Peninsula Essence December 2021

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DECEMBER 2021

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Dancing Queen • Community Patrol • Documenting Today Resist & Dye • Literary Splash • Transistion Farm • Fine Memories REIV High Five • 'Twas The Night Before Christmas



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Leading

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10. Dancing Queen

Director of Peninsula Dance School, Melanie Gard, has led the dance studio to step boldly into the digital space to keep the magic of dance alive during the recent lockdown.

16. Community Patrol

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GIFT GUIDE

3936-BeachPatrol is a bunch of fantastic people who care deeply about their local community. Many of them giving up their own time to collect litter from the beautiful Safety Beach and Dromana foreshore and beach.

Arts

Peninsula Styles

Stay& y Pla

20. Documenting Today

Photographer Karina Laird has developed a profound appreciation of nature and the environment. She connects with the people and places unique to the peninsula - always noticing the details that people often overlook.

25. Resist & Dye

As a child, Jane Suffield was always drawing and painting. She wanted to be an artist. Her mother, who was very creative, taught Jane sewing, knitting, crocheting and embroidery. These skills proved very helpful later in life when she began her current art practice.

30. Literary Splash

Dr Christine Balint is an award-winning author, creative writing teacher at the University of Melbourne and an Arthurs Seat resident. Recently, Christine was awarded the prestigious Viva La Novella Prize for her latest book, Water Music, a historical fiction based on the patronage system, which existed in Venice from 1400 to 1797.

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Eat & Drink Proudly published by

Writers: Andrea Louise Thomas, Joe Novella, Andrea Rowe Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Creative: Sam Loverso, Dannielle Espagne Publisher: Melissa McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or email brooke@mpnews.com.au Phone: (03) 5974 9000 Registered address: 63 Watt Road, Mornington 3931

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

facebook/peninsulaessence Instagram @peninsulaessence

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40. Fine Memories

There have been many wines that hold a special significance for Garry Crittenden, but none more so that the one he has just released. “Memories” Pinot Noir, as it is appropriately called, is a wine that marks the 12-month anniversary of the passing of Margaret Crittenden.

Focus On

52. Focus On Rosebud

Interesting facts, coffee safari, what to do and photos.

Real Estate 54. REIV High Five

RT Edgar Peninsula’s Director Vicki Sayers has been recognised for the fifth consecutive year by the Real Estate Institute of Victoria (REIV), picking up the 2021 Residential Salesperson of the Year (Executive) award in October.

69. 'Twas The Night Before Christmas Cover Image by Yanni

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Peter Carlyon and his family happened upon small acreage just over the sandy dunes of the Southern end of the Mornington Peninsula and have turned it from lifeless to lush and created a dynamic food network.

History

www.peninsulaessence.com.au

PEFC Certified This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

34. Transition Farm

Golden Beaches Sorrento front beach, with its pristine golden sand and crystal clear water, sits just below the “Millionaire's Walk” that stretches from Portsea to Sorrento on the Southern Mornington Peninsula.

December 2021

In 1886 the people of Victoria were delivered a Christmas present they didn’t need. A ship had arrived from overseas carrying the deadly smallpox virus amongst its nearly 600 passengers.

Every Month 8.

Peninsula Styles

38. Recipe

56. Crossword


The all-electric EQC. The all-electric EQC. Electric now has a Mercedes. Electric now has a Mercedes.

Visit us at Mercedes-Benz Mornington and discover the all-electric EQC today. Visit us at Mercedes-Benz Mornington and discover the all-electric EQC today. www.mbmornington.com.au www.mbmornington.com.au

Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5923 0011 LMCT443 www.mbmornington.com.au Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5923 0011 LMCT443 www.mbmornington.com.au


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LUXURY RETIREMENT LIVING COMES IN THE HEART OF BRIGHTON As a family-owned and operated business, OnetoAnother, operated by the Buxton family, brings together a boutique style of retirement living in Bayside’s Brighton with luxury independent living residences.

While The Granton, the newest village has 35 one, two and three-bedroom apartments with features including a theatre, treatment room, a gym as part of the wellness centre, and a consulting suite.

The Buxton family manages two communities in Brighton, The Crescent and The Granton under the banner of OnetoAnother, which means ‘from one family to another’.

There’s also a seated bistro, bar, an exceptional refrigerated wine wall and an alfresco courtyard set amongst landscape gardens as well.

Managing Director Samantha Buxton said “Retirement Living may not be for everyone but the only regret we seem to hear is ‘I wished we had done it earlier.’ “It is simple–moving early typically translates into extended independence. Life on your terms”.

Another key element to the villages are the emergency call monitoring service, which gives peace of mind to families. “Our staff are there overnight in both villages. “The emergency call system is monitored 24 hours a day”. We offer flexible levels of support as resident’s needs change over time.

Both villages are metres to Brighton’s lively Church Street for dining, entertainment and shopping - home to more than 200 retailers. The Crescent has 71 one and two-bedroom apartments, shared spaces include a licensed bistro, lounges where residents enjoy a coffee whilst reading the morning newspaper, a private dining room, gym, billiards, art studio, library and consulting suite for allied health professions. “The Crescent is beautifully designed and has stood the test of time.”

RETIREMENT LIVING in STYLE — now SELLING

With a commitment to design and functionality, the villages are perfect for the next chapter in the lives of retirees eager to hold onto their independence and inner-Melbourne lifestyle. Ms Buxton said they want residents to be proud of where they live.

To find out more, call 1300 204 032.

One, Two and Three-Bedroom Residences available from $895,000 • Masters with WIR & spacious en-suite • Superior kitchens with scullery • Gaggenau appliances • 3 metre high ceilings • Private outdoor terraces or balconies • Concealed heating and cooling • Motorised blinds and curtains • Church Street on your doorstep

BOOK YOUR PRIVATE APPOINTMENT TODAY 1300 204 032 ONETOANOTHER.COM.AU

233 NEW STREET, BRIGHTON

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NOTHING JADED

EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE Candy Nelson Nakamarra paintings are noted for their bold contrasting colours and multi layers in sophisticated and sought-after contemporary works such as this large scale piece which tells of the creation time hailstorm that brought water to the region. everywhenart.com.au

Miracles is a collection inspired by the love of disco music. Each piece is named in honour of one of the many groove-oriented funky, disco songs. This Forget Me Not bangle is made from hand beaten sterling silver inlayed with pieces of turquoise and lapis lazuli. Follow @nothingjaded on Instagram to see which fabulous peninsula markets they’ll be showcasing these babies at this summer. Shop online. nothingjaded.com

Peninsula

Styles PRODUCTS FROM THE PENINSULA WE'RE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

ALBERT & DAPHNE Melbourne made Judith Hoffman mugs available from Albert & Daphne 103 Main Street Mornington albertanddaphne.com.au

A ROOM WITH A VIEW This gorgeous San Jose check maxi dress is sure to be a festive fave. Available at A Room with a View in Dromana and online aroomwithaview.com.au

SORRENTO FURNITURE Custom made outdoor sofas create an amazing space to enjoy summer with friends and family. If you're considering transforming your outdoor space contact Sorrento Furniture 42 Watt Road, Mornington sorrentofurniture.com.au

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Wht' a s?n

Upcoming Peninsula Events

*DECEMBER 2021

* Check with venue for any restrictions.

3 DECEMBER A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS VARIETY SPECIAL

7 DECEMBER CURATORS FLOOR TALK WITH DANNY LACY

10 DECEMBER SOUL NIGHT MARKET – DROMANA ESTATE

mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

unrivalledevents.com.au/soulnight-market

One of the most rewarding and meaningful experiences you can have in a Gallery is to be guided through the exhibition by a key contributor or curator of the show. In this instance, Danny has three new exhibitions to talk about.

Featuring a stellar cast led by Chris McKenna as compere, along with music theatre star Ian Stenlake, tenor Roy Best, Michelle Fitzmaurice and featuring the wonderful Frankston Ladies Choir - this show will be just the ticket to get you into the true Christmas Spirit.

Soul Night Market's aim is to create a festive foodie-type vibe, like the Night Markets in the City, with live soul-inspired music plus a selection of some of Melbourne’s most talented makers.

artscentre.frankston.vic.gov.au

10-12 DECEMBER GO FISH PENINSULA

GoFish Peninsula, hosted at Skybus Stadium in Frankston, is set to be the appetiser for the pinnacle GoFish Nagambie, whilst being slightly smaller it still packs a punch with all the trademark GoFish favourites - big cash, unique prize draws and a fun weekend with mates.

12 DECEMBER HIGH TEA AT THE MORNINGTON BOTANICAL ROSE GARDENS

18 DECEMBER EMU PLAINS MARKET

morningtonrosegardens.com.au

emuplainsmarket.com.au

Beneath the sun dappled stringy bark canopy, the Emu Plains Market transforms the natural bush setting into a snaking trail of colourful market stalls welcoming people to the unique atmosphere. Meet the big man in red as he spreads his Christmas Cheer! SANTA VISITS THE EPM 10AM to 12PM.

gofishtournament.com.au/ peninsula

The Holiday Road

The Mornington Rose Garden has over 4000 roses planted in 86 beds and is surrounded by a border of native Australian trees and shrubs and High Tea will be served in the Don Gordon Garden Room.

Accommodation sorted. Good company planned. Regionally sourced, pasture fed, ethically reared free range proteins (aka meat!), delivered conveniently to your door, holiday rental, caravan or campsite in 95% biodegradable packaging!

ORDER HERE

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DANCING

By Andrea Rowe Photos Yanni

C

OVID-19 has dealt a devastating blow to dance studios and the performing arts, which also sustain the wellbeing, physical health, entertainment, creativity and social connection of so many. For dancers on the Peninsula, this fulfilment, along with regular dance practice during the pandemic, has been exceptionally challenging to maintain. But dancers are masters at pivoting. And, Peninsula Dance School’s Director, Melanie Gard has led the dance studio to step boldly into the digital space to keep the magic of dance alive. “We’ve danced our way as a community through tough times and we’re standing strong,” says Melanie. Known by her adoring dancers, families and staff as Miss Mel, the determined Dance Director moved classes online last year to sustain the energies and expression of young dancers who are driven to perform. Now, they’re hungry to get back into the studio, and on stage. Under the floodlights, and adorned in costumes, they’ll dance to commemorate an impressive 60-year legacy of Peninsula School of Dance. The Diamond Jubilee celebration will reflect the talent of the former Rosebud Ballet School which was first established in 1961. Fast forward to 2021, and hundreds of young dancers call the studio their special place.

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It offers over 10 streams of dance and performance skills from ballet and broadway to hip hop and tap, starting with petite beginner programs all the way to VCE dance.

That space evolved from a modern studio dance floor to computer screens, where Mel and her dedicated staff zoomed into family homes to keep kids dancing.

47-year-old Mel has been at the helm of the dance school since 2006, introducing new dance streams, inclusive programs like Rhythm Works for people with disabilities, memorable performance opportunities with Cabaret Cathedral and Victorian Dance Festival, workshops, choreography competitions and exams, and a unique experience for students, dancing in the Disney Land parade.

“Our students were logging on to see their friends as much as to improve their pliés – dance mattered even more for the connection it gave them. Friendship really is the glue we all need.”

Despite the pandemic, it continues to be a renowned and thriving dance studio on the southern peninsula, and one of the few certified dance studios in Australia to hold a Keeping Kids Safe in Dance accreditation.

The dance studio is their happy place, where their friendship groups are and they explore self-belief

Peninsula School of Dance’s leap from lockdown is set to be a celebration of hard work, commitment, resilience, and talent amongst a community of families who value dance and performance.

“We talk a lot about the lessons and insights we will all take from lockdown,” says Mel, “I knew my dancers valued each other’s company, and are passionate about movement and dance. But I’m grateful for how we kept them connected, and helped kids through such traumatic times. The dance studio is their happy place, where their friendship groups are and they explore self-belief; we had to hold that space for them.”

Dance lessons in lounge rooms gave families a rare insight into what their own children love about dance. They’ve told Mel that the positive affirmations and recognition of their children by the dance teaching team was vital for wellbeing during such harsh restrictions. “Suddenly our studio lessons became an intimate experience the whole family could see. Some parents told us they loved hearing the classical music or dance beats filling up their homes.

Another said it was like sunshine in her day. I’m thrilled we could offer that consistency, and that I could demonstrate that in challenging times, it’s important to show up, participate and move forward.” “Dance teachers really could run the world,” jokes Mel. “I’m grateful to the families who have done their best supporting their dancers too. Really, we’ve all done our best during COVID times to be there for our kids.” continued next page...

