__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

JULY 2021

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

From Rye To A Pie • Perch & Pose • And That’s A Wrap • Cool To Be Kind Larger Than Life • Hot Chocolate • Fenton Hall: A Small Building With A Big History


CHANGE

ALL IN 5 Call us today to book a complimentary consult to discuss how easy it can be to get that brand new smile!

YOUR

Sp ecial offer ALL-IN-5 FOR THE PRICE OF ALL-IN-4

Early access to Super financing available

5983 5348 E smile@balnarringdentist.com.au

W balnarringdentist.com.au


contents

Leading 8.

+

Education Training

From Rye To A Pie

Jordyn Allen is a well-respected AFLW player with the Collingwood Football Club, and her journey to the top of her chosen sport started at the Rye Junior Football Club.

for all the family!

12. Perch & Pose Three-year-old Smee the macaw lives with trained wildlife handler and art workshop host, Teneale Wilson. An Australian assistance bird, Smee is now helping locals soar to new heights with ornithological encounters and inspiring art workshops.

16. And That's A Wrap Portsea couple Julia and Jordy Kay are eco-entrepreneurs. Their goal is to eliminate petroleum-based plastics. They are producing 'Great Wrap'; Australia’s first fully compostable cling wrap made from potato waste.

28

42

Arts 20. Cool To Be Kind Seventen-year-old identical twins Callum and Jackson McPartlane have struck quite the chord with music fans, playing songs that spread messages of kindness, empathy and resilience during tough times.

Must Try Dishes

24. Larger Than Life

48

Mornington artist Marta Gola likes to work on a grand scale. She draws portraits in graphite pencil and charcoal on oversized paper or canvases. Her largest work to date is 4 metres long.

Somerville Advertising Feature

Eat & Drink Proudly published by

Writers: Andrea Louise Thomas, Joe Novella, Andrea Rowe Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Creative: Sam Loverso, Dannielle Espagne Publisher: Melissa McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

Phone: (03) 5974 9000 Registered address: 63 Watt Road, Mornington 3931 www.peninsulaessence.com.au facebook/peninsulaessence instagram@peninsulaessence

Focus On 46. Somerville

Interesting facts, coffee safari, what to do and photos, and featuring some of the local businesses you will find there.

History It is a small, unpretentious, weatherboard building standing back from the roadway, motorists drive past, barely registering its presence. This is Fenton Hall, once the heart of the Merricks North community and, for many who grew up nearby, it still holds its soul.

Mist on the Water

PEFC Certified This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

E ssence

After working as a pastry chef and chocolatier for almost twenty years, it was natural for Deniz Karaca to create his business 'Cuvée Chocolate' and open his own workshop with his wife Kylie.

52. Fenton Hall: A Small Building With A Big History

Cover Image by Yanni

4 | PENINSULA

38. Hot Chocolate

A misty sunrise on a cold July morning at Devilbend Reservoir is the epitome of winter on the glorious Mornington Peninsula.

July 2021

Every Month 6. 7.

Peninsula Styles What's On

41. Recipe 44. Crossword 42. Must Try Dishes


OZ D E S I G N F U R N I T U R E M O R N I N G TO N

A U S T R A L I A N O W N E D & O P E R AT E D


THE WHITE PIGEON SAID Handcrafted on the Mornington Peninsula and focused on reducing our environmental footprint and exposure to toxins, this eco friendly range, for Mums, bubs (and the whole family) by The White Pigeon Said has you covered. thewhitepigeonsaid.com

A ROOM WITH A VIEW Super soft denim shirt by Dricoper, producing garments using environmentally friendly fabrics. Available at A Room With A View. Shop 4, 277 Point Nepean Road, Dromana, also online at aroomwithaview.com.au

Peninsula

Styles PRODUCTS FROM THE PENINSULA WE'RE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

INDIGO THREADS Take your casual wardrobe up a notch with Capty. These super soft leather, slip-on shoes are the perfect addition to any woman's wardrobe. Available at Indigo Threads, Shop 11/49 Eramosa Rd W, Somerville, also online at indigothreads.com.au

MORNINGTON MERCEDES Mercedes-Benz Mornington welcomes a new era of electric driving with the exciting arrival of the allelectric EQA – the first luxurious compact vehicle by Mercedes-EQ. Visit Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington LMCT 443 P: 5923 0011 mbmornington.com.au @mbmornington

E ssence

6 | PENINSULA

July 2021

ARTISAN'S ALLEY LillyPilly Pottery brings you functional ceramic pieces using clay textures and colours to create an eclectic range of ceramic homewares to suit just about any taste in décor. Available at Artisan's Alley, 17 Main St, Mornington artisansalley.com.au


What's on?Upcoming Peninsula Events JULY 1 MPRG CONNECT LAUNCH

Join fellow Mornington Peninsula artists to celebrate the launch of MPRG Connect. MPRG Connect serves to enhance the relationship between the Gallery and our local visual artists, with the initiative providing time, space, mentorship, and support to our creative communities. mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

JULY 10 TASTE OF TRUFFLE AT MAX'S RESTAURANT AT RED HILL ESTATE Jenny from Red Hill Truffles speaks about how truffle is grown and harvested. Discover the best methods for cleaning, storing and using truffle to create simple yet extraordinary dishes at home and then enjoy a delicious five course truffle degustation dinner prepared by the talented chefs at Max's Restaurant. maxsrestaurant.com.au

JULY 1-31 MONSIEUR ZIGIS AT FLINDERS HOTEL

JULY 2021 JULY 1-31 GIN MASTERCLASS AT BASS & FLINDERS DISTILLERY

Say hello to Monsieur Zigis, Flinders Hotel's intimate French pop-up restaurant in Zigis Bar. Every Thursday evenings Monsieur Zigis will take you on a contemporary set 4 course French culinary journey created with the finest Mornington Peninsula produce. flindershotel.com.au

Bass & Flinders Distillery offer a selection of the most unique masterclasses available constantly exploring new flavours and aromas to ensure a fun, interactive taste experience like no other, where you have an opportunity to create your very own bespoke gin or spiced brandy. bassandflindersdistillery.com

JULY 13 ROVERS

JULY 18 CRUDEN FARM SUNDAY OPENING

Rovers is a delightful and modern comedy-drama that has audiences laughing, crying and celebrating the imagination and heart of Australia’s trailblazing women. Woven from true stories and wild machinations, this is a fast-paced & poetic night at the theatre that everyone will love. artscentre.frankston.vic.gov.au

Once a month throughout the year, Cruden Farm is open on a Sunday for you to take a tour or just come for the day and enjoy a stroll around the gardens and farm. You are welcome to BYO a picnic, and there is coffee and tea available to purchase at the gatehouse. crudenfarm.com.au

BUSINESS ADVISORS AND TAXATION SPECIALISTS Providing a full range of accounting and taxation services to businesses and individuals, with minimum stress. Starting/Leaving a business Running a business Tax returns / consulting Rental properties Investors and retirees

Finalist for Accounting Support Staff & Regional Suburban Firm of 2021

Servicing the Mornington Peninsula and Australia wide.

Find the best, freshest and most exciting Aboriginal art at one of Australia’s leading specialist galleries Open Friday-Tuesday | 11-4 39 Cook Street, Flinders 3929 | T: 03 5989 0496 mccullochandmcculloch.com.au | everywhenart.com.au

6/143 Point Nepean Rd, Dromana P. 5981 9426 specialtywinetours.com.au W. aspireaccounting.com July 2021

E ssence | 7

PENINSULA


FROM RYE TO A pie

By Joe Novella Photos Gary Sissons & AFL Photos

O

ur beautiful Peninsula is full of great people, produce, fantastic eateries and spectacular scenery; we all know that. But how many of us know that it is also a breeding ground for AFL talent including the likes of Tom Lynch (Richmond), Jacob Weitering (Carlton) and Lachie Whitfield (GWS), all of whom played their junior footy on the fields and grounds of the 'Ninch'. However it’s not just the boys of the Peninsula who are going on to play at the elite levels and becoming champions of their game; our home ground can also lay claim to the development of an AFLW champ-in-the-making in the form of Jordyn Allen. continued next page...

E ssence

8 | PENINSULA

July 2021


July 2021

E ssence | 9

PENINSULA


Jordyn (Jordy) was sports mad from the time she could walk and talk, “Sport was my only interest as a kid,” she told me during a recent interview, “and my parents encouraged me to try my hand at all sports, so I did, starting with motocross as well as tennis, netball, nippers and footy.” Nowadays Jordy is a well-respected AFLW player with the Collingwood Football Club but her journey to the top of her chosen sport started at the Rye Junior Football Club. “I was born in Rosebud Hospital and lived most of my life in Rye, just moving recently, so I’m pretty much 'Ninch' born and bred.” Jordy’s not the only junior from Rye JFC to make it to the big time with the likes of Georgia Walker and Luke Davies-Uniacke also going on to play at the highest level. According to Jordy, the lure of playing AFL footy was not the reason she first pulled on the boots for the Rye Demons. “AFLW wasn’t a ‘thing’ when I first started,” she said. “My main reason for starting was to follow my brother, Jackson. When I was a kid, I just wanted to do what Jackson did. I found what he did much more interesting than what other girls my age were doing. Mum would try to get me to do other stuff like horse riding, scared that I might break too many bones

E ssence

10 | PENINSULA

July 2021

following my brother, but back then I would rather follow Jackson and do motocross and footy. Jackson was my inspiration really.” Jordy’s progression through the ranks as a junior involved playing with and against the boys from U10s to U14s and then against girls much older than herself. At 14 her talent was recognised and she entered elite development pathways that included being part of the Dandenong Stingrays Youth Girls Academy. At 15, Jordy was playing on the hallowed turf of the MCG as vice-captain of the Vic Metro team that won the U16 AFL Youth Girls National Championship. Jordy was awarded MVP honours in the Grand Final of those championships for her sterling defensive work that led to many referring to her as ‘The Rock from Rye’. From 2016 Jordy’s rise was meteoric with honours and awards including: • 2 x Under18 All-Australian honours: 2017, 2018 • Dandenong Stingrays Captain: 2017–2018 • Vic Country Captain: 2018 • Dandenong Stingrays Best and Fairest: 2018 Jordy was drafted by Collingwood as their first selection in the 2018 AFLW draft when she was 18 years-old, and has now completed her third season with the club. “I’d never really considered a career as a professional sports person when growing up,” Jordy said. “I was just doing stuff for fun and the love of it but the explosion of women’s football and the formation of the AFLW meant a professional sports career was possible for me.


And I was thrilled to go to Collingwood. When you think of footy you think of Collingwood; it’s a destination club with world class facilities at the Holden Centre and I really love being a part of the set-up.”

As a kid I’d kick the ball around with my cousins and my brother and I loved it

I asked Jordy what it was like when she first got to Collingwood, moving from an amateur to a professional environment. “All the girls were bigger than me; that’s the first thing I had to cope with. There were girls who had professional careers in other sports or had been playing professionally and they were physically a lot stronger. So I focused on what I could do well, which was kick and handball, and I tried to make sure that I played to my strengths. And I never forgot why I started playing football; that helped me keep grounded and helped me to push through injuries and rehab and times when things didn’t go my way.” So why did you start playing football? I asked. “For the love of the game,” Jordy responded. “As a kid I’d kick the ball around with my cousins and my brother and I loved it. I remember the pure joy of it. I wanted to keep kicking the footy around all the time. As soon as I forget that love of the game or don’t feel it anymore, and footy becomes just a job in a huge business environment, well, then, I think that’s the time for me to hang up the boots.” So how does Jordy cope with the stress and demands of a highperformance environment like the AFLW? “Keeping interests outside of footy helps me stay happy and grounded including going for a surf, a bike ride or a hit of tennis; anything to keep my body moving,” she said. And getting back to the Peninsula, maybe, I wondered?

“Yeah, I love getting back to the 'Ninch' when I can to catch up with family and friends and to take part in a few clinics for local footy clubs.”

I asked Jordy, how it felt to be a role model for the girls that go along to the clinics, most of them wanting to be just like her. “I don’t take it for granted, the way these young girls aspire to be like me. I’m aware of the responsibility I have in helping to shape the growth of women’s football going forward so all these kids at clinics can have the same opportunities as I did.” And what about Jordy’s role models? “I really look up to women like AFLW’s Daisy Pearce who blazed a trail for our sport as well as cricket’s Ellyse Perry and surfing legend, Sally Fitzgibbons.” "And what about life after footy?" I asked, thinking a 20-year-old living out her football dream probably hasn’t thought that far ahead. I was wrong. “I’m doing a Bachelor’s degree in Paramedicine,” said Jordy. “One, because it really interests me and, two, for something to fall back on when my professional footy career is done and dusted.” Jordy’s response shouldn’t have surprised me because what comes through in our conversation is her maturity for one so young, and how grounded she is for one who has achieved so much in such a short space of time. Has the success changed her in any way? “No, I don’t think so,” she said. “I’m always going to be the girl from the Peninsula, and I always keep in mind who helped me get here and how much I love the game. If I wasn’t at Collingwood, I’d be just as happy in Rye, having a kick with mates, but now I’m here I’m going to give it all I have.” Good luck Jordy, from your home crowd on the peninsula.

