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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS March 17, 2014 | 75¢

Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

Woman is freed by judge in Idaho

Rhody royalty crowned

PT resident was attacked in case PENINSULA DAILY NEWS AND NEWS SOURCES

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The 2014 Rhododendron Festival Queen Addie Richert, left, stands with, from left to right, outgoing queen Emma White Thunder and the 2014 royal court, made up of Princess Lane Hill, Prince Shiloh Lanphear-Ramierz and Princess Kaycee McGuire, at a coronation ceremony Saturday at Chimacum High School.

Public comment is sought on ONP management alternatives Public gatherings set; input can be submitted in writing

first Wilderness Stewardship Plan before it puts together its draft environmental impact statement. The final plan, expected to be put into effect in late 2015, will guide management of most of the 922,650-acre park for the next 15 to 20 years.

BY ARWYN RICE AND LEAH LEACH

Meetings slated

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — The public is invited to mix and match elements of four preliminary alternatives outlined for managing wilderness in Olympic National Park. Park staff are seeking public input on preliminary alternatives for the park’s

Comment can be made in person at meetings in Port Angeles and Forks this week and in Port Townsend next week. Comments also can be made in writing by mail or online by May 17. One alternative for the plan is obligatory. Alternative A is to make no changes in current practices, a most unlikely

choice for the park’s preferred option. The public can focus on any part of the remaining three alternatives, according to Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman. “All are alternatives. We have not selected any as preferred,” she said. “The preferred alternative we end up with may include elements of each of B, C and D.” None of the options have price tags as yet. Detailed descriptions of them are at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/olymwild. To summarize the options: ■ Alternative B would emphasize minimizing the human footprint on wilderness areas by reducing infrastructure constructed in the park. TURN

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BOISE, Idaho — A 31-year-old woman sentenced to life in prison for an attack on a Port Townsend woman she has always said she took no part in has been released from prison after serving nearly 12 years. Sarah Pearce was freed Friday after 3rd District Court Judge Juneal Kerrick granted post-conviction relief and amended Pearce’s 2003 sentence to time served after a compromise deal between Canyon County prosecutors and attorneys with the Idaho Innocence LeBrane Project. “This is a tragic misidentification,” Pearce told Kerrick. “I did not commit this crime, but all the same I was punished for it. “The experience goes almost too deep for words. “I will try to walk away from this taking more from it than it has taken from me.” Pearce was one of four Pearce people convicted in the roadside kidnapping, beating and stabbing of Linda LeBrane, a Port Townsend woman left to die alongside her car after it was set on fire. LeBrane was driving through Idaho on Interstate 84 in June 2000, headed from her home to her family cabin in Utah, when she was forced from the road.

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Mixed results come for Peninsula politicians Session produces victories and defeats BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIA — The 60-day legislative session that ended last Thursday at midnight produced both triumphs and disappointments for the North Olympic Peninsula’s three elected leaders. Legislators walked away from the state Capitol with a bipartisan state supplemental budget, and the 24th District’s senator, one of the chamber’s longest-serving members, was in the thick of budget discussions right up until the end. “[The] number one goal for me was getting it done in 60 days,

after six months last year,” said state Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam, referring to last year’s marathon combination of one regular session and two special sessions that lasted into June. The $155 million supplemental operating budget passed 85-13 in the state House and 48-1 in the Senate last week, a margin in both chambers Hargrove said is almost unheard of. “I think the two highest vote totals ever, I think in anybody’s memory,” said Hargrove, who has served in the state Senate for 21 years, preceded by eight years in the House.

Hargrove said he’s satisfied with the $58 million the supplemental budget sets aside for the state’s obligations under the McCleary decision, a 2012 state Supreme Court ruling named for a Chimacum resident that mandates the state fully fund basic education by 2018.

Education down payment Hargrove added, however, he ideally would have liked to see more money raised toward the estimated $1½ billion to $2 billion per biennium the state will have to raise for education, a sentiment echoed by his colleagues in the state House. “Some of us would have liked to make a little larger down pay-

ment on that obligation,” said Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim. Tharinger and Hargrove, along with Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim serve the 24th Legislative District, which comprises Clallam and Jefferson counties and a portion of Grays Harbor County. Van De Wege said Friday he would have liked to see some longstanding state tax exemptions, such as a 90-year-old break for oil companies related to transferring the resource, deleted to help raise more money for education. The supplemental operating budget did not close any existing tax preferences, Hargrove explained, nor did it create any new ones.

Clockwise from top, Sen. Jim Hargrove, Rep. Steve Tharinger and Rep. Kevin Van De TURN TO BILLS/A6 Wege

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Tundra

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By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2014, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Death of ‘12 Years’ author still a mystery HISTORIANS KNOW WHERE Solomon Northup was born, where he lived and where he worked. They know whom he married and how many children he had. They know he played the fiddle and spent 12 years enslaved in the South before being freed. What historians don’t know about the author of 12 Years a Slave is when and how he died and where he is buried. It’s a lingering mystery in the final chapter of the life of the 19th-century free-born African-American whose compelling account of enforced slavery in preCivil War Louisiana was made into the Oscar-winning film of the same title. “That’s sort of a big blank spot in the story, for sure,” said Rachel Seligman, co-author of Solomon Northup: The Complete Story of the Author of Twelve Years a Slave, published last year. This month, “12 Years A Slave” took home the Academy Awards for best picture, best adapted screenplay and best supporting actress. The accolades have sparked new interest in Northup’s story, which was little known until recent years even in the upstate New York communities where he spent most of his life. Northup was born July 10, 1807, in what is now the Essex County town of Minerva, N.Y., in the Adirondack Mountains. His father, a former slave, moved the family to neighboring Washington County, eventually settling in the village of Fort Edward, on the Hudson River 40 miles north of Albany. Northup married Anne Hampton in the late 1820s, and the couple lived in an 18th-century house in Fort Edward that is now a museum. Northup found work as

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Solomon Northup historical marker is seen in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Northup was the author of “Twelve Years a Slave.” a musician, and in 1841, two white men lured him to Washington, D.C., with the promise of more work. Instead, they kidnapped him and took him to New Orleans, where he was sold into slavery. Northup endured the next 12 years enslaved on a Louisiana cotton plantation before friends in Saratoga finally won his freedom. In 1853, he published a memoir of his ordeal that led to a speaking tour supported by abolitionists. He got involved in the Underground Railroad, helping escaped slaves find freedom in the Northeast and Canada. But around 1863, the height of the Civil War, he dropped out of sight and was never heard from again. Theories abound about what may have happened to him. One scenario has him being captured and killed while serving as a spy for the Union Army. The man who helped rescue him said he believed Northup had taken to drink and was kidnapped yet again. Or Northup could have died in a place where no one knew him or cared to properly bury an AfricanAmerican at a time when a war over slavery was tearing the nation apart. “He may have just wandered around from place to place and died somewhere nobody knew who he was,

and he was buried in a potter’s field,” said David Fiske, co-author of the 2013 Northup book along with Union College professor Clifford Brown.

Winfrey sells Harpo Oprah Winfrey is selling Harpo Studios in Chicago to a developer, but the studio will remain on the property for another two years. Winfrey filmed “The Oprah Winfrey Show” at the studio from 1990 to 2011, when Winfrey she ended the talk show to start the Oprah Winfrey Network on cable. “We have entered into a purchasing agreement with Sterling Bay for the fourbuilding Harpo Studios campus in Chicago’s West Loop,” Harpo told Crain’s Chicago Business in a statement. “We expect the transaction to be closed in 30 days. The property will be leased back to Harpo for two years and the studio will continue to produce programming for OWN.” About 200 people work at the 3.5-acre campus, which will sell for about $32 million, Crain’s reported Sunday. Harpo said it expects to close the transaction in 30 days.

Passings By The Associated Press

MITCH LEIGH, 86, the Tony Award-winning composer of “Man of La Mancha,” died Sunday, according to The New York Times. Born Jan. 30, 1928, in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Leigh first penned incidental music for Mr. Leigh the Broadin 2013 way productions of “Too True to Be Good” in 1963 and “Never Live Over a Pretzel Factory” in 1964. Following a premiere at the Goodspeed Opera House, Mr. Leigh’s musical “Man of La Mancha”

opened on Broadway in 1965 and went on to win five Tony Awards, including best musical. “Man of La Mancha,” which features lyrics by Joe Darion and a book by Dale Wasserman, ran for 2,328 performances on Broadway and spawned productions across the world. The production’s rousing anthem “The Impossible

Dream” became an enduring classic. Mr. Leigh’s other Broadway scores included “Cry for Us All,” “Sarava,” “Chu Chem” and “Ain’t Broadway Grand.” In addition to his scores, Mr. Leigh also staged Yul Brynner’s farewell appearance in “The King and I” in 1985.

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Seen Around

A FLORIDA MAN tattooed a spider on his face Peninsula snapshots in an attempt to overcome WANTED! “Seen Around” his arachnophobia, which items recalling things seen on the is a fear of spiders. North Olympic Peninsula. Send The tattoo should also them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax help him overcome his fear of employment. 360-417-3521; or email news@ peninsuladailynews.com. Seth Meyers

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: Do you think the missing Malayasia Airlines jetliner will ever be found or the mystery solved? Yes

77.4%

No Undecided

15.0% 7.5% Total votes cast: 1,379

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1939 (75 years ago) Two media through which the new Olympic National Park is receiving widespread publicity was being displayed locally by the Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce. The park is mentioned prominently in a striking two-page advertisement in the Saturday Evening Post. The magazine ad is sponsored by the Washington State Progress Commission, Oregon State Highway Commission and the British Columbia Travel Bureau. In addition, the new Washington state roadmap issued by the Texas Oil Co., or Texaco, is the first roadmap issued publicly that shows the outline of the new park. The map shows how the Olympic Highway, Primary State Highway 9, loops around the national park, outlined in green.

1964 (50 years ago) The National Bank of Commerce of Seattle outbid two North Olympic Peninsula firms for the purchase of $65,000 Clal-

lam County general-obligation bonds during a county commissioners meeting. The bonds were sold to cover the county’s share of funds to construct a new bridge to replace the old lower Dungeness River bridge. Commissioners then authorized county engineers to call for construction bids.

1989 (25 years ago) Another player jumped into the political fray over timber supplies and the northern spotted owl when a new pro-industry group drew more than 80 people to the Vern Burton Center in Port Angeles for a formation meeting. It was a public send-off for the North Olympic Timber Action Committee, a Port Angeles group that plans to fight political and environmental moves to reduce logging on forestlands on the Olympic Peninsula. The group is the result of discussions by officials of the Port of Port Angeles and the local timber industry.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, March 17, the 76th day of 2014. There are 289 days left in the year. This is St. Patrick’s Day. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On March 17, 1776, British forces evacuated Boston during the Revolutionary War. On this date: ■ In 1762, New York’s first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place. ■ In 1861, Victor Emmanuel II was proclaimed the first king of a united Italy. ■ In 1912, the Camp Fire Girls organization was incorporated in Washington, D.C., two

years to the day after it was founded in Thetford, Vt. The group is now known as Camp Fire USA. ■ In 1943, the Taoiseach of Ireland, Eamon de Valera, delivered a radio speech about “The Ireland That We Dreamed Of.” ■ In 1950, scientists at the University of California at Berkeley announced they had created a new radioactive element, “californium.” ■ In 1959, the Dalai Lama fled Tibet for India in the wake of a failed uprising by Tibetans against Chinese rule. ■ In 1966, a U.S. midget submarine located a missing hydrogen

bomb which had fallen from an American bomber into the Mediterranean off Spain. ■ In 1973, U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm, a freed prisoner of the Vietnam War, was joyously greeted by his family at Travis Air Force Base in California in a scene captured in a Pulitzer Prize-winning AP photograph. ■ In 1988, Avianca Flight 410, a Boeing 727, crashed after takeoff into a mountain in Colombia, killing all 143 people on board. ■ Ten years ago: A car bomb tore apart the five-story Mount Lebanon Hotel catering to foreign-

ers in the heart of Baghdad, killing seven people. Charles A. McCoy Jr., suspected in a series of highway shootings in central Ohio, was arrested in Las Vegas. ■ Five years ago: The Seattle Post-Intelligencer published its final print edition. ■ One year ago: Two members of celebrated high school football team in Steubenville, Ohio, were found guilty of raping a drunken 16-year-old girl and sentenced to at least a year in juvenile prison in a case that rocked the Rust Belt city of 18,000.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, March 17, 2014 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation times to turn over files quickly that might be especially newsworthy. Most agenWASHINGTON — Honda is cies also took recalling almost 900,000 Odyslonger to sey minivans because of a answer Obama potential fire hazard, the records National Highway Traffic Safety requests, the analysis found. Administration said in a report The government’s own figposted on its website Saturday. ures from 99 federal agencies Honda told the agency that covering six years show that part of the fuel pump in Odyshalf way through its second sey models from 2005 to 2010 term, the administration has could “deteriorate prematurely made few meaningful improvein a manner that can result in ments in the way it releases cracks” and allow gasoline to records despite its promises leak. from Day 1 to become the most The automaker said it was transparent administration in not aware of any fires or injuries history. resulting from the problem. The agency also said on its Newtown demands website that Chrysler was HARTFORD, Conn. — Some recalling about 18,000 cars of the charities paying for menbecause of a transmission probtal health care for children and lem. Chrysler said that the trans- families affected by the Sandy mission on the 2014 500L could Hook massacre are running become stuck in the park setting short of money, and officials don’t know how much they’ll or that it might pick the wrong gear, causing the car to move “in need — and for how long — to repair the psychological scars an unintended or unexpected from the mass shooting. direction.” Newtown officials are applyChrysler said it was not ing for a federal grant and charaware of any accidents related ities are pooling their resources to the issue. in an attempt to ensure that free longterm mental health Records denials care remains available following WASHINGTON — The the December 2012 shooting Obama administration more that left 20 first-graders and six often than ever censored govern- educators dead. ment files or outright denied Three of the charities that access to them last year under have been providing funds for the U.S. Freedom of Information services have started working Act, according to a new analysis together, while the charity that of federal data by The Associhas raised the most money — the ated Press. Newtown-Sandy Hook CommuThe administration cited nity Foundation — said that it more legal exceptions it said jus- will likely join the alliance soon. tified withholding materials and The Associated Press and refused a record number of The New York Times

Honda, Chrysler issue recalls amid problems

Briefly: World into tiny cells. The Egyptian government has not released official numbers for those ABUJA, Nigeria — At least 16 arrested in people were killed in desperate stampedes for government jobs in the sweeps since the mili- Morsi Nigeria when hundreds of thoutary ousted sands were invited to apply for Islamist President Mohammed fewer than 5,000 positions, offiMorsi in July. cials and activists said Sunday. Interior Minister Abba Moro held the applicants responsible, Rebel town seized saying they “lost their lives DAMASCUS, Syria — Syrian through their impatience.” troops backed by Hezbollah Activists blamed his ministry fighters seized a key rebel supand called for him to be fired. ply town on the Lebanese borEmergency officials said the der Sunday, driving them from death toll could rise. the area and scoring a major Nigerians are desperate for blow against them in the 3-yearwork, with official statistics put- old-conflict. ting the unemployed at 24 perThe fall of Yabroud emboldcent of the 170 million people, or ened government forces to nearly 41 million unemployed. attack nearby rebel-held towns, pressing forward in what has Egypt crackdown been nearly a yearlong advance against rebels fighting to overCAIRO — Egypt’s crackdown throw President Bashar Assad. on Islamists has jailed 16,000 Support from the Iranianpeople over the past eight months in the country’s biggest round-up backed, Shiite Hezbollah appears to have tipped the balin nearly two decades, according ance in the border area, even as to previously unreleased figures it has partly prompted the confrom security officials. flict to bleed into Lebanon Rights activists said reports of abuses in prisons are mount- where it has ignited polarizing sectarian tensions between Suning, with prisoners describing systematic beatings and misera- nis and Shiites. ble conditions for dozens packed The Associated Press

16 killed in stampedes for jobs in Nigeria

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

People celebrate in Simferopol, Ukraine, on Sunday after residents in Crimea voted to secede from Ukraine and join Russia.

Crimean voters favor split by wide margin Overwhelming majority seek joining Russia BY MIKE ECKEL AND JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine — Fireworks exploded and Russian flags fluttered above jubilant crowds Sunday after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabilizing and were expected to slap sanctions against Russia for it. Ukraine’s new government in Kiev called the referendum a “circus” directed at gunpoint by Moscow — referring to the thousands of Russian troops now in the stra-

and Europe over the vote, which could also encourage rising proRussian sentiment in Ukraine’s east and lead to further divisions in this nation of 46 million. Residents in western Ukraine and the capital, Kiev, are pro-West and Ukrainian nationalist. The Crimean parliament will meet today to ask Moscow to be Two choices annexed, and Crimean lawmakers will fly to Moscow later in the day The Crimea referendum offered for talks, Crimea’s pro-Russia voters the choice of seeking annex- prime minister said on Twitter. ation by Russia or remaining in Ukraine with greater autonomy. Already on track? After 50 percent of the ballots were counted, Mikhail Malishev, In Moscow, the speaker of the head of the referendum commit- lower house of the Russian parliatee, said more than 95 percent of ment, Sergei Naryshkin, sugvoters had approved splitting off gested that joining Russia was a and joining Russia. done deal. Opponents of secession “We understand that for 23 appeared to have stayed away years after Ukraine’s formation Sunday, denouncing the vote as a as a sovereign state, Crimeans cynical power play and land grab have been waiting for this day,” by Russia. Naryshkin was quoted as saying Russia was expected to face by the state ITAR-Tass news strong sanctions today by the U.S. agency.

tegic Black Sea peninsula after seizing it two weeks ago. But after the polls closed late Sunday, crowds of ethnic Russians in the regional Crimean capital of Simferopol erupted with jubilant chants in the main square, overjoyed at the prospect of once again becoming part of Russia.

Final words from plane came after systems were silenced BY CHRIS BRUMMITT AND JIM GOMEZ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — The final words from the missing Malaysian jetliner’s cockpit gave no indication anything was wrong, even though one of the plane’s communications systems had already been disabled, officials said Sunday, adding to suspicions that one or both of the pilots were involved in the disappearance. Authorities also examined a flight simulator confiscated from the home of one of the pilots and dug through the background of all 239 people on board, as well as the ground crew that serviced the plane. The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 took off from Kuala Lumpur

Quick Read

on March 8, headed to Beijing. On Saturday, the Malaysian government announced findings that strongly suggested the plane was deliberately diverted and may have flown as far north as Central Asia or south into the vast reaches of the Indian Ocean.

Turned off after 40 minutes Investigators have said someone on board the plane first disabled one of its communications systems — the Aircraft and Communications Addressing and Reporting System, or ACARS — about 40 minutes after takeoff. The ACARS equipment sends information about the jet’s engines and other data to the airline. Around 14 minutes later, the transponder that identifies the

plane to commercial radar systems was also shut down.

Deliberate move? The fact that both systems went dark separately offered strong evidence that the plane’s disappearance was deliberate. On Sunday, Malaysian Defense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said at a news conference that the final, reassuring words from the cockpit — “All right, good night” — were spoken to air traffic controllers after the ACARS system was shut off. Whoever spoke did not mention any trouble on board. Air force Maj. Gen. Affendi Buang told reporters he did not know whether it was the pilot or co-pilot who spoke to air traffic controllers.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Helicopter plucks dog from California cliff

West: Los Angeles police to see loaner Lamborghini

Nation: Winter has more in store for parts of U.S.

Nation: Fetching ‘Peabody & Sherman’ tops box office

A RESCUE WORKER dangling from a helicopter plucked a stranded dog from a Northern California seaside cliff. The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department reported Sunday that a black Labrador named Oreo couldn’t get back up after it made its way halfway down a 90-foot cliff at Portugese Beach, about 70 miles north of San Francisco. After the scared dog refused entreaties to climb back up, the decision was made to dangle a sheriff’s deputy about 100-feet below a helicopter. The dangling deputy was able to attach a rope to the dog’s harness and pull it to safety.

THE LOS ANGELES Police Department is getting a Lamborghini. But don’t expect to see the exotic Italian sports car — decked out with police decals and painted black and white — pursuing fugitive drivers down the city’s freeways. Officer Sally Madera said that the car is privately owned and will be loaned to police for “charity events and recruitment.” Nathalie and Travis Marg of a Los Angeles-based telecommunications company called Light Source 1 Inc. donated the use of their car to support the department’s air support team.

SPRING IS JUST days away, but winter is not leaving quietly. Much of the East Coast enjoyed spring-like temperatures Saturday. That’s expected to change today with the arrival of another late-winter storm. The National Weather Service said snow is expected from the Central Appalachians to the Jersey Shore. Parts of Virginia and West Virginia could receive up to 10 inches of snow. Rain and thunderstorms are expected in the Southeast, some of which could be strong. Winter-weary people are hoping this is winter’s final encore.

CHASING DOWN THE top spot at the box office after debuting at No. 2 last week, “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” took the lead in its second weekend. The DreamWorks animated film about the time-traveling adventures of a genius dog and the human son he adopted earned $21.2 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. The 3-D kiddie-jaunt features voices from “Modern Family” stars Ty Burrell and Ariel Winter. Warner Bros.’ warrior drama “300: Rise of an Empire,” the 3-D sequel to the original, 2007’s “300,” dropped to second place with $19.1 million after debuting at No. 1 last weekend.


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MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PT planners to mull pot businesses BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — City government is addressing the marijuana legalization process on two fronts: the regulation of cultivation and production facilities and the location of the town’s only retail pot store. The Port Townsend Planning Commission heard Thursday an update on the potential siting of growing and processing businesses within the city limits as well as an update as to where the city’s sole retailer may be located. The commission has scheduled a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. March 27 in council chambers at City Hall, 540 Water St., to collect input about land use and regulations.

BILL BEEZLEY/EAST JEFFERSON FIRE-RESCUE

A recent single-car wreck in Port Townsend sent three people to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

PT crash victims improve to Harborview on Thursday after the Buick LeSabre they were in left the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS condition to satisfactory, a road and hit a tree on Harborview representaUmatilla Avenue. PORT TOWNSEND — tive said Sunday. Davis and his daughThe conditions of three ter had to be extracted people injured in a wreck Two children from the vehicle by East Thursday have been Jefferson Fire-Rescue, Paul Davis, 40; his upgraded at Harborview while Teagarden was able daughter, Ella Davis, 11; Medical Center. to exit the car on her All three patients were and her friend, Lily Teaown. improved from serious garden, 12, were airlifted Initially, all three were

Three in satisfactory condition

reported to be in critical condition Friday morning, and their conditions were upgraded to serious Saturday. State Patrol troopers were expected to inspect the vehicle for possible mechanical failure, with results of the investigation due in about two weeks.

8 under consideration

OPNET reports arrests, sentences PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A 43-year-old Port Angeles man has been arrested for investigation of selling heroin on four days in 2012, Olympic Narcotics Enforcement Team supervisor Jason Viada said. Kevin L. Caynor was booked into the Clallam County jail Friday on investigation of four counts of possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance. He was arrested in an OPNET search of a residence on the 2900 block of Vinup Street just east of Port Angeles, Viada said. His brother, Ennis N. Caynor, 37, also of Port Angeles, faces drug charges for allegedly selling methamphetamine twice in December 2012, Viada said.

Ennis Caynor is awaiting court proceedings related to separate cases involving heroin, methamphetamine and a stolen motor vehicle, Viada said. Kevin and Ennis Caynor are each being held in the Clallam County jail without bail. Meanwhile, 50-year-old Thomas A. Reina of Sequim was arrested Dec. 31 for investigation of possession of heroin with intent to deliver. He was awaiting a 2011 case in which OPNET alleged that he sold Oxycodone in March and April of 2011, Viada said.

Meth sentencing In another OPNET case, Patricia J. Sullivan, 52, of Belfair was sentenced to 20 months in prison Feb. 13 for possession and delivery of methamphet-

amine in Port Ludlow and Port Hadlock last May and June, Viada said. Terri L. Turner, 55, of Port Townsend received a 90-day jail sentence Feb. 7 for conspiracy to deliver methamphetamine and two counts of methamphetamine possession, Viada said. She was arrested in Port Townsend last September during an OPNET investigation. Susan M. Smith, 47, of Port Townsend was sentenced to one day in jail and one year probation after pleading guilty to methamphetamine possession, Viada said. Mark J. Pierce, 44, of Port Hadlock was sentenced to two years probation Jan. 24 after pleading guilty in Jefferson County Superior Court to two counts of selling methamphetamine, Viada said.