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Performing arts is about performing; we haven’t been onstage in two years

A conversation with the wise and wonderful Mel covers everything from memories of her dancing childhood to the life lessons at the barre that dancers gain. And then there’s insight to local life and how performances at community gatherings and events form the foundation of civic contribution, celebration of talent, opening young minds to new experiences and providing equitable opportunities.

It’s abundantly clear that this 60-year-old dance school which started in the Rosebud Memorial Hall and is now a rising star of the Capel Sound industrial estate has been witness to great moments on the Southern Peninsula. And nurtured true talent. The school has a well-respected history of dance students from Jason Coleman, and Chloe Dellimore who have both contributed to global performing arts, and respected teacher Miss Sandra McKay OAM.

She’s also a live-in-the-moment mum to three kids, a much sought-after assessor and dance mentor as a Licentiate with Cecchetti Ballet of Australia, and sits on the Mornington Peninsula Arts and Culture Advisory Panel.

But Miss Mel’s greatest joy is the life skills dance offers her students. “When I talk to past students they reflect on how shared experiences of classwork, rehearsals, concerts and showtime preparation have built skills to take into their many careers. Dance can be a discipline, a stimulation for ideas and a celebration of memories of growing up. “

Your name doesn’t have to be up in lights to impress Mel though.

“Every time I step into a studio with my students, I’m not just teaching them how to dance, but at the core I’m helping them become collaborative, expressive, strong, resilient and respectful people. That’s a special honour.”

She’s in awe of her dance students as they explore valuable life skills and gain self-esteem. Mel is soaring along with them. “Every time I teach - I’m buzzing, I love that someone wants to turn up and become a confident dancer or express themselves. I love seeing their journey.”

As restrictions ease, Mel has pivoted again with an outdoor studio space, providing welcome respite for eager dancers and their families. She’s planning to move students back indoors to their beloved dance floors after summer and will rebuild the strong sense of community that Peninsula School of Dance prides itself on.

She won’t tell you herself, but Mel’s peers will be the first to declare their admiration for her passion as an educator and advocate for dance inclusivity. Mel’s background in disability and community development, as well as her ground-breaking partnerships with local government and community organisations drives her commitment to inclusivity for dancers of all abilities.

“Performing arts is about performing; we haven’t been onstage in two years. We’re all set to get back into the theatre to give our students the diamond jubilee performance of their dreams, and to let our dancers, and our community’s dance history, shine.”

As well her busy role as Director of Peninsula School of Dance (which she runs in partnership with her husband Robbie), she’s also the Co-director of Unlocking our Potential, a unique vocational and life skills disability program, and the Vice Chair of Dance Arts Alliance which received national media attention representing dance studio owners during lockdown restrictions.

Continuing with her giving spirit, Mel is encouraging the community to share their studio stories and dance day memories with her. She’s established a blog on her website featuring interviews with key staff and dancers, and capturing the dance school’s history in the hearts of many. “Sixty years is a long time, and two years of this interrupted history really is a small blip in the timeline. It’s felt catastrophic and awful - but we will survive, and it’s important that we celebrate our history and plan for a fabulous future for the next generation of performers.”

Follow Peninsula School of Dance FB: facebook.com/ Peninsulaschoolofdance Insta: @peninsuladance W: peninsuladance.com.au

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What What are are you you waiting waiting for for??

Summertime is a great time to get out and about in your backyard. Summertime is a great time to get out and about in your backyard. Explore more of the Mornington Peninsula at Explore more of the Mornington Peninsula at

visitmorningtonpeninsula.org visitmorningtonpeninsula.org

visitmorningtonpeninsula.org visitmorningtonpeninsula.org

@morningtonpeninsula @morningtonpeninsula

@officialmorningtonpeninsula @officialmorningtonpeninsula PENINSULA | 13

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open 7 DAYS secret

D I S C OV E R T H E P E N I N S U L A’ S B E S T K E P T

NE W CO N TA IN E RS A R R I V I N G R E G U L A R L Y

• Sun Lounges • Market Umbrellas • Massive range of Rattan • Cushions • Lamps • Jewellery • Artworks, and much more!

• Indoor/Outdoor Furniture • Homewares • Giftware • Tables • Chairs • Lounges • Bar Tables and Stools

December 2021

BONEO RD

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COLCHESTER ROAD FACTORY 2

BONEO ROAD

Come in and visit us today to view some of our new stock or find us on 2/1 Colchester Road, Rosebud | kibuimports@gmail.com | 5986 6778

NEWINGTON AVE

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WHO WILL WIN THE 2021-22 BEST BITES PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARDS? Brunch with the family, coffee with friends, going out for dinner or just grabbing some takeaway now has even more meaning. Because while you are supporting local eateries, you can also share the love further by nominating your favourite foodie spot for this year’s Best Bites People’s Choice Awards. The award-winning Best Bites program is the Shire’s pledge to recognise and encourage excellence in local businesses that serve food. The Best Bites Food Guide is now available online at mornpen. vic.gov.au/bestbites and lists local food businesses that have received a Best Bites certification. These businesses scored over 95 per cent in their food safety assessment and provide excellence across a range of areas for customers. The Best Bites Food Guide is a great place to find a new favourite place to eat, and supporting local cafes, restaurants and takeaway outlets is one way we can all make a difference. Nominate your favourite Best Bites food business at mornpen. vic.gov.au/bestbites, and go into the draw to win a box of fresh, local produce to the value of $100!

Nominations for the 2021-22 Best Bites People’s Choice Awards close 8 March 2022.

To find other ways you can support local business mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal

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COMMUNITY patrl

By Joe Novella Photos Yanni

V

olunteers are indeed the lifeblood of our Mornington Peninsula community. They power everything from local sport to charity organisations. They come together without expectation of payment or reward, except for the knowledge that they are helping their community to become a better place. And as a result, more often than not, their great work flies under the radar and, consequently, they miss out on the help and resources they desperately need. That's why it's so important to raise awareness of the work these volunteer community groups perform, and one such group is the Safety Beach and Dromana Beach Patrol, or 3936-BeachPatrol as it is officially known. 3936-BeachPatrol is a bunch of fantastic people who care deeply about their local community. Many of them give up their own time to collect litter from the beautiful Safety Beach and Dromana

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foreshore and beach. Having driven down along the highway, after the Melbourne Cup long weekend and seeing litter around every bend, never has the commitment of these volunteers been more welcome. So how did it all start? I asked Gary Robertson, the founder of 3936-BeachPatrol. "Back in 2017 I found that my daily walks were being spoilt by the amount of rubbish I saw lying around and I found I couldn’t just walk past it. I had to stop and pick it all up. "After doing this for a while, I realised I had to do something about it, so I went online to see if there were any groups around that could help me. I found there were beach patrol groups operating in Rye and Tootgarook. So, I contacted Beach Patrol Australia and, after hearing what they do, I decided to start up a Beach Patrol group in Dromana / Safety Beach." continued page 18...


Summer Entertaining SUMMER 21-22

A U S T R A L I A N O W N E D & O P E R AT E D


This litter problem isn't going away and needs urgent direct action

The Beach Patrol movement started in Melbourne's Middle Park Beach in 2009 and since then Beach Patrols have been started all around the bay by concerned communities. The focus of Beach Patrol is to prevent litter from entering Port Phillip Bay and then being swept out by the tides to endanger our precious marine life. Litter on beaches and in overflowing bins on beach foreshores is especially problematic, but so too is litter that finds its way into the Bay via street and stormwater drains. "The biggest culprits are plastics and cigarette butts," said Gary. "Plastic bags, confectionary wrappers, cups and we have a new type of litter we're seeing more and more of and that's wipes. All these items are so dangerous to our marine life which mistakes the litter for food and swallows it, choking or dying of malnutrition.

"This litter problem isn't going away and needs urgent direct action. We keep records and these show that for Safety Beach/ Dromana we collect over 20 different categories of litter including dangerous items like needles. We collect between 1,500 and 4,000 pieces of litter a month, up to 28,000 pieces a year. We need most hands on deck after public holidays and during the summer tourist season because even though most people do the right thing there are a minority of people who treat our Peninsula like their dumping ground."

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Safety Beach/Dromana Beach Patrol started in 2017 with 30 volunteers and has grown to over 1400 today, made up of people of all ages and from lots of different backgrounds. For identification, volunteers are supplied with t-shirts purchased with funds donated by the council. They are equipped with gloves and tongs, and provided with tubs for sorting litter, all supplied by a combination of Beach Patrol Head Office funding, donations from Bunnings Rosebud, and fundraising activities like sausage sizzles. "We're a community group," said Gary. "We do what we do for our community, but we rely on our community as well. We've partnered with other community groups like local schools and we've also run corporate clean up days. We've worked with council to increase the amount of bins on the foreshore and partnered with them on installing three cigarette butt bins as part of a trial. So we're very active, apart from just picking up litter, and we could always use extra help." Safety Beach/Dromana Beach Patrol members meet every month (twice a month in Jan/Feb) for 90 minutes to do a beach clean. You don't need any qualifications to be a member, just head to the group's Facebook page or website, or just turn up on the third Sunday of each month at Safety Beach or Dromana piers.


So what's in it for the volunteers, I enquired? "For me personally," Gary explained, "it has been a very rewarding and satisfying experience. I've made some life-long friends and have got to know lots of like-minded people I see in and around the town. My real passion is doing whatever I can to ensure the health of Port Phillip Bay and its marine life, and I feel like I'm doing that through my local Beach Patrol. I encourage people to join us and even if you can't make it to the scheduled cleans, pick up any litter you see when you're out walking. It all helps." If you're a local business wanting to give back to the community, please get in contact; your support will be more than welcome and you will be doing a great service for the local environment and community. On behalf of all of us on the Peninsula, a big thanks to all the Beach Patrol volunteers doing their bit for our community and for the environment, keeping our beaches clean and our marine life safe.

To join the Safety Beach Dromana Beach Patrol head to the group's facebook page facebook.com/groups/112190529472887 or visit their website: beachpatrol.com.au/beach-groups/3936/46

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 430 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u December 2021

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Arts

DOCUMENTIG

By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

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ational Geographic magazine had a huge impact on Arthur’s Seat photographer, Karina Laird. As a child, she would pore over the images absorbing the exotic faces, places, exquisite detail and the impact of documentary photography. It influenced the way she looked at the world and the way she developed her own photographic style. Part of the reason images resonated so much with Karina was because she grew up with dyslexia. Learning to read was challenging. She felt she could connect more with images. This influenced her style of learning, but also taught her to develop the photographic eye that is the underpinning of her current practice. Growing up, Karina developed a profound appreciation of nature and the environment finding beauty all around her. She connected with the people and places unique to the Peninsula - always noticing the details that people often overlook. Historical photography has had a big influence on Karina. She remembers spending many hours looking at the old photographs in her grandparents’ photo albums observing the way people dressed, socialised and how the world looked then – particularly Melbourne - compared with today. continued page 22...

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Karina didn’t start studying photography until she was 20. Her parents didn’t think it was a practical career choice, but for her, the pull was irresistible. Her first camera was her grandfather’s 1975 Olympus OM2. She still has it. She loves the look of vintage cameras so when she bought her first camera, it was an Olympus OMD. Karina studied at Holmesglen in Glen Waverly attaining a Certificate IV in Photography and Photo Imaging, followed by a Diploma in the same subject at Chisolm in Dandenong. The courses gave her the foundation to start her career.

I try hard to take photos that are different, to capture the things that mostly go unnoticed

In describing her style Karina says, “I look at photography in a documentary way. Although I know photography is an art form, I look at it more as documenting life. I try hard to take photos that are different, to capture the things that mostly go unnoticed.”

“Because of my interest in history, I want to document life today. I see beautiful photos from history and I want my photos to look like that in decades to come. I don’t just want to capture the clothing, buildings and cars, I want to show the feeling of the time we are living in,” she says.

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Travel photography and street photography are her favourite genres. “There is no real limit to what you can do and where you can go now. I love textures, people and places. It suits my documentary style to photograph things just as they are without any manipulation. I like travel photography because what is mundane to locals is exotic to me,” she says. She always wanted to travel to Cuba because she thought it was funky and different to the rest of the world – a crumbling time capsule. “Everything has been preserved, but it’s falling apart. It’s like going back to the 1950s. The cars are old, the paint is peeling off the buildings, but it’s vibrant and colourful,” she says.

