanich Police Service, as well as Sidney North Saanich RCMP, will be discussed when the region’s mayors get together in the future to talk about effective policing. file photo

Region’s mayors to put policing under microscope Peninsula mayors invited to open dialogue on policing Erin McCracken News staff

Oak Bay’s mayor is inviting the region’s mayors over for an “open and frank discussion” on policing in the region. The single-issue meeting, to be held early in the new year, may allow leaders to identify “a better way” to deliver policing to the region’s municipalities more efficiently and cost-effectively, Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen said. The mayors could look at the pros and cons of a regional police service, something for which Dean Fortin, Victoria’s mayor and Victoria police board chair, and Victoria police Chief Const. Jamie Graham have been advocating. Consolidation of policing services will likely also be a topic of interest at the meeting, Jensen said. “We certainly want to hold out that the Oak Bay-Saanich model is one that could work regionally,” he said, noting that Oak Bay council recently extended its contract with Saanich to use some of the district’s policing services. The meeting is about exploring options, Jensen said. “I’m sure there’s other innovative ways to deliver policing services and that’s one of the reasons I want to start the dialogue with the other mayors,” he said. “I certainly heard during the [November municipal election] campaign that, even in Oak Bay, people want to ensure that they have the proper and efficient policing services for the whole region,” said Jensen. Leaders have a responsibility to listen to the plethora of letters to the editor and editorials written on the issue, he said.

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The mayoral talk is especially timely given the contentious relationship between Victoria and Esquimalt representatives on the Victoria police board. Esquimalt and Victoria’s police services were amalgamated in 2003. Esquimalt announced in October its preference to be policed by the RCMP rather than the Victoria Police Department. The township has submitted paperwork asking B.C.’s Solicitor General Shirley Bond for permission to make the switch. The ministry is expecting “People the results of an independent want to ensure review of the troubled amalgamation by the end of the that they have month. the proper and In that context, “I think [policing is] going to be efficient policing a tough issue to sort out, services for the there’s no question about whole region.” that,” Jensen said. “But until we sit down and start talking – Nils Jensen, about it we’re not going to Oak Bay mayor know what the way forward is.” At the upcoming meeting, the mayors will likely examine several policing models, “one of them being the Esquimalt model where there’s an amalgamated force [with Victoria], and we’ve seen the fallout from that,” said Jensen. “On the other hand we have the Oak Bay-Saanich model that seems to be working very well.” Other models include RCMP operations in Langford, Colwood, View Royal, Metchosin, Highlands and Sooke, as well as North Saanich and Sidney. Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich and Central Saanich have municipal police services. A date for the mayoral meeting on policing has not been fixed. emccracken@vicnews.com

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www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A5 www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A5

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012 PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012 

POLICE NEWS IN BRIEF

Man hugs woman who hit him A man hit by a car near Mayfair Shopping Centre in Victoria Wednesday afternoon stayed at the scene of the accident just long enough to hug the woman who had struck him. When police arrived, the victim had left. The woman driver said she was on Tolmie Avenue near the mall when a man ran out from bushes on the roadside. She was unable to stop in time and hit the man. He fell, and when she went to help him, he got back up on his feet, gave the woman a hug and walked away. The man, who police say is wellknown to them, was found soon after, but declined medical assistance and did not file a police report.

No gun in Keating shooting

Police discovered a group of teens making a video after reports of suspicious vehicles in a parking lot on Dec. 27. The group of teens drew suspicion around 9:30 p.m. as they filmed in a parkade in the 2200 block of Keating X Road.

Man pukes on Christmas

Central Saanich police were called out to aid a man spotted vomiting on Wallace Drive near West Saanich Road on Christmas Day. The man was gone when police arrived.

Cougars back on Peninsula

Conservation officers and police were called out for a cougar crossing the road on Dec. 21. The cat was spotted near Rudolph and Styan roads around 3:30 p.m. The cat was gone when police arrived.

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Women in politics still face challenges Natalie North

the senate. The aim is to discuss challenges in a non-partisan light. “I’ve exchanged horror stories When Christy Clark became pre- with other women who have expemier on March 14, it marked the first rienced similar things,” May said, time in 20 years that B.C. wasled singling out comments about weight and fashion that by a woman. Mere female politicians months later, another constantly deal with. woman made his“I’m hoping political tory by becoming Local Members of culture can change.” the first Green Party Parliament: Janni Aragon, a candidate elected as ■ Elizabeth May, professor of political a member of parliaSaanich-Gulf Islands science specializing ment. And there’s the ■ Denise Savoie, in gender politics fact four of the seven Victoria at the University of MLAs on the South Victoria, calls May a Island are women. Local Members of the voice of reason. However, before Legislative Assembly: “I think it’s a little declaring a golden age early to say that she’s for women in politics, ■ Carole James, some kind of harbinSaanich-Gulf Islands Victoria-Beacon Hill ger of hope for all MP and Green Party ■ Lana Popham, female elected offileader Elizabeth May Saanich South cials,” Aragon said. says the hard work is ■ Ida Chong, “If anything, what just beginning. Oak Bay-Gordon Head we’ve witnessed here When May was is that she was able elected to the House to effectively run a of Commons on May 2, she began contacting other campaign in a new riding and win. I female members and soon helped don’t think that speaks so much to form a new all-party women’s cau- her gender as to the politics of the cus to tackle some of the issues fac- day. People were so unhappy with the previous MP, Gary Lunn.” ing women in politics. Victoria-Beacon Hill MLA Carole The group, led by New Democrat Francois Boivin and Conservatives James, who was ousted from her Nancy Ruth and Rona Ambrose, position as provincial leader of the includes every woman member of NDP in late 2010 as a result of party

News staff

Women in politics

Winter solstice not what it seems The winter solstice of Dec. 21 isn’t the day when the sun rises lastest and sets earliest, as many people believe. At our latitude the latest sunrise did not occur until Dec. 31, while the earliest sunset occurred on Dec. 12. Winter solstice is the moment when we are farthest away from the sun due to the Earth’s axis tilt. Dec. 21 marks the date when the days gradually begin to lengthen again. While it may be the astronomical solstice, the reversal of the lengthening of nights may take place over a period of days.

“Even though the latest sunrise and the earliest sunsets are at a little bit of a different time [across the Northern Hemisphere], the actual length of [Dec. 21] is the shortest [of the year],” said Lauri Roche, president of the Victoria branch of the Royal Astronomical Society of B.C. “It’s only up at the Arctic Circle … the solstice day, the 21st day, when the actual sunset and sunrise are at the shortest and the longest.” On Dec. 21 the sun was out for eight hours, 18 minutes, 37 seconds.

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B.C. Premier Christy Clark became the first woman leader of this province in 20 years. Despite advancements, the climate still isn’t friendly to women in the political realm, some say. infighting, says it is getting better for women in politics. Despite the personal insults and heckling, the atmosphere in what is still a mainly male-dominated environment has improved over the seven years James served as opposition leader, she said. “We still have a long way to go for women in politics and I don’t think that’s unique to British Columbia; I think that’s common across the country,” James said. “There are many women, myself included, who believe in doing politics differently.” When James was vocal about her desire to lessen the hostile environment at the legislature, she felt she was regarded as weak or unable to keep up with the cut and thrust of the political games, she said. By retaining her position as MLA despite the public scrutiny she

endured, James hopes to set an example to other women and contribute to a positive change in the political scene. “I certainly wouldn’t say that it’s all related to gender,” James said. “The more that we’re able to elect people – women, young people, folks from the multicultural community, people who do politics in another kind of way and get more diverse faces in the system – that’s how I believe we’ll be able to make the change.” May remains hopeful that the women’s caucus will gain momentum and more members – especially young women – who will strive to be political stars. “We’ve got a sense that maybe things are coming together,” May said. nnorth@saanichnews.com PAID ADVERTISEMENT

