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Border Patrol in ONP? Bill adding powers in wilderness mulled By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

The U.S. Border Patrol could build roads in Olympic National Park and other wilderness areas without approval from the federal departments of Interior and Agriculture under legislation that has survived a key congressional committee’s vote. House leadership is deciding if the National ONLINE . . . Security and Lands Protection Act, approved 26-17 on Oct. 5 by the House Committee on Natural Resources, will go to the House floor for a vote, committee spokeswoman Crys- ■ Text of bill, other tal Feldman said Friday. The bill, HR 1505, would details: grant broad new powers to http:// U.S. Customs and Border tinyurl.com/ Protection — the umbrella pdnbill1 agency for the Border Patrol — within 100 miles of the northern border with Canada and southern border with Mexico. Under the provisions of the bill, the agency would have “immediate access” to any public land managed by the federal government “for purposes of conducting activities that assist in securing the border (including access to maintain and construct roads, construct a fence, use vehicles to patrol and set up monitoring equipment).” Turn

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John Gussman/Doubleclick Productions

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arth and debris are lifted by explosives in the above image of a former spillway of the Elwha Dam taken from video by John Gussman of Sequim, who is chronicling the removal of the dam and its companion Glines Canyon Dam up the Elwha River. The blasting of layers of the spillway’s concrete foundation and bedrock will form a diversion channel through which the river will run starting Monday. At right, an image from the Glines Canyon Dam webcam just before dusk Saturday shows water cascading over notches cut into the dam. Lake Mills behind it is draining as the former high dam is lowered and eventually removed. Gussman’s video — including a slow-motion replay — as well as the dam webcams are accessible via www.peninsuladailynews.com. Related story on Page A5

National Park Service

200 ‘occupy’ PA in march to park By Tom Callis

ALSO . . .

Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

■ Occupy demonstrations grow across U.S., around globe/A4

test organizers in Port Angeles, said that between 10 and 20 people planned to stay overnight at the park in solidarity with protestors in New York City, who have camped on Wall Street for the past month. Deputy Police Chief Brian Smith said police would issue citations to anyone who camps and refuses to leave. “We don’t offer an all-night campground at a park,” he said. Cloud said they plan to leave if asked. “We’re not trying to cause any strife,” she said. The protest attracted many first-time demonstrators who said they are frustrated by ongoing economic problems they believe were caused by the large banks that have been insulated from their effects. Turn

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Justin Kitts of Port Angeles, dressed as his own version of Captain America, expresses his opinion of the U.S. economy as 8-year-old Julius Johnmson of Port Angeles, lower left, holds his own sign during an “Occupy Port Angeles” rally at Veterans Park on Saturday.

PORT ANGELES — An Occupy Wall Street demonstration, such as those that have sparked a movement against growing economic inequality nationwide, drew about 200 people to Port Angeles on Saturday. Protesters gathered at Veterans Memorial Park on Lincoln Street to call for an end to corporate influence on government and speak out against the excesses of big business. “It’s about time we say enough is enough,” said David Douglas of Ellensburg, who was visiting Port Angeles and decided to join the protest, which was held a day after a similar rally in Port Townsend that drew more than 200 people. To honks of support from passing motorists, the protesters marched to symbols of Wall Street, including Chase Bank branch downtown and to Bank of America on Eighth Street. Anami Cloud, one of the pro-

Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C3 Commentary/Letters A8 Couples *PW Dear Abby C4 Deaths C7 Movies C3 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

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UpFront

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Actor Hagman diagnosed with cancer

Jackson case

A University of California, Los Angeles, sleep expert described Dr. Conrad Murray’s use of a cocktail of drugs on Michael Jackson as LARRY HAGMAN “unethical, disturbing and HAS been diagnosed with beyond comprehension.” cancer. The comThe bination of 80-year-old drugs used actor is as Jackson famous for struggled to playing J.R. fall asleep Ewing on on the day “Dallas.” he died was In a a “recipe for Murray statement Hagman disaster” Friday, he and ultimately caused his said: “As J.R., I could get death, Dr. Nader Kamanaway with anything — gar testified Thursday. bribery, blackmail and Under questioning by adultery. But I got caught Murray’s attorney, J. by cancer.” Michael Flanagan, the Hagman declined to specify what kind of cancer witness was asked to tell he’s contracted but said it’s jurors what he knew about “a very common and treat- the events of June 25, able form.” 2009, the day of Jackson’s He plans to continue death. working on a new reboot of “To summarize, Mr. “Dallas” for TNT, which Jackson was receiving very begins production Monday. inappropriate therapy in a The new “Dallas” home setting, receiving focuses on the Ewing offvery potent therapies withspring as they clash over out monitoring,” Kamangar the future of the family said. dynasty. He said diazepam The original prime-time (Valium), lorazepam (Atisoap opera aired on CBS van) and midazolam from 1978 to 1991. (Versed) were given to the Hagman underwent a sleepless star during a liver transplant in the mid- 10-hour period throughout 1990s. the night and morning. Said Hagman: “As we all “This cocktail was a recknow, you can’t keep J.R. ipe for disaster,” Kamangar down!” said.

Facing foreclosure Court records show comedian Chris Tucker is facing foreclosure on his multimillion-dollar mansion in Montverde, Fla. Records show SunTrust Bank filed papers against the California resident with Lake County Tucker courts earlier this week. According to documents, Tucker bought the 10,000-square-foot lakefront home for $6 million in 2007 — before the housing market crashed. The bank claims he still owes more than $4.4 million, but the county property appraiser has the home currently assessed at $1.6 million. The Orlando Sentinel reported that the house is located in the Bella Collina development, a 1,900-acre community overlooking lakes and a championship golf course. Calls placed by The Associated Press to Tucker’s Hollywood representatives seeking comment were not returned as of late Thursday night. Tucker is best known for staring alongside Jackie Chan in three “Rush Hour” films. Other credits include “Friday,” ‘’Money Talks” and “The Fifth Element.”

Passings

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: During these tough economic times, do you feel more generous toward others, less generous or about the same as before the Great Recession? More generous  Less generous 

25.6% 18.7%

About the same  55.7% Total votes cast: 1,009 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

By The Associated Press

RAY AGHAYAN, 83, an Emmy-winning costume designer who worked on more than a dozen Academy Award shows and the opening and closing ceremonies of the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, has died. A spokeswoman for the Costume Designers Guild told the Los Angeles Times that Mr. Aghayan died of natural causes Monday at his Los Angeles home. Mr. Aghayan designed costumes for Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross and many other stars. He and his lifetime partner, Bob Mackie, shared the first Emmy ever awarded for costume design in 1967. Mr. Aghayan went on to win two other Emmys. He also was nominated for Oscars three times.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

Song Contest in Naples, Italy, where he placed 10th. As late as 2003, he performed in Richard Strauss’ “Ariadne auf Naxos” in Malmo. The Deutsche Oper dedicated a performance Friday of Verdi’s “Messa da Requiem” to Mr. Wixell.

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vocal opposition figures in a country where those who dissent publicly risk reprisals or imprisonMrs. Pollan ment. in 2010 Even after the Ladies accomplished the goal for which they were founded — their husbands’ freedom — the group continued to protest against the government, which excoriated the women as traitors doing the bidding of the United States.

Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

History repeats itself in Clallam County. LAURA POLLAN, 63, William B. “Billy” Smith a Cuban dissident who has appointed bailiff of Clalfounded the opposition lam County Superior Court group Ladies in White and to fill a vacancy caused by for nearly a decade staged the death of Harry Bishop. weekly protest marches Smith was bailiff of the with other wives of political court in Port Angeles 37 prisoners to press for their years ago, in 1899. release, died Friday in “Those were the days Havana, her husband said. when the sheriff was his Hector Maseda said his own deputy and often was Did You Win? wife died of a “cardiorespiforced to ride horseback to State lottery results ratory attack” after doctors round up jurors and prisons had tried for nearly an both,” Smith said today in Friday’s Daily Game: hour to revive her. Mrs. Polan interview. 8-8-9 lan had been in intensive _________ Smith later became ClalFriday’s Keno: 04-06care for acute respiratory lam County auditor, until 08-14-15-22-26-28-42-46-50INGVAR WIXELL, 80, a problems since Oct. 7. 52-54-59-64-67-70-72-73-78 Dec. 31, 1934. baritone and one of SweEarlier Friday, her Friday’s Match 4: den’s greatest opera singers, daughter, Laura Labrada, 1961 (50 years ago) has died. said Mrs. Pollan had under- 03-06-19-22 Friday’s Mega MilGeorge B. Munro of The Deutsche Oper in gone a tracheotomy to help lions: 13-35-42-45-54, Sekiu was elected chairman Berlin, where Mr. Wixell her breathe. Mega Ball: 26 of the Clallam School Direcworked for three decades, She added that doctors Saturday’s Daily tors Association at the said he died Oct. 8 in had discovered a strain of group’s meeting at Stevens Malmo, Sweden, after a dengue but said an aggres- Game: 4-8-7 Saturday’s Hit 5: Junior High School in Port short illness. sive respiratory virus was 12-17-26-29-39 Angeles. One of his most memora- the main problem. Saturday’s Keno: He took over from Doug ble roles was as the villainMrs. Pollan was one of 01-06-22-30-31-33-35-38-40- Lewis of Sequim. ous Baron Scarpia in Pucci- the best-known and most 42-43-44-47-52-55-56-58-68Also at the meeting, E. ni’s “Tosca.” 74-77 John Maier, president of the Mr. Wixell joined the Saturday’s Lotto: Laugh Lines new Peninsula College, gave Deutsche Oper in 1963 and 05-27-28-39-41-45 a progress report, and Chesalso made guest perforSaturday’s Match 4: AMISH PEOPLE ter Babcock, assistant state mances in Vienna, Milano, superintendent of public London, New York and other HAVE rejected most forms 03-09-12-20 Saturday’s Powerball: instruction for curriculum, of technology. They’re like cities. updated the association on In 1965, he was Sweden’s old people, but on purpose. 05-10-24-38-43, Powerball: Craig Ferguson 1, Power Play: 4 the new methods of “team entrant to the Eurovision

teaching” and programmed learning with “teaching machines.”

1986 (25 years ago) Motorists headed off the Olympic Peninsula and onto the Hood Canal Bridge on Sunday had to run a gauntlet of state Department of Game agents who set up a check station near the bridge’s west end. The department was performing one of its regular game checks, designed the gauge the number and species of animals taken by hunters and to find hunting or fishing violators. Dennis Ohlde, enforcement agent supervisor for the North Olympic Peninsula, said 12 citations were issued, including nine for carrying loaded firearms in motor vehicles.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

A VISITOR FROM Cleveland impressed with our big birds around here — sea gulls . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Oct. 16, the 289th day of 2011. There are 76 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Oct. 16, 1793, Queen Marie Antoinette was beheaded during the French Revolution. On this date: ■  In 1846, American dentist William Morton demonstrated the effectiveness of ether as an anesthetic by administering it to a patient undergoing jaw surgery. ■  In 1859, anti-slavery activist John Brown led a group of about 20 men in a raid on Harpers Ferry, Va. The rebels were soon killed, but the incident brought the American Civil War closer. ■  In 1916, Margaret Sanger opened the first birth-control clinic

in the U.S. in New York City. ■  In 1946, 10 Nazi war criminals condemned during the Nuremberg trials were hanged. ■  In 1952, an estimated 10,000 Communist-led Viet Minh troops launched an offensive in northwestern Indochina, overrunning French Union forces in the Nghialo basin. ■  In 1962, the Cuban missile crisis began when U.S. President John F. Kennedy was informed by his aides that reconnaissance photographs revealed the presence of Soviet missile bases in Cuba. ■  In 1964, China detonated its first atomic bomb. ■  In 1970, Anwar Sadat was elected president of Egypt, succeeding the late Gamel Abdel Nasser. ■  In 1978, the College of Car-

dinals of the Roman Catholic Church chose Cardinal Karol Wojtyla of Poland to be the new pope; he took the name John Paul II. He was the first non-Italian pope in 456 years. ■  In 1987, rescuers freed Jessica McClure, an 18-month-old girl trapped in an abandoned well for 58 hours in Midland, Texas. ■  In 1991, a man crashed a pickup truck into a restaurant in Killeen, Texas, and shot patrons, killing 23 people before taking his own life. ■  In 1996, fans tried to squeeze into a World Cup qualifying soccer match in Guatemala City, killing 78 people and injuring more than 100 in the crush. ■  In 2002, the North Korean government admitted it had been conducting a major covert nuclear-

weapons development program for several years, in violation of international agreements. ■  In 2007, Libya won a seat on the powerful U.N. Security Council as a nonpermanent two-year-term member. ■  Five years ago: Tamil rebels in Sri Lanka rammed a truck packed with explosives into a convoy of military buses, killing at least 93 sailors in one of the deadliest insurgent attacks since a 2002 cease-fire. ■  One year ago: Officials took the extraordinary step of warning some flights landing at France’s main airport to come with enough fuel to get back home, bracing for a possible fuel shortage after a new round of protests against plans to raise the retirement age to 62.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 16, 2011

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Campaign reports show disparity in GOP WASHINGTON — With just over a year left in the race for the White House, campaign finance reports released Saturday show how flush some Republican candidates are with cash — and how nearly broke others are. The top contenders, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry, brought in more than $14 million and $17 million, respectively. Texas Rep. Ron Paul, a favorite among libertarians, collected $8.2 million. Herman Cain’s report said he raised $2.8 million and has $1.3 million in the bank, but the former Godfather’s Pizza CEO loaned his campaign $675,000, most of it borrowed in the spring. Other candidates reported being in debt, including former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann.

Death penalty is goal SEAL BEACH, Calif. — Scott Dekraai, 41, showed no emotion Friday at his first court appearance hours after prosecutors

said they would seek the death penalty if he is convicted of the shooting rampage at the Salon Meritage on Wednesday Dekraai Dekraai postponed entering pleas on eight counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. He is accused of killing his ex-wife and seven others at the beauty salon, which was packed with customers just after lunch when the gunman opened fire with at least two handguns. Police said a bitter custody battle over his 8-year-old son triggered the violence.

Today’s news shows Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows: ■  ABC’s “This Week” — Obama campaign adviser David Axelrod; Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich.; Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga. ■  NBC’s “Meet the Press” — GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain; Gov. Bobby Jindal, R-La.; former Gov. Tim Pawlenty, R-Minn. ■  CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Reps. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and Elijah Cummings, D-Md. ■  CNN’s “State of the Union” — GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich; Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., Democratic Party chairwoman; Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.; Lewis. ■  “Fox News Sunday” — House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va.; Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Militants try to hit U.S. base in Afghanistan

ton’s longtime Arab allies. The successes come even as Yemen falls deeper into turmoil, with President Ali Abdullah Saleh clinging to power in the face of months of massive proKABUL, Afghanistan — Mili- tests. Saturday saw the worst bloodshed in weeks in the capitants tried to blast their way tal, Sanaa: into an American base in eastAt least 18 people were killed ern Afghanistan on Saturday, when Saleh’s troops fired on prostriking before dawn with rocket-propelled grenades and a testers and clashed with rivals. Witnesses estimated up to car bomb. All four attackers were killed 300,000 people joined Saturday’s as well as two truck drivers demonstrations, the largest in parked nearby, said provincial the capital in several months. Police Chief Gen. Mohammad “Everyone with interests in Qasim Jangalbagh. Yemen, including al-Qaida and Two Afghan security guards the Americans, is raising the were wounded. stakes at this time of uncerThe militants failed to breach tainty,” said analyst Abdul-Bari the gate of the base in Panjshir Taher. “The Americans are wastprovince’s Rakha district, ing no time to try and eliminate though they did hit a security the al-Qaida threat before the tower with a rocket-propelled militants dig in deeper and cangrenade. not be easily dislodged.” Three of the men attacked on Also dead in the Friday airfoot, shooting, while a fourth strike in the southeastern provdetonated the explosives-laden ince of Shabwa was Egyptianvehicle outside the gate, Jangal- born Ibrahim al-Banna, identibagh said. fied by the nation’s Defense The blast hit two fuel tankers Ministry as the media chief of that were waiting to enter the the Yemeni branch of al-Qaida. base, killing the Afghan drivers inside, he said. Pardon under way A NATO spokeswoman conJERUSALEM — Israel’s firmed the attack but said there were no American deaths or president Saturday began the injuries and no significant dam- process of formally pardoning age to facilities. hundreds of Palestinian prisoners who are to be exchanged for an Israeli soldier held by Gaza Militants killed militants for five years. SANAA, Yemen — The A spokeswoman for President United States has raised the Shimon Peres said he received tempo in its war against althe files of hundreds of prisoners Qaida in Yemen, killing nine of set for release in the first phase the terror group’s militants in the second, high-profile airstrike of the deal and has 48 hours to sign the pardons. in as many weeks. The swap will likely happen The dead in the late Friday Tuesday. night strike included the son of Under the deal, 1,027 PalesAnwar al-Awlaki, the prominent American-Yemeni militant killed tinians — including some behind attacks on Israelis — in a Sept. 30 strike. will be released in two stages in Yemeni officials Saturday return for Sgt. Gilad Schalit, attributed the recent U.S. successes against al-Qaida to better who was captured by Hamasbacked militants in a 2006 crossintelligence from an army of border raid. Yemeni informers and cooperation with the Saudis, WashingThe Associated Press

U.S. troops in Africa to help fight atrocities By Bradley Klapper and Mark S. Smith The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The United States is venturing into one of Africa’s bloodiest conflicts, sending about 100 U.S. troops to central Africa to support a years-long fight against a guerrilla group accused of horrific atrocities. The Obama administration said the troops will advise, not engage in combat, unless forced to defend themselves. In a letter to Congress, President Barack Obama said Friday that the troops will assist local forces in a long-running battle against the Lord’s Resistance Army, considered one of Africa’s most ruthless rebel groups, and help to hunt down its notorious leader, Joseph Kony. The first of the troops arrived in Uganda on Wednesday, the White House said, and others will be sent to South Sudan, the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. While the size of the U.S. footprint is small, Obama’s announcement represents a highly unusual intervention for the United States. Although some American troops are based in Djibouti and small groups of soldiers have been deployed to Somalia, the U.S. traditionally has been reluctant to commit forces to help African nations put down insurgencies. It demonstrates the Obama administration’s escalating attention to and fears about security risks in Africa, including terror networks, piracy and unstable nations. The move was intended to show some engagement to lessen the impact of one of the worst protracted wars in Africa. Obama declared his decision to send troops as in keeping with the national security interests of the United States. The White House announced it in a low-key fashion, releasing the Obama notification and justification of the troop deployment that the president sent to congressional leaders. Pentagon officials said the bulk of the deployment will be of special operations troops, who will provide security and combat training to African units. The move raises the profile of U.S. involvement on the continent — and represents an apparent

The Associated Press

A U.S. Army soldier walks past military Humvees that are ready to be shipped out of Iraq at a staging yard at Camp Sather in Baghdad on Saturday.

U.S. won’t stay in Iraq beyond year’s end, sources say The Associated Press

BAGHDAD — The U.S. is abandoning plans to keep U.S. troops in Iraq past a year-end withdrawal deadline, The Associated Press has learned. The decision to pull out fully by January will effectively end more than eight years of U.S. involvement in the Iraq War, despite ongoing concerns about its security forces and the potential for instability. The decision ends months of hand-wringing by U.S. officials over whether to stick to a Dec. 31 withdrawal deadline that was set in 2008 or negotiate a new security agreement to ensure that gains made and more than 4,400 American military lives lost since March 2003 do not go to waste. In recent months, Washington has been discussing with Iraqi leaders the possibility of several thousand American troops remaining to continue training Iraqi security forces. A Pentagon spokesman said Saturday that no final decision has been reached about the U.S. training relationship with the Iraqi government. But a senior Obama administration official in Washington confirmed Saturday that all American troops will leave Iraq except for about 160 active-duty soldiers attached to the U.S. Embassy. A senior U.S. military official confirmed the departure and said the withdrawal could allow future but limited U.S. military training missions in Iraq if requested. Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue.

victory for administration officials who have argued for more robust intervention in humanitarian crises. The change in policy could reflect the long-standing concerns of a number of high-ranking Obama advisers left scarred by the U.S. failure in the 1990s to

intervene to stop the genocide in Rwanda and the belated action to finally halt the violence in Bosnia. For a current parallel, the Lord’s Resistance Army’s 24-year campaign of rebellion, rape and murder represents one of the world’s worst human rights crises today.

Bishop first in U.S. charged with sheltering abusive clergy The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The first U.S. bishop criminally charged with sheltering an abusive clergyman has been accused of failing to protect children after he and his diocese waited five months to tell police about hundreds of images of child pornography discovered on a priest’s computer, authorities said. Bishop Robert Finn and the Kansas City-St. Joseph Catholic Diocese have pleaded not guilty on one count each of failing to report suspected child abuse, officials said Friday. Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said Finn and the diocese were required under state law to report the discovery to police because the images gave them reason to believe a child had been abused. The indictment, handed down Oct. 6 but sealed because Finn was out of the country, says the bishop failed to report suspicions

Quick Read

against the priest from Dec. 16, 2010, when the photos were discovered, to May 11, 2011, when the diocese turned them over to police. Finn denied any wrongdoing in a statement Friday and said he had begun work to overhaul the diocese’s reporting policies and act on key findings of a diocese-commissioned investigation into its practices. He faces a maximum penalty of one year in jail and a $1,000 fine if convicted of the misdemeanor. The diocese also faces a $1,000 fine. After the Catholic sex abuse scandal erupted in 2002, grand juries in several regions reviewed how bishops handled claims against priests. However, most of the allegations were decades old and far beyond the statute of limitations. Until Finn was indicted, no U.S. Catholic bishop had been criminally charged over how he

Robert Finn Indictment first of kind in U.S. responded to abuse claims, although some bishops had struck deals with local authorities to avoid prosecution against their dioceses.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Thrill-seekers run from bulls in Arizona town

Nation: Charlie’s crew falls from ABC’s grace

Nation: Shelter calls on mechanic to free cat in van

Nation: Brothers accused of stealing bridge for scrap

IT’S NOT THE streets of Pamplona, but a few hundred people got a similar thrill by running from bulls in the Arizona desert. Nearly two dozen bulls chased more than 200 people in the first of several runs Saturday on a quartermile, fenced track in the small town of Cave Creek. Based on the annual running of the bulls in Spain, the weekend-long event drew dozens of spectators and hundreds of runners — some who paid to do all the runs. Organizers said the Cave Creek version is safer because the bulls are rodeo animals.

ABC SAID ITS revamped version of the 1970s hit “Charlie’s Angels” is being shut down after only four airings because of low ratings. The network said Friday that four more episodes remain to be aired. The action series focused on three female detectives in Miami. But the reboot has struggled in the ratings since its premiere last month. It’s ABC’s first cancellation of the new fall season. The original “Charlie’s Angels” aired for six seasons on ABC and launched one of its angels, Farrah Fawcett, as a major star. There also were two feature films.

A MECHANIC WAS the one doing the surgery at an Ohio animal facility when a woman drove in with a cat stuck behind her minivan’s dashboard. He had to take apart the dash during a three-hour rescue operation last week in Hilliard, Ohio. Driver Nehal Dhruve said she hit the cat with her van and decided to take it to the local Humane Society. The cat wouldn’t stay on the van’s seat but instead hopped down and climbed up under the dashboard. Mechanic Daryl McKay cut his hands trying to free the feline, so an animal control staffer with smaller hands took over and pulled it out.

TWO BROTHERS HAVE been charged with stealing the 50-foot-long by 20-foot-wide Covert’s Crossing Bridge in western Pennsylvania and selling the 15½ tons of scrap metal for more than $5,000. Police said Benjamin Arthur Jones, 24, and Alexander Williams Jones, 25, of New Castle used a blowtorch to break up the bridge in late September or early October. Authorities said Alexander Jones told a recycling company employee that he had permission to carve the bridge for scrap. The recycling company called the police.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 16, 2011 — (C)

Border Patrol lists arrests Peninsula Daily News

Five Mexican nationals and a citizen of India were apprehended in Whatcom, Skagit and Kitsap counties between Sept. 27 and Oct. 4, according to a weekly, par­ tial list of Border Patrol arrests supplied Tuesday by the agency’s Blaine Sector office. There were no appre­ hensions listed from Clall­am or Jefferson coun­ ties on the Border Patrol’s “weekly blotter.” The blotters, always lim­ ited to one page, do not include arrests that result in ongoing investigations and are chosen based on

providing “a good mix that the community wants to hear about,” according to Blaine Sector spokesman Richard Sinks. The Blaine Sector covers Alaska, Oregon and the western half of Washington. The Border Patrol gave these accounts of the arrests, all of which resulted in foreign nationals being processed for removal from the U.S.: ■  Agents observed “sus­ picious behavior” Sept. 27 before making contact with two people near the Samish River. They admitted to being Mexican citizens illegally in

the United States. ■  A citizen of India was arrested Sept. 27 after entering the U.S. illegally near Lynden and attempt­ ing to leave the border area by taxi. ■  A State Patrol request for translation assistance at the scene of a vehicle acci­ dent near Everson on Sept. 30 resulted in one of the people involved admitting to being a citizen of Mexico illegally in the U.S. The person had been removed from the U.S. four previous times and had a criminal history that included fraud, driving while license suspended

Occupy: Rally

and possession of mari­ juana. ■  Border Patrol agents took custody Oct. 3 of a Mexican citizen from the Skagit County jail whose prior convictions included driving under the influence, domestic violence and forg­ ery. The person admitted to being in the U.S. illegally. ■  A Mexican citizen incarcerated at the Kitsap County jail was taken into custody Oct. 4 after admit­ ting to being illegally in the U.S. The person had been convicted of the rape of a child.

Bill: Vehicle access to park roads Continued from A1 It allows the agency to waive the Endangered Spe­ cies Act and three dozen other mostly environmental laws within that zone and the American Indian Reli­ gious Freedom Act, which guarantees access to reli­ gious sites and protection of “sacred objects.” Republican U.S. Rep. Bob Bishop of Utah spon­ sored HR 1505 and chairs the Natural Resources Committee.

No traction George Behan, a spokes­ man for U.S. Rep. Norm Dicks, whose constituency includes Clallam and Jeff­ erson counties, said Friday that it’s unlikely the bill will gain any traction. “It’s way too broad and is not expected to move any­ where other than [Bishop’s] committee,” Behan said. But it’s created some­ what of a stir on the North Olympic Peninsula, where increased Border Patrol staffing and patrols sparked the formation of Port Ange­ les-based Stop the Check­ points, which has picketed the site of a new, underconstruction $5.7 million Border Patrol station two miles east of downtown Port Angeles. “To me, this is like using the fear of immigration and terrorism to do away with environmental protections as part of the overall rightwing movement,” Lois Danks, the group’s orga­ nizer, said last week.

Level playing field Supporters of the pro­ posed law said the legisla­ tion would put the Border Patrol on a level playing field with drug smugglers and human traffickers on the nation’s southern bor­ der who have no regard for laws, environmental or oth­ erwise, and can act with impunity in such regions as designated wilderness areas, where motorized transport is forbidden. “Cartels have figured out that the Border Patrol can’t maintain a routine

national forests — includ­ ing Olympic National For­ est — from blocking U.S. Customs and Border Pro­ tection’s efforts to “achieve operational control” over a 100-mile band south of the Canadian border.

GAO report THE U.S. GOVERNMENT Account­ ability Office — an investigative and auditing branch of Congress — has examined the impact of land management laws on Border Patrol activities. Noting Border Patrol staffing nationwide doubled between 2005 and 2010 and that hun­ dreds of miles of fence were con­ structed along the southern border, the agency interviewed more than two dozen southwestern-area supervisory agents to determine whether land management laws, such as historic property assess­ ments, hindered enforcement activi­ ties. “Despite the access delays and restrictions, 22 of the 26 agents in charge reported that the overall security sta­ tus of their jurisdic­ tion is not affected by land management laws,” the GAO con­ cluded. “Instead, factors such as the remote­ ness and ruggedness of the terrain have the greatest effect on their ability to achieve operational control.” Peninsula Daily News

Operational control

presence on federal lands,” said Melissa Subbotin, spokeswoman for Bishop. The bill seeks to achieve “operational control” over international land borders. It would prevent the sec­ retary of the interior, who manages Olympic National Park and other national parks, and the secretary of agriculture, who manages 1A5135145

Operational control was defined by U.S. Border Patrol Chief Michael Fisher, testifying Feb. 15 before the House Committee on Home­ land Security, as “the ability to detect, identify, classify and then respond to and resolve illegal entries along our U.S. borders.” To that end, the Border Patrol would be allowed to conduct vehicle patrols of designated wilderness areas, where motorized vehicles are otherwise banned. The Border Patrol now has vehicle access to exist­ ing roads in Olympic National Park, said Blaine Sector spokesman Richard Sinks. Sinks said the Border Patrol maintains “situa­ tional awareness” of wilder­ ness areas by working with the Forest Service, Depart­ ment of Interior and county, state and tribal law enforce­ ment agencies and “is con­ tinually analyzing the threat to and through the wilderness park areas.” But what about building a road in Olympic National Park where there isn’t one now? Border Patrol spokes­ woman Kerry Rogers said the agency does not com­ ment on pending legisla­ tion. And park officials have not yet studied the bill and its implications, park spokeswoman Barb Maynes said Friday. The law would open up to Border Patrol vehicular activity to the 44,258-acre Buckhorn Wilderness Area, which abuts Olympic National Park’s eastern boundary, and the 166,825acre Brothers Wilderness Area in Olympic National Forest in Jefferson County — where motorized vehicle traffic is not allowed. That doesn’t sit well with the Washington Wil­ derness Coalition, whose conservation director called the legislation “an extreme kind of overreaction.” “It’s like heating your house with a flamethrower,” Tom Uniack said, fearful

O

perational control was defined by U.S. Border Patrol Chief Michael Fisher, testifying Feb. 15 before the House Committee on Homeland Security, as “the ability to detect, identify, classify and then respond to and resolve illegal entries along our U.S. borders.” the legislation could open the door to more wide­ spread abandonment of “cornerstone environmental laws.” The legislation was not aimed at activities on the U.S.-Canadian border, Subb­otin said. “It was written specifi­ cally to address issues along the southern border, but it’s hard to exclude the north­ ern border,” she said. “This would remove the checkerboard pattern of where the Border Patrol can and can’t patrol.” Funding for such proj­ ects as roads also could be an issue.

Road building Congress “would still have to appropriate funds” for road-building projects, Feldman said. “The only reason they would construct roads is if there is criminal activity going on,” she added. “They would need to ensure operational control at the border if there is evi­ dence of criminal activity.” Asked how likely it is that the Border Patrol would waive environmental and land management laws along the northern border, Feldman said, “It’s an unlikely site for large-scale illegal entry.” If passed by Congress and signed into law by Pres­ ident Barack Obama, the law would sunset in five years. “That does not change my concerns at all,” Uniack said.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

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Continued from A1 money already,” she told the crowd. “We need to show our gov­ One of them was Sutton Beckett, a former owner of ernment that this is a democ­ Beckett’s Bikes, which closed racy and they need to listen to the people and not the lob­ in 2010. “I am here to save our byists.” Protestors took turns middle class, which is deteri­ speaking from a microphone orating rapidly,” he said. and expressing their discon­ “We all feel it.” tent with the struggling Some also carried signs economy. against war and calling for Brian Grad, 60, of Sequim reduced military spending. told the crowd that the “The people for war are nation is at risk of losing the the people raking in piles American dream and played and piles of cash,” said Mil­ a song on guitar about the ton Patrie of Veterans for gap between rich and poor Peace. called “I’m Busted.” Cloud said the demon­ “Where’s it going?” he strators, though many from asked. different backgrounds, share “Is this just going to be a similar view that large cor­ something our grandkids be porations have too much telling their grandkids power. about?” “This is about people who A couple of union repre­ want to control their own sentatives also made an government,” she said. appearance. Cloud said she is frus­ Lee Whetham, Olympic trated that many large busi­ Peninsula Building Trades nesses pay fewer taxes than Organization president, said her own business, the Caf­ he was there to protest what feinated Clothier. he believes is a war on the “The people this recession working class. has not been hard for is the “It’s about time we fight people who have a lot of back,” he said.

Protests spread through globe Peninsula Daily News and news sources

The Wall Street protest spread throughout the world Saturday, with people gath­ ering in hundreds of loca­ tions in more than 70 coun­ tries. One day earlier, more than 200 people gathered in the triangle park in front of Chase Bank in Port Townsend during the noon hour. “Corporate greed and Wall Street has vacuumed up the American dream and spat out the middle class,” said Linda Brewster, who was one of several speakers who addressed the crowd during Occupy PT on Friday. “People graduate from college if they are lucky, and they can’t pay off their loans because they can’t get a job,” she added. The Occupy Wall Street people’s assembly that sparked the Occupy move­ ments throughout the world today started Sept. 17 in a Manhattan, N.Y., park, when 1,500 people gathered to occupy New York City’s financial district. The movement asserts that 99 percent of the popu­ lation is getting poorer while the wealth is held by the remaining 1 percent. Many of the Port Townsend protesters carried signs, with such slogans as “End Corporate Personhood,” “When Does the Greed Stop?” and “I’ll believe that corporations are people when Texas executes one.” About 160 people signed a petition protesting corporate greed and military spending that will be sent to Sen. Patty Murray, D-Bothell, who cochairs the congressional “supercommittee” responsi­ ble for identifying $1.5 tril­ lion in federal deficit reduc­ tion over 10 years by late November.

Carpool today The Port Townsend rally was also a planning center for a carpool today, when protesters from the Olympic Peninsula plan to join dem­ onstrators at Occupy Seattle, where 3,000 to 5,000 people filled Westlake Park on Sat­ urday for a protest “against corporate greed and its influ­ ence in government and against joblessness.” Carpools will form at Haines Place Park and Ride, 1615 Sims Way, Port Townsend, at 9:45 a.m. today They are expected to go to Bainbridge Island, where the protesters will walk onto the ferry and join the protest in Westlake Park.

For more information about the carpool, phone Mark Stevenson at 360-3859037. On Saturday, police offi­ cers were stationed along the edge of Westlake Park as the protesters’ numbers grew over the lunch hour from a couple hundred to enough to fill the park and spill over Pine Street to the other side, The Seattle Times reported. Protesters marched to the city’s Pike Place Market, where about 200 sat down in the middle of First Avenue and blocked traffic. City leaders have said they will arrest people for trespassing if they stay in Westlake Park past the clos­ ing time of 10 p.m. Instead, Mayor Mike McGinn has invited protest­ ers to sleep in City Hall Plaza, something about 30 or 40 protesters did Friday night, according to some peo­ ple at the rally. Protests also took place in Tacoma, Olympia, Yakima, Spokane and Vancouver, Wash. Demonstrations were conducted nationally and worldwide Saturday. Protesters from Occupy Wall Street in New York City paraded to a Chase Bank branch, banging drums, blowing horns and carrying signs decrying corporate greed. Demonstrations else­ where ranged from about 50 people in Jackson, Miss., to at least a thousand each in such larger cities as Denver and Pittsburgh. In cities across Europe, tens of thousands nicknamed “the indignant” marched against government cost-cut­ ting and failed financial poli­ cies in Europe. Violence broke out in Rome, where police fired tear gas and water cannons at some protesters who broke away from the main demon­ stration, smashing shop and bank windows, torching cars and hurling bottles. Protesters also turned out in Australia and Asia. Protests were conducted in Canada, from Toronto’s financial district to Victoria, where Two Occupies — as they were called — were held Saturday. About 100 turned out at the British Columbia Legis­ lature in the morning, the Victoria Times Colonist reported. About 300 gathered later in the day at Centennial Square. That protest is called the People’s Assembly of Victoria (Occupy Victoria).

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 16, 2011

A5

Explosions blast new channel for river By Tom Callis

want to be,” he said. “We’re just hoping the weather holds out the rest of the month and we can reach our goals.” No work can occur in the river during fish migration periods, which last for 5½ months of the year, preventing the $325 million federal project from being completed sooner.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Elwha River will change its course this week after two rounds of explosions blasted a new channel at the Elwha Dam. The channel is on the west side of the 108-foot structure, where several spillways once stood. Barnard Construction will divert the stream to continue demolition of the east side of the dam, where the river currently flows. That will occur sometime midweek, said Brian Krimmer, construction manager. The river will be rerouted back to the east side in January, where it will remain for the rest of the project. The company in charge of demolishing the river’s two dams has been working for about a month, and already, much of the Elwha Dam has been removed. The only visible structures remaining are the powerhouse, penstocks and surge tank. But below that, Krohmer

Fish window

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Demolition crews make progress on dismantling the remains of the Elwha Dam west of Port Angeles on Friday. See a video of explosives being used at the dam, http://tinyurl.com/damblast.

The first fish window will start Nov. 1 and last until the new year. By then, Krohmer expects 15 feet of the Glines Canyon Dam to be removed. At 210 feet tall, the dam is the tallest in the nation to be removed. Demolition of the eastside of the Elwha Dam will continue during the fish window. No more explosions are planned, but one more may be set to remove additional rock on the west side of the Elwha Dam in January, Krohmer said.

________

said, about 80 feet of con- expected to be completed in located upstream in Olym- about a year later, Krohmer Reporter Tom Callis can be crete remains. pic National Park, is sched- said. early 2013, he said. reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom. Demolition of the dam is “We’re right where we callis@peninsuladailynews.com. Glines Canyon Dam, uled to be fully demolished

Clallam to shorten Missing woman, 26, is work week in 2012 reportedly seen in PA

P

By Tom Callis

By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County employees will have a 37.5-hour work week next year. Commissioners reached that consensus at the end of an eight-hour budget meeting with individual departments Thursday. Meanwhile, elected law and justice officials pitched a one-tenth of 1 percent juvenile justice sales tax to maintain mandated public safety services. They said the tax would generate about $1 million per year for critical services. The cut in hours will affect the 164 county employees who haven’t already had their hours cut. It will not affect sheriff’s deputies and sergeants, Corrections staff and judges. The move will save $460,000 in the general fund, county Administrator Jim Jones said. Commissioners plan to declare a financial emergency and approve the shortened work week in a resolution before they pass a 2012 budget in early December.

$2.4 million shortfall

Recommended cuts

Juvenile Services is $76,564 short of its $143,564 in recommended cuts. District Court can save most of the $208,293 it needs to cut by folding its West End court into Clallam County District Court 1. There would still be a judge in Forks, but the administrative work would be handled in Port Angeles. If the proposed law and justice tax is placed on the ballot and approved by voters, Jones said, an 8.5 percent sales tax would still be lower than most jurisdictions in the area. “We’re not going to lay off 30 people,” Jones said. “We just can’t run government with that many people gone. But we’re still about $400,000 short. “It’s a real problem.”

Emails in protest

Two weeks ago, Jones recommended $674,850 in cuts to the Sheriff’s Office, which is the largest department in the county. Benedict identified $400,000 in a combination of cuts and new revenue but is still $274,850 short of the recommendation. Superior Court is $74,321 short of its $195,425 in recommended cuts. The Prosecutor’s Office is $136,782 short of the $196,932 it needs to cut. In ________ the proposal, Kelly said present staffing shortages Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be are already affecting public reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. safety, with fewer cases ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com. filed and prosecuted.

Class to be given on social networking Peninsula Daily News

Description of man The man is described as being between 6 feet 2 inches and 6 feet 4 inches tall and weighing about 300 pounds, with short hair, possibly blond. There have been no other confirmed sightings of Pimentel since. Jennifer Pimentel, who is mentally about 12 years old, is 5 feet 9 inches tall and weighs 126 pounds. She has brown hair and brown eyes and was wearing a red and white jacket. The Port Angeles woman has been missing since Monday, when she was dropped off by friends at The Gateway transit center and purchased a Dungeness Bus Lines ticket to SeaTac. She never got on the bus,

Jennifer Pimentel Missing since Monday

according to the Port Angeles Police Department. The sightings occurred after her identification card was found alongside U.S. Highway 101 east of Discovery Bay at about noon Tuesday. Her Safeway card and EBT card were also found nearby Friday, Roggenbuck ________ said, after the man who Reporter Tom Callis can be turned her ID card in to the reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom. Jefferson County Sheriff’s callis@peninsuladailynews.com.

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Office showed officers where he found it. Her father, Henry Pimentel, said the man’s description doesn’t sound like anyone he knows and added that he is still “very concerned” for her safety. “There’s just too many question marks going on,” he said. Roggenbuck said there also have been unconfirmed reports of Jennifer Pimentel being seen on a Clallam Transit bus Monday and at a Macy’s store in Olympia. Anyone who has seen her or has information on her whereabouts should immediately phone the Port Angeles Police Department at 360-452-4545.

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1A701297

SEQUIM — A pair of local entrepreneurs will lead a workshop titled “Creative Marketing with Social Networking” on Monday evening. Mary Beth Beuke, owner of the internationally known West Coast Sea Glass jewelry company based in Dungeness, and Renne Emiko Brock-Richmond of Unique as You, a Sequim art, marketing and event production firm, will lead the discussion from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at The Lodge at Sherwood Village. The Lodge is at 660 W. Evergreen Farm Way, off

Fifth Avenue south of Old Olympic Highway. Admission is free to the program, which is part of the Sequim Humanities and Arts Alliance’s monthly Cultural Connections series. Time also will be set aside Monday evening for networking and announcements of projects and events. Beuke and Brock-Richmond will share tips on how to use Facebook, Twitter and other social media to develop an audience. Both women have some 20 years of teaching experience. To find out more about

PORT ANGELES — Jennifer Pimentel, a developmentally disabled woman who has been missing for nearly a week, was seen in Port Angeles last Tuesday with an unidentified man, police have learned. Sgt. Glen Roggenbuck of the Port Angeles Police Department said two people who know the 26-yearold woman spotted her with the man at the Peninsula Housing Authority’s Mount Angeles View neighborhood and in the 700 block of Lopez Street. They didn’t know she was missing at the time, he said.

1A701376

Jones said the county has received many emails protesting recommended cuts to such programs as Streamkeepers, juvenile probation officers and Master Gardeners. “We’re getting emails from people about everything on that list. . . . lots of emails,” Jones said. The Washington State University Master Gardeners program would lose some county support under the proposal, with the county cutting money for a full-time administrative assistant position and a part-time position that now oversees the Master Gardener program, Jones said. The county would continue paying its contracted one-third of the coordinator’s salary, he said, and would continue providing an office and utilities. All of the recommendations are only proposals, Jones emphasized. “No decision will be made until it is finalized Dec. 6,” he said.

hone the Port Angeles Police Department at 360-452-4545 with information.

Peninsula Daily News

1A701141

County officials are struggling to make up a $2.4 million shortfall in the $30.4 million general fund. Jones recommended 30 layoffs when he presented his latest budget Oct. 4. He was required by law to produce a balanced recommended budget. But commissioners decided last week that they cannot operate county government with an 8 percent reduction in a 385-member workforce. In the marathon meetings held Oct. 7 and Thursday, each department presented ideas for new revenue or cuts in an attempt to save jobs. After those meetings, Clallam County is still $800,000 short of a balanced budget. The 37.5-hour work week helps but still leaves

the county $340,000 in the red. About half of the county’s workforce went to a 37.5-hour work week in 2002. The 6.25 percent cut could mean shorter hours or unpaid furlough days for the 164 employees affected in 2012. “We cannot put a budget together right now, absent passing a tax that our experts told us is the minimum they need to run the county,” said Jones, who is taking a 10 percent pay cut next year along with the three elected commissioners. Since the earliest such a tax could be placed on the ballot is February, the law and justice departments proposed to use a portion of the county’s reserve fund to balance the budget. Jones has said the reserve fund is off limits this year. He said the county must maintain a minimum of $6.5 million to pay for emergencies, like a crash of its 12-year-old computer system. The law and justice proposal — including the sales tax — was signed by Sheriff Bill Benedict, Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly, District Court Judge Rick Porter and Superior Court Judges George L. Wood, Ken Williams and S. Brooke Taylor.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

24th loses PT in 1 redistricting plan By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Republican preference for a map of legislative districts moves Port Townsend and much of the populated area of East Jefferson County out of the 24th Legislative District and places it into the 23rd, joining it with Bainbridge Island and Poulsbo. The plan was among those that survived the cut during a special meeting of the Washington State Redistricting Commission on Friday, when four legislative plans, two each from Democrats and Republicans, were whittled to one from each party. In addition to Port Townsend, the Republican version would place Port Ludlow, Port Hadlock, Chimacum, Irondale and Marrowstone Island in the 23rd District, which is represented by Sen. Christine Rolfes and Reps. Sherry Appleton and Drew Hansen. All are Democrats.

The idea to divide East Jefferson County came from former U.S. Sen. Slade Gorton. Gorton and former state Rep. Tom Huff are the Republican members of the redistricting commission.

Commission to decide Any redistricting plan must be approved by three of the four commissioners prior to being submitted to the state Legislature. If three do not approve a single plan, the proposals will be addressed by the state Supreme Court. Huff said it is unlikely that the decision will have to be made by the court, saying he expects compromises from both parties before the commission settles on a single plan to forward to the state Legislature. “Nothing you see now is permanent,” Huff said. “We want to compromise,” he added. “None of us want to see this go to the

Supreme Court.” Gorton was not available for comment. Commissioners have until January to finalize their plans but have set a goal of finishing their work in November and sending it to the state Legislature for approval. If the commission’s recommendation is completed in November, the plan could be addressed during a legislative special session scheduled to begin Nov. 28, Huff said. The commission’s next scheduled meeting is at 10:30 a.m. Nov. 8 at the John A. Cherberg Building, 41 Sid Snyder Ave. S.W., Olympia. Special meetings can be scheduled with 24 hours’ notice. The Democratic plan does not change the boundaries of the 24th Legislative District. It keeps Clallam and Jeff­erson counties together with a portion of Grays Harbor County.

Under either proposal, current 24th District representatives — Sen. Jim Hargrove of Hoquiam and Reps. Kevin Van De Wege and Steve Tharinger, both of Sequim — would stay in place. All are Democrats. Democrats on the commission are Dean Foster and Tim Ceis.

Boundaries After the legislative boundaries are defined, the commissioners will redraw congressional boundaries to create a new 10th Congressional District. Foster has proposed a plan to carve that district out of the Olympic Peninsula. That plan would end Rep. Norm Dicks’ 6th Congressional District representation of the North Olympic Peninsula. Dicks, D-Belfair, was first elected to Congress in 1976 and is senior Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee.

Peninsula Democratic Party leaders oppose both changes. Dicks’ influence is vital to the region, said Clallam County Democratic Chairman Matthew Randazzo. “Anyone else would be less effective,” he said. “It would take us years for a new representative to become as influential.” He also said that “any proposal which places Port Townsend with Bainbridge Island would be an attempt to ghettoize Democratic strongholds, creating lopsided legislative districts.” Jefferson County Democratic Party Chairwoman Teri Nomura said the Republican proposal would dilute the county’s current Democratic majority.

Some like idea But Jefferson County Republican Party Chairman Ron Gregory of Port Ludlow liked both potential changes to the political landscape on the Peninsula.

He would support Gorton’s proposal to move Port Townsend into the 25th District because it would give Republicans more influence in the reconfigured 24th. He would also favor a new congress­ional district that, he said, would allow the Republicans a fighting chance to elect someone to Congress. The redistricting process comes every 10 years, after the U.S. Census, to ensure that each district has a balanced population. A 14.1 percent population increase reflected by the 2010 Census gives Washington state an additional congressional seat. Commissioners also must redraw 49 state legislative districts into roughly equal population sizes.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Man arrested in PT after pickup overturns Treated for minor cuts Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — A 27-year-old Port Townsend man was arrested for investigation of driving while intoxicated and hit-and-run after a pickup he was driving overturned in the 3100 block of North Sheridan Street on Thursday night. Robert Aldana and an unidentified passenger were treated for minor cuts after they were found at a house nearby, said Sgt. Ed Green with the Port Townsend Police Department. Aldana was no longer in custody in the Jefferson

“The windshield was shattered, and a large toolbox that had been in the bed of the truck had broken free.”

Bill Beezley spokesman, East Jefferson Fire-Rescue

County jail late Friday. The GMC pickup he was driving left the roadway, hit a boulder in a yard and overturned, coming to rest just feet from the front porch of a home, said Bill Beezley, East Jefferson Fire-Rescue spokesman. Firefighters arrived at the wrecked truck at 9:45 p.m., Beezley said. They found the pickup resting on its passenger side.

“The windshield was shattered, and a large toolbox that had been in the bed of the truck had broken free, strewing tools across the yard,” Beezley said in a statement. “But there were no occupants in sight.” Witnesses told firefighters that the two people in the truck had left it and run south. Law enforcement and firefighters found them about a half-hour later at a home in the 1400 block of McPherson Street, Beezley said. The home belonged to the registered owner of the pickup, Green said. There, they received medical care for cuts on Crystal Craig their arms and hands. They East Jefferson Fire-Rescue firefighters place tape around a pickup that were not taken to a hospi- rolled on North Sheridan Street in Port Townsend on Thursday night. tal.

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Whiskey Bend Road, the gravel road connecting Olympic Hot Springs Road to the Whiskey Bend trailhead, will close to all use Thursday. The road has been closed to vehicles but open to foot, stock and bicycle traffic since December, when winter storms caused extensive damage to the road. On Thursday, the 4.5mile Whiskey Bend Road will close to all use — motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists, and stock users — for about 45 days so that contractor Barnard Construction and the Olympic National Park road crew can begin repairs to two slide-damaged areas. After December’s slide damage, road engineers discovered large voids where

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PORT ANGELES — A section of the Waterfront Trail will be closed beginning Thursday for repairs. The section of the trail between the east side of the Rayonier property parking lot at the footbridge to the area where the trail begins to curve to the south near Morse Creek will be closed to all public access until about Dec. 21. The closure is necessary for work and construction associated with slide and riprap repairs, said Teresa Pierce, city spokeswoman. About 1,500 feet of the trail west of the trestle at Morse Creek will remain open during construction. Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday Seafood Night Your choice of three seafood entrées get a free salad bar (all day)

Thursday Homestyle Ribs (after 4pm)

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PORT TOWNSEND — The new season for Olympic Peninsula Dance, which sponsors family-friendly dances each month, begins today at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St. The evening will start with a rumba lesson at 7. No partner or registration is necessary; experienced dancers are encouraged to help beginners. Then Katzenjammer, the duo featuring Charlie Gould and Val Vontourne, will provide music for dancing from 8 p.m. until 11 p.m. Admission is $15 for adults or $10 for people with disabilities and students with any school identifica-

Trail section to close

547 N. Oakridge Drive Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.457.7500

279 W. Washington Sequim, WA 98382 360.683.7500

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tion. Children 12 and younger can get in for $7. For more details about these monthly dances, phone 360-385-6919 or 360-3855327, or visit www.Olympic PeninsulaDance.com.

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log cribbing beneath the road had eroded away, seriously compromising the road’s stability and motorists’ safety, necessitating the road closure and repairs, said Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Hearing set on bus pass price increase By Rob Ollikainen

Fare proposal

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam Transit will hold a public hearing Monday on a nine-point proposal that includes a significant price hike for monthly bus passes. The cost of an adult base pass, good within one city, would be raised from $27 to $36 per month. An adult premium pass, which is used for city-to-city travel, would go from $36 to $54 per month. Transit officials said the increase is needed to cover a $250,000 shortfall in the $7.3 million operating budget. Monday’s hearing will begin at 1 p.m. at the Clall­am Transit System building at 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd. in Port Angeles. If approved, the price increase would take effect in January. General Manager Terry Weed said the last increase for bus passes was in 1997. Cash fares were raised in July 2010.

THE CLALLAM TRANSIT board is considering a range of increases for monthly passes. Base passes are for travel only within a city, while premium passes are for the entire county. The only pass that would not cost more under the proposal would be the $18 disabled and youth base pass. Here are the present fares and the proposed increases for passes: ■  Adult base: $27 to $36. ■  Senior base: $9 to $18. ■  Adult premium: $36 to $54. ■  Disabled and youth premium: $27 to $36. ■  Senior premium: $18 to $36. — Source: www. clallamtransit.com

Senior base pass Under the current proposal, the price of a $9 senior base pass and $18 senior premium pass would be doubled. The consolidated senior/ youth/disabled discount base pass would cost $18 per month. The premium discount pass would be $36 per month. Cash fares would remain the same: $1 for an adult and 50 cents for seniors, youths and disabled riders

Clallam Transit cut its total service by 5.8 percent in February to save $187,861 in annual costs. The new proposal simplifies the pass structure so that for those who ride the bus more than 18 times a month, it’s a better deal to buy a pass. Those who ride it fewer than 18 times a month will have a better deal by paying cash. The price increase for passes is one of nine changes Clallam Transit is proposing. The public agency’s governing board may decide to adopt all nine or any number of the changes. The other proposed changes are: ■  Eliminate paratransit discount tickets. ■  Require proof of eligibility for reduced-cash fares and passes. ■  Cut employer-sponsored bus pass programs from 20 percent to 5 percent. ■  Implement locationbased pricing for paratransit trips. ■  Charge paratransit riders actual cost to travel of more than three-fourths of a mile off a fixed route. ■  Eliminate pro-rated bus pass sales to government entities. ■  Reduce the 10 percent commission for public bus pass outlets to 5 percent. ■  Establish a 15 percent profit target for fixed routes.

in the city; and $1.50 for adults and $1 for others on longer trips. According to Transit projections, the price increase in passes would generate $123,000 in new revenue. ________ The projection assumes Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be that some riders will shift reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. to cash fares. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. On the expense side, com.

a tale

John Clauson of Belfair weaves a yarn during Saturday’s open mic session of the 17th annual Forest Storytelling Festival at Peninsula College in Port Angeles. The three-day festival of taletelling features storytellers from around the region. The event continues at 10 a.m. today with a free concert of inspirational stories, followed by additional performances, with a $15 admission.

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Weaving

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 16, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A8

Yearbook photos tell school saga I PULLED OUT my old high school yearbook the other day. It’s amazing how little I’ve changed except W. Bruce for my looks. Cameron I don’t like looking at my headshot in the yearbook because it appears that I was trying to make a statement about how plaids, stripes and flowers can all go together as long as the colors don’t match. (Maybe the statement was, “I can’t dress myself.”) More fun are the group photographs, like the one that proves I was in a rock band called the Festering Wounds. I sang “background vocals,” which are differentiated from “backup vocals” in that I stood slightly off stage and wasn’t allowed to do any actual singing. I was, however, empowered to

get lunch as long as I paid for it. It has always been true, though, that the guys in the band got all the best-looking chicks — at least it was until I joined. Being a background vocalist didn’t get me any chicks, betterlooking or otherwise. Probably they were intimidated. Anyway, I’m in a picture of the band, everyone scowling at the camera because we were festering. I’m not identified in the caption, but there’s a slight sliver of a hand in the lower left corner — and, well, that’s my hand. I’ve got my whole hand in the photo of the Ecology Club because I was the president of that organization (and, for a while, its only member). You talk about being popular with the chicks — what’s more appealing to high school women than a skinny kid who knows stuff about the ozone layer? Admittedly, most of the women who eventually joined the Ecology Club dressed like

Speaking Out

Sandinistas, but they were pretty attractive on the days they showered. More important than their appearance, though, was the fact that they listened to everything I said and did everything I ordered until somewhere in the middle of their first meeting. After that, the motion that they passed that “We Don’t Need a President or a Power Structure” seemed, in their minds, to be more important than club discipline. We did a lot of good, though. We passed a motion condemning air pollution. We passed a motion condemning water pollution. And we passed a motion condemning prom as being “An Example of a Male-dominated Culture of Oppression of Women Because Nobody Invited Us.” That’s why I didn’t go to prom. I was in shoulder-to-shoulder solidarity with my fatigue-wearing sisters in the Ecology Club. Plus, no one would go with me.

When it came to sports, I was one of those all-around athletes who could pretty much try out for anything. Most of the coaches seemed to feel I was too good to play on their teams, though, so I’m not in very many pictures. Football, for example — the coach personally requested I not try out because I would strike fear in the hearts of my own teammates, who would take one look at my fierce stance on the field during intra-squad practice and wilt in terror, truly frightened they might be tackled by me and wind up in the hospital visiting me. The yearbook also shows that we must have had a fencing team because there are a bunch of cheerleaders in one photo, and there I am, watching them from behind a fence. There were a lot of academic clubs in high school, but I didn’t join them because I didn’t want to have anything to do with those idiots. I was more intellectually

inclined — a member of the Water Balloon Society and a group called the Dull Thuds. (I don’t remember what the Thuds did, but I’m sure it was a lot more impressive than those thick-headed morons in the Quantum-Physics Club.) The caption describing the members of the Thuds doesn’t identify me by name, but I know I was a member because I recognize my hand. At any rate, I think my yearbook, with all of its photographs, captures, for me, the most important aspect of my entire academic career, which is that when it comes to high school, I attended. That, and one undeniable fact: I had a hand in nearly everything.

________ W. Bruce Cameron is a nationally syndicated humor columnist. His column appears on this page every Sunday. Email Cameron at www. tinyurl.com/pdnbcameron.

What about raising taxes on people who make more than $1 million a year?

Jan Jones

Denny Atkinson

Carol Goss

Dan Koester

Lauri Mohr

Jacob Morrison

Lynne Rudesill

Gary Smith

Dahlia gardener Port Angeles

Retired Customs officer Port Townsend

Insurance agent Port Townsend

Welder Agnew

Retired postal worker Clallam Bay

Self-employed Port Angeles

“I think the tax system is inequitable, and we should raise the tax. When Warren Buffet substantiates that the rich are not paying as much, that sealed my opinion.”

“Sounds great. It should be done. It would certainly help our economy. It’s about time we did something like this. They seem to get all the perks and all the tax write-offs.”

“Yes, it’s a good idea, and it’s about time. The lower class doesn’t have as many discounts, either. I feel they can afford it much more than the middle or lower class.”

“Most of those people are in corporations that make a lot of money. They’re the auto makers, cellphone execs and oil companies. It’s all profit for them. They can pay.”

Retired human resources worker Port Angeles

Retired hospital worker Port Angeles

“No. I believe they pay more than people realize they pay. People making over a million still pay taxes one way or another. Maybe we should close all the loopholes.”

“The rich have all kinds of loopholes. . . . They need to pay their share. I know a millionaire, and even he makes money when his company is shut down.”

“Probably a good idea. I understand that the rich are getting more tax breaks. Anyway, can you spend a million dollars? The rich are getting richer and the poor poorer.”

“I’m for it, but I’d like to know what percentage is proposed. I think it’s inevitable that a broader tax increase will ensue, especially if we want to get out of this jam.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices Need hatcheries

decision in 1974 [known as the Boldt Decision], the The Oct. 12 letter fishing and hunting oppor“Tribal fishing” is absotunities that exist for the lutely correct — salmon public today might not be should not be taken in any available. of our rivers. Do the math. The Jamestown Only a tiny percentage S’Klallam tribe is indeed a of the smolt we send out steward of the land, and we ever makes it back through are proud of our efforts to all the high-tech fishing make a difference in progear and the hordes of tecting and restoring our salmon-eating birds and precious natural resources. animals in the ocean. We are active in the coBut one chinook salmon management of fish and lays about 4,000 eggs — wildlife and the habitat coho a little less, but still that supports these valuplenty. able resources. If that fish is allowed to Just one example is the lay those eggs, quite a lot work we have accomof fish will be produced, plished, together with our and we could have a reamany partners, in bringing sonable quantity of salmon. back the Jimmycomelately If those eggs are instead Fishing practices sold to the Japanese, no I am writing in response Creek population of summer chum salmon, one of fish are spawned from to a letter claiming our the eight summer chum them. We need more hatch- local salmon populations populations listed for proeries, not fewer. won’t benefit from dam tection under the EndanTo those who cry, oh, the removal projects or river gered Species Act. hatchery salmon are inferestoration projects We are actively working rior to wild, hatched because of nets fished by salmon, I ask: Have you tribal citizens [“Tribal fish- to do the same for the Dungeness River chinook never heard of DNA, the ing,” Oct. 12 PDN]. population. formula for reproduction Those who are wellAs for the gillnet fishing God placed in every living versed in the history of fish that tribal citizens particicreature? and wildlife management pate in, I am not clear if The real problem is that in this state know that the letter writer is aiming the salmon restoration were it not for the historic United States vs. Washing- criticism at all gillnet fishindustry might not get all ers or just those who are ton State federal court the contributions and government handouts they do now. Is an Irishman born in New York genetically inferior to one born in Dublin? The state of Alaska puts its hatcheries on nonsalmon-bearing streams to avoid competition for food. Washington should do the same. The great salmon shortage did not occur until after federal Judge George Boldt decided to do a “favor” for the tribes. That favor is hurting the tribes, too. I have video that proves it. Marv Chastain, Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Sue Stoneman

Acting Advertising Director

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

Our readers’ letters, faxes citizens of an Indian tribe. Jamestown S’Klallam fishers use gillnets in Dungeness Bay and fish alongside non-Indian fishers who also use gillnets. But evidently, the letter writer feels that it is just the tribal gillnets that are causing harm. I can assure Peninsula Daily News readers that the Dungeness Bay coho fishery is carefully managed for both gillnet fisheries — and that the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe is active in managing and producing the coho that are harvested. Ron Allen, Sequim

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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benefit to home recycling. People recycle to reduce resource consumption and help the environment. It would be disgusting for the city to charge a higher fee to people who care about recycling than it does to those who don’t. Edwin R. Johnson, Port Angeles

of hundreds of county residents and potentially save Clallam County many thousands of dollars. But I just learned that the Clallam County commissioners are considering terminating Master Gardener program coordinator Muriel Nesbitt and office manager Lori Kennedy as a cost-cutting measure. A volunteer Master GarMaster Gardeners dener since 2001, I’ve used According to the Washmy training and profesington State University sional scientific background Extension Office, the first to bring information on two Native Americans in better nutrition through the United States living on home gardens to groups from the east end to the a reservation have just west end of Clallam County. completed the two-year These citizens would not Clallam Master Gardener education program and 100 have had access to Master Gardeners’ volumes of Allen is the chairman of hours of volunteer service information without Masthe Jamestown S’Klallam and are holding plant ter Gardeners’ dedicated tribe. clinics and home-garden professional staff — seminars on the Lower Fee ‘outrageous’ Elwha Klallam and Makah Muriel Nesbitt and Laurie Kennedy. reservations. The Oct. 6 Peninsula The decision to cut all They’ll receive their Daily News article “Recyfunding for Master GarMaster Gardener badges in cling not free so who pays?” deners’ professional staff or a planned December cerewas shocking. to continue to fund Master mony attended by officials It says that Port AngeGardeners’ staff and proles city staff want to charge from Washington State grams lies with three more money to people who University and the press county commissioners — recycle than they charge to that will mark a national Steve Tharinger, Mike milestone. people who don’t recycle. Chapman and Mike Clallam Master Garden- Doherty. They say that will be more “equitable.” ers are working to permaTurn to Voices/A9 There is no personal nently improve the health

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

by

Peninsula Daily News

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Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A8

make our children a priority in this school district. If you want a small porHe deserves our vote. tion of the county budget to Walter Trial, continue to fund the MasSequim ter Gardeners programs, contact your county comFor Rosales missioners by phone (360After careful consider417-2233), fax (360-417ation, I am endorsing Ste2493) and/or by email phen Rosales for the (commissioners@co.clallam. Sequim School Board. wa.us). I have worked with and Beth Oakes, witnessed Stephen’s work Joyce at the Boys & Girls Club, the Sequim Food Bank and Rosales critic in other community events First, I must admit that and activities. I do not know much about Stephen has worked to Stephen Rosales, who is raise funds to preserve the running for a seat on the Sequim Senior Meals ProSequim School Board. gram, where he is an active However, various news member of the leadership articles in the Peninsula team that is working with Daily News give me pause Olympic Community to question his abilities Action Programs (OlyCAP) with regard to dealing to make sure that our effectively with co-workers seniors in need can receive and peers. at least one meal a day Troubling to me is the even as federal resources resignation of 13 volunteer supporting that program members of the Sequim are constricting. Food Bank in 2009 and the The Sequim-Dungeness executive director in proValley Chamber of Comtest over changes implemerce named Stephen Citimented by Mr. Rosales and zen of the Year in 2007. his management style. In 2011, Stephen This is not to say that received a Clallam County some of the changes at the Community Service Award. Sequim Food Bank were Before retiring to not warranted or were Sequim in 2005 with his unnecessary, but only to family, Stephen had an question why so many peo- engaging career in Texas ple found it impossible to government. work with Mr. Rosales. Stephen does not sit idly Is this a premonition of by on the sidelines. things to come should Mr. Soon, Stephen became Rosales be elected to the involved in civic groups, Sequim School Board? volunteering time at I certainly hope not. Sequim schools and as a But why should we Little League volunteer, expect him to be any more and supported nonprofit of a team builder as a organizations by raising School Board member than funds, improving operahe was as a member of the tions, volunteering time Sequim Food Bank? and enhancing the delivery I am not willing to take of service to children, this chance. seniors and those in need. Our children need and Stephen is a rare asset deserve an effective School to the Sequim community, Board, not one that breeds and he will be an engaging animosity and enmity new member of the Sequim among its members. School Board when he is Therefore, I am voting elected. to re-elect Walt Johnson to When we evaluate anythe Sequim School Board, one for a position of public and I urge others to do the trust, we should be looking same. for patterns of behavior, Mr. Johnson has already and in Mr. Rosales’ case, I demonstrated his leaderhave witnessed firsthand a ship and his ability to work pattern of behavior that is effectively with others to trustworthy, proactive,

Our readers’ letters, faxes

communicative and thoughtful. Those are characteristics that describe Stephen Rosales. I hope that you will join me in electing Stephen Rosales as a new member of the Sequim School Board. Robert Spinks, Sequim

devote to this difficult job. I find all those qualities in abundance in Deborah Stinson, and I urge you to cast your vote for her in November. Laura Tucker, Port Townsend

For Slowriver

I’m writing to urge my fellow citizens to join me in Spinks is the former supporting Jack Slowriver police chief of Sequim. for the position of Olympic Medical Center commisFor Stinson sioner (District No. 3). In the past few years, We have two wonderful I’ve been fortunate enough candidates running for to get to know Jack a little, City Council Position 3 in and I feel extremely confiPort Townsend. dent that Jack would be an I am supporting Deborah Stinson because I have excellent choice for this important position. known her for eight years Jack will bring a track and have worked with her record of accomplishments on many community projand bridge-building to this ects and events. I marveled at her excep- post as well as a commitment to transparency and tional ability to work with a broad range of personali- improved communication with the citizens of Clallam ties and perspectives. County. She listens to all, then Last year, Jack’s comuses her years of experimitment to health and ence to gently and wisely public service resulted in lead the group toward a an appointment to the solution or decision that favors the greatest amount Clallam County Public of good. I can see why Lau- Health Advisory Commitrie Medlicott, the outgoing tee. Needless to say, having access to quality health City Council member, has care is an issue of imporendorsed Deborah to fill tance to everyone. her position. Keeping OMC fiscally Deborah is also a dedisolvent and accessible to cated community member, members of the public serving with numerous should be the key goals of groups that benefit our region, many in a leadership the OMC commissioners. And yet, OMC is currole. rently more $20 million in Her tireless, selfless work earned her the Jeffer- debt. Members of the public son County Heart of Service Award given by Penin- who find this alarming and sula Daily News and three who might wish to speak or ask questions at board of local Rotary clubs. commissioners meetings Her dedication to service includes all of our com- would find another alarmmunity members — young ing indicator: Public comment may and old, those new to the community, those who have not be allowed at their work sessions. “been here forever,” people I trust Jack to quickly of little means and retired and openly address the fiscitizens with large stock cal stewardship issues facportfolios — and everyone ing OMC and to bring back in between. I know Deborah will look out for us all. the opportunity for I also want a City Coun- increased public comment at meetings. cil member who has deep It’s your health. knowledge of our commuThis is our hospital. nity and the complexity of Jack Slowriver will be the issues, the leadership skills to move in a positive an advocate for all of us and will help OMC get direction and the time to

Sunday, October 16, 2011

A9

and email

back on track. Join me in voting Jack Slowriver for OMC commissioner. Max Mania, Port Angeles Mania is a member of the Port Angeles City Council.

McEntire critic During the Clallam County commissioner primary, an oft-repeated ad from the McEntire campaign asked: “Inflation, Taxes, & Unemployment Up/Incomes Down/Businesses Closed. Had enough?” Yes, I’ve had enough, enough of: ■ McEntire’s debasement of political dialogue through angry, empty rhetoric. ■ Misplaced blame on our local commissioners for our nation’s economic problems. ■ False insinuation that our commissioners have imposed excessive taxes. ■ A “fiscal conservative” who racks up frivolous Port of Port Angeles commission expenses on the public’s dime, then makes an excuse that it wasn’t tax money — it was still our money. ■ A “self-made man” who touts “self-reliance” but whose two federal pensions aren’t sufficient to buy his own bottled water. ■ The claim that any progress at the Rayonier pulp mill site stemmed from the failed $1.3 million Harbor-Works venture. (The city’s acquisition of the sewage-overflow tank, for example, was an entirely separate effort.) ■ McEntire’s confusion of what may be legal (creating Harbor-Works without input from the public or the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe, a legally named party to the cleanup) with what is wise leadership. We can do better. Linda Barnfather’s work in both private enterprise and the state Legislature demonstrates her ability to get beyond rhetoric and ideology. Her reputation in

Olympia has established an excellent working relationship with the many state agencies by which the county is regulated and funded. And with her positive attitude and listening ability, she will bring county citizens together for solutions that improve all of our lives — far more than “enough” for Clallam County. Ed Chadd, Port Angeles

For McEntire I have not been involved in politics for quite a few years. I have voted mostly as a Democrat, although I have voted both ways. I have always believed that at the county level, the Clallam County commissioner position should be onpartisan. The way I have always looked at it, the board of commissioners consists of three people working to do what’s best for the county without being influenced or pushed by ideology. I attended a debate between commissioner candidates Linda Barnfather and Jim McEntire. I felt both presented themselves well and are good, honest people. I have read some unflattering remarks made toward Mr. McEntire that believe not to be true. Yes, you can say he’s mostly been employed by the government. I believe it is meant to be uncomplimentary. Most all people refer to their time with the military as “I served.” As far as experience, when going to sea as a captain on a rescue mission, you are going to run into situations from time to time in which there is no room for indecisiveness. This leads one to become most serious in all matters. I ask those who know the true meaning of “served” to please join with others to elect Jim McEntire. He will make a great county commissioner. Dennis Dehmalo, Sequim

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Michael Carman

to Angeles Clinic for Animals [Port Angeles] on behalf of my kitty, Pixie. You all have given my kitty a Rave of the Week RAVES TO ALL the students second chance at life, and you all who attended the Dungeness will forever be in my heart. River Festival at Railroad Bridge I don’t know any of you, and THIS IS A rave for my wonthat makes this just more derful hair client who found and Park on Sept. 23. Each participated in more special. brought me a white pumpkin than 24 excellent exhibits and You all are what makes the after he heard me ask: “They activities. They were enthusiastic world go round! really have white pumpkins?” and well-behaved as they experienced and learned about features THANK YOU TO the artists/ of this local area. cancer survivors and Landings . . . and other Raves Art Gallery [Port Angeles] for the A RAVE FOR the young boy inspiring exhibit. A VERY SPECIAL, huge who helped me take a chair to thank-you to Dr. Dirk Gouge, who the checkout counter in Goodwill is always there for our Port Ange- in Sequim on Oct. 8. Rant of the Week les High School Roughriders. What a gentleman. It takes a special kind of guy Thanks again. SHAME ON ALL you onlookto volunteer his private time ers last Sunday at Safeway. away from his family and doctor RAVES AND HAPPY Why wouldn’t anyone help job to take care of our guys. National Feral Cat Day (today) to this young man? Peninsula Friends of Animals, His mother had his arm in THE CRAB REVIVAL last Olympic Mountain Pet Pals and her hands and was twisting his Sunday morning [at the Port everyone who helps feral cats hand back till it was purple all Angeles Crab & Seafood Festival] have a better life and not keep was great — a very positive addi- reproducing through trap, neuter the way through the store! This young boy . . . was yelling tion to the festival. and return. in pain for someone to help him, Thank you for all you do to RAVES AND MANY thanks and no one even looked! help the cats. to the barista who offers doughI had to do something! nuts to her Sunday customers He needed it, and hopefully it A HUGE THANK-YOU for simply because she likes to make all the donations that were sent helped. people happy. A kind and thoughtful gesture, it was much appreciated!

We need to help each other. Even if it seems hard, it’s worth it.

. . . and other Rants TO ALL THOSE inconsiderate readers of the North Olympic Library System books who crease the corner of pages in lieu of a bookmark and write in, smear food or whatnot in and generally deface/destroy the books. Please treat the books so that others may enjoy them. TO THE FOLKS who walk their dogs along Thornton and Marine drives in Dungeness and let them defecate along the roadside. This lovely area has become a fecal zone. Next time, bring a baggie! How hard is that? After all, it’s your pet. A MIXED-BREED DOG is just a mutt. You might be called a Dorkie yourself if you pay $400. When I grew up, they were given away for free.

Stop supporting these breeders and rescue a dog from the shelter. A RANT TO co-workers who discuss after-hours socializing with each other in the hearing of others who are not invited. It may seem petty and childish, but it’s still hurtful.

________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), email us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. On voice messages, spell out names for raves. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


A10

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 16, 2011 — (C)

Homecoming

time for

Peninsula Daily News

Riders

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Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News

King Keenan Walker, varsity football quarterback, and Queen Kiah Jones, a leader of the girls volleyball team, reign over the Port Angeles High School homecoming. Kiah’s older sister, Skylar, was homecoming queen two years ago. The 2011 royals are seniors, and their class won the homecoming competition that culminated in a halftime chariot race during Friday night’s game at Civic Field. At right, before the game, freshman Erin Rice looks at fellow members of her school’s marching band at the start of the homecoming parade from the Clallam County Courthouse to Civic Field.

Olympic Medical Center commissioners will consider approving an affiliation agreement with Swedish Health Services on Wednesday. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. in Linkletter Hall in the basement of the Port Angeles hospital, 939 E. Caroline St., Port Angeles. The board also will take public input on OMC’s proposed redistricting plan and hear an administrator’s report on operations and union negotiations.

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Eye on Clallam a work session.

PA City Council The Port Angeles City Council will consider approval of 2012 utility rates and fees Tuesday. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. in council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. Also on the agenda: ■  Peninsula Plywood utility payback agreement. ■  Spruce Railroad trail comments. ■  Lodging Tax Advisory Committee appointments. ■  Port Angeles Downtown Association report. A special meeting will be held at 5 p.m. in the same location to discuss the budget.

Clallam Transit The Clallam Transit board will conduct a public hearing on proposed price increases for bus passes and a fare structure change Monday. The hearing will begin at 1 p.m. at the Clallam Transit System building at 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd. The Clallam Transit board is also expected to take action on the following agenda items: ■  An agreement for public transit service with the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe. ■  Approval to public legal notice for a public hearing on proposed service improvements and efficiencies. to ■  Authorization apply for grants. ■  Acceptance of an agreement for joint use of Clallam Transit administration, operations and maintenance facility. ■  A grant application for a vanpool investment program. The board will also hear

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Sequim City Council The Sequim City Council will discuss 2012 departmental budgets when it meets Monday. The workshop will begin at 5 p.m. in its chambers at the Sequim Transit Center, 190 W. Cedar St. Police and other departmental budgets, with the exception of Public Works, will be discussed. The council also will review a fee ordinance and consider a conflict waiver with City Attorney Craig Ritchie for approval.

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Board of Health The Clallam County Board of Health will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to the public health fee schedule Tuesday. The meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. The board also will discuss whooping cough in infants, program updates and community health assessment data.

Public utility district The Clallam County Public Utility District commissioners’ meeting Monday has been canceled. The next meeting will be held Oct. 24.

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The three Clallam County commissioners will consider a bid award and contract to C&J Excavating Inc. for backflow prevention installation at the Clallam County Fairgrounds on Tuesday. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. in the commissioners’ boardroom (160) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Also on the agenda: ■  An amendment to a state Department of Behavioral Health and Recovery contract to continue implementation of a drug court case management system and to subcontract recovery support services for adult drug court. ■  An amendment to a state Department of Ecology contract for moderaterisk waste activities. ■  An amendment to a state Department of Ecology contract for solid waste enforcement activities. amend■  Contract ments with the state Recreation and Conservation Office adding a state Department of Fish and Wildlife work site and secondary sponsorship. ■  A bid opening for a tie road in Sequim. Commissioners will meet in the same boardroom Monday at 9 a.m. to discuss the agenda items in

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(C)

Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 16, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

SCOREBOARD In this section

Winging it

Prep Notes

Football playoff picture WITH A FEW weeks left in the season, the playoff picture is starting to take shape in prep football. As of Saturday, all but two Matt of the North Schubert Olympic Peninsula’s nine teams can claim at least a reasonable shot at the postseason. A Port Townsend loss Saturday would have eliminated it from playoff contention, and its chief rival, Chimacum, needs to win out and get a ton of help. Meanwhile, Port Angeles and Sequim already have spots locked up. It’s just where each will land that’s in question. With that in mind, here’s a quick glance at where each team with playoff hopes stands going into the stretch run:

Price torches Buffaloes in UW blowout

ALSO . . . ■ Cougs fall at Stanford/B4

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Washington quarterback Keith Price throws against Colorado on the first play in the first half of Saturday’s game in Seattle. Price threw for four touchdowns as the Huskies improved to 5-1 on the season.

SEATTLE — The names changed with every score Washington posted in its nearly perfect first 30 minutes. The guy orchestrating Saturday’s onslaught remained the same. Keith Price continued his assault on Washington’s record book with four firsthalf touchdown passes, and

Washington made its case for a national ranking with an impressive 52-24 rout of Colorado on Saturday. Price’s TD passes went to four different receivers, setting the tone for the day. Seven different Huskies scored as Washington topped the 50-point mark for the first time in more than 10 years. “The guy plays. In the football world, he’s a baller,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said. Turn

Dawgs/B4

to

Port Angeles ■ Best case: Roughriders win out and get a Sequim win over North Kitsap next week to claim Olympic League title. That would mean a date with the Class 2A SPSL’s fourth seed (Steilacoom or Washington) at North Kitsap in the preliminary state playoffs. ■ Worst case: Two straight losses could put the Riders in a pigtail playoff with Interlake. ■ My best guess: The Riders split their last two and then must travel to face the 2A Seamount’s top team (Hazen or Renton) in the preliminary playoffs.

Sequim ■ Best case: Wolves continue October dominance with two more wins to earn a second straight Olympic League title. They get 2A SPSL No. 4 Steilacoom or Washington at North Kitsap in the preliminary playoffs. ■ Worst case: Wolves lose two in a row and drop into third seed and preliminary playoff at 2A Seamount champion. ■ My best guess: I picked them to win league at the start of the season, and I’m not changing now.

Chimacum ■ Best case: Cowboys win out, Cedar Park Christian and Orting lose out, forcing the dreaded Kansas City tie-breaker between the three for a spot in the 1A preliminary playoffs. ■ Worst case: Cowboys lose out and finish in a three-way tie for last place in the 1A Nisqually. ■ My best guess: Somewhere in between, with the Cowboys splitting last two — which includes the PT game — and missing postseason.

Forks ■ Best case: Spartans knock off Tenino and Elma in succession, get some help, and claim SWL-Evergreen’s third seed to 1A preliminary playoffs. That would mean a game at SWL-Trico No. 2 (LaCenter). ■ Worst case: Spartans drop final two games and finish out of playoffs in sixth place. ■ My best guess: Leaning toward the “worst case,” but could envision a Forks split that results in the SWLEvergreen’s fourth and final playoff bid at Trico champ Kalama. Of course, the Spartans could split and likely remain out of the playoffs.

Quilcene ■ Best case: Rangers top Peninsula rivals Neah Bay, Clallam Bay and Crescent in succeeding weeks for Northwest Football League’s third or fourth 1B playoff bid. A fourth seed would result in a game against the league champ in the 1B preliminary playoffs. ■ Worst case: Rangers lose two or three of their remaining games and are left out of the postseason. ■ My best guess: Road games at Neah Bay and Crescent will be tough. I’ll go with 1-2 and just out of the playoffs.

Neah Bay ■ Best case: Win out against Quilcene, Lummi and Clallam Bay and claim Northwest Football League title with a game against league’s No. 4 in 1B preliminary playoffs. Turn

to

Schubert/B2

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles’ Keenen Walker, left, tries to disrupt a pass to North Kitsap’s Andrew Hecker in the second quarter on Friday at Port Angeles Civic Field.

Rough homecoming North Kitsap upsets Riders 35-14 at Civic

By Matt Schubert Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles ran into the wrong football team at the wrong time Friday night. Missing one of its most explo-

sive athletes to injury, Port Angeles couldn’t get a handle on a North Kitsap squad that spent the past week stewing on a game it let get away. North Kitsap seized control from the beginning and never let go in Friday night’s critical

Olympic League contest, ruining the Roughriders’ homecoming with a decisive 35-14 win at chilly Civic Field. “[North Kitsap] played a better game than we did tonight, no doubt about it,” Port Angeles coach Tom Wahl said. “We seemed like we were always fighting out of a hole in the first half.” The loss spoiled Port Angeles’ unblemished record and muddied the waters in the Olympic League title race with two weeks to go.

Instead of needing only to win out to claim the title, the Riders (4-1 in league, 6-1 overall) now must also get help from rival Sequim, which plays at North Kitsap (4-1, 4-3) next Friday. “We still got a shot at the league championship,” Wahl said. “I think we should be able to keep ourselves up and optimistic.” North Kitsap came off the bus Friday night still fuming over a 34-28 overtime loss to Olympic the week before. Turn

to

Riders/B3

Loggers get rolled Quimper Prep Tennis

Crescent can’t stop unbeaten Lopez in loss

duo wins tourney

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

JOYCE— Undefeated Lopez rolled over Crescent 80-36 in Northwest Football League action in a rare Friday afternoon game. Lopez (5-0 in league and overall) scored 30 points in the first quarter and 38 in the third. Crescent (3-3, 4-3) scored twice in the second period and three times in the third quarter behind big Mike Zapien’s 156 yards and two touchdowns on the ground. The game was halted with 11:25 left to play in the fourth quarter when the Lobos scored their final touchdown to trigger the 40-point mercy rule. Tommy Kramer was a oneman wrecking ball for Lopez as he scored nine touchdowns. “Kramer is just an outstanding football player,” Crescent coach Darryl Yount said. Kramer is a former state champion in the 100-meter dash and he is also an outstanding shot putter, Yount said. “He combines all that speed and strength to be the kind of player who can succeed at the next level. We had no answer for him,” Yount said.

POULSBO — Port Angeles, Sequim and Chimacum/Port Townsend boys tennis teams all have players advancing to the Class 2A West Central District championships next spring. The area teams each had players who finished in the top four at 2A sub-district competition Thursday and Friday at North Kitsap High School. The top area finishers were the top doubles team from Chimacum/Port Townsend, Egan Cornachione and Benny Ryweck, who won the sub-district doubles championship. Cornachione may have a tough decision to make come springtime, however, since he’s also a starting infielder on the Cowboys’ state championship baseball team. Sequim’s Byron Boots was runner-up in singles play while Hayden McCartney of Port Angeles captured third in singles. Cornachione and Ryweck beat Klahowya’s top doubles team 6-2, 6-3 in the championship match. Sequim’s doubles team of Andrew Gunstone and Evan Hill claimed fourth place for a berth to the district tournament.

Prep Football

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Crescent’s Mike Zapien, left, tries to break loose from the defensive efforts of Lopez Island’s Tommy Kramer Turn to Football/B3 in the first quarter on Friday in Joyce.

Turn

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Preps/B2


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Today’s

Tuesday’s Games Port Angeles at Sequim Port Townsend at Kingston Klahowya at Bremerton Olympic at North Mason South Kitsap at North Kitsap

Today No events scheduled

Area Sports

Volleyball

Bowling Laurel Lanes Oct. 15 PeeWee Kids League Boys’ high game: Nick Amsdill, 77. Girls’ high game: Abby Robinson, 85. Bantam Kids League Girls’ high game: Sierra Burkett, 106; girls high series: Sierra Burkett, 291. Junior Kids League Boys’ high game: Nathan Dewey, 178; boys’ high series: Nathan Dewey, 428. Oct. 14 Seven Cedars Mixed Men’s high game: Bill Van Gordon, 248; men’s high series: Bill Van Gordon, 610. Women’s high game: Rita Berson, 182; women’s high series: Rita Berson, 528. Leading team: “We Deliver”. Oct. 13 Longhouse Market Men’s high game: Tony Chapman, Jr., 257; men’s high series: Tony Chapman, Jr., 721. Women’s high game: Robin Iredale and Jean Smith, 197; women’s high series: Robin Iredale, 526. Leading team: James Gang.

Golf Peninsula Golf Club Oct. 13 Men’s Club Sub Par Any Two Holes Individual Event Gross: Bob Brodhun, 72; Rick Hoover, 72; Rick Parkhurst, 73; John Pruss, 73. Net: Larry Bourm, 61; Lyle Andrus, 62; rudy Arruda, 63; Gary McLaughlin, 64; Al Osterberg, 64; Bill Rinehart, 64; Gordon Thomson, 64; Eric Kovatch, 64; Kit Metcalf, 66; Ray Santiago, 66; Ray Dooley, 66; Harry Thompson, 66; Lawrence Bingham, 66; Steve Callis, 66. Team Event Gross: Tim Lusk and Gerald Petersen, 68; Rick Parkhurst and Bob Brodhun, 70; tim Lusk and Rob Botero, 71; Tom Hainstock and Steve Callis, 71; Rick Hoover and Jack Heckman, 71. Net: Larry Bourm and Bill Rinehart, 58; Larry Bourm and Joe Tweter, 60; Steve Jones and Lyle Andrus, 60; Gene Norton and Gordon Thomson, 60; Rudy Arruda and Jack Morley, 60; Dave Henderson and Gary McLaughlin, 61; Al Osterberg and Ray Dooley, 61; Dave Boerigter and Gordon Thomson, 61; Eric Kovatch and Jeff Colvin, 61; Eric Kovatch and Win Miller, 61. Winter League October 14 ­— Week Two Team Points 1. Triggs Dental Lab No. 1 14 2. Golf Shop Guys 14 3. The Brew Crew 14 4. Glass Services 12 5. Taylor Made Construction 12 6. Windermere 7.5 7. Triggs Dental Lab No. 2 6.5 8. Green Machine 5 9. Team Fireball 5 Individual Event Gross: Rob Botero, 33; Mike DuPuis, 34; Mel Triggs, 40. Net: Tory Clayton, 29; Mark Mast, 31; Justin Tognoni, 31; Vic Ward, 33; Daren Mast, 34; Darrel Vincent, 34; Buck Ward, 34; Sonny Carter, 35; Pat Ryder, 35.

Preps Girls Soccer Olympic League Team League Pts Overall Bremerton(3A) 5-0-1 16 9-1-2 North Kitsap 4-1-1 13 7-1-5 Klahowya 4-1-0 12 7-2-2 Port Angeles 2-1-2 8 6-4-3 Kingston 2-3-0 6 5-4-2 Port Town.(1A) 2-4-0 6 5-7-0 Olympic 1-2-2 5 5-4-3 Sequim 1-4-0 3 2-9-0 North Mason 0-5-0 0 0-10-0

Olympic League League Overall North Kitsap 6-0 10-1 Port Angeles 5-0 11-0 Sequim 4-1 9-2 Kingston 3-2 5-5 Olympic 3-2 7-4 Klahowya 1-4 5-6 North Mason 1-4 2-9 Bremerton(3A) 1-5 3-9 Port Town. (1A) 0-6 0-12 Tuesday’s Games Port Angeles at Sequim Port Townsend at Kingston Klahowya at Bremerton Olympic at North Mason 1A Nisqually League League Overall Vashon Island 9-0 10-0 Life Christian 7-1 10-1 Cascade Christian 4-4 4-4 Seattle Christian 3-5 3-5 Orting 3-6 4-6 Charles Wright 2-5 3-7 Chimacum 1-8 3-9 Monday’s Games Chimacum at Seattle Christian Cascade Christian at Charles Wright Vashon Island at Life Christian Auburn Adventist at Orting Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Montesano 9-1 9-1 Onalaska 9-1 9-1 Forks 6-4 7-4 Tenino 6-4 6-4 Hoquiam 6-4 6-4 Rochester 2-8 2-8 Rainier 2-8 2-8 Elma 0-10 0-10 Tuesday’s Games Rainier at Onalaska Montesano at Forks Hoquiam at Tenino Rochester at Elma North Olympic League League Overall Crescent 3-0 9-1 Neah Bay 1-2 3-2 Clallam Bay 1-3 4-6 Tuesday’s Game Crescent at Neah Bay

Football Friday’s Scores Adna 52, Winlock 14 Anacortes 28, Burlington-Edison 23 Archbishop Murphy 60, Coupeville 6 Arlington 35, Monroe 15 Bellevue 61, Sammamish 7 Bellevue Christian def. Darrington, forfeit Bethel 73, Puyallup 56 Bonney Lake 49, Decatur 6 Bothell 42, Garfield 0 Brewster 65, Pateros 21 Camas 58, Heritage 6 Capital 42, Wilson, Woodrow 14 Cashmere 36, Chelan 35 Cedarcrest 27, South Whidbey 17 Central Kitsap 42, Stadium 16 Centralia 27, Aberdeen 21 Cheney 34, East Valley (Spokane) 28, OT Chiawana 28, Davis 0 Clarkston 24, Pullman 0 Cle Elum/Roslyn 56, Granger 7 Colfax 14, Lind-Ritzville 13 Colton 56, Liberty Christian 48, OT Columbia (Burbank) 14, Goldendale 7 Columbia River 46, Fort Vancouver 0 Colville 28, Freeman 27 Connell 56, Wahluke 0 Curtis 51, Emerald Ridge 14 Dayton 26, Tekoa-Oakesdale/Rosalia 6 Deer Park 34, West Valley (Spokane) 21 DeSales 34, Asotin 7 East Valley (Yakima) 35, Toppenish 28

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Eastlake 44, Issaquah 17 Eastside Catholic 28, Blanchet 14 Eatonville 22, Sumner 19 Edmonds-Woodway 35, Cascade (Everett) 0 Eisenhower 48, Moses Lake 21 Ellensburg 29, Quincy 21 Lakes 69, Enumclaw 0 Ferndale 28, Sedro-Woolley 0 Franklin Pierce 39, White River 19 Gonzaga Prep 48, North Central 13 Graham-Kapowsin 49, Todd Beamer 14 Grandview 28, Ephrata 21 Hanford 23, Eastmont 6 Hockinson 55, R.A. Long 19 Interlake 58, Lake Washington 27 Jenkins (Chewelah) 13, Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 6 Kalama 53, Columbia (White Salmon) 27 Kamiakin 28, Sunnyside 0 Kennedy 41, Lindbergh 28 Kennewick 34, West Valley (Yakima) 6 Kentwood 41, Kent Meridian 13 Kettle Falls 34, Mary Walker 6 King’s 42, Granite Falls 13 Kiona-Benton 41, Mabton 8 LaCenter 34, Stevenson 8 LaConner 60, Chief Leschi 0 Lake City, Idaho 21, Wenatchee 20 Lake Roosevelt 46, Waterville 13 Lake Stevens 38, Marysville-Pilchuck 7 Lakewood 43, Sultan 7 Lewis and Clark 31, Mt. Spokane 7 Liberty (Spangle) 31, Bridgeport 8 Lynden 35, Mount Baker 0 Lynnwood 44, Marysville-Getchell High School 8 Manson 27, Liberty Bell 0 Mariner 21, Kamiak 17 Meadowdale 35, Everett 0 Mercer Island 32, Liberty (Renton) 10 Meridian 47, Lynden Christian 0 Morton/White Pass 36, Toutle Lake 0 Mossyrock 27, North Beach 8 Mount Si 28, Juanita 21 Mount Vernon 27, Glacier Peak 20 Mountain View 45, Kelso 0 Mountlake Terrace 17, Shorewood 14 Napavine 23, Wahkiakum 12 Naselle 48, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 7 Nathan Hale 37, Chief Sealth 20 Newport (Bellevue) 42, Redmond 24 Nooksack Valley 48, Friday Harbor 7 North Thurston 35, Black Hills 14 O’Dea 35, Bainbridge 14 Oak Harbor 42, Shorecrest 21 Odessa-Harrington 66, Columbia(Hunters)Inchelium 28 Olympia 27, Gig Harbor 3 Omak 62, Tonasket 21 Oroville 48, Entiat 0 Othello 73, Wapato 6 Peninsula 36, Auburn Mountainview 10 Pomeroy 63, Garfield-Palouse 22 Prairie 58, Hudson’s Bay 0 Prosser 55, Selah 0 Raymond 36, South Bend 6 Reardan 35, Davenport 0 Renton 32, Evergreen (Seattle) 12 Richland 31, Walla Walla 15 Ridgefield 11, Castle Rock 3 Riverside 41, St. Maries, Idaho 0 Royal 42, River View 24 Seattle Prep 48, Rainier Beach 20 Selkirk 52, Curlew 12 Skyline 49, Jackson 24 Skyview 61, Evergreen (Vancouver) 9 Snohomish 42, Stanwood 14 South Kitsap 38, Mount Tahoma 0 Southridge 41, Pasco 0 Squalicum 38, Sehome 14 Steilacoom 30, Fife 25 Tacoma Baptist 49, Concrete 14 Taholah 42, Lake Quinault 0 Tahoma 42, Auburn Riverside 19 Toledo 35, Ilwaco 0 Touchet 48, LaCrosse/Washtucna 36 Tumwater 52, River Ridge 7 University 54, Rogers (Spokane) 34 W. F. West 35, Mark Morris 14 Waitsburg-Prescott 26, Tri-Cities Prep 20 Warden 37, Kittitas 6 Washington 52, Clover Park 21 Wellpinit 58, Northport 18 White Swan 39, Soap Lake-Wilson Creek 22 Willapa Valley 51, Ocosta 12 Woodinville 38, Inglemoor 14 Woodland 35, Washougal 28, 2OT Yelm 35, Foss 7 Zillah 50, La Salle 12

Baseball MLB Playoffs LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) American League Texas 4, Detroit 2 Saturday, Oct. 8: Texas 3, Detroit 2 Sunday, Oct. 9: Detroit at Texas, ppd. rain Monday, Oct. 10: Texas 7, Detroit 3, 11 innings Tuesday, Oct. 11: Detroit 5, Texas 2 Wednesday, Oct. 12: Texas 7, Detroit 3, 11 innings Thursday, Oct. 13: Detroit 7, Texas 5 Saturday, Oct. 15: Texas 15, Detroit 5 National League St. Louis 3, Milwaukee 2 Sunday, Oct. 9: Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 6 Monday, Oct. 10: St. Louis 12, Milwaukee 3 Wednesday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 3 Thursday, Oct. 13: Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 2 Friday, Oct. 14: St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 1 Today: St. Louis (Jackson 12-9) at Milwaukee (Marcum 13-7), 5:05 p.m. x-Monday: St. Louis (Carpenter 11-9) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 17-10), 5:05 p.m.

Football NFL Standings NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco 4 1 0 .800 142 78 Seattle 2 3 0 .400 94 122 Arizona 1 4 0 .200 96 121 St. Louis 0 4 0 .000 46 113 East W L T Pct PF PA Washington 3 1 0 .750 83 63 N.Y. Giants 3 2 0 .600 127 123 Dallas 2 2 0 .500 99 101 Philadelphia 1 4 0 .200 125 132 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 4 1 0 .800 157 125 Tampa Bay 3 2 0 .600 87 125 Atlanta 2 3 0 .400 104 130 Carolina 1 4 0 .200 116 132 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 5 0 0 1.000 173 111 Detroit 5 0 0 1.000 159 89 Chicago 2 3 0 .400 107 122 Minnesota 1 4 0 .200 111 106 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF PA San Diego 4 1 0 .800 120 109 Oakland 3 2 0 .600 136 133 Kansas City 2 3 0 .400 77 150 Denver 1 4 0 .200 105 140 East W L T Pct PF PA Buffalo 4 1 0 .800 164 120 New England 4 1 0 .800 165 119 N.Y. Jets 2 3 0 .400 121 125 Miami 0 4 0 .000 69 104 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 3 2 0 .600 127 95 Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 105 94 Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 59 115 Indianapolis 0 5 0 .000 87 136 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 119 57 Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 110 94 Pittsburgh 3 2 0 .600 102 89 Cleveland 2 2 0 .500 74 93 Today St. Louis at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Detroit, 10 a.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Baltimore, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at New England, 1:15 p.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 5:20 p.m. Open: Arizona, Denver, Kansas City, San Diego, Seattle, Tennessee Monday Miami at N.Y. Jets, 5:30 p.m.

College Football Scores FAR WEST BYU 38, Oregon St. 28 Boise St. 63, Colorado St. 13 Montana 30, Portland St. 24 Montana St. 41, N. Arizona 24 Nevada 49, New Mexico 7 San Diego 31, Drake 24 UC Davis 38, UTSA 17 Washington 52, Colorado 24 Weber St. 39, Idaho St. 12 Wyoming 41, UNLV 14 SOUTHWEST Ark.-Pine Bluff 22, Southern U. 21 Cent. Arkansas 21, McNeese St. 18 Oklahoma St. 38, Texas 26 SMU 38, UCF 17 Sam Houston St. 47, Nicholls St. 7 Texas A&M 55, Baylor 28

MIDWEST Ball St. 23, Ohio 20 Butler 42, Valparaiso 14 Cincinnati 25, Louisville 16 Dayton 28, Davidson 0 E. Michigan 35, Cent. Michigan 28 Illinois St. 28, South Dakota 3 Indiana St. 46, W. Illinois 24 Miami (Ohio) 9, Kent St. 3 Michigan St. 28, Michigan 14 Missouri 52, Iowa St. 17 N. Illinois 51, W. Michigan 22 N. Iowa 31, S. Dakota St. 14 Ohio St. 17, Illinois 7 Toledo 28, Bowling Green 21 Wisconsin 59, Indiana 7 Youngstown St. 35, S. Illinois 23 SOUTH Alabama 52, Mississippi 7

Alabama St. 20, Prairie View 7 Appalachian St. 49, The Citadel 42 Bethune-Cookman 58, Fort Valley St. 30 Chattanooga 51, W. Carolina 7 E. Kentucky 41, SE Missouri 17 Florida A&M 47, Savannah St. 7<Florida St. 41, Duke 16 Georgetown 21, Howard 3 Georgia Southern 50, Furman 20 Grambling St. 44, Concordia-Selma 0 Jackson St. 17, MVSU 16 Jacksonville 50, Morehead St. 14 James Madison 34, Villanova 10 LSU 38, Tennessee 7 Liberty 63, Coastal Carolina 27 Louisiana-Lafayette 30, North Texas 10 Marshall 24, Rice 20 Miami 30, North Carolina 24 Morgan St. 52, NC Central 3

Murray St. 36, E. Illinois 27 NC A&T 42, Delaware St. 24 Norfolk St. 34, Hampton 24 Presbyterian 28, Gardner-Webb 14 SC State 23, Georgia St. 13 Samford 43, Elon 31 South Alabama 33, UT-Martin 30 South Carolina 14, Mississippi St. 12 Towson 39, Old Dominion 35 UTEP 44, Tulane 7 VMI 21, Charleston Southern 17 Virginia 24, Georgia Tech 21 Virginia Tech 38, Wake Forest 17 W. Kentucky 20, FAU 0 William & Mary 24, New Hampshire 10 Wofford 47, Virginia-Wise 14 EAST Albany (NY) 28, Robert Morris 17 Brown 34, Princeton 0

Campbell 35, Marist 21 Colgate 35, Cornell 28, OT Duquesne 28, CCSU 21 Harvard 42, Bucknell 3 Holy Cross 25, Dartmouth 17 Lafayette 28, Yale 19 Lehigh 34, Fordham 12 Maine 27, Rhode Island 21 Monmouth (NJ) 40, Bryant 35 Penn 27, Columbia 20 Penn St. 23, Purdue 18 Rutgers 21, Navy 20 Sacred Heart 60, St. Francis (Pa.) 45 Stony Brook 55, St. Anselm 6 Temple 34, Buffalo 0 UConn 16, South Florida 10 UMass 21, Delaware 10 Utah 26, Pittsburgh 14

Schubert: Ball Preps: Tourney Continued from B1 Clallam Bay ■ Worst case: Lose all three and end up on the outside looking in. ■ My best guess: The game at Lummi two weeks from now might be too much to ask. Give me a 2-1 finish and a spot in a pigtail playoff against Lopez.

Crescent ■ Best case: Regroup after bye next week, then beat Tulalip and Quilcene for fourth playoff spot in Northwest Football League. ■ Worst case: Lose last two games and finish out of the playoffs. ■ My best guess: Loggers sweep and squeak into 1B preliminary playoff against Lummi.

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■ Best case: Continue remarkable rise to respectability with wins at Muckleshoot and Quilcene, then shock the world with upset of Neah Bay. Depending upon what happens in other games, that could result in No. 2, 3 or 4 Northwest Football League playoff spot. ■ Worst case: Bruins drop all three and are out of postseason. ■ My best guess: Bruins drop two of three and miss playoffs by one game.

________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt.schubert@peninsuladailynews.com.

Continued from B1 beat Cory Stewart of Klahowya 6-1, 7-6 (7-2). “Hayden has done a great Gunstone and Hill came through the consolation job all season and his level of bracket, beating Chris play in this tournament was Gracey and Nick Tedford of as good as it’s been all seaNorth Kitsap 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 in son,” Riders coach Brian the semifinals to make the Gundersen said. Gundersen said he knew consolation finals, where they lost 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 to Ste- the Roughriders, who sent ven Breitmeyer and Alex eight players to sub-district, would have a tough time Olsen of North Kitsap. In singles competition, advancing to district play. “The Olympic League meanwhile, top-seeded Zac Fohn of North Kitsap beat has a lot of talent, depth and Boots 6-0, 6-3 for the sub- experience this year, and we knew it was going to be difdistrict title. Boots was seeded second ficult to advance,” Gunderin the tourney. sen said. “I’m extremely McCartney had to come proud of how this team up through the consolation played all season.” bracket, beating Cody Host North Kitsap domiCombs of Kingston 6-0, 6-0 nated the sub-district comin the consolation semifi- petition, capturing three of nals. the top six doubles places In the third-place final, and two of the top six sinMcCartney, the third seed, gles spots.

Today 10 a.m. (7) KIRO NFL Football, Buffalo Bills at New York Giants. 10 a.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, San Francisco 49ers at Detroit Lions. 11 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA Golf, The McGladrey Classic at Sea Island Golf Club in St. Simons Island, Georgia. Noon (25) ROOT Women’s College Soccer, Oregon at Colorado. 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO IndyCar Auto Racing, IZOD World Championship at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas, Nev. 1 p.m. (10) CITY NFL Football, Dallas Cowboys at New England Patriots. 1:15 p.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Dallas Cowboys at New England Patriots. 1:30 p.m. (5) KING Dew Tour, Pantech Open at Las Vegas, Nev. 5 p.m. (5) KING NFL Football, Minnesota Vikings at Chicago Bears. 5 p.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers in NLCS Game 6. 6 p.m. (26) ESPN MLS Soccer, Chivas U.S.A. at Los Angeles Galaxy.

Hockey NHL Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 5 4 1 0 8 13 11 Los Angeles 4 2 1 1 5 9 10 Phoenix 4 2 1 1 5 13 11 Anaheim 3 2 1 0 4 4 5 San Jose 2 1 1 0 2 6 4 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 4 4 0 0 8 13 5 Chicago 4 2 1 1 5 12 10 Nashville 4 2 1 1 5 11 12 St. Louis 3 1 2 0 2 9 9 Columbus 5 0 4 1 1 10 17 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 5 4 1 0 8 17 11 Minnesota 5 2 1 2 6 12 12 Edmonton 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 Vancouver 4 1 2 1 3 10 13 Calgary 4 1 3 0 2 11 14 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 6 3 1 2 8 18 16 Philadelphia 4 3 0 1 7 12 8 N.Y. Islanders 4 3 1 0 6 11 6 New Jersey 4 3 1 0 6 9 8 N.Y. Rangers 3 0 1 2 2 5 9 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Toronto 3 3 0 0 6 11 7 Buffalo 4 3 1 0 6 14 9 Boston 5 2 3 0 4 10 9 Montreal 4 1 2 1 3 11 13 Ottawa 5 1 4 0 2 14 23 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 4 4 0 0 8 15 11 Carolina 5 2 2 1 5 13 18 Florida 3 2 1 0 4 7 6 Tampa Bay 5 1 2 2 4 14 19 Winnipeg 3 0 3 0 0 5 13 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s Games Carolina 4, Buffalo 3 Anaheim 1, San Jose 0 Saturday’s Games Colorado 6, Montreal 5, SO Florida 3, Tampa Bay 2, SO New Jersey 3, Nashville 2, SO Boston 3, Chicago 2, SO Toronto 3, Calgary 2

Pirate women earn 1-0 win “It was just one of those games where it was a matter of time, but we didn’t really get the result we wanted.” Denae Brook earned the shutout in goal in her Peninsula Daily News first start for the Pirates. LONGVIEW — The She wasn’t really tested, Peninsula College womhowever, due to the conen’s soccer team claimed servative defensive tactics its eighth straight win employed by Lower with a 1-0 victory over Columbia (1-9-0, 1-11-0). Lower Columbia on Sat“She did what she urday. needed to do, but there The Pirates domiwasn’t a lot to do,” Andernated control of the ball, son said. “She didn’t really out-shooting the Red ever have to make any Devils 21-4, to earn its saves that tested her.” seventh shutout win of The win, combined the season in the with Bellevue’s 2-1 loss to NWAACC West Division Highline, gave Peninsula affair. a 7-point edge atop the Kelsie Ng broke West Division standings. through with the game’s The fourth-ranked only goal in the 36th Pirates are now also tied minute. with Walla Walla for the But outside of that, points lead in the entire the match was marked NWAACC. by a lot of missed Peninsula’s women chances for the Pirates will host Bellevue (6-2-2, (9-1-0 in West, 10-2-2 6-4-2) on Wednesday at 2 overall) on Lower Colum- p.m. The top-ranked men bia’s muddy pitch. play at 4 p.m. “They put pretty much eight people back Peninsula 1, Lower Columbia 0 in the defense and made Peninsula 0 0 — 0 Home 0 0 — 0 it crowded and chaotic,” Scoring Summary Pirates coach Kanyon First half: 1, Peninsula, Kelsie Ng, 36th. Anderson said. Second Half: No scoring.

Peninsula now seven points up in West Division


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(C) — Sunday, October 16, 2011

Football

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Continued from B1 “Defensively, it just continues to be a struggle,” Yount said. Offensively, though, the Loggers were fine once they uncorked in the second quarter. While Zapien ran for two touchdowns, Crescent quarterback Kai Story had two scoring throws to Joel Williams. Story passed for 145 yards in the game while Williams caught eight passes for 95 yards. Eric Larson led on defense with seven tackles and an interception. Williams also had a pick to go along with his five tackles. Gene Peppard had six tackles in the game. The Loggers have a bye Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News this coming week and then Quilcene Rangers Josh King (44), Colby Schreier (24), Devon Greenwood (59) and Colton Pol (7) play at Tulalip Heritage on zero in on Lummi ball carrier Robert Scott during Saturday’s homecoming game in Quilcene. Oct. 29. Lopez 80, Crescent 36 Lopez Crescent

30 6 38 6— 80 0 14 22 0— 36 First Quarter L—Kramer 44 run (Kramer run) L—Kramer 22 run (Kramer run) L—2 run (Kramer run) L—Kramer 7 run (run good) Second Quarter C—Williams 28 pass from Story (run failed) C—Williams 9 pass from Story (Story run) L—Kramer 21 run (run failed) Third Quarter L—24 run (Kramer run) C—Zapien 1 run (March pass from Story) L—Kramer 36 run (Kramer run) C—Larson 79 kickoff return (Bamer run) L—Kramer 45 run (run good) C—Zapien 18 run (run failed) L—Kramer 1 run (Kramer run) L—Kramer 28 run (run failed) Fourth Quarter L—Kramer 71 run (run failed) Individual Stats Rushing— C: Zapien 26-156, Bamer 8-37, Story 3-9. Passing—C: Story 11-14-0, 145 yards. Receiving—C: Williams 8-85, Larson 2-42, Findley 1-10, Bamer 1-3, March 1-3.

Charles Wright 34, Chimacum 7 CHIMACUM — Charles Wright spoiled the Chimacum football team’s homecoming with a 34-7 victory on a brisk Friday night at Memorial Field. The Tarriers (4-1 in league, 5-1 overall) scored four touchdowns between the second and third quarters to pull away for the Class 1A Nisqually League win. “We did some really good things offensively and defensively, but our own mistakes really was the difference in this game,” Chimacum coach Shawn Meacham said. “Not to take anything away from Charles Wright but we beat ourselves. “If we play a mentally tough game, it would have been a different outcome.” Chimacum (1-4, 1-6) scored its lone touchdown in the fourth quarter to avoid a shutout as Derek Ajax ran for a 3-yard score and Kyle Madayag kicked the extra point. The Cowboys had 141 yards on the ground and another 80 through the air. Justin Morris led on defense with eight solo tackles, four assists and a fumble recovery, while Daryl Settlemire had seven solo tackles and two assists plus a fumble recovery. Joe Modispacher added six solo tackles and a fumble recovery. “They all had another great game defensively,” Meacham said. “Charles Wright did not run a single play towards Daryl Settlemire the entire second half.

B3

The Cowboys now travel to Cedar Park Christian (3-2, 5-2) this Friday with the league game set for Juanita High School in Kirkland. Ch. Wright 34, Chimacum 7 Ch. Wright Chimacum

0 14 13 7— 34 0 0 0 7— 7 Second Quarter CW—Chris Lee 27 pass from Fritz Jacobson (Alec Dennis kick) CW—Alexander Moore 35 pass from Jacobson (Dennis kick) Third Quarter CW—Moore 44 pass from Jacobson (Dennis kick) CW—Nick Ho 49 run (kick failed) Fourth Quarter CW—Raheem Hughey 8 run (Dennis kick) C—Derek Ajax 4 run (Kyle Madayag kick) Individual Stats Rushing— C: Hare 7-60, J. Morris 11-47, Ajax 6-17, Madayag 4-12, Thornton 9-5. Passing—C: A. Morris 3-17-3, 45 yards; Ajax 4-16-1, 35 yards. Receiving—C: J. Morris 2-48, Cienega 2-22.

Clallam Bay 40, Tulalip 12 CLALLAM BAY — Ryan Willis threw for three touchdowns and ran for another to help boost the Bruins to their third win in four games Friday night. Clallam Bay pulled away with two touchdowns in the third quarter — one on a 5-yard Austin Ritter run and the other on a 28-yard pass from Willis to Bryce Hatt — to roll to a much-needed Northwest Football League victory. “It was a big win for us,” Clallam Bay coach Cal Ritter said. “We dominated the line of scrimmage and my kids are in midseason form. “I’m really happy with how the boys are playing.” Clallam Bay (3-2, 3-3) had control of the game throughout, despite turning the ball over five times. Austin Ritter led the Bruins with 165 yards of offense, including 130 on the ground on 20 carries, and three touchdowns. Jeremy Rock added 108 yards and one touchdown on 17 carries, while Willis was 5-of-9 through the air for 61 yards, three TDs and two interceptions. “Matt Mohr, Kelly Gregory and Joe Maneval did a superb job [on the offensive line],” Cal Ritter said. “I couldn’t ask for them to do any better. They made it so we could pass. They made it so we could run. Hats off to my offensive line.” After giving up two touchdowns in the first half to lead 18-12 at the break, the Clallam Bay defense shut out Tulalip the rest of the way. The unit also came up with a safety toward the end of the game.

“Putting these last two wins together really help build a little momentum,” Cal Ritter said. “Hopefully we can take that to Muckleshoot next weekend.” Clallam Bay 40, Tulalip 12 Tulalip Clallam Bay

6 6 0 0— 12 6 12 14 8— 40 First Quarter CB—A. Ritter 7 pass from Willis (run failed) T—6 run (pass failed) Second Quarter CB—Rock 3 run (run failed) T—5 run (run failed) CB—Ritter 28 pass from Willis (run failed) Third Quarter CB—A. Ritter 5 run (run failed) CB—Hatt 12 pass from Willis (Rock run) Fourth Quarter CB—Willis 2 run (run failed) CB—Safety Individual Stats Rushing— CB: A. Ritter 20-130, Rock 17-108, Willis 6-11, Foulkes 2-13, Hatt 3-25. T: No stats available. Passing—CB: Willis 5-9-2, 61; Gregory 0-1-0, 0. T: no stats available. Receiving—CB: A. Ritter 2-35, C. Ritter 1-17, Hatt 1-12, Wrziesen 1-6. T: No stats available.

Neah Bay 34, Highland Chri. 0 NEAH BAY — Thin Highland Christian of Arlington got even thinner during the game and threw up the white flag early in the second quarter with the Red Devils leading 34-0 on Friday night. Showing up with only eight players for 1B eightman football, Highland Christian lost two players to injury, one on what became the final play of the game with 11:47 left in the first half. Neah Bay, hungry for playing time after receiving a forfeit from Muckleshoot recently, improved to 5-0 in the Northwest Football League and 5-1 overall while Highland fell to 1-5, 1-6. The third-ranked Red Devils, winners of five straight after losing to topranked Lummi in the first game of the season, now will host Quilcene this Friday night. Against Highland, quarterback Josiah Greene threw three touchdown passes while Titus Pascua and Tyler McCaulley had long scoring runs. Josiah Greene had scoring passes to Zeke Greene, Keaton Hawkins and Leyton Doherty. Neah Bay 34, Highland Christian 0 Highland Chr. 0 0 x x— 0 Neah Bay 26 8 x x— 34 First Quarter NB—Z. Greene 2 pass from J. Greene (pass failed) NB—Pascua 65 run (pass failed) NB—McCaulley 67 run (Z. Greene pass from J. Greene) NB—Hawkins 27 pass from J. Greene (pass failed) Second Quarter NB—Doherty 10 pass from J. Greene (Reamer pass from J. Greene)

Individual Stats Rushing— NB: Tyler McCaulley 1-67, Pascua 1-65. Passing—NB: J. Greene 3-6-0, 39 yards. Receiving—NB: Z. Greene 1-2, Hawkins 1-27, Doherty 1-10.

Rainier 28, Forks 12 RAINIER — Missing a few key players, the Spartans came back in the second half but fell short by a couple of touchdowns in SWL-Evergreen Division action Friday night. The loss means Forks has no margin for error in the race for a playoff spot after falling to 2-3 in league and 2-5 overall. “We have to win out now,” coach Mark Feasel said. That won’t be easy as the Spartans host Tenino (4-1, 6-1) in their final home game of the season next Friday. The Rainier Mountaineers, meanwhile, stayed in the hunt for the playoffs by improving to 2-3, 3-4. Forks was missing two key two-way players because they were ineligible against Rainier, including top receiver Tyler Penn. In addition, fullback Sergio Chase missed the game because of a strained knee that he suffered in practice last week. Chase won’t be able to practice this week but might be able to play against Tenino, Feasel said. Plus Feasel is hoping to get his ineligible players back by next week. Rainier led 28-0 at halftime but the Spartans scored twice in the second half while not giving up a touchdown to make a game of it. “In the second half, to their credit, our kids buckled down and got it done,” Feasel said. “They could have given up.” The Spartans also came out in the second half in the shotgun formation, which got their passing game going. Brady Castellano threw two touchdown passes for Forks, including one for 10 yards to Jonah Penn, and one for 14 yards to sophomore Brett Pederson. In the first half, the Spartans had problems against Rainier’s running game. “You have to give Rainier a lot of credit because they have a big line and they pounded the ball down the field,” Feasel said.

“Their ground game is pretty darn stout.” The Spartans also moved the ball well on the ground but ended up shooting themselves in the foot in the red zone, with either a penalty here or an interception there. Feasel praised Braden Decker for having a great game on both sides of the ball and Shane WhiteEagle for another outstanding running game. Game statistics were not available.

Lummi 63, Quilcene 18 QUILCENE — The Rangers played their hearts out against the top-ranked 1B team in the state at their homecoming game Saturday. It took until there were only four minutes left in the game for Lummi (5-0, 7-0) to stop the Northwest Football League game because of the 40-point mercy rule. A lot of teams don’t make it to the second half with Lummi. “They put their second team in against us in the second quarter and we started to score on them, so they kept their first team in against us for the entire second half,” Quilcene coach Nic Dahl said. “We played real tough and didn’t give up.” The Rangers (2-3, 3-3) can’t let up now, though, because third-ranked Neah Bay looms this coming week. Quilcene plays at the Red Devils on Friday night. “I love it,” Dahl said. “I love the competition.” Colton Pol caught two touchdown passes in the game for the Rangers while Devon Greenwood had a 35-yard run for a score. Jake Pleines and Colby Schreier threw one scoring strike each to Pol. Lummi 63, Quilcene 18 Lummi Quilcene

15 14 7 27— 63 0 0 12 6— 18 First Quarter L—27 run (run good) L—25 run (kick good) Second Quarter L—20 run (kick good) L—45 run (kick good) Third Quarter Q—Pol 25 pass from Pleines (run failed) L—35 run (kick good) Q—Greenwood 35 run (run failed) Fourth Quarter L—42 run (kick good) Q—Pol 15 pass from Schreier (run failed) L—25 run (kick good) L—18 run (kick good) L—25 interception return (kick failed) No individual stats available.

As of Oct. 15 Olympic League Conf. Overall x-Sequim 5-0 7-0 x-North Kitsap 4-1 4-3 x-Port Angeles 4-1 6-1 Kingston 3-2 4-3 Olympic 2-3 2-5 Bremerton(3A) 1-4 2-5 North Mason 1-4 1-6 Klahowya 0-5 1-6 x-clinched playoff berth Thursday’s Game Sequim 35, Olympic 8 Friday’s Games North Kitsap 35, Port Angeles 14 North Mason 40, Klahowya 20 Kingston 35, Bremerton 28 Oct. 21 Games Port Angeles at Klahowya Sequim at North Kitsap North Mason at Kingston Olympic at Bremerton 1A/2B Nisqually League Conf. Overall Charles Wright 4-1 5-1 Life Christian 4-1 5-2 Cascade Christ. 3-1 4-2 Cedar Park Christ. 3-2 5-2 Orting 3-2 3-4 Vashon Island 1-4 1-6 Chimacum 1-4 1-6 Port Townsend 0-4 0-6 Friday’s Games Charles Wright 34, Chimacum 7 Cedar Park Christian 16, Orting 14 Saturday’s Games Life Christian 35, Vashon Island 8 Port Townsend at Cascade Christian, LATE Oct. 21 Games Orting at Port Townsend Chimacum at Cedar Park Christian Vashon Island at Charles Wright Oct. 22 Game Life Christian at Cascade Christian Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division Conf. Overall x-Montesano 5-0 7-0 Hoquiam 4-1 6-1 Tenino 4-1 6-1 Elma 3-2 4-3 Rainier 2-3 3-4 Forks 2-3 2-5 Onalaska 0-5 0-7 Rochester 0-5 0-7 Friday’s Games Rainier 28, Forks 12 Hoquiam 53, Onalaska 8 Montesano 63, Elma 7 Tenino 49, Rochester 15 Oct. 21 Games Tenino at Forks Onalaska at Rochester Elma at Hoquiam Montesano at Rainier Northwest Football League Conf. Overall Lummi 5-0 7-0 5-0 Lopez 5-0 Neah Bay 5-0 5-1 Evergreen Luth.(2B) 3-2 4-2 Clallam Bay 3-2 3-3 Crescent 3-3 4-3 Quilcene 2-3 3-3 Tulalip Heritage 2-4 2-4 Highland Christian 1-5 1-6 Muckleshoot 0-5 0-5 Rainier Chr. (2B) 0-5 0-5 Friday’s Games Clallam Bay 40, Tulalip 12 Lopez 80, Crescent 36 Neah Bay 34, Highland Christian 0 Saturday’s Games Lummi 63, Quilcene 18 Muckleshoot at Rainier Christian Oct. 21 Games Quilcene at Neah Bay Clallam Bay at Muckleshoot Highland Christian at Lummi Oct. 22 Games Lopez at Davis Tulalip at Evergreen Lutheran

Football Playoff Scenarios Olympic League: Top four 2A teams qualify for 2A state preliminary playoff crossover games. Oly 1 hosts SPSL 4 at North Kitsap or Silverdale Stadium. Oly 2 hosts SPSL 3 at North Kitsap or Silverdale Stadium. Oly 3 plays at Seamount 1. Oly 4 plays at Seamount 3 in pigtail playoff. Nisqually League: Top four teams advance to postseason. Champion receives automatic 1A state berth. Nisqually 2 hosts Northwest Dist. 3. Nisqually 3 plays at Northwest Dist. 2. Nisqually 4 plays at Northwest Dist. 1. SWL Evergreen Division: Top four teams advances to 1A state preliminary playoffs against SWL-Trico. No. 1 seeds host No. 4 seeds and No. 2 seeds host No. 3 seeds. Northwest Football League: Top four 1B schools qualify for playoffs. No. 1 and 4 play for WCD’s top seed in 1B state tournament. No. 2 and 3 play pigtail playoff for spot in 1B preliminary playoff against Dist. 4 No. 2

Riders: North Kitsap runs away with victory Continued from B1 our mouth from last week, losing on our homecoming,” And the Vikings quickly said Milyard, who spread took their frustrations out the ball around to six receivon a Port Angeles team that ers for 222 yards on 14-of-25 clearly missed speedy passing with three TDs and senior starter Cameron no interceptions. “We just wanted to come Braithwaite — out because out and punch them in the of a knee injury. North Kitsap scored on mouth right away. The two three of its four possessions first plays got the momento take a 21-0 lead 16 min- tum on our side and just utes into the game, mixing helped us along the road.” Every time Port Angeles in play-action bootlegs with appeared ready to take that a deadly screen game. The Vikings’ wing-T energy back from North Kitattack took advantage of a sap on offense, it simply Rider secondary that had a couldn’t break through. A pair of costly special sophomore starting in place of Braithwaite at corner- teams errors in the first back as quarterback A.J. quarter had the Riders startMilyard completed 9 of his ing drives on their 3- and first 15 passes for 156 yards 1-yard line. The team’s one big play in and two touchdowns. That included throws of the first half, an 86-yard 13 and 26 yards to Conner scoring pass from Keenen McCorkle and J.T. McCorkle Walker to Skyler Gray, was on a two-play scoring drive brought back to the Rider 32 to begin the game and set because of an illegal block downfield and an unsportsthe tone for the evening. “We had a bad taste in manlike penalty.

Port Angeles entered North Kitsap territory just once the entire half, on its final drive, and that came to a halt at the Viking 29 after Walker’s fourth-down pass fell incomplete. The Riders failed to come up with a first down on its first three fourth-down conversions — all in North Kitsap territory. The second, on fourthand-7 at the Vikings 20, ended the Riders’ first drive of the second half. North Kitsap immediately answered the stop with an 80-yard toss sweep from Dan Mitchell on the very next play for a 28-0 lead. “Football is a game about momentum, and we just didn’t have the momentum off the start,” Rider running back Dylan Brewer said. “They read plays well, they gang-tackled well and we were kind of shooting ourselves in the foot.” Port Angeles was able to

move the ball to some degree against North Kitsap with a special two-back set, totaling 15 first downs and 337 yards for the game, 204 coming on the ground. Brewer had 126 of those yards on 18 carries. But with Walker pressured consistently on pass dropbacks, and the Riders missing their leading receiver in Braithwaite, the passing game struggled. Walker completed just 1 of his first 12 attempts and finished with 133 yards on 7-of-25 passing with one touchdown and two interceptions. The senior quarterback scored the Riders’ first touchdown on a 5-yard keeper to put the score at 28-7 midway through the third quarter, but he was intercepted on the team’s next drive. North Kitsap then scored six plays later on Milyard’s third passing touchdown of

the night, a 26-yarder to McCorkle, to put the game away. “We had a tough one last week,” said North Kitsap coach Jeff Weible, the recipient of a post-game Gatorade shower. “The kids just had a rotten taste in their mouth all week. “They really came to work this week, and we had really good practices. Our coaches put together a good game-plan, and they just executed it.” Eli Fiscalini scored the final touchdown of the game late in the fourth quarter on a 17-yard pass from Walker. Fiscalini compiled 114 yards of offense, including 51 rushing yards on four carries, and Gray added 70 yards on three receptions. But that wasn’t enough to overcome a motivated and tricky North Kitsap offense that rolled for 384 total yards, including 162 rushing.

“They did well controlling the ball,” Wahl said. “They made very few mistakes, as far as giving up the ball. “They were able to do a variety of things. I thought they had a very nice balanced attack. “They just really kept us off balance.” N. Kitsap 35, Port Angeles 14 North Kitsap 14 7 7 7— 35 Port Angeles 0 0 7 7— 14 First Quarter NK—Nettleton 26 pass from Milyard (Gracey kick) NK—Fisher 2 run (Gracey kick) Second Quarter NK—Nettleton 25 pass from Milyard (Gracey kick) Third Quarter NK—Mitchell 80 run (Gracey kick) PA—Walker 5 run (Haskins kick) Fourth Quarter NK—McCorkle 26 pass from Milyard (Gracey kick) PA—Fiscalini 17 pass from Walker (Haskins kick) Individual Stats Rushing— PA: Brewer 18-126, Fiscalini 4-51, Walker 12-40, Gray 4-(minus 13). NK: Mitchell 7-107, McCorkle 6-33, Golden 9-30, Fisher 3-9, Loveless 1-2, Young 1-(minus 8), Gill 1-(minus 2), Milyard 3-(minus 9). Passing—PA: Walker 7-25-2, 133. NK: Milyard 14-25-0, 222. Receiving—PA: Gray 3-70, Fiscalini 4-63. NK: Urquhart 4-77, Nettleton 4-51, McCorkle 2-39, Hadden 2-36, Golden 1-11, Adams 1-8.


B4

Sunday, October 16, 2011

SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

QB uncertainty a killer in NFL Under center issues a mark of mediocrity

The Associated Press

Stanford safety Michael Thomas (3) runs after picking up a ball fumbled by Washington State wide receiver Jared Karstetter, bottom, during the first half of Saturday’s game in Pullman.

Trees fell Cougars Stanford explodes in second half for win The Associated Press

PULLMAN — Washington State quarterback Jeff Tuel had barely played a down this season after fracturing his collarbone on his first series against Idaho State. But Tuel started against No. 7 Stanford on Saturday, and Washington State had it worst offensive outing of the season in a 44-14 loss to the Cardinal (6-0, 4-0 Pac12). “The only way you get better is by playing at this point,” Cougars coach Paul Wulff said. “We knew there were going to be some issues.” That was an accurate assessment, though Wulff said the decision to start Tuel was right even though backup Marshall Lobbestael has played well this season.

Tuel completed 17 of 30 passes, but for just 145 yards with no touchdowns. Stanford’s defense held Washington State (3-3, 1-2) to just 257 total yards. Wulff said his receivers dropped too many passes and his defense had to spend too much time on the field. That gave Heisman Trophy candidate Andrew Luck too much time to shake off a rusty first half and blow the game open with four second-half touchdown passes for Stanford. “In the first half, Andrew Luck looked like a good football player,” Wulff said. “In the second half, he looked like a great football player.” Stanford’s victory extended the nation’s longest winning streak to a school-record 14 consecutive games.

“We played great tonight in the second half,” Luck said. Indeed, the Cardinal outscored the Cougars, 34-7, in the second half. But the first half was a different story. Stanford led just, 10-7, at the break, its lowest first-half output of the season. “It was just little mistakes,” Luck said. “It was my fault for not putting the ball where it was supposed to be.” Luck completed 23 of 36 passes for 336 yards with one interception. Meanwhile, Stanford’s defense, which allows just 10 points per game, kept the Washington State from getting untracked. “I love what our defense was doing,” Stanford coach David Shaw said. “We make adjustments and they get it.” Washington State defensive tackle Anthony Laurenzi pointed to Stanford’s quick touchdown on its first series of the second half as a turning point.

Pac-12 Standings NORTH Conf. Overall Stanford 4-0 6-0 Washington 3-0 5-1 Oregon 2-0 4-1 Washington State 1-2 3-3 Oregon State 1-2 1-5 California 0-3 3-3 SOUTH Conf. Overall Arizona State 3-0 5-1 USC 3-1 5-1 UCLA 2-1 3-3 3-3 Utah 0-3 Colorado 0-3 1-6 Arizona 0-4 1-5 Thursday’s Game USC 30, California 9 Saturday’s Games Utah 26, Pittsburgh 14 Washington 52, Colorado 24 Brigham Young 38, Oregon State 28 Stanford 44, Washington State 14 Arizona State at Oregon, LATE

“We came out and they scored on us right away and we lost momentum,” he said. “I felt like we got flat after that touchdown. When our offense couldn’t counter after that, we fell apart.” Stanford drove 85 yards on its first possession of the half, with a 62-yard pass play from Luck to Coby Fleener covering most of it

Dawgs: Price turning into star Continued from B1 so impressive Sarkisian felt almost like he was transAdded Sarkisian, “He just ported back to his days at plays the game. I love coach- USC when he helped choreograph the most dynamic ing him. It’s fun.” In general, it was an offense of its time. “It’s fascinating. It hasn’t afternoon of continued progression for the Huskies in been this way in a long time their continual climb out of for me personally,” Sarkisian their 0-12 hole in 2008 back said. “When I’m calling plays for this football team right to Pac-12 legitimacy. The win gave the Hus- now, I’m not calling plays for kies their first 5-1 start in a a specific guy.” The Huskies compiled decade, their first 3-0 start in conference play since 1997 nearly 400 yards of offense and almost certainly a in the first half and led 38-10 return to the AP Top 25 after at the break behind TD barely missing out on the passes of 17, 11, 14 and 4 yards by the sophomore QB. poll the last two weeks. Price now has 21 TDs on It also highlighted UW’s the season, tied for fourth ability to handle success. They were favored by two most in Washington history touchdowns, coming off an for single-season TD passes impressive road victory two with six games remaining. Washington (5-1, 3-0 Pacweeks ago at Utah. Next week, the Huskies travel to 12) has now scored at least Stanford for a crucial Pac-12 30 points or more in its first six games for the first time North showdown. Instead of coming out flat in school history. The 52 against the overmatched points were the most since Buffaloes, the Huskies put posting 53 on Idaho in Septogether a first half that was tember 2001.

The Huskies scored on all six possessions in the first half and did not punt until the opening drive of the second half when a penalty slowed their march near midfield. Price exploited the middle of Colorado’s defense and didn’t make any risky throws. He threw just four incompletions in the first half and when he did make a bad toss, he answered immediately. The example: Price missed Devin Aguilar for a potential touchdown midway through the second quarter, but on the next play, he found running back Chris Polk for a 14-yard TD to give the Huskies a 28-10 lead. “We could have [struck] earlier than we did. I just overthrew that ball,” Price said. “But I think we’re getting better.” Price added TD throws of 17 yards to Jermaine Kearse, 11 yards to Austin Seferian-

Jenkins and 4 yards to Aguilar to round out his total. Kevin Smith added a 22-yard TD run on a reverse in the first quarter, becoming the first Washington player other than Polk or former quarterback Jake Locker to score a rushing touchdown since Sept. 12, 2009. Jesse Callier and Bishop Sankey also had rushing touchdowns for the Huskies. Polk didn’t find the end zone rushing, but did top 100 yards for the 16th time in his Washington career, one behind Napoleon Kaufman’s school record. Polk finished with 117 yards on 18 carries. Playing healthy for the first time since the season opener after suffering knee and ankle injuries, Price finished 21 of 28 for 257 yards, didn’t commit a turnover and wasn’t sacked. “Keith was just feeding everyone and everyone was making plays when the opportunity came,” Kearse said.

Keller shines in home finale Sounders goalie comes up big in victory, receives special send-off The Associated Press

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SEATTLE — Sammy Ochoa and Fredy Montero scored in the final 10 minutes and sent retiring goalkeeper Kasey Keller out with a victory in his final regular-season home match, helping the Seattle Sounders FC rally for a 2-1 win over San Jose on Saturday. Ochoa pulled the Sounders even in the 82nd minute when he collected a pass from Mauro Rosales and drilled a right-footed shot off the post and past goalkeeper Jon Busch. Five minutes later, Montero took a pass from Lamar Neagle and chipped his shot past Busch to give the Sounders an unlikely victory.

Chris Wondolowski scored in the 24th minute for San Jose and silenced the 64,140 in attendance, the third largest singlegame crowd in Major League Soccer history. But Keller made a handful of saves that showed despite his age he’s going out as still one of the top goalkeeper’s in the league. This wasn’t Keller’s final home game as Seattle already wrapped up second place in the Western Conference and will host the second-leg of a semifinal playoff series, currently lined up to be against Real Salt Lake. But it was the chance to honor his two decades of professional soccer. Keller was the first

stayed within 1-0 at halftime was thanks to Keller. He saved a pair of shots from distance in the opening minutes, then made a remarkable save with his right hand, scooping Wondolowski’s header off the goal line and away from danger in the 43rd minute. His sequence in the second half was even better and at least gave Seattle a chance at scoring late and salvaging a draw. It came in the 65th minute when Keller ran out and slid to push away a flubbed pass by Patrick Ianni. He bounced up and immediately stopped one shot well out from his net, then made another diving save and finally was able to shove the ball away from danger. The rapid saves drew a standing ovation and gave Seattle a chance to pull even late.

rookie Christian Ponder to the Lions when the teams meet Dec. 11. By Richard Rosenblatt Then again, maybe The Associated Press handing off to Adrian Play a guy who’s strug- Peterson every down may gling, or try the guy you not warrant a QB change. thought wasn’t as good as ■ Jacksonville — More the starter. 1-4 madness here, and it all That’s been starts with Del the quarterback Rio’s decision to quandary for cut starter David plenty of coaches Garrard days over the first before the seapart of the NFL son. Next Game season. C’mon! What John Fox of was that about? the Broncos has Oct. 23 Luke McCown, relented, Leslie vs. Browns starter of seven Frazier of the at Cleveland NFL games in a Vikings hasn’t, Time: 10 a.m. career that and Jack Del Rio On TV: Ch. 13 began in 2004, of the Jaguars was horrible. had virtually no Now it’s choice but to make a rookie Blaine Gabbert by switch. default. Injuries to their starters He certainly will learn left Jim Caldwell of the under fire, especially with Colts and Tony Sparano of the next three games the Dolphins with abso- against the Steelers, lutely no choice. Ravens and Texans. Pete Carroll of the Ouch. Seahawks, on the other ■ Indianapolis — These hand, has another week to guys couldn’t find a better decide whether a switch is replacement for Peyton necessary. Manning? Meanwhile, rookies GM Chris Polian perCam Newton of the Pan- suaded 38-year-old Kerry thers and Andy Dalton of Collins to unretire, and the Bengals are making now he’s out with a concustheir coaches look good by sion and Curtis Painter is getting their careers off to in, learning on the job very impressive — in Newton’s slowly. case record-breaking — Result? A perennial starts. Super Bowl contender is With so much uncer- 0-5 and seven-point undertainly over who’s calling dogs to the Bengals today. signals on any given SunNot all of this can be day, it’s no wonder this Pick pinned on Painter since the Six of teams with quarter- Colts seem to lose a startback issues is not to be ing player or two to injury confused with a list of every week. Super Bowl contenders. But having a QB who ■ Denver — After much sometimes looks as if he’s caterwauling by fans, and running scared is hardly a after so many failures by way turn things around, Kyle Orton, it’s Tebow time although the past three in Broncoland. losses have been by three, Fox has a bye week to seven and four points. tailor the offense for a more ■ Miami — Against the innovative, scrambling Jets on Monday night, tough guy who promises to Sparano can only hope ramp up the excitement Matt Moore holds up level. against what could be a Orton threw eight TD fierce pass rush. passes and seven intercepThe Dolphins lost Chad tions (tied for the league Henne for the season with lead) and was sacked nine a separated left shoulder times as the uninspiring on Oct. 2, leaving the job to QB on a 1-4 team. the former Panthers’ Tim Tebow displayed his starter. unconventional, yet effecMoore proved sometive style by nearly leading what capable in a loss to his team to a comeback win the Chargers — 17 of 26 for over the Chargers last 167 yards and an intercepweek. tion — but couldn’t get the “They drafted him here Dolphins in the end zone for a reason — to win enough in the 26-16 loss. games. And he’s going to ■ Seattle — A big win make it happen, trust me,” against the Giants, now a says teammate Rahim bye week, and Carroll will Moore. have to determine whether ■ Minnesota — Despite Tarvaris Jackson (right a 1-4 record, Frazier is pectoral muscle) is healthy sticking with Donovan enough to start over sucMcNabb — even though cessful reliever Charlie the QB was still bouncing Whitehurst, who threw for passes and being booed by 149 yards and a 27-yard the home fans in last week’s TD pass with 2:37 left in a victory. 36-25 upset at New York. The 34-year-old McNabb A controversy? ranks in the bottom six “Well, is it controversial among NFL starters in that you have two quartercompletion percentage backs that can play? I think (56.8) and yards passing it’s great that we do,” Car(849). roll said. This may be cruel and “Fortunately we’re in unusual punishment for that situation where if TarVikings fans, but perhaps varis can’t go, then Charlie Frazier is waiting to throw will play.”

195132514

Tim Booth

American to play on a U.S. passport in England and added firsts during other stops in his career play- Keller ing at the highest levels in Spain and Germany. Then he returned to Seattle to lead the Sounders for their first three seasons. The crowd was just a small symbol of acknowledgment for what Keller has accomplished. He was feted with a pair of bronzed goalkeeper gloves, a motorcycle and an all-terrain vehicle by the team following the victory as the massive crowd chanted “Kasey Keller.” And it all came after one of his finest performances. The only reason Seattle

On Football


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 16, 2011

Our Peninsula

c

SECTION

WEATHER, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, DEATHS In this section

Horses haul logs for low-impact effect By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — “Gee! Haw!” Greg Lane shouted as he directed his two large draft horses through the woods up Deer Park Road. The American Belgians, Jim and Otto, snorted as they pulled a 30-foot-long log through the brush Friday, their massive hooves resonating like thunder. Yet despite their large size — they weigh about 1,500 pounds each — the horses left little evidence of their presence on the forest floor. And that’s exactly the idea. Through his Draft Works Horse Logging, Lane, a retired health care administrator, practices a form of low-impact logging that resembles early forestry operations on the North Olympic Peninsula, though on a small scale.

T

he roughly two dozen logs that Greg Lane and his horses will pull from the woods, each one previously knocked down by wind, will be used to build the ceiling and decking.

logs that Lane and his horses will pull from the woods, each one previously knocked down by wind, will be used to build the ceiling and decking. The couple said they wanted to use wood to do the least harm to the forest on their property and hire as locally as possible. “It really is the perfect fit,” David Mattern said. Lane started his business about four years ago. He said he had always been fascinated by draft horses and enjoyed being outdoors. Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News Horse logging seemed to Less harm be a perfect fit. Greg Lane of Draft Works Horse Logging of Port Angeles leads draft horses Jim, foreground, and “It all just came together,” Otto as they pull a log in the Deer Park area southeast of Port Angeles on Friday. “This is not fast-food logging,” said Lane, who com- Lane said. And it has grown since. Tree Service and Scott more said. what we don’t do,” Lane his own behavior will rub pares his operation to the Whitmore of S&L Portable “We have the ability to said he tells potential cus- off on them. organic food movement. Sawmill to form the Olym- customize, to cut boards to tomers. “You can’t rush it with For spouses David Mat- Growing business any size a customer is look“It [the land] would not horses . . . as soon as you tern and Pam Wilder, it Two years ago, he started pic Forest Guild. Together, they provide a ing for.” couldn’t be done in a better his own lumber manufaclook the same.” show anxiety about your one-stop shop for local and Lane acknowledged that way. Still, working with large work, it’s not going to be as turing business, Heritage The Seattle couple own Millworks, which he will low-impact logging and convincing landowners to animals with a mind of smooth.” hire someone who uses a their own does present its the 23-acre forested property, use to turn the Matterns’ lumber. ________ But it’s not just about logging method seen as a own challenges, he said. where they plan to build a wood into ceiling and deck sustainability. bit outdated can be a hard “They are different every Reporter Tom Callis can be yurt-like house and one day panels. “We can produce really sell. day you work with them,” reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom. retire. Then last year, he “It’s not what we do; it’s Lane said, adding that callis@peninsuladailynews.com. The roughly two dozen teamed up with Sitkum high-quality stuff,” Whit-

LEFT: Pam Wilder and David Mattern are using a horse logging service to clear a portion of their property in the Deer Park area southeast of Port Angeles. BELOW: Greg Lane of Draft Works Horse Logging of Port Angeles unhitches his draft horses Otto, foreground, and Jim after hauling a felled log to a clearing.

College to host artist’s lecture Reception follows free talk at gallery Peninsula Daily News

D

avid Roholt is head of the art department and a professor of art at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom in Lakewood. in 2006. He is a recipient of the W. Garfield Weston Fellowship and worked as an artist-inresidence in Manitoba, Canada, in conjunction with the Delta Waterfowl Organization, completing a number of plein-air oil paintings inspired by the Prairie Pothole Region surrounding Lake Manitoba. Today, Roholt’s works can be found in public and private collections, and he has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in Canada, Denmark, England, Germany and the United States. His teaching experience includes two years in Sterling, Colo., where he was an assistant professor of art at Northeastern Junior College. Roholt currently has 24 paintings on exhibit in the PUB Gallery of Art.

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PORT ANGELES — Peninsula College will welcome Pacific Northwest artist David Roholt to its Port Angeles campus, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., for two events on Wednesday, Oct. 26. Roholt will deliver an artist lecture in the Little Theater at 1 p.m. . Following his talk, there will be a reception in the Pirate Union Building Gallery of Art adjacent to the theater at 2 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public. Roholt is head of the art department and a professor of art at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom in Lakewood. A native of Salt Lake City, Roholt lived in northern Japan for two years prior to studying at Utah State University, where he earned a bachelor’s in painting and drawing in 2002. In 2003, he moved to the Front Range of Colorado and received a Master of Fine Arts in painting from Colorado State University

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Sunday, October 16, 2011

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Forlorn family focus Library to host new of Global Lens film series on literature Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Cinema-goers will get a glimpse of a rarely seen corner of rural China and its river border with North Korea when the Global Lens Series brings “Dooman River” to Peninsula College on Friday. The film will be screened in Maier Performance Hall (Room E-13) at 7 p.m. The film is in Korean and Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles. Global Lens is co-sponsored by Peninsula College’s Magic of Cinema film series and the Port Townsend Film Festival. The film focuses on the forlorn lives of a family of three: 12-year-old Chang-

ho; his mute older sister, Soon-hee; and their grandfather. They live in an impoverished village near the frozen river-border with North Korea. Although plagued by unemployment and other tensions, their village is relatively prosperous when compared with its counterparts across the river, and the villagers are initially sympathetic toward the North Korean refugees who are fleeing Kim Jong-il’s totalitarian state. When Chang-ho meets a Korean escapee his own age, they form a bond based on a mutual love of soccer. Meanwhile, other villagers grow fearful of crimes com-

Sequim City Band to conclude season Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Sequim City Band will conclude its 2011 season with an indoor concert at the Sequim High School auditorium, 601 N. Sequim Ave., at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23. “Magical Moments in Music” will feature the horn quartet of Bob Becker, Richard Greenway, Ray Krejci and Robert Nathan playing “Caught by the Horns,” composed by Burton Hardin. Also performing will be Martin Forster on solo clarinet in “Adagio and Tarantella” by Ernesto Cavallini and arranged by Thomas Reed. Other selections include “Irish Songs for Solo and Band,” arranged by Robert Smith; “Deirin De”; and tenor Joel Yelland singing a “Jug of Punch.” The program also will include “South Pacific” by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein; “Symphonic

Suite from Star Trek” by Michael Giacchino, Alexander Courage and Gene Roddenberry, arranged by Jay Bocook; “Mancini Magic,” featuring six memorable tunes by Henry Mancini, arranged by Jerry Brubaker; and “Duke Ellington in Concert,” arranged by Paul Murtha. Another piece will be “Where Valor Proudly Sleeps” by Robert Longfield, which was inspired by a visit to Arlington National Cemetery and is dedicated to the fallen soldiers. Two marches will begin and end the concert: “Marche Des Parachutistes Belges,” written in 1946 by Pierre Leemans and arranged by Charles A. Wiley, and John Philip Sousa’s “The Stars and Stripes Forever March.” Membership in the Sequim City Band is open to all musicians on approval of the director. For more information, visit www.sequimcityband. org or phone 360-683-2546.

PORT ANGELES – The popularity of Halloween continues to rise year after year among adults looking for a good time and wanting to escape from reality for a night. But if you’re driving an old car that has become your worst nightmare, this Halloween sale might just be your chance to escape for good! Here’s why. Local car dealer, Mark Ostroot, General Sales Manager of Price Superstore, is at it again and is giving Port Angeles residents who hate their old car a real treat… a way to escape and drive a nicer, newer car even if they owe more than it’s worth or even if it’s in frightful condition and needs to “rust in peace.” In response to the success of Halloween as an adult escape holiday, Price Superstore has put together their Old Car Escape Plan, which is going on only for the month of October. They are planning on helping 77 local residents escape from their old car and drive home in a nicer, newer car, SUV, minivan or truck. Using the Old Car Escape Plan, Price Superstore will completely pay off your current lease or loan on the car that’s getting under your skin so you can drive a nicer, newer car you’ll love. If you’re driving an old monster, the Old Car Escape Plan can get you $4,000* more for your old car than it’s actually worth. This gives you the opportunity to make something out of almost nothing and will allow you to drive a car you’ll be proud to own.

Nightmares Just Don’t Happen While You’re Sleeping

“Many times people buy a car and they absolutely

mitted by famine-stricken refugees seeking food and shelter. Chang-ho soon turns on his new friend as suspicions mount against the illegal immigrants and his sister reels from unexpected aggression. This triggers a quandary over his loyalties in what has been called an “exquisitely detailed story of compassion and strife across an uneasy geopolitical border.” Admission to the film is $5. PC and area high school students are admitted free with a current student ID. For more information on the fall film series, visit the college website at www. pencol.edu.

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — “Celebrate Authorship,” a new monthly series on the peaks and pitfalls of writing, will begin at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., at 1 p.m. Saturday. Author Georgia McDade and a panel of local writers will read and talk about their works and answer audience questions. McDade is a retired college instructor who facilitates a variety of workshops in addition to spending a large part of her time writing and editing. Although literature is her love, especially Shakespeare, she has been called the Michael Jordan of Eng-

lish teachers and the Outline Queen as a result of her students’ successes. In addition to her more than 30 years at Tacoma Community College, she has been on the faculties of Lakeside School, Zion Preparatory, Renton Vocational School, Seattle Central Community College, Seattle University and the University of Washington.

Variety of genres McDade writes in a variety of genres. Her first book, Travel Tips for Dream Trips, is about her six-month solo trip around the world. Other participating authors include: Lois Kennedy, who has published

poetry and written biography and magazine articles; Bill Chisham, a writer of fiction, technical books and a number of mystery plays, which have been presented locally with Readers’ Theater Plus; Wylie Walthall, a retired community college teacher with several published books including his most recent, Clandestine Entry and Other Stories; and Matthew Stone, who is writing a young-adult sci-fi novel that can be read online. The program is free, and no registration is required. For more information, visit www.nols.org, phone 360-683-1161 or email Sequim@nols.org.

Briefly . . . Fair, pumpkin party slated Saturday SEQUIM — Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road, will host a Kids Pumpkin Party at 4 p.m. followed by a Country Fair at 5 p.m. Saturday. During the pumpkin party, kids can carve a pumpkin, decorate a sugar cookie and drink hot cider. The fair will include food, a wheel of fortune, facepainting, guessing games, a cake walk, a fortune teller and games for kids.

Wine, dinner gala SEQUIM — Olympic Medical Center Foundation, in conjunction with the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, will present “An Evening in Australia” for the 2011 Harvest of Hope Wine & Dinner Gala on Saturday. The event will be held at SunLand Golf & Country

Club, 109 Hilltop Drive, starting at 6 p.m. The ninth annual Harvest of Hope gala will raise funds for local cancer patients being treated at OMC through the provision of services, programs and equipment. Local chefs Kevin Parker and Sarah Phillips will be featured; wines from South Australia will be served. Todd Ortloff of KONP AM will host the fundraiser. Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., and dinner will be served at 6:45 p.m. Attendees will be able to help raise funds through the purchase of raffle tickets or live auction items. A sample of live auction items includes a private dinner for eight with state Attorney General Rob McKenna, weekend getaways to Victoria and Seattle, “instant” wine cellars featuring wines from Australia and New Zealand, and two meals a month for a year at Chestnut Cottage and The Oak Table.

love it, then a few years later it becomes their worst nightmare. They just start to hate the thing. Maybe it’s not reliable anymore, maybe it doesn’t feel comfortable or they hate the way it drives or looks. Maybe it’s the payments. Something’s just not right about that old car and they can’t stand it anymore. They feel trapped in the car and they want out,” explained Ostroot. A solution to this problem is not common but, as Ostroot told us, neither is he and what they do at Price Superstore. “I’ve read that a lot of people use Halloween as an escape from reality and that got me thinking. Part of what they are escaping from is everyday problems, like issues with their car. Halloween can help them escape for a night, but I can help them escape for good,” Ostroot exclaimed. “My Old Car Escape Plan lets us pay off current loans or leases by giving $4,000* more than cars are currently worth. And believe it or not, used cars are worth more right now than ever before. So your car’s value may really surprise you. With slowdowns in vehicle production and natural disasters affecting the supply of cars from the manufacturers, the used car market is hot. It’s a great time to score a big deal and that’s a real treat.”

Don’t Be Cursed By Bad Credit

Mark Ostroot says his Old Car Escape plan is perfect for people who have had credit challenges in the past and think they can’t get approved for a nicer, newer car. “My For The People® Credit Approval Process is like waking up from a nightmare. You no longer have to run and hide from past credit problems,” Ostroot said. “We have ways of making the banks really understand your situation. We bring the person into the process. We tell your specific story. We don’t just quote credit scores and send pay stubs. With my process the lenders see you as a person where traditionally they just see a bunch of stats. That’s what

Phone the OMC Foundation at 360-417-7144 or visit www.omhf.org.

Dental takeover

PORT ANGELES — Irwin Dental Center will take over the Volunteers in Degree, honors Medicine of the Olympics PULLMAN — Port clinic from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Angeles resident Ranjeet Friday, Oct. 28. Kaur Seera recently graduThe clinic will be held in ated from Washington State the former Olympic ComUniversity with a Bachelor munity Action Programs’ of Science in nursing, magna Oral Health Center in the cum laude. Armory Square Mall, 228 W. The magna cum laude First St. distinction denotes a gradeIrwin Dental Center will point average between 3.7 have three dentists, five and 3.9. hygienists, eight dental assistants and a few front Student honored office staffers on hand to volSEATTLE — University unteer. Walk-ins and a small of Washington student Teyamount of pre-screening will loure Ring has become a occur. member of the Phi Sigma Tooth extractions, fillings Theta National Honor Sociand some easy root canals ety. Phi Sigma Theta is ded- on the front teeth only will be performed. icated to recognizing and There will be a prescriprewarding academic achievement in undergrad- tion for an antibiotic if needed but no prescriptions uates at institutions of for pain medicine. higher learning. For more information, Ring is the daughter of phone 360-457-0489. David and Lili Ring of Sequim. Peninsula Daily News

makes my program so different and so much more effective.”

Tell Us Your Horror Story

As a fun addition to their Old Car Escape Plan, Price Superstore is running a cool contest. If you visit Price Superstore and share your “old car horror story” they’ll record it put it on YouTube and Facebook. The video story with the most comments and likes will win a flat-screen TV. It’s a fun way to take part in this spooky but lucrative holiday promotion. Some important facts you should know: ➢ It’s completely free to have your personal situation evaluated by the experts at Price Superstore and to take advantage of the Old Car Escape Plan… ➢ Their transparent trade appraisal process guarantees you’ll get a “more than fair” offer to take over your current payments especially since the used car market is HOT RIGHT NOW…  ➢ There’s absolutely no obligation to buy a car…  ➢ Because Mark Ostroot is a Dealer For The People® there will never be any high-pressure tactics involved…  ➢ This offer is good until close of business on October 31… Ostroot says, “There are no games here. I believe everyone deserves to drive a nicer, newer car and never be stuck in a car they hate. So come on in, and let me put my Old Car Escape Plan into action for you so you can drive a nicer newer car even if you’ve had credit problems.” As a final treat, Price Superstore’s Old Car Escape Plan will pay off your existing lease or loan in full or give you $4,000* more than your old car is worth…even if it’s worth nothing… so you can drive home in a nicer, newer car you’ll love to own and look great driving. To take advantage of this generous offer, visit Price Superstore in Port Angeles or call (360) 457-3333 to schedule an appointment to create your customized Old Car Escape Plan.

Price SuperStore

1527 E. Front St., Port Angeles • (360) 457-3333 Disclaimer: With approved credit. Rebates to dealer. On select models. With purchase at retail. Some negative equity may be refinanced. *See dealer for complete details. 1A5136861


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 16, 2011

C3

Common crow a nuisance, a plague CROWS WEREN’T ALWAYS the problem they can be today. Back in the ’50s, there was a bounty on them, and my cousin who lived in King County used his BB gun to collect some of it. He wouldn’t listen to my scolding. Now, I’m not so sure I would scold very hard. The trouble with crows is that they are just too smart for their own good. They have learned to live off wasted food meant for human consumption. Not only that, they have become panhandlers that recognize those who can be manipulated into providing food for them. Every year, this column receives numerous complaints from readers who are plagued with this bird’s burgeoning population. What can be done about crows? How can they get rid of them? Is there a way to get rid of them or deal with a neighbor who feeds them? All of these questions are difficult to answer. Suggestions can be offered, but that’s about all. Forget about getting out the old BB gun.

Federal offense to shoot Since the ’70s, perhaps earlier, it has been a federal offense to shoot any member of the corvid family, and that includes all crows. The entire group was lumped under a law meant to protect one member of the family, the threatened Chihuahuan raven. It is an inhabitant of our Southwest and Mexico. Nothing was threatening the other crows, but they were protected as well. That got the ball rolling on the crow problem. Another factor coupled with

BIRD WATCH Joan

the federal protection also had an influence on crow numbers. From the 1950s to the present, fastfood outlets marched across the country, leaving in their wake a fat and happy crow

Carson

population. Human garbage is a crow’s feast. Dumpsters that sit in the parking lots of fast-food restaurants usually have a contingent of crows waiting for food. Customers who fail to make use of waste receptacles donate to these feathered gluttons. The riotous living goes on and on — near grocery store Dumpsters, around meat-packing areas, feeder lots and even at backyard feeders.

Accessible food attractive Easily accessible food attracts crows. Then, there is the neighbor who enjoys tossing out his own garbage to a gang of eager crows. Give them some food to argue over, and they will provide loud, raucous entertainment without end. Meanwhile, other songbirds look upon these beggars as predators. Every year, robins in particular lose a large number of their eggs and offspring to the crows and their cousins, the jays. I don’t have any easy answers to any of these things that encourage crow numbers to grow. I can only make suggestions. If every enterprise that gener-

Paul Carson

The common crow is a panhandler among birds. ates food waste observed the strictest cleanliness rules, it would make a big difference. Locked garbage cans keep the bears out and would work for crows. Keeping the area around the Dumpsters clean would help even more. When you ask a neighbor to stop feeding the crows and they refuse, that’s a problem. If those cannons that shoot air were legal in residential areas, that might be an interesting way to discourage them, but I’m

afraid that would lead to more problems. Persistence in asking them to stop feeding might work. Nobody likes to be “pestered” for very long. Is there anything good about crows? Well, they eat unwelcome insects. That’s what they appear to be doing right now. For the past week or more, I’ve watched them marching all over the median strips poking about in the grass and weeds.

I suspect they are after craneflies that become active in the fall. I hope this is what they are doing. The crow problem has been with us a long time, and if you have found even a partial solution, I’d love to hear about it and so would a lot of other people.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. Email: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Clubs and Organizations Port Angeles Sons of Italy Sons of Italy invites participants to join with others of Italian descent to share an afternoon of companionship and potluck the third Sunday of each month at 1:30 p.m. in the St. Anne Room of the Queen of Angels Church, 209 W. 11th St. Social members of nonItalian descent with an interest in the Italian culture are welcome to attend. For more information, phone Pat Restaino at 360452-1222.

mation on member benefits.

Community grange The Mount Pleasant Community Grange will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The guest speaker is the incoming District No. 2 fire chief, Sam Phillips. The Grange is located at the corner of Mount Pleasant and Draper roads in Port Angeles. Phone Suzanne Barber at 360-477-4156.

OMC fundraiser

Submit your club news

Music lovers are invited to Monday Musicale on Monday at noon in the St. Anne’s Room of the Queen of Angels Church, 209 W. 11th St. A meeting will be held, followed by a program by The Plaids.

taurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. The meeting is open to all owners of Ford Mustangs and Mercury Cougars manufactured from 1964 to the present. For more information, phone Marv Fowler at 360683-1329 or visit www. northolympicmustangs. com.

School retirees

DAR meeting

Kiwanis Club

The Clallam County School Retirees’ Association will meet Tuesday at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. Retirees are invited to visit at 11:30 a.m., and a buffet lunch will be served at noon. The program will include Brenda Francis describing the “Elwha S’Klallam Experience” and Kevin Slattery with infor-

n  Deer Park Cinema,

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Northwest Olympic Mustangs and Cougars Car Club meets the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at Joshua’s Res-

Intuitive Circle

The Intuitive Circle meets the third Thursday of the month from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 73 Howe Road, Agnew. A donation of $5 per PA Lions Club meeting is requested to help pay for facility rental The Port Angeles Lions Club will meet Thursday at and speaker honorarium. The focus of the group is noon at the Red Lion Hotel, on the community, educa221 N. Lincoln St. Michell Gentry, Clallam tion and the practice of developing natural intuiCounty Family YMCA youth development directive and psychic abilities tor, will speak on building and will feature a variety futures. of guest speakers. For information on the For more information, eyeglass and hearing aid phone Marie-Claire Berprogram, phone 360-417nards at 360-681-4411. 6862.

Mental health

Rhody society

NAMI is a volunteer organization that offers support for families, friends and individuals suffering from any mental illness, a local affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

The Juan de Fuca Port Angeles chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will meet Thursday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. A guest speaker will discuss bees.

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to

Clubs/C4

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Port Angeles Olympic Kiwanis Club began its new Kiwanis year Oct. 1, following the installation of officers by Lt. Gov. Don Zanon. The new officers are: ■  President: Geri Zanon. ■ President-elect:

Nancy Martin. ■  Assistant treasurer: Martha Standley. Returning officers: ■  Treasurer: Carla Sue. ■  Secretary: Tim Crowley. Board members for the 2011-2012 year are Harold Walters, Rayna Abrahams, Martha Standley, Dave Murphy, Janet Williams and Chuck Standley. Olympic Kiwanis meet Thursday mornings at   7 a.m. at the Cornerhouse Restaurant, First and Laurel streets, Port Angeles. Anyone interested in Kiwanis can phone Geri Zanon at 360-452-8677 for more information.

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The Michael Trebert Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will meet at the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center, 905 W. Ninth St., at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday. Barbara Houtenbrink of the state Daughters of the American Revolution will discuss Lucretia Coffin Mott, a Quaker, abolitionist and human-rights leader. State Treasurer Jerry McCoy will also attend. For more information, phone Pat Graham at 360417-1346.

For further information, phone 360-417-0255.

Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) will meet Thursday from 9 a.m. to   11:30 a.m. at Fairview Bible Church, 385 O’Brien Road. Refreshments and child care will be provided. For more information, phone 360-457-5905.

The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Medical Center Auxiliary will hold a Miche bag fundraising event at Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday. A Miche bag is a style of purse. For more information, phone Patty McCarty at 360-461-5243.

Monday Musicale

MOPS meets

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Family brutal in dealing with burial DEAR ABBY: My mother’s family has never been close-knit, but what they did to her was despicable. My grandmother died recently, and not one person in the family called Mom to notify her. We saw it in our local paper. No funeral details were mentioned, so we called the mortuary repeatedly only to be told arrangements were “still pending.” Mother tried to contact her sister but got no response. She called her brother four times. He told her the same thing — the arrangements were pending. Two days later, Mom heard from another relative that her mother had been buried in a private ceremony with only immediate family. Mother called her brother again and was told

him to share no information with Mother. He said his “hands were it wasn’t Abigail tied” because she made true — the Van Buren him promise not to divulge arrangeany details to us. ments were Abby, please tell your still pendreaders that no matter how ing. dysfunctional family ties The next may be, everyone should be day, Mom able to pay last respects to and I went their own parent. to the cemAnd funeral homes etery to see should have the decency to if the rumor tell callers that funeral was true. arrangements are private Imagine our sadness rather than lying about it. when we found my grandBrenda in Texas mother’s grave. Mom was heartbroken Dear Brenda: My that she wasn’t able to pay deepest sympathy to you her respects to her own and your mother for your mother. loss. We went to my uncle to Regardless of what break the news to him, caused the falling-out with thinking he didn’t know, her siblings, their behavior and were shocked when he was brutal and allowed her admitted he had known all no closure. along about the arrangeThey have made it plain ments but that Mother’s that she should keep her older sister had instructed distance, and for her own

DEAR ABBY

sake, I hope she will. It is obvious who “runs” that family, and further contact will cause your mother only more pain and frustration. Sometimes people have to build their own family, and that’s what I recommend you do. Dear Abby: At 78, my dad has given up on life. After a bout with cancer in his 50s, he has gone downhill with severe depression, sleep apnea, heart issues, etc. Dad sleeps about 20 hours a day and refuses to do anything to improve his quality of life. My mom is a vibrant woman of 70 who enjoys excellent health. She has many years ahead of her, but her quality of life has diminished because of my father. We encourage her to find some kind of life out-

side the home through friends, women’s groups, church groups, etc., but she’s reluctant to leave Dad. She’s a youthful person who is, basically, living with a corpse. I love my father, but his refusal to do anything to make his life better (treat his sleep apnea, get some exercise, take his meds properly) makes me realize he won’t change. I hate that two lives are being destroyed because of Dad’s choices. How can I make Mom see her life could be better? Troubled Son in Illinois

day and isn’t compliant in taking his meds. And you need to find out whether your father’s condition is improvable at this point because you may be judging him too harshly. While your mother’s life might improve if she got out more, it’s possible that if she took the time away from your dad, she would feel too guilty to get the most out of it. If there are family members or friends who would stay with him while she went out, she might be more receptive. Remember, you can always suggest, but don’t push.

Dear Troubled Son: You and your mom should schedule an appointment with your father’s physician to discuss everything you have disclosed to me. His doctor needs to know he sleeps 20 hours a

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

_________

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C3 phone Tim Riley at 360460-4655. It will meet Thursday from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Green Party the basement of Olympic The Green Party of ClalMedical Center, 939 Carolam County meets the line St. third Thursday of the month at 6:30 p.m. OPEN meets The public is invited to The Olympic Peninsula come and help bring about Entrepreneurs Network change. will meet Thursday from The location of the 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 175 meeting place changes S. Bayview Ave., Unit 39. from month to month. Participants are asked For more information to bring a chair as seating and for the meeting place, is limited. phone 360-683-0867 or OPEN meetings are 360-683-8407. intended to bring together inventors, innovators and Square dance club entrepreneurs of all ages Strait Wheelers Square from around the Peninsula Dance Club meets the secwho share common interond and fourth Saturday of ests and passions for every month from 7:30 p.m. inventing. to 10 p.m. at Mount PleasSupport-type services ant Community Hall, 2432 are also invited. Mount Pleasant Road. Members can share The cost is $5. resources, feedback and For more information, talent. phone 360-457-3912. For more information,

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Car club meets The Sequim Valley Car Club meets the third Monday of every month at 6 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. For more information, phone 360-681-0413.

Poetry reading The Poetry Alliance hosts a poetry reading the third Monday of each month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Sequim Senior Activity Center, 921 E. Hammond St. The event is free.

Arrival at the meeting is requested for 6:50 p.m. Guests are welcome. For more information, phone the president and chairman at 360-808-2088.

Gem, mineral group The Clallam County Gem and Mineral Association will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at The Fifth Avenue, 500 W. Hendrickson St., in the upstairs meeting room. Visitors are welcome. Information about the club can be found at www. SequimRocks.com or phone Ed Bourassa, president, at 360-977-5994.

Stockhounds meet

Toastmasters SKWIM Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday of every month promptly at 7 p.m. at Blue Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest Road.

Friends chapter

2 p.m. at Safe Haven, The North Olympic Pen- 257509 U.S. Highway 101. The public is welcome to insula Chapter of the Comattend. passionate Friends meets Members who are interthe third Tuesday of each ested are encouraged to month, except December, at come and observe. 6 p.m. at St. Luke’s EpiscoFor further information pal Church, 525 N. Fifth or directions, phone 360Ave. 452-0414 or email pfoa@ TCF is a nonprofit selfolypen.com. help support organization that assists bereaved famiOlympic Minds lies in their grief journey Olympic Minds, The after the death of a child. Institute of Noetic Sciences For more information, community group for phone 360-457-7395 or Sequim and Port Angeles, 360-417-1885. meets the first three Thursdays of each month Audubon Society at 1 p.m. in the conference The Olympic Peninsula room of The Lodge at SherAudubon Society will meet wood Village, 660 Everat the Dungeness River green Farm Way. Audubon Center at RailThe meetings are free road Bridge Park 2151 W. and open to the public. Hendrickson Road, at For more information, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Martha Jordan, a widely phone 360-681-8677. known swan biologist, will present a slide program on Friday Book Club Washington’s native trumThe Friday Book Club peter and tundra swans. meets the third Friday of The program is free and every month at 1:30 p.m. at open to the public. the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave.

The Stockhounds Investment Club meets every third Tuesday of the month to share knowledge, do research on prospective stocks and evaluate the group’s current portfolio. Members are of the area from Port Angeles to Port Townsend. PFOA board meets For more information, phone Merlyn Wursher at The Peninsula Friends 360-379-5412 in Port of Animals board meets the Townsend or Mike Zuspan third Wednesday of every at 360-582-1345 in Sequim. month from 11:30 a.m. to

Things to Do online The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . .

http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings . . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

Artisans

The Pulmonary Support Group for people who have trouble breathing and/or their caregivers meets the fourth Saturday of every month at 11:30 a.m. at M&G Mariners Cafe, 707 E. Washington St. All are welcome. For more information, phone 360-452-1473. Turn

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Clubs/C5

Olympic Medical Center Amanda Jean and Nickolas James Eshom, Port Angeles, a son, Jaxon Kyle, 8 pounds 1 ounce, 8:02 p.m. Sept. 25. Lacey and Ryan Anderson, Sequim, a daughter, Quinlee Kay, 7 pounds, 11:10 p.m. July 22. Trisha and Andrew Fontana-Malouf, a son, Jonathan Marin, 8 pounds 14 ounces, 1:25 p.m. Sept. 12. Stephanie and Tyler Tenneson, a daughter, Haylie Jo, 9 pounds 2 ounces, 7 a.m. Sept. 29.

Out of town

Shannon, Robert & Gwen W NE TION A OC

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The Olympic Peninsula Explorers will walk along the Olympic Discovery Trail from Railroad Bridge Park to Robin Hill County Park on Saturday. The club will meet at 9 a.m. at QFC, 990 E. Washington St., before driving to Railroad Bridge Park. For more information, phone Mary Allen Clark at 360-452-0593

Pulmonary support

Creative Consignment

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Explorers walk

Brittney Croker and Jo Donisi, Port Angeles, a daughter, Lillian Elise, 6 pounds 0.58 ounces, 7:49 a.m. Sept. 27 at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 16, 2011

C5

For lush spring grass, to-do fall list SEVERAL PEOPLE IN the past two weeks have come up to me wanting to know what it is I tell people to do now to their lawns in order to improve them. I guess I should be happy that by now, I have people trained that yes, this is the time of year (autumn) to really make a difference in the quality of your lawn. And I guess I should be happy that I have to write yet again the whole fall turf schedule for an ideal lawn because, after all, I write this column precisely to prescribe what to do now and here on the Peninsula.

A GROWING CONCERN

to a perfect autumn lawn. May ■  Mow short. This is the exact opposite of what I normally preach, the true secret of a great lawn: raising up your mower to 3.5 to 3.75 inches’ cutting height. But that is to grow a lush, thick and green lawn during the growing season. Optimum time During October, we deal with heavy moisture and dark and Since here on the Peninsula, dreary days, so we must compenthe end of October is the optisate for these conditions. mum time to control weeds in Lower your mower to the lowyour lawn and enhance your est setting possible without overall yard, then why not go through a quick and precise list- scalping the lawn, then rake and pick up the clippings just this ing of the chores to be done in once. order for you to have the best (Well, OK, once more in the lawn ever for next year? earliest of spring when you will In essence, the name of the game is mow short, lime, fertilize, overseed yet again.) We mow extremely short to overseed and then admire, so let’s break down these four steps first cut away and remove the

Andrew

old, worn-out or dead grass blades of the summer season. This will ensure new, vigorous and robust young growth for winter’s wet and snowy weather. We also mow very low in order to allow the nutrient program and the lime to evenly penetrate downward to the soil surface and not hang up in the thick and long blades of grass. So for both cultural and application reasons, mow very, very short, then . . . ■  Lime. Your grass cannot grow well, no matter what you do, if you do not lime your lawn twice a year. Our weather and soil profile moves your pH to an acidic condition too high for healthy growth in the typical American lawn. Lime leeches into the top soil and then through to the subsoil below the root zone, so use the short lawn and heavy fall rains to water in your pelletized lime, then . . . ■  Fertilize. Your lawn is always a ravenous beast, so feed the beast often. In the fall, you want a lownitrogen blend; blood meal is a

perfect product. Mix with bonemeal one-to-one and add in some iron or get a great organic lawn fertilizer at your favorite outlet or co-op. Now that the lawn is mowed short and the lime is down, fertilize away because it, too, will easily drop to the ground thanks to that super-short cut, and those pesky rains will actually do the work of getting this precious nutrient into the ground and up into the plant. Then . . . ■  Overseed. This is the kicker, the linchpin, the Holy Grail, the secret ingredient of a perfect lawn, so do not skip this crucial step as so many people do!

Overseeding’s benefits Overseeding does two crucial things: One, overseeding twice a year (early fall then early spring) keeps your lawn getting ever more lush and full, filling in any bare spots and problem spots and replacing the natural death of individual grass plants. Overseeding more importantly

plugs the bare areas of ground where a weed seed could grow, and this is its true value. When you overseed twice a year, within a few years, weeds find it nearly impossible to grow. Got it? No chemicals, no pulling weeds, no weedy lawn — overseeding gives you all of this. Always get top-quality seed, which means grass seed with a 92 percent or better germination rating and with far less than 1 percent weed seed preferred. I also believe you should only use rye and fescue blends, which are evergreen grass, meaning they will stay green even in the dry of summer with little water. So go to the co-op today or your favorite nursery/greenhouse and get a great big bag of grass for overseeding, then . . . ■  Sit back and admire your lawn.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or email news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Briefly . . . Fun at lunch set Thursday at PA office PORT ANGELES — Strait Occupational & Hand Therapy’s monthly brown bag luncheon called “Funch: Fun at Lunch” will be held Thursday. Funch will be held at the business, 708 S. Race St., Suite C, from 12:05 p.m. to 12:55 p.m. This month’s craft project is lavender sachets. All materials and a dess­ert will be provided. Participants are asked to bring an item for the Port Angeles Food Bank to help support the organization’s Friday Food Bank for Kids. The program, which sends Ziploc bags of food home with youth Fridays to help sustain them over the weekend, is in need of soup, juice boxes, granola bars, fruit cups and other nonperishable, individually wrapped snacks. Registration is needed by Tuesday. Phone 360-417-0703 to register.

Hospice class set PORT ANGELES —

Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County will present “Legal Issues” and “Mortuary Services” at Drennan Ford Funeral Home, 260 Monroe Road, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday. Attorney John Rutz will present “Legal Issues” and Steve Ford of Drennan Ford will present “Mortuary Services.” This is the fifth in Hospice’s Fall Community Education Series. The series is free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-452-1511.

Help with taxes AARP Tax-Aide is looking for new volunteers to prepare federal income tax returns for the upcoming tax season. Volunteers of all ages and backgrounds are welcome. Volunteers are trained during December and January, using IRS-provided materials and software. All volunteers must attend the classes and do an extensive amount of self-study in order to pass the IRS Test in January. Tax-Aide volunteers provide free tax return preparation and electronic filing for members of the community.

New volunteers work with experienced volunteers at convenient locations such as libraries and community centers. The Tax-Aide program is sponsored by the AARP Foundation and the IRS. One need not be an AARP member or a retiree to volunteer or to receive tax preparation services from AARP Tax-Aide. There are also some opportunities for “greeters” at some Tax-Aide sites. These volunteers are not required to pass the IRS Test. Those interested in volunteering should contact: ■  Jefferson County: Phone David Self at 360385-2617 or email dcself@ olypen.com. ■  Port Angeles: Phone Hearst Coen at 360-4526541 or email hj_coen@ msn.com. ■  Sequim: Phone Gail Anundson at 360-582-1295 or email gail@anundson. org. ■  Forks: Phone Corinne Spicer at 360-3746332.

Nominations open PORT TOWNSEND — AAUW Port Townsend is seeking nominations for its Women of Excellence Award.

The group annually honors a woman who has contributed significantly to the status of women through paid and/or volunteer work in Jefferson County. To be eligible, nominees must have resided and/or worked in Jefferson County for three years. Application forms are available at www.aauwpt. org or by mailing a request to townsend@aauw.org or Women of Excellence Award, AAUW of Port Townsend, P.O. Box 934, Port Townsend, WA 98368, or by phone to 360-4375151. Up to three letters of reference should accompany the one-page application. Nominations are due Tuesday, Nov. 1. For information on AAUW Port Townsend scholarships and educational programs, visit www. aauwpt.org.

Dress up your pet SEQUIM — The Sequim Petco, 1205 W. Washington St., will hold a Pet Costume Contest from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Registration will begin at 1:45 p.m. Bring your pet in a fun or frightening costume for

a chance to win prizes. Pet costumes will be judged on creativity/originality, attention to detail and how well the costumes suit each pet’s personality. No purchase is necessary to participate, but pets must be on a leash or in a carrier. For more information, phone 360-582-9283.

T-shirt benefit PORT ANGELES — Members of the Port Angeles Fire Department are supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Operation Uplift, a North Olympic Peninsula cancer support organization, with the sale of pink logo T-shirts this month. They will also begin wearing the shirts while out in the community on Monday. The front of the shirts displays the Port Angeles Fire Department’s duty logo with “Breast Cancer Awareness” inscribed below. The back of the shirts displays the International Association of Firefighters logo with the words “Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness.” Shirts, in sizes small through extra large, are available for $15 at the fire

station, 102 E. Fifth St., or from all fire engines and ambulances. The public can purchase shirts at any time; just ring the doorbell of the station if it is after business hours. For more information, phone 360-417-4655.

Chronic conditions PORT TOWNSEND — “Living Well With Chronic Conditions,” a six-part workshop, will be presented by the Port Townsend Athletic Club and the Olympic Area Agency on Aging starting Monday, Oct. 24. The workshops will be held at the Cotton Building, 607 Water St., from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on six consecutive Mondays. Materials were developed by Stanford University’s Chronic Disease SelfManagement Program. The workshops are designed to help individuals with chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma, heart disease, pain, arthritis and hypertension. Participants learn how to lessen stress and frustration, manage symptoms and deal with fatigue. For more information or to register, phone 866-5821487 or 360-538-2457. Peninsula Daily News

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The Rhody Os Dance Club holds dances every first and third Friday with rounds from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and mainstream square dance from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road. There are also Tuesday night square dance lessons from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. For further information,

from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and a performance from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Donations support scholarships. For more information, visit the club website at http://d15.wotfa.org.

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Continued from C4 vices, skills and goods Monday at 7 p.m. at the Port Townsend and Dundee Hill Center, Hancock and 32nd streets, Port Jefferson County Townsend. For further information, phone Mike Dobkevich at Norway daughters 360-379-2627 or email Today at 1 p.m. at the dobkevich1@q.com. Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Park Pals’ board Chimacum, Thea Foss No. The Sequim Park Pals’ 45, Daughters of Norway board meets the third will hear “The Life and Tuesday of each month at Music of Edvard Grieg.” 7 p.m. at 1011 New MeadCarol Pease will show ows Loop. photos and have recordAll are welcome, and ings, focusing on the “Peer dog-park users and volunGynt Suite.” teers are encouraged to The meeting is open and attend. free to the public. For further information, Refreshments will be phone 360-683-1515. served. For further information, Garden club meets phone 360-379-1802. The Port Townsend Garden Club will meet Exchange group Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. at North Olympic Grace Lutheran Church, Exchange, a local currency 1120 Walker St., Port group, will host an orienta- Townsend. tion for everyone interested A light lunch will be in building a sustainable served, followed by a precommunity by trading ser- sentation by the Jefferson


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Sunday, October 16, 2011

NationWorld

Peninsula Daily News

Experts offer advice on vitamin safety By Marilynn Marchione The Associated Press

Two studies last week raised gnawing worries about the safety of vitamin supplements and a host of questions. Should anyone be taking them? Which ones are most risky? And if you do take them, how can you pick the safest ones? Vitamins have long had a “health halo.” Many people think they’re good for you and at worst might simply be unnecessary. The industry calls them an insurance policy against bad eating. But our foods are increasingly pumped full of them already. Even junk foods and drinks often are fortified with nutrients to give them a healthier profile, so the risk is rising that we’re getting too much. Add a supplement, and you may exceed the upper limit. “We’re finding out they’re not as harmless as the industry might have us believe,” said David Schardt, a nutritionist at the consumer group Center for Science in the Public Interest. Last week a study of nearly 40,000 older women found a slightly higher risk of death among those taking dietary supplements, including multivitamins, folic acid, iron and copper. It was just an observational study, though, not a

rigorous test. Another study found that men taking high doses of vitamin E — 400 units a day — for five years had a slightly increased risk of prostate cancer.

$9.6 billion in sales As many as one-third of Americans take vitamins and nearly half of people 50 and older take multivitamins, surveys suggest. Americans spent $9.6 billion on vitamins last year, up from $7.2 billion in 2005, according to the Nutrition Business Journal. Multivitamins top the list, at nearly $5 billion in sales. Yet there is no clear evidence that multivitamins lower the risk of cancer, heart disease or any other chronic health problems. No government agency recommends them “regardless of the quality of a person’s diet,” says a fact sheet from the federal Office of Dietary Supplements. And vitamins aren’t required to undergo the strict testing required of U.S.-approved prescription medicines. Some fads, such as the antioxidant craze over vitamins A and E and beta-carotene, backfired when studies found more health risk, not less. And studies that find more disease in people with too little of a certain vitamin can be misleading. Correcting a deficiency so you have the right daily amount is different from

The Associated Press

The nutrition label on a box of multivitamins. supplementing beyond recommended levels. The best way to get vitamins is to eat foods that naturally contain them, said Jody Engel, a nutritionist with Office of Dietary Supplements. “Foods provide more than just vitamins and minerals, such as fiber and other ingredients that may have positive health effects.” Schardt adds: “It’s virtually impossible to overdose on the nutrients in food.”

Talk to a doctor Some folks may need more of certain nutrients and should talk with their doctors about supplements: n   Po s t m e n o p a u s a l women regarding calcium and vitamin D to protect bones. n  Women planning on pregnancy regarding folate, or folic acid, to prevent

Consumerlab.com, a company that tests supplements and publishes ratings for subscribers, has found a high rate of problems in the 3,000 products it has tested since 1999. “One out of four either doesn’t contain what it claims or has some other problems such as contamination or the pills won’t break apart properly,” said company president Dr. Tod Cooperman. For example, one gummy bear calcium product had 250 percent of the amount of vitamin D claimed on the label. Another liquid product made with rose hips had just over half the amount of vitamin C listed. “You don’t have to pay a lot. Price is not necessarily linked to quality,” he said. “The quality doesn’t really relate to where you’re buying it. I know many people are surprised by that or don’t want to believe it, but that is the case. We find good and bad products in every venue.” Mark Blumenthal, executive director of the American Botanical Council, suggests looking for “seals of approval” or certifications of quality from groups that spot-test supplements such as the USP, or United States Pharmacopeia; NSF International; and NPA, the Natural Products Association.

birth defects. n  People older than age 50 and vegans who may need vitamin B12. “As we get older, a number of us no longer produce enough acid in the stomach to extract the B12 in food,” Schardt explained. women, n  Pregnant who may need extra iron. n  Breastfed infants and possibly other infants concerning vitamin D. Vitamin D is a nutrient many of us may need to supplement. Last fall, the Institute of Medicine, a panel of scientists who advise the government, raised the recommended amount but also warned against overdoing it. People ages 1 to 70 should get 600 international units a day, older folks 800 units. What to do If you do need a supplement, beware — quality Experts offered varies. advice:

n  Keep it simple. The more ingredients there are in a supplement combo, the more chance that one of them will not be the right amount, Cooperman said. n  Consider a supplement combo tailored to your gender and age, the Office of Dietary Supplements suggests. Multivitamins often contain little iron, and ones for seniors give more calcium and vitamin D than products aimed at younger adults. n  Take vitamin D with dinner. A study found significantly more absorption of that nutrient when it was consumed at the largest meal, which tends to have more fat, than at breakfast, Cooperman said. n  Watch out for vitamin K — it promotes clotting and can interfere with common heart medicines and blood thinners such as warfarin, sold as Coumadin and other brands. n  Current and former smokers are advised to avoid multivitamins with lots of beta-carotene or vitamin A; two studies have tied them to increased risk of lung cancer. n  For cancer patients, “vitamins C and E might reduce the effectiveness of certain types of chemotherapy,” Engel said. n  People having surgery should know that some vitamins can affect bleeding and response to anesthesia. And with any supplethis ment — ask your doctor.

Testing in Tokyo finds radioactive hot spots By Hiroko Tabuchi The New York Times

TOKYO — Takeo Hayashida signed on with a citizens’ group to test for radiation near his son’s baseball field in Tokyo after government officials told him they had no plans to check for fallout from the devastated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. Like Japan’s central government, local officials said there was nothing to fear in the capital, 160 miles from the disaster zone. Then came the test results. The level of radioactive cesium in a patch of dirt just yards from where his 11-year-old son, Koshiro, played baseball was equal to those in some contaminated areas around Chernobyl. The patch of ground was one of more than 20 spots in and around the nation’s capital that the citizens’ group, and the respected nuclear research center they worked with, found were contaminated with potentially harmful levels of radioactive cesium. It has been clear since the early days of the nuclear accident, the world’s second worst after Chernobyl, that the vagaries of wind and rain had scattered worrisome amounts of radioactive materials in unexpected patterns far outside the evacuation zone 12 miles around the stricken plant. But reports that substantial amounts of cesium had accumulated as far away as Tokyo have raised new concerns about how far the contamination had spread, possibly settling in areas where the government has not even considered looking. The government’s fail-

The Associated Press

A baseball stadium in Tokyo was found to be contaminated with radioactive cesium. There have been calls for broader testing. ure to act quickly, a growing chorus of scientists say, may be exposing many more people than originally believed to potentially harmful radiation.

Government failure It is also part of a pattern. Japan’s leaders have continually insisted that the fallout from Fukushima will not spread far, or pose a health threat to residents, or contaminate the food chain. And officials have repeatedly been proved wrong by independent experts and citizens’ groups that conduct testing on their own. “Radioactive substances

are entering people’s bodies from the air, from the food. It’s everywhere,” said Kiyoshi Toda, a radiation expert at Nagasaki University’s faculty of environmental studies and a medical doctor. “But the government doesn’t even try to inform the public how much radiation they’re exposed to.” The reports of hot spots do not indicate how widespread contamination is in the capital; more sampling would be needed to determine that. But they raise the prospect that people living near concentrated amounts of cesium are being exposed to levels of radiation above accepted international standards meant to protect

pleted aerial testing in eastern Japan, including Tokyo. But several experts and activists say the tests are unlikely to be sensitive enough to be useful in finding micro hot spots such as those found by the citizens’ group. Kaoru Noguchi, head of Tokyo’s health and safety section, however, argues that the testing already done is sufficient. Because Tokyo is so developed, she says, radioactive material was much more likely to have fallen on concrete, then washed away. She also said exposure Aerial testing was likely to be limited. The government has not “Nobody stands in one ignored citizens’ pleas spot all day,” she said. “And entirely; it recently com- nobody eats dirt.” people from cancer and other illnesses. Japanese nuclear experts and activists have begun agitating for more comprehensive testing in Tokyo and elsewhere, and a cleanup if necessary. Robert Alvarez, a nuclear expert and a former special assistant to the United States secretary of energy, echoed those calls, saying the citizens’ groups’ measurements “raise major and unprecedented concerns about the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster.”

Tokyo residents knew soon after the March 11 accident, when a tsunami knocked out the crucial cooling systems at the Fukushima plant, that they were being exposed to radioactive materials. Researchers detected a spike in radiation levels on March 15. Then as rain drizzled down on the evening of March 21, radioactive material again fell on the city. In the following week, however, radioactivity in the air and water dropped rapidly. Most in the city put aside their jitters, some openly scornful of those — mostly foreigners — who had fled Tokyo in the early days of the disaster. But not everyone was convinced. Some Tokyo residents bought dosimeters. The Tokyo citizens’ group, the Radiation Defense Project, which grew out of a Facebook discussion page, decided to be more proactive. In consultation with the Yokohama-based Isotope Research Institute, members collected soil samples from near their own homes and submitted them for testing. Some of the results were shocking. The sample that Hayashida collected under shrubs near his neighborhood baseball field in the Edogawa ward measured nearly 138,000 becquerels per square meter of radioactive cesium 137, which can damage cells and lead to an increased risk of cancer. Of the 132 areas tested, 22 were above 37,000 becquerels per square meter, the level at which zones were considered contaminated at Chernobyl.

Options for ‘No Child’ law kept open in Olympia By Donna Blankinship The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — State education officials are keeping their options open on applying for a waiver to the federal education law known as No Child Left Behind. Education department spokesman Nate Olson said the key is figuring out whether Washington would meet the federal requirements for a waiver and whether the Legislature needs to take some action first. Washington updated its intentions toward No Child Left Behind in an email last

week to the U.S. Department of Education, saying it would make its decision known by the mid-February 2012 due date. Even so, the state is now counted by the federal government as one of 37 states, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, that have declared their intent to apply for a waiver from key requirements of the unpopular law. Superintendent Randy Dorn said what Washington and other states really need is for Congress to come up with a better education law to replace No Child Left Behind.

“This is kind of a BandAid,” said Olson. “We don’t need Band-Aids any more. We need something different.” President Obama offered the waivers after expressing frustration with Congress’ inability to revise the law. The key provision every state would like to see disappear is the requirement every child be proficient in math and reading by 2014. With a waiver, states would no longer need to meet that deadline. Washington would need a miracle or a new federal law to hit that target because at

least 39 percent of the children in any given grade are flunking the statewide math test used to determine whether students are meeting the requirements of No Child Left Behind. Students are doing much better in reading, but they are still not at 100 percent proficiency.

Waivers The waivers also would allow states to escape some restrictions on how they use school-improvement money; spending requirements for money aimed at low-income schools could be eased; and

other school-accountability requirements could be waived or eased. But before Washington can apply for a waiver, the state needs to make sure it meets four requirements established by the U.S. Department of Education. Olson said Washington is OK on at least two of the four. Each state needs college and career-ready standards and tests aligned to those standards. “We feel that we have that,” Olson said. They need a rigorous state-accountability system, based largely on the principals expressed in a new

nationwide curriculum system. Washington has adopted what is called the “Common Core” standards and leads a coalition working on developing new nationwide tests. But Olson said it’s not entirely clear to state officials which accountability system the federal government is referring to in this criteria. Washington has several, and each is a little different. Each state is required to commit to design, pilot and implement a system of teacher and leader evaluation “based significantly on student-growth measures.”


Peninsula Daily News

Japanese pen pals visit school Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Tanabu Senior High School students from Mutsu City, Japan, recently visited Port Angeles. Thirty-eight students were accompanied by their principal, teachers and guides from the intensive English program at Tanabu Senior High in Mutsu City. The exchange is part of the Port Angeles School District and Peninsula International Relations Association (PIRA) exchange program. Thirty students from Port Angeles High provided homestays for the guests. Japanese students

attended class at Port Angeles High with their student hosts and also visited pen pals at Jefferson Elementary. The students also participated in a question-andanswer session in which teacher Jefferson third-grade teacher Evan Murphy asked questions on a projected white board (i.e., where do you live, what is your favorite food), then students logged in answers given by the exchange students by way of student responding devices. The exercise enabled students to learn more about their friends from Japan. Responses were projected for all to view on the white board.

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 16, 2011

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Port Angeles School District

Exchange students from Mutsu City, Japan, share Japanese games with Jefferson Elementary School pen pals. From left are Colton Reitsma, Natalie Schmidt, Kanako Nakamura, Ayaka Kadono and Ruka Kudo, Danny Roullo (hitting colored ball) and Tessa Lowen. The Jefferson students are from teacher Evan Murphy’s third-grade classroom.

Briefly . . . Indian music show slated Oct. 23 in PT PORT TOWNSEND — Steve Oda and Ty Burhoe will present a concert of classical Indian music at 8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23. The concert will be held at the Madrona Mind Body Institute (Building 310) at Fort Worden State Park. Oda is a disciple of the teachings of sarode master

Ustad Ali Akbar Khan. Burhoe studied the tabla under Zakir Hussain. Tickets are $12 in advance at www.tala records.com and $15 at the door. For more information, email Jon Crane at Crane drums@gmail.com.

Swan discussion SEQUIM — Biologist Martha Jordan will discuss Washington’s native trumpeter and tundra swans at a meeting of the Olympic

Peninsula Audubon Society on Wednesday. The meeting will be held at the Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, at 7 p.m. The program is free and open to the public. Jordan will present slides, and attendees will learn about the species’ life history, biology and a few swan identification tips. She will shed light on the problems and contro-

versies these birds face on their wintering grounds and what is needed to ensure their future. Participants can pick up a free swan identification pamphlet at the meeting. Jordan has a degree in wildlife science from Oregon State University. She began to look at swans in the late 1970s and by 1984 had contributed much information to state and federal agencies on the status of

Death and Memorial Notice RUTH M. GOIN August 5, 1927 October 10, 2011 Ruth M. Goin passed away peacefully on October 10, 2011, at the age of 84. Ruth was born on August 5, 1927, in   Osakis, Minnesota, to Lewis and Margaret Schulz. After the loss   of their dairy farm during the Depression, Ruth’s family moved to Port Angeles in 1945, where she found employment with Rayonier mill and Brelsford & Wehrli Optometrist. Ruth met the love of

Mrs. Goin her life, James E. Goin, who also was employed by Rayonier mill, and they

were married February 1, 1975. Ruth was a volunteer for the Olympic Medical Center Auxiliary and a member of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Among her interests of traveling, camping and hiking, throwing the ball for her favorite grand-doggie, Lola, always made her smile. She is survived by her husband, James Goin; sister Darlene Alward; daughter and son-in-law Shirley and Gene Adolphsen; son and daughter-inlaw Tom and Vicki Bush; and two granddaughters, Sarah and Katie Adolphsen.

She was preceded in death by her brother, Robert Schulz, in 1991. Ruth was a very loving, caring and thoughtful person who touched our lives and soul. We will miss her greatly. There will be a funeral service held Saturday, October 22, 2011, at   10 a.m. at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 East Lopez Avenue, Port Angeles. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Alzheimer’s Association of Western and Central Washington, 1422 Northwest 85th Street, Seattle, WA 98117-4236.

Death and Memorial Notice ALVIN OSCAR ‘WOODY’ BERTELSON April 17, 1950 September 4, 2011 Woody was born in Midland, South Dakota, to Alvin Oscar Bertelson Sr. and Ethlyn Curtis Bertelson. He spent his younger years living on a small horse and cattle ranch with his sisters. Not being allowed to work with cattle with the cowboys, Woody developed his roping skills by practicing on his mother’s chickens. At the age of 5 years, he was “The Champion Chicken Roper of Haakon County, South Dakota.” After his father passed away, the family moved to Hot Springs, South Dakota. In 1970, Woody joined the U.S. Army and served in Vietnam until 1972. It

Death Notices Gregory Ryan Curtis Jan. 25, 1956 — Oct. 8, 2011

Gregory Ryan Curtis died at his Clallam Bay home. Cause of death is pending. He was 55. Services: None. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

www.peninsuladaily news.com

was then he moved to Clallam Bay and started working in the logging industry. On April 4, 1972, Woody married Vivian Tennyson of Hot Springs. They had five children. They divorced in 1986. Woody and the kids moved to Joyce, where

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday. A convenient form to guide you is available at   area mortuaries or by downloading at   www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at   www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

flight in 1990. Woody’s biggest passion and love was for his family and friends. Everyone always got a smile and warm, big bear hug from him. On Sunday, September 4, 2011, Woody was suddenly called home to be with his Lord father. A celebration of life was held at the Woodard Property on September 10, 2011. He leaves behind wife Terri; daughter Amanda Bertelson Holman; sons Patrick, Daniel, Brian and Darin Bertelson, and David McNally and Kevin McNally; 14 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; sisters Cricket (Ethlyn) Luscume, Julie Hall and Mary Bertelson; and five nieces and nephews. View the guestbook and share memories at www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com.

years and chairs the Washington State Swan Stewards, a local group for the Trumpeter Swan Society. Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice THOMAS B. ‘TURBO’ ERICKSON June 15, 1928 October 10, 2011 Mr. Thomas Erickson, 83, of Port Angeles passed away October 10, 2011, of natural causes. Thomas “Turbo” was born June 15, 1928, in Port Angeles to Charles M. and Florence (Leffel) Erickson. He married Carolyn Erickson on September 13, 1948, in Port Angeles. Turbo served in the U.S. Navy and was a truck driver by trade. He retired in 1997 after owning and operating his own log truck business for many years, as well as working for other trucking companies. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Erickson of Port Angeles; daughters and sons-in-law Linda and Ken Jackson, Jody Applegate and Susan and Walt Hafer, all of Port Angeles; sister-inlaw Phyliss Erickson of Brinnon; sister and brother-in-law Juanita and David Miller of Cali-

Mr. Erickson fornia; six grandchildren, Camille Hefton (Bob), Cara Medley (Tyler), Kermit Nathanial Applegate, Alan Applegate (Cassie), Kylie Hafer and Tommy Hafer; and six greatgrandchildren. Mr. Erickson was preceded in death by his parents, brother Donald Erickson in 1995 and son-in-law Kermit Applegate. At his request, there will be no services held. Memorial contributions may be made to the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, 2105 West U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles, WA 98363.

Death and Memorial Notice WILLIAM RALPH GRIFFIN November 6, 1920 October 12, 2011 Mr. William Ralph Griffin, 90, of Sequim passed away October 12, 2011, of natural causes. He was born November 6, 1920, in Montgomery, Alabama, to William R. and Julia (Bryson) Griffin. Mr. Griffin served in the U.S. Navy during the attack on Pearl Harbor as well as in the Korean War. W. Ralph married Laura Mae Johansen. He retired from Seat-

tle City Light and went on to teach at Seattle Community College. He lived in Seattle until 1999, when he and Laura moved to Sequim. Mr. Griffin was very active with the Pearl Harbor Survivors and went to many reunions with his wife, Laura. He especially enjoyed teaching at Seattle Community College and helping to mold young lives. He will be missed by many. W. Ralph Griffin is survived by his daughter, Laina M. Griffin, and granddaughter, Amy Elizabeth. His wife, Laura, and son, Gary Robert, preceded him in death.

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they became active in the Joyce Bible Church, Little League Football and the Joyce High School football teams. In 1991, he married Theresa “Terri” Christensen and combined their families. Together, they were active in Back Country Horseman. Woody served as president, and together, they logged many trail-clearing hours and attended many trail rides. Horses and farming were great loves of Woody’s. He was wellknown with his team of Belgian mares Minnie and Pearl at the local fairs competing in the weight pulls. He also logged with them, being able to have fun and work at the same time. Woody’s other passion was skydiving and flying. He has logged almost 200 jumps and did his first solo

trumpeter swans in Washington, including the first swan management plan. She was a board member of the Trumpeter Swan Society for more than 15


C8

WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Low 38

55/40

57/39

57/41

54/39

Times of clouds and sun.

Partly cloudy and chilly.

Partly sunny.

Partly sunny.

A blend of sun and clouds.

Mostly cloudy with a shower possible.

The Peninsula An area of high pressure will be sitting off the Pacific Northwest coast today. This will bring a rain-free day to the Peninsula with times Victoria of clouds and sunshine along with seasonable temperatures. 58/41 Tonight will be partly cloudy and chilly. High pressure will Neah Bay Port shift from off the Pacific Northwest coast eastward to the 53/42 Townsend northern Rockies Monday into Tuesday. This will continue Port Angeles 54/42 to provide rain-free weather with sunshine each day 55/38 and seasonable temperatures. The next chance for a Sequim shower will be on Thursday.

Forks 57/40

Yakima Kennewick 62/35 65/38

Marine Forecast

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

3:50 a.m. 2:54 p.m. 7:09 a.m. 4:34 p.m. 8:54 a.m. 6:19 p.m. 8:15 a.m. 5:40 p.m.

Tomorrow High Tide Ht

6.8’ 7.9’ 6.8’ 6.1’ 8.2’ 7.3’ 7.7’ 6.9’

9:20 a.m. 10:06 p.m. 12:24 p.m. ----12:44 a.m. 1:38 p.m. 12:37 a.m. 1:31 p.m.

3.0’ 0.3’ 4.9’ ---0.4’ 6.4’ -0.4’ 6.0’

4:35 a.m. 3:29 p.m. 8:03 a.m. 5:02 p.m. 9:48 a.m. 6:47 p.m. 9:09 a.m. 6:08 p.m.

6.5’ 7.6’ 6.7’ 5.8’ 8.1’ 7.0’ 7.6’ 6.6’

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

9:59 a.m. 10:51 p.m. 12:12 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 1:26 a.m. 2:39 p.m. 1:19 a.m. 2:32 p.m.

5:26 a.m. 4:17 p.m. 9:02 a.m. 5:36 p.m. 10:47 a.m. 7:21 p.m. 10:08 a.m. 6:42 p.m.

10:47 a.m. 11:44 p.m. 12:59 a.m. 2:53 p.m. 2:13 a.m. 4:07 p.m. 2:06 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

6.2’ 7.3’ 6.6’ 5.6’ 8.0’ 6.7’ 7.5’ 6.3’

Nov 2

3.4’ 0.9’ -0.1’ 5.1’ -0.1’ 6.6’ -0.1’ 6.2’

Atlanta 84/59 El Paso 85/58

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Full

Nov 10

AFFORS*06503

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 88/65 Miami 85/76

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 80 44 61 84 68 70 65 50 56 72 65 60 82 69 62 72 58 69 88 74 64 60 64 38 58 86 88 47

Lo W 55 s 34 sh 40 pc 59 s 54 pc 52 pc 32 pc 35 c 27 pc 46 c 50 pc 43 sh 58 s 46 s 41 pc 48 pc 35 c 38 pc 67 s 50 s 42 pc 43 sh 36 pc 25 c 38 c 70 pc 65 s 37 sh

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 70 92 88 78 85 62 57 84 86 66 88 66 85 93 68 100 65 78 78 80 76 75 86 70 70 59 65 72

Lo W 50 pc 66 s 60 s 62 pc 76 t 42 pc 37 pc 57 s 66 s 54 pc 60 s 41 pc 66 pc 64 s 52 pc 68 s 42 pc 53 s 45 pc 54 pc 54 pc 49 s 66 s 63 pc 56 pc 36 pc 41 c 56 s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 104 at Gila Bend, AZ

Low: 21 at Angel Fire, NM

683-9619 385-2724 452-0840

✔ Trusted Experts ✔ Senior Discount ✔ Lifetime Warranty

ff o r d a b l e Roofing

New York 66/54 Washington 72/56

145118410

A

3.2’ 0.6’ -0.2’ 5.1’ -0.3’ 6.6’ -0.3’ 6.2’

Oct 26

Chicago 62/41

Denver 74/50

Los Angeles 78/62

City Hi Lo W Athens 59 48 r Baghdad 98 67 pc Beijing 68 46 s Brussels 59 45 s Cairo 85 69 s Calgary 49 30 c Edmonton 49 30 s Hong Kong 82 72 s Jerusalem 72 55 s Johannesburg 84 46 pc Kabul 82 40 s London 64 48 pc Mexico City 73 48 pc Montreal 54 46 c Moscow 37 29 c New Delhi 98 63 s Paris 66 47 s Rio de Janeiro 75 66 r Rome 67 49 pc Stockholm 50 38 s Sydney 72 57 s Tokyo 82 60 s Toronto 61 48 sh Vancouver 52 42 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Clouds and sun today. Wind from the west at 8-16 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Partly cloudy tonight. Wind west at 10-20 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Partly sunny tomorrow. Wind northeast 4-8 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear. Tuesday: Partly sunny and milder. Wind east-northeast 8-16 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Ht

First

Detroit 60/43

Kansas City 70/50

World Cities Today

Spokane 57/38

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Low Tide

New

Oct 19

Everett 57/43

Seattle 55/44

Today

San Francisco 70/56

-10s -0s

Olympia 59/35

Ht

Minneapolis 57/37

Moon Phases Last

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Billings 50/35

Sunset today ................... 6:24 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:36 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 8:54 p.m. Moonset today ............... 12:17 p.m.

Port Ludlow 56/42

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

Seattle 55/44

Sun & Moon

Bellingham 54/31 Aberdeen 59/42

National Forecast

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 53 34 0.01 11.80 Forks 59 33 0.00 88.87 Seattle 57 43 0.01 27.62 Sequim 58 40 0.00 11.68 Hoquiam 62 38 0.00 51.87 Victoria 56 35 0.00 23.63 P. Townsend* 53 47 0.02 12.75 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Thursday

High 55

57/42

Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 16, 2011

Business

SECTION

D

Politics and Environment

 $ Briefly . . . Port of PA boss to speak to Forks chamber FORKS — Jeff Robb, executive director of the Port of Port Angeles, will keynote this week’s luncheon meeting of the Forks Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday. Robb is expected to give an overview of activities involving the port, a taxing district which covers all of Clallam County and Robb includes Sekiu Airport on the West End. Wednesday’s meeting, open to the public, starts with no-host lunch at noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information.

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch Oct. 14, 2011

Dow Jones industrials

11,644.49

Nasdaq composite

2,667.85

Standard & Poor’s 500

+166.36

+47.61 +20.92 1,224.58

Russell 2000

+13.64 712.46

NYSE diary Advanced: Declined: Unchanged: Volume:

2,527 515 75 3.6 b The Associated Press

Nasdaq diary Advanced: Declined:

630

Unchanged:

133

Volume:

The Polar Star, a 1970s-era Coast Guard icebreaker, is undergoing a four-year, $57 million overhaul at Vigor Industrial on Harbor Island in Seattle.

1,891

1.6 b

AP

Cold reality sets in for pricey icebreakers

Cochrane, a Port North Hood chamber Townsend nativeFigures who reflect market fluctuations BRINNON — The North NOTE: after close; may not match other AP content founded Hood Canal Chamber of ComBy Kyung M. Song Power Trip merce will meet at the Brinnon he United States is running short of BRIEF 101411: Chart shows The Seattle Times Energy Corp. Community Center, 306144 U.S. MARKET icebreakers, with its only pair of market figures for Dow, S&P, Russell SEATTLE — Climate change is melting parts of in 2002. Highway 101, at 5:30 p.m. Mon- daily 2000 and Nasdaq, along with NYSE andthe ice-locked Northwest Passage. Among day. heavy icebreakers, Polar Sea and diary; stand-alone; 1c x 4 inches; China is building its first modern icebreaker in Cochrane’s Open to the public, the meet- Nasdaq Polar Star, sidelined in Seattle, one with 112 pt xwill 288bept; ETA 6:30 p.m. Staff topics ing will feature a presentation hopes of staking claims to Arctic waters. Cochrane the state of by the chamber’s director, Doug Frigid polar regions are opening up to increased broken engines and the other undergoing the industry Hixson, co-owner of Cove RV shipping traffic, scientific exploration and tourism. an overhaul to keep it running a decade for local grid-tied solar energy, Park and a real estate broker Yet the United States is so short of icebreakers past its life span. with Johnson Realty, on propos- particularly as East Jefferson capable of navigating those still-unpredictable waters County switches power providals to promote the Brinnon/Quilthat since 2007, it has made the annual supply run to ing from Puget Sound Energy to cene business community. McMurdo Station, the American research outpost in cluded the nation’s icebreaking capabilities were the Jefferson County Public The presentation is the culAntarctica, with a ship leased from Sweden. inadequate to support its polar missions and urged Utility District. mination of the brainstorming The nation’s two heavy-duty U.S. icebreakers sit immediate construction of two ships. Open to the public, Monday’s session held by the chamber’s sidelined in Seattle, home of the Coast Guard’s Another independent study was done by ABS board of directors in late August. luncheon of the Jefferson County three-ship icebreaker fleet. Consulting in 2010. The meeting will also feature chamber, combining former The Polar Sea and its twin, the Polar Star, are It said the Coast Guard would need three each of nominees for vacant positions on chamber organizations in Port 1970s-era cutters that have been patched up to keep heavy and medium icebreakers — double its current the chamber’s board. Townsend, Port Ludlow and the going past their original life span. fleet. Soup and bread will be proTri-Area, begins at noon at the Regardless of the latest recommendations, Washvided at the meeting by Elk Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Thinner ice ington’s Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Mountlake Terrace, Meadows B&B. Otto St. is trying to block the service from carrying out a For further information, The only working icebreaker is the 12-year-old plan she believes would put the United States even Monday’s meeting sponsor is phone the chamber at 360-765Healy, which boasts elaborate scientific labs but can further behind — mothballing the 33-year-old Polar the Port Townsend Food Co-op. 4999 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monbreak through only thinner ice. Sea and raiding it for parts. day. After years of hand-wringing over the nation’s Cantwell has co-sponsored a bill authored by County candidates diminished Arctic ambitions, Congress is now await- Sen. Mark Begich, D-Alaska, to prevent the service PORT ANGELES — The two ing what is meant to be the definitive independent from decommissioning the Polar Sea before the Forums continue candidates for Clallam County analysis on whether it should build new icebreakers Polar Star returns to service in 2013. PORT ANGELES — A fourcommissioner, Democrat Linda or eke even more service out of the two aged vessels. meeting series of political The latter ship is undergoing a four-year, $57 Barnfather and Republican Jim Paradoxically, experts say, the thinning ice will million overhaul at Vigor Industrial (formerly Todd forums for Port Angeles McEntire, will appear before increase demand for icebreakers as more people Shipyards) on Harbor Island in Seattle. Regional Chamber of Commerce this week’s breakfast meeting of flock to the hazardous polar environs. members continues with candithe Port Angeles Business AssoTurn to Icebreakers/D2 A National Research Council panel in 2006 condates for Port Angeles City ciation on Tuesday. Council on Monday. Although the winner will repAppearing resent District 1 (Sequim area) will be City on the three-member Board of Council PosiCommissioners, the position is tion 6 incumelected countywide. bent Don Ballots for the Nov. 8 election Perry and will be mailed to registered votchallenger ers starting Wednesday. Sissy Bruch; Open to the public, Tuesday’s and council PABA meeting begins at 7:30 Position 7 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, incumbent Peninsula Daily News 113 DelGuzzi Drive. Hallett Cherie Kidd, news services There is a $2.16 minimum who is now charge by Joshua’s for those OLYMPIA — With too few unopposed after challenger Cody who do not order breakfast. hands to pick the apples in EastBlevins withdrew last month. ern Washington, Democratic Gov. Blevens’ name still appears Manager hired Chris Gregoire says the farmon ballots for the all-mail elecPORT LUDLOW — James labor shortage has prompted a tion. crisis. Though listed on the ballot by Robinson has been hired as the food and beverage manager for In the Wenatchee Valley, apple district, all City Council memThe Resort At Port Ludlow. growers have posted their helpbers are elected by voters cityHe will wanted signs across the countrywide. work closely In addition, Jim Hallett, side. with chef unopposed candidate for a seat And for the first time in years, Dan Ratigan on the three-member Port of growers in the state have at the resort’s Port Angeles Board of Commislaunched a radio campaign, offerFireside Ressioners, will make a brief preing pay of $120 to $150 a day, but taurant. sentation. there have been few takers, much Robinson Hallett will also be at the to the governor’s regret. has 20 years luncheon meeting in his role as “We’re not getting anybody to in the food 2011 chamber president. The Associated Press take a bite on these jobs, so we and beverage Ballots for the Nov. 8 election industry, most Robinson Gov. Chris Gregoire speaks to reporters in Washington, D.C., don’t have anybody to do these will be mailed to registered vot- recently was jobs,” she said Thursday night. after Thursday’s meeting. Minnesota Gov. Mark Drayton, ers starting Wednesday. left, and Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley are with her. general manager of La Crêpe Turn to Farm/D3 Open to the public, the chamMichel in Albuquerque, N.M. ber’s Monday lunch­eons begin at “James offers a strong mix of noon in the upstairs banquet practical, front-of-the house and room at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 kitchen experience along with N. Lincoln St. Luncheon tickets are $13 and superlative leadership and can be purchased from the meet- strong cellar management skills,” said Debbie Wardrop, ing room cashier. general manager of The Resort The chamber’s final candidates forum will be held Oct. 24 At Port Ludlow. The Associated Press “We don’t know who does it, them back in pens. “He has an intense passion with scheduled appearances by and we don’t want to know who He said mink released into for the art of bringing food, wine Hospital District No. 2 (Olympic SPOKANE — Animal rights does it,” said Vlasek. the wild tend to die fairly and people together.” Medical Center) board candiactivists claim to have released In a statement sent to news quickly, and most of the aniThe Fireside Restaurant dates Jeanne Labrecque, John about 1,000 mink from their media, the unnamed group mals released early Wednesday recently received the Wine Nutter, John Miles and Jack cages at a mink farm near the Spectator magazine’s Award of said it also destroyed breeding morning stayed close to the Slowriver. tiny town of Gifford, located Excellence. records. ranch. along the Columbia River in The restaurant’s wine collec“We think that the callous The North American Animal Energy to be topic northeastern Washington, but tion has expanded over the last Liberation Press Office said ani- disrespect with which the fur the freed animals didn’t scamPORT TOWNSEND — Alterthree years from 30 to 3,500 botindustry treats the animals is mal liberationists were taking per away. native energy sources, particutles representing more than 430 despicable,’” the statement responsibility for the release. Stevens County Sheriff Sgt. larly solar power, and their labels. said. But Jerry Vlasek, a spokesLoren Erdman said the owners applicability locally will be preFor more information, visit A message left at the mink man, said he did not know the of Miller’s Mink Ranch were sented at this week’s Jefferson www.portludlowresort.com or ranch seeking comment from name of the group that able to round up nearly all of County Chamber of Commerce phone 877-805-0868. its owners was not returned. released the mink. the released animals and put luncheon meeting on Monday. Speaking will be Andy Turn to Briefly/D5

T

Gov Gregoire calls state’s farm labor shortage crisis

Activists free mink, but most stick around


D2

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Old boat’s 80 years of rich history AT THE BEGINNING of last week, Ian McLeod of Shelton moored his boat, Ranger 7, in the Port Angeles Boat Haven. The 50-foot-long wooden vessel — a familiar sight at Pleasant Harbor in Brinnon — was built in 1926 by the U.S. Forest Service at Gravina Island Marine Station in Ketchikan, Alaska, and has a rich history. In 1907, President Theodore Roosevelt signed legislation creating two national forests in Alaska, the Chugach and the Tongass, which together have more than 10,000 miles of rugged coastline. To patrol these coastlines and administer the forests, mineral rights and fish and wildlife policies, the U.S. Forest Service had to have boats. The first to be built was the 64-foot Tahn, which was commissioned in 1908 and placed in service in Ketchikan where she was the sole vessel available for patrolling the 25 million acres of the two national forests. In 1913, the Forest Service contracted with the Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton for three boats, each 36 feet long, that were named Rangers 1, 2 and 3. The Forest Service built a boat construction and maintenance facility of its own on Gravina Island in 1916 to support its growing Ranger boat fleet, which by then totaled six vessels. This complex became the headquarters of all Forest Service marine activity in Alaska.

ON THE WATERFRONT By 1931 five Sellars more Ranger vessels, Nos. 6 through 10, were built at the station. The Forest Service boats of “the Tongass navy” or “the Green Serge navy” were called upon to perform virtually endless tasks. As the only transportation to and from remote communities, Ranger boats were depended upon to deliver needed supplies and foodstuffs. During the Depression, the boats were used to tow the scows that housed Civilian Conservation Corps workers. In World War II, the vessels were painted gray and used to transport military personnel to their various posts. In 1961, the Forest Service declared Ranger 7 as surplus property, and she was auctioned off. For the next five years, the owner used her for hunting and fishing in the waters of Southeast Alaska. In 1966, he replaced the original Atlas diesel engine with a Caterpillar 320 and also extended the wheelhouse. Subsequently, the boat was sold, renamed Edna D and taken to Port

David G.

David G. Sellars (3)/for Peninsula Daily News

The Ranger 7, which once worked Alaskan waters for the U.S. Forest Service, sits in Port Angeles Boat Haven last week. Townsend where she was used for log salvage in and around Admiralty Inlet. Following the owner’s death, the boat fell into disrepair and was purchased by Jim and Jill Thompson of Bellingham in 1980. When the Thompsons purchased the boat, they were looking for a vessel that they could live aboard. Their expectation was that after a few short months of refurbishing her, they would be able to call her home. After refurbishing, rebuilding, replacing and refinishing numerous aspects of the boat, their goal of living aboard the renamed Ranger 7 came to fruition — in 1986. For the next 14 years, the Thompsons cruised throughout Puget Sound and Canadian waters. During their stewardship, which lasted until 2000, Ranger 7 was entered in the Victoria Classic Boat Festival a number of times and once won an award as the best restored powerboat and twice for best work boat. Ian has owned Ranger 7 just shy of a year and keeps her moored at Pleasant Harbor Marina. He brought her to Port Angeles for the expertise of Mike Evans, a mechanic who has garnered a stellar reputation on the waterfront for his mastery of all things diesel. Mike diagnosed the balky engine problem as a blown head gasket which he is replacing. Ranger 7 was expected

to be under way by Saturday afternoon for the trip back to Brinnon.

Quick visit

Monday provided bunkers to the Crowley-owned articulated tug and barge, Commitment. On Tuesday Tesoro refueled, an 825-foot tanker that is due in the eastern Siberian port city of Kozmino, Russia, on Oct. 25. Tuesday also saw Tesoro’s refueling barge alongside Overseas Tampa, a 597-foot petroleum products carrier. Tesoro on Friday bunkered Sea Bay, a 597-foot tanker that is flagged in Hong Kong.

n The articulated tug and barge duo consisting of the tug Sound Reliance Bottom washing and tank barge 550-2 For much of last week, moored to the Port of Port Expeditions was on the Angeles’ Terminal 1 North hard at Platypus Marine’s on Thursday afternoon. repair yard at Marine The 121-foot tug and Drive and Cedar Street in her 477-foot companion Port Angeles. barge were dockside for a She is the former Victo- scant 24 hours to allow for ria Express II and was out the offloading of oily water of the water to have her residue. bottom pressure-washed The articulated pair and painted. were replaced at Terminal Confidence is also sit1 by Alaskan Legend, a ting on the hard in Platy941-foot crude oil tanker. pus Marine’s yard with her According to Chandra ________ bow nosed into a satellite “Hollywood” McGoff of building. David G. Sellars is a Port Washington Marine Repair, The 50-foot commercial Angeles resident and former Navy the topside repair company fishing vessel was built by boatswain’s mate who enjoys Sunnfjord Boats of Tacoma on the waterfront, the dou- boats, ships and strolling the ble-hull tanker was sched- waterfront. and currently hails from uled to be at the dock until Items involving boating, port Sitka, Alaska. late Saturday afternoon to activities and the North Olympic Capt. Charlie Crane, Peninsula waterfronts are always have her stern tubes director of sales and marwelcome. Email ­dgsellars@hotmail. inspected. keting for Platypus Marine, com or phone him at 360-808n Tesoro Petroleum on 3202. said Confidence will be in for a couple of weeks to give Verne Braghettia and his crew in the fiberglass department time to install a bulbous bow. The pilot boat Puget Sound was hauled out of the water Tuesday and put back in Friday. According to Capt. Charlie, the 74-foot boat which was built by Nordlund Custom Boat Builders of Tacoma, was in the Commander Building for a few days as personnel applied a new coat of paint to the weather decks. Charlie also said that Robert Shelton and the crew of the boat took the opportu- Confidence, a fishing boat from Alaska, is getting a bulbous bow — for fuel efficiency — nity to do maintenance on fashioned at Platypus Marine in Port Angeles. the Hamilton Jet Drives.

Icebreakers: Cantwell fights Expeditions, formerly Victoria Express II, sits in the Platypus Marine Inc.’s TraveLift slings as she gets new bottom paint.

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Continued from D1 date of 2014, said Cmdr. Christopher O’Neil, a Coast The work will add seven Guard spokesman in Washto 10 years to the ship’s ington, D.C. The Coast Guard, which service. Cantwell argues that is part of the Department of with a fleet containing only Homeland Security, has one currently working ice- asked for $39 million in fisbreaker, the Coast Guard cal 2012 for its polar icecan’t afford to junk the breaking program. Icebreakers use their Polar Sea, as decrepit as it thick steel hulls and overmay be. Constructing a new ice- hanging curved bows to breaker could take a decade bust through ice. The Polar Sea and Polar and as much as $1 billion, money that Congress is Star can easily break 6 feet unlikely to approve any- of ice at 3 knots, and 21 feet or more by backing and time soon. Cantwell said yanking ramming. They carry a crew of 146 the Polar Sea from service would leave the Coast and have room for 32 scienGuard with no backup tists and a year’s supply of food. heavy icebreaker. The Healy, which has “What happens if something happens to the Polar half the horsepower and needs about half the crew, Star?” she said. can break 4½ feet of ice going forward. Polar Sea in imbo The state of American The Coast Guard main- capacity to ply frozen watertains that retiring the Polar ways has long caused Sea, now docked at its base alarm. at Seattle’s Pier 36, would Thanks to warming allow the service to channel polar climates, what was ice resources to reactivating its is now sometimes water. sister ship. Some scientists believe Not incidentally, the that the Northwest PasPolar Sea could be canni- sage, which links the Pacific balized for scarce parts. and Atlantic oceans via The 60,000-horsepower Canada’s Arctic ArchipelPolar Sea was refurbished ago, could become ice-free in 2006, but its engines in the summer in this cenfailed in June 2010. tury. The Coast Guard hasn’t That would open a shipfixed the engines because it ping route that would be would cost $22 million and days or even weeks shorter wouldn’t extend the Polar than traversing the PanSea’s current service-end ama Canal.

U.S. underequipped? Garrett fears the United States is underequipped to navigate that less-ice-covered world. Earlier this year, Sweden decided to keep its loaner icebreaker Oden closer to home in the frozen Baltic. The National Science Foundation scurried to secure a Russian ship for an upcoming restocking voyage to McMurdo in Decem-

ber or January. The Polar Star and Polar Sea have made those trips in past years. “You’re putting yourself at the mercy of other people’s priorities,” Garrett said. Rita Colwell, former director of the National Science Foundation, which runs the McMurdo Station and is the main user of the three Coast Guard icebreakers, agrees. Colwell believes the United States has long ceded dominance in the Arctic to Russia and other nations. Like Garrett, Colwell served on the National Research Council panel that recommended building two replacement icebreakers for the Polar Sea and the Polar Star. She called it an urgent military, economic and scientific issue. But Garrett and Colwell are both resigned to the likelihood that it may be a long while before a modern icebreaker gets built. So it would make sense, they say, to rescue the Polar Sea and squeeze more life out of it. Garrett acknowledges that could be akin to pouring money into fixing a beat-up gas guzzler. Still, he said, absent any foreseeable money for new vessels, that “is the only tool we have in the short term.”

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The result is more traffic — and more potential trouble, said Jeffrey Garrett, a retired Coast Guard rear admiral who has served on all three icebreakers, including as commanding officer of the Polar Sea. For instance, more than 325 vessels crossed the Bering Strait between Russia and Alaska in 2010, a third more than just two years earlier. In 2007, a Canadian cruise ship became the first such vessel to sink in Antarctica after puncturing its hull on submerged ice. Garrett traveled through the Northwest Passage last month. He saw hardly any ice, unusual for this time of the year. Now a Seattle-area maritime consultant, Garrett expects to see more oil drilling, tourism, and scientific and shipping activity in the Arctic.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 16, 2011

D3

Fewer ferry trips, but revenue rises Higher fares responsible for both, report suggests Peninsula Daily News news services

Trish Nelson, right, senior territory manager for Safeco Insurance Co. presents the Safeco Achievement Award to Julie Jeromchek of Callis & Associates Insurance of Port Angeles.

Agent receives award, is promoted Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Julie Jeromchek of Callis & Associates Insurance has received the Safeco Achievement Award. The award recognizes Jeromchek’s “dedication, diligence, integrity, and commitment to excellence and exem-

plary representation of the Safeco Insurance Co.” Jeromchek was also recently promoted from senior personal lines agent to agency personal lines manager. She has worked for the firm since 1985. For more information, phone her at 360-452-2314.

More mobile devices than people in America Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — The machines are taking over. At least that’s the case with cellphones and other mobile devices, which for the first time outnumber human beings in the United States, the wireless trade group CTIA says. Precisely, there are 327.6 million active phones, tablets and laptops on cellular networks, up 9 percent from January. That compares with 315 million women, men, girls, boys and infants populating the country, including Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands, CTIA said last week in its semiannual survey. Bolstering the mobile mania — children are receiving cellphones at ever younger ages while seniors have begun to embrace the simplicity of tablets and smartphones, analysts say. We have become a multigadget-toting society that is

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martphones and basic cellphones make up the majority of mobile devices. always connected to each other and to the Internet. That has prompted consumers to buy up the latest mobile gizmos despite an economic slump that is crimping spending in virtually every other retail category. Despite stubbornly high unemployment, Apple said this week that it took a record 1 million pre-orders in a single day for its latest iPhone. Revenues for the wireless industry grew 6 percent to $164.6 billion in the 12 months ended June 2011, according to CTIA. Tablets became the fastestselling hardware device in history, smack in the middle of an economic slump. It helps that gadgets are

getting cheaper. Amazon unveiled a Kindle Fire tablet for $199, less than half the price of the iPad, the original tablet. Cheaper devices also are hitting the market, including low-priced or free smartphones.

Cable-TV down Consumers now view paid television services as expendable, analysts say. Time Warner Cable lost 130,000 television subscribers nationwide in the second quarter, and Comcast lost 238,000. But consumers won’t give up their mobile-phone contracts. Smartphones and basicfeature phones make up the majority of mobile devices, while tablets make up less than 5 percent. But tablet sales are exploding (up 17 percent from last year), and the devices are expected to supplant laptops in the not-toodistant future.

SEATTLE — The number of customers riding Washington State Ferries increased as much as 22 percent between 2000 and 2008, but ridership — the total number of trips taken by those customers — dropped 13 percent in the same period. But even as passenger and vehicle ridership has declined, revenue has increased because of fare increases — from about $110 million in 2002 to $147 million in 2010. Those findings are included in a report released last week, the Fare Media Study, which studies fares on the ferries. The study was done by the Cedar River Group. The 2011 Legislature directed the Joint Transportation Committee to conduct a study assessing the ferry system’s fare structure and payment methods as the state looks for ways of streamlining and simplifying them. Later this year, recommendations will be made on possible approaches to try to make the fare system more seamless. The new report found the ridership decreased for a variety of reasons — higher fares, service reductions, changing demographics and more people driving

Vermont controversy The issue surfaced in Vermont on Friday, when a group of migrant farmworkers complained that too many police officers in the state were acting like immigration agents. Gregoire said farmers were at a disadvantage because they couldn’t simply move their operations if they needed more workers. “Frankly, Microsoft has the luxury of opening up an office, because of the nature of its business, across the border in British Columbia,” she said. “That doesn’t work to pick cherries or apples.” Wyss, who represents more than 900 farm families in the county, said growers were facing a bleak harvest this year.

A long-range plan for the ferries calls for a reservation system on most runs. Today, riders can make reservations only on the Sidney, B.C., route and the Port Townsend-Coupeville ferry. The first new reservation system will be on the Anacortes-San Juan routes, followed by Seattle-Bainbridge, Seattle-Bremerton and Edmonds-Kingston. Reservations are not planned on the FauntleroySouthworth route or Mukilteo-Clinton. The state has ferries on 10 routes; 56 percent of all ridership is in the Central Puget Sound region. As fares have increased, the study said, the number of frequent-ferry riders has dropped. Fares increased substantially after the motorvehicle excise tax was

Seattle-Bainbridge drop Ridership losses varied by route. The biggest dip was the Seattle-Bainbridge Island ferry, which fell 32 percent between 2000 and 2010. In all, Central Puget Sound dropped by 61 percent. Other report findings: n Fare revenue provided 70 percent of the operating funds for the state ferries in 2010, much higher than other transit agencies. (Seattle Metro is about 25 percent.) n The number of nonfrequent ferry riders is increasing, from 54 percent in 2000 to 61 percent in 2010. n Ridership peaked in 1999 at 26.8 million riders and declined by nearly 16 percent to 22.6 million last year.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The daughters of a Port Angeles tax accountant and civic leader who died last summer will continue her accountancy. Molly Tucker and Melissa Tucker-Riffle will hold an open house on Thursday to commemorate the reopening of the business, formerly Kristin J.

He read an email he’d just received from one of them, who complained about a harvest that was two weeks behind schedule because the farmer was 200 pickers short and it had rained on four of the past seven days. Wyss said all of his growers were struggling to find labor this fall. Wyss said Congress should streamline the procedures to allow more foreign workers to be hired as farm laborers. He called the current process complex and cumbersome. “You have to apply in January to get the worker in June,” he said. With members of Congress at loggerheads over immigration issues, Gregoire said her group told members of the Washington state delegation Thursday that they understand any overhaul wouldn’t pass anytime soon. “What we said to them is, ‘We understand that you’re not going to move on that until the election’s over, but we’re in a crisis now,’” said Gregoire. “‘Surely there’s something you can do that will get us through at least next season, until you are able to deal with it as a comprehensive reform issue.’”

Tucker Accounting, as M&M Accounting Services at 324 W. First St. Kristin J. Tucker, who took over the accountancy of Charles Nickles when he retired in 1983, died of a stroke Sept. 6. In addition to her business, Tucker was active in civic affairs, including stints as president of the Port Angeles Rotary Club and the Port Angeles Downtown Association. “She could always make time to sit down with someone if they just had a question, and thrived on solving tax-related issues with the IRS,” Tucker-Riffle said of her mother. Trucker-Riffle, a Port Ludlow resident, and Molly Tucker, who is moving back

to her native Port Angeles from Edmonds, said they want to run M&M in the same vein. Molly Tucker, a registered tax-preparer with the IRS, has been preparing returns alongside her mother for over 15 years. She and two friends operated Crazy Fish, Baja & Beyond bar and eatery earlier in the decade. Her sister, currently expecting her second child, has a background in property management and also was an assistant for her mother for 10 years. Penny Hordyk, who has worked for Kristin J. Tucker Accounting since 2006, will continue with the firm. The phone number for M&M Accounting is 360452-9749.

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Wyss and other farmgroup leaders said the labor pool had dried up partly because more migrant workers feared they’d be detained as the federal government sought to get tough with employers who were relying on illegal labor. In the first seven months of the year, federal officials reported they’d already initiated nearly twice as many enforcement cases against businesses as they did in all of 2009.

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Continued from D1 are eligible to work in the United States. In Washington state, the (To learn about fruitpicking jobs, click on the governor and farm groups Washington WorkSource want nothing to do with it, farmworker services web- for one simple reason — site, http://tinyurl.com/ about 66,000 of the 92,000 workers who are needed for pdnfarm). While much of the talk seasonal harvests — nearly on Capitol Hill is tough, 72 percent — are “docuwith opponents of illegal ment challenged,” according immigration vowing to seal to the state’s farm groups. That’s a nice way of saythe borders, Gregoire said Congress should focus ing they’re in the U.S. illeinstead on a way to get gally. “With E-Verify, you’re more foreign workers to help with harvesting in looking at a catastrophic Washington state, the thing that could happen to nation’s top producer of agriculture as a whole,” said apples. Jon Wyss, the president of It’s become an increas- the Okanogan County Farm ingly common refrain this Bureau, who accompanied year across the country: Gregoire on her trip. n In Alabama, where a Wyss called Washington new state law is aimed at state “the refrigerator to cracking down on illegal the world,” noting it’s the immigrants, the construc- top producer of at least 13 tion, agriculture and poul- agricultural commodities in try industries all report the United States that are huge shortages of labor. exported around the globe. n A study by the Univer“They go through our sity of Georgia this year ports, and if we don’t have found the state had a short- the labor to produce those age of 5,244 workers in the commodities and get them fields. to the ports, they’re going to n In California, farmers go somewhere else,” he said. have complained of too few Gregoire said it made no workers to pick the avoca- sense to rely on E-Verify dos. alone, “without a solution to n In Texas, growers have the overall problem.” appealed for more employ“All we’re going to do is ees to help pick their penalize employers,” she organic crops and vegeta- said. bles, with little luck. “We’re going to lose jobs, and we don’t have any way Against E-Verify to get those jobs back.” Gregoire was interGregoire returned home Friday after leading a viewed at the Washington, 15-member delegation of D.C., Office of the U.S. Trade farm-group representatives Representative, where she and the farm-group repreto Washington, D.C. They lobbied members of sentatives had met earlier Congress to oppose a with the office’s chief agriRepublican bill that would cultural negotiator. “Now why — in this force employers to use a federal database called recession, as hard-hit as we E-Verify to determine are — would we, the state of whether their employees Washington, support that?”

across the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. The report found changing and simplifying the structure could help boost ridership. Ferries have a complex fare structure, with more than 2,500 different fares. There are discounts for seniors and children, different fares based on the size of vehicles, discounted multi-ride tickets and a summer surcharge.

reduced in 2000. The Legislature made the move after a voterapproved Tim Eyman initiative was invalidated in court. Before 2001, fares increased only four times in the previous 15 years. Fares went up 20 percent in 2001 and 12.5 percent in 2002, and fares have risen every year but one since then. Fares are set to go up 2.5 percent in January. State ferries also have implemented significant service reductions, the report found, including reduced winter hours on most routes and the elimination of some passengerferry service.


D4

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Global arms race focuses on drones U.S. monopoly on robot craft nears an end By Scott Shane

The New York Times

WASHINGTON — At the Zhuhai air show in southeastern China last November, Chinese companies startled some Americans. They unveiled 25 different models of remotely controlled aircraft — and showed video animation of a missile-armed drone taking out an armored vehicle and attacking a U.S. aircraft carrier. The presentation appeared to be more marketing hype than military threat — the event is China’s biggest aviation market, drawing both Chinese and foreign military buyers. But it was stark evidence that the United States’ near monopoly on armed drones was coming to an end, with far-reaching consequences for American security, international law and the future of warfare. Eventually, the United States will face a military adversary or terrorist group armed with drones, military analysts say. But what the short-run hazard experts foresee is not an attack on the United States, which faces no enemies with significant combat drone capabilities, but the political and legal challenges posed when another country follows the American example. The Bush administration, and even more aggressively the Obama administration, embraced an extraordinary principle — that the United States can send this robotic weapon over borders to kill perceived enemies, even American citizens, who are viewed as a threat. “Is this the world we want to live in?” asks Micah Zenko, a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. “Because we’re creating it.” What was a science-fiction sce-

nario not much more than a decade ago has become today’s news. In Iraq and Afghanistan, military drones have become a routine part of the arsenal. In Pakistan, according to American officials, strikes from Predators and Reapers operated by the CIA have killed more than 2,000 militants; the number of civilian casualties is hotly debated. In Yemen last month, an American citizen was, for the first time, the intended target of a drone strike, as Anwar al-Awlaki, the al-Qaida propagandist and plotter, was killed along with a second American, Samir Khan. If China, for instance, sends killer drones into Kazakhstan to hunt minority Uighur Muslims it accuses of plotting terrorism, what will the United States say? What if India uses remotely controlled craft to hit terrorism suspects in Kashmir, or Russia sends drones after militants in the Caucasus?

‘International norm’ American officials who protest will likely find their own example thrown back at them. “The problem is that we’re creating an international norm” — asserting the right to strike preemptively against those we suspect of planning attacks, argues Dennis M. Gormley, a senior research fellow at the University of Pittsburgh and author of Missile Contagion, who has called for tougher export controls on American drone technology. “The copycatting is what I worry about most.” The qualities that have made lethal drones so attractive to the Obama administration for counterterrorism appeal to many countries and, conceivably, to terrorist groups — a capacity for leisurely surveillance and precise strikes, modest cost, and most important, no danger to the operator, who may sit in safety thousands of miles from the target. To date, only the United States, Israel (against Hezbollah in Leba-

The Associated Press

A U.S. Predator unmanned drone armed with a missile stands on the tarmac of Kandahar military airport in Afghanistan. non and Hamas in Gaza) and Britain (in Afghanistan) are known to have used drones for strikes. But American defense analysts count more than 50 countries that have built or bought unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, and the number is rising every month. Most are designed for surveillance, but as the United States has found, adding missiles or bombs is hardly a technical challenge. “The virtue of most UAVs is that they have long wings and you can strap anything to them,” Gormley says.

Cameras, sound equipment That includes video cameras, eavesdropping equipment and munitions, he says. “It’s spreading like wildfire.” So far, the United States has a huge lead in the number and sophistication of unmanned aerial vehicles (about 7,000, by one official’s estimate, mostly unarmed). The Air Force prefers to call them not UAVs but RPAs, or remotely piloted aircraft, in acknowledgment of the human role. Air Force officials should know, since their service is now training more pilots to operate drones than fighters and bombers. Philip Finnegan, director of

corporate analysis for the Teal Group, a company that tracks defense and aerospace markets, says global spending on research and procurement of drones over the next decade is expected to total more than $94 billion, including $9 billion on remotely piloted combat aircraft.

Prime spy target Israel and China are aggressively developing and marketing drones, and Russia, Iran, India, Pakistan and several other countries are not far behind. The Defense Security Service, which protects the Pentagon and its contractors from espionage, warned in a report last year that American drone technology had become a prime target for foreign spies. Last December, a surveillance drone crashed in an El Paso , Texas, neighborhood; it had been launched, it turned out, by the Mexican police across the border. Even Hezbollah, the Lebanese militant group, has deployed drones, an Iranian design capable of carrying munitions and diving into a target, says P. W. Singer of the Brookings Institution, whose 2009 book Wired for War is a primer on robotic combat. Late last month, a 26-year-old man from a Boston suburb was arrested and charged with plotting to load a remotely controlled aircraft with plastic explosives

and crash it into the Pentagon or United States Capitol. His supposed co-conspirators were actually undercover FBI agents. It was unclear that his scheme could have done much damage. But it was an unnerving harbinger, says John Villasenor, professor of electrical engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. He notes that the Army had just announced a $5 million contract for a backpack-size drone called a Switchblade that can carry an explosive payload into a target; such a weapon will not long be beyond the capabilities of a terrorist network. “If they are skimming over rooftops and trees, they will be almost impossible to shoot down,” he maintains. It is easy to scare ourselves by imagining terrorist drones rigged not just to carry bombs but to spew anthrax or scatter radioactive waste. Speculation that al-Qaida might use exotic weapons has so far turned out to be just that. But the technological curve for drones means the threat can no longer be discounted. “I think of where the airplane was at the start of World War I — at first it was unarmed and limited to a handful of countries,” Singer says. “Then it was armed and everywhere. That is the path we’re on.”

Key piece of health law too costly, scrapped Long-term care insurance is eliminated Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration will not implement a new program to provide Americans with long-term care insurance, abandoning a controversial part of the president’s health-care law. The move will not affect other parts of the sweeping overhaul, including preparations for a major expan-

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sion of health-insurance coverage starting in 2014, according to administration officials. But the decision to give up on what once was touted as a key benefit of the law marks a major retreat for the administration — and a vindication for critics who have voiced doubt about promises that Democrats made as they fought to enact the law. The move also struck a blow at a long-cherished goal of consumer advocates and liberal Democrats, especially the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, who championed a government entitlement to help elderly Americans pay for home care or a nursing home. In a letter to senior Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said such a benefit remains critical.

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But she said the program envisioned in the health-care law — the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports, or CLASS — couldn’t have been structured to collect enough in premiums to remain solvent. The law required the administration to certify that CLASS would remain solvent for 75 years before it could be put into place.

No ‘viable path’ “For 19 months,” Sebelius wrote, “experts inside and outside government have examined how [the Department of Health and Human Services, HHS] might implement a financially sustainable, voluntary and self-financed longterm-care insurance program under the law. “But despite our best analytical efforts, I do not see a viable path forward for CLASS implementation.” Republican critics of the program urged even more aggressive action to eliminate the benefit. “Simply setting aside the program for the near term is not enough,” said Sen. John Thune, R-S.D. “Repeal is the only solution to ensuring American

taxpayers will not be on the hook in the future for this disastrous entitlement.” Rep. Frank Pallone Jr., D-N.J., a leading proponent, criticized the administration’s decision and pledged to work to revive the program. “The Obama administration is simply wrong,” he said. “This is too important to give up.” Kennedy, Pallone and many consumer advocates pushed for the long-termcare program amid evidence that few Americans have such insurance. As a result, many elderly Americans often face tens of thousands of dollars in bills for home care or for stays in nursing homes, which are not covered by Medicare, the federal program for the elderly and disabled. Nursing-home stays are covered by the Medicaid program for the poor. To qualify for aid, however, seniors must spend down their resources, only to then become a burden on the government.

Benefit draw Advocates for a new entitlement — including AARP, the Alzheimer’s Association and the National Council on Aging

The Associated Press

ATLANTA — Consumers should be prepared to pay more for peanut butter soon. Another hot, dry summer in peanut-growing states and competition from more profitable crops like cotton have sharply shrunk the U.S. peanut crop this year.

The tight supply means consumers will pay more for yet another grocery staple. A miserable drought and scorching temperatures hit states like Georgia and Texas. U.S. farmers are expected to produce roughly 1.8 million tons of peanuts this year, down nearly 13 percent from last year, accord-

No fix? Administration officials have not proposed an alternative. Nor does it appear likely that lawmakers will fix the program. In her letter to congressional leaders, Sebelius warned that an estimated 15 million elderly Americans will need some kind of long-term care by 2020, with few having insurance. “Without insurance coverage or the personal wealth to pay large sums in their later years,” she wrote, “more Americans with disabilities will rely on Medicaid services once their assets are depleted, putting further strain on state and federal budgets.”

for snacks say they are watching their competitors to determine whether price hikes will be necessary. The J.M. Smucker Co., which makes Jif peanut butter, plans to raise its wholesale prices 30 percent in November. Kraft Foods, which launched its Planters peanut butter in June, is raising prices 40 percent Oct. 31.

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ing to a survey released last week by the Department of Agriculture. Assuming that estimate holds, it would be smallest harvest recorded since 2006. Peanut-butter producers already have plans to hike prices for peanut butter significantly in the next few weeks. Those who package nuts

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and pushing premiums even higher. Administration officials predicted such a scenario. “This imbalance . . . would cause the program to quickly collapse,” Kathy Greenlee, the program administrator, concluded in a memo to Sebelius. Greenlee predicted premiums for the program could have cost $391 a month, or even as much as $3,000 a month, for a benefit that paid only about $50 a day.

Prepare to shell out more for peanut butter

Port Angeles Hardwood LLC

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— argued that could be avoided if workers paid a portion of their paycheck into a long-term-care insurance program, whose benefits they could draw on when they got old. As Democrats crafted the health-care measure, the program had a strong selling point. Early budgetary projections from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated that because workers could start paying into the CLASS program for five years before benefits became available, it would show a positive balance for years, helping to offset the overall cost of the health-care law. That was welcome news to Democrats, who were struggling to find ways to show the law wouldn’t widen the deficit. Yet, there were early warnings that the CLASS program would not be sustainable over the long run. Because the program is voluntary, younger, healthier workers would be less likely to sign up than older, sicker ones. That could create a destructive cycle in which premiums would have to rise to pay out higher benefits, in turn driving away even more healthy workers


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 16, 2011

D5

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1

Macias hired PORT ANGELES — Jim Macias has been hired as a flight instructor for Rite Bros. Aviation. Macias has been flying for five years and taught flying for a year in the Tri-Cities where he Macias helped train a dozen new pilots. Rite Bros. Aviation is owned by Jeff Well and Theresa Powell and is located at 1406 Fairchild International Airport. The business is open every day. For more information, phone Rite Bros. at 360452-6226.

Hearing rally Robert Keesee and Gwen Samsing of Mountain View Hearing Aid Centers Inc. attended Keesee training on Starkey hearing aids and hearing protection products at the recent Starkey Hearing Alliance Rally in Eden Prairie, Minn. Mountain View has two offices — 625 N. Fifth Ave, Suite 3, in Sequim, 360-681Samsing 4481, and in Port Angeles at 504 E. Eighth St., Suite F, 360-452-1188.

Beanery now open PORT ANGELES — The Beanery is now open and serving espresso, snacks and beverages in downtown Port Angeles at 116 E. Front St. while remodeling continues next door. The former mobile espresso truck has found a home in the former Elwha Theatre building, next to the future site of Captain T’s apparel shop. From now until Thanksgiving, The Beanery’s hours are 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday. The adjoining storefront is still undergoing renovation and, when complete, will be the new site of Captain T’s, which is currently located on Railroad Avenue. When work is complete, The Beanery will expand its menu and include a gift shop featuring items from the Pacific Northwest.

KONP talk guests

DO YOU HAVE a business expansion planned, staffing change or a new product line? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is of high resolution. Please note: We cannot publish items by private businesses soliciting business — e.g., merchandise sales, paid seminars, openings in preschools or other paid educational or training programs. These need to be addressed as paid advertisements. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

Thursday and Friday, depending where on the globe. The world’s 70 million BlackBerry users were affected. Research In Motion Ltd.’s two CEOs apologized profusely for the company that makes the phones. In the April-to-June period, 19 percent of the smartphones sold in the world were BlackBerrys, while a nearly equal number, 18 percent, were from a variety of brands that use Google Inc.’s Android software, according to research firm Gartner Inc.

autos, clothing and furniture last month to boost retail sales 1.1 percent, the Commerce Department said Friday. It was the largest gain in seven months. Auto sales rose 3.6 percent to drive the overall increase. Excluding that category, sales gained a solid 0.6 percent.

Gas price increase?

PORT ANGELES — As the temperature has fallen, so too has the price of gasoline on the North Olympic Peninsula. The average price for regular was $3.77 a gallon on Saturday morning, Defict $1.3 trillion down two cents from the Public records fine WASHINGTON — The previous weekend, a Peningovernment ran a $1.3 tril- sula Daily News survey OLYMPIA — A Thurlion deficit for the budget showed. ston County judge has year that ended last month But that price drop is ordered the Olympia — the third straight year it expected to slow or reverse School District to pay has operated more than $1 in the coming months. $14,000 for withholding a trillion in the red. Indeed, at some stations public record. The 2011 budget deficit in Port Angeles, a gallon of Superior Court Judge was the second highest on regular had zoomed up to Paula Casey ruled in record. It’s slightly ahead $3.86 by Saturday night. August that the district of the previous budget “Increased demand for violated the Washington year’s $1.29 trillion deficit gasoline and oil has helped Public Records Act by failing to disclose a draft letter but below the $1.41 trillion to stall out recent price imbalance record in 2009. drops at the pump,” accordto an attorney during litiA decade ago, the goving to the AAA auto club. gation on behalf of the famernment was running sur“In addition to demand, ily of a 6-year-old girl who pluses and trillion-dollar positive jobs numbers in was allegedly molested by eninsula aily ews deficits seemed unimagina- the U.S., optimism about a school bus driver. ble. But those deficits now correcting debt issues in Casey ordered the disloom over tense negotiaEurope and a weaker U.S. trict to pay the money to LeClerc, executive director managers — Gerad Nucci tions in Washington. dollar have all helped to Tacoma lawyer Darrell in Sequim, John Locke in of Park View Villas retireLawmakers are under bring a slow halt to dropCochran. He is seeking Port Angeles and Kelly ment complex. ping prices. $2.25 million from the dis- pressure to agree by Liske in Port Townsend — In a separate segment, Thanksgiving on where “As economies do better, trict for the girl’s family. will join Bowman at their Becca Korby, executive or appear to do better, that they can cut $1.2 trillion District spokesman branches. director of Healthy Famitypically drives up oil and over the next decade. Ryan Betz said Thursday The seminars will be lies, and Ann Simpson of gas prices as investors buy If they cannot, autothat the district mistakenly held at 6 p.m. and last the Forks Abuse Program. more of these commodities matic cuts to Medicare, did not include the draft about 90 minutes. ■  Thursday: Clallam letter among the 544 pages defense spending and other in anticipation of increasThey are free and County commissioners. critical areas of the budget ing demand.” originally provided to ■  Friday: Max Mania, include a light meal and Despite the recent price would go into effect in JanCochran after he filed a beverage. representing Port Angeles declines, the price of gasouary 2013. lawsuit. The schedule: Community Players. line is still up sharply from ■ Monday — Sequim In a second segment, G-20 tiff over euro last year, 72 cents per galPrison changes Avenue branch, 333 N. Nicole Persun, 17-year-old lon year-over-year. PARIS (AP) — Finance EVERETT — The state Sequim Ave. Phone 360published author. In New York, benchchiefs from the Group of 20 683-3886 for more informa- Department of Labor and In the final segment, a rich and developing nations mark crude rose $2.57, or Industries has given the tion. discussion about a Civil 3.1 percent, on Friday to Department of Corrections wrangled Friday over ■ Wednesday — Port War exhibition. end at $86.80 per barrel in whether the eurozone a 30-day extension to finish Angeles Eastside branch, New York. should pick up the whole making changes to fix 1603 E. First St. Phone Offerings expand Brent crude, which is bill for its escalating debt safety problems exposed 360-417-3204. used to price oil from forPORT ANGELES — crisis, or whether the rest ■ Wednesday, Oct. 26 after the death of correceign countries, rose $3.57, The UPS Store, 136 E. of the world should help tions officer Jayme Biendl — Port Townsend Castle or 3.2 percent, to finish at Eighth St., is expanding last January at the Monroe out more. Hill branch, 1321 Sims digital print services for its The International Mon- $114.68 in London. Reformatory. Way. Phone 360-385-1416. customers. Spokesman Hector Cas- etary Fund — the world’s Staff members recently lender of last resort for Nonferrous metals tro said the changes Hired by Serenity completed a training procash-strapped countries — involve how prisons docuNEW YORK — Spot nonferrous PORT ANGELES — gram by the Graphic Arts ment the movement of cor- has until now funded about metal prices Friday. Linda Kreaman has been and Communications a third of the cost of the Aluminum - $0.9876 per lb., rectional officers and hired as the new director of inmates. Department at California London Metal Exch. bailouts of Greece, Ireland Copper - $3.3235 Cathode full Homeless Youth Services, State Polytechnic UniverThe Department of Cor- and Portugal. the Serenity House of Clal- rections was fined $20,000 sity in San Luis Obispo But while some, includ- plate, LME. Copper - $3.4050 N.Y. Merc which is being rolled out to lam County division head- for violations related to ing the United States, are spot Fri. quartered at the Dream the 4,500-unit UPS Store arguing that Europe has Biendl’s slaying. Inmate Lead - $1995.50 metric ton, Center, 535 E. First St. network nationwide. more than enough money Byron Scherf is charged London Metal Exch. “KreaSteve Deutermann, part to spend its way out of the with aggravated murder Zinc - $0.8568 per lb., London man’s 20 owner of the Port Angeles crisis, others are pushing and could face the death Metal Exch. years of store and a UPS Store for more support as the Gold - $1678.00 Handy & Harpenalty if convicted. experience franchise consultant for currency union’s debt trou- man (only daily quote). in the local western Washington and bles risk dragging the Gold - $1681.80 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Oregon, attended the train- social serworld economy back into Nation/World Silver - $31.870 Handy & Harvices coming in San Luis Obispo. recession. man (only daily quote). munity give Brittainy Girr, the Silver - $32.140 troy oz., N.Y. BlackBerry hurt? Autos fuel retailing her a solid store’s lead print services Kreaman Merc spot Fri. associate, was trained by a foundation NEW YORK — The lonWASHINGTON — U.S. Platinum - $1558.00 troy oz., for continuUPS Store franchise congest BlackBerry outage consumers stepped up their N.Y. (contract). ing the Dream Center and worldwide in many years sultant. spending on retail goods in Platinum - $1549.50 troy oz., The Port Angeles store’s Youth Services’ successful has left customers outN.Y. Merc spot Fri. September, a hopeful sign growth,” said Serenity new capabilities include raged, threatening to cost for the sluggish economy. Peninsula Daily News House Deputy Director digital editing, Adobe softthe granddaddy of all They spent more on and The Associated Press ware for print management Shirley Anderson. smartphones more busiIn her previous position ness when it’s already and design and new equipwith Peninsula Community struggling to keep up in a ment. Mental Health Center, The store now offers crowded marketplace. products for small business Kreaman collaborated with The three-day blackout the Dream Center, local customers including marinterrupted email and school districts and county Internet services for tens of keting flyers, newsletters, juvenile services. custom design notepads, millions of frustrated users Kreaman succeeds NCR forms, business cards before service was restored Alona Koehler. who and calendars. accepted a position with The UPS Store in Port Renton-based Help Point. Angeles has been a locally For more information, owned business since 1996. HEARTH & HOME phone the Dream Center at For more information, 257151 Highway 101 • 452-3366 phone the store at 360-452- 360-565-5048. A sprightly little market 6602 or go to its website, unlike any you’ve seen www.theupsstorelocal. Gregoire to China com/2889. OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Ten Reasons Gregoire is traveling to First Fed seminars China and Japan this to Shop at PORT ANGELES — In week. McPhee’s Grocery partnership with the Gregoire said that growEntrepreneur Institute and ing the U.S. economy will 1. Our diet tea comes in pretty the Business Incubator@ little green boxes. $2.99 require close coordination or ur Lincoln Center, First Fed2. Our Wonder Bread comes in a with international parteral will host a business pretty white bag-thing. $2.09 ners. eFiciency ree after-hours seminar, “The 5 3. Our potatoes come in a skin She will first attend a C’s of Commercial Credit,” kind-of-thing. urvey elebration forum to discuss economic at three branch locations 4. Our Pepsi Cola comes in a opportunities with provinthis month. Sequim HealtH & reHabilitation can whatchamacallit. 59¢ The first session is Mon- cial leaders in China. 650 WeSt Hemlock Street 5. Our plantain chips ($2.99) are The forum will also day. lightly salted, but our kosher Sequim, Wa include the governors of Mark Bowman, vice salt ($3.19) isn’t. It’s heavily Georgia, Hawaii, North president and senior loan salted. WeDneSDay, october 26, 2011 officer for the North Olym- Carolina, Guam and the 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm 6. We sell different flours, but Northern Mariana Islands. pic Peninsula region of don’t sell different flowers. Gary Locke, WashingEnterprise Cascadia, will reFreSHmentS anD Door prizeS 7. Our peanut butter selection present the seminars. ton’s former governor and runs the full gamut from A to B. pleaSe rSvp 360.582.2400 Enterprise Cascadia now U.S. ambassador to 8. Is a special day coming up by tHurSDay, october 22, 2011 promotes conservationChina, will host a reception for a loved one? Get her a based development in for the governors. necklace! (35¢) Ages 4 and coastal communities in Gregoire said she will Older. Candy Oregon and Washington then travel to Japan for 9. We sell candy bars–from and is headquartered in meetings with manufacturAbba-Zabas to Zagnuts. 90¢ the Pacific County town of ers to encourage them to 10. Buying cookies here exhibits Ilwaco. expand their presence in maturity. Buying cookies Bowman also spent elsewhere exposes a sugar Washington. many years as a small dependency and possibly a business owner in the tourcharacter flaw. Microscope-Skype ism industry in Port AngeREDMOND, Wash. — les. 717 RACE ST. Internet video chat service Three First Federal …helping people live better PORT ANGELES Skype is now officially a commercial relationship

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PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio at 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and www.konp.com on the Internet outside the Port Angeles area. Station manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Monday through Thursday segments, McGlasson and Karen Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. This week’s scheduled lineup: ■  Monday: Retired Port Angeles teacher Bill Ellis on his proposal for a pledge from politicans. In the second segment, singer Kim Trenerry discusses an upcoming multimedia event. In the final segment, 2011 Clallam County Prayer Breakfast speaker Ed Tandy McGlasson,a retired professional football player who now operates a California-based ministry. ■  Tuesday: Port Angeles School District Position 5 board candidates Steve Baxter and Arlene Wheeler are scheduled. In a separate segment, Olympic Medical Center’s Hospital District No. 2, District 3, Position 2 board candidates John Miles and Jack Slowriver are scheduled. ■  Wednesday: John

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part of Microsoft. The two companies joined forces late Thursday when Microsoft Corp. completed its $8.5 billion purchase of Skype. The closing came five months after Microsoft announced the deal. Microsoft is counting on Skype to help it catch up in some the hottest markets in technology and media. Those areas include online socializing, mobile phones and digital video. Skype’s roughly 170 million users made 207 billion minutes of voice and video calls last year — almost 400,000 years’ worth.


D6

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 16, 2011

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Choose Well. Choose Wave. 1-866-WAVE-123 | WaveBroadband.com *Offers expire 11/30/11. Offers are good for new internet customers, or former customers inactive for at least 60 days or more and in good standing. Equipment fees, franchise fees, taxes and other fees apply. $34.95/mo. High Speed 10 offer is good for the first 12 full months of service; Free Wireless Home Networking service offer is good for the first 3 full months of service. High Speed 10 Internet regularly $44.95/mo. with qualifying cable or phone service; $54.95/mo. without, and features 10 Mbps downstream / 1 Mbps upstream. All levels of internet service include up to 100 GB of data transfer usage a calendar month at no additional charge. High Speed 18 and High Speed 50 include an additional 200 GB, for a total of 300 GB. Data transfer usage includes both downstream/download and upstream/upload activity. Data transfer usage beyond the included allotment in a month is subject to additional charges. Speed comparison based on 1.5 Mbps DSL service. Minimum computer system requirements apply. Speed is not guaranteed and is affected by user’s computer and site user accesses. Wireless Home Networking regularly $5/mo. $3/mo. multimedia modem rental fee applies. Installation is $29.95, and is good for 1 computer with standard cable modem or up to 3 computers with Wireless Home Networking, where available. Special wiring is extra. Not available in all areas. Prices subject to change. Not valid with other offers. Call for details. Other restrictions may apply. 1A5136137


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

SECLUDED

OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE

NEAT AS A PIN

Paul Beck

Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157 chuck@portangelesrealty.com www.portangelesrealty.com

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891

PILI’S BEST BUY

PRICED RIGHT

MOUNTAIN & STRAIT VIEW

UPTOWN REALTY PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

Built 1990, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,780 SF. 2-car attached garage. Corner private lot .50 acres landscaped, decks and fenced yard. Heat pump. Irrigation water available. ML#261851/271598 $249,900

UPTOWN REALTY DAN BLEVINS Office: (360) 417-2805 Cell: (360) 808-3097 www.DanBlevins.com

I SPEAK LAVENDER

TOWN & COUNTRY

MOVE IN READY

1A407720

1A407735

You’ll love the affordable price of this 1,504 SF mfg. home in Port Angeles. 3 BR/2 BA, dining room, casual living room, master suite with whirlpool tub for bubble baths, open kitchen w/breakfast area, appliances included. ML#262049 $139,000 www.jeanirvine.com

And Priced Right! Freshly painted inside, carpets have just been cleaned. Newer appliances and low maintenance yard care. $39,900 ML#261090/226536

Nearly the last view lot on W. 4th Street in PA. Spectacular Strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Ready to build on - Easy access - utilities in at street or alley. Located in a fine established area - Across from Crown Park - Close to walking trails. $79,950 ML#261167 Call JEAN

Find us on Facebook.com/alwayscalljace

BARGAIN HUNTER?

1A407725

1A407743

Own a piece of history with stunning views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca & Mt. Baker! The historic 100 year old Bell House of Cedarbrook Herb & Lavender Farm/Gift Shop, adjoining parking lots, Café & Gift shop can be yours! Plenty of parking & easy hwy access. ML#260490 Only $699,500 Always Call JACE for Land & Homes on Land!

1.70 acres of this gated beauty. 3 BR/2.5 BA, double garage and outside wood storage. Kitchen, dining room & great room have hardwood floors. Sit on the deck on a quiet evening and enjoy the landscape and unobstructed mountain view. $369,900 ML#262042

UPTOWN REALTY PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

670-9418 teamtopper@olypen.com

BEAUTIFUL CITY LOT

1A407718

This property sits on an oversized lot with a fully fenced yard. Close to bus routes, schools and shopping. Property is two blocks away from the public library. Home has a chimney for a propane stove, built-in cabinets in living room and hardwood floors. Needs some TLC and elbow grease. Roof looks relatively new, a one car garage with room for a workbench. ML#261770 $109,900 Call DAN @360-808-3097

COUNTRY GARDEN

1A407732

1A407722

1A407719

This home has it all, big space, big yard, large deck. Deck and back porch have just been rebuilt. Remodeled 2008. Close to the high school, college, several churches. Albertsons and bus line. But on a quiet street. $130,000 ML#261925 Call Pili for more information.

Snuggle in to this cute cabin in the City limits with a fenced yard, lots of garden space, fruit trees and berries. Lots of insulation and newer windows will keep you cozy. Wood stove heats the entire house & Seller will leave and abundance of wood! ML#261899 Only $89,000 JEANINE SELLS HOMES & LAND!

Chuck Turner

Linda Ulin

(360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

1A407742

WRE/Sequim - East

WRE/Port Angeles

1A407714

3 BR/1.75 BA, family room with fireplace on a quiet cul-de-sac. Great starter home, or rental property. Just listed at $169,000! ML#262021

Recently updated with laminate floors in living room, dining room & kitchen. 3 BR/2 BA, 2 fireplaces. Interior doors upgraded. Home features vinyl siding, metal roof, Trex decking, solar screens on living room windows (west side of home), new metal garage doors & low maintenance. ML#261757 $199,900 Call LINDA.

E1

‘C’ IS FOR CUTIE

1A407744

1A407734

High Bluff Waterfront. Great privacy and unobstructed views of the Strait. 330 ft. of frontage of high bank. Water share available through Crescent Water Association. ML#261753 $144,900

Sunday, October 16, 2011

WRE/Sequim - East

Eileen Schmitz

1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

Jennifer Felton

(360) 460-9513 800-786-1456 feltys@olypen.com

CUSTOM WATERFRONT HOME Let ME Entertain You

WATER VIEWS & MORE

NEW LISTING

Magnificent 5,562 SF, 3 BR/3.5 BA home with panoramic views of the Strait. Granite countertops, hardwood floors and many upgrades. Additional Dwelling Unit is a site built, 1 BR w/ kitchen, propane fireplace and sunroom. ML#261733/263317 $899,000

WRE/Port Ludlow UPTOWN REALTY DAVID A. RAMEY Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

Laura Halady

(360) 437-1011 Direct: (360) 301-2929 laura@olypen.com

NEW LISTING

TOWN & COUNTRY

Roland Miller (360) 461-4116 rolandmiller@olypen.com

SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW

CEDARS DUNGENESS HOME

1A407746

1A407733

1A407721

Private setting. 1-story, 3 BR/2 BA, built in 1989, 2-car attached garage, 0.26 acre in the city. Master has a bath and walk-in closet. This property abuts a city greenbelt and NO street views! The entire property is fenced - ready for kids and/or pets. Sellers are offering a $3000 flooring allowance to the buyers at closing. ML#262062 $159,900

• Architecturally Designed on 8th Tee • Bamboo Floors & Clean Fir Woodwork • Spacious Rooms & High Ceilings • Enjoy Golf Course & Mt. Views • Gardener’s Delight ML#262053/284048 $259,000

from this elegant home near the water. Beautiful hardwood floors and a gourmet kitchen with custom cabinetry and granite counters. New metal roof, custom oak and willow built-in closet systems, garage/workshop and a brand new bathroom since 2006. This home is also a gardener’s delight. $324,900 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.COM

Team Thomsen Realtors® WRE/SunLand UPTOWN REALTY

MARC THOMSEN, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

TEAM SCHMIDT 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim Irene: 460-4040 Mike: 460-0331 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland teamschmidt@olypen.com

1A407741

This Brick home on 4+ acres is an Entertainers dream. Covered BBQ, Kids Play Equipment, Volley ball field, Estate like grounds. Pond, Huge living room, formal dining, tons of storage, huge shop garage, additional garage. You really don’t want to miss this, make an appt. today. Only $399,000 ML#261590

1A407731

1A407723

1A407740

Spectacular views! Beautiful Sunrises! Main level living w/lower level guest rooms, 3 BR/2.5 BA, large deck w/hot tub. Double garage and garden shed. ML#207801 $455,000

UPTOWN REALTY Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

WRE/Port Angeles

Jean Ryker Managing Broker 360-477-0950 rykerproperties@olypen.com

360.565.2020 mrsjace@jacerealestate.com

www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.COM

9,600 + square foot lot priced below tax assessed value! Mature trees, nice neighborhood and next door to golf course. City utilities to lot. Call Kimi 360-461-9788 for location and a copy of the plat map. ML#261892 Only $69,900.


E2

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

51

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

1935 bungalow that was extensively remodeled in 1995. At that time, the remodel included new wiring, roof, septic, kitchen cabinets, interior doors, sheetrock, windows, insulation and more. Currently rented under market at $600 a month. $124,900 ML261709/261383 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

51

Homes

A PANORAMIC WATER, ISLAND & MOUNTAIN VIEW HOME overlooks P.A., Strait, Vancouver Island and Victoria. Borders Nat’l Park. Great home. Photos at: bitly.com/PAhome FSBO. $238,000. 360-452-8770 BARGAIN HUNTER? You’ll love the affordable price of this 1,504 sf manufactured home in Port Angeles. Has 3 Br., 2 bath, dining room, casual living room, master suite with whirlpool tub for bubble baths, open kitchen with breakfast area, appliances included. $139,000. ML262049. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

Homes

‘C’ IS FOR CUTIE Snuggle in to this cute cabin in the City limits with a fenced yard, lots of garden space, fruit trees and berries. Lots of insulation and newer windows will keep you cozy. Wood stove heats the entire house and seller will leave an abundance of wood! $89,000. ML261899. Jeanine Cardiff 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company CEDARS AT DUNGENESS HOME Architecturally designed on the 8th tee, bamboo floors and clear fir wood work, spacious rooms and high ceilings. Enjoy golf course and mtn views. Gardener’s delight. $259,000 ML234876/261231 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

COMMERCIAL NEIGHBORHOOD ZONING This home on 8th Street has a new roof, gutters and the exterior has been freshly painted. There is a foyer that has a door into one Br./office and a separate door into the living room. The kitchen has lots of built-ins plus a large walk-in pantry. You can live and work from this charming home located at 212 W. 8th Street. $115,000 ML261731/226536 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. COUNTRY GARDEN 1.70 acre of this gated beauty. 3 Br., 2 ? bath, double garage and outside wood storage. Kitchen, dining room and great room have hardwood floors. Sit on the deck on a quiet evening and enjoy the landscape and unobstructed mountain view. $369,900. ML262042. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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Homes

Country Living Ranch Home On Acreage For Sale By Owner. Beautiful end of the road privacy on 2.5 acres with optional adjacent parcels available up to 20 acres. 3 spacious bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1996 custom built 1825 sf home. $295,000 Jerry 360460-2960. COUNTRY LIVING, CITY CONVENIENCE Home is a 2 Br., 2 bath, 2005 model in excellent shape situated on a beautiful country acre parcel. The location? You can have it both ways being perfectly positioned between Sequim and Port Angeles – it’s just a short drive either way. You won’t find many newer homes on an acre for this price! Check it out and call it home. $174,000. ML252040. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Homes

CUSTOM DESIGN MTN VIEW HOME Single level 2,590 sf on 2 acres. Estate’s water system and private well for landscaping. Southern exposure backyard, fruit trees and garden space. Family/game room (additional entry and kitchenette). 2 car garage, large shop and covered RV parking. $429,000 ML252372/261535 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND CUSTOM WATERFRONT HOME Spectacular views! Beautiful sunrises! Main level living with lower level guest rooms, 3 Br., 2.5 baths, large deck with hot tub. Double garage and garden shed. $455,000. ML270801 Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

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Homes

DEAD SOLID PERFECT Enjoy hiking trails, clubhouse and golf. 3 Br., 2.5 bath, new carpets, vinyl floors, kitchen/bath countertops and interior paint. Bonus room with fireplace, 2 car attached garage. Chain-link backyard, fruit trees, landscaped yards and more. $199,500. ML261300 Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LET ME ENTERTAIN YOU This brick home on 4+ acres is an entertainer’s dream. Covered barbecue, kid’s play equipment, volley ball field, estate-like grounds, pond, huge living room, formal dining, tons of storage, huge shop garage, additional garage. You really don’t want to miss this, make an appt today. $399,000. ML261590. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

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51

Homes

I SPEAK LAVENDER! Own a piece of history with stunning views of the Straits of Juan de Fuca and Mt. Baker! The historic 100 year old Bell House of Cedarbrook Herb and Lavender Farm/Gift Shop, adjoining parking lots, cafe and gift shop can be yours! Plenty of parking and easy hwy access. $699,500. ML260490. Eileen Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company LOTS OF POSSIBLE USES 2,448 sf plus 676 sf of garage on 1.42 acres with highway frontage. 2 water and power meters. Great zoning. $225,000 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. MOUNTAIN AND STRAIT VIEWS Built in 1990. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,780 sf. 2 car attached garage. corner private lot. .50 acres landscaped, decks, and fenced yard. Heat pump. Irrigation water available. $249,900. ML261851/271598 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Homes

MOUNTAIN AND STRAIT VIEWS Built in 1990. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,780 SF. 2 car attached garage. Corner private lot .50 acres landscaped, decks, and fenced yard, heat pump. Irrigation water available $249,900 ML261851/271598 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY NEW LISTING Private setting. 1 story, 3 Br., 2 bath, built in 1989, 2 car attached garage, 0.26 acre in the city. Master has a bath and walk-in closet. This property abuts a city greenbelt and no street views! The entire property is fenced – ready for kids and/or pets. Sellers are offering a $3,000 flooring allowance to the buyers at closing. $159,900. ML262062. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

SUNDAY • 1 - 3 PM

Sunday, October 16, 2011

1A407715

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. New carpet. Bathrooms newly remodeled with tile shower and granite countertops. Peek-a-boo water view and mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 27x20 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. $199,000. 360-460-7503

Compose your Classified Ad on

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G BI

S NU O B

12:00 to 1:30 pm

OM RO

1025 W. 5th St., Port Angeles WATER VIEW! This home is a delight! Loads of charm with beautiful wood floors, tile, fresh paint & lots of other updates. Wonderful family home; or lower level has separate entrance, second kitchen... perfect for Mother-in-law unit. Nice deck to enjoy BBQ & water view. ML#261270 A GREAT VALUE AT

1:00 to 3:00 pm Y RR E CH

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Kathy Love 602 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles

1115 E. 8th St., Port Angeles

211 W. 6th St., Port Angeles

CLASSIC 4 BR/3.5 BA TUDOR Very traditional floor plan with formal dining, separate kitchen and living room, close, convenient location, some SW and Mtn. views, full basement and a very big, finished bonus room with full bath in the garage. Insulation and DSL line added. Only $195,000 MLS#261260 JOYCE will greet you.

PANORAMIC UNOBSTRUCTED views of the city, salt water, WONDERFUL CRAFTSMAN STYLE Located in desirable Cherry

Directions: S. on Race St., W. on Lauridsen Blvd.

Directions: From Front/First Streets, S. on Chambers, E. on 8th.

harbor, Ediz Hook, shipping lanes, Coast Guard Base, Victoria & beyond! Newly remodeled, 4 BR/2 BA, 2,280 SF beauty. The view can be seen from almost every room. Central location: Walk/bike ride to downtown, medical facilities, groceries, harbor, etc. DelGuzzi built home. Priced to sell at only $279,000 MLS#261924

Hill neighborhood. You will love the sunroom/porch as you step inside this home. It has tiled floor and windows that make this home very light and bright. Spacious living rm has gorgeous oak flooring with wood inlaid in great shape. Living rm has fireplace, formal dining, newer kitchen, breakfast room. Gorgeous Mt. view from master suite. This home has been well loved and cared for. Come and See. $239,500 MLS#260971

Directions: S. on Lincoln, R. on 6th to sign.

Office: 452-3333 1-800-453-9157 klove@olypen.com www.portangelesrealty.com

DEAD SOLID PERFECT

Team Thomsen Realtors®

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

1:00 to 2:30 pm

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

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Steve Landvik

Office: (360) 417-2790 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 Email: stevel@olypen.com

Enjoy hiking trails, clubhouse & golf. 3 BR/2.5 BA, new carpets, vinyl floors, kitchen/BA countertops & interior paint. Bonus room w/ fireplace, 2-car attached garage. Chain-link backyard, fruit trees, landscaped yards & more. Call CHUCK ML#261300 $199,500

2:00 to 3:30 pm

NG TI S LI

WRE/Sequim - East

Chuck Murphy 421 Ahlvers, Port Angeles

THIS HO M E HAS IT ALL, big space, big yard, large deck. Deck and back porch have just been rebuilt. Remodeled 2008. Close to the high school, college, several churches, Albertsons and bus line, but on a quiet street. $130,000 MLS#261925 Directions: S on Peabody, L. on Ahlvers, house on the left.

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

Marc Thomsen, ABR, Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

1A407724

Associate Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

(360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

608 W. 9th St., Port Angeles

Corner of “B” and 5th, Port Angeles

LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL SHOP AND SWEET HOME? Walk through this beautifully updated 2BR

ENDLESS UNOBSTRUCTED WATER, MT & CITY VIEWS! New gourmet kitchen, quartz, cherry, gas.

CLASSIC CRAFTSMAN, across new Trex-like deck with a hot tub in a privately fenced and beautifully landscaped backyard to a big beautiful shop and a 2-car garage. $163,800 MLS# JOYCE will greet you.

Large family rm with a wall of energy efficient windows overlooking the views. The master suite has everything you could want including more spectacular views. Energy efficient and well maintained. MLS#260833 ONLY $360,000

Directions: S. on Race, W. on 8th, across 1st bridge, S. on Pine or Cedar, W. on 9th.

Directions: West 8th, R. on “B”.

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SUNDAY NOON - 2 PM

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DAPHNE ESHOM

Office: 360-417-2791 Email: Daph@olypen.com

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PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

D CE U D RE

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

E IC PR

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

Associate Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

12:00 to 1:30 pm M UI Q SE

Marc Thomsen, ABR, Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

1A407749

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

731 W. Hammond St., Sequim BEAUTIFUL 8 YR. OLD 3 BR/2 BA mfg. home on its own city lot in Sequim. Features include oak flooring in the entry, living and dining areas. Propane fireplace in the living room with Cherry wood façade, large kitchen w/plenty of cabinets, attached 2-car garage, private deck with awning, fenced yard w/plenty of room to park your RV. $219,000 MLS#261491 DIRECTIONS: W. Washington St. to S. 7th Ave. to W. Hammond. R. on W. Hammond and follow to #731.

2:00 to 3:30 pm IM QU E S

TOM BLORE

tom@sequim.com

And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

82 Draper Valley Rd., Port Angeles

10 Danielle Crt., Sequim

612 N. 7th Ave., Sequim

GORGEOUS OLYMPIC MT. VIEW! Great family home w/4 BR/2.5 BA. Open stairway, huge living, formal dining, large kitchen, family room w/brick fireplace. Located on 2.5 acres. Included is a large shop/ barn. Draper Valley Rd. has a private feeling and is super close in to Port Angeles. Priced at $279,500 MLS#260403 Vivian will greet you.

RETIREMENT MADE EASY! Lovely remodeled 3 BR/2 BA home w/energy efficient windows, heat pump, new kitchen cabinets, cooktop, flooring. Also, skylights & large windows for natural lighting, family rm & living rm, wonderful covered patio & 2car garage. In Parkwood next to a greenbelt for privacy. $69,000 MLS#261267

Directions: From Hwy 101, S. on Monroe, L. on Draper Rd., L. on Draper Valley Rd.

2 BR PLUS DEN/OFFICE - BUILT IN 1999 2 BA, vaulted ceilings, 1-car attached garage. Easy walk to groceries, medical facilities, pharmacy, busline, church, restaurants and shopping. Covered south-facing patio in low-maintenance yard. SELLER FINANCING AVAILABLE - STOP BY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Priced to sell at $58,000 with cash or conventional. MLS#261420

Directions: Hwy 101 to Parkwood, R. on Marjory, L. on Danielle Crt. Directions: In Sequim, N. on 7th Avenue to #612.

VIVIAN LANDVIK, GRI

Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

Team Thomsen Realtors®

Team Thomsen Realtors®

Marc Thomsen, ABR, Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Marc Thomsen, ABR, Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

Managing: Residential, Furnished, Commercial and Storage Property Management is NOT our sideline

6A113352

portangeleslandmark.com

195133101

1A407748

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty 1115 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.7861 • Toll Free 1.800.292.2978 • www.UptownRealty.com

Free Investment Consultations 330 E. 1st St., Ste #1 360.452.1326 Port Angeles Fax: 360.457.3212


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 51

Homes

51

Homes

Move in ready and priced right! Freshly painted inside, carpets have just been cleaned. Newer appliances and low maintenance yard care. $39,900. ML261090/226536 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

NEAT AS A PIN 3 Br., 1 ? bath, family room with fireplace on a quiet cul-desac. Great starter home, or rental property. $169,000 ML262021 Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

NEW, NEW, NEW Windows, roof, floors, countertops, deck, copper plumbing and more. 2 decks, backyard pond, fruit trees and raised-bed garden. Master bath has walk-in closet, oversized shower and soak tub. Wood stove, built-in dining hutch and large kitchen. Attached carport, RV parking, circular driveway, detached garage and shop. 134,000. ML261291 Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

WATER VIEWS AND MORE Magnificent 5,562 sf 3 Br., 3.5 bath home with panoramic views of the Strait. Granite countertops, hardwood floors, and many upgrades. Additional dwelling unit is a site built one Br. unit with kitchen, propane fireplace and sunroom. $899,000 ML261733/263317 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Recently updated with laminate floors in living room, dining room and kitchen, 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 fireplaces. Interior doors upgraded. Home features vinyl siding, metal roof, Trex decking, solar screens on living room windows (west side of home), new metal garage doors and low maintenance. $199,900. ML261757 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

PRICED RIGHT This property sits on oversized lot, with a fully fenced yard. Close to bus routes, schools, and shopping. Property is two blocks away from the public library. Home has a chimney for a propane stove, builtin cabinets in living room and hardwood floors. Needs sum TLC and elbow grease. Roof looks relatively new, a one car garage with room for a workbench. $109,900. ML261770. Dan Blevins 417-2805 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY REMODELED SOLMAR RAMBLER 3 Br., 3 bath home with garage conversion with 2nd kitchen. A perfect situation for live-in nurse, nanny or ? Large level lot. $239,000 ML262028/282638 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SHERWOOD VILLAGE Wonderful mtn views and adjacent to greenbelt, short distance to all Sequim amenities. Southern exposure patio and small garden area. Vaulted ceilings with living area on main floor. Newer paint and roof. Owner financing available. $120,000 ML234876/261231 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPACIOUS RAMBLER On oversized west side lot. 3 Br., 2 bath, family room with fireplace, formal dining room plus nook. A private south side patio and much more! $225,000 ML261905 Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW From this elegant home near the water. Beautiful hardwood floors and a gourmet kitchen with custom cabinetry and granite counters. New metal roof, custom oak and willow built-in closet systems, garage/ workshop and a brand new bath since 2006. This home is also a gardener’s delight. $324,900 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

Lots/ Acreage

2 FOR 1 This market has created many opportunities and this is certainly one of them. Two great lots for the price of one. These lots are in an excellent neighborhood near the college. $69,900. ML260880. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY BEAUTIFUL CITY LOTS Nearly the last view lot on W. 4th St. in P.A. Spectacular strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Ready to build: easy access, utilities in at street or alley. Located in fine established area, across from Crown Park. Close to trails. $79,500. ML261167. Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Beautiful parcel close to both Port Angeles and Sequim. Power and water in street on O’Brien Rd. Mountain views. $129,000. ML250687. Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

54

Lots/ Acreage

NEW LISTING 9,600+ square foot lot priced below tax assessed value! Mature trees, nice neighborhood and next door to golf course. City utilities to lot. $69,900. ML261892. Kimi Robertson 461-9788 JACE The Real Estate Company Secluded high bluff waterfront. Great privacy and unobstructed views of the strait. 330’ of frontage of high bank. Water share available through Crescent Water Assoc. $144,900. ML261753 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Commercial

Property is zoned C1 commercial but is financeable as residential with manufactured home on site. Rental. Do not disturb or contact tenants. $299,900. ML261298 Carolyn and Robert Dodds or Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

61

Apartments Furnished

P.A.: 1+ Br. apt., overlooking harbor. Avail. until Jan. $600 mo. 775-5378 WINTER SPECIAL Motel weekly, $179. Continental breakfast, microwave, refr., bathtub, Wi-Fi. Clean. 457-9494.

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Manufactured Homes

EXCELLENT CONDITION 2 Br., 2 bath, nice floor plan, over 1,400 sf, separate great room. Enjoy Parkwood amenities. $59,500. ML255353/261603 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

WE CURRENTLY HAVE ONE-BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE AND EXPECT TO HAVE OUR NEXT OPENING IN FEBRUARY, 2012.

Our lovely one-bedroom apartments include: Beautifully landscaped grounds with garden areas for tenants, lean bright facilities, friendly knowledgeable staff, two meals served daily in our dining room, light housekeeping service biweekly, transportation on our modern minibus, and a lively activity program. Our rents are subsidized based on your income. If you are interested, please call for more information.

Discovery View Retirement Apartments 360-385-9500.

Clallam County Kathryn J. Goettling, single family residence with attached carport, 124 Loafer Lane, $145,652. Keith Stackhouse, double-wide manufactured home placement, Tacoma Avenue, $100,000. James and Barbara Kelly, woodstove installation, 60 Park Lane, $2,700. Christopher and Shaunna Bauer, freestanding woodstove, 93 Ridge Place, $3,000. Martin E. Moilanen, 500-gallon above-ground propane tank and piping with gas range located in kitchen, 142 Lewqllen Road, $3,800. Candace and Frank Kathol, single family residence with garage and propane tank, 312 Bigelow Road, $194,057. Gabriel and Jenny Artigas, single family dwelling with garage and 500-gallon propane tank, 52 Frog Creek Drive, $394,727. Michael Baguley, completion of detached Quansit for storage, 1291 Gasman Road, $35,424. William Lausche, single family residence with attached garage, 153 Rainbow Ave., $220,368. Pamela J. Brantley, concrete retaining wall, 162 Twin View Drive, $11,200. Curtis and Monica Dichiera, detached shop, Eden Valley Road, $66,438. Keith Brown, residential addition, 21 Draper Road, $20,317. Steven R. and Tomi Anne Belgard, detached pole building, 82 Tanager Lane, $28,372. Douglas Marcoux, replace deck, 100 Wild Orchid Lane, $7,258.

Port Angeles Benjamin Hertel and H.L. Merrill, wood-burning stove, 703 E. Fifth St., $2,000. Parkview Association (Peter Jorgensen), convert storage to laundry, 1430 Park View Lane, $50,000. Zenaida T. Montoya, re-roof, 1102 S. A St., $10,500. Ray L. and Jessie L. Shipman, new siding on upper portion, 211 W. 15th St, $480. Karla R. Newgard; residential remodel: enclose garage for rec room/laundry; 1831 W. 16th St.; $7,906. Port Angeles Hardwood LLC; lean-to roof; 333 Building 1, Eclipse Industrial Parkway; $70,000. Brian A. and Mary E. Coyle; on-site slurry fill, 300-gallon tank; 1713 W. Eighth St.; $1,000. Safeway Stores Inc., remodel pharmacy and add bathroom, 110 E. Third St., $70,000. Bruce O’Rourke and Ann Ricks, re-roof, 726 E. Fourth St., $6,565. James A. Turman, re-roof, 920 S. Lincoln St., $8,500. Donna Marie Morris, free-standing gas stove, 1840 W. Fourth St, $3,400. James K. Kirschner, ductless heat pump, 127 W. Second St., $6,115. Kari Shields and David H. Pigors, electric furnace, 1303 W. Fifth St., $3,185.

Sequim Sea Breeze Sequim Association LP, 525 W. McCurdy Road - Building 3, fire alarm system for smoke detection monitoring, $4,920. Sea Breeze Sequim Association LP, 525 W. McCurdy Road - Building 4, fire alarm system for smoke detection monitoring, $4,920. Richard and Jean Gookins, site construction short plat, 9999 Pine St., $0. Daniel K. and Joanne Edwards joint trustees, re-roof cabins and move debris to Port Angeles transfer station, Sunnyside Ave. N., $8,000.

Jefferson County Dale Coyle, two-storey detached garage/shop, 2002 Beaver Valley Road, $61,816. Flora Mace, repair and replace roof and second-storey walls on barn, 4900 Center Road, $16,000. Jay Stickney, swap-out above-ground 120-gallon propane tank, 2281 Thorndyke Road, $0. Ecologic Place, Family LTD PTR, 10 Beach Drive, $21,490. Edward Ran Hill, new heat pump, 212 Goliah Lane, $4,500. Robert Lundgren Jr., attached garage to mobile home, 4042 Hastings Ave. W., $43,450. Jason Shelton; 250-gallon above-ground propane tank with cook stove, heat stove and tankless water heater; 293603 U.S. Highway 101; $0.

Port Townsend Bay Vista Condominium Condo Association, commercial re-roof, 1707 Water St., $2,362.50. O’Reilly Auto Parts, commercial tenant improvement for new auto parts store, 2223 Sims Way, $106,000. City of Port Townsend, commercial tenant improvement for Pink House renovation, 1256 Lawrence t., $61,500. Lee N. Whitford, residential accessory dwelling unit/garage, 417 T St., $167,000. Mark and Susan Bianchi, converting loft to residential accessory dwelling unit, 26 Vista Blvd., $0. Diana C. Gusset, residential re-roof, 1914 Clay St., $13,555. Chi Bounds, residential re-roof, 510 Tyler St., $1,800.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 45 building permits issued from Oct. 3-7 with a total valuation of $1,971,047 : Port Angeles, 13 at $239,651; Sequim, 4 at $17,840; Clallam County, 14 at $1,233,313; Port Townsend, 7 at $352,218; Jefferson County, 7 at $128,025.

1A5135706

WATER VIEW! This home is a delight! Loads of charm with beautiful wood floors, tile, fresh paint and lots of other updates. Wonderful family home; or, lower level has separate entrance, second kitchen..perfect for mother-inlaw unit. Nice deck to enjoy BBQ and water view. $175,000 ML261270 Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

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1A5137127

PILI’S BEST BUY This home has it all, big space, big yard, large deck. Deck and back porch have just been rebuilt. Remodeled 2008. Close to the high school, college, several churches, Albertson and bus line. But on a quiet street. $130,000. ML261925. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

WATER VIEWS AND MORE Magnificent 5,562 SF 3 Br., 3.5 bath home with panoramic views of the Strait. Granite countertops, hardwood floors, and many upgrades. Additional dwelling unit is a site built one bedroom unit with kitchen, propane fireplace and sunroom. $899,000 ML261733/263317 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

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Apartments Unfurnished

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CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean quiet, upstairs 2 Br., in well managed complex. Excellent references required. 457-7149 COLLEGE P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba. No pets. $500. 457-1611 EAST P.A.: 1 Br., quiet gar. apt. i. $500, $150 utilities, W/D, no dogs, cats with dep. Available 10/22. 360-461-6177

Apartments Unfurnished

WEST P.A.: 1 Br. $550 + dep. 460-4089. mchughrents.com

63

Duplexes

SEQ: 2 Br., 2 bath, $850. P.A. 1 br., 1 ba. $600. 360-808-5054. SEQUIM: 2 Br. + den, 2 ba, W/D, no smoke, pets neg., 1 yr. $875. 452-4701. SEQUIM: 219 Matriotti, 2 Br., 1 ba, W/D, no pets/smoking, 1st, last, dept. $650. 681-4809

64

Houses

Classified 64

Houses

DISCOVERY BAY Beach front, like new, 2 Br., 2 ba, all appl. $1,000. 460-2330.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba......$500 H 1 br 1 ba......$600 H 2 br 2 ba......$700 A 2 br 1 ba......$700 A 2 br 2 ba......$750 H 3 br 1 ba......$875 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 HOUSES/APT IN SEQ A 2 br 1 ba......$725 H 2+ br 1 ba....$775 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$825

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

1725 W. 5th P.A. 2 Br. $600, no smoking/pets. 457-1632.

JOYCE: 2 Br. chalet on the water, privacy. $975 mo. 681-6308.

P.A.: 1 Br. private apt., remod., great location. $700. 452-6714

20 MIN. TO SEQ. OR P.T.: 3 Br, 2 ba, water view, lg. deck, 3-car gar., all appl., boat ramp near by, cr. ck, ref $1,100. 683-2799

P.A.: 1801 W. 16th. 3 Br., 2 bath. No smoke/pets. $800, first, last, dep. 457-4196

P.A.: 1 Br., 1,200 sf, new carpet, incl. W? G. $625. 457-8438

AGNEW: Private, wooded 1 Br. on 5 ac. $725. 460-9710.

P.A.: 2 Br. house, $895. 3 Br. duplex, $795. 452-1395.

P.A.: Central, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, no smoke/pets. $650. Lease, credit check. 360-796-3560

CENTRAL P.A.: Country in the city, 2 Br., 2 ba, updated with computer room. $825/$850. Drive by 415 S. Valley then call 460-7652.

P.A.: 1 Br. $600 mo., $250 dep., util. incl No pets. 457-6196.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Houses

65

P.A.: 2 ered large $900.

Br., 1 ba, covparking with storage room. 670-6160.

WEST END P.A. $300 plus ult. No pets. 477-7036

P.A.: Pvt 2 Br., 2 bath, pics ezpa.net, 1,400 sf. $675. 452-5140.

67

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

MEXICO: 2 luxury units, Pueblo Bonito Blanco resort in Cabo San Lucas, $600 per unit. (A Steal!). Nov 7-14, 6 nights. 457-0151.

SEQ: Exc. water view 2 Br. $765. tourfactory.com/397357 SEQUIM/ CARLSBORG 3 Br., 1.75 ba, fenced, all appliances, W/D, wood stove, wood floors/ceilings, new windows/blinds. $950 mo., 1st, last, no smoke, pet ok. 683-3863

SEQUIM: 4 Br., 3 ba for rent now. $1,150/mo. 1 year lease. No smokers. Ref's req'd. Scott: 360-388-8474 SEQUIM: New, 2 Br., 2 car gar., granite/ hardwoods, yard maintained. $1,150 mo. 460-0432.

SEQUIM 150 Deytona St. 2 Br. single wide and outbuildings on fenced half acre. No smoking, pets negotiable. Annual lease $675 + util. Drive by, Olypenhomes.com or call 452-4258.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

W.SIDE HOUSE AND SHOP.3+BD,1BA., 3BAY garage (RV) w/ storage. Fully fenced yard. No smoking. Bkgrd. check req. $1,000 per mo. + utilities. Call 360-457-8126

68

Vacation

Need someone to do a task? Use WhoCanHelp

Commercial Space

LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

Are you a service provider looking for customers? Use WhoCanHelp Peninsula Daily News has partnered with WhoCanHelp.com to give the North Olympic Peninsula a powerful tool.

It’s easy to use. It’s FREE!

Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737

Go to PeninsulaDailyNews.com and look for the WhoCanHelp link.

PEABODY PLAZA 1 or 2 person, 7th and Peabody. $375 mo. 452-1232 ext. 11

Questions? Phone (360) 417-7691 or visit: www.whocanhelp.com/contact

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

WCH4x4

STUDIO: Dungeness, view, util incl. $550, 6 mo. lease. No pets. Refs. Available Nov. 683-4503

Country Cottage Nice view, animal friendly, lg fenced yd. 1 Br., no smoke. Credit check. 3121 Mt. Pleasant Rd., P.A. $695 mo. $695 dep. 808-2677.

64

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

EXCELLENT CONDITION

SHERWOOD VILLAGE

CUSTOM DESIGN MT. VIEW HOME COMMERCIAL NEIGHBORHOOD ZONING

1A407736

• Single Level 2,590 SF on 2 Acres • Estates Water System & Private Well for Landscaping • S. Exposed Backyard, Fruit Trees & Garden Space • Family/Game Room (Additional Entry & Kitchenette) • 2-Car Garage, Large Shop & Covered Parking

• Wonderful Mt. Views & Adjacent to Greenbelt • Walking distance to All Sequim Amenities • S. Exposure Patio & Small Garden Area • Vaulted Ceilings w/Living Area on Main Floor • Newer Paint and Roof • Owner Financing Available ML#234876/261231 $120,000

ML#255353/261603 $59,500

1A407711

1A407713

1A407712

• 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath • Nice Floor Plan • Over 1,400 Square Feet • Separate Great Room • Enjoy Parkwood Amenities

You can live and work from this charming home located at 212 W. 8th Street. A new roof, gutters and the exterior has been freshly painted. There is a foyer that has a door into one BR/office and a separate door into the living room. The kitchen has lots of builtins plus a large walk-in pantry. ML#261731/226536 $115,000

ML#252372/261535 $429,000

WRE/SunLand WRE/SunLand

WRE/SunLand

Deb Kahle

Kim Bower

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

LOTS OF POSSIBLE USES

BEAUTIFUL PARCEL

Kelly Johnson Realtor®, SRS, SFR Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

1935 BUNGALOW

Windows, roof, floors, countertops, deck, copper plumbing & more. 2 decks, backyard pond, fruit trees & raised-bed garden. MABA has walk-in closet, oversized shower & soak tub. Wood stove, built-in dining hutch & large kitchen. Attached carport, RV parking, circular driveway, detached garage & shop. Call Karen ML#261291/238644 $134,000

Extensively remodeled in 1995. At that time, the remodel included new wiring, roof, septic, kitchen cabinets, interior doors, sheetrock, windows, insulation and more. Currently rented under market at $600 a month. ML#261709/261383 $124,900

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/Sequim - East WRE/Port Angeles

Harriet Reyenga

WRE/Port Angeles

Clarice Arakawa (360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

(360) 457-0456 (360) 460-8759 harriet@olypen.com

Quint Boe Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

Home is a 2 BR/2 BA, 2005 model in excellent shape situated on a beautiful country acre parcel. The location? You can have it both ways being perfectly positioned between Sequim and Port Angeles - it’s just a short drive either way. You won’t find many newer homes on an acre for this price! Check it out and call it home. Call DAVE ML#252040/134476 $174,000

4 BR/2.5 BA, 2,636 SF. New driveway off Hidden Highlands allows for even more privacy. Mt. views, pond and a 2,880 SF barn, tack room and storage. Fenced and partially fenced. Possible uses include horse or livestock ranch, vineyard, corporate retreat, wildlife lookout and more. ML#260659/203063 $495,000

WRE/Sequim - East

Dave Sharman (360) 683-4844 842 E. WASHINGTON ST. SEQUIM, WA 98382 dsharman@olypen.com

WRE/Port Angeles

Clarice Arakawa (360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

1A407730

WRE/Sequim - East

477-5718 KarenK@olypen.com

1A407637

1A407726

1A407727

Property is zoned C1 commercial but is financeable as residential with manufactured home on site. Rental. Do not disturb or contact tenants. Call CAROLYN, ROBERT OR DAVE for more details. $299,900 ML#261298/238931

Karen Kilgore

BEAUTIFUL 23.5 ACRE RANCH

ZONED COMMERCIAL COUNTRY LIVING, CITY CONVENIENCE

Carolyn & Robert DODDS Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

1A407728

Close to both Port Angeles and Sequim. Power and water in street on O’Brien Road. Mountain views. ML#250687 $129,000

NEW, NEW, NEW

1A407739

1A407738

1A407737

2,448 SF plus 676 SF of garage on 1.42 acres with highway frontage. 2 water and power meters. Great zoning. ML#260536 Only $225,000. Call Harriet for details 360-460-8759

WRE/Port Angeles

Brenda Clark 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 brendac@olypen.com www.sequimproperty.com/sunland


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

E5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Female dog. 385-3763

P.A.: 2 ered large $900. Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned FORD: ‘05 F150 XLT and managed mutual 4X4 SuperCrew bank on the North Cab. 91K mi, 1 Olympic Peninsula. Own, Auto check, We have the following leather int 5.3L, opportunity in pwr W, L, M, CD, Sequim: cruise, new brakes, • Customer Service recent service, Manager records, tow pkg In Kitsap County: never towed, never • Commercial off road, never Relationship Manager wrecked, non For job descriptions smoker. $14,900. and to apply, please 360-477-8620 visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com. GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, EOE 151K mi., 4 studded CHEV: ‘81 Step-side. tires, good condition. ‘350’ V8, runs good, $7,800. 683-3425. $900. 477-1688. Hauling and Buying (9) deck enclosure Unwanted cars windows, new, temand trucks. pered. Cost $2,000. A&G Import Auto Inc Sell $720. 800-248-5552 360-301-2974 EAST P.A.: 1 Br., quiet HAY: Local, no rain, gar. apt. i. $500, barn stored. $5 bale, $150 utilities, W/D, delivery available. 683-7965 no dogs, cats with dep. Available 10/22. ISUZU: ’93 2WD pick360-461-6177 up. 4 cyl, 5 speed, 30+mpg, runs/looks Experienced caregood. $1,500/obo. givers needed: part 457-6540 and full time. Please call 452- JOYCE: 2 Br. chalet on the water, privacy. 2396 or apply at $975 mo. 681-6308. 805 E 8th St, Port Angeles, WA LOST: Dog. Small 98362. black/white Sheltie. Near Bluffs at Gunn FREE: 1.5 year old Rd. 460-1967. female Walker Hound, needs room SEQ: 2 Br., 2 bath, to run or in the coun- $850. P.A. 1 br., 1 ba. try. 457-1364. $600. 360-808-5054.

Br., 1 ba, covparking with storage room. 670-6160.

P.A.: 1+ Br. apt., overlooking harbor. Avail. until Jan. $600 mo. 775-5378 QUAD TRAILER: 18’ holds 5 quads *(2 stacked), electric brakes, mounted spare tire. $2,250. 683-3425 RAT TERRIERS Adorable. Black and white tri, UKC tails, shots, dewclaws, wormed. $450. 360-643-3065 SALE: Sun.-Mon.9-2 p.m., 830 Washington St. Queen bed sets, $40-$50. 8 pc. full bedroom sets, $100-$150 ea. 477-6325 That radio station that uses my name tricks you into insulting and abusing me. Why? Because I refuse to watch any television. Ask Jack wenay@olypen.com TOYOTA: ‘07 Tundra. V8, 2WD, 35K mi., pwr, mint. $16,000. 477-7088 TOYOTA: ‘91 pickup. 103K, runs great. $2,000. 452-4268. TRAILER: ‘05 Landscape trailer, 8x14, great condition. $2,250. 683-3425.

Build a Loving Legacy Online Now you can memorialize a loved one on PeninsulaDailyNews.com as well as in the print edition of the PDN. Upload photographs, provide video, invite others to sign your online guest list and contribute loving recollections.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

That radio station that uses my name tricks you into insulting and abusing me. Why? Because I refuse to watch any television. Ask Jack wenay@olypen.com

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Wedding Ring. Parking lot of Safeway, P.A. 565-2314 FOUND: Woman’s ring. At restaurant in P.A. Call to describe. 477-9332 LOST: (2) garden gnomes. 1 small white ceramic, 1 large plastic with solar panel, near East 11th and Albert St., P.A. Small reward. 452-2516. LOST: Binoculars. Sat., 10/8 at Lower Elwha Dam construction viewing platform, P.A. 457-5937 LOST: Cat. Black and white Tuxedo, no claws, 8 yrs. old, Heather Circle Monterra, Sequim. 457-0327 LOST: Dog. Missing from Hwy 101 and east side Safeway area, PA. White boxer, approx 40 lbs., may have purple collar. Answers to Fancy. Not spayed. 206-940-5098 LOST: Dog. Shih-Tzu Pom, black with white chest, Front St. area, P.A. 670-3719. LOST: Dog. Small black/white Sheltie. Near Bluffs at Gunn Rd. 460-1967. MISSING: Bikes. Specialized Hard Rock with yellow extra large frame, front suspension. 1 Eastern Element, white, green wheels. $200 for information leading to or return of. Missing from E. 11th Street, P.A. 477-6856 or 779-7917.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs:

Visit bit.ly/pdnobituaries

LOST: Glasses. Dark framed reading glasses with yellow tape, Sequim area on Wed., Oct. 12. 683-6280

165121149

Buying Selling Hiring Trading

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. AUTO SALESPERSON Koenig Chevrolet Subaru is looking for a highly motivated individual for our Auto Salesperson position. Excellent pay program and benefits. Contact Bill Koenig Chevrolet Subaru 457-4444

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following opportunity in Sequim: • Customer Service Manager In Kitsap County: • Commercial Relationship Manager For job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com. EOE

Case Manager-PATH Program for WEOS Full-time This position involves outreach to persons who are homeless and who have mental health/substance use issues. Additional duties include working with our housing support team in providing supportive services and developing housing resources. Bachelors degree in social sciences, social work or related area and 2 years mental health treatment experience preferred. Closely related experience may be substituted for education and/or mental health experience preference. The pay range is DOE Send resumes to Gena @ genab@forkshospital.org. CNA for Long Term Care Full-time and Part-time Washington State Certification required The pay range is $10.56 – $15.12 Send resumes to Gena @ genab@forkshospital.org.

Help Wanted

AUTO TECHNICIAN Career Opportunity! Email your resume arlin_lidstrom@ wilderauto.com Caregiver Needed Great pay, DOE. Light house keeping/cooking. Refs req. Send resume to 181 Green Meadows Drive, Sequim, WA 98382.

CNA/NAR Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com Delivery Driver Wanted Part-Time or Possible FullTime. Part-time delivery driver to the greater Seattle area. One or two round trips each week driving a van delivering light weight parts. Driver must have current Washington Class C CDL and clean driving record. Position could be expanded to full-time with additional in-house non-driving work. If interested please contact hr@acti.aero for employment information. Development Mgr for First Step 25 hrs. wk. For req/full desc or to submit resume email fstep@olypen.com EOE Experienced caregivers needed: part and full time. Please call 4522396 or apply at 805 E 8th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362. HOME HEALTH DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR Full-time Mon.-Fri., with rotating weekends. Prior management and durable medical equipment/ billing exp. a MUST. Needs to be a good organizer, multi-task oriented and have excellent management skills. Pick up application at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. Lower Elwha Dental Clinic seeking full time experienced Dental Assistant; one with experience in expanded functions, four handed Dentistry, enjoys taking care of patients, and wants to work with a great team in a growing clinic. Please send your resume and application to: Employment Services, 2851 Lower Elwha Road, Port Angeles, WA 98363.

31

31

Help Wanted

HANDYMAN: Reliable repairman. Rent/ wages. 620-0482. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. MA: Per diem, medical experience required, wage DOE. Send resume to SSDS, 777 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. PAINTER/PREPPER Wages DOE. Pick up application at Evergreen Collision, 820 E Front St., P.A. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

Retail Associate. Local company needs an energetic, problem solver with a great attitude for customer service. General const. knowledge, sales & forklift exp helpful. Lift 100 lbs and have a valid driver’s license. Mail resume to P.O. Box 4112, Sequim, WA 98382.

Help Wanted

RECEPTIONIST For busy office. MUST be great with people and be able to multitask. Send resume: Peninsula Daily News PDN#234/Reception Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SCHEDULER Schedule clinical appointments. Exper req’d. FT with benefits. Resume & cvr ltr to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

34

Work Wanted

BROTHER & SISTER TEAM. Looking for caretaker position-home, farm, business. Quiet, drug free, responsible and trustworthy, late 50s. Love animals, do maintenance, give you more freedom while keeping your property safe. Small salary with separate, private small quarters or larger salary if not. Personal references available. Karen & Donny 360-808-0698 EDDY’S REPAIR Small engine repair. Mower, trimmers, chainsaws. Pick up and delivery for a fee. 360-681-3065.

34

Work Wanted

Enrich your garden. Fall program. Prune, weed, feed, mulch. Outstanding results. Sunshine Gardening 452-9821 HANDYMAN: Sequim area, references, $15 hr. 775-7364. HOME CLEANING Reliable, dependable, flexible. Call Meredith 360-461-6508. Housecleaning, pet walking, errands. Mature, reliable. 683-4567 Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513 Young Couple, Early Sixties. available for moss removal, fall clean-up, garden restoration, fence and deck repairs. Excellent references. Chip & Sunny’s Groundskeeping Services 360-457-1213

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

41

Business Opportunities

www.kbsilverandgold wealth.com

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring

Bath Aides & Restorative Aides Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim is looking for 3 Bath Aides & Restorative Aides to complete our care team. Please call Heather Jeffers at 582-3900 for more information.

195135153

Call today!

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

1 5 10 14 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 30 32 33 35 38 40 41 43 46 48 49 52 54 55 56 57 59 60 62 64 66 67 71

74 75 76 78 81 84 86 87 89 90 92 94 96

ACROSS Sassy Judge’s decrees Vena __ Iranian faith “In the Valley of __”: 2007 film Lots of lots Fictional coward Oboists’ section *Dishonest kegler? Chief Norse god Park place Move sneakily Mystic’s deck 108-Down on a screen Style with layers *Inane Laconian serf? Org. with a WasteWise program “__ Touch This”: MC Hammer hit Job listing initials They’re hard to read Rolls gas Grooves in boards Key letters *Where to see historic tickers? Pride youngster Overzealous bather? Other, to Ortega “__ porridge in the pot ...” 2000s drama set in Newport Beach U.K. decorations Foreign correspondent? Lab specimen Question of time Many Soc. Sec. recipients *Treat one’s stye? Six-time Olympic swimming gold medalist Van Dyken Two twos, say ___ mail Terhune’s Lad, e.g. Renaissance family name Day break? Slight incision Scintilla Stinks Sound during a drive? *Fights during breathing exercises? Bounces back Animal on Wyoming’s flag Range in Utah

97 Non-roaring big cat 99 Onetime Beatle Sutcliffe 100 Alt. announcers 102 China’s Mao __tung 103 *Broadway tykes? 106 Series ender 110 Govt. securities 112 30th anniversary gift 113 Like some dress patterns 115 Not from here 117 High-tech tablet 119 *Throw tennis star Sharapova? 121 Asian menu promise 122 Golden State sch. 123 “Macbeth” (1948) director Welles 124 Auctioneer’s word 125 74-Across numbers 126 Mint leaver, often 127 “¿Cómo __?” 128 “__ the night ...”

DOWN 1 Organic fuel 2 New York Bay’s __ Island 3 __ Waldo Emerson 4 Eighth of 24 5 Freshwater fish 6 Frau’s “I” 7 Iraklion native 8 It incited a 1773 party 9 Stars of old Rome 10 Stopped bleeding 11 Help 12 Express 13 Invalidates 14 Part of a support system? 15 Dynamic opening? 16 *Where you might hear “Oy vey! I need a drink!”? 17 Big stink 18 Six-Day War victor: Abbr. 24 Food made from cultures

71

Appliances

MISC: 25 cf refrigerator side-by-side, front door ice and water, excellent, $650. Upright freezer, 15 cf good condition, $150. 452-3200

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

91 Canonized Archbishop of Canterbury 93 Humorist Mort 95 Mike Brady, to Carol’s girls 98 Light element, and a hint to how the answers to starred clues have been inflated 100 Pie-making aids 101 “Finally!” 104 Pound-watching org. 105 Reno-__ Intl. Airport 107 See 90-Down 108 It shows the way 109 With 118-Down, 2000s boxing champ 111 Tops 113 Low wetlands 114 Boys 115 “Wait, there’s more ...” 116 Singer Reed 118 See 109-Down 120 U.S. govt. broadcaster

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. SINUS SURGERY Solution: 10 letters

T U R B  I N A T E G R A L N E

R E T A W T L A S B R I E F N

H E C N E C S E L A V N O C D

S I C H L H E A L L O P E N O

R E S O N A N C E B E V L A S

A O C T V I B I W S E R U C C

E A I O O E Q S S P R A Y H O

L I P T ҹ A A ҹ R E ҹ T E ҹ R A R Y U Y Y E A M W H H T T S A N P I

www.wonderword.com

N A S T C T R U P S O S S N C

I O N S I C N D A P M T U E T

N R I A P E R I T I N O A L T

G H F P S A N I L A M R O N F

Join us on Facebook

S T F E I A O T R E A T U T A

R U N N Y N L A V O M E R B H

10/15

Anatomy, Bone, Brief, Burn, Channel, Convalescence, Cures, Drain, Ears, Endoscopic, Enlarge, Flush, Heal, History, Interior, Labs, Lining, Local, Nasal, Normal, Open, Option, Part, Pathway, Patient, Recovery, Removal, Repair, Resonance, Runny, Saltwater, Salve, Scar, Smooth, Sniff, Spray, Spur, Swells, Techniques, Test, Throat, Tore, Treat, Turbinate Friday’s Answer: Calendar THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ZOAKO ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ORNPE AALIPM

ATDBAE

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: AN Friday’s

72

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

61 Litigator’s org. 63 __ Arbor, Michigan 65 Tokyo, once 68 In good condition 69 Hip-hop’s __ Yang Twins 70 “A Dissertation Upon Roast Pig” essayist 71 Hello or goodbye 72 Teeny parasites 73 Votes for 74 Sri Lankan export 77 Bullets may be seen on one 78 Posture-perfect 79 Vier + zwei 80 *When mildly amusing sitcoms air? 82 Lump 83 Lifting apparatus 85 Bikini sizes 88 Microwave choices 90 With 107-Down, words to a goner

© 2011 Universal Uclick

10/16/11

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

29 Witching hr. follower 31 Gibraltar landmark 33 Assessor’s decision 34 Homemade tipple 36 Superman lookalike, evidently 37 Jacks and jennies 39 Kvetch 42 Golf green border 43 Prokofiev’s wolf catcher 44 Pulls down 45 Ruse 46 90 degrees 47 Mystery novelist Grafton 49 Brewery flavoring 50 Accessory often worn diagonally 51 Salinger heroine 53 Pitch : baseball :: __ : cricket 57 Quisling’s crime 58 Lighthearted genre about womanhood

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

“GIVE IT SOME GAS” By GARETH BAIN

By DAVID OUELLET

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

Furniture

BUNK BED: Complete unit with desk, chair, shelves, wardrobe, mattresses, bunky boards, good condition, paid $1,400. Sell for $575/obo. 775-1035. DINING SET: Dining table and 6 chairs, solid cherry, double pedestal table. 2 capt. chairs, 4 side, upholstered seats. Perfect condition. $700. 504-2017.

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

72

72

Furniture

BED: Full size mattress and box springs, plush eurotop, in great shape. Over $800 new. Selling for $300/obo. 681-3299 FURNITURE SET Sunroom furniture set, 5 piece deluxe, like new. Includes love seat, chair, tables, stool, and lamp. $500. 681-6076. MISC: 83” sofa, red and gold plaid, exc. cond., $400. Cherry queen headboard, $150, matching mirrors, $75. (2) occasional tables, $75 and $50. 582-0954. MISC: Floral French provincial love seat, like new. $225. Recliner, lg., grayish green, excellent condition, $125. 477-1328, 457-4756 MISC: Oak (inlay) coffee and (2) end tables, $300. 1940s Winthrop secretary, $800. Singer sewing machine in cabinet, $300. 775-220-9611. MISC: Pine china hutch, $250. Pine armoire, $500. (2) Flat screen projection Sony tvs, $250 ea. Light wood dining table with leaf, 6 chairs, $125. 452-1003, call after 5.

Furniture

Couch/Love seat set. nice condition. matching set. Dark colors. $175. 477-8484 SOFA BED: Single, in very nice oak cabinet, cost $1,400. Sell $450. 452-7745. SOFA/LOVE SEAT Matching set, tan and Navy floral. $100 both/obo. 681-8694. SOFA: Natuzzi leather sofa, light tan, 75” long, 1 yr old. Excellent condition. $550. 385-4320

73

General Merchandise

ASSORTED ITEMS Large blonde pedestal dining table and 4 chairs; (2) coffee tables; assorted table lamps; (2) TVs. From $15-$150. Call for info. 417-7685

BOX TRAILER: ‘06 24’+. Excellent shape. $6,500. 683-8162

73

General Merchandise

(9) deck enclosure windows, new, tempered. Cost $2,000. Sell $720. 360-301-2974 CANOPY SHELVING Made by Leer, to fit inside pickup bed camper shell. Used with side doors. Call for details. $500. 683-8810 CAR TRAILER: 6’x12’ single axle small car trailer. Also works great for ATVs. $400. 460-0262, 681-0940 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 CEMETERY PLOT: 1, Sequim View Cemetery, space #3, Lot 507, division 3, value approx. $1,200. Asking $750. 452-5638, evenings. CEMETERY PLOTS (2) Plots in Dungeness Cemetery, lot 133. Retail $1,900 each, both $2,500. 509-341-9082 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

(Answers Monday) OMEGA DROWSY CHERUB Jumbles: BRAVO Answer: When they went to New York City, they saw these — BURROS

The Last Word in Astrology BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get together with friends, relatives or neighbors. Getting involved in community events will help you diversify your plans to better suit the current trends. Changing your direction based on what you see and hear will help you establish future stability. 4 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Attend a reunion, or make plans to visit old friends. By interacting with people from your past you will be able to put plans in perspective. Looking back will motivate you to pursue old goals that you have yet to achieve. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Jot down your ideas. Let your imagination run wild and explore the possibility of using your skills in a variety of ways. Something that someone from your past is doing will spark your interest and help you diversify, but don’t copy or infringe. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Good fortune is heading your way. A relationship with someone will help you get ahead personally. Make changes that will upgrade your image or help you explore and expand your talents. Use your responsibilities to show others your capabilities. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll see opposition and support regardless of what you do, say or try to change. Preparation will be key to the outcome of any family business you must deal with. Don’t let your love for someone cost you. Budgeting and moderation are necessary. 4 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Visiting old friends will bring back memories. Someone from your past will have an effect on a choice you make now. A change of location or direction in vocation is apparent and can bring about greater possibilities for the future. 2 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Take on a new project and you will find a way to earn extra cash. A change of scenery will motivate you to consider alternatives to your current living situation. Once you make a decision, follow through before you miss an opportunity. 5 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Time spent fixing up your digs will pay off.You can improve your assets if you are creative with your money. An inheritance, rebate, surrender, settlement or gift is apparent. Love is on the rise. 3 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Work on you and your relationships with oth-

ers. A change at home will be the result of a change of heart or plans by you or someone you’ve known for some time. Absorb what’s happening, deal with it and move on. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Money, travel, intrigue and change may all be a draw, but make sure you aren’t living beyond your means. Practical application is the only way to ensure a favorable outcome. Don’t leap before you look; get facts and figures first. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Find ways to make your home more conducive to your needs. Invite friends or family over to share your thoughts and plans. Someone you love is likely to disappoint you. Don’t overindulge, overspend or make promises you cannot keep. 5 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Listen to reason and you stand to make some extra cash. Letting your emotions get in the way of personal or financial advancement must be stopped. A partnership can bring you added security if you dismiss being stubborn. 2 stars

You can help us protect America! Call 1-866-247-2878 to report suspicious activity on the water and along our coastline.

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

77

Bargain Box

HEARTH: For woodstove. Beige tile 49”x 49”. $100. 582-3132

WANTED: Old flat head Ford parts, speed equip. 452-8092.

DINGY: Very sturdy, white fiberglass. Custom manufactured by Matteus Zoetem (in Los Angeles). With oars. $250. 683-2743.

FIREWOOD: 35 rounds white fir, 16”x15”, you pick up. $60. 681-0721. FIREWOOD: Cord $160, delivered. Proceeds to P.A. Senior Class ‘12. 417-4663. FIREWOOD: Seasoned, ready to burn, come see quality.$175+. 461-6843

FLATBED TRAILER 20.5’ dual 3,500 lb. axles trailer with new brakes, wiring, battery, wheel bearings and paint. Licensed and ready for your choice of decking. Must sell! $1,500/obo. 477-0903 FRONTIER WOOD STOVE Take 16” wood. $450. 360-732-4328 LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg. LUMBER: 6 doz. 4x4 old growth cedar, 8’ long, some or all. $7.50 ea. 374-5085. MISC: Flat screen monitor, Acer 20”, new in box, $100. 3 piece wicker set, 2 chairs, love seat (needs paint), $40. Dishes, spring, fall, winter, $15-$50. 928-3483 MISC: Max Weider Crossbow (like Bow Flex), used very little, paid $500, will sell for $200. Nice treadmill, $50. Peavy Powered speaker, 15”, very little use, $200. Call 460-4938, ask for Lecia. MISC: New trex accents decking madera color, $2.70 ft. Diamond plate truck toolbox, $150. New RV cover, 34' class A, $200. 5th wheel louvered tailgate fits chevy, $125. 6' tilt angle 3 point blade, $175. 360-683-2254

General Merchandise

MISC: Trash burner, $140. Upright heavy duty Kirby vacuum, w/attachments and carpet cleaning attach., $150. 7 quart Presto canner, $50. 360-379-1099. MISC: Washer/dryer, $200. XXXL leather jacket, $200. (2) twin beds, $80. Rear hitch carrier, $225. 457-8376 Mobility Scooter Rascal 600 Model, red, almost new, 2 baskets. $899. 452-5303 POWER CHAIR Jazzy, 1103 Ultra, with power seat, 300 lb. weight capacity, used very little only in house. $3,300 681-2346

75

PIANO: Samick upright, ebony black, used once. $2,000. 681-0227 PIANO: Spinett, good condition. $500. 452-6661

76

75

Musical

GOLF CART: Electric with side curtains and doors. Good condition. $950/obo. 477-1625 GUN SHOP at the P.A. Antique Mall, 109 W. 1st St. Taking guns on consignment, 1 low fee. Buying/trading/selling guns, rifles scopes, binoculars, spotting scopes Special order new guns, dealer plus 10%. We do scope mounting, also buying gold/silver. Call 452-1693 or 457-6699 GUNS: Model Tech 9mm with 2 clips, $325. Hi-Point, model 995, 9mm, $225. Sell both for $500. 460-9080. HAND GUN: Taurus, model 617-Titanium, 7 shot, .357 magnum, collectors item, factory ported, super light, 4 speed loaders. $600. 360-509-6763 MISC: XD .45 with laser, $550. Mako Shark .22, $395. Marlin .17 HMR, $450. 360-452-6363. POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746.

BASS GUITAR: EMG acoustic electric bass, stand, gig bag, and amp. $225. 457-1289 GUITARS: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $200. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $150. Both in new condition, great sound! Make an offer! 477-0903. LAP HARPS: (2) never used brand new. Stoney End Isabella Cross String, $900/obo. Mideast Heather, hand carved, $450. Both with padded cases and extra new set of strings. 808-8608.

Sporting Goods

FIREARMS: 1911 .45 cal., $625. Marlin 3030, with Leopold scope, $550. Call Marty at 670-8918.

PROM DRESS: 2 short and 1 long, like new, $25 each call for sizes and color. And prom shoes 7 ? and 8 $10 each. Call 452-9693 SHOP SMITH: With jigsaw attachment. $200. 477-4573. Tools/Shop Equip. Saws, sanders, drills, and more. $25$300. 681-2908 for details. Sale is in Rural Sequim Area. TRAILER: ‘05 Landscape trailer, 8x14, great condition. $2,250. 683-3425. ZERO CLEARANCE PROPANE FIREPLACE “HeatnGlo.” Complete, excellent cond. Handsome oak mantle. $375/obo. 457-6127.

Musical

RELOADING EQUIP. Redding Boss Press, Dillon CV-500 Vibratory tumbler, 4 bags, Corn cob media and polish, Redding #2 scale and extras. $300 all. 457-6845 REVOLVER: Ruger GP100, 4” barrel, caliber 327 federal mag, new in box, $450. 460-4491. RUGER: M77 Tang Safety 7mm mag, new Leupold VX-III, 6 boxes ammo, sling, case, custom stock. $1,000 firm 417-2165 WANTED: Guns, ammo, scopes. The older the better. Worn or broken ok. 683-9899

Garage Sales Sequim

Business Liquidation. Oct 14-16 FriSun 8-4. Restaurant equipment, magnetic induction cooktop, commercial refrigerators, freezer and convection oven, stainless steel sinks tables, faucets, kitchen items, mixers, soup warmer, china, plates, tea cups, saucers, tea pots, flatware, serving items, tiered serving trays, shelves, book cases, display cabinet, furnishings, lighting, decor, cash register, Nurit card machine, a/c unit, printer, comp desk, mirror, butcher block kitchen island. Antique loveseat Wingback chairs. Everything goes some personal stuff too. Bring your own boxes, bags and strong backs. 645 W. Washington STE 3. Cafe Blossom GARAGE Sale: FriSat., 9-5 p.m. 1071 Woodcock Road. Exercise equipment, pants and jeans, dive fins, over 200 karaoke discs, and lots of misc. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., Sun., 9noon, 131 Lois Lane. Rain or shine. Fishing gear, household, kitchenware, furniture, car bed, toys and lots of designer clothes, baby to adult sizes, .25¢ ea or $2 a bag. SALE: Sun.-Mon.9-2 p.m., 830 Washington St. Queen bed sets, $40-$50. 8 pc. full bedroom sets, $100-$150 ea. 477-6325

78F

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg.

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Garage Sales Jefferson

Collectibles! ESTATE. FURS, Furniture, kitchenware, jewelry, porcelain, crystal, pottery, ceramics, glass, lamps, mirrors, art, hospital bed, clothing, linens.Victorian thru 60's VISA/MC NO EARLY BIRDS PLEASE. Friday Sunday (10/1410/16) 9-3 p.m. 13502 Cutoff Road Park on Romans Rd. Port Townsend. YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 9-3 p.m. 423 Fredricks St., turn east on Fredricks from Hwy. 19, go straight heading towards water, on to gravel road, house on left, Port Townsend. Nice things. Priced to sell.

81 82 83 84 85

ADORABLE DORKIE PUPPIES Out of our Yorkie and dapple Mini-Dachshund. Tiny, first shots and dewormed. $300-$450. 452-3016. FREE: 1.5 year old female Walker Hound, needs room to run or in the country. 457-1364. FREE: To good home. Female Lutino Cockatiel. Must bring own cage to pick up. If you want more info please call Kathy Barnes at 683-5796. LOVING TORTIE SEEKS SINGLE CAT HOME. 3 yr old fixed female shorthair. Ideal companion. Serious inquiries only. 460-8785. MINI-DACHSHUND Puppies, 2 black and tan smooth coats and 1 black and tan long coat, males, 1st shot and wormed. $400. 452-3016. Northwest Farm Terrier Puppies. Versatile, medium-sized, healthy, intelligent. Born 7/21/11, $350 for males, $400 for females, price includes papers, flea and tick treatment, vaccinated and wormed twice. Great dogs! 360-928-0273. sg1953@yahoo.com PUPPIES: 2 beautiful male Mini Schnauzer puppies. 16 weeks. Outstanding no-shed coats. Very loveable and attentive. Tails cropped, dew claws removed, 3 times wormed, first, second and third shots. Leash and potty training started, well puppy vet checked. Both parents on site. $475. 681-7480. RAT TERRIERS Adorable. Black and white tri, UKC tails, shots, dewclaws, wormed. $450. 360-643-3065

83

Farm Animals

ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817. CHICKS: Young hen and rooster, and layers. Start at $2.50 up to $20. 460-9670. HAY: Local, no rain, barn stored. $5 bale, delivery available. 683-7965

84

Horses/ Tack

QUARTER HORSE 7 yrs. old, sure footed, well trained, trail riding horse, 14.4 hands, soral colored, beautiful must see. $900/obo. Text message or call 360-912-1122 Please Serious inquires only

HEWESCRAFT: 14’ with trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293

LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445

Pets 91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DOZER: ‘94 550 Long track Case. With brush rake. $15,000. 683-8332. DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325 MISC: Cat 12 grader, 99E, $8,500. Detroit 4-53 engine, $2,500. Deutz BF6L913 engine, $1,500. Ranco end dump trailer, $17,000. ‘87 Peterbuilt 10 WH tractor, $16,000. Utility 40’ flatbed trailer, $6,000. (4) 17.5x25 loader tires, $1,000. 18” and 14” steel beams, .30¢/lb. 360-379-1752 PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071. SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618

93

Marine

ALUMINUM BOAT: 17’ Bass Tracker, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684. BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350 BOAT: 12’ aluminum with trailer, 6 hp motor and accessories. $1,500/obo. 808-0156 BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 DINGHY: Mint condition sailing nesting dinghy including trailer, motor, mast, boom, sails, canvas cover. $3,200. 360-379-1616

LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,000. 683-1957. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714 SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 206-397-9697 SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new electronics. Roller furling. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. Take as is, $10,000. 760-792-3891 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276

HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing 1200. 30K mi. $2,700. 461-2627.

SEARAY: 18’ 120 hp 220 Chev 4 cyl., Mercruiser O/B, new water pump, needs engine work, EZ Load trailer in great condition. $600/obo. 206-794-1104

HONDA: ‘86 200 TLR trials bike. Unique, factory street legal. $750. 461-2627. HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,900. 360-683-9175

TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384

94

Motorcycles

ATV: ‘07 Eton 150. 2WD, Viper, as new. $2,200. 683-6203. HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950 HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HARLEY: ‘49 Pan Head Chopper. Completely restored, have all receipts, beautiful bike. $17,000. 360-731-0677 HD ‘03 1200 SPORT 5 spd, lots of extras! 12K miles! VIN431230 Expires 10/19/11 $4,900 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HD ‘05 DYNA-WIDE GLIDE FXDWGI, 5 spd, 88 cu in, a must see! Tons of chrome! VIN310963 Expires 10/19/11 $10,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HD ‘05 SOFTAIL SPRINGER FLSTSCI, 88 cu in, 5 spd, bags, windshield, lots of extras! Only 13K miles! VIN061251 Expires 10/19/11 $10,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633 HONDA: ‘03 XR100R. Excelelnt condition. $1,500. 808-3953. HONDA: ‘04 750 Aero Shadow. Gorgeous black and silver. $4,500. 452-0837. HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376 HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096. HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874

JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

94

Marine

BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523.

78E 73

93

Farm Equipment

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

ROUND 2 Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m. 820 W. 6th St., in alley between A & B St. Lots of new stuff added! Crafting supplies, material, holiday stuff, children’s books, household items, teen, you and baby clothes, plus more! Mary Kay products available on hand and to order.

General Merchandise

85

Wanted To Buy

FISHING POLES: (8), 2 with reels, 8’-10’. $150 all. 582-3132.

78B

73

79

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,200/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. HONDA: Fat-Cat. New battery, new oil, fresh tune up, carburator rebuilt, rack to haul out your deer. $1,600 cash 683-8263 HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $750. 460-1377. KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. Moto Guzzi 2004 California Stone Touring VERY LOW MILES. Bought New, always garaged ridden only 2,200 miles (not a misprint).Gorgeous big V-twin.Only $4,800. Call Randy at 360-821-1107. In Port Ludlow.

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $14,000 452-2275 HARLEY: ‘90 SportsterXLH 883. Cust. pearl paint w/ wolf/moon emblem, Screaming Eagle pkg, Corbin saddle, windshld, fwd contrls, saddlebags w/ quick-release brackets, Kuryakyn ISO grips, more. Stock seats, svc manual, HD sissybar/rack incl. Lots of power and modified gearing for hwy speeds. 20,900 mi. $3,600. 360-683-2182

94

E7

Motorcycles

KAWASAKI: ‘93 KLX 650. $1,800. 460-3530 QUAD TRAILER: 18’ holds 5 quads *(2 stacked), electric brakes, mounted spare tire. $2,250. 683-3425 QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,500/obo. 452-3051 QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 SCOOTER: ‘05 Honda Reflex. Like new condition, very low mi., 50+ mi. to the gal., Versahaul, other extras. $2,600. 360681-7102 for appt. SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $1,999/obo. 582-0841 SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643. SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. TRIUMPH ‘05 ROCKET III 2298CC, 3 cyl, 140 hp, 5 sp, only 7,800 miles! VIN20105 Expires 10/19/11 $8,450 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bon. Exc. cond., extras. $5,500. 460-6780. YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $8900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701. YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957. 5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222

5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075 CAMPER: ‘03 10.6’ Bigfoot truck camper. 2500 series, color bamboo, model 25C106E. Highest quality, excellent condition. $9,000/obo. 360-379-1804 CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615. CAMPER: ‘94 8’6” Lance Squire Lite, Fully provisioned, good cond. $3,500. 360-683-4830 or 360-460-3946 CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779.

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E8

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1A5137097

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s Tractor Service

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

FREE Estimates

Moss Prevention

360-457-6747 JIMGRP*044PQ

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair Larry Muckley

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

LARRYHM016J8

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

HANDYMAN

JP

Larry’s Home Maintenance

PAINTING

(360) 683-8332

REPAIR/REMODEL

s Handyman Services

78289849

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

Call NOW To Advertise

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Columbus Construction • Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

ASBESTOS

Asbestos

WINDOW CLEANING

WANTED: Wind Damaged

& Leaky Roofs

G

D

ARLAN ROOFING

457-5186

360

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

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165122885

72289323

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DIRT WORK

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452-9995

0A5100969

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155120082

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76289935

452-0755 775-6473

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887. MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 MOTOR HOME: ‘75 Newell Coach 35’. Aerodynamic aluminum body, Original, not a conversion, Cat, many featurs, updates. $18,500/obo. 460-6979 MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436. MOTOR HOME: ‘94 19’ Falcon Sport recreational van. 35K, fully loaded, exc. cond. $8,600. 452-2215 TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457. TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 TRAILER: 19’ Terry. Very clean, well maint. New tires. $1,950. 379-6868 or 360-301-5507 TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $4,900. 681-7381

4 Wheel Drive

TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730 TRAILERS: Older 21’ Roadrunner. Completely redone inside. New tires. $3,200. ‘98 28’ Komfort. Excellent shape. Large slide out. New tires. Large Tanks. $7,900. 683-8162.

Parts/ Accessories

CANOPY SHELVING Made by Leer, to fit inside pickup bed camper shell. Used with side doors. Call for details. $500. 683-8810 ENGINE: ‘87 Subaru engine. $150. 460-0262 ENGINE: Ford 351 M, complete rebuilt small block, new oil pump and gaskets. $1,300. 683-1032. FORD: ‘97 Escort LX. 4 dr, parting out. $5$500. 206-794-1104 Hauling and Buying Unwanted cars and trucks. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552 SNOW TIRES: (4) Michelin non-studded, used 1 season Sequim to PA. 225/60R18. $500. 683-7789 STUDDED TIRES Like new Mud Terrian LT 265/75 R16 studded snow tires, mounted on set of custom wheels for F250 or F350 Ford ‘00 or newer truck. $500. 460-5974. WHEELS: (4) Dodge Charger 18”x8” polished, caps, and lug nuts. $400. 683-7789 WHEELS: (4) MKW 20”, chrome. All four for $500. 808-2563.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $4,500. 460-8155. CHEV: ‘03 Tahoe 4WD 4.8 liter V8, runs great, cloth interior excellent shape, power seat, windows, locks, newer tires, custom rims. $9,900. 460-7901. CHEV: ‘04 AWD full size contractor van. $7,850. 452-5803.

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $38,500. 683-2342. CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967 CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $6,500. 683-4830. CHEV: ‘96 Suburban. CD, leather, exc. $3,650. 461-2627. CHEV: ‘97 Tahoe. 4x4, leather interior, air conditioning, tow pkg., runs/drives great, must sell. $3,995. 775-9648. DODGE ‘03 RAM 1500 SLT 4x4 automatic, air, cruise, 5 disc CD, black leather, split bench seats 6, power windows, locks and mirrors, bed liner, hitch. Why Pay more? We have the lowest in-house rates! Military discounts! 90 days same as cash. $10,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. 4WD, exc cond, loaded, V6, tow, CD changer, 3rd seat, more. 122K, books $7,740. Sacrifice $6,900. 457-4363. FORD: ‘05 Expedition. 1 ownr, low mi., exc. cond. $12,000/ obo. 683-9791, 942-9208

FORD: ‘05 F150 XLT 4X4 SuperCrew Cab. 91K mi, 1 Own, Auto check, leather int 5.3L, pwr W, L, M, CD, cruise, new brakes, recent service, records, tow pkg never towed, never off road, never wrecked, non smoker. $14,900. 360-477-8620

FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323. FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659 FORD: 87 F250. 4x4 standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $3,200. 457-5649 FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘89 F250 4WD. 101K mi. $5,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: ‘91 F250 Lariat 110K, blue ext., lots of extras, good cond $2,500/obo. 457-4347 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 GMC ‘04 SONOMA SLS CREW CAB 4X4 4.3 liter Vortec V6, auto, alloy wheels, new tires, bedliner, tow package, rear sliding window, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $12,945! V6 gas mileage in a crew cab! Clean inside and out! Loaded! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $11,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com GMC: ‘88 Suburban 3/4 ton 4x4. 5.7L V8, 198K miles. Solid engine and trans. 4x4 works great. Gutted inside. Was used for camping and hauling fire wood. Extra set of 17” tires, wheels and lug nuts included. $900. Jason, 452-3600 JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988 NISSAN ‘02 XTERRA SE SPORT UTILITY 4X4 3.3 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, Goodyear mud terrain tires, running boards, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, power windows, door locks and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, 6 CD stereo, compass/temp. display, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book value! Sparkling clean inside and out! Ready for adventure! Stop by Gray Motors today! $8,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

&$+ FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

REID & JOHNSON

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com • mj@olypen.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

PUBLIC NOTICE: PROPOSED REDISTRICTING PLAN, OCTOBER 19, 2011, 6:00 PM NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing to receive public input on a proposed redistricting plan of the commissioner districts of Public Hospital District No. 2 of Clallam County will be held during the regular business meeting of the Board of Commissioners of Olympic Medical Center, at 6:00 p.m., October 19, 2011, Linkletter Hall, Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline Street, Port Angeles, Washington. Copies of the proposed redistricting plan will be available prior to the public hearing beginning October 10, 2011, at the Office of the Administrator, Olympic Medical Center. Gay Lynn Iseri Clerk to the Board of Commissioners Pub: Oct. 11, 16, 2011

102

Legals City of P.A.

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104.

135114426

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

97

CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $8,500. 360-928-3440

29’

TRAILER: ‘94 30’ Komfort Travel Trailer. Great shape, living room slide-out, A/C, micro, refrigerator/freezer. $4,000. Brinnon area. 360-535-2078

96

97

102

Legals City of P.A.

NOTICE OF FILING OF PRELIMINARY BUDGET AND NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Manager of the City of Port Angeles will file the preliminary budget for the year, 2012, with the City Clerk as of November 1, 2011. The proposed budget will be available for public review after that date on the City’s website, in the City Clerk’s office, or the Finance Department, at City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street. A public hearing on proposed revenue sources for 2012, including the property tax levy, will be conducted by the City Council on Tuesday, November 1, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., or soon thereafter, at City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street. A public hearing will be held on proposed revenue sources and the proposed budget on Tuesday, November 15, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., or soon thereafter. A second public hearing on the proposed budget will be held on Tuesday, December 6, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., or soon thereafter. City Hall is accessible for persons with disabilities. Please contact the City Clerk, (360) 4174634, if you will need any special accommodations to attend the public hearings. Janessa Hurd City Clerk Pub: Oct. 16, 23, 2011

KIA ‘03 SORENTO Blue 4x4 automatic, power windows and locks, air, CD, hitch. Very clean! Lowest in-house financing guaranteed! Military discounts! 90 days same as cash. $6,495 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 NISSAN ‘03 FRONTIER XE KING CAB 4X4 PICKUP 3.3 liter V6 engine, 5 speed manual trans, alloy wheels, new tires, spray-in bedliner, rear sliding window, air, tilt, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Only 46,000 original miles! Immaculate cond. inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $13,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891 TOYOTA: ‘88 4WD. V6, new exhaust/ tires, runs good. $2,700/obo. 681-0447 TOYOTA: ‘93 extended cab pickup. SR5 4x4. $3,500. 460-1481

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347 FORD: 96 Ranger XLT. Long bed, 131K mi. $2,650. 417-5460. GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Runs great, nice body, forest green, captains chairs. $4,500. 385-2012. ISUZU: ’93 2WD pickup. 4 cyl, 5 speed, 30+mpg, runs/looks good. $1,500/obo. 457-6540

98

Pickups/Vans

MAZDA: ‘84 B2000 pickup. New tires/ clutch, 110K, 30+ mpg. $1,800. 683-7173 TOYOTA: ‘07 Tundra. V8, 2WD, 35K mi., pwr, mint. $16,000. 477-7088 TOYOTA: ‘08 Tacoma SR5 ext. cab. 4 cyl, auto, all pwr. CD stereo, 1 owner. 14,680 original miles. $18,000/obo 417-8291 TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535 TOYOTA: ‘91 pickup. 103K, runs great. $2,000. 452-4268.

99

Cars

PLYMOUTH ‘94 GRAND VOYAGER LE ALL WD Local van with only 88,000 miles! V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM, alloy wheels, 7 passenger seating, dark glass, roof rack and more! Hard to find all wheel drive! Exp. 1022-11. VIN166347 $3,495 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

BUICK ‘05 LACROSSE SEDAN 3.8 liter Series III V6 engine, auto trans, alloy wheels, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors and drivers seat, cruise control, tilt, air, CD stereo, OnStar, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $13,015! Sparkling clean inside and out! One owner! Only 29,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

104

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

CHRYSLER: ‘03 Town & Country Ltd. DVD, loaded. $6,500. 808-0825 DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756 FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949

Legals Jefferson Co.

99

Cars

FORD: ‘94 F150. $1,000. 452-2615.

Legals Jefferson Co.

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘81 Step-side. ‘350’ V8, runs good, $900. 477-1688.

104

98

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

NOTICE OF FINAL BUDGET HEARING The preliminary Operating and Capital Budget of the Port District of the Port of Port Townsend, for 2012, has been prepared and placed on file at the offices of the Port District. The Port Commission of the Port of Port Townsend hereby gives notice of the following date for a public hearing for the purpose of fixing and adopting the final Operating and Capital Budget, and tax levy amount for the fiscal year 2012, and rate adjustments of the Port of Port Townsend; a copy of which will be furnished to any interested party who will call at the Port Administration Office, 375 Hudson Street, during regular business hours (8:00 4:30, M-F). The Port Commission of the Port of Port Townsend will meet at the Port Administration Office, 375 Hudson Street, Port Townsend, Washington, on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. Any interested party may appear and give comments. Pub: Oct. 16, 23, 2011

File No.: 7023.92293 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: David S. Wrinkle, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 519999 Tax Parcel ID No.: 821 343 019 Abbreviated Legal: S34 T28 R1E Tax 41 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: The East 510 feet, except the East 235 feet thereof of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, in Section 34, Township 28 North, Range 1 East, W.M., in Jefferson County, Washington, lying Northerly of State Highway No. 104, right of way as conveyed by instrument recorded May 11, 1959, under Auditor's File No. 161378. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 172 Hubbard Creek Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/24/07, recorded on 01/31/07, under Auditor's File No. 519999, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from David S Wrinkle and Wendi H. Wrinkle, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 8/12/2011 Monthly Payments $21,909.40 Late Charges $886.68 Lender's Fees & Costs $322.50 Total Arrearage $23,118.58 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $976.64 Statutory Mailings $39.04 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,707.18 Total Amount Due: $24,825.76 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $305,028.95, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David Wrinkle aka David Senter Wrinkle 172 Hubbard Creek Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Wendi Wrinkle aka Wendi Heins Wrinkle 172 Hubbard Creek Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 David Wrinkle aka David Senter Wrinkle P.O. Box 2392 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Wendi Wrinke aka Wendi Heins Wrinkle P.O. Box 2392 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David Wrinkle aka David Senter Wrinkle 172 Hubbard Creek Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Wendie Wrinkle aka Wendi Heins Wrinkle 172 Hubbard Creek Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David Wrinkle aka David Senter Wrinkle P.O. Box 2392 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Wendie Wrinkle aka Wendi Heins Wrinkle P.O. Box 2392 Poulsbo, WA 98370 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/12/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/12/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 8/12/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7023.92293) 1002.198755-FEI Pub: Oct. 16, Nov. 6, 2011

99

Cars

FORD: ‘76 LTD. 2 dr, 351, good cond., runs exc., very dependable, some new. $950. 460-6979. ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154. CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiufl, must see. $7,800. 681-3093. CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $10,500. 452-7377. CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419 CHEV: ‘67 El Camino. 400/T400. $12,000. 707-241-5977 CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767. CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170. CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, larger ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. $3,500. 808-3374. CHEV: ‘99 Malibu LS. 1 owner, only 86K miles. Very nice car. $3,465 360-912-3901

FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. FORD: ‘86 Taurus. Runs great, clean. $600/obo. 681-3313. FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,000 477-1805 FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858 HONDA: ’06 Civic Hybrid. 112K hwy. mi., tinted windows, nice wheels, mounted snow tires, very clean. Just retired. $9,500/obo 360-731-0677 HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006. HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata Limited. Black beauty, all the options plus tinted windows and navigation system, extra set of wheels and tires. $17,800. 477-3191. MAZDA: ‘06 Miata MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $14,500/obo. 681-0863

DODGE: ‘96 Caravan. Runs and drives super. Well maint. with records, 159K. $2,400. 457-1104. MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966

FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598.

MERCURY: ‘95 Grand Marquis. Good transportation. $1,850. 457-5500.

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MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353. MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165. OLDS: ‘65 98 LS 4 dr Sedan. 2 owner in great condition, int. like new, 83K. $6,000. 582-0208. PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768. PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577 PONTIAC: ‘78 Trans Am. Lots new, nice. $4,800/obo. 477-3180 STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963 TOYOTA ‘06 COROLLA LE 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM CD, remote entry and more! One week special. Exp. 10-2211. VIN708161. $8,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Excellent, dark blue, extras $18,000/ obo. 928-3669.

FORD: ‘02 Mustang GT convertible. 8 cyl., 2 tone gray, 36K, great condition. $12,000/obo. 452-7745

FORD: ‘65 Fairlane 500 Sport Coupe. ‘289’ 225 hp, auto, bucket seats, real nice car. $6,900. 457-6540

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VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,500. 681-7381. VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184.

MG: ‘65 Midget. 85,672 orig. mi., mostly orig. interior. In running cond. $4,800. 417-2606.

VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs well, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,295/obo. 775-9648

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File No.: 7763.26090 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA6 Trust Grantee: C. Knodel, as her separate estate and Madison J. Piersoll III and Diana E. Piersoll as their respective interests may appear of record Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007 1201088 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043003-490400 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 2SP 23/11 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 of Short Plat recorded January 20, 1992 in Volume 23 of Short Plats, Page 11, under Auditor's File No. 663191, being a short Plat of a portion of the South half of the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter in Section 3, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1725 Woodcock Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/08/07, recorded on 05/10/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1201088, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Keith L. Franklin, a single man, as Grantor, to Land Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank FA, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Washington Mutual Bank FA to Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA6 Trust, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1248593. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/15/2011 Monthly Payments $38,286.82 Late Charges $1,559.50 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,893.46 Total Arrearage $43,739.78 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $54.20 Total Costs $526.70 Total Amount Due: $44,266.48 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $331,549.82, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Keith L. Franklin 1725 Woodcock Road Sequim, WA 98382 Keith L. Franklin 267 Watershed Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Keith L. Franklin 1725 Woodcock Road Sequim, WA 98382 Keith L. Franklin of Keith L. Franklin 267 Watershed Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 C. Knodel 1725 Woodcock Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of C. Knodel 1725 Woodcock Road Sequim, WA 98382 C. Knodel 609 W. Wash St, Ste 44 Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of C. Knodel 609 W. Wash St, Ste 44 Sequim, WA 98382 Madison J. Piersoll III 1725 Woodcock Road Sequim, WA 98382 Diana E. Piersoll 1725 Woodcock Road Sequim, WA 98382 Madison J. Piersoll III 609 W. Wash St, Ste 44 Sequim, WA 98382 Diana E. Piersoll 609 W. Wash St, Ste 44 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 02/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 02/11/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/15/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7763.26090) 1002.146480-FEI Pub: Oct. 16, Nov. 6, 2011


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File No.: 7081.22801 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Flagstar Bank, FSB Grantee: Jason A. Fryer and Sheri M. Fryer, as tenants in common Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1225563 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000032850 Abbreviated Legal: N2 LTS 10 & 11 BLK 328 TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: The North half of Lots 10 and 11, Block 328 of the Government Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1013 South Laurel Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/18/08, recorded on 08/20/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1225563, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Jason A. Fryer and Sheri M. Fryer, husband and wife., as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson EVP on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Peninsula Mortgage, Inc. its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Peninsula Mortgage, Inc. its successors and assigns to Flagstar Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1268459. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/15/2011 Monthly Payments $14,929.00 Late Charges $587.79 Lender's Fees & Costs $590.50 Total Arrearage $16,107.29 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $629.68 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,422.20 Total Amount Due: $17,529.49 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $199,169.68, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jason A. Fryer 1013 South Laurel Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Sheri M. Fryer 1013 South Laurel Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Jason A. Fryer P.O. Box 2 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Sheri M. Fryer P.O. Box 2 Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/15/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/15/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/15/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7081.22801) 1002.199081-FEI Pub: Oct. 16, Nov. 6, 2011

File No.: 7283.26741 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Chad Gouge, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1220125 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000041704 Abbreviated Legal: S2 LTS 1 & 2 BLK 417 TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: The South half of Lot 1 and 2 in Block 417 of the Townsite of Port Angeles. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1410 South Cedar Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/28/08, recorded on 04/28/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1220125, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Chad L Gouge, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Coldwell Banker Mortgage, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Coldwell Banker Mortgage, its successors and assigns to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20111268546. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/15/2011 Monthly Payments $6,305.85 Late Charges $198.76 Lender's Fees & Costs $146.25 Total Arrearage $6,650.86 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $673.16 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,451.68 Total Amount Due: $8,102.54 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $160,601.21, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Chad L. Gouge 1410 South Cedar Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Chad L. Gouge 1410 South Cedar Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Chad L. Gouge 5321 Tumbleweed Drive Amarillo, TX 79110 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Chad L. Gouge 5321 Tumbleweed Drive Amarillo, TX 79110 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/12/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/12/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/15/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7283.26741) 1002.198758-FEI Pub: Oct. 16, Nov. 6, 2011

File No.: 7021.28072 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Grantee: Andrea Hartman, a single woman Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1208751 Tax Parcel ID No.: 132808-520450 Abbreviated Legal: LT 6, BK 4 MANSFIELD 3RD ADD., 5/66 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 6, Block 4, Mansfield's Third Addition to the Townsite of Forks, Washington, as per Plat Recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, page 66, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 981 8th Avenue Forks, WA 98331 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/06/07, recorded on 09/10/07, under Auditor's File No. 20071208751, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Andrea Hartman, a single woman, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Ward Lending Group, LLC., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Ward Lending Group, LLC. to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1266692. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/26/2011 Monthly Payments $28,630.42 Late Charges $1,167.66 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,438.50 Total Arrearage $31,236.58 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $540.00 Title Report $582.10 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $75.00 Total Costs $1,246.22 Total Amount Due: $32,482.80 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $132,783.34, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Andrea Hartman 981 8th Avenue Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Andrea Hartman 981 8th Avenue Forks, WA 98331 Andrea Hartman 43 South Washington Street Apt 1 Easton, MD 21601 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Andrea Hartman 43 South Washington Street Apt 1 Easton, MD 21601 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/14/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/14/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/26/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.28072) 1002.190643-FEI Pub: Sept. 25, Oct. 16, 2011

File No.: 7258.25437 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank Nat'l Trust, as trustee for WaMu Series 2007-HE1 Trust Grantee: James B. Walters, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1192181 Tax Parcel ID No.: 032902-500010 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1 John Henry Knapman Jr. Subdiv 14/67 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1, John Henry Knapman, Jr. Subdivision, as per plat recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, page 67, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/21/06, recorded on 11/30/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1192181, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James B. Walters, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, acting as receiver for the Savings Bank and pursuant to its authority under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. degrees 1821(d) to Deutsche Bank Nat'l Trust, as trustee for WaMu Series 2007-HE1 Trust, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2009 1239785. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/21/2011 Monthly Payments $98,840.00 Late Charges $5,930.40 Lender's Fees & Costs $6,142.41 Total Arrearage $110,912.81 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $472.50 Total Amount Due: $111,385.31 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $317,688.69, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James B. Walters 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 James B. Walters 3908 154th Avenue Southeast Bellevue, WA 98007 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James B. Walters 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James B. Walters 3908 154th Avenue Southeast Bellevue, WA 98007 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/26/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/26/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/21/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7258.25437) 1002.126471-FEI Pub: Sept. 25, Oct. 16, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7763.27865 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Nay Myo and Loralee A. Nielsen Myo, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2003 1101470 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033006-429040, 033006-42905 Abbreviated Legal: Lts. 1 & 2, SP 6/23 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel A: Lot 1 of Gram's Investment Co., Short Plat, recorded December 18, 1978 in Volume 6 of Short Plats, page 23, under Clallam County Recording NO. 490449, being a portion of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 6, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Parcel B: Lot 2 of Gram's Investment Co. Short Plat, recorded December 18, 1978 in Volume 6 of Short Plats, page 23, under Clallam County Recording No. 490449, being a portion of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 6, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1030 Kirner Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/11/03, recorded on 02/14/03, under Auditor's File No. 2003 1101470, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Nay Myo and Loralee A. Nielsen Myo, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, a Washington corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington corporation, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/25/2011 Monthly Payments $21,697.44 Late Charges $813.92 Lender's Fees & Costs $43.39 Total Arrearage $22,554.75 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $692.67 Statutory Mailings $19.56 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,389.73 Total Amount Due: $23,944.48 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $184,431.10, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Nay Myo 1030 Kirner Road Sequim, WA 98382 Loralee A. Nielsen Myo 1030 Kirner Road Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/24/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/24/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/25/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27865) 1002.171478-FEI Pub: Sept. 25, Oct. 16, 2011

File No.: 7037.07935 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1217531 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-009130 Abbreviated Legal: LT. 8, BK. 91, TPA 1/27 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 8, Block 91, Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/06/08, recorded on 03/11/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1217531, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254253. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/17/2011 Monthly Payments $20,407.86 Late Charges $870.40 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,300.99 Total Arrearage $24,579.25 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Total Costs $472.50 Total Amount Due: $25,051.75 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $158,422.89, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/15/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/15/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/17/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7037.07935) 1002.163195-FEI Pub: Oct. 16, Nov. 6, 2011


Jessica ‘Bloodspilla’ Carvell

Port Scandalous roller derby doll

Inside ■  Woman didn’t believe in love until . . .

Peninsula Daily News Sunday, October 16, 2011

■  Husband still grieves for his late wife ■  What would you do to make life easier for kids? Chris Tucker/for Peninsula Woman


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Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Woman didn’t believe in love till ... MARIBEL WAS 34, twice divorced. She got married the first time because she was pregnant and didn’t want her baby to be born out of wedlock. The marriage lasted two months. The second marriage was a volatile affair that managed to last 12 years. Her second husband died in 2005. “I liked my first husband and loved my second husband, but I wasn’t in love with him,” she said. “I never thought the in-love feeling really existed.”

Lightning strike And she certainly didn’t believe in love at first sight. Until March of 2007. It was a Saturday night, and she was doing what

Cheryl Lavin

Tales from the Front

she did every Saturday night. She was at a club with some family and friends. Her brother worked there as a DJ. “Suddenly, this vision crossed my path,” she said. “He took my breath away. I can remember it, as if it were yesterday. “He was straight out of GQ, with his suit jacket, tie and sunglasses sitting cocked to one side on his head. He stood there 5 feet, 9 inches, dark and handsome. I turned to tell my

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Weddings, anniversaries

Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

brothers that he was a dog of sorts and that I brought out the good in him. “He’s 12 years my junior. He says I’m his one real love. We don’t argue or fight. We work through our differences, and I still look at him the same way I did that first day. “He’s my soul mate,” she said. “This is my fairy tale, my happilyever-after. “By the way, the person he was talking to that night was a girl he was seeing, but not a girlfriend.”

Jodie Lynn

Newborn brings out baby in 3-year-old

________ Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales from the Front at her home office in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.tales fromthefront.com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.

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1A5136762

Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned.

ing person, but this wasn’t something I did all the time. He looked at me, removed the phone from his ear and hung up. He didn’t have a chance.” Maribel says she and Bobby danced and kissed and exchanged numbers, then went their separate ways. For a few weeks, they called and texted and saw each other Saturday nights. They started hooking up in April, became exclusive in July, moved in together in August and became pregnant in November. “What a busy 2007!” she said. They were married in November 2010 and now have a 3-year-old boy. “Bobby had never been married before,” she said. “He hadn’t been serious with anyone for a long time. I heard from his

116208473

Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

sister in-law, and in a blink of an eye, he was gone. “I made it my mission to find him,” she said. “The club had two sections — it was pretty big. I must have gone in circles five or six times. I was motivated, to say the least. “I’m a very daring individual. I don’t shy easily, and a little liquid courage assisted me in my endeavor. An hour or so later, there he was. “He was trying to cross a crowded dance floor with a cellphone attached to his ear,” she said. “I pointed him out to my friends. There he is! Him! He’s supposed to be mine! That is my man! “Something came over me,” she said. “It was inexplicable. I ran across the room and tugged on his arm and asked, ‘Is that phone call important?’ “I’m a daring and outgo-

Parent to Parent

I RECENTLY HAD my third child, and the second one seems to be reverting back to babyhood. Among many things, she also wants me to hold and rock her like I do the new baby. She is almost 3, and I hate to see her become so upset when I spend time with the infant. What can I do to help her make the older sibling transition without feeling guilty?

Detroit mother We had the same problem, but it occurred when our second child was born. Our oldest son was a little older than 3. He was also the first grandchild and had plenty of attention. However, when the baby came along, he very quickly grew weary of the attention being shifted away from him to his new brother. He wanted the baby’s room, crib, toys and bottle. His temperament drastically changed, and he was constantly crying. My mom decided to pick him up three times each week instead of the normal one and spend additional time with him all the while explaining that baby Jack could not join them because the place or trip was only for big brothers. Turn

to

Lynn/8


Husband grieving still for late wife DEAR JOHN: LAST year, I lost my wife to breast cancer. I have had a very difficult time accepting this loss. Up until the time that she got seriously ill, it never occurred to me that she would leave me behind. Being a male and being seven years older, I always thought that I’d go first. I know my two grown children worry about my continued distress over the loss of their mother, but I just can’t seem to recover my balance. Any suggestions would be appreciated. — Needing Some Advice in Youngstown, Ohio Dear Needing: October is breast cancer awareness month. I don’t have to tell you that you’re one of tens of thousands of men who have lost a dear partner to this devastating disease. But there is hope for the future. First, you know that you were loving partners. If you had gone before her, would you have wanted the rest of her life to be one of unending sadness or one of loss, acceptance and a commitment to move on? Second, you should realize that just in reaching out to me, you are processing your pain and accepting your loss. Third, join in the work to help find a cure for this dreadful disease. Nearly 40,000 women will die this year because of breast cancer, but many more will survive. Support research and a cure. It’s the kindest act you can do in her honor. Dear John: I have a terrible habit of blowing up over small things. When this happens, my partner, “Alan,” shuts down, and we

Generations

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Mars vs.

Venus John Gray

you can talk through your actual concerns. The goal is not to lay blame, but to resolve it together. By sticking to your written word, you’ll accomplish your goal.

Dear John: I have a very simple question, but there probably is no simple seem to argue for hours answer. after before resolving things. My wife and I were both Alan says he can’t live wondering how you define like this, and I agree. We “spoiled” children. We’re love each other very much, expecting our first child in and we get along wonderthree months, and we fully more than 90 percent would appreciate your of the time, but the other guidance. 10 percent, or less, does — Wanting to Get it serious damage to our relaRight in Philadelphia tionship. We both are afraid of Dear Wanting to Get losing our “soul mate” over it Right: Obviously, you a technicality. If we can’t have some time to look and find a way to diffuse my learn from others, but your temper, will our relationdesire to learn more about ship fail? parenting now is a sign of — Seeking a Better good things to come. Way in Pittsburgh, Pa. What society sees as a spoiled child is a situation Dear Seeking: When in which a parent has you find yourself at the failed to define boundaries boiling point, don’t get ver- for the child and failed to bal. Instead, leave the follow through on defined house. Go for a long walk. consequences should those When you get back, find boundaries be crossed. a quiet room, and take out Adults don’t always a pen and paper. Organize agree on issues that need your thoughts. boundaries. What is the real issue In any regard, children, behind your concern? What like adults, will test the fears do these concerns boundaries however and raise within you? How wherever they are imposed. would you like to see this Parents who firmly but lovissue resolved? What can ingly stick to their boundyour partner do or say to aries on important issues help the two of you resolve will rarely have their chilthis? dren called “spoiled” by When going through those on the outside lookthis process, leave out ing in. words that suggest blame. ________ Then, write about the love John Gray is the author of you feel for your partner. Men Are From Mars, Women Are This process should help From Venus. diffuse your anger. If you have a question, write to If it works, then ask John in care of this newspaper or your partner to suggest a by e-mail at: comments@mars time in which the two of venusliving.com.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

3

Perspectives of three Peninsula women Photos

and interviews by

Dave Logan

This week’s question: If you could do one thing to make life easier for your kids or kids of this country, what would it be?

“Get rid of drugs. They are just killing America, especially our kids. They are the biggest problem we have besides the politicians. “A few friends of mine had kids involved with drugs. I really don’t know what the answer is to getting rid of them, though. The temptations are so real, like with meth and heroin. “We need to help our kids and their future.”

“Less homework, so parents like me can have more time with their kids. “I have a child in middle school, and as it is now I don’t get to see her that much. With less homework, we could go outside together, play together, do crafts indoors and baking, too. “Doing things together is what I am trying to say. You only have your kids for a short time. We need quality family time without any electronics.”

“More money and support for the education of our kids, and free nannies for all moms. I just had to throw that in. “I feel education is often overlooked. Kids can’t get enough supplies. Classes, at times, seem too large, and teachers are underpaid for all the work they do. “I could think of a million things to help kids, but it boils down to students and getting a good start. Education is the key, I believe.”

Dana Morger, 55 day care provider Quilcene

Jen O’Steen, 42 service coordinator Port Angeles

Christy Henningsen, 31 dental hygiene student Port Angeles


4

Sunday, October 16, 2011

No

shrinking

violet

Women find family on roller derby track By Diane Urbani for

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

de la

Peninsula Woman

Paz

PORT ANGELES ­— The women are proud to be Port Scandalous: up from zero experience and coach-free. And they are the real thing: a rollerderby team, just a year and a half old and gearing up for the next bout versus the Spokannibals from, you got it, Spokane, this Saturday night at the Olympic Skate Center. “I used to skate here as a kid,” says Jessica Carvell, a founding member of Port Scandalous. Then, like a blond bobcat on wheels, she sweeps onto the rink for Monday-night practice.

Kelsy and Matthew Martin

An

‘Let’s do this’ Back in early 2010, Carvell hadn’t the foggiest idea what roller derby was — or what it has turned into. Then she and some friends went to a Rat City Rollergirls bout at KeyArena in Seattle. They were electrified. Carvell and her posse, including Serena Staples and Holly Wickersham, said: “OK. Let’s do this.” “This” is modern derby: jamming for the point, blocking, pivoting and hitting hard with the shoulders and the hips — all in booty shorts, fishnets and such. “The less you wear, the cooler you are,” says Carvell. It’s fun to be feminine, after all, and it is especially fun to go for it on the flat track.

bouts between teams across the region. Carvell, whose full-time day job is in admissions at Olympic Medical Center, is officially treasurer and accounts-payable person for Port Scandalous.

Learning the sport

Alter ego

Not that Carvell and crew knew how to play at first. But friends from other derby teams in Western Washington — including Aimee “BrawlyAnna” Durgan, who grew up in Port Angeles and now lives in Port Orchard — came to help them train. And over the past 18 months, the players have gone to boot camps and

On the rink, she’s Bloodspilla, a name she lifted from a computer game her husband, Tom, used to play. She is known, too, as “mother hen” to her teammates, one who knows what-all is going on with each. Carvell proudly declares that she has a derby wife — sort of like a best buddy — in Heather “Milady Misery” Harris.

Chris Tucker/for Peninsula Woman

Serena Staples, left, and Jessica Carvell skated as girls growing up in Port Angeles; today they are bouting players on the Port Scandalous roller derby team. And OK, she also has a derby “girlfriend,” Kari “Cherry Pi” Bailey. They’re all part of the team’s stretchy-strong web of support.

Frank and Irene Brown on their wedding day

Derby devotion “We’re for the skaters, by the skaters,” adds Carvell, 36. Sure, Port Scandalous has had coaches. But they couldn’t devote enough time to the team. The derby dolls are devoted: they hold three practices per week in addition to bouts every month. Turn

to

Carvell/7

Frank and Irene Brown of Port Ludlow celebrated their 75th wedding anniversary Oct. 15 at the Weiser Vendome in Weiser, Idaho. Frank Brown married Irene Spear on Oct. 17, 1936, in Weiser, Idaho. Mr. Brown was an

Th

expert in concrete, an they traveled to many ferent construction si He was also a logger carpenter. They moved to Ala in 1964, and Mr. Brow worked as a superinte dent on various const tion projects while Mr


Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Martin — Jones Kelsy Jones and Matthew Martin, both of Port Angeles, were married Aug. 13 at the Lariat Hall in Port Angeles. John Nutting officiated at the 5:30 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Michael and Linda Jones, and the groom is the son of Mark and Cora Martin. All are of Port Angeles. Tonya Jones, sister of the bride, was maid of honor, and Shamber Edwards, Nick Bielby and Amy Meldrum were bride’s attendants. David Martin, brother of the groom, was best man, and Raymond Parke, Jordan

Lee and Shavik Pearson were groom’s attendants. Amber Settle was flower girl, and Hunter Bielby and Gavin Horn were ringbearers. The bride graduated from Port Angeles High School in 2004 and from Peninsula College in 2006. She is employed by Starman Inc. The groom graduated from Port Angeles High School in 2004. He is employed by Les Schwab Tire Center. The couple honeymooned on the Oregon coast. They live in Port Angeles.

aska wn entrucrs.

Chelsie and Adam Carmichael

Carmichael — Bradshaw Marcus and Amy Logan

Logan — Meisner

Frank and Irene Brown today.

he Browns

nd y difites. and

5

Weddings

nniversary

y.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Brown worked for the state of Alaska. The Browns built a cedar home in Juneau, where they enjoyed boating and fishing as well as entertaining visitors from the Lower 48. For the past 10 years, they have lived near Port

Ludlow with their small Schnauzer, Susie Q. The couple’s family includes Tracy Brown, Patricia Strafford, Phyllis Anderson and Rod Brown. Their oldest son, Frank, is deceased. They also have 17 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

Amy Meisner and Marcus Logan of Vancouver, Wash., were married Aug. 21 at an outdoor wedding at the Fairgate Inn in Camas. Pastor Jim Fitzpatrick officiated at the 2 p.m. ceremony. Pastor Fitzpatrick read from a Bible that belonged to the groom’s grandfather, the Rev Paul Logan. The bride is the daughter of Howard and Pamela Meisner of Vancouver. The groom is the son of David and Marcia Logan of Port Angeles. Jodi Foust was the maid of honor. Tessa Vasilas, Jenny Peterson, Wendi Meisner and Dayna Bailey were bridesmaids, and Kayla Meisner was junior bridesmaid. Adam Logan was best man. Jon Cummings, Chris Cummings, Chris Hartmann and Jeff Logan were groomsmen, and Charles Logan was junior groomsman. Clara Stickney was the

flower girl, and Jacob Meisner was the ringbearer. Guitarist Warren Horsley of Port Angeles provided special music, and a second follow-up reception was held Sept. 17 at the Port Angeles Senior Center. The bride graduated from Prairie High School in Vancouver, Wash., in 1993 and attended Clark College. She is employed by Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Ore. The groom graduated from Port Angeles High School in 1997 and from Central Washington University in 2003. He taught at Port Angeles High School from 2005 to 2009. He currently is finishing his master’s degree through Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif., and substitute teaching at the high school level. The couple honeymooned on the island of Kauai in Hawaii. They live in Vancouver, Wash.

Chelsie Bradshaw of Port Angeles and Adam Carmichael of Yakima were married Aug. 20 in Eden Valley at Pooh’s Ponds. The Rev. Andrew McCarty officiated at the 5:30 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Dan and Pam Bradshaw, and the groom is the son of Bill and Debbie Carmichael. All are of Port Angeles. Tabatha Meadows was matron of honor, and Kristen Williams and Lena Lemke were bridesmaids. Steve Menkal was best man, and John Williams and Brent Lemke were groomsmen. Anna Menkal was

flower girl, and Kamron Meadows was ringbearer. The bride wore her recently deceased aunt’s wedding ring as the “something blue.” The bride graduated from Port Angeles High School in 2005. She is employed by First Federal. The groom graduated from Port Angeles High School in 2003 and from Peninsula College in 2005. He is employed by C&J Excavating. The couple are planning a honeymoon for their first anniversary. They live in Port Angeles.

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Peninsula Woman Every Sunday in

Peninsula Daily News


6

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

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Sunday, October 16, 2011

7

Carvell: B, junior teams provides fresh meat decades before she arrived at a Port Scandalous practice last year, has found a new kind of network here. She might not have found these women friends “on the outside,” she says, “but now they are like my family.” Staples, whose derby name is Scarlett O’TearYa, wants women to know: “No matter what your background, you would have a place here.”

Continued from 4 Past opponents include Toxic 253 from Tacoma, the Oly Rollers from Olympia and the Whidbey Island Rollergirls. So Port Scandalous, with 14 bouting players on the roster, has two captains, Wickersham, aka WickedSlam, and Molly “Stone Cold StunHer” Crabtree. Angie “Diva DerailHer” Wilhelm serves as team trainer — and with these three, that old coach thing is superfluous. In addition, the team has six recent “fresh meat” graduates — relative newcomers — on its new B squad. Oh, and there’s the junior team, which has in its ranks Maddelyn, Carvell’s 13-year-old daughter. Her eldest, 17-year-old Karli Carvell, is waiting to join “the big league,” as her mother says. And Olivia Carvell, 10, isn’t old enough for the junior team but brings her homework to the rink on practice nights.

Family affair “ So it’s a family sport,” Carvell says, adding that roller derby bears no resemblance to its 1970s counterpart: There’s no hair-pulling nor fighting, and the women check their workaday stresses at the door. On derby nights, “you’re

Checking it out

Chris Tucker/for Peninsula Woman

The Port Scandalous team including, from front left, Kari “Cherry Pi” Bailey, Serena “Scarlett O’Tearya” Staples and Jessica “Bloodspilla” Carvell, has won five bouts in a row since June. just skating,” says Carvell. That’s shorthand for the fact that on that track, you are a trained athlete, a strategist, part of a lean machine focused on scoring. “It’s a total team thing. We rely on each other,” Carvell says, adding that the skaters come from various walks of life. Not everybody was an athlete before showing up at the rink; Carvell certainly wasn’t. “I played soccer when I was 12,” she recalls. “That was it.” Size doesn’t matter

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Dylan Wickersham, 16, son of Wicked Slam, became a student of roller derby in summer 2010. “When he gets interested in something, he studies and reads until he knows everything about it,” says his mom. Dylan helps referee, puts together player lineups and leads the players through some intense calisthenics at practice. They lift and lower their legs through a set of 20 repetitions, for example, while wearing their heavy skates.

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agement. Her teammates are ever grappling with that issue, too. It can be challenging to “meld with all of the estrogen running around,” she says, “until we get on the Time management floor.” Then, she adds, Now that she’s a mother, everybody skates and the wife and full-time staffer at drama dissipates. the hospital, Carvell well Staples, who had not knows the art of time man- skated for two and a half either, Carvell says. One look at these women, and it’s abundantly clear: Variety is the spice of Port Scandalous.

Monday nights are for “fresh meat,” which means women age 18 and older can come check out the scene at Olympic Skate Center. If one decides to go for it, there are boot camps — in Seattle, Portland, even Kauai, Hawaii. Then there is the junior league for 12- to 17-yearolds, on which Staples’ daughter Tyra, 14, skates. “We train hard. Really hard, three nights a week,” adds Staples, whose day job is emergency room

nurse at Olympic Medical Center. Port Scandalous has won its past five bouts; when they’re playing at home, it’s standing-room only for spectators. And these days, they’re working with someone who will never be able to join the team, but who is deep into derby.


8

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Carvell: Derby

is a workout

Continued from 7 with a grin. Carvell adds that each Then, at the blow of the new player decides how much extra boot-camp whistle, they leap to their training time she wants to feet and bolt for the oppoput in along with the site end of the rink, where Olympic Skate Center they drop and do some practices. more. “They set their own Dylan, of course, has an boundaries, and we welironic nickname: Dilly come them,” she says. Dally, “because he always But once they learn to makes us try to hurry up,” skate like this, “they’re Wickersham says usually hooked.”

Lynn: Share

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Port Scandalous bouts PORT SCANDALOUS, THE women’s roller derby team from Port Angeles, takes on the Spokannibals at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Olympic Skate Center, 707 S. Chase St., Port Angeles. Tickets to the bout are $10 in advance at Bada Bean! Bada Bloom!, 1105 E. Front St., or $12 at the door if any are left by Saturday night. Next month’s bout pits Port Angeles’ derby dolls against Trouble Brewing, a team of Seattle-area Starbucks staffers, Nov. 12 at the Olympic Skate Center. To find out more about the team, visit www.Port ScandalousRollerDerby.com or search for Port Scandalous on Facebook. Peninsula Woman

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S

APPAREL

Got an idea for a feature story? Peninsula Woman is always looking for   suggestions. Please   e-mail yours to . . . diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com

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N O W AVA I L A B L E AT The “Original” Since 1957 19701278

Continued from 2 ter helper. Praise her for every little thing she does for the baby and you. This helped so much When the baby sleeps that soon he started getand your energy level is ting more into the big not drained, spend one-onbrother role and actually one time with her doing started helping with the baby by him bringing toys, simple but meaningful activities. blankets, bottles, etc. Keep your patience and — Becca Williams stay calm should an emoin Detroit tional meltdown occur and try to reestablish a sense of From Jodie normalcy within the houseWhile your daughter is hold. almost 3, she still very A little extra hug will go much needs attention and a long way in this situation. requires help doing normal Can you help? daily activities. Much of your time before We hear a lot about the new birth was most bullies today. But it’s usulikely spent doting on her if ally between kids. I am an you stayed at home, and if elementary school teacher you worked outside the and feel bullied by the home, she still probably got principal. most of your personal time. How can I approach her It is hard for kids around about this without fear of this age to adapt to anylosing my job? There are thing new that upsets the others who feel the same balance in their life, espeway, but they are not willcially if he or she requires ing to speak out. constant attention and ________ makes odd crying noises. Jodie Lynn shares parenting Share as much as you tips through her weekly column. can about babies with her Write her at Parent to Parent, through a book or video 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwhere the focus is on the wood, MO 63040 or direct2contact@ parenttoparent.com via e-mail. older child being a big sis-

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Sunday Fun

Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau

Classic Peanuts by Charles Schulz

For Better or For Worse by Lynn Johnston

Dennis the Menace by Hank Ketcham

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday Fun

Blondie by Dean Young and John Marshall

H A G A R the horrible by Dik Browne

The Wizard of Id by Jeff Parker

Sunday, October 16, 2011

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Sunday, October 16, 2011

Sunday Fun

Zits by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

B.C. by Mastroianni and Hart

Born Loser By Art and Chip Sansom

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