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Monday

Can the Hawks repeat?

A breezy, rainy day is expected across area B10

Seattle’s coach says NFL champs set for an encoreB1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS February 24, 2014 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Board’s pick for director named

The ‘nightmare’ continues

Interim leader in negotiations BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tire tracks and heavy ruts mar an area of Lincoln Park in Port Angeles, the result of intentional vandalism with a vehicle.

Vandalism repeats in PA Lincoln Park is site of recurring vehicle damage to grass BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — City staff members hope bollards defining a new parking area will curb Lincoln Park vandalism described as a “nightmare.” Pickup truck drivers have bypassed rock barriers around the grassy area of the park at 1500 W. Lauridsen Blvd., to joyride, driving in circles, tearing up grass and digging deep tire ruts. “It’s just been a consistent nightmare,” Parks and Recreation Director Corey Delikat told Port Angeles parks

board members during a meeting last week. “This year has probably been the worst,” he said. The most recent damage was spotted in a grassy area on the east side of the park Feb. 16, Delikat said, by a city staff member who reported it to Port Angeles police.

the pad a new parking area, with bollards preventing trucks from accessing both the nearby gravelled areas and the lawns. “[This work is] definitely on our list [that] we want to do this year,” Delikat said. “We can’t afford to build fences or build bollards around the entire place.”

Left serious tracks

Extensive damage

The trucks have ripped deep ruts in some of the park’s gravel parking lots, Delikat added. Delikat told parks board members last week he’s planning to spend about $2,800 on 80 metal bollards, short posts, to be placed around an unused concrete pad on the east side of the park in between two gravel parking lots. Delikat said the intent is to make

Photos taken by Officer Lucas DeGand of the Feb. 16 damage show wheel ruts carved into the grassy area, with some patches reduced to muddy mess. “It’s a problem for sure,” said Brian Smith, deputy Port Angeles police chief. “It’s not a new problem. It’s a recurring problem.” TURN

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Supplemental budget on tap for state legislature this week Financial pitch has been the focal point for area’s senator BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIA — The State Legislature’s two chambers are expected to release their own proposed 2014 supplemental budgets this week, and this has meant weeks of long days for North Olympic Peninsula’s state senator.

Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam, said the Senate is expecting to hold a press conference today during which a Senate bipartisan budget will be presented.

Much work on funding plan Hargrove, the ranking Democrat on the budget-writing Senate Ways and Means Committee, said he has spent most of days since the 2014 legislative session began working with Senate Republican leaders on a proposed supplemental budget. “Which of course has taken 12 to 14 hours every day for me,” Hargrove said Friday. Hargrove said he could not speak

Eye on Olympia much about the Senate proposal before it’s officially released, but said it mostly contains adjustments for spending changes not expected in the larger 2013-2015 biennium budget passed last year after a marathon legislative session. Examples of such increases in the Senate’s proposal include more money to refill the state’s forest fire accounts, which were depleted by an active fire season last year, Hargrove said. TURN

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Audit report set for meet BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The preliminary results of an early audit of Port of Port Angeles operations, which was prompted by citizen concerns over the June 24 resignation of former Executive Director Jeff Robb, will be presented at Tuesday’s port commission meeting. Mike Riley, state auditor in charge, and Carol Ehlinger, Team Port Orchard program manager and assistant manager for the audit, will present the results of the accountability and financial review at a public audit exit conference at 9:15 a.m. Tuesday in the public meeting room of the tax district’s administrative office Robb building, 338 W. First St. The state Auditor on Friday refused a state Public Records Act request for the audit. Agency spokesman Thomas Shapley said the report is not complete. TURN

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INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 98th year, 47th issue — 2 sections, 18 pages

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Congratulations Barb Butcher

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1190 E. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382

John L. Scott is proud to announce Barb Butcher as Top Producer and achieving Presidents Gold 2013 Congratulations we are so proud of you.

PORT ANGELES — Longview resident Ken O’Hollaren, interim executive director for the Port of Port Angeles, has been identified as the port commissioners’ choice to take the agency’s top administrative job on a permanent basis at $145,000 a year. A draft executive director contract for O’Hollaren, the former Port of Longview executive director, is posted at http://tinyurl.com/ PDN-port-contract under “agendas and minutes” for consideration by commissioners at their regular meeting Tuesday morning. Commissioners will meet at 9 a.m. Tuesday in the public meeting room at the port administrative building, 338 W. First St. in Port Angeles. The revelation of O’Hollaren’s candidacy was a surprise to port commission Vice President John Calhoun, who told Peninsula Daily News on Friday that the identity of the port’s top and only prospect for the position would be revealed at Tuesday’s meeting. “I did not know [the contract] would have his name on it and so forth, but there it is; it’s public information then,” Calhoun said Sunday afternoon. Commissioners have kept O’Hollaren’s name a secret since Jan. 27, when they emerged from an executive session and, with almost no discussion, directed port attorney Simon Barnhart to negotiate a contract with a candidate they refused to identify.

CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION PENINSULA POLL PUZZLES/GAMES

B5 B4 A7 B4 B4 B10 A3 A2 B6

*PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

SPORTS SUDOKU WEATHER WORLD

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UpFront

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2014, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, ext. 5052 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2014, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Kiss won’t rock Hall of Fame concert KISS WON’T ROCK and roll all night — or at any point during the day, either — when they are inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April, the band said Sunday. The 40-year-old group is unable to agree on which lineup should perform during Frehley the April 10 ceremony in New York City and has decided not to plug in at all. The dispute concerns Criss whether original members Ace Frehley and Peter Criss would join Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley in a live performance, or whether the current lineup of Stanley, Simmons, Eric Singer and Tommy Thayer would play.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

From left, bassist Gene Simmons, guitarist Tommy Thayer and singer Paul Stanley of Kiss perform on stage in Berlin in June 2013. In a message on its website, Kiss said it won’t perform with any lineup, calling it “an emotional situation where there is no way to please everyone. “Our intention was to celebrate the entire history of Kiss and give credit to all members, including longtime present members Tommy Thayer and Eric Singer, and additionally Bruce Kulick and Eric Carr . . . ,” the band wrote on its website. “Although Kiss has moved forward far longer without them, Ace and Peter are at the very foundation of what we have built, and this would all be impossible had they not been a part of it in

the beginning.” The band made no mention of former guitarists Vinnie Vincent, who helped kick off the band’s unmasked era, or Mark St. John, who was with the band in 1984 and died in 2007. The dispute was brought to a boil when Frehley called into Eddie Trunk’s syndicated radio show Friday to say that Simmons and Stanley had rejected a reunion for the induction. “They just shot down any type of reunion with us,” Frehley said during the broadcast. The band’s statement said it has never refused to play with Frehley and Criss.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: Which nation, if any, do you consider to be the greatest enemy of the United States? Iran China

Russia

By The Associated Press

None

________ MARIA VON TRAPP, 99, the last surviving member and second-eldest daughter of the musical family whose escape from Nazi-occupied Austria was the basis for “The Sound of Music,” has died. Ms. von Trapp died at her home in Stowe, Vt., on Tuesday, according to her brother Johannes Ms. von Trapp von Trapp. in 2008 Ms. von Trapp was the last surviving member of the seven original Trapp Family Singers made famous in

“The Sound of Music.” She was portrayed as Louisa in the 1959 Broadway musical and a 1965 film, which won the Oscar for best picture. She was the third child and second-oldest daughter of Austrian Naval Capt. Georg von Trapp and his first wife, Agathe Whitehead von Trapp. Their seven children were the basis for the singing family in the musical and film.

32.3%

Afghanistan 2.5% Other

“These concerts, the people are sitting there, old people, desolated and ill, and they came to the concerts, and this music was for them our food. Music was our food. Through making music, we were kept alive,” she once recalled.

28.5%

North Korea

Passings ALICE HERZ-SOMMER, 110, believed to be the oldest-known survivor of the Holocaust, died Sunday morning in London, a family member said. Ms. Herz-Sommer’s devotion to the piano and to her son sustained her through two years in a Ms. HerzNazi prison Sommer camp, and a in 2010 film about her has been nominated for best short documentary at next week’s Academy Awards. She died in a hospital Sunday morning after being admitted Friday, daughter-in-law Genevieve Sommer said. “We all came to believe that she would just never die,” said Frederic Bohbot, producer of the documentary “The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life.” “There was no question in my mind, ‘Would she ever see the Oscars?’” An accomplished pianist, Ms. Herz-Sommer, her husband and her son were sent from Prague in 1943 to a concentration camp in the Czech city of Terezin — Theresienstadt in German — where inmates were allowed to stage concerts in which she frequently starred. Ms. Herz-Sommer and her son, Stephan, were among fewer than 20,000 who were freed when the notorious camp was liberated by the Soviet army in May 1945.

13.7%

Undecided

6.7% 4.2% 7.1% 5.0%

Total votes cast: 1,470 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1939 (75 years ago)

An injunction sought to prohibit the city of Port Angeles to proceed with construction and operation of an athletic park along Race Street was denied by Clallam County Superior Court Judge John M. Ralston. The case was brought by Iver Twito, his wife and others to restrain progress toward the athletic park and playground, including a fenced area and grandSeen Around stand to seat 3,000 people. Peninsula snapshots Ralston expressed doubt that the city could legally A RAVEN DOING construct such a plant or forward somersaults and go into the athletic busihappily gronking as he ness, since an entrance fee flies through the Ocean would be required in some Grove neighborhood near Beckett Point on Discovery instances. He voiced hope that the case might go to a Bay . . . higher court to test the WANTED! “Seen Around” city’s authority. items recalling things seen on the However, he said he did North Olympic Peninsula. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box not think the injunction 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax was valid based on an argument that the park would 360-417-3521; or email news@ peninsuladailynews.com. constitute a nuisance.

1964 (50 years ago) A department of fisheries for Peninsula College received its second major endorsement in a week when George Starlund, state director of fisheries, backed the project during a Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce luncheon. Planned construction of a rearing pond on White Creek on the new Peninsula College campus already received the praise of Gov. Albert D. Rosellini during a visit to the North Olympic Peninsula last week. Starlund said he will return March 9 to review the location with college President E. John Maier and School District No. 21 Superintendent John D. Glann.

ington will slide down the ways and into the water for the first time March 7. After it is rigged and crew trained, its maiden voyage will start May 8 — and its first two destinations will be Port Angeles and Port Townsend. The new ship, a replica of one that plied Northwest waters in the late 18th century, will tie up at Port Angeles City Pier on May 10-13, and then dock in Port Townsend on May 13-15 before heading to Seattle.

Laugh Lines

CHARLIE SHEEN ANNOUNCED that he’s getting married for the fourth time. I believe I heard Charlie 1989 (25 years ago) say: “I just know this is the The Grays Harbor Hiswoman I’m going to be torical Seaport Authority with for the rest of my Febannounced that its square- ruary.” Jimmy Fallon rigged tall ship Lady Wash-

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Feb. 24, the 55th day of 2014. There are 310 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Feb. 24, 1864, according to the National Park Service, the first Union prisoners arrived at the Confederates’ Andersonville prison camp in Georgia. During its 14 months of existence, the overcrowded camp ended up holding some 45,000 men, more than four times its intended capacity. On this date: ■ In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII issued an edict outlining his calendar reforms. The Gregorian Calendar is the calendar in general use today.

■ In 1803, in its Marbury v. Madison decision, the Supreme Court established judicial review of the constitutionality of statutes. ■ In 1821, Mexican rebels proclaimed the Plan de Iguala, their declaration of independence from Spain. ■ In 1868, the U.S. House of Representatives impeached President Andrew Johnson following his attempted dismissal of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton; Johnson was later acquitted by the Senate. ■ In 1912, the American Jewish women’s organization Hadassah was founded in New York City. ■ In 1938, the first nylon bris-

tle toothbrush, manufactured by DuPont under the name “Dr. West’s Miracle Toothbrush,” went on sale. ■ In 1961, the Federal Communications Commission authorized the nation’s first full-scale trial of pay television in Hartford, Conn. ■ In 1988, in a ruling that expanded legal protections for parody and satire, the Supreme Court unanimously overturned a $150,000 award that the Rev. Jerry Falwell had won against Hustler magazine and publisher Larry Flynt. ■ Ten years ago: A 6.5-mag-

nitude earthquake devastated an isolated region of northern Morocco, killing more than 600 people. ■ Five years ago: In the first prime-time speech of his term, President Barack Obama appeared before Congress to sketch an agenda that began with jobs, then broadened quickly to include a stable credit system, better schools, health care reform, reliable domestic sources of energy and an end to the war in Iraq. ■ One year ago: Pope Benedict XVI bestowed his final Sunday blessing of his pontificate on a cheering crowd in St. Peter’s Square.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, February 24, 2014 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation notorious drug lord and said on ABC’s “This Week” that his arrest is a significant victory for Mexico NASHVILLE, Tenn. — With and the possibly hundreds of thousands United States. of rape kits untested across the Guzman McCaul country, a number of states are faces at least proposing legislation to address backlogs that in at least one case seven federal indictments. dates back nearly three decades. Injuries kill 2 siblings In Memphis, Tenn., alone, there are more than 12,000 INDIANAPOLIS — Two untested rape kits going back to young children died Sunday the 1980s, according to the New from injuries they sustained in York-based Rape Kit Action a house fire that killed two of Project, which has been tracking their siblings and their parents, the backlogs nationwide. an Indianapolis Fire DepartIn the entire state of Texas, ment spokeswoman said. there are about 16,000 untested Miranda Guerra, 14, and her kits collecting dust in police evi- 6-year-old brother, Fuentes, dence rooms. were pronounced dead Sunday Tennessee is among at least afternoon at Riley Hospital for 17 states with proposals that Children, Capt. Rita Reith said. range from requiring law enforceThe two children had been ment agencies to inventory their considered in “extreme critical” rape kits to analyzing them in a condition following the fire, certain amount of time. which happened Saturday mornThree states — Colorado, Illi- ing on Indianapolis’ east side. nois and Texas — have passed Authorities said Lionel “Leo” laws that mandate a statewide Guerra, 47, and his 33-year-old accounting of untested rape kits. wife, Brandy Mae, were pronounced dead shortly after Drug lord extradition arriving at Eskenazi Hospital on WASHINGTON — The chair- Saturday. The couple’s 11-year-old son, man of the House Committee on Homeland Security is encourag- Esteban, and 8-year-old daughter, Blanquita, were pronounced ing Mexico’s authorities to dead Saturday at Riley Hospital. extradite drug kingpin Joaquin A fifth, older sibling, Luis “El Chapo” Guzman to the Guerra, had been keeping a vigil United States to ensure he at Riley Hospital for Miranda remains behind bars. Guzman was arrested Satur- and Fuentes. His age was not reported, day morning in the resort city of and it wasn’t clear where he was Mazatlan, Mexico. at the time of the fire. Republican Michael McCaul The Associated Press calls Guzman the world’s most

Bills focus on untested rape kits backlog

Governors: Insurance law is here for good States’ leaders ‘make it work’ on health care BY STEVE PEOPLES AND KEN THOMAS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The explosive politics of health care have divided the nation, but America’s governors, Republicans and Democrats alike, suggest that President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul is here to stay. While governors from Connecticut to Louisiana sparred Sunday over how best to improve the nation’s economy, governors of both parties shared a far more pragmatic outlook on the controversial program known as “Obamacare” as millions of their constituents begin to be covered. “We’re just trying to make the

best of a bad situation,” Republican Gov. Terry Branstad of Iowa, who calls the health care law “unaffordable and unsustainable,” yet something he has to implement by law. “We’re trying to make it work as best we can for the people of Iowa.”

if not impossible, as states move forward with implementation and begin covering millions of people — both by expanding Medicaid rolls for lower-income resident or through state or federal exchanges that offer federal subsidies to those who qualify. Republican opposition to the law is the centerpiece of the GOP’s Winter meeting political strategy ahead of the midterm elections. As governors gathered in And to be sure, not every GOP Washington this weekend for the leader embraced the inevitability National Governor’s Association of the law’s implementation. winter meeting, Democratic governors such as Maryland’s Martin Removable? O’Malley and Connecticut’s Dannel Malloy made pitches to raise “I don’t think that it’s so deeply the minimum wage, while Repub- entrenched that it can’t be lican governors such as Louisi- repealed,” Louisiana Gov. Bobby ana’s Bobby Jindal and Indiana’s Jindal said. Mike Pence called for more free“But I do think, as we argue for dom from federal regulations, repeal, we have to show folks particularly those related to the what you replace it with.” health insurance overhaul. Despite a troubled rollout, But governors from both par- nearly 3.3 million people have ties report that a full repeal of the signed up through Feb. 1 for health law would be complicated at best, care coverage under the law.

Briefly: World Presidential powers granted amid unrest KIEV, Ukraine — Parliament speaker Oleksandr Turchinov assumed presidential powers Sunday, plunging Ukraine into new uncertainty after a deadly political standoff — and boosting long-jailed Yulia Tymoshenko’s chances of a return to power. The whereabouts and legitimacy of President Viktor Yanukovych are unclear after he left the capital for his support base Tymoshenko in eastern Ukraine. Allies are deserting him one by one, even as a presidential aide told The Associated Press on Sunday that he’s hanging on to his presidential duties. Three months of political crisis have left scores of people dead in a country of strategic importance to the United States, European nations and Russia.

Taliban talks halted ISLAMABAD — Afghanistan’s Taliban said Sunday they had suspended “mediation” with the United States to

exchange captive Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five senior Taliban prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay, halting — at least temporarily — what was considered the best chance yet of securing the 27-year-old soldier’s freedom since his capture in 2009. In a terse Pashto language statement emailed to The Associated Press, Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid blamed the “current complex political situation in the country” for the suspension. A U.S. official with knowledge of the talks said the cause of the suspension was not the result of any issue between the United States and Taliban.

Tutu weighs in on law JOHANNESBURG — South Africa’s retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu made an impassioned plea Sunday to Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni not to sign into law a harsh antihomosexuality bill that calls for a life sentence for some samesex relations. Tutu, a Nobel peace prize winner, said in a statement that Museveni a month ago had pledged not to allow the antigay legislation to become law in Uganda. But last week, Museveni said he had reconsidered and would consult scientists on whether homosexuality is determined by genetics or by a person’s choice. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TUMULT

THAILAND

IN

Soldiers guarding the scene of an explosion stand at attention as the evening national anthem is played over loudspeakers at a main protest site in Bangkok, Thailand, on Sunday. More than a dozen people were hurt Sunday by a small explosion at an anti-government protest in the city less than a day after a bloodier attack in an eastern province killed one child and left about three dozen people wounded.

Wood-burning stoves placed under fire in proposed rules BY DAVID A. LIEB THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — A federal proposal to clean up the smoke wafting from wood-burning stoves has sparked a backlash from some rural residents, lawmakers and manufacturers who fear it could close the damper on one of the oldest ways of warming homes on cold winter days. Proposed regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would significantly reduce the amount of particle pollution allowed from the smokestacks of new residential wood-powered heaters. Wood-burning stoves are a sta-

Quick Read

ple in rural homes in many states, a cheap heating source for lowincome residents and others wanting to lessen their reliance on gas or electric furnaces. Outdoor models often cost several thousand dollars, but indoor stoves can cost as little as a few hundred dollars and sometimes double as fashionable centerpieces in homes. Some manufacturers contend the EPA’s proposed standards are so stringent that the higher production costs would either force them out of business or raise prices so high that many consumers could no longer afford their products.

“There’s not a stove in the United States that can pass the test right now — this is the death knoll of any wood burning,” Reg Kelly, the founder of Earth Outdoor Furnaces in Mountain Grove, told Missouri lawmakers during a recent hearing.

Symbolic action More than three dozen Missouri lawmakers have co-sponsored a bill that would symbolically fight back against the EPA by declaring, “All Missourians have a right to heat their homes and businesses using wood-burning furnaces, stoves, fireplaces and heaters.”

. . . more news to start your day

West: Avalanche buries 2 snowmobilers, killing man

Nation: Faulty pipe led to mall carbon monoxide leak

Nation: ‘Lego Movie’ lead builds with third top finish

World: Syrian rebels claim senior al-Qaida fighter killed

A MONTANA MAN has died in an avalanche while riding his snowmobile on the Idaho-Montana border. Authorities said a group of four men on snowmobiles triggered the avalanche about 1:15 p.m. Saturday while riding in the West Cabinet Range about 15 miles southwest of Troy, Mont. The Montana-based Flathead Avalanche Center said two snowmobilers were buried, but one had his face exposed and was dug out with no injuries. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Department identified the deceased snowmobiler Sunday as 49-year-old Bryan William Harlow of Libby, Mont.