GLASS HALF FULL? TOP UP YOUR SALES BY ADVERTISING IN

Book into the next issue Call Brooke on 0409 219 282 brooke@mpnews.com.au

July 2021

E ssence | 11

PENINSULA


PERCH & pose By Andrea Rowe Photos Supplied

A

nimals have been long been a source of inspiration for artists. Sketching and painting bird life helps learn about their remarkable features, abilities, and habitats. continued next page...

E ssence

12 | PENINSULA

July 2021


*T

LY P P A

E

R

M

S

A

N

D

C

O

N

D

IT

IO

N

S

SE R 3 VI NO YE C AR E F S* EE

Two Bedroom Villa Offer Purchase a qualifying 2 bedroom villa and pay no service fee for 3 years!

VILLAGE GLEN… 41 YEARS OF SERVICE TO RESIDENTS

Retirement is a time to really enjoy life. At Village Glen, we have a selection of premium, self-contained 2 bedroom villas, available in a range of layouts to suit all types of lifestyle. We’ll even waive the service fee for the first 3 years to give you one less thing to worry about when you purchase a qualifying 2 bedroom villa and settle prior to the 31st December 2021.

TO SECURE YOUR NEW LIFESTYLE, CALL VILLAGE GLEN TODAY ON

03 5986 4455

335 EASTBOURNE ROAD, CAPEL SOUND VIC 3940 W W W .V I L L A G E G L E N . C O M . A U *Terms & conditions apply. Visit website for more.

July 2021

E ssence | 13

PENINSULA


The Mornington Peninsula’s newest muse making wildlife connections is a macaw named Smee. Three-year-old Smee lives with trained wildlife handler and art workshop host, Teneale Wilson. An Australian assistance bird, Smee is now helping locals soar to new heights with ornithological encounters and inspiring art workshops.

Deb McNaughton is a respected artist known for her vibrant and contrasting patterned artworks that have appeared in interior and clothing collaborations, murals, magazine covers and design and lifestyle TV shows. Featuring tropical elements in her works, Smee was called on as a life model to help teach observation and painting techniques for younger artists.

“Smee brightens up everyone’s day, no matter how they interact with him,” says Teneale.

“Smee was a wonderful workshop opportunity to inspire wildlife painting. Macaws blush when they're excited, going bright in the face, which makes them fantastic art studies,” Teneale enthused.

The former kids' party facilitator, and part-time veterinarian receptionist was smitten with Smee from the beginning. A longtime bird carer -“I’ve had canaries and lorikeets since I was a child,”-Teneale had always hoped to adopt a macaw and care for it. Her goal was recognised when a hearing-impaired woman in Euroa was no longer able to care for Smee. “Smee had helped her live independently in her home, alerting her to visitors or when the phone rang, helping her participate in activities and being her companion.” “Having been raised in captivity, Smee needed a dedicated carer to help him learn important skills. He’s very smart with the IQ of a 4-year-old; caring for him is like having a curious child who is dependent on you.”

“I’ve always been creative as a hobby, so I was thrilled when Deb offered to train me to facilitate similar workshops locally. It wasn't until Smee came into my life that I started to put the pieces together surrounding my love of birds, creativity, and events. I’m grateful for Deb’s support.”

Because he’s naturally curious he mimics speech saying, Who's that? and What's that?

Smee’s bright plumage now features in local Life Drawing art classes for budding young artists. “Kids love Smee. Workshops start with a talk about macaws. The kids ask questions about Smee’s abilities. Because I support macaw habitat programs through Amazon Aid and World Wildlife Fund, I also share how they can support macaws in the wilds of the Amazon.”

Smee has quickly become connected to the Mornington community.

“Often the best way to learn about animals is by being closer to them.”

“It’s incredible how many people started to look out for him. Many people are fearful of birds and their flapping, but as Smee is shy and still when he’s out, people are at ease.”

Smee’s not always a quiet poser when it comes to up-lose painting sessions or wildlife encounters.

Smee’s presence in her life also brought about a career change for Teneale. “When I adopted Smee I knew that I had to alter my life to ensure his needs were taken care of. I'd already had an event business so I realigned my direction and skills, offering wildlife encounters at events and birthdays. Smee’s popularity was growing and I was exploring ways to satisfy his social interactions.” “When artist Deb McNaughton approached me to collaborate for art classes at her studio in Aspendale, it seemed like a perfect opportunity.”

E ssence

14 | PENINSULA

July 2021

“Because he’s naturally curious he mimics speech saying, “Who's that?” and “What's that?” to people. He loves preening in front of a mirror, and rolling on his back; – he loves belly rubs and is a big cuddler!” “Smee’s got a cheeky side. If you're wearing dangling earrings, scrunchies, ribbons or glasses he’ll try to take them off. It often breaks the ice with people.” “Smee always gets involved; at home he’s into all our activities and he and my step-son Miles play an iPad 'Pop the Balloon' game together.” When Teneale’ s partner joins her for guitar and piano jams, Smee strides along the keyboard too.


Teneale has recently collaborated with boutique zoo 'The Funky Farm,' introducing other animals for children to interact with before interpreting them through art. She’s also developing encounter programs for aged care facilities and nursing homes. “Many older people are looking for opportunities to interact with animals, Smee is so gentle and inquisitive, and just lifts their mood.” Teneale says it’s a big responsibility owning a macaw. “I’m currently helping him learn how to free-fly and return, which takes focus. Because macaws get quite stressed if left alone and are extremely socially connected, we go everywhere together.” “There’s no chance of having a quick errand down the town; he’s quite the celebrity.” Smee’s celebrity status will soon increase, with an upcoming Channel 9 appearance on a reality vet show.

Dr Peter A. Scott is a specialist orthodontist offering orthodontic care for children, teens and adults alike in both the Mornington Peninsula and inner Melbourne areas. He is also a consultant orthodontist at the Royal Childrens Hospital.

Specialist Orthodontist Creating Beautiful Smiles On The Peninsula For Over 30 Years

Back in the art class, while Smee is content to pose and preen for portraits, he’s yet to pick up a paintbrush himself. Teneale says it’s far too tempting for his beak to chew on.

Expertise In Child And Adult Orthodontics

'Meet and Greets' with Smee and Birdlife Drawing workshops can be booked through social media.

Early Assessment Of Dental Development And Facial Growth Ideal Age Of Initial Assessment 7-9 Years Early Intervention Where Appropriate For Best Outcome No Referral Necessary

Follow Smee the Macaw For enquiries and bookings Facebook is preferred FB: www.facebook.com/smeethemacaw Insta: instagram.com/smeee_the_mornington_macaw

13 Beach St Frankston

Ph: 9783 4511

www.drpeterscottorthodontist.com.au www.facebook.com/drpeterscottorthodontist July 2021

E ssence | 15

PENINSULA


AND THAT'S A wrap By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Supplied

P

ortsea couple Julia and Jordy Kay are eco-entrepreneurs. Their goal is to eliminate petroleum-based plastics. They are producing Great Wrap; Australia’s first fully compostable cling wrap made from potato waste. And they are making it right here on the Mornington Peninsula at their solar powered factory in Tyabb. They both left distinguished careers to embark on a new venture to create a product that could make a positive difference in the world.

Julia is an architect from Western Australia. She has a masters degree in architecture from the University of Western Australia and also spent a year studying architecture in Milan, Italy. She worked for Cox Architecture in Perth and transferred to Melbourne four years ago. On construction sites she discovered that all of the building materials delivered came on pallets wrapped in plastic; even the bricks and timber. This led to an incredible amount of plastic waste. It stuck with her. continued page 18...

E ssence

16 | PENINSULA

July 2021


REDISCOVER YOUR OWN BACKYARD

W

inter is the perfect season to immerse ourselves in all that the Mornington Peninsula has to offer. Time to rediscover our local attractions, uncover new experiences and support local business as we explore. With school holidays here, many of us are looking for great things to see and do on the Peninsula with our families. Why not create a family adventure in the great outdoors and explore mazes and adventure activities designed to enliven the senses? Or visit a sand masterpiece to reconnect with treasured childhood stories? Meet friendly farm animals in a rustic farm setting or experience a close encounter with our iconic Australian animals.

As our local businesses continue to reinvent local experiences, we can all make a difference. Stay, play and explore local – you might be surprised what you rediscover in your own backyard.

Connect with local businesses on our Peninsula at: mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal

Share a meal at one of our characterful cafes, taste test a new ice cream flavour (even if it is winter!) or make it easy and grab take away to support your favourite local restaurant. Let little and older ones tap into their creativity and attend a workshop or explore a new exhibition. Foster your own curiosity by challenging yourself with winter activities - try your hand at becoming a chocolatier; master the art of pasta making; or dabble in pottery. Through your support, our local arts industry can continue to rebuild their momentum.

Young at Art Program, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery

July 2021

E ssence | 17

PENINSULA


Jordy is a winemaker from Mount Martha. He left school at fifteen to work in the vineyards of the Mornington Peninsula. At seventeen he went to Europe to become a winemaker. Back home, he set up his own label, Jordy Kay, in the Otway Ranges making natural organic wines. He completed a bachelor’s degree at Melbourne Polytechnic in Viticulture and Winemaking. He later moved to Seymour, taking on a 50-year-old vineyard and reinvented it. He was also appalled by the amount of plastic waste involved in his industry. Julia and Jordy met at a pub in Fitzroy two and a half years ago and realised right away that they were on the same wavelength. They both wondered if they were doing work that was really making an impact. They wanted to do something that would make the world a better place. Sitting on a beach on Phillip Island, they had a conversation about plastic waste and how to tackle the problem.

The scale of the problem with plastic wrap is huge. “150,000 tonnes of cling wrap and pallet wrap goes into landfill in Australia every year. A major supermarket uses 500,000 km. of cling wrap in a year. All that wrap goes into landfill and it takes a thousand

E ssence

July 2021

Great Wrap, by contrast, is a totally compostable product that breaks down into carbon and water within 180 days. It takes less time to break down than an orange peel. Great Wrap serves the same purpose as plastic cling wrap, but has no environmental impact. If all plastic wrap was replaced with this fully compostable product, it could actually change the world. It would eliminate one source of plastic waste. It’s a great beginning.

Our goal is to put an end to petroleum-based plastic being manufactured

It was there and then that the concept for Great Wrap was launched.

18 | PENINSULA

years to break down,” Julia says. Even biodegradable wrap is made of petroleum plastic. It has an organic element added that makes it biodegrade quicker, but it still breaks down into microplastics which go into the environment and never disappear.

To start, Julia and Jordy worked out the product they wanted to make. Once that was decided, they reverse engineered it. It took a lot of time and research to figure out the formula and to source the base ingredients. They have been importing their potato base from Idaho in the United States. It’s the waste product from potato chip manufacturing. Their aim now is to find a similar high starch, high glucose base sourced in Australia which will most likely come from the fruit juice


and wine producing industries. They are working with Monash University as research partners to localize the processing solution. Great Wrap is currently producing about 900 rolls of cling wrap per day, but their goal is to produce three million kilometres of wrap by the end of this year. The business is expanding by leaps and bounds. Soon they will be the biggest cling wrap manufacturers in the Southern Hemisphere. “Our goal is to put an end to petroleumbased plastic being manufactured,” Julia says. It’s not just cling wrap for home use and pallets that Julia and Jordy are looking at producing. They want to cover as many industries’ needs as possible. They are now looking into producing silage wrap. That’s the plastic that hay bales are wrapped in. Many farmers just burn the wrap after use which is bad for the environment. Compostable wrap is the perfect solution. Next Julia and Jordy want to move into making the punnets that fruits and vegetables come in. Silage wrap and punnets are their goal for 2022. There is no reason to believe that the plastics industry can’t be totally revolutionised. Harmful plastics can be replaced by compostable products. If anyone can do that, it’s Julia and Jordy Kay.

greatwrap.co

July 2021

E ssence | 19

PENINSULA


Arts

COOL TO BE kind By Andrea Rowe Photos Gary Sissons

S

eventeen-year-old identical twins Callum and Jackson McPartlane have struck quite the chord with music fans, playing songs that spread messages of kindness, empathy and resilience during tough times. The talented duo perform acoustic pop, rock and country as

E ssence

20 | PENINSULA

July 2021

a duo band 'Bo’Ness', and they aren’t afraid to tackle important issues from their own lived experiences. Their debut single 'We Don’t Need This Town', covers domestic violence, drawing on personal experience, and their journey to start a new live with their mother and younger brother.

continued next page...


