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MAY 2021

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PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Tokyo Ahoy! • Leader Of The Pack • Material Girls • Focused • Ben & Bennie Paringa Perfect • Muchos Tacos • Beach Escape • Five Talented Sisters


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contents

Leading 8.

Tokyo Ahoy!

For Sorrento locals and brothers, Will and Sam Phillips, representing Australia at the 2021 Tokyo Olympics culminates a lifelong passion for sailing on the Mornington Peninsula.

12. Leader Of The Pack

Reverend Father Geoff McIlroy spends a lot of his time doing God’s work, but when he does get some spare time, he often swaps his priestly vestments for leathers and heads for the wide-open roads of the beautiful Mornington Peninsula.

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Peninsula Seniors Feature

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Arts 18. Material Girls

Mother-daughter design duo Amanda Saunders and Rory Saunders-Shaw are the talented designers behind Quirkie Su, making mindfully-made creations from upcycled materials.

22. Focused

In January one of Luisa Denu's photographs was published in Vogue magazine. The Year 11 student has a clear vision of where she wants to go with her photography and has the initiative to get there.

Dromana Advertsing Feature

26. Ben & Bennie

Bennie, a whimsical cartoon version of himself, and alter-ego of Ben Ross grew into something much larger while on a surfing trip to Mexico.

Eat & Drink 44. Paringa Perfect

Paringa Estate head chef Joel Alderson has built his career working in some of the best kitchens in Australia so he knows what he and his team are bringing to the table is worth coming back for. Proudly published by

Writers: Andrea Louise Thomas, Joe Novella, Andrea Rowe Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Creative: Sam Loverso, Dannielle Espagne Publisher: Melissa McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au

reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

Phone: (03) 5974 9000 Registered address: 63 Watt Road, Mornington 3931 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

58. Focus On Dromana

Historical facts, great coffee places and what to do in one of Victoria's most popular peninsula holiday locations.

Real Estate 67. Beach Escape

Taking a casual stroll right to the spectacular Ocean Beach of Rye is just one of the natural wonders on offer with this luxurious designer escape contemporary build home.

Mary Huntley came to live in the Red Hill-North Merricks area after the death of her husband, John Huntley, in 1887. All five of her daughters grew to be accomplished young women. Cover Image by Yanni

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Focus On

70. Five Talented Sisters

All material is copyright, and may not be

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Peter Fernie, cook and owner of restaurant Tacos Tacos Tacos had his first taste of authentic Mexican food in his late teens. He fell in love with the spice from the chillies and the cooked food paired with fresh salsas and guacamole.

History

facebook/peninsulaessence instagram@peninsulaessence

PEFC Certified This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

48. Muchos Tacos

Heronswood House and Gardens, located in Dromana on the Mornington Peninsula, is home to The Diggers Club and showcases the best flowers and plants for Australian conditions. The gardens change throughout the year and peak in summer with wonderful planting combinations of summer perennials and heirloom vegetables.

May 2021

Every Month 6. Peninsula Styles 47. Recipe 51. Must Try Dishes 56. Crossword


INCLUDES: • Souvenir Photo • 2 x Return Gondola Flight • 2 x Tea/Coffee • High Tea Platter Box • Special Gift for Mum


EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE Julie Yatjitja’s paintings shimmer with exuberant energy as she captures the intensity and power of country and the many underground watercourses of her birthplace of Indulkana in the APY Lands as in this recent painting of the Iwantja Soakage. 1/39 Cook Street, Flinders Ph: 5989 0496 mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

DANCING WITH JUNIPER Dancing With Juniper organic lavender heat packs are made with Australian organic wheat. Originally hand drawn designs featured on locally sewn, products they are inspired by our unique, sunburnt country. Whimsical, fun and eclectic and super cosy for the chiller months ahead. Available at Emu Plains Market and online at dancingwithjuniper.com

Peninsula

Styles

SORRENTO FURNITURE True to its Scandinavian design heritage, Stressless® Sam has a generous and open design with round soft shapes and a curved back and seat that invites you to relax. All comfort functions and motions are motorised, synchronized and individually adjustable. Available at Sorrento Furniture now located at 42 Watt Road, Mornington sorrentofurniture.com.au

PRODUCTS FROM THE PENINSULA WE'RE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

A ROOM WITH A VIEW It doesn't get much sweeter than this blush pink, puff sleeve sweater. Perfect for the chillier weather it's available at Shop 4, 277 Point Nepean Rd, Dromana Ph: 5981 8033 or shop online aroomwithaview.com.au

BAYSIDE SHOES

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Timeless, this classic boot exudes cool-casual style. A winter wardrobe staple, the Racer by Ferracini is a stylish touch on every day looks. 103 Railway Pde, Seaford Ph: 9785 1887 baysideshoewarehouse.com.au


OZ DESIGN FURNITURE MORNINGTON A U S T R A L I A N O W N E D & O P E R AT E D


TOKYO ahoy! By Amy Newman Photos Gary Sissons & Supplied

F

or Sorrento locals and brothers, Will and Sam Phillips, representing Australia at the 2021 Tokyo Olympics culminates a lifelong passion for sailing on the Mornington Peninsula. “We both started sailing on our family couta boat, Muriel, from when we were only a few months old - so we’ve been sailing our whole lives,” says Sam, 29, who, along with Will, 33, works in the local family business, The Wooden Boat Shop. “We then learnt to sail at Sorrento Sailing Couta Boat Club (SSCBC) in their junior sailing program and have sailed at other clubs all over the Peninsula. We are still members at Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron and enjoy sailing just as much today as we did back then.”

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With international and state borders closed for so much of 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the local waters have been a key part of their Olympic training schedule. “We recently finished a training camp at Flinders Yacht Club, where we were using the unique location to access Bass Strait to train for the bigger wave conditions we expect to see in Japan,” explains Sam. “On the Western Port side, the protection of French and Phillip Island offer possibilities for almost any wind direction. On the Port Philip side, the summer sea breeze direction is offshore meaning that sailors get to enjoy flat water. With access to both Port Philip and Western Port bay there are so many options to choose from.” continued next page...


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Rather than going to Europe in 2020, instead we were training up and down the east coast of Australia trying to avoid the lockdowns and border closures

Off the water, they have seen their family business like their sailing, grow and evolve. From a humble garden shed beginning, The Wooden Boat Shop is now a five-factory business that builds and restores boats, and the brothers have received tremendous support from the local community in their Olympic pursuit.

“SSCBC have been great in supporting us with our Olympic campaign. Whether it's contributing to the costs of equipment, providing training facilities, coach boats or rules analysis - their eagerness and enthusiasm to assist our campaign has been a constant.” After qualifying for the Olympic 49er class in February 2020, just before COVID-19 swept the world, their preparation has certainly not been as originally planned. It has, however, provided some benefits. “The postponed Olympics has given us an extra year to prepare. Yes, the goalposts have shifted a year later but it has given us more time to improve and seek advantages over the competitors,” says Will. That said, the change in timing and preparation has not been without its challenges. “The Olympic sailing circuit, along with most of the competitive Olympic teams, is based in Europe so while we have had the advantage of staying fit, healthy and COVIDfree, they have been able to train and compete with each other,” says Sam. “Rather than going to Europe in 2020, instead we were training up and down the east coast of Australia trying to avoid the lockdowns and border closures.

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The last time we competed in a big event was February 2020 so by the time we get on the start line for the first race in Japan we will be stoked to be there.”

Reflecting on their sailing journey, some of the best memories for Sam and Will are sailing couta boats on the Mornington Peninsula. “The couta boats were designed to catch barracouta in the open waters of Bass Strait, explains Sam. “As a result, they display tremendous seafaring capabilities, exceptional speed, a large cockpit and spectacular, classic lines. Apart from their significant heritage to the local coastline they're also a great social boat to sail.” Today, their involvement continues through the Gill Next Gen Couta Boat race held every January at Sorrento. “It’s a lot of fun racing with young energetic people and also helps to continue the tradition of the historic couta boat,” says Will. Despite sailing all over the world, the boys agree that the Mornington Peninsula is one of the best places to sail, and, when they have free time, they also love exploring some of the best that the Mornington Peninsula has to offer including kite boarding in the flat-water surrounding Mud Island, cycling up Arthur’s Seat, swimming at Sorrento, and exploring the Quarantine National Park and local wineries. Hopefully, those future experiences will soon be as Olympic medallists.

The Tokyo Olympic Games start on Friday 23rd July, 2021. See more at Olympics.com.au


Custom made lounge furniture NEW SHOWROOM AND WORKSHOP NOW OPEN IN MORNINGTON

New Showroom and Workshop 42 Watt Rd Mornington 3931 (03) 5975 0344 info@sorrentofurniture.com.au

Interior Design Kate Walker Design @katewalker_design Photography Armellehabib @armellehabib Styling Greenhouse Interiors @greenhouseinteriors/ May 2021

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LEADER OF THE pack

By Joe Novella Photos Yanni

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here’s a lot more to the Reverend Father Geoff McIlroy than a life of prayer and preaching. Sure, as the Parish Priest at Saint Macartan’s in Mornington, Father Geoff spends a lot of his time doing God’s work, but when he does get some spare time, he often swaps his priestly vestments for leathers and heads for the wide-open roads of the beautiful Mornington Peninsula on his Harley Davidson Softail Heritage Classic. I asked Father Geoff what his parishioners think when they see him in his riding gear. “First impression, I suppose, is I look a little scary, like a rebel maybe, not as a Priest should look like. But then they see it’s me with the big fluorescent cross on my back, and they know I’m riding for pleasure on my day off.” Father Geoff’s life journey into the priesthood, and eventually to Saint Macartan’s in December 2019, has been one full of twists and turns. “I came out from England in 1968 aged five with my father, mother and sister and we lived in Sydney for four years before moving to Keysborough, Melbourne. It was a new estate with no church. So my family and others became the foundation members of the new Keysborough Parish of the Resurrection.” continued next page...

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Celebrate her

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Becoming part of the community in Keysborough was an important part of Father Geoff’s spiritual journey. The young Geoff McIlroy witnessed firsthand the power of belonging and feeling welcomed. “We came to a country where we had no relatives and we became part of a beautiful new family in the Church.” The young Geoff attended Keysborough Tech. before moving to St Bede’s, Mentone, where his faith could be nurtured and his academic aptitude for English and the Sciences could be further developed. And from there he graduated to a highly successful career in business with 25 years as an Industrial Chemist, Quality Assurance Manager and International Systems Auditor.

First impression, I suppose, is I look a little scary, like a rebel maybe, not as a Priest should look like

As a young man, Geoff had it all: a loving partner, great jobs, money and travel experiences all over the world including Italy, America and England. So what made him leave a lifestyle that would be the envy of many to become a priest at the ripe old age of 46? “Something was missing in my life,” said Father Geoff. “Even with all the trappings there was an emptiness, a missing link, and it was my love of God that was missing, I’d lost it. I asked myself, 'How can I love someone I don’t know?' Well, I can’t, so I set out to find out, to find the face of God.”

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Father Geoff’s spiritual search for reconnection with God led him into community work: retirement villages, setting up a halfway house and Christian counselling service, even into leading a mission overseas. “I saw the face of God in all these places. And the last place I saw him was in my heart, where he revealed my life’s purpose. It happened when I was teaching a person the power of prayer to help her deal with a loss, and it was then I realised that this is what I was meant to do. I was meant to connect people with God.” So how did his love of motorbikes come along, I wondered? It seems so removed from the life of a Priest. “Riding a motorbike,” said Father Geoff, “is quite a solitary thing; you alone in your helmet experiencing the road and environmental conditions, feeling connected to nature all around you. You can smell it, taste it, sense it, and most of all really thoroughly appreciate it better. It is a pleasure to feel the torque of an engine kick in when you take a tight line up a curving mountain road, feeling the temperature change when the weather conditions change, and feel the grip of the road and the speed of the bike - all within the limits of the law of course, and within the limits of the road conditions and my ability. Also meeting other motorcyclists; having the bike opens up dialogue and helps begin friendships.”


