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Friday/Saturday Cold and rainy, subfreezing over weekend C10

Seattle’s Hernandez wins Cy Young Award B1

Peninsula Daily News 50 cents

November 19-20, 2010

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

State deeper in red

Getting c-c-cold — and it might snow Peninsula Daily News

Also . . .

Hurricane Ridge Road from Port ■ AccuWeather’s five-day North Angeles into Olympic National Park Olympic Peninsula forecast/C10 remained closed Thursday after more snow fell Wednesday night — and snow Park officials. is expected soon in populated areas. The storm dropped 10 inches to 20 The National Weather Service has inches of snow Wednesday on the state’s issued a winter weather advisory for the mountains, the National Weather SerStrait of Juan de Fuca and Hood Canal. vice said. The advisory will last from 9 a.m. to Forecasters say low temperatures in 6 p.m. today along the Strait and 6 a.m. Western Washington will drop to the to 2 p.m. along Hood Canal. A trace of snow to 3 inches is forecast 20s and 30s into early next week. Forecasters say it will be colder in today for the lowlands along the Strait, Eastern Washington, with lows in the with greater accumulations above 500 20s and teens into early next week. feet. For more information about HurriUp to 1 inch of snow is forecast today for the lowlands along Hood Canal with cane Ridge, visit www.nps.gov/olym or phone the park visitor center at 360up to 4 inches above 500 feet. 565-3130. A chance of snow is also forecast for Updated weather forecasts for North the Peninsula on Saturday. Hurricane Ridge now has 14 inches Olympic Peninsula towns can be found total, according to Olympic National at www.peninsuladailynews.com.

Tax collections plummet; deficit put at $5.7 billion By Curt Woodward The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — State tax collections are down again, swelling the budget deficit by about $1 billion over the next 2½ years as lawmakers grapple with recent voter rejection of higher taxes. Thursday’s state revenue forecast from chief economist Arun Raha adds an additional $385 million to the hole in the current year’s state budget, which runs through June. The 2011-2013 deficit is now pegged at about $5.7 billion out Raha of a roughly $33 billion general fund. Gov. Chris Gregoire already has ordered spending cuts to address the current deficit, but her actions won’t be enough to fill the additional budget gap. Gregoire has limited ability to adjust the budget without help from the Legislature, but she could call lawmakers into a special session to fix the shortfall. The Democratic governor said she’s set a Nov. 29 deadline for legislative leaders to recommend steps to balance the current budget. But Gregoire made clear that she can do little more with her limited budgetbalancing powers.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Scott Hilliard, an employee of Port Angeles Tire Factory, installs a studded snow tire on a customer’s wheel Thursday.

Future Border Patrol station

‘Ending significant programs’

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Bingo is played inside the Eagles lodge building this week. The structure will be sold to the government, and its sprawling dance floor and other entertainment equipment will be removed.

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Eagles OK deal to sell lodge the appropriate environmental compliance Peninsula Daily News work, and that is still underway.” The Border Patrol station, which covers PORT ANGELES — The Border Patrol Clallam and Jefferson counties, is now will buy the Eagles Aerie 483 lodge build- headquartered in the Richard B. Anderson ing at 110 S. Penn Street for a new Border Federal Building at 138 W. First St. in Patrol station, U.S. Customs and Border downtown Port Angeles, but the facility Protection confirmed Thursday. has become too small since the number of “We have agreed upon a price with the agents has quadrupled to 25 since 2006. Eagles, the fraternal order that owns the Penn Street property we intend to Sale price not divulged acquire,” Richard Sinks, supervisory Pili Meyer of Coldwell Banker Uptown patrol agent for Customs and Border ProRealty, who represents the Eagles, said tection’s Blaine sector, said Thursday in Wednesday she had been notified by the an e-mail. Border Patrol’s Realtor, Karen Kilgore of “However, we do not anticipate closing Windermere Real Estate Sequim East, on this property until early in the new calendar year, as we still have to complete that Customs and Border Protection will

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Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County Public Defenders hired forensics experts this week to pore over more than 60,000 pages of financial documents involved in the aggravated first-degree theft case against former Treasurer’s Office cashier Catherine Betts, Port Angeles lawyer Loren Oakley said Thursday in Superior Court. Oakley said during a five-minute status hearing that it was not likely he would be ready to defend Betts, who allegedly stole at least $617,467 in public funds from the office’s cash drawer, by the scheduled trial date of Jan. 10. “Given the volume of discovery in this case, I doubt we’ll be ready to go in two months,” he said. Turn

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buy the lodge building and property two miles east of downtown for the Eagles’ counteroffer price — an amount Meyer said she could not divulge. The Eagles’ asking price was $1.99 million May 30 on 4.6 acres valued at $2.14 million for the building and land. After the Border Patrol made an initial offer of $1.7 million, the Eagles’ membership voted Sept. 24 to sell the building and made a counteroffer. “The message I am getting is that this is a done deal,” Meyer said Wednesday, adding that the purchase agreement must be signed by “four or five” government officials before it becomes final. Turn

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More delay due in treasury theft trial

Sides agree to price; Border Patrol plans to move in next year By Paul Gottlieb

“Quite frankly, we can’t cut any deeper without ending significant programs. Extremely difficult choices must be made, and given this sharp revenue decline, they must be made now,” Gregoire said. “The Legislature will need to act quickly — delay will only deepen the problem and limit the options.” Majority Senate Democratic leaders concurred with Gregoire’s sense of urgency. “When we reach agreement on a way forward, we believe the Legislature should — and will — act immediately,” Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown, D-Spokane, and Sen. Ed Murray, D-Seattle, said in a joint statement.

Business C7 Classified D1 Comics C9 Commentary/Letters A10 Dear Abby C9 Deaths C8 Faith C6 Movies *PS Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Spotlight

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UpFront

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Palin raises tempers, ups show ratings TWENTY-YEAR-OLD Bristol Palin’s improbable run to next week’s “Dancing with the Stars” finals has led to such an uproar that conspiracy theories are floating, some fans are insisting they’ll never watch again, and a Wisconsin man actually shot up his television, apparently in disgust over Palin’s dancing. “There’s been more angst over this than over the 2000 election,” quipped media industry analyst Shari Anne Brill. But the always-popular show is enjoying a ratings boost, undoubtedly due to the novel casting. Many were surprised when the shy Bristol, once the country’s best-known teen mom, became a contestant on the hit show, where judges’ scores are combined with public votes to determine the winners. Bristol, paired with professional partner Mark Ballas, put on her game face and started, well, learning to dance. Her effort was clear; so was her lack of skill and experience. Flash forward to this week’s results, with four remaining couples vying for three finals spots. “Dirty Dancing’s” Jennifer Grey was declared safe, then Disney Channel’s Kyle Massey. It came down to Palin and singer Brandy, who had wowed the judges with

The Associated Press

Bristol Palin, left, and her partner, Mark Ballas, perform during “Dancing with the Stars” in Los Angeles on Monday. her sultry tango, earning a perfect score. When Palin was declared safe, Brandy was speechless, and the jaw of Grey’s partner, Derek Hough, quite literally dropped. The next morning, “Dancing” fan Kimberly Fishman arrived at her job at a Northern California bank. She was furious at the result, and so were co-workers. “People were saying it’s the tea party voting, that all of Alaska voted,” said Fishman, 42. “It’s all politics.” Fishman, who identifies herself as a liberal, has resolved not to watch next week. “I’m done,” she said. “No one could say Bristol is the better dancer.” Yet, she added, she herself didn’t vote. That’s a key point, media analyst Brill said. “A lot of people out there are watching but not voting.”

Boyle tops 2 charts Singing sensation Susan Boyle has a No. 1 album in the U.S. and the U.K. simultaneously for the second time in a year — a feat not achieved for more than 40 years. Her record label, Sony, said she is the first woman to reach the milestone achieved by Boyle the Beatles in 1969 and The Monkees in 1967. “The Gift” reached No. 1 in the U.K. on Sunday and topped U.S. charts Wednesday. The eccentric Scot shot to international fame after her audition for the TV show “Britain’s Got Talent” received more than 120 million views on YouTube.

WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: Now that nearly two years have passed since he left office, how do you regard George W. Bush’s presidency?

Excellent 

Good 

Fair 

Poor 

11.6% 24.0% 12.1% 51.0%

Undecided  1.3% Total votes cast: 1,389

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

Passings

Corrections and clarifications

By The Associated Press

GERTRUDE NEUMARK ROTHSCHILD, 83, whose research helped improve light-emitting and laser diodes now used in many cell phones, flatscreen televisions and Bluray disc players, and who waged a successful patentinfringement battle against some of the world’s biggest electronics companies including Sony, Nokia and Hitachi that yielded tens of millions of dollars in settlements and licensing fees, died Nov. 11 in Rye, N.Y. The cause was heart failure, her lawyer, Diana D. Parker, said. Mrs. Rothschild lived in Hartsdale, N.Y. In the 1980s, Mrs. Rothschild, who taught materials science and engineering at Columbia University, began studying the optical properties of wide bandgap semiconductors and developed diodes capable of using the upper range of the spectrum and serving as a superior light source. This was an important breakthrough. The new short-wavelength LEDs, which emit blue, green, violet and ultraviolet light, were much more energyefficient, reliable and longlived. Short-wavelengthemitting laser diodes could store vastly more information more compactly.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

The new technology lent itself to a wide variety of applications, from billboards and traffic lights Mrs. to handRothschild held mobile devices and high-definition DVD players.

had a syndicated chess column for decades and wrote more than 20 books, among them New Ideas in Chess, Modern Chess Brilliancies and The 10 Most Common Chess Mistakes. The book that Mr. Evans was probably most famous for was one on which he assisted: Fischer’s My 60 Memorable Games. He cajoled and exhorted Fischer to finish the book, _________ helped him with the prose LARRY EVANS, 78, a and wrote introductions to five-time United States all the games. chess champion and prolific During Fischer’s prelude writer who helped Bobby to the world championship, Fischer win the world Mr. Evans was what is championship in 1972, died known in chess as his secMonday in Reno, Nev. ond. He helped him train Mr. Evans, who lived in and prepare for his Reno, died of complications matches against Mark of gall bladder surgery, Taimanov, Bent Larsen and according to the website of Tigran Petrosian. the United States Chess Dr. Anthony Saidy, an Federation. international master who Although Mr. Evans was a grandmaster, he was best knew Mr. Evans for many years, said, “He was one of known for his writing; he the very few American grandmasters that I couldn’t beat, ever.”

Laugh Lines

The major pilots unions are complaining about the use of full-body scanners and these patdown techniques at the airport. Pilots say the searches make it almost impossible for them to smuggle in liquor. Jay Leno

Did You Win? State lottery results

Thursday’s Daily Game: 1-8-7 Thursday’s Keno: 03-08-13-22-25-27-28-3637-40-41-50-52-54-60-6566-71-72-73 Thursday’s Match 4: 08-22-23-24

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago) Six-year-old Edward Conyingham of Tatoosh Island, injured in a fall from a radio tower on the island off Cape Flattery, was listed in serious condition in a Seattle hospital. Edward, the son of E.F. Conyingham, chief naval radio operator at Tatoosh, was taken by the Coast Guard cutter Redwing to Port Angeles, and he then was flown from the Ediz Hook air station to Sand Point Naval Air Station in Seattle. The nature of his injuries were not reported by Marine Hospital there.

1960 (50 years ago) Olympic Memorial Hospital has received a threeyear accreditation by the National Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. Administrator William E. Murray told hospital commissioners the high rating followed an official inspection Oct. 21. After the commissioners’ meeting, anesthesiolo-

gist Dr. A.W. Kneller demonstrated the Port Angeles hospital’s new resuscitator and how the portable equipment can facilitate breathing in a patient of any age.

1985 (25 years ago) Clallam County commissioners will receive a petition signed by more than 850 people urging them to enact a “keg registration” ordinance. The petition, initiated by the Clallam County chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, is aimed at controlling the sale of kegs of beer to teenagers.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

ON A PORT Angeles farm, lady is ecstatic with the washer and dryer her husband bought in Seattle for $1. Then she whispers, “I hope they work” . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, Nov. 19, the 323rd day of 2010. There are 42 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Nov. 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address as he dedicated a national cemetery at the site of the Civil War battlefield in Pennsylvania. On this date: ■  In 1600, King Charles I of England was born in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. ■  In 1794, the United States and Britain signed Jay’s Treaty, which resolved some issues left over from the Revolutionary War. ■  In 1831, the 20th president of the United States, James Gar-

field, was born in Orange Township, Ohio. ■  In 1919, the Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles by a vote of 55 in favor, 39 against, short of the two-thirds majority needed for ratification. ■  In 1942, during World War II, Russian forces launched their winter offensive against the Germans along the Don front. ■  In 1959, Ford Motor Co. announced it was halting production of the unpopular Edsel. ■  In 1969, Apollo 12 astronauts Charles Conrad and Alan Bean made the second manned landing on the moon. ■  In 1977, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat became the first Arab leader to visit Israel.

■  In 1985, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev met for the first time as they began their summit in Geneva. ■  In 1990, the pop duo Milli Vanilli were stripped of their Grammy Award because other singers had loaned their voices to the “Girl You Know It’s True” album. ■  Ten years ago: President Bill Clinton ended a historic visit to Vietnam. Attorney Charles Ruff, who’d represented President Clinton during the Monica Lewinsky scandal and his impeachment trial, died in Washington, D.C., at age 61. ■  Five years ago: Two dozen Iraqi men, women and children in Haditha were killed by U.S. Marines after a Marine was killed

by a roadside bomb; the squad leader, Staff Sgt. Frank Wuterich, is awaiting trial on charges of voluntary manslaughter. ■  One year ago: President Barack Obama wrapped up his weeklong Asia trip in South Korea, where he said the United States had begun talking with allies about fresh punishment against Iran for defying efforts to halt its nuclear weapons pursuits. President Hamid Karzai pledged to get tough on corruption and strengthen security in Afghanistan as he started a second fiveyear term. Artist Jeanne-Claude, who helped create various “wrapping” projects with her husband, Christo, died in New York at age 74.


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, November 19-20, 2010

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Suspect in Ohio gives directions to bodies in tree MOUNT VERNON, Ohio — An unemployed tree-trimmer arrested after a teenage girl was found bound and gagged in his basement pointed the way Thursday to the bodies of her brother, mother and another woman, stuffed into garbage bags and hidden in a hollow tree, authorities said. The three victims and the rescued 13-year-old disappeared more than a week ago from a blood-spattered home. Authorities Hoffman said all three were murdered there, though they did not say how, and that the tree-trimmer, Matthew Hoffman, gave investigators information through his attorneys that led them to the bodies in the woods in central Ohio. Hoffman, 30, an ex-convict who spent six years in a Colorado prison on arson and other charges, remained jailed on charges of kidnapping the girl, Sarah Maynard, and is the only suspect in the killings.

Censure is the most serious congressional discipline short of expulsion. The House, which could change the recommended discipline by making it more serious or less serious, probably will consider the recommendation after Thanksgiving. The ethics committee voted 9-1 to recommend censure and that Rangel pay any taxes he owes on income from a vacation villa in the Dominican Republic.

Jonestown memorial

OAKLAND, Calif. — A group of Peoples Temple survivors announced plans Thursday for a granite monument inscribed with the names of more than 900 people who died in the Jonestown tragedy 32 years ago to the day. Some ex-members have grown impatient with efforts by the Rev. Jynona Norwood over the decades to erect a 36-footlong stone wall, like the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, at the Oakland cemetery where more than 400 unidentified and unclaimed victims are buried. Those planning the new memorial include Jim Jones Jr., an adopted son of the temple leader. Jones told The Associated Press it’s time to move forward with an alternative monument — four large stone slabs that Censure for Rangel would be sunk flat on the grassy WASHINGTON — The mass grave site overlooking San House ethics committee ThursFrancisco Bay. day recommended censure for Norwood, whose family lost longtime Rep. Charles Rangel, 27 relatives in the tragedy, said suggesting that the New York Democrat suffer the embarrass- she would press ahead with her ment of standing before his col- own memorial, even though cemetery management said it is leagues while receiving an oral rebuke by the speaker for finan- impractical for the site. cial and fundraising misconduct. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Anti-U.N. cholera protesters attack in Haiti PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Anti-U.N. violence spread to Haiti’s capital Thursday as protesters blocked roads and attacked foreigners’ cars over suspicions that peacekeepers introduced a cholera epidemic that has killed more than 1,100 people. The unrest followed three days of similar violence in northern Haiti. The protests are fueled by suspicions, shared by some U.S. disease experts, that a contingent of Nepalese soldiers brought cholera with them to Haiti and spread the disease from their rural base into the Artibonite River system, where the initial outbreak was centered. The 12,000-member U.N. Stabilization Mission in Haiti, or MINUSTAH, which has been the dominant security force in Haiti for six years, denies responsibility for the epidemic.

tors to seek his arrest abroad through Interpol. Assange, whose whereabouts are unknown, is suspected of Assange rape, sexual molestation and unlawful coercion. He has denied the allegations, which stem from his encounters with two women during a visit to Sweden in August. His lawyer in Britain, Mark Stephens, said Assange had consensual sex with both women who then turned on him after becoming aware of each other’s relationships.

Dental records

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Dutch authorities are reviewing the dental records of missing U.S. teen Natalee Holloway as they analyze a jawbone with a tooth in it that was found in Aruba last week, the FBI told The Associated Press on Thursday. The girl’s father, Dave HolloWikiLeaks warrant way, said earlier that he provided the records but added STOCKHOLM — The eluthat he had received no new sive Australian behind the biggest leak of U.S. war documents official information on the invesin history is wanted by Sweden tigation on the Dutch island in the Caribbean. in a drawn-out rape probe and A tourist found a jawbone could soon face an international last Friday and took it to the arrest warrant curtailing his ability to jump from one country front desk of the Phoenix Hotel, said Ann Angela, spokeswoman to another. for the Aruba prosecutor’s office. A Swedish court Thursday It was then sent to the Nethapproved a motion to bring Julian Assange, the 39-year-old erlands for analysis. There has been no announcement on founder of WikiLeaks, into cuswhether the bone is human. tody for questioning. The deciThe Associated Press sion paves the way for prosecu-

The Associated Press

A Transportation Security Administration agent performs an enhanced pat-down on a traveler at Denver International Airport on Wednesday.

Airports consider call to ditch TSA agents System is bloated bureacracy, congressman from Florida says By Ray Henry and Mike Schneider The Associated Press

ATLANTA — In a climate of Internet campaigns to shun airport pat-downs and veteran pilots suing over their treatment by government screeners, some airports are considering another way to show dissatisfaction: ditching TSA agents altogether. Federal law allows airports to opt for screeners from the private sector instead. The push is being led by a powerful Florida congressman who’s a longtime critic of the Transportation Security Administration and counts among his campaign contributors some of the companies that might take the TSA’s place. Furor over airline passenger checks has grown as more airports have installed scanners that produce digital images of the body’s contours, and the anger intensified further when TSA added a more intrusive style of pat-down recently for those who opt out of the full-body scans. Some travelers are using the

The top executive at Orlando Sanford International Airport said he plans to begin the process of switching to private screeners in January as long as a few remaining concerns can be met. The airport is within Mica’s district. CEO Larry Dale said members of the board that runs Sanford were impressed after watching private screeners at airports in Rochester, N.Y., and Jackson Hole, Wyo.

Internet to organize protests aimed at the busy travel days next week surrounding Thanksgiving. For Republican Rep. John Mica of Florida, the way to make travelers feel more comfortable would be to kick TSA employees out of their posts at the ends of the snaking security lines. This month, he wrote letters to the nation’s 100 busiest airports Customer service asking that they request private He said TSA agents could do security guards instead. better at customer service. In Georgia, Macon City CounCongressman’s push cilor Erick Erickson, whose com“I think we could use half the mittee oversees the city’s small personnel and streamline the sys- airport, wants private screeners tem,” Mica said Wednesday, call- there. Erickson called it a protest ing the TSA a bloated bureaumove in an interview. cracy. “I am a frequent air traveler, Mica is the ranking Republican on the House Transportation and and I have experienced . . . TSA Infrastructure Committee. Once agents who have let the power go the new Congress convenes in to their head,” Erickson said. “You January, the lawmaker said he can complain about those people, but very rarely does the bureauhopes to lead the committee. Private contractors are not a cracy work quickly enough to cure-all. For example, contractors remove those people from their must follow all TSA-mandated positions.” TSA officials would select and security procedures, including hand pat-downs when necessary. pay the contractors.

China’s restrictions on Nobel winner threaten presentation The Associated Press

OSLO, Norway — The Nobel Peace Prize may not be handed out this year because China is not likely to let anyone from imprisoned award-winner Liu Xiaobo’s family attend the ceremony, a Nobel official said, calling China’s diplomatic pressure this year unprecedented. Outraged by the award, Beijing has reportedly clamped down on Liu’s relatives and pressured other countries not to send representatives to the Dec. 10 award ceremony in Oslo. Ambassadors from Russia, Cuba, Kazakhstan, Morocco and Iraq have all declined invitations to the ceremony but didn’t specify the reasons, Geir Lundestad, secretary of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, told The Associated

Quick Read

Press on Thursday. “For an embassy to actively try to persuade other embassies to not participate in the ceremony is something new,” Lundestad said. The prestigious $1.4 million award can only be collected by the laureate or close family members. Liu, a Chinese dissident, is serving an 11-year sentence for subversion after co-authoring an appeal calling for reforms to China’s one-party political system. His wife, Liu Xia, has been under house arrest and subject to police escort since the award was announced last month. Lundestad said no other relatives have announced plans to come to Oslo for the ceremony. “The way it looks now, it is not likely that someone from his close family will attend,” Lundestad said. “Then we will not give out

the medal and the diploma during the ceremony.” If that happens, it will be the first time since 1936, when there was no one present to accept the medal and diploma for German journalist Carl von Ossietzky, who was seriously ill and not allowed to leave Nazi Germany. However, a representative of Ossietzky received the prize money only. The Nobel committee has skipped selecting a winner altogether in some years, including during World War II. Lundestad said the committee has not lost hope that someone from Liu’s family can attend the ceremony. Friends said all of Liu’s closest family members are under tight police surveillance aimed at preventing them from attending the ceremony.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Being chauffeured not good for driving skills

Nation: Massachusetts joins ban on Four Loko

World: Beaujolais batch released according to rule

World: Restoration effort for Stonehenge gets grant

Pennsylvania’s governor is grappling with a problem facing many teenagers — inexperience behind the wheel. Responding to a question at a news conference Thursday, Ed Rendell acknowledged that he has not driven extensively for 20 years — since before his days as Philadelphia mayor in the 1990s. For the past eight years, plainclothes state troopers assigned to his security detail have chauffeured Rendell in a state-owned sedan. He’s promising to bone up on his driving skills by term’s end but said he was never a great driver to begin with.

Massachusetts liquor regulators Thursday banned the sale of caffeine-packed alcoholic drinks, making the state the fifth in the nation to outlaw Four Loko and others like it. They filed an emergency regulation banning the drinks and ordering their immediate removal from stores. The commission had originally planned to simply restrict sales of the drinks beginning Monday. But officials took a tougher stance Thursday, a day after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned four drink manufacturers that the caffeine is an “unsafe food additive.”

The latest batch of Beaujolais Nouveau, the popular French wine that’s more fun than fine, made its debut Thursday. The verdict for some: a sweet, fruity and authentic flavor that matches 2009’s excellent harvest. “It’s excellent! I really like it!” said the 72-year-old Francois Cheri, who has tasted it for the past 30 years. According to a rule in place since 1985, Beaujolais Nouveau cannot be uncorked until the start of the first minute of the third Thursday of November. The scrupulously respected rule opens the way for midnight celebrations that continue into day.

Stonehenge is getting a multimillion-dollar grant that conservators said will help restore some dignity to a World Heritage site blighted by busy roads and cramped facilities. English Heritage said today that it now has about two-thirds of the money it needs to revamp the area around the prehistoric circle of stones. The group acknowledged, however, that the improvements probably wouldn’t come in time for the 2012 Olympic Games, when hordes of tourists are expected to descend on the site. The grant is being awarded by the Heritage Lottery Foundation.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Sculptor’s last work to be dedicated By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The last work by internationally renowned blacksmith and sculptor Russell Jacqua, who died in 2006, will be dedicated Sunday as his final gift to the community he loved. The Courtyard of Grace has become part of the Grace Lutheran Church, 1120 Walker St., and has as its centerpiece a large Jerusalem cross surrounded by slate and polished granite embedded into the floor. The cross is surrounded by vertical granite pillars connected by benches and adorned with the ornate metalwork for which Jacqua was best known, “This courtyard is designed to be a place of meditation for the entire community,” said Pastor Coe Hutchison. “It is a beautiful place to visit, where you can sit and have a cup of coffee or just think.”

12:30 p.m. dedication The dedication at 12:30 p.m. will include Jacqua’s friends and several members of the approximately 160-strong congregation to which he belonged. In keeping with the medieval architecture of the courtyard, the celebration will include ancient liturgical rites and music. Aside from the cross and pillars, the courtyard includes a columbarium along one side, which includes 96 compartments, each designed to store the cremated remains of two church members and their families.

“Russell designed a space that is like no other place that we experience in our lives. It is a place where our Christian community can celebrate our present life and our eternal life at the same time.”

Coe Hutchison pastor at Grace Lutheran Church

Still to be constructed is a baptismal fount, in which the ritual signifying the beginning of life will be administered. The proximity of the two will help visitors ponder life and its questions, Hutchison said, adding that “the design for the columbarium and the Courtyard of Grace is meant to accommodate the fabric of everyday life.”

Jacqua’s death Jacqua died in June 2006 at the age of 59 after a twoyear struggle with ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis — Lou Gehrig’s disease — a neurological degenerative disease that progressively weakens muscles and leads to death. He planned and designed the Courtyard of Grace, though he was too weak to do much of the work, and the heavy lifting was accomplished by friends and associates. A Port Townsend resident for 32 years, Jacqua was one of the first American artist-blacksmiths to use industrially

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Grace Lutheran Church Pastor Coe Hutchison stands in the Courtyard of Grace, which is to be dedicated Sunday. powered hammers. His work is visible throughout Port Townsend. He created the sculpted metal railings for the stairs in the City Hall annex lobby, as well as “Leafwing,” the large metal sculpture at the beginning of the Larry Scott Trail — which was dedicated the week before Jacqua’s death.

Construction of the is open to anyone who courtyard cost about wishes to visit, with no time limits or other restrictions. $120,000, Hutchison said. It can be reached from the inside of the church or Volunteer labor from the parking lot, makIt would have been more ing it accessible at any time, if not for volunteer labor though it will not be lit at and additional contribu- night. tions from the congregation, “Russell designed a space he added. that is like no other place The Courtyard of Grace that we experience in our

lives,” Hutchison said. “It is a place where our Christian community can celebrate our present life and our eternal life at the same time.”

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

OMC OKs 1 percent hike in property tax By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Olympic Medical Center has adopted a 2011 budget with $1.5 million in operating income and spending $7.5 million on capital projects. Hospital commissioners also approved a 1 percent property tax increase Wednesday night in

Port Angeles. OMC forecasts a 1.8 percent margin next year — or less than half of the public hospital district’s 4 percent goal. As a result, capital spending in the budget is about half as much as normal. “That’s the economic reality we have to deal with,” said Commissioner

John Nutter, who chairs the long-term strategy.” Budget and Audit CommitThe largest piece of capitee. tal spending slated for next year is the $700,000 archiNot ‘sustainable’ tectural design on an emergency “My concern is it’s not a expanded department. sustainable pattern.” The hospital’s property Chief Executive Officer tax levy was increased by Eric Lewis agreed. “The way we balance the $36,241. OMC will receive budget is we reduce capital $3.7 million in property spending,” Lewis said. “That, again, is not a taxes in 2011.

The owner of a $250,000 house will pay an extra $1.17 next year, or $117.87 instead of $116.70. Nutter noted that the tax levy covers about half of OMC’s losses in uncompensated care. Next year’s budget has $131.4 million in operating revenue and $129.9 million in operating expenses. In part because of a decline in outpatient vol-

ume, OMC projects a $480,829 loss in net income — from $2.9 million this year to $2.4 million next year. With more than 1,000 employees, OMC is Clallam County’s largest employer.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Court: Teachers can’t have sex with any students By Donna Gordon Blankinship

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday that student age doesn’t matter in teachersex cases, even if the student is 18 and considered

an adult by other state laws. The case involves Matthew Hirschfelder, a former choir teacher at Hoquiam High School, who had been charged with first-degree sexual misconduct with a minor in 2006. An 18-year-

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old choir member told police she had been involved in a sexual relationship with him. Hirschfelder, who was 33 at the time, denies any relationship occurred. He asked a lower court judge to dismiss the case because the girl was not a minor. The judge refused to dismiss the case and encouraged the Court of Appeals to clarify what state law said on the issue. The appeals court ruled in January 2009 that the statute did not criminalize sexual relations between students and teachers. A few months later, the Legislature clarified the law, saying all sex between school employees and fulltime registered students 16 or older is illegal.

Reversed 5-4 The Supreme Court on a vote of 5-4 reversed the appeals court and said the state law was not unconstitutionally vague. Hirschfelder’s attorney, Rob Morgan Hill of Olympia, was surprised by the ruling. “I thought that the issues

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were so clear that it was logically impossible for them to decide as they did,” Morgan Hill said. He was surprised by the way the court ruled on unconstitutional vagueness, since the legal standard says a law should be written so a person of common intelligence will understand it. The Supreme Court’s decision implies that four Supreme Court judges and three Appeals Court justices have below common intelligence because they interpreted state law differently than the five justices in the majority, Morgan Hill said. “Which is bizarre,” he added. Morgan Hill said he expected his client will want to appeal this decision to the U.S. Supreme Court. They have 90 days to bring that petition. Megan M. Valentine, Grays Harbor County deputy prosecuting attorney, said she felt the Supreme Court took a common sense approach to the case and was clear in explaining the reasons for their decision. “I’m pleased with the

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“Reading ‘minor’ as Hirschfelder urges — to exclude those students 18 or older — renders the words ‘registered student’ in the statute meaningless.”

State Supreme Court decision on former choir teacher case

words ‘registered student’ in the statute meaningless,” the decision said. The dissent, written by Chief Justice Charles W. Johnson and signed by justices Susan Owens, Richard B. Sanders and Tom Chambers, argues the majority did not properly interpret state law and used the wrong statutes to make its argument, while ignoring ‘Minor’ ambiguous others that would have fit He argued that the term the case better. “minor” is ambiguous. In the decision, written Dissent by Justice Debra L. Ste“The majority’s concluphens and signed by justices sion is inconsistent with the Barbara Madsen, Gerry statutory scheme, taken as Alexander, Mary Fairhurst a whole, and does not, ultiand James Johnson, the jus- mately make sense,” Johntices argue that they must son wrote in his dissent. focus on the plain language He called the majority’s of the statute, which prohib- explanations unpersuasive its sexual relations between and imprecise. school employees and regisThe dissent also crititered students. cizes the majority for rewritThey cite another statute ing a “bright-line rule.” that defines students as “We should not use the anyone enrolled in school statute to criminalize conand younger than 21. duct between two consent“Reading ‘minor’ as ing adults where the LegisHirschfelder urges — to lature has expressly proexclude those students 18 vided otherwise,” Johnson or older — renders the wrote. results,” Valentine added. Hirschfelder argued that the former statute, titled “sexual misconduct with a minor in the first degree” was not intended to criminalize sexual intercourse between school employees and registered students age 18 or older because of the statute’s use of the word “minor.”

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Peninsula Daily News

Friday, November 19, 2010

A5

Psychologist testifies at baby death hearing Teen mom might have misunderstood rights By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Lauryn Louise Last did not know what she was doing in January 2009 when she waived her rights to remain silent and to have an attorney present during police questioning about the death of her newborn boy, a psychologist said Thursday. During three hours of testimony in Clallam County Superior Court, Anthony Eusanio of Edmonds said the impact of the physical and sexual abuse the Port Angeles teenager endured as a child and the drugs she took the day police questioned her severely compromised her ability to grasp the implications of not invoking her Miranda rights when asked by police. Last, now 18, gave selfincriminating statements that led to a second-degree murder charge in the Dec. 31, 2008, death of her fullterm infant. “Lauryn Last put her baby face-down into a toilet and allowed it to drown for several minutes until it died,” according to the statement of Port Angeles Police Officer Jesse Winfield contained in court files. “She then threw her son into the trash can outside in a plastic garbage bag.” Last, then 16, was charged as an adult Jan. 2, 2009, with first-degree murder, a charge later reduced to second-degree murder. The maximum sentence for the second-degree murder charge is 18 years and four months. Last was represented Thursday by John Hayden of Clallam Public Defenders.

Sexual assault Last’s child was fathered by her mother’s then-37year-old boyfriend, who is now serving time in Colorado for sexual assault of Last as a child, Eusanio said. The proceedings Thursday before Judge Ken Williams, intended to determine the admissibility of Last’s statements to police, were continued from Oct. 25. If Williams rules that Last’s statements to police are inadmissible, “that would make it very difficult for the state to proceed,” Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John Troberg said Thursday after the hearing. “She spoke at length both in recorded statements and nonrecorded statements,” he added. The hearing will continue again at 9 a.m. Dec. 2, when the proceedings are expected to conclude, although Williams is not expected to issue a ruling at

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Lauryn Last appears in court at the Clallam County Courthouse on Thursday.

“Lauryn thought the right to remain silent was that you shouldn’t speak until spoken to by the police.”

Anthony Eusanio psychologist

that time, Troberg said. Eusanio interviewed Last at a detention center a few weeks after she was charged, he said.

Administered tests

self-esteem and “guarded, inhibited, ingratiating, a people-pleaser” and “unlikely to stand up for herself,” Eusanio said. “To avoid abandonment, she will submit to intimidation and abuse,” Eusanio said. The psychologist said the combination of her mind-set with the methadone she took and the marijuana she smoked the day of her questioning by police led to her failure to understand what she agreed to. Hayden asked Eusanio if he agreed that Last had “failed miserably” in understanding that she could assert her right to remain silent and be represented by counsel — and Eusanio said yes. “Lauryn thought the right to remain silent was that you shouldn’t speak until spoken to by the police,” Eusanio said. “She clearly was not getting it.” Troberg said he will question Eusanio at the Dec. 2 hearing and may call two police officers who took the statements from Last. On rebuttal, Troberg also may seek further testimony from Miami psychologist Bruce Frumkin, who testified Oct. 25 that he did not give credence to the connection between complex post traumatic stress disorder and Last’s waiver of her Miranda rights. Last’s trial was set for June 7 but has been postponed indefinitely until Williams rules on the admissibility of Last’s statements to police.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

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Port Angeles utility workers, from left, Brent Robinson, Logan Dean and Jim Shea, restring a set of 12,000-volt power lines onto a new pole Thursday at First and Oak streets in downtown Port Angeles. A storm packing high winds Monday evening damaged a wooden utility pole next to the Richard B. Anderson Federal Building, leading to a power outage in the downtown area. Crews replaced the damaged pole with a fiberglas-composite pole designed to flex in high winds.

He administered 17 psychological tests and measurements, interviewed Last for four hours, tested her for four hours and wrote a 49-page report on the results. Staff at the detention center — she’s now living with a relative on her own recognizance — described her as constantly talking to herself in a “chatty” manner and “so withdrawn and Peninsula Daily News fragile that even the other PORT ANGELES — A detention center detainees woman was arrested for didn’t know what to say to investigation of shoplifting her,” Eusanio said. and possession of heroin at Last was molested and the new Walmart Super“almost raped” by two teenCenter. age boys at age 5, physically The arrest at about abused by a relative from 1 a.m. Wednesday is the ages 8 to 11 and sexually second for alleged shopliftassaulted at 15, resulting in ing at the store since it her pregnancy, Eusanio opened Oct. 26 at 3471 E. said. Kolonels Way, off U.S. HighThe trauma had caused way 101. her to become submissive, Mari L. Hines, 32, of Port the manifestation of which Angeles was spotted by were symptoms of what store personnel taking Eusanio called complex about $36 in merchandise, post-traumatic stress disorsaid Clallam County Sherder and “pathological” periff’s Sgt. Randy Pieper in a sonality characteristics. statement. Sometimes confused When she was searched with bipolar disorder, ________ just inside the front door, CPTSD involves prolonged staff writer Paul Gottlieb trauma that often begins in canSenior be reached at 360-417-3536 Deputy Brian Knutson childhood and is marked by or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily found about 1.4 grams of extreme defensiveness, low news.com. black tar heroin, what

PA woman arrested in shoplifting at Walmart Second hit at retailer’s new store

eninsula

Peninsula Daily News news sources

KINGSTON — The Port of Kingston suspended passenger ferry service to Seattle indefinitely Thursday after a second engine failed on the Spirit of Kingston. Meanwhile the port’s backup boat, Victoria Express — which was purchased from a Port Angeles company — is still not being used on the route, the Kingston Community News said online Thursday. Ferry Programs Manager Karen Arnold told the news agency the crew is now certified to operate the vessel, but the monohull ferry is too unstable at the dock to safely load passengers.

“At the dock, she pitches wildly,” Arnold said. “It’s just not safe.” Arnold said SoundRunner service will not resume for at least two weeks as repairs are made to the Spirit.

Improve alert system The port will use the time to improve its rider alert system and make provisions for the ORCA card system before relaunching, Arnold said. SoundRunner sailings have been canceled on seven of the 24 days the ferry has been in operation, due to bad weather and mechanical failures, the news agency said.

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Sequim Soroptimists will host the free event. Human trafficking is the fastest-growing criminal enterprise in the world, according to the event announcement. It is second only to the drug trade in terms of global revenue. In the United States, Portland, Ore., ranks first and Seattle second for the most cases of human trafficking, event organizers said.

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appeared to be a morphine sulfate tablet and a used syringe, Pieper said. The stolen items were not listed in court documents. Hines was released on her personal recognizance. Her arraignment is set for Dec. 3 in Clallam County Superior Court. A previous theft charge had resulted in an order not to enter Walmart, Pieper said. Hines at a Wednesday hearing was again ordered not to enter Walmart.

Norman L. Livengood, 32, of Port Angeles was arrested for investigation of assault and third-degree theft by Deputy Ken Oien on Nov. 10 at about 3 a.m., Pieper said. Store personnel confronted Livengood as he was leaving and recovered a PlayStation and about five pocketknives, Pieper said. When being detained, Livengood threatened store personnel with pepper spray, Pieper said. Charges in that case were filed in Clallam County District Court on Nov. 11.

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

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A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

BPA proposes smaller rate increase Peninsula Daily News

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Bonneville Power Administration has proposed an 8.5 percent average wholesale electrical power rate increase, which would take effect Oct. 1. The rate proposal will be considered during a public rate-setting process in the coming months, culminating in a July decision. The announcement has

no effect on the Clallam County Public Utility District’s plans to raise electrical rates for both homes and businesses by 8 percent beginning Dec. 1.

