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Springtime singtime

Thursday Mostly cloudy today with a shower C10

Live music available all across the Peninsula C1

Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

50 cents

March 24, 2011

Lights out in PT 1,200 lose power for 90 minutes By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — More than 1,200 downtown Port Townsend customers had no electrical power for about an hour and a half Wednesday after two transformers blew at around 1:45 p.m. Power was restored in stages, with the majority coming back online at 3:15 p.m. and the remainder about 45 minutes later. During the outage, Port Townsend City Hall, the Jefferson County Courthouse and all merchants in the downtown and uptown areas were without power.

Puget Sound Energy reported that about 1,264 customers lost power. PSE crews inspected the transformers and wiring at the Kearney Street substation — which controls the downtown and uptown shopping districts as well as Sims Way — and found no specific cause for the outage, said Mackenzie McDowell, spokeswoman “We don’t know what happened,” McDowell said. “Something tripped the circuit, but we don’t know what.” Joanna Sanders, Port Townsend assistant city clerk,

was in Don’s Pharmacy when the outage struck. She heard “a loud pop” even though the substation was several blocks away.

‘Loud pop’ The outage blanked out traffic lights at major intersections. Port Townsend Police Sgt. Troy Surber directed traffic at the traffic signal at the intersection of Water and Taylor streets, while portable stop signs were placed at Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News the corner of Kearney Street and Port Townsend Police Sgt. Troy Surbe directs traffic Sims Way. Turn

downtown Wednesday afternoon while electricity was out

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Successful ‘shakedown’

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Landscaper David Tavis adds plants to the area outside of City Hall and the newly paved portion of Water Street in Port Townsend, scheduled to open Friday.

Activities planned to mark downtown renovations in PT Zach Simomson-Bond

The schooner Adventuress is shown during its “shakedown cruise” Wednesday afternoon.

Adventuress ship-shape to resume public sailings By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The schooner Adventuress took a “shakedown cruise” Wednesday afternoon, giving the 98-year-old vessel its first workout since an extensive series of repairs this winter. “Everything was great,” said Capt. Daniel Evans shortly after docking. “The boat is in better shape than it ever has been.” The renovation project included restoration of the stern, reframing the bow and, most significantly, the replacement of the horn timber — the key structural extension of the keel that runs to the transom. The projects were partially subsidized by a $125,000 historical grant awarded by American Express to Sound Experience, a nonprofit organization based in Port Townsend that provides educational programs and cruises aboard the tall ship built

Final layer of asphalt laid; Water Street scheduled to reopen to traffic Friday By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — With the final layer of asphalt laid on Water Street on Wednesday and the street scheduled to reopen to traffic Friday, plans are in the works for events over the next two months to commemorate the new Civic District. “There is a recognition by the city [of Port Townsend] that these renovations have taken a very long time, so these events are an offering to the public,” said Teresa Verraes, Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce executive director.

“They will really bring that end of town into focus.” The downtown redevelopment project includes the repaving of Water and Madison streets, the construction of a new Pope Marine Park and the $1.17 million renovation of the old police station into a visitor center. After Water Street is reopened — in a project that included replacing a 100-year-old waterline — the next step will be the paving of both sides of Madison Street, scheduled for completion April 15. Turn

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Hood Canal Bridge retrofit wins contractors’ award Peninsula Daily News Elizabeth T. Becker

Capt. Korie Griffith gives her 9-month-old son, Owen, a spin at the helm of the schooner Adventuress during Wednesday’s outing. in 1913. The Adventuress earned the American Express award by capturing first place in an Internet vote contest last summer. In a recent blog, Capt. Korie Griffith said all components of

this project were slightly redesigned for added strength, ventilation and ease of future repair without compromising the vessel’s original lines. Turn

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LAS VEGAS — The Hood Canal Bridge retrofit and replacement project has been named one of the most significant construction projects of 2010 by the Associated General Contractors of America. As a result, the project’s contractor, Kiewit-General, was one of 20 firms to receive the association’s Aon Build America Award, the association announced Wednesday from Arlington, Va.

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“These projects require tremendous skill, extraordinary craftsmanship and dogged determination from their contractors,” said Ted Aadland, the association’s president and the CEO of Portland, Ore.-based Aadland Evans Constructors Inc. “Frankly, they are the kind of projects many of us dread starting and all of us dream of completing.” Turn

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Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 95th year, 70th issue — 3 sections, 22 pages

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Business B4 Classified C5 Comics C4 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby C4 Deaths A6 Lottery A2 Movies C10 Nation/World A3

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UpFront

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Chris Brown destroys dressing room CHRIS BROWN TRASHED his dressing room at “Good Morning America” and broke a window with a chair Tuesday in New York after co-host Robin Roberts asked him about his attack on Rihanna, according to a person familiar with the show. The person was not authorized to discuss the

matter and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Security was called Brown but not police. Brown was on the ABC morning show Tuesday to promote his new album, “F.A.M.E.,” released the same day. During his interview with Roberts, she asked him about the 2009 attack on his then-girlfriend — preceding her questions by noting he

had been “very good” about talking about the attack. A clearly agitated Brown tried to deflect the line of questioning, saying he was past that and wanted to focus on his new CD. Roberts laughed and thanked Brown for letting her discuss that matter with him, and after the interview, Brown performed. But instead of performing another song for the online audience, as he was scheduled to do, he went to his dressing room and started smashing things, according to the person.

Passings By The Associated Press

ELIZABETH TAYLOR, 79, went from dazzling beauty in her glory years to self-described ruin in old age. She spent almost her entire life in the public eye, from tiny dancer performing at age 3 before the Ms. Taylor future queen in 1991 of England to child screen star to scandalous home-wrecker to three-time Academy Award winner for both acting and humanitarian work. A diva, she made a spectacle of her private life — eight marriages, ravenous appetites for drugs, booze and food, ill health that sparked headlines constantly proclaiming her at death’s door. All of it often overshadowed the fireworks she created on screen. Yet for all her infamy and indulgences, Ms. Taylor died Wednesday a beloved idol, a woman who somehow held onto her status as one of old Hollywood’s last larger-thanlife legends, adored even as she waned to a tabloid figure. Ms. Taylor died of congestive heart failure at Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she had been hospitalized for about six weeks. “We know, quite simply, that the world is a better place for Mom having lived in it. Her legacy will never fade, her spirit will always be with us, and her love will live forever in our hearts,” her son, Michael Wilding, said in a statement. A star from her teen years in such films as “National Velvet,” ‘‘Little Women” and “Father of the Bride,” Ms. Taylor won bestactress Oscars as a high-end hooker in 1960s “BUtterfield 8” and an alcoholic shrew in a savage marriage in 1966’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” In the latter, she starred with husband Richard Burton, their on-screen emotional tempest considered a glimpse of their stormy real lives (they divorced in 1974, remarried in 1975 and divorced again a year later). For all the ferocity of her screen roles and the turmoil of her life, Ms. Taylor was remembered for her gentler, life-affirming side.

AIDS activism had become Ms. Taylor’s real work long before she gave up acting. Her passion in raising money and AIDS awareness brought her an honorary Oscar, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, in 1993. Ms. Taylor received the Legion of Honor, France’s most prestigious award, in 1987 for AIDS efforts. In 2000, Queen Elizabeth II made Ms. Taylor a dame — the female equivalent of a knight — for her services to charity and the entertainment industry. Ms. Taylor herself, however, suffered through the decades. She fell from a horse while shooting 1944’s “National Velvet,” causing a back injury that plagued her for the rest of her life. Her third husband, producer Michael Todd, died in a plane crash after only a year of marriage. Ms. Taylor had lifethreatening bouts with pneumonia, a brain tumor and congestive heart failure in her 60s and 70s, and from drug and alcohol abuse, including a 35-year addiction to sleeping pills and painkillers, which prompted her to check in to the Betty Ford Center. She had at least 20 major operations, including replacements of both hip joints and surgery to remove the benign brain tumor. Ms. Taylor got four straight Oscar nominations from 1957-1960, for “Raintree County,” the back-toback Tennessee Williams adaptations “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” and “Suddenly, Last Summer,” then her win for “BUtterfield 8,” a film

Did You Win? State lottery results

Wednesday’s Daily Game: 4-8-4 Wednesday’s Hit 5: 03-07-16-31-38 Wednesday’s Keno: 02-03-04-06-07-09-12-1620-21-23-25-47-48-57-6073-75-79-80 Wednesday’s Lotto: 12-13-18-24-30-38 Wednesday’s Match 4: 01-02-20-21 Wednesday’s Powerball: 05-15-26-28-32, Powerball: 9, Power Play: 2

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Have you filled your income taxes yet?

Yes 

No 

55.1% 33.0%

OMG — it’s that time!  4.4% The Associated Press

Elizabeth Taylor is shown at the premiere of “The Lady with the Lamp” at the Warner Theater in London on Sept. 22, 1951. she later disparaged. Not long before Burton’s death, as her Hollywood career was winding down and her first stint in rehab lay before her, Ms. Taylor, turning 50 at the time, looked back on her life selfcritically but unapologetically. “I don’t entirely approve of some of the things I have done or am or have been,” she said. “But I’m me. God knows, I’m me.”

Don’t have to pay  7.5% Total votes cast: 1,101 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ The incorrect solution to Tuesday’s Jumble puzzle was published Wednesday on Page C5. The correct solution appears above.

_________

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) A well-illuminated drafting room 28 feet wide is now home to the Clallam County Engineering Department, just in time for the staff to complete flood control plans for the county. The new space in the Clallam County Courthouse’s garret, which was added on a few years ago to accommodate federal Works Progress Administration draftsmen, also includes an office for County Engineer Herbert W. Pollock. The whole area is illuminated by seven skylights.

1961 (50 years ago) Results of a questionnaire prepared by state Rep. Paul H. Conner of Port Angeles and published twice in the Port Angeles Evening News have been tabulated. The strongest reaction of the 11 questions came on whether parents should be responsible for the malicious acts of their children.

A whopping 96 percent answered yes. A total of 94 percent said they were against relaxing liquor laws during the Seattle World’s Fair in 1962. And 73 percent believed the minimum driving age should be raised to 18 years.

1986 (25 years ago) Dr. Robert Littlejohn, who set up his family medical practice in Sequim in 1948, is building the first independent living center for senior citizens in Clallam County. Littlejohn and his wife, Jo, are partners with Dr. Stan Berman and wife, Nan, and son and daugh-

Laugh Lines IN DALLAS, A warehouse full of energy drinks caught fire. Firefighters say the fire raged for five hours and then totally crashed. Conan O’Brien

ter-in-law William and Esther Littlejohn in the 66-unit center at Fifth and Hendrickson streets, Sequim. The elder Littlejohn developed one of the area’s first nursing homes in 1974 when he and others built Sherwood Manor, located nearby. Then 10 years ago, he was part of a 10-person group that developed the Sequim Medical Plaza.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots WHILE FUELING AT a Sequim gas station, two excited dogs inside a pickup truck jump on the door lock button, locking the motorist out. The doggies were still wagging their tails as their irked master called for a locksmith . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, March 24, the 83rd day of 2011. There are 282 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On March 24, 1765, Britain enacted the Quartering Act, requiring American colonists to provide temporary housing to British soldiers. On this date: ■  In 1882, German scientist Robert Koch announced in Berlin that he had discovered the bacillus responsible for tuberculosis. ■  In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill granting future independence to the Philippines. ■  In 1944, in occupied Rome, the Nazis executed more than 300 civilians in reprisal for an attack

by Italian partisans the day before that had killed 32 German soldiers. ■  In 1955, the Tennessee Williams play “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” opened on Broadway. ■  In 1958, rock ’n’ roll singer Elvis Presley was inducted into the Army in Memphis, Tenn. ■  In 1976, the president of Argentina, Isabel Peron, was deposed by her country’s military. ■  In 1980, one of El Salvador’s most respected Roman Catholic Church leaders, Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero, was shot to death by a sniper as he celebrated Mass in San Salvador. ■  In 1989, the supertanker Exxon Valdez ran aground on a reef in Alaska’s Prince William Sound and began leaking 11 mil-

lion gallons of crude oil. ■  In 1995, after 20 years, British soldiers stopped routine patrols in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ■  In 1999, NATO launched airstrikes against Yugoslavia, marking the first time in its 50-year existence that it had ever attacked a sovereign country. Thirty-nine people were killed when fire erupted in the Mont Blanc tunnel in France and burned for two days. ■  Ten years ago: Three car bombs exploded almost simultaneously in southern Russia, killing some two dozen people in the worst act of terror to hit Russia outside warring Chechnya in months. A Twin Otter plane crashed into a mountainside house on the

Caribbean island of St. Barthelemy, killing all 19 people onboard and one person on the ground. U.S. skater Michelle Kwan won her fourth World Figure Skating title in Vancouver, B.C.; Irina Slutskaya of Russia got the silver, and American Sarah Hughes earned the bronze. ■  Five years ago: Thousands of people across the country protested against legislation cracking down on illegal immigrants. ■  One year ago: Keeping a promise he’d made to anti-abortion Democratic lawmakers to assure passage of historic health care legislation, President Barack Obama signed an executive order against using federal funds to pay for elective abortions covered by private insurance.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 24, 2011

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Briefly: Nation Anti-abortion bills advance in GOP-led states NEW YORK — Dozens of bills are advancing through statehouses nationwide that would put an array of new obstacles — legal, financial and psychological — in the paths of women seeking abortions. The tactics vary: mandatory sonograms and anti-abortion counseling, sweeping limits on insurance coverage, bans on abortions after 20 Daugaard weeks of pregnancy. To abortion-rights activists, they add up to the biggest political threat since the Roe v. Wade decision of 1973 that legalized abortion nationwide. What’s different this year is not the raw number of antiabortion bills, but the fact that many of the toughest, most substantive measures have a good chance of passage due to gains by conservative Republicans in last year’s legislative and gubernatorial elections. On Tuesday, South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard signed into law a bill that would impose a longest-in-the-nation waiting period of three days before women could have an abortion — and also require them to undergo counseling at pregnancy help centers that discourage abortions.

BP oil spill probed NEW ORLEANS — The

blowout preventer that should have stopped the BP oil spill cold failed because of faulty design and a bent piece of pipe, a testing firm hired by the government said Wednesday in a report that appears to shift some blame for the disaster away from the oil giant and toward those who built and maintained the 300-ton safety device. The report by the Norwegian firm Det Norske Veritas is not the final word on the Deepwater Horizon disaster. But it helps answer one of the lingering mysteries nearly a year later: why the blowout preventer that sat at the wellhead and was supposed to prevent a spill in case of an explosion didn’t do its job.

Teacher inquiry PHOENIX — A metropolitan Phoenix school district has launched an inquiry into a substitute teacher who wrote a letter that portrayed Hispanic students in a harsh light and was read aloud last week at the Arizona Legislature during a debate on an immigration bill. The Glendale Elementary School District said it has determined that some statements by teacher Tony Hill in his letter to Senate President Russell Pearce were inaccurate. In the letter, Hill said a majority of the eighth-graders he had recently taught at a Glendale school had refused to say the Pledge of Allegiance and declared that Americans had stolen their land. Hill also wrote that while substitute teaching in the area, he came to believe that “most of the Hispanic students do not want to be educated but rather [want to] be gang members and gangsters.” The Associated Press

Briefly: World Radiation level in water higher than standard

lis in Jerusalem in several years. A blast Israel quickly blamed on Palestinian militants ripped through a bus stop in Jerusalem on Wednesday, killing a woman, wounding two dozen other peoTOKYO — Radiation leaking ple and intensifying fears that a from Japan’s tsunami-damaged period of relative calm could be nuclear power plant has caused ending as hopes for a negotiated Tokyo’s tap water to exceed peace fade. safety standards for infants to Violence has been on the rise, drink, officials said Wednesday, with the knife slaying this sending anxiety levels soaring month of a Jewish settler family over the nation’s food and water as they slept and the deaths of supply. civilians in Gaza by Israeli Residents cleared store strikes Tuesday in retaliation shelves of bottled water after for rocket fire from the HamasTokyo Gov. Shintaro Ishihara ruled strip. said levels of radioactive iodine Israeli Prime Minister Benjain tap water were more than min Netanyahu warned militwice what is considered safe for tants not to test Israel’s “iron babies. will,” and vowed a tough Officials begged those in the response to the bombing. city to buy only what they needed, saying hoarding could 15 killed in assault hurt the thousands of people without any water in areas devDARAA, Syria — Syrian astated by the March 11 earthpolice launched a relentless quake and tsunami. assault Wednesday on a neigh“I’ve never seen anything borhood sheltering anti-governlike this,” clerk Toru Kikutaka ment protesters, fatally shooting said, surveying the downtown at least 15 in an operation that Tokyo supermarket where the began before dawn, witnesses entire stock of bottled water said. sold out almost immediately At least six were killed in the after the news broke, despite a early morning attack on the allimit of two 2-liter bottles per Omari mosque in the southern customer. agricultural city of Daraa, The unsettling new develop- where protesters have taken to ment affecting Japan’s largest the streets in calls for reforms city, home to around 13 million and political freedoms, witpeople, added to growing fears nesses said. over the nation’s food supply. An activist in contact with people in Daraa said police shot Israel bombs Hamas another three people protesting JERUSALEM — Israeli war- in its Roman-era city center after dusk. planes hit Hamas targets in Six more bodies were found Gaza early today, retaliating for later in the day, the activist rocket attacks on Israeli cities, as tension peaked over the first said. deadly bombing targeting IsraeThe Associated Press

Gadhafi tanks forced to back off two cities By Maggie Michael and Ryan Lucas The Associated Press

BENGHAZI, Libya — NATO ships began patrolling off Libya’s coast Wednesday as airstrikes, missiles and energized rebels forced Moammar Gadhafi’s tanks to roll back from two key western cities, including one that was the hometown of army officers who tried to overthrow him in 1993. Libya’s opposition took haphazard steps to form a government in the east, as they and the U.S.-led force protecting them girded for prolonged and costly fighting. Despite disorganization among the rebels — and confusion over who would ultimately run the international operation — coalition airstrikes and missiles seemed to thwart Gadhafi’s efforts to rout his opponents, at least for now.

Fuel depot hit Coalition aircraft hit a fuel depot in Tripoli, a senior government official told reporters in a late-night news conference. Deputy Foreign Minister Khaled Kaim at first denied reports that Gadhafi’s compound in Tripoli was hit earlier, then bactracked and said he had no information about that. Other targets Wednesday were near Benghazi and Misrata, he said. U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates acknowledged there is no clear end to the international military enforcement of the no-fly zone over Libya, but President Barack Obama said it “absolutely” will not lead to a U.S. land invasion. From Ajdabiya in the east to Misrata in the west, the coalition’s targets included Libyan troops’ mechanized forces, mobile surface-to-air missile sites and lines of communications that supply “their beans and their bullets,” said Rear Adm. Gerard Hueber, a top U.S. officer in the campaign in Libya. He asserted that Gadhafi’s air force has essentially been defeated. He said no Libyan aircraft had attempted to fly over the previous 24 hours. “Those aircraft have either been destroyed or rendered inoperable,” Hueber told Pentagon

The Associated Press

A Libyan supporter of Moammar Gadhafi displays his new automatic weapon during a staged demonstration in BanWaled, Libya, on Wednesday. reporters by phone from the U.S. command ship in the Mediterranean Sea. A doctor in Misrata said Gadhafi’s tanks fled after the airstrikes, giving a much-needed reprieve to the besieged coastal city, which is inaccessible to human rights monitors or journalists.

Tanks fled after airstrike The airstrikes struck the aviation academy and a vacant lot outside the central hospital, the doctor said. “Today, for the first time in a week, the bakeries opened their doors,” the doctor said, speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals if Gadhafi’s forces take Libya’s third-largest city, 125 miles southeast of Tripoli.

Neither the rebels nor Gadhafi has mustered the force for an outright victory, raising concerns of a prolonged conflict. Gates said no one was ever under any illusion that the assault would last just two or three weeks. He had no answer when asked about a possible stalemate if Gadhafi hunkers down, and the coalition lacks U.N. authorization to target him. Obama, when asked about an exit strategy during an interview with the Spanish-language network Univision, didn’t lay out a vision for ending the international action, but rather said: “The exit strategy will be executed this week in the sense that we will be pulling back from our much more active efforts to shape the environment.”

U.S. role in Libya costs hundreds of millions; price tag could rise By Donna Cassata

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Stretched thin by two wars, the U.S. military is spending upward of $1 billion in an international assault to destroy Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s air defenses and save rebels from likely defeat, according to analysts and a rough calculation of the military operation so far. Missiles fired from submarines in the Mediterranean, bombs dropped by B-2 stealth bombers and an array of warplanes launching airstrikes over the northern portion of Libya easily total hundreds of millions of dollars. The campaign entered its fifth day on Wednesday. The Obama administration isn’t talking overall cost, but the magnitude of the military campaign, the warships and aircraft deployed and the munitions used

Quick Read

provide some information to estimate the growing price tag. As of Tuesday, the coalition had fired at least 162 sealaunched Tomahawk missiles priced at $1 million to $1.5 million apiece and dispatched B-2 stealth bombers - round-trip from Missouri — to drop 2,000-pound bombs on Libyan sites. Total flying time: 25 hours. Operating cost for one hour: at least $10,000. Yet those numbers only provide part of the costs. The B-2 bombers require expensive fuel — and rely on air tankers to refuel in flight — and probably needed parts replaced upon their return to Whiteman Air Force Base. The pilots most certainly will get combat pay. A contingent of U.S. warplanes; 11 ships steaming in the Mediterranean, including three submarines, two destroyers and two

amphibious ships; and one F-15 fighter jet that crashed, costing $75 million or more — it all adds up to numbers that unnerve budget-conscious lawmakers. “Every six hours, we have another billion-dollar deficit,” said Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., a member of the House Armed Services Committee. “This could cost us a billion dollars there, which means simply another billion-dollar debt that our kids, our grandkids and our great-grandkids are going to have to pay back.” Yet some Democrats argue it could have been far more costly. “This financial obligation would have been much more significant it if were unilateral,” Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said Wednesday in a conference call with reporters. “Multilateral would not eliminate it, but it minimizes it.”

. . . more news to start your day

West: Boy claims shooting to cover up ripping pants

Nation: Former bathroom being turned into eatery

Nation: Woman finds dog alive in burned-out home

Nation: Mega Millions jackpot at $304 million

POLICE SAID A 14-year-old Utah boy was trying to cover up for falling and ripping his new pants when he reported a bullet grazed him. South Salt Lake Police Sgt. Mikael Wersland told the Salt Lake Tribune that the teen reported the shooting Tuesday evening. Police said about 10 witnesses told them they did not hear any gunfire in the area at the time. Wersland said the boy “fell down and tore the knee” of his pants, but lied about being grazed by a bullet because he didn’t want to get into trouble. The sergeant said the teen only suffered a “scrape where he fell down.”

A FORMER PUBLIC bathroom in a historic Boston park is being turned into a sandwich shop. Don’t get grossed out. The 660-square-foot “Pink Palace” on Boston Common, built in the 1920s, hasn’t been used as a restroom in decades. City officials announced Tuesday they have agreed to a 15-year lease with the Florida-based Earl of Sandwich chain for a takeout operation at the site. The goal is to open the shop later this year or early next year following renovations. The Boston Parks Department said the project is a chance to preserve the historic mausoleum-like structure while bringing new life to the Common.

A BOSTON WOMAN who thought her beloved dachshund was gone forever after a fire destroyed her apartment a month ago found the pet Monday living in the wreckage of her burned-out home. Terisa Acevedo moved in with relatives after the Feb. 23 fire. She returned to the apartment Monday when her landlord asked her to turn off the alarm on a vehicle in the driveway. The 24-year-old Acevedo heard scratching, pulled away the plywood covering the doorway and found the year-old pup, Lola. She said Lola jumped into her arms and set off a flood of tears.

ONE OF TWO multistate lotto games played in Washington state has a jackpot of $304 million — its seventh-largest ever — for its Friday night drawing. The Mega Millions game, in which five numbers and a six Mega Ball number must be matched to win the 26-year annuity, is played in Washington, 40 other states, the District of Columbia and U.S. Virgin Islands. The companion Powerball game, played in Washington, 41 other states as well as D.C. and Virgin Islands, drew for a $101 million jackpot Wednesday night. Whether anyone matched 05, 15, 26, 28, 32 and Powerball 9 wasn’t reported at press time.


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Thursday, March 24, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

$1 million bail for alleged kid molester By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A Superior Court judge set a $1 million bail for a 28-yearold Clallam County man who was arrested for investigation of molesting a 7-year-old girl and failing to register as a sex offender. Steven Virgil Scott Will-

meth remained in custody at the Clallam County jail Wednesday after Clallam County sheriff’s deputies arrested him in a sting operation Tuesday at a tree farm off Deer Park Road. Police said he allegedly molested the Clallam County girl at the trailer where he was living at the

tree farm since November. Willmeth has outstanding warrants for previous sexual assaults in Oklahoma and for failing to comply with the sex and violent crime offender registry, deputies said. The Clallam County Prosecutor’s Office plans to file formal charges Friday.

Judge George L. Wood on Wednesday upheld Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Ann Lundwall’s request for $1 million bail. Wood also imposed a two-year sexual assault nocontact order between Willmeth and the victim. Sheriff’s Detective Sgt. Lyman Moores said Willmeth was convicted

in Oklahoma on two rape charges involving separate women. He was sentenced to prison and fled to Clallam County after being released on supervision, Moores said. Responding to a tip, detectives drove to Willmeth’s residence in an unmarked vehicle and

arrested him without incident on a private road. First-degree child molestation is a Class A felony punishable by a maximum of life in prison and a $50,000 fine.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

‘Bound for Freedom’ takes stage tonight By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — “Bound for Freedom” is a story of a time that, though more than 150 years ago, is similar in some ways to the era we’re living in. So believes Juanita Ramsey-Jevne, writer and director of the show on stage tonight and Friday in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Admission is free to both shows. While Friday is the public performance — patrons are invited to come shortly before the 7 p.m. curtain — those who want to attend tonight must obtain a free ticket from Five Acres School, the producer behind “Freedom.” The school at 515 Lotzgesell Road in Dungeness can be reached at 360-681-7255.

South were using the Underground Railroad to escape their brutal masters, when Native Americans were being forced out of their homelands and onto the Trail of Tears and when women were beginning to call for civil rights.

Three acts

“Freedom” tells these stories in three acts, starting with a young man’s move from Mississippi to Ohio. In college there, Daniel — played by Five Acres student Mathew Craig — meets a Northern woman; they marry and move back to his native South. At home, Daniel tangles with his brother, Caleb, played by Lily Gloor, over the institution of slavery. Daniel has come to believe the slaves must be freed, while Caleb is against such a radical change in the Change ‘exploding’ Southern way of life. At the same time, “Free“Freedom” is about the dom” shows women ques1850s, when “change was tioning another foundation exploding all over,” Ramsey- of American life: the DeclaJevne said. ration of Independence. Together with her students at Five Acres, she’s What about me? bringing that period to vivid To its assertion that “all life in a drama featuring 14 songs, 32 young actors and men are created equal,” an ending that points up they ask, “What about me?” Ramsey-Jevne’s original the possibility of redempsong bears that title. In it, tion. Pre-Civil War America the women sing: What about me? was when slaves in the

My liberty? I am your mother, your daughter, your helpmate, I worked beside you creating this land, You claim your right to freedom and liberty, But what about me? “Freedom” is not only a stage play, but also a way to open up history for young students, Ramsey-Jevne said. “They are always shocked,” she added, “when you tell them we in the United States enslaved people. “With the play, I wanted to present a realistic picture — but not in a way that condemned anybody. I tell the students: If you lived in this time, you would have had these challenges.” The story’s ending aims to lift people’s spirits, Ramsey-Jevne said. It shows how people in power can have changes of heart and how those without power find ways to rise above their oppressors. The struggles and sea changes that took place here in the 19th century, she said, aren’t so different from the trials playing out today in various nations across the world. In “Freedom,” RamseyJevne illustrates the strength of the human spirit with music and new lyrics for the traditional song “I’ll Fly Away:”

Witness-coordinator post to be filled soon By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

Administrative Specialist Tina Hendrickson has temporarily taken over Shimko’s duties. Shimko, 33, was charged after an incident at her home concerning a 35-yearold man Dec. 12. Kelly put her on paid administrative leave Dec. 15 and fired her at the end of January. The victim-witness coordinator, who often comforts domestic-violence victims, acts as a liaison between victims, witnesses, the county Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and other agencies.