Briefly . . . Boat-bottom regulations talk slated PORT TOWNSEND — The Point Wilson Sail and Power Squadron will present “Facts, Benefits and Challenges of New BottomPaint Regulations” at the Port Townsend Yacht Club, across from West Marine on Washington Street, at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

The program is free and open to all. Matt Elder of Sea Marine will explain the benefits and challenges for recreational boaters as new bottom-paint regulations are implemented. Elder will share the results of three years of testing alternative paints in local harbors and provide background on why Washington, at this time, is the only state with such bottom-paint regulations. For more information,

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Discussion topics, which concern domestic and foreign policy issues, are taken from the Foreign PolDiscussion group icy Association’s Great SEQUIM — The Decisions 2014 Briefing Sequim Great Discussion Book and from Foreign Group will meet at the Affairs, the bimonthly pubSequim Library, 630 N. lication of the Council on Sequim Ave., for “The End Foreign Relations. of Hypocrisy — American For more information, Foreign Policy in the Age of phone John Pollock at 360Leaks.” 683-9622, email jcpollock@ The free meeting is from olypen.com or visit http:// 10 a.m. to noon Friday. tinyurl.com/SequimGreat New members are welDecisionsDiscussion. come. Peninsula Daily News

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“Things are changing so quickly, so I won’t speculate about what action they might take,” he said. “A lot of it has to do with the definition of a park, as some city owned land that is referred to as a park may not fall under those standards.” Applicants for retail licenses were initially to be vetted by the Liquor Control Board before entering a lottery, but that changed, according to Forrest Thomson, owner of Herbal Access. “They were so overwhelmed that they decided to hold the lottery first and check people out later,” Thomson said. With the presumed disqualification of the six properties and McBride’s decision to not pursue the matter, Thomson could win the lottery by default. A moratorium on the establishment of any marijuana related business outside of the business district is in effect until August. That could be rescinded by the council once guidelines are established. Jefferson County officials are using present zoning laws to consider pot businesses. The governments of Clallam County, Port Angeles and Forks have yet to make any rules regarding marijuana, while the Sequim City Council has a moratorium on recreational marijuana shops.

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While eight retail licenses are currently under consideration, the most likely location is Herbal Access at 2427 W. Sims Way, which is now operating as a medical marijuana dispensary. Of the rest, six are apparently ineligible while the seventh, Green House at 1230 W. Sims Way near QFC, will not open because of refinancing issues. “We were ready to go and were within the boundaries, but I was told by my bank they would not refinance the property if it contained a marijuana business,” said Ken McBride, who owns the property. “It’s ironic how this was made legal, approved by the voters, and they pull the rug out from under us.” The state Liquor Control Board is implementing the statewide initiative voters approved in November 2012 that legalized and regulated the growing, processing and distribution of marijuana to adults 21 and older. The state has allotted areas with certain numbers of retail stores. Growers and possessors are not limited in the same way. Jefferson County will get four retail cannabis stores: one in Port Townsend and three anywhere else. Neighboring Clallam County is allowed a maximum of six retail stores: two in Port Angeles, one in Sequim and three anywhere else. The Liquor Control Board said it has 34 pending license applications that are listed with a Port Townsend mailing address, although not all are within the city limits. This includes 12 for production, 13 for processing and nine potential retailers. One of the proposed retailers, Sea Change Cannabis at 282332 U.S. Highway 101, is located in Discovery Bay. Of the remainder, two locations seem to fulfill siting requirements while the

rest most likely will be disqualified because of their proximity to parks and schools. State law requires a 1,000 foot buffer between those areas and any marijuana business. Two locations now operating as medical facilities apparently do not qualify because of their proximity to parks: the Townsend Herbal Collective at 1139 Water St., and the Alternative Clinic at 1433 W. Sims Way. Two locations originally thought to be allowed — 803 N. Park St. and 2328 E. Sims Way, the former home of Akamai Art Supply — were disqualified because of their proximity to Jefferson County Mental Health at 884 W. Park St., since it qualifies as a school, according to John McDonough, a senior planner for the city. This newly discovered restriction rules out the location of any marijuana enterprise in the business park, McDonough said. While confirming these assessments of the property, McDonough said he would not speculate which properties would be approved or rejected by the liquor control board.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

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Students to talk climate on D.C. train trip BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — With 10 days to go, the Students for Sustainability are getting ready to hop on a cross-country train to travel to Washington, D.C., and work to raise consciousness about global warming along the way. “This is a huge issue,” said Harry Doyle, 17, one of the 14 Port Townsend High School seniors making the trip. Students plan to leave on March 27 and return on April 7. “The idea that we will be responsible for change is a little unrealistic, but it’s all about the small voices coming together making a large push. “So if we see a change in the future, we can say that we were a part of it.” The trip is projected to cost about $25,000. Students have raised $19,000.

Fundraiser today Their last fundraiser is set at 7 p.m. today. A benefit showing of “A Place at the Table,” a movie about food insecurity, will be in the Port Townsend High School auditorium, 1500 Van Ness St. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. They also are raising money on Indiegogo at http://tinyurl.com/ PDN-sustainabilitytrain in a campaign that started Jan. 31 and ends Thursday. As the train travels through 12 states, one student will be in charge of each state, contacting schools, newspapers and legislators and gathering signatures for petitions expressing concern about sustainability and

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Students for Sustainability, from left, Eamonn Clarke, Harry Doyle and Micah Evalt talk about their train trip to Washington, D.C., in KPTZ’s studio in Port Townsend. global warming. The train will make 55 stops, where the students will step off the train to make their case with the locals. Some of these stops will be in the wee hours. Students hope to generate interest in midnight environmental rendezvous. Once they reach D.C., students plan to present petitions signed by their own constituents, said Laura Tucker, one of three chaperones.

A meeting has been scheduled with Pennsylvania Democrat Sen. Robert Casey, as well as with some of the Washington state delegation: Sen. Patty Murray, D-Whidbey Island; Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Mountake Terrace, and Rep. Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, whose 6th Congressional District includes the North Olympic Peninsula. The students hope to talk with President Barack Obama. That isn’t out of the question, but is pretty unlikely, Tucker said.

He added that he sees a correlation between conservative Christian groups and global warming deniers. “But Christians are morally strong so we can appeal to that,” the student said. “We’ll ask them how they feel about the future and whether they want their descendants to experience drought and severe weather disasters. “I can’t believe that some people don’t see this as an issue because it’s all about our future, quite literally.” The Students for Sustainability began gathering last year but chose not to become an official school club “because they didn’t want to be told what to do and how to do it,” Tucker said. This year, the group has become official, seeking to use the school’s fundraising infrastructure to make contributions taxdeductible, support the upcoming trip and perhaps make the student lobbying trip to Washington, D.C., an annual event, she added. The guiding principle for the club, which now has 40 members, is to take action to mitigate climate changes at school, in the community, in the state and on a national level. The club also encourages recycling and efficiency. “The response from the community has been overwhelming, both financially and personally,” Tucker said. “This support has really inspired us.”

The students will go to the White House, she said. They have a meeting set with the Presidential Council on Environmental Quality. The students want to schedule meetings with some of those who have voted against their concerns. Doyle said the students have studied the positions of everyone ________ they will meet and will bring up their positive votes cast even if Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bertheir voting record is not mant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com. environmentally favorable.

Congress heads out on spring recess PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

Eye on Congress

WASHINGTON — The House and Senate are in recess beginning today. When they return, both chambers will debate sanctions against Russia and financial aid to Ukraine, while the Senate will take up a bill to provide jobless aid to the longterm unem- Murray Cantwell ployed. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays Contact legislators and from noon to 1 p.m.) (clip and save) and leave a detailed mes“Eye on Congress” is sage, which will be emailed published in the Peninsula to Van De Wege, Tharinger Daily News every Monday or Hargrove, or to all three. when Congress is in session Links to other state offiabout activities, roll call cials: secstate.wa.gov/ votes and legislation in the elections/elected_officials. House and Senate. aspx. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Learn more Cantwell (D-Mountlake Websites following our Terrace), Sen. Patty Mur- state and national legislaray (D-Whidbey Island) and tors: Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Gig ■ Followthemoney. Harbor). org — Campaign donors by Contact information industry, ZIP code and more — The address for Cantwell ■ Vote-Smart.org — and Murray is U.S. Senate, How special interest groups Washington, D.C. 20510; rate legislators on the issues. Kilmer, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. ■ SEPARATION-OFPhone Cantwell at 202- POWERS DISPUTE: Vot224-3441 (fax, 202-228- ing 233 for and 181 against, 0514); Murray, 202-224- the House on Wednesday 2621 (fax, 202-224-0238); passed a Republican bill Kilmer, 202-225-5916. (HR 4138) empowering one Email via their websites: chamber of Congress to file cantwell.senate.gov; murray. civil actions compelling the senate.gov; kilmer.house.gov. executive branch to “faithKilmer’s North Olympic fully execute” the law. Peninsula is located at 332 E. The bill would codify a Fifth St. in Port Angeles. Republican narrative that Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on several of President Barack Tuesday, and 1 p.m. to Obama’s executive orders 4 p.m. on Wednesday and and administrative actions Thursday. It is staffed by — in areas such as health Judith Morris, who may care, immigration and be contacted at judith. same-sex marriage — have morris@mail.house.gov or gone well beyond what Con360-797-3623. gress authorized.

State legislators

Democrats counter that all presidents use discretion to implement complex laws and Kilmer say the Constitution has safeguards against presidential overreach. This bill would require congressional suits to be heard by a three-judge panel in federal court, with expedited appeals to the Supreme Court. A yes vote was to send ■ BAN ON MEDIthe bill to the Senate, where CARE VOUCHERS: The it is expected to die. House on Friday defeated, Kilmer voted no. 191 for and 226 against, a ■ EXTENDED JOB- motion by Democrats to keep LESS BENEFITS: Voting Medicare from being con187 for and 228 against, the verted to a voucher program House on Wednesday under HR 4015 (above). Although the bill has no defeated a Democratic bid to expand HR 4138 (above) voucher language, the curso that it also restores job- rent House-passed Republiless checks for about 1.5 can budget would reach balmillion of the longterm ance by fiscal 2023 through unemployed whose eligibil- steps such as voucherizing ity for extended benefits Medicare. A yes vote was in opposiexpired Dec. 28. A yes vote was to revive tion to changing Medicare benefits that Republicans to a voucher program. Kilmer voted yes. said must be paid for elsewhere in the budget. ■ SEXUAL MISCONKilmer voted yes. DUCT IN THE MILI■ DELAY OF INDI- TARY: Voting 97 for and VIDUAL MANDATE: Vot- none against, the Senate on ing 238 for and 181 against, March 10 passed a bill (S the House on Friday passed 1917) to keep prosecutorial a Republican bill (HR 4015) decisions in military sexualto delay the Affordable Care assault cases in the chain of Act individual mandate for command while giving the five years and use $138 bil- armed services more tools lion of the resulting savings for preventing or responding to pay doctors for their to the estimated 26,000 acts treatment of Medicare of sexual misconduct each patients. year against U.S. troops.

The bill would grade commanders on their record of preventing or dealing with assaults in their ranks; require victims to be advised of the relative merits of pressing military vs. civilian charges; limit the “good soldier” defense and require the secretary of defense and attorney general to jointly address the scourge of sexual attacks on those in uniform. In addition, the bill would extend to the service academies several provisions already in law to protect active-duty troops, including the appointment of special counsels to help assault victims navigate the military legal system and the outlawing of retaliation against those who report sexual misconduct. A yes vote was to send the bill to the House, where its prospects are uncertain. Cantwell and Murray voted yes. ■ CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT: Voting 96 for and two against, the Senate on Thursday passed a bipartisan bill (S 1086) to renew the Child Care and Development Block Grant law at an average annual cost of $2.62 billion between fiscal 2015-2019. Enacted in 1990 during the administration of President George H.W. Bush, the law authorizes programs for a projected 1.6 million children from low-income families in after-school hours while their parents are at work.

Parents use state-provided vouchers to pay for care at a facility of their choice. The bill requires states to conduct regular health and safety inspections of facilities and background checks on staff members, among other safeguards. A yes vote was to send the bill to the House, where its prospects are uncertain. Cantwell and Murray voted yes. ■ FLOOD-INSURANCE PREMIUMS: Voting 72 for and 22 against, the Senate on Thursday passed a bill (HR 3370) to cap National Flood Insurance Program premium increases at 18 percent per year per property. This would roll back free-market reforms enacted in 2012 to trim the program’s debt, which stands at $24 billion due largely to covering damages from hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and Sandy in 2012. The bill also would repeal a trigger in the 2012 law that subjects newly sold properties to premiums based on risk rather than subsidies. Serving a market shunned by private insurers, the NFIP covers 5.6 million residential and commercial properties in flood plains in 22,000 U.S. communities. A yes vote was to send the bill to President Obama. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

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Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to

The bill would repeal Medicare’s so-called Sustainable Growth Rate formula while giving Congress time to replace it with a more effective Medicare reimbursement policy. The bill’s delay of the individual mandate would cause 13 million Americans to lose their health insurance and raise premiums by 10-to-20 percent for those receiving coverage in ACA exchanges, according to the Congressional Budget Office. A yes vote was to reform Medicare-reimbursement policies while gutting the 2010 health law. Kilmer voted no.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Plan: Alternatives for

wilderness protection CONTINUED FROM A1 road corridors, areas around visitor centers and drive-in ■ Alternative C would campgrounds. Wilderness begins 200 emphasize protecting natural resources through eco- feet from the centerline of system restoration, includ- each paved road and 100 ing the removal of non- feet from the centerline of each gravel road, Maynes native species. ■ Alternative D would said. Here are more details manage use and recreation to provide visitors with a about the alternatives: greater range of wilderness Alternative B experiences. This option, to decrease Park zoning the imprint of human The alternatives outline beings, would reduce develhow each zone in the park opments, protect natural resources and restore disis managed. The park’s General Man- turbed areas, allowing the agement Plan — approved natural process to prevail in 2008 as the foundation and offering a primitive wilfor other, more specific derness experience to visiplans — has six zones defin- tors. Very few new facilities ing areas of the park according to their use, from camp- would be built. No new grounds to wilderness areas shelters would be built under this alternative or that have no trails at all. Draft alternative zone any other. Camp sites and camping maps are available at http://parkplanning.nps. areas would not increase and the number might gov/olymwild. decrease, as might total trail mileage. Public meetings Fishing regulations To make comment in would be reviewed annuperson, attend a public ally. Hazard fuel reduction meeting. Each two-hour for fire prevention would meeting will begin at 5 p.m. not occur. The North Olympic PenCollaring or capturing insula meetings are set in: animals for scientific ■ Port Angeles on research would not be Tuesday at the Port Ange- allowed. les Public Library, 2210 S. Historic structures Peabody St. would be reviewed to deter■ Forks on Wednes- mine which would be mainday at the state Depart- tained, and which would be ment of Natural Resources allowed to deteriorate natuoffice, 411 Tillicum Lane. rally. ■ Port Townsend on Horses, burros, mules March 24 at the Cotton and llamas would be Building, 607 Water St. restricted to designated The Wilderness Stew- stock camps, with some disardship Plan will replace persed stock use in the the outdated Backcountry Bogachiel drainage area. Management Plan completed in 1980, the park’s Alternative C summary said. This option focuses on It will be developed in natural accordance with the Wilder- protecting resources. Healthy ecosysness Act of 1964. Public comment is to be tems would be restored, taken on the draft environ- non-native species removed, mental impact statement at extirpated species reintrothe end of this year or the duced and historic strucstart of next year. The final tures and cultural landdocument is to be released scapes would be protected. Park operations would in the spring or summer of move to using non-mecha2015. A record of decision is nized equipment where expected in fall 2015, with possible. The number of the plan implemented soon administrative buildings would be cut. after. Trails would be mainThe wilderness plan will guide management for most tained to protect natural of the park, about 1,300 resources and reduce hiker square miles of the and stock impact. Officials would seek to 1,442-square-mile park. When it comes to the remove non-native fish. Hazard fuel reduction park, it’s easier to define what isn’t wilderness than for fire prevention would be kept to a minimal level, as what is. Non-wilderness includes needed to protect historic

structures. Historic structures would be reviewed to determine degree of practical maintenance; structures threatened by natural processes would not be protected. The number of campsites and camp areas would remain about the same as now but might shift to different areas. Horses, burros, mules and llamas would be limited to designated stock camps and the number of trail miles might be reduced.

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Alternative D Alternative D would offer a greater range of wilderness experiences to visitors. Facilities, including trails and camping areas, in heavy-impact areas would be reduced and redistributed to other areas of the park. Sport fishing would be promoted to catch nonnative fish. Hazard fuel reduction for fire prevention would occur around historic and administrative structures. Historic structures would be maintained and protected as practical and reconstructed if necessary. The number of campsites and camp areas would remain about the same but might shift to different areas. Horses, burros, mules, llamas and pack goats would be limited to designated stock camps. The number of trail miles might increase slightly. All alternatives include a goat management plan. Natural fires within park boundaries would be allowed to burn without suppression unless the fire threatened properties adjacent to the park. Comments can be made online at http://park planning.nps.gov/ olymwild. They can be mailed to Sarah Creachbaum, Superintendent; ATTN: WSP Preliminary Draft Alternatives; Olympic National Park, 600 E. Park Ave.; Port Angeles, WA 98362.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com. Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can be reached at 360-4173531 or at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com.

LANDSLIDE

BLOCKS WAY THROUGH IN

PA

A slide of soil and trees blocks the Olympic Discovery Trail along the Port Angeles waterfront between North Francis Street and City Pier. The slide covered the path in several feet of mud, rocks and trees. Officials at the scene said they didn’t know how long it would take to clean up the trail.

Bills: OMC payments CONTINUED FROM A1 cal center’s CEO, said in a prepared statement Van De Wege said not released Friday. funding education enough in The bill will apply only the supplemental budget to OMC and Grays Harbor will make next session’s Community Hospital in 2015-2017 biennium budget Aberdeen, if the Aberdeen talks all the more challeng- hospital converts to a publicly-run facility. ing. “Those were some disapOther sole community pointments, and I think it hospitals in the state sets us up for next session include facilities in Centrabeing extremely difficult,” lia and Moses Lake. The 24th district’s three Van De Wege said. One unanimous high legislators agreed securing point for the 24th district’s more support for OMC was legislators, however, was a team effort. “It took, I think, all of final passage in both chambers of legislation that will us,” Van De Wege said. “It was nice for all three increase Medicaid reimbursements for outpatient of us to coalesce around one services to Olympic Medical big project.” Center, or OMC, from 55 No supplemental budget percent to 70 percent. The bill, which desigIn the negative column, nates OMC as a sole com- all three of the North Olymmunity hospital, now awaits pic Peninsula’s legislators Gov. Jay Inslee’s signature. expressed dismay that a “We worked with the supplemental capital budgovernor’s office, and they’re get did not pass this sessupportive of doing it, and I sion. don’t think there will be “It’s very, very disapany problems,” Tharinger pointing,” Van De Wege said. said. Hospitals officials have Hargrove said his Demosaid this will mean a $1 cratic colleagues in the Senmillion annual reimburse- ate tried to put the supplement increase for the Port- mental capital budget up Angeles-based facility. for a vote after it passed the “We couldn’t be more House, but the Senate’s pleased with the tremen- mostly Republican majority dous efforts of our local ultimately rejected the elected officials who pushed move for a full Senate vote. the sole community hospi“The Republicans in the tal bill through the legisla- Senate, for the first time in ture,” Eric Lewis, the medi- 20 years, didn’t support a

capital budget,” Tharinger said.

Landfill bluff money In particular, the lack of a supplemental capital budget means $5 million earmarked for the city of Port Angeles for help with its $19.6 million effort to shore up a bluff keeping garbage built up in the city’s shuttered landfill from falling into the Strait of Juan de Fuca will not come this year. One half of the $5 million would have helped bring down the overall cost of the project to the city, City Manager Dan McKeen explained, while the other half would have allowed the city to shift more garbage than originally planned. “We are extremely disappointed that the legislature could not pass a supplemental [capital] budget,” McKeen said. Not affected, however, is $3.9 million in funding assistance the state Department of Ecology has pledged to the city. “We’ve been very pleased with the effort provided by the Department of Ecology to assist the city,” McKeen said.

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

Freed: Was mistaken ID, Innocence Project says CONTINUED FROM A1 again for mercy, and she showed me no mercy.” Efforts by the Peninsula Her assailants took her and her car to a secluded Daily News to reach Leroad west of Caldwell, where Brane on Sunday were they hit her with a metal unsuccessful. In a Jan. 29, 2012, PDN baseball bat, repeatedly stabbed her, slashed her article, LeBrane said she throat and left her for dead went through months of next to her car, which they medical recovery, two years set on fire, authorities said. of intense physical therapy When her attackers left, and five years of psychiatric LeBrane rolled away from treatment, and suffered the burning car and was from post-traumatic stress rescued by passers-by who disorder, or PTSD. “We lost our house saw the flames. “Sarah was the ring- because I couldn’t work,” leader,” LeBrane said in LeBrane said at the time. court. “She kept screaming “It’s still really hard for me to the men . . . ‘kill her, kill to go out.” But LeBrane did go on to her.’ I begged her again and

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mark many accomplishments, earning a master’s degree in creative writing from Goddard College in July 2011. She also played violin in the Port Townsend Community Orchestra and was a founding member of the Rhododendron Festival’s Lawn Chair Drill Team.

Writing helps She has written poetry and said in 2012 she was writing an account of her assault “so I can finally get it out of my brain.” Two of the four assailants remain in custody in the Idaho prison system. Kenneth Wurdemann was released in early 2012, while Jeremy Flores San-

chez and John David Wurdemann, Kenneth Wurdemann’s brother, are serving life sentences, according to the Idaho Department of Corrections. The Idaho Innocence Project has worked on Pearce’s behalf since 2007 on the belief her conviction was a case of mistaken identity. The group said LeBrane reported that the woman who joined her three male attackers was petite, pretty and spoke Spanish to one of the men, who could have been her boyfriend. Pearce is 5 feet 6 inches tall, doesn’t date men, was 17 at the time and doesn’t speak Spanish. The Idaho Innocence Project also said that 30

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minutes after a witness claimed to have spotted Pearce at a motel with the three men, a group matching the attackers’ descriptions — three Hispanic men and a Hispanic woman in a maroon car — used the victim’s stolen credit card 60 miles away in Jordan Valley, Ore. “We think it was a case of mistaken identity pure and simple, with tragic consequences,” said Greg Hampikian, director of the Idaho Innocence Project. Bryan Taylor, Canyon County prosecutor, in a statement said Friday’s post-conviction relief deal confirms Pearce’s guilt, “which has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt and to the satisfaction of a jury of her peers. “More importantly, it reaffirms that the only

truly innocent person in this sad story of senseless violence is Linda LeBrane.” Kerrick, who sentenced Pearce in 2003, said the case has been difficult. She noted LeBrane’s certainty in identifying Pearce but also numerous questions about the accuracy of that identification. She also noted that Pearce has been in prison longer than the 10 years prosecutors offered her during her initial trial in exchange for a guilty plea, which Pearce declined. “If in fact you did not commit these crimes,” Kerrick told Pearce, “then one day [in prison] was too many. So there has been tremendous loss on both sides.” Material from the Associated Press was used in this report.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, March 17, 2014 PAGE

A7

The three faces of Barack Obama BARACK OBAMA IS surely the first president to be Thomas L. accused of actFriedman ing in foreign policy like Pollyanna, John Wayne and Henry Kissinger in the same month. Ever since Russian President Vladimir Putin’s land grab in Crimea, conservatives have denounced President Obama as a man who doesn’t appreciate what a merciless, Hobbesian world this really is. He’s a Pollyanna — always looking for people’s good side. Meanwhile, liberals have been hammering Obama for what they say is his trigger-happy drone habit, having ordered the targeted killing by air of hundreds of individuals; he’s John Wayne, seeking vigilante justice against those who have harmed, or might be planning to harm, the United States. And, just to round things out, Obama has been accused by critics on the left and right of being a Kissingerian hyperrealist who is content to watch the Syrian regime crush its people, because, as tragic as that is, American interests there are minimal. It can’t be easy being Pollyanna, John Wayne and Henry Kissinger all at once. So who is Obama — really — on foreign policy? I’d say less Pollyanna than his critics claim, more John Wayne and Henry Kissinger than he’d admit, but still undefined when it

comes to the greatest leadership challenges in foreign policy — which go beyond Crimea but lurk just over the horizon. If Obama has been a reluctant warrior in Crimea, it’s because it’s long been part of Russia and home to a Russian naval base, with many of its people sympathetic to Russia. Obama was right to deploy the limited sanctions we have in response to Putin’s seizure of Crimea and try to coolly use diplomacy to prevent a wider war over Ukraine — because other forces are at play on Putin. Do not underestimate how much of a fool Putin made of himself in Crimea this weekend — in front of the whole world — and how much this will blow back on Russia, whose currency and stock markets are getting hammered as a result of Vladimir’s Crimean adventure. Putin has organized, basically overnight, a secession referendum on Crimea’s future — without allowing any time for the opposition to campaign. It was held under Russian military occupation, in violation of Ukraine’s Constitution, with effectively two choices on the ballot: “Vote 1 if you want to become part of Russia,” or “Vote 2 if you really want to become part of Russia.” This is not the action of a strong, secure leader. And if Obama has been a Kissingerian realist in his reluctance to dive into the Syrian civil war, or Ukraine, it’s because he has learned from Iraq and Afghanistan that the existence of bad guys in these countries doesn’t mean that their opponents are all good guys.

