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Peninsula Daily News December 5, 2010

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State patient poll cites annoyance Hospital patients on the North Olympic Peninsula are more upset about not being able to sleep at night than any other aspect of their stays, according to a Washington State Hospital Association survey. Released last week, the results for Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles and Jefferson Healthcare hospital in Port Townsend for overnight hospital stays in 2009 were consistent with the statewide average that shows that a little more than half — 51 percent — of all hospital patients in Washington state are satisfied hospitals are “quiet at night.” OMC’s score on that aspect was 47 percent, while Jefferson Healthcare’s was 51 percent. It was easily the lowest score among several categories covering how satisfied patients were with their overnight hospital experiences statewide and on the North Olympic Peninsula. There were no results for Forks Community Hospital, which is still compiling data for patient satisfaction, Chief Financial Officer John Sherrett said last week. Patient satisfaction was one part of a two-part survey conducted by the Washington State Hospital Association. Surveys were voluntary. The state association provided percentages but no numbers of patients who completed the survey. The second part deals with infections acquired in hospitals between July 2009 and June of this year.

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A Washington State Hospital Association survey showed that 71 percent of Jefferson Healthcare patients surveyed who stayed overnight in 2009 were satisfied with their experience.

Jefferson Healthcare vows to keep its infections nil By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

Jefferson Healthcare’s goal is to continue having no hospital-related infections at the facility, said Terri Camp, chief nursing director and chief quality officer of the 42-bed hospital. Applying “best practices” to medical procedures is the byword for small hospitals such as Jefferson Healthcare, she said. “I have to be able to say that for every patient, for every nursing shift, no matter how busy you are or how Hospitals/A6 many distractions or other

things are happening, we do all evidence-based practices so infections are prevented.” At Jefferson Healthcare — where on average 12 patients stay overnight — 71 percent of patients were satisfied with their experience compared with a 66 percent of patients statewide at all hospitals surveyed. For other categories, the satisfaction rate was 89 percent for providing discharge instructions, 80 percent for nurse communication, 80 percent for doctor communication, 77 percent for room cleanliness, 69 percent for pain con-

trol, 68 percent for staff responsiveness, 57 percent for staff explanations about medicine — and 51 percent for “quiet at night.” The quiet-at-night category is not a top priority, Camp said. “We’re aware of it, but we’re not doing any particular initiatives on that right now,” she said. “We’ve been prioritizing other initiatives.” They include improving response times for C-sections, called the C-section timing rate. Turn

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Regional ‘food security’ urged Peninsula farming touted at ‘summit’ in Port Townsend By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Sarita Shaffer discusses small farming at the Food and Finance Summit as Crystie Kisler, right, and others listen.

PORT TOWNSEND — Increasing the region’s reliance on local food is an attainable goal that will increase the overall health of the community, said organizers of a food conference. “We produce about 4 percent of our food locally in Jefferson County,” said Katherine Baril, Washington State University Extension executive director, at a Food and Finance Summit at Fort Worden State Park on Friday. “If we moved that up to 20 percent, that is $45 million a year that will go into our economy in direct contributions and grants we don’t have to write and new investments we don’t have to make.”

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PORT TOWNSEND — Santa arrived via horse-drawn carriage in Port Townsend on Saturday to the cheers of about 200 people gathered around Haller Fountain at the end of Taylor Street for the annual lighting of the community Christmas tree. Friendship’s the thing about Port Townsend, Santa — who remained unidentified — said during the tree-lighting ceremony in a poem written especially for the occasion. “It’s not just the season,” the poem said. It’s “why we all love here, for very good reason.” One busy little girl couldn’t stay to say hello to Santa or tell him what she wanted for Christmas. “I already opened all my presents,” Jasal Reynolds, 3, declared earlier while resting on a bench in front of Santa’s destination. Dad Jason nodded, not a bit sheepishly. “Every day she says, ‘Please,’ and she says it so sweetly,” he explained. Jasal said her best present is her brandnew bike. So far. Who knows what Santa has in mind?

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Baril said that 20 percent “food security” is a reasonable goal within the “Puget Sound foodshed” of Clallam, Jefferson, Skagit, King, Kitsap and Mason counties. She also said that such a goal is attainable specifically in Jefferson County. “We should encourage county . . . plans to set a goal of 20 percent local food security by 2020 and then develop specific action plans of how to achieve that level,” she said. Her suggestions included allowing farm stands, prioritizing land that can grow local foods, encouraging more local purchases and developing seeds and plant varieties that can grow year-round in the county’s climate. Baril said that 167 people attended the conference, mostly food producers, and more than one-third were from Jefferson County. Turn

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Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C3 Commentary/Letters A10 Couples *PW Dear Abby C5 Deaths C8, C9 Movies C4 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

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UpFront

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

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Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Dave Brubeck beats illness for his 90th DAVE BRUBECK GINGERLY made his way to the bandstand through a packed Blue Note jazz club in New York, and a smile lit up the jazz legend’s face after he began playing a Duke Ellington medley he dedicated to “my favorite jazz composer, pianist, musician and friend.” The pianist, who celebrates his 90th birthday Monday, mixed standards and originals drawn from his nearly 70-year career in a 90-minute set that left time for only a shortened “Take Five,” the late alto saxophonist Paul Desmond’s odd-metered tune that surprisingly put the Brubeck Quartet at the top of the pop charts nearly 50 years ago. Brubeck could easily have excused himself from the late November sold-out Blue Note gig: It came a month after he was discharged from a Connecticut hospital after a 16-day stay following heart surgery to install a pacemaker. But he felt a strong motivation to perform with his quartet. “It’s the love of the music and the love of being with the group because we have such a great time,” said Brubeck, speaking by tele-

The Associated Press

Kennedy Center honoree Dave Brubeck stands for the National Anthem at the Kennedy Center Honors gala in Washington on Dec. 6, 2009. phone from his Wilton, Conn., home. His doctors were concerned that Brubeck might not be able to perform again when he checked into the hospital on Columbus Day after complaining of dizziness and fatigue. Brubeck spent a week in the intensive care unit before being transferred to the rehabilitation unit. His quartet ended a three-month hiatus at a Nov. 19 concert in Worcester, Mass. Brubeck was celebrating his 90th birthday with an intimate party for family and friends Saturday night

at his son, Chris’ home, in Wilton. Three of his sons — Chris (bass and trombone), Darius (piano) and Dan (drums) — just completed a “Brubecks Play Brubeck” British concert tour. On Monday, four generations of Brubecks, including several great-grandchildren, will gather in the family home in the Connecticut woods to watch Turner Classic Movies broadcast “Dave Brubeck: In His Own Sweet Way,” a new documentary directed by Bruce Ricker and narrated by Alec Baldwin. Its executive producer was Clint Eastwood.

Passings

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Do you think U.S. automakers or foreign automakers produce better-quality cars?

U.S. 

Foreign 

Undecided 

28.9% 57.3% 13.8%

Total votes cast: 914 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

By The Associated Press

RON SANTO, 70, a star third baseman of the Chicago Cubs and their longtime broadcaster, who became a revered figure for his exploits on the field and his battle against juvenile diabetes, died Thursday in a hospital in Arizona, where he lived during the off-season. The cause was complications of bladder cancer, said WGN Radio, where Mr. Santo, a Seattle Mr. Santo native, was a in 1969 Cubs color commentator for the last 21 years. Playing for the Cubs from 1960 to 1973, then for a final season with the Chicago White Sox, Mr. Santo hit 342 career home runs. He won five Gold Glove awards for fielding every season from 1964 to 1968 and was named an All-Star nine times. Mr. Santo was an important figure on the 1969 Cubs team that held a wide lead over the Mets in the National League East race before collapsing in yet another notorious chapter for a franchise that has not won a pennant since 1945 or a World Series since 1908. When he took a routine

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

Corrections and clarifications

physical at 18, Mr. Santo was found to have juvenile diabetes. “I didn’t know what it was, so I went to the library and looked it up,” he told The Chicago Sun-Times in 1990. “I can still remember the feeling I had when I read the description: life expectancy of a juvenile insulindependent diabetic: 25 years. It also stated that it would cause blindness, kidney failure and hardening of the arteries. At that point, I said to myself, ‘I’m going to fight this thing and beat it.’ That’s how badly I wanted to live and be a big league ballplayer.” Mr. Santo took insulin but kept his diabetes a secret from the Cubs until he was named to his first All-Star team in 1963. He did not allow the public to know of his diabetes until his final years with the Cubs. After his playing days ended, Mr. Santo raised millions of dollars for diabetes research. The disease took a heavy toll on him. He had heart attacks, went through

quadruple-bypass surgery, then underwent amputation of his legs, in 2001 and 2002, as a result of circulatory problems. Using prostheses and walking with a cane, he persevered as a broadcaster, elated when things went right and deflated when the Cubs were, well, the Cubs. Ernie Banks was known as Mr. Cub. Nonetheless, as Billy Williams once put it: “If you say Chicago Cubs, you say Ron Santo.”

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

The cast of 100 in a music show to be staged in the Roosevelt High School auditorium by the Port Angeles American Legion Auxiliary kept its dress rehearsal past midnight Did You Win? early today. “Happy Days,” which State lottery results the show is called, will feaFriday’s Daily Game: ture comedy, smartly cos6-5-4 tumed dancers and catchy Friday’s Keno: 01-04ensemble singing. 06-07-11-14-15-22-27-28-29American Legion Auxil31-36-39-50-55-58-59-75-80 iary members will turn all Friday’s Match 4: proceeds of the show over 06-11-18-20 to their child welfare work. Friday’s Mega Millions: 06-11-12-18-56, 1960 (50 years ago) Mega Ball: 12 Three West End proSaturday’s Daily duced many steelhead SunGame: 0-9-8 day, opening day of the Saturday’s Hit 5: winter fishing season. 06-19-20-22-25 Leading the procession Saturday’s Keno: 05-13-20-22-24-28-32-33-35- was the Lyre River, fol39-43-46-49-53-56-62-65-66- lowed by the Pysht and Hoko rivers. 73-75 Game Protector J.H. Saturday’s Lotto: Laney said he checked 17 01-11-33-34-38-40 Laugh Lines steelhead caught on the Saturday’s Match 4: Pysht, 19 on the Lyre and No matter how 03-04-14-18 much you push the enveSaturday’s Powerball: 11 on the Hoko. Reports from the Sol lope, it’ll still be stationery. 13-24-27-31-42, Powerball: Your Monologue 22, Power Play: 5 Duc, Bogachiel, Quillayute

and Hoh rivers say that fishing was rather slow, although one party of two fishermen caught six steelhead on the Bogachiel.

1985 (25 years ago) Cause of a fire in a storage room of the Federal Building in downtown Port Angeles was under investigation. Six Port Angeles firefighters with one truck responded to the fire at 8:30 a.m. and quickly extinguished it. Smoke filled the downstairs area, but no one was injured.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

ON CHRISTMAS LANE in Diamond Point, the deer depicted on the caution sign is decked out for the season with a bright red nose . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Dec. 5, the 339th day of 2010. There are 26 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Dec. 5, 1933, national Prohibition came to an end as Utah became the 36th state to ratify the 21st Amendment to the Constitution, repealing the 18th Amendment. On this date: ■  In 1776, the first scholastic fraternity in America, Phi Beta Kappa, was organized at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. ■  In 1782, the eighth president of the United States, Martin Van Buren, was born in Kinderhook, N.Y.; he was the first chief executive to be born after American independence. ■  In 1791, composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart died in Vienna at age 35.

■  In 1792, George Washington was re-elected president; John Adams was re-elected vice president. ■  In 1831, former President John Quincy Adams took his seat as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ■  In 1848, President James K. Polk triggered the Gold Rush of ’49 by confirming that gold had been discovered in California. ■  In 1932, German physicist Albert Einstein was granted a visa, making it possible for him to travel to the United States. ■  In 1955, the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations merged to form the AFL-CIO under its first president, George Meany. ■  In 1979, feminist Sonia Johnson was formally excommunicated by the Mormon Church because of her outspoken support

for the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution. ■  In 1994, Republicans chose Newt Gingrich to be the first GOP speaker of the House in four decades. ■  Ten years ago: Florida’s highest court kept the presidential race on the legal fast track, agreeing to a speedy hearing of Democrat Al Gore’s appeal of a ruling that in effect awarded Republican George W. Bush the state’s 25 electoral votes. ■  Five years ago: The trial of Saddam Hussein resumed in Baghdad. French engineer Bernard Planche was kidnapped in Baghdad; he was later freed. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice denied the United States engaged in torture or lesser forms of cruel treatment against terror suspects. ABC News named Elizabeth

Vargas and Bob Woodruff coanchors of “World News Tonight,” replacing the late Peter Jennings. Edward L. Masry, the personalinjury lawyer portrayed by Albert Finney in the Oscar-winning movie “Erin Brockovich,” died in Thousand Oaks, Calif., at age 73. ■  One year ago: A jury in Perugia, Italy, convicted former University of Washington student Amanda Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, of murdering Knox’s British roommate, Meredith Kercher, and sentenced them to long prison terms. Knox, Sollecito and a third person convicted in a separate proceeding maintain their innocence. A nightclub blaze in Perm, Russia, killed more than 150 people. Spain won the Davis Cup for the second straight year. William A. Wilson, 95, the first American ambassador to the Vatican, died in Carmel, Calif.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 5, 2010

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Briefly: Nation Obama praises new trade deal with S. Korea

The 738-foot Golden Seas, with a full load of canola seed, suffered engine troubles in strong winds and rough seas Friday that caused it to drift toward Atka Island, about 1,300 miles southwest of Anchorage. WASHINGTON — President During the night, after the Barack Obama on Saturday weather eased, it motored at praised a newly sealed trade about 3 to 4 mph back out to deal with South Korea as a sea, reducing fears it would run landmark agreement that promaground, said Coast Guard ises to boost the domestic auto Chief Petty Officer Dana Warr. industry and support tens of A powerful commercial tug thousands of American jobs. was expected to arrive Saturday “This evening, he said. Strong winds agreement continued, with 16- to 20-foot shows the seas, but calmer weather U.S. is willing appeared to be moving in. to lead and A Coast Guard cutter was compete in also on the way. the global economy,” the president told Today’s news guests reporters at ■ ABC’s “This Week” — Retired Obama the White Gen. Wesley Clark, former NATO House, calling supreme commander; Bob Maginit a triumph for American work- nis, national security analyst with ers in fields from farming to the Family Research Council; R. Clarke Cooper, executive director of aerospace. The pact, which requires con- Log Cabin Republicans; Elaine Donnelly, president of the Center for gressional approval, would be Military Readiness; Tammy Schultz, the largest since the North director of National Security and American Free Trade AgreeJoint Warfare at the Marine Corps ment with Canada and Mexico War College; former national secuin 1994. rity adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski; forObama said the South mer U.S. Ambassador to AfghaniKorean deal would support at stan Zalmay Khalilzad; Sakena least 70,000 American jobs — Yacoobi, executive director of the Afghan Institute of Learning. welcome news with the latest ■ CBS’s “Face the Nation” — unemployment figures showing Sens. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., and Dick nearly stagnant job growth. Durbin, D-Ill. The president said the jobs ■ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — report showed more needed to Sens. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and be done. John Kerry, D-Mass.

Ship in distress ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Emergency vessels hurried to reach a cargo ship carrying nearly half a million gallons of fuel as it struggled off Alaska’s remote Aleutian Islands for a second day Saturday.

GOP blocks Dems’ tax plan for upper incomes ‘Peace of mind’ that taxes won’t increase needed, Obama says By David Espo

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans derailed legislation Saturday to extend expiring tax cuts at all but the highest income levels in a political showdown that paradoxically clears a path for a compromise with the White House on steps to boost the economy. “We need to get this resolved, and I’m confident we can do it,” President Barack Obama said shortly after the near party-line votes. The public must have “the peace of mind that their taxes will not go up” on Jan. 1, he added. Obama has signaled that he will bow to Republican demands for extending tax cuts at all income levels, and his remarks capped a day that lurched between political conflict and talk of compromise on an issue that played a leading role in last month’s elections. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., eyeing the 2012 campaign, accused Republicans of siding with “millionaires and billion-

aires” with their rejection of proposals that would let tax cuts passed during George W. Bush’s presidency lapse on seven-figure incomes. Republicans noted that unemployment rose to 9.8 percent last month and said it made no sense to raise taxes on anyone in a weak economy. Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., jabbed that Democrats were undergoing a “political catharsis” in public after losing control of the House and surrendering several seats in the Senate in the Nov. 2 election.

Hoping for compromise But the rhetoric subsided quickly after the votes, and Senate leaders in both parties said they hoped political clashes would give way to compromise in the next several days. Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell, the GOP leader, said he was relatively confident there would be a deal with the White House “not to raise taxes in the middle of a recession.” He said talks were continuing

on the length of an extension to be enacted for the cuts that were put in place in 2001 and 2003. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said he hoped for an agreement by the middle or end of next week on legislation that would combine an extension of tax cuts with a renewal of expiring jobless benefits for the longterm unemployed. Officials have said that in addition to tax cuts and unemployment benefits, the White House wants to include renewal of several other tax provisions that are expiring. They include a break for lowerand middle-class wage earners, even if they don’t make enough to pay the government, as well as for college students and for companies that hire the unemployed. Key lawmakers and administration officials have been at work negotiating the terms of a possible deal for several days. But many congressional Democrats privately have expressed anger at Obama for his willingness to surrender to Republican demands to let the tax cuts remain in place at upper incomes, and numerous officials said no compromise would be possible until they had engineered votes in both the House and Senate.

■ CNN’s “State of the Union” — Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind.; Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.; Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y. ■ “Fox News Sunday” — Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D.; Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas; former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Spain threatens striking workers with jail terms MADRID — Spain placed striking air traffic controllers under military authority Saturday and threatened them with jail terms in an unprecedented emergency order to get planes back in the skies and clear chaotic airports clogged with irate travelers. Hours after the order was issued at an emergency Cabinet meeting, officials said strikers were returning to work but that it could take up to two days before flights return to normal. Spain got the all-clear from Eurocontrol, Europe’s air traffic control agency, to reopen air space closed Friday when the wildcat strike began, ruining the start of a long holiday weekend for hundreds of thousands of people. Many travelers stood shouldto-shoulder at airport terminals or slept anywhere they could, including hunching over abandoned customer service desks or against luggage carts. The chaos served up yet another headache for a beleaguered Socialist government writhing at the center of Europe’s debt crisis and struggling to overcome recession as it trails badly in the polls with elections due in 2012.

Ivory Coast elections ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — The two candidates in Ivory Coast’s disputed presidential election took dueling oaths of office Saturday after each claimed victory, as the political

crisis spiraled out of control and renewed unrest in this country once split in two by civil war. Incumbent President Laurent Gbagbo defied calls from the United States, France and the United Nations to concede defeat, wrapping himself in the Ivorian flag as he was sworn in for another term. Hours later, opposition candidate Alassane Ouattara announced that he, too, had taken his own oath. Saturday’s developments leave Ivory Coast with two men who both claim to be president, furthering inflaming the political chaos in the West African nation whose once-prosperous economy was destroyed by the brief 2002-2003 civil war.

Iran: U.N. sent spies TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s intelligence minister accused the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency of sending spies in the guise of inspectors to collect information about Iran’s nuclear activities, state TV reported Saturday. The claim was another sign that Iran has hardened its stance since the assassination a week ago of a prominent nuclear scientist and the wounding of another. Iran is to hold talks beginning Monday in Geneva with world powers trying to persuade it to curtail key elements of its nuclear work. Intelligence Minister Heidar Moslehi said that inspectors sent by the International Atomic Energy Agency had engaged in espionage and the Vienna-based agency must take responsibility for their actions. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks during a news conference at the Geneva press club in Switzerland on Nov. 4.

WikiLeaks loses significant source of revenue in PayPal By Juergen Baetz

The Associated Press

BERLIN — WikiLeaks has lost a major source of revenue after the online payment service provider PayPal cut off its account used to collect donations, saying the website is engaged in illegal activity. The announcement also came as WikiLeaks is struggling to keep its website accessible after service providers such as Amazon dropped contracts, and governments and hackers continued to hound the organization. The weekend move by PayPal came as WikiLeaks’ release of hundreds of thousands of United States diplomatic cables brought commercial organizations on the Internet that have business ties with the organization under more scrutiny.

Quick Read

WikiLeaks also is under legal pressure in several countries, including the U.S., and a former colleague of founder Julian Assange has said he will launch of a competing platform. Donating money to WikiLeaks via PayPal was not possible anymore Saturday, generating an error message saying: “This recipient is currently unable to receive money.” PayPal said in a blog posting that cutting off WikiLeaks’ account was prompted by a violation of the service provider’s policy, “which states that our payment service cannot be used for any activities that encourage, promote, facilitate or instruct others to engage in illegal activity.” The short notice was dated Friday, and a spokeswoman for PayPal Germany declined Saturday to elaborate and referred to

the official blog posting. WikiLeaks confirmed the latest trouble in its Twitter account, saying: “PayPal bans WikiLeaks after U.S. government pressure.” WikiLeaks has embarrassed Washington and foreign leaders by releasing a trove of brutally frank U.S. diplomatic cables. PayPal, a subsidiary of U.S.based online marketplace operator EBay Inc., offers online payment services that are one of several ways WikiLeaks collects donations — and until now was probably the most secure and convenient way to support the organization. The other options listed on WikiLeaks’ website are through mail to an Australian post office box, through bank transfers to accounts in Switzerland, Germany or Iceland, as well as through one “credit card processing partner” in Switzerland.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Two Minn. teens accused of stealing calves

Nation: ‘Secret Santas’ give $100 handshakes

Nation: Censured Rep. Rangel still loves Congress

World: Global warming talks take step forward

Two teenage boys from central Minnesota are accused of stealing at least 17 calves to start their own dairy farm. Authorities this week arrested a 19-year-old from Rothsay and a 16-year-old from Barnesville. Stearns County Sheriff John Sanner said deputies received a tip that led them to 17 calves and eventually the teens. The calves are believed to have been stolen from three counties: Douglas, Stearns and Todd. Investigators said the teens told them they wanted to start their own dairy farm. They said the teens planned to keep the heifers and sell the bulls, splitting the profits.

“Secret Santas” are roaming the streets of North Carolina, handing out $100 handshakes. The Charlotte Observer reported that a crew of donors, who insist on anonymity, handed out the money Friday to anyone who looked like they could use it. Felicia Adams was handed $100 while she was working at a Goodwill outlet store. She said the money will help her get to New York to visit her father, who is dying of cancer. The donors take thousands of dollars from their own bank accounts to hand out. It’s the fourth year the random acts of kindness have been done in Charlotte.

U.S. Rep. Charles Rangel returned to his home turf in the New York City’s Harlem neighborhood Saturday, saying he still loves Congress — despite a showdown with colleagues over ethics violations that led to his censure by the House. “I have not lost my ability to love the Congress and to love this country,” the 80-year-old Democrat told reporters at Harlem Hospital, where a crowd at a town hall meeting gave him a standing, cheering ovation as he entered. Dapper in a dark suit and tie, Rangel appeared confident and as defiant as ever about the allegations that led to his public scolding Thursday.

The slow-moving U.N. talks on combating global warming took a step forward Saturday with revised proposals for a $100 billion-a-year climate aid fund and other issues for debate by the world’s environment ministers this week. Despite that advance, the chairwoman of key closed-door negotiations warned the open conference that obstacles remain to what delegates hope will be a package of decisions next Friday on financial and other side matters under the U.N. climate treaty. “Progress has been made in some areas,” Zimbabwe’s Margaret Mukahanana-Sangarwe said. But she said the talks were “going backwards” on important issues.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Initiative instigator Eyman is back By Bill Sheets

The (Everett) Herald

MUKILTEO — Tim Eyman grew up in what he once described as “sort of a cowboy area” of Yakima, and his recent flurry of activity in a sense resembles an old Western shootout. The professional initiative instigator is riling up the townsfolk, either fer’ him or agin’ him, more than he has for some time. “You have to come out with all guns a-blazin’,” Eyman said. “It’s the only thing that ever works.” Emboldened by his success in helping stop the deployment of traffic enforcement cameras in his hometown of Mukilteo and by the passage of another of his statewide tax-limiting measures, Eyman is blasting away on several flanks. He’s fighting plans for traffic cameras in Monroe and Bellingham. He spoke against a possible increase of car-tab fees by Snohomish County. He exchanged fire with the state Transportation Commission over its decision to raise ferry fares 2½ percent and opposes its recommendation for a $3.50 toll on state Highway 520, the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge between Seattle and Medina, to help pay for a new span.

Eyman comeback All of this comes just a year after some newspaper and broadcast editorial writers were speculating about the end of Eyman. After sponsoring several successful initiatives, most aimed at cutting taxes, Eyman, 44, had been on a bit of a losing streak. His 2008 measure to open carpool lanes to all traffic at nonpeak hours lost at the ballot box, as did his 2009 initiative to cap revenue collected by cities, counties and the state. Whether he struck just the right chord with voters this year, was helped by the anti-tax sentiment nationwide or both, Eyman is back. “It was just an interesting year, where it was like everything we’d been advocating for 11 years suddenly became monstrously mainstream and widely accepted,”

he said. This year’s I-1053 requires any state tax increase to be approved by two-thirds majority in the Legislature, and any fee increase by a simple majority. Eyman got a similar measure passed in 2007, I-960, but it was overturned this year by the Legislature under a law that allows initiatives to be suspended after two years.

Letting voters decide Fighting taxes is still clearly close to Eyman’s heart, but he says his emphasis now is on letting voters decide. “This is not a debate over is a toll good or bad, is a ferry fare increase good or bad, are car-tab fees good or bad. It’s a question of who should decide.” Still, Eyman has strong opinions on each of his current pet issues. He claims the motives for traffic cameras are strictly financial and not motivated by safety, despite some officials’ insistence to the contrary. He describes government as a wild stallion that will run amok with taxing and spending if it is not reined in. “Every initiative that I’ve passed is trying to put a saddle on that wild stallion and trying to focus it in a particular direction,” he said. Despite those apparent convictions, some say Eyman’s in it for the money. He makes his living from a fund called “Help Us Help Taxpayers,” for which he actively solicits donations. “He seems to be out showing up at local governments to try to gin up some more work for himself. He just does it as a moneymaker for himself,” said state Rep. Hans Dunshee, D-Snohomish, chairman of the House capital budget committee. “If somebody would pay him to run an initiative to outlaw blue monkeys, he’d do it.”

Second mortgage Eyman took out a second, $250,000 mortgage on his house to help gather enough signatures to qualify I-1053 for the ballot. Later, as Dunshee pointed out, oil companies

and banks were among those that came to the initiative’s rescue. British Petroleum, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Tesoro were among its donors. Eyman, though, still has $237,000 to pay on his mortgage, he said. According to state disclosure forms, he made $53,644 last year from Help Us Help Taxpayers and, if 2010 ended now, he would end up with $36,201. He gets half of the fund, and his two partners, Mike and Jack Fagan of Spokane, split the rest. Eyman is beating the bushes — “begging,” he says half-jokingly — for contriThe Associated Press butions to help him pay off Tim Eyman is interviewed by the news media on Election Night in Seattle that mortgage. on Nov. 2 after early returns show that two ballot initiatives he

sponsored are passing.

Newest causes Meanwhile, he’s still beating the drum for his causes. He recently had a sharp exchange with members of the state Transportation Commission over its decision to increase ferry fares by 2½ percent. Eyman argued that although I-1053 doesn’t take effect until Dec. 2, the commission should hold off on any decisions until after then to reflect the intent of the voters in placing fee increases in the hands of the Legislature. “Nobody’s fingerprints are anywhere on this decision,” he said later, noting the commissioners are appointed, not elected. Commissioner Richard Ford of Seattle, a former Port of Seattle executive director, said the increase was part of the ferry system’s long-term plan to try to meet expenses. Even with the increase, which takes effect Jan. 1, fares will not come close to covering the system’s costs, officials say. “It means the rest of the taxpayers pay it,” Ford said. “It costs a lot to run those ferries, and the fuel costs have been killing them.” Eyman says governments will always say that. “When it comes to government, it’s always a crisis, they’re saying, ‘It’s a crisis now, so we need to bend the rules.’”

Eyman’s initiative record Tim Eyman started his career in the 1990s trying to get funding for what would become Safeco Field — where the Seattle Mariners baseball team plays — put up for a public vote. Since then, he’s backed more than 20 statewide initiatives and now one city measure in Mukilteo, where he lives. He’s gotten enough signatures to put a dozen measures on the ballot. Here’s how they fared:

1997 ■  Began Initiative 200, to eliminate affirmative action in state and local governments. Later led by conservative talk-radio host John Carlson. Approved in 1998.

1999 ■  I-695, to reduce motor-vehicle excise taxes (car tabs) to a flat $30 and to prevent any state or local jurisdiction from raising taxes or fees without a vote of the people. Approved, although later overturned by the Supreme Court; Legislature passed the car tab portion.

2000

2007

■  I-722, imposing a 2 percent limit on property tax increases (at the time 6 percent). Approved, overturned in court.

■  I-960, to require voter approval or a twothirds legislative vote for any tax increase. Approved.

■  I-745, requiring that 90 percent of transportation taxes be spent for roads. Defeated.

2008

2001 ■  I-747, limiting property tax increases to 1 percent per year. Approved.

2002 ■  I-776, axing taxes for car registration. Approved, overturned in court.

2004 ■  I-892, to reduce property taxes. Defeated.

■  I-985, to open carpool lanes to all traffic in nonpeak hours. Defeated.

2009 ■  I-1033, to cap revenue that can be raised by cities, counties and states. Defeated.

2010 ■  Initiative 2 in Mukilteo, requiring a public vote before any traffic enforcement cameras are installed and limiting fines to $20. Approved.

■  I-18, to shrink the ■  I-1053, requiring King County Council from 13 members to nine. the Legislature to receive either two-thirds legislaApproved. tive approval or voter 2005 approval to raise taxes ■  I-900, allowing the and requiring majority legislative approval to state auditor to do perincrease fees. formance audits of state Approved. and local agencies. The (Everett) Herald Approved.

Hearing on Nippon permit for biomass project Monday PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles City Council will conduct a hearing Monday on an appeal of a shoreline development permit granted to Nippon Paper Industries USA Inc. for its $71 million biomass project. The meeting will be at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St.

It will be a closed-record hearing, meaning that no further testimony or comment will be taken that day. The seven environmental groups that filed the appeal contend that the shoreline management permit should have listed Nippon’s proposal as an electric utility. The Nippon cogeneration plant would produce 20

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forest Network and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club — said the assessment was incomplete mainly because it didn’t address the possible effect removing wood waste, known as slash, from logging sites will have on the forests. The coalition members have appealed the city’s shoreline development permit decision because of several concerns, they said in a statement. They listed the following concerns that the biomass project would: ■  Draw millions of gallons of water every day from the Elwha River that flows from Olympia National Park. ■  Threaten the sustainability of forest ecosystems. ■  Increase air and water pollution. ■  Negatively impact public access to, and enjoyment of, the shoreline and Waterfront Trail. ■  Add more carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the proposed plant and associated

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 5, 2010

A5

Youth drop-in center marks 1st year By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Just over a year ago, three women founded The Answer For Youth, a drop-in center for young people. After their inaugural year, the trio believe they still have a good answer. The center was founded in October 2009 by Pam Fosnes, Susan Hillgren and Cookie Kalfur. It is open 14 hours per week, allowing at-risk young people between 13 and 24 — and sometimes older — to stop by for help, resources or just a listening ear, Hillgren said. Hillgren planned the organization to be a place that was modeled after a family, saying that all the youngsters who go there know that they are cared for but sometimes hear the hard truths.

Prayer part of work She also wanted a place that celebrated spirituality. “Here, we pray,” she said. “I don’t care who they

are praying to — God can do the work. It is a start.” She said her primary goal is to support the young people where they are. “We don’t have the resources to push them to the next level,” she said. “But if we can keep them at the level they are functioning now — that is our goal.” Hillgren, now the executive director, said the organization has had 2,900 visits from 250 different people. The group has served 561 children in day care. Participants have done 600 hours of community service. “We try and help them in any way we can,” Kalfur, a former principal of Choice Alternative High School, now known as Lincoln High School. “We do counseling by appointment, educational support by appointment and even some health evaluations by appointment.” The building, located at 711 E. Second St., is also host to Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings,

Kalfur said. Fosnes, a nurse, also worked with the students on an organic garden at the center in which the young people worked, harvested, cleaned and cooked the vegetables. “That went over really well,” Hillgren said. Just in rent and monthly bills, the organization costs about $1,100 a month to run, Hillgren said.

Individual donations Donations from individuals make up most of that, but the organization still seeks help every month. “We really need some monthly donors,” Hillgren said. Local churches also have stepped up to help. First Presbyterian is the latest, donating $2,100 in proceeds from its harvest festival in October, Fosnes said. In addition to emotional and academic support, the drop-in center also houses a food pantry and clothing donations. The Answer For Youth is open from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Organizers for The Answer for Youth, from left, Pam Fosnes, Cookie Kalfur and Susan Hillgren celebrate a year of serving at-risk youths at the Port Angeles youth center. Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. The organization also accepts clothing and food donations. Its nonprofit 501(c)(3) status is pending by the IRS. Hillgren added that,

though the center is not one of the member agencies of the United Way of Clallam County, donations to United Way can be earmarked for it. For more information, visit www.theanswer4youth.

org, e-mail info@ theanswer4youth.org or phone 360-670-4363.

__________

Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Sarge’s Place breaks ground, begins work By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — About 60 people attended a Saturday groundbreaking — and the beginnings of renovations — for a sanctuary for homeless veterans. The event, which began at 10 a.m., drew supporters and volunteers who began breaking down portions of the building up for renovation. Sarge’s Place, housed in a former apartment house — also known as the Peterson Building — at 260 Ash Ave. in Forks is expected to open in the spring for homeless rural veterans. The North Olympic Regional Veterans Housing Network has been working on the project for about three years, said Cheri Fleck, project organizer and

housing network president. The facility will contain 12 transitional beds, including eight for men and four for women on the first floor. Sleeping areas will be separated by tall partitions. Three two-bedroom family apartments will be on the second floor. Residents can stay in the transitional beds for up to two years and in the apartments indefinitely. Among the volunteers was the Clallam County chapter of the Roughnecks, a motorcycle group made up largely of law enforcement officers, said Eric Cram, one of the members. Also attending the groundbreaking was Judith Morris, on behalf of Rep. Norm Dicks, D-Belfair, who represents the 6th Congressional District, which

includes the North Olympic Peninsula. Fleck and her team began working on Sarge’s Place about three years ago. The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development — with help from U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Bothell — awarded the nonprofit North Olympic Regional Veterans Housing Network a $487,000 grant to buy and remodel the building. The network also received a federal Department of Veterans Affairs daily grant of up to $38.90 per veteran for operating expenses.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Cheri Fleck, right, North Olympic Regional Veterans Housing Network president and organizer of the Sarge’s Place project in Forks, speaks during the groundbreaking and start of the renovation of the housing for homeless veterans.

School officials brainstorm 5-year strategic plan PORT ANGELES — Action plans for the Port Angeles School District — gleaned from a two-day meeting of citizens, staff and students this weekend — are being prepared for presentation for the School Board to evaluate at its meeting Monday, Dec. 13. The district hosted the public workshop Friday and Saturday at the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center to brainstorm ideas for the five-year strategic plan. The plan, developed by about 80 people at the community forum, are based on the five categories adopted by the board earlier this year: organizational culture, student achievement, resources, adaptability in support of student achievement and community support. The 80 people who participated in the brainstorming session were divided into groups, with each working on a specific goal, Superintendent Jane Pryne said. Each group developed an overarching theme in each area, based on research done by a board subcommittee over the past couple of months. After the goals were developed, they were individually voted on by the whole group.

All-day kindergarten

The two-day forum began with an evaluation of the state of the district. Student achievement is on the rise at the Port Angeles School District, despite a drop in state resources, district officials said. School Board member

their peers around the state,” the last decade. The district projects Reid said. another drop of 306 student in the next five years, but the State funding rate of the decline has slowed As the state grapples with by a third, Schwob said. a $5.7 billion budget deficit, The school district has education funding continues lost 66 employees over the to decline. past 10 years. It currently The state once provided employes 390. the district with 82 percent Pryne discussed adaptof its revenue. Now it pro- ability, and district spokesvides 65 percent, said Jim woman Tina Smith-O’Hara Schwob, executive director of addressed community later business and operations. in the presentation. The district’s property tax “We’re not going to try levy is providing 19.5 percent and look at all this as a mass of district revenue, with fed- and try to solve it,” said diseral support and local nontax trict consultant Kenneth support paying for the rest. Jones. District enrollment, which “It’s never been proven to is directly tied to funding, work. But what we’re going has steadily dropped over to do is we’re still going to

use these to inform our wisdom about what we don’t want in our future.” Questions, comments and suggestions regarding the strategic planning process and its development may be sent by e-mail to info@portangelesschools.org or mailed to Superintendent Jane Pryne, Port Angeles School District, 216 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles, WA 98362.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com. Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

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“One of the issues, for example, was to re-instate all-day kindergarten,” Pryne said. “I honestly can’t remember how that vote came out, but that is the sort of thing we were talking about.” Although all five members of the School Board participated in the meeting, no action was taken. The board will formally evaluate the plans at its Dec. 13 meeting — which is scheduled at 7 p.m. at Lin-

State of the district

Patti Happe said the on-time graduation rate at Port Angeles High School is on its way back up after it bottomed out at 62 percent in 2008. The graduation rate crested at 88 percent in 2005 before a sharp decline. It rose to 78 percent in 2009. “We are building back up,” Happe said during her presentation on organizational culture. “It’s a pretty good metric of student satisfaction within the school.” A student survey found that 68 percent of students either agreed or strongly agreed that teachers expect them to succeed. “Sixty-eight percent — not 100 [percent],” Happe said. Assistant Superintendent Michelle Reid said Port Angeles elementary, middle and high school students are making “strong and sustained gains” in reading and writing scores. Stevens Middle School students are making strong gains in science and math, too, she said. “Overall, our students in Port Angeles outperform

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Peninsula Daily News

coln High School, 924 W. Ninth St. — and consider possible implementation after that. Strategies will be implemented over the course of the next five years to improve the district, Pryne said. Pryne also will discuss the forum at Monday’s School Board meeting, scheduled at 6 p.m. at Jefferson Elementary, 218 E. 12th St. Monday’s meeting is planned to make up the Nov. 22 meeting canceled because of snow and ice. The group attending the two-day meeting and working on the plans included teachers, other district staff, parents, community members, retirees and students, Pryne said.

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By Rob Ollikainen and Paige Dickerson


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Food: Buying local supports the community Continued from A1 the financial system have a common adversary, which is Among those from Clal- complexity,” said Cascade lam County were Commis- Harvest Coalition program sioner Mike Doherty, Clal- manager Alex Moore, the lam County representatives conference’s moderator. of Ecotrust Shorebank, as well as representatives of Common adversary the Sequim Lavender Co. “We see a complexity in and Nash’s Organic Pro- the modern industrial food duce. complex where a potato or a Baril said the turnout at carrot may be handled by a the conference was higher dozen entities before it than projected. Only 100 reaches your plate, and it is people were expected to treated like gold bullion, attend. while there are people The conference was starving on the developing directed toward both food world.” and finances, which is not If the topic of food and as incongruous a mix as it finance is a new one, may sound. the networking component “The food system and was similar to any

other conference. “This was an opportunity for people to meet face to face and talk about their business,” Moore said. “I have heard that a lot of the attendees made some valuable contacts today.” Sarita Shaffer of Viva Farms in Skagit County said the average age of farmers is 57 years old, and it is necessary to replenish the farming workforce in order for the local food movement to succeed. “It’s very difficult what farmers do, and they need to know that what they do has some value,” she said. “The best thing is to give them business, but even words of encouragement

are very important.” Many of the attendees were small local food producers. The Port Townsend Food Co-op had seven representatives.

More than price Co-op outreach manager Brwyn Griffin said that locally grown food can be more expensive than other food, but its value is judged on factors other than price. “If someone pays more for locally grown food, they need to realize what they are not paying for,” she said. Those who buy food grown elsewhere — which may be cheaper — “are not

paying to support the community,” Griffin said. “They are not keeping the dollars local, and they are not being responsible about the environmental cost of the production methods.” Griffin said that education is a necessity for letting local farmers know that a market exists. Baril also values consumer education, saying that the greatest obstacle to increased local food production is perceptual. Port Townsend Mayor Michelle Sandoval said that the government can speed the rate of increasing local food production by creating opportunities for

affordable housing. Farmers are enthusiastic about the idea of supplying 20 percent of local food but first need some assurance of the demand. “I can go from producing 50 cartons of eggs a week to 80 cartons a week using the system that I have in place,” said Chimacum farmer John Bellow. “But if I have to go up to 300 cartons a week, I will need to add more equipment and develop new systems.”

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Hospitals: Jefferson 71% patient satisfaction Continued from A1 those in Port Townsend and Forks, state Hospital AssoOMC, which has 126 ciation spokeswoman Cassi beds, recorded two infec- Sauer said Friday. tions, and Jefferson Healthcare, a 42-bed hospital, had Hospital infections none. The survey of the rate of Overall patient satisfaction scores were 63 percent hospital-related infections for OMC and 71 percent for — data required by state law — covered pneumonia Jefferson Healthcare. The overall statewide infection rates from ventilapatient satisfaction rate tors; from central, or intravenous, lines into main was 66 percent. The patient satisfaction arteries or veins; from data are required by federal orthopedic surgery includgovernment from larger ing hip- and knee-joint hospitals such as Olympic replacements; and from Medical Center but not crit- hysterectomies — all of ical-access hospitals such as which apply to the Port

Angeles and Port Townsend hospitals. Infections from cardiac surgery also are included in the statewide survey, but that surgery is not performed at any North Olympic Peninsula hospital. Forks Community Hospital, a 45-bed facility, does not perform any procedures that apply to the infection rate data, according to the survey. The goal of every hospital in the state is zero infections, even if just one infection in a category is listed in the survey, Sauer said. “It is useful,” she said of

the infection survey. “They can compare themselves with other likesized facilities and see if they are having more or fewer infections than their peers and see if there are things they need to do differently,” she said. “If you see some hospital with even a single infection and you see another hospital with zero, it might be good to consult with that hospital and ask, ‘What are you doing that we are not doing?’” The patient satisfaction categories included the percentage that would recom-

mend the hospital to friends and family. The statewide average for all hospitals was 71 percent, compared with a national average of 69 percent.

Recommend hospital

Whitman County, which was recommended by 91 percent of patients. The recommendation rate for Harrison Medical Center in Bremerton was 72 percent, and for Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, 71 percent. The full survey results, including the patient satisfaction questionnaire, are at www.wahospitalquality. org.

While 71 percent of Jefferson Healthcare patients recommended that hospital, 70 percent of OMC patients recommended Olympic ________ Medical Center. The highest percentage Senior staff writer Paul Gottlieb of patient recommendations can be reached at 360-417-3536 in Washington went to Pull- or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily man Regional Hospital in news.com.

Jefferson: OMC is focusing on

improving patient satisfaction Continued from A1 “We are really focusing on looking at improvements that make a difference to the outcomes of the patients,” Camp said.

OMC: ‘Shhh’ Olympic Medical Center has put up posters depicting three children saying, “Shhhhh . . .” The 126-bed hospital is working to improve its patient satisfaction scores as recorded by the Washington State Hospital Association, Chief Medical Officer Scott Kennedy said last week. “This is one area we continue to work hard on, but what we really want to do better on is the question on quietness,” he said. “It’s tough when you need alarms if someone is getting out of bed or if they fall.” Overall, 63 percent of patients at the 126-bed facility were satisfied with their experience at the hospital compared with 66 percent of patients statewide at all hospitals surveyed. For other categories, the satisfaction rate was

Olympic Medical Center put up these posters 85 percent for providing discharge instructions, 80 percent for doctor communication, 74 percent for nurse communication, 73 percent for room cleanliness, 70 percent for staff responsiveness, 68 percent for pain control, 62 percent for staff explanations about medicine — and 47 percent for “quiet at night.” “There’s a lot of education going on with our nursing staff,” Kennedy said. “We’ve got to keep our alarm systems up, but we are looking at what we need and what we don’t need in

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infections per 100 orthopedic surgeries on hips compared with a statewide average of 0.76 per 100. While OMC’s rates per 100 surgeries are higher than state averages, they are the lowest rates the hospital could have had by having just one infection in each category, Kennedy said. Sauer echoed that analysis. “I don’t look at it as an alarming statistic,” she said. “It’s very hard to compare hospitals that do 30 Dad Jason Reynolds and daughter Jasal, 3, with procedures to hospitals that their puppy, Clifford, take a break from the do 1,000.” hectic season on a bench where hundreds

different cases,” he said. “The main thing is closing doors where appropriInfection-control officer ate, doing whatever we can to help our patients get to OMC has a full-time sleep.” infection-control officer who examines hospital-related 2 infections infection data on a daily Two infections were basis, Kennedy said. “Evidence-based mearecorded at OMC, where on sures” are employed to limit average 44 patients stay overnight — the average hospital-related infections, and the goal statewide is to daily census. One infection occurred eliminate all such infections after an abdominal hyster- by 2012, he said. Kennedy said he was ectomy out of 32 that were performed during the sur- “feeling pretty good” about vey period and one after a the infection survey results. “We wish all the numhip replacement out of 29 bers were zero, but that’s that were performed. That represents a rate of our determined goal.” ________ 3.13 infections for every 100 abdominal hysterectomy Senior staff writer Paul Gottlieb surgeries compared with a can be reached at 360-417-3536 statewide average of 1.37 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily for every 100, and 3.45 news.com.

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$1,000 spending spree Continued from A1 preferably red. Pierre has his eye on a Before toddling off on remote-controlled motor other business, Jasal said bike that can do wheelies, that if she had time to meet and Finn needs some more Santa, she would tell him, “I soldiers, lots of ’em — an love Tom and Pookie and Army pack. In fact, make Clifford,” her cats and new that three, one for each puppy, in that order. buddy. “That’s a good thing to say,” said her dad. Spending spree Three young boys hudThe ceremonies ended dled together near the fountain stuck around for the with a special gift for Linda big event and a possible Smith, too old to be expectvisit with Santa. ing attention from Santa. They all want the same Her ticket was the winthing this year. ner of among 16,000 sold or given away by local merNerf gun chants for a $1,000 spend“A nerf gun,” was the ing spree from participating reply in unison from Pierre merchants. The ceremony was orgaBallou, 8, Eli Lacy and Finn nized by Port Townsend Marlow, both 6. Oh, and in case the line Main Street. ________ of children waiting to see Santa at Flagship Landing Julie McCormick is a freelance after the ceremonies was writer and photographer living in too long, Santa should know Port Townsend. Phone her at 360that Eli also favors a pedal- 385-4645 or e-mail julie powered dirt bike, mccormick10@gmail.com.

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Dem posts to be voted Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Democratic Central Committee will elect officers for 2011-2012 on Saturday. Committee members will gather at 10 a.m. at the Jace The Real Estate Co. community meeting room at 933 E. First St., Port Angeles. The meeting — called by the outgoing chairman, John Merton Marrs of Lake Sutherland — is open to the public. The nominating committee has proposed the election of Matthew Randazzo of Port Angeles as chairman, Jack Slowriver of Port Angeles as vice-chairman, Kris Grier of Port Angeles as treasurer, Lindsay Buxton of Port Angeles as recording secretary, Earl Archer of Sequim as state committeeman, Pat Johansen of Sequim as state committeewoman and Marrs as corresponding secretary. Nominations also will be taken from the floor. After the election, the new chairman will immediately take over and oversee a second election for trustees, three from each county

commission district, to serve on the county party’s executive board with the new officers. Serving with Marrs have been Ida Fintel of Sequim, vice-chairwoman; Julie Johnson of Neah Bay, state committeewoman; Ed Grier, corresponding secretary; and Kris Grier, Buxton and Archer, who have been nominated for re-election to their posts. The trustees have been County Commissioner and state Rep.-elect Steve Tharinger; Genaveve Starr and Marco X. Hermosillo of District 1; Hank Warren, Nancy Chambers and John Miller of District 2; and Dan Duncan, Nancy Messmer and Patsy Feeley of District 3. Marrs said the Central Committee also is planning for its participation in the 24th Legislative District biennial organization meeting, which will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 8, at the Port Angeles Library’s Carver Room. The 24th District comprises Clallam and Jefferson counties and half of Grays Harbor County.

Sunday, December 5, 2010

A7

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Artisans

and crafts

and it continues today

Agatha Shawver of Port Angeles, left, talks with Diane Eason of the Sequim-based Kitchen Cottage during a benefit crafts sale on Saturday at Vern Burton Community Center in Port Angeles. The sale, featuring a wide variety of local artisans and crafts makers, was a fundraiser for the Olympic Medical Center Auxiliary. The sale continues from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today.

Burglaries sentence 3 hurt in Lake Crescent wreck Saturday evening for homeless man Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A 27-year-old Port Angeles man was sentenced to three years in state prison as a result of a plea agreement in several summertime burglary cases. Andrew Mahlum, 27, who is homeless, was sentenced in Clallam County Superior Court on Monday. Mahlum pleaded guilty to two counts of seconddegree burglary, seconddegree theft, residential burglary, third-degree theft, second-degree trafficking stolen property and thirddegree malicious mischief.

The cases included theft from a school and some electronics items. Two laptop computers were reported missing Aug. 8 by the Queen of Angels School. When Port Angeles police officers contacted Jeneva Maneval on another matter, she told officers that Mahlum had left some electronic items in her backyard and that he had also stolen a Nintendo Wii from her home on West 11th Street. The electronic items are believed to include those taken from the school. Court documents said

that after Maneval confronted Mahlum about the Wii, he purchased a new one for her. Officers eventually located the stolen Wii at Peninsula Pawn Brokers. According to court documents, police also found Mahlum with a video camera. Mahlum was among those arrested following investigations of more than 60 home burglaries in the Port Angeles area this summer. A victim restitution hearing will be held March 11 in Clallam County Superior Court.

Juan de Fuca to see a 3 p.m. matinee Saturday, Feb. 19. The cost of the trip is $130 per person, which includes a ticket to the performance plus a $40 tax-deductible donation to the symphony. The price does not include lodging or ferry fare, but symphony coordinator Barbara Hutter has arranged for a special rate of $89 for a standard room at the Chateau Victoria the weekend of Feb. 18, 19 and 20. To reserve seats, phone Hutter at 360-683-4743. For information about the opera trip and the Port Angeles Symphony’s concerts and other events, visit www.PortAngeles-

Symphony.org or phone 360-457-5579.

ONP: Pickup crossed center line on U.S. 101

injuries Saturday night. A man driving a fullsize pickup east on Highway 101 crossed into the westbound lane and struck a Ford Ranger driven by a Forks woman at about 6:40 p.m., Maynes said. All three were taken by ambulance to Olympic Medical Center for evaluation, she said. The Ranger also carried the woman’s teenaged son, who was able to get out of the vehicle on his own, Maynes said.

Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Three people were taken to Olympic Medical Center after two pickups collided Saturday evening when one crossed over the center line on U.S. Highway 101 at Lake Crescent about four miles west of Barnes Point. Olympic National Park spokeswoman Barb Maynes did not know the names of the people in the wreck or the extent of their

The woman was extricated from the Ranger, Maynes added. Both lanes of the highway were blocked after the wreck, Maynes said. Westbound traffic was being diverted from Highway 101 to state Highway 112 at Laird’s Corner on Saturday night, said a dispatcher with the State Patrol, which was assisting the park, along with Clallam County Sheriff’s Office and Clallam County Fire District No. 2. Maynes said that officers will investigate if drugs or alcohol were a factor in the crash.

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VICTORIA — Tickets are still available for the Port Angeles Symphony’s February trip to Victoria to see Puccini’s opera “La Boheme” at the Royal Theatre. Local opera fans can accompany members of the Port Angeles Symphony across the Strait of

SHELTON — A whale that may have been wounded in a collision with a vessel has washed up dead on a beach in the Totten Inlet area of south Puget Sound. John Calambokidis of Cascadia Research said Saturday it was a 40-foot Bryde’s whale, a primarily Court martial tropical species that rarely JOINT BASE LEWISshows up in Puget Sound. MCCHORD — A soldier It is the second Bryde’s whale to turn up dead in the area this year, and researchers aren’t sure what it was doing here. The badly injured whale was first spotted in November, missing large

in the final killing, but his lawyer said he feared he’d be killed if he didn’t follow an order to shoot at the victim. Winfield sent messages home to his parents after the first killing, telling them he was being threatened to keep quiet. His father said he asked Lewis-McChord officials to intervene on his son’s behalf, to no avail. No trial date has been set. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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who warned of an alleged plot to kill Afghan civilians only to be charged in the case faces a court martial. Officials at Joint Base Lewis-McChord said Friday that the commanding general has referred charges against Spc. Adam Winfield of Cape Coral, Fla., to a military trial. Winfield is one of five soldiers accused in the deaths of three civilians during patrols in Kandahar Province this year. Prosecutors said Winfield willingly participated

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FORKS — The 15th annual Forks Festival of Trees will be held in the downtown Bank of America building today. Sponsored by Soroptimist International of the Olympic Rain Forest, the event will open at 1 p.m. Music from the Peace Children’s Choir is set for 1:30 p.m., with the live auction of trees and wreaths at 2 p.m. and lasting until every item has been sold. Cookbooks, baked goods, knives and other items will be available in a silent auction. There was a public preview of the 21 decorated trees on Saturday. The Best of Show award went to a tree titled “All That Glitters is Gold,” sponsored by the Forks Emblem Club. The tree was designed by Joni Eades. Proceeds from the Festival of Trees benefit Soroptimist projects, including educational scholarships, Relay For Life sponsorship, travel expenses for medical care for West End women with cancer and other charitable causes. For more information, phone Cathy Johnson at 360-374-9382 or e-mail cathyej77@hotmail.com.

chunks of flesh and blubber. Calambokidis said at least one — and probably both — of the whale’s injuries seems to have come from a boat propeller. Scientists hope to move the carcass to another location where they can perform an examination on Monday.

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PA man expands eatery after attack By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — In the face of a series of tests and one brutal crime, Jaime Bautista has constructed an American dream. Bautista, 40, is the owner of the n e w l y enlarged F i e s t a Jalisco restaurant in Port Ange- Bautista les, a place with flamboyant Mexican music and murals and 14 employees — or make that “15, with me; sometimes I work,” he tells a reporter. Just then, a man named Bruce leans out from a Fiesta booth and remarks that he rarely sees Bautista as he is for this moment: sitting down in his own restaurant. Bautista, a compact man with cafe-con-leche skin, was the victim of a vicious assault earlier this year.

Attacked outside On the night of March 21, a man wearing a ski mask and brandishing a 6-inch knife attacked Bautista outside his restaurant. The man grabbed Bautista by the shoulders and struck him, knocking him to the asphalt. He then kicked him several times in the head, took Bautista’s wallet and escaped on foot, according to Port Angeles Police Dep-

uty Chief Brian Smith. The assailant had already punctured one of the rear tires on Bautista’s pickup truck, Smith said, and was waiting for the restaurateur when he walked out of the back door at about 10:45 p.m. Bautista went to Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, where he stayed overnight. The next day, a Monday, he went home to his wife, Angeles, and their three young children.

‘A shock’ It was “a shock,” to have this happen in his adopted home town of Port Angeles, Bautista said. He’d had $16 in his wallet along with his credit cards and said he would have handed them over had the robber merely asked. “I still feel like he took something [else] from me. It’s difficult to describe,” Bautista said. His wife, whom he married on Valentine’s Day in 2006, “was very sad,” he added. “I always told her, ‘We’re safe’” in Port Angeles. “I don’t blame her for being scared.” But Bautista, who’s been sole proprietor of Fiesta Jalisco since 2005, speaks of the assault only when a reporter asks about it. He’s much more interested in talking about the life he’s built here. Bautista was fresh out of high school when he left his native Mexico City. The 18-year-old, looking for

adventure, came first to Portland, Ore., amid a rainstorm. The weather and atmosphere weren’t hospitable, and he thought about turning back.

Seeking adventure

space, nearly doubling the seating capacity to 150. The move “shows my commitment to the community,” Bautista said. Right after opening up the remodeled space on Labor Day weekend, he and the summer crew found themselves with a bustling crowd of tourists and locals filling every table. “That blew my mind. I never thought we were going to fill it that quick,” Bautista recalled. There have been some good, busy days and nights since, and Bautista said he hasn’t had to lay off all of his summer workers. Instead, he trimmed their hours. If it were him, he said, he would rather have something than no job at all. Clearly, Bautista relishes his work, especially the interaction with people. But ask what gives him the most joy, and he tells the story of getting to know Angeles, a woman from the town of Tonaya, Mexico, through letters and long talks on the telephone — before they had met face to face. No, the Bautistas did not meet on the Internet. A mutual friend put them in touch, and they started out as old-fashioned pen pals, while he lived in Port Angeles and she in Tonaya.

“But I’m stubborn” and not dampened by a little challenge. Still, “I didn’t think it was going to last long,” Bautista said of his crossing into the United States in 1988 — without legal immigration documents. It took him 10 years to become a naturalized U.S. citizen; during that period, he moved from small town to town, from Lincoln City, Ore., to Eugene, Ore., and then to Forks, where a friend wanted him to come work in a restaurant. “I don’t care for the big city,” he said. “There’s too much crime.” In 2002, he and a business partner left Forks to open two restaurants: Fiesta Jaliscos in Port Angeles and Port Hadlock. The partnership didn’t work out, and Bautista took over the Port Angeles restaurant at 636 E. Front St. in 2005. Pedro Arceo still owns the Hadlock Fiesta Jalisco. This September, as the recession lingered in the form of high unemployment in Clallam County, Bautista Fell in love over phone took a risk. “I fell in love with her just talking to her” on the Expanded restaurant phone, he recalled. He expanded his place “She didn’t send me a into the adjacent vacant picture until about a year

after we started talking.” When they met, Bautista said, he knew she was the one. They had a church wedding in Mexico, and then he brought her here on a fiancee visa for their U.S.-legal ceremony. At first, “she had a hard time. She has a big family down in Mexico. She left them to come up here to a different world,” Bautista said. Now Angeles has settled in; she’s the mother of Selena, 4, Sebastian, 2, and Julissa, 1, a “stay-at-home” mom who doesn’t stay home much. Bautista believes Port Angeles is still a good place to raise children and looks forward to watching his children grow up here, then go to college. “I don’t feel any prejudice here” against his Mexican ethnicity, Bautista said. “I’ve never felt that.” As for the attack of last spring, “I’ve put that ordeal behind me.”

Police investigating

Bautista said he believes he knows who his attacker is. “When I go out, I’m more aware of my surroundings,” he said. “But I’m not going to let that stop me from doing what I have to do and what I like to do.” Fiesta Jalisco is “like my first baby,” he said with a smile. “I love this country” for the opportunities it has given him Bautista added. Bautista’s friend and accountant Duane Wolfe said the restaurateur has also put considerable effort toward improving his operation. “Most people don’t work their businesses as hard as he does. He works extremely hard,” Wolfe said. He remarked, too, on the landscaping and design of the restaurant, which he considers some of the bestlooking in Port Angeles. The Fiesta Jalisco building used to be “just a small box,” Wolfe said, adding that it used to be The Big Scoop, an ice-cream parlor, in the 1980s. Bautista, for his part, said the holiday season has started off well: After the Nov. 27 tree lighting downtown, Fiesta Jalisco saw a healthy rush of patrons. “It’s a good feeling,” Bautista said, “being busy.”

The Port Angeles Police Department is actively investigating the case, according to Smith. Over the past nine months, “we have invested quite a bit” of detective time, Smith said. Jason Viada, the department’s detective supervisor, added that a witness was interviewed “just the other ________ day” and that he is confident that the police have a Features Editor Diane Urbani suspect, though he declined de la Paz can be reached at 360to estimate when that sus- 417-3550 or diane.urbani@ pect may be arrested. peninsuladailynews.com.

Commissioners to conduct budget hearing Monday Peninsula Daily News

The three Jefferson County commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the proposed 2011 budget Monday. The hearing will be at 10:30 a.m. after the commissioners’ meeting begins at 9 a.m. at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. Public comment will be taken on the proposed budget of nearly $53 million, which allocates $15.6 million for the general fund and $37.1 million for other funds. Adoption of a final budget is tentatively set for Monday, Dec. 13. Commissioners also will consider approving a reso-

lution giving Washington State Parks a franchise for a sewer main on county road rights of way in Brinnon. A public hearing was held on the matter Nov. 15, and staff members recommended that the board approve the franchise. Commissioners will consider approving a collective bargaining agreement with United Food and Commercial Workers to defer raises throughout 2011.

PT City Council The Port Townsend City Council will consider an amendment to the interlocal agreement with East Jefferson Fire-Rescue, discuss the Port Townsend Public Development Authority and consider a collective

Eye on Jefferson bargaining agreement Monday. The City Council will meet at 6:30 p.m. in chambers, 540 Water St. The council will consider authorizing the city manager to execute the amendment to the agreement with the fire district. It will discuss the interim board of directors of the city’s public development authority and the authority’s charter. It also will discuss and possibly approve a resolution authorizing a collective bargaining agreement with Local Union No. 589 of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters for General Government employees

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for 2011. Also on the agenda is an ordinance providing for the issuance and sale of $3,880,000 in bonds to pay for improvements to sidewalks, utilities and the library. Other city committee meetings, which will be in conference rooms at City Hall, 250 Madison St., unless otherwise noted, are: ■  Arts Commission — 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, first-floor conference room. ■  Parks, Recreation and Trees Advisory Board — Board retreat from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Mountain View Commons, 1925 Blaine St.

■  Historic Preservation Committee — 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, third-floor conference room. ■  Council Finance Budget Committee — 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, first-floor conference room. ■  Council Community Development/Land Use Committee — 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, first-floor conference room.

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Chimacum schools The Chimacum School Board will conduct its annual board reorganization Wednesday. The meeting will be at 7 p.m. in the high school library, 91 West Valley Road. It is also scheduled to begin a discussion of “Standard # 5,” with the purpose of engaging the local community to represent the values and expectations it holds for its schools.

Port of Port Townsend Port of Port Townsend commissioners will discuss extending the terms of a letter of intent they signed with Make Waves! concerning the construction of an aquatic recreation center on Kah Tai Lagoon when they meet Wednesday. The meeting will be at 3:30 p.m. at 375 Hudson St. Since the signing of the letter, additional information has come forward regarding National Park Service involvement with the broader Kah Tai and whether or not the port’s property is impacted by the National Park Service’s redesignation of the property. The port attorney is looking into this and will need more time to evaluate. The port said that representatives of Make Waves! have agreed that an extension would allow the issue to be resolved in an appropriate manner.

Hospital district Jefferson Healthcare hospital commissioners will consider medical staff appointments, reappointments and privileges Wednesday. Commissioners will meet at 3:30 p.m. in the hospital auditorium at 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend.

Public utility district Jefferson County Public Utility District commissioners will review the district’s insurance coverage and set their 2011 meeting schedule when they meet Wednesday. The commissioners will meet at 5 p.m. at the PUD office, 250 Chimacum Road, Port Hadlock.

Jefferson Transit The Jefferson County Transit Board plans a special meeting Tuesday. The meeting will be at 1:30 p.m. at Mountain View Commons, 1919 Blaine St., Port Townsend.


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Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Sunday, December 5, 2010

A9

Spending aLL youR time

in the Kitchen duRing the

hoLidayS?

pacific RefRigeRation Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

From left, city employees Tyler Johnson, John Merchant and Mary Heather Ames download traffic data from the electric speed-limit sign in front of Blue Heron Middle School.

Traffic data: Most drive speed limit

offeRS theSe

time SaveRS

By Charlie Bermant

between 25 and 30 mph. limited scope. Above 30 mph, the sign Currently, the more flashes an urgent “slow detailed data interfaces PORT TOWNSEND — down.” with a computer through a A traffic counter on an elecBluetooth connection. tronic speed-limit sign was Most at speed limit A second speed reader reprogrammed in October sign north of the school Civil engineer Mary to provide traffic data, clocked 82,000 cars, which quantifying the traffic load Heather Ames said the data on one of Port Townsend’s indicated that most cars were coming from the less traveling on the road adhere populated portion of the main roads. The sign, which is located to the speed limit but did school district. “It appears that the in front of the Blue Heron not have any specific data speed reader signs are effecMiddle School, counted about the number of cars tive at reminding people to 130,000 cars traveling north and the speed. The sign is not equipped drive the speed limit,” Ames on San Juan Avenue since with a camera to capture said. Oct. 18. “As time goes on, we are The sign has a radar the license plates of speedhoping to compare data on component similar to that ers. on police cars, indicating Ames also said that something like a yearly whether a vehicle is speed- many cars drove much basis to see if trends ing. slower than the speed limit emerge.” ________ It reads out the vehicle’s during the recent snowspeed in a single light if it is storm. Jefferson County Reporter under the 25 mph posted Prior to the upgrade, the Charlie Bermant can be reached at speed limit, flashing the data could be downloaded 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ number if the speed is to a palm device and had peninsuladailynews.com. Peninsula Daily News

PA motorcyclist is in serious condition Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles motorcyclist was in serious condition at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle on Saturday after a wreck at about 5:20 p.m. Friday. Thomas Paxton, 51, was not breathing on his own when he was airlifted to Harborview from Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, said Lt. Chris Old of the State Patrol on Friday. He had massive internal bleeding and serious head injuries, Old said, as well as two broken wrists. The Harborview hospital nursing supervisor said Paxton was in serious condition as of Saturday evening.

Harold Heagy, 40, also of Port Angeles, was driving the car that hit Paxton and suffered head, neck and rib injuries, State Patrol said. He was taken to OMC but was no longer there by Saturday morning, the nursing supervisor said. She did not know if he had been transferred or was treated and discharged.

Blocked for 4 hours State Highway 112 was blocked in both directions for four hours and 45 minutes, state Department of Transportation said. The State Patrol gave this account of the wreck: Heagy was traveling west on state Highway 112 in a 1999 Saturn SL2 near Nordstrom Road, about

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nine miles west of Port Angeles, when he crossed the center line of the highway, striking Paxton headon. Paxton was riding a 2008 Yamaha motorcycle, traveling east on state Highway 112. “There is a sweeping curve in that area,” Old said. Paxton was wearing a helmet, and Heagy was wearing his seat belt at the time of the wreck. Neither drugs nor alcohol were considered factors in the collision, State Patrol said. Charges and citations are listed by the State Patrol as pending. The State Patrol said both vehicles were totally destroyed.

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Briefly: State 100,000th degree slated for WWU BELLINGHAM — Western Washington University expects to award its 100,000th bachelor’s degree during fall commencement Saturday. The university dates its history back to 1893 but did not begin giving four-year degrees until 1933. The first bachelor’s degrees were bachelors of arts in education. Before 1933, the school gave out teaching certificates

and diplomas. One graduating senior will be selected at random from those who signed up for a drawing to receive the 100,000th degree. WWU is also celebrating with a redesigned diploma.

asking the Justice Department to conduct a civilrights review, following several highly publicized incidents including the fatal police shooting of a Native American woodcarver. The organizations claimed that some Seattle police review officers appear to “inflict injury out of anger” at susSEATTLE — Seattle’s pects rather than to protect mayor said he would welpublic safety. come a Justice Department The Seattle Times review of whether the police department has a pattern of reported that Mayor Mike violating the rights of minor- McGinn and the head of the City Council’s public safety ities. committee said they would The American Civil Libwelcome such an investigaerties Union of Washington tion. and dozens of other organiThe Associated Press zations sent a letter Friday

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 5, 2010

Commentary

Page

A10

My dogs taught me life lessons SOMEHOW I’VE BECOME a full-fledged adult. I have no idea how this happened. Feels like only yesterday Jen I was rolling in Lancaster at 4 a.m. after Dollar Beer Night, or rather, Dollar Beer Afternoon. Yet now I find myself with a mortgage, four types of insurance and a retirement account consisting of a pitcher of laundry quarters. I don’t own a single stick of garbage-picked furniture anymore, and my shelves are made of wood, not milk crates. Despite my best efforts, I’ve managed to grow up. Matter of fact, I’m so grown up that I’m experiencing the existential angst of having done so.

Fortunately, the solution to my midlife crisis is soft, sweet, and cuddly with a pink belly, so my husband and I are adopting . . . a pit bull puppy. Recently we contacted a rescue agency that brought over a fine adoption candidate. We met and instantly loved an adolescent, energetic golden boy with an enormous head. He adored us, too. Everyone was on board with the adoption . . . except for the two spoiled, surly, middle-aged dogs who live here. Let’s just say they were less than hospitable. That’s when I realized I wasn’t the only one desperate for maturity. We adopted our pit bull Maisy and shepherd Loki eight shoeshredded, carpet-stained years ago. They went through rudimentary obedience training as puppies, but they’ve long since forgotten their manners. The problem is, we set the behavior bar terribly low.

Speaking Out

We wanted two sweet dogs who’d coexist with our miserable cats and who’d be friendly toward guests, and, oh, boy, are they friendly! They’ll knock you over with the brute force of their love. Or they used to, back when people would still visit. Once we achieved those goals, we never pushed them any harder, and we wound up with two willful dogs who’d tell us in no uncertain terms when they were ready to eat, to potty and to be entertained. If we were very lucky, they’d make a tiny bit of room on the bed so we could sleep with them. Apparently this was bad. Perhaps when our friends would say stuff like, “You should really read Cesar Millan’s books,” or “No, seriously, please watch ‘The Dog Whisperer,’” or “Thank God you don’t have kids,” we should have taken the hint. But now I’m finally grown up enough to realize we must break the cycle. so we’ve forgone adoption while we bring Maisy

and Loki in line. We’ve enlisted them in a doggie boot camp, which is as much for us as it is for them. Despite acting like their pronged training collars were killing them dead, splat, the first time we attached them, they’ve quickly come around. In a few sessions, they now comprehend that everyone wins when they obey our cues. And we learned we don’t have to be Cesar himself to take control of our pets. Our old dogs, who’d grown accustomed to receiving forkbased bites of whatever I was eating (kind of a trick, I’d rationalize) now do real tricks for their treats; their days of being served on silverware are over. The dogs are much happier since we’ve taken charge. Through the training process, they’ve discovered not only that no squirrel tastes as good as discipline feels, but it’s easier to do what’s expected because ultimately the rewards are greater.

Hey, that might explain why I finally grew up, too. We’re so pleased with their progress that we’ll all be ready for a puppy shortly. We’ll start working with her immediately so she’ll grow up understanding expectations and won’t ever get stuck in a state of arrested development. Now if I could only train our middle-aged kitties not to barf in my shoes. Then again, there’s a reason no one calls themselves “The Cat Whisperer.” ________ Jen Lancaster is a humorist and the author of three books — Such a Pretty Fat, Pretty in Plaid and Bitter is the New Black. She is one of four columnists who appear here every Sunday. She can be reached at www. jennsylvania.com or at Tribune Media Services, Attn: Jen Lancaster, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1500, Chicago, IL 6061.

How do you feel about tax cuts being extended for families that make more than $250,000 a year?

Jerry Crouse

Barbara Dyer

Ken Fishel

Kathy Curry

Garry Groves

Julie Smith

Travis Quent

Sharon Peterson

Retired sales manager Sequim

Retired teacher Port Townsend

Retired engineer Kala Point

Homemaker Port Angeles

Custodian Port Angeles

Roofer Joyce

Health care worker Port Angeles

“I don’t want them extended. I believe those with higher incomes can afford to pay, and this money will be directed to provide services that could be cut, like health care.”

“I think it is only fair and good for the economy that we extend these tax cuts, but for everyone. In fact, I’d even make them permanent.”

“Fine with me. Actually, I would like to see a flat tax. That would be a perfect scenario. Just because you make more money shouldn’t make a difference.”

“That’s a hard one. I think I’m in favor of tax cuts for all. I believe the tax would directly affect small businesses. Extend the tax cut to all. How and why should we differentiate?”

Telephone company employee Port Angeles

“They shouldn’t raise taxes on anyone. I’m a small business owner. It would affect the people who try to create jobs. The government must learn to get by on less. Politicians are greedy.”

“I personally think the $250,000 family should maybe pay a little more than us $40,000 families, us normal people. It only seems fair for them to pay more.”

“They shouldn’t get that tax cut. The middle class is really hurting. The rich are getting richer, so they can afford it. It makes the most sense.”

“They should extend the tax cuts only for little persons like me. The rich get away with too much. They seem to make the rules for taxing the little people like me.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices ‘We’re forgotten’

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Sewage tank

but why in a neighborhood of established single-family I am one of the neighresidences? bors opposed to the Sea I contacted Mayor Ken Breeze apartment complex Hays of Sequim with my project on McCurdy Road concerns, and he responded and South Fifth Avenue that was mentioned in your that the City Council is considering zoning reform, Nov. 30 article [“New including some interim Apartments Going Up In Sequim. Complex To Serve quick fixes to the kinds of code issues that relate the Low-Income Families”]. I found it rather astonSea Breeze project. ishing that Joe Irving, city I figure by the time this planner, was quoted saying complex is completed, I some neighbors voiced con- may have to apply for an cern about the project — apartment, as the value of try every neighbor on our home will have reached McCurdy and the three rock bottom. cul-de-sacs of Fifth (West It should also be noted Salal Place). that out-of-area companies I personally canvassed are being used for the projall of these homes over a ect — Timber River Develmonth ago, and every sinopment Inc. of Bellingham gle property owner was is the co-developer, and against this project. Dawson Construction of We all took a huge hit Bellingham is the project’s on our property values contractor. when the U.S. Highway With unemployment fig101 bypass went in — in ures so high in Clallam our front yard — and now County, it would have been we face high density, lowbetter to utilize some of our income housing in our folks who might need backyards. employment now. We are the forgotten But that’s another can homeowners of Sequim. I am all for more afford- of worms altogether. Adeline Curtis, able housing in Sequim. Sequim God knows we need it,

tank for overflow backup. This multimillion dollar Go Clallam County. project in harm’s way is an You’ve put time and accident waiting to happen, thought into responsibly be it pipeline wear, break and sustainably handling or leakage, or tank overstormwater on courthouse flow onto the Rayonier property. I look forward to property and into Ennis viewing the design and Creek — both of which are materials for capturing and under a state cleanup. filtering stormwater. Instead, the city should This is money well eliminate overflows by spent toward eliminating upgrading its existing citypollutants in our streams wide stormwater collection and the Strait of Juan de system, follow AIA and Fuca (“Stormwater Grant state recommendations by Poised For Approval,” Nov. building center street grass 30 PDN). swales to handle street Sadly, although prodded runoff, property site source by citizens, the American separation of sewage and Institute of Architecture stormwater and either col(recommendations for rede- lect this water into an signing the city) and some underground system or dislegislators to sustainably connect roof drains and use handle stormwater, the city this rain/snow melt for garof Port Angeles is doing the dens and aquifer recharge. opposite. At large paved sites, In a flood-tsunami zone pervious cement can with rising waters and replace impervious cement. increasingly violent storm These long-term, sussurges annually churning tainable methods work up shoreline rip-rap, bluffs worldwide. and the recreation trail, Darlene Schanfald, the city plans on building a Sequim multi-mile long pipeline to carry sewage and sludge in Schanfald is the Olymthe shoreline area to its pic Environmental Council wastewater treatment Coalition project coordinator for the Rayonier plant and the Rayonier

Peninsula Daily News

News Department

John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson

Suzanne Delaney

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 suzanne.delaney@peninsuladailynews.com

Executive Editor

Michelle Lynn

Interim Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Advertising Director

Sue Stoneman

Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

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Business/Finance Director

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Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

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Hazardous Waste Cleanup Project.

heater shutoff. Will the city save that amount, or will the residents who participate save Electric meters I again congratulate the that amount? It makes no sense to PDN for its sense of irony. replace electric meters Just above the continuawithout simultaneously tion of the Nov. 18 article replacing water meters, about the electrical meter since the reader can read replacement marketing both during the same visit, contract of $44,801 [“Marso no personnel savings keting Firm Hired to Push would be realized. New PA Meters”] you Where will the money placed the article about the for the replacement of elecincrease in property taxes, tric and water meters come which will gain the city from? Will this involve approximately $40,000 another increase in taxes? [“Property Tax Levy Up Will they be replaced 1%”]. simultaneously? I’ll wager that a huge Please tell us the whole majority of Port Angeles plan. residents would vote to Thomas See, forgo both the marketing Port Angeles plan and the tax increase, providing a net savings to We asked Lusk for a the city of about $4,000. response. Here it is: At the least, they could The city’s aging electric award the contract to a and water meters are simlocal firm. ply wearing out and likely I guess our City Council under-measure what many is afraid the residents will people use. revolt against changing the The Bonneville Power electric and water meters. Administration is planning In the article, Mr. Phil significant electric rates Lusk [city power resources increases for every city in manager] says that the city the region. could save $3 million from Turn to Voices/A11 the voluntary water

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 businesses will be used to bring down costs whenever These increases will possible. make it necessary for all The AMI system will utility customers to better provide a financially manage their overall elecresponsible, future-ready trical consumption. and fair delivery of electric The sensible next step is and water services to all to replace old meters with utility customers. highly accurate new ones, Information will be called an Automated available through various Metering Infrastructure communications, events system, or AMI, so everyand the city’s Web site at one pays their fair share, www.cityofpa.us. and for the new meters to A web page dedicated to provide customers with the the AMI system will be ability to use power when available in late January it is the least expensive. 2011. As customers make lifeCustomers with addistyle choices on how they tional questions may call use their utility services, a me at 360-417-4703 or key communications oute-mail me at reach plan will provide plusk@cityofpa.us. information and education on ways all residents can ‘U.N Agenda 21’ use power when it is the It is a done deal. cheapest. Electric and Soon, Lake Sutherland water meters will be replaced at the same time. will be closed to fishing. If you think contacting Utility rates and grants the state Department of from the BPA will pay for Fish and Wildlife, the the AMI system. National Park Service or Any cost savings are federal, state or local repreultimately passed on to utility customers. Property sentatives to keep the lake open to fishing will do any taxes cannot used to fund good, think again. any of the city utilities. In the winter issue of No responses were received from local firms to Range magazine, read the article, “Watch Out! Biodidevelop the communications plan. versity Replacing Global All city staff will be Warming as the Next involved in the communica- Crisis,” by Michael S. Cofftions outreach and local man, Ph.D.

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Souvenirs from space With the space shuttle program nearing the end of its road, NASA is offering souvenir tchotchkes to schools, colleges and universities. For just $23.40 — to cover the cost of shipping and handling — your school can become the owner of an official space shuttle heat shield tile. There are 7,000 tiles available, first-come, firstserved. NASA says the purpose is to preserve the space shuttle’s history and inspire the “next generation of space explorers, scientists and engineers.” The lightweight tiles — which protected the shuttles from 3,000-degree temperatures on re-entry to Earth’s atmosphere — played a tragic role in the 2003 space shuttle Columbia disaster, which was triggered by a failure of the thermal protection system, of which tiles were a key component. Schools can apply to receive a tile at http:// gsaxcess.gov/NASAWel.htm. Peninsula Daily News sources Coffman discusses the United Nations Agenda 21, which “lays out a global plan to micromanage the human population, their property rights, what they can buy and sell, how they live, the energy they use, and what kind of communities they should live in — all in the name of protecting the environment.” Sens. Susan Collins (Republican, of Maine) and Maria Cantwell (Democrat, of Washington) are sponsoring a bill, the Consoli-

dated Land, Energy, and Aquatic Resources Act of 2010 (CLEAR), which fulfills several of the U.N. Agenda 21’s goals. There is a colored map in Coffman’s article that shows the United States. Take a good look at the stunning plans for the Olympic Peninsula. Most of the Peninsula is colored red. Translated, Core Reserves and Corridors — little to no human use. The remaining area is

Sunday, December 5, 2010

A11

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yellow — buffer zones — highly regulated use. When you think about Lake Sutherland, think Agenda 21. When you think about the removal of the Elwha River dams, think Agenda 21. When Olympic National Park wants to buy more private property surrounding the park, think Agenda 21. How is that global governance working out for you? Deirdre A. Cahill, Port Angeles

now allow powerful corporations to once again legally defraud the middle class of a fair share of the country’s economy. People who say that what the economy needs most is lower taxes willfully ignore the facts. They ignore the fact that businesses expand when they expect future demand for their products to exceed their current production. Corporations are currently sitting on piles of cash, waiting for demand to increase. About 70 percent of our ‘Wilfully ignorant’ economy comes from consumer demand. Corporate profits are Consumer demand will the highest ever recorded. continue to be weak as long Unemployment is peras the middle class is sistently high. struggling. The top 10 percent of We must ignore the willincome earners now receive fully ignorant and their the highest proportion of dupes who say that we total income since the late can’t afford to extend 1920s. This is not the result of unemployment benefits and must cut government some economic law of the spending for food stamps, universe. education, health care and Governments created other things that are corporations and provide essential for the middle the rules by which they class to again be the driver operate. of a robust economy. The greatest economic The motto of the willfully boom in human history was made possible by rules ignorant: Take care of the billionaires, and the billionput in place after the last aires will take care of you. near-complete collapse of Roger Fight, the economy in the 1930s. Sequim Changes to those rules

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher and Michael Carman A Reminder: Please, no rants that name specific businesses, organizations or churches. Also, please submit rants about news items — such as budget decisions by Clallam County commissioners, electric rate hikes by Clallam County Public Utility District and utility tax increases by the city of Sequim — as signed letters to the editor. Many thanks!

Rave of the Week A BIG RAVE and hug to the Korean War vet who bought dinner at Gwennie’s Restaurant (Sequim) for a World War II vet and his wife. You left before we found out. Thank you. It’s great to be remembered.

. . . and other Raves A RAVE FOR nurse Tim in the emergency room. Thank you for taking our mother on Thanksgiving. Your humor and gentleness made her ER visit calm and comfortable. Also, to Gary, Cindy and Greg at the Joyce Fire Department. Your care, concern and humor eased our hearts and minds in such a difficult time. A SPECIAL RAVE for all those responsible for the Queen of Angels Thanksgiving feast (Port Angeles). Sharing is the greatest tie of all. A SUPER HUGE rave for Gary, the best checker at Safeway, downtown, for finding my wallet and turning it in and saving me so much grief right before the holidays. BIG, BIG RAVE to the person who turned in the purse I’d left in a basket at Safeway east,

in Port Angeles. It wasn’t opened and was left at the service desk. They said a customer turned it in. I’m a senior citizen, and thank you so much. May God bless you. A GRATEFUL RAVE for Harriet and all the nurses with Olympic Medical Home Health who make life worth living. Your devotion to your patients is immeasurable.

These professional drivers are always courteous, friendly and helpful. Happy holidays to all. A GRATEFUL RAVE for the excellent service at Discount Tires (Sequim) in the middle of the snowstorm last week. A special note of thanks to Nick and Pete, whose sales and service skills were noted and appreciated. Great job, and you’ll have my repeated business!

dinner, and when I got to the table, the free dinner was meatloaf. Somebody forgot to tell the church — while I do appreciate the meal — that a free community Thanksgiving dinner means turkey, not meatloaf!

. . . and other Rants

A MOTHER SPEAKING to her young daughter at the airport: “Remember all those times I talked to you about intimate I WANT TO say thank you to A HEARTFELT THANK you touching by strangers? — well, Jason, the electronics manager at rave to Debbie, manager of the it’s OK here, they’re authority the Sequim Walmart. deli in the Lincoln Street Safefigures.” On Black Friday, there were way (Port Angeles). horrendous crowds, and everyShe made sure that my husthing was out of control. RANT TO NEIGHBORS on band I received the Thanksgiving He didn’t seem to have any the West Side who didn’t stop to dinner that my sister had help, yet he was making sure to check to see if I was OK when I ordered for us when we were still go above and beyond for the crashed my car in the snowstorm. unable to travel to the store customers, and we really I wasn’t. because of the ice and snow. appreciate it. I re-broke my broken elbow and was freezing cold ’cause my A SPECIAL THANKS to my BIG THANK YOU to the two car was not able to start! neighbors, Mike and Pam ladies, the PDN delivery man Then, one family walked by and medics Tenneson and Brown Caldwell, for making sure I get with no words, but their son said, my mail and newspaper in this for the special care I received “Ha, ha.” bad weather. after falling in the J.C. Penney Very much appreciated. parking lot (Sequim) at 5 a.m. on TO THE PERSON spinning Black Friday. A HEALTHY RAVE to dieti- donuts in the Quality 4x4 & I appreciated the help from cians Amanda Cash of Nutrition Truck Supply parking lot (Port all! Professionals! Trails, who has been instrumen- Angeles) on Nov. 21 in the snow and ice. THANKS TO THE managers tal in my education and followYour efforts broke windows. of the Port Angeles Safeway, through for my newly diagnosed Saar’s Market Place, Swain’s and case of diabetes. Thanks for the consideration. Olympic Laundry for their generI feel very blessed to be on the ous donations to Esther Chapter road to good health with AmanFREELOADERS OF ALL 19 OES. programs to help the needy da’s help. They helped make the Harshould be stopped, as they will vest Dinner a success. A HUGE RAVE to the older continue if successful. Thank you also to all who gentleman at IGS (Port Angeles) I’m a recipient of the wondercame. You make us proud to live who found my wallet outside of ful benefits offered by “Talking in a generous community. IGS and brought it into the store. Books,” which was designed for Thank you, and happy holiblind and/or invalid adults or A BIG RAVE to the gentledays (but a rant to the person children. men at Port Angeles Auto Glass who took my wallet and threw it Please, doctors, help keep for resetting my truck-door outside by the cars and took all those programs running for those handle and glass at no charge. my change). of us who need them by refusing May your holiday be happy to sign authorizations for and your New Year prosperous. patients who are not legally entiRant of the Week tled to them. MANY THANKS TO the Olympic Bus Line Drivers for RANT FOR PORT Angeles IMAGINE MY SURPRISE getting us safely to and from dog owners who refuse to pick up when I went to a church for a Seattle in the recent snowy weather. free community Thanksgiving after your puppies.

WHILE AMID DISPOSAL sorting, the only personal physical reminder of a departed mother — her long. white, beaded wedding gloves — were accidentally taken to a consignment store. When the error was noted, the store found the gloves stolen with only the original box remaining. How cruel thievery is. THIS PAST SUMMER, a running-horse weather vane with green patina “left” our garage when tradesmen finished a home job. In this economy, things are tough for all, but thievery is never acceptable, and word-ofmouth and no referrals can hurt you even more. PITY POOR RESIDENTS living on Evans Road (Sequim), having to suffer all those cement trucks belching black, foul-smelling exhausts. TO THOSE WHO criticize people wanting to control the deer population and wildlife because they were here first. Do you have blood on your hands for killing rats and mice who were here first, also? ________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), e-mail us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Also, only one rant or rave per writer. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


A12

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Sweets

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

for the sweet

Nativity

Santa Claus and Frosty the Snowman on the JT’s Sweet Stuffs float make their way down Forks Avenue on Saturday during the ninth annual Forks Twinkle Light Parade. At least 16 floats lit up the town during the parade in which all floats were decked out in holiday lights. After the parade, stores were open late for a “Moonlight Madness” sale.

scene in

Joyce

Lori Nuss and John Nuss, both of Joyce, play the roles of Mary and Joseph in a living Nativity scene during Saturday’s annual Awana Christmas Festival at the Joyce Bible Church in Joyce. The event featured a decorated tree auction, food, crafts, music and an archery competition.

Hurricane Ridge Road to open daily Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — A “grand winter opening” celebration will mark the beginning of Hurricane Ridge Road’s sevenday-per-week schedule at noon Friday, Dec. 17. Daily access to Hurricane Ridge’s skiing, snowshoeing and other winter fun will begin that day. “We hope the public will join us and our many partners in celebrating the beginning of winter on the Ridge,” said Karen Gustin, Olympic National Park superintendent. Until this year, Olympic National Park kept Hurricane Ridge Road open only Fridays through Sundays in the winter months. A city, civic and business effort to raise $75,000 matched federal funding pays for plowing the road on the remaining days — unless falling snow precludes the operation until the weather clears. Funds allowed the park to hire eight new staff members to keep the road open. Weather permitting, Hurricane Ridge Road will be open daily from 9 a.m. to dusk through the winter season, except for Christmas Day.

Shuttle buses Starting Dec. 17, a 12-passenger shuttle bus will leave twice a day Wednesday through Sunday from two Port Angeles locations: the Port Angeles Visitor Center, in front of The Landing mall at 121 E. Railroad Ave.; and the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St. All Points Charters and Tours owner Willie Nelson is working with the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, the city of Port Angeles and the park to transport passengers to the popular snow-play spot 17 miles south of Port Angeles. Shuttle vans will depart from the Railroad Avenue visitor center at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. and will pick up passengers at the Vern Burton center at 9:05 a.m. and 1:05 p.m. before the 45-minute drive to the Ridge. Vans will leave Hurricane Ridge at about 11 a.m. and

Want more information? Peninsula Daily News

Here are numbers and websites for information about Hurricane Ridge: ■  Road and weather condition updates are posted on the Olympic National Park website, www.nps.gov/olym, or by phoning the park’s hotline at 360-565-3131. People also can follow “HRWinterAccess” on Twitter to receive road condition updates. ■  Information about the Hurricane Ridge downhill ski and snowboard area is available at www.hurricaneridge.com. More information about ski and snowshoe routes and trails is available at park visitor centers, the Olympic National Park website or the park’s visitor newspaper, the Bugler. ■  Overnight wilderness camping informa3:30 p.m., though scheduling details will remain flexible during the start-up period for this new service, the park said. Round-trip tickets are $10 per person. The park said that rates for special circumstances are under development and will be made available soon. In addition, park entrance fees — $5 per person for those 16 years and older — will be required at the park entrance station near Heart O’ the Hills on Hurricane Ridge Road. Park and national public land entrance passes will be honored. Advance reservations for the shuttle bus are recommended. To make reservations, phone All Points Charters and Tours at 360-565-1139 or 360-460-7131. All vehicles, including four-wheel-drive vehicles, are required to carry tire chains when traveling above the

tion is available at the park’s Wilderness Information Center at 360565-3100 or the visitor center at 360-565-3130. ■  Weather updates and avalanche risk information is available at the Northwest Weather and Avalanche Center on the Web at www.nwac.us or by phoning 206-526-6677. ■  Hurricane Ridge weather conditions are available on the park’s website. Click first on “Photos & Multimedia,” and then on “Webcams.” The webcam image is updated every 15 minutes — though severe weather can cause webcam outages. Weather station information is provided hourly. ■  More information about visiting Hurricane Ridge and other areas of the park is available at the park’s website.

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

A motorist drives down Hurricane Ridge Road last week in front of snowcovered Olympic Mountains. Park Visitor Center, at the base of Hurricane Ridge Road, is open daily throughout the winter from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except on Christmas.

Ski, snowboard area

Heart O’ the Hills entrance station in winter. Once visitors arrive, they can ski, snowshoe and play on snowboards and tubes. The Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center will be open beginning Dec.17. The information desk will be staffed daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., except when rangers are outdoors leading snowshoe walks or assisting visitors. The snack bar and ski shop, with both ski and snowshoe rentals, will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday beginning this coming Saturday through March 27. It also will be open during the Christmas holiday from Sunday, Dec. 26, through Sunday, Jan. 2, as well as on Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, Jan. 17, and Presidents Day on Monday, Feb. 21. The Olympic National

Weather permitting, the downhill ski and snowboard area will operate from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays from this coming Saturday through Sunday, March 27, expect for Christmas Day. The ski tows also will be open Monday, Dec. 27, and Friday, Dec. 31, as well as Jan. 17 and Feb. 21. More information about the Hurricane Ridge downhill ski and snowboard area is available at www. hurricaneridge.com. Opportunities for crosscountry skiers and snowshoe walkers range from open, level meadows near the visitor center to extreme terrain

in the park’s wilderness backcountry. Anyone skiing or snowshoeing beyond the immediate Hurricane Ridge area should sign in at the registration box in the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center and be prepared for steep terrain and the possibility of avalanches. Ranger-led snowshoe walks will be offered at 2 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Monday holidays from this coming Friday through March 27. The walks last 90 minutes and are less than one mile in length. Space is limited, so people should register at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center information desk 30 minutes before the scheduled walk. A donation of $5 is suggested. Organized groups such as youth or school groups must make advance reservations

for snowshoe walks. Group snowshoe walks are provided Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Monday holidays at 10:30 a.m. for groups holding reservations. To make reservations, phone 360-565-3136. Tubing and sliding are permitted only for children 8 years of age and younger at the Small Children’s Snowplay Area just west of the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center. If conditions become too dangerous for sliding, the Small Children’s Snowplay Area will be closed. Overnight wilderness camping is permitted in the Hurricane Ridge area with advanced registration. Winter camps must be at least one-half mile from the Hurricane Ridge parking area. Overnight parking is not permitted at Hurricane Ridge.

Up to $5 Mail-In Rebate with purchase of any Federal® Power•Shok® Rifle Ammunition Purchase one box of any federal Power•Shok® rifle ammunition and receive a $2.50 rebate

WRE/Port Angeles

Purchase two boxes of any federal Power•Shok® rifle ammunition and receive a $5.00 rebate

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WELCOMING

The “Original” Since 1957

Alan & Michaelle Barnard to our team of real estate professionals.

PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A. © 2010 Swain’s General Store Inc.

www.swainsinc.com

(360) 461-2153

mlee@olypen.com

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After 10 years of owning and operating Re/Max Performance Team, we decided that it was time to let go of ownership and management of our own company and just concentrate on helping our clients with their real estate needs. With less responsibility, we have more time for ourselves and for you. To accomplish this, we closed our office and have returned to Windermere Real Estate Port Angeles. Before Re/Max, we were the management team for Windermere for 4 years so we have known and worked with many of the people here. Windermere Real Estate is the most productive company in our area providing all of the same marketing tools, multiple listing services and support that you have grown to expect from us. We are still “The Performance Team” and look forward to serving you as we have for nearly 20 years in Clallam County. Warmest wishes for a wonderful Holiday Season and New Year!

See Store For Details 602 East First Street Port Angeles, WA

452-2357


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 5, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Oregon, Auburn set up title tilt By Eddie Pells

The Associated Press

For Oregon, it’s not so much the funky uniforms as the players who wear them. For Auburn, it’s not so much about the bumpy road this season as where it will end. The Ducks and Tigers locked up spots in the national title game Saturday, while the nation’s other undefeated team, TCU, closed the day looking at a once-in-a-lifetime trip to the Rose Bowl that still feels like a consolation prize. Ranked No. 1 in the AP Top 25, Oregon (12-0) defeated Oregon State 37-20 and No. 2 Auburn (130) routed No. 18 South Carolina 56-17 in the SEC title game to secure spots in the Newton BCS title game, Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz. No. 3 TCU watched it all from home but got no help and got left out — the way some team does almost every year in a sport that refuses to adopt a playoff. Oregon opened as a 3-point favorite Saturday night at the Las Vegas Hilton sports book but within 30 minutes, the line went down to 1 point. The title pairing will become Kelly official tonight when the BCS awards spots in the Rose, Sugar, Orange and Fiesta Bowls along with the national championship game. Going into Saturday, the top two teams were flipped in the BCS standings, with Auburn at No. 1 and Oregon ranked No. 2. “It hasn’t really set in yet,” said Auburn coach Gene Chizik, who has a month-plus to prepare for stopping the nation’s top-scoring offense in the title game. “I know that’s where we’re going.” Oregon, the team with a multitude of uniform combinations that includes four helmets, five jerseys and four different color of socks, is seeking the first national title in program history. Behind running back LaMichael James, the Ducks average more than 50 points per game. “The one thing I think, and now I hope, is that we’re not known for our uniforms, we’re known for the players inside the uniforms and that’s what makes this thing special,” Ducks coach Chip Kelly said.

Tigers’ wild ride Auburn has been on a crazy ride this season, which has brought sometimes daily revelations about a payfor-play scheme involving quarterback Cam Newton’s failed recruitment to Mississippi State. Earlier in the week, Newton was cleared by the NCAA to play in the SEC title game and, once again, he played undistracted football, leading an SEC team to the BCS championship game for the fifth straight year. “It was a lot of guys keeping me focused,” Newton said. “I just want to thank them. There’s some resilient guys on this team. I’ve said that a billion times, but without the guys on this team, I wouldn’t have had the success I did.” Newton, who threw for 335 yards and four touchdowns Saturday, and James, who ran for 134 yards and two scores, are among the favorites to win the Heisman trophy when it’s awarded next Saturday. One day short of a month later, they go for an even bigger prize. The coaches traded compliments about their upcoming opponents and the stars they’ll be trying to stop come January. “I think, obviously, you’ve seen clips of Newton,” Kelly said. “He’s a tremendous football player, but it’s not just Cam Newton.” Newton is the latest in a long line of Auburn greats — including Heisman winners Pat Sullivan and Bo Jackson — but the school’s only other national title came in 1957, when Shug Jordan was coach. In 2004, the Tigers came close again, finishing 12-0 but getting left out of the championship game. Turn

to

BCS/B2

SCOREBOARD Page B2

All locked up UW clinches bowl bid with dramatic victory over WSU By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

PULLMAN — One drive, one throw and one career-defining moment for Jake Locker. No more debating his place in Washington lore. Locker will be remembered as the quarterback that brought Washington from its darkest point and returned the Huskies to the postseason. The senior quarterback, who turned down the NFL a year ago for one last shot at the postseason, threw

a 27-yard touchdown pass to Jermaine Kearse with 44 seconds left, and Washington became bowl eligible with a with a stirring 35-28 win over rival Washington State in the 103rd Apple Cup on Saturday night. Locker drove Washington 88 yards in under 4 minutes. His fade route to Kearse was perfectly on target, beating cornerback Nolan Washington and sending the purple-clad fans at Martin Stadium into frozen delirium. Turn

to

Apple/B4

The Associated Press

Washington quarterback Jake Locker (10) celebrates after running for a touchdown against Washington State in the first half of Saturday’s game in Pullman.

Prep Basketball

PA girls outlast Kingston Peninsula Daily News

Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News

Port Townsend forward Robert Ristick launches a shot from long range during Friday night’s Olympic League game against Klahowya in Port Townsend.

Bombs away Midrange shot fading out of prep basketball By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

Greg Glasser was a senior at Spanaway when the 3-point line was first introduced to high school basketball in 1987. The first thing he did when he heard the news: Get a roll of athletic tape, tape down a line 19 feet, 9 inches away from the hoop and start firing away. Fast forward 23 years later, and now the Sequim High School boys coach is trying to get his fifthgrade son to resist the same urge.

“The team that he is playing on, they are all trying to chuck the ball up from there,” Glasser said. As Glasser’s assistant, Larry Hill, said, “Anytime you put a line on the floor that’s going to be the challenge,” Indeed, outside of the dunk, the most popular shot in basketball these days is the 3-pointer. Regardless of age, whenever a player wanders into a gym to play, they are far more likely to start launching bombs from behind the arc than do anything else. Its siren song is simply too sweet.

Also . . .

■ Boys basketball preview capsules for area A schools/B3

“If you open the gym and the let kids go . . . the first shot 80 percent of the kids will take is a 3-point shot,” Forks boys coach Scott Justus said. “That’s exactly what they do. “It’s almost like let’s just take that line off the floor.”

Midrange jump shot Justus’ sentiment is one that isn’t completely off base for some old-school coaches. For the biggest casualty of the 3-point line is something many of them hold near and dear: the midrange jump shot. Turn

to

Shot/B3

PORT ANGELES — The team that didn’t lose a single Olympic League game last season looked awfully shaky in its first this year. The Port Angeles girls basketball team held off several late challenges from a Sophia Baetz-less Kingston squad to win its first game of the season 45-40 on Friday night. Senior Allison Knowles broke a tie game twice in the fourth quarter with 3-point baskets, the last coming with Knowles 1:42 left, to help the Roughrider survive a game Kingston team. “I think we went into this game way too lightly,” said Knowles, one of four returning starters from last year’s 16-0 Olympic League champions. “We can’t do that. Every game is a different game with different players, you don’t know [the outcome].” Senior Jessica Madison scored a team-high 10 points and had five assists but only managed one field goal against a Kingston defense keying on her. Madison was limited to just two points in the final two quarters as Kingston climbed back into the game from a 21-13 halftime deficit thanks in large part to Amanda Carper. The sophomore shooting guard sank 5 of 6 shots for 12 points in the second half. That included a pair of 3-pointers that tied the game at 37 and 40 points late in the fourth quarter. But Knowles bailed the Roughriders out both times with clutch 3’s from the wing set up by passes from Taylyn Jeffers and Madison. “We couldn’t hit shots,” Riders head coach Mike Knowles said. “We shoot the ball really well, and tonight was not a night to shoot the ball.” Indeed, the Riders struggled all game to hit shots. Turn

to

Preps/B3

Roughriders come on strong PA top area team at Spartan Invite Peninsula Daily News

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Forks’ Tyler Cortani pins Sequim’s Nick Moroles in a 130-pound class matchup during the Forks Invitational wrestling tournament Saturday in Forks.

FORKS — Port Angeles made a late push to place second as the highest area finisher at the Forks Invitational wrestling tournament Saturday. Port Angeles and Sequim both traveled to Forks for the traditional season-opening tourney, with Tenino and La Center making the trip as well. The Roughriders trailed for most of the tournament before making their comeback towards the end to finish second behind La Center. Turn

to

Wrestling/B4


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Area Sports

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s College Soccer, College Cupat WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, N.C. 10 a.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Washington Redskins at New York Giants. 10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA Golf, Qualifying Tournament Day 5 at Orange County National in Winter Garden, Fla. 10 a.m. (7) KIRO NFL Football, Denver Broncos at Kansas City Chiefs. 11 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s College Basketball, Purdue at Notre Dame. Noon (5) KING PGA Golf, Chevron World Challenge at Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, Calif. 1 p.m. (10) CITY NFL Football, Dallas Cowboys at Indianapolis Colts. 1 p.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Carolina Panthers at Seattle Seahawks. 1 p.m. (25) FSNW Men’s College Basketball, Oklahoma at Arizona. 3 p.m. (25) FSNW Men’s College Basketball, Virginia at Virginia Tech. 5 p.m. (25) FSNW Men’s College Basketball, Temple vs. Maryland in BB&T Classic at Washington, D.C. 5:15 p.m. (5) KING NFL Footbal, Pittsburgh Steelers at Baltimore Ravens. 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Rodeo, PRCA National Finals at Las Vegas, Nev. 7:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Men’s College Basketball, Texas at USC.

SPORTS SHOT

Bowling LAUREL LANES 7 Cedars Mixed Men’s high game: James Paulsen, 267; men’s high series: James Paulsen, 652. Women’s high game: Fitu Sharpe, 224; women’s high series: Fitu Sharpe, 528. Leading team: Bowling Blind. Mix And Match Men’s high game: Bob Gunn, 240; men’s high series: Joe Morrison, 669. Women’s high game: Vahl Burkett, 190; women’s high series: Mary Jane Birdsong, 515. Leading team: OFIMA.

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Winter League — Week 7, Dec. 3 Team Points 1. Triggs Dental Lab 55.5 2. Glass Services 46.7 3. Windermere 43.5 4. Golf Shop Guys 40.5 5. Clubhouse Comets No. 1 38 6. Laurel Lanes 38 7. Green Machine 36 8. The Brew Crew 31.5 9. Lakeside Industries 25.4 10. Clubhouse Comets No. 2 17 Gross: George Peabody, 37; Mel Triggs, 38; Rena Peabody, 39. Net: Leroy Chase, 31; Don Coventon, 31; Warren Taylor, 32; Eric Schaefermeyer, 33; Ruth Thomson, 33; Buck Ward, 33; Greg Shield, 35; Brian Doig, 35; Darrel Vincent, 35; Linda Chansky, 35. 2010 Apple Cup Best Ball — Final Results Gross: 1. Mark Mitrovich and Jim Jones Jr., 66; 2. Gary Thorne and Mike DuPuis, 69; 3. Gerald Petersen and Tom Hainstock, 71; 4. Paul Reed and Bill Evenstad, 71; 5. Rick Parkhurst and Bob Brodhun, 72. Net: 1. Keith lawrence and Claire Lawrence, 58; 2. Jan Hardin and Tim Morrisey, 63; 3. Dave Wahlstin and Todd Reed, 64; 4. Brian Duncan and Larry Aillaud, 64; 5. Tom Lawe and Gary Murphy, 64; 6, Gene Norton and Gene Middleton, 65; 7. Jay Keohokalole and Troy Atwell, 65.6; 8. Jim Bourget and Mike Clayton, 66; 9. Win Miller and Eric Kovatch, 66; 10. Bill Hansen and Jay Bruch, 66. Long drive (+3 to 11): Mark Mitrovich. Long drive (12 to 20): Troy Atwell. Long drive (21 and up): Gary Murphy. Closest to pin No. 17 (+3 to 11): Paul Reed. Closest to pin No. 17 (12 to 20): Bernie Anselmo. Closest to pin No. 17 (21 and up): Gary Murphy.

Basketball PA PARKS & RECREATION ADULT Dce. 4 League Standings Team W L Irwin Dental Center 2 0 Blue Sharks 2 0 4 In The Key 1 1 Langston Services 1 1 Burley Construction 1 1 Sergio’s/Tracy’s 1 1 Cougar’s 0 1 7 Cedar’s Casino 0 1 Ulin’s Concrete 0 2

Volleyball PA PARKS & RECREATION COED Dec. 4 League Standings Team W L D. A. Davidson 5 0 Blind Ambition Blinds 5 0 McCrorie Carpet One 4 1 High Energy Metals 4 1 Michael’s Seafood 3 1 Fitness West 3 2 A Brewed Espresso 3 2 Dave’s Repair 2 3 Elwha River Casino 1 2 Joyce General Store 1 3 Captain Zak’s 1 3 Northwest Wood 1 3 Olympic Medical Tire 1 4 Drake’s U-Bake Pizza 1 4 Les Schwab 0 4

Prep Sports Football Saturday’s Scores 1A Football Championship Championship Cascade Christian 42, Connell 35 2A Football Championship Championship Tumwater 34, Archbishop Murphy 14 4A Football Championship Championship Ferris 24, Skyline 16

The Associated Press

Feeling

ducky

The Oregon duck mascot is passed over head of fans after the football team’s 37-20 win over Oregon State on Saturday in Corvallis, Ore. The Ducks all but clinched a spot in the BCS title game with the win (see story on Page B1). Basketball Friday’s Scores BOYS Auburn 59, Tahoma 44 Auburn Mountainview 84, Highline 38 Battle Ground 67, Shorecrest 54 Bethel 71, Graham-Kapowsin 43 Bonney Lake 69, Washington 54 Bremerton 69, Central Kitsap 67 Capital 61, Shelton 42 Cascade (Leavenworth) 39, Selah 38 Cascade Christian 62, Franklin Pierce 57 Cedarcrest 73, W. F. West 50 Centralia 41, R.A. Long 29 Chiawana 70, Kennewick 54 Chimacum 61, Crosspoint Academy 37 Cle Elum/Roslyn 41, Wahluke 38 Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 74, Lewis and Clark 66 Curlew 53, St. Michael’s 34 Davis 63, West Valley (Yakima) 49 Federal Way 78, Puyallup 67 Fort Vancouver 73, Heritage 59 Foss 63, Stadium 56 Foster 71, Kamiak 59 Hoquiam 75, Aberdeen 57 Jackson 83, Glacier Peak 61 Jenkins (Chewelah) 68, Kettle Falls 19 Kentridge 81, Thomas Jefferson 50 Kentwood 60, Kentlake 43 Kingston 55, Port Angeles 52 Klahowya 49, Port Townsend 44 Lake City, Idaho 52, Enumclaw 29 Lake Stevens 70, Oak Harbor 41 Lake Washington 75, Interlake 45 Life Christian Academy 83, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 34 Lind-Ritzville 53, Columbia (Burbank) 43 Mercer Island 62, Mount Si 42 Mount Baker 52, Squalicum 49 Mount Tahoma 63, Wilson, Woodrow 46 Mount Vernon 80, Anacortes 61 Mt. Rainier 81, Kent Meridian 70 Mt. Rainier Lutheran 52, Cedar Park Christian (Everett) 39 Muckleshoot Tribal School 71, Tulalip Heritage 70 Newport 63, West Seattle 40 North Mason 56, North Kitsap 36 North Thurston 64, Fife 51 O’Dea 61, Eastside Catholic 28 Okanogan 76, Ephrata 34 Olympic 49, Sequim 42 Onalaska 58, Mossyrock 35 Oroville 70, Republic 44 Overlake School 62, Darrington 54 Pe Ell 76, Willapa Valley 58 Priest River, Idaho 57, Newport 40 Prosser 48, Kiona-Benton 34 Redmond 52, Shorewood 41 River View 64, Warden 60 Rochester 69, Orting 64 Rosalia 44, Liberty (Spangle) 36 Sammamish 58, Liberty (Renton) 53 Seattle Christian 51, Steilacoom 50 Seattle Prep 63, Blanchet 32 Shoreline Christian 46, Evergreen Lutheran 40 Skyview 50, Columbia River 49 Sunnyside 46, Eisenhower 39 Sunnyside Christian 73, Liberty Christian 46 Taholah 51, Crescent 27 The Oaks Academy 74, N. Idaho Christian, Idaho 36

Todd Beamer 74, Emerald Ridge 71 Toledo 76, Winlock 46 Toppenish 58, Highland 44 Trout Lake 61, Vancouver Christian 54, OT Walla Walla 45, Pasco 41 Wapato 81, Zillah 79 Wenatchee 59, Southridge 53 White Swan 70, Waterville 18 Wilbur-Creston 56, Mansfield 27 Yelm 45, Gig Harbor 29 Tournament Seattle Lutheran 63, Portland Lutheran, Ore. 28 GIRLS Arlington 58, Meadowdale 53 Bellarmine Prep 74, Lincoln 44 Bellevue Christian 60, King’s 40 Bethel 35, Graham-Kapowsin 29 Capital 64, Shelton 28 Cashmere 73, Seattle Academy 13 Castle Rock 41, Montesano 33 Central Kitsap 74, Bremerton 44 Charles Wright Academy 42, Northwest School 39 Chiawana 76, Kennewick 29 Cle Elum/Roslyn 62, Wahluke 32 Columbia (Burbank) 46, Lind-Ritzville 30 Colville 53, Reardan 50 Curlew 59, St. Michael’s 37 Davis 54, West Valley (Yakima) 37 East Valley (Spokane) 41, Sandpoint, Idaho 27 Eatonville 71, Bonney Lake 66 Edmonds-Woodway 51, Southridge, Ore. 36 Emerald Ridge 76, Todd Beamer 60 Ephrata 54, Okanogan 45 Federal Way 65, Puyallup 25 Ferndale 76, Bellingham 49 Garfield-Palouse 34, LaCrosse/Washtucna 21 Granger 59, Mabton 49 Heritage 64, Fort Vancouver 13 Jenkins (Chewelah) 50, Kettle Falls 47 Lake City, Idaho 71, University 63 Lake Washington 76, Interlake 19 Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 51, Medical Lake 42 Liberty (Renton) 63, Sammamish 13 Lyle-Klickitat-Wishram 31, King’s Way Christian School 27 Lynden Christian 55, Archbishop Murphy 54 Meridian 28, Coupeville 22 Moses Lake 61, Hanford 28 Mount Si 58, Mercer Island 44 Mount Tahoma 68, Wilson, Woodrow 53 Mount Vernon Christian 47, Rainier Christian 20 Mt. Rainier 73, Kent Meridian 42 Mt. Rainier Lutheran 36, Cedar Park Christian (Everett) 24 Newport 44, Priest River, Idaho 23 North Kitsap 52, North Mason 25 Olympic 50, Sequim 42 Oroville 40, Republic 38 Port Angeles 45, Kingston 40 Port Townsend 49, Klahowya 41 River View 69, Warden 22 Rochester 39, Orting 36 Rogers (Puyallup) 46, Ballard 38 Rosalia 58, Liberty (Spangle) 55 Seattle Christian 59, Fife 18 Seattle Lutheran 35, Portland Lutheran, Ore. 29 Selah 60, Cascade (Leavenworth) 47 Snohomish 51, Bothell 35

Spanaway Lake 63, Curtis 37 Stadium 47, Foss 22 Sunnyside Christian 49, Liberty Christian 25 Tahoma 55, Auburn 46 Thomas Jefferson 38, Kentridge 32 Toledo 52, Winlock 32 Walla Walla 40, Pasco 28 Warrenton, Ore. 61, Ilwaco 58 Wenatchee 61, Southridge 50 West Valley (Spokane) 54, Central Valley 46 White River 57, Enumclaw 29 Woodland 66, W. F. West 45 Yelm 48, Bainbridge 40, OT

Football NFL All Times PST NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 6 0 .455 209 St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 213 San Francisco 4 7 0 .364 187 Arizona 3 8 0 .273 194 East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 8 4 0 .667 344 N.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 277 Washington 5 6 0 .455 215 Dallas 3 8 0 .273 256 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 9 2 0 .818 276 New Orleans 8 3 0 .727 265 Tampa Bay 7 4 0 .636 219 Carolina 1 10 0 .091 140 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 8 3 0 .727 222 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 269 Minnesota 4 7 0 .364 189 Detroit 2 9 0 .182 258 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 7 4 0 .636 285 San Diego 6 5 0 .545 310 Oakland 5 6 0 .455 255 Denver 3 8 0 .273 250 East W L T Pct PF New England 9 2 0 .818 334 N.Y. Jets 9 2 0 .818 264 Miami 6 5 0 .545 205 Buffalo 2 9 0 .182 229 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 5 0 .545 282 Jacksonville 6 5 0 .545 240 Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 257 Houston 5 7 0 .417 288 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 8 3 0 .727 250 Pittsburgh 8 3 0 .727 254 Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 216 Cincinnati 2 9 0 .182 225 Today’s Games San Francisco at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Denver at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 10 a.m.

College Basketball Far West

BYU 78, Hawaii 57 Denver 66, CS Northridge 63 Illinois 73, Gonzaga 61 N. Arizona 91, Bethany, Calif. 50 Utah Valley 77, Sacramento St. 52 Washington 108, Texas Tech 79 Weber St. 65, Seattle 61 Wyoming 81, Indiana St. 51

Southwest

Arkansas 75, Troy 60 Houston 75, Sam Houston St. 71, OT Houston Baptist 88, Texas St. 81 N. Iowa 64, TCU 60 North Texas 70, Texas Southern 64 Prairie View 90, Ecclesia 65 Rice 75, Lamar 73 SMU 71, Grambling St. 51 Texas A&M 79, Pacific 59

Midwest

Akron 54, Ill.-Chicago 52 Austin Peay 77, E. Illinois 73, OT California 76, Iowa St. 73 Cincinnati 81, Toledo 47 Cleveland St. 82, Wis.-Milwaukee 59 Dayton 70, Miami (Ohio) 58 Detroit 78, Wright St. 69

IPFW 76, S. Utah 66 Illinois St. 62, Montana St. 56 Indiana 79, Savannah St. 57 Iowa 70, Idaho St. 53 Marquette 96, Longwood 65 Marshall 65, Ohio 57 Michigan 65, Harvard 62 Michigan St. 74, Bowling Green 39 Middle Tennessee 73, SIU-Edwardsville 64, OT Minnesota 71, Cornell 66 Missouri St. 101, Cent. Arkansas 61 N. Dakota St. 82, S. Dakota St. 75 North Dakota 54, E. Michigan 49 Oakland, Mich. 99, UMKC 62 Oral Roberts 63, IUPUI 61 Purdue 66, Alabama 47 S. Illinois 75, Chicago St. 61 Utah 68, Bradley 60 Valparaiso 66, Loyola of Chicago 56 W. Illinois 57, Centenary 51 W. Michigan 109, Alma 50 Wis.-Green Bay 74, Youngstown St. 59 Wisconsin 76, South Dakota 61

South Alabama A&M 75, Martin Meth. 70

Appalachian St. 78, Samford 69 Bethune-Cookman 62, Florida A&M 55 Chattanooga 67, W. Carolina 65 Coastal Carolina 73, Charleston Southern 71 Coll. of Charleston 92, Georgia Southern 84 Davidson 68, The Citadel 53 Delaware St. 64, Md.-Eastern Shore 53 E. Kentucky 77, Tenn.-Martin 69 East Carolina 91, Fayetteville St. 70 Florida Atlantic 50, South Florida 42 Gardner-Webb 59, Radford 52 George Mason 80, UNC Wilmington 52 Georgia St. 64, James Madison 63 High Point 76, UNC Asheville 73 Jackson St. 61, Fla. International 52 Jacksonville 71, Florida Gulf Coast 56 Liberty 75, Winthrop 72 Lipscomb 77, Mercer 65 Louisiana Tech 67, Louisiana-Monroe 58 Louisville 97, South Alabama 70

Memphis 77, W. Kentucky 61 Miami 79, West Virginia 76 Mississippi 86, Southern Miss. 81 Morehead St. 75, Murray St. 65 Morgan St. 70, Coppin St. 64 N. Carolina A&T 89, Norfolk St. 81, OT N.C. Central 74, S. Carolina St. 71, OT North Carolina 75, Kentucky 73 Presbyterian 92, VMI 78 Stetson 74, North Florida 64 Tennessee Tech 64, Jacksonville St. 62 Tulane 63, Louisiana-Lafayette 52 UCF 74, SE Louisiana 49 Va. Commonwealth 59, William & Mary 55 Vanderbilt 85, Belmont 76 Wake Forest 75, Holy Cross 64 Wofford 75, Elon 69

East

Albany, N.Y. 88, Siena 82, OT Boston College 76, Massachusetts 71 Brown 62, Maine 54 Bucknell 52, Boston U. 49

Columbia 73, Stony Brook 72 Delaware 75, Old Dominion 67 Drexel 63, Northeastern 58 Duke 82, Butler 70 Fairleigh Dickinson 48, Cent. Connecticut St. 46 Fordham 74, Lehigh 67 Georgetown 68, Utah St. 51 Hampton 67, Howard 55 Hofstra 74, Towson 62 Long Island U. 81, St. Francis, Pa. 67 N.J. Tech 65, St. Joseph’s, L.I. 57 New Hampshire 65, Colgate 60 Oklahoma St. 92, La Salle 87, 2OT Penn 68, Army 52 Penn St. 77, Duquesne 73 Pittsburgh 87, Rider 68 Providence 87, Rhode Island 74 Quinnipiac 77, Mount St. Mary’s, Md. 75 St. Bonaventure 76, Buffalo 74 St. Francis, NY 65, Robert Morris 63 St. Peter’s 66, Manhattan 49 Syracuse 65, N.C. State 59 Vermont 82, Yale 78 Wagner 73, Sacred Heart 68, OT

BCS: Horned Frogs headed for Rose? Continued from B1 derided system of determining a champion, sans That was one of the playoff. This year’s have not is most controversial episodes in what has become TCU, which finished 12-0. an annual debate about But it topped the nonwho got the best and BCS Mountain West Conworst of the deal in col- ference, not the highly lege football’s widely regarded SEC, and never

had the cachet to break into the top two. The Horned Frogs will almost certainly end up making their first trip to the Rose Bowl, where they’ll likely play Wisconsin, the pick from a threeway tie for the Big Ten

title because of its higher BCS ranking. “Everyone won. There’s nothing we can do about it,” TCU coach Gary Patterson said after Saturday’s games. “I can live with all three being undefeated.”

PA 275 231 225 319 PA 281 240 262 301 PA 209 197 223 276 PA 172 166 239 282 PA 231 225 256 323 PA 266 187 225 295 PA 252 294 218 321 PA 188 181 229 288

Cleveland at Miami, 10 a.m. Chicago at Detroit, 10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Oakland at San Diego, 1:05 p.m. Carolina at Seattle, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m.

College Football The AP Top 25 Fared Saturday No. 1 Oregon (12-0) beat Oregon State 37-20. Next: TBA. No. 2 Auburn (13-0) beat No. 18 South Carolina 56-17, SEC Championship. Next: TBA. No. 3 TCU (12-0) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 4 Wisconsin (11-1) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 5 Stanford (11-1) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 6 Ohio State (11-1) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 7 Michigan State (11-1) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 8 Arkansas (10-2) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 9 Boise State (11-1) beat Utah State 50-14. Netx: TBA. No. 10 Oklahoma (10-2) vs. No. 13 Nebraska, Big 12 Championship. Next: . No. 11 LSU (10-2) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 12 Virginia Tech (11-2) beat No. 20 Florida State 44-33, ACC Championship. Next: vs. TBA at Orange Bowl. No. 13 Nebraska (10-2) vs. No. 10 Oklahoma, Big 12 Championship. Next: . No. 14 Nevada (12-1) beat Louisiana Tech 35-17. Next: TBA. No. 15 Missouri (10-2) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 16 Oklahoma State (10-2) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 17 Alabama (9-3) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 18 South Carolina (9-4) lost to No. 2 Auburn 56-17, SEC Championship. Next: TBA. No. 19 Texas A&M (9-3) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 20 Florida State (9-4) lost to No. 12 Virginia Tech 44-33, ACC Championship. Next: TBA. No. 21 Utah (10-2) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 22 Mississippi State (8-4) did not play. Next: TBA. No. 23 West Virginia (9-3) beat Rutgers 35-14. Next: TBA. No. 24 Northern Illinois (10-3) lost to Miami (Ohio) 26-21, Friday. Next: TBA. No. 25 Hawaii (9-3) vs. UNLV. Next: vs. TBA at Hawaii Bowl, Dec. 24.

Waller scorches Vancouver for win Pirates guard hits for 38; Von Vogt gets first victory Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula College men’s basketball team rebounded from an 0-2 start to the season with a 82-73 home win over Vancouver Island on Saturday night. Sammeon Wallerexploded for 38 points on 12-of-20 shooting to boost the Pirates to their first win under head coach Lance Von Waller Vogt. “It’s a huge win for a bunch of young guys who haven’t won a game like this at the college level,” Von Vogt said.

NWAACC Waller’s point total is the most for a Pirate since Ryan Rutherford scored 41 against Olympic last January. Thad Vinson added 13 points and DeJuan Smith scored 12 in the Peninsula win. The Pirates were trailing Vancouver, the fourth-ranked university in Canada, 33-13 with seven minutes to go before the half when they went on a 19-6 run to cut the lead down to seven at halftime. “We were down twenty points at one time,” Von Vogt said. “But we changed the tides and ended up running away with it.” The Pirates will next travel to the Mount Hood Crossover Tournament on Dec. 17 starting at 6 p.m.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

2A/1A Boys Hoops Capsules Port Angeles (2A) ■ Head coach: Wes Armstrong (second year; 12-11 overall) ■ Last year: 9-7 in Olympic League, 12-11 overall; reached 3A districts ■ Returning starters: Colin Wheeler (6-3, Sr., G/F); Kyler Morgan (6-2, Sr. G); Ian Ward (6-3, Sr., F) ■ Top newcomers: Justin Antioquia (6-2, Sr., G); Casey Smith (6-5, Sr., C); Hayden McCartney (6-3, Jr., F); Keenen Walker (5-10, Jr., G); Cameron Braithwaite (5-9, Jr., PG) ■ Player to watch: Colin Wheeler The All-Olympic League honorable mention forward came on at the end of his junior year, averaging 16.0 points per game in the last 10 contests. ■ Outlook: The Roughriders rebounded from a dismal three-win season in 2008-09 by returning to the Class 3A district playoffs in head coach Wes Armstrong’s first year. The Riders lost all but three players from that 12-11 team, but Armstrong is confident this year’s squad is talented enough to fill the void. “We will have tremendous depth at all positions and we are getting much better at putting the ball in the basket. But our number one key to success is getting after it on the defensive end,” Armstrong said. “For us to compete we need to limit our opponents scoring opportunities and make it difficult for them to run their offensive sets.” Armstrong wants his team to push the ball more this season. The team will press on defense while playing mostly man-to-man. “We think all the pieces are there to compete for one of the top spots in the Olympic League,” Armstrong said.

Sequim (2A) ■ Head coach: Greg Glasser (fourth year; 27-42 overall) ■ Last year: 9-7 in Olympic League, 10-12 overall; reached 2A districts ■ Returning starters: Corbin Webb (6-1, Jr., G) ■ Top newcomers: Jayson Brocklesby (6-2, Soph., F), Gabe Carter (6-3, Soph., F) ■ Player to watch: Corbin Webb The Wolves’ starting point guard since his freshman year, Webb is as polished as they come in the Olympic League. ■ Outlook: Sequim lost an awful lot from a team that was in the Olympic League race nearly the entire regular season. Four of five starters are gone — one being junior Frank Catelli, who didn’t come out this winter — with only Webb and senior Nick Camporini (6-1, G/F) significant contributors last year. Kenny Meier (5-9, Sr., G) and Josh McMinn (6-3, Sr., F) also saw some time. “I think that learning by fire is what’s going to happen for us,” said Sequim head coach Greg Glasser, whose team won at 3A Bainbridge 64-59 in its first game of the season. Most of the team played dozens of games together during the summer and fall in AAU competition. So the Wolves may be more developed than their experience suggests. “Our basketball IQ is pretty high,” Glasser said. “These guys understand the game. They understand what to do in clutch situations. “We’re not going to be as athletic as some of the other teams in the Olympic League, but I think with our anticipation and our knowledge of the game, that’s what’s going to make us competitive this year.”

Port Townsend (1A) ■ Head coach: Tom Webster (first year) ■ Last year: 6-10 in Olympic League, 9-14 overall; reached 1A Tri-District ■ Returning starters: Seiji Thielk (6-3, Sr., G); Jacob DeBerry (6-3, Sr., C); Hab Rubio (5-7, Sr., PG) ■ Top newcomers: Matt Juran (6-3, Sr., C); Kylen Solvik (6-3, Jr., G/F); Kyle Kelly (6-0, Soph., G); Robert Ristick (6-2., Sr., F) ■ Player to watch: Jacob DeBerry One of the Redskins’ top rebounders last year, DeBerry will be counted on to score more this season.

Also . . .

■ More hoops previews to come later this week

■ Outlook: Tom Webster begins the second leg of his three-sport tour by taking over a Redskins team that will once again make its bones on defense. “Team defense is a PT tradition,” said Webster, who promises to stick to the same man-to-man principles outgoing coach John Stroeder taught. “We’ve got to keep that going.” Stroeder still visits practices whenever his schedule allows, providing the same bellowing defensive voice that led the Redskins to state twice in 2007-09. With the team’s two top scorers from last year gone — Eric Thomas and Evan O’Brien — the bigger concern seems to be where the points will come from. “We’ve got guys who are willing to shoot it,” Webster said. “We’re going to find out in a hurry [who will take that role]. “I would love to score more than like 30 points a game, which PT did win games scoring around 30 points a game [before].” Port Townsend must finish above two 2A teams in order to reach the playoffs.

Forks (1A) ■ Head coach: Scott Justus (second year, 150-77 overall in previous seasons) ■ Last year: 4-10 in SWL Evergreen Division, 8-12 overall; missed playoffs ■ Returning starters: Frank Noles (6-1, Sr., F); Brady Castellano (6-3, Jr., F); Tyler Penn (5-11, Jr., G); Jonah Penn (5-10, Jr., PG) ■ Top newcomers: Bryce Johnson (6-2, Sr., C); Cameron Leons (6-0, Jr., G/F); Tanner Watson (5-8, Jr., G); Shaquille Cress (6-2, Jr., C) ■ Player to watch: Frank Noles Noles scored as many as 26 points in a game last year while averaging 9.0 points and 6.7 rebounds a game. ■ Outlook: The Spartans’ rebuilding continues in Year 2 of the third Scott Justus era on the West End. Forks returns four starters from a team that finished out of the playoffs for the third time in four years. That includes Noles and 6-3 forward Brady Castellano (6.9 points per game). “We’ve got a lot to prove and a long ways to go,” Justus said. “I used the word potential a lot last year because I feel that these kids are so athletic and they have so much potential. It just never seemed to come out last year.” Things will be even tougher for Forks this season with former 2A’s Elma and Hoquiam back in the Evergreen mix. Forks likely must finish in the top four to reach the postseason. “I do expect to finish in the top four, but I always expect to be there,” Justus said. “We have trouble scoring the basketball, though. “We’re going to have to have three or four guys step up. It won’t be the same guy every night. We just don’t have that go-to guy.” Matt Schubert

B3

Preps: PA wins Continued from B1 Port Angeles (1-0 in league and overall) made just 13 of 59 field goal attempts, including just 4 of 23 from 3-point range. Yet an edge on rebounds (40-28) and turnovers (2516) was enough to extend the Riders’ Olympic League win streak to 22 games. (The last loss came to Kingston in January 2009.) The absence of Buccaneers (0-1, 0-2) star Sophia Baetz — the All-Olympic League player tore a ligament in her knee this summer — didn’t hurt things either. “We had a lot of open shots, and we just didn’t capitalize on them,” Mike Knowles said. Jeffers led the Riders with 12 rebounds and also scored five points. Sophomore Mariah Frazier added eight points and nine rebounds, while junior Kiah Jones had seven points and six rebounds. Port Angeles 45, Kingston 40 Kingston 7 6 14 13 — 40 Port Angeles 10 11 10 14 — 45 Kingston (40) Carper 12, Hilse 10, Rose-Alberts 8, Brown 4, Wicklein 3, Snaza 3. Port Angeles (45) Madison 10, Knowles 9, Frazier 8, K. Jones 7, Jeffers 5, Johnson 4, Rodocker 2.

Olympic 50, Sequim 42

Chimacum (1A) ■ Head coach: Jim Eldridge (second year; 4-16 overall) ■ Last year: 2-10 in 1A Nisqually League, 4-16 overall; missed playoffs ■ Returning starters: Landon Cray (5-8, Jr., G); Quinn Eldridge (5-11, Jr., G); Mason Moug (6-3, Sr., F); Dylan Brown-Bishop (6-2, Sr., F); Ryan Riggle (6-3, Sr., F) ■ Top newcomers: Riley Downs (6-1, Fr., G/F) ■ Player to watch: Landon Cray The Cowboys’ ace pitcher isn’t too shabby on the hardwood either. He was Chimacum’s leading scorer last year at 12.1 points per game and 2.4 steals. ■ Outlook: Chimacum started the long trek back to respectability after following up a winless 08-09 campaign with four wins. Now in head coach Jim Eldridge’ second year the Cowboys are looking to compete for one of the 1A Nisqually League’s five postseason berths. Chimacum returns all five starters from a year ago and all but two players from the entire roster.

Sunday, December 5, 2010

SEQUIM — The Trojans held off a late Wolves rally to hand them their 43rd straight loss Friday night. Taylor Balkan had 14 points and Lea Hopson 11 for Sequim, which got to within five points in the fourth quarter after entering the frame down 14. Sequim (0-1 in league and overall) travels to Port Townsend on Tuesday for a 5:15 p.m. game Olympic 50, Sequim 42 Olympic Sequim

12 4 22 12 — 50 4 8 12 18 — 42 Individual Scoring

Olympic (50) Balkan 14, Hopson 11, Guan 2, Desand 4, Briones 2, Zbaraschuk 7. Sequim (42) Lagat 2, Quiteuis 11, Jones 6, Payne 7, Jackson 9, Halstead 16.

Quilcene 29, Mary M. Knight 22 ELMA — The Rangers survived a defensive slugfest for their first win of the season Friday night. Sarah Bacchus and Leanne Weed each had seven points for Quilcene (1-1) in the nonleague win. Quilcene 29, Mary M. Knight 22 Individual Scoring Quilcene (29) Kaiser 4, Lara 1, Bacchus 7, Weed 7, Turley 4, Beukes 4. Mary M. Knight (22) Not reported.

Port Townsend 49, Klahowya 41 (OT) SILVERDALE — The Redskins eked out a win against the Eagles in their Friday night Olympic League opener. Jordan Dixon’s layup tied the game for the Eagles with two seconds remaining in regulation, sending the game into overtime. Bella Fox-Garrison led the Port Townsend with 16 points but it was Kiley Maag’s two 3-pointers in overtime that helped the Redskins beat the Eagles. Port Townsend next hosts Sequim on Tuesday starting at 5:15 p.m.

Port Townsend 49, Klahowya 41 (OT) Klahowya 11 9 7 9 5 — 41 Port Townsend 7 20 7 2 13 — 49 Individual Scoring Klahowya (41) Bowling 3, Lindgren 1, Lever 5, Durbin 6, Dixon 13, Page 2, Holt 6, Rouse 4, Winters 2. Port Townsend (49) Johnson 3, Evalt 4, Maag 13, Dowdle 8, FoxGarrison 16, Hossack 5.

Taholah 53, Crescent 27 JOYCE — The Loggers lost their opening game with new coach Nate Mandeville at home against Taholah on Friday night. Sara Moore led the team with 10 points, seven rebounds and three steals. Taholah 53, Crescent 27 Taholah Crescent

10 13 13 17 — 53 9 5 5 5 — 27 Individual Scoring

Taholah (53) Moore 10, McGowan 7, Bellford 4, Jakueukora 6. Crescent (27) James 17, Johnstone 13, Grover-McCony 9.

Boys Basketball Olympic 49, Sequim 42 SILVERDALE — The Trojans crashed the boards to hand the Wolves a loss in their first Olympic League game of the season Friday night. Corbin Webb poured in 12 points and Nick Camporini 11 to lead Sequim, but Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News it wasn’t enough to over- Port Angeles’ Mariah Frazier, front, takes a shot come an off shooting night amid a sea of hands from Kingston defenders in and 19 offensive rebounds the second quarter on Friday in Port Angeles. from Olympic. “Nothing was going,” Kyler Morgan had 13 Sequim coach Greg Glasser Clallam Bay 65, Eastside Acad. 20 Eastside Academy 5 5 4 6 — 20 points to lead the Riders said. Clallam Bay 22 14 16 13 — 65 while Zane Ravenholt had Individual Scoring “We still stayed focused (20) 26 points and seven no matter the situation. We Eastside Not reported. rebounds for the Buccajust couldn’t buy a basket Clallam Bay (65) neers and hit a pair of free Portnoy 24, Welever 12, Teachout 6, James 6, tonight.” throws to clinch the win. Sequim (0-1, 1-1) heads Ritter 4, Willis 4, Folkes 2. Port Angeles is on the to Port Townsend on Tues- Clallam Bay 72, Wishkah Valley 41 road again for its next game day night for another league Wishkah Valley 8 13 5 15 — 41 Clallam Bay 20 13 24 15 — 72 at North Mason on Tuesday game. Individual Scoring with the tipoff starting at 7 Wishkah Valley (41) Anderson 17, Johnson 10, Talevich 4, Mitchell 3, Olympic 49, Sequim 42 p.m. Sequim 9 9 8 16 — 42 Olympic 13 6 15 15 — 49 Sequim (42) Hill 3, Meier 3, Carter 6, Webb 12, Brocklesby 7, Camporini 11 Olympic (49) Campbell 6, C.J. Enchomienda 6, Gallagher 15, Otis 9, Phillips 4, Muir 1, Fesuluai 2, Sullivan 2, Cable 5

Klahowya 49, Port Townsend 44 PORT TOWNSEND — The Redskins (0-1) failed to hang on to a 10-point third quarter lead on their way to dropping their first Olympic League game of the season Friday night. Jacob DeBerry had 20 points and seven rebounds, but it wasn’t enough to hold off the Eagles, who outscore the Redskins 14-4 in the fourth quarter. Klahowya 49, Port Townsend 44 Klahowya 13 11 11 14 — 49 Port Townsend 10 19 11 4 — 44 Individual Scoring Klahowya (49) Smith 2, Davis 14, Hartford 8, Harstad 2, Rose 7, Mitchell Flowers 16. Port Townsend (44) Thielk 5, Kelly 7, DeBerry 20, Solvik 7, Juran 3, Coppenrath 2.

Clallam Bay wins 2 CLALLAM BAY — Jacob Portnoy and Kyle Hess each had 20-point games to lead the Bruins to victories over Eastside Academy and Wishkah Valley this weekend. Both wins were blowouts, as the Bruins (2-0) topped Eastside 65-20 on Friday and Wishkah 72-41 on Saturday in a pair of nonleague affairs.

Higgins 2. Clallam Bay (72) Hess 25, Portnoy 19, Ritter 6, Willis 6, Teachout 6, James 4.

Quilcene 76, Mary M. Knight 51 ELMA — Ben Davidson went off for 30 points and Brandon Bancroft notched a triple-double to lead the Rangers to a nonleague victory Friday night. Davidson scored 16 of his game-high 30 during a 26-13 Quilcene fourth quarter and Bancroft added 23 points, 11 steals and 10 rebounds. “We just simply wore them down,” Quilcene coach Mark Thompson said. Quilcene (1-1) hosts Crescent on Monday at 7 p.m. Quilcene 76, Mary M. Knight 51 Quilcene 14 18 18 26 — 76 Mary M. Knight 12 10 16 13 — 51 Individual Scoring Quilcene (76) Davidson 30, Bancroft 23, Jordan 8, Pleines 11, Perez 2, Shreier 2. Mary M. Knight (51) Not reported.

Kingston 55, Port Angeles 52 KINGSTON — The Buccaneers outlasted the Riders on Friday night in a game featuring a pair of Olympic League favorites. Kingston (1-0, 2-0) took a 48-40 lead with four minutes remaining, but let the Riders (0-1, 1-1) back into the game by missing six free throws in the final minute.

Kingston 55, Port Angeles 52 Port Angeles Kingston

10 12 16 14 — 52 10 10 18 17 — 55 Individual Scoring Port Angeles (52) Phair 2, Morgan 13, Walker 2, Antioquia 5, Ward 4, Wheeler 12, McCartney 9, Smith 5. Kingston (55) Combs 2, Sander 3, Hill 12, Byers 10, Ravenholt 26, Sundquist 2.

Loggers split pair JOYCE — The Loggers split a pair of nonleague games this weekend to start the season 1-1. The Loggers didn’t have enough gas to keep up with Taholah as they lost 73-52 in their season opener Friday night. Joel Williams scored 21 points to lead the Loggers, while Joey Barnes had 12 of his own. The Loggers then regrouped the next day and beat Eastside Academy 54-20. Williams had a doubledouble, scoring 16 points, 11 rebounds and eight steals, while Kia Story added 16 points. Taholah 73, Crescent 52 Taholah Crescent

18 13 22 20 — 73 7 15 14 15 — 52 Individual Scoring

Taholah (73) Tahkel 24, Jackson 15. Crescent (52) Williams 21, Barnes 12, Weingrand 8.

Crescent 54, Eastside Academy 20 Eastside Acad. 3 8 4 5 — 20 Crescent 23 14 19 8 — 54 Individual Scoring Eastside Academy (20) Lepton 9, Calduran 8. Crescent (54) Williams 16, Story 16, Barnes 9.

Shot: Stepping up to the line Continued from B1 With kids so focused on either shooting from distance or driving to the hoop, the 12- and 15-foot jumper has fallen into the margins. Players spend much of their formative years (fifth through eighth grades) hoisting shots from deep. As a result, they develop bad habits with their technique that negatively affect anything shot inside that range. “I really believe that keeping kids within their range has a huge effect on their technique,” said Hill, who wrote his thesis on the art of the jump shot. “I would never let [my son] Evan shoot the ball outside of 15 feet until he was an eighth-grader. By the time he got to high school [he could shoot well behind the line].” That being said, Hill conceded, “Nick Camporini wanted to shoot nothing but 3s [when he was younger].

“Now he can shoot from more than 30 or even 15 years ago, opening up the distance, too.” lane to drivers and discour3-point specialists aging them from taking a 16-foot shot. Therein lies the other Thus, it isn’t all that problem, because coaches uncommon for high school aren’t completely innocent teams to shoot upwards of in this whole thing either. 18 to 25 3s in a game with Three-point specialists almost everything else in or like Camporini are highly around the paint. valued. “The 3-point shot really Coaches know how much opened the lanes up,” said the 3-point shot can change Hill, who has been involved the tenor of a game, and as a coach with Sequim basthey want that weapon as ketball since 1977. “It did much as anyone. exactly what they hoped it So if a player can knock would. that shot down with some “When that happened, consistency, he’ll often be that 12 to 17 foot range shot given carte blanche to shoot just became an unacceptfrom the outside. able attempt. It took coaches In fact, many coaches a while and kids a while to now teach a “3 or in the key” figure that out, but it was philosophy; one that encour- gradual.” ages players to either fire it Still, there are times up from distance or get into when that shot presents the lane for a layup or con- itself. tact. The short corner (a The threat of the 16-foot baseline shot) is 3-pointer has also led often one of the weaker coaches to put defensive spots in zone defense. pressure on the ball a lot Teams that run the tra-

ditional flex also get a lot of good looks on the elbows (an area extended from each side of the free throw line). Yet those shots are often the hardest for players to make. “Sometimes that’s the toughest shot in basketball,” Port Angeles coach Wes Armstrong said. If only there were a line there. Maybe then it would change. It seemed to have worked with the outside shot. “Kids shoot the ball at distance far better than they used to,” said Hill, who played when teams relied on hitting the 12- and 15footer. “Just in our scrimmage the other night we had eight different kids who hit a 3. “That would have been unheard of 30 years ago.”

________ Sports writer Matt Schubert can be reached at 360-417-3526 or at matt.schubert@peninsuladailynews.com.


B4

Sunday, December 5, 2010

SportsRecreation

Tech-nically dominant UW romps in 108-79 home win

The Huskies closed the first half with an 8-0 run, including a lay-in and dunk by Bryan-Amaning. Holiday nearly broke his career high of 18 by that point, after scoring 13 points — including three 3-pointers — to give the Huskies a 14-8 lead in the first 4 minutes. The Huskies, used a 19-6 run midway through the first half to lead 43-27 after Texas Tech had cut the lead to 24-21 on Roberson’s five straight points. “I think they are better than they were last year,” Texas Tech coach Pat Knight said. “They pass the ball a lot better. “Last year they relied on a couple of guys more than they do this year. I mean they have five guys out on the floor who are a threat. Especially, deep threats.”

The Associated Press

SEATTLE— Justin Holiday had just the kind of game his coach knew he could. The senior had 17 of his career-high 20 points in the first half to lead No. 23 Washington past Texas Tech 10879 on Saturday. “He had a phenomenal game,” Washington coach Lorenzo Romar said. “He’s a stat-sheet stuffer. He had 17 in the first half. “Good players can score or good players can defend. The great players can do both. He did a great job.” Matthew Bryan-Amaning added 18 points, Isaiah Thomas had 16 and C.J. Wilcox scored 11 for Washington (5-2), which won its second consecutive game after two losses to Top 25 teams Kentucky and Michigan State at the Maui Invitational. Holiday hit a career-high four 3-pointers and finished with nine rebounds. “I felt normal,” Holiday said. “A lot of my shots were open so I didn’t have to force them. “And every time I shot I didn’t really think about it.”

No. 20 Illinois 73, Gonzaga 61 The Associated Press

Washington’s Terrence Ross goes to the basket late in the second half against Texas Tech during Saturday’s game in Seattle. Brad Reese scored 19 while John Roberson and David Tairu had 14 apiece to lead Texas Tech (5-4), which has lost three of its last four games. The Huskies led 61-42 at halftime before the Red Raiders scored seven in a

row to get within 75-62 with 12:28 left. Bryan-Amaning responded with two free throws and two dunks to push the lead to 19 and help the Huskies cruise to their 24th straight non-conference home win.

SEATTLE — Demetri McCamey finished with 11 points and seven assists and Illinois was blistering from beyond the arc in a defeat of Gonzaga on Saturday. Mike Tisdale hit a pair of 3-pointers early in the second half to extend a 34-28 lead, and the Illini (8-1) went on a 14-3 run to take a 62-44 advantage. Ten of Illinois’ first 11 baskets in the second half came from beyond the 3-point line.

Apple Continued from B1 When the desperation throw of Washington State quarterback Jeff Tuel fell into the arms of Washington safety Nate Fellner on the final play, those same fans rushed the turf to celebrate the Huskies’ first bowl trip since 2002. But they did have to dodge snowballs and water bottles flying from the angry Washington State student section in an ugly scene that nearly got out of control. They’ll find out today where they are headed. The likely destinations: either San Antonio for the Alamo Bowl, or the Holiday Bowl in San Diego. “I don’t really have words to explain how I feel right now,” Locker said. “I’m just so proud to be a part of this team, part of this program.” Two years ago, Washington (6-6, 5-4 Pac-10) walked out of this same stadium a program plummeting downward, on its way to an 0-12 season and wholesale changes. It was the bottom of a six-year run when the Huskies won just 18 games. So while the celebration may seem over the top for a team that won its final three games to finish 6-6, just getting to that point is a milestone for Washington. Of BCS conference teams, only Baylor and Duke had longer droughts without a bowl game than the Huskies, whose last postseason appearance came in 2002 with a trip to the Sun Bowl. “This has been four or five years in the making for a few of us,” Washington safety Nate Williams said. “It means a lot to us.” Locker’s touchdown throw to Kearse made up for two costly turnovers earlier by the quarterback, when the Huskies were bound for points that would have made this victory far more comfortable. And Locker was helped along by the second-best rushing day in Washington history from Chris Polk.

Peninsula Daily News

Lose this and season’s over Seahawks host NFL’s worst in must-win game IF LAST WEEK’S game against Kansas City was a must win for the Seattle Seachickens, then today’s game at home against 1-10 Carolina is a must, must, must win. After all, if you Brad can’t beat LaBrie the worst team in football at home, then it’s time to hang up the old cleats and go fishing. Or maybe you should stay home and knit. Evidently, the Seachickens didn’t get the message about the must win last week. The pregame memo to the Seachickens must have read: Go ahead, take this Sunday off. Don’t worry your little heads off about tackling fundamentals. Let’s see who can have the most missed tackles this game. The very young Chiefs, these same Chiefs who have been struggling for several years, came rolling into Seattle and stomped Seattle into submission by a 42-24 score. Seattle gave up 503 total yards, 270 on the ground. That’s a lot of missed tackles. And it’s also the defensive stats of a very bad college team. The Seachickens are a mediocre 3-2 at home (both blowout losses) and now face the reeling Panthers. The one-win, can’t-do-anything-right Panthers. Let’s hope Carolina has an off game to give our Seachickens a fighting chance.

Carolina (1-10) at Seattle (5-6) Time/TV: Today, 1:15 p.m., Ch. 13. Opening line: Seattle by 6½. Last meeting: Panthers beat Seahawks 13-10, Dec. 16, 2007. Last week: Panthers lost to Browns 24-23; Seahawks lost to Chiefs 42-24. Panthers unit rankings: Offense overall (32), rush (22), pass (32); Defense overall (14), rush (25), pass (7t). Seahawks unit rankings: Offense overall (29), rush (32), pass (17); Defense overall (30), rush (22), pass (30) Panthers streaks, stats and notes: Panthers making first trip to Seattle since NFC championship game in January 2006, won by Seahawks 34-14. Panthers have worst offense in NFL, averaging 259 total yards per game. Only five teams, including Seattle, average under 300 ypg. After struggling through much of season on ground, Panthers have averaged 129 yards rushing over last four games, including season high 151 at Cleveland. RB Jonathan Stewart returned last week after missing two games with concussion and ran for 98 yards. Washington native playing first game in home state. LB Jon Beason has 120 tackles, and with six games remaining has chance to break his club record of 169 set last year. Seahawks streaks, stats and notes Seattle’s offense ranks 25th or worse in NFL in eight major statistical categories: total yards, yards per play, yards rushing per game and attempt, first downs, third- and fourth-down efficiency and points per game. Seattle’s 20 yards rushing last week tied for third-fewest in franchise history. QB Matt Hasselbeck two wins shy of tying Dave Kreig for most wins by QB in franchise history. Hasselbeck threw for 282 yards last week against Kansas City, but 159 came on two completions to WR Ben Obomanu. WR Mike Williams missed last week with foot strain and questionable this week. He caught 41 passes in his previous six games. After racking up 21 sacks in first seven games, Seattle’s defense has not gotten to quarterback in three of past four, all losses LB David Hawthorne leads Seattle with 65 total tackles. He signed one-year extension through 2011 season this week.

That means Green Bay falls out of this very unscientific Top-Six list because 1. New England the Packers fell to the FalPatriots (9-2) — Seachicken castoff Deion Branch cons last week and are now a pedestrian 7-4, like had three catches for 113 yards and two touchdowns four other teams. That said, Green Bay lost 20-17 against the Lions on on a field goal with 9 secThanksgiving. Seattle could have used Branch (or onds left at Atlanta. anyone, for that matter, who can actually catch the Bottom Six ball) against the Chiefs. 27. Minnesota 2. New York Jets (9-2) Vikings (4-7) — Darn the — Still tied with the Pats Redskins for losing to the for the best record after Vikings last week. It’s hard destroying the Bengals on to make fun of Brett Favre Thanksgiving. The issue of when Minnesota wins. who is the best between 28. Arizona Cardinals the two teams will be (3-8) — It’s pretty much decided Monday night official, the Cardinals have when they face off. gone from first to last in 3. Atlanta Falcons the NFC Worst after being (9-2) — A lot of writers are pounded at home by the picking the Falcons as the 49ers last week. No. 1 team, but come on, 29. Detroit Lions (2-9) this is an NFC team after — The Lions are back to all. And I’m not completely their old selves after giving sold on Matt Ryan carryus some hope they could ing the offense. climb out of the basement. But it’s interesting that Losing Matthew Stafford two of the top three teams to injury again isn’t helphave young quarterbacks ing. (third-year Ryan and sec30. Buffalo Bills (2-9) ond-year Mark Sanchez of — The Bills took the Steelthe Jets). ers to overtime before los4. Baltimore Ravens ing last week. (8-3) — I thought I would 31. Cincinnati Benbe a little wild and crazy gals (2-9) — As bad as the and pick the Ravens ahead Seachickens have been of the Steelers. These two recently, at least they’re teams also face off this not the Bengals. There’s no week to decide the leader excuse, with the talent on of the AFC North. this team, to be this bad. 5. Pittsburgh Steelers 32. Carolina Pan(8-3) — Since I picked the thers (1-10) — If only the Ravens ahead of the Steel- Seachickens could play the ers, watch Pittsburgh win Panthers every week. That today’s game. way both teams could end 6. New Orleans Saints up with 8-8 records. (8-3) — The defending ________ Super Bowl champs were Sports Editor Brad ­LaBrie can picked over Chicago (also be reached at 360-417-3525 or at 8-3) because they’re the brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews. defending champs. com.

Top Six

The Associated Press

Washington wide receiver Jermaine Kearse (15) catches the game-winning touchdown pass over Washington State’s Nolan Washington (29) in the fourth quarter of Saturday’s game in Pullman. Sixty years after Hugh McElhenny ran for a schoolrecord 296 yards against the Cougars, Polk nearly topped it. The sophomore ran for 284 yards and two touchdowns, including a 57-yard dash early in the fourth quarter that gave the Huskies a 28-14 lead. Running powerfully and breaking tackles all night, Polk had seven runs of 10 yards or more. His 36-yarder on the Huskies’ final drive put Washington into scoring position. Later in the drive, after Washington coach Steve Sarkisian initially sent out kicker Erik Folk for a 49-yard field goal attempt, Polk raced for 15 yards on fourth-and-1 on the same play he scored the game-winning touchdown on the final play at California last week. Two plays later, Kearse hauled in the winning score. “I knew the ball was going to come my way,” said Kearse, who finished with six catches for 178 yards. “Jake gave me an opportunity, and I just made the best of it.”

Washington State (2-10, 1-8) didn’t make anything easy and in the process may have saved coach Paul Wulff’s job. His future has been in debate all season, but the continued competitiveness of the Cougars as the year progressed makes Wulff’s staying or going a difficult decision for athletic director Bill Moos. “I feel very comfortable, but it’s not my decision. I feel good about where we are at and what we have done,” Wulff said. “Bill and I will meet, spend time tomorrow and next day and go from there.” Tuel threw for 298 yards and three touchdowns for the Cougars and did his best to engineer a rally. Instead of rolling over, Tuel quickly led a 10-play scoring drive, capped by his 1-yard plunge on third-andgoal to get Washington State back within seven. The Cougars then held the Huskies’ offense to a three-and-out and took back possession at their 27 with 7:20 left.

Tuel went to work again. He hit Daniel Blackledge, who finished with seven catches for 132 yards, for gains of 32 and 26 yards to get inside the Washington 20. Tuel then hit Marquis Wilson on a 16-yard slant to tie the score at 28 all. “It was pretty emotional for everybody,” Tuel said. “I thought we played a pretty good game.” But Locker had one more chance, validating his decision to bypass the NFL a year ago and return to school. He was 14 of 22 for 226 yards and threw a 66-yard touchdown to Kearse on the third play of the second half. Locker ran for a 7-yard TD run in the first half, but also threw an interception in the end zone and fumbled at the Cougars 1 on the first play of the fourth quarter. “The moment Jake decided to come back, I’m assuming that this is what he was envisioning,” Sarkisian said. “This moment is why he came back.”

Wrestling: Forks 3rd at Invite finish in fourth place ahead of the fifth place Tenino. “We are still pretty young,” Sequim coach Len Borchers said. The Wolves finished with one individual champion at the tournament along with four runner-ups and two third-place finishes. Clay Charlie stood out for his team as the 285-pound heavyweight champion. Sequim travels to its next meet at Klahowya on Sequim takes fourth Wednesday starting at 7 The Wolves were able to p.m. along with a few runner-ups and some fifth- and sixthplace finishers. Leandro Ordenez was the champion in the 119 division for the Spartans, while Cutter Grahn won at 125 and Tyler Cortani at 130. The Spartans take a week off before traveling to the Fife Tournament on Saturday at 9:30 a.m.

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Continued from B1 Malachi Mulhair took the 112 division, Nathan Cris“I thought this was a tion the 189 and Jacob good showing for us,” Port Dostie the 215. The Riders had eight Angeles coach Erik Gonzalez said. “We were behind all wrestlers in the final. day and closed the gap Forks close behind towards the end.” The Roughriders finished Forks ended its tournawith four individual champions, two runner-ups and ment with a third-place finfive third-place finishers to ish behind Port Angeles. “We have some good, raw place just 3½ points behind talent,” Forks coach Bob La Center. Josh Basden was the Wheeler said. The Spartans ended with champion in the 103-pound division for the Riders, while three individual champions


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 5, 2010

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SECTION

Our Peninsula

DEAR ABBY, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, THINGS TO DO In this section

Pictured is Tom Parker outside his mobile home.

Going mobile with Home Fund help EDITOR’S NOTE — For 21 years, Peninsula Daily News readers in Jefferson and Clallam counties have supported the “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund. Today we feature another in a series of articles on how the Home Fund operates and who benefits from our readers’ generosity. The next article will appear Wednesday. By Tim Hockett

For Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Despite serious setbacks, Tom Parker says life has been good to him. And living in Port Angeles, he adds, is like frosting on the cake. “I’ve had a great life, and I’ve been able to travel around the world twice on my own dime. “And now look where I live!” He points to little Peabody Creek that runs right beside his home. He is so enthusiastic about his life here that he’d be well-suited as a spokesman for the local Chamber of Commerce. But Tom has had his share of hardships. “I was raised on a working farm, and my folks had a grocery store,” he says. “I grew up working hard. I retired the first time in 1977 in the wake of the Alaska pipeline boom. “And life was great — until my first wife became ill and eventually died of cancer in 1989.” Tom remarried, and life was moving along again when, just two years later, he and his wife were in a terrible auto accident. “We were broadsided by a dump truck,” he says. “Both my feet were crushed and broken all up. “My wife was even more seriously injured, and I found myself needing to quickly overcome my situation to care for her.”

Intense pain But she later died, and, while dealing with that loss, Tom was found to have suffered considerable untreated nerve damage from the accident. “I had put myself on the back burner to care for her — the pain I was experiencing just to stand up was getting worse and worse,” he recalls. “It was like I was being shot in my feet every time I tried to walk, tried to stand up or tried to take a shower.” Part of Tom’s plan for retirement was to have a fifth-wheel trailer where he could live and also be mobile as well as self-contained. “I thought, with my set of skills, I could be a caretaker of

Give voice to your heart A GIFT OF any size is welcome. The Peninsula Home Fund has never been a campaign of heavy hitters. If you can contribute only a few dollars, please don’t hesitate because you think it won’t make a difference. Every gift makes a difference, regardless of its size. To donate, write a check to “Peninsula Home Fund” and attach it to the coupon that accompanies this story. Mail both items to Peninsula Home Fund, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Or drop them at the newspaper’s offices in Port

Townsend, Sequim or Port Angeles (addresses on page A2 of the PDN daily). Again, all contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. The fund’s IRS number, under the auspices of OlyCAP, is 91-0814319. You can also donate online by credit card — just visit www.peninsuladailynews.com, then click near the top of the home page on “Peninsula Home Fund.” Whether you donate by coupon or online, you will receive a written thank-you and acknowledgment of your contribution. To delay may mean to forget.

Barnard, one of OlyCAP’s emergency services volunteers, to make a home visit. “Betty was fantastic,” Tom recalls. “She came with a young man and interviewed me and began to work on the resources necessary for getting me a wheelchair ramp designed specifically for my trailer.” Betty was able to access funds from the Peninsula Home Fund and from a few other resources to help pay for the building materials. Volunteers from the local Lions Club came to Tom’s place A mobile wheelchair and worked out a design for a double-back ramp that wouldn’t That solution was a mobile take up too much space. wheelchair. “It’s all up to code and works “When I discovered I could get a mobile wheelchair, I was really great,” says Tom. Tom was so enthusiastic excited. about the addition to his home “But then I was faced with that one of his first trips out in another problem: How would I get in and out of my fifth-wheel?” his new chair was to the Peninsula Daily News, where he subTom didn’t live in a regular home — or even a regular mobile mitted a “Rave” for the Sunday paper about how great he was home. Tom called OlyCAP, and that’s treated by OlyCAP. “All I can say is ‘I’m free!’” when the community’s network It is with those words that began to go to work for him. Tom Parker extends his thanks OlyCAP is nonprofit Olympic Community Action Programs, the to a generous community that made his life great again. No. 1 emergency care agency in The story doesn’t end there. Jefferson and Clallam counties. Tom now reports that It also screens the applicants because the chair takes the for the Peninsula Daily News’ strain out of his having to take “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund and distributes steps, he doesn’t need pain medication except on rare occasions. the funds. “I’m back to having a great Sherry Wabaunsee, the OlyCAP receptionist, took Tom’s call, life,” he says. “Look at the beautiful place and when she heard about his mobility limitations, asked Betty where I live!”

property and be able to bring my home along with me,” he says. “But finally, my inability to walk just made me decide to retire.” Tom applied for and received disability from Social Security. As his mobility decreased and his pain increased, Tom found himself needing more pain medications, which, he readily acknowledges, was not a good thing. There were days when he was in constant pain. He knew he needed a solution that could get him off his feet.

The PDN’s Peninsula Home Fund provides a unique lifeline on the North Olympic Peninsula.

No deductions All the money collected for the Home Fund goes — without any deductions — for hot meals for seniors, warm winter coats for kids, home repairs for the low income, needed eyeglasses and prescription drugs, dental work, safe, drug-free temporary housing . . . The list goes on and on. From Jan. 1 through Nov. 23 this year, the Home Fund had helped more than 1,800 families — about 180 households every month plus individuals like Tom Parker — in Jefferson and Clallam counties. From Thanksgiving through

Dec. 31, the PDN’s Peninsula Home Fund — a safety net for local residents when there is nowhere else to turn — is seeking contributions for its annual holiday season fundraising campaign. From Port Townsend to Forks, from Quilcene and Brinnon to LaPush, it’s a “hand up, not a handout” for children, teens, families and the elderly. n No money is deducted for administration or other overhead. Your entire donation — 100 percent, every penny — goes to help those who are facing times of crisis. n All contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. n Your personal information is kept confidential. Turn

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Fund: Focus is a ‘hand up, not a handout’ Continued from C1 les — $100. ■ DixieLee and Stan Sayles, Port Townsend — Peninsula Daily News $100. does not rent, sell, give or ■ Drs. Joseph L. and otherwise share your Judy M. Price, Sequim — address or other informa$100. tion with anyone, or make ■ Daphne Raymond, any other use of the inforPort Angeles — $50. In mation. memory of Leo and Brian n Instances of help are designed to get an individ- Raymond and Neil Jervis. ■ Dolores Mangano, ual or family through the Port Angeles — $25. crisis — and every effort is ■ Jack and Jan Forrest, made to put them back on the path to self-sufficiency. Port Townsend — $100. ■ Leila Roberts, Port That’s the “hand up, not Angeles — $25. a handout” focus of the ■ David and Barbara fund. In many instances, Pen- Allen, Forks — $200. In memory of Barney and insula Home Fund case managers at OlyCAP work Sylvia Murphy. ■ Bob and Leola Reeve, with individuals or families to develop a plan to become Sequim — $100. Merry Christmas! financially stable — and ■ Philomena and Steavoid a recurrence of the ven Brown, Port Angeles — emergency that prompted $100. aid from the fund. ■ Sam and Martha n Begun in 1989, the Baker, Port Angeles — fund is supported entirely $300. by Jefferson and Clallam ■ Carmela Richardson, residents. Port Angeles — $20. In Individuals, couples, memory of Elwood businesses, churches, serRichardson. vice organizations and ■ Agnes R. Hansen, school groups set a record for contributions in 2009 — Forks — $10. In memory of my husband, Larry Hansen. $230,806.95. ■ Yvonne Dillion and With heavy demand this year, the carefully rationed Daniel Zimm, Port Townsend — $100. fund is being rapidly ■ John and Debra Gall, depleted. Sequim — $25. All the money collected ■ Janine Moore, Forks in 2009 is expected to be — $25. spent before Dec. 31. ■ George H. Bergner, n Peninsula Home Sequim — $100. In memory Fund contributions are of Margaret Grijalva. often used in conjunction ■ Julian and Maureen with money from other agencies, enabling OlyCAP McCabe, Port Angeles — $25. In honor of our six to stretch the value of the grandkids. contribution. ■ Denzel and Lisa n Money is usually distributed in small amounts, Schoenfeldt, Port Angeles — $100. usually up to $150. ■ Tim Swegle, Port n Assistance is limited Angeles — $200. In honor to one time in a 12-month of Dorothy Swegle. period. ■ Dennis and Diane Applying to Home Fund Isaac, Sequim — $30. ■ Carol Simon and Paul To apply for a grant Willems, Port Townsend — from the fund, phone Oly$100. CAP at 360-452-4726 (Clal■ Chris Gutmacher and lam County) or 360-385Andy Stevenson, Port 2571 (Jefferson County). Angeles — $100. If you have any ques■ Al and Mary Alice tions about the fund, phone Ruhmann, Port Townsend John Brewer, Peninsula — $100. Daily News editor and publisher, at 360-417-3500. Or e-mail him at john. Many thanks also to brewer@peninsuladaily these donors (who news.com. requested that the Peninsula Daily News amount of their donapublishes stories every tion be kept private): Sunday and Wednesday during the fundraising ■ Lucy E. Willis, campaign listing contribuSequim. tors and reporting on how ■ James and Rachael the fund works. Graham, Port Angeles. ■ Charles Brown, Port Contributions so far Angeles. ■ Robert Zech, Port While most of the Angeles. money for the Peninsula ■ Peggy Newlin, Port Home Fund is raised between Thanksgiving and Angeles. ■ Norman Gallacci, Dec. 31, the fund itself Lacey. In memory of memnever closes. bers of Gallacci and Morris Donations of any families deceased, espeamount are always welcially this year, Charlie come. Gallacci and Stanley MorHere is a list of donors ris. Also deceased members whose contributions were of PAHS Class of 1957. received between Thanksgiving and Dec. 1 — thank Peace . . . and thanks . . . for the memories! Norman. you very much for mak■ James and Marianne ing a difference in the lives — and futures — of Ude, Port Angeles. ■ Fran and Keith Wolyour neighbors like Tom len, Port Angeles. Parker: ■ Ellen and Ted Tsonn Kerry and Marilyn eff, Port Angeles. Perkins, Port Angeles — ■ Dick and Dottie Fos$50. In memory of Eva Wilter, Port Angeles. son. ■ Dave Dau, Port Ange■ Quail Hollow Psycholes. In honor of the working therapy, PLLC, Sequim — poor. $100. ■ Vi Embree, Port Ange■ Ruth M. Lindberg,

Port Angeles. In memory of Marvin J. Lindberg. ■ Kathleen Balducci and family, Port Angeles. In memory of Bal and so many loved ones. ■ John and Rosemary Forster, Port Angeles. ■ David Miller, Port Angeles. ■ W. Neal and Kathyrn Fridley, Port Angeles. For Harley. ■ Chuck and Sarah Whelchel, Sequim. ■ Joyce and Vince Zodiaco Nordland, In memory of Douglas and Ruth Bennett. You are both fondly remembered by your friends on Marrowstone Island. You were heroic to the end. Rest in peace. ■ Irma Stennes, Port Angeles. In memory of my daughter, Denise Fletcher. ■ Darryl Huddleston, Sequim. In memory of Connie. ■ Laura J. Horrocks, Port Angeles. In memory of Garrett Horrocks. ■ Robert and Ruth Worley, Port Angeles. ■ Bob and Audrey Kaplan, Port Angeles. ■ Homer and Karla Muto, Port Angeles. ■ Linda Whitehouse, Port Angeles. In memory of William A. Whitehouse. ■ Betty J. Abbott, Port Angeles. In memory of Bernie Guy and Lori. ■ Voneda Stiewe, Chimacum. In memory of my grandson, Rob. ■ Chris Minard, Carlsborg. In honor of family and friends. ■ Lucille Caughron, Sequim. In honor of Leonard. ■ John and Mary Wegmann, Port Angeles. In memory of Bob Boardman. ■ Velma Heinle, Port Angeles. In memory of Steve Harsh, my wonderful, loving grandson. Grandma. ■ Jack and Sue Spears. Port Angeles. ■ Rosemary Cockrill, Port Angeles. Blessings to family, friends and neighbors. ■ Richard and Ruth Hazelton, Sequim. ■ Charles and Marilyn Whidden, Port Angeles. ■ Chris and Joan Antolock, Port Angeles. In memory of Gramps Ralston. ■ Dale and Jo Bruntz, Port Angeles. ■ Glenn Greenleaf, Sequim. ■ Ken and Charlotte Patterson, Port Angeles. In this joyous season of hope, no one should be without. ■ David and Susan Koehler, Sequim. In memory of Doug and Lillian Babcock. ■ Pat Johnson, Sequim. ■ Dorothy DeLand, Port Angeles. In honor of Robert DeLand. ■ Weezie Jenkins and Steve Conner, Port Townsend. In memory of Charleen Jenkins. ■ Donald and June Hall, Sequim. ■ Gwen Lovett, Port Townsend. ■ Tom and Judie Sharpe, Port Angeles. ■ John and Nancy Jost, Sequim. ■ M. L. Mansfield, Sequim. ■ Inge Magrs, Sequim. In memory of Bill Magrs. ■ Mary K. Otto, Port

Angeles. In memory of Si Otto. ■ Eldora Pederson, Port Angeles. ■ Ingrid Lehrer, Sequim. ■ David and Ann Salmon, Sequim. ■ James R. and Helen S. Karr, Sequim. ■ Judy Munro, Port Angeles. In loving memory of my parents, Tom and Sally Munro. ■ Marilyn Bruning, Sequim. In loving memory of Fritz and Andy. ■ Everett and Jean Tozier, Port Angeles. ■ William L. Plumley and Mark O. Downing, Forks ■ Linda Anderson, Sequim. ■ Wallace L. Avery Sequim. ■ Dr. and Mrs. Edward A. Hopfner, Port Angeles. ■ Bruce and Gerri Ferguson, Port Angeles. In honor of my parents: Robert and Charlotte Ferguson. ■ Levetta Frymire, Port Angeles. In honor of Harry Frymire, a veteran, and all veterans. ■ Robert A. Massey, Sequim. In memory of Margaret Massey. ■ Brenda McMillan, Port Townsend. In honor of Gary Novak. ■ Hazel Gershowitz, Port Angeles. ■ Robert Rankin, Sequim. ■ Michael Pruden, Port Townsend. ■ Jim and Bev Cone, Sequim. ■ Rita Marston, Port Angeles. In memory of Don Marston. ■ Jock and Sonchen Patton, Port Hadlock. ■ Russell and Sandra Hesselman, Port Angeles. In memory of Scott, beloved son. ■ Kathe Smith, Port Angeles. In memory of Kris Fairbanks. ■ John and Laurie Nutting, Port Angeles. ■ Vernon Cooper, Sequim. ■ Nada Johnson, Port Angeles. ■ A.L. and Beth McGuffin Sequim. ■ Barbara Gase, Port Angeles. ■ Joyce Blankenship, Port Angeles. ■ Mary Robinson, Port Angeles. In memory of A.V. Robinson. ■ Beverly Smola, Sequim. In honor of Eugene. ■ Sandra and David Marsh, Sequim. ■ Sandy Ruddell, Port Angeles. In memory of Mac Ruddell. ■ Anna and Paul Chasman, Port Angeles. In memory of Bob Boardman. ■ Charlotte Petersen, Port Angeles. ■ Colette Shoeman, Port Angeles. In memory of Roy Shoeman. ■ Kathleen Chapman, Port Angeles. In memory of Jack B. Chapman. ■ Larry and Lynn Gosser, Port Angeles. ■ Dick and Vicki Van Calcar, Port Angeles. ■ Mike and Marlene McMillen, Port Angeles. In loving memory of our son: Keith Michael. ■ Marolyn and Herb Russell, Port Angeles. In

memory of Willard C. Muller. ■ Jerry Macomber, Sequim. In memory of Bob Macomber. ■ Joe and Naomi Denhart, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents and our friend Bob Kennedy. ■ Jean Brown, Sequim. ■ K. M. Reed, Port Townsend. In memory of Gerald Thorsen. ■ Carolyn B. Muller, Port Angeles. In memory of Willard C. Muller. ■ Paul and Anne Weisel, Sequim. ■ Pam and John Clise, Port Townsend. ■ Al and Jane Bloomquist, Port Angeles. In memory of Al and Anna Bloomquist. ■ Dale and Nathalia Doran, Port Angeles. In honor of friends and family. ■ Charles and Barbara Blum, Sequim. ■ Gary and Geri Braun, Port Angeles. ■ Roger and Jean Campbell, Sequim. ■ Ed and Carol Fjerstad, Sequim. In honor of Burnie Fjerstad and Mary Nosko. ■ Don and Betty Gray, Port Angeles. In honor of our children, grandchildren and greats. ■ Craig and Susan Fahrenholtz, Port Angeles. ■ Bucholz and Bullinger, Sequim. ■ Al and JoAnn Hamilton, Port Angeles. In memory of Dick and Gloria Timm. ■ Franny Koski, Port Angeles. In memory of Rod and Helen MacKenzie. ■ Violet Grall, Port Angeles. In memory of Alvin Grall. ■ Ron Little, Sequim. In honor of Betty Little. ■ Maura and Roger Oakes, Port Angeles. ■ Richard and Jeanine Moore, Sequim. In gratitude for God’s faithfulness to his children and the blessing of his son Jesus Christ. ■ Fran and Joe Streva, Sequim. ■ Gerald and Charlotte Pierce, Sequim. ■ Bill and Dorothy Caldwell, Sequim. ■ Richard and Etta MacDonald, Port Ludlow. In memory of Patricia Bascue ■ Ron and Judy Priest, Sequim. ■ Mel and Vicci Rudin, Port Angeles. ■ Marjorie Faires, Port Angeles. ■ Gunther and Lee Dohse, Chimacum ■ Jill Blake, Sequim. ■ Carol Lee and Robin Moses, Carlsborg ■ Bernice Swanson, Sequim. ■ Dorothea Morgan, Port Angeles. ■ Dona and Jim Cloud, Port Angeles. ■ Gary and Dianne Salyer, Sequim. ■ Barbara Baker, Sequim. In memory of Cy. ■ Rudolph Meyer, Port Angeles.

Many thanks also to these donors (who requested anonymity): ■ Port Angeles — $200. ■ Cedar Falls, Iowa — $100. In memory of Donald Wildman.

■ Sequim — $100. ■ Port Townsend — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Sequim — $50. ■ Port Angeles — $25. ■ Sequim — $200. In honor of Bill Babcock. ■ Sequim — $150. ■ Sequim — $35. ■ Port Angeles — $200. ■ Port Townsend — $100. ■ Sequim — $100. In honor of the needy. ■ Port Angeles — $50. ■ Sequim — $25. ■ Sequim — $10. In memory of Priscilla Roesler. ■ Port Angeles — $400. In memory of Bal and Jack. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Port Townsend — $100. In memory of my husband. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Port Townsend — $25. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Sequim — $25. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Sequim — $200. ■ Sequim — $150. ■ Sequim — $25. ■ Port Angeles — $10. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Sequim — $150. In memory of Larry, Gary and Jerry. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $20. ■ Sequim — $25. ■ Port Townsend — $100. ■ Sequim — $200. ■ Sequim — $500. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Sequim — $60. ■ Sequim — $200. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Sequim — $50. ■ Sequim — $10. ■ Port Angeles — $200. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $25. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $100. ■ Sequim — $50. ■ Sequim — $100. ■ Sequim — $25. ■ Port Angeles — $25. ■ Port Townsend — $100. ■ Mino City, Japan — $100. ■ Port Angeles — $46. ■ Port Angeles — $30. In memory of James Nickolaus. ■ Sequim — $75. ■ Sequim — $25. ■ Port Angeles — $200. ■ Port Ludlow — $200. ■ Port Townsend — $100. In honor of Charlie and Marti Hetrick. ■ Port Angeles — $25. ■ Sequim — $50. ■ Port Angeles — $200. ■ Nordland — $50. In memory of David Bodkin. ■ Port Angeles — $100.

_________ HANDWRITING CAN BE hard to decipher at times. Please report any errors in this list to John Brewer, 360-417-3500 (there’s voice mail if he’s away) — or e-mail him at john.brewer@ peninsuladailynews.com. We’ll rerun the listing correctly. Our sincerest appreciation again to our donors.

Briefly . . . Concert and tea slated for Tuesday

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 5, 2010

C3

Keep birds fed with winter feeder tips ONCE THE WIND began backing off, upward of 200 robins were flying over the neighborhood. They were an example of birds coping with the Thanksgiving week storm that Mother Nature threw at us. Group after group passed overhead almost nonstop. They had been feeding on the berries of the madrona trees that grow along the beach. The tree behind our house had been loaded with berries, and the robins attacked it, too. Robins have been everywhere, and any tree with berries still on it will soon be stripped. Winter is officially weeks away, and if that early storm was an example of what is ahead, the birds will be facing some challenges this month and in January. We can’t assume the entire responsibility for them, but sometimes, that’s the way we feel. We can make their lives a little easier, but the weaker ones and the sick birds won’t survive. Many people faithfully feed the birds in their

They have added another dimension to winter feeding. yards. The syrup in their feedJoan I’m sure ers must be kept from Carson this has freezing, and that is a chala real lenge. effect on Most of us have bird accepted the task of taking numbers. the syrup feeders in at When night and putting them out the early the following mornweather ing. We also keep more turns than one feeder going bad, you throughout the day. When can check one starts freezing, another any feed- takes its place. ing station and see Last year, a reader came increased bird activity. up with a way to slow the Some birds that never syrup’s freezing. She placed come to the feeders will a hand warmer heat pack show up and use the birdaround the feeder bottle, baths. secured it with a knitted How the word gets out sleeve and held everything is a mystery, but it does. in place with rubber bands Freezing temperatures at the top and bottom. make finding a source of I’m not good at knitting, water a challenge, even in so a sock was sacrificed; its the Northwest. toe was cut off. There are heaters you We leave the porch light can place in the birdbath to over the feeder on all night keep it from freezing, but it and all day if temperatures isn’t easy for everyone to are still in the freezing find a place to plug in range. these heaters. Some of us When it comes to the just keep the teakettle other feeders, black sunbusy. flower seeds are the best Hummingbirds have because their oil content is become winter residents in higher, and that’s good for many yards, and this is a body heat. fairly recent occurrence. Mixed seed should be

Bird Watch

Paul Carson

An American robin copes after the Thanksgiving week storm. scattered on the ground and in sheltered areas where snow doesn’t cover it. When it is scattered over a broader area, more birds can feed without contaminating the seed. Our carport and patio become a mess, but they offer a good supply of exposed bird seed. The lard-oatmeal mix is the most popular food in

the feeders, so it pays to have a good supply mixed up. Commercial bird cakes made with suet, seed and dried fruit are quick and easy when supply can’t keep up with demand, but they usually end up being eaten last if you have been using the lard-oatmeal mix. It may seem early to be concerned about winter

feeding, but November’s early storm was a reminder to be prepared. Once that is under control, holiday preparations can move ahead.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a self-addressed, stamped envelope for a reply. E-mail: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Clubs and Organizations Submit your club news The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Port Angeles TOPS meetings There are four weekly meetings of TOPS groups in Port Angeles. TOPS 125 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 5:45 p.m. followed by a meeting at 7 p.m. at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., Port Angeles TOPS 1163 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 8:45 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave. TOPS 1493 meets Wednesdays at 10 a.m., with weigh-in from 9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., at Jace The Real Estate Co.’s meeting room, 330 E. First St. For further information, phone Pat Ferns at 360-504-2143. TOPS 1296 meets Mondays with weigh-in at

10:30 a.m. followed by an 11 a.m. meeting at 2531 E. Helm Drive; phone Carol Packer, 360-452-1790. For further information about all chapters, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Boys & Girls club The Mount Angeles Unit of Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula meets regularly weekdays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at 2620 S. Francis St. For information on membership, phone 360-4172831.

Dream Machines The Peninsula Dream Machines will meet today at 11 a.m. at Fairview Grange, 161 Lake Farm Road. For more information, phone 360-452-3597.

VW club Strait Air Volksgruppe, a

club for Volkswagen owners and enthusiasts, will meet today at noon at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. For further information, phone 360-452-5803.

Tennis club meets The Peninsula Tennis Club, a nonprofit Community Tennis Association, meets regularly for free community play at Erickson Park, Fourth and Race streets. The Peninsula Tennis Club promotes tennis play and supports improvements to tennis facilities in Clallam County. For information on club activities, visit the website at www.peninsulatennisclub. com or phone 360-460-2588.

PA Toastmasters The Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 meets Mondays from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Clallam Transit Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd. For further information, phone Bill Thomas at 360460-1040 or Leilani Wood at 360-683-2655.

Fibromyalgia group The Fibromyalgia support group meets the first Monday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St. The support group is for those diagnosed with fibromyalgia and to help family and friends understand it better. For more information, phone Penny Brewer

The Peninsula Daily News wants to congratulate North Olympic Peninsula businesses celebrating anniversaries in December. On Dec. 10th, we will publish a FREE ad listing the businesses who respond to this special event by Dec. 6th. Is your business having an anniversary later this year? You can use this coupon now to let us know the date.

Garden club board

Garden club meets

The Port Angeles Garden Club Board will meet Monday at 1 p.m. at the home of Linda Nutter, 1701 E. Third St. For directions, phone 360452-5160.

Lincoln Heights Garden Club will meet Tuesday at Scandia Hall, 131 W. Fifth St. Christmas swags and decoration making will begin at 10 a.m. Members can bring greens and trimmings and ribbons and cones will be available. Luncheon will be served at noon. Following a brief business meeting, there will be a Christmas party. Gift exchanges should be limited to a $5 value.

Fly fishers club Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishers club meets the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Loomis Log Cabin at Lincoln Park, off West Lauridsen Boulevard. The public is invited. For more information, phone Darlene Whitney

Remember the food bank. For further information, phone 360-452-4047, 360417-7531 or 360-457-9607

Men’s chorus The Olympic Peninsula Men’s Chorus meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the Monterra Community Center, in the Agnew area between Sequim and Port Angeles. Take Gunn Road to Finn Hall Road. Turn left onto Finn Hall, turn right on Monterra Drive, and Monterra Community Center will be straight ahead. Turn

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Deck your home with holiday lights NOW THAT WE have crossed the line into December, a cloak of darkness descends upon our wonderful Olympic Peninsula due to our very northern position of latitude. In fact, you may have noticed, even at 2 o’clock in the afternoon with a thick cloud cover overhead, we plunge into a twilight effect. And it is precisely the fact that we do darkness so well that I will take today’s column space to write about holiday light displays, or as I prefer to say, light sculptures. And it truly is the sculpture and art of holiday lights that causes this form of landscaping to be one of my personal favorites. The art is in figuring out how to use the hardscape of your yard to its full advantage under the illumination you conspire to create. Botanical gardens around the country have taken full advantage of this art form. Hang amber lights on your yellow pfitzers, drape blue lights on your blue juniper, or undercoat the holly tree with green, then add red lights for the berry effect. Trim your windows, drape

A growing concern the large rock and let the icicle lights cover every eave and window dormer of your house or business. We have all heard of how the darkness of winter can be depressing, how the absence of the sun affects many people’s moods. But the opposite is true, as well. Festive lighting uplifts people’s spirits. We all can hearken back to our childhood — remembering being loaded into the car on Christmas Eve to go out and view the lights and recall the magical moments we felt as a child on those lighted tours. So before I pass onto you the professional secrets that make light sculptures a breeze, let me first beg, even plead, with each of you to put at least one or two strands around your picture window or bedazzle at least one tree in your front yard.

Andrew May

OK, with that said, first up is preparation. Art flows if it is fun, easy and has a rhythm, so preparation is essential. First, get your lights gathered and bought. Then, in the warm, dry comforts of the indoors, unpack them. Get them out of the boxes and untie them from the packages that they all come in. Cut off the labels, test them to see if they work and pack them in boxes that can be easily grabbed — that way, when you are outside on a ladder in the dark on the roof or in a tree, all the lights are ready, untied, unknotted and easily strung up. This is the No. 1 trick. Ease and flow equals creativity. Next is electricity, and here the name of the game is different circuits. Different circuits, not different outlets. Different outlets can all be the same circuit, and most homeowners overload the power source — different bedroom windows are generally on separate circuits. Cut a thin board to place in the bottom of the windowsill with a hole drilled in it for the cord to

go through and insulate. Get special plugs that screw into porch and other outside lighting fixtures and even more outlets on different circuit breakers. You do not want these lights shining where you are stringing lights, and that porch bulb only serves as light pollution, making your display less brilliant. Always use the shortest cords possible, and use the biggest gauge cord you can get. Cords of 16 gauge are a minimum. I prefer 12- and 10-gauge extension cords, which limit heat overload and hence fire probability. Never, ever plug more than six strands of 100 lights if they are not LED — and not more than 10 of those together. Always, when possible, plug those strands in end-to-end because you want, at all costs, to avoid tall columns of lights in plug on top of plug. This rack system is the No. 2 cause of homeowner failure in light sculptures. You can never have enough lights, so get more and double string your lights, placing the second string around the first —

but have that second string plugged into a separate end-toend line. That way, if one section goes out, it will not create a hole in the display because you have now taken care of that potential and predictable problem. And the way to do that is to buy multiheaded outlet plugs that you put at the end of your (short as possible) heavy-duty outside extension cords. And finally, and perhaps most important, let those displays burn late into the night (past 10 p.m. or preferably throughout the night). Do not deny those people who work the graveyard shift, earlymorning tourist arrivals or latenight truck deliverers to miss out on seeing your awesome creation. ’Tis the season, so please illuminate our dark, black and long evenings.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C3 The chorus, a chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, is open to any men who have an interest in music and singing. There are no requirements to read music, nor is solo singing a requirement to join the chorus. The chorus sings songs in four-part harmony in barbershop style and also other a cappella song styles. Visitors are welcome at any meeting. For more information, phone 360-681-7761.

Ski network The Olympic Peninsula Ski Network, a loose-knit group of local people who make weekday carpool trips to the Cascade-area ski resorts for the enjoyment of snow activities, will have an organizational meeting Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. There are no restrictions on type of snow fun enjoyed or on the level of skill.

For additional information, phone 360-417-5503.

German speakers A German conversation circle, der Stammtisch, for those who speak and understand German meets weekly Wednesdays, with time and location variable. They discuss current events, movies, books, music, food, evolving and changing language, or other subjects. For further information, phone 360-457-0614 or 360808-1522.

second Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Vern Burton Community Center meeting rooms, 308 E. Fourth St. The meeting is open to the public.

For further information, phone Janet E. Boyce at 360-417-2896.

Wood artisans

The Pacific Northwest Wood Artisans meets the Harmonica Society second Thursday of each The Port Angeles Harmonth from 9 a.m. to noon monica Society meets the in the craft room at the Port second and fourth WednesAngeles Senior Center, Sevdays of each month from enth and Peabody streets. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at St. Members include but are Andrew’s Place Assisted Liv- not limited to carvers, drifting Community, 520 E. Park wood artists, wood turners, Ave. intarsia artists, furniture All levels and ages of makers and chain saw artplayers welcome. ists. For more information, Gun club Anyone interested in givphone Bob Vreeland, secreing old wood new life is welThe Port Angeles Gun tary, at 360-457-0239. come. Club Shotgun Shooting on For more information, Wednesdays and Sundays Soroptimists meet visit the website at www. begins at 10 a.m. at U.S. Highway 101 across from The Soroptimist Interna- woodartisans.net or phone 360-681-7885. Deer Park Road. tional Port Angeles-Jet Set For further information, meets every Thursday at visit their website at www. Lions meet 7 a.m. at the Port Angeles shootpagc.com or phone Senior Center, Seventh and The Port Angeles Club Karen Rogers at 360-417Peabody streets. will meet Thursday at noon 1143. The group’s mission and at the Port Angeles Crabcore purpose is to improve House Restaurant, 221 N. Peninsula Paddlers the lives of women and girls Lincoln St. in local communities and Lion Scooter Chapman The Olympic Peninsula throughout the world. Paddlers Club meets every will discuss the District 19-I Those wishing to volunspring conference to take teer in an atmosphere of place in April in Port Angesupport, friendship and fun les. are invited to join. For information on the For further information, Lions’ hearing aid and eyevisit the group’s website at glass recycling program, “The Next Three Days” (PG- www.sijetset.com. phone 360-417-6862. 13)

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Surgical Weight Loss Support Group meetings are Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Terrace Apartments, 114 E. Sixth St., in the multipurpose room. This group has a licensed practical nurse as one of the starting members. There will be a broad spectrum of people, some beginning the process to get a gastric bypass and some who have already had surgery and are willing to help others acquire vital information on the process. Guest speakers will assist with information and a question-and-answer time.

Radio controllers The Olympic Radio Control Modelers group meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. The models fly at 1520 Critchfield Road, off Edgewood Drive. For more information, phone Rich Hixson at 360461-7470.

Monthly meetings of Olympic Timber Town are the second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S.

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Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International Noon Club meets every Friday at noon at the Bushwhacker, 1527 E. First St. Soroptimist is an international organization with a focus on making a difference for women. Locally, the club supports the community though scholarships, Operation Uplift and other community projects.

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Pilots breakfast The Clallam County Pilots Association Safety Breakfast will be Friday at 7:30 a.m. at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101.

The PA Peggers meet Fridays with a 5:30 p.m. check-in and a 6 p.m. start for games at the Eagles Aerie, 110 S. Penn St. The weekly events are nine games played against nine different opponents. New members are welcome. The group is an American Cribbage Congress, Grass Roots Cribbage Club. The season runs from the

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Veterans for Peace Veterans for Peace, Tony van Renterghem chapter, will meet Saturday at 2:30 p.m. at Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 73 Howe Road, off North Barr Road. All veterans of military service, foreign or domestic, are eligible for full membership. Nonveterans are welcomed as associate members. Membership includes veterans and nonveterans from Clallam and Jefferson counties. Turn

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Humorous OpenMinded Parent Educators, HOPE, is an inclusive group of home-schooling parents and children who meet Fridays. Time and location are variable. All are welcome. For further information, phone Lisa Harvey-Boyd at 360-452-5525, or visit online at http://tinyurl. com/32m6fjg.

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Instead of a regular meeting, the Clallam County Democratic Club will gather for a “Dems Dine Out” evening at Michael’s Seafood & Steakhouse, 117-B E. First St., Port Angeles. The dinner will be Thursday starting at 5 p.m. For reservations, phone Maja Cox at 360-683-0659.

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The Nicotine Anonymous Fellowship Group meets every Friday at 5 p.m. at Cedar Grove Counseling, 1020 Caroline St. For further information, phone 360-452-2443.

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first of September to the end of May. For additional information, phone Jim or Lisa Duff at 360-808-7129 or e-mail papeggers@hughes.net.

The Olympic Peninsula Korean War Veterans group and Korean Defense Veterans Chapter No. 310 meet the second Friday of the month at 1:30 p.m. at the Elks Naval Lodge, secondfloor boardroom, 131 E. First St. Anyone who served in Korea during the war and after the truce was signed in 1953 is eligible for membership. For more information, phone Gerald P. Rettela at 360-457-6994.

PA Peggers

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Peabody St. Olympic Timber Town is developing a 57-acre museum and heritage center on the former Clallam log yard on West U.S. Highway 101. The group encourages all timber and logging history buffs to join in preserving this part of our Olympic Peninsula heritage. For further information, phone Bob Harbick at 360452-8248.

Ruminta Carpenter and Michael Grieb, Sequim, a daughter, Gracie Jane, 7 pounds 9 ounces, 12:29 p.m. Nov. 12. Claire and Tony Toth, Sequim, a son, Xavier Liam, 8 pounds 3 ounces, 11:42 p.m. Nov. 15. Amanda Mae and Kyle Joshua Sorensen, Sequim, a daughter, Addyson Grace, 8 pounds 8 ounces, 5:38 a.m. Nov. 17. Morgan and John Nolan, Blyn, a daughter, Charlotte Elizabeth, 7 pounds 11 ounces, 6:29 p.m. Nov. 27. Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 5, 2010

C5

No need to save dignity of vain star DEAR ABBY: We are a group of ladies in retirement in a smallish town. One member of our group has, over the last few years, started to “put on a show” — and I mean that literally. “Dottie” writes revues and, of course, stars in them herself. While there’s nothing wrong with a vanity production, this woman is making herself look foolish. She is not slender (no sin), but she is also not talented. Dottie’s friends feel she looks ridiculous singing and dancing, but no one has the nerve to tell her because she is vain and has a short temper. We can’t tell our pudgy, grayhaired friend to get off the stage, so we thought you might be just the person to save our friend’s dignity. Can you help? In the Wings in Northern California

dear abby Abigail

Dear in the

Van Buren Wings: Your

friend is living her dream of being in the footlights. It is not up to you or me to “save her dignity” by bursting her bubble. If you don’t like her performance, no law says you — or anyone else — must attend her revues. And feeling as you ladies do, it might be kinder if you stayed away.

universal requirement. I think this is something out of the 15th century, so I never say anything. Kim thinks I’m rude. What say you, Abby? Already Blessed in Lake Forest, Calif.

Dear Already Blessed: I say you and Kim are both right. The custom of saying “Bless you” or “God bless you” after someone sneezes did originate in the Middle Ages, when it was believed that when people sneezed, their souls left their bodies for an instant — and saying “God bless you” would prevent the devil from snatching it. And Kim is correct that the Dear Abby: My girlfriend, polite thing to do is to say it. “Kim,” believes that saying “Bless If you care about her feelings, you” after someone sneezes is a you will accommodate her — not

just because it’s good manners, but because you know it’ll make her happy. Dear Abby: I have a 3-yearold, muscular male American pit bull terrier. When I walk “Petey,” I am often asked by young and old alike if they can pet my dog because of his good looks. While Petey has never bitten anyone, I am not comfortable letting strangers pet him. The breed can be aggressive. I always reply to these requests with a “no” and a “thank you,” after which I am invariably asked if my dog is mean. Now, if there is a possibility that a dog is mean, why would someone ask to pet him in the first place?

Perhaps I’m overly sensitive, but it’s an annoying rhetorical question. Is there a nicer way to answer? A Dutiful Pet Owner in Glens Falls, N.Y. Dear Dutiful Pet Owner: An honest response would be that your dog isn’t mean, but you can’t guarantee that he won’t snap if someone he doesn’t know touches him. Another way to say it would be, “My dog hasn’t bitten anyone . . . yet.”

_________

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www. dearabby.com.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C4 were Julie Hall, Pat Dorst, Janice Harsh and Elaine Nicholes. VFP works to support Meetings are every veterans and bring about Wednesday from 9:45 a.m. peaceful solutions to interto 10:45 a.m. at St. Andrew’s national problems. Church, 910 E. Park Ave. For more information, Weigh-in is from 8 a.m. phone David Jenkins at 360to 9:30 a.m. 385-7612. For more information, phone 360-452-3429.

duplicate, unit and championship games. Play is open to the public, with visitors welcome at any time. Coffee and refreshments are offered at each game. For further information, phone 360-681-4308; for partnership arrangement, phone 360-582-1289.

The Port Angeles Coin Club will meet Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Raymond Carver Room at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. For more information, phone 360-928-0239.

Food addicts meet

Coin club meets

Eagles Club The Eagles Club will dance to the music of Bob and Cookie on Saturday from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the clubhouse, 110 S. Penn St. Members and guests are welcome. Admission is $5. For more information, phone 360-452-3344.

Sequim Cooties meets Cooties meets the first Sunday of the month at 3 p.m. at the VFW Hall, 169 E. Washington St. For more information, phone the post at 360-6839546.

Chorus invitation

The Grand Olympics Chorus invites women who enjoy singing to join the Sweet Adeline practice any Monday night at 6:30 p.m. at the Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. No formal training or Square dance club experience needed. Strait Wheelers Square For further information, Dance Club will meet Satur- phone 360-683-0141 or, from day from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Port Townsend, phone 360at Mount Pleasant Commu- 385-4680. nity Hall, 2432 Mount Pleasant Road. Sequim City Band The cost is $5. The Sequim City Band For more information, rehearses each Monday phone 360-452-6974. from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Swisher Hall behind the TOPS’ best losers bandstand at the James TOPS (Taking Off Center for the Performing Pounds Sensibly) 1163 met Arts, 202 N. Blake Ave. Nov. 10 to honor the memFor further information, bers who were the best losphone 360-683-4896 or ers for October. visit the website at www. Patsy Triggs was honored sequimcityband.org. as queen for the best weight loss. Bridge club She contributed her sucThe Sequim Duplicate cess to staying focused and Bridge Club meets regularly eating healthy. each Monday and Friday at Others that were honnoon at the Masonic Temple, ored that day were Jason 700 S. Fifth Ave. Hunter, Marsha Logan and The club is affiliated with Vern Melick. the American Contract KOPS (Keeping Off Bridge League, which proPounds Sensibly) honored vides sanctions for standard

Food Addicts In Recovery Anonymous meetings are Mondays at 2 p.m. and Thursdays at 7 p.m. at Calvary Chapel Sequim, 91 S. Boyce Road.

Vegetarian potluck The group meets for a monthly vegetarian/vegan potluck and program the first Monday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, 30 Sanford Lane. The potluck will feature favorite holiday dishes, and members are asked to bring the recipes, as well as the dishes, to share with the group. For more information or directions, phone Heather Reseck at 360-385-0150 or Walter Grant at 360-6831414.

French Club The French Club invites anyone who knows French or would like to learn to meet every week at the Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. Beginners meet Tuesdays from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; intermediates meet Tuesdays from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.; and advanced meet Fridays for a reading and conversation group from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. For further information, phone 360-681-0226.

Deaf Coffee House The Deaf Coffee House will meet Monday from

Adopt a Youth Boru and Legesse

Room, 323 E. Washington St. All interested members of the public are invited to attend. The agenda may be accessed at www.facebook. com/ccanortholypen. For further information, phone John Albiso at 360928-1073 or e-mail nop@ ccapnw.org.

Bereavement

Toastmasters

The Sequim Bereavement group meets Tuesdays from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Assured Hospice Office, 24 Lee Chatfield Ave. For further information, phone 360-582-3796.

SKWIM Toastmasters meets the first and third Tuesdays promptly at 7 p.m. at Blue Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest Road. Arrival at the meeting is requested for 6:50 p.m. Guests are welcome. The president and chairman can be phoned at 360808-2088.

Senior Softball Sequim Senior Softball Recreational Club meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. at Carrie Blake Park (weather permitting) for practice and pick-up games. All levels of players, men 55 years and older and women 50 years and older, are welcome to participate for good fun and exercise. For further information, phone John Zervos at 360681-2587 or e-mail jazervos@gmail.com.

Just Dolls meets The Just Dolls of Washington Doll Club meets the first Tuesday evening of every month and is open to anyone interested in dolls and/or bears. Club members conduct business and share dolls, engage in community service and organize an annual doll show. New members are welcome. For further information and location, which varies from month to month, phone Dori Beachler at 360-6831006.

Meeting set The Coastal Conservation Association North Olympic Peninsula Chapter, CCA-NOP, will meet Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Moon Palace Restaurant’s Lotus

Outriders meet The Olympic Peninsula Outriders, an organization of informal retired motorcycle riders, meets Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at The Mariner Cafe, 707 E. Washington St. No dues, no rules; just friendship among retired riders. The group has day rides and other rides throughout the year.

TOPS 1135 TOPS 1135 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 9:15 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. Visitors are welcome. For further information, phone Lynnette Baughman at 360-683-7178.

Quilters meet The Sunbonnet Sue Quilters meets every Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the Sequim Masonic Temple, 700 S. Fifth Ave. The second Wednesday of the month is the business meeting. At the close of the business meeting, birthdays of the current month are celebrated with cakes and the gift of a fat quarter (an 18-inch-by-22-inch piece of

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fabric popular with quilters). On the last Wednesday of the month, the guild meets to work on community quilts. Completed quilts are distributed to fire victims, Habitat for Humanity home recipients, foster children and other needy or worthy causes. All meetings are open to the public. For further information, phone Joan Mack at 360681-0795.

Guild for hospital The Sequim Guild for Children’s Hospital, presided over by President Carol Labbe with Vice President Molly Christianson, meets the second Wednesday of each month. The meeting is at 1 p.m. at The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The group welcomes visitors and new members. For more information, phone Jackie Green at 360683-1002.

LapBand support The Peninsula LapBand Support Group meets the second Wednesday of every month at 6 p.m. in the basement of St. Luke’s Episcopal Parish, 525 N. Fifth Ave. Those attending should use the ramp on the left side of the building. Turn

to

Clubs/C6

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Boru, 10 years old, and his brother, Legesse, 13 years old, are a great sibling set. Legesse is a confident, expressive and gentle boy. He loves soccer and is a big Chelsea fan. Boru is rather shy and reserved but loosens up and is quite talkative when he gets to know people. Both of them work hard in school and get along well with the other children. For details on Boru and Legesse, phone Adoption Advocates International at 360-452-4777. Families interested in adoption must be approved by a licensed agency. If adoption is not an

5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Sequim Community Church in the Geneva Hall, 960 N. Fifth Ave. and Cape Hope Way. Participants are asked to help bring refreshments, and donations are appreciated. For further information, e-mail sdch_2010@comcast. net.

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457-7993

Walk-ins Always Welcome

Mon. - Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 Sundays Noon - 4 Until Christmas

0B700962

210 E. 4th St. Port Angeles

0C5105690

is pleased to introduce


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C5 Those attending should use the ramp on the left side of the building. For more information, phone 360-582-3788 or 360-681-0202, or e-mail PenLapBand@q.com.

Pinochle group A double-deck pinochle group meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. Members host the card games once or twice a year in their homes. For more information, phone Brenda Holton at 360-452-5754 or Christine Hohman at 360-385-3396.

Spanish club A Spanish club with conversation and study for intermediate Spanish students meets every Thursday at 2 p.m. at Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St. For further information, phone 360-681-0215.

Gamblers meet Gamblers Anonymous meets Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at Calvary Chapel Sequim, 91 S. Boyce Road. For further information, phone 360-460-9662.

Olympic Minds Olympic Minds, The Institute of Noetic Sciences community group for Sequim and Port Angeles, meets the first three Thursdays of each month at 1 p.m. in the conference room of The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-681-8677.

Alzheimer’s group

The Alzheimer’s Support Group meets the second Thursday of every month from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Sequim Senior Center, 921 Hammond St. For more information, phone Kathy Burrer at 360-582-9309.

including times and maps, visit the group’s website at www.spcug.net or e-mail spcug1@gmail.com with questions.

Fiddlers play

Washington Old Time Fiddlers play music the second Saturday of every Calligraphy group month through May, with Peninsula Scribes meets an all-players jam from the second Friday of every 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and month from 10 a.m. to a performance from 1:30 p.m. at Parkwood 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., at Clubhouse across from the Sequim Prairie Grange, Sunny Farms in Sequim. 290 Macleay Road. Participants will learn Free and open to the more about calligraphy and public. paper arts. Donations support fidThere is a new project dler scholarships. each month. For more information, Those coming may bring phone Hershel Lester at a bag lunch, and coffee and 360-417-6950 or e-mail refreshments will be prohandrlester@olypen. vided. For more information, West End phone Linda O’Neill at 360-477-4356 or e-mail Fontluvr@aol.com

Port Angeles Today Hike — The Olympic Outdoor Club hikes the Marmot Pass Trail. This is a moderately difficult hike of 10.6 miles round-trip, with an elevation gain of 3,500 feet and a high point at 6,000 feet. Prepare for winter conditions. Hikers from Port Angeles will meet at 8 a.m. at the Clallam County Courthouse. Hikers from Port Angeles and Sequim will rendezvous at 8:45 a.m. at the southeast corner of the Walmart parking lot in Sequim. Hikers from the Quimper Peninsula will meet at 9 a.m. at the Quimper Credit Union in Hadlock. All participants will rendezvous at 9:30 a.m. at the junction of State Route 20 and U. S. Highway 101 in Discovery Bay. olympic.outdoors@yahoo. com.

PC clinic A PC Clinic presentation will be offered by the Sequim PC Users Group (SPCUG) on Saturday at 10 a.m. at the computer lab, Room E-3, Sequim High School, 601 N. Sequim Ave. Topics covered will include how to: increase the speed of your computer, load web pages faster, protect your computer when a power surge or brownout occurs and prevent the loss of documents, photos and music. Comparisons of commercial security software versus available free programs for computer protection will be included in the discussion. Participation from the audience is encouraged. A suggested donation of $5 is requested from visitors. For more information,

dance. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Refreshments, 9 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081. “Meet me in St. Louis” — 2 p.m. Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Tickets $14. Available online at www.pacommunity players.com or at Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St. Show ends today.

Monday Overeaters Anonymous — St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone 360-477-1858. Walk-in vision clinic — Information for visually impaired and blind people, including accessible technology display, library, Braille training and various magnification aids. Vision Loss Center, 228 W. First St., Suite N (Armory Square Mall). Phone for an appointment at 360-457-1383 or visit www. visionlossservices.org/vision.

Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 PA Vintage Softball — p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellow- senior citizens and students, ship and recreation. Phone $6 ages 6 to 12. Children Gordon Gardner at 360-452- younger than 6, free. Reserva5973 or Ken Foster at 360-683- tions, phone 360-452-2363, 0141 for information including ext. 0. time of day and location. Volunteers in Medicine of Lions Breakfast — All-you- the Olympics health clinic — can-eat breakfast served at the 909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 Crescent Bay Lions Clubhouse, p.m. Free for patients with no corner of Holly Hill Road and insurance or access to health state Highway 112, from 8:30 care. Appointments, phone a.m. to 11 a.m. $6 adults, $3 for 360-457-4431. children. First Step drop-in center Feiro Marine Life Center — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. p.m. Free clothing and equipAdmission by donation. Phone ment closet, information and 360-417-6254. referrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, Port Angeles Fine Arts computers, fax and copier. Center — “Art is a Gift.” 1203 Phone 360-457-8355. E. Lauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 General discussion group p.m. Free. Open seven days a week through Dec. 24. Show — Port Angeles Senior Center, runs till Jan. 2. Phone 360-457- 328 E. Seventh St., 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. No specified topic. Open 3532. to public. Boy Scout Christmas tree The Answer for Youth — sales — Boy Scout Troop No. 1473 will be selling Christmas Drop-in outreach center for trees on Marine Drive across youth and young adults, providfrom Sunset Do It Best Hard- ing essentials like clothes, food, ware between Simmer Down Narcotics and Alcoholics AnonCoffee and Action Brake & ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Muffler. Noon to 5 p.m. Fil Bygolly Annual Christmas Sale — 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday Noon to 4 p.m. 1804 W. Eighth St. Affordable shopping experience. Phone 360-457-0663. Dance — Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. with 30 minutes of instruction, followed by folk and ballroom

TOPS meets The Port Townsend Chapter of Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meets Mondays at 5:30 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 230 A St., Port Townsend. For further information, phone 360-385-1081.

Camera club meets

The Port Townsend Camera Club meets the first Monday of the month TOPS 879 meets Thursat 7 p.m. at the Port days with weigh-in at noon Townsend Community followed by a meeting at 1 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge, Center, 620 Tyler St. Participants will share 130 W. Division St., Forks. and critique digital, print For further information, and slide photographs. phone Maria Goss, area Anyone interested may captain, at 360-275-2179. come for guest speakers, refreshments, photo conForks friends tests, field trips, classes in Friends of Forks Aniall photography-related mals monthly meetings are subjects and public showthe first Wednesday of the ings of work with other month at 6:30 p.m. at the club members. Forks Community Center, 91 Maple St. Car club The public is welcome to Rakers Car Club, a attend. For further information, 50-year-old organization, meets the first Tuesday of visit the FOFA website at www.friendsofforksanimals. the month at 7 p.m. at the Highway 20 Roadhouse, org or phone the message 2152 Sims Way, Port line at 360-374-3332. Townsend. People interested in old cars and trucks are invited. Port Townsend There is a minimum age of 21 to attend meetings.

TOPS meeting

Exchange group Our local currency

Things to Do Today and Monday, Dec. 5-6, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

group, North Olympic Exchange, will host an orientation to explain how this trading system works for services, skills and goods as well as building a more sustainable community today at 5 p.m. at the Dundee Center, Hancock and 32nd streets, Port Townsend. For further information, phone Mike Dobkevich at 360-379-2627 or e-mail dobkevich1@msn.com.

Garden club tea

On Wednesday from noon to 2 p.m., members of the Port Ludlow Garden Club will host their annual Holiday Tea Party at the Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, Port Ludlow. This members-only annual event features a sampling of holiday tea sandwiches and sweets provided by club members. There is no charge to members. Individuals wishing to join the club for 2011 may attend the tea by paying the 2011 dues at the door. Dues for the 2011 gardening year will commence with the January meeting and may be paid at that meeting. Members wishing to pay by mail should send a check for $20 made out to PLGC at P.O. Box 65235, Port Ludlow, WA 98365. For further information on the event, phone Kathleen Taylor at 360-3016431.

Auxiliary group Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 41, Port Ludlow, meets the second Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Port Ludlow Fire Station on Oak Bay Road. All are welcome. Participants are invited to make a contribution to the local community, meet new people and get involved in boating on the Puget Sound. (You don’t have to own a boat.) For more information, visit www.a1300401. uscgaux.info.

phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International of Port Townsend/ Jefferson County, a professional businesswomen club, meets the first three Thursdays of the month at noon at Discovery View Retirement Apartments, 1051 Hancock St., Port Townsend. For information on joining the organization, visit the website at www. soroptimistpt.org.

Society lunch The Olympic Peninsula Orchid Society’s annual Christmas no-host luncheon will be Thursday at noon at the Olympic Timberhouse Restaurant, 295534 U.S. Highway 101, Quilcene. Guests are welcome. For information, phone 360-385-3723.

PT SLUG meets PT SLUG, a Macintosh users group, will meet Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum. A basic Mac “how-to” starts at 6:30 p.m. before the regular meeting. The public is welcome. For further information and for newsletters, visit www.ptslug.org.

Food Addicts

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous, a support group, meets Saturdays TOPS 1393 meets from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Thursdays with weigh-in at 8:15 a.m. and a meeting at First Baptist Church, 1202 Lawrence St., Port at 9 a.m. at the Beacon Light Center, 1820 Irondale Townsend. For further information, Road, Port Hadlock. For further information, phone 360-385-0318.

TOPS meeting

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

Sequim Ave. Tickets $16.50, Olympic Theatre Arts members $14.50, children $11.50. AvailSenior meal — Nutrition able by phoning box office at program, Port Angeles Senior 360-683-7326 or visiting www. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., olympictheatrearts.org. Show 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 runs through Dec. 12. Thursday per meal. Reservations recom- through Saturday performances mended. Phone 360-457- at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows at 2 p.m. 8921. Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 — Clallam Transit Business Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Open to public. Phone Bill Thomas at 360-460-4510 or Leilani Wood 360-683-2655.

Trivia night — Oasis Sports Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360582-3143.

Monday

odist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Carolyn Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for Lindley, 360-417-8554. children 6 to 12, free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits German class — Sequim interpret the Harbor Defenses Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim of Puget Sound and the Strait Ave., 2 p.m. Phone 360-681- of Juan de Fuca. Phone 3600226. 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Health clinic — Free medical services for uninsured or Jefferson County Historiunder-insured. Dungeness Valcal Museum and shop — 540 ley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 Water St., Port Townsend, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for p.m. Phone 360-582-0218. adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; Trivia night — The Islander free to historical society memPizza & Pasta Shack, 380 E. bers. Exhibits include “JefferWashington St., 5:30 p.m. Free. son County’s Maritime HeriPrizes awarded. Must be 21. tage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Phone 360-683-9999. Chinese in Early Port Sign language group — Townsend.” Phone 360-385“Deaf Coffee House,” portable 1003 or visit www.jchsmuseum. building next to playground at org. Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave., 6 p.m. to 8 Commanding Officer’s p.m. Participants communicate Quarters museum tour — using American sign language. Fort Worden State Park, noon E-mail sdch_2010@comcast. to 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for net, Gerilee Gustason at children. Phone 360-385-1003. gerileeg@aol.com or Diane Dickson at dianed52@ Port Townsend Marine Scicomcast.net. ence Center — Fort Worden Women’s barbershop cho- State Park. Natural history and rus — Singers sought for marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Grand Olympics Chorus of Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible youth (6-17); free for science Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., center members. “Whales in 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone at 360-683-0141. 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. Port Townsend and org.

Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Bingo — Masonic Lodge, Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit Jefferson County Doors at 4 p.m. Food, drinks www.sequimyoga.com. and pull tabs available. Phone Walk aerobics — First Bap- Today 360-457-7377. tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Port Townsend Aero Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 Sequim and a.m. Free. Phone 360-683- Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 AirDungeness Valley 2114. port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Exercise classes — Sequim Admission: $10 for adults, $9 Today Community Church, 1000 N. for seniors, $6 for children ages VFW breakfast — 169 E. Fifth Ave. Cardio-step, 9 a.m. to 7-12. Free for children younger Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 10:15 a.m. Strength and toning than 6. Features vintage airp.m. Cost: $5 a person. class, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. craft and aviation art. Cost: $5 a person. Phone ShelPittsburgh Steelers Fan ley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or Hike — The Olympic OutClub — Watch the team with e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. door Club hikes the Marmot other black and gold fans at com. Pass Trail. This is a moderately Stymies Restaurant at Cedars difficult hike of 10.6 miles at Dungeness Golf Course, Senior Singles— Hiking round-trip, with an elevation 1965 Woodcock Road. 10 a.m. and a walk. Meet at 9 a.m. gain of 3,500 feet and a high Phone 360-775-8663. Phone 360-797-1665 for loca- point at 6,000 feet. Prepare for tion. winter conditions. Hikers from Adult Scrabble — The Port Angeles will meet at 8 Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 Free blood pressure a.m. at the Clallam County p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. screening — Faith Lutheran Courthouse. Hikers from Port Church, 382 W. Cedar St., 9 Angeles and Sequim will ren26th annual Sequim a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360dezvous at 8:45 a.m. at the Christmas Chorus Concert 683-4803. southeast corner of the Wal— Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. 2 p.m. Tickets Sequim Duplicate Bridge mart parking lot in Sequim. are $5.00 with no charge for — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Hikers from the Quimper PenBoy Scout Christmas tree children under 12. Purchase Ave., noon Phone 360-681- insula will meet at 9 a.m. at the sales — See entry under tickets at Frick’s Drug, 608 4308, or partnership 360-683- Quimper Credit Union in Hadlock. All participants will renSequim Village Center; Bauer 5635. Today. dezvous at 9:30 a.m. at the Interior Design, 119 N. Sequim Women’s weight loss sup- junction of State Route 20 and Mental health drop-in cen- Ave., the Sequim Chamber of ter — The Horizon Center, 205 Commerce, 1192 E. Washing- port group — Dr. Leslie Van U. S. Highway 101 in Discovery E. Fifth St. , 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ton St., or at the door. Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim Bay. olympic.outdoors@yahoo. com. For those with mental disorAve. ders and looking for a place to “The Thwarting of Baron Puget Sound Coast Artilsocialize, something to do or a Bolligrew” — Presented by Family Caregivers support hot meal. For more information, Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. group — Trinity United Meth- lery Museum — Fort Worden

Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com. Free bike clinic — Chauncey Tudhope-Locklear offers “Port Townsend ReCyclery,” Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone 360-643-1755. “The Little Match Girl” — Based on the Hans Christian Andersen story. Presented by Key City Public Theatre. 2:30 p.m. $18 for adults, $10 for kids 12 and under. Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St. “Little Women” — Presented by Brinnon Community Theatre at the Brinnon Booster Club, 151 Corey Lane. in three performances: 7 p.m. Friday; 2 and 7 p.m. today. Admission is $5. Phone 360-796-4910.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 5, 2010

C7

Briefly . . . Principal of the Day for third-grader PORT ANGELES — With the help of family and friends, Jefferson Elementary School third-grader Talon Roloson raised $1,102 during the school’s recent Fun Run 2010 event. As top fundraiser at the school, he was awarded the opportunity to be Principal of the Day. A total of $6,300 was raised by students, staff and family members through the Fun Run 2010 activity. Elizabeth Jewell won the honor of Music Teacher of the Day and Elise MannLinenkugel was Physical Education Teacher of the Day.

Blue Heron benefit PORT TOWNSEND — Inuit singer and songwriter Simon Lynge will perform a benefit concert to raise funds for Blue Heron Middle School education programs at 7:30 p.m. Friday. The concert will be held in the Port Townsend High School auditorium, 1500 Van Ness St. Lynge will perform and give a multimedia presentation featuring photographs of his native Greenland intermingled with personal observations of the impact of climate change on the people, communities and environment of the area. Lynge’s CDs and other merchandise plus baked goods and coffee will be available during intermission. Tickets prices are $15 for adults and $8 for children younger than 18. A limited number of VIP “Meet Simon Lynge” special ticket packages are available for $60. This VIP package includes prime seats, a CD, a Simon Lynge tote bag and an invitation to an after-concert reception with the artist at Sweet Laurette Cafe and Bistro. The VIP reception includes wine and hors d’oeuvres in the price. Tickets are available through Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St.; the Port Townsend Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St.; and Crossroads Music, 2100 Lawrence St.; and through the Blue Heron Parent Teacher Association, which is sponsoring the show.

Half-staff flags

Port Angeles School District

Jefferson Elementary School student Talon Roloson, center, helps prepare for a school fire drill with custodian Jim Varela, left, and Principal Michelle Olsen. As the top fundraiser in the school’s Fun Run 2010, Talon got to be Principal of the Day. Extension Beach Watcher program will hold two free energy-related presentations at the Feiro Marine Life Center, 315 N. Lincoln St., from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Jeffrey Ward, from the Battelle Marine Sciences Lab in Sequim, will present “From Waves to Watts: Electric Power from the Strait and Puget Sound.” Ward will discuss the status and science of tideand current-harnessing projects in the area, where they might be located, pros and cons, other considerations and how close the projects are to installation. Clallam County Public Utility District employee Mattias Jarvegren will present “Energy Economics on the Homefront.” Jarvegren will discuss upgrading home energy efficiency and which home appliances are energy hogs, and offer tips and tools to make homes more comfortable, efficient and economical. For more information, phone 360-565-2619.

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire has directed that state and U.S. flags at all state agency facilities be lowered to half-staff for National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day on Tuesday. Flags should remain at half-staff until close of business or sunset Tuesday or first thing Wednesday morning. National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day was created by Congress in 1994 in honor of the Americans killed or injured as a result of the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

ATLANTA — Port Angeles native Jodilyn Keller has been accepted for membership in Golden Key International Honour Society and was honored during a recent new-member event at Ashford University. The society provides academic recognition to top-performing college and university students, as well as scholarships and awards, job and internship offerings, networking, service and leadership-development opportunities.

Open house

Honor roll named

PORT HADLOCK — Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., will hold its annual Holiday Open House from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday. The public is invited to enjoy refreshments and crafts. Attendees can create holiday cards, gift tags, ornaments and other seasonal items. Materials will be provided. For more information, phone 360-385-6544 or visit www.jclibrary.info.

PORT ANGELES — Queen of Angels School recently released its honor roll listing for the first trimester for grades 5-8. Students must earn a 3.5 or higher grade-point average to be recognized. ■  Eighth grade: Brady Anderson, Abigail Fishman, Hannah Gauthun, Emily VanDyken, Clare Wiswell, Matthew Witczak. ■  Seventh grade: Sara Hahn, Sonia Witczak. ■  Sixth grade: Molly Braaten, Carley Rife, Anika VanDyken. ■  Fifth grade: Violet Beltran, Faith Chamberlain, Megan Hahn, Julia Logston, Emily Menshew,

Energy event set PORT ANGELES — The Washington State University Clallam County

Golden Key honor

Joslyn Millsap.

Student of month MERIDIAN, Idaho — Madisyn Sophia-Marie Payne, 11, of Port Angeles was recently chosen as Student of the Month for Outstanding Achievement in Integrity at Mary McPherson Elementary School. Payne, who is enrolled as a fifthgrader at the Idaho school for the year, is active in Payne standard and Latin ballroom dance, basketball and cheerleading, and she enjoys reading. She is the daughter of Jerry M. and Kimberly Payne of Port Angeles.

Holiday celebration Jerry Brummel, right, general manager of Suncrest Village PORT ANGELES — Congregate Care Center in Sequim, presents a check for North Olympic Land Trust $1,725 to Olympic Community Action Programs Senior and Lazy J Tree Farm will Nutrition Director Karen Bert. hold their second annual Holiday Celebration at the farm, 225 Gehrke Road off Old Olympic Highway between Port Angeles and Sequim, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Visitors can pick out a Christmas tree, go on a horse-driven sleigh ride with Belgian horses from Jim Bower’s Blue Mountain farm, spend time with Santa Claus, snack on cookies and hot apple cider, and sing carols around a bonfire at the event. Attendees also can stroll down to Siebert Creek with naturalists Coleman Byrnes and James Karr to learn about how the North Olympic Land Trust helps to permanently protect salmon habitat on land like the Lazy J Tree Farm. Local fruits and vegetables, jam, wreaths and other products will be sold. The event is free and open to the public. Lazy J Tree Farm is open daily for Christmas tree-cutting and sales from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, visit www.nolt.org.

Laura Gipson, 360-385-0441.

Department of Agriculture Rural Development, private donors, fees, several foundations and proceeds from First Step’s annual dinner and auction, Midnight in Paris. For information or to enroll in Three Bears Educare, phone 360-452-3263.

Volkswalk slated PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Explorers will hold a Port Angeles waterfront volkswalk Saturday. The walk will leave from the Port Angeles Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St., at 9:15 a.m. The 6.84-mile walk has one steep hill but is OK for strollers and leashed pets. A carpool will leave from the Sequim QFC at 8:30 a.m. For more information, phone 360-681-5405.

Christmas fair SEQUIM — Christmas Lane Fair, a bazaar featuring about 40 local crafters, will be held at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave., from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The bazaar’s “Holly Daze Cafe” will offer chili, soups, pumpkin pie, cake and beverages. There will be a bakedgood table. For information, phone

the church at 360-6835367.

Gift wrapping set SEQUIM — The Sequim Museum & Arts Center will offer holiday gift wrapping from noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays, Dec. 11 and 18. The gift wrapping will be held at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St. Volunteers will wrap patrons’ gifts for a donation of $3 per package. Gifts do not need to have been purchased from the Museum Store or the Sequim Arts Small Works Show and Sale.

Baby item drive PORT ANGELES — The second annual Cradle of Caring baby care item drive will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 11. Donations of baby food, including formula and cereal, as well as disposable diapers will be accepted for the Port Angeles Food Bank. Donations can be taken to the Masonic Temple, 622 S. Lincoln St.; Safeway, 2709 E. U.S. Highway 101; and Albertsons, 114 E. Lauridsen Blvd. The drive is sponsored by the Esther Chapter No. 19 of the Order of the Eastern Star. For more information, phone 360-457-9444. Peninsula Daily News

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Jefferson County HistoriSilent war and violence cal Museum and shop — See protest — Women In Black, entry under Today. Adams and Water streets, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Puget Sound Coast ArtilQuilcene Historical lery Museum — See entry Museum — See entry under Overeaters Anonymous — under Today. Today. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church,

Continued from C6 10 a.m. Open to public. Phone

Cabin Fever Quilters — TriArea Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum,

Walkling grant

PORT ANGELES — First Step Family Support Center was recently awarded a $3,865 grant from the Ben & Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust in support of its Three Bears Educare Center. Three Bears provides early-learning focused child care for children up to age 5. The grant will support staff training needs. Suncrest donates Located in the agency’s new Dorothy Duncan SEQUIM — Jerry Brummel, general manager Learning Center, Three of Suncrest Village Congre- Bears is the result of a strategic plan for growth to gate Care Center, recently meet the needs of working presented a check for $1,725 to Olympic Commu- families with young children in Clallam County. nity Action Program’s Other funding for Three Senior Nutrition program. Bears comes from U.S. The funds were raised

Things to Do Monday

during an Oktoberfest celebration held at Suncrest Village. The event included community members as well as visits from Clallam County Commissioner and state Rep.-elect Steve Tharinger and state Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, and the sale of ceramic plates made by resident of Suncrest Village. OlyCAP Senior Nutrition provides evening dining and home-delivered meals to seniors in Clallam and Jefferson counties. For more information or to purchase a ceramic plate, phone OlyCAP at 360-452-4726.

1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. public. Share and critique digiPhone 360-385-6854. tal, print and slide photographs. Guest speakers, refreshments, Port Townsend Camera Club — Port Townsend Com- photo contests, field trips, munity Center, Lawrence and classes and showings with Tyler streets, 7 p.m. Open to other members.


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Sunday, December 5, 2010

PeninsulaNation

Peninsula Daily News

Puerto Rico mulls its future status By Ben Fox

The Associated Press

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Dayra Rivera saw the letter as a slap in the face for Puerto Ricans. No, Apple Inc. told her over the summer, you can’t have the free iPhone case promised to U.S. customers. Apple, which was giving out plastic cases because of problems with dropped calls, said it wouldn’t ship to an “international” destination. Never mind that Puerto Rico’s 4 million residents are American citizens and that it is closer to the mainland than Hawaii. “I felt like I was being treated like a second-class citizen,” said Rivera, a 46-year-old manager of a clothing store near the capital, San Juan. Apple, as it turns out, is hardly alone in considering the island 1,000 miles southeast of Florida a foreign land. Other businesses, politicians, entertainers and even Puerto Ricans themselves are not quite sure what to make of a place where highway distances are in kilometers but road speeds in miles per hour. Puerto Rico and the United States are like one of those couples who have been together forever without getting married, forcing people to make awkward introductions at weddings like “and . . . this is her special friend.” Perhaps comedian Larry David captured the confusion most bluntly on the TV program “Curb Your Enthusiasm” as he riffed on America’s boundaries, asking: What is Puerto Rico anyway? It’s a question the island asks itself all the time. For now, at least, the most Puerto Rican thing about Puerto Rico could be its identity issues. Puerto Ricans can’t decide whether they want to go for statehood, have some sort of in-between commitment or break up altogether. They have voted on the issue three times to date, in 1967, 1993 and 1998, and each time decided to keep the status quo. The issue may come up again in 2011. The pro-statehood movement, which now controls the legislature and the governor’s office, hopes to hold another vote. And the U.S. House has

The Associated Press

Puerto Rico’s new ad campaign, “Puerto Rico Does It Better,” is displayed in New York’s Times Square on Tuesday. passed a bill that would allow Puerto Rico’s government to ask its residents if they want to change the island’s commonwealth status. But most exasperating of all is that, even as Puerto Rico is preoccupied with its status, much of the United States hardly seems to know or care. Several months ago, House candidate Vaughn Ward, a Republican from Idaho, called Puerto Rico a “country” in a political debate. When corrected, he said, “I really don’t care what it is. It doesn’t matter.” For the record, Puerto Rico has been under U.S. jurisdiction — some would say boot heel — since 1898 and its people citizens since 1917. The island is home to 150,000 military veterans,

and three-quarters of its National Guard troops have been deployed overseas since the Sept. 11 attacks. The island shuts down and shoots off fireworks on the Fourth of July. Yet Puerto Ricans can’t vote for president, and their representative in Congress can’t vote either. They pay Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes but not federal income tax (they pay Puerto Rican income tax instead, so it’s no paradise.) And The Associated Press considers its reporters in Puerto Rico foreign correspondents. Both Spanish and English are the official languages, though you will hear much more of the former than the latter. The island has a holiday in honor of Eugenio Maria de Hostos, a figure associ-

ated with Puerto Rican independence. It puts up its own Miss Universe contestant and its own Olympic team. Confused? So is Congress. Members of the U.S. Congress have wondered if they need passports to travel to Puerto Rico, according to an oft-told anecdote by New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez, the son of Cuban immigrants. And Joachim de Posada, an author and business consultant who lives in Puerto Rico, gets the passport question all the time, most recently in Germany. (Answer: U.S. citizens don’t need passports.) “It is amazing the level of ignorance I find, not only in the U.S. but all around the world,” de Posada said. There are other U.S. territories, such as Guam and

Church not Catholic enough Conservatives pointing out people not living the faith By Rachel Zoll

The Associated Press

unfounded. Still, the bloggers had an impact. The bishop who oversees the anti-poverty grants said that a few, but not all, of the accused grantees had indeed taken positions contrary to church teaching and had been defunded. Since the controversy erupted, 10 of the 195 U.S. dioceses have suspended or dropped annual parish collections for the program, and the bishops are reviewing their grant policies.

‘Lack of civility’ In August, O’Malley blocked access from archdiocesan headquarters to one of the critical blogs, the anonymously penned Boston Catholic Insider. “The lack of civility is very disturbing,” said Terrence C. Donilon, the archdiocesan spokesman. The work of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops is another frequent target. Activists and bloggers, including Bellarmine Veritas Ministry of Texas, have been investigating the bishops’ Catholic Campaign for Human Development, a national grantmaking program created in the 1970s to support community organizing and economic development. The activists concluded that some of the grantees back same-sex marriage, artificial contraception or legalized abortion. As part of the push, activists accused the director of the bishops’ national social justice office of serving on the board of a nonprofit while it advocated for gay marriage and abortion. The claims against him were shown to be

Death Notices Mary B. Donahue June 5, 1923 — Dec. 2, 2010

Mary B. Donahue died in Port Angeles of age-related causes. She was 87. Her obituary will be published later. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel of Port Angeles is in charge of arrangements.

summit of Spanish-speaking countries. “You’ve got your fast food, your Costco, the mall. It’s definitely very American,” said 32-year-old Adriana Pons, who was born on the island but moved back from New York to help out in her family’s water-bottling business. “But it’s very hard to categorize. It’s neither here nor there.” Which comes back around to the question of whether Puerto Ricans can get free iPhone cases. A number of companies don’t ship to Puerto Rico to avoid conflicts over exclusive distribution agreements that some manufacturers have in the island. Others won’t ship because it’s too expensive — often more than twice what it costs with the major shipping companies to a mainland U.S. destination. Sometimes, there are also issues with warranties that might not be applicable in Puerto Rico. At least one company, www.buyonlineshiptopr. com, allows people to work around it by having their goods shipped to Miami, then sent by U.S. Postal Service. Primo Delgado, the marketing director, said they have worked with most of the major online retailers since opening in April. Even if Puerto Rico became a state, he said, it would face the same issues, and shipping would still be a problem. But Rivera sees it as injustice all the same. She fired off a note to popular consumer rights advocacy blog Consumerist. com, which publicized her cause, as did several other online forums. “A lot of people were really upset over this situation,” she said. “They weren’t treating Puerto Rico right.” Rivera said she generally stays out of the status debate, but the iPhone saga has pushed her toward statehood. “I want Puerto Rico to be a state so this situation gets fixed,” she said. She may not have to wait. An Apple spokeswoman said the cancellation of Rivera’s iPhone had been a mistake, though she wouldn’t say why or how it was made. And in August, Rivera got a follow-up: another e-mail that her case was en route. This time, the e-mail was in Spanish.

Death and Memorial Notice Charlene W. Atwood March 8, 1932 November 14, 2010 Charlene W. Atwood passed away peacefully at home in Forks from cancer-related illness. She was born to Charles Ellis and Inez Clark Whitlock on March 8, 1932, in Bentonville, Arkansas. Charlene married Billy Eugene Morris on May 17, 1951, and widowed September 23, 1963. Charlene married Alan Leroy Atwood Sr. on June 22, 1973. She lived with the love of her life for 37 happy years. Mrs. Atwood is survived by her husband and three daughters, Dinah S. Laffin, Sarah L. Atwood and Candice Orosco; four stepchildren, Alan L. Atwood Jr., James L. Atwood, Craig A. Atwood and Peggy S. Chase; 13 grandchildren

Mrs. Atwood and 20 great-grandchildren. At her request there will be no memorial service. Donations in her memory can be made to Assured Hospice, 24 Lee Chatfield Way, Sequim, WA 98382. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles is in charge of cremation.

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NEW YORK — Pressure is on to change the Roman Catholic Church in America, but it’s not coming from the usual liberal suspects. A new breed of theological conservatives has taken to blogs and YouTube to say the church isn’t Catholic enough. Enraged by dissent that they believe has gone unchecked for decades and unafraid to say so in the starkest language, these activists are naming names and unsettling the church. n In the Archdiocese of Boston, parishioners are dissecting the work of a top adviser to the cardinal for any hint of Marxist influence. n Bloggers are combing through campaign finance records to expose staff of Catholic agencies who donate to politicians who support elective abortion. n RealCatholicTV.com, working from studios in suburban Detroit, is hunting for “traitorous” nuns, priests or bishops throughout the American church. “We’re no more engaged in a witch hunt than a doctor excising a cancer is engaged in a witch hunt,” said Michael Voris of Real CatholicTV.com and St. Michael’s Media. “We’re just shining a spotlight on people who are Catholics who do not live the faith.” John Allen, Vatican analyst for the National Catholic Reporter, has dubbed

this trend “Taliban Catholicism.” But he said it’s not a strictly conservative phenomenon — liberals can fit the mindset, too, Allen said. Some left-leaning Catholics are outraged by any exercise of church authority. Yet, on the Internet and in the church, conservatives are having the bigger impact. Among Voris’ many media ventures is the CIA — the Catholic Investigative Agency — a program from RealCatholicTV to “bring to light the dark deeds of evil Catholics-inname-only, who are hijacking the Church for their own ends, not the ends of Christ.” In an episode called “Catholic Tea Party,” Voris said: “Catholics need to be aware and studied and knowledgeable enough about the faith to recognize a heretical nun or a traitorous priest or bishop when they see one — not so they can vote them out of office, but so they can pray for them, one, and alert as many other Catholics as possible to their treachery, two.” The blog “Bryan Hehir Exposed” is aimed at a top adviser to Boston Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Rev. J. Bryan Hehir, who is the former head of national Catholic Charities and a professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Among the bloggers’ claims is that Hehir is a

Marxist sympathizer who undermines Catholic teaching on abortion and marriage. Hehir, who has advised church leaders for four decades, hasn’t responded to any accusations and neither has O’Malley, a Capuchin Franciscan friar known for his humility. However, O’Malley said in April on his own blog that Hehir “inspires us with his compassion, vision and fidelity to the work of the Church.”

the U.S. Virgin Islands, but none has near the population of Puerto Rico and the huge cultural impact on the mainland that comes with it. The question of what exactly the island is lingers even among Puerto Ricans in the United States, who outnumber those in Puerto Rico. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has called her parents immigrants, but they’re not from another country — they’re from Puerto Rico. Sotomayor herself in recent years has been careful not to come down publicly on one side or the other of the statehood issue. Not so resident commissioner Pedro Pierluisi, the nonvoting representative in Congress. “The question about the statehood for Puerto Rico is not whether it’s going to happen; it’s when,” he said. “I have no doubt that’s where we’re headed.” Pierluisi said that the growing Hispanic population in the United States will compel Congress to support statehood if islanders demand it. Hector Pesquera, cochairman of the National Hostos Independence Movement, has a very different take. To him, Puerto Rico would be obliterated by statehood. “People who vote in favor of statehood are like chickens voting for Kentucky Fried Chicken,” he said. The rest of the world is similarly all over the place in its dealings with Puerto Rico. The island has its own ranking on World Economic Forum’s annual ranking of global competitiveness — coming in at No. 41, between Cyprus and Spain. The U.S. is ranked No. 4. Puerto Rico also got its own ranking in a Gallup World Poll published in July of the happiest countries (No. 23) and its own spot on Transparency International’s annual list of corruption perceptions, coming in at 33rd least corrupt (the U.S. was 22nd). And technically it is a commonwealth, which means it has some political and economic autonomy. But Puerto Rico doesn’t make the Forbes list of best countries to do business. It doesn’t have its own seat at the United Nations, and it’s not invited to the annual Ibero-American


PeninsulaNation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 5, 2010

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Pilot program expands organ recovery At-home deaths are new focus By Samantha Gross The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Families choosing whether to donate a loved one’s organs usually have days to grapple with their decision, all while the patient lies hooked up to machines in a hospital bed. But they would have only about 20 minutes to make the choice in a new pilot program meant to recover organs from patients who die at home. That’s roughly how long a team of organ specialists will have after a cardiacarrest patient is declared dead to arrive at the home, check a donor registry, determine medical eligibility, obtain a family member’s consent and get the person into a specialized ambulance.

Wednesday launch The program launching Wednesday — the first of its kind in the U.S., according to organizers and other experts — could eventually lead to thousands more organs donated each year nationwide. But the six-month trial, a collaboration between Bellevue Hospital and New York City’s police and fire departments, could be declared a success without a single organ being recovered, organizers say. Instead, what’s being tested is the ability of the team — composed of two EMTs, an organ donor family services specialist and a Bellevue emergency physi-

The Associated Press

An organ preservation specialist demonstrates how a donor would be handled inside the New York City Fire Department’s new Organ Preservation Unit. cian — to successfully interact with grieving and shocked family members in the limited time available before it is too late to use a person’s organs. A police detective will arrive at the scene before the team to make sure there’s nothing about the death that warrants a criminal investigation.

Could be ‘revolutionary’ The project is “very, very modest but has the potential to prove a concept that could be revolutionary,” said Dr. Lewis Goldfrank, director of emergency services at Bellevue Hospital Center and the leader of the pilot,

which is being funded with a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health Resources and Services Administration. Of the roughly 50,000 people who died last year in downstate New York-area hospitals, about 600 were judged eligible to donate their organs. Of those, only 261 became donors, said Elaine Berg, the president and CEO of the New York Organ Donation Network. The small number is due in part to policies preventing the vast majority of people who die of cardiac arrest from becoming donors, said Goldfrank, who estimated that each year

Death and Memorial Notice Frederick F. Germeaux August 6, 1923 November 14, 2010 Mr. Frederick Germeaux, 87, of Port Angeles passed away on November 14, 2010, of natural causes. He was born on August 6, 1923, in Montesano, Washington, to Fred and Thelma (Lewis) Germeaux. Mr. Germeaux was a seaman in the U.S. Navy from 1942-1945.

He married Mary Page on December 28, 1947. She preceded him in death on June 6, 1996. Mr. Germeaux was employed by the Crown Zellerbach mill for 22½ years. He loved hunting, fishing, clamming and crocheting; he acquired numerous ribbons for his Clallam County Fair entries. Mr. Germeaux was a member of the Queen of Angels Church, Eagles Aerie 483, and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 4760.

Death and Memorial Notice Derek Andrew Crawford April 14, 1983 November 24, 2010

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

North Olympic Peninsula Obituaries, Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice listings appear online at www.peninsuladailynews.com

50 minutes Once there, they must determine whether the person is a registered organ donor and whether the person has any medical conditions — such as cancer or AIDS — that would eliminate them as candidates. And they must get the permission of family in a matter of minutes. The pilot program team has been told they have 50

minutes from the time a person’s heart stops beating to the time his or her body must be placed in the ambulance and hooked up to a machine that creates blood circulation. Once at Bellevue, another machine will increase body oxygen. Only residents of Man-

hattan who are between 18 and 59 will be eligible for the pilot program. Similar programs are already in place in France and Spain, where there are fewer barriers because people in those countries are considered organ donors unless they opt out, Goldfrank said.

Death and Memorial Notice Steven Nelson January 30, 1953 November 29, 2010 Steven Nelson, 57, of Sequim passed away November 29, 2010, of heart failure. He was born in Los Angeles, California, and moved to Sequim at the end of 1990. He was married to Cherilyn Nelson, and they had just celebrated their 22nd anniversary on Thanksgiving. He was a general contractor by trade and liked to say he “could build anything from a dog house up to a high rise.” He helped many customers at The Home Depot, where he was employed until the summer of 2007, when his health worsened. He is survived by his daughter, Amber Nelson; brother and sister-in-law,

Mr. Nelson Michael and Nancy Nelson; sister, Karen Nelson; and brother, David Nelson. His memorial service will be held Sunday, December 19, at 2 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church of Sequim, 100 South Blake Avenue. A reception will follow at his home.

Death and Memorial Notice Patrick Gallagher Sr. April 22, 1940 November 20, 2010 Patrick Gallagher, Sr., of Port Ludlow died Saturday, November 20, 2010, at home after a two-year battle with lung cancer. He was born in Stonycreek, Pennsylvania, on April 22, 1940, to Richard and Mary Gallagher. Pat was preceded in death by both parents, brothers Richard and Charles, and a sister, Helen. He received his degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington in 1967. He started his career in aerospace at Lockheed in Sunnyvale, California, and continued with Cessna in Wichita, Kansas, and retired from Boeing in July 1995.

Mr. Gallagher After moving to his retirement home in Port Ludlow, he worked for three years as a contract engineer. He loved camping, hiking, fishing, hunting and shooting trap. The only thing he enjoyed more was spending time with his family, especially his

Tea Rose Beil In October 10, 1923 November 18, 2010

T

grandchildren. Pat is survived by his wife of 48 years, Arlene; children, Bridget Shinsato (Glenn), Patrick Gallagher II (Annemarie), and Molly Rudd (James); and grandchildren, Carolyn Shinsato, Eileen Shinsato, Sara Shinsato, Brennan Rudd, Madison Rudd, Patrick Gallagher III and Daniel Gallagher. He is also survived by his brother, John Gallagher, and sisters, Mary Johns, Eilene Ehr and Peggy Evans. The funeral Mass, celebrated by Father William Shawn McKnight, will be held at 11 a.m. December 21, 2010, at Saint Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church, 1335 Blaine St., Port Townsend. A reception will follow in the parish hall. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to your favorite charity.

Loving Memory

ea Rose Beil passed away on November 18, 2010, at her home in Port Angeles with family members by her side. Tea Rose was born in Union City, New Jersey on October 10, 1923, to Felix and Linda Garzone, who had immigrated to the United States from Biella, Italy. She had one brother, Raymond, who preceded her in death. The highlight of her life was when she met Leonard W. Beil on September 11, 1943, while Leonard was stationed at City College of New York as a member of the U.S. Army Specialized Training Program. Tea Rose and Leonard were married in Union City, New Jersey, on February 26, 1944, just before Leonard’s 75th Army Division was assigned to combat duty in Europe. After Leonard’s discharge from the Army in 1945 they moved to Pullman, Wash., where Tea Rose worked to assist Leonard as he completed his degrees in agriculture and education at Washington State College. In her quiet, behind-the-scenes manner, Tea’s strongest desire in life was to support Leonard in his work in education and community service activities and give positive support to all parts of her five children’s endeavors and later her seventeen grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. She was a 62-year member of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit in Sequim and Port Angeles. Tea Rose was a member of the Sequim Prairie Grange for 62 years. She attended St. Joseph Catholic Church in Sequim and Queen of Angels in Port Angeles. From 1948 to 1965, Tea Rose took a vital role with Sequim High School student activities as Leonard served as Vocational Agriculture Instructor and principal of Sequim High School. Tea Rose helped chaperone over a hundred Sequim High School dances and sold tickets and ran concession stands for athletic events. She especially enjoyed being invited to Sequim High School class reunions. Even at forty-year class reunions, Sequim graduates would fondly recall Tea’s close involvement in many of their activities. Many recalled the times spent at her family home in Sequim as guests before athletic events. Tea Rose was honored by having the Port Angeles coffee shop, Bella Rosa, named after her. When her daughter, Linda, opened it in 2001, she chose the name using the town her parents were from in Italy along with her middle name. The joy of her life was being at home to raise her five children. She was endlessly proud and supportive of her children. She took much pride in watching her family grow and get married: Leonard D. Beil and Stella Ley, Ron and Kathy Beil, Gary and Pam Beil, Linda and Kevin Berglund, and Susan and Eric Rogstad. The grandchildren and great-grandchildren were treasured and loved by Tea Rose. This humble woman never bragged about herself, but constantly about her husband and family. She had no titles other than wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother and friend. She had no formal degrees or awards but was a powerful force as she led by example and love. She made everybody feel special and like they were the center of the universe. She exemplified unconditional love and acceptance. Tea Rose will be missed by all those who were blessed to be a part of her life. Memorial contributions can be made to the Port Angeles Rotary Club Foundation Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 730, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

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Beloved grandson of Art, Lucetta (deceased) and Essie Halls of Sequim died suddenly on November 24, 2010, at age 27 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He is survived by his mother and father, John and Deborah (Halls) Crawford of Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; and by Sequim residents John and Pam (Halls) Vass, Tina (Halls) Vass, Stephanie (Halls)

Ream, their children and grandchildren; and also by sister Sharon, Santa Teresita Carmelite Order, Duarte, California; by cousins Kyle and Anna in Denver, Colorado; and other family in Wisconsin. Memorial Service will be at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 121 East Maple Street, Sequim, on Monday, December 6, at 1 p.m. Derek was a dedicated and passionate salmon fisherman. Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made in his name to fraserriverkeepers.ca or saveoursalmon. ca.

He is survived by son and daughter-in-law, Kenneth C. and Cheri Germeaux of Battle Ground, Washington; daughter and son-in-law, Kandy and Don Peterson of Port Angeles; seven grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. At his request, there will be no services. Memorial contributions may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

350,000 to 450,000 people in the U.S. suffer cardiac arrest outside of a hospital, with most dying. Only kidneys will be recovered in the pilot program. Last year, more than 4,650 people in the U.S. died while awaiting a kidney — accounting for 70 percent of deaths on the transplant list, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing. As an ethical measure, EMTs attempting to revive a person and the doctor who ultimately makes the decision to declare a person dead won’t know whether the patient is a registered organ donor and whether he or she is considered a candidate for the pilot program. Team members will be sent to the scene in a specialized organ preservation vehicle but will only enter the home after a person has been declared dead.


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WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 40

Low 30

42/36

46/39

44/37

43/32

Partly sunny and chilly.

Mostly cloudy, a couple of showers; cold.

Rather cloudy and chilly.

Cloudy and breezy with rain possible.

Overcast and windy with rain possible.

Mostly cloudy with rain possible.

The Peninsula Dry and cold weather will prevail across the Peninsula today with a partly sunny sky as high pressure slides off to the east. Victoria Temperatures will climb into the 30s to near 40 in most places. 44/32 Tonight will be mostly cloudy and cold with a shower of snow, Neah Bay Port rain or freezing rain possible as a weak upper-air distur44/37 Townsend bance crosses the area. Monday will be another cold and Port Angeles 43/35 largely dry day with a mostly cloudy sky. The next storm 40/30 system will approach the region on Tuesday, bringing a Sequim cloudy day along with the chance of rain.

44/34

Forks 46/33

Olympia 44/30

Spokane 18/16

Yakima Kennewick 28/18 27/22

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Partly sunny today. Wind east-northeast 12-25 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Mostly cloudy tonight with a couple of showers. Wind northeast 8-16 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mostly cloudy tomorrow. Wind east 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Tuesday: Cloudy with rain possible. Wind east 20-30 knots. Waves 4-8 feet. Visibility under 3 miles.

LaPush

11:14 a.m. ----Port Angeles 3:26 a.m. 12:22 p.m. Port Townsend 5:11 a.m. 2:07 p.m. Sequim Bay* 4:32 a.m. 1:28 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Tuesday

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

9.4’ --7.8’ 7.4’ 9.4’ 8.9’ 8.8’ 8.4’

5:18 a.m. 6:07 p.m. 7:57 a.m. 8:13 p.m. 9:11 a.m. 9:27 p.m. 9:04 a.m. 9:20 p.m.

2.7’ -1.2’ 5.6’ -1.9’ 7.3’ -2.5’ 6.9’ -2.3’

12:49 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 4:09 a.m. 1:03 p.m. 5:54 a.m. 2:48 p.m. 5:15 a.m. 2:09 p.m.

6:07 a.m. 6:51 p.m. 8:53 a.m. 8:53 p.m. 10:07 a.m. 10:07 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m.

1:36 a.m. 12:44 p.m. 4:51 a.m. 1:46 p.m. 6:36 a.m. 3:31 p.m. 5:57 a.m. 2:52 p.m.

6:54 a.m. 7:33 p.m. 9:50 a.m. 9:35 p.m. 11:04 a.m. 10:49 p.m. 10:57 a.m. 10:42 p.m.

7.6’ 9.2’ 8.1’ 7.1’ 9.7’ 8.6’ 9.1’ 8.1’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

2.8’ -1.1’ 5.6’ -1.8’ 7.3’ -2.4’ 6.9’ -2.3’

wilder Auto You Can Count on us!

Minneapolis 16/2 San Francisco 57/49

95 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles

360-457-8511

7.7’ 8.8’ 8.1’ 6.8’ 9.7’ 8.2’ 9.1’ 7.7’

2.9’ -0.9’ 5.5’ -1.5’ 7.2’ -1.9’ 6.8’ -1.8’

Dec 13

Houston 57/35

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Last

Dec 21

Dec 27

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 60 49 s Baghdad 82 55 s Beijing 42 21 pc Brussels 38 25 r Cairo 76 56 pc Calgary 22 8 s Edmonton 17 5 s Hong Kong 77 68 s Jerusalem 73 51 pc Johannesburg 87 53 s Kabul 57 25 s London 37 27 s Mexico City 71 37 s Montreal 32 27 sn Moscow 23 15 c New Delhi 79 44 s Paris 40 34 r Rio de Janeiro 88 73 pc Rome 50 45 pc Stockholm 28 25 sf Sydney 75 66 r Tokyo 61 52 s Toronto 30 16 sf Vancouver 42 28 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

New York 39/30 Washington 42/27

Atlanta 46/25

El Paso 68/36

Moon Phases Full

Denver 42/17

Los Angeles 68/52

Sunset today ................... 4:21 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:49 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 8:00 a.m. Moonset today ................. 4:17 p.m. First

Detroit 32/20

Chicago 26/11 Kansas City 34/14

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Miami 77/53

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 60 35 pc 24 19 pc 49 33 pc 46 25 s 40 29 pc 41 26 pc 37 22 sf 30 8 s 18 -3 s 42 31 c 39 27 c 34 24 sf 54 27 s 34 17 c 26 11 pc 34 14 sf 23 17 pc 46 35 pc 52 30 s 42 17 c 28 10 s 32 20 sf 44 34 pc -7 -23 c 30 9 s 82 66 s 57 35 pc 36 22 sn

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 34 62 46 68 77 23 16 40 56 39 44 28 68 75 39 73 42 42 49 59 34 43 60 65 57 20 37 42

Lo W 14 pc 46 pc 25 s 52 c 53 pc 14 pc 2s 23 pc 37 pc 30 pc 22 s 7 pc 41 pc 50 pc 27 pc 50 pc 32 pc 21 pc 33 c 46 sh 18 s 29 c 35 pc 55 pc 49 r 0s 23 c 27 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 86 at Laredo, TX

Low: -18 at Wisdom, MT

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1 New 3 r e Ov heel & s 4-W el Drive he All-W Choose o t ! From

Billings 30/8

Sun & Moon

Dec 5

Everett 43/33

Seattle 44/33

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 44/33

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 43 35 trace 10.59 Forks 44 31 0.05 113.99 Seattle 49 34 0.00 38.30 Sequim 47 34 0.00 8.94 Hoquiam 48 36 0.14 62.67 Victoria 42 35 0.03 29.28 P. Townsend* 45 36 0.00 14.58 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 44/34 Bellingham 39/25

Aberdeen 48/35

Peninsula Daily News

peninsuladailynews.com

929 W 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98363

MONDAY, DECEMBER 6th

Port Angeles School District

through

From left, Sequim guitar maker Pete Barthell watches as Port Angeles High School students Michael Steele and Thomas Williams check adjustments to their machine. Instructor Mike Frick is at right.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12th

PA seniors serve as guitar helpers PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School seniors Michael Steele and Thomas Williams have been helping Sequim guitar maker Pete Barthell bring a machine design to fruition. The students helped design and build a machine for Barthell that will cut slots for frets on guitar fingerboards. Steele and Williams worked with Barthell in their Port Angeles High School machine tools class, which is taught by Mike Frick.

Thank-you

County Fire District No. 3. The association and its members provided more than 40 dozen cookies, goodies and custom thankyou notes signed by many of the Sequim Association of Realtors real estate professionals. “It’s just our way to say ‘thank you,’” said Humphrey.

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PORT ANGELES — Four North Olympic Peninsula authors will sign cop-

ies of their books at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 12. Tim McNulty, photographer David Woodcock, photographer Ross Hamilton, Gary Peterson and Glynda Peterson Schaad will be on hand at the signing. Discover Your Northwest will provide light refreshments during the event. For more information, phone 360-565-2985. Peninsula Daily News

Rickie, Denny, Jon Ruth, Lori & Andrea

9C5065365

SEQUIM — The Sequim Association of Realtors delivered an assortment of cookies to first-responder groups in the Sequim area as a way of showing appreciation on First Responder Day, which was Tuesday. Association President Hill Humphrey, incoming President Heidi Hanson and project organizer Cindy Smith delivered home-baked cookies and other goodies to Olympic Ambulance, Washington State Patrol, Sequim Police Department and Clallam

From left, Heidi Hanson, incoming president of the Sequim Association of Realtors, and event organizer Cindy Smith of Clallam Title present cookies as a gesture of gratitude on First Responder Day. Travis Anderson accepts the cookies on behalf of Clallam Fire District No. 3.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 5, 2010

Business

SECTION

D

Politics and Environment

 $ Briefly . . . State ferries chief to speak to chamber PORT TOWNSEND — The possibility of losing a second state ferry, now under construction, on the Port TownsendWhidbey Island run will be discussed at this week’s Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting on Monday. David Moseley, assistant secretary of transportation in charge of the state ferry system, will be keynote speaker. Moseley is Moseley expected to discuss the effects of planned $17 million in ferries cutbacks to help balance a $5.7 state budget deficit, including the possibility of the new MV Chetzemoka being the only ferry between Port Townsend and Coupeville (Keystone) instead of a second twin ferry, MV Salish. The Salish, due to be launched in 2011, would go into service in the San Juan Islands instead, according to one proposal being discussed in Olympia. Open to the public, Monday’s luncheon of the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, combining former chamber organizations in Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and the Tri-Area, begins at noon at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St. Lunch costs $12 for a full meal, $9 for soup and salad or $5 for dessert and beverage. Prices include tax. Monday’s meeting sponsor is Cobalt Mortgage Inc. of Port Townsend.

Biomass program PORT ANGELES — A talk on the use of biomass to generate electricity on the North Olympic Peninsula will be given to this week’s Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce lincheon meeting on Monday. Representing the North Olympic chapter of the Society of American Foresters will be Harry Bell and Tom Swanson. Both are Bell on the staff of Green Crow of Port Angeles. Electrical generation by burning biomass — also known as slash or hog fuel — to heat boilers is proposed by the owners of the paper mills in Port Angeles and Port Townsend and has been implemented on a small scale on the campus of Forks High School. In addition to the program by Bell and Swanson, the chamber will announce its Business of the Month and beautification Swanson awards for December. Open to the public, Monday’s chamber lunch­eon begins at noon in the second-floor meeting room of the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier.

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Neah Bay Chamber

of

Commerce

Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce Vice President Vicky Druge, Treasurer Mary Ann Lovik, President Meredith Parker and chamber member Greg Colfax stand in front of the new Neah Bay welcome sign and directory. Colfax provided the outline for the canoe that tops the sign.

Coast Guard talk FORKS — Members of the Forks Chamber of Commerce will hear a program on Coast Guard Station Quillayute River at the chamber’s weekly luncheon on Wednesday. Established in 1929, the LaPush boat station has a staff of 29 active duty personnel responsible for the coastline between Cape Alava and the Queets River mouth — including the treacherous Quillayute River bar. According to its website, accessible at http://tinyurl. com/2bcokth, the station has two 47-foot motor life boats, a 25-foot response boat and a 16-foot jet sled, all used primarily for search, rescue and homeland security. The Forks chamber meeting, open to the public, starts with no-host lunch at noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information.

Van Romer speaks SEQUIM — Leslie Van Romer, chiropractor, speaker and author, will present “10 AgeDefying Secrets: Rev Up and Reverse the Downward Spiral!” at the Olympic Theatre Arts Center, 414 N. Sequim Ave., from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday. She will be joined by Dr. Narinder Duggal. The presentation is free, but reservations are requested. Phone 360-683-8844 or e-mail katy@drleslievanromer.com.

Wine and cider Four Jefferson County wineries and cideries will hold a joint open house from noon to 5 p.m. this coming Saturday, Dec. 11, and Sunday, Dec. 12. Participating in the open house are FairWinds Winery, 1984 Hastings Ave. W.; Sorensen Cellars, 274 Otto St.; Eaglemount Wine & Cider, 2350 Eaglemount Road; and Finnriver Farm & Cidery, 62 Barn Swallow Road. The wineries will offer special sales, wine and cider for gifts, dinner, hostess gifts and toasts.

O’Broin certifies

FLINT, Mich. — Dr. Samantha Ruth (Hauff) O’Broin, formerly of Port Angeles, has certified with the American Board of Emergency Medicine. O’Broin is a clinical instructor and residency site coordinator for the University of Michigan Department of Emergency Salmon coalition Medicine. PORT ANGELES — A proShe works at Hurley Medical gram by the North Olympic center in Salmon Coalition has been Flint, Mich. scheduled for this week’s Port O’Broin Angeles Business Association graduated breakfast meeting on Tuesday. from Port The Port Hadlock-based Angeles High salmon coalition, one of 14 such School in agencies throughout the state, 1997, earned covers an area along the coast of a bachelor’s the Strait of Juan de Fuca from degree from the Hood Canal Bridge to Neah Pomona Col- O’Broin Bay, coordinating salmon habilege in Calitat restoration projects. fornia in More about the agency can be 2001 and graduated with honors found at www.nosc.org. from the University of WashingTuesday’s PABA breakfast ton School of Medicine in 2005. meeting, open to the public, She performed a four-year begins at 7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s residency in emergency mediRestaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive, cine at the University of MichiPort Angeles. gan Health System in Ann There is a $2.16 minimum Arbor, Mich. charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order breakfast. Turn to Briefly/D5

Neah Bay adds sign, revamps its website Peninsula Daily News

NEAH BAY — A new sign welcoming visitors and providing information about town services in Neah Bay is the most visible result of a $76,100 U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Enterprise grant awarded to the Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce. The new sign features places to eat and drink; places to stay; places to shop; places to visit; Wi-Fi and ATM locations and other services available in Neah Bay, center of the Makah tribal reservation. “The day that the sign was installed, local businesses were fielding phone calls from visitors requesting information — the benefits were realized immediately,” said Meredith Parker, president of the Neah Bay chamber. “Our community was in need of additional ways to inform and educate our visitors, and the USDA grant provided the means for the chamber to achieve its goals.” The chamber worked with OlySigns of Port Angeles to create the sign on the state Highway 112 extension. The grant also helped pay for the creation of a media outreach plan by Deborah Black of Anastasi Black Public Relations. This included coordinated media releases and ads in Puget Sound publications and radio stations plus brochures created by Lora Messinger and distributed by the Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau. The grant also provided for a complete revamp of the chamber’s website, www.neahbaywa.com. The website was completed by Laurel Black of Laurel Black Design and developed by John Gussman of Double-click Productions. Content for the website was produced by Parker. The creation of the new sign was done in a way unique to Neah Bay. The base color of the sign and brochures was inspired by the color of cedar bark used by Makah weavers in making baskets, hats and clothing.

The website emphasizes red and black, colors that have been used by the Makah for eons — in artwork as old as that excavated from the Ozette archaeological site (those artists used red ochre and charcoal) and seen in the traditional regalia worn during the annual Makah Days celebrations and at tribal potlatches. Greg Colfax, a master woodcarver, owner of the Apocalypto Motel and Linda’s Wood-fired Kitchen and a member of the Neah Bay chamber, provided the outline for the canoe that tops the welcome sign. “This signifies that our Neah Bay and surrounding areas of businesses, entrepreneurs, tribal government and locals are all pulling in the same canoe to attain the community’s collective success,” Parker said.

Inspired by Makah traditions Janine Bowechop, director of the Makah Cultural and Research Center, added: “Our tribe has always been known for how we treat our visitors, and this project is in keeping with that tradition.” The chamber collaborated with the center to ensure that the sign’s design elements and imagery were in keeping with Makah style. Parker said the chamber’s membership includes 71 percent of all businesses in Neah Bay and the surrounding area and includes home-based businesses and supportive individuals. “Since its inception, the Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce has hit the ground running,” said Diane Schostack, executive director of the Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau. “They have joined with the Olympic Peninsula Tourism Bureau, secured grants for marketing and visitor services and have united and focused the business community in Neah Bay in new and dynamic ways.”

Gregoire agrees to pay 85% of health premiums Promise to state workers subject to Legislature OK

the Washington Federation of State Employees, which represents about 40,000 state workers. “We’re glad to have done that, but we’re not happy to have our members sacrifice even more.”

The Associated Press

More to give?

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire told state workers for months that they’d have to pay a bigger share of health-care costs — equal to 26 percent of their health-insurance premiums — because of a looming multibilliondollar budget shortfall. That all changed when Gregoire’s office agreed late last week week to have workers pay 15 percent of health-care premium costs, with the state picking up the other 85 percent in the next twoyear budget. The state currently pays 88 percent of the premium, and state workers pay 12 percent. Under the tentative agreement, subject to funding by the Legislature, the increase in the workers’ share of the premium in 2012 would result in about a $27-a-month increase in costs for the average employee that year, according to the governor’s office. There would be no increase in out-of-pocket costs for workers in the Uniform Medical Plan, which

Welch noted workers haven’t received cost-of-living increases for a couple of years, the Legislature made changes to health benefits last year that forced higher co-pays and deductibles, employees have been laid off — and many have had their pay cut through furloughs. There’s likely more to come, given that the state faces a $1.1 billion shortfall in the current fiscal year, which ends in June, and a $5.7 billion gap in the next budget cycle. “The other shoe hasn’t dropped — next week, we expect the governor to come to the table with proposals for wage cutbacks,” Welch said Friday. “When you put it all together in a package, the health-care settlement we got is reasonable.” State Sen. Joe Zarelli, the ranking Republican on the Senate Ways and Means Committee, feels differently.

The Associated Press

According to the agreement with Gov. Chris Gregoire, state workers will pay $27 more monthly on average for health insurance next year. covers more than half of state workers. “Considering where we started in August, where they wanted our members to go from 12 percent to a 26 percent share of premiums, it was a substantial movement,” said Tim Welch, a spokesman for

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BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Boats trailered in driveways targets This is the time of year when most recreational boaters — except diehard winter crabbers and hearty wind sailors — have their boats out of the water and stowed away for the season. Some have their pride and joy in storage facilities, but most have their boat on a trailer sitting in their driveway or side yard. Boats stored over the winter become easy targets for thieves. And many boat owners don’t discover that they’ve been a victim of theft until springtime when it’s time to make preparations to put the boat back into the water. According to BoatUS Marine Insurance, the three most common items stolen from stowed boats are electronics, outboard motors and outdrives. To avoid a theft of your boat’s electronics, it is well worth your time and effort to remove the gear and store it in your home. If they are permanently installed, make sure to have a record of ownership information, including the model and serial numbers. It is also a good idea to have photographs of your onboard electronics. Small outboard motors should be removed and stored in a locked garage or other secure structure. Larger outboard motors should have a lock installed. It is recommended that outdrives be removed and stowed in a secure location after having recorded the unit’s serial number. The next best defense against a theft would be to install an outdrive lock, BoatUS says. Some more tips: ■ When storing a boat and trailer at your residence, don’t leave the trailer tongue facing the street. Additionally, block the trailer, and remove the tires and store them in the garage. At the very least, wheel locks should be installed as well as a lock on the hitch receiver. ■  If you are looking to sell your boat in favor of a new craft for next season, do not leave a “For Sale” posted on it all winter. It has the potential of attracting the wrong kind of attention and gives nefarious characters an excuse to climb aboard and nose around with impunity. Adding personalized markings to equipment helps identify and recover stolen items.

On the waterfront Making your mark readily apparent is an Sellars added deterrent because it makes those items less “marketable” and less likely to be stolen. ■  Don’t forget that fourlegged “bandits,” such as raccoons and other forest critters, would enjoy the comfort and shelter of a stored boat. Ensure that winter covers are tight and remain securely attached. If at all possible don’t store your boat in a place that makes it easy for animals to get aboard, such as near trees or building overhangs. Cover large exhaust ports, and never leave a ladder leaning against the boat.

David G.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Good reputation

The 941-foot oil tanker Alaskan Frontier, operated by the Alaska Tanker Co., receives topside repair at the Port of Port Angeles Terminal 1 north pier Saturday.

Platypus Marine Inc., the Port Angeles boat and yacht repair company at Marine Drive and Cedar Street, has Seeya in the Commander Building. The boat’s owner brought the 36-foot Yellow Fin by trailer from his home in Portland, Ore. According to Capt. Charlie Crane, Platypus’ director of sales and marketing, the owner was particularly attracted to the company because of the reputation Verne Braghettia and the fiberglass department has garnered within the industry. Capt Charlie said the boat will be at Platypus’ facility well into March for extensive fiberglass modifications. The owner is an avid sportfisher of albacore and is reconfiguring Seeya into a go-fast fishing boat that can get him out and back for a day’s tuna fishing — a round trip of 100 to 200 miles or more. Platypus also has Ocean Cape, a 52-foot Sunnfjord that hails from Douglas, Alaska, sitting on blocks in the Commander Building. The commercial fishing vessel will be in Port Angeles until the end of the month while personnel sandblast her bottom and the

entire boat receives a new coat of paint. Dan O’Keefe, a project manager at Platypus Marine, is also the leader for Boy Scout Troop 1473 of Port Angeles. Beginning this weekend, the troop is selling Christmas trees on Marine Drive next to Action Brake and Muffler, whose owners generously donated the use of a space for the Boy Scouts’ fundraising event. This is the second year the troop has had a tree lot. The brainchild behind this fund raising event is Kim O’Keefe, Dan’s wife and project manager for the O’Keefe household. Half of the net proceeds from the sale of the trees are used to defer the costs of the troop’s activities throughout the year. The other half are posted on a prorated basis, based on hours worked, to each Scout’s individual account, which he then uses to defer the costs of attending the annual Boy Scouts’ summer camp. Dan said their goal this year is to help as many Scouts as possible to earn enough money to pay their camp expenses for next summer.

Historical note

months to get the Neah Bay station in working order — many In the Dec. 21, 1877, edition of things will have to be provided for the Puget Sound Weekly Argus published in Port Townsend, there a position so isolated which are not needed on the Atlantic coast. is news of the arrival from San Francisco of the recently commisFilling up in the harbor sioned revenue steamer, Thomas Corwin, a topsail schooner with a On Wednesday, Tesoro Petrocomplement of eight officers and leum in Port Angeles bunkered 33 enlisted personnel. Genmar Phoenix, an 882-petroOnboard the 140-foot vessel leum products tanker that is was a steel lifeboat that incorpoflagged in the Marshall Islands. rated the latest technology On Thursday, Tesoro provided gleaned from English and French bunkers to the Hong Konglifeboats whose destination was flagged bulk cargo ship, Hebei the U.S. Lifesaving Station at Mercy which is 800 feet long. Neah (spelled Neeah) Bay. And today, Tesoro is scheduled The boat was built of iron and to refuel the 941-foot crude oil weighed 3½ tons. tanker, Alaskan Frontier, which She had five thwarts (rowers was tied up Saturday to the Port seats) which could accommodate of Port Angeles’ Terminal 1 north 10 men rowing double-banked, pier. and could be steered either with a ________ rudder or steering oars. The news article went on to David G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resisay that it was the intention of dent and former Navy boatswain’s mate who the government to have her enjoys boats and strolling the waterfront. manned by “Cape Flattery IndiItems involving boating, port activities and ans” who are famous for their the North Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are skill and daring in handling boats always welcome. or canoes in the heavy surf which E-mail dgsellars@hotmail.com or phone him at 360-417-3736. prevails at all times at the cape. His column, On the Waterfront, appears The article concludes by saying every Sunday. that it will take a couple of

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Sunday, December 5, 2010

D3

Lawmakers to discuss liquor sales Privatization unlikely but changes due By Rachel La Corte The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Voters rejected two ballot measures last month that would have gotten Washington state out of the liquor business. Now, supporters of changing the state’s current system of selling booze are looking to try to make changes through the state Legislature. While it’s unlikely full privatization will be seriously considered by lawmakers, a few legislators plan to introduce bills on the issue again. And officials with the state Liquor Control Board say they are working with Gov. Chris Gregoire to address frustrations over the current system, short of completely removing the state from the equation. Rick Garza, deputy director of the liquor board, said the liquor board officials will be meeting with lawmakers, stakeholders and others in the coming weeks to see if there can be some agreement on possible changes. He said that November’s vote indicated two messages from voters. “I honestly believe the public said, ’I want to treat alcohol different than other commodities because it’s a product that people abuse,”’ he said.

“At the same time I think they’re looking for improved convenience.” Currently, beer and wine are sold in thousands of grocery and convenience stores, but customers can only buy hard liquor by the bottle in the 324 state and contract stores.

Session on Tuesday The state Senate Labor, Commerce & Consumer Protection Committee is holding a work session Tuesday morning to discuss what, if any, changes the Legislature should make, as lawmakers prepare to return to the state capital for the 105day legislative session that begins next month. Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, a Seattle Democrat who is chairwoman of the committee, said that while voters gave a double rebuke to complete privatization, lawmakers can’t “ignore the concerns people have about the system.” “We still need to modernize the system more, and I’m very optimistic we can do that, but I want to do it the right way,” she said. “I think there will be a lot of proposals before us and we should consider them seriously.” Last month, voters rejected two competing privatization measures. Initiative 1100 was a Costco-backed measure that would have not only abolished the current staterun system and removed the state price markup, but would have gone further by dismantling the current distribution model, allowing retailers like Costco to

The Associated Press

Boxes of liquor roll along on a massive conveyor system inside the Washington State Liquor warehouse in Seattle. buy beer, wine and spirits directly from manufacturers instead of going through distributors. It was rejected by 53 percent of voters. Initiative 1105, backed by distributors, would have kept in place state laws that protect beer and wine distributors. In addition to removing the markup, it also would have removed all additional liquor taxes. It was rejected by 65 percent of voters.

Defeated, but . . . Rep. Gary Alexander, R-Olympia, said that lawmakers shouldn’t interpret the vote results as a lack of interest in privatizing liquor sales, noting that hundreds of thousands of voters signed petitions to get the measures on the ballot. Alexander said he was going to reintroduce a prior bill he sponsored that would ultimately change the state model to that of Oregon’s, where all liquor stores are private stores that contract with the state.

About 800 union jobs exist at the state’s more than 160 state stores, and Alexander said that the costs of those jobs should be shouldered by the private sector. “To me, government should be a supportive function that takes care of the responsibilities the private sector cannot do,” he said. Earlier this year, the Legislature directed the state Liquor Control Board to prepare a plan to convert at least 20 state liquor stores to contract stores between July 1, 2011, and July 1, 2013, and to assess the cost benefit. However, in a recent report to the Legislature, the liquor board said it does not recommend implementing the plan and that other options should be explored. “The concern we have is not about the concept of conversion, but rather the financial viability,” said the state Liquor Control Board’s director of business enterprise, Pat McLaughlin. He said that the main concern is that they wouldn’t

be able to find private businesses willing to take on the costs of running the stores compared to the commission they would receive from the state. McLaughlin said that most contract stores in are more rural areas, and that state stores are usually located in urban — and generally, more expensive — areas. He said that under a prior plan to convert 10 contract stores this year, they’ve had difficulty attracting private owners to three locations in the greater Seattle area because of that.

Higher commissions Garza said they may have to consider offering higher commissions to independent businesses to entice them to take over state stores, a tough sell heading into a legislative session where the state faces a projected $5.7 billion budget hole. “Why would you want to do that if you’re not going to see a financial benefit for

the state?” he asked. Sen. Tim Sheldon, D-Potlatch, sponsored a bill earlier this year that would have closed all state liquor stores and the state distribution center, and auctioned off franchise agreements to the highest bidder, opening the door for grocery sales. His bill was ultimately turned into a study bill that didn’t go anywhere. Sheldon said he’ll also reintroduce his bill in the next session. “Privatizing liquor shows the public we can reform state government,” he said. Washington is among 18 so-called “control” or “monopoly” states that exercise broad powers over wholesale distribution of hard liquor. Of those states, 12 — including Washington — are also involved in retail alcohol sales through either state-run liquor stores, outlets operated by private contractors, or both. Last year, liquor sales generated more than $370 million in revenue to state and local governments.

Nalley’s closing landmark food plant in Tacoma The Associated Press

TACOMA — Nalley’s Fine Foods, a 92-year-old Tacoma institution, is closing its plant here and moving operations to an Iowa factory. The plant in a south Tacoma industrial area long known as “Nalley Valley” once produced a wide variety of foods, including pick-

les and potato chips, but now turns out Nalley’s Chili and Brooks Beans. Mountain Lakes, N.J.based Pinnacle Foods Group LLC, which owns dozens of nationally known brands, said its acquisition a year ago of Nalley’s owner Birds Eye Foods gave it too much capacity for canned meat products and led to the deci-

sion to centralize production at its Armour plant at Fort Madison, Iowa. The Nalley brand will be kept after the move, expected to be completed by the middle of next year. The move is contingent upon final approval of state and local incentives being offered in Iowa, provisions of which are being negoti-

ated, Pinnacle spokeswoman Michelle Weese said Friday. However, she said the deciding factors were that the Midwest plant has the better production capability and is closer to sources for ingredients. The Tacoma plant’s 160 employees will be given the chance to apply for other jobs within Pinnacle. The company also is negotiating with the plant’s three unions — the Teamsters, Operating Engineers and Machinists — on the timing of the closure and transition programs for the employees they represent. Pinnacle said it plans to invest $20 million at the accounts in a very danger- Iowa plant and add 65 jobs ous scenario in terms of the to the 430 now there. ability to cover unexpected Other brands costs,” he said. Kuper agreed that Pinnacle, whose other health-care costs are going brands include Duncan up, but pointed out that Hines, Vlasic, Mrs. Butterpart of the increase — about worth’s and Mrs. Paul’s, also $55 million — would be manages Tim’s Cascade covered by the boost in pre- Snacks in the suburb of miums paid by state work- Algona between Tacoma ers. and Seattle. The rest would come Weese said that plant from reserves. and its approximately 100 The governor’s office did employees are not affected not provide details Friday by the Nalley’s move. on how much health-care Nalley’s has been part of costs are projected to Tacoma since Marcus Nalincrease in the next two ley founded his company in years. 1918.

Premiums: 100,000

state workers affected Continued from D1 “I think it’s not a smart way to do business in terms of controlling costs,” Zarelli said of the health-care agreement. “I don’t know what their thinking is.” The agreement, reached Thursday afternoon, has to be incorporated into the overall union contract, which is still under negotiation, and then ratified by the union. The Legislature also would have to approve funding for the contract. If the deal goes through as is, the premium changes would take place Jan. 1, 2012, and would likely cover more than 100,000 state employees, both union and nonunion.

The governor’s office said the tentative agreement would keep the state’s cost to provide employee health care in the next two-year budget at around $1.2 billion, which is what the state expects to spend in the current budget cycle. “That was our overall goal and we achieved that,” said Glenn Kuper, a spokesman for the governor’s budget office.

Health costs However, Zarelli, R-Ridgefield, noted that health-care costs for the state will actually increase. The governor’s office, he said, is planning to draw down two health-carerelated reserve accounts to make up the difference. “This puts those reserve

A

t one time the Nalley label was on more than 1,300 products, including chip dips, salad dressing and canned hash.

The 28-year-old Nalley began by selling “Saratoga Chips” — thin slices of potato fried in oil — he made at home.

He built his company into a major West Coast food processor, opening his Nalley Valley factory in 1941. The plant long was known for its heady aromas of cucumbers pickling and potatoes frying. At one time the Nalley label was on more than 1,300 products, including chip dips, salad dressing and canned hash. The company eventually was acquired by larger corporations.

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Peninsula Daily News

Could our salmon run out of food? Ocean changes studied By Les Blumenthal Tacoma News Tribune

WASHINGTON — With the number of salmon in the North Pacific having doubled in the past 50 years, scientists increasingly are concerned there may not be enough food to support them, and changing ocean conditions could make it worse. On the surface, mounting scientific evidence would seem to contradict conventional wisdom that salmon are a disappearing species. But as with everything salmon, it’s more complicated. While more than $13 billion has been spent since 1978 to try to restore wildsalmon populations in the Pacific Northwest, salmon hatcheries in the United States, Russia, Japan and Canada have expanded rapidly. In 1970, 500 million hatchery-raised salmon were released. In 2008, more than 5 billion hatchery fish headed out to sea. As with wild salmon, a small percentage of hatchery fish actually survive to spawn. Once in the ocean, the hatchery fish compete for the same food as wild salmon. While the North Pacific and the Bering Sea may be vast, salmon often congregate in the same feeding grounds. “Many hatcheries were built on the premise that the ocean had an unlimited capacity to support all salmon,” said Gregory Ruggerone, a fisheries scientist who works for Natural Resources Consultants in Seattle. That may not be true. With nearly 650 million adult Pacific salmon in the ocean at any given time, competition for food is

increasing, and alreadyshrinking wild stocks could be crowded out.

West coast runs “It could lead to a reduction in wild stocks,” said Randall Peterman, a professor in the School of Resource and Environment Management at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C. Studies in recent years suggest competition for food is affecting salmon runs up and down the West Coast, from Puget Sound chinook to Bristol Bay, Alaska, sockeye. Returning fish are smaller in some instances, making them more susceptible to predators. In others, runs are declining. Competition between wild and hatchery salmon is nothing new. Wild salmon are considered heartier and more resistant to disease than their hatchery-raised counterparts. If the salmon you buy at the fish counter isn’t farmraised, it’s likely hatcheryraised silver, coho or chinook. Fishermen are expected to toss back any wild ones they catch. Before a salmon is released from a hatchery, one of its fins is clipped to distinguish it from wild ones. The fins can be clipped by hand or using a laser device. “We know stocks from all over the Pacific intermingle and overlap,” Ruggerone said. “There is a melting pot. But there is a lot we don’t know.”

International issue The issue of too many salmon and too little food is an international one, with Japanese hatcheries releasing mostly chum salmon, valuable for their roe, and the Russian releasing pink salmon. “Five years ago at a conference in Russia, a guy stood up and said I was trying to start a war between

The Associated Press

A sea lion makes a meal out of a salmon in the Columbia River downstream from the Bonneville Dam. Russia and the U.S.,” Ruggerone said. Since the mid-1970s, the waters of the North Pacific have been slightly warmer, creating an upwelling that brings zooplankton, krill and other salmon food favorites to the surface. But a 20- to 30-year weather cycle known as the Pacific decadal oscillation could reverse itself soon, and colder water means less food for salmon. Climate change is causing even greater uncertainty. “This concern about competing for limited resources may become considerably more acute if the North Pacific area occupied by salmon decreases due to climatic change,” according to an article co-authored by Ruggerone and Peterman published this fall in a technical journal published by the American Fisheries Society. The article talks about a “common pool” of salmon food in the North Pacific and suggests hatchery fish have become so abundant that there may not be enough food for the wild fish. Despite years of study, salmon remain pretty much a mystery fish. While much is known about the time they spend

in fresh water and their journeys down rivers and streams to the sea, once they enter saltwater they pretty much disappear for up to three years, only to return to fresh water to Peninsula Daily News spawn. news services Pink salmon, the most abundant species, could be VICTORIA — Global fisheries have expanded so the main culprit when it rapidly over the past half-century that the world is comes to competition for running out of places to catch wild fish, according food. to a new study conducted by researchers in CanWhile some juvenile ada, the United States and Australia. salmon stocks linger in fresh The findings, published in the online journal water for a year or more, PLoS ONE, are the first to examine how commerpinks rush to the ocean cial marine fisheries have expanded geographically where they have first crack over time. at the food and return a Looking at fleets’ movements between 1950 and year later to spawn. 2005, researchers charted how fishing has been Scientists know Pacific expanding southward at roughly 1 degree latitude salmon can migrate thoueach year in order to compensate for depleted fish sands of miles once they stocks in the Northern Hemisphere. enter the ocean. During that same period, the world’s commerStudies of fish tagged at cial fish catch increased fivefold from 19 million hatcheries and caught later metric tons in 1950 to a peak of 90 million in the late 1980s, before declining to 79.5 million tons in have shown the fish are 2008, the most recent year for which figures are capable of traveling remarkavailable. able distances. Daniel Pauly, a co-author at the University of But most of the studies British Columbia Fisheries Centre, said the global date to the 1960s and 1970s, seafood catch is now dropping “because there’s and scientists now want to essentially nowhere to go.” use genetic testing to better That fish catches rose for so many decades track their journeys to “looks like sustainability but it is actually expanNorth Pacific feeding sion driven. grounds. “That is frightening, because the accounting is “We have some idea what coming now.” is going on, but there is a lot we don’t know,” Ruggerone said. During the past several years, he said, one West only 10 percent of the fish “The thing about science Coast salmon run had expected in another run is every answer generates roughly three times as many showed up. 10 more questions,” Rugfish return as expected and No one knows why. gerone said.

World running out of places to catch fish

Finger length, cancer risk linked Orcas irked

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were 33 percent less likely inger length is set to develop the potentially fatal disease. before birth, LONDON — Men with “Relative finger length long index fingers are at influenced by the lower risk of prostate can- could be used as a simple level of sex hormones test for prostate-cancer cer, a study found. British scientists who risk,” said Ros Eeles, one of babies are exposed to compared the hands of the study’s lead authors in the womb, 1,500 prostate-cancer and a researcher who invespatients and 3,000 healthy tigates links between researchers say. men found that those whose genetic makeup and tumors index finger (the first finger at London’s Institute of in the British Journal of and the second digit of the Cancer Research, in a state- Cancer. hand) was longer than their ment. Finger length is set The study was published before birth, influenced by ring finger (the fourth digit) the level of sex hormones babies are exposed to in the Your brand and mission come womb, researchers from the institute and the University alive in your marketing materials . . . of Warwick in Coventry, England, said in the state. . . and for that you need top-notch creative services. ment. Laurel Black Design will create the tools you need A longer index finger to get the results you want. points to less testosterone, Call today for a consultation which may protect against and let’s get started! cancer later in life, they L�UREL BL��K D���GN said. “Our study indicates it is ���������������������������������������������������������������������� the hormone levels that Peninsula Daily News news services

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babies are exposed to in the womb that can have an effect decades later,” said Ken Muir of the University of Warwick, the study’s other lead author, in the statement. “As our research continues, we will be able to look at a further range of factors that may be involved in the makeup of the disease.” Scientists from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the U.S. National Institute of Aging in 2004 found that men with high blood levels of testosterone were at increased risk of prostate cancer. In the new British study, more than half of the men had an index finger shorter than the ring finger. Those whose two fingers were about equal had a similar prostate-cancer risk, the researchers found.

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over noise, studies show By Judith Lavoie

Victoria Times Colonist

VICTORIA — Endangered killer whales in the Strait of Georgia have to shout over constant noise from increasing marine traffic, researchers say. “The noise is virtually continuous during daylight hours and quiets a little bit overnight,” Richard Dewey, associate research director on the University of Victoria’s VENUS project, said. “In addition to the annoyance of the constant din, [the whales] are likely to have to shout over the engine sounds and listen through the racket to pick out and identify the messages.” Tricky tasks, such as the use of broadband clicks to echo-locate fish — the sole diet for resident killer whales — is likely to be extremely difficult when boats and ships are nearby, Dewey said. VENUS — Victoria Experimental Network Under the Sea — has hydrophones in an underwater network of hubs in the Strait of Georgia and Saanich Inlet. The instruments are connected to researchers around the world, through high-speed communications techniques. It is a challenge sorting out the streams of noise, which also includes the scratchy sounds of creatures such as squat lobsters apparently preening their gills on the hydrophone, Dewey said. “We are picking up both engine noise and vocalization and, although we can’t understand whale-speak to say the whales are using different words or differ-

ent tones in the presence of engine noise, we hope to get that sorted out in the future,” he said. It was expected the Strait of Georgia would be noisy as it is one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world, but among recent changes is the increase in massive container freighters. “They travel at twice the speed that vessels used to travel at, they use four times as much energy and make four times as much noise in the ocean,” Dewey said.

Unanswered question One of the as yet unanswered research questions is whether the whales can survive increasing noise at the same time as they are coping with shrinking salmon runs and climate change. “Whether the whales and dolphins can adapt is an open question,” Dewey said. “Sorting out which part of these changes they are responding to is another part of the challenge.” Resident killer whales, with 87 animals in the three pods, are a major focus for VENUS researchers. Marine mammal specialist John Ford, of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Pacific Biological Station, is trying to learn and analyze whale language as part of the project. That means sorting out different sounds for echolocation, long-distance calling and intra-pod communication. “Then we will try to find trends that they might have to employ to adapt to this noisy environment,” Dewey said.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 5, 2010

D5

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1

Make a wreath SEQUIM — McComb Gardens, 751 McComb Road, is offering “Wreath Making in the Greenhouse.” Individualized instruction will be provided. Welcoming wreaths take about two hours to design and construct. One garbage can of greens is needed. Cost is $15 per wreath. Reservations are required. The Greenhouse is open for wreathmaking Wednesday through Saturday until Christmas. For more information, phone McComb at 360-6812827.

Novel published

Send us your business news Do you have a business expansion planned, staffing change, new product line or something newsworthy? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

Exeltech was picked for the award because it has weathered the recession well and also has grown outside Lacey, doing business throughout the state, Verchot said. That growth is the result of a business decision to compete with larger engineering companies, rather than strictly be a subcontractor to those larger companies, Kuruvilla said. In addition to its work in Port Angeles, Exeltech is known for projects in Bremerton, in Tacoma and in Tumwater, where it worked on a bridge-rehabilitation project near the former Olympia brewery.

weight by dramatically limiting their food intake. The FDA will make a final decision on the LapBand in the coming months. On Friday, a panel of FDA advisers recommended expanding use of the device to include patients who are mildly obese. The device from Allergan Inc. is currently implanted in roughly 100,000 people each year. It usually helps patients lose 50 pounds or more and has been limited to patients who are morbidly obese.

B.C. power costs

WASHINGTON — The U.S. and South Korea have reached an agreement on the largest trade pact in more than a decade, a highly coveted deal the Obama administration hopes will boost American exports and create tens of thousands of U.S. jobs. After a week of marathon negotiations, representatives from both countries broke through a stalemate Friday morning on outstanding issues related to the automobile industry, which have been a sticking point in the talks. The agreement would be the largest U.S. trade deal since the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico, and would bolster U.S. economic ties with South Korea, the world’s 12th largest economy.

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SEQUIM — Henery’s Garden Center, 1060 Sequim-Dungeness Way, recently received a shipment of live trees that can be used as Christmas trees, then replanted for continued enjoyment. For more information, phone Henery’s at 360-6836969.

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China offerings NEW YORK — Chinese companies are poised to dominate the U.S. IPO market next week. Of the nine companies scheduled to conduct initial public offerings, six are from China and one is from Taiwan. If all go to market as

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PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio at 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and on www.konp.com on the Internet outside the Port Angeles area. Station general manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Mon-

PORT ANGELES — Bay Variety, 135 W. First St., will hold its annual Christmas open house from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. this coming Saturday, Dec. 11, and on Sunday, Dec. 12. Homemade goodies and door prizes will be available, and special discounts will be offered. For more information, phone the department store at 360-457-5200.

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BRUSSELS — Europe and the euro will never be the same. The debt crisis is forcing governments to rewrite some of the eurozone’s most fundamental rules. While some see the current turmoil as the slow-motion wreckage of the common currency bloc, others maintain Europe will have the political resolve to keep it together and even bring it closer together. Either way, one thing is clear: Thanks to new debt and bailout rules being agreed among the 16 eurozone nations, Europe’s monetary union will be forever altered, even if it survives the crisis.

NEW YORK — Benchmark oil settled up $1.19 at $89.19 a barrel Friday on the New York Mercantile Exchange. There are widespread expectations that the price will hit $90 a barrel by year’s end and head toward $100 a barrel by next spring when traders Copyright challenge begin looking ahead to the summer driving season. SAN FRANCISCO — In other Nymex trading Viacom Inc. is seeking to in January contracts, heatoverturn a court decision ing oil rose 3.28 cents to that dismissed its claims settle at $2.4874 a gallon, of copyright abuse against gasoline slipped 0.32 cent YouTube, even though the to $2.3521 a gallon and Internet video site used to natural gas gained 0.6 show thousands of pirated cent to $4.349 per 1,000 clips. cubic feet. The challenge filed FriIn London, Brent crude day in a federal appeals rose 78 cents to $91.42 a barrel on the ICE futures court in New York had been expected since a June exchange. ruling rebuffed Viacom’s copyright infringement Nonferrous metals lawsuit against YouTube NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous and its owner, Google Inc. metal prices Friday. Viacom’s renewed effort Aluminum - $1.0548 per lb., to collect more than $1 bil- London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.9511 Cathode full lion in alleged damages plate, LME. from Google is the latest Copper - $3.9950 N.Y. Merc twist in a closely watched spot Fri. legal battle that has Lead - $2291.50 metric ton, already dragged on for London Metal Exch. nearly four years. Zinc - $0.9970 per lb., London Oral argument on the Metal Exch. appeal probably won’t hapGold - $1403.15 Handy & Harpen until at least next man (only daily quote). summer. Gold - $1405.40 troy oz., NY

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VICTORIA — B.C. PORT ANGELES — Hydro is seeking to The Egyptian Cat, a paraincrease residential cusnormal love story by local tomer power rates by author Diane Reaves, has nearly 30 percent over the been published through next three Smashwords.com, an interyears. national electronic book B.C. publisher. Hydro said The it needs the novel takes increase in place in part to pay Atlanta, for $6 bilNew York, eninsula aily ews lion in capi- Cobb London and, tal projects. through the Under the plan, the archeologist average monthly residenday through hero’s time- Reaves Shellac nails tial bill, which the utility Thursday travel, in SEQUIM — Village said is now about $71 Alexandria, Egypt, during segments, Hair Design, 645 W. Wash- Canadian, would increase the 1920s. and Karen ington St. No. 5, is now by about $7 in each of the It can be sampled or Hanan offering shellac nails. next three fiscal years into purchased through at www. hosts “Art “They go on like polish, 2014. smashwords.com/books/ Beat” on wear like gel and come off B.C. Hydro CEO Dave view/22268. Fridays. in minutes,” said owner Cobb said the corporation The book is also availWilliams This Janet Stern. will file an application able for the Kindle (Barnes week’s For more information or with the British Columbia & Noble) and for other scheduled lineup: an appointment, phone her Utilities Commission in electronic reader devices late February to formally at 360-683-1144. Monday: Port Ange■  through Smashwords. seek approval. les City Manager Kent Reaves is the author of “We have among the Myers. Exeltech lauded published nonfiction books lowest rates in North Tuesday: To be ■  on health and fitness, SEATTLE — Exeltech, America and they will announced. including HydroRobics, the engineering company continue to be, with the Wednesday: Dan ■  which has been translated that managed the construc- potential increases we’re Williams from Green into several languages. tion of the Eighth Street looking at,” Cobb said. Diane and her husband, Planet ZipLine. bridges and The Gateway ■  Thursday: Peninsula transit center in Port AngeGraham Reaves, live in Port Angeles. She is curCollege President Tom Kee- les along with other Nation/World rently writing the sequel to gan. smaller city projects, is the The Egyptian Cat. recipient of a Washington ■  Friday: Joy LingerMinority Business of the felt and Elizabeth Kelly National job trickle Year award from the UniPeterson certifies from the NW Women’s WASHINGTON — The versity of Washington’s Chorale; author Pamela PORT ANGELES — Business and Economic nation added only a trickle Hastings; artist David Daniel Peterson recently Development Center. of jobs in November, far Haight and Bar N9ne earned certification as a Exeltech, fewer than experts had owner Galen Hammond. Professional in Human based in expected and a reminder Resources from the HR Lacey, was that the economy is still Certification Institute. Winter wear one of five recovering only fitfully. To become certified, an SEQUIM — Brian’s companies The job market was applicant must pass a com- Sporting Goods and More receiving weak all around: Stores, prehensive examination is fully stocked with goods the award factories, construction and demonstrate a strong from the for winter weather. companies and financial background of professional center, part Kuruvilla These items include firms all cut positions. The human resource experiof the uniwind-up flashlights to use unemployment rate ence. versity’s in power outages, thermal nudged closer to double The HR Certification Foster School of Business. underwear, winter hats, digits again — 9.8 percent, Institute is the credentialThe award was received after three straight gloves, coats, boots and ing body for human by Santosh Kuruvilla, months at 9.6 percent. resource professionals and fleece liners. Exeltech CEO and presiNew items include Yak Employers added is affiliated with the Socident. Santosh was the projTrax, lightweight traction 39,000 jobs for the month, ety for Human Resource ect manager for the Eighth devices that fit over your the Labor Department Management. It describes Street project. itself as the world’s largest shoes for improved mobilKuruvilla, now 49, came said Friday. ity on ice and sleds in all The report caught econorganization dedicated to the United States from shapes and sizes. omists off guard. They had exclusively to the human India to pursue graduate The store is at 542 W. predicted 150,000 new jobs resource profession. studies at Washington Washington St., next to after the economy added Peterson is director of State University. operations for Country Aire Arby’s in the Safeway He worked for two engi- 172,000 in October — Natural Foods and director parking lot. neering companies over the which had been enough to qualify as a hiring spurt in For more information, of human resources and next 10 years, then finance for Michael’s Seaphone Brian’s at 360-683acquired Exeltech in 1998. this anemic post-recession food and Steakhouse. Both 1950. His company has about economy. businesses are in down50 employees, spread town Port Angeles. Wolsley on staff throughout its locations in Stomach bands Lacey, Seattle, Portland WASHINGTON — PORT ANGELES — Donate to toy drive Odette and Port Angeles. About 12 million more Wolsley recently “Minority [owned] busi- obese Americans could PORT ANGELES — joined the staff of Shear nesses are having an soon be eligible to get surBada Bean! Bada Bloom!, Elegance, 210 E. Fourth St. impact statewide,” said gery to implant a small, 1105 E. Front St., is holdWolsley specializes in Michael Verchot, director of flexible stomach band ing a “Santa’s Helpers Toy nails, including pedicures the center. designed to help them lose Run” until Dec. 24. and manicures, gel and Customers who bring in one new unwrapped toy to acrylic and shellac applications. put under the business’ She is available for Avalon Wood & Gas Stoves Christmas tree will receive appointments from 10 a.m. a free 12-ounce drink. to 6 p.m. Wednesday Limit is one drink per through Saturday and by donation per customer. special request. For more information, For more information, phone the business at 360452-9948 or visit www. phone her at 360-457-7993. badapa.com. Tax Credit Ends Dec. 31.

Trade deal reached

planned, it will be a record number of Chinese companies listing in the U.S. in the same week, according to data provider Dealogic. The companies drawing big investor interest are E-Commerce China Dangdang Inc., which is modeled after online store Amazon.com Inc., and Youku.com Inc., an Asian mash-up of popular U.S. online video websites Hulu and YouTube.


D6

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Blaring TV spots come under fire Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — Congress has come to the aid of millions of Americans who find themselves reaching for a mute button to silence those loud television commercials. “The problems with earsplitting TV advertisements have existed for more than 50 years. Not five, 50,” said Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., who noted that her office has received many messages of support and that people approach her in restaurants and supermarkets to ask about the legislation. “Television advertisers first realized that consumers often left the room during commercials, so they used loud commercials to grab their attention as they moved to other parts of their home.” On a voice vote late Thursday, the House passed an Eshoo-sponsored bill that would force the Federal Communications Commission to set new, lower volume standards for ads. The legislation, already passed by the Senate, now goes to President Obama for his signature. The new regulations, which apply to all broadcast providers, including cable and satellite, would go into effect a year after the FCC establishes new decibel levels. Ads won’t be allowed to

be louder than the loudest portions of the shows in which they’re placed. “Every American has likely experienced the frustration of abrasively loud television commercials,” Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., said when the Senate approved the measure in September. “While this may be an effective way for ads to grab attention, it also adds unnecessary stress to the daily lives of many Americans.”

Complaints for years Said Mark Cooper, director of research at the Consumer Federation of America: “It’s not like the consumer has any choices. It’s a case where it’s very difficult for consumers to express their sovereignty.” The FCC has been receiving complaints from consumers since the 1960s about jarring sound bursts on commercials, but the commission does not regulate program or commercial volume. Instead, it reminds viewers that newer TVs come equipped with circuits designed to stabilize volume differences or advises people that one solution is still to make aggressive use of the mute button on the remote. One reason commercials may sound louder is a

sound-compression technique in which the difference between loud and soft sounds is compressed. The result: While peak sound levels of commercials and programs may not differ, the average levels of commercials are higher. Consumers can buy volume regulators to adjust the sound, but consumer advocates say they shouldn’t have to invest in more equipment. Eshoo said there will be a “noticeable difference” in noise levels once the law goes into effect. “It’s a small bill in the greater scheme of things, she said, but “it will bring relief to millions of television viewers.” The broadcast advertisVivian Elvis Hansen/Peninsula Daily News ing industry argued that the legislation was unnecessary because broadcastestaurant s anniversary ers could police themselves. Denny and Lori Negus, owners of Wildfire Wood-Fired Grill, 929 The HULA Media W. Eighth St., Port Angeles, celebrate the restaurant’s second Exchange, a distributor of broadcast advertising, anniversary this week. announced Thursday that local and network broadcasters and cable outlets automatically would start receiving advertising spots with lowered volume. “We’re really helping broadcasters and cable networks alleviate a growing problem, without any additional cost or equipment investment on their part,” office spouse was a dude, lem with a work spouse is said Roger Cucci, the com- By Ann Belser kind of “Brokeback Moun- that other people in the P ittsburgh Post-Gazette pany’s vice president of department can feel left out, tain” with office furniture. engineering. Maybe it’s a proximity This brings us to shop- because, as Olds said, cothing. ping — as so many things workers can detect a close You’re both in the same do. relationship from a mile department or you sit near Sixty-seven percent of away and that can splinter each other at work. the respondents said their workplace cohesiveness. You have the same boss, work spouse influenced Olds said most employthe same complaints, the their purchasing decisions, ees report that they go to same lousy insurance, the with 60 percent saying their work to see their friends — same pay cuts. work spouse was more and, of course, earn a payYou start talking about influential in jewelry pur- check. work and move on to home chases than their legal And as much as people repair, childcare or fami- spouse — which, if you long to never have to get up, lies. think about it, makes get dressed and commute, Next thing you know, sense. Olds said, “for people who you are having lunch Men who have work work alone at home, work together and pretty soon . . . spouses often ask them loses its savor because they you have an office spouse. about buying gifts for their can’t connect with people They used to be called “a wives. there.” close friend at work,” said And women who have In her own experience, Jacqueline Olds, an associ- same-sex work spouses are Olds’ office spouse, Richard ate in psychiatry at McLean going to trust a woman’s Schwartz, is also her actual Hospital and Massachu- opinion about a necklace or spouse. setts General Hospital in earrings. The two have offices Boston. Surprisingly, only 78 across the hall from each “The expression ‘work percent of the respondents other at home in Camspouse’ is so useful,” because said their work spouses bridge, Mass., so there is no immediately people know influenced their choice of downside to them being what it means. restaurants (we suppose work spouses. “Some people have them the other 22 percent bring “If I make him lunch, no and some people don’t.” bag lunches), while 56 per- one gets jealous,” she said. When Captivate Net- cent said their work spouse work, a subsidiary of Gan- influenced a technology nett Co. Inc., surveyed 600 purchase (“Do you like your white-collar workers about iPhone? Because Mark says Follow the their office interactions, he really likes his Blackthey found that for all the Berry.”) PDN’s breaking time work spouses spent There are those very few news via . . . together, most people’s work spouse relationships interaction with their work that go over the line. Executives engage in wife/husband was confined inappropriate behavior (12 and the Harvard Stem Cell to the office (55 percent). There was that 24 per- percent of married execuInstitute. So direct conversion cent of the respondents who tives had a physical affair might offer a more efficient called their office spouses in with their work spouse) FACEBOOK TWITTER and faster way of getting the evening and on week- more than nonexecutives (8 Peninsula Daily pendailynews the kinds of cells scientists ends, presumably still fum- percent). Another potential probing about work. want. A work spouse does not A glimpse of what might be possible through direct have to be of the opposite conversion emerged in 2008. sex — 67 percent of married Port Angeles Hardwood LLC Researchers got one kind of women reported they have pancreatic cell to turn into had a same-sex office 333 Eclipse Industrial Pkwy another kind within living spouse, while 34 percent of Port Angeles, WA 98363 mice. married men said their

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Scientists trick cells into switching IDs By Malcolm Ritter The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Suppose you could repair tissue damaged by a heart attack by magically turning other cells into heart muscle, so the organ could pump effectively again. Scientists aren’t quite ready to do that. But they are reporting early success at transforming one kind of specialized cell directly into another kind, a feat of biological alchemy that doctors may one day perform inside a patient’s body. “I think everyone believes this is really the future of so-called stem-cell biology,” says John Gearhart of the University of Pennsylvania, one of many researchers pursuing this approach. The concept is two steps beyond the familiar story of embryonic stem cells, versatile entities that can be coaxed to become cells of all types, like brain and blood.

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SEC E SAF 70 N. Bagley Creek Rd., P.A. URE (5 miles E. of P.A., Corner of 101 & Bagley)

MOUNTAIN VIEW HEARING

www.mtnviewhearing.com

0B5103582

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452-8344 • 929 E. Front • PA

Contact Vail Case at 460-1661

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10

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0B5103413

Scientists are learning to guide those transformations, which someday may provide transplant tissue for treating diseases like Parkinson’s or diabetes. It’s still experimental. But at its root, it’s really just harnessing and speeding up what happens in nature: a versatile but immature cell matures into a more specialized one. The first step beyond that came in 2007, when researchers reversed the process. They got skin cells to revert to a state resembling embryonic stem cells. That opened the door to a two-part strategy: turn skin cells from a patient back into stem cells, and then run the clock forward again to get whatever specialized cell you want. The new direct-conver-

sion approach avoids embryonic stem cells and the whole notion of returning to an early state. Why not just go directly from one specialized cell to another? It’s like flying direct rather than scheduling a stopover. Even short of researchers’ dreams of fixing internal organs from within, Gearhart says direct conversion may offer some other advantages over more established ways of producing specialized cells. Using embryonic stem cells is proving to be inefficient and more difficult than expected, scientists say. For example, the heart muscle cells developed from them aren’t fully mature, Gearhart noted. And there’s no satisfactory way yet to make mature insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, which might be useful for treating diabetes, says George Daley of Children’s Hospital Boston

360-385-6883 or Sequim 360-683-1881 265 Chimacum Rd., Port Hadlock Normal Hours: M–F 8-5 www.mountainpropane.com MOUNTP198306


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

COUNTRY HOME

COUNTRY LIVING

Sunday, December 5, 2010

2% CLOSING COSTS

E1

'D' IS FOR DECK THE HALLS

W NE ING T S I L

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Freshly painted inside and out, this 1,680 SF, 4 BR/2 BA manufactured home is on 1.19 acres of flat pasture land located in a small, quiet community east of Sequim. $119,000 ML#251897

0C405637

0C405655

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Solid cedar perimeter walls inside & out add to homey feeling & charm. Hardwood floors under w-2-w carpet. Large open living area w/ many windows makes home cheery & bright. Many trees; fruit & shade. New roof 2008. New septic system/exterior paint 2010. Short walk to community beach. Call LINDA ML#252379/156602 $229,900

Best value on the market! Immaculate waterview home nestled amongst the trees with private hiking trail loop. Wine cellar, chef-friendly kitchen with pantry & island, windows abound & oodles of storage. Spacious & viewsome master suite, 2 fireplaces, ideal for entertaining & house guests and ideal home office. Beautifully maintained inside & out. Priced more than $70,000 below assessed value - owner says “Sell!” Only $449,500. ML#252385 Always call JACE for Land & Homes on Land!

With an offer accepted in December, buyer qualifies for a 2% credit for closing costs. Get started on your home ownership ladder with this 3 BR home on an oversized lot minutes from town. You will love the sunroom! Enjoy all kinds of backyard activities or grow a garden. Come take a look at www.PiliMeyer.com and see how terrific this is for yourself. Only $169,000! ML#251890

®

TOM BLORE

WRE/Sequim-East

Linda Ulin

UPTOWN REALTY

tom@sequim.com

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891 linulin@olypen.com

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

www.calljace.com jace@olypen.com

933 East First St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

email: pili@olypen.com

WATER VIEW CHARMER

LAKE SUTHERLAND ROAD

This beautifully designed home, built in 1997, sits on 2.74 acres with gorgeous mountain views - access to Lake Sutherland & a shared boat dock conveys. All 3 BR have walk-in closets & office space. Large master w/5 piece bath - X-tra large guest bath. Living & family rooms and MUCH MORE! $369,900 ML#251566

Beautiful, century old home with an amazing view of the PA harbor. Also enjoy an unstoppable view of the Olympics from your backyard. Hardwood throughout the home, although most of the home is currently carpeted. Many updates still needed, but allows the opportunity to make this YOUR home. $325,000 ML#252095/138514.

Beautiful private end-of-the-road gated setting on 2.27- Acres. This home features knotty pine cabinetry in the kitchen, vaulted ceiling in living area, wood wrapped windows, tile flooring in entry, bath and kitchen, large walk-in pantry, solid core doors, don’t miss the laundry room 12x20 that has been added that has room for processing meats/fruits, etc. Landscaping has lots of fruit trees and garden area. Only $395,000 MLS#251896 Call Brody at 360.477.9665

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Newer 3 BR/2 BA home within the Port Angeles city limits. Kick back and relax on the deck and enjoy the nicely landscaped yard in this quiet neighborhood. You won’t believe how wonderful and classy this home looks and feels -- COME SEE! $177,000 ML#251853/145266

360.565.2020

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978

A HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

LIGHT & BRIGHT

Jace Schmitz, REALTOR®

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

®

WRE/Port Angeles

Brody Broker

Mark Macedo

Cell: (360) 460-4794 shawnee@olypen.com shawnee.mywindermere.com

www.welcomehomesequim.com

A FAIR HOUSE

BEST PRESENT EVER!

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

SEQUIM PRIME COMMERCIAL

PANORAMIC MT. VIEWS

This home, conveniently located between P.A. and Sequim, has panoramic Mt. views from 1.9 acres. The 2006, 3 BR/2 BA manufactured home has a split floor plan, vaulted ceilings and large kitchen. There is a large garage and separate art studio/ hobby room with wood stove. $199,000 ML#251136. www.330OldOlympic.com Call Gail 360-477-9361 / 683-3900

0C405641

Custom built with attention to detail. 3 BR/3 BA and over 2,100 SF on 20 plus acres. View of the Strait, San Juans, Mt. Baker. Secluded, semiparked out with numerous mature trees, two shops and so much more! This is the Log Home you’ve been waiting for. $775,000 ML#251461. Ask for Tim.

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0C405635

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Across from the fairgrounds, that is. A 2 BR/1 BA beautifully upgraded house with new appliances and newer roof. There is a greenhouse for the green thumbers and big shop for the fixers and builders. Check out the beautiful landscaping. Enjoy fruit from your own orchard. Possible owner financing. $175,000 MLS#252388 Call Rita

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

Broker

761 N. Sequim Ave. Cell: 360-477-9665 email: Brodybroker@olypen.com

(360)477-9244 questionmark@olypen.com

UPTOWN REALTY

Shawnee Hathaway-Ochs

Prime Commercial Parcel with outstanding Hwy 101 frontage in Sequim located near Sears and next to Big 5 Sporting Goods. Call Jim $159,000 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.com

CARROLL REALTY

Gail Sumpter

Rita Erdmann

190 Priest Rd. 360-477-9361 PO Box 1060 gail@gailsumpter.com Sequim, WA 98382 www.gailsumpter.com 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

UPTOWN REALTY

Office: (360) 457-1111 Cell: (360) 460-1029 rita@olypen.com www.carrollrealtyteam.com

Tim Riley

Office: (360) 417-2783 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 Email: timriley@olypen.com

NEWER RAMBLER

SEE IT ALL FROM HERE...

www.u-saverealestate.com

WATERFRONT ELEGANCE

FAMILY TIME W

NE

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NG

I ST

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Located in a newer Port Angeles neighborhood. 3 BR/2 BA, open floor plan, lots of light, kitchen island with breakfast bar, fenced-in backyard and enclosed deck. $249,900 ML#252103/139411 Call Nason or Terry for more information.

3,355 SF, 3 BR/3 BA. 115’ of beach. Gourmet kitchen, wonderful master suite! Fully finished daylight basement. All on 1.4 acres. Visit and experience! MLS#29158063 $850,000.

3 BR/2.5 BA, 1,828 SF, well built and excellently maintained two story home. Great room upstairs makes entertaining and visiting fun and easy while you enjoy looking at the peek-a-boo saltwater view from the dining room. Home features add’l Family room down w/wood stove. Quiet, private cul-de-sac. 732 Christman Pl. PA ML#252336 $219,000

Spruced up home with remodeled kitchen, hardwood floors & super media/family room. It’s got that homey feeling with a warm wood stove, family “hub” & lots of light. Refreshing! 4 BR/2 BA, 2,456 SF plus a double attached garage. $259,900 ML#251840

Margo Petersen-Pruss

WRE/Port Angeles

Nason Beckett

TERRY

(360) 457-0456 (360) 477-9027 nason@olypen.com

Bryan Diehl

BROOKE NELSON

Office: (360) 417-2812 www.RealtorBrooke.com BrookeNelson@olypen.com

1-800-786-1456 margo@olypen.com www.portangelesrealty.com 360-477-9027

(360) 437-1011 Cell: (360) 821-9056

ATTENTION PILOTS!

FANTASTIC WATER VIEWS

Handy????

WRE/Port Ludlow

UPTOWN REALTY

Cell: 460-4251 Office: 452-3333 NESKE Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157

A-FRAME

0C405640

This nearly new hangar and home is located on the Diamond Point airstrip. Built in 2005, this 1,700 SF, 2 BR/2 BA home has vaulted ceilings, HW floors, attached 2-car garage plus hangar. Taxi to the strip! $475,000 ML#252292

Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE Mark McHugh

UPTOWN REALTY

David A. Ramey

Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

Dan Erickson

461-3888 dan@olypen.com

0B405552

0C405668

0C405633

Excellent Opportunity! Don’t miss out on this fixer located at 5th & Cherry. 3 BR/1 BA, garage, 1,176 SF, chain link fenced. Convenient location, walk to everything. Only $100,000 MLS#252344

On a clear day you’ll see the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Mt. Baker. 3 BR/2 BA. Well designed living space. Fireplace in the great room that opens to a large country kitchen and dining area. Kitchen is fully equipped and spacious with an island. Skylights and vaulted ceilings keep it feeling warm and cozy. $369,000 MLS#252256/148033

Office: (360) 683-0660 Toll Free: 1-800-708-0660 Fax: (360) 683-2527 www.marknmchugh.com

Solidly built A-Frame home. Warm and cozy 3 BR/2 BA with spacious living area. Sitting on 2.45 acres with a bit of a water view. $189,900. ML#251842/122178 Call Thelma

WRE/Port Angeles Thelma Durham

(360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com


E2

Classified

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

2% CLOSING COSTS With an offer accepted in December, buyer qualifies for a 2% credit for closing costs. Get started on your home ownership ladder with this 3 Br. home on an oversized lot minutes from town. You will love the sunroom! Enjoy all kinds of backyard activities or grow a garden. $169,000. ML251890. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY A FAIR HOUSE Across from the fair grounds, that is. A 2 Br., 1 bath beautifully upgraded house with new appliances and newer roof. There is a green house for the green thumbers and big shop for the fixers and builders. Check out the beautiful landscaping. Enjoy fruit from your own orchard. $175,000. ML252388. Rita Erdmann Carroll Realty 457-1111 Beautiful, century old home, with an amazing view of the P.A. harbor. Also enjoy an unstoppable view of the Olympics from your backyard. Hardwood throughout the home, although most of the home is currently carpeted. Many updates still needed, but allows the opportunity to make this your home. $325,000. ML252095 Shawnee Hathaway Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEST PRESENT EVER Custom built with attention to details. 3 Br., 3 bath and over 2,100 sf, and 20 plus acres. View of the Strait, San Juans, Mt. Baker. Secluded, semi parked out with numerous mature trees, 2 shops and so much more! This is the log home you’ve been waiting for. $775,000. ML251461 Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT With your

2 DAY

Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More!

Homes

ATTENTION PILOTS! This nearly new hangar and home is located on the Diamond Point airstrip. Built in 2005, this 1,700 sf, 2 Br., 2 bath home has vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, attached 2 car garage plus hangar. Taxi to the strip! $475,000. ML252292. Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE 683-0660 COUNTRY CHARMER Well kept home on 3.17 acres. Mountain view with pond, garden area and orchard, barn and Clallam ditch irrigation, property bordered by Matriotti Creek. $299,000. ML241623/29093313 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND COUNTRY LIVING Solid cedar perimeter walls inside and out add homey feeling and charm. Hardwood floors under wall to wall carpet. Large open living area with many windows makes home cheery and bright. Many trees fruit and shade trees. New roof 2008. New septic system and exterior paint 2010. Short distance to community beach. $229,900. ML252379. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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COUNTRY HOME Freshly painted inside and out, this 1,680 sf 4 Br., 2 bath manufactured home is on 1.19 acres of flat pasture land located in a small quiet community east of Sequim. $119,000. ML251897 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 DELIGHTFUL TRADITIONAL HOME With an “end of the road” location! Nice, private 4 Br., 3 bath on a wooded 7.7 acres not far from town! Daylight basement has kitchenette, 2 Br., 1 bath and family room. $320,000. ML251042. Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. DOMINION TERRACE Remodeled home in 2006 with new flooring, counters, appliances, provides good views, and short distance to clubhouse. Enclosed storage in carport area, and off covered patio. Wood burning grill in patio area for outdoor cooking. HOA fees include electricity, water, sewer, trash, and cable. Pets restricted to 2 per household. $119,000. ML252350. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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FABULOUS OLYMPIC MOUNTAIN VIEWS Lovely traditional 3 Br., 2 bath home on 1.15 serene acres between Sequim and Port Angeles. Great area for gardening, hiking and bicycling. Great Sequim schools. Lovely kitchen with lots of cabinets and a handy kitchen bar. Family room with high vaulted ceilings and lots of windows facing the Olympics. $279,900. ML251440. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East FAMILY TIME 3 Br., 2.5 bath, 1,828 sf, well built and excellently maintained two story home. Great room upstairs makes entertaining and visiting fun and easy while you enjoy looking at the peek-aboo salt water view from the dining room. Home features an additional family room downstairs with wood stove. Small quiet street, house is at the end of cul-de-sac, private yet just moments from downtown. 732 Christman Place, P.A. $219,000. ML252336 Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

FANTASTIC WATER VIEWS On a clear day you’ll see the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Mt. Baker. 3 Br., 2 bath. Well designed living space. Fireplace in the great-room that opens to a large country kitchen and dining area. Kitchen is fully equipped and spacious with an island. Skylights and vaulted ceilings keep it feeling warm and cozy. $369,000. ML252256/148033 Dan Erickson 461-3888 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY GREAT REMODEL Clean and ready! Kitchen redone with new floor and stainless appliances. New paint and large new deck. 3 Br. plus den. Large detached garage. Private feel to this 1.2 acre parcel. Property to east is green space - nice open fields. Irrigation is piped to property. Un-blockable mountain view, quiet dead end street. $249,000. ML251292 Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

UPTOWN N REALTY

12 pm to 2:00 pm E IC PR

D CE U D RE

1121 E. 5th St., Port Angeles SOLID AFFORDABLE HOME This home built in 1956 has approx. 1,000 SF, 3 BR/1 BA. Fireplace insert, hardwood floors in bedrooms, newer vinyl insulated windows, vinyl flooring and a good-sized kitchen. Carport and covered patio, nice yard w/storage outbuilding. $119,000 ML#252046 Steve will greet you.

Directions: S. on Race, L. at 5th to 1121

STEVE LANDVIK

Office: (360) 417-2790 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 Email: stevel@olypen.com

12:00 pm to 1:30 pm T EA R G

OP SH

Homes

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Homes

FALL IN LOVE Spacious country home on 1.37 acres. Home features gorgeous master suite with a dream bath, 100 year old fir floors, light and bright sunroom overlooking the truly unique property with gardens, a “woman cave” studio with 3/4 bath, old homestead outbuildings, fruit trees and privacy. $355,000. ML252007. Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. HANDY? Excellent opportunity. Don’t miss out on this fixer located at 5th and Cherry. 3 Br., 1 bath, garage, 1,176 sf, chain link fenced. Convenient location, close distance to everything. $100,000. ML252344. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY HAPPY SPACE Inside find a super clean 3 Br., 2 bath home with huge, sunny country kitchen complete with fireplace. Outside find 3.17 acres with irrigation, fruit trees, workshop, and plenty of room to have animals, gardens, or whatever adds to your happiness. $279,900. ML251626 Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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3 Br., 2 bath, formal dining room, full basement, breakfast nook, 1.5 lot, new roof, separate 2 car garage. $245,000. 1410 E. 2nd St., P.A. 360-457-9740 HOME ON 5.99 ACRES 2,840 sf 3 Br., 2.5 bath, den and 450 sf bonus room, 8 and 9 foot ceilings with column entry, large master Br. with jacuzzi tub in bath, pole barn with RV opening and fenced pasture. $499,000. ML241304/29072566 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND LAKE SUTHERLAND ROAD This beautifully designed home, built in 1997 sits on 2.74 acres with gorgeous mountain views, access to Lake Sutherland and a shared boat dock conveys. All 3 Br., have walk-in closets and office space. Large master with 5 piece bath, extra large guest bath. Living and family rooms, and much more! $369,900. ML251566 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

12:00 pm to 1:30 pm TY LI A QU

1327 W. 12th., Port Angeles

262 Mariah Winds, Port Angeles

MOUNTAIN VIEW This 1,462 SF, 3 BR/2 BA has been maintained very well. Built in 1989 features open concept with nice accents and skylights. Deck off the kitchen. 2-car garage with entry off the alley. Large front yard with towering Fir trees. This one will not last. ONLY $199,900 MLS#252293 Steve will greet you.

BUILT IN 2004 with skilled craftsmanship & quality products, this beautiful 3 BR/2.5 BA, 2,166 SF home is a must see for someone who wants to live in luxury. It resides in the upscale neighborhood of Mariah Winds w/2.75 acres of privacy. Many delightful features to share with you - stop by and see! $415,000 MLS#252233

Directions: W. 8th across bridges to C St., N. on C to 12th, W. on 12th to 1327.

STEVE LANDVIK

Office: (360) 417-2790 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 Email: stevel@olypen.com

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ID ND E L SP

DE TU I L SO

Directions: Hwy 101, S. on Monroe, W. on Mariah Winds.

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

EW VI

2152 W. 4th St., Port Angeles

53 S. Windflower, Port Angeles

617 E. Whidby, Port Angeles

QUIET CUL-DE-SAC Desirable neighborhood, quality built home with 4 BR/1.5 BA, attached garage, PLUS 1,100 SF 2-car garage/ finished shop w/built-in compressed air power, upstairs loft w/ 2 rooms - could be an office/studio or potential apartment. PRICED TO SELL AT ONLY $212,500 MLS#252264.

BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME (2005) on 2 private fenced acres, 2 BR plus den, 2 BA, hardwood, tile, granite, large windows to enjoy nature & wildlife from indoors, organic gardens, orchard, Mt. views - located between Sequim & P.A. in a prestigious neighborhood. $399,000 MLS#252097.

ENJOY AN EXPANSIVE SALTWATER VIEW, the harbor & across the Strait to Canada! 3 BR/1 BA, newly remodeled kitchen, bath, vinyl windows, wood floors, fenced yard, garage & large workshop. Move-in ready. This is a steal at only $159,000 MLS#251938.

Directions: Front St./Marine Dr., L. on Hill, R. on W. 4th.

Directions: Hwy 101 between Sequim and PA, S on O’Brien Rd., L. on Headwaters Ln, R. on Windflower.

Directions: First/Front St., S. on Peabody, E. on Whidby.

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty 1115 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.7861 • Toll Free 1.800.292.2978 • www.UptownRealty.com

0C405649

www.peninsula dailynews.com

LET’S GO HOT TUBBIN’ The weather outside may be frightful but in the hot tub it will be delightful ‘cause this spa is in its own cedar wood lined room. 3 Br., 2.5 bath with a 3 car garage. Outside yards are landscaped with plenty of room for outdoor activities. This is the home they will want! So stop on buy! $260,000. ML251989 Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LIGHT AND BRIGHT Newer 3 Br., 2 bath home within the Port Angeles city limits. Kick back and relax on the deck and enjoy the nicely landscaped yard in this quiet neighborhood. You won’t believe how wonderful and classy this home looks and feels $177,000 ML251853/145266 Mark Macedo 477-9244 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

ON-SITE SECURITY Swimming pool, golf course, club house, pool house. All new in 2008: 40 year roof, cedar fence, appliances, carport, floors, patio. New paint inside/out, new bath counters and toilets. Great wood burning fire place. 3rd Br. can be used as rec room; has counters, sink, cook top and refrigerator. $205,000. ML252067. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East P.A.: 3 Br., 1 bath, with rec room, 1,266 sf, built in 1972, concrete foundation, wood stove. Below assessed value, great deal at this price! Must see! $140,000 360-477-2334 P.A.: Cute home, 2 Br., 1.75 ba, wood stove, big garage, ramp, nice yard. $95,000. 360-452-2758, 360-775-7129

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ER AT W

GOOD BONES Easy flowing 1,976 sf floor plan, 800 sf 2 car garage plus storage, home backs up to a greenbelt, newer updates throughout, 1 year home shield warranty. $278,000. ML251696/114788 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Newer rambler located in a newer Port Angeles neighborhood. 3 Br., 2 baths. Open floor plan, lots of light, kitchen island with breakfast bar, fenced in backyard and enclosed deck. $249,900. ML252103 Nason Beckett 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Sunday, December 5, 2010

EW VI

Homes

Lovingly restored Cherry Hill Victorian. 3 Br., 2 bath + cozy guest cottage and shop. $238,000. 360-457-6845

OPEN HOUSE

2:00 pm to 4:00 pm IN TA N OU M

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Office Hours

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN VIEWS This home, conveniently located between P.A. and Sequim, has panoramic mountain views from 1.9 acres. The 2006 3 Br., 2 bath manufactured home has a split floorplan, vaulted ceilings and large kitchen. There is large garage and separate art studio / hobby room with wood stove. $199,000. ML251136. Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9361 PARKWOOD PRICE REDUCTION 2 Br., 2 bath, 1,998 sf home, master Br. with sitting area, oversized 2 car garage with work bench, enclosed patio and landscaped yard, large corner lot. $120,000 ML251593/108036 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Homes

PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN VIEW Like new home. Southern exposure. main home is approx. 1,800 sf, RV garage with loft, very close to the Cedars Golf Course. $349,000 ML251450/98961 Irene Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SEE IT ALL FROM HERE... Spruced up home with remodeled kitchen, hardwood floors and super media/family room. It’s got that homey feeling with a warm wood stove, family “hub” and lots of light. Refreshing! 4 Br., 2 bath, 2,456 sf plus a double attached garage. $259,900. ML251840. Margo Petersen-Pruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY SHERWOOD VILLAGE Delightful 3 Br., 2 bath condo, one owner unit, expanded square footage, upgraded appliances, large private patio and great open space. $249,000. ML251606/108765 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

SUNLAND HOME FOR SALE. 3 Br., 3 ba on 6th FairwayHdwd Flrs. 2 Wtr HtrAll Cedar. Lots of storage, 2 Car Gar. Poss. Seller Terms. Ask: $208,900 360-681-6890 SUNLAND RAMBLER Affordable 2 Bd., 2 bath 1,176 sf home. Enjoy all the amenities Sunland Gold Community. With pool and tennis courts. $159,000. ML252281 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SUNLAND TRADITIONAL 3 Br., 3 baths, upper level has 2 and 2, lower level has 1 and 1, formal dining and nook, 2 fireplaces and oversized garage. Enjoy Sunland amenities. $289,000 ML252062/136048 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536. WATERFRONT ELEGANCE 3,355 sf 3 Br., 3 bath. 115’ of beach. Gourmet kitchen, wonderful master suite! Fully finished daylight basement. All on 1.4 acres. Visit and experience! $850,000 MLS#29158063 Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow Wonderful 3 Br., 2 bath, 2,158 sf home located on a very private 3.22 acre parcel. This home has a large detached garage with room to park all your toys, a circular driveway and is located at the end of a long country road. $275,000. ML252058 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

52

Manufactured Homes

HIDE-A-WAY-PARK Home is snug and comfortable. Enjoy the convenience and ease of a spacious kitchen and efficient floor plan. Handy location close to town affords easy access to Sequim’s amenities, yet this 55+ park is quiet and private. New laminate flooring and carpet. $22,500. ML252206 Sheryl Payseno Burley and Cathy Reed 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 53

63

Open House

Duplexes

WOW! $247,500 for 2,250 sf home 3-5 Br., 3 bath. SPOTLESS +gar, nw windows, 1/2A Owner 360-452-1919 1515 Butler St., P.A. Sunday 2-4 p.m. or appt.

P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016.

54

64

Lots/ Acreage

A beautiful property in Port Angeles. For sale $168,000. Located just minutes from town off of Mt Angeles Road. The 4.77 acre parcel is surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. Septic installed, electric hook up pd, city water. www.portangelesprop.com or 360-460-0572 NO BINOCULARS NEEDED 1.84 high bank waterfront acres, ready to build. Also a quarter share of 12 treed acres, that can never be developed. Power and phone in at road. CC&R’s to protect your investment. $225,000. ML252101. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SEQUIM LAND WANTED Must support 2 horses. 505-281-1591. TRULY UNIQUE This 35 acres property was approved for almost 40 lots at one time. With gentle topography, stunning water views, city utilities on two sides, and zoning for several lots per acre, this could represent the single best investment/development property on the market in Sequim at this time! $799,950. ML252353 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company

58

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

Houses

A HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Beautiful private end of the road gated setting on 2.27Acres. This home features knotty pine cabinetry in the kitchen, vaulted ceiling in living area, wood wrapped windows, tile flooring in entry, bath and kitchen, large walk-in pantry, solid core doors, don’t miss the laundry room 12x20 that has been added that has room for processing meats/ fruits etc. Landscaping has lots of fruit trees and garden area. $395,000. ML251896 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company ‘D’ IS FOR DECK THE HALLS Best value on the market! Immaculate water view home nestled amongst the trees with private hiking trail loop. Wine cellar, cheffriendly kitchen with pantry and island, windows abound and oodles of storage. Spacious and view-some master suite, 2 fireplaces, ideal for entertaining and houseguests, and ideal home office. Beautifully maintained inside and out. Priced more than $70,000 below assessed value. Owner says “Sell!” $799,950. ML252385. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

64

Houses

2 Br., 2 bath. Clean, great kitchen w/mtn view in P.A. W/D. No smoking/pets. Ref req. $800. 457-1392. 4 Br., 2 bath, 3.99 acres, hot tub, $1,230. 12 min W. of P.A. 360-461-4278. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br. $750, 1st, last, $400 dep. 360-461-2438. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 606 S. Laurel, references required. $700. 457-6600. EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747. EAST P.A.: Small 2 Br. mobile. $500. 457-9844/460-4968

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. P.A. APTS & HOUSES Studio.................$400 A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 1 ba......$650 H 2 br 2 ba......$800 H 3 br 1 ba......$800 H 3 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 4 br 3 ba....$1350 SEQ APTS/HOUSES H 1 br 1 ba.......$800 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1100 H 3 br 2 ba....$1250

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

ONE MONTH FREE RENT with 12 mo. lease! Neat/clean 2 Br. mfd home, Sequim, in town. W/S/G, W/D inc. New upgrades $625. 360-582-1862 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $685 mo., $700 dep. 460-5290. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $895. 452-1395.

64

Houses

64

E3

Houses

P.A.: 4 Br., 1 bath. Remodeled. $895, 1st, last. 452-1234.

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $600, $500 dep., incl. trash. 460-4294

P.A.: By college, view, 3 Br., 2 ba. $1,150, lease. 457-4966.

SEQUIM: Cute 3 Br., 1 car gar, fenced, pet ok, no smoke. Dec. free. $800. 477-5682

P.A.: Cozy 1 Br., shed, $595, last, dep. No pet/smoke 452-4671 P.A.: Furnished 2 or 3 Br. Weekly or monthly. 360-417-1277. www.pacr.biz P.A.: Newer 3 Br., 3 bath. Neighborhood, location, garage, yard, weatherized. No smoking/pets $950 mo. 452-9458. P.A.: Traditional, older home. 3 Br., 1 bath. $1,100. 452-5894. P.A.: Water view 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage. $1100/mo. 452-1016 PALO ALTO: Rustic cabin. 1 Br., loft, W/D $700. 360-683-4307. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

SEQUIM AREA BEAUTIFUL CRAFTSMAN-BUILT FARMHOUSE 4 Br., 2 ba, modern kit., fplc., sun rm., gar., fenced yard. Bright and spacious. No smoking or pets. $1350 plus dep. Call 360-3874911 for appt. to view. SEQUIM: 2 Br. 2 ba, new construction, W/S/G, W/D, dishwasher, storage shed, security system, very nice, very clean. $700, dep. Year lease. 681-0280 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $995 mo, last, dep. 683-0123.

SUNLAND HOME FOR LEASE. 3 Br., 3 ba, 6th Fairway, hdwd floors, 2 car gar. $975 mo., 1st, last, dep. Pets neg., no smoke. 681-6890. WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Share my house. Own room and bath, furnished, laundry, near college, nonsmoker, no pets. Prefer female 35 - 55 yrs. But call, we will talk. $400 plus 1/2 ult. Mike 452-9685. Room W/Private Bath for Rent in Puyallup. $500. per month requires $500. deposit. If you work in Pierce or King County and need a place to live. You will have access to separate living room and only share the kitchen and laundry room. This is a nonsmoking, drug free environment. Furnished or unfurnished. Very quiet and private home. Available 1/1/2011 call 360-809-3603 for more information. ROOMMATE wanted. $400, internet, W/D. 206-227-9738

66

Spaces RV/ Mobile

RV SPACES: $375 mo., incl. W/S/G, WiFi, Cable. 461-6672.

68

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Commercial

High traffic area commercial building on 4 city lots. Possible uses with CSD zoning are financial services, schools, bakery, deli, medical offices and more. $499,000 ML251230/83980 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SEQUIM PRIME COMMERCIAL Prime commercial parcel with outstanding Highway 101 frontage in Sequim located near Sears and next to Big 5 Sporting Goods. $159,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

Clallam County Mount Pleasant Community Grange, propane furnace, piping and 120-gallon propane tank, 2432 Mount Pleasant Road, $5,810. Dennis and Janis Flagg, woodstove, 681 Palmer Road, $1,500. Leo Gaten, sink, 195 Eaton Lane, $2,000. Glen and Sharman Richardson trust, sitting room, 491 Lupine Drive, $34,789. Suzi Schmidt, single family dwelling with attached garage, 5 Solmar Drive, $139,829. Stephen and Catherine Beebe, 1423 Ward Road, $80,000. Susan and Robert Rose, attached garage, 140 Bolster Way, $21,113

Port Angeles Green Creek Wood Products LLC, tall structure for log de-barker, 436 Eclipse West Drive, $700,000. Robert V. Fraker, heat pump, 1415 W. 12th St., $6,770. Port of Port Angeles, storage room, 101 E. Railroad Ave., $7,000. Clallam County Parks Department, hood and fire rated gypsum for fairgrounds kitchen, 1608 W. 16th St., $11,000.

Sequim

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

BIG 3 Br., 2 ba, luxury apt., W/D, hrdwd flrs, west P.A. Section 8 ok. $900. 452-1010. BIG, apts. $625-650, near WalMart, W/G included. 417-6638. CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540. P.A.: 1 Br apt, no pets/ smoking. $600 incl. basic utilities, W/D. 565-8039 P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. By appt. 452-4409. P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $560. Now accepting pets. 4020 Newell Rd. 360-452-4524. P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244 P.A.: Really large 2 Br., 1 ba., $625, 1st, last. No pets. 452-1234.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL

Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building B, six unit apartment complex, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $456,826.90. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building D, six unit apartment complex, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $678,567.15. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building E, six unit apartment complex, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $609,571.22. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building F, six unit apartment complex, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $456,826.90. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building G, six unit apartment complex, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $609,571,22. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building H, community building for apartments, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $183,496.19. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building C, six unit apartment complex, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $678,567.15. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, Building A, six unit apartment complex, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $609,571,22. Sea Breeze Sequim Assoc. LP, site work for seven apartment buildings and community building, 525 W. McCurdy Road, $0. Aaron J. and Bethelyn J. Breitbach, bedroom addition, 732 Maizie Court, $19,382.40. Choice Development LLC, tenant improvement for beauty salon, 10127 Old Olympic Highway, $2,500.

Jefferson County Alan Youse, transmitter tower and cabinet facility, 591 N. Jacob Miller Road, $61,578. Richard Rein trustee, gas furnace replacement, 133 E. Ludlow Ridge Road, $0. Susan Ohlson, 100-gallon above-ground propane tank and lines to existing appliances, 2327 Hastings Ave. W., $0. Lassen Properties LLC, 100-gallon above-ground propane tank with lines and generator, 275953 U.S. Highway 101, $0. David Sweat, hot water heater and pipe, 531 Pinecrest Drive, $0. Holloway Mulik, single family residence, 670 Fairmount Road, $138,600.

Port Townsend Darrel Spayth, residential re-roof, 1830 Cherry St., $5,916.

peninsula dailynews.com

Department reports New Medical Office

Area building departments report a total of 29 building permits issued from Nov. 22-26 with a total valuation of $5,520,785.35: Port Angeles, 4 at $724,770; Sequim, 11 at $4,304,880.35; Clallam County, 7 at $285,041; Port Townsend, 1 at $5,916; Jefferson County, 6 at $200,178.

0C5101081

97315731

space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665


E4

Classified

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

SHERWOOD VILLAGE

PANORAMIC MT. VIEW

SUNLAND TRADITIONAL

HIGH TRAFFIC AREA

(360)550-6042 (360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

Quint Boe

Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456 boeq@olypen.com

0C405666

(360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

WRE/Port Angeles

0C405645

0C405646

CLARICE ARAKAWA

1.84 high bank waterfront acres, ready to build. Also a quarter share of 12 treed acres, that can never be developed. Power and phone in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. Call Quint $225,000 MLS#252101

DELIGHTFUL TRADITIONAL HOME

Commercial building on 4 city lots. Possible uses with CSD zoning are financial services, schools, bakery, deli, medical offices and more. Call Clarice for details. $499,000 MLS#251230/83980

WRE/Port Angeles

0C405647

Cathy: 460-1800 Sheryl: 460-9363 www.sequimwa.com

Cathy: 460-1800 Sheryl: 460-9363 www.sequimwa.com

The weather outside may be frightful but in the hot tub it will be deeliteful cause this spa is in its own cedar-lined room. 3 BR/2.5 BA with a THREE car garage. Outside yards are landscaped with plenty of room for outdoor activities. This is the home they will want! So stop on buy! ML#251989/130619 $260,000 Call LORI or CHUCK

WRE/Sequim-East LORI TRACEY CHUCK MURPHY

Cathy Reed Sheryl Payseno Burley

Cathy Reed Sheryl Payseno Burley

0C405662

0C405663

Home is snug and comfortable. Enjoy the convenience and ease of a spacious kitchen and efficient floor plan. Handy location close to town affords easy access to Sequim’s amenities, yet this park is quiet and private. New laminate flooring and carpet. ML#252206 $22,500 Call SHERYL or CATHY 683-5056. WRE/Sequim-East

WRE/Sequim-East

NO BINOCULARS NEEDED

W NE OF RO

0C405661

For the right owner. Large open home in Parkwood. 1,803 SF, 3 BR/2 BA, 2 living rooms, large master, heat pump and a new roof. Very private fenced backyard. Good home, good price $69,500 Call SHERYL or CATHY, 6835056 ML#251574/107251

0C405657

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WRE/SunLand

WRE/SunLand

Irene Schmidt

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s  "EDROOM "ATH   3& (OME s -ASTER "EDROOM WITH 3ITTING !REA s /VERSIZED  #AR 'ARAGE W7ORK "ENCH s %NCLOSED 0ATIO AND,ANDSCAPED 9ARD s ,ARGE #ORNER ,OT -, $120,000 WWWDEBKAHLEMYWINDERMERECOM

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WRE/SunLand

Brenda Clark

0C405658

WRE/SunLand

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0C405656

0C405659

s,IKE.EW(OME s3OUTHERN%XPOSURE s-AIN(OMEIS!PPROX 3& s!PPROX 3&26'ARAGEW,OFT s6ERY#LOSETOTHE#EDARS'OLF#OURSE -,$349,000 WWWSEQUIMLANDANDHOMESCOM

s $ELIGHTFUL  "2 "! #ONDO s /NE /WNER 5NIT s %XPANDED 3QUARE &OOTAGE s 5PGRADED !PPLIANCES s ,ARGE 0RIVATE 0ATIO  'REAT /PEN 3PACE -, $249,000 WWWBRENDACLARKMYWINDERMERECOM

PARKWOOD PRICE REDUCTION

with an “end-of-the-road� location! Nice, private 4 BR/3 BA on a wooded 7.7 acres not far from town! Daylight basement has kitchenette, 2 BR/1 BA & family room. Call Michaelle 461-2153 $320,000 ML#251042

WRE/Port Angeles MICHAELLE BARNARD (360) 461-2153 Email: mlee@olypen.com

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

E5

Peninsula Pe ninsula

MARKETPLACE

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

AIR COMPRESSOR Brand new Speedaire, 3 phase, 60 gal. tank. $800/obo. 417-5583. AUCTIONS: Joyce Self Storage, 50600 Hwy. 112, units 123, 119, 219, Dec. 8th, 11 a.m. Call to verify 928-2560 BEEF: Farm raised, 1/2 $1.50 lb., whole $1.25 lb. Hanging weight. 928-2197. BIG, apts. $625-650, near WalMart, W/G included. 417-6638. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br. $750, 1st, last, $400 dep. 360-461-2438.

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Coordinator for all ages at Trinity United Methodist Church, Sequim. Carry out education programs, recruit, train volunteers, in United Methodist tradition. 20 hours a week. BA in education or equivalent. Resume, references to church at Box 3697, Sequim 98382, or email church@sequimtumc.org, by Dec. 15. 360-683-5367.

Chevy Transmissions. 1969 Powerglide + Turbo 350, $125 each. 1970 Turbo 400, $175. 360-452-9876

•Chief Nurse Executive •Marketing Director •Patient Advocate •Radiology Director •Home Health Occupational Therapist •Home Health Physical Therapist •ICU RN Competitive compensation and benefits www.jeffersonhealth care.org

RNs | LPNs Part-time positions are available for RNs or LPNs with a current Washington nursing license. Longterm care experience is preferred.

Clallam PUD is looking for exceptional people committed to public service to join our utility.

We offer excellent pay and benefits in a mission-driven environment.

Professional Medicine, Personal Treatment

PALO ALTO: Rustic cabin. 1 Br., loft, W/D $700. 360-683-4307.

FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $6,700. 457-0655. FREE: To good home. 3 year old neutered male Terrier mix. References required. 360-457-8667 GENERATOR: Winco 3 KW, 1,800 rpm, well built. $400/obo. 417-5583 HOME THEATER Sony, Blue Ray/DVD, 5 speakers, woofer, new, never opened box, makes great gift. $200/obo. 360-620-2366 HONDA: ‘07 Fit. Approx. 52K, great shape. $9.850. 360-774-2549 INSURANCE: Wellestablished agency has openings for qualified individuals. Sales experience helpful but not req. Email your resume to swreinhart@ft.newyo rklife.com. Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce is currently hiring executive director. Job descriptions at our website, www.jeffcountychamb er.org Mechanics Special Nissan ‘02 Altima. 45K Gorgeous, light green. $3,500/obo. Needs minor work. 452-7737

LIBRARY CIRCULATION SPECIALIST Part-time. Peninsula College is recruiting for a Specialist to facilitate operations of the circulation counter. Salary: $12.42 hr. Schedule: approx 19 hrs pr week, Mon.-Fri. Additional information and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu or upon request to 360417-6298. EEO. Looking for the right person. Must be customer orientated, retail experienced, willing to work long hours, computer savvy, and able to think on their feet. Great pay, good benefits. Resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#186/Retail Pt Angeles, WA 98362 MISC: Pride Revo Mobility Scooter, not used, excellent condition, paid $3,000, sell for $1,300. Lift chair, good shape, paid $1,000, sell for $300. Walkers, $25. 461-4861, 417-5078 OLYMPIAN: 9’ fiberglass, good condition. $300/obo. 417-5583 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $685 mo., $700 dep. 460-5290. TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325

Peninsula College is recruiting to fill tenure-track faculty positions to teach in the following disciplines beginning fall of 2011. Chemistry English Job descriptions and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu or upon request to Human Resources, (360) 417-6298. EOE The Quileute Tribe has a job opening for a Human Services Director. This position is responsible for program development and planning, annual budget preparations, contract and grant development, monitoring, and reporting for multiple programs. Must have a minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Services or equivalent field and five years’ experience administrating social services programs in a Tribal community preferred. Knowledge and experience in the following programs desired: ICW, TANF, Elder Services, Youth Programs, Domestic Violence, Prevention programs, and Head Start. Visit our website to obtain a job application and complete job description at www.quileutenation.org or call at 360-374-4366. Salary DOQ. PUPPIES: Yorkshire Terriers. Darling, excellent health background, companion only. Prices start at $700. olympichollyhill.com 461-9121 RESIDENTIAL AIDES FULL-TIME OR ON-CALL Assist chronically mentally ill adults in daily living skills, cooking, and housekeeping. Req h.s./GED, exp pref’d. $10.13-$11.05/hr, DOE. FT w/benes, or add $1.hr for on-call work. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE ROCK SAW: 16 Inch Covington Lapidary Rock Saw. New in 2008. Excellent condition. $800. 360-457-9669

Room W/Private Bath for Rent in Puyallup. $500. per month requires $500. deposit. If you work in Pierce or King County and need a place to live. You will have access to separate living room and only share the kitchen and laundry room. This is a nonsmoking, drug free environment. Furnished or unfurnished. Very quiet and private home. Available 1/1/2011 call 360-809-3603 for more information. SALES + SERVICE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Mt Angeles Memorial Park Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel Currently seeking self-motivated individuals for Family Service to staff our facilities We offer: Excellent income potential Comprehensive benefit package Thorough training (paid) Wage + Commissions + Bonuses Recession-proof industry Don’t reject what you don’t understand, give us a call to learn more about our tremendous Opportunity Preferably email your resume to: renee.harpe@scius.com Or call Renee Harpe at 452-6255 Spotlight Tanning 715 E. First St ., P.A. Open House Wed. Dec. 8th, all day free giveaways, 1 mo. unlimited tanning, Sensaria gift basket, hot cider, goodies.

There's never been a better time to start a new career. One where you can reach out and make a difference by helping seniors in their homes. We're seeking quality people who are truly committed to working at least 20 hrs. a week: days, evenings, overnights, weekends, and holidays. Call 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 360-681-2511

CLEARANCE PRICING

ON ALL NEW HONDAS 2011 HONDA

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5 SPEED AUTOMATIC VP

FEATURED SPECIALL LEASE Offer valid from 11/2/2010 through 1/4/2011 1

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$159.00 per month for 36 months. h $1 $1,999.00 999 00 totall ddue at signing. i i Includes down payment with no security deposit. Excludes taxes, titles and fees. For well-qualified buyers. *FEATURED SPECIAL LEASE: Closed-end lease for 2011 Civic Sedan 5 Speed Automatic VP (Model FA1F3BEW) for $159.00 per month for 36 months with a $1,840.00 capitalized cost reduction available to customers who qualify for the HFS Super Preferred or Preferred credit tier. Other rates/ tiers are available under this offer. $1,999.00 total due at lease signing (includes first month’s payment and capitalized cost reduction with no security deposit; total net capitalized cost and base monthly payment does not include tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Not all buyers may qualify.

CIVIC

INSIGHT

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**

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LOW PRICES ON ALL REMAINING 2010s 2010s **Up to 60 months on approval of credit. For well qualified buyers. All vehicle sales subject to a negotiable $150 document fee. Photos for illustration purposes only. Offer ends 1/4/2011.

Check us out online at www.wilderhonda.com

WILDER HONDA YOU CAN COUNT ON US!

97 Deer Park Road | Port Angeles | 1-800-927-9395 • 360-452-9268 Making money is easy with a Peninsula Classified garage sale ad. Gather your items, call Peninsula Classified to place your ad, and go!

WANTED: Donation of artificial Christmas trees for fundraising Christmas party. Leave message at 417-3555 GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

We make it easy to reach thousands of potential shoppers with one simple call. We’ll even give you a garage sale kit complete with everything you need for a successful sale. Say as much as you want* for 2 days

Only $19.95 Make easy cash – invest in Peninsula Classified.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 360-452-8435 • 1-800-826-7714

4B235385

CHRISTMAS COMPUTERS Desktops from $75. Laptops from $120. LCD monitors, from $84. All guaranteed. 683-9394

Get details and application forms from our website www.clallampud.net or contact us at humanresources @clallampud.net Phone 360-565-3228 We also have answers to Frequently Asked Questions and Employee Benefits information on our website. EOE.

Contact Rachel Sondie. Rachel_Sondie@LCC A.com 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. in Port Townsend Visit us online www.LCCA.com. EOE/M/F/V/D Job #19751

MISC: Antiques: 1950s cherry dining set, $300 and buffet, $200, both $400. Ludwig upright piano, $500. Blue/ cream love seat, $250. 2 gold wing chairs, $45 ea. Oak dresser, $195. Modern: Oak dining table, 4 chairs, $395. Side-by-side Maytag frige/freeze, $250. 360-437-9297

HONDA YEAR END CLEARANCE EVENT

0C5105632

Jefferson Healthcare Human Resources 834 Sheridan Avenue Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-2200 ext.2085 Fax 360-385-1548 EOE

UNIT MANAGER Full-time leadership position available at our skilled nursing facility for an RN with supervisory experience and a current Washington nursing license. Long-term care experience is preferred. $1,000 sign-on bonus available!

CHRISTMAS TIME Beautiful coat, leather and suede. $100/ obo. Call Debbie at 360-452-6034

Meter Reader II Port Angeles / Sequim Service Area

CHEV: ‘85 S10. 4x4, king cab, auto, canopy. Straight, dependable, clean. PS, PB, A/C, tilt, CC, AM/FM/cassette. New shocks, battery, tires. 2.8 V6. Runs great! No rust. Drive anywhere. $3,300. 360-452-7439

REGISTERED NURSE OPPORTUNITY Life Care Center of Port Townsend

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

*15 line maximum

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

ACROSS 1 Postcommencement fliers? 5 Skirmish 9 Polite address 13 Freedom of speech inhibitor 19 Snack with several eating options 20 Grimm bad guy 21 Adolescent woe 22 Shopping with a mouse, say 23 Athlete’s illegal plan? 26 Check up (on) 27 Put to work 28 Whom a physician should heal? 30 TV Batman Adam 31 Dost speak 32 Kenyan tribe 35 Businesses 37 Credits (to) 40 It’s nearly bisected by the Missouri R. 41 Caesar’s 601 44 Inevitably short story of a track event? 47 It’s not wall-towall 49 Hopping desert rodent 51 Cross-country need, perhaps 52 Put on the tube 54 Until now 55 Sign of a slip 57 “SNL” producer Michaels 59 Endure 60 Handful 61 Deceive 64 Winans of gospel 65 Asian celebration 66 Leave no room in 68 Derrières? 72 This, in Spain 75 Distress letters 77 Restaurateur Toots 78 Exams for sophs or jrs. 80 Warm lining 81 Influence 84 Publishing crime 86 Place 88 Milan’s __ alla Scala 89 Dept. in charge of rural development 90 Author Tarbell 93 Brain

94 Does without 96 Contented furnace part? 99 Dogpatch’s Daisy __ 100 Children’s author Blyton 102 Cutting tool handy in tight crevices 103 Football play also called a sweep 105 __ man 106 Rumor starter? 111 General Mills brand 114 Do some home improvement 116 Film set at the Bates Motel 117 Island state 119 Pass receiver’s nightmare? 123 Delphic medium 124 Failed ’80s gridiron org. 125 Go (toward) 126 What kings and courts do 127 Civic or rec follower

128 Allot, with “out” 129 Line on a horse 130 “__ Death”: “Peer Gynt Suite No. 1” movement DOWN 1 Sets of regulations 2 Olfactory lure 3 Energized 4 Dirties 5 Stick-in-the-mud 6 Some NFL blockers 7 Gallery display 8 “__ durn tootin’!” 9 20th-century Canadian composer André 10 __-deucy 11 Therapy subject 12 Seth of “SNL” 13 Dangerous links game? 14 365 días 15 Shines 16 Take a shine to 17 Spanish liqueur 18 Took off

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

4C235382

We’re here to meet your everyday needs!

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E E R E S A L A C I T P O E H

S S F A C T O R L A T I G I D

M N A T E N R E T N I E G C S

O E F E D D A E R H T H O T S

C C D A R R R V T A D M O U E

I I O I C C Q G D E P R L R N

S L T H A U N H F A A T U E T

Solution: 8 letters

U W I A A E A I T G I T A Y S

M V E L L R N I E M A M T A U

www.wonderword.com

E D I N D I B U A E O U A L B

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S E M A G C I N O R T C E L E

12/4

HYATS ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

UDTNE HOKERS

DABINT

Answer: Friday’s

Community Notes

GRAND OPENING! NOV. 30TH. HANDCRAFTED ITEMS, JEWELRY, CLOTHES, GLASS WORK, QUILTS! DRAWINGS GIVEN AWAY ALL WEEK! TUES THRU SAT 10AM TO 5PM. 803 CARLSBORG RD #D 360-681-7655. ART CONSIGNERS WANTED & BIRD HOUSES.

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©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. Orange and White. Neutered male, long hair, orange spots on face. Been lost a long time. 360-457-0832 FOUND: Glasses. Small size, maybe child’s? Purple frame, black case. 452-8435 FOUND: Mail. From your Oma and Opa in Germany for your 19th birthday sent to our PO Box in Sequim. Name to and from unable to read. Please call 452-6419 FOUND: Scarf. Purple, blue, green, in snow by street, Cherry and Fogarty, P.A. 452-8076. FOUND: Wedding band. Men’s, call to describe. 452-7602, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., ask for Mary Kay. LOST: Cat. From Taylor Cutoff area, Sequim. 3 yr. old female, gray and white long hair. “M” on forehead, very timid. 681-0737. Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

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LOST: Cat. Neutered male, dark black/ brown and tan bullseye tiger cat, goes by “Buttons”, microchipped, around Anderson Rd./Mountain View Drive, west of Dungeness River, Sequim. 683-7571. LOST: Cat. “Tigger”, last seen near P.T. courthouse 11/14/ 2010, brown long hair, tan belly black stripe on back. 360-977-5232 LOST: Dog. 90-100 lb. Black Lab, no collar, hospital area, P.A. 457-4249 LOST: Wallet. Old, green, Buzz in Sequim, Thurs., 12/2 Please, much needed items. REWARD. 683-5648 or 360670-9078. MISSING: Purse. Taken out of my car, in front of Jim’s Pharmacy, P.A. Please leave address book that was in the purse in Jim’s Pharmacy, no questions asked. 452-2016

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Lost and Found

Personals

SANTA’S GIFT Santa is still trying to find that special country lady, close to height/weight proportionate who wants that life full of love, togetherness, being best friends and a partner that she has never had before. What is inside is what counts. No smoking, no drugs. Santa has that special gift that has been looking for the right lady for sometime and he will keep waiting until that special lady comes into his life. White male, 60, 6’, height/weight proportionate, nonsmoker, brown hair, hazel eyes, beard, excellent health, who is very affectionate, romantic, caring, giving from the heart, down to earth, loves the outdoors and animals, home life, sense of humor. Honesty and respect is very important also. Santa has that special gift just waiting to be unwrapped by that right country lady that wants a life full of love that will grow every day. santa@olypen.com

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

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Help Wanted

Adult care home in Sequim needs a caregiver on weekends. (4) different shifts. Call 683-9194. CAREGIVERS Looking for a great place to work? Go no further! Contact Cherrie 360-683-3348

•Chief Nurse Executive •Marketing Director •Patient Advocate •Radiology Director •Home Health Occupational Therapist •Home Health Physical Therapist •ICU RN Competitive compensation and benefits www.jeffersonhealth care.org Jefferson Healthcare Human Resources 834 Sheridan Avenue Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-2200 ext.2085 Fax 360-385-1548 EOE Professional Medicine, Personal Treatment

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Coordinator for all ages at Trinity United Methodist Church, Sequim. Carry out education programs, recruit, train volunteers, in United Methodist tradition. 20 hours a week. BA in education or equivalent. Resume, references to church at Box 3697, Sequim 98382, or email church@sequimtumc.org, by Dec. 15. 360-683-5367.

Diabetes Program Coordinator (RN) Energetic educator responsible for Outpatient Diabetes Education program. Will lead the team in enhancing Pt. education and care, program development, and maintain positive customer relationships. RN and Certified Diabetes Educator required with 3+ years’ experience running a successful program; must have a good understanding of ADA program requirements. The successful candidate will have a passion for diabetes care and education, be self motivated and innovative thinking to create a “buzz” about diabetes prevention in our community. Email nbuckner@olympicm edical.org or apply online at www.olympicmedical.org GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

(Answers Monday) FORAY EMPLOY IMPORT Jumbles: FLORA Answer: The pancake cook was fired because he was a — FLIP FLOP

The Last Word in Astrology

Help Wanted

Chef/Food & Beverage Manager. The Olympic Lodge in Port Angeles is seeking an experienced Chef/Food & Beverage Manager. We are looking for that special person to manage and operate our unique boutique restaurant. Wages & benefits depend on qualifications. Please do NOT call or apply at Olympic Lodge. Send resume to: exechk@gmail.com

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Concentrate on what you can do, not what you cannot. Let your faith lead you in the right direction. Your knowledge and belief will not let you down. Positive action will bring you the answers you are looking for. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Getting together with old friends or colleagues will help you make decisions you have been unable to make in the past. A look at changing your geographical location or at least expanding the area where you currently spend your time, will pay off. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll be pulled in different directions when dealing with personal and professional partnerships. You may want to make some changes. The sooner you deal with the past, the easier it will be to reach your goals and ease your stress. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Own up to the way you feel. It’s important to move forward knowing that you have been honest with yourself and the ones you love. The way you handle others will determine how you are treated in return. 3 stars

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll be the life of the party, the one who coordinates what’s to happen next, to take charge and to entertain friends and family. You can do all the above effortlessly but remember not to leave anyone out. 5 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Sticking around home will probably lead to disagreements over financial matters. Get out with friends who can ease your stress and boost your morale. Talking to someone who thinks the same way you do will be a positive endeavor. 2 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You cannot resolve issues at home right now but you can step out of your situation for the moment. The stress release you get by changing your environment will guide you to make the right decisions. 4 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Let your creativity flow and promise yourself that you will pay more attention to your own needs and ideas in the future. You are the one who has to make the adjustment, so stop waiting for someone else to tell you what to do next. 3 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Don’t even consider getting into a ruckus with

someone over something that isn’t worth it. Walk away from anyone trying to upset you. Accepting the changes that are going on in your life is the first step toward recovery. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Signed, sealed and delivered is where you should be heading. There is something very special you can do for someone you love. It will turn your relationship into something much bigger and better than you thought possible. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Volunteer your services. Interacting with people in need can be a humbling experience and will make you more aware of your own good fortune. Greater stability and security are heading your way. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t let your emotions take over, leading you down the wrong path. Let go of the people and things that are no longer working for you. Love is in the stars and a commitment from the heart can be made. 2 stars

Help Wanted

Clallam PUD is looking for exceptional people committed to public service to join our utility. Meter Reader II Port Angeles / Sequim Service Area Get details and application forms from our website www.clallampud.net or contact us at humanresources @clallampud.net Phone 360-565-3228 We also have answers to Frequently Asked Questions and Employee Benefits information on our website. EOE. HOME HEALTH DEPARTMENT SERVICE REP Knowledge of home health equipment/ retail sales experience required. Fulltime position, varied shifts, some weekends, with benefits, wage DOE. Apply in person at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE.

If you re looking for the best home for your lifestyle, turn to the best source for real estate information —Peninsula Classified. It only takes MINUTES to find a home that s just what you want.

52241068

Peninsula Classified is here to lend a helping hand. Computers, vehicles, jobs, real estate, pets… you name it!

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I JUST BOUGHT A BLU-RAY!

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

Spotlight Tanning 715 E. First St ., P.A. Open House Wed. Dec. 8th, all day free giveaways, 1 mo. unlimited tanning, Sensaria gift basket, hot cider, goodies.

Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

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HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword.

by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Community Notes

Compose your Classified Ad on

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92 “He was white and shaken, like __ martini”: Wodehouse 95 Filly’s father 97 Lager alternative 98 Barnyard brayer 101 Jerk 103 Right-on 104 Swedes’ neighbors 107 Victim of Hercules 108 Tan shades 109 Financially struggling, with “in” 110 Boxing ring borders 111 Prefix with -aholic 112 Wonderland tea party attendee 113 McGregor of “Big Fish” 115 Skillful 116 Some profs 118 Mer land 120 Discoverer’s shout 121 Miffed, with “up” 122 Tiny amount

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Adult Family Home RN Homecare near Sequim has a private room available. Dementia and elder care, respite. Competitive prices. 683-1967.

Adult care home in Sequim has a private room available. Best care at best rates. Call Wild Rose at 360-683-9194

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50 “... __ saw Elba” 53 Coral phenomena 56 Chariot ending 58 Earthy tone 62 One weber per square meter 63 Above 67 Reluctant 69 Charmed snakes? 70 Notes after mis 71 Mark of disgrace 73 “Swan Lake” outfit 74 Tram car fillers 76 Conceal 79 How AA members complete their program 81 News bit 82 City east of Tempe 83 City employee who helps with the dishes? 85 ChapStick, e.g. 87 A, to Fauré 91 Changed the locks?

Advance, Archive, Audio, Blue, Burn, Compatible, Create, Data, Date, Digital, Disc, Drive, Electronic, Enable, Factor, Feature, Games, Group, Hardware, High Definition, Increase, Internet, Laser, Length, License, Life span, Load, Media, Motion, Movies, Music, News, Optical, Player, Product, Quality, Read, Robustness, Storage, Ultimate Friday’s Answer: Hand Feed

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Nobody at all Steaming mad Russian auto Longtime Olivia Newton-John label Rainbow paths Tired partner? Barely make, as a living Bridge star Omar Caught in a net Where authors exhibit unedited work? Overused word at the nursery Disney president Robert Designated area for Southern dialogue? Tummy muscles Costner links film Classified charge Bridges of “Starman”

© 2010 Universal Uclick

12/5/10

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

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NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

“CD CHANGERS” By NORA PEARLSTONE

By DAVID OUELLET

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 452-8435


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

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General Merchandise

LIVING CHRISTMAS TREES. McComb Gardens. 681-2827. MISC: Pride Revo Mobility Scooter, not used, excellent condition, paid $3,000, sell for $1,300. Lift chair, good shape, paid $1,000, sell for $300. Walkers, $25. 461-4861, 417-5078 MISC: Singer featherweight 221 sewing machine with case, excellent condition, $400. Exercise system, Weider Flex CTX, $125. Bike, Turner, recumbent, $500. 683-0146.

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Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. CAREGIVERS: Hiring, P.A., Sequim, P.T. Paid Training. Benefits. 360-457-1644. INSURANCE: Wellestablished agency has openings for qualified individuals. Sales experience helpful but not req. Email your resume to swreinhart@ft.newyo rklife.com. Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce is currently hiring executive director. Job descriptions at our website, www.jeffcountychamb er.org REGISTERED NURSE OPPORTUNITY Life Care Center of Port Townsend UNIT MANAGER Full-time leadership position available at our skilled nursing facility for an RN with supervisory experience and a current Washington nursing license. Long-term care experience is preferred. $1,000 sign-on bonus available! RNs | LPNs Part-time positions are available for RNs or LPNs with a current Washington nursing license. Longterm care experience is preferred. We offer excellent pay and benefits in a mission-driven environment. Contact Rachel Sondie. Rachel_Sondie@LCC A.com 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. in Port Townsend Visit us online www.LCCA.com. EOE/M/F/V/D Job #19751

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. Law Office Ast. Sequim, 20 hr/wk $10. Cover & resume Maxwell Webb, P.O. Box 2118, Bellingham, WA 98227. LEGAL ASSISTANT Full -time, for personal injury law firm. Strong phone, typing and grammatical skills required. Case mgmt. experience a plus. Drop off or mail resume to 601 S. Race St. Suite A, P.A. LIBRARY CIRCULATION SPECIALIST Part-time. Peninsula College is recruiting for a Specialist to facilitate operations of the circulation counter. Salary: $12.42 hr. Schedule: approx 19 hrs pr week, Mon.-Fri. Additional information and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu or upon request to 360417-6298. EEO. The Quileute Tribe has a job opening for a Human Services Director. This position is responsible for program development and planning, annual budget preparations, contract and grant development, monitoring, and reporting for multiple programs. Must have a minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Services or equivalent field and five years’ experience administrating social services programs in a Tribal community preferred. Knowledge and experience in the following programs desired: ICW, TANF, Elder Services, Youth Programs, Domestic Violence, Prevention programs, and Head Start. Visit our website to obtain a job application and complete job description at www.quileutenation.org or call at 360-374-4366. Salary DOQ.

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Help Wanted

Looking for the right person. Must be customer orientated, retail experienced, willing to work long hours, computer savvy, and able to think on their feet. Great pay, good benefits. Resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#186/Retail Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Opening: Manager, cocktail lounge, references. 928-9593. Peninsula College is recruiting to fill tenure-track faculty positions to teach in the following disciplines beginning fall of 2011. Chemistry English Job descriptions and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu or upon request to Human Resources, (360) 417-6298. EOE RESIDENTIAL AIDES FULL-TIME OR ON-CALL Assist chronically mentally ill adults in daily living skills, cooking, and housekeeping. Req h.s./GED, exp pref’d. $10.13-$11.05/hr, DOE. FT w/benes, or add $1.hr for on-call work. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE RNA/CNA: Golden Years Personal Care, part-time/on-call, all shifts. 452-3689. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SALES + SERVICE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Mt Angeles Memorial Park Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel Currently seeking self-motivated individuals for Family Service to staff our facilities We offer: Excellent income potential Comprehensive benefit package Thorough training (paid) Wage + Commissions + Bonuses Recession-proof industry Don’t reject what you don’t understand, give us a call to learn more about our tremendous Opportunity Preferably email your resume to: renee.harpe@scius.com Or call Renee Harpe at 452-6255 TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325

There's never been a better time to start a new career. One where you can reach out and make a difference by helping seniors in their homes. We're seeking quality people who are truly committed to working at least 20 hrs. a week: days, evenings, overnights, weekends, and holidays. Call 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 360-681-2511

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MOVING SALE 4 steel belted radials with rims, excellent, $75. John Deere lawn tractor/ mower and bagger, 54” swath, 170 hrs., $2,500. 1985 6 hp long shaft O/B motor $500. 681-2785 or 406-249-3661

Work Wanted

Hannah’s helping hands. Great worker, reliable, efficient, and timely. Will clean your home for the holidays and help to hang decorations too. Working in Joyce, Port Angeles, and Sequim. Please call Hannah Hope at 360-775-1258 HOUSEKEEPING + $13 hr. your supplies. 457-2837 VHS to DVD copying services. Call Nancy 360-774-0971

ROCK SAW: 16 Inch Covington Lapidary Rock Saw. New in 2008. Excellent condition. $800. 360-457-9669

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

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Furniture

BEDROOM: Black lacquer dresser, armoire, king headboard, mirror. $200/ obo. 797-7311

SCOOTERS/TREADMILL-2 PACESAVER SCOOTERS $950 each (battery chargers included), WESLO FOLDUP TREADMILL with wheels $150, all like new. 457-4837. SOFA BED: Reddish brown, great condition. $100/obo. 683-9194 Sunvision tanning bed model K-24SH, excellent shape. $500. 461-0721. Sunvision tanning bed model K-24SH, excellent shape. $500. 461-0721.

Broyhill Chest/ Armoire. Dark cherry wood finish chest/ armoire. Paid $700 new. Sell for $200. 681-2779

TABLE SAW. JET JWTS-10, 2 fences, router wing w/Bosch insert, blade guard, dust containment box, 2 inserts. $375.00. 681-2524

COFFEE TABLES: 2 matching, 1 large, $50/obo and 1 small, $40/obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685.

VACUUM: Rainbow SE plus accessories and rug shampooer. $450. 670-6230.

DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $150/ obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685.

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ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. MATTRESS: Simmons Beauty Rest king size mattress set. $250. 452-5813.

Home Electronics

HOME THEATER Sony, Blue Ray/DVD, 5 speakers, woofer, new, never opened box, makes great gift. $200/obo. 360-620-2366 PS2: Playstation 2. Like new, 2 controllers, memory card, 39 games, some player guides. $225/obo. 452-6351.

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Musical

ANTIQUE PIANO Excellent condition. $800. 452-5876. CELLO: 3/4 size Kohr, bow, soft case, stand good condition. $350. 457-3666.

MISC: Lg. 2 piece china hutch, top section 5’ wide with lighted glass shelves, bottom section 6’ wide, $400. Electric lift chair, like new, neutral color, $350. Rocker/recliner, almost new, light blue/gray, $150. Wheelchair, $100. 683-8202

MISC: Sofa blue print, excellent condition, $100. Dark wood hutch, $50. Single headboard, $10. Dark wood desk with chair, $25. 452-5876.