PORT ANGELES — The vacant position of Clallam County victim-witness coordinator is being filled after the former coordinator, Anna E. Shimko, received two years’ probation on a charge of fourth-degree domestic violence assault. Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly said Wednesday that the first round of interviews for Shimko’s position was completed last week and that 30 applicants were narrowed to 10 who are now finalists for the position. Stipulated order Kelly did not know when Forks District Court 2 the position will be permanently filled. The base pay Judge Eric Rohrer on is $18.95 an hour. Feb. 3 handed down a stipu-

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lated order of continuance agreed to by special prosecutor and former Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Chris Shea, who represented the city of Port Angeles.

Tests, program Shimko agreed to get an alcohol abuse evaluation, complete a 12-week anger management program, abstain from alcohol, not enter establishments where alcohol is the chief item of sale, abstain from participating in activities where most of the participants are drinking alcohol and submit to random blood, breath, urine or saliva tests. She also must complete 24 hours of community service. Senior staff writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

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“Bound for Freedom,” the musical drama on stage tonight and Friday at Peninsula College’s Little Theater, stars students from Five Acres School in Dungeness. They include, from left, third-grader Ki Buttocola and fourth-graders Zach Baird, Tane Ridle, Fiona Feighner and Jade Harris. Free at last . . . we are free at last! No more shackles chain me to the past I’ll fly away Shouting hallelujah, free at last! I’ll fly away . . . In the morning with these wings of freedom I shall rise I’ll fly away. The show’s young cast, meanwhile, is more than eager to take the stage. Irie Brown, a sixth-

By Nicholas K. Geraniois

The Associated Press

SPOKANE — A man indicted on charges of placing a bomb along the planned route of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade in Spokane pleaded not guilty in federal court Wednesday. Kevin Harpham, 36, will remain in the Spokane County Jail without bail after his appearance before U.S. Magistrate Cynthia Imbrogno. A trial date has been set for May 31. Harpham, who has extensive ties to white supremacist groups, gave yes and no answers during his brief court appearance. Federal prosecutors have sealed nearly all the information in what authorities have termed a case of attempted domestic terrorism, a decision Harpham’s lawyer called “somewhat unusual.” Roger Peven, Harpham’s lawyer, said even he has not

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LONGVIEW — A Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad spokesman said a freight train has struck a shuttle van carrying BNSF crew members in Washington state, killing three people and seriously injuring a fourth.

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Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

been privy to many of the details of the FBI investigation that led to his client’s March 9 arrest. “I expect to get something today,” Peven, a federal defender, said Wednesday. Assistant U.S. Attorney Joe Harrington declined to say why the documents have been under seal.

Indicted Tuesday Harpham was indicted by a grand jury Tuesday on charges of attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction and unauthorized possession of an unregistered explosive device. Harpham is an Army veteran who lives near Addy, 50 miles north of Spokane. The bomb was found the morning of the parade Jan. 17 and disabled before it could explode. No one was injured. Harpham’s father, Cecil, has told reporters his son was with him the morning the bomb was found and

could not have planted the device. Peven said he has met with the father but could not disclose the contents of the conversation. The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups, has said that Kevin Harpham made more than 1,000 postings on an Internet site used by racists called the Vanguard News Network. The SPLC has also said that Harpham belonged to a neo-Nazi group, the National Alliance. Kevin Harpham served from 1996 to 1999 in the Army at what is now Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma. He owns 10 acres of land north of Addy in rural Stevens County, a few miles south of his father’s home. Property records show he bought the land in 1997 and built a small house in 2007. His lawyers have said Harpham is not married and had not been recently employed.

Spokesman Gus Melonas said the collision happened late Wednesday afternoon at a private rail crossing in the Longview area as the van was leaving a BNSF railyard to take the crew members to Vancouver, Wash. Killed were the contract van driver and two crew members. Melonas said a

fourth person, also a crew member, was hospitalized. The loaded grain train was bound from Crookston, Minn., to Seattle. It did not derail. Railway officials and local authorities are investigating. Melonas said he did not immediately have identification on the victims.

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Jevne, “is that the people of the past are no different from us. They were just as human as we are. They made mistakes, and many of them also made a difference. “This story is about seeing the past with our eyes open and honoring who the people were.”

Freight train, van collide; 3 killed The Associated Press

Pinnacle

grader, describes “Freedom” as “really cool and interesting.” “We worked really hard on it; it would be good if people supported us in our efforts,” said Gloor, who’s also in her final year at Five Acres School. “I would say: Definitely come,” added Liam Harris, the fifth-grader who plays abolitionist Thomas Mortenson. “The overall message of the play,” said Ramsey-

Trial date set for suspect in King parade bomb in Spokane

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Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Thursday, March 24, 2011

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Boat track gets go-ahead for races By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Start your engines. The North Olympic Peninsula’s first sprint boat racetrack cleared its final regulatory hurdle Wednesday evening, allowing A2Z Enterprises to hold the sport’s finals Sept. 17. The Port Angeles Planning Commission voted unanimously to give the group of investors, which is building the 4-acre track near William R. Fairchild International Airport, a

permit to hold events on the property. The decision was met by applause from the approximately 40 people who came to show their support. No one spoke against the sprint boat track at the Planning Commission meeting.

‘We’re going to happen’ Dan Morrison, the track’s main proponent — who has spent 21⁄2 years trying to make it a reality — appeared relieved and elated by the decision. “It feels good. It feels

good to know that we’re going to happen,” Morrison said. Sprint boat racing involves small, two-person speedboats powered by water-jet propulsion racing one at a time around a winding watercourse. Morrison, an avid sprint boat racer, said construction of the track has been under way since October at 2917 W. Edgewood Drive. It’s expected to be finished in July. That would leave A2Z Enterprises — made up of Morrison, Dan Zozosky,

Jerry Payne, all of Port Angeles, and Scott Ackerman of Colfax — two months to prepare to host finals. Morrison, who is also the U.S. Sprint Boat Association vice president, said he expects to be ready.

‘Leave wanting more’ “It’s going to leave a good impression and leave everyone wanting more,” he said. The sport is still relatively new in the United States, and races are mostly limited to Oregon and

Washington state. But Morrison said he expects a large turnout at the races, with 3,000 to 5,000 people attending the finals race. He added that the sport is growing “in a huge way” and is attracting national television coverage. Morrison compared the noise level to the monstertruck events held during the Clallam County Fair. Morrison said there will be two races a year, unless he can organize an international event. Sprint boat racing is not

the only extreme sport the group has in mind. Morrison said he is working with W.E. Rock of California to host rock crawling on the property. In that event, fourwheel-drive vehicles climb an artificial hill up to 30 feet in height. That could be held on the property as early as next year, Morrison said.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Sail: Shakedown cruise proceeded ‘flawlessly’ Continued from A1 quietly slip away,” she wrote. “In addition to strengthening this historic land- First public sail mark and creating local Evans said the shakejobs, one of the exciting down cruise proceeded results of this project was in flawlessly, though there preserving the traditional were “a few glitches” in the shipwright techniques that rigging that were fixed get lost as ships of this age right away.

Wednesday’s test run was in preparation for the season’s first public sail Saturday, which is sold out. The boat has scheduled public sailings and educational programs around Puget Sound throughout the summer, originating from Seattle, Tacoma,

Olympia, Bellingham and Friday Harbor. It is scheduled to return to Port Townsend from Sept. 9-11 for a series of special event “festival sails.” The cruises last about three hours, with participants raising sails, taking the helm and singing a sea

shanty or two. Nonmember prices for public sails are $40 for adults and $20 for 18 and younger, while specialevent sails are $55 for adults and $30 for youths. For more information about sails and overnight programs aboard the

Adventuress, visit www. soundexp.org or phone 360379-0438.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Lights: No filing in dark Continued from A1 cleaning the office. Workers thought about At City Hall, the front catching up on filing, “but if doors automatically locked you file in the dark, the when the electricity was papers will end up in the interrupted. They were wrong folder,” said Lori Baipropped open during the ley, assistant clerk. At the Port Townsend outage. District Court closed Food Co-op, the staff waited during the outage, but most about an hour before movcounty offices remained ing perishables into the open, with the Superior freezer, then moving them Court clerk’s personnel back when the power came

back on a few minutes later. The PSE office at 181 Quincy St. stayed open throughout the outage, using generators to supply light as customers came in to pay their bills.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Renovations: Sculpture

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

The east side of the Hood Canal Bridge from Salisbury Point County Park Continued from A1 in 1987, was intended to fill that will discuss the role of is shown a year ago. Also to be finished April 15 is the $1.2 million paving and landscaping of Pope Marine Park, which will feature a playground and a giant toy. Then, a $70,000, 8-foottall bronze sculpture, “Salish Sea Circle,” by artist Gerard Tsutakawa will be installed at the corner of Water and Madison streets. The Cotton Building, the former police station at 607 Water St., will reopen as a gallery that will be available for public gatherings and exhibits. It also will supply public bathrooms. Eventually, the Tidal Clock will become an amphitheater — work is to begin in July — and the Wave Gallery will be reopened after a $530,412 upgrade, allowing people to walk out for a view of the bay. The Tidal Clock, created

with water and marine life as the tide changed. It never worked as envisioned. Instead, it collected debris. The new features will be anchored by the Northwest Maritime Center and the Jefferson County Historical Society, which are both established tourist attractions. Scheduled events include: ■  Main Street’s Downtown Open/Available Space Tour from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. April 29, when the public can tour all the properties for sale or lease in the downtown area. The tour will begin at the Mount Baker Block Building, 213 Taylor St. ■  Dedication of the newly remodeled Cotton Building at 1 p.m. April 30. Following the dedication, the Port Townsend Arts Commission will open a photo exhibit chronicling the construction of “Salish Sea Circle,” including a panel

public art in communities. ■  The unveiling of The Three Otters at the Northwest Maritime Center at 12 p.m. May 7 at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St. The 30-inch-tall bronze sculpture is by renowned Northwest sculptor and Whidbey Island resident Georgia Gerber, creator of the bronze pig, Rachael, at Pike Place Market. ■  Dedication of the “Salish Sea Circle” and Community Plaza/Pope Marine Park at 1 p.m. May 14. A professional photographer will be on-hand to snap pictures of families with the Salish Sea Circle and will make these photos available for purchase. “Downtown is going to be beautiful after this,” Verraes said. “Everyone is going to want to be down there.”

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Kitsap counties is the longest floating saltwater bridge in the world. Much of the work for the project to retrofit and replace part of the bridge was performed on pontoons and required components to be floated out of a graving dock with only inches of clearance above the floor, the contractors said in a statement. The team used the largest floating crane on the West Coast.

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Continued from A1 senting all areas of construction evaluated more The Hood Canal Bridge than 115 projects this year, won for best renovation of a assessing each project’s highway and transporta- complexity, use of innovative construction techniques tion project. The Aon Build America and coordination with partAwards recognize the ners, among other criteria. The east end of the Hood nation’s most significant construction projects. The Canal Bridge was replaced awards were announced in 2009, and the west half during the association’s retrofit to match the east annual convention in Las half was finished in 2010. At 6,350 feet, the bridge Vegas. A panel of judges repre- connecting Jefferson and

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Briefly . . . George Washington author to talk PORT ANGELES — Peter A. Lillback, author of George Washington’s Sacred Fire, will discuss America’s first president at a special event at the George Washington Inn, 939 Finn Hall Road, today. Lillback will hold three 45-minute sessions covering three perspectives on Washington’s life: “George Washington’s Sacred Fire,” “George Washington as Prophet: Are We Losing Our Constitution?” and “Who Will Be the Next George Washington, and How Will We Recognize Him or Her?” A light continental breakfast will precede the sessions at 8:30 a.m. George Washington’s Sacred Fire represents a culmination of 20 years of primary-source research and scholarship, for which the author has received wide scholarly acclaim and international media coverage, including recent appearances on the Glenn Beck program, “Fox & Friends,” and “Strategy Room” on Fox News. Registration is required and can be made by phoning the inn at 360-452-5207. A light lunch will be provided at the conclusion of the sessions, which are free with the purchase of Lillback’s book. Paperbacks will be available for $20, with hardcover copies priced at $35. The author will be available to sign books after the sessions.

Soldier sentenced JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — A U.S. soldier was sentenced to 24 years in prison Wednesday after saying “the plan was to kill people” in a conspiracy with four fellow soldiers to kill unarmed Afghan civilians. Military judge Lt. Col. Kwasi Hawks said he initially intended to sentence Spc. Jeremy Morlock to life in prison with the possibility of parole but was bound by the plea deal. Morlock will receive 352 days off his sentence for time served. He was sentenced after he pleaded guilty to three counts of murder and one count each of conspiracy, obstructing justice and illegal drug use at his court martial at Joint Base LewisMcChord, south of Seattle. The 22-year-old soldier was accused of taking a lead role in the killings of three unarmed Afghan men in Kandahar province in January, February and May 2010. Asked by the judge whether the plan was to shoot at people to scare

Death and Memorial Notice them or to shoot to kill, Morlock replied, “The plan was to kill people.” Morlock was the first of five soldiers from the 5th Stryker Brigade to be courtmartialed. Under the plea deal, Morlock agreed to testify against his co-defendants, Pvt. 1st Class Andrew Holmes and Spc. Michael Wagnon II. Morlock, his voice shaking at times, told the judge he has had a lot of time to reflect on his actions in Afghanistan and ask himself “how I could become so insensitive and how I lost my moral compass.”

Small quake SEQUIM — A magnitude 2 micro-quake occurred south of Sequim and Blyn early Wednesday morning. The Pacific Northwest Seismic Network reported the minor tremor was at about 5:25 a.m. and was located about eight miles south of Blyn and nine miles south of Bell Hill. It was recorded at a depth of about 28 miles, the network said.

Highway 20 blocked PORT TOWNSEND — Both lanes were reopened by noon Wednesday after a morning wreck blocked the roadway near its junction with U.S. Highway 101. Both lanes were blocked after the 10:50 a.m. wreck. One lane was re-opened by 11:20 a.m., permitting alternating traffic, the state Department of Transportation said. No one was hurt in the wreck, said Trooper Krista Hedstrom, State Patrol spokeswoman. A car driven by Jesse B. Wallace of Quilcene left the roadway and rolled onto its side into a ditch, Hedstrom said, adding she did not know why the car left the road.

Donation to YMCA PORT ANGELES — The Bushwhacker Restaurant plans to donate 10 percent of Sunday dinner proceeds to the Olympic Peninsula YMCA’s Power of Community Campaign. The restaurant at 1527 E. First St., will donate 10 percent of all proceeds made between 4 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., said owner Bob Grattan. “The Y is such an integral part of our community, supporting them is easy,” he said in a statement. The Olympic Peninsula YMCA raises about $161,000 annually for assistance for families and children who could not otherwise participate, said Kyle Cronk, the YMCA’s chief executive officer. “We are wildly appreciative of the support from the Bushwhacker,” Cronk said. Peninsula Daily News

Death Notices Marilyn J. Adolphsen Aug. 31, 1938 — March 22, 2011

Marilyn J. Adolphsen, 72, died in her Port Angeles residence of age-related causes. Her obituary and service information will be published later. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

Karla Marie Collins Dec. 15, 1951 — March 19, 2011

Karla Marie Collins of

Port Angeles died at 59. Her cause of death is pending. Services: Monday, March 28, 12:30 p.m., funeral at Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles. Pastor Jason Noble will officiate. A 2 p.m. reception will follow at Lighthouse Christian Center, 304 Viewcrest Ave., Port Angeles. Burial will be in Mount Angeles Memorial Park, U.S. Highway 101 and Monroe Road, Port Angeles. www.drennanford.com

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Peninsula Daily News

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RITA ANN MARKISHTUM January 4, 1942 March 20, 2011 “Neath the shade of Thy protecting wings let me Nestle” Rita Ann Markishtum, 69, of Neah Bay passed away on March 20, 2011, of lung cancer. She was born in Neah Bay to William Markishtum and Emily Bowechop on January 4, 1942. Rita was a graduate of Evergreen State College, and retired in 2004 as a Chemical Dependency Counselor. Her passions included poker, bingo and Slahal stick games. Ms. Markishtum was a member of the Catholic Church and the Makah

Ms. Markishtum Slahal Club. She is survived by companion, Roger Chartraw; daughter, Tinker Lucas of Neah Bay; sons, Bill Barbre of Lynnwood, Washington, and Donny Strong of Gresham, Oregon; sister, Gail Davis of

Neah Bay; brother, Little Critter of Neah Bay; and grandchildren Andrea, Holly, Kyler, Paige, Tarah, Owen and Austin. Visitation will be held today, March 24, 2011, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at HarperRidgeview Funeral Chapel, 105 West Fourth Street, Port Angeles. A funeral will take place on Friday, March 25, 2011, 1 p.m. at the Neah Bay Community Gymnasium, with the Reverend James Kallappa officiating, and burial at the Neah Bay Cemetery. A dinner at Neah Bay Community Hall will follow graveside services. Special thanks to Dr. Ann Cooper, the Olympic Medical Cancer Center and Assured Hospice for your loving care.

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsula dailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Death and Memorial Notice RAYMOND F. MORRIS January 28, 1933 March 13, 2011 Raymond F. Morris was born January 28,1933, in Port Angeles to the late Harold and Valda Morris. He died March 13, 2011, of COPD. In 1951, he met Nancy Smith (b. March 15, 1936) of Beacon Point Resort on Hood Canal. He and Nancy soon married, Ray in his Marine Corps uniform. While he spent his tour of duty in Korea, his daughter, Susan, was born in 1952. On leaving the Corps, Ray returned to Beacon Point where he and Nancy worked for her parents, the late Harry and Ruth Smith. Son Steven was born in 1955.

Mr. Morris Ray and Nancy managed the resort and sold oysters for new owners until they purchased the resort in the mid-1960s. In 1968, their son, Raymond Lee, was born. The Morrises continued to farm oysters on-site while the old cabins were sold, several to former vis-

itors to the resort. Thanksgiving Day of 1998 brought tragedy when Ray and Nancy suffered a terrible fire in which they lost their home and, much worse, their son, Lee. They returned to the property the next year and lived on the Canal until the fall of 2009 when they bought Nancy’s dream home on Arcadia Road, Shelton, Washington. Nancy died on January 3 of this year. Among his last words to her, Ray said he’d be following her soon, and so he did. Raymond and Nancy were known, appreciated and dearly loved for their friendliness, kindness, humor, generosity and loving spirits. They are sorely missed by daughter, Susan Parrington (Tad) of Kingston, Washington; son, Steven of Shelton, Washington;

child-of-the-heart Cindy Morrow (Jeff) of Shelton, Washington; Ray’s sisters, Beverly Davidson (Richard) and Lila Morris of Port Angeles; Nancy’s brother, Wally Smith (Leatha) of Port Hadlock, Washington; grandchildren, Graham Parrington (Jana McKinley) of Olympia, Washington, and Sheela Shadforth (Mike) of Port Angeles; two greatgrandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews; and countless friends and neighbors. Donations may be made to the American Lung Association, 2625 Third Avenue Seattle, WA 98121-1200 or the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 4002018, Des Moines, IA 50340-2018. Please contact McComb Funeral Home for service information, 360-426-4803.

Death and Memorial Notice VERLE QUENTIN ‘BRUCE’ QUIGLEY July 27, 1919 March 19, 2011 Mr. Verle Quentin “Bruce” Quigley, 91, of Port Angeles passed away on March 19, 2011. Bruce was born July 27, 1919, in Sublette, Illinois, to Verle Hamilton and Nell (Waddell) Quigley. He was raised in Geraldine, Montana, and graduated from Northern Montana College, Havre, Montana, in 1941. He attended the University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, from 1941-42, before joining the Army in July of 1942. He served in World War II, attached to General Patton’s Third Army, 4th Armored Forward, 187th Signal Repair Company, where he fought in the Battle of the Bulge and helped liberate Ohrdruf concentration camp in Germany.

Mr. Quigley After the war, he returned to Montana where he began working at the First National Bank in Geraldine. He met Joan McNally when she came in to have her first teacher’s paycheck cashed at the bank. They married on March 28, 1953, at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Port Angeles. Bruce was the Presi-

dent and CEO of First National Bank, Geraldine, Montana, in addition to being a wheat farmer and an independent insurance agent. He and Joan were blessed with a family of four daughters. He had a lifelong love for music, playing violin when he was young and singing in church choirs and barbershop quartets as an adult. In 1992, Bruce retired and he and Joan relocated to Port Angeles. Bruce attended Geraldine Methodist Church and Independent Bible Church in Port Angeles and was a lifetime member of Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion. He worked with the Boy Scouts and served as a board member of various charitable associations over the years in both Geraldine and Port Angeles. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Joan

Quigley; his daughters and sons-in-law, Kari and Buck Melton of Dalton Gardens, Idaho, Lori and Tim Gliko of Mount Juliet, Tennessee, and Kristin and Tim Brye and Bobbi and Michael Chapman of Port Angeles, Washington; 15 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Verle and Nell Quigley, and brothers Rex and Robert Quigley. Pastor Anthony Sackor and Pastor Ted Mattie will co-officiate the funeral services on Sunday, March 27, 2011, at First Presbyterian Church in Port Angeles at 2 p.m. There will be a private burial at Port Crescent Pioneer Memorial Cemetery with military honors. The family asks that memorial contributions be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

Death and Memorial Notice JAMES E. BOONE February 4, 1926 March 18, 2011 James E. Boone, 85, of Sequim passed away on March 18, 2011, at his home in Sequim of congestive heart failure. He was born February 4, 1926, in Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, to Colonel Howard A. Boone and Clara L. Boone. Jim grew up on Army bases throughout the United States, where his father was the post commander. Jim joined the Air Force as his two older brothers had done. After discharge from the Air Force, he was accepted at the University of Washington School of Architecture and graduated with his degree in 1951. Jim went to work in Seattle for the Alaska District Corps of Engineers in

Mr. Boone 1952. He met Rachel R. Thompson while working there and they were married in February of 1954. They spent most of their married life living in Bellevue, Washington. Jim worked at several different architectural firms in Seattle, but spent most of his architectural career at Durham, Anderson and

Freed Architects, where they designed schools, hospitals, and churches. After 38 years of living in Bellevue, he and his wife retired to Sequim in 1993, and have thoroughly enjoyed living on the Peninsula. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Colonel Howard Boone and

wife Clara; and brothers, Howard Alton Boone Jr. and Paul Thomas Boone. Jim is survived by his wife of 57 years, Rachel; and three children, daughter Leda Stewart of Renton and son-in-law Lon, daughter Janis Day of Plains, Montana, and son-in-law Paul, and Gregory Boone of Federal Way, Washington; and two grandchildren, Kyle and Kevin Stewart of Renton, Washington. There will be a memorial service for Mr. Boone at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Sequim on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, at 11 a.m. Interment will be at Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent, Washington. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 24, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A7

Obama contradicts himself on Libya LIBYA’S RECENTLY RESIGNED ambassador to the United States, Ali Aujali, is optimistic about the outcome of the bombing of his country. He tells me he thinks dictaCal tor Moammar Gadhafi will be Thomas ousted, that free and fair elections will be held and that a new government will be pro-Western. From his lips to Allah’s ears. Given the history of the Middle East, such a notion requires greater faith than that possessed by the holiest of holy men. After first displaying indecisiveness about Libya, President Brack Obama touted his shotgun marriage to a “coalition” of nations attempting to dislodge Gadhafi. In Brasilia, Brazil, recently, the president used the word “coalition” five times.

Was this an attempt to align himself with former President George W. Bush, who advanced a “coalition of the willing” against Saddam Hussein in Iraq? President Obama seems to be channeling his predecessor. He signed an order closing Guantanamo prison as his first presidential act, but recently announced it will stay open and the military tribunals established by President Bush and supported by Congress will resume. And now, instead of Saddam Hussein, Obama is going after Gadhafi. Is this the same man who delivered a stem-winding, antiIraq war speech almost nine years ago in Chicago when he was a state senator? That speech is worth revisiting. State Sen. Obama said Oct. 2, 2002, that he isn’t “opposed to all war,” only “dumb war, rash war.” Substitute Gadhafi and Libya for Saddam Hussein and Iraq in this excerpt from that speech: “I suffer no illusions about [Moammar Gadhafi]. “He is a brutal man. A ruthless man. A man who butchers

his own people to secure his own power. “He has repeatedly defied U.N. resolutions. . . . He’s a bad guy. “The world and the [Libyan] people would be better off without him.” Here is Obama in 2002, with his ultimate argument against the Iraq war. Again I substitute Libya for Iraq and Gadhafi for Saddam: “[Gadhafi] poses no imminent and direct threat to the United States, or to his neighbors . . . the [Libyan] economy is in shambles . . . the [Libyan] military [is] a fraction of its former strength and . . . in concert with the international community he can be contained until, in the way of all petty dictators, he falls away into the dustbin of history.” If Obama believed what he said in 2002 about Iraq and Saddam, doesn’t that seem a good rationale for not committing anymore treasure — which we have run out of — and possibly more American lives with no greater goal than unseating Gadhafi in the hope that someone better will

Peninsula Voices Ferry workers

Education bills

I used to work part time for Washington State Ferries. Because I was part time, I wasn’t able to vote on ferry system issues with the Marine Engineers’ Beneficial Association, but I would still attend union meetings. Out of more than 200 members, they often wouldn’t get a quorum of seven people so they could have the meeting. Now, there have been several letters to the editor to Peninsula Daily News complaining about possible loss of benefits for Washington state ferry workers. Go to your union meetings, people. You collect the benefits and don’t bother showing up. Who do you think got you those good benefits and pay? Michael Walsh, Port Angeles

House Bill 1849 and Senate Bill 5522 propose a Washington Education Council comprised entirely of appointed positions, contravening our traditional belief that public schools function best through local control of locally elected administrators. These bills would create a new, unaccountable bureaucracy. We would have no power to remove appointed council members we determine to be unfit. More tax dollars would fund activities of state administrators of education rather than going to students. Increased bureaucracy decreases student achievement. This state needs less rather than more bureaucrats in Olympia thinking they know what is best for our children. Senate Joint Resolution

take his place? What is this president’s foreign policy? Does he have one other than pressuring Israel not to build more “settlements”? A “no-fly zone” will not depose Gadhafi and his sons. They must be overthrown, but that is not our announced objective. Does the president seriously believe a Gadhafi-free Libya will suddenly embrace Jeffersonian democracy? If so, he is a bigger amateur on the world stage than some suspect. President Obama says, “humanitarian reasons” are a motivating factor for using American and allied forces to topple Gadhafi. What makes Gadhafi worthy of special humanitarian concerns when many other governments similarly oppress their people? Gadhafi can’t live forever. The actuarial table will soon catch up with him. What’s the rush, especially if a power vacuum is created in Libya that terrorist groups are

Our readers’ letters, faxes

8212 would make the state superintendent of public instruction an appointed position, remove this office’s independence from the governor, make the position unaccountable to

Washington voters and reduce local control of education. SB 5346 provides for state-funded vouchers to private schools. Although vouchers can

all too happy to fill, as they might do in Egypt and other countries in the region that are now experiencing revolutions? Former Ambassador Aujali strongly doubts that will happen, but no one can be certain. If Iraq qualified as a “dumb war” in Obama’s mind back in 2002, what is smart about starting a third war against Moammar Gadhafi today? Is the United Nations, rather than Congress, now the authority for such action? That’s what Democrats asked when President Bush was in the White House. It remains a valid question under President Obama.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated news columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors @tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and e-mail

serve to improve public schools by encouraging competition between private and public schools, SB 5346 initiates control of private school because, with this proposal, private

schools using vouchers must conform with rules, regulations, textbooks, assessments and reforms of our state’s public schools. Consequently, private schools would lose their independence and take on the methods, curricula and other public school characteristics. Since its 1970 inception, U.S. Department of Education spending has increased from $18 billion $87 billion (excluding higher learning) with increasing dropout rates and without improved test scores or better educated students. If more spending and more centralization, planning and control were the solution, would this fiasco exist? For more information, see http://tinyurl. com/4tfc4tf and http:// tinyurl.com/4b8xbaw. Claudia Cookson, Port Angeles

Despite U.S., Haiti’s Aristide returns home LATE AT NIGHT on March 17, 2011, former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide boarded a small plane with his family in Johannesburg, South Africa. The followAmy ing morning, he arrived in Goodman Haiti. It was just more than seven years after he was kidnapped from his home in a U.S.-backed coup d’etat. Haiti has been ravaged by a massive earthquake that killed more than 300,000 people and left 1.5 million homeless. A cholera epidemic carried in by United Nations occupation forces could sicken almost 800,000. A majority of the population lives on less than a dollar a day. Now, Aristide, by far the most popular figure in Haiti today and the first democratically elected president of the first black republic in the world, has returned home. “Bon Retou Titid” (good

return, Titid, the affectionate term for Aristide) read the signs in Port-au-Prince as thousands flocked to accompany Aristide from the Toussaint L’Ouverture Airport to his home. L’Ouverture led the slave uprising that established Haiti in 1804. I was able to travel with Aristide, his wife, Mildred, and their two daughters from Johannesburg to Haiti on the small jet provided by the government of South Africa. It was my second flight with them. In March 2004, the Aristides attempted to return from forced exile in the Central African Republic, but never made it back to Haiti. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and other U.S. officials warned Aristide to stay away from the Western Hemisphere. Defying such pressure, the Aristides stopped in Jamaica before traveling to South Africa, where they remained until last weekend. Just before this Sunday’s election in Haiti, President Rene Preval gave Aristide the diplomatic passport he had long promised him. Earlier, on Jan. 19, U.S. State

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Department spokesman P.J. Crowley tweeted, referring to Aristide: “today Haiti needs to focus on its future, not its past.” Aristide’s wife, Mildred, was incensed. She said the United States had been saying that since they forced him out of the country. Sitting in the plane a few minutes before landing in Haiti, she repeated the words of an African leader who criticized the past abuses of colonial powers by saying, “I would stop talking about the past, if it weren’t so present.” Mark Toner, the new State Department spokesman, said last week: “Former President Aristide has chosen to remain outside of Haiti for seven years. “To return this week could only be seen as a conscious choice to impact Haiti’s elections.” Aristide did not choose to leave or remain outside Haiti, and the Obama administration knows that. On Feb. 29, 2004, Luis Moreno, the No. 2 man in the U.S. Embassy in Haiti, went to the Aristides’ home and hustled them off to the airport. Frantz Gabriel was Aristide’s personal bodyguard in 2004.

