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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS March 10, 2014 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Housing market hopes abound

Powerful artistic statements

‘Solid year’ eyed despite local dip BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A decorated vinyl wrap adorns a utility box at the corner of Sequim Avenue and Washington Street in Sequim. The wrap was designed by Jamestown S’Klallam totem designer Dale Faustich and sponsored by the tribe. City officials are seeking design submissions and sponsorships to decorate more utility boxes.

Sequim seeks decorations on city utility boxes Design submissions, sponsors wanted for downtown work

tions director. “We’d like to do more.” Three boxes were wrapped in vinyl prints of scenes designed by local artists as part of the city’s centennial celebration in 2013. Gary Robertson’s design of Sequim’s outdoors adorns a box at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Washington Street.

“It makes them just so much more interesting than the drab boxes,” she said.

QR code art

Each utility box has a label with a QR code on it so those carrying smart phones can scan them for more inforBY JOE SMILLIE mation on the art. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Those that have been put up already were sponsored by local organizations Decorative dreamscape SEQUIM –– After getting positive for $1,500 each, with $500 going to the feedback about three utility boxes Karelyn Ghormley’s dreamscape of artist and $1,000 to production and wrapped in vinyl art scenes depicting the valley is around a box at Third Ave- installation. life in the Dungeness Valley, city offinue and Washington Street. To submit a design or sponsor a box, cials are looking for more artists and Jamestown S’Klallam totem designer contact Hanna at 360-681-3422 or sponsors to expand the public art instal- Dale Faustich’s tribal print is featured bhanna@sequimwa.gov. lation. on the box at the corner of Sequim Ave________ “People really seem to like them, and nue and Washington Street. we’ve gotten lots of good, positive comHanna said the city has identified Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Joe Smillie ments on them,” said Barbara Hanna, four more utility boxes it would like to can be reached at 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at the city’s marketing and communicawrap with art featuring designs by locals. jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

PORT ANGELES –– Though the influential Seattle housing market has dipped early in 2014, local real estate trackers have few fears a two-month drop will prevent buyers looking here from across Puget Sound. “I would hasten to tell you that it can be very misleading to take just a two-month picture of real estate activities and attempt to deduce trends,” Dick Pilling, communications chair for the Port Angeles Association of Realtors, said. “I think we’re lined up to have another pretty solid year.” Real estate data from Clallam County as a whole is difficult to assemble, as sales in Port Angeles and Sequim are tracked by the local Olympic Multiple Listing Service, while others are tracked by the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. “I don’t think I’d do a great job of tracking the Seattle market, so I don’t know how good a job Seattle would do of tracking our market,” Pilling said.

Seattle’s sway Nevertheless, the metro Seattle market has a big influence on North Olympic Peninsula real estate. “The people you typically see buying homes in Port Townsend and Jefferson County are those with second homes or retirees that have finally been able to make the jump,” he said. “A lot of that comes from Seattle.” February 2014 home sales in the Seattle area were 10.4 percent below the February 2013 pace, and the median price paid dropped from $410,000 to $405,400, according to the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. TURN

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Nippon is nearly Drones, OMC bills passed chambers Eye on Olympia back in operation Both OK measure on BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Workers returned to the Nippon Paper Industries USA plant Sunday to bring the facility back into full operation after a two-week repair closure. The plant, shuttered to work on the company’s $85 million biomass cogeneration plant, saw some systems up and running while others remained shut down as of Sunday afternoon, a union official said. “Number 8, the old boiler, is running,” said Darrel Reetz, vice

president of Association of Western Pulp & Paper Workers Local 155, on Sunday.

Biomass not burning yet The biomass plant had not yet begun operating as of Sunday afternoon, but, “they’re getting things going,” Reetz said. Crews encountered mechanical and electrical difficulties with several key systems in the paper plant itself Sunday — problems similar to those a car might have after not being used for some time, he said. TURN

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state use of aircraft BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIA — Bills supported by North Olympic Peninsula legislators governing unmanned aerial vehicle use by state agencies and increasing Medicaid reimbursements for Olympic Medical Center to $1 million more annually have passed both chambers of the state Legislature. The full state House of Representatives and Senate floor votes

came last week as legislators work to wrap up the 60-day 2014 legislative session by Thursday. “All the talk is not to [extend state and local the session],” said state Sen. Jim law enforceHargrove, D-Hoquiam. ment would have to get Warrant required approval from Hargrove said Friday that the their respecHouse companion of a Senate bill tive governing he introduced that would require body to purstate or local law enforcement chase drones. The bill, agencies obtain a warrant before using unmanned aerial vehicles, EHB 2789, Hargrove or drones, for surveillance passed passed 83-15 in the House on Feb. 17 with Har46-1 in the Senate on Friday. Agencies still could use drones grove’s 24th District colleagues, in emergency situations, fire pro- state reps. Steve Tharinger and Kevin Van De Wege, both Sequim tection, and wildlife and environDemocrats, voting in favor. mental research under the bill, TURN TO DRONES/A8 Hargrove explained, though both

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1190 E. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382

98th year, 59th issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

(800) 998-4131 • (360) 683-4131 Real Estate - Sequim

Congratulations Tom Williamson & Karen Pritchard

To Contact Tom & Karen please call 360-460-9973 or email Karen@olypen.com

Tom & Karen Realtor™

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John L. Scott is proud to announce Team Tom & Karen for achieving Presidents Gold 2013. Congratulations we are so proud of you.

CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION PENINSULA POLL

B5 B4 A9 B4 A8 B4 B10 A3 A2

*PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS WEATHER WORLD

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UpFront

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2014, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2014, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Demme to sell art collection A RIOT OF color greeted Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme the first time he walked into Haitian Corner, an art gallery around the corner from his Manhattan apartment. Instantly transfixed, he left with a $250 painting by Haitian master Wilson Bigaud. The Demme seed was planted. Demme’s appreciation for work by self-taught Haitian painters like Bigaud and Hector Hyppolite flowered into an obsession that he fed with multiple trips to the cash-poor but artistically rich island nation, where he learned Creole and shot two documentaries. “If you’re falling in love with a country, falling in love with their art is a great lubricant and a great

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

“President Nixon and Family” by Edger JeanBaptiste is one of many pieces of art to be sold by Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme. elixir,” Demme said. “Haitian art led me to Haiti for the first time, and I discovered a great country and a great people, and the art takes on a greater meaning for me now.” Now 70 and having spent the better part of three decades amassing pieces from Haiti and other Caribbean countries as well as the United States, South America and Africa, the director of “The Silence of the Lambs” said he’s looking to “streamline and

simplify” his life by selling 90 percent of his wellregarded collection of selftaught or “outsider” art. More than 900 pieces — many of them by artists with little or no formal training but abundant talent — will be auctioned at Philadelphia’s Material Culture on March 29-30. The sale will be preceded by a weeklong exhibition free to the public. The auction is expected to bring in $1 million to $1.4 million.

Passings

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: So far, the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”) has . . .? Helped me/my family Had no effect I don’t know

stopped fighting, until the end of his strength, for culture in Europe.” Teatro Real, where Mr. Mortier Mr. Mortier in 2008 was serving as artistic adviser, said in a statement: “He contributed to promoting Spain’s operatic and cultural landscape and placing the Teatro Real among the world’s leading international opera houses.” Mr. Mortier became the director of Belgium’s National Operation, known

as La Monnaie, in 1981, steering it away from “bourgeois” entertainment and to international recognition and acclaim. He did so without relying on “star” singers, some of whom he considered little more than hired voices, and instead looked for the best stage directors who would immerse themselves in his vision. At a time when much of opera was still ensconced in the regalia of “old” art, Mr. Mortier relied on people such as director Peter Sellars and composer Philip Glass to push the artistic envelope, sometimes to a breaking point.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1939 (75 years ago) Clallam County’s Pomona Grange, which recently adopted a resolution asking the federal government to promote development of the county’s manganese resources, especially as a strategic war material, has received replies from the state’s two U.S. senators and U.S. Rep. Mon Wallgren. All three assured the Grange of their desires to help in the matter. Sen. Lewis B. Schwellenbach, D-Spokane, said he plans to appear before the Senate Military Affairs Committee when it considers a bill proposing federal accumulation of strategic material. Congressman Wallgren, D-Everett, whose 2nd District includes Clallam and

34.8%

Hurt me/my family

By The Associated Press

GERARD MORTIER, 70, a Belgian opera director whose nonconformist style often grated the traditionbound elite and who became a fiercely avantgarde impresario, has died. Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo made the announcement Sunday, and the country’s media said Mr. Mortier died the day before at his home in Brussels after a protracted battle with pancreatic cancer. Di Rupo called Mr. Mortier a “visionary and generous personality,” praise echoed by French President Francois Hollande, who said, “He never

17.3%

Jefferson counties, acknowledged the Grange manganese resolution as well as another urging reestablishment of a U.S. Weather Bureau station in Port Angeles.

1964 (50 years ago) Sequim Mayor Max Schmuck brought before the Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce a proposed direct-dialing system between Sequim and Port Angeles that would allow toll-free calls. The chamber went on record as favoring the extended service through Pacific Northwest Bell Co. The issue of extended dialing and the costs associated with it was raised a year ago by the Sequim Prairie Grange. In a Feb. 13 letter from

Uncertainty is high at Peninsula Plywood, where union workers have appealed to the parent corporation that wants to sell the mill by wearing buttons that say: “ITT, don’t sell us out.” Workers are worried that they will lose their jobs when owner ITT Rayonier Inc. either sells the mill or closes the 48-yearold plywood plant on the Port Angeles waterfront. The mill employs about 170.

9.9%

Total votes cast: 1,513 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

Laugh Lines WE WERE ALMOST obliterated by a giant asteroid the other day. According to NASA, a 100-foot-wide asteroid came within 216,000 miles of Earth. The asteroid actually got closer to the Earth than the moon. Then the moon got all jealous and went through the Earth’s text messages. Jimmy Kimmel

the state Utilities and Seen Around Transportation CommisPeninsula snapshots sion, Pacific Northwest Bell was requested to poll teleOLDER phone customers of both GENTLEMAN Sequim and Port Angeles exchanges on their desires VOLUNTEER cleaning up and weeding Port Angeles for direct dialing. High School tennis courts ...

1989 (25 years ago)

38.1%

Corrections and clarifications

■ Clallam County sheriff’s deputies are looking for Andrew Donald Luquette, 31, and Ronnie Lee Bayley, 37, both described as transients from the Sequim area, in connection with a home break-in along Woodcock Road between Cays and Towne roads in Sequim. Cays Road was misidentified in an article on the investigation Sunday on Page A8.

■ Sequim-area resident Robert Beebe is the lone candidate on the ballot for the Clallam Conservation District supervisor election March 20, while on the Jefferson County Conservation District, only ChairWANTED! “Seen Around” woman Julie Boggs of Chiitems recalling things seen on the macum filed for the seat North Olympic Peninsula. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box available and was named 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax to it without a vote. A 360-417-3521; or email news@ headline on Page A7 Sunpeninsuladailynews.com. day implied there would be elections in both counties.

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Lottery LAST NIGHT’S LOTTERY results are available on a timely basis by phoning, toll-free, 800-545-7510 or on the Internet at www. walottery.com/Winning Numbers.

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, March 10, the 69th day of 2014. There are 296 days left in the year. Today’s Highlights in History: ■ On March 10, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln signed an order assigning Ulysses S. Grant, who had just received his commission as lieutenant-general, to the command of the Armies of the United States. On this date: ■ In 1785, Thomas Jefferson was appointed America’s minister to France, succeeding Benjamin Franklin. ■ In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell’s assistant, Thomas Watson, heard Bell say over his experimen-

tal telephone: “Mr. Watson — come here — I want to see you.” ■ In 1880, the Salvation Army arrived in the United States from England. ■ In 1933, a magnitude 6.4 earthquake centered off Long Beach, Calif., resulted in 120 deaths. ■ In 1949, Nazi wartime broadcaster Mildred E. Gillars, also known as “Axis Sally,” was convicted in Washington, D.C., of treason. She served 12 years in prison. ■ In 1969, James Earl Ray pleaded guilty in Memphis, Tenn., to assassinating civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

■ In 1973, the Pink Floyd album “The Dark Side of the Moon” was first released in the U.S. by Capitol Records. ■ In 1985, Konstantin U. Chernenko, who was the Soviet Union’s leader for just 13 months, died at age 73. ■ In 1993, Dr. David Gunn was shot to death outside a Pensacola, Fla., abortion clinic. Shooter Michael Griffin is serving a life sentence. ■ Ten years ago: Teenage sniper Lee Boyd Malvo, 19, was sentenced in Chesapeake, Va., to life in prison for his role in the October 2002 killing rampage in the Washington, D.C., area that

left 10 people dead ■ Five years ago: A gunman, 28-year-old Michael McLendon, killed 10 people, including his mother, four other relatives and the wife and child of a local sheriff’s deputy across two rural Alabama counties before committing suicide. ■ One year ago: The president of Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai, accused the Taliban and the U.S. of working in concert to convince Afghans that violence would worsen if most foreign troops left — an allegation the top American commander in Afghanistan, Gen. Joseph Dunford, rejected as “categorically false.”


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, March 10, 2014 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Witness from shoe-bomb plot to testify today NEW YORK — The trial of Osama bin Laden’s son-in-law and al-Qaida spokesman after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks resumes today with the airing of testimony from a London resident who said he participated in a 2001 shoe-bomb plot. Saajid Badat will testify live via videotape from London at the New York trial of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith about his experiences with al-Qaida after the attacks that demolished the World Trade Center. Prosecutors are using the testimony to try to show that Abu Ghaith knew of al-Qaida’s plans when he promised in videotapes sent across the world in the weeks after the Sept. 11 attacks that “the storm of airplanes will not abate” against Americans and advised Muslims in America and Great Britain to stay off aircraft. Abu Ghaith, born in Kuwait, faces a possible life prison sentence if he is convicted of conspiring to kill Americans and of providing material support to alQaida.

Obama to visit Ukraine WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will meet this week with Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk, the White House said Sunday, in a prominent show of U.S. support for Ukraine’s fledgling new government. Vice President Joe Biden cut short his trip to Latin America, nixing a planned stop in the

Dominican Republic so he can attend Wednesday’s meeting, an aide to Biden said. Biden had been the White House’s Obama prime point of contact with Ukraine’s president, Viktor Yanukovich, before he fled to Russia last month following violent clashes in Kiev. Obama’s White House meeting with Yatsenyuk will focus on options to peacefully resolve Russia’s military invention in the Ukrainian region of Crimea, the White House said, adding that the resolution must respect Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.

73 arrested at bash AMHERST, Mass. — A pre-St. Patrick’s Day celebration near the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts spiraled out of control, pitting police in riot gear against thousands of drunken and unruly revelers at the annual “Blarney Blowout.” Seventy-three people were arrested, and four officers were injured in the clashes. Authorities spent most of Saturday trying to disperse several large gatherings around the UMass campus for the party traditionally held the Saturday before spring break, Amherst police said. The partying carried into early Sunday, and Amherst police Capt. Jennifer Gundersen said police were busy with numerous reports of fights, noise and highly intoxicated individuals. The Associated Press

No consensus found on data breach cases System lacking for notifying those affected BY ERIC TUCKER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The data breach at Target Corp. that exposed millions of credit card numbers has focused attention on the patchwork of state consumer notification laws and renewed a push for a single national standard. Most states have laws that require retailers to disclose data breaches, but the laws vary wildly. Consumers in one state might learn immediately that their personal information had been exposed, but that might not happen in another state, and notification requirements for businesses depend on where their customers are located. Attorney General Eric Holder

The issue gained fresh urgency as part of a larger security debate after data breaches involving retailers Neiman Marcus and Target. Target, the nation’s secondlargest retail discounter, has said 40 million credit and debit card accounts were exposed between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15. The company went public with the breach Dec. 19, several days after it said it learned of the probHurdles remain lem and soon after the news Despite general agreement on began leaking online. the value of a national standard, there are obstacles to a straight- Target fallout forward compromise: ■ Consumer groups don’t want Since then, sales, profit and to weaken existing protections in stock prices have dropped, the states with the strongest laws. company’s chief information offi■ Retailers want laws that cer has resigned and banks and are less burdensome to comply retailers are facing continued with and said too much notifica- scrutiny about what more can be tion could cause consumers to done to protect consumer data. tune out the problem. The Justice Department is ■ Congress is looking at dif- investigating the data theft, and ferent proposals for how any fed- Holder urged Congress in a video eral standard should be enforced statement last month to adopt a and what the threshold should be national notification standard before notification requirements that would include exemptions for kick in. harmless breaches. has joined the call for a nationwide notification standard, but divisions persist, making a consensus questionable this year. “We’re stuck with the stateby-state approach unless some compromise gets done at the federal level,” said Peter Swire, a privacy expert at Georgia Tech and a former White House privacy official.

Briefly: World ence in Crimea, a part of Ukraine since 1954, and pro-Russia forces keep pushing for a KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia vote in favor of — Vietnamese authorities reunification searching waters for the missing with Moscow Putin Boeing 777 jetliner spotted an in a referenobject Sunday that they susdum the local parliament has pected was one of the plane’s scheduled for next Sunday. doors, as international intelliPresident Barack Obama has gence agencies joined the inves- warned that the March 16 vote tigation into two passengers would violate international law. who boarded the aircraft with stolen passports. Envoy: No recognition The object was found in CAIRO — Arab foreign minwaters about 56 miles south of isters rejected Israel’s Tho Chu island in the same area where oil slicks were spot- demands that the Palestinians recognize it as a Jewish state, ted Saturday. saying such a move would More than a day and a half undermine the rights of Palesafter Malaysia Airlines Flight tinian refugees. MH370 went missing with 239 In a resolution released Sunpeople, no confirmed debris from day at the headquarters of the the plane had been found, and Arab League in Cairo, the forthe final minutes before it diseign ministers called the issue appeared remain a mystery. of Palestinian refugees an integral part of a comprehensive Putin backs vote and just peace. KIEV, Ukraine — Russian Israeli Prime Minister BenjaPresident Vladimir Putin on min Netanyahu said last week Sunday defended the separatist the Palestinians must recognize drive in the disputed Crimean Israel as a Jewish state to show Peninsula as in keeping with they are serious about peace. international law, but Ukraine’s It was the latest sign that prime minister vowed not to despite seven months of mediarelinquish “a single centimeter” tion efforts by U.S. Secretary of of his country’s territory. State John Kerry, wide gaps Over the weekend, the Krem- remain between the two sides. The Associated Press lin beefed up its military pres-

Object thought to be missing plane’s door

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PAINT

THE TOWNSFOLK RED

A Hindu man pours a bucket of colored water on a woman outside a temple before the procession for the Lathmar Holi festival in Barsana, India, on Sunday.

Democrats, GOP test out fall plans in Florida House race BY MICHAEL J. MISHAK THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Voters in this stretch of beach towns and retirement communities provide the first 2014 campaign test of whether Democrats can counter GOP attacks on the president’s health care overhaul by accusing Republicans of threatening popular benefit programs for the elderly. Democrat Alex Sink and her allies in the spirited race to replace the late U.S. Rep. Bill

Quick Read

Young in the House have spent millions of dollars on TV ads ahead of Tuesday’s special election painting Republican David Jolly as an extremist who wants to privatize Social Security and gut Medicare.

Senior relatives Jolly has responded with a TV spot featuring his elderly mother and aunt, in which he said “protecting their Social Security means everything to me.” Jolly argues that it is Sink who

would undermine Medicare because of Democratic-passed cuts to the program under President Barack Obama’s health care law. The suburban St. Petersburg district is considered a proving ground for each party’s political messages and a possible bellwether for the midterm elections. Officials in both parties have said in recent days that private polls show the race to be close. Each has made late appeals for campaign cash.

. . . more news to start your day

West: State oversight may tame California pot shops

Nation: Woman’s finger nearly bitten off in brawl

Nation: ‘300’ sequel wins with $45.1 million debut

World: Venezuela claims debt to Panama is fraud

A CALIFORNIA LAWMAKER has introduced legislation to regulate the state’s free-wheeling medical marijuana industry — the farmers that grow the drug, the hundreds of storefront shops that sell it and the doctors who write recommendations allowing its use. The state in 1996 was the first to authorize marijuana use for health purposes — there are now 20. The bill introduced by state Sen. Lou Correa marks a milestone not only because it would provide significant state oversight of the multi-billion dollar industry for the first time, but because it is likely to get serious consideration in Sacramento after years of inaction.

POLICE SAID A dispute over a parking spot at a southern New Jersey mall ended when a woman bit and almost severed the finger of another driver. The fight at the Cherry Hill Mall involved three women and occurred around 4:30 p.m. Saturday outside Nordstrom’s. Details about the dispute were not disclosed, but authorities said it began as a verbal argument before it turned physical. The injured woman was a 42-yearold Philadelphia resident. She was in stable condition at a hospital.

THE “300” SEQUEL “Rise of an Empire” ravaged the post-Oscars boxoffice weekend with a domestic debut of $45.1 million but an even bigger international haul of $87.8 million. The film didn’t come close the North American debut of Zack Snyder’s 2007 original ($70.9 million and without the benefit of 3-D ticket prices), but it performed like a blockbuster overseas. The week’s other new wide release, 20th Century Fox’s animated “Mr. Peabody & Sherman,” opened in second with $32.5 million. Though the performance was better than some expected, it’s a low total for a film that cost about $140 million to make.

VENEZUELA’S FOREIGN MINISTER said 90 percent of his government’s $1 billion debt to Panama is fraudulent and criminal charges are likely to result. Jaua’s comments Sunday come after Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro broke relations with Panama last week over its call for the Organization of American States to discuss a crackdown on protests in Venezuela. Elias Jaua said the government paid Panamanian businessmen for imports that never arrived, so Panama isn’t owed a claimed 90 percent of the debt from these transactions.


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MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim to hear new noise ordinance City to consider adopting state sound standards BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM –– Residents and businesses in the city may soon have to watch exactly how much noise they are pumping out. A number of complaints about noisy neighbors in the last year has prompted city officials to review how they determine violations of the noise ordinance, and the proposed new revisions include precise measurements of that noise.

City Council members will conduct a hearing at 6 p.m. today on the proposed ordinance before considering adoption. The hearing will be in the Sequim Transit Center, 190 W. Cedar St. The new ordinance would adopt state noise standards that require the city use a special meter to measure actual decibel levels. City Attorney Craig Ritchie said the new code lends more actual measurements to the city code that is currently based on complaints by neighbors. “As the code is now, if people complain it’s too noisy, then it’s too noisy,” Ritchie said. “So it’s not all that helpful.” Ritchie noted most all those who have received complaints

about their noise levels have adjusted. “Frankly, we haven’t had problems where people don’t obey when police tell them to turn it down,” he said.

Prompted by restaurant case Earlier this year, the city received a number of complaints about noise coming from Krush, the Rock Plaza restaurant that recently closed. “That was what made us look at getting an ordinance together that is a little more clear,” Ritchie said. “And this one is because we’ll have measurements. A decibel’s a decibel.” Chris Hugo, community development director, said the proposed new law expands the half-page

existing ordinance to five pages. “That’s what it took to make our activities legal and defensible and objective,” Hugo said. A noise meter and an instrument to keep it calibrated would cost almost $1,000. Police or the city’s code compliance officer would respond to noise complaints to measure noise on the spot. A violation would be registered if noise was measured at louder than 55 decibels — a normal conversational speech volume — at another residence more than 50 feet away in residential neighborhoods. In commercial areas, noise could be up to 57 decibels. Those limits would fall by 10 decibels after 10 p.m. Violators would receive a civil

Group’s new logo invokes city’s nearby natural facets BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The saw blade simply didn’t cut it. After a lukewarm reception to a proposed new logo for the Port Angeles Downtown Association that included the silhouette of a saw blade, association board members continued to work with the North-Carolinabased consultant that developed the design to come up with something different, association board president Bob Lumens said Friday. The result was a tweaked logo, with an anchor and mountains replacing the blade, and a new tagline: “Soaring Heights, Surprising Depths.”