Her upcoming exhibition at the Frankston Arts Centre, 'Su Alma' (Spanish for ‘their souls’) is based on her travels in Mexico and Cuba where she captured the people, art, architecture, colours, textures and vibrancy of everyday street life. In 2019, Karina won the FAC Open Exhibition competition with a photo of a hairdresser in Havana. The prize was this solo exhibition. Although income is the biggest challenge for a photographer, the best part for her is that the field is limitless.


Where she can go, what she can do, what she can make has no bounds. She loves the idea that she can create something that can be held onto forever and show the world she lived in. Karina appreciates vivid colour in photography, but thinks it can also be a distraction. She finds black and white more interesting. Despite the fact that digital photography is easier and cheaper to produce, she prefers film. She likes that it can be raw and a bit fuzzy. It puts the fun in photography because she never knows what she’s going to get until the prints come back. She loves that surprise.

Photo: Karina Laird

Above all else, Karina wants to evoke feeling and emotion in her work. That a story comes through the photograph is her main aim. She feels a photograph can be beautiful even if it’s not technically sound if it conveys feeling. Come along to her exhibition to see how you feel about her vision.

Su Alma exhibition is at Frankston Art Centre Curved Wall Gallery. Opening night: Thursday, December 9 from 6-8pm (Registrations essential/thefac.com.au). Exhibition runs until Saturday, January 29, 2022. karinajanephotography.com

Photo: Karina Laird

WHAT DO YOU THINK? HOW DOES IT MAKE YOU FEEL?

‘Can a solar panel really make a drawing?’ ‘I’m interested in what’s happening.’ ‘Watching this makes me feel relaxed.’ MORNINGTON PENINSULA REGIONAL GALLERY

Cameron Robbins Solar Drawing Instrumental 2021 DC Motor, Unisolar 24V Panel (outdoors), cedar, stainless steel, aluminium, brass, copper, PolyEthylene, high tensile steel, carbon fibre, cable, pulleys , CVT gearbox, bearings, shafts, graphite, paint Exhibited in Wall Drawings 12 November 2021 – 13 March 2022

FREE ENTRY Open Tuesday–Sunday 11am–4pm

EXHIBITIONS / ARTIST TALKS / WORKSHOPS / KIDS PROGRAMS / ONLINE ACTIVITIES AND MORE – Civic Reserve, Dunns Rd, Mornington, Victoria mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

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RESIST & dye

By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

W

hen Kenya declared its independence from Britain in 1963, the comfortable colonial lifestyle that Jane Suffield knew as a child came to an end. She was seven years old when her family left Africa. They flew to Aden, Saudi Arabia and then boarded a ship for the long journey to Perth and then another to Sydney. As a child, Jane was always drawing and painting. She wanted to be an artist. Her mother, who was very creative, taught Jane sewing, knitting, crocheting and embroidery. These skills proved very helpful later in life when she began her current art practice. Although she did her HSC (Higher School Certificate) in painting, Jane did not begin her career as an artist. Her high school art teacher suggested she study interior design (though her heart was really in music). continued next page...

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She studied Interior Design at Randwick Technical School for a year before shifting to the Sydney Conservatory of Music to study clarinet. She wasn’t happy there so she went to the Sydney College of the Arts to complete a Bachelor of Arts in Interior Design. Jane subsequently worked for an architectural firm in Sydney as a draftsperson. Then, when her son finished high school, she moved to Wagga Wagga to teach clarinet and saxophone at the Riverina Conservatory of Music. While there, Jane met her current partner, a musician and composer from Melbourne. They decided to leave Wagga Wagga to build a house on a hill in McCrae set amongst the gum trees. It’s an innovative house they co-designed. Jane’s art studio is set above it in a beautiful garden she created.

There are countless ways to bind, stitch, fold, twist, or compress cloth for shibori and each way results in very different patterns. Jane begins with a design drawing, but sometimes the fabric and dye have a mind of their own.

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Jane loves working with her hands as she did when she learned hand crafting techniques from her mother. She loves the manual aspect of wrapping, binding and stitching. Before she begins, she has to think in reverse, imagining what she wants to resist and what she wants to dye.

It’s an amalgamation of art and science

Jane still teaches music and works as a draftsperson for an architect, but she is gravitating more and more to her art practice, shibori – an ancient Japanese manual resist dyeing technique using indigo dye to produce intricate patterns on fabric.

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“There is a natural randomness and improvisation that you can’t control between the dye, the pleats and the resistance. It’s the surprise I really love. That’s the joy of it,” she says.

Shibori is a time and labour-intensive craft. It may take 8-10 hours or more to bind and stitch a single piece before it is ready for dyeing. Then, it’s dipped into indigo dye and left to oxidize before dipping again. It might require a dozen dips before the right shade of blue is achieved.

Japanese aesthetic has always appealed to Jane. It’s what drew her to shibori in the first place. She attended a two-day workshop with Yoshiko Wada, a Japanese-American textile artist/ scholar largely responsible for the resurgence of interest in shibori. This workshop was revelatory. It set Jane on a path to connect and study with innovators in shibori and other global dyeing techniques from Africa to Australia. Jane has exhibited her work in numerous group shows through the World Shibori Network. When she decided she wanted to get


more serious about exhibiting and selling her work locally, she joined an artists' group, the Peninsula Studio Trail, where she found the camaraderie and support she needed to move to the next level. Recently Jane has widened her scope of study to dyes beyond blue - investigating colours derived from nature. She keeps encyclopaedic sample books of fabrics and dyes. There is a lot of chemistry involved in fabric dyeing: “Every colour has a recipe and a particular method of application,” she says. "It’s an amalgamation of art and science." Living on the Peninsula with its easy access to beach, bush and farmland provides a wealth of inspiration. Everything can be found in the beauty and patterns in nature. She also looks at aerial and macrophotography for those same patterns and repetitions. Jane is now experimenting with fabric art sculpture. She’d love to make textile jewellery or incorporate origami in some way. The arts and crafts of Japan are a constant source of interest and inspiration. She hopes to go to the Arimatsu Indigo Festival in Japan when the world opens up, but for now, she is happy making art in McCrae.

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NATURE OF WALL DRAWINGS AND PAINTINGS Presented as part of MPRG’s Festival of Drawing 2021, the exhibition Wall Drawings brings together eleven leading contemporary artists from across Australia, exploring the expansive nature of wall drawings and paintings, through newly commissioned wall-based works. The exhibition is showing 12 November – 13 March. Curated by Danny Lacy and Ellinor Pelz, featured artists create diverse spaces of intimate, vast and imagined landscapes throughout the gallery’s foyer, walls, alcoves and facade. The exhibition features work from artists Penny Evans, Emily Floyd, Tony Garifalakis, Julia Gorman, Yuria Okamura, Jason Phu, Kerrie Poliness, Cameron Robbins, Gemma Smith, Lisa Waup and Jahnne Pasco-White. Artist Cameron Robbins has created a sunlight-powered drawing instrument which draws in graphite onto the gallery’s foyer wall, inspired by the lunar eclipse of May 26 2021. Each line is made as sunlight filters through cloud, atmosphere and trees, to motivate a solar motor-driven pen. Each day, drawings accumulate from thousands of consecutive lines.

Cameron explains: “During the eclipse we are reminded that the Earth always casts its shadow into space while the moon passes through it on its monthly journey and projected onto it is the red ring of all the sunset and sunrises at once.” Also part of part of MPRG’s Festival of Drawing is Collection+ by Jess Johnson and Eduardo Paolozzi, an ambitious new series that pairs newly commissioned work by leading artists represented in the MPRG Collection alongside select institutional loans. Collection+ features new work by trailblazing artist Jess Johnson with one of the pioneers of the pop art movement Sir Eduardo Paolozzi. Johnson was the winner of MPRG’s National Works on Paper Prize in 2014. Her energetic and diverse drawing practice has established her as one of the most captivating artists working today. Pairing Johnson’s work with Sir Eduardo Paolozzi draws attention to the dizzying structural elements underlying their works; form, pattern, repetition and colour - and creates a dialogue between artists of different generations whose works share a unique visual logic.

Image credits: Jess Johnson, Algorithm 2020, pen, fibre tipped markers, acrylic, gouache on paper, Courtesy of the artist and Ivan Anthony Gallery, Auckland and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney

Photo: Jess Johnson, Algorithm 2020, pen, fibre tipped markers, acrylic, gouache on paper, Courtesy of the artist and Ivan Anthony Gallery, Auckland and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney

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12 NOV – 13 MAR MPRG Director Danny Lacy says “The Collection+ series is an opportunity to use the MPRG collection as a starting point for developing unique and experimental pairings between local and international artists. Playing with visual, historical and conceptual connections, these shows bring the wider world into conversation with our collection” “Johnson and Paolozzi are artists from different generations and geographies whose work reverberates with a distinct graphic visual language” Rounding out MPRG’s Festival of Drawing 2021 is Thin grey line – Contemporary Drawing, featuring artists Becc Orszag, Indigo O’Rourke, Laith McGregor, and Natalie Ryan. Thin Grey Line brings together the work of four highly skilled contemporary artists who incorporate fine detail into their drawing practices. Presenting stunning new drawings from each artist, this focus exhibition highlights the remarkable dexterity and enduring fascination of the medium of pencil drawings.

MPRG’s Spring Festival of Drawing 2021 12 November – 13 March Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery Civic Reserve, Dunns Road, Mornington Tuesday–Sunday, 11am–4pm More information: 5950 1580 or mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

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Jess Johnson’s work in Collection+ Jess Johnson / Eduardo Paolozzi at MPRG until 13 March

Interest free payment plans available Pop into the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery and pick up a free ‘MY MPRG’ kids activity booklet designed by Melbourne artist, designer and illustrator Beci Orpin. Children are invited to browse through artworks in the current exhibition and use the activity booklet to enhance their gallery experience. The activity book encourages creativity, drawing from the curriculum to harness a range of skills including mindfulness, visualisation, comprehension and comparison. Included within the booklet is a foldout poster, which invites children to seek inspiration from artworks in the MPRG collection and curate their own gallery exhibition.

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LITERARY splash

By Damon Photos Yanni????

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December 2021 December 2021


By Damon Rowston Photo Gary Sissons

D

r Christine Balint is an award-winning author, creative writing teacher at the University of Melbourne and an Arthurs Seat resident. Recently, Christine was awarded the prestigious Viva La Novella Prize for her latest book, Water Music.

"Looking for something new and researching it is something that interests and motivates me. I think that if I find it interesting and new, then others might not know about it either, and it might also be of interest to readers."

Water Music is historical fiction based on the patronage system, which existed in Venice from 1400 to 1797. The system allowed often impoverished girls the opportunity to participate in fulltime musical education. Through the eyes of orphan Lucietta, Christine's readers are transported to eighteenth-century Venice, where they follow Lucietta as she navigates her way through life and the expectations of her secret benefactor.

Water Music was originally part of a larger project that Christine worked on for a few years. The larger story was created using the voices of multiple characters – Lucietta being one of them. Whilst editing, Christine pulled out Lucietta's character because "it didn't belong" and "took over too much from the story and the other characters." "I was still very attached to it [Lucietta's character] though, and I felt that it was a strong piece in its own right," Christine said.

"The story’s about finding your own path and not feeling like you have to follow other people's expectations about your future, but finding what it is that makes you happy in your own life," Christine said.

During COVID-19, Christine came across the Viva La Novella Prize for short novels. Having extra time on her hands, she was able to look over Lucietta's story—which later became Water Music—and found that it was the perfect size for the competition.

Christine has always been fond of writing. As a teenager, she would write short stories and enter them into small country town competitions, occasionally winning. In her early 20's Christine had her big break with the release of The Salt Letters – a project that began as a creative writing thesis.

Christine mentioned that publishing a book can be very "unpredictable" making writing a "difficult" career to pursue.

Specialising in English and Modern European Studies at university, Christine integrates her interest in European history and music into her writing, especially visible in the content of Water Music.

"Whether you like or don't like a piece of writing is very subjective. Sometimes, a piece of work will be loved by a publisher, and at other times a publisher will be completely disinterested. So often, it's a matter of finding the right person who is going to love it," Christine said. "Almost all writers that I know have unpublished manuscripts; it's just a part of the work. You have to really love it to be able to keep going," "There have been times where I have seriously questioned whether I should keep going, which just makes the times where you win a prize like the Viva La Novella so much more exciting and life-changing."