A FAULTY WATER heater flue pipe caused the carbon monoxide leak that killed a New York restaurant manager and sent more than two dozen people to hospitals, a fire official said Sunday. Huntington Chief Fire Marshal Terence McNally said the fumes were circulated in the basement by the ventilation systems at the Legal Sea Foods restaurant at the Walt Whitman Shops on Long Island. Restaurant manager Steven Nelson was found unresponsive in the basement Saturday night and pronounced dead at a hospital. The restaurant was evacuated, and 27 people were treated at hospitals.

ACTION-PACKED NEW RELEASES couldn’t stack up to 3-D hit “The Lego Movie,” which took the No. 1 slot in its third weekend at the box office. The Warner Bros. animated film bested Relativity Media’s “3 Days to Kill” and Sony’s “Pompeii” on their opening weekends. “The Lego Movie,” featuring the voices of Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Banks and Morgan Freeman, earned $31.5 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. The domestic total has passed $183 million. Overseas, it grossed $23.1 million.

TWO SUICIDE BOMBERS killed a senior al-Qaida operative Sunday, blowing themselves up inside the militant leader’s compound in the Syrian city of Aleppo, rebels and activists said. The killing of Abu Khaled al-Suri, who rebels said was serving as alQaida chief Ayman al-Zawahri’s representative in Syria, falls against the backdrop of bloody rebel infighting between an al-Qaida-breakaway group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, and an array of ultraconservative and more moderate opposition fighters. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the assassination.


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Marijuana businesses on agenda Sequim council to mull zoning, other pot issues BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM –– The City Council will consider new regulations on how it plans to zone for recreational marijuana when it meets tonight. The Sequim Planning Commission approved proposed regulations last Tuesday night that ban marijuana processing and production from the city and limit retail to heavy commercial zones on the far east and west ends of town. The planning commission also recommended the council place a moratorium on allowing the one retail store the Washington State Liquor Control Board allocated the city to set up shop. The council meets at 5 p.m. in the Sequim Transit Center, 190 W. Cedar St.

Moratorium requested Chris Hugo, director of community development, said the moratorium allows the city to ban pot shops if state regulators do not require the city to allow one. “If the state does adopt preemption of local ordinances, then we’ve got the zones that best suit our needs for the one retail store,” he said. “If they don’t preempt, then we don’t recommend we get in the marijuana business at all.” The Liquor Board is regulating the recreational marijuana industry made legal by the November 2012 passage of Initiative 502. Hugo noted Sequim voters supported Initiative 502 by a slim majority. Legislators are considering how much power to give local jurisdictions in regulating the production, processing and retail sale of marijuana. Another key provision in the planning commis-

sion’s recommendations to the council is declaring in the city’s codes that marijuana is not an agricultural activity. Sequim’s codes allow agricultural production and processing in singlefamily residential and mixed-use zones. Hugo said planning commissioners felt marijuana production and processing facilities do not benefit the city because tax revenues are not slated to be shared with local jurisdictions. “It doesn’t bring us any tax revenue,” Hugo said. “If the city gets no benefit, why should we allow it?” The liquor control board is considering applications submitted late last year for those looking to grow, package and sell recreational marijuana.

ARWYN RICE (2)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Lindsay Russell, right, with 8-month-old Dylan Russell, and Chad Russell of Port Angeles brave the Sunday afternoon snow to look at an outdoor auto glass tinting display at the KONP Home Show at Port Angeles High School.

Wintry weather does little to slow KONP Home Show Organizers report lower, but strong attendance count

Schools, parks BY ARWYN RICE

If the state says Sequim must allow a pot shop to open, it will be limited to the city’s C2 and C3 zones, which are the dense commercial areas on the east and west ends of Washington Street. Initiative 502 mandated marijuana facilities be placed at least 1,000 feet from schools, parks, libraries and day care centers. Local jurisdictions are given an opportunity to oppose a marijuana business license application. Seven businesses have applied to set up retail marijuana shops in Sequim. Addresses for five of those would be in the approved zones. Only one applicant to process marijuana is sited in Sequim’s limits. No producer applications came from inside Sequim.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Organizers of the 32nd annual KONP Home Show closed the doors on the event Sunday afternoon, satisfied with the moderate crowd that arrived despite a rainy and snowy weekend. An estimated 7,000 people viewed 110 home-improvement information booths, gathered in the Port Angeles High School gymnasium and in the parking area surrounding the gym. The KONP Home Show, presented by the Clallam County Public Utility District, is a showplace for North Olympic Peninsula businesses to display their services and for prospective customers to gather information. “On a scale of one to 10, I would call this year’s turnout a seven,” said Stan Comeau, sales manager for KONP AM and FM radio in Port Angeles, which sponsors and organizes the show.

Good turnout

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Joe Smillie can be reached at 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at jsmillie@peninsuladailynews. com.

Great Decisions group to meet at Sequim Library on March 7 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — The Sequim Great Decisions Discussion Group will meet at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., from 10 a.m. to noon Friday, March 7.

The meeting is free and open to the public. The topic of the meeting is “Game-changing Technologies.” For more information, visit tinyurl.com/Sequim GreatDecisionsDiscussion.

Open 7 Days a Week 7 a.m.-4 p.m.

This year, the show added 30 new exhibitors, including Roger Harden and Steve Seibert, local vendors for Kangen Water. “I’m surprised at the turnout, with this weather and on Sunday,” Harden said.

Indoor, outdoor displays

Vendors located in two gymnasiums and outdoor vehicle displays offered visitors of a wide variety of services, including contractors, homeimprovement supplies, landscaping, pet care, health care options and ________ home decor. “I thought it was going to be Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360smaller than this. I’m very impressed,” 452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@ said Gary Sachs, who recently moved peninsuladailynews.com.

Rhody Society set to meet on March 6

Kelly Dodson and Sue Milliken of Port Townsend’s Far Reaches Farm will speak about their recent trip to Scotland. All interested people are invited, and refreshments will be provided.

Student play set PORT TOWNSEND — Students from the Port Townsend School District’s OCEAN program will per-

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available at intermission. Since most of the seating is on the gym floor, organizers suggest audience members bring pillows, blankets, backpacks and low-back chairs to sit on. A few standard chairs and some bleacher seating will be available for patrons who require them. For more information, phone March Weinblatt at 360-344-3435. Peninsula Daily News

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form “Arthur’s Stone, Merlin’s Fire: The Making of a King.” The play will start at 7 p.m. Friday, March 7, in the Mountain View YMCA gym, 1925 Blaine St. A suggested donation is $10 for adults and $5 for children. Six performances will be presented: March 7-8 and 14-15 at 7 p.m., plus March 9 and 16 at 2 p.m. Concessions will be

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to Diamond Point and was looking for information on home heating and cooling systems. Sachs said he found what he needed at the show and had an appreciation for the attitudes of the vendors. “It has people who will actually talk to you,” he said. The KONP Home Show started in 1982 at the Vern Burton Community Center. For more information, visit the home show website is at www.the konphomeshow.com.

Briefly . . .

CHIMACUM — The Olympic Peninsula chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will meet at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 6.

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There was a large turnout Saturday, despite early snow and continuing rain, but Sunday’s snow may have chased a few people away, Comeau said. Vendors reported that while the number of people walking the aisles was down compared to last year’s estimated 9,000 to 10,000 visitors, there seemed to be a higher number of people who were intent on a project, he said.

Gary Sachs of Diamond Point, left, discusses heating and air conditioning options with Chris Christie of All Weather Heating and Cooling of Port Angeles. Turnout for the 2014 KONP Home Show at Port Angeles High School was estimated to be about 7,000 this year.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

A5

Alleged Clallam Bay shoplifter in court today not paid for the beer in his backpack, deputies said. The two struggled. Ojeda disbooked for investigation of one armed Green and, with the help of count each of first-degree robbery, an employee from a neighboring second-degree assault and third- business, bound his hands and degree theft. feet with duct tape, deputies said. Clallam County Sheriff’s deputies said Greene slashed an 14 warrants employee of Weel Road Deli at Jesse Espinoza, the Clallam 17203 state Highway 112 above the left eye with a 4-inch knife County deputy prosecuting attorney assigned to the case, said he Wednesday afternoon. The employee, Cipriano Ojeda, requested $250,000 as bond for had confronted Greene as he was Green because of a criminal hisleaving the store, saying he had tory involving 14 past warrants

Suspect has extensive criminal history BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Kingston man is expected to be charged in Clallam County Superior Court today with the attempted shoplifting of a six-pack of beer that left him bound in duct tape. A bond of $250,000 was set Thursday for Alexander Greene, 28. He remained in the Clallam County jail over the weekend,

and 27 criminal convictions, 11 of which are felonies, in multiple jurisdictions. “Based on his criminal history, warrant history, seriousness of the case and risk to the community, I asked for $250,000,” Espinoza said in an email. Superior Court Judge Christopher Melly set the bond at the amount Espinoza requested. Sheriff’s deputies arrived at the Weel Road Deli at about 1:30 p.m. to find Ojeda bound with duct tape on the sidewalk outside the deli.

The Sheriff’s Office said a Clallam Bay Corrections Center officer and medics from Clallam County Fire District No. 5 also helped detain Greene until deputies arrived. Ojeda had been taken to Forks Community Hospital via ambulance for the forehead wound, the Sheriff’s Office said, and was later discharged.

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsuladailynews.com.

Education, wages topic of D.C. meet Inslee, Obama in agreement on big issues BY DONNA GORDON BLANKINSHIP THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — After meeting with President Barack Obama, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said he is even more focused on increasing opportunities for working Americans. Inslee said in a conference call from Washington, D.C., that he and the president agree: Education is one of the best ways to accomplish that. Raising the minimum wage and building a clean energy economy were two other focuses at a White House meeting Friday with a group of Democratic governors, the governor said. The governor said he hasn’t given up on the Legislature putting more money into education this year, even though there are only three weeks left in the session. He criticized some lawmakers in the Senate for wanting to do nothing on the education budget this year, calling that just kicking the can down the road until next year. “We’re hoping some of our Republican colleagues have an epiphany,” Inslee said.

McCleary decision The state Supreme Court has told the Legislature it must make meaningful progress toward meeting the requirements of its 2012 McCleary decision — named for a parent in the Chimacum School District — which said the state is not meeting its constitutional duty to amply pay the cost of basic education and that the state depends too much on local dollars. “We have a number of legislators who think zero is a good answer,” the governor said. “You can run but you cannot hide from this McCleary decision.” State Sen. Andy Hill, chairman of the Senate Ways and Means Committee, has said Republicans are just as committed to providing amply for the education of Washington children as Democrats. But the Republican from Redmond noted that there

are different ways to reach the goals of the McCleary decision, and the process takes time. Inslee also talked about the president’s push for post-high school education and training for students who aren’t going to college, and he previewed a meeting he has scheduled with U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan today. The governor is hoping to resolve a stalemate between federal officials and the state Legislature over the state’s teacher and principal evaluation system. The federal government has said Washington must require school districts to use student scores on statewide tests as a factor in teacher evaluations. The current law does not mandate it. Washington state has a waiver from provisions of the so-called No Child Left Behind law. It could lose the waiver and some federal money by not changing the current law. No other states have been given a pass on this issue. Inslee said he was going to press the state’s case with Duncan but may still need the Legislature to take action. Earlier this week, the state Senate defeated a bill that would have made the required change in the evaluation law.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Eye on Congress

NEWS SERVICES

WASHINGTON — Congress returns from recess today. The House will resume debate on a bill to scale back the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, while the Senate will vote on judicial nominations.

“Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Whidbey Island) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Gig Harbor). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Kilmer, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-2280514); Murray, 202-224-

2621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Kilmer, 202-225-5916. Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; kilmer.house.gov. Kilmer’s North Olympic Peninsula is located at 332 E. Fifth St. in Port Angeles. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. It is staffed by Judith Morris, who may be contacted at judith. morris@mail.house.gov or 360-797-3623.

Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove.

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BREMERTON — Fire officials say a blaze at a home in Bremerton killed one man early Sunday. The Central Kitsap Fire & Rescue said firefighters found the home engulfed in flames just before 5 a.m. Four adults and three children had been inside the home but safely evacuated. After fighting the fire, crews found the dead man in the living room area. He did not live in the home. The Kitsap County Sheriff’s Office and the County Fire Marshal are investigating.

How’s the fishing? Lee Horton reports. Fridays in

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Chemo Brain A Common Problem Health Notes by Tom Lindley, R.Ph. Mental fog known as “chemo brain” has been reported by patients who have received chemotherapy and radiation. The short-term memory lapses and attention deficits may interfere with completing tasks and learning new skills. Most studies about chemo brain have been done on women with breast cancer. Hormonal agents, such as selective estrogen-receptor modulators (eg, tamoxifen) and aromatase inhibitors, have also been associated with cognitive changes. Several recent studies have investigated whether preventive medication and alterations in the delivery of radiation can preserve cognitive function. Results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial demonstrated that the drug memantine was effective in preserving cognition in patients with brain metastases treated with whole-brain radiotherapy. Previously, mental changes associated with chemotherapy were thought to be temporary, but that is not supported by recent studies. In some people, these deficits worsen over time. Researchers at M.D. Anderson are conducting an NIH-funded study to determine biomarkers that can identify women before treatment who are at increased risk of developing chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction.

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jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/ elections/elected_officials. aspx.

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Congress back in D.C. following week’s recess

Contact legislators On the minimum wage, (clip and save)

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PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Howly Slim, left foreground, and Sandy Summers play and sing in the Hootenanny for Pete, a tribute to the late Pete Seeger at the Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 73 Howe Road east of Port Angeles on Saturday. The free event drew a capacity crowd to sing the songs of Seeger, who died last month at age 94.

Minimum wage

Inslee said he and the president also agree on the connection between economic growth and a higher minimum wage. Inslee said he would like to see the state and the nation ramp up the minimum wage to make up for lost ground over the past decade. The economy will grow and the need for public assistance will decrease if the minimum wage goes up, he said. The president, supported by some of Washington’s congressional delegation, is pushing for a federal minimum wage of $10.10 an hour. Washington state has a minimum wage of $9.32. Inslee said he also supports Seattle and other communities’ independent efforts to take their own path on the minimum wage. Seattle officials are discussing an increase to $15 an hour.

DE LA


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Monday, February 24, 2014 — (C)

Ruts:

$1,000 Continued from A1 DeGand estimated about $1,000 worth of damage had been done to the grass, Smith said. “In the most recent case, we’re looking for information on the responsible parties,” Smith said. Delikat said maintenance staff members have been dealing with the problem for the last five or six years and have placed kneehigh rocks around many of the grassy areas meant to block access from the vehicle pathways that lead into the park. Rocks first were placed on the west side of the park in 2011. More were added to the eastern side as the pickup truck joyriders moved there, Delikat said. The vandals, though, sometimes simply move the rocks to get past them, Delikat added.

Damage in winter The damage is seen most often in winter, when few park visitors are present and the grassy areas are effectively deserted, Delikat explained. Maintenance staff reseed the damaged lawns as fresh tire ruts are discovered, though Delikat said, some areas have been so heavily driven upon that seeds can no longer take hold. Smith said it is difficult to catch those responsible in the act, although anyone found driving through the park where they’re not supposed to would at the very least likely get a ticket. Someone trying to get away after being approached by police would face a more serious offense, Smith explained, and could be arrested and booked into jail if they’re thought to be responsible for thousands of dollars in damages.

Peninsula Daily News

Booze prices to rise in bars, restaurants By Manuel Valdes The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Booze prices at bars and restaurants in the state may go up this year as multiple interests fight over rules following the voter-approved privatization of the state’s liquor system. The possible price hike

could be a hangover from battles among two giant national distributors, Costco and its allies, and the state Liquor Control Board. Since the end of Prohibition in the 1930s the state had tightly controlled the distribution and sale of liquor.

Sticker shock But in 2011 Washington voters approved a privatizaFollowing privatization, tion initiative that was sup- there have been multiple ported by Costco and other lawsuits and some consumretail interests. ers have complained about sticker shock in grocery Backed initiative aisles. Idaho liquor regulators Costco spent more than $20 million backing Initia- said this month that Washtive 1183 and distributors ington residents crossing also provided millions. the border boosted the Gem

State’s booze sales by $10 million last year. Similar stories came from liquor stores on the Oregon border. While prices have decreased, off the shelf liquor prices in 2013 were still significantly higher than pre-privatization prices.

Port: Hiring satisfies commissioner Continued from A1 was named interim director by commissioners July 29. He took over for embatCalhoun said he is satisfied the hiring process was tled former Executive decided upon in open ses- Director Jeff Robb, who was sion, which has been ques- rehired to the newly-cretioned by Nancy Krier, state ated, unadvertised director Assistant Attorney General of environmental affairs position June 24, the same for open government. “Once you make a day he resigned as the motion to make the decision port’s highest paid employee to work on a contract with because of “serious health one individual, that neces- issues.” When commissioners sarily precludes going forward with any other interviewed him for the recruitment,” Calhoun said. interim post in public sesKeeping the name secret sion July 19, O’Hollaren was “in the public interest” said he had read news because identifying accounts of Robb’s deparO’Hollaren “might have ture and a whistle-blower caused him to say, ‘the hell complaint by then-port with it, I just don’t need it,’” Director of Business Development Colleen McAleer he added. “That’s what happens that led to Robb’s exit. McAleer won election to with these high-profile posiformer Commissioner Paul tions.” Sequim-area Calhoun said he expects McHugh’s commissioners will approve seat in November. O’Hollaren said during the contract at their March his interview that he viewed 11 regular meeting. O’Hollaren, who did not himself “as a facilitator.” return a call for comment “[O’Hollaren] seems to early Sunday afternoon, bring a calming, reassuring

effect to the whole position, and I thought those are standing attributes,” Calhoun said. Robb’s salary was and still is $138,000, but O’Hollaren’s would be $145,000, according to the draft contract. His interim director salary was about $11,500 a month, which annually would be $138,000.

‘Typical’ The contract amount is “typical for port executive directors,” Calhoun said. O’Hollaren, selected by the commissioners to the permanent post without the job being advertised, would be reimbursed for mileage for one weekly 370-mile round trip between his Longview residence and Port Angeles, according to the contract. The mileage reimbursement rate is 56 cents per mile, equalling a roughly $207 payment for the trip.

O’Hollaren, who was 58 when hired as interim director, also would receive a $750 monthly housing allowance for up to six months, to end when he relocates to the North Olympic Peninsula, and would be reimbursed for relocation expenses not to exceed $10,000. Calhoun said O’Hollaren and his wife already have begun looking for a home. O’Hollaren also would receive six weeks of vacation leave and two weeks of sick leave. If he is terminated, O’Hollaren would be compensated for all accrued leave. He retired from the Port of Longview in December 2012 after 24 years as its top administrator. The port had hired the Seattle executive search firm Waldron to submit names of applicants for the permanent executive director position under a maximum $45,000 contract.

Calhoun said that in early January, before the search began, O’Hollaren told Calhoun he wanted the job and, Calhoun presumed, also told Commissioners McAleer and Jim Hallett. Commissioners then conducted a job performance evaluation of O’Hollaren in executive session. “I expressed my opinion that I thought he was an excellent candidate and exactly the kind of director we need on a permanent basis,” Calhoun said. “To be able to see and observe a person’s performance in an organization prior to hiring someone is a luxury commissioners rarely get. “I hope we are ultimately successful in signing this contract.”

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at pgottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

Audit: Concerns began process early

Continued from A1 lations, including those dealing with hiring prac“As with any audit, tices and open-meeting issues, corrections and clar- requirements. At same June 24 port ifications may come up during the exit conference or commission meeting at technical review, which can which Robb resigned, comalter the final report,” Shap- missioners voted 2-1 to immediately hire him to the ley said in an email. unadvertised, new position The audit, which began of director of environmental ________ Sept. 25, would have affairs at the same salary Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can occurred in early 2014 but he had earned as executive be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. for concerns expressed by director, $138,000, without 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula citizens who called the discussion on Robb’s salary dailynews.com. Auditor’s Office about the or the need for the position. events surrounding Robb’s Robb said then that he resignation, Shapely said. quit for health reasons and The accountability por- intends to retire in July, tion of the audit focuses on when he becomes eligible the port’s hiring and meet- for full state retirement ing practices and the port’s benefits. compliance with port, state His resignation was preand federal rules and regu- ceded by a port lease-

related whistle-blower complaint by former Director of Business Development and current port Commissioner Colleen McAleer, who replaced Paul McHugh following a campaign during which the whistle-blower complaint was a centerpiece.