I met him when he was with the Aristides in the Central African Republic then, and saw him again last Friday as the Aristides arrived home. He recalled: “It was not willingly that the president left, because all the people that came in to accompany the president were all military. “Having been in the U.S. military myself, I know what a GI looks like, and I know what a special force looks like also . . . when we boarded the aircraft, everybody changed their uniform into civilian clothes. “And that’s when I knew that it was a special operation.” The U.S. continued to prevent Aristide from returning for the next seven years. Just last week, President Barack Obama called South African President Jacob Zuma to express “deep concerns” about Aristide’s potential return, and to pressure Zuma to block the trip. Zuma, to his credit, ignored the warning. U.S. diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks reveal a concerted, multiyear drive to hamper the return of Aristide to Haiti, including diplomatically punishing any country that helped Aristide, including threatening to

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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block a U.N. Security Council seat for South Africa. After landing in Port-auPrince, Aristide wasted no time. He addressed the people of Haiti from the airport. His remarks touched on a key point of the current elections there: that his political party, the most popular party in Haiti, Fanmi Lavalas, is banned, excluded from the elections. He said, “The problem is exclusion, and the solution is inclusion. “The exclusion of Fanmi Lavalas is the exclusion of the majority . . . because everybody is a person.” Looking out on the country he hadn’t seen in seven years, he concluded: “Haiti, Haiti, the further I am from you, the less I breathe. “Haiti, I love you, and I will love you always. Always.”

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email her at mail@democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 24, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

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Outdoors

Straps not part of this event IT MUST BE spring: The waiting list for bike repairs is one-week long at Sound Bikes and Kayaks in Port Angeles. Luckily, the last vestige of winter — Strap- Matt less Weekend Schubert atop Hurricane Ridge — should be enough to keep Peninsulites company while they wait on that wobbly wheel this Saturday and Sunday. The way area snowsport historian Frank Crippen tells it, the two-day snow­skate event harkens back to a simpler age when man, woman and child were unencumbered by bindings and other trappings of the modern snowboard scene. “In times gone by, these enlightened strap-free warriors would gather in the shadows of Mount Olympus and compete in games involving speed and gravity-defying tricks,” said Crippen, passing on an untold oral history. “The modern Snowskate Olympics are intended to bring back the days of old in a two-day gathering of the tribe.”

Fledgling sport A sport still in its infancy in terms of mass appeal, snow­skating combines elements of snowboarding with that of skateboarding. Boards resemble its four-wheel counterparts, except a snowboard is attached to the bottom rather than wheels. Also, as the event name denotes, there are no bindings. Thus, the only thing keeping riders attached to their boards is their own guile and grasp of Earth’s gravitational pull. Crippen promises some of the “world’s best snow­skaters” will compete in Strapless Weekend (aka the Snowskate Olympics), including a few sponsored riders. Set for Saturday and Sunday in the “Olympic Snowskate Arena” at Hurricane Ridge, it will include a number of different competitions. The North By Northwest Masters of Snowskating Freeride will be held Saturday morning at 10 a.m., with the Snowskate Park Jam set for 1 p.m. the same day in the Terrain Park. The Snowskate Powder Downhill is Sunday at 10 a.m., and the Almost Legendary Snowskate Baked Slalom closes things out at 1 p.m. While some events emphasize tricks and showmanship (e.g., the Park Jam), others will be an all-out race for Olympic glory (e.g., the aptly-named Baked Slalom). Each is open to the public. Free demos will also be on hand for anyone wishing to give the sport a try or compete against the best and brightest of the snow­skate world. “It’s tough but it’s not tough,” said Crippen, owner of North by Northwest Surf Co., 902 S. Lincoln St. in Port Angeles. “We had a ranger up there [Wednesday], and she picked it up pretty quick. “It’s like anything: It’s easy to do; it’s just not easy to do well.” A total of $1,000 in cash will be up for grabs as well as a “swag bag” of prizes. The winner of the Park Jam will take home $700, while the Baked Slalom champion walks away with $300. Winners in the two other events will get prizes. The entry fee is $20 for two days and $15 for one. Also tied into the weekend is a special musical production from the T-Bagging Bandits — possibly a right-wing rock band — on Saturday night at the Coo Coo’s Nest, 1017 E. Front St. in Port Angeles.

Whittaker speaks In keeping with the snow theme, Port Townsend’s Leif Whittaker will give a special presentation of his alpine mountain climbing exploits Tuesday in Port Angeles. Turn

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Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News (2)

Crescent’s Matthew Waldrip, center, takes the lead in the boys 110-meter hurdles, going on to win the event at his home track in Joyce on Wednesday. Also competing were, from left, Kaleb Dodson, Quinntin March and Braden Bamer of Crescent and Zach Ennis of Port Angeles.

Crescent cruises Logger boys, girls roll in home meet Peninsula Daily News

JOYCE — New season, same old results. The domiALSO . . nant Crescent High School ■ Listing girls and boys of complete track and field results/B3 teams picked up right where it left off a year ago Wednesday. Competing in a four-way meet against North Olympic League rivals Neah Bay and Clallam Bay, as well as the Port Angeles junior varsity, the Logger boys and girls came away with a pair of decisive victories on its home track in Joyce. Winners of the last two NOL titles, the boys and girls showed exactly why they are favorites to three-peat this spring. The girls won nine of 16 events on their way to a 58-point win, while the boys took eight of 16 to beat their nearest challenger by 33 points.

Anne Grover and Rashaya Donnell each claimed two individual victories to lead the Logger girls to a total of 113 points at the meet. Grover won the 100-meter hurdles in 20.55 seconds and claimed triple jump with a leap of 25 feet. 7.5 inches. Meanwhile, Donnell took the shot put (28-5.5) and javelin crowns (87-4). Melissa Willis earned two victories for Clallam Bay in the long jump (13-3) and high jump (4-4). But that didn’t keep the Bruins from finishing well behind the Loggers and Roughriders in third.

Loggers threesome The trio of Mike Zapien, Joel Williams and Matthew Waldrip carried the Loggers boys to a commanding victory, with each winning two events. Turn

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Kellie Belford of Crescent finishes the anchor stretch of the 4-by-200-meter relay well ahead of Port Angeles’ Jolene Millsap on Wednesday in Joyce.

NIT Tourney

Cougars survive OT thriller Casto plays as WSU drops Northwestern The Spokesman-Review

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles’ Cole Uvila, left, runs back to first after a pop fly by teammate Brian Senf (18) was caught in the outfield, but not in time to beat the throw to Port Townsend’s Robert Ristick during Wednesday’s game at Volunteer Field.

Riders stomp PT Napiontek drives in five as PA earns 14-1 victory Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Easton Napiontek might get a few more starts on the mound if he can reproduce what he did Wednesday. The 6-foot-8 junior righthander tossed three innings of no-hit ball and drove in five to lead the Port Angeles baseball

team to a dominating 14-1 win over Port Townsend in five innings at Volunteer Field. Napiontek struck out six and walked none on the hill and went 2 for 3 at the plate with a two-run triple and three-run homer in a tremendous display of all-around dominance. “Easton had a huge day,” Port

Preps Angeles coach Bob Withrow said. “That triple he hit almost went out, too. Both of them were to right center [field]. He’s got power to all fields.” As he proved in his first varsity pitching outing in Wednesday’s Olympic League matchup, he’s got some pitching chops as well. “He had good control,” Withrow said. Turn

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PULLMAN – It wasn’t easy, but what during the past 48 hours had been? Washington State edged Northwestern, 69-66 in overtime Wednesday and earned a trip to New York for the National Invitation Tour- Casto nament semifinals. With the scored tied at 66, the Cougars scored their last three points at the free-throw line and survived two 3-point attempts in the final 4 seconds by Northwestern’s Alex Marcotullo. The Wildcats (20-14) had tied the score at 64 on John Shurna’s drive that was goaltended by DeAngelo Casto with 4.2 seconds left. The game was played in the shadow of the past 48 hours and the ongoing saga of whether or not Casto would play. Casto appeared in WSU’s 74-64 win over Oklahoma State on Monday night, scoring 11 points and grabbing five rebounds. Less than three hours after it was over, he had an interaction with a Pullman police officer at his residence, resulting in a small of amount of marijuana being seized, according to police reports.


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SportsRecreation

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Thursday Boys Soccer: Kingston vs. Port Angeles at Peninsula College, 5:30 p.m.; Bremerton at Sequim, 6:45 p.m.; North Kitsap at Port Townsend, 6:45 p.m.; Chimacum at Cascade Christian, 4 p.m. Track: Forks at Ilwaco, 3:30 p.m.; Chimacum at Orting, 3:30 p.m. Boys Golf: Chimacum at Vashon Island, 3:30 p.m.

Friday Baseball: Port Angeles at Olympic, 4 p.m.; Sequim at Klahowya, 4 p.m.; North Mason at Port Townsend, 4 p.m.; Forks at Rainier, DH, 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.; Chief Leschi at Quilcene, 3:45 p.m.; Chimacum at Vashon Island, 4 p.m. Softball: Port Angeles at Olympic, 4 p.m.; Sequim at Klahowya, 4 p.m.; North Mason at Port Townsend, 4:15 p.m.; Forks at Rainier, DH, 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.; Chimacum at Vashon Island, 4 p.m. Girls Tennis: Klahowya at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.; North Mason at Chimacum, 4 p.m. Golf: Port Townsend at Bremerton, Gold Mountain Golf Club, 3 p.m. Boys Soccer: Tenino at Forks , 6 p.m.

Saturday Baseball: Quilcene at Evergreen Lutheran, 3:30 p.m. Boys Soccer: Port Angeles at North Mason, 1:45 p.m.; Sequim at Auburn Mountainview, 2 p.m.; Port Townsend at Orting, 12:30 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Women’s League results March 22 Game One Halberg Chiropractic 49, Elwha River Casino 48 Leading Scorers: Gundersen, 20; Shamp, 13; Buckingham, 12; Halberg 9 Game Two 7 Cedars Casino 86, Avalanche Varsity 46 Leading Scorers: Crumb, 34; Helpenstel, 18; Barker, 18; Rodocker, 14; Johnson, 12 Bowling LAUREL LANES March 22 Mixed Up Mixed Men’s High Game: Calen Walz, 221 Men’s High Series: Calen Walz, 561 Woman’s High Game: Barb Sellers, 183 Woman’s High Series: Barb Sellers, 483 March 22 Tuesday Brunch League High Score: CHeri Pysson, 189 High Series: Cheri Pysson, 506 League Leader: Avon/Louise Ensor March 22 Laurel Lanes Seniors Men’s High Game: Pat Flanigan, 194 Men’s High Series: Rick Lefler, 470 Woman’s High Game: Hazel Vail, 180 Woman’s High Series: Hazel Vail, 470 League Leaders: Sunflowers Golf Peninsula Golf Club Men’s Competition March 22 Better Nine Indidvidual Gross: Mike Dupuis, 34; Rob Botero, 35 Individual Net: Bill Pampell, 31.5; Brian Duncan, 32.5; Jim Bourget, 32.5; Jack Morely, 32.5; Gene Ketchum, 32.5 Team Gross: Dupuis/Botero, 63 Team Net: Pampell/Doran, 60; Pampell/ Munro, 60; Parkhurst/Duncan, 61; Jones/ Boerigter, 62; Duran/Morely, 63

College Basketball NCAA Tournament FIRST ROUND Regional Championship Sunday, March 27 Semifinal winners SOUTHEAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 17 At The Verizon Center Washington Butler 60, Old Dominion 58 Pittsburgh 74, UNC Asheville 51 At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. Florida 79, UC Santa Barbara 51 UCLA 78, Michigan State 76 At The Pepsi Center Denver BYU 74, Wofford 66 Gonzaga 86, St. John’s 71 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Wisconsin 72, Belmont 58 Kansas State 73, Utah State 68 Third Round Saturday, March 19 At The Verizon Center Washington Butler 71, Pittsburgh 70 At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. Florida 73, UCLA 65 At The Pepsi Center Denver BYU 89, Gonzaga 67 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Wisconsin 70, Kansas State 65 At New Orleans Arena Regional Semifinals Thursday, March 24 Florida (28-7) vs. BYU (32-4), 4:27 p.m. Butler (25-9) vs. Wisconsin (25-8), 6:57 p.m. Regional Championship Saturday, March 26 Semifinal winners SOUTHWEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 17 At The Pepsi Center Denver Morehead State 62, Louisville 61 Richmond 69, Vanderbilt 66 Friday, March 18 At The United Center Chicago Notre Dame 69, Akron 56 Florida State 57, Texas A&M 50 Purdue 65, St. Peter’s 43 Virginia Commonwealth 74, Georgetown 56 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Kansas 72, Boston University 53 Illinois 73, UNLV 62 Third Round Saturday, March 19 At The Pepsi Center Denver Richmond 65, Morehead State 48

The Associated Press

Grizzly

victory

Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce (34) fights for the ball but Memphis Grizzlies guard Tony Allen (9) ties him up in the second half of Wednesday’s game in Boston. The Grizzlies won 90-87 Sunday, March 20 At The United Center Chicago Virginia Commonwealth 94, Purdue 76 Florida State 71, Notre Dame 57 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Kansas 73, Illinois 59 At The Alamodome San Antonio Regional Semifinals Friday, March 25 Kansas (34-2) vs. Richmond (29-7), 4:27 p.m. Florida State (23-10) vs. Virginia Commonwealth (26-11), 6:57 p.m. Regional Championship Sunday, March 27 Semifinal winners WEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 17 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Temple 66, Penn State 64 San Diego State 68, Northern Colorado 50 At The Verizon Center Washington Connecticut 81, Bucknell 52 Cincinnati 78, Missouri 63 Friday, March 18 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Texas 85, Mich. 81 Arizona 77, Memphis 75 At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. Michigan 75, Tennessee 45 Duke 87, Hampton 45 Third Round Saturday, March 19 At The Verizon Center Washington Connecticut 69, Cincinnati 58 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. San Diego State 71, Temple 64, 2OT Sunday, March 20 At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. Duke 73, Michigan 71 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Arizona 70, Texas 69 At The Honda Center Anaheim, Calif. Regional Semifinals Thursday, March 24 San Diego State (34-2) vs. Connecticut (28-9), 4:15 p.m. Duke (32-4) vs. Arizona (29-7), 6:45 p.m. Regional Championship Saturday, March 26 Semifinal winners FINAL FOUR At Reliant Stadium Houston National Semifinals Saturday, April 2 East champion vs. West champion Southeast champion vs. Southwest champion National Championship Monday, April 4 Semifinal winners

NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament First Round Saturday, March 19 At Bryce Jordan Center University Park, Pa. Penn State 75, vs. Dayton 66 DePaul 56, Navy 43 At Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham, N.C. Marist 74, Iowa State 64 Duke 90, Tennessee-Martin 45 Sunday, March 20 At Harry A. Gampel Pavilion Storrs, Conn. Connecticut 75, Hartford 39 Purdue 53, Kansas State 45 At Comcast Center College Park, Md. Maryland 70, St. Francis, Pa. 48 Georgetown 65, Princeton 49 Regional Semifinals At The Liacouras Center Philadelphia Sunday, March 27 Connecticut (34-1) vs. Georgetown (24-10), 9 a.m. DePaul (29-6) vs. Duke (31-3), 11:30 a.m. Regional Championship Tuesday, March 29 TBD DAYTON REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 19 At Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee 99, Stetson 34 Marquette 68, Texas 65

At St. John Arena Columbus, Ohio Georgia Tech 69, Bowling Green 58 Ohio State 80, UCF 69 At Huntsman Center Salt Lake City Temple 63, Arizona State 45 Notre Dame 67, Utah 54 Sunday, March 20 At John Paul Jones Arena Charlottesville, Va. Miami 80, Gardner-Webb 62 Oklahoma 86, James Madison 72 Second Round Monday, March 21 At Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee 79, Marquette 70 At St. John Arena Columbus, Ohio Ohio State 67, Georgia Tech 60 At Huntsman Center Salt Lake City Notre Dame 77, Temple 64 Tuesday, March 22 At John Paul Jones Arena Charlottesville, Va. Oklahoma 88, Miami 83 Regional Semifinals At University of Dayton Arena Dayton, Ohio Saturday, March 26 Tennessee (33-2) vs. Ohio State (24-9), 9 a.m. Oklahoma (23-11) vs. Notre Dame (28-7), 11 a.m. Regional Championship Monday, March 28 TBD SPOKANE REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 19 At Maples Pavilion Stanford, Calif. St. John’s 55, Texas Tech 50 Stanford 86, UC Davis 59 At The Pit/Bob King Court Albuquerque, N.M. North Carolina 82, Fresno State 68 Kentucky 66, Hampton 62, OT At McCarthey Athletic Center Spokane, Wash. Gonzaga 92, Iowa 86 UCLA 55, Montana 47 Sunday, March 20 At Cintas Center Cincinnati Louisville 81, Vanderbilt 62 Xavier 72, South Dakota State 56 Second Round Monday, March 21 At Maples Pavilion Stanford, Calif. Stanford 75, St. John’s 49 At The Pit/Bob King Court Albuquerque, N.M. North Carolina 86, Kentucky 74 At McCarthey Athletic Center Spokane, Wash. Gonzaga 89, UCLA 75 Tuesday, March 22 At Cintas Center Cincinnati Louisville 85, Xavier 75 Regional Semifinals At Veterans Memorial Arena Spokane, Wash. Saturday, March 26 Gonzaga (30-4) vs. Louisville (22-12), 6 p.m. Stanford (31-2) vs. North Carolina (27-8), 8:30 p.m. Monday, March 28 Regional Championship TBD DALLAS REGIONAL First Round Sunday, March 20 At Ferrell Center Waco, Texas West Virginia 79, Houston 73 Baylor 66, Prairie View 30 At Intrust Bank Arena Wichita, Kan. Wisconsin-Green Bay 59, Arkansas-Little Rock 55 Michigan State 69, Northern Iowa 66 At Auburn Arena Auburn, Ala. Florida State 76, Samford 46 Georgia 56, Middle Tennessee 41 At CenturyTel Center Shreveport, La. Texas A&M 87, McNeese State 47 Rutgers 76, Louisiana Tech 51 Second Round Tuesday, March 22 At Ferrell Center Waco, Texas Baylor 82, West Virginia 68 (24-9), 6:45 p.m. At Intrust Bank Arena Wichita, Kan. Wisconsin-Green Bay 65, Michigan State 56 At Auburn Arena Auburn, Ala. Georgia 61, Florida State 59

At CenturyTel Center Shreveport, La. Texas A&M 70, Rutgers 48 Regional Semifinals At American Airlines Center Dallas Sunday, March 27 Georgia (23-10) vs. Texas A&M (29-5), 1:30 p.m. Baylor (33-2) vs. Wisconsin-Green Bay (34-1), TBA Regional Championship Tuesday, March 29 TBD FINAL FOUR At at Conseco Fieldhouse Indianapolis National Semifinals Sunday, April 3 Philadelphia champion vs. Dayton champion Spokane champion vs. Dallas champion National Championship Tuesday, April 5 Semifinal winners

Basketball NBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma 46 24 .657 — Denver 42 29 .592 4½ Portland 41 30 .577 5½ Utah 36 36 .500 11 Minnesota 17 54 .239 29½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB y-L.A. 51 20 .718 — Phoenix 35 34 .507 15 Golden State 30 42 .417 21½ L.A. Clippers 27 44 .380 24 Sacramento 18 52 .257 32½ Southwest Division W L Pct GB x-Spurs 57 13 .814 — x-Dallas 49 21 .700 8 New Orleans 40 31 .563 17½ Memphis 40 32 .556 18 Houston 38 34 .528 20 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB y-Boston 50 20 .714 — Philadelphia 37 34 .521 13½ New York 35 36 .493 15½ New Jersey 23 47 .329 27 Toronto 20 50 .286 30 Southeast Division W L Pct GB x-Miami 49 22 .690 — x-Orlando 46 26 .639 3½ Atlanta 40 32 .556 9½ Charlotte 28 42 .400 20½ Washington 17 52 .246 31 Central Division W L Pct GB y-Chicago 51 19 .729 — Indiana 32 40 .444 20 Milwaukee 28 42 .400 23 Detroit 25 46 .352 26½ Cleveland 13 57 .186 38 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Wednesday’s Games Indiana 111, Charlotte 88 New Jersey 98, Cleveland 94, OT Philadelphia 105, Atlanta 100 Memphis 90, Boston 87 Miami 100, Detroit 94 Sacramento 97, Milwaukee 90 Oklahoma City 106, Utah 94 Orlando 111, New York 99 Houston 131, Golden State 112 Toronto at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Washington at L.A. Clippers, LATE San Antonio at Denver, LATE Today’s Games Minnesota at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 6 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League Minnesota Twins: Reassigned C Steve Holm and OF Jeff Bailey to their minor league camp. New York Yankees: Claimed LHP Jose Ortegano off waivers from Atlanta and optioned him to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Optioned OF Greg Golson to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Assigned C Jose Gil, OF Jordan Parraz and INF Jorge Vazquez to their minor league camp. Seattle Mariners: Optioned INF Dustin Ackley to Tacoma (PCL). Reassigned C Steven Baron, INF Sean Kazmar, OF Gabe Gross and LHP Fabio Castro to their minor league camp. National League Chicago Cubs: Optioned RHP Justin Berg and LHP Scott Maine to Iowa (PCL). Assigned RHP Angel Guzman and RHP Todd Wellemeyer to their minor league camp.

SPORTS ON TV Today 7:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA Golf, Open de Andalucia at Parador de Malaga Golf in Malaga, Spain. Noon (47) GOLF PGA Golf, Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill Golf Club and Lodge in Orlando, Fla. 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 MLB Baseball, Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs in Spring Training. 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF LPGA Golf, Kia Classic at La Costa Resort & Spa in San Diego, Calif. 4 p.m. (7) KIRO Men’s College Basketball, San Diego State vs. Connecticut in NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen at Anaheim, Calif. 4:15 p.m. (28) TBS Men’s College Basketball, BYU vs. Florida in NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen at New Orleans, La. 6:30 p.m. (7) KIRO Men’s College Basketball, Duke vs. Arizona in NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen at Anaheim, Calif. 6:55 p.m. (28) TBS Men’s College Basketball, Butler vs. Wisconsin in NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen at New Orleans, La. Houston Astros: Assigned RHP Cesar Carillo outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). Milwaukee Brewers: Acquired OF Brett Carroll from Kansas City for cash considerations and assigned him to Nashville (PCL). New York Mets: Optioned 2B Justin Turner to Buffalo (IL). Washington Nationals: Claimed LHP Lee Hyde off waivers from Atlanta and optioned him to Syracuse (IL). Placed RHP Stephen Strasburg on the 60-day DL. American Association Amarillo Sox: Signed OF Fehlandt Lentini. Traded OF Chase Porch to Windy City (Frontier) for a player to be named. El Paso Diablos: Signed LHP Rosalio Gomez. Gary Southshore Railcats: Signed RHP Scott Shaw. Lincoln Saltdogs: Signed LHP Nolan Chestnut, RHP Sean Potter, RHP John James and RHP Brendon Smith. St. Paul Saints : Signed LHP Alain Quijano. Frontier League Evansville Otters: Signed OF Chris Weimer. Florence Freedom: Signed LHP Shawn Schaefer. Released RHP Brandon Forshee, INF Patrick Rose and RHP Everett Saul. Gateway Grizzlies: Signed RHP Adrian Garza to a contract extension. Lake Erie Crushers: Signed RHP Alberto Rolon to a contract extension. Signed RHP Eric Gonzalez.

Basketball National Basketball Association Houston Rockets: Signed F Mike Harris to a 10-day contract. New Jersey Nets: Recalled G Ben Uzoh from Springfield (NBADL). NBA Development League Rio Grande Valley Vipers: Reacquired G Matt Janning. WNBA San Antonio Silver Stars: Named Vickie Johnson assistant coach.

Football United Football League Virginia Destroyers: Named Marty Schottenheimer coach and general manager.

Hockey National Hockey League Anaheim Ducks: Activated G Jonas Hiller off the injured list. Chicago Blackhaks: Recalled F Marcus Kruger from Djurgardens (Swedish Elite League). Detroit Red Wings: Recalled G Joey MacDonald from Grand Rapids (AHL). Placed G Chris Osgood on injured list. Los Angeles Kings: Recalled F Oscar Moller from Manchester (AHL). American Hockey League Bridgeport Sound Tigers: Returned F Jean Bourbeau to Odessa (CHL). Grand Rapids Griffins: Signed F Mike Hedden. Syracuse Crunch: Assigned F Brian Lebler to Elmira (ECHL). ECHL Elmira Jackals: Signed F Andrew Favot. Central Hockey League Allen Americans: Announced F Bruce Graham was recalled by Lake Erie (AHL). Fort Wayne Komets: Announced Chicago (AHL) assigned D Matt Krug to the team. Mississippi Riverkings: Claimed D Danko Mironovic off waivers from Fort Wayne. Quad City Mallards: Suspended D Tyler Townsend.

Swimming USA Swimming: Named Talia Mark marketing manager, Emily Silver athlete relations manager, Amanda Rost marketing manager for corporate services and Matt Whewell public relations and digital communications coordinator.

Soccer Major League Soccer Chivas USA: Loaned F Chukwudi Chijindu to the L.A. Blues. Traded the rights to D Yamith Cuesta to Chicago for a 2012 supplemental draft pick. Red Bull New York: Signed D Tyler Lassiter.