Looking for something new and researching it is something that interests and motivates me

"It began for me with Vivaldi*. One day, I was listening to the radio, and the presenter started talking about his music," Christine said. "Nearly all his music was composed for orphan girls, and that's what grabbed my attention in the first instance." Inspired by Vivaldi's music, Christine began researching. She received funding from the Australia Council to research the orphanages in the Venetian archives. She joined the Melbourne Women's Choir, where she sang to music by Vivaldi and other Venetian composers, experiencing it firsthand. Christine eventually travelled to Venice with the choir, and had the opportunity to perform some of this music at the Pietà church, designed by Vivaldi himself.

Winning this award has reinforced Christine's passion for writing and allows her to continue doing what she loves: "You realise that, it is okay, you can keep going, and someone actually wants to read what you've written". *Antonio Lucio Vivaldi was a famous Italian composer who worked as a priest in the Pietà Orphanage during the Venetian Republic.

Despite Water Music being fiction, Christine meticulously researches to paint an accurate picture of Venetian society. Experiencing Venice, reading historical documents and embracing Venetian culture gives Christine the capacity to create historical fiction. "People sometimes have issues with historical fiction. They like to ask writers why they're not representing society as it is now, in this moment," Christine said. However, working on historical fiction allows Christine to escape reality. She can explore and learn new things about different places through research, motivating her to continue writing.

Water Music by Christine Balint is available in most independent bookshops on the Mornington Peninsula and online: booktopia.com.au/water-music-christinebalint/book/9781922267610.html

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The final pieces of the jigsaw are falling into place at Village Glen Retirement Community, on the magnificent Mornington Peninsula Health and Wellness Centre

Golf Cafe

New Lakeside Apartments

Croquet Lawn and Bowling Green

9-Hole Golf Course

Caravan Storage

New Jake’s Bar, dining room and lounge

New cinema and library

The Hub is the heart of Village Glen, already home to the village shop and hair salon, and the now newly completed facilities offer residents so much more. It’s designed to be a place where residents and their guests can gather to relax, converse and rest in a beautifully appointed and furnished communal precinct. No service fee for three years on qualifying 2 bedroom villas, terms and conditions apply. Offer available until March 31st 2022. F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N C A L L U S O N 0 3 5 9 8 6 4 4 5 5 335–351 Eastbourne Road, Capel Sound VIC 3940

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W W W.V I L L AG E G L E N .C O M . AU


FROM ULURU TO THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA For almost 40 years, Maruku Arts, based next to Uluru has been coordinating the making, buying, promotion and sales of the now famous, highly distinctive Central Australian Aboriginal carved wooden artefacts. Made in 20 communities over thousands of square kilometres of the APY and NPY Lands of SA, NT and WA, the punu (wood) artefacts range from traditional hunting spears, shields, clubs, clapsticks and piti (wooden bowls) to delightful carved animals, birds and reptiles as well as wall boards incised with hot wires to create patterns called 'walka'. Now exhibited in leading galleries as well as popular tourist outlets, for the first time a wide range of carvings, boards and paintings from Maruku Arts is featuring on the Peninsula in an exhibition at Everywhen Artspace. All the Family - wood carving, painting, photography runs to December 24

Piti (bowl) by Dianne Golding and wana (digging stick) by Nancy Carnegie

EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE Open Friday -Monday 11-4. Tues, Wed & Thurs by appointment A: 39 Cook St, Flinders. P: 5989 0496 W: everywhenart.com.au

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Eat & Drink

TRANSITION farm FROM LIFELESS LAND TO COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE, TO BIODYNAMIC ORGANIC SEED SAVING By Amy Minichiello

I

t was back in 2007 when Peter Carlyon happened upon a small acreage just over the sandy dunes of the Southern end of the Mornington Peninsula. His wife, Robin, and two small children had just sold their first property - a 100-acre farm, in the Victorian Alps. They were set to begin a new way of life over in Tasmania. However, a sliding doors moment prevailed.

We created a dynamic food network that attempted to balance the needs of the farm, the farmer, and the community

Robin dug her hands into the white sandy soil and exclaimed, “How are we going to feed our family?!” The farm was, “lifeless, not a single bug in sight.” Cooch grass invaded the horse paddocks. Robin sat cross-legged, breathing deeply, eyes closed as she tried to meditate life into the surrounds only to come up short. It was sheer determination and a vision for what could be that was the driving force to give this thing a go. I wonder now, knowing what they had to do back then, would they do it again? “It was a lot of work and at times, I wonder where we got so much time and energy. But the experience has shown me that Peter has great perception to recognise what a property could be.” Robin agreed to move to this sand-blanketed patch of earth because she wanted to support Peter’s vision. It was a combined purpose that saw them achieve something quite extraordinary over the years that followed.

Sitting up at the gorgeous, long, Victorian Ash kitchen bench inside Peter and Robin’s mud brick home, I found myself equally mesmerised and immensely inspired by this husband-and-wife team. It is no mean feat to take on something of this magnitude, especially with two small children in tow. Robin used to drive around to local producers asking, “Can I please empty your bins?” It was here that she filled huge bags full of discarded leaves, damaged fruit, and vegetables – anything that could be given to the chooks or dig into the ground and decompose. Worm farms dug into garden beds followed, along with the use of biodynamic principles. It was a recipe that rewarded. A large photo hung to my right on the wall that overlooked what was once the house vegetable garden. It is an image of a 5-year-old Maya, Peter and Robin’s eldest child, standing in front of a wall of greenery. That photo was taken a year after they had moved to the farm. Suddenly nature was singing. There were bugs, insects, reptiles, and birds. Life began to bloom. Seeds were sown, garden beds appeared, poly-tunnels were erected, garden mandalas created. Peter and Robin created a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) supplying freshly harvested certified biodynamic and continued page 36...

Photo: Honey Atkinson

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organic vegetables to 120 local families, along with restaurants in Melbourne and the Peninsula. “We created a dynamic food network that attempted to balance the needs of the farm, the farmer, and the community. The system did not cater to everyone in the community, but we felt that by year nine we, the farmers and the community of like-minded CSA members, were cocreating a sustainable food system,” explained Robin. It was with a heavy heart that they closed the CSA chapter in 2020. The desire to tread a new path proved to be too strong to ignore. Sourcing high quality organic seed in Australia was becoming more difficult to, especially with the limitations and/ or need to fumigate certain varieties of seed which were imported. So, they changed gears, focused, and put all their energy into creating a seed business.

cluster in order for them not to cross-pollinate, and Robin had decided to plant 800 feet of tomatoes!” These time-consuming efforts they are dedicating themselves to is in order to build what they call foundation seed. “This is the seed from which future seed crops will come. We are observing maturity dates; disease resistance; plant architecture; fruit size, shape and colour; extreme weather resilience – trying to enhance the genetic information that transfers from generation to generation”. And with 100 different seed varieties so far, that is no mean feat!

Maintaining living gene pools through seed saving within the public sector is true food security and human survival

It is where food begins: a single seed. An interconnected web of growing history allows opportunities for growth and plant diversity, “Maintaining living gene pools through seed saving within the public sector is true food security and human survival,” says Robin.

“We were pretty strong on trying to get people to understand where their food came from and it is the same for us with seed; getting people more in the know about the background of products. Where they actually came from and their environmental cost, but most importantly we want more people to grow their own food. It is a truly empowering feeling in so many ways.”

While they hope that the next farm has better soil to begin with, this farm has taught them how important it is, “to focus on soil health and a diverse healthy ecosystem – which is reflected in the nutrient density of the food we eat and enriches our lives and those of the community in so many ways.” It is for this very reason that they would, and may, do it all over again.

Having to farewell their small team in March 2020, thanks to the first lockdown, saw them hand pollinate all the squash, cucumbers and pumpkins themselves, and then the tomato plants decided to start flowering, “Robin and I had to bag every individual flower

transitionfarm.com

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December 2021

Photos: Peter and Robin Carlyon


Photographer: Lillie Thompson

Photographer: Lillie Thompson

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recipe PISTACHIO, WHITE CHOCOLATE & CURRANT BISCOTTINI Makes 17

INGREDIENTS 40g unsalted pistachios 110g almond meal 110g caster sugar Pinch of salt Zest of an orange 1/3 cup currants 1/3 cup white chocolate, finely chopped 2 egg whites For the Festive spiced sugar coating ¼ cup caster sugar ¼ cup icing sugar, sifted ¼ tsp ground cinnamon ¼ tsp ground ginger ¼ tsp ground cloves ¼ tsp grated nutmeg

METHOD 1. Preheat your oven to 160 degrees fan-forced (180 degrees conventional) and line a baking tray with a sheet of baking paper. Set aside. 2. Place pistachios into a small food processor and blitz to a fine crumb. 3. Tip the pistachio meal into a medium sized bowl along with the almond meal, sugar, salt, orange zest, currants, and white chocolate. Whisk everything together until combined.

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4. In a small bowl, whisk the egg whites, just enough to break them up slightly. Pour them into the dry ingredients and stir to combine. 5. Combine all the festive spiced sugar ingredients together in a small bowl. 6. Roll tablespoon amounts of mixture into the spiced sugar, coating them well before placing each one onto the prepared baking tray. Allow about 5cm between each. 7. Pop the tray into the preheated oven and bake for 18 to 20 minutes or until lightly golden and the wonderful festive aroma fills your home. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the tray for 10 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack, if you can wait that long!

COOKS TIP *They keep well for at least 6 days (perhaps even longer) in the pantry in an airtight container. **Any leftover spiced sugar can be stored in a glass jar and re-used. It also makes a delightful addition sprinkled over the top of porridge or added into fruit crumbles.

aminikitchen.com I Insta: @amy_minichiello_ December 2021


BACKYARD HENS KEY TO INCREASING SELF-SUSTAINABILITY Many people either own backyard hens or know of someone who does. The growing popularity has largely been due to families wanting to become more self-sustainable. So why is keeping backyard hens so good for your family? Well, hens make for fantastic pets! Our breed of hens are Hy-line Browns which are extremely friendly and placid. They love company and like nothing more than to spend time interacting with their owners. We hear lots of entertaining stories from our customers such as their hens going on school runs, on swings with the kids, and happily jumping up onto their laps.

Not only do they need to be responsible for feeding and providing water for their hens but they must collect eggs daily and keep the coop clean and safe. Excess eggs can also be sold or given away to friends and neighbours which is a great way of benefiting others in your local community. Visit our farm: 3590 Frankston-Flinders Road, Merricks Call Jason: 0406 691 231 Open Thu to Mon 10am - 4pm (Closed Tue & Wed) W: TalkingHens.com.au

Good egg-laying breeds like our Hy-Line’s also quickly pay for themselves by providing your family with highly nutritious and delicious eggs throughout the year. Their eggs are high in protein and minerals but low in calories. You also have peace of mind knowing exactly how your hens are treated and what food they have eaten. Of course, you can’t get more “local” food than what you get from your own backyard! When combined with a vegetable garden, your family becomes far more self-sufficient and able to live more sustainably. If you really had to avoid social contact, your hens and vegetables could keep your household well fed over the long-term. Hen ownership also teaches children some important, practical lessons about life.

Looking for backyard hens but unsure where to start? Talking Hens is a family business that enjoys backyard hens. We specialise in friendly, egg laying hens with quality products to keep them happy and healthy. There’s nothing like the friendship and entertainment that you receive from our laying hens - a pleasure to be shared!

Talking Hens 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd Merricks, Vic 3916

Opening Hours: Thursday to Monday 10am to 4pm Closed: Tuesday and Wednesday

For enquiries call Jason 0406 691 231 Email: talk@talkinghens.com.au Visit: TalkingHens.com.au

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FINE rie me s By Paul Sellars

A

new wine from one of the Mornington Peninsula’s most celebrated vineyards, the 2020 “Memories” Pinot Noir, as it is appropriately called, is a wine that marks the 12-month anniversary of the passing of Margaret Crittenden, wife to Garry and co-founder of the family business. Across 38 consecutive vintages at Crittenden Estate there have been many wines that hold a special significance for Garry Crittenden, but none more so that the one he has just released. ‘Memories’ is a wine both hugely symbolic for its celebration of Margaret’s life as well as a tangible manifestation of what she helped bring about – one of the Mornington Peninsula’s great vineyard treasures. Beyond that it is also a testament to an all too often-unsung hero and pioneer of wine and tourism on the Mornington Peninsula, and to the extraordinary and enduring legacy she has left behind.

That very night Garry rang the man now recognised as the father of Tasmanian wine, Claudio Alcorso, who the following day welcomed the Crittendens to his vineyard on the Derwent River and took them through what Garry remembers as “his astonishing range of virtually unknown wines” grown on the property famously known today as Mona. It was a watershed moment for the Crittendens. “We were so inspired by that experience that over dinner a few weeks later I proposed that we sell up everything and move to Tasmania to plant a vineyard,” says Garry. “I remember clearly Margaret telling me that ‘you might find it a little lonely,’ although ironically enough nine years later we did plant what is now known as the Tolpuddle Vineyard in the Coal River Valley near Hobart, with her full support.” continued next page...