Varied experiences Lumens said the new tagline, which replaces “From rough cut, to fine grain,” is meant to convey the varied experiences available in Port Angeles between the mountains and the water. “In other words, there’s a whole lot more here than you see,” Lumens said. Lumens said the association’s board of directors approved the new design

PORT ANGELES DOWNTOWN ASSOCIATION

The Port Angeles Downtown Association approved the group’s new logo created by Arnett Muldrow and Associates of Greenville, S.C. formally during a meeting in January and displayed it at the association’s booth at the KONP Home Show in Port Angeles March 1.

Re-branding effort The new logo is part of a larger re-branding effort for the downtown being sponsored by the association, which paid Arnett Muldrow and Associates of Greenville, S.C., $12,000 to develop a new logo, tagline and marketing plans. The original logo was presented by the consulting firm during a September meeting, during which

potential ads and other marketing materials using the same motif were also discussed. The presentation followed brainstorming sessions earlier in the week during which the consultant gleaned from residents, business owners and city officials what makes downtown unique.

Same coloring

“The tagline will be used some places; it won’t be used other places,” Lumens said. “It doesn’t have to be part of everything.” Lumens said the association’s marketing committee began working on changes to the logo not long after the September meeting, adding that the full board of directors also discussed the designs during at least two regular board meetings.

Still work to do Though the logo has been voted on, Lumens said the association’s work with Arnett Muldrow and Associates is not over, adding that the consultant is now working to develop street light banners with the logo motif and a redesign for the association’s website. Lumens said a possible name change for the association is also being considered. “That’s part of it that we’re still massaging,” Lumens said.

The new logo keeps the original forest green and tan_______ nish yellow and the basic Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can layout of the original, with be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. the focus still being the words 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula “Downtown Port Angeles.” dailynews.com.

Briefly . . . Jefferson GOP Women set to meet PORT LUDLOW — The Republican Women of Jefferson County will meet at the Inn at Port Ludlow, 1 Heron Road, at 11:30 a.m. Thursday. Gift boxes will be packed for the military. For more information, phone Peggy Reep at 360385-4953.

Nia intro class PORT ANGELES — White belt Nia instructor Suzie Bliven will lead an introduction to nia at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., at 8 a.m. Thursday. Nia is a sensory-based movement practice that draws from martial arts, dance arts and healing arts. The movements are designed to allow people of all fitness levels to participate. The free class is taken

Rheumatoid Arthritis or Bacterial Infection? Health Notes by Kevin Borde, R.Ph.

Later that same day at the Sequim Police Department, Gockerell SEQUIM — A allegedly struggled with Sequim man accused of Deputy Matt Murphy driving into a building for his pistol. with a van and assaultMurphy’s hand was ing two deputies before cut and required three he was subdued with a stitches, the Sheriff’s stun gun in January Office said. will have to complete a Troberg said the sendrug treatment program tence was based on the or face prison time after fact that Gockerell was being sentenced in the likely under the influcase last week. ence of heavy methamDanphetamine use. iel G. “He fairly obviously Gockerhad some kind of methell, 54, amphetamine-induced will psychosis,” Troberg said. serve no If Gockerell does not addicomplete the minimum tional 90-day drug treatment jail time Gockerell program, Troberg said after he he could face between 12 was sentenced to 364 and 16 months in prison. days in jail, with 60 Gockerell will also days credit for time serve two years of served and 304 days supervised release suspended sentence, said John Troberg, chief through the state criminal deputy Clallam Department of Corrections, Troberg added. County prosecuting Gockerell must also attorney. pay $1,400 in fines and Gockerell pleaded court fees, with a restiguilty Feb. 19 to two tution hearing set for counts of third-degree June 6. assault against a police After Gockerell was officer and one count arrested, deputies found each of attempted disarming of a police officer, one rifle in the shed where he was subdued fourth-degree assault/ and five more in the domestic violence, hit garage of the nearby and run property damhome. age and unlawful posGockerell also had session of a firearm. reportedly punched a Gockerell was subwoman in the head at dued with a stun gun his home just as law and arrested at his Belfield Avenue home in enforcement arrived, Sequim Jan. 7 soon after according to the Sherhe drove a minivan into iff’s Office. The unidena nearby building supply tified woman was taken store and, after he drove to Olympic Medical to his home about a mile Center for treatment. away, punched a Clallam _________ County Sheriff’s deputy Reporter Jeremy Schwartz in the head during a can be reached at 360-452struggle in a shed about 2345, ext. 5074, or at 20 feet away from the jschwartz@peninsuladaily house. news.com. BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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care for various orchid varieties and answer questions to help any level of a hobby orchid enthusiast. Guests are welcome to the meeting. For more information, phone 360-385-3723.

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E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 7 p.m. Thursday. The free concert will feature two vocal jazz ensembles, combos and solos, all in a cappella style. The ensemble is back from performing at the annual Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival at the University of Idaho, where close to 5,000 students participate in everything from performance clinics to afternoon Young Artists Concerts, workshops, eveVocal jazz concert ning concerts and more. For more information on PORT ANGELES — becoming a part of the The Peninsula College Vocal Jazz Ensemble, email Vocal Jazz Ensemble will perform at its winter-quar- Elaine Gardner-Morales at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS egardner@pencol.edu. ter concert in the Little Theater at the college, 1502 SEQUIM — The OlymPeninsula Daily News pic Peninsula’s Orchid Society will host Alan Mathews of Seattle Orchid at 170 Flying Cloud St. at 1 p.m. Thursday. Mathews will discuss

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Bacteria that produce Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) symptoms include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium marinum,  and Borrelia Burgdorferi. In fact, before Lyme Disease was recognized in 1975, doctors in Lyme, CT were perplexed because a number of children were displaying symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis, which actually turned out to be caused by infections from ticks carrying the Borrelia bacteria. If RA symptoms are caused by bacteria as opposed to an autoimmune reaction, treatment with conventional drugs like methotrexate, prednisone, Enbrel®, Humira®, or Remicade® can worsen the condition. This is because these drugs treat RA by suppressing the immune system. Therefore, if you have Rheumatoid Arthritis and you aren’t responding to therapy, be sure to discuss this possibility with your doctor or our pharmacist.

barefoot and is open to children and adults. No equipment or experience is necessary. Participants may wish to bring a water bottle and wear loose clothing. This workout is the third in the library’s “Get Moving!” series. For more information on this and other upcoming events, visit www.nols.org and click on “Events” and “Port Angeles” or phone 360-417-8500.

infraction for a first offense. Repeat offenses within 24 hours could garner a fee of $100 a day for every day the noise violation continued. Construction projects and parades would be exempt between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. Appeals of noise complaints would be heard by a hearings examiner, Ritchie said. “It’s unfortunate we have to have the five-page code to do such things, when in the past you could just ask your neighbor to be quiet, or more quiet,” Council member Laura Dubois said during the last City Council meeting.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

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Man guilty of assault on police officer PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Sequim man is set to be sentenced March 18 after a Clallam County jury convicted him last week of trying to run over a Port Angeles police officer in May and telling a woman with him that day to lie about what happened. Jacob Kendall Backman, 36, was convicted by a Clallam County jury Thursday of second-degree assault and witness tampering, according to the Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. The jury found the assault charge to be aggravated because the victim was an on-duty police officer, the Prosecutor’s Office said, so Backman faces a possible sentence of 10 years. Court documents give this account: Port Angeles Officer Bruce Fernie responded to a report of possible drug activity on East Second Street on May 13. When Fernie approached a white truck driven by Backman and signaled the vehicle to stop at about

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

GOLD STAR

CEREMONY HONORS FALLEN

Jeff McFarland of Port Angeles, a member of the American Legion Riders, salutes after a gold star banner honoring U.S. Army Sgt. Benjamin Brand is posted on a light pole in front of the Clallam County Courthouse in Port Angeles on Friday. Brand, who had ties to Port Angeles, died while serving with the army’s 78th Aviation Battalion in December 2011.

6:40 p.m., Backman quickly accelerated, causing Fernie to run, then push off the truck as it passed to avoid being run over. Backman wrote a letter from jail to his woman passenger telling her what to testify to, and that she should “remember” a statement differently than what she told police, resulting in the tampering conviction. The woman said Backman had instructed her to say that Fernie was farther away from the truck than she initially had told police and asked her to say Backman drove “slowly” past the officer. Backman also told the woman to say Fernie hit the truck with his hand twice while saying “stop,” which she said she did not remember happening, and that Backman had the hood of his dark brown sweatshirt up the whole time, which the woman said he did not. Backman has previous felony convictions for robbery, drugs, firearms and malicious mischief, according to the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office.

Both chambers to mull Russian sanctions PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

WASHINGTON — This week, the House will take up Medicare payment rates to doctors and the protection of private water rights, while the Senate will debate child care and development grants to states. Both chambers will vote on a bill imposing economic sanctions on Russia.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Whidbey Island) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Gig Harbor). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Kilmer, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-2280514); Murray, 202-2242621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Kilmer, 202-225-5916. Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; kilmer.house.gov. Kilmer’s North Olympic Peninsula is located at 332 E. Fifth St. in Port Angeles. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. It is staffed by Judith Morris, who may be contacted at judith. morris@mail.house.gov or 360-797-3623.

Websites following our state and national legislators: ■ Followthemoney. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■ Vote-Smart.org — How special interest groups rate legislators on the issues. ■ LOAN GUARANTEES FOR UKRAINE: Voting 385 for and 23 against, the House on Thursday passed a bipartisan bill (HR 4152) to allocate up to $1 billion in U.S. taxpayer funds to guarantee private-sector loans obtained by Ukraine to salvage its economy. Now awaiting Senate action, the bill would add Ukraine to the list of countries eligible for loan guarantees from a U.S. Department of State fund established for that purpose. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate. Kilmer voted yes.

■ ENVIRONMENTAL CHECKS ON NUCLEAR PLANTS: Voting 187 for and 220 against, the House on Thursday refused to exempt from HR 2641 (above) projects that involve building nuclear-power plants in earthquake fault zones. A yes vote was in opposition to fast-track reviews of nuclear construction in earthquake-prone areas. Kilmer voted yes.

cent per year per property. This would undercut reforms enacted in 2012 to trim the program’s debt, which stands at $24 billion due largely to covering damages from hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and Sandy in 2012. The bill also would repeal a trigger in the 2012 law that subjects newly sold properties to premiums based on risk rather than subsidies. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate, where progress is expected. Kilmer voted yes.

■ FLOOD-INSURANCE PREMIUMS: Voting 306 for and 91 against, the House on Tuesday passed a bill (HR 3370) to cap National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) premium increases at 18 per-

■ S E X U A L ASSAULTS IN THE MILITARY: Voting 55 for and 45 against, the Senate on Thursday failed to reach 60 votes needed to advance a bill (S 1752) to transfer the military’s handling of sex-

Eye on Congress building, authorizing by permit or helping to fund. Known as Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, these reviews must receive Environmental Protection Agency clearance before the project can proceed. In part, this bill sets a fast-track schedule for completing reviews; limits the number of reviews per project; authorizes states to prepare certain environmental assessments and allows agencies to accept secondary rather than original analyses of environmental impacts. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate, where it is expected to die. Kilmer voted no.

■ REJECTION OF CIVIL RIGHTS NOMINEE: Voting 47 for and 52 against, the Senate on Wednesday failed to reach a majority needed to end a GOP-led filibuster against the nomination of Debo P. Adegbile as assistant attorney general for civil rights. Adegbile, 47, drew criticism over his contribution to a 2009 NAACP Legal Defense Fund brief that argued the jury received improper instructions in the trial of Mumia Abu-Jamal on charges of murdering Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner in 1981. A federal appeals court agreed. Abu-Jamal then received a life sentence, which he is now serving, instead of the death penalty. A yes vote was to advance the nomination. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

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Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Write Van De Wege and

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Sen. Patty Murray D-Whidbey Island

ual-assault cases and certain other major offenses from the chain of command to outside military prosecutors, who would determine whether to file charges. All 100 senators then voted to pass a competing bill (S 1917) that would grade commanders on their record of preventing or dealing with sexual misconduct in their ranks, among other provisions. A yes vote was to remove prosecutorial decisions from the chain of command. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

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Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/ elections/elected_officials. Sen. Maria Cantwell D-Mountlake Terrace aspx.

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MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Area consumers urged to recycle used electronics PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Since E-Cycle Washington started five years ago, more than 212 million pounds of electronics — equal to the weight of 383 fully loaded 787 Dreamliner jets — were recycled, according to the state Department of Ecology. E-waste, or electronic waste, is consumer electronics that no longer work or are outdated and unwanted. It includes computers, other office equipment, TVs, mobile phones, entertainment devices and more.

Recyclable materials But these devices are full of materials such as copper, aluminum, glass and plastics that can be recycled. Washington’s free statewide E-Cycle program provides collection sites for computers including tab-

lets, monitors, e-readers, portable DVD players and TVs. By state law, the E-Cycle program is paid for by the manufacturers of these devices. There are 335 free E-Cycle drop-off sites spread throughout the state, with at least one in every county. In Clallam County, the following businesses are E-Cycle drop-off sites: ■ Port Angeles: Goodwill, 603 S. Lincoln St. ■ Sequim: Goodwill, 680 W. Washington St., Suite C ■ East of Sequim: EcycleNW, 272693 U.S. Highway 101. For more information about E-Cycle Washington, contact Miles Kuntz at Miles.Kuntz@ecy.wa.gov or 360-407-7157, or contact Christine Haun at Christine.Haun@ecy.wa.gov or 360-407-6107 at Ecology.

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A Boy Scout practices welding techniques during a welding course. Enclume in Port Hadlock provided space and equipment for Several scouts during the merit badge clinic.

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Nearly 50 Boy Scouts from as far as Port Angeles and Camano Island came to the Chimacum Stake Center, Enclume Design Products and the Port Townsend Paper Mill recently for an activitypacked merit badge clinic. Scouts sharpened skills such as welding, electronics and pulp and paper making while earning awards and the American Heritage Merit Badge. “One of the joys of Scouting is

that it gives young men a chance to explore career paths or hobbies that they might not otherwise get to experience in schools,” said Lonnie Reynolds, event organizer.

Plumbing skills Scouts in the Plumbing Merit Badge class, for example, practiced threading and soldering pipes, and those in the welding course used equipment and space provided by Enclume in Port Hadlock to tack and weld several plates into joints. The Boy Scouts of Port

Townsend Troops 1477 and 1479 will be hosting a rocket academy at the Port Townsend Scout Cabin at LeRoy Carroll Park on the corner of Mill and Discovery roads from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 29. All boys age 7 to 10 are invited, not just those currently registered as Cub Scouts. For more information about the programs available through the BSA in local communities, email Sean Mobley at smobley@seattle bsa.org or visit www.seattlebsa.org.

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PORT ANGELES — The annual benefit for the Captain Joseph House Foundation, “Forming Foundations for Families,” will take place at C’est Si Bon, 23 Cedar Park Drive, from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, April 5. The cost for the live auction, raffle and dinner is $85 for general admission and $75 for active or retired military veterans. Dinner includes a glass of wine and a choice of filet mignon with mushrooms, sole parchment or tureen of roasted organic vegetables. Proceeds will go toward phase 2 of the remodel to transition a former bed-andbreakfast to a retreat for families of fallen soldiers. For more information or to make reservations, phone Betsy Reed Schultz at 360-460-7848, email betsy.rs@live.com or visit www.captainjosephhouse foundation.org.

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The Jefferson County Master Gardener Foundation is accepting grant applications. Jefferson County residents and schools can apply for grants ranging from $100 to $1,500 per applicant. Applications are due April 1. Since 2008, the foundation has awarded $40,000 back to the community from fundraising events. The criteria for awards includes gardening or horticultural projects that follow environmentally sustainable practices benefiting multiple residents of Jefferson County. For more information, phone 360-385-2019 or 360-301-4087, or email gswilli@earthlink.net. Peninsula Daily News

Growing pains? Andrew May’s garden column. Sundays in

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


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PeninsulaNorthwest

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Houses: Sequim uptick CONTINUED FROM A1 price of $152,450 and list price of $154,450. Sales in Port Angeles Despite the drop, real estate watchers said the were up 34 percent 2013. Sequim’s market is farhousing market still has plenty of pent up demand ing better, with 81 sales in and fewer homes for sale. the first two 2014 months, “The Seahawks’ run to up from the 72 sales in the the Super Bowl affected same period in 2013. sales,” said J. Lennox Scott, Prices dropped, however, chairman of John L. Scott from a $217,500 median in Real Estate, in a statement 2013 to $210,000 in 2014, from the MLS. though the median list Scott added more homes price was also significantly have been put on the marlower, falling from $230,000 ket since the Seattle NFL squad won the world cham- in 2013 to $215,000 in 2014. “We had kind of a blip in pionship Feb. 2. January where the median “That might have something to do with it,” said price jumped up to $249,000, Sequim Association of Real- but that settled back down,” THE ASSOCIATED PRESS tors president E. Michael McAleer said. “I think we’re kind of McAleer. “But winter is typically a slow time. Not too staying along the same traUN IN THE SUN many people want to get jectory as last year.” out there when it’s rainy Olympic College students Daniel Miller of Port Orchard, left, and In the Sequim market, and gray.” 584 homes sold during Josiah Beaushaw of Key Peninsula kick a hackey sack in 2013, a 52 percent increase Bremerton on Friday. The applied science students said they PA market dips over the 385 sales in 2012 came outside after they saw the sun shining. Forecasts call for a The 46 sales in the Port and the highest total since bit of back-and-forth in the coming week, with alternating Angeles market are down the market peaked at 652 showers and sun. For more weather, see Page B10. from the 50 sales the previ- sales in 2004. The median price last ous year, according to the Olympic Multiple Listing year was steady at $215,000, off the $227,000 median at Service. Prices have ticked up a the 2004 peak. Out west, sales in Forks bit but are further off the list price than those that rose from three to four, though the median price is sold in 2013. Median sale price for a way down, from $260,000 in Port Angeles home in 2014’s 2013 to $149,750, according first two months was to the Northwest Multiple $153,000, while the median Listing Service. “It’s not hot, but it’s interim planning director construction of the new listed price was $156,400. BY JOE SMILLIE after the 2010 resignation civic center. He will also aid This is compared with the steady,” said Sandy Schier, PENINSULA DAILY NEWS of Dennis Lefevre. in development of the city’s early 2013 median sale proprietor of Lunsford Real SEQUIM –– Former He left Sequim in April capital improvement plan. planner Joe Irvin has been 2011 to take a post as the His position will be hired back on an interim zoning administrator and funded with savings from basis to help guide the city interim community affairs the retirement of parks through special planning director in Marco Island, manager Jeff Edwards and projects. Fla. money budgeted for the City Manager Steve CONTINUED FROM A1 maintenance on the paper He begins with Sequim park plan. Burkett announced the hire on March 31 under a templant’s equipment while the Irvin will be paid a proTuesday. porary contract through the rated portion of the annual Reetz said he doesn’t facility was inactive. “Although Joe brings end of the year. Employees received salary for the position, expect the plant to be fully much technical strength to operational for at least a notice on Feb. 18 that a twowhich ranges from $57,960 this position from his city Master parks plan few days, as each system is week scheduled mainteto $76,500. work experience, some of nance shutdown scheduled restarted. Burkett said the city He will help prepare a his greatest strengths are Plant Manager Harold for April was moved up to his strong commitment, master plan for the city’s may make the position perNorlund has not returned begin Feb. 23. interpersonal skills, and his parks, along with updating manent as it prepares a Those who were let go calls for comment about the knowledge of the Sequim a parks and recreation budget for 2015. for the two weeks were shutdown. ________ community and organiza- phase of the city’s compreallowed to take unused During the shutdown, vacation time. tional values,” Burkett said. hensive plan rewrite. Sequim-Dungeness Valley EdiIrvin also will coordinate tor Joe Smillie can be reached at 119 out of an estimated 200 Irivin worked as the Others sought tempocity’s senior planner from special seasonal events and 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at plant employees were with- rary employment or filed 2005 to 2011, serving as help with management of jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com. out work. for unemployment. Reetz did not know how Repairs to the new biomany employees returned mass boiler included new to work Sunday. screws installed on the fuel Some employees were system and upgrades to the retained during the shut- boiler’s ash-processing sysdown to perform routine tem. Arlene Irene

F

Former Sequim planner hired for special projects

Estate in Forks. The Forks market had 319 homes listed as of March 1, down from the 324 listed March 1, 2013. “I’m hoping this summer will move it into a little bit higher price range because our inventory is a little bit smaller,” Schier said. “But slow and steady wins the race.”

East sales tick up In Jefferson County, sales have been up a tick, with 55 homes sold through the year’s first two months over the 50 sold during the same period in 2013. The average sale price for all of Jefferson County during the first two months of the year was $232,605. That represents a slight increase over the average sale price of $231,527 from the first two months of 2013. Port Townsend home sales have been well off the early 2013 clip, with the $195,000 median price through the first two months of 2014 a big drop from the $238,500 median from January and February 2013. Through February, the 14 homes sold in Port Ludlow at a median price of $248,750 was above the five homes sold in early 2013, though the median price from last year’s first two months was $290,000.

Plant: 119 not working

Death and Memorial Notice

(Kardonsky) Sullivan

Drones: Mirror measures

September 25, 1943 March 5, 2014 Arlene Irene Kardonsky was born in Port Angeles on September 25, 1943 to Louis and Lillian Kardonsky. Arlene and her many siblings were raised living on Valley Street, which is where she met and fell in love with her soul-mate, Dennis “Sully” Sullivan. Arlene and Dennis were married November 11, 1960 and they enjoyed more than 53 years of marriage before she was carried home in the arms of her savior March 5, 2014. Arlene was greeted at the heavenly gate by her Mama and Daddy, Dee Bridges, Alice Czarnecki, Walt Kardonsky, Leo Kardonsky, Ann Balch, Kenneth Kardonsky, Hayley Haller and her honorary family member, Elvis Presley. Arlene leaves behind her loving family, Dennis “Sully” Sullivan, Vivian

The most precious things in life.

CONTINUED FROM A1 get reimbursed from Medicaid for outpatient services. The bill, co-sponsored by The 24th Legislative District comprises Clallam Hargrove in the Senate, and Jefferson counties and passed its chamber of origin a portion of Grays Harbor 47-1 Feb. 17. “It bodes well for its sucCounty. The bill, which now cess that it had such a posireturns to the House so tive vote in the House,” Rep. minor changes made in the Tharinger said Saturday. The bill now returns to Senate can be agreed upon, mirrors a proposal Har- the Senate so minor grove introduced at the changes made in the House beginning of the session can be agreed upon in the after being approached proposed legislation’s chamabout proposing such legis- ber of origin, Tharinger lation by the American Civil explained. The bill would raise outLiberties Union of Washingpatient Medicaid reimton. “The House bill passed bursement rates for Olymfirst, so we just decided to pic Medical Center, referred use that vehicle,” Hargrove to as a “sole community hospital,” from 55 percent said. Hargrove said earlier to about 70 percent, which this session that he has had would mean a $1 million reimbursement concerns over the issue of annual increase for the Port-Angedrones and privacy for a les-based hospital, CEO few years. Eric Lewis has said. Tharinger said the bill OMC reimbursement as written would only apply Friday also saw unani- to Olympic Medical Center mous House approval of a given its financial situation Senate bill that would and the fact it’s publicly increase the amount cer- run, though it could apply tain rural hospitals, such as to the currently private Olympic Medical Center, nonprofit Grays Harbor

Mrs. Sullivan Croft, Leona Cope, Lisa Temple, Diana Lair, Marchelle Regan, Rachel Sullivan, Hannahlynn Sullivan, Jacob Sullivan, Josh Temple, John Dennis “JD” Temple, Kylee Wong, Chava Haller, Mikaya Haller, Kaleb Temple and Jaxon Temple, several nieces and nephews, her faithful dogs, Barney, Buddy and Charles and her cat and companion, Mokie. A viewing will be from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., on Monday, March 10, at Harper Ridgeview

Funeral Chapel. Services will be held at 11:00 a.m., Tuesday March 11, 2014 at Harper-Ridgeview Funderal Chapel, 105 West Fourth St., Port Angeles, with internment to follow at Jamestown Cemetery. There will be a reception and celebration of life held following internment, at Pioneer Park 152 West Cedar Street, Sequim. Harper Ridgeview Funeral Chapel was entrusted with the arrangements.