College Central Collegiate Hockey Association: Announced the resignation of commissioner Tom Anastos, who will become hockey coach at Michigan State. Arkansas: Named Mike Anderson men’s basketball coach. George Washington: Granted transfer releases to basketball G Tim Johnson and F Chris Firtzgerald. Georgia Tech: Named Ryan Bamford associate athletic director for internal operations. Louisiana Tech: Fired men’s basketball coach Kerry Rupp. New Jersey Institute Of Technology: Named Sergio Gonzalez women’s soccer coach. Northern Illinois: Named Mark Montgomery men’s basketball coach. RPI: Named Tim Landis football coach. Utah: Promoted interim women’s basketball coach Anthony Levrets to coach.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Witness refutes Bonds Jury hears about use of syringes By Ronald Blum

The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Bonds looked at the witness stand with a blank expression as a childhood friend and former business partner described how baseball’s biggest star walked into the master bedroom at his spring training home along with trainer Greg Anderson, who had a syringe with a needle. A few minutes later, Bonds and Anderson walked out. Steve Hoskins testified in federal court Wednesday that he never saw Anderson inject Bonds. The question for the jury will be whether Hoskins’ description, which the defense began to challenge later in the day, is a path toward convicting Bonds of lying when he told a grand jury seven years ago he never knowingly took steroids. Speaking softly and fidgeting a bit in the witness chair, Hoskins gave the first dramatic testimony in the trial of the home-run king, who faces four counts of making false statements and one count of obstruction. Hoskins said he witnessed scenes of Bonds and a needle-bearing Anderson entering a bedroom once or twice each spring training for three straight years starting in 2000. A partner with Bonds in a memorabilia business, Hoskins said the home-run hitter asked him to inquire about the effects of the ste-

The Associated Press

Steve Hoskins, right, a former business partner of Barry Bonds, and an undentified man walk in the lobby of a federal courthouse in San Francisco on Wednesday after Hoskins testified in Bonds’ perjury trial. roid Winstrol in 1999, at around the time Bonds was having left elbow surgery April 20. Hoskins said he went to Dr. Arthur Ting, who is expected to testify later in the trial, and brought a sheet of information back to the slugger. Hoskins said he planned to go to Bobby Bonds, the defendant’s father and a former major leaguer himself, to express his suspicions. “I was concerned in 1999 after speaking with Dr. Ting about it,” Hoskins testified. “In 2003 I was even more concerned because it was getting — it just seemed to be getting out of hand.” This was the period when Bonds noticeably bulked up and started posting unprecedented power numbers for the San Francisco Giants. The seven-time NL MVP hit a season-record 73 homers in 2001 en route to a career record 762 by the

time of his last season in 2007 — months before he was indicted for his 2003 grand jury testimony. Hoskins, who also helped Bonds get his equipment in order at the ballpark, said Bonds’ body changed in this period — prosecutors allege the transformation was caused by steroids. “His shoe size just got bigger,” Hoskins said. “His glove size changed. “His body weight changed. He got heavier and bigger.” Bonds, in a lighter gray suit than previous days and a striped tie, took copious notes during the testimony of Hoskins, who followed federal agent Jeff Novitzky to the stand and became the second witness in a trial expected to last about a month. Both prosecutors and the defense played for the jury portions of a recording Hoskins secretly made of a conversation that took place

in front of Bonds’ locker in 2003. Hoskins said he put an Olympus digital recorder in a pocket and recorded Anderson “to show Bobby actually what really was going on.” “That was the only way to prove it to him,” Hoskins said. Hoskins never played the conversation for Bobby Bonds, who by 2003 was ill with cancer and died that August. Much of the recording was first released by the prosecution in February 2009. At one point, Anderson is heard discussing what the government alleges are designer steroids he supplied to Bonds. “But the whole thing is . . . everything that I’ve been doing at this point, it’s all undetectable,” he said. Voices on the recording were muffled, and during the portion played by the prosecution, jurors were given transcripts to aid them.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

B3

Prep Track and Field Four-way Meet at Crescent School (Joyce) Top 3 March 23 GIRLS Team scores: 1 Crescent, 113; 2 Port Angeles, 55; 3 Clallam Bay, 37; 4 Neah Bay, 1. 3200 Meter Run Finals 1, Jones, Taylor, Port Angeles, 14:40.24. 2, Jakubkova, Zuzana, Crescent, 15:38.24. 3, Rose, Kailee, Crescent, 17:33.24. 100 Meter Hurdles 1, Grover, Anne, Crescent, 20.55. 2, Christie, Devanie, Crescent, 21.28. 3, Moore, Sara, Crescent, 22.55. 100 Meter Dash 1, Millsap, Jolene, Port Angeles, 14.94. 2, Christie, Devanie, Crescent, 15.52. 3, Moore, Sara, Crescent, 15.57. 1600 Meter Run 1, Reader, Bailey, Port Angeles, 7:19.79. 2, Dacko, Kathrine, Port Angeles, 7:20.36. 3, Jakubkova, Zuzana, Crescent, 7:28.25. 4x100 Meter Relay 1, Port Angeles ‘A’, 58.23. 2, Crescent ‘A’, 1:00.93. 300 Meter Hurdles 1, Belford, Kellie, Crescent, 54.38. 2, Grover, Anne, Crescent, 57.31. 3, Erickson, Inga, Clallam Bay, 1:12.71. 800 Meter Run 1, Jakubkova, Zuzana, Crescent, 3:11.65. 2, Bowen, Becca, Crescent, 3:17.49. 3, Dacko, Kathrine, Port Angeles, 3:23.09. 200 Meter Dash 1, Frantz, Jandi, Crescent, 32.61. 2, Erickson, Inga, Clallam Bay, 34.68. 3, Welliver, Kenna, Clallam Bay, 36.49. 4x200 Meter Relay 1, Crescent ‘A’, 2:02.48. 2, Port Angeles ‘A’, 2:11.01. 4x400 Meter Relay 1, Crescent ‘A’, 4:58.29. Long Jump 1, Willis, Melissa, Clallam Bay, 13-03. 2, Grover, Lynn, Crescent, 13-01. 3, McBride, Britteny, Port Angeles, 12-00. Triple Jump 1, Grover, Lynn, Crescent, 25-07.50. , Rose, Kailee, Crescent, ND. High Jump 1, Willis, Melissa, Clallam Bay, 4-04. 2, Christie, Devanie, Crescent, 4-02. --, Welliver, Kenna, Clallam Bay, NH. Shot Put 1, Donnell, Rashaya, Crescent, 28-05.50. 2, Andrus, Kiana, Port Angeles, 28-00.50. 3, Erickson, Kirstin, Clallam Bay, 27-08. Discus Throw 1, Erickson, Kirstin, Clallam Bay, 81-07.50. 2, Andrus, Kiana, Port Angeles, 73-00. 3, Donnell, Rashaya, Crescent, 65-03. Javelin Throw 1, Donnell, Rashaya, Crescent, 87-04. 2, Erickson, Kirstin, Clallam Bay, 77-09. 3, Bowen, Rachel, Crescent, 65-00.

BOYS Team scores: 1 Crescentt, 95; 2 Port Angeles, 62; 3 Clallam Bay, 45; 4 Neah Bay, 36. 110 Meter Hurdles 1, Waldrip, Matthew, Crescent, 19.80. 2, Ennis, Zach, Port Angeles, 21.74. 3, March, Quinntin, Crescent, 22.49. 100 Meter Dash 1, Pascua, Titus, Neah Bay, 12.53. 2, Temres, Easton, Port Angeles, 12.59. 3, Monje, Joey, Neah Bay, 12.86. 1600 Meter Run 1, Dennis, Brendan, Port Angeles, 5:02.51. 2, Ahrens, Michael, Port Angeles, 5:03.64. 3, Herbert, Evan, Port Angeles, 5:14.58. 4x100 Meter Relay 1, Crescent ‘A’, 48.92. 2, Neah Bay ‘A’, 49.40. 400 Meter Dash 1, Williams, Joel, Crescent, 55.12. 2, Christie, Dylan, Crescent, 57.74. 3, Mohr, Matt, Clallam Bay, 1:00.41. 300 Meter Hurdles 1, Waldrip, Matthew, Crescent, 45.25. 2, Scott, Philip, Port Angeles, 51.57. 3, Wood, Michael, Port Angeles, 56.43. 800 Meter Run 1, McKay, Connor, Clallam Bay, 2:26.71. 2, Wonderly, Jesse, Clallam Bay, 2:30.55. 3, Monette, Joshua, Neah Bay, 2:36.72. 200 Meter Dash 1, Temres, Easton, Port Angeles, 25.07. 2, Pascua, Titus, Neah Bay, 25.45. 3, Dennis, Brendan, Port Angeles, 26.20. 3200 Meter Run 1, Tupper, Kyle, Port Angeles, 12:44.74. 2, McKay, Connor, Clallam Bay, 13:00.93. 3, Portnoy, Zac, Clallam Bay, 14:38.44. 4x400 Meter Relay 1, Crescent ‘A’, 3:53.81. 2, Port Angeles ‘A’, 4:08.47. 3, Clallam Bay ‘A’, 4:09.89. Long Jump 1, Pascua, Titus, Neah Bay, 19-00. 2, James, Emmitt, Clallam Bay, 18-05. 3, Larson, Eric, Crescent, 17-06. Triple Jump 1, Christie, Dylan, Crescent, 38-08.50. 2, Scott, Philip, Port Angeles, 35-05.50. 3, Winck, Elisha, Neah Bay, 35-00. High Jump 1, Willis, Ryan, Clallam Bay, 5-06. 2, Christie, Donovan, Crescent, 5-04. 3, Williams, Joel, Crescent, 5-00. Shot Put 1, Zapien, Mike, Crescent, 41-00.50. 2, McCaulley, Tyler, Neah Bay, 40-08.25. 3, Hutto, Austin, Crescent, 36-07.50. Discus Throw 1, Zapien, Mike, Crescent, 103-05. 2, Chomica, Dmitri, Port Angeles, 90-08. 3, Hutto, Austin, Crescent, 85-01.50. Javelin Throw 1, Williams, Joel, Crescent, 143-03. 2, Hutto, Austin, Crescent, 135-10. 3, Ritter, Austin, Clallam Bay, 128-02.

Preps: Sequim falls to Vikings Continued from B1 pions blasted two home runs to hand the Wolves “I still think he’s just their first loss of the season learning how to pitch. He Wednesday. Steffen Jeffcoat and Alex throws hard. As he learns more he’s just going to get Nettleton each took Sequim starter Isaac Yamamoto better.” Unfortunately for the deep, as the Vikings trigRedskins, their pitching gered the 10-run mercy rule wasn’t nearly as dominant. by the fifth inning. “You gotta play really Port Angeles (2-0 in league and overall) capital- well to beat them and we ized on 10 walks and three didn’t,” Sequim coach Dave hit batters to score 14 runs Ditlefsen said. “They capiin just four innings against talized on every mistake we made.” Port Townsend hurlers. Sequim (1-1, 2-1) will The Riders were also perfect in the field for the next host Klahowya on Frisecond straight game, com- day at 4 p.m. mitting zero errors. Senior second baseman North Kitsap 10, Sequim 0 (5 inn.) Kitsap 0 2 6 1 1 X X ­— 10 5 1 Kyler Morgan robbed the North Sequim 0 0 0 0 X X X — 0 2 3 Redskins (0-1 in league, 0-2 WP- Reitan; LP- Yamamoto (0-1) Pitching Statistics overall) of a pair of hits in Kitsap: Retain 5IP, 2H, 3K. the field, and Port Angeles North Team: Yamamoto 5IP, 5H, K, 6BB, 5ER. pitchers yielded zero free Hitting Statistics North Kitsap: Jeffcoat 2-3 (4RBI, HR), Nettleton passes. 1-2 (HR). Cole Uvila had two RBIs Sequim: Royall 1-2, Ramirez 1-2. and one run scored and Brian Senf a triple, stolen Quilcene 10, base and RBI for the Riders, Rainier Christian 5 who punched out seven hits AUBURN — Brandon all together. “Those games are tough Bancroft went five innings when they are not getting a on the mound and scored lot of strikes,” Withrow said four runs to lead the Rangers to a victory in their first of his own hitters. “I thought they did a Sea-Tac League game of the good job of waiting for season Tuesday. Quilcene (2-0) scored pitches and taking their three runs in the third walks when they could.” Robert Ristick was inning to regain a lead it tabbed with the loss on the would never relinquish. mound for the Redskins. Quilcene 10, Rainier Christian 5 Jacob King scored their lone running, crossing home Quilcene 1 0 3 1 0 1 4 ­— 10 8 1 Rainier 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 — 5 6 4 plate on a single from Cody WP- Bancroft; LP- Not reported Pitching Statistics Russell. Bancroft 5IP, 2H, 10K; Davidson 2IP, “We had some guys that 4H,Quilcene: K, 3BB. it was their first pitching Hitting Statistics [appearance on varsity] Quilcene: Bancroft 2-4 (4R, 2RBI), C. Schreier 1-3 (2B, 2RBI, BB), Davidson 1-1 (2RBI, 2BB), Murray ever. . . so they kind of 2-4 (R, RBI), Pleines 1-3 (R, 2RBI, BB), K. Schreier struggled,” Redskins coach 1-3 (2R, RBI, BB). Tom Webster said. “I’m still encouraged by Softball a lot of our young kids.” Port Angeles 11, Port Angeles travels to Port Townsend 0 Olympic on Friday, while Port Townsend hosts North DRY CREEK — Lauren Mason on the same day. Curtis and Stacy Webb combined to throw a noPort Angeles 14, Port Townsend 1 hitter as the Roughriders Port Townsend 0 0 0 1 0 X X ­— 1 4 2 won their second straight to Port Angeles 3 7 0 4 X X X — 14 7 0 WP- Naptiontek (1-0); LP- Ristick begin the season. Pitching Statistics Curtis tossed four Port Townsend: Ristick IP, Goodrich 2IP, Dellinnings of hitless ball before agarza IP. Port Angeles: Napiontek 3IP, 0R, 0H, 0BB, 6K; leaving the game with a Pitz IP, ER, 4H, K; Reandeau IP, 0R, 0H, 2K. knee injury — she was hit Hitting Statistics Port Townsend: King 1-2 (R), Russell 1-2 (RBI). by a pitch — in WednesPort Angeles: Napiontek 2-3 (3B, HR, 5RBI, HBP, day’s Olympic League tilt. 2R), Uvila 1-1 (R, 2RBI), Senf 1-3 (3B, RBI, SB). Webb then came on and struck out the side in the fifth, North Kitsap 10, ending the game because of Sequim 0 the 10-run mercy rule. “I’m really pleased for SEQUIM — The reigning Olympic League cham- Lauren,” Port Angeles coach

Buddy Bear said. “She’s been sitting in the wings like other pitchers behind Stacy, but she did a good job.” Kelsey Hinsdale led the Rider attack at the plate with a 3-for-3 day with a double, triple and five RBIs. Port Angeles (2-0 in league and overall) next plays at Olympic on Friday. Port Angeles 11, Port Townsend 0 Port Townsend 0 0 0 0 0 X X ­— 0 0 1 Port Angeles 2 0 2 7 X X X — 11 7 1 WP- Curtis (1-0); LP- LeMaster Pitching Statistics Port Townsend: LeMaster 4IP. Port Angeles: Curtis 4IP, 7K, 0BB; Webb IP, 3K. Hitting Statistics Port Angeles: Hinsdale 3-3 (2B, 3B, R, 5RBI), Drake 2-2 (2R, 2RBI), Wahto 1-3 (R, RBI), Lucas 1-3 (R, RBI).

Port Angeles 4, Central Kitsap 3 Match Report Singles No. 1 : Corn (PA) def. Scarr (CK) 6-1, 6-0. No. 2: Bohman (PA) def. Brown (CK) 6-0, 6-0. No. 3: Fickas (PA) def. Mur (CK) 6-4, 7-6. Doubles No. 1: Miller/Cheung (CK) def. Boyd/Cook (PA) 6-7, 7-5, 7-6. No. 2: Carlo/Jensen (CK) def. Rutherford/Drake (PA) 5-7, 7-6, 6-3. No. 3: Coffman/Reyes (PA) def. Russell/Nguyen (CK) 6-4, 6-3. No. 4: Sullivan/Barrow (CK) def. Peet/Moriarty (PA) 6-2, 6-2.

Boys Golf Sequim 205, Port Angeles 209

SEQUIM — The Wolves defeated the Riders in ninehole Olympic League action Tuesday at Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course. Sequim’s Ryan O’Mera and Port Angeles’s Terrance Sequim 12, Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News Stevenson tied for match North Kitsap 0 medalist. Clallam Bay’s Donald Hanson competes in the O’Mera and Stevenson long jump at Crescent High School in Joyce on SEQUIM — The Wolves bats came alive as they both shot a 36 for the day. Wednesday. cruised to an Olympic Sequim 205, Port Angeles 209 League victory Wednesday. (9 holes) The Wolves scored 12 Port Angeles (1-1) runs on seven hits while Stevenson 36, Payton 39, Nagus 44, Schlinkmann finishing the game errorless. 44, Weltzler 46. (1-0) Rylleigh Zbaraschuk Sequim Continued from B1 rip the 110 hurdles (19.80) O’Mera 36, Torres 40, Maloney 42, Francis 42, had a big game at the plate, Francis 44. and 300 hurdles (45.25). Neah Bay’s Titus Pascua crushing the ball for two Zapien earned first-place doubles and a triple. finishes in the discus (103- was the only other doubleSequim 242, Columbia Haupt picked 5) and shot put (41-0.5); winner in the boys meet, Kingston 270 up the win on the mound, Williams the javelin (143-3) taking the 100-meter dash WHITEHORSE — and 400 (45.25); and Wald- (12.53) and long jump (19-0). pitching four innings while Sequim continued it’s winstriking out four. ning ways on the road. Ryan O’Mera was named Sequim 12, North Kitsap 0 the match medalist in the North Kitsap 0 0 0 0 0 ­— 12 7 0 Sequim 0 1 7 4 0 — 0 6 2 victory after shooting a 38 WP- Haupt ; LP- Holt in nine holes. Pitching Statistics “It will be wonderful to Continued from B1 Sequim will host OlymSequim: 4 IP; 0 R; 5 H; 1 BB; 4 K present my story to the peoNorth Kitsap: 3 IP; 8 R; 3 ER; 6 H; 6 BB; 0 K pic on April 1. Hitting Statistics ple that live right beneath The son of famous Sequim: Zbaraschuk, 3-4, 2R, 5 RBI, 2 2B, 1 3B; Sequim 242, Kingston 270 those mountains.” mountaineer Jim WhitMiller, 2-3, 1 R; M. Zbaraschuk, 1-4, 1 R, 1 RBI; Clift, 1-2, 1 R, 1 2B; Abell, 2 R, 2 RBI (9 holes) The slide show presentataker — the first American Sequim (2-0) to summit the world’s tall- tion will be followed by a O’Mera 38, Francis 47, Pinza 48. est peak, Mount Everest — short question and answer Girls Tennis session. Leif has led his own life of Port Angeles 4, Boys Soccer Tickets cost $20 and are high-altitude exploration in Central Kitsap 3 Forks 3, Elma 2 available at Necessities and recent years. Temptations and North by In fact, Leif followed in ELMA — The Spartans PORT ANGELES — The Northwest Surf Shop in Riders swept all three sin- battled through two over- his father’s footsteps by gles matches to knock off time periods to earn an summiting Everest himself Port Angeles and Brian’s Sporting Goods and More in Class 4A Central Kitsap in SWL victory on the road a year ago. At Tuesday night’s Sequim. nonleague action Wednesday. Wednesday. There will also be tickets Geovany Miguel started event, he will share stories, The player of the match on sale at the door the night was Shayla Bohman, the the scoring off for Forks, photographs and video of the event for $25. Seating Rider’s No. 2 singles player. finding the back of the net from that expedition as is limited so advance pur“Shayla was in control early in the first half off an well as others atop the highest peaks in Antarctica chase is recommended. Alexis Ayala assist. from the very beginning Juan Beltran and and South America. Proceeds benefit the and played at a high level,” The presentation is set Gabrial Camarena each had Hurricane Ridge Winter said Port Angeles coach huge goals for the Spartans, for 7 p.m. at the Peninsula Sports Education Fund. Brian Gundersen. the latter winning the game College Little Theater, 1235 ________ Kelsey Coffman and in OT. E. Lauridsen Blvd. Kyrie Reyes — the No. 3 Matt Schubert is the outdoors “I learned how to climb Forks 3, Elma 2 and sports columnist for the Pendoubles team — sealed the in the Olympic Mountains,” 1 1 0 1 — 3 insula Daily News. His column victory for the Riders with Forks Leif Whittaker said in a Elma 1 1 0— 2 regularly appears on Thursdays Scoring Summary their 6-4, 6-3 win. news release. and Fridays. He can be reached at First half: 1, Forks, Miguel (Ayala); 1, Elma. Port Angeles will face Second Half: 2, Elma; 2, Forks, Beltran. “I owe so much to that matt.schubert@peninsuladaily Second Overtime: 1, Forks, Camarena. news.com. Klahowya today. place.

Track: Loggers

Schubert: Peak


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 24, 2011

PAGE

B4

Business

Politics & Environment

Starbucks’ growth plan: New places, products By Sarah Skidmore The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Starbucks Corp. is expanding the products and places it sells to customers and adding extras — like free online access to Marvel Comics in its cafes and single-serve coffee machines in other stores. The company has been working for some time to move its business beyond its cafes, which took a hit during the recession but have since rebounded. On Wednesday, executives laid out how the company is putting its new strategy into practice. “We are now playing from a position of strength,” Chief Financial Officer Troy Alstead told the capacity crowd at the company’s annual meeting in Seattle. CEO Howard Schultz said one of Starbucks’ critical steps is expanding its consumer packaged-goods business, which he said could one day rival its retail business in revenue. A key component of that will be increasing singleserve coffee sales in the U.S., an estimated $1.6 billion market. Starbucks said two-thirds of the growth in

the U.S. coffee market during the past year has come from the single-serve market. Starbucks entered the market with its Via Ready Brew instant coffee in 2009 and expanded its presence in February when it announced a deal with Courtesy Products to provide its coffee in premium hotel rooms. Starbucks then announced this month that it will provide coffee and Tazo tea for Green Mountain Coffee’s Keurig singlecup machines. Starbucks plans to sell the Keurig system in specialty retailers in the fall and in its own stores in 2012. The company said Wednesday it believes it can ultimately build the K-Cup deal into a business worth more than $1 billion. Starbucks said it also plans to sell an on-demand single-cup brewing system through its partnership with Courtesy Products through specialty retailers starting in the fall. The company announced a 10-year extension of its partnership with Autogrill’s HMSHost to operate Starbucks cafes in U.S. airports and other travel sites.

The Associated Press

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz begins the 2011 shareholders meeting at McCaw Hall in Seattle on Wednesday. Company leaders said Starbucks remains dedicated to coffee and its own stores. And they highlighted a number of ways the company hopes to connect with consumers in its cafes, including a system for paying for drinks by phone and its increasingly popular social networking tools to increase traffic. The company also announced plans to enhance the free Wi-Fi network it provides in nearly 7,000 company-operated cafes, adding access to subscrip-

tion and Web services including The Economist, ESPN Insider Rumor Center, Marvel Digital Comics and Mediabistro. Customers log in using their own computers, tablets or smartphones. Providing the service is intended to increase sales of Starbucks’ drinks and other products. Shares of Starbucks, which got a boost from a dip in coffee bean commodity prices, rose $1.74 — almost 5 percent — to close Wednesday at $36.69.

Settlement option would save $1.2 billion to workers By Manuel Valdes The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — A businessbacked Senate bill allowing a settlement option for the state’s workers’ compensation system would result in savings of about $1.2 billion during the next two years, according to a state estimate released late Tuesday. The hefty estimate is a new turn in this session’s debate over the workers’ compensation system, which is on shaky financial ground. A state’s auditor report last December pegged parts of the system as insolvent or in danger of becoming insolvent in the next five years. But opponents said

Wednesday the “savings” are a cost shift to injured workers and settlements could lead those laborers to other state assistance programs. Labor interest groups have steadfastly opposed the settlement option, instead backing a package of House bills that aim to streamline the system for savings of about $450 million in the next six years. Meanwhile, lawmakers say Gov. Chris Gregoire is rolling out this week another proposal that addresses the problems of the program. Earlier this session, Gregoire set the pace by backing a middle-of-the-road bills package that included a lim-

ited settlement option for workers older than 55 years of age. Republican leaders, who met with the Gregoire Wednesday, said the governor is not backing a settlement option now. “If the governor would just stay where she’s at, and let us work that,” said Rep. Gary Alexander, R-Olympia.

New proposal? Scott Whiteaker, spokesman for Gregoire, said that she will be unveiling a new proposal to reform workers’ compensation. But couldn’t give too many details. “Her proposal recognizes the need to modernize the workers’ compensation sys-

tem and the thoughts of legislators, business and labor,” he said. According to the “fiscal note” prepared by the Office of Financial Management, including a settlement option for all workers would reduce costs by $1.7 billion in the next two years. Settlement payments would total about $990 million, resulting in the $730 million of one-time net savings. There would also be reduced costs of $500 million for this biennium and subsequent cycles. “It’s a good chunk of change, it’s a jaw dropper,” said Sen. Jeanne KohlWelles, D-Seattle, chair of Senate’s labor committee. “Of course the ball is in the House’s court.”

Board-certified teachers’ pay questioned by UW center report By Donna Gordon Blankinship

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — As state lawmakers debate cutting $50 million in bonuses for national board certified teachers, researchers at the University of Washington released a brief Wednesday that concludes the incentive program is failing to meet key goals. The system was designed in part to attract the best teachers to the neediest schools and keep them there, but that isn’t happening, according to UW’s Center on Reinventing Public Education. The report concludes that the state should con-

sider refining its bonus program because of these failures. Gov. Chris Gregoire has proposed skipping the bonuses for the next two years to help balance the state budget by saving nearly $100 million over the biennium. Other states, including Florida, Georgia, Ohio and South Carolina, are also considering changing or eliminating their bonus program for board certified teachers. Lead researcher Jim Simpkins said he decided to look into the effectiveness of this program after reading the governor’s budget proposal. His goal was to look at the

Bank of America: Fed nixes dividend hike plan The Associated Press

Opposition A representative of the state’s largest teacher’s union disagreed with both the focus and the findings of the study. Jim Meadows, instruction, certification and higher education specialist for the Washington Education Association, said the main goal of the bonus program was not to move good teachers to the neediest schools; the goal

was to get board-certified teachers in high-poverty schools by either moving them or by certifying existing teachers. A 2010 study by other researchers at the University of Washington found that board-certified teachers are more likely to stay in challenging schools than their noncertified colleagues. Meadows said that’s another reason to celebrate the program he calls one of the most effective reform efforts in Washington state in recent history. The bonus program has helped Seattle Public Schools spread great teachers around the district and increase the number of nonwhite teachers seeking the certification, Meadows said.

RIDING MOWER:

Builders set mixer at title office PORT ANGELES — Olympic Peninsula Title Co. 319 Peabody St., Suite A, will host the North Peninsula Association’s Building Connections event from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. today. Maureen Pfaff and Olympic Peninsula Title Company staff will provide a tour of their offices and a discussion on the services they provide. Olympic Peninsula Title has been a member of the North Peninsula Building Association since 1984. The purpose of Building Connections is to provide members an informal opportunity to network within the Association while encouraging members to “Do Business With A Member.” For more information, phone the NPBA office at 360-452-8160 or email faleana@npba.info.

World’s costliest TOKYO — Japan’s government said the cost of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast could reach $309 billion, making it the world’s most expensive natural disaster on record. The extensive damage to housing, roads, utilities and businesses across seven prefectures has resulted in direct losses of between 16 trillion yen ($198 billion) and 25 trillion yen ($309 billion), according to a Cabinet Office estimate Wednesday. If the government’s projection proves correct, it would top the losses from Hurricane Katrina. The 2005 megastorm that ravaged New Orleans and the surrounding region cost $125 billion, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

New-home sales WASHINGTON — Sales of new homes nationwide plunged in February to the fewest on records dating back nearly half a century, a dismal sign for an already-weak housing market. New-home sales fell 16.9 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 250,000 homes, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. It’s the third straight monthly decline and far below the 700,000-a-year pace that economists view as healthy. The median price of a new home dropped nearly 14 percent to $202,100, the lowest since December 2003. New-home

Real-time stock quotations at

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prices are now 30 percent higher than of those being resold.