Father Geoff’s words gave me pause to think about my own moments of peace and connection. Now, I must admit, I have my own struggles in connecting with God, but I cannot deny we all have times and ways to connect to an energy greater than ourselves. For me, it’s when I swim in the waters of our beautiful bay; for others it may be as the walk or jog, work in their gardens or meditate. For Father Geoff, it just so happens to be on the back of a “hog”. Father Geoff’s love of his bike has led him to start a club. “All through my motorcycle life I have been part of motorcycle clubs, as they are places where those who love riding and forming friendships meet and go riding. So wherever I go, I try to find a club to ride with. I couldn’t find one on the Peninsula that would fit around my duties at Saint Macartan’s, so I decided to start my own, which I have called Peninsula Motorcycle Club.” And Father Geoff’s favourite rides? “I used to lead a ride over Mt Hotham each year, staying a few days at Harrietville and touring around before heading over to Omeo, Swifts Creek, Bruthen then back to Melbourne. I’ve also gone over to Adelaide, overnight at Mt Gambier. Both terrific rides. But right now, I like the challenge of the hairpin, corkscrew turns, up and down Arthur’s Seat and around the Peninsula.”

Father Geoff is enjoying his time as part of the Mornington community. “I love the windy, crisp, clean air with a hint of saltiness,” he said. “I love Main Street cafe’s and restaurants, but mostly it’s the people. They seem more relaxed than other places I’ve lived, or maybe it’s just me?” During his time at Saint Macartan’s, Father Geoff hopes to reconnect people with God and the Church, grow the parish and make the Church more relevant in the everyday lives of the locals. And most of all, he’d love to get more people to join him on one of his rides around our beautiful Mornington Peninsula.

The Peninsula Motorcycle Club meets the last Monday of the month at 10am in front of St Macartan’s Community House (10 Drake Street). For further information or to join, contact Fr. Geoff McIlroy at mornington@cam.org.au

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PORSCHE MAY SERVICE SPECIAL Call for further details on your model. Calvin Pusterla

Welcoming EuroCars Road & Track to the Mornington Peninsula! ECR&T is the recently opened, state of art service and repair facility of Calvin Pusterla and Lee Bertuch. ECR&T offer a full-service automotive business, with the latest in European diagnostic technology, and expertise. The immaculately clean work environment makes this the right choice and is second to none on the Peninsula, appealing particularly the Porsche enthusiasts and discerning car owners who care about their vehicles and want to trust them to trained specialists. Calvin has had over 40 years experience in the industry with an extensive background in Porsche motorcars, Audi, BMW and Mercedes. His personal love for the Porsche Marque has seen him become the recognised expert with a wealth of knowledge he is known for today. Having been a founding partner and owner of the very successful Jocaro Motors in Braeside, Calvin now brings his many years of expertise to the Mornington Peninsula. “Having lived down here for the last 25 years I thought it was about time we introduce a real option for the Porsche and Euro car owner on the Peninsula, somewhere to have their pride and joy looked after and in their own backyard” Calvin said. With an extensive career in the automotive industry, servicing and repairing road cars coupled with running

State of the Art Automotive Service and Repair Centre 40 + years experience

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race cars in Australia and overseas, Calvin has now teamed up with Lee Bertuch. Lee, having started his apprenticeship as an automotive mechanic in a rural Toyota dealership at the age of 17 and loving all things with an engine soon found his love for V8 supercar racing. Fast forward six years he began working as a race car mechanic for Larry Perkins, and this was the beginning of a real career for Lee. Moving around different teams in Melbourne Lee’s experience working as Crew Chief for a team called Tasman Motorsport saw his passion ignited, with car 51 as his main charge, running no other than Mark Skaife and Greg Murphy. His experience also introduced the opportunity to work in Carrera Cup, affording him his knowledge of Porsche cars today. With the combined wealth of knowledge that Calvin and Lee offer, having worked at the cutting edge of technology in the car racing industry, EuroCars offers their clients the very best in automotive service. 4 Elite Way, Mornington Mobile: 0414 582 104- Calvin Mobile: 0430 435 520- Lee Email: calvin@calvinsprestige.com.au Instagram: eurocars911

4 Elite Way, Mornington | 0414 582 104 eurocars-road-track.business.site Open Monday - Friday 8am -5.30pm


FACES OF LOCAL BUSINESS

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e have loved seeing the faces of local businesses celebrated in the Mornington Peninsula Shire’s Support Local campaign. The eighteen-month campaign continues to show us the real people behind our hardworking business community and connect them with customers. As part of a wider raft of actions the Shire has taken to support and promote businesses during Covid-19, the Support Local Business Directory has grown to include over 840 local businesses. It is now a fantastic resource to find local products and services across a multitude of industries. The updated directory demonstrates the Shire’s long-term commitment to sustain local organisations and businesses and build community-to-business connections.

It congratulates efforts to source produce grown and purchased from other small local businesses to help strengthen the local economy. It commends the local collaborations seen between businesses innovating in their products and services. We all have a role to play in the recovery of this beautiful region. Our local support can make a real difference. Discover more about the businesses on our Peninsula at mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal

Through the launch of the Support Local Spotlight, the Shire strives to shine the light on innovation and excellence demonstrated by local business owners. The blog recognises best practice for other businesses to learn from and for the community to appreciate. Local business and industry also play a key role in supporting the local supply chain, building local networks, and being involved in the community. The Shire applauds businesses employing local people who live on the Peninsula.

Kidz Shed, Hastings

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Arts

MATERIAL

girls

By Andrea Rowe Photos Yanni

M

other-daughter design duo Amanda Saunders and Rory Saunders-Shaw value vintage and savour sustainable fashion. The two are the talented designers behind Quirkie Su, makers of mindfully-made creations from upcycled materials. Their quirky and considered pieces range from Australian keepsake soft toys to re-purposed clothing created with fashionable focus in their St Andrews Beach studio. After a year of revisiting where we spend our money, and focussing on buying local, the Quirkie Su designers have found themselves a popular choice for the conscious shopper. They’re happily putting upcycling and slow fashion front-and-centre, remodelling pre-loved fabrics into clothes and toys, and made-toorder commissions. “We’re saving so much from landfill which is so important, and we love thinking through how we can repurpose and salvage material for new styles each time. We are inspired when making new pieces, and encouraging people to rethink how they can wear handmade clothing,” says Amanda. Tackling fashion’s ethical and environmental issues, and reducing landfill has been a key focus for Quirkie Su’s small batch productions for the past seven years. Rory and Amanda offer a refreshing take on fast fashion’s negative impacts on people and the planet, constantly rethinking how and where they source their materials to stitch into distinctive creations. Quirkie Su is a nod to the duo’s names, “My middle name is Sue,” says Amanda “and Rory is Rory-Sioux. Besides, we make things that are a little odd and unconventional” continued next page...

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Dr Peter A. Scott is a specialist orthodontist offering orthodontic care for children, teens and adults alike in both the Mornington Peninsula and inner Melbourne areas. He is also a consultant orthodontist at the Royal Childrens Hospital.

Specialist Orthodontist Creating Beautiful Smiles On The Peninsula For 30 Years Expertise In Child And Adult Orthodontics Early Assessment Of Dental Development And Facial Growth Ideal Age Of Initial Assessment 7-9 Years Early Intervention Where Appropriate For Best Outcome No Referral Necessary

13 Beach St Frankston

Ph: 9783 4511

www.drpeterscottorthodontist.com.au www.facebook.com/drpeterscottorthodontist May 2021

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Qurkie Su started at my kitchen table making animals for pleasure and market stalls

Spend time in their cosy studio and it’s apparent much of what they create is intuitive and adaptive. Jackets styled from classic Laconia and Okaparinga vintage blankets, and cardigans created from crocheted rugs hang beside baskets brimming with cute fabric animals and cosy woollen knits and slouchy jumpers.

At the heart of their sustainable design and production is their clever utilising of offcuts and textile waste to inspire unique designs. And while they excel at producing unique pieces, the pair have skilfully adapted to their own life experiences The hands of 57-year-old Amanda have seen her master a career as a masseuse, and then return to her love of making, which tapped into art/design at Frankston Tech art and design background, and an Associate Diploma in Ceramics in the late 1980's. “Qurkie Sue started at my kitchen table making animals for pleasure and market stalls.” Rory, 24, who struggled with anxiety throughout high school, adapted to home schooling and found her true calling designing and making upcycled creation and clothing. ‘She is just a natural,” says Amanda. “Distance Education worked for Rory and she had an aim to work creatively in an environment where she felt comfortable. It was an obvious choice that she keeps working with me as I expanded to sell at Finders Keepers markets. At 17 she was suddenly learning commerce and business management, writing market applications,

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and researching sustainable methods.”

“Anxiety is a part of me, and I’ve learnt how to cope. Working in a home-based business means I can make decisions based on how I feel, and I can control some of that environment around me,” says Rory. “I’ve always liked working out things for myself. Mum showed me how to sew and we were working on collaborations from the beginning. “We do so much together, like scouring for vintage fabrics, creating designs, figuring out how to make a product and production finishing” Rory adds. Their individual skills complement each other “Mum doesn’t sew zippers - that’s my department - and I can’t crochet at all,” laughs Rory. “I like to make, make, make,” says Amanda “and Rory is fantastic with stockists’ communications, photography and marketing. We make a good team.” They both share the thrill of sourcing material; “It’s like a treasure hunt,” confesses Amanda. As is “researching overseas trends for the next seasons colours, and styles”, enthuses Rory. Vintage scouts, favourite op. shops and Instagram vintage hunters offer support for fabric acquisitions. Reflecting ethical and sustainable fashion while displaying self-expression excites them. “We’re open to genderless, nonbinary clothing and markets


don’t often cater for men’s clothing options. It’s a worthy challenge creating for people exploring who they are through clothing.” “Artists like Harry Styles wears genderless clothing. We’re making clothes just as attractive to the guy who wears what he wants, not what society tells him he should be wearing,” Amanda reinforces. For Rory, she’s motivated by thrill of the oneoff designs. “There’s no guarantee we’ll ever find another fabric in the same colour, or design. I like that connection. Buyers do too and they’re seeking us out for bespoke creations. It’s their own wearable art.” Their quirky keepsakes and soft toys menagerie are just as artistic.

“We fill them with 100% recycled PET stuffing to ensure they’re environmentally friendly, and we love adapting fabric to create personalities for each animal,” Amanda shares. The vintage animals sell well at select boutique stores, and Quirkie Su is well-regarded in the maker industry, with Finders Keepers Marketplace’s showcasing them in the Top 5 Designers Curated Clothing for winter.

We fill them with 100% recycled PET stuffing to ensure they’re environmentally friendly

From dogs, bunnies, cats, foxes and kangaroos, Quirkie Su’s studio overflows with colourful critters made from upcycled vintage blankets, felts, and fabrics, sporting bespoke embellishments and features. “Our dog breeds keep growing, from schnauzers to pugs. After the Black Saturday fires our koalas and kangaroos were sent across the world. Along with our dogs, cats, and foxes they’ve been given as baby and birthday gifts, and even décor statement pieces.”

While they downed tools temporarily last year for noble causes, volunteering to sew lifesaving wildlife pouches in the aftermath of Black Saturday, and over 300 stylish masks during lockdowns, they’re happy to be back doing what they love most: heads bent, hands busy stitching the fabrics of the past with the expression of contemporary styles, ethically and quirkily creating together.

W: quirkiesu.squarespace.com Insta: instagram.com/quirkiesu FB: facebook.com/QuirkieSu

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focused By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni & Luisa Denu

S

eventeen-year-old Luisa Denu lights up when talking photography. She’s got a lot to be excited about: in January one of her photographs was published in Vogue magazine! The Year 11 student has a clear vision of where she wants to go with her photography and has the initiative to get there. She finds a lot of her inspiration right here on the Mornington Peninsula. Whether surfing, swimming, walking the Port Phillip Bay beaches or charging through the waves on surf life-saving patrol at Portsea back beach, Luisa loves the sea and all it represents. Her family moved from Guenzburg, Germany, to Frankston when she was five, so a lot of her childhood memories were made on Peninsula beaches. It’s not surprising, then, that she characterises her work as ‘beachy’ and adventurous. Sustainability is a strong focus. She hopes that by creating appealing images of the environment, people will be more inclined to want to protect it. “My photography is about creating an admiration of the environment and preserving beauty,” she says. Luisa wants to capture the rugged beauty of the Mornington Peninsula for generations to come. While in primary school, Luisa received a kids' underwater camera for her birthday. It sparked her interest in photography. She really got serious five years ago when her parents gave her a digital single lens reflex camera for Christmas. Luisa read the entire owner’s manual that night. Learning to use all of the manual settings opened up a whole new world. Once she grasped the technical aspects, the rest came naturally to her. continued next page...

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One of the things Luisa loves about photography is that it connects people to their memories. She loves to capture a moment for her own memory and also for sharing with others. Luisa has spent a lot of time travelling, bushwalking and camping and has enjoyed documenting her various adventures.