5

signs your home is ready for a winter

deep clean When the temperature drops, it’s time to close up the windows and prepare to spend more time indoors. Take a good look around and see how you can make your home cleaner and comfortable for the cold season. Having a cleaner environment will help keep your family healthier, happier and more comfortable at home. Here are some signs that your house could do with a Winter Deep Clean.

if this is your home We are ready to be your cleaning solution

Buildup dust on ceiling fans

Air vents shows signs of buildup dust

Dirty oven

services we offer Regular Cleaning Vacate/Move In Clean Custom/Specialised Cleaning Service

Finger marks and grimes on walls

Grimy light switches and power points

Environmental Purification Service

1300 910 971 or contact us to know more about our disinfection services

BOOK YOUR CLEAN TODAY w w w.e s s e n t i a l h o m e s e r v i c e s .c o m . a u

|

c o n t a c t @ e s s e n t i a l h o m e s e r v i c e s .c o m . a u July 2021

E ssence | 21

PENINSULA


Thanks to growing up as “tour babies” on the road with their godfather, country music artist Adam Brand, music was bound to feature in their lives. When their touring and merchandise manager mum, Sallyann, moved them from Whittlesea to Frankston in primary school years, they discovered guitar playing and harmonising, and “performing fast became something we were passionate about,” says Callum. The talented twins were soon busking in the Frankston Mall from age 11, before finding themselves on stage at gigs with their music idols, moving up the Spotify charts and appearing on TV as 2020 'The Voice' contestants. “After The Voice everyone knew who we were; it was quite surreal. Coming out of it we were juggling gigs and school-work and constantly making choices about what feels right for us,” Callum recalls. “It certainly makes a difference with good people encouraging you; – we were no longer singing side-stage or just in the shower, and we’re grateful,” says Jackson. “Growing up on the road we got to meet so many wonderful artists, and they were always quite protective of us. Adam Brand was very much a father figure to us, and we learnt so much from him on-stage and off-stage.” Both boys are graduates of the CMAA Junior Academy of Country Music in Tamworth, runners up for the Order of Australia Medal for their volunteer commitment to spreading the message about bullying and domestic violence. In 2018 they achieved the Wakakiri “People’s Choice Award” at the national finals, and Best Junior Talent at the Basin Music Festival. The talented duo is grateful for mentors who have opened doors to opportunities too. Their 2020 song 'We Don’t Need This Town', was co-written with Lachlan Bryan at a song - writing camp, achieving Top 10 on the Country Music Charts in 2020 and encouraging conversations around domestic violence. 2021 had Bo’Ness playing gigs alongside their idols during the Red Hot Summer Tour in Victoria, ACT and South Australia and, closer to home, at Mornington’s Country Music Festival. But when Australian rock legend Jimmy Barnes pulled them up on stage in the Barossa to sing with him, the boys said he made a “dream come true” for them both. Their perfect sibling harmony has been in hot demand. Their gig list and support act credentials feature Australian singer-songwriters Adam Brand, Vanessa Amorosi, Shannon Noll, Claymore, Cornell and Car, Carter and Carter, Amber Lawrence, Chris Cheney, Lyn Bowtel, Reece Mastin and they’ve written songs with Golden Guitar winner Lachlan Bryan. While music idols matter to the twins, family is most important.

E ssence

22 | PENINSULA

July 2021

Their band name Bo’Ness, is a nod to the Scottish town their grandmother hailed from, their mother Sallyann supports their communications and touring schedule, and their conversations are peppered with how much they adore their younger brother Lewis who lives with mild cerebral palsy. The boys are open to learning about their indigenous heritage, shared with them by their beloved Pop who was a Gunditjamara man from Warrnambool area who passed away in recent years. Jackson says they are “proud to learn more and to represent our heritage.” While their Nairm Marr Djambana Reconciliation Week Spirit Dreaming gig was cancelled due to snap lockdown announcements, the twins are looking forward to future gigs at the Peninsula - based gathering place.


Our main message is to treat everyone with kindness, The twins are just as dedicated to spreading make time for the kindness word. Their trademark on-stage wear of 'Kindness' t-shirts complements their others and always anti-bullying and empathy anthems, capturing leave a smile the attention of audiences and campaigners. “We were drawn to 'Bully Zero' and 'Kind is Cool' from the start and we’re constantly sharing their messages’. The boys added that speaking about their own experience at the Frankston Youth Forum was one of their more nerve-wracking gigs, as they stepped out from behind their guitars to talk honestly about their experience of being bullied and domestic violence. “We know as a family what it’s like to experience this, and while we wish it never happened to us, we want others who might be in a vulnerable situation to know that it’s OK to speak up about it. When we were kids, we didn’t know what domestic violence was; we just knew our mum was getting hurt,” said Jackson.

Their albums and website promote support services for others to access with messages for overcoming adversity and mental health wellbeing, this has been put into practise through their ambassadorial roles with 'Kind is Cool', and Peninsula based charity 'That’s The Thing About Fishing' founded by guru Glenn Cooper, and work with youth mental health advocate Hannah Swinnerton. “Our main message is to treat everyone with kindness, make time for others and always leave a smile. Keeping hurt and with worry trapped inside isn’t healing” adds Callum. While the boys sing in prefect harmony, and it’s challenging for interviewers to make out voice differentiation during phone interviews, they do have some differences. Callum is left-handed while Jackson is right-handed, and Callum’s known for his cooking skills, while Jacksons is attached to the guitar 24-7. The brothers cheekily share “Mostly, we can’t separate; we even sleep-walk together. It’s a twin thing!” Their connection makes collaborating seamless. “One of us will write the song lyrics, and the other the chords. And sometimes we flip it around,” reflects Callum. While they’re not your average teenagers, the brothers do maintain a schedule on par with their peers. “We’re teenagers; we sleep a lot,” jokes Callum. When not on stage or catching shut eyes, the boys share class time, studying VCAL / VET music and performance at high school, as well as focussing on business management. Ask them about what success in their future looks like and they’re rather humble about a touring musicians career spreading songs of kindness, empowerment and mental health. “Life is just a happier place if people are kind to each other; we’re just happy spreading that message” shares Callum. But they do confess to harbouring ultimate dream gigs of playing at an AFL gig or onstage at the Grand Old Oprey in Nashville. They say big dreams come true for big hearts, and these brothers deserve all that comes their way.

W: bonessmusic.wordpress.com FB: facebook.com/BoNessmusic Insta: instagram.com/boness_music YouTube: Bo'Ness

July 2021

E ssence | 23

PENINSULA


E ssence

24 | PENINSULA

July 2021


LARGER THAN life By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

M

ornington artist Marta Gola likes to work on a grand scale. She draws portraits in graphite pencil and charcoal on paper or canvases which are 2.1 x 1.4 metres! She has to work from a ladder. Her largest work to date is 4 metres long. “I like the physicality and energy of working with big gestures. It’s really satisfying. The works are larger than life. It’s an extension of reality for me,” she says. As subject matter, Marta is most inspired by people. She loves their complexity. “I love to use the body to illustrate feeling, intimacy, family and state of mind. Anything about being human and how we feel drives me,” she says. She loves the sense of connection she gets with people and loves to convey that through her art.

She took a year off to work in London and travel through Europe. She wanted to reconnect to her roots. Marta was born in Poland and moved to Australia with her parents when she was two. She was quite lucky to make it. When the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in the Ukraine occurred in 1986, Poland was downwind from it. As a baby Marta suffered badly from radiation sickness and it was touch and go. When she recovered, her parents fled Communist controlled Poland. They were fortunate to get out.

Art was always my thing. I was the girl who was good at art.

Marta drew incessantly from childhood. She was always drawn to people and figurative work. “Art was always my thing. I was the girl who was good at art. As a shy, reserved person it was the perfect outlet,” she says. She didn’t really want anything else so she pursued art all through her school years.

When it came time to apply for art colleges, she was accepted by all of them, but she was determined to go to the Victorian College of the Arts. At seventeen, she was the youngest person in the program. It was highly conceptual and theoretical which was sometimes a challenge, but she stuck with it and got her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Drawing.

While she was in London, Marta was working in retail and visual merchandising. A writer friend teed her up with a creative director who planted the seed about working as a graphic designer.

When she came back from London, Marta completed a Certificate IV in Graphic Design at Shillington College of Graphic Design in Melbourne. She worked for a number of years for a branding agency and still does that work as a freelancer. Marta and her husband moved from Fitzroy to the Mornington Peninsula five years ago. They were initially going to move to London, but when they found out they were having a baby, they had second thoughts. Leaving vibrant Fitzroy to come to the Peninsula was quite an adjustment. Two years ago, Marta realised she could not live without being an artist. She had to be true to herself and was compelled to pursue her art. Marta found her tribe when she joined the Peninsula Studio Trail. continued next page...

July 2021

E ssence | 25

PENINSULA


“The PST has made me feel connected and part of a community. It transports me into a world of ideas,” she says. She has had her own studio for the past year and a half and has found it to be fantastic for her mental health. Marta has got two rambunctious little boys and while she feels motherhood has clarified things in her world, she also needs to escape into her world of art. “Art is my medicine, my mediation, my prayer. I’m moving a burning energy inside me when I’m doing art,” she says. Now she feels she can truly identify as an artist. Marta likes drawing in black and white because she feels it is highly expressive and emotive. “I love the fact that drawing is a vulnerable and earnest process of creating. It’s in constant flux.

E ssence

26 | PENINSULA

July 2021

It’s not a concrete or stagnant thing. I love mark making, lines, gestural marks, erasing, removing and remaking. Drawing is so alluring. There is no distance from the artist’s hand to the artwork. Drawing is exciting because it’s imperfect and immediate,” she says. Marta is able to share her work and creation stories through Instagram and her website, but it really has to be viewed to get the sense of scale. Her studio can be seen by appointment or viewed during one of the Peninsula Studio Trail’s open weekends. It is certainly worth the trip to see this artist working larger than life.

martagola.com


HEAL COUNTRY! A CELEBRATION OF NAIDOC WEEK

A

Peninsula Hot Springs has also invited Everywhen to showcase a selection of Indigenous works by artists that they represent in the foyer of the Spa Dreaming Centre as part of the PHS NAIDOC Week program.

" Originating in the 1930s and established as an annual event in 1975, NAIDOC Week celebrates the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples," says Everywhen's co director, Susan McCulloch. " Based on a different theme each year, NAIDOC Week has become a very significant event and one that all Australian's are asked to participate in."

"We've presented a show for NAIDOC Week once before with the Hot Springs, and we're thrilled that they've asked us to collaborate again,' says Susan. "It's both creative and rewarding for local businesses to work together like this and an exciting opportunity to show Aboriginal art in a completely different venue."

This year's theme Heal Country! invites all to actively protect and maintain Indigenous people's lands, culture and heritage.

Heal Country! A celebration of NAIDOC Week will be held at Everywhen Artspace and Peninsula Hot Springs (Spa Dreaming Centre foyer) from July 4-11.

rt from Arnhem Land, the Kimberley, the APY Lands, the Pilbara and the Central Desert features in special exhibitions to mark NAIDOC week from July 4-11 at Everywhen Artspace and Peninsula Hot Springs.

" Art offers a great way in for people to explore the deep relationships that Indigenous peoples have with their lands and culture,' says Susan. "As we represent more than 40 Aboriginal art producing communities around Australia, we can select works of different media and styles to demonstrate the range, quality and diversity of contemporary Aboriginal art." Artists include leading bark and ceremonial pole painters from the Northeast Arnhem Land region of Yirrkala, traditional healers and artists from the APY Lands, new generation women artists of the Central Desert's Utopia region whose vibrant paintings detail the plants and bush medicine stories of the region, ochre painters from the Kimberley and senior and emerging artists from the Western Desert of the NT.

EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE A: 39 Cook St, Flinders. T: 5989 0496 E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au W: mccullochandmcculloch.com.au | everywhenart.com.au Open Fridays -Tuesdays, 11am-4pm Peninsula Hot Springs A: 10 Springs Lane, Fingal Open daily: 24 hours

reawaken your career with u

If you are passionate about wellness, looking for unique employee benefits and skilled in the following areas – we would love to meet you

July 4 -11

Spa therapists Food & beverage attendants

Heal Country! A celebration of NAIDOC Cleaners

Pool attendants

We’re hiring full-time, part-time, day and night shift. Join our team now and be part of Victoria’s award-winning wellness location.

Our people are at the heart of our busi and delivering a memorable and relaxi experience is our mission. Now open 24/7 all year round, we’re hiring full an part time employees to grow our team

A workplace with a difference, our employee benefits include access to geothermal bathing (terms and condit apply), all wellness experiences as wel as generous discounts on retail spa products and treatments.

To apply and learn more about a career at Peninsula Hot Spring visit our website peninsulahotsprings.com/our-story/careers

Art such as that by (from top) Atipalku Intjalki, Gordon Barney, Muluymuluy Wirrpanda, Maringka Burton (to right), Moyurrurra Wunungmurra, Natalea Pula Holmes and Janet Golder illustrate the importance of protecting and celebrating Indigenous lands, culture and heritage.

EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE mccullochandmcculloch.com.au | everywhenart.com.au Peninsula Hot Springs | peninsulahotsprings.com.au

ssence| 27| 27 EEssence

PENINSULA JulyJuly 20212021PENINSULA


+

Education Training

for all the family!

MENTONE GIRLS’: A PLACE FOR GIRLS TO THRIVE At Mentone Girls’ Grammar School, students from ELC to Year 12 are educated to be the kind of confident, compassionate, and moral leaders our world needs right now. The safe, supportive environment that ensures every girl is known, seen and heard provides a carefully curated opportunity for girls to find their voice and, more importantly, learn how to use it.

which ensures students are free to be themselves and are respected for it.