Smaller banks WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke told a group of executives from smaller banks Wednesday that the financial overhaul will level the playing field for them with the industry’s giants. Bernanke said it would be important for the banks to adapt to the changing regulatory environment, in remarks to the annual convention in San Diego of small- and medium-size banks. Bernanke acknowledged their concerns about the new law. But he said most of the requirements are aimed the country’s biggest banks and not them. Congress passed the regulatory law last year in an effort to prevent a repeat of the 2008 financial crisis. Small-bank executives have complained that it will cost them a lot of money to meet the new rules, even though they were not responsible for causing the financial crisis.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.1557 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.2860 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.3035 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2662.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0418 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1439.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1427.50 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $36.970 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $36.271 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1746.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1739.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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NEW YORK — Bank of America said the Federal Reserve has objected to its plan for raising its dividend in the second half of this year. But the bank said in a regulatory filing Wednesday that it’s been given another opportunity to submit a comprehensive plan to the Fed so that the central bank may reconsider its decision. The Charlotte, N.C., bank expects to resubmit a request to dole out a second-half dividend.

Bank of America shares fell 27 cents, or 2 percent, to $13.61 in pre-market trading. Last week, the U.S. Federal Reserve cleared the way for major lenders to increase their dividends if they passed stress tests. Banks had been forced to cut dividends to preserve cash following the financial crisis. It was a condition of the government’s bank bailout package. Citigroup on Monday said it planned to reinstate a penny-per-share quarterly dividend.

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 24, 2011

Our Peninsula

SECTION

c

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

Welcome spring with live music SPRING HAS FINALLY sprung, so get out of that recliner and throw off that winter blanket and get out and dance or, at least, tap your toes or move to the groove of live music. Somewhere in the following list of gigs across the Peninsula, you will surely find some live music to soothe your soul or maybe cut a rug to.

classics from the ’50s through the ’70s that many bands don’t cover, like Sherry and others, that (aka Lorrie John require a two- to three-octave and Clipper, range. Nelson aka the Works) ■  On Saturday, Denny Secrocks from ord Jr. livens up Randy’s Place 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 3 Crabs Restaurant, 11 ■  On Mon- Three Crabs Road, with country day, Dave and and old rock from 5:30 p.m. to Rosalie Sec8 p.m. ord’s guest ■  Every Wednesday at Mugs will be Ron ’n’ Jugs Bar & Grill, 735 W. Munro at Washington St., Jimmy HoffSmuggler’s man and friends perform Landing, 115 unplugged from 7 p.m. to midRailroad Ave., night. Donations welcome. from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. ■  On Friday, Chuck Grall, Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Les Wamboldt and Olde Tyme Victor Reventlow host the very Country will perform at the popular and rousing open mic Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to W. U.S. Highway 101, from 6 p.m. 9:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■  On Friday at Stymie’s Bar Victor Reventlow will host & Grill at Cedars at Dungethe acoustic jam from 6 p.m. to ness, 1965 Woodcock Road, 9 p.m. every Tuesday. Don’t be Kelly Hoch and Barry Burnett left out! perform classic rock and country ■  Tonight and every Thursfrom 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. day, Larry and Rene Bauer ■  On Friday at Club Seven direct the goings-on at the open Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, mic hosted by the Cracked Blyn, Phil Westbrook, “The Bean, 108 DelGuzzi Drive, from Piano Man,” tickles the ivories 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. You ■  On Tuesday, Howly Slim can get tickled, too, if your tune picks and grins at Kokopelli request stumps him. Grill, 203 E. Front St., at 6 p.m. On Saturday, dance to Pop ■  Every Tuesday evening at Culture, a Club Seven favorite, the Port Angeles Senior Cen’cuz they play Top 40 and classic ter, Seventh and Peabody rock and country from 9 p.m. to streets, the Port Angeles Senior 1 a.m. Swingers present Wally and the On Sunday, you’ll not want to Boys playing ballroom dance miss the Timebenders and favorites for the dancing pleasure their tribute to the best songs of of all adults 45 years and older the ’60s through the ’90s, comfrom 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. plete with costume changes and comedy, from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free! ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis On Monday, we be jammin’ Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highwith host Barry Burnett and way 101, Bob and Dave play friends, so bring your ax and/or blues with a brew and barbecue vocal talents for the fun from from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC

Music notes

soul at 6 p.m.

■  On Saturday, Washington Old Time Fiddlers play live music at the Tri-Area Commu■  Tonight at The Upstage, nity Center, 10 West Valley 923 Washington St., waltz to the Road, Chimacum. All-players jam “Homemade Music” of Kristin and Otto Smith when they host from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., perWaltz Night at 7:30 p.m. No snow formance from 1:30 p.m. to this time, so you should be able to 3:30 p.m. Free and open to the make it. Dance review and lesson public. Donations support scholarships. For more information, visit at 7 p.m. $5 cover. On Friday, the Robin Bessier www.olympus.net/community/ Port Angeles oldtime fiddlers/play.htm. Quintet plays jazz with heart, ■  On Sunday, the Washington harmony and humor at 7:30 p.m. ■  Tonight at Castaways Vocalist Robin is backed by Skip Old Time Fiddlers Association of Restaurant and Night Club, Clallam and Jefferson Counties Morris, vocals, guitar; Mike 1213 Marine Drive, the SundHorsfall, piano, vibraphone; Ted has its annual spring concert, Me owners will host a jam from ’n’ My Fiddle, at the Sequim Enderle, bass; and Tom Svor5 p.m. to 8 p.m. These fellas High School auditorium, 601 nich, drums. $5 cover. really know how to have fun! Phone 360-385-2216 for reser- N. Sequim Ave. The concert On Friday and Saturday, begins at 2 p.m. after a perforvations. Castaways will be rockin’ counOn Saturday, Paul Green and mance by the Dungeness All try style to the tunes of the Stars Folk Dance Band at Straightshot Blues Band will Jimmy Hoffman Band from 1:30 p.m. The Angel Band will get your blues juices flowin’ at 8 p.m. to midnight. It covers clasplay during intermission. 8 p.m. $10 cover. sics to contemporary country Ralph Byers (93!!), the Man in On Sunday, jazz it up with the with some classic rock, blues and the Hat and one of the district’s Carla Main Band at 6 p.m. originals that’ll get your happy original founders, will be saluted. $6 cover. feet on the floor. A donation of $5 per person, On Wednesday, the Seattle■  Like the blues? Then head $10 per family or a membership based band Kora will bring its out to the Junction Roadpurchase would be appreciated. unique infusion of West African house, junction of U.S. Highway ■  On Saturday evening, dance music and jazz for its first appear101 and state Highway 112 five to the Cajun/zydeco music of ance in Port Townsend. miles west of Port Angeles, on Swamp Soul at the Quimper $8 cover, youths $4. Saturday night and boogie to the Phone 360-385-2216 for reser- Grange, 1210 Corona St., Port Soulshakers from 9 p.m. to Townsend, from 7:30 p.m. to vations. 1 a.m. Mike Pace’s guitar and ■  Tonight at The Castle Key, 10:30 p.m. $12 cover. Cindy Lauders down and dirty ■  Fans of the No Inhibitions Seventh and Sheridan streets, vocals set this band apart. Cover. jazz band will be sorry to hear of Johnny Z and Sylvia Heins On Sunday, Chantilly Lace the death of its leader, Willy play jazz from 5 p.m. to hosts the Junction Jam from Peterson, 40. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Willy brought his band to On Saturday, the Castle, as in Next Wednesday, banjo craftsmany of the Jazz in the Olympics Geoffrey Castle, comes to The man Jason Mogi and bassist Castle with his magic violin from gigs and was a monthly regular Paul Stehr-Green play from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. He will not on jazz nights at 7 Cedars. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. He died of Burkitt’s lymphoma. disappoint! $10 cover. ■  On Friday at Wine on the A benefit for the Peterson fam■  Joe Crecca and the Waterfront, 115 Railroad Ave., ily, hosted by Moxie Swing, will Home Wreckers will play rock the rhythms of Africa will come be Sunday from 2 p.m. to and blues Saturday at the alive with a performance by 6 p.m. at One Ten Lounge, Uptown Pub and Grill, 1016 Tyler Richart and Kora Kana 18881 Front St., Poulsbo. Lawrence St., at 9 p.m. at 8 p.m. Tyler blends sensuous ________ ■  Ol’ Howly Slim picks and African rhythm with American grins at the Banana Leaf Bisroots stylings. Cort and Kia John Nelson is a self-styled music lover Sequim and Blyn Port Hadlock tro, 609 Washington St., on FriArmstrong will accompany. and compulsive night owl who believes in ■  On Friday, grab your sideday at 6 p.m. $3 cover. ■  On Friday at the Ajax “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the kick and head for the Oasis Bar Cafe, 271 Water St., Daniel On Saturday, the new duo of ■  George Radebaugh enter- North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live and Grill, 301 E. Washington Jason Mogi and Paul StehrMache will play classical and tains Friday at Lanza’s, 1020 Music, appears every Thursday. St., and dine and dance to the Green will make their debut finger-style guitar at 6 p.m. Lawrence St., at 6 p.m. Are you performing in or promoting a live with a night of new tunes, covers, Old Sidekicks from 5:30 p.m. to On Saturday, Buzz Rogowski On Saturday, Mike Horsfall music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565Appalachia, jam band improvisa- 8:30 p.m. will play jazz and originals on takes the stage at 6 p.m. 1139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews. On Saturday, get your boogie tions and classic rock ’n’ roll at piano for the wine dinner at 6 ■  Steve Grandinetti picks com (subject line: John Nelson). up and dance to the classic rock Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of enter8 p.m. $3 cover. p.m. and sings Saturday at the Owl tainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in of Chantilly Lace from 8 p.m. to On Sunday, Jim Nyby will Spirit, 218 Polk St., from 5 p.m. ■  On Friday at Bar N9ne, midnight. The band plays many perform blues, ballads, jazz and to 8 p.m. 229 W. First St., All About Me Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

Things to Do Today and Friday, March 24-25, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Women 45 and older and men 50 and older. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-452-5973 or Ken Foster at 360-683-0141 for information, time of day and location.

People: The Faces of Clallam County.” Lower level, changing exhibits, Books-Plus Shopping. Elevator, ADA access parking in rear. Tours available. Phone 360-452-6779. Gastric bypass surgery support group — 114 E. Sixth St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Open to the public. Phone 360457-1456. Elwha-Morse Management Team meeting — Clallam County Courthouse, Room 160, 223 E. Fourth St., 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Port Townsend

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula Spanish class — Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Bingo — Masonic Lodge, Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. 0226. Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and pull tabs available. Chess Club — Dungeness Phone 360-457-7377. Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Sequim Ave., 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 Five Acre School play p.m. Bring clocks, sets and “Bound for Freedom” — Set in 1850s America just before boards. All are welcome. Phone start of Civil War, with 15 songs 360-681-8481. and dances from the era. Little Health clinic — Free mediTheater, Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7 p.m. cal services for uninsured or under-insured, Dungeness ValFree. ley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 Sequim and the p.m. Phone 360-582-0218. Free. Phone 360-457-8971.

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Newborn parenting class — “You and Your New Baby,” third-floor sunroom, Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline Port Angeles Pre-3 Coop- St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. 8:30 p.m. Phone 360-4528909. erative — For ages 10 months Phone 360-417-7652. to 18 months. First Baptist Mental health drop-in cen- Friday Church, 105 W. Sixth St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Amy ter — The Horizon Center, 205 Play and Learn Port AngeBrilhart at 360-681-7883 or E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disor- les — For children for ages 0-5 email prethree@yahoo.com. ders and looking for a place to to attend with parent, grandGuided walking tour — socialize, something to do or a parent or caregiver with indiHistoric downtown buildings, hot meal. For more information, vidual and group play, songs an old brothel and “Under- phone Rebecca Brown at 360- and story time. 9 a.m. to 11a.m. Phone 360-452-5437 for locaground Port Angeles.” Cham- 457-0431. tion and information. ber of Commerce, 121 E. RailSenior meal — Nutrition road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 Walk-in vision clinic — p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 program, Port Angeles Senior for visually senior citizens and students, Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Information $6 ages 6 to 12. Children 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per impaired and blind people, younger than 6, free. Reserva- meal. Reservations recom- including accessible technoltions, phone 360-452-2363, mended. Phone 360-457-8921. ogy display, library, Braille ext. 0. training and various magnificaKnit, crochet and spin — tion aids. Vision Loss Center, Port Angeles Fine Arts All ages and skill levels, Veela Armory Square Mall, 228 W. Center — “Strait Art 2011” Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. First St., Suite N. Phone for an 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 to 6 p.m. appointment 360-457-1383 or a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360visit www.visionlossservices. Volunteers in Medicine of 457-3532. the Olympics health clinic — org/vision. Mental illness family sup- 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 Insurance assistance — port group — For families and p.m. Free for patients with no friends of people with mental insurance or access to health Statewide benefits advisers disorders. Peninsula Commu- care. For appointment, phone help with health insurance and Medicare. Port Angeles Senior nity Mental Health Center, 118 360-457-4431. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. Tai chi class — Ginger and a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge Phone Rebecca Brown, 360Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., Stewart at 360-452-3221, ext. 457-0431. 6:30 p.m. $12 per class or $10 3425. First Step drop-in center for three or more classes. No Port Angeles Fine Arts — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 experience necessary, wear p.m. Free clothing and equip- loose comfortable clothing. Center — See entry under Today. ment closet, information and Phone 360-808-5605. referrals, play area, emergency Toddler storytime — Ages Bariatric surgery support supplies, access to phones, computers, fax and copier. group — Terrace Apartments, 18 months to 3 years. Port 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 Angeles Library, 2210 S. PeaPhone 360-457-8355. body St., 10:15 a.m. p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. Museum at the Carnegie Preschooler storytime — Celebrate Recovery — — Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by Christ-based recovery group. Ages 3 to 5. Port Angeles donation $2 per person; $5 per Lighthouse Christian Center, Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., family. Main exhibit, “Strong 304 Viewcrest Ave., 7 p.m. to 10:15 a.m.

Dungeness Valley

Today

Wine tasting — Damiana’s Best Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Three Rivers Winery of Walla Walla featured.

Soroptimist International of Sequim call for artists — For artwork to display during 14th annual Gala Garden Bingo — Port Angeles Show on March 18 and 19, Meditation class — 92 Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh 2012. Submit flower and/or Plain Jane Lane, 6 p.m. AdmisSt., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone garden themed works by sion by donation. 360-457-7004. March 31. Visit www.sequim Gamblers Anonymous — Museum at the Carnegie gardenshow.com for an artist Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce agreement and contract infor— See entry under Today. Road, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360mation. 460-9662. Veterans recognition — Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Bell-ringing ceremony, VeterGardening discussion — ans Park, 217 S. Lincoln St., 1 Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206- Leilani Wood presents “Prepar321-1718 or visit www. p.m. Public welcome. ing the Vegetable Garden.” sequimyoga.com. Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Introduction to line dance for beginners — Port Angeles Strength and toning exer- Ave., 6:30 p.m. Free. Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh cise class — Sequim ComSierra Club program — St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 munity Church, 1000 N. Fifth members, $3 nonmembers. Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per Ron Good, seasonal interpretative ranger for Olympic Phone 360-457-7004. class. Phone Shelley Haupt at National Park, talks on Elwha or email River Restoration project. TrinThe Answer for Youth — 360-477-2409 jhaupt6@wavecable.com. ity United Methodist Church, Drop-in outreach center for 100 S. Blake Ave., 6:30 p.m. youth and young adults, providLine dancing lessons — Free and open to the public. ing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics High-beginner, intermediate Phone 360-457-6605 Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 and advanced dancers. Sequim Food Addicts in Recovery E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Drop- Anonymous — Calvary ChaMental health drop-in cen- ins welcome. $3 per class. pel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. Phone 360-681-2826. Phone 360-452-1050 or visit ter — See entry under Today. www.foodaddicts.org. Sequim Senior Softball — Senior meal — See entry Co-ed recreational league. under Today. Travelers Journal series Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for — Elston and Jackie Hill presPA Peggers Cribbage Club practice and pick-up games. ent “Paradoxical Wildlife Pre— Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn Phone John Zervos at 360- serve: Midway Atoll National St. Check-in, 5:30 p.m. Games, 681-2587. Wildlife Refuge.” Sequim High 6 p.m. New members welcome. School cafeteria, 601 N. Sequim Museum & Arts Sequim Ave., 7 p.m. Admission For more information, email p a p e g g e r s @ h u g h e s . n e t , Center — “The Studio by the $5. Kids 18 and younger free. phone 360-808-7129 or visit Creek Show.” 175 W. Cedar St., Photo enlargement as a door 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone prize. Fundraiser for Peninsula www.papeggers.com. 360-683-8110. Trails Coalition. Phone Dave Friendship Dinner — First Shreffler at 360-683-1734 for United Methodist Church, SevParent connections — more information. enth and Laurel streets. Doors First Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., open, 3 p.m. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. 10 a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. Turn to Things/C2 Guided walking tour — See entry under Today.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, March 24, 2011

PT Mock Trial team going to state

Things to Do Continued from C1 under Today.

Friday Soroptimist International of Sequim call for artists — See entry under Today

Sequim Museum & Arts Center — See entry

that the suspect had just fatally shot the officer’s canine partner. Is it murder, manslaughter or selfdefense? The high school students will argue whether the officer acted on a reasonable good-faith belief that the use of deadly force was justified by fears that the officer was in imminent peril. The prosecution team consisted of Mackenzie Sepler, Britta Janssen and Karling Rutenbeck. Sepler received the award for best overall attorney at the regional competition. The defense team was led by Jennifer Grauberger, Trey Ottaway and Jazmine Richter. The team is advised by Port Townsend High School teacher Chris Pierson and assisted by Judges Craddock Verser and Jill Landes.

Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIA — The Port Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Townsend High School Ave., noon. Phone 360-681- Mock Trial team earned its 4308, or partnership 360-683third consecutive first-place 5635.

French class — 2 p.m. For Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 9 a.m. Phone 206- more information, phone 360321-1718 or visit www. 681-0226. sequimyoga.com. Mujeres de Maiz informaWalk aerobics — First Bap- tion night — Board of Mujeres tist Church of Sequim, 1323 de Maiz Opportunity FoundaSequim-Dungeness Way, 8 tion gives program about work a.m. Free. Phone 360-683- in Chiapas, Mexico. Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., 3 2114. p.m. Free. Circuit training exercise class — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 Port Townsend and a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Jefferson County Phone Shelley Haupt at 360477-2409 or email jhaupt6@ wavecable.com. Today Line dancing lessons — Beginning dancers. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, 10 a.m. to 11a.m. $3 per class. Phone 360-681-2826.

Peninsula Daily News

Yoga classes — Room to Move Yoga, Second floor, 1008 Lawrence St. For more details or questions, visit www.roomto moveyoga.com or phone 360385-2864. to

Things/C10

knowledge of the U.S. judicial system. Students participate as attorneys, witnesses and court bailiffs. In this year’s case, which

2151 W. Hendrickson Rd. Sequim

WOLF SUMMER Age 8+ Subtitles 2:00pm

OPEN FOR THE SEASON

Please call for reservations 683-5494 Limited Seating

Lake Ozette Steering Committee Meeting

…We’ve got it all.

DEER PARK CINEMAS

135115286

www.pen-movies.com

Ya Gotta Call Us for All Your Flower Needs

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across from Les Schwab

Getting Married this Summer?

42 Rice Street, Sekiu, WA

Community members are invited to attend the Steering Committee’s discussion about Lake Ozette Sockeye Salmon recovery and implementation.

ALWAYS $6 00

Large Dahlia bouquets available all summer

Sekiu Community Center

360-460-6179 2532 Hwy 101 E., Port Angeles

Largest Selection of hanging baskets on the Peninsula Begonias, Fuchsia Blue Wave Petunia

Wed. March 30th, 10:15 am– 3:15 pm

Did you get your Money Tree Coupons on Tuesday?

the team will also argue at state, the defendant (played by Rose Burt), a police officer, tracks an arson suspect into a dark alley and shoots him, apparently believing

Sunday Free Matinee APRIL 3rd Dungeness River Audubon Center

Cedar Lane Farm Nursery Dogwoods, Magnolias, Maples, Flowering Currant, Budded Rhodes, Heather, Special Conifers, Hedging and Blueberries. This Friday 11-4, Saturday 9-5, and Sunday 11-4. FREE 4” Pink Heather with every purchase over $25 Fri, Sat, Sun • 3/25, 26, 27 only. Spring Cleaning Clearance Sale, too.

The Port Townsend High School Mock Trial team from left are Jenny Grauberger, Leah Finch, Trey Ottaway, Rose Burt, Jazmine Richter, Emily Huntingford, Forrest Walker, Madeline Levy, Luke Janssen, Mackenzie Sepler, Allison Tuuri, Raven Pope, Karling Rutenbeck, James Campbell and Britta Janssen.

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victory at the regional championships held recently at the Tacoma Law and Justice Center. This weekend, the team will compete against 27 other Washington state high schools at the YMCA Mock Trial State Championship at the Thurston County Courthouse. In mock trial competitions, high school students portray each of the principals in a cast of courtroom characters. As the student teams study a hypothetical case, review the research in a mock trial kit and receive guidance from volunteer attorneys in courtroom procedure and trial preparation, they acquire a working

Our Big Annual Spring Dahlia Tuber Sale Now in Progress

“Nobody does it better!”

For more information, please contact Blake Trask at (206) 583-0655 or at btrask@triangleassociates.com

3931 Old Olympic Hwy. Just West of McDonnell Creek

417-6710 See Ya Soon!

Benefit for new

ALL FILMS PRESENTED IN D.L.P. DIGITAL CINEMA 100% DIGITAL PICTURE AND SOUND

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat! Shane Park Playground!

SUCKER PUNCH

Dance & Socialize

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2

RODRICK RULES

With Music by Testify

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES MARS NEEDS MOMS DOLBY DIGITAL

3D

RED RIDING HOOD THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU 135115562

LINCOLN THEATRE

Saturday, March 26, 2011 Elks Lodge, Port Angeles

THE LINCOLN LAWYER

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LIMITLESS

8:00-9:00pm entry only By Donation ($10 suggested)

INSPIRING HOPE

RANGO

SUPPORTING CHANGE

DISCOUNT PRICES

ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6 P.M.

A fundraiser for

Please join us for the 2011

Spring Concert of the Featuring

An

PATTY DUKE

afternoon with

A Brilliant Madness: Living with Manic Depression

Mozart

Please join the PCMHC Board of Directors on Friday,

Please join the PCMHC Board of Directors on Friday, May 13 at 5:30 pm at the CrabHouse Restaurant May 13 at 5:30 pmvery at the Crabhouse for this special event! Restaurant for this very special event!

Grand Mass in c minor Angeles High School Auditorium Dewey Ehling, Conductor

5:30 VIP Reception / 6:30 Dinner / 7:30 Speech Sponsor a table of ten: $1000 Individual tickets: $100

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Adults $15 • Srs./Students $12 • Children 12 & under free N O R E S E RV E D S E AT I N G

Learn more about mental health care, and support PCMHC in providing these vital community services!

This concert is partially funded by Sequim Community Foundation Ticket Outlets: Itty Bitty Buzz, 110 E. First Street, PA, The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim or from Peninsula Singers members or at the door

Please call 360-457-0431 for ticket and reservation information

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 Port

April 3, 2011, 2:00 pm

May 13, 2011


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Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, March 24, 2011

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rdAge

Medicare kicks in when you turn 65 TODAY IS MARCH 24, and in the interests of “full disclosure” (which almost never happens in the real world), be warned that I have not had a change of heart. I am going to continue to describe the view, from 30,000 feet, of the Medicare Machine. I am doing this to us for two reasons: First, an awful lot of people are closing in on the age of Medicare maturity and have more than a passing interest in understanding how this thing works, and second, an awful lot of people who are already on Medicare and had deluded themselves (as do I) into thinking that they understand it, don’t. I know this to be true because an awful lot of you have said to me, in the past week, “I didn’t know that.” Note the repetitive use of the descriptor “awful,” then we’ll move on. Last week we were all about Part A, Part B, Part B penalties, COBRA coverage, tra la, and I have no intention of repeating all of that because I presume you were paying attention, and I like you, so I’m jumping right in to where we left off. Unless you’ve been on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for 23 months, you qualify for Medicare when you turn 65, and if you’re still working, please go back and have a look at last week’s column; if you’re not still employed, you have a 7-month “Initial Enrollment Period” (IEP)

Part D coverage: One is through a private Part D plan, as noted above, and the other is through a Medicare Advantage plan. “Advantage Plans” are another moniker for “Part C,” which I vaulted over earlier and will come back to later. (Hey, I never told you this was easy!) Here’s a test: Remember what “IEP” is? Go look a few paragraphs up and cheat; I did. Right! “Initial Enrollment Period!” So, the IEP for Part D works exactly the same way as the IEP for Part B! (Note: Reread that last sentence. You actually understood it, didn’t you? Scary, huh? I know.)

Now, if you are still employed at age 65 and have coverage through your employer, or you surrounding Mark get prescription drug coverage that 65th birththrough a retiree health insurHarvey day: three ance or the VA or wherever, and months before if it is “creditable” (which is an your 65th unnecessarily fancy word for birthday, the “equal to or better than the month of that Medicare Part D standard plan”), birthday and you can evade the dreaded penthree months after your 65th alty. The way you can prove that period. you had “creditable coverage” is So, if you turn 65 in May, that each year (usually in the you can enroll fall), your company, plan, whoin Part B in February, March or ever will send you a letter saying April, and if you do, it will so. Keep these letters and put become effective May 1. them someplace where you can actually find them. Enrolling kickover If you don’t have said prescription drug coverage or if it If you enroll in May, it’ll kick isn’t “creditable,” consider enrollin June 1; in June, on Aug.1; in July, on Oct. 1; and in August, on ing in a Part D plan because it Nov. 1 — because that’s how it is. might help you pay for prescription drugs, and you will sidestep Now, take a deep breath the penalty ad infinitum. because I’m going to vault over Time out: No, you don’t have Part C and go to straight to Part to do this; in fact, you don’t have D, which you can think of as to do any of this! There is no law standing for “drugs” — prescripthat says you have to enroll in tion drugs — prescription drug Medicare or any parts thereof. coverage. You can go your own way, roll the Part D plans are “private,” dice and take your chances. You meaning they are offered by prionly care about “penalties” if you vate insurance companies, not the federal government. Like change your mind down the way Part B, Part D has a penalty; and decide to enroll in Medicare, actually, you will have The Penthen BOOM! Oops. . . . But it’s up alty if you don’t sign up for Part to you; most of us cave in and D when you’re eligible, and that enroll. penalty will never go away. There are two ways to get

HELP LINE

AEP: Oct. 15 through Dec. 7 Beginning this year (2011, in case the migraine has already started), the “AEP” (Annual Enrollment Period) for Part D will run from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7. We do this every year, “this” being review of our Part D plans, because formularies and premiums change — often. We do this every year because most of us can’t afford not to. Some of us don’t do it, because we’re _____ (fill in the blank). Whatever changes we do or don’t make to our Part D plans become effective Jan. 1 of the next year. Get used to it. I had hoped to do this all in two columns; I also thought Rome was built in a day. There’s

Briefly . . . Preregister for all-day kindergarten PORT ANGELES — Registration for all-day kindergarten for the 2011-2012 school year is now open at BoBaggins Daycare & Learning Center, 237 W. Eighth St., in Port Angeles, and Bibity Bobity — A Kid’s Place, 11 Childers Lane, Carlsborg. The all-day kindergarten classes run from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and will be taught by Kate Boyd and Mary Benavidez. Early-morning child care and after-school care are included in the costs. For more information, visit www.janechilders.com or phone 360-452-8939

a fine line between optimism and delusion, so we’ll carry on next week, but here’s something else that will happen next week, seven days from this very day, on March 31: A few of us are going to be at Life Care Center of Port Townsend (previously known as Kah Tai Care Center, 751 Kearney St.) from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. to answer questions or engage in conversations about stuff like this or long-term care or in-home care or Medicaid or Advance Directives or whatever the heck else you’d like to talk about. We are not going to give speeches. The reason we’re not going to give speeches is because, then, we’d be talking about what we want to talk about instead of what you want to talk about, which doesn’t usually help you, so come on. I presume there will be cookies; after three consecutive weeks of Medicare, there’d better be.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Duplicate Bridge Results held at 7 p.m. April 1. Second-round cost is $5 per person, $20 per family. ‘Pass the Mic’ The final round will be SEQUIM — King’s Way held at 7 p.m. April 8. Foursquare Church will hold Tickets are $25 and “Pass the Mic,” a vocal talent include hors d’oeuvres and competition, beginning at dessert. 7 p.m. Thursday, March 31. Auctions will be held The church is located at April 1 and 8. 1023 Kitchen-Dick Road. Contestants can register Funds from the contest to sing at www.thekingsway. will go toward Camp King’s net or by phoning the church Way, a summer camp project at 360-683-8020. that ultimately serve 250 Table sponsorships are campers in up to seven also available. camps per summer. The first-place winner in Turley wine tasting the age-14-and-older division will receive $500, $250 PORT ANGELES — for second and $125 for Turley Wine Cellar wines third. will be featured at a special Youths 13 and younger Olympic Peninsula Enologiwill receive $100 for first cal Society tasting and dinplace, $50 for second and ner at C’est Si Bon, 23 $25 for third. Cedar Park Drive, at 6 p.m. Entry is free for the first Tuesday, April 19. round March 31. Vintages from the small, The second round will be Templeton, Calif.-based win-

or 360-683-2311.

ery are not typically sold in wine stores, and it takes two years to get on the waiting list to join their wine club. Six Zinfandels, all from 2004 but from different vineyards, will be paired with a five-course dinner including pate, duck breast salad, rosemary lamb chops and a chocolate dessert. The cost is $70 for enological society members and $80 for guests. The tasting is limited to 30 people. Send checks to OPES, PO Box 4081, Sequim, WA 98382. For more information about the wine, phone 360460-2896. To find out if there is space available, phone Kathy Langhoff at 360-6813757. Peninsula Daily News

Sequim

south); Gert Wiitala-Jim Wiitala, first; Bob MacNeal-John Anderson, second; Mary Norwood-David Johnson, third; Marge Knee-Ruby Mantle, fourth.