2 to 1 vote McHugh and Commissioner John Calhoun voted to hire Robb to the new position, while Commissioner Jim Hallett was opposed. A scathing report on the complaint by Port Angeles lawyer Donna Knifsend reviewed Robb’s tenure as executive director as seen

through the eyes of port employees. She issued an executive summary June 17 regarding “conflicts within the organization.” The port met in executive session June 19 to discuss Robb’s job performance. The public is excluded from executive sessions, which are not recorded and at which, under state law, commissioners cannot make decisions. In Robb’s one-page statement at the June 24 port commissioners meeting, he cited “serious health issues” and said he and commissioners “have agreed that I will continue at the port as director of environmental

affairs to facilitate transition of this important work” related to environmental cleanup of port property. No such agreement was discussed in open session. Calhoun, who helped Robb write the statement, according to a Peninsula Daily News public records request, said it was “a mistake” that the word agreed was used. McHugh said Robb “misspoke.” Robb has said he will not comment further on his resignation.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at pgottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

Budget: Pressure to stay on lawmakers Continued from A1 Hargrove said. Gov. Jay Inslee released Once the proposal is his 2014 supplemental budreleased, Hargrove said he get proposal, with $200 mildoes not expect his work lion in new spending, in load to lighten in the com- December, according to a Jan. 28 Tacoma News Triing week. “Most of my effort will be bune article. Hargrove, along with kind of herding cats, to State Reps. Steve Tharinger make sure that the people who have issues with this, and Kevin Van De Wege, that or the other thing in both Sequim Democrats, represent the 24th Legislathe budget will have their tive District, which com42974708 questions answered,” prises Clallam and Jefferson counties and a portion ★ Voted BEST Mexican Food Since 2003! ★ of Grays Harbor County. In a Friday interview, Tharinger, who co-chairs the House Finance Committee and sits on the Special includes 16 oz. T-Bone Steak, rice, House Appropriations Combeans, and pico de gallo mittee, said his chamber is expected to release its own Sunday Only supplemental budget pro$ 99 1 Kids Meal posal Wednesday or Thursday. Open 7 days a week Tharinger said he has Lunch & Dinner not been as immersed in 452-3928 • 636 E. Front St. • Port Angeles developing the House pro-

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Lewis said Forks Community Hospital and Jefferson Heathcare are defined as critical access hospitals and get 101 percent of outpatient costs reimbursed through Medicaid, a state-run program for low income people half funded by the state and half funded by the federal government. The bill now makes it way through the House, where Tharinger and Rep. Van De Wege have said they plan to help the proposed _________ legislation make its way through. Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can “I think [Tharinger] and be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. I will definitely work on the 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com. issue,” Van De Wege said.

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“[The bill] seems like it’s in a pretty good form.” Lewis said Tharinger worked to get OMC $100,000 per year for Medicaid outpatient reimbursement in the 2013-2015 budget after a house bill increasing the rate failed to gain traction last year. “We couldn’t get the bill passed, that was meant to be an interim thing,” Lewis said. “What we want is a multi-year fix to this issue.” Tharinger said he’s hopeful the Senate bill will survive in some form in the House. “I think we’ll be able to address those reimbursement rates for those hospitals,” Tharinger said. “I think we’ll get a solution, I’m just not exactly sure what that will be.”

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, February 24, 2014 PAGE

A7

What Google seeks in employees Most of the time, the nonexpert will come up with the same answer, added Bock, “because most of the time it’s not that hard.” Sure, once in a while they will mess it up, he said, but once in a while they’ll also come up with an answer that is totally new. And there is huge value in that.

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AST JUNE, IN AN INTERVIEW with Adam Bryant of The New York Times, Laszlo Bock, the senior vice president of people operations for Google — i.e., the guy in charge of hiring for one of the world’s most successful companies — Thomas L. noted that Google had determined that “[grade- Friedman point averages] are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless.” He continued: “We found that they don’t predict anything.” He also noted that the “proportion of people without any college education at Google has increased over time” — now as high as 14 percent on some teams. At a time when many people are asking, “How’s my kid gonna get a job?” I thought it would be useful to visit Google and hear how Bock would answer. Don’t get him wrong, Bock begins, “Good grades certainly don’t hurt.” Many jobs at Google require math, computing and coding skills, so if your good grades truly reflect skills in those areas that you can apply, it would be an advantage. But Google has its eyes on much more. “There are five hiring attributes we have across the company,” explained Bock. “If it’s a technical role, we assess your coding ability, and half the roles in the company are technical roles. “For every job, though, the No. 1 thing we look for is general cognitive ability, and it’s not IQ. It’s learning ability. “It’s the ability to process on the fly. It’s the ability to pull together disparate bits of information. “We assess that using structured behavioral interviews that we validate to make sure they’re predictive.” The second, he added, “is leadership — in particular emergent leadership as opposed to traditional leadership.”

T

BOB ENGLEHART/CAGLE CARTOONS

“Traditional leadership is, were you president of the chess club? Were you vice president of sales? How quickly did you get there? “We don’t care. “What we care about is, when faced Bock with a problem and you’re a member of a team, do you, at the appropriate time, step in and lead. “And just as critically, do you step back and stop leading, do you let someone else? Because what’s critical to be an effective leader in this environment is you have to be willing to relinquish power.”

W

HAT ELSE? HUMILITY AND ownership. “It’s feeling the sense of responsibility, the sense of ownership, to step in,” he said, to try to solve any problem — and the humility to step back and embrace the better ideas of others. “Your end goal,” explained Bock, “is

what can we do together to problem-solve. I’ve contributed my piece, and then I step back.” And it is not just humility in creating space for others to contribute, says Bock, it’s “intellectual humility.” “Without humility, you are unable to learn.” It is why research shows that many graduates from hotshot business schools plateau. “Successful bright people rarely experience failure, and so they don’t learn how to learn from that failure,” said Bock. The least important attribute they look for is “expertise.” Said Bock: “If you take somebody who has high cognitive ability, is innately curious, willing to learn and has emergent leadership skills, and you hire them as an HR person or finance person, and they have no content knowledge, and you compare them with someone who’s been doing just one thing and is a world expert, the expert will go: ‘I’ve seen this 100 times before; here’s what you do.’ ”

O SUM UP BOCK’S APPROACH to hiring: Talent can come in so many different forms and be built in so many nontraditional ways today, hiring officers have to be alive to every one — besides brand-name colleges. Because “when you look at people who don’t go to school and make their way in the world, those are exceptional human beings. “And we should do everything we can to find those people.” Too many colleges, he added, “don’t deliver on what they promise. You generate a ton of debt, you don’t learn the most useful things for your life. It’s [just] an extended adolescence.” Google attracts so much talent it can afford to look beyond traditional metrics, like GPA. For most young people, though, going to college and doing well is still the best way to master the tools needed for many careers. But Bock is saying something important to them, too: Beware. Your degree is not a proxy for your ability to do any job. The world only cares about — and pays off on — what you can do with what you know (and it doesn’t care how you learned it). And in an age when innovation is increasingly a group endeavor, it also cares about a lot of soft skills — leadership, humility, collaboration, adaptability and loving to learn and re-learn. This will be true no matter where you go to work.

________ Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears here every Monday. Email him via nyti.ms/friedmanmail.

It’s time to stop insulting minimum wage workers BEATING DOWN LOWPAID workers is not only not nice but also not necessarily good for business. And though some arguments against Froma raising the Harrop minimum wage are debatable, others are simply insulting. The national minimum wage is currently $7.25 an hour. Back in 1968, it was $10.77 in today’s dollars. So President Obama’s proposal to raise the minimum to $10.10 is hardly radical. Many states exceed the federal standard — with Washington state’s wage the highest, at $9.32 an hour. Last year, voters in the small city of SeaTac, home to SeattleTacoma International Airport, went a big step further, raising its minimum wage to an unprecedented $15. All eyes are now on SeaTac. Will the $15 minimum floor, now in its second month, lead to a wave of layoffs and business failures as its foes predict? So far, there’s scant evidence of that, according to The Seattle Times. One hotel did close its fullservice restaurant, but another is adding rooms and a day spa. Some SeaTac businesses have

increased prices to cover the wage hikes. Yawn. Folks flying to Honolulu or London can surely afford 10 cents more for their burger. Many insist that raising the minimum hurts consumers through higher prices. They may not be wrong but consider the class implications of that argument. If the CEO were paid a few million less, consumers would benefit. No one ever says that. Another bizarre talking point has been making the rounds — that most earners of the minimum wage aren’t poor, so raising it wouldn’t cure poverty. “Only 11 percent of the workers affected by such an increase come from poor households,” David Brooks writes in The New York Times. “Nearly two-thirds of such workers are the second- or thirdearners living in households at twice the poverty line or above.” That may be so, but the minimum wage is not only for the impoverished. It’s also for the struggling middle class, including those earning somewhat more but affected by the minimum.

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Peninsula Voices OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

Public libraries are also ‘third places’

earmarking it for a child’s education or handbags? Higher wages can be good for business. Because Oregon has a minimum wage well above that of neighboring Idaho, employers in the eastern part of the former are deluged with job seekers willing to drive across the border for a better deal. Businesses in SeaTac report a surge in applicants attracted by the $15-an-hour wage floor. Employers now have their pick of the most motivated workers. A higher minimum helps the economy by putting more money into low-income pockets. It also MILT PRIGGEE/CAGLE CARTOONS lifts many out of the poverty programs, such as food stamps. Obviously, setting the miniBy the way, living at twice the mum wage is a balancing act, poverty line, or $47,100 for a fam- and a too high level would do ily of four, is not easy, especially more harm than good. in expensive parts of the country. But experience shows that Now imagine a lawyer being moderate increases have had littold by her firm, “Hey, you’re tle effect on employment. married to another lawyer, so you Finally, let’s be mindful that a don’t need to make $70,000.” minimum wage is about more (That’s the average beginning than keeping the poor from lawyer’s salary and three times starving. the poverty line for a family of It’s also about attaching digfour.) nity to a person’s labor. Note how those making the ________ lowest amounts are also scrutinized for what they intend to do Froma Harrop is a columnist with their money. Oh, they’re for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. only high-school kids saving for a Her column appears every car, we hear. Monday. First off, how they plan to Contact her at fharrop@gmail. spend it is nobody’s business. com or in care of Creators Secondly, would anyone base a Syndicate Inc., 737 Third St., lawyer’s pay on whether she’s Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MICHAEL FOSTER, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mfoster@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525; lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim news office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend news office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

In her Feb. 17, column, Froma Harrop lamented the loss of third places (social gathering spots other than home or work/school) in our communities. She noted bookstores, taverns, coffee shops and churches can be third places. But Ms. Harrop left out a very important third place: public libraries. Libraries are welcoming, comfortable, noncommercial community spaces. At the North Olympic Library System (NOLS) libraries in Clallam Bay, Forks, Port Angeles and Sequim, and at thousands of public libraries across the country, people of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds are welcome to browse, visit, read, learn, and by all means linger. Yes, libraries offer free Wi-Fi, online services, e-books and downloadable audio books, but not at the expense of providing those all-important third places where people can come together. Want to feel the beating heart of your community? Visit your public library. Paula Barnes, Port Angeles Paula Barnes is the director of the North Olympic Library System.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, February 24, 2014 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

B NFL

Carroll: Hawks set for encore BY TODD DYBAS MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

INDIANAPOLIS — The Seattle Seahawks have a historically daunting issue in front of them: repeating. No team has won consecutive Super Bowls since the New England Patriots in 2004-05. It has been even more challenging for the losing team to get back to the game. That hasn’t happened since 1994 when the Buffalo Bills made the last of four consecutive trips. Like he did when asked about dealing with the Super Bowl, Seahawks coach Pete Carroll likened the process to something he went through at USC. He said the Seahawks’ program is designed to sustain. “I don’t think it’s any different than winning a national championship and trying to win it again and having another great season one year after the next,” Carroll said. “There’s a whole mentality that goes into how you get there; that once you get there, you continue. “It’s not a brand-new experience. It doesn’t have to be. But it does take great discipline and it does take the proper work ethic and mentality so that you can stay in connection with that which got you there.”

Must stay focused When the season ended, Carroll said his players needed to understand the challenges ahead in the offseason. Not the least of which is remaining focused amid increased fame and demands. “You have to see the signs that are demonstrated by the players and coaches and the people that support you that takes you away from what it takes,” Carroll said. “That’s a whole science.” Seattle’s front office also has to deal with one of the issues for every team this season. The Seahawks began holding draft meetings the Wednesday before the Super Bowl. A record number of underclassmen have declared for the draft, prompting scouts and front offices to go back and research college juniors they paid little attention to before. While Carroll and the front office sort through the draft prospects, they will also be keeping an eye on the attitude of players on the roster. They don’t have access to them again until April 21, when offseason workout programs start. “I think it’s in the makeup of the people. We’re going to watch that really carefully,” Carroll said. TURN

TO

NFL/B5

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forks senior Joel Ward wrestles Austin Morris of Quincy in the opening round of the Mat Classic. Ward went on to place second in the Class 1A 220-pound division, leading the Spartans to a second-place finish.

Forks finishes second Class 1A team title goes down to the final match BY MICHAEL CARMAN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TACOMA — It came down to the last man standing for the Forks wrestling team. Too bad that last man turned out to be 285-pound Blaine wrestler Mikey Antczak. The Spartans bid for the Class 1A team state championship was derailed at the Mat Classic’s 420th and final match — a contest between Antczak and Chewelah’s Dustin Olson on Saturday night at the Tacoma Dome. With Antczak’s victory by decision, the Borderites earned

Wrestling

it’s just not a good situation to be in.” A bright spot remains for the four points and wrenched the Spartans: four of the seven first-place trophy away from state-placing Forks boys will Forks by a score of 110.5 to 109. return next season. The title that slipped just out of the Spartans’ clutches would Ward reaches final have been the first state team Dejection was widespread in championship in any sport in the Forks contingent, which had the history of Forks High School. gathered mere moments before “Nothing left to say,” said to cheer on teammate Joel Ward Forks coach Bob Wheeler, who in his 220-pound title match could only shake his head as the with Chelan’s Asa Schwartz. clock expired in the 285-pound Ward fell 4-0 in a match that final. would have given Forks the “When you are forced to hav- championship. ing to sit around and wait for Blaine advanced two wresanother team to lose in order for tlers to the finals, but yours to win and you’ve had 160-pounder Jon Stewart lost opportunities to win it yourself, his title match, giving Ward the

opportunity to clinch first place. In the final, Ward and Schwartz spent much of the two minutes locking arms with each other, both looking to gain an advantage. Neither wrestler scored in the round. Schwartz had the advantage to start the second period and was aggressive, pinning Ward’s arm back behind his body and then pinning his wrist behind his waist. Looking to get out of the round as quickly as possible, Ward received a stall warning with 13 seconds left. Schwartz picked up a quick point to start the final round after Ward was called for another stall. He earned another point on an escape after getting away from Ward 15 seconds later. TURN

TO

STATE/B3

Neah boys, girls lose title games Red Devils teams, Riders girls next play at regionals PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MOUNT VERNON — The Neah Bay boys and girls basketball went down to the wire before falling in their respective 1B Tri-District tournament championship games. Both teams, along with the Port Angeles girls, move on to play at regionals this Saturday. The Red Devils boys will face Wishkah Valley at Mount Tahoma High School at 10 a.m. The Neah Bay girls will play Wellpinit at the same location

at noon. Port Angeles will meet Burlington-Edison at Mount Vernon High School at 2 p.m. The winners at regionals will advance to the state tournament. Keanu Hamilton made the game-deciding layup with 5.6 second to play to lift thirdranked Tulalip Heritage a 68-66 win over the No. 1 Neah Bay boys Saturday night at Mount Vernon Christian School. With the score tied at 66, the Hawks came out of a timeout with 22.6 seconds on the clock and gave the ball to Bradley Fryberg. After dribbling outside the 3-point line, Fryberg drove into the key and found a cutting Hamilton underneath the hoop.

Regionals Matchups Saturday Mount Tahoma High School Neah Bay boys vs. Wishkah Valley, 10 a.m. Neah Bay girls vs. Wellpinit, noon Mount Vernon High School Port Angeles girls vs. Burlington-Edison, 2 p.m. Hamilton corralled the pass and hit the lay-in to give the Hawks their first lead since losing it late in the third quarter. A desperation 3-pointer by the Red Devils bounced harmlessly off the rim as the buzzer sounded. Abraham Venske led the Red Devils with 19 points to go along with nine rebounds and six assists.

Josiah Greene chipped in with a nice all-around game of his own, scoring nine points, grabbing 10 rebounds, dishing five assists and recording four steals. John Reamer contributed 10 points and eight boards, and Christopher Martinez finished with eight points. TURN

TO

HOOPS/B5

On home ice and snow, Russia wins most medals United States takes second, totaling 28 BY JON KRAWCZYNSKI THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOCHI, Russia — Russia’s post-Soviet athletic decline hit bottom at the Vancouver Olympics, where the once dominant winter sporting nation left with only three gold medals and the daunting task of rebuilding its team in time to host the Sochi Games. Four years later, the Russians are back on top of the winter world. After a stunning podium sweep Sunday in the men’s 50-kilometer cross-country race and another gold in the four-man bobsled, Russia finished the Winter Games with more total medals and more gold medals than anyone else. It was a worst-to-first rise that surprised even the most devoted Russian fans. “You probably didn’t believe that Russia could win the medals table, just like Canada did in Vancouver,” said Alexander Legkov, who won the 50-kilometer crosscountry race.

Olympics “I believed it could happen. Now it happened and that’s great.” Actually, Russia did Canada one better. The Canadians finished first in gold medals in Vancouver, but were third in the overall tally. The Russians had 13 gold medals in Sochi — their highest Winter Games total ever — and 33 total medals.