Too many leaders in all these countries turned out to be more interested in using their freedom to loot rather than liberate. Where authentic reformers emerge in Syria or Ukraine we should help them, but, unlike Sen. John McCain, most Americans are no longer willing to be suckers for anyone who just sings our song (see dictionary for Hamid Karzai), and they are now wary of owning the bailouts and gas bills of countries we don’t understand. As for John Wayne Obama, “the quickest drone in the West,” every American president needs a little of that in today’s world, where you now have legions of superempowered angry people who wish America ill and who have access to rockets and live in ungoverned spaces. So I have no problem with Obama as John Wayne or Henry Kissinger. If you want to criticize or praise him on foreign policy, the real tests fall into two categories: ■ How good is he at leading from behind on Ukraine? ■ How good is he at leading from in front on Russia, Iran and China? There is probably no saving Crimea from Putin in the short term, but we do not want to see him move beyond Crimea and absorb the parts of eastern Ukraine where the Russophones reside. We should be ready to offer arms to the Ukraine government to prevent that. But let us never lose sight of the fact that the key to keeping more of Ukraine out of Russia’s paws will depend on the ability of Ukrainians to come

Peninsula Voices Warming ‘doubts’ In spite of rhetoric to the contrary, the “scientific community” has not “already settled the climate-change question” (Peninsula Voices, March 12, “Climate change”). Many qualified scientists have sincere doubts that global warming is actually occurring at this time, that the human contribution to greenhouse gases is anything other than insignificant, or that if global warming were occurring, it would be generally a bad thing.

As of March 12, 2014, there were 31,487 Americans with bachelor’s degrees or higher who signed the following statement, including 9,029 with doctorates, according to www.petitionproject.org: “There is no convincing scientific evidence that human release of greenhouse gasses is causing or will, in the foreseeable future, cause catastrophic heating of the Earth’s atmosphere and disruption of the Earth’s climate. “Moreover, there is substantial scientific evidence

that increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide produce many beneficial effects upon the natural plant and animal environments of the Earth.” An article in the Jan. 27, 2012 Wall Street Journal signed by 16 eminent scientists casts considerable doubt on the currently popular “consensus” as follows: “Speaking for many scientists and engineers who have looked carefully and independently at the science of climate, we have a message to any candidate

together in a way that is inclusive of both the majority that sees its future with the European Union and the minority of Russophones who still feel some affinity for Russia. If the Ukraine drama pits a united Ukraine — seeking a noncorrupt democracy tied to Europe — against a Putin trying to forcibly reintegrate Ukraine into a Russian empire, Putin loses. But if Ukrainians are divided, if hyper-nationalist parties there dominate and pro-Russians are alienated, Putin will discredit the Ukraine liberation movement and use the divisions to justify his own interventions. Then our help will be useless. We can’t help them if they won’t help themselves. Ukrainians have already wasted a quarter-century not getting their act together the way Poland did. The big three issues where Obama must lead from the front are: changing the character of Russia’s government, preventing Iran from getting a nuke and preventing a war in the South China Sea between Beijing and Tokyo. (I will save China and Iran for later.) But regarding Russia, I vehemently opposed NATO expansion because I held the view then, and hold it today, that there is no big geopolitical problem that we can solve without Russia’s cooperation. That requires a Russia that does not define its greatness by opposing us and recreating the Soviet empire, but by unleashing the greatness of its people. It is increasingly clear that that will never be Putin’s Russia, which stands for wholesale corruption, increasing repression and

OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES for public office: There is no compelling scientific argument for drastic action to ‘decarbonize’ the world’s economy. “Even if one accepts the inflated climate forecasts of the [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change], aggressive greenhouse-gas control policies are not justified economically.” I would hate to think the public is influenced by the bias of the popular media, whose “ideological rhetoric has overpowered science, facts and common sense,” to use the March 12

a zero-sum relationship with the West. Putin is looking for dignity for Russia now in all the wrong places — and ways. But only Russia’s people can replace Putinism. The way the United States and European Union help, which will take time, is by forging new energy policies that will diminish Europe’s dependency on Russian gas — the mother’s milk of Putinism. But we Americans also have to work harder to make our country a compelling example of capitalism and democracy, not just the world’s cleanest dirty shirt when it comes to our economy and not just the best democracy money can buy when it comes to our politics. The most important thing we could do to improve the prospects of democracy in the world “is to fix our democracy at home,” said Larry Diamond, a democracy specialist at Stanford University. “The narrative of American decline and democratic dysfunction damages the luster of democracy in the world and the decisions of people to feel it is a model worth emulating. “That is in our power to change. If we don’t reform and repair democracy in the United States, it is going to be in trouble globally.” Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears in the Peninsula Daily News on Mondays. Contact Friedman via https://www.facebook.com/ thomaslfriedman.

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letter writer’s own words. That said, I am curious Diane E. Hanes, if she differentiated Port Angeles between those who have access to fluoridated, publicly owned, water systems, Unconvinced and those who drink nonIn response to the Feb. fluoridated well water, or 27 letter in Peninsula water from private water Voices [“Fluoride critic”], I systems. would find the writer’s If she could break down argument against fluorida- her statistics about dental tion more compelling if she cases in the emergency fleshed out her statistics a room a bit more, it could bit more. strengthen her argument. What I’m saying is that Based on what I read in if you give 10 different, let’s her letter, I’m not consay, statisticians, the same vinced that fluoridation is set of data, you’re liable to a bad thing. Dennis R. Bertaud, get 10 differing interpretations of that data. Sequim

The myth of the ‘childless city’ DISAPPROVING OF WHITE, urban liberals can be a career for right-leaning sociologists. A decade or Froma two ago, their story was that Harrop the American future lay in fast-growing exurban counties, with their cheap land and virtuous Republican voters. Now that many American cities have become the hot, hot, hot place for jobs and ambitions, the story has to be rewritten. “Are cities without children sustainable?” ask Joel Kotkin and Ali Modarres in the culturally conservative City Journal. The answer is easy: Of course they are. Children don’t sustain cities. Adults sustain cities — and suburbs and farms. The article is titled “The

Childless City: It’s hip, it’s entertaining — but where are the families?” It includes a photo of an orgiastic party at a New York nightclub, attended by the casts of “The Real World” and “Jersey Shore.” Right, as if nobody’s getting up at 6 a.m. to put in a long day at the office. One doesn’t have to read too deeply into articles such as this to find the agenda. They portray urban liberals — obsessing on the white ones — as immature, anti-child and self-celebrating. This offers the balm of moral superiority for conservatives vexed to see so many Americans finding economic success amid a progressive worldview. The city has become an entertainment machine, say the authors, “a system built for the newly liberated individual.” I, for one, have no problem with newly liberated individuals, as long as they pay their taxes. Their mode of recreation is

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their own business. More to the point, these newly liberated individuals are hardly an invention of the city’s new “self-celebrating” creative class. Holly Golightly was a creature of the 1940s. There were no children and there was much partying in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” A point of concern for meddling cultural conservatives with degrees in social engineering is falling fertility rates. This trend has visited nearly every corner of the earth, but Kotkin and Modarres find it especially troubling in our largest, densest urban areas. They no longer provide the things “families need,” such as more housing space. Of course, large houses with spacious backyards are hard to find, much less afford, in the big city. Why would you expect them in urban America any more than you’d expect palm trees in Minneapolis? One might also question the

“need” for more square footage, a hangover from the McMansion era, as well as the land obsession. Send these guys a subscription to Dwell magazine. It’s time to mention the law of supply and demand. A lot of people want to live in Manhattan and Brooklyn, which is why real estate is expensive there. The amount of land can’t grow. Housing is indeed much cheaper in the big and also culturally rich Texas cities — Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Austin — largely because they are surrounded by big open country. (They, too, have growing hipster neighborhoods dominated by unmarried and/or childless funlovers.) The biggest flaw in “The Childless City” is that it’s not true. The number of white married couples with children younger than 6 in New York City has risen 11 percent over the past decade.

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MICHAEL FOSTER, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mfoster@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525; lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim news office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend news office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

The biggest increases came in the gentrifying neighborhoods of Brooklyn and Manhattan. Kotkin and Modarres should be sentenced to standing stationary in the middle of a Broadway sidewalk on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, as the baby carriages plow their way to the farmers market. Hic sunt liberals, as the Romans would have put it. Here be liberals. Self-celebrating? Perhaps. But also reproducing. That could be bad news for conservatives, who often associate place of birth with future political leanings. But no news need be really bad when you can make your own.

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears Mondays. Contact her at fharrop@gmail. com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, March 17, 2014 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

B NCAA Hoops

Gonzaga is still a danger in tourney SELECTION SUNDAY A year ago: As expected, Gonzaga, the nation’s top-ranked men’s college basketball team, received the West Region’s No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament. It marked an unprecedented Dave height for the Zags and, from a Boling more practical perspective, represented what was expected to be the easiest path to the Final Four. The seeding was a reward for the approach that fueled the historic rise in the first place: battling through a tough nonconference schedule before taking care of business in the West Coast Conference. A year ago at this point, it added up to a 31-2 record. But when they lost their second game of the NCAA tournament to ninth-seeded Wichita State, the Zags were the first top-seeded team to be ousted, and critics snapped that they were unworthy of the lofty rating and seeding. The loss to Wichita State became less of a smudge when the Shockers topped second-seeded Ohio State in the regional finals and pushed eventual champion Louisville to the edge before losing in the national semifinals.

Not Shockers this year That run was a springboard to Wichita State’s undefeated season, and now it’s the Shockers who are likely to receive a No. 1 seed Sunday . . . and the target that comes along with it. Sunday, when the Zags learn their opponent in the field of 68, the discussions will not be about reaching new heights but extending an impressive streak to a new length. By winning the West Coast Conference tournament championship this season, in addition to the regular-season title, the Zags (28-6) have earned their 16th consecutive NCAA tournament bid. Eighth-seeded Gonzaga will face nine-seed Oklahoma State in San Diego on Friday. Only Kansas (25th), Duke (19th) and Michigan State (17th) added to longer streaks. Granted, earning a bid out of the WCC is not the challenge Kansas, Duke and Michigan State face each year. But more than 300 schools are eligible for this tournament, and only three teams have been lacing up their sneakers this time of year for a longer uninterrupted string than Gonzaga. Kansas, Duke and Michigan State. That’s it. Those three, with a combined 37 Final Four appearances. As Gonzaga coach Mark Few said after winning the WCC tournament title game, “It never gets old.” The formula was changed a bit this season, though, with a lowerkey nonconference season, and with a late struggle in the conference that caused the Zags to finish unranked. TURN

TO

BOLING/B5

DAVE LOGAN (2)/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend goalkeeper Forrest Piatt grabs the ball after a header by Port Angeles’ Jesse Salgado (19). Also in on the play for Port Townsend are Mark Street (15), Patrick Charlton (11) and Ian Hadden (2).

Riders edge Redskins PA wins season opener on a late penalty kick PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles opened the boys soccer season with a win over Port Townsend when freshman Jackson May converted a penalty kick in the 77th minute to give the Roughriders a 2-1 victory. “It was a hard fought game by both teams, but the Riders came away with an important three league points to start the season off,” Port Angeles coach Chris Saari said after Saturday’s game. The Redskins scored first to take a 1-0 lead into halftime. “Mark Streett served a wonderful free kick from the mid-

Prep Soccer field line to the feet of senior forward Max Meier, who settled with one touch, beat a PA defender, and found the back of the net in the 33rd minute,” Port Townsend coach Steve Shively said. Saari said Port Angeles had scoring chances in the first half with a few breakaway opportunities, but were unable to capitalize. The Redskins maintained their lead for much of the second Port Angeles’ Jackson May (15) tries to direct the ball half.

around Port Townsend defender Colin Coker (21). May,

TURN

TO

SOCCER/B3 a freshman, scored the game-winning goal.

Sequim knocks off White River Wolves led by Bentz, Besand BY MICHAEL CARMAN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim first baseman Alexas Besand, left, looks back at the infield after a first-inning force out of White River’s Kayla Smith.

SEQUIM — Sequim’s softball team had a solid start to its season, dropping White River 4-3. The Wolves were led by a complete-game, four-hit performance from pitcher Makayla Bentz and a 3 for 3 outing at the plate from first baseman Alexas Besand that included a triple and three RBIs. “It was a real solid start for us, Makayla was tough on the mound and Alexas had a great day at the plate,” Sequim coach Mike McFarlen said after Saturday’s win. Some solid glove work by infielders Olivia Kirsch at third

Softball base, Mary Lu Clift at shortstop and Shelby Lott at second base also contributed to the Sequim victory. “We’re pretty good defensively, too,” McFarlen said. The Wolves hopped on the scoreboard first, putting a run across with two outs in the bottom of the third inning. Lott picked up an infield single and Besand then tripled her home with a rocket shot down the first-base line into right field. Sequim struck again in the bottom of the fifth with Besand rapping a single up the middle to score Bentz. Clift then reached base on an infield single and Melissa Lewis came aboard after an error by White River’s Maddie Bailey. TURN

TO

WOLVES/B3

Virginia joins Gators, ’Cats, Shockers as top seeds THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The surprises start right at the top of the NCAA tournament bracket: Virginia is a No. 1 seed. They keep going throughout the matchups. Last year’s national champion, Louisville, was seeded fourth in the Midwest despite playing well enough to be considered a No. 1 by many. And speaking of that Midwest region — Wichita State and Michigan are there, as well, making it three of last year’s Final Four participants all vying for one spot this year. SMU, the team led on a renais-

sance by coaching lifer Larry Brown — nowhere to be found. And Michigan State, the team that geared things up in time to win the Big Ten tournament, is only a No. 4 seed. The tournament begins Tuesday with a pair of First Four games, and things get going in earnest Thursday when 32 of the 64 teams in the main draw take to the floor. As expected, Florida earned the top overall seed and is No. 1 in the South. Undefeated Wichita State is on top in the brutal Midwest, and Arizona took top billing in the West despite losing to

College Basketball UCLA in the Pac-12 final. In the end, the individual matchups mean much more than the seeding details. Still, some of the numbers the selection committee came up with this year were head-scratchers — yet another reason Warren Buffett felt perfectly comfortable fronting the insurance money to pay a $1 billion prize to anyone who can fill out a perfect bracket. Wake Forest athletic director

Ron Wellman, the chairman of the selection committee, said Virginia’s twin ACC championships — regular season and tournament — made the Cavaliers (28-6) the choice for a No. 1 seed over Michigan and Villanova, despite an RPI rating of 11. “Virginia’s total resume was very impressive,” Wellman said. “They continued to impress us throughout the year.” Michigan is a ‘2” in the Midwest and could need to get through Duke, among others, simply to reach the regional final. The top half of the bracket includes Wichita State, Kentucky

and Louisville. The last bubble teams in were Iowa, which plays Tennessee in the First Four on Wednesday; and North Carolina State, which plays Xavier on Tuesday. Sitting out was SMU — a team almost all the experts had securely in the bracket. Not the folks in the conference room, who couldn’t overcome the Mustangs’ strength of schedule: 129. “When I saw Louisville [was a No. 4 seed], I kind of figured that they didn’t have a lot of respect for our conference,” Brown said. “But we only can blame ourselves, that’s the way I look at it.”


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Monday, March 17 Baseball: Port Townsend at Chimacum (moved from Port Townsend), 4 p.m.; Port Angeles at Bainbridge, 4 p.m. Softball: Chimacum at Sequim, 4 p.m.; Quilcene at Klahowya, 4 p.m.; Coupeville at Port Townsend, 4:15 p.m.; Port Angeles at Gig Harbor, 4:45 p.m. Girls Tennis: Port Townsend at Coupeville, 4 p.m.

Tuesday Baseball: Foster at Sequim, 4 p.m.; Quilcene at North Kitsap JV, 4:15 p.m. Boys Golf: Bellevue Christian at Chimacum, Port Ludlow Golf Club, 3:30 p.m. Boys Soccer: Charles Wright at Chimacum, 4 p.m.; Forks at Hoquiam, 5 p.m.; Port Angeles at Sequim, 6:45 p.m.; Klahowya at Port Townsend, 6:45 p.m. Girls Tennis: Olympic at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.; Kingston at Port Townsend, 4 p.m.; North Mason at Sequim, 4 p.m. Softball: Forks at Port Angeles JV (doubleheader), 3 p.m.

Wednesday, Baseball: Klahowya at Port Angeles, at Civic Field, 4:15 p.m.; Port Townsend at Sequim (moved from Port Townsend), 4:15 p.m. Softball: Wishkah Valley at Quilcene, 3:45 p.m.; Klahowya at Port Angeles, at Dry Creek Elementary School, 4:15 p.m.; Port Townsend at Sequim (moved from Port Townsend), 4:15 p.m.

Area Sports Running Port Angeles Parks and Recreation St. Patrick’s Day Fun Run Saturday 5k In order of finish: Name Age Gabriel Long M/18U Kamron Meadows M/18U Steve Kellmyer M/51+ Kynzie DeLeon F/18U Roy Osterhaus M/51+ Emilia Long F/18U Leah Peiffer F/19-35 Colby Taylor M/18U Austin Seelye M/18U Jason Meadows M/36-50 Hayden Eaton M/18U K.C. Eaton M/36-50 Kelly Tietz F/19-35 Roger Dean M/51+ Kelly Simonson F/36-50 Katie Peabody F/19-35 Cami Cromer F/19-35 Easton Dempsey M/18U Hunter Dempsey M/18U Kay Hobbs F/51+ Joel Lewis F/19-35 Sheila Fordrung F51+ Marcus Spooner M/19-35 Tiare Bailey F/51+ Alan Cummings M/51+ Debbie Preston F/51+ Noah Peiffer M/18U Garrett Little M/18U Colby Ellefson M/18U Emily Ellefson F/36-50 Julian Money M/18U Paige Garcia F/18U Madyson Heistand F/18U Christina Heistand F/19-35 Bill Pearl M/51+ Sarah Pearl F/36-50 Deb McGoff F/51+ Ginny Sturgeon F/51+ Frederick Layton M/19-35 Katherine Layton F/19-35 Kandice Chatterton F/19-35 Kori Malone F/19-35 Lila Haynes F/36-50 Chlow Loehr F/18U Rose Tosh F/19-35 Heidi Bryan F/36-50 Lori Pritchard F/51+ Alisha Freeman F/19-35 Faith Davis F/18U Harrison Fulton M/18U Halli Simpson F/19-35 Scarlet Fulton F/18U Craig Fulton M/51+ Dee Young F/51+ Nikki Sturm F/19-35 Joey Currie M/19-35 Crista Currie F/19-35 Betsy Zumkeller F/51+ Daysha Campbell F/19-35 Malina Whitehead F/19-35 Anne James F/19-35 Char Care F/51+ Beanie Gerbach F/51+ Angela Loushin F19-35 Briauna Simpson F/18U Chris Clark M/18U Annabel Ellefson F/18U Cherie Hildebrand F/51+ Ivy Powless F/18U Josh Powless M/19-35 10k Order of Finish: Name Age Josh Sutcliffe M/36-50 Gracie Long F/18U Lara Malpass F/36-50 Lisa Preston F/36-50 Pete Noftz M/51+ Dan Boon M/51+ Nick Bailey M/51+ Diane Froule-Webb F/51+ Erica Varner F/19-35 Amy Petrotta F/51+ Phillip DeVault M/36-50 Alex Noftz F/51+ Iris Sutcliffe F/36-50 William Holt M/51+ Reagan Garcia F/18U Maggie Garcia F/36-50 Christa Peterson F/36-50 Dorothy Barber F/51+

Preps JV Softball Port Angeles 18, White River 6 PA: Hope Wegener: winning pitcher, 2/2, two singles, scored two runs; Ashley Howell: 2-2, two singles, scored three runs.

Brooklyn New York Boston Philadelphia

Olympic League

Calendar

Saturday’s Scores Boys Soccer Port Angeles 2, Port Townsend 1 Kingston 2, Sequim 1 North Kitsap 3, North Mason 1 Softball White River 11, Port Angeles 5 Sequim 4, White River 1

Baseball Mariners 5, Angels 3 Sunday’s Game Los Angeles ab r hbi ab r hbi A.Almonte cf 3 0 1 0 Calhoun rf-1b 2 1 1 0 En.Chavez cf 2 0 1 1 Jimenez ph-1b 1 0 0 0 K.Seager 3b 4 1 1 0 Trout cf 3000 R.Morla 3b 1 0 0 0 Torrealba c 1 0 1 0 Hart dh 4 0 0 0 Pujols 1b 2000 D.Pizzano dh 1 0 0 0 Tracy lf 2000 Smoak 1b 2 1 1 0 Freese 3b 2011 Morrison 1b 1 0 0 0 M.Long pr-cf 0 1 0 0 Saunders rf 3 0 2 1 H.Kendrick 2b 3 0 0 0 Gillespie rf 1 0 0 0 Green 2b 1000 Ackley lf 3 0 1 1 Aybar ss 3120 J.Lara pr-lf 1 1 0 0 McDonald ss 1 0 0 0 Zunino c 1 1 0 0 Iannetta dh 1 0 0 1 Quintero c 1 0 0 0 C.Pena ph-dh 2 0 0 0 B.Miller ss 3 0 0 0 Conger c 2000 T.Smith ss 1 1 1 1 I.Stewart 3b 2 0 1 0 Bloomqst 2b 2 0 0 1 An.Romine pr 0 0 0 0 K.Marte 2b 1 0 0 0 Cowgill lf-rf 2 0 0 0 Boesch rf 2000 Totals 35 5 8 5 Totals 32 3 6 2 Seattle

Seattle 200 002 010—5 Los Angeles 000 011 001—3 E—K.Marte (2), Calhoun (1). DP—Los Angeles 1. LOB—Seattle 7, Los Angeles 6. 2B—A. Almonte (2), En.Chavez (1). 3B—Aybar (1). HR—T.Smith (1). SB—Calhoun (1), M.Long (2), An.Romine (4). SF—Bloomquist, Iannetta. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle R.Elias W,3-0 5 2 1 1 2 2 Miner 2 2 1 1 0 2 Luetge 1 1 0 0 0 1 Medina S,1-1 1 1 1 0 1 1 Los Angeles C.Wilson L,0-2 5 6 4 2 3 7 Cor.Rasmus 2 1 0 0 0 2 Salas 1 1 1 1 0 0 Kohn 1 0 0 0 0 2 WP—Cor.Rasmus. Umpires—Home, Tom Woodring; First, Kerwin Danley; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Gerry Davis. T—2:50. A—9,628 (9,558).