Part of Margaret’s legacy can be found within the Mornington Peninsula Shire’s libraries. It’s here where you will find a remarkable collection of newspaper clippings and other memorabilia that Margaret meticulously compiled over 28 years. In 2018 Garry had the 240 pages of hard work bound into six hardback copies that became known as ‘The Big Red Book’. In the wake of Margaret’s passing, three of the copies were donated to the local libraries. “Of all the remarkable contributions that Margaret made over more than 30 years, not just to our family business but also to the overall recognition of the Mornington Peninsula’s wine industry, this is probably the most significant and enduring,” says Garry. Marrying in 1969 and moving to the peninsula three years later, Margaret and Garry Crittenden’s life and business pivot would come in 1978 when the couple took their young children Zoe and Rollo on a holiday to Tasmania. This would be where, in a restaurant in Hobart, they encountered something unheard of at the time – Tasmanian wine.

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What the Crittendens ultimately agreed to was to establish a vineyard on the Peninsula and after a year-long search they purchased the land which the family still occupies to this day. It is well documented that when Margaret and Garry established the family business they called Dromana Estate in 1982 - later to become Crittenden Estate as it is known today - they doubled the vineyard area on the Peninsula in a single day when they planted their first five acres of vines. What is far less well known - yet is fundamentally at the heart of this story – is that from that point on, many of the things the Crittendens did were a first for the Peninsula’s nascent wine industry, and it was Margaret who thought of and implemented them.

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For while Garry is justifiably known throughout the industry for his tireless innovation and pushing of boundaries, he is the first to admit that it was often Margaret generating the ideas. It was one day in the summer holidays of 1988, with Garry away at the London Win Trade Fair to help build an export market and unaware of her plans, that Margaret set up the Peninsula’s first “cellar door” in the winery - with just a trestle table, notepad, pen and cash tin. Much in the way of innovation flowed from that moment, and as Garry recalls, Margaret was “so taken with the potential of what she had begun that in 1992 she went on to conceptualise, design and build not just a cellar door but her own restaurant, where she worked the stoves seven days a week for the next 13 years”. continued next page...

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“It was Margaret who started what was not just the first cellar door on the Peninsula, but the first cellar door that served food and the first one that was open seven days a week,” says Garry.

Margaret not only dreamt these things up, but then went on to bring them to life

Then in 2005 Margaret went on to create another first for the Peninsula – by conceiving the first winery accommodation on the Peninsula in the form of three multi-award-winning Lakeside Villas fronting the lake of Crittenden Estate which are now managed by Rollo’s wife Linda. “Margaret not only dreamt these things up, but then went on to bring them to life,” says Garry. “I may have received a lot of the credit, but it was Margaret doing a lot of the hard work.” Margaret’s immense contribution to the Peninsula may be nowhere near as well recognised as it should be.

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But, well before her passing, having watched Zoe and Rollo assume the helm of the family business and take it to new heights, investing themselves heavily in the regional wine industry’s well-being in the process, she would have known her legacy was assured. And that all the hard work was worth it a hundred times over. The back label of the 2020 Memories Pinot Noir fittingly reads: “Crafted by Garry Crittenden, this wine has been released in commemoration of the outstanding contribution Margaret made not only to Crittenden Estate but also the wine and tourism industries on the Mornington Peninsula. May her achievements be celebrated forever.”

crittendenwines.com.au


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YOUR 2021

GIFT GUIDE

CRITTENDEN ESTATE A Crittenden Estate gift voucher makes an ideal present for the wine lover in your life and can be redeemed for online purchases or at the Crittenden Wine Centre. Visit Crittenden Estate located at 25 Harrisons Road, Dromana. crittendenwines.com.au

ALBERT & DAPHNE Mornington made Juz Savage reuseable face wipes available at Albert & Daphne 103 Main St, Mornington albertanddaphne.com.au emuplainsmarket.com.au

COASTAL GRAZING Spoil that someone special this festive season and celebrate with a Coastal Grazing platter, gift box or grazing table. Locally made goods for pick up or delivery. Order throughemail, Facebook or Instagram. coastalgrazing.com.au

CHIEF'S SON DISTILLERY Surprise adult guests this Christmas with a Chief's Son handcrafted whisky cracker to make the day memorable. Bonbon includes a 50ml bottle of The Tanist 43%abv. Crackers $12 each or 6 for $69 (use the code bonbon at checkout). Or a Chief’s Son Whisky Tasting pack, perfect for experiencing our core range of Australian-made Single Malt Whiskies, both in 45% & 60%abv. Perfect for Secret Santa, stocking fillers or Christmas hampers. chiefsson.com.au

OLIEVE & OLIE Self-care stocking stuffers are in bountiful supply at Olieve & Olie. Their natural skincare products and luxe candles make gifting easy this festive season. Gift your loved ones glowing skin with hand and body cream, lip balm, scrubs, shaving gel, body butter, hand and body washes and so much more. 7/16 Henry Wilson Drive, Rosebud olieveandolie.com.au

KOLLAB Gifts for everyone! With storage solutions to suit all occasions in beautiful prints. Available in store at 7, 23-27 Suffolk Street, Rosebud, or shop online kollab.com.au

ORIGINAL SPIRIT CO Original Spirit Co's Ginfusion gift pack trio is the perfect way to sample and enjoy three of the most popular Ginfusion flavours. Presented in a quality gift box with personalised Christmas decoration, this flavoursome trio makes a thoughtful gift for Gin lovers and cocktail lovers alike. originalspiritco.com

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Gift boxes to LOVE

December 2021


INDIGO THREADS Tis the season to spoil that someone special and this Christmas Indigo Threads has you covered. From stunning boho fashion to accessories and candles you'll find it hard to decide. Gift vouchers also available. Shop in store at Indigo Threads Mornington and Somerville boutiques and online. indigothreads.com.au

Gift vouchers to GIVE ARTHURS SEAT EAGLE Take your gift giving to new heights this Christmas! An Arthurs Seat Eagle gift card will send you soaring over the sights of Port Phillip Bay. aseagle.com.au/gift-cards

TALKING HENS The perfect gift idea for those who love their friendly, feathered friends. Buy online or visit the farm on any Friday, Saturday, Sunday or Monday between 10am - 4pm. 3590 FrankstonFlinders Rd Merricks. P. 0406 691 231 talkinghens.com.au

PENINSULA SHORT STAYS No better way to treat someone you love than with a luxurious stay at Mornington's finest accommodation. For further details and bookings, visit peninsulashortstays.com.au

RED HILL CANDLE CO. Scent-sational gift vouchers! Can be used for purchases in store and online or for a Scent Lab creative workshop session. redhillcandleco.com.au

PROVINCIAL HOME LIVING There’s nothing nicer than receiving a beautifully wrapped gift and finding something inside you’ve been wanting for a long time. provincialhomeliving.com.au

ARTISAN'S ALLEY Artisan’s Alley has a gift for everyone this Christmas, including a great range of jewellery from our local designers who create stunning pieces inspired by the Mornington Peninsula. artisansalley.com.au

FRANKSTON ARTS CENTRE A gift voucher to the Frankston Arts Centre is valid for three years and the lucky person in your life will enjoy browsing the website and planning good times that await them in 2022. theFAC.com.au

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2021

17 Main Street Mornington The home of local makers, designers & artists

• • • • •

Artisan's Alley is a collaboration of a shared desire for bringing you the best unique products from local makers. With a range of carefully crafted high-quality items including homewares, artworks, skincare, jewellery, clothing, candles and furniture there’s a lot to explore and find for you, your home or a favoured friend. Our talented artisans also work in the store so you can meet the creators, hear how they are inspired and where the materials and designs are sourced. Open Tuesday to Sunday 10am to 5pm www.artisansalley.com.au 03 5976 8742

NEW MAIN STREET MORNINGTON LOCATION

53 Main St, MORNINGTON 0406 648 887 Shop 11, 49 Eramosa Rd West SOMERVILLE 0449 541 149 Shop online at www.indigothreads.com.au

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artisansalleymornington


BIRTHDAY BOX

GRAZING PLATTER

GRAZING TABLES

CHRISTMAS BOX

Creating beautiful sweet and savoury grazing tables, platters and boxes for any occasion. We source locally made goods and deliver them straight to your door! Order through email, www.coastalgrazing.com.au or Facebook and Instagram. Visit www.coastalgrazing.com.au for further information.

Evoke / Soy Candles / Family / Gifts / Home evokemelb.com.au we are always happy to assist with any enquiries 0401 400 144 or 0400 608 121 Follow us

December December 2021 2021

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WHOLESALE WINES

DIRECT TO PUBLIC

AT WHOLESALE PRICING

Wine Lovers Warehouse is the direct to public arm of our wholesale business specialising in restaurant, hotel, and function wines for over 17 years. With COVID-19 restrictions imposed on our venue customers, 2020 put a big handbrake on our wholesale business and stopped it dead. We made a decision to transform and stay alive, supported by our friends and the local community, which we

P

*

IS IN TH OR A G N I BR NF ATIO C I L UB

E E F R LE OF B

Y!er L B U B u s to m

B bottle per cber 2021

* O n e g D e ce m durin

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Come along and say hello, grab a bottle or a case. Don’t forget to bring in this publication for a free bottle of bubbles with any purchase.

HOURS: Thursday, Friday, Saturday Weekly 10am until 5pm

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will be forever grateful, opening up the warehouse three days every week to the public, selling our wines and our suppliers at trade prices and no retail mark ups. It is our commitment to remain open servicing the needs of our Wine Lovers community into 2022 and beyond.

December 2021

LOCATION: Unit 5, 3 Trewhitt Court, Dromana Industrial Estate PHONE: 9596 4278


Viscosi Wines Red Hill Mornington Peninsula 2019 Pinot Noir

Taylor Ferguson Fernando 2016 Barossa Shiraz

Vignerons d’Argeliers Qué!, Southern France 2019 Shiraz Cabernet

Yellowglen Alessandra 2017 Sparkling Pinot Noir Chardonnay

RRP $32 OUR PRICE $12

RRP $46 OUR PRICE $15

RRP $25 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $18 OUR PRICE $7

John Luke Limited Release 2019 Heathcote Malbec

Momentum Chapter Two McLaren Vale 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon

Willow Ridge Heathcote 2017 Shiraz

Nillahcootie Estate Mansfield 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon

RRP $32 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $48 OUR PRICE $8

RRP $29 OUR PRICE $10

RRP $35 OUR PRICE $5

Visit our warehouse in Dromana to browse our wide range of hugely discounted wines!

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Focus On

on

Cfe Safar

Rsebud

Rosebud is a seaside town on the Mornington Peninsula, approximately 75 km southeast of the Melbourne city centre. It is a large beach-side town fronting Port Phillip, located between Rye and Dromana, and has a population of 12,501. Rosebud provides safe swimming beaches along its continuous stretch of sandy bay coastline, with the focal point being Rosebud Pier which it located opposite Jetty Road and extends about 300 metres into the water. Originally known as Banksia Point, Rosebud began life as a fishing community in the early 1850s. On 2 June 1855, the cargo vessel Rosebud, owned by one of the colony's best known pastoralists Edward Hobson, was washed over the large sandbars and onto the beach. The burgeoning community made off with the cargo of damask and household goods, but the wreck remained for many years as the locals slowly stripped its hull to use in the construction of houses. It became commonplace to call the area "The Rosebud" in reference to the ship, which was shortened to "Rosebud" as the last vestiges of the ship disappeared.

Rosebud covers an area of 1,051 square km.

Rosebud's commercial centre stretches along one side of about a 2 kilometre length of Point Nepean Road, with some shops separated from this wide thoroughfare by a service road. The shopping precinct features attractive garden strips, paved areas and several wood carvings of notable local identities from the past.

Some of the famous residents (permanent and holiday) of Rosebud were Judith Durham, Arthur Boyd and William John Ferrier. Judith spent her first six summers in the weatherboard house that stood on the west side of Durham Place. It is well documented on many websites that the 1995 Australian of the Year launched his fabulous career as a painter from the age of 16 while living in Rosebud from 1936-9 with his grandfather. One of young Arthur's paintings was of the Burnhams' jetty at the end of Boneo Rd; it is reproduced in Peter Wilson's "On the Road to Rosebud" alongside photos of the jetty. Ferrier won acclaim from all over Australia, and probably a job in the lighthouse branch, because of his heroic rescue of two of the seven crewmen of the La Bella at Warrnambool.