TEAM North Saanich report to the community: Re: SANDOWN RACETRACK With all the rhetoric surrounding the proposal to exclude a portion of the Sandown Racetrack from the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR), we feel that the community is entitled to know some of the real facts. In principle, more land for farming is a good idea. But as always, the devil is in the details—how much is it going to cost the taxpayer, and for how long? On the plus side, there is a strong appeal in securing 83 Acres for farming in perpetuity. On the negative side, in the rush to get the deal done, nobody seems to have done sufficient investigation to ensure that the taxpayers won’t be on the hook for a big “white elephant” at the end of it all. The feel-good factor of doing something positive for agricultural sustainability has blinded the proponents of the Sandown deal to normal prudence and good municipal business practice. The main problems that we can see at the present time, are: • The so-called “Business Case”, prepared by the District is woefully inadequate. It is a single page document which under-states expenses, has numerous omissions, and offers no supporting documentation. • There is no recognition of the fact that all the site remediation to satisfy the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) conditions will have to be completed first, at District expense, before the revenue stream from the commercial properties can start. In other words, the taxpayers will have to frontend all expenses. • The revenues are based on a best case scenario, assuming full property tax income starting in year 1 from full commercial build-out, which is highly unlikely. • There should be a five year projection of cash flow showing offsetting revenues and expenses to minimize the hit on taxpayers. • There is no mention of the professional Agrologist that has to be hired, as required by the ALC, to supervise the remediation. • There is no mention of the cost of site drainage, which promises to be huge. • Farming requires approximately one foot depth of irrigation water per year. Do we have sufficient

infrastructure to supply this amount of water? • Over the years there have been fuel spills, imported material dumped on the site, and fill for the parking lot, race track, etc. There is no cost allowance for environmental assessment, excavation, and trucking away fill and contaminated soil. • The existing soil, which is very poor according to the ALC, will require considerable reclamation by importing top-soil from elsewhere. There is no cost allowance for all the trucking, grading, leveling and testing that will be required. • There are legal costs: for consolidation and transfer of ownership of the constituent parcels; for preparing the Memorandum of Understanding for the ALC; for the infamous covenant to prevent the land use from ever being changed by some future Council. • The covenant restricts the site in perpetuity to agricultural uses and expressly prohibits any kind of park or other development. As it stands now, this means no walking trails or dog runs. Perhaps Sandown will start to pay for its operating costs someday, but in the meantime, guess who is on the hook? The current economic climate is not a good time for a risky financial adventure. We campaigned and were elected on a platform of fiscal restraint for the District. We cannot, in good conscience, proceed on a hope and a prayer that this will end well for the taxpayers, as the proponents of the Sandown deal are urging us to do. It is Council’s fiduciary duty to protect taxpayers from financial ‘black holes’—open-ended commitments with uncertain incoming revenue to offset. We have asked the District administration to get cracking on ���lling in the gaps in their Business Case and confirm our understanding of our obligations under the terms of the ALC agreement. Signed, TEAM North Saanich Craig Mearns Dunstan Browne Conny McBride We are dedicated to keeping the District: “Off your back, out of your wallet, and off your property.”

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A6 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - PENINSULA

EDITORIAL

NEWS REVIEW

Jim Parker Publisher Erin Cardone Editor Victoria Calvo Production Manager Bruce Hogarth Circulation Manager

The Peninsula News Review is published by Black Press Ltd. | #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 | Phone: 250-656-1151 • Fax: 250-656-5526 • Web: www.peninsulanewsreview.com

OUR VIEW

Put parks on your resolutions list This year of the Peninsula News Review’s birthday marks the end of another centennial year – the 100th anniversary of B.C. Parks. The system that turned 100 on March 1, 2011 originated with the creation of a provincial park here on Vancouver Island – Strathcona Park. To mark the occasion, B.C. Parks made a big gesture to draw users out to its natural Unique beauty of spaces, trails and after Vancouver Island attractions admitting fewer is worth enjoying people had been taking advantage of provincial parks recently than in the past. Among other changes, it scrapped parking fees at its destinations and used $10.1 million to reinvigate trails, bathrooms, campgrounds and picnic areas provincewide. As B.C. Parks’ birthday draws to a close, we’d like to remind Saanich Peninsula residents of the natural abundance around us. On the Island alone, there are almost 170 provincial parks. That doesn’t count the many regional and federal parks that call our rock home. In North Saanich is John Dean Park, and on the edge of Central Saanich rests the expansive Gowlland Tod Provincial Park. The latter hosts 25 kilometres of trails, many of which wind along the waterfront to offer spectacular views of Saanich and Tod inlets. The park surrounds the delicate Finlayson Arm – a mecca for scuba divers who hope to see rare marine life. As this new year begins, many of us will make resolutions to lose weight, quit smoking, spend more time with the kids or the parents, or to save money. Consider resolving to better appreciate the natural gifts this Island has to offer by spending time in parks, be they regional, provincial, or federal. After all, we pay a heck of a lot of money to live in our little corner of paradise here on the Peninsula. We certainly get what we pay for, so let’s be sure we take full advantage. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com or fax 250-656-5526. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Peninsula News Review is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2010

Harsh year ahead for B.C. politics George Abbott has launched The B.C. Liberal government a broad plan to “transform” enters 2012 with the weight of education. Along with “personalized its “golden decade” heavy on its learning plans” and “flexibility and shoulders. choice,” the plan promises “regular Having delivered a throne teacher performance evaluation speech and a raft of legislation sessions.” Buckle your seatbelts, last fall, the government must pick parents. up where it left off and Health care: Premier build a February budget Christy Clark hosts from the wreckage of the the annual premiers’ harmonized sales tax. conference in Victoria This takes place as growth Jan. 16-17. The provinces and revenue projections divided sharply in decline, and demand for December, as the three government services western ones backed continues to rise. Ottawa’s imposition of The NDP opposition a new funding formula, finds itself in a frontwhile those from runner role and now faces Tom Fletcher Manitoba east protested pressure to detail its B.C. Views the news that six per cent long-promised practical annual increases will slow alternative. A revived B.C. a bit in five years. Conservative Party must also move B.C.’s more immediate problem beyond protest to problem solving. is a shift to per capita funding Here are some of the immediate that phases out targeted money problems that will face the for things such as our dedicated legislature when it resumes on hip and knee surgery program. Valentine’s Day. Provinces are now supposed Education: It seems inevitable to create such innovations for that the B.C. Teachers’ Federation their own sake, without further will once again have a new contract federal intrusion into provincial imposed. In December, school jurisdiction. support staff joined the parade of That change costs B.C. an public sector unions that accepted estimated $256 million a year, the two-year “net zero” wage starting in 2014. The B.C. Liberals mandate. have this year to find savings, or Deficits that forced that mandate face the task in an election year. have ballooned again due to the And NDP leader Adrian Dix is HST mess and the October throne restricted by his vow to make only speech hinted strongly that “net spending promises that add up. zero” will be extended in all but Energy and environment: As name in 2012. with the minimum wage, the B.C. Little noticed amid the usual Liberals are forced to tinker with labour noise, Education Minister

the carbon tax. Taxing schools and hospitals to fund natural gas and cement companies’ emission projects has to stop, as Environment Minister Terry Lake has admitted. Clark and Finance Minister Kevin Falcon must be tempted to borrow an NDP suggestion that carbon tax revenues be redirected more broadly to transit and energy saving refits. But this means spending the money instead of reducing income taxes, as legislation currently requires, and both parties must face the fact that this entails a tax increase. A storm is about to begin up north as federal environmental hearings open on a proposed oil pipeline to Kitimat. Clark remains carefully non-committal, the NDP bitterly opposed. But the parties actually agree on liquefied natural gas exports from the same port. The NDP signalled cautious support for the plan before Christmas, with scrutiny of drilling and water use. We in the media do a poor job of reporting when parties agree. Debate will soon resume on B.C.’s new Family Law Act, aimed at avoiding courts and conflict, with bipartisan support. Fixing B.C.’s impaired driving legislation, to keep that out of our clogged courts, should also be expedited. B.C.’s traditional blame game won’t make the problems of 2012 go away. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Taxing schools and hospitals to fund natural gas companies has to stop.’


PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW -Wednesday, -Wednesday, January January 4, 4, 2012 2012 

LETTERS

www.peninsulanewsreview.com www.peninsulanewsreview.com •• A7 A7

A councillor’s letter to Sandown owner Bill Randall acres of municipal property to I am writing with regard to the ALR, so there is no net loss your proposal with the District of agricultural land. of North Saanich The district has a piece that, in exchange for of property adjacent commercial re-zoning to Sandown perfect of 12 acres of your for this purpose, and 83-acre ALR property the Victoria Airport (known as the Sandown Authority, bless their race track lands), you hearts, will give (and will give the remainder truck) yards and yards to the people of North of clean topsoil to this Saanich. land to help bring it up As you know, the to snuff for agricultural Agricultural Land Commission has agreed Elsie McMurphy use. Guest comment Mr. Randall, you are to this extraordinary an astute business swap, provided person and obviously this is that North Saanich keeps the a good deal for you. But wow, remaining land in the ALR and what an amazing opportunity dedicates a complementary 12

Readers respond: Concert group appreciates attention to funding cuts Re: Arts groups’ crises soften (Our View, Dec. 21) Thank you for raising the important issue of support for arts and culture in our community. In addition to support from the Victoria Foundation, the Sidney Concert Society is grateful to Capital Regional District’s Community Arts Development, and our local Community Arts Council of Saanich Peninsula for their grants in support of concerts this seasons. Our next concert is the Four Concerto Evening on Jan. 13, with a Beethoven Solo Piano to follow on March 30. Also, current SCS activities include a program of classics for teens and maintenance of a website, www. sidneyclassicalorchestra.ca, to inform the community of our objectives and program.The sustaining strength of our society is in the SCS contributing members and merchant supporters who provide volunteer time, operating funds and in-kind services for each concert. Once again, thank you for your

Letters to the Editor We reserve the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News Review will not print anonymous letters. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Peninsula News Review, 6-9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C., V8L 3C7 ■ Fax: 250-6565526 ■ Email: editor@ peninsulanews review.com

for the people of North Saanich, and our entire region, to have an agricultural amenity like this smack dab in the middle of our municipality. Not only is this proposal future-oriented in terms of food security and environmental considerations, it will generate increased revenue for the municipality – approximately $350,000 annually – from the leases and taxes. Sure sounds like a win for everyone. I know you are anxious to hear something positive from council about the fate of this deal, and I’m sorry that you did not get that signal at council’s last meeting. There was some kerfuffle about

costs of demolishing some of the tattered old barns – thank you for your additional contribution of $100,000 to do that – and the costs of servicing, which, as we all know, developers undertake, if and when there is development. And I’m sure we can straighten out the duelling engineer opinions with further information. I hope the CRD’s decision to support this project is encouraging to you, as it would be a shame if you decide to withdraw your offer and instead simply plan to create a handful of estate homes. In the recent election, many, many people spoke to me about their desire to see North Saanich

arts funding, helping others

recognition of our ongoing community efforts. Ian J. Reid director of development Sidney Concert Society

Carelessness at Christmastime upsets grandmother A message to the coward who just passed my grandson on the road while there was a cougar right there, near the Smitty’s in Brentwood Bay, a few weeks ago. My grandson came to spend the holidays with me and told us about the incident. The driver could have at least honked the car horn to scare the cougar away. Instead the person just turned and drove the opposite way. My grandson was walking home from working the night shift. He saw that Smitty’s workers were just opening the restaurant, so he went there until he thought it was safe. I hope that this letter might save somebody’s life. Thank God it didn’t attack my

Tyers, Dorothy Laura It is with great sadness that the family of Dorothy Laura Tyers announces her sudden passing on November 20, 2011 at the age of 82. Dorothy was born June 12, 1929 and grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She was employed at James Richardson & Sons for many years in Winnipeg before moving with her husband Bill to Victoria, B.C. in the early 1970’s. Dorothy continued to work as an accountant until her retirement in Sidney, B.C. and devoted many years as a caregiver to Bill during his battle with multiple sclerosis. Dorothy & Bill had a cottage at Lake Brereton, Manitoba where they spent many summers entertaining family and friends, fishing, boating, and just having a good time. She was a very caring and loving person who enjoyed meeting new people and spending time with friends, loved to travel, and took great pleasure in sharing the beauty of Vancouver Island with family and friends when they came to visit. Dorothy‘s constant companions were her pets. Her passion for animals was evident by the loving home she provided for her many dogs and cats. Dogs and cats lived together in perfect harmony in their home with Dorothy, all supported by her love for them. Dot, or Aunty Dot, to all of us who knew and loved her, will always be fondly remembered and forever in our hearts. We’ll miss her. She is survived by her brother Tom (Mary) Dewar, brother-in-law Donovan (Joyce) Tyers, and many in-laws, nieces, nephews, and their families. Dorothy was predeceased by her husband, William Frederick (Bill) Tyers, her brother Edward (Ted) Dewar, and her sisters Margaret (Dewar) Hewitt, and Christina (Dewar) Murray. In memory of Dot, donations can be made to the Victoria SPCA at Victoria@spca.gc.ca A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Condolences may be directed to the family at JadeTyers@gmail.com

maintain its rural, agricultural character, and I, as one councillor, am wholeheartedly in support of this gift for today’s citizens and tomorrow’s generations, which is forward-looking, revenuegenerating, protects the ALR and supports the official community plan. That’s a pretty nice package for us and for you, Mr. Randall. When council has additional information and has this matter again on its agenda, perhaps you’ll stop by once more and hear from the people of North Saanich that they want this deal to go through. Elsie McMurphy is a North Saanich councillor.

Established 1912

grandson. That I am thankful for. Yvonne Pierre Pitt Meadows

Shopping better in Sidney than in Victoria Re: Good and compassionless souls in Victoria (Letters, Dec. 28) This letter is in response to D. Berry of Sidney, who fell while trying to reach his vehicle before it was towed from Johnson Street, and he received a $60 parking ticket. I sincerely hope your knee surgery went well and that you are well into your recovery. Next year, I would suggest you do your Christmas shopping in downtown Sidney, where parking is free and plentiful, there are no meter readers on staff and the tow trucks are dispatched to highway breakdowns. Is it any wonder business is declining in downtown Victoria? Margaret Westbrook Sidney

This week in history ■ 1913: A gang of pirates operates in the waters around Sidney. Thieves take “every moveable thing” from Mr. Henry Ruckles’ gasoline launch. Mr. J.J. White is dismissed from the office of postmaster for “political partisanship.” He is replaced by Mr. James Critchley. ■ 1941: Hostess House is opened by Lt.-Gov. Eric Hamber. Hostess House, on Second Street, is for the men, friends and relatives of the Patricia Bay Airport. ■ 1961: Hundreds turn out for a ceremony at the Patricia Bay Airport to watch the departure of the last scheduled DC3. The airlines are changing over to Viscounts. – Judy Reimche

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An RCMP officer removes open alcoholic beverages from a vehicle at a CounterAttack roadblock.

Judge restores toughest drinking driving penalties Same judge who suspended impaired penalties reverses previous decision temporarily

arrest the driver and administer a breath test at the police station, or else issue only a 24-hour suspension. A roadblock that caught two impaired drivers would lose its investigating officers to the criminal procedure and might have to halt enforcement Jeff Nagel early that night as a result. Black Press For roadside readings of 0.08 per cent or higher, The courts have temporarily restored the power police had previously been imposing a 90-day drivof B.C. police officers to issue immediate 90-day ing ban, a $500 fine and impounding the vehicle for suspensions to impaired drivers caught with a 30 days. That suspension can cost a driver blood-alcohol level over 0.08. $3,750, including $700 for towing B.C. Supreme Court Justice Jon “Forty-five more and storage and $1,420 to take a Sigurdson, who previously struck mandatory “responsible driver” down that part of the roadside pen- people are alive to course. alty system, issued a follow-up rul- enjoy the holidays this To comply with the court rulings, ing just before Christmas that susyear because police the province must ensure those pends the implementation of his drivers get a chance to challenge decision until June 30. stopped impaired the decision. That effectively gives the prodrivers. ” “We will work to introduce vincial government six months to changes to the Motor Vehicle Act as pass new legislation to ensure the – Shirley Bond, soon as possible in the spring legroadside penalties and process to Solicitor General islative session,” Solicitor General appeal them comply with the law. Shirley Bond said in a statement. Sigurdson noted the government Sigurdson also found 90-day suspensions are considers the automatic roadside penalties more effective than criminal prosecutions in fighting constitutional for drivers who refuse to provide a breath sample upon request. impaired driving. He upheld the use of the immediate roadside “I have concluded that an immediate declaration of invalidity of part of the [administrative prohibitions for drivers who blow in the warn penalty] regime may pose a danger to the public,” range, between 0.05 and 0.08. Bond noted the roadside penalties resulted in a he wrote. Sigurdson’s original Nov. 30 ruling fanned fears 40 per cent drop in alcohol-related deaths in the that police powers to battle impaired drivers first year. “Forty-five more people are alive to enjoy the holwould be seriously eroded just as the holiday idays this year because police stopped impaired CounterAttack campaign was getting underway. For three weeks after the Nov. 30 judgment, drivers, people who would not be with their famipolice had been unable to issue the 90-day suspen- lies today without this legislation.” Sigurdson has yet to rule on whether B.C. drivsions and related penalties and fees that add up to $3,750 for drivers who blow in the “fail” range ers who were punished without sufficient right to appeal are entitled to compensation. over 0.08. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com Instead, officers at roadblocks faced a choice:

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For an idea of what anniversary organizers are looking for, some sample moments can be viewed on the website at www.uvic.ca/anniversary/ moments/index.php, which is also where submissions can be made. Photos, videos and up to 200 words of copy can be submitted. A selection committee will review all submissions with an eye to sharing as many as possible over the course of the 2012-13 anniversary period. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -Wednesday, January 4, 2012

A9



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Wednesday, Wednesday, January January 4, 4, 2012 2012 -- PENINSULA PENINSULA NEWS NEWS REVIEW REVIEW

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Grow a Native Plant Garden.

Peninsula’s Evan Wallbridge takes a shot on Saanich goalie Owen Carson at Pearkes Recreation Centre during the Timbits Novice Christmas Tournament. A total of 24 teams with players aged five- to eight-years-old were invited to the annual tournament. No standings were recorded and every game ended with a pizza shootout.

CPP, EI premium hikes necessary Economist says benefits might shrink if freeze is instated Rudy Haugeneder News staff

Residents of the Capital Region are invited to participate in a FREE workshop on gardening with drought-resistant native plants. Instructor Patricia Johnston will provide instruction on native plant identification, their benefits and how to use them. An overview of CRD Water Conservation programs will be provided and participants will be given a tour of a native plant garden. These informative workshops will be held at Swan Lake Nature House, located at 3873 Swan Lake Road in Victoria. Workshop Dates:

Saturday, January 28 9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Wednesday, March 7 9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Wednesday, February 8 1 to 4 pm

Sunday, March 18 1 to 4 pm

Saturday, February 11 1 to 4 pm

Wednesday, April 11 9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Sunday, February 19 1 to 4 pm

Saturday, April 14 9:30 am to 12:30 pm

The Next Steps in Native Plant Gardening Sunday, January 22nd 1 to 4 pm Saturday, March 31st 9:30 am to 12:30 pm *pre-requisite—Grow a Native Plant Garden workshop and experience gardening with native plants Each workshop is limited to 20 participants and pre-registration is required. Call 250.479.0211 to reserve your spot today.

www.crd.bc.ca

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Despite keeping more money out of people’s pockets, premium increases for Canada’s social safety net – Canada Pension Plan, Employment Insurance, medicare – are necessary to keep them meaningful, financial experts and economists say. Helmut Pastrick, chief economist for Central 1 Credit Union, the central financial association for B.C. and Ontario credit unions, said the pension plan premium increases are needed to offset stock market losses in recent years and to pay the growing number of baby boomers who will rely on it when they retire. If premiums into the self-funded plan were frozen at the current rate, he said, pension benefits would not increase in the future and might even shrink. Travis Koivula, a certified financial planner with Island Savings Credit Union in Victoria, said CPP is “a primary source of retirement income” for most seniors. Canada Pension Plan, administered by an independent financial investment management board that invests the assets to earn money to pay pension benefits, must “increase premiums or cut benefits,” he said. That’s something retired people can’t afford, he added. “Most people take far more out of CPP than they put in over the years.” It is important younger people contribute to not only secure their own retirement futures, but take care of their parents and grandparents, Koivula said.

No one likes to see their payroll deductions increase, he said, especially since average wages haven’t increased. “But if rates didn’t increase, the long-term viability of Canada Pension could suffer.” B.C. Medical Services Plan premiums rose six per cent on Jan. 1, meaning a family of three or more will pay $128 monthly – up $7 from last year and $84 over the year. Federal EI and CPP premiums will increase collectively by $306 per employee this year, with just under half paid for by employees themselves. Groups such as the Canadian Taxpayers Federation and Canadian Federation of Independent Business think the increases are little more than taxpayer gouging and will prevent job growth. Taxpayers’ Federation B.C. director Jordan Bateman said the increases will hurt the economy because “families and seniors are already finding it difficult to keep up with rate increases at B.C. Hydro, ICBC, B.C. Ferries and tax hikes at the gas pump.” Shachi Kurl, director of provincial affairs in BC for the Federation of Independent Business, described the CPP and EI rate hikes as payroll taxes that “makes it harder for small business to create new jobs” during hard economic times like now. People who complain about the increased premiums do so without understanding they are paying towards critical social safety net service which “for the most part they are getting full value for,” Pastrick said, including pending hikes to ICBC and B.C. Hydro rates. “Most people only look at the cost side and don’t think of the benefit side,” he said, “The alternative [to these services] is much worse in social terms.” editor@peninsulanewsreview.com


A NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012 PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A13 www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A13



St. John’s United Church

SPORTS SPORTS

Presents

Jazz at St. John’s

An Evening of Jazz Vespers featuring...

Ken Lister and Pat Coleman January 8th - 7:00 p.m. 10990 West Saanich Rd., in Deep Cove For more information, call Bernadette @

250-656-0875 An offering will be taken

Events January

submitted photo

submitted photo

Peninsula peeweespeewees victorious at Christmas Classic Classic Peninsula victorious at Christmas nsula Minor Hockey Association’s peewee C3 team surged ahead to beat an as yet undefeated team and win

The Peninsula Minor Hockey Association’s peewee C3 team surged ahead to beat an as yet undefeated team and win a Christmas Classic Tournament gold medal last week. Victoria Christmas Classic Tournament gold medal week. boys rocked the matchup, winning Juanthe de Fuca swept the tournament until that final game, thelast Peninsula Although Juan de Fuca swept the tournament until that final game, the Peninsula boys rocked the matchup, winning Bay Recreation Centre. 6-3 at Oak Bay Recreation Centre. Evans was instrumental in the victory, firing off three for a hat trick. Trey Sjerven’s “amazing” goaltending Evans was in thetovictory, forco-manager a hat trick. Tracy Trey Sjerven’s “amazing” goaltending of the Dawson opponents’ shots atinstrumental bay, contributing the win,firing said off thethree team’s Zeisberger. kept most of the opponents’ shots at bay, contributing to the win, said the team’s co-manager Tracy Zeisberger.

The importance of eye care Vision is one of our most valuable assets. Most people take their sight for granted and yet almost everything we do in life depends on it. Maintaining eye health and vision is an important part of our health care system. Having regular eye exams by a doctor of optometry can ensure that not only is your vision functioning properly, but also, that your eyes are healthy. Many health problems can be detected through the eyes. For example, diabetic patients should have yearly eye exams to rule out damage to the back of the eyes, because loss of vision can result if left untreated. During the eye exam, the optometrist will determine if corrective lenses would significantly improve your vision. Often people, who have never had an eye exam, do not realize what they are missing. This is particularly true of children. The optometrist can put all doubts aside, and if corrective lenses are required, a prescription will be provided to meet your specific vision requirements. A visit to the optometrist will ensure your vision and eye health remain at their best.

