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July-August 2010

Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

CLALLAM COUNTY

Introduction THIS SPECIAL SECTION of the Peninsula Daily News, also available at no charge at the county courthouse, libraries and other public places across Clallam County, provides voters with information about the Aug. 17 primary election. It profiles the candidates for countywide and local races in which there are more than two candidates (except in judicial cases), and also discusses measures on the ballot. Washington state has adopted the top two primary system, in which the two top vote-getters in all nonjudicial races advance to the general election regardless of party affiliation. In the case of the Clallam County commissioner District 3 race, only voters in that district — from Port Angeles’ west side through the West End — will vote to determine the two who will advance to the general election. Voters countywide will then select among the two in the Nov. 2 election. Compilation of information, including the question-andanswer segments, was coordinated by PDN Senior Writer Paul Gottlieb. Candidates’ answers to questionnaires were limited to 75 words per question and were edited for length, grammar and spelling. Only primary races in the primary election are profiled in this section, and write-in candidates are not included. In Clallam County, all voting is done by mail. There is no Election Day precinct polling.

drop box is provided. Important information Do not place more than one ballot in the official return envelope, and don’t forget to sign the envelope. Fill in the square next to your choice. And make no identifying marks on your ballot. Putting more than one ballot in a return envelope, signifying your choice with an X or check mark You can register to vote online or learn more about the (✔) instead of election process at the Clallam County elections completely division website, http://tinyurl.com/clalvotes. inking in the square (■■ ) or Mail-in ballots were sent to placing an registered voters in the appropri- identifying mark on a ballot will ate jurisdictions starting July 28. invalidate the ballot or ballots They must be postmarked no involved. later than Aug. 17 or dropped off by no later than 8 p.m. Aug. 17 at Election calendar any of the following locations: Here are some significant ■ Clallam County Courthouse, dates relating to the primary and 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. A general elections: drive-up drop box is provided. ■ Aug. 9: Voter registration ■ Sequim Motor Vehicle deadline for people not currently Licensing Office, 1001 E. Washregistered to vote in Washington. ington St., Sequim. Registration must be done in ■ Forks District Court, 500 E. person at the Auditor’s Office Division St., Forks. An outdoor in the county courthouse in

Port Angeles. ■ Aug. 16: Last day for writein candidates to file a Declaration of Candidacy for the Aug. 17 election. ■ Sept. 1: Deadline for County Canvassing Board to certify the primary election returns. ■ Oct. 4: Deadline for online and mailed voter registrations for Nov. 2 election. ■ Oct. 13: Ballot distribution for Nov. 2 election begins. ■ Oct. 15: Peninsula Daily News’ general election voter guide for Clallam and Jefferson counties published. ■ Oct. 25: Deadline for voter registration in person in the Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse in Port Angeles. ■ Oct. 13: Ballot distribution for Nov. 2 election begins. ■ Nov. 1: Last day for write-in candidates to file a Declaration of Candidacy for the Nov. 2 election. ■ Nov. 2: Deadline for returning ballots in the all-mail general election. Got questions? Questions about Clallam County elections can be posted to the County Auditor’s Office elections division at 360-417-2217 Mondays through Fridays or at http://tinyurl.com/clalvotes. Voter registration information is available by phoning 360-4172221. Statewide elections information — including a link to the state’s online voters guide — is available from the Secretary of State’s Office in Olympia on the Web site, www.vote.wa.gov.


Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

July-August 2010

CLALLAM COUNTY

Commissioner, District 3 Why are you running for this position? Doherty: My education, training and experience have prepared me for public service. I have been honored to serve Clallam County residents in several positions, elective and appointed, and I work daily to build trust between county residents and their county government. I put in long hours because I enjoy the position of county commissioner, and I am proud of my record. My fellow commissioners and I have been fiscally responsible yet future oriented. Peach: I am running for county commissioner because I can apply my business and leadership skills to address issues including property rights, business retention and fiscal responsibility. Poole: It is time for the West End to be represented by someone who lives and shares the unique values we have out here. We need a person who sees the impact policies have. We need a people person, not a bureaucrat. And we need results that will let us work, not hamstring us. What personal qualities do you possess that recommend you for this position? Doherty: I believe I am a critical thinker, and I seek opportunities for improvement. I strive to learn as much as I can about a given topic in order to maximize possibilities and generate solutions. I work collaboratively — with my colleagues, other elected officials and local, state and federal agencies. I am an optimist, and I try to view the world with a bit of humor. I also have a lot of energy for this job. Peach: My strengths include the ability to engage, focus and deliver results.

Poole: As a working, middleclass person, I have gained insight to the day-to-day workings of a broad range of people. From that insight, I have a critically thinking mind that I feel gives me the ability to see through the deceptions and halftruths and an ability to come to a decision that factors in a wider range of consequences than what I have seen from our incumbents so far and Mr. Doherty in particular. How would you balance the needs of West End residents with needs of the rest of Clallam County? Doherty: The third commissioner district extends from central Port Angeles to the Pacific Ocean. I spend at least two days each week — typically Wednesdays and Saturdays — meeting with West End residents. The third district commissioner represents the unique needs of West End residents, yet county commissioners are elected countywide. Commissioners Chapman, Tharinger and I share a nonpartisan, pragmatic approach to addressing countywide issues. We strive to make informed and balanced decisions for all of Clallam County. Peach: The fundamental difference between me and the incumbent is, he supports values from outside the county which result in direct loss of property rights and economic growth. I have the opposite view. Poole: There already exists a symbiotic relation between the two sides. We are basically a resourcedriven economy, and they need these resources for their mills, ports and other activities. Our little bubble of tourism from Twilight means tourists must go through Sequim and Port Angeles, which translates to some business. Turn

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Howard V. “Mike” Doherty Jr. Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-457-9135 E-mail: doherty_ mike@ yahoo.com Age: 67 Education: High school, Port Angeles High School; associate of arts, Peninsula College; bachelor of arts, Gonzaga University; master’s degree in juvenile counseling, Gonzaga University; post-graduate program in constitutional law, Georgetown University; law degree, Gonzaga University. Occupation: Clallam County commissioner Campaign website: www.re-electdoherty.info; www.mikedoherty.info Have you ever held elective office, and if so, what? Clallam County board of freeholders, 1975-1976; Clallam County commissioner, 197679, 1999-current. Port Angeles School Board, 1992-1999 Party preference: Democratic Party

Bill Peach

Robin V. Poole

Residence: Forks

Residence: Beaver

Phone: 360-327-3695

Phone: 360-327-3522

E-mail: billpeach203hwy101@ yahoo.com Age: 54 Education: Bachelor of science, civil engineering; bachelor of science, forest engineering; master’s in business administration. Occupation: Executive director, Quileute tribe. Retired as regional manager, Clallam Timber and Land Division, after 26 years of service to Rayonier Inc. Campaign website: www.electbillpeach.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No Party preference: Republican Party

E-mail: lindseyjoe 25@ yahoo.com Age: 61 Education: Shorecrest High School, Seattle, now Shoreline, class of 1967; Edmonds Community College, associate of arts degree Occupation: UPS driver for 33 years Campaign website: None Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? None Party preference: Republican Party

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Primary Election Guide

July-August 2010

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

Clallam County commissioner, District 3 Continued from preceding page The needs of the two sides are not exclusive but mutually inclusive. What would you do to foster economic growth in the West End? Doherty: I have a record of supporting the retention and expansion of existing jobs in the timber, fishing and tourism economies of the West End. I helped arrange the funding from local governments and the state of Washington for the biomass-to-energy feasibility study, with a focus on West End capacity. I have supported value-added timber industry opportunities including innovative technologies. I have also supported workforce training programs that leverage current and new employment opportunities. Peach: I have 26 years of management experience in private industry and have been president of the Clallam County Economic Development Council. I live in the West End and recognize our strengths, which include natural resources and the values of the people. I support job retention, reducing the cost of implementing regulations and protection of property rights. I see excellent potential for renewal energy and have experience in business development including construction of a greenfield plant.

About the job Clallam County commissioner, District 3 Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Primary election boundaries: West End, including Forks precincts 1-5, Clallam Bay, Quileute, Neah Bay, Sekiu, Joyce, Sappho, Beaver, Bogachiel, Elwha, Dry Creek, Port Angeles precincts 14, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 26. District boundaries begin on the west side of Port Angeles, west of Laurel Street, south of Lauridsen Boulevard and west of C Street. Voters: 12,159, including 4,473 in Port Angeles precincts and Black Diamond, which is next to the city limit. Term: Four years Compensation: $61,000 beginning in January, and a mileage allowance of $400 a month, 50 cents a mile or use of a county vehicle. Commissioners also receive all county medical, dental and optical benefits and retirement benefits. Duties: Approve a budget that in 2010 is $90 million, including a general fund operating budget of $33 million that covers 400 employees. Commissioners hire a county administrator, who supervises a three-person office staff. The general fund budget for the commissioners’ office is $605,607 in 2010. Commissioners serve as an appeals board for all land-use issues, and sit as the majority on the five-person county Board of Health, which sets county health policies and hears appeals of rulings by the county health officer. They serve individually as board representatives on various local, regional and state boards and committees.

Poole: Economic growth doesn’t need to be fostered, it needs to be turned loose. To do that, we need to kick the state Department of Ecology where it hurts. We need to loosen restrictive ordinances, stop passing negative legislation and be proactive in helping start up businesses. In short, let capitalism work, and get government out of the way.

Doherty: Most everyone involved in watershed planning for WRIA-19 values a communityoriented plan created by area residents and local jurisdictions. The end goal is a predictable, sustainable water supply. A scientific water resource record is before the local planning group. While it may be necessary to take more time to determine whether the concerns of some interests can be satisfactorily addressed, a state agency will ultimately intervene if agreement cannot be reached at the local level.

Do you side with Clallam County Public Utility District on rejecting the draft watershed plan for West End Watershed Resource Inventory Area 19? Explain.

Peach: Yes. The plan ignores the authority of the intergovernmental agencies to manage the process, which includes the PUD. The Clallam County commissioners tasked the incumbent

with responsibility for WRIA 19. His failure to provide leadership has resulted in use of $750,000 in taxpayer dollars to develop a plan that can not be adopted by the county commissioners because it does not comply with the law. Poole: I definitely side with PUD on their rejection. PUD is working from a realistic viewpoint, and that viewpoint translates into providing water to a community. The other side’s view is at best theoretical, claiming stuff that can’t really be supported, nor is it inclusive of all the other factors. Fish management is much more complex than water flow. Space limits me, so I will take on that argument some other time. Where would you cut if you

must cut the county budget? Doherty: We should continue a mix of strategies. For example, attrition through retirements, adjusting employee hours and applying technology (e.g. providing online access to services, records and maps) have saved personnel costs. Maximizing grant revenues have produced opportunities and cost savings in public safety, health and natural resource programs. Energy efficiency measures have reduced operating costs (solar panels save $35,000 each year pre-heating water.) Incorporating hybrid vehicles in the county fleet has reduced fuel consumption costs. Peach: The county has drawn on reserves for two years and must do so again this year. At the rate of drawing down the $11 million reserve at $2 million yearly, Clallam County will experience financial crisis after four years. I support job retention. The budget question is not what to cut, but what we can grow. It is time to collect taxes that were not paid years ago that resulted in county timberland ownership. Poole: I have not seen a budget. It would be unfair to arbitrarily suggest slashing something I know very little about. That is not to say I wouldn’t cut the budget. We have to balance. I just need more information. How much emphasis should the county put into addressing climate change? Doherty: I have served on three statewide climate change advisory committees dealing with land use, coastal infrastructure and adaptation. As a coastal timber county, our area will experience impacts including water shortage, increased wildfire risk and sea level rise. Clallam County is a member of the largest group of local governments studying and sharing strategies related to climate change. A volunteer group of county employees has assisted with the

production of a County Climate Action Plan. Peach: Bill Gates in his book, Business at the Speed of Thought, responded to the question about the future of the Internet with the statement that we will overestimate the short term and underestimate the long term. I drive a diesel car. It was a personal choice. I have no right, nor does the county, to impose values. The role of the county commissioner is to represent values. Poole: None. Time, I believe, will show the sham that is global warming. Scientists can take a proposition and get a given result if they are willing to skew the numbers. This is what I believe has happened. Why should voters choose you over your opponents? Doherty: In these challenging times for county residents as well as local governments, I hope voters will support a candidate with a record of fiscal responsibility and pragmatic problem-solving. I have worked to build cooperation among local, state, federal and tribal agencies in order to sustain core services of Clallam County government. I have a strong record of working hard to protect local revenue sources while accessing federal and state grant funds to augment local resources. Peach: The choice is to vote for a county commissioner who will either support the values of people who do not live in Clallam County or support the values of the people of Clallam County. I support the values of the people of Clallam County Poole: I have no hidden agendas. I have only the desire to make this county a great place to live in and work in. Being a person of the middle class, I can relate to most people’s problems, and I feel I will bring a fresh outlook on government, one that is borne in the belief that government should not be the answer but merely a tool to help us live the American dream.


Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

July-August 2010

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CLALLAM COUNTY

Community development director

Alan Barnard

John Miller

Sheila Roark Miller

Sean Ryan

Timothy S. Woolett

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Carlsborg

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-461-0175

Phone: 360-457-8347

Phone: 360-460-0241

Phone: 360-912-0224

Phone: 360-452-6404

E-mail: barnardfordcd@ gmail.com Age: 65

E-mail: jhmiller49@ msn.com Age: 61

E-mail: ElectSheila@ olypen.com Age: 51 Education: Associate of arts degree, Peninsula College, 2005; National Fire Academy, Emmitsburg Md., 1997 and 2004; business honors graduate, Port Angeles High School, 1976

Campaign website: www.barnardfordcd.com

Education: Fargo North High School, Fargo, N.D., 1967; bachelor’s degree in politics, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J., 1971; graduate study in political science and at Huxley College of Environmental Studies, Western Washington University, Bellingham, 1979-1984, master’s degree not earned

Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? Never held public office

Occupation: Director of community development, Clallam County, 2007 to the present

Campaign website: www.ElectRoarkMiller.com

Education: Bachelor’s degree, speech communication, post-graduate courses in industrial relations and executive leadership Occupation: Real estate broker/owner

Campaign website: None at this time Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? Clallam County Charter Review Commission, 2002 and 2007; elected chairman of the review commission in 2007; Clallam County director of community development

Occupation: Clallam County code compliance officer III/deputy fire marshal

Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No

E-mail: ryansofsequim@ aol.com Age: 48

E-mail address: tswoolett@olympus.net Age: 54

Occupation: Small-business owner and Clallam County Fire District No. 3 volunteer firefighter

Education: Peninsula College, associate of applied science (mid-management) 1986; Peninsula College, associate of arts (general undergraduate requirements) 1987; Western Washington University, bachelor of arts (major: geography), 1989

Campaign website: None.

Occupation: Land use planning

Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No

Campaign website: None at this time

Education: High school graduate, numerous business and management classes

Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No


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July-August 2010

Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

Clallam County director of community development Why are you running for this position?

development in both the public and private sectors, I’ve had the opportunity to gain a “360-degree” perspective of the land use and community development process. I have the professional qualifications to do the job and seriously believe that I can make a positive contribution to the public, the department and the county overall.

Barnard: From my last nearly 20 years working with the Department of Community Development on the customer side on behalf of myself and my clients, plus a great deal of current input from many concerned frequent users of DCD, it’s clear the next director needs to be from outside of county government and outside of the bureauWhat personal qualities do cracy to bring a fresh approach. you possess that recommend Utilizing my extensive busiyou for this position? ness management experience, my focus will be service, outreach Barnard: Most of my working and accountability. career has involved business management. John Miller: I have perI’m a skilled communicator formed the duties of director of and experienced public speaker. community development for the In business and community last 3½ years honorably. service work, I have been sucThe department has expericessful in bringing people with enced stability over that period diverse backgrounds and interwith very little turnover in perests together to achieve a comsonnel. mon goal. In the department, we pride I accept and embrace leaderourselves on delivering customer ship roles, carefully engendering service of the highest order. trust and cooperation from those We have cleared up most I lead. Affecting positive change growth management non-compli- for local folks with whom I share ance issues from 2007. this wonderful county motivates We have a Shorelines Master me to get involved. Program to update by 2012 and other major tasks I want to see John Miller: I like to say through. that my job as the head of the Sheila Roark Miller: I believe citizens want an elected official who will work hard for the people, who doesn’t take his or her salary and position for granted and who knows the area and its issues. Having built mutually respectful relationships with design professionals, business owners and community citizens, I decided it was time to offer the voters a better choice.

department is to make sure the 30 people on the staff have the resources they need to get the job done. I am available to go into the community and “spread the word” on the good things we are doing and advocate to the commissioners. I have gotten on well with other department heads in the courthouse. I work cooperatively, emphasizing teamwork.

Ryan: First and foremost, I am a businessman, not a politician. I am not afraid to stand up for what is right and not be swayed by popularity. I can make the hard decisions, the decisions that are right for our county, our taxpayers and our budget. Woolett: I have more than 15 years experience in local government planning and community development, seven years of which are with Clallam County as a senior planner. I also have 5½ years experience with land use in the private sector, thus gaining first-hand experience from the perspective of a land owner. I have first-hand experience and working knowledge of county government. I know the needs of staff and the desire to know any needs of the public that I am currently unaware of. How well is the DCD processing permits? Barnard: My interviews with frequent users of DCD and my personal dealings indicate permit processing is too often a frustrating and uncertain ordeal, both at the planning and permitting counters. There is a serious need for a greater commitment to assist the public in any way possible to help the applicant achieve the requested action. Improvement here will result in economic improvement for this county and greater success and trust by the public in DCD.

John Miller: In the 3½ years that I have been in the position of director of DCD, the building division has not denied a single building permit application. Ryan: I believe that as a busiSheila Roark Miller: I That shows that our staff ness owner in the building trade works with the property owners in Clallam County for more than actively listen for the substance and the intent of our citizens’ to help them to satisfy the regu15 years, I have seen first hand complaints. latory requirements that the the “booms and woes” of the I find solutions to their probcounty is legally obligated to fulcounty. lems based on my knowledge of fill. As taxpayers, I feel that In those rare occurrences that together we can have a penetrat- the county, its ordinances and the intent of the law and its intricate get near the approval time limit, ing voice for our community, it is because we need additional which should be working toward codes. I am organized and a forward information on the project. making it a “true community thinker, a practical individual government.” who is willing to listen to others Sheila Roark Miller: Comand is humble enough to know pared to King County, Clallam Woolett: With more than 20 wins in both efficiency and qualyears experience in local govern- that I don’t know all of the ity. answers. ment planning and community

However, in today’s economic climate, this isn’t about having that cozy, small-town feeling when you walk in the door. It is about using the department’s resources so efficiently that superior, in-house training programs and a great software system ensures that all technicians have the right answers at their fingertips. Ryan: Being in the building trade, and dealing with developers routinely, I feel that all departments, not just the permit processing, will need to be reassessed, with the community voices in mind. There are more aspects to the performance than just my opinion. There is a whole community of taxpayers that need to be heard to build an effective community development department. My door would always be open to any persons with concerns. Woolett: The ordinances have inconsistencies and areas where they lack clarity. A serious effort needs to be applied to the correction of these deficiencies, which would facilitate the processing of permits, ease the job of community development staff and ensure fairness to landowners. I have worked with the ordinances in place and have experienced the confusion first-hand. At this point in time I believe DCD is doing the best they can with the tools at hand. How has the Growth Management Act worked out? Barnard: The 1990 Growth Management Act is a complicated attempt to coordinate land use planning statewide. I attended many GMA development group meetings, often the only citizen observing. GMA has both helped and hurt our county in my estimation. While it provided a framework to more predictable development, it has also taken land value away from many and increased the cost of development. It’s reality, though, and we all have to make it work. John Miller: The Growth Management Act (GMA) was amended by the Legislature in

1995 to add some options for rural counties. Clallam County has established many Limited Areas of More Intense Rural Development (LAMIRDS). These designations allow more concentrated development than can occur in the rural zoning portions of the county. Clallam County is now compliant with the GMA in all but the lack of sewer service in Carlsborg. The list was longer in 2007. Sheila Roark Miller: It worked pretty well until the county was sued. We scrambled to re-create “innovative” zoning districts. It was not written for the common landowner to understand. That’s the good news. The bad news rests on the shoulders of Carlsborg Urban Growth Area property owners. Translation: Your children will not have a college education because you cannot build on your empty lot. Just don’t tell the eastern neighbors that a sewage treatment facility is moving in. Ryan: The GMA was designed to manage development density between the city and county lands by regulating the amount of units allowed per area or acre. The program has worked fairly well but is written in such a way that can be interpreted in different aspects. Though this program is managed by the county commission board, the DCD’s job is to help them balance and promote economic development by encouraging building growth for affordable housing. Woolett: The Growth Management Act is in place, and we are working within its regulatory framework. Are we making efficient use of the GMA? I would say no. The county’s comprehensive plan and zoning ordinance are in place, as is the zoning of lands within the county. Although we live under these regulatory requirements, I do not believe they are being applied effectively. Turn

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Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

July-August 2010

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Clallam County director of community development Continued from preceding page How would you balance the rights of developers with the need to abide by land-use regulations? Barnard: Balance is the key word throughout DCD’s jurisdiction. Regulations exist to allow development while protecting the environment and public safety. I don’t think we are underregulated by any means so we must be very judicious when considering any additional regulation. DCD exists to assist the public in achieving its property goals within the regulations. DCD must do all it can to find acceptable solutions to help citizens to succeed when exercising their property rights. John Miller: Land use in Washington state is specified in state law. Local jurisdictions have the authority to adopt ordinances that govern how the state laws will be implemented within the constraints of the Washington Administrative Code and case law. As noted previously, the building division has not denied even one building permit in the last 3½ years. I point out that statistic to show the helpful approach we take in the department with project proponents.

About the job Director of community development Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Primary election boundaries: Countywide Term: Four years Voters: 45,804 Compensation: $64,211 to $70,877 yearly salary, mileage allowance of $400 a month, 50 cents a mile or use of a county vehicle. The director also receives all county medical, dental and optical benefits and retirement benefits. Duties: Administer, enforce and advise county commissioners on laws, not including health, that are related to the environment, land-use permits, land and shoreline development, natural resources, zoning, land divisions, building and fire codes, watershed planning, mining and agriculture. The director prepares and presents to county commissioners, for their adoption, comprehensive land use plans and landdevelopment regulations. The director administers an annual general fund budget that in 2010 is $3.44 million and covers 32 employees. The department has the second-largest general fund budget next to the Sheriff’s Office budget. The director has same the independent authority and administrative and managerial rights as other elected officials. The position became one of the few, if not only, elected county community development director positions in the nation in 2002 under a proposal offered by the county Charter Commission that was overwhelmingly approved by voters.

and build appropriate compromise. It can be done, it just needs to be done together as a community. Affordable housing needs to Sheila Roark Miller: Solube addressed. This will keep our tions must be based on the intent sons, daughters and grandchilof the law. dren in our community to build a Most decisions come down to a solid foundation for the future. middle ground. We cannot have a healthy ecoWoolett: Land use regulanomic base without some level of tions do regulate the use of land construction or development, and within a given zone. we have to realize that what However, land use regulations attracts people to our area in the should also be seen as an assurfirst place is the natural environ- ance of what an owner can do ment and mild climate. with his/her land as well as what Most developers expect and can be expected of the land surabide by clearly communicated rounding their ownership. regulations. There needs to be clarity and consistency in local land use regRyan: We all have rights as ulations to aid developers in taxpayers. Voices of these taxpay- understanding what is required ers need to be heard, and someof them prior to completing their times, changes to regulations decision-making process. made. We all have to come together, What will you cut if you find what works for each side must cut the DCD budget?

Barnard: County budget cuts are a reality at least for the near future. We will have to look carefully at the number and types of issues DCD handles and the staffing and time frames necessary to complete and approve them. Applications are down substantially from previous years, yet I understand staffing remains approximately the same. As in the private sector, being creative, finding better procedures, cutting costs and carefully adjusting staff levels is what the taxpayer expects. John Miller: To make our budget target of a 4.6 percent reduction in spending in 2010, we trimmed many budget lines. For example, we gave two vehicles back to the motor pool to reduce $14,000 in one line item. If we cut further going into 2011, personnel positions will

likely be on the line. Department heads discussed with the commissioners and administrator last year the possibility of a four-day work week for the courthouse. Sheila Roark Miller: I don’t think we need a manager who counts carbon footprints when we can hire an associate planner who gladly does the job at a thousand dollars less a month. I would eliminate out-of state or across-state travel for managers. You can also reduce travel, motel and meal costs by sending staff to local training courses.

always be improved. State law contains the Growth Management Act, Shoreline Management Act and other statutes that Clallam County and all local jurisdictions are required to enforce. We have a track record of providing a high level of customer service and have received many notes of thanks for the respectful way in which property owners have been treated. We will speed up where we can do so efficiently and fairly.