A notable feature of Rosebud's bay foreshore is a lack of commercial development. Most of the area between the coastal route of Point Nepean Road and the beach consists of community facilities, parkland and camping areas within sections of bushland. Rosebud has a temperate coastal climate, and is usually several degrees cooler than Melbourne. The annual maximum mean temperature is 19.1 degrees C.

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The foreshore area of Rosebud is one of the largest camping areas on the peninsula. During the summer months the populations of Rosebud and Dromana can double is size. Making a very touristy feel. By the 1960s, Rosebud had emerged as the largest town on the southern peninsula, complete with a shopping centre and extensive sporting facilities. In time it became home to an increasing number of permanent residents, including 'sea change' retirees.

rF eshly brewed oc eee is a must-have for weekends. Here are a few places to check out when you're in this beautiful ap rt of the world* .

D 'A lia's Bakery Cafe   1041 POINT NEPEAN RD

D'Alias Bakery Cafe is a great place to catch up with friends over breakfast or lunch or just enjoy a coffee with a mouth-watering dessert in a relaxed atmosphere. A wide variety of pastries and breads baked daily are on offer.

The Corner Cafe

1455 POINT NEPEAN RD Great coffee in a casual seaside environment with loads of homemade deli food items to eat in or take to the beach. Team that up with all day breakfast and a modern lunch menu selection – all bases are covered.

Blue Mini Cafe  2 COLCHESTER RD

One of the best places for coffee in town with a great atmosphere. Eclectic breakfasts and seasonal lunches in a large room with exposed-brick walls and retro touches.

La Casa Nostra Deli   1033 POINT NEPEAN RD

Great coffee. Strong as you like it but you can get a half shot which is about the same as regular coffee shops and still great. La Casa Nostra Deli is a world of food. We stock international groceries, quality kitchenware and local produce, as well as being official stockists of Herbie's Spices, Bodum and Bialetti coffee makers and spare parts. *Please note: Restrictions may still be in place in regards to dining in. It is advised to check with businesses for relevant information.


What to do A large beach-side centre fronting Port Phillip on the Mornington Peninsula, Rosebud is located between Rye and Dromana. The town was named after the English schooner that was blown ashore in 1855 a short distance to the west of where the Rosebud Pier now stands. Rosebud's commercial centre stretches along one side of about a two kilometre length of Point Nepean Road with the shopping precinct featuring attractive garden strips, paved areas and several wood carvings of notable local identities from the past. Enjoy Rosebud’s safe swimming beaches along its continuous stretch of sandy bay coastline with the focal point being Rosebud Pier. Take part in the various water sports and golf activities just a short drive away, or visit the recently opened Yawa Aquatic Centre. Home to plethora of events, Rosebud hosts the Peninsula Short Film Festival, the Rosebud Kite Festival, and of course the Rosebud Foreshore carnival. This popular summer holiday destination is the perfect base from which to explore the countless outdoor attractions nearby. Photos Yanni

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Real Estate

REIV HIGH vefi V

icki Sayers of RT Edgar Peninsula wins fifth consecutive REIV Residential Salesperson of the Year Award

RT Edgar Peninsula’s Director Vicki Sayers has been recognised for the fifth consecutive year by the Real Estate Institute of Victoria (REIV), picking up the 2021 Residential Salesperson of the Year (Executive) award in October. Sayers was first awarded the title in back-to-back years in 2017 and 2018 before completing a hattrick of the award in the Executive category from 2019 to 2021. She was the first woman ever to receive the accolade. “It’s a great honour to be acknowledged by the REIV with this award,” said Sayers. “Our industry is all about connecting people to their dream properties, and I really enjoy that side of the business, so to be recognised for that is a great feeling. “My thanks to the REIV, my team at RT Edgar Peninsula and to all of our clients we’ve been able to help into the market around the Mornington Peninsula.” Born and bred in Mt Eliza, Sayers has excelled in the last 12 months recording 61 sales and 29.5% increase in revenue under difficult circumstances due to Covid restrictions. Sayers and her team took every roadblock and obstruction as an opportunity, pivoting quickly to a virtual listings model and ensuring properties were available to view online and in local press. The quick thinking provided a legup on their competitors. Thanks to their pro-active approach, the RT Edgar Peninsula team were able to recruit new staff and continue to upskill their current employees during the lockdown.

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“It was important for us to maintain our high level of service and we knew to do this, we had to ensure that we were kept connected and supported,” Sayers said of keeping her staff motivated and engaged during a difficult period. “During lockdowns, we delivered, flowers, food, wine and motivational cards to staff, to keep up morale and personally acknowledged their individual roles and the success they contribute to the business.” With the awards held virtually due to Covid restrictions, Sayers made sure her team felt part of the night with gift packages to all staff to celebrate their achievements. Real estate is in Sayers’ blood having followed the footsteps of her father into the industry, and now daughter Ella part of the RT Edgars Peninsula team. Sayers’ local connections to the Peninsula community have seen her become a trusted expert in real estate around the region, her knowledge has extended to the rest of the team who were recognised as a finalist for the REIV Residential Sales Team of the Year award this year. The REIV award is the latest accolade to Sayers’ body of work, highlighted by being listed in Australia’s Top 50 Women in Real Estate by Real Estate Business in 2016, 2019, 2020 and this year was listed in Victoria’s Top 50 Agents.

For more information visit: rtedgar.com

Photo: RT Edgar Peninsula


• No more mud in your gutters • Gutters stay clean - no more cleaning • No more vermin or birds in your roof • Save money and cleaning time • Protect your most valued investment • 28 year guarantee -your home, your building

*Valid Until 31/12/21 Conditions apply

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Puzzle

Crner

ACROSS 1. Octopus arm 5. Business experts 11. Adieu 15. Foot digit 16. Fishpond carp 17. Totals, ... to (4,2) 19. Excuse 21. The Mob 23. Bawled 25. Copper alloy 27. Gentlest 28. Tarnish 30. Doting 31. False doctrine 32. Sounded alike 33. Evaluate, ... up 34. Rapturous 35. Leave house hurriedly (4,3) 36. Terra firma 38. Shear (sheep) 40. Enfold 42. Woe! 44. Cement 45. Mobile phone company 46. Jazz instrument, ... sax 48. Waist bands 49. Child's building blocks 50. Actress, Meg ... 51. Tickled fancy of 52. The pair 53. From Bangkok 54. Puzzle, Rubik's ... 55. Dutch cheese 56. Nevertheless (4,2) 58. Caribbean pirate 59. Undercover (venue) 61. Heighten 63. Spy group (1,1,1) 64. Seafood treat, jellied ... 65. Sir ... Newton 67. Express gratitude to 69. ESP, sixth ... 71. Everything included (2,3) 73. Cowboy's friend 74. Ousts 76. Dusk 78. Likeness 80. Travel on horse 82. Pigments 83. Prophesied 85. Capability (4-3) 89. More taut 91. Red/yellow mix 93. Part of a piano

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94. Append 96. Cutting tooth 98. Liqueur, ... Maria 99. Boxer or terrier 100. Teach 102. In the wrong (2,5) 103. Well-read 104. 12th 105. Flower necklace 106. LA suburb, Bel ... 107. Reside in 108. Antiseptic solution 110. Dad's mum 112. Of race & culture 114. Scullers 117. Spotted 120. Mollify 123. Panache 125. Spirit 127. Represent, ... for 128. Hebrew country 131. In the distance 133. Chops up (of food) 134. Shrewder 135. Cars 136. Trifled 137. Scenic outlook 140. White lie 141. Mi, ..., soh 142. Heavily loaded 145. Pearl-making mollusc 147. Cinema attendant 148. Complied 150. Balanced 151. Ancient Gaelic speaker 152. Rework 153. US Mormon state 154. Famed pacifist, Mahatma ... 156. Bluefin creature 158. Hide-out 160. Harsh experience 162. Leer 163. Sinned 164. Pimply condition 165. Length of DNA 166. Whisky measure 167. Metal track 168. Type of sword 170. Yearns 172. Preserving liquid 173. Half 174. Runs off to marry 177. Texan city 179. Actress, ... Thompson 180. Positive pole 182. Tangle

December 2021

183. Policy reversal (1-4) 185. Amongst 187. Sicker 188. Kiosk 189. Spin coin for decision (4,2) 191. UK New Year's honour (1,1,1) 192. Leaf beverage 193. JFK's family, the ... 194. Dismays 195. Reserve for future use (3,5)

DOWN 1. Moist-eyed 2. Gesture of assent 3. Closets 4. Sicilian volcano 5. Halted 6. Din 7. Combine into one 8. Duration device 9. Agile & clever 10. Skimmed 11. Suva is there 12. Public toilets (4,5) 13. Peter out 14. Accounts records 18. Main meal accompaniments (4,6) 20. Ordering (around) 22. Smoker's receptacle 24. Onlookers 26. Traumatised by battle (5-7) 29. Compatibility 37. Mohair 38. Sexually chaste 39. Snooker sticks (4,4) 40. Slender toughness 41. Insulin-secreting gland 43. Turkish capital 44. Acquires 47. Portent 57. Refuses 60. Lubricating 62. Colder 66. Separately 68. Fitness to fly (of plane) 69. Stupefy 70. Currency of Italy & Spain 72. Artistically (pleasing) 73. Ailments 75. Actress, ... Harlow

77. Amend 79. Sincerity 81. Veneration 84. Foodstuffs 85. Containers for boiling 86. Agreeing to 87. Water outlet 88. Gambled 90. 2.471 acres 92. Hollywood prize, Academy ... 95. Cosmetics brand, Elizabeth ... 97. Porridge flake 101. Small hobby room 109. Taverns 111. Triumphant cry 113. Flexible pipe 115. Brings up (child) 116. Between 118. Clueless, no ... 119. Love god 121. Table-tennis bat 122. Curved over 124. Sent (goods) by plane 126. Dental specialist 129. Refuted 130. Lacking enthusiasm 131. Alpine singer 132. Suspension 138. Tempt 139. Mute with embarrassment (6-4) 143. Unfaithful marriage partners 144. Give authority to 146. Reverberate 149. Drill hole 155. Steered (course) 157. Tidies up 159. Unrelenting 161. Gracefully 165. Chemical fumes protector (3,4) 169. Instance 171. Turned uncontrollably 172. Crypts 175. Bonuses 176. Sloping sharply 177. 70s dance music 178. Hear (about) 181. Electrical resistance units 184. Russia's ... Mountains 186. 007's creator, ... Fleming 190. Ceylon, ... Lanka


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Stay& y Pla

ON THE PENINSULA

This summer will be bigger than ever on the Mornington Peninsula with an extensive array of things to do and places to see. Here are just a few your family and friends can check out and enjoy!

Crittenden Estate is one of the Peninsula’s oldest iconic wineries. Family owned and operated since 1982, we are locals who are passionate about making quality cool climate wines that reflect this incredible wine making region. Described by James Halliday as an outstanding winery regularly producing wines of exemplary quality, Crittenden Estate was yet again awarded Halliday’s highest rating of five red stars in the 2022 Halliday Wine Companion. Discover the custom-built Crittenden Wine Centre designed to enable customers to appreciate the caliber of their wines in comfort and style. The Wine Centre provides an innovative way of tasting that enables guests to properly explore their wide range of wines that are crafted on site.

CRITTENDEN ESTATE WINE CENTRE 25 Harrisons Rd Dromana

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I 5987 3800 I crittendenwines.com.au


pretty as a picture Rye Beach, Port Phillip Bay

R E M I & G R UB

When you visit, leave it as you found it. Bin your litter or take it with you.

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PENINSULA SHORT STAYS - MORNINGTON PENINSULA’S FINEST ACCOMMODATION A bespoke collection of some of the Mornington Peninsula’s Finest Boutique Holiday Accommodation.

Book 7 nights and only pay for 5 during December 6-15, 2021 at James St, use code JAMESST at checkout.

Peninsula Short Stays comprises of luxuriously contemporary, separate and private townhouses situated in the beautiful coastal town of Dromana Village. Sleeping up to ten guests per townhouse, each include secure on-site parking, fully-equipped kitchens and outdoor gardens offer the perfect holiday escape. These homes are your gateway to everything that the beautiful Mornington Peninsula has to offer. We are dedicated to making all your holiday dreams come true. Whether it’s a short escape from the city with friends or bonding time with the family, our bespoke holiday accommodations are the finest around town. With us, the best beaches, wineries, restaurants and famed local attractions are on your doorstep. Our proximity to Portsea, Sorrento, Blairgowrie, Mount Martha and Red Hill ensures you easy access to the very best the region has to offer. Our properties are located at 16 James St, 35 Williams St and 42 Francis St in Dromana.

