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JANUARY 2021

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsu-

Crew Of The Blue • Skateboard Makers On A Roll • Fighting Fit For Tokyo Shaping Originality • The Art Of Lisa Wang • Exceptional New Aboriginal Art For Summer Taste And Class • Viable Viticulture • Message In A Bottle • JimmyRum Gold And Silver We’ll Close Down The Racecourse And Sell It


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Get the gift of a straight smile this holiday season!

Call now to book your complimentary introductory discussion with one of our dentists

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EMAIL: SMILE@BALNARRINGDENTIST.COM.AU

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Leading 10. Crew Of The Blue The family behind Port Phillip Bay’s premier dolphin swim tourism operation, Polperro Dolphin Swims.

WHERE TO STAY AND PLAY THIS SUMMER ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA

18. Skateboard Makers On A Roll From the love of engineering and design, Bottle Boards skateboards were born here on the Mornington Peninsula.

26. Fighting Fit For Tokyo Dromana boxer Caitlin Parker is reaching for gold at the 2021 Olympics in Tokyo.

Arts 30. Shaping Originality Having spent three decades coaxing molten glass into every imaginable shape it is fair to say Leisa Wharington is a master at her craft.

34. The Art Of Lisa Wang Lisa's work will be on display at the Mornington Rotary Art Show 22 January until Monday 26 January.

38. Exceptional New Aboriginal Art For Summer The Summer Collector’s Show runs until February 23 at Everywhen Artspace.

PENINSULA prestige

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Eat & Drink Proudly published by

42. Taste And Class Quality and consistency at Hotel Sorrento is something head chef Matt Henke ensures is delivered with every meal.

46. Viable Viticulture Writers: Andrea Louise Thomas, Andrea Rowe, Cameron McCullough, Melissa McCullough Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Creative: Sam Loverso, Dannielle Espagne Publisher: Melissa McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or email brooke@mpnews.com.au

Instagram @peninsulaessence All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

Phone: (03) 5974 9000

Sustainability runs deep in the Crittenden Estate veins.

50. Message In A Bottle Etch sparkling husband and wife team pour impactful philosophies into their successful business while their products are being poured into heathy-option glasses throughout global tables.

56. JimmyRum Gold And Silver Local craft rum producer, JimmyRum was crowned gold and awarded two silver medals at the 2020 Australian Distilled Spirits Awards.

Focus On 86. Focus on Blairgowrie Interesting facts, coffee safari, what to do and photos.

History 102. We’ll Close Down The Racecourse And Sell It

Registered address: 63 Watt Road, Mornington 3931 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

The battle over members reserve entry that lasted nearly three years.

facebook/peninsulaessence PEFC Certified This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

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Every Month Cover Image by Yanni

Summer on the Mornington Peninsula.

January 2021

8. Peninsula Styles 55. Must Try Dishes

45. Recipe 88. Crossword


INCLUDING

custom built sofas & dining chair gallery rugs & artwork

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MORE SALE OFFERS ON PAGES 7, 9 AND BACK PAGE


MERCEDES BENZ MORNINGTON When you take a test drive at MercedesBenz Mornington not only will you get to enjoy some of Victoria’s most beautiful seaside stretches of open road and spectacular sights – you will get the opportunity to fully appreciate what these machines were designed for. Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington P 5902 7201 mbmornington.com.au

Peninsula

THE COMMONFOLK COLLECTIVE

Styles EMELDO Emeldo jewels are eclectic, fun, bold and bright! They are slightly wild but still totally wearable. The perfect summer accessory for any outfit. Available at Emu Plains Market and emeldo.com

More than just a candle, it's a feeling! The Commonfolk Collective candles share the love, make you smile and bring all those good summer vibes to your tribe. Available at Emu Plains Market and thecommonfolkcollective.com

PRODUCTS FROM THE PENINSULA WE'RE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

LUDUCO LIVING Aura Recliner Chair from Himolla Germany. Motor or manual mechanism with a huge range of easy care leathers and fabrics. Prices from $3499 in the Luduco January Sale. Unit B1/1128 - 1132 Nepean Hwy, Mornington P 5973 4899 luduco.com

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TEA CIRCLE Tea Circle Pyramid Tea Infusers are one-of-a-kind. Crafted from food-grade stainless steel, utilising high-quality hinges and locking mechanisms, each infuser has a unique pendant attached, influenced by the standout artistry on the labels of each of their four staple tisanes. Available at teacircle.com.au


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CREW OF THE blue By Andrea Rowe Photos Yanni

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aptain Troy Muir has grown up on Port Phillip Bay. Windswept, wide smiling and rugged, it’s possible that salt water runs through his veins from a lifetime on and under the water.

Troy’s parents, Tony and Judy Muir, salty legends in their own right, first launched Polperro as a research boat while advocating for regulations to protect Port Phillip Bay’s smiling ambassadors, the rare breed of Bottlenose Dolphins.

The Bay is 48-year-old Troy’s sanctuary, workplace, playground and legacy; and he loves sharing it with curious marine creatures and eco-adventure seeking visitors.

Melbourne’s Bay is home to 80 – 100 of a precious subspecies of dolphin known as the Burrunan, as well as a population of Common dolphins and Australian fur seals. They’re joined by sea dragons, cuttlefish, spider crabs, stingrays and diverse marine creatures and habitat.

Troy’s family pioneered Port Phillip Bay’s premier dolphin swim tourism operation over 34 years ago. An institution on the Bay, the Sorrento-based business has won multiple awards for ecotourism and international respect for its contribution to marine research and conservation.

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Troy’s respect and care for them is as deep as the ocean. continued next page...


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The last thing The last thing we want towe want to do is disrupt do is disrupt the habitatthe of habitat of marine animals marine animals

Growing up in Blairgowrie, the bay was front and centre in Troy’s life. His father, the late Tony Muir, was a legendary local Master Mariner and diver who earned his living on and around the sea. So too did Troy, joining the deckhand and dive master trade, working on ferries, tugs and vessels throughout the Bay. Like his adored dad, whose picture watches over him from inside Polperro’s cabin, Troy is a man of the sea. And he’s happy to share it. From behind the ship’s wheel, Troy gazes out across the timber vessel’s aqua and white trim towards a silver-blue horizon. He’s scanning for the tell-tale signs of dolphins, bow-riding the wake of the ferry, breaking the water’s surface or gathering beneath diving gannets feeding on schools of fish. Troy and his trusty crew, (Ben Muir, a marine diver and ecoguide, marine biologist and eco-guide Jess Beckham, veterinarian and marine science eco-guide Tom Andrews, and climate scientist and dive master Sophie Stringer) are an oceanic force for good. The business provides schools with marine education programs matched to curriculum for geography, outdoor education and citizen science subjects like marine pollution and species monitoring. Polperro passengers are assured a seamless saltwater experience “School groups, families, couples and locals have swimming with dolphins on their bucket list. But it comes with a respect for the marine life and the environment that we’re all lucky to send time in,” says Troy. “The last thing we want to do is disrupt the habitat of marine animals; we’ve been doing this for a long time and we want to ensure the bay and reef life remain protected.”

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This philosophy of marine conservation forms the backbone of Polperro’s operations. Troy and the crew, including his mother Judy Muir, an Order of Australia recipient for contributions to marine science education, are proud of their ecotourism operations. From the moment you step aboard the Polperro you’re encouraged to learn while immersing in memorable adventures. “Many people don’t realise that 80% of the marine species we have in Port Phillip Bay are only found here, nowhere else in the world. The Bottlenose dolphins are endemic to these waters and Gippsland,” says Troy. “That’s reason enough to protect them in the wild.” The wonder of marine experiences never grows old for Troy; dolphins remain a favourite. “They’re incredible. From their different temperaments to how they socialise and forage. They have intricate communications as air breathing mammals, occupying space above and beneath the waves, and using sound to analyse their environment. They are an intricate part of a connected ecosystem and the health of the bay.” “We’ve spent time watching and swimming with them, identifying each dolphin by their dorsal fins, which are as unique as fingerprints.” It’s no surprise David Attenborough is one of Troy’s heroes. Like the BBC natural historian, the Polperro crew passionately contribute to research and marine regulation studies. They assist with marine mammal mapping, photography, recordings and hosting Marine Mammal Research teams on the vessel. They’re champions for marine conservation while ensuring all who board the boat have unforgettable marine adventures.


With two trips a day departing from Sorrento Jetty, the welcome from the crew is as cosy as the wetsuits you’re kitted out in for snorkelling. “Port Phillip Bay temperatures average 18 to 21 degrees Celsius, depending on the seasons, but you're always warm in the wet suits.” Once a pod of dolphins is located out in the Bay, and their wellbeing and safety assessed, the crew prepare guests to slide into the water, holding suspended buoys to swim and snorkel with these curious creatures. Encountering a dolphin while snorkelling in 2000 square metres of Port Phillip Bay is an unforgettable close encounter of the cetacean kind. Troy says that “being up close to an intelligent, wild animal in their natural habitat is a privilege” and when the stars of the show, the Bottlenose Dolphins, move through the water, turning a thoughtful eye to observe you, you feel humble and grateful to be in their company. Incredibly social, they dart back and forth in a dazzling display of underwater acrobatics, sun sparkling off their skin, an adorable snout smile urging you to beam right back at them. There are strict protection measures in place to ensure their safety. Troy is quietly proud that his family have championed a legacy of protection for this precious marine creature.

The Polperro heads to a seal haul-out site in the South Channel, known as Chinaman’s Hat, where seals lounge and greet the vessel nosily. Slipping into the water with these oceanic acrobats, visitors snorkel alongside, over and under them. Their silky forms and inquisitive whiskers twitch as they buzz and click around swimmers. The crew keep company with swimming noodles and ongoing commentary on their habits. Captain Troy ensures non-swimmers enjoy the cavorting too, with front row seats from the bow and seal insights. Back on the boat, it’s just as heart-warming, with Ben, still in his wetsuit good naturedly baking fresh scones and serving hot chocolates while marine biologist Jess shows images and research specimens. As undeniable ambassadors for marine life they talk thoughtfully about habitat impacts and threats. “Plastics continue to be a problem, and we all have to do our bit,” but Troy recognises that community care has made a big difference “We had a bit of a renaissance in the '90s where a sense of stewardship grew and the Bay became a part of Melbourne’s identity. That Melbourne ranks consistently as one of the world’s most liveable cities is a legacy of the health of the Bay.”

While the crew can’t guarantee dolphin sightings, they’ll work hard to ensure all on the boat have memorable marine encounters.

Heading back to harbour, Troy diverts for some dragon-hunting. Scone warmed snorkellers are back in the water, following the whimsical flutter of weedy sea dragons through kelp forests. It’s not unusual to spy the tail of a male sea dragon curling protectively around its egg.

The Bay is also home to a population of up to 70 Australian fur seals.

continued next page...

Calling all 8 - 10 year olds to Try Sailing! LEVEL 1 - MYC JUNIOR & YOUTH SAILING PROGRAM

TRYSAIL Developing independence & resilience outdoors

Mornington Yacht Club’s Junior and Youth Sailing Program encourages active learning for young sailors to develop confidence and competence as they develop into resilient and independent youth. After 4 sessions, membership is required, committing to a lifelong journey of Family, Friendship & Sailing at MYC! Act Now! Only 16 places available each month! Act Now! - go to our website to register your interest Sundays 9am-12pm

A - Jan / Feb B - Feb / Mar

4 SESSIONS

Find out more by contacting the club or going to our website.

Mornington Yacht Club Schnapper Point Drive, Mornington VIC 3931 Phone: (03) 5975 7001 www.morningtonyc.net.au

FREE!

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“The seagrass provides the perfect feeding and breeding sanctuary for the colony. They forage and drift along so gracefully, showing us how diverse and entertaining our marine life really is.” Troy and his team dive and dart on the boat and in the water as effortlessly as their adored marine life, ensuring guests are just as enamoured. Their inclusive nature ensures passengers of all abilities are accommodated. It’s very much a family business. Troy’s partner Justine McNamara, a respected artist, works in the booking office, daughter Matilda-Pearl, emerging singer-songwriter, works a summer job as deckhand, and youngest daughter Bonnie is a swimming ‘super fish’. Brother Ben is eco-guide and dive master and mother Judy Muir contributes to their Advanced Ecotourism

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accreditation. The memory of patriarch, Tony Muir is treasured by them all. While there’s no denying the underwater locals are the main attraction of Port Phillip Bay, the crew of Polperro and Captain Troy are something special too.

polperro.com.au Facebook: @PolperroDolphinSwims Insta: @polperrodolphinswims


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PENINSULA SUMMER outdoors

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ocal business is the life blood of the Mornington Peninsula. Many have impressively adapted through the challenges of 2020. The Mornington Peninsula Shire congratulates this innovation and urges everyone – community members, organisations and businesses – to consider how we spend, recommend and utilise local services.

Open for summer, local business looks a little different. Many of our local food businesses have embraced outdoor dining, an opportunity to experience regional culinary delights and a cold beverage while soaking up the sun and fresh air in new ways. Locals and visitors can experience creative outdoor spaces with loads of atmosphere.

This summer the Shire wants to see how you support local. Share a summery snap of your favourite local businesses for your chance to win. Coffee down the street? Ordered a gift online? Helped by a local tradie? Share your photos on Instagram or Facebook and tag the business and @ourpeninsula and add #supportlocal #summerisforeveryone to your post. Their top picks will receive a prize from a local business. For more details about the stories of our local business innovation visit mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal or for full competition details see : mornpen.vic.gov.au/summerguide

While you might have to drive a little slower and park a little further away to enjoy these lively spaces across the Peninsula it’s a small price to pay to keep our village centres thriving and support local jobs. Outdoor music programs over summer showcase local talent and get musicians back to what they love doing most, entertaining.

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SKATEBOARD MAKERS ON A roll By Cameron McCullough Photos Yanni & Supplied

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t wasn’t the love of skating that inspired peninsula-based Harry Robertson, 25, and Sam Kirby, 24, to get into the skateboard manufacturing game, but rather the love of engineering and design. They wanted to make something beautiful and practical and, most importantly, fill a gap they saw in a market.

“We actually met at university and worked on some projects together,” said Harry.

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“I was studying industrial design, which is more about the product, and Sam was studying communication design, which is more about the visual and graphic side of a product”. “We realised we have complementary skills that work well together to get a product from concept to market.” And while studying, and with the appropriate entrepreneurial flair, the two saw an opportunity in the skateboard field. Bottle Boards was born. continued next page...


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It started with humble beginnings. Literally in the loungeroom. The pair worked tirelessly to design and construct strong, flexible, and lightweight skateboards that would live up to their expectations, and those of their clients.

“We are also mindful that skateboards have grown to be somewhat of a fashion statement by the rider. They don’t just want something generic from a shop; they want to be unique.”

“Each of our boards are handcrafted. This results in a board that is aesthetically beautiful while still strong and giving the rider comfort and control,” said Harry.

“We really liked the idea of a skateboard for getting from ‘point a’ to ‘point b’,” said Harry.

“It was a long process with over 50 prototypes and many design changes. “We would make boards and then go to skating days and let riders try them out. Of course, these people would become our customers, so we’d take their feedback on board and then move on to the next prototype.”

We believe there will be a rise in the popularity of skateboarding now it has been admitted as an Olympic sport

Harry and Sam saw many skateboards on the market were traditional vert decks. Great for the skatepark, but not as good for cruising. Then there were pure cruising boards that did not perform well in a skatepark setting. They decided to fuse the two and make a hybrid board that was suited for cruising but could also be used at the skatepark. “We believe there will be a rise in the popularity of skateboarding now it has been admitted as an Olympic sport,” said Harry.

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There is also the practical aspect of skateboarding.

“We admired them as a mode of transport, but you can also have some fun on them. “We know that any good product is an extension of the user and we have designed Bottle Boards to be precisely that”.

Bottle Boards have been getting quite the following with sales across Australia and the furthest sale coming from Houston, Texas. In the three years they have been operating, they have sold hundreds of boards. “We now have four boards in our range that perform different functions unique to the particular rider,” said Sam. “The proof we are doing something right is that we’ll sell a board to someone and they’ll contact us saying their mate or girlfriend wants one too. continued next page...


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“If you have return customers, you realise they are enjoying the product. “It is that attachment that people get to our boards that is a real point of difference.” Bottle Boards use a manufacturing process that is a combination of superior materials and careful craftsmanship.

It is that attachment that people get to our boards that is a real point of difference

“We use a unique combination of the two woods; layers of Canadian maple and bamboo, to create a board that is beautiful but very strong,” said Harry. “We also use a cold-pressing technique where boards are pressed together for 24 hours allowing the grains in each layer to settle together for maximum strength. “And, of course, we are Australian made, which is a great reason to buy our boards!”

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Being locally made means that Bottle Boards have full control over their inventory and allows boards to be customised. “We don’t want a business based on networks, supply chains and wait times,” said Harry.

“We want to have our hands on everything we produce and make sure they are perfect”. Bottle Boards are also committed to the environmental credentials of its boards. “Buy a skateboard and we’ll plant a tree,” said Harry, with Bottle Boards partnering with onetreeplanted.org resulting in a tree being planted in the Tasmanian Midlands for every sale. continued next page...


• INDOOR/OUTDOOR FURNITURE • HOMEWARES • GIFTWARE • TABLES • CHAIRS • LOUNGES • BAR TABLES AND STOOLS • SUN LOUNGES • MARKET UMBRELLAS • MASSIVE RANGE OF RATTAN • CUSHIONS • LAMPS • JEWELLERY • ARTWORKS, AND MUCH, MUCH MORE

Kibu has the Peninsula covered with umbrellas - from small beach umbrellas to our giant cafe 5x5m umbrellas.

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The future looks bright for Bottle Boards. They are branching out into merchandise to help build the brand and looking to innovate in the future while remaining firmly Australian made. “In terms of commitment, we are extremely motivated, and both dedicate a lot of time to it,” said Harry. “We want people to realise and recognise that there is a local skateboard business that is manufacturing superior product”. And as for skating? “We might not have skated that much in our youth but are definitely skating a lot now,” said Harry.

“It is a great way to connect with our customers and friends and get out and about. “And what better way than doing it on a skateboard of your own creation?” Head to Bottle Boards website where you can subscribe to keep up to date. E: info@bottleboards.com.au Facebook: @bottleboards Insta: @bottle.boards W: bottleboards.com.au

We might not have skated that much in our youth but are definitely skating a lot now

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..Indulge yourself, invite family and friends. Polperro’s wildlife swims will provide wonderful and lasting memories for all on our small personalised tours. - Bookings are advised polperro.com.au


FIGHTING FIT FOR Tokyo By Melissa McCullough Photos Damien Wyer & Supplied

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aitlin Parker, a Dromana boxer, has been chosen to represent Australia at the now-2021 Tokyo Olympics. She was just 13 years of age when she had her first ring experience against a 25-year-old opponent in a bout in Western Australia. She had only two years’ boxing experience in the lead up to this first match.

“I was always big for my age, but it must have been a shock for her to see how young I was,” she says, laughing. “I think I stopped growing at 13.” Although there was no “winner” in that exhibition bout, Caitlin felt right at home and took to the sport with gusto. Continued next page...

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Caitlin was no stranger to combat sports. “I’d already been right into taekwondo and earned a black belt, and was eager to try something new,” she said. When she was 11, she decided to try boxing. “I saw boxing as an interesting challenge and was eager to prove myself against the boys. I’m an extremely competitive person and train as hard as I can.” And train she does. In the lead up to the Olympics her usual week consists of about 16 sessions of drills and exercise with one day off for rest. She says, “We do a whole variety of training methods. For example, in the first session we will do some kind of condition training such as running, rower, bike, etc.” Her second session focuses on strength and the third session comprises, boxing, sparring and pad work. Her hard work has proven rewarding and, at just 24 years of age, Caitlin fights in the 69-75kg female middleweight class and has been in the Australian team since she was 15. Coach Marcos Amado, of Peninsula Boxing, Mornington, is full of praise for his charge who he says is only the third Australian female boxer ever to qualify for an Olympic Games. Over the course of her boxing career, Caitlin has won seven Australian championships as well as winning a Bronze Medal in the 2011 Junior World Championships in Turkey; a Silver Medal in the 2014 Youth World Championships in Bulgaria; a Bronze Medal in the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in China, and a Silver Medal in the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast. In March 2020 she returned from the Asia and Oceania Olympic Qualification tournament in Amman, Jordan, where she was successful in her Olympic Selection and ranked in the top two in Asia and Oceania. She also added a Silver Medal to her collection in that event. It was a relief to Caitlin to hear that the 2020 Olympics had been postponed rather than cancelled. “I have waited for my Olympic Dream for so long already - I can wait another year,” she said. As of 2019, her successes have made her the highest internationally ranked female amateur boxer in Australia. “I love what I do, and I am so thankful that I have a good coach,” Caitlin said. The compliment is reciprocated by coach Marcos who says Caitlin is “the best at what she does”.

My drive and motivation in life is to not only do well for myself but to do well for them and be the best version of me I can be

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She lists her parents as her biggest inspirations in life and says of them, “My Dad worked two jobs seven days a week for most of my life and my Mum would work multiple jobs to raise money for me to train and compete, and they would still come to training every night. They always pushed me to do my best and instilled in me to never give up. My drive and motivation in life is to not only do well for myself but to do well for them and be the best version of me I can be.” Caitlin is currently studying a Diploma of Sports Coaching and Development and work when she can, as a motivational speaker to schools, sport groups and businesses. Come May, Caitlin will make her way overseas and, hopefully, travel restrictions-wise things will be OK. If not, she will take the necessary precautions to have a good training camp and have some competition before the Olympics. She says, “I’m not going to stress if I don’t get any competition before then. In an elite sport such as boxing you have to be adaptable to the situation. I’ll be ready no matter what.” Her goal and dream is to be Australia’s first ever female Olympic Boxing medallist. Brimming with strength and determination she is positioned as a genuine Gold Medal chance for the 2021 Olympics. Tokyo cannot come quickly enough.

Facebook: @caitlinparkerboxer Insta: @caityparkerr January 2021

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Arts

SHAPING originality

By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Peter Marko

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eninsula glass artist Leisa Wharington is a true original. Her work is immediately recognisable. Her pieces are fluid and organic and infused with unique inclusions. Having spent three decades coaxing molten glass into every imaginable shape for both beauty and utility, it is fair to say she is a master at her craft.

Originally, Leisa studied ceramics at Caulfield Institute of Technology; a dynamic school where artists learned practical

hands-on skills. Every floor of the Art and Design building on campus housed a different art practice. Leisa found herself drawn from her ceramics studio up to the top floor of the building where the glass artisans were working. She was immediately mesmerised. She completed a Bachelor of Arts in Ceramic Design with a major in glass. She then went on to do post-graduate studies at the Pilchuck Glass School, an international centre for art glass education in Stanwood, Washington (USA). continued next page...

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With considerable knowledge and practical skills to match, Leisa set up her own studio in Merricks in 1982 on a 50-acre bush block surrounded by nature, her key source of inspiration. She shared the studio with Peninsula jeweller Flick Pope, working there for 25 years. They hosted an annual event called Christmas at The Studio that attracted hundreds of followers. Five years ago Leisa set up The Studio and Co. in Hastings. It is a unique and beautiful space where she and a small group of artists produce and sell their work. Visitors to The Studio can see Leisa at work in a practice that dates back centuries. Equally impressive is the fact that she built all of the equipment she uses.

texture that catches her eye. Sometimes she incorporates flotsam and jetsam into her work. Part of what drew Leisa to working with glass is the immediacy of it. Unlike ceramics where a piece needs to be made and fired and glazed and fired, she can make something in glass and it takes shape right before her eyes. Glassblowing and shaping is an exciting process, but it takes extraordinary coordination. The artist and the glass are always moving.

There are never ending designs to be made. I’m always thinking of new shapes

Leisa’s father and the two generations preceding him were sheet metal fabricators. Leisa was always making something with her Dad from wood, metal or whatever was on hand. He taught her how to weld and she has used many of the skills he taught her in her career as an artist.

Every piece Leisa makes starts from a bag of sand and flux. Even after thirty years, she still marvels at the magic of making glass. “It all starts with a grain of sand. You can create something amazing from a grain of sand. There are never ending designs to be made. I’m always thinking of new shapes,” she says. Living on the Peninsula is an endless wellspring. “The natural world has always been my inspiration,” she says. She walks the beach at Somers every day and there is invariably a shape or

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To begin, Leisa dips a long metal pole called a punty (or alternatively, a blowpipe depending on what kind of piece she is making) into a crucible of molten glass inside a large furnace heated to 1250 degrees Celsius! At this stage, the glass is much like honey. To keep it from hardening, she must keep the punty or blowpipe spinning all the time.

Leisa takes the piece out of the furnace to shape it with tools. She puts it back into another furnace called a glory hole to soften it as needed. She spins and shapes and cuts the piece until it is just the form she wants and then transfers it to a cooling kiln. This an exacting practice which requires strength, timing and considerable skill. Leisa’s designs are unique and distinctive. She makes all kinds of things from ornamental objects and tableware to elaborate


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chandeliers. Over the years, she has been asked to make some unusual things. One of her most unique commissions was crafting an hourglass filled with the ashes of the client’s loved one. She has also made glass jewellery incorporating ashes. It is worth seeing how Leisa works because glassblowing and glass sculpture are becoming lost arts. Schools are no longer teaching these skills. Leisa occasionally teaches in winter when there aren’t as many customers coming through the studio doors, but there may come a time when glass art is a thing of the past. See it while you can.

theglassstudio.com.au The Studio and Co., 200 Marine Parade, Hastings Photography Insta: @petermarkophoto

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THE ART OF Lisa Wang B

orn and raised in China. Lisa Wang's passion and aptitude for art was evident at an early age. Her formal art training commenced at secondary school and continued through university. In 2000 Lisa graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Shanghai. In 2002, Lisa left China for New Zealand to open a new chapter in her life. During her time there she developed further as an artist and became a respected art teacher, guiding and tutoring many emerging artists. Lisa exhibited widely and received a number of prestigious awards. Her paintings were successfully sold to overseas, as well as to New Zealand private collections. In early 2007, Lisa moved to Australia, and started work as a full-time artist. Lisa enjoys working with a variety of subjects, she is known for her unique use of light, confident strokes and ability to capture fine details. In 2008, Lisa completed a series of paintings of Victorian sheepdog trials, which has been very well received. In July 2009, Lisa was commissioned by the Geelong Football Club to complete a series of 18 oil paintings to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the club. The paintings captured key players, significant moments and passionate supporters of the club, the exhibition was on display at the Geelong Art Gallery for a month and was extremely successful. All the paintings are now part of the club's permanent collection. Lisa also has a great passion for drawing, and has been commissioned to do many portraits in recent years. She loves to work with faces, because :“They are very challenging but always different and exciting.”

Lisa's work will be on display at the Mornington Rotary Art Show at the Peninsula Community Theatre on the corner of Wilsons Road and Nepean Hwy, Mornington - Friday 22 January until Monday 26 January. morningtonartshow.com.au

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www.melbournemadness.net Have a “Very Silly Christmas” by having the silliest January 2021 34 | PENINSULA magician in Magicland

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Mornington

ART

SHOW 22 Jan – 26 Jan 2021 (Gala Opening Night 21 Jan)

Open 10am – 5pm

PENINSULA COMMUNITY THEATRE Cnr Nepean Hwy & Wilsons Rd, Mornington


BE A

Summer is an inspiration to everyone on the Mornington Peninsula, and none more than our local producers Whether it’s our beaches, blue clear water, fresh hinterland air or just the summer vibe feels the Mornington Peninsula Beer, Cider + Spirits Trail has you covered with events, live music, food and, of course, plenty of cool bevies. Blaze your own trail of fresh session ales, summer IPAs, seltzers, spirits and ciders. Our best brewers, distillers and cider makers are looking forward to enjoying a sip with you.

THIRST QUENCHING IN THE SPIRIT OF SUMMER BASS & FLINDERS DISTILLERY DROMANA

• Live music Sundays • Fresh summer cocktail menu, grazing boxes and gin paddles • New experiences: Spiced Brandy Masterclass

CHIEFS SON DISTILLERY SOMERVILLE

• New Release Distillers Select 2020 • Distillery tours • Local cheese tasting

JIMMYRUM DISTILLERY DROMANA

• Live music Sundays • New bigger Rum Garden with mist sprays + kids play area • New summer cocktail menu

Mix it up this summer with fresh cocktails

Meet our cider makers at one of their homegrown orchards, producing the finest traditional ciders the perfect summer thirst quencher.

HART’S FARM SHOREHAM

• Farmgate • Apple cider tastings

MOCK RED HILL RED HILL

• Cider lounge and outdoor vine-covered courtyard • Certified Bio-Dynamic ciders and juice • Tapas style lunch

TUCKS

RED HILL SOUTH

• Pet-friendly • Cider and wine tasting • Seasonal menu


WHAT'S ON TAP Our brewers are a cool bunch who love to experiment, you’ll find limited releases and special brews in their taphouse. Check out all the new beer gardens popping up just in time for summer.

TRY LIMITED RELEASES

DAINTON BREWERY CARRUM DOWNS

• Live music Fri, Sat + Sun • New beer garden • Seasonal releases

HICKINBOTHAM OF DROMANA DROMANA

• Live music Sat + Sun • New Ruby Red Cider • NYE Event

JETTY ROAD BREWERY DROMANA

• Live music Thur - Sun • Seasonal collaborative brews on tap

RED HILL BREWERY

RED HILL SOUTH

• New beer garden • New menu • Seasonal brews

SMART BROTHERS BREWING SOMERVILLE

• New beer garden • Seasonal small-batch brews

ST ANDREWS BEACH BREWERY FINGAL

• Live music Fri - Sun • Birdcage beer garden • New Tidal Seltzer + seasonal brews

TAR BARREL BREWERY AND DISTILLERY MORNINGTON

• Live music • Woodfire pizzas + seasonal brews • Pet-friendly

FOLLOW THE BEER, CIDER + SPIRITS TRAIL

TWØBAYS BREWING CO

Whether Brown Ale you like Pale Ale , Lager, or an IPA to satisfy , you will find one your thir st. Discover classic, swe et and spir its rich in and dry ciders botanicals. Follow our ‘Beer, Cid er & Spirits and sip the hom your way through Trail’ egrown Morningto flavours of the n Peninsu la.

DROMANA

• Live music • New releases and summer beers

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EXCEPTIONAL NEW ABORIGINAL ART FOR SUMMER

O

utstanding new pieces of Aboriginal art have been flying in from around Australia to feature in The Summer Collector's show at Everywhen Artspace. Works come from as far afield as the Central, Western and Eastern deserts, Far North Queensland, the APY Lands, Utopia, the Pilbara, the Kimberley, Arnhem Land and Victoria. “ 2020 has been a watershed year for Aboriginal art, “ says Everywhen’s co director Susan McCulloch. “Aboriginal artists all over Australia have been extremely proactive in isolating themselves and their communities and taking all precautions to keep as safe as possible.” The results, she says have been great. The downside has been that most of the community-owned art studios which enable the work of the artists were closed for extensive periods, thus severely limiting the amount of art that could be made. Simultaneously, says Susan, there’s been a upswing of interest in Australian Aboriginal art. She attributes this to such factors as the Black Lives Matter movement, people spending on home beautification rather than travel, several highly publicised international exhibitions and auctions of Aboriginal art, exhibitions by both public and private galleries, social media and an increased ability to explore and buy art online.

Amounara, acrylic on canvas, 167 x 198cm by Rene Sundown. Courtesy the artist and Iwantja Arts

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“Many people are also wanting to support our unique Indigenous culture and learn more about it,” she says. “While the community art centres are still not able to work at full capacity, the art that’s now being made is fresh, varied, often of exceptional quality and with often, a great sense of joy.” “This has enabled us to show an extensive and dynamic group of works,” says Susan. “As we work with several hundred artists from more than 40 community-owned Aboriginal art centres and a number of independent artists, we can show a huge variety of styles and media.” As well as paintings, the Summer Collector’s show features sculptures, carvings and other 3D works with special capsule exhibitions by Kimberley ochre painter Gordon Barney and works from Australia’s oldest art centre, Ernabella Arts in the APY Lands. “The most frequent comment we get from first time visitors is “we never knew Aboriginal art could be like this!” The Summer Collector’s Show runs until February 23. EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE A: 39 Cook St, Flinders T: 5989 0496 E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au W: www.mccullochandmcculloch.com.au Open: January - seven days a week February - Fridays -Tuesdays Hours: 11am-4pm

Larrakitj - Ceremonial poles in natural ochres on wood by Naminpu Maymuru- White. Courtesy the artist and Buku Larrnggay Mulka


The Summer Collector’s Show 2021 Outstanding Aboriginal art from 9 regions. With feature showings of Ernabella Arts and ochre painter Gordon Barney, Warmun Arts To February 23 January: Open daily | February: Open Friday-Tuesday | Wed & Thurs by appt. | 11-4 View online mccullochandmcculloch.com.au Everywhen Artspace | 39 Cook Street, Flinders 3929 | T: 03 5989 0496 E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au | mccullochandmcculloch.com.au January 2021

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A FRESH LOOK THIS SUMMER

T

he summer months are here and it is a perfect time to renovate, renew and rejuvenate your living spaces.

Out with old and in with the new and this means reconsidering what you have on your walls. Is it that art you have collected in your past journeys and it looks like it’s from a by-gone era or do you simply need a fresh change? Whether you just need a fresh look or you have moved into your new home, your walls definitely need artwork that will uplift and enhance the ambience of your rooms. This is where Nissarana Galleries at 211 Main Street Mornington becomes your one-stop destination for advice and artwork that will complement your existing interior design. Representing more than 120 acclaimed career Australian artists, the gallery specializes in providing contemporary and indigenous artworks that are suitable for modern large homes as well smaller townhouses and apartments. The friendly staff have many decades of experience in the art industry and interior design and can assist you in choosing that very special piece that will be add the extra touch of beauty and balance to your most important living environment.

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NISSARANA GALLERIES Open 10am-5pm seven days or after hours by appointment A: 211 Main St, Mornington T: 03 5976 8877 A: 5 Hastings St, Noosa Heads, Queensland T: 07 5455 4428 E: info@ngmornington.com.au W: nissaranagalleries.com.au Insta: @nissaranagalleries


Styling | Honor and Grace Interiors instagram honorandgraceinteriors Photography | Lisa Atkinson instagram lisaatkinsonphotographer

Custom lounge furniture made in Mornington 10 Bennetts Rd, Mornington | (03) 5975 0344 | info@sorrentofurniture.com.au

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Eat & Drink

TASTE & class By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

H

It’s like an orchestra in the kitchen. Every player is important

otel Sorrento is an icon. Since 1872, this majestic hotel with its distinctive rough hewn cream coloured limestone facade has been standing sentinel on the clifftop overlooking historic Sorrento park and Port Phillip Bay. As the first commercial establishment in town, it is an important part of local history.

When Australian playwright Hannie Rayson wrote Hotel Sorrento in 1991, the name became part of the cultural lexicon. The film version of the play was made in Sorrento in 1995 and the film crew stayed at the hotel through the course of its shoot. The film’s premier was also held at the hotel. Over the years, this hotel has seen many owners, but for the past 40 years, the Pitt family have owned and operated it, lovingly restoring it, adding to it and bringing it luxuriously into the 21st century. In 2021 the hotel will again expand, adding 15 new suites, a wellness spa, 25 metre pool plus yoga and meditation studios. What really makes this hotel stand out is the personal connection the Pitt family build with guests, many of whom return year after year. Meticulous attention to detail and guest wellbeing is at the heart of Hotel Sorrento. Consistent quality is paramount. In the kitchen at the restaurant, it is consistency and quality that head chef Matt Henke ensures is delivered with every meal. He’s been doing so for many years. Matt is not the kind of chef who wants to be the star of the show; he sees himself as equal partner with the entire team.

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“It’s like an orchestra in the kitchen. Every player is important,” he says.

Matt began experimenting with cooking as a boy. At fifteen he did work experience at Madeline’s, a fine dining restaurant in Mornington. He was subsequently offered an apprenticeship where he was involved in every aspect of the kitchen. He credits where he is today to this holistic kitchen experience though he also completed a Certificate III in commercial cookery at Frankston’s Chisholm Institute. He moved on to working at a Swedish restaurant, Akvavit, in Melbourne’s Southgate on the Yarra. It was an interesting experience to be working in a kitchen where everyone was speaking Swedish! Next Matt worked at Frankston’s Ambassador Hotel, which offered everything from fine dining to banquets and room service. After three years he moved on to the Dava Hotel where he was head chef. This is where he learned traditional pub cooking Moving down the Peninsula, Matt spent eleven years at The Portsea Hotel where the pressure was really on because of the sheer volume. The team of chefs often catered for 10002000 meals a day during peak times! Maintaining grace under pressure and keeping a positive mindset have held Matt in good stead throughout his career, as those who have worked with him would attest.

Continued next page...


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At Hotel Sorrento Matt is a humble, relaxed and unassuming head chef. He exudes a quiet confidence and takes pleasure in being part of a team. His outstanding organizational skills, ability to multi-task, professionalism, calm and personable nature makes it all possible. This is particularly impressive when considering how busy the restaurant can be. Over summer he is ordering some items by the tonne and serving 2000 meals a day. Matt would characterize the menu as Modern Australian. What he means by that is that it includes aspects of many cultures in its offerings from traditional pub meals to curries and tacos to slow cooked lamb shank and everything in between. The diversity and variety of is amazing. There is truly something for everyone. What he’s really enjoying at present is cooking with the wood fired grill and new wood oven. The flavours they produce are just mouth watering. Matt wants meals to be memorable, but he also wants the dining experience to be perfect. “I love what I do. I’m a perfectionist. I involve myself in every aspect of the restaurant. If the kitchen is running well, the floor needs to be running well. It all needs to flow,” he says. He learns a lot about what is working well, or not, from the customers. He encourages that feedback.

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Focusing on seasonal fresh ingredients predominantly from local producers and offering a consistent menu along with a wide variety of daily specials means diners can always find an old favourite or try something new. And if it’s not on the menu, you can request it and come back for it at a later date. What more could you ask for? hotelsorrento.com.au


Recipe MARINATED WHOLE BAKED PORT PHILLIP BAY SNAPPER

This dish began as a shared/banquet style offering for the Pitt family when they were entertaining family and friends at the Hotel. It was so popular that we adapted it to be used on our regular menu in single serves using small baby Snapper, Barramundi, and white fleshed reef fish.

Ingredients:

6-8 serves 2-3kg Snapper (cleaned & gutted). Marinade: (will keep for up to 2 weeks refrigerated) 5 coriander roots washed and chopped 8 cloves garlic (peeled) 5 shallots (peeled) 1 birdseye chilli 1 table spoon minced turmeric or turmeric powder 2 table spoons white pepper 3-4 tablespoons fish sauce 2-3 tablespoons lime juice ¼ cup coconut cream (skimmed off the top off a cold can)

Garnish /Salad:

1 capsicum deseeded and sliced 1 red onion peeled and sliced ½ bunch coriander Bunch Thai basil 2 stems spring onions sliced 1 carrot julienned Dried shallots Black sesame seeds 3 lemons or limes cut into wedges 4 tablespoons of light olive oil

Method:

Use a sharp knife, cut 3-4 longways into the whole fish 1cm apart To make marinade place all ingredients in food processor until smooth consistency (like a paste) Rub the marinade into the cuts made into the fish Place fish in fridge for minimum 30 minutes marinating (up to 3 hrs is ideal)

Cook:

Preheat oven to 180 degrees (fan forced) Cooking time will vary depending on fish size. Approx 25-30 minutes for 2-3kg fish. Do not be afraid to take the fish out and check. If it is not quite cooked, cover in foil for 5 minutes to prevent fish drying out. While fish is cooking toss all garnish ingredients in a large bowl in light olive oil (or sesame oil… 1 teaspoon mixed with the olive oil is ample). Serve cooked fish on a bed of steamed Basmati or Jasmine rice. Place garnish on top of fish (or to the side) and serve.

Hotel Sorrento, 5-15 Hotham Rd, Sorrento Phone: (03) 5984 8000 hotelsorrento.com.au December January 2021 2020

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VIABLE viticulture By Ed Verrill

T

here is a lot of rhetoric about sustainability in wine, but when you look at the statistics, and remember that getting grapes to grow, pressing and fermenting the juice, then transporting it to the consumers that keep our industry alive is all part and parcel of the agriculture industry, you realise that people in glass houses probably shouldn’t throw stones. The world is in a state, and our climate in dire straits. Here in Australia, we’ve just had the worst fire season on record, and there can be no denying that we humans are largely to blame. It’s very easy to point the finger at big industry and over-use of personal transport, but agriculture represents one of the largest dangers to the planet out there. In 2018, 9.9 percent of greenhouse gas emissions came from farming alone.

The sustainability question sprang back to mind when I was asked by a friend (who professes his wine knowledge to be about as deep as a bargain bin) to name the best wine in the world. I deflected that everyone’s taste is different, that bang-for-buck should come into it and that everyone has their personal biases anyway. But I also noted that tastes are changing. Sustainability now features so heavily in how we view producers and their finished products. Through social media and the internet at large we are granted access to anyone, anywhere, at the push of a button. We can no longer ignore the backstory to how each bottle arrives at the table. There are producers we have read about, people we know, people we like, maybe who we have visited and spent quality time with. The link between product and consumer is now bound by so much more detail. This depth of knowledge can definitely make the wine taste that little bit better. I thought about the winery at which I have spent the most time, a place where as much effort goes into looking after the environment as guiding juice to wine, and realised that a major factor that should be at the forefront of how ‘pleasing’ a wine is, is not only how well people handle grapes, but how they manage the whole ecosystem that supports them.

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For two vintages in a row, I was lucky enough to work with a producer whose careful touch in the winery is perfectly balanced with as careful a touch as possible on the environment. The two go hand-in-hand throughout the business and the results in shifting towards more sustainable processes have been both revealing and rewarding. After 25 years of conventional farming – relying on the use of synthetic chemicals and fertilisers to manage the vineyard – started to take its toll on the quality of their grapes, the Crittenden family on the Mornington Peninsula found themselves digging in the dirt for a more holistic approach. In their efforts to produce fine wine without the environmental hangover, they have seen the calibre of their crop skyrocket. They are now aiming for the stars, to become a leading light for the way that viticulture should be approached worldwide. The Crittendens ceased harmful chemical and fertiliser use in the vineyard in 2008 and have since become masters of muck. The winery produces approximately 50 tonnes of marc every year as a by-product of winemaking. The discarded skins and stalks are rich in nitrogen, magnesium and other elements that are essential to organic matter, so a huge component of high-quality fertiliser is already on-site. While most wineries will pay to have it taken away (and most likely dumped in land fill), the Crittenden family is reaping the rewards of working with this nutrient rich residue, so much so that they are also now taking it from other local wineries. It is mixed in with locally-sourced horse manure and straw or wood chips, turned once a month by a digger to aerate it, and is then watered as needed during the bacterial and fungal ferment into compost. There’s no way they would ever be able to buy in this amount of compost, which is why chemical alternatives are invariably used elsewhere, but their natural preparation has now become a vital ingredient in the surge in soil health of the vineyard. For the past ten years, Rollo Crittenden has been documenting a wide range of parameters in the grapes to quantify the benefits of their from the ground-up approach and, simply put, has noticed ‘an impressive increase in the right stuff’. As we all know, better grapes equals better wine. In an endeavour to boost the vineyard ecosystem, the estate has long been cycling inter-row cover crops Continued next page...


Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 430 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u January 2021

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and is an internationally recognised forerunner in researching this field. They are constantly measuring the benefits of their composting and green mulching in order to refine their processes. Such dedication to understanding sustainability is rare; taking the time to document it so that others can follow by example, even rarer. Crittenden Estate is not only protecting their immediate ecosystem by ditching chemical farming in favour of regenerative management, but they are giving back to the very earth that grows their grapes. To top it all, these healthy soils require a fraction of the irrigation they once did. This flows neatly into the topic of water; it always stunned me how wasteful we can be in wineries. It’s all literally going down the drain. There’s always a hose on somewhere, whether it’s for irrigation, or cleaning, or more cleaning. Scarcity of water is a real concern the world over and the question over how long we can keep growing wines in regions that are drying up, bit by bit, is an incredibly pertinent one. Every single drop that goes down the drain at Crittenden is processed through an on-site water treatment plant: ‘It was bloody expensive and it’s actually a bit of a pain to run, but you’ve got to put the effort in where it counts’, I recall Rollo relating to a clutch of visitors who were interested in the whirring steel tank that sits at one end of the winery. The rest of the water they use is either in the form of rainwater from a dam or bore, and a small proportion comes from Melbourne. Even that is recycled before arrival. Remember as well, that they are tapping into this supply less frequently for irrigation as the vineyard finds better equilibrium.

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The reductions also apply to their power. The introduction of solar panels across the entire property has seen a 60% drop in overall energy costs. Their work is not only reducing its toll on the environment, but the bills at home too. Sustainability runs deep in the Crittenden veins. Founding father, Garry, has now passed the reins on to Rollo. In our last chat, he informed me that he’s now busy with bees, after investing in hives for the property to boost local colonies. As Rollo pushes the agenda forward, the next generation is nipping at his heels. Rollo’s nineyear-old son, Oscar, has recently been recognised locally for his campaigning to reduce ocean plastics, and the estate produced a limited series of ‘Endangered’ Arneis to back up his efforts, a proportion of its profits going to turtle rehabilitation sanctuaries. Quality wine will always come at a cost, so reducing this cost to the natural world should be a major concern of everyone involved in the production and enjoyment of it. The accolades are stacking up for the estate, which is always a pleasure to see, but this is personal. Having witnessed first-hand their zeal to raise the bar year-on-year, those in Crittenden Estate are true sustainability heroes.

Crittenden Estate - 25 Harrisons Rd, Dromana VIC Open 7 days, 10:30am - 4.30pm Ph: 5987 3800 crittendenwines.com.au


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MESSAGE By Andrea Rowe Photos Yanni

A

conversation with Jason and Andy Quin is as refreshing as their ETCH Sparkling beverages. The husband-andwife team are the effervescent force behind ETCH Sparkling, a non-alcoholic adult sparkling beverages business based on the Mornington Peninsula. While the couple pour impactful philosophies into their successful business, their products are being poured into heathyoption glasses throughout global tables. ETCH sparkling beverages have become a table favourite for a growing number of Australians choosing to drink less, or looking for an alternate to alcohol, while enjoying a sophisticated sugarfree option. The new beverage company utilises Australian native fruits and herbs sustainably farmed from natural growing regions across the country. But it took a life changing realisation for Jason to trailblaze this health-focussed business with a social conscience. ETCH Sparkling comes with some heavy-hitting history, and hopeful offerings for others. For Jason, that business spark came after a creeping reliance on alcohol inspired him to quit drinking. The respected wine merchant of 23 years had began consuming more alcohol after work, as his battle with alcoholism “snuck up� on him.

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IN A bottle “I crossed the line. My family journey in alcoholism affected everyone and it was time to change it. I'm one of the people who was able to sort myself out and came back from that. Re-setting gave me a chance to check in on what was acceptable, and redefine my relationship with drinking.” That’s no easy feat for a heavy hitter in the wine industry where alcohol consumption is deeply woven into the culture. Sobriety realigned Jason and his wife Andy’s vision to work in business together, integrating their values and careers, and fast-tracking collective knowledge to launch ETCH Sparkling. They sourced and brewed non-alcoholic, sugar free flavours to be paired with good food, and presented stylishly so consumers didn’t feel like the odd one out at social events often dominated by alcohol rituals. This stylish vision has motivated others to flick a switch for healthier social drinking options. Australia has seen a growing movement in consumers seeking responsible drinking and non-alcoholic options, tapping into the Hello Sunday Morning and Dry July sober-curious culture. “Taking a break or changing habits in your relationship with alcohol is more appealing if you’re given options. Current products on the market were limited; they look and taste like sugary drinks that don’t help you blend in. We want people to be feeling great about what they bring to the table and the choices they make.” Continued next page...

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It’s elegant abstinence, but it’s no ordinary beverage. Jason and Andy applied their industry background into sophisticated production, branding, and packaging.

Taking a break or changing habits in your relationship with alcohol is more appealing if you’re given options

While the essence of ETCH Sparkling is native Australian plant based, no sugar and alcohol free, it taps into a growing pattern for Australian consumers. Health, inclusion, and social conscience aren’t just words on a page for the ETCH Sparkling team, they’re absorbed and played out in all they do. The phrase ‘Table Proud’ features in the Quin’s conversation, referencing how the products enable enjoyment of an ‘adult drink’ presenting well and complementing instead of overwhelming meals. ETCH stands for Every Time Choose Health, an ethos built into sourcing their ingredients. The sparkling water-based beverages feature natural Australian native botanicals. The couple source from sustainable farming regions, and incorporate Australian herbs and plants traditionally used by First nations people. Jason spent time with local Gundijtmara Kirrae Wurrung-Bundjalung man Lionel Lauch of

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Living Culture as well as communities across Australia gaining inspiration, insight and learnings.

“We locate fruits and herbs where they naturally thrive, and bring out those intensely flavoursome tastes during the blend and brew stages. Our flavour profile takes people on a journey. That journey led us to native Australian plants, alcohol free, no sugar and sustainable farming where water management and native pollination occur, and the soil management isn’t manipulated.” From the tables of Merricks General Store to restaurants and stockists across Australia and Singapore, the flavoursome match of this quality non-alcoholic drink to a wonderful meal is gaining popularity. “People are discovering that it’s OK transitioning away from alcohol, and enjoying a fabulous drink without overpowering flavours,” says Andy. With 3 flavours, a citrus based Sparkling using Finger Lime, Lemon Myrtle and Rosemary known as ZST; PLM, a dry Sparkling using Davidson Plum, Riberry and Strawberry Gum; and a


sparkling drink with sweetness from raw, native flora Mornington Peninsula Honey and Rosewater. HNY references honey and Happy New Year, a sure summer 2021 crowd pleaser. The couple are as excited bottling beverages in their Seaford factory as they are serving up ETCH at Farmer’s markets, a decidedly family affair. Thirteen-year-old daughter Maya is a budding horticulturalist, interested in Australian edible gardens while ten-year-old Darby provides hands-on logistics support and customer service. While the couple promote a sense of balance through their beverages, they do the same as a family spending time in the parks, beaches and community venues across the Mornington Peninsula. Jason, a keen marathon runner, invigorates his mental and physical health by running the tracks of Bushrangers Bay and Arthurs Seat. The couple reflect that during 2020 many people chose to “check in on themselves and took it as an opportunity to become healthier,” says Andy.

“The pendulum has started to swing. Presence is important and people are making the change for their own health, aware that what we consume doesn’t have to impact our environment, families or how we feel tomorrow.” That’s a powerful message for social change bottled in a single serve. etchsparkling.com.au Facebook: @etchsparkling Insta: @etchsparkling

Celebrate in Style!! with SE Melbourne and the Mornington Peninsula's highest-rated grazers wholesomefoodie.com.au @wholesomefoodiemelbourne

WEDDINGS | ENGAGEMENTS | CORPORATE | BIRTHDAYS

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Must try

Dishes

Crystal bay prawns with soba noodles, edamame, baby cucumber, radishes, snow pea tendrils with roasted sesame dressing.

Potato rรถsti, romesco, broccolini, redpepper salsa, chorizo + poached eggs.

Homemade mango and coconut ice cream.

Nordie Cafe

Tucks

Stillwater At Crittenden

1008 Mornington-Flinders Rd, Red Hill P 5989 2171 nordie.com.au

Succulent eye fillet served with baked potato, side of asparagus, accompanied with a shiraz.

Crispy sweetcorn fritters with spiced relish, sour cream, rocket salad with a lemon maple dressing.

Savoury cream bun with smoked trout and horseradish.

Squires Loft Mornington

Mr Frankie

33 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South P 5989 8412 montalto.com.au

25 Harrisons Rd, Dromana P 5981 9555 stillwateratcrittenden.com.au

104 Main St, Mornington P 5976 8482 squiresloftmornington.com

37 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South P 5989 8660 tuckswine.com.au

Montalto

48 Norman Ave, Frankston South P 0499 698 405 mrfrankie.com.au

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JIMMYRUM gold&silver L

ocal craft rum producer, JimmyRum was crowned gold and awarded two silver medals in the cane spirits category at the 2020 Australian Distilled Spirits Awards, presented by the Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria. Adding to their collection of accolades, including Australian International Spirits Awards and Drink Easy, presented by Broadsheet, this cemented JimmyRum as Victoria’s best cane spirit producer for 2020.

Their handcrafted spirit is the result of years of research, product development, and pure passion injected into every barrel by owner and ‘Chief Ideas Man’ James McPherson. “It’s truly awesome to be recognised by our peers as an awardwinning spirit,” James said. “We’re just getting started here at JimmyRum and can’t wait to change the way Australians think about rum,” he continued. While their primary goal is to produce amazing rums that warm the soul, they also love to educate as many patrons as they can about the beauty and distinctiveness of rum styles from around the world. They will be producing a wide variety of rum including dark, light, spiced, agricole, and cachaça.

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JimmyRum is the first dedicated craft rum distillery in Victoria. They are on a mission to show visitors what rum can be with their Australian crafted distinctive and delicious rums. James says, “Rum has been misunderstood for far too long and we want to share with you how diverse, unique, and exciting rum can be.” You can visit the working distillery in Dromana and experience a guided tasting of the awardwinning spirits, enjoy a signature cocktail and a bite to eat in the outdoor rum garden. With over 30 cocktails to choose from, seasonal menu featuring local peninsula producers and award-winning spirits to taste and take home, a day at JimmyRum is one of Mornington Peninsula’s greatest finds. Advance bookings are encouraged, as the venue tends to hit capacity for popular weekend sessions, including their famous Sunday Session with local musicians.

Find out more and book a table at jimmyrum.com.au


& y Sta ay Pl P L AC E S TO S TAY A LO N G W I T H T H I N G S YO U C A N S E E & D O W H E N YO U V I S I T T H E M O R N I N G TO N PENINSULA THIS SUMMER

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Stay& Play

STILLWATER AT CRITTENDEN Nestled at the foot of Red Hill within the acclaimed Crittenden Estate is Stillwater, a modern vineyard restaurant showcasing the best of seasons produce in a truly beautiful setting. Since opening it’s doors in 2004, Stillwater has gained a reputation as one of the Peninsula’s finest, offering relaxed fine dining, indoors or out. Enjoy lunch with a view or an event to inspire. Our menu reflects the best of seasonal produce, sourced locally and organic where possible. Family-friendly and with a relaxed atmosphere, Stillwater prides itself on making every guest welcome in this unique and special setting on the Mornington Peninsula.

O

With the easing of restrictions Stillwater is pleased to once again offer special event packages to suit any occasion. Whether it be a corporate function, work conference, Christmas party, birthday celebration, christening or similar, Stillwater will ensure it is one to remember. The Stillwater terrace is now open for lunch from Friday through till Sunday. Sit back and relax whilst joining us on the lawn for pizza, tapas and platters. Pre-booking is required. A: 25 Harrisons Rd, Dromana P: 5981 9555 W: stillwateratcrittenden.com.au

Restaurant O Weddings O Functions

Nestled at the foot of Red Hill within the acclaimed Crittenden Estate is Stillwater, a modern vineyard restaurant showcasing the best of seasons produce in a truly beautiful setting.

25 Harrisons Rd, Dromana P: (03) 5981 9555 Summer opening hours: 7 days for lunch from 14 Dec 2020 to Jan 31, 2021. Dinners Thu-Sat nights. Bookings Essential stillwateratcrittenden.com.au

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Stay& Play

PLAY AT THE KIDZSHED

INDOOR PLAY CENTRE & CAFE

A fun place for kids all ages to play & explore. Parents can relax, enjoy good coffee & yummy home-made food, including gluten free! Kidz Shed is an independent & operated indoor play centre. With an outdoor dining area with umbrellas, climbing equipment & jumping castle. Affordable birthday parties tailored to your needs, themed parties or hire the entire venue. “We always hear from our customers how impressed they are with our cleanliness. Now we are increasing our already high hygiene standards to follow current restrictions & ever-changing guidelines. We’ve always provided hand sanitiser and will be stepping it up even further!” Kidz Shed’s hours have altered to move with our everchanging times, please call to check or book.

SPECIALISING IN KIDS BIRTHDAY PARTIES JANUARY PLAY HOURS WED – SUN 9AM – 4PM

OUTDOOR SEATING & PLAY AREA IMPORTANT INFORMATION! WE ARE CLOSED ON DAYS OF HIGH TEMPERATURES PLEASE SEE FB, INSTA OR WEBSITE FOR UPDATES FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL LISA 0409 875944

P: 5906 5900 M: 0409 875944 E: kidzshed@gmail.com W: kidzshed.com.au 128 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento t: 03 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e: marlenemiller3@bigpond.com Specialising in antique jewellery, as well as newly-made jewellery by Melbourne’s top jewellers

222 MARINE PDE HASTINGS

5906 5900 KIDZSHED.COM.AU

MARLENE MILLER As you wander along the glamorous Sorrento shopping strip you simply have to visit Marlene Miller Antiques, an Aladdin’s cave of unique and unexpected treasures. As soon as you walk into the shop there is so much to see, with two stories of antiques and bric-a-brac from lovely old tools, crystal and fine china to fur coats, hats, dining furniture with chairs by Jacob and Josef Kohn (established in 1849), hat boxes, old leather suitcases with great labels, as well as a great variety of lovely lamps to give your home that special ambience. Upstairs hosts a range of books dating back to the 1700’s, prints and paintings. Known by reputation for her fabulous jewellery with lots of old (including Gold Rush jewellery which was actually made during the Gold Rush)and mourning jewellery which was created to mourn the death of a loved one and became popular in the 1800’s, along with newly created hand-made pieces by Melbourne’s top jewellers. Marlene Miller Antiques has been in Sorrento since 1985 and has been in her present purpose-built building for the past 10 years.

A: 128 Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento P: 5984 1762 or 0438 537 757 January 2021

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Winter Bonus 3 nights for the price of 2 – 1st May to 30th September

NO. 1 IN HOLIDAY RENTALS ON THE No.1 IN HOLIDAY RENTALS ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA MORNINGTON PENINSULA PORTSEA | SORRENTO | BLAIRGOWRIE | RYE

beach house rentals 47A Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento | PH: 03 5984 4578 WWW.BEACHHOUSERENTALS.NET.AU

beach house rentals

Golden sands, wineries, gastronomy, art, fashion, but more importantly, platinum accommodation. From designer style beach houses to vast estates with an abundance of luxurious amenities, or just your average family beach cottage, it is all here on the Mornington Peninsula.

Portsea | Sorrento | Blairgowrie | Rye

47A Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento PH: 03 5984 4578 beachhouserentals.net.au

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Stay& Play

HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM THE UNTOLD EVENTS CO!

Looking for some super fun things to do this January? Here’s the Untold Events Co MUST DO list!

EMU PLAINS MARKET : TWILIGHTS JAN 2ND + 16TH 3PM to 8PM EMU PLAINS RESERVE, BALNARRING www.emuplainsmarket.com.au LITTLE BEAUTY MARKET : TWILIGHT JAN 23 3PM to 8PM CRN HIGH & YOUNG ST, FRANKSTON www.littlebeautymarket.com.au

support local, support small, support innovation, support love, support handmade... support your local market! Love supporting small businesses? Check out our interest store of curious goods at 103 MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON

www.albertanddaphne.com.au

ALBERT & DAPHNE

1. Discover the Emu Plains Market at twilight. Unlike any other market you have ever seen the EPM twilights offer a festival like atmosphere featuring an amazing array of food, entertainment, fun for the kids & 250+ of the very best stallholders Melbourne has to offer! Catch these iconic twilights on Jan 2 and Jan 16 from 3pm to 8pm. www.emuplainsmarket.com.au 2. Visit the prettiest market around: Little Beauty Market has quickly become the creative hub of Frankston showcasing 100+ talented makers handpicked for their uniqueness. Catch a special twilight market on Jan 23 from 3pm to 8pm to experience all the sights and sounds this beautiful market has to offer. www.littlebeautymarket.com.au 3. Check out Albert & Daphne’s Interest Store Of Curious Goods: Visit the Untold Events Co latest venture, a bricks and mortar shop in the heart of Main Street Mornington www.albertanddaphne.com.au

Crittenden Estate is one of the Peninsula’s oldest iconic wineries. Family owned and operated since 1982, we are locals passionate about making outstanding quality cool climate wines that reflect this incredible winemaking region.

Crittenden Estate WINE CENTRE

Described by James Halliday as an outstanding winery regularly producing wines of exemplary quality, Crittenden Estate was yet again awarded Halliday’s highest rating of five red stars in the 2021 Halliday Wine Companion. Discover our story at the custom built Crittenden Wine Centre, designed to enable our customers to truly appreciate the calibre of our wines in comfort and style.

Crittenden Estate 25 Harrisons Rd Dromana open seven days I 5987 3800 www.crittendenwines.com.au

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Stay& Play

YOUR LOCAL WILDLIFE PARK Next time you are thinking of visiting one of the big zoos, why not consider checking out your local wildlife sanctuary? Moonlit Sanctuary Wildlife Conversation Park in Pearcedale has over 70 species that are waiting to meet you. You can explore the bushland while feeding kangaroos and wallabies, patting friendly koalas and enjoying encounters with wombats, koalas and dingoes and seeing many other animals including endangered species. Moonlit Sanctuary is the ideal place to learn more about the fascinating animals that call Australia home. There are keeper presentations and shows in the purposebuilt arena daily. And don’t forget to stop at the Koala Encounters area to snap a photo with one of the irresistibly cuddly koalas or book an encounter to pat a super cute wombat named Mary. Moonlit Sanctuary grew out of the childhood dreams of founder and director Michael Johnson. Michael imagined a place where people could experience the rare and unusual animals that roam the Australian bush. Moonlit Sanctuary is that place. “We thank every visitor who comes through our doors and experiences Moonlit Sanctuary, especially those who connect with wildlife they have never seen or heard of before,’ said Michael. ‘It is our hope that each connection creates awareness of the animal’s plight, and that together we can help halt their extinction, so that our children’s children will also experience the joy of their company.” The Sanctuary has become an ark for endangered creatures, and a showcase of their unique beauty. It is a living classroom which encourages children and adults alike to unlock the mystery of Australian mammals, reptiles, birds, fish, insects and amphibians in a natural bush setting. Mr Johnson said, “Moonlit Sanctuary’s activities range from breeding and releasing endangered species to critical habitat restoration and encouraging our visitors to become wildlife champions.” Having re-opened to visitors in late October, the Sanctuary is enjoying seeing locals return. Mr Johnson explains, “Our visitors provide a fantastic real-life enrichment for the animals, and some of our social animals were very aware that things had changed but, of course, couldn’t understand why.” “We believe meeting each other is just as engaging for many of our species as it is for the visitors,” he added. Open every day, except Christmas Day, Moonlit Sanctuary offers a great family day out but it doesn’t stop there. As the sun sets, Moonlit Sanctuary comes alive again with unique lantern-lit guided tours.

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Night birds are active, kangaroos come out to play, tiny gliders swoop around, and endangered quolls, pademelons and bettongs forage for food. Groups for Night Tours are kept small and take 1 1/2 to 2 hours to complete. Tours begin between 7pm and 8:30pm depending on the time of sunset and must be booked in advance. It is an amazing way to get close up to Australia’s fascinating wildlife, offering opportunities to meet a wide variety of animals in their natural nocturnal environment where they are really active, busily interacting with each other and their visitors. The Night Tour guides are passionate and knowledgeable about the animals and their conservation and will answer all your wildlife questions during this unforgettable wildlife safari. For a truly special experience you can book a private night tour; perfect for that date night you’ve been planning or as a holiday treat for the family. Bookings are essential as the Park has implemented new procedures to ensure social distancing with staggered arrival times. Bookings can be made online at moonlitsanctuary.com.au. Night Tour Tickets Adults: $55 Concession: $50

Children: $33 Family: $165

Private Night Tours $290 for 1-2 people

$72 for additional people

Day Admission Tickets Adults: $26 Children: $13 Concession: $23 Family Pass: $70 Located at 550 Tyabb-Tooradin Rd, Pearcedale Open from 10:00am-5:00pm weekdays and 9:30am to 5:00pm weekends.


your local wildlife sanctuary

your local wildlife sanctuary Located in Pearcedale at the entrance to the Mornington Peninsula Open daily from 10am—5pm


Stay& Play

HIT THE SWITCH! What do you remember as a kid? No doubt it’s a few key experiences that stand out in your mind. Family travels, adventures, or maybe trying new things for the first time?! If that’s what you remember, then how about you ‘hit the switch’ on your everyday routine and create your own key experience by enjoying some Ranch life. Bring yourself, partner, mates or your family and get amongst everything that The Ranch has to offer. Stay in one of our cosy log cabins, and couple it with a ride package where you can experience the views of Bass Strait while riding one of our beautiful horses. Our horses are hand-picked to suit your size, riding ability and requirements. We have different trails to suit all riding abilities.

If you’re looking for a more relaxing stay, grab a book and lounge around the pool or send the kids to do some activities while you chill and enjoy a tea or coffee and a bite to eat in our new café. At night, you can simply sit, sip and watch the sunset. We can’t wait to have you here. Whether it’s just for coffee and cake, a day trip, a weekend away or a full week of fun and adventure. See you soon! A: 810 Boneo Rd, Cape Schanck P: 5988 6262 W: theranchmp.com.au

The Ranch has also partnered with Peninsula Nomads who specialise in creating and setting up private tipi experiences and pop up picnics. Glamping at The Ranch is a unique experience that delivers peaceful surrounds with the sound of the ocean in the background and the varying sounds and calls from the roaming animals. Try something new by booking some of our activities. How about mountainboarding, archery, rock climbing, giant swing or crate stack. Adventure camp doesn’t only have to be for the kids. Adults can also share in the fun and adventure. Nothing like a little rivalry between the kids and the adults and/or adults among their mates!

STAY & PLAY STAY & PLAY

STAY & PLAY

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STAY & PLAY STAY & PLAY STAY & PLAY

Hit the Switch on your every day routine and make the most of a weekend theaSwitch onof your every day routine andactivities make the and mosthave of a weekend away! Hit Grab couple families, book some a family Hit the Switch on your every day routine and make the most of a weekend a couple families, somefun activities and have a family camp.away! The Grab 'big kids' willofhave just book as much as the little ones. away! GrabThe a couple of families, book some activities and have a family have just as much fun as the little ones. Make camp. up for all 'big thekids' lost will catch up time you've missed in 2020, bundle all your forkids' all the losthave catchjust up time you've missed in 2020, bundle all your camp.Make Theup 'big will as much fun as the little ones. mates and have some FUN! Stay in a cabin, try mountainboarding, take a and FUN! up Staytime in a cabin, trymissed mountainboarding, take a all your Makemates up for allhave the some lost catch you've in 2020, bundle scenicscenic horsehorse trail,trail, fire an an arrow, have swing...the is endless. haveaa giant giant swing...the funfun is endless. mates and have somefire FUN!arrow, Stay in a cabin, try mountainboarding, take a scenic horse trail, fire an arrow, have a giant swing...the fun is endless.

GLAMPING GLAMPING

Experience glamping at The Ranch with

Experience glamping at The Ranch with Peninsula Nomads. Enjoy waking up in our GLAMPING Peninsula Nomads. upall inour our unique setting, Enjoy with thewaking sounds of Experience glamping at The Ranch with uniqueanimals. setting,Enjoy with athe sounds of all our coffee and breakfast in our Peninsula Nomads. Enjoy waking up in cafe the next morning. animals. Enjoy a coffee and breakfast in our our unique setting, with the sounds of all our cafe the next morning. ForEnjoy more information: animals. a coffee and breakfast in our www.theranchmp.com.au cafemore the next morning. For information: admin@theranchmp.com.au

www.theranchmp.com.au 5988 6262 For more information: admin@theranchmp.com.au www.theranchmp.com.au 5988 6262


Stay& Play

GOLD MEDAL-WINNING BEER IS HERE TWØBAYS Brewing Co has stacked up a pile of milestones since opening just two years ago. And now the Dromana-based team can proudly place its first gold medal behind the bar. Located in the Dromana Industrial Estate Habitat, TWØBAYS Pale Ale won gold at the Independent Brewers Association Beer Awards in November. To receive a gold medal, at the ‘Indies’, beer has to be of an exceptional standard – it’s not a first-second-thirdplace scenario – many categories don’t award any gold medals. Back in October 2018, TWØBAYS asked the public to sample two Pale Ales and vote for their favourite. There was a clear winner, so they launched with that beer and now it’s front and centre of their core range. “Mornington Peninsula’s breweries are competing with other craft beer hotspots across the country, and we’re all faring really well with another big medal haul,” says CEO and Founder Richard Jeffares. “We’re just pumped to be a part of that now.” TWØBAYS has poured more than 30 different beer styles through its Dromana taproom in the last two years, from a 3.5% Passionfruit Sour to an 8.0% Double IPA, and lots in between. “We're really looking forward to getting that buzz back in the Dromana Habitat this summer,” says Jeffares. “We’ve all been hurting through a challenging year, and the fantastic businesses in this hotbed in the Dromana Industrial Estate are raring to go this summer. Within 500-metres, you can walk from our Taproom to Jetty Road Brewery, Jimmy Rum, Bass & Flinders Gin Distillery and Mr Little Cider! These craft liquor manufacturers all have great tasting rooms on-site too. It’s a brilliant community – and such a great atmosphere on weekends with something for everyone." TWØBAYS is also famous across the country as it is Australia’s only dedicated gluten free brewery with a taproom. “Prior to being diagnosed with Coeliac Disease, I fell in love with everything about craft beer,” says Jeffares who can no longer drink beer brewed with barley, wheat or rye. “Craft beer is a full sensory experience – and it’s so much fun to explore and share in the journey with people close to you. It’s about the feeling; both mouthfeel of the beer, and the feeling of the moment you compare notes over an incredible new taste. It’s about the sight –

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the look of the beer in a glass and the sight of giant stainless-steel tanks! It’s about the smell – the smell of the brewery and the hoppy aromas in the beer – and the sounds; a can opening, or tap pouring with a great buzz all around you.” “I couldn’t do that anymore so my brewery had to have a Taproom. Now we can share this sensory journey with people who otherwise may not have had the chance to experience what craft beer is really all about. That’s why we brewed a Hoppy Brown Ale which is now ranked Australia’s best gluten free beer on untappd.com. It’s why we released a Red Ale and a lime and coriander Gose, with plenty more to come.” With every tasting paddle (4 x 150ml samples) you get a beer menu complete with notes on the aroma, flavour and colour, and the beers can be matched with great gluten free pizza just metres away from the towering stainless steel. “What has really surprised us, is how many ‘non-gluten free’ customers come in just to explore beers made from alternative malts, like millet and buckwheat,” added Jeffares. With delivery and stockists nationwide, TWØBAYS is growing fast, but the Taproom will always be the heartbeat of the business. It’s where Richard and the team get to share a beer with their customers. While booking is not compulsory, it's advised for those who want to secure a table inside. A: Unit 1, 2 Trewhitt Court, Dromana 3936. E: taproom@twobays.beer P: 0359 100 880 W: twobays.beer @twobaysbeer Opening Hours: Fri 4-9pm, Sat 12-9pm, Sun 12-6pm + 12-9pm on Sun 24 and 12-5pm on Mon 25 January


A BEER FOR EVERYONE

For the full craft beer experience, come and enjoy a paddle and a pizza just metres away from our stainless-steel brewery. Fri 4-9pm, Sat 12-9pm and Sun 12-6pm (check online for additional hours over summer)

Unit 1, 2 Trewhitt Court, Dromana, Victoria 3936 taproom@twobays.beer 03 5910 0880

www.TWOBAYS.BEER


Stay& Play

LET THEM EAT STEAK After a long winter, Squire’s Loft Mornington has re-opened its doors and arms to those looking for an unforgettable dining experience on the Mornington Peninsula. New owners, Siller and Deborah Bello have emerged from the lockdown, eager to introduce their newly redesigned restaurant in the heart of Main Street. With a carefully curated cocktail list including a Pisco Sour and Summer Fling, diners can enjoy mixologist-inspired concoctions. Others may choose to wine-match with a wine from the hand-selected wine list including an array of the finest local wines from Montalto, Polperro, Foxeys Hangout, Trofeo, Crittenden, Point Leo Estate and more. One thing that has - and will always - remain true to Squires Loft Mornington is the unwavering commitment to quality, cooked-to-perfection steaks. Premium quality ingredients locally sourced and accompanied with signature touches including baste and sauces is what makes Squires Loft Mornington a true foodie destination. Siller and Deborah are passionate about delivering a dining experience complemented with and elegant and sophisticated ambience which was inspired by New York City Steakhouses and fine dining locally and abroad.

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Our dedicated team look forward to serving you soon 104 Main Street Mornington Dinner: Tues, Wed, & Sun 5.30 to 10pm. Thur - Sat 5.30pm to 11pm Lunch: Sat & Sun 12pm to 3pm T: 5976 8482 squiresloftmornington.com.au


NEW LOOK

OPEN FOR LUNCH SATURDAY + SUNDAY + DINNER TUESDAY - SUNDAY 104 MAIN ST MORNINGTON | PHONE 5976 8482

WWW.SQUIRESLOFTMORNINGTON.COM.AU January 2021

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Stay& Play

PARC IS REBOUNDING FROM COVID AND IS BACK TO SUPPORT YOU IN 2021! Following an on and off 8-month closure period due to the impact of COVID-19, Peninsula Aquatic Recreation Centre is back stronger than ever in 2021. The business had tremendous success with the launch of its digital platform, PARC Your Way, during closure supporting the local and wider community to keep active whilst at home for free. This program is continuing to run whilst the facility is open, meeting a demand for the flexibility of at-home fitness workouts popular with so many people these days. The facility itself welcomed back visitors from early November and following a gradual increase in capacity is now operating at ‘COVID normal’. This means it’s almost back to its former glory but with strict hygiene and safety measures in place. Patrons can enjoy all of the usual fitness and aquatic programs, including Aqua classes and hydrotherapy with the familiar quality support from trainers and staff at PARC.

Shannon Mounsey, Health & Fitness Manager at PARC, said: “It’s been a long road but we’re delighted to be open again. The Centre still looks a bit different with new terms of entry and cleaning processes in place to protect our members, however it’s awesome to have the familiar buzz of activity back! “2021 is going to be an awesome year as we’re developing even more exciting new programs for our members across the Peninsula. Ensuring that we’re always innovating and expanding the quality of our offering whilst bringing excellent service and flexibility to suit all lifestyles.” To find out more about PARC’s current operating levels visit the website: W: parcfrankston.com.au

LOVE ty LOVE fitnes LOVE LOVE able s LOVE be ac LOVE cesse Love being part of a wonderful community Love the joy a good workout brings Love participating in quality health and fitness programs Love the friendly, skilled and knowledgeable staff Love all the new and innovative ways to be active Love celebrating successes with my PARC family LOVE that PARC is back in 2021. LOVE my PARC! Come join our PARC family!

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Love being part of a wonderful community Love January 2021participating in quality health and fitness programs Love the joy a good workout brings

LOVE LOVE


Stay& Play

HAWKES FARM – IT’S IN THE SOIL Richard Hawkes is a sixth-generation Hawkes farmer. That means Hawkes hands have been pulling fresh fruit and vegetables out of Victorian soil for more than 100 years. Things changed in 2007 when Farmer Richard started growing the trusty potato in a small area on the Boneo farm, and today Hawkes’ Premium Kipflers are served in restaurants across Australia. Turning off the Boneo Road, the red-tinted soil we’re so accustomed to seeing in these parts makes for a friendly welcome down a long drive past pick ‘n’ ride tour trailers, the new picnic lawn, and a 1970-something red Farmall Tractor for the kids (and the big kids) to play on.

farmgate experience. Hawkes even won gold in the Food Tourism 2019 RACV Victorian Tourism Awards. The shelves are brimming with the usual local suspects, but also features produce that is harder to find, including Cape Schanck Olive Estate olive oil, Red Hill Truffles and hazelnuts, Rye Sourdough Co, and Tuerong Farm flour. Friendly farmgate staff serve up fresh Boneo Road Roasters coffee and cakes supplied by the Hidden Kitchen in Tootgarook, while Hawkes’ very own iconic food truck whips up strawberry smoothies in the summer, hot soup in the winter, and the most divine hand-cut, thrice cooked hot chips all year round.

The farm gate, which started as a few bags of spuds and an honesty box, stocks fresh produce from around the Peninsula – and even further afield for a handful of specialist goods.

Farm Gate: Every day 8am – 5pm (except Christmas Day).

Many farmers and producers in the region supply around the nation but do not sell direct, so Hawkes Farm is making the best of local available to everyone, in a sustainable and responsible one-stop shop and

P: (03) 5988 6785

Food Truck: Saturdays and Sundays 10am – 3pm A: 661 Boneo Road, Boneo E: enquiries@hawkesvegetables.com.au @hawkes_farm

. ry day exc m! e v e n e p O p y 8am-5 eo a D s a m X o Rd, Bon e n o B 1 6 6 mgate, r a f d o o f Fresh d picking! picnics an m.com.au r hawkesfa

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Stay& Play

HIGH GLASS ON THE HILL From molten glass to unparalleled beauty in the spectacular hills we’re proud to call home – an ancient craft with a vibrant future The Mornington Peninsula is graced with countless narratives of boutique businesses driven by a passion and love for this land – but few hold the global stature Gordon Studio Glassblowers does. The simple truth is, not many of our 8 billion-human population are capable of evolving a skill that has been practised since the middle of 1st Century BC. You can feel the ancient craft in each artisanal design, telling stories of yesteryear through a modern-day lens. From native animals, to large platters and Zoom framers, to centrepiece garden sculptures (exhibited in the new front courtyard), the Gallery presents a smorgasbord of glass art – all created in this Red Hill studio. Each piece takes a unique journey from ideation to kiln, and sometimes – after hours on the blowpipe – the malleable molten glass ends up in the cracked glass wall Eileen and Grant are building (slowly, hopefully) metres from the workshop. To look into the finished creation presents an opportunity to see captured fire manifesting in a spellbinding energy and light – telling a personal story for a lifetime to those fortunate enough to own a piece, however small or large.

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Passed over 60 years through three generations of the Gordon family, from Norway to Scotland to Adelaide, Tasmania and Victoria, each Gordon glassblower brings their own perspective on the craft. From Alasdair and Rish Gordon mastering engraving and sandblasting techniques in Norway, to Eileen and brothers Kevin and Cameron – and then Eileen’s husband Grant – to their two sons Hamish and Calum, who grew up in the studio and are now both emerging glass artists working in Australia and New Zealand. To watch Eileen Gordon and husband Grant Donaldson at work with their sons and the team is mesmerising. In the same way that we are transfixed by fire, watching people create colour, movement and light from fire further fills the cup. Such skills – and active artists with this experience and talent – are usually reserved for audiences in the artistic and cultural capitals of the world; New York, Berlin, Montreal or Milan. But here on our doorstep, we’re extremely proud that the Gordon Family and their business call Red Hill, and the Mornington Peninsula, home. Studio and Gallery: Every day 10am – 5pm (except Christmas Day). A: 290 Red Hill Road cnr. Dunns Creek Road Red Hill P: 03 5989 7073 @gordonstudioglassblowers


GORDON STUDIO GLASSBLOWERS RED HILL

ANCIENT CRAFT MODERN ART

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HELLO AGAIN.

It’s been a while. WITH THE ANTICIPATED SUMMERTIME NOW IN FULL SWING, REDISCOVER BOTH THE ALLURE AND BEAUTY OF THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA AS WELL AS COUNTLESS EXPERIENCES TO IMMERSE YOURSELF IN. Summertime on the Mornington Peninsula is undoubtedly one of the most vibrant and enticing stages of the year. Nestled between verdant hinterlands and enchanting seas, our region encourages an array of activities and pursuits for each and every local and visitor. While this year has truly been like no other, we are beyond excited to be welcoming you back to our own piece of coastal paradise. Where you can say hello again to the gorgeous summertime and simultaneously create new memories to last indefinitely.

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visitmp.org January 2021


Mazda 3 10 WEEKLY PRIZES TOTAL PRIZE POOL

$47K

Say hello again to our major summer giveaway. Simply enter online and tune into 3MP for weekly winner announcements, live on air.

There are 10 weekly prizes from chef’s hat restaurants to weekend getaways, from pampering experiences to body products, the Peninsula’s best wines, beers, cider and spirits, and a major prize of a brand new Mazda 3 G20 Pure Auto. WEEK

1

WEEK

3

WEEK

5

WEEK

7

WEEK

9

Peninsula Hot Springs DRAWN 11/12/2020

Wine and Pamper DRAWN 08/01/2021

Beer, Cider + Spirits Trail DRAWN 22/01/2021

WEEK

2

WEEK

4

WEEK

6

Crittenden Estate

WEEK

Mornington Racecourse

WEEK

DRAWN 05/02/2021

DRAWN 19/02/2021

MA JOR PRIZE

8

10

Mercure Portsea DRAWN 18/12/2020

ENTER + VIEW PRIZE DETAILS AT

visitmp.org/win

Pt. Leo Estate DRAWN 15/01/2021

Lancemore Lindenderry Red Hill

Terms and Conditions apply. Closing date for entries is 25 February 2021.

DRAWN 29/01/2021

TO ENTER + FIND OUT MORE SCAN HERE

Carmel at Sorrento DRAWN 12/02/2021

Samsonite Luggage Pack DRAWN 26/02/2021

Mornington Mazda - Mazda 3

DRAWN 6 MARCH 2021

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY

January 2021

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WHOLESALE WINES

DIRECT TO PUBLIC

AT WHOLESALE PRICING

Wine Lovers Warehouse is the direct to public arm of our wholesale business specialising in restaurant, hotel, and function wines for over 17 years. With COVID-19 restrictions imposed on our venue customers, 2020 put a big handbrake on our wholesale business and stopped it dead. In March we made a decision to transform and stay alive, supported by our friends and the local community, which we will

be forever grateful, we opened up the warehouse three days every week to the public, selling our wines and our suppliers at trade prices and no retail mark ups. It is our commitment to remain open servicing the needs of our Wine Lover community into 2021 and beyond. Come along and say hello, grab a bottle or a case. Don’t forget to bring in this publication for a free bottle of bubbles with any purchase

HOURS: Thursday, Friday, Saturday Weekly 10am until 5pm LOCATION: Unit 5, 3 Trewhitt Court, Dromana Industrial Estate, 3936


Terra Felix Mornington Peninsula Pinot Gris

Viscosi Wines Mornington Peninsula Pinot Noir

Granite Rose Estate Mornington Peninsula Chardonnay

Sterling Estate Adelaide Hills Sparkling Rose

RRP $25 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $24.95 OUR PRICE $8

RRP $24.95 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $29 OUR PRICE $14

Hidden Ridge King Valley Prosecco

Rosemount Estate 1.5L Magnum Chardonnay

Rouge Home Coonawarra Shiraz

Nillahcootie Estate Mansfield Cabernet Sauvignon

RRP $32 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $22.95 OUR PRICE $8

RRP $19.95 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $35.00 OUR PRICE $5

Call us on 9596 4278 or see our full range on our website www.winelover.com.au


Practical. Cost Effective. Door-to door service. Practical. Cost Effective.Door-to-door service. Luxury Holiday Linen Hire

Holiday Rentals, B&Bs

Domestic & Commercial Washing & Ironing

Restaurants/Wineries

Accommodation & Table Linen Hire

Day Spas Medical Specialists

Proudly servicing the greater Mornington Peninsula region. info@baylinen.com.au E:E: info@baylinen.com.au P: 0438 0438 387 387 344 P: 344 baylinen.com.au

baylinen.com.au


TALKING ABOUT BACKYARD HENS ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA

T

alking Hens is a family business based in Merricks on the Mornington Peninsula and sells entertaining, fun and friendly laying hens. It all started back in 2012 when we had a free-range egg farm business in Keysborough, on the outskirts of Melbourne. They began selling free range eggs at farmers markets and to local customers. As they grew they started selling backyard hens along with owner Giuliana's dad’s special free range chicken feed. Giuliana says, "We greatly enjoyed our range of different customers but with working 7-days a week and long hours, we decided to stop selling eggs. This meant that we could focus exclusively on selling hens and everything needed by backyard chicken keepers."

"The lessons that we have learned from our egg farming experience and our customers have been invaluable in ensuring that we provide the best advice and support we can to our customers. We have added a complete range of products to make owning backyard chickens a breeze and a pleasure that the whole family can enjoy," said Giuliana. 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd, Merricks M: 0406 691 231 W: talkinghens.com.au Facebook: @TalkingHens

They continue selling the breed they know very well which is the Hy-Line Brown laying hen and feedback from customers confirms that they are ideal for urban backyards. Not only are the hens fantastic layers but are also very good with children and pets.

Looking for backyard hens but unsure where to start?

Talking Hens is a family business that loves backyard chickens! We like them so much that we specialise in supplying only the friendliest, best-laying hens along with the best quality products to keep them happy and healthy. There’s nothing like the friendship, entertainment and nutrition that you receive from our laying hens - a pleasure to be shared!

Visit our Website to learn more and download our FREE, Beginner’s Guide to Backyard Chickens at:

www.TalkingHens.com.au

Open Thursday to Monday 10am till 4pm (Closed Tue & Wed). 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd Merricks. For enquiries 0406 691 231

www.facebook.com/TalkingHens January 2021

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We are pleased to announce the MORNINGTON SUMMER OF MUSIC daytime program for the month of January.

Musicians, artists and buskers will bring music to Main Street. Simply scan the QR Code above for updated program information.

Bringing LIVE MUSIC back to MORNINGTON!

.

www.morningtonmusicfestival.com.au/summer-of-music/

mainstreetmornington.com.au


There are 773 reasons to move to Village Glen

Is it the 9 hole golf course? Is it the 8 rink bowling green or croquet lawn? Is it the restaurant or café? Or the craft centre, workshop or vegetable garden? Is it the pool, spa or gymnasium? Or even our very affordable service fee?

It’s our community... it’s our 773 residents. Village Glen, where it’s all about people. Call us today to receive our information pack. 335 Eastbourne Road, Capel Sound VIC 3940

03 5986 4455 WWW.VILLAGEGLEN.COM.AU January 2021

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THE BAYS AGED CARE HASTINGS Come and experience our home for yourself. Hastings has welcomed a new aged care home, and we are now welcoming tours. Situated on the original Hastings Bush Nursing Hospital site, the architecturally designed home has been carefully created to maintain the welcoming, homely feel that the previous home was renowned for. The residents can now enjoy ultimate luxury, whether it is by the cosy gas log fires in the cooler months or relaxing in one of the beautiful gardens or sunrooms. Stunning artwork, multiple living spaces, a designated family room, and state-of-the-art aged care amenities are all a part of our home. The unique sense of family resonates throughout the home. "It's the best move I've done. They look after me, and it's number one. They are like friends, why is this so different in here, they are like family," said Mario, resident for seven months. All the rooms are beautifully designed and appointed with a selection of aspects to suit. Whether you prefer orientation to the sunny northeast with water glimpses or internal calming courtyard views, each private room caters for a variety of preferences. All rooms have their own ensuite and are filled with natural light. The four dining and lounge areas are warm and inviting, each with their own servery, gas log fire and terrace or courtyard to enjoy. Beautifully designed to promote a sense of homely ambience, the coordinated artwork and colour schemes will be sure to resonate with residents and their loved ones. To honour the heritage of the Hastings site, there are a number of historical photographs from times gone by. A key point of difference with The Bays Aged Care Hastings is, as part of The Bays Healthcare Group, the home is aligned with The Bays Hospital in Mornington. Founded in the 1930s as the Mornington Bush Nursing Hospital, The Bays Hospital has a rich history of caring for the community. Residents at The Bays Aged Care

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Mario, resident The Bays Aged Care.

may choose to access the comprehensive range of acute medical, surgical and intensive care services, from the same trusted team, when the need for acute care arises. The new home provides a quiet sense of luxury and modern styling while maintaining its community charm. The treasured "Pink Ladies" and volunteers have their own space where they can meet to discuss fundraising opportunities to support the residents or prepare and distribute freshly, cut flowers. The professional staff, with their welcoming smiles, provide the best possible care for the residents. The Bays Aged Care Hastings is a fully accredited Aged Care provider. Trusted by the local community for over 90 years The Bays is independent, not for profit, and community owned. The Bays Aged Care normally operates at full occupancy. With the extension of places created by the completion of the new building, we are excited to offer a limited number of places available immediately. Tours are now available. For more information and to book a tour contact our Customer Service Coordinator on 0436 913 373 or Welcome2Hastings@thebays.com.au Welcome2Hastings@thebays.com.au


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AAbeautiful new aged care in Hastings is opening soon. Experience our home forhome yourself. available. Book today. beautiful new aged care home inTours Hastings is opening soon. A beautiful new aged care home in Hastings is opening soon. Think comfortable, modernmodern rooms that cater singles and and We’ve We’ve for thefor Mornington community for for Think comfortable, rooms thatfor cater for singles been caring the Mornington Peninsula community A beautiful new aged care homebeen incaring Hastings is Peninsula opening soon.

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The Bays Aged Care Hastings

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Retirement living, but not as you know it.

Introducing the Heronswood

ALFRESCO

DINING 3.5 x 4.6

STUDY BEDROOM THREE 2.3 x 3.9

LOUNGE 3.5 x 4.6

BATH ROOM

DW

WO MW

FRIDGE

WM

LINEN

ENSUITE

BUTLERS PANTRY

KITCHEN 5.6 x 2.5

LAUNDRY 4.2 x 1.9

WIR

The Heronswood has the kitchen as the heart of the home. With open plan living and dining both flowing to the undercover alfresco, BBQ area and verandah, this is contemporary coastal living at its best. The working zone is completed with a butlers pantry. The master suite has a walk-in robe and ensuite with double vanity. A ssecond double bedroom, study/third bedroom, bathroom, laundry and a double garage complete this delightful home.

ROBE

$815K

BEDROOM TWO 4.2 x 3.0

Image is indicative only

MASTER SUITE 4.2 x 3.6 GARAGE 5.5 x 6.1 VERANDAH

THE HERONSWOOD VILLA

Visit the village and inspect the display villas seven days a week 10:00am–4:00pm. Call to discuss your retirement future with our friendly sales specialists and learn more about living at Martha Bay.

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The finishing touches on your dream home!

$5K FREE UPGRADE OFFER

BR

LDRY STUDY

BEDROOM 2 3.1 x 3.0

BUTLERS PANTRY

ROBE

F DINING 4.9 x 3.6

BATH ROOM

DW

KITCHEN

WO MW

LINEN

SETTLE BY 30 JUNE 2021 TO RECEIVE $5,000 WORTH OF FREE UPGRADES OF YOUR CHOICE ON THE DALKEITH.

LOUNGE 5.1 x 5.1 ALFRESCO

Conditions apply

ENS

WIR ENTRY

MASTER SUITE 4.4 x 3.5

GARAGE 5.8 x 5.7 PORCH

THE DALKIETH VILLA

111 Craigie Road Mt Martha

Freecall: 1800 998 990 marthabay.com.au


Focus On

on

Blairgowrie

Blairgowrie is located on a thin strip of the Mornington Peninsula, facing Port Phillip Bay in the north and Bass Strait in the south, nestled between the popular beach resorts of Rye and Sorrento. Blairgowrie is 87 km south of Melbourne. Population: 4,627 Blairgowrie has an area of 6.3 square kilometres Blairgowrie has a compact commercial centre situated opposite the Bay beach, featuring a supermarket, speciality shops and cafes. Popular for holiday makers and families, it has calm and safe sandy beaches that front onto Port Phillip. Also fronting Port Phillip is the extensive Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron boat harbour which is a hive of water craft activity. Spectacular walks and scenery can be enjoyed in the Mornington Peninsula National Park which runs along the rugged Bass Strait coastline. There are numerous walking tracks along cliff tops, through sand dunes and down to the beaches below. Koonya Ocean Beach, at the end of Hughes Road, is the most easily accessible, with a lookout at the car park providing views down to the rocky outcrop of Pelly Point and inland across Blairgowrie towards the bay beach. Other places of interest along this scenic coastline include Bridgewater Bay at the end of St Johns Wood Road, Pearses Beach and Dimmicks Beach Blairgowrie Jumping Rock is a special attraction of the area, and suited for daredevils. Situated in Bridgwater Bay, the scenery is as beautiful as you’d expected it to be so you can marvel at the breathtaking view before diving from the 10m rock into the pristine waters.

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Blairgowrie's was originally named Canterbury. Later it was known as Sorrento West. After the Second World War it was renamed Blairgowrie. The name Blairgowrie was taken from an old estate called 'Blairgowrie House' owned by Dr. John Blair who adopted the name from a Scottish Village north of Strathmore . The Honorable Michael O’Grady bought over 140 acres of land around the Blairgowrie district and built his 6 room house "Villa Maria" in l872. He was a prominent figure in public life and in Irish circles in Melbourne In the 1860’s and 1870’s and his career was very fully described in The Advocate after his death. The late 1940's and 1950's saw a period of extensive sub-division and opening up of all the Blairgowrie area north of the Melbourne Road, and, east of St. Johns Wood Road, through to the Ocean Park. In 1954, the Club Constitution was completed and the name changed to the Blairgowrie Yacht Club. Later that year the name became Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron to avoid conflict of the initials with the Brighton Yacht Club. The next two years saw a period of intense co-operative effort in building the Club House. It was a memorable occasion on the evening of 9th November 1957 when Commodore George Pizzey welcomed Miss Australia to the new Clubhouse.

Coffee Safari

Freshly brewed coffee is a must-have for weekends away and the Mornington Peninsula's coffee haunts are second to none. Here are just a few to check out when you head down to this beautiful part of the world.

Saint Ernest

2827 POINT NEPEAN ROAD Known for their friendly service, Saint Ernest offers breakfast, lunch and dinner with a focus on sharing their modern Australian dishes. The beverage list champions local and international wines, while the coffee is a seasonal blend coffee from Axil coffee roastery.

Panda Blairgowrie 2871 POINT NEPEAN ROAD

From coffee to cocktails, breakfast to dinner, Panda caters for all occasions. Seating is also available in the rear courtyard, and out the front.

Blairgowrie Cafe

2837 POINT NEPEAN ROAD Located opposite Blairgowrie Beach, dine indoors or under an umbrella al fresco. Great selection of coffee and meals from breakfast and lunch to afternoon tea.


What to do Take in a walk along Montforts & Koonya beaches and discover secluded parts of the peninsula coastline and bushland. Try some rock jumping at Bridgewater Bay or maybe a bit of fishing off the Blairgowrie pier, which is also a popular spot for scuba diving. The Blairgowrie Yacht Club offers both locals and tourists a variety of water activities. Relax and unwind at one of the many restaurants and cafes there. Photography: Yanni & supplied

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Puzzle

Corner

ACROSS 1. Least fatty 5. Covered cart 9. Slack 12. Layabouts 16. Elicit 17. Surgical dressing 18. Cleans (carpet) 20. Ashamed 22. Restraining cord 23. Swimming stroke 24. Fruit pastes 26. Tempting 27. Fragile 28. Gossips (6-7) 31. Furious 32. Persist 34. Mark of disgrace 36. Luau souvenir 37. Stealthy thieves (3,8) 40. Major computer firm (1,1,1) 42. Supply (entertainment) (3,2) 43. Leaks slowly 45. Comes before 47. Domestic helpers 49. Dud car 50. Deviates 52. Set of beliefs 54. Happen 55. Nips 56. Relaxation routine 58. Dethrone from 59. Promotional hype 60. Hovel 61. Narrow part of bottle 62. Lingered (on) 63. Plant, ... vera 64. Pure 67. Hurt 68. Facet 69. Jumpier 72. Lingerie item 74. State grants 78. Drily humorous 79. Olympic Games body (1,1,1) 80. In vogue, ... mode (1,2) 81. Granule 82. Fencing blades 85. Dessert, ... pie 87. Follow next 88. Slippery fish 90. Sweethearts' card 91. Dues

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92. Eccentric pop star, Lady ... 93. Baghdad citizen 94. Better late than ... 95. Skim swiftly 96. Home stereo (2-2) 97. Creamy cheese 100. Sigh of relief 102. No-man's-land 103. Go for dip 104. Study tables 106. Surmise 108. December 31, New Year's ... 109. Crony 110. Mum & ... 112. Merriment 116. Graze 118. Appraised 120. Apparel 121. Scan 123. Chesty gasp 125. Origin 126. Dapper 127. Alcoholic derelict 128. 12 o'clock 129. Heredity DNA units 130. Ellipse shapes 131. Jaunty 132. Small bell sounds 134. Most socially popular group (1,4) 136. Wise people 139. Indestructible 141. Section 142. Excursions 144. Chile's capital 146. Sibling's daughter 147. Adds seasoning to 148. Flit (about) 149. Opponents 151. ... & outs 152. Counterfeiter 155. Zimbabwe's largest city 158. Welsh dog 159. Moody 162. Misgivings 164. Cracked on surface 165. Up on ahead 166. Discards 170. Port-au-Prince is there 171. Robben Island detainee, Nelson ... 172. Advantage 173. Olive farm 174. Local dialect 175. Broke promise January 2021

176. Backslide 177. Vacuous 178. Abominates

DOWN 1. Disconnect from the internet (3,3) 2. March birthstone 3. Showed by example 4. Inns 5. Bowler's goals 6. Insect larva 7. Twig shelter 8. Ambitious person (2-6) 9. Frond 10. Acceptable 11. Totally deplete 12. Accommodating 13. Loyalties 14. Assessing 15. Realm 19. Is obliged to 21. Stain on character 25. TV comedy series 26. Teaching session 29. Sexual drive 30. Rudder bar 33. In so far (as) 35. Unpalatable 36. Miming to pre-recorded lyrics (3-7) 38. Word puzzles 39. Nomadic 41. Misinterpret 42. Shank 44. Take a chair 46. Barbiturate 48. Frowns 49. Soothed 51. Thin layer 53. Mistrustfully 55. Cricket legend, Sir Donald ... 57. Abdominal muscles 60. Used spade 65. Composition 66. Steak cut (1-4) 70. Dutch sea walls 71. Whiskey-laced hot beverage (5,6) 73. Rescued by helicopter 75. Fertiliser compound 76. Lifeless 77. Biblical garden 78. Animal's drinking pool

83. Eject from house 84. Goo 85. Wrote in icing 86. Dollars & ... 89. Country, ... Lanka 91. Scarcely any 92. Roaming frivolously 96. Mob 98. Throat-clearing noise 99. Riding strap 101. Span 103. Chides 105. Spreads out untidily 107. Refusals 111. Nimble 112. Descended rock-face by rope 113. Elementary 114. Slightest 115. Cross 117. Aroused 119. Decimal base 120. Staring 122. Tragedy 124. Extrasensory perception (1,1,1) 132. Dealing illegally 133. Granny 134. Agree 135. International cycling event, ... France (4,2) 137. Butane or neon 138. Actor's dilemma (5,6) 140. Not to excess, in ... 141. Petrified 143. Flounce 145. Moving cartoons 150. Bus terminals 153. Obtained more weapons 154. Timeless 156. In a distant manner 157. Reviewed (ledger) 158. Code 160. Orange skin 161. Zilch 163. Braces (oneself ) 166. Light 4WD army vehicle 167. Story 168. Orchestra woodwind 169. Trim


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PENINSULA prestige

By Melissa McCullough Photos Supplied

F

or the second year in a row, Brynor Constructions was won the prestigious HIA Eastern Victoria Home of the Year award. Ron Bryan has been in the Residential and Commercial building industry for over 40 years and together with Adam and Sam Norris formed Brynor Constructions in 2005. Based in Blairgowrie and continuing to work in the Eastern and Bayside suburbs of Melbourne Brynor Constructions are award winning boutique builders of architecturally designed homes with interior decorating, pools and landscape included in their building concept. Adam Norris says, “We pride ourselves on our meticulous attention to detail as we realise that building or renovating a home is a lifetime dream for many people. It becomes a team effort with the client, architect and builder working together to achieve the one goal your unique home.”

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BRILLIANT Announced with an online broadcast on Thursday 3 December 2020, the Mornington Peninsula-based builders won the award for a stunning custom-built home in Blairgowrie. HIA’s judges praised the home as an “architectural masterpiece”, “built to a very high standard” and “simply spectacular”. “We are extremely proud of this achievement and would like to thank the owners and architects for entrusting us to bring their vision to life and all of our trades and suppliers for all their hard work”, Adam said. This architectural masterpiece is set on this sloping block to capture the distant views to Arthurs Seat. The most notable facet of the interior is the spectacular polished concrete and granite stone walls and large glass windows and doors which spans the entire upper floor and adjoins the expansive deck and Alfresco


building area with a lap pool and infinity edge to rocks below with a magnificent outlook to the landscape gardens. The expansive home boasts an abundance of natural light and layout flows beautifully incorporating sympathetic materials such as granite, charred hardwood timber cladding and concrete render had the home scoring highly for visual appeal. Owners of the property, Annette and Dennis Trewin were thrilled to bits with the quality of the house, workmanship, and attention to detail. Annette said, “Though we had full trust in the planning of our home, we felt at ease making suggestions for changes with the architect and all of our thoughts were taken on board.” In their ‘70s, the husband and wife have made some careful plans for this to be their forever home. Fine points such as the main living space situated on one level, extra wide doorways, ledges to sit in the

shower, and a lift to get to the lower lever will enable Annette and Dennis residence in a functional space for years to come. “HIA congratulates Brynor Constructions on this outstanding achievement,” says Fiona Nield, HIA Victoiran Executive Director. “A HIA Home of the Year title is something every builder aims for. So winning the award twice in two years is something truly special.” Brynor Constructions also won the Outdoor Project award, and were finalists in the kitchen and bathroom categories, highlighting the overall appeal of the home.

brynorconstructions.com.au

January 2021

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PENINSULA prestige

A M AST E R C L ASS I N B E ACH S I D E LUXE

4

4

4

PRICE CONTACT AGENT

40 FAUCONSHAWE ST, BALNARRING BEACH An extraordinary combination of luxury and quality is on offer with this spectacular beachside residence built by the Swell Building Group. Art meets architecture throughout with sublime gallerystyle spaces complemented by double-height glass frames that look out to a salt chlorinated / solarheated swimming pool and spa that is surrounded by lush landscaped gardens and alfresco dining. The interior begins with a bespoke kitchen flaunting a suite of integrated Miele appliances including dual ovens, coffee machine and two dishwashers, whilst a blend of soap stone and Caesarstone make a grand statement in design. The expansive living zone extends out to a fantastic alfresco with barbecue and kitchen. Each of the four bedrooms have Nest climate control, whilst the family bathroom showcases a triple-head shower and a freestanding stone bathtub.

Candice Blanch 0416 123 415

A sumptuous master suite has a luxurious ensuite boasting a round stone tub, triple head, walkaround shower, walk-in robes and a private terrace by the pool. Beautifully appointed throughout, this fully automated smart home also features a dazzling array of resort-style inclusions such as an X Golf simulator, basement theatre, a separate home gym and a 500+ bottle wine cellar. From the street is a six-car garage and a separate man-cave has kitchen facilities. This home has everything you could need for complete lifestyle convenience and luxury.

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History

“We’ll close down the racecourse and sell it” By Lance Hodgins

H

orse racing was one of the earliest organised sports on the Mornington Peninsula. The first Mornington races were held in the 1870's on part of Beleura, a property which at that time stretched to Sunnyside Creek. The Mornington Racing Club grew out of the Baxter’s Flat race meetings and conducted its first meeting in 1899.

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Early horse racing at Mornington In 1911 the Mornington Racing Club began leasing its current site on the Drywood Estate. It registered with the Victorian Racing Club and soon after World War 1 the first Mornington Cup was held. Racing boomed through the 1920s and 30s and Mornington drew praise as one of the best courses outside Melbourne.


During World War Two this fine course was used as a signals training depot by the army. The racetrack was dotted with telegraph poles, the race buildings were neglected and the surroundings became overgrown. Reginald Ansett to the rescue In 1947 Reginald Ansett, a Mt Eliza resident, formed a company which bought the course and set about restoring it to its former glory. Ansett was one of Australia’s most successful businessmen. His home-grown airline company had gone into wartime production employing 2,000 workers. After the war Ansett Transport Industries established cut-price interstate flights and linked them to his own resort hotels across the country. Ansett’s toughness and enthusiasm were admirably suited to the struggles which faced the Mornington Racing Club. He arranged to purchase the land for £14,000 and set about restoring it, filling in the holes in the track and removing the scrub from the surrounds. His business acumen led him to buy the army buildings, useful at a time when building materials were in short supply.

Below left: Mornington Main Street in 1913 Above: A plane lands at the racecourse in 1922, thought to be delivering prominant bookmaker Wallace Mitchell (from the Downward family collection) Below: The starting gate in 1924 (from the Downward family collection)

continued next page...

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Twelve months later, on Thursday 4 December 1947, the rebirthed Mornington Racing Club held its first meeting in front of a record crowd of 6,500 spectators. Full of enthusiasm, the Club undertook a two-year program of expensive innovation and additions, including the enlarging of the members’ reserve. A problem emerges Early in 1949, however, rumours began to circulate that the trainers were about to boycott the Mornington Cup meeting. On the night before entries closed only 26 horses had been nominated for the entire meeting and Club Secretary Jack Cuddigan was getting worried. The action had been suggested at a meeting of the Victorian Trainers’ Association but it was obvious that many trainers were not in attendance and the VTA was reluctant to say whether the race meeting was officially “blacklisted”. There were, however, rumours that pickets had been posted outside the city office of the Racing Agencies to discourage entries. The main grievance was over the issue of tickets to trainers. Across the State, it was the practice for all members of the Victorian Trainers’ Association, whether they were racing at that meeting or not, to be admitted free of charge - to not only the race course but also to the members’ enclosure.

Trainers claimed that only the members’ enclosure gave them a good view of the finish in the likelihood of needing to make a protest. This was certainly true of the Mornington track, where the trainers’ area was off to one side of the finish line. The Mornington Racing Club felt that this was going too far. Their Club had 680 members and each one was given two ladies’ tickets; the members’ enclosure was unable to handle more than 1,500 people. Mornington argued that all of the 260 members of the VTA did not deserve free entry into every race course, let alone into a potentially overcrowded members’ enclosure. In a last-minute gesture, the Victorian Racing Club tried to ease the problem by “recognising” VTA membership but the Mornington Club dug in its heels. It decided to go it alone with a compromise: it would allow all trainers entry into the racecourse but NOT into the members’ enclosure. Ansett was not convinced that all trainers were “men of standing” and “worthy of membership”. When nominations closed on the following day, entries had swelled to 80 and it looked like the Cup meeting would go ahead as scheduled for 24 February. The VTA responded by officially announcing a boycott. Mornington fought back by asserting its right to control its own members’ enclosure.

Above: Ansett Airways was established by Reg Ansett in 1935 and dominated Australian aviation for 65 years Left: The Mornington Racing Club Committee - Reg Ansett at centre and Jack Cuddigan second from left. Top right: Victoria’s leading trainerof that era, Fred Hoysted

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Said Ansett: “My committee is unanimous that they are the ones who control the Members’ Reserve and therefore they are not prepared to automatically admit trainers to it.” Ansett then asked the VTA to lift its embargo for such an important meeting, but they replied that it was now too late and they had the support of 90% of their members. Twenty of the nominated horses, however, had come from just three VTA members and it appeared that there might be a rift in the trainer ranks. Within days Victoria’s leading trainer, Fred Hoysted, announced his intention to resign from the VTA. Hoysted stated that he had never been associated with a dispute or a strike in his long training career and he didn’t intend to start now. The boycott by trainers looked like it might widen to embrace bookmakers, transporters and jockeys. Already at least one owner was told by a jockey that he would not take his ride for fear of being seen as a strike-breaker and suffer further recriminations. Nevertheless, the 1949 Mornington Cup meeting came and went. It was a great success with over 7,000 spectators and of the sixty-four acceptances only fifteen were withdrawn. Trainer Des McCormack resigned from the VTA and had ten horses competing. Fred Hoysted had a good day: he also left the VTA, provided seven runners, and won the last event. In presenting the Cup to the winning owner, the Chief Secretary referred to the “frivolous” dispute between the Club and the Trainers’ Association. A few days later, support for Mornington came from the VRC which slammed the trainers for using boycott methods to ventilate their racing grievances. A compromise that pleases nobody Unfortunately, the deadlock continued and the VTA warned that their members would not be entering horses in the next Mornington meeting coming up in four weeks time. The Chairman of the VRC hastily spoke to the Trainers’ Association, and then held an informal meeting with Mornington to reach a compromise: those trainers who also held a VRC badge would be admitted to the members’ enclosure as well as the trainers of horses competing on the day. The boycott of the 21 March meeting was lifted and the meeting was saved. The VTA, however, were still not happy. They felt that Mornington had driven a wedge into their ranks and created two classes of trainers: the “haves” and the “have nots”. They also feared that the Mornington “disease” would spread to other racing clubs throughout the State. Mornington maintained that they were not being vindictive towards trainers in general. After all, they had already reduced training fees at their track from £1 to 10 shillings for a gallop on the rails and 5 shillings on the outside of the track. But on the matter of the trainers and members, Ansett and his Club remained firm: Mornington would simply not admit all of the trainers to its members’ reserve. The problem simmers The situation remained static for three years - until April 1952 when it boiled over again. The VTA’s patience ran out and it indicated that it might boycott the 3 May meeting over the Mornington issue. With only 30 horses nominated for the six events, the Mornington Club was forced to extend its closing date. When the VTA officially announced a boycott, seventeen of those horses were withdrawn leaving most of those remaining from small trainers who were not members of the Association.

The principal race of the day – the Dava Handicap – had only three horses entered, one of which, ironically, belonged to Reg Ansett himself. A week out, the Mornington Racing Club was forced to pull the pin and cancel the meeting. Nonetheless, Mornington stuck to its guns. It pointed out that it had spent a whopping £20,000 on improvements – one of which was a trainers’ stand - but it still could not accommodate all trainers in its members’ enclosure. The stand-off continued. On Mornington’s request, the VRC were called in to act as a mediator, a role rejected years earlier by them on the grounds that this would be “interfering in a domestic matter”. This time around, however, it was the trainers who refused to come to the table, and so the deadlock intensified. The VTA even rejected an approach by the Owners’ Association and maintained that they would talk only to the Mornington Racing Club. “This is a matter between the trainers and the Mornington Racing Club and we have no intention of meeting the VRC or any other body. We demand equal rights for trainers, and until we come to an agreement with Mornington no one can make us nominate horses for any of that club’s meetings.” Mornington’s Reginald Ansett reply was stern. “We are sick and tired of the whole thing and we could just as soon close down the racecourse and sell it. We could let the polo people or anyone else interested have Mornington Racecourse and get out of it nicely. continued next page...

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the public, and that each club has an essential right to control admission to its own members’ enclosure without direction from the Victorian Racing Club or any subordinate organisation.” And then came the crunch. “The main fact is that there has been an admitted and long sustained boycott of a Club (Mornington) by an organisation (VTA) established primarily for advancing the interest of its own members and determined to enhance its own status by enforcing privileges for them. “In the Committee’s opinion, the action of the VTA was not justified, and in future the VRC will not recognise the VTA or deal with it or its representatives on any racing matter so long as the Association supports a policy of direct action. “Production of the VTA badge will no longer entitle the holder to any privileges at Flemington.” Towards a resolution This withdrawal of long-held City privileges by the VRC hit the trainers hard. One third (119) of VTA members had VRC badges as well and so the ban would not affect them. For the remaining two-thirds of the rank and file VTA members, however, this ban was like a red rag to a bull. They were determined to fight. What if other country race clubs decided to follow Mornington’s example?

Above: Reginald Ansett

“I know it’s a tragedy to speak this way, but we can’t be pushed around. Mornington members feel that they should have control of their own members’ enclosure. If they don’t, it’s not worth going on. “We are all heartily sick of the argument.” Ansett pointed out that the cancellation of another race meeting would hit hard and wide. “There were likely to be staff dismissals,” he went on, “as well as a loss of revenue for the government, charities, owners, jockeys and the trainers themselves. “Trainers claim that they put on the show but they forget that without owners to foot the bill, jockeys, and the paying public, there would be no racing.” Only 18 entries were received for 31 May race meeting and it was reluctantly called off. Ansett’s forecast of a widespread effect was proven right, as the day was to be in aid of four local charities: two Catholic parish schools, the Menzies Boys Home and the Andrew Kerr Memorial Home. Furthermore, in order to achieve a profit for these good causes, prize money had been kept to a minimum – which now drew complaints from the Owners’ Association. Ansett took the opportunity to accuse them of being in cahoots with the trainers and being dictated to by the VTA. The Victorian Racing Club finally steps in The VRC had finally had enough. They ordered both the Mornington Club and the Trainers’ Association to forward submissions for consideration at their next committee meeting on 30 May 1952. This would require a back-down from the trainers who had always demanded that they thrash things out only with the Mornington Club and no-one else. They complied with the request. After the meeting, the VRC Committee issued the following statement: “The Committee emphasizes that every racing club has an obligation to provide accommodation for both its members and

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A general meeting of the VTA chose to challenge the power of the VRC and decided that it would continue to boycott races at Mornington. But there were signs of alternative opinions in the ranks, and the next Mornington fixture was not scheduled until October – which would allow plenty of time to consider all options. At the next general meeting of the VTA some members felt that they were pursuing a hopeless cause in defying the VRC, which now did not recognise their badge at all. Metropolitan clubs were refusing to allow VTA members to run trials on their courses, which was a major problem as fees from these trials and the sale of race books made up a large part of the VTA’s revenue. Furthermore there were more restrictions being imposed at Flemington involving admittance to the birdcage, access to the trainers’ stand, and use of the trainers’ car park. The dispute finally collapsed on Thursday 24 July 1952. After a lively discussion, members of the VTA accepted Mornington’s offer to allow only trainers of competing horses access to the members’ enclosure, and the trainers immediately applied to the VRC to have all of their Flemington privileges restored. A happy future With the issue resolved, development of the racecourse and its surroundings grew rapidly. Today, the race course is very much part of the Mornington suburban area. In 2010, the Melbourne Racing Club merged with the Mornington Club, and it is now home to monthly race meets and much loved annual events. It has frequently been voted the best “country” track in the State.Still occupying its original 68 hectare site, it is a popular venue for staff functions, car displays, farmers’ markets and rock concerts. And, of course, its member facilities are second to none. This is a chapter from "Tiffs Over Time": a collection of arguments from earlier times on the Mornington Peninsula. Copies are available from the author, Lance Hodgins, for $20 plus postage (if necessary). Ring Lance on 5979 2576.


Above: Aerial view of Mornington racecourse 1960's (photo courtesy Mornington and District Historical Society) Below: Mornington racecourse in recent times

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