Sheila Roark Miller: Hearing examiner decisions should be transmitted to staff and contractors and be available for citizens Ryan: I believe each departwith Internet access. ment needs to be evaluated for A conditional-use permit their priorities and performances, requires a multitude of processweaknesses and strengths. ing up front but lacks the necesIf elected, that will be my first sary follow-up to ensure complipriority. ance in the end. I believe a full evaluation will A requirement such as “sewer reveal from the start where connection approval” should improvements can be made with include a list of action items. the budget in order to fulfill the It should fully explain steps needs of our county tax resources and fees so applicants can underand our taxpayers. stand the financial and energy commitment should they choose Woolett: I cannot give a speto proceed. cific answer to this question. However, I think that during Ryan: Again, I believe that these difficult economic times, we the voices of the taxpayers, the need to evaluate which projects land conservationists and the are essential at this time and developers need to be heard and which ones can wait. understood by our county proIf a project is not essential to cesses. the public health, safety and welThere is always room to fare, then it should be tabled for improve. the time being and resources There is never a perfect sysallocated to more pressing needs. tem, but if we find a common ground between all the voices What about the county and a well-stated compromise, land-use process should be we can build a cleaner, safer, susimproved? tainable, family-friendly lifestyle that appeals to all members of Barnard: Public servants our community. must serve from responsibility to the public, not power over the Woolett: My underlying public. theme here is the lack of consisWhile DCD has many qualitency and clarity in the current fied professionals with excellent land use ordinances. technical skills, the land-use proThese are key issues to me cess still can be frustrating, diffi- since they were the cause of cult and the outcome uncertain. many struggles and hardships to An entrepreneurial approach both staff and landowners while is needed to serving the public I was employed as Clallam Counwhere the applicant’s success is ty’s senior planner. primary goal. DCD works for the The best way I can see to citizens, is paid by the citizens improve the process is to repair and thus must be more helpful the codes and to work with staff and responsive to the citizens. in better understanding, identifying and formulating solutions. John Miller: Processes Turn to next page administered by humans can


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Primary Election Guide

July-August 2010

Clallam County director of community development Continued from preceding page I am the best qualified candidate. Why should voters choose I understand first-hand the you over your opponents? challenges facing our community. Barnard: I’ve spent 45 years I will do what it takes to lisin the private sector, where my ten to the needs of the citizens, success is tied to the service and I will translate these needs level I can provide to my cusinto doable solutions. tomer. I”m not a bureaucrat. I’ve I will do what it takes to gain taught customer relations, effec- back the support of local busitive communication and negoti- ness. ations. I am a proven manager, I will take the county forfacilitator, communicator, vetward into better economic times. eran and community volunteer. I am highly educated, wellServing my fellow county citirespected and trustworthy. zens is a high and worthy calling. The status quo in DCD can Ryan: I am just an “average be much better with the right person” in the community, a leadership, which I will provide. voice no different than those I will take direction from. John Miller: I have the I am not a fancy politician or track record to run on. a smooth-talking salesman. When I came into office, the I am just a taxpayer in this department was facing several community who wants to see us growth management appeals flourish and our tax dollars that required the preparation of working for the people. a rural lands study to justify our designation of the Woolett: I have extensive LAMIRDS. experience in planning and comLargely, that stood up before munity development, and more the growth management hearnotably, I have experience in the ings board. Clallam County DCD. We still have Clallam CounHaving been involved with ty’s version of rural zoning land use in both the public and before the court of appeals — private sectors, I have a good and could prevail. sense of the needs of both. I am proud of having repreI also have a working knowlsented the property rights of edge of the ordinances, how they Clallam County citizens in the work together, their strengths course of these appeals. and their weaknesses. I have the professional qualiSheila Roark Miller: With fications to do the job of DCD my 20 years in the department, director.

CLALLAM COUNTY

Prosecuting attorney

Lauren Erickson

Peninsula Woman Every Sunday in

Peninsula Daily News

Larry Freedman

Deb Kelly

Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-460-3834

Phone: 360-809-0164

Phone: 360-452-3432

E-mail: laurenerickson@ wavecable.com Age: 54 Education: Bachelor of arts, history, University of Washington, 1977; law degree, Seattle University, 1989 Occupation: Administrative law judge and Port Angeles attorney specializing in child welfare cases Campaign website: www.laurenerickson.info Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? Port Angeles City Council, 2000-2006 Party preference: Democratic Party

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

E-mail: larryf@olypen.com Age: 72 Education: Bachelor of arts, University of Vermont, 1959; law degree, Boston University School of Law, 1963. Admitted to practice law before the United States Supreme Court and in Massachusetts, District of Columbia, Virginia, Maryland and Washington state as well as numerous federal court districts and appeals courts. Specialized coursework: mediation skills training workshop, government contract law and related issues. Occupation: Held position of judge pro tem, commissioner, adjunct professor of law at George Mason University School of Law for 14 years and taught numerous continuing legal education teaching courses for attorneys. Managing partner in three successful major law firms in 47 years of law practice. Also held positions as arbitrator, mediator, special prosecuting attorney for two United States attorneys and contract attorney for city of Sequim for criminal probation matters. Presently practicing attorney in Sequim. Campaign website: None Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No Party preference: Democratic Party

E-mail: kellyforprosecutor@ yahoo.com Age: 57 Education: Bachelor of arts, Rice University, Texas, 1974; law degree, Southern Methodist University, Texas, 1978 Occupation: Prosecuting attorney Campaign website: www.kellyforprosecutor.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? In 1993, I was appointed to the District Court bench and served there during 1994. In 2002, I won election as Clallam County prosecuting attorney and have served there from January 2003 to the present, running unopposed in 2006. Party preference: Republican Party


A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

Primary Election Guide

July-August 2010

9

Clallam County prosecuting attorney Why are you running for this position?

to extensively cross-train personnel, document basic office procedures, enact policies providing Erickson: I am running for consistency in the handling of prosecutor to fix the serious percriminal matters and routinely Prosecuting attorney sonnel and operational issues hold employees accountable for Kelly: The prosecutor’s office plaguing the office. behavior and performance. serves the public well. Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan If elected, I will move swiftly Holding employees accountWith fewer attorneys and to prioritize cases, restructure higher caseloads, the office enjoys able rarely enhances managers’ Primary election boundaries: Countywide the office and restore its credibilpopularity but is an absolute a better than 90 percent convicity in the community. necessity with shrinking tion rate at trial, aggressively Term: Four years I am a very experienced prosresources — and is no less than prosecutes sex and violent ecutor, having tried all types of the public deserves. offenders, supports diversion proCompensation: $121,877 salary, mileage allowance of $400 felony cases ranging from grams for less serious offenders, a month, 50 cents a mile or use of a county vehicle. attempted murder to serious To what degree should has improved victim-witness serThe prosecuting attorney also receives all county medical, assaults. children be tried as adults? vices, vigorously fights to predental and optical benefits and retirement benefits. Under my leadership, the depserve land use rights for county uty prosecutors will be mentored, Erickson: There are certain citizens and has saved taxpayers Duties: Represents the interests of the citizens of the allowing them to develop the classifications of crimes that, money by using community volcounty in criminal trials and in all other legal matters involvskills to make the right decisions depending upon the child’s age, unteers, computerizing legal ing the county. for Clallam County. must be handled in adult court. research, bringing expensive litiThe prosecutor decides who will be prosecuted and what However, when there is an gation in-house and pinching charges will be filed. Freedman: I am running for option, only rarely should a child pennies wherever possible. Serves as legal adviser to all county officials and school disprosecutor after being urged to be prosecuted as an adult. tricts. do so by numerous law enforceChildren, including teenagers, How well is the prosecuting Proposes and administers a budget that in 2010 is ment officials, judges, attorneys do not have fully developed attorney’s office being run? $1.23 million and which covers 24 employees. and former prosecutors. brains, are very susceptible to There has been a huge waste peer pressure and can make horErickson: The current proseof taxpayer money because of rific mistakes. cutor has created an organizaAnother attribute of mine is my family has dedicated more lawsuits involving a hostile work A child should only be prosetional structure providing for than 70 years to this county. environment, age discrimination, the ability to foster communicacuted as an adult when a child’s three civil deputies and seven tion between people and the abilI trust we have demonstrated fines for misrepresentation to the personal history appears to leave criminal deputies, and yet the ity to de-escalate situations. integrity and commitment. court and not following court little hope of rehabilitation. civil side has two management These are valuable skills for rules on discovery. positions while the criminal side the prosecutor, who must help A dysfunctional office environFreedman: Children should How adequately is the pros- has none. ment has been created because of crime victims, negotiate legal setnot be charged as adults except This has created a criminal tlements and provide legal advice ecuting attorney’s office servmassive employee turnover, division with no leader, resulting in very exceptional cases of an ing the needs of the public? unnecessary retrials and delayed on myriad issues directly affectextreme predatory crime and a in trial delays and convictions ing the public. justice. New, professional manhistory of such behavior. Erickson: The current prose- being overturned on appeal. agement is required. The age of the child is imporFreedman: My experience as cutor has not been a good stewAdditionally, poor management choices have resulted in an tant. One of the purposes of juveKelly: I believe public service judge, law professor, arbitrator ard of the public’s money and is nile detention is to rehabilitate. and mediator as well as manager not serving the public well. absurd level of turnover and an is a calling, not an entitlement. of highly successful law offices Children should be charged as age discrimination lawsuit that Prosecutors are called to be Despite current economic conhave resulted in a professional children except where the act is has already cost taxpayers in zealous advocates for the public ditions, she continues to ask for excess of $400,000. extreme and rehabilitation is not who owe their highest allegiance approach, a balanced temperaunnecessary new positions and to justice rather than to a sympa- ment and an understanding of likely. has used $90,000 in federal stimgood management strategy. Freedman: Poor managethetic victim or an impressive ulus money to hire outside lawMy ability as an attorney was yers to draft simple office policy. ment has resulted in the loss of conviction rate. Kelly: Most children underrecognized when I was selected respect of the judges, law enforce- stand right and wrong at a very It is often frustrating but The office has provided poor as one of the top 100 criminal ment and the public because of nonetheless rewarding to fulfill young age. legal advice on public disclosure law attorneys in the United that obligation. Our state automatically proserequests and hired a Seattle law waste, delays, misrepresentations States. to the court, lost trials and overMy office has made huge cutes older teenagers in adult firm at considerable expense to My management experience charges, unnecessary retrials and court for certain serious offenses strides in improving its service to fight disclosure of public docureversals. the public in both civil and crimi- and ability to teach will enable but allows return to juvenile ments. me to make the necessary Poor management is also evinal departments. court if extenuating circumchanges. dent in the huge expenditure of I want to continue that work. stances exist. Freedman: Although the funds (reported in PDN to be in Younger teenagers may be incumbent claims a 90 percent Kelly: What is right is not excess of $400,000) and both What personal qualities do tried as adults for limited serious conviction rate, the record shows time and disruption due to the always what is easy. you possess that recommend crimes if aggravators exist and a in the past five years, approxiIf you know what is right, you lawsuit against the prosecutor’s you for this position? judge agrees. mately 39 percent of jury trials must act accordingly, whatever office and in the loss of unpreceThe laws are appropriate. ended with convictions as the cost. dented numbers of employees. Erickson: The most imporMy office carefully considers charged, 24 percent were not I will not quit or falter. tant quality I have is personal the offender, circumstances of the guilty and 37 pled or were given Between my husband’s miliKelly: While there is always integrity. crime and the admissible evimuch reduced charges. tary service, search and rescue, room for improvement, the prose- dence and exercises its discretion The public can trust me to The inefficiency of losing 33 and work as a deputy sheriff, my cutor’s office is better run than maintain exceedingly high ethiaccordingly. attorneys caused delays and children’s military service, and ever before. cal standards both in and out of Turn to next page the courtroom. my own service as a prosecutor, additional costs. The refusal by My administration is the first

About the job

the prosecutor to use the drug court for treatment (down 50 percent) results in more repeat offender crimes.


10

July-August 2010

Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

CLALLAM COUNTY

Judge, District Court 1 Why are you running for this position? Tim Davis: Becoming a judge has been a career goal. I believe I will be a good and fair judge who demands accountability without taxing the system unduly, as we are currently seeing. My background as a prosecutor and assistant attorney general prepared me for this continued public service. I want to improve our community and help engender respect for the law. It is time for a change, and I am the right person for this position. Pam Lindquist: I believe I can best serve the people in this county as the judge of District Court 1.