American second overall Norway finished second in the race for gold with 11, while the United States was second on the overall medal table with 28. (See final medal count on Page B2.) Evgeni Plushenko, Julia Lipnitskaia and Adelina Sotnikova helped restore Russia’s prominence in figure skating, Alexander Zubkov won two gold medals in a stirring late-career return to the top in bobsled and the unprecedented cross-country sweep on Sunday helped everyone forget about the incredible disappointment that was Russia’s men’s hockey team.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russia swept the medals in the men’s 50K cross-country race. Gold medal winner Alexander Legkov is flanked by silver medalist Maxim Vylegzhanin, left, and bronze medal winner Ilia Chernousov on Sunday. “The country believed in us. But nobody believed that Russia would even be in the top three in total medals, but we have won,” Zubkov said. For a nation that finished first or second in gold medals in every Winter Games it entered as the

Soviet Union, Vancouver was a wake-up call. The three gold medals there put Russia in 11th place, a failure so humiliating that it prompted an audit into widespread misspending and cost many of the country’s top sports officials

their jobs. It also turned up the pressure on the Russians to re-invest in a sports program that suffered from apathy in the years after the Soviet fall. TURN

TO

MEDALS/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Olympics

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Final Medal Count Russia United States Norway Canada Netherlands Germany Austria France Sweden Switzerland China South Korea Czech Republic Slovenia Japan Italy Belarus Poland Finland Great Britain Latvia Australia Ukraine Slovakia Croatia Kazakhstan

G 13 9 11 10 8 8 4 4 2 6 3 3 2 2 1 0 5 4 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0

S 11 7 5 10 7 6 8 4 7 3 4 3 4 2 4 2 0 1 3 1 2 2 0 0 1 0

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

B Totals 9 33 12 28 10 26 5 25 9 24 5 19 5 17 7 15 6 15 2 11 2 9 2 8 2 8 4 8 3 8 6 8 1 6 1 6 1 5 2 4 2 4 1 3 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 1

Preps BOYS BASKETBALL Saturday’s Scores Bothell 67, Edmonds-Woodway 55 Colton 66, Garfield-Palouse 60 Kennewick 65, Mt. Spokane 38 Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 79, Liberty (Spangle) 71 Riverside 39, Chelan 28 University 63, Shadle Park 50 Vashon Island 67, Seattle Christian 57 1A District 6/7 Championship Okanogan 71, Brewster 67, OT 1A Southwest District 4 Third Place Kalama 56, Hoquiam 53 Championship Toledo 50, Woodland 48 1A Yakima Valley District 5 Third Place Naches Valley 50, Columbia (Burbank) 48 Championship Zillah 54, La Salle 49 1B Northeast District 7 Third Place Wilbur-Creston 59, Valley Christian 56 Championship Wellpinit 55, Odessa-Harrington 46 1B Southwest District 4 Third Place Wishkah Valley 75, Taholah 53 Championship Oakville 68, Three Rivers Christian School 63 1B Tri-District Fifth Place Shorewood Christian 63, Cedar Park Christian (Mountlake Terrace) 58 Championship Tulalip Heritage 68, Neah Bay 66 2A District 5/6 Semifinal Wapato 82, Ephrata 69 2A Northwest District 1 Third Place Anacortes 65, Sehome 52 Championship Lynden 57, Lake Washington 53 2A West Central District 3 Fifth Place Sumner 42, Clover Park 38 Third Place Foster 66, Bremerton 49 White River 55, Fife 47 2B Eastern Bi-District Championship St. George’s 58, Northwest Christian (Colbert) 36 2B Southwest District 4 Fifth Place North Beach 52, Napavine 48, OT Third Place Onalaska 50, Willapa Valley 39 Championship Morton/White Pass 68, Mossyrock 39 2B Western Bi-District Semifinal Tacoma Baptist 54, LaConner 50 3A Sea King District 2 Consolation Final Mercer Island 48, Seattle Prep 41 Third Place Bellevue 74, O’Dea 52 Championship Rainier Beach 78, Eastside Catholic 38 3A West Central-Southwest Bi-District Fifth Place Kennedy 65, Enumclaw 62 Third Place Foss 80, Timberline 74 Championship Lincoln 80, Wilson 70 4A Columbia Basin League Championship Wenatchee 56, Moses Lake 50 4A Greater Spokane District 8 Second Place Gonzaga Prep 68, Ferris 61 4A South Puget Sound League Seventh Place Curtis 67, Emerald Ridge 40 Third Place Bellarmine Prep 45, Stadium 38 Championship Todd Beamer 51, Kentridge 36

GIRLS BASKETBALL Saturday’s Scores Chiawana 83, Central Valley 57 Edmonds-Woodway 66, Eastlake 65 Lind-Ritzville 51, Dayton 34 Okanogan 63, Freeman 52 Sunnyside 65, Kamiakin 58 University 62, Shadle Park 52 1A District 6/7 Championship Cashmere 48, Brewster 38 1A Northeast District 7 Second Place Colville 53, Clarkston 29 1A Tri-District Consolation Semifinal Eatonville 51, Port Townsend 40

HARD-EARNED

SECOND

The sixth-grade Port Angeles AAU team took second at the Port Angeles President’s Day tournament earlier this month. The team is, back row from left: Lucas Jarnagin, Brody Merritt, Skylar Cobb, Brenden Roloson-Hines and Derek Bowechop; front row from left: team helper Parker Nickerson, Kaizer Shamp, Gabe Ritchie, Brady Nickerson and Milo Whitman. Not pictured are Stuart Methner and Isaiah Getchel. Championship Lynden Christian 67, Cascade Christian 30 1A Yakima Valley District 5 Third Place Mabton 56, Zillah 46 Championship La Salle 50, Granger 39 1B Northeast District 7 Third Place Wellpinit 56, Almira/Coulee-Hartline 45 Championship Wilbur-Creston 53, Republic 50 1B Southeast District 9 Second Place Tekoa-Oakesdale 54, St. John-Endicott 32 1B Southwest District 4 Championship Mary Knight 65, Taholah 62, OT 1B Tri-District Third Place Tulalip Heritage 45, Muckleshoot Tribal School 42 Championship Mount Vernon Christian 51, Neah Bay 46 2A Southwest District 4 Third Place Black Hills 72, River Ridge 56 2A West Central District 3 Fifth Place Olympic 43, Kingston 40 Third Place Renton 45, Port Angeles 36 Championship White River 48, Sumner 45 2A Yakima Valley District 5 Second Place West Valley (Yakima) 64, Grandview 43 2B Southeast District 9 Championship Colfax 50, Northwest Christian (Colbert) 49 2B Southwest District 4 Consolation Willapa Valley 35, Pe Ell 26 Third Place Napavine 58, Wahkiakum 46 Championship Toutle Lake 52, Morton/White Pass 36 2B Western Bi-District Third Place Crosspoint Academy 60, Orcas Island 53 Championship Bear Creek School 54, LaConner 50 3A Northwest District 1 Consolation Final Ferndale 58, Marysville-Pilchuck 47 Championship Glacier Peak 53, Mountlake Terrace 52 3A Sea King District 2 Fifth Place Liberty 61, Holy Names 57 Third Place Blanchet 57, Mercer Island 51 Championship Cleveland 77, Bellevue 49 3A West Central-Southwest Bi-District Fifth Place Auburn Mountainview 51, Bonney Lake 47 Championship Prairie 63, Wilson 42 4A Columbia Basin League Championship Moses Lake 49, Davis 40 4A West Central District 3 Consolation Kentridge 50, Tahoma 48, OT Third Place Skyview 50, Bellarmine Prep 32 Championship Mt. Rainier 61, Todd Beamer 41

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 14 .754 — Portland 37 18 .673 5

Minnesota Denver Utah

27 28 .491 25 29 .463 19 36 .345 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 38 20 .655 Phoenix 33 21 .611 Golden State 34 22 .607 L.A. Lakers 19 36 .345 Sacramento 19 36 .345 Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 40 16 .714 Houston 37 18 .673 Dallas 34 23 .596 Memphis 31 24 .564 New Orleans 23 32 .418 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 31 25 .554 Brooklyn 25 28 .472 New York 21 35 .375 Boston 19 38 .333 Philadelphia 15 41 .268 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 40 14 .741 Washington 28 28 .500 Charlotte 27 30 .474 Atlanta 26 29 .473 Orlando 17 41 .293 Central Division W L Pct Indiana 42 13 .764 Chicago 29 26 .527 Detroit 23 33 .411 Cleveland 22 35 .386 Milwaukee 10 45 .182

15 16½ 23 GB — 3 3 17½ 17½ GB — 2½ 6½ 8½ 16½ GB — 4½ 10 12½ 16 GB — 13 14½ 14½ 25 GB — 13 19½ 21 32

Saturday’s Games Washington 94, New Orleans 93 Charlotte 92, Memphis 89 Dallas 113, Detroit 102 Atlanta 107, New York 98 Indiana 110, Milwaukee 100 Minnesota 121, Utah 104 Sacramento 105, Boston 98 Golden State 93, Brooklyn 86 Sunday’s Games L.A. Clippers 125, Oklahoma City 117 Miami 93, Chicago 79 Washington 96, Cleveland 83 Toronto 105, Orlando 90 Sacramento at Denver, late. Brooklyn at L.A. Lakers, late. Minnesota at Portland, late. Houston at Phoenix, late. Monday’s Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Golden State at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at New York, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Boston at Utah, 6 p.m. Tuesday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 4 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 4 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Chicago at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Portland at Denver, 6 p.m. Houston at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

College Basketball Men’s Major Scores Saturday FAR WEST Arizona 88, Colorado 61 BYU 89, Portland 72 Boise St. 91, UNLV 90, OT CS Northridge 81, UC Irvine 75 Cal Poly 69, UC Riverside 64 Colorado St. 82, Wyoming 67

Denver 72, Nebraska-Omaha 60 E. Washington 85, S. Utah 74 Fresno St. 79, Utah St. 76 Hawaii 86, UC Davis 77 Idaho 83, Grand Canyon 77 Montana 62, Idaho St. 61 Nevada 75, Air Force 56 New Mexico 58, San Diego St. 44 North Dakota 75, N. Arizona 63 Sacramento St. 79, N. Colorado 58 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 76, Santa Clara 54 San Diego 69, Gonzaga 66 San Francisco 64, Pacific 59 Stanford 83, UCLA 74 UC Santa Barbara 80, Cal St.-Fullerton 65 Washington 86, Oregon St. 62 Weber St. 86, Montana St. 68 EAST American U. 58, Army 54 Baylor 88, West Virginia 75 Binghamton 72, UMBC 70 Brown 81, Cornell 75, OT Bryant 68, CCSU 65 Canisius 90, Fairfield 78 Colgate 84, Loyola (Md.) 60 Dayton 57, Duquesne 54 Fairleigh Dickinson 73, Sacred Heart 66 Georgetown 74, Xavier 52 Harvard 59, Princeton 47 Mass.-Lowell 58, New Hampshire 52 NJIT 99, Fisher 67 Penn 74, Dartmouth 65 Quinnipiac 90, Niagara 88 Rhode Island 87, St. Bonaventure 78 Robert Morris 71, St. Francis (NY) 70, OT Saint Joseph’s 87, Fordham 72 St. Francis (Pa.) 83, LIU Brooklyn 64 St. Peter’s 61, Monmouth (NJ) 51 Towson 83, Hofstra 77 Villanova 57, St. John’s 54 Wagner 71, Mount St. Mary’s 66 SOUTH Alabama 80, Missouri 73 Alabama St. 92, Alcorn St. 86 Arkansas 73, Mississippi St. 69 Charleston Southern 86, Presbyterian 47 Clemson 63, Georgia Tech 55 Davidson 59, Wofford 49 Delaware St. 84, Md.-Eastern Shore 71 Duke 66, Syracuse 60 E. Kentucky 96, Austin Peay 75 ETSU 88, North Florida 85 East Carolina 67, Rice 55 Elon 66, Georgia Southern 61 Florida 75, Mississippi 71 Florida A&M 80, Bethune-Cookman 75 Furman 68, Appalachian St. 53 Gardner-Webb 85, Winthrop 79, OT Georgia 73, South Carolina 56 Georgia St. 80, Louisiana-Lafayette 77 Hampton 81, Howard 78 High Point 85, Longwood 59 Jackson St. 79, Grambling St. 59 Jacksonville 88, SC-Upstate 82 Kentucky 77, LSU 76, OT Liberty 79, Campbell 59 Louisiana Tech 71, Old Dominion 66 Memphis 82, Temple 79, OT Miami 69, Boston College 42 Middle Tennessee 56, Marshall 53 Murray St. 69, Morehead St. 58 NC Central 73, NC A&T 55 NC State 71, Virginia Tech 64 Nicholls St. 68, McNeese St. 59 Norfolk St. 73, Coppin St. 68 North Carolina 105, Wake Forest 72 North Texas 78, FAU 76 Richmond 62, La Salle 49 SE Missouri 77, UT-Martin 74 Savannah St. 75, SC State 65 South Alabama 86, Troy 78 Southern Miss. 77, UTEP 68 Southern U. 70, Alabama A&M 62 Tennessee Tech 69, Jacksonville St. 57 Texas Southern 73, MVSU 65 Tulane 68, UTSA 56

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SPORTS ON TV

Today 11:30 a.m. (25) ROOT Soccer UEFA, Barcelona vs. Manchester City Champions League 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Syracuse vs. Maryland (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Penn State vs. Nebraska (Live) 4 p.m. FS1 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Oklahoma vs. Baylor (Live) 5 p.m. PAC-12 Network, Men’s Volleyball, UCLA vs. Stanford (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Oklahoma vs. Kansas (Live) Tulsa 77, FIU 65 UAB 64, Charlotte 62 UNC Asheville 100, Coastal Carolina 85 UNC Wilmington 57, Coll. of Charleston 55, 2OT VMI 88, Radford 76 Vanderbilt 67, Auburn 59 Virginia 70, Notre Dame 49 W. Carolina 70, The Citadel 52 W. Kentucky 72, Louisiana-Monroe 63 William & Mary 81, Northeastern 67 MIDWEST Bradley 55, Loyola of Chicago 38 Buffalo 78, Kent St. 69 Chicago St. 73, CS Bakersfield 68 Cleveland St. 74, Milwaukee 50 IPFW 84, IUPUI 60 Indiana 61, Northwestern 56 Kansas 85, Texas 54 Louisville 58, Cincinnati 57 Marquette 96, DePaul 94, OT Missouri St. 77, Indiana St. 66 N. Dakota St. 74, S. Dakota St. 59 Ohio 66, Akron 50 Ohio St. 64, Minnesota 46 S. Illinois 61, Evansville 56 Saint Louis 66, George Washington 59 South Dakota 64, W. Illinois 54 UMKC 74, Utah Valley 56 Valparaiso 68, Youngstown St. 66 Wichita St. 83, Drake 54 Wisconsin 79, Iowa 74 SOUTHWEST Abilene Christian 124, SW Adventist 57 Ark.-Pine Bluff 76, Prairie View 61 Arkansas St. 73, Texas St. 68 Houston 88, UCF 84 Iowa St. 71, TCU 60 Oklahoma 86, Kansas St. 73 Oklahoma St. 84, Texas Tech 62 Oral Roberts 63, Cent. Arkansas 50 Sam Houston St. 74, Lamar 71 Stephen F. Austin 70, Northwestern St. 68 Texas A&M 68, Tennessee 65, OT Texas A&M-CC 66, Houston Baptist 61 Texas-Arlington 75, UALR 71

Hockey National Hockey League WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 57 39 12 6 84 196 135 Chicago 60 35 11 14 84 207 163 Colorado 58 37 16 5 79 174 153 Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147 Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 164 164 Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 168 175 Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 146 180 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147 San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142 Los Angeles 59 31 22 6 68 139 128 Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169 Vancouver 60 27 24 9 63 146 160 Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179 Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 57 37 16 4 78 176 125 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145 Montreal 59 32 21 6 70 148 142 Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182 Detroit 58 26 20 12 64 151 163 Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191 Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183 Buffalo 57 15 34 8 38 110 172 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138 N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146 Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167 Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161 Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175 Carolina 57 26 22 9 61 144 158 New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146 N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164 200 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday’s Games No games scheduled Sunday’s Games No games scheduled Monday’s Games No games scheduled Tuesday’s Games Carolina at Buffalo, 4 p.m.

Transactions BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES — Agreed to terms with OF Brett Gardner on a four-year contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Designated SS Justin Sellers for assignment.

BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW JERSEY NETS — Signed C Jason Collins to a 10-day contract.

HOCKEY National Hockey League MONTREAL CANADIENS — Recalled D Jarred Tinordi from Hamilton (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Claimed D Mike Kostka off waivers from Chicago. American Hockey League SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE — Recalled D Josh McFadden from Cincinnati (ECHL). Loaned G Rob Madore to Cincinnati.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

B3

State: Swagerty, Gale help Riders finish 9th CONTINUED FROM B1 Teigan Glidewell, the same wrestler he bested for third Schwartz added to his in last year’s Mat Classic. in lead when Ward was called Mat Classic semifinal for clubbing Schwartz in action. the head too harshly on a Spartans placers lockup. The Chelan wrestler Ward was the highest of picked up his final point on eight Forks state-placers, a second Ward stall late in including. the match to take the title The Spartans also had by a 4-0 score. third-place showings from After the final, Ward was Sebastian Morales (106 as upbeat as one could be pounds) and Miguel after losing a state champi- Morales (285). onship. Sebastian Morales fell There were no tears, just 2-0 to Vashon Island sophoa sheepish grin and a hug more Chase Wickman, but when Forks assistant came back for a 6-3 win Frankie Torres came over to against Blaine’s Kyle Gontell him to keep his head up zalez and earned third after and stay proud after the a 4-2 decision over Okanamatch. gan’s Anthony Payton. “I wrestled him as best I “Making it to the Dome, could,” Ward said. “He’s a I expected more out of really tough wrestler, prob- myself, but this is what ably the best 220 overall, happened,” Sebastian and I couldn’t get an open- Morales said. ing on him. “I did all right but I “I’m not too disap- think I made a few mispointed; I don’t think I could takes which cost me [in the have done anything differ- semifinals].” ently [to beat him]. Miguel Morales fell 17-9 “He only beat me by a in his semifinal to eventual few points.” runner-up Olson, but picked Schwartz and Ward had up the pieces with a 5-1 vicmet in January at the Gut tory over teammate Jake Check Challenge, with Claussen, who placed sixth Schwartz winning by a sim- in the 285-pound division. ilar margin, 3-0. Morales earned a mea“Joel wrestled as well as sure of revenge in the thirdhe could,” Wheeler said. place match, besting Kiona“He did well with him, Benton’s Cody Zyph 9-2. but it’s hard to do anything Zyph beat Morales in last with Schwartz. He keeps year’s 285-pound state perfect position and it’s so final. hard to get in and get any Morales, a junior in only kind of points on him — his second season of wreshe’s just tough. tling, gritted his way “Schwartz is a perfect through an ankle injury college-style wrestler. He suffered in the semifinal. should be able to compete “I’ve been working my at the next level easily.” way up, just trying to do the Ward advanced to the best I can and I feel like I 220-pound final after earn- should be up there in the ing a 5-2 decision over finals, but at least I could

state champion, he finished out his career like a true champion by wrestling as well as he could on a hobbled ankle throughout the postseason,” Gonzalez said. Sophomore Tyler Gale improved upon last year’s fifth-place finish, picking up fourth place this time around after beating Olympic’s Tre Toledo 9-3 and Spencer Clegg of Clarkston 7-5, before falling to Colville freshman T.J. Baun for the second time in the tournament. Junior Roberto Coronel (285) placed fifth for the Roughriders and junior Matt Robbins (182) took seventh. Another junior, Kyle La Fritz (220), who placed fifth last year, injured his knee LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS in Friday’s evening session Port Angeles’ Tyler Gale tries to pin Dawson Biddix of Sedro-Woolley. and was forced to miss the Gale, a junior, went on to place fourth in the 106-pound division. rest of the Mat Classic. As with Forks, the Ridget back and beat him als and regionals, finished minute timeout before the ers appear to have a bright [Zyph],” Miguel Morales 20th with 28 points. final round future ahead, with SwaDeer Park won the 2A said. The injury timeout gerty being the only graduThe Spartans’ other four state title with 109 points. grated on Roughriders ating state participant. Four the six Riders wres- coach Erik Gonzalez. state placers were “We’ve seen a real trend Other area placers 132-pounder Nanito San- tlers who made state placed, chez, who took fourth; led by a pair of fourth-place toward complete cautiousSequim and Port Alvaro Ortiz, fifth at 113 finishers, one of those being ness in recent years, in Townsend weren’t as wellsenior standout Ozzy Swaterms of treating any apparpounds; Ricky Barragan, ent injury being suffered,” represented at state as fifth at 138; and Brooke gerty. Swagerty (126 pounds) Gonzalez said, “and some Forks and Port Angeles, but Peterson, who placed fifth in the girls 145-pound divi- finished fourth for the sec- wrestlers use that to their three of the five wrestlers ond straight year, falling advantage, and I think sent by the Wolves and Redsion. into the consolation bracket that’s what happened here skins to the Mat Classic Port Angeles takes 9th after an 11-7 loss to Toppen- and I don’t think it’s sports- earned state placements. Shae Shoop (113 pounds) ish’s Sergio Morales in the manlike.” The Roughriders picked semifinals. Swagerty rebounded to and Matt Cain (152) both up their second straight Morales scored a two- beat Sultan’s Jamell Carroll took seventh place for Port top-10 finish at Mat Classic, point takedown with 10 sec- 1-0 in his next match, and Townsend, becoming the finishing in ninth place in onds remaining in the sec- nearly completed a come- school’s first state placers Class 2A with 61.5 points. ond round, then clutched back for third place, bat- since Brett Johnson in Port Angeles was the his knee after the round tling back from being down 2010. highest-placing Olympic concluded and was attended 3-0 in the final round to Sequim’s Kaylee DitlefLeague team. Kingston was to by medical staff. Travis Filleau of Sumner sen went on the comeback 10th with 60 points and trail after opening the tourHe returned in time for before falling 4-2. Olympic, which topped the the third round, but “Though Ozzy came up nament with a close loss to Roughriders at sub-region- achieved an effective two- just short of his goal to be a earn an eighth-place finish.