Being published in Vogue was a huge boost for Luisa. It gave her confidence in her abilities and the sense that her work had real value

For Luisa, the best thing about photography is the human connection. Though naturally shy, photographing people brings her out of her shell. Now people are her favourite subject. She likes to put them in a natural environment to create an awareness of how the human presence changes the whole picture - civilization vs. the wilderness, so to speak. In her work, Luisa is always looking for something thought provoking and original that connects to the viewer. Even in a landscape, she tries to compose the shot in a way that tells a unique story. For her, photography is all about narrative and feeling. While getting a great photo frequently involves a lot of planning, Luisa likes to keep her work free flowing. “It’s often the unplanned moments that make the best photos,” she says. Sometimes she shoots in burst mode. Coming back to look at those shots later often reveals that the unintended ones turned out to be the best.

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If she had to choose, Luisa prefers to shoot on film believing that more thinking goes into shooting on film because a roll of film has a limited number of shots and she has to consider each composition carefully. There is no delete option. She particularly likes film for landscapes.

Luisa likes working in colour because she equates it with happiness, it adds a modern touch and colour has a powerful impact on the viewer. That said, she likes black and white too. It’s her favourite way to convey a particular emotion. Right now, the most important thing to Luisa is getting an audience for her work. That’s why she uploaded her images to Unsplash, a free library of stock images. It doesn’t generate any income, but it creates exposure and it gives her photo credit. That is how her image of the breaking surf at Noosa National Park was discovered by Vogue magazine. Being published in Vogue was a huge boost for Luisa. It gave her confidence in her abilities and the sense that her work had real value. Now she feels she can truly identify as a photographer. That’s a good thing because it’s her sole focus. When she finishes high school, she plans to travel around Australia taking photos, and after that, the world.


luisadenu.com

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BEN & bennie

By Keith Platt Photos Yanni & Supplied

B

en Ross may have failed to impress with the results of first online freelance graphic artist job that he won, but it did give him an idea. The idea, a whimsical cartoon version of himself, an alter-ego he called Bennie, grew into something much larger while Ross went on a surfing trip to Mexico. On returning to the Mornington Peninsula, the former carpenter who had also embarked on a few other business ventures (including a surf brand company with his brother), decided on a graphics-led future. With brush in hand, he (and Bennie) have been making waves of their own, including a sellout exhibition in Tokyo they couldn’t attend because of the coronavirus restrictions.

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Here Ben Ross speaks with Keith Platt shortly after completing a more than four metre high mural at a Dromana rum distillery: continued next page... May 2021


Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 430 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u May 2021

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What's the mural based on and were you given a brief or told to just do a mural?

Most of the images I’ve seen of yours are cartoon style, when and how did this develop for you?

The rum mural was based on the process of rum and how it’s made. I had no clue how it was made; I just like the stuff. So, I had a sit down meeting with James McPherson the owner of Jimmy Rum, and we walked through how it was made. The brief was pretty non-existent, but it did follow something I’d previously done on the process of beer, so when I was talking to James I thought, let's do the process of rum, and they loved it.

I started drawing [professionally] when my brother and I started a surf brand in Sydney. I was in America and South America mid2019 for six months visiting my partner and having a surf trip in between. I was sitting in a hostel in San Diego before the surf trip to Mexico and my bank account was looking very grim, so I decided to jump on a website for people who want design work done. They will list the job and designers bid of the job. I don’t recommend it at all, but that's for another story. I won this job for a yoga company in London, so I just drew myself as a caricature doing some downward dog and crossing the leg type poses. She hated it and didn't pay me, but from there Bennie was born and I never looked back. My vision really came alive. The soft palettes you see on my work today are all Mexican inspired: soft pastels, white beaches, blue and pink skies. Mexico was a true inspiration.

Did you have any formal art training? Nah, not at all. I've drawn from a very young age and continued on with that with the computer and PR side of the art. I learn everything off Adobe tutorials, YouTube tutorials, books and Google. I love to read, so whatever information out there on the problem I'm having, I'll read up until I'm perfect in that department. I have been meaning to enroll in a [tertiary] course but I'm just so busy I can't find the time to even look at the courses. With the art, honestly, I draw and paint every day just trying to reach those 10,000 hours.

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Have you done caricatures? I base a lot of my caricatures on real people. I’ve drawn a few famous people - Steph Gilmore, and Shia Leubuff - and I've had a few clients hit me up to draw them as caricatures. But mainly it’s whatever pops into my head and I feel would be a perfect caricature for the job I'm doing. I'm now doing a job for a beer company and they want Aussie icons, so the bowl cut, the mullet and whatnot. I Googled 1980s photos and drew a lot of them. As I said earlier, I draw every day and there are a lot of new caricatures tucked away in my notebooks, so I have a few up the sleeve waiting for the perfect job. Do you get inspiration from “real” people for your themes? Not really. I honestly get all my inspiration from my head. I'll be listening to a song and I'll think that would be an unbelievable picture to draw so I'll jot it down in a notebook and draw when I get home. My mind is always moving, always thinking of what looks cool. It’s essential for anyone that wants to create to carry a notebook around to write down all their thoughts.

Has anyone ever said, “Hey, that’s me”? Yes, all the time. Whenever I'm painting, I’ll get people saying, “That's me”. I want people to put themselves in my art and get away from the harsh realities of this world, so I love it when people come up and say, "Hey, that one could be me”. It means what I'm doing is right in my eyes, and that also means that person is seeing themselves in my art. I see that you had a sold-out exhibition in Tokyo, what type of work was on the show? Yeah, that was so exciting; shame I couldn't get there due to COVID. But, yes, my first ever international art show was in the heart of Tokyo, and everything sold. It was unbelievable. I couldn't be there, but I did video chat to them on the opening night on a massive projector. It was an experience and a half. The art on show was an exhibition called "I'll bring the vibes”. As Japan was going into COVID lockdown and with all the uncertainty in the world, I just wanted to put some happy smiles on the faces of Japan. My 15 painted canvases were mainly all my caricatures, drinking and having a good time. I'll be having another exhibition there this year and, hopefully, be able to go and share a few too many with the fans. continued next page...

May 2021

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Freehand or digital? I love digital, but for my digital drawings I use an app called ProCreate. It's a digital program, but is a freehand platform, so I draw freehand on digital if that makes sense. But to answer your question, I'm a digital lover. The vision in my head just comes out way clearer. I do love painting and drawing as I find it unreal to see my caricatures come to life. My dream would be to create an action figure of my caricatures. But I love the digital as you can get any colour to pop.

Can you identify with any of them stylewise or sentiment-wise? Sure, everyone that does pop art and the surf culture all has the same sort of touch, the soft pastels and playful moods, but I try to get as much of my own personality on each piece. I try not to look at other artists’ stuff otherwise my stuff will look like theirs. If you want to make it big you really need your own look. I believe I've done that now, no one that I know of is doing the art I'm doing. Is there a network of surf-inspired artists on the peninsula?

There has been a long line of surf-inspired cartoon characters, have you any particular favourite artists? My favourite artists would be Keith Haring, Jim Phillips and Steve Harrington. Those three have my heart with art and I absolutely love what they come out with. Keith being very political, Jim brings the surf and skate culture to life and Steve, well there’s not much I can say, but I bloody love everything he does. We do have some really good artists here in Australia too, with Jake Ross, my brother, Kantaro, the Japanese goddess, Irvine and one of my favourites, Lee Mac, the music guru, and who can forget Lucas Beaufort. Even the Mornington Peninsula has some greats with Josh Brown and Jack Miers killing it at the moment, and the prince of art himself, Cam Stynes. I love the art scene, and I love what everyone is producing; it keeps me on my toes trying to keep up with these guys.

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I'm not too sure, I try to keep to myself as much as I can. So, if I'm not surfing, I’ll be in the studio creating. I know some of the other artists are surfers. Their art may be surf inspired, but I don't know. I know that when I’m out surfing it’s to get away from the world, and that's what I try to implement in all my pieces. So that people who don't surf know the feeling of what it's like to just be lost when the next wave is coming. Those other artists might do this too as I know they’re all surfers and we all chase the same thing. Who do you regard as being within your orbit? All those guys I have mentioned are in their own orbit. I try to keep work talk out of a lot of my conversations, but there is always that appreciation of the work they have done and the work I have done. But mainly when I do see these boys, it’s just about surf and what the swell has been doing. I'll talk anyone's ear off if they will let me, happy to discuss surf or the world, really just happy for the conversation (laughs).


The Bays Healthcare Group Comprehensive Care Across Generations Growing the Community

It is an honour that life begins for so many Mornington Peninsula babies at The Bays Maternity Unit. Our unit is amongst the finest in the country, with superior facilities and care from a team that feels like family.

Planning for the Future

Caring for the Community

The Bays Hospital Mornington offers a comprehensive range of acute medical, surgical and intensive care services, with on-site radiology, pathology and infusion services and specialist consulting suites.

Connecting the Community

New Developments

The Bays is committed to investing in our community through buildings, equipment, our people and services. This includes our recently redeveloped state-of-the-art Dialysis Unit and Aged Care home in Hastings.

Your Support As a not for profit communityowned organisation, with members rather than shareholders, The Bays has been part of Mornington Peninsula life for over 90 years. We rely on the generosity of our local community. A donation to The Bays helps make a positive impact on countless lives by supporting health care projects that benefit people of all ages, from tiny babies to the elderly.

As the needs of our community grow, so too does The Bays. Main Street Mornington, will soon see a brand new three-storey building housing our Comprehensive Cancer Centre. Treatment for all stages of the cancer journey will be available close to home.

The Bays is extremely fortunate to have the help and dedication of our wonderful volunteer team. We also run a vibrant community engagement program, featuring regular healthfocused educational events and other local outreach projects.

The Bays Healthcare Group Trusted by Generations for over 90 years Vale Street, Mornington www.thebays.com.au

To become a Member of The Bays, or to make a donation, please contact our Fundraising and Community Engagement Manager Rebecca Hasler on 03 5970 5339 or visit www.thebays.com.au/support-us.


Peninsula Seniors Feature

BEST YEARS OF YOUR life By Patricia Howard

T

oo often Australians approach their retirement years with dread. They fear they won’t have enough money to live on and, worse still, that somehow, they will run out of money when they most need it. In writing 'The No-Regrets Guide to Retirement: how to live well, invest wisely and make your money last', I want all Australians to know they can have the retirement of their dreams and live a happy, wonderful life after they stop work. I also wanted to help as many Australians as possible avoid some of the more obvious pitfalls that can lead to financial heartbreaks and the sort of regrets that can last the rest of their lives. Hopefully some simple tips can stave off the more obvious disasters.

TIP 1 DON’T GROW OLD AND GREY. GO HARLEQUIN! Don’t live your retirement the way your parents did or according to some out-dated rule book. Most importantly, don’t skimp on the here-and-now, so you can leave a nest egg for your children. Retirement is your big opportunity. Make the most of every single day

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TIP 2 YOUR ‘HALF A MILLION’ RETIREMENT NEST EGG Every Australian is eligible for the age pension. While it is means tested, this is the equivalent of having $500,000 in retirement savings. More, its secure, indexed for inflation and you will never lose it – it’s your long-lost retirement nest egg. There’s too much talk in the financial planning industry that you need a million dollars to retire. Don’t give up on your financial situation. There are still lots of strategies to help you make the most of your financial position and taking advantage of the age pension is one of them.

TIP 3 MAKE GOOD CHOICES Just as a healthy diet focuses on good food choices, so you should choose good investment options. Think ‘high yielding dividends’ spiced up by ‘franking credits’ and served with a dish of ‘capital growth‘ on the side. Retirement is a time in your life to make good decisions about your health, about staying fit and thinking long term. That’s the case for your finances as well. Make healthy financial decisions.


Peninsula Seniors Feature

TEN KEY STEPS TO RETIREMENT TIP 4 AND GIVE UP THE (FINANCIAL) SMOKES! A key downside of the financial industry focusing so much attention on people needing a million dollars to retire is that it makes people anxious and this in turn prompts many to take risks with their money. Your precious retirement savings are irreplaceable. Don’t put your money into anything you don’t understand and remember retirement is all about generating as much income as you can as safely as possible with some capital growth.

TIP 5 LIVE LIKE A MILLIONAIRE Learn to live off investments just like millionaires do. As John Travolta once said, “I learnt very early how millionaires live. They never spend their capital, just the income it generates, and they always get good advice”. Make sure you know exactly how much money your investments are generating and adjust your spending each year to stay within those limits. That’s the key to making sure you never run out of money.