Rick Porter: District Court is the lowest elected court. I have been encouraged to run for one of the higher courts, but I have consistently said no because I love this court. This is the people’s court. By holding offenders accountable when they commit minor offenses, we can hopefully turn their lives around before they commit more serious crimes. Being a District Court judge is not just about imposing punishment and fines. It’s about changing lives. What personal qualities do you possess that recommend you for this position? Davis: Through my professional demeanor, I have gained the esteem of my colleagues and of those working in law enforcement and throughout the judicial

system here in Clallam County. I have good people skills and managerial skills as well as flexibility that will allow me to judge each case on its individual merits. I can be tough without demeaning people. I can put the needs of the community ahead of personal agenda while still demanding accountability.

I have served on the Planning Commission and board of directors for the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce. I also served as a deacon at Independent Bible Church. I have been married for 17 years to the love of my life, and we have three great kids.

Current programs do not wisely use limited community resources. I will bring an open mind and listen to involved parties to solve problems.

Lindquist: I do not believe the current District Court is adequately serving the needs of the public. How adequately is the curThe lack of professionalism and rent District Court serving amount of uncollected monetary Lindquist: I am hardworking the needs of the public? obligations (i.e., fines) are opportuand believe in personal responsi- Explain. nities to teach accountability that bility. have been squandered. Furthermore, I excel at probDavis: It does not. The court also needs to adopt lem-solving using intelligence, The public comes before the standardized performance meacreativity and a willingness to court to have disputes resolved in sures to evaluate its performance cooperate. a fair and equitable fashion by a in several key areas. judge who listens carefully and This will enable the court to Porter: I have been an attor- rules according to established identify areas of concern and ney for 20 years, serving as a rules. address them in a timely and prosecuting and defense attorney. Even the losing party can effective manner to better meet I am a judge advocate general leave the court feeling that justhe needs of the public. (JAG) in the Washington Air tice was done if they have been Guard. given a fair hearing. Turn to next page

Clallam County prosecuting attorney Kelly: Every plea agreement must enhance public safety, What is your philosophy on obtain restitution for the victim making plea deals with defen- and provide for offender accountability. dants? If an agreement can’t be reached that meets those tests, Erickson: People must be the case should be tried. held accountable for their To try every criminal case, at actions. least double the number of existHowever, under certain ciring judges, courtrooms, clerks, cumstances, when the interests defense attorneys and prosecuof the victim and the citizens of Clallam County are better served tors would be needed as well as more law enforcement. by a negotiated agreement, the Alternatively, two-thirds of prosecutor should pursue such a crimes now prosecuted would solution. have to be ignored. Plea agreements are necesFreedman: Plea agreements sary. are not inherently bad as long as reasoned judgment is utilized Where will you cut if you and not made because of errors have to cut the prosecuting of the prosecutor, leaving only attorney’s office budget? the possibility of plea deals. Reasonable plea agreements Erickson: If necessary, the can be achieved if the prosecutor chief deputy position could be redoes not overcharge, but makes classified as the chief criminal charges based only on what can deputy, resulting in a salary be proven and if the rules of reduction and saving money. court and ethics are followed. I would also speak with the If the rules are followed, valid attorneys and determine if any charges can be prosecuted. are willing to absorb pay cuts in Continued from preceding page

exchange for time off as was done others’ salary decreases. While any decision where cuts by the attorneys 10 years ago in are made must depend upon the order to save budget cuts. magnitude of cuts necessary, I will preserve vital services, and I Freedman: Through the promise I will personally share elimination of unnecessary lawthe pain. suits, massive turnover of employees, retrials, and prosecuWhy should voters choose torial overcharging (resulting in unnecessary trials), there should you over your opponents? be no need to make further cuts. Erickson: During the next The enormous loss of employdecade, budgets will be tight in ees has resulted in waste, unnecall areas and levels of governessary expense and disruption, causing delays in the administra- ment. I have worked in both the tion of justice. public and private sectors in Justice delayed is justice accounting support positions and denied. No other county or city comes understand budget constraints and will not waste taxpayer close to these numbers. money. I have worked on both the Kelly: Over the past few civil and criminal sides of the years, we have made numerous office and have the legal skills, reductions to save money. management ability and prosecuMost county employees’ salatorial experience to make better ries were reduced last year due choices for Clallam County, leadto budget cuts. ing to greater community safety. While my salary cannot be lowered by law, I voluntarily Freedman: The incumbent reduced my compensation by an prosecutor states that all is fine amount significantly exceeding in her office.

Ms. Erickson was trained in that office and agrees with most of her positions. I don’t agree. Unlike what is occurring now, I will provide respectful and honest dealings with the public and courts. I will support law enforcement. Their lives are on the line. Predatory crimes against children, the elderly and those vulnerable are not negotiable. Vote for change. Vote for Larry Freedman. Kelly: Eight years ago, I promised to focus the office on community safety and justice. Faced with the immediate loss of two attorney positions, I promised we would get the job done, although I noted that sometimes it might not look pretty. I keep my promises. My attorneys have more than 150 years of legal experience in Washington state. You know what I stand for. I will never quit fighting for you. I ask for your vote.


A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

Primary Election Guide

July-August 2010

11

Clallam County District Court 1 judge Continued from preceding page revenue created by District Court’s pay-or-appear program? Porter: The pay-or-appear program has increased the collecDavis: The allocation of revetion of fines from $1.4 million to nue from the District Court is $2.4 million a year. Since taking office, no tax dol- largely controlled by statute, rule and interagency agreement. lars have been required to fund The District Court judge does the court. not control where that money We also created a $160,000 goes. fund to pay for drug and alcohol The pay-or-appear program and domestic violence treatment. has been an ineffective program I have established probation that consumes more resources court, DUI drug court and menthan its collections justify. tal health court to meet those The situation is difficult, parspecific needs, again at no ticularly in a tight economy. expense to the taxpayer. The system needs to be openly reviewed and assessed with What’s your judicial phiinput from all interested parties. losophy? Davis: The law is our best means of peacefully resolving disputes. Holding people accountable without rancor or disrespect is essential, as is impartiality and understanding. Efficiency alone is not enough. Decisions must be consistent with fundamental goals of justice. Judges must always focus on applying the law to any situation fairly and without favor. Lack of respect toward the general public reflects poorly on our justice system. I will be tough on crime, not the taxpayer. Lindquist: People deserve to be treated as full members of society; no excuses, no coddling and all the credit for their own successes. This can only be realized by providing a fair forum for all participants and ensuring equal access to justice. Porter: It is the judge’s responsibility to ensure everyone is treated fairly and with respect. Offenders must be held accountable, but it is not just about exacting punishment. It’s about protecting the community and changing lives. A judge must be fiercely independent and have the confidence and courage to use his own judgment and not simply be a rubber stamp for the legal establishment. That is why I have never accepted endorsements or contributions from lawyers. How would you spend the

Lindquist: The “revenue” created by the pay-or-appear program is only the percentage of the monetary penalties imposed that the court actually collects. I would follow the statutory provisions on how such monetary obligations are to be disbursed. Porter: The $2.4 million that is collected is divided between the county ($1.2 million), Port Angeles ($275,000), Sequim ($110,000) and the state ($815,000). By law, those funds go into their general funds to be spent by the county commissioners and city councils, not the court. Indirectly, those funds pay for all the cost of running the court, and we have been able to establish a $160,000 fund to pay for drug and alcohol and domestic violence treatment.

Tim Davis Residence: Port Angeles Phone: Would not provide. E-mail: timdavisforjudge@gmail.com Age: 59 Education: Bachelor of arts, Keele University, Staffordshire, England; law degree, University of Iowa Occupation: Assistant attorney general Campaign Website: under construction; on Facebook, “Tim Davis for Judge” Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No

Pam Lindquist Residence: Port Angeles

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-457-6406

Phone: 360-452-2532

E-mail: pdlindquist@justice.com Age: 42 Education: Bachelor of arts in economics, California State University, Northridge; law degree, University of Wisconsin, Madison Occupation: Attorney Campaign website: pdlindquist.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No

Should diversion programs be expanded, and if so, in what areas? Explain. Davis: Absolutely. Currently, it is rare to see diversion offered once charges are filed. A structured, post-filing diversion program such as is used extensively in Kitsap County and elsewhere has proved economical and effective. Any program that better uses our limited resources while maintaining a proper focus on justice should be fully and openly examined and, if deemed proper, put into effect. Lindquist: Yes, diversion programs should be expanded. One particular diversion program I intend to institute is a

Rick Porter

E-mail: rdporter@olypen.com Age: 51 Education: Law degree, University of Puget Sound, 1989 Occupation: It has been my honor and privilege to serve the citizens of Clallam County as your District Court judge since I was elected in 2002. Prior to my election, I was the senior prosecuting attorney here in Clallam County. In addition, I am also a member of the Washington Air Guard, where I serve as a judge advocate general and the staff judge advocate for the 194th Regional Support Wing. Campaign website: Facebook — PorterforJudge Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? I was elected District Court judge in 2002.

Teen Traffic Court to allow 16and 17-year-old new drivers a chance to keep that very first traffic ticket off of their records. Porter: A year ago, in light of the declining economy and the cities’ looming budget crisis, I initiated the discussion of establishing a diversion program. Diversion programs reduce costs because the cities don’t pay

filing fees, there are no jail costs, the supervision costs are paid by the offender, and it has reduced the court calendars. This program has worked very well and should be expanded, but only for nonviolent, non-addicted offenders. Should judges be elected or appointed? Explain. Davis: Having served in states

where judges are appointed and where they are elected, my observations are that each system has strengths and weaknesses. Under either system, it is important for the electorate to have the option to replace a judge who does not reflect community values or treat those who appear before the court with professional courtesy and respect. Turn

to next page


12

Primary Election Guide

July-August 2010

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

Clallam District Court 1 judge Continued from preceding page Lindquist: One of the greatest strengths of our country is that the public has a voice in determining its local government through the opportunity to vote. Elections keep judges connected to the communities that they serve. Porter: Thirteen generations ago, my great grandfather (times 13), came to this country from England on the Mayflower and helped establish Plymouth Rock. He came here with a dream — a dream where decisions were made by the citizens, not backroom deals and appointments made by the privileged few. Article 1, Section 1 of our Constitution says, “All political power is inherent in the people, and governments derive their just power from the consent of the governed.” Why should voters choose you over your opponents? Davis: The same judge has presided in District Court for almost eight years. The court is not run as effectively as some would have us believe. Sticking to a certain way of doing things when there are clear indications that the system is wasteful is contrary to community interests. I am open to alternatives and bring a different perspective to the problems facing the court. It is time for a change and a new direction.

NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

About the job District Court 1 judge Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Primary election boundaries: From the county line east of Sequim to west of Lake Crescent

Compensation: $141,710 salary, a mileage allowance of $400 a month, 50 cents a mile or use of a county vehicle. The judge receives all county medical, dental and optical benefits and retirement benefits. Same health and retirement benefits as other county employees. Duties: Jurisdiction over criminal cases including misdemeanors, gross misdemeanors and criminal traffic cases including driving under the influence of liquor or drugs, hit and run and driving with a suspended license. With the exception of DUI and some game violations, those convicted of criminal offenses in district court may be sentenced to pay up to $5,000 in fines, a year in jail or both. The judge also issues anti-harassment and domestic violence protection orders. Rules on small claims limited to claims of up to $5,000. In these cases, each party is self-represented. The limit on awards on other civil cases is $75,000. Cases involving awards above that amount are heard in superior court. Cases heard include neighborhood disputes, consumer problems and landlord-tenant matters. The judge manages a general fund budget that in 2010 is $1.1 million and covers 13 employees, including probation.

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Peninsula Daily News

By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

Voters: 41,686

Lindquist: I have a balanced background in civil and criminal law, both as a prosecutor and a defense attorney, and I have spent years appearing in District Court 1.

Proposition 1

Therefore, I know how it has been run, and I know how it should be run to increase the integrity and professionalism, and to better meet the needs of the public. Porter: Experience. I am the only candidate with any judicial experience. I have presided over 15,000 criminal cases and 9,000 civil cases. By reducing continuances, I have shortened criminal case processing times from 126 judicial days to 42 judicial days. I believe in holding offenders accountable while providing them with treatment opportunities and the motivation to succeed. I am also the only candidate who has served in the U.S. military. I am tough, fair and efficient.