Medals: Russia

Canada rules rink, a flame dies, Olympics end

CONTINUED FROM B1 to see it with my own eyes. And I’m saying — it’s a IOC President Thomas bomb. Unbelievable.” A conversation about Bach said Sunday that Olympic officials made it Russia’s turnaround can’t clear to Russia that build- be had without an examinaing roads, arenas and hotels tion of its past difficulties with doping. in Sochi wasn’t enough. At four of the previous The IOC “always made them aware that it is not six Olympics, both summer enough just to organize the and winter, Russian athgames, but that we also letes were stripped of medneed a good home team,” als after failing doping tests. Bach said. “So they were working hard after the shock they Doping problems had in Vancouver and I The situation had grown think it’s just remarkable so dire that former IOC progress that has been President Jacques Rogge made within four years of publicly chastised the RusVancouver to today. We can sians and demanded that only congratulate the Rus- they “respond with strong sian team to this great suc- anti-doping actions” in Vancess.” couver. To be fair, five of the RusRussian anti-doping sian gold medals were won agency managing director by athletes who weren’t Nikita Kamaev told The Russian citizens four years Associated Press before the ago. Sochi Games started that Speedskater Victor Ahn, ramped up testing resulted who came to Russia after a in about 180 busts in 2013, falling out with his native an almost 70 percent yearOlympic team in South on-year increase in positive Korea, won three gold med- cases. als and a bronze. Vic Wild, So far in Sochi, six athan American who moved to letes have tested positive Russia when he married for banned substances. Russian snowboarder Alena None have been Russian. Zavarzina, won two snow“It was a fantastic perboarding golds. formance, great work by the That mattered little to coach and federation. They fans who were aching to did everything professionshow the rest of the world ally and put such a great that Russia is a pushover ending,” Vitaly Mutko, Rusno more. sia’s ministry of sport, told “Vancouver is now left the Russian television netfar behind. One cannot work R-Sport. compare the results,” said “The team has exceeded Khasan Zhilov, a 37-year- the plan. The rest isn’t old fan from Moscow. important. I congratulate “I came here yesterday everybody.”

SOCHI, Russia — The Olympic flame was snuffed out. No chance of that for the Canadian hockey team, champions again. The Sochi Games completed a 17-day run Sunday with Canada’s 3-0 victory over Sweden in the men’s hockey final, the last of 98 gold medal events. The end of the $51 billion extravaganza came on a day when Russia captured the medals race, and IOC President Thomas Bach lauded the host city for its “amazing” transformation. Only three sports were on the schedule, with the other gold medals coming from Russian cross-country skier Alexander Legko and bobsledder Alexander Zubkov leading the way for the hosts in the four-man. The fifth and sixth doping cases surfaced, involving NHL and Sweden star Nicklas Backstrom — by far the standout name of

the group — and Austrian cross-country skier Johannes Duerr. At the closing ceremony, the athletes stuck to tradition by mugging for cameras and taking a last celebratory prance. The flag was handed over to the next winter host, and a giant mascot bear blew out the flame and sent the Olympics on their way to Pyeongchang, South Korea. ■ HOCKEY: The Canadians won gold for the third time in the last four Olympics, taking all six of their games in Sochi. Jonathan Toews scored in the first period and captain Sidney Crosby scored his first goal of the tournament in the second. Chris Kunitz also scored and Carey Price made 24 saves for Canada. Henrik Lundqvist stopped 33 shots for the injurydepleted Swedes. “We’re just an amazing team to watch, the way we work together,” Toews said. “We

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■ DOPING: Sochi had six doping cases; Vancouver had one four years ago. As IOC President Thomas Bach sees it, that’s good news — the drug cheats are getting caught. “The number of the cases for me is not really relevant,” he said. One who was suspended was Nicklas Backstrom, who plays for the NHL’s Washington Capitals, tested positive for a substance found in allergy medication.

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were just all over them.” ■ CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING: Alexander Legkov got down to work in a hurry. He led a Russian sweep of the men’s 50-kilometer cross-country race. He was followed by Maxim Vylegzhanin and Ilia Chernousov. That assured Russia of finishing with the most medals. It was also the host nation’s first gold in the sport in Sochi. “This is priceless,” Legkov said. “It’s more valuable than my life.”

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B4

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

Dilbert

by Lynn Johnston

Doonesbury Flashbacks

by Garry Trudeau

Frank & Ernest

DEAR ABBY: Can you be sexually harassed/abused by your spouse? My husband talks dirty to me and grabs at my breasts. I have repeatedly asked him to stop, but he doesn’t listen and continues to do it. We have two small kids at home, and by the time they go to bed, I could care less about being intimate. His behavior disgusts me, and to be honest, I don’t want to have sex with him. I have female problems and have told him it hurts, but it makes no difference to him. He touches me in front of the kids, and I have to slap his hand away. I can’t leave him because I don’t have a car or income for myself, nor do I have family or friends close by. I can’t go to his family because they see him in a different light. What would you suggest, and is it harassment — and could I press charges? Leave My Aura Alone

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY me when parents head for the toy Van Buren department so their children will have something to play with while they shop. Then, after the kids have spent time drooling, teething, sneezing, etc., they leave the dirty toys at the end of the aisle for someone else to buy. Yesterday, I saw a child sucking on the paw of a stuffed animal. When I commented on how that must be the child’s favorite toy, the mother said it wasn’t theirs — she was just keeping the little boy quiet while she shopped. Last week, I stood behind someone in the checkout line. In her child’s mouth was the ribbon from a Mylar balloon. When the mother finished loading her groceries onto the conveyor belt, she said, “Time to put this back now!” It’s my pet peeve: First, the germs they get from sucking on this stuff, then the ones everyone else is exposed to from the child. And on top of that there’s the stealing because I have seen children break toys. This is wrong, and we’re all paying for it. Why can’t these parents throw something in the diaper bag before they leave home? Put It Down! in Virginia

Abigail

Dear Aura: You have mentioned so many problems in your short letter that it’s hard to know where to begin. While your husband’s attempts at foreplay are beyond clumsy and ineffective, I can’t help but feel some sympathy for him because it appears you have him on a starvation diet. How long this can continue for either of you is uncertain. Rather than try to charge harassment, why not schedule an appointment with your gynecologist and find out why having sex is painful for you. It is not supposed to be, and your doctor may be able to help you resolve the problem. Marriage counseling might also help because it’s clear you and your husband aren’t communicating on any meaningful level. If these problems are not resolvable, you can’t continue living like this and neither can he. Because your family isn’t nearby and you have no transportation, call or write them and let them know you may need their help to return. If they are unable to help you, contact a domestic abuse hotline. Unwanted sexual advances could be considered harassment, and sex without consent is rape.

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

Red and Rover

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Husband, wife need counseling

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Fun ’n’ Advice

Dear Put It Down: Because the parents aren’t doing their job — they are forgetful or lazy and have no consideration for the store owners or other shoppers. Sadly, parents like the ones you have described raise children who are just like themselves.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Dear Abby: It absolutely frosts by Brian Basset

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Pickles

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Make plans, but don’t share your ideas. Act in secret and you’ll make a much larger impact when the time is right to present or promote. Don’t let impulsiveness be your downfall. Strategize every move you make and avoid interference and criticism. 5 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t be afraid to make changes. Taking the initiative will help you gain respect, even though you are likely to face opposition from a jealous onlooker. An unusual set of circumstances will surround a money, health or legal issue. Get the facts straight and proceed. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Keep your emotions under control. You don’t want to give anyone the upper hand. Know what’s in your bank account and how much you can afford before you spend on something you don’t need. Someone you deal with has ulterior motives. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Put greater focus on yourself and the personal improvements you can make. Dedication and presenting the best possible picture will be what captures the interest of someone looking for a partner or a service you can offer. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Take pride in what you do. Say what’s on your mind and enjoy socializing and being a participant. Partnerships will flourish and romantic encounters will lead to a close bond with someone who supports your efforts and boosts your confidence. 5 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A partnership will turn out to be prosperous. Enjoy the company of someone you’ve known for a long time. Listen to what’s being said, but don’t be too quick to divulge your personal secrets. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Time and energy spent trying to accomplish the tasks you’ve been given will pay off. Don’t let anyone confuse or sidetrack you with criticism or meddling. Take special care of your health. Proper diet and exercise will help you stay strong. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Try not to get bent out of shape if someone overreacts or gives you a hard time. Head in whatever direction looks promising and give your all until you get the results you desire. A new friendship or activity will be exhilarating. 2 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Let communication lead the way. Interaction will lead to interesting information and good connections that will be valuable to you when it comes to legal, money or health issues. Ask questions and strategize to make sure you get your timing perfect. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Make adjustments at home that will motivate you to be more creative. Taking part in an unusual event will broaden your outlook and help you expand your friendships. An unusual lifestyle will capture your interest. Love is in the stars. 4 stars

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Put more emphasis on money, contracts, legal matters and getting back on track. What you do to encourage positive change will bring good results, but that doesn’t mean you should be excessive. Greater security will help build confidence. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Take part in an event that is geared toward a cause you believe in and you will form an alliance with someone who is able to help you advance. Make a difference by going above and beyond what’s expected and you will reap rewards. 2 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

B5

Hoops: Riders lose to Renton NFL: Husky TE CONTINUED FROM B1 After trailing by eight points at halftime, 36-28, Neah Bay outscored Tulalip 24-10 in the third quarter to take a six-point lead into the final frame. But in the fourth, the Hawks chipped away at the Red Devils’ lead, finally overtaking them on Hamilton’s shot. Hamilton finished with 16 points for the Hawks, who were led by Shawn Sanchez’s 19 points. Tulalip Heritage 68, Neah Bay 66 Neah Bay 14 14 24 14— 66 Tulalip Heritage 21 15 10 22— 68 Individual scoring Neah Bay (66) Martinez 8, J. Greene 9, E. Greene 7, Venske 19, Moss 7, Reamer 10, McCaulley 6. Tulalip Heritage (68) B. Jones 8, Fryberg 10, Miranda 9, Miles 2, Sanchez 19, Hamilton 16, Enick 4.

JESSE MAJOR/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles point guard Maddy Hinrichs advances the fall upcourt. Mount Vernon (51) Sakuma 11, Case 15, Whitner 2, Kuipers 5, Vanrooyeer 15, Noste 3.

Renton 45, Port Angeles 36

Girls Basketball Mount Vernon Christian 51, Neah Bay 46 MOUNT VERNON — Neah Bay committed 30 turnovers, but managed to stay in Saturday’s game at Mount Vernon Christian School by playing stout defense. The fifth-ranked Red Devils held the Hurricanes to 10 of 52 shooting from the field, including 2 for 19 in the fourth quarter, but Neah Bay was unable to retake the lead after losing in the second quarter. Senior Cierra Moss led Neah Bay with 22 points and she grabbed 11 rebounds. Faye Chartraw added 12 points and pulled down a team-high 12 boards and Blaire Hill had 10 rebounds. Mount Vernon Christian 51, Neah Bay 46 Neah Bay 13 10 12 11— 46 Mount Vernon 9 19 14 9— 51 Individual scoring Neah Bay (46) Haily Greene 3, Aguirre 4, J. Greene 2, Chartraw 12, Moss 22, Hill 3.

TACOMA — The Roughriders fell to the Indians in the third-place game of the 2A West Central District tournament Saturday at Foss High School. In Burlington-Edison, Port Angeles will be facing a team it went on the road and beat 43-40 in late December. Port Angeles led Saturday’s game 7-5 after a lowscoring first quarter, but Renton responded with a 21-6 second period to take a 26-13 lead into halftime. “For the second straight night, we were plagued by hesitation on offense,” Port Angeles coach Michael Poindexter said. The Riders battled in the second half, but were unable to take a big enough chuck out of the Indians’ big lead. “We finally were willing to attack pressure in the second half and were much more successful as a result,” Poindexter said. “For the second half, I

felt we looked like a team that wanted to compete and believed in ourselves. That had been by and large lost for the previous game and a half. “The stronger second half gives us at least some positive note on which to approach our preparations this week for a BurlingtonEdison team that is playing very well in the latter part of the season.” Bailee Jones led the Riders with eight points, while Krista Johnson added seven and Kylee Jeffers scored six. Taylor Farris finished with a game-high 19 points for Renton and Natajia McMillen contributed 13. Renton 45, Port Angeles 36 Port Angeles 7 6 13 10— 36 Renton 5 21 10 9— 45 Individual scoring Port Angeles (36) Jones 8, Johnson 7, Jeffers 6, Wheeler 5, Hinrichs 4, Boe 2, Baxley 2, Lee 2. Renton (45) Farris 14, McMillen 13, Proctor 9, Williams 3, Alem 2, Curry 2, Stowers 2.

Eatonville 51, Port Townsend 40 MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — The Redskins’ determined postseason run came to an end in the sixthplace game of the 1A Tri-

District tournament at Mountlake Terrace High School on Saturday. Port Townsend coach Randy Maag said his team was doomed by 7 for 27 shooting at the free-throw line, compared to Eatonville’s 19 of 27. After trailing by six after three quarters, the Redskins tried to create more of the late-game magic that has become their signature in the postseason. “We were within one point with four minutes left and just couldn’t find the basket from the field or free-throw line,” Maag said. It was the last game of Maag’s coaching career, and the last for a number of seniors, including Jewel Johnson, Rilke Rutenbeck, Jayde Richardson and Trish Reeves. Johnson led the Redskins with 16 points and Rutenbeck added nine. Port Townsend had a fun run through the postseason, edging Charles Wright 33-30 last week in the TriDistrict play-in game thanks to three points in the final minute by Rutenbeck. A few days later, Rutenbeck banked a 3-pointer at the buzzer to beat Seattle Academy 31-30. Despite not making regionals, Maag said the postseason provided a special ending for he and his players. “An absolutely great season. I’m very proud to have coached my last year with this group,” he said. “My eight seniors on the postseason roster have some great memories.” Eatonville 51, Port Townsend 40 Port Townsend 10 17 5 8— 40 Eatonville 17 13 8 13— 51 Individual scoring Port Townsend (40) Johnson 16, Rutenbeck 9, Lee 2, Reeves 4, Richardson 5, Deen 4. Eatonville (51) Voss 14, Schoeph 11, Godwin 2, Vandenboom 3, Boettcher 5, Brankline 16.

CONTINUED FROM B1 kins’ agent were not returned. On Wednesday, “That’s the kind of indiSeferian-Jenkins said he cator, signs we look for. Do hoped to run around a things change because of 4.6-second 40-yard dash. what just happened? It’s the same as did you change He did not indicate any injuries. because you got beat last On the NFL Network, week or because you won big last week? It’s no differ- Seferian-Jenkins said he was not cleared medically ent. to participate in the “We want to stay on 40-yard dash. course, stay the same and He did participate in the continue to expand and bench press Saturday. grow.” Seferian-Jenkins benched Seferian-Jenkins hurt? 225 pounds 20 times. That was good for 10th among Former Washington the 14 tight ends that partight end Austin Seferianticipated. Jenkins did not run the 40-yard dash with the UCLA’s Barr confident other tight ends at the UCLA linebacker NFL combine. Anthony Barr said his goal The NFL Network reported that Seferian-Jen- is to go No. 1 overall in this year’s draft. Barr was kins had a foot injury. asked if that is realistic, There was a report from and he said, “It’s very realdraftinsider.net that istic.” Seferian-Jenkins had a Asked why, he said, fracture in his foot that “Why not? may affect his health for Barr is long on talent, Washington’s Pro Day on and apparently confidence, April 2. too. Calls to Seferian-Jen-

Hamblin leads Oregon State past Washington THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Ruth Hamblin scored 18 points and grabbed 14 rebounds to help Oregon State roll to a 77-57 victory over Washington on Sunday. Oregon State led by just one at 16-15 but the Beavers went on a 15-2 run, with seven points by Gabriella Hanson, to take a 31-17 lead and led the rest of the way. The Beavers built a 42-25 lead at halftime. Deven Hunter scored 17 points and Hanson added 15 for Oregon State (19-9, 11-5 Pac-12), which has won seven straight and is tied with No. 20 Arizona State for third place in the conference.

Kelsey Plum scored 26 points and Jazmine Davis added 19 to lead Washington (16-11, 9-7) which snapped a four-game winning streak.

WSU 108, Oregon 88 PULLMAN — Tia Presley scored a career-high 32 points to lead Washington State over Oregon 108-88 on Sunday. The 108 points is third most in the history of the program and the 42 field goals made is a school record. Presley was 13 of 17 from the floor as WSU shot 53 percent. Lia Galdeira had a season-high 27 points.

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FSBO: Mains Farm, Sequim. 3 Br., 2 bath, hobby room, formal dining, open concept vaultedceiling great room, remodeled kitchen with quar tz counters and stainless appliances and Wolf gas stove, propane fireplace, in-ground irrigation, 2 car garage with shop, greenhouse, and more! Great water view and dual mountain views. $299,000. (360)582-1834

FULL and par t time RNs and LPNs Pediatr i c i n t e n s i ve h o m e care RNs and LPNs n e e d e d i n Po r t A n geles. Please contact Catherine D’Ambrosio at cpd@cda-rn.com or (206)953-4299 Experience preferred, commitment to excellence required.

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NICE GUY: Looking for a NICE lady, 45+. Me: UW grad, slender, 5’11” fit, financially secure, NS, beach walks, kayaking, Starbucks, music, reading, nature, adventure, movies, sharing. You: Nice, tried the rest now try the best. Peninsula Daily News PDN#730/Nice Guy Port Angeles, WA 98362 NICE LADY, 65, looking for NICE GUY 65-70 yrs. ME: Active, NS. sews, t r ave l , m u s i c , b e a c h walks, good cook. YOU: Nice guy, no drugs, single only. Send response Peninsula Daily News PDN#736/Nice Lady Port Angeles, WA 98362

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4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General ADVERTISING Sales Rep: Looking for a Full or Part time opportunity? Consider the Red Book Telephone Directory. Your Opportunity is here. Call 425-488-3211, Fax 425-488-0946, or visit redbooksearch.com

L O S T: D o g . S p a n i e l M i x . W h i t e a n d ye l low/tan. No collar. Medium sized/knee high, 23lbs. Curly, bushy tail. 13yrs, Female, “Dixie,” Needs medication. Lost Jan. 18, E. Bay St., P.A. REWARD! (206)235-0729 www.facbook.com/ BringDixieDogHome for more information

L O S T : Wa l k i n g s t i ck . Great sentimental value, F O U N D : C a t . M a l e . gold letter says Missy. Graysmarsh area, Se- Seiku area. Please call (360)928-3483 quim. (360)683-5349.

BODY TECH: Exper ienced, good with metal fa b r i c a t i o n , 1 0 ye a r s exp. req. Ancient Auto Works. (360)457-2767. CAREGIVER: Live-in. Room and board. (360)457-5766 HOUSEKEEPER Full-Time. Benefits after 90 days. Pickup applications 550 W. Hendrickson Sequim, WA 98382

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Angeles area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Monday through F r i d a y a n d S u n d a y. Contact Dave Smith M o n . - Fr i . , b e t we e n 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. at (360)452-4507 or (360)808-7679

EXPERIENCED Dental Assistant: Full Time. Benefits. Send resume to Dental Office, P.O. Box 1359 Sequim, WA. 98382

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B6 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. ‘CAPTAIN PHILLIPS’ Solution: 7 letters

C A T H E R I N E N A H S R N By Melanie Miller

DOWN 1 Glum drops 2 Behave poorly 3 “I __ return”: MacArthur 4 Large Alaskan bears 5 Vampire tooth 6 Baldwin in Capital One ads 7 Call on a retro phone 8 Bra parts 9 Many an Actors Studio member 10 Popeye’s Olive 11 *Picturesque spot for a warm drink 12 Actress Paquin of “True Blood” 13 British noblewoman 21 TV educator Bill in a lab coat 22 Didn’t go out 26 Vessel on a mantel 28 Bat first 29 Each 31 Angled pipes 32 Adept 33 Cologne scent 34 Not pro 35 *Place for changing out of a wet suit

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Abdirahman, Abduwali, Ahmed, Alabama, Andrea, Barkhad, Bilal, Billy Ray, Castellano, Catherine, Chris, Corey, Crew, Cronan, Duty, Elmi, Faysal, Frank, Greengrass, Hanks, Hufan, John, Keener, Khat, Mahat, Michael, Mike, Mohamed, Murphy, MV Maersk, Najee, Navy, Nemo, Oman, Omar, Perry, Quinn, Radio, Raid, Richard, Sail, Save, SEAL, Shane, Ship, Somalia, Survival Yesterday’s Answer: Extinguished

Friday’s Puzzle Solved Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

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37 To the __ degree 40 Traps for the unwary 41 Big mouth, informally 44 John of London? 46 Armored superhero 48 One who was born there 50 Yellowfin tuna 53 Noise from a sleeper

2/24/14

54 Otherworldly 55 Deep anxiety 56 Capitalizes on 57 Three-handed card game 59 Blissful place 60 Senator Harry of Nevada 61 Aykroyd and Quayle 63 Moon lander, for short

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ACROSS 1 To-do list item 5 Short-lived crazes 9 Destroy beyond repair 14 Yodeler’s feedback 15 Landed 16 “Laughing” critter 17 Teensy bit 18 A hop, skip and jump away 19 Savanna antelope 20 *Powerful stratum of society 23 In high spirits 24 Spread out, as one’s fingers 25 __ New Guinea 27 Large seaweed 30 Mixed in a glass 33 Travel book inserts 36 Bard’s nightfall 38 Take care of 39 Game with Wild Draw Four cards 40 Continue with the fun, and a hint to each part of the answers to starred clues 42 Keebler cookie character 43 Stone-faced 45 Side with green eggs 46 Part of MIT: Abbr. 47 Unit of explosive force 49 Anjou, e.g. 51 Memorable labor leader Jimmy 52 Rinsed the soap from, as a car 56 GI R&R provider 58 *When brandy may be served 62 __ and crossbones 64 Innovator’s spark 65 Additional 66 Studio stand 67 Line in blue cheese 68 Diva’s solo 69 Rose parts 70 Comes to a close 71 Require

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Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans. here: Yesterday's

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: DRESS GRIND HANGAR THROWN Answer: The fancy new airline had — HIGH STANDARDS

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale General General General General General General General Wanted Clallam County CNA/RNA: Part/full-time, all shifts. Wright’s Home Care (360)457-9236. CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE We are looking for individuals interested in a carrier route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Wed. Fill out application at 147 W. Washington, Sequim. Call Jasmine at (360)683-3311, ext. 6051 CASHIER: Part-time, 16 hrs., includes Sat., exper ienced. Apply Lynn’s Caboose, 242751 Hwy. 101 W., P.A. No calls.