TIP 6 ‘SLIDE’ INTO RETIREMENT These days few people just stop working at age 65. Find a new mojo and slide your way into retirement. Find a side hustle, volunteer or turn a hobby into a business - you just need to find your groove. If you can monetarize these activities or find a way of making some additional income from them, it will take some of the financial pressure off you in retirement and help make your money last that much longer.

Be wary of romantic involvements and the scams that can come with them; everything from sending money to on-line romantic encounters to backing your partner in a new business deal. Make sure you do your homework and look upon any money you give someone as a gift and not a loan.

TIP 9 BUILD YOUR “ESCAPE HATCH”. Make sure you have a strategy outlining what you will do if all goes wrong. Again, remember, you will always qualify for the age pension and you can’t lose it, its indexed for inflation and it will last as long as you do.

TIP 10 MOST IMPORTANTLY ENJOY YOUR RETIREMENT Make good decisions to maximise your income in retirement and then get on with enjoying life. Do not make the mistake of spending all day, every day counting your pennies. There are more important things to do in life than that. Rosebud local, Patricia Howard, author of 'The No-Regrets Guide to Retirement: how to live well, invest wisely and make your money last' (Wiley), is a licenced Australian financial adviser. She has a Commerce degree from the University of Melbourne, holds her own Australian Financial Services Licence and recently passed the FASEA Financial Adviser exam. Find out more at www.patriciahoward.com.au

TIP 7 FAMILIES – LOVE ‘EM AND LEAVE ‘EM While families can be a great source of happiness as you grow older, they can be a massive financial burden. Never speak to your family or loved ones about your financial situation except in the most general terms and never allow your savings to become part of regular conversations. This only encourages others to think you will always have a few dollars to spare to help them out. That may or may not be the case, but it should be your decision. It should not be your family pushing you to give them cash.

TIP 8 SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED POVERTY It’s surprising how often love lives and financial affairs become intertwined. If you are living alone, step up and make sure you take control of your financial situation and make sound decisions about what you do with your money. May 2021

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Peninsula Seniors Feature

MORE THAN JUST A VILLAGE Alan Day was 18 years old when he started serving in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in the bombing of Darwin, and says he’s very proud to continue supporting those affected by it. The 99 year old is President of the Darwin Defenders Association (Melbourne Chapter), and plans to be President for as long as he can. “It’s a great honour (to be President) because I was leading the team to protect Darwin from the bombing.”

quality aged care and retirement living services to Australians for more than 50 years. The Mornington is an established vibrant community and also delivers home care packages within the region. Alan said he has ‘everything I need’ at The Mornington. “It’s a beautiful place and I feel really comfortable here. I feel like I can always ask for help, and that’s really important to me, because at the same time I still feel independent.” 150 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington. P: 5970 5500

Alan was a Medical Orderly and played an important role in coordinating care and feeding assistance to armed forces and Australian citizens. He has accumulated eight honours and decorations in his lifetime, and said the warm reception he received at The Mornington Retirement Village was very lovely. “The staff and residents here are very kind. They all know that I am a returned serviceman, and are very thankful for what I’ve done for Australia and give me lots of credit for that,” Alan said. In 2019, The Mornington became part of Southern Cross Care, a not-for-profit organisation that has been providing

Mum was so independent. Now with a little help, she can stay that way.

e bl !* li a 00 a 0 av 30, ow 2 N m$ o fr

Mum was the independent one in our family, but we could see she was struggling at home. She wasn’t ready for an aged care home, but needed a little help. Luckily, Shearwater Serviced Apartments at The Mornington offers Mum the support she needs. The wonderful services have helped mum to stay independent, including delicious meals, apartment and linen cleaning, plus much more. She loves the privacy of her one-bedroom apartment, but also the amazing Clubhouse. Mum’s never been better! For a private tour of Shearwater Serviced Apartments at The Mornington, call the team on 1800 852 772. 150 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington themornington.com.au

®

*Price correct at time of printing. | Southern Cross Care (SA, NT & VIC) Inc.

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Peninsula Seniors Feature

JOINT PAIN OR INJURY?

Get back to the life you love

Pain, whether acute or chronic is often frustrating and even debilitating. It can hinder your performance or stop you from doing things you enjoy. Beleura Private Hospital offers diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation for ongoing joint pain or injury. We specialise in advanced orthopaedic services including arthritis management, complex hip and knee surgery, joint reconstruction, replacement and revision.

Local joint pain and injury solutions

Scan the code to learn more about our orthopaedic services 925 Nepean Hwy, Mornington, VIC 3931 Ph: 03 5976 0888

To enquire call 03 5976 0888

MANHATTAN IN MORNINGTON House red or white wine, rose sparkling or tea & coffee MAIN

With state-of-the-art technology and options for minimally invasive robotic surgery, plus on-site physiotherapy and rehabilitation; we provide a comprehensive service that supports you to get you back to a full life. Ask your GP or physiotherapist about a referral today.

beleuraprivate.com.au

Your choice of:

We are fortunate to have a team of highly respected orthopaedic surgeons who are recognised for their commitment to delivering quality care for the communities of the Mornington Peninsula. Feel confident in trusted and caring hands.

$35

LUNCH SPECIAL

Monday Thursday & Friday 12pm-3.30pm Bookings essential Ph 5925 6199

Manhattan Chicken Salad Chicken tenderloins on a bed of mixed salad leaves, spanish onion, cherry tomatoes, cucumber, persian feta Beer Battered Fish & Chips Fish and chips with chef’s side salad & tartar sauce Risotto Con Zucca Roasted butternut pumpkin with gorgonzola, spinach and spring onions topped with pine nuts & parmesan DESSERT Miniature Lemon Tart Served with fresh cream & strawberries Mini Cannoli

A Little Italy in Mornington.

The Manhattan specialises in traditional and modern Italian cuisine encompassing everything mediterranean from fresh seafood, pizzas, pasta to specialty entrées, soups and desserts. Dinner Sun to Thurs 5pm -8.30pm Fri & Sat 5pm - 9pm Shop SENIORS 2, 55 Barkly Street Mornington SPECIAL Brunch or Lunch Tuesday - Thursday P: 5925 6199 A Little Italy in Mornington. 2 courses $25 includes a glass of wine, tea or coffee manhattaninmornington.com.au Bookings Essential - Please mention this offer Manhattan specialises in traditional and 5976 4867 modern Italian (03) cuisine encompassing everything

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Mediterranean from2021 fresh seafood, pizzas and May Shop 2, 55 Barkly Street (corner Barrett Lane) pastas to specialty entrées, soups and desserts.

Mornington,VIC 3931


Peninsula Seniors Feature

SEASIDE FUNERALS - RESPECT AND DIGNITY Family operated Seaside Funerals is owned by a mother and son team who live on the Mornington Peninsula. With several years of experience working in all aspects of the industry, Mikyle Caruso is the mortuary technician of Seaside Funerals and Toni Caruso has numerous years of experience as a mortuary assistant. Toni and Mikyle are supported by caring and compassionate staff with a combined experience of over 20 years. Seaside Funerals aim is to provide a professional, empathetic and supportive service, priding themselves in supporting the family during a difficult time. They offer a female only funeral service if requested and service all cultural backgrounds. Their 24-hour service with a fully equipped transfer vehicle ensures careful consideration regarding bringing your loved one into their care. Other vehicles include an arrangement car and fully serviced hearse.

have the opportunity to assist in the dressing of their loved one upon request. The Funeral can be arranged in the funeral home with the opportunity to view a large coffin/casket showroom or in the comfort of your family home and the on-site chapel can be used for a viewing or funeral. Servicing the Mornington Peninsula, metropolitan Melbourne and all of Victoria with a range of packages available, Seaside Funerals will help make your final goodbye loving and memorable at an affordable price. A: 62/1140 Nepean Hwy, Mornington P: 0429 460 895 W: seasidefunerals.com.au

The funeral home houses a care facility in which your loved one awaits their final farewell dedicating time to assisting you in arranging your loved ones farewell with respect and dignity. During this time, your loved one is prepared to the families wishes by the Seaside Funeral staff. Families also

Seaside Funerals is family-owned and operated by Mornington Peninsula locals. We offer a range of affordable packages, including a female-only funeral service on request, and catering for all cultural backgrounds. Our caring and compassionate staff service Metropolitan Melbourne and all of Victoria.

0429 460 805

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62/1140 Nepean Hwy, Mornington

I

seasidefunerals.com.au


Peninsula Seniors Feature

CLEAR EARS Blocked ears can be frustrating and painful. Our team of qualified nurses at Clear Ears Frankston use effective microsuction technology to clear wax and debris from your ear canals. This microsuction technique is the same ear cleaning method used by ENT specialists, GPs and Audiologists. It's safe, gentle and dry.

the ear canal or eardrum which can lead to pain, infection and sometimes loss of hearing. This is when Clear Ears can help. Our team at Clear Ears are all qualified nurses who have been trained in the use of microsuction and curettage techniques to clean your ears gently and safely.

Not enough earwax can lead to itchy ears. Too much can build up and cause blockage leading to problems with hearing, tinnitus, dizziness and earache. This is more common in people who wear hearing aids or use earbuds or ear plugs regularly. About 20% of the population simply produce too much earwax.

Your treating nurse will discuss and assess your ear health, clean your ears and provide education on looking after your ears and managing your ear wax.

It's tempting to use a cotton bud, paper clip or hair pin to try and remove wax from your ears, but please STOP! Why? The problem is when you use cotton buds or other things to try and remove wax it disrupts the natural cleaning mechanism of the ear. Often you will end up pushing your earwax deeper in towards the more sensitive structures and create a bigger problem. You also run the risk of damaging

The procedure is conducted in line with all relevant Australian Standards and with the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). New location now open 13 Hastings Road, Frankston No referral is required. For more information or to book an appointment visit: www.clearears.com.au or Call: 1300 327 929

Are your ears blocked? P R O F E S S I O N A L E A RWA X R E M OVA L A gentle and safe microsuction procedure, conducted by qualified nurses. Blocked ears can be frustrating and painful. Our team of qualified nurses use effective microsuction technology to clear wax and debris from your ear canals. This microsuction technique is the same ear cleaning method used by ENT specialists, GPs and Audiologists. It's safe, gentle and dry.

For more information or to book your appointment visit at www.clearears.com.au or Call 1300 327 929

New Location Now Open 13 Hastings Rd, Frankston No referral required | E: info@clearears.com.au

F R A N K STO N I K E W I M O O R A B B I N I A R M A D A L E May 2021

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Peninsula Seniors Feature

IN THESE EXTRAORDINARY TIMES GREENWAYS IS AN EXTRAORDINARY VILLAGE In these uncertain times, there’s no need to feel alone. Now more than ever, it is a great time to join our community at Greenways Retirement Village. Residents at Greenways have always felt their village was unique: a beautiful, landscaped oasis in the heart of Seaford, a thriving, social, welcoming and supportive community with a real sense of security and first class facilities. The village offers affordable living options and low ongoing maintenance charge for peace of mind with incredible staff to support their every need. Further, it has private owners with a genuine and active interest in exceeding resident expectations and has done so for over 40 years. With the recent challenging events, Greenways residents now know their village is unique and extraordinary. At Greenways, our residents continue to enjoy the benefits of living in a vibrant and happy retirement community among friends. They feel connected, safe, secure, supported and independent. But don’t take it from us. See what our happy residents have to say! “You made us safe in ways we would not have thought of,” says Anne Glassborow, who recently moved to Greenways. Brian Casey, president of the Greenways Residents’ Committee, agrees: “A mere thank you is totally insufficient to portray our gratitude to all the staff here at Greenways. Your happy, selfless, dedicated and professional support for residents is second to none.” Merle, a resident for over

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8 years, sums up her feelings: “How glad am I that I moved to Greenways!”. And the feedback from Ian, a resident since 2011, and his family, is greatly appreciated: “You are heroes. All of you … Thank you”. It’s no surprise that Greenways received 100% satisfaction from residents in its previous resident survey. We’re confident that feeling has been reinforced during the current challenges. And we’ll do everything we can to ensure Greenways’ incredible community spirit and unique culture thrives well and truly beyond. We invite you to arrange a private village tour by appointment to meet our fabulous staff and residents, and view our homes. Alternatively, with current restrictions, you may prefer to receive a comprehensive information pack by mail and we can answer any questions you may have over the phone. Please call Sandra (on (03) 9786 8679 or 0433 883 228) at any time to arrange. We’ll do whatever suits you. 1 bedroom unit: Prices from $339,500 2 bedroom unit: Prices from $405,000 3 bedroom unit: Prices from $550,000 Apartment: Prices from $273,000 Availability is limited. We look forward to welcoming you to Greenways. Greenways Village 330 Frankston-Dandenong Road, Seaford Call (03) 9786 8679 or visit www.greenwaysvillage.com.au


Peninsula Seniors Feature

RATE YOUR HEARING AT NEPEAN HEARING Four million Australians have hearing loss. Nepean Hearing is offering free hearing tests and rating your hearing for your age (for the over 40’s). The number of Australians who are hearing impaired is increasing because of the ageing population - we are living longer excessive noise - in the workplace and high levels of music. Hearing loss is often described as the ‘invisible disability. People often wait for 5-10 years before they seek help. Hearing loss may also be a contributing factor in the speed of onset of dementia. The degree of loss is also correlated to the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. It is important to know about your hearing.