The research unequivocally shows that single-sex schools like Mentone Girls’ Grammar offer the optimal conditions for girls to thrive, free from gender stereotypes, unconscious bias and the myriad of other obstacles that can impede a young girl’s development into womanhood.

Students’ academic results support this. Of the school’s Class of 2020, 37% were placed in the top 10% of Australia, with an Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) of 90 or higher, and 72% were placed in the top 20% of Australia, with an ATAR of 80 or more – remarkable achievements despite periods of remote learning. Students also continue to achieve results above average in the National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests. The school welcomes students of all talents and abilities, so such success is a testament to its learning and wellbeing initiatives.

With 122 years of excellence in girls-only education from Early Learning to Year 12, Mentone Girls’ Grammar offers a vast array of curricular and co-curricular activities spanning sport, academics and the performing arts. Early Learning curriculum blends inquiry- and play-based learning drawn from the International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years Programme (PYP) and the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework. This continues in the Junior School, where students delve deeply into concepts and make connections across subjects. Senior students engage with subjects spanning the Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Technology, Languages, Entrepreneurship and the Arts. Underpinning this are the Anglican values of social justice and community service, and the School’s strategic priorities that seek to protect and enhance each student’s social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing. These priorities form part of a pastoral care program that equips students with the skills needed to manage life’s challenges. At the forefront of this is Principal Natalie Charles. Ms Charles was appointed at the start of 2020 for her vast sectoral experience, outstanding educational leadership and her passion, empathy and humour. She is renowned for her tenacious commitment to excellence in girls’ education – an ideal fit for Mentone Girls’ Grammar. For Ms Charles, a Mentone Girls’ Grammar education is unparalleled. She says it is vital for girls to develop the confidence and skills they need to flourish in today’s complex world, which sends contradictory and, at times, vexed messages about who and what they can be. “If ever there was an imperative to exercise one’s rights and responsibilities in our proudly independent girls’ school, it is now,” she says. “Leading and inspiring the next generation of women to take their place in a complex world – one that simultaneously empowers, disarms, celebrates and shames them – is a challenge. But by focusing on each girl’s need to acquire knowledge, develop transferable skills and, most importantly, to find purpose and belonging, we ensure they rise boldly to the opportunities and setbacks, inspiring hope in themselves and in others.” Key to this vision is the School’s size and nurturing environment,

E ssence

28 | PENINSULA

July 2021

“Because we are a small school with an extensive history, we offer an intimate environment where every girl can achieve her personal best. This fosters a strong sense of belonging underpinned by exceptional pastoral care, teaching and learning.”

While academic results speak for themselves, Ms Charles says the evidence in support of single-sex schools is undeniable. “Compared with coeducational peers, girls from single-sex schools like Mentone Girls’ Grammar are less likely to be concerned about their personal mental health, they have higher intentions of completing a degree or a doctorate, they score higher on academic tests in science, mathematics and literacy, and they are less likely to experience bullying at school.” Ms Charles remains confident that single-sex schools will remain in high demand, particularly Mentone Girls’ Grammar. “Mentone Girls’ Grammar provides a beautiful moment of respite from added pressures and allows young women to compete on their own terms. It gives a voice to girls’ opinions and choices while allowing them to challenge themselves without the fear of failure, empowering them to find their purpose in life.” “This is incredibly liberating and a truly powerful force for transformation.” Mentone Girls’ Grammar hosts regular open morning and individual tours where families can meet Principal Natalie Charles and experience the school in action. To find out more, call Admissions on 9581 1200, email info@mentonegirls.vic.edu.au or visit : mentonegirls.vic.edu.au


Empowering EmpoweringGirls Girls

Where Whereevery everygirl girlisisknown, known, seen seenand andheard. heard. APPLY APPLYTODAY TODAY

mentonegirls.vic.edu.au mentonegirls.vic.edu.au July 2021

E ssence | 29

PENINSULA


+

Education Training

for all the family!

CURIOSITY AND WONDER LEAD TO A NATURAL DESIRE TO LEARN

Mt Eliza House Sanctuary of Early Learning is a privately owned Long Day Care facility and government registered Kindergarten. Our commitment at Mt Eliza House is to provide a homelike environment where each individual child can thrive. All children have the right to grow and learn in their own way, at their own pace, allowing them to gently unfold to reach their full potential. With large natural outdoor play spaces, the children spend their days exploring their world, creating positive friendships and developing empathy and respect. Our curriculum reinforces connections with nature and encourages selfreliance, problem solving and creativity. Our educators acknowledge the diverse ways in which individuals learn in our ever-changing world, and support and nurture each child’s learning journey. Learning environments are provided to assist young ones to become curious, confident and caring decision makers. We invite you to visit and take a tour of our facilities today. Mt Eliza, 41 Baden Powell Place P: 9787 0788 W: mtelizahouse.com.au

E ssence

30 | PENINSULA

July 2021

Frankston, 1-3 Vera Street P: 9783 1117 W: frankstonhouse.com.au

Seaford, 6-10 Govan Street P: 8796 3000 W: seafordhouse.com.au


Sanctuary of Early Learning

With over 20 years experience, we are committed to continuous quality care and to ensure a full balanced development for each child in our expansive natural learning environment.

Curiosity and wonder lead to a natural desire to learn

Your most precious people are our priority

Frankston House Sanctuary of Early Learning 1-3 Vera Street Frankston E info@frankstonhouse.com.au P 9783 1117 W frankstonhouse.com.au

Brand new Seaford centre NOW OPEN and taking enrolment.

Mt Eliza House Sanctuary of Early Learning 41 Baden Powell Place Mt Eliza E info@mtelizahouse.com.au P 9787 0788 W mtelizahouse.com.au

Seaford House Sanctuary of Early Learning 6-10 Govan Street, Seaford E info@seafordhouse.com.au P 8796 3000 W seafordhouse.com.au | 31 July 2021 PENINSULA

E ssence


+

Education Training

for all the family!

EDUCATING GENERATION ALPHA By Mrs Fiona Wines, Head of Senior School, Deputy Principal at Toorak College At Toorak College, we are known for developing aspiring young people who go on to thrive in their futures. To do this, we look to develop programs that cater for every individual’s learning needs and nurture in our students the skills they need beyond their school years. Our approach will never change. What does change, however, are the needs, opportunities and pressure points of each generation. As the world evolves, teachers too must innovate and develop an educational experience that best suits each generations’ needs. Having introduced a number of exciting and innovative programs in the last 2 years catering to the current and future needs of Gen Z-ers, Toorak College have our eye on the future and are in the process of researching and planning the possibilities for the next generation of Senior School students, Generation Alpha. Generation Alpha will provide the lens through which we can look to for the next decade and beyond. They are those born between 2010 and 2024 and the children of Gen Y. They will be the largest, most culturally diverse and digitally connected generation and what they experience in their early years must be considered as we tailor an educational program for them. Generation Alpha enter their schooling years with extensive technological skills. They have a heightened sense of consumerism and brand awareness and actively participate in decision making both in online environments and within their family home. They have more of a voice than the generations before them and are eager to use it. So, in planning their educational journey, we need to consider how these students will learn best and what they need to thrive. Interpersonal Skills Interpersonal skills are key successful futures and how we view these skills over time must be reviewed. Communication and collaboration are specifically taught in our Agile Learning program, however, for Generation Alpha, they must lead them to be able to effectively co-create. Working cooperatively and effectively with others towards a common goal is essential but learning how to create with another person is where we need to go next. While students in past generations were participants in their educational journey, our current programs are designed to include elements of choice, allowing students to provide significant input in the direction of their unique program. This approach puts us ahead of the game but we are now looking ahead to allow Gen Alpha students ways they can act as cocreators on their educational journey.

E ssence

32 | PENINSULA

July 2021

Thinking Critically Gen Alpha are used to voicing their opinion but we must teach them how to think critically and provide effective feedback so that they can effect change. We must also teach them how to receive feedback and resilience. These are essential skills for all generations. Looking towards 2030 and beyond, our focus is firmly on how to prepare students for jobs that do not yet exist. There will be many more opportunities, in a variety of fields, for young people who are willing to continuously learn, think critically, and give and receive feedback, those who understand that they cannot just be employable but that they must be adaptable and even entrepreneurial in the future. Effective Leadership One of the skills that Gen Alpha students will need to develop is effective leadership. As their generation moves into adulthood, the societal and economic challenges they face may be more uncertain. We know students at Toorak College feel empowered as they have been given a voice from an early age, so we need to teach them how to empower others when in leadership roles within our curriculum and through extracurricular opportunities. Over time, what effective leadership looks like will continue to evolve from ‘empowerers’ to ‘enlargers’ and it is our role to ensure students have the opportunity to develop and practice these skills in order to become effective and empathetic leaders. Taking the needs of each generation into account, I am proud that Toorak College continues to design flexible programs. Generational awareness, combined with our knowledge of the individual strengths of our students, will allow our programs to evolve further. W: toorakcollege.vic.edu.au


2023

SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

Challenging every student through diverse experiences to develop their confidence and unlock their potential.

toorakcollege.vic.edu.au/scholarships July 2021

E ssence | 33

PENINSULA


FUTURE CHEFS Education

FUTURE MUSICIANS Training for all

the family! + future comes FiRST at ... FUTURE Your child’s OLYMPIC CHILDREN BEING CHILDREN ABOUT

hild’s future comes FiRSTat... at ... child’sfuture future comes comes FiRST hild’s FiRST at FUTURE... SCIENTISTS

SWIMMERS

CHILDCARE I KINDERGARTEN I EARLY EDUCATION

Learning through Play at FiRST

Welcome to FiRST Early Learning; - A sanctuary for learning, FUTURE MARINE BIOLOGISTS development, and growth.

We ensure that every child and family feels welcome, safe and secure when they take their first steps into our centres,

We understand the child as an individual and human being a range ofMovement needs, wants, interests, abilities and languages ach kinder with • Music and FUTURE ENVIRONMENTALISTS FUTURE DOCTORS • Cooking RE BUILDERS personable to each child’s journey, working in unique d excursions • Swimming lessons FUTURE ENVIRONMENTALISTS FUTURE DOCTORS RE BUILDERS • Yoga sessions collaboration with families and the environment.

NHAM 2040

FUTURE FUTURE ENDEAVOUR HILLS HASTINGS FRANKSTON SOUTH FiRST is dedicated5979 to providing an9783 environment that is sustainable FUTURE FUTURE 9700 1922 2831 3390 MUSICIANS CHEFS MUSICIANS showing respect and understanding in providing educational CHEFS info@firstearlylearning.vic.edu.au 12484814-AV13-21

all-inclusive play based learning environments that promote, encourage and further developsFUTURE children’s interests, ideas, FUTURE FUTURE OLYMPIC FUTURE theories, needs, sense of self, belonging and becoming. SCIENTISTS

OLYMPIC SWIMMERS SCIENTISTS Our class’s range from 6 weeks to 5 years. SWIMMERS

Learning through Play at FiRST Nurseries: Learning through Play at FiRST FUTURE MARINE BIOLOGISTS

FUTURE BUILDERS

FUTURE BIOLOGISTS We MARINE lay the stepping stones to nurture, build and develop secure

and trusting relationships with our nurseries to foster and enhance social, emotional and well-being for your child. Every change, growth and milestone is celebrated, encouraged and supported. Our environments and resources are complete with safe and ach kinder • Cooking • Music and Movement natural resources. ach kinder stimulating •• Music and Movement •• Cooking d excursions Swimming lessons Yoga sessions

FUTURE CHEFS

d excursions • Yoga sessions • Swimming lessons NHAM ENDEAVOUR HILLS HASTINGS FRANKSTON SOUTH NHAM ENDEAVOUR HILLS HASTINGS FRANKSTON SOUTH 2040 9700 1922 5979 2831 9783 3390 2040 info@firstearlylearning.vic.edu.au 9700 1922 5979 2831 9783 3390 info@firstearlylearning.vic.edu.au

2-3 years: These early years are an enriching and exciting time in a toddlers life as pathways are opened with endless opportunities for learning and investigating. Self help skills are developed, independence is flourishing and confidence building. Through observation, research and provocations, children’s interest and learning are continuously expanded as they grow and change.

Kindergarten: High-quality kinder funded education to our 3 and 4 year old children. FiRST understands the importance of the child’s first 5 years being the most important in a child’s life, for learning and development. We provide enthusiastic, educated and experienced bachelor qualified kindergarten teachers that deliver the steps needed for quality educational curriculums to build and prepare your children for the next stages in their lives. Our programs are created with intentional and play FUTUREteaching ENVIRONMENTALISTS FUTURE DOCTORS based learning styles to provide but not inclusive to physical, social, emotional well being, language and literacy, sense of community and connection, numeracy, creative expression and arts, sustainability, science and technology, independence and responsibility to path the stepping stones for their future.