PUD rates down road But a BPA hike in wholesale prices could affect PUD rates down the road, said Michael Howe, PUD spokesman. “Anytime costs go up, we

will consider what we need to do to make sure we can provide the service required,” Howe said. PUD staff recommended the 8 percent increase that comes into effect in December after BPA, which is its principal supplier, raised its wholesale power rate by 5 percent for the second consecutive year. The boost will be about $8 per month for the average residential customer

using 1,400 kilowatt hours monthly, Howe said. But the announcement of BPA’s proposed rate is a pleasant surprise for those supplied by the nonprofit federal agency based in Portland, Ore. In May, BPA announced that wholesale rates could increase by as much as 20 percent in 2011. BPA said that the 2011 rate increase would support maintenance and refurbish-

ment of Northwest hydroelectric and nuclear generating facilities. BPA will hold down the extent of its increase by not rebuilding its financial reserves, the agency said in a prepared statement. It said that reserves have been diminished by two years of low runoff and reduced energy prices that resulted in losses exceeding $300 million. The strategy keeps rates

lower for now amid a difficult economy but exposes ratepayers to greater rate volatility, the BPA said. If Columbia River streamflow and the economy do not improve over the coming year, BPA would rely on short-term borrowing instead of reserves to meet financial obligations. The agency would then have to quickly raise rates further to repay the borrowed funds.

‘Barefoot Bandit’ suspect says not guilty Defendant works on plea deal for profits By Gene Johnson

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The attorney for the teenager accused of being the “Barefoot Bandit” is working with prosecutors to negotiate a plea deal the lawyer said could involve using movie- or book-deal profits to compensate the victims of an alleged two-year, crosscountry crime spree. Defendant Colton Harris-Moore, 19, pleaded not guilty Thursday to federal charges that include interstate transportation of stolen aircraft and being a fugitive in possession of a firearm.

‘Very reluctant’ “He’s very reluctant to make a dime off this, he really is,” said his lawyer, John Henry Browne. However, Browne said that when he told his client that money from movie or book deals could be used to repay victims — and incidentally win him a more favorable plea deal, with less time behind bars — “that changed his mind a little bit.” The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Seattle declined to

“He’s a fairly industrious young man. By the time he gets out of custody, he’ll probably be able to get a job and make some money. He’s talented.”

comment on whether it is negotiating a possible plea deal with Harris-Moore. The “Barefoot Bandit” moniker was coined after a thief committed some of the crimes without socks or shoes and gained a big following on the Internet. Harris-Moore is accused of leading authorities on a cat-and-mouse game in pilfered cars, boats and small planes after allegedly escaping a halfway house south of Seattle in 2008. This year, he made a daring cross-country dash that ended four months ago after he allegedly stole a plane in Indiana, crashlanded it in the Bahamas and was captured by Bahamian police at gunpoint in a stolen boat.

Before the judge Harris-Moore, who was indicted by a grand jury last week, appeared before U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Alice Theiler on Thursday wearing prison khakis over an orange shirt. He stated his name and year of birth, and frequently looked down during the brief hearing. He told the judge he understood the charges against him — interstate

Greg Banks prosecutor in Island County, where defendant grew up

Colton Harris-Moore 19-year-old defendant

John Henry Browne Attorney for Harris-Moore

transportation of a stolen aircraft, a stolen firearm and a stolen vessel, as well as being a fugitive in possession of a firearm and piloting an aircraft without a valid airman’s certificate. Browne entered the not guilty plea on HarrisMoore’s behalf. Afterward, the attorney told reporters that discussions are in the early stages on a possible deal that could resolve federal and state charges against Harris-Moore. Not guilty pleas are typical at this stage, even if defendants later intend to change their pleas. Four of the five counts against Harris-Moore carry maximum sentences of 10 years in prison, and Browne said that realistically, his client could be looking at

anywhere from four to 12 years if convicted. Trial was set for Jan. 18. The federal charges stem from a spate of crimes in late 2009 and early this year, when Harris-Moore is accused of flying a stolen plane from Anacortes to the San Juan Islands; stealing a pistol in eastern British Columbia; stealing a plane from a hangar, where authorities found bare footprints on the floor and wall, and flying it to Granite Falls where it crashed after running out of fuel; and stealing a 32-foot boat in southwestern Washington and taking it to Oregon.

Hopscotch across U.S. From Oregon, authorities said, the bandit hopscotched his way across the

U.S., frequently stealing cars from the parking lots of small airports, until he made it to Indiana, where he stole another plane and made for the Bahamas. In all, Harris-Moore, a self-taught pilot, is suspected of more than 70 crimes across nine states. A possible plea deal by Harris-Moore would require the consent of prosecutors in other jurisdictions. Some, including Greg Banks, the prosecutor in Island County, where Harris-Moore grew up and where he was first arrested at age 12, have indicated they want Harris-Moore to answer for local crimes in their courts, rather than in one overarching plea in federal court in Seattle. If those prosecutors don’t want to cooperate, “I’ll bankrupt them,” Browne said, citing the expense of putting on a high-profile trial in small, rural counties. The assertion drew a chuckle from Banks. “I’ve had calls all morning about whether a jury trial over a bunch of burglaries is going to bankrupt our county, and the answer is no,” Banks said.

“It was a funny thing for him to say.” Banks, however, said he wouldn’t rule out agreeing to a global plea deal if it meant any profits could be used to repay victims, but he noted the complexity of working out such a deal. And, he said, HarrisMoore wouldn’t necessarily need to sell his story to pay restitution. “He’s a fairly industrious young man,” Banks said. “By the time he gets out of custody, he’ll probably be able to get a job and make some money. “He’s talented.”

In solitary Browne said HarrisMoore has been in solitary confinement at the Federal Detention Center south of Seattle, where he’s been drawing airplane designs and reading about aircraft and nature. He’s received letters from his mother and aunt but few visits, and he’s not interested in getting out of solitary, Browne said. “He’d rather stay where he is, which is rather unusual,” the lawyer said.

Some could pay $7 to drive across Tacoma bridge By Christian Hill Tacoma News Tribune

TACOMA — Drivers would pay $7 to cross the Tacoma Narrows bridge using photo tolling under a recommendation by a citizens advisory committee. The proposed toll is high

for a reason. Committee members want to dissuade people from using the option as much as possible. The nine-member commission — with one vacant seat — is concerned that photo tolling will cost too much in lost revenue and

eventually lead to higher tolls for drivers who use transponders or stop at tollbooths to pay for their crossing. “We’ve got a working revenue source . . . and let’s not mess with it,” said Jim Pasin, a committee member from Gig Harbor who

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hoto tolling: High fee would apply only to drivers without transponders or who didn’t stop at tollbooth. $1.50 to pay the expenses of tracking down the registered owner and mailing the bill — would pencil out. Committee members were leery of their numbers in reaching that conclusion and rebuffed their later suggestion of $5.50. Under the adopted proposal, a $5 late fee would be assessed if the bill wasn’t paid within 30 days. If the bill was left unpaid for 80 days, a $40 civil penalty would be added. The late fee and penalty would replace the current $52 fine for failure to pay a toll — $40 of which goes to Pierce County, with the remainder dedicated to the bridge. State Sen. Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, called the current arrangement a “cash cow for county courts.” The bridge would receive all the money under the recommendation, after paying costs. The state Transportation Commission is considering tolls starting in the spring for the 520 floating bridge using transponders and photo tolling. There will be no tollbooths.

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Chief among Pasin’s concerns, which were shared by other committee members, were that some photos of license plate numbers would be unreadable and that bills would be mailed to invalid addresses. He also worried that the option would mean less interest revenue because drivers would have 80 days to pay. Staff members had said a photo toll of $4.25 — the $2.75 transponder toll plus

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meeting Wednesday. Committee Chairman Alan Weaver voted no, voicing concern that the recommendation, if approved, would require legislative tweaking. Committee member Caroline Belleci was absent. The state Transportation Commission has the final say on the matter and will consider the recommendation next month. With photo tolling, a camera would capture the license plate of a vehicle, and a bill would be mailed to the vehicle’s registered owner.

Committee members said it will provide a test case for photo tolling. Better them than us, the committee was saying as committee member Ron Jones, also of Gig Harbor, said he didn’t want the Tacoma Narrows bridge to be the “canary in the coal mine.” Photo tolling on the Narrows bridge is also scheduled to begin in the spring.


PeninsulaNation

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, November 19, 2010

A7

Cell phones’ likely hazards revisited Book details possibilities of cancer

using a cell phone seemed to decrease the risk of brain tumors, which the authors acknowledged was “implausible” and a product of the study’s methodological shortcomings. The authors included some disturbing data in an appendix available only online. These showed that subjects who used a cell phone 10 or more years doubled the risk of developing brain gliomas, a type of tumor.

By Randall Stross The New York Times

WARNING: Holding a cell phone against your ear may be hazardous to your health. So may stuffing it in a pocket against your body. I’m paraphrasing here. But the legal departments of cell phone manufacturers slip a warning about holding the phone against your head or body into the fine print of the little slip that you toss aside when unpacking your phone. Apple, for example, doesn’t want iPhones to come closer than 5/8 of an inch. Research In Motion, BlackBerry’s manufacturer, is still more cautious: Keep a distance of about an inch. The warnings may be missed by an awful lot of customers. The United States has 292 million wireless numbers in use, approaching one for every adult and child, according to CTIA — The Wireless Association, the cell phone industry’s primary trade group. It said that as of June, about a quarter of domestic households were wirelessonly. If health issues arise from ordinary use of this hardware, it would affect not just many customers but also a huge industry. Our voice calls — we chat on our cell phones 2.26 trillion minutes annually, according to the CTIA — generate $109 billion for the wireless carriers.

Book on dangers The cell phone instructions-cum-warnings were brought to my attention by Devra Davis, an epidemiologist who has worked for the University of Pittsburgh and has published a book about cell phone radiation, Disconnect. I had assumed that radiation specialists had long ago established that worries about low-energy radiation were unfounded. Her book, however, sur-

Experts’ warnings

Joshua Trujillo/seattlepi.com

U.S. Sen. Patty Murray speaks on a cell phone handed to her by a commuter at the Colman Dock passenger ferry terminal on the Seattle waterfront. veys the scientific investigations and concludes the question is not yet settled. Brain cancer is a concern that Davis takes up. Over all, there has not been a general increase in its incidence since cell phones arrived. But the average masks an increase in brain cancer in the 20-to-29 age group and a drop for the older population. “Most cancers have multiple causes,” she said, but she points to laboratory research that suggests mechanisms by which lowenergy radiation could damage cells in ways that could possibly lead to cancer. Children are more vulnerable to radiation than adults, Davis and other scientists point out. Radiation that penetrates only 2 inches into the brain of an adult will reach much deeper into the brains of children because their skulls are thinner and their brains contain more absorptive fluid. No field studies have been completed to date on cell phone radiation and children, she said. Henry Lai, a research

professor in the bioengineering department at the University of Washington, began laboratory radiation studies in 1980 and found that rats exposed to radiofrequency radiation had damaged brain DNA. He maintains a database that holds 400 scientific papers on possible biological effects of radiation from wireless communication. He found that 28 percent of studies with cell phone industry funding showed some sort of effect, while 67 percent of studies without such funding did so. “That’s not trivial,” he said. The unit of measurement for radiofrequency exposure is called the specific absorption rate, or SAR. The Federal Communications Commission mandates that the SAR produced by phones be no more than 1.6 watts per kilogram. One study listed by Lai found effects like loss of memory in rats exposed to SAR values in the range of 0.0006 to 0.06 watts per kilogram. “I did not expect to see

barrels of crude oil a day. The refinery was shut down for six months after the April 2 blast, with its 360 employees working on maintenance during that time. San Antonio-based Tesoro began its gradual restart of the refinery in mid-October. Last month, the state Department of Labor and Industries fined Tesoro $2.39 million for violating workplace safety and health regulations. Tesoro has appealed the fine.

venience stores here are adding fruits and vegetables to their inventory to give shoppers in one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods healthier choices. The goal of the Healthy Corner Stores program is to encourage customers to buy an apple instead of a candy bar or whole-grain bread instead of doughnuts. The Spokane Regional Health District received $10,000 in federal stimulus money to pay for consultants and food displays at the Dairy Mart and Bong’s Grocery and Deli. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Briefly . . . Part of trail to be closed for repairs PORT ANGELES — The Waterfront Trail will be closed between the Red Lion Hotel and Francis Street Park from Monday, Nov. 29, through Friday, Dec. 10. The closure will allow workers to repair a bridge east of the hotel. Access to the trail will remain open at Francis Street Park and at Morse Creek.

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effects at low levels,” he wireless devices.” The association has set said. up a separate website, www. cell phonehealthfacts.com. San Francisco law Four attractive young The city of San Francisco people are seen on the home passed an ordinance this page, each with a cell phone year that requires cell pressed against the ear — phone retailers to post SARs and all four are beaming as prominently. they listen. This angered the CTIA, By this visual evidence, which announced that it cell phone use seems to be would no longer schedule correlated with elation, not trade shows in the city. cancer. The association mainThe largest study of cell tains that all FCC-approved phone use and brain cancer phones are perfectly safe. has been the Interphone John Walls, the associa- International Case-Control tion’s vice president for Study, in which researchers public affairs, said: in 13 developed countries “What science tells us is, (but not the United States) ‘If the sign on the highway participated. says safe clearance is 12 It interviewed brain can________ feet,’ it doesn’t matter if cer patients, 30 to 59 years Randall Stross wrote this article your vehicle is 4 feet, 6 feet old, from 2000 to 2004, then or 10 feet tall; you’re going cobbled together a control for The New York Times. He is an author based in Silicon to pass through safely. group of people who had not Valley and a professor of business “The same theory applies regularly used a cell phone. at San Jose State University. E-mail: stross@nytimes.com. to SAR values and The study concluded that

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The 737 minutes that we talk on cell phones monthly, on average, according to the CTIA, makes today’s typical user indistinguishable from the heavy user of 10 years ago. Davis recommends keeping a phone out of close proximity to the head or body, by using wired headsets or the phone’s speaker. Children should text rather than call, she said, and pregnant women should keep phones away from the abdomen. The FCC concurred about the best way to avoid exposure. It is not by choosing a phone with a marginally lower SAR, it said, but rather by holding the cell phone “away from the head or body.” It’s advice that I find hard to put into practice myself. The comforting sight of everyone around me with phones pressed against their ears, just like me, makes the risk seem abstract. But Davis, citing unsettling findings from research in Israel, France, Sweden and Finland, said: “I do think I’m looking at an epidemic in slow motion.”

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Peninsula Daily News

How smoky plume drew world’s eyes Was contrail off California from missile? By Brian Stelter And William J. Broad The New York Times

LOS ANGELES — Gil Leyvas has been a photojournalist on board a television news helicopter for more than a decade. He has seen countless airplanes and their wispy contrails. What he saw — and recorded — near Los Angeles on Nov. 4 and 8 looked nothing like the trail from an airplane. It looked, to him, like the launching of a missile. The first time, it looked like a far-off plume of smoke somewhere over the Pacific Ocean. The second, it appeared to be rising into the air, a large vertical column set against the bright orange sky at sunset. It was spectacular. The sunset video piqued the attention of KCBS, the TV station Leyvas works for, and by dawn the next day, Tuesday, Nov. 9, news anchors were speaking of a “mystery missile,” one that apparently posed no danger to Los Angeles but that baffled the people who saw it.

Worldwide attention By the end of the day, the video had garnered worldwide attention, which the absence of an official government explanation only magnified. All the authorities could say at first was that there was no radar evidence of any craft in the area. So people put forward all manner of theories: n It was a classified Navy test. n It was a provocation by a foreign power.

KCBS/KCAL

n It was a publicity stunt for a television show about aliens. Last Wednesday, Nov. 10, about 30 hours after the “mystery missile” started attracting news media attention, a Pentagon spokesman said that “there is no evidence to suggest that this is anything else other than a condensation trail from an aircraft.” That same day, news coverage took a sharp turn, with many reporters, and experts, concluding that what Leyvas had seen was an airplane or, barring that, an optical illusion. Some experts chastised media outlets for running with a half-baked, wholehyped story. That has not stopped the guesswork, however. And it has not stopped Leyvas from wondering what caused the contrails. “I’m trained to look for something that’s out of the ordinary, and this was out

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of the ordinary,” he said in an interview. Leyvas said that he had never seen an airplane contrail that resembled the contrails on Nov. 4 and Nov. 8. In fact, while he was recording the contrail on Nov. 8, he briefly panned the camera away when he saw a second contrail in the distance, only to discover that the second one had been caused by a jetliner. “There was no comparison at all” between the two, he said, because the mysterious one was several times bigger. He added: “The video speaks for itself.”

A missile? Experts have clashed in recent days on whether the mystery plume came from a missile or an aircraft, and they now tend to favor the aircraft explanation. Many, however, say that the available evidence can-

not rule out a missile. “I’m 98 percent sure it was a contrail,” or engine vapor from an airplane, said Jonathan McDowell, a Harvard astronomer who tracks rocket launchings and space activity. But he said that scores of missiles fly off launching pads in Southern California every year — and that a number of them are highly classified tests of foreign missiles that American intelligence agencies had managed to acquire. A main site of secretive work, McDowell said, is San Nicolas Island — a speck in the ocean about 75 miles west of Los Angeles that the military has used for decades. Last week, some experts suggested that San Nicolas seemed to lie in the vicinity of the mystery plume. Theodore A. Postol, a physicist and former Pentagon science adviser who teaches at the Massachu-

setts Institute of Technology, said that he, too, had come around to the jet explanation, but he also urged interpretative caution. “I can’t rule out a missile launch,” he said. “The argument that it’s a contrail from an airplane could be wrong, but it’s not dismissible.”

America’s air defense Postol said he was amazed that the federal and military authorities let the episode fester for days with a series of inconclusive answers. “These people are responsible for the air defense of the United States,” he said in an interview. “Yet they did a lot of hand waving and left the impression that they were not telling the whole story. “That’s not responsible for the people with their kind of responsibilities.” The Pentagon said that

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no Department of Defense entities had reported any scheduled or inadvertent launchings of rockets or missiles on Nov. 8. When KCBS inquired about the contrail on Nov. 4, it found that there had been no launchings scheduled that day at Vandenberg Air Force Base, north of Los Angeles, where satellites are launched into orbit. Leyvas said there were two copies of the unedited videotape of the Nov. 8 contrail, one that he has and one at the station. He and Scott Diener, the news director at KCBS, said there had been no effort by any government entity to obtain the unedited videotape, perhaps as part of an investigation into the incident. “The media are the only people begging for the video,” Diener said Thursday. Indeed, the “mystery missile” video was irresistible to television outlets across the country, which were playing the clip incessantly by Tuesday evening. Locally, KCBS noted in one segment that “it even looks as if there is some sort of rocket separation” shown on the tape. In another segment, it compared the Nov. 8 tape to the sighting on Nov. 4, which received no media attention at the time.

Lessons from incident

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A frame from a video of a contrail off the California coast taken on Nov. 8 by a photojournalist.

11/17/10 5:21:05 PM

But some people, including John E. Pike, director of GlobalSecurity.org, said from the start that the tape showed an airplane. In an interview, Pike, whose group in Alexandria, Va., analyzes space and military technologies, defended the military’s evasiveness as resulting not from dissembling but from the difficulty of knowing with certainty what every part of its vast network was up to. “I think it temporarily confused the Pentagon,” he said of the plume. “They had to triple-check to see if they actually did have something going on out there, to see if there was some black program they should not talk about.” In military jargon, black is a synonym for secret. Pike added that television news programs had acted irresponsibly in pushing the missile thesis without bothering to establish basic facts that would have quickly cleared up the riddle. “To me, it demonstrated the extent to which news organizations are captives of their sources,” he said. McDowell of Harvard drew another lesson. “It’s a great teaching moment,” he said. “Just because there’s an obvious interpretation doesn’t mean there isn’t something more subtle going on. “It’s always worth taking a second look to see if there’s an alternative hypothesis that might fit the data.” Diener, the KCBS news director, said that the experts interviewed by KCBS on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning had leaned toward the missile theory, spurring the initial “mystery missile” coverage. Asked why he thought there had been a change in the tone of the coverage, he surmised that the aircraft was “the explainable answer as opposed to the unexplainable.”


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

(C) — Friday, November 19, 2010

A9

Deficit: Special session

probable in December Continued from A1 tinues, even though the recession officially ended Any possible special last year. “It will be awhile yet session likely would be held in early December, before the losses can be when lawmakers are fully tallied or even known,” scheduled to hold their Raha told the state’s Ecousual organizing meet- nomic and Revenue Forecast Council. ings. “Uncertainty will conLegislators also could wait until January’s reg- tinue to prevail until a new ular session to rebalance normal — whatever that the current budget, but may be — settles in. that would shave pre“We are in uncharted cious weeks from the territory.” window needed to capture any savings before GOP wants to convene July. Revenues had been flowThe new revenue forecast also said Washing- ing relatively close to target ton will collect about in recent months, making $810 million less than the immediate deficit propreviously hoped for the jection a surprise to some next state budget, which state officials. Republicans immedilawmakers will write when the 2011 legislative ately renewed calls for a session convenes in Jan- December special session to begin making spending cuts uary. Raha said the continu- to help fix the budget hole. ing erosion of tax income Democrats remain in conshows that damage from trol of the Legislature, but the Great Recession con- voters essentially tied their

hands earlier this month by rejecting several tax increases and making it difficult for lawmakers to pass future tax hikes. Raha’s report of individual economic indicators painted a discouraging picture for economic growth in the immediate future. Credit to small business remains tight, and recovery in commercial construction isn’t expected until 2012. Single-family housing remains weak, and a recent uptick in multifamily housing is not presumed sustainable. Auto sales are rising but are still well below prerecession levels, Raha said. On the positive side, Raha said, the state’s strong aerospace and software industries along with important export ties to Pacific Rim nations mean Washington still could perform better than other U.S. states in the economic recovery.

Trial: Another status

hearing set Dec. 14 Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Women play bingo inside the Fraternal Order of Eagles building in Port Angeles on Wednesday. The hall pictured here features a large wooden dance floor and a disco ball.

Station: Paperwork

wending on its way Continued from A1 “The paperwork, which looks like the final paperwork, is churning its way through the labyrinth of government,” Meyer said. Kilgore did not return calls for comment. The Eagles club is looking for a new home to replace the 36-year-old building that has become too large and expensive to maintain for the club’s shrinking membership, lodge real estate committee member Kevin Wheeler said. Membership has dwindled from a high of 3,000 several years ago to about 900.

Looking for new place

Kevin Wheeler lodge real estate committee member

On July 27, the Border Patrol sponsored an open house in Port Angeles to explain the need for a new facility, claiming its present quarters were overcrowded and that space was needed for 25 to 50 agents — the standard space requirement for new Border Patrol stations, the agency said.

Staff growth

Senior staff writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladailynews. com.

Growing pains? Andrew May’s garden column. Sundays in

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Taylor moved the felony trial from July 12 to Jan. 10, putting it almost two years after the alleged theft was discovered. Clallam County approved a $597,516 insurance settlement to cover the alleged theft Oct. 5, not including a $10,000 deductible.

the Richard B. Anderson Federal Building, also is moving to larger quarters, though not with the Border Patrol. The General Services Administration, which is coordinating ICE’s relocation, is reviewing responses for requests for proposals for leased space in Port Angeles, GSA spokesman Ross Buffington said Wednesday. Buffington would not comment on the number of proposals received or potential new locations. “We don’t anticipate having a lease ready to sign before the start of the year,” he said.

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“We have to move forward, and moving forward is finding another place to live and figuring out what we are going to build if we end up with just land,” Wheeler said. “We are actively looking at properties and seeking people out.” Meyer said she was befuddled by the federal government actions. Federal officials agreed to the counteroffer in writing. Without signing the document or having a signed agreement — or even paying earnest money — officials conducted site inspections, did environmental assessments and took bids from contractors for the project, budgeted at $8 million. “This is a real inside-out transaction,” Meyer said. “We have something the government has submitted as the final offer that incorporates the offer that was discussed but hasn’t been signed by anyone in the government,” she added. “I’ve never had a transaction like this,” Meyer said. “I’m stunned that it’s taken this long, but I guess that’s the way they work.”

“We have to move forward, and moving forward is finding another place to live and figuring out what we are going to build if we end up with just land.”

Continued from A1 Thursday was to answer yes when asked if the Dec. Wood set another sta- 14 status-hearing date tus hearing for 1 p.m. would work for her. Tuesday, Dec. 14, when State Assistant Attorney Oakley said he expects to General Scott Marlow, who know if he’s ready to pro- is prosecuting the case, also ceed with the trial. participated by phone. Betts, The theft, discovered who has May 19, 2009, involved pleaded Betts allegedly manipulatnot guilty, ing and destroying Treaparticisurer’s Office paper and pated in computer records in a the hearchecks-for-cash fraud ing by involving real estate excise s p e a k e r Betts tax proceeds over a six-year phone period, a state Auditor’s from Shelton, where she Office investigation conreturned after being cluded in February after a released on her own nine-month investigation. recognizance. On June 10, Superior Her only participation Court Judge S. Brooke


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, November 19-20, 2010

Commentary

Page

A10

After-election analysis and angles PROOF IS IN the eye of the analyst. Post-election, I’ve hosted the Republican Women of Clallam County, been a guest at a Martha League of Ireland Women Voters luncheon, taken minutes for the Clallam County Republican precinct officers committee, emceed a Shelter Providers Network meeting and heard numerous individual views. Everyone agrees the political process needs less nastiness (particularly from the opposition), more participation (especially by voters who support their causes and candidates) and for elected officials to heed the message the voters delivered in the Nov. 2 election. There’s no agreement, however, on just what that message is. For the fourth time, voters imposed a requirement for a supermajority to approve any tax increases.

On the same ballot, they reelected most of the legislators who had overridden that requirement. Voters rejected a state income tax and repealed “snack taxes” imposed by the 2010 Legislature. On the same ballot, they reelected the Democratic legislative majority that imposed the snack taxes, and whose state party endorsed the income tax. Nevertheless, my Republican friends see a clear anti-tax message. The message isn’t so clear to University of Washington senior lecturer Nancy Amidei, who spoke to the League of Women Voters Nov. 13 at SunLand Golf and Country Club. The income tax was rejected by 64.21 percent, the supermajority passed by 63.8 percent and the snack taxes were repealed by 60.5 percent of those voting. Amidei extrapolated those figures to show that anti-tax voters made up only 41 percent to 43 percent of all eligible voters. That’s not a landslide or a stunning victory, she said, sounding as if she believes nonvoters are overwhelmingly pro-tax. Congressional and legislative campaigns decided by much nar-

rower margins invite losing candidates and their supporters to question how much of a mandate the winners received. Blaming non­participants for election outcomes is a bit of a stretch this year. Statewide, voter turnout was 70.55 percent, 74.38 percent in Clallam County and an astounding 81.29 percent in Jefferson County — the best in the state. Amidei went on to fault the initiative process, which doesn’t require voters to sit through hours of hearings, read staff reports and examine budget impacts before voting. Ballot issues are decided “not on the will of the people, but on the whim of the people,” she said. Initiatives and referenda do not follow the law­making process established by the U.S. Constitution and are not allowed at the federal level. “We’ve got to get back to teaching civics,” said Amidei. Civics — the study of how our government is supposed to function — is not required for high school graduation or addressed by Washington Assessment of Student Learning tests, she noted. Even among politically active

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people, many do not understand the law­making process, the roles of various elected officials or the different levels of government. “Without understanding of the process, voters are much more easily swayed . . . deceived . . . frightened,” Amidei said. In table conversation earlier, I noted that the United States was founded as a republic, not a democracy. “Yes, but it’s not anymore,” responded Amidei, whose topic was “Reclaiming Democracy,” not reclaiming the Republic of the United States of America. (Another contrast there — every Republican meeting opens with the Pledge of Allegiance, but the non­partisan League of Women Voters’ agenda included neither pledge nor national anthem.) Instead, Amidei offered encouraging words for further democratization. Citing Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and a long list of other social programs, she said they were “brought by both Democrats and Republicans” and “passed during bad budget times.” Economic down times present opportunities to increase govern-

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ment involvement in social services, because “people rise to a challenge,” she said. Optimism for growing government isn’t widely shared among my social service contacts. The Shelter Providers Network discussed greater collaboration, efficiency and efficacy to wring the most good from every increasingly scarce dollar. Perhaps the best political insight was voiced by a private citizen who came to the network meeting as a first-time visitor, after reading about it in the Peninsula Daily News. “The trend for government to take care of everything is ending,” she said. “Now the trend is for the community to take care.”

________

Martha Ireland was a Clallam County commissioner from 1996 through 1999. She is on the administrative staff of Serenity of House of Clallam County, co-owns a Carlsborgarea farm with her husband, Dale, and is active in the local Republican Party, among other community endeavors. Her column appears every Friday. E-mail: irelands@olypen.com.

and e-mail

but the oligarchy they fought against. The Fourth Amendment Wake up, America, before to the U.S. Constitution it is too late! Do you think it states: “The right of the cannot happen here? people to be secure in their Remember Nazi Gerpersons, houses, papers, and many. Remember the Soviet effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, Union. And as George Sanshall not be violated, and no tayana wrote: “Those who warrants shall issue, but cannot remember the past upon probable cause. . . .” Where exactly do virtual are condemned to repeat it.” Welcome, to our glorious strip-searches and full-body homeland, comrade. pat-downs, as a condition of Jeff Forberg, air travel, fit in? Sequim I can’t seem to find a clause in the Constitution that Local bounty allows for such imposition. Celebrate the local How then, do Homeland Security and TSA adminis- bounty this Thanksgiving trators justify this invasion and give the local farm of privacy? economy a boost. Does frisking old ladies Put on your warm and children make any clothes and come on out to sense? Just who are we support the Port Townsend looking for with such draFarmers Market. It will be conian measures? going every Saturday until Oh, I know the arguDec. 19. ment: “We have to give up In all my years of attenda little freedom for the ing the Port Townsend sake of security; it’s just a Farmer’s Market, the Saturminor inconvenience.” But as Benjamin Frank- days Nov. 13 and Nov. 6 lin aptly noted, “Those who have been the most poorly would give up essential lib- attended. Your local farmers have erty to purchase a little walked the extra mile to temporary safety deserves grow winter produce, have neither liberty nor safety.” This is one more step in braved the elements to harthe erosion of our freedom, vest with frozen fingers and muddy clothes and have leading ultimately to the persevered through a tough loss of both liberty and growing season to bring you safety for us all. a local bounty for not only Governments which the holidays, but for great, behave as such are called healthy, daily eating. “totalitarian” and “dictatoThey not only deserve rial.” This is not the America but need your support to get of our Founding Fathers, through the winter season

PDN have claimed opposition to the proposed Nippon project based on concerns of air quality and public health. In this geographic location, no one knows the long-term consequences of a modern biomass facility versus the potential loss of several hundred jobs. Nippon has proposed a $71 million biomass cogeneration facility in Port Angeles. At least 20 new jobs would be created. This size investment should secure future jobs for the current 250 employees. Project delay or cancellation along with global economic concerns could result in the mill’s closure by the company’s overseas the sun shine 24/7? No. and flourish for years to squash, try fish instead of leadership. Electricity is not a storturkey, be creative, be joyful come. Air quality is a vital able product. What is and give thanks for what Buying from a local health ingredient, particuneeded needs to be generwe are accomplishing as a farmer is economical, the larly for those with respiraated and put on the grid. community. prices are fair, the food is tory conditions, young and With losing the ability of Chris Llewellyn, organic, the selection is old. Quilcene generating electricity locally good, the dollar stays in our Unemployment and povfrom the hydroelectric dams area and boosts the local erty are also powerful, Llewellyn owns Serendip- on the Elwha River, keeping economy and, most imporadverse contributors to the voltage at the proper ity Farm. tantly, you will be a part of public health. level will be more costly for preserving our rural land, The medical literature Biomass backed the power companies, and protecting our watersheds is replete with studies of you know who pays for the The biomass boiler is a and those wonderful farm suicide, depression, alcohol extra cost — the customer. good thing for the commuvistas we all enjoy. abuse, illicit drug use and The demand for electricSo, many thanks to those nity. domestic chaos that often ity is not going to decrease It will give a stable arise from unemployment. of you who put on warm in the future with the source of green power that Mortality rates are boots, hats and gloves to increase of electric vehicles the energy companies have higher among the impovershow up on Saturdays. and more people moving to to buy mandated by voters ished and uninsured. Bring your friends, this area. of Washington state. This is particularly encourage a neighbor who A Nov. 5-6 letter writer The only other type of true for those with chronic has never attended a farm[“Biomass Concerns”] said green power is wind and illness who are forced to ers’ market. they moved from Cave delay their medical care Plan your meals around solar. Junction, Ore., and said that (e.g., diabetes, asthma, Do the wind blow and what we have, stuff a since the installation of the severe depression, cancer). biomass boiler there, the The air quality and the residents of the area have preservation of several been exposed to daily sumhundred Port Angeles fammer hazes, poor air quality ily-wage jobs have imporand constant noise of truck- tant implications in public ing and biomass deliveries. college newspaper has forced happen. But now that it’s out there, health. I contacted the Chamber I finally feel ready to say ‘Yes, it’s I would hope that reaRamirez to publicly expose his of Commerce at Cave Junc- sonable, local discussants me. I’m one of the thousands.’” secret and has put this son of a tion. Ramirez’s critics say he wasn’t in this debate acknowledge maid and a restaurant worker into Their response to my all epidemiologic evidence honest with the student body about the thick of a debate on immigraletter: “Though before con- as we look at balanced and tion and education that has reached his immigration status when he ran struction there was some relevant public health confor president and should resign. a boiling point in recent weeks. public concern, we have cerns for the North Olym“He misled the students . . . he Some have called for his resignahad no issues with haze, pic Peninsula. should step down,” said Cole tion while others have rallied to his air quality or noise.” This concept seems gerRojewski, president of the campus’ defense. So, how much more mis- mane to the current local College Republicans and one of “In a way, I’m relieved,” said information is being put out biomass discussion and Ramirez’s opponents in the race for Ramirez, a 22-year-old political scithere? may be valid in the analypresident. ence major from Tulare, Calif. David Moody, sis of future projects that But school administrators said “I don’t want to be a liability or Port Angeles come before our commuRamirez broke no rules by running for cost the school donations. I never president of Associated Students Inc. nity. Biomass and health really thought this was going to Los Angeles Times Mark Fischer, M.D., Recent letters to the Port Angeles

Student body president an illegal immigrant The parents of popular California State University, Fresno Student Body President Pedro Ramirez always talked a lot about el sueño Americano — the American Dream. He was to study hard, get good grades and claim the prize. But it wasn’t until that night in their kitchen when the high school valedictorian was filling out university applications that they told him a missing detail — he wasn’t a United States citizen. He was born in Mexico. He came to this country when he was 3 years old. Now, an anonymous tip to the

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News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com ■ Jennifer Jackson, Port Townsend Neighbor columnist, 360-379-5688; jjackson@olypen.com

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, weekend commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Misty memories of the way they were Talk about your misty watercolor memories. What’s too painful to remember, we simply choose to forget. The bittersweet story of a Maureen preppie for Dowd whom things always came too easily and his noodging partner, pressuring with sky-high expectations until that final clash split them apart. Has time rewritten every line? It’s trying, big-time. Yes, Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand met up on “Oprah” on Tuesday to talk about their 1973 turn in “The Way We Were” as the culture-crossed Hubbell and Katie. But the more charged reunion was taking place in Dallas at the groundbreaking ceremony for the George W. Bush Presidential Center at Southern Methodist University. After a period of estrangement and after circling each other with dueling memoirs, a happy W. and a gaunt Dick Cheney were reunited on stage. “History is beginning to come around,” Cheney said with satisfaction. After hailing W. as “classy,” Vice acted unclassy. Demonstrating that Bush still cannot control Cheney, the former vice president defied W.’s promise not to mock President Obama. “This may be the only shovelready project in America,” Cheney noted sardonically, making fun of Obama’s attempts to dig out from under the trillions of debt left by his predecessors. Together again were the president and vice president who invaded, deregulated, overspent, created a climate of fear and intensified the class divide with tax cuts — all so recklessly that our

resources are sapped just as we need to step up and compete with our banker, China. “I wasn’t a very good economic prognosticator,” Bush told CNN’s Candy Crowley. No kidding. The pair fell out over the Scooter Libby pardon. Up until that point, Vice had been able to lead W. off various cliffs with faux deference and a good sense of which buttons to push. (W. would do anything to avoid getting labeled a wimp.) Bush writes in his autobiography that when he told Scooter’s old boss that the jury verdict should be respected, Dick stared at him intensely. “I can’t believe you’re going to leave a soldier on the battlefield,” Cheney said. “The comment stung,” Bush concedes. “In eight years, I had never seen Dick like this, or even close to this. I worried that the friendship we had built was about to be severely strained, at best.” In his book, Bush is respectful to Cheney. He doesn’t even mention his vice president’s neardeadly aim with a shotgun. But it is telling that W. takes pains to paint his Vice as a mere supporting player, not the huge force for global domination that he was. This conscious diminution of Cheney makes the power struggle in that White House all the more apparent. W. writes that he considered dropping Cheney from the ticket in 2004, but even that wasn’t his own idea. Cheney diabolically suggested it, knowing the Dauphin would refuse. On the “Today” show interview with Matt Lauer, Bush was asked by an audience member to name his most insightful adviser. The chagrined ex-president tried to avoid the question at first. It was fascinating to watch the body language of the man who said his decision to invade Iraq

relied more on body language than vigorous debate. When W. did offer a list, Cheney did not immediately pop to mind. Hank Paulson was first. Then Condi, who elbowed Cheney aside. Then Colin Powell, Cheney’s nemesis. Then Rummy, Cheney’s mentor and partner in dark machinations. And then, finally, when W. could avoid it no longer, he mentioned Vice, damning with faint praise: “Dick Cheney’s advice was consistent and strong.” He told Lauer that he was motivated to run for president because of his father: “I wondered whether or not I had what it took to get in the arena like he did.” And he writes that one of the motivating factors for sacking Saddam was that the Butcher of Baghdad tried to assassinate his dad. Yet, despite his father being the measuring stick and prod, he did not keep the former president and foreign affairs expert in the loop on Iraq. Asked by Bill O’Reilly why he did not like to seek advice from his father — the only other American president who went to war with Saddam — W. offered a nonsensical answer that simply underscored his perpetual fear of being overshadowed by his dad. “He knew that I had better information at the time than he would have known,” W. said. He also talked as usual about how close he and his dad are, which makes the whole thing even weirder. As Barbra sang on “Oprah”: If we had the chance to do it all again, tell me, would we? Could we?

_________

Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. Contact Dowd via http://tinyurl. com/dowdmail.