Take advantage of the free hearing test offered by Nepean Hearing to ensure your hearing is at its optimum. Nepean Hearing is an independently owned clinic and the audiologists are University of Melbourne trained. Main office: 13 Hastings Road, Frankston (across the road from Frankston Hospital) P: 9783 7520 171 Camms Road, Cranbourne P: 5966 1117 Hastings Community Health 185 High Street Hastings P: 97837520

Many people ignore the signs of hearing loss, which include; turning the TV or stereo up so loud that others complain, frequently needing to ask others to repeat themselves, and not being able to hear properly on the telephone. Constant ringing is also another warning sign of hearing loss. As technology advances, many people with hearing loss benefit from hearing aids. These innovations have made a positive difference in the way they can communicate and enjoy their lives.

FreeWhat?... hearing Say tests to Seniors

Personalised Service, Personalised Products

during Seniors Week

Did you know that many audiologists are not independent, and rely on commissions from only one supplier? At Nepean Hearing, we are proud to be able to offer the latestSeniors technical innovations from the During Week 15% industry, regardless of the manufacturer.

discount on our hearing aids We offer serviceretirees. and personalised forpersonalised self funded products. Call us today and book your free hearing assessment and make sure you’re getting the right device.

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www.nepeanhearing.com.au HASTINGS

Ph: 9783 7520

www.nepeanhearing.com.au “Hear to help”

12365829-CG39-17

13 Hastings Rd, FRANKSTON 13 Hastings Rd,Health,185 FRANKSTON Hastings Community High St, HASTINGS 171 Camms Rd, CRANBOURNE Hastings Community Health,185 High St,


Peninsula Seniors Feature

$20 OFF *

THE FOOTWEAR SPECIALIST Whether we are called seniors, elders or just mature aged we face the same problems as we age with reduced stamina, bone density, muscle strength and energy levels. Bayside shoes carry an extensive range of orthotic friendly and supportive footwear as part of their “foot solutions” model to assist in making a difference to your health.

Built with comfort top of mind, Rockport footwear features a number of sports inspired details. Rockport has been keeping customers walking in comfort since 1971. Call in and feel the comfort Rockport offers.

*Excludes specials or already discounted items. Offer expires 31/5/21

THE ‘LARGEST’ SHOE STORE ON THE PENINSULA!

BAYS I D E

SHOES

BAYSIDESHOES.COM.AU | 9785 1887 | 103 RAILWAY PARADE, SEAFORD

Whatever our fitness level or dietary beliefs, one area that we can manage and protect is our feet. The wear and tear of time affects the skeletal structure of our body affecting our feet, knees, hips and back that can create pain. The benefit of correctly fitted and supportive shoes with good orthotic support can significantly reduce foot, knee, hip and back pain and improve your quality of life. So come and see our highly experienced and trained staff who will help you with all your special footwear needs. The store has disability and free parking with a wheel chair ramp at the store entrance. A: 103 Railway Parade, Seaford 10am to 5pm Mon to Fri and 10am to 3.30pm Sat. P: 9785 1887 W: baysideshoewarehouse.com.au

HASTINGS SENIORS INFORMATION

Together again at last! HASTINGS U3A

Ÿ New premises Ÿ New timetable Ÿ New courses Ÿ Low fees

Welcome Seniors to our friendly club with over 45 years experience. Join our many activities – Bingo, Billiards, Craft, Carpet Bowls, Cards, Art, Darts and many more 1.00pm -3.30pm weekly. Enjoy our newly renovated facilities, so warm and welcoming with low cost membership. Hastings Seniors Citizens 55 Plus 16 Herring Street, Hastings Phone: 59791286

These are exciting times! Now that the Covid restrictions have been eased, we can get together again. We have lined-up for you an adventurous choice of new courses, and we’re bringing back many of the most popular pre-Covid subjects as well. MEMBERSHIP ENQUIRIES WELCOME Come and visit us, and have a look at our courses there’s sure to be something of interest to you.

HASTINGS UNIVERSITY OF THE THIRD AGE

New location: Hastings Seniors Learning Hub

Corner Salmon & Herring Streets, Hastings. Phone 5979 8585 Office hours: Mondays & Tuesdays 10am - 4pm, Thursdays 1pm - 4pm By “University of the Third Age” we mean people sharing knowledge, skills and activities of interest. There are no exams or certificates, just locals aged 45+ getting together, learning something new, enjoying activities they can share, and building a strong local fellowship.

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BRAND NEW L A K E S I D E A PA RT M E N T S C O M P L E T I O N E A R LY 2 0 2 1 S E L L

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Artist Impression - Kitchen/ Living

There’s only 16 of these luxury Apartments located in the heart of the village. Sizes ranging from 105m2 to 148m2. • Spacious kitchen with island bench and European appliances including integrated fridge and freezer

Artist Impression of South West Elevation

• All apartments feature en-suite and second bathroom together with full laundry • Full width balconies with views over the verdant village • Adjoining the Hub which includes restaurant, cinema, hairdresser, library and shop

Contact us today for more information on these brand new Apartments. 03 5986 4455 335 Eastbourne Road, Capel Sound VIC 3940

WWW.VILLAGEGLEN.COM.AU


This is what we call care and security.

Village Glen, the Mornington Peninsula’s leading provider of retirement living, is a place where you can always feel safe and secure. Surround yourself with a community of friends and neighbours, as well as a team of staff, including qualified nurses who are on call 24 hours a day. Village Glen offers 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom villas, 1 bedroom apartments plus the new 2 bedroom Lakeside Apartments with secure undercover parking. There is a size and a budget to suit everyone – plus various contract types. 335 Eastbourne Road, Capel Sound VIC 3940 03 5986 4455 WWW.VILLAGEGLEN.COM.AU

May 2021

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Eat & Drink

PARINGA perfection

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By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni & Supplied

J

oel Alderson, head chef at Paringa Estate’s fine dining restaurant exudes a quiet confidence. He has built his career working in some of the best kitchens in Australia so he knows what he and his team are bringing to the table is worth coming back for. He’s happy to be at the helm in a relaxed setting surrounded by spectacular beauty. Being in the kitchen wasn’t where Joel originally saw himself. He went to university in his native Tasmania,to become a teacher, but realised it wasn’t for him. He feels his personality is better suited working in a kitchen. He loves being part of a team. From childhood, Joel had always been interested in cooking so the transition to study commercial cookery was an easy one. He did the first half of his coursework at Drysdale TAFE in Hobart and then moved to Sydney’s Ultimo TAFE to finish his studies. It gave him the opportunity to gain valuable work experience in a big city. From the beginning, Joel was very ambitious. He only wanted to work in the best kitchens with the best chefs. He started his apprenticeship at Restaurant Balzac in Sydney’s Randwick under owner and executive chef Matthew Kemp, helping to prepare nine-course degustation menus among other things. Switching gears, he moved to Canberra to work at Water’s Edge, another high level best of the best team environment. He spent two years there, which he feels is the perfect tenure. It gives enough time to gain wisdom from a chef, but not so much as to become too much like that mentor chef. continued next page...

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Tiny Dunkeld in Northern Victoria was his next destination to work as sous chef at The Royal Mail Hotel with chef Dan Hunter. Hunter’s philosophy was eating natural and let the ingredients speak for themselves. The Royal Mail was voted best regional restaurant consecutively.

At Paringa, Joel characterises his cooking as ‘refined bistro’. Designing the menu gives a chance for his personality to shine through. Presentation is very important to him. The food needs to capture the imagination and take diners on a journey from the wording on the menu to discovering the flavours on the plate.

Next stop was Attica in Melbourne, one of the world’s top 100 restaurants. He worked as senior chef de partie under owner/ head chef Ben Shewry with a team of chefs cooking truly innovative food.

He likes to reference the Peninsula environment by sourcing from local producers. For instance, he gets his veggies from Mary Loucas in Main Ridge who grows organic herbs and vegetables. All ingredients are sourced locally or nearby in Victoria.

His first role as head chef was at The Brix in Fitzroy where he had the opportunity to build the restaurant from the ground up. He stayed on for a year before another great opportunity came along. Melbourne’s iconic Windsor Hotel was undergoing redevelopment. Joel was hired as a consultant, but he ended up as full time executive chef managing 30 chefs, learning the whole business of running a restaurant. “Success is based on guests coming through the door and leaving happy,” he says. He managed that at The Windsor for five years.

Success is based on guests coming through the door and leaving happy

Joel moved to the Mornington Peninsula for a rare opportunity to work as head chef at Pt. Leo Estate under culinary director Phil Wood at the very beginning of its development. He left that role to take up an executive chef position at Stellar at the Continental Hotel in Sorrento. When it was time for a change, Joel saw the role open up at Paringa. He wanted to be more hands-on; to create his own small close knit team and work in a small family dining room. Paringa was the perfect fit. There he knows everyone from the vineyards to the kitchen.

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Joel likes to keep the flavours on his menu light, to focus on textures, herbs and layering of flavours. “I like to marry flavours that are comfortable together. I like to focus on simple, fresh sustenance,”he says. Comfort is top of the order. His aim is to have a user-friendly dining room where people are comfortable and want to return time and again.

When the restaurant was closed during lockdowns, Joel moved from the kitchen to the vineyards to work on vineyard maintenance. He loved being outdoors, seeing how the grapes were cared for, witnessing vintage harvest and seeing how Paringa wine was made. In fact, if he could do something completely different, he’d be a winemaker. He feels wine is an important complement to dining. Come to Paringa for a holistic dining experience featuring some of the very best food and wine on the Peninsula. It won’t disappoint.

paringaestate.com.au


recipe FROZEN MT ZERO OLIVE OIL, LOCAL FIG, CULTURED GOAT MILK AND PISTACHIO INGREDIENTS

METHOD

Olive oil parfait

1. Semi whip to soft peaks the thickened cream and refrigerate.

Makes 1x 20cm x 5cm loaf tin 400g thickened cream 1 whole egg 6 yolks 125g caster sugar 400g olive oil – something light/ fruity in flavour works best Cultured goat milk

2. Combine whole egg, yolks, sugar and warm over a Bain Marie of simmering water whilst whisking until the sugar is dissolved. 3. Once dissolved and yolks have started to thicken, transfer to a stand mixer with a whisk attachment. Whisk on high until yolks are light pale in colour and doubled in volume. 4. Slowly add the cold olive oil in a steady stream until all is emulsified.

110g thickened cream 100g caster sugar

5. Gently combine the yolk mix and the semi whipped cream folding softly.

1 vanilla bean 3 sheets titanium strength gelatine 250g goat milk yoghurt

6. Set in a tin or mould lined with cling wrap so that it can easily be removed. 7. Place in freezer until frozen, at least 3 hours but best overnight if possible.

200g goat milk 400g thickened cream – semi-whipped 100g pistachio nuts 50g candied olives Chocolate mint leaves to garnish Few drops of olive oil to garnish

8. Bloom the gelatine in enough water to cover with the addition of 2 ice blocks. 9. Warm the cream, sugar and the scraped vanilla bean over a low heat until its at roughly body temperature.