Central

Saanich

OPTOMETRY CLINIC

Get Your FREE Collectable Hockey Cards! Keegan Kanzig

First 2500 fans will receive cards

6-8 11 & 12 16 - 20 18 21 22 27 & 28 28 28 & 29 29

Speed Weekend R - C Race Blood Donor Clinic Come Paint with Me - Adult Art Classes Tourism Vancouver Island - Pro-D Days Robbie Burns Dinner Under the Mango Tree Heidi of the Mountain - Triple Threat Production Variety Club - Charity Event Gold & Silver Buyer Peninsula Young Performers - Solo/Small Group

6-9 8&9 10 11 12 14 16 17

Danceworks - Competition Blood Donor Clinic Anastasia - Ballet Jorgen For the Love of Africa Fundraiser Danceworks - Showcase of Winners Palm Court - Be My Love (Bodine Hall) Hearts of the Community Volunteer Awards Opera Express

3 4 7&8 8 16

yoUnlimited Inspirational Women’s Conference Team Westcoast Race & Award Ceremony Blood Donor Clinic Stelly’s Fashion Show Peninsula Clay Artists Society - Reception & Show/Sale Peninsula Players - Murder at the Howard Johnson’s Peninsula Clay Artists Society - Show & Sale Peninsula Players - Murder at the Howard Johnson’s Spring Break Art Camp Ensemble: Made in Canada Victoria Gilbert & Sullivan - HMS Pinafore Ride the Wave - Public Show Ride the Wave - School Shows

February

March

16 & 17 17 & 18 18

VICTORIA R OYALS

Dr. Paul Neumann

Healthy Eyes. Doctor Delivered.

HOCKEY CARD NIGHT JANUARY 6TH OYALS R A I R O T VIC

Vision Matters

Puck drops at 7:05pm against Kelowna

at the

Winspear

Calendar

19 - 23 20 24 & 25 25 28 - 30

Monthly Meetings/Classes

Canadian Federation of University Women - 4th Tuesday monthly Iyengar Yoga - ongoing registration 250-656-9493 Musical Theatre Classes - Every Tuesday (Winter/Spring Session) NOSA - Every Wednesday Peninsula Business Women - 3rd Tuesday monthly Peninsula Garden Club - 2nd Monday monthly (excluding Oct. Dec. & Aug) PROBUS - 2nd Tuesday monthly Sidney Anglers Association - 4th Monday monthly Sidney Shutterbugs - 1st and 3rd Thursday monthly SPAC - 1st Monday monthly For show, ticket and conference information visit:

www.marywinspear.ca

Dr. Paul Neumann Optometrist

#1 - 7865 Patterson Rd. Saanichton

250-544-2210

www.cseyecare.com

support by

or contact us at

HOCKEY KEY CARD PARTNERS

250-656-0275

Budg get Carr Sales

District of North Saanich

Town of Sidney

2243 Beacon Ave., Sidney, B.C.


A14 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Track and field athletes go without winter break Group prepares for meets in 2012 Even though it’s January, there’s no sleeping in cosy dens until spring for both the younger and older athletes of the Peninsula Track and Field club. Weekly practices at the Parkland secondary school track are the order of the day on Saturdays for the masters and senior games throwers and jumpers, or during the evenings for the younger sprinters and middle distance runners of the club. The older athletes will resume their practices on Jan. 14 while the youngsters will return to their workouts that same week with Karen MacEwan, the club’s head coach. As these activities progress, the work to resurface the existing track at Parkland continues with the help of North Saanich council, whose technical staff have been working with the club executive to prepare and forward an application for a B.C. government capital works grant to assist in this effort.

Other public and corporate fundraising initiatives will be pursued during the coming months to ensure the refurbished track will be available for general community and school use in 2013. Building upon the successes achieved by club athletes last year with Canadian youth gold medals and world masters silver medals, 2012 looks to be another year in which Peninsula athletes can rise to personal best performances and enjoy the benefits of a healthy and active program of running, jumping and throwing. Details on times and other information can be checked with McEwan, at 250-655-4981. For very young track rascals, ages six to eight, registration for the April-May program happens at the track during the month of March or by phoning Lesley Foster at 250-656-5660. The club welcomes new members of all ages and encourages anyone interested in learning about coaching or officiating to contact McEwan or Foster with questions. sports@peninsulanewsreview.com

MASTER OF EDUCATION With your M.Ed. in Leadership, or M.Ed. in Leadership and School Counselling, you’ll be ready to step into a school counsellor or other leadership position in public or private schools. This program is offered in local BC communities. Apply now for fall programs. Learn more at an info session: Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm Tuesday, January 17, 2012 Campbell River - School Board Office Nanaimo - Woodlands Secondary

School Library

Wednesday, January 18, 2012 Courtenay - Mark R. Isfeld Senior

Secondary Library Victoria - Victoria High School Library

RSVP to 1.800.663.7466 ext.105 www.CityU.edu/Canada

Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - PENINSULA

Where are they now? Travis Paterson News staff

When the curtain fell on the Victoria Salmon Kings’ days as an organization last March, some of the more transient players were gone the next day. Others, however, weren’t in a hurry to give up their Victoria apartments until they’d signed their next minor pro contract. So when Victoria Royals players began showing up early for this season’s training camp, there was an odd mix of players on the practice ice at Save-OnFoods Memorial Centre. Royals, Salmon Kings, players from the NCAA (Justin Courtnall, Brian Nugent), AHL (Lee Baldwin) and NHL (Ryan O’Byrne) all skated during the Royals’ official ice times. Two of those players were exSalmon Kings Matt Siddall and Mike Hamilton, now playing with the Fife Flyers of the British Elite Ice Hockey League. A check-in with the team reveals the pair have had a tough season on the ice, though perhaps a great one off it. The Flyers are last with just two wins in 22 games. Hamilton leads the Flyers in scoring, 13th in the league. Siddall leads the team too – in penalty minutes. He’s also fifth in the league. It’s one of the better situations for ex-Salmon Kings. Many have hung up the skates on the pro game, including Adam Taylor and Kiel McLeod. Others are likely starting their office careers as a lot of ECHLers are NCAA grads. Perhaps the most fascinating story is that of former Salmon Kings player Milan Gajic, who is taking a crack at pro lacrosse with the Washington Stealth. Gajic hopes to join brothers

file photo

Above: Milan Gajic has made the switch from pro hockey to pro lacrosse with the Washington Stealth since the Victoria Salmon Kings were dissolved. Below: Kiel McLeod has quit pro hockey altogether. Nenad, Ilija and Alex in the National Lacrosse League. Most former players, however, are chasing the next step in their hockey career. Coach Mark Morrison was rewarded by True North Sports and Entertainment (longtime owners of the Manitoba Moose) with a job as an assistant coach with the Winnipeg Jets AHL affiliate, the St.

STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYER

Make the resolution to save time and money with flyerland.ca

STORES • FLYERS • DEALS COUPONS • BROCHURES • CATALOGUES CONTESTS • PRODUCTS

Save time, save money.

SP3405

Visit our other Black Press sites The term “university” is used under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education effective April 11, 2007, having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister. City University of Seattle is a not-for-profit and an Equal Opportunity institution accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

NEWS REVIEW

John’s Ice Caps. Joining Morrison on the Ice Caps are tough guy Tommy Maxwell, who finished last season with the Salmon Kings, and Garth Murray, who resurrected his AHL career with a fiery month in Victoria last year. Defenceman Derick Martin and forward Derek Couture are still plugging in the ECHL. sports@peninsulanewsreview.com

PENINSULA

Church Services HOLY TRINITY

ANGLICAN CHURCH

West Saanich and Mills Road Sunday Services

8:00 a.m. ...................................Eucharist (said) 9:00 a.m. .....................................Family Service 10:30 a.m. ...................................Choral Service Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. ................... Eucharist Rev. Canon Penelope Black 250-656-3223

SAANICH PENINSULA CHURCH ADVENTIST CHURCH PRESBYTERIAN 9296 East Saanich Rd. at Willingdon

RESTHAVEN SEVENTH-DAY 9300 Willingdon Rd. 250-544-0720 www.sidneyadventist.ca

Saturday Worship ..........................11:00 “Everyone Welcome”

10:00 a.m.............................Worship SUNDAY SCHOOL & NURSERY A Warm Welcome Awaits You!