Giants (ss) 13, Mariners 6 Saturday’s Game San Francisco Seattle ab r hbi ab r hbi Arias 3b 4 1 1 0 A.Almonte cf 3 2 2 1 J.Panik 2b 2 0 1 2 En.Chavez cf 2 1 0 0 T.Abreu 2b 4 2 1 0 K.Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 R.Moreno ss 1 0 1 0 L.Bonilla 3b 1 0 1 1 Belt 1b 3 1 1 0 Smoak 1b 4120 Dminguez 1b 2 0 1 1 Zimmerman 1b 1 0 0 0 H.Sanchez c 4 0 2 2 Hart dh 3110 C.Jones pr 0 1 0 0 P.Brady pr-dh 1 0 0 0 Quiroz ph-c 2 0 0 0 Morrison rf 3 1 1 1 Hicks ss-3b 4 2 2 2 J.Blash rf 2010 Colvin dh 4 1 0 0 Zunino c 2000 B.Miller dh 1 0 0 0 M.Dowd c 1000 J.Perez lf 5 1 3 2 Franklin ss 3 0 1 0 Kieschnick rf 4 1 1 1 T.Smith ss 1000 Ford cf 2 1 1 0 M.Saunders lf 3 0 1 2 M.Blair cf 1 2 1 1 Gillespie lf 2010 Bloomquist 2b 3 0 0 0 T.Kelly 2b 1000 Totals 43131611 Totals 40 611 5 San Francisco (ss) 210 031 501—13 Seattle 004 100 010— 6 E—A.Reifer (1), Kieschnick (1), Bloomquist (2), J.Blash (1), Paxton (1), Zunino (2). LOB— San Francisco 9, Seattle 11. 2B—J.Panik (1), Belt (3), Hicks (6), J.Perez (6), M.Blair (1). 3B—L.Bonilla (1). HR—J.Perez (1), A.Almonte (2). SB—Hicks (1), J.Perez (2), Ford (1). CS—J. Perez (1). SF—Hicks. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Edw.Escobar 2 2/ 3 5 4 4 3 2 1/ 0 0 0 0 D.Maday 3 1 Loe W,2-0 1 1 1 0 0 1 A.Reifer 1 0 0 0 0 0 Dunning 1 0 0 0 0 0 J.Gutierrez 1 1 0 0 0 2 T.Vessella 1 2 1 1 0 0 Kontos 1 1 0 0 1 1 Seattle Paxton 4 6 3 2 1 4 1/ 3 3 0 0 Rodney L,0-1 3 2 2/ 0 0 0 1 R.Ramirez 3 1 Furbush 1 0 1 1 1 0 1/ 5 4 0 1 Wilhelmsen 3 5 J.Arias 12/3 0 0 0 1 1 Farquhar 1 2 1 1 1 0 HBP—by Rodney (T.Abreu). WP—Paxton 2, Furbush, J.Arias. Balk—Farquhar. Umpires—Home, Adam Hamari; First, Dan Bellino; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T—3:43. A—11,777 (11,333).

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 48 17 .738 Portland 43 23 .652 Minnesota 32 32 .500 Denver 29 37 .439 Utah 22 44 .333 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 47 20 .701 Golden State 41 26 .612 Phoenix 38 28 .576 Sacramento 23 43 .348 L.A. Lakers 22 44 .333 Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 49 16 .754 Houston 44 22 .667 Dallas 39 27 .591 Memphis 39 27 .591 New Orleans 27 39 .409 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 37 28 .569

GB — 5½ 15½ 19½ 26½ GB — 6 8½ 23½ 24½ GB — 5½ 10½ 10½ 22½ GB —

33 31 .516 27 40 .403 22 45 .328 15 51 .227 Southeast Division W L Pct x-Miami 45 19 .703 Washington 35 31 .530 Charlotte 33 34 .493 Atlanta 29 35 .453 Orlando 19 48 .284 Central Division W L Pct x-Indiana 49 17 .742 Chicago 37 29 .561 Cleveland 26 40 .394 Detroit 25 41 .379 Milwaukee 13 54 .194 x-clinched playoff spot

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

3½ 11 16 22½ GB — 11 13½ 16 27½ GB — 12 23 24 36½

Saturday’s Games New York 115, Milwaukee 94 Washington 101, Brooklyn 94 Memphis 103, Philadelphia 77 Indiana 112, Detroit 104, OT Atlanta 97, Denver 92 Chicago 94, Sacramento 87 Sunday’s Games Charlotte 101, Milwaukee 92 Phoenix 121, Toronto 113 Miami 113, Houston 104 New Orleans 121, Boston 120, OT Sacramento at Minnesota, late. Dallas at Oklahoma City, late. Utah at San Antonio, late. Golden State at Portland, late. Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, late. Today’s Games Philadelphia at Indiana, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Chicago, 5 p.m. Utah at Houston, 5 p.m. Boston at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Miami at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Portland, 7 p.m. Washington at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Orlando at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey National Hockey League WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 68 45 16 7 97 218 172 San Jose 68 44 17 7 95 213 165 Los Angeles 68 38 24 6 82 165 144 Phoenix 68 32 25 11 75 188 193 Vancouver 69 30 29 10 70 163 187 Calgary 68 27 34 7 61 165 202 Edmonton 68 23 36 9 55 169 223 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 67 46 14 7 99 223 151 Colorado 67 43 19 5 91 206 180 Chicago 67 38 15 14 90 227 178 Minnesota 67 35 22 10 80 164 164 Dallas 66 32 23 11 75 191 185 Winnipeg 68 30 29 9 69 186 199 Nashville 68 29 29 10 68 164 201 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 67 45 17 5 95 215 146 Toronto 68 36 24 8 80 201 207 Tampa Bay 67 36 24 7 79 194 175 Montreal 68 36 25 7 79 172 174 Detroit 66 30 23 13 73 174 184 Ottawa 66 28 25 13 69 189 218 Florida 67 25 35 7 57 166 217 Buffalo 67 19 40 8 46 132 200 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 67 44 19 4 92 209 167 Philadelphia 67 35 25 7 77 192 193 Columbus 67 35 26 6 76 195 184 N.Y. Rangers 68 36 28 4 76 177 169 Washington 68 31 27 10 72 197 205 New Jersey 68 29 26 13 71 166 176 Carolina 67 29 29 9 67 168 192 N.Y. Islanders 69 26 34 9 61 195 233 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday’s Games Columbus 2, Minnesota 1, SO Boston 5, Carolina 1 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 0 Montreal 5, Ottawa 4, OT Tampa Bay 3, New Jersey 0 N.Y. Islanders 4, Buffalo 1 St. Louis 4, Nashville 1 Phoenix 3, Calgary 2 Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 1 Sunday’s Games Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3 Vancouver at Florida, late. Toronto at Washington, late. Edmonton at Carolina, late. San Jose at N.Y. Rangers, late. Colorado at Ottawa, late. Montreal at Buffalo, late. Detroit at Chicago, late. Dallas at Winnipeg, late. Today’s Games Minnesota at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Winnipeg at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Boston at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Minnesota at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Dallas at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Carolina at Columbus, 4 p.m. Colorado at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Buffalo at Calgary, 6 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Florida at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

College Basketball NCAA Tournament Glance FIRST ROUND At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Tuesday Albany (N.Y.) (18-14) vs. Mount St. Mary’s (16-16) N.C. State (21-13) vs. Xavier (21-12)

Wednesday, March 19 Cal Poly (13-19) vs. Texas Southern (19-14) Iowa (20-12) vs. Tennessee (21-12) EAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Villanova (28-4) vs. Milwaukee (21-13) UConn (26-8) vs. Saint Joseph’s (24-9) At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. Michigan State (26-8) vs. Delaware (25-9) Cincinnati (27-6) vs. Harvard (26-4) Friday At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Virginia (28-6) vs. Coastal Carolina (21-12) Memphis (23-9) vs. George Washington (248) At The AT&T Center San Antonio Iowa State (26-7) vs. North Carolina Central (28-5) North Carolina (23-9) vs. Providence (23-11) Third Round Saturday At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Villanova-Milwaukee winner vs. UConn-Saint Joseph’s winner At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. Michigan State-Delaware winner vs. Cincinnati-Harvard winner Sunday At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Virginia-Coastal Carolina winner vs. Memphis-George Washington winner At The AT&T Center San Antonio Iowa State-North Carolina Central winner vs. North Carolina-Providence winner Regional Semifinals At Madison Square Garden New York Friday, March 28 Villanova-Milwaukee_UConn-Saint Joseph’s winner vs. Iowa State-North Carolina Central_ North Carolina-Providence winner Michigan State-Delaware_Cincinnati-Harvard winner vs. Virginia-Coastal Carolina_MemphisGeorge Washington winner Regional Championship Sunday, March 30 Semifinal winners SOUTH REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Syracuse (27-5) vs. Western Michigan (23-9) Ohio State (25-9) vs. Dayton (23-10) At The Amway Center Orlando, Fla. Florida (32-2) vs. Albany-Mount St. Mary’s winner Colorado (23-11) vs. Pittsburgh (25-9) Friday At Scottrade Center St. Louis Kansas (24-9) vs. Eastern Kentucky (24-9) New Mexico (27-6) vs. Stanford (21-12) At Viejas Arena San Diego UCLA (26-8) vs. Tulsa (21-12) VCU (26-8) vs. Stephen F. Austin (31-2) Third Round Saturday At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Syracuse-Western Michigan winner vs. Ohio State-Dayton winner At The Amway Center Orlando, Fla. Florida_Albany-Mount St. Mary’s winner vs. Colorado-Pittsburgh winner Sunday At Scottrade Center St. Louis Kansas-Eastern Kentucky winner vs. New Mexico-Stanford winner At Viejas Arena San Diego UCLA-Tulsa winner vs. VCU-Stephen F. Austin winner Regional Semifinals At FedExForum Memphis, Tenn. Thursday, March 27 Syracuse-Western Michigan_Ohio State-Dayton winner vs. Kansas-Eastern Kentucky_New Mexico-Stanford winner Florida_Albany-Mount St. Mary’s_ColoradoPittsburgh winner vs. UCLA-Tulsa_VCU-Stephen F. Austin winner Regional Championship Saturday, March 29 Semifinal winners MIDWEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At The Amway Center Orlando, Fla. Louisville (29-5) vs. Manhattan (25-7) Saint Louis (26-6) vs. N.C. State-Xavier winner At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Michigan (25-8) vs. Wofford (20-12) Texas (23-10) vs. Arizona State (21-11) Friday At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Duke (26-8) vs. Mercer (26-8) UMass (24-8) vs. Iowa-Tennessee winner At Scottrade Center St. Louis Wichita State (34-0) vs. Cal Poly-Texas Southern winner Kentucky (24-10) vs. Kansas State (20-12) Third Round Saturday At The Amway Center Orlando, Fla. Louisville-Manhattan winner vs. Saint LouisN.C. State-Xavier winner At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Michigan-Wofford winner vs. Texas-Arizona State winner Sunday At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Duke-Mercer winner vs. UMass_Iowa-Tennessee winner At Scottrade Center St. Louis Wichita State_Cal Poly-Texas Southern winner vs. Kentucky-Kansas State winner

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SPORTS ON TV

Today 10 a.m. (26) ESPN Baseball MLB, St. Louis Cardinals vs. Boston Red Sox Spring Training Site: Jet Blue Park - Fort Myers, Fla. (Live) 11 a.m. (25) ROOT Soccer UEFA, Arsenal vs. Bayern Munich, Champions League 11:30 a.m. (304) NBCSN Soccer EPL 4:30 p.m. (304) NBCSN Hockey NHL, Minnesota Wild vs. Boston Bruins, Site: TD Garden - Boston, Mass. (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder vs. Chicago Bulls, Site: United Center - Chicago, Ill. (Live) 5 p.m. (320) PAC-12 Softball NCAA, Arizona vs. UCLA (Live) 5:30 p.m. (306) FS1 Boxing, Golden Boy Williams vs. Hernandez - Boston, Mass. (Live) 7:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NBA, Los Angeles Clippers vs. Denver Nuggets, Site: Pepsi Center Denver, Colo. (Live) 8:30 p.m. (304) NBCSN Soccer EPL Regional Semifinals At Lucas Oil Stadium Indianapolis Friday, March 28 Wichita State_Cal Poly-Texas Southern_Kentucky-Kansas State winner vs. Louisville-Manhattan_Saint Louis-N.C. State-Xavier winner Michigan-Wofford_Texas-Arizona State winner vs. Duke-Mercer_UMass_Iowa-Tennessee winner Regional Championship Sunday, March 30 Semifinal winners WEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Wisconsin (26-7) vs. American (20-12) Oregon (23-9) vs. BYU (23-11) At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. San Diego State (29-4) vs. New Mexico State (26-9) Oklahoma (23-9) vs. North Dakota State (256) Friday At The AT&T Center San Antonio Creighton (26-7) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (2311) Baylor (24-11) vs. Nebraska (19-12) At Viejas Arena San Diego Arizona (30-4) vs. Weber State (19-11) Gonzaga (28-6) vs. Oklahoma State (21-12) Third Round Saturday At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Wisconsin-American winner vs. Oregon-BYU winner At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. San Diego State-New Mexico State winner vs. Oklahoma-North Dakota State winner Sunday, March 23 At The AT&T Center San Antonio Creighton-Louisiana-Lafayette winner vs. Baylor-Nebraska winner At Viejas Arena San Diego Arizona-Weber State winner vs. GonzagaOklahoma State winner Regional Semifinals At The Honda Center Anaheim, Calif. Thursday, March 27 Wisconsin-American_Oregon-BYU winner vs. Creighton-Louisiana-Lafayette_BaylorNebraska winner San Diego State-New Mexico State_Oklahoma-North Dakota State winner vs. ArizonaWeber State_Gonzaga-Oklahoma State winner Regional Championship Saturday, March 29 Semifinal winners FINAL FOUR At AT&T Stadium Arlington, Texas National Semifinals Saturday, April 5 East champion vs. South champion Midwest champion vs. West champion National Championship Monday, April 7 Semifinal winners

Transactions BASEBALL American League MINNESOTA TWINS — Optioned LHP Kris Johnson, C Eric Fryer and INF Danny Santana to Rochester (IL). Reassigned LHP Sean Gilmartin, OF Darin Mastroianni, OF Jermaine Mitchell, INF James Beresford and INF Brandon Waring to their minor league camp. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned RHP Kyle Drabek, RHP Chad Jenkins and LHP Sean Nolin to Buffalo (IL). National League ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Reassigned RHP Zach Petrick and OF James Ramsey to their minor league camp.

BASKETBALL National Basketball Association OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER — Signed G Mustafa Shakur to a 10-day contract.

FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS — Agreed to terms with WR Emmanuel Sanders on a three-year contract. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed S Quintin Demps and CB Walter Thurmond.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

B3

Even Robinson Cano’s beans make headlines BY BOB DUTTON MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

PEORIA, ARIZ. — Second baseman Robinson Cano is absent again from the Seattle Mariners on another short, personal hiatus. This time, he’s back in the Dominican Republic to attend to a family matter. Club officials knew about the issue in advance, and manager Lloyd McClendon said Cano is expected to return in time for Tuesday night’s game against San Diego. The trip coincides with the Mariners’ first camp open date today, and minimizes his absence. But it also begs a question: Will Cano find time for another round of broomstick-and-beans before he returns? That story quickly made the rounds early last week after he explained how he honed his batting eye during a four-day recovery from an infection in his mouth that prompted root-canal surgery. Yep, hitting black beans with a broomstick. “I have to keep my eyes on the beans because they’re so little,” he

explained. “You have to follow them all the way. That’s what you want in the game. You want to follow the pitch all the way.” That makes a great image, doesn’t it? And the story got big play. Then again, everything about Cano seems to get big play since he spurned the Yankees by signing a 10-year deal with the Mariners for $240 million. “I love this game,” he explained, “and I didn’t want to sit at home and not do anything. That’s what I THE ASSOCIATED PRESS did the last two days [of his Seattle Mariners’ second baseman Robinson absence].”

Cano hits an RBI-double during a spring game Bean technique worked against the Chicago Cubs last week. In his return to the lineup last Monday, Cano rocked three straight singles. The first two came against Royals ace James Shields. The other was against former All-Star reliever Aaron Crow. Beans and a broomstick. McClendon spent the last seven years as the hitting coach in Detroit but said he’s never heard of that technique. “That’s a pretty good one,” he said. “Maybe I ought to have all of the rest

of players do the same thing.” The broomstick story muted attention from a stir Cano created earlier in spring by seeming to chide the Mariners for not doing more to improve their roster after he agreed to his mega-deal. “I’m not going to lie,” he told CBSSports.com. “We need an extra bat, especially a right-handed bat. We have many left-handed hitters. We need at least one more righty.”

The story attracted scant notice in the Northwest, where the Mariners’ need (and search) for a righthanded bat is well-known. Further, Cano has consistently maintained he’s only a piece of the puzzle. He cited the need for “a lot of good players” on multiple occasions as the only way to “build a good team.” But elsewhere, particularly in New York, it was seen as evidence that discontent had already set in.

When he later dismissed that suggestion, it got lost in the storm. “I don’t want to say that we are close,” Cano said, “but I know we have a team that can compete. We have some good, young talent and some good pitching.” But, yes, like pretty much any player, he’d welcome roster additions that would improve the club.

Not focused on power It is also drawing notice — little doesn’t — that while he is 14 for 23 this spring in nine games, all but two of his hits are singles. That does seem more Ichiro than Cano, who averaged 45 doubles and 28 homers over the last five seasons. Far from a concern, he contends his diminished spring power is by design. “The goal at spring training,” Cano said, “is just to work on my swing. Middle away. I’m not trying to pull or get out front. “Like I always say, ‘I’m not a home run guy.’” He follows this approach in batting practice. Cano’s swing is an easy flick of the wrists toward

the ball, much like a frog snapping its tongue at a bug. It’s rare that he doesn’t make solid contact, although the ball rarely reaches the track. It is, exactly, what McClendon wants to see from everyone at this point. “One of our challenges is to get guys to understand how you take batting practice,” McClendon said, “because, look, this is the only time you have to work on your craft. For me, hitting home runs in BP means nothing. “I want to see the [swing] path. I want to see you staying inside the ball. That’s what I’m trying to get my guys to understand.” All they need to do is watch. “I don’t want to leave training feeling good because the ball is flying here,” Cano said. “It doesn’t count here how many homers you hit here. You just want to get your swing ready for the regular season.” Now, he’s gone again for a few days. That might mean another helping of black beans. Served soft and easy. With a stick.

Bentz

Allen gets hot late, Heat top Rockets Wolves: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI — Ray Allen was somewhat surprised to see how open he was. So was Dwyane Wade, who even took an extra dribble before believing his eyes and sending a 50-foot pass to the best 3-point shooter in NBA history. Moments later, the Miami Heat were back on track. Allen scored 14 of his 25 points in the fourth quarter on a milestone day for the veteran, Wade and LeBron James each added 24 points and the Heat closed with a flourish to beat the Houston Rockets 113-104 on Sunday and snap their worst stretch of results since 2011. “When Ray gets into a rhythm, he’s the best 3-point shooter of all-time,” said Heat forward Chris Bosh, who scored 18 points to help Miami win for just the second time in its last seven games. Miami trailed 97-92 fol-

NBA lowing a 3-pointer by James Harden midway through the fourth, then finished the game on a 21-7 run. Allen had 11 points during that late stretch, including a 3-pointer that allowed him to pass Allen Iverson for 21st on the NBA’s scoring list. It was also the 750th regular-season win that Allen was a part of in his career. “I don’t know how I get open,” said Allen, who took about 1,000 shots on a practice day Saturday by Heat coach Erik Spoelstra’s estimate. “When I am, I have to be ready to shoot it.” Harden finished with 30 points for Houston, which got 21 points and 14 rebounds from Dwight Howard. Patrick Beverley added 15 points and Terrence Jones scored 12 for the Rockets, who’ve dropped

three straight. “We just didn’t play well down the stretch,” Rockets coach Kevin McHale said. And that all started when no one seemed to want to guard Allen. Houston led by five when Wade sparked the late run with a 50-foot assist after a timeout that set up a 3-pointer from the left corner by Allen. “A critical possession,” Wade said. Allen also made three technical-foul free throws to help his late rhythm. One came after a defensive three-second violation, another following Houston’s second delay-of-game whistle on the afternoon, and the third when Beverley was hit with a technical in the final minute. James hit a pair of free throws with 46 seconds left for his first points of the final quarter, and that sealed it for Miami, which moved back within three games of Indiana for the

No. 1 spot in the Eastern Conference. Allen now has 24,370 points, two more than Iverson. Afterward, he was all about the win. “Tonight we came out and finished the game,” Allen said, “as opposed to letting it slip away from us.” The first surprise of the day came about 20 minutes before tip-off, when the Heat announced Greg Oden — who appeared in his 100th career game, nearly seven years after being the No. 1 overall pick in the 2007 draft — would be starting at center. It was the second start of the season for Oden, who also opened a game against Chicago last month in part because James was unavailable while dealing with a broken nose. Oden had three rebounds in the game’s first three minutes, and the Heat never trailed in the first half, going into the break with a 57-54 lead.

CONTINUED FROM B1 lone run. She finished with five Bailey bobbled Lewis’ strikeouts for the Wolves grounder and first baseman (1-0). Sequim will host ChimaKayla Smith’s attempt to cum on Monday. throw out Besand at third base sailed over the HorSequim 4, White River 1 nets’ third baseman. White River 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 — 1 4 2 Besand and Clift scored Sequim 0 0 1 0 3 0 X — 4 10 1 (1-0); LP- Vollandt (0-1) and Sequim was on the WP- Makayla Bentz Pitching Statistics White River: Smith 4 IP, 2K, 5 H, ER; Vollandt 2 IP, right side of a 4-0 margin. 4 H, 2 ER. Bentz carried a shutout K,Sequim: Bentz, 7 IP, 5K, 3 H. Hitting Statistics into the final frame, but an White River: 1-3, 2B, RBI; Fray 1-2; Long 1-2. error and a Bailey single Sequim: Besand 3-3, 3B, R, 2 RBI; Lott 2-4 2 R; scored the Hornets’ Clift 1-3, R.

Schmidt recovering from skin cancer THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Mike Schmidt sat down at a picnic table beyond the leftfield wall on a sunny morning at Bright House Field, then scooted over to seek the shade. He wasn’t taking any chances. The 64-year-old Hall of Famer is recovering from an advanced form of

skin cancer that kept him from being a guest instructor with the Philadelphia Phillies in spring training. Schmidt was in camp Sunday and publicly spoke for the first time about his illness — stage 3 melanoma, and the two operations, radiation and chemotherapy treatments that followed.

Soccer: Wolves lose to Bucs Next up for the Riders is Bernice. Sequim tied the score a league game rival Sequim right before halftime on a on the road. goal by Cameron Chase off an assist by Eli Berg in the Port Angeles 2, Port Townsend 1 33rd minute. Port Townsend 1 0 —1 Port Angeles 0 2 —2 The Wolves had a few Scoring Summary scoring chances after LarFirst half: 1, Port Townsend, Max Meier (Mark ios’ go-ahead goal but were Streett), 33rd minute. Second half: 1, Port Angeles, Ioffrida (Schnei- unable to convert. der), 68th minute; 2, Port Angeles, J. May, 77th Kingston outshot minute. Sequim 5-4. “Austin Wagner had a Kingston 2, couple of nice saves,” Sequim 1 Brasher said, “not much KINGSTON — The tested him.” Sequim hosts rival Port Wolves battled last year’s Olympic League co-champi- Angeles on Tuesday night. “It’s a good rivalry, we’re ons to the end before falling 2-1 on a goal in the 72nd excited to play that game,” minute by Kingston’s Moi- Brasher said. ses Larios. Kingston 2, Sequim 1 “It was a pretty hard1 0 —1 fought match,” Sequim Sequim 1 1 —2 coach Dave Brasher said of Kingston Scoring Summary Saturday’s game. First half: 1, Kingston, Braden Bernice, 10th The Buccaneers opened minute; 1, Sequim, Cameron Chase (Eli Berg); 33rd the scoring with a goal in minute. Second Half: 2, Kingston, Moises Larios, 72nd the 10th minute by Braden minute.

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CONTINUED FROM B1 called,” he said. Saari said goalkeeper “PT continued to domi- Spencer May was the Ridnate both the possession ers’ defensive player of the and pace of the match, dem- match for making “some big onstrated by PA earning saves throughout the match three frustration-filled yel- to keep [us] in the game in low cards throughout the his first start in goal.” Jackson May and Iofmatch,” Shively said. Port Angeles scored the frida were the offensive equalizer on a goal by Vin- players of the match, while cent Ioffrida that was Agustin Muller and Tim assisted by a corner kick Schneider were chosen as taken by Tim Schneider in the transition players of the match. the 68th minute. For the Redskins, Nine minutes later, May scored the game-winner Shively singled out the perafter Port Townsend was formances of senior goalkeeper Forrest Piatt, junior called for a handball. “Jackson May nicely defender Colin Coker and placed the penalty kick to sophomore midfielder Patthe right corner with confi- rick Charlton. Port Townsend won the dence,” Saari said of the JV match 3-0 with two freshman forward’s goal. Shively questioned the goals by Sam Meier and one by Luke Anderson. penalty. The Redskins host Kla“The game was heading into certain overtime when howya on Tuesday at a mysterious handball was Memorial Field.