Dude, where’s my Obamacare waiver? More than one million Americans have escaped the clutches of the Democrats’ destructive federal health care law. Lucky them. Their employMichelle ers and labor Malkin representatives wisely applied for Obamacare waivers earlier this fall and got out while the getting was good. Now, it’s time for Congress to create a permanent escape hatch for the rest of us. Repeal is the ultimate waiver. As you’ll recall, President Barack Obama promised repeatedly that if Americans liked their health insurance plan, they could keep it. “Nobody is talking about taking that away from you,” the cajoler-in-chief assured. What he failed to communicate to low-wage and part-time workers across the country is that they could keep their plans ■ only if their companies begged hard enough for exemptions from Obama­care’s private insurancekilling regulations. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website, at least 111 waivers have now been granted to companies, unions and other organizations of all sizes who offer affordable health insurance or prescription drug coverage with limited benefits. Obamacare architects sought to eliminate those low-cost plans under the guise of controlling insurer spending on executive salaries and marketing. It’s all about control. If central planners can’t dictate what health benefits qualify as “good,” what plans qualify as “affordable” and how health care dollars are best spent, then nobody can. The ultimate goal, of course: precipitating a massive shift from private to government insurance. McDonald’s, Olive Garden, Red Lobster and Jack in the Box are among the large, headlinegarnering employers which received the temporary waivers. But perhaps the most politically noteworthy beneficiaries of the HHS waiver

program: Big Labor. The Service Employees Benefit Fund, which insures a total of 12,000 Service Employees International Union health care workers in upstate New York, secured its Obama­care exemption in October. The Local 25 SEIU Welfare Fund in Chicago also nabbed a waiver for 31,000 of its enrollees. SEIU, of course, was one of Obama­care’s loudest and biggest spending proponents. The waivers come on top of the massive sweetheart deal that SEIU and other unions cut with the Obama administration to exempt them from the health care mandate’s onerous “Cadillac tax” on high-cost health care plans until 2018. Other unions who won protection from Obama­care: ■  United Food and Commercial Workers Allied Trade Health and Welfare Trust Fund ■  International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Union No. 915 ■  Asbestos Workers Local 53 Welfare Fund ■  Employees Security Fund ■  Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 123 Welfare Fund ■  United Food and Commercial Workers Local 227 ■  United Food and Commercial Workers Local 455 (Maximus) ■  United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1262 ■  Musicians Health Fund Local 802 ■  Hospitality Benefit Fund Local 17 ■  Transport Workers Union ■  United Federation of Teachers Welfare Fund ■  International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (AFLCIO) ■  Plus two organizations that appear to be chapters of the International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA) Several of these labor organizations did not respond to requests for comment about their waivers. But Jay Blumenthal, financial vice president of the Local 802 Musicians Health Fund in New York, did explain to me: “We got grandfathered in” (his description for getting a pass) because “things were moving so fast” and “we need time now to prepare for the law.” In other words: Policy cram-

downs first, political fixes later. A supporter of Obama­care, Blumenthal told me he “sees no irony, no,” in unions supporting the very health care “reform” from which they are now seeking relief. Chris Rodriguez, director of human resources at Fowler Packing Co. in California’s San Joaquin Valley, sees things a little differently. Fowler pursued an HHS waiver because their low-wage agricultural workers would have lost the basic coverage his company has voluntarily offered for years. “We take care of our employees, and we warned [health care officials that] if they imposed this, large numbers of workers would lose access to affordable coverage,” he told me. Rodriguez said he’s grateful the firm won a waiver, but he did not lose sight of the fact that the very policies passed to increase health insurance access are having the opposite effect: “That’s our government at work.” Indeed, some prominent government officials who lobbied hardest for Obamacare are now also joining waiver-mania,■ including liberal Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden, who has been pushing for an individual mandate exemption for his state of Oregon, and Democratic Sen. Ben Nelson of Nebraska, who is pushing to waive Obama­care’s burdensome 1099 reporting requirements of small businesses. Fearful of retribution by HHS secretary and chief inquisitor Kathleen Se­belius, who has threatened companies speaking out about Obama­care’s perverse consequences, many business owners who obtained waivers refused to talk to me on the record. One said tersely: “We did what we had to do to survive.” A new House GOP majority now has the chance to protect the rest of America from this regulatory monstrosity. We want out.

________ Michelle Malkin is author of Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. E-mail: malkinblog@gmail.com.

Friday, November 19, 2010

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Friday, November 19, 2010

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Forks home-school students, from left, Rachel Howe, Kayla Jones, Sara Lester and Nicole George hold a bake sale fundraiser for Friends of Forks Animals.

Home-school students help animals FORKS — Homeschooled high school students Rachel Howe, Kayla Jones, Sara Lester and Nicole George recently raised more than $160 during a bake sale for Friends of Forks Animals. They organized the fundraising effort for their community service requirement for their senior portfolios. The students have been working on the portfolios all four years of high school under the guidance of adviser Diane Cowles. The students are members of Home School Plus+, a parent-partner program of the Quillayute Valley School District. Friends of Forks Animals is a nonprofit dedicated to providing low-cost spay/neuter and medical assistance to low-income families on the West End. For more information, phone 360-374-3332.

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Queen of Angels students, from left, Netsanet Hayden, Clare Wiswell and Emily Van Dyken take a break during a recent watershedmonitoring outing to the Dungeness River and Dungeness Spit. rock/pebble size to determine nesting viability for salmon eggs and collected, identified and counted aquatic macroinvertebrates. The students’ findings proved their hypothesis; that there is a healthy habitat for salmon. The students also went to the Dungeness Spit, where Lorenz Sollmann of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service explained the formation of the sandbar. Students also observed fossils found in the area.

Honor roll released PORT ANGELES — Olympic Christian School has announced its honor roll for the first quarter of the 2010-2011

academic year. Named to the Principal’s Honor Roll with a perfect 4.0 grade-point average were eighth-grader Lora Rudzinski, fifthgrader Jane Rudzinski and fourth-graders Josiah Carter and Hollund Bailey. Named to the “A” Honor Roll with a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher were seventh-graders Annie Robertson, Jayden Sparhawk and Hadassah Winters; sixth-graders Mikaela Dodson, Jasmine Gauthun and Sarah Tiemersma; fifth-graders Lily Robertson, Amanda Dodson and Carson Wilder; and fourth-graders Riley Cowan, Joshua Jones and Matthew Tiemersma. Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, November 19-20, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Outdoors

Snider Creek steelie review THE CONTRACT IS almost up on the Snider Creek broodstock. After nearly 25 years, the Matt steelhead supplementation Schubert program for the Sol Duc River tributary is under review by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. As part of that effort, Fish and Wildlife will be gathering public comments through Dec. 15, with a meeting also scheduled Nov. 30 in Forks to discuss the issue with the public. A joint project with the Olympic Peninsula Guides’ Association, the Snider Creek broodstock was created in 1986 to increase fishing opportunities for steelhead on the Sol Duc. The 25-year contract for the program, which produces between 50,000 and 100,000 smolts each year, expires in June 2011. Unlike most other supplementation efforts in the state, Snider Creek broodstock offspring come from wild steelhead caught by anglers involved in the program. Now state fishery managers are re-evaluating the project, including its contribution to state and tribal fisheries and its effect on wild steelhead populations, regional fish program manager Ron Warren said. “We are looking into the benefits of this program and whether it is consistent with current efforts to protect and restore wild populations,” Warren said in a news release. “We’d like to hear from the public before we make a decision on whether to continue, modify or end the program.” State estimates on annual run sizes for Snider Creek steelhead have varied the past 20 years. Escapement figures have landed anywhere between 20 to 450-plus fish in a given year during that time. The average annual escapement estimate the past 11 years is 250. Comments on the program can be submitted by e-mail to snidercreek@ dfw.wa.gov or by U.S. Mail to: Snider Creek, 48 Devonshire Road, Montesano, WA, 98563. In addition, people can submit comments and discuss the program with Fish and Wildlife staff at the Nov. 30 public meeting at the West End Sportsmen’s Club, 243 Sportsmen’s Club Road. The meeting runs from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Information on the program is available on Fish and Wildlife’s website at http://tinyurl.com/2uqhc33. The Statewide Steelhead Management Plan, which drives state management policies, is available at http://tinyurl.com/3xtsods.

Early returns Anglers don’t have to wait until Black Friday to target winter steelhead. With recent rains bringing a slew of fish into West End rivers this week, there’s already enough of the anadromous rainbow trout around to merit a toss or two. “It isn’t going to be red-hot, but it’s going to be OK [this weekend],” Bob Gooding of Olympic Sporting Goods (360-374-6330) in Forks said. “A couple of fellas did pretty well on them the other day, before the water went all gunnysack.” The traditional kickoff to steelhead season is Thanksgiving weekend, when runs of hatchery fish begin to show up in numbers on Peninsula rivers. Yet there’s always a few that arrive early, and this year is no different. A few eager beavers have already been seen in the Quillayute system (most notably the Bogachiel) and a few Strait of Juan de Fuca streams. Fall salmon continue to make some noise as well. “There’s still some good [salmon] coming, and the lower rivers will be the best for a good one,” Gooding said. Turn

to

Schubert/B4

The Associated Press (2)

Seattle pitcher Felix Hernandez, center, poses for a photo with a a fan after winning the American League Cy Young award at his home in Valencia, Venezuela, on Thursday.

King Felix crowned Mariners ace wins AL Cy Young award By Ben Walker

The Associated Press

For once, Felix Hernandez got all the support he needed for a big win. The Seattle ace earned the AL Cy Young Award on Thursday despite a modest 13-12 record. His major league-leading 2.27 ERA and superior stats put him far ahead of Tampa Bay’s David Price and the Yankees’ CC Sabathia and their impressive win-loss numbers. Victimized by the Mariners’ poor hitting all season, Hernandez found ample backing with the voters in this pitchers’ duel. They clearly recognized how little the last-place Mariners helped him — in 10 starts, they were either shut out or held to one run. “This confirms the Cy Young is an award not only for the

pitcher with the most wins, but the most dominant,” a teary-eyed Hernandez said while celebrating with relatives at the family home in Valencia, Venezuela. King Felix got 21 of the 28 first-place votes and 167 points in balloting by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. The 24-year-old right-hander led the league in innings (249 2/3), was second in strikeouts (232) and held AL opponents to the lowest batting average (.212). Price, who went 19-6 with a 2.72 ERA, was second with four first-place votes and 111 points. Sabathia, who was 21-7 with a 3.18 ERA, drew the other three first-place votes and finished third at 102. “I feel like they got it right,” Price said on a conference call from Nashville, Tenn. Turn

to

Felix Hernandez in action against the Texas Rangers in

King/B3 Seattle on Sept. 17.

Locker, Dawgs belt Bruins 24-7 Washington still alive for bowl bid By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The numbers were far from what Jake Locker wanted playing in Husky Stadium for the final time. The celebration, however, was exactly why he returned to Washington. Playing with a cracked rib, Locker scored on a 3-yard run in the first half, and Quinton Richardson returned an interception

28 yards for a touchdown with 6:22 left to help Washington keep its fledgling bowl hopes alive with an ugly 24-7 win over UCLA on Thursday night. Locker’s rib was such a concern that Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said he seriously considered keeping Locker on the bench. Ultimately, he called a conservative game that rarely exposed the Huskies’ senior quarterback. “I felt really good and [Sarkisian] knew I was going to be really honest with him,” Locker said. “We have a really good open

relationship and I truly don’t believe he would have let me be out there all week practicing and thinking I’m going to play without that intention.” Instead, the bulk of this one was put on the shoulders of running backs Chris Polk and Jesse Callier, and a Washington defense that limited UCLA to just 51 yards of offense in the final 3½ quarters. Polk carried 25 times for a career-high 138 yards and capped the best night of his career with a 2-yard TD plunge with 4:24 left. Callier, the Huskies’ speedy freshman, added 107 yards as

Washington (4-6, 3-4 Pac-10) saw two backs top 100 yards for the first time in three years. Washington finished with a season-high 253 yards rushing. “We knew that we were going to run the ball, but I had no clue that we were gonna just keep running it like that,” Polk said. “That was just a dream for me.” Playing a prime-time Thursday game, the Huskies broke out all black uniforms for the first time in school history, even going as far as painting the end zones of Husky Stadium black. Turn

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Dawgs/B3

Neah Bay set for 1B football playoffs Lyle/Wishram to play Red Devils in quarters Peninsula Daily News

WASHOUGAL — The gameplan for Lyle/Wishram is hardly a secret. Henry Mattai is going to get the ball early, often and even more after that for Class 1B’s fourth-ranked football team. And if anyone wants to beat the Cougars (7-2 overall), they’re going to have to figure out a way to stop it. That’s the task at hand for Neah Bay (8-2), which travels 300-plus miles tonight to Washougal to take on Mattai and the rest of the Cougars in the 1B state quarterfinals. Red Devils head coach Tony McCaulley certainly knows what his young team has

to do once the ball is kicked off at 7 p.m. “They are going to go to him. They’ve got to. That’s what they do. And we’ve got to stop him,” McCaulley said of Mattai, the third-best eight-man football rusher alltime with 6,284 yards in 36 games. “It’s going to be tough, extremely tough, because he’s really good, but I feel like we’re ready.” McCaulley has reason for optimism. Since starting the season on a sour note with a 45-0 loss to No. 2 Lummi, the Red Devils are 8-1 with seven mercy-rule victories and another narrow loss to Lummi (4130). That includes a 52-6 drubbing of North Olympic Peninsula rival Quilcene in last week’s 1B preliminary playoff in Silverdale. Titus Pascua had yet another big game in the win, running for 165 yards and two

touchdowns on 16 carries and returning the opening kickoff 82 yards for a touchdown. Josiah Greene added 182 yards of offense with two scores of his own. Each player has been a big part of the Neah Bay offense, a unit that has helped the Red Devils score an average 50.7 points per game this season. But McCaulley’s biggest concern isn’t finding the end zone against Lyle. It’s putting the clamps on Mattai that is the worry. “He probably is the best running back in the state from what I’ve seen,” McCaulley said. “He’s got really good balance. He’s big. He’s extremely strong. “Our offense, I think we can move the ball. I don’t know how much, but we can move the ball on them. Turn

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Playoffs/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Friday, November 19, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Football: Quarterfinals Class 1B Football Championships — Neah Bay at Lyle/Wishram at Washougal High School, 7 p.m. Women’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Clark College Tournament, 1 p.m.

Saturday Men’s Soccer: NWAACC Semifinals - Peninsula College at Columbia Basin in Tukwila at the Starfire Complex, 6:30 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION Men’s Basketball Nov. 17 Results Game One Irwin Dental Center 78, Langston Professional Services 51 Leading Scorers: Greg Glasser (LPS), 19; Cody Smithson (IDC), 14; Dan Linde (IDC), 11; Isaac Rapelje (LPS), 10 Game Two 4 In The Key 71, Ulin Concrete Pumping 50 Leading Scorers: Ryan Rutherford (4ITK), 21; Lance Scott (4ITK), 16; Jack Heckman (UCP), 11; Darrell Joslin (UCP), 10

Bowling LAUREL LANES Nov. 17 Big Four Men’s High Game: Kim Acuna, 277 Men’s High Series: Gerry Mangano, 682 Dr. Birch’s Wednesday Seniors Men’s High Game: Mac Shawver, 258 Men’s High Series: Mac Shawver, 642 Women’s High Game: Glady’s Kemp, 192 Women’s High Series: Ginny Bowling, 521 League Leaders: Mountain Beavers

Volleyball PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION Nov. 17 Coed Results Swanson’s 3, Northwest Wood Products 0: 27-25, 25-11, 25-12 Blind Ambition Blinds 3, Drake’s U-Bake Pizza and Subs 0: 25-4, 25-13, 25-12 Fitness West 3, Captain Zak’s 0: 25-21, 25-14, 25-22

Basketball NBA Standings and Schedule WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct New Orleans 9 1 .900 San Antonio 9 1 .900 Dallas 7 3 .700 Memphis 4 8 .333 Houston 3 8 .273 Northwest Division W L Pct Utah 8 4 .667 Oklahoma City 7 4 .636 Portland 7 5 .583 Denver 6 5 .545 Minnesota 4 9 .308 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Lakers 10 2 .833 Golden State 7 4 .636 Phoenix 6 6 .500 Sacramento 3 7 .300 L.A. Clippers 1 12 .077 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 9 2 .818 New Jersey 4 7 .364 New York 4 8 .333 Toronto 3 9 .250 Philadelphia 2 10 .167 Southeast Division W L Pct Orlando 8 3 .727 Atlanta 8 4 .667 Miami 7 4 .636 Charlotte 4 7 .364 Washington 3 7 .300 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 6 4 .600 Cleveland 5 5 .500 Indiana 5 5 .500 Milwaukee 5 6 .455 Detroit 4 8 .333

GB — — 2 6 6 1/2 GB — 1/2 1 1 1/2 4 1/2 GB — 2 1/2 4 6 9 1/2

GB — 5 5 1/2 6 1/2 7 1/2 GB — 1/2 1 4 4 1/2 GB — 1 1 1 1/2 3

All Times PST Thursday’s Games Indiana 107, L.A. Clippers 80 Orlando 105, Phoenix 89 Denver at Portland, LATE Today’s Games Oklahoma City at Boston, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Memphis at Washington, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Cleveland at New Orleans, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 6 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. New Jersey at Sacramento, 7 p.m. New York at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Phoenix at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Orlando at Indiana, 4 p.m. Miami at Memphis, 5 p.m. Dallas at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Cleveland at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. New Jersey at Denver, 6 p.m. Utah at Portland, 7 p.m. New York at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Boston at Toronto, 10 a.m. Washington at Detroit, 3 p.m. New Orleans at Sacramento, 3 p.m. Golden State at LA Lakers, 6:30 p.m.

The

bouncing ball

NFL Standings and Schedule PA 199 164 198 261 PA 209 193 229 252

...

Miami linebacker Cameron Wake (91) sacks Chicago quarterback Jay Cutler during the first quarter of Thursday night’s game in Miami. Dolphins linebacker Koa Misi (55) looks on. The Bears won 16-0. See story on Page B4.

Atlanta New Orleans Tampa Bay Carolina Chicago Green Bay Minnesota Detroit

South W L T Pct 7 2 0 .778 6 3 0 .667 6 3 0 .667 1 8 0 .111 North W L T Pct 7 3 0 .700 6 3 0 .667 3 6 0 .333 2 7 0 .222

PF 222 201 188 104

PA 175 151 206 215

PF 191 221 169 215

PA 146 143 195 202

AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Oakland 5 4 0 .556 235 Kansas City 5 4 0 .556 212 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 239 Denver 3 6 0 .333 203 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 7 2 0 .778 208 New England 7 2 0 .778 258 Miami 5 5 0 .500 172 Buffalo 1 8 0 .111 164 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 240 Tennessee 5 4 0 .556 241 Jacksonville 5 4 0 .556 196 Houston 4 5 0 .444 217 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 6 3 0 .667 196 Pittsburgh 6 3 0 .667 200 Cleveland 3 6 0 .333 172 Cincinnati 2 7 0 .222 184

PA 188 194 197 252 PA 150 214 208 245 PA 185 179 250 257 PA 165 162 182 213

All Times PST Thursday’s Games Chicago 16, Miami 0 Sunday’s Games Detroit at Dallas, 10 a.m. Oakland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Washington at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Houston at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Arizona at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Carolina, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Atlanta at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Indianapolis at New England, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Monday Night Football Denver at San Diego, 5:30 p.m.

College

Football NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 4 0 .556 166 St. Louis 4 5 0 .444 160 San Francisco 3 6 0 .333 160 Arizona 3 6 0 .333 175 East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 6 3 0 .667 257 N.Y. Giants 6 3 0 .667 236 Washington 4 5 0 .444 183 Dallas 2 7 0 .222 194

The Associated Press

All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Ohio 31, Temple 23 Wednesday’s Games Miami (OH) 19, Akron 14 Toledo 33, Bowling Green 14 Thursday’s Games 11 Alabama 63, Georgia State 7 Washington 24, UCLA 7 Air Force at UNLV, LATE Today’s Games Fresno State at 4 Boise State, 12 p.m. Saturday’s Games 7 Wisconsin at Michigan, 9 a.m. 10 Oklahoma State at Kansas, 9 a.m. Purdue at 12 Michigan State, 9 a.m. Pittsburgh at South Florida, 9 a.m. Penn State vs. Indiana, 9 a.m. West Virginia at Louisville, 9 a.m. Virginia at Boston College, 9 a.m. North Carolina St. at North Carolina, 9 a.m. Troy at 17 South Carolina, 9:21 a.m. Appalachian State at Florida, 9:30 a.m. East Carolina at Rice, 10 a.m. Northern Illinois at Ball State, 10 a.m. Duke at Georgia Tech, 10:30 a.m. Clemson at Wake Forest, 11 a.m. UTEP at Tulsa, 11 a.m. Eastern Michigan at Buffalo, 11 a.m. Kent State at Western Michigan, 11 a.m. Colorado State at Wyoming, 11 a.m. Kansas State at Colorado, 11:10 a.m. Idaho at Utah State, 12 p.m. Marshall at Southern Methodist, 12 p.m. Weber State at Texas Tech, 12 p.m. Mississippi at 5 LSU, 12:30 p.m. 6 Stanford at California, 12:30 p.m. 9 Ohio State at 20 Iowa, 12:30 p.m. 16 Virginia Tech at 24 Miami (FL), 12:30 p.m. Illinois at Northwestern, 12:30 p.m.

Florida Atlantic at Texas, 12:30 p.m. Arkansas State at Navy, 12:30 p.m. North Texas at Louisiana-Monroe, 12:30 p.m. UCF at Tulane, 12:30 p.m. Memphis at UAB, 1 p.m. New Mexico State at 18 Nevada, 1:05 p.m. Middle Tennessee at W. Kentucky, 1:15 p.m. New Mexico at Brigham Young, 3 p.m. 13 Arkansas at 21 Mississippi St., 4 p.m. 15 Missouri at Iowa State, 4 p.m. Army vs. Notre Dame, 4 p.m. Connecticut at Syracuse, 4 p.m. Florida Intern. at Louisiana-Lafayette, 4 p.m. Tennessee at Vanderbilt, 4:30 p.m. Rutgers at Cincinnati, 4:30 p.m. 8 Nebraska at 19 Texas A&M, 5 p.m. 14 Oklahoma at Baylor, 5 p.m. 25 Florida State at Maryland, 5 p.m. USC at Oregon State, 5 p.m. Houston at Southern Miss, 5 p.m. 23 Utah at San Diego State, 7 p.m. San Jose State at Hawaii, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey NHL Standings and Schedule WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 16 12 3 1 25 58 40 Chicago 21 10 9 2 22 62 59 St. Louis 17 9 5 3 21 44 47 Columbus 16 10 6 0 20 46 41 Nashville 17 8 6 3 19 45 48 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 18 10 5 3 23 55 46 Colorado 18 10 7 1 21 63 56 Minnesota 17 9 6 2 20 40 39 Calgary 17 7 10 0 14 47 52 Edmonton 17 4 10 3 11 42 71 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 17 12 5 0 24 53 39 Anaheim 21 10 8 3 23 52 61 San Jose 18 9 5 4 22 55 49 Phoenix 18 8 5 5 21 50 54 Dallas 17 10 7 0 20 53 49 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 20 12 6 2 26 70 49 Pittsburgh 20 10 8 2 22 61 53 N.Y. Rangers 19 10 8 1 21 57 52 New Jersey 19 5 12 2 12 34 62 N.Y. Islanders 18 4 11 3 11 39 62 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 19 12 6 1 25 49 39 Boston 17 11 5 1 23 51 31 Ottawa 19 9 9 1 19 47 60 Toronto 18 7 8 3 17 43 52 Buffalo 20 7 10 3 17 53 64 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 19 14 4 1 29 70 49 Tampa Bay 19 10 7 2 22 60 63 Carolina 18 9 9 0 18 58 61 Atlanta 19 7 9 3 17 58 69 Florida 17 8 9 0 16 46 44 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. All Times PST Thursday’s Games Boston 4, Florida 0 Toronto 3, New Jersey 1 Tampa Bay 8, Philadelphia 7 Nashville 3, Montreal 0 Dallas 5, San Jose 4, F/OT Today’s Games Carolina at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Ottawa at St. Louis, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Los Angeles at Boston, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Toronto at Montreal, 4 p.m. Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 4 p.m. Nashville at Carolina, 4 p.m. New Jersey at St. Louis, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Minnesota, 5 p.m.

Colorado at Dallas, 5 p.m. Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Columbus at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Calgary at Detroit, 2 p.m. NY Islanders at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Vancouver, 6 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League Kansas City Royals: Signed RHP Steven Shell and OF Brett Carroll to minor league contracts. Re-signed RHP Luis Mendoza, RHP Julio Pimentel, C Cody Clark, INF Irving Falu, INF Mario Lisson and INF Jamie Romak to minorleague contracts. Minnesota Twins: Signed manager Ron Gardenhire to a two-year contract extension through the 2013 season. Signed pitching coach Rick Anderson, bench coach Steve Liddle, bullpen coach Rick Stelmaszek, third base coach Scott Ullger, hitting coach Joe Vavra, first base coach Jerry White, athletic trainer Rick McWane, assistant athletic trainer Dave Pruemer and strength and conditioning coordinator Perry Castellano to two-year contracts through the 2012 season. New York Yankees: Traded 1B Juan Miranda to Arizona for RHP Scott Allen. National League Atlanta Braves: Named Marty Reed pitching coach for Gwinnett (IL); Rocket Wheeler manager and Mike Alvarez pitching coach for Mississippi (SL); Luis Salazar manager, Derek Botelho pitching coach and Bobby Moore hitting coach for Lynchburg (Carolina); Paul Runge manager, Derrick Lewis pitching coach, Carlos Mendez hitting coach and Ty Cobbs trainer for Rome (SAL); Randy Ingle manager, Gabe Lukert pitching coach and D.J. Boston hitting coach for Danville (Appalachian); Jonathan Schuerholz manager, Vladimir Nunez pitching coach and Brandon Harris trainer for the Braves (GCL). Colorado Rockies: Traded INF Clint Barmes to Houston Astros for RHP Felipe Paulino.

Football National Football League Cincinnati Bengals: Signed DE Victor Adeyanju. Placed DE Jonathan Fanene on injured reserve. Cleveland Browns: Signed OL Jeff Hansen to the practice squad. New York Jets: Waived DL Jarron Gilbert.

Hockey National Hockey League NHL: Suspended Calgary F Olli Jokinen three games for a cross check to the head of Colorado’s Wojtek Wolski in a Nov. 17 game. Suspended Tampa Bay F Mattias Ritola two games for hitting New York Islander Matt Moulson from behind in a Nov. 17 game. Carolina Hurricanes: Reassigned D Brett Carson to Charlotte (AHL). Edmonton Oilers: Placed G Nikolai Khabibulin on injured reserve. Recalled G Martin Gerber from Oklahoma City (AHL). Los Angeles Kings: Placed F Scott Parse on injured reserve. Montreal Canadiens: Recalled D Yannick Weber from Hamilton (AHL). New York Islanders: Assigned F Jon Sim to Bridgeport (AHL). Tampa Bay Lightning: Recalled F James Wright and D Matt Roy from Norfolk (AHL).

Lacrosse National Lacrosse League Colorado Mammoth: Signed F John Grant, Jr. to a three-year contract and F Dan Carey to a one-year contract. Placed F Derek Malawsky on the holdout list. Toronto Rock: Agreed to terms with G Bob Watson on a one-year contract.

Soccer Major League Soccer Kansas City Wizards: Announced they are changing their name to Sporting Kansas City. Vancouver Whitecaps: Signed D Jay DeMerit.

College Kentucky: Agreed to terms with women’s basketball coach Matthew Mitchell on a contract extension.

SPORTS ON TV

Today 8:30 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Ford 400 Sprint Cup Series Practice (Live) 12 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Ford 400 Sprint Cup Series Qualifying, Site: Homestead Miami Speedway - Homestead, Fla. (Live) 1 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Asia Pacific Classic Malaysia 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Coaches vs. Cancer Classic, 3rd Place Game, Site: Madison Square Garden - New York City (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder vs. Boston Celtics, Site: TD Garden - Boston (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Coaches vs. Cancer Classic Championship Game (Live) 6:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NBA, Chicago Bulls vs. Dallas Mavericks, Site: American Airlines Center - Dallas (Live) 6:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Fresno State vs. Boise State Boise, Idaho (Live) 9 p.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Hong Kong Open, Round 3, Site: Hong Kong Golf Club New Territories, Hong Kong (Live) 4:30 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer EPL, Tottenham Hotspur vs. Arsenal, Barclays Premier League, Site: Emirates Stadium - London (Live)

Saturday 9 a.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Wisconsin vs. Michigan, Site: Michigan Stadium - Ann Arbor, Mich. (Live) 9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Pittsburgh vs. South Florida, Site: Raymond James Stadium Tampa Bay, Fla. (Live) 11 a.m. (2) CBUT Gymnastics, Tumbling & Trampoline World Championships Metz, France (Live) 12 p.m. (2) CBUT Figure Skating, Grand Prix Men’s Free Program, Pairs Free Program - Moscow, Russia (Live) 12 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Ford 400 Sprint Cup Series Happy Hour, Site: Homestead Miami Speedway - Homestead, Fla. (Live) 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO Football NCAA, Ohio State vs. Iowa (Live) 12:30 p.m. (7) KIRO Football NCAA, Ole Miss vs. Louisiana State University, Site: Tiger Stadium Baton Rouge, La. (Live) 12:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Virginia Tech vs. Miami, Site: Sun Life Stadium - Miami Gardens, Fla. (Live) 1:30 p.m. (2) CBUT Figure Skating, Grand Prix Women’s Free Program, Dance Free Program - Moscow, Russia (Live) 1:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Ford 300 Nationwide Series, Site: Homestead Miami Speedway - Homestead, Fla. (Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Toronto Maple Leafs vs. Montréal Canadiens (Live) 4 p.m. (5) KING Football NCAA, Army vs. Notre Dame, Site: Yankee Stadium - Bronx, N.Y. (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Arkansas vs. Mississippi State, Site: Davis Wade Stadium - Starkville, Miss. (Live) 4 p.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, Missouri at Iowa State (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Oklahoma vs. Baylor, Site: Floyd Casey Stadium - Waco, Texas (Live) 5:05 p.m. (4) KOMO Football NCAA, USC at Oregon State (Live) 7 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Chicago Blackhawks vs. Vancouver Canucks (Live) 9 p.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Hong Kong Open, Final Round, Site: Hong Kong Golf Club - New Territories, Hong Kong (Live)


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, November 19, 2010

Chimacum, PT win titles

PDN Weekly Football Picks

Peninsula Daily News

This weekend’s games (Day) High School Neah Bay vs. Lyle/Wishram, 7 p.m. (Fri.) College Stanford at California, 12:30 p.m. (Sat.) Ohio State at Iowa, 12:30 p.m. (Sat.) Virginia Tech at Miami, 12:30 p.m. (Sat.) Nebraska at Texas A&M, 5 p.m. (Sat.) Southern Cal at Oregon State, 5 p.m. (Sat.) NFL Green Bay at Minnesota, 10 a.m. (Sun.) Oakland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. (Sun.) Seattle at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. (Sun.) N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. (Sun.) Denver at San Diego, 5:30 p.m. (Mon.)

Brad LaBrie Sports Editor

Matt Schubert Sports Reporter

Mike Carman Golf Columnist

B3

Thomas Honor Guest Picker (Sports Asst.)

Neah Bay

Lyle/Wishram

Lyle/Wishram

Neah Bay

Stanford Ohio State Miami Nebraska Southern Cal

Stanford Iowa Virginia Tech Nebraska Southern Cal

Stanford Ohio State Virginia Tech Nebraska Southern Cal

California Ohio State Virginia Tech Nebraska Southern Cal

Green Bay Pittsburgh New Orleans N.Y. Giants San Diego

Minnesota Pittsburgh New Orleans Philadelphia San Diego

Minnesota Pittsburgh New Orleans Philadelphia San Diego

Green Bay Pittsburgh New Orleans Philadelphia Denver

Record: 113-58

Record: 116-55

Record: 122-49

Record: 95-76

SEQUIM — Port Townsend and Chimacum’s youth football programs both earned a North Olympic Youth Football League championship last Saturday at Sequim High School. The Chimacum Cowboys A squad and the Port Townsend Braves B squad both won North Olympic titles and advance to the second annual Battle of the Bridge championship this Saturday. The Neah Bay C squad also won a North Olympic championship and will compete in the Battle of the Bridge, which will pit North Olympic championship winners against Kitsap Youth Football League champions. Battle of the Bridge games are scheduled at Memorial Field in Port Townsend on Saturday. Neah Bay vs. Kitsap for the C squad title starts at noon while the Port Townsend Braves B squad takes on Kitsap at 2 p.m. and the Chimacum Cowboys A squad battles Kitsap at 4 p.m. Following are results of the Port Townsend vs. Chimacum North Olympic Youth Football League title games last week in Sequim.

B squad title Port Townsend 39, Chimacum 0

The Associated Press

Washington quarterback Jake Locker drops back to pass as UCLA’s Damien Holmes moves in during the first half Thursday in Seattle.

The Braves opened the game with a first-play 52-yard touchdown run by Berkley Hill and never looked back. Hill led the team with three touchdowns, two rush-

Youth Football ing and one receiving pass from quarterback Detrius Kelsall. Peyton Hundley had two scores while Isaiah Mason had one for Port Townsend. The Braves’ balanced offense kept Chimacum on its heels all day. The Braves’ defense allowed just one first down, on Chimacum’s final drive. Chimacum was held to less than 60 yards for the whole game. The Braves’ starting defense, led by their line, allowed only one touchdown all year. The defense includes Kaiden Parcher, Caleb Lumbard, Jacob Boucher, Max Davis, Payton Lake, Hundley, Hill, Brennan LaBrie, Mason, Kelsall and Jeremiah Thetford. Chimacum was the best team the Braves faced all year.

A squad title Chimacum 32, Port Townsend 26 The Port Townsend Braves led 26-7 at halftime but the Cowboys scored 25 unanswered points in the second half to win by six. Austin Widmer had two interceptions on the day for Port Townsend. The second half was all Cowboys, who ran and passed over the smaller Braves team to score the 25 unanswered points. Chimacum’s final score came with 14 seconds left to take the lead and claim the championship.

Dawgs: Stay alive for bowl bid Pirates set to battle Continued from B1 They might want to consider doing it again. In the final home game of his career, Locker was just 10-of-21 passing for 68 yards and an interception. He carried just four times for 9 yards as Sarkisian tried to protect the quarterback’s tender ribs that kept him on the sideline Nov. 6 against Oregon. Locker left to a huge ovation with 2 minutes remaining, replaced by freshman Keith Price. If he had a redo, Sarkisian said, he wished he would have called a timeout to give Locker more of a final moment. After three straight losses, Washington kept its bowl hopes alive, but still needs wins at California (Nov. 27) and in the Apple Cup against Washington State (Dec. 4) to reach the needed six victories.

“This puts back a lot of life in the season,” Polk said. “Because we had some guys slipping away like, ‘Aw, man, this again. But this just reassured us that what we’re doing is right.” Meanwhile, UCLA’s hopes of going to a bowl game for the second straight season took a major hit. The Bruins (4-6, 2-5) close at Arizona State and at home against USC, needing to win both to get six victories. For the moment, UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel would simply like a quarterback that can run a functional offense. Starter Richard Brehaut went to the bench with a concussion midway through the third quarter after an awful incompletion that ended a Bruins drive at midfield. Brehaut was chewed out by Neuheisel on his way to the bench.

A few moments later, Neuheisel realized Brehaut wasn’t right. “I wanted to talk to him after the series to talk about the third-down play that I thought he didn’t see what we just talked about and he couldn’t recall what we had just talked about, so I said you can’t play anymore,” Neuheisel said. Enter Darius Bell, who had no previous playing experience. More of a running threat, Bell threw only three passes, the last one intercepted by Richardson. It was Washington’s first interception return for a touchdown since Mason Foster’s game-winning return against Arizona last season. After throwing his interception, Bell was then replaced by Clayton Tunney as Neuheisel continued his revolving door of QBs. Tunney was intercepted

on his third pass by safety Nate Fellner. “We were down two scores and we needed to throw and Darius’ strong suit is probably more as a runner in this offense,” Neuheisel said, “and I didn’t think with six minutes left and change that we had the ability to be methodical. “I know Clayton throws it pretty well and knows enough about our offense to go in there and throw it down the field.” The trio of Bruins quarterbacks combined to go 6 of 25 with three interceptions. UCLA’s offense, which rumbled for 97 yards in the first quarter behind the running of Johnathan Franklin, finished with just 163 total yards. Franklin scored the Bruins’ only touchdown on a 31-yard run in the first quarter and finished with 53 yards on 18 carries.

King: Felix awarded Cy Young Continued from B1 dacy. Many fans who rely more “Felix, I thought he on traditional numbers — deserved it, even though he win-loss record for pitchers didn’t have a lot of wins. You — didn’t think he rated at can’t really control all that. the top of the list. You can’t control the offense, Others who count on and the hitters and stuff like baseball’s newer math that. pointed at how well Hernan“The numbers he put up dez had done on the things — those were pretty ridicu- he could fully command. lous numbers outside of the He led AL pitchers in a won-loss column,” he said. stat that matters a lot to the “I feel as if Felix was on a sabermetricians of the sport different team — if he was — Wins Above Replaceon the Yankees or something ment. like that — he’s going to win Hernandez beat Texas in quite a few ballgames.” his last start. The 13 wins by HernanEven with fewer voters dez marked the fewest for a focusing less on win-loss Cy Young starter in a full records, no telling how they season — Tim Lincecum set would’ve treated him if he’d the record last year with 15 finished below .500. victories for San Francisco. Once the season ended, Fernando Valenzuela Hernandez started hoping. won the NL award in strike“I didn’t have the wins,” shortened 1981 after going he said. “But if you look at 13-7. all the numbers . . . wow!”’ His mark of six games Hernandez thought he over .500 had been the low- would get the Cy last year, est for any Cy starter until too, after winning 19 games Hernandez. but finished second, beaten “It’s not only the wins, it’s out by Zack Greinke’s 16 the whole stats,” Hernandez victories and better showing said. with other numerology. A month after the AllBut no more sighs for Star break, Hernandez Hernandez now. appeared to be a long shot In the Year of the Pitcher, for the award. and in the voting for the He was 8-10 on Aug. 15 100th overall Cy Young after 26 starts, but a debate Award, he came out No. 1. “This is the first of many,” had already begun to brew about his Cy Young candi- he said. “Now I have to work

even harder because I’m the best pitcher in the American League.” Hernandez said he started crying when he got the award and his family began jumping around. “It was a great, great, great, amazing feeling,” he said. The Mariners finished with an AL-worst 61-101 record and their 513 runs were by far the fewest in the majors. They gave him barely more than three runs to work with each game and weren’t too sharp in the field, either — in his 34 starts, he got saddled with 17 unearned runs. “They tried to do too much for me. I love my teammates,” he said. “They would tell me, ‘You did your job.”’ Hernandez might’ve ranked even higher overall had the Mariners decided not to skip his regular start on the final day of the regular season. He needed one more inning to match NL Cy Young winner Roy Halladay for most in the majors, and he finished one strikeout behind AL leader Jered Weaver of the Angels. Halladay unanimously won his award in a year he led the NL with 21 wins,

pitched a perfect game and a no-hitter, and topped the majors in shutouts and complete games. “Obviously, Felix’s numbers are very, very impressive,” Halladay said earlier this week when asked about the AL Cy Young vote. “Ultimately, you look at how guys are able to win games. Sometimes, you find a way to win games,” he said. Hernandez said he felt vindicated that wins are only part of the equation. “This is the proof,” he said. Hernandez went 7-4 against playoff teams and was at his best against the high-scoring Yankees, going 3-0 while holding New York to one run in 26 innings with 31 strikeouts. Sabathia and Price each led strong staffs that pitched their teams into the playoffs. Both aces went 3-2 against teams that reached the postseason. Sabathia was listed on all 28 ballots, Price on 27. Sabathia won the 2007 Cy with Cleveland. The big lefty went 10-1 this season against Seattle, Baltimore and Kansas City, the three last-place teams in the AL.

in soccer Final Four Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula College men’s soccer team returns to the NWAACC Final Four for the third time in four years this weekend. The Pirates (11-3-4 overall) will take on Columbia Basin (12-3-4) and its stingy defense in Saturday’s semifinal at Starfire Athletic Complex in Tukwila at 6:30 p.m. A total of five players were named to the NWAACC West Division All-Star team earlier this week. Among them was West Division MVP Miguel Gonzalez, who scored a school record 14 goals this season for the West Division champions. Also honored as All-Stars were midfielder Tyler Hindmarch (5 goals, 2 assists), defender Jeff Mullen (3 assists), defender Brent Ricigliano (1 goal, 3 assists) and goalkeeper Jared Wilson (5 shutouts). Head coach Andrew Chapman was also named West Division coach of the year for the third time in

four seasons. Peninsula will face arguably the top defensive team in the NWAACC when it takes on Columbia Basin on Saturday. The Hawks were tied with Clark for fewest goals allowed this season. They also have an NWAACC best nine shutouts this season. “They are harder to get in behind,” Chapman said. “They are also good on their free kicks, so they take advantage of their opportunities when they get them. “They are just a hard, hard working team.” Waiting in the finals will be the winner of Saturday’s Highline-Shoreline match at 4 p.m. A team send-off will be held today at 9:45 a.m. at the college. The Pirates will gather around the Black Pearl (Peninsula College’s bus) between the PUB and the library at 9:45 a.m. before leaving 15 minutes later. Fans are welcome to swing by and slap a few high fives before the Pirates push off on their journey for the school’s first NWAACC title in men’s soccer.