10. Once gelatine has softened squeeze out all water and add to the cream mixture. Set aside at room temperature until required. 11. Combine the yoghurt and goat milk then add the gelatine mix. 12. Add the semi whipped cream to the yoghurt and gelatine small amounts at a time, folding gently until combined. 13. Let set in the fridge for at least 2 hours prior to using. 14. Remove the olive oil mould from the freezer onto a cutting board and unwrap. 15. Using a sharp knife that has been warmed slightly in warm water cut 2cm slices. 16. Place olive oil parfait on plates, arrange sliced figs over the top. 17. Pipe cultured goat milk over the top and sprinkle with pistachio nuts, candied olives and a few drops of olive oil. 18. Finally add some small leaves of chocolate mint to garnish.

44 Paringa Rd, Red Hill South I P: 5989 2669 I paringaestate.com.au May 2021

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May April2021 May 2021 2021


MUCHOS tacos A NEW SPICE ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA By Natasya Rallios Photos Yanni

Y

ou know you are having a good taco when you can smell the tortilla. It’s soft and authentic and does not have a thousand products in it. Our tacos with the tortillas we use are made of one hundred percent corn, water and salt,” said Peter Fernie, owner of restaurant Tacos Tacos Tacos in Mornington. The cook and father of three had his first taste of authentic Mexican food in his late teens. He fell in love with the spice from the chillies and the cooked food paired with fresh salsas and guacamole. He learnt more about Mexican food after travelling to the United States and experiencing the mouth-watering taco offerings on a Taco Tour with a great friend who lives in LA (yes, taco tours do exist!).

After years of working in plumbing and sales, Peter took a year off to cook and spend time with his family. He moved to Mornington four years ago and dreamed of opening a food business with his wife and family. “I have always enjoyed cooking for people and hosting dinner parties. I never thought of a career as a cook, but my family and friends always compliment me on my fantastic cooking. I was ready for a change and I wanted to try and make a living from this,” he said.

I was really surprised at the number of different tacos on offer from different regions of Mexico

“I was really surprised at the number of different tacos on offer from different regions of Mexico. It was so different to what I had experienced in Australia and this inspired me to research Mexican food further and deepen my knowledge of the cuisine,” said Peter. Peter spent his childhood growing up in Melbourne and on the Sunshine Coast. His family were great cooks, and he was always exposed to delicious food as a child. He loved trying new cuisines and would always put his own spin on recipes. “My cooking was inspired by my Mum and her side of the family. My Mum’s family is English, and Dad’s is Scottish. I have memories of Mum cooking out of the Women’s Weekly cookbook. She loved great food and there was always a homecooked meal on our dinner table,” he said.

His wife Claire was very supportive and encouraged him to follow his passion. She gained a new appreciation of Mexican food after travelling to Los Angeles. “My wife visited the same local spots that I did in LA. Over a few frozen margaritas she hatched a plan on a napkin with her friend and came home and told me that “we have

to do this”. “With shop rents being so high, we decided to start with local markets and then expanded into catering. Our niche in the market was our gluten-free Mexican recipes. We had a pop-up marquee in a number of suburbs including Mornington, Red Hill, Yarra Glen, Portsea and Sorrento. We then catered for birthdays and special occasions with our taco party and salsa bar theme.” But when the pandemic hit the markets stopped, and Peter and Claire launched their own delivery service to keep their business viable. continued next page...

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“We posted to all of the local groups on social media and the next thing we know we’re doing local deliveries during the lockdown. It was great that we were so busy, but opening my own cantina was still at the back of my mind,” he said. It was the passing of Peter’s mother last year that inspired him to take a leap of faith and not wait any longer. “When Mum passed away it was now or never. I was approaching sixty years old, and I knew that if I left it any longer, I was never going to do it. The shop came up for rent and we negotiated a lease on the property. I know that it’s what Mum would have loved to see,” he said. Tacos Tacos Tacos opened at the end of November last year and the local community have already asked if there will be a second shop opening. The family-run restaurant has an indoor and outdoor dining area and serves up to 30 people and also offers takeaway and delivery. It has attracted lots of families and locals that love great food. “I’m really happy with the feedback that I get from my food. A lot of locals have commented on how fresh it is, with many grabbing a burrito for the road. My wife and kids have given away 1500 take away menus.

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We originally thought that it would be a takeaway shop but the longer we’ve been open we’ve had to make room for tables as people want to dine in,” he said. On his menu, you’ll find dishes including a range of tacos, loaded nachos, burritos, quesadillas and tostadas. In time, locals will be able to enjoy Mexican style beers and margaritas with their meals. With Cinco De Mayo coming up on Wednesday, 5 May Peter and Claire have plans to create a set menu and arrange for a Mexican mariachi to play music and celebrate Mexican food and culture. Peter is happy and appreciative of the fantastic support that he has received from the local community. “It’s nice to be able to fulfill this dream with my family and I know Mum would be proud.”

A: 96 Wilsons Rd, Mornington P: 0490 103 612 W: tacos.melbourne


Must try

Dishes

Beef short rib, slow cooked and served with spiced cherry and barbados rum jus.

Kingfish with buttermilk and horseradish.

JimmyRum Distillery

33 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South

6 Brasser Ave, Dromana

Ph 5989 8660

Ph 5987 3338

montalto.com.au

Montalto Restaurant

Squid ink linguine with prawn mince, vermouth, tarragon, chilli and garlic. Monkey Business Dromana 1/277 Point Nepean Rd, Dromana Ph 5981 0685 monkeybusinessdromana.com.au

jimmyrum.com.au

Orecchiette pasta with seasonal greens of broccolini, peas and asparagus, tossed with chilli, garlic, brown butter, lemon and topped with pine nuts and goat’s feta.⁣⁣

Crispy buttermilk chicken burger. Tender marinated chicken thigh, crunchy slaw, American cheese on a floured bap with chipotle mayo.

Grilled halloumi with caper and raisin dressing.

Hickinbotham of Dromana

montalto.com.au

Flinders Hotel

194 Nepean Hwy, Dromana

Cnr. Cook &, Wood St, Flinders

Ph 5981 0355

Ph 5989 0201

hickinbotham.biz

Montalto Piazza

33 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South Ph 5989 8412

flindershotel.com.au

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COMING TO MP LETTERBOXES SOON

SEA + DO • W H AT

'S ON • F L AV O

URS • S TAY

Your gu id the Mor e to Peninsulnington a

Our natural environment inspires an abundance of experiences influenced by our beautiful coastal landscape and the rolling hills of the hinterland. FOUND is a celebration of exploring and rediscovering your backyard.

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visitmorningtonpeninsula.org


Experience your backyard visitmorningtonpeninsula.org

FOLLOW US

@morningtonpeninsula

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@officialmorningtonpeninsula May 2021

PENINSULA

MORE IDEAS?


TOURING TAKES YOU YOUR FURTHER

S

it back, relax and enjoy the exclusive experience of journeying around the Mornington Peninsula on a distinguished tour. Between coast and country, there is an abundance of guided tours on offer, taking you into the heart of the region’s wineries, breweries, and those little hidden gems just waiting to be discovered. Whether partaking with friends or family, these adventures have been specifically designed to promote outstanding destinations of the region, all whilst introducing exemplary flavours along the way. With countless opportunities to meet local producers and go behind-the-scenes of various establishments, the exploratory tours

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along the Mornington Peninsula are a must-do for all who seek wonder, discovery as well as new ways to enjoy impressive taste sensations. Our expert guides will make sure you have the most memorable and comfortable time possible as they go above and beyond to organise and conduct these special experiences. So, what are you waiting for? Plan your next occasion with one of the region’s cherished tour groups, allowing for a myriad of exceptional and unforgettable moments with those around you.

visitmorningtonpeninsula.org


TALKING HENS WITH THE GIRLS!

T

alking Hens has grown in recent years bringing with it many changes and the expansion of our team. Our Merricks based business sells the ever popular Hy-Line Brown laying hens to families wanting to keep friendly backyard pets. It all started back in 2012 when they started a free-range egg business in Keysborough on the outskirts of Melbourne. We sold our eggs at farmers markets and to local customers. As we grew we started selling our Hy-Line Brown hens along with my father’s special chicken feed mix. The Hy-Line Brown is one of the most popular egg laying hens but it was the feedback from customers that confirmed for us that they were ideal for urban backyards. Not only are the hens fantastic layers but are also very good with children and other pets. Talking Hens has been blessed with having wonderful customers and have recently added two amazing new staff, Leonie and Tanya. They are both very engaging and enthusiastic about backyard hens and keeping customers expertly informed on their care. Both Leonie and Tanya bring skills from different industries and make it an entertaining and fun place for us all to work. This is what they have to say about working at Talking Hens: Leonie “It's a pleasure working at Talking Hens and sharing Giuliana’s and Jason's method for fuss free, cost effective hen ownership”.

Tanya “From concrete to chickens, never in a million years would l have thought that I would go from a tradie lady to a chicken lady! It's very rewarding hearing the stories and seeing the smiles from the customers after we have guided them through their chicken journey”.

3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd, Merricks M: 0406 691 231 FB: @TalkingHens

W: talkinghens.com.

Looking for backyard hens but unsure where to start?

Talking Hens is a family business that loves backyard chickens! We like them so much that we specialise in supplying only the friendliest, best-laying hens along with the best quality products to keep them happy and healthy. There’s nothing like the friendship, entertainment and nutrition that you receive from our laying hens - a pleasure to be shared!

Visit our Website to learn more and download our FREE, Beginner’s Guide to Backyard Chickens at:

www.TalkingHens.com.au

Open Thursday to Monday 10am till 4pm (Closed Tue & Wed). 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd Merricks. For enquiries 0406 691 231

www.facebook.com/TalkingHens May 2021

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Puzzle

Corner

ACROSS 1. Dropping in on 5. Limestone cave formations 11. Supporter of popular rule 15. Yes in Paris 16. Drink brand, ... Maria 17. Quietened 19. Seaweed-wrapped snack 21. Simpleton 23. Poked 25. Cast out 27. Lobe ornament 28. Cowboy's noosed snare 30. Unnatural sleep 31. Amuse 32. Swapped (cheque) for money 33. Poker stake 34. Train coach 35. Underground cell 36. Orient 38. Fit of temper 40. Back (legs) 42. Docket 44. Cosmetic oil, ... butter 45. Wading bird 46. Roster 48. Sorry 49. Strong flavour 50. Ancient harp 51. Form of dermatitis 52. Chaste 53. Enormous 54. Hospital dormitory 55. Ark builder 56. Waters around Greece, the ... 58. Lampshade fitting (5,4) 59. Behaving 61. Vibrate 63. Pigment 64. Appropriate 65. Annual periods 67. Synagogue scholar 69. Endure 71. As a whole (2,3) 73. Moulds 74. Lie snugly 76. Affix (4,2) 78. Circle (globe) 80. Relaxation routine 82. A long time 83. Bye! 85. Arranging at intervals 89. Fringed cords 91. Subtle shade of meaning

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93. Lump of turf 94. Rewrite 96. Panther 98. Gratuity 99. Wedding promise (1,2) 100. Bon vivant 102. Initially (2,5) 103. Happens, ... pass (5,2) 104. Success 105. Misjudge 106. Golf ball peg 107. Venerate 108. Materialise 110. Famous record label (1,1,1) 112. Pastoral 114. Firmed muscles (5,2) 117. Leads astray 120. Hoards 123. Slightly open 125. Frozen sleet 127. Actress, ... Keaton 128. Dreaded 131. Elixir 133. Prepared 134. Twitter comment 135. Connection 136. Cooking herb 137. Marshal's reinforcements 140. Ram's mate 141. Coffee's rival 142. Whiff 145. Incendiary bullet 147. Repeat 148. Cheerfulness 150. Tibet's Dalai ... 151. Automated teller machines (1,1,2) 152. Correctional institution 153. Baby-bottle top 154. Spasm 156. Iraq's neighbour 158. Be stoical, grin & ... it 160. Fairly modern 162. Humans, ... sapiens 163. Kathmandu is there 164. Line of symmetry 165. Conqueror 166. Dozes, ... off 167. Liver sac, ... bladder 168. Bounders 170. Sum put by for a rainy day (4,3) 172. Soviet exile area 173. Mature 174. Picnic basket 177. Secreted 179. Jeans maker, ... Strauss

May 2021

180. Wrongly assists 182. Sun shower arc 183. Urge (3,2) 185. Pamper 187. From Zurich 188. Having an advantage (3-2) 189. Merriest 191. Rightful 192. Anticipated arrival time (1,1,1) 193. Farce 194. Allotted 195. Not well regarded