Tom Loveday directed the game Friday, March 11, with winners: Tom Markley-Jodi O’Neill, first; Rick Zander-Jim Tilzey, second; Tom Davies-Ted Rogers, third; Helen Stratton-Paul Stratton, fourth (north/ south); Sueann Swan-John Anderson, first; Jim Wiitala-Vern Nunnally, second; Suzanne Berg-Brian Robbins, third; Pat Karls-Sonja Schoenleber, fourth (east/ west). Vern Nunnally directed the game Monday, March 14, with winners: Carol Keller-Brian Robbins, first; Eileen DeutschBonnie Broders, second; Larry Phelps-Jim De Vogler, third; Fay CoupeGerry Paul, fourth (north/

Chimacum The winners Tuesday, March 15, were: Ted Rogers-Patrick Thomson, first; Suzanne Berg-Tom Loveday, Pat Karls-Sonja Schoenleber and Sharon Hills-Eileen Rogers, threeway second-place tie.

Port Townsend The winners Tuesday, March 15, were: Eileen Deutsch-Bonnie Broders, first; Jean Gilliland-Bob MacNeal, second; Pat Karls-Sonja Schoenleber, third.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

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BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 58 Brand introduced by Philip Morris in 1975 59 Chick lit book #4 (1974) 64 Iron Man co-creator 67 Where 76-Across may be worn 68 Affixes on 69 Chick lit book #5 (1960) 74 “A Dog of Flanders” writer 75 Pip of “Great Expectations,” e.g. 76 67-Across jewelry 77 Fold member 80 Says 82 Theater with fans 84 Political commentator Colmes 85 Nerve cell projection 86 Opponent of Napoleon 87 Chick lit book #6 (1930) 92 Start to production? 93 Tel Aviv’s ___ Park 94 Refer (to) 95 Chick lit book #7 (1985) 101 Group in “Sex and the City,” e.g. 103 Some washers and dryers 104 Wine container 105 Philadelphia’s ___ Whitman Bridge 106 Environmental pollutant, for short 108 Snarl

109 Chick lit book #8 (1967) 114 Bracelet attachment 115 Christmas or Yom Kippur 116 Spread, as rumors 117 Some church overhead? 118 Bony 119 Game highlights shower DOWN 1 Rose high in some people’s estimation 2 Besides 3 Gossip fodder 4 Down, with “up”? 5 Mille & ___ Roses (Lancôme perfume) 6 School in the Patriot League 7 Stage light 8 Artery 9 True-crime writer Rule 10 Home of Agate Fossil Beds Natl. Monument 11 First horse to compete in all three Triple Crown races 12 With cold feeling 13 Stuck 14 Famous bathrobe wearer, informally 15 Folk guitarist Leo 16 1986 Indy 500 winner 17 Wombs

18 ___ the Short, early king of the Franks 19 Power cord feature 24 Chess opening? 29 “What moves you” sloganeer 31 Mosquito protection 32 Reno setting: Abbr. 33 180s 34 Vitamin and supplement chain 35 Night light? 36 ___ time (never) 37 Old or morning follower 40 Harsh treatment 41 “If at first, the ___ is not absurd, then there is no hope for it”: Einstein 42 Ulster or Norfolk 43 Friends and neighbors 44 Broached 45 A quarrel 46 “A Cooking Egg” poet 47 Dodge S.U.V. 52 Affairs 54 Part of a support group 55 Skating maneuver 57 Femur or tibia 59 Rock singer Dee 60 “Just a ___” 61 Bookcase material 62 When most movies open: Abbr. 63 YouTube selection 64 Bar selection 65 Hypes

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ACROSS 1 Dinner party 8 Accompanied on a ticket 15 ___ Works 20 Biofuel option 21 Size of a football field, roughly 22 “Wyoming Outlaw,” e.g. 23 Chick lit book #1 (1992) 25 Italy’s longest river 26 ___ Pie Island (artist commune on the Thames) 27 Turned right 28 The Browns, on sports tickers 29 Headline 30 A nut might go on one 33 Chick lit book #2, with “The” (1843) 36 Bear witness 37 ___ Franco (watch brand) 38 “Down with thee!” 39 Chick lit book #3 (1965) 44 ___ D. Young (Time’s Man of the Year in 1929) 48 Two-time N.B.A. M.V.P. Steve 49 Kerfuffles 50 Emphatic acceptance 51 Italian city where pizza was invented 53 Mich. neighbor 54 Clumsy handler 56 P.R. locale

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C4

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Tundra

Fun ’n’ Advice

Peninsula Daily News

Opinions clash on social networking DEAR ABBY: “Heartbroken Teacher in Oakland, Calif.” did absolutely nothing wrong! He wrote a letter of recommendation based on his knowledge and impression of one of his students. That was all he could and should have done. He wasn’t obligated to do a background check or any kind of research. That is for the future employer to do if he/she chooses. I also teach and would have done exactly the same as he did. It is shocking and sad to discover that one’s impression of a student was partially incorrect. Keeping secrets about past wrongdoings is nothing new. But social networking sites make the evidence of such behavior more accessible. This is an issue for our society to address. Helen in Lompoc, Calif.

For Better or For Worse

Abigail

Van Buren

from drug use, sex stories, their latest vandalism to their disgusting underage drunken escapades. They also include semi-nude photos of themselves because they think it’s cute. I truly am . . . Ashamed of My Generation, Red Oak, Texas

Dear Abby: As teachers, we never completely see the character of our students. I interact with them outside of the classroom, but only at lunch and in student groups. No matter how friendly I become with my students, I am always their Dear Helen: I agree. And only teacher, so I can never fully know time will tell how it will be resolved. who they are, and I never assume That letter, from a teacher that I do. shocked to learn a respected student When I write a recommendation, had posted inappropriate stories I can only comment on the person I about herself online, generated tons was able to observe as their teacher of responses from both here and (or rarely, mentor). abroad. Read on: My recommendation letters often mention my boundaries of perception, and I never go beyond that. Dear Abby: I am a 25-year-old Teachers shouldn’t fear the repereducation student. I don’t have a social networking site, nor do I have cussions of their comments if they honestly state what they observed. any desire to create one. Christensen I don’t understand the importance in Daegu, South Korea of posting pictures and personal information on the Internet for all to Dear Abby: Employers managed see. for centuries without being able to My father, a computer programmer, taught me that once something learn a person’s life story at the click of a button. is posted on the Internet, it’s there There’s a reason it’s called “social forever, regardless of whether it is networking.” If we wanted our deleted or not. employers there, we’d invite them. When I ask classmates why they Anyone who snoops uninvited is use a social networking site, the invading our privacy. My employer most common answer is, “To stay in pays me for the time I am at work. touch with family and friends.” The rest of the time, I should be The last time I checked, the telefree to do as I please. phone was used for that reason. Christopher Kim in Oradell, N.J. in Columbus, Ohio Dear Abby: I am tired of living –––––––– in a world that revolves around Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, social networking sites. also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was As a 20-something, I have friends founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letwho don’t think twice about what ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by they post. They’ll tell the world anything — logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): You can make a fabulous money deal. Negotiations will go sweetly and much can be accomplished that will set you up for the future. A major move appears to be underway that will rejuvenate you emotionally, mentally and financially. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You need to get everything sorted out with institutions and government agencies first, so that you will have clear sailing when you make your next move. Don’t let loved ones have too much information regarding your financial position. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The more involved you get in a group or organization that allows you to be creative, innovative and dynamic, the easier it will be to progress in other areas of your life. The confidence you get from excelling while helping others will lead to your own advancement. 3 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Concentrate on what you can do to make life better. Strive for self-perfection. Don’t be upset by what someone else does or says. Finish what’s being asked of

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Doonesbury

you and take on more responsibilities. The proof will be in what’s done, not what’s said. 3 stars LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Stand tall and do your best. The rewards for your actions will be superb and the recognition you receive from your peers and superiors will lead to an offer you cannot refuse. Don’t show any anger or you will undo what you’ve worked so hard to achieve. 5 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Slow down and evaluate what you have done and what’s left to do. Tally up what you’ve spent and what’s required of you to finish what you’ve started. There is a lot riding on how you handle both money and emotional matters. 2 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your personal relationship will be strengthened by what you are currently experiencing with regard to home and family. Greater opportunities and the chance to make a valuable move are apparent. Expect the unexpected. 5 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t let trivial matters sidetrack you. Put your energy into what counts and what and who can help you get ahead. Explain your intentions and whoever

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

comes on board freely will be the only testament you require. 3 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Look at the big picture and the little aggravations that crop up will not bog you down. You will have the right idea and course of action in mind, so play out your strategy and you will find satisfaction and progress along the way. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There is likely to be a scuffle or backlash if you tread into someone’s territory. Overreacting will be your downfall, resulting in mishaps and minor accidents. Think before you act. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): By taking a position someone offers you, you can alter your future financially. It’s a new day and time for a new beginning. The knowledge and experience you pick up can catapult you into something even bigger. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You may feel anxious but that’s no reason to let your emotions take over. Be as reserved as possible, especially when dealing with superiors or anyone able to alter your future. Welcome changes exuberantly. 2 stars


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011

C5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

Barn-stored, local GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8:30-4 p.m., grass hay. $4/Bale. 150 Tyee Rd. Honda 683-3518, 460-7020 90, misc. home BASEMENT Sale: items, collectible doFri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. lls, Neoprene chest 131 W. 7th St. Furni- wadders new, 110 ture, tools, and misc stick welder. items. HANDYWOMAN CHEV: ‘80 1 ton extended van, runs Cleaning, Cooking, Care-giver, Painting, and drives. $1,000/ Yard-work, Shopobo. 477-2202. ping, Errands, Pet ESTATE Sale: Fri.- sitting/walking or ??. Sat., 8-4 p.m. 1824 Discount for seniors, Harbor Crest, Gales vets, disabled. Debb Addition. Furniture, 360-775-6775. pool table, beds, rid- Sequim area. For ing and push mow- P.A. & P.T. plus ers, 1986 Ford pick- mileage. up, framed artwork, HELP WANTED and a ton of jewelry! Kitchen, dish sets, Experienced servers only. Apply in person assorted tools, collectibles, heirloom at The Mariner Cafe. No phone calls! glassware, lifetime of memories! SomeMedical Assistant thing for everyone! Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest (PPGNW) seeks Medical Assistant candidates for our Port Angeles/Forks/ Sequim Health FOR SALE Centers. Join our BY OWNER medical team to BOAT SHOW & provide outstanding MARINE SWAP reproductive Saturday April 16th healthcare and famThe show will feature ily planning servicprivately owned es; assist licensed boats in the water staff; phlebotomy, and on trailers and is injections, labs, open from 9 a.m.-4 vitals, room p.m. Kayaks, Dinghpatients; provide ies, Sailboats, Power information about boats Register your PPGNW services. vessel or to sign up Bi-lingual Spanish for the Flea Market skills & women’s call 360-437-0513. h/c exp preferred. MA certificate/ FORD: ‘93 Escort HCAe license Wagon. Must sell. required. EOE $1,400/obo. 670-6883 Please apply at: FRESH SHIPMENT of www.ppgnw.org/job quality reconditioned s appliances. 600 E. First Street, P.A. MOTOR HOME: ‘00 P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ 31’ Flair. 2 tip-outs, pets. $600, last, dep. fully loaded, 18K. $45,000. 457-3260. 452-1694 eves.

23

Lost and Found

FOUND. Camera bag. Call and identify contents. 681-3770. FOUND: Make-up case. Evans Rd., Sequim. 683-5680. LOST: Dog. Large, male, white Husky shepherd mix dog, “Marshall”, last seen in Gales Addition , P.A. 670-5335 or 670-6154

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

Wild Rose Adult Care Home has a private room available. Best care at best rate. 683-9194

Place your Ad With The New Classified Wizard

LOST: Dog. Male black Shih-Tzu, white chest/paws, black collar and leash, S. O St., P.A. 452-9654 MISSING: Disc Golf Basket. In Lincoln Park on Tuesday. Yellow Innova brand chains and basket. Reward. 775-4191.

Pick your ad package and rate that works for you. Type your ad how you would like it to read. See your ad before it runs exactly how it will publish. Add a border, graphic, picture, Yellow on Sunday Pay for your ad on our secure site.

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds. And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

MOVING Sale: Fri, Sat and Sun. Noon - ?, 2938 E. Walnut St., Apt #1. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-? 1803 W. 10th St. Furniture, baby gear, appliances, bicycles, and lots more! NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-4409. TUBE STEPS: Stainless steel, excellent condition, ‘92-’99 Suburban, no drill installation. $100. 457-4756

31

Help Wanted

Are you an experienced Sawmill Supervisor? Do you possess the following experience/skill levels? • Min. 3 yrs. sawmill, 1 yr. supervisory experience • Excellent communication skills • Ability to direct and teach • Safety program experience • Quality control experience • Mechanical aptitude • Strong attention to detail • Verifiable organizational skills • Strong computer skills (MS Office preferred) • Understanding and ability to use computerized machinery set-up systems Then we want you to join our Management Team. Excellent wage and benefits package.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICIAN Spectrum Health Systems seeking Administrative Technician to work in correctional setting in Forks. Responsible for maintaining clinical records; tracking, monitoring, and referral/processing/scheduling of DOSA & chemical dependency offenders, including meeting with and interviewing offenders. Good communication skills and knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook required. Competitive salary & benefits. Fax resume 253-779-9962 or email: resumes@ spectrumsys.org

Applications & Resumes accepted at Interfor Pacific; 243701 Hwy 101 W; Port Angeles; WA 98363. EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer. ASSOCIATE DENTIST Sequim office, Mon., Wed., Fri., 8-5 p.m. Resume to: splendent@hotmail.co m

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

CAREER OPPORTUNITY SALES Immediate sales position is open at Wilder Toyota. If you are looking for a positive career change, like working with people and are income motivated, this could be for you. Whether you have sold cars or not, we have an extensive training program for your success. Joining the Wilder Team has great benefits: 401(k), medical and dental insurance, vacations and a great work schedule. Guaranteed income while you learn. Call Rick or Don for an appt. 457-8511.

SHOP LOCAL

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

peninsula dailynews.com

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. CARPENTER/ REMODELER Truck, tools and experience required. Leave msg 417-6990 CNA PREFERRED Full/part-time. Stop by in person to pick up an application. 8th and G St. in Port Angeles. No phone calls please. COOK: Exp. breakfast & lunch cook needed. Call Ryan at 360683-6800 ext. 18. Cuddles & Crayons. Hiring ASAP. Hours Vary. For Info contact Regan 460-8680 rr2larsen@msn.com CUSTOMER SERVICE ASSOCIATE Seeking career-minded, coachable learner for fast paced position. Successful applicants must have superior communication skills, solid and reliable work history, and 2+ yrs prior customer service experience. Previous aerospace, automotive, or marine experience preferred. Please send resume with cover letter and wage history to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#204/Service Pt Angeles, WA 98362 DENTAL ASSISTANT Sequim office, work Mon., Wed., Fri., Sat. Resume to: splendent@hotmail.co m DINNER COOK Experienced. Joshua’s Restaurant. DRAFTS PERSON Skilled in mechanical, structural & electrical 2D & 3D drafting using AutoCad &/or Solidworks. Full-time position with benefits for manufacturer of industrial refrigeration systems. Email resume to info@ imspacific.com or fax 360-385-3410. Applications accepted thru 3/25/2011. Head housekeepers, maintenance, housekeepers. Apply at 1807 Water St., P.T. HELP WANTED Experienced servers only. Apply in person at The Mariner Cafe. No phone calls! LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840.

LPN’S AND CNA’S Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com Medical Assistant Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest (PPGNW) seeks Medical Assistant candidates for our Port Angeles/Forks/ Sequim Health Centers. Join our medical team to provide outstanding reproductive healthcare and family planning services; assist licensed staff; phlebotomy, injections, labs, vitals, room patients; provide information about PPGNW services. Bi-lingual Spanish skills & women’s h/c exp preferred. MA certificate/ HCAe license required. EOE Please apply at: www.ppgnw.org/job s

31

34

Help Wanted

Medical Office Admin with Hanger Orthopedic Group. Front desk duties, billing, collections, excellent customer service, communication and ability to multi-task. Great $$ and benefits. Apply at Hanger.com or email dcassady@hanger.c om NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com RNA/CNA: Golden Years Personal Care, part-time/on-call, all shifts. 452-3689. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SALES: Part timesalary, part time commission, real estate experience required. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#205/Sales Pt Angeles, WA 98362 SARC is now accepting applications for the part-time lifeguard and cashier. Please pick up application 610 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. 683-3344 ext. 12 SARC is now accepting applications for the full-time position for director. Salary range is $55,000 to $65,000. For application and job description go to www.sarcfitness.co m and click on jobs or pick up at 610 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. 683-3344 ext. 12 SUNNY FARMS Looking for persons with retail exp., produce or grocery preferred. PT/FT positions. Heavy lifting req. Pick up application at 261461 Hwy. 101, Sequim. WELDER & FITTER Opening for a selfmotivated, productive welder with mechanical skills. Must be proficient with TIG & MIG. Fulltime position with benefits. Email resume to hr@ imspacific.com, fax to 360-385-3410 or mail to IMS, PO Box 2028, Port Townsend, WA. 98368.

34

Work Wanted

Best Choice Lawn Care. Maintenance and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/ P.A. 360-683-6296. Cleaning, handy man, yard work, errands. 681-4502 Experienced child care in your home. References. Contact Tracy at 681-3313. HANDYWOMAN Cleaning, Cooking, Care-giver, Painting, Yard-work, Shopping, Errands, Pet sitting/walking or ??. Discount for seniors, vets, disabled. Debb 360-775-6775. Sequim area. For P.A. & P.T. plus mileage. HOUSECLEANING Over 20 yrs. expereince. 928-3077.

I Sew 4U. Hemming, alterations, curtains, any sewing project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeli ve.com I'm Sew Happy! Professional Computer Repair HelperTek.com - We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us at 775-2525 helpdesk@helpertek.c om Professional Home & Office Cleaning Quality, Honest and hardworking, we provide all equipment. Flexible scheduling, references available. Free estimate. Call 360452-3202. Email: judy@minnoch.com Sequim Father and Son Lawn Service, in business since 1992, big and small jobs. 681-2611

Young Couple Early 60’s. available for misc gardening services, as well as hauling, gutter & deck cleaning, moss removal, seasonal cleanup, weeding, general maintenance & repair. Hard working and reliable with excellent references. 457-1213

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034. Affordable haircut service at your home. Call Alex 360-912-1048 Experienced and dependable. tree and hedge trimming, mowing, hauling, weeding, bark/gravel delivery, etc. 1st hour is $30, then $17/hr. Also flat rates. References avail. Additional help if needed. 461-7772 Handyman service. JTL Handyman services. All types of home and appliance repair and installations, Landscaping and lawn care available. No job to small, affordable prices, free estimates. Licensed, bonded, & insured contractor #JTLHAHS906Q3. Phone: 360-797-1512 E-mail: jml4455@msn.com

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51 Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim 2 Full Time Nurses & Certified Nursing Asst. Sign-On Bonus for First 5 Qualified Full-Time CNAs Hired After 3/11/11. Join OUR team. Apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave, Sequim. AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare (compare at www.medicare.gov)

51

Homes

BEAUTY AND CONVENIENCE The Dungeness Plan features 1,889 sf of living space. Convenient single floor plan with 2 Br. plus den. Greatroom, gas fireplace, spacious kitchen, sunny breakfast nook, formal dining room, oversized doors, windows and doorways to provide a feeling of spaciousness and lots of natural light. Fenced rear yard. Front yard maintenance included in HOA dues. $315,000. ML260430. Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East CONVENIENT LOCATION To enjoy Sequim and Port Angeles. Cozy 3 Br., 1 bath rambler on large lot in older, settled neighborhood with No CCR’s! Separate 2x12 room in garage not included in square footage as it is not heated, but could be. Lot size is approximately .4 acres, but has 75 foot greenbelt easement across rear lot. $144,000. ML260414. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East COUNTRY LIVING AT ITS BEST Captivating Custom Home plus a 3 stall garage, set on 5 private park like acres, secluded by tall cedars and native rhodies. The owners pride is evident in this lovely home with its open floor plan and special amenities. $485,000. ML00000 Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

YARD WORK WANTED: Spring mowing, pruning, overseed, fertilizer, lime, moss killer, weed, and barking. Reasonable rates. 360-797-3023

Work Wanted

135114495

6A113352

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

MISC: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, $200/obo. “Estrada” handmade acoustic guitar from Morelia, Mex., red with black accent, comes with soft case, $150/obo. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $200/ obo. Washburn mini amp WA8, with owner’s manual and amp cord, great for practice and personal use, $20/obo. All in new condition, great sound! 481-8955, 477-0903

31

Homes

110 year old renovated Victorian and a rental cottage. You must see this home to appreciate all the work. Centrally located close to shopping. This is bargain shopping at it’s best. $229,000. ML252483 Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFUL CONDO IN SUNNY SEQUIM Great mountain view. 2 Br., 2 bath, located in Sunland. Enjoy many amenities including golf, swimming and tennis. $179,900 ML260040. Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Country Ranch Style Home For Sale By Owner. 41 Summit View Place, Port Angeles. This home has 3 bdrms, 2 bth, living & family room, wet bar, den, deck, and single car garage. This home has new windows and newer flooring. Asking price is $187,000. Call (360)457-0070 for more details and showing. EXCELLENT WATER VIEW From this solid Del Guzzi built home on the east side. With a brand new 30 year roof, vinyl windows, a wood burning fireplace, and hardwood floors under the carpet. A great starter home. 2 Br., 1 bath, a fenced backyard with covered porch, and detached garage/shop. $135,000. ML252403. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

51

Office Hours

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM Homes

Fantastic views from this centrally-located home. This spacious 3+ Br. home has had many upgrades including floor coverings and a new deck. You won’t find this much square footage and this much view at this little price. Possibility of a mother-in-law apartment downstairs. $217,500. ML251629. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GOLF COURSE CONDO! Wonderful golf course condo with mainfloor living and an extra bed, bath, office/den space upstairs. Located in a park like golf course setting in the heart of Port Ludlow. $235,000. ML78054. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow LIFE AT THE ORCHARDS Discover life renewed in this resort-style community nestled among acres of fruit trees and close to everything. Community hobby center, clubhouse with gourmet kitchen, dining room and full reception area and a guest suite you can rent. $179,000 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LIGHT AND BRIGHT Newer 3 Br., 2 bath home within the Port Angeles city limits. Nicely landscaped yard in quiet neighborhood. You won’t believe how wonderful and classy this home looks and feels. $169,000. ML251853/145266 Marc Macedo 477-9244 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY Located steps away from trails at Lincoln Park, schools nearby. New vinyl. Updated master bath. Newer carpet on stairs and upper level. Room for RV parking in back ally. $169,000 ML252431/161445 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. MT ANGELES HOME This 2007, 1,936 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath home is well laid out with open floor plan, big kitchen, and a large living room. And check out the walkin granite shower! And don’t miss the covered back porch. Located next to a green belt in an area of nice homes, it will surely appreciate in time. Also partial mountain and partial saltwater views from this property. $246,900. ML252453. Dan Blevins 417-2805 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Multiple views on .62 private acres near schools and shopping. Great water/ mountain views from Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great room, rec rm. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on 1st floor. Shop. Warm, south facing, tiled patio. Fruit trees/garden. $334,000. 457-2796. NICELY RESTORED 1976 2 Br. on 1/2 acre with city limits at the back fence. Two spacious decks, garage and carport plus workshop. Oversized shower, soak tub, wood stove, built-in buffet, walk-in closet in master Br. Back has room for RV parking and features small pond, patio area and many bearing fruit trees. $134,900. ML251965 Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN VIEW 2.5 acres in Sequim Valley! 2,090 sf with great room, 3 Br., 2.5 baths, living room, office/hobby room, laundry room with desk area, 3 car attached garage with extra long bay and shop area. Fenced yard. $419,996. Claire Koenigsaecker U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

51

Homes

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, single car garage, 1,188 sf on city lot, open floor plan, professionally landscaped, sprinkler system, huge patio, partly fenced, mtn. view from yard, many extras. $159,900. 452-9297. PRICE IMPROVEMENT Buildable acreage and so close to town. Beautiful 6.79 acres, mountain views and stream. Perfect horse property with possible owner financing. Zoned as urban growth area. Could easily support a tri-plex. PUD power and water to the road. $115,000. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY PRIVATE SETTING Very private 3 Br., 2 bath home on 1.21 acres with gorgeous mountain views. Walk-in closets in every Br. 24’x35’ metal sided double garage with extra 12’x10’ room built inside. Partially enclosed and covered RV garage. Close to Discovery Trail. $240,000. ML260349/185702 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY RIGHT TIME FOR RENTAL INVESTMENT Duplex on 0.21 acre private lot. Built in 1975 each unit has 768 sf, 2 Br., 1 bath. Very stable rental history, two separate back yards. New roof in 2004. $219,900. ML250464. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SEQUIM VIEW HOME 3 Br., 2 ba, 1.25 acres, 16x20 sunroom, 24x36 shop, gardeners delight, 243 Brazil Rd. $349,000. 360-504-2504 STYLISH AND SOPHISTICATED NW contemporary style home features water view on a large corner lot in prestige’s Crest Haven. Architecture optimizes space and dramatic windows/ skylights infuse the home with natural light. Hardwood floors, 11’ ceilings, large family room, kitchen with large bar/island and walkin pantry. Large deck with southern exposure and tastefully landscaped. $285,000. ML260341. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SUMMER BREEZE Well maintained home that is wheel chair accessible from the front entry and garage. The home features all new carpet, master bath with walk in shower, kitchen and dining area with laminate flooring, deck off the dining room, large laundry room, and easy access to down town Sequim. $249,000. ML260466. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 Updated rambler short distance to schools and stores. Both baths have been remodeled with Corian countertops and tile floors. Open kitchen/dining/livingroom. Roomy breakfast bar that sits six. Large 2 car garage that is heated and plumbed with a sink. $185,900. ML260242 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. UPSCALE SUNLAND CONDO 3 Br., 2 bath, silestone countertops, open room concept at 2,039 sf, exterior and landscape maintained, long driveway. $286,000. ML170986/260112 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND


C6

ACROSS 1 Soaking spots 6 Mideast ruling family name 11 Field call 14 Language that gives us “kayak” 15 Abu __ 16 She played Beatrix in “Kill Bill” 17 Romantic evening components, perhaps 19 Strain 20 Reason-based faith 21 Film in Cannes 22 California Gold Rush staple 27 Watering hole 28 23-Down was one: Abbr. 29 “Able was __ ...”: palindrome start 30 Try in court 32 Came around regarding 36 Alien statutes 40 It can make a star shine 41 4-Down titles 42 Stadium take 43 Like sashimi 46 Cause of star wars? 47 Wurlitzer whirlers 52 27-Across offerings 53 Plant moisture buildup 54 Quaint stopover 55 Decide once and for all, and what one can do to the ends of 17-, 22-, 36- and 47Across 61 Hens do it 62 Novelist Jong 63 Blue Cross competitor 64 Yellow __ 65 He passed Lou in 2009 to become the Yankees’ alltime hit leader 66 Pulitzer writer Kidder DOWN 1 Certain eBay click

51

Homes

SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO 2 Br., 2 baths, nice sunroom, propane stove, murphy bed, Shoji screen. $185,000 ML145314/252226 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND View the strait from your deck, fully landscaped and graveled, RV setup (dump, water, and amp service), newer septic installed, oversized garage with shop and bath. $127,500 ML185583/260346 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND WARM AND INVITING Updated rambler: new paint, floors and fixtures. 2 Br., 2 bath, office space, open entertainment area with built-in bar area including mini refrigerator. Super efficient Hampton regency stove, high density pet resistant carpet. Oversized 1 car garage with two workshops, fully fenced, deck, greenhouse, 5 fruit trees, sitting area with firepit. $99,950. ML260256 Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East WOW! This 3 Br., 2 bath manufactured home is priced to sell. 1,303 sf of living space on .37 acres conveniently located between Port Angeles and Sequim. Built in 1995 and remodeled in 2005 with new laminate floors, countertops and appliances, the home has a nice deck and private location. $139,000. ML260469 Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9361

54

Classified

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011

Lots/ Acreage

2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. CALL 253549-3345 PORT ANGELES lot at 222 W. Park Ave. Half acre + CLOSE IN TOWN Water, Power, and Sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Point lot with water view, perc, water. $69,000. Owner financing. 4.77 acres off Mt. Angeles Rd. Surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. http://portangelesprop.com

54

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. KEY WEST, FLA.