Rev. Irwin Cunningham 250-656-2241

ST. PAUL’S UNITED CHURCH

Sunday Worship & Children’s Program at 10:30 am Minister: Rev. David Drake Music: Mary Lou Day Fifth & Malaview, Sidney

250-656-3213 www.stpauluc.com

Come Worship With Us - Everyone Welcome Christmas Eve Service 7pm 9300 Willingdon Road, North Saanich Pastor Travis Stewart T: 250-885-7133 E:peninsulamission@shaw.ca www.peninsulamission.org


www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A15 www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A15

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012 PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012 

THE ARTS

Black ice. The secret agent.

Local mom releases fitness book, memoir

file image

Sidney mother and trainer Karen McCoy releases her first book, One Rep at a Time, this month.

Sidney’s Karen McCoy is working toward becoming an international lifestyle guru. The bodybuilding champion and trainer has more than 22,000 Twitter followers and hundreds of Facebook fans who regularly receive her messages. Come January, they can buy her book. One Rep at a Time is McCoy’s memoir and includes her eight-week body makeover program that buyers access from a password in the book. It links to workout videos, workout cards, plus nutrition and spiritual information. McCoy tells of her fall from grace after her son was diagnosed with a terminal disease. Her body, once a pinnacle of health and strength, fell apart. With patience and tenacity, she healed her body and spirit, she says, and began to see her son’s challenges with fresh eyes. She now teaches these lessons through training and lifestyle programs. One dollar from the sale of every book goes toward the Tristan Graham Children’s Foundation. One Rep at a Time: An Athlete and Mother Reveals the Secrets to Creating Inner Power and Serenity by Karen McCoy, is published by Agio Publishing House in Victoria. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

ARTS LISTINGS IN BRIEF

ANAVETS puts on live tunes on Fridays

The Army, Navy and Air Force Unit 302 offers up live music Friday nights. Bands perform from 7 to 11 p.m. The unit is at 9831 Fourth St., Sidney. On Friday, Jan. 6, dance to Blue Cadillac; on Jan. 13, Rock Steady performs; Jan. 20 is music by Ron King; on Jan. 27, Chickwagon offers country rock. A special event is Saturday, Jan. 28 when the sea cadet fundraiser sees a silent auction and music by Backbeat from 7 to 11 p.m.

Robbie Burns dinner tickets on sale

The annual Robbie Burns dinner with the Greater Victoria Police Pipe Band is Jan. 21 at the Mary Winspear Centre. Spend a great evening with the pipe band in memory of the Bard at the ninth annual dinner

and entertainment event. Doors open at 5 p.m. with dinner and silent auction to follow. Tickets are $50, available from band members, Ron Morgan at 250383-6182 or Jim Maxwell at 250-598-0120.

Jazz vespers features trio of musicians

St. John’s United Church kicks off 2012 with another evening of inspiring jazz vespers on Jan. 8, featuring Juno award-winning bassist Ken Lister, seasoned veteran jazz guitarist Pat Coleman, and critically acclaimed saxophonist Roy Styffe. Ken Lister has been playing jazz bass professionally since 1984 and has extensively toured Canada and elsewhere, including the British Isles, Cuba and South America. Lister is a member of the Hugh Fraser Quintet and the Vancouver Ensemble of Jazz

Capital Regional District Arts Advisory Council Appointments The CRD seeks a volunteer to serve on the Arts Advisory Council. The AAC adjudicates funding programs and provides advice to the CRD on issues relating to the arts in the capital region.

Improvisation. As a member of the Hugh Fraser Quintet, he won a Juno award for Best Mainstream Jazz Album of 1997. Pat Coleman began playing jazz guitar in 1969 and has since worked as an instructor, studio musician, jingle writer, and feature film and TV drama score composer. Multi-instrumentalist (saxophone, clarinet and flute) Roy Styffe studied jazz at Humber College in Toronto, and has also studied at the Banff School under Dave Holland, Kenny Wheeler and Lee Konitz, and in New York with Dick Oatts. All jazz vespers services begin at 7 p.m. at St. John’s United Church, 10990 West Saanich Rd., across from Deep Cove school. Admission is free, but an offering is taken. For information, call Bernadette at 656-0875 or email bernadettegreene@shaw.ca.

Watch for our Auto Section

INMOTION

For details on responsibilities and how to apply, visit www.crd.bc.ca/arts. Application deadline is Friday, January 20, 2012 at 4:30pm. Contact: CRD Arts Development 625 Fisgard Street, Victoria, BC V8W 1R7 T: 250.360.3215 artsdevelopment@crd.bc.ca

IN ALL SOUTH VANCOUVER ISLAND COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

Hides in the shadows. Attacks without warning. Keep winter under surveillance. ShiftIntoWinter.ca DriveBC.ca

Report a road hazard to our 24 HR hotline 1.877.391.7310 or at www.mainroad.ca

Duncan: 250.746.7510 Malahat: 250.743.8931 Langford: 250.391.7310 Sooke: 250.642.0915 Salt Spring Isl: 250.537.5722 Galiano Isl: 250.539.2423 Mayne Isl: 250.539.2114 Pender Isl: 250.629.3431 Saturna Isl: 250.539.5722 Thetis Isl: 250.246.3431

COVER-TO-COVER

On-Line

Now available in an easy to read downloadable and printable format! Instant access to our complete paper! Editorial, Ads, Classifieds, Photos

Go to:

peninsulanewsreview.com

Click on Link (on the right) or Scroll down to the bottom Click on eEdition (paper icon)


Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW www.peninsulanewsreview.com A15

Peninsula News Review Wed, Jan 4, 2012 A16 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

PERSONAL SERVICES FINANCIAL SERVICES

CHRISTMAS CORNER

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

HOME STAY FAMILIES

AURICLE LAWNS- Hedge, tree pruning, winter clean, pwr wash, snow rmvl. 882-3129

Become a Psychiatric Nurse - train locally via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month program is recognized by the CRPNBC. Gov’t funding may be available. Toll-free 1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com

HOMESTAY FAMILIES REQUIRED

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. Locations in Alberta & BC. Hands on real world training. Full sized equipment. Job placement assist. Funding Avail. www.iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

Please call Michelle 250-655-9481

LEGALS WAREHOUSEMAN’S LIEN ACT Notice is hereby given that Kustom Towing, (2009) Ltd, 3297 Douglas St, Victoria, BC, V8Z 3K9 will be selling a BOAT & TRAILER BC3161116 Owner Scagrave-Pell, N. 2005 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 1G1JC52F457178110 Owner A. Lima to cover costs incurred. To be sold at 647B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10am-2pm January 11, 2012.

PERSONALS DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, Free to Try!!! 1-877297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #4011 or 1888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1 Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #4010. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+). HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com

LOST AND FOUND LOST PRESCRIPTION black glasses BMO in James Bay. If found please (250)361-2050.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS

to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca

March 15-19

Register for any Sprott-Shaw Community College program between Dec. 1, 2011 - Feb. 29, 2012 and receive up to $1000* towards tuition.

mish@shaw.ca

Learn more at sprottshaw.com/gift

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD

HELP WANTED

TRADES, TECHNICAL

LEGAL SERVICES

Alberta earthmoving company requires a Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanic. You will work in a modern shop and also have mechanics truck for field work. The job is at Edson, Alberta. We require that you have experience on Cat crawlers and or Deere excavators. Call Lloyd at (780)723-5051.

PRO MAC MANUFACTURING WELDERS & MACHINISTS Pro Mac Manufacturing in Duncan BC is a manufacturer of machinery parts, custom fabrications and industrial Brushcutters. We are expanding our fabrication and machining departments and are looking for: • STEEL FABRICATORS • WELDERS We require qualified Journeyman Welders and Fabricators to layout, fit, fabricate and weld steel assemblies. CWB ticket or qualifications an asset. • MACHINIST We require qualified Journeyman Machinists for Manual and/or CNC machining. Pro Mac offers a superior compensation package of wages, benefits and pension. Please forward resumes to Pro Mac Manufacturing at

CRIMINAL RECORD?