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The shutdown was due to problems with the screws, which transport hog fuel, the woody logging debris used in biomass-fired plants. The fuel was not adequately feeding the mill’s new boiler, Reetz said. The biomass boilers burn wood waste to create steam for the plant, and the new boiler, installed in 2013, is designed to generate enough electricity to sell. The biomass plant has the capacity to produce 20 megawatts, but has been able to produce only about half that amount.

Community Hospital in Aberdeen were it to convert to a public hospital. Other sole community hospitals in the state include facilities in Centralia and Moses Lake. Forks Community Hospital and Jefferson Healthcare are defined as critical access hospitals and now get 101 percent of outpatient costs reimbursed through Medicaid, a staterun program for low-income people with half funded by the state and half funded by the federal government. In an interview earlier this year, Lewis said about 12 percent of Olympic Medical Center patients were on Medicaid in 2013, adding that about 10,000 people throughout Clallam County use the program. Tharinger was able to secure $100,000 per year for Medicaid outpatient reimbursement for Olympic Medical Center in the 20132015 budget as a temporary proviso after a bill he introduced last session to raise reimbursement rates failed to gain traction. Tharinger said the stronger support for a permanent solution through legislation likely came from working to inform other legislators about the budgetary challenges rural hospitals such as Olympic Medical Center are facing. “Just educating them on the issue,” Tharinger said. When reached by phone Saturday, Rep. Van De Wege said he could not comment on legislative matters because he was on duty as a firefighter/paramedic with Clallam County Fire District No. 3.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, March 10, 2014 PAGE

A9

How America can expose Putin J

UST AS WE’VE TURNED THE coverage of politics into sports, we’re doing the same with geopolitics. There is much nonsense being written about how Vladimir Putin showed how he is “tougher” than Barack Obama and how Obama now needs to demonstrate his manhood. This is how great powers get drawn into Thomas L. the politics of small Friedman tribes and end up in great wars that end badly for everyone. We vastly exaggerate Putin’s strength — so does he — and we vastly underestimate our own strength and ability to weaken him through nonmilitary means. Let’s start with Putin. Any man who actually believes, as Putin has said, that the breakup of the Soviet Union was “the greatest geopolitical catastrophe” of the 20th century is caught up in a dangerous fantasy that can’t end well for him or his people. The Soviet Union died because Communism could not provide rising standards of living, and its collapse actually unleashed boundless human energy all across Eastern Europe and Russia.

A

WISE PUTIN WOULD HAVE redesigned Russia so its vast human talent could take advantage of all that energy. He would be fighting today to get Russia into the European Union, not to keep Ukraine out. But that is not who Putin is and never will be. He is guilty of the soft bigotry of low expectations toward his people and prefers to turn Russia into a mafia-run petrostate — all the better to steal from. So Putin is now fighting human nature among his own young people and his neighbors — who both want more European Union and less Putinism. To put it in market terms, Putin is long oil and short history. He has made himself steadily richer and Russia steadily more reliant on natural resources rather than its human ones. History will not be kind to him — especially if energy prices ever collapse. So spare me the Putin-body-slammedObama prattle. This isn’t All-Star Wrestling. The fact that Putin has seized Crimea — a Russian-speaking zone of Ukraine,

once part of Russia, where many of the citizens prefer to be part of Russia and where Russia has a major naval base — is not like taking Poland. I support economic and diplomatic sanctions to punish Russia for its violation of international norms and making clear that harsher sanctions — even military aid for Kiev — would ensue should Putin try to bite off more of Ukraine. But we need to remember that that little corner of the world is always going to mean more, much more, to Putin than to us, and we should refrain from making threats on which we’re not going to deliver. What disturbs me about Crimea is the larger trend it fits into, that Putinism used to just be a threat to Russia but is now becoming a threat to global stability. I opposed expanding NATO toward Russia after the Cold War, when Russia was at its most democratic and least threatening. It remains one of the dumbest things we’ve ever done and, of course, laid the groundwork for Putin’s rise.

DAVID HORSEY/TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE

but it is time we expose his real weakness and our real strength. That, though, requires a long-term strategy — not just fulminating on “Meet the Press.” It requires going after the twin pillars of his regime: oil and gas. Just as the oil glut of the 1980s, partly OR A LONG TIME, PUTIN engineered by the Saudis, brought down has exploited the humiliation and global oil prices to a level that helped colanti-Western attitudes NATO lapse Soviet Communism, we could do the expansion triggered to gain popularity, but same today to Putinism by putting the this seems to have become so fundamenright long-term policies in place. tal to his domestic politics that it has That is by investing in the facilities to locked him into a zero-sum relationship liquefy and export our natural gas bounty with the West that makes it hard to see how we collaborate with him in more seri- (provided it is extracted at the highest environmental standards) and making ous trouble spots, like Syria or Iran. Europe, which gets 30 percent of its gas President Bashar Assad of Syria is engaged in monstrous, genocidal behavior from Russia, more dependent on us instead. that also threatens the stability of the I’d also raise our gasoline tax, put in Middle East. place a carbon tax and a national renewBut Putin stands by him. At least half the people of Ukraine long able energy portfolio standard — all of which would also help lower the global oil to be part of Europe, but he treated that price (and make us stronger, with cleaner understandable desire as a NATO plot air, less oil dependence and more innovaand quickly resorted to force. I don’t want to go to war with Putin, tion).

F

Y

OU WANT TO FRIGHTEN Putin? Just announce those steps. But you know the story, the tough guys in Washington who want to take on Putin would rather ask 1 percent of Americans — the military and their families — to make the ultimate sacrifice than have all of us make a small sacrifice in the form of tiny energy price increases. Those tough guys who thump their chests in Congress but run for the hills if you ask them to vote for a 10-cent increase in the gasoline tax that would actually boost our leverage, they’ll never rise to this challenge. We’ll do anything to expose Putin’s weakness; anything that isn’t hard. And you wonder why Putin holds us in contempt?

________ Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears here every Monday. Email him via nyti.ms/friedmanmail.

Keeping soul in city rejuvenation E

MANY AMERICAN CITIES now enjoy an amazing reversal of fortune. Once hollowed-out Froma shells mainly Harrop for those too poor to move — or those so rich they didn’t have to deal with the poor — cities are again filling up with educated and aspiring young people. They are flooding into Chicago, Philadelphia, New York and other places once given up for dead. The influx of newcomers with money has raised housing prices and property taxes for many longtime residents, leading to social conflict. Who belongs downtown? The short answer is everybody. But the short answer is too short. Consider Honolulu’s Kakaako neighborhood. Once a flat, low-strung area of auto repair shops, warehouses and some residents, it’s now

become a real estate bonanza for shopping centers and high-rise condos. A master plan for development envisions perhaps 22 residential towers plus acres of retail and office space. People already living there are wondering what’s going to happen to their views. Then there are the old Hawaiian burial grounds. Considering the sad financial shape of so many urban downtowns, such cities would be insane to turn away all those tax dollars. But there’s also a price to pay for the loss of modest neighborhoods inhabited by the same folks for generations. One is fairness. Often, the most coveted areas are not the impoverished slums but those blue-collar holdouts where longtime residents and shopkeepers preserved the charming streetscapes. These people hung in through the bad old days of crime and filth. They’re still in the same little house, but now the value of the house has tripled along with their real estate taxes.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

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veryone belongs downtown — with one exception: That is rich foreigners using prime American real estate to park their money.

Sure, some could sell at a handsome profit, but others call their surroundings home and want to stay. Though many recent arrivals love the old buildings, they seem to prefer the new high-rise condos with granite kitchen counters. The residential towers replace the warehouses that employed the locals, take away the views and bring in chain stores salivating over the arrival of big spenders. Even the small hip stores price out the old-timers. Where there was spaghetti and meatballs, there’s now artisan pizza. Handmade chocolate is nice, but for many residents, the hardware store was even nicer. This process has been called Brooklynization. That refers to the transformation of gritty old Brooklyn neighborhoods into pricey hangouts

best afforded by tech and financial types. San Francisco, in particular, has become a hotbed of tension between the longtime bohemian types and an inflow of technology workers, thousands of them millionaires, many of them “entitled.” Again, urban America desperately needs these taxpayers, but it must recognize that cities have a fragile culture that big-money development can flatten. Balance must be found. Everyone belongs downtown — with one exception: That is rich foreigners using prime American real estate to park their money. Even they can be downtown, but cities should stop letting developers put up billionaire residential towers on prime real estate — prime because the city’s residents, shoppers and workers made it so. New York’s hallowed West

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MICHAEL FOSTER, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mfoster@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525; lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim news office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend news office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

57th Street is now being lined by narrow needles, 50 or more stories high, with apartments going for $20 million, $50 million, $80 million. They are being marketed to filthy-rich Russians, Chinese and others looking for a safe place to “invest” their money. Typically, the buildings are more than half-empty most of the time. We can understand former Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s wish to bring in taxpayers ripe for milking, but there’s such a thing as selling one’s soul. And soul is an established city’s greatest asset. Once that’s gone, the place loses the very thing that attracted newcomers in the first place. So who belongs in the city? Its people.

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears every Monday. Contact her at fharrop@gmail. com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ PAUL GOTTLIEB, acting commentary editor, 360-452-2345, ext. 5060 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A10

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Celtic magic to swirl through Story Swap PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

lam County are hosts of this event, Story Swap from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. in the library’s Raymond Carver Room, where admission is free, and everyone is welcome. James the Obscure, aka James Hodgson of Sequim, will offer three tales during the first half. He calls his set “deep Celtic magic,� with legends about heroes and oaths fulfilled, promises kept and

PORT ANGELES — A mortal enters the world of the faerie, unbidden. A man steals a sealskin and wins a wife. A king disrespects a goddess and earns a curse. This is the world of James the Obscure, teller of Celtic tales at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., on Tuesday night. The Story People of Clal-

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debts repaid. After James the Obscure — a retired teacher and former Story People president — comes a refreshment break, followed by an open-mic section for other storytellers to step up and share their tales. To find out more about the swaps held every second Tuesday of the month, visit www.ClallamStory People.org or phone 360452-8092.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, March 10, 2014 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

B Pac-12

Huskies display flash of potential

Neah pair earn MVPs Venske, Moss honored; Hinrichs state 2nd team PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR A FEW minutes Saturday afternoon — four minutes and 28 seconds, to be exact — the Washington Huskies played basketball with the skill of a team that is not ready to concede the season as a lost cause. At the beginning of the secJohn ond half, the McGrath Huskies combined a lockdown defense with an ampedup offense to go on a 15-0 run against USC. The rest of the game was a bit of a snore. The Trojans brought a 2-15 conference record into Hec Edmundson Pavilion, and somehow kept the issue in doubt — but you couldn’t watch that brief floor show without wondering if the Huskies, who begin the Pac-12 Conference tournament on Wednesday against Utah at noon, might make some magic in Las Vegas.

‘We can get four in a row’ Said guard C.J. Wilcox: “The guys are confident we can get four in a row.” The guys are confident? Seriously? The guys haven’t won four in a row all season, nor have they played four times in four days. Their only back-to-back games this season were at the 2K Sports Classic at New York’s Madison Square Garden, where Next Game an 11-point defeat to Boston Wednesday College followed vs. Utah a thorough drub- at Las Vegas bing at the Time: Noon hands of IndiOn TV: Pac-12 ana. When Wilcox talks about the confidence his team has while it prepares for four games in four days, it sounds more like a prayer than a pronouncement. And yet . . . Every once in a while, the Huskies wipe the sleep out of their eyes, crouch down in the no-nonsense posture of defenders with a purpose, and click in a way that suggests anything is possible. The energy during the 15-0 spurt to open the second half was palpable. Freshman point guard Nigel Williams-Goss delivered a pair of dazzling passes to Shawn Kemp Jr., setting up the sophomore forward for a layup and then a dunk. Wilcox had a layup and buried a 3-pointer, part of a comprehensively impressive farewell performance on senior day.

Defense is the key But it all began on defense. “The first five or six minutes of the second half, we ran half-court one time,” said Huskies coach Lorenzo Romar. “We were getting deflections and steals and they were taking shots maybe they didn’t want to, and we were off to the races.” After the 82-75 victory, which had no effect on seeding for the conference tournament, I asked Romar what his reasonable expectations were for the Huskies in Las Vegas. “Is that a trick question?” he asked, “because my answer would be we expect to win it all.” He paused, then pondered the key word. “Realistically? If we go out and are not distracted on the defensive end, and we’re sharing the ball, I don’t think we have to do anything supernatural,” Romar continued. “If we play up to our capabilities, which we have at times, we have a chance. If we don’t, we’ll get beaten.” TURN

TO

MCGRATH/B3

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Neah Bay’s Abraham Venske goes to the hoop against Wishkah Valley during the Red Devils’ regionals win at Mount Tahoma High School last month.

NEAH BAY — Postseason awards continue to roll in for North Olympic Peninsula basketball players. Neah Bay’s Abraham Venske and Cierra Moss were voted North Olympic League basketball MVPs by the league’s boys and girls coaches. Venske, the boys MVP, was the Red Devils’ second-leading scorer this season, averaging 12.3 points per game. The junior also averaged five rebounds, three assists and 2.1 steals per game, and helped Neah Bay finish third at the Class 1B state tournament in Spokane over the weekend. Venske is joined on the boys all-league team by teammate Josiah Greene, Clallam Bay’s Kelly Gregory and Travis Walker and Kaleb Dodson of Crescent. Neah Bay senior Zeke Greene was named Defensive Player of the Year and Clallam Bay coach Kelly Gregory earned Coach of the Year honors. Boys honorable mention recipients are Martin Waldrip (Crescent), Calvin Ritter (Clallam Bay), Zeke Greene, Ryan Moss (Neah Bay), Sam Signor (Clallam Bay) and Casey Randall (Clallam Bay). Cierra Moss capped off a stellar career with a 40-point, 20-rebound game against Taholah on Friday that guaran-

teed the Red Devils a state trophy. Earlier this season, Moss joined Neah Bay’s 1,000-point club. She finished the season averaging 25.1 points, 12.1 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 3.5 steals. Neah Bay junior Faye Chartraw, Crescent’s Shannon Williams and Lauren Hartley and Clallam Bay’s Jeddie Herndon join Moss on the all-league team. Chartraw also is the Defensive Player of the Year. Kathleen Winter of Clallam Bay was chosen as Coach of the Year. Girls honorable mentions: Inga Erickson (Clallam Bay), Haley Holgerson (Crescent), Holly Greene (Neah Bay) and Mariah LaChester (Clallam Bay).

PA’s Hinrichs honored Port Angeles senior guard Maddy Hinrichs was voted to the Class 2A state tournament second team by media members covering the tournament at the Yakima SunDome. Hinrichs averaged nine points, six rebounds, three assists and three steals in the Roughriders’ two games at state. Julie Spencer of state champion W.F. West earned the 2A girls state tournament MVP award. TURN

TO

PREPS/B5

M’s newest star Cano fitting in Former Yankee embracing role on new team BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PEORIA, Ariz. — Standing in the middle of the clubhouse holding court with fellow Latino players, Felix Hernandez could not allow himself to walk away from this conversation without a resolution. He was not going to let Robinson Cano get in the last word. Especially when the two Seattle Mariners stars were bantering at a volume loud enough for everyone in the complex to hear. The debate: Who is tougher to face? Is it Cano the hitter? Or is it Hernandez the pitcher? There was no final answer. Just a lot of laughter — the kind the Mariners hope comes with victories during the regular season. “It’s good man. It’s going to help a lot,” Hernandez said. “You see how we’re talking . . . It’s good for the kids. It’s good for everybody here making everyone loose.” For a rare time in their history, the Mariners can lay claim to having one of the most dominant starting pitchers in base-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle Mariners’ Robinson Cano at bat against the Cleveland Indians during a spring training game last week in Peoria, Ariz. ball and one of the top offensive talents in the game on the same roster at the same time. Cano’s signing in the offseason was a stunning coup by Seattle. They threw $240 million over 10 years at the fivetime All-Star and in turn, Cano

accepted the responsibility of giving up the New York limelight for the anonymity that playing in Seattle can sometimes bring. With that come expectations: ■ Be a clubhouse leader and take the lessons learned from

the likes of Jorge Posada, Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera in his time with New York and bring them to a roster of young players yet to match their expectations. TURN

TO

M’S/B3

Bennett, Tate among tough decisions Saturday morning. The backdoor conversations have been going on for weeks. Players cannot sign new confirst mild steps toward roster tracts until Tuesday. In between, BY TODD DYBAS retention. teams will have an exclusive MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE A second-round tender offer three-day window to talk to was made to wide receiver and RENTON — Unrestricted their unrestricted free agents. restricted free agent Doug Baldfree agent Michael Bennett is win. If Baldwin signs the tender, not walking around with a 30 Likely to test waters that means he is under contract percent off sticker affixed to his Multiple reports have said in 2014, at least initially, for forehead. As he said after the season, Bennett will become a free agent about $2.19 million. These tenders often are holdthis is not Costco. This is real instead of signing early with the over offers. Baldwin can sign the life. There will be no discounts. Seahawks. He’s one part of the Seahawks’ tender offer, then see the Welcome to NFL free agency. After a potent year at defen- effort to keep together their Seahawks restructure his consive tackle and end for the Seat- Super Bowl-winning team as tract closer to the season. In most cases, the restructurtle Seahawks — Bennett was much as possible. Wide receiver Golden Tate is ing comes with a threat of being moved as needed to be a funky matchup — he has become their the other notable unrestricted cut by the team if the player most sought after unrestricted free agent. He led the team in does not accept less money than free agent. receptions and receiving yards the initial tender offer. Official talks between his last season. It’s unlikely Baldwin would agent and the Seahawks started On Friday, Seattle took its find himself in that situation,

Seahawks get first shot at free agents

Seahawks

but a good reminder that NFL teams are able to operate ruthlessly. If Baldwin chooses not to sign the tender, he can negotiate with any team through May 2.

Hawks can match If Baldwin signs with a new team, the Seahawks can match the offer and retain him. If the Seahawks choose not to match the offer, they receive a compensatory second-round pick for another team signing him. When it comes to dealing with free agents, this is a piecemeal offseason for Seattle. The Seahawks signed backup center Lemuel Jeanpierre and backup safety Jeron Johnson to oneyear contract extensions. Each was a restricted free agent. TURN

TO

HAWKS/B5


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

Today’s

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Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

BOYS BASKETBALL Saturday’s Scores State 1A State Championship Zillah 52, King’s 46 Fourth Place Cedar Park Christian (Bothell) 54, Toledo 39 Third Place Okanogan 56, Seattle Academy 37 State 1B Fourth Place Three Rivers Christian School 63, Tulalip Heritage 49 Third Place Neah Bay 55, Shorewood Christian 44 Championship Colton 59, Pomeroy 46 State 2A State Championship Pullman 64, Lynden 58, OT Fourth Place Clarkston 41, Mark Morris 26 Third Place Anacortes 56, Lake Washington 48 State 2B State Championship Morton/White Pass 54, St. George’s 51 Fourth Place Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 69, Mossyrock 60 Third Place Bear Creek School 63, Liberty (Spangle) 39 State 3A State Championship Rainier Beach 47, Eastside Catholic 45 Fourth Place O’Dea 64, Stanwood 50 Third Place Bellevue 71, Wilson 61 State 4A State Championship Garfield 68, Richland 59 Fourth Place Jackson 61, Gonzaga Prep 44 Third Place Issaquah 60, Todd Beamer 49

GIRLS BASKETBALL Saturday’s Scores State 1A State Championship Lynden Christian 55, King’s 40 Fourth Place Okanogan 47, Granger 33 Third Place Cashmere 47, Blaine 35 State 1B Fourth Place Wilbur-Creston 84, Neah Bay 46 Third Place Pateros 68, Mount Vernon Christian 43 Championship Colton 68, Tekoa-Oakesdale 32 State 2A State Championship W. F. West 48, Mark Morris 37 Fourth Place White River 62, East Valley (Spokane) 55 Third Place Lynden 53, Ellensburg 48 State 2B State Championship Colfax 45, Toutle Lake 38 Fourth Place DeSales 55, Morton/White Pass 34 Third Place St. George’s 51, Northwest Christian (Colbert) 48 State 3A State Championship Cleveland 54, Blanchet 45 Fourth Place Sunnyside 56, University 42 Third Place Bellevue 70, Wilson 61 State 4A State Championship Gonzaga Prep 53, Mt. Rainier 51 Fourth Place Inglemoor 39, Skyview 36 Third Place Lynnwood 48, Moses Lake 38

College Basketball Saturday Night’s Game UCLA (23-8) D. Wear 1-4 0-0 2, T. Wear 2-5 0-0 4, Adams 2-8 3-4 7, Powell 2-6 2-4 7, Anderson 6-11 5-6 19, Bail 1-1 0-0 2, LaVine 0-8 0-2 0, B. Alford 2-8 4-4 10, Allen 1-1 0-0 2, Parker 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 18-54 14-20 55. WASHINGTON ST. (10-20) Shelton 3-8 4-6 10, Railey 2-7 0-3 4, DiIorio 1-1 0-0 2, Woolridge 2-8 3-6 8, Lacy 1-10 6-6 9, Iroegbu 3-3 6-8 14, Kernich-Drew 4-8 0-0 10, Longrus 0-3 2-2 2, Hawkinson 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 5-9 0-1 14. Totals 21-57 21-32 73. Halftime—Washington St. 34-26. 3-Point Goals—UCLA 5-23 (Anderson 2-4, B. Alford 2-6, Powell 1-4, T. Wear 0-1, Adams 0-3, LaVine 0-5), Washington St. 10-29 (Johnson 4-7, Iroegbu 2-2, Kernich-Drew 2-5, Woolridge 1-4, Lacy 1-8, Railey 0-1, Shelton 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—UCLA 37 (Anderson 11), Washington St. 46 (Shelton 14). Assists— UCLA 11 (B. Alford, Anderson 4), Washington St. 14 (Longrus, Railey 3). Total Fouls—UCLA 23, Washington St. 17. A—3,142.