DOWN 1. Passenger carrier 2. Distress call (1,1,1) 3. Permanent 4. Author, ... Vidal 5. Female sibling 6. Mystified, all ... (2,3) 7. Burning out of control 8. School dress 9. Small bell sounds 10. Fashioned 11. Low platform 12. Baton-twirler, drum ... 13. Bone in chest wall 14. Most shipshape 18. Desolation 20. Powerful headlight type 22. Absurdity 24. Jelly-like dessert 26. Emergency touchdown (5-7) 29. Contaminating 37. Surprise attack 38. Noisy snakes 39. Meringue ingredient (3,5) 40. Determined 41. Recoiled (4,4) 43. Do harm to 44. Fiji's capital 47. Current (1,1/1,1) 57. Spookier 60. Sheer hosiery 62. Orphan girl musical 66. Leisurely walk 68. Outside bounds of decency (6,3,4) 69. Minor mistake 70. Patch (sock)

72. Artistically (pleasing) 73. Made easy 75. Receive as salary 77. Solemn vow 79. In a crass manner 81. Army corporal (1,1,1) 84. Advocate 85. Lounge furnishings 86. Hoped (to) 87. Silly 88. Shopkeepers 90. Feeds from breast 92. Aussie city, ... Springs 95. Proficient 97. Strike 101. Like peas in a ... 109. Unusual 111. Mother 113. London nightspot 115. Approaches 116. Slimmer 118. Unspoilt paradise 119. Love god 121. Take into custody 122. Run of 124. Delayed response 126. Aggravating 129. Repugnance 130. Decreases 131. Boxer's training aid 132. Intrinsic 138. Filmy 139. Office suppliers 143. Allegorically 144. Rented 146. Apiece 149. Beers 155. Rink boots (3,6) 157. California fracture line, San ... Fault 159. Great joy 161. Disobeys 165. French bean 169. Off-loaded 171. Poisoned by fumes 172. Oozed 175. Prudes 176. Up-at-dawn person, early ... 177. Weapon of mass destruction (1-4) 178. Resided 181. Swirl 184. Cattle prod 186. Jet-bubble bath 190. Large antlered animal


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on

Dromana

Dromana is a bayside centre, nestled between Safety Beach and McCrae, and situated at the foot of the towering peak of Arthurs Seat, 66 km south of Melbourne. Dromana's commercial centre is concentrated along the coastal boulevard of Point Nepean Road, with Arthurs Seat and its surrounding bushland providing a scenic backdrop to the shops and cafes along this route. Dromana's foreshore reserve lines the coast and consists of grassy picnic areas, shelters, walking tracks and designated camping areas. The calm, sandy beaches provide safe swimming and boating opportunities. Points of interest along the coast include the Dromana Pier and the rocky cutting at Anthony’s Nose where a boat ramp is situated. Heronswood is a historic property situated on an elevated 2 hectare allotment on Latrobe Parade, overlooking the bay. The house and surrounding gardens date back to 1871 and are open for visitors to explore and enjoy. The property includes a cafe which serves organic produce from the gardens and fresh food from local growers where possible. There is a retail shop and nursery, with garden workshops held regularly. Heronswood is managed by Diggers Club, Australia's largest garden club, which also looks after the cool climate St Erth Gardens at Blackwood in the Macedon Ranges. It is believed that the name Dromana is of Irish origin and that it came about from the influx of gold prospectors in the mid 19th century. There is a Dromana on the tidal section of the Blackwater River, near Cappoquin, County Waterford in Ireland, and this is the most likely origin of the name.

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Dromana and neighboring Tuerong to the north, are home to a number of vineyards, some with cellar doors open for wine tasting. In 1841, Hugh Jamieson purchased 5,120 acres (2,070 ha), or eight square miles, of land from the Crown for ₤1 an acre under the terms of the short-lived Special Survey regulations. The purchase included the northern part of the present suburb of Dromana to the east of Safety Beach. The area is known as Jamieson's Special Survey in cadastral surveys. The first subdivision of Crown lands in Dromana occurred in 1854. Dromana Post Office opened on 12 April 1858. The completion of its pier took place in 1872, allowing the shipping of produce to the city markets. In 1881, Dromana was well established as a seaside resort. A major contributor to the development of Dromana was Spencer Jackson. One of his greatest achievements was the facilitation of the construction of a road to the summit of Arthurs Seat in 1929. Dromana's pier was much longer in those days and Dromana shared with Sorrento the ability to accommodate the bay steamers which did much to promote Dromana as a tourist destination. The McKeown and Shaw families ran guest houses for over half a century. Dromana is known for its number of vineyards. More than 22 separate vintners operate within Dromana, as well as several vineyards. The Dromana Drive-in cinema is a popular entertainment spot for locals and holidaymakers alike.

Coffee Safari Freshly brewed coffee is a must-have for weekends. Here are a few places to check out when you're in this beautiful part of the world.

Laneway Espresso

167 POINT NEPEAN ROAD A fun café with great coffee and meals and a great antique shop at the front.

Little Rebel Coffee Roastery 22 COLLINS RD

A boutique coffee roaster situated in the Dromana Industrial Estate. Choose from the house blend, single origin blends, filter, pour over or cold brew, all made by expert baristas and enjoy a sweet treat or toastie with your brew.

Pier Street Kitchen

19 PIER STREET DROMANA Serving breakfast, brunch or lunch with a Mediterranean twist.

Cafe Jett

197 POINT NEPEAN ROAD Cosy spot serving hot, strong coffee and delicious, belly-warming soups amongst an array of other menu items.


What to do There’s always something fabulous to do in Dromana. Head down to the beach with its white sands and calm waters, and then enjoy a relaxed lunch at one of the many cafes or restaurants. Sip amongst the vines at one of the many wineries or taste an award-winning drop at one of the local distilleries. Check out the peninsulas must-visit Dromana Industrial Estate and the array of producers and hidden treasures to be found there. Catch a movie at the Dromana Drive-In, or for history buffs there’s plenty to check out at the Dromana Historical Society. And don’t forget to call into the picturesque gardens at Heronswood Estate, the home of the Digger’s Club.. Photos Yanni

May 2021

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ni

ng

ni

la

Fr

Nepean HWY JimmyRum

Crittenden Estate

Little Spritz

ve ser A

Stillwater at Crittenden

Bras

Dr�mana+ ///////DROMANA INDUSTRIAL///////

June Ave

highlighting some unique businesses you will find in this area of the Peninsula

Bass Surfboards

Dr

Two Bays Brewing

Wine Lovers Warehouse

ve

Terrace

Lombray A

Trewh

The Vegan Dairy

Collins R

Boatshed Cheese

Thomso n

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Peninsula Fresh Seafood

itt Ct

Brasser

Ave

Dalkeith

Rainier Ave

M

A Room with A View

or

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Collins Rd

ac

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Old M

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Hickenbotham

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on Dromana

Seabreeze Cellars

Boundary Rd

L o vingly ha ndcr afted on site Award winning BoatShed Cheese is renowned for its handmade artisan French style soft cheese, utilising goat, cow and buffalo milk from across Victoria.

Ta st ing r oom open Tues - Sat from 9am - 4pm & Sunday 11am - 4pm

Visit us at 3/10 Thomson Tce, DROMANA | info@boatshedcheese.com | 0476 180 382

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Cheese making classes available


on Dromana

A P PA R E L & C U STOM S U R F BOA RD S

Born out of a passion for the surf industry and a desire to support independent and local brands. With decades of surf industry experience throughout the team, you know you’re in good hands.

24 Colli ns Road Dro m a n a VI C , 3 9 3 6 | O pen 7 days PH : 0 3 59 8 18 1 6 5 | b a ss-su r f b o a rd s.co m . au

LITTLE SPRITZ Sparkling Wine and Soda Little Spritz is light at 8% abv, refreshing, all-natural and downright delicious. With three styles to choose from, there is one for every occasion. Visit our Little Spritz Tasting Bar and enjoy a slice of summer. Open Thursday to Sunday 11am-5pm. For more information on this unique Peninsula destination, contact Natalie:

E: FB: W: A:

hello@littlespritz.com.au littlespritz INSTA: @littlespritz littlespritz.com.au 20 Brasser Ave, Dromana

Discover Victoria’s first and only dedicated craft rum distillery, hidden in the back streets of Dromana. With daily rum tastings, seasonal food menu and premium cocktails, JimmyRum is a place to set anchor. Discover the Peninsula’s premium distillery and cocktail bar this weekend.

*Subject to COVID regulations, please check our website for up to date information. May 2021

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WHOLESALE WINES

DIRECT TO PUBLIC

AT WHOLESALE PRICING

Wine Lovers Warehouse is the direct to public arm of our wholesale business specialising in restaurant, hotel, and function wines for over 17 years. With COVID-19 restrictions imposed on our venue customers, 2020 put a big handbrake on our wholesale business and stopped it dead. In March we made a decision to transform and stay alive, supported by our friends and the local community, which we will

be forever grateful, we opened up the warehouse three days every week to the public, selling our wines and our suppliers at trade prices and no retail mark ups. It is our commitment to remain open servicing the needs of our Wine Lover community into 2021 and beyond. Come along and say hello, grab a bottle or a case. Don’t forget to bring in this publication for a free bottle of bubbles with any purchase

HOURS: Thursday, Friday, Saturday Weekly 10am until 5pm LOCATION: Unit 5, 3 Trewhitt Court, Dromana Industrial Estate, 3936


Sterling Estate Adelaide Hills Sparkling Proscecco

Yellowglen Alessandra 2017 Vintage Sparkling Pinot Noir Chardonnay

Yellowglen Botanics 2019 Vintage Sparkling Prosecco

Seppelt The Great Entertainer Sparkling Chardonnay Pinot Noir

RRP $29 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $18 OUR PRICE $9

RRP $18 OUR PRICE $9

RRP $15 OUR PRICE $7

Willow Ridge Mornington Peninsula Pinot Noir

John Luke Limited Release Heathcote Shiraz

Nillahcootie Estate Mansfield Cabernet Sauvignon

Yellowglen Sunset Spritz Rosé Infused with Wild Berries

RRP $29 OUR PRICE $12

RRP $29 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $35 OUR PRICE $5

RRP $10 OUR PRICE $5

Call us on 9596 4278 or see our full range on our website www.winelover.com.au


on Dromana

SEA BREEZE CELLARS We are a family owned business and our customers are why we exist. We go out of our way to ensure every experience is pleasurable.

WITH OVER 1500 PRODUCTS, 700 OF THOSE SPIRITS

“The pinnacle of service, friendliness. The selection of Spirits is immense - quite possibly unrivalled on the Mornington Peninsula.” — Cynthia via Facebook

244 BOUNDARY ROAD DROMANA M: 0407 900 246

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P: 5987 0877

WWW.SEABREEZECELLARS.NET.AU May 2021


on Dromana

Simply delicious

& doesn’t cost the environment www.thevegandairy.com (03) 9018 5558

4/277 Point Nepean Rd, Dromana 5981 8033 shop online- www.aroomwithaview.com.au @ aroomwithaviewdromana

F R ES H F R O M O C E AN TO YO U Come and visit us at our newly opened seafood processing facility located at 2/10 Thomson Terrace in the Dromana Industrial Estate. As a grower, processor, wholesaler and retailer of fresh local seafood, we are your “one stop shop” for the freshest seafood on the Mornington Peninsula Factory 2/10 Thomson Tce. Dromana Shop Ph: 5981 0425 I Mobile: 0409 192 770 E: info@peninsulafreshseafood.com.au www.peninsulafreshseafood.com.au

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on Dromana

O

Restaurant O Weddings O Functions

Nestled at the foot of Red Hill within the acclaimed Crittenden Estate is Stillwater, a modern vineyard restaurant showcasing the best of seasons produce in a truly beautiful setting. The terrace is now open for lunch Saturdays and Sundays only until the end of April, weather permitting (not available Easter Sunday). Sit back and relax whilst enjoying pizza, tapas and platters on the lawn.

25 Harrisons Rd, Dromana P: (03) 5981 9555 Lunch Wednesday to Sunday, Dinner Friday and Saturday. Bookings Essential

stillwateratcrittenden.com.au

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Real Estate

BEACH escape

LUXURIOUS DESIGNER ESCAPE CLOSE TO OCEAN BEACH

T

aking a casual stroll right to the spectacular Ocean Beach of Rye is just one of the natural wonders on offer with this stunning contemporary build home. The modular-style home embraces the full beauty of its coastal surrounds, that are enhanced even further when viewed from the home’s elevated setting through the incredible, gigantic plate glass windows. continued next page...