FUTURE W: firstearlylearning.vic.edu.au MUSICIANS

Your child’s future comes FiRSTat... at ... Your child’s future comes FiRST Your child’s future comes FiRST at ... FUTURE 12484814-AV13-21

FUTURE SCIENTISTS 12484814-AV13-21

OLYMPIC SWIMMERS

Learning through Play at FiRST FUTURE MARINE BIOLOGISTS

• Bush and beachBUILDERS kinder • Music and Movement FUTURE ENVIRONMENTALISTS FUTURE DOCTORS • Cooking FUTURE • Incursions and excursions lessons FUTURE ENVIRONMENTALISTS FUTURE DOCTORS • Swimming FUTURE BUILDERS • Yoga sessions PAKENHAM 5922 2040 SCAN ME

FUTURE FUTURE ENDEAVOUR HILLS HASTINGS FRANKSTON SOUTH FUTURE FUTURE 9700 1922 5979 2831 9783 3390 MUSICIANS CHEFS MUSICIANS CHEFS info@firstearlylearning.vic.edu.au

12484814-AV13-21

E ssence

34 | PENINSULA

July 2021

FUTURE

FUTURE FUTURE


+

Education Training

for all the family!

THE MAYOR’S READING CHALLENGE Frankston City Libraries invites children aged 0-5 years and their families to get involved with this year’s Mayor’s Reading Challenge. In its eleventh year, the Mayor’s Reading Challenge supports early literacy development, by encouraging parents and carers to engage in regular reading experiences with their children in a fun and rewarding way. According to Frankston City Mayor, Kris Bolam, the challenge is not only fun, it creates positive literacy outcomes for young children.

the books you enjoy via Story Box Libraries or Tumblebooks, both free with your Frankston City Libraries membership. The Mayor’s Reading Challenge runs throughout August and participants can register via the Frankston City Libraries website, by dropping into the Frankston, Seaford or Carrum Downs libraries or by visiting the Council Customer Service Centre at Langwarrin. For more information and to register, go to library.frankston.vic.gov.au or phone 9784 1020

“Australian research has found that children who are read to six or seven times a week have a literacy level almost a year ahead of children who are not read to at home, and tend to learn more when they start school,” the Mayor said. “Everyone who completes the challenge of 60 books receives a free book and goes into the draw to win one of the major prizes. “We encourage parents to make reading interesting by not only sharing children’s books but materials you enjoy. You could read snippets of your favourite magazine or newspaper out loud, point out road signs or sing nursery rhymes.” The books read in your regular Storytime sessions with Kerry, Monica and Bev all count towards the Challenge, as do any of

Frankston City Mayor, Kris Bolam reads with Spencer (aged 3) and Lily (aged 3).

July 2021

E ssence | 35

PENINSULA


ART CLASSES FOR ALL AGES AND ABILITIES At Creative Makes we help people discover their creativity through a wide range of classes including, pottery, kids art classes, adults art classes, life drawing, collage, watercolour, paint and sip sessions, and kid's art parties.

Our studio is a fun and friendly space for people who would like to explore their creativity, no matter their age or skill level! We will guide you to discover your unique creative self.

All our classes are designed to guide people, at any stage of their creative journey, in an encouraging and supportive environment, without judgment or expectations. Whether you are a complete beginner or have already started on your creative path, Mel and Jade bring their experience and enthusiasm for all things art and craft to the Creative Makes studio. Our guest facilitators embrace this same ethos, and this allows the Studio to be a place of Creative Freedom.

Pre-Primary and Primary Kids classes A comprehensive timetable of School Holiday Classes Adult Art and Creative classes

In the after-school classes the students are encouraged each week to think about their own individuality, so their work will be uniquely theirs. Learning through experimentation and exploration of different mediums, such as painting, drawing, printing, and collage. You will experience this same exploration during our adults’ classes, encouraging a sense of adventure and connectedness.

Family Workshops Group classes and Private lessons (NDIS compliant) Online and in-store Art and craft supplies Custom workshops

location: 6 High Street Hastings VIC 3915 website: www.creativemakes.com.au email: melscreativemakes@gmail.com | phone: 0425 867 919 facebook/melscreativemakes | instagram/_creativemakes_

LOVE PENINSULA ESSENCE AND DON’T WANT TO MISS A COPY? PENINSULA ESSENCE MARCH 2020

FREE

FREE

Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

FREE Peninsula ER 2020 & visiting on the Mornington Living

NOVEMB

EMB NCE NOV 0 ER 202

Living

g on the

& visitin

insula

* savings off recommended retail price

LIVING & VISITING ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA

Bedshed Mornington is a registered NDIS provider #4050046901

 $48 twelve month subscription (12 issues) or $30 six month subscription (6 issues)  Name ................................................................................................................. Address ............................................................................................................

Phone.............................................................................................................

Strictly Mercurio • Fixer Uppers • Spirit Of Adventure • Sustainable Fashion The Tale Of An Ancient Mariner • Making An Impact • Celebrating Culture • Healing Harmonies Colours Of White • Seafood Dream Team • From Bottle To Board • Dalywaters • Mr Planck, Sir 24/02/2020 3:28:49 PM

To Sea Family • Tree Perfection Heritage Farm Masterchef • ‘FIFTY’ • Pickle Wholehearted • Exquisite Detail • MPRG Dead And Hemp A Feeling • Found Backyard Hens red To Succeed • Morven Empowe

20/7/20

LIVING & VISIT ING ON THE MORN INGTO N PENIN

27/07/2020

2:39 pm

er In A Lett t • Lifeline Tea Towel Pivo s t• For Gold 100 Year Swimming Grant Recipien- Celebrating Pearl • • FAC ory • Girl A Lockdown HMAS Cerberus n ng Hist y• Preservi ing • Once Upo ind the Stor Feel Man Beh Focus On eanity • The -a-b tain Sus

2020

26/10/

3:23:46

2:03:29 PM

 Visa 

Mastercard

Card number ............................................................................................

PM

SULA

vehicles. nstrator customers Excludes

for demo differ vary. time may periods au. nty start warranty ry Warra gton.com. vehicle. s first). Batte mbmornin of the occur ration here www. hever ment first regist00km (whic nty state date of 200,0 warra from the date or refer to the years s for 5 first registration please sions ars from and exclu tions s, condi

W: creativemakes.com.au

...........................................................................................................................

Front Cover_MAR 2020.indd All Pages

1

M: 0425 867 919

E: melscreativemakes@gmail.com

on Pen

Morningt

bb Road au ington-Tya gton.com. Morn ornin 29-31 .mbm 3 www CT44

20OTL.indd e_August20 1 sulaEssenc 2020.indd BGS_Penin spine_AUG Front Cover_No

A: 6 High Street Hastings

To subscribe phone Mornington Peninsula News Group on 03 5974 9000 or complete the details below.

PENINSULA A PENINSUL LA U S N I N PE AUGUST 2020

We are also extending beyond the studio walls via our new Zine – Why Art? – so keep a lookout at your local café or community venue for our first edition titled JOY, being published in late June.

6 AND 12 MONTH SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE Select the subscription period and each month, Peninsula Essence will be mailed to you in a sealed plastic bag.

MARCH 2020

*

LA ESSE

. the city added ed in racter, bines ded cha t SUV com re, it to spa compac r room it you ats and – making tyle you. y lifes takes today. he road nington Mor Benz

for all the family!

Be inspired to discover your creativity

PENI NSU

GLA.

+

Education Training

0 3:22

18/9/2

Expiry date ...............................................................................................

pm

Post to Peninsula Essence Subscriptions PO Box 588, Hastings Vic 3915

E ssence

36 | PENINSULA

July 2021


July 2021

E ssence | 37

PENINSULA


Eat & Drink

HOT chocolate

E ssence

38 | PENINSULA

July 2021


There is something really magical about dining in at a restaurant, having a meal and finishing it off with a dessert that has your chocolate in it Deniz Karaca owner of Cuvée Chocolate.

By Natasya Rallios Photos Leon Shoots and Thomas Barnes

D

eniz Karaca started his career at 16 as an apprentice at the esteemed Cron & Lanz patisserie in Göttingen, Germany and developed his own unique style making pastries and desserts. Since then, he has worked at a number of prestigious restaurants, hotels and chocolateries around the world. “My two passions in life are wine and chocolate. I spent most of my career in hospitality developing my chocolate skills and I eventually learnt how to make chocolate from scratch by experimenting on my own,” he said. After working as a pastry chef and chocolatier for almost twenty years, it was natural for Deniz to create and sell his own chocolate and open his own workshop with his wife Kylie. “We founded Cuvée Chocolate from our kitchen base in 2014. At first it was a hobby, but our premises kept growing and in time we built a chocolate facility in Carrum Downs. We produce all of our chocolate in - house with cocoa beans, that are sustainably grown, sourced from all around the world' said Deniz. Deniz and Kylie sell their handmade chocolate Australiawide and you can place an order on their website. They offer a range of dark, milk and white chocolate flavours. “We started supplying to restaurants this year and we work closely with a lot of wineries and restaurants on the Mornington Peninsula. Local wine makers are delighted to put our chocolates alongside their wines. It’s also great to see restaurants using the flavours of our chocolate in their featured desserts,” said Deniz.

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 430 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u

continued next page... July 2021

E ssence | 39

PENINSULA


I paired up with South Australian wine maker Penfolds and created a sculpture that matched all of my chocolates to their famous wines

His genuine passion and creative approach to desserts has won Deniz many awards. In 2013 he represented Australia and was ranked among the top three in the World Chocolate Masters in Paris. The renowned international competition invites the world’s best pastry chefs to represent their countries and unveil their talent to a global audience.

“I had to qualify to take part in the competition and I competed against twenty-two other nations. One of the assignments for the competition was to create a chocolate sculpture and bring a unique flavour from our nation. “I thought that this was a great opportunity for me to showcase an Australian wine. I paired up with South Australian wine maker Penfolds and created a sculpture that matched all of my chocolates to their famous wines,” he said. Being a Master Pastry Chef, Deniz's accolades include Australian Patissier of the Year 2016, #1 Chocolatier in Australia and Asia in 2012 and 2013, and in 2017 he appeared as a guest chef on Masterchef Australia as part of a pressure test elimination where contestants had to reproduce his “Passion for Caramel” tart. Deniz is committed to sharing his knowledge and expertise with the next generation of pastry chefs and has served on the industry advisory boards for Holmesglen and William Angliss Institute. “It’s really important to train local students and provide them with more experience. I’ve seen the challenges that the industry has faced with COVID-19.

E ssence

40 | PENINSULA

July 2021

Most international workers have gone back to their countries overseas and our locals don’t have the same expertise. Kylie and I regularly open our kitchen and offer masterclasses and internships to TAFE students in addition to the qualification they’re pursuing so they can broaden their knowledge and learn about how chocolate is made. The students gain more respect for the ingredients and the process of making chocolate,” said Deniz. With every Cuvée chocolate bar that you purchase you’ll receive a suggested wine pairing. Deniz said that matching wine with chocolate is all about finding the right balance and it can be complimentary or contrasting. “My favourite is a 75% dark chocolate with a glass of Australian Shiraz. Another wonderful match is a milk chocolate and a glass of rosé. It depends on the season and the occasion. I have to admit, though, that nothing beats Friday night Netflix with chocolate and wine,” he said with a laugh. A lot of customers have said that what makes Cuvée chocolate special is that the chocolate is made the old school way and it isn’t sweet or bitter. “We get really excited when we see our customers enjoying and appreciating our Cuvée chocolate.”

cuveechocolate.com.au


recipe

WHITE CHOCOLATE & GINGER CRÈME BRÛLÉE Yields approximately 8 brûlée

INGREDIENTS 370g cream 150g egg yolk 70g Cuvée Bianco 30% White Chocolate 5g ground ginger 80g caster sugar

METHOD Start by breaking your Bianco white chocolate bar into small pieces, roughly the size of five cent pieces or smaller and place them into a bowl.

Pour the hot mixture through a fine strainer or sieve over the chocolate bits and leave it to melt for 1-2 minutes before thoroughly combining with a whisk. Fill the brûlée mix into shallow, wide dishes and place them into an oven tray filled about 10mm high with water. Cook in the oven at 110˚C, uncovered for approx. 30minutes (you know whether the brûlée is cooked or not if you shake the dish lightly and there is little to no movement on the surface). Just before serving, sprinkle the brûlée with caster sugar and caramelize using a blowtorch.

Add the cream, egg yolk and ginger into a small bowl and combine with a whisk. Over a hot water bath and whilst constantly stirring, heat this

CHEF'S TIP

mix to 82˚C, but be careful not to overheat as this will curdle

For an extra crunchy top, burn the layer of caster sugar and

your egg yolks and ruin the brûlée.

then sprinkle with sugar again and burn a second time!

July 2021

E ssence | 41

PENINSULA


Must try

Dishes

Open prawn sandwich with curried egg salad. Monkey Business Dromana

Crispy cauliflower fritters served with smoked beetroot hummus and fresh lemon.