Playoffs: Grid Continued from B1 semis — takes on Tahola in another quarterfinal Satur“It could be [high scor- day. If both win this weeking] but defense in the end will win it. If we’re going to end, they will meet each win, we’re going to have to other in the Tacoma Dome for the second straight stop the run.” If that happens, the Red year. Devils just might get a shot “We’ve had a go week of at revenge in the 1B semifi- practice,” McCaulley said. “I nals. feel pretty upbeat about it. Lummi — the same “[Lyle] is going to be a school that lost to the Red pretty dang good team, but Devils twice last season we feel pretty good about only to beat them in the 1B it.”

Eastern Washington wins The Associated Press

CHENEY — Cliff Colimon scored 21 points and Laron Griffin added 19 points, 16 rebounds and five assists — all career highs — as Eastern Washington held on for its first win, beating Northwest 96-87 on Thursday night. Tremayne Johnson had 19 points and nine rebounds and Jeffrey Forbes had 15

points for the Eagles (1-2). Jordan Call scored 21 points and Tyson Christie 16 for Northwest (3-2), an NAIA school, which trailed by as many as 23 in the second half before rallying within four in the final minute. Jason Waltman’s two foul shots pulled Northwest within 91-87 with 35.8 seconds left, but Forbes hit four straight free throws as Eastern finally pulled away.


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SportsRecreation

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Schubert: Winterfest is here Continued from B1 lady. “Big bucks, most of “The ones up higher are them spend most of their getting pretty dark,” Good- life nocturnal,” Gooding said. “But now they are on ing said. the prowl and they are out “That rain kind of there in the daylight hours. pushed all the salmon up “You could honk your toward the hatchery upstream, but it brought in horn and throw a rock at them and they don’t care.” some steelhead, too.” Gooding, for one, thinks So once the rivers drop that hunters still have a down into shape (likely today or Saturday), anglers chance to reap the benefits. “Different does come can divide their attention [into heat] at different between steelhead and times,” Gooding said. salmon. “As long as there is one “A few people saw a couple [steelhead] show up on around [the bucks] are on the prowl.” the Lyre and Bogachiel already,” Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and Winterfest More (360-683-1950) in The kids call it “pow.” I Sequim said. refer to it as snow. “But they were getting Whatever the nomenclachromer salmon in the Sol ture you prefer, white stuff Duc just three days ago. continues to gather atop “It should be done by Hurricane Ridge. now, but they are still getSki season can’t be too ting some pretty bright fish far behind. on the Sol Duc.” To get things started, Hurricane Ridge Winter Rarin’ to go? Sports Education Foundation will host its annual So did the bucks do their business already this Winterfest fundraiser tonight and Saturday at year? Vern Burton Community Hunters are about to find out this weekend with Center, 308 E. Fourth St., in Port Angeles. the return of modern rifle The event begins with deer season. Friday night’s “Dinner and The hunt will last through Sunday in all nine a Movie” extravaganza, starting at 5 p.m. Game Management Units There will be live and (GMUs). Whether or not silent auctions, prime rib hunters will be bolstered dinner, an oyster bar and a by some hot-and-bothered bucks, however, appears to showing of Teton Gravity Research’s movie “Light be up for debate. the Wick.” An early rut in late More than 150 items October has some thinking will be up for bid in the the thrill is gone. “I think it’s pretty much silent auction, with another 16 on the docket for the over,” Ryan Gedlund of live auction. Swain’s General Store A limited number of (360-452-2357) in Port tickets will be available at Angeles said. “I haven’t heard for sure . . . but it did the door for $45. Winter sports fans can start early.” also buy and sell used If such is the case, that equipment at the ski swap would be too bad for those in Vern Burton on Saturlooking to bag a buck this weekend. day. Rutting bucks tend to Those looking to drop off make for easier targets gear can do so from 8:30 because their mind is a.m. to 10 a.m. Items will focused on cozying up to a then be up for sale between

11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Admission is $3 per person, or $7 for a family. The ski swap will be followed by a second showing of “Light the Wick” at 7 p.m. Tickets for the movie cost $10. For more information on the event, visit www.hurricaneridge.com.

Also . . . ■ Blackmouth season remains pretty quiet in Marine Area 5 (Sekiu) and 9 (Admiralty Inlet). ■ Mum’s the word on the first week of the fall/ winter recreational crabbing season. Perhaps it was the wind, or maybe even a lack of crabs, but there just wasn’t much chatter accompanying this week’s openers in Areas 6 (eastern Strait), 9 and 12. ■ Anyone desperate for fresh razor clams can make the trek to Long Beach or Twin Harbors this Saturday and Sunday. The beaches open to afternoon digging both days, with minus tides hitting the beach at 5:39 p.m. on Saturday (minus 0.4 feet) and 6:17 p.m. on Sunday (minus 0.7 feet). ■ The Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby — formerly known as the Discovery Bay Salmon Derby — hits the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca on Presidents Day Weekend, Feb. 19-21. The derby will span 500 square miles of fishing, with launch ramps and weight stations in Freshwater Bay, Port Angeles, Sequim, Gardiner and Port Townsend. First prize wins $10,000. Tickets cost $40 and will go on sale the first week of January at numerous area merchants. For more information, visit www.GardinerSalmonDerby.org. ■ Washington Trails Association will gather an

Fish Counts

all-day volunteer work party at Peabody Creek Trail in Olympic National Park on Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. There also will be a volunteer work party gathering at Mount Walker Trail in the Hood Canal Ranger District on Friday, Nov. 26. Volunteers must preregister 48 hours in advance. To pre-register, contact Washington Trails at 206-625-1367 or visit www.wta.org. ■ Fish and Wildlife will conduct a public survey to help assess the agency’s Enforcement Program through the end of 2010. The survey, available on Fish and Wildlife’s website at http://tinyurl. com/23weqw8, consists of about 20 questions concerning the program’s performance in the field. It takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. Those who would like the survey mailed or faxed to them should contact Jonathan Neville at 360902-8358 or jonathan.neville@dfw.wa.gov. ■ Waters West Fly Fishing Outfitters in Port Angeles plans to hold a spey casting class Dec. 5 on the Hoh River (water levels permitting). The class will meet at the Hoh at 9 a.m., with instruction geared toward beginning and intermediate spey casters. Rods, reels and lines are provided. Steelhead fishing techniques will be covered as well. Cost is $95. To sign up, contact Waters West at 360-4170937. ■ Dungeness River Audubon Center will warm up for its annual Christmas Bird Count with a trip around Dungeness Valley on Dec. 11 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. A group will meet at Railroad Bridge Park to view birds of the forests before heading to Dunge-

Saltwater Fishing Olson’s Resort Saturday, Nov. 13 — 5 boats (13 anglers): 2 chinook; Sunday, Nov. 14 — 3 boats (10 anglers): No fish; Port Townsend Boat Haven Monday, Nov. 8 — 1 boat (2 anglers): 1 chinook; Sunday, Nov. 14 — 2 boats (4 anglers): No fish; Curley’s/Straitside Resort (Area 5) Saturday, Nov. 13 — 20 anglers: 49 chum; Reports are provided by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife reports are taken randomly and do not reflect all fish caught.

Five best bets for this week ■ Sol Duc salmon — Time is running out for anglers hoping to throw a few more salmon into the freezer this fall. There are still plenty of fish in the river. You might have to pick through a few to get one worth keeping, but isn’t that part of the fun? ■ Wading for crab — A few minus tides will roll into Peninsula bays Sunday, Monday and Tuesday nights. Might I suggest throwing on some waders and heading out to Dungeness Bay for some crab wading in the dark? As long as you have a lantern, crab rake and hearty constitution, you can come away with crabs. ■ Hoodsport chum — This run tends to wind down by the time ness Landing Park at noon to view saltwater birds.

Send photos, stories Want your event listed in the outdoors column? Have a fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique, why not share it with our readers? Send it to me, Matt

Thanksgiving rolls around. Given the way anglers pounded them last Saturday — 20 anglers, 49 chum — this year might be the exception. ■ Winterfest — The annual winter sports fundraiser returns to Vern Burton Community Center tonight (see column for specifics). Good food, good people and good booze. Sold. ■ Young man —Felix Hernandez won his first Cy Young award Thursday after voters looked past his so-so 13-12 record toward the rest of dominant stat line. Given Felix’s age (24) and stats to date, this could be the first of many. My over/under: 2½. Matt Schubert Schubert, Sports Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; phone, 360-417-3526; fax, 360-4173521; e-mail matt.schubert @peninsuladailynews.com.

__________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column appears on Thursdays and Fridays.

Bears shut out Dolphins 16-0 The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Chicago Bears cornerbacks Charles Tillman (33) and Tim Jennings (26) celebrate after Tillman intercepted a pass against the Miami Dolphins on Thursday. They’re really hard to get in the NFL.” The Dolphins were blanked for the first time since a 3-0 loss at Pittsburgh during their one-win season in 2007. Their only other home shutout since the first year of the Don Shula era came in 2001. Matt Forte carried 25 times for 97 yards and a score for the Bears, who converted 10 of 18 thirddown situations and controlled the ball for nearly 38 minutes. Cutler said the offense had an easy job. “The way the defense is playing, we didn’t have to do much,” he said. The Dolphins went 1 for 12 on third down, and a 46-yard kickoff return to start the game created their best scoring threat.

They moved inside the Bears 35 for the first time on the game’s final play. Thigpen, pressed into duty after Chad Pennington and Chad Henne were hurt in Sunday’s game, finished 17 for 29 for 187 yards, and he had 27 of the Dolphins’ 39 yards rushing. But he found himself scrambling often and fell to 1-11 as an NFL starter. “Offensively we couldn’t get out of our own way,” Thigpen said. “We would get one thing going, and then we’d get one thing to set us back.” Ronnie Brown and Ricky Williams combined for 11 yards rushing on six carries. “We got the offense onedimensional,” said Urlacher, who had a sack, a tackle for a loss and a quarterback hurry.

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MIAMI — The Chicago Bears had a ready response for Brandon Marshall’s taunting. Julius Peppers and a swarming defense allowed only 187 yards and a single third-down conversion Thursday night, and the Bears won 16-0 to send the injury-ravaged Miami Dolphins to their second home shutout in 40 years. Marshall drew an early flag for taunting when he flipped the ball at former Denver teammate Jay Cutler, standing in front of the Bears bench. “We don’t need that to fire us up,” Chicago coach Lovie Smith said. “We were fired up when we stepped on the field.” Marshall also was penalized for an illegal block and dropped two passes before he left the game in the second quarter after aggravating a sore right hamstring. He wore street clothes on the sideline in the second half and didn’t talk to reporters after the game. Miami’s already depleted offensive line lost center Cory Procter with a left knee injury. And with third-string quarterback Tyler Thigpen taking six sacks in his first NFL start since 2008, the Dolphins were no match for a Bears defense that took over the NFL lead in points

allowed per game. “Offensively we’re embarrassed what we put on the field,” Thigpen said. “I put the blame on me.” Playing in Miami for the first time since losing Super Bowl 41 to Indianapolis, the Bears (7-3) won for the third time in 12 days and moved a half-game ahead of Green Bay atop the NFC North. The Dolphins (5-5) lost at home in prime time for the third time this season. Coach Tony Sparano declined to blame injuries for the dismal showing. “Those are excuses,” he said. “I’m not going to use them. I don’t want my team to use them. This is the NFL. The next guy has to step up.” Peppers had three sacks and Charles Tillman recorded an interception for the Bears, who earned their first shutout since Nov. 19, 2006, against the Jets. “It’s nice to get a couple sacks,” Peppers said. “It’s even nicer to get that goose egg.” Smith had the Bears blitzing even in the final moments, when the outcome was decided. “Coach let us keep going at the end of the game,” linebacker Brian Urlacher said. “We didn’t want to give up any points. Anytime you have a chance that late in the game for a shutout, you might as well try to keep it.

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, November 19-20, 2010

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SECTION

Our Peninsula

BUSINESS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY In this section

Feast from buffet of literary offerings Reading for Hunger Relief slated tonight

Peninsula Weekend the late American wordsmith with a penchant for the light and short. Gouge said she’ll probably read one of her briefer works, a tribute to her late husband, Denver, titled “Cookies.”

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — It’s a double harvest tonight of nourishment for our bodies and food for our souls. The annual Reading for Hunger Relief, a Port Angeles tradition for 16 years now, brings together a group of seven local writers, offering widely varying points of view, in support of two local food pantries. Janet Lucas Admission to tonight’s Creative nonfiction reading — which starts at 7 p.m. in the Raymond Carver Room at the Port Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News Angeles Library, 2210 S. Poet and Peninsula College professor Carmen Germain stands in the Peabody St. — is $5 or a Peninsula College library on Thursday. She started the Reading for donation of nonperishable Hunger Relief program 16 years ago. food items. All proceeds benefit the Sequim and Port Angeles food banks. The evening is a buffet of sumptuous stories and poems, said Carmen Germain, the poet and Peninsula College professor who started the whole thing 16 years ago.

Travelers

Harvest of experience “In keeping with the ‘share the harvest’ idea, the writers have such a variety of life experience,” she added. “These are people who approach poetry and fiction and nonfiction in different ways.” Listeners can plan on generous servings of humor, thanks to playful writers like Jim Fisher. The Peninsula College English professor will read

Jim Fisher Serving of humor

Michael Mills Costa Rican inspiration

Kate Reavey Take on part of planet

Jen Gouge Newest addition

a few of his comic “sonnettes,” 14-line poems with a few choice words per line. New to the lineup this year is Jen Gouge, coordi-

nator of the college’s medical assisting program. “I’ve been [teaching] here for 17 years; I’ve been writing all along,” Gouge said,

adding she’s been trying to get in to the Reading for Hunger Relief for years, too. “I’d boo and hiss from the back,” she joked.

Suddenly, this fall, “I write a weird poem, and I’m in.” This particular piece is a dark one, she said, about heaven: who gains entry and what you have to do to get in. Usually, “I’m more of an Ogden Nash-type poet,” Gouge added, nodding to

Elsewhere in the reading, Peninsula College writing teachers Michael Mills and Kate Reavey will offer their angles on various parts of the planet. Mills said he’ll read a poem written while he was in Costa Rica last year; Reavey may reflect on her time teaching in Tuscany this past spring. Adding creative nonfiction to the spread is Janet Lucas, an English professor originally from Port Angeles, who taught at China’s Guilin University of Electronic Technology in 2008. She’ll read an excerpt from her piece about the importance of creating empathy in writing. Sharing more poems is Charlotte Warren, a Sequim writer who grew up in India. She’s author of a poetry collection titled Gandhi’s Lap and appears in anthologies such as Poetic Voices Without Borders. Germain, who was chosen earlier this year for inclusion in the New Poets of the American West anthology, will also share a few of her newer poems tonight. Those and the rest of tonight’s works will be bound into a chapbook to be sold during the event for a $10 donation. Turn

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Reserve seats now for ‘La Boheme’ PA Symphony plans trip to Victoria in February Peninsula Daily News

VICTORIA — Puccini’s opera “La Boheme” is coming to Victoria’s Royal Theatre in early 2011. Local opera fans can accompany members of the Port Angeles Symphony on a trip across the Strait of Juan de Fuca to see a 3

p.m. matinee on Saturday, Feb. 19. To reserve the best seats, phone symphony coordinator Barbara Hutter at 360-683-4743 before Friday, Nov. 26. The cost of the trip is $130 per person, which includes a ticket to the performance plus a $40 tax-

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deductible donation to the symphony. The price does not include lodging or ferry fare, but Hutter has arranged for a special rate of $89 for a standard room at the Chateau Victoria the weekend of Feb. 18, 19 and 20. For information about the opera trip and the Port Angeles symphony’s concerts and other events, visit www.PortAngeles Symphony.org or phone 360-457-5579.

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Workshops, holiday bazaars highlight weekend events Peninsula Daily News

Workshops, holiday shopping and a chance to help decorate a Sequim park for the season are among the opportunities offered on the North Olympic Peninsula this week. For more about music and arts, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide, in today’s PDN. Other major weekend events for you to enjoy are spotlighted on this page and inside, on “Things To Do” on Page C4 and — by area — below:

Port Angeles PORT ANGELES — Winterfest returns to Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St, in Port Angeles tonight and Saturday. The event begins with tonight’s “Dinner and a Movie” extravaganza at 5 p.m. and continues Saturday with a swap meet from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The two-day fundraiser is put on by the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Educa-

Talk, potluck set PORT ANGELES — A representative from Angel

Crest Gardens will speak at Dry Creek Grange, 3520 W. Edgewood Drive, at 3 p.m. Sunday. The talk will be followed by a potluck dinner. The event is free and open to the public. Angel Crest Gardens, which began as a roadside flower vendor and has expanded into several roadside stands and a plant nursery, is located at 58424 state Highway 112, five miles west of Port Angeles.

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Basketry weekend PORT ANGELES — A “No-Frills Basketry Weekend” is planned at the Peninsula College Longhouse of Learning on Saturday and Sunday. The workshop at the Longhouse at 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. Elaine Grinnell, Julie Grinnell, Theresa Parker and Julie McKenney will lead the workshop, sharing basketry techniques and projects. The event is open to the public. It costs $50. For more information, phone 360-683-5731 or 360-640-0041. Turn

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Events/C2

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tion Foundation to support skiing activities at Hurricane Ridge each winter. More than 150 items will be up for bid in tonight’s silent auction, with another 16 on the docket for the live auction. A prime rib dinner with a no-host bar, an oyster bar and a showing of Teton Gravity Research’s movie “Light the Wick” also are planned. Tickets are $40 and are available at Swain’s General Store, Necessities & Temptations and Brown’s Outdoor. A limited number of tickets will be available at the door for $45. On Saturday, winter sports fans can buy and sell used equipment at the ski swap in the community center. Gear can be dropped off between 8:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. Admission to the sale is $3 per person or $7 for a family. The ski swap will be followed by a second showing of “Light the Wick” at 7 p.m. Tickets for the movie cost $10.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, November 19, 2010

Craft fair set Nov. 26-27 Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Arts Guild will hold its 20th Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 26, and Saturday, Nov. 27. It will be held in the center’s gymnasium and in two rooms in the upstairs portion of the building. More than 50 artists will be selling their handmade work. Examples include pottery, carved wood; gold, sil-

ver and enamel jewelry; silver chains, spun and knitted goods; felt scarves; hunting knives; hats; woven rugs; lampwork beads; paintings; leather bags and belts; oil and watercolor paintings; willow chairs, ironworks and blown glass. Fair-goers also can listen to the music of local students downstairs and Celtic harpist David Michael upstairs. Attendees are welcome to purchase and paint bowls, with a percentage of each sale to be donated to the Jefferson County

Food Bank. Over the past 19 years, the artists have donated about $16,000 to area food banks. The Port Townsend Arts Guild is a self-supporting, nonprofit organization that funds cultural activities and high school scholarships in the arts in Jefferson County by presenting several arts and crafts fairs each year. This year, the group presented a total of $3,500 in scholarships. For more information, phone 360-379-3813, or visit www.porttownsendarts guild.org.

Reading: Help others Continued from C1 The reading will last for about an hour and a half, with Port Book and News owner Alan Turner serving drinks and sweets as he does at many library events. To Germain, the evening’s gathering is a way to strengthen community here.

Help others Listening to poetry and prose is a way to open yourself up to the world beyond your own experience, she said, while contributing money or food helps fellow Port Angeles and Sequim residents who are struggling.

“I’ve been there,” Germain added. “Years ago, I was a student, and I was working. My husband had a serious medical condition and had to have surgery,” and their household income fell far enough that they became eligible for food stamps. Germain remembers using them at the grocery store — and watching the cashier roll her eyes in disgust. “I understand when people say things like, ‘I had it really rough and I never asked for help.’ But you don’t know until you’re faced with the situation” that you may need that help, perhaps from a local

food bank. “There are people in this community who’ve lost jobs or who are underemployed,” Germain said, adding that each year, she watches basic expenses, such as utilities, increase as winter sets in. Both local pantries will continue accepting donations after tonight’s reading. The Port Angeles Food Bank, 402 S. Valley St., can be reached at 360-452-8568 while the Sequim Food Bank, 144 W. Alder St., is at 360-683-1205.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . 4-H winners named for year’s work SEQUIM — Dogs Inc. 4-H Club members Alexa Asselin and Daniel Fink were honored at the recent Clallam County 4-H Leaders Council Awards Dinner. Asselin received awards for the Best Club Record Book in Clallam County and Junior Leader of the Year. Fink won awards for Clallam County Teen Leader of the Year, a medal for highest score in the senior division in Leadership Project, best smallanimal record book in the senior division and the Janet Fry Outstanding 4-H’er for Clallam County. The Fry award is presented to the 4-H’er who best personifies the spirit of 4-H, which is defined as leadership, citizenship, community service, helping other 4-H members and active participation at all levels. The awards recognize Asselin’s and Fink’s work from Oct. 1, 2009, to Sept. 30, 2010. Both help fellow club members train dogs for around four hours per week. They both are members of the Dog Inc. Dog Drill Team that performed at the Clallam County Fair, the Jefferson County Fair, the Hurricane Ridge Ken-

Dogs Inc. 4-H Club members Alexa Asselin and Daniel Fink display the awards they received at the Clallam County 4-H Leaders Council Awards Dinner. nel Club Show and the Welfare for Animals Guild Dog Walk and marched in the Port Angeles Fourth of July Parade.

Exercise fundraiser SEQUIM — Anytime Fitness owners Jay and Heidi Bryan and trainers Nikki Julmist and David Schmidlkofer will hold an exercise fundraiser for the Sequim Food Bank from 9 a.m. to 10:20 a.m. Thursday. The 1,000-calorie, 80-minute, Thanksgiving Day workout will be held at Anytime Fitness’ location in Rock Plaza, 10131 Old Olympic Highway. Suggested donation is $5 or five cans of food for

the food bank. Participants should be in good health and have a regular exercise regiment. To register, phone 360683-4110.

Thank a responder OLYMPIA — A “Day of Appreciation for First Responders in Washington state” will be Monday, Nov. 30, as proclaimed by Gov. Chris Gregoire in June. The website www. thankafirstresponder.com has information on “adopting” a police, sheriff, State Patrol, fire or EMT station as a way of paying respect to first responders in the state. Peninsula Daily News

Events: Fundraiser to help Crescent High Continued from C1 Christmas fund. The owners of the Daily Grind will match the contriHelp fund the prom butions dollar for dollar. PORT ANGELES — The Daily Grind is located Crescent High School class at 1919-A E. First St., next of 2012 will hold a Krispy to O’Reilly’s Auto Parts. Kreme doughnut fundraiser at three locations in Port Angeles beginning at 9 a.m. Sequim Saturday. Members of the school’s Nature mart junior class will sell the SEQUIM — The fourth tasty treats at Thurman’s, annual Holiday Nature 1807 E. Front St.; Sergio’s, 205 E. Eighth St.; and the Mart will be held at the Port Angeles Walmart, 3471 Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge E. Kolonels Way. Doughnuts will cost $9 Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. per dozen. Proceeds from the sale Saturday. There will be gifts for will help fund the 2011 people, pets and birds; Crescent Senior Prom. Traditionally, the Cres- crafts; wreath-making; and cent junior class is respon- a bake sale and other food. Birds from the Northsible for raising funds for west Raptor and Wildlife the senior prom. Center will be featured from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gift bazaar slated Proceeds from the HoliPORT ANGELES — The day Nature Mart will supFriends & Co. Gift Bazaar will port the Dungeness River be held at the Campfire Club- Audubon Center and Railhouse from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. road Bridge Park. The raptor center will Friday and Saturday. The clubhouse is at 619 also accept donations. For more information, E. Fourth St. visit www.DungenessRiver Tips to Salvation Army Center.org or phone 360683-1355. PORT ANGELES — Baristas at the Daily Grind Greywolf bazaar will donate all tips collected SEQUIM — More than Saturday and Sunday to the Salvation Army’s 60 booths will be featured

Visitors look over holiday goods at the 2009 Holiday Nature Mart. The 2010 edition will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim. phone 360-683-7044.

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at the Greywolf Elementary Holiday Bazaar on Saturday and Sunday. The bazaar will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at the school at 171 Carlsborg Road. In addition to vendors, the bazaar will offer a Scholastic Book Fair, a bake sale, a Santa’s Kitchen serving down-home dishes and delectables provided by Old Post Office Sweets & Gifts.

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To RSVP, phone 360-683The event is sponsored by the Greywolf Elemen- 7862. tary School Parent Teacher Thrift shop open Association. For more information, SEQUIM — The phone 360-681-8561. Sequim-Dungeness Hospital Guild Thrift Shop, 204 Recycling doors W. Bell St., will be open SEQUIM — A free work- from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Satshop on finding second uses urday. Holiday items and dish for hollow-core doors is ware will be featured. planned Saturday. All white-tag items will The workshop on turn- be at half-price during this ing the doors into useful sale. household items like bookProceeds from this shop shelves, corner cabinets and are returned to the comroom dividers will be from munity. The shop is always in 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Around Again, 765 W. Washington need of volunteers. For more information, St..

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Yuletide Bazaar SEQUIM — Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Sequim Ave., will hold its Yuletide Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The bazaar will include holiday decorations, handcrafted gifts and baked goods. For more information, phone 360-681-0946.

Holiday Bazaar SEQUIM — The Sequim Guild of Seattle Children’s Hospital will hold its Holiday Bazaar at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. The bazaar will include more than 40 handicrafts vendors. Homemade soups, sandwiches, pies and beverages will be sold. Proceeds support medical services at Seattle Children’s Hospital. For more information, phone Carol Labbe at 360683-7130.

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SEQUIM — The public is invited to help decorate Bank of America Park for the holidays Saturday. Decorating will begin at 11 a.m. at the park, located at the corner of Washington Street and Sequim Avenue. For more information, phone Emily Westcott at 360-670-6294.

SEQUIM — The Sequim High School Band will hold a series of car washes to raise money to compete at Magic Music Days at Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., this spring. The first car wash will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Rock Plaza, corner of Sequim Avenue and Old Olympic Highway. Other car washes are set for Saturdays on Dec. 18, also at Rock Plaza, and Jan. 8, Feb. 5 and March 12 in the parking lot of Tarcisio’s Restaurant, 609 W. Washington St. Turn

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, November 19, 2010

C3

Briefly . . . State park auction set for Nov. 27

A complete list of the items can be seen at the Fort Worden customer service office in Building 200 daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. until Wednesday. Claims against the propPORT TOWNSEND — erty listed on the auction Fort Worden State Park will block must be made in writhold an auction of unclaimed ing to Fort Worden State property next weekend. Park prior to Wednesday. The auction will be held For more information, in the USO Building (Build- phone the park office at ing 26) from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. 360-344-4400. Saturday, Nov. 27. The public can preview the auction items and regis- Yule tree permits OLYMPIA — “You-Cut” ter for the auction from Christmas tree permits are 10 a.m. to noon. now available from Olympic All sales are cash only, and sales tax will be added. National Forest for $5 each, cash or check only. Each year, Fort Worden The permits are valid collects hundreds of items only in specified areas. that have been left behind Maps and information by visitors to the park. These items are stored in about cutting areas will be provided with each permit the park’s lost-and-found sale. room for at least 60 days. Douglas fir is the most If no one claims these abundant and popular items after 60 days, the Christmas tree species items can be auctioned or found in the forest. donated. Pacific silver fir may be Proceeds from the sales found along ridge tops at will go into the park’s higher elevations, but accesrenewal and stewardship sibility depends on snow account. and road conditions. Items that will be aucEach permit allows for tioned include jewelry, bikes, the cutting of one tree. helmets, books, cell phone A maximum of five peraccessories, clocks, blankets, assorted electronic adapters, mits will be available to cameras, sports equipment, each household. Christmas tree permits toys, items for the kitchen are not refundable. and home, glasses, shoes and sandals, coats and jackTree-cutting is prohibited ets and other clothing. in wildernesses areas, devel-

oped campgrounds, administrative sites, within 300 feet of streams on private or state-owned lands within national forest boundaries and in other posted areas. Permits can be purchased at the Hood Canal Ranger District Office, 295142 U.S. Highway 101 in Quilcene, 360-765-2200, or the Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitor Information Center, 1411 S. Forks Ave., in Forks, 360-374-2531. Contact either location for their hours, permit availability and current road and weather conditions. Visit www.fs.fed.us/r6/ olympic for order forms and additional information.

name a few. The narratives weave history, science, suspense, humor and pathos. Each story is told in a different style with cliffhangers, which may or may not resolve by the end of the book. Copies of Cloud Atlas can be borrowed from the library. Preregistration is not required, and drop-ins are always welcome.

tly used coats, blankets, hats, gloves and mittens now through Dec. 15 for the Salvation Army Warm Coat and Blanket Drive. Items may be dropped off at any Sequim or Port Angeles First Federal branch. Clothing collected will be distributed from the Salvation Army located at Second and Peabody streets in Port Angeles. First Federal has participated in this project for many years.

Wreath-making

Hardy’s Market

SEQUIM — McComb Gardens, 751 McComb Road, will offer “Wreath Making in the Greenhouse” sessions Friday, Nov. 26, and Saturday, Nov. 27. Cloud Atlas talk Individualized instrucPORT ANGELES — The tion will be provided in Port Angeles Reading PALS making welcoming book discussion group will wreaths, which take about discuss Cloud Atlas by two hours to design and David Mitchell at the Port construct. Angeles Library, 2210 S. Cost is $15 per wreath, Peabody St., at 6:30 p.m. and a garbage can full of Wednesday, Dec. 1. greens is needed. In Cloud Atlas, Mitchell No artistic talent is presents six separate but required. loosely connected stories of To make a reservation people from the past to the or for more information, distant future. phone McComb Gardens at Readers enter the lives of 360-681-2827. a 19th-century notary on a Pacific Ocean voyage, an Coat, blanket drive investigative journalist in PORT ANGELES — the 1970s being chased by First Federal branches in hit men and a young man on a quest for meaning in a Port Angeles and Sequim post-apocalyptic world, to are collecting new and gen-

SEQUIM — Hardy’s Market, 10200 Old Olympic Highway, will hold a free Thanksgiving dinner from 11 a.m. until supplies are gone Thursday. The market is holding the meal “to say thank you for supporting your local market.” Last year’s meal served about 150 people. For more information, phone the market at 360582-0240.

Elwha Resort book PORT ANGELES — Local author and Peninsula Daily News historical columnist Alice Alexander will hold a book signing for her new book, Memories of Elwha Resort, at the Museum at the Carnegie, 207 S. Lincoln St., at

6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Memories of Elwha Resort is a collection of stories and reminiscences by the owner-operators of the resort that stretch from 1924 to 2001. The book will be offered for $14.95 plus tax at the signing. Refreshments will be served. The book signing is sponsored by Odyssey Bookshop and the Clallam County Historical Society. For more information, phone the historical society at 360-452-2662.

Reserve your spot SEQUIM — A free Thanksgiving dinner will be at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave., at 3 p.m. Thursday. Reservations are required for the traditional turkey dinner. Reservations can be made by phoning the church at 360-683-5367 between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday. Because Clallam Transit buses will not be operating on Thanksgiving, the church will help arrange transportation for Sequim residents who have no other way to get to the dinner. The church also sponsors free community dinners the last Thursday of each month. Peninsula Daily News

Events: Faith Lutheran school hosts bazaar Continued from C2 6 p.m. Saturday. Toys will go to Child Protective and Youth Services, All car washes will run Battered Youth Healthcare from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, Services, Community Hose-mail bkmoore@olypen. pital, Forks; Olympic Medical Center, Port Angeles; com. and ambulance service and police departments. Donihue signs books For more information SEQUIM — The Good phone 360-683-8598 or Book Store, 108 W. Wash- e-mail eckersonc@olypen. ington St., will host a book com. signing with author Anita Corrine Donihue from Trust work party 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. SEQUIM — North Donihue will sign copies of the anniversary edition Olympic Land Trust will of her devotional book on host a work party at the prayer, When I’m On My Siebert Creek Conservation Area, off U.S. Highway 101 Knees. About 2 million copies of east of Olympic Cellars, the book have been sold in from 10 a.m. to noon Saturthe U.S. and other coun- day. Volunteers will pull out or tries. Donihue speaks at wor- cut scotch broom in advance ship services, Christian of spring tree planting. If there are enough volwomen’s retreats and local unteers, there also will be and national conferences. some trail maintenance Christmas bazaar work done. Volunteers should bring SEQUIM — The Faith drinking water, work gloves Lutheran Pre-School and handsaws, if available. Christmas Bazaar will be Tools, juice and snacks held at 354 W. Cedar St. will be provided. from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. SaturRSVPs are not required day. but are appreciated. The event will include For more information, handcrafted gifts and baked phone 360-417-1815 or goods, a silent auction and e-mail lorrie@northolympic lunch. landtrust.org. For more information,

West End Forks story time FORKS — The Forks Library’s story time today will be on “Giving Thanks.” The story time, which is for children from 3 to 5 years old, will be at 2 p.m. at the public library at 171 S. Forks Ave. The free story time, which is open to the public, will include stories, music and a craft project. For more information, phone the Forks Library at 360-374-6402, e-mail Forks@nols.org or visit www.nols.org.

Forks market indoors FORKS — The Forks Open Aire Market and West End Art League will operate “under cover” at the Bank of America, 481 S. Forks Ave., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Saturday and from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Merchandise from local artists, artisans and vendors will be sold. Live music is planned. Another indoor sale will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 11. For more information, phone Bonny Dunker at

phone 360-681-7126.

Toys for Tots

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SEQUIM — A toy collection drive and visit from Santa are planned at Dungeness Kids Co. on Saturday. The Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots program will collect toys at the business at 990 E. Washington St. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Santa will visit with children, and parents can take photos of the children on Santa’s lap. Toys for Tots will host live collections of toys at Walmarts in both Sequim and Port Angeles on Friday, Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://tinyurl. com/25l9ref.

360-374-6789 or e-mail canned goods on their doorc o n t a c t @ fo rk s o p e n a i r e steps with notes saying “Scouts” for pickup if they market.com. will not be home. An annual tradition for Cub Scout food drive the scouts, last year’s drive FORKS — Cub Scout collected more than 300 Pack 4467, with help from pounds of canned goods for the Forks Elks Lodge, will the food bank. go around Forks collecting donations for the Forks Port Townsend and Food Bank. Jefferson County Scouts will meet at the Elks Lodge on Merchant Road at 9 a.m. to plan which Help radio station groups will visit which PORT TOWNSEND — neighborhoods. The KPTZ-FM “Queen’s Individuals can leave Bazaar: A Second-Hand

Sale of Distinction” will be held at the Clam Cannery Hotel, 111 Quincy St., from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. KPTZ, Port Townsend’s community radio station, is nearly ready to begin broadcasting. The station now has a studio, and it is in the process of building a radio tower. The KPTZ Queen’s Bazaar will help raise funds to match a federal grant to build and equip the station. Turn

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Turkey bingo event SEQUIM — St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 121 E. Maple St., will host turkey bingo from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Bingo cards are available, with three for $5 and seven for $10. The final game will be a 50-50 blackout. For more information, phone 360-582-3792.

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SEQUIM — The North Olympic Chapter of a Brotherhood Against Totalitarian Enactments of Washington will collect toys at the entrance of the Sequim Walmart, 1110 W. Washington St., from 10 a.m. to

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Events: Nature talk set Continued from C3 Donated items such as furniture, fine art, jewelry, linens, rugs, dishes, tools and more are being sought for the sale. Items should be in good condition and special in some way. To donate, phone 360385-9771 or e-mail info@ kptz.org. Donations will be accepted at the Clam Cannery between 9 a.m. and noon today.

Puget Sound treasures PORT TOWNSEND — Sigrid Llewellyn will discuss “Puget Sound Natural Treasures and Human Impact” at a meeting of the AAUW Port Townsend Branch on Saturday. The meeting will be from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave., Port Townsend. The beauty and biodiversity of the environment of Puget Sound will be discussed using a series of photos and examples that illustrate the complexity of the ecosystem and food web. Llewellyn worked for 35 years as a physicist, systems engineer and a manger in the space industry, telecommunications and information technology. The event is free and open to the public.

Membership to AAUW is open to graduates who hold an associate degree/equivalent or higher from an accredited institution. For more information e-mail porttownsend@ aauw-wa.org or visit www. aauwpt.org.

Time travel talk PORT TOWNSEND — Andrew D. Basiago — who believes Mars harbors life and that the federal government has achieved time travel and has “quantum access” to past and future events — will speak from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Basiago’s talk will be held at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St. He has been identified as the first of two “planetary whistle-blowers” predicted by the Web Bot Project, which analyzes the content of the Internet to discern global trends. Basiago is also on a crusade as a lawyer and activist to have the U.S. government disclose what he calls its time travel secrets. He advocates lobbying the government to declassify its secret teleportation capability so that teleportation can be adopted globally as a new form of civilian transport. Basiago will tell the story of his experiences for two hours and take questions for two hours. Tickets are $18.01 and

are available at www. truthevent.com. For more information, visit www.projectpegasus. net/andrew_d_basiago.

Country dance PORT TOWNSEND — A free English country dance will be held at the RoseWind Common House, 3131 Haines St., from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. The dancing will be taught by Nan Evans from Portland, Ore. Fred Nussbaum and Friends will provide music. The dance will be followed by a potluck dinner. RoseWind Common House is a fragrance-free facility, and street shoes are not allowed. It is part of the RoseWind Cohousing community. For more information, phone Dan Post at 360-5540417 or e-mail dan.post@ frandango.org.

Contra dance set PORT TOWNSEND — East Coast contra caller George Marshall will lead a contra dance at the Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., at 7:30 tonight. Music will be provided by the Syncopaths. Admission is $12 for adults, $6 for youths younger than 18.

Things to Do Today, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 19-21, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today Play and Learn Port Angeles — For children for ages 0-5 to attend with parent, grandparent or caregiver with individual and group play, songs and story time. 9 a.m. to 11a.m. Phone 360-452-5437 for location and more information.

ext. 309, or e-mail cheryl@ ccfymca.org. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Future Relics of the Elwha Dam.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-3532.

Bingo — Port Angeles Friends and Co. Gift Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh Bazaar — Campfire Club- St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone house, 619 E. Fourth St., 9 360-457-7004. a.m. to 3 p.m. Museum at the Carnegie Walk-in vision clinic — — Featured exhibit, “Strong Information for visually impaired People: The Faces of Clallam and blind people, including County.” Miniatures exhibit till accessible technology display, Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln library, Braille training and vari- streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Chilous magnification aids. Vision dren welcome. Elevator, ADA Loss Center, 228 W. First St., access and parking at rear of Suite N, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. building. 360-452-6779. Phone 360-457-1383 or visit Introduction to line dance www.visionlossservices.org/ for beginners — Port Angeles vision. Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh Insurance assistance — St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 Statewide benefits advisers members, $3 nonmembers. help with health insurance and Phone 360-457-7004. Medicare. Port Angeles Senior The Answer for Youth — Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge Drop-in outreach center for Stewart at 360-452-3221, ext. youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, 3425. Narcotics and Alcoholics AnonScrapbook and paper- ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. crafts class — Clallam County Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Family YMCA Art School, 723 E. Fourth St., 10 a.m. to noon. Mental health drop-in cenCost: $8, $5 for YMCA mem- ter — The Horizon Center, 205 bers. For children 8 to 14. To E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. register, phone 360-452-9244, For those with mental disor-

Puyallup Fair winners earn their spurs PORT ANGELES — Clallam County youths competed successfully at the recent Puyallup Fair, including Marissa Wilson and her horse, Echo. They topped 126 other competitors to win the grand championship in showmanship in the Senior Western Games. Wilson also earned white ribbons in poles, barrels, key race and figureeight competitions. Wilson, a member of the Silver Spurs 4-H Club, also competed on the senior equine judging contest team with Suzanne Hiestand, Olivia Pluard and Lauren Gallacci of Pony Express 4-H Club, and Nathan Gentry of Neon Riders 4-H Club. Gentry earned a red ribbon during the competition. Hiestand and Pluard earned blue ribbons in the showmanship, hunt seat, stock seat, bareback and trail contests. Gallacci won a blue ribbon in hunt seat, red ribbons in showmanship and stock seat, and a white ribbon in trail. Ashley Farmer and Valora Bain of Silver Spurs 4-H Club earned blue ribbons in the intermediate equine judging contest.

ders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431. Global Lens Film Series — South African film “Shirley Adams.” 4 p.m. Chinese film “The Shaft,” 7 p.m. Little Theatre, Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., $5 each film. Students free. English subtitles. Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-4578921. PA Peggers Cribbage Club — Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn St., Check-in, 5:30 p.m. Games, 6 p.m. New members welcome. For more information, e-mail papeggers@hughes.net, phone 360-808-7129 or visit www.papeggers.com. Bingo — Masonic Lodge,

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Call 565.3702 to RSVP or for more information.

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Feiro Marine Life Center 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, Admission by donation. Phone drinks and pull tabs available. 360-417-6254. Phone 360-457-7377. Port Angeles Farmers Reading for Hunger Relief Market — The Gateway, Front — Peninsula College faculty and Lincoln streets, 10 a.m. to writers entertain with poetry, 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts fiction and creative nonfiction and music. to support Sequim and Port Angeles Food Banks. Raymond Joyce Depot Museum — Carver room, Port Angeles 15 miles west of Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., 7 on state Highway 112, 10 a.m. p.m. to 9 p.m. Suggested dona- to 4 p.m. 1915-era log depot tion is $5. houses, photographs and historical information regarding “Meet Me in St. Louis” — Joyce, Port Crescent, Twin, Port Angeles Community Play- Lake Crescent, Camp Hayden, house, 1235 E. Lauridsen the Spruce Railroad and early Blvd.. 7:30 p.m. Tickets $14 logging. Phone 360-928-3568. available online www.pa communityplayers.com and Guided walking tour — Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Historic downtown buildings, Front St. an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. RailSaturday road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 Olympic Outdoor Club p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 hike — Heather Park Trail, a senior citizens and students, moderately difficult hike of 10 $6 ages 6 to 12. Children miles round trip; elevation gain younger than 6, free. Reservaof 3,800 feet; high point of tions, phone 360-452-2363, 5,740 feet. Be prepared for ext. 0. winter weather. Quimper Peninsula hikers meet at 8:30 a.m. Port Angeles Fine Arts at Quimper Credit Union, Port Center — “Future Relics of the Hadlock. Sequim and Quimper Elwha Dam.” 1203 E. Lauridhikers meet 9:15 a.m. at south- sen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. east corner of Sequim Walmart Free. Phone 360-457-3532. parking lot. Port Angeles and other hikers meet 10 a.m. at Peace rally — Veterans Olympic National Park Visitors Park, 217 S. Lincoln St., noon Center. E-mail olympic. to 2 p.m. Sponsored by Green outdoors@yahoo.com. Party of Clallam County. Phone 360-683-0867. Intro rowing classes — For beginners and intermediates Cribbage — Port Angeles

The Answer for Youth — Drop-in outreach center for youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Second St., 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

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mentary Thanksgiving Day dinner for veterans and PORT ANGELES — A their families, widows and representative from Angel widowers also will be open Crest Gardens will speak at Dry Creek Grange, 3520 to the general public. Reservations are W. Edgewood Drive, at requested. 3 p.m. Sunday. The dinner will be from The talk will be followed 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the VFW by a potluck harvest dinner. Hall, 169 E. Washington St. The event is free and To make a reservation open to the public. or for more information, Angel Crest Gardens is phone 360-683-9546, leavlocated at 58424 state ing the names of people Highway 112. who plan to attend the dinner on the answering VFW Thanksgiving machine. Peninsula Daily News SEQUIM — A compli-

Embroidery class — Golden Craft Shop, 112-C S. Lincoln St., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Zazen — NO Sangha, a Bring an embroidery needle, Zen community, offers zazen hoop, scissors and a 12-inch alternated with kinhin. 420 W. square of plain cotton fabric. Third St., 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Phone 360-457-0509. Also opportunities for private teaching interviews with SenMuseum at the Carnegie sei Kristen Larson. For direc- — Featured exhibit, “Strong tions, phone 360-452-5534 or People: The Faces of Clallam e-mail nosangha@aol.com. County.” Miniatures exhibit till Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln The Friends and Co. Gift streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ChilBazaar — Campfire Club- dren welcome. Elevator, ADA house, 619 E. Fourth St., 9 access and parking at rear of a.m. to 3 p.m. building. 360-452-6779.

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The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Our Purpose: To engage the community in strengthening the foundation for education in Port Angeles. We will accomplish this through everyone’s participation in the development of the District’s strategic plan.

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Clallam County 4-H competitor Marissa Wilson won a grand championship in showmanship at the Puyallup Fair.

ages 16 and older. Olympic Peninsula Rowing Association Boathouse, 1431 Ediz Hook, 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. Membership fees apply. E-mail Tim Tucker at tim@ccfymca.org.

Get in on the Things to Do

You’re Invited: Port Angeles School District’s Education Summit for Strategic Planning on Friday, December 3 and Saturday, December 4 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center, 905 West 9th Street

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Briefly . . .

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

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Peninsula Daily News

“Meet me in St. Louis” — Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7:30 p.m. Tickets $14 available online at www.pa communityplayers.com or Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St.

Sunday PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information including time of day and location. Lions Breakfast — All-youcan-eat. Crescent Bay Lions Clubhouse, Holly Hill Road and state Highway 112, 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. $6 adults, $3 for children. Feiro Marine Life Center — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. Admission by donation. Phone 360-417-6254. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Future Relics of the Elwha Dam.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-3532. “Meet me in St. Louis” — Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 2 p.m. Tickets $14 available online at www.pa communityplayers.com or Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St. Dance — Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. with 30 minutes of instruction, followed by folk and ballroom dance. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Refreshments, 9 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Today Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit www.sequimyoga.com. Walk aerobics — First Baptist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way 8 a.m. Free. Phone 360-6832114.

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Peninsula Daily News

Things to Do Cultural Connections — Sequim Humanities and Arts Circuit training exercise Alliance. The Lodge at Sherclass — Sequim Community wood Village, 660 W. Evergreen Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 Farm Way, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Free. Visit www.sequimarts Phone Shelley Haupt at 360- alliance.org or phone 360-460477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@ 3023. wavecable.com. “M*A*S*H” — Sequim High Sequim Great Decisions School auditorium, 601 N. Discussion Group — Sequim Sequim Ave., 7 p.m. Tickets $7 general and $5 for seniors, Public Library, 630 N. Sequim children and students with ASB Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. “The cards available at the door one Geography of Chinese Power.” hour before show. Topics from Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions 2009 publication and articles in Sunday Foreign Affairs magazine. VFW breakfast — 169 E. Phone 360-683-9622, e-mail Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 jcpollock@olypen.com or click p.m. Cost: $5 a person. on www.fpa.org/info-url_ nocat4728/. Pittsburgh Steelers Fan Club — Stymie’s Bar & Grill, Line dancing lessons — Cedars at Dungeness Golf Beginning dancers. Sequim Course, 1965 Woodcock Road, Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams 10 a.m. Phone 360-775-8663. Road, 10 a.m. to 11a.m. $3 per class. Phone 360-681-2826. Adult Scrabble — The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 Sequim Museum & Arts p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. Center — “Autumn on the Olympic Peninsula.” 175 W. Trivia night — Oasis Sports Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bar and Grill, 301 E. WashingFree. Phone 360-683-8110. ton St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360582-3143. Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., 12:30 p.m. Phone 360- Port Townsend and 681-4308, or partnership 360Jefferson County 683-5635.

Continued from C4

“M*A*S*H” — Sequim High School auditorium, 601 N. Sequim Ave., 7 p.m. Tickets $7 general and $5 for seniors, children and students with ASB cards available at door one hour before show.

Saturday Sequim Open Aire Market — Farm, food and art and craft vendors. Cedar Street between Sequim and Second avenues, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit www. sequimmarket.com.

Today Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com. Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854. OlyCAP “Dinner and a Murder” —The real-life wedding between Ramon Dailey, writer and director, and Tiela Short, one of the actresses. Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, Port Ludlow, 5 p.m. Tickets $50 at www. brownpaper tickets.com/ event/110125 or phone Bob Logue 360-385-2571, ext. 6324. Visit www.ptmystery. com. Rhody O’s Square Dances — Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road, 6:30 p.m. Dance — The Syncopaths perform while George Marshall calls. Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., 7:30 p.m. Admission $12 for adults, $6 for 18 and younger. All dances taught. Olympic Peninsula Dance — Stickshift Annie with Kimball & The Fugitives. Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Adults $15, students with ID and disabled $10, ages 12 and younger $7. Pre-dance lesson in “Beginning Tango” with Gary Balhorn and Sofia Christine, 7 p.m. Open to all ages and smokefree. For more information, visit www.olympicpeninsuladance. com or phone 360-385-6919 or 360-385-5327.

Saturday Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art. AAUW Port Townsend Branch — “Puget Sound Natural Treasures and Human Impact” with Sigrid Llewellyn. Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship,, 2333 San Juan Ave., 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Visit www.aauwpt.org. Boatbuilding — The Boat School, 42 N. Water St., at 10 a.m. Phone Wayne Chimenti 360-379-9220 or e-mail force10sails@hotmail.com. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous — First Baptist Church, 1202 Lawrence St., 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Visit www. foodaddicts.org. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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perform contemporary works written for and about their generation. Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., 8 p.m. Tickets at the door $10, students $5. Visit www.keycity publictheatre.org.

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Light lunch — Free hot meals for people in need, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Phone 360-683-4862.

Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High Comedy night — Come- School’s 100th anniversary. Northwest Maritime Cen- dian Harrold Gomez. Castle Phone 360-765-0688, 360ter tour — Free tour of new Key Restaurant, 651 Cleveland 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or quilcenemuseum@ headquarters. Meet docent in St., 8:30 p.m. $10 cover. Phone e-mail olypen.com or quilcene chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 360-379-1990 museum@embarqmail.com. p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not Sunday Free bike clinic — allowed inside building. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or Olympic Outdoor Club Chauncey Tudhope-Locklear e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. hike — Tunnel Creek Trail, a offers “Port Townsend ReCymoderately easy hike of 8.5 clery,” Food Co-op, 414 KearJefferson County Histori- miles round trip; elevation gain ney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone cal Museum and shop — 540 of 2,450 feet; high point at 360-643-1755. Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 5,050 feet. Be prepared for TeenLab — Local teens Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for winter weather. Port Angeles children 3 to 12; free to histori- hikers meet at 8:30 a.m. Clal- perform contemporary works cal society members. Exhibits lam County Courthouse, 223 written for and about their geninclude “Jefferson County’s E. Fourth St. PA and Sequim eration. Key City Playhouse, Maritime Heritage,” “James hikers meet 9:15 a.m. at south- 419 Washington St., 2:30 p.m. Swan and the Native Ameri- east corner of Sequim Walmart Tickets at the door $10, stucans” and “The Chinese in parking lot. Quimper Peninsula dents $5. Visit www.keycity Early Port Townsend.” Phone hikers meet at 9:30 a.m. at publictheatre.org. 360-385-1003 or visit www. Quimper Credit Union, Port English country dance — jchsmuseum.org. Hadlock. All hikers meet 10 a.m. at state Route 20 and U.S. RoseWind Common House is Commanding Officer’s Highway 101 in Discovery Bay. at 3131 Haines St., 4 p.m. to 6 Quarters museum tour — E-mail olympic.outdoors@ p.m. Lessons by Nan Evans from Portland. Music by Fred Fort Worden State Park, noon yahoo.com. Nussbaum and friends. Folto 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for children. Phone 360-385-1003. Port Townsend Aero lowed by a potluck dinner. No Museum — Jefferson County street shoes or fragrances. Prostate health concerns International Airport, 195 Air- Phone Dan Post at 360-554— Men’s group forming for any port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 0417 or e-mail dan.post@ prostate health related support. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 frandango.org. Fiesta Jalisco Mexican Restau- for seniors, $6 for children ages WordPlay Reading Series rant, Rhody Drive, Port Had- 7-12. Free for children younger lock, noon to 1 p.m. than 6. Features vintage air- — Staged reading of comedy “Intimate Exchanges: Volume I” craft and aviation art. by Alan Ayckbourn. Key City Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden Chimacum Grange Farm- Public Theatre, Key City PlayState Park. Natural history and ers Market — 9572 Rhody house, 419 Washington St., 7 marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Suggested donation $10. For more information, visit Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for p.m. www.keycitypublictheatre.org. youth (6-17); free for science center members. “Whales in Puget Sound Coast ArtilOur Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone lery Museum — Fort Worden Forks and 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. the West End ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for org. children 6 to 12, free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits Today Peace vigil — Ferry inter- interpret the Harbor Defenses Holiday sale — Forks Open section, downtown Port of Puget Sound and the Strait Aire Market and West End Art Townsend, 12:30 p.m. Bring of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360- League will operate “under flags, banners or posters. 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ cover.” Bank of America, 481 S. olypen.com. Forks Ave., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia Jefferson County HistoriSt., by appointment. Artifacts, cal Museum and shop — 540 Saturday documents, family histories Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Holiday sale — Forks Open and photos of Quilcene and Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Aire Market and West End Art surrounding communities. New children 3 to 12; free to histori- League will operate “under exhibits on Brinnon, military, cal society members. Exhibits cover.” Bank of America, 481 S. millinery and Quilcene High include “Jefferson County’s Forks Ave., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360- Maritime Heritage,” “James 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or Swan and the Native Ameri- Sunday e-mail quilcenemuseum@ cans” and “The Chinese in Holiday sale — Forks Open olypen.com or quilcene Early Port Townsend.” Phone Aire Market and West End Art 360-385-1003 or visit www. museum@embarqmail.com. League will operate “under jchsmuseum.org. cover.” Bank of America, 481 S. OlyCAP “Dinner and a Commanding Officer’s Forks Ave., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Murder” — The real-life wedding between Ramon Dailey, Quarters museum tour — writer and director, and Tiela Fort Worden State Park, noon Short, one of the actresses. to 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120 children. Phone 360-385-1003. Spinnaker Place, Port Ludlow, Port Townsend Marine Sci5 p.m. Tickets $50 at www. b r o w n p a p e r t i c k e t s . c o m / ence Center — Fort Worden event/110125 or phone Bob State Park. Natural history and Logue 360-385-2571 Ex 6324. marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for Visit www.ptmystery.com. youth (6-17); free for science Bingo — Booster Club, center members. “Whales in Corey Lane, Brinnon, 6:45 Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ p.m. ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. TeenLab — Local teens org. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com.

0A5100353

Foster parent benefit — Dine at Applebee’s, 130 River Road, and 15 percent of food order will be donated to the North Olympic Foster Parent Association. 11 a.m. to midnight. Inform server before placing order. Phone 360-6839090.

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Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits Clean-up work party — interpret the Harbor Defenses Volunteers clean Dungeness of Puget Sound and the Strait River Audubon Center, Rail- of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360road Bridge Park, 2151 W. 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ Hendrickson Road, 9 a.m. to olypen.com. noon. Phone the Audubon at 360-681-4076 or e-mail Jefferson County Historirivercenter@olympus.net. cal Museum and shop — 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous — Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Literature meeting at St. Luke’s children 3 to 12; free to historiEpiscopal Church, 525 N. Fifth cal society members. Exhibits St., 10 a.m. Phone 360-452- include “Jefferson County’s 0227. Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native AmeriSequim Museum & Arts cans” and “The Chinese in Center — “Autumn on the Early Port Townsend.” Phone Olympic Peninsula.” 175 W. 360-385-1003 or visit www. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. jchsmuseum.org. Free. Phone 360-683-8110. Port Townsend Marine SciHoliday Nature Mart —Gifts ence Center — Fort Worden for people, pets and birds; State Park. Natural history and crafts; wreathmaking; bake marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. sale; live birds; food; and more. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for Dungeness River Audubon youth (6-17); free for science Center, Railroad Bridge Park, center members. “Whales in 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, 10 Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone a.m. to 4 p.m. Supports River 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ Center and Railroad Bridge ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. Park. Visit www.Dungeness org. RiverCenter.org or phone 360Conversation Cafe — Vic683-1355. torian Square Deli, 940 Water Birds of Prey — Learn how St., No. 1, noon. Phone 360Raptor Center restores wildlife 385-6959 or visit www. to health. Dungeness River conversationcafe.org. Topic: Audubon Center, Railroad Critical Mass. Bridge Park, 2151 W. HendrickQuilcene Historical son Road, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free, but donations accepted. Museum — 151 E. Columbia Part of Holiday Nature Mart. St., by appointment. Artifacts, Visit www.DungenessRiver documents, family histories Center.org or phone 360-683- and photos of Quilcene and 1355.

Friday, November 19, 2010


C6

FaithReligion

Friday, November 19, 2010

Hajj

Peninsula Daily News

Give thanks on every day of the year

ritual

Muslim pilgrims cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called “Jamarat,” the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina, near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday. The annual pilgrimage draws 2.5 million visitors a year, making it the largest gathering of people in the world.

The Associated Press

Pastor asks married church leaders to stop Facebooking By Wayne Parry

The Associated Press

NEPTUNE, N.J. — Thou shalt not commit adultery. And thou also shalt not use Facebook. That’s the edict from a New Jersey pastor who feels the two often go together. The Rev. Cedric Miller said 20 couples among the 1,100 members of his Living Word Christian Fellowship Church have run into marital trouble over the last six months after a spouse connected with an ex-flame over Facebook. Because of the problems, he is ordering about 50 married church officials to delete their accounts with the social networking site or resign from their leadership positions. He had previously asked

married congregants to share their login information with their spouses and now plans to suggest they give up Facebook altogether. “I’ve been in extended counseling with couples with marital problems because of Facebook for the last year and a half,” he said. “What happens is someone from yesterday surfaces, it leads to conversations, and there have been physical meet-ups. “The temptation is just too great.”

Practice preaching Miller is married and has a Facebook account that he uses to keep in touch with six children. But he will heed his own advice — and will cancel his account this weekend.

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service Mass: Saturday Vigil 5 p.m. Sunday 8:30 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Confession: Half hour before all Masses & 4-5 p.m. Saturdays Youth Religious Ed Classes: Sundays 9:35-10:35 a.m. at Parish School Life Teen Night: Sunday 6-7:30 p.m. at Parish Hall Eucharistic Adoration: Fri. 9:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. Sat.

On Sunday, he plans to “strongly suggest” that all married people stop using Facebook, lest they endanger their marriage. “The advice will go to the entire church,” he said. “They’ll hear what I’m asking of my church leadership. “I won’t mandate it for the entire congregation, but I hope people will follow my advice.”

Pulpit warnings Miller said he has spoken from the pulpit before about the dangers of Facebook, asking married couples to give each other their passwords to the site. “Some did,” he said. “Others got scared and deleted their accounts right away.

“And some felt it was none of my business and continued on.” Miller said he has gotten a mostly positive response so far among the leaders subject to his edict, which was first reported by the Asbury (N.J.) Park Press. Pat Dawson, a minister at the church, uses her Facebook account to see photos of her relatives. She is unmarried and therefore not required to delete her account, but she agrees with Miller about the dangers such sites can create. “I know he feels very strongly about this,” she said. “It can be a useful tool, but it also can cause great problems in a relationship. “If your spouse won’t give you his or her password, you’ve got a problem.”

Worship Hours: 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages: 9:45 a.m. Nursery Provided: Both services

“The One We Follow”

Sunday 9:30 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936 www.thecrossingchurch.net

Services: Saturday at 1 p.m.

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

Pastor Neil Castle

Teaching the principles of Science of Mind SUNDAY 10 a.m. Services

6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services

Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

(Disciples of Christ)

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

Scandia Hall, 131 W. 5th St., P. A.

A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship

SUNDAY 9:15 a.m. Study Hour 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 360-504-1950

SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship 4:00 p.m. Youth Group portangelesumc@tfon.com www.gbgm-umc.org/portangelesfumc

SUNDAY

9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study

Saturday, 5:00 p.m. Sunday, 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Confessions: 4:00 - 4:45 p.m. Saturday

Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Fam ily friendly

Issues of faith Suzanne

give thanks.” During one week, we are encouraged to actively practice gratitude by saying thank you to every person who does even the slightest thing that is helpful or beneficial to us throughout the day. The other week’s task is to find something that is good in every situation and acknowledge it as good. By paying attention to the trait of gratitude, it becomes “an invitation to sensitize yourself to the good and to the gifts in your life at every moment, even if at that same moment there happens to be difficulties,” Morinis wrote. Rabbi Chaim Stern said: “What I have is so much more important than what I lack — a family, friends, enough to eat and drink, a place to live in, work to do, my feelings, my hopes and dreams — how can I not give thanks for this?” If only we could learn to make gratitude a part of our everyday lives, how much more serene we would become. The sense of calm and peace would not only heal us spiritually, but physically as well. Rabbi Mordechai Gifter told us: “We humans have a tendency to always want more. Therefore, it is easy to forget to feel grateful and happy with the good that we already have. “We should strive to feel a joy that is complete. Lack of joy with what we have is destructive both spiritually and physically.” Thousands of years ago, the importance of gratitude to God for our blessings was clear. “It is good to give thanks to the Lord and to sing praises to Your name, O Most High, to proclaim Your goodness in the morning and Your faithfulness at night” (Psalms 92: 1-2). As we continue through this season of joyous holidays from many different traditions, let us learn to look for the good and be thankful, even if we face difficulties in our lives. When we open ourselves to gratitude, we learn to recognize the good that we already have. This then enables us to “awaken to the good and give thanks.” Kein yehi ratzon. May it be God’s will. Shalom.

DeBey

________

Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven by seven religious leaders on the North Olympic Peninsula. Suzanne DeBey is a lay member of the Port Angeles Jewish community.

Briefly . . . St. Andrew’s sets service of thanks PORT ANGELES — St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., will hold a service of Thanksgiving at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The service will be followed by homemade doughnuts and hot apple cider. It is a nondenominational service of music, prayer and candlelight. Thanks will be given to

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Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Worship: 11 a.m. Praise and Fellowship Service 6 p.m. Nursery Available

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In our fast-moving world where our families are often spread out across the globe, the ability to gather together, sit down to a holiday meal and share fond memories is something in which we should revel. On Thanksgiving, it is natural that we reflect on such blessings because that’s what the holiday is about. But what about the rest of the year? It’s easy to be thankful when we are surrounded by our loved ones at an abundant table. However, it’s sometimes difficult to express gratitude in our everyday lives when we are burdened with worries about our jobs, health, finances and the well-being of our families. We can forget to be grateful for what we do have in the midst of our complaints about what we lack. To make sure we stay focused on the beauty in our lives, Jewish tradition tells us we should say a hundred blessings a day. Imagine if you had to stop a hundred times to say a blessing over something in your life for which you were thankful. Not only would your day be consumed with the actual reciting of the blessings, but you would have to be constantly vigilant, noting any small thing that would call for a blessing. Who would have time to complain?! A Chasidic saying reminds us of how easily we forget to notice the good in our lives: “How full of wonders the world is! And yet we take our little hand, cover our eyes and see nothing!” One of the ways Jews remind themselves to always be appreciative of the beauty in their lives is to recite the Shehechyanu, a special blessing said every time we experience something for the first time or when an event has not occurred for a long time. The translation is: “Blessed are you, ruler of the universe who has given me life, sustained me, and brought me to this moment.” It can be said when seeing a natural wonder, experiencing something important or feeling moved by anything of beauty or importance. It reminds us, not only of the good in our lives, but also the Source from which it has come. The Jewish practice of Mussar deems gratitude as a trait upon which we should reflect often in our daily lives. In Alan Morinis’ book Every Day, Holy Day, twice a year for one week, gratitude is the theme. During those weeks, we are to read a brief passage about being grateful, and throughout the day, we remember the phrase, “Awaken to the good and

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

Peninsula Daily News

God for “all that we are, all that we have and respond with praise.” The public is welcome.

Day of reflection PORT TOWNSEND — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1020 Jefferson St., will observe Advent Reflection Day from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-379-9159.

Sunday’s lesson PORT ANGELES — The Rev. John Wingfield will lead Sunday worship at Unity in the Olympics, 2917 E. Myrtle St., with “The Power of Thanks Giving” on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Sunday school will be held at the same time. Meditation time will be in the sanctuary from 10:15 a.m. to 10:25 a.m. Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, November 19-20, 2010

Business

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Politics & Environment

Raising retirement age will hurt poor, study says By Stephen Ohlemacher choice but to turn to the The Associated Press broken disability program.” Under current law, peoWASHINGTON — Rais- ple can start drawing ing the retirement age for reduced, early retirement Social Security would dis- benefits from Social Secuproportionately hurt low- rity at age 62. income workers and minorities, and increase disability Moving the threshold claims by older people Full benefits are availunable to work, government able at 66, a threshold gradauditors told Congress. The projected spike in ually increasing to 67 for disability claims could harm people who were born in Social Security’s finances 1960 or later. The deficit commission’s because disability benefits typically are higher than leaders, Democrat Erskine early retirement payments, Bowles and Republican the Government Account- Alan Simpson, last week proposed a gradual increase ability Office concluded. The report, obtained by in the full retirement age, to The Associated Press ahead 69 in about 2075. The early retirement age of its scheduled release would go to 64 the same today, provides fodder for year. those opposed to raising the Under their plan, the eligibility age for benefits, new thresholds wouldn’t be as proposed by the leaders fully phased in until today’s of President Obama’s deficit 4-year-olds are ready to commission. retire. “There’s more to consider AARP criticized the recthan simply how much ommendations, and House money the program would Speaker Nancy Pelosi, save by raising the retire- D-Calif., called them “unacment age,” said Sen. Herb ceptable.” Kohl, D-Wis., chairman of Experts, however, warn the Senate Special Commit- that Social Security is on a tee on Aging. financially unsustainable The report shows an path that will worsen as unequal effect on certain people live longer and colgroups of people, he said lect more benefits. Thursday, and many of For many workers, them “would have little reducing early retirement

payments or delaying eligibility would provide an incentive to put off retiring, resulting in more earnings and potentially more savings for later in life, according to the watchdog agency’s report. But it “could create a financial hardship for those who cannot continue to work because of poor health or demanding workplace conditions,” the report said. The report, requested by Kohl’s committee, draws on research by outside groups as well as interviews with Social Security officials and data from the Social Security Administration.

Health condition About one-fourth of workers age 60 and 61 — just under the early retirement age — reported a health condition that limited their ability to work. Among those older workers, blacks and Hispanics were much more likely to report fair or poor health than whites, according to the report. Less healthy older workers had lower incomes, less accumulated wealth and were much less likely to have attended college. “Some people just can’t continue to work beyond

age 62 for either health reasons or they’re just not able to find jobs,” said David Certner, legislative policy director for AARP. “Just because we tell people they should work longer doesn’t mean that there are employers out there willing to hire people.” Workers older than 55 are less likely than younger workers to lose their jobs, the report said. But when older workers get laid off, they are less likely to find other employment. Nearly 54 million retirees, disabled workers, surviving spouses and children now get Social Security. Payments for retired workers average $1,020 a month; disability benefits average $929 a month. In 75 years, 122 million people, or one-fourth of the population, will be drawing benefits. On its current path, Social Security is projected to run out of money by 2037, largely because of aging baby boomers reaching retirement. The longer action is delayed, the harder it will get to shore up the program, government auditors say..

2 Olympic Medical Center therapists pass certification Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Olympic Medical Center Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation therapists Jonathan Wolff and Chris Shaw recently passed the American Physical Therapy Association’s orthopedic specialist certification exam. Wolff and Shaw are now certified clinic specialists in orthopedic physical therapy, which allows them to treat patients with complex musculoskeletal ailments and achieve clinical outcomes through improved diagnostic and advanced clinical practice skills. “I am very pleased that Jon and Chris have joined fellow therapists Rick Klawitter and Gloria Andrus in this achievement,” said Ken Berkes, director of OMC’s rehabili-

tation services. To obtain board certification, candidates must submit evidence of required clinical practice in a specialty area and complete a written examination demonstrating specialized knowledge and advanced clinical proficiency in a specialty area of physical therapy practice.

76,000 nationwide The American Physical Therapy Association represents more than 76,000 physical therapists, physical therapist assistants and students of physical therapy nationwide. The American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties awarded specialist certification to nearly 1,000 physical therapists this year across the U.S.

GM shares jump on Wall Street The New York Times

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Advisers issued a report Thursday concluding that the contentious law that targeted the recession has been a significant factor in the recovery. The report says the stimulus has created or saved 2.7 million to 3.7 million jobs through the third quarter of this year. Obama economists predicted in early 2009 that the stimulus would save or create 3.5 million jobs. Unemployment, however, is at 9.6 percent. And the report comes after an election in which voters appeared to reject assertions by Obama and Democrats that they had pulled the country out of an economic quagmire.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Thursday. Aluminum - $1.0088 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.6939 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.8305 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $2221.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9434 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1350.25 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1352.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $26.910 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $26.830 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum - $1656.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1663.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu.

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SPOKANE — Sterling Financial Corp., with its shares currently trading on the NASDAQ stock exchange at around 25 cents, said it will conduct a 1-for-66 reverse stock split in an effort to raise its stock price. Sterling Financial is the Spokane-based holding company of Sterling Savings Bank, which has branches in Port Angeles and Forks. Sterling has been successfully fighting back financially after huge losses on construction and real estate loans brought it to the brink of failing. NASDAQ trading requirements include that shares listed on the exchange must trade above $1 — a price that Sterling’s shares haven’t achieved since April 30. The reverse stock split will become effective at the opening of trading today. Sterling’s shareholders approved the idea in October. “After consideration of our alternatives, the board determined that a reverse split of Sterling’s common shares is in the best interest of shareholders — maintaining our listing on NASDAQ provides the company with greater flexibility to financially and strategically support the company,” said Greg Seibly, president and CEO.

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PORT ANGELES — Bay Variety hosts its annual Holiday Open House on Saturday and Sunday with discounted merchandise, refreshments and an in-store drawing. Bay Variety, 135 W. First St., was recognized as the Port Angeles Downtown Association’s Business of the Month for its years of community service as an “anchor store” downtown. For more information about this weekend’s open house, phone 360-4575200.

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Olympic Medical Center Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation therapists Jonathan Wolff, left, and Chris Shaw recently passed the American Physical Therapy Association’s orthopedic specialist certification exam.

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WASHINGTON — The Peninsula Daily News White House said the and The Associated Press $800 billion stimulus law passed in the early days of the Obama administraHow’s the fishing? tion continues to improve Matt Schubert reports. economic conditions and Fridays in increase employment. President Obama’s Peninsula Daily News Council of Economic

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NEW YORK — Shares of General Motors surged Thursday in their New York Stock Exchange debut. GM’s shares gained $1.19 to close at $34.19, up 3.6 percent from their initial public offering price of $33. Earlier, the shares had risen as high as $35.99. Trading volume was heavy, with more than 450 million shares exchanging hands. The offering, which raised $23.1 billion, is bigger and more ambitious than had once seemed possible. But the recently bankrupt automaker will have to build on its revival for the government to recoup its entire $50 billion investment and validate President Obama’s administra-

tion’s decision to keep GM from collapsing. To break even, the Treasury Department will need to sell its remaining 500 million shares at an average price of $53 each in the months and years to come. And while the administration may retain great influence over GM, it may not be able to keep stoking the enthusiasm investors have shown for its stock in recent days. Still, now that General Motors has shown that it can be profitable, a complete exit by the government could happen even within the next two years. With the offering, GM is shedding its ties to the government faster than expected, cutting the Treasury Department’s ownership stake to 26 percent, from nearly 61 percent.

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Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Self-help housing breaks ground in PA Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Housing Authority of the County of Clallam has broken ground on eight homes to be built by families at Peninsula Village through the Mutual Self Help Housing Program. A groundbreaking ceremony was held at the construction site at Village Place and Village Circle Road, off Lindberg Road, just south of Peninsula Golf Course.

Homeowners’ labor The eight homes will be built with 65 percent of the labor coming from the homeowners. Funding and support has been provided by: ■  U.S. Department of Agriculture, including a Rural Development technical assistance grant of $477,640 to pay for staff, equipment and administration of the program and Rural Development direct loans to homeowners to cover lot and construction costs. These funds are administered through the Rural Development office in Port Angeles.

■  Department of Housing and Urban Development SHOP funding of $120,000 through Community Frameworks to buy and develop land. SHOP stands for self-help homeownership. ■  Down payment assistance in the form of deferred payment loans from the Port Angeles Realtors Association and the Washington State Housing Trust Fund. Peninsula Village families represent a cross section of the community: young families, senior citizens, single adults, families with no children, singleparent households and those with disabilities. The Mutual Self Help Housing Program also has another project slated to begin in early 2011. The program is accepting applications from households interested in becoming homeowners. The Housing Authority of the County of Clallam provides prepurchase counseling and education, credit repair and access to downVivian Elvis Hansen/Peninsula Daily News payment assistance. For more information, Construction Supervisor Bruce McCoppen stands by one of the eight homes being built by phone 360-452-7631, families enrolled in the Housing Authority of the County of Clallam Mutual Self Help Housing Program. ext. 22.

Military writing medal earned by Sequim man Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Sequim resident Stewart M. Harris recently received the 2010 Military Writers Society of America Gold Medal for his book, Shore Duty, A Year in Vietnam’s Junk Force. The book took top honors in the Military History/Navy category. An Illinois native, Harris received an electrical engineering degree at Iowa State University before being commissioned in the Navy in 1964. After two tours on destroyers, Harris was assigned for one year as

a senior adviser with Coastal Group 16, South Vietnam. The three previous senior advisers had been killed by a sniper, a mistaken bomb drop by the U.S. Air Force and when the base was overrun. Shore Duty is the story of Harris’ year as the senior adviser. He was honored at the Military Writers Society of America conference in Pittsburgh. Shore Duty is available at Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., and online at www. barnesandnoble.com and www.amazon.com.

On stage, behind scenes roles filled Local group at arts booking conference Peninsula Daily News

BELLEVUE — The recent annual Arts Northwest Booking Conference was attended by more than 15 North Olympic Peninsula performers, presenters and supporters of the arts. Port Angeles resident Karen Hanan, executive director of Arts Northwest, arranged for Grammy Award-winning singer Kathy Mattea to deliver the keynote speech that was given a standing ovation by the 375 in attendance at the

three-day conference. The Arts Northwest organization has partnered with performing artists and presenters for more than 30 years. The conference included performances by more than 50 artists and groups who tour the country to entertain and educate. Included were classical music on piano and violin, singers, dramatic readings, puppetry and ballet and hiphop dancers. For more information about Arts Northwest, visit www.artsnw.org, e-mail admin@artsnw.org or phone 360-457-9290.

Help for animals needed Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society is seeking donations of cat and kitten food and nonclumping cat litter. All animal kennels are filled to capacity with adoptable dogs, cats, kittens and puppies. Foster homes are needed

Death Notices Tea Rose Beil Oct. 10, 1923 — Nov. 18, 2010

Cub Scouts help out with bridge project SEQUIM — Webelos and parents from Sequim Cub Scout Pack 4490 recently dug more than 130 trees and shrubs at Lazy J Tree Farm. Their project was related to the redesign of the approach at the Dungeness River at Railroad Bridge Park last spring. Peninsula Trails Coalition purchased native plants from the Clallam Country Conservation District’s winter plant sale and planted them at Lazy J Tree Farm through the generosity of owner Steve Johnson. The plants the Cub Scout volunteers dug up were taken to Railroad Bridge Park and transplanted by Peninsula Trails Coalition volunteers. For more information about this project and Peninsula Trails Coalition, phone Cherie Pickett at 360-681-4830 or e-mail cheriepickett@wavecable. com.

Webelos and parents from Cub Scout Pack 4490 participating in the project at Lazy J Tree Farm include, from left, Doug Jensen, Jazen Bartee, Jim Bartee, Alliyah Weber, Carl Weber, Lyle Kingsley, Sean Weber, Robby Streett, Thomas McCulloch, Sandy McCulloch, Nickolas Kingsley, Kyle Morton, Joe Morton, Robert Streett, Liam Braaten, Juan Joy, Kenneth Joy and Dylan Jensen.

— goals also supported by First Step,” Rees said. “The children had so much fun in the wet clay with Rosalynn,” said Three Bears Educare Director Ani Benitez. Holiday project “Through this activity PORT ANGELES — with Aglazing Art, our chilFirst Step Family Support dren have created a memCenter recently partnered ory of their tiny hands to with Aglazing Art Studio remember these precious for a holiday craft project. years forever.” Children from First Aglazing Art Studio is Step’s Three Bears Educare located at 713 E. First St. program pressed their For more information, hands into clay to create a phone 360-797-1278. keepsake for holiday gift giving. Lavender bazaar Supplies and assistance SEQUIM — The Sequim were donated by Aglazing Lavender Growers AssociaArt Studio. tion will hold its eighth “As a locally owned busiannual Lavender Holiday ness, we are committed to Bazaar at Carrie Blake help make a difference in Park, 202 N. Blake Ave., our community,” said from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. SaturAglazing Art Studio owner day, Nov. 27. Rosalynn Rees. Raffle tickets will be “First Step Family Sup- sold for a chance to win gift port Center is an integral baskets filled with Sequim part of this community, lavender products and a providing support and edu- lavender-decorated Christcation to local families with mas tree. small children. Proceeds from the raffle “I believe that art is a will be donated to the Dungeness Valley Health & means to bridge gaps Wellness Clinic. between people of all ages For more information, and demographics, and it is phone 360-582-1345. a great way to express Peninsula Daily News unity, friendship and love

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for these animals. The hours for Olympic Peninsula Humane Society have changed. The society is open Monday through Friday from noon to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, phone 360-457-8206.

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Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Prickly City • “Cathy” has been retired; we’re auditioning this comic. Share your thoughts: comics@peninsuladailynews.com.

Friday, November 19, 2010

Self-respect is key to net a good catch DEAR ABBY: I’m a 33-year-old male who has finally found the love of my life. My girlfriend and I have been together for three years. Needless to say, an engagement is right around the corner. I have a sister who has struggled her entire life dating the wrong men. She’s beautiful inside and out. She called me last night crying, asking me why men always cheat on her. Most people would assume that the use of the word “always” is an exaggeration. I would have to say that 90 percent of her boyfriends have, indeed, cheated on her one way or another — whether it was in high school or when she dated a race car driver or, more recently, an acquaintance of mine. What can I say to reassure her that there are some good guys left in this world who won’t cheat? Looking for Answers for Sis

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Looking for Answers: Tell your sister that there are men with character who take relationships seriously. They may not be as glamorous as a race car driver or flashy or glib, but they have more important qualities to offer. Point out that when one man after another is unfaithful, it can damage a woman’s self-esteem. And when that happens, it can make her insecure and willing to suspend her better judgment out of fear that she’ll be alone. Explain that women with high self-esteem receive more respect because they won’t settle for less and they don’t jump into relationships — they wait for a man to prove himself. Men value more highly what they have to work for. Perhaps that will help to set her straight.

Frank & Ernest

Dear Abby: I have lived an amazing life surrounded by family, friends and loved ones. My parents and maternal grandparents are still active in my daily life. Because I am so close to all of them, I’m scared, worried and sometimes downright depressed at the thought of losing any of them. I know in the circle of life, death should be accepted as the next great adventure, but I don’t know if I can handle that. I’m asking for advice on how to handle these events now. I do not have family near me but an amazing circle of friends for sup-

Garfield

Momma

dear abby Abigail

Van Buren

port. I just know that I’m going to slip into a world of sadness that I’m afraid I won’t come out of. My problems may seem minor in light of today’s issues, but I do need guidance. Selfish in Las Vegas

Dear Selfish: The concerns you are feeling are not “selfish.” They are normal, if somewhat premature. You are fortunate to have your parents and grandparents in your life — if only through phone calls and e-mails. You are also lucky to have supportive friends nearby. The hardest part of grieving the loss of a loved one is regret about words that were never said. So tell your parents and grandparents often how much you love and appreciate them. See them when you can. And continue to be the kind of person of whom they can be proud because when they are gone, you will be their legacy. Dear Abby: Please tell me how to tell my husband of 25 years, who has different political views than mine, to shut up during news shows and comedies and mysteries I watch on my TV — not his — within earshot of his office. He insists on coming in while I’m trying to concentrate and blasting his views whether I want to hear them or not. Frustrated in Dayton, Ohio Dear Frustrated: You can’t completely ignore your husband’s rants, but when you’re trying to devote your attention to one of your favorite TV shows, some headphones might lessen the distraction. Contact your local electronics store for suggestions.

_________

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): Use a little more aggression but don’t become stubborn. You need to find a balance that allows you to finish what you are doing without upsetting someone with whom you deal regularly. Financial gain is apparent. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Emotional opportunities can turn your life around. The more information you have, the easier it will be to make the right move. A money matter can lead to a disagreement. Make sure you pay old debts. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Lay your plans out for everyone to see. There will be strength in numbers. Enjoying what you are doing to earn a living or falling for someone you work with are both likely. Don’t compromise. 3 stars

Elderberries

Dennis the Menace

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Doonesbury

presentation if you expect to get ahead. Someone is likely to make you look bad in order to gain control. Don’t underestimate the competition. You have to keep a close watch on what others do and offer. 2 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The changes you want to make will be opposed. Hidden costs may take you by surprise if you haven’t been keeping a close tab on everything. An argument can easily change the family dynamics, leading to an irreversible problem that may need legal or psychological help to mend. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A relationship may cost you but, in the end, it will be worth every penny you spent. Changes at home will lead to a happy environment and a better lifestyle. Your dedication will pay off and will enhance your reputation. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Give greater thought and time to improving your skills and adding to what you have to offer. Advancement can be yours if you are open about your plans and get everything in writing. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This is the perfect time to put your game plan to work. Present your skills to people who can use your services. You can make change happen if you are innovative in the way you approach tasks. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You have to give your own

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Being secretive

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

will spare you grief. If you are too open about what you want to see happen or what you plan to do, you will face all sorts of problems. You could alienate someone you want to continue to have in your life. Don’t cause unnecessary friction. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll have more control working behind the scenes and doing things that are not visible to your colleagues, friends or family. The element of surprise is the best way to get what you want. Make sure you have a well laid out plan. 5 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Overspending on things you don’t need will come back to haunt you when someone comes by to collect an old debt. Don’t leave yourself in a precarious position that might affect your credit or reputation. Love is in the stars. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You can get ahead professionally if you work hard and approach people in a position to help you. Letting people know what you are capable of doing will aid you in finding a position with greater responsibility and higher income. 4 stars


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

SaTurday

Sunday

Yesterday

Monday

TueSday

High 41

Low 31

39/27

35/26

36/26

39/32

Periods of rain.

Rain.

Rather cloudy, showers around; chilly.

Cold with clouds and sunshine.

Cold with times of clouds and sun.

Plenty of sunshine, but chilly.

The Peninsula It will remain cool and wet across the Olympic Peninsula today as another low pressure system spins off the coast. The air mass in place when the system arrives should be cool enough to allow for snow at a low 500 feet and above. Snow levels this low Neah Bay Port in November are highly unusual and are a result of an 42/35 Townsend arctic air mass taking hold that will keep conditions chilly Port Angeles 43/35 through the weekend. The low should slowly edge south41/31 ward as the weekend progresses, but the possibility for Sequim showers will linger through Sunday with temperatures 43/34 staying low. Forks

Victoria 42/33

Port Ludlow 43/34

42/32

Olympia 42/31

Seattle 42/34

Spokane 38/23

Yakima Kennewick 40/24 45/29

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Occasional rain today. Wind from the northeast at 8-16 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Periods of rain mixing with snow tonight. Wind from the northeast at 12-25 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mostly cloudy and chilly tomorrow with a couple of showers. Wind east-northeast at 8-16 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Table Location High Tide LaPush

10:06 a.m. 11:16 p.m. Port Angeles 2:18 a.m. 11:33 a.m. Port Townsend 4:03 a.m. 1:18 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:24 a.m. 12:39 p.m.

Today

Sun & Moon

Moon Phases Full

Last

New

Friday, November 19, 2010 Seattle 42/34

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

8.6’ 7.1’ 6.4’ 6.9’ 7.7’ 8.3’ 7.2’ 7.8’

4:06 a.m. 4:55 p.m. 6:42 a.m. 7:14 p.m. 7:56 a.m. 8:28 p.m. 7:49 a.m. 8:21 p.m.

2.6’ 0.1’ 4.8’ -0.4’ 6.2’ -0.5’ 5.8’ -0.5’

10:43 a.m. ----2:58 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 4:43 a.m. 1:45 p.m. 4:04 a.m. 1:06 p.m.

8.8’ --6.9’ 7.0’ 8.3’ 8.4’ 7.8’ 7.9’

Sunday

Low Tide Ht 4:50 a.m. 5:37 p.m. 7:27 a.m. 7:44 p.m. 8:41 a.m. 8:58 p.m. 8:34 a.m. 8:51 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

2.8’ -0.3’ 5.2’ -0.9’ 6.7’ -1.2’ 6.3’ -1.1’

High Tide Ht 12:04 a.m. 11:20 a.m. 3:36 a.m. 12:27 p.m. 5:21 a.m. 2:12 p.m. 4:42 a.m. 1:33 p.m.

7.4’ 8.9’ 7.2’ 7.0’ 8.7’ 8.4’ 8.2’ 7.9’

Low Tide Ht 5:33 a.m. 6:18 p.m. 8:10 a.m. 8:17 p.m. 9:24 a.m. 9:31 p.m. 9:17 a.m. 9:24 p.m.

3.0’ -0.6’ 5.4’ -1.3’ 7.0’ -1.7’ 6.6’ -1.6’

Nov 28

Dec 5

First

Dec 13

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 67 60 sh Baghdad 81 54 s Beijing 52 38 s Brussels 47 36 c Cairo 83 63 s Calgary 6 -6 c Edmonton 9 -11 s Hong Kong 74 65 s Jerusalem 79 57 s Johannesburg 71 55 t Kabul 66 28 s London 50 43 pc Mexico City 73 41 pc Montreal 34 29 pc Moscow 36 32 c New Delhi 82 48 s Paris 52 41 c Rio de Janeiro 83 74 s Rome 56 49 s Stockholm 36 32 pc Sydney 70 60 pc Tokyo 60 50 s Toronto 44 30 pc Vancouver 40 30 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

San Francisco 57/47

Denver 59/25

CASH BACK

New York 48/41 Detroit Chicago 49/31 52/30

Kansas City 54/33

Los Angeles 68/56

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

Washington 54/39

Atlanta 64/39

Houston 67/49 Miami 79/68

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 60 27 48 64 49 52 40 24 25 44 46 46 68 54 52 56 38 46 66 59 48 49 44 16 28 81 67 36

Lo W 33 s 8s 36 r 39 s 34 s 33 s 21 c 13 sn 8 pc 32 c 36 s 34 pc 41 s 28 pc 30 pc 39 s 20 sn 35 r 47 s 25 s 22 pc 31 pc 33 r 4 sf 7 sn 68 sh 49 s 16 s

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 54 68 61 68 79 48 38 64 71 48 61 46 78 80 50 75 44 59 54 61 62 52 69 64 57 36 39 54

Lo W 33 s 51 s 44 s 56 pc 68 pc 27 pc 15 pc 40 s 56 s 41 s 38 s 23 pc 56 s 52 s 38 s 54 s 36 r 38 s 34 pc 42 pc 39 s 40 pc 49 s 57 pc 47 pc 16 pc 22 sn 39 s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 85 at Indio, CA

Low: 2 at Alamosa, CO

No Payment Till Spring*

0B5102567

Up to $6,000

Minneapolis 38/15

Billings 24/13

El Paso 70/36

Sunset today ................... 4:32 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:28 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 3:06 p.m. Moonset today ................. 5:27 a.m.

Nov 21

Everett 44/32

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 47 31 0.03 9.95 Forks 45 33 0.57 107.99 Seattle 44 35 0.18 36.97 Sequim 48 33 0.01 8.62 Hoquiam 46 37 0.74 59.08 Victoria 44 31 0.13 26.78 P. Townsend* 47 42 0.26 14.10 *Data from www.ptguide.com

-10s -0s

Bellingham 40/29 Aberdeen 45/37

Peninsula Daily News

*Deferred payments are good for contracts up to 60 months. 120 day deferred plan.

Now you can place your classified ad 24/7! Try our new Classified Wizard — www.peninsuladailynews.com

- $16,500 Must Go!

0B5103476


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

D1

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S ! FASHIONABLE GIFTS Great dog gifts. Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church Bizarre, 9-3 p.m., Sat.11/20, 923 N. Sequim Blvd. GARAGE Sale: Fri., 10-2 p.m., 33 S. Alder Lane, Four Seasons Park. Propane fireplace, yard tools, appliances, furniture, and more. Everything must go, make offers. P.A.: Water view 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage. $1150/mo. 452-1016

P.A.: 2 Br. quiet, clean. TOY POODLES: 8 No smoke/pets $675 wk. old black male, 1 6 mo female tri-color mo., dep. 457-0928. phantom. $550 ea. 477-8349 RECEPTIONIST Part-time, week- TOYOTA: ‘91 Corolla. ends, holidays, on 4 dr, 5 speed, good call. Apply in pershape, runs good, son. 520 E. Park 30+ mpg. $1,650/ Ave., P.A. obo. 452-8788.

23

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. All black, long hair, very friendly, Mantle Rd., Sequim. 683-0050.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

FOUND: Cat. Short hair tortoise hair, very friendly, Gellor and Blue Mtn. Rd., P.A. 417-0173 FOUND: Cockatiel or similar type. 941-716-2043

I love you. I’m sorry. Please forgive me. Thank you.

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Blackberry phone. Discovery Trail near Robin Hill Park, Sequim. 681-4784

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

SUPER ECLECTIC SALE 507 Holgerson (off Hogback & Lotzgesell) Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m. Antique Furnishings, Shabby Chic, Art, Leather Sectional Sofa, Queen/Twin Beds, Linens, Kitchenware, Books, Rugs, Lamps, Book Shelves, Bosch Washer & Dryer, Yard & Garden Art & Furniture, Vintage Diecast Cars, More!! Warm Indoor Sale. PENINSULA ESTATE SALES

LOST: Cat. Indooronly cat lost in No. Beach, P.T., neighborhood. “Sister” short-hair, black and white tuxedo, very agile, has microchip. If you see or are able to catch her please call or email. Thank you! 360-385-9757 jwoodbri@uoregon.ed u LOST: Cat. Last seen 11/6, House Road, Sequim. Big black and white tuxedo, 20 plus pounds, male, microchip. 683-3000 LOST: Child’s coat. Shiny purple with Disney Ariel on the back, last seen at Roosevelt School, P.A. 460-6814.

Lost and Found

LOST: Cockatiel, yellow. Hospital area, PA. 452-0931. LOST: Wallet, brown leather, “Tool”, Sun. night in Sequim. 683-3195

25

Personals

HOLIDAY/SANTA The holidays are coming and Santa has a very special early gift for that right lady who wants a special life with a love and togetherness she has never had before. She has to be non-smoker, no drugs, and close to HWP. Santas gift is a white male, 60, HWP, who is very affectionate, romantic, caring, giving from his heart, down to earth, loves the outdoors and animals, home life, with a sense of humor, honesty and respect are very important also. Now Santa is just waiting for the right lady to unwrap her early gift which could be her soul mate for eternity. littlewilddeer@yahoo .com

LOST: Ladies engagement ring. Home Depot or Costco, Sequim areas. Glaly will pay reward if found. 460-9432.

The missing piece to your home selling success.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31 sula P enin if ied s s C la 4 3 5 4 52 - 8

Accountant. Accountant to perform technical and administrative accounting work for fast growing manufacturing company. Bachelors degree in Accounting required. Experience in Manufacturing preferred. Must be detail-oriented, a positive attitude, with excellent attendance. Benefits, paid vacation, and 401(k) contribution. Apply through WorkSource, Clallam County or if out of area www.go2worksource.com, job WA2116991.

AIR FLO HEATING CO. Hiring only the best always. All positions available. Wage DOE. Medical, dental, retirement, holiday pay, vacation. Candidates must have a valid driver’s license, will be drug tested and background checked. Apply in person at 221 W. Cedar St., Sequim, or submit resume to airfloheating.com ASSURED HOSPICE LHC Group RN/PART-TIME TEMPORARY FOR COMMUNITY LIASON Seeking motivated individuals to enhance our expanding program. For application call 360-582-3796

CAREGIVERS Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com

CAREGIVING IS A JOY Serve the elderly with a smile and receive personal satisfaction, provide non medical companionship and help for the elderly. Hiring evenings and weekends only. Call Mon.Fri., 9-5. 681-2511. LEGAL ASSISTANT FOR LAW FIRM Word processing and paralegal responsibilities plus some bookkeeping. Requires 65+ wpm with accuracy in Word, excellent client service skills. Must be detail-oriented and able to multi-task. Includes benefits. Send cover letter, resume, and references to Greenaway, Gay & Tulloch

Nippon Paper Industries is currently looking to fill the following positions: •Multi-craft Mechanic: Journeyman status is required. Candidates must be willing to work rotating shifts. •E & I Technician Journeyman status is required. Candidates must be willing to work rotating shifts. •Extra Board: Must be 18 years of age or older. Candidates must be able to work rotating 12 hour shifts and adapt to ever changing shift patterns, holding multiple positions within a week including nights and weekends. To apply, contact WorkSource at: 228 W. 1st Street, Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 360-457-2103 www.go2worksource .com AA/EOE

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. Bank CSR positions. midsound.hr@washin gtonfederal.com CAFE GARDEN hiring daytime server. Apply in person. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. Lincare Port Townsend, WA Branch. Customer Service Rep. (CSR) Phone skills, maintain patient files, process orders, manage computer data, filing. Full time permanent fast paced position with growth opportunities. $12-$13 DOE, excellent benefits. Email resume to jobs@lincare.com with “PORT TOWNSEND CSR” on the subject line. LOCAL LOGGING COMPANY Looking for log truck driver, experienced only, paid on percentage. Available now. 360-460-7292. RECEPTIONIST Part-time, weekends, holidays, on call. Apply in person. 520 E. Park Ave., P.A. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325 TAXI DRIVER: Parttime, nights. Must be at least 25, clean driving record. Call 360-681-4090 or 253-377-0582 To design and rebuild 2 bathrooms at Clallam Bay Pres Church. eastman001 @centurytel.net WANTED: Front office person for busy solo family practice. Insurance and coding exp. preferable. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#184/Front Office Pt Angeles, WA 98362

34

34

Work Wanted

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

Jack of all trades, 24 years in the making, honest wages. 808-5292

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

MOWING, pruning. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142.

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

41

Business Opportunities

Home Appeal, a real Estate staging company. Lots of inventory! Must sell! Makes great money! Call 360-461-1198.

5 SPEED FEATURED Offer $139.00 valid from per 11/2/2010 AUTOMATI month through SPECI 1/4/2

.

HONDA YEAR END CLEARANCE EVENT CLEARANCE PRICING

ON ALL NEW HONDAS 2010 HONDA

FIT

5 SPEED AUTOMATIC C

FEATURED SPECIAL AL LEASE

$

139

Offer valid from 11/2/2010 through 1/4/2011 011

PER MONTH*

$139.00 per month for 36 months. $1,999.00 total due at signing signing. Includes down payment with no security deposit. Excludes taxes, titles and fees. For well-qualified buyers. *FEATURED SPECIAL LEASE: Closed-end lease for 2010 Fit 5 Speed Automatic (Model GE8H2AEW) for $139.00 per month for 36 months with a $1,860.00 capitalized cost reduction available to customers who qualify for the HFS Super Preferred or Preferred credit tier. Other rates/tiers are available under this offer. $1,999.00 total due at lease signing (includes first month’s payment and capitalized cost reduction with no security deposit; total net capitalized cost and base monthly payment does not include tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like) Not all buyers may qualify.

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding and mowing. 452-2034 CLEANING Houses, offices, rentals. Honest, hard working, reliable. Since 1986. 360-681-4502 HOLIDAY HELPER Lights, decor, gifts, etc. 360-797-4597. House Cleaning- Professional cleaning service, owner for over 10 years. $20/hr *See my online ad with photo* Excellent local references. 360-797-1261 home. 360-820-3845 cell. Ask for Julie. HOUSEKEEPING $13 hr., references. 457-2837 In-home care available for your loved ones. Experienced caring RN available, flexible hours, salary negotiable. Call Rae at 360-681-4271. Retired electrical worker seeks to exchange services as handyman/caretaker for living quarters. Skilled and experienced, have tools and pickup truck. 928-533-5670. rogerpyatt@ yahoo.com

CIVIC

INSIGHT

0.9% APR ACCORD

**

CR-V

LOW PRICES ON ALL REMAINING 2010 2010ss **Up to 60 months on approval of credit. For well qualified buyers. All vehicle sales subject to a negotiable $150 document fee. Photos for illustration purposes only. Offer ends 1/4/2011.

Check us out online at www.wilderhonda.com Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 360-417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy!

WILDER HONDA YOU CAN COUNT ON US!

97 Deer Park Road | Port Angeles | 1-800-927-9395 • 360-452-9268

0B5103544

7C126517

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

5000900

Airport Storage Unit Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., Sun., 9-12 p.m. 4114 S. Airport Rd. Unit #503. Must Sell! Garage door opener, stereo equipment, large trampoline, W/D, furniture, black leather couch set, crib. BEDROOM: Black lacquer dresser, armoire, king headboard, mirror. $200/ obo. 797-7311 CARLSBORG: 1 Br. $300, internet, W/D. 206-227-9738 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 CELLO: 3/4 size Kohr, bow, soft case, stand good condition. $350. 457-3666. GOAT: Wether, Alpine 1.5 yrs. old. $50. 417-6781 WANTED: Old or broken banjo. 681-0695.

31

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM


Classified

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

ACROSS 1 “When I __ kid ...” 5 Colorado NHLers 8 They may be surrounded at parties 14 Set up: Abbr. 15 Acqua Di __: Armani cologne 16 Like a maelstrom 17 19 Cash in Nashville 20 Rolls to the gate 21 Colorful cats 22 Pitts of early cinema 24 Retired New York senator Al D’__ 25 Hi-__ 28 30 Second degree? 33 In spades 35 It’s usually four 36 Former 56Across team 38 Cuisine that includes phanaeng 39 “Entourage” agent Gold 40 English walled city 41 Guard dog command 43 “__ be a pleasure!” 44 O3 45 Unlock’d 46 49 Place for flock members 50 “I __ your long lost pal”: Paul Simon lyric 52 Salon sound 54 Given, as custody 56 Baseball div. 60 Mel Gibson persona 61 Like five answers in this puzzle, literally and figuratively 63 Ring of color 64 “Popeye” surname 65 Shell’s shell, e.g. 66 Aquarium denizens 67 “Bottle Rocket” director Anderson 68 Colony workers DOWN

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. BOARDING PASSES

By Daniel A. Finan

1 Showed relief, in a way 2 Deported? 3 Vintage R&B record label 4 Madison Ave. symbolizes it 5 Court star with the autobiography “Open” 6 Sundial number 7 One learning about the birds and the bees? 8 Kind of party 9 Get away from the others 10 In the slightest 11 12 “Yes __?” 13 Stallone and Stone 18 Set 21 Stand offerings 23 Odd, as a sock 25 1980 DeLuise film 26 “Can you dig it?” response 27 29 “Wayne’s World” cohost 31 Shouldered 32 Out of line 34 Golfer’s concern

11/19/10 Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

Money Loaned/ Wanted

Money Desired: Borrow $75,000 on 5 acres zoned heavy industrial with access to City sewer & water line with existing lease. Will pay 10% per annum per mo. Secured with first deed of trust. Will pay closing costs. 360-457-1417 or 360-670-1378.

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

Homes

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Master bath newly remodeled with tile shower granite countertop. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 30x24 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $210,000 360-460-7503

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

51

T P R F A R E S S S E C C A V

N C U A S M N S E G A G G A B

E A B O O K I N G S E N C I A

G R C B R B L P O T E A H R R

Solution: 8 letters

A D I S A G R A A T T R E P C

L L I G I T I W I I C T C O O

E E S G E S A C O R R L K R D

www.wonderword.com

T P V K I Y S N U A C U A T E

A R C A E T S U P S S R L S T

D I A N R S A E I L T E A E S

T A O I L T D L E N A O T F S

I M P A N S E T A G G N M A T

M E E C O N O M Y N U M B E R

E D O O R H P A S S E N G E R

11/19

Join us on Facebook

Access, Agents, Aircraft, Airlines, Airports, Baggage, Bags, Barcode, Board, Bookings, Card, Check, Class, Customer, Date, Deals, Depart, Digital, Door, Economy, Fares, Gates, Getaway, Groups, Hotels, Issuing, Magnetic, Mobile, Money, Number, Passenger, Plan, Platform, Rates, Rules, Scan, Seats, Stripe, Ticket, Time, Train, Travel, Vacations Yesterday’s Answer: Infection THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ICCOL ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ERECK (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

37 ___ Affair: 17981800 France/USA dispute 42 Hindu meditation aid 44 “Swan Lake” maiden 47 Wild goats with recurved horns 48 Makes void 51 Gladiator’s defense 53 Window-making

11/19/10

giant 54 Word in a basic Latin conjugation 55 Tupper ending 57 Many millennia 58 Certain NCO 59 General __ chicken 61 Tipping target, so it’s said 62 Drano component

Homes

A GREAT OPPORTUNITY Comfortable, easy to live with floor plan. Cozy fireplace for those chilly evenings. Great kitchen and dining area combo for easy living. All appliances included. Deck and railing are being painted by seller. $195,000. ML251993/2131039 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND A HOME TO REMEMBER 3 Br., 3 bath plus bonus room. Open flowing 1,900 square feet floor plan. Spacious kitchen with separate dining room. 800 square foot with ample storage. 35’ deck and easy care landscaping. $278,000. ML2251696/114788 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND BEAUTIFUL NEW HOME In desirable Monterra. 3 Br., 2 bath, and lots of storage. Established, low maintenance landscaping and peaceful surroundings. Ideal for a second home or rental. RV and boat storage is $5/month upon availability. $175,000. ML251723. Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East CLASSIC WITH STUNNING WATER VIEW Bamboo floors, vaulted ceiling, large windows. Cooks will delight in this kitchen complete w stainless appliances and butler pantry. Large master, guest quarters/media room down. Beautifully landscaped. Located midway between Sequim and Port Angeles. $360,000. ML251495 Cathy Reed 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

CLOSE TO ALL Great home right in Sequim but with a country feel. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,808 sf home on 1.02 acres just a few blocks from the center of town. Single story, cedar siding, heat pump, double car garage plus RV/workshop. $250,000. ML252323. Steve Marble Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 808-2088 COME TAKE A LOOK Quiet cul-de-sac, fantastic landscaping. 3 Br., 2 baths. Close to the Strait, eat in kitchen with formal dining room, covered patio. $235,000. ML241697/29098253 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND COUNTRY LIVING, CITY CONVENIENCE Home is a 2 Br., 2 bath, 2005 model in excellent shape situated on a beautiful country acre parcel. The location? You can have it both ways being perfectly positioned between Sequim and Port Angeles – it’s just a short drive either way. You won’t find many newer homes on an acre for this price! Check it out and call it home. $189,000. ML252040. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East DRAMATIC VIEWS OF THE STRAITS Victoria, the San Juans, Mt. Baker and beyond from this 2000+ sf home. On one level in Dungeness Heights you get a nice mountain view as well. $359,500. ML252269/149145 Doug Hale 477-9455 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

EXQUISITE CUSTOM HOME Built in 2005 with a separate office/den. Exceptionally landscaped with a large deck and a private wooded backyard. Beautiful hardwood floors and a large gourmet kitchen. Three car garage and RV parking! $329,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 ‘F’ IS FOR FRESHWATER BAY Absolutely gorgeous mature trees surround this home. Large level area with antique outbuildings and gentle forest topography. New laminate floors, double pane windows, upgraded kitchen and bathrooms. Covered parking and plenty of space to grow your garden and dreams. Just a couple minutes away from the picturesque beach and boat launch at Freshwater Bay. $129,000. ML252291. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company HOME ON 2 ACRES 1.96 cleared acres with small barn/ workshop, 2 garden sheds. House has had some recent updates. There is 111’ of Dungeness River frontage. This property would be a wonderful investment or starter home. $219,900. ML250991 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East HOME SWEET HOME This is the one. Excellent floor plan, skylights, 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage, 1,474 sf. On a quiet dead-end street in a great neighborhood, it just doesn’t get any sweeter. $199,700. ML251563 Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

51

CATATH

LAVOAW Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: Yesterday’s

Homes

"In-Town" Mini-Farm. 4 bedroom, 1+ bath home on 1.08 acres. Fenced pasture, mt. view, greenhouse, chicken coop, detached garage. Carport. 8x24 deck. Mature fruit trees. Appliances convey. New roofs/heat pump and MUCH more! $210,000. Contact Dave at 360-670-8260 or weissguy60@yahoo.c om INVESTORS ALERT! Main unit is 2 Br., 1 bath with remodeled kitchen and bath. Ally unit is 1 Br., 1 bath with many upgrades. Both units are in good condition. Add to that fully fenced yard and you have two terrific rentals. $169,500. ML252169 Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. LEASE TO OWN 3 Br., 3 bath, upper level has 2 and 2, lower level has 1 and 1. Formal dining and nook. 2 fireplaces, oversized garage. AHS warranty coverage plus package. $289,000 ML252062/136048 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND LIVE LARGE! 4 Br., 3.5 bath, 5 garages on 5 acres in Happy Valley. Appreciate spaciousness and flow. Master suite downstairs; library loft plus 3 large Br. and 2 baths upstairs. Partially wooded, partially open land. All baths upgraded. Gourmet kitchen; formal dining room off kitchen. Great location just minutes from town. $669,000. ML251170. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

” (Answers tomorrow) OPIUM FLORAL BROGUE Jumbles: ORBIT Answer: When the aging model dyed her hair, she got to the — ROOT OF THE PROBLEM

51

Homes

MAINS FARM FANTASY 3 Br., 2 bath, with third bath near completion. At nearly 2,600 sf, this is a big house for the money, and it’s on a big lot. Located in the in the desirable Mains Farm area. Heat pump for efficiency. 2-sided fireplace for atmosphere. Irrigation hook ups for the environment. Motivated seller will leave TV’s, vault, and riding lawnmower for the new owner. $299,000. ML251438 Rita Erdmann Carroll Realty 457-1111 MOTIVATED SELLER New, mountain view home on one acre with no restrictions. This 3 Br. + den, 2 bath home features a great room concept with vaulted ceilings, kitchen with island and pantry, master suite with a large walk-in closet, spacious laundry room and a 2 car attached garage. Located in the Mt. Pleasant area, just minutes from town. $205,000 ML252140/141264 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NEAR DISCOVERY TRAIL Country living at its best with Agnew irrigation rights. This beautiful 3 Br., 2 bath home is waiting for you. Includes living room and dining room combination with nice size kitchen with eating space. Barn/chicken coop structure with oversized garage 912 sf. Perfect for the car buff. Even has area for the RV with RV dump, power and water. Orchard has 10 fruit trees, apples, plums and lots of mature plants and flowers. $219,900. ML251347 Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

JUST REDUCED Foreclosure built in ‘06. Propane fireplace, open kitchen, 3 Br., 2 bath. Large utility room, oversized garage with alley entrance. $169,290. ML252202/144212 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND NEW CONSTRUCTION 1,572 sf home with 3 Br., 2 baths, den and a 2 car attached garage. Located on Rook Dr. with a view of the Olympic mountains. $229,900 ML252158/142275 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NEW LISTING 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,578 sf well maintained rambler set back from road and close to town. Great room includes family room, living room, dining area and kitchen. Fenced backyard and patio for enjoying the outdoors. $209,900. ML252215. Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NEWEST OF ALL Just being completed 3 Br., 2 bath home in Solmar with path to the lake. Great culde-sac location with lots of trees and a nice patio area. Great room with vaulted ceilings. $199,999 ML252119/140200 Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY PRICE REDUCED You’ll love this 3 Br., 2 bath, one level home. Updated kitchen with newer countertops, pull outs, breakfast bar and a new stove. Skylights and newer countertops in both bathrooms. The roof is approx. 2 years old. Fenced in area for your pets. 2 car attached garage and plenty of parking in the back. $179,500. ML252096/138720 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

51

Homes

DUNGENESS: Cash for 2 Br., garage. $138,000. 928-9528. SALT WATER VIEWS Many potential uses for this delightful water and mountain view home and guest cottage. The historical character and central location create an excellent atmosphere for a B&B or a vacation rental. Or rent the guest home and live in the main house. The guest house has its own utilities. $280,000. ML251537. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SPACIOUS AND COMFORTABLE Home in west Alder Estates. Close to Safeway and medical offices. 3 Br., 2 bath (3rd Br. has built-ins for a great office). Room for a small garden in back. Storage shed is big enough to be a small shop. Easy-care landscaping. $34,900. ML252327. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SPECTACULAR WATERFRONT HOMESITE Sweeping views across Discovery Bay to Diamond Point, Protection Island, and Strait. Nice landscaped site with PUD water installed, with existing 3 Br. septic, ready for your new home. Plus a 1,332 sf fully finished shop with 1/2 bath. $399,000. ML251731. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

New Medical Office space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

97315731

1031 EXCHANGE? Seller wants to move this property, great lot in Sunland overlooking the 14th fairway. Beautiful views of the pond and golf course. Above road grade lot, utilities to property. Enjoy living in Sunland with all the amenities! $155,000. ML250919. Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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S D S T A E S P L A T F O R M

© 2010 Universal Uclick

The blank clues for 17-, 28-, 46-Across, and 11- and 27-Down, are intentional. These five clues are supposed to be blank and are referenced in 61-Across.

43

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

D2

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS For Better or For Worse

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

CARLSBORG: 1 Br. $300, internet, W/D. 206-227-9738 SEQUIM: Lg. unfurnished room. $350 incl. util. 457-6779. SEQUIM: Room for rent - Shared living space and kitchen. Country setting. No smokers, no pets. Background check. $400 per month plus utilities. 681-2184.

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52

Homes

SHERWOOD VILLAGE CONDO Brand new with attached 3 car garage, exterior of unit is complete, interior appointments to be selected, last 3 car garage unit at this price. $350,000. ML250338/24720 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND WANT TO SCALE DOWN? But don’t want to give up your hobbies? The Orchards on Fourteenth is the answer. Beautiful 1 Br. floor plan a clubhouse with lap pool, guest apartment, art/pottery studio, woodworking shop, auto shop and other amenities just for you. $179,000. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WATER VIEW WOW! Hard to find water view rambler in convenient location 3 Br., 1 3/4 baths, hardwood floors, remodeled kitchen and baths. Right across the street from ONP headquarters means miles of trails and quiet await you. $259,000. ML251992/131494 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WELL KEPT HOME On 3.17 acres, mountain view. Pond, garden and orchard. Bam and Clallam ditch irrigation. Bordered by Matriotti Creek $299,000. ML241623/29093313 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Well maintained home, close to stores and bus line. Seller in the process of getting a new roof put on. Home has a great sun room off the back. Detached 2 car garage with work bench and storage area. $150,000 ML250465/34906 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

52

Manufactured Homes

For sale by owner. double wide, 3 Br., 2 full baths, all appliances, in P.T. $20,000. 457-5785. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, single wide, 55+ park, owner may carry contract. $22,500/obo. 683-5120

Manufactured Homes

SPIC AND SPAN Recent upgrades throughout, recently painted exterior, enlarged front desk, close to many services, private financing available. $49,900. ML242650/29167467 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

54

Lots/ Acreage

A beautiful property in Port Angeles. For sale $168,000. Located just minutes from town off of Mt Angeles Road. The 4.77 acre parcel is surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. Septic installed, electric hook up pd, city water. www.portangelesprop.com or 360-460-0572 Buildable corner lot on dead end in Paradise Bay, Port Ludlow, 1 block from community private boat ramp on private beach. Cash or contract. $24,000. 360-437-9389 GOLF COURSE HOME In a private, gated community. Well maintained, living room, family room dining room and eat in kitchen. 2 Br. plus an office. Park like surroundings. Daylight basement partially finished with workshop. $445,000. ML85256 Lois Chase Johnson 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow Lake Sutherland 3+ acres with beach rights with dock, Hwy 101 frontage. electrical close by. Subdividable, zoned R1. 360-460-4589. PRIVATE AND LOVELY Great private location right on the Olympic Discovery Trail. 1.49 acres, bordered by trees with a really nice cleared building site up on a knoll in an open meadow. Even a great mountain view will be possible with removal of a few trees. This is the best priced acreage on the market and you have to walk it to see how nice it is. $49,950. ML252259. Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company

54

Lots/ Acreage

WEST P.A.: Cash for 30 acres, utilities. $138,000. 928-9528.

55

Farms/ Ranches

Nice farm on 5.12 acres. Various outbuildings for animals and storage. Greenhouse, fruit trees, garage with workshop. Small creek runs through, mostly fenced. $222,500. ML250362/27596 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

58

Commercial

4 ACRES ZONED INDUSTRIAL Plus a 6,100 square feet 7 bay shop with 14’ doors that is insulated and heated. Excellent highway 101 front-age. Also includes a 2 Br., 1 bath home. $499,000. ML252253. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

62

Apartments Unfurnished

P.A.: Quiet and clean. Water view. 1 Br. $575. 206-200-7244

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

P.A.: Really large 1 Br., 1 ba., $625, 1st, last. No pets. 452-1234.

HOUSES IN P.A. 1 br 1 ba......$500 1 br 1 ba......$525 2 br 1 ba......$650 2 br 2 ba......$800 3 br 2 ba......$950 3 br 1.5 ba..$1100 HOUSES IN SEQUIM 2 br 2 ba......$925 2+ br 2 ba....$950 3 br 2 ba....$1100 3 br 2 ba....$1250

SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 Br., in quiet 8-plex. $600. 460-2113.

63

Duplexes

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540.

CETNRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1,200 sf. $650. 457-8438 P.A.: 2 Br. quiet, clean. No smoke/pets $675 mo., dep. 457-0928. P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, no pets/smoke. $675, 1st, last, dep. Available Dec. 417-5137.

68

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 WAREHOUSE: Heated space. 800-8,000 sf. 360-683-6624.

360-417-2810

Clean 1 Br., 1 bath water view w/washer/dryer, $600/dep water/sewer paid. No smoking/pets. 360-808-5054 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, 433 E. 1st St., P.A. No smoking/pets. 1st, last, deposit. $575 mo. 417-1688. P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

64

Houses

2 bed, 2 bath. Fireplace, lovely kitchen w/mtn view, on bus line. Includes W/D. $850. 457-1392. Bell St. 3 Br., 2.5 ba, heat pump, fenced yard, $1,000/month; first, last, deposit. 360-683-3441 ravensbop@olympus. net

MOBILE: Rent to own, fixer. $500. Ref req. 760-723-7782.

NEED A RENTAL? Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com P.A.: 1 Br., no pets. $575 incl. util. Credit check. 460-0575. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $950. 452-1395. P.A.: 4 Br., 1 bath. Remodeled. $895, 1st, last. 452-1234. P.A.: By college, view, 3 Br., 2 ba. $1,150, lease. 457-4966. P.A.: Lovely historic home, fully remodeled, immaculate, 3 Br., 2 ba. $1,100 mo. 417-9776 P.A.: Newer 3 bd., 3 bath. Neighborhood, location, garage, yard, weatherized. No smoking/pets $900 mo. 452-9458. P.A.: Water view 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage. $1150/mo. 452-1016 PORT HADLOCK Newly remodeled, 3 Br., 2 ba, W/D, fridge? $1,250 mo, cleaning and security dep. 360-531-3997 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

CENTRAL P.A. , 3 Br. study, no smoke/ pets $875. 775-8047 CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 606 S. Laurel, references required. $700. 457-6600. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., garage, no smoke/ pets. $800, 1st, last, dep. Avail. Dec. 1st. 360-461-2438

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1st floor 3 Br., $695. 1 or 2 Br., $495 + utilities. No smoking/pets. 360-452-4258

SEQUIM: Share 2 Br. apt., have full run of apt. $450 mo., $100 deposit. 681-8685.

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

1 Br. cabin with loft. Upper Palo Alto Rd. $700. 477-9678

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

64

Houses

Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747. EAST P.A.: Small 2 Br. mobile. $500. 457-9844/460-4968

PT LUDLOW home 2 Br., 2 bath, view, decks, fireplace, $1,200. 360-312-7546 kryan2@yahoo.com SEQUIM: 2 Br. 1 ba, in town, W/S/G incl., W/D, security system, year lease, dep. $650. 460-8978. SEQUIM: Idle Wheels Park on 5th Ave. 1 Br., 1 ba. single wide, $495. 683-3335.

EAST SIDE P.A.: Lg. 3 Br., 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, 1st, last, $500 dep. 452-1147.

SEQUIM: Newer 2 bdr mfd homes. W/S/G, W/D incl. Recent upgrades. $645 & $685. 360 582-1862

FORKS: 2 Br., 1 ba mobile, rent to own. $350. 360-780-0100.

WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

72

Furniture

BED: Adj electric extra long twin bed w/memory foam mattress and wireless remote (programmable preset positions and vibramassage). Great cond/steel mechanism by Motion Bedding. Owner manuals. 360-681-8967. BEDROOM SET Solid oak. Large chest, $200. Dresser with mirror, $200. King headboard, $100. 2 pier cabinets with mirror, $300. Take all, $700. Must see to appreciate. 360-565-6038 BEDROOM: Black lacquer dresser, armoire, king headboard, mirror. $200/ obo. 797-7311 COFFEE TABLES: 2 matching, 1 large, $50/obo and 1 small, $40/obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685. DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $150/ obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

72

Furniture

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. LOVE SEAT: Sofa bed. $200 firm. 452-5431 MATTRESS SET Beauty Rest, queen, firm, like new. $525. 360-681-4134 MISC: (2) twin electric beds, $200 and $300. Dining room set, oak, 6 chairs on casters, $400. Oak poster bed, queen set, 2 piece armoire, $500. All obo. 360-683-4401 MISC: Brown leather sofa, very unique southwestern stitch pattern, $200/obo. Over sized brown leather recliner, brand new, $175/ obo. 582-0892. MISC: Leather sofa, white, $375. Oak table with chairs, $300. Oak entertainment center, $75. Computer table, $75. Air conditioner with remote, $50. Water cooler, $45. Recp. saw/rotozip, $75 each. Drill bits/chisels, $40 each. 360-452-8297, Cell 256-318-9599. RECLINER: Small rocker/recliner, dark burgundy fabric, great shape, will deliver. $150/obo. 681-3299 TABLE: Wrought iron Italian table with double beveled glass top, made in Italy, 4 chairs with new cushions, good condition, appraised at $600. Sell for $500. 457-3005 or 4617478.

73

General Merchandise

$800 buys a cheap Charlie pellet stove with outside vent and electric start. Ken at 928-9410 AIR COMPRESSOR Brand new Speedaire, 3 phase, 60 gal. tank. $900/obo. 417-5583. AWESOME SALE! Old trunk, $35. Vac, 6 hp, $35. Toaster ovens, new, $20, used, $15. 360-683-2743 BBQ GRILL: Large propane, with side burner, works good. $20. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays. CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563

Christmas quilts for sale. Christmas and everyday quilts, queen/king size. $300 each. Homemade, hand quilted, machine washable. Phone 683-6901.

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746

COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves.

Glass Table Cover 67 5/8” x 47 5/8”, 1/4”, oval race track cut, $225/obo. You transport. 457-0773 Monterra.

CUSTOM SHED Beautiful 8x8 custom built shed. Asking for only materials no time or labor. $1,000. Call to explain why. 457-2780

CLOSING OUT Mary Kay products. Good selection. Call for appt. 681-8597 Seq.

73

General Merchandise

CREDIT CARD MACHINE Like new. Paid $600. Asking $400. 681-3838 DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504 GENERATOR: Winco 3 KW, 1,800 rpm, well built. $450/obo. 417-5583 GREAT DEALS. ‘87 Citation 5th wheel $2000/obo. Yardman auto drive riding mower 42” 17hp, bagger, $500. Stacked washer and dryer front load Kenmore washer, Gibson dryer both work great, $400. 461-3164 LEAF/LAWN MULCHER VACUUM Craftsman professional, tow behind riding mower, 1/3 off, like new. $725. 681-3522 LUMBER: Rough cut cedar. 1x4 fence boards. $1 ea. 460-5686 METAL LATHE Sears Roebuck, model #10920630, 14” bed, 6” throw, 110V motor. $250. Robert169@ Qwest.net 360-683-3385 MISC: Antique piano, good shape, $800. Blue sofa, good shape, $150. Twin bed with headboard, $25. Hutch, $75. 2 dining room chairs, $10 ea. Desk with chair, $25. 452-5876 MISC: Desk, $50. Office chair, $25. Copy machine, $25. Printer, $25. Fax, $20. 5th wheel hitch, $75. Massage machine, $60. Flagpole, $50. Coffee table, $20. 457-6174 MOVING BOXES Used, cardboard, different sizes, incl. wardrobe, good condition. Blue Mountain Road. $200 all. 360-928-3467 NECKLACE: Amber and turquoise, from jeweler, unique, casual or dress, never worn, in box. $325. 477-4733. Office Equipment and Kiln. Canon i9900, hi-end printer, lightly used, $192/obo. 15 ink carts for above, new, $8 ea. Xerox XC1045 copier, used, $199/obo. Olympic Kiln, model 1818H, never used, $397/obo. 360-683-5216 SERGER: Like new, sews and cuts at same time. $200. 457-9782 SEWING MACHINE Brother, DB2-B757-3, Commercial, heavy duty. $295. Rrobert169@ Qwest.net 360-683-3385 SINGER: Sewing machine. Featherweight with case and book. Just serviced. Sews perfectly. $475. 477-1576. VENDING MACHINES 2 Antares combo vending machines, with dollar bill changer. All manuals and keys. Excellent working condition. $500 ea. or trade for ?. 683-8180.

73

D3

General Merchandise

WANTED! Your Consignments!!! Artisan Creative Consignment is wanting your handcrafted Art, household and clothing!!! Reasonable consignment! Call for details! Michele at 360-461-4799, Heather at 360-775-4283, or business line at 360-681-7655

75

Musical

ACCORDION: 19” keyboard, 120 base, electric. Excellent condition. Buy a $3,000 accordion for $500. 683-7375. CELLO: 3/4 size Kohr, bow, soft case, stand good condition. $350. 457-3666. Give the gift of music. Guitar instruction by Brian Douglas. 360-531-3468 Marshall JCM TSL 2000 & 4 twelve cab. good condition works great. $1,800. 360-460-0864 PIANO: Early 1900s upright Kimball, great condition, original ivorys, solid oak case, beautiful tone. $1,200. 379-6986. VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $150. 452-6439

76

Sporting Goods

GUNS: Colt Python 357 mag., $1,000. Smith & Wesson model 66, 357 mag., $600. Marlin model 39, $450. 683-9899. GUNS: Custom Arisaka 300 gauge sporter, $300. Single shot 12 gauge, $100. 360-452-2029 MISC: Minkota 46 lbs electric trolling, $150. Honda 1,000 watt generator, $450. 360-385-7728 RECUMBENT BICYCLE Easy Racer Goldrush. Large. $2,500. 360-452-3495 RECUMBENT BIKES Tour Easy, $1,000/ obo. Vision, $400/ obo.Good condition. 681-2329

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

ESTATE sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m. 114 W. 3rd St., P.A. Household, furniture, antiques, collectibles, toys, ruby glass, yard art, Dickens Christmas Cottage, Kincade prints, guns, huge coin collection, refrigerator, washer, and dryer.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Airport Storage Unit Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., Sun., 9-12 p.m. 4114 S. Airport Rd. Unit #503. Must Sell! Garage door opener, stereo equipment, large trampoline, W/D, furniture, black leather couch set, crib.

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914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875 YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

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D5

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D6

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 10-5 p.m. 1323 W. 10th St. Furniture, household, misc. MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m. 4505 S. Reddick Rd. Sears 19 hp mower, like new. (2) weed eaters, camping gear, washer and dryer, living room set, dishes, pots and pans. Come look! 457-6572, 565-1007

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

CRAFT Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., 2034 E. 3rd Ave., Gales Addition. Homemade crafts, come and see what we have! GARAGE Sale: Fri., 10-2 p.m., 33 S. Alder Lane, Four Seasons Park. Propane fireplace, yard tools, appliances, furniture, and more. Everything must go, make offers.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

FINAL MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m., 80 Summerset Ct. Refrigerator, glassware, tools, make an offer! GARAGE Sale: ThursSat., 9 a.m.-? 387 E. Washington St. Lots of vintage furniture! Collectibles, jewelry, glass, kitchen stuff. SUPER ECLECTIC SALE 507 Holgerson (off Hogback & Lotzgesell) Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m. Antique Furnishings, Shabby Chic, Art, Leather Sectional Sofa, Queen/Twin Beds, Linens, Kitchenware, Books, Rugs, Lamps, Book Shelves, Bosch Washer & Dryer, Yard & Garden Art & Furniture, Vintage Diecast Cars, More!! Warm Indoor Sale. PENINSULA ESTATE SALES TWO SALES, ONE LOCATION Fri.-Sat., 8:30-3 p.m. No earlies! 132 Farm Creek Lane, 2 miles up Hooker Rd. Honda pressure washer, tools, antique outboards, pump organ, pottery, fishing, art glass, collectibles, carvings, crocks and jugs, too much to list! No junk!

78F

Classified

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

ANTIQUE Collectibles Sale: Fri. and Sat., 10-4 p.m. Sun. 1-4 p.m. New Song Center, 3918 San Juan Ave, Port Townsend. Furniture, native/western items, paintings, vintage sheet music, records, books. Dried grasses/moss, wreaths, potpourri, pressed flowers, beads/jewelry, frames, Washer/dryer, stove and more! KPTZ Radio’s Queen’s Bazaar: 9-4 p.m., Nov. 18, 111 Quincy in P.T. Antique and modern furniture, rugs, prints, ceramics, fabric, tools. All sales support KPTZ Radio. Donations: Thurs. 28 p.m., Fri. 9-12 p.m.

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Wanted To Buy

1ST AT BUYING FIREARMS Cash for the Holidays. Old or new, rifles, shotguns, and pistols. 1 or whole collection. Please call, I will bring cash today. WA State Firearms Transfer paperwork available. 681-4218. BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 Costco shed parts, recycle for cash. 417-5336 evenings. WANTED: 22 cal. rifle. Call 683-1413 WANTED: Buying gold, jewelry, scrap jewelry, silver, old coins. P.A. Antique Mall, Mon.-Sat. 109 W. First St. 452-1693 WANTED: Car tow dolly. 360-701-2767. WANTED: Lucky Louie, Guptill and Supreme lures/ plugs. 683-4791. WANTED: Old or broken banjo. 681-0695. WANTED: Over stuffed chair and ottoman. 582-0892.

Pets

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Pets

GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383.

SULCATA TORTOISE Juvenile. $150. 808-5208

Chihuahua puppies. 3 very cute, happy, friendly, healthy purebred Chihuahua puppies. 2 females 1 male. 7 weeks old. $250-400 360-670-3906

TOY POODLES: 8 wk. old black male, 1 6 mo female tri-color phantom. $550 ea. 477-8349

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

Christmas Puppies Lhasa Apso, order now for Christmas, adorable. $500 ea. 477-2115 DACHSHUNDS: (2) AKC, lovable, need a new home. 7 and 11 yrs old, must be placed together. $100. 477-4192. FASHIONABLE GIFTS Great dog gifts. Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church Bizarre, 9-3 p.m., Sat.11/20, 923 N. Sequim Blvd. FREE: 4 yr. old Great Dane/Boxer mix, needs room to run, loves to be indoors, great with kids, loyal family dog, current on all vaccinations and is microchipped. 460-0865 KITTENS: 3 male, orange. 9 weeks old. $10 ea. 4521233. PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, Powder Puff China-Jacks, registered, vet checked, shots, wormed. $500-$800 each. 582-9006. PUPPIES: Lhasa Apso, purebred, 5 beautiful boys, pictures upon request. $400. 360-774-1430. Toy Australian Shepherds- Two femalesblack tri and two blue merle males and one black tri male. Tails docked, dew claws removed and will have first shots and vet checked. Reserve your precious pup today. Will be ready at Thanksgiving Time. $450. Call 360-374-5151.

Pictures Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

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Pets

Borders Logos Bold Lines Yellow Highlight on Sunday

Annual Antique & Collectible Sale Masonic Hall Port Townsend behind Post Office. Nov. 20th, 9-4 p.m., Jewelry, buttons, pottery, linens, rugs, furniture, Christmas decorations, unusual items, great gift ideas.

Albino Parakeet Hen. Gorgeous 'keet hen pure white with dark red eyes, very healthy, $50. With cage, or FREE (just hen no cage) to home with aviary/ large cage, other 'keets, and considerate owner. 360-457-8385

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Legals Clallam Co.

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

PUPPIES: Ready for Christmas! Shih-Tzu, 2 males, $300/obo ea. Shots, vet checked. 582-9382 or 460-3319.

Walker Puppies. 4 female/4 males 2 black and tan, 5 reds and one brown and white. 360-770-0332 or 360-670-6084.

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Farm Animals

CALL DUCKS: $25 each pair. 683-3914. GOAT: Wether, Alpine 1.5 yrs. old. $50. 417-6781 HAY: Alf/grass. $5.00 bale. Grass, $4.00. In barn. 683-5817. NUBIAN: Goats, $125 ea. 1 Wether, $75. Age 5+ mo. 360-385-6327 Weaner pigs, nice Duroc cross, winter price $55. Also young large blue butt boar, $150/obo. 775-6552

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Horses/ Tack

MARE: 6 yr old quarter horse mare. Been there, done that! Performance, rodeo, equestrian team, been hauled everywhere. Flashy. Very sweet, no vices. $6,000 negotiable to good home. 360-477-1536 msg.

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Farm Equipment

BOX SCRAPER Rankin 72”, blade and 6 shanks, for 3 point hitch. Model BBG72J. Never used. $600. 360-301-2690

Add:

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CAGES: (2) large wire cages for birds, rabbits or ? $10 each. You haul or we will haul with gas money included. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays.

Grab Their ATTENTION!

Garage Sales Jefferson

Legals Clallam Co.

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360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

101

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

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TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843

93

Marine

APOLLO: ‘77 20’. Must see! Very clean in and out. Rebuilt 302 IB OMC OB. Fresh water cooled, hydraulic trim tabs, head, galley. Priced to sell. $3,800/obo. 681-0411 BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887 BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirrors/ windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, exc. inside/out, all new brakes. $42,000/ trade. 460-8325.

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles.

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Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

93

Marine

Aluminum 17 ft., C/C, 2 Mercury 4 strokes. $8,000 firm. 452-2779 BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698 HEWESCRAFT: ‘06 18’ Sea Runner. 115 hp and 8 hp 4 stroke Yamahas, all elelctric tilt, much more. $21,900. Just completely serviced. Bob 360-732-0067 LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $14,500/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480 RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 SANGER: ‘76 Super Jet. Built 455 Olds, Hardin in water exhaust, seats 5, upholstery good, dog house fair, turnkey ready. $2,500/obo. 681-3838

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Motorcycles

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Motorcycles

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Motorcycles

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Recreational Vehicles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘50 Panhead Basketcase. Fresh motor, title in hand. $7,500. 457-6174 HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895.

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,700. 461-1202 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290. KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIKE: ‘08 Suzuki Burgman 400 CC. Looks and runs like new. Very stable. $6,500/obo. 683-6079 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895 YAMAHA: ‘03 V-Star 1100. Excellent condition, windshield, bags, air kit, crash bars, 15K mi. $4,300. 452-7184.

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

‘01 Monaco Diplomat LE (luxury edition). 40’ diesel pusher, 330 Cummings with Banks power pack, 6 speed Allison trans, 2 slides, electric power awnings, 2 TVs, AM/FM CD VCR, sat dome, like new washer and dryer unit, all new Michelin tires, 7.5 KW generator, leveling system, battery charger with inverter, beige leather interior, real tile floors, Corian counters, well maintained, always garaged, beautiful coach, 30K miles, non-smoker, no pets. $79,000. 681-4218.

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914 CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426. HERE’S THE DEAL Buy my 29’ Pace Arrow with 57K miles on it, general power pack, Monroe shocks, stabilizers, hydraulic levelers, air conditioning, 16’ awning. Price $3,500 then trade on new bus for about $8,000 Ken at 928-9410. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘86 Toyota Dolphin. 4 cyl., auto trans. new tires, battery, and water heater. Must sell. $5,500/obo. 360-670-3856 MOTOR HOME: ‘89 21’ Winnebago Warrior. New tires and refrigerator. $8,000. 360-681-7614 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625 MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

QUAD: ‘04 Honda 250 EX Sportrax. Low mi. $2,200. 683-2107.

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670

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QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $15,500. 457-7097.

SCOOTER: Aero Honda 80, runs well. $450. Ken at 928-9410

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

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QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213. RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7314.21053 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. GMAC Legals LLC Grantee: Alice Fay Miller, a single woman Tax Parcel ID Clallam Co. Mortgage, No.: 033031-502275 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 49, 6/74 Notice of Trustee's

Legals No.: 7763.27428 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMor- Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On Clallam Co. File gan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Manuel Perez and November 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam

File No.: 8318.20026 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Sound Community Bank Grantee: Donald E. Kirst, a married man, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 043008-501400 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 15, 6/34 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 15 of First Plat of Alderwood East, as Recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 34, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 122 Agnew Parkway Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/22/04, recorded on 06/28/04, under Auditor's File No. 2004-1136332, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Donald E. Kirst, whose wife is Jody A. Kirst, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Sound Community Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/24/2010 Monthly Payments $4,614.00 Late Charges $230.70 Total Arrearage $4,844.70 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $537.66 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,306.22 Total Amount Due: $6,150.92 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $119,520.11, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Donald E. Kirst 122 Agnew Parkway Port Angeles, WA 98362 Jody A. Kirst 122 Agnew Parkway Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/13/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/13/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/24/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8318.20026) 1002.163017-FEI Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2010

Janette M. Perez, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-015155 Abbreviated Legal: N 1/2 Lts. 11 & 12, Bk. 151, TPA 1/27 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The North Half of Lots 11 and 12, Block 151 Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington, Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 615 South I Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/29/07, recorded on 05/30/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1202168, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Manuel Perez and Janette Perez, husband and wife as joint tenants, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/20/2010 Monthly Payments $17,259.90 Late Charges $694.10 Lender's Fees & Costs $164.70 Total Arrearage $18,118.70 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $692.67 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,394.17 Total Amount Due: $19,512.87 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $198,672.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Manuel Perez 615 South I Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Janette Marie Perez 615 South I Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/19/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/20/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27428) 1002.163451-FEI Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2010

County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 49 of Lester McFarland Farm, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 74, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 700 McFarland Drive Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/28/07, recorded on 03/30/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1198757, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Alice F. Miller, an unmarried woman, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS", as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS" to GMAC Mortgage, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1255434. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/21/10 Monthly Payments $27,726.49 Late Charges $1,192.55 Lender's Fees & Costs $167.00 Total Arrearage $29,086.04 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $726.28 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,560.84 Total Amount Due: $30,646.88 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $217,006.64, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Alice F. Miller 700 McFarland Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Alice F. Miller 700 McFarland Drive Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/20/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/21/10 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.21053) 1002.163579-FEI Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2010


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itaska Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, mech. perfect, serviced, ready to roll. $20,500. 452-2148. TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $13,000. 477-3695. TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177. WANTED TO BUY Car tow dolly. 360-701-2767

96

Parts/ Accessories

CAR TRAILER: 16’ enclosed. Tandem axles, winch, electric brakes, side door, rear clam shell doors with ramps, equalizer hitch, battery, inside dimension: 80” tall, 74” wide. Ideal for Model A or Model T Ford or similar. Bargain at $2,250. 360-683-8133 PARTING OUT: ‘89 Toyota Celica automatic. $5-$500. 683-7516 STUDDED TIRES: (4), Cooper 215/60 R16, nearly new. $200. 683-8833 TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $1,000 for all. 683-7789 TOOL BOX + Craftsman 3 piece, 16 drawer tool box, great shape, $100. S-10 2” dropped spindles, $75. Firestone Wilderness LT 265/70 R16, $350. and Firestone FR710 235/55 R17, $250. All like new. 360-452-9876 WHEELS: (4) 16”, 8 hole Chev truck. $60. 683-8833

97

4 Wheel Drive

BUICK: ‘04 Rainier. V8, AWD, leather, 87K, premium sound, wheels, all power. $12,800. 460-3037

101

Legals Clallam Co.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘06 TRAILBLAZER LS 4X4 Just in time for winter, 6 cylinder, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD, roof rack, alloy wheels, tow package and more! “0” down financing available with rates as low as 3.85% O.A.C. One week clearance special! $6,000 under Kelley Blue Book! Expires 11-27-2010. $8,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHEV: ‘02 Trailblazer LTZ. Low mi., all power, air, leather, new tires/brakes, Bose audio & more. Low book. $9,250. 460-4765 CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362 CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713. CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409. CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512. DODGE ‘03 DAKOTA SLT 4 DOOR QUAD CAB 4.7 liter V8, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tile, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, slier, privacy glass, matching canopy, spray on bedliner, tow package, running boards, alloy wheels, fog lamps, privacy glass, very clean and reliable local trade, nonsmoker. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

97

4 Wheel Drive

97

97

4 Wheel Drive

DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556

FORD: ‘92 Aerostar. Loaded, Eddie Bauer model. Excellent in and out. $1,800. 360-683-5871

FORD ‘02 F250 SUPER CAB LONG BED LARIAT 4X4 7.3 liter powerstroke diesel, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, spray-in bedliner, tow package, airbags, trailer brake controller, BD exhaust brake, 4” ATS exhaust, winch bumper with brushguard, 12,000 lb warn winch, diamond plate toolbox, driving lights, keyless entry, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather heated seats, adjustable pedals, CB radio, 6 CD stacker stereo, information center, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Only 64,000 miles! Immaculate condition! Loaded with all the options and lots of accessories! None nicer! $21,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643

FORD: ‘09 F150 4x4. XLT super cab, 15K mi. $26,500. 360-765-4599 FORD: ‘85 Bronco. Sat. radio, 33” tires. $1,300. 640-8996. HONDA ‘07 CR-V ALL WD SPORT UTILITY 2.4 liter i-VTEC 4 cylinder, auto, keyless entry, power windows, locks, mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, MP3, CD stereo, dual front, side impact, and side curtain airbags, Kelley Blue Book value of $19,750! Only 43,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today and save! $14,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA ‘00 TUNDRA SR5 4 DOOR ACCESS CAB TRD off road package, 4.7 liter V8, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tilt, power windows and locks, AM/FM CD/cassette, slider, privacy glass, matching canopy, tow package, spray on bedliner, step bars, alloy wheels, fog lamps, very clean local trade, 1 owner non-smoker. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

101

GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273

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Legals Clallam Co.

4 Wheel Drive

GMC ‘99 DENALI V-8 4x4, 128K, tow ready. Power locks, windows, seats, mirrors, gray leather. The Other Guys Auto and Truck setting the standards in buy here pay here! Lowest in house financing rates! $8,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 www.peninsula dailynews.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

97

4 Wheel Drive

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Clallam County Board of Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at 10:30 a.m., or as soon thereafter as possible in the Commissioners’ Meeting Room of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street, Room 160, Port Angeles, Washington. The purpose of the public hearing is to consider an ordinance amending Chapter 21.01, the text of which is being published in summary and in compliance with RCW 65.16.160 and Clallam County Charter Section 3.10. (NOTE: The full text will be mailed without charge upon request – see "Proponent" below for the address and/or telephone number.) All proposed ordinances are available on the County website www.clallam.net. Comments for or against this proposed ordinance are encouraged. Interested persons must either submit their written comments before the hearing is commenced (see Proponent’s address below) or present written and/or oral comments in person during the public hearing. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), appropriate aids and/or reasonable accommodations will be made available upon request. Requests must be received at least seven (7) days prior to the hearing – see "Proponent" below. The facility is considered "barrier free" and accessible to those with physical disabilities. Clallam County Board of Commissioners 223 East 4th Street, Suite 4 Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 Telephone: 360.417.2233

FORMAL IDENTIFICATION: Ordinance amending CCC 21.01 DESCRIPTIVE TITLE: Building and Construction Code SECTION-BY-SECTION SUMMARY OF PROPOSED CHANGES: .010, Purpose: Adopts specific appendices of the 2009 I Codes, Section and identifies 2009 Uniform Plumbing Code and the 1997 Abatement of Dangerous Buildings Code as being adopted. .015, Definitions: Adds definition of agricultural buildings and integrates the Washington State Ventilation and Air Quality Code in the building code. .045, Work exempt from permit under International Residential Code (IRC) Section 105.2(1) is amended to read: One-story detached buildings used as tool and storage sheds, playhouses, agricultural buildings and similar uses, provided the floor area does not exceed 400 square feet. (2) The work exempt from permit under International Building Code (IBC) Section 105.2(1) is amended to read: One-story detached accessory structures used as tool and storage sheds, playhouses and similar uses, provided the floor area does not exceed 120 square feet. (3) IBC section 105.2(6) is amended to read: Sidewalks and driveways not more than 30 inches above adjacent grade and not over any basement or story below and are not part of an accessible route. (4) Exempt work under IBC/IRC Section 105.2 shall include the following: Minor construction and alteration activities to single family dwellings (R3 and IRC) and their accessory structures where the total valuation, as determined by the Building Official or as documented by the applicant to the satisfaction of the Building Official, does not exceed $1,500 in any 12month period; provided that the construction and/or alteration activity does not effect any structural components or reduce existing egress, light, air and ventilation conditions. This exemption does not include electrical, plumbing, or mechanical activities. (5) The work exempt under IRC section 105.2(10) is amended to read: Decks not more than 30 inches vertically above grade at any point measured horizontally 36 inches from the edge of the deck to adjacent grade. .050 Uniform Plumbing Code, deletes reference to Appendix B that is adopted by the State and therefore unnecessary. .150 Refunds, new Section setting the existing refund policy to ordinance. It identifies inactivity time frame for permit application, issued permit cancellation, and refund amounts. Pub: Nov. 19, 2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF

WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 0307679309 APN: Legals Clallam Co. 03-30-22-349030 TS No: WA-253344-C I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 0307628221 APN: 06-30-07-509080 TS No: WA-219621-C I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 11/29/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF WA, COUNTY OF CLALLAM, CITY OF PORT ANGELES, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS LOT 4 OF HAYS SHORT PLAT RECORDED ON SEPTEMBER 23, 1998 IN VOLUME 28 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 85, UNDER AUDITORS FILE NO. 1998 1016051, BEING A PORTION OF BLOCK 3 OF VACATED WILDER ADDITION, CALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON Commonly known as: 2434 WEST EDGEWOOD DR PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/17/2005, recorded 5/31/2005, under Auditor's File No. 2005 1157451, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from SHAWN E AMUNDSON AND REGINA L AMUNDSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE COMPANY, A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE COMPANY, A CORPORATION to U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust, Inc., Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-5; BY: GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, ITS ATTORNEY IN FACT. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 6/30/2010 NO.PMT 11 AMOUNT $1,056.02 TOTAL $11,616.22 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 8/23/2010 NO.PMT 2 AMOUNT $1,073.63 TOTAL $2,147.26 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 6/30/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 11 TOTAL $596.97 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 8/23/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 2 TOTAL $108.54 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 5/17/2005 Note Amount: $145,000.00 Interest Paid To: 7/1/2009 Next Due Date: 8/1/2009 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $18,708.06. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $151,404.60 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $136,517.17, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 8/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 11/29/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 11/18/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 11/18/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11/18/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): SHAWN E AMUNDSON AND REGINA L AMUNDSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE 2434 WEST EDGEWOOD DR PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 SHAWN E AMUNDSON AND REGINA L AMUNDSON 108 VIEWCREST AVE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362-6951 by both first class and certified mail on 7/22/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 8/23/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3706463 10/29/2010, 11/19/2010 Pub.: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2010

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605

PUBLIC HEARING Proposed Clallam County Ordinance Amending Clallam County Code, Chapter 21.01 – Building and Construction Code

PROPONENT:

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 12/17/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 3 OF THE H. SAHAR SHORT PLAT, RECORDED MARCH 25, 1983 IN VOLUME 12 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 67, UNDER AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 540791, BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER IN SECTION 22, AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 3 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 1696 W SEQUIM BAY RD SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/29/2006, recorded 3/31/2006, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1177663, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from JACK S. TAMBLYN, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 4/1/2009 THRU 4/30/2009 NO.PMT 1 AMOUNT $3,448.53 TOTAL $3,448.53 FROM 5/1/2009 THRU 4/30/2010 NO.PMT 12 AMOUNT $2,871.93 TOTAL $34,463.16 FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO.PMT 2 AMOUNT $2,543.72 TOTAL $5,087.44 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 9/14/2010 NO.PMT 3 AMOUNT $2,576.55 TOTAL $7,729.65 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 4/1/2009 THRU 4/30/2009 NO. LATE CHARGES 1 TOTAL $153.89 FROM 5/1/2009 THRU 4/30/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 12 TOTAL $1,500.72 FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 2 TOTAL $217.30 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 9/14/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 2 TOTAL $217.30 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 3/29/2006 Note Amount: $472,000.00 Interest Paid To: 3/1/2009 Next Due Date: 4/1/2009 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $57,167.71. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $560,727.09 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $514,862.39, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 12/17/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/6/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/6/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/6/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): JACK S. TAMBLYN, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE 1696 W SEQUIM BAY RD SEQUIM, WA 98382 JACK S. TAMBLYN 1970 SOUTH 7TH AVENUE SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 8/5/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 9/14/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3736691 11/19/2010, 12/10/2010 Pub.: Nov. 19, Dec. 10, 2010

GMC: ‘01 3/4 Sierra. Trailer tow, 4 wheel push button, air, electric brakes, 84K. Nice. See to believe. Canopy, boat rack, 1 owner. $9,950. 360-457-6572 or 360-565-1007

97

4 Wheel Drive

ISUZU: ‘91 Trooper. Runs good, new tires. $1,500/obo. 670-6041

ISUZU: ‘98 Rodeo. 4x4, leather seats, sunroof, new trans., new tires. $4,000. 457-7766 or 452-2602 ext 2.

NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $19,000. Call 360-670-1400

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Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

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4 Wheel Drive

TOYOTA ‘01 SEQUOIA SR5 V-8 automatic, 4x4. Third row seating, gray cloth. Nice, nice, nice! The Other Guys Auto and Truck serving the community since 1996! Military discounts! Lowest buy here pay here interest rates! $12,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 www.peninsula dailynews.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.09-2-00648-5 Sheriff’s No.10000990 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam QUANTUM SERVICING CORPORATION, its successors in interest and/or assigns, PLAINTIFF(S) VS KYLE GREEN AKA KYLE A. GREEN and DANICA GREEN AKA DANICA M. GREEN, Husband and wife; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint DEFENDANT(S) TO: KYLE GREEN AKA KYLE A. GREEN and DANICA GREEN AKA DANICA M. GREEN, Husband and wife; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 525 W 5TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2010 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $228,698.91 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED October 25, 2010 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 525 W 5TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Lot 14, Block 84, of the Original Townsite of Port Angeles, according to Plat thereof recorded in Vol. 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Assessor’s Property Tax Parcel Number: 063000-008465-2007 Pub: Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2010 File No.: 7341.20421 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. HSBC Bank USA N.A. Grantee: Donald L. Cobb and Sherri L. Cobb, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 03-30-28-440050 Abbreviated Legal: Section 28, Township 30 North, Range 3 West Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel A: That portion of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 28, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the South line of the North 50 feet of the South half of the said Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter with the Westerly right of way line of Marshall Road; thence Westerly along said South line a distance of 209 feet to the true point of beginning; thence North parallel with the East line of said Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter a distance of 209 feet; thence West parallel with the South line of said Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter a distance of 209 feet; thence South parallel with the East line of said Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter 209 feet to the South line of the North 50 feet of said South half of the South half of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter; thence Easterly along said South line 209 feet to the point of beginning; together with an easement for ingress, egress and utilities over and across the following described tract; beginning at the intersection of the South line of the North 50 feet of the South half of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter, Section 28, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., with the Westerly right of way line of Marshall Road; thence Westerly along said South line 418 feet; thence North parallel with the East line of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter 209 feet to the true point of beginning; thence North 60 feet; thence East parallel with the South line of said North half of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter 560 feet; more or less, to the Westerly line of Marshall Road; thence Southwesterly along the road to a point that is 209 feet North of the South line of the North 50 feet of the South half of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter when measured at right angles thereto; thence West parallel to the South line of said North half of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter to the true point of beginning. Parcel B: That portion of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 28, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the South line of the North 50 feet of the South half of the said Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter with the Westerly right of way line of Marshall Road; thence Westerly along said South line a distance of 209 feet; thence North parallel with the East line of said Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter a distance of 209 feet; thence East parallel with the South line of the North half of said Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter a distance of 346 feet, more or less, to the Westerly right of way line of the Marshall Road; thence Southwesterly along said right of way line a distance of 245 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 224 Happy Valley Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/29/08, recorded on 06/11/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1222341, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Donald L. Cobb and Sherri L. Cobb, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Diana R. Harrison, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA), as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to HSBC Bank USA N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20091239065. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/23/2010 Monthly Payments $41,500.98 Late Charges $2,075.04 Lender's Fees & Costs ($2,535.03) Total Arrearage $41,040.99 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $405.00 Title Report $878.04 Statutory Mailings $40.09 Recording Costs $121.00 Postings $283.90 Sale Costs $1,128.20 Total Costs $2,856.23 Total Amount Due: $43,897.22 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $276,047.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Donald L Cobb 224 Happy Valley Road Sequim, WA 98382 Sherri L Cobb 224 Happy Valley Road Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/21/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/21/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7341.20421) 1002.125442-FEI Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2010


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

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4 Wheel Drive

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Classified

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056. TOYOTA: ‘96 4-Runner, SR5, loa-ded, gold and wood package, sunroof, Pioneer sound, 12disc changer, 154k miles, $7,000/obo. 360-417-0223

98

Pickups/Vans

BOX TRUCK: ‘00 GMC. 12’ box, runs great. $10,500/obo. 582-9006 CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton. ‘350’ V8, auto, nice. $2,000. 681-7632. CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $7,000/obo. 457-7097 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929. FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157 GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773 TOYOTA: ‘03 Tundra, 93,000 miles, V8, 4x4, access cab, leer canopy, great condition, $14,000/obo. Call 360-448-1440 for more details. TOYOTA: ‘98 Tacoma. 5 speed 2WD, X Cab, great tires, new brakes, bed liner, canopy. $5,050. Call 360-452-6965

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99

Cars

BMW: ‘76 2002 Great restoration foundation, runs good. $1,900. 461-6039. BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,700/ obo. 206-272-0220. BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406

99

Cars

CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-797-4497

CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427

CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817

CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863

CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV ‘08 COBALT LT COUPE Very economical 2.2 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, rear spoiler, only 40,000 miles, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report, balance of factory 5/100 warranty, just reduced! $9,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Cars

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619.

99

CHEV: ‘78 Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition. Fully restored interior and exterior. Silver twotone paint with sport striping. L48 automatic. Runs excellent. $18,500. 425-888-4306 or 425-941-4246 CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649. CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440

CHEV: ‘98 Blazer. 2WD, full pwr Vortex V6, well maintained. Must sell. $2,500/ obo. 360-461-5195.

CHRYSLER ‘06 PACIFICA ALL WD WAGON 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seats, keyless entry, privacy glass, alloy wheels, only 39,000 miles, very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514 DODGE: ‘95 Intrepid. 4 door, white, less than 36K mi., like new, original owner. $4,000. 452-3591. FORD ‘01 TAURUS SE 4 DOOR Extra clean, V6, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD, alloy wheels and more! One week special. Expires 11-27-2010. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com FORD ‘06 TAURUS SE 4 DOOR Economical 3.0 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, keyless entry, ABS, only 30,000 miles, beautiful 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Cars

CHEV: ‘90 Cavalier. Auto, 2 door coupe. $900. 683-8249. FORD: ’62 Thunderbird Coupe. Mostly all restored, approx. $30,000 put into it. $15,900/obo. 460-0401, 582-9597 FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403 FORD: ‘53 2 door sedan. 35K mi. $2,900. 457-9329.

CAMRYS

FORD: ‘90 Tempo. Runs great. 129K miles. 20-25 mpg. $900. 360-775-4854. FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542.

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619. GEO ‘93 PRIZM 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, 5 speed, air, tilt, wheel, AM/FM CD, and more! Expires 11-272010. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com HONDA: ‘06 Civic. 67,000 mi., 2 door coupe, clean, white with black/ gray interior. $10,000/obo 460-0845 HONDA: ‘88 Accord. 2 door, auto, $1,800/ obo. 452-8663. HYUNDAI ‘04 ELANTRA GLS SEDAN 2.0 liter 16 valve 4 cylinder, auto, power windows, locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, cassette stereo, dual front and side impact airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $6,215! Clean and straight! Great fuel economy! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272 LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $3,300. 452-9693 eves.

OVER 31

LINCOLN: ‘99 Town Car. Low miles, must sell. $7,500/obo. 360-670-3856

MPG

EPA estimate, actual mileage will vary.

MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204 MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $4,500/ obo. 582-1292.

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677

$

1,000

MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966

Toyota Cash Back*

OR

MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,400. 360-460-0385

0.0%

MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062.

APR up to 60 months* Includes Toyota 2 Year Year Auto Care Maintenance Plan

GREAT SELECTION! *TFS Tier 1, 11, 111 Customers on Approval of Credit. Offer expires 1/1/11. Does not include tax, license & documentation fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typographical errors. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details.

You Can Count On Us!

www.wildertoyota.com 0B5104578

95 Deer Park Road • Port Angeles – 1-800-927-9379 • 360-457-8511

Cars

MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828 MERCURY: ‘92 Grand Marquis. Fully loaded, new tires, smooth ride, maroon with cloth interior. $950 firm. 452-3537. OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635.

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866

NEW 2011 TOYOTA

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MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909 SUBARU ‘08 LEGACY SPECIAL EDITION ALL WD 4 door, economical 2.5 liter 4 cylinder, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, power moonroof, keyless entry, side airbags, alloy wheels, fog lamps, side airbags, only 32,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/60 warranty, non-smoker, spotless Carfax. $16,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 25,000 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $16,750. 452-6014

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,750. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132. TOYOTA ‘97 COROLLA 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, AM/FM cassette and more! One week special. Expires 11-27-2010. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527. TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183. TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774. TOYOTA: ‘91 Corolla. 4 dr, 5 speed, good shape, runs good, 30+ mpg. $1,650/ obo. 452-8788. VW ‘01 BEETLE GLS TURBO 1.8 liter turbocharged 4 cylinder, 5 speed, alloy wheels, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, heated seats, air, tilt, cruise, cassette, 6 CD changer, dual front airbags. Priced way under Kelley Blue Book! Turbocharged with a 5 speed! Sparkling clean! This is one fun little bug! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,995/obo. 775-9648

101

Legals Clallam Co.

The Seattle Area Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry Journeyman & Apprenticeship Training Trust will be opening up the application process. Applications must be picked up in person on December 6th after a one hour orientation that will be given at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 North Lincoln Street, Port Angeles Wash. This will start at 10:30 AM. All completed applications are due back on December 28th to 321 West Pine Street, Sequim, Wash. Applicants will then be scheduled for the hands on portion of the process, with the successful applicants then scheduled for an interview with the testing committee. Any questions should be directed to Dale Wentworth, 425-2715900 Pub: Nov, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7090.24149 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-10 Grantee: Mary L. Lagerquist, a married woman, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 04-30-34-340200 Abbreviated Legal: N1/2 Pcl. 2, Surv. 2/116, ptn SE SW, 34-30-4 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The North half of Tract 2 of Survey recorded in Volume 2 of Surveys, page 116, on May 2, 1977 under Auditor's File No. 467046, being a portion of the South half of the Southwest quarter of Section 34, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M. Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 2512 Hooker Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/23/03, recorded on 09/10/03, under Auditor's File No. 20031116813, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Mary L. Lagerquist, a married woman, as her separate estate, as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Ameriquest Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Citi Residential Lending, Inc., as attorney-in-fact for Ameriquest Mortgage Company to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-10, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2009-1232404. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/23/2010 Monthly Payments $9,737.34 Late Charges $396.24 Lender's Fees & Costs $169.20 Total Arrearage $10,302.78 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $566.00 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,267.06 Total Amount Due: $11,569.84 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $168,701.15, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Mary L. Lagerquist 2512 Hooker Road Sequim, WA 98382 Spouse of Mary L. Lagerquist 2512 Hooker Road Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/19/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7090.24149) 1002.163457-FEI Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2010

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7886.22492 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PNC Mortgage, a division of PNC Bank, National Association sbm National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank Grantee: Mathew Shapiro, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 948 303 103 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 17, 18, 19 and the South 1/2 of Lot 20 in Block 31 of the supplemental plat of Eisenbeis Addition to the City of Port Townsend, as per plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 24, records of Jefferson County Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1008 Hill Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/25/07, recorded on 05/31/07, under Auditor's File No. 524020, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Mathew Shapiro an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank to National City Mortgage a subsidiary of National City Bank, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 533697. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 8/20/2010 Monthly Payments $10,747.66 Late Charges $495.53 Lender's Fees & Costs $693.63 Total Arrearage $11,936.82 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $776.14 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,555.26 Total Amount Due: $13,492.08 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $206,891.46, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 29, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/18/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Mathew Shapiro 1008 Hill Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Mathew Shapiro P.O Box 597 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Mathew Shapiro 1008 Hill Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Mathew Shapiro P.O Box 597 Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/20/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 8/20/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7886.22492) 1002.163609-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2010


Peninsula Singers concert | This week’s new movies

‘Meet Me in St. Louis’ Peninsula

Page 7

Robert Bronsink

Janessa Fodge, left, Annika Pederson and Jennifer Fodge star in “Meet Me in St. Louis,” opening this weekend at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse.

Peninsula Daily News

The week of November 19-25, 2010


2

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Artists discuss visions at Northwind Arts Showing through November

director of admissions; Erin Morrison, an admissions counselor who depicts Peninsula Spotlight exhibition, which features “urban ecosystems” in her works by seven faculty and work; and Cornish art PORT TOWNSEND — staff members at Seattle’s instructor Kristen Ramirez. A free artists’ talk is set for Cornish College of the Arts. A native of San Francisco, Sunday at the Northwind The show’s contributors Ramirez says she too finds Arts Center, 2409 Jefferson include Eric Swangstu, for- inspiration in cityscapes. St. mer manager of the Art “I try to conjure an The 2 p.m. discussion Mine in Port Hadlock who affection,” she says, “for our will provide insights into disorienting, layered, is now Cornish’s associate this month’s Northwind blighted, urban/suburban American places.” The Cornish artists’ paintings, sculpture, glasswork and photography are on display through NovemPeninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s ber at the Northwind galweekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items lery, which is open from about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: noon to 5 p.m. Thursdays ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to through Mondays. arrive 10 days before Friday publication. For details visit www. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before NorthwindArts.org or publication. phone 360-379-1086. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port

“Sleeper” by Eric Swangstu is one of the works in the Cornish College of the Arts facultystaff show at the Northwind Arts Center in Port Townsend.

May we help?

Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-417-3550 weekdays.

College jazz ensemble to give 2 free concerts Peninsula Spotlight

PORT ANGELES — The first of two free jazz concerts designed to put

Port Angeles in a festive, holiday mood is set for noon Wednesday in the Pirate Union Building, aka

11 am - 10 pm

Mad Maggi

Stop by and See our NEWLY EXPANDED Dining Room and Lounge

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Friday, Nov. 19

Blood, Sweat & Tears in the hourlong show. Then, Wednesday, Dec. 1, the 18-piece band will stage a longer show at 7 p.m. in the college’s Little Theater. Both concerts are free and open to the public.

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Peninsula Spotlight

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

3

Peninsula Singers to ring in the season ‘La Fiesta de la Posada’ adds spice to story of the Nativity By Diane Urbani

Paz

George Stewart; Peninsula Singers pianist Sandy Rawson; and percussionists Sonja Shipley and SEQUIM — The pageantry, Carol Wood from Port Townsend. replete with flowers, trumpets “The trumpets are so grand,” and three kings, begins this Ehling said. And though mariaweekend. chis usually include guitars, Dave and Iola Brubeck’s “La “Sandy [Rawson] is so gifted on Fiesta de la Posada,” a work so the piano, we wanted to use her.” complex it’s not often performed, Following the fanfare, the is the centerpiece of the Peninsingers will process into the sula Singers’ pair of holiday con- church carrying Mexican-style certs at 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 2 paper flowers, which they will p.m. Sunday. then use to adorn the place. Musical director Dewey The music only grows grander. Ehling will conduct, in the The Three Wise Men, portrayed bright, airy Trinity United Methby Trent Pomeroy, Brian Doig odist Church at 100 S. Blake Ave. and Gary McRoberts, will bring the gift of an a cappella trio. Complicated piece And the Peninsula Singers’ Linda Grubb, as Mary, will offer The late Dave Brubeck is of a poignant aria: the Magnificat, course known as an innovative in which she sings, “My Soul jazz pianist. In “La Fiesta,” Magnifies the Lord,” from the though, he created a piece for gospel according to Luke. chorus and mariachi band, “It’s just a spectacular piece of inspired by his boyhood in Calimusic, and very, very difficult to fornia. His wife, Iola, wrote the lyrics sing,” Ehling said. The Magnificat “is very easily for this story of Mary and Joseph searching for an inn — a posada the most difficult thing I’ve ever sung,” said Grubb, who’s been — on the eve of the birth of performing for more than 50 of Jesus. Ehling has brought together a her 68 years. But Brubeck’s creation “has Northwest mariachi band to come to be beautiful,” she added. start the proceedings: Seattle “We’ve all grown to love it.” trumpeters Dan Schmidt and de la

Peninsula Spotlight

Dewey Ehling reacts as the Peninsula Singers hit a high note during a September concert in Sequim.

Diane Urbani

Ehling has led “La Fiesta de la Posada” before, as director of the Anchorage Community Chorus in the 1980s, and he still marvels at Brubeck’s fascinating rhythms and compound meters. In Sequim, the conductor will add some Brubeck piano improvisation, via a recording played during Saturday and Sunday’s performances. “It’s so thrilling to hear him,” Ehling said.

For these holiday concerts, he has also chosen some familiar music related to nature and the Northwest, including “The Green Cathedral” by Carl Hahn. Also on the program are “Joyful Pilgrim,” an original composition by Sequim’s Karen Williamson, plus other original works by local composers Bernard Super, Jane Stevenson and Jaie Livingston. “Come expecting a very festive introduction to the Christmas season,” said Grubb.

de la

Paz/Peninsula Spotlight

And to finish “La Fiesta de la Posada,” the singers will bring in a traditional piñata, break it open and share the candies inside with the audience. Tickets to the Peninsula Singers’ concerts are $14 for adults or $12 for seniors and students, while children 12 and younger are admitted free. To purchase in advance, visit the Itty Bitty Buzz, 110 E. First St. in Port Angeles or The Buzz at 128 N. Sequim Ave. in Sequim.

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4

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Stickshift Annie pulls into PT tonight

Ballentine to perform Alternative-folkie Jake Ballentine brings his banjo, harmonica and his soulful singing to Wine on the Waterfront in The Landing mall in Port Angeles at 8 p.m. and to Damiana’s Best Cellars, 141 W. Washington St., Sequim, at 6 p.m. Saturday.

Based on the Book by Sally Benson Adapted by Christopher Sergel Directed by Richard Stephens

Peninsula Spotlight

Stickshift Annie, aka Annie Eastwood, is bringing her dance-friendly blues and ballads back to Port Townsend for the fourth time. Guitarist Kimball Conant joins her on vocals and plays the six-string and slide guitar; completing the band are bassist Larry Hill, percussionist Phil Bowden and drummer John Rockwell. To find out more about this and the other familyfriendly events presented by Olympic Peninsula Dance of Port Townsend, visit www.Olympic PeninsulaDance.com.

goes from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.; it’s a smoke-free party for all ages. Admission is $15 for adults, or $10 for students and for people with disabilities, or $7 for children age 12 and younger. If those younger kids come with a parent, though, they get in free.

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Tickets: Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front, PA or online at pacommunityplayers.com $12 Adults, $6 Children & Students $6 Tuesdays at the door

Produced by special arrangement with The Dramatic Publishing Company of Woodstock Illinois

Stickshift Annie, aka Annie Eastwood, brings her blues and ballads to the Port Townsend Elks Lodge tonight.

PORT TOWNSEND — Rhythm and blues plus Latin and swing music are all part of the scene tonight as Stickshift Annie and Kimball & the Fugitives arrive at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., off Old Fort Townsend Road. To start the evening, Argentine tango teachers Gary Balhorn and Sofia Christine will give a tango lesson at 7 p.m., and participants need neither a partner nor previous experience. Tango enthusiasts, though, are encouraged to come help beginners. The rest of the dance

Port Angeles Community Players present

Port Angeles Community Playhouse 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. 360-452-6651

Tango lesson to kick off night of music


Peninsula Spotlight

5

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Comedian Gomez A tale of dragon, baron, knight family-friendly production to take PT stage OTA’s begins day after Thanksgiving Peninsula Spotlight

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Spotlight

Harrold Gomez Performs in PT Townsend’s Castle Key, inside Manresa Castle at 651 Cleveland St. The cover charge for the 8:30 p.m. performance is $10. The winner of the 2002 International Seattle Comedy Competition, Gomez has opened for the late Bernie Mac, Chris Rock, Dave Chappelle, Ray Romano and others. For more details about his Castle Key show, phone the restaurant at 360-379-1990.

SEQUIM — A big, black dragon with red eyes, a baron who overtaxes the townspeople, a well-meaning and wandering knight and a very sharp magpie are en route to the playhouse. Yes, Olympic Theatre Arts opens its family show, “The Thwarting of Baron Bollingrew,” next Friday, Nov. 26. It’s pure fun, says director Tracy Williams, yet it comes with an impressive pedigree. The playwright is Robert Bolt, who also wrote “A Man for All Seasons” and the screenplays for “Lawrence of Arabia” and “Doctor Zhivago.” “Baron” is also a bit like “Toy Story,” in that it’s loaded with funny lines fit for grownups as well as children.

The title role is played by seasoned Olympic Theatre Arts thespian Ric Munhall, while our hero, a knight named Sir Oblong Fitzoblong, is brought to goofy life by Dave McInnes. Gallivanting around them are Squire Blackheart, the baron’s henchman played by Jared Stewart, Arie Vlaardingerbroek as Sir Graceless Strongbody, and Damon Little, 9, as Michael Magpie. As The Duke, Lee Harwell sends Sir Oblong off to Bollingrew Island to slay the dragon there and to thwart the baron, who is insensitive to the needs of his good people. All of this ramps up to a satisfying showdown, promised Loren Johnson, the Olympic Theater Arts manager who suggested “The Thwarting” as the company’s holiday show. The play’s 17-member cast includes a flock of children

mances are also slated for Dec. 2 and Dec. 9, and the show closes with the 2 p.m. matinee on Dec. 12. Tickets are $15, or $10 for children younger than 12. OTA members and activeduty military service members enjoy a $2 discount. For details and reservations, visit www.Olympic TheatreArts.org or phone 360-683-7326.

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PORT TOWNSEND — One night after watching the premiere of Eddie Murphy’s HBO special “Delirious” in 1983, Harrold Gomez had an epiphany: Not only could he earn a living “talking crazy,” but unlike most money-making opportunities in the New Haven, Conn., housing projects where he grew up, this one was legal. Today, Gomez is wellknown on the Northwest comedy scene. He’s also performed in 43 states and two Canadian provinces, gamboling across the humor map from tales of his twin daughters to stories of his 70-yearold dad, who “refuses to cut his Jheri Curl,” that glossy, wavy hairstyle made famous by Michael Jackson during the 1980s. This Saturday night, Gomez — plus another young comic he’ll bring to open the show — will entertain at Port

amid an ensemble of veteran actors, Williams added. “We have some really talented kids . . . we laugh and have such a great time,” she said, adding that there’s no heavy message here, just a light moral to the story. Shows are 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays starting Nov. 26, and 2 p.m. Sundays starting Nov. 28. Two 7:30 p.m. perfor-


6

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Sneak peek at future Teens show off chops in unique presentation By Diane Urbani

de la

Peninsula Spotlight

Things to come The TeenLab show is “a chance to see what is about to happen artistically,” in the Port Townsend area, Bethel said. “These are the people who are going to be [in local theaters] in the next four to 10 years.” Among the performers, who range in age from 13 to 18, are Molly Brown, Carla Davies, Rosa

Downtown Community Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Fountain

Production opens up world of possibilities Audience to help choose show’s ending By Diane Urbani

Tom Giske

Freeman Luoma practices for the TeenLab show this weekend at the Key City Playhouse in Port Townsend. Davies, Freeman Luoma, Tanner Matthew, Logan McCubbin-Troy, Jason Noltemeier and Raquel Noltemeier. One skit tells of a magic pen that makes its drawings real. In another, two robbers are in the middle of a bank heist when they discover they forgot to bring the rope. Other monologues take off from the question “If we can land a man on the moon, we ought to be able to . . .” In yet another comedic bite, two girls are guy-watching at a sporting event. What unfolds is plain charming, Bethel said. The show is made up of 25 short pieces — and a good mix of comedy and tragedy, he added.

Key City production coordinator Erin Lamb, for her part, encourages community members to come see the TeenLab performers dish out an unusual form of theater. “People will get to watch the outcome of unique educational opportunity,” she said, “happening right in their backyard.” General admission to the TeenLab performances is $10, or $5 for students. Advance tickets are available with a credit card by phoning the Key City office at 360-3790195. Visit www.keycitypublic theatre.org for more information.

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“We’re only entertaining four possibilities, of the 16 potential endings,” said director Charlie PORT TOWNSEND — Love, Bethel. That’s two possible endmarriage and other dramas are ings each night, with the chosen about to branch off of one womone ultimately selected with help an’s decision of whether to have from the audience. a cigarette. This show “is about the com“Intimate Exchanges: Volume edy of human relationships,” I,” the last gasp of Key City Pub- Bethel added. Thanks to the lic Theatre’s WordPlay series, fea- audience, Monday’s denouement tures Celia Teasdale, whose may well differ greatly from Sunsmoke — or lack of — has the day’s. a power to set in motion a series of Bethel, who works in regional fortunate and unfortunate theater in the New York City events. area, is visiting Port Townsend to stage “Intimate” along with the Cigarette’s impact TeenLab project, which has performances at the Key City PlayThe play, written by Tony house Saturday night and SunAward winner Alan Ayckbourn, day afternoon. He’s also getting starts at 7 p.m. this Sunday and ready to appear in “Seven Poor Monday at the Key City PlayTravellers,” one of Key City’s house, 419 Washington St. in three holiday shows scheduled downtown Port Townsend. In it, for December. people might get divorced or Admission to WordPlay is a married, start affairs, have chilsuggested donation of $10. Prodren or die — because of Celia’s ceeds from the entire 2010 Wordcigarette. Play series support Key City’s When Ayckbourn wrote “Intieducation programs at Grant mate,” he included 16 possible Street Elementary School in Port endings, while stipulating that Townsend, summer theater all of the characters be played by camps for teenagers and annual only two actors. So, playing all scholarships. the roles in Key City’s staged For more information, visit reading will be Judith Glass Col- www.keycitypublictheatre.org or lins and Andrew Tree. phone 360-379-0195. de la

Peninsula Spotlight

Paz

PORT TOWNSEND — There’s angst of course, but there’s also gentle comedy. TeenLab, a monthlong acting and writing intensive at Key City Public Theatre, has given birth to a show featuring sketches, monologues, dialogues, poetry and even a riff about cows on the moon. All of the above will leap onto the stage at 8 p.m. Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St. in downtown Port Townsend. Charlie Bethel, a New York director and performer, has orchestrated this second annual TeenLab, and he’s calling it the shape of dramatic things to come.

Peninsula Spotlight


Peninsula Spotlight

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

7

‘Meet Me in St. Louis’ PA Community Players sing out in comedy By Diane Urbani

Peninsula Spotlight

de la

Paz

PORT ANGELES — It’s about time we took two hours out to laugh together. So believe the cast and crew of “Meet Me in St. Louis,” the classic comedy about a houseful of sisters — starring real-life sisters — opening tonight at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse. “Meet Me” was of course a huge hit movie in 1944, a “Technicolor romance of gaiety and song!” according to the trailer. With Judy Garland and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” it’s one of the best-loved films in American cinema history. But this chance to experience “Meet Me” as done by the Port Angeles Community Players, instead of watching the old movie on television, is one worth taking, promises Richard Stephens. He’s the director, and he’s plain in love with what’s unfold-

Robert Bronsink

Janessa Fodge, left, her sister, Jennifer Fodge, right, and Faith Chamberlain, standing at center, watch as Hope Chamberlain carries on in “Meet Me in St. Louis.”

Jennifer Fodge, who plays 18-year-old Rose, acknowledges that she and her sisters do get into some trouble as they assert themselves. But when things go wild and awry, it’s all funny, Fodge says. “There’s a whole lot of comedy Story of sisters in it. And it’s all good, clean “Meet Me” is the story of Rose, humor. There’s no violence,” Esther, Agnes and Tootie Smith, except for when she slaps her and their all-out effort to stop boyfriend John (Lukas their father from accepting a pro- Sarkowsky) because she thinks motion at work and moving the he hurt her little sister, Agnes family to New York. The World’s (Hope Chamberlain). John later Fair is coming to their home gets a chance to explain. town of St. Louis, for one thing; they adore their house, and Rose Betwixt and between is in love with the boy next door. Rose is caught between womThe girls put together grand schemes; there are confrontations anhood and childhood, Fodge that escalate and plots that back- said, adding that one of the challenging parts of her role was the fire, and “anybody who’s had a back-and-forth. family can relate to the antics,” “I love the sibling relationsays Stephens. ships,” said Janessa Fodge, Jenni“This looks like a very proper fer’s younger sister who portrays Edwardian comedy, but these Rose’s sister, Esther. She knows girls are anything but proper.”

ing inside the intimate playhouse. “It’s an absolutely beautiful production, with gorgeous sets and costumes; it’s family friendly, but not in a sugary-sweet, cloying way,” Stephens began.

all about those: The Fodge family has three boys and three girls. Alongside Janessa and Jennifer, “Meet Me” also stars three girls from the Chamberlain family: Sisters Hope and Faith play Agnes and Tootie, the two youngest Smith girls, while their cousin Danielle Chamberlain plays the snobby girl from New York who tries to steal the heart of the Smith girls’ older brother Lon (Peter Hanes). These girls have their dads on stage with them, too: brothers Tim and Steve Chamberlain, who play the toadying Mr. Duffy and boss Mr. Dodge, respectively. Veteran actor George Wood plays Mr. Smith, father to the five Smith kids, while Barbara Frederick is matriarch Mrs. Smith. “I’ve approached her as a mother who lets her kids have some freedom but reins them in when they need it,” Frederick said. She and Stephens describe the play as a high-spirited cele-

bration of family and connection to one’s home — something they reckon we can use right now. “There’s so much bad news out there,” Stephens said. “People want to see that there are good families who can hang together, love each other and work through their problems together.” Janessa Fodge sums up “Meet Me” more succinctly.

Fun production “It’s a blast to be in,” she says. Curtain time for “Meet Me in St. Louis” is 7:30 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Tuesday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Tickets are $12, or $6 for students for all shows except on Tuesday nights, when all seats sell for $6 at the door. Outlets include Odyssey Books, 114 W. Front St., and www.PACommunityPlayers.com.


8

Friday, November 19, 2010

Keep up with the sights and sounds on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Peninsula Spotlight Every Friday in Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

PS Calendar: Port Townsend Friday OlyCAP’s “Dinner and a Murder” — Not just a show, but the real-life wedding between director-writer Ramon Dailey and actress Tiela Short. Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120

Spinnaker Place, 5 p.m. Tickets $50 at www.brownpaper tickets.com/event/110125, or phone Bob Logue 360-3852571, ext. 6324, or visit www. ptmystery.com. Dance — The Syncopaths

play while New England’s George Marshall calls. Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., 7:30 p.m. All dances taught. Admission $12 for adults, $6 for youth younger than 18. Olympic Peninsula Dance — Stickshift Annie with Kimball & the Fugitives. Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Admission $15, or $10 for disabled and for students with ID; $7 for kids 12 and younger. Open to all ages and smokefree. Beginning tango lesson with Gary Balhorn and Sofia Christine, 7 p.m. For information, visit www.olympicpeninsuladance.com or phone 360385-6919 or 360-385-5327.

day and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Admission $10 or $5 for students. Visit www.keycitypublictheatre.org. Comedy night — Standup comedian Harrold Gomez. Castle Key Restaurant, 651 Cleveland St., 8:30 p.m. $10 cover. Phone 360-379-1990.

Sunday WordPlay Reading Series — Staged reading of comedy “Intimate Exchanges: Volume I” by Alan Ayckbourn. Key City Public Theatre at Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., 7 p.m. Sunday and Monday. Suggested donation $10. For more information at www. keycitypublictheatre.org.

Monday

Saturday TeenLab — Local teens perform contemporary works written for and about their generation. Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., 8 p.m. Satur-

Coffee Concerts at Turtle Bluff III — Pianists Gwendolyn Moore and Barbara Hinchcliff. 523 Blue Ridge Road, 10 a.m. Monday and Tuesday. Phone 360-385-3626.

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Peninsula Spotlight

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

9

PS    Nightlife Clallam County Port Angeles Bar N9NE (229 W. First St.) — Open mic Thursday, 9 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Spence Brothers Band (rock) tonight and Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., $3; Sundowners, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The Junction Roadhouse (US Highway 101 and state Highway 112 junction) — Barry Burnett, Sunday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Jason Mogi and friends Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Wine on the Waterfront (115 E. Railroad Ave.) — Songwriter Jake Ballentine (vocals and bluesy harmonica, folk) tonight, 8 p.m., $3; Cort Armstrong (country with guitar), Saturday, 8 p.m., $3.

Kokopelli (203 E. Front St.) — Howly Slim (vocals and guitar), Tuesday, 6 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn

Coo Coo Nest (1017 E. First St.) — T Baggin Bandits (rockabilly), Saturday, 9 p.m.

Port Angeles Senior Center (Seventh and Peabody streets) — Wally and the Boys (ballroom dance favorites) Tuesday 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first timers free.

Cracked Bean (108 Del Guzzi Dr.) — Open mic with hosts Larry and Rene Bauer, Thursday, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

R Bar (132 E. Front St) — DJ OB1, tonight, 9 p.m.; Big Fine Daddies (rock) Saturday, 10 p.m., $4.

Dupuis Restaurant (256861 Highway 101) — Bob and Dave (blues), Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Smuggler’s Landing Restaurant and Lounge (115 Railroad Ave.) — Dave and Rosalie Secord’s Luck of the Draw Band Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. Highway 101) — Acoustic jam hosted by Victor Reventlow, Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The Veela Cafe (133 E. First St.) — Jim Lind (rock and country) tonight, 7:30 p.m.

The Buzz (128 N. Sequim Ave. ) — Open mic hosted by Kelly Thomas, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Cedars at Dungeness (1965 Woodcock Road) — Robin Lynn tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Damiana’s Best Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) — Jake Ballentine (contemporary acoustic folk music) Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) — Gil Yslas and Rick May, tonight, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.; Moderately Loud Rock Saturday, 9 p.m., $3; nostalgia with Mary Lou Montgomery (jazz) Monday, 5:30 p.m. to

8:15 p.m.; Final Approach (“boomer” music) Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Chantilly Lace (open mic jam), Thursday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

6 p.m.; Jim Nyby (piano, harmonica, vocals with blues, ballads, jazz and soul), Sunday, 5:30 p.m.; Buzz Rogowski (jazz and originals) Thursday, from 6 p.m.

7 Cedars Casino (270756 Highway 101) — Robbie Walden and the Gunslingers (country) tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ OB1, Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Timebenders Sunday, 6 p.m. to 9:15 p.m.; comedy night with Andrew Sleighter and Vince Valenzuela Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.

Hadlock House (141 Chimacum Road) — Mastermind Productions karaoke with DJ B-Man, tonight and Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.

West End A Work In Progress/Cafe Paix (71 N. Forks Ave., Forks) — Therapy Session (country, blues, folksy music) Saturday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Inn at Port Hadlock (310 Hadlock Bay Road) — Open mic hosted by Dave Sheehan Thursday, 7 p.m.

Port Townsend Banana Leaf (609 Washington St.) — Howly Slim (vocal and guitar) tonight, 5 p.m.

Port Hadlock

The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — 41 Miles (acoustic folk rock),Saturday, 8 p.m.; open mic Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue.

Ajax Cafe (271 Water St.) — Ahmad Baabahar (guitar with vocals), tonight, 6 p.m.; Ezekiel Kelly (fingerstyle guitar) Saturday,

Sirens (823 Water St.) — Otis Heat (vocals, guitar and drums), tonight, 9 p.m., $5; Matt Sircely and friends (mandolinist,

Jefferson County

songwriter), Saturday, 9 p.m., $5; open mic Wednesday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; karaoke Thursday, 9 p.m. Undertown (211 Taylor St.) — Mike and Val James, DJ party tonight, 7:30 p.m.; Jim Nyby & the F Street Band Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Upstage (923 Washington St.) — Delta Hot House Band tonight, 8 p.m., $8; Alice Stuart and the Formerlys blues band Saturday, 8 p.m., $12; Monday Night Live Open Mic, 6 p.m. Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — Brian “Buck” Ellard (guitar and fiddle, covers and originals with country flavor), Saturday, 9 p.m., $3; open mic hosted by Greg Vinson, Tuesday, 8 p.m. This listing, which runs every Friday, is to announce live entertainment at Clallam and Jefferson county night spots. Call in your information by Tuesday to 360417-3527, fax it to 360-417-3521, or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

December 11, 2010

Port Angeles Symphony Adam Stern, Music Director/Conductor

Holiday Concert CORELLI Concerto Grosso in g, Op. 6 #8, “Christmas” J. STRAUSS Wiener Blut • HANDEL Water Music SULLIVAN Overture, “H.M.S. Pinafore”

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Morning Dress Rehearsal PAHS Auditorium 10 am $5 Individual, $10 Family

Ticket Information Port Angeles: Port Book and News, 104 E. First Sequim: BeeDazzled at The Buzz, 130 N. Sequim Ave. Tickets also available at the door.

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10

Friday, November 19, 2010

PS Sequim Friday Sequim Museum & Arts Center — “Autumn on the Olympic Peninsula.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Free. Phone 360-683-8110.

Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

PS Calendar: Port Angeles

“M*A*S*H” — Sequim High School Performing Arts Center, 601 N. Sequim Ave. 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Tickets $7 general and $5 for seniors, children and students with ASB cards at door one hour before show.

Friday

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Global Lens film series — “Ordinary People” from Serbia, 4 p.m., “The Shaft” from China, 7 p.m., Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., $5 per film.

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Elwha Power.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Free. Phone 360-457-3532.

Friday, Dec. 17th – 7:30pm Saturday, Dec. 18th – 3:00 & 7:30pm Sunday, Dec. 19th – 3:00pm

Reading for Hunger Relief — Peninsula College faculty writers entertain with poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction in support of Sequim and Port Angeles food banks. Raymond Carver room, Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Suggested donation $5 and/or nonperishable food items.

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Monday Librarian Nancy Pearl — Discusses her latest book, Book Lust To Go: Reading Recommendations for Travelers, Vagabonds and Dreamers. Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Free. Phone 360-4526367.

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“Meet Me in St. Louis” — Port Angeles Community Players at Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. 7:30 p.m. Friday, Saturday, Tuesday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets $14 at Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St.; online at www.PACommunityPlayers.com.

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Peninsula Spotlight

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

11

PS At the Movies: Week of November 19-25 Port Angeles Note: Showtimes at the Deer Park Cinema may change Wednesday, Thanksgiving Eve, when two new movies open. “Due Date” (R) — Peter Highman (Robert Downey Jr.) will be a dad for the first time when his wife gives birth in five days. A chance encounter with aspiring actor Ethan Tremblay (Zach Galifianakis) launches a road trip crosscountry. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily, plus 9 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (PG13) — Without the guidance and protection of their professors, Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), Ron (Rupert Grint) and Hermione (Emma Watson) begin a mission to destroy the Horcruxes, the sources of Voldemort’s immortality. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:45 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. daily plus 10:15 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Morning Glory” (PG-13)

■  Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360452-7176. ■  Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■  The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■  Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883.

________ Motion Picture Association of America rating definitions G — General audiences. All ages admitted. PG — Parental guidance suggested; some material may not be suitable for children. PG-13 — Special parental guidance strongly suggested for children younger than 13. R — Restricted. Younger than 17 requires parent. NC-17 — Adults only. NR — Not rated by MPAA. — Newly hired as a producer on a national morning TV program called “Daybreak,” Becky Fuller (Rachel Mc­Adams) decides to revitalize the lowrated show by bringing in legendary anchorman Mike Pomeroy (Harrison Ford). At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 9:20 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 12:55 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “The Next Three Days” (PG-13) — Life for John (Russell Crowe) and Lara (Elizabeth Banks) Brennan is perfect until she is convicted of a murder she says she did not commit. With Brian Dennehy and Liam Neeson. At the Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 4:55 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 9:25 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Red” (PG-13) — The CIA targets a team of former agents for assassination. Starring Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and

Helen Mirren. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 9:25 today and Saturday, plus 12:45 p.m. and 2:55 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Pine. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 9:10 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:10 p.m. and 3:10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Skyline” (PG-13) — Jarrod and Elaine (Eric Balvour and Scottie Thompson) travel to Southern California to visit Jarrod’s friend, Terry (Donald Faison). But what is supposed to be a fun getaway turns into a weekend of terror as a cluster of strange, mesmerizing lights signals the arrival of a malevolent alien invasion. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 7:05 p.m. daily, plus 9:05 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:05 p.m. and 3:05 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Tangled” 3D (PG) — In this Disney musical comedy, when the kingdom’s mostwanted bandit, Flynn Rider (voice of Zachary Levi), hides in a convenient tower, he immediately becomes a captive of Rapunzel (voice of Mandy Moore). At Deer Park Cinema. Starts Wednesday.

“Unstoppable” (PG-13) — When a massive, unmanned locomotive laden with toxic chemicals roars out of control, a veteran engineer and a young conductor must risk their lives to save those in the runaway’s path. Starring Denzel Washington and Chris

“The Father of My Children” (NR) — Gregoire Canvel (Louis-Do de Lencquesang) has everything a man could want: a wife he loves (Chiara Caselli), three delightful children and his dream job — he is a film producer. But storm clouds are gathering. At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily through Tuesday.

T’s Restaurant

Fine Dining with Northwest Cuisine

Enjoy A DrAft BEEr With onE PiEcE fish & chiPs

DEER PARK CINEMAS ALL FILMS PRESENTED IN D.L.P. DIGITAL CINEMA 100% DIGITAL PICTURE AND SOUND

HARRY POTTER

& THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PT.1 UNSTOPPABLE MORNING GLORY MEGAMIND 3D

DOLBY DIGITAL

3D

RED

LINCOLN THEATRE

THE NEXT 3 DAYS SKYLINE DUE DATE

6

$ 00

Fri., Sat. & Sun. Nov. 12-14 & Fri., Sat. & Sun. Nov. 19-21

0B5102642

385-0700

www.pen-movies.com

for just

and the arrival of the Chetzemoka!

141 Hudson St. Port Townsend Ts-restaurant.com

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (PG13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theater. Special expanded show times scheduled; phone 360-385-3883 or visit

0B5103418

AnniveRSARy

WA520-CL-48866

112 Kala Square Place, Suite 1, Port Townsend, WA 98368 • 360-379-6425

“My Dog Tulip” (NR) — In this animated drama, a confirmed bachelor who dislikes dogs adopts an Alsatian and forms a close bond with his new companion. With the voices of Christopher Plummer, Isabella Rossellini and Lynn Redgrave. At the Rose Theatre. Showtime 4:30 p.m. daily through Tuesday.

“Howl” (NR) — The origin, meaning and impact of Allen Ginsberg’s landmark poem come to the fore, as a prosecutor tries to get the work banned on the basis of “Burlesque” (PG-13) — Ali obscenity. At the Rose The(Christina Aguilera) is a small- atre. Showtime 7:20 p.m. daily town woman with a great voice through Tuesday. who leaves her troubled life behind and follows her dreams “Burlesque” (PG-13) — to Los Angeles. She lands a See synopsis under Port job as a cocktail waitress at Angeles listings. At Rose The-

6TH

Please drop by and participate in our festive food drive at: 112 Kala Square Place, Suite 1, Port Townsend, WA 98368 Donations of turkeys, canned goods and everything else will be gratefully accepted during the holiday season for the Jefferson County Food Bank. Please help others during these tough times.

Cobalt Mortgage

Port Townsend

Celebrating our

Turkey for Tough Times and Fixin’s for Families

atre. Starts Wednesday.

the Burlesque Lounge, a once-majestic theater that houses an inspired musical revue led by Tess (Cher), the proprietor. At Deer Park Cinema. Starts Wednesday.

0B5104143

“Megamind 3D (PG) — Though he is the most brilliant supervillain the world has known, Megamind (voice of Will Ferrell) is the least-successful. Thwarted time and again by heroic Metro Man (voice of Brad Pitt), Megamind is more surprised than anyone when he actually manages to defeat his longtime enemy. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m. and 9:20 p.m. daily, plus 12:50 p.m. and 2:55 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Where to find the cinemas

no substitutions, dine-in only, not valid with other coupons or discounts

DISCOUNT PRICES

ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6 P.M.

peninsuladailynews.com


12

Friday, November 19, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

www.lesschwab.com

winter driving? PROXES ST II

ECLIPSE

our Best sport truck tire!

WINTERCAT XT

STARTING AT

155

44

superior performance

FlAt REpAiR • RoAd HAzARd

ALL SEASON

RELIABILITY LONG LASTING

FREE

TREAD

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS FlAt REpAiR • RoAd HAzARd

70,000 MILE

eXcellent Wet/dry traction

WARRANTY Featuring a modern tread design, these quality traction radials offer multi-sipes and are pinned for studs for safe winter driving.

The Proxes ST II is a premium high-performance tire for SUVs, sport trucks and select crossovers. It is avail-

able in a broad range of OE and plus fitment sizes.

tread design may vary

YouR SIze IN STock, cAll foR SIze & PRIce

tread design may vary

P155/80SR-13

pinned for studs

H, v, W & Z rated

FREE

67 99

Winter traction

255/60VR-17

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS

STARTING AT

SizE

SUPERMARkET

235/65TR-16 215/65TR-17 185/60TR-15 195/60TR-15 205/60TR-16 215/60TR-16 225/60TR-16

PRICE 149.46 171.68 98.93 102.79 116.60 123.58 135.98

SizE

SUPERMARkET

215/60TR-17 225/60TR-17 225/60TR-18 195/55TR-15 205/55TR-16 215/55TR-17 225/55TR-17

PRICE 169.15 175.63 194.65 124.67 132.68 156.82 159.19

A quality all season tire with a 70,000 mile warranty. It’s modern tread pattern provides

FREE

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS

excellent handling for increased vehicle safety.

FlAt REpAiR • RoAd HAzARd

YouR SIze IN STock, cAll foR SIze & PRIce

see your local les scHWaB for details on tire siping! NON-SIPED

SIPED

GRIPPING EDGES

GRIPPING EDGES

improved Braking!

Research has shown that the most effective braking power occurs immediately prior to losing traction. Siping extends the window allowed for maximum braking power by giving the existing tread a helping hand. In the examples above, notice how the siped tire has dozens more grippin g edges.

CREDIT IS EASY les scHWaB revolving credit plan ENDING MINIMUM MONTHLY BALANCE PAYMENT DUE $0.01 - $10.00 . . . . . . . . . . BALANCE $10.01 - $50.00 . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 $50.01 - $100.00 . . . . . . . . . . $15.00 $100.01 - $250.00. . . . . . . . . . $25.00 $250.01 - $500.00 . . . . . . . . . $50.00 $500.01 - $1,500.00 . . . . . . . . $75.00 $1,500.01 - $2,500.00. . . . . . $150.00 OVER $2,500.00 . . . . 1/3 OF BALANCE

or cHoose

90 days

same as casH o.a.c.

ask store for details payment programs on approved credit daily percentage rate of 0.04931% - 18% per annum

452-7691

2527 e. HIgHWAY 101

Will siping adversely affect my tires?

TIE BARS

Siping will not adversely affect your tires or tire’s performance in any way. The tread on your tires retains all of its strength due to the patented spiral cutting process. This process leaves uncut areas known as tie bars keeping your tread strong.

NON-SIPED

SIPED

SURFACE TEST

SURFACE TEST

LES SCHWAB SHOCKS mountain ryder ii

39

mountain ryder Xt

95

Our Most Popular SUV and Mini Pickup Shock (2WD and 4WD)

ALIGNMENT

rmX monotuBe

49 95

each

79 95

each

each

Our Most Popular Full Size Truck Application

High Pressure Nitrogen Gas and Floating Piston Technology combine to create the fastest responding shock ever

We know the importance of having good shocks. that is why we offer a variety to choose from. Worn shocks can cause uneven tire wear, damage suspension components, and also cause abnormal drift, sway, and bounce to your vehicle. SHOCk INSTALLATION IS ExTRA.

Hours

8 A.m.-6 P.m. mon.-FrI. 8 A.m. - 5 P.m. sAt.

Better traction!

The tread surface on your tire is made up of many smaller surfaces known as “Tread Blocks.” The reason for so many surfaces is especially important when it comes to icy or wet road conditions. The “Tread Blocks” get their gripping power not from their many smooth surfaces, but from the even more numerous sharp surrounding edges. Siping provides more of these gripping edges.

sequIm 360-683-7261 802 e. WAsHIngton

standard alignment

28 50

tHrust alignment

56 25

4 WHeel alignment (ShimS included)

83 50

proper WHeel alignment Helps ensure Better Handling and tire mileage

Port toWnsend 360-385-0124 2355 sIms WAY

0B5102589

Port Angeles

SPIRAL CUT


PDN11192010c