Y R O L L A M A R G A R E T G By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel

2 Darth, at one time 3 Large cask 4 Gandhi, for one 5 Directs 6 Attaches to the house 7 SeaWorld performer 8 Did nothing 9 Symbol of honesty 10 Bad-mouth 11 Sweetie pie 12 Whirlpool brand 13 Like some slippery floors 18 Sally in space 21 Anglers’ baskets 22 “So I was wrong” 23 2009 Peace Nobelist 24 Leslie Caron title role 25 Sub 26 British weapon designed in Czechoslovakia 27 Three-time Masters champ Mickelson 31 Ruffles features 32 Had 33 Challenged 34 Campfire base 35 __ buco

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

64

Houses

GREAT FUTURE HOMESITE Nice level lot with all utilities in at road. CC&R’s to protect your investment. Priced to sell. $55,000. ML251879. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NO BINOCULARS NEEDED 1.84 high bank waterfront acres, ready to build. Also a quarter share of 12 treed acres, that can never be developed. Power and phone in at road. CC&R’s to protect your investment. $179,000. ML252101. Shawnee Hathaway Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. P.A.: $25,000 under assessed value. Beautiful 10,000 sf city lot in area of fine homes. $41,000. 457-4004

Commercial

‘C’ IS FOR CAFE Live the dream! Local cafe with residence upstairs. Plenty of room to grow your herbs and vegetables. Longstanding presence on the Olympic Peninsula seeks new owners to take this established cafe to the next level. Easy highway access. Adjoining Lavender shop/farm also for sale. $325,000. ML260473. Eileen Schmitz 360-565-2030 JACE The Real Estate Company ‘P’ IS FOR PASTORAL Sequim farmland, perfect for small farm, home or investment uses. Very private with irrigation rights, awesome mountain views and Lotzgesell Creek (year round). Many different building sites. Buyer to assume “Current use farm and agriculture program” tax designation or pay to remove building sites. Owner financing. $149,000. ML241762. Jace Schmitz 360-565-2030 JACE The Real Estate Company

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished from $395$500, 2 Br. $514 + util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258 CENTRAL P.A.: Upstairs, 1 Br. no smoking, no pets. washer/dryer on premises. Mo. to Mo. $500., $600. dep. 236 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Close to shopping, bus schools. 457-4538 P.A.: 1 Br. $475. Dwntown, some pets ok. 425-881-7267 P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-4409. P.A.: 2 Br. apt., no smoking/pets. $650. 457-1695 P.A.: Nice, newer 2 Br 1 ba, 930 sf W/D. $700. 808-4972.

1,310 sf, single level 2 Br., 2 bath, 2 car, ocean/mtn view. Remodled all the extras, upscale area. 360-281-6928 2 Br. rural home with extraordinary mountain view. Luxury master bath and full main bath. Oversized untility/media room. Attached 2 car garage. 2 large decks in back overlooking acres of state forest land. Breathtaking sunsets and quiet setting. $1,200 month. Call 457-8472

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APTS P.A. H 1 br 1 ba .....$450 A 1 br 1 ba......$575 H 2 br 1 ba......$650 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$750 H 3+ br 2 ba....$875 H 3 br 2 ba......$895 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 1 ba....$1200 HOUSES/APTS SEQ H 2 br 1 ba.......$575 H 3 br 2.5 ba..$1000

64

Houses

P.A.: 2 Br., 2 bath on 2+ acres. Garage/ shop, carport, room for livestock, pets OK. All appliances, some furnishings available. $950. 461-2973

SEQUIM: 1 & 2 Br. apt. $575 & $625. 683-3001, 460-9623 SEQUIM: Dominion Terrace condo 1 Br. 55+, view, clubhouse + pool, all util., more. $900 mo. 683-4994.

63

Duplexes

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath. $650. 813 E. 2nd St. 460-7235.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

WANTED: Roommate to rent a house with. 461-9718

68

Commercial Space

Between Seq./Carlsborg, 2,400 sf shop/ office. 683-1639. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 P.A.: Office/retail/storage. 4,400 sf, 50¢/ sf. All/part. 457-5678 PORT LUDLOW Suitable for retail or professional offices. Contact Larry at 360-437-8246 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Sequim’s Newest DOWNTOWN RETAIL Now Available. 683-331l, days 683-3300, eves.

P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ pets. $600, last, dep. 452-1694 eves.

P.A.: Studio apt. $550 mo., $250 deposit. Includes utilities. 457-6196 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

West Sequim Bay. Waterfront, 3 Br., very clean, fresh paint, no smoke/ pets, $1,100/mo. incl. water. 683-5825

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

P.A.: Charming Vintage 2 Br, 1 bath home, recent remodel with deck and 1 car detached storage garage. Remodeled with new bathroom, carpet, kitchen. W/D. $850/ mo. First/last/damage. Contact cell: 206-898-3252; H 360-437-8119 P.A.: Cute 1 Br. nice area, recently remodeled, no smoke, small pet ok w/dep. $675. 452-4933. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

P.A.: 2 Br. senior cottage, all utilities incl. except phone, W/D, housekeeping and dining services avail upon request. Inquire at Park View Villas, corner of 8th and G St., P.A. 452-7222 for showing.

SEQUIM: 2 Br. in town, clean/quiet park, W/D, W/S/G incl. year lease. $650. 460-8978.

P.A.: 433 1/2 E. 1st St. 2 Br., no pets/smoking, $550, 1st, last, dep. 417-1688.

WEST P.A.: Newer 3 Br., 2 ba, W/D, NS. $950, $500 deposit. 460-7454, 670-9329

SEQUIM: Palo Alto Rd. new log cabin, 1 Br. $800, utilities paid. 683-4307.

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3/24

Angela, Armory, Ashby, Atocha, Audubon, Ballast, Beach, Bone, Buoy, Cayo, Coral, Curry, Dive, Duval, Eaton, Fathom, Flagler, Fort, Gardens, Golf, Hemingway, Jackson, Kedge, Keys, Kraals, Lighthouses, Mallory, Margaret, Marina, Martello, Monroe, Pier, Roosevelt, Shops, Shore, Sigsbee, Smather, Snorkel, Stock, Sunset, Swim, Tours, Water, Wharf, White Yesterday’s Answer: Milkshake

3/24/11

SUNLAND: 3 Br., 2 ba, $950 ++, water incl. 797-7251.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

R A S S R A O F A T H O M A F

Solution: 7 letters

50 Volleyball great Gabrielle 51 More elusive 55 Dr.’s study 56 Were now? 57 Cassis apéritif 58 Seventh Greek letter 59 Mandela’s org. 60 Mary __ Ash, cosmetics company founder

37 Snatch 38 __-Rooter 39 “A Clockwork Orange” narrator 43 New Jersey’s state tree 44 Top server 45 Burrowing marsupial 47 Puts in the can? 48 Radii neighbors 49 Homeland of 23Down’s father

Lots/ Acreage

AFFORDABLE SECLUSION 10 acres partially cleared, ready for home of buyers choice, all utilities in already, zoning allows for second homesite. $149,000. ML193922/260461 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

3/24/11

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

1 acre lot in Carlsborg on Village Ln. Mountain view, PUD water $57,500 or best offer. 360-681-3992

58

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

71

Appliances

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

Bosch Duel Fuel Range, Vermont Casting LP Stove, Jotul LP Stove. 4 year old stainless steel Bosch 4 burner gas top with electric oven, great condition! $500/obo, new $1,200. Vermont Castings ‘Radiance’ LP stove, ivory enamel, 38,000 BTU’s, 4 years old, works great, $2,600 new, only $1,350/ obo. Jotul GF 100 DC Nordic QT, ivory enamel, 17,000 BTU’s, heat capacity of 600 sq. ft., 4 years old, new $1,685, $650/obo. Located on Marrowstone Island. Contact Gary. 360-531-1378

Furniture

DEHUMIDIFIER: Like new, works great, removes up to 45 pints water from air every 24 hrs., LG brand, Energy Star rated, paid $218 new 4 mo. ago. Sell for $150. 928-9764 or 808-3229.

MISC: Queen Anne hutch, table, 8 chairs, extensions/ pads, 2 side tables. $800 for all. Baldwin Hamilton upright grand piano, 1983, $800/obo. Contact 360-452-6347 or 360-808-4088

FRESH SHIPMENT of quality reconditioned appliances. 600 E. First Street, P.A.

MISC: Sofa, reclines on each end, $600/ obo. Futon, queen, $200/obo. 4 folding tray tables, $20. 683-3386

LAST WEEK SPEED QUEEN WASHERS AND DRYERS ON SALE Prices going up April 1st. One only Zenith 56” Projection TV was $1,800, now $499. Pacific Refrigeration, 600 E. 1st, Port Angeles. REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, side-byside, ice maker and water, 25 cf, white. $399. 417-0826.

72

Furniture

CHINA CABINET Leaded glass on top, 4 doors on top and bottom, solid oak, 7.5’ long. $2,000. 457-3911 Desks. 48 in. oak roll top desk in beautiful shape.$150. Antique oak executive desk also in great shape. $200. 452-3952. DINING TABLE Solid oak, nice shape, 4 chairs. $300/obo 452-6439 ENT CENTER: Solid oak, 3 shelves with glass door, storage underneath, 51.5” high, 54” wide, TV opening of 28”. $200. 452-2867.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

72

MISC: All excellent condition. La-Z-Boy lift chair, $800. Green ultra-suede sofa, $500. Antique oak table/chairs, side board $1,500. Queen size bed, $200. Brass twin beds, $200. 457-0758. MISC: Large dining table with 4 chairs, light blond finish, $135. 2 matching coffee tables, 1 large $40, 1 small $30. Very nice, must see to appreciate. 681-4429

MISC: RECLINING SOFA LIKE NEW Signature Design, Upholstered Fabric, Dark Brown New December 2010, cost $849, sell $550/obo. CLOTHES VALET STAND, Smartek-Mahogany, new $50. Slitzer 15pc CUTLERY SET WOOD BLOCK, new, $60. 360-683-4856

Serta mismatched queen mattress and box spring, great shape. $200/obo. 681-3299 SET: Bedroom furniture, queen bed, dresser, nightstand, antique style. $700/obo. 452-4349, leave message.

73

General Merchandise

BACK FROM VEGAS! Spring and summer wear arriving daily. Large line of swimsuits, sundresses, denim, tank tops, fun & trendy handbags and accessories. Name brands, Silver, Rock Revial, Sinful by Affliction, Vigoss. SPOTLIGHT TAN and APPAREL 715 E. First Street P.A. 452-9715. CAMERA EQUIPMENT Sony Alpha 200 digital SLR. Six lenses, 22 filters, flash, studio lights, tripod, remote, 3 batteries, 4 gig memory card, aluminum hard case, and more! $1,500/ obo. Don 775-4463 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com HAM EQUIP: Icom Pro 3, Ameritron Al811H amplifier, like new, $2,150. Atlas 210, with tuner, excellent condition, $175. 928-3483.

JUICER: Jack La Lanne’s Deluxe Power Juicer. Gently used several times. I have another juicer so am selling this one. The operating manual and recipe book are included. It retails for $125, your cost is just $60. Call 417-7691

73

General Merchandise

MISC: (2) 5,000 watt generators, $300 ea. Partner Mark III concrete saw, with extra blades, $600. 452-4820 MISC: Cement mixer, small, portable, electric motor, $200. 24’ fiberglass extension ladder, $90. 5 hp Craftsman rear tine rototiller, $300. 681-2016 MISC: GE 15” Profile trash compactor, $250. Bosch dishwasher, $250. Weatherguard van roof rack, 3 rail system, $250. 775-4838 MISC: Little Chief Smoker, top load, unopened box, $70. Wine rack, holds 24 bottles, $20. Electric roaster large, $20. 452-5810 MISC: Power wheelchair, $2,500. Transfer wheelchair, $100. Power recliner, $350. Walker w/seat, $75. Bathtub safety chair, $75. Bedside commode, $50. Bedside eating table, $ 50. Toilet bars and raised toilet seat, $35. Some never used, all in good condition. 457-3887. MISC: Used fireplace brick, .05¢-.25¢ ea., you haul, located in Sequim. 2 Hoyer lifts, 2 power wheelchairs, $500-$3,000. Call for details. 1-360-535-9232 Mount Angeles Cemetery Crypt. Mausoleum Crypt #4 Tier “E” South. Inside Mausoleum #1. Valued at $3,500. For sale at $1,500. 206-282-4345 MOVING: 27” JVC color TV. $100/obo. 360-477-1185 POOL TABLE Dynamo coin operated. $1,000/obo. 460-2768 RIDING MOWER: ‘08 Craftsman, 24 hp, 42” cut, less than 50 hrs. $1,200. 452-3051 UTILITY TRAILER ‘07 33’, tandem axel g.n., deck length 25’, 14K lbs GVWR, 5’ spring loaded pop up, dove tail with 5’ ramps. $4,500. 452-5457, 808-3899 WOOD STOVE Brand new, Hearthstone, Heritage model. $3,000. 457-0758 YOU CAN’T AFFORD NOT TO HEAR! You’ve never seen anything like it. A.M.P. hearing aids you can afford. ONLY $1500 A PAIR. Limited Time. Call Now 452-2228. CERTIFIED HEARING 819 Georgiana St., Suite B Port Angeles

73

General Merchandise

Newer propane tank, 500 gallons. $1,100. 360-600-6845

74

Home Electronics

SERVER: IBM X3250, 4 GB, dual core, rack mount 1U, rails, like new. $400. 683-5149 TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

75

Musical

ACCORDION: Excelsior 120 bass with mussett, midi-able, $625. 477-7181. MISC: ‘75 Gold Top Les Paul deluxe, mint condition, $3,500. ‘70s Fender Bandmaster amp, $600. Yamaha PSR 320 keyboard, $100. 808-5647 MISC: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, $200/obo. “Estrada” handmade acoustic guitar from Morelia, Mex., red with black accent, comes with soft case, $150/obo. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $200/ obo. Washburn mini amp WA8, with owner’s manual and amp cord, great for practice and personal use, $20/obo. All in new condition, great sound! 481-8955, 477-0903 PIANO: Currier Spinet beautiful condition. Take $350 or offer, must sell. May trade. 797-3403 PIANO: Currier Spinet beautiful condition. Take $350 or offer, must sell. May trade. 797-3403 PIANO: Wurlitzer console piano and bench, light oak, recently tuned. $649. 683-3212

76

Sporting Goods

GUNS: Remington model 700 BDL, 270 cal., 3-9 Leopold scope, $550. Savage model 110, 223 cal., 6-24 Tasco scope, $350. Savage model 93R, 17 HRM cal., 6 power Leopld scope, $300. Thompson Center Hawkens muzzle loader, 50 cal., lots of extras, $250. Llama model 1911 45 cal., auto pistol, $350. Pheonix Arms model HP22, auto pistol, 22 cal., 3” and 5” barrells, $160. Ethaca, model 37, 20 guage, slide action shot gun, $175. 681-2016.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011

C7

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAWN/YARD CARE LOG HOMES RESTORATION

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

www.LundFencing.com

Chad Lund

360-670-1350 360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

Roof & Gutter Cleaning Moss Prevention Window Washing

Call Bryan or Mindy

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360 Lic#buenavs90818

HANDYMAN

JP

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key 24 yrs. experience

Paul Baur, owner Home & Bus.

360-681-7878 #BAURLH*023DJ

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Larry Muckley 135114329

#LUNDFF*962K7

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

93313234

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

Baur Log Homes

Pressure Washing

Small jobs is what I do!

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360-460-6176

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

(360) 683-8332

AIR DUCT CLEANING

s Handyman Services

78289849

CONSTRUCTION

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APPLIANCES

TREE SERVICE

ROOFING

SE EMM P PER ER F I T R E EE E SE ER R VIC VIC E

SPRING SPECIAL:

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Serving the entire Peninsula

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EXCAVATING

360

452-9995

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

360/460•9824

LANDSCAPING

72289323

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

025073138

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER contact@jkdirtworks.com

TREE SERVICE

UPHOLSTERY

Specializing in Trees

FREE

• View Trimming • Tree Topping • Selective Tree Removal • High Climbers • Chip On Site • Free Estimates

Mole Control

Tr e e s Shrubs Hedges

683-8328

LANDSCAPING SERVICES Scott A. Campbell, Owner afterhours.upholstery@q.com BY APPOINTMENT

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(360) 460-0518

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anthonystreetop@gmail.com

offers a new service to do-it-yourselfers

24 HR Emergency Don’t Wait Until it’s Too Late

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ROOFING

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360-461-7476 Clallam County Lic # LINKRR*910QR

135114313

Bill Link OWNER ON EVERY JOB

RATES

1 1 1 2 2 2

AND SIZES: X 1” X 2” X 3” X 1” X 2” X 3”

COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

C reate an A ctio n P lan

What to do; when & how to do it!

CALL KRISTINA TODAY!

PPROFESSIONAL RScanning O F E SPriSntiIngOServices NAL S c a n n i n g & Printing Se r v i c e s D DESIGN ESIGN S SCANNING CANNING FFILM ILM O OUTPUT UTPUT P PRINTING RINTING P PACKAGING ACKAGING M MEMENTOS EMENTOS

(360) 457-8479 www.outonalimblandscape.com

125111793

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY

ROOFING

LINK

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115108508

O r a n g e Pe e l - K n o c k Dow n - Ha n d Tr ow e l

3Licensed 6 0and. Bonded 4 5 2Contr.. 7#ESPAI*122BJ 938

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LIC

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ASBESTOS

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EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

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0A5100969

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expires: June 17, 2011

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river1966@msn.com

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Call NOW To Advertise 360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

To advertise call 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


C8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Odometer needs to be recalibrated Dear Doctor: I recently purchased a 2008 Nissan Frontier pickup truck with 34,500 miles and is still under Nissan’s new car warranty. For many years, I have made approximately 20 trips a year from my house in Oakdale, N.Y., to another home in Walton, N.Y. The trip has always measured between 191 and 192 miles; however, in my Frontier, the trip measures 198 miles. Can odometers be calibrated and might this be covered under warranty? I’m concerned that when my Frontier reaches the 36,000-mile warranty limit, the truck will have many fewer actual miles than the odometer shows. Bill Dear Bill: Yes, the odometer can be recalibrated. It is done electronically by reprogramming. Tire size also plays a part in calibration and correct speed and odometer readings. You can have the dealer check the vehicle and it should be covered under the warranty.

New suspension Dear Doctor: My 1996 Lincoln has 94,000 miles on it, runs great and looks new.

THE AUTO DOC The front air Damato shock boots have deteriorated and now leak. I’m advised the parts replacement shocks cost more than $2,000. Can I replace these air shocks with conventional ones? If so, will there be any appreciable handling or steering difference? My Lincoln dealer will only replace with OEM. Werner Dear Werner: I see many vehicles with air suspension failures, and I always suggest the conversion over to conventional coil spring assemblies. The vehicle will ride and handle better than the old air suspension. On most vehicles, a simple snip of a wire at the air suspension module will also shut off the air suspension light, and the compressor will not run. Have your technician contact a conversion company. There are many out there.

Junior

The conversion coil spring assembly will come complete and ready to bolt in place.

Cold affects remote Dear Doctor: I have a 2006 Volkswagen with 33,000 miles on it. I have had a problem with the driver’s side door. When the weather is very cold, I am unable to unlock the driver’s side door with the remote. All the other doors open without a problem. I have to go into the car from the passenger side, start it up and get it warm, then the door will open from the inside of the car but not the outside. After the car has warmed up, it’s fine. We have used de-icer, and the dealer even put a new lock on the door, all to no avail. Do you have any advice? Opal Dear Opal: When it comes to frozen doors in cold weather, lubrication usually takes care of the problem — not replacing parts. When lubricating any moving door parts and/ or linkage never use regular petroleum oil. You need to use a synthetic oil or graphite only. You also need to lubri-

Car of the Week

cate all the rubber seals, including the trunk seal. Have the technician remove the door panel and lubricate all the moving door linkage. As for lubricating the door key cylinder, use only graphite and do not overlubricate.

Is switching fuels OK? Dear Doctor: I have a Flex Fuel 2003 Chevy Tahoe with 129,000 highway miles. Now that gas prices are going higher, I would like to use the E85 fuel. Would there be any problem switching from 87 octane gasoline to the flex fuel? Will the fuel delivery system parts be harmed? Gus Dear Gus: The use of E-85 will not cause any problems with the Chevy’s fuel-injection system and or engine valves. Your engine is designed to run on either fuel.

________

Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

2011 BMW 750i ActiveHybrid BASE PRICE: $102,300. AS TESTED: $106,075. TYPE: Front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, five-passenger, mid-size, gasoline-electric, hybrid, luxury sedan. ENGINE: 4.4-liter, twin-turbocharged, directinjection V-8 with 20-horsepower electric motor and lithium-ion battery. MILEAGE: 17 mpg (city), 24 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: 150 mph. LENGTH: 199.8 inches. WHEELBASE: 120.9 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 4,795 pounds. BUILT AT: Germany. OPTIONS: Driver assistance package (includes lane departure warning, automatic high-beam headlights, blind spot warning) $1,350; cold weather package (includes heated steering wheel and rear seats) $800; iPod and USB connector $400; satellite radio with one-year complimentary service $350. DESTINATION CHARGE: $875. The Associated Press

1996 TOYOTA TACOMA SR5 XTRA CAB 4X4

2007 HONDA CRV AWD SUV

2006 DODGE RAM 3500 CREW CAB 4X4

2004 SUBARU LEGACY AWD WAGON

3.4L V6, 5 SPD, AC, TILT, CRUISE, CD, REAR SLIDER, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, NEW TIRES, GARAGE-KEPT BEAUTY! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

2.4L V-TEC 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, 6-DISC CD/MP3, MOONROOF, ALLOYS, SIDE AIRBAGS, 45K MI, HIGHLY-RATED 4X4, PRICED TO SELL! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

6.7L CUMMINS DIESEL, RARE 5 SPD MAN, AC, TILT, CRUISE, CD, PWR SEAT, HEAVY CHASSIS (12,200 GVW), NEW TIRES, LOW MI, HURRY ON THIS ONE! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

2.5L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, MP3, DUAL SUNROOFS, ENKEI ALLOYS, PWR DOORS & LOCKS, THIS THING IS LOADED! ONLY 62K MI, SHARP! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2003 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE

2001 FORD F-450 SUPERDUTY POWERSTROKE BUCKET TRUCK

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2010 KIA SPORTAGE LXV6

$9,995

$18,500

GRAY MOTORS

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12406092

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS

$10,995

GRAY MOTORS

AWD

3.3L V6, AUTO, AC, AM/FM/CASS, TOW PKG, 7 PASS, LUGGAGE RACK, PRIV GLASS, 78K MI, VERY, VERY CLEAN LOCAL TRADE-IN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX

$6,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

7.3L DIESEL “POWERSTROKE” TURBO DIESEL, AUTO, AC, PWR INVERTER, TOW PKG, ALTEC PTO BOOM, 35’ MANLIFT, HEAVY, HEAVY DUTY 15K LB GVW DUAL REAR WHEELS, SERVICE BED, PLATFORM, CLEAN & RELIABLE CORP LEASE RETURN, SPOTLESS CARFAX

$12,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

VERY ECONOMICAL 1.6L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, AM/FM/CD/MP3, SIDE AIRBAGS, 31K MI, BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, SPOTLESS CARFAX

$10,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

2.7L V6, AUTO, AWD, AC, CRUISE, TILT, FOG LAMPS, AM/FM/CD/MP3, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, LUGGAGE RACK, PRIVACY GLASS, ALLOYS, ONLY 12K MI, VERY, VERY CLEAN FACTORY PROGRAM CAR, BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, NON-SMOKER

$18,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

2006 CHEVROLET AVEO

2000 NISSAN MAXIMA GLE

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

NO CREDIT CHECKS!

AUTO, AC, TILT, STEREO, BLACK CLOTH–N ICE! TWO TO CHOOSE FROM!

AUTO, TAN LEATHER, AC, CLIMATE, CD, SUNROOF, PWR LOCKS, WINDOWS & MIRRORS, MILITARY DISCOUNTS!

LOWEST IN-HOUSE FINANCING

GUARANTEED!

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www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

90 DAYS

SAME AS CASH!

$6,495 WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

76

Sporting Goods

GUNS: M1 Garand, $750. K31 Swiss, $250. Mosin-Nagant, 91/30, $175. Browning Hi-power, $625. carpenterbean@gma il.com 452-4158, email is best contact or call after 5:30. MISC: Colt Lawman nickle-plated, 357 Magnum, $500. HK .45 auto, NIB, $600. 683-9899 Pontoon Boat. 375fc Seaeagle. Two swivel seats, casting bar, pole holders, and a motor mount. It’s in great shape! Call to see. $600. 452-3952

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

BASEMENT Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. 131 W. 7th St. Furniture, tools, and misc items. HELP END HOMELESSNESS We will pick up leftover items from your garage or estate sale. Serenity Thrift Stores 452-4711 in Port Angeles or 683-8269 in Sequim

82

Pets

DOG: 1 yr. old Male Yorkie/Chihuahua named Charlie. He has short sandy colored hair, white socks and needs a good home that can give him lots of attention and love. Please see online PDN ad for more info & pictures. $200/ obo. Contact Noelle 360-461-6115 FREE: Cat. 10 yr. old Main Coon, 15 yr. old long hair white, fabulous cats, smart, neutered males, must find good homes due to health and moving. 360-981-8222 NORTHWEST FARM TERRIER PUPS Training started, 10 weeks old, 1st shots, etc., to approved homes. Your best dog awaits! $350 ea. 417-0605 PITBULL PUPS Ready now. $200 ea. 683-5943 or 360-780-0021. PUPPIES: Shih-tzu, 2 male, 1 female, 9 weeks. Need good home. $200 ea. 912-2140

WANTED: Quality items in good condition for garage sale on 6/4. No clothing or shoes. Profits benefit WAG, local dog rescue. For pickup call 452-8192

Schnoodles: Poodle/ Schnauzer cross. Non-shedding. Pups are 7 weeks old and will have 1st shot and wormed. They are black with white and S&P with white. $175-$250. 452-2579.