128 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento t: 03 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e: marlenemiller3@bigpond.com Specialising in antique jewellery, as well as newly-made jewellery by Melbourne’s top jewellers

W: peninsulashortstays.com.au

MARLENE MILLER ANTIQUES As you wander along the glamorous Sorrento shopping strip you simply have to visit Marlene Miller Antiques, an Aladdin’s cave of unique and unexpected treasures. As soon as you walk into the shop there is so much to see, with two stories of antiques and bric-a-brac from lovely old tools, crystal and fine china to fur coats, hats, dining furniture with chairs by Jacob and Josef Kohn (established in 1849), hat boxes, old leather suitcases with great labels, as well as a great variety of lovely lamps to give your home that special ambience. Upstairs hosts a range of books dating back to the 1700’s, prints and paintings. Known by reputation for her fabulous jewellery with lots of old (including Gold Rush jewellery which was actually made during the Gold Rush)and mourning jewellery which was created to mourn the death of a loved one and became popular in the 1800’s, along with newly created hand-made pieces by Melbourne’s top jewellers. Marlene Miller Antiques has been in Sorrento since 1985 and has been in her present purpose-built building for the past 10 years. A: 128 Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento P: 5984 1762 or 0438 537 757

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CHIEF'S SON DISTILLERY Chief’s Son Distillery handcraft the most beautiful single malt whisky, slowly and passionately, here on the Mornington Peninsula. By using the very best of artisan ingredients, small batch processes, hand selected barrels and a totally manual system there is no doubt that they embody absolute dedication to the craft, uncompromising attention to detail and the endless pursuit of perfection.

captivatingly true story, which is a powerful insight into opportunity, family and courage. Whisky tastings are conducted in the tasting room overlooking the distillery floor with the tasting fee redeemable on purchases over $100. The tasting room is open 7 days a week, 11am to 4pm during Summer. Tours run at 11am on Thursday – Saturday, and can be booked on-line

Chief's Son craft their whisky from specialty malts and handmade barrels to give the whiskies a distinctive flavor, which has been recognised by winning 10 international awards. With industry influencers tipping big things for this family owned and operated, small batch distillery. A distillery tour and tasting is a must this Summer. Known for their big, bold creamy malts, distillery owners Stuart and Naomi are passionate about creating an immersive whisky experience. Grab your friends or family and reconnect over a guided whisky tour. Enjoy a local cheese platter with a core range whisky tasting, whilst sampling the whiskies directly from the barrel, they’ll share their

A: 25/50 Guelph Street, Somerville W: chiefsson.com.au

r u O r e v o c Dis Winning rd ge a w A Ran NOW AVAILABLE AT DAN MURPHY’S also availble online, distillery door and select independent retailers. Distillery Door MON - FRI 10 - 4pm SAT - SUN 11 - 4pm Tours available Thu, Fri, Sat @ 11am.

25/50 Guelph Street, Somerville VIC 3912 03 9013 0859

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INDOOR PLAY CENTRE & CAFE OUTDOOR SEATING & PLAY AREA

SPECIALISING IN KIDS BIRTHDAY PARTIES

A fun place for kids all ages to play & explore. Parents can relax, enjoy good coffee & yummy home-made food, including gluten free! Kidz Shed is an independent & owner operated indoor play centre. With an outdoor dining area with umbrellas, climbing equipment & jumping castle.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION!

CLOSED FROM DEC 24, 2021 THEN REOPENING JAN 4TH, 2022

PLAY AT THE KIDZSHED OVER THE HOLIDAYS

WE ARE CLOSED ON DAYS OF HIGH TEMPERATURES PLEASE SEE FB, INSTA OR WEBSITE FOR UPDATES

Open everyday after through Jan 2022

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL LISA 0409 875944

222 MARINE PDE HASTINGS

5906 5900 KIDZSHED.COM.AU o

ho,ho,h

SANTA VISITS BOTH MARKETS IN DECEMBER 10AM to 12PM

Affordable birthday parties tailored to your needs, themed parties or hire the entire venue. “We always hear from our customers how impressed they are with our cleanliness. Now we are increasing our already high hygiene standards to follow current restrictions & ever-changing guidelines. We’ve always provided hand sanitiser and will be stepping it up even further!” Kidz Shed’s hours often alter to adapt to current guidelines. Please call to check or book. P: 5906 5900 M: 0409 875944 E: kidzshed@gmail.com W: kidzshed.com.au

CRAFTY SHOPPING DESTINATIONS Looking for the very best crafty shopping experiences on the Mornington Peninsula? You’ll find them both indoors & outdoors from the creators of Untold Events Co! Discover Emu Plains Market. Unlike any other market you have ever seen, the EPM offers a festival-like atmosphere featuring an amazing array of food, live entertainment, fun for kids, & more than 250 of the very best makers & creators Melbourne has to offer. Catch EPM every month from November to April. W: emuplainsmarket.com.au

Support local, support handmade, support innovation, support love, support small business... support your local market! LITTLE BEAUTY MARKET : DEC 11 | 9-2 CRN HIGH & YOUNG ST, FRANKSTON www.littlebeautymarket.com.au EMU PLAINS MARKET : DEC 18 | 9-2 EMU PLAINS RESERVE, BALNARRING www.emuplainsmarket.com.au

Love supporting small businesses? Why not check out our interest store of curious goods!

ALBERT & DAPHNE

103 MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON | WWW.ALBERTANDDAPHNE.COM.AU

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December 2021

Visit the prettiest market around. Little Beauty Market has quickly become the creative hub of Frankston, showcasing more than 100 talented makers hand-picked for their uniqueness. To experience all the sights & sounds LBM has to offer visit us on the 4th Saturday of the month at Beauty Park. W: littlebeautymarket.com.au The coolest new kid on the block, Albert & Daphne’s Interest Store of Curious Goods in the heart of Main Street Mornington, is a curated collection of unique finds. A haven for men’s & women’s beautiful clothing, accessories, one-of-a-kind homewares, shoes, artwork and special gifts. It’s a must visit destination this summer! W: albertanddaphne.com.au


WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER AS A KID? If you’re looking for a more relaxing stay, grab a book and lounge around the pool or send the kids to do some activities while you chill and enjoy a tea or coffee and a bite to eat in our new café. At night, you can simply sit, sip and watch the sunset.

No doubt it’s a few key experiences that stand out in your mind. Family travels, adventures, or maybe trying new things for the first time?! If that’s what you remember, then how about you ‘hit the switch’ on your everyday routine and create your own key experience by enjoying some Ranch Life.

We can’t wait to have you here. Whether it’s just for coffee and cake, a day trip, a weekend away or a full week of fun and adventure. See you soon!

Bring yourself, partner, mates or your family and get amongst everything that The Ranch has to offer.

W: theranchmp.com.au

Stay in one of our cosy log cabins, and couple it with a ride package where you can experience the views of Bass Strait while riding one of our beautiful horses. Our horses are hand-picked to suit your size, riding ability and requirements. We have different trails to suit all riding abilities. Try something new by booking some of our activities. How about mountainboarding, archery, rock climbing, giant swing or crate stack. Adventure doesn’t only have to be for the kids. Adults can also share in the. Nothing like a little rivalry between the kids and the adults and/ or adults among their mates!

STAY AND PLAY!

Bring your family and friends, stay in our charming wood cabins and make the most of all our activities. While you're here, check out The Jar Bar cafe - it's healthy, sustainable and delicious! www.theranchmp.com.au theranchmp

The Ranch Mornington Peninsula

5988 6262

SAVE THE DATE

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OLIEVE & OLIE WANTS YOU TO HAVE A JOLLY OLIE CHRISTMAS All Olieve & Olie wants for Christmas is a jolly community where Santa sacks are filled with locally made products and our nearest and dearest are delighted to receive gifts from small businesses. Where they can, Olieve & Olie source their ingredients directly from the producers to ensure that they’re natural, chemical-free and harvested sustainably while also actively supporting our local farmers and producers. They also dream of a Christmas where that warm and fuzzy feeling that comes with gifting isn’t overcome by the stress of searching for that perfect present. They’ve made gifting easy with their extensive range of natural skin care and candles, with a plethora of choices for the whole family to indulge in, including shaving gel, sanitiser and more from their Olie range that is just right for the hardto-buy-for man. Tick off your shopping list in one hit when you stop by their factory shop front. Start by perusing their luxe range of soaps including Soapon-a-Rope, Limited Edition Soap with splashes of gold, or Handmade Soap Bars that are available singularly or in a 3-pack. Olieve & Olie hand creates indulgent and creamy soap that is superb for everyday use. As a natural soap, it’s great used as a cleanser, even on the face. Thanks to the extra virgin olive oil and essential oils, their soaps will not strip the oil that occurs naturally on your skin. Santa’s tip is to get your hands on the Limited Edition Soap before it runs out, as they’ve only completed a limited run. This one comes packaged in a luxe matte black box with stylish drawings and gold detailing.

Their skin will be renewed and glowing as the olive oil contains antioxidants that provide anti-aging benefits. For those after a vigorous scrub, the Salt Scrub Jar is preferable as it contains coarse salt. Salt is the hero as it stimulates and lifts dead skin cells. And just like that, you’re Christmas shopping is complete. Draw a hot bath and indulge with the treats that you’ve picked up for yourself along the way – go on, you deserve it. Their factory shopfront is open Monday to Friday from 9am-4pm or Saturday 10am-2pm, and closed Sundays and public holidays. You can shop online or find your nearest stockist of Olieve & Olie products at olieveandolie.com.au Please join Olieve & Olie in making this silly season a jolly Olie Christmas!

OLIEVE & OLIE A: Factory 7/16-18 Henry Wilson Drive, Rosebud P: 03 5982 0992 FB: olieveandolie Insta: @olieveandolie

With summer here, wash off the sunscreen with a wash like no other. Olieve & Olie’s Hand & Body Wash will leave your skin feeling clean and soft. It provides a deep cleansing effect whilst protecting and nourishing your skin. It’s suitable for all skin types, including sensitive skin so it’s perfect to place in the shower, by the bath or at the sink for the whole family to use. Scented with only essential oils, their wash provides therapeutic benefits including natural anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. For the ultimate gift, pick up one of their Wash & Cream Twin Sets that comes in a stunning box with gold swirls or just choose a wash from four lush scents and one fragrance free option. Christmas spirit won’t be in short supply with their new range of Christmas Candles. Choose from Pine Needle & Eucalyptus, Plum & Juniper Berry, and Orange & Cedar Leaf. These handmade candles are created using natural soy wax, high-quality fragrances and leadfree cotton wicks that have a 60-hour burn time. While these scents are beautiful all year round, their candle range also includes five other delicious scents, with something for everyone. Ones dear to your will relish in taking some time to themselves to give their skin a much needed scrub. An invigorating Coffee Scrub in Chai or Latte will awaken the skin and soul with its smooth and creamy texture. While the combination of artesian salt and olive oil creates a superb exfoliation that can be found in the striking Salt and Sugar Scrub Pouch.

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Photo: © willowcreative


Olieve & Olie NATURAL SKINCARE HANDCRAFTED RIGHT HERE ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA

GIFTING MADE EASY THE FACTORY SHOP IS OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 9AM - 4PM, AND SATURDAY 10AM - 2PM. CLOSED SUNDAYS AND PUBLIC HOLIDAYS.

7/16-18 HENRY WILSON DVE, ROSEBUD

PH 5982 0992

WWW.OLIEVEANDOLIE.COM.AU December 2021

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WHAT’S ON AT FRANKSTON CITY LIBRARIES THIS SUMMER FrankTALK with Heather Morris

School Holiday Program Our free January school holiday program is packed with activities to keep the kids entertained this summer! Jump onto the Library website for full schedule and to book.

BIG Summer Read There are some fantastic prizes, including an iPad, up for grabs for kids who take on the Big Summer Read Challenge! School aged kids are invited to register via the link on our Big Summer Read page of our website, then, between 1 Dec and 31 Jan aim to read 10 or more books and complete some fun challenges along the way! There are some great prizes to be won throughout the summer, jump online and register today!

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Heather Morris is the author of The Tattooist of Auschwitz and Cilka’s Journey, which together have sold eight million copies worldwide. Now she brings us an astonishing new story that will break your heart, but leave you amazed and uplifted by the courage and fierce love of three sisters, whose promise to each other kept them alive in a place without hope. Please join us for this FrankTALK with Heather Morris in-conversation on Monday 14 February at 7pm at the Frankston Arts Centre. This event is free but bookings are essential as numbers are limited.

For details of these events, go to W: library.frankston.vic.gov.au Stay up to date, follow us @FrankstonCityLibraries on Facebook and Instagram


OPEN BOXING DAY 2021 www.wittingslowamusements.com.au

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History

Above: The SS Preussen.

'Twas The Night Before Christmas

By Lance Hodgins

I

n 1886 the people of Victoria were delivered a Christmas present they didn’t need. A ship had arrived from overseas carrying the deadly smallpox virus amongst its nearly 600 passengers. Although the Melbourne passengers were quarantined at Point Nepean, everyone was on a knife edge. All the usual security measures were in place, but would that prove to be enough? The Voyage Out The SS Preussen began its journey from northern Germany, stopping at Antwerp, Belgium, to pick up mostly English passengers who were migrating to Australia. She was a new ship, over 457 feet long, and capable of 14 knots. After a brief sightseeing stop at Port Said, she passed through the newly-opened Suez Canal and headed for Australian waters.

On reaching Albany’s King George’s Sound, the news was out. One passenger, a 24 year-old Welshman named John Pryce had smallpox. He had gone ashore for a walk around Port Said and apparently contracted the disease there. Within a few days he was feeling very unwell with dysentery. The ship’s doctor eventually recognised the disease as smallpox and immediately sought his isolation and called for mass vaccination on board. The Preussen was rejected by the West Australia’s health authorities and it passed on to the port of Adelaide. By then Pryce had died and he was buried at sea. Some of the 26 Adelaide passengers were showing signs of smallpox so they were immediately put into the quarantine station on Torrens Island. On Tuesday December 21 the Preussen left for Melbourne. continued next page...

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The Deadly Smallpox Virus Smallpox was a feared and highly contagious disease found in all parts of the world. After an incubation period of 1- 2 weeks, the variola virus began with a rash which developed into blisters which could cover the entire body. It would attack the circulatory system, bone marrow and/or respiratory systems and bring death to one in five people who contracted it. As early as the 1700s, Dr Edward Jenner had noticed that milk maids were immune to the disease after having had the relatively mild and harmless cowpox. He took cowpox from a milkmaid’s blister and infected a boy with it, then exposed him to smallpox – which he resisted. This led to the very word “vaccination” – from vacca which is Latin for cow – but the mechanism was not understood as the world was yet to discover bacteria and viruses. Victoria Braces Itself The health authorities were notified of the approaching “smallpox ship” and the quarantine station was hurried into a state of readiness. There would be 250 passengers to quarantine, their luggage to be disinfected, and cargo to be fumigated and forwarded to Melbourne. The Central Board of Health Officer Dr Sutherland was placed in charge of arrangements and ships and personnel flooded in. The steamer Pharos brought provisions, a provedore and his staff of assistants. A police force of seventeen constables arrived to patrol the boundary, marked by yellow flags, just as much to prevent the quarantines from leaving as to warn visitors from Portsea who might wander into danger. Steam tugs arrived with a convoy of lighters – one with 300 tons of coal for the Preussen’s ongoing voyage and several others for the

unloading of the considerable amount of cargo. On the night of Wednesday December 22 the Preussen entered the Heads and anchored at Point Nepean. Dr Sutherland sent his assistant on board and was relieved to learn that there were no new cases of smallpox – as yet – but recognised that this would likely change over the next couple of weeks. All day Thursday 235 passengers and their belongings were shuttled ashore in lighters. Most were third class passengers, in crowded steerage where the risk of infection was great. They were predominantly English, with a sprinkling of German, French and Italian. Freshly installed in their buildings, they welcomed the fresh meals as an agreeable change from the fare on the Preussen. Above: A smallpox victim. Left: The steamer Pharos on its way to Portsea.

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Above: Point Nepean Quarantine Station, circa 1875.

The Vaccine Situation The next day, Friday December 24, was vaccination day for many of the passengers, stewards and attendants. Dr Sutherland had brought down from Melbourne a good supply of calf lymph for this purpose since the Preussen’s captain had warned him that there had been problems on board. Many of the crew had been vaccinated but the German medicos had met with considerable resistance from the British passengers who did not trust these “foreigners”. The Captain could not legally enforced vaccination and, as a result, only about one quarter of the passengers had received “the jab”. Once on English speaking soil, however, nearly everyone agreed and all hoped that it would not be a matter of too little, too late. In the meantime there was not much in the way of amusements – a hit of cricket, a throw of quoits, or a stroll along either the back or front beach – so long as you didn’t stray beyond the well-marked boundary, guarded carefully by a dozen constables. They watched as the last cargo was unloaded and the Preussen weighed anchor and started on her voyage to Sydney at 4.30pm on Christmas Eve. The Melbourne quarantines were looking forward to Christmas Day – they had organised a cricket match to be followed by a concert in the evening.

Christmas Morning December 1886 News broke and spread like wildfire throughout the quarantine station: ONE OF THE CREW OF THE PREUSSEN HAD GONE MISSING. Panic set in. Some things were certain: he was an assistant engineer on the steamer and a search of the ship could find no trace of him. Van Nyuti, Von Reuter, Von Ryuti, Von Reuti – or whatever his name was – could not be found. His clothes and a lifebelt were also missing. Security was supposedly strict whilst the various lighters had been alongside the Preussen. Two on the previous afternoon were thoroughly searched, but to no avail. The Board of Health regarded the escape as a very serious matter and a more detailed description was organised and sent to Police Superintendent Toohey. They were looking for a 24-26 year-old Austrian, 5’8” in height, black eyes, dark complexion and hair, black moustache, slight beard on chin, lightly built and speaking German and Italian. He was last seen wearing a dark tweed suit and a cheesecutter cap. He possibly had a sea-proof suit of waterproof clothing with him. continued next page...

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Above: The jetty at the Quarantine Station.

Days Go By... By the time the Preussen arrived in Sydney there were with several confirmed cases of smallpox – many of them amongst the crew. They were taken to the isolated hospital hulk Faraway. Adelaide was also reporting several new cases. By the end of the Christmas weekend the cases at Point Nepean were multiplying and the authorities began to regard Von Nyuti’s escape as increasingly serious. Although he had not shown any signs of smallpox by those who last saw him on board, he was potentially a huge danger to the health of thousands – particularly if he reached the streets of Melbourne. A reward of £20 was announced and the sightings poured in. One promising report occurred several days after Christmas. A tourist from Melbourne was on the Sorrento back beach when he was approached by a man dressed in dungaree trousers over another pair, looking as if he had just come out of the ocean. He asked for a drink of water and offered a shilling if he would get him a tinful. When asked who he was, the man had stated that he was an engineer on the Preussen at the quarantine station. He then sought directions to the jetty and took off in that direction. Later that same day a young friend of the Melbourne visitor reported the same man on board the Ozone excursion steamer on its way back to Port Melbourne. When he tried to speak to him he was told to mind his own business and on docking he had taken a train into the City. He was now wearing a light tweed suit and hard black hat, but when a description of the fugitive was published in the Police Gazette, the young man realised who he had seen. A man answering Von Nyuti’s description was seen in company

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at the Half Way Hotel on the Ferntree Gully Road at Mulgrave. He was a “sailor-looking man” who did not seem to be seeking work but was travelling to the Dandenongs. One strong lead had him on the way to Sydney and the police chiefs in Albury received bulletins to be on the lookout. Into The New Year The combined Australian smallpox numbers swelled to over 100, and it became the most serious invasion of the disease into the colonies for a long time. The fact that those affected were in quarantine was some solace but the escape of Von Nyuti made people feel uneasy. Was he now carrying the seeds of the hated disease throughout the streets of Melbourne? How could he have escaped the security of the quarantine station? How had he changed his appearance? Back at the quarantine station, one of the passengers suggested that the fugitive’s clothes had been taken ashore by another passenger who had been friendly with Von Nyuti. On interrogation, the friendship was admitted to but the passenger denied helping him and claimed that he had not had anything to do with Von Nyuti for the last few weeks of the voyage. The authorities, and particularly the Captain of the Preussen, were keen to defend their own security measures. Von Nyuti was allegedly too intoxicated (as observed by some of the crew) to take his normal shift in the engine room. The lighters and the steamer had been thoroughly searched. A tidal expert observed that there was no hope of swimming ashore from the Preussen as it had been anchored in mid-channel where the tides run fast and strong. Von Nyuti must have fallen overboard and been taken by sharks – or


simply drowned as he was carried out the Heads. The missing life belt lent credence to the theory that he had tried to swim ashore. Yet the sightings continued to pour in. He was seen herding pigs at Braybrook – a doubtful pastime for a fugitive but one which nevertheless had to be checked out. A senior detective investigated and found that the swineherd was none other than a Frenchman going about his normal farming activities. A young man reported to the Central Board of Health that whilst shooting at Campbellfield near Coburg he noticed a man answering Von Nyuti’s description. He was dressed in a dirty pair of trousers and singlet and sunburnt so much that he apparently had been exposed to the elements for some time. More suspiciously, he seemed to be rubbing his skin as if he was terribly itchy. The local police investigated and subsequently found that their man was an

Irishman well known to them and already on their books as a case of insanity. Well into January and a tip-off led police to a house near the Melbourne docks. They converged on the house in Yarraville only to find that a French fisherman was living there. A few days later a man was arrested at Wagga Wagga and the Preussen’s officers were sent up to New South Wales to identify him. False alarm. Von Nyuti is working in Gippsland! Police rushed to a farm at Jumbunna, near Poowong, but it was another blank. At about the same time, the case of the wet man discovered on Sorrento’s back beach, and later seen on the Ozone, was put to rest. The actual person had been found and he was NOT Von Nyuti. continued next page...

Below: Sketches at the Quarantine Ground, 1882.

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Above: A recent photograph of Mud Island.

The Final Chapter Finally, in late February and almost two months after the disappearance, there was much excitement in Port Philip Bay. A Geelong fisherman, named Johnstone, landed on Mud Island with his seine nets and was immediately confronted by a stranger in a semi-nude state who was gesticulating wildly and behaving in a most eccentric manner. When Johnstone hailed him, he yelled something back in broken English, then abruptly turned and ran away. After dealing with their nets, Johnstone and his companions looked for the man but failed to find anyone, so they left and returned to Queenscliff. It was only in later conversation with their fellow fishermen that the topic came up of “that German chap with smallpox” and they felt they should report the incident. They called the Sorrento Police but received no immediate response. Had they believed that it was too far for anyone to swim? Were the tides too strong? The local police had, in fact, begun a thorough investigation. They knew that Mud Island offered a supply of rabbits and shellfish and a man could easily exist on the uninhabited island for some time. There were also several sheds there erected by some fishermen for their occasional shelter from the weather. Finally, it was reported that Sorrento police had traced the mystery man. Apparently two seine-net fishing boats had come into contact when they arrived at the same time on the mud flats around the island. One of the men, a Norwegian, had walked into the other party’s nets with a rope of his own net and caused an altercation. Being surprised, he had answered in his own language and then

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hastily cleared out, so that when Johnstone and his party went to look for him he was not be found, having hastily left on his boat. The trail was cold and nothing more was heard of Von Nyuti – real or imagined. When the last passengers of the Preussen were released from quarantine in March 1887, 14 people had died. Post scripts A subsequent report by the Victorian Central Board of Health reflected poorly on the Preussen and it owners. Conditions on board were evidently quite unhygienic, precautions against smallpox were ludicrous, and protection from the infected body of John Pryce was lacking. It was rumoured that, early in the voyage, another passenger had been hastily buried at sea. The mostly British passengers were loaded at Antwerp presumably to avoid meeting stricter English regulations. Travelling on a cut rate fare, these steerage passengers knew they would in for a rough time of it but few of them anticipated the events which would follow. As a result of the varying approaches to meeting the danger – in particular the non-acceptance of the vessel by WA - one of the first powers handed to the new Commonwealth of Australia in 1901 was a national and uniform quarantine system. Many felt that if the Preussen had been intercepted and quarantined in Perth then many of the further problems would have been avoided. Today, smallpox is the only human disease to be totally wiped out by vaccination. As a result of a decade-long blitz, the World Health Organization was able to announce in 1980 that, instead of causing two million deaths a year, it had been eradicated.


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PENINSULA


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