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B4

Fun ’n’ Advice

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

Dilbert

Keep daughter busy, out of trouble

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Classic Doonesbury (1971)

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

DEAR ABBY: My 11-year-old daughter, “Gwen,” just started middle school. She makes good grades, but she’s strong-willed. Do kids grow up instantly when they start middle school? She wants to know if she can have a boyfriend. I told her not until she’s 15. Now she’s flirting with girls who ask her out. I told her to stay away from them, not because they are lesbians but because they are not good girls. They are always in trouble. Gwen says I’m too strict, and if I don’t stop, she will run away. I adopted her at birth (it was an open adoption), and she recently asked me if I am going to place her for adoption. She was worried that I would. I am very concerned that she is hanging out with the wrong crowd. Any advice? San Antonio Mom

by Lynn Johnston

by G.B. Trudeau

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Brian Basset

Van Buren

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Use charm and finesse to get ahead professionally. Present your ideas and services with confidence. Someone from your past can help fill a void you’ve been feeling. A partnership will help stabilize your life personally and professionally. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Forward thinking will help keep you on track. An unusual opportunity is apparent. Don’t let it pass you by because you are too involved in trying to do the impossible. Go with the flow and you will find your way to victory. 5 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Stay calm, collect your thoughts and engage in dynamic conversations that are geared toward positive change. There is much you can accomplish if you refuse to let negativity leak into your

by Hank Ketcham

Pickles

by Brian Crane

How do I respond tactfully, but also convey that they should think twice before they say these things? Upset in Ohio Dear Upset: If someone says you look good, respond as you would to any other compliment — say thank

you. When someone offers a suggestion about how you can “cure” yourself, you’ll save yourself a lot of frustration if you keep in mind that the person cares enough about you to try to be helpful. All you need to do is smile and say firmly that you are under a doctor’s care and are satisfied with the treatment you are receiving. And, heaven forbid, if another individual tells you that your MS is “all in your head,” remember that just because a jackass brays does not mean you have to pay attention. Confidential to My Irish Readers: I received this Irish prayer from a reader. I’m sharing it with you today in honor of St. Patrick’s Day: Take time to work, It is the price of success. Take time to think, It is the source of power. Take time to play, It is the secret of perpetual youth. Take time to read, It is the foundation of wisdom. Take time to be friendly, It is the road to happiness. Take time to love and be loved, It is the privilege of the gods. Take time to share, Life is too short to be selfish. Take time to laugh, Laughter is the music of the soul.

________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Dennis the Menace

Abigail

Dear Abby: I am a 29-year-old woman who has just been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. It has been a rough road, and I’m lucky to have such a supportive group. My issue is, when people find out, I get comments such as, “Wow, you look so good!” or suggestions on how I should “cure” my MS. The most hurtful one was that it’s all in my head. While I appreciate that folks care and want to offer help, I find their comments offensive and hurtful.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t stir up an emotional situation. Let people come to you. Concentrate on unfinished projects that are weighing you down. A willingness to make adjustments to your plans will open up opportunities to collaborate with someone who has something worthwhile to offer. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

Dear Mom: People do not grow up “instantly.” I know individuals who are immature at 50, and I’m sure if you think about it, so do you. From what you have told me about your daughter, it’s clear that she is far from the grown-up she thinks she is. If you do not to want Gwen to date until she is older, that is your prerogative as her parent. The gender of the person isn’t the issue. Because you think she is hanging out with the wrong crowd, my advice is to make sure she is so busy she doesn’t have time to spend with them. Involve her in activities outside of school — sports, scouting, music or art. And be sure she knows that you are her forever mother and that nothing she could ever do will lessen your love for her.

by Jim Davis

Red and Rover

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

by Eugenia Last

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. ideas, intentions and plans for 22-Dec. 21): Play strategically future development. 2 stars and fairly. Protect your secrets LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): and be ready and willing to Rely on friends or relatives make last-minute changes if you feel have clear vision. A necessary. Don’t let uncerchange is in order, but it has tainty within relationships be to be the right move. Don’t your downfall. Look out for feel threatened by red tape or your best interests. Romance stipulations you encounter. is highlighted and love could Hard work will get you closer lead to affluence. 4 stars to your goal. 4 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22-Jan. 19): Be prepared to 22): Shake things up a bit and wheel and deal to the best of take ownership of the things your ability. Nothing will come you do and say. Don’t let what easy, but it will be worth your others do or say stand time and effort to do your best between you and your plans. and push for what you want. Express your strategy boldly Unexpected change will result and continue in the direction in opportunity. 5 stars that suits you. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): 18): Your passion and desire Jump into action. Participate to do well and reach your and engage in whatever grabs goals will transform into proyour interest. Sitting back or posals that can bring you waffling will not impress oth- greater financial security. Look ers or help you advance. Love at every angle and don’t be is on the rise, and a romantic afraid to negotiate until you gesture will improve your per- feel content with the outcome. sonal life. 3 stars 2 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Live in the here and now. The past will only drag you down and hold you back. Focus on home, family and possibilities for the future. Engage in creative or unique endeavors that have the potential to raise your income and your reputation. 3 stars

The Family Circus

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Take a moment to breathe. Formulate your plan of attack. Process all the information you receive and find the channel best suited to your specific needs as well as what you have to contribute. A personal investment will pay off. 3 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


SportsRecreation Mathematicians hoping their calculations add up to perfect NCAA tourney bracket PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY MARY PILON THE NEW YORK TIMES

Typically, when the worlds of math and sports collide, name calling, noogies and maybe even a wedgie follow. But that was not the case Thursday night at the National Museum of Mathematics in Manhattan, where 50 would-be mathematicians huddled in a windowless classroom to harness the power of linear algebra and complex computer codes to predict the outcome of each of the 67 games in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament. They weren’t there just for the love of the equation. “There are a billion reasons to be here tonight,” said Tim Chartier, a math professor at Davidson College, who was leading the event, called March (Mo) Mathness. He was referring to the contest with the $1 billion prize offered by Quicken Loans (and insured by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway) for a perfect bracket. To reach Chartier’s room at the museum, the crowd opened doors with handles shaped like the symbol for pi. Once assembled, Chartier said that theirs was no easy task. He estimated that the odds of picking every winner were one in

nine quintillion. “But there is a chance,” he said. On Sunday, the NCAA released the matchups for its biggest tournament. Chartier was preparing the eager students, who paid as much as $100 at the door, to get a leg up on other sports fans with his first public, in-depth presentation of the mathematical models he uses for choosing winners. In 2009, Chartier and his Davidson students began developing a bracket program that quickly yielded remarkable results, even though many of the participants had no interest in college basketball. The program can be adjusted for losses early and late in the season, as well as for margins of victory and defeat. Chartier insists that his program works. Several of his students have finished in the 90th percentile of ESPN’s annual contest, which drew more than eight million entries last year. Three students finished in the 96th to 99th percentiles. But the outputs are only as good as the inputs. Last year, one student accurately predicted 14thseeded Harvard’s win over third-seeded New Mexico but was beaten by more than 98 percent of the ESPN entries.

“You have to be a bit careful there,” Chartier said. The underlying math — applied linear algebra — is similar to what the Bowl Championship Series used to produce its rankings, but with a twist. Instead of incorporating past results, Chartier’s math helps predict how the tournament teams will be ranked and how they might fare. The software allows for either a Colley ranking, which is a linear system that uses only wins and losses, or a Massey ranking, which integrates the scores of the games. For most of the class, only basic math skills were required to follow along, but math majors were also challenged. “We may be home to Steph Curry,” Chartier said, referring to Davidson’s former point guard, “but also some major bracketology.” Chartier, 45, has also used math to solve Sudoku puzzles. He has explored the relationship between linear algebra and the physique of Yoda from “Star Wars.” And he has pondered the meaning of Buzz Lightyear’s slogan, “To infinity and beyond.” Chartier is also a mime. Using simple diagrams that showed various win-

loss situations, Chartier broke down the algorithm using systems of only four teams. He then expanded it to a diagram that looked like a spider web indicating the outcomes of nearly 350 teams in about 5,000 games. Several students gasped. “Holy smokes!” one exclaimed. With iPads that had Chartier’s software ready to go, along with printouts of practice brackets that used previous years’ data, students peppered Chartier and two student assistants with questions. What about upsets? How are emotional favorites factored? How much weight is a home game worth? And what about Florida? At one table, Joan Casazzone and Helen Kramer, high school math teachers from Great Neck, N.Y., worked on their predictions, hoping to bring the science of bracketology into their classrooms. “I’d love more of the nitty-gritty,” said Casazzone, who described herself as a basketball fiend. “Coding is hot right now.” She and Kramer said they hoped to fill out several brackets after, some using math, others using feelings. “We teach adolescents,” Kramer said. “So we know a lot about unpredictability.”

Djokovic beats Federer to win Indian Wells title BY BETH HARRIS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIAN WELLS, Calif. — Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (3) to win the BNP Paribas Open for the third time on Sunday. Federer rallied from a break down and a 5-3 deficit in the third set to force the tiebreaker, but he made

a slew of mistakes to lose the 33rd meeting between the rivals. Federer still leads the series 17-16, having beaten Djokovic in three sets in the semifinals at Dubai two weeks ago. Djokovic will remain No. 2 in the world, while Federer will rise three spots to No. 5 today in the ATP Tour rankings.

Flavia Pennetta routed injured Agnieszka Radwanska 6-2, 6-1 to win the women’s title, the biggest of her career. Federer was trying to win a record fifth title in the desert, and at 32, he would have been the oldest Masters 1000 winner since 34-year-old Andre Agassi won at Cincinnati in 2004.

But Djokovic wouldn’t allow it. After Federer breezed to the first set in 31 minutes, Djokovic settled down and locked into the punishing rallies that marked most of the match. He earned the lone break of the second set to go up 5-3 after Federer pulled a forehand wide.

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

B5

Boling: Zags CONTINUED FROM B1 ning the WCC, Few got his 400th career victory. Even more impressive is that he Losses to Memphis, got there in just 499 BYU, Dayton and Kansas State left them 2-4 against games. Only Adolph Rupp, Clair teams in the top 50 of the RPI ratings. Stumbles Bee, Jerry Tarkanian and against San Diego (155) Roy Williams did so and Portland (176) were quicker. even more humbling. A Sporting News piece As an eighth seed, Gon- by Mike DeCourcy last zaga certainly is a neighweek made an interesting borhood with which they’re point of how the efforts of familiar. But this edition of Few and his staff have the Zags could be heating “forced the Zags to defy up at the right time. categorization.” After senior guard Their string of titles and David Stockton drove for tournament appearances, the winning layup against he wrote, has gone a long Santa Clara in the WCC way toward invalidating tournament quarterfinals, the term “midmajor” as it the Zags pounded Saint applies to teams that occaMary’s and then won consionally pop up from a nonvincingly (75-64) against power conference, have a BYU in the title game. run of success and then With Sam Dower Jr. (20 fade away again in favor of points and 13 rebounds in the usual heavyweights. the title game) and PrzeThis year, the Zags will mek Karnowski on the appear in their 16th front line, the Zags have straight NCAA tournathe size to match most ment. Sweet 16, you might NCAA teams. When the say. guards hit from the perim________ eter, it’s a combination that’s hard to beat. Dave Boling is a McClatchy In the process of winNews Service sports columnist.

Senden rallies late to win BY DOUG FERGUSON

PGA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALM HARBOR, Fla. — More than seven years without a victory. A trip to Augusta National riding on the outcome. A three-way tie for the lead going into a daunting three-hole closing stretch called “The Snake Pit” on the Copperhead course of Innisbrook. John Senden was trying to keep his mind off all of that Sunday in the Valspar Championship. The finish will be hard for him to forget. Senden chipped in for birdie from 70 feet on the 16th hole, one of only two birdies in the final round at the toughest hole on the

course. He followed that with a 20-foot birdie putt to build a two-shot lead, then made it tough for Kevin Na to catch him with perfect pace on a 40-foot putt on the 18th that left him only a tap-in for par. Senden closed with a 1-under 70 and had enough strength left to hoist a trophy he said felt like 50 pounds. “I didn’t turn my phone on because I know there’s going to be 4,000 messages,” Senden said. “It feels good to do it again after seven years. Lot of good things to come.”

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4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment Momma General General General General

T O D AY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

VET KENNEL/ JANITORIAL POSITION Part-time, weekends required. Apply in person, G r e y w o l f Ve t e r i n a r y Hospital, Sequim.

3010 Announcements

CAREER SALES OPPORTUNITY Immediate sales position is open at Wilder Auto. If you’re looking for a positive career change, like working with people, this could be for you! The Wilder team has great benefits, 401k, medical and dental, and a great work schedule, paid training, college tuition plan for your children! Jason Herbert for an appointment, 452-9268. wilderauto.com/jobs

LONG-Time gardener in P. A . w i l l s h a r e l a r g e greenhouse and garden with the right person(s). Must have interest in gr ow i n g fo o d a n d b e able to work. No cost to you--will teach. Write to CAREGIVER: AdultP.O. Box 1421. care home needs certified caregiver, 4 shifts, S a t . , 7 a . m . - 1 p. m . , S u n . - Tu e s . 1 - 7 p . m . 3023 Lost Good cook, easy care clients. (360)683-9194. LOST: Cat. Black and b r ow n t a bby, fe m a l e, CARRIER ROUTE about 13 years old, AVAILABLE needs medication, near Peninsula Daily News intersection of 7th and Circulation Dept. Cedar. (360)452-1518. Is looking for an individual interested in a Por t LOST: Dog. Male, Jack Angeles area route. InRussell terrier mix, long terested parties must be hair, brown speckles on 18 yrs. of age, have a ears, Salt Creek area. valid Washington State (360)928-0262 Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning 4026 Employment delivery Monday through General Friday and Sunday. Stop by Pe n i n s u l a D a i l y News, 305 W. First St. to ADVOCATE/ complete application. No CASE MANAGER calls please. Bachelor’s Degree in Social or Human Services. Apply at: employment_fstep@ olypen.com. Visit www.firststepfamily.org for a complete job description. No phone calls please. CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE BOOKKEEPER: PT, 30 hrs. week, Quickbooks We are looking for individuals interested in experience, busy manufacturing facility, wage a carrier route. Interested parties must be DOE. Send resume to 18 yrs. of age, have a Peninsula Daily News valid Washington PDN#625/bookkeeper State Drivers License, Port Angeles WA 98362 proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early HAIRSTYLIST Promoting beautiful and morning delivery Wed. Fill out application at healthy hair in Sequim, 147 W. Washington, our busy Aveda-concept Sequim. Call Jasmine salon needs a stylist at (360)683-3311, who is experienced with ext. 6051 cutting and coloring. Wonderful clientle. Bring resume to 131 E. Wash- CNA/RNA: Part/full-time, ington, Sequim for inter- all shifts. Wright’s Home view appointment. Care (360)457-9236.

COME JOIN THE WAVE TEAM! Construction Coordinator I Assist in coordinating constr uction effor ts through in-house and contract labor for new construction, drop bury and rebuild projects. Locate and TDR underground coax cable and make repairs. Work to reduce replacing coax drops by making repairs. Responsible for safety and quality of work performed within the construction department. Q u a l i f i c a t i o n s : 5 y r s. cable television or telecommunications technical experience. Ability to manipulate connectors, fasteners, wire and hand tools. Ability to lift 50 pounds. Knowledge of National Electrical Codes. Valid driver’s license and satisfactory d r i v i n g r e c o r d . Va l i d Wash. Flagging Card. To apply, send resume and cover letter to cjones@ wavebroadband.com or apply in person at Wave Broadband, 725 East 1st St., Por t Angeles, WA 98362. Diverse Workforce/EEO

FRONT OFFICE Coordinator: Immediate opening in medical specialty clinic. Experience in medical setting preferred. Send introductory letter and resume. Personnel P.O. B ox 2 3 9 1 Po r t A n geles, WA 98362. KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 Marina Summer Help The Port of Port Angeles is seeking candidates interested in a summer help position that includes custodial, landscape maintenance and cash handling duties at the John Wayne Marina in Sequim. The position will work 32 hr per wk, working Sat.-Tues. each week. Star ting hour ly wage is $12.25 per hour. Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Port Admin Office, 338 W. First Street, Port Angeles or online at www.portofpa.com. Applications accepted t h r o u g h W e d n e s d a y, March 28th. Drug testing is required.

NURSE: OR Nurse, immediate opening, par t time, permanent position. Apply at 777 N. 5th Ave., Sequim.

MEDICAL BILLER/ RECEPTIONIST F u l l - t i m e, m i n . 3 y r s. ex p. i n o p h t h a l m o l o gy/optometry field, excellent computer/typing skills, strong verbal/written skills. Email resume with references to: medicaljobopening1@ gmail.com

LEGAL ASSISTANT For Por t Angeles law firm. Applicant must have excellent written and oral communication skills, be detail oriented and able to multi-task, and have good interpers o n a l s k i l l s. Wo r k i n g knowledge of Word and Excel required, as well as bookkeeping capability. Full-time/salar y DOE. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#742/Legal Port Angeles, WA 98362

NURSE: Per Diem, multi-doctor clinic is recruiting for a per diem nurse to join our team. Please respond if you prefer a flexible schedule, enjoy working with a team and h ave c o m p a s s i o n fo r others. Back office experience preferred. Washington State license req u i r e d . S u b m i t c ove r letter and resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#743/Nurse Port Angeles, WA 98362

DRIVER: PT, CDL Class A or B with Pass, air endorsement. (360)460-7131

by Mell Lazarus

REPORTER The Sequim Gazette, an award-winning weekly community newspaper in Sequim, Wa., is seeking an experienced reporter. Your assignments will be varied, including everything from local government and politics to investigative pieces and more. If you have a passion for community journalism, can meet deadlines and produce people-or iented news and feature stories on deadline (for print and web), we’d like to hear from you. Exper ience with InDesign, social media and photo skills a plus. Minimum of one year news reporting experience or equivalent post-secondary education required. This fulltime position includes medical, vision and dental benefits, paid holidays, vacation and sick leave, and a 401k with company match. One of the top weeklies in Washington State, the S e q u i m G a ze t t e wa s named the top newspaper in the state in its circulation size by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association in 2005-2008 and 2010, and among the nation’s best in 2011 and 2012 ( N a t i o n a l N ew s p a p e r Association). We are a newsroom of four, covering the stories of the Sequim-Dungeness Valley on the Olympic Peninsula. We are par t of the Sound Publishing newsgroup that boasts 43 n ew s p a p e r t i t l e s, t h e largest community media organization in Washington State. Interested individuals should submit a resume with at least 3 non-returnable writing samples in pdf format to hr@soundpublishng.com or by mail to SEQ/REP/HR Department Sound Publishing, Inc., 11323 Commando Rd. W, Main Unit Everett, WA 98204

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment General General General Wanted NURSE: RN, LPN, or M A fo r p r i m a r y c a r e medical office, FT, office exp. preferred. Peninsula Daily News PDN#740/Nurse Port Angeles, WA 98362 ORDER FULFILLMENT/ CUSTOMER SERVICE Must lift 50 lbs. consist e n t l y, c u s t o m e r a n d computer experience a must, team player, detail oriented, min. wage. Please email resume to: nnewman@ starmaninc.com

Permanent and On-call positions available now at Clallam Bay Corrections Center Correctional Officer 1 Pay starts at $16.99 hr., plus full benefits. Closes 4/2/14. Apply on-line: www.careers.wa.gov. For further information please call Laura at (360)963-3208 EOE Support/Care Staff To work with developmentally disabled adults, no exper ience necessary, will train. $10 hr. to start. CNAs encouraged to apply. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. from 8-4 p.m. The Quileute Tribe has several job openings in va r i o u s d e p a r t m e n t s, check out our website at www.quileutenation.org to down load job descriptions and job application or call us at (360)374-4366

Program Manager (PM) Olympic Area Agency on Aging (O3A) seeks PM based in Port Hadlock. 40 hrs. wk., $43,757$54,647 annual range, exempt, full agency paid b e n e f i t p a ck a g e . P M manages ser vice contracts in a 4-county area. Required: WDL, autoins, BS/BA liberal arts, soc. health services + 3 y e a r s ex p. i n a d m i n and/or social ser vices planning and management, competitive bids, contract monitoring and evaluation. For complete job description & application: 1-866-720-4863 or www.o3a.org. Open until filled; applications received by 9:00 am. Monday, March 24, 2014 included in first review. O3A is an EOE. Project management consultant seeks par ttime construction progress observer with significant commercial building construction experience for a project in Sequim. Must be MSWord literate, be able to read and inter pret construction documents, and be able to follow a strict communications p r o t o c o l . H o u r s m ay vary from 2-8 per week starting April 2014 and into early 2015. Please send resume and references with contact info: colson@ optimumbldg.com by March 21st, 2014 SERVICE PLUMBER Experienced, full-time, benefits. P.A. (360)452-8525

THE HOH TRIBE Fisheries Enforcement Officer. For more info and to apply go to www.hohtribe-nsn.org TRANSIT OPERATOR Applications now being accepted for TRANSIT OPERATOR (Por t Angeles Base) with Clallam Transit System. 40-hour work week not guaranteed. $18.68 per hour AFTER COMPLETION OF TRAINING. Excellent benefits. Job description and application available at CTS Administration Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles, WA 98363. (360)452-1315, or online at clallamtransit.com. A number of eligible candidates may be retained on a next hire l i s t fo r Po r t A n g e l e s base for six months. APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 4:00 p.m., March 28, 2014. AA/EOE.

A LT E R AT I O N S a n d Sewing. Alterations, mending, hemming and some heavyweight sewing available to you from me. Call (360)531-2353 ask for B.B. AT T E N T I O N A s p i r i n g Authors: Exper ienced writer offers one-on-one tutoring to ambitious creative writers. Ages 13 and up. $12 an hour. Will work with your schedule. Email newau thor0701@gmail.com if interested.

B I Z Y B OY S L AW N & YARD CARE: Your work is our play! We enjoy mowing, weeding, edgVET KENNEL/ ing, hedge trimming, JANITORIAL POSITION landscape maintenance Part-time, weekends re- and general yard cleanquired. Apply in person, up! Free job quotes! G r e y w o l f Ve t e r i n a r y Call Tom at 460-7766 Hospital, Sequim. CAREGIVER/House30 4080 Employment keep/cook/errands. yrs exp., good local refs. Wanted (360)912-1238 ADEPT YARD CARE Bark, bed prep, etc. (360)452-2034 Affordable Lawn Maintenance (360)477-1805 A LAWN SERVICE Senior Discount (360)461-7506

COMPUTER Care Sales & Service: Custom builds or hardware repairs. 24 yrs exp. Fr e e e s t i m a t e s, V i r us/Malware removal.Discounts avail, d r o p o f f s w e l c o m e. 170 Deytona, Sequim. Chet@olypen.com 360-808-9596


B6 MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

4080 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Wanted Wanted Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County M OW I N G , P r u n i n g , Father & Sons’ L a n d s c a p e S e r v i c e thatching, bark dust. since 1992. 1 time clean Honest and dependable. (360)582-7142 ups, pruning, lawn maintenance, weeding, orRUSSELL ganic lawn renovations. ANYTHING (360)681-2611 775-4570 or 681-8582 FRUIT Tree Pruning: Expert in fruit, ornamental S AW M I L L : B a n d s a w and exotic shrubs. Semi sawing custom lumber retired to take the time to form your clean logs. (360)460-9226 do it right. Photos on PDN site. Also complete SKILLED LABOR lawn service. Book now. 30 yrs. exp. inside and P.A. only. Local call, outside. (360)301-2435. (360)808-2146 HANDYMAN for Hire. Property maintenance, painting, dump runs, minor home repairs, house washing, etc. Free estimates. Available anytime. Call (360)461-9755 Homecare Provided Licensed CNA, will provide loving, experienced care. (360)681-4019. JUAREZ & SON’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problems and projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 253-737-7317.

MIKE’S YARD CARE Weeding, Mowing, and Clean-up. Good references. (360)477-6573.