Voters throughout Clallam County are being asked to approve a 17-cent increase in the levy for the North Olympic Library System on the Aug. 17 primary election ballot — the first levy rate increase the library has sought in 32 years. Called a levy lid lift, the measure would restore the property tax rate back to the statutory limit, to 50 cents per $1,000 of assessed valuation, from the current 33 cents per $1,000 of valuation. That means the owner of a $200,000 home would pay about $100 in property taxes a year, or $34 per year more than they currently pay. Because it is a levy lid lift, voters are asked to approve a rate rather than a total amount. The public libraries scheduled two one-week closures this year, cut staff, reduced hours of operation at three libraries, cut library materials by 10 percent, deferred some maintenance and continued to rely on old technology for telephone systems and other equipment, library system director Paula Barnes said. Library officials expect another budget shortfall in 2011. Kaj Alhburg, a Port Angeles attorney, said that although he is supportive of libraries, the increase is too much, noting the increase in taxes is a 51.5 percent increase over the current rate. “I’m a great supporter of libraries — I love books,” Alhburg said. “But the more than 50 percent increase in the levy strikes me as excessive. “My feeling is that this might be a time that they might have fallen behind 10 or 15 percent in the last decade so perhaps ask for a rate of 36 or 37 cents. “This strikes me as the wrong year to ask for such an increase.” He said that asking homeowners for more in an already eco-

NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM DISTRICT PROPOSITION NO. 1 The Board of Trustees of the North Olympic Library System District adopted Resolution 10-04-03 concerning the financing of library maintenance and operations. If passed, this proposition would authorize the District to restore its 2010 regular property tax levy rate from $0.33 to $0.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value for collection in 2011, which amount would then be used for computing the limitations on subsequent levies authorized under Chapter 84.55 RCW. Should this proposition be approved?

nomically challenged time is too much. The library system took $88,000 out of reserves for 2010 and cut another $88,000, Barnes said. The first system-wide library closure was from April 29 through April 3. The second will be from Aug. 30 to Sept. 4. All 51 employees of the library system are on unpaid furloughs during the closures. Barnes said if the measure does not pass, it will mean layoffs, shorter hours and less materials. The last time the system requested a levy rate increase was in 1978. “Perhaps we should have come back and asked before this, but if we had asked for a rate any lower than this, we would be coming right back and asking again for another increase,” she said. “The 50-cent rate ensures that we won’t need to come back to the voters for another 10 years. “We heard very loudly from the community that they get levy fatigue.” She said that a citizen advisory committee had told the board and her that a larger increase one time was preferred over several small increases.


Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

July-August 2010

13

WASHINGTON STATE LEGISLATURE

Representative, 24th District Position 1 Why are you running for this position?

From my experiences as a small business owner, banker, pilot, military veteran and union worker, I can view our issues from the many perspectives of the people of our district and can relate to their concerns. Years of community leadership and volunteer service demonstrate additional layers of expertise.

Durgan: Government is out of control. Spending and taxation are in an upward spiral with no end in sight under the current political leadership. This needs to end, and governVan De Wege: The most ment needs to be fundamentally important quality I possess is the changed. ability to listen. Whether it is hearing conGase: When I wonder about cerns about a sales tax increase the future in store for my grand- from constituents, about the sons, I become concerned with Department of Ecology abusing the economic direction in which its government power from landour state is headed. owners, or about the need for What kind of an economy are family-wage jobs from families, I we creating, and is it acceptable? have listened first and then acted I think not. in Olympia. This is the time in my life I work to be an independent that I can devote to this very voice for citizens who want soluimportant job. It is with a “fire in tions, not partisan politics, in the gut” passion that I believe I Olympia. can make a positive difference. How will you balance your Van De Wege: As a firecurrent job status with being fighter/paramedic, I see the a state representative, espeeveryday struggles that the peocially during the three-month ple of the 24th District face. legislative session, when I am running for this position being in Olympia on a daily because I see families who strug- basis is so important? gle with health care, seniors who cannot afford their prescription Durgan: I am retired and drug medications and business own a storage business. owners who are trying to survive. While the Legislature is in Our community is concerned session, I will be able to devote about the economy. my full attention to that job by I’m running to keep governhiring a manager to operate the business. ment in check and help create jobs that put people back to Gase: I will be a full-time repwork. resentative for the three-month What personal qualities do session. During the remaining nine you possess that recommend months, I will continue to act as you for this position? a self-employed real estate consultant and share my real estate Durgan: I have been a fiscal duties with team members as conservative my entire life. needed. I have had to work for everyThis will allow me to be in thing I got and therefore underconsistent and regular communistand the value of money. cation with the people of the disMoney is a limited resource trict, in person. that must not be squandered. Having flexible control over my time is a distinct advantage Gase: I bring more than 50 to better serve the district. years of relevant and pertinent life experience to the table, and Turn to next page not a single day as a politician.

Craig Durgan

Dan Gase

Residence: Port Ludlow

Residence: Port Angeles

Phone: 360-437-4127

Phone: 360-417-2804

E-mail: durgan@olympus.net Age: 53 Education: Bachelor of science degree from U.S. Merchant Marine Academy

E-mail address: Dan@votedangase.com Age: 56 Education: Associate of arts, Peninsula College, industry-specific courses at Arizona State University and The Wharton School [of Business] at University of Pennsylvania.

Kevin Van De Wege Residence: Sequim Phone: Home, 360-6814412; cell phone, 360-4770548 E-mail: kevinvandewege@hotmail. com Age: 35

Campaign website: www.newwaycampaign.com

Campaign website: www.votedangase.com

Education: Associate’s degrees in fire investigation and administration from Edmonds Community College; paramedic certification from Northwest Medical Training; professional writing certificate and bachelor’s degree in social science from Washington State University

Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? Nope

Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No

Occupation: Firefighter/ paramedic with Clallam County Fire District No. 3

Party preference: Republican Party

Party preference: Republican Party

Campaign website: www.kevinvandewege.com

Occupation: Retired from a seagoing career as a marine engineer. Last position was as chief engineer onboard the MV President Polk.

Occupation: Real estate managing broker, consultant

Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? State representative for the 24th Legislative District since 2007 Party preference: Democratic Party


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Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

State House of Representatives, 24th District, Position 1 Continued from preceding page Van De Wege: I have been blessed with a wonderful family and am fortunate to have a career as a firefighter/paramedic in Sequim. I have been able to combine my career with being a state representative, which makes for a busy schedule, a schedule that I have had great success handling the past four years serving the district. With that experience, I am ready to continue being a voice for them in Olympia. How well is the current legislative delegation serving the 24th District? Explain. Durgan: Not very well. Unemployment is sky high, with no end in sight. Government regulation is severely restricting small business. It is the small business that historically leads the country out of a recession. But that is not possible due to excessive government regulations. And to add insult to injury, the Legislature is raising taxes. This is merely a recipe for a prolonged recession.

About the job 24th District state representative Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Primary election boundaries: Clallam and Jefferson counties, and the northern half of Grays Harbor County, including Hoquiam, Montesano and Ocean Shores, but not including Aberdeen. Voters: 84,216, including 45,804 in Clallam County, 21,586 in Jefferson County and 16,826 in Grays Harbor County. Compensation: $42,106 yearly salary, $90 a day for expenses while the Legislature is in session, mileage allowance of 50 cents. Legislators are eligible for the same medical, dental and retirement benefits as state employees. Legislators supervise one full-time legislative assistant who schedules appointments, follows up on constituents’ correspondence and serves as an office assistant. In odd-numbered years, the session lasts 105 days, while in even-numbered years, it’s 60 days. Duties: Draft bills, vote on state laws, address constituents’ complaints and concerns, participates on legislative and regional committees. Approve a state operating budget than in 2009-2011 is $30 billion. The budget pays for 110,000 employees, including 48,000 higher education employees. the state Legislature to suspend voter-approved, tax-limiting Initiative 960? Explain.

In 2009, we implemented an “all cuts” approach to our state’s budget, resulting in cutting core services for citizens. Durgan: This action is despiA balanced budget approach cable. in 2010 helps everyone in our The people voted to limit taxa- state. tion, and the Legislature thumbed its nose at the people. What should the state of Government and politicians Washington do to take care of need to understand that the peo- needs of those who can’t take ple are the final say in all things. care of themselves? Explain.

Gase: I believe that it is very challenging for my opponent serving the 24th District to do a satisfactory job carrying out the duties of the office. Having a full-time job in addition to the duties of his office creates a conflict of interests and a considerable challenge to regularly meet with and listen to the entire district during the year — thus creating a significant hardGase: The people of the state ship for the personal constituents spoke clearly when they voted for of his district. their Legislature to require a two-thirds majority vote before Van De Wege: Even though raising our taxes. we have faced huge economic My opponent voted to “suschallenges, the current legislative pend the will of the people,” delegation has been very success- resulting in major tax increases. ful serving the 24th District by This was wrong. helping create jobs, making sure government is running more effiVan De Wege: We face the ciently, continuing to protect our worst economic crisis in years. most vulnerable citizens and I voted for the suspension of making sure we are steering our I-960 to eliminate tax loopholes public school system in the right that corporations were using to direction, which will prepare our fund Wall Street greed. children for the challenges of the Reigning in loopholes ensures 21st century. corporations contribute more to our tax base, making it fair for Was it right or wrong for everyone.

state government will allow this to take place. Van De Wege: Our focus should be to continue to make government run more efficiently. This includes core services the state provides to protect the elderly and our vulnerable populations. We cannot have seniors being kicked out of nursing homes and children with no access to health care, and we cannot turn our backs on the disabled. The state must make tough and careful choices in these arenas to ensure vulnerable populations are protected in an efficient manner. What’s your plan of attack for fighting the estimated shortfall of at least $3 billion that’s expected for the 20112013 state budget? Durgan: Across-the-board pay and benefit cuts for all state workers are the first order of business. Second, I would commission the state auditor to recommend cuts and possible elimination of ineffectual programs. Gase: Washington state does not have an income problem, we have a spending problem. I would eliminate excessive spending on lower-priority items. We must continue evaluating more efficient ways of accomplishing the same goals.

Van De Wege: The plan of attack for our state’s budget will be to make state government more efficient, to carefully build on the nearly $4 billion in cuts Durgan: People who are in we made this biennium and to true need should receive help. close any remaining tax loopThe real question is how holes that corporations are abusmuch of the money is being used ing. for them and how much for the This plan has gotten us state bureaucracy. through the worst of the recession, and combined with our Gase: Taking care of the vulaggressive job creation, Washingnerable population of Washington ton state is expected to lead the state — those individuals who nation out of the recession. have nobody to care for them — must remain a priority of our Why should voters choose state. you over your opponents? This must be accomplished with the help and cooperation of Durgan: My opponent voted all the people of Washington. to set aside Initiative 960. He I believe we are a population has been in office for four years that is willing to give of ourand therefore is culpable for the selves. A focused prioritization of current budget problems that the

state is having. Gase: I am the pro-business, free-enterprise, reduced-spending, smaller-government and cut-tax candidate. My opponent’s record shows that he has voted for bigger government and higher taxes. The voters have an opportunity to make a choice between two very distinct approaches to government. Van De Wege: The way out of this recession is to create jobs. I worked this session to help find ways to create jobs such as helping Peninsula Plywood open, which created 125 jobs; creating sustainable jobs with new biomass projects, securing the 520 bridge pontoon project in Grays Harbor and doubling the small business tax credit. My proven experience has created real results — not political rhetoric and excuses for the people of our district.

Send me to school! SUPPORT EDUCATION: When you go on vacation, donate the credit for your suspended copies to provide the PDN to schools. Phone 360-452-4507.