CNA/RNA: Ideally available for all shifts including weekends. Great b e n e f i t p a ck a g e a n d 401k. Apply in person at Park View Villas, 8th & G Streets, P.A.

INFORMATION & ASSISTANCE SPECIALIST 25 hrs wk, located in the Information & Assistance Sequim office. Provides I&A to seniors, adults with disabilities, caregivers, & families in a friendly social ser vice setting. Good communication & computer skills a must. BA Soc Sci and 2 yrs direct service exp. or 2 yrs relevant college and 4 yrs exp., WDL, auto ins. required. $13.16/hr, full benefit pkg, Contact Information & A s s i s t a n c e, 1 - 8 0 0 801-0050 for job descrip. & applic. packet. Closes 4:00 pm 3/10/14. I&A is an EOE. KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497

COME JOIN THE WAVE TEAM! Wave Broadband is now seeking Broadband Technician I, II, III The Broadband Technician will be responsible to provide outstanding customer service contributing to Wave’s success in making custome r s h a p p y. U n d e r supervision, the broadband technician will perform basic installations, disconnects and service changes for residential customers as well as perform basic troubleshooting from tap to customer’s electronic devices (TV, CPE, Modem, MTA, etc.) For a full job description, v i s i t w w w. w ave b r o a d band.com/careers Competitive salary and benefits including service discount! To apply, send resume and cover letter to cjones@ wavebroadband.com or apply in person at Wave Broadband, 725 East 1st St., Por t Angeles, WA 98362. Diverse Workforce/EEO

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FAMILY SERVICE WORKER IN PORT ANGELES, WA Full time temporary. The Family Service Worker is responsible for the delivery of family services in the areas of social services, health and parent involvement. The Family Ser vice Wor ker is responsible for proactive par ticipation in social service jobs as assigned to support the overall operations on the program. The applicant must have a Bachelor of Ar ts in Family Services, Social Work, Human Services or Human Development, or a related field, plus two years Social Service experience. Applications are available at OlyCAP: 823 Commerce Loop, Port Townsend, WA (360) 385-2571; 228 W. First St., Ste. J, Port Angeles, WA (360)452-4726; www.olycap.org. Closes when filled, for best consideration apply by 2/28/14.

LICENSED Home-care aid, full/part-time, great benefits, contact Nyomi at Concerned Citizens, 805 E. 8th St., P.A., (360)452-2396

FULL and par t time RNs and LPNs Pediatr ic intensive home care RNs and LPNs n e e d e d i n Po r t A n geles. Please contact Catherine D’Ambrosio at cpd@cda-rn.com or (206)953-4299 Experience preferred, commitment to excellence required. INSURANCE/Financial CSS (Sequim). We are looking for a friendly, results-driven individual to work as a customer service specialist. If you’re good with people, enjoy working in a team environment, and handle multi-tasking with ease, this may be a good fit. Hrs 8:30-5:30, Mon.-Fri., Starting salary $ 2 6 , 0 0 0 / y r, S e n d r e sume to jjnsequim@gmail.com Medical Assistant ACE Certified Ja m e s t ow n Fa m i l y Health Clinic in beautiful Sequim, WA is dedicated to serving our tribal members and community. We are recruiting for a full-time professional and compassionate certified Medical Assistant. Amer ican Indian/ Alaska Native preference for qualified candidates. Please visit http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com to view full job announcement and to apply. MENTAL HEALTH Supervisor for Community Suppor t Ser vices team of case managers a n d p e e r c o u n s e l o r s. Req.. Master’s degree, prof. lic, 5 yrs exp. working with severe and persistent mental illness. F T, b e n e s , R e s u m e , cover ltr to Peninsula Behaviorial Health, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. http://peninsula behavioral.org/EOE

REPORTER QUALITY Control/Safety Manager. G r e e n C r e e k Wo o d Products is looking for a Quality Control Manager for its Por t Angeles sawmill and Spanaway kiln sites. This position would also be responsible for site safety. Experience required. Salary DOE Send resume to P.O. Box 2469 PA 98362 or go to 436 Eclipse West Dr. More info: Jo at 360-417-3644 or jo@greencrow.com QUEETS Clearwater School District is seeking an education leader to serve as Superintendent/Principal, starting July 1, 2014. The successful candidate will have skills as an excellent communicator and listener, outstanding organizational abilities, a collaborative leadership style, knowledge of school finance and sound fiscal management, be a visionary and empowering leader, and show a commitment to ser ving ALL students. Exper ience with UW CEL framewor k preferred. At least three years academic teaching at the elementary level, curriculum development, and principal experience will also be necessary. Queets Clearwater is a K-8 school located approximately 20 minutes north of Amanda Park, in the beautiful Olympic N a t i o n a l P a r k . Fr e e housing, as well as a generous benefits package. For information on how to apply please contact Mike Ferguson at (360)962-2395. Application deadline is March 28th, 2014.

RECEPTIONIST: Family practice has opening for full-time receptionist, includes Saturday. Wages DOE, benefits. MOTOR ROUTES Send resume to: Central P.A. and Forks Peninsula Daily News area, driver location Port PDN#735/Receptionist Angeles. Call 457-4260. Port Angeles, WA 98362

PART time dental receptionest: Experienced Send resume to Dental Office PO Box 1359 Sequim, WA. 98382 PLUMBER: Must be exper ienced and have good driving record. For info call (360)582-9067. S C H O O L C O O K : Fo r young children. Flexible hours. Some gf, dair y free and vegan meals. Willingness to help in school garden. (360)457-6610

The Sequim Gazette, an award-winning weekly community newspaper in Sequim, Wa., is seeking an experienced reporter. Your assignments will be varied, including everything from local government and politics to investigative pieces and more. If you have a passion for community journalism, can meet deadlines and produce people-or iented news and feature stories on deadline (for print and web), we’d like to hear from you. Exper ience with InDesign, social media and photo skills a plus. Minimum of one year news reporting experience or equivalent post-secondary education required. This fulltime position includes medical, vision and dental benefits, paid holidays, vacation and sick leave, and a 401k with company match. One of the top weeklies in Washington State, the S e q u i m G a ze t t e wa s named the top newspaper in the state in its circulation size by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association in 2005-2008 and 2010, and among the nation’s best in 2011 and 2012 ( N a t i o n a l N ew s p a p e r Association). We are a newsroom of four, covering the stories of the Sequim-Dungeness Valley on the Olympic Peninsula. We are par t of the Sound Publishing newsgr o u p t h a t b o a s t s 4 3 n ew s p a p e r t i t l e s, t h e largest community media organization in Washington State. Interested individuals should submit a resume with at least 3 non-returnable writing samples in pdf format to hr@soundpublishng.com or by mail to SEQ/REP/HR Department Sound Publishing, Inc., 11323 Commando Rd. W, Main Unit Everett, WA 98204

SERVER: Fine dining, immediate opening, writWE NEED YOU! ing skills/social media Case Manager & Men- exp. Resume to tal Health Therapist FT Bella@olypen.com w/benes. Req. MA & 2 yrs exp. Per-Diem Medical AsWHY PAY s i s t a n t E l i g i b i l i t y fo r SHIPPING ON HCA license req. INTERNET Per-Diem DMHP MA, or BSN with mental health PURCHASES? exp. Resume/cvr ltr to: SHOP LOCAL PBH 118 E. 8th St. Port Angeles, WA 98362 EOE peninsula http://Peninsula dailynews.com behavioral.org

SUBSTITUTE TEACHER and SUBSTITUTE TEACHER ASSISTANT Positions in Clallam and Jefferson Counties, both long-term and on-call. Wor king with children and their families in a p a r t d ay, p a r t o r f u l l ye a r, H e a d S t a r t / ECEAP, 35 hours per week. Applicant for Teacher position must have a minimum of an AA in Early Childhood Education and experience working with preschool aged children, BA in ECE preferred. Applicant for Teacher Assistant must have CDA or equivalent, AA in ECE p l u s ex p e r i e n c e w i t h preschool preferred. Application and Job Descr iption available at: OlyCAP, 823 Commerce Loop, Por t Townsend, 98368 (360) 385-2571; OlyCAP, 228 W. 1st St., Suite J, Por t Angeles, 98362 (360) 452-4726; and online at www.olycap.org. For best consideration, apply by Februar y 25, 2014. Closes when filled.

4080 Employment Wanted Affordable Lawn Maintenance (360)477-1805 A LT E R AT I O N S a n d Sewing. Alterations, mending, hemming and some heavyweight sewing available to you from me. Call (360)531-2353 ask for B.B. CERTIFIED healthcare provider. Avail. for nights and occasional days, for elderly or young women. Refs. avail., serval years experience. (360)683-7817 COMPUTER Care Sales and Repairs 24+ years exp. Desktop/Office/Laptop computers upgraded, free estimates in Sequim. Virus/Malware remova l . D i s c o u n t s ava i l , drop offs welcome. chet@olypen.com (360)808-9596 EXPERIENCED CARE For the elder lady in your life as if she were my own mother. 477-1242.

FRUIT Tree Pruning: Expert in fruit, ornamental and exotic shrubs. Semi retired to take the time to do it right. Photos on PDN site. Also complete lawn service. Book now. P.A. only. Local call (360)808-2146

F O R S A L E : M o ve - i n ready. 2,300 sf, 3 bed/2 bath plus a large bonus room. Large living area, dining room, kitchen with island. Mountain view, 1.01 landscaped acres, close to Discovery Trail. Covered front porch and large rear deck. 1,008 sf detached garage with workshop. $229,000. I Sew 4U (360)582-9782 *Hemming *Alterations *Zippers replaced *Any project Don’t wait! Call FSBO: 1,644 sf, custom today for an appointment 3 Br., 2.5 bath, gentle sloping treed 7+ acres, Patti Kuth, 417-5576. oversized 2 car garage I’m Sew Happy! with adjoining RV carPERSONAL Concierge por t, unattached addiServices. Need an extra tional garage, dead-end hand or have run out of road, Erving Jacobs, betime? I can help! house- tween Seq. and P.A., work, errands, garden- non-smoke. $343,000. (360)460-4868 ing, party prep, etc. P.A. (360)477-1969 references available. Call be- FSBO: Mains Farm, Sequim. 3 Br., 2 bath, hobtween 8 am and 8 pm. by room, formal dining, concept vaulted105 Homes for Sale open ceiling great room, reClallam County modeled kitchen with quar tz counters and BEAUTIFULLY stainless appliances and REMODELED Wolf gas stove, propane W a r m h o m e w i t h fireplace, in-ground irrienough of a water view gation, 2 car garage with to see the cruise ships shop, greenhouse, and and 4th of July fireworks! more! Great water view Lots of pride and thought a n d d u a l m o u n t a i n went in to how wonderful views. $299,000. the owners wanted this (360)582-1834 home to be: hardwood flooring throughout, HOME ON 6+ ACRES amazing sun room with IN THE CITY LIMITS r o o m t o r e l a x , s o u n d Here is a rare and wonsystem, and a hot tub derful opportunity to own with special vents for 6+ acres in the Port Anmoisture control. Nice geles city limits! This deck off of sun room has mountain view property glass railings...all the h a s a n ex i s t i n g f i xe r more to enjoy the view! h o m e a n d d e t a c h e d Special features include shop waiting for your hand painted tub in mas- personal touches or to ter bath. live in while you build MLS#271981. $235,000. your dream home. ZonThelma Durham ing is flexible; contact (360)460-8222 Brooke for details. WINDERMERE MLS#280163. $199,900. PORT ANGELES Brooke Nelson (360)417-2812 CHARMING COLDWELL BANKER Traditional 4 bedroom UPTOWN REALTY home, centrally located. Large Kitchen, open LOG HOME s t a i r c a s e a n d l a r g e Elegant 2 Br., 3 bath log backyard. Partial water home on 5 acres of parview. tially wooded rolling hills. MLS#280244. $174,900. This home is complete Kathy Love with top of the line appli452-3333 ances, granite counterPORT ANGELES tops and a brand new REALTY detached two car gar-

FILMOGRAPHER: Exceptional, studying film at P.C., email to inquire. FSBO: 1.3 acres, 2 br., Sierra_Horsley den, 1.5 bath, and brand @live.com new kitchen! Upgrades abound! Built in ‘67, HOUSE CLEANING 30+ yrs. exp., references 1,180 sf. Beautiful view of the mountains and Mt. Mary (360)640-0111 Baker! 12’ x 8’ shed, lots of room for orchard or RUSSELL garden! $212,000. ANYTHING (360)582-0498 775-4570 or 681-8582

age. With a wood burning stove, vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors and open floor plan, this home has a classic lodge like feel. MLS#271331. $329,000. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-477-9189


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County OLD MILL RD GEM On 14 ac. with creek frontage. 1,776 sf brick home. Enjoy the view of the foothills from the hot tub on the private deck and patio in back. Beautiful fenced horse pasture with shop. MLS#280267 $429,000 Ania Pendergrass Evergreen (360)461-3973 UPGRADED DOUBLEWIDE Spacious with Mountain View. Refrigerator, dishwasher, washer, dryer, kitchen sink & faucet, lighting, doors & paint on inside are all new. All furniture may stay with the home if buyer so desires. Flooring & kitchen cabinets have not been completed; so Seller will give $5000 allowance for same with a full price offer. Spacious covered deck overlooking landscaped yard. Home is in a senior (62+) park. Buyer must obtain approval from park management. MLS#280161/587552 $30,000 Roland Miller (360) 461-4116 TOWN & COUNTRY

ONE OWNER HOME 3 Br., 3 bath, over 3,000 SF, designed for living o n m a i n l eve l , s t r a i t views from this private setting, gas kitchen range and propane fp, RV parking by house is possible. MLS#593157/280240 $320,000 Deb Kahle (360) 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

P.A.: Sunny, 2 br., 1,056 sf., walk-in closets, breakfast bar, vinyl wind ow s, n ewe r f u r n a c e and electrical panel, patio, covered deck, car port and shop. $94,500. Great fianancing available! (360)808-4476 SALT WATER AND MOUNTAIN VIEW LOT! This 1 acre lot is located in the lovely Elwha Bluffs neighborhood of fine homes. Salt water and mountain views are available to enjoy. About 1/2 acre is usable, the rest slopes down into the Elwha valley. Located near the end of a deadend road and close to t h e E l w h a R i ve r a n d Olympic Discovery Trail. MLS#280170. $70,000. Jeanine Cardiff (360)460-9221 JACE The Real Estate Company

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 3 bath. Want to see more? www.peninsuladaily news.com Custom 1.5 story cedar home has wood stove, heat pump, skylights, teak wood floors, large master suite. Over sized 2 car garage. Beautiful easy c a r e ya r d w i t h f r u i t trees. Enjoy the golf course and pool. $242,000 360-683-8317

SPECTACULAR VIEWS OF HARBOR, VANCOUVER ISLAND Mt. Baker, Cascades, Coast Guard Base, beautifully renovated victorian, upscale and quality, 4 br., 2.5 bath 2335 sf with basement with garage, 0.33 acres ( 2 lots) gorgeous meticulous landscaping, private, central location, near hospital. MLS#264171. $649,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes EAST P.A.: Older 1 Br. mobile home in stages of remodel, new vinyl windows, owner will sell o n t e r m s fo r $ 1 , 5 0 0 . Space rent $350 mo. for qualified tenants. (206)276-7245 P. A . : 1 4 x 4 0 m o b i l e home located in View Vista Park, must be 55 or older and one small indoor pet is ok. Fully furnished and ready to move in. $25,500. Call 417-3991 for an appt.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014 B7

420 Vacation Getaways for Sale

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

Big Island Kona Condo 1 Br., 1 ba, ocean front complex, ground floor unit. $189,900. Photos available. (360)457-4315

P.A.: 2,000 sf, 2 Br., den, 2 ba, sauna, Jacuzzi, NP, NS. $1,000 mo., plus dep. (360)452-7743

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

S E Q : 1 B r. , i n t ow n , some utils, no pets/smoke, $550/mo, $700 dep. 460-3369.

1931 W. 6th St. P.A. 3 Br., 2 ba, lg. gar., no smoking/pets. $950 mo. (360)457-9776

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 1 bath, 1 Car Gar. $900. Sequim - Dungeness M e a d o w s , N o pets/smoke. E A S T P. A . : 4 0 ’ 5 t h (360-683-4449) wheel, 3 tip-outs. $550 mo., cable TV and Wifi. SEQUIM: Newer home, 457-9844 or 460-4968 in town, 3 br., 1.75 bath, fenced. Avail March 1. JAMES & $980, plus deposit. ASSOCIATES INC. (360)683-2599. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 SEQUIM: Nice, single HOUSES/APT IN P.A. w i d e , 2 b r. , 1 b a t h , A 1 br 1 ba utilities..$525 w h e e l c h a i r a c c e s s A 1 br 1 ba..............$575 ramps, in quiet mobile A 2 br 1 ba..............$675 home park. $700, last, H 2 br 1 ba..............$700 security. (360)477-6117. H 2 br 1.5 ba........$1,050 H 3 br 3 ba...........$1,450 605 Apartments DUPLEXES IN P.A. Clallam County D 1 br 1 ba..............$500 D 2 br 1.5 ba...........$650 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, D 2 br 1 ba view.....$700 D 2 br 1.5 2 car ga..$900 quiet, 2 Br., excellent references required. Complete List at: $700. (360)452-3540. 1111 Caroline St., P.A. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

605 Apartments Clallam County 1ST Month Rent Free! EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 • Nice, family environment with plenty of room for your children to play. • 2, 3 Br. units avail. • Must income qualify 2202 West 16th, P.A.

Managed by Sparrow Management, Inc.

605 Apartments Clallam County

1163 Commercial Rentals

SEQUIM: 1 Br., close to town, on site laundr y. $585. (360)681-8679.

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes P.A.: Clean 2 br., no smoke/pets. $650 first, last, dep. (360)460-7235 SEQ: 2 Br., fenced yard, detatched garage, close to shopping, W/S paid. $800. (360)457-6092. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, W/D, 1st, last, dep. $600 mo. (360)461-0842.

TWO OFFICES IN DOWNTOWN SEQUIM GAZETTE BUILDING FOR SUB-LEASE 448-sq-ft for $550 mo., 240-sq-ft for $350 mo. Perfect for accountant or other professional. S h a r e d c o n fe r e n c e room, restroom, wired for high-speed Internet. Contact John Brewer, publisher, (360)417-3500

SEQ: Updated 2 br., 2 bath, single car gar., 6005 Antiques & fenced back yard, heatCollectibles ed workshop, fireplace and wood stove. $850, AUCTION: Antique barn deposit. (360)582-7361. to be removed, 90x60, WINDERMERE barn boards/timbers. By CENTRAL P.A.: ConSUNLAND a p p t . o n l y. S e q u i m . ve n i e n t 2 b r. , 1 s t f l r. Send bid to D. Kirst, 187 $589 incl. util! Clean, roomy, NO SMOKE/pet 683 Rooms to Rent Rebel Lane, Por t Ang e l e s , WA 9 8 3 6 2 b y maybe. 504-2668. Roomshares 3/10/14. (360)808-3397. PA: 1 Br., no pets/smok- SEQUIM: Fur nished 1 ing $550. Br. $380, plus electric. 6010 Appliances (360)457-1695 (360)417-9478.