A PRIVATE RESERVE Bordered by a 50 acre nature preser ve, in a quiet neighborhood near the golf course, is the setting for this 4 BR, 2 BA NW home. Hardwood floors, beautiful cabinetry and wood trim create a warm and cozy retreat. 2 gas fireplaces and heat pump provide efficiency and style. MLS#280359. $295,000. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

G R E AT WAT E R a n d mountain view. Lovely 2,700 sf., Del Guzzi built h o m e o n . 6 2 p r i va t e acres. Living, dining, and rec rooms. Laundr y room with back entr y. Pr ivate entr y on first floor. Attached two car TOM’S YARD carport and shop. Warm, MAINTENANCE BUILD YOUR DREAM Mowing, trimming, and south facing tiled patio. Fr u i t t r e e s / g a r d e n . HOME HERE! edging. Free estimates. $360,000. Enjoy the lovely sweep(360)457-4103 (360)457-2796 ing mountain views from WO N D E R F U L h o u s e this sunny 2.5 acre parBEAUTIFUL cleaning. Experienced, cel between Por t Anreferences. Call Esther PROPERTY geles and Sequim in a (360)775-9513 O u t s t a n d i n g l ay - o u t , n i c e s u b d i v i s i o n w i t h Large Kitchen, over 21 CC&Rs. Fully fenced, c r e s. S a l t wa t e r a n d with PUD water, power, 105 Homes for Sale amountain views plus a plus an irrigation ditch, Clallam County bonus room above the on a private paved road. garage to accommodate MLS#280184. $189,000. 3 BEDROOM Kathy Brown guests. Large flowing CHARMER (360)417-2785 great room, wood stove, This charming home in hardwood floors. Great COLDWELL BANKER Carlsborg has many up- formal dining room for UPTOWN REALTY grades, including teak special occasions. Even engineered hardwood a 2nd Kitchen in the garLAKE DAWN floors, carpet, paint, and age! Property features 2 WATERFRONT kitchen cabinets. Front wells (1 Ar tesian) for y a r d i s f u l l y fe n c e d ; both domestic and out- This gorgeous 1 bedrooms are spacious; lo- door watering, no restric- room, 1 bath cabin sits on the lake with new cation is close to town tions! dock. Call to see. with country charm... MLS#280327/599068 MLS#272082. $169,000. MLS#270826. $126,000. $695,000 Team Powell Brooke Nelson Mark Macedo (360)775-5826 (360)417-2812 (360)477-9244 COLDWELL BANKER COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY UPTOWN REALTY UPTOWN REALTY

F O R S A L E : M o ve - i n ready. 2,300 sf, 3 bed/2 bath plus a large bonus room. Large living area, dining room, kitchen with island. Mountain view, 1.01 landscaped acres, close to Discovery Trail. Covered front porch and large rear deck. 1,008 sf detached garage with workshop. $229,000. (360)582-9782 DARLING 3 bedrm 1 and ¾ bath rambler in lovely neighborhood. Home has hard surface flooring, great kitchen with unique breakfast bar, updated vinyl windows, cozy wood fireplace and huge fenced backyard. This wo u l d b e t h e p e r fe c t h o m e fo r a 1 s t t i m e home buyer or to downsize. MLS#280348. $159,000. Jennifer Holcomb (360)460-3831 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

COMFY-COZY Comfy-Cozy describes this great home in the Bluffs area. There are 2 bedrooms. 1 is currently being used as a den/office that opens via glass slider onto a huge deck overlooking a partial water view of the strait and nice back yard. The detached garage is oversized for a single car so there’s room for storage o r a s m a l l wo r k s h o p. The garage has a breezeway leading to the nicely covered front porch. The efficient wood stove easily warms the whole house along with the electric heaters. This is a great p l a c e t o d ow n s i ze o r start out. This could be a nice rental property. MLS#280410. $112,000. Barclay Jennings (360)808-4142 JACE The Real Estate Company EXECUTIVE STYLE LIVING Beautiful craftsman, superior quality, 3 br, 2.5 ba, 2782 sf, custom,3.72 fenced acres, pasture, 3-stall horse barn, g r e e n h o u s e, m a s t e r gardener landscaping, delightful outdoor living areas MLS#280393. $475,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

F S B O : M a nu fa c t u r e d h o m e, 3 b r. , 2 b a t h , 1,240 sf., 2004 Fuqua on foundation, with slab. ADA ramp access, 2 car a t t a c h e d g a r a g e, RV storage, garden shed. Mt. views, located on E a s t S i d e P. A . , i n county. HOA, approx. 1/2 acre, level lot. $159,900. (360)477-8474

HENDRICKSON PARK Charming 2 br., 2 bath home in 55yr and older community. Convenient location in town; close to stores and amenities of Sequim. Extra room off living room can be used as an office. Low maintenance landscaping helps make life easy. Complete with an attached carport and paved driveway. MLS#261705. $69,900. Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-808-1712

LARGE TOWNHOME ON 10TH FAIRWAY Master br on main floor, additional br suite upstairs, large great room o f f k i t c h e n , wo o d f p, oversized 2 car garage (3rd door), nice sized patio off dining room. MLS#480477/270962 $267,500 Deb Kahle (360) 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

LAST 2 LOTS AVAILABLE Ready to build. All city utilities are in, street is paved. On quiet cul-desac of new custom homes off Milwaukee Dr. Close to Olympic Discovery Trail, downtown Port Angeles and harbor and marina. MLS#272381/272380 $34,000 Harriet Reyenga (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.: Water and mounPORT ANGELES tain view, 4 Br., 3 bath, 2 car garage, updated t h r o u g h o u t , 3 bl o ck s WHY PAY from Peninsula College, SHIPPING ON private yard with hot tub. Potential for rental space INTERNET downstairs. $209,000. PURCHASES? (360)477-9993 or (360)670-9673.

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

NOT YOUR TYPICAL 1929 HOME! Ta s t e f u l l y r e m o d e l e d and updated. Brand new heat pump, newer roof, new carpets, nicely appointed master suite, elegant and functional kitchen, Lots of storage, fruit trees and flowers galore outside! A true turn-key home. MLS#280382. $219,900. Ania Pendergrass Evergreen (360)461-3973

PRIVATE DEEP WATER DOCK Unique home with fantastic views of the Strait and San Juan Islands! Upgraded kitchen with granite counter tops, GE high performance stainless appliances, hardwood flooring. Master br. suite on main level. 2nd br. and bath, plus an upper loft. Guest apartment, rec room, and storage r ms on lower level. Very Special Sequim Bay Waterfront! MLS#263753. $895,000. Tom Blore (360)683-4116 PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE PLANS Solution: 7 letters

L A C O L D E B T A L F S L A By Charlie Riley

Friday’s Puzzle Solved Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage P.A./SEQUIM: River Rd. 1.6 ac. Deer Park Rd. 2.4 ac. Dan Kelly 53 ac. Lake Sutherland 50’ of lake frontage. Elwha 13 ac heavy timber. Owner finance. (360)461-3688.

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes

605 Apartments Clallam County 1ST Month Rent Free! EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 • Nice, family environment with plenty of room for your children to play. • 2, 3 Br. units avail. • Must income qualify 2202 West 16th, P.A.

WANTED: ‘77 or newer, 24’ X 36’ double wide mobile, must be moveable. 417-3571.

SEQUIM: 1 Br., in town, some utils, no pets/ smoke, $550 mo., $700 dep. (360)460-3369.

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes

DISCO BAY: Fabulous P.A.: Clean 2 br., no water view, newly reno- smoke/pets. $650 first, vated 3 Br., 2 ba. $900. last, dep. (360)460-7235 (360)460-2330 P.A.: Refurnished 2 br. JAMES & N o s m o k e / p e t s , g a r. ASSOCIATES INC. $675, dep. 457-4023. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 SEQ: 2 Br., fenced yard, HOUSES/APT IN P.A. detatched garage, close A 1 br 1 ba ...............$475 to shopping, W/S paid. $800. (360)457-6092. H 1 br 1 ba duplex....$500 H 2 br 1 ba ...............$750 H 3 br 1.5 ba ............$850 683 Rooms to Rent H 3 br 1 ba .............$1000 Roomshares H 4 br 2 ba.view..$1,350 HOUSES/APTS IN SEQ A 2 br 1.5 ba ............$875 M A S T E R S U I T E i n H 2+ br 2 ba .............$850 country haven. Beautiful H 2 br 2 ba. river ....$1000 Master bedroom for rent. H 3 br 3 ba .............$1700 The room is fully furnished, full bathroom, 2 Complete List at: closets. All utilities in1111 Caroline St., P.A. cluded. Plenty of privaP.A.: 2,000 sf, 2 Br., cy, with a creek outside den, 2 ba, sauna, Jacuz- your window, and a view zi, NP, NS. $1,000 mo., of the Olympic Mountains. (360)797-3892. plus dep. (360)452-7743

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E S E L C I H E V M P L E H A

3/17

Accident, Advisor, Assistance, Battery, Boost, Ditch, Driver, Driveway, Dues, Engine, Fast, Flatbed, Fleet, Fuel, Help, Highway, Hotels, Hotline, Lift, Local, Lockout, Member, Mileage, Motorists, Overhaul, Phone, Policy, Program, Prompt, Remotely, Repair, Road, Safe, Sand, Snow, Spare, Start, Stuck, Timely, Tire, Towing, Travel, Trip, Vehicles, Winch Yesterday’s Answer: Bond

RULBT ©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

CHERP (c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

38 Swiss river 39 Othello, for one 40 Pillow fight garb 41 Psychologist’s treatment 42 Cookie dough units 45 Summer shoe style 46 Former German leaders 47 Back home after traveling, say

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 TWO OFFICES IN DOWNTOWN SEQUIM GAZETTE BUILDING FOR SUB-LEASE 448-sq-ft for $550 mo., 240-sq-ft for $350 mo. Perfect for accountant or other professional. S h a r e d c o n fe r e n c e room, restroom, wired for high-speed Internet. Contact John Brewer, publisher, (360)417-3500

6010 Appliances

WASHER/DRYER Whirlpool Duet high-cap a c i t y s t e a m wa s h e r (2013 model) and dryer. Managed by Sparrow Both have pedestals, Management, Inc. front-load. Washer has CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, wa r ra n t y u n t i l 2 0 1 8 - quiet, 2 Br., excellent brand new. Dr yer has warranty through April references required. 2014. $750 for washer, $700. (360)452-3540. $400 for dryer. (949)278-3187 CENTRAL P.A.: Studio, 1 ba, no smoking/pets. $400. (360)457-9698.

P.A.: Gorgeous doublewide 55+ park, 06’ Karsten 28’ x 56’. 3br/2 P A : 1 B r . , n o b a t h , m o ve - i n r e a d y. pets/smoking, W/S/G. $550. (360)457-1695. Stainless appliances, spacious kitchen. Car Port, storage- Avail now P.A.: 1 Br., spectacular for $44k approved fin wa t e r v i ew, o n bl u f f, downtown. No pets. avail. Call today Call Pat (360)582-7241. 206-849-3446 for appt.

O N E Y L I R T M N A A I I W R L L P D E T Y M R O R O P E E T O C O O V N Y D E A L R A T E I O O T V L ‫ګ‬ D C E I ‫ګ‬ U F A F ‫ګ‬ E F A S S L E T O ‫ګ‬ R A C C I

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

SEQUIM: Fur nished 1 RUGER: 10-22 carbine, Br. $380, plus electric. great cond., wood stock, (360)417-9478 extra 25 mag, some ammo. $185. SEQ: 2 Br., fenced, car(360)582-1296 port, view, appliances. 1163 Commercial $850. (360)681-3196. Rentals

BRINNON: 2 Br. mobile home in quiet area, pets ok. $400 mo. (360)796-4270

© 2014 Universal Uclick

H P A P W A H T R R S O W T F

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

520 Rental Houses Jefferson County

P T A I S H G A T I H I M A L

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses 683 Rooms to Rent Clallam County Roomshares Clallam County WHAT A RARE FIND B e a u t i f u l 4 . 5 2 a c r e s. Close in location. Property has 215’ frontage on L e e ’s C r e e k . Ve r y p e a c e f u l a n d p r i va t e feeling. Nice building site on knoll above the creek. PUD Power and Wa t e r h o o k u p p o s sibility. You will love the sights and sounds of this wo n d e r f u l p r o p e r t y. I would be great to build a home, or it would lend itself to a vacation spot for your RV. MLS#280331. $49,500. Vivian Landvik (360)417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

S I N D R I V E R A S A S E Y

6042 Exercise Equipment

MISC: Thule Sidekick and rack, like new for 2004 VW Beetle, $250. Pro-for GR 80 recumbent, programmable bike, $150. E-mail photo available. (360)385-7405

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment TRACTOR: 1950 Ferguson. 3 pt. hitch, new tires, 5’ Br ush hog, post-hole digger, fronte n d l o a d e r, a l l n ew eng., clutch, and more! $4,000 (307)436-6053 TRACTOR: 2011 Cub Cadet Yanmar tractor, bucket and backhoe. 24 horse, 12 hours. Asking $15,000. (360)452-9314. TRACTOR: Mahindra 28 hp, hydrostatic transmission with attachments, approx 175 hrs., excellent condition. $10,500/ obo. (760)594-7441.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition HANDGUN: 1911 Colt, series 70, Mark IV, large frame, hi-cap mags and 45 ammo. $1,200 for all. (360)461-5195

50 Moral principles 52 For instance, with “as” 55 Piece of paper 56 “The Jetsons” boy 58 Malia Obama’s sister 61 Cosby/Culp TV series 63 Rotation meas. 65 Global currency org.

VONCIE

THOLCB

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday's

6075 Heavy Equipment

6105 Musical Instruments

TRUCK/TRACTOR: ‘56 Kenworth , new batteries, excellent r unning condition. $6,500/obo. (360)683-3215

PIANO: Sohner upright, approx. 45 years old. In excelllent condition. Appraised at $1,200, will sell for $1,150. (360)385-2516

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

6080 Home Furnishings

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

CAPTAINS BED: Full size, birch hardwood, 8 drawers and 3 doors, excellent condition. $450/obo. (360)775-8807

NICE, DRY FIREWOOD $190 cord (360)477-8832

3/17/14

LIFT CHAIR: Almost new, heated, vibrates. $800. (360)461-9382 or (360)457-6887.

LIFT CHAIR: Power Lift R e c l i n e r, B e s t H o m e Funishings, bought loca6065 Food & ly on Feb. 18, 2014 and Farmer’s Market paid $1,037, only used 5 times. Sell for $600. HALIBUT: Fresh, whole (360)681-2139 fish only. (360)640-1920. MISC: Beautiful handTHE SUN’S OUT! made wood bookcase, Blueberries, raspberries, $ 5 0 . O a k t a b l e a n d strawberries, fruit trees, chairs, $40. Nice wood w a l n u t a n d h a z e l n u t office desk, $50. Leather trees, cypress, sequoias, sofa with 2 recliners, noble and douglas fir $75. (360)797-3326. trees, (20% off all ornaMISC: Double recliner mental trees). G&G Farms, 95 Clover love seat dark blue and Ln., off Taylor Cutoff, black, $195. 3 roll-away beds, $35 and $45. Sequim. (360)683-8809. Clean living room chair, $25. 3 night stands, $10 6075 Heavy ea. Side table, $40. Vacuums, $8-$10. Equipment (360)327-3666 C AT / Tr u ck / Tra i l e r TABLE: 30”Hx42”Wx18” Combination. 1997 Ford leaf, 4 jewel Tuscany F250 “Heavy Duty” 4x4: swivel tilt chairs. $550. 7.3 Power Stroke with (360)683-3469 Manual Trans. This rare low milage truck (130k) is in excellent condition 6100 Misc. and has been well mainMerchandise tained by a single owner. Truck comes with New CAR TRAILER: 14’. Tires and Canopy. 2005 $1,000. (360)670-3053. Caterpillar 247B MultiTe r r a i n w i t h l o w h r s M I S C : E n t e r t a i n m e n t (104). This unit is also in c e n t e r , o r i g . p r i c e , excellent condition and $ 2 , 3 0 0 , n o w $ 7 0 0 . c o m e s c o m p l e t e w i t h Whirlpool refrigerator, side windows and a front used 7 mo., $125. Workdoor kit. The following out bench, $25. Exercise quick connect attach- b i ke , $ 5 0 . Tr e a d m i l l , ments are included and $ 7 5 . D o l l c r i b w i t h 9 are original CAT equip- dolls, $150. ment: Auger A14B with 9 (360)460-9418 inch Bit; 78” Angle Blade; 72” bucket and POOL TABLE: League pallet forks.2005 Trail- size, slate. Possible coin m a x 1 2 U T E Tr a i l e r . operated. $500. Trailer has very little us(360)477-2918 age. $58,000. SAFE: Diebold, fire clas(360)681-8504 sification B, T-20 tamper EQUIPMENT TRAILER resistant door, 25” wide x 27” deep x 46” tall, 24’, 3 axle with ramps. ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n . $3,200/obo $500. (360)683-3215 (360)683-7345 GMC: ‘98 C7500 series truck, propane new Jas6105 Musical per engine under warInstruments ranty, flat bed, lumber racks and tool boxes, Allison tranny. $10,200/ PIANO: Kimball Ar tist obo. (360)683-3215. Console Piano with bench and lamp. Like SEMI END-DUMP n ew c o n d i t i o n . C a n ’ t TRAILER: High lift-gate, play due to hand surgerex. cond. $15,000/obo. ies. You transport. $575. (360)417-0153 (360)681-0451

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

DOWN 1 Talk and talk and ... 2 Show more staying power than 3 Old Montreal team 4 Poker game starter 5 Sheep’s sound 6 Terra __: pottery clay 7 Surefire winner 8 Latin “I love” 9 “The Merry Widow” composer Franz 10 Serious-andfunny show 11 Orbitz quote 12 Originated (from) 13 Oh-so-stylish 17 Finished for good 21 Logical guy with pointy ears 24 Ranch worker 25 Auto dealer’s inventory 28 Bach composition 32 Gold, to Gomez 34 Workout place 36 Communication for the deaf: Abbr.

3/17/14

R G T I R E T S O O B T U S R

6115 Sporting Goods BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection Including Estates. Call (360)477-9659

6125 Tools TABLE SAW: 5 hp Delta uni-saw with 10’ Biesamer fence, 8’ right, 2’ left, new mag starter, excellent condition. $700. (916)768-1233, Sequim

6140 Wanted & Trades

-

ACROSS 1 Bambi’s mom, e.g. 4 First grade lessons 8 Father-son actors Robert and Alan 13 Essence 14 Sodium hydroxide, in chem class 15 Deserve 16 Tricky situation to deal with 18 Chicago airport 19 Smitten 20 Piper’s son of rhyme 22 Radio switch letters 23 End 24 Salon styling stuff 26 Santa’s laugh sounds 27 Victrola corp. 29 Govt. intelligence gp. 30 Dr. of rap 31 Division word 33 Taiwanese-born director Lee 35 Asked God for guidance 37 Former NFLer with a season record 23 touchdown receptions 40 JFK’s vessel 43 Soft slip-on 44 Norse trickster 48 “I got it!” 49 “Norma __” 51 Approves 53 Flying Peter 54 Flying socialite 57 Start of a fitness motto 59 Curved foot part 60 Minor league rink org. 61 “Just watch me!” 62 “Politically Incorrect” host Bill 64 Hearty meal often made with mutton, and, in a way, what the ends of 16-, 24-, 37- and 54Across comprise 66 “Not __ out of you!” 67 Casino freebie 68 Chile’s Cape __ 69 Methods: Abbr. 70 “Ghost Hunters” channel 71 Two-time loser to DDE

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014 B7

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: GIANT BOOTH VIABLE AUBURN Answer: The documentary about the construction of the Eiffel Tower was — RIVETING

9820 Motorhomes MOTORHOME: ‘85 Winnebago. Diesel, Mistubishi motor, 4 speed, good tires, good mileage, 2 bed, shower with toilet, s t e r e o, A / C, b o d y i s good, needs some work. $3,500. (360)301-5652.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

TRAILER: 25’ HiLo. Excellent, all works, H2O h e a t e r, A / C, f u r n a c e. MOTORHOME: ‘89 Toy- $4,250. (360)963-2156. ota Dolphin. Sleeps 4+, low mi., clean, strong, TRAILER: ‘77 20’ Komr e l i a bl e, e c o n o m i c a l . fort. Real good shape. See at Mobuilt R.V., P.A. $1,875. (360)461-1352. REDUCED: $3,395/obo TRAILER: ‘89 33’ Air(425)231-2576 stream Excella. Double MOTORHOME: Holiday axle, new hickory, wood Rambler 2000 Endeav- floors, ceiling air condior, 38’, (2) slide-outs, tioner unit, new ceramic 3 3 0 H P C a t , A l l i s o n RV toilet, straight body, Tr a n s , 7 9 k , s i x - w a y good condition, includes leather pilot and co-pilot swing arm tow pkg. seats, 4 dr. fridge with $14,300/obo ice maker, hyd. leveling (360)775-7125 jacks, 7.5 diesel gen., rear vision sys., combo washer/dryer, solar panel, 25’ side awning, satellite dish, (2) color TVs, many other extras! Asking $59,000. In Sequim, (360)301-2484

6135 Yard & Garden

9802 5th Wheels

FREE: Horse manure. On Happy Valley Rd., will load. (360)582-9154 LAWNMOWER: Craftsman Lawn Tractor, 26 H P, 5 4 ” m o w e r, a u t o TRAILER: Rare retrans., 3 bagger. $1,150. sealed 1978 Argosy by (360)681-7400 Airstream. $11,500! All crevices have been re7025 Farm Animals sealed for extra protect i o n w / n ew p a i n t t o o. & Livestock Stored indoors! Weighs RO O S T E R : B e a u t i f u l 1,000s less but Same show rooster. Attn. farm Airstream quality. Interipeople or people with or exactly as in 1978 chickens. Noted as a when it came off the facFrench chicken that is tory floor. 28 ft. Comes called Cuckoo Marans, 5 w i t h l o a d s o f ex t r a s mo. old, just amazingly ( a w n i n g , s w a y b a r s ) please only serious cash beautiful. $10. buyers only! Sequim, (360)457-8102 (360)808-6160.

7035 General Pets PUPPIES: 9 week old puppies, (2) teacup chihuahuas, one male, one female, $500. (3) male chihuahua-terrier mix, $300 each. All are extremely loving! (360)582-6308

9820 Motorhomes TRAILER: Sur veyor ‘14 Bunkhouse 28’. Luxurious, sleeps six. Locally owned, only used three times. Full kitchen, bath. Lighted/power awning. Premium audio/TV. Auto climate control. $27,000. (360)8081206.

9817 Motorcycles

TRAILER: ‘12 RPod by Forest River. Model 171, Hood River Edition. $10,400. (360)797-1284, Sequim.

WANTED TO BUY WA N T E D : C l a s s C Salmon/bass plugs and m o t o r h o m e . 1 9 9 5 o r TRAILER: Airstreem ‘93 Excella 1000. 34’, very lures, P.A. Derby me- newer, low miles. nice, in Port Angeles. morabilia (360)683-4791 (360)374-6490 $14.500. (206)459-6420.

ITASCA: ‘07 24’, “C,” with tow car and satellite TV, 30K mi., mint cond. $48,650. (360)683-3212.

5TH WHEEL: Alpenlite ‘90 32’, fair condition. $4,000/obo. (360)457-5950

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

K AWA S A K I : ‘ 0 9 K X 2 5 0 F. E x c e l l e n t cond. Fresh top end. Under 60 hours on bike and always maintained. Original owner. Bike also has new graphics/plastics. Comes with many extras. $3,500/obo. (360)775-7996 KAWASAKI: ‘69 TR120 Enduro. Clean bike, no corrosion, needs minor work, orig. condition. $500. (360)452-4179.