Peninsula Daily News


Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

July-August 2010

15

WASHINGTON STATE LEGISLATURE

Representative, 24th District Position 2 Why are you running for this position? Carter: When I talk to my friends and neighbors, there are two common beliefs that we all hold. First, we love living on the Olympic Peninsula. Bugsy and I have lived all across the United States, and there is nowhere we would rather live than here. The other is that we are deeply concerned about the direction our state is heading. We have to take back our state! I will address some of those concerns below. Dwyer: I am running for this position because I wish to represent this entire District. I am committed to serving as a full-time legislator in Olympia. I have served well on the Montesano School Board, the ARC of Grays Harbor (Special Olympics), and the Leukemia Society of America. I am ready to make a difference in Olympia. McEntire: Today, our state’s governance does not, cannot and will not get us to the economic future all of us desire for our posterity. It squelches our American system of private enterprise. The Legislature has thrown out former Gov. Locke’s and thenstate Sen. Dino Rossi’s “Priorities of Government” approach to balancing the state budget. Government itself has become the priority. I’m running for office to be a part of a more fiscally responsible state Legislature. Tharinger: Because I am the best person for the job. There is no one running for this seat that has the experience and skills that I bring. The Legislature and the 24th Legislative District face a number of serious challenges during this recession. Turn

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Larry Carter

John (Jack) Dwyer

Residence: Port Ludlow

Residence: Montesano

Phone: 360-437-9224 E-mail address: lwc@cablespeed.com Age: 62 Education: Attended Northeast Louisiana State College. Fell in love with high school sweetheart. Dropped out and married her in 1967. Still married to Bugsy. Joined the Navy. No regrets. Occupation: Retired — U.S. Navy, Naval Nuclear Power Program until I made master chief. I was assigned as command master chief for my last two jobs in the Navy. Campaign website: www.newwaycampaign.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No Party preference: Republican Party

Phone: Office: 360-2498041; cell phone, 360-4706282 E-mail address: jackdwyerdc@yahoo.com Age: 54 Education: Associate of science, Burlington County College, N.J.; bachelor of science, Thomas Edison State College, N.J.; master’s of divinity, John XXIII College, Mass.; doctorate of chiropractic, Cleveland Chiropractic College, Calif. Occupation: Chiropractor Campaign website: www.jackdwyer.net Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? Elected to the Montesano School Board in November 2009 Party preference: Democratic Party

Jim McEntire

Steve Tharinger

Residence: Sequim

Residence: Sequim

Phone: 360-452-2199

Phone: 360-683-6480

E-mail: votejimmcentire@gmail.com Age: 60 Education: Bachelor of science, U.S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, Conn., 1972; master’s degree in public administration, The George Washington University, Washington, D.C., 1988 Fellow, Secretary of Defense Strategic Studies Group, Arlington, Va., 1998-1999 Occupation: Retired in 2000 from the U.S. Coast Guard as a captain after 28 years of service as an officer (colonel equivalent) and retired again in 2006 from the federal Senior Executive Service after an additional six years of civilian service to the nation. Campaign website: www.jimmcentire.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? Elected as commissioner (District 1), Port of Port Angeles, in 2007, in a countywide vote. Assumed office in January 2008. Party preference: Republican Party

E-mail: tharyoko@olypen.com Age: 61 Education: Bachelor of arts, political science, Colorado College, 1971 Occupation: Clallam County commissioner Campaign website: www.stevetharinger.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? County commissioner Party preference: Democratic Party


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A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

State House of Representatives, 24th District, Position 2 Continued from preceding page I have a proven track record of fiscal responsibility and working to make government efficient, effective and accountable. I want to take my experience to Olympia to represent the people of the 24th District. What personal qualities do you possess that recommend you for this position? Carter: Qualities that are sorely missing in Olympia like accountability, faith in our citizens and a gut-wrenching knowledge that the state is not the answer to every problem. There should be an adult in the state House who will stand up to petty political partisanship and bring common sense into the equation. I’m a fearless and energetic leader who is not swayed by special interests and will dedicate myself to your needs in the district. Dwyer: As a chiropractor, I am a small business owner and understand the challenges of doing business in our district. I am a great listener, and I am utilizing this quality to hear the needs of our constituents as I campaign throughout the district. I feel our legislators are elected to follow the will of the people, not necessarily their own. To do that effectively, I must listen to what people are telling me. McEntire: I am a thoughtful, reasonable, common-sense, fiscal conservative. I have extensive experience in public-sector budgeting, strategic planning and business realignment. I know how to ask all the right questions to discover which state government programs are working and which are not. Most importantly, shown by my record as a port commissioner, I am willing and able to make the hard choices necessary to bring spending in line with our state’s tax revenues. Tharinger: I have lived in the 24th District for more than years. I am an active listener with

About the job 24th District state representative Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Primary election boundaries: Clallam and Jefferson counties, and the northern half of Grays Harbor County, including Hoquiam, Montesano and Ocean Shores, but not including Aberdeen. Voters: 84,216, including 45,804 in Clallam County, 21,586 in Jefferson County and 16,826 in Grays Harbor County. Compensation: $42,106 yearly salary, $90 a day for expenses while the Legislature is in session, mileage allowance of 50 cents. Legislators are eligible for the same medical, dental and retirement benefits as state employees. Legislators supervise one full-time legislative assistant who schedules appointments, follows up on constituents’ correspondence and serves as an office assistant. In odd-numbered years, the session lasts 105 days, while in even-numbered years, it’s 60 days. Duties: Draft bills, vote on state laws, address constituents’ complaints and concerns, participates on legislative and regional committees. Approve a state operating budget than in 2009-2011 is $30 billion. The budget pays for 110,000 employees, including 48,000 higher education employees. good facilitation skills. I have the proven capability to do the hard work of bringing people together to find solutions. I understand our communities and our way of life on the Peninsula, the challenges we face. I take the job of representing the people seriously, but don’t take myself all that seriously. How will you balance your current job status with being a state representative, especially during the three-month legislative session, when being in Olympia on a daily basis is so important? Carter: I’m a retired Navy command master chief who will commit my time and energy to working for the good folks in the 24th District. Unlike other candidates, I will not be encumbered with conflicting responsibilities or time restraints. Being your representative will be a full-time job; listening to you, working for you, and responding directly to you.

pate by phone, according to county policies, when in Olympia. Washington has a citizen Legislature, while most representatives have other jobs. My other job would be to serve as county commissioner. The roles complement each other and will keep me in constant contact with the people I represent. How well is the district’s current legislative delegation serving the 24th District? Explain. Carter: The current legislators provide more support for the I-5 corridor and their party bosses than they do to the district citizens. I’m not accepting campaign contributions. They force an allegiance that often conflicts with what is right. I don’t want voters’ money, I want their votes. Dwyer: Rep. Lynn Kessler has done a great job for the 24th District over the past 18 years, and we have much to be grateful for. She has led the way to initiate and maintain jobs in the district. In Grays Harbor, we are enjoying her efforts with the pontoon project, biodiesel plant and the Satsop Development Center. It will be my job to continue the efforts of Lynn Kessler and create additional opportunities.

Dwyer: I have made definite plans to be a full-time legislator, along with caring for my patients. As a chiropractor, I am able to alter my office schedule to allow this flexibility. During the intense legislative session, I will have another chiropractor in my office to care for McEntire: I’m running for an my patients. open seat. I strongly disagree with the McEntire: As has been Legislature’s suspension of the reported, if the voters of the 24th will of the people, clearly District elect me as one of their expressed in I-960, which state representatives, I have required a two-thirds vote in committed to resigning my curboth Houses of the Legislature to rent office as a port commisraise taxes. I will vote to re-impose the sioner, effective as of the date my supermajority if I-1053 does not successor is appointed or by the end of 2010, whichever is earlier. make the ballot. I’m retired, so I will wholly Tharinger: The current deledevote my time to representing gation is extremely effective in citizens of the 24th. serving the district. Sen. Hargrove focuses on longTharinger: Having a team of term issues such as natural experienced county commissioners who focus on the public inter- resources, health and human services and corrections. est, not special interests, faciliMajority Leader Kessler has tates the decision process, makbeen a strong voice linking rural ing it possible for me to particiand urban Washington.

Kevin Van de Wege is a champion for jobs, education and the environment. Losing Lynn Kessler’s style of leadership and seniority is a challenge. My experience as a commissioner will help meet that challenge. Was it right or wrong for the state Legislature to suspend voter-approved, tax-limiting Initiative 960? Explain. Carter: It was wrong! They are arrogant, and overrode the will of the people. I-960 was passed by the people of Washington to prevent the Legislature from running amok with our tax dollars. Rather than facing the truth and having the courage to cut government waste and challenge special interests, our Legislature called the budget crisis “complicated” and implied we, the people, aren’t smart enough to understand it. These legislators work for lobbyists, not for us. Dwyer: The decision to suspend Initiative 960 was wrong. It was a mistake that the Legislature must correct. Legislators are elected to follow the will of the people. We cannot suspend or void the clear vote of the people, even when legislators think they have a better idea. Legislators are servants and not policy makers. This is an important difference between me and other candidates for this position. McEntire: In this instance, it appears that the majority of the Legislature once again avoided the difficult choices facing us in “re-setting” state government for a different economic era. Although the state Legislature has the constitutional power to repeal or amend laws placed on the books by initiative two years after they are enacted, I believe laws restricting action by the Legislature should be honored in all cases. Tharinger: It was not right to suspend I-960. Turn

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Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

July-August 2010

17

State House of Representatives, 24th District, Position 2 Continued from preceding page of work or have lost health insurance benefits. It is necessary to adhere to The new federal health care the voter’s voice. program is scheduled to return The public as a whole needs to almost $180 million to our state. engage in the conversation about These funds should be reinwhat kind of state we want and vested into Washington Basic how we best pay for it. Health Care for those without A thriving, healthy and wellinsurance benefits. educated state requires thoughtful investments, not partisan McEntire: I have six prioriantics. ties for the state budget: We need effective problem Legal obligations such as pensolving in Olympia, and I look sions for retired state employees, forward to sharing my experience debt service, budget stabilization, to create solutions to our state’s and K-12 education; public safety challenges. and health, law and justice, transportation, protecting the What should the state of vulnerable of our society and Washington do to take care of common-sense environmental needs of those who can’t take protections. care of themselves? Explain. Children suffering from abuse and elderly or intellectually chalCarter: First, we should stop lenged folks without family or using our limited resources in who are being exploited by their subsidizing illegal aliens. family are examples of those who We should focus on core are vulnerable. responsibilities for citizens and fund those critical to those who Tharinger: We are a stronger can’t take care of themselves. community when we pull We should consolidate protogether to help each other. grams and agencies to eliminate Effective, efficient, accountredundant administration and able government has a role in payments. meeting the needs of the most Truthfully, I don’t think we vulnerable. give ourselves enough credit for Good government partners what we are already doing. with the building blocks of our We Washingtonians are noted communities that are closest to for our pioneering spirit and gen- home — family, the church, the erosity. service club, the cities and counties — to deliver services. Dwyer: We have a responsiI have a proven track record bility to help our citizens who of working to provide compashave lost the means to support sionate assistance to local prothemselves and their families. grams while remaining fiscally So many of our people are out responsible.

What’s your plan of attack for fighting the estimated shortfall of at least $3 billion that’s expected for the 20112013 state budget? Carter: We must relax onerous regulations and taxes on our businesses to unleash their potential. Eliminate state funding for programs that send jobs overseas and discourage the removal of productive land from tax rolls. For state employees, let’s raise retirement age and have them contribute more to bring the benefits state employees get in line with those of the private sector. We should implement school vouchers and let parents decide what is best for their children. Dwyer: The state has lots of money. We really have a crisis in setting our priorities. We should do the hard work of setting our state’s priorities, for example, education, health care, etc. Then we take the amount of funds and distribute it according to the priorities. This is the way we do our family and business budgets. Why can’t we do the same thing with this state? We need to live within our means. McEntire: Please refer to the six priorities I have already noted. Everything else is on the table. Tharinger: We face unprece-

dented challenges in our state. The governor and other leaders have called for a radical rethinking of how we fund and operate our state government. My proven record of bipartisan solutions that have kept Clallam County debt-free will help to develop the new strategies that our state needs. We must continue to find efficiencies and develop sustainable budgets. There are no simple soundbite solutions to this challenge. Experience and hard work will help. Why should voters choose you over your opponents? Carter: I will provide honest representation. I will listen to constituents, and I will tell them exactly what I think I can or can’t do. I will not campaign in the district with one set of promises and vote in Olympia with a different set of promises. With me, voters get a tough, smart legislator who will not be intimidated. My campaign shows that I have not, and cannot be bought. Please visit me at www. newwaycampaign.com. Dwyer: I am fully qualified for this position and ready to serve. I am a man of integrity whom the voters can trust. It’s time we had representa-

tion that we can respect. I wish to bring honor back to our Legislature. I want to represent this entire district, to support education, health care, senior citizens, those with disabilities and to put our residents back to work. I ask for your vote. McEntire: I’ll respect the will of the people of the 24th. As a port commissioner, I’m proud of my record in encouraging good jobs and in vigorously pursuing other economic development opportunities to bring jobs to Clallam County. I’m also a strong proponent of our port’s fiscal discipline — keeping the port’s tax levy the same, banking the authorized 1 percent increase and keeping port charges from rising in a very difficult economy. Tharinger: We need proven leadership, not ideological simplicity. I understand the diversity of the issues and challenges. I have a record of creating solutions. I know how to form partnerships to keep our communities safe, healthy and working. I have worked to protect our quality of life and environment while supporting economic development. For inclusive, transparent and accountable representation, I am the best choice. I ask for your vote to represent you in Olympia.