1/277 Point Nepean Rd, Dromana

Hickinbotham of Dromana

Ten Minutes by Tractor

Ph 5981 0685

194 Nepean Hwy, Dromana

1333 Mornington Flinders Rd, Main Ridge

monkeybusinessdromana.com.au

Crispy pork belly, char sui, sweet potato mole and szechuan pickles. The Milbri

1183 Point Nepean Rd, Rosebud

Ph 5981 0355

Ph 5989 6455

www.hickinbotham.biz

tenminutesbytractor.com.au

House-made flame grilled classic beef burger, seasonal produce & relishes on a lightly toasted bun, served with a side of chips.

Paccheri tube pasta with crayfish napoli, spanner crab and calamari finished off with a hint of heat from house fermented chilli.

Smart Brothers Brewing

Assaggini

Ph 5982 3901

4/1071 Frankston - Flinders Rd, Somerville

themilbri.com.au

Ph: 0491 763 765 smartbrothersbrewing.com.au

E ssence

42 | PENINSULA

July 2021

Dry aged roasted pigeon, confit turnips, cauliflower gel and pickled cipollini.

1C Albert St, Mornington Ph 5973 5791 assaggini.com.au


HOW TO KEEP YOUR HENS HAPPY IN WINTER!

T

alking Hens is holding a 3-part winter series of presentations on keeping your backyard hens safe and healthy over winter. Each presentation will take place at the Talking Hens farm in Merricks (unless COVID restrictions apply). Many people either own hens or know someone who does. Owning hens not only brings fresh eggs but hens make surprisingly good pets. The most common feedback that staff at Talking Hens receive is how families are surprised at how much they love their new pets. As the seasons change each year, they bring with them different challenges for backyard chicken keepers. In the 3-part winter series - Talking Hens will explain the key issues to overcome in winter and how to enable your backyard flock to thrive in spite of them. On Sunday the 13th June, Talking Hens held their first ever Facebook LIVE Event due to COVID restrictions. Jason covered all of the information in the first part of the 3-part series “Keeping Hens Safe and Warm in Winter”. He talked about how to keep hens safe from predators, how to create a warm, dry and comfortable chicken coop and run for them, reducing cold drafts, improving ventilation and an assessment of the pros and cons of different bedding and nesting options.

The Event can now be viewed on the Talking Hens Facebook page. For notes on the presentation, you can simply email us for a copy of the PDF. The next two presentations are: Part 2 - Managing Behavioural Issues, Sunday 11 July 2021 at 2pm. Understanding the “pecking order” with hens, how to safely introduce new hens to an existing flock and correcting negative behavioural issues. Part 3 - Overcoming Illness Within the Flock! Sunday 15 Aug 2021 at 2pm. What to do when hens are showing signs of poor health, common viruses that may affect your hens and the signs to watch-out for, plus simple steps to keeping your flock in good condition over winter. Visit the Talking Hens Facebook page to book into Part 2 and 3 or watch the video of Part 1. If you have any further questions please call Jason on 0406 691 231.

Looking for backyard hens but unsure where to start?

Talking Hens is a family business that loves backyard chickens! We like them so much that we specialise in supplying only the friendliest, best-laying hens along with the best quality products to keep them happy and healthy. There’s nothing like the friendship, entertainment and nutrition that you receive from our laying hens - a pleasure to be shared!

Visit our Website to learn more and download our FREE, Beginner’s Guide to Backyard Chickens at:

www.TalkingHens.com.au

Open Thursday to Monday 10am till 4pm (Closed Tue & Wed). 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd Merricks. For enquiries 0406 691 231 www.facebook.com/TalkingHens July 2021

E ssence | 43

PENINSULA


Puzzle

Corner

ACROSS 1. Impel 5. Breakfast drink (6,5) 11. Yearly (3,5) 15. Cheek 16. Nautical shelter 17. Foams 19. Strict 21. Plumbing trap pipe (1-4) 23. Gave speech 25. Intimate (feelings) 27. Chatterer 28. Completely consume (3,2) 30. Spewed-out magma 31. Wage 32. Penetrates 33. Duty list 34. Lamb chops 35. Queer 36. Damp & chilly 38. Inlets 40. Drilling platforms 42. For ... & every 44. Temerity 45. French ... soup 46. Lumber 48. Economic bounce-back 49. Famous volcano 50. Eye lustfully 51. Confederacy 52. Against 53. Eons 54. Weaving machine 55. His lordship, his ... 56. Monarch's seat 58. Lush 59. Wine cup 61. Heighten 63. Magnetic resonance imaging (1,1,1) 64. Record label (1,1,1) 65. Michaelmas daisy 67. Hot under the collar 69. Theft 71. Table & ... 73. Neckerchief 74. Carped 76. Afternoon nap 78. Distinguished 80. Decays 82. Donations to charity 83. Become too big for 85. More spasmodic 89. Tiny fish

E ssence

44 | PENINSULA

91. Morphine or heroin 93. Aural organ 94. Quarter of a half 96. Cylindrical 98. Cry 99. Klutz 100. Attempt to equal 102. Salon worker 103. Ungrateful person 104. Piggish 105. Large deer 106. Admit, ... up 107. Hamper (emotions) 108. Map pressure line 110. Ostrich cousin 112. Of race & culture 114. Journalist 117. Anaesthetises 120. Sneeze noise (1-6) 123. Flows away 125. Transaction 127. Confer 128. Garb 131. Blush 133. Brown pigment 134. Fabric insert 135. Caesar or Waldorf 136. Egg-producing chicken 137. White-faced 140. Mite 141. Forensic ID check, ... test (1,1,1) 142. Blackboard stand 145. Snub 147. Acquired in advance (3-6) 148. Dwell 150. Vexes 151. Hence 152. Blade's cutting side 153. Rove 154. Taiwanese city 156. Mineral vein 158. Type of ski lift (1-3) 160. Disruptive weather feature (2,4) 162. Leg joint 163. Unlace 164. Spreading trees 165. Castrate 166. Cult 167. Have (to) 168. Region 170. People who fast 172. Piece (of gossip) 173. Feudal peasant 174. Response

July 2021

177. Soundless 179. Frosted 180. Guru 182. Foolish 183. Film award 185. Travelling stagehand 187. Palm off 188. Not ever 189. Batty 191. Umpire 192. Approximate hour of arrival (1,1,1) 193. Crested parrot 194. Cinderella's ugly kin 195. Bewitches DOWN 1. Smothered 2. Couple 3. Sidekick 4. Panache 5. Covent Garden or La Scala spectacles 6. Ethiopia's Addis ... 7. Manage (3,2) 8. Energy unit 9. Non-reactive 10. Church officials 11. Jaunty 12. Resuming business 13. Amount after tax 14. Quagmire 18. Athletes' outfits 20. To-do (5-2) 22. Curving 24. Accords 26. Alienation 29. Of horoscopes 37. Items for discussion 38. Sanctifying 39. Grabbed 40. Nomadic 41. Suffers in heat 43. Taxi-driver 44. Mum's mum 47. Street protest 57. Female calf 60. Gained 62. Unsuitable 66. Sum 68. Fitness to fly (of plane) 69. ... & now 70. Floor slate 72. Artistically (pleasing)

73. Diddle (5-6) 75. China/Korea continent 77. Aftertaste 79. The ... is just before the dawn (7,4) 81. Also titled (1,1,1) 84. Grievances 85. Jokers 86. Berated 87. Solve (problems) (4,3) 88. Makes elegant 90. Dawdles 92. Eskimo building 95. Long-necked bird 97. Idiot 101. Soldiers 109. Bosom 111. Spoil 113. Dr Jekyll & Mr ... 115. Breadth 116. Scything 118. Goes astray 119. Supplemented, ... out 121. Case-hardened 122. Tramps 124. Wall-smashing device (9,3) 126. Photo blow-ups 129. Baby frogs 130. Legal right of access 131. Mad Russian monk 132. Tottered 138. Endeavour 139. Welsh arts festival 143. Aircraft stunts 144. Pass (of time) 146. Stink 149. Congers 155. Cross 157. Wife of duke 159. Direct course 161. Evoking 165. Digestive fluids, ... juices 169. Postal destination 171. Takes a whiff 172. Sleeps loudly 175. Forgo 176. Religious customs 177. Nasal bone cavity 178. Floodbank 181. 60s frizzy hairstyle 184. Zodiac Cancer symbol 186. Alphabet (1,1,1) 190. The lot


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

15

17

19

20

26

30

21

22

27

28

31

38

33

39

40

51

54

57

59

63

67

69

74

75

85

86

92

88

93

108

100

110

117

123

112

118

129

113

119

130

134

120

131

139

133

148

143

156

157

158

165

160

167

168

171

174

176

177

182

187

191

169

172

175

181

161

164

166

170

153

159

163

144

149

152

155

186

142

147

151

180

126

141

146

122

136

140

173

121

132

135

162

193

111

125

128

150

101

107

124

127

185

106

109

116

154

95

99

105

145

90

103

104

138

79

89

94

102

137

78

82

87

98

66

72

77

81

97

115

71

76

84

65

70

80

91

60

64

68

73

114

55

58

62

43

47

50

53

96

42

46

49

52

41

45

48

83

29

35

44

61

14

24

32

37

56

13

23

34

36

12

16

18

25

11

178

179

183

184

188

189

190

192

194

195

See page 59 for solution July 2021

E ssence | 45

PENINSULA


on

Somerville

Somerville is a township and coastal rural locality in Victoria, Australia, 53 km southeast from Melbourne's central business district, as a part of the urban enclave on Western Port comprising Somerville, Hastings, Bittern, Crib Point, and Tyabb. The official population of Somerville as of the 30th June 2020 is 12,151. The size of Somerville is approximately 38 km². • Originally an orchard town, Somerville has experienced significant population growth over the last twenty years. The town was known during the early 1900s up until WW2 for the fruit which was produced in its orchards. A harvest festival was held once a year and special trains ran from Flinders Street Station to the town during the festival. • The township was once located on Lower Somerville Road, with several original buildings still there today. Somerville Post Office opened on 21 November 1870 and closed in 1893. • The railway came to Somerville in September 1889. The station was a mile or so from Lower Somerville Road and the town centre moved from there to its current site during the 1890s. Somerville Railway Station Post Office opened on 15 August 1890 and was renamed Somerville in 1907. • The Somerville Hotel was built in the early 1900s as well as a Mechanics' Hall which formed part of the Station Street shopping strip. • The Somerville war memorial was unveiled on November 4, 1923 at the intersection of Frankston Flinders Road and Eramosa Road West. With the increasing population and traffic, the memorial was moved from this busy intersection to Clarinda Street in 1966. From November 2014 to April 2015 the memorial was moved from Clarinda Street to the Fruit growers Reserve. The cenotaph was restored with markers surrounding it telling the residents the history of the area. Trees were also planted surrounding the memorial remembering the lost soldiers.

E ssence

46 | PENINSULA

July 2021

• An avenue of honour was originally located on Eramosa Road East where the road was lined with plane trees in 1917. Each tree represented a resident who fought in World War 1 in Somerville. In early 2013 a new avenue of honour with ornamental pear trees was planted along Station Street. • The Somerville Fruitgrowers Reserve once held annual festivals to celebrate the local fruit growers in the area. Following World War 2 the people of the area donated a period cannon to the community reserve. • The Mechanics' Hall is a popular venue for local bands to play and do small school plays. On January 7, 2015 a massive storm ravaged Somerville and neighbouring town Tyabb ripping off the roof of the hall. The roof was later restored.

Coffee Safari Fresh brewed coffee is a must have for weekends away and the Mornington Peninsula is second - to - none with great coffee haunts around the towns. Here are a few to check out when you head down to this beautiful part of the world.

Ducky Brown Café 17 ERAMOSA ROAD WEST

Fabulous coffee and a great selection of hot and cold food, Ducky Brown Café has a relaxed vibe and plenty of tables.

Two to Tango

2/13 ERAMOSA RD EAST Serving up delicious creations from their all-day menu and perfectly poured, silky coffee made from their signature Two Tango & Commonfolk blend.

• A clay quarry is owned and operated by The Bayport Group on 9 Pottery Road Somerville, digging to a depth of 30 metres over 60 acres. This was the original site of Peninsula Pottery which operated from 1901 to 1991 making bricks for some of the historical buildings in Somerville including St. Andrews Anglican Church, and the Somerville Hotel in 1901, but all historical kilns and the chimney were knocked down and removed in 2004.

Miss Moose Tuck Shop

• Inghams has a large factory north of Somerville that employs a large number of the town’s population.

Great atmosphere with indoor and outdoor seating. Enjoy a coffee and dessert or a casual meal.

• The median house price in Somerville is $726,250. • The median rental price is $470 per week.

1/25 GRANT ROAD

A great place to have breakfast and a coffee in a casual, trendy setting.