MOTOR SCOOTER Aprilia ‘08 500ie. Beautiful like new, silver ‘08 Aprilia 500cc Scooter. <1,000 miles garaged year round. Great commuter bike with 60+ miles per gallon! Wond e r f u l fo r s h o r t / l o n g hauls.Includes (2) helmets keys/remotes, owners manual and new batter y! ONLY serious cash buyers call. Don’t pay dealers freight and set up charges. This is a deal at $3,600. (360)808-6160

B OAT S a l e / M a r i n e Swap. Apr il 12, 2014 Boats, kayaks, dinghies, marine gear, outboard engines. Register your 9742 Tires & vessel for the show! Call Wheels Port Ludlow Marina for details. (360)437-0513. MISC: Make a dually out CATALINA: 22’ sailboat. of your Dodge pickup or Swing keel, with trailer, 4 late model Ford, (4) 17” HP outboard. $3,800. tires, rims and adaptors, paid $2,300, like new, (928)231-1511. 1 , 6 0 0 m i . , y o u r s fo r LAVRO: 14’ drift boat, 2 $750. (4) antique books, $450. (360)457-2858. sets oars, trailer. $1,000. (360)928-9716

O LY M P I C : 1 5 ’ . N e w 9180 Automobiles Yamaha 50 hp motor, Classics & Collect. new Suzuki 4 stroke, new Elite 5 GPS Chart- CHEV: 2000 SS Camaro. Top condition, cherry plotter, downriggers. $3,900. (360)774-6505. red, new wheels/tires, recent big tune-up. RIVER BOAT: 15’ Valco $9,500/obo. w i t h C a l k i n s t r a i l e r, (360)457-9331. $1,500/obo. (360)928-3863 CHEV: ‘87 Camaro Iroc Convertible. DisassembTRAILER 17’ boat/sport/ led, good body, no motor utility trailer, LED lights, /trans, ready to restore! bunks, galvanized, new $500. (360)379-5243. tires and spare. $625. (360)681-8761 FORD: (2) 1966 F100s. 1 long bed, with ‘390’ C6 tranny, power steering, 9817 Motorcycles power disc brakes, runs and drives. 1 short bed, 6 cyl. 4 speed, nice H O N DA : ‘ 8 0 C X 5 0 0 . wheels and tires, runs and drives. Both trucks Dependable, shaft drive. $4,000. (360)809-0082. $600. (360)461-0938.


B8 MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014

Classified 9180 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks Classics & Collect. Others

AC C O R D I A N : S i l ve r tone, made in Italy, 220 base, 2 tone, 3 octave. $150/obo. 461-1379.

D E C A N T E R S : 3 B a r - REEL: PF Lueger bait ware, glitzy, 1950s, 8 casting reel No. 510B, r o l y p o l y s . $ 4 0 . supreme, in box. $125. (360)683-9295. (360)457-9214

AIR COMPRESSOR DINING SET: Large ta- RICE COOKER: Food Bostitch, 4 gal, OL195. ble, leaf, 6 chairs. $200. steamer, Aroma, 10 cup $50/obo. (360)460-5762. (360)457-7146 digital, new. $35. (360)775-0855 AIR COMPRESSOR D O G H O U S E : L a r g e, Craftsman, 5 gal. tank, white igloo. $35. ROD AND REEL: Spin model #921.166360. (360)457-0404 r o d a n d r e e l c o m b o, $100. (360)460-5762. never used. $75. DV D s : 3 6 a s s o r t e d (360)452-8953 AIR COMPRESSOR DVDs, excellent condiGood cond. $50. tion. $3 each. SAILBOAT: 12’ fiber(360)797-3236 (360)452-8953 glass sailboat. $200. (360)461-0938 AIR COMPRESSOR FABRIC: Upholstry fabPor ter Cable air com- r i c, m e d . bl u e, 1 0 0 % SANDER: Vertical, 10’’, pressor CF2400, 2 HP, 4 poly velvet, 14 yards, with sliding fences, like gal. $150. 457-5186. new. $100. 681-0103. new. $150. (360)452-9146 AMP: Kenwood, power- F I G U R I N E : H a r m o n y ful stereo amp., ver y Kingdom collectible Y2k, SCULPTURE: Bronze, nice. $100. perfect condition. $50. school of dolphins, ap(360)452-9685 (360)452-7967 prox. 2’ x 2’. $100. (360)681-7579 AQUARIUM: 40 gallon, FILE CABINET: 2 drawstand, hood, filter, many er, metal. $25. SERVING CART: White, extras. $100. (360)379-4763 for patio, with 2 glass (360)681-4432 shelves, rolls. $50. FIRE EXTINGUISHER (360)775-0857 AQ UA R I U M S : 2 m i d Vintage, red with yellow size, wrought iron stand, lettering. $15. SHELVES: Wood, very 3 l i g h t h o o d s, p u m p. (360)452-6842 nice. 60” x 72”. $75. (360)452-9530. $175/obo. FISHING: Chest waders (360)477-8744 AU TO G R A P H : N A S - and boots, fits 10-11 CAR die-cast 1:24 scal, shoe. $25 ea. SKI JACKET: Women’s Napa Auto Parts M. Wal(360)457-8763 o r g i r l s, d ow n , h o o d , trip. $100. 775-0380. blue. $38. FOOSBALL TABLE (360)775-0855 AU TO G R A P H : N A S - Free standing. $65. CAR hat, No. 24 Jeff (360)670-6025 BED: Twin size, SOFA Gordon, AARP. $30. light floral pr int, ver y (360)775-0380 F R E E : 2 d r a w e r f i l e good condition. $75. (360)775-0857 AWNING: 10’x10’, white, cabinet, old. (360)793-1708 light weight. $15. S O FA : Loveseat, 6 (360)681-8049 FREE: Bird cage, 24’’ by months old, was $1,000 24’’ by 60’’, suitable for new. $200/obo. AXLE: Trailer axle and (360)775-9631 dump hydrolic cylinder larger birds. (360)683-8058 and pump. $200. SONY RECIEVER (360)457-5186 FREE: Cannon PC 735 Black rinish. $100/obo. B E A M S : 4 ’’ x 1 0 ’’ x 1 6 ’’ . copier, needs ink. (360)775-9921 (360)683-7397 $30. 4’’x12’’x9’’. $20. SPRAYER: Solo back(360)452-7721 FREE: Cub cadet grass pack. $20. catcher. (360)793-1708. B E D : Te m p u r p e d i c , (360)640-0556 used, clean/stain free, FREE: File cabinet, 2 STORAGE CABINET price firm. $200. drawers, metal. Multimedia, solid oak, (360)461-7058 (360)793-1708 ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n . BED: Twin, teak frame, GOLF: Full set Arnold $75. (360)775-0857. good mattress. $65. Palmer woods and irons. TABLE: Oak, nice, 36” x (360)457-6127 $50. (360)385-2776. 55”, (4) chairs. $25. BICYCLE TRAINER (360)775-4978 G O L F : M e n ’s W i l s o n CycleOps bicycle trainer, staf irons. $35. TABLE SAW: Sears, old ex. cond. $150. (360)385-2776 but works. $50. (360)452-7944 (360)683-8058 GRANITE: Corner BIKE: Pacific Horizon, piece, 24” x 25”. $80. 20’’, girls. $50. TENT: Coleman, 4 per(360)683-1217 (360)457-9528 son, 9’ x 8’, used once. $30. (360)457-8763 GRASS CATCHER: For BIKE: Raleigh, 21 speed, mountain bike, 42” mower. 160. TIRES: 22sx75x15”, (360)582-3840 good condition. $90. Toy o h i g h w ay t r e a d , (360)640-0556 Toyota 6-lug rims. $100. GRASS TRIMMER (360)775-9631 B I R D C A G E : N i c e , E c h o , G T- 2 2 5 , v e r y stand, toys, food, etc. good condition. $75. TIRES: 4 all season, (360)681-8592 $25. (949)241-0371. Blackwell, 215/65R-15 for Toyota Sienna. $75. BLENDER: Oster izer, HAT: Ladies, gray, vel(360)681-5158 multi-function, glass con- ve t , fa n c y b e a d wo r k . $20. (360)683-9295. tainer with lid, ex. cond. TIRES: (4) Bridgestone $20. (303)916-8518. H I T C H : R e s s e f i f t h P245/75R16, M+S, 50% B O B B L E H E A D : Ke n wheel hitch, complete tread. $200. (360)452-5652 Griffey Jr., 2013 mari- with bars. $200. (360)683-2529 ners hall of fame, new. TOOL BOX: Diamond $40. (360)457-5790. HOIST: Lever chain, 1 plate, out of ‘91 Toyota pickup. $70. BOBBLEHEAD: Randy ton, US made. $125. (360)457-7146 (360)452-1661 Johnson, Dan Wilson, Mariners Hall of Fame. TOOLBOX: Truck toolHOLSTER: Pro Carr y, $40. (360)457-5790. box, full-size truck, lock, new, HD. $25. fiberglass. $50/obo. (360)457-9528 BOOK CASE: 6’ x 3’, (360)452-9685 oak shelves, very nice. JACK: 2 ton, fl oor, auto$175. (360)460-1796. TRAILER HITCH motive, still in box. $30. Husky, for 5th wheel, BOOK: Harbor In Bloom (360)681-8049 16K adjustable, EZ Rollby Debbie Macomber, brand new $26. Asking JACKET: Men’s, large, er. $200. (360)452-7967. C o l u m b i a , l i k e n e w, $13. (360)683-4994. TRAVEL TRAILER: 14’, black/gray. $25. needs some work, poB O OT S : S p e r r y “ To p (360)452-9146 tential. $200. S i d e r s ,” m e n s , S i z e (360)775-5248 J A C K E T : U S N a v y 11M, ver y low use. leather flight, fur collar, $30/obo. (360)452-5003. TREADMILL: Profor m new, size 38. $125. 585. $10. B O OT S : Wo m e n ’s, (360)683-7397 (360)457-0404 leather, 6” Vibram sole, LADDER: 10’, fibersize 6, like new. $10. TRIMMER CORD: New, glass, self-standing. (360)457-1994 grass trimmer, 175mi, 2 $130. (360)681-8761. 80’’ rolls. $15 each. CANOPY: Black, tinted LAWN FURNITURE (360)681-8592 windows, 76” x 60”. Table, chairs, umbrella. $100. (360)912-4536. TRIPOD: Professional $35. (360)793-1708. CAR AMP: ITS Audio, quality. $80. MATTRESS SET: King 700 watt, good cond. (360)683-8058 and double size, mat$100. (360)683-1217. TRUCK DOORS: Driver, t r e s s / b ox s p r i n g s e t . CAR COVER: New in $100 ea. (360)582-0542. passenger doors off ‘91 b ox , C h r y s l e r ‘ 1 1 o r Toyota pickup. $150 for newer. $200. M I S C : R i d e r p a n t s , both. (360)457-7146. (360)683-2529 large, $20. Motorcycle TV: Big screen TV, 65”, cover, $20. C H A I R : L a n e L a d y ’s, works well. $200/obo. (360)452-5401 with ottoman, floral print, (360)912-4536. good condition. $50. MODEL KITS: 10 unTV: good condition, 4 (360)775-0857 built kits, vintage and new, wood and plastic. available. $25 each. CHAPS: “River Road,” $85/obo. (360)452-6842. (360)582-0542 black leather, large. $40. (360)582-9782 M OW E R : P u s h , g o o d VACUUM: Oreck Commercial XL, lightweight, cond., sharp blades. C H E S T: 4 d rawe r s, red, excellent shape. $40. (360)379-4763. newly painted, new $60. (303)916-8518. hardware, 36” x 45”. OIL TREATMENT: STP, $45. (360)457-6431. r e d u c e d p r i c e , 1 5 o z VISE: Wilton Quick Recans at $4 ea. $45 case lease #161072-10, used, C H E S T: 4 d rawe r s, excellent cond., unique. of 12. (360)683-4994. small, 16” x 35”. $20. $80. (360)461-1979. (360)457-6431 OPERA NEWS: Caruso WALKER: With seat and t r i bu t e, Fe b r u a r y 2 4 , CLEATS: Used NIKE, brakes. $45. youth 3.5, 4.5, 5, black/ 1973, good condition. (360)683-6097 white, good condition. $15. (360)681-0571. $10 ea. (360)457-5299. W E E D E AT E R : G a s PHILODENDRON p owe r e d , ex t ra s p o o l CLOCK: Antique, wood, Lush, large, quality pot. with line, little use. $50. Waterbury mantel clock, $45. (360)681-8015. (360)683-7394 working. $40. PHONE: Cordless, set of (360)683-4322 3 with charging bases WELDER: 220 volt, old COLLECTABLES: Die- plus answering machine. but works. $100. (360)452-1661 cast cars, trucks, drag- $30. (360)582-0723. sters, 12 avail. $10 ea. PHOTO: Johnny Carson W E T S U I T: J e t p i l o t (360)681-7579 size, men’s, large. $200. signed color 8x10. $200. (360)477-8744 (360)681-2968 COLLECTIBLE: 2000 Rose Bowl Pristine Wa- PICTURE: Rie Munoz WHEELCHAIR: With terford crystal, with cert. print, “Tossing Sticks.” foot rests. $50. $200. (360)681-2968. (360)452-7944 $175. (360)683-6008. COOKTOP: Kenmore, PLATES: Bradford Ex- WHEELS: 4 aluminum 30”, white. $35. c h a n g e c o l l e c t a b l e , wheels with tires off ‘91 (360)582-3840 birds, animals, nature. Toyota pickup. $100 for all. (360)457-7146. $20 ea. (360)670-6025. CRIB: Solid wood. $25. (360)457-0404 PUZZLES: (6) Wysocki W H E E L S : ( 4 ) F o r Subaru, 15”, newly CRONIN STONE: Earth puzzles. $2.00 each. painted. $75. (360)683-6008 tones, 24.5 sq ft, with (360)457-6127 edging. $110. R A N G E H O O D : 4 2 ’’ , (360)683-7435 white, externally vented, WICKER BASKETS: 20 total, good shape. Large C U R TA I N S : V i n t a g e range hood with fan. $5. Medium $3. Small style curtains, small rose $15.(360)460-4039. $2. (360)452-7721. pattern, (8) panels. RECORDS: Over 100 $50. (360)683-7668. classic Rock and Roll WOOD PULLEY: old, 4, 3 with hooks. $120. DRESSER: 5 drawers. LPs, 1960-1978. (360)683-7435 $200/obo. 452-8895. $50. (360)775-8590.

CLASSIC 1974 Mercedes, 450 SL. Sacrifice at $13,500. Very clean. No dents, no scratches. Interior like new. speedo reading 59,029. Comes with a car cover. Has the factory manuals. Larry at 360-504-2478, cell: 618-302-0463. FORD: ‘31 Model A Rumble seat coupe. Looks and runs good. $15,000. (360)681-5468. FORD: ‘63 Fairlane 500. Hard top. $10,000/obo. (360)808-6198

9292 Automobiles Others BMW: ‘98 318i. Black, 240k mi., runs well but needs a little work. $1,750. (360)461-9637. CADILLAC: ‘02 Deville DTS. Sedan 4 dr, 54,000 mi., black on black, must see. $6,200 (360)681-3093 CHEV: ‘08 Aveo. Hatchback, 5 speed, 38k mi, 35 + MPG, 98% cond. $7,500. (360)683-7073 between 6:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. JAGUAR: ‘12 FX. 1 of 200 with special sports pkg., extra low miles. $43,900 (360)765-4599 MAZDA: ‘04 RX-8. Top condition, 15,000 original mi., black, loaded, extra set of tires/wheels, for winter. $10,000/obo. (360)460-1393 MAZDA: ‘12 5 Sport Ed. 31K, 6 sp. manual, seats 6, great gas mi. $14,450. (360)200-8833. MERCEDES: ‘75 240D Diesel. Runs great. $2,300. Call for more info at (360)301-3652.

SUBARU ‘08LEGACY 2.5i SEDAN 2.5L, 4 cyl., automatic, alloy wheels, sunroof, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r windows, doors, mirrors and drivers seat, cruise, tilt A/C, MP3 CD stereo, satellite radio, 8 airbags. 32k original miles. Carfax certified one owner with no accidents, like new condition inside and out. AWD for all-weather p e r fo r m a n c e. E x p e r i ence why these are teh N o r t h we s t s ’s favo r i t e cars. $15,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com SUBARU: ‘84 GL SW 2x4WD, low mi., new clutch, WP, rad, hose s, s e a l s, m o r e. 5 x stud. $3,000/obo. (360)460-9199 TOYOTA : ‘ 0 0 C a m r y. A / C, l e a t h e r s e a t s, 4 cyl., runs good. $4,999. (360)374-3309 TOYOTA : ‘ 0 2 C a m r y. 130k mi., ex. cond. $6,500. (360)452-4034.

9434 Pickup Trucks Others C H E V: ‘ 0 0 S - 1 0 4 x 4 . Original owner, ext. cab, auto, canopy, 77k miles. 6,800. (360)471-6190. CHEV: ‘70 K-20. 4x4, partial restoration, auto, 350, extras. $5,500 or part trade. 452-5803. FORD: ‘73 1 Ton flat bed with side racks, 65K original mi., winch, new power steering, brand new paint. $4,000. (360)640-8155 FORD: ‘76 F250. V8, low miles, need mechanic. $1,000. (360)582-9480 FORD: ‘77 F-350 1 ton dually. Newer engine, dump truck PTO. $3,175/obo. 460-0518.

FORD: ‘91 F250. 7.3 diesel, 97K mi., tow pkg., tinted windows, auto, 2WD, truck box, new rear tires, runs good. $2,700. (360)477-2809. FORD: ‘95 F150 4x4. 300 strait 6, 5 speed, ext. cab. $2,900/obo. (360)808-3825 FORD: ‘96 F150. Eddie B a u e r E d . , V 8 , 4 W D, bed liner, Gem top, sun v i s o r, 1 2 5 k m i , g o o d cond. $4,900. (360)457-8763

GMC ‘00 SIERRA 1500 LONG BED 2WD 4.3L Vor tec V6, auto, c h r o m e w h e e l s , n ew tires, matching Leer canopy, spray-in bedliner, priacy glass, tilt, A/C, J V C C D s t e r e o, d u a l front airbags. 108k miles. Accident free Carfax. Immaculate condition inside and out. Vortec V6 engine for great fuel mileage. $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

9556 SUVs Others

G M C : ‘ 0 4 D u r a m a x . CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 153k 2 5 0 0 H D, 4 x 4 , s h o r t miles, good cond., 4WD. bed, extras, 108K mi. $1,900. (360)460-8155. $24,000. (360)461-0088 C H E V : ‘ 9 2 S u bu r b a n . New tires, brakes, mufGMC: ‘76 GMC 1/2 ton. f l e r , n e w e r e n g i n e , 3 5 0 w i t h h e a d e r s . 3 Panasonic stereo, 4WD, speed auto new tires. auto. $3,250/obo. Over $11,000 invested. (360)461-7478 or Asking $3,500/obo (360)452-4156 (360)531-1681 FORD: ‘04 Expedition. TOYOTA ‘00 TUNDRA E x . c o n d . , 1 o w n e r, 135k, new tires, ecoSR5 EXT. CAB 4x4 4.7 V8, dual exhaust, nomical 2WD. $5,395. (360)683-7176 auto, alloy wheels, running boards, tow package, spray-in liner, brush GMC: ‘95 Yukon. Runs guard, rear sliding win- we l l , l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r. d ow, p owe r w i n d ow s, $2,500/obo. (360)461-6659 doors, locks, and mirrors, cr uise, tilt, A/C, CD/cassette stereo, dual H O N D A : ‘ 0 2 C R V. front airbags. 94k miles. A W D , ( 2 ) s e t s A c c i d e n t - f r e e C a r fa x . wheels/tires (snow), tow bars on front and back, Two previous owners. auto, 115k miles. $13,995 $9,500. (360)461-5190. GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 ISUZU: ‘99 Amigo. 68K graymotors.com mi., 4WD, V6, auto, air, FM/CD, sunroof, excelTOYOTA : ‘ 0 7 Ta c o m a lent condition. $6,200/ access cab. V6, 4x4, ex- obo. (360)640-2711. tra set of tires and rims w i t h s e n s o r s , a u t o , T O Y O TA : ‘ 9 2 L a n d cruise, A/C, 42k miles. Cruiser. White ext., gray $28,000/obo int., 6 cyl., loaded, ex. (360)452-7214 cond. $4,950. 461-5193.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9730 Vans & Minivans 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Others Clallam County Clallam County DODGE: ‘10 Grand NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS Caravan, handicapped conversion. Kneels, in- SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of floor wheelchair ramp, Clallam County Commissioners at 223 East Fourth passenger transfer seat. $39,000. (360)681-3141. Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until DODGE: ‘98 1 Ton Cargo Van. 360 V8, auto, A/C, new tires, 42,600 miles, can be seen at Ace Auto Repair, 420 Marine Drive. $6,200. (505)927-1248

DODGE ‘98 RAM 3500 CARGO VAN 5.9L V8, auto, new tires and brakes, tow package, trailer brake controller, tinted windows, passenger protection cage, locking console box, tilt wheel, A/C, dual front airbags, 42k original miles, set up and ready to go to work. Local consignment! Tons of life left in this Ram Van! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

10:00 a.m., Tuesday, April 1, 2014, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud for:

The paving of approximately 0.51 miles of Old O l y m p i c H i g h way, f r o m t h e i n t e r s e c t i o n o f Barr/Gunn Roads (M.P. 3.50) to the McDonald Creek Bridge (M.P. 4.01) . Work includes realignment, regrading, widening, installation of hot mix asphalt, guardrails, irrigation lines, and other related work.

Complete plans and specifications may be obtained from the office of the Public Works Department, Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 6, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015, (360) 417 2319. Questions regarding this project may be directed to Rich Fox at (360) 417-2316 or Joe Donisi at (360) 417-2404.

The sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, “BID PROPOSAL - OLD OLYMPIC HIGHWAY PROJECT, CRP C1228 “. Address bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 4, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 or hand-deliver to 223 E. 4th St., Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents delivered to other offices and received late by the Commissioners’ Office will not be considered nor will bids received by facsimile or e-mail.

TOYOTA : ‘ 9 8 S i e n n a . 179K, great condition, Clallam County will determine the lowest responnew tires. $4,500. sible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam (360)775-8296

County Code Section 3.12.070 and reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive infor-

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices malities in the process or to accept the bid which in Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam File No.: 7037.96136 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: The Heirs and Devisees of Nellie A. Hazelett, who also appears of record as Nelene A. Hazelett, deceased and Michael J. Hazelett, who also appears of record as Michael Jay Hazelett, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 728702 Tax Parcel ID No.: 08-31-33-430150 Abbreviated Legal: PTN SW4SE4 S33-T31N-R8WWM, CLALLAM CO., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On March 28, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Beginning at the intersection of the North line of Highway No. 112, and the East line of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 33, Township 31 North, Range 8 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington; thence North along the East line of said Subdivision 974 feet; thence Northwesterly parallel with the North line of said Highway, 185 feet; thence Southwesterly 845 feet, more or less, to the North line of said highway; thence Southeasterly along said North line 575 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning; except that portion thereof described as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the North line of Highway112 and the East line of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 33, Township 31 North, Range 8 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington; thence North along the East line of said subdivision 300 feet; thence Northwesterly parallel with the North line of said Highway 400 feet; thence South parallel with the East line of said subdivision 300 feet, more or less, to the North line of said highway; thence Southeasterly along the said North line 400 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, also except that portion, if any, lying within railroad right of way conveyed to Crown Zellerbach Corporation by Deed recorded under Auditor’s File No. 295915. And that portion as stipulated in Superior Court Cause Number 99-2-00366-5 and disclosed by Survey recorded under Clallam County Auditor’s File No. 2002 1083040. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Including a 1988 Moduline 48 X 28 mobile home, plate &79192, VIN 19892 Commonly known as: 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/18/95, recorded on 09/25/95, under Auditor’s File No. 728702, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Wilfred D. Hazelett and Shirlee M. Hazelett, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, a Washington Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Washingon Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121281882. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 11/19/2013 Monthly Payments $19,520.19 Lender’s Fees & Costs $68.60 Total Arrearage $19,588.79 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $700.00 Statutory Mailings $120.77 Recording Costs $76.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $1,194.72 Total Costs $2,161.49 Total Amount Due: $21,750.28 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $62,666.40, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 28, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Heirs & Devisees for The Estate of Wilfred D. Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Heirs & Devisees for The Estate of Shirlee M. Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Heirs & Devisees for The Estate of Nelene A. Hazelett aka Nellie A. Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Michael Jay Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael Jay Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/20/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/21/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/19/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.96136) 1002.228138-File No. Pub: Feb. 24, March 17, 2014 Legal No. 544458

County.

Clallam County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award.