INCLUSION WORKER - Full time 1-1(contract position) The Inclusion Worker will support a young man living with Autism to develop skills needed to be active in the community. Required Qualifications - valid BCDL, experience supporting people with disabilities, first aid, be able to use visual schedule and picture exchange, behaviour management techniques. Please apply to office@beconsupport.ca or fax 250.721.2571 with your resume and covering letter.

phumber@promac.bc.ca

or fax 250-746-4799 Attn: Phil Humber.

*Some conditions apply

Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

LOCAL HAY. $7.75 per bale delivered. Call 250-539-3049 or cell 360-305-1115.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FRIENDLY FRANK 1500 W portable Oil Heater (new), $45 obo. Call 250-3817200. HONEYWELL ELECTRIC whole room heater, top cond. $32. 250-598-1265.

bcjobnetwork.com

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

With the aging population, Healthcare & Healthcare providers are some of the hottest career opportunities available. Practical Nursing is one of the fastest growing segments in healthcare. Train locally for the skills necessary in this career eld.

FEED & HAY

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

PERSONAL SERVICES

TRAIN TO BE A PRACTICAL NURSE IN VICTORIA TODAY!

PETS

Req’d F/T Live-in-Caregiver with exp to look after elderly parents; providing timely meals; providing required medication on time, providing care & assistance; helping in daily activities. Sal: $10/hr Knowledge of English, Punjabi an asset. Contact Amarjit @ d h a r i wa l a m a r j i t @ ya h o o. c a Fax: 778-426-4414 Location: Sidney, BC.

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS

GIFT SUCCEED.

OF EDUCATION

2 students per home.

M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

HOME CARE/SUPPORT

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

STUDY.WORK. S U . O

THAI CORNER Rest. Req’s 2 F/T Thai Food Cook, 3 to 5 yrs Exp. $3000/mo. Please email: r.chalermwat@hotmail.com or mail apply to: 2231 Bradford Ave., Sidney, B.C., V8L 2C8.

Brentwood Bay. Duties include picking and packing flowers and crop maintenance. No experience necessary. $9.79/hr. 40+ hrs/week. 5-6 days/week Work available in 2012: Mar 1- Nov 1. Send resume to Fax: 250-652-6949 E-mail: p_bulk@yahoo.ca

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

THE

TRAIN TO be an apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

Horticultural Labourer needed at Eurosa Farms,

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

FUEL/FIREWOOD

SproUStt-S ha w JOIN ON:

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

250.384.8121 www.sprottshaw.com

CALL VICTORIA:

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS www.bcjobnetwork.com EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A17 Wed, Jan 4, 2012, Peninsula News Review

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012  A16 www.peninsulanewsreview.com MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

FUEL/FIREWOOD

RECREATIONAL PROPERTY

APARTMENT/CONDO

HOMES FOR RENT

SUITES, UPPER

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

RECREATIONAL Property in Port Renfrew. Spectacular ocean view, ocean access, optional sheltered boat docking. 24’ RV trailer, storage cabin, tool shed, covered outdoor work area w/woodstove, parking. $130,000. (250)753-8986.

LANGFORD- 4 bdrm home, 3 bath,approx 3000sq ft. $1700+ utils. Equitex 250-386-6071.

DOWNTOWN SIDNEY lge sunny 2bdrm, 1.5bath, modern open kitchen, 1 blk to ocean/main St. Garden, sunroom/den, FP, parking, NS, $1240 mo incls W/D, Feb. 1. Hugo at 403-259-1870 or call (evenings) at 403-253-5285.

FREE CASH back with $0 down at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877792-0599 DLN 30309. Free delivery www.autocreditfast.ca

$50-$1000 CASH

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in January, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

FREE Tow away

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

RENTALS

STOREWIDE CLEARANCE! Furniture, Mattresses, Tools & Hdwe. New & Used, Good Selection, Low Prices! Up to 50% OFF or Less! BUY & SAVE 9818 4th St., Sidney. We Buy, Sell, Trade. buyandsave.ca

APARTMENT/CONDO

REAL ESTATE HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053

www.webuyhomesbc.com

WE’RE ON THE WEB www.bcclassified.com

COOK ST Village area. 1bdrm, hardwood floors. Heat, hot water, storage, parking incl $795 ns or pets. 250-595-5162 JAMES BAY, char home, 1 large bdrm, 1050 sq ft, 1.5 blks from harbour, $1250 H/W & heat incl’d, 250-881-3659. MALAHAT 1 & 2 BdrmsPanoramic views. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250-478-9231. OAK BAY Junction. Feb. 1st. 1-bdrm in quiet, senior’s 55+ building. $660. Heat, h/w incl. N/P. Share purchase required. 1678 Fort St. (250) 595-4593. SIDNEY: CLOSE to Beacon & waterfront. Comfortable grnd floor apt. 2 bdrms, 2 baths, 5 appls, parking. $1200./mo + hydro. (250)656-1444. QUADRA: 2 bdrm apt., 2 bath, 3pc appl’s, h/w floors, NS/NP, close to everything. $1250. (250)216-5090, (250)386-6523

NORTH SAANICH- lrg 1 bdrm loft in rural setting, lrg deck overlooking farmland. Shared laundry. N/S, pet friendly. $900. Available now. Call (250)652-7707. SIDNEY- 2006 1 level 3 bdrm, 2 bath executive home w/gas F/P, attached dbl garage, close to downtown. $2500. Avail Now. (250)652-7707. SIDNEY: OCEAN view, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, close to town, $1950/mo. 1-877-353-5552 or info@whitetreecondos.com

QUADRA/MACKENZIE: 3 bdrms, $1250+ 50% utils, sun deck, laundry, St. prkg. Avail immed, 250-516-5556.

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

250-885-1427

SUITES, LOWER

SIDNEY, 3BR, Great location, Recently reno’d, garage, fenced yard, $1350. Dean 250-857-2210 ref.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

COLWOOD LOWER suite, 1 bdrm, 1050sq ft, single $900, couple $950. (250)955-8757.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

all conditions in all locations

COLWOOD, UNFURN’D room available, incls all utils, $450. (Avail immed). 250-858-6930.

858-5865

AUTO SERVICES

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

For scrap vehicle

TRUCKS & VANS

$0-$1000 CASH

For Junk Cars/Trucks

Will tow away any car or truck in 45 mins. FREE!

BEATERS UNDER $1000

SIDNEY- 1 bdrm + studio. Indoor cat OK. Sep entrance, N/S. $800. (250)812-4154.

TowPimp.com 250-588-7172

toll free 1-888-588-7172

SIDNEY(5th Street) Available now. Pet ok, 2 bdrms, 1 bath, coin op, $1050, inclds H/W. Above store. Equitex, 250-386-6071.

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

www.PreApproval.cc

SERVICE DIRECTORY BUYING - RENTING- SELLING

SELL IT FAST WITH CLASSIFIEDS!

1-800-910-6402

250.388.3535

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

COMPUTER SERVICES

FENCING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

HANDYPERSONS

MALTA MOVING. Best Rates. BBB Member. Residential/ Commercial. (250)388-0278.

RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. References, affordable, experienced. Les (250)880-2002. ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. MALTA FENCING & DECKS. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278. QUALITY CEDAR fencing, decks and installation, pressure washing. For better prices & quotes call Westcoast Fencing. 250-588-5920.

DRYWALL

FURNITURE REFINISHING

CARPENTRY

AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601

CUSTOM PLANER- (Fir, cedar) baseboards, casings, crown molding (any shape). Call (250)588-5920.

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

MALTA DRYWALL & Painting. Residential/Commercial. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

DEEP COVE Renovations. General Contracting. Specializing in finish carpentry. Honest , Reliable. (250) 882-0897.

MUD on the RUN. Small drywall repairs, textures & renovations. Ross (250)812-4879.

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

ELECTRICAL

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES

250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

MALTA HOUSECLEANING. BBB. Best rates. Residential/Comm. 250-388-0278

WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

QUALITY HOUSECLEANER or caregiver, very reliable. Call (250)656-3362 after 6pm.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519.

PREPARATION FOR Fall, Winter & Spring. Professional garden & landscape services. Maintenance, design & installations. Call (250)474-4373.

AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869

COMPUTER SERVICES

GARDENING

RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

CLASSIFIEDS WORK HARD! Call 250.388.3535

Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603

PAINTING

AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. References, affordable, experienced. Les (250)880-2002.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694.

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. HANDYMAN SERVICES. Lawns, fences, pruning, flooring, painting, drywall, small renos. Mike/Chris 250-656-8961 MALTA HANDYMAN. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278. SENIOR HANDYMANHousehold repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

HOME IMPROVEMENTS IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MALTA DRAIN Tiles. Replace and Repair. BBB member, best rates. (250)388-0278.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

MALTA HOUSE Renos & Repairs. BBB member. Best rates. (250)388-0278.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

INSULATION

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS DIAMOND DAVE Gutter cleaning, gutter guard, power washing, roof de-mossing. Call 250-889-5794. GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades & maintenance. WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440.

MALTA BLOWN insulation & batting. Removal. Best rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127. NORM’S PAINTING- 15% offQuality work. Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

UPHOLSTERY

OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

SAFEWAY PAINTING

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB YOUR PERSONAL Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. (250)886-6446.

PLUMBING FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663. PRICED BY the job. No surprises. Guaranteed. 25 yrs, 2nd generation Master Plumber. 778-922-0334 Visa/MC.

WINDOW CLEANING BLAINE’S WINDOW WASHING. Serving Sidney & Brentwood since 1983. Average house $35. 250-656-1475 DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS 250.388.3535


A18 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - PENINSULA

realestate

Barb Ronald For all your

Real Estate needs...

250-384-8124

See our

Waterfront Best Buy!

NEW Auto Section

$799,000

Enjoy the marine scene & sea life down Colburne Passage towards Piers & Salt Spring Island. .66 acre oceanfront lot with 85’ shoreline. Spacious open plan 2778 sq. ft. home with vaulted cedar ceilings. Freshly painted, new carpets & light fixtures. Convenient to ferries, marinas, bus & Sidney amenities.

Jean Dunn

250-655-1816 By the Sea 1-800-326-8856 w w w. j e a n d u n n . c o m

Helping you is what we do.™

NEWS REVIEW

INMOTION

SIDNEY @ Shoal Harbour

1,1950 sq.ft 100% newly renovated townhome, 2 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage. Top of the line kitchen appliances and granite countertops, built-in breakfast nook, circular dining room bench, living room with gas fireplace. Master bedroom suite is 650 sq.ft with fireplace. Bamboo flooring & carpet in bedrooms. The latest in lighting throughout. The ocean view is stunning, walk to the beach and 5 minutes to Sidney. One year lease required. Sorry - no pets or smokers. Available immediately. $2,100 / mon.

John Romashenko 250-588-9246 Saanich Peninsula Realty Ltd. 250-656-0145

Every Friday

IN ALL SOUTH VANCOUVER ISLAND COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

REACHING OVER

100,000+ HOMES EVERY ISSUE

There’s more online

For more stories and web exclusives visit peninsulanewsreview.com

Available

Paper Routes

DEAN PARK Route 6543 - Amity Dr., Aldous Terr. (odd&even), Ebor Terr. (odd&even), Bourne Terr. (odd&even), Bexley Terr. (odd&even) Route 6567 - Barrett Dr. (odd&even), East Saanich Rd. (even), Lowe Rd. Route 6551 - Pender Pk. Dr. (odd&even), Orcas Pk. Terr. (odd&even), Salish Dr. (odd&even)

SAANICHTON Route 6218 - Hermwood Rd., Mt. Newton X Rd., Sloping Pines, Jovi Rd. Route 6220 - Arthur Dr. (odd&even), Lochside Dr. (odd), Lancelot Pl., James Island Rd. (odd&even), Turgoose Terr.

Route 6221 -Panaview Heights, Veyaness Rd. (odd&even), Stellys X Rd., East Saanich Rd.

Positions Open For FT/PT Carriers, Sub Carriers & FT/PT Drivers. All Age Groups Welcome!

Call... Arlene 250-656-1151

BRENTWOOD Route 6003 - Stellys X Rd. (odd), West Saanich Rd., Kristen Pl. Route 6039 - Garden Gate, Torin Rd. Route 6042 - Wallace Dr., Grieg

SIDNEY Route 6412 - Seventh St., Brethour Ave., Henry Ave.


www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A19

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Wednesday, January 4, 2012 

up to $18.94 value with $150 purchase

FREE

*

2 Rubbermaid 68 L totes 536306 / 905355

Save compared to our “regular price” for comparable top selling National Brands in our store. “Regular price” does not include promotional pricing, or special offers including manufacturer coupons, clearance sales, “2 for _”, or “free” offers. Product attributes may vary between the no name® products and the comparable top selling National Brands.

no name® foam plates 9”, 100 count 670620

1

98 each

no name® paper plates

no name® butter tarts

8.75”, 100 count

450 g

559184

870269

12

00 or 6.99 each

no name® foil

assorted types and sizes

1

FROM

48 after savings

3

each

no name® pasta entrees assorted varieties, frozen, 215 g

4

5/

00 or 1.00 each

no name® cloths and sponges

no name® flaked or chunk light tuna

661040

170 g

1

FROM

22 after savings

2

584027

FROM

88 after savings

4

533084

5/

no name® jumbo wieners regular, 675 g 481117

3

88 each

no name® stirred yogurts selected varieties, 12 X 100 g 177425

00

382400

no name® brooms, mops, pails or dust pans

25%off

assorted varieties, 375 g

or 4.69 each

2/

25%off

no name® sliced meats

303073

8

25%off

426815

00

2/

*Get 2 free Rubbermaid 68L totes when you spend $150 or more before applicable taxes at the Real Canadian Superstore location. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $18.94 for the 2 Rubbermaid 68 L totes will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, December 30th, 2011 until closing Thursday, January 5th, 2012. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on Free product.

00 or .88 each

no name® soup tomato, cream of mushroom, chicken noodle or vegetable, 284 mL 655547

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT .88 EACH

.48

each

3

98 each

no name® plain stirred yogurt 1 kg

2

286708

48 each

no name® fruit drinks assorted varieties, 10 X 200 mL

1

327892

98 each

no name® granola bars selected varieties, 175-210 g 461260

1

48 each

>ÃÌiÀ >À`

Prices are in effect until close, Thursday, January 5, 2012 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2011 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.


A20 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

You’ll feel like family! GROWN IN CHILE EXTRA FANCY

C Flame Seedless O Grapes U N $297 T R Cheese Y V $497 A L Black Forest or U Honey Ham E

NEW CROP

Lb $6.55 Kg

FAITH FARMS Your Choice

Approx 400 g Limit 4 Total

FLETCHERS

IN THE DELI

BIG TO SCHOOL

BACK SAVINGS

Watch for our

FLYER EVERY FRIDAY

in select Saanich News, Victoria News, Goldstream Newss Gazette Gazeette & Peninsula Peniinsula News News Review Review

97

¢ 100 g

GREAT FOR BACK TO SCHOOL LUNCHES

CALIFORNIA

Fancy Navel Oranges

2/ 5

$ 00

FROZEN

Chilean Porkloin Back Ribs

3

$ 47

lb $7.65/Kg

IN OUR BAKERY

IN STORE BAKED

Cinnamon Buns

2/ 5

$ 00

6 Pack

TASSIMO

20

%

off All

at Checkout While Stocks Last

Products

DOLE

Pineapple Juice or Blends

4/ 5

$ 00

1 L 3 Varieties

GOLD SEAL SOLID OR FLAKED WHITE

Albacore Tuna

2/ 3

$ 00

170 g Limit 4 Total

Proud Prou ud to be serv serving Victoria ictoria si ssince incee 11984 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday Jan 4th - Saturday Jan 7th, 2012

4420 West Saanich Rd, Royal Oak • 1153 Esquimalt alt Rd, Rd, Victoria Victor Vi oria Open Op O pen D Daily aily 88a 8am am - 110pm 0pm pm

Offers valid at Royal Oak and Esquimalt Country G Gro Groc Grocer cer lo llocations ocattions o only. nlly.


Jan 4 2011 PeninsualNewsReview