Vesbar

3/80 STATION STREET


What to do Originally an orchard town, Somerville has experienced significant population growth over the last twenty years. There are plenty of places to eat from kid - friendly venues to the classic pub with a modern feel Somerville Hotel, to international cuisine restaurants all within a few kilometres of each other. Somerville also satisfies with venues to grab a drop. New breweries, distilleries and coffee bean roasters are cropping up all around town. Enjoy horse riding at the Willow Lodge Riding Ranch, check out the dinosaurs at Dinosaur World or set sail to Western Port from Yaringa Boat Harbour. As for shopping, there is plenty to satisfy the shopaholic with two main shopping centres, Somerville Plaza and Centro Somerville, as well as delightful specialty shops with arts and crafts and clothing stores. Photos Yanni

July 2021

E ssence | 47

PENINSULA


on Somerville LOCAL BUSINESSES C77

Speedwell St

3

7

FRA NK

SULA

T RD COOLAR C785

T

Simcock St

GRAN

T RD

D WES

D

OSA R

SR

PENIN

DER

M11

LIN

ERAM

N-F

LINK

STO

1

ERAM Somerville Central

OSA R

D WES

T Ritchies

2 Somerville Plaza

Coles Target

Woolworths

Aldi

July 2021

St

Somerville Mechanics Hall

tion

E ssence

48 | PENINSULA

ERAMOSA RD EAST

1 Somerville Egg Farm 2 Indigo Threads

St

Jones

Edward

Sta

Somerville Recreation Centre

4

5 Somerville Hotel

Rd

Graf Rd

McDonalds

Guelph St

3 Original Spirit Co. 4 Walsh Conveyancing 5 Smart Brothers Brewing


on Somerville

FARM FRESH 'GOOGIES' Somerville Egg Farm is a third generation family-owned and managed farm that has been producing quality eggs on the Mornington Peninsula for 40 years. The Napolitano family, together with their loyal, hardworking staff, are all passionate about the welfare of the hens, the environment and delivering excellent produce from their egg farm straight to your plate. As well as selling free-range and cage eggs wholesale they have a barn door open six days a week. Customers are welcome to come along and see the free-range chickens in their natural surroundings and buy truly farm-fresh eggs with lovely golden yolks.

“We always try to greet our customers with a smile and a warm welcome and often a chat. Our customers are not just people in a revolving sales door. We appreciate that people go out of their way to visit us and our farm” Visit this free-range egg farm to experience premium eggs today. SOMERVILLE EGG FARM A: 220 Eramosa Rd West, Moorooduc Open Monday-Friday 8am-4.30pm, Saturday 8am-12.30pm. P: 5977 5405

Not only are their eggs fresh, they are hormone, chemical and antibiotic free, so you can be assured that you are receiving only the essential vitamins and minerals that eggs provide for your diet. The owners take pride in the fact that many of their customers are familiar faces that have been buying their eggs from the farm shop for years.

BA DOOR RN MOND SALES AY 8AM - TO FRIDAY AND S 4:30PM 8AM - ATURDAYS 12:30P M

Tired of stale tasting supermarket eggs? Our farm is family owned and managed. We have been producing quality eggs for 40 years, supplying many cafes and restaurants and other businesses on the peninsula. Eggs are collected 365 days a year so you can be assured that you are buying the freshest eggs with the best yolk and flavour from our barn door. Come and visit our Free Range hens roaming in their paddocks!

ESH FARM FR E EGGS G N FREE RA OLESALE AT WH ES! PRIC

C SEE T OME AN ROAMHE CHICKD THE PING FREEENS ADDO IN CK!

CHOOK POO BY THE BAG

July 2021

E ssence | 49

PENINSULA


on Somerville

Women’s Fashion Boutique Shop online at www.indigothreads.com.au

Shop 11 49 Eramosa Rd West 0449 541 149 www.facebook.com/ indigothreads

Taking the stress out of buying or selling your home. Professional, experienced and affordable conveyancing services.

Whether you’re upsizing, downsizing or moving into Aged Care, Walsh Conveyancing bring a wealth of experience, guidance and support for you through these times. We’ll be with you every step of the way supporting you through the sales process.

READY TO GET STARTED?

E ssence

50 | PENINSULA

Call us on 5977 5111 or visit www.walshconveyancing.com.au

July 2021


MORNINGTON PENINSULA OWNED AND MADE FOR YOU ENERGY EFFICIENT HIGH PERFORMANCE QUALITY GERMAN DESIGN CONTROL YOUR COMFORT with energy efficient uPVC windows and doors featuring aluplast-technology

YOUR PERFECT CHOICE Factory 1/ 7 Lyall Street, Hastings Phone: 5909 8040 or 0412 221 767 Email: contact@livingdesigndoubleglazing.com.au www.livingdesigndoubleglazing.com.au July 2021

E ssence | 51

PENINSULA


History

Fenton Hall: A Small Building With A Big History By Ilma Hackett - Balnarring & District Historical Society

I

t is a small, unpretentious, weatherboard building standing back from the roadway on the wide corner block of land where Merricks Road meets the Bittern–Dromana Road. Motorists drive past, barely registering its presence. This is Fenton Hall, once the heart of the Merricks North community and, for many who grew up nearby, it still holds its soul. A school needed It began life as a school. In 1937 the Education Department had leased a vacant farmhouse, ‘Pembroke’, where Miss Beatrice Storer was employed to teach the fourteen school-age youngsters who lived in the area. Prior to that, children from the farms and orchards travelled several miles to the schools in Merricks, Red Hill or Balnarring, or they were taught at home. Now Merricks North State School No. 4552 had opened. However the accommodation was a temporary arrangement and the owner of ‘Pembroke’ did not wish to continue the lease. In the winter of 1938, families who lived in Merricks North met with the purpose of resolving the school problem. The public meeting, chaired by local man, David Robb, took place at ‘Pembroke’. A letter had been received from the Education Department offering the sum of 60 pounds, the equivalent of five years rent, towards the building of a new school if the community could raise the remainder. Two councillors and the Shire Secretary attended the meeting and informed the gathering that a site of one

E ssence

52 | PENINSULA

July 2021

and a half acres (0.6 hectares), the former junction of Merricks Road with Tubbarubba and Bittern-Dromana roads, was available. The community pitches in As a result of the meeting a committee of three (David Robb, James Fenton and Fred McIlroy) was formed to raise the necessary money. Work towards finalising the land transfer and planning the building went ahead. At a subsequent meeting, three weeks later, with the bulk of the subscriptions collected, a Committee of Management consisting of seven members was elected and work began in earnest. First the land was cleared of timber by the Council’s sustenance work group and towards the end of July the committee met on site to determine where the building would be positioned. Then began a series of weekly working bees to grub stumps, haul timber and level the ground using equipment pulled by draught horses. When all was ready work started on erecting a wooden building 24 feet by 24 feet (7.3 x 7.3 metres) under the guidance of Jack Burton, a local builder who owned a small orchard over the road. Labour was never in short supply. Local residents turned out in force. While the men did the heavy work, the women kept the billy boiling and provided refreshments. Children scrambled over the mounds of earth and stacks of timber about the site, turning it into an adventure playground. Work continued every Saturday and by 22 October, 1938 all was ready for the official opening, barely three months after the foundations were put in place.


James Fenton M.H.R. James Fenton was enthusiastic about the school from the start. A former parliamentarian, his home was in Merricks North and in 1938 he had been retired for two years. Fenton had entered politics in 1910 when elected to the House of Representatives after winning the seat of Maribyrnong. He went on to hold this seat for the next twenty-four years. While serving under Scullin, he deputised for the Prime Minister when Scullin was overseas. However disagreement over policy during the Great Depression led to Fenton supporting Joseph Lyons when Lyons split from the Labor Party and formed the United Australia Party. After losing his seat in 1934 Fenton became Director of the Commonwealth Oil Refineries. Known as ‘Jim’ to his neighbours Fenton lived with his family at ‘Carinya’, on the corner of Tubbarubba Road and One Chain Road in Merricks North, a property he had owned since 1918. He took a keen and active interest in local affairs and it was through his influence that Merricks North had its own Post Office instead of using the Merricks Post Office at Weston’s store. Merricks North State School is officially opened Fenton had invited the Prime Minister, Joseph Lyons, to open the new school but Lyons was unable to attend. Instead, the Assistant Minister for Commerce, Senator Allan McDonald officiated. Also present were Mr Curtain (MLA), Mr Gartside (MLA), the Hon. James Fenton, Mr Rudd the Shire President, and the Chief Inspector of Primary Schools, Mr Leach. Senator McDonald admitted he had never heard of Merricks North until Mr Lyons had asked him to represent him but he commented that he was “astounded by its beauty and considered it had a very bright future.” (Argus, Monday, 24th October, 1938). It was a gala occasion, a major social event, for the whole community which turned out in force. continued next page...

Above: James Fenton MHR Below: Official Opening, 22 October 1938

July 2021

E ssence | 53

PENINSULA


Ray Murphy was appointed teacher. His pupils ranged from Grades 1 to 8 and they sat in desks of varying size. The teacher had a table and chair at the front of the room. The blackboard was fixed to the back (south) wall of the school-room, next to the open fireplace. It was a back-to-back fireplace with the one in the supper room which was on the south side of the school-room. The supper room measured 12 feet by 24 feet (3.6 x 6.5 m) and was built by Jack Burton. This had been added soon after the school was officially opened as the building was also to serve as a community hall. It was fitting that the hall should carry the name of James Fenton who had been instrumental in its establishment. A working bee constructed a shelter shed (a roofed structure with three walls and an earthen floor) in the grounds for the children to use. The earliest toilets were pans in little wooden shelters tucked away near the edge of the bush. These had to be emptied by the older school boys. A hole was dug and the contents emptied into the hole and buried. In 1941 the Shire was asked to have the Sanitary Contractor call to empty the pans at the hall. Left: The Weekly Times covers the opening of Fenton Hall Below: The hall c. 1939 Right: Merricks North State School - 1942 class

E ssence

54 | PENINSULA

July 2021


Children entered the building by way of the door into the supper room where bags were left before lessons began for the day. Roger Carr recalled the open classroom where “Biggies could help the Littlies and you were always inclined to work one or two years ahead of your year as your interest was taken by another’s work.” Mary Karney (then a pig-tailed Mary Robb) remembered their Young Farmers Club when they planted orchard trees in a plot facing Merricks Road. “Orchardist fathers gave us lessons on upkeep, pruning etc.” The school year always ended with a concert given by the pupils and the highlight at the end of the proceedings was the arrival of Santa Claus to the skirl of bagpipes played by David Robb. Gifts were then distributed and a dance followed. A community centre A small, rather tinny piano had been donated soon after the hall opened and each Friday, when classes ended for the week, the children carried the desks out to the shelter shed. This was in readiness for Saturday when ballroom dancing lessons were given

to the older boys and girls by a husband and wife team. Mr Watts explained and demonstrated the steps while his wife played the music. Old-time dances taught included the Pride of Erin, Parma Waltz and Barn Dance. Not the Fox Trot; it was considered too modern! As a community hall it could be hired for various purposes. Two residents who lived nearby held keys and they arranged bookings. On a Sunday Presbyterian church services were held, with the group paying one shilling for each service. In 1940 electricity came to the area and the hall was connected. World War II and the years following The war years brought changes to the district. During 1941 and 1942, after Japan entered the war, there were a number of troops camped throughout the district and dances were frequently held for their entertainment. The piano and a couple of violins supplied the music and partners were often school girls but there was always continued next page...

July 2021

E ssence | 55

PENINSULA


by planting trees and shrubs while money needed for maintenance work and repairs was raised by holding dances and euchre parties in the hall. Whole families attended the dances. The ladies cleaned the hall in the evening and the floor was scattered with sawdust and kerosene or candle shavings to give it a gloss. Children helped by taking running slides across the floor in their socks. A Younger Set formed in 1944 but numbers fell away. Then three years later, in 1947, Garry Downward and Jim Martin started up the Merricks North Youth Group which met every Tuesday. Later a new group of young people met socially on Friday evenings. Tennis was popular and a club was formed. Two courts were planned on fairly level land behind the hall where the old road had been. One was built but the second didn’t eventuate. Interest in tennis waned and the existing court fell into disrepair. In February 1949 the Merricks North Progress Association formed with Bill Stone as its president. Its meeting place was Fenton Hall. In May the local branch of the Liberal Party also began holding meetings there. That same year a request came to the Hall Committee from the Hastings RSL asking it to refuse use of the hall for any Communist Party meeting. At the end of the decade a fund was started to raise £135 to buy a better piano. This started with a social. On the evening Mrs Watts provided the music, the floor was prepared for dancing and ladies attending were asked to bring a ‘basket supper’. The door fee was two shillings. As well as dancing, card games in the form of progressive euchre were played in the supper room. Picture shows followed by a supper were popular but the fund grew slowly. In 1954 the old piano was sold for six pounds two shillings. The total amount still fell a long way short of the amount needed. Ted Fritsch stepped in and offered to pay for the piano. He was given a cheque for the amount of money sitting in the fund but he never cashed it. The school closes

Above: Mrs Francis: Merricks North’s teacher. 1943 – 1950

an excellent supper. The Committee of Management decided that any function held to raise money for patriotic purposes would be free of charge. The hall became a First Aid post and the centre for the Red Cross Air Raid Precautions Group. The signals, as remembered by Mary Karney, were: Red - alert; Yellow - take precautionary measures; Black - prepare for air raid; White - cancel; Green - all clear. Windows were “blacked out’ in accordance with regulations and some doors were painted black. Working bees were held periodically to beautify the surrounds

E ssence

56 | PENINSULA

July 2021

The school had a succession of teachers. Ellen Harding replaced Mr Murphy. She boarded with the Burton family who lived opposite Fenton Hall. The number of pupils remained small and boys and girls often played together in the school-ground. ‘Cowboys and Injuns’, various ball games, marbles and foot races were popular. Mr Laurie Cooper succeeded Miss Harding as teacher and when he joined the Forces in 1942 Mrs Vera Francis took his place. According to Roger Carr she drove an “old black oblong of a car”, collecting children along her route. Although the school was small it took part in the first combined Peninsula School Athletics Carnival held at Hastings in 1950. As one pupil recalls, “To great excitement, jubilation and euphoria our tunnel ball team, which included the entire school enrolment over third grade, took home the winner’s flag. It was proudly displayed for the rest of the year.” When Mrs Francis left, after eight years at the school and with closure pending the following year, she was given a sincere and emotional farewell from not just the school community. Merricks North State School closed its doors for the final time at the end of the 1950 school year, as did most of the other small schools of the district. From 1951 children were taken by bus to the new consolidated school at Red Hill.