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July-August 2010

Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

STATE SUPREME COURT

Justice, Positions 1, 5, 6 Position 1

By Rachel La Corte

winner of that match-up will also advance unopposed. Independent pollster and OLYMPIA — Washington political scientist Stuart Elway state Supreme Court Justice said that with an expected low Richard Sanders is no stranger primary turnout and the relato controversy. tively low-profile nature of court And his bid to seek a fourth races, challengers have an uphill term has led to an unusually battle. spirited campaign that may However, Wiggins has raised a extend beyond next month’s pricompetitive amount of money mary. and endorsements from a variety Sanders has drawn two oppoof groups. nents, former Court of Appeals Chushcoff hasn’t raised any Judge Charlie Wiggins and money and says he doesn’t plan Pierce County Superior Court to, but his presence could result Judge Bryan Chushcoff. in neither Sanders nor Wiggins It’s not the only Supreme getting more than 50 percent of Court race on the Aug. 17 primary ballot, but it’s the only high the vote. “The conventional wisdom is if court race where there’s a good chance that no one candidate will someone has the resources to mount a campaign, that could be draw more than 50 percent and pretty effective because they’re win the race in the primary. Also up for re-election are Jus- such low visibility races,” Elway said. tice Jim Johnson and Chief Jus“It’s a real targeted camtice Barbara Madsen. Madsen is running unopposed paign.” First elected to the Supreme in the primary, so she will Court in 1995, Sanders is known advance alone to the November for his sometimes passionate disballot. senting opinions, and in past Johnson faces Tacoma attoryears has drawn fire for controney Stan Rumbaugh, and the The Associated Press

Jim Johnson

versial actions on and off the bench. Wiggins has wasted little time in attacking Sanders on those fronts. Last year, the state Supreme Court withdrew a landmark public-records ruling after the losing party, King County, complained that Sanders had a conflict of interest because he didn’t disclose that the ruling affected a public-disclosure lawsuit he filed

Stan Rumbaugh

in Thurston County in 2005 against the state attorney general. Sanders withdrew from the public-records case, although he insists that the cases weren’t similar, and that he was advised by the court’s staff ethics adviser that he didn’t need to recuse himself. In 2005, Sanders was given an admonishment by the state Judicial Conduct Commission for

Position 5

Barbara Madsen

touring Washington’s sex predator commitment center at McNeil Island while residents had appeals pending. In 2008, Sanders stood up and yelled “tyrant!” at then-U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey at black-tie dinner in Washington, D.C., for The Federalist Society, a conservative legal group. Turn

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Washington’s three historical Supreme Courts Special to the Peninsula Daily News

Washington has had three distinct Supreme Courts in its relatively short history. While part of the Oregon Territory (1848-1853) three justices, appointed by the president of the United States, served on the territorial Supreme Court. When not hearing appeals the three jurists rode circuit, presiding over important trials in three separate and widespread judicial districts which encompassed much of the present-day Oregon, Washington and Idaho. In 1853 the area north of the Columbia River and east to the Continental Divide was separated from Oregon and became the Washington Territory with its

own Supreme Court composed of three (and later four) justices. On October 1, 1889, the people of the Washington “Territory” west of the present Idaho line approved a state constitution, elected public officials, and by means of an Act of Congress became a full-fledged member of the Union. The Supreme Court was composed of five justices elected by the voters of the state. John P. Hoyt, Thomas J. Anders, T. L. Stiles, Ralph O. Dunbar and Elmon Scott were the original members of the court. Hoyt had served on the territorial Supreme Court and was presiding officer at the conven-

tion that wrote the new state constitution. Stiles and Dunbar also were delegates to that convention. The number of justices serving on the Supreme Court has varied from the original five to the present nine. Although justices were no longer responsible for riding the trial court circuit as in territorial days, they continued to experience crowded dockets, necessitating an increase in membership. In 1905, the court was permanently expanded to seven justices, and in 1909 the number was increased to the present nine. Between 1889 and 1909 all cases were heard en banc, with

all justices participating. Between 1909 and 1969, most cases were heard by a department of the court, each composed of the chief justice and four associate justices. Since establishment of the Court of Appeals in 1969, all cases are heard en banc.

Nearly two-thirds of all justices of the Supreme Court have been initially appointed to fill a vacancy, but with rare exception all appointees have been confirmed by the voters. In 1907, the Legislature established a direct nonpartisan election system for nominating judges, replacing political party conventions. Six-year terms Separate nonpartisan ballots Each justice serves a six-year were also authorized for the term, with three submitting November general elections, themselves to the electorate removing judges from the politievery two years. cal party lists. Vacancies that occur through Except for a brief return to resignation or death are filled by partisanship in 1912, the names the governor, but these appointees of candidates for the Supreme must gain approval of the voters Court have subsequently at the next general election. appeared on nonpartisan ballots.


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State Supreme Court justice, Positions 1, 5, 6 Position 6

Continued from preceding page Sanders later released a statement saying he was speaking his conscience, and he cited inadequate access to the legal system for detainees at Guantanamo Bay and the importance of the Geneva Conventions. Sanders calls Wiggins’ criticism of his personal behavior “a campaign of character assassination.” “I wanted to go into this election talking about legal issues, talking about my record,” he said. On that point, both Chushcoff and Wiggins point to concerns about Sanders’ judicial philosophy. Wiggins notes that in cases where the Supreme Court is divided, Sanders votes in favor of the defendant 94 percent of the time. “By protecting the rights of the accused to this extent, he’s really failing to protect the rights of the public,” Wiggins said. Sanders takes issue with Wiggins’ figures, noting that they exclude unanimous cases and petitions for review. That said, Sanders is unapologetic for “preserving and protecting our individual rights.” “If I’m going to stick up for the

Where to find out more about the Supreme Court candidates: ■ Sanders campaign: www. friendsofjustice.com ■ Wiggins campaign: charliewigginsforjustice. com

Bryan Chushcoff

Richard B. Sanders

rights of some criminal, you know I’m going to stick up for the rights of other people,” Sanders said. Wiggins has raised about $120,000 and secured the endorsements of many prosecuting attorneys, the state Democratic Party and the Washington Council of Police & Sheriffs. Sanders, a self-described libertarian, has raised nearly $150,000 and has the support of the powerful Building Industry Association of Washington, the state Republican and Libertarian parties, and business groups. In the other contested race,

Johnson, who is seeking his second term, has raised about $82,000. He’s fighting off challenger Rumbaugh, who has raised nearly $49,000 and secured endorsements from liberal advocacy groups like Seattle-based Fuse. As Wiggins’ does with Sanders, Rumbaugh points to the support that Johnson has received from the Building Industry Association of Washington, or BIAW. “It’s become clear over the last six years that my opponent has danced with the people that brung him,” Rumbaugh said.

Charlie Wiggins

BIAW has endorsed both Johnson and Sanders, but they haven’t yet donated money to either campaign, though they have given hundreds of thousands of dollars in prior Supreme Court races — including Johnson’s first failed bid to the court in 2002. “If people I had worked for and worked with didn’t support me, that would be a bigger story,” Johnson said. “They supported me because of what I wrote, not vice versa.” BIAW spokeswoman Erin Shannon notes that the builders aren’t alone in supporting judi-

■ Chushcoff campaign: www.Chushcoff4Justice. com ■ Johnson campaign: www.JimJohnsonforJustice. org ■ Rumbaugh campaign: www.rumbaughforjustice. com ■ Madsen campaign: chiefjusticemadsen.org cial candidates, and points to the trial attorneys who support Rumbaugh.

About the job State Supreme Court justice Partisan or nonpartisan: Nonpartisan Primary election boundaries: Washington state Voters: 3,535,879 (as of March 31) Term: Six years Compensation: Each of the nine justices on the Washington State Supreme court is paid the same: $164,221 annually. Duties: The Washington State Supreme Court is the court of last resort in Washington. It is based in Olympia in

the Temple of Justice on the state capitol grounds. Nine justices serve on the court; they are elected in nonpartisan elections to serve six-year terms. The court’s duties and responsibilities are defined in Article IV of the Washington State Constitution of 1889. That constitution originally set the number of judges on the court at five, giving the Washington state Legislature the right to change the number of judges from time to time as it deemed advisable. Some 8,500 cases are tried each year before the 143 judges of the Superior Courts of Washington state, the trial court of general jurisdiction. About 3,500 appeals are filed by losing parties claiming that the outcome was the result

of error, either of fact or law, sometimes both. In 2007, the Washington Supreme Court had a total of 1,463 filings. Among those, 98 were from trial courts, 1,120 were from the Court of Appeals, 134 were original actions. To be considered a qualified candidate to serve on the state Supreme Court, a person must be licensed to practice law in Washington. Justices must also retire from service at the end of the calendar year that he or she turns 75, according to the state constitution. The state Legislature is given the leeway under the constitution to reduce the retirement age to 70 should it see fit to do so. Additionally, justices of the court are

ineligible to serve in any other form of public employment during their term on the court, nor are they allowed to practice law in any Washington state court during their tenure on the Supreme Court. The chief justice serves as the court’s chief spokesperson, presiding over the court’s public hearings and serving as the administrative head of the state’s trial and appellate court system. Up until 1995, the chief justice was determined through a rotation system. In 1995, the voters of the state passed a constitutional amendment changing this system to one in which the chief justice is elected by the other justices. That same amendment changed the term of the chief justice from two to four years.


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Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

U. S. C O N G R E S S

Representative, 6th District Why are you running for this position? Cloud: I want to bring more economic prosperity to the citizens of this district. Restrictions on property use, burdensome taxation and a never-ending web of regulations have stifled the American economy. When elected, I will endeavor to stop the growth of the federal government and restrain its influence. I will fight cap-and-trade legislation, seek to repeal the nationalization of health care and work to bring more jobs to this district through a revitalized private sector.

I have successfully represented citizens of this district in trial, in the state Supreme Court and in the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. I understand how legislation and laws adopted by Congress affect people. My background in economics allows me to analyze the economic effects of federal policies. My lifelong residence in the district will enable me to serve effectively.

Dicks: I was born and raised in the 6th Congressional District and have dedicated my life to serving this region. I am proud of my ability to work across party lines to forge consensus on issues important to Dicks: I remain deeply conthe Olympic Peninsula and our cerned about the challenges faced region. by people living here on the PenAnd I believe I have demoninsula, and I believe that through strated the energy and dedicamy experience and my position tion for fighting for job growth, in the U.S. House, I am uniquely protecting our environment and qualified to represent their inter- helping veterans, military perests and to help expand economic sonnel and their families here in opportunities for working famithis area. lies. I have worked hard for the Young: I possess a never-quit, Elwha restoration, creating new no-excuse mind-set that is jobs and restoring salmon runs, needed in our Congress. and I’m committed to helping I believe my life experience this area address all its critical (rising up from homelessness to infrastructure needs. excel in school and beyond) and business career (traveling the Young: I am running for the country consulting with major future of our kids. corporations as a business techAt my age, not many people nology consultant) have are in a position to put everycemented within me a much thing on hold and run for U.S. needed innovative spirit as well. Congress. Finally, I believe that “leaderMost of us are “heads under ship” equals “service.” water” working on building our Some leaders try to dictate families, homes and careers. After much consideration, I’ve while others try to dominate, but truly effective leaders serve. come to the conclusion that if I don’t act now, my/our children What’s your opinion about will not have the same opportunities for success that we enjoyed tearing down the Elwha River dams? growing up. What personal qualities do you possess that recommend you for this position? Cloud: As an attorney, I have fought corruption in both the private and public sectors.

Cloud: The decision to tear down the Elwha River dams occurred so long ago, in the early 1990s, that it would be appropriate to reopen the issue to determine if the rationale supporting the removal of the dams and the science behind it has changed.

Doug Cloud

Norm Dicks

Jesse Young

Residence: Gig Harbor

Residence: Belfair

Residence: Gig Harbor

Phone: 253-627-3133

Phone: 253-272-5884

Phone: 253-432-0200

E-mail: doug@dougcloud.com Age: 53 Education: University of Washington, bachelor of arts in economics, 1980; law degree, University of Washington, 1983 Occupation: Attorney Campaign website: www.dougcloud.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? No Party preference: Republican Party

E-mail: norm@normdicks.com Age: 69 Education: Bachelor of arts, University of Washington, 1963; law degree, University of Washington School of Law, 1968 Occupation: U.S. congressman Campaign website: www.normdicks.com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? Yes, I am the current representative of the 6th Congressional District in the House of Representatives. Party preference: Democratic Party

E-mail: info@jesseyoungforcongress. com Age: 33 Education: Bachelor’s degree in business administration, management information systems, University of Notre Dame Occupation: I resigned my position of senior business technology consultant at Russell Investments, Tacoma, four months ago to fully campaign. Campaign website: www.jesseyoungforcongress. com Have you ever held elective public office, and if so, what? This is the first elected office I’ve sought. Party preference: Republican Party

Dicks: In Congress, I have led the effort to secure funding for the Elwha restoration because I believe it’s the right thing to do. This is a unique opportunity to bring back the river’s historic salmon runs, and it’s an important investment for generations to come. In addition, the jobs created

by this project will have a positive impact for working families and our local economy in this region now, when it is needed the most. Young: I will move to keep the dams. The science behind their removal was agenda-driven from

the start and incomplete regarding the true impact to our fish and wildlife. There are better alternatives available that’ll benefit both our habitat and our communities. I will move to implement such alternatives. Turn

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Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

July-August 2010

21

Member of Congress, 6th Congressional District Continued from preceding page How well is the current congressional seniority system serving the needs of the 6th Congressional District? Explain. Cloud: The current congressional seniority system is a disservice to this and every other district in America. The seniority system rewards one thing: longevity in office. It allows an inept incumbent to claim perpetually that he must be retained lest we give up the seniority. Recently, a Harvard Business School study determined that chairs of congressional committees who have seniority do not economically benefit their districts. This is because government influence and control kills the economy. Dicks: I believe I have demonstrated a record of results based on my dedication to this job, on my interest in working cooperatively with colleagues and on the increasing ability that my committee assignments have provided to fight for people in the 6th District. I now serve as chairman of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee and vice-chairman of the Interior Subcommittee, both critically important to the interests of this district and to our region. Young: It serves us very poorly. Our incumbent would have you believe that his pork is good for us. First, no amount of pork can compete with the blessings of the free-market system. It guarantees growth that benefits us all, while relying on pork leaves us hoping and begging for handouts. Second, there is no guarantee that we’ll get his pork because polls are showing that Republicans will take back control of Congress this November. What should be done to address the federal deficit? Cloud: Spending must be less than revenues. Consequently, federal spending must be reduced.