P.A.: Quality, newer 2 WILD ROSE Adult Fami- WASHER/DRYER: Set, CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 Br., DW, W/D, NS, NP. ly Home: Private room ba, no smoking/pets. avail., great care at the works good. $110 both. $650. (360)796-3560. (719)351-6468 $500. (360)457-9698. best rate. (360)683-9194

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B8 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014

AIR MATTRESS: And B O O K S : 1 6 0 L o u i s pump. $10. L’Amour hardback and (360)457-4383 paperback. $100. (360)640-1544 AUTOGRAPH: Buzz AlBOOTS: Cork, Westco, drin. $200. sz. 9, used one month, (360)681-2968 were $400. Sell for AUTOGRAPH: Framed $200. (360)640-0556. signed CDs, Dolly Parton, Bernadette Peters. BOW: Mar tin Mamba, 58” recurve, 50# at 28”, $100 each. 681-2968. wood arrows, quiver. AXLE: Trailer axle and $100. (360)504-2109. dump hydrolics. $200. BROADFORK: All steel, (360)457-5186 24”. $165. BARBER POLE: Profes(360)582-3840 sional, fully functional, BRUSH GRILL: For Marvy model 55. $200. Ford F150. $75. (360)479-1997 (360)417-0826 BAR STOOLS: (2), 30” seat, with backs, black BUTTONS: Lovely, vintage, antique. $10 per and cherry color. $70. group, $90 for all. (360)477-9493 (360)460-8768 BICYCLE: Men’s, seven s p e e d c r u i s e r , w a s CABINET: Wood grain, 24” x 12” x 48”, two $350. Asking $100. doors, one shelf. $10. (360)452-9685 (360)452-6974 BOAT: 12’ Livingston CAMP TOILET boat, oars. $200. Portable toilet with ris(360)457-7009 er/carrier, never used. B O B B L E H E A D : Ke n $40. (360)504-2109. Griffey Jr., 2013 mariC A N O P Y: B l a c k , fo r ners hall of fame, new. Toyota truck. $200. $40. (360)457-5790. (707)241-5977 BREAD MAKER: Oster DOG CRATE: 26” x 32”. deluxe, like new. $30. $50. (360)457-4399. (360)775-0380

CHAIR: Antique Morris F R E E : E xe r c i s e m a chair, good cond., $50. chine, older, Pro-for m (360)681-8911 XP 115, excellent condition. (360)681-6325. CLOTHES: L, size 12-14, 20 pieces, dressFREE: Hot tub. es, coats, fancy, sport. (707)241-5977 $25 all. (360)452-6974. FREE: Wood stove, Lopi COUNTER TOP TABLE wood stove, inser t or Fairly new with chairs. freestanding, with wood. $200/obo. (360)477-4838 (360)461-1379 FREEZER: Kenmore, 14 DESK: Honey oak, 64” x cubic ft., chest, 2 years 32” x 29”, two drawers. old. $200. $100/obo. (360)582-0892 (360)912-1990 GARBAGE CAN DISHWASHER: Black $5. (360)683-4038. GE, New. $195. GOLF CLUBS: Woods, (360)582-1843 irons, bag, hand car t, DOG DOOR: Like new, much more. $85. fits patio (sliding door) (360)683-9295 from Home Depot. $90. GPS: Garmin with ac(360)477-6968 cessories. $20. DOLLHOUSE: Barbie 3 (360)457-9528 s t o r y D r e a m To w n house, car and pool, ex. GUN: 22 cal, supplies, box. $125. cond. $80. 683-4405. (360)640-1544 DRAPES: Custommade, fit 6’ sliding door, HATS: (1) pur ple, (7) red, (3) red hat scarves, pastel floral. $200. jewelry. $75/obo. (360)681-7579 (360)457-7009 DRILL: Milwaukee 3/4’ elec,AC-DC with MT, 3/4 HOSE REEL: Carts with hoses. Two at $20 each. chuck. $200. (360)683-9295 (360)808-0523

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JACKET: Lightweight NAILS: 3.75” gal. coil, QUEEN BED: Frame, SHOP TOOLS: Wood- TABLE: Oak, round, (2) motorcycle jacket, large, roofing or siding nails, headboard, mattress, shop dust collection sys- chairs, spindle legs. one box. $35. Fieldsheer. $80. box spring, ex. cond. tem, 2 hp. $100. $100. (360)457-4399. (360)640-0556 (360)477-6968 $200. (360)775-0857. (360)683-3486 TIRES: 4, 245/75R/16. JAZZ CD: Your choice N E B U L I Z E R : P u l m o RATCHET: 3/8 PLOMB S H O T G U N : S t e v e n s $80 for all. from collection. $5. Savage 320 12 gauge, Aide DeVilbiss compres- #5249. $20. (360)417-0826 (360)457-5790 (360)582-9703 brand new. $190. sor, tubing. $30. (360)460-1919 (360)460-4039 LIGHT BULBS: 6 new T O M AT O C AG E S : 5 REFRIGERATOR: and 60 watt. $5 each. available, $5 each. freezer, excellent, sideSKI ACCESSORIES O F F I C E C H A I R : O a k (360)457-9528 (360)683-4038 Goggles, hood, poles, w i t h u p h o l s t e r i n g , 5 by-side. $175. (360)775-0857 black pants, sz. XL. $50. LIGHT FIXTURE: 18”, coaster, large. $65. TOOL BOX (360)457-6541, 4-9 p.m. (360)775-0855 grosted glass globe, RIFLE: 22 cal, call for in$10. (360)683-4038. hangs from ceiling. $30. fo. $165. SKI JACKET: Womens, PA I N T I N G : S n o w (360)452-9530 (360)417-1134 gir ls, down, blue with UTILITY TRAILER scene, with pheasants. hood. $38. L U G G AG E : R i c a r d o 1937 utility trailer. $200. $85. (360)460-8768 RIFLE: 22 cal, single (360)775-0855 Beverly Hills, hard sides, (360)457-5186 shot western auto. $165. carr y on spinner, red, PA R T S : B r i g g s a n d (360)417-1134 SKIS: Kastle skis, bindnew. $50. 775-0380. Straton, new and excelVHS TAPES: TV Scifi ings, 71”, with men’s sz series, “The Prisoner,” lent used. $10. ROCKING CHAIR MICROMETER: 1” to 2”, 12 boots, $125. (360)457-4971 Wood. $20. 17 vol. $5. $25. Tubuler MFG Co., (360)457-6541, 4-9 p.m. (360)461-0663 (360)681-5082 Min. USA 1” standard, PASTA MAKER: Elec$25. (360)582-9703 ROCKING HORSE: De- S O FA : 7 ’ , b r o w n , 3 V H S TA P E S : Va r i o u s tric, new in box. $60. groot wood lath art rock- cushion, will deliver if movies. $1. (360)582-3840 MIRRORS: (5) variety, needed. $75. ing horse, 25” x 34”. all framed. $5-$20. (360)681-5082 (360)670-7777 $75. (360)683-0146. POOL CUE: 58” graph(360)452-9685 ite, 19 oz., Pro Tip, soft SAW: Fraftsman 10” ra- SOFA: Earth tones, swirl WEED EATER: 2 gas MISC: Gazelle exercis- case, like new $25. pattern, 7’ long. $25. available. $30 each. dial arm saw. $100. e r, $ 7 5 . A u d i o P i e r (360)683-5284 (360)457-9091 (360)683-4038 (360)683-3486 Stand, $40. (360)461-0663 POOL CUES: Two Vi- SCANNER: and copier. SOFA/LOVE SEAT WELDER: Old, working, pers, 19 oz. and 17 oz., Works. $20. 6 mo. old, was $1,000 220VAC welder. $100. MITER SAW: Craftsleather cases. $100 ea. new, very nice cloth. (360)457-7009 man, 7.25”, like new. (360)452-1661 (360)775-9631 $200. (360)775-9631. $30. (360)460-5762. SCREEN: Chinese, 5’ WINCH: War n pull all OPENER COIN: Sea- POSTER: Friends of the wide, 6’ tall, gold em- TABLE: Oak, (5) chairs, 120 volt, new in box. Fields, 2004, framed. picture available. $150. bossed. $200. hawks, encased. $75. $100. (360)460-5762. $50. (360)683-0146. (360)681-8911 (360)808-0523 (360)457-4383

E E F R E Eand Tuesdays A D SS FRMonday

M ail to: Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

B ring your ads to: Peninsula Daily News 305 West 1st St., PA

For items $200 and under

• 2 Ads Per Week • 3 Lines • Private Party Only

• No Pets, Livestock, Garage Sales or Firewood

F

6075 Heavy Equipment

6100 Misc. Merchandise MODEL TRAINS: HO train layout, 5 different c i t i e s , 1 6 ’ x 1 0 ’ , “ L” shaped, would cost thousands of dollars to build. $850 takes it! (360)477-0865

TRACTOR: Mahindra 28 hp, hydrostatic transmission with attachments, approx 175 hrs., excellent condition. $10,500/ obo. (760)594-7441.

C AT / Tr u ck / Tra i l e r Combination. 1997 Ford F250 “Heavy Duty” 4x4: 7.3 Power Stroke with Manual Trans. This rare low milage truck (130k) is in excellent condition and has been well maintained by a single owner. Truck comes with New Tires and Canopy. 2005 Caterpillar 247B MultiTe r r a i n w i t h l o w h r s (104). This unit is also in excellent condition and comes complete with side windows and a front door kit. The following quick connect attachments are included and are original CAT equipment: Auger A14B with 9 inch Bit; 78” Angle Blade; 72” bucket and pallet forks.2005 Trailm a x 1 2 U T E Tr a i l e r . Trailer has very little usage. $58,000. (360)681-8504

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6080 Home Furnishings

6010 Appliances MISC: Side-by-side refrigerator, nice, Sears, $400. Frigidaire warming oven, $200. Electr ic wine cooler, $100. (360)461-6659

6035 Cemetery Plots

CEMETERY PLOT Dungeness Cemeter y, military lot, one single, division 5, lot 107, Garn base 5E, 1/2 plot, military lot. $2,000. (360)582-7743

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment

R I F L E : A K - 4 7 . E x t r a MISC: Queen mattress set, nice, newer, $250. clips, ammo. $600. TV stand, $75. Recliner, (360)670-3053 $60. (360)477-9418. S H OT G U N : B r ow n i n g Auto 5, 16 gague, Bel6100 Misc. gium made in 1948, Merchandise g o o d s h a p e, s t o ck i s good, small crack forend, shells, recoil bar- BOAT TRAILER: Tanrel. $450/obo. d e m a x l e g a l va n i ze d (360)681-7418 K i n g Tr a i l e r, 2 2 ’ - 2 4 ’ b o a t , r o l l e r s, b ra ke s, flushing system, 6055 Firewood, brake excellent condition. Fuel & Stoves $3,900. (907)398-0816. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com NICE, DRY FIREWOOD $190 cord (360)477-8832

6075 Heavy Equipment GMC: ‘98 C7500 series truck, propane new Jasper engine under warranty, flat bed, lumber racks and tool boxes, Allison tranny. $10,200/ obo. (360)683-3215. TRUCK/TRACTOR: ‘56 Kenworth , new batteries, excellent r unning condition. $6,500/obo. (360)683-3215 EQUIPMENT TRAILER 24’, 3 axle with ramps. $3,200/obo (360)683-3215

SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: High lift-gate, ex. cond. $15,000/obo. (360)417-0153

FLOOR LOOM: 6 treadle, 4 heddle, shuttles, bench, more. $300. (360)374-6332 METAL DETECTOR Garrett Ace 250, like new. $145. (360)457-5604

6140 Wanted & Trades WANTED: Fly fishing reels, rods, tackle and misc. (360)457-0814. WANTED: Quality optics, binoculars, scopes, range finders and misc. (360)457-0814 WANTED TO BUY Salmon/bass plugs and lures, P.A. Derby memorabilia (360)683-4791

6135 Yard & Garden TRIMMER: Craftsman 22” high wheel, 6.75 torque rating. $250. (360)681-2852

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes GORGEOUS gold sable male also 2 black and tan female purbred yorkies. Gold sable boy is $600. Toy black and tan female, $600. Tiny toy black and tan female, $ 6 5 0 . T h ey h ave h a d their Vet wellness exam, 2nd shots and wormed. Ta i l s d e w c l a w s r e m o ve d . T h ey a r e n o n shedding 14 weeks old and started on potty pad t r a i n i n g . L o o k i n g fo r warm loving laps. Pictures can be emailed if interested. (360)452-9650

MOTORHOME: ‘89 Toyota Dolphin. Sleeps 4+, low mi., clean, strong, r e l i a bl e, e c o n o m i c a l . See at Mobuilt R.V., P.A. REDUCED: $3,395/obo (425)231-2576

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9802 5th Wheels 5TH WHEEL: ‘04 34’ Alpenlite. 2-slides, great condition, going south or live in the best park on the Peninsula. $19,000. (509)869-7571

9817 Motorcycles HONDA: ‘82 XL80S. $400. (360)683-3490.

KAWASAKI: ‘09 KX250F. Excellent cond. Fresh top end. Under 60 hours on bike and always maintained. Original owner. Bike also has new graphics/plastics. Comes with many exTRAILER: Airstreem ‘93 tras. $3,500/obo. (360)775-7996 Excella 1000. 34’, very nice, in Port Angeles. $14.500. (206)459-6420.

8183 Garage Sales PA - East

MISC: 20’ extension ladder, $20. 5 tomato cages, $1 ea. 2 weed eaters, gas operated, $30 7025 Farm Animals ea. 3 garbage cans, $5 & Livestock ea. Empty tool box, $10. (360)683-4038 BULL: 8 mo. old. $500. (360)683-2304 M I S C : G l a s s d i s p l ay cases, bookcases, étagères, taxidermy, artwork display shelving, 7035 General Pets utility cases, antique furniture, collectibles, sea- A K C W e s t G e r m a n gull boat motor, Even- S h e p h e r d P u p p i e s . rude 1952 boat motor, Beautiful litter of Top EuJohnson Seahorse 1949 r o p e a n w o r k i n g a n d boat motor, much more. showlines German (360)670-3437 Shepherd Puppies. Males and Females MISC: Hoosier cabinet, available. Taking depos1921-’22 model, excel- its now .$1,200. Please lent cond., $600. Win- visit us at chester model 68 single vomedentalkennel.com shot .22 rifle, mint condior call (360) 452-3016 tion, $320. (360)460-7274 PUPPIES: Miniature brindle Poodles, 1 boy, 1 OIL STOVE: With tank, girl, 1st shots, wormed, you haul. $300. ready to go. $550 ea. (360)565-6274 (360)385-4116

NO PHONE CALLS

MOTORHOME: ‘94 32’ 9050 Marine F l e e t wo o d C o r o n a d a . Miscellaneous Only 67K mi., good condition, too much to list, BELLBOY: ‘72 ‘19 boat, call for info. $11,000. 140 HP Johnson ‘86, (360)457-4896 Evenrude 15 HP kicker, M O T O R H O M E : F o u r many extras! Call for deWinds ‘98, Class C, 22’. tails. $1,995. (360)683-7297 Gas and electric fridge, good cond., trailer hitch, CATALINA: 22’ sailboat. 98,330 miles. $7,200. Swing keel, with trailer, 4 (360)582-9769 HP outboard. $3,800. 7045 Tack, Feed & M OTO R H O M E : G ray - (928)231-1511. h aw k ‘ 0 4 Jay c o. 2 6 ’ , Supplies gen., 10’ slide, Ford 450 FIBERFORM: 17’, 50 a n d 6 h p Ya m a h a s . V10, 18,900 miles. MISC: Saddles, $100$2,750. (360)460-6647. $35,000. 683-8418. $400. Pads, $5-$25. Blankets, $20-$75. Clothes MOTORHOME: Newmar LAVRO: 14’ drift boat, 2 $5-$50. (360)460-7534. 2001 Mountainaire for sets oars, trailer. $1,000. (360)928-9716 sale, 38’ with 63,100 miles. In very good conTRAILER 17’ boat/sport/ Asking $31,000. 9820 Motorhomes dition. Call Bill, (360)582-0452 utility trailer, LED lights, to find more info and/or bunks, galvanized, new tires and spare. $625. see the unit. (360)681-8761

AUCTION: Airpor t Rd. TRAILER: ‘03 Kit ComSelf Storage, 12 p.m. panion Extreme. Small Wed., Feb 26, 4114 S. slide. $4,500. 461-6130. Air por t Rd. Units 213, 210 and 1205. 460-8333 ITASCA: ‘07 24’, “C,” deluxe interior, 30K mi., to verify. nonsmoker, mint cond. $39,950. (360)683-3212.

M OV I N G S a l e : E ve r y day from Thursday to February 28, 10-5 p.m., Villa Apartments, 401 E. 5th St., Apartments 109 and 110. New Simmons full bed with frame, antique dresser, table and chairs, bar stools, flat screen enter tainment center (TV not for sale), cabinet, dresser with mirror.

or FA X to: (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

MOTORHOME: ‘03 38’ Dutch Star. 20,230 mi., tr iple slide-out, new fridge, micro., gas oven, queen bed, sm freezer, many extras, Cat 3808, 6 sp. Allison Trans. Book $127,000. Asking $80,000. (360)457-3718 or (360)565-6408. MOTORHOME: ‘85 Winnebago. Diesel, Mistubishi motor, 4 speed, good tires, good mileage, 2 bed, shower with toilet, s t e r e o, A / C, b o d y i s good, needs some work. $3,500. (360)301-5652.

5A246724

D A S E E D A E FR E E FR RE

9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles Classics & Collect. Others Others CHEV: 2000 SS Camaro. Top condition, cherry red, new wheels/tires, recent big tune-up. $9,500/obo. (360)457-9331. CHEV: ‘57 Nomad. $27,000. (360)452-9697. CHEV: ‘87 Camaro Iroc Convertible. Disassembled, good body, no motor /trans, ready to restore! $500. (360)379-5243. CLASSIC 1974 Mercedes, 450 SL. Sacrifice at $13,500. Very clean. No dents, no scratches. Interior like new. speedo reading 59,029. Comes with a car cover. Has the factory manuals. Larry at 360-504-2478, cell: 618-302-0463.

BUICK ‘02 CENTURY CUSTOM Economical 3.1 liter V6, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CASS/CD, power windows, locks and seat, keyless entry. only 69,000 miles, very clean corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. epa rated 21 city / 29 hwy. Nice, clean reliable,affordable car! $5,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

SUBARU: ‘84 GL SW 2x4WD, low mi., new clutch, WP, rad, hose s, s e a l s, m o r e. 5 x stud. $3,000/obo. (360)460-9199

MAZDA: ‘04 RX-8. Top condition, 15,000 original mi., black, loaded, extra set of tires/wheels, for winter. $10,000/obo. (360)460-1393

DODGE: ‘07 Charger. 109K, runs great, new tires. $7,000 firm. (360)797-1774

9932 Port Angeles 9932 Port Angeles Legals Legals Summaries of Ordinances Adopted by the Port Angeles City Council On February 18, 2014

Ordinance No. 3496 THIS ORDINANCE of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, adds a new Chapter 3.80 to Title 3 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code establishing an FORD: ‘63 Fairlane 500. apprenticeship program. Hard top. $10,000/obo. (360)808-6198 Ordinance No. 3497 THIS ORDINANCE of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, makes changes to Chapter 2.44.030 9292 Automobiles and Chapter 3.70.010 of the Port Angeles Municipal Others Code relating to City Hall business hours. FORD ‘06 MUSTANG Convertible, green, 93k miles, V6, leather, loaded. Buy here, pay here! Lowest in-house rates on the Peninsula! Guaranteed! $10,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 theotherguys.com

The full texts of the Ordinances are available at City Hall in the City Clerk’s office, on the City’s website at www.cityofpa.us, or will be mailed upon request. Office hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Friday 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. These Ordinances shall take effect five days following the date of publication by summary. Janessa Hurd, CMC City Clerk Pub: Feb. 24, 2014

9935 General Legals

Legal No. 545387

9935 General Legals

9935 General Legals

Department of Natural Resources Notice of Geoduck Clams For Commercial Harvest

AUCTION LOCATION Room 172, Natural Resources Building, 1111 Washington Street SE, Olympia, Washington TRAILER: Rare resealed 1978 Argosy by Airstream. $11,500! All crevices have been resealed for extra protect i o n w / n ew p a i n t t o o. Stored indoors! Weighs 1,000s less but Same Airstream quality. Interior exactly as in 1978 when it came off the factory floor. 28 ft. Comes w i t h l o a d s o f ex t r a s (awning,sway bars) please only serious cash buyers only! Sequim, (360)808-6160.