The community’s hub The hall no longer had the guaranteed income from the rental of the premises by the Education Department but throughout the 1950s Fenton Hall remained a hub for the community. It became the local Baby Health Centre in 1951 where mothers could bring their infants to be weighed and checked by a visiting mothercraft nurse and where new mothers could socialise with other mothers. Five years later the Baby Health Centre asked the Committee to upgrade the hall to comply with Health Department regulations. The Flinders Shire Council helped with the cost, matching pound for pound to a limit of £100. Once again local people helped by donating necessary items and volunteering their labour to bring the building up to standard. The hall continued to echo with the voices of children when a pre-school was established. Children not yet of school age came to learn and play with each other in readiness for ‘big’ school. Then in 1952 Fenton Hall became a polling station. Prior to that people registered their vote at the general store at Merricks. On election days for many years the hall became a hive of political activity. During the 1950's it also became home to a lending library for the people of Merricks North. The Flinders Shire Council set up a number of depots across the peninsula where people could borrow books. Periodically the central library at Rosebud sent out a new supply of books to change over the reading stock. The hall was fitted with bookshelves made by Horace Reid. With Fenton Hall on one side of the Bittern–Dromana Road and the post office building on the other, until its closure in1966, that particular corner continued to be a natural meeting place for the people who lived in the neighbourhood. The junction was a stopping place for the school buses where children were picked up in the morning and dropped off at the end of the day and a bus shelter was erected in front of the hall in 1954. A change of direction In 1955 the Progress Association took over the responsibility from the Fenton Hall Committee which remained as a sub-committee of the Association, attending to its maintenance and insurance matters, while the Progress Association pushed for matters that affected the whole community. Some were successful, some not. A public telephone box never materialised, nor did an official rubbish tip for the area but road maintenance and improvements met with some success after constant complaints. An extension to the hall was made to the north side of the building in 1959. Measuring 15 feet by 24 feet (4.5 x 6.5 m) it included a covered entrance. The same year a barbecue fireplace was built in the grounds. A much needed new toilet block was built in 1968 when Garry Downward, now a local councillor, pressed to have the antiquated toilets replaced. These had been condemned by the Department of Public Health. By the 1970's many of the members of the original Progress Association had either left the district or died and they were replaced by new residents whose interest in the community was equally as focused and keen. The new organisation called itself the Merricks/ Merricks North Progress Association and Fenton Hall Committee of Management. It combined the interests and duties of both of the former groups.

Above: Ballet student. 1981

Ballet School The 1970's brought a new activity to the hall which was to last for almost two decades. It again became a school but this time a ballet school. Newcomer to the district, Clare Major, was a graduate of the London College of Dance and Drama. She rented the hall for a dance school. Former pupil Sarah Hale recalls, “Classes were held on Saturday mornings and after school most afternoons of the week... I have many a wonderful memory both outside the hall and in the back kitchen, being told to ‘ssshhh’ before the class actually started.” Clare, “a wonderful teacher”, also prepared her students for the annual British RAD ballet exams and entered them in eisteddfod competitions around Melbourne. End-of- year concerts were a magical highlight for the young dancers. Classes continued until Clare retired in 1988 and moved from the district. continued next page...

July 2021

E ssence | 57

PENINSULA


More recent activities Enthusiasts of varied activities have used the hall as their centre. It has echoed to the rhythm of tap dancing classes and line dancing which enjoyed popularity for a time. It has housed a group with spinning wheels, table tennis players and a band held practices there. Husband and wife, Peter and Nola Coulthurst, who lived nearby, were treasurer and secretary of the committee for many years and bookings for the hall were made through them. Their house was a handy pick-up point for the key. They adopted a caretaker role for the hall for about twenty-five years. The Committee of Management working with Hastings Shire made major updates and improvements to the building while minor problems were often dealt with by someone local. The hall saw many a private party in celebration of a special event as it offered both indoor and outdoor facilities. The Farmers Association and environmental groups made it their headquarters and the local CFA held meetings there. Rental fees were kept low for local groups. For a number of years a barbecue was held on Easter Sunday for local residents – a ‘Back to Merricks North Day’ - when people turned up from around the state to renew old ties. Many had gone to school at the hall. A Gala Day known as a Gathering was introduced in 1993 where residents could come together, enjoy a barbecue lunch, meet new people and reminisce with old friends. It remained a very popular event until just a few years ago. Winds of change The local committee handled all matters relating to the hall until 1994 when the shires of the Peninsula were amalgamated to form the one Mornington Peninsula Shire run initially by state governmentappointed commissioners. Changes were introduced and the local Committee of Management was replaced by contractors. The Below: Merricks North ‘Gathering’ 1993

E ssence

58 | PENINSULA

July 2021

community was no longer responsible for looking after its hall. Gaining access to the hall became more difficult when the key was no longer held locally; there was more ‘red tape’ to negotiate. Use of the hall as a public meeting place gradually fell away. There has been social change too, particularly during this century. People are wealthier and many no longer have a rural background. For many newcomers their Merricks North property is a weekend and holiday retreat. Interests lie elsewhere and with the improvements in transport and communication horizons are broader. The small hall at Merricks North is no longer seen as a neighbourhood centre. Today the hall is unused. Long strands of bark, from the huge gum tree overshadowing the building, accumulate on its roof. Dead leaves choke the gutters and have been blown into holes in the weatherboards at ground level. The windows are dusty. Spiders weave intricate webs in corners. The toilet block is closed off – an ‘out of order’ sign bars admittance. Yet the hall has special meaning to many people associated with Merricks North. A local Friends group has been organised and is working with the Shire to see how the old building can be given new life. The Shire is currently undertaking an extensive survey to identify the hall’s structural problems and its heritage worth is under review. Fenton Hall sits waiting. Its future is still uncertain but not without promise. References: The Story of Fenton Hall by Mary Karney Snippets, the news sheet of Balnarring & District Historical Society; Contemporary newspapers Photographs: From the B.D.H.S. collection For further information contact: savefentonhall@gmail.com


What are the perks of living

at Lifestyle Communities?

Mon - Fri 9.30am - 5pm Saturday 9.30am - 4pm Sunday 11am - 3pm

There is nothing warmer! Possum Merino clothing and accessories in a variety of styles, colours and sizing from XS to XXL. Quality that last for years.

kiwihouseonline.com.au

I

V A

T

O R A N G E

E

S

L

F R O T H S

A

W

U

I

R

I

N N E R

L

A V A

S

S A

C U T

E

L

E

T

D A N K

A

R

G

S

N

G A

E

U P

T U R N

A N T

I

I

S E

N

I

R A

S C A R F

I

R A

L

H O G G

I

I

I

T

I

I

M R

I

H

E

N

H E

I

A

T

Y

L

I

S

T E

O

L

T

D

T I

E

T

I

B

C O C K A

E

F

C

R E

T O O

E S

T

E A R

E

O A

F

U

N

I

K

O W N T

R

R E L

E N G R A O T H N

S

T

F

V T

L

O

R

O

I

A

A

D D

L

E R

A

T

B

I

L

T

E

L

I

N H

I

I

E

L

I

I

N E E

U T

O L

L

N O

P

L M S

N

B

S

E

S

A R E A

R O A M

T

D

I

I

C E D

O S C A R

C

R

I

E N T

E

E R S

T

P P E

R

I

A

N

N S A N E

B E G U

C

N

I

I

O

O

U

E

S

P

C

L

R

O

R

H

K

L

U

T

S

U

P

L

N

E

F

W

O

S

L

L

T

N

A

T

A

I

A

C

I

L

Q

A

A

I

D

E

Q

E

U

N

N

T

S

I

U

W

W

A

O

D

U

N

R

D

E

R

H

N

E

G

L

R

O

N

A

N

L

O

T

I

I

G

T

O

O

D

R

E

C

I

A

O

N

C

N

G

C

D

I

S

P

P

L

S

G

R

I

C

G

R

O

N

D

R

O

E

U

C

Y

P

A

A

B

E

U

I

U

O

O

D

B

O

M

O

M

R

O

E

R

M

T

O

L

N

S

U

A

O

W

D

A

N

T

S

S

M

Q

I

O

R

I

L

O

D

T

D

O

C

I

N

E

M

A

T

O

D

L

D

I

R

B

WALK IN

BILLIARDS ROOM

CROQUET COURT

INDEPENDENT

GYM

TENNIS COURT

SPA

INDOOR POOL

AQUA CLUB

BOWLING GREEN

OUTDOOR POOL

FISHING BOAT

LOW MAINTENANCE

DOG WASH

BUS

CINEMA

ELECTRIC CAR

STUDIO

Eyewear As Individual As You Are

T

I

S N

B

U

O

E A S E

N

H

H

D E

L

E

E

I

E

E

S H O O

A Y E R

E D G E

U

S

E T

R

K

A

C

E

E D

E

E M U

R E S

E D

S

S

I

B

I

N O T

D N A T

N E V E R I

E R

U M B E R

N E E D

E

E P S

T

L

L

I

A S

N

E

F O

B S

T

L

I

N

I

O

B I

E

E

A

A

B A R

I

M

Y

T

A S

N

L

B

T

E A C H

D E A

U

I

A

K A D

H

B

R O T

E S

S

U N T

G

I

G H T H

R E D D E N

S E C T

S

E

I

E D

E

N

A N S W E R

S W A M

R

I

M

E R S

R

O

C H A

T

S

L O D E

K N E E G

I

S

P R E E M P

I

E M

E R

S

P E

G O B

E N T

U

T

N

I

R I

L

E

E A G U E

L M S

S E D A T

L O O M

E M U

S O B A R U

T

L

A

E R K

E

E

L

S O B

G

W O O D

O G L

E I

R

G S

O N

A

A D

N

R O A D

J

I

I

E O R A

T R A N G E

A

R

S

U

T

T

I

I

S U C C U

E R G O

S E R F

I

L

G N O R E A

R

B A Y S

S A

E

T

S

A

V

D

D

T

T

A

R

N S E

I L

E

A

R K S

G E

T U P

N A G G E D

A S H E N T

E A E R S

S

E N D O W T

E R

E N T

E B B S

O

I

L

A R Y

T

N E W S M A N G

B A B B

A G E S

S H

E

A

T

R

O N

A R S

D

C

U B E N D

T N A

O P

R

T U B U

E E

L

O U T G R O W R

L

E

R O T

E

P

H

C E

S

T H R O N E

D

L

P E R A N N U M

I N

E X A C T

F

J O

E

B

P

N

Complete the find a word & receive a FREE local hamper. Call Sheryn on 0409 411 010 to find out more.

7/90 Main Street Mornington (Walk through Mall)

M O T

U

I

L

S

L

E S

Call in Monday to Saturday to enjoy Kay’s renowned expertise and personal service and view the latest fashion and styles in eyewear.

Stocking Paul Taylor Eyeware

MainStreet Eyecare 57 Main Street, Mornington July 2021

Ph: 5975 3235

E ssence | 59

PENINSULA


The all new S-Class sets a new benchmark for luxury and innovation. Enhanced with refined aesthetics, a state-of-the-art digital cockpit and our most advanced safety systems, everything in the all new S-Class is designed to take care of what’s most important: you and those around you.

CARES FOR WHAT MATTERS. Experience the all new S-Class today at Mercedes-Benz Mornington.

The all new S-Class sets a new benchmark for luxury and innovation. Enhanced with mbmornington.com.au refined aesthetics, a state-of-the-art digital cockpit and our most advanced safety systems, everything in the all new S-Class is designed to take care of what’s most important: you and those around you.

Experience the all new S-Class today at Mercedes-Benz Mornington.

TheThe all new S-Class. all new S-Class.

mbmornington.com.au

Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5923 0011 LMCT443

ssence

Mercedes-Benz 60 | PENINSULAE Mornington July 2021 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5923 0011 LMCT443

Profile for Peninsula Essence

Peninsula Essence July 2021  

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded