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FEBRUARY 2021

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Aboriginal Art Nodes • Quintessential Australian • Heronswood Blooms World Of Art • Mr Brightside • FAC Citizens • Surviving Tyabb Gem • Max's Moxy Elevation • Tipsy, Topsy, And Turvy at Balnarring Beach


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STOREWIDE


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Think dentists are better in town? Quality dental care available right here on the Mornington Peninsula

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contents

Leading 8. Aboriginal Art Nodes Six Mornington Peninsula Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups have revitalised 16 lifeless NBN optical fibre cable cabinets.

12. Quintessential Australian He's one of Australia’s most widely recognised and beloved actors, not just because he is phenomenally talented and prolific, but because he is a genuinely good bloke.

16. Heronswood Blooms Australia’s most remarkable gardening organisation is right here on the peninsula and its garden home has just had a rare redesign.

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Arts & Antiques

on the Peninsula

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Real Estate

Arts 24. World Of Art He has spent his entire life creating, collecting and teaching art. Strangely enough, it all began with vegetables.

30. Mr Brightside Amazing murals that take inspiration from the bright, bold and fun skate and surf art that is synonymous with the 80s and 90s.

34. FAC Citizens A new program at Frankston Arts Centre that will provide in-depth and fascinating insights into the arts for eleven young people.

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36. Surviving Tyabb Gem What started as a hobby of her late husband, an interest inherited from his own father, eventually grew into their business.

Must Try Dishes Proudly published by

Writers: Andrea Louise Thomas, Andrea Rowe, Erica Louise Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Creative: Sam Loverso, Dannielle Espagne Publisher: Melissa McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or email brooke@mpnews.com.au Phone: (03) 5974 9000

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

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During a wine tasting visit to Red Hill Estate, he explained to the owner that wine should be matched with food and that would sell more wine.

48. Elevation After COVID-19 forced the business to be parked, Ric is thrilled to be back on the road, driving clients to the peninsula's finest wineries.

Focus On 64. Focus on Red Hill Interesting facts, coffee safari, what to do and photos.

History Carlton football club championJack Wrout and friends built homes on the Mornington Peninsula. Tipsy belonged to one who was fond of a drink; Topsy was the house that Jack built; Turvy, the third, belonged to a man whose natural building skills were limited.

facebook/peninsulaessence Instagram @peninsulaessence

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44. Max's Moxy

68. Tipsy, Topsy, And Turvy at Balnarring Beach

Registered address: 63 Watt Road, Mornington 3931 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

PEFC Certified This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

Eat & Drink

Every Month Cover image by Yanni

Sunsets on the Mornington Peninsula during summer often reveal a stunning array of colour and depth. This image taken from Safety Beach doesn't disappoint.

February 2021

6. Peninsula Styles 53. Must Try Dishes

47. Recipe 66. Crossword


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KOLLAB Kollab offers colourful, fun everyday essentials - for everybody! Shop the range at 7, 23-27 Suffolk Street, Capel Sound or online at kollab.com.au. @kollabcollection

HOOK + EYE We are just loving the meadow tie-strap jumpsuit in fern print from Hook+Eye. This exclusive print on 100% linen is a must have wardrobe staple this Summer. Available at Emu Plains Market and hookandeye.com.au

OZ DESIGN FURNITURE - MORNINGTON

Peninsula

Styles PRODUCTS FROM THE PENINSULA WE'RE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

ABBIE CAG Dreamy water watching at Dromana pier. Hang a little slice of the Mornington Peninsula in your home with an Abbie Cag Shots fine art print. Available at Emu Plains market and abbiecagshots.com

A ROOM WITH A VIEW The rattan lounger combines quality, comfort and cool coastal style. Online now at aroomwithaview.com.au

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Bring the beach home and escape to the serenity of the sea with our Coastal collections. Inspired by the beaches we love to visit in the summer and the blue waters we love to swim in, the coastal look provides a feeling of relaxation, mimicking that of a walk along a sandy beach with the sounds of the waves lapping the shore. Transform your place like a beach getaway without ever leaving. Leave all the stress and pressure behind when you open the front door to your coastal escape. It’s all about the predominately white foundation, paired with other calming and inviting tones of blues and green that makes for a look that is equal parts warm and equal parts cool. Showroom D4, Peninsula Home, 1128 – 1132 Nepean Hwy, Mornington P 8560 1137 ozdesignfurniture.com.au


your local wildlife sanctuary

your local wildlife sanctuary Located in Pearcedale at the entrance to the Mornington Peninsula Open daily from 10am—5pm February 2021

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ABORIGINAL ART nodes By Erica Louise Photos Supplied

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ix Mornington Peninsula Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups have revitalised 16 lifeless NBN optical fibre cable cabinets with striking new artworks. This is due to an innovative art project initiated by the Mornington Peninsula Shire.

Tracey-Lea, Arts & Cultural Development Coordinator at the Mornington Peninsula Shire, said “The Shire had received complaints from the community after seeing NBN nodes being tagged and covered with graffiti. We were asked whether there was a possibility of engaging local artists to decorate the cabinets with murals.”

Recognising the importance of Aboriginal storytelling through art, the Mornington Peninsula Shire collaborated with NBN Co., and called upon six local Aboriginal groups, the Bunurong Land Council Aboriginal Corporation (BLCAC), Balee Group, Baluk Arts, Bunjilwarra, Living Culture and Willum Warrain to complete the task of preparing artworks for the nodes.

Seeing an opportunity to boost Aboriginal art in the public and increase the awareness of Peninsula-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups as highlighted in the Shire’s Art and Culture Plan and Reconciliation Action Plan, Tracey-Lea contacted NBN Co to discuss the idea of decorating node cabinets with Aboriginal artworks.

Gunditjmara and Torres Strait Islander artist Lisa Waup, from Baluk Arts, with her node artwork ‘Community’. Photo: Tanya Fry

Men’s Business’ by the Willum Warrain Men’s Group at Hastings. Photo: Constantine Ongarezos, NBN Co.

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Bunurong people are excited and proud to share their stories and connection for this project on their traditional lands The NBN Aboriginal artwork project is the first of its kind in this region. It sees all Aboriginal groups working with the Shire collaboratively. The Bunurong Land Council Aboriginal Corporation led the project as the traditional custodians and worked with the Mornington Peninsula Shire. The Peninsula’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community is diverse and made up of people with heritage and ancestry dotted across Australia. “Bunurong people are excited and proud to share their stories and connection for this project on their traditional lands,” said Dan Turnball, CEO of the Bunurong Land Council.

As the Mornington Peninsula Shire supports self-determination and decision-making it gave each group the responsibility of selecting their own artists who could submit artworks of their choice. High quality photographs were taken of the original works, which were then printed onto anti-graffiti coated vinyl and wrapped around the nodes by a local installer. The stories told through the nodes’ artworks are not limited to ancestral tales. One of the traditional stories is Glenn Shaw’s “Bush Potato Vine” depicting the natural food source for many Aboriginal people who live on and around the coastline of the Southern Australia mainland and Tasmania. Heather Kennedy’s “Coming out of COVID” celebrates the joy and freedom felt by the whole community coming out of lockdown. continued next page...

Mornington node ‘Grandfather Sun’ by Lionel Lauch of Living Culture. Photo: Constantine Ongarezos, NBN Co.

Rosebud node ‘Coming Out of Covid’ by Heather Kennedy from Bunurong Land Council Photo: Constantine Ongarezos, NBN Co.

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While in theory, the concept of decorating the NBN nodes sounds simple, it took two years to bring the Aboriginal artwork project to life. Lengthy approval processes, countless meetings and multiple complexities were involved. Despite this, the art initiative is a community success.

Some artists have not seen their work displayed in a community space before. This project means so much to them

“As well as supporting the artists financially, particularly through trying times during COVID lockdowns, we’ve seen is a great sense of pride. Some artists have not seen their work displayed in a community space before. This project means so much to them.”

The Aboriginal art nodes can be found in Balnarring, Dromana, Flinders, Hastings, Mornington, Mount Eliza, Red Hill, Rosebud, Rye, Somerville, Sorrento, Tootgarook and Tyabb.

Each node has a unique QR code, directing viewers to more information about the story, the artist and the local organisations involved. The Mornington Peninsula Shire is also developing a PDF map, making it easier for locals, visitors and tourists to locate each node.

While there are over 350+ NBN nodes located on the Peninsula, those chosen for the program were prone to graffiti and tagging. The 16 Aboriginal art nodes are evenly spread out, with two or three per council ward, although some are tucked away. “There are three nodes located next to schools, which has been great for students. School groups have been able to connect with the artwork in their areas, and learn more about the stories created by the artists.”

Read more about the Aboriginal art node project by visiting the Mornington Peninsula Shire’s Art & Culture website: artsandculture.mornpen.vic.gov.au.

Representatives and artists from local Aboriginal groups Willum Warrain, Baluk Arts and Living Culture with Mornington Peninsula Shire Councillors and staff and NBN Co staff at Bunurong Land Council member Glenn Shaw’s ‘Bush Potato Vine’ art node at Flinders. Photo: Tanya Fry

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152152 Main 152 Main Main Street Street Street Mornington Mornington Mornington 152 Main Street Mornington 152 Main Street Mornington

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PHPH (03) PH (03) (03) 5959 7559 75 2475 24 3924 3939 PH (03) 59 75 24 February 2021 PENINSULA ssence | 11 PH (03) E59 75 24 39 39


If you walk away from the film and it stays in your head, they’ve done a great job

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QUINTESSENTIAL

Australian

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ctor Shane Jacobson is one of Australia’s most widely recognised and beloved actors, not just because he is phenomenally talented and prolific, but because he is a genuinely good bloke who represents the everyday understated down-to-earth Australian. He’s personable, approachable and very knowledgeable about the industry through his exceptionally diverse career. He’s not only famous in Australia, but internationally as well. He’s a true blue, lovable, Aussie icon. While he’s best known for his work on stage and screen, Shane has also been a producer, screenwriter and creative director. He also wrote a memoir called The Long Road to Overnight Success. He has a comprehensive understanding of the industry and what makes things work. This makes him perfectly placed to be one of the judges at this year’s 10th annual Peninsula Film Festival. Shane got involved with the festival through his long time friendship with actor and Festival Director, Steve Bastoni. The first time he came to the festival, he was surprised at how big it was. He didn’t realise that it’s the biggest outdoor film festival in Victoria. He loved the idea of an entire community gathered on the foreshore, enjoying a film together. Shane feels honored to be a judge this year, but also feels the weight of it. He knows how much work it takes to make a film. “Anyone who makes a film is to be admired,” he says. As a judge, he’s looking to be surprised and taken on a journey. “If you walk away from the film and it stays in your head, they’ve done a great job,” he notes. Continued next page...

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Shane thinks that film festivals are enormously important to the industry. “To get a film on a real screen is a huge mountain to climb. A festival like the PFF gives filmmakers a chance to see their product on a big screen and enjoyed by a real audience. They get to hear the audience react and that is fuel for continuing on their journey,” he says. As a COVID adaptation, the PFF will be screened at the iconic Dromana Drive In. Shane thinks this is a genius approach that also harkens back to the old days when going to the drive in was common and notes that “With so few drive ins left, the Peninsula is blessed to have one on their doorstep.” Shane has great childhood memories of family holidays on the Peninsula staying with his aunt and uncle in Rosebud. His uncle was a Park Ranger at the Rosebud foreshore and his Mum knew lots of people who camped at Rosebud. The family used go from caravan to caravan visiting friends. “It always feels like a holiday when I am on the Mornington Peninsula,” he says.

Keeping engaged in the industry has never been hard. Shane loves the immediacy of feedback in live theatre, hearing the word on the street right after a television show has aired, and seeing the finished product after the long, drawn out process of making a film. “They are all different, but they all bring joy. Everything I’m involved in is out there to bring people entertainment and that’s a great position to be in,” he says.

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Shane has a comfortable relationship with fame because, as he explains, “For the most part people are good eggs. What I experience is really just friendliness. My mother used to say, 'Darling, there are no strangers in the world, just friends you haven’t met.' I kind of live that experience because people really just want to reach out and say, 'Hi'."

Acting natural in front of a camera is a very unnatural act.

Shane always knew he wanted to be a performer. His mother ran a dance school and she gave him his first stage opportunity when he was eight. It was at the Broadmeadows Town Hall. He played a cowboy with a comedic twist. When the audience laughed and clapped, he said to himself, “I want more of that.”

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Through his varied career in comedy, film, television and theatre, Shane has had the opportunity to work with legends in the industry. He’s worked with some of his heroes, such as Bryan Brown and Paul Hogan. “I’ve been fortunate to work with people I’ve spent a lot of time admiring like Jack Thomson, Jackie Weaver and Hugo Weaving,” he says. He loves that Australian actors are so grounded and understated.

The best advice Shane ever got was to get a lot of experience. “Acting natural in front of a camera is a very unnatural act. To be good, you’ve got to do it a lot. Paul Hogan told me that to succeed in the business you need a thick hide. That’s proved to be true. Things won’t always work out; you’re going to hear 'No' a lot. You’ve got to keep going. You’ve got to stay true to yourself and it doesn’t hurt to be polite,” he says. The pandemic had a huge impact. Shane lost a year’s work in film, TV, theatre and live performance. Instead, he worked at home producing a documentary. It was a very different process not being able to collaborate with people in person. Now he’s back on set with Guy Pearce in the TV series, Jack Irish. Come and join Shane at the PFF on Saturday, March 6 at the Dromana Drive In. Gates open at 5:30 and films air at 8:30. For more information on this and other PFF events go to the website: peninsulafilmfestival.com.au.


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HERONSWOOD blooms brighter than ever! A

ustralia’s most remarkable gardening organisation is right here on the Peninsula and its garden home has just had a rare redesign. 2020 lockdowns saw people all over the world turning to their gardens and reconnecting with nature like never before. From absolute beginners who decided to start on the road to self sufficiency, through to seasoned gardeners who got stuck into big projects and really relied on the sanctuary their gardens provide. Even one of the Peninsula’s most famous gardens got a bit more attention and has emerged from lockdowns really blooming. Heronswood House and Garden in Dromana is the home of the Diggers Club – Australia’s most remarkable gardening organisation. The Diggers Club was established in 1978 by Clive and Penny

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Blazey as a small mailorder seed operation with the aim of providing Australian gardeners with access to rare and unusual seed varieties. In the 1980’s the Blazeys bought the historic Heronswood House (circa 1864) as their family home and set about trialling plants for Australian conditions and creating a display garden of the plants their Club was keeping in circulation. The very first certified organic public garden, Heronswood is today a living catalogue of the plants and seeds that Diggers has championed and preserved. The Club now has over 80,000 members Australia-wide and the public gardens became so popular that the mailorder operation had to move to a separate site (also in Dromana). Diggers.com.au and the nursery onsite at Heronswood, offer more than 500 different varieties of heirloom seeds and thousands of rare and unusual plants. The Club continues to educate the public on


the importance of publicly-owned, open-pollinated seeds for our food supply, and offers members nuts and bolts gardening skills to ensure success for future generations of gardeners. About 10 years ago, the Blazey family gifted ownership of the Diggers Club as well as its priceless gardens to the non-profit Diggers Foundation to ensure their legacy continues and the gardens remain intact and accessible to the public. Entry is free for Diggers members and children under 16, or $10 for others. And aficionados will find a few changes following some exciting garden renovations through all the challenges of 2020. While every organisation suffered from the drawn out lockdowns of 2020, gardeners really are a resourceful bunch. The garden gates were forced to close to the public, but essential staff made the most of the rare time away from the public eye. As a significant public garden, key staff were able to undertake maintenance, and without daily visitors, they could finally get messy! This meant redesigning garden paths, getting stuck into hedges to open up even more spectacular views across the bay and out to Mt Martha, creating a range of new garden zones and picnic lawns, laying tonnes of granite screenings and gravel mulch, planting hundreds of new plants, moving others and even turning their hands to some stonewalling from materials found onsite – metres and metres of it in fact! Regular visitors will notice lots of other changes in the garden as well as it emerges from its biggest transformation since the Blazeys first put their mark on the property.

There are still a range of projects on the go, including a bog garden and extension, the upper Dry Garden path and garden and a Ficus walk; all have been cordoned off until complete. And there are plans coming up for an exciting new Australian rainforest walk and more. A garden is never finished and never static. That means you’ll find something new at every visit. Heronswood House and Garden is open 10am-5pm seven days a week. The Fork to Fork cafÊ serves seasonal lunch and local wines for lunch and tea/coffee and cakes through the day from 10am3pm. Bookings are required in peak times. See diggers.com.au for details and follow them on Facebook and Insta @thediggersclub for updated info & news.

Gallery Heronswood The Heirloom Room in Gallery Heronswood features a collection of 90 open pollinated heirloom fruits and vegetables that have been preserved by The Diggers Club. Moulds were created and painted based on grown-out specimens and the replicas are so perfectly presented they appear real. This means you can learn about rare varieties no matter the season. The Gallery is housed in the original drop-slab cottage dating back to 1864 and faithfully restored. Continued next page...

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Heronswood House The heritage listed house is one of the oldest on the Peninsula – designed by Edward La Trobe Bateman and built as the holiday home of William Hearn – the first law Professor at Melbourne University.

105 Latrobe Parade, Dromana P: (03) 5984 7321 www.diggers.com.au

The Vegetable Parterre Diggers were forerunners in the ‘garden to plate’ movement in Australia. Their original Fork to Fork restaurant was one of the first to run on the zero food miles concept. Today, the Fork to Fork café is set in the historic house and on the gorgeous pool lawn, still sharing produce direct from the garden and offering a seasonal, casual dining experience.

The Perennial Border Heronswood Garden is listed in the Oxford Companion to Gardens as one of only 4 entries for Victoria, along with Melbourne Botanic Gardens, Mawallock, and Ripponlea. The summer flowering perennial border is always worth a visit.

Visit

Heronswood The home of The Diggers Club Gardens, Cafe, Gallery and Nursery

diggers.com.au

Members and kids under 16 free. Others $10 entry 105 Latrobe Parade, Dromana, VIC 03 5984 7321

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There are 773 reasons to move to Village Glen

Is it the 9 hole golf course? Is it the 8 rink bowling green or croquet lawn? Is it the restaurant or café? Or the craft centre, workshop or vegetable garden? Is it the pool, spa or gymnasium? Or even our very affordable service fee?

It’s our community... it’s our 773 residents. Village Glen, where it’s all about people. Call us today to receive our information pack. 335 Eastbourne Road, Capel Sound VIC 3940

03 5986 4455 WWW.VILLAGEGLEN.COM.AU February 2021

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THINK. SPEND. RECOMMEND.

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ocal business is the life blood of the Mornington Peninsula. The Mornington Peninsula Shire applauds the innovation shown by businesses to reconnect to their customers in new ways over summer. The Shire urges everyone – community members, organisations and businesses – to consider how we spend, recommend and utilise local services. Open for summer, local business looks a little different.

Share your photos on Instagram or Facebook and tag the business and @ourpeninsula and add #supportlocal #summerisforeveryone to your post. The Shire’s top picks will receive a prize from a local business. For more details about the stories of local business innovation visit mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal or for full competition details see mornpen.vic.gov.au/summerguide

Many of our food businesses have embraced outdoor dining, an opportunity to experience culinary delights and a cold beverage while soaking up the sun and fresh air. Locals and visitors can enjoy outdoor spaces with loads of atmosphere, including a variety of outdoor music programs across townships to entertain and inspire. There is no better time to explore our local region. Rediscover outdoor adventures, world class food and wine, craft brewing and distilling, art and culture. Through your support, local tourism businesses can continue to deliver their unique offerings. Need a big job done? Maybe you’re a business, organisation or school that needs to tender for some work. Think local and employ local contractors and consultants. The Shire wants to see how you support local. Share a summery snap of your favourite local businesses for your chance to win.

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O

ctagon started servicing the stunningly beautiful Mornington Peninsula in 2010 when it was established by Stephen, dad to the current owner Jack, with younger brother Ben currently learning his trade after finishing his education in 2019. The company looks quite different 10 years on from when Stephen started the business with just himself and a single big van. Jack, the company director, took over the business in 2019 allowing his dad to concentrate on quotations and fishing! Whilst only 24 years old has been on the “octagon tools” himself since he was 15 and has worked fulltime for Octagon since he was 18. Put simply, if you need it moved “Octagon will arrange to move it” - be it a single home item purchased from a local furniture provider or a full home contents pack, relocate, store and redelivery.

Octagon currently has several streams to their business with: document shredding service, packing service, courier service, storage facilities, relocation service, full packing supplies shop and mobile self-storage service with Octibox which Octagon delivers to you, you fill and then gets stored it in their new facility at 6 Elite Way Mornington. They currently have two storage facilities in Mornington with multiple removalist and courier vehicles servicing the Mornington Peninsula and Victoria daily. Contact Jack on (03) 5975 8279 for your next moving experience.

Octagon prides itself on employing young local people and providing them with the opportunity to grow with the business. They support their training needs both in vehicle licences and daily on the job training. Their community spirit also shines through by way of support to local organisations including Mt Martha Soccer Club and Safety Beach Coast Guard.

REMOVALS & STORAGE LOCAL REMOVALS

STORAGE

PACKING

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When you choose Octagon Removals & Storage to move from one home into another, you will benefit from an owner-operated business which takes care and pride on assuring that your belongings are well looked after during the whole process whilst also maintaining our business reputation at the same time. Let us know if you need any assistance with your packing or if you’d simply like us to arrive on the day to collect and transport your belongings to your next home. Have a chat with us and find out how we can assist you.

6 Elite Way Mornington

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I (03) 5975 8279 I Contactable 24/7 – 365 Days I octagonremovalsandstorage.com.au February 2021


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Kibu has the Peninsula covered with umbrellas - from small beach umbrellas to our giant cafe 5x5m umbrellas.

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Arts

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WORLD OF art

By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

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cCrae artist Gary Goodrich is surrounded by art – in his studio, in his home and in his garden. He has spent his entire life creating, collecting and teaching art. Strangely enough, it all began with vegetables, his father was a market gardener. When he was eight, there was a dollmaking competition at school. Gary entered a doll made entirely of vegetables. It was so remarkable that it won first place and was featured in the Herald Sun. An artist was discovered.

Gary was always making things as a child. His fertile imagination could transform ordinary, found, objects into artworks and he is still doing it today. It’s called assemblage and he is very good at it. He made his first carved sculpture in Year 11 at high school and he still has it on his mantelpiece. He always loved creating so it’s not surprising that he went on to art school. At Caulfield Institute of Technology, Gary completed a degree in Painting and Sculpture in 1973. He couldn’t imagine making a Continued next page... February 2021

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living as an artist so he went to the University of Melbourne to get a Diploma of Education. He started teaching art at Rosebud High School (now Rosebud Secondary College) in 1975 and taught there for 36 years, guiding and inspiring young artists. All the while he was producing his own art.

The most interesting thing he has created is the place where he lives. His home, studio and garden are curated galleries where art is central to everything. You’ll find mosaic, carving, painting and assemblage in and around the studio and garden. It is an art lover’s paradise.

Gary kept his students inspired, not only by exposing them to great art and artists, but also by introducing them to world music. He’d ask students to guess where the music was from. It opened up a new world for many students who hadn’t had exposure to other cultures. However, inspiration worked both ways as Gary found his students a constant source of inspiration and fresh ideas.

“I collect art to be inspired, to feel like I am near the artist. In original art you can see the artist’s touch. My own work is an ongoing thing influenced by where I live – the spirit of the place. This is where the spirit of my art is,” he says.

For Gary art is a way of life. “Art is about people and living. It’s part of the joy of living. There is uniqueness about artwork. It represents people,” he says. As for being an artist, he adds, “I don’t feel like I’ve had a choice in it. I can’t imagine a world without art. As my artist friend George Johnson says, 'I need it to make sense of the world'.”

I collect art to be inspired, to feel like I am near the artist

Gary doesn’t have a favourite medium. “I like everything. I like paint and wood carving and I love getting my hands on clay. I also like assemblage because each object inside it has a story of its own,” he says. There are many sources of inspiration in Gary’s world. “ I am inspired by other artists, relationships with people and with nature. I am inspired by where I live. I look one way and I have the view of Arthurs Seat, I look another way and I see the bay, I look another way and I see the lighthouse. There’s also the McCrae homestead. I am living in paradise,” he says.

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Gary has many favourite artists, but he loves Frenchman Pierre Bonnard for his colour, Uruguayan Joaquin TorresGarcia for his structure, Scottish/Australian Ian Fairweather for his vision and German Kurt Schwitters for creating art out of rubbish in the 1920s.

Being part of the Peninsula Studio Trail has been a blessing for Gary because it has connected him to other artists, like-minded people, and to an audience for his work. Because he worked as a teacher for many years, he did not put a lot of emphasis on exhibiting his own work. Now that he has retired, he has the time to focus on his art career. If you ask Gary what he’d like to do next, he’ll tell you, “Another painting.” He loves that patrons in Australia and overseas have his work in their collections. Nothing pleases him more. You can visit Gary’s remarkable studio by appointment. You won’t see anything like it anywhere else in the world. Contact him on 0481 066 583 or gwgoodrich@iinet.net.au


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QUEENSCLIFF

PORTSEA

Wine Food Farmgate reveals the Mornington Peninsula’s most delicious secrets. As you explore the tree-line back roads or scenic coastal drives, keep your eyes peeled for farmgates and wineries nestled in the hinterland or on our coastal piers. It is here you will discover handpicked, hand caught and handmade delights! Share your experience #winefoodfarmgate

FOOD AND WINE BLUE MINI EATERY, EMPORIUM, EVENTS

ELAN VINEYARD & WINERY 17 Turners Rd, Balnarring (03) 5989 7209

2 Colchester Rd, Rosebud (03) 5981 2520

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It’s a different way to approach art as a business but I really enjoy it.

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MISTER brightside By Erica Louise Photos Supplied

L

ook closely and you’ll spot snippets of Kyle Brightside’s distinctive artwork at live events and community spaces across the Mornington Peninsula. Kyle’s art captures the essence of ‘old school’ surf and skate culture. His work takes inspiration from the bright, bold and fun skate and surf art that is synonymous with the 80s and 90s. His business BrightSide Art blends a history of creative endeavours. Kyle spent his adolescence finding discarded skateboards and surfboards and decorating them. “The more I did, the better I became,” said Kyle who ,despite failing art in high school, continued dabbling in his craft. While completing a Business & Marketing degree at university, Kyle supplemented his studies with casual work in the events industry.

“I came to know people so many people that when I finished uni I stepped straight into events management. I worked at private sporting events and moved into the non-profit space, working in fundraising campaign management.” Kyle soon realised that office-based jobs weren’t the best fit for him. Seeking alternative ways to make a living, he left the corporate world five years ago to start his creative business BrightSide Art. Kyle brings marketing campaigns to life by combining his professional background with his artistic flair. “I do a lot of art activations with creative advertising agencies, such as painting live pieces. It’s a different way to approach art as a business but I really enjoy it.” His work has been recognised on a national and international level, with invitations to paint murals and collaborate with brands all over the world. Continued next page...

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“I’ve travelled up and down the east coast of Australia from the Northern Beaches of NSW to Queensland, working with brands who’ve felt drawn to my bright and beachy artwork, perhaps because it suits their weather. I’ve also spent a fair bit of time working with numerous clients over in Los Angeles.” Kyle’s artistic travels drew to a halt in 2020. The pandemic proved a challenge for creatives and BrightSide Art was not left untouched. With his ability to travel taken away, and paid gigs in Melbourne few and far between, Kyle’s reliance on painting large scale murals was not sustainable. With time to reflect, he come up with the idea to sell self-paint skateboard art packs and polyester fabric wall decal designs. “I spent most of 2020 looking for cool stuff, but couldn’t find anything that was really cool, so I figured I’d make my own.”

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Still wanting a presence on the scene, his skateboard art packs allowed him to contribute and inspire the next generation of creatives. “This has become quite a big motivator for me now; to have more of an impact on different people, particularly teens.” Kyle describes the first two years of his business as “productive, but a little bit all over the place.” He experimented with Brightside Art in the beginning and was open to everything and anything. Now he has established his style and proved his worth in the industry, he has a clear direction of where he wants BrightSide Art to go. He has been collaborating with The Mornington Peninsula Shire’s Art & Culture team by working on activations across the region, the latest being a temporary live art piece in Rosebud.


“I have a 4-metre wall that I bring to an activation. I design and paint live in front of people while engaging with the community. This is a way to introduce mural artwork to people who might otherwise classify my work as graffiti. My work shows people that art can be diverse and that wall murals create a bright and happy presence.” Other projects on Brightside's horizon include digital artworks such as a cover for a Sydney-based music and skateboard magazine, and a series of designs for a line of skateboards owned by a Californian brand. Follow Kyle’s artistic endeavours on brightsideart.com.au. You can also check out BrightSide Art on Instagram @brightsidekyle.

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 430 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u February 2021

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FAC citizens A

new program at Frankston Arts Centre will provide in-depth and fascinating insights into the Arts for eleven young people.

Frankston City Manager Arts and Culture Andrew Moon said the ‘FAC Citizens’ Program was designed to engage with young artists, arts makers and theatre lovers aged from 16 to 22 years old. “Being an FAC Citizen is an opportunity to gain learning and insight into the various roles and departments that are involved in an artistic venue like the FAC including technical operations, marketing, box office, gallery curation and programing,” he said. “As part of the program, students will develop an authentic understanding of the roles and responsibilities of each department and have the opportunity to apply their learnings through a series of real world activities. Our hope is that the experiences provided will provoke engagement with the arts and inspire future career paths.” FAC Citizens will attend shows and get opportunities to work behind the scenes and help out with projects and programs. Lucy Anderson, 18, recently graduated from Toorak College and is excitedly looking forward to participating in the FAC Citizens program. “I’ve been involved with the Frankston Arts Centre for many years both as patron, performer and crew member/technician. I have danced in the theatre for many years. My school has been in the theatre multiple times when I have worked in a variety of

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different roles and I’ve worked with PLOS and Panorama on their shows in recent years making the Frankston Arts Centre like a second home to me for periods throughout the year,” she said. “There have been a few occasions when I have ‘bumped out’ one show and then within two days been back to ‘bump in’ the next. I am very comfortable in the space and I am so excited to be spending more time learning in the venue and I am grateful for this opportunity.” Olivia Sutherland, 19, is currently studying a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Melbourne. “I’ve lived in Frankston my whole life. I’ve been involved in community projects in Frankston for about four years and have been finding it an incredible community and a fulfilling practice. I’m currently focusing on the intersection between education and the climate crisis and I think that Arts is essential to uplifting voices and sharing stories,” she said. A talented artist, Olivia won the Peninsula Grammar Principal’s Acquisitive Award in 2019 while completing Year 12. Olivia received the award for ‘Don’t snooze the alarm’ – a thought provoking watercolour and screen print on cotton rag paper that celebrates beauty in the ordinary. For more information about Frankston Arts Centre, visit www.thefac.com.au or phone (03)9784 1060


Custom made lounge furniture in Mornington Interior Design | Kate Walker Design instagram katewalker_design Styling | Green house Interiors instagram greenhouseinteriors Photography | Armelle Habib instagram armellehabib

10 Bennetts Rd, Mornington (03) 5975 0344 info@sorrentofurniture.com.au February 2021

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SURVIVING TYABB gem By Tyler Wright Photos Yanni & Supplied

Sheila Martland is well versed in the world of collecting. After all, she has been in the business for more than 40 years and owns one of the largest spaces dedicated to antiques and old wares. What started as a hobby of her late husband, an interest inherited from his own father, eventually grew into their business: Tyabb Packing House Antiques. Mrs Martland called antique collecting a "disease". It's infectious. "Once you’ve got two of something and then you think ‘oh, I’ll get three’ and so on,” she said. 'The Shed' has a steady flow of customers from 11:30am on a Thursday. "This isn't busy," Sheila confirms. “The weekends are much busier.” In 1968, The Martlands packed their bags and moved to Australia from their home in England. With four kids in tow, the change proved challenging. “We had to sort of knuckle down and undergo a complete change of lifestyle.”

“It was a real pain, because it was a really dilapidated old building,” Mrs Martland said. After 13 years in Moorooduc, they took the plunge and purchased a property right next to a railway line in Tyabb – where the business remains. When you enter The Packing House, converted from what once was a storage space for apples and pears grown on the Peninsula, you are met with diversity. On your left – a jeweller and antique beds. On your right – thousands of books spanning from travel to religion. The space is designed so each separate chamber flows into the other, and you end up back at the start after doing a full circuit. Sheila said each room was leased to different orchardists in the area before it became a hardware co-op and then they took over in 1993. Each chamber is still marked with the name of a type of apple or pear - Jonathan and Democrat among the list of fruits. Continued next page...

It was when they met the Bradburys and joined to create the ‘Moorooduc Antiques and Old Wares Market’ that selling memorabilia and second-hand goods became a source of income. Months later, the couple were left to handle the business by themselves.

continued next page...

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“We started off strictly keeping the names, but it’s sort of dwindled a bit over the years. “That’s why we’ve left all the pipework all over the place and some of the doors, and we’ve tried to keep some of the original things.” While there are salutes to the history of the site, transforming the large space was not all peaches and cream. No emergency exits and unsafe wiring were some of the problems the couple faced. The pair even thought to themselves at one point – “What have we done?” "It was horrific. I often look back and think today it must be so hard for anybody to start a business." But she goes on to say that they “got there” in the end. The antiques shed is now home to more than 20 dealers, many with decades of experience. Not only this, but their friendliness creates a warm, chatty atmosphere as you get lost in browsing anything from movie posters to china. The main complex is joined by a separate group of dealerships called ‘The Village,’ home to artisans and creative specialists. “We run it differently to a lot of places,” Sheila said. “Here, [storeholders] have to be in attendance, each one's got their own 'shop', and they have to look after it.”

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“We’ve always kept a high standard.” The key to being open after so many years lies in their “mixed bag of tricks” and individual quirks. This is what, Sheila said, keeps it as interesting as possible. After recently re-opening following a six-month closure because of the pandemic, the dealers have managed to return. “It’s strange, you know. We came in on the Thursday and Friday to clean everything and opened on the Saturday, and in a couple of days it was just like it used to be.” “We’re just hoping that we’ll carry on; we’ll just see what happens in the next couple of months,” she added. The plan moving forward? To wait until Easter before starting anything new. Times are just too unpredictable.

Tyabb Packing House Antiques is located on 14 MorningtonTyabb Road, Tyabb, and open Thursday-Sunday, 10am-5pm.


Arts & Antiques on the Peninsula

AN ALADDIN’S CAVE OF TREASURES As you wander along the glamorous Sorrento shopping strip you simply have to visit Marlene Miller Antiques, an Aladdin’s cave of unique and unexpected treasures.

128 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento t: 03 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e: marlenemiller3@bigpond.com Specialising in antique jewellery, as well as newly-made jewellery by Melbourne’s top jewellers

As soon as you walk into the shop there is so much to see, with two stories of antiques and bric-a-brac from lovely old tools, crystal and fine china to fur coats, hats, dining furniture with chairs by Jacob and Josef Kohn (established in 1849), hat boxes, old leather suitcases with great labels, as well as a great variety of lovely lamps to give your home that special ambience. Upstairs hosts a range of books dating back to the 1700’s, prints and paintings. Known by reputation for her fabulous jewellery with lots of old (including Gold Rush jewellery which was actually made during the Gold Rush) and mourning jewellery which was created to mourn the death of a loved one and became popular in the 1800’s, along with newly created hand-made pieces by Melbourne’s top jewellers. Marlene Miller Antiques has been in Sorrento since 1985 and has been in her present purpose-built building for the past 10 years.

A: 128 Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento P: 5984 1762 or 0438 537 757 February 2021

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Arts & Antiques on the Peninsula NEW WORKS FOR SUMMER COLLECTOR’S SHOW AT EVERYWHEN Fresh paintings and sculptures have arrived to join the existing wide range of outstanding art for the Summer Collector’s Show at Everywhen Artspace. Featuring works from as far afield as Far North Queensland, the APY Lands, Utopia, the Pilbara, the Kimberley, Arnhem Land and Victoria, the exhibition showcases a great variety of styles and media. New works including paintings by the talented younger generation artist Michelle Lewis from Ernabella who says of her softly fluid works that relate the Honey Ant dreaming. “ I am painting the landscape from above, as you might see it from an airplane or as a bird looking down. It is beautiful country both from on the ground and up above…. I think of how the tjala (honeyants) tunnel though the sandy soil as well as about the waterholes, the assemblages of trees and shrubs and the country that is “quiet” (empty).” Equally evocative are the finely textured ochre memorial poles and Mimih carvings from Arnhem Land and a range of paintings from artists of Utopia including those of the mid-career artists Janet Golder Kngwarreye and Teresa Purla as well as senior artist Jeannie Mills Pwerle.

Teresa Purla paints the country of her grandmother, the famous artist, the late Minnie Pwerle in whose country she says the tracks of her creation ancestors can be seen in an extremely beautiful area surrounded by towering gums along the banks of a large and often-dry river bed. “ The tracks of my r ancestors as they danced can be clearly see in the imprints on the smooth rock formations,” she says. Striking landscapes of Eastern Desert country as well as the plants used for bush medicine are also arriving for the upcoming solo exhibition by highly talented younger generation artist Selina Teece Pwerle. The Summer Collector’s Show runs until February 23. Selina Teece Pwerle landscapes and bush medicine exhibition opens on March 5.

EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE A: 39 Cook St, Flinders. P: 5989 0496 E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au W: mccullochandmcculloch.com.au Open Fridays-Tuesdays, 11am-4pm Wed & Thurs by appointment.

Michelle Lewis, Michelle’s Honey Ant Dreaming, 106 x 165cm. Teresa Purla, Grandmother’s Country, 120 x 90cm.

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Arts & Antiques on the Peninsula

The Summer Collector’s Show 2021

Upcoming March

Outstanding Aboriginal art from 9 regions.

Selina Teece Pwerle Landscapes & Bush Medicine

To February 23

Open Friday-Tuesday | 11-4 | Wed & Thurs by appt. | 39 Cook Street, Flinders 3929 T: 03 5989 0496 | mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

UNTOLD EVENTS CO. MUST DO LIST OF 'FUN THINGS' THIS FEBRUARY 1. Discover the magical market #underthestringybarks at Emu Plains Market. Unlike any other market you have ever been to, EPM offers a festival-like atmosphere featuring an amazing array of food, live entertainment, fun for kids, & more than 200 of the best stallholders Melbourne has to offer. Catch these iconic markets from October to April. www.emuplainsmarket.com.au 2. Visit the prettiest market around. Little Beauty Market has become the creative hub of Frankston, showcasing more than 100 talented makers handpicked for their uniqueness. www.littlebeautymarket.com.au 3. Check out Untold Events Co Interest Store of Curious Goods. Albert & Daphne is located at 103 Main Street, Mornington and is fast becoming a Peninsula favourite for unique men’s & women’s clothing, shoes, accessories & homewares. www.albertanddaphne.com.au

Support local, support handmade, support innovation, support love, support small business... support your local market! EMU PLAINS MARKET : FEB 20 | 9-2 EMU PLAINS RESERVE, BALNARRING www.emuplainsmarket.com.au LITTLE BEAUTY MARKET : FEB 27 | 9-2 CRN HIGH & YOUNG ST, FRANKSTON www.littlebeautymarket.com.au Love supporting small businesses? Why not check out our interest store of curious goods!

ALBERT & DAPHNE

103 MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON | WWW.ALBERTANDDAPHNE.COM.AU

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Aged Care that’s beyond the everyday. The Bays Aged Care, Hastings

Experience our home for yourself Book a tour today

Beautifully designed and completed in 2020, each room combines a sense of classic sophistication and homely ambience. Residents can enjoy the many inviting features of the home’s common areas, including flickering gas log fires, terraces and sunny courtyards. We believe activity and social engagement promotes health and wellbeing and encourages each person to have fun and enjoy each day. Our lifestyle program is complimented by a brand new accessible bus to see residents get out and about in style. Our home is aligned with The Bays Hospital in Mornington, with expert medical services proudly delivered by the trusted team at The Bays Healthcare Group.

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Safety and professionalism are our highest priorities and we achieved a COVID-19 -free status throughout 2020. In addition to permanent residential there are options for private and government-funded respite care, memory support and dementia care. We’ve been caring for the Mornington Peninsula community for over 90 years, with local staff and care teams to help you or your loved one feel at home. A limited number of places at The Bays Aged Care Hastings are currently available.

To find out more, call 03 5979 0333 or visit thebays.com.au/aged-care

The Bays Aged Care Hastings

Trusted by generations for over 90 years 86 VICTORIA STREET, HASTINGS VIC 3915 February 2021


No private health insurance? No problem!

SELF-FUND MATERNITY PACKAGES at The Bays Hospital Mornington

2 NIGHT STAY FROM $4,500*

Your experience includes:

The Bays Obstetricians:

All care provided by our award winning maternity team

Dr Kelly Griffin 03 5970 5353

Accommodation in a private room

Dr Andrew Griffith 03 5976 5257

State of the art delivery suites with private deep baths

Dr Keith How 03 5976 6630

A la carte restaurant quality meals made fresh to order and delivered at your preferred time

Dr Sarah Roberts 03 5970 5353

Dr Amy Swanson 03 5970 5353

Additional nights optional at $500 per night

EXPERIENCE THE BAYS DIFFERENCE

To have your baby at The Bays you must be under the care of one of our Obstetricians.

For a detailed quote, please contact our administration team: P: (03) 5975 2009 E: reception@thebays.com.au

www.thebays.com.au www.facebook.com/TheBaysHealthcareGroup

Trusted by generations for over 80 years

* Price excludes special care nursery admission, additional operating theatre/ caesarean related fees, obstetrician fees, paediatrician fees, anaesthetists fees, diagnostic charges and other hospital related expenses. Duration of stay commences from time of arrival and is 48 hours from arrival to the hospital. Visit our website for up to date information. Prices are current as at 18 January 2021.


Eat & Drink

MAX'S moxy By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

M

ax’s Restaurant was built on pure moxy. During a wine tasting visit to Red Hill Estate, chef Max Paganoni had the nerve to tell its owner, Sir Peter Derham, that whoever was running the place was an idiot! Rather than balking at the comment, Sir Peter wanted to know more. Max was only too happy to explain that wine should be matched with food and that the estate would sell more wine if it had a restaurant on site.

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With one of the best views on the Mornington Peninsula, the location could not have been more perfect. Sir Peter said he would build the restaurant if Max would run it. A handshake deal was made and Max has been running the restaurant, which he now owns, seven days a week for twenty-five years. The only interruption to service was due to the pandemic but, even then, Max’s was serving takeaway meals and heat-at-home meals.


Head chef Charles Yates (left) and Max Paganoni (right)

In all the years Max has been in the food business, he has never lost his love for cooking or enthusiasm for serving customers. He considers his kitchen staff to be family and is happy to work side by side with them, bringing people meals they love. His signature dish, Tuscan porchetta, is so popular that when he took it off the menu, people wrote angry letters. He soon put it back on. Some of his customers have been dining at

Max’s year-in and year-out since the restaurant opened.

I was bred to be a chef

Max grew up on a farm in Tyabb. Everything the Paganoni family ate came from their kitchen garden and paddock. It was fresh and every ingredient was familiar. They even made their own wine. Max got a first hand education in flavour. He started cooking for the family when he was eight. “I was bred to be a chef,” he says.

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Max started his first apprenticeship at a Chinese restaurant in Frankston where he worked six days a week and spent the seventh day at school studying cooking at the William Angliss Institute in Melbourne. His second apprenticeship was at the Baxter Providore (now Sages Cottage). Like his experience at home, everything served was paddock-to-plate. When he finished his apprenticeship, he backpacked around Australia before heading to Europe. He wined, dined and worked his way through Germany, France and Italy. Max became very familiar with the virtues of pairing wine with food. He returned home worldlier and more knowledgeable about food and wine. This is how he had the cheek to front Sir Peter Derham with the notion that food and wine should be paired. Max’s moxy, knowledge and confidence led to the establishment of the Mornington Peninsula’s first winery restaurant. The early days were hard. Max had to win customers over to the winery restaurant concept, but patience, persistence and great reviews brought customers through the doors and they just kept coming. The restaurant started out small but has grown over the years, now offering ample indoor and outdoor dining. Because of its spectacular location, Max caters for lots of weddings and other special events. The restaurant is consistently booked. COVID may have slowed things down for a while, but patrons are

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back now wining and dining with Max. The new summer menu is up, serving old favourites and new flavours. Max designs the menu, but is open to suggestions from staff about new possibilities and fresh ideas. The menus have evolved over the years to cater for changing palates. Max describes the menu as Modern Australian, which he sees as borrowing the best elements of many international cuisines, but he emphasizes that fresh local ingredients are the key to great flavours. Travel has had a big influence on Max’s life and cooking and he likes to share what he has learned. Twice a year, in May and September, he takes a small group on food, wine and culture tours in Northern Italy, Tuscany, Sardinia and Sicily. (Pre-pandemic that is.) Max also founded MP Experience, a venture he now runs with his sister, Danielle and mother Jacinta. They offer a wide range of tours on the peninsula from secret gardens to private wineries. Whether you love truffles or chocolates, tasting wine and cheese or relaxing in the local hot spring, there is a tour to suit every taste. Try one.

Max’s Restaurant, 53 Shoreham Road, Red Hill South P: 5931 0177 W: maxsrestaurant.com.au


recipe MAX’S TUSCAN STUFFED PORCHETTA Serves 6 – 8 people

Ingredients: 5 cloves garlic 5 rosemary sprigs ½ cup coarse salt 5 sprigs thyme 5 sprigs sage ½ tablespoon fennel seeds 1 tablespoon of Max’s award winning extra virgin olive oil 1 ½ kg pork belly

Preparation Remove rosemary and thyme from stalks and roughly chop along with the garlic cloves and sage. Place pork skin side down, rub with half the amount of salt, then fill with garlic cloves and chopped herbs and truss closed with butcher’s string. Score pork at 2cm intervals, rub with a dash of olive oil and the remaining salt. Cook pork in oven at 230C for about 1 hour, basting from time to time then turn oven down to 180C and cook for another 2 hours. Slice and serve on creamed potatoes topped with a little of the pan juices. Max’s Restaurant, 53 Shoreham Road, Red Hill South P: 5931 0177 W: maxsrestaurant.com.au

December2021 February 2020

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elevation

By Amy Newman Photos Yanni

T

he wheels on the bus are going around and around again for Elevate Wine Tour founder Ric Warren.

After being parked for more than half of 2020 Ric is thrilled to be back on the road after COVID-19 restrictions lifted and taking clients to some of the best wineries the Mornington Peninsula has to offer. And it's not any regular bus that he is taking them on with luxury top of mind. Continued next page...

Continued next page...

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“Having been on many wine tours over the years, I felt that there wasn't enough emphasis being placed on the standard of transportation,” says Ric who started tours of the region in March 2016 and has since hosted thousands of guests.

There are so many incredible winemakers and region is renowned for its minimal intervention and sustainability. This means not it is wonderful to approach only production of superior quality wines, but meet some of them that the environment is being looked after too. on our travels Ric is full of praise for the winemakers of

“With that in mind, our first van on the road was a MercedesBenz equipped with comfortable and spacious seating, free Wi-Fi, USB charging ports and a fridge. As the name suggests, the idea of Elevate was to take touring experiences to the next level, offering a transportation and guiding service that matched the calibre of the venues we were taking guests to.”

the region that he has built solid working relationships with. “There are so many incredible winemakers and it is wonderful to meet some of them on our travels as they all have a unique story to tell”, says Ric who has worked in the alcohol and beverage industry since he was 18. “One thing they certainly share is an unwavering passion for our region and its diverse terrain.”

The Mornington Peninsula wine region is world class with the wines it produces. Most vineyards are boutique in size and the

In the five years since Elevate was founded, Ric has seen the region prosper.

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The wonderful thing about our region is its abundance of other offerings that complement the wine region

“The biggest change in recent times has been the significant private investment across the region. New developments such as Point Leo Estate, Jackalope Hotel, RACV Cape Schanck and the Arthurs Seat Eagle have been huge draw cards for our local Mornington Peninsula region resulting in a huge spike in domestic and international visitors,” says Ric.

“What was once a region that saw people flocking down here mainly throughout the summer time, is now an all-year-round destination with some of Australia's finest restaurants and wine producers showcasing the amazing local produce on offer. Construction of the Mornington Peninsula freeway has also contributed to the influx of people to our region, cutting travel time down from Melbourne and landing them conveniently in the heart of the wine region.”

The diversity of the region has also been incorporated into the tours, so it is not only wine that is on offer.

“The wonderful thing about our region is its abundance of other offerings that complement the wine region. There are small produce stores, fruit picking, breweries, distilleries, cideries, chocolateries and artisan cheesemakers just to name a few. We love to incorporate some of these venues on our tours giving guests a chance to try something different.” One question he is often asked is how the region compares to the Yarra Valley given both are in proximity to Melbourne and renowned for their cooler climate wines. “Both Mornington Peninsula and the Yarra Valley share some similarities, being a cool climate and also growing some of the same varieties,” says Ric. “One of the key differences is that the Continued next page...

O

Restaurant O Weddings O Functions

Nestled at the foot of Red Hill within the acclaimed Crittenden Estate is Stillwater, a modern vineyard restaurant showcasing the best of seasons produce in a truly beautiful setting. The terrace is now open for lunch Saturdays and Sundays only until the end of April, weather permitting (not available Easter Sunday). Sit back and relax whilst enjoying pizza, tapas and platters on the lawn.

25 Harrisons Rd, Dromana P: (03) 5981 9555 Summer opening hours: 7 days for lunch from 14 Dec 2020 to Feb 28, 2021. Dinners Thu-Sat nights. Bookings Essential

stillwateratcrittenden.com.au

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Must try

Dishes

Greek massa Lamb, chicken or falafel souvlaki all with homemade tzatziki sauce, cos lettuce, gourmet tomatoes, fresh onions with parsley. Enjoy one from these markets: emuplainsmarket.com.au littlebeautymarket.com.au

Charred atlantic salmon With wasabi infused buttermilk, yuzu gel, and pickled local apples.

Max's Restaurant

53 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South P 5931 0177 maxsrestaurant.com.au

Smoked salmon rye sandwich (Smørrebrød) Open nordic rye bread w/ hot smoked salmon, parsnip remoulade, qukes, salmon roe + witlof

Vegan burger V2 meat pattie, vegan cheddar, onion, pickles, tomato, butter lettuce, tomato sauce, mustard and vegan aioli on a vegan brioche style bun

Nordie Cafe

Mr Bentley's Burger Bar

1008 Mornington-Flinders Rd, Red Hill P 5989 2171 nordie.com.au

2379 Point Nepean Rd, Rye P 0477202265 mrbentley.com.au

Wood-Fired Grill. Black Angus 1.2 kilo tomahawk steak with wood-roasted crayfish and saltbush butter.

Our mouth-watering ribs can now be enjoyed during our extended lunch times from Wed-Sun.

Hotel Sorrento

104 Main St, Mornington P 5976 8482 squiresloftmornington.com

Squires Loft Mornington

5-15 Hotham Rd, Sorrento P 5984 8000 hotelsorrento.com.au

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Mornington Peninsula is also a maritime climate. Being surrounded by water provides a beautiful cooling effect which helps regulate the temperature and provide ideal conditions for growing high quality grapes. Having grown up on the Mornington Peninsula, I am a little biased about our local wine region with the amazing Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris on offer.” As for the future, Ric is excited to keep the wheels turning - last year he added a smaller van to cater for couples and groups of up to five - alongside his latest project, the Elevate Wine Store which launched in September 2020. “Knowing that we were unlikely to conduct any tours for the remainder of the year it was a difficult pill to swallow, so my partner Chantel and I decided to launch an online wine store that meant that lovers of the wine region could still have some of their favourite wines delivered to their doorstep. It was nice to know that we were also able to support the cellar doors.” P: 0402 005 002 E: info@elevatewinetours.com.au W: elevatewinetours.com.au

nordie café is guaranteed to set you up for a day of winery or adventure tours with its all day brunch and casual lunch menus. highly regarded allpress coffee available from 7am. there are also plenty of kids options on the menu, as well as cubby house in the back yard

LITTLE SPRITZ YOUR SUMMER ESSENTIAL. Little Spritz is light, refreshing, all-natural and downright delicious. With three styles to choose from, there is one for every occasion. Visit our Little Spritz Tasting Bar and enjoy a slice of summer. Open Thursday to Sunday 11am-5pm. For more information on this unique Peninsula destination or to book a private tasting or event, contact Natalie:

best bites award winner

P: E: FB: W: A:

1008 MORNINGTON-FLINDERS ROAD RED HILL

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PH 5989 2171

0439 368 181 hello@littlespritz.com.au littlespritz INSTA: @littlespritz littlespritz.com.au 20 Brasser Ave, Dromana

*Subject to COVID regulations, please check our website for up to date information.


DANCKERT REAL ESTATE INVITES YOU TO WATCH

FORD VS FERRARI AT OUR ANNUAL OUTDO0R CINEMA EVENT ABOVE SOUTH BEACH, MT MARTHA

FREE ADMISSION FRIDAY 12TH FEBRUARY 2021 FROM 7:00PM PRE-FILM LIVE MUSIC BY THE CALMER MILES

DA N C K E R T R E A L E S TAT E

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Real Estate

BEACHSIDE lux

A

n extraordinary calibre of luxury and quality is offered by this spectacular beachside residence, where unforgettable indoor and outdoor dimensions establish a fresh benchmark in design, luxury and quality. Art meets architecture throughout sublime gallery-style spaces where double-height glass frames the night-lit salt/solar-heated swimming pool and spa surrounded by lush landscaped gardens and alfresco dining. A bespoke entertainer's kitchen flaunts a suite of integrated Miele appliances, including dual ovens, coffee machine, two dishwashers, fridge/freezer and Zip tap, whilst a blend of Soap Stone and Caesarstone make a grand design statement.

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The expansive living/dining zone extends out to a BBQ kitchen alfresco, highlighting beautiful natural light through intelligently placed skylights and wall-to-wall glass. Each robed bedroom features Nest climate control, with an exclusive family bathroom showcasing triple-head shower and a freestanding stone bathtub. A sumptuous master suite offers resort-style living with a luxurious ensuite with round stone tub, triple head walk-around shower, walk-in robes and a private, poolside terrace. An expansive home office welcomes a place to work uninterrupted, while underfloor heating on the ground level and wet areas helps keep the home comfortable year-round.


 Unforgettable indoor & outdoor dimensions set a benchmark in design, luxury & quality.  Sublime gallery-style spaces with double-height glass & concrete floors  Salt/solar-heated pool & spa surrounded by lush landscaped gardens and alfresco dining  Bespoke entertainer's kitchen flaunts a suite of integrated Miele appliances & Soap Stone/Caesarstone benchtops  Exclusive bathroom designs with freestanding bathtubs & triple-head showers  Sumptuous master suite with luxurious ensuite and a private, poolside terrace 40 Fauconshawe St, Balnarring Beach Land Size-845m2 4 Bed 4 Bath 4-6 Car

Appointed to an incomparable level, it also includes full home automation, elevator, remote blinds, aquarium, bespoke designer lighting, CCTV, video intercom, retractable ducted vacuum, X Golf simulator, fully-fitted safe room, basement theatre, outdoor shower, a separate gym and a 500+ bottle wine cellar. With numerous wine fridges, a 6-car remote garage, flood gates and separate man-cave with kitchenette, this home has everything you could need for complete lifestyle convenience and luxury. Set within paces of Balnarrings beautiful ocean beaches and walking trails, and only moments to Tulum Store and Balnarring town centre.

 Expansive home office, separate mancave, theatre room & gym  Underfloor heating, zoned heating & cooling, full home automation, elevator, & bespoke designer lighting  Retractable ducted vacuum, X Golf simulator, fully-fitted safe room & a 500+ bottle wine cellar  6-car remote garage & flood gates  Within paces of ocean beaches & walking trails & only moments to Tulum Store & Balnarring town centre

Contact Candice Blanch Impact Realty 0416 123 415 February 2021

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THE BENCHMARK OF FUTURE BEACHSIDE LIVING Emerging above the leafy streets of Melbourne’s bayside city of Frankston, Horizon expresses an organic balance of architecture and landscape. “Situated on a high ground at a place bound by land and ocean, Horizon is an elegant, sculptural landmark, where the curves evoke the gentle contours of the rocks and the sand dunes,” Callum Fraser says, Director at Elenberg Fraser – the architect behind Horizon. “The building’s dynamic movement and tiered gestures invite sunlight into the apartments, creating warm, light-filled and airy spaces.” The moment you step inside Horizon, you will experience the perfect balance of warmth, welcome and indulgence. “I’ve developed apartments for the affluent suburbs in Melbourne and Sydney and realised that no one was offering this to the aspirational buyer on the peninsula,” Danny Ciarma says, Director at Urban DC – the developer behind Horizon. “I noticed a gap in the market and thus came my vision for Horizon, which was to provide an up- market opportunity for those who want to reside by the bay.” The building includes shared executive facilities such as the boardroom, an executive lounge and a library that residents can book, for when visitors intrude on their idyllic way of life. The lobby is the heart of Horizon, with a concierge on hand to assist in booking spaces, arranging services and providing advice on local highlights. Three basement levels cater to a range of hobbies and interests, including a luxurious temperature- controlled Wine Room to house your curated private wine collections. For those that can’t spend a day without their tools, the basement is also home to a bike repair and workshop bay for all your woodworking and car maintenance needs.

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On the rooftop, experience the ultimate in wellness and rejuvenation. Relax in the spas that overlook the ocean, book in for a yoga class at the rooftop studio or treat yourself to a massage at the private treatment room. The bespoke Horizon app makes booking spaces and services a breeze. Enjoy a five-star dining experience in your own home with our in-house chef who will prepare sumptuous meals in your own residence or at the residents private rooftop dining room, which overlooks the stunning Frankston coastline. “The Frankston lifestyle is a mix of beachside ambience, quiet streets, scenic trails, and must visit eateries.” “It’s days out sailing, a trip to the gallery, a walk along the beach before dinner and then relaxing on the balcony with a glass of fine wine, watching the sunset on the water,” Ciarma says. With a collection of luxurious havens that overlook the water and the surrounding hills, including the Garden Villa residences and upper level penthouses, Horizon boasts a diverse offering for the owner occupier, with 2 bedroom apartments from $750K and 3 bedroom apartments from $1M. PARTNERS Urban DC is a unique residential property development company specialising in high end inner urban apartment developments that incorporate award-winning design in vibrant cosmopolitan locations. With over 20 years of experience, Elenberg Fraser is an architecture practice in its truest sense, operating across the Asia-Pacific region with hubs based in Melbourne, Brisbane and Ho Chi Minh City. Contact Mark Jones 0411 202 922 E: mark@rechampions.com.au W: horizonfrankston.com.au


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HELLO AGAIN.

It’s been a while. WITH THE ANTICIPATED SUMMERTIME NOW IN FULL SWING, REDISCOVER BOTH THE ALLURE AND BEAUTY OF THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA AS WELL AS COUNTLESS EXPERIENCES TO IMMERSE YOURSELF IN. Summertime on the Mornington Peninsula is undoubtedly one of the most vibrant and enticing stages of the year. Nestled between verdant hinterlands and enchanting seas, our region encourages an array of activities and pursuits for each and every local and visitor. While this year has truly been like no other, we are beyond excited to be welcoming you back to our own piece of coastal paradise. Where you can say hello again to the gorgeous summertime and simultaneously create new memories to last indefinitely.

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visitmp.org February 2021


Mazda 3 10 WEEKLY PRIZES TOTAL PRIZE POOL

$47K

Say hello again to our major summer giveaway. Simply enter online and tune into 3MP for weekly winner announcements, live on air.

There are 10 weekly prizes from chef’s hat restaurants to weekend getaways, from pampering experiences to body products, the Peninsula’s best wines, beers, cider and spirits, and a major prize of a brand new Mazda 3 G20 Pure Auto. WEEK

1

WEEK

3

WEEK

5

WEEK

7

WEEK

9

Peninsula Hot Springs DRAWN 11/12/2020

Wine and Pamper DRAWN 08/01/2021

Beer, Cider + Spirits Trail DRAWN 22/01/2021

WEEK

2

WEEK

4

WEEK

6

Crittenden Estate

WEEK

Mornington Racecourse

WEEK

DRAWN 05/02/2021

DRAWN 19/02/2021

MA JOR PRIZE

8

10

Mercure Portsea DRAWN 18/12/2020

ENTER + VIEW PRIZE DETAILS AT

visitmp.org/win

Pt. Leo Estate DRAWN 15/01/2021

Lancemore Lindenderry Red Hill

Terms and Conditions apply. Closing date for entries is 25 February 2021.

DRAWN 29/01/2021

TO ENTER + FIND OUT MORE SCAN HERE

Carmel at Sorrento DRAWN 12/02/2021

Samsonite Luggage Pack DRAWN 26/02/2021

Mornington Mazda - Mazda 3

DRAWN 6 MARCH 2021

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY

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Practical. Cost Effective. Door-to door service. Practical. Cost Effective.Door-to-door service. Luxury Holiday Linen Hire

Holiday Rentals, B&Bs

Domestic & Commercial Washing & Ironing

Restaurants/Wineries

Accommodation & Table Linen Hire

Day Spas Medical Specialists

Proudly servicing the greater Mornington Peninsula region. info@baylinen.com.au E:E: info@baylinen.com.au P: 0438 0438 387 387 344 P: 344 baylinen.com.au

baylinen.com.au


HEMP INCREASING IN POPULARITY WITH BACKYARD HENS!

T

here are a variety of different options that can be used for chicken bedding and nesting. Common ones are straw and hay but these bring problems as they are poor absorbers of moisture so need frequent cleaning and replacement. Hay goes mouldy when wet which isn’t good for anyone let alone the hens! More recently, industrial hemp fibre has come onto the market and brought with it some significant advantages over traditional bedding materials. Why is this? Hemp is an exceptional absorber of moisture so can efficiently dry out chook droppings and allow them to break down into compost rapidly. It also has antibacterial properties so that any bacteria on your hen’s dirty feet, feathers or droppings has less of a chance to grow on and contaminate freshly laid eggs. Hemp is also a wonderful insulator for nesting boxes and bedding areas to keep them warm and cosy.

garden after allowing enough time for it to break down by the hen droppings. At Talking Hens we sell a range of different volumes of hemp from small to our large 140L bales. We can advise you on exactly how much you might need for your coop and how best to use it. When hemp is used in the dry areas of your coop, it will last for well over a year and be a great addition to the health and cleanliness of your backyard chicken environment. 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd, Merricks M: 0406 691 231 W: talkinghens.com.au Facebook: @TalkingHens

There are different types of hemp which can be used for health and medicinal purposes. Some are used by people for ailments while industrial hemp has no nutritional use but is excellent for bedding materials for your hens. Hemp that has been used in the coop can go into the compost or put directly onto your vegetable

Looking for backyard hens but unsure where to start?

Talking Hens is a family business that loves backyard chickens! We like them so much that we specialise in supplying only the friendliest, best-laying hens along with the best quality products to keep them happy and healthy. There’s nothing like the friendship, entertainment and nutrition that you receive from our laying hens - a pleasure to be shared!

Visit our Website to learn more and download our FREE, Beginner’s Guide to Backyard Chickens at:

www.TalkingHens.com.au

Open Thursday to Monday 10am till 4pm (Closed Tue & Wed). 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd Merricks. For enquiries 0406 691 231

www.facebook.com/TalkingHens February 2021

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Focus On

on

Red Hill

Red Hill is 73 kilometres south of Melbourne, located in the hinterland of the Mornington Peninsula, between the coastal towns of Dromana and Balnarring. It has a population of approximately 1527 including Red Hill South and is very much a rural area, with the landscape consisting of scenic hills and native forests.

Coffee Safari Red Hill Baker

SHOP 5, CNR POINT LEO & SHOREHAM ROAD • The name Red Hill derives from the rich, red clay that has made the area predominantly agricultural from its first European settlement in the mid-nineteenth century. • Many Red Hill streets are named after pioneers: Sheehan, McIlroy, Stanley, Bayne, Arkwell, Eaton, Nash, Perry and Callanan. • Red Hill Post Office opened on 1 August 1871. • A railway operated in Red Hill between 1921 and 1959 and was known as the Red Hill railway line. • Since the 1970s, wineries have been established around Red Hill to take advantage of the microclimate that suits cool climate grapes, and especially pinot noir. • Herbert Robinson (1876–1919), later mayor of Albany, Western Australia, and member of the Parliament of Western Australia was a notable resident of Red Hill. • Wine lovers unite at the annual Winter Wine Weekend in June, and join in the fun and sample more than 200 premium wines from some 50 wineries before exploring local cellar doors.

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• Red Hill is very much a rural area, with the landscape consisting of scenic hills and native forests. Scattered throughout the area is a proliferation of vineyards, orchards and berry farms. Many of the vineyards are boutique wineries, offering visitors the opportunity to experience fine dining, wine tasting and the purchase of local produce of the region. Most of the wineries also feature attractive gardens, free for visitors to wander through or have a picnic within. • The commercial centre of Red Hill is spread across distinct spots on Arthurs Seat Road, Flinders Road and Shoreham Road, featuring a variety of eateries and services. Tucked away along roads and shady laneways around Red Hill, visitors will also find several galleries and cafes. • Red Hill is a major centre on the Mornington Peninsula for entertainment events, including the popular Red Hill Show and the peninsula's premier art show - Art Red Hill. • Strawberries, cherries and apples are grown and available seasonally at the farm door. • The median house price for Red Hill is $1,530,000.

Grab a great coffee along with a wide variety of delicious fresh bakery goods, all made on the premises.

Red Hill Cellar & Pantry 141 SHOREHAM ROAD

Passionate about good food and wine, Cellar & Pantry is the local Grocer, Café and a hub for the local community. The place where the locals meet for a coffee, bite to eat or a drink or just shop, right in the heart of Red Hill.

Food on the Hill

10/159 SHOREHAM ROAD Great spot for locals and visitors alike to enjoy a great cup of coffee with friendly and helpful staff. Relaxed casual vibe and excellent choice of food for all tastes and budgets.

Nordie Cafe

1008 MORNINGTON-FLINDERS ROAD Funky, relaxed café with amazing coffee blends and all day breakfast menu. A family-friendly, welcoming space with a cubby house out the back!


What to do Whether it’s driving through the scenic hills and native forests, enjoying a relaxing stay at a beachfront b&b, or partaking in fine wines and art, Red Hill is the epitome of a relaxed getaway. Scattered throughout the area is a proliferation of vineyards, orchards and berry farms. Many of the vineyards are boutique wineries offering visitors the opportunity to experience fine dining, wine tasting and the purchase of local produce of the region. Come to the commercial centre of Red Hill and further delights await with a variety of cafes, bakeries, galleries and shady laneways with hidden delightful day spas and art exhibitions.

Photography: Yanni

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Puzzle

Corner

ACROSS 1. Loudly 6. Itemised reminder note (5,4) 11. Sweet bun 15. 44th US President, Barack ... 16. Employment 17. Monday or Wednesday 18. Recovering speedily 21. Disrepair 22. Equal (2,1,3) 23. Surpassed 24. Walk affectedly 28. Ceramic paving square 30. Supplements, ... out 32. Maintained pace (4,2) 35. Perfume, ... toilette (3,2) 37. Breathing hole 38. Transfer sticker 40. Catching (thief ) 43. Giving off fumes 45. Sustains 47. Playwright, ... Wilde 48. Torvill or Dean (3-6) 52. Tibetan ox 53. Demolish (5,4) 56. Gamin 58. Scrape 60. Moved to another region 61. Actress, ... Streep 62. Cuddles 64. Missing in action (1,1,1) 65. Gone by 67. Large Mediterranean island 69. Gawked 72. Moaned 75. Lacklustre 77. Sharp 78. Suitor 79. Lessen 81. Locals 83. Rebuffs 84. Fleshy ear tissue (3,4) 86. Diplomat's skill 87. Russian rulers 90. Embellish 92. Persian Gulf republic 93. Contained within this 95. Cultured 96. Formed liking for (4,2) 98. Wearing footwear 99. Imbibed 100. Make believe 101. Suddenly lose control

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102. Experiment rooms 103. Fork spike 104. Wedding promises 106. Pithy 110. Pakistan currency 113. Pipe 115. Overexert 116. Arise (from) 117. Least industrious 118. Appellation 119. Exhibitionist 122. Fairground treats 125. Bee nest 126. Yolk surrounds 127. Canvas support 129. Major ocean 130. Telegraphed 131. Excess weight 132. Body powder 133. Please reply (1,1,1,1) 134. Lift 137. Missile pits 138. Deflection (of bullet) 142. Not at home 143. Weeder 145. Italian bread 146. Predatory bird 149. Rekindle 151. Provides (for) 152. Guidance 154. Laborious preparation 156. Plastic clothing material (1,1,1) 157. Banners 159. Zones 161. Shoots dead 163. Famous ruins near Vesuvius 168. Excitedly 171. Lethal 172. Sports injury remedy (3,4) 176. Foolish 177. Dodge City is there 180. Superior 181. Egotistical 183. Belittled 187. Congenital 188. Surgery instrument 190. Chubbier 191. Helper 192. US cotton state 193. Bygone (days) 194. Banjo sound 195. Type of light bulb 196. Representative government 197. Depresses February 2021

DOWN 1. Small amphibians 2. Brainwaves, bright ... 3. Ganges country 4. String toy (2-2) 5. Risks 6. Gold purity unit 7. Scolds 8. Linger 9. Ballet dresses 10. Coarser 11. Look after 12. River growth, blue-green ... 13. Proficient 14. Consume (3,2) 19. Ireland (poetic) 20. Xmas carol, The First ... 25. Also known as (1,1,1) 26. Vagrants 27. Craving 29. Noble title 31. Youngsters 32. Dutch airline (1,1,1) 33. Mocked, ... fun at 34. Water boiler 36. Stirred 39. Vitamin C, ... acid 40. Fixing pin 41. Conciliator 42. Filed 44. Chivalrous man 46. Song, Auld Lang ... 47. Permissible 49. Withdrawal 50. Fate 51. Vulgarity 53. Collapse (4,4) 54. Scoundrel 55. Was obliged to pay 57. Mental pictures 59. Knives 63. Rebuts 66. Rid of dirt (5,2) 67. Declared 68. Poured 70. Yearly 71. Receding 73. Hotelier, Conrad ... 74. Credits & ... 76. TV news compere 80. Rocket science 82. Europe's tallest volcano 85. Opposed to 88. Lower leg bracelets

89. Drool 90. Fan 91. Volunteered 94. Niggled 97. Stared lasciviously at 104. Deer meat 105. Gracefully slim 106. Band of minstrels 107. Lanyard 108. Sushi condiment 109. Happened, ... pass (4,2) 111. The Leaning Tower of ... 112. Impish 113. Casual garment (1-5) 114. Excuses (from tax) 120. Obsessed, having a ... mind (3-5) 121. Nerve 123. Unthinkably 124. Gourmets 127. Good Friday period 128. Flayed 135. Go away from 136. The V of VC 139. Party mime game 140. Heavy antelope 141. Minuscule amount 144. Belongings 147. Egyptian cobras 148. Scarcity 150. Pronto (1,1,1,1) 153. Glimpse 155. Hoodwinks 158. Stadium 160. Shorts 162. Ancient Peruvian 164. Egg cells 165. No ... or buts 166. Sensual dance 167. Discounted, on ... 169. So! 170. Sheltered side 172. Charged particles 173. Igloo dweller 174. Cyberspace persona 175. Oven for pottery 177. Two-masted boat 178. Swedish prize benefactor 179. Chopping 180. Trademark 182. Debonair 184. Whiskers 185. Humiliation 186. Stalemates 187. Laundry appliance 189. Price tickets


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History

Tipsy, Topsy, and Turvy at Balnarring Beach By Arthur O’Bryan and Ilma Hackett

J

ack Wrout bought his seafront block at Balnarring Beach in the late 1940’s and, for a number of years he, his wife Nancy and their two young children, Nancy and John, came to camp on their land during the holidays. Jack had a small engineering firm where parts for Bren guns were manufactured during the war years and, as this was an essential service, he had not been called up. Then, in the 1950’s, a small weatherboard house was built on the block and it became the family’s holiday home. The Wrouts had many visitors, particularly during the summer’s beach-weather days, and Jack persuaded friends to buy the lots adjoining his own. Land was relatively cheap then as Balnarring Beach was a long way from the city; not an easy destination. [Son] John recalls that it was quite an adventure to get here. “You could expect a number of flat tyres before you arrived. Fuel was limited – many cars had petrol converters. At Carrum you had to wait until the tide was right in order to cross the creek.” The friends named their houses Tipsy, Topsy and Turvy. Tipsy belonged to one who was fond of a drink; Topsy was the house that Jack built; Turvy, the third, belonged to a man whose natural building skills were limited. “He would pound in a sixinch nail for a coat hanger.”

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A community of friends Jack, his immediate friends and others nearby formed a small community-within-the-community. Because the friends all lived close to each other there was a lot of interchange between households so Jack rigged up a party-line telephone system to enable them to communicate with each other quickly. He purchased six telephones – the old-fashioned, wind-up sort – and installed a system between neighbouring houses. Each house had its own identifying ‘code’, a variation of long and short rings, but anyone could listen in because it was a party line. The families did things together on a social basis. They clubbed together and bought an army hut – a semi-circular Nissen hut – when the old huts from the former RAAF Initial Training School at Somers were being sold off by the military. The hut was erected in the back yard of the Wrout property as a centre for their kids. There wasn’t much socially in the general neighbourhood for the young people so the hut became their social hub. It was used as a centre for showing movies. Jack set up a place for a projector and 16 mm films were hired from the city. These often were available before they were released officially. Folding chairs provided seating as they could be cleared away to leave space for other activities. The young people also went to the open-air pictures that were screened at the caravan park. Afterwards they went back to the hut at Wrouts’ for


a dance and the crowds that congregated there were often close to two hundred in number. They had their own small band (a piano and a couple of guitars) to provide the music. Ian Clyne, who later played keyboard in his own band, The Ram Jam Big Band, was the pianist. At New Year’s Eve they met on the beach and as the clock hands pointed to midnight a fireworks display lit up the night sky. This became a tradition that John continues to this day. The Wrouts always kept a small speed boat for fishing excursions and water sports. It was invariably named Topsy, like the house, and still is. John now owns Topsy V. The Football Hero Jack Wrout was very well known in sporting circles. A VFL star, he played full forward with the Carlton Football Club during the late 1930’s and early 1940’s. Wearer of guernsey No. 28, he starred in the 1938 premiership team that played against Collingwood in the grand final; it was Carlton’s celebrated first premiership win since 1915. The game drew a record crowd which far exceeded the number the Melbourne Cricket Ground could safely accommodate

at that time. With four goals to his credit, Wrout was the leading goal kicker for Carlton for the match and one of the best afield. Wrout had started playing football with West Melbourne CYMS and began his senior football career with North Melbourne in 1931 when he was nineteen. He was selected to play in two games in his first year and five games the following year. He had impressed from the start as a strong and intelligent player and he was popular with his team mates. In 1933 he was chosen as a member of the Carnival team to play in Sydney. Unhappily he broke his leg during a league game before the Carnival and was unable to go. His disappointment was keen but his club mates banded together to raise the fare to send him to Sydney - if he was able to travel. The Sporting Globe (July 19, 1933) reported that Wrout was “an idol at North and genuinely popular with the players.” In 1934 he had regained form and in June was selected to play in the VFL representative team in Adelaide. He played 53 games in all with North Melbourne and scored 52 goals. continued next page...

Left: The original Topsy Below: Carlton Football Club team photo, 1942. Jack Wrout circled

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Left: Jack Wrout featured in the traditional "cigarette card" Above: Jack Wrout, Chairman of Selectors, with an anxious Ron Barassi and a relaxed Syd Jackson on the bench

From Light Blue to Navy Blue Wrout transferred to Carlton mid-season in 1936 where he played at centre half forward. He became the Navy Blue’s star forward, recognised for his sure marks and reliable long kicks. In the annual kicking contest between Carlton and Stanford University (U.S.A.) in 1939 he sent a drop kick 72 yards using an Australian ball and 67 ½ yards using an American ball. The 1938 premiership year was arguably the highlight year of his football career. In 1943 he topped Carlton’s goal-kickers with a total of thirty-three goals. He had notched up 130 games and kicked 267 goals with Carlton before injury forced him to retire. In 1944, during a closely contested game against

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Footscray (which Carlton lost by one point after Wrout had been taken from the field), his leg was again broken and his ankle badly sprained. The bone couldn’t be set immediately because of the swelling. The injury healed but Wrout announced his retirement in April 1945. He was left with a slight limp in later life. Several years later he bought his land at the seaside. Jack Wrout didn’t sever relations with the Carlton Football Club after his retirement. In 1958 he was elected to the committee and he spent twenty years as its Vice-President. He also became Carlton’s legendary Chairman of Selectors, highly regarded for his no-nonsense approach. It was during these years that the Carlton players were introduced to his holiday home, Topsy, at Balnarring Beach.


Above: Carlton team members playing beach cricket at Balnarring in 1963. Batsman is Wes Lofts, 1968 premiership full back, and second leg slip is Gordon Collis, 1964 Brownlow medallist

The Blues at Balnarring Beach Today’s AFL footballers are high performance athletes who train with a strict diet and an elite fitness program, but it was the little weatherboard house on Balnarring Beach where the Carlton Football Club went for pre-season summer camps. Jack’s son John, himself a former footballer and once captain of Brunswick in the VFA, recalls growing up the son of a Carlton legend. “Dad loved getting the boys down to train – Jezza (Alex Jesaulenko), Big Nick (John Nicholls), Serge (Sergio Silvagni), Wallsy (Robert Walls) - they were all up for it. They would arrive for the weekend and stay out back in the games room- the corrugatediron Nissen army hut. The players would be up before dawn beach running, ocean swimming, surfing, lots of circuit work and plenty of push-ups.” John says, “They’d punch holes in the floorboards from banging down push-ups for hours on the soft huon pine. They’d train hard all day and then Jack would fire up the barbie. They’d be up pretty late.” “It was fantastic,” he says. John reflects on players enjoying the seaside. “Dad had me in charge of the ski boat, with the intention of teaching the boys how to ski. I remember the day Sergio Silvagni swallowed half of Western Port Bay. He was strapped into Dad’s skis but could not

pull himself out of the water. He was so bloody strong we dragged him underwater the entire length of Merricks Beach. He just hung on refusing to let go. Eventually the bindings snapped and the skis popped up and there was Serge, heaving up and bobbing around like a cork.” John speaks reverently about coach, Ron Barassi, reading out players’ names from the back deck of the house. “At camp’s end all the players would come off the beach and gather at the side of the house where Barassi would call out their names. This was 1970, Carlton’s greatest Premiership year. I was there when he called out the team list; it was a special time to be alive.” Balnarring Beach is a long way from the training facilities of Princes Park, but the commitment to get players to optimum fitness was as important then as it is today. “There wasn’t a lot of sports science back then,” says John. “Dad wanted the Blues to be winning flags, so he tried to make sure the boys were properly prepared for the season. They trained flat out, but when they were done, they’d stop for a BBQ and a couple of beers on the deck.” That was the way it was back then. It’s hard to imagine players enjoying a beer like that today, but in those days, it was reward for effort. continued next page...

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Above left: Topsy today Above right: Jack Wrout's Life Membership Certificate

Topsy today Jack Wrout died in 1981 and in 2014 white ants forced John to demolish the original weatherboard bungalow. He built a new Topsy, a stylish home that still has those sea views and a private back deck. Visitors enter through a front door that features the unusual porthole glass panel that was a feature of the original front door, and John has also retained the hand-crafted, wrought-iron house name that his father made. It reads “Topsy” in an elegant script. Like his father, John is a big-hearted Blue who loves to entertain.

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When he’s not launching his boat into the rolling swells of Bass Strait he’s entertaining guests with giant crayfish on the beach or a cocktail party in the front room of Topsy where open windows invite a cool afternoon sea breeze. On one wall of his home is a tribute to his father, the colourful Life Membership Certificate signed by Sir Kenneth Luke who was, at that time, President of the Carlton Football Club. Luke went on to become President of the VFL. In 2016 Jack Wrout’s name was added to Carlton Football Club’s Hall of Fame - the ultimate recognition of a Blues great.


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