MOTORHOME: Holiday Rambler 2000 Endeavor, 38’, (2) slide-outs, 330 HP Cat, Allison Tr a n s , 7 9 k , s i x - w a y leather pilot and co-pilot seats, 4 dr. fridge with ice maker, hyd. leveling jacks, 7.5 diesel gen., rear vision sys., combo washer/dryer, solar pan- 9802 5th Wheels el, 25’ side awning, satellite dish, (2) color TVs, many other extras! Ask- 5TH WHEEL: Alpenlite ‘90 32’, fair condition. ing $59,000. In Sequim, $4,000/obo. (360)301-2484 (360)457-5950

MOTOR SCOOTER Aprilia ‘08 500ie. Beautiful like new, silver ‘08 Aprilia 500cc Scooter. <1,000 miles garaged year round. Great commuter bike with 60+ miles per gallon! Wond e r f u l fo r s h o r t / l o n g hauls.Includes (2) helmets keys/remotes, owners manual and new batter y! ONLY serious cash buyers call. Don’t pay dealers freight and set up charges. This is a deal at $3,600. (360)808-6160 TRADE: ‘10 new Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic trike with only 60 miles, factoy Lehman trike valued at $20,000 (sell) or trade for older restored pickup truck, will consider any make and model. (360)452-5891

AUCTION DATE and TIME Eighteen (18) quotas will be offered on February 25, 2014. The first sealed bids will be opened at 10:00 a.m. and continue every 30 minutes until all quotas have been auctioned. HARVEST AREAS The harvest areas are as follows: Dungeness West in Clallam County; Langley North and Langley South in Island County; Still Harbor in Pierce County. NUMBER OF QUOTAS, SIZE, AND PRICE PER POUND Harvest Area Quota # Harvest Ceiling Price Per Pound Dungeness West 14 Quotas 26,000 $4.00 Harvest Area Langley North Langley South Still Harbor

Quota # 4 Quotas

Harvest Ceiling

Price Per Pound

3,240

$4.00

3,240 10,800

$4.00 $4.00

Additional information is posted at the Department of Natural Resources, Aquatic Resources Division, 1111 Washington St SE, PO Box 47027, Olympia, WA 98504-7027. Or you can view the information on our website: http://www.dnr.wa.gov/BusinessPermits/Topics/ShellfishAquaticLeasing/Pages/aqr_wildstock_geoduck_fishery.aspx Pub: Feb. 6, 13, 20, 24, 2014 Legal No. 542166

91190150

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Momma

9556 SUVs Others

by Mell Lazarus

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others

Abandoned Vehicle Auction In accordance with RCW 46.55.130, the following ve h i c l e s w i l l b e a u c tioned at Evergreen Towing, 703 E. WA. St., Sequim, WA 98362 on 2/25/14. Viewing At 11 a.m. All Bidders must sign in to be able to bid 8 a.m.-10:30 a.m. ‘86 CAD FLEETWOOD WA license #639-ZGX ‘86 TOYO MOTORHOME WA license #AAC4103 ‘90 TOYO 4RUNNER WA license #739VPD ‘93 SUBAR LEGACY WA license #801WSZ ‘94 CHEV S10 PU WA license B43356P ‘98 FORD RANGER MO license B43356P ‘01 CHEV MOCCP WA license ABP0966

JAGUAR: ‘12 FX. 1 of 200 with special sports pkg., extra low miles. $43,900 (360)765-4599 NISSAN: ‘97 Altima. 4 door, 90k, good cond. $4,500/obo. (360)775-0028

DODGE: ‘01 Ram 2500. 4X4, service box, Cummins turbo diesel, 5 sp., q u a d - c a b, 2 0 0 k , we l l maintained, good tires. $9,000/obo. (360)775-7703

GMC: ‘76 GMC 1/2 ton. 350 with headers. 3 speed auto new tires. Over $11,000 invested. Asking $3,500/obo (360)531-1681

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014 B9

9730 Vans & Minivans 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Others Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

CHEV: ‘99 Tahoe 4WD. CHRYSLER ‘13 TOWN Black, leather int., newer AND COUNTRY TOURING EDITION tires/shocks, recent mechanical work. $2,300/ 3.6 liter V6, auto, dual zo n e c l i m a t e c o n t r o l , obo. (360)461-7478. cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD/ FORD: ‘04 Expedition. DVD/satillite/MP3 with E x . c o n d . , 1 o w n e r, rear entertainment, pow135k, new tires, eco- er windows, locks, seat, nomical 2WD. $5,395. 7-passenger seating (360)683-7176 with full leather, power rear hatch and sliding GMC: ‘95 Yukon. Runs doors, stow and go, fog we l l , l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r. lamps, privacy glass, al$2,500/obo. loy wheels, bal. of facto(360)461-6659 r y 5 / 1 0 0 w a r r a n t y, H O N D A : ‘ 0 2 C R V. 37,000 miles, 1-owner, A W D , ( 2 ) s e t s spotless Autocheck rewheels/tires (snow), tow port. great value! $19,995 bars on front and back, REID & JOHNSON auto, 115k miles. MOTORS 457-9663 $9,500. (360)461-5190. reidandjohnson.com JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee Limited. 105k miles DODGE: ‘98 1 Ton Carwith a recently rebuilt 4.7 go Van. 360 V8, auto, L V8, All the options. A/C, new tires, 42,600 $ 5 , 0 0 0 . C a l l A n d y a t miles, can be seen at (360)477-8826 for info. Ace Auto Repair, 420 Marine Drive. $6,200. T O Y O TA : ‘ 9 2 L a n d (505)927-1248 Cruiser. White ext., gray int., 6 cyl., loaded, ex. FORD: ‘99 Windstar cond. $4,950. 461-5193. mini-van. 7 passenger, new battery, nearly new 9730 Vans & Minivans t i r e s , 8 0 k m i l e s , ex . cond. $3,250 firm. Others (360)374-6700

FORD: ‘73 1 Ton flat MAZDA: ‘03 4X4. Exbed with side racks, 65K tra cab, 6 cyl., almost original mi., winch, new new tires, has lift kit, power steering, brand d e t a i l e d i n s i d e a n d o u t , n o d e n t s, n i c e new paint. $4,000. paint, very good over(360)640-8155 PONTIAC: ‘97 Sunfire. all condition. $4,500. R u n s, p r i c e d t o s e l l ! FORD: ‘77 F-350 1 ton (360)457-7009 Needs some work. $700. dually. Newer engine, (360)460-0518 dump truck PTO. TOYOTA: ‘96 TR100. 2 $3,375/obo. 460-0518. door, small cab, 64K, 9434 Pickup Trucks ver y good cond., V6, long bed with liner, 5 sp. Others $5,800. (360)452-6127 DODGE: ‘90 Ram 150 HONDA: ‘07 Odyssey work van. 110 A/C inbetween 9 a.m.-6 p.m. CHEV ‘03 TAHOE ver ter, bulkhead, 3.9 EX-L. V6, leather, origiV8, automatic, 4x4, gray V6, could be camper. nal owner, non-smoker, lether interior, power all R u n s g r e a t . 128k miles, very good 9556 SUVs cond. $10,300. loaded. Make your mon$1,500/obo. Others (360)582-0659 ey go further; ask what (360)775-8807 the interest rate is! CHEV: ‘04 Blazer LS. $10,995. CADILLAC: ‘02 Deville TOYOTA: ‘01 Sienna. 7 TOYOTA : ‘ 9 8 S i e n n a . The Other Guys F O R D : ‘ 9 1 F 2 5 0 . 7 . 3 4.3 V6, Excellent cond. passenger, leather, good 179K, great condition, DTS. Sedan 4 dr, 54,000 mi., black on black, must Auto and Truck Center d i e s e l , 9 7 K m i . , t o w $8,500/obo. condition, moon roof. new tires. $4,500. (360)477-4838 360-417-3788 pkg., tinted windows, ausee. $7,200. (360)775-8296 $4,800. (360)457-9038. theotherguys.com to, 2WD, truck box, new (360)681-3093 rear tires, runs good. 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices HYUNDAI: ‘10 Elantra CHEV: ‘70 K-20. 4x4, $3,500. (360)477-2809. Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Touring. 31K, sunroof, partial restoration, auto, ISUZU: ‘94 pickup. very clean. $12,500/obo. 350, extras. $5,500 or File No.: 7042.29316 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. The Bank of 4WD, good condition. (360)681-4809 part trade. 452-5803. New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A.. as trustee on behalf of CWABS Asset$2,250. (360)460-6647. Backed Certificates Trust 2004-6 Grantee: the Heirs of Michael L. Olson, deceased Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2004 1134218 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 034538 Abbreviated Legal: S2 LTS 9 & 10, BLK 345 TP A, County of Clallam, Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County State of Washington. Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE File No.: 7037.96136 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: The Heirs and Devisees of Nellie recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A. Hazelett, who also appears of record as Nelene A. Hazelett, deceased and A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGMichael J. Hazelett, who also appears of record as Michael Jay Hazelett, as TON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are elihis separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 728702 Tax Parcel ID No.: gible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. 08-31-33-430150 Abbreviated Legal: PTN SW4SE4 S33-T31N-R8WWM, SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be CLALLAM CO., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the followFORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the ing: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHING- To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : TON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eli- h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r gible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States DepartSEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be ment of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining 4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webLisyour rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the follow- tAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid ing: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatTo l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : clear. I. On March 28, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r - County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Depart- Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by ment of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569- the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable 4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webLis- at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the tAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: The South half of Lots 9 and hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys 10, Block 345 Townsite of Port Angeles as per Plat recorded in Volume 1 of Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what- Plats, Page 27, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County clear. I. On March 28, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1109 South Cherry County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by dated 05/20/04, recorded on 05/26/04, under Auditor’s File No. 2004 1134218, the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Michael L Olson, as his separat time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the ate estate, as Grantor, to Landsafe Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Beginning at the intersection of an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systhe North line of Highway No. 112, and the East line of the Southwest quarter tems, Inc. solely as nominee for Full Spectrum Lending, Inc., as Beneficiary, of the Southeast quarter of Section 33, Township 31 North, Range 8 West, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic RegistraW.M., Clallam County, Washington; thence North along the East line of said tion Systems, Inc. to The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A.. as Subdivision 974 feet; thence Northwesterly parallel with the North line of said trustee on behalf of CWABS Asset-Backed Certificates Trust 2004-6, under an Highway, 185 feet; thence Southwesterly 845 feet, more or less, to the North Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012line of said highway; thence Southeasterly along said North line 575 feet, more 1279248. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are or less, to the point of beginning; except that portion thereof described as fol- provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to lows: Beginning at the intersection of the North line of Highway112 and the supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided East line of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 33, herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now Township 31 North, Range 8 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington; pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the thence North along the East line of said subdivision 300 feet; thence North- Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. westerly parallel with the North line of said Highway 400 feet; thence South III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the parallel with the East line of said subdivision 300 feet, more or less, to the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinNorth line of said highway; thence Southeasterly along the said North line 400 state as of 11/19/2013 Monthly Payments $9,716.99 Lender’s Fees & Costs feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, also except that portion, if any, ly- $954.40 Total Arrearage $10,671.39 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trusing within railroad right of way conveyed to Crown Zellerbach Corporation by tee’s Fee $550.00 Title Report $341.46 Statutory Mailings $100.13 Recording Deed recorded under Auditor’s File No. 295915. And that portion as stipulated Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,075.59 Total Amount Due: in Superior Court Cause Number 99-2-00366-5 and disclosed by Survey re- $11,746.98 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of corded under Clallam County Auditor’s File No. 2002 1083040. Situate in Clal- $49,715.03, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument lam County, State of Washington. Including a 1988 Moduline 48 X 28 mobile evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are home, plate &79192, VIN 19892 Commonly known as: 52321 Highway 112 due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by stat09/18/95, recorded on 09/25/95, under Auditor’s File No. 728702, records of ute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or imClallam County, Washington, from Wilfred D. Hazelett and Shirlee M. Hazelett, plied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, a Wash- March 28, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any ington Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, Washingon Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was must be cured by 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a disconassigned by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washing- tinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any ton Mutual Bank to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, under an As- time before 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth signment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012- in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, ad1281882. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are vances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/17/14 (11 days supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarherein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now antor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the enpending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the tire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to rein- transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the state as of 11/19/2013 Monthly Payments $19,520.19 Lender’s Fees & Costs following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS The Estate of Michael L. Olson, $68.60 Total Arrearage $19,588.79 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 The Estate of Fee $700.00 Statutory Mailings $120.77 Recording Costs $76.00 Postings Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA $70.00 Sale Costs $1,194.72 Total Costs $2,161.49 Total Amount Due: 98290 The Heirs and Devisees of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South $21,750.28 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obliga- Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 The Heirs and Devisees of Michael L. tion is: Principal Balance of $62,666.40, together with interest as provided in Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Unthe note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/11, and such known Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Ob- Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased ligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or 7022 73rd Place Southeast Port Angeles, WA 98362 The Estate of Michael L. warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or Olson, Deceased c/o Law Offices of Curry Andrews, PLLLC 350 West Washcondition of the Property on March 28, 2014. The default(s) referred to in para- ington Street, Suite 2 Sequim, WA 98382-3340 The Heirs and Devisees of Migraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances chael L. Olson, Deceased c/o Law Offices of Curry Andrews, PLLLC 350 West costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/17/14 (11 days before the Washington Street, Suite 2 Sequim, WA 98382-3340 Lindy Lou Conrrad, Persale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued sonal Representative c/o Law Offices of Curry Andrews, PLLLC 350 West and terminated if at any time before 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), Washington Street, Suite 2 Sequim, WA 98382-3340 Lindy Lou Conrrad, Perthe default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent pay- sonal Representative of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 ments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Lindy Lou Conrrad, Personal the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time af- Representative of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place ter 03/17/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrow- Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Richard E. Burns, heir of The Estate of Mier, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encum- chael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 brance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed Caroline Burns Weiss, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, WA 98290 Geoff L. Olson, heir of The Esthe obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written tate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast Snohomish, notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower WA 98290 Richard E. Burns, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Heirs & De- 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Caroline Burns Weiss, heir visees for The Estate of Wilfred D. Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port WA 98363 Heirs & Devisees for The Estate of Shirlee M. Hazelett 52321 High- Angeles, WA 98362 Geoff L. Olson, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, way 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Heirs & Devisees for The Estate of Nelene Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Lindy Olson, A. Hazelett aka Nellie A. Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, Deceased 7022 73rd Place Southeast 98363 Michael Jay Hazelett 52321 Highway 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Un- Snohomish, WA 98290 Lindy Olson, heir of The Estate of Michael L. Olson, known Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael Jay Hazelett 52321 High- Deceased 1109 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first way 112 Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, return class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/18/13, proof of which is receipt requested on 09/20/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trus- in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/19/13 Grantor and Borrower were tee; and on 09/21/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of dewritten notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a con- fault was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in spicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to dethe sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those prive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a law- those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW suit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trus- grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR tee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day follow- the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under ing the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day folare not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the lowing the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenright to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under ants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occuChapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall pro- pied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in vide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trus- accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be actee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are cessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.north- You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttrustee.com and westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/19/2013 www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/19/2013 Date Executed: NorthDate Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signa- west Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Belture P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith levue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lamber t (425) 586-1900. (TS# (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.96136) 1002.228138-File No. 7042.29316) 1002.258821-File No. Pub: Feb. 24, March 17, 2014 Legal No. 544458 Pub: Feb. 24, March 17, 2014 Legal No. 544459

File No.: 7236.24063 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee, on behalf of registered holders of Merrill Lynch Mortgage Investors Trust, Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-HE2 Grantee: Tiffany E. Andersson, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1153527 Tax Parcel ID No.: 023015 510557 / PID 13154 Abbreviated Legal: LT 20, BK. 5, DIAMOND POINT, 5/28, CLALLAM CO., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On March 7, 2014, at 10:00 AM inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 20, Block 5, Plat of Diamond Point, according to the plat thereof filed in Volume 5 of plats at page(s) 28 and 28A, records of Clallam County, Washington Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 90 West Street Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/25/05, recorded on 03/31/05, under Auditor’s File No. 2005 1153527, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Tiffany E. Andersson, An Unmarried Woman, As Her Sole And Separate Estate, as Grantor, to Land Title & Escrow Company Of Clallam County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Fremont Investment & Loan, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the certificateholders of the MLMI Trust, Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-HE2, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1270005. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 12/03/2013 Monthly Payments $55,685.64 Late Charges $0.00 Lender’s Fees & Costs $1,954.60 Total Arrearage $57,640.24 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $384.60 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $77.00 Recording Costs $76.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $607.60 Total Amount Due: $58,247.84 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $163,812.77, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 07/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 7, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/24/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/24/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/24/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Tiffany E. Andersson 90 West Street Sequim, WA 98382 Tiffany E. Andersson 1954 N. Rainier Avenue Bremerton, WA 98312 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Tiffany E. Andersson 90 West Street Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Tiffany E. Andersson 1954 N. Rainier Avenue Bremerton, WA 98312 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/09/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/10/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 12/03/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Kathy Taggart (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7236.24063) 1002.252762-File No. Pub: Feb. 3, 24, 2014 Legal No. 541110

File No.: 7037.100914 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Jason M. Treider and Charity L. Treider, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1222506 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-033170/59347 Abbreviated Legal: 13/331. TPA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On March 7, 2014, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 13, Block 331 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 415 East 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/11/08, recorded on 06/13/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008-1222506, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Jason M. Treider and Charity L. Treider, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 10/28/2013 Monthly Payments $20,743.35 Total Arrearage $20,743.35 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $700.00 Total Costs $700.00 Total Amount Due: $21,443.35 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $150,697.13, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 7, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/24/14 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/24/14 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/24/14 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jason Treider 415 East 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Charity L. Treider 415 East 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jason Treider 415 East 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Charity L. Treider 415 East 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 02/19/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 02/19/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttr ustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/28/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.100914) 1002.242596-File No. Pub: Feb. 3, 24, 2014 Legal No. 541122


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014 Neah Bay 41/36

Bellingham g 41/33

Olympic mpic Peninsula Pe en TODAY AY BR

Y EEZ

BREEZY & RAIN

Port EZY Townsend To o B R ER A I N T & 42/37

43/38

Sequim 43/39

Olympics Snow level: 4,000

Forks 46/38

ZY EE IN BR RA &

Port Ludlow 43/38

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

National TODAY forecast Nation

Yesterday Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 38 33 0.51 8.08 Forks 45 38 1.79 21.77 Seattle 44 37 0.09 8.91 Sequim 38 36 0.22 4.03 Hoquiam 44 39 0.01 13.78 Victoria 37 29 0.40 8.93 Port Townsend 38 35 **0.42 5.90

Forecast highs for Monday, Feb. 24

Aberdeen 47/39

Billings 12° | 8°

TONIGHT

Low 38 Showers to sluice streets

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

48/41 47/41 Another day Clouds wring out dull and dreary selves on region

46/39 50 more shades of gray

Denver 60° | 33°

Los Angeles 71° | 50°

Ocean: E wind 25 to 35 kt easing to 20 to 30 kt. Combined seas 4 to 7 ft. Showers likely. Tonight, E wind 20 to 30 kt easing to 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 4 to 6 ft .subsiding to 3 to 5 ft. W swell 4 ft at 11 seconds.

49/40 Monotony persists

Spokane 30° | 17°

Tacoma 44° | 39° Yakima 34° | 27°

Astoria 49° | 42° © 2014 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 7:10 a.m. 8.6’ 12:58 a.m. 3.9’ 8:54 p.m. 6.7’ 2:26 p.m. 0.7’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 8:22 a.m. 8.8’ 2:19 a.m. 3.7’ 9:55 p.m. 7.2’ 3:29 p.m. 0.1’

8:42 a.m. 6.6’

3:39 a.m. 5.8’ 4:31 p.m. -0.3’

12:39 a.m. 6.3’ 9:52 a.m. 6.6’

4:57 a.m. 5.7’ 5:29 p.m. -0.5’

1:26 a.m. 7.3’ 10:19 a.m. 8.1’

4:52 a.m. 6.4’ 5:44 p