SOFA: Mini sectional, red, less than a year old. $300/obo. 417-2047

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General Merchandise

AIR COMPRESSOR Brand new Speedaire, 3 phase, 60 gal. tank. $800/obo. 417-5583. BATH CHAIR: Goes down into water, lifts up out of water. $650. 360-681-0942. BBQ GRILL: Large propane, with side burner, works good. $20. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays. CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 CHRISTMAS TIME Beautiful coat, leather and suede. $100/ obo. Call Debbie at 360-452-6034 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504

Winterize lawns, rake leaves, etc. 797-3023

FIREWOOD: White fir. $125 cord. 360-808-1958

Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513

GENERATOR: Winco 3 KW, 1,800 rpm, well built. $400/obo. 417-5583

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

AUCTIONS: Joyce Self Storage, 50600 Hwy. 112, units 123, 119, 219, Dec. 8th, 11 a.m. Call to verify 928-2560 FIL BYGOLLY With Dr. Deco Restocked. Fri., 10-5. Sat., 10-4. Sun., 124. 1804 W. 8th St. Huge Gift Store Merchandise and Toy Sale Everything 50% OFF! Great for holiday shopping! Yard sale at same location too. Something for everyone at this sale! Airport Rd. and Courtney Rd. Sat.-Sun., 9-3.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

SALE: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 8-5 p.m., 111 Dryke Rd. #17. Rain, snow or sunshine, indoors. No earlies please. 55 gal. fish tank, 17” computer monitor, coffee table, small end table, 6’ Christmas tree, lighted ceramic village, lighted bldgs., too much to list and all prices are negotiable. No reasonable offer refused.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Cemetery niche/plot (for infant) in any of the 3 local cemeteries. 417-7009, msg.

WANTED: Donation of artificial Christmas trees for fundraising Christmas party. Leave message at 417-3555 WANTED: STERLING SILVER Any cond. Coins, pre 1965. 360-452-8092.

82

Pets

LHASA APSO: Puppies. Ready Dec. 9. Tuxedo and Parties. 3 girls, 3 boys. $450. 477-8349 PUPPIES: Lhasa Apso Purebred Puppies. 2 boys left, 12 weeks old. Potty pad trained & working with doggie door. Comes with starter pack. $300. 360-774-1430

Give the gift of music. Guitar instruction by Brian Douglas. 360-531-3468 Keyboard. Yamaha Model 620. Great deal. Three years old. Perfect condition. $625. 360-460-0572

PIANO: Older Shondorfl upright cabinet grand. Good sound. $475. 452-7114.

76

Sporting Goods

6.8 SPCII unfired M4 AR-15 with accessories, private sale. $800. 460-7628. MISC: Colt gov’t 1911 45 ACP, SS, full custom, $1,150. Mossberg 500 12GA, blk synthetic stock, 18” bbl and 28” vent rib, $200. 477-9263. Reebok Treadmill. In Like New condition. 10 preset programs, iPod attachment, heart monitor. Was $600 new, asking $300. 541-279-9108 REVOLVER: US Arms Abilene 45 Colt, rare. $750. 681-0814. S&W M&P AR15 M4 .223 flat-top rec. with carry handle site 16” ch barrel, ch gas key, carrier, 6 pos stock, bayo lug, mil spec comp, case, 30 rd mag, fact warr new in box. $970. 683-7716 TREADMILL: Gold’s Gym brand, 10 speed, up to 10 percent incline, barely used, apt. too small. $200. 425-686-8537

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

CHRISTMAS FLEA/CRAFTS BAZAAR Sat., 9-3 p.m. Campfire Girls Bldg. Jewelry from Ursula and others, lots of nice flea market gifts. Cheap and reasonable!

93

Marine

ALUMALITE: Drift boat, very clean, great bottom, oars, trailer included. $3,200, make offer. Must sell due to health. 681-0717. BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698

Puppies: Lhasa Apso, ready now for Christmas, adorable. $400 ea. 477-2115. PUPPIES: Yorkshire Terriers. Darling, excellent health background, companion only. Prices start at $700. olympichollyhill.com 461-9121 SHIH-TZU: 3 mo. old male, healthy, playful. $300/obo. 582-9382 Shiranian pups (Pom Shih Tzu). 2 female $350. 2 male $300. What a GREAT Christmas gift. Pictures online. 360-452-5843 TOY POODLES: 8 wk. old black male, 1 6 mo female tri-color phantom. $550 ea. 477-8349

83

Farm Animals

BEEF: Farm raised, 1/2 $1.50 lb., whole $1.25 lb. Hanging weight. 928-2197. GRASS HAY $5 per bale 460-4294 HAY: Alf/grass. $5.00 bale. Grass, $4.00. In barn. 683-5817.

85

Farm Equipment

B-7410 Kubota Tractor. Diesel front end loader, new back hoe, 4x4. Tire balast. Like new. Only 30 hours on tractor. First $15,000 takes it it home. 360-582-1278

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles.

MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIAN: 9’ fiberglass, good condition. $300/obo. 417-5583 OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $14,500/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480

SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

Hay & butcher beef. Grass round bales, cow quality. Cubes horse or beef. Grain feed angus butcher beef. By the lb. Quarters available. ready by dec 10th. $5/lb & up. Rnd bales $25 & up. 360-457-3900

82

Pets

AKC Champion Sired Black Lab Puppies. 8 wks., wormed, 1st set of shots. $450. 912-2785 AKC Registered MiniSchnauzer puppies. Born 08/14/2010. First shots, dew claws removed, tails docked. 2 males and 1 female left from litter. $350. 360-460-7119 BEAUTIFUL LAB PUPPIES Vet checked, 1st shots. Females, $250. Males, $200. 417-0808 Beautiful tiny female Yorkshire Terrier 7 months old. She has had all her shots and comes for Ch bloodlines. Will be 4 lbs full grown. Wonderful lapdog and will do great in a family with another small dog or dogs for companionship. $800. 360-452-3016 Brittany: Beautiful, house trained, great with kids, very loving, 8 mo old male. Scott Adams 477-9266 CAGES: (2) large wire cages for birds, rabbits or ? $10 each. You haul or we will haul with gas money included. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays. DACHSHUND Mini puppies. 8 weeks old. $300 each. 360-796-3290 FREE: Kittens. (2) 4 mo. old brothers, one long hair, one short, black, very friendly, abandoned by neighbors. Please help! 683-0050. FREE: To good home. 3 year old neutered male Terrier mix. References required. 360-457-8667 Old English Sheepdog Puppies. Purebred, non-papered, DOB Oct 2, very socialized, very smart, playful, adorable fluff balls. Both parents on site. 3 males $300 ea., 3 females $350 ea. 360-775-4182.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383. SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153. TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843

93

SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052

94

Motorcycles

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirrors/ windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, exc. inside/out, all new brakes. $42,000/ trade. 460-8325.

Marine

BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887 BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

94

Motorcycles

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210 QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213. RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177 SCOOTER: Aero Honda 80, runs well. $450. Ken at 928-9410

LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761.

RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

CHRISTMAS COMPUTERS Desktops from $75. Laptops from $120. LCD monitors, from $84. All guaranteed. 683-9394

MISC: Antiques: 1950s cherry dining set, $300 and buffet, $200, both $400. Ludwig upright piano, $500. Blue/ cream love seat, $250. 2 gold wing chairs, $45 ea. Oak dresser, $195. Modern: Oak dining table, 4 chairs, $395. Side-by-side Maytag frige/freeze, $250. 360-437-9297

Rocker/Recliners Almost new, 2 matching, gray-blue. $300 ea. 681-2282.

78B

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670 HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895.

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,700. 461-1202 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290. KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973.

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780

95

E7

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $14,000. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itaska Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, mech. perfect, serviced, ready to roll. $20,500. 452-2148.

MOTORHOME: ‘02 37' Newmar Kountry Star. Cummins diesel on freightliner chassis, 2 slideouts, Allison transmission. auto tracking satellite dish, new tires, new washer/dryer, 59,000 miles. $67,500 360-301-5735 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177.

96

Parts/ Accessories

URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

Chevy Transmissions. 1969 Powerglide + Turbo 350, $125 each. 1970 Turbo 400, $175. 360-452-9876

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

FREE PICK UP Unwanted cars and trucks in area. State licensed and bonded auto wrecker. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552

95

Recreational Vehicles

RIMS: 5 excellent condition Jeep Rubicon wheels, 17”, 5x5 bolt. $300. 360-797-3571 SNOW TIRES: (4) mounted 205/70/14 Toyo studless, 80% tread. $300. 683-9294

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

Studded Snow Tires set of 4 unmounted. Les Schwab Wild Cat Mud & Snow studded tires. LT235/75R15. Less than 300 miles. Over $650 new - $375 for all. 360-809-0030. TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $1,000 for all, will separate. 683-7789

97 5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914

‘80 Prowler Travel Trailer. 20’. $2,500. With hitch. Sleeps 5, full kitchen, full bath. Tina 360-809-0836. CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426. HERE’S THE DEAL Buy my 29’ Pace Arrow with 57K miles on it, general power pack, Monroe shocks, stabilizers, hydraulic levelers, air conditioning, 16’ awning. Price $3,500 then trade on new bus for about $8,000 Ken at 928-9410. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘89 21’ Winnebago Warrior. New tires and refrigerator. $8,000. 360-681-7614 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625 MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘98 TAHOE LT 4X4 SPORT UTILITY Popular 5.7 liter (350) Vortec V8, automatic, alloy wheels, running boards, tow package, privacy glass, roof rack, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors! Power heated leather seats, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, rear air, dual front airbags, Kelley Blue Book value of $9,220! Only 75,000 miles! This Tahoe is in immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $8,595 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362 CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713. CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

CHEV: ‘85 S10. 4x4, king cab, auto, canopy. Straight, dependable, clean. PS, PB, A/C, tilt, CC, AM/FM/cassette. New shocks, battery, tires. 2.8 V6. Runs great! No rust. Drive anywhere. $3,300. 360-452-7439 CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512.


E8

Classified

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

HOMELAWN/YARD SERVICES CAREROOFING

FENCING

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KITCHENS/BATHS/DOORS

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. 180K. $900. 457-9292 DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556 FORD: ‘05 F-350 Lariat. 4x4 6.0 diesel, leather, LB, crew cab, fully loaded, great cond. $23,000. Todd 461-9566

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213 FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com. ISUZU: ‘98 Rodeo. 4x4, leather seats, sunroof, new trans., new tires. $3,500. 457-7766 or 452-2602 ext 2. NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400

97

4 Wheel Drive

GMC: ‘97 4WD. Runs good, 140K mi. $4,500/obo. 683-4401

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV/GMC: (3) 19491950, projects and spare parts. $2,400 all. 457-9329. CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $6,000/obo. 457-7097 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210.

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157 GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876 FORD ‘05 RANGER LONG BED 2WD 4.0 liter V6, auto, bed mat, vinyl floors, AM/FM stereo, air, dual front airbags, Kelley Blue Book, value of $7,800! Hard to find long bed! Extra clean! Stop by Gray Motors today and save! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $6,700. 457-0655. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929.

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘86 B2000, 5 sp, canopy, bed liner. $700/obo. 460-7974. MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. NISSAN: ‘87 pickup. 4 cyl, 5 spd. $1,250. 683-7516 PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

99

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘96 4-Runner, SR5, loa-ded, gold and wood package, sunroof, Pioneer sound, 12disc changer, 154k miles, $6,000/obo. 360-417-0223

FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133.

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

Legals Jefferson Co.

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7345.23527 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC Grantee: Ronald G. Allie, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 953 101 401 Abbreviated Legal: LTS 1-4, BLK 14, 2/18 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of JEFFERSON, State of Washington: Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Block 14 all in GISE's Addition as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 18, Records of Jefferson County, Washington, together with those portions of vacated Carroll Avenue and Fifth Street, abutting upon said lot which would attach by operation of Law. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 71 S 6TH ST PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/26/06, recorded on 08/02/06, under Auditor's File No. 513986, records of JEFFERSON County, Washington, from Ronald G Allie, a single person, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for CTX Morgage Co., LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 553580. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $8,598.36 Late Charges $335.64 Lender's Fees & Costs $97.14 Total Arrearage $9,031.14 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $417.34 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,133.84 Total Amount Due: $10,164.98 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $77,301.55, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS RONALD G. ALLIE 71 S 6TH ST PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Ronald G. Allie 71 S 6TH ST PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/17/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/17/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7345.23527) 1002.177823-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010

99

Cars

99

Cars

BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,700/ obo. 206-272-0220.

CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896.

Buick: ‘90 Century Ltd. 64K, new tires/ batt/brakes/pump, all electric, tilt A/C 2.5 liter, auto. $950. 775-7048.

CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427

BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915 CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHEV: ‘90 Cavalier. Auto, 2 door coupe. $700. 683-8249.

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403 FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542.

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619.

99

Cars

HONDA: ‘07 Fit. Approx. 52K, great shape. $9.850. 360-774-2549 MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204 Mechanics Special Nissan ‘02 Altima. 45K Gorgeous, light green. $3,500/obo. Needs minor work. 452-7737 MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $4,500/ obo. 582-1292.

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,400. 360-460-0385

99

Cars

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866

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104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7523.21604 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. OneWest Bank, FSB Grantee: Brad Burlingame and Kay Burlingame, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 702131022 Abbreviated Legal: PTN NE 13-27-2W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: That portion of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 13, Township 27 North, Range 2 West, W.M., Jefferson County, Washington, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point 376 feet East of the Center of Section 13; thence North 296 feet; thence West 63.5 feet; thence North 16.5 feet; thence West 16.5 feet; thence North 424.5 feet; thence West 296 feet; thence North 565 feet; thence East 361 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence continuing East 180 feet; thence South 310 feet; thence West 180 feet; thence North 310 feet to the Point of Beginning; Together with and subject to an easement for ingress and egress, over and along the existing road in Section 13, Township 27 North, Range 2 West, as disclosed by Auditor's File No. 214541, recorded August 10, 1972, and by Volume 16 of Surveys, Page 135, and Judgment in Jefferson County Superior Court Case No. 95-200373-6; Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 432 Elkhound Pass Quilcene, WA 98376 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/03/07, recorded on 01/23/07, under Auditor's File No. 519776, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Brad Burlingame and Kay Burlingame, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Indy Mac Bank, F.S.B., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Indy Mac Bank, F.S.B. to OneWest Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 550263. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/01/2010 Monthly Payments $10,533.06 Late Charges $468.16 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,748.12 Total Arrearage $12,749.34 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $508.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $112.00 Recording Costs $127.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $817.00 Total Amount Due: $13,566.34 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $203,294.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Brad Burlingame 432 Elkhound Pass Quilcene, WA 98376 Kay Burlingame 432 Elkhound Pass Quilcene, WA 98376 Brad Burlingame 176 Lake Sutherland Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Kay Burlingame 176 Lake Sutherland Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Brad Burlingame 1812 Lindsay Hill Road Quilcene, WA 98376 Kay Burlingame 1812 Lindsay Hill Road Quilcene, WA 98376 Brad Burlingame 8760 State Highway 303 Northeast #5 Bremerton, WA 98311-9265 Kay Burlingame 8760 State Highway 303 Northeast #5 Bremerton, WA 98311-9265 Brad Burlingame P.O. Box 351 Quilcene, WA 98376-0351 Kay Burlingame P.O. Box 351 Quilcene, WA 98376-0351 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/29/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/01/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7523.21604) 1002.161656-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010

99

Cars

MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062.

SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909

MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828

SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132.

MITSUBISHI ‘07 ECLIPSE SPECIAL EDITION COUPE 2.4 liter, 4 cylinder, 5 speed, alloy wheels, sunroof, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, locks, and mirrors, leather seats, cruise, tilt, air, Rockford Fosgate 6 disc MP3 player, dual front and side impact airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $16,115! Only 32,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Local trade! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527.

NASH: ‘50 Statesman. Needs work, runs great, extra engine and tranny. Must sell. $4,995 or make offer. 681-0717 OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PONTIAC: ‘97 Sunfire. Great condition. $3,000/obo. 582-3813 PONTIAC: ‘97 Sunfire. Great condition. $3,000/obo. 582-3813 PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635.

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

Legals Jefferson Co.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965.

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959

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SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 25,000 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $16,750. 452-6014

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E9

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘91 Corolla. 4 dr, 5 speed, good shape, runs good, 30+ mpg. $1,650/obo. 360-452-8788

TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774.

VW ‘06 JETTA GLS TDI SEDAN 1.9 liter 4 cylinder turbo diesel engine, 5 speed manual transmission, alloy wheels, keyless entry, sunroof, power windows, locks, and mirrors, power programmable heated leather seat, CD stereo, dual Zonde climate control, air, cruise, tilt, steering wheel controls, information center, traction control, 10 interior airbags, priced under Kelley Blue Book value! Spectacular fuel mileage! Sparkling clean inside and out! Only 44,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $17,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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101

TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183.

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE

Legals Clallam Co.

NO. 10-2-00853-8

This is to certify that Public Notice and List of Property in the Clallam County foreclosure sale was posted as of November 22, 2010. Clallam County Treasurer’s Office, Clallam County Courthouse, Port Angeles City Hall and the Forks City Hall in the State of Washington are the posting sites for the list of foreclosure properties. The foreclosure sale will be held on Friday, December 10, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. in the Commissioner’s Meeting Room in the Clallam County Courthouse, located at 223 East Fourth Street, in the City of Port Angeles, County of Clallam, State of Washington. Bidders should register in the Treasurer’s Office from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. on Dec. 10th. JUDITH A SCOTT, CLALLAM COUNTY TREASURER Pub: Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2010 LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Public Hearing NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing of the Clallam Transit System Board will be held to solicit public comments on the declaration and disposition of surplus personal property. The public hearing will be held Monday, December 20, 2010, beginning at 1:00 p.m. at the Clallam Transit System, 830 West Lauridsen Boulevard, Port Angeles Washington. All interested parties are encouraged to attend. The proposed surplus personal property to be considered to declaration and disposition includes one 2002 Chevrolet Express van. Copies of information detailing the proposed surplus personal property will be available prior to the regular meeting and public hearing at Clallam Transit System or phone 452-1315. Terry G. Weed

General Manager Legals Pub: Dec. 5, 2010 Clallam Co.

File No.: 7283.26405 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Emma Adcox, an unmarried woman and Bernice Massey, an unmarried woman, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship and not as tenants in common Tax Parcel ID No.: 0230155503800000 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 5, Block M, Sunshine Acres Industrial Park, according to the Plat thereof filed in Volume 8 of Plats at Page(s) 36, 37 and 38, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/31/08, recorded on 04/01/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1218687, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Emma L Adcox, an unmarried woman, Bernice Massey, an unmarried woman, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship and not as tenants in common, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Lender and Lender's successors and successor assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. . *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/02/2010 Monthly Payments $30,476.16 Late Charges $1,110.48 Lender's Fees & Costs $88.75 Total Arrearage $31,675.39 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $800.00 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,592.12 Total Amount Due: $33,267.51 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $294,397.61, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Emma L. Adcox 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Emma L. Adcox 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Bernice Massey 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Bernice Massey 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/26/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/26/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/02/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26405) 1002.167973-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010


E10

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Classified

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7283.26369 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Judy A. Theis, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 0430255400100000 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1 Summerset Place, Vol. 10, Pg 45 & 46 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 17, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Summerset Place, as recorded in Volume 10 of Plats, pages 45 and 46, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 11 SUMMERSET CT SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/26/06, recorded on 11/08/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1191022, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Judy A Theis, an unmarried woman., as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20101255614. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/13/2010 Monthly Payments $5,431.40 Late Charges $217.00 Lender's Fees & Costs $553.75 Total Arrearage $6,202.15 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $563.68 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,346.24 Total Amount Due: $7,548.39 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $146,473.84, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 17, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/06/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/06/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/06/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS JUDY THEIS 11 SUMMERSET CT SEQUIM, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JUDY THEIS 11 SUMMERSET CT SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/12/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/12/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26369) 1002.166441-FEI Pub: Nov. 14, Dec. 5, 2010

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7037.08390 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Jason Burgess and Jennifer Burgess, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 961 806 614 Abbreviated Legal: LTS. 45 THRU 48, BK. 66, 2/129 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 17, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lots 45, 46, 47 and 48 in Block 66 of Irondale No. 2, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 129, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 130 W KINCAID ST PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/30/08, recorded on 11/07/08, under Auditor's File No. 538545, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Jason Burgess and Jennifer Burgess, husband and wife, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 553363. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/09/2010 Monthly Payments $9,024.72 Late Charges $300.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $60.16 Total Arrearage $9,385.68 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $652.50 Title Report $726.28 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,486.78 Total Amount Due: $10,872.46 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $203,306.46, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 17, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/06/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/06/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/06/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS JASON BURGESS 130 W KINCAID ST PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 JENNIFER BURGESS 130 W KINCAID ST PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/28/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/09/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.08390) 1002.164543-FEI Pub: Nov. 14, Dec. 5, 2010

CA$H

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If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

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HARMONY BETWEEN MAN, NATURE AND MACHINE

$199/MO.*

102

102

Legals City of P.A.

CITY OF PORT ANGELES INVITATION TO BID for Twin Shaft Inline Grinders

The Toyota Prius was named one of Forbes.com’s “Toughest cars on the road.�***

$2349 DUE AT SIGNING

Legals City of P.A.

Sealed bids will be received by the Public Works and Utilities Director until 2:00 PM, Tuesday, December 21st, 2010, and will be opened and read in the Public Works & Utilities Conference Room, Port Angeles City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, Port Angeles, Washington 98362. Bids will be taken for the following: Bid Item1: 4 Inch Twin Shaft Inline Grinder

MODEL #1223

Bidders shall have the option to bid on one or both bid items. Bid documents may be obtained at the Public Works and Utilities Department, Corp Yard, between the hours of 8:30am and 3:30pm, at 1703 South B Street, Port Angeles, Washington 98363, or by contacting Lucy Hanley, Contract Specialist at lhanley@cityofpa.us or (360) 417-4541. Pub: Dec. 5, 2010

NEW 2011 TUNDRA CREW MAX “Most Dependable Large Pickup, Five Years in a Row�††

A 2010 Consumers’ Top RatedŽ Vehicle - Edmunds.com†

104

$2,500 CASH BACK *

NEW 2010 VENZAs VENZA s AWD

OR

*

$1,000 CASH BACK

*36 monthly lease payments of $199, excluding tax, with option to purchase at end of term, $2,349 due at lease signing/delivery applied to first month payment, license, and capitalized cost reduction, and security deposit . Includes 12,000 mi. a year. Plus a $150 negotiable dealer documentary service fee, subject to credit approval. TFS Tier 1+ thru Tier 3 Customers On Approval of Credit. Offer expires 1/3/2011. Does not include tax, license & documentation fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typographical errors. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. **Insurance Institute for Highway Safety 2010 rating for Venza, vehicle class Midsize SUV. Ratings are only meaningful when comparing vehicles in the same weight class. 2010 model year tested. For more details on 2010 Top Safety Pick Awards, see www.iihs.org. †Edmunds and Consumers’ Top Rated are registered trademarks of Edmunds.com, Inc. ††The Toyota Tundra received the lowest number of problems per 100 vehicles among large pickups in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2006-2010 Vehicle Dependability StudiesSM. 2010 study based on 52,422 consumer responses measuring problems consumers experienced in the past 12 months with three-year old vehicles (2007 model-year cars and trucks). Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed October – December 2009. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com ***Forbes.com; “Toughest Cars On The Road� March 29, 2010.

You Can Count On Us!

www.wildertoyota.com 0C5105633

95 Deer Park Road • Port Angeles – 1-800-927-9379 • 360-457-8511

Legals Jefferson Co.

Brinnon School Board of Directors is hereby requesting from members of the public residing within the Brinnon School District boundaries, written and signed input regarding mitigating circumstances in the above fore mentioned Memorandum of Understanding. All submittals must be accompanied with name and physical address of submitter to be reviewed at a public Special Board Meeting, January 24, 2011, 6:00 PM, Brinnon School library. Submittals must be received or postmarked no later than December 31, 2010.

$1,500 CASH BACK 0% FOR 60 MO.

104

Public Notice

OR

2010 IIHS Top Safety Pick**

Legals Jefferson Co.

The Brinnon School Board of Directors has been requested to submit a Memorandum of Understanding between Pleasant Harbor Marina and Golf Resort LLP and the Brinnon School District #46 to identify those impacts to the District associated with the development of the Pleasant Harbor Marina and Golf Resort (Resort), now under regulatory review by Jefferson County, not addressed by increased revenue from the proposed Resort and subject to supplemental mitigation to assure concurrency in accordance with the ordinance of approval, Ordinance 01-0128-08 paragraph 63(c).

0% FOR 60 MO. NEW 2010 HIGHLANDERs HIGHLANDERs

Bid Item 2: 8 Inch Twin Shaft Inline Grinder

Mail written and signed submittals to: Nancy Thompson, Superintendent Secretary to the Board Brinnon School District #46 46 School House Road Brinnon, WA 98320 All members of the public submitting comments are requested to attend the January 24, 2011 meeting to answer Board questions. Only written and signed submittals received or postmarked by December 31, 2010 will be accepted for review. Pub: Nov. 14, Dec. 5, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7283.26396 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Michael E. Schmitt and Amy Schmitt, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 0530101490700000 Abbreviated Legal: L4, Vol 5, PG 36, Clallam County, WA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 4 of Lunn Short Plat recorded July 14, 1978, in Volume 5 of Short Plats, page 36 under Clallam County Auditor's File No. 484442, being a portion of the West half of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 10, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 732 GASMAN RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/18/06, recorded on 04/24/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1179016, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Michael E Schmitt, a married man, and Amy Schmitt, a married woman, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1256744. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/04/2010 Monthly Payments $12,396.36 Late Charges $401.45 Lender's Fees & Costs $25.00 Total Arrearage $12,822.81 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $726.28 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,508.84 Total Amount Due: $14,331.65 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $212,961.22, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS MICHAEL SCHMITT 732 GASMAN RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of MICHAEL SCHMITT 732 GASMAN RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/02/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/03/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/04/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26396) 1002.168756-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010

File No.: 7261.26647 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the C-BASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-MH1 Grantee: Wanda Fay Harrison, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 0530343291200000 Abbreviated Legal: LT.1, HARRISON SP, 25/67 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Harrison Short Plat, recorded September 28, 1993 in Volume 25 of Short Plats, Page 67, under Clallam County Recording No. 693920, being a portion of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 34, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 417 Miles Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/28/05, recorded on 04/08/05, under Auditor's File No. 20051154092, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Wanda Fay Harrison, who also appears of record as Wanda Harrison, a single woman, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Argent Mortgage Company, LLC to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the C-BASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-MH1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2007-1201046. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/02/2010 Monthly Payments $37,300.71 Late Charges $1,747.90 Lender's Fees & Costs $4,925.38 Total Arrearage $43,973.99 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $405.00 Total Costs $405.00 Total Amount Due: $44,378.99 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $160,081.27, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Wanda Fay Harrison 417 Miles Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Wanda Fay Harrison 417 Miles Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/22/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/22/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/02/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7261.26647) 1002.122754-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010


Peninsula Daily News Sunday, December 5, 2010

Pamela Hastings

Inside ■  Her sister’s boyfriend keeps putting the moves on her ■  Tales of mooching partners ■  She wants to wait for marriage to have sex; he doesn’t

Tr Fr eat ee of Se To the e Pa ga’s W ge So eek 4 up :

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

Author, artist and dollmaker


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Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Readers share tales Confrontation needed of moocher partners with sister’s boyfriend WE RECENTLY HEARD from Deep Pockets whose boyfriend — and I use the term as loosely as rapper’s pants — was a freeloader, a user, a cheap S.O.B. and, in a word, a turd. He lived at her house, contributing nothing but his appetite and his dirty laundry. She pampered him with special coffee, special soap and Pepperidge Farm cookies. When they went out, they used her car and her gas. When he picked up lunch for the two of them, he asked her for half. And he wasn’t poor. Far from it. He retired in August 2009 with more than $1 million dollars.

Cheryl Lavin

Tales from the Front

When she gave him an ultimatum — start paying half of the bills or go home, he went home. Here’s what you had to say . . .

Laura I thought I was reading about Dan and me when I read about Deep Pockets

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Weddings, anniversaries

Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

to

Lavin/11

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tion and must be handled with care, especially since you it seems your sister will take her boyfriend’s word over yours. This in itself must be terribly frustrating and stressful for you. However, if you Jodie Lynn are absolutely positive about your sister’s reaction, it may be best for you to try straight to his face and to settle things between the record the conversation. two of you before approachIf he continues to bug ing your sister. you, tell your sister about Tell him how you feel Nashville reader his behavior. If she doesn’t about his behavior and perTell him to stop or you believe you, play the haps ask why he thinks you will have no choice but to recording for her. However, would be interested in a confront him in front of relationship with him. be prepared for whatever your sister. Maybe he thought he was takes place next. getting signals from you that Make it perfectly clear For example, if she were simply never there. you are in no way attracted blames you for whatever The very first thing you to him and you feel his reason, simply keep quiet need to get out of the way is behavior is totally unacother than to say that you to let him know that you are ceptable. thought it was best she not interested in him at all Be sure he knows that knew what type of person there is not any room for he was and now it is out of and you are very disappointed that he would or him to squirm out of any your hands and she can could think otherwise. Once confrontation that may handle it on her own. he hears this, maybe he will happen between the three Make a secondary copy of you and that you mean of the recording just in case stop altogether and move on. If not, take additional business. she becomes so upset she precautions to discuss the — N.N. tears up the first one. in Nashville, Tenn. — Larry H. in Dallas situation with your parents and ask them for suggestions on how to approach Dallas reader From Jodie your sister. Who knows, one This is a messy situaConfront the dirtbag of them may be able to talk with her about the situation, and she may not become as upset as she would if it were you.

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9B313914

Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

MY SISTER’S BOYFRIEND has been calling, texting and asking me out. I am stunned and have no clue how to bring this up to her because I know she loves him very much and would be heartbroken, even to the point of not believing me and standing up for him. What should I do and how do I do it?

and Jim. We owned a condo together and had agreed on who paid what. Somehow, I always ended up paying more, even though Dan made more money. If I went to the store to pick something up, he always asked me to pick up razor blades, body wash, shaving cream — you name it. It took me a very long time to realize that I should have put my foot down the first time it happened. Just like when he’d invite his grown daughters over and expected me to shop, cook and clean up.

We just found out our children’s great-grandmother has been diagnosed with cancer and only has six to 12 months to live. What is the best way to explain the situation to our 8-year-old twins?

________ Jodie Lynn shares parenting tips through her weekly column. Write her at Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040 or direct2 contact@parenttoparent.com via e-mail.


Peninsula Woman

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

3

Pamela Hastings holds one of her more abstract dolls: a figure of a bird inspired by her friend Gray Lucier of Port Angeles, who told her a story of how he saved birds when he was a boy.

Diane Urbani de la

Paz /for Peninsula Woman

In a flash In

a

flash

Hastings celebrates women in transformation By Diane Urbani for

B

eware of telling Pamela Hastings what you would go out and do, if you just had the nerve. “Do it!” she’s likely to say, after listening carefully to your idea. Five years ago, Hast-

ings took her own leap. At 58, she was divorced and living in Saugerties, N.Y., with a well-paying job and a relationship that was, in a word, “OK.” But “I realized I was angry a lot of the time,” she recalled.

de la

Peninsula Woman

Paz

Hastings was pouring energy into a relationship that wasn’t giving it back. An artist since she was a girl, she wanted to instead put her energy into making new kinds of art. Meantime, she tended to blame her partner for

her unhappiness. So, at last, “I decided to make a move,” all the way to the opposite corner of the country, to the Olympic Peninsula. Hastings had relatives in the Seattle area, and when she learned about Port Ange-

les — a town about the size of Saugerties — she liked the looks of the place. Via the Internet, she landed both a job at Olympic Medical Center Home Health and a house to rent. Turn

to

Hastings/4


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Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Hastings: Life filled with art, friends, family Continued from 3 An occupational therapist by profession, Hastings is also a dollmaker — and one who takes extreme pleasure in teaching other women how to make their own wild creatures out of sticks and scraps. In workshops online and physical, she shows how assembling a doll, or a quilt, or anything you want, is a way to tell your story, and fiercely. Today Hastings’ life is filled with art, friends, visits from family and her job as an occupational therapist for people with shoulder, arm and hand injuries.

Three books She is the author of three books, including the self-published Dollmaking As a Transformative Process, and this fall’s Hot Flash! A Celebration, a col-

“People throughout history have used icons to represent what they wanted or what they were afraid of. We haven’t changed all that much in our minds and feelings from our ancestors.”

Pamela Hastings artist, dollmaker

she added. “We haven’t changed all that much in our minds and feelings from our ancestors.” Hastings’ latest book has a fiery-looking doll on its pink cover. But Hot Flash! isn’t only about that much-discussed sign of menopause.

teaching English in Taiwan. “Perhaps the biggest spur to my leaving was my demented fascination with watching for my husband’s car at the home of his new ‘friend,’ a house that I passed daily on my drive to work,” Feierabend writes. “That may not be the best reason to embark on an True stories adventure in a foreign Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Woman country, but initially it was It’s a trove of women’s Pamela Hastings makes dolls with messages such as this one that says my strongest motive. true stories — illustrated “Love Thyself.” with their artwork — “Even at the age of 61, I about love, struggle, loss thought it was within my and can be less intimidatlection of 50 personal mutual friends and Faceand rejuvenation. It turns grasp . . . to build a new life ing. essays by women she book. out that “hot flash” can also for myself in a foreign In workshops, “I have knows around the world, How does making a doll country.” people use forms as simple mean a burst of creativity, thanks to workshops, transform? It all has to do and a flash of courage to She did just that, stumas possible: a bundle of with personal symbols — bling and plunging ahead sticks, or a very basic fabric try something new. and sticks. Carol Feierabend is one despite fear and lack of shape, so they don’t get of many who embraced her Mandarin Chinese vocabubogged down in creation Like a 3-D painting hot flash: a desire for a big lary. Feierabend stayed five but can let their subconchange after her marriage scious come through,” You can make a doll years, teaching, eating the had ended. In May 2001 Hastings said. representing yourself, or strange foods, making “People throughout his- she sold her business and someone in your life, or a friends and learning the tory have used icons to rep- said goodbye to Vermont, fear, a hope or a healing language. resent what they wanted or where she had lived for 28 process. It’s like painting, years, and accepted a job Turn to Hastings/5 only it’s three-dimensional what they were afraid of,”

Read an excerpt from Pamela Hastings’ book Hot Flash! A Celebration on Page 6.

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Peninsula Woman

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

5

Hastings: Essays by women Continued from 4

Where to find the book

“Almost every moment,” she writes, “I was as wide awake and alive as I have ever felt.” The book also looks full into the face of suffering, in essays such as the one by Anna Wiancko Chasman of Joyce. In a piece titled “The Phoenix and the Fire,” Chasman writes of her daughter Erica, who died of cancer at 16. Enduring this, for Chasman, was akin to walking through scorching flames, to being transformed like kiln-fired clay.

Resonating truth On the day Erica died, and as Chasman held her daughter one last time, a lark landed on the sunlit window ledge of her room. The bird sang, and kept singing for nearly 20 minutes. “A truth resonated inside me: This was Erica, singing of rebirth and eternity,” her mother writes. Chasman, now an art therapist, lives in a house she and her husband, Paul, built on Freshwater Bay; it has a studio where she works with clay and teaches classes. Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

Pamela Hastings made this “Love Thyself” doll for Kathy Charlton for Heart Health Month in February at Charlton’s Olympic Cellars Winery. The letters on the heart spell out “love thyself.”

HOT FLASH! A Celebration, a collection of essays by 50 women, is available on www.PamelaHastings.com for $25. Port Angeles author Pamela Hastings also invites women to share their stories on her Facebook page, which can be found by searching for her name on www.Facebook.com. Hastings, also the author of Dollmaking As a Transformative Process, teaches art workshops on the North Olympic Peninsula and online at www. Joggles.com. Hastings’ dolls are also part of the Art Is a Gift show and sale throughout December at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd. For information, phone 360-457-3532. Peninsula Woman Other essayists include Kathy Dexter of Port Townsend, who writes: “Art has always been a big thing to me. The folks that I lived around always encouraged me to try new things and felt that ‘everything is art’ and ‘we are all artists. It is not a thing learned in school, it is a thing inside of us all.’” To Dexter, “hot flash” means “another page turning in this book of my life, another adventure . . . and this I embrace.” Gloria Skovronsky of Sequim is here, too, reflecting on how she realized her dream of becoming an art-

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ist: “by sheer strength of will, by ignoring family opinions and by never giving up.”

us piles of beautiful paper, skeins of thread, broken branches to use as arms and legs. I was enthralled,” Skovronsky recalled. These days Hastings is reveling in her multifaceted life. She’s an occupational therapist at McGovern Therapy Specialists in Port Angeles; she’s creating a 9-1/2-foot-tall doll named “Woman’s Work” in her living room, among other projects. And Hot Flash! is selling, well, like hotcakes. The beauty of this book, to Hastings, is that it reveals the everyday heroism of women. She has been heartened by the stories of grace under fire, and humor under pressure. Women, Hastings said, “should be proud and happy as much as possible.” She knows, of course, that this is easier said than done. “There is so much horrible stuff happening in the world,” she said. “It’s good to reach out and connect.”


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Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Hot Flash! excerpt I love the phrase “hot flash.” I love the notoriety that the first and second Hot Flash Dolls I made got — one lives with Pamela Armas, one of the hottest, flashiest women around, and the second travels with Pokey Bolton, editor of Quilting Arts magazine and Cloth, Paper Scissors I used all my best and brightest fabrics and sequins to express the feeling of joy. I was born in 1947 and grew up in the Fifties and Sixties, with vague rumors of women going through “the change.” It certainly didn’t sound like anything to look forward to, rather horrible: going

crazy in an uncontrollable way. Almost as bad as “the C word” or “that way,” which were also never discussed in polite company, but only whispered in hatted ladies’ sequestered gossip, when it was thought that the inquisitive pig-tailed girls were well out of the way instead of playing under the bridge table. My mother, who is in her eighties now, says that the only thing she knew about menopause as a girl was that sometimes Church Ladies “got hot.” Turn

to

Pamela Hastings’ Hot Flash! A Celebration

Excerpt/8

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Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 5, 2010

7

Weddings Arrington — Reed Melanie Beatrice Reed and Boyce James Arrington, both of Sequim, were married Nov. 20 at their Sequim home. Connor Clark officiated at the noon ceremony. It was an informal, civil service with friends as witnesses. The bride is the daughter of Ronald and Cheryl Reed of Richland. The groom is the son of Doug Arrington of Australia and the late Shawn Arrington. The bride graduated from Hanford High School in 1999 and from Western Washington University. She is employed by the Sequim Gazette. The groom graduated Melanie and Boyce Arrington from Peninsula College in 2002. He is employed by moon to Paris in October. They live in Mervin Manufacturing. The couple took a pre-wedding honeySequim.

Lyons — Myers Teresa L. “Terry” Myers and John Lyons, both of Sequim, were married Nov. 7 in the backyard of their Sequim home. Don Jones officiated at the 2 p.m. ceremony. Horses from a neighboring pasture came up to the fence to watch the proceedings. The bride is the daughter of Evelyn Nystrom of Bellingham and John Myers of Yakima. The groom is the son of Norman Allen of Tonasket and the late Florence Allen. Ramona Jones was matron of honor, and John Livermore was best man. The couple met eight months before through Teresa and eHarmony.com and fell in love shortly thereafter. The bride graduated from Gwinn High School in Gwinn, Mich., in 1973. She is the administrator at Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation. The groom graduated from Thomas

John Lyons Jefferson High School in Federal Way in 1972 and from Wenatchee Valley College in 2005. He is self-employed. The couple plan a honeymoon next year. They live in Sequim.

Rooney — Springob Shannon Marie Springob and Chester Lyman Rooney Jr., both of Port Angeles, were married Nov. 13 at the Elks Naval Lodge in Port Angeles. Andrea Clancy officiated at the 1 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Debra and Joe Springob Sr. of Port Angeles. The groom is the son of Marie Lewis of Helendale, Calif., and Chester Rooney Sr. of Carlsborg. Sarah Springob was maid of honor, and Samantha Sutherland was bridesmaid. Anthony Hernandez was best man, and David Springob was groomsman. The bride graduated Chester and Shannon Rooney from Port Angeles High School in 2009 and The groom is employed by Westport attended Peninsula College. She is in the Army and will leave Shipyard. soon for basic training. The couple live in Port Angeles.

McNutt — Wurtenberger Joelle Lee Wurtenberger and Philip Andrew McNutt, both of Fontana, Calif., were married Nov. 14 in Newport Beach, Calif., aboard the yacht Athena. Capt. Philip Bradley officiated at the 5 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Thomas and Katherine Wurtenberger of Maumelle, Ark. The groom is the son of John and Dava McNutt of Port Angeles. Jessica Hansen, the bride’s sister, was matron of honor, and Megan Parrish was bridesmaid. Anna Joelle and Philip McNutt Leigh Wurtenberger, the bride’s 15-month-old daughter, was carried down Arkansas Christian High School in 2006 the aisle as a member of the wedding and will graduate from the University of party. La Verne in La Verne, Calif., in 2011. Brent Robinson was best man, and The groom graduated from Port AngeSeth McNutt, the groom’s brother, and les High School in 2000 and from NorthJason Wurtenberger, the bride’s brother, west Lineman College in Idaho in 2002. were groomsmen. He is employed by Henkels & McCoy. Angelina Wurtenberger was flower girl. The couple honeymooned in Las Vegas. The bride graduated from Central They live in Fontana, Calif.


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Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Excerpt: Talk about it Continued from 6 on the other side. Three of my brothers are close by in I can see them now, with Seattle, and whole winters pass without my having to their tight girdles and shovel. My Very Own home round paper fans, so will be paid for when I’m sweaty and embarrassed, 93 — sooner if I keep at it even in rural Northern — and I am coming to Vermont. appreciate more and more Well, My Dears, we are women of the Twenty-First a life where I don’t have to answer to anyone but Century: we not only talk about menopause, we shout myself — as long as I show about, sing about, and cele- up at work four days a week and pay my taxes. brate our own individual So even though my own and collective transformainternal temperature rises tions from breeding stock to RED HOT, FLASHING, and falls, the peaks and valleys are smoothing out OUTSPOKEN, CELE(I try not to feel too borBRATING, MATURE ingly the same), and even WOMEN!!! You don’t have to be over 40 to qualify . . . though some may think that we did it all in the it’s a state of mind, more Women’s Movement of the than a state of the body. ’60s and ’70s, women are Some of the contributors still earning less than men, here were in their 20s when I started this project and there is nothing as wonderful as shared stories in 2002. The progress of the book of other Everyday Heroines was interrupted by my own to encourage us in our jourMajor Life Change, leaving neys. As Laurie Kuslansky a Relationship to live alone, says, “Laugh and the world laughs with you. Cry and a paid-for house, a profityou cry with your girlable job as a per diem Occupational Therapist, to friends.” move here to the very *** opposite corner of the counHot Flash, the book, was try, the Olympic Peninsula, born in the spring of 2002, where my computer desk while I was on my Herolooks out onto very tall ine’s Journey, teaching and evergreens, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Canada traveling along the West

Mad Maggi

Coast of the U.S. for six weeks, while still living in the Northeast. After deciding to quit my Regular Job and devote myself to my passion —walk the talk — in 2001, I presented a program at International Quilt Market [in Houston, Texas] on Making a Living Doing What You Love . . . and lived to recognize the simplicity/difficulty of my premise. I’ve been back and forth to working a job since then, realizing that the Important Part is doing what I love, even if it’s in snippets of time. Now (2010) I’m back to a “Regular Job” four days a week, doing orthopedic occupational therapy, treating people with hand to shoulder injuries, and like many people in today’s economy, planning to work till I drop, in a good environment. I realize that I am becoming more and more “political” in the sense of becoming more aware of a strong part of my life mission being to try to change the world for the better, even if it’s only one woman at a time, encouraging people to live more creative, responsible, and happier lives. I’m sure Men could use help, too, having been forced into a tight mold of their own, but someone else is going to have to take care of them.

Diane Urbani

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A doll that Pamela Hastings made for her friend, artist Gray Lucier of Turn to Excerpt/11 Port Angeles.


Peninsula Woman

See counselor to discuss expectations DEAR JOHN: AT 20, I’m still a virgin. Frankly, I want to stay that way until I marry. Unfortunately, the man I love — and hope will be my husband eventually — doesn’t feel the same way. He is not a virgin, and although he hasn’t exactly said this, I’m guessing that he wants to “try it out” before he fully commits to me. We are at a standstill, and I feel him growing more distant. What’s your suggestion? — Status Quo in Macon, Ga.

Marriage Licenses Clallam County Jesus Libreros Marin, 54, and Lois Renee Sullivan, 48; both of Port Townsend.

Jefferson County Monica Lisa Beas, 19, of Arlington, and Miguel Claderon Vega, 22, of Port Townsend.

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Peninsula Daily News

Mars vs.

Venus John Gray give in to his request? No. It is, however, to understand his point of view. If both of you are serious about marriage, I suggest you seek the advice of a joint counselor who can help you better discuss your visions of marriage, love, respect and commitment. You’ll learn a lot about each other and yourselves, including whether you’re ready to make this commitment in the first place.

Dear John: My husband has an interesting mole in an undisclosed place. My girlfriend let it slip that she knows about it. Should I be worried? — Suspicious Wife in Montpelier, Vt. Dear Suspicious Wife: Ask before you jump to any conclusions. If the situation were reversed, it’s what you’d hope he’d do, right? Here’s hoping that his answer will have you both laughing.

________

John Gray is the author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus. If you have a question, write to John in care of this newspaper or by e-mail at: comments@mars venusliving.com.

Friday, Dec. 17th – 7:30pm Saturday, Dec. 18th – 3:00 & 7:30pm Sunday, Dec. 19th – 3:00pm

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Dear Status Quo: Your stance is admirable in a day and age of casual sex and starter marriages. If you haven’t heard the term “starter marriage,” it refers to first marriages that end within a year or two, usually because the couple marries for the wrong reasons. Perhaps, the union was “what was expected of them”: in other words, social, familial or peer pressure before one or both was ready for the emotional commitment. Or perhaps they had great sexual chemistry but poor communication skills. And yes, sex is a very important part of marriage. Divorces happen all the time because the sex or passion is not part of the equation. That said, if there is no sexual chemistry between you for whatever the reason, it will have an effect on your marriage, possibly affecting its longevity. Is this reason enough to

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News


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Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Business Directory

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Peninsula Woman

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

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Excerpt: More aware of others in the world Continued from 8 other share accomplishments; women share stories. Welcome to your large, What is All This Hot messy collection of new Flashing About? friends. Today I’ve learned It is said that women as that this is Interstitial Art a group are less linear — between the cracks of thinkers than men are. In set categories . . . aren’t we these pages, you’ll find all all?! kinds of stories . . . like all Some are represented the kinds of women and by large contributions and experiences there are. I am some by small ones . . . all becoming more aware of are important. I hope this trans-gendered, transsexbook will start and conual, bisexual and all the tinue each of you in your many more varieties of collecting, listening to stobeing than just heterosexries, making ART out of ual, traditional Women and your experiences. Couldn’t Men — more options and all the Energy of Hot more tolerance, with celeFlashing, of experiences bration of variety in our exploding, be harnessed to world, I hope. Can we trea- save the Planet . . . or at sure and support each oth- least our Selves! er’s differences? My Life so Far, My Life I have collected and as a Woman — is tied to arranged these contribumy journaling. I write daily, tions in a non-linear way, now on computer, have like the stories told around sketch books and journals a late-night bottle of wine from since I was a teen. I by long-term and new realized again today that if friends. Long ago I noticed I could not write down, draw out all the ideas, that men meeting each

rages, dreams percolating in my brain, I’d probably end up in a corner sucking my thumb. Mom used to tell us endless stories, talking about “when I was a boy,” an only girl in a family of boys, like me. Later she said she didn’t look at men, couldn’t tell one from another. In me, she raised a lover and a victim of men, and I’m hoping that the lover wins out in the end, knowing that I must keep learning to love Myself, before I can love others well. Women as Friends has come later in life for me, but not less precious. My message in all my work: sharing some of the tools to live responsibly and creatively within your own personal talents and interests. Be what YOU can be: the best, the most, the happiest, the most successful in creating your own perfect existence. I am putting more of myself and more interactiveness into this

Hot Flash book. My books and classes, art work, and online presence is so much an outflowing of who I am. Each contributor to this book and all of you with whom I’ve discussed the project over the last eight years of its gestation process are included in spirit. Each time I do a project like this, I put more of my self in, and people respond, because we recognize our selves in others. Sharing validates our own experiences. We are probably not as old, stupid, inept or alone as we sometimes think . . . so read, laugh, cry and reach out to others. I think that learning to tell our own truths, developing that skill over time, continuing to work at it as a high-priority, lifetime project is what lights my own fires, and also shines as a beacon to and from other women I’ve been meeting via the Internet. The HOT FLASH book has

grown from who I am, and who and what I attract to myself. I’m thinking about a workbook sort of thing, perhaps rituals — my skeptical and spiritual sides coexist in a sometimes uneasy truce. Whatever it becomes, it has to be honest. It must be something that I would enjoy discovering and exploring if someone else had done it.

Symptoms of Menopause “The hardest years in life are those between ten and seventy.” — Helen Hayes, at 75 Human females are different from other animals in having menstruation and ceasing to be able to reproduce after only half our lives have passed — at least in this age of modern medicine. Susun Weed sees the years between potential motherhood and the wise, whole “crone” as the

menopausal years, in most women, from the mid-forties to the early sixties. When is the HOT FLASH period? What should we call it? Many women don’t like to think of ourselves as “Crones.” How about seeing the stages as Potential Mothers to Hot Flashers to Wise Women? We have Feelings about Fat, Feelings about Age, Feelings about Dependence, Feelings about Wrinkles and the effects of gravity on flesh. We are examining our roles in life and thinking about which ones to keep, which ones we want to add. We wonder why we have suddenly become invisible to construction workers and advertising executives. By finding remarkable role models and sharing stories, we hope to create rewarding futures for ourselves. — From Hot Flash! A Celebration by Pamela Hastings

Lavin: Readers bash the moochers in their lives and women. Wake up! Let’s start a campaign to socialize in mixed groups — men and women together, and minimize the one-on-one crazy relationships until we find out about each other. When I was in my 20s, we were big on socializing in groups and learning about each other. Everyone

couples until they really treated each other with get to know each other? respect. We had common interests and career aspira_______ tions. It’s time to do it Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales again.

from the Front at her home office

in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.talesfromthefront. com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.

Cheryl What do you think of Paula’s suggestion that men and women spend more time socializing in groups and less time as

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Continued from 2 nificant other” or spouse who was selfish. This appears to be a I had split the beneficiaries of my 401k and my life learned behavior. When you look at the family of insurance policy three ways, between my son, my selfish people, you find that apples don’t fall far from granddaughter and Dan. When Dan changed jobs, trees. Deep Pockets is so much he called his youngest better off without this daughter and told her he leech. had just put her name on his life insurance policy so Paula she would be responsible for his funeral. This just Why would Deep Pockcrushed me. ets allow someone to treat What I should have her in such a manner for done is contacted my insur- 10 years? ance company and investI may not be the brightment firm immediately and est person, but why are taken Dan’s name off of some grown women allowthem as a beneficiary. In ing some men to treat front of him! them like something to be At some point we stop discarded? Where is a being victims and become woman’s self-respect, selfvolunteers! I’ve met both esteem and personal digmen and women who have nity? been involved with a “sigI say to the single men


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Sunday, December 5, 2010

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Your Problem Solvers: Beautiful, Complimentary Gift Wrap, Local Delivery & Shipping Available! Cards for every occasion! • Holidays • anniversaries • BirtHdays For ALL thE thiNgS thAt MAKE LiFE diviNE: Weddings graduations • sometHing for everyone

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Necessities & Temptations is doing a

“Trade-in Event” for the Homeless.

Traditional Candy Canes and more from Hammond’s

1995

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Our Playful Mr. Parker, Jen, Sarah, New Christmas DeeDee, Robin, Katherine, Collectibles Bo, Becky, Chris, Edna & Kringlekins Poseable Elves Sandy say: “Visit our trees; they’re

amazing!”

Trade in a coat in any size or shape, clean with all its buttons and working zippers for $20 on the purchase of any new coat from Necessities & Temptations. Hats, gloves and scarves all have a “trade-in” value of $2.00 Shoveling snow inspired the staff to do this trade-in event for those folks who need coats, hats, scarves and gloves so desperately. The event will continue through December, 2010.

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