Final Men’s Pac-12 Standings Conf. 15-3 12-6 10-8 10-8 10-8 10-8 10-8 9-9 9-9 8-10 3-15 2-16

Overall 28-3 23-8 22-8 21-10 21-10 19-11 19-12 20-10 17-14 16-14 10-20 11-20

RACE

TO THE HOOP

Joel Wood of the Port Angeles seventh-grade basketball team drives towards the basket against the Washington Warriors from Federal Way at Port Angeles High School on Sunday at the 18th annual Spring Hoopfest. The Port Angeles team fell short, losing 46-25. The two-day tournament featured 42 teams — 24 boys and 18 girls teams — playing in fifth- through eighth-grade divisions. Teams from Black Hills, Bremerton, Federal Way, Lake Washington, Lakewood, Meadowdale, Olympia, Poulsbo, Puyallup, Silverdale, Tacoma, Chimacum, Clallam Bay, Forks, Sequim and Port Townsend participated at Port Angeles High School, Stevens Middle School, Roosevelt Elementary School,and the Vern Burton Memorial Community Center. Thursday Second Round Arizona vs. Utah/Washington, noon. California vs. Colorado/USC, 2:30 p.m. UCLA vs. Oregon/Oregon State, 6 p.m. Arizona State vs. Stanford/Washington State, 8:30 p.m. Friday Semifinals Arizona/Utah/Washington vs. California/Colorado/USC, 6 p.m. UCLA/Oregon/Oregon State vs. Arizona State/Stanford/Washington State, 8:30 p.m. Saturday Championship Game, 3 p.m. (FS1)

Baseball Mariners (ss) 8, Dodgers (ss) 5 Saturday’s Game Los Angeles ab r hbi ab r hbi A.Almonte cf 3 0 1 0 D.Gordon 2b 4 1 2 0 Avery lf 2 0 1 0 M.Rojas 2b 0 0 0 0 K.Seager 3b 4 0 1 0 C.Crawford lf 3 1 0 0 P.Kivlehan 3b1 0 0 0 Baxter lf 1000 Franklin ss 4 1 1 0 H.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 C.Taylor ss 1 0 0 0 B.Harris ss 1 0 0 0 Smoak dh 2 2 1 2 Van Slyke rf 3 1 1 1 J.Montero 1b 4 2 2 3 J.Garcia rf 0000 S.Romero lf 3 2 2 1 Robinson 1b 3 1 1 0 Gillespie rf 0 1 0 0 Bates 1b 2000 J.Jones rf-cf 4 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 3000 Triunfel 2b 3 0 1 1 D.Mayora 3b 1 0 0 0 K.Marte 2b 1 0 0 1 Pederson cf 3 1 2 2 Quintero c 2 0 0 0 J.Scavuzzo cf 1 0 0 0 T.Marlette c 1 0 0 0 Federowicz c 3 0 0 0 Butera c 0000 Guerrero dh 4 0 1 0 Totals 35 810 8 Totals 35 5 7 3 Seattle (ss) 032 100 020—8 Los Angeles (ss) 300 002 000—5 E—Kensing (1), J.Montero (1), Beavan (1), Butera (1). DP—Seattle 1, Los Angeles 1. LOB—Seattle 4, Los Angeles 9. 2B—Franklin (3), S.Romero (1), Pederson (1). HR—Smoak (1), J.Montero 2 (2), S.Romero (1), Pederson (2). SB—Gillespie (2), D.Gordon 2 (7). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Beavan W,1-0 3 3 3 1 1 2 Kensing 2 1 0 0 0 1 A.Carraway 12/3 3 2 2 2 1 J.Arias 11/3 0 0 0 1 1 Farquhar S,1-1 1 0 0 0 2 1 Los Angeles Beckett L,0-1 3 6 5 5 1 0 J.Wright 2 2 1 1 1 0 J.Dominguez 2 1 0 0 1 3 Withrow 1 1 2 1 1 2 P.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 WP—Farquhar 2, J.Wright. PB—Butera. Umpires—Home, Alex Ortiz; First, Scott Barry; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Ben May. T—3:19. A—13,427 (13,000). Seattle

Washington State 73, UCLA 55

Arizona UCLA Oregon Arizona State Colorado Stanford California Utah Washington Oregon State Washington State USC

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Strk L1 L1 W7 L2 L1 W1 W1 L1 W1 W1 W1 L1

Pac-12 Tournament MGM Grand Garden Arena - Las Vegas Wednesday First Round Washington vs. Utah, noon. USC vs. Colorado, 2:30 p.m. Oregon State vs. Oregon, 6 p.m. Washington State vs. Stanford, 8:30 p.m.

Mariners (ss) 18, Giants 3 Saturday’s Game San Francisco ab r hbi ab r hbi En.Chavez cf 4 1 2 2 G.Blanco cf 2 0 0 0 L.Landry cf 2 2 2 0 G.Brown cf 2 0 0 0 B.Miller ss 4 1 1 2 Belt 1b 2000 Seattle

K.Marte ss-2b2 1 2 0 M.Minicozzi 1b1 1 0 0 T.Kelly 2b-3b 4 3 1 0 Posey c 1000 Hart dh 4 0 0 0 Susac c 3012 T.Smith dh-ss1 1 0 2 Sandoval 3b 2 0 1 0 Morrison 1b 4 1 1 0 Dominguez 3b 2 0 1 0 Choi pr-1b 2 2 1 2 T.Abreu dh 4 0 1 0 M.Saunders rf3 3 2 3 J.Perez lf 1000 J.Blash rf 1 0 1 1 R.Lollis lf 2000 Ackley lf 4 1 3 2 Kieschnick rf 2 1 0 0 D.Pizzano lf 1 0 0 0 J.Parker rf 1000 Bloomquist 3b31 1 1 Noonan 2b 4 0 1 0 D.Peterson 3b10 1 2 Adrianza ss 2 1 1 0 Buck c 3 1 0 0 J.Ciriaco ss 0 0 0 1 Sucre c 20 00 Totals 45181817 Totals 31 3 6 3 Seattle (ss) 405 000 351—18 San Francisco 000 002 100— 3 E—Vogelsong (1), J.Perez (1). DP—Seattle 1, San Francisco 1. LOB—Seattle 5, San Francisco 5. 2B—T.Kelly (1), Ackley (4), Susac (2), Adrianza (1). 3B—Ackley (1). HR—B.Miller (2), M.Saunders (1). SF—D.Peterson, J.Ciriaco. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle E.Ramirez W,2-0 4 1 0 0 1 4 Noesi 2 3 2 2 1 1 Beimel 1 1 1 1 1 2 S.Shackleford 1 1 0 0 0 0 Ruffin 1 0 0 0 0 0 San Francisco Vogelsong L,1-1 21/3 6 7 5 1 2 Petit 22/3 3 2 0 0 1 Affeldt 1 0 0 0 0 1 J.Lopez 1 3 3 3 1 0 Romo 0 3 5 5 2 0 Dunning 1 1 0 0 0 0 Tobin 1 2 1 1 0 1 Umpires—Home, Dale Scott; First, Paul Schrieber; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Chris Guccione. T—3:13. A—12,123 (12,000).

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 46 16 .742 Portland 42 20 .677 Minnesota 31 30 .508 Denver 27 34 .443 Utah 22 41 .349 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 44 20 .688 Golden State 39 24 .619 Phoenix 36 25 .590 Sacramento 22 40 .355 L.A. Lakers 21 42 .333 Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 46 16 .742 Houston 43 19 .694 Dallas 37 26 .587 Memphis 36 26 .581 New Orleans 25 37 .403 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 34 26 .567 Brooklyn 30 30 .500 New York 24 40 .375

GB — 4 14½ 18½ 24½ GB — 4½ 6½ 21 22½ GB — 3 9½ 10 21 GB — 4 12

Boston Philadelphia

21 41 .339 15 47 .242 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 43 17 .717 Washington 33 29 .532 Charlotte 29 34 .460 Atlanta 26 35 .426 Orlando 19 45 .297 Central Division W L Pct x-Indiana 46 16 .742 Chicago 35 28 .556 Detroit 24 38 .387 Cleveland 24 40 .375 Milwaukee 12 50 .194 x-clinched playoff spot Saturday’s Games Utah 104, Philadelphia 92 New York 107, Cleveland 97 Memphis 111, Charlotte 89 San Antonio 121, Orlando 112 Washington 114, Milwaukee 107 L.A. Clippers 109, Atlanta 108 Sunday’s Games Chicago 95, Miami 88, OT Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, late. Denver at New Orleans, late. Sacramento at Brooklyn, late. Detroit at Boston, late. Toronto at Minnesota, late. Portland at Houston, late. Indiana at Dallas, late. Phoenix at Golden State, late. Today’s Games Denver at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 4:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Utah, 6 p.m. Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Boston at Indiana, 4 p.m. Sacramento at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. San Antonio at Chicago, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Houston at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 5 p.m. Dallas at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

14 20 GB — 11 15½ 17½ 26 GB — 11½ 22 23 34

Hockey National Hockey League WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 64 43 14 7 93 207 157 San Jose 65 41 17 7 89 199 157 Los Angeles 64 36 22 6 78 155 135 Phoenix 64 29 24 11 69 177 185 Vancouver 66 29 27 10 68 153 174 Calgary 64 25 32 7 57 150 191 Edmonton 64 22 34 8 52 160 208 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 63 43 14 6 92 208 143 Chicago 64 37 13 14 88 221 171 Colorado 64 41 18 5 87 196 170 Minnesota 63 34 22 7 75 156 154 Dallas 64 31 23 10 72 185 179 Winnipeg 65 30 28 7 67 180 189 Nashville 64 26 28 10 62 152 191

8:30 a.m. NBCSN Sochi 2014 Winter Paralympic Games 10:30 a.m. (25) ROOT Softball NCAA, UAB vs. East Carolina Noon NBCSN Soccer EPL, Sunderland vs. Liverpool (Live) 1 p.m FS1 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Big East Tournament, Semifinal (Live) 3:30 p.m. FS1 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Big East Tournament, Semifinal (Live) 3:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball H.S., WIAA Girls 3A Championship 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Sochi 2014 Winter Paralympic Games 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Women’s Basketball NCAA, AAC Tournament Championship, Site: Mohegan Sun Arena - Uncasville, Conn. (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, MAAC Tournament Championship, Site: MassMutual Center - Springfield, Mass. (Live) 4 p.m. NBCSN Basketball NCAA, CAA Tournament, Championship (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, WCC Tournament, Semifinal, Site: Orleans Arena - Las Vegas, Nev. (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, SoCon Tournament, Site: U.S. Cellular Center - Asheville, N.C. (Live) 6 p.m. FS1 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Big 12 Tournament, Championship (Live) 7 p.m. CSNNW Hockey NHL, New York Islanders vs. Vancouver Canucks (Live) 8:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, WCC Tournament, Site: Orleans Arena - Las Vegas, Nev. (Live) 11 p.m. NBCSN Sochi 2014 Winter Paralympic Games, Biathalon (Live) 11:30 p.m. (2) CBUT Sochi 2014 Winter Paralympic Games EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 63 41 17 5 87 199 141 Montreal 66 35 24 7 77 166 166 Toronto 65 34 23 8 76 193 198 Tampa Bay 64 34 24 6 74 183 167 Detroit 64 29 22 13 71 171 179 Ottawa 64 28 25 11 67 182 209 Florida 63 24 32 7 55 154 201 Buffalo 63 19 36 8 46 127 186 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 63 42 17 4 88 201 157 N.Y. Rangers 65 35 26 4 74 171 162 Philadelphia 64 33 24 7 73 183 188 Columbus 64 33 26 5 71 186 178 Washington 65 30 25 10 70 191 197 New Jersey 65 28 24 13 69 161 167 Carolina 64 27 28 9 63 160 184 N.Y. Islanders 66 24 33 9 57 181 224 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday’s Games Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3, SO Ottawa 5, Winnipeg 3 St. Louis 2, Colorado 1 Toronto 4, Philadelphia 3, OT New Jersey 5, Carolina 4 Washington 3, Phoenix 2 Columbus 1, Nashville 0 Dallas 4, Minnesota 3 Vancouver 2, Calgary 1 San Jose 4, Montreal 0 Sunday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 3, Detroit 0 Boston at Florida, late. Chicago at Buffalo, late. St. Louis at Minnesota, late. Los Angeles at Edmonton, late. Today’s Games Pittsburgh at Washington, 4 p.m. Nashville at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Colorado, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Toronto at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Nashville at Buffalo, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Carolina, 4 p.m. Detroit at Columbus, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Edmonton at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Toronto at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Reassigned RHP Fabio Castillo, RHP Mike Wright, and INF Chris Marrero to their minor league camp. MINNESOTA TWINS — Optioned LHPs Logan Darnell, Edgar Ibarra and Brooks Raley and RHP Trevor May to Rochester (IL); 1B Kennys Vargas to New Britain (EL); INF Jorge Polanco and OF Max Kepler to Fort Myers (FSL). Reassigned RHPs Alex Meyer, Lester Oliveros and Yohan Pino; Cs Kyle Knudson, Matt Koch and Stuart Turner; OFs Byron Buxton and Chris Rahl and INF Miguel Sano to their minor league camp.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Impact of WSU’s M’s: win over UCLA

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

Hitting before marketing

CONTINUED FROM B1 approachable and affable. One day after workouts, ■ Be the first great left- Cano set up the “net drill” handed power hitter the that helped him become a Mariners have employed better hitter with the Yansince Ken Griffey Jr. was in kees and worked extensively with inconsistent his prime. ■ And bring buzz back first baseman Justin to a franchise that’s seen its Smoak. fan base and public interest nose dive over the last Not the loudest dozen seasons. He doesn’t have to be the “I’m not going to lie, it feels a little different loudest voice in the clubbecause everywhere you house. Hernandez, the look around you see differ- established star in Seattle, takes care of that with ease. ent faces,” Cano said. “I think he’s had a really “I’m here now. I have it in my mind that I’m with nice influence on those the Mariners and I can’t around him. That’s what we wait for the season to start.” were hoping for. We were So far, Cano is embrac- hoping for his talent to play ing his role. His locker, but when you bring in tucked in a corner of the someone of his stature, how Mariners’ remodeled spring does that affect everyone training facility, is a hub of else around him? And I think it’s been good for the activity. Some days, Cano chats other guys,” Seattle general with younger players. Other manager Jack Zduriencik times, his corner is engulfed said. “And a great guy. Just by music blasting from the two speakers next to his real genuine, smart, articulate in terms of the game, chair. Everyone understands he has a great feel for the they are in the presence of a game. We’ve had several star. But Cano doesn’t carry discussions about different himself like one. He’s things and he’s got a good

BY JACOB THORPE MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

PULLMAN — Washington State’s 73-55 win over UCLA on Saturday night was more than just an uplifting couple hours at the end of a dreary season. The game leapfrogged Washington State over USC in the standings, keeping the Cougars out of last place in the conference. That means that 11th-seeded Washington State will take on sixth-seed Stanford on Wednesday in Las Vegas’ MGM Grand in the first round of the Pac-12 tournament. The game is slated for 8:36 p.m., an oddly specific time considering that it almost assuredly Next Game won’t start until after 9. The Cougars will need to pull Wednesday off another upset to advance. vs. Stanford Stanford went 2-0 against at Las Vegas Washington State this season Time: 8:36 p.m. and the Cougars have never On TV: Pac-12 beaten the Cardinal in postseason play. In 2008 the Cougars lost to Stanford 75-68 before both teams would advance to the NCAA Tournament’s “Sweet 16.” The winner will have a date with No. 3 seed Arizona State.

grasp on the game itself.” The Mariners seems to understand the star they have acquired, the guy represented by Roc Nation Sports, the guy with Jay-Z on speed dial. Cano is marketable on a national scale, the first time Seattle has employed a player with such reach since Ichiro Suzuki was in his first few seasons after arriving from Japan. But Seattle’s front office is not pushing Cano, at least for now.

Comfort first They understand this first year is about getting Cano comfortable with being somewhere other than New York and letting his play on the field speak for itself. There are nine more years to the contract for Seattle to capitalize on Cano’s marketing potential. “He’s arguably the best player in the game and to have him here and on the field as a presence, yeah, he’s a superstar but what he’s going to do for our team

McGrath: UW Reed on a roll, wins at Doral

Keselowski edges Junior on last lap in Las Vegas THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

6-0 in matches to lead Augusta State to two NCAA titles, followed by three PGA Tour wins in seven months. “I don’t see a lot of guys that have done that besides Tiger Woods and the legends of the game,” Reed said. “I believe in myself, especially with how hard I’ve worked. I’m one of the top five players in the world. I feel like I’ve proven myself.” He joined some exclusive company. Since 1990, only Woods, Phil Mickelson, Rory McIlroy and Sergio Garcia had three PGA Tour wins before turning 24. This was not an accident, either. Reed has had a share of the lead going into the final round of all three of his victories — the Wyndham Championship last August, the Humana Challenge in January and a World Golf Championship at Doral that featured the strongest field so far this year. His last two wins were wire-to-wire, including ties. Reed finished at 4-under 284, matching the highest winning score at Doral. Mark McCumber won at 284 in 1985. Reed, Donaldson and Watson were the only players to finish under par. Dustin Johnson, who lost momentum around the turn, made double bogey on the 18th hole for a 72 and tied for fourth with Richard Sterne (71).

DORAL, Fla. — Patrick Reed felt he belongs among the best in the world. He beat them all Sunday in the Cadillac Championship. Dressed in a red shirt that he always wears in the final round — with Tiger Woods in the group ahead of him — Reed made backto-back birdies early on the front nine to build a big lead and showed off a great short game when the pressure was building on the new Blue Monster at Doral. Equipped with a twoshot lead, the 23-year-old Texan wisely played the final hole conservatively. He two-putted for bogey and closed with an even-par 72 for a one-shot victory over Bubba Watson and Jamie Donaldson of Wales. Reed became the youngest winner of a World Golf Championship, his third win in his last 14 tournaments. Woods, only three shots behind going into the final round in his best chance this year to win a tournament, said his back flared up after an awkward shot out of the bunker on the sixth hole. He failed to make a birdie in the final round for the first time in his PGA Tour career, and his 78 was his worst Sunday score ever. Reed is expected to go to No. 20 in the world ranking. In his own ranking, he feels he belongs in the top five. Tiger fades He cited an amateur Woods went into the career that includes going REGIST ER

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LAS VEGAS — Dale Earnhardt Jr. knew he probably didn’t have enough fuel to finish. Being in Vegas, he decided to gamble anyway. And when Earnhardt’s tank went bust on the final lap, Brad Keselowski was right there to clean up. Keselowski surged ahead when Earnhardt ran out of fuel, claiming a dramatic victory Sunday in the NASCAR race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. Earnhardt’s Chevy sputtered and slowed out of the second turn, and Keselowski roared past him on the backstretch in his Penske Ford for the first weekend sweep in his career. Keselowski followed up Sat-

urday’s Nationwide Series victory with his first Las Vegas Cup win, doing it in exhilarating fashion against the friend and mentor who gave him his first big break in racing. “That’s what you live for as a driver, at least I do,” Keselowski said. “Those moments where you’re side by side, and you lay it all out on the racetrack and bring back the car with the tires smoking, engine smoking, and you’re worn out inside because you gave it all you had.” Earnhardt finished second and didn’t regret it, secure in his overall position thanks to the new rules in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship, which puts increased emphasis on wins.

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final round with a chance to win for the first time all year. It didn’t last very long. He beaned and bloodied a spectator on the opening hole and missed a 10-foot birdie putt. He beaned another spectator on No. 3, kicking the ball back into the fairway, only he followed that with a shot into the water and made bogey. Woods made two more bogeys over the next three holes and was an afterthought. He said the pain intensified after his bunker shot on the sixth. Woods had his left foot in the sand and his right foot flexed against the lip of the bunker. “That’s what set it off and then it was done after that,” he said. “Just see if I could actually manage . . . keep the spasms at bay.” The results are not very promising on his short road to the Masters. Woods has played only four tournaments, and only twice went 72 holes.

in terms of leadership and showing some of our young guys, it’s going to be invaluable,” Seattle vice president of marketing Kevin Martinez said. “He’ll be front and center in some of our efforts, as he should be, but it’s what he brings on the field where the organization is really going to benefit.” Cano will be part of Seattle’s always popular television commercials. And the club asked Cano to be a speaker at the opening for its new academy in the Dominican Republic. It was something Cano was more than willing to do, being just a few miles from his home. It gave the Mariners front office a sense of just how revered Cano is in the Dominican. “I know he’s really taking this serious. He has a genuine interest in making us, in any way he can, get better,” Zduriencik said. “With all the young players down in the Dominican Republic he wants to be right in the midst of it all and he wants them to relate to the Mariners and him.”

Felix shaky in Mariners’ 9-8 win over Texas THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PEORIA, Ariz. — A shaky Felix Hernandez allowed four earned runs in 2 1/3 innings before the Seattle Mariners rallied late to beat the Texas Rangers 9-8 on Sunday. Making his second Cactus League start, Hernandez (1-1) allowed four hits and walked one, while striking out four. Hernandez opened the game by issuing a leadoff walk to Jurickson Profar before sandwiching a pair of strikeouts around a flyout by Prince Fielder. Fielder got the best of Hernandez in the third, though, when he lined a double that scored Elvis Andrus and sparked a fourrun inning. Hernandez left the game one batter later after striking out Michael Choice, who reached on a wild pitch. Seattle’s reserves scored six runs in the eighth, erasing Texas’ five-run lead.

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CONTINUED FROM B1 “And we don’t have to have all kinds of bad things to happen to the other team.” Romar, a former assisThe march to the madtant at UCLA, has long ness phase of the schedule been a disciple of the phihas been a long and fruslosophy of the late Bruins trating trek for the Huscoach John Wooden. So is Seahawks coach Pete Carkies, whose hopes at comroll, whose don’t-worrypeting for a regular-season about-the-opponent, don’tconference title unraveled worry-about-anything-orwhen 6-foot-10 redshirt anybody-except-what-yousophomore forward Jerdo lectures were heard nard Jarreau was sidelined daily by the Super Bowl with a knee injury after champions. one start. The challenge of winIf they go one-and-done ning four games this week in Las Vegas, fans will — or winning even once shrug their shoulders and before having to face No. 1 think: appropriate. The seed Arizona on Thursday season went into the — will require the Huskies clunker early, and pretty to achieve the potential much remained in the they showed early in the clunker. second half Saturday. But there’s no drawback If the defense forces to dreaming, and envisionturnovers and the ball is ing the early second-half shared in transition, mira- effort Saturday expanded cles won’t be necessary. by an effort necessary to Gaining an automatic win four games in four NCAA tournament berth days. despite a mediocre regularSupernatural intervenseason record of 17-14 tion won’t be needed. Natuwould be recalled as a mir- ral will work just fine, as acle, perhaps, but the task long as the natural is as of surprising the college super as it was for a few basketball world is in their minutes against USC. hands. ________ “We don’t have to shoot 70 percent from the field John McGrath is a McClatchy every game,” said Romar. News Service sports columnist.

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B4

Fun ’n’ Advice

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

Dilbert

High blood pressure can hurt kidneys

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Classic Doonesbury (1970)

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

DEAR ABBY: I thought I was a healthy 40-year-old until I was diagnosed with high blood pressure. My doctor began treating it as a standalone condition, without considering that high blood pressure is a major risk factor for kidney disease. At first, I wasn’t even tested for kidney disease. But eventually, he gave me a urine test, and it was discovered that I had protein in my urine — one of the earliest signs of kidney damage. Apparently, my high blood pressure had damaged my kidneys. Healthy kidneys filter out wastes and toxins, but my kidneys’ ability to do so began to decrease at an alarming rate. I continued to manage my blood pressure with medication and decided to make a few lifestyle changes, as well, that helped me avoid the progression of kidney disease to kidney failure. I limited my salt intake, started eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains, decreased the amount of meat I was eating and began swimming every day. I began to feel better, and when I went to the doctor, it turned out my kidney function had stabilized. Please tell your readers that if they have high blood pressure they should be proactive and ask their doctor to check their kidneys. Early detection and lifestyle change can make a major impact on your health, as I have learned. Duane Sunwold, Spokane

by Lynn Johnston

by G.B. Trudeau

by Bob and Tom Thaves

Rose is Rose

Abigail Van Buren

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Tuck your emotions somewhere safe and sound. Getting bent out of shape will not help your relationships with friends or family. Compromise and offer your assistance, not your criticism. Focus on self-improvement, not trying to change others. 2 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Choose your friends and associates wisely. Give and take must be part of the equation if you want to form workable partnerships. Take a pass on anyone who is unpredictable. Help others and it will be reciprocated. 4 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Dear Reverend: Do it the same way doctors or lawyers do with people who approach them for “free” advice outside the office. As soon as you are approached, say firmly, “I’m studying right now. If you want to talk, please call my office, and I’ll schedule an appointment with you. Right now I’m busy.” And then refuse to be intimidated by their reaction. Unless you draw the line, they’ll suck you dry.

by Hank Ketcham

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Pickles

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Get organized and discuss your plans with people you feel can help you get ahead. A change of location will do you good, but caution while traveling will be necessary. There is money to be made, but contracts must be signed first. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Not everyone will be as open as you are. Reserve judgment if someone shares gossip with you. Information isn’t likely to be validated. A personal change at home will end up costing you more than anticipated. Recalculate and backtrack to fit your budget. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Find solutions and offer help. Your suggestions and hands-on expertise will put you in a good position to negotiate what you would like in return. You stand to benefit due to your generosity. Don’t be shy. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put your energy and effort into doing a good job. Showing your ability under unusual circumstances will make you stand out in the crowd. Your expertise will help you get ahead, but expect someone to be jealous and act unruly. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Avoid overreacting or being around someone who GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t waste time. Get to is being too demanding. Put more effort into getting the point. Talk to anyone ahead and making new conable to help you get a new tacts that can help you reach venture up and running. A your goals. Love is in the service or skill you have to offer will be profitable if you stars and romance will bring follow through. Love is high- good results. 2 stars lighted. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. CANCER (June 21-July 21): Share your thoughts 22): Take a unique approach and visit places that inspire to getting things done. Don’t you to take on something wait to see if someone else new or unusual. Let your imagination wander and you wants to go first. Don’t be will come up with workable afraid to be different or to solutions for both self- and delve into something that inspires you to try something home improvements. React based on your feelings. new. Travel, communicate 5 stars and socialize. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

tion, the National Kidney Foundation’s website is kidney.org.