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Displaying superb flair, the home comes alive with a vibrant natural colour scheme comprising a striking mix of vertical spotted gum timber with grey tones of timber grain panelling, both complemented by the rawness of the rammed earth retaining walls. Generous in its proportions with soaring ceilings generating impressive space, all rooms here have that distinct wow factor. Entry is to a vast lounge that showcases the fantastic outlook across the dunes and a few steps up is the combined family room and dining area which, for seamless entertaining, opens via triple stacked doors to a tranquil stone terrace with batten alfresco pergola. Presented in an absolute matte black finish, the kitchen certainly makes a bold statement in style, whilst in terms of function, there is an intriguing concealed butlers’ pantry and appliances including a convection oven and microwave, and an induction cook top. Accommodations begin with a ground floor guest bedroom and ensuite, whilst upstairs are three more bedrooms including the

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Eyewear As Individual As You Are

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5 Douglas Court, RYE 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2 car $1,975,000 Sam Crowder 0403 893 724 Crowders Real Estate, 2375 Point Nepean Road, Rye P: 5983 3038

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There is a lovely ensuite with enclosed double rainfall shower, and to the main bathroom, shared between the remaining two bedrooms, is a step-in shower and a soaker bath. Just minutes from town, golf courses and beaches, this 6-star energy efficient home is the ideal sea change peninsula escape.

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fabulous master bedroom, which amidst the contemporary, has a welcome touch of rustic with the vivid green doors of the built-in robes a pleasant contrast.

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Crossword solution

Call in Monday to Saturday to enjoy Kay’s renowned expertise and personal service and view the latest fashion and styles in eyewear.

Stocking Paul Taylor Eyeware

MainStreet Eyecare 57 Main Street, Mornington

Ph: 5975 3235


Commercial Builder – Fit out shop fitting and interior. Extensive industry experience. Fully insured and ready to build or re-model the interior of your business.

P: 0414 037 697

E: danielq. bui l der@out l ook. com

W: dq-bui l der. com .a u

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History

Five Talented Sisters By Ilma Hackett - Balnarring & District Historical Society

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ll five of Mary Huntley’s daughters grew to be accomplished young women.

Mary came to live in the Red Hill-North Merricks area after the death of her husband, John Huntley, in 1887. She brought her family to ‘Hillside’, an orchard that her husband had inherited from his father just three years before his own death from cancer.

The Background Story Her husband’s father, John Huntley Sr. had migrated to the colony of N.S.W. from Kent in the U.K. with his brother in 1835. He then came to the Port Phillip District where he bought land at Brighton and established a farm. His market garden, ‘Kentish Gardens’, at Brighton, where he grew fruit trees, became something of a show piece and he narrowly missed being awarded the Silver Cup at the Brighton Horticulturalist Society show in 1875. By then his 10-acre orchard lot had been established for thirty years and he was growing a variety of Pippin apples as well as apricots, plums and pears. John Sr. was also a member of the Brighton Council and one of his daughters, Elizabeth, married Thomas Bent, a fellow councillor. When land sales opened up the Mornington Peninsula, John Sr. selected two lots, totaling just over 200 acres, in the Red Hill– Merricks North area, prime orchard country, where he established an orchard. He died in 1884 a few months after he was hit by a train at a railway crossing in Brighton. His eldest son inherited the peninsula property. John Huntley Jr. was not a man of the land like his father but a boot-maker by trade and the orchard on the Peninsula was leased. Then, just three years later, he too, died. A New Start John Huntley’s widow then came to live at ‘Hillside’, bringing her children with her. There were seven Huntley children in all: five daughters and two sons. They were Annie, Mabel, Louise, Laura, Jack and Perce, and youngest daughter Evelyn, better known as Lin. The thirteen-acre orchard that had been established at ‘Hillside’ did well. Cherries and plums were the main fruits grown but apples, strawberries and raspberries were also grown. In July, 1900 Mary remarried when she and Jack Shand wed. Jack (who was sometimes called Peter) was one of the Shand family who owned the sawmills at Red Hill. He was a big man, known for his incredible strength and his natural genius with mechanical and mathematical things. He was a practical problem solver. With his brother Alex, Jack did contract work around the district. The year following his wedding he bought ‘Kent Orchard’. After a fire destroyed ‘Hillside’, the combined family moved into the house at ‘Kent Orchard’ to live. Later Jack established ‘Kentucky’, another orchard in Merricks North. Mary’s sons grew up to become

Left: Mary Huntley

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orchardists. Her daughters went their various ways. Each of the girls displayed a special talent in the arts, either drawing and painting, or music. When they were old enough each of them left home, either to marry or to seek fame and fortune in a wider world. The Popular Pianiste The eldest of the Huntley children, Annie, was born c.1880. She showed a gift for drawing and painting at an early age. One of her sketches, drawn when she was eleven, is a detailed study in pencil of building framed by tree branches on which sit three small birds. There are still two other examples of her work, both landscapes in water colour of local scenes. One is a picture of the old log cabin that stood on Huntley land. This was originally owned by a Captain Smith. The second painting is a view from the Main Ridge area looking across to Port Phillip Bay. However Annie's first love was music. She was a skilled pianist and she left home when she was 17 years old to follow her dreams. Annie first performed in public when she was 14 or 15 playing at the popular People’s Promenade Concert in Melbourne. Such concerts had been popularised in London’s Cremorne Gardens. They were outdoor entertainments where those who attended strolled around the gardens while listening to singers or classical music being played. Annie appeared both as an accompanist and as a solo pianist and was described in the Argus newspaper as an “effective pianiste”. She decided to further her experience by going to Perth. Family legend has it that she travelled overland to Western Australia, taking her piano with her. She went in stages and gave music lessons wherever she stopped. In this manner she paid her way west. Throughout 1897 she appeared regularly in a number of concerts. She appeared at the hall in the Osborne Hotel and also at the Cremorne entertainment centre. This was a hotel that had been converted to an entertainment centre with an indoor hall but also an outdoor area where concerts could be given in the open air in the London fashion. Annie was a popular pianist “giving every satisfaction” and it was written that she contributed in no small measure to the success of Cremorne. One review made mention of the fact that she was the niece of Thomas Bent, ex-minister for transport in Victoria. In 1898 her engagement was announced to Mr J. C. Hearman. The wedding didn’t go ahead and Annie didn’t return to Victoria but sailed for Europe. In 1899 news was received from London that Miss Annie Huntley, late of Perth and niece of Mr Thomas Bent, was “making splendid progress as a pianist. It is predicted she will be a great success.” However her musical career petered out after she met and married a Spanish count, Alfonso De Aguilar. She was well-known in European society as a lady of culture and intellect. Her husband drove fast cars and was unfortunately killed during a car race. Annie retreated to her home in London where she died in 1956 at the age of seventy-six. continued next page...

Top right: Annie’s pencil sketch Middle right: Captain Smith’s Cabin Bottom right: Main Ridge to Port Phillip Bay

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Above: Annie Huntley Top right: Cremorne Theatre, Perth Right: Handbill for the Cremorne Theatre, Perth

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A Friend of the First Lady Second daughter, Mabel was known to the other members of her family as ‘Sis’. She followed the example of her older sister and also left Australia to travel overseas. She found work as an ‘au pair’, helping well-to-do families with domestic work and childminding, gaining experience and seeing the world as she went. After spending time in Europe she travelled to the U.S.A. where she set down roots. In Washington D.C. she worked as a journalist. This brought her in contact with a number of prominent people. Among them was Eleanor Roosevelt, America’s First Lady. Mabel treasured a diamond pin that had been given to her by Mrs Roosevelt as a token of friendship. Mabel did not return to Australia and died in America. She did not marry. (The diamond pin was subsequently passed down to Mabel’s nephew, Bill.) The one who stayed home Louise was another sister who liked to paint and sketch. Her life was more conventional than that of her two older sisters. She married a local man, becoming the wife of David Mairs Jr. The Mairs family was a prominent one in the Balnarring-Bittern area, owners of the extensive sheep grazing property, ‘Campsie’. David’s father, also David, had been an early settler in the Bittern parish. An Irishman, he had gradually bought up land adjoining his original selection until he owned about 4,000 acres. ‘Campsie’ extended from Hann’s Inlet to what is now known as Somers. After his death in 1902 the property was divided between his three surviving sons. Son, David was clever and well educated but had turned his back on becoming a doctor, as his father had hoped, to work the farm with his brother, William. continued next page...

Above: Sisters Laura, Mabel and Lin Below: 'Campsie', home of David and Louise Mairs

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The two had bought out another brother who had no interest in the land. When David and Louise married a new home for them was built on the property. Louise became the mother of three children, a son (David) and two daughters (Mary Louise and Truda). The two brothers were not as good farmers or businessmen as their father had been and the property became run down although they continued to shear about 2,000 sheep. In 1911 one thousand acres was acquired by the Navy to establish the Flinders Naval Depot and sections of the remainder of the property were gradually subdivided for sale. By 1923 the Mairs had sold off the remainder of their land and bought two properties north of Melbourne, in Kilmore and Lancefield. It is said that David was fond of his drink and fond of playing cards. During one such session, he put up one of his properties as his stake – and lost it. Companion to an African Princess Fourth daughter, Laura, was another talented painter but apparently shone in other areas as well. The Mornington Standard reported that in 1900 at the first match of the Red Hill Rifle Club she had performed the opening ceremony and fired the first shot. A neat bull’s eye! For the remainder of the day she and Miss Oswin ‘dispensed refreshments’ from a marquee until it was time for her to present the trophy to the contest’s winner. Her step-father, Jack Shand was captain of the club. As a young woman she was caught up at home looking after her mother as Mary aged, but after Mary’s death she, too, went to Europe to study painting. Her life there was far from ordinary. For a period she acted as a companion to the daughter of an African tribal king while that young lady was staying in Europe. Later she moved to Scotland, the traditional home of the Huntley family. Laura did not return to Australia but died in Edinburgh from a brain tumour. She remained a single lady. From Berlin back to Balnarring Evelyn (called ‘Lin’) was musically gifted and, like her oldest sister, a talented pianist. She went to Europe pre-World Two to further her studies. Her photograph was taken aboard the ship that took her to Germany and this she had turned into a postcard. In 1908 she wrote on the reverse side of a photo-postcard telling how she was getting to like Berlin and was hoping very soon to be able to speak the language. With an eye for beauty she comments on the shade of green of the beautiful horse chestnut trees near her residence. In Germany she became well known as a concert pianist. Lin returned in 1912 to marry local man, Phillip Vansuylen. Both his parents were from families who had pioneered the Balnarring district and Phil was the second of a large family. He was a jack-of all trades. At times he worked for his father as a bullock driver, he was also a woodchopper and when the Naval Base opened he worked there as an assistant plumber. After their marriage Phil and Lin lived on their farm, ‘Baltara’, in Bittern where they kept a small orchard as well as milking cows. Later Phil ran sheep.

Top left: Lin Huntley Left: Lin and Phillip on their wedding day

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Above: Father-in-law Jack Shand with Phil Vansuylen Right: Mountain Road by 'L. H.'

Although she had no family of her own, “Aunty Lin” was a great favourite of her young nieces and nephews. They responded instinctively to her friendly, gentle nature. She was well-liked and renowned for her hospitality. Lin kept in touch with friends from the music world and she had many visits from musicians and singers she had met overseas. They sought her out when they came to Australia. Well-known Australian operatic soprano, Joan Hammond, visited her at ‘Baltara’. One of Lin’s nephews recalls an impromptu concert during the visit when the household was entertained by Joan singing while Lin accompanied her on the piano. Lin died in 1940 from leukemia. Among her possessions was a small painting with the initials ‘L.H.’ across one corner. This was done by one of her sisters, either Laura or Louise and it shows a winding bush road in hilly countryside. There is some speculation that it could be somewhere in the Red Hill area, though it would

seem to be of more mountainous surroundings where mountain ash grows. (The painting was passed on to her niece, Betsy Cook, and is now in the possession of a family member.) Four of the five daughters of Mary Huntley left the peninsula to travel overseas to widen their horizons and foster their talents. Only one (Lin) returned to make a life in the area. The fifth (Louise) moved elsewhere in Victoria. References: Interviews with the late Bill Huntley, Betsy Cook and Mary Karney All Our Somers by Bruce Bennett Various contemporary items from newspapers, including the Argus, Daily news (Perth) and the * Mornington Standard Photographs: Balnarring & District Historical Society collection Internet (Australian Variety Theatre Archive) Huntley family photographs

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Profile for Peninsula Essence

Peninsula Essence May 2021  

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