The attached contract plans, these contract provisions and the Standard Specifications for the above-described project are hereby APPROVED THIS eleventh DAY OF March, 2014 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Michael C. Chapman, Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: March 14, 17, 24, 2014 Legal No. 549119 INVITATION TO BID City of Forks

Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received by the City of Forks, at the Public Works Department, 500 East Division St. Forks, WA 98331, for the labor, materials, and equipment necessary for the completion of the Spartan Avenue Rehabilitation Project, until 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 1, 2014, and no later, at which time such bids will be opened and publicly read aloud and tabulated for submission to the City Council at a future council meeting. BIDS RECEIVED AFTER THE FIXED TIME FOR OPENING WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED. Bids must be completely sealed within a separate envelope with the outside of the envelope marked BID OPENING DATE - April 1, 2014 and “Spartan Avenue Rehabilitation Project, Federal Aid No: STPR-B055(001”. The name and address of the bidder should also appear on the outside of the envelope. Bids should be addressed to City of Forks Public Works Department, 500 East Division St. Forks, WA 98331. Faxed or e-mailed bids will not be accepted. All bid proposals shall be accompanied by a bid proposal deposit in the form of a cashier’s check, postal money order, or surety bond made payable to the City of Forks in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. Should the successful bidder fail to enter into such contract and furnish satisfactory performance bond within the time stated in the specifications, the bid proposal deposit shall be forfeited to the City of Forks. No bid shall be considered unless accompanied by such bid proposal deposit. The right is reserved to reject any and all bids and to waive irregularities and informalities in the bidding. The City will award the Contract for this project to the lowest responsive bidder based on the lowest total amount of the bid proposal. Availability of Bidding Documents: Contract documents are anticipated to be available for pick up on or after March 10, 2014. Bona fide general contractors may obtain the contract documents at any one of three locations of Exeltech Consulting, Inc., located at 116 West 8th Street, Suite 120, Port Angeles, WA 98362, (360) 417-3803 (by appointment only), or 2127 5th Ave., Seattle, WA 98121, (206) 623-9646, ext. 1108, or 8729 Commerce Place Dr ive NE, Suite A, Lacey, WA 98516, (360) 357-8289, ext. 1108, upon a refundable payment of $100.00 per set. The $100.00 fee is refundable if the set of documents is returned unmarked and undamaged.

Copies of the contract documents may also be examined at these locations as well as at Forks City Hall located at 500 East Division Street, Forks, WA 98331, (360) 374-5412, ext. 245, or Hartnagel Building Supply Inc., 3111 E Highway 101, Port Angeles, WA. This contract is a federally funded project and therefore will require prevailing wages to be paid. BID DOCUMENTS WILL NOT BE MAILED TO BIDDERS.

The following is applicable to federal aid projects. The City of Forks in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 USC 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. The improvement for which bids will be received is described below: PROJECT DESCRIPTION: “Spartan Avenue Rehabilitation Project, Federal Aid No: STPRB055(001)” consisting of the grinding and inlay of Hot Mix Asphalt, constructing sidewalk ramps, and all other work necessary to complete the project as specified in the contract documents within the City of Forks corporate limits. This project is funded with Federal funds. Pub: March 10, 17 2014 Legal No. 547950

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014 B9

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County CR RESOLUTION 7, 2014 INITIATING A COUNTY ROAD PROJECT DESIGNATED AS CRP C1228, OLD OLYMPIC HWY-BARR/GUNN RDS. TO MCDONALD CREEK BRIDGE IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED that Old Olympic Highway, be improved as follows: The paving of approximately 0.51 miles, from the intersection of Barr/Gunn Rds. (M.P. 3.50) to the McDonald Creek Bridge (M.P. 4.01). Work includes realignment, regrading, widening, installation of hot mix asphalt, guardrails, irrigation lines, and other related work. IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED that an appropriation from the officially adopted road fund budget and based on the County Engineer’s estimate is hereby made in the amounts and for the purposes shown: ACCOUNT PURPOSE TOTAL ESTIMATED 2014 CODE ESTIMATE YEAR EXPENDITURE 595.11 Engineering $104,754.00 $5,752.00 595.20 Right of way acquisition $212,404.00 $6,015.00 Total (Not subject to RCW 36.77.065) $317,158.00 $11,767.00 595.12 Construction Engineering $102.051.00 $102.051.00 595.90 Construction Administration $5,000.00 $5,000.00 595.30-80 Construction by Contract $1,020,519.00 $1,020,519.00 595.30-80 Construction by Day Labor $0.00 $0.00 Total (Subject to RCW 36.77.065) $1,127,570.00 $1,127,570.00 Total: $1,444,728.00 $1,444,728.00 Est. Date to Commence Work: Jun-14 Road Dist.: 1 Est. Date to Complete Work: Oct-14 Road Type: Arterial Transfer costs from: 698-1005 Signed This 5 Day of March, 2014 Ross Tyler, P.E. County Engineer This project is included in the officially adopted annual road program as Item No. 13. IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED that the construction is to be accomplished by contract in accordance with RCW 36.77.020 et.seq. ADOPTED THIS 17th DAY OF September, 2013. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Michael C. Chapman, Chair Jim McEntire Howard V. Doherty, Jr. ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC Clerk of the Board Pub: March 17, 2014 Legal No. 549126 File No.: 7042.29316 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A.. as trustee on behalf of CWABS AssetBacked Certificates Trust 2004-6 Grantee: the Heirs of Michael L. Olson, deceased Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2004 1134218 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000 034538 Abbreviated Legal: S2 LTS 9 & 10, BLK 345 TP A, County of Clallam, State of Washington. Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On March 28, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: The South half of Lots 9 and 10, Block 345 Townsite of Port Angeles as per Plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/20/04, recorded on 05/26/04, under Auditor’s File No. 2004 1134218, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Michael L Olson, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Landsafe Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Full Spectrum Lending, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A.. as trustee on behalf of CWABS Asset-Backed Certificates Trust 2004-6, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121279248. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 11/19/2013 Monthly Payments $9,716.99 Lender’s Fees & Costs $954.40 Total Arrearage $10,671.39 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $550.00 Title Report $341.46 Statutory Mailings $100.13 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,075.59 Total Amount Due: $11,746.98 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $49,715.03, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 28, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 The Heirs and Devisees of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 The Heirs and Devisees of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Port Angeles, WA 98362 The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased c/o Law Offices of Curry Andrews, PLLLC 350 West Washington Street, Suite 2 Sequim, WA 98382-3340 The Heirs and Devisees of Michael L. Olson, Deceased c/o Law Offices of Curry Andrews, PLLLC 350 West Washington Street, Suite 2 Sequim, WA 98382-3340 Lindy Lou Conrrad, Personal Representative c/o Law Offices of Curry Andrews, PLLLC 350 West Washington Street, Suite 2 Sequim, WA 98382-3340 Lindy Lou Conrrad, Personal Representative of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Lindy Lou Conrrad, Personal Representative of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Richard E. Burns, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Caroline Burns Weiss, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Geoff L. Olson, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Richard E. Burns, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Caroline Burns Weiss, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Geoff L. Olson, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Lindy Olson, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Lindy Olson, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/18/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/19/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/19/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lamber t (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7042.29316) 1002.258821-File No. Pub: Feb. 24, March 17, 2014 Legal No. 544459

File No.: 7303.24873 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Nationstar Mortgage LLC Grantee: Jacob D. Deese and Kristie Deese, who acquired title as Kristie C. Jacobson, each as their separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2011-1272677 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063012530855/65861 Abbreviated Legal: E1/2 LT. 12, All Lt 13, BB, 1/23 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On April 18, 2014, at 10:00 AM inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 13 and the East half of Lot 12, Block 8, Gales Addition to the Townsite of Port Angeles, as per Plat Recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 23, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 2111 East 5th Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/16/11, recorded on 11/23/11, under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1272677, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Jacob D. Deese, and Kristie Deese, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Recontrust Company, N.A., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Bank of America, N.A., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Bank of America, N.A. to Nationstar Mortgage LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2013-1297537. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 01/16/2014 Monthly Payments $12,305.59 Lender’s Fees & Costs $34.02 Total Arrearage $12,339.61 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $750.00 Title Report $673.16 Statutory Mailings $21.08 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $80.00 Total Costs $1,538.24 Total Amount Due: $13,877.85 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Pr incipal Balance of $164,690.75, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/13, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on April 18, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kristie C Jacobson PO Box 2562 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Jacob D Deese PO Box 2562 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Kristie C Jacobson 2111 East 5th Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Jacob D Deese 2111 East 5th Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 12/03/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 12/04/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttr ustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 01/16/2014 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7303.24873) 1002.260989-File No. Pub: March 17, April 7, 2014 Legal No. 549145 File No.: 8701.20101 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Green Planet Servicing, LLC Grantee: David L. Cooper, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2011-1263067 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043015 330125 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of 15-30-4 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On April 18, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The East half of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 15, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, EXCEPT the East 168.00 feet of the North 259.29 feet of said East half of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter, Section 15. Commonly known as: 83 Davidson Drive Sequim, WA 98382-7465 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/25/11, recorded on 02/18/11, under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1263067, records of Clallam County, Washington, from David L. Cooper, unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mortgage Investors Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Mortgage Investors Corporation, its successors and assigns to Green Planet Servicing, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121284206. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 12/12/2013 Monthly Payments $18,824.19 Late Charges $503.80 Lender’s Fees & Costs $1,914.73 Total Arrearage $21,242.72 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $350.00 Statutory Mailings $46.92 Recording Costs $89.00 Postings $243.78 Sale Costs $1,051.72 Total Costs $1,781.42 Total Amount Due: $23,024.14 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $145,914.05, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on April 18, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David L. Cooper aka David Cooper 83 Davidson Drive Sequim, WA 98382-7465 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David L. Cooper aka David Cooper 83 Davidson Drive Sequim, WA 98382-7465 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/07/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/07/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 12/12/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8701.20101) 1002.244607-File No. Pub: March 17, April 7, 2014 Legal No. 549142

File No.: 7303.23508 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Nationstar Mortgage LLC Grantee: William C. Carmichael and Debbie A. Carmichael, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1170078 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000 031260 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 14, Blk 312 Tpa, Clallam Co., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On April 18, 2014, at 10:00 AM inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 14 in Block 312 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1625 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/19/05, recorded on 11/28/05, under Auditor’s File No. 2005 1170078, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from William C. Carmichael and Debbie A. Carmichael, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Kitsap Community Federal Credit Union, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Bank of America, N.A., Successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP to Nationstar Mortgage LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20131292194. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 01/08/2014 Monthly Payments $35,283.62 Late Charges $316.76 Lender’s Fees & Costs $226.26 Total Arrearage $35,826.64 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $700.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $10.54 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $80.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $819.54 Total Amount Due: $36,646.18 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $114,496.30, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on April 18, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 04/07/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS William C. Carmichael 1625 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Debbie A. Carmichael 1625 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 12/03/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 12/04/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 01/08/2014 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7303.23508) 1002.261008-File No. Pub: March 17, April 7, 2014 Legal No. 549140

Trustee Sale No WA09000024-13-1 APN 62948 Title Order No 8367780 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on 4/18/2014, 10:00 AM, At the first floor main lobby to the entrance of the County Courthouse, 223 East 4th, Port Angeles, WA 98362, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashiers’ check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of King, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 10 of Highland Hills, Division No. I, as recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, page 12, records of Clallam County, Washington. APN: 62948 More commonly known as 1226S N ST, , Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/26/2007 and recorded on 11/30/2007, as Instrument No. 20071212825 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Clallam County, WA from SIEGLINDE INGRID ELLIS, as her separate estate, as Trustor(s), to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Whitney Mortgage Corp,, as the original Beneficiary. The beneficial interest was assigned to Cenlar, FBS and recorded as Instr ument Number 20131294839 II. No action commenced by CENLAR F.S.B, the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Current Beneficiary: CENLAR F.S.B Contact Phone No: (877) 909-9416 Address: 425 Phillips Blvd, Ewing, NJ 08618 III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: DELINQUENT PAYMENT INFORMATION From January 1, 2013 To December 9, 2013 Number of Payments 12 Monthly Payment $1,370.64 Total $16,447.68 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION From January 1, 2013 To December 9, 2013 Number of Payments 11 Monthly Payment $58.37 Total $642.07 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: November 26, 2007 Note Amount: 180,000.00 Interest Paid To: December 1, 2012 Next Due Date: January 1, 2013 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $166,902.12, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on April 18, 2014. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by April 7, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before April 7, 2014 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustees’ fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the April 7, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the current Beneficiary, CENLAR F.S.B. or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SIEGLINDE I. ELLIS 1226S N ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SIEGLINDE I. ELLIS 1209 E 5TH ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 SIEGLINDE ELLIS 1226S N ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 SIEGLINDE ELLIS 1209 E 5TH ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on October 18, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustees’ Sale. X. If the Borrower received a letter under RCW 61.24.031: THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you might eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Comm i s s i o n : Te l e p h o n e : ( 8 7 7 ) 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 o r ( 8 0 0 ) 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 We b s i t e : www.wshfc.org The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; NOTICE TO GUARANTOR(S) - RCW 61.24.042 - (1) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency jUdgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustees’ Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor in order to avoid the Trustee’s’ Sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24.RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within· one year alter the Trustees’ Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any Deed of Trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. The failure of the Beneficiary to provide any Guarantor the notice referred to in this section does not invalidate either the notices given to the Borrower or the Grantor, or the Trustee’s Sale. DATED: 12/10/2013 TRUSTEE CORPS By: Joseph Barragan, Authorized Signatory TRUSTEE CORPS 1700 Seventh Avenue Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 TRUSTEE CORPS 17100 Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 P1074418 3/17, 04/07/2014 Pub: Feb. 17, March 7, 2014 Legal No. 547867


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014 Neah Bay 46/39

Bellingham g 45/37

Olympic Peninsula TODAY Y BRE

EZY

BR

47/39

Olympics Snow level: 1,500 feet

BR

Forks 47/37

E

Port Townsend T o 47/39

EZY

Sequim 48/38

EE ZY

Port Ludlow 49/39

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

National TODAY forecast Nation

Yesterday Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 54 45 0.91 14.12 Forks 52 44 2.90 36.65 Seattle 76 46 0.67 17.27 Sequim 49 46 0.31 6.21 Hoquiam 54 46 1.40 19.16 Victoria 51 40 0.70 14.87 Port Townsend 58 44 **0.49 8.79

Forecast highs for Monday, March 17

Aberdeen 49/38

Billings 49° | 42°

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Low 39 48/41 Clouds; speck of Gray continues rain or two Peninsula cover

Marine Weather

THURSDAY

49/38 Sprinkles quash pollen

FRIDAY

48/38 49/38 Sun sneaks in; Somber skies showers possible abide

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 25 to 35 kt easing to 20 to 30 kt. Wind waves 3 to 6 ft. Chance of showers. Tonight, W wind to 25 kt becoming SE 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft subsiding to 2 ft. Ocean: NW wind to 25 kt becoming W to 15 kt. Wind waves to 5 ft. W swell 16 ft subsiding to 14 ft. A chance of showers. Tonight, S wind to 15 kt becoming NW to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft. W swell 8 ft.

Denver 67° | 39°

CANADA Victoria 48° | 37° Seattle 48° | 39° Olympia 52° | 36°

Spokane 47° | 36°

Tacoma 49° | 37° Yakima 47° | 34°

Astoria 48° | 41°

ORE.

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TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 2:09 a.m. 8.6’ 8:32 a.m. 0.6’ 2:35 p.m. 8.0’ 8:37 p.m. 1.4’

Port Angeles

4:02 a.m. 6.7’ 10:11 a.m. 2.0’ 4:22 p.m. 6.2’ 10:17 p.m. 2.5’

4:28 a.m. 6.7’ 10:46 a.m. 1.4’ 5:11 p.m. 6.2’ 10:54 p.m. 3.1’

Port Townsend

5:39 a.m. 8.3’ 11:24 a.m. 2.2’ 5:59 p.m. 7.6’ 11:30 p.m. 2.8’

6:05 a.m. 8.3’ 11:59 a.m. 1.6’ 6:48 p.m. 7.6’

Dungeness Bay*

4:45 a.m. 7.5’ 10:46 a.m. 2.0’ 5:05 p.m. 6.8’ 10:52 p.m. 2.5’

5:11 a.m. 7.5’ 11:21 a.m. 1.4’ 5:54 p.m. 6.8’ 11:29 p.m. 3.1’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

New York 36° | 25°

Detroit 31° | 10°

Washington D.C. 32° | 26°

Los Angeles 76° | 56°

Atlanta 54° | 54°

El Paso 76° | 42° Houston 63° | 43°

Full

Miami 87° | 73°

Fronts Cold

Mar 23

Mar 30

Apr 7

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset tomorrow

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Apr 15 7:22 p.m. 7:20 a.m. 8:53 p.m. 8:03 a.m.

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 44 Casper 42 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 73 Albany, N.Y. 21 MM PCldy Charleston, W.Va. 63 Albuquerque 37 Clr Charlotte, N.C. 73 Amarillo 35 Cldy Cheyenne 39 Anchorage 18 .04 Cldy Chicago 40 Asheville 42 Rain Cincinnati 60 Atlanta 53 .54 Rain Cleveland 44 Atlantic City 31 Cldy Columbia, S.C. 76 Austin 56 .05 Clr Columbus, Ohio 53 Baltimore 34 Cldy Concord, N.H. 50 Billings 38 Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 68 Birmingham 56 1.33 Rain Dayton 54 Bismarck 18 .04 Cldy Denver 48 Boise 44 Clr Des Moines 51 Boston 29 PCldy Detroit 40 Brownsville 69 Cldy Duluth 22 Buffalo 15 Snow El Paso 70 Evansville 66 Fairbanks 19 WEDNESDAY Fargo 22 56 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 34 2:38 a.m. 8.8’ 9:11 a.m. 0.4’ Great Falls 51 3:16 p.m. 7.8’ 9:11 1.8’ Greensboro, N.C. 72 Hartford Spgfld 55 50 4:56 a.m. 6.7’ 11:25 a.m. 0.9’ Helena 80 6:03 p.m. 6.2’ 11:33 p.m. 3.7’ Honolulu Houston 67 Indianapolis 55 6:33 a.m. 8.3’ 12:07 a.m. 3.4’ Jackson, Miss. 70 7:40 p.m. 7.6’ 12:38 p.m. 1.0’ Jacksonville 77 Juneau 41 73 5:39 a.m. 7.5’ 12:00 p.m. 0.9’ Kansas City Key West 79 6:46 p.m. 6.8’ Las Vegas 79 Little Rock 66

Nation/World

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 1:40 a.m. 8.5’ 7:56 a.m. 0.9’ 1:56 p.m. 8.2’ 8:04 p.m. 1.0’

LaPush

First

Chicago 35° | 18°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

TONIGHT

Tides

New

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 39° | 18°

San Francisco 66° | 52°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 48° | 38°

*Rainfall reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 49/39

Sunny

Hi 46 57 67 25 66 68 63 76 66 50 67 27 59 57 82 36

12 .09 Cldy Los Angeles 22 .07 Clr Louisville 53 Rain Lubbock 37 Snow Memphis 46 Rain Miami Beach 20 Clr Midland-Odessa 19 Cldy Milwaukee 32 Cldy Mpls-St Paul 20 Cldy Nashville 54 .02 Rain New Orleans 27 Cldy New York City 21 Clr Norfolk, Va. 54 1.29 Clr North Platte 28 Cldy Oklahoma City 25 Clr Omaha 24 .12 PCldy Orlando 16 PCldy Pendleton -5 Clr Philadelphia 43 Clr Phoenix 42 Snow Pittsburgh -12 PCldy Portland, Maine 2 Clr Portland, Ore. 35 Clr Providence 9 Clr Raleigh-Durham 41 Clr Rapid City 44 Rain Reno 25 PCldy Richmond 30 PCldy Sacramento 68 Clr St Louis 65 .56 Rain St Petersburg 28 Cldy Salt Lake City 59 1.05 Rain San Antonio 57 Cldy San Diego 33 .02 Snow San Francisco 32 .60 Snow San Juan, P.R. 73 PCldy Santa Fe 53 Clr St Ste Marie 57 .62 Rain Shreveport

81 67 73 68 80 76 35 31 68 70 58 71 55 64 61 80 69 63 86 50 48 65 59 72 45 70 73 80 72 77 56 80 74 76 86 50 16 67

57 40 40 56 .38 71 44 .10 17 12 49 .17 68 .10 31 43 26 38 .66 23 .02 58 42 34 61 24 25 54 28 43 23 .03 37 42 50 35 65 37 60 .03 60 52 74 25 -7 54 1.01

Clr Snow Cldy Rain Cldy Clr Snow Clr Rain Rain PCldy Rain Clr Clr Cldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Clr Cldy Clr Rain PCldy Rain PCldy Clr Rain Clr Snow PCldy Clr Clr Clr Clr Clr Clr Clr Cldy

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 92 at Thermal, Calif., and Death Valley, Calif. ■ -27 at Crane Lake, Mich., and Babbitt, Mich. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington, Del.

33 40 77 75 76 69 70 72 52 65

16 .03 PCldy 16 .04 Cldy 63 PCldy 33 .28 Clr 53 Clr 40 1.02 Rain 40 Cldy 34 .20 Clr 22 PCldy 32 Cldy

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo Otlk 77 59 PCldy 77 58 Cldy 60 42 Cldy 53 43 Cldy/Wind 56 43 Cldy 83 58 Cldy 39 21 Snow 66 38 PCldy 72 65 Cldy 72 50 Cldy 77 59 Rain 57 38 Rain 59 46 Cldy 76 49 PCldy 18 1 Clr 36 28 PCldy 86 61 PCldy 60 45 PCldy 96 73 Clr 70 47 Clr 82 66 PCldy 67 46 PCldy/Wind 24 20 PCldy 45 37 Clr

Briefly . . . Enrollment in optional ed available PORT TOWNSEND — Optional Education Program Enrollment, or OPEPO, is open through April 30. For families with students entering grades 1-5, OPEPO is a multi-age education program offering diverse enrichment oppor-

tunities, family involvement and inquiry-based learning in the Port Townsend School District. Applications and information are available at Grant Street Elementary School. For more information, contact Carrie Spender Lennox at 360-774-2521 or carriespender@gmail.com.

Infantry grad COLUMBUS, Ga. — Army Pvt. Ian Steward of

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as the demonstrator during the Wednesday meeting at PORT LUDLOW — The the Bay Club, 120 SpinnaPort Ludlow Artists’ League ker Place. will present Helga Winter The event is from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Guests are welcome. A guest fee of $5 may be paid for an individual meeting. Time for A Clean Dog!

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Helga Winter will demonstrate her woodturning and painting skills during the Port Ludlow Artists’ League meeting at the Bay Club at 1 p.m. Wednesday.

Sequim has graduated from basic infantry training at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. During the nine weeks of training, Steward received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness and first aid, plus Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included development of basic combat skills, battlefield operations and tactics, along with use of various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman. Steward is the son of Doug and Sherri Steward of Sequim. He is a 2013 graduate of Sequim High School. Peninsula Daily News

Born in Germany Winter, who does both woodturning and painting, was born in Germany and came to America as a young woman to study education. She apprenticed herself with fine furniture-maker

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and woodcarver Paul Pitts and studied with woodturners Rude Osolnik and David Ellsworth. After moving to Port Townsend in 1987, Winter’s turned vessels became her canvas. She discovered madrona as a turning wood and was the first to explore its “orneriness.” She turned the roots, trunks and branches, and began embellishing the surfaces with dyes and wax resist. For examples of Winter’s work, visit www.helga winter.com. For more information about the artists’ league, phone Judy Danberg at 360-437-0342 or email shortline@cablespeed.com.

THESE FEATURES

-Kitchens in all Apartments -Extra Storage in Each Apartment -Delicious Daily Meals -Bi-Weekly Housekeeping -Recreation & Activity Programs -Scheduled Transportation

Now Showing Welcomes

Income Limits Apply.

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360-681-3800 TDD 711 251 S. Fifth Ave., Sequim

suncrestvillage@gres.com

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You could be enjoying your retirement years, right now!

Join us March 19, 2014 at Noon Please RSVP 360.582.2400

Mediate... A Path to Resolution

Dr. Carl Weber

■ The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

Refreshments will be provided

Presented by

“Like Father, Like Son” (NR) “Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago” (NR) “12 Years a Slave” (R)

650 W. Hemlock Street, Sequim, WA 98382 Phone: 360.582.2400 • Fax: 360.582.4655

www.sequimskillednursing.com

■ Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-385-3883) 42990513

Partner Agency

41951854

Parenting Plans •Dissolutions • Family Workplace • Small Claims Neighborhood

Serving Clallam & Jefferson Counties

“The Lego Movie” (PG; animated) “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” (PG; animated) “Need for Speed” (PG-13) “Son of God” (PG-13) “300: Rise of an Empire” (R)

Presenting on Pain

Need to resolve a conflict?

1-800-452-8024 www.pdrc.org

■ Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

“Mr. Peabody & Sherman” (PG; animated)


PDN20140317J