Dear Abby: I’m a member of the clergy who enjoys studying for my ministry and doctoral work at a local coffee shop. Three men who go there every day have found out that I’m a minister, and they each want to talk with me while I’m there. Although all three are members of the same religion, none of them is affiliated with a church. I have invited them to visit my worship services, as well as call the office and set up an appointment with me. I have also tried to diplomatically explain that I go to the coffee shop to study. One of them ignores it, another appears hurt and the third one gets offended. When they’re not around, I am productive. When they show up, they want me to be their chaplain. Because of where I live, finding another coffee shop is not a viable option. How can I set a boundary with them and still do my studying there? Thank you. The Rev. Ken in New York

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Brian Basset

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Dear Duane: It is generous of you to share your medical history in an effort to caution my readers. The National Kidney Foundation urges everyone to learn about these vital organs and whether they might be at risk. The three major risk factors for kidney disease are: high blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of kidney failure. People who have these risk factors should ask their doctor to check their kidney function with a simple blood and urine test. Readers, March is National Kidney Month, and March 13 is World Kidney Day. If you are at risk, schedule an appointment with your doctor. For anyone who needs more informa-

by Jim Davis

Red and Rover

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Take advantage of an opportunity, but make sure you read the fine print first. Staying on top of any situation you get into personally, professionally or financially will ensure that you get ahead. A healthy regime will pay off. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You’ll have a magnetic influence on others if you share your imaginative ideas. Socializing will open up doors to people and information that will be beneficial to you in the future. Offer whatever service or information you have to share. 5 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Noah, Augustin lead Bulls over Heat BY ANDREW SELIGMAN

NBA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Joakim Noah and Jimmy Butler understand it. The real victory for the Chicago Bulls will come when they’re knocking the Miami Heat out of the playoffs, not during the regular season — no matter how charged the atmosphere is. Even so, they’ll take this. Noah had 20 points and 12 rebounds, D.J. Augustin scored 22 and the Chicago Bulls beat the Miami Heat 95-88 in overtime Sunday after Butler blocked LeBron James at the end of regulation. “I want what they have — a championship,” Noah

said. “One day, we’re going to have to get through those guys.” The Heat have owned them when it counts in recent seasons. With a healthy Derrick Rose and the No. 1 seed in 2011, Chicago fell to Miami in the Eastern Conference finals. Last year, with Rose out, the Heat knocked off the Bulls in the second round on the way to their second straight championship. “It’s still a good win,” Butler said. “It gives us confidence we can beat them. But . . . in the playoffs, like

Thibs said, we can’t go around them; you’re going to have to go through them.” Dwyane Wade scored 25 for Miami, but with James struggling again, the Heat dropped their third straight to match their longest losing streak of the season. James scored 17 points on 8-of-23 shooting and couldn’t come through after Miami blew a 12-point lead down the stretch. With a chance to win it at the end of regulation, he got stripped by Butler on a layup attempt. In overtime, it was all Bulls. Chicago outscored Miami 9-2, starting with Augustin’s 3 just under a minute in. Butler added a

jumper from the wing, Noah scored on a putback and Butler hit two free throws to make it 95-86 with 1:33 left before James made a layup. Noah also had seven assists and five blocks with his dad — tennis great Yannick Noah — looking on. Butler added 16 points and 11 rebounds while containing James. Wade tried to carry the load for Miami, particularly in the early going. Chris Bosh scored 15, but James had another rough afternoon. The four-time MVP is 23 for 59 in the three games since his career-high and franchise-record 61-point effort against Charlotte last week.

Briefly . . . 2500 students. As a former high school/college coach and athletic director, Jack is also a featured newspaper columnist, having written 12 books on the recruiting process. One of the many realities RenPORT TOWNSEND — Jack Renkens details are the high expectakens of Recruiting Realities will tions of athletes and parents when it bring his unique, no-nonsense precomes to having sports pay for a colsentation on college athletic recruitlege education. ing to Port Townsend High School “There are a lot of student-athauditorium tonight at 7 p.m. letes out there and less than 1 perRenkens’ 45-minute presentation, cent are going to a Division I school,” “It’s a Game... Know the Rules,” is he said. free and open to the public. “However you’ve got 99 percent of “It may not be what some parents want to hear, but it definitely is what kids out there that can play at the college level in divisions other than they need to hear,” Renkens said of D1. The key is finding the right his presentation. school and financial aid package.” “I’m primarily trying to get famiRenkens said student-athletes lies to be realistic about the opportumust come to terms with three basic nities that are available and to get them to understand it’s about getting realities: ■ Number one: You don’t get to your education, not about hitting the pick the school. They pick you. ball, kicking the ball, throwing the ■ Number two: A college coach ball. It’s about finding the right can’t recruit you if he/she doesn’t match academically.” Entering his 16th year touring the know who you are. Student-athletes need to market themselves. United States, Renkens has pre■ Number three: Don’t get hung sented at state athletic conferences, football clinics, college financial plan- up on the words “athletic scholarship.” Focus on “funding,” comprised ning groups, sports camps and high of academic money, merit money, schools from coast to coast. grants, endowment and achievement His speaking tour includes money. over 170 high schools each year, For more on Renkens’ presentawith enrollments from 250 to

College sports recruiting talk at PTHS tonight

tion, check the Recruiting Realities web site at www.recruitingrealities. com. To see him in action, search ‘Jack Renkens’ on YouTube.com.

Roughriders of the week PORT ANGELES — Seniors Kylee Jeffers and Ozzy Swagerty have been selected as last week’s Port Angeles High School StudentAthletes of the Week. Jeffers helped the girls basketball team in a number of ways at the district tournament. She was called upon to defend one of the district’s best players against Renton and stepped in as point guard at a critical time in the game against Franklin Pierce. Also in the Franklin Pierce game, she made 9 of 10 free throws. Swagerty took fourth at the wrestling state tournament in the 126pound weight class. “Though Ozzy came up just short of his goal to be a state champion, he finished out his career like a true champion by wrestling as well as he could on a hobbled ankle throughout the postseason,” Port Angeles wrestling coach Erik Gonzalez said. “His efforts resulted in a fourthplace finish for himself and a ninthplace finish for the Roughriders. Ozzy will be sorely missed.” Peninsula Daily News

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

B5

Zirkle leads super tight Iditarod race in Alaska THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Aliy Zirkle is barely holding on to the lead in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, arriving at a checkpoint just one minute ahead of her closest rival on Alaska’s wind-scoured western coast. The 44-year-old musher arrived at the village of Koyuk with 11 dogs at 2:07 p.m. Sunday after a 50-mile run from the previous

checkpoint at Shaktoolik. Four-time champion Jeff King and his 12-dog team are close behind, arriving into the checkpoint at 2:08 p.m. Zirkle has come in second place in the last two years in the nearly 1,000mile race to Nome, 171 miles west of Koyuk. She is seeking to become only the third woman to win the race and the first woman to win since the late Susan Butcher in 1990.

Preps: Weller CONTINUED FROM B1 Burnston; Most Improved: Katlyn Hitt; Power Quilcene’s Weller Rebounder: Sammy Rae 12 rebounds per named to 1st team (averaged game); and the Mentor Quilecene sophomore Award went to Allison guard Megan Weller was Jones. selected to the 1B Sea-Tac League First Team. Nisqually awards She averaged 18 points, Chimacum’s Orion five rebounds, three assists, three steals per game and Weller was voted Nisqually shot 52 percent from the League boys basketball allleague honorable mention. field this season. Chimacum girls players Weller also was chosen as the Rangers’ most valu- Lauren Thacker and Kierable player at the team’s sten Snyder also received end-of-season banquet last honorable mention. Cedar Park Christian’s week, in which Quilcene celebrated its season that Trey Drechsel was named included a 11-11 record and Nisqually League boys MVP, while Kaelyn Voss of a postseason berth. Other team honors were: Eatonville was chosen as Most Inspirational: Taylor girls MVP.

Hawks: Salary CONTINUED FROM B1 are balancing the future. NFL teams received Bennett and Tate are more room in their waisttwo important starters, but bands last week when the they don’t carry the panache salary cap for the 2014 seaof free safety Earl Thomas son was raised $10 million or cornerback Richard to $133 million. The cap is expected to Sherman, who can become rise during the next three free agents after the 2014 years, something that could season. be a huge benefit for the While the Seahawks Seahawks in their attempt manage this year’s salary to remain on top of the cap and roster needs, they league.

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4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General General

91190150

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Classified

B6 MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

DOWN 1 AOL, for one 2 Deer girl 3 Devices to stop tiny invading armies 4 Semiannual time-change amount

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. BOURBON VS. SCOTCH Solution: 7 letters

D I S T I N C T I R I P S A N By Brom Hart

5 Admit (to) 6 Patronize, as a hotel 7 Spot for a cat, or drink like a cat 8 Wire service initials 9 Coffee order: Abbr. 10 Thinks ahead 11 Enzyme that breaks down fats 12 Handy 13 Plays the banjo, like someone “in the kitchen with Dinah” 18 Unwell 21 Wetter than wet 22 “The Alphabet Song” start 23 “Dies __”: Latin hymn 25 Mos. and mos. 26 Fancy tie fabric 27 “Growing” difficulties 29 Craps cube 33 Spades in a fourspades bridge contract, say 34 Sunlit courtyards 37 Ireland’s __ Féin 39 [error left as is]

3/10/14

Friday’s Puzzle Solved Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

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D I R I E T S A T E M S W R C

B A R R C B W A N A T O A A E

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A D A M A H E T E E R M R C N

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C S R S W C C E E U M T S L T

H E K A K Y O A I E H S W F T

www.wonderword.com

L E T Y E L N E L T L E E L Y

Y R E B M E J A C K Y R R T D L E L ‫ګ‬ W N D A ‫ګ‬ A S A S ‫ګ‬ R I S L M N M T T ‫ګ‬ G O I R O O N X A C A E E I S N R D G D T I U H E E T A T G A V O R A Y D O B G

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Aged, Amber, American, Aroma, Austere, Barley, Barrel, Batch, Body, Bottle, Caramel, Cask, Charred, Corn, Creamy, Distinct, Drambuie, Fermented, Firm, Flavor, Grain, Jack, Kentucky, Malt, Mash, Mixed, Natural, New Orleans, Nutty, Older, Pure, Rich, Salt, Scotland, Single, Smooth, Soda, Spirit, Straight, Sweet, Taste, Test, Warm, Water, Wheat, Whiskey, Yeast Yesterday’s Answer: Wedding THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

DEZDA ©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

GALEE (c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

40 Soup legume 41 Many a DeMille movie 42 Use a keyboard 44 Command to Rover 46 Tribe for which a helicopter is named 47 Gave 10 percent to the church 48 Borrowed, as a library book

3/10/14

50 Japanese religion 53 Phi Beta __ 54 Put a stop to 55 Settle, as a debt 59 Chaste 61 NHL player, e.g. 62 “__ Father, who art ...” 63 One in Quebec 64 Qt. halves 65 Nonetheless

DUNROG

DIHNED

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 “Famous Potatoes” state 6 Speak drunkenly 10 Addition word 14 “__ what?”: “What next?” 15 Adhesive strip 16 Shopper’s memory aid 17 Porky’s girlfriend 19 Impressionist 20 Very __ yours 21 Utter mess 22 Tire inflater 24 Feigns sleep, say 28 Pitt of “Troy” 30 Three-note chord 31 Aboveground trains 32 Per __: for each person, as income 35 Got one’s uniform dirty, perhaps 36 Runs away from military duty 38 Israeli parliament 43 “Exodus” author Leon 45 Haughtily terse 46 “From __ Zinc”: vitamin slogan 49 Skimpy skirts 51 Cut out, as coupons 52 Either of two of the Inspector Clouseau films, with “The” 56 Cooler cubes 57 World book 58 Like a lummox 60 Lamb serving 61 Yipping adoptee 66 Pile 67 Undersized 61Across 68 Sharp-crested ridge 69 Novelist Ferber 70 Twistable cookie 71 Leavening agent

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: Yesterday's

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: ACUTE PESKY AMAZED PROPER Answer: The shoppers thought the new grocery store was — A SUPER MARKET

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale General General General General General Wanted Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Habitat for Humanity, f u l l - t i m e . To a p p l y please see posting at www.habitatejc.org I D E A L A S S I S TA N T innkeeper needed for upcoming summer season. Interact with g u e s t s , s o m e fo o d prep, cleaning, phone and computer. Busy 18 to 20 hours per week, Apr-Oct. Great working environment, very fair wage, in P.A. Respond to innkeepers assistant@gmail.com REPORTER The Sequim Gazette, an award-winning weekly community newspaper in Sequim, Wa., is seeking an experienced reporter. Your assignments will be varied, including everything from local government and politics to investigative pieces and more. If you have a passion for community journalism, can meet deadlines and produce people-or iented news and feature stories on deadline (for print and web), we’d like to hear from you. Exper ience with InDesign, social media and photo skills a plus. Minimum of one year news reporting experience or equivalent post-secondary education required. This fulltime position includes medical, vision and dental benefits, paid holidays, vacation and sick leave, and a 401k with company match. One of the top weeklies in Washington State, the S e q u i m G a ze t t e wa s named the top newspaper in the state in its circulation size by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association in 2005-2008 and 2010, and among the nation’s best in 2011 and 2012 ( N a t i o n a l N ew s p a p e r Association). We are a newsroom of four, covering the stories of the Sequim-Dungeness Valley on the Olympic Peninsula. We are par t of the Sound Publishing newsgr o u p t h a t b o a s t s 4 3 n ew s p a p e r t i t l e s, t h e largest community media organization in Washington State. Interested individuals should submit a resume with at least 3 non-returnable writing samples in pdf format to hr@soundpublishng.com or by mail to SEQ/REP/HR Department Sound Publishing, Inc., 11323 Commando Rd. W, Main Unit Everett, WA 98204

DEVELOPMENT Director - United Good Neighbors of Jefferson County (UGN). Seeking Development Director with demonstrated fundraising, marketing, and volunteer management success to substantially increase awareness of, and contributions to, the community’s safety net programs. 4-year degree or equivalent required. Full-time; Salary range: $35,000$40,000 DOE. Email resume and cover letter by March 17 to debbie @WeAreUGN.org ENTRY LEVEL MILL RELIEF N I P P O N PA P E R I N DUSTRIES USA is recruiting for Extra Board positions used to fill mill operations’ vacancies as needed. REQUIREMENTS: High school graduate (not G.E.D.); age 18 or older. Able to wor k rotating 12-hour shifts and perform work classified with Heavy Strength requirements. Must meet requirements for consideration. Please send cover letter and resume to jobs@npiusa.com AA/EEO/E-Verify employer. EXECUTIVE Director: experience required, m i n . B a c h e l o r ’s d e gr e e, M a s t e r ’s p r e ferred. 3-5 yrs nonprofit mgmt and grantw r i t i n g ex p e r i e n c e , preferably in health care or human services organizations with knowledge of healthcare safety net syst e m s fo r v u l n e ra bl e p o p u l a t i o n s . Fa m i l iarity with Carver Policy Governance Model. Salary based on experience. Submit resumes to the following e-mail: manager @vimoclinic.org

INFORMATION & ASSISTANCE SPECIALIST 25 hrs wk, located in the Information & Assistance Sequim office. Provides I&A to seniors, adults with disabilities, caregivers, & families in a friendly social ser vice setting. Good communication & computer skills a must. BA Soc Sci and 2 yrs direct service exp. or 2 yrs relevant college and 4 yrs exp., WDL, auto ins. required. $13.16/hr, full benefit pkg, Contact Information & A s s i s t a n c e, 1 - 8 0 0 801-0050 for job descrip. & applic. packet. Closes 4:00 pm 3/10/14. I&A is an EOE. KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 LOWER Elwha Health Clinic job announcement. Medical Assistant wanted with clinical exper ience, to work in a tribal health clinic. Min. 2 years of experience. FT position with benefits. WA State certification required. Indian preference in hiring in accordance with PL 93-638. Open until filled. Contact: Personnel, 2851 Lower Elwha Rd., Pt. Angeles, WA 98363 (360) 452-8471 ext. 7429 for required application packet. Or go online to w w w. e l w h a . o r g t o download an application.

P/T PATIENT DRIVER (15-20 hrs/month) Pacific Cataract and Laser Institute is a l e a d i n g p r ov i d e r o f cataract and laser vision correction surger y. Our Silverdale office is hiring a Port Angeles based par ttime driver to provide transportation for our patients as needed in a company provided vehicle. Requirements include a current driver license, favorable driver’s record upon job o f fe r ( a p p l i c a n t ex pense), flexible weekday schedule and good mobility. Duties include general vehicle maintenance, good map-reading and address locating skills, assisting patients to and from vehicle, and lifting up to 50 pounds. Semi-retired applicants welcome. Online application required at www.pcli.com under Career Opportunities. QUEETS Clearwater School District is seeking an education leader to serve as Superintendent/Principal, starting July 1, 2014. The successful candidate will have skills as an excellent communicator and listener, outstanding organizational abilities, a collaborative leadership style, knowledge of school finance and sound fiscal management, be a visionary and empowering leader, and show a commitment to ser ving ALL students. Exper ience with UW CEL framewor k preferred. At least three years academic teaching at the elementary level, curriculum development, and principal experience will also be necessary. Queets Clearwater is a K-8 school located approximately 20 minutes north of Amanda Park, in the beautiful Olympic N a t i o n a l P a r k . Fr e e housing, as well as a generous benefits package. For information on how to apply please contact Mike Ferguson at (360)962-2395. Application deadline is March 28th, 2014.

MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT TEMPORARY ONE YEAR ASSIGNMENT Opportunity to work in a dynamic group practice a t Ja m e s t ow n Fa m i l y Health Clinic. T h i s t e m p o ra r y gra n t funded position is res p o n s i bl e fo r p a t i e n t care and requires a HS diploma and current CPR cer tification. This grant funded position HOUSEKEEPER Starting at $9.50/hr., ap- runs through April 2015 ply in person at Tides with potential for continInn, 1807 Water St., Port ued employment beyond end of grant. Excellent Townsend. benefits, Full-Time, Mon. - Fri. Indian preference for qualified candidates. SERVICE WRITER/ Please visit http:// TIRE SALES jamestowntribe. Apply in person at Port iapplicants.com for full Angeles Tire Factor y, Permanent and On-call description and to apply. 3 2 0 Tu m w a t e r Tr u c k positions available now Route, P.A. at Clallam Bay NOW INTERVIEWING Corrections Center Support/Care Staff Rainshadow Laundry Correctional Officer 1 & Carwash in Sequim To work with developPay starts at $16.99 hr., mentally disabled adults, is seeking customer plus full benefits. service specialists for no exper ience necesCloses 4/2/14. Fill-In and part-time at- sary, will train. $10 hr. to Apply on-line: tendants. Please apply start. CNAs encouraged www.careers.wa.gov. in person Mon.-Thurs. to apply. Apply in person For further information 7-2 p.m. 143 N. 7th at 1020 Caroline, P.A. please call Laura from 8-4 p.m. Ave. at (360)963-3208 EOE

THE QUILCENE COMPUTER Care SCHOOL DISTRICT Is accepting applications Sales & Service: Cusfor the following certifi- tom builds or hardware cated positions (may be repairs. 24 yrs exp. combined depending on Fr e e e s t i m a t e s, V i cer tification) for 2014/ r us/Malware remov2015: .6 FTE K-12 Mu- a l . D i s c o u n t s a v a i l , s i c / B a n d ; . 4 F T E L i - d r o p o f f s w e l c o m e. brarian; .4 FTE Foreign 170 Deytona, Sequim. Chet@olypen.com Language (Spanish or 360-808-9596 French). Call (360)7653363 for application maFather & Sons’ terials or download from website www.quilcene. L a n d s c a p e S e r v i c e since 1992. 1 time clean wednet.edu. EOE. ups, pruning, lawn mainWAREHOUSE tenance, weeding, orDELIVERY ganic lawn renovations. Full-time, must be able 681-2611 to work Saturday, heavy FRUIT Tree Pruning: Exlifting, clean driving record and background pert in fruit, ornamental check. Apply in person and exotic shrubs. Semi retired to take the time to at 1114 E. First St., P.A. do it right. Photos on WE NEED YOU! PDN site. Also complete Case Manager & Men- lawn service. Book now. tal Health Therapist FT P.A. only. Local call w/benes. Req. BA & 2 (360)808-2146 yrs exp. Per-Diem Medical Ass i s t a n t E l i g i b i l i t y fo r HANDYMAN for Hire. Property maintenance, HCA license req. Per-Diem DMHP MA, or painting, dump runs, BSN with mental health minor home repairs, house washing, etc. exp. Free estimates. Resume/cvr ltr to: Available anytime. Call PBH 118 E. 8th St. (360)461-9755 Port Angeles, WA 98362 EOE M OW I N G , P r u n i n g , http://Peninsula thatching, bark dust. behavioral.org Honest and dependable. (360)582-7142

4080 Employment Wanted ADEPT YARD CARE Bark, bed prep, etc. (360)452-2034 Affordable Lawn Maintenance (360)477-1805

A LT E R AT I O N S a n d Sewing. Alterations, mending, hemming and some heavyweight sewing available to you from me. Call (360)531-2353 ask for B.B. Alterations and Sewing. Alterations, mending, hemming and some heavyweight sewing available to you from me. Call (360)531-2353 ask for B.B. AT T E N T I O N A s p i r i n g Authors: Exper ienced writer offers one-on-one tutoring to ambitious creative writers. Ages 13 and up. $12 an hour. Will work with your schedule. Email newau thor0701@gmail.com if interested. Barefoot Hoof Trimming Corrective Hoof Care Zach, (509)770-0191

RUSSELL ANYTHING 775-4570 or 681-8582 SKILLED LABOR 30 yrs. exp. inside and outside. (360)301-2435.

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Beautiful new 3 bed, 2 bath, 1,815 sf home with mountain view in the Estates. Covered front porch, cherry laminate flooring, Hardiplank siding and heat pump. The kitchen features slab granite counter tops with tile back splash and solid custom hickory cabinets with pull outs. The spacious master suite has a walkin closet and bathroom with tile floor, double sink hickory vanity and walk-in shower. 30’ x 24’ garage with an 8’ door. MLS#272005. $289,900. Kelly Johnson (360)477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

FSBO: 1,644 sf, custom 3 Br., 2.5 bath, gentle sloping treed 7+ acres, CAREGIVER/Housekeep/cook/errands. 30 oversized 2 car garage with adjoining RV caryrs exp., good local refs. por t, unattached addi(360)912-1238 tional garage, dead-end road, Erving Jacobs, beHomecare Provided Licensed CNA, will pro- tween Seq. and P.A., vide loving, experienced non-smoke. $343,000. (360)460-4868 care. (360)681-4019.

CONDO IN THE COUNTRY Sunny souther n exposure with this 2 br., 2 bath condo. EZ access to town, yet out in the country! Updated lighting and wall heaters. Att a c h e d 1 c a r g a ra g e. Large, private, fenced in backyd with patio and fruit trees. Large common area with cherr y trees. MLS#280330. $133,500. Tom Blore (360)683-4116 PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE

IMMACULATE HOME On one acre, in a peaceful setting, down a private countr y lane, but close to town. 3 BR, 2 B A , 2 0 1 7 S F, a t r u e gour met kitchen, heat p u m p, s k y l i g h t s, a n d basement with 2 workshops/hobby rooms. Surrounded by beautiful gardens, decks, hot tub, and water feature. MLS#280339. $325,000. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

P.A.: Water and mountain view, 4 Br., 3 bath, 2 car garage, updated t h r o u g h o u t , 3 bl o ck s from Peninsula College, private yard with hot tub. Potential for rental space downstairs. $209,000. (360)477-9993 or (360)670-9673.

DEVELOPER SPECIAL Great oppor tunity to create your own piece of paradise inside the city limits. 3.48 acres of land waiting for you to build dream home OR develop the land into lots just as the 2nd phase of this property to the East was developed. Property has been sur veyed so the corners are marked! MLS#280231. $75,000. Ania Pendergrass Evergreen (360)461-3973

MAJESTIC MOUNTAIN VIEW Custom home on one acre with a great room,private dining room and a master bedroom suite with two walk in closets and a soaking tub. This home is perfect for entertaining friends with it’s gas fireplace to keep you war m in the winter and a large Trex deck for barbeques in the summer. $259,900 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 3 bath. Want to see more? www.peninsuladaily news.com Custom 1.5 story cedar home has wood stove, heat pump, skylights, teak wood floors, large master suite. Over sized 2 car garage. Beautiful easy c a r e ya r d w i t h f r u i t trees. Enjoy the golf course and pool. $239,000 (360_683-8317

DUNGENESS BAY NEIGHBORHOOD One level, 3 bed, 2 bath home on a half acre corner lot near the boat launch and community beach access. Lovely, souther n exposure fenced back yard with large deck, fruit trees, garden shed and Mountain view. The home features an energy efficient heat pump, new roof, living room with wood stove, family room with built-in hutch and office space, master suite with full bath plus a sitting area. Large front deck to enjoy the views of the ships in the Strait. MLS#280333. $249,000. Kelly Johnson (360)477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

MOUNTAIN VIEW HOME Sequim 3 bedroom - 3.5 b a t h r o o m - 2 1 5 0 s f, granite counters / custom cabinets / hardwood floors / tile, master bedroom with walk-in-closet and private deck, breakfast bar / fireplace / appliances included, fe n c e d ya r d / p r i va t e patio / attached 2 car garage, great location close to amenities and Discovery Trail! MLS#280168. $354,450. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-477-9189

NEW CASH PRICE OF $99,400 3 br., 2 bath, remodel. Buy “as is” for this price. A good investment proper ty that needs some w o r k , d o yo u r s e l f o r have work done for additional cost to cover those expenses. MLS#271597 Rebecca Jackson (360)417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY F O R S A L E : M o ve - i n ready. 2,300 sf, 3 bed/2 bath plus a large bonus room. Large living area, dining room, kitchen with island. Mountain view, 1.01 landscaped acres, close to Discovery Trail. Covered front porch and large rear deck. 1,008 sf detached garage with P.A.: Sunny, 2 br., 1,056 workshop. $229,000. sf., walk-in closets, (360)582-9782 breakfast bar, vinyl wind ow s, n ewe r f u r n a c e CHECK OUT OUR a n d e l e c t r i c a l p a n e l , NEW CLASSIFIED patio, covered deck, car port and shop. $94,500. WIZARD AT Great fianancing www.peninsula available! dailynews.com (360)808-4476

SPECTACULAR VIEWS! Unobstructed views of the harbor Strait to Canada, Cascades, and beyond, 0.40 acre lot! all usable! new remodel / 1,410 sf, 2 br., 2 bath, 735 sf garage / separate workshop, rv parking / close to downtown. MLS#280307. $295,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

WELL KEPT HOME M t . V i ew s a n d L a n d s c a p e d ya r d , 2 b e d rooms, 2 baths, 1,080 sf, energy efficient heat pump, new flooring in ma bath, 2 car garage with storage. MLS#598699/280312 $117,500 Deb Kahle (360) 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND “WHATA WATER VIEW!” 3 br., 3 bath has great view and deck to view it from. Private back yard with hot tub. Beautifully landscaped. In home m o v i e t h e a t e r. N e a t shop with dust prevention system. Lots to like. MLS#272287. $269,000. Dick Pilling (360)417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage

P.A./SEQUIM: River Rd. 1.6 ac. Deer Park Rd. 2.4 ac. Dan Kelly 53 ac. Lake Sutherland 50’ of lake frontage. Elwha 13 ac heavy timber. Owner finance. (360)461-3688.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

311 For Sale 505 Rental Houses Manufactured Homes Clallam County WANTED: ‘77 or newer, 24’ X 36’ double wide mobile, must be moveable. 417-3571.

605 Apartments Clallam County

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes

1163 Commercial Rentals

SEQ: 2 Br., fenced yard, detatched garage, close to shopping, W/S paid. $800. (360)457-6092.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

SEQUIM: Nice, single w i d e , 2 b r. , 1 b a t h , wheelchair access ramps, in quiet mobile CENTRAL P.A.: Conhome park. $700, last, v e n i e n t 2 B R 1 s t f l r. DISCO BAY: Fabulous security. (360)477-6117. $589, 1BR 2nd flr. $555water view, newly reno$656 incl. util! Clean, vated 3 Br., 2 ba. $900. 605 Apartments light, NO SMOKE/pet (360)460-2330 maybe. 504-2668. Clallam County E A S T P. A . : 4 0 ’ 5 t h P.A.: 1 Br., downtown, wheel, 3 tip-outs. $550 m t n . v i e w. N o p e t s . 1ST Month Rent mo., cable TV and Wifi. $550. (360)582-7241. Free! 457-9844 or 460-4968 EVERGREEN JAMES & PA : 1 B r. , n o COURT APTS ASSOCIATES INC. pets/smoking, W/S/G. (360)452-6996 Property Mgmt. $550. (360)457-1695. • Nice, family environ(360)417-2810 ment with plenty of HOUSES/APT IN P.A. room for your children SEQUIM: 1 Br., in town, A 1 br 1 ba ...............$475 to play. some utils, no pets/ H 1 br 1 ba duplex....$500 • 2, 3 Br. units avail. smoke, $550 mo., $700 dep. (360)460-3369. H 2 br 1 ba ...............$750 • Must income qualify 2202 West 16th, P.A. H 3 br 1.5 ba ............$850 WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br. H 3 br 1 ba .............$1000 apt. $550, $550 dep., H 4 br 2 ba.view..$1,350 lease. (360)457-7364. HOUSES/APTS IN SEQ Managed by Sparrow A 2 br 1.5 ba ............$875 Management, Inc. 665 Rental H 2+ br 2 ba .............$850 H 2 br 2 ba. river ....$1000 Duplex/Multiplexes H 3 br 3 ba .............$1700 CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba, no smoking/pets. Complete List at: P.A.: Clean 2 br., no $500. (360)457-9698. 1111 Caroline St., P.A. smoke/pets. $650 first, last, dep. (360)460-7235 P.A.: 2,000 sf, 2 Br., CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent den, 2 ba, sauna, JacuzSEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, zi, NP, NS. $1,000 mo., references required. W/D, 1st, last, dep. $600 $700. (360)452-3540. plus dep. (360)452-7743 mo. (360)461-0842.

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

TWO OFFICES IN DOWNTOWN SEQUIM GAZETTE BUILDING FOR SUB-LEASE 448-sq-ft for $550 mo., 240-sq-ft for $350 mo. Perfect for accountant or other professional. S h a r e d c o n fe r e n c e room, restroom, wired for high-speed Internet. Contact John Brewer, publisher, (360)417-3500

SEQUIM: Clean, spacious, 2 Br., 2 ba, den, laundr y room, garage, W/D, large fenced yard, great mtn. view, no pets/ smoking. $900 mo. plus security dep., incl. yard, trash, septic. (360)681-5216

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares WANTED: Mature senior looking for furnished room in shared house, Sequim area. Needs some storage. Willing to pay $450-$500/mo, including utilites. (239)216-6496

1163 Commercial Rentals PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

6005 Antiques & Collectibles ANTIQUE DOLL RESTORATION Nurse Nancy America’s Rembrandt of doll restoration will be at Sequim Elegant Flea, Sequim Prairie Grange, Friday March 14 and Saturday March 15, 9-3 p.m. Bring your cher ished childhood dolls with you for a free appraisal and estimate of restoration. (360)265-5664

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 B7

6010 Appliances

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

TURBO COOLERS: (2) three door, less than two years old. $3,500 each. (360)301-3377

HANDGUN: 1911 Colt, series 70, Mark IV, large frame, hi-cap mags and 45 ammo. $1,200 for all. (360)461-5195

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

6035 Cemetery Plots

MISC: Highend custom AR-15, stainless barrel, nickel boron BCG, am6065 Food & BURIAL SITE: In Mt. mo, $1,100. Glock 19 Angeles Memorial Park, 9 m m l i k e n e w , t w o Farmer’s Market mags, $550. Slidefire Garden of Devotion. $1,999. (360)452-9611. stock, $280. Nickel BorTHE SUN’S OUT! on BCG, $190. Specialized bike, $200. Prices Blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, fruit trees, 6042 Exercise FIRM. Jason walnut and hazelnut (360)460-7628 Equipment trees, cypress, sequoias, noble and douglas fir P I S T O L S : B r o w n i n g MISC: Thule Sidekick trees, (20% off all ornaand rack, like new for 1955 .380/9mm, shor t mental trees). 2004 VW Beetle, $250. and Hi-Standard M-101 G&G Farms, 95 Clover Pro-for GR 80 recum- .22LR. $400 each, in- Ln., off Taylor Cutoff, b e n t , p r o g r a m m a b l e cluding holsters. Sequim. (360)683-8809. (206)550-4660 bike, $150. E-mail photo available. (360)385-7405 R I F L E : A K - 4 7 . E x t r a 6075 Heavy clips, ammo. $600. (360)670-3053 Equipment 6045 Farm Fencing

& Equipment

6075 Heavy Equipment

C AT / Tr u ck / Tra i l e r Combination. 1997 Ford F250 “Heavy Duty” 4x4: 7.3 Power Stroke with Manual Trans. This rare low milage truck (130k) is in excellent condition and has been well maintained by a single owner. Truck comes with New Tires and Canopy. 2005 Caterpillar 247B MultiTe r r a i n w i t h l o w h r s (104). This unit is also in excellent condition and comes complete with side windows and a front door kit. The following quick connect attachments are included and are original CAT equipment: Auger A14B with 9 inch Bit; 78” Angle Blade; 72” bucket and pallet forks.2005 Trailm a x 1 2 U T E Tr a i l e r . Trailer has very little usage. $58,000. (360)681-8504

RIFLE: AR-15, Windh a m , 5 . 5 6 m m , 5 0 0 + GMC: ‘98 C7500 series truck, propane new JasTRACTOR: 2011 Cub rounds. per engine under warCadet Yanmar tractor, $895. (360)504-2520. ranty, flat bed, lumber EQUIPMENT TRAILER bucket and backhoe. 24 24’, 3 axle with ramps. racks and tool boxes, Alhorse, 12 hours. Asking $3,200/obo 6055 Firewood, lison tranny. $10,200/ $15,000. (360)452-9314. (360)683-3215 obo. (360)683-3215. Fuel & Stoves TRACTOR: Mahindra 28 TRUCK/TRACTOR: ‘56 hp, hydrostatic transmisSEMI END-DUMP NICE, DRY Kenworth , new batter- TRAILER: High lift-gate, sion with attachments, FIREWOOD ies, excellent r unning ex. cond. $15,000/obo. approx 175 hrs., excel$190 cord condition. $6,500/obo. lent condition. $10,500/ (360)417-0153 (360)477-8832 (360)683-3215 obo. (760)594-7441.

D •I •R •E •C •T •O •R •Y

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

No job too small!

LAWN CARE MAINTENANCE

PAINTING

FOX PAINTING

Licensed Cont#FOXPAPC871D7

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274 larryshomemaintenaceonline.com

RDDARDD889JT

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PAINTING

LAWNCARE

Painting The

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right!

Driveways - Utilities - Site Prep - Demolition Concrete Removal - Tree & Stump Removal Drainage & Storm Water Specialist Engineering Available - Rock Walls Lawn Restoration - Hydroseeding Top Soil - Compost - Bark

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All Repairs Needed • Siding • Windows • Gutters Environmentally friendly Products Exterior Chemical Treatment Power Washing Gutter Cleaning • Window Washing

360-452-2054

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Lic. # ANTOS*938K5

Landscapes by

ockburn.INC Now’s the time to

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Sale Price $ 50 Only 4 per foot Bonded & Insured AAGUT**964K6

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

TV REPAIR

TV Repair

MNC ROOFING No Obligation Quotes All Kinds of Roofs Power Washing Emergency Leakes

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/PSUIXFTU&MFDUSPOJDT

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Over 43 Yrs Experience Licenced & Bonded Lic.#MNCROR*877RC

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NEED A DUCTLESS HEAT PUMP?

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HEAT PUMP

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HEATING/COOLING

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by Bliss

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Angeles Heating install those. City & County Rebates are available. How about service to your existing Heat pump? We service all brands at competitive rates. Call us, We can help you with all your Heating and Cooling needs

Hair Extentions

Beautify your home & eliminate damage. On-the-job forming in my factory on wheels. It’s quick and affordable!

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HAIR AND NAILS

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed • Bonded • Insured 42989644

41978361

That Angeles Heating is one of the only Companies on the Peninsula that still offers Oil Heat service? If you’re in need of oil heat service Call BOB at ANGELES HEATING today!

30 colors to choose from!

Owner/Operator Dan Scribner

Licensed CONTR#A2ZFEF*870DM Bonded & Insured

PAINTING

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

42977922

Email: a2zfencing@hotmail.com CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! www.a2zfencing.net 360-460-9504

HEATING

OIL HEAT DID YOU KNOW

Cedar-Chain Link-Vinyl, Custom Wrought Iron Gates & Fencing, Installation and Repairs

360-681-0722 Lic # SERVIOP965R7

GUTTERS

Over 43994534

3 6 0 - 4 52 - 3 7 0 6 • w w w . n w h g . n e t

23597511

Appliances

360-460-0518 SEAMLESS ALUMINUM

Design & Construction

www.dungenesslandscaper.com

Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

Flooring

General Contractors Water/Fire Damage Expertise Complete Home and Business Repair 431007157

C

REPAIR/REMODEL

ANTHONY’S SERVICE

LANDSCAPING

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

• Fully Insured • Licensed • FREE • Senior Estimates Discount

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Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

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WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

39881502

914 S. Eunice St. Port Angeles

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE

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360-477-1935DONARAG875DL • constructiontilepro.com

TREE SERVICE

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41968949

AA

“AFFORDABLE HOME IMPROVEMENTS”

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Removal of popcorn or acoustic ceilings Water Damage Smoke Damage Removal of wallpaper Repair of cracks and holes Texture to match Orange Peel - Knock Down - Hand Trowel

APPLIANCES

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC. 457-9875

(360) 460-3319

We Need Work Interior Painting

26636738

Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

Peninsula Since 1988

GENERAL CONST. ARNETT

24614371

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

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Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

TILE & STONE

Remodels Interior & Exterior Kitchen, Baths, Decks, Fences, Laminate and Hardwood Flooring

Complete Lawn Care Hauling Garbage Runs Free Estimates BIG DISCOUNT for Seniors

Exterior Painting

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

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• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

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116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA Visit our website: www.dickinsonexcavation.com Locally Operated for since 1985

582-0384

No Job Too Small

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Call (360) 683-8332

Quality Work

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• Raods/Driveways • Grading • Utilities • Landscaping, Field Mowing & Rotilling • Snow Removal 23590152

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Larry Muckley

Columbus Construction • Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Excavation and General Contracting • All Site Prep - includes Manufactured Homes • Land Clearing and Grubbing • Septic Systems • Rock Walls & Rockeries

✓ Senior Discount ✓ Yard Service ✓ Hedges/Trees ✓ Roof/Gutter Cleaning

41595179

Chad Lund

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Serving Jefferson & Clallam County

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

REPAIR/REMODEL

23590413

457-6582 808-0439

32743866

(360) (360)

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

In s id e , O u ts id e , A ny s id e

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Jami’s

Larry’s Home Maintenance

Painting & Pressure Washing

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

452-0755 775-6473

43935701 3-9

SERVICE


Classified

B8 MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014

6140 Wanted & Trades

Momma

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

by Mell Lazarus

WA N T E D : RV, R o a d Trek, 20’, with queen bed, low miles. Under $40,000. (360)452-1519. WANTED TO BUY Salmon/bass plugs and lures, P.A. Derby memorabilia (360)683-4791 AMMO: .380 Auto, 46 CORK BOOTS: Westco, size 9, used 1 month, Rd. box. $15. cost $400. $200. (360)775-7410 (360)640-0556 AMMO: Blanks, 308 belt COVER: Truxport roll-up of 95 rds. $25. Tonneau cover for Ford (360)775-7410 Ranger. $90. BATTLE TANK: Radio (360)775-7960 control, 1/20 scale, MIA DESK: L shaped dark ABRAMS, New. $50. hardwood. $30. (360)683-7435 (360)477-7117 BEAM: Pressure treated, 11’ long, 11.25’ wide, DINNER: White porcelain, William Sonoma, 30 3.5’ thick. $40. pieces. $75. (360)640-0556 (360)683-6275 BED MAT: Rubber, DiaDOG CRATE: medium, mond plate, 6’ x 10’, 1/8” metal, 30” x 30” x 24”. thick, new. $50. $50. (360)683-0146. (360)460-5762 BICYCLE: 21 speed Ex- DOLL: Hard plastic 19” summer dress and pedition, saddle bag. shoes. $75. $200. (360)582-0812. (360)681-3492 BICYCLE: Batavus MixD V D s: 36 assorted te Racer, Bell two-bike DVDs, excellent conditrunk rack. $100/obo. tion. $3 each. (360)457-3400 (360)452-8953 BINOCULARS: Bauch & EXERCISE MACHINE Lomb, custom, National C a r d i o exe r c i s e m a Audubon Society. $100. chine. $10. (360)683-6275 (360)452-3550 BIRDING SCOPE: Au- FEZ: Shriner, Afifi Made d u b o n L i g h t w a v e in USA. $10. 15-45x, new in box. $95. (360)683-9295 (360)477-6985 FILE CABINET: 2 drawB O B B L E H E A D : Ke n er, wooden, heavy, no Griffey Jr., 2013 mari- top. $20. ners hall of fame, new. (360)683-8606 $40. (360)457-5790. FIRE EXTINGUISHER B O B B L E H E A D : Ke n Vintage, red with yellow Griffey Jr., 2013 mari- lettering. $25. ners hall of fame, new. (360)452-6842 $40. (360)457-5790. FOOSBALL TABLE BOOKS: Harr y Potter Freestanding. $65. hard covers, #1-7. $69 (360)670-3025 for set. (360)775-0855. FREE: Coffee table. BOOTS: Justin cowboy, (360)681-8034. roper style, 11.5. $15. FREE: Futon, dissem(360)683-9295 bl e d a n d r e p a i r e d t o BREAD MACHINE function property. Hitachi, ex. cond., $25. (360)457-8330 (360)683-0997 FREE: Large wood BRONZEWARE SET burning stove, iron, great Handmade Thai bronze- for shop, you haul/cap ware set, 165 pc., wood ceiling. (360)457-2931. case. $60. 681-7568. FREE: Patio table, cart, CANOPY: Fits ‘92 Toyo- 2 chairs, chest of drawta pick-up, black, tinted ers, sewing machine, skis. $50. (360)681-2811 windows. $200. (360)775-9631 FREE: Work bench, with CARVING: “Roadruner,” vise, 66” x 30”. (360)504-2520 by local artist. $200. (360)681-2968 FURNITURE: File cabiCERAMIC: Lladro Latino net, (2) drawer file cabiboy with dog, “Gres” fin- net, wood, heavy, not top. $20. (360)683-8606. ish. $95. (360)681-7579 GOLF CLUBS: With CHARGER: Radio con- bag, cart, balls, 5-6-7-9 trol charger, cone lipo and wedge, putters. $40. (360)452-6974 charger, good cond. $45. (360)504-2999. HAT: Red, new, wide CHARGER: Radio con- brim, lovely straw, nettrol charger,NI-ED, NI- ting bow, feathers, never worn. $12.50. 681-2720. MH. $15 for both. (360)504-2999 HEART MONITOR With pulse reading. C H E S T: 4 d rawe r s, n e w l y p a i n t e d , n e w $10/obo. (360)452-6842. hardware, 36” x 45”. HYDRAULIC PRESS $45. (360)457-6431. 12 ton, imported, nearly C H E S T : 4 d r a w e r s , new. $70. (360)775-5248 small, 16” x 35”. $20. (360)457-6431 JACKET: Leather, women’s, waist length, mediCHINA CABINET: Two u m / p e t i t e, bl a ck , l i ke piece, excellent condi- new. $100. 683-9131. tion. $20. (360)797-4178 JACKET: XL, 7 Cedars, embroidered front and CHINA: Vintage Bone, back. $65. 12 tea cups $5 each. 8 (360)683-0146 Demi-Tasse Cups, $5 each. (360)582-0490. JAZZ CD: The best of Miles Davis, John ColCLOCK: Antique, Ad- trane, Columbia. $5. m a n t i n e m a h o g a n y, (360)457-5790 Seth Thomas 1916. $200. (360)582-1622. KAYAK: Penguin, one person, hardly used, COATS: Wool, (3), la- paddle. $100. dies, 12-14, med length, (360)683-8606 good cond. $5 ea. KAYAK: Penguin, one (360)452-6974 person, hardly used, COMPOUND BOW paddle included. $100. #50. $35. (360)683-6097 (360)683-8606

LIGHT FIXTURES: Ba- S AW : 1 0 ” t a bl e s aw, roque style, (1) large, (3) steel dust catcher. $100. small, cream color. (360)808-1195 $150. (360)457-6134. SAWS: Craftsman Miter LOVE SEAT: Very nice saw, $40. Black & Deckcond., silk with leaves, er, 7.25” circular, $20. dark wood front. $200/ (360)683-7841 obo. (360)912-4536. SCOOTERS: (2), like MAILBOX: On pedestal, new, Razor and Fuzion. pony express style, gray. $85. (360)582-1622. $75.(360)775-0857. S E RV I N G D I S H : V i n MANTLE: Light oak, ex- tage, Everlast aluminum cellent condition. $175. casserole dish with lid. (360)797-4178 $25. (360)452-7721. METAL SIGNS: Bobcat, SHEET MUSIC: For piaTecumsen, $15 each. no, WWI, WWII, Gospel, (360)457-4971 Hollywood, 180 pieces. MICROWAVE: Over the $90. (360)452-7721. r a n g e , L G , s t a i n l e s s SHOES: Ferragamo lasteel, works great. $140. dies walking shoes, tan 360-582-6579 size 10. $50. (360)681-3492 MISC: CD player, 5 disc, $25. Cassette stereo re- SHOES: Ferragamo lacorders, $15 and $20. dies walking shoes, tan (360)452-9685 size 10. $50. (360)681-3492 MISC: loveseat, $50. Dresser, small, wood, SKI JACKET: Women’s $ 3 0 . T V, c o l o r, w i t h or gir ls, down, hood, VHS, $20. 452-9685. blue. $38. (360)775-0855 MISC: Table saw, $50. U p r i g t f r e e z e r, $ 5 0 . SKIS: With poles, K2 in Compactor, $25. White sofa $50. (360)681-2811 good condition. $50/obo. (360)775-9631 MIXER: Kitchenaid 4.5 SLIDE PROJECTOR quart, white, very good Kodak Carousel 4400 in cond. $80/obo. case, nice. $90. (360)683-0997 (360)477-1716 MIXER: Osterizer mixer, SLIDE PROJECTOR glass container, perfect Kodak carousel 650H working order. $60. with remote. $40. (303)916-8518 (360)457-1491 MODEM: Century Link, SOFA: 86’, FlexSteel. high speed. $25. $150. (360)681-2156. (360)683-2454 MOWER: Craftsman ‘06 riding mower, not running. $100. (360)928-9565

FREE: To good home because of family health problems, 2 cats, 1 very loving, 1 is shy. (360)452-4327

PHONE: Harley David- TABLE: Dining table, son, landline. $45. solid mahogany, drop (360)670-3025 leaf. $200. (360)681-2720 POOL STICKS: With cases, Vipers, 17 and 19 TABLE SAW: 12”. $30. oz. $50/obo. (360)775-7450 (360)912-4536 TA I L G AT E : ‘ 0 4 POSTER: Framed, Rie C h ev / G M C, f u l l s i ze, M u n o z 1 9 8 4 p o s t e r. white. $100. $125/obo. (360)477-1716 (360)681-2968 TELESCOPE: Bushnell PRINTER/SCANNER 675x3.5 motorized reCannon, ink included. flector, video eyepiece. $30. 360-683-2454. $75/obo. 681-6050. PRINTER/SCANNER TIES: Jerry Garcia, silk Pixma MG 2120, ink in- ties, (7). $10 ea. cluded. $30. (360)457-4022 (360)683-2454 TILLER: Manis. $150. PRINT: Rie Munoz print, (360)683-7394 “Picking fish.” $175. (360)683-6008 T R I P O D : M - 5 , b ra s s, survey, ancient. $50. P R I N T: T h o m a s K i n (360)457-4971 kade,limited edition, “Beside Still Waters.” $35. TV: RCA 20” flat screen, (360)681-7579 ex. cond. $30. (360)683-7394 R A I L ROA D T I D E S : 8 tides, good condition. $8 TV STAND: Dark wood each. (360)582-6579. corner stand, up to 32’ RECLINER: Burgundy, TV, 2 shelves, storage. ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n . $75. (360)775-0857. $50. (360)775-0857. VACUUM CLEANER R E C L I N E R : H u n t e r Electrolux canister, oldg r e e n l e a t h e r, L a n e . er, works, bags. $50. (360)683-6008 $25. (360)582-0490. ROD AND REEL: Spin r o d a n d r e e l c o m b o, never used. $75. (360)452-8953

WALKER: With seat and brakes. $45. (360)683-6097.

WASHING MACHINE ROOFING: Corrugated 3 years old, whirlpool, needs timer, you haul. metal roofing, green, 12 $20. (360)681-8034. sheets, 3’ x 10’. $10 ea. (360)457-0960 WAT C H E S : Wa t t h a m RUG: Black and gray a n d M o v a d o . B r a n d new. $10 each. wool 2’3”x9’. $50. 360-683-4648 (360)681-3492

M ail to: Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

WEDDING DRESS New, 15-16 bridal original # 2780. $35. (360)683-7435 WINDOWS: (8) 28” x 28”, (7) 22” x 36”. $5 ea/obo. (360)457-0960.

Bring your ads to: Peninsula Daily News 305 West 1st St., PA

• No Pets, Livestock, Garage Sales or Firewood

or FAX to: (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

NO PHONE CALLS

5A246724

S D A E E E R E F FR

E E R F

For items $200 and under

6080 Home Furnishings

6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6105 Musical Instruments

BUNK BED: Solid wood with built-in desk and 5 d r aw e r d r e s s e r, ve r y good quality, does not fit in my house. $400/obo. (360)761-8793

MISC: Bed, queen, four p o s t e r, t wo m a t c h i n g oak night stands, $600. Cherry finish dinette set, HW table with leaf, (2) captain chairs, (4) side chairs, $600. Coffee table, oak, Queen Anne, (2) end tables, $200. Bedroom dresser with mirror, $150/obo. Curtains, pinch-pleated living-room curtains, ivory, 201” x 84”, white sheers, center-draw curtain rods, $200. Cur tains, pinchpleated living-room curtains, ivory, 96” x 84”, white sheers, centerdraw curtain rods, $100. (360)683-8028

MISC: Double recliner love seat dark blue and black, $195. 3 roll-away beds, $35 and $45. Clean living room chair, $25. 3 night stands, $10 ea. Side table, $40. Vacuums, $8-$10. (360)327-3666

MUSICAL Instruments. Student Models: Ar mstrong Piccolo Sterling Silver Body and Head, $450.00 Gemeinhardt Flute, $250.00. Leblanc Vito Clarinet, $250.00. All in excellent condition with hard cases. 1970s vintage. (360)797-1340.

DINNING SET: Mission Style dining room suite by Bassett. Table seats to 10 with (2) included leaves. (2) ar mchairs and (4) matching side chairs. Includes large matching cabinet with glassed doors and shelves and base cabinet with storage. About 25 years old, in great shape. Pictures a v a i l a b l e fo r e - m a i l . $ 4 , 0 0 0 n e w. A s k i n g $1,800/obo. TABLE: 30”Hx42”Wx18” (360)683-5216 leaf, 4 jewel Tuscany swivel tilt chairs. $550. LIFT CHAIR: Almost (360)683-3469 new, heated, vibrates. $800. (360)461-9382 or (360)457-6887. 6100 Misc. LIFT CHAIR: Power Lift R e c l i n e r, B e s t H o m e Funishings, bought localy on Feb. 18, 2014 and paid $1,037, only used 5 times. Sell for $600. (360)681-2139

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

HORSE BOARDING Our facility has a covered arena with attached viewing room with heat, coffee, refrigerator. Round pen, box stalls with 70ft. partially covered paddocks. Daily turnout. Bathing pad. We are located on the Olympic D i s c ove r y Tra i l . Ve t tech on premises. We furnish hay and grain. We exercise horses fo r a b s e n t o w n e r s , bl a n ke t i n g , fe e d i n g meds and supplements all with no c h a r g e . We fe e d 3 times daily. Very experienced with geriatric h o r s e s. H a n d c a r r y war m water to each horse during frigid weather. Spring and summer will be here soon. Come join us. If you don’t have a horse you may lease one, or j u s t c o m e a n d g i ve hugs to our mini’s and retirees. Give us a call then stop by for coffee. Contact Darlene, (360)912-0209

SUIT: Woman’s wool 3 piece, Hong Kong blue tailored, petite. Wor n 2x.$40. (360)683-3028.

PA N A M : 1 s t c l a s s m e nu f r o m 1 9 7 6 a n d ticket voucher. $50. (360)681-3492

POOL TABLE: League size, slate. Possible coin PIANO: Sohner upright, operated. $500. approx. 45 years old. In (360)477-2918 excelllent condition. ApSAFE: Diebold, fire clas- praised at $1,200, will sification B, T-20 tamper sell for $1,150. (360)385-2516 resistant door, 25” wide x 27” deep x46” tall, very good condition. $500. (360)683-7345

6105 Musical Instruments

6115 Sporting Goods BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection Including Estates. Call (360)477-9659

FREE: Spinet piano with matching bench, mahogany, good condition, Merchandise needs tuning, you pick BIO BIDET: Luxury toilet up. (360)457-1698 or seat, new in box. Heated (360)461-2656 lv msg. 6140 Wanted seat, remote control, & Trades many functions. Retails GUITAR: 1945 Gibson L7. With Kent Armstrong $500, will sell for f l o a t i n g p i ck u p, a n d $400/obo. hard-shell case. Sun- WANTED: Quality op(360)457-1232 burst, immaculate condi- tics, binoculars, scopes, range finders and misc. tion. $3,300. CAR TRAILER: 14’. (360)457-0814 (360)385-2585 $1,000. (360)670-3053.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

7030 Horses

7035 General Pets

COMPUTER DESK LAPTOP DESK STAND SATELLITE DISH: New, Oak, with hutch, ver y 2 shelves, adjustable, with cables, for DirecTV. nice, office chair incl. rolls. $25. Have 3, $10 each. $200. (360)460-3708. (360)775-0857 (360)775-5248

• 2 Ads Per Week • 3 Lines • Private Party Only

LAWN MOWER: 8 yrs. old, Sears Craftsman 6 hp, needs minor work, has 75 hrs. of run time, includes new mower blade, new throttle cable, new spark plug. $40/obo. (360)452-3433, eves or before 10 a.m.

OPERA NEWS: Febru- S TO R AG E C E N T E R : ar y 24, 1973, Car uso Wood, 4’ by 6’ and 5’ by 6’. $25 each. tribute, good cond. $15. (360)775-0857 (360)681-0571

COMPUTER DESK LADDER: Fiberglass, Complete set of Harle- double-sided, 3 step, SADDLE: Call for name quin to 5/87. $10. green bull, new. $50. and size. $200. 360-683-4648 (360)460-5762 (360)457-1963

E E E A D SS FFRRE Monday and Tuesdays AD

SPRAY GUNS: 2HVLP Spray guns, new in box. Craftsman, $85. Central Pro, $45. 1 683-7841.

6135 Yard & Garden

P U P P I E S : A K C We s t German Shepherd Pupp i e s . To p E u r o p e a n working and showlines. Males and females both long and stock coat available. with health guarantee. Currently 6 wks old. We are accepting deposits. Visit our website at www.vome dentalkennel.com or call (360)452-3016. $1,200.

TRAILER: Rare resealed 1978 Argosy by Airstream. $11,500! All crevices have been resealed for extra protect i o n w / n ew p a i n t t o o. Stored indoors! Weighs 1,000s less but Same Airstream quality. Interior exactly as in 1978 when it came off the factory floor. 28 ft. Comes w i t h l o a d s o f ex t r a s (awning,sway bars) please only serious cash buyers only! Sequim, (360)808-6160.

9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks Classics & Collect. Others Others CLASSIC 1974 Mercedes, 450 SL. Sacrifice at $13,500. Very clean. No dents, no scratches. Interior like new. speedo reading 59,029. Comes with a car cover. Has the factory manuals. Larry at 360-504-2478, cell: 618-302-0463. FORD: (2) 1966 F100s. 1 long bed, with ‘390’ C6 tranny, power steering, power disc brakes, runs and drives. 1 short bed, 6 cyl. 4 speed, nice wheels and tires, runs and drives. Both trucks $4,000. (360)809-0082. FORD: ‘63 Fairlane 500. Hard top. $10,000/obo. (360)808-6198

9292 Automobiles Others BMW: ‘98 318i. Black, 240k mi., runs well but needs a little work. $1,750. (360)461-9637. CADILLAC: ‘02 Deville DTS. Sedan 4 dr, 54,000 mi., black on black, must see. $6,200 (360)681-3093

TRAILER: Sur veyor ‘14 Bunkhouse 28’. Luxurious, sleeps six. Locally owned, only used three times. Full kitchen, bath. Lighted/power awning. Premium audio/TV. Auto climate control. $27,000. (360)8081206.

9802 5th Wheels

CHEV ‘06 COBALT LT 4 door, 4 cyl, auto, A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, AM/FM/CD, power sunroof, alloy wheels, rear spoiler, remote entry and more! One week special: $6,995 VIN#652909 Exp. 3-15-14 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

MERCURY ‘99 COUGAR Gray, 5 speed, 4 cyl, gray and black cloth int e r i o r, 1 2 5 k , s p o i l e r, cute. $5,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 FORD: ‘91 F250. 7.3 theotherguys.com diesel, 97K mi., tow pkg., tinted windows, auPONTIAC ‘09 VIBE to, 2WD, truck box, new AWD 4 c y l , a u t o, A / C, t i l t rear tires, runs good. whee, cruise, power win- $2,700. (360)477-2809. d ow s, l o ck s, m i r r o r s, FORD ‘93 DIESEL AM/FM/CD, electronic s t a b i l i t y c o n t r o l , r o o f 7.3 L 4x4 ext cab, gray r a c k , m o r e . B u i l t b y cloth interior, 122k. $9,995. Toyota. One week speThe Other Guys cial: Auto and Truck Center $8,995 360-417-3788 VIN#405146 theotherguys.com Exp. 3-15-14 Dave Barnier FORD ‘93 F250 Auto Sales SUPERCAB XLT *We Finance In House* LONGBED LIFTED 4x4 452-6599 7.5L V8, automatic, dual davebarnier.com fuel tanks, alloy wheels, 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA tow package, trailer brake controller, canopy, TOYOTA : ‘ 0 0 C a m r y. side steps, power winA / C, l e a t h e r s e a t s, 4 dows and door locks, cyl., runs good. $4,999. r e a r s l i d i n g w i n d o w, (360)374-3309 cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, cassette 9434 Pickup Trucks stereo, Cobra CB radio, bucket seats with conOthers sole. Only 100,000 original miles! Stands tall on C H E V: ‘ 0 0 S - 1 0 4 x 4 . big tires! Immaculate Original owner, ext. cab, condition inside and out! auto, canopy, 77k miles. A true must-see! Excel6,800. (360)471-6190. lent example of this body style Ford! Come see CHEV: ‘70 K-20. 4x4, the Peninsula’s 4X4 expartial restoration, auto, perts for over 55 years! 350, extras. $5,500 or Stop by Gray Motors topart trade. 452-5803. day! $7,995 FORD: ‘73 1 Ton flat GRAY MOTORS bed with side racks, 65K 457-4901 original mi., winch, new graymotors.com power steering, brand FORD: ‘94 F150. 4x4, new paint. $4,000. 300 ci 6 cyl. Rebuilt front (360)640-8155 end plus many extras. FORD: ‘77 F-350 1 ton $3,200. (360)928-3483. dually. Newer engine, FORD: ‘96 F150. Eddie dump truck PTO. B a u e r E d . , V 8 , 4 W D, $3,375/obo. 460-0518. bed liner, Gem top, sun v i s o r, 1 2 5 k m i , g o o d FORD ‘98 RANGER cond. $4,900. XLT (360)457-8763 4 x 4 , w h i t e, c l u b c a b,

CHEV: ‘08 Aveo. Hatchback, 5 speed, 38k mi, 35 + MPG, 98% cond. 5TH WHEEL: ‘04 34’ Al- $7,500. (360)683-7073 penlite. 2-slides, great between 6:00 a.m. and condition, going south or 4:30 p.m. live in the best park on the Peninsula. $19,000. DODGE: ‘02 and ‘04 gray cloth interior, 113k. (509)869-7571 Neon. $2,500 each. Call GMC: ‘76 GMC 1/2 ton. $6,495. (360)457-8729 350 with headers. 3 5TH WHEEL: Alpenlite The Other Guys speed auto new tires. ‘90 32’, fair condition. DODGE: ‘07 Charger. Auto and Truck Center Over $11,000 invested. $4,000/obo. 109K, runs great, new 360-417-3788 Asking $3,500/obo (360)457-5950 tires. $7,000 firm. theotherguys.com (360)531-1681 PUPPY Socialization (360)797-1774 and dog obedience classes in Port Angeles. 9050 Marine FORD ‘03 FOCUS ZX5 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Puppy socialization and Miscellaneous Hatchback, 4 cyl, auto, Clallam County Clallam County dog obedience classes A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, s t a r t i n g M a r c h 8 t h . CATALINA: 22’ sailboat. power windows, locks, INVITATION TO BID Classes last for 4 weeks. Swing keel, with trailer, 4 mirrors, AM/FM/CD, alCity of Forks Classes are held at New HP outboard. $3,800. loy wheels, remote entry Leash on Life in Port An- (928)231-1511. a n d m o r e ! O n e we e k Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be regeles. For more informaspecial: ceived by the City of Forks, at the Public Works Detion call Cheryl, LAVRO: 14’ drift boat, 2 $4,995 partment, 500 East Division St. Forks, WA 98331, (360)670-5860 sets oars, trailer. $1,000. VIN#133097 for the labor, materials, and equipment necessary (360)928-9716 Exp. 3-15-14 for the completion of the Spartan Avenue RehabiliDave Barnier tation Project, until 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 1, 7045 Tack, Feed & TRAILER 17’ boat/sport/ Auto Sales Supplies utility trailer, LED lights, *We Finance In House* 2014, and no later, at which time such bids will be opened and publicly read aloud and tabulated for bunks, galvanized, new 452-6599 submission to the City Council at a future council MISC: Saddles, $100- tires and spare. $625. davebarnier.com meeting. (360)681-8761 $400. Pads, $5-$25. Bla2946 Hwy 101 E. PA BIDS RECEIVED AFTER THE FIXED TIME FOR nkets, $20-$75. Clothes OPENING WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED. $5-$50. (360)460-7534. FORD ‘05 MUSTANG Bids must be completely sealed within a separate 9817 Motorcycles PREMIUM 2D envelope with the outside of the envelope marked CONVERTIBLE GT BID OPENING DATE - April 1, 2014 and “Spartan CLONE 9820 Motorhomes 4.0L V6, automatic, cold Avenue Rehabilitation Project, Federal Aid No: air intake, JBA Dual Ex- STPR-B055(001”. The name and address of the h a u s t , t h r o t t l e b o d y bidder should also appear on the outside of the ens p a c e r, Fo r d R a c i n g velope. Bids should be addressed to City of Forks Strut Tower Brace, per- Public Works Department, 500 East Division St. fo r m a n c e E C U Tu n e, Forks, WA 98331. Faxed or e-mailed bids will Optima Battery, drilled not be accepted. and slotted brake rotors, All bid proposals shall be accompanied by a bid K A W A S A K I : ‘ 0 9 alloy wheels, deep tinted proposal deposit in the form of a cashier’s check, K X 2 5 0 F. E x c e l l e n t windows, keyless entry, postal money order, or surety bond made payable cond. Fresh top end. to the City of Forks in an amount equal to five perITASCA: ‘07 24’, “C,” U n d e r 6 0 h o u r s o n p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r cent (5%) of the total bid. Should the successful with tow car and satellite bike and always main- locks, mirrors, and drivbidder fail to enter into such contract and furnish ers seat, leather seating, TV, 30K mi., mint cond. tained. Original owner. cruise control, tilt, air satisfactory performance bond within the time stat$48,650. (360)683-3212. B i k e a l s o h a s n e w conditioning, Shaker 6 ed in the specifications, the bid proposal deposit MOTORHOME: ‘85 Win- g r a p h i c s / p l a s t i c s . CD Stereo, Dual front shall be forfeited to the City of Forks. No bid shall nebago. Diesel, Mistubi- Comes with many ex- airbags. Only 100,000 be considered unless accompanied by such bid Miles! GT style bumpers proposal deposit. shi motor, 4 speed, good tras. $3,500/obo. (360)775-7996 and stripe added to com- The right is reserved to reject any and all bids and tires, good mileage, 2 plete the look! More up- to waive irregularities and informalities in the bidbed, shower with toilet, gra d e s t h a n yo u c a n ding. s t e r e o, A / C, b o d y i s shake a stick at! Great The City will award the Contract for this project to good, needs some work. sound and power! Faster the lowest responsive bidder based on the lowest $3,500. (360)301-5652. than a stock GT! This total amount of the bid proposal. Mustang was the previ- Availability of Bidding Documents: Contract docuMOTORHOME: ‘89 Toyous owners pride and ments are anticipated to be available for pick up on ota Dolphin. Sleeps 4+, joy, now it’s your turn! or after March 10, 2014. Bona fide general contraclow mi., clean, strong, Come see the guys that tors may obtain the contract documents at any one r e l i a bl e, e c o n o m i c a l . have been bringing you of three locations of Exeltech Consulting, Inc., loSee at Mobuilt R.V., P.A. t h e b e s t c a r s s i n c e cated at 116 West 8th Street, Suite 120, Port AnREDUCED: $3,395/obo 1957! Stop by Gray Mo- geles, WA 98362, (360) 417-3803 (by appointment MOTOR SCOOTER (425)231-2576 Aprilia ‘08 500ie. Beau- tors today! only), or 2127 5th Ave., Seattle, WA 98121, MOTORHOME: ‘94 32’ tiful like new, silver ‘08 $8,995 (206) 623-9646, ext. 1108, or 8729 Commerce F l e e t wo o d C o r o n a d a . Aprilia 500cc Scooter. GRAY MOTORS Place Dr ive NE, Suite A, Lacey, WA 98516, Only 67K mi., good con- <1,000 miles garaged 457-4901 (360) 357-8289, ext. 1108, upon a refundable paydition, too much to list, year round. Great comgraymotors.com ment of $100.00 per set. The $100.00 fee is recall for info. $11,000. muter bike with 60+ fundable if the set of documents is returned un(360)457-4896 miles per gallon! Won- JAGUAR: ‘12 FX. 1 of marked and undamaged. d e r f u l fo r s h o r t / l o n g 200 with special sports MOTORHOME: Holiday hauls.Includes (2) helCopies of the contract documents may also be exRambler 2000 Endeav- m e t s k e y s / r e m o t e s , pkg., extra low miles. $43,900 amined at these locations as well as at Forks City or, 38’, (2) slide-outs, owners manual and new (360)765-4599 Hall located at 500 East Division Street, Forks, WA 3 3 0 H P C a t , A l l i s o n batter y! ONLY serious 98331, (360) 374-5412, ext. 245, or Hartnagel Tr a n s , 7 9 k , s i x - w a y cash buyers call. Don’t MAZDA: ‘04 RX-8. Top Building Supply Inc., 3111 E Highway 101, Port Anleather pilot and co-pilot pay dealers freight and seats, 4 dr. fridge with set up charges. This is a condition, 15,000 origi- geles, WA. nal mi., black, loaded, ice maker, hyd. leveling deal at $3,600. extra set of tires/wheels, This contract is a federally funded project and jacks, 7.5 diesel gen., (360)808-6160 for winter. $10,000/obo. therefore will require prevailing wages to be paid. rear vision sys., combo (360)460-1393 washer/dryer, solar panel, 25’ side awning, sat- 9180 Automobiles MAZDA: ‘12 5 Sport Ed. BID DOCUMENTS WILL NOT BE MAILED TO ellite dish, (2) color TVs, Classics & Collect. 31K, 6 sp. manual, seats BIDDERS. many other extras! Ask6, great gas mi. ing $59,000. In Sequim, $14,995. (360)200-8833. The following is applicable to federal aid projects. (360)301-2484 The City of Forks in accordance with Title VI of MAZDA ‘99 B3000 4x4 the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 V6, auto, A/C, tilt wheel, USC 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Fed9832 Tents & cruise, AM/FM/CD, rear eral Regulations, Department of Transportation, Travel Trailers slider, alloy wheels, tool- Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nonb o x , s p r a y - o n l i n e r, discrimination in Federally Assisted Programs TRAILER: ‘03 Kit Commore! One week special: of the Department of Transportation issued purpanion Extreme. Small AMC: Rare 1970 AMX suant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders $4,995 slide. $4,500. 461-6130. VIN#MO9633 that it will affirmatively ensure that in any con2-seater, 390 V/8, 4 spd. Exp. 3-15-14 tract entered into pursuant to this advertise$17,000/obo. TRAILER: ‘12 RPod by Dave Barnier ment, disadvantaged business enterprises as (360)928-9477 Forest River. Model 171, Auto Sales defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full H o o d R i v e r E d i t i o n . CHEV: 2000 SS Cama- *We Finance In House* opportunity to submit bids in response to this $10,400. (360)797-1284, ro. Top condition, cherry 452-6599 invitation and will not be discriminated against Sequim. red, new wheels/tires, davebarnier.com on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or recent big tune-up. 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA sex in consideration for an award. $9,500/obo. The improvement for which bids will be received is MERCEDES: ‘75 240D (360)457-9331. described below: Diesel. Runs great. CHEV: ‘87 Camaro Iroc $2,300. Call for more PROJECT DESCRIPTION: “Spartan Avenue Rehabilitation Project, Federal Aid No: STPRConvertible. Disassemb- info at (360)301-3652. B055(001)” consisting of the grinding and inlay of led, good body, no motor Hot Mix Asphalt, constructing sidewalk ramps, and /trans, ready to restore! SUBARU: ‘84 GL SW all other work necessary to complete the project as $500. (360)379-5243. 2x4WD, low mi., new specified in the contract documents within the City TRAILER: Airstreem ‘93 F O R D : ‘ 3 1 M o d e l A clutch, WP, rad, hos- of Forks corporate limits. This project is funded Excella 1000. 34’, very R u m b l e s e a t c o u p e . e s, s e a l s, m o r e. 5 x with Federal funds. nice, in Port Angeles. stud. $3,000/obo. P u b : F e b . 2 0 , 2 3 , 2 0 1 4 Looks and runs good. $14.500. (206)459-6420. $15,000. (360)681-5468. (360)460-9199 Legal No. 544618


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9434 Pickup Trucks Others

9556 SUVs Others

FORD ‘03 EXPEDITION XLT 4x4 5.4L Triton V8, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, r unning boards, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, keyless entr y, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and d r i ve r s s e a t , l e a t h e r seats, third row seating, adjustable pedals, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, rear A/C, CD/Cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Clean Carfax! Like new condition inside and out! You just won’t find one nicer than this! Stands tall on brand new tires! Come see the Peninsula’s 4X4 experts for over 55 years!! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 TOYOTA : ‘ 0 7 Ta c o m a graymotors.com access cab. V6, 4x4, extra set of tires and rims GMC: ‘95 Yukon. Runs w i t h s e n s o r s , a u t o , we l l , l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r. cruise, A/C, 42k miles. $2,500/obo. $29,000/obo (360)461-6659 (360)452-7214 T O Y O TA : ‘ 9 2 L a n d TOYOTA: ‘96 TR100. 2 Cruiser. White ext., gray door, small cab, 64K, int., 6 cyl., loaded, ex. ver y good cond., V6, cond. $4,950. 461-5193. long bed with liner, 5 sp. $5,800. (360)452-6127 9730 Vans & Minivans between 9 a.m.-6 p.m. GMC ‘05 SIERRA 1500 LONG BED 2WD 4.3L Vor tec V6, automatic, chrome wheels, new tires, matching leer canopy, spray-in bedliner, pr ivacy glass, tilt, wheel, air conditioning, J V C C D s t e r e o, d u a l front airbags. Only 108k miles! Accident free Carfax! Immaculate condition inside and out! Vortec V6 engine for great fuel mileage! Why break the bank when you can get this very nice truck fo r a bu d g e t - f r i e n d l y price? Come see the Peninsula’s value leaders for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

9556 SUVs Others

Others

DODGE: ‘10 Grand Caravan, handicapped CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 153k conversion. Kneels, infloor wheelchair ramp, miles, good cond., 4WD. $1,900. (360)460-8155. passenger transfer seat. $39,000. (360)681-3141. CHEV: ‘99 Tahoe 4WD. Black, leather int., newer DODGE: ‘98 1 Ton Cartires/shocks, recent me- go Van. 360 V8, auto, chanical work. $2,300/ A/C, new tires, 42,600 miles, can be seen at obo. (360)461-7478. Ace Auto Repair, 420 H O N D A : ‘ 0 2 C R V. Marine Drive. $6,200. (505)927-1248 AWD, (2) sets wheels/tires (snow), tow bars on front and back, TOYOTA: ‘01 Sienna. 7 passenger, leather, good auto, 115k miles. $9,500. (360)461-5190. condition, moon roof. $4,800. (360)457-9038. FORD: ‘04 Expedition. E x . c o n d . , 1 o w n e r, TOYOTA : ‘ 9 8 S i e n n a . 135k, new tires, eco- 179K, great condition, new tires. $4,500. nomical 2WD. $5,395. (360)775-8296 (360)683-7176

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 B9

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF INVITATION TO BID

NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS

SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners at 223 E. Fourth Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington, until 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, March 18, 2014, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud for the 2014 Hot Mix Asphalt and CSS-1 Liquid Asphalt Requirements of the Clallam County Public Works Department.

SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners at 223 East Fourth Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, March 18, 2014, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud for:

Sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, “BID PROPOSAL - 2014 HOT MIX ASPHALT REQUIREMENTS”. Address bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 East 4th Street, Suite 4, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015, or hand deliver to 223 East 4th Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents delivered to other offices and received late by the Commissioners’ Office will not be considered, nor will bids received by facsimile or e-mail.

The sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, “BID PROPOSAL - 2014 CRUSHED ROCK SUPPLY”. Address bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 4, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 or hand-deliver to 223 E. 4th St., Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents delivered to other offices and received late by the Commissioners’ Office will not be considered nor will bids received by facsimile or e-mail.

Clallam County hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined in Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 at 49 CFR Part 23 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award.

Clallam County will determine the lowest responsible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam County Code Section 3.12.080 and reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive informalities in the process or to accept the bid which in its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam County.

THE SUPPLY, TRANSPORTING, AND STOCKPILING OF APPROXIMATELY 20,000 TONS OF Bid price is to include all applicable taxes and to in- CRUSHED ROCK MATERIAL, AND OTHER REclude delivery to various locations. Complete LATED WORK. specifications and bid forms may be obtained from the Public Works Department, 223 E. Fourth Street, Complete plans and specifications may be obtained Suite 6, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015, or by call- from the office of the Public Works Department, ing (360) 417-2319 (Seattle phone number 206 464 Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 6, Port Angeles, 7098, Ext. 2319). All bidding and related questions WA 98362-3015, (360) 417 2319. Questions reregarding this supply contract may be directed to garding this project may be directed to Tom Maley Tom Maley at (360) 417-2378. at (360) 417-2378.

Clallam County will determine the lowest responsible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam County Code Section 3.12.070; and reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive informalities in the process or to accept the bid which in its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam County.

Clallam County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award.

APPROVED THIS 25th DAY OF February, 2014 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Michael C. Chapman, Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board The attached contract plans, these contract proviPub: March. 3, 10, 2014 Legal No. 546301 sions and the Standard Specifications for the above-described project are hereby

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

File No.: 7042.10537 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Green Tree Servicing, LLC Grantee: Paulette W. Pitcher, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1209275 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033021-520060 Abbreviated Legal: LT. 6 Estate Subdivision 14/80, Clallam County, WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On April 11, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 6 of the Estate Subdivision as recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 80, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 101 Morgison Loop Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/31/07, recorded on 09/19/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007-1209275, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Arthur E. Abrams and Paulette S. Pitcher, as joint Tenants with Right of Survivorship and not as tenants in common and not as Community Poperty, as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson, EVP on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Peninsula Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Peninsula Mortgage, Inc., it’s successor’s and assigns. to Green Tree Servicing, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2013-1292706. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 12/03/2013 Monthly Payments $24,906.20 Lender’s Fees & Costs $2,102.00 Total Arrearage $27,008.20 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $1,000.00 Title Report $829.26 Statutory Mailings $104.05 Recording Costs $48.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $31.50 Total Costs $2,082.81 Total Amount Due: $29,091.01 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $242,287.88, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on April 11, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/31/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 03/31/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/31/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS The Estate of Arthur Abrams aka Arthur E. Abrams, Deceased 101 Morgison Loop Sequim, WA 98382 The Estate of Arthur Abrams aka Arthur E. Abrams, Deceased 4041 Water Fall Drive Montrose, CO 81403 Paulette Pitcher aka Paulette S. Pitcher 101 Morgison Loop Sequim, WA 98382 Paulette Pitcher aka Paulette S. Pitcher 4041 Water Fall Drive Montrose, CO 81403 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Arthur Abrams aka Arthur E. Abrams, Deceased 101 Morgison Loop Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Paulette Pitcher aka Paulette S. Pitcher 101 Morgison Loop Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Arthur Abrams aka Arthur E. Abrams, Deceased 4041 Water Fall Drive Montrose, CO 81403 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Paulette Pitcher aka Paulette S. Pitcher 4041 Water Fall Drive Montrose, CO 81403 The Heirs and Devisees of Arthur Abrams aka Arthur E. Abrams, Deceased 4041 Water Fall Drive Montrose, CO 81403 The Heirs and Devisees of Arthur Abrams aka Arthur E. Abrams, Deceased 101 Morgison Loop Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 11/08/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/29/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 12/03/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7042.10537) 1002.259320-File No. Pub: March 10, 31, 2014 Legal No. 546490

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APPROVED THIS 25th DAY OF February, 2014 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Michael C. Chapman, Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: March. 3, 10, 2014 Legal No. 546302

File No.: 7037.104321 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Trustee for Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I, LLC, Green Point Mortgage Funding Trust 2006-AR1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR1 Grantee: Douglas B. Hawes, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1167874 Tax Parcel ID No.: 042902 119020 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 2 Short Plat 8/78 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On April 11, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 2 of Rubino Short Plat recorded July 15, 1980 in Volume 8 of Short Plats, Page 78, under Clallam County Auditor’s File No. 509589, being a portion of Parcel 3 of Survey recorded in Volume 2 of Surveys, Page 8, under Clallam County Auditor’s File No. 449420, being a portion of the East 1/2 of Section 2, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 71 & 73 Waggler Way Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/17/05, recorded on 10/21/05, under Auditor’s File No. 2005 1167874, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Douglas B Hawes, A Married Man, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for GreenPoint Mortgage Funding, Inc., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for GreenPoint Mortgage Funding, Inc., its successors and assigns to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Successor by merger to Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, N.A., F/K/A Norwest Bank Minnesota, N.A., solely as trustee for Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I, LLC, Green Point Mortgage Funding Trust 2006-AR1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012 1286284. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 12/02/2013 Monthly Payments $14,744.13 Lender’s Fees & Costs $794.86 Total Arrearage $15,538.99 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $750.00 Title Report $1,473.16 Statutory Mailings $44.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $2,351.16 Total Amount Due: $17,890.15 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Pr incipal Balance of $573,414.99, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/13, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on April 11, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/31/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 03/31/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/31/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Douglas Hawes 73 Waggler Way Sequim, WA 98382 Douglas Hawes PO Box 3069 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Douglas Hawes 291 Grandview Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Douglas Hawes 73 Waggler Way Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Douglas Hawes PO Box 3069 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Douglas Hawes 291 Grandview Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Douglas Hawes 71 Waggler Way Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Douglas Hawes 71 Waggler Way Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/31/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/24/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 12/02/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.104321) 1002.258993-File No. Pub: March 10, 31, 2014 Legal No. 546491

File No.: 7236.23472 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of New York Mellon, f/k/a The Bank of New York, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the Alternative Loan Trust 2006-6CB, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-6CB Grantee: Micheal E. House, a married man as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20061176529 Tax Parcel ID No.: 13-2809-620309/ PID# 5937 Abbreviated Legal: Lots 3 & 4 BK 3 Peterson Add to Forks, Clallam Co., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On March 21, 2014, at 10:00 AM inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lots 3 and 4 in Block 3 of Peterson Addition to the Townsite of Forks, Clallam County, Washington, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 4 of Plats, page 43, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 530 CALAWAH WAY FORKS, WA 98331 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/07/06, recorded on 03/14/06, under Auditor’s File No. 20061176529, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Micheal E. House, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Stewart Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders CWALT, Inc., alternative Loan Trustee 2006-6CB, Mortgage E Pass Through Certificates, Series 2006-6CB, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20111270009. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 12/10/2013 Monthly Payments $26,025.18 Late Charges $0.00 Lender’s Fees & Costs $2,357.29 Total Arrearage $28,382.47 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $384.60 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $398.60 Total Amount Due: $28,781.07 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Pr incipal Balance of $110,620.60, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 07/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 21, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/10/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 03/10/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/10/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Michael E. House 530 Calawah Way Forks, WA 98331 Michael E. House 208543 Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael E. House 530 Calawah Way Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael E. House 208543 Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Rachel E. House 530 Calawah Way Forks, WA 98331 Rachel E. House 208543 Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/10/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/10/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 12/10/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Kathy Taggart (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7236.23472) 1002.239188-File No. Pub: Feb. 17, March 10, 2014 Legal No. 542995

File No.: 7023.107765 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Grantee: Colleen L. Nicholson, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2011-1270736 Tax Parcel ID No.: 66679/063013 540250 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn Lot 2, Mora Garden Tracts V4P51, Clallam Co., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On March 21, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: That portion of Lot 2 of Mora Garden Tracts, in Section 13, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 4 of Plats, Page 51, records of Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 2; thence North along the East line thereof, a distance of 208 feet to the true point of beginning; thence continuing North 159.19 feet; thence West parallel with the South line of said Lot 2, a distance of 296.42 feet; thence South 159.19 feet; thence East 296.42 feet to the true point of Beginning. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 530 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/26/11, recorded on 09/30/11, under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1270736, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Colleen L. Nicholson, a single person, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage ELectronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Pacific Mortgage Corporation, a California corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage ELectronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for American Pacific Mortgage Corporation to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20131291439. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 11/13/2013 Monthly Payments $11,552.23 Late Charges $326.30 Lender’s Fees & Costs ($246.04) Total Arrearage $11,632.49 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $900.00 Title Report $673.16 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,657.16 Total Amount Due: $13,289.65 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $162,509.56, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 21, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/10/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 03/10/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/10/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Colleen L. Nicholson 530 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Colleen L. Nicholson 916 South Oak Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Colleen L. Nicholson 530 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Colleen L. Nicholson 916 South Oak Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/11/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/11/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/13/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Neang Avila (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.107765) 1002.258409-File No. Pub: Feb. 17, March 10, 2014 Legal No. 542997


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WeatherWatch

MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 Neah Bay 45/35

Bellingham g 48/ 48/34 8

Olympic Peninsula TODAY AY BREE Z S H OW Y & ERS

B

Townsend 48/46

50/35

Olympics Snow level: 3,000 feet

Forks 53/34

RS WE SHO & Port P Po o ZY REE

Sequim 52/36

Port Ludlow 51/37

SH OW ER

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NationalTODAY forecast Nation

Yesterday Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 52 41 0.87 13.09 Forks 50 48 2.50 32.40 Seattle 60 44 1.28 15.48 Sequim 53 48 0.10 5.82 Hoquiam 52 47 1.76 16.70 Victoria 47 39 0.80 14.00 Port Townsend 54 46 **0.06 8.06

Forecast highs for Monday, March 10

Billings 49° | 39°

San Francisco 65° | 55°

S

Aberdeen 53/36

Last

New

First

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Miami 80° | 64°

Full Cold

Mar 30

Apr 7

Marine Weather

51/41 Clouds slip back over Peninsula

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind rising to 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves building to 2 to 4 ft. Showers likely. Tonight, W wind 15 to 25 kt easing after midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. Ocean: SW wind 10 kt becoming W. Wind waves 1 ft. W swell 7 ft at 12 seconds. Showers likely. Tonight, NW wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 7 ft at 12 seconds

CANADA Victoria 50° | 40° Seattle 51° | 42° Olympia 56° | 41°

Spokane 50° | 38°

Tacoma 53° | 42° Yakima 52° | 38°

Astoria 51° | 45° © 2014 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 8:22 a.m. 7.4’ 2:18 a.m. 4.2’ 10:02 p.m. 6.4’ 3:31 p.m. 1.7’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 9:28 a.m. 7.5’ 3:32 a.m. 4.0’ 10:54 p.m. 6.7’ 4:27 p.m. 1.4’

Port Angeles

12:56 a.m. 6.2’ 9:52 a.m. 5.6’

6:07 a.m. 5.4’ 5:42 p.m. 1.3’

1:42 a.m. 6.4’ 11:04 a.m. 5.5’

7:12 a.m. 5.1’ 6:36 p.m. 1.3’

Port Townsend

2:33 a.m. 7.7’ 11:29 a.m. 6.9’

7:20 a.m. 6.0’ 6:55 p.m. 1.4’

3:19 a.m. 7.9’ 12:41 p.m. 6.8’

8:25 a.m. 5.7’ 7:49 p.m. 1.4’

Dungeness Bay*

1:39 a.m. 6.9’ 10:35 a.m. 6.2’

6:42 a.m. 5.4’ 6:17 p.m. 1.3’

2:25 a.m. 7.1’ 11:47 a.m. 6.1’

7:47 a.m. 5.1’ 7:11 p.m. 1.3’

LaPush

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

LOWER ELWHA SMOKE SHOP 43991943

Nobody can beat our prices on smokeless tobacco!

WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS’ COUPONS!

DISCOUNTS OFFERED ON ALL CARTONS OF TOBACCO See store for details

SURGEON GENERAL’S WARNING: CIGARETTE SMOKE CONTAINS CARBON MONOXIDE. SMOKING CAUSES LUNG CANCER, HEART DISEASE, EMPHYSEMA, AND MAY COMPLICATE PREGNANCY.

(360) 457-1390

M–Th 7:30am–7:00pm Friday 7:30am–8:00pm Saturday 9:00am–8:00pm Sunday 10:00am–6:00pm

-0s

0s

7:12 p.m. 7:35 a.m. 1:42 p.m. 4:49 a.m.

Burlington, Vt. 36 12 Casper 52 40 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 71 49 Albany, N.Y. 24 Clr Charleston, W.Va. 62 35 Albuquerque 33 Clr Charlotte, N.C. 68 39 Amarillo 28 Clr Cheyenne 48 37 Anchorage 11 Clr Chicago 30 19 Asheville 42 Cldy Cincinnati 58 31 Atlanta 49 PCldy Cleveland 37 17 Atlantic City 37 .01 PCldy Columbia, S.C. 71 40 Austin 42 .58 Cldy Columbus, Ohio 54 31 Baltimore 41 PCldy Concord, N.H. 49 23 Billings 46 Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 56 38 Birmingham 45 Cldy Dayton 52 28 Bismarck 34 Cldy Denver 51 35 Boise 49 Rain Des Moines 36 22 Boston 30 Clr Detroit 35 20 Brownsville 55 .37 Rain Duluth 26 18 Buffalo 12 Cldy El Paso 62 43 Evansville 57 28 Fairbanks 17 01B WEDNESDAY Fargo 27 24 50 25 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 34 11 10:25 a.m. 7.6’ 4:33 a.m. 3.6’ Great Falls 49 48 11:35 p.m. 7.1’ 5:14 p.m. 1.1’ Greensboro, N.C. 62 38 Hartford Spgfld 50 28 51 36 2:17 a.m. 6.5’ 7:52 a.m. 4.8’ Helena 79 71 12:14 p.m. 5.5’ 7:22 p.m. 1.3’ mmHonolulu Houston 69 48 Indianapolis 47 19 3:54 a.m. 8.0’ 9:05 a.m. 5.3’ Jackson, Miss. 70 51 1:51 p.m. 6.8’ 8:35 p.m. 1.4’ Jacksonville 69 42 Juneau 40 33 40 22 3:00 a.m. 7.2’ 8:27 a.m. 4.8’ Kansas City Key West 72 63 12:57 p.m. 6.1’ 7:57 p.m. 1.3’ Las Vegas 72 51 Little Rock 67 43 Hi 44 53 47 29 66 70 60 59 62 53 69 44 59 55 77 33

2851 Lower Elwha Rd. Port Angeles

■ Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) “American Hustle” (R) “The Lego Movie” (PG; animated) “The Monuments Men” (PG-13) “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” (PG; animated)

Pressure Low

High

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

.01 .09

.01

.01 MM

Now Showing

AND CONVENIENCE STORE

Warm Stationary

Mar 16

Nation/World

ORE.

Tides

50/43 Showers may reclaim region

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset tomorrow

“Son of God” (PG-13) “300: Rise of an Empire” (R)

■ The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

Clr Clr PCldy Clr PCldy Clr PCldy Clr PCldy PCldy Clr PCldy Cldy Clr Clr Clr PCldy Cldy PCldy Clr Clr Cldy Clr PCldy Clr PCldy Clr

.67 PCldy .53 Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy .95 Snow Clr Clr Cldy Cldy

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

81 58 63 28 53 25 66 41 76 62 56 31 27 18 29 17 69 40 67 50 57 37 64 44 54 27 39 30 39 24 74 53 64 51 58 39 80 61 52 18 47 23 51 50 59 32 68 39 56 32 66 47 68 46 70 56 42 30 71 59 60 39 64 45 82 59 67 58 86 72 46 23 22 01B 59 45

.01 .04 .63

.30

.19

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 89 at Point Mugu, Calif. ■ -14 at Doe Lake, Minn., and Spincich Lake, Minn.

Atlanta 71° | 45°

Fronts

Mar 23

New York 48° | 34°

Detroit 46° | 30°

Washington D.C. 60° | 35°

El Paso 72° | 41° Houston 72° | 51°

-10s

52/40 Low 35 49/35 Cloudy; showers Sun gives sneak Sunshine to may drop in peek at spring flex its power

Chicago 49° | 37°

Los Angeles 77° | 57°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

TONIGHT

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 45° | 35°

Denver 66° | 36°

Almanac

Brinnon 49/37

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 52° | 42°

*Rainfall reading taken in Nordland

✼ ✼

Sunny

PCldy Clr Clr PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr PCldy Clr Clr Clr Clr Rain PCldy Clr PCldy PCldy Rain Clr Cldy PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Clr Clr PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Clr Clr Cldy Cldy

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington, Del.

33 37 67 42 76 39 67 43 49 59

26 22 54 22 55 28 46 20 30 37

Cldy PCldy Clr Clr Clr .60 Clr PCldy Clr PCldy PCldy

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo Otlk 75 57 PCldy 78 57 Sh 58 36 PCldy 61 38 Clr 64 42 Clr 73 52 Clr 39 18 PCldy 71 42 PCldy 70 64 PCldy/Wind 55 44 Sh 71 61 Ts 45 30 Cldy/Wind 62 43 Cldy 76 49 PCldy 34 28 Snow 52 36 Clr 82 61 PCldy 65 42 Clr 94 74 Clr 61 43 PCldy 79 65 Clr 51 35 Clr 40 31 Rain/Snow 50 37 PCldy

Sequim Rotary Club to hold penny drive for polio fight PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — The Rotary Club of Sequim is holding a penny drive throughout this month to help in the “Adult World” (R) effort to eradicate polio. “Walking the Camino: Six Rotary International Ways to Santiago” (NR) has joined forces with the “12 Years a Slave” (R) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, UNI■ Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-385-3883) CEF, the World Health Organization and the Bill “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” and Melinda Gates Foun(PG; animated) dation to end polio. As of Jan. 13, India was How’s the fishing? declared “polio-free,” which means India had gone three Lee Horton reports. years without a single case Fridays in of wild poliovirus. It costs 60 cents to PENINSULA DAILY NEWS immunize a child.

All funds collected will be donated to the Rotary Polio Plus fund. In addition, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will match community contributions twofold. The Rotary Club has partnered with local banks as collection sites for pennies: Kitsap Bank, Union Bank, Columbia Bank, Washington Federal, Sound Community Bank and KeyBank. KSQM 91.5 FM has agreed to be “Penny Central,” and people can drop off donations there as well. For more information, phone Christine Paulsen at 360-461-1866 and visit www.endpolionow.org.

Ocean View Cemetery HAS A NEW BURIAL SECTION JUST FOR VETERANS

43987462

Serving: Port Angeles • Sequim Port Townsend • Discovery Bay Kingston • Edmonds • Greyhound Amtrak • Downtown Seattle Sea Tac Airport • Seattle Hospitals Olympic Bus Lines is an independent agent of Greyhound. You can now purchase your Greyhound tickets locally at your only nationwide reservation location on the Olympic Peninsula.

Jim Breitbach Cindy Kochanek Tom Morse Ocean View Cemetery has completed a new and affordable section of 22 burial spaces just for Veterans. The new section has a beautiful view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the majestic Mt. Baker. The Veteran and their decedents may place one full body and four cremations per grave space.

• Free WiFi on board • Providing complimentary home-made chocolate chip cookies from “Cockadoodle Doughnuts” in Port Angeles.

(360) 417-0700

Outside the area toll free

(800) 457-4492

www.dungenessline.us

Payment Plan Available 43991704

Port Angeles/Sequim

Late night or early morning flight? Ask us about special hotel rates!

For more information contact Cindy Kochanek at 360-417-4550 or Tom Morse at 360-461-2042 Stop by and check out our beautiful 54 acre cemetery with a spectacular view that cannot be beat. Ocean View Cemetery 3127 West 18th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98363 360-417-4565 YOUR ONLY LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED CEMETERY SERVING THE CITY OF PORT ANGELES SINCE 1894


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