About the job 6th Congressional District Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Primary election boundaries: Clallam, Jefferson, Grays Harbor, Mason, Kitsap counties, and part of Tacoma in Pierce County. Voters: 375,369 Term: Two years Compensation: $174,000 yearly salary, with annual costof-living increases. House members receive health and retirement benefits under the same plans available to other federal employees. Members can participate in the Civil Service Retirement System or the Federal Employees’ Retirement System. Duties: The 435 members of the House draft bills and vote to enact federal laws. All congressional spending bills are initiated in the House. House members elect the president in Electoral College deadlocks. The House has the power to initiate impeachment proceedings, while the Senate conducts impeachment trials. More government-provided services should be contracted to private companies. Less money should be transferred from one group of people to another. Some departments of the government should be considered for complete elimination, for instance, the Department of Education. The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq should be wound down. Less money should be spent on foreign aid.

and implement prioritized spending via the “household budget” model. Regardless of what we are told by our president and Congress, we all inherently know that we should not spend more than we make. As such, we should publicly engage the nation with a prioritized list of spending options and allocate money on the top priorities down through the list until it is used up. Cut spending for all the rest.

Dicks: I am strongly committed to reducing the federal deficit. I remain determined to discontinue inefficient and wasteful federal programs, to ensure that we have tax fairness for working Americans, and that we seek more sustainable models to ensure the solvency of federal entitlement programs. As chairman of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, I am committed to ensuring that our defense dollars are spent wisely and that the weapons we buy meet today’s defense requirements.

What should the federal government do to spur the economy? Explain.

Young: Remove political game-playing from the process

Cloud: Too often, the federal government makes the economy less efficient. Thus, we need less government meddling in the economy. The federal government must reduce the regulations that raise costs to businesses and citizens and slow economic productivity. Likewise, the heavy burden of taxation must be reduced. Thus, the government should reduce spending, cut taxes and limit regulations in order to spur the economy.

Dicks: Bringing new jobs to our area remains my top priority. The removal of the two dams on the Elwha River has put more than 200 to work and will have a lasting, positive impact. I am working with community leaders to identify projects that improve our economy. I am also fighting to ensure that Boeing has a fair shot at winning the Air Force tanker program bid, which will support thousands of good jobs in Washington State. Young: The free market works. Let’s use it and distinguish ourselves from the rest of the world. We need legislation that makes it easy for individuals to create small businesses, innovate, and find ways to provide valuable goods and services to the market. Such policies will unshackle our innovative spirit, create demand for our goods and services, grow our economy and create more jobs. It is a virtuous circle of success to which we must return. Should the moratorium on offshore drilling be lifted? Explain. Cloud: Yes, the moratorium on off-shore drilling should be lifted. However, a comprehensive review of existing laws limiting the damages of those responsible for off-shore oil drilling spills should be completed. Laws limiting the liability of those responsible for oil spills should be changed so those responsible for environmental catastrophes must pay the costs of their pollution. More drilling safeguards are necessary, such as requiring the drilling of simultaneous relief wells, to prevent well blowouts. Dicks: It was my amendment to the Interior Appropriations bill that has maintained a federal moratorium on oil and gas drilling off the Washington and Oregon coasts for the past 25 years, and particularly in light of the Gulf of Mexico spill, I see no reason at this time to change that policy. Young: Yes. This is a national

security issue as much as an environmental one. If we stop drilling, other nations will set up drilling rigs just outside of our territorial waters and engage in unregulated drilling. Other nations are continuing to grow their drilling and production capacities while we are diminishing our own. We should open up all avenues of drilling so that we, as a nation, can move away from foreign dependency as quickly as possible. Why should voters choose you over your opponents? Cloud: I have represented citizens of this district all my adult life. I understand what the word representation means. I know the people of this district well. I have consistently taken positions on the issues before Congress which support a smaller government, constitutional economic solutions and more openness and honestly in government. My background in economics and law enables me to analyze the issues and support the policies that most benefit our district and our country. Dicks: I have a proven record of results representing the people of this area in Congress. As a strong advocate for working families, I’ve fought to spur job growth and protect our local economy. I have fought to improve national parks, including Olympic, as well as to protect Puget Sound and our salmon runs. Knowing the values important to people here on the Peninsula, I’ll continue to fight hard in Congress for their interests. Young: Not only do I absolutely love and care about this district, I possess a unique blend of business experience desperately needed in Congress today. If you believe that we have too many lobbyists, lawyers and career politicians in Congress today, then you’ll probably agree with me that we need to elect someone from the real world who has had to face real budgets with real deadlines and still achieve real and effective results.


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Primary Election Guide

July-August 2010

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

U. S. C O N G R E S S

U.S. senator By Curt Woodward The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Delivering dollars for Washington state is a point of pride for Democratic Sen. Patty Murray, whose efforts have helped her comfortably win re-election twice. Republicans insist that this November, it will be her downfall. The GOP is looking to tap into voter angst over the $13 trillion national debt. Tea partiers and fiscal conservatives have pushed to oust lawmakers they say contribute to rampant federal spending that will bankrupt future generations. Murray, once labeled the “Queen of Pork” by the watchdog group Taxpayers for Common Sense, is high on their list. “The idea of dragging home pork is an old-school measurement of a senator,” said Republican Dino Rossi, one of Murray’s rivals and the most likely to emerge from the state’s unusual top two primary system Aug. 17. “And right now, with Republicans and Democrats alike doing that, it’s bankrupting America. There’s nothing in the Constitution that says the job of a senator

Clint Didier

Patty Murray

is bringing home pork.” As a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee and chairwoman of its transportation subcommittee, Murray has steered millions of dollars to Washington state for military projects, roads, veterans facilities and other projects. She is unapologetic about her work as she travels across the state highlighting federal projects she’s directed home in a time of a stubborn economic downturn and a state unemployment rate of 8.9

percent, below the national average. “You can opt out of that, but that means every community in our state is going to be left behind,” said Murray, 59, who is fourth in the Democratic leadership. “That money is still going to be allocated in the budget, but it’s just going to go to California or New York.” This fierce election-year debate over federal spending is playing out in scores of congressional and

About the job U.S. senator for Washington state Partisan or nonpartisan: Partisan Primary election boundaries: Washington state Voters: 3,535,879 (as of March 31) Term: Six years Compensation: $174,000 yearly salary, with annual cost-of-living increases. Senate members receive health and retirement benefits under the same plans available to other federal employees. Members can participate in the Civil Service Retirement System or the Federal Employees’ Retirement System.

Duties: The 100 members of the Senate draft bills and vote to enact federal laws. The Senate has several exclusive powers not granted to the House of Representatives, including consenting to treaties as a precondition to their ratification and consenting or confirmation of appointments of Cabinet secretaries, federal judges, other federal executive officials, military officers and other federal uniformed officers, as well as trying federal officials impeached by the House. The Senate is a more deliberative body than the House of Representatives because the Senate is smaller and its members serve longer terms, allowing for a more collegial and less partisan atmosphere that is more insulated from public opinion than the House. The Senate is considered a more prestigious body than the House of Representatives because of its longer terms, smaller membership and larger constituencies.

farmer, high school coach and former NFL tight end who has the backing of tea party activists and 2008 vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Didier, who played eight seasons with the Washington Redskins and the Green Bay Packers in the 1980s, has railed against Rossi as the GOP establishment’s hand-picked choice. He drew sustained cheers at the state party convention in June and easily beat Rossi in a straw poll of conservatives. Dino Rossi “Is Patty Murray really that much worse than Dino Rossi in my book? I don’t know. At this point, today, I’d say no,” said Ted Piccolo of Electric City, a conservative gubernatorial races throughout Republican and local precinct comthe country, from Kansas to Flormitteeman. ida. Other Republicans are miffed It’s certain to be a factor in the by the Didier candidacy, saying high-stakes outcome that will Rossi’s poll numbers and statewide decide control of Congress and the identity make him the only GOP future of President Barack candidate with a real shot at Obama’s agenda. unseating Murray. Republicans need a gain of 10 “I’m not going to sit on the sideseats to capture the Senate major- lines and let liberals control our ity, a possibility if they can win state and our national government seats in Democratic-leaning states while I sit in my armchair being like Washington and California. ideologically pure,” said Russell Mike Duffy, a retired school Johnson of Everett. principal and education consulThe challenge from the right tant, considers himself fairly conhas forced Rossi to shift. servative on money matters, but He has signed on to the tea he still sees a role for government party-inspired “Contract From spending during the long economic America,” which includes pledges downturn. to enact a flat income tax rate, “As a business owner, as somerepeal the new health care law body that’s done pretty well, I ben- and reject a cap-and-trade system efited from the Bush tax cuts,” said for carbon dioxide emissions. Polls have shown Murray and Duffy, of Olympia. “On the other hand, with where Rossi with commanding leads over the rest of the primary field and we are now and with jobs going overseas, I think we have to invest essentially tied in a head-to-head match-up. a little more.” Murray has about $6.8 million As for having a long-serving in campaign cash as of June 30 senator, Duffy said, “That’s a spewhile Rossi banked about $1.3 milcial treasure.” lion in his first blitz of fundraising The quirky primary system after entering the race in late May. puts all candidates on the same ballot regardless of party affiliation, sending the two highest votegetters to the general election. All primary After two unsuccessful bids for governor in the past 10 years, candidates for U.S. Rossi, 50, is one of the state’s bestSenate are listed on known Republicans. the next page. Complicating Rossi’s path a bit is GOP hopeful Clint Didier, a


A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

Primary Election Guide

July-August 2010

23

U.S. Senate candidates for the 2010 primary election A total of 15 primary candidates are on the statewide primary ballot for U.S. Senate. Although incumbent Sen. Patty Murray and challengers Dino Rossi and Chuck Didier are considered the frontrunners in the top two primary, here is a list of all the candidates, including phone numbers and e-mail addresses where available, from which voters can get more information:

■ Mohammad H. Said, Centrist, 509-754-4689, drsaidusa@yahoo.com ■ Goodspaceguy, Democrat, 206-601-8172, goodspaceguy@ yahoo.com ■ Mike The Mover, Democrat, 206-546-9545, Mike_the_mover@comcast.net

■ Norma D. Gruber, Republican, 509-525-1434, scottgruber@charter.net

■ Paul Akers, Republican, 360-961-4551, mail@ akersforussenate.com

■ Mike Latimer, Republican, 206-293-2178, Mike@Mike4senate. net ■ James “Skip” Mercer, no party preference, 425-516-9600, committee@mercerforsenate.com ■ Clint Didier, Republican, 509-736-6080, clint@clintdidier.org ■ Schalk Leonard, no party preference, 360-930-0739, schalk4senate@gmail.com ■ Patty Murray, Democrat, 206-286-9199, Patty@ pattymurray.com

■ Bob Burr, Democrat, 360671-7813, bobburr@comcast.net ■ William Edward Chovil, Republican, 253-229-0556, no e-mail address ■ Dino Rossi, Republican, 425-451-2010, info@dinorossi.com ■ Charles Allen, Democrat, 206-291-3576, charles@ charlesallen2010.com ■ Will Baker, Reform, 253627-1317, willpower76@hotmail. com


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July-August 2010

Primary Election Guide

A public service of the Peninsula Daily News

2010 Clallam Primary Voter Guide  

2010 Jefferson Clallam Voter Guide