78B

83

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Farm Animals

MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-? 1803 W. 10th St. Furniture, baby gear, appliances, bicycles, and lots more!

Barn-stored, local grass hay. $4/Bale. 683-3518, 460-7020

78D

MISC: Fancy show pigeons, $10 ea. Free aquatic turtle. 681-2486

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-4 p.m. 1824 Harbor Crest, Gales Addition. Furniture, pool table, beds, riding and push mowers, 1986 Ford pickup, framed artwork, and a ton of jewelry! Kitchen, dish sets, assorted tools, collectibles, heirloom glassware, lifetime of memories! Something for everyone!

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

Come to the CCS Teens’ **Garage Sale** for their Mission to Mexico. Fri., Mar. 25 & Sat., Mar. 26, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Calvary Chapel Sequim — just off Hwy 101, 91 S. Boyce Rd., Sequim Enhance your shopping with our Lattes and Italian Soda. www.goborderless.org No early birds, please. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8:30-4 p.m., 150 Tyee Rd. Honda 90, misc. home items, collectible dolls, Neoprene chest wadders new, 110 stick welder. MOVING Sale: Sat. 85, Sun. 1-5, 512 Summer Breeze Ln. Furniture, household items and more.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536.

85

Farm Equipment

Mower, grooming PTO driven. Simak SM-120; 3-16” blades. Less than 20 hrs. use -$1800 new$850. 732-4311.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

93

Marine

19’ Lightening sailboat, full sails. Teak woodwork, new seats, extended tiller arm, trailer. Good condition, and newly laminated bottom. Must sell, moving. $2,000/obo. 253-245-4531 ARISTOCRAFT: 19’ 120 OMC, Merc 2 outdrive, rebuilt eng. $900/obo. 683-1415. BOAT MOTOR: 1957 short shaft, Evinrude, new tune up, 18 hp, must sell, very clean, fuel tank and hoses included. $300. 360-477-8122 DINGHY: Livingston. 7.5’ long, with oars and cover. $400. 681-8592

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

SNOW AND ICE GONE... MAYBE, WE HOPE! Fruit trees, flowering trees, blueberries, cypress, and deer fencing. G&G Farms, off Taylor Cutoff Rd., Sequim. 683-8809.

82

Pets

ADORABLE PUPPY TO GOOD HOME ONLY: Cute small dog. Puppy size, but almost full grown. Male, not neutered. The most adorable puppy ever. Loving, happy, funny and needs the right home. I’m moving. Has eye issue that may or may not need surgery in the future. Call 460-4280. BIRDS: For sale due to ill heath. Kaytee with cage/extras, $150. Several hand fed young cockatiels, $40 ea. 2 sets mated cockatiels, $100 set. All delightful, sweet and fun. 452-9084. BLACK LABS: (2) 5 mo. old males with all shots, playful, sweet and gentle, I would love someone to adopt them together. $150 ea. or $200 both 360-417-0808

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘11 Soft Tail Deluxe. Pearl blue, lots of chrome, bags, windshield, never driven, must sell due to health. $21,000/obo. 360-681-4245

HARLEY: ‘03 FLSTFI Fat Boy Custom. Only 3,100 mi., $38,000 invested. Just a few custom features; Harley custom paint set, Thunder Star chrome wheels, D&D Slash Cut exhaust system, Headwins custom headlights with turn signals, Lepera custom seat, chrome passenger back rest, custom foot board, custom windshield (easy removable), leather bag kit, leathers, helmets, and more. All goes. Never outside on a rainy day, must see. $13,900. Call Jim at 360-379-3646 HARLEY: ‘06 Soft Tail Deluxe, special edition, 123rd of 150, 1450cc, fully dressed, immaculate, always garaged, never in rain, in parades and won lots of awards. $17,000/obo. 360-808-3444

HAY: Good quality grass hay, $5.50 bale. 461-5804.

MOVING Sale: Fri, Sat and Sun. Noon - ?, 2938 E. Walnut St., Apt #1. MOVING Sale: Sat., 9 a.m., Eagles, 110 S. Penn St. Everything must go, tables, chairs, etc.

94

FOR SALE BY OWNER BOAT SHOW & MARINE SWAP Saturday April 16th The show will feature privately owned boats in the water and on trailers and is open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kayaks, Dinghies, Sailboats, Power boats Register your vessel or to sign up for the Flea Market call 360-437-0513. GLASPLY: ‘69 17’ fiberglass, I/OBD motor and trailer for sale. $1,500. 457-1360 Livingston Model 12T Resort, seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer, extras, show room condition. $6,800. 681-8761 OWENS: 16’ I/O, 125 hp Mercury motor, needs work. $700/ obo. 681-0828. TOLLY: ‘66 38’. Twin 318s, 200 hrs., loaded. Trade for 20’ alum. $25,000. 360-770-2410 TROPHY: ‘06 21’ model 2002. Walkabout, Alaskan pkg., 150 hp Mercury, 15 hp kicker, downriggers, radar, 2 depth finders, GPS, Winless, 2 canvas tops, many extras. $37,550. 681-0717.

94

Motorcycles

APOLLO: ‘07 Orion 110. Exc. cond., some riding gear. $1,000. 683-8558.

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Blk cherry/blk pearl; 11,250 miles. One owner; garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. Never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,500. 360-461-4222 HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $6,900/obo. 360-477-8923 HONDA: ‘03 Shadow 600cc. Saddlebags, 2,400 miles, showroom quality, stored in heated area. Health forces sale. $3,500. 385-2065 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘99 XR200R. Includes riding gear. $1,000. 461-5609. LEATHERS: Black, 2X. New; vests, man’s $80, woman’s with red roses and fringe, $125. Used; jacket with zip lining, $150. Pants, $80. 417-9257 QUAD: ‘04 Kawasaki 700 KFX. Very good shape. $3,200/obo. 461-2056 QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘04 27’ Jayco. Big slide, sleeps 6-8, barely used, in great shape. Priced to sell at $10,900. 461-9054. 5TH WHEEL: Terry. $1,500. 808-5722

33’

5TH WHEEL: ‘99 25’ Artic Fox. $10,850. This particular fifth wheel is heavily insulated and ideal for the great northwest. Rv cover included. Please call for more information. 360-732-7540 MOTOR HOME: ‘00 31’ Flair. 2 tip-outs, fully loaded, 18K. $45,000. 457-3260.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft. 3 slides, 6 speed Allison trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner stovetop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table,light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, 6 KW generator, leveling sys, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k) gently used, non smokers. $108,000/obo 360-683-3887

MOTOR HOME: 2002 Newmar Kountry Star Class A Diesel 37' 59,000 miles, Generator, Leveling System, 2 Slideouts, Backup Camera, New Tires, W/D, Queen Bed, No Pets, Non-Smoking. Must See. Only $59,500. Bill 360-301-5735 MOTOR HOME: ‘98 31’ Itasca Class C. Ford V10, 35K, 14’ slide, sleeps 6. $16,500. 452-2148 for details. TRAILER: ‘02 25’ Layton. Excellent condition. Call for details. $8,500. 928-2404, evenings

96

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘94 Blazer Silverado 4WD. Very good cond., 5.7L, auto, ABS, all power, tinted, air, tow pkg., luggage carrier, 177K $3,800. 457-8917.

DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 56K. $26,995. 971-226-0002 DODGE: ‘99 Ram 2500. Cummins turbo diesel, 47,400 mi. $17,800. 379-0575. FORD ‘98 EXPLORER SPORT 2 DOOR 4X4 4.0 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, CD/cassette stereo, air, dual front airbags, sparkling clean inside and out! Local trade! Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘01 F150 crewcab Lariat. 92K, V8, 4.6L, auto, Carfax, leather, hard tonneau cover, bedliner, running boards. $12,000. 457-4185. FORD: ‘08 F350 LARIAT DIESEL. 4x4 crew cab, dually, 23K mi., new cond., leather interior, dual heaters and heated seats, auto, air, power rear windows, door locks, seats, mirrors, windows, tilt keyless entry, cruise, tow pkg., alloy wheels, moonroof, tinted, adj. pedals, deluxe stereo, limited slip rear end, plus $3,000 aftermarket accesor. $36,750. 452-3200, 452-3272 FORD: ‘99 Explorer. All WD V8, E.B., 152K mi., exc. cond. $5,500. 460-9323. GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460

MISC: 2010 Leer side open canopy, fits Ranger, $900. New 455 Buick engine w/ Edelbrocks heads, turbo 400 manuel valve body, all for $6,000. ‘96 Camaro, no interior, $500. 681-3838 TIRES: 4 mud terrian P235/75 R15, 2 yrs. old, 90+% tread. $300. 360-385-1329. TRUCK BED: GMC Dually ‘73-’88 with tailgate. Straight, solid, no dents, 2 fuel doors, red. $500/ obo. 461-1750. TUBE STEPS: Stainless steel, excellent condition, ‘92-’99 Suburban, no drill installation. $100. 457-4756 WHEELS/TIRES: 4 Hyundai alloy wheels with mounted Hankook tires, 215/55-17 includes lug nuts and TSP monitors. $600. 477-3191

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Legals Clallam Co.

SALE OF TIMBER BETSY LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled "Proposal for the Betsy Logging Unit," addressed to the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m., local time, May 10, 2011, for the purchase of timber on the Betsy Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, Washington. This logging unit contains approximately 88.3 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 4,000 MBF of sawlogs, including 3,560 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, 279 MBF of western redcedar sawlogs, 86 MBF of Sitka spruce sawlogs, 63 MBF of red alder and other hardwood sawlogs and 12 MBF of Douglas-fir sawlogs; 77 cords of western redcedar salvage; and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs and western redcedar salvage are removable at the Purchaser’s option, except they may not be removed from allotment T4017. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier's check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of Thirty Six Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($36,500.00), must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of Sixty One Thousand Dollars ($61,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder's failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering. The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington 98587. Dated this 16th day of March, 2011 at Taholah, Washington, Greg Masten, Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: March 24, 31, 2011

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘86 F350 Crew cab. Utility box. $1,500. 460-5765. GMC: ‘83 Jimmy 4WD. $500. 460-9776 NISSAN ‘04 FRONTIER XE CREW CAB 4X4 3.3 liter V6, auto, offroad package, alloy wheels, matching canopy, bedliner, tow package, keyless entry, privacy glass, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, CD stereo, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $17,125! Sparkling clean inside and out! Only 39,000 miles! One owner! Stop by Gray Motors Today! $15,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

TOYOTA: ‘02 Lifted Toyota Tacoma SR5. V6, 5 speed, 79,000 miles, 6" Fabtech lift, 35" BFG's, Leer canopy, tinted windows, exhaust, MTX sub and amp, power windows/locks, MP3 player. $16,500/obo. 360-460-0723

TOYOTA: ‘09 Venza AWD. 13,000 miles, 3.5L V6, excellent condition, metallic dark grey, leather interior, auto climate control, "Star Safety System", power everything, keyless remote $27,450 Call 360-385-4267 or cell 360-390-5267.

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘03 S10, 5 speed. $5,800/obo. 457-7014 CHEV: ‘07 Silverado. Crew cab, 1/2 ton, tow pkg., power, 70K, canopy, running boards, clean, well under book at $16,500. 681-0103. CHEV: ‘80 1 ton extended van, runs and drives. $1,000/ obo. 477-2202.

HONDA: ‘08 CRV EXL AWD. I am the original owner of this 08 CRV. It has 24,500 mostly highway miles and is excellent throughout. No stop and go driving! It has $1,100 of dealer installed upgrades including fog lights, rear spoiler, door guards, rubber floor mats and unused carpet mats. Kelley Blue Book private party value is $24,900. Will sell for $23,900. Check out dealer offerings and prices then give me a call. 360-452-7342.

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101

Legals Clallam Co.

98

Pickups/Vans

DODGE: ‘79 Stake, with HD dump bed. $2,700/obo. 452-4820 DODGE: ‘89 Custom van. Great for camping, new tranny, low mi., will trade for car in good condition or $2,500/obo. Cell 940-391-9957 DODGE: ‘97 Caravan. 4 cyl. runs excellent. $2,500. 809-3215. FORD: ‘85 Clubwagon. 8 passenger, great shape, diesel. $2,800. 360-460-3162 FORD: ‘90 Aerostar van. Runs good $1750/obo 808-4661 FORD: ‘95 F350. Service body, 145K mi., 5.8L V8, auto. $2,850. 461-1835. FORD: ‘98 E350. 110K miles, power locks/windows, A/C, cruise. Ladder rack, all inside racks. $6,000/obo. 460-0556 FORD: ‘98 Ranger XLT Super Cab. 106,500 miles; 6 cyl 4.0 liter 5 sp. man trans; A/C CD AM/FM; power windows & doors; alloy wheels; bed liner; shell; air shocks; very good tires. No body damage, never wrecked. $3,600. 306-797-1624 GMC: ‘70 Servicebox. Perkins diesel, Allison tranny. $1,200/ obo. 360-301-3902. GMC: ‘72 3/4 ton pick up. $500. 460-9776.

CHEV: ‘89 Astrovan. Mark III, auto, 232K mi., runs excellent. $800. 683-7173. DODGE ‘99 RAM 1500 CLUB CAB SLT LARAMIE 2WD 5.2 liter V8, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, matching canopy, carpeted bedliner, privacy glass, keyless entry, 4 opening doors, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seats, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, information center, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $8,410! Only 67,000 miles! Clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

Parts/ Accessories

YAMAHA: ‘07 TTR125 LE. Big wheel, electric start, excellent condition. $1,600. 681-2594

Legals Clallam Co.

97

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011

Legals Clallam Co.

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of MICHAEL L. SWISHER, Deceased. NO. 11-400073-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 24, 2011 Personal Representative: Kent D. Swisher Attorney for Personal Representative: Simon Barnhart, WSBA #34207 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 11-4-00073-7 Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 2011 Case No.: 11-4-00069-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE L. ARMACOST, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: March 17, 2011 JUDITH G. GRANLEE-GATES Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: March 17, 24, 31, 2011

JEEP EAGLE: ‘95 Minivan. AWD, 4 new tires, runs good. $4,000. 457-3521. MISC: ‘04 GMC Savana 8 Passenger Van, $7,800. ‘96 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT 2WD Pickup, $2500. Both well maintained vehicles. Call for details or see online add. 360-374-6850 TOYOTA: ‘98 Tacoma. 2WD, 5 speed, 124,500 miles, AM/ FM/CD, great tires, new brakes, 21 MPG, bed liner & canopy, GOOD condition. $5,050. 452-6965

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

BMW: ‘94 530i. 3L, V8 5 spd. $2,950. 425-753-1666 BUICK ‘06 LUCERNE CXL SEDAN 3.8 liter Series III V6, auto, chrome wheels, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, power programmable heated leather seats, CD stereo, navigation, cruise, tilt, air, auto climate control, information center, dual front, side impact, and side curtain airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $16,780! Only 45,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $14,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com BUICK: ‘97 Lasabre Limited. 47K original mi $4,295. 460-9556 CHEV: ‘04 Impala LS. Low mi., leather, all power, great gas mi., excl. cond. $7,500. 452-6174. FORD: ‘59 2 door wagon, V8, stick, good shape, 105K. $4,900. 683-7847. FORD: ‘65 Mustang. New transmission, runs but needs body/ interior work. $3,000. 360-504-2590 FORD: ‘67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053 FORD: ‘93 Escort Wagon. Must sell. $1,400/obo. 670-6883 FORD: ‘95 Mustang GT. 5 sp, V8, black, very nice, 114K mi. $5,850. 460-9078. HYUNDAI: ‘09 Accent. Low mi. $9,900. 797-3130, after 5. LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $2,500. 452-9693 eves.

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

LINCOLN: ‘90 Towncar. Nearly $4,000 spent on car in last 2 years. $1,700. Bill at 360-582-3727 LINCOLN: ‘95 Town Car. Runs good, drivable, needs some work. $1,200. 461-1996 LINCOLN: ‘95 Towncar. exc. cond., 81K orig. miles. $5,000. 602-677-7453 MAZDA: ‘94 Miata. Red, 5 speed, 99K, runs good. $3,500. 360-437-0428. NISSAN: ‘05 Altima. Excellent condition. $9,800. 775-340-2652 SATURN: ‘96. 33 MPG, looks great, runs great. $1,500. 477-9755

TOYOTA: ‘03 Sequoia. Immac., runs perf, Carfax, all eqpt + rear A/C, dual pwr sts, moonroof (slide, tilt), run brds, priv glass, grill grd, tow pkg, alloys, wnd deflects, 2 rem keys, sir XM & boost, grt tires. 133K. Can't beat this deal! $11,000/obo. 360-461-1595 VW: ‘00 New Beetle. 1.8 liter turbo, only 25K mi. on factory purchased motor. Sunroof, ABS, loaded. $4,200.385-2318 VW: ‘70 Karmann Ghia. Project. $700. 681-2382 VW: ‘71 Camper. Good cond. $2,500. 360-820-0339 VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,895/obo. 775-9648 WANTED: Veteran and wife, both disabled, seeking donation of car, truck, van, fixer ok or adult trikes. God Bless. 797-3403

101

Legals Clallam Co.

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.11-2-00100-1; 11-9-00100-6 Sheriff’s No.11000246 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam FOUR SEASONS PARK COMMUNITY CLUB, Plaintiff, VS DONNA LEWIS, Defendant(s) TO: DONNA LEWIS THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 111 S ALDER LANE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $4,573.38 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 111 S ALDER LANE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Lot 14 of Four Seasons Park, Division 3, as recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, (page(s) 38, records of Clallam County, Washington Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.10-2-00958-5; 10-9-01008-2 Sheriff’s No.11000242 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam FOUR SEASONS PARK COMMUNITY CLUB Ron Scott, agent Plaintiff, VS JAMES AND JULIE HOUK Defendant TO: JAMES HOUK AND JULIE HOUK THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 654 S ALDER STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY 04/22/2011, IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $3,859.16 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 654 S ALDER STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 LOT 32, Four Seasons Park Division No. 5, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page(s) 56, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.10-9-00768-5, 07-2-00811-2 Sheriff’s No.11000205 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam KAPPERT'S ENTERPRISES, INC., D/B/A KAPPERT’S WATERFRONT CONSTRUCTION, Plaintiff, VS JAMES W CIACIUCH AND KIMBERLY ANN CIACIUCH AS TRUSTEES OF THE JAMES W. AND KIMBERLY ANN CIACIUCH REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED MAY 14, 1997, Defendant TO: JAMES W CIACIUCH AND KIMBERLY A CIACIUCH THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 310 LONGFELLOW ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 04/22/11 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $66,779.72 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 310 LONGFELLOW ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 LOT 2 OF BECKLEY SURVEY, RECORDED APRIL 6, 1992 IN VOLUME 24 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 8, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 666580, BEING A SURVEY OF PARCEL 12, EAGLE RIDGE, AS RECORDED APRIL 9, 1979, IN VOLUME OF SURVEYS, PAGE 142, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 494268 AND RE-RECORDED APRIL 12, 1979 IN VOLUME 3 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 143, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 494423, BEING A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010


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Thursday, March 24, 2011

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Overcast with a chance of rain.

Cloudy with rain possible.

The Peninsula An upper-level trough will move onshore today, resulting in some scattered showers and mountain snow showers. Temperatures will remain near to slightly above normal. This trough will remain over Western Washington tonight and into the day on Friday Neah Bay Port as the threat for showers continues. It will be noticeably 48/39 Townsend cooler on Friday with highs only in the upper 40s for most Port Angeles 52/39 locations. A cold front will approach the Washington 51/37 coastline on Saturday, bringing a chance for a steadier Sequim rainfall. The weather pattern will remain unsettled on 52/38 Sunday. Forks

Victoria 51/41

Olympia 59/35

Everett 54/40

Seattle 55/41

Spokane 50/35

Yakima Kennewick 57/33 60/39

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Mostly cloudy today with a passing shower. Wind east 8-16 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mostly cloudy tonight. Wind south-southwest 4-8 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility clear. Mostly cloudy tomorrow with a passing shower. Wind east-southeast 4-8 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Saturday: Cloudy with rain possible. Wind east 10-20 knots. Waves 2-4 feet. Table Location High Tide LaPush

4:09 a.m. 5:19 p.m. Port Angeles 5:51 a.m. 8:52 p.m. Port Townsend 7:36 a.m. 10:37 p.m. Sequim Bay* 6:57 a.m. 9:58 p.m.

Today

Billings 47/26

San Francisco 56/46

Tomorrow

SaTurday

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

8.7’ 6.9’ 7.1’ 6.6’ 8.5’ 8.0’ 8.0’ 7.5’

10:53 a.m. 10:56 p.m. 12:37 a.m. 1:12 p.m. 1:51 a.m. 2:26 p.m. 1:44 a.m. 2:19 p.m.

-0.5’ 2.4’ 4.3’ -0.6’ 5.6’ -0.8’ 5.3’ -0.8’

4:58 a.m. 6:20 p.m. 6:35 a.m. 10:16 p.m. 8:20 a.m. ----7:41 a.m. 11:22 p.m.

11:49 a.m. 11:54 p.m. 1:44 a.m. 2:11 p.m. 2:58 a.m. 3:25 p.m. 2:51 a.m. 3:18 p.m.

5:55 a.m. 7:27 p.m. 7:28 a.m. 11:31 p.m. 12:01 a.m. 9:13 a.m. 8:34 a.m. -----

12:50 p.m. ----3:17 a.m. 3:15 p.m. 4:31 a.m. 4:29 p.m. 4:24 a.m. 4:22 p.m.

8.2’ 6.4’ 6.6’ 6.6’ 8.0’ --7.5’ 7.5’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

0.2’ 2.9’ 4.8’ -0.2’ 6.2’ -0.3’ 5.8’ -0.3’

7.5’ 6.1’ 6.1’ 6.7’ 8.0’ 7.4’ 7.0’ ---

0.6’ --4.9’ 0.2’ 6.4’ 0.2’ 6.0’ 0.2’

Apr 3

First

Apr 11

Chicago 37/20

Denver 56/29

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Full

Apr 17

City Hi Lo W Athens 63 50 pc Baghdad 74 50 s Beijing 57 35 s Brussels 57 45 pc Cairo 67 54 pc Calgary 31 21 c Edmonton 27 15 pc Hong Kong 71 58 s Jerusalem 50 41 sh Johannesburg 84 57 pc Kabul 66 41 s London 61 45 pc Mexico City 82 48 s Montreal 36 17 sf Moscow 37 16 sn New Delhi 94 65 s Paris 64 45 s Rio de Janeiro 86 75 s Rome 65 46 s Stockholm 43 20 pc Sydney 81 64 s Tokyo 53 40 sh Toronto 28 12 c Vancouver 51 42 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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0s

Atlanta 68/40 Houston 81/62 Miami 84/67

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

World Cities Today

Affordable Dentures And Implants To Look And Eat Your Best

New York 44/28 Washington 56/28

El Paso 78/49

Moon Phases New

Detroit 30/16

Kansas City 50/37

Sunset today ................... 7:32 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:08 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 1:23 a.m. Moonset today ................. 9:50 a.m. Last

Minneapolis 28/14

Los Angeles 62/50

Sun & Moon

Mar 26

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

Seattle 55/41

-10s -0s

Bellingham 54/38 Aberdeen 55/42

National Forecast

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 52 33 0.00 5.74 Forks 61 33 0.03 45.10 Seattle 62 34 trace 12.50 Sequim 55 35 0.00 5.16 Hoquiam 60 38 0.01 26.15 Victoria 54 35 0.00 13.68 P. Townsend* 50 39 0.01 6.56 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Port Ludlow 53/39

52/37

Peninsula Daily News

Hi 66 38 54 68 47 50 48 47 31 55 38 28 78 53 37 44 50 56 78 56 40 30 53 34 49 83 81 41

Lo W 37 s 28 sf 39 c 40 s 22 pc 28 pc 25 c 26 c 14 c 34 c 26 sf 14 sf 48 s 27 pc 20 pc 26 pc 32 sh 36 c 58 s 29 pc 27 pc 16 pc 35 c 3 pc 30 sh 71 pc 62 s 27 pc

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 50 64 64 62 84 30 28 56 78 44 66 44 84 72 45 73 57 71 47 52 44 53 80 62 56 36 44 56

Lo W 37 s 49 s 41 s 50 pc 67 s 17 pc 14 pc 34 pc 56 s 28 pc 50 s 30 pc 60 s 50 s 26 pc 52 s 39 c 35 pc 33 sn 44 r 33 pc 35 sh 63 s 54 pc 46 r 23 c 27 sn 28 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 95 at Laredo, TX

Low: -4 at Stanley, ID

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Things to Do Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden JeffCom 9-1-1 administra- State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. tive board — Port Ludlow Fire Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for Hall, 7650 Oak Bay Road, Port children 6 to 12; free for chilLudlow, 8:30 a.m. Phone Kathy dren 5 and younger. Exhibits Young at 360-385-3831, ext. interpret the Harbor Defenses 588, email kyoung@jcpsn.us of Puget Sound and the Strait or visit www.jeffcom911.org. of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or email artymus@ Port Townsend Aero olypen.com. Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 AirNorthwest Maritime Cenport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 ter tour — Free tour of new for seniors, $6 for children ages headquarters. Meet docent in 7-12. Free for children younger chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 than 6. Features vintage air- p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not craft and aviation art. allowed inside building. Phone Chimacum TOPS 1393 — 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or Evergreen Coho Resort Club email sue@nwmaritime.org. House, 2481 Anderson Lake Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visitors welcome. Phone: 360-7653164.

Continued from C2

East Jefferson County Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to noon. Open to men 50 and older and women 45 and older. Phone 360-437-5053 or 360437-2672 or 360-379-5443. Tax-Aide — Free assistance with tax preparation provided by trained volunteers. Bring any and all necessary documentation. Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum. By appointment, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone 360-732-4822.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Friday

Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden Yoga classes — See entry State Park. Natural history and under Today. marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for Port Townsend Aero youth (6-17); free for science Museum — See entry under center members. Phone 360Today. 385-5582, email info@ptmsc. org or visit www.ptmsc.org. Tax-Aide — See entry under Today. Port Ludlow Artists’ League scholarship auction Puget Sound Coast Artil- — Bridge Deck, just off Oak lery Museum — Fort Worden Bay Road, near the Port LudState Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. low Beach Club. Noon to 7 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for Phone Ginny Ford at 360-437children 6 to 12; free for chil- 2298 or email vpatrickford@ dren 5 and younger. Exhibits aol.com. interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait Conversation Cafe — The of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360- Upstage, 923 Washington St. 385-0373 or email artymus@ noon. Phone 360-385-6959 or olypen.com. visit www.conversationcafe.

Port Angeles (360-4527176) “The Adjustment Bureau” (PG-13) “Battle: Los Angeles” (PG13) “The King’s Speech” (R) “Mars Needs Moms” (PG) “Red Riding Hood” (PG-13)

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Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854.

Adventure travel lecture — Chris Duff, small-boat ocean traveler, presents past sea adventures and plans for his attempt to row from Scotland to Northwest Maritime Cen- Iceland in specially modified ter tour — See entry under rowboat, Northern Reach, Today. which will be on display. Northwest Maritime Center, 431 WSU Jefferson County Water St., 7 p.m. Admission is Master Gardeners plant by donation.

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Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or email quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com.

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PDN03242011j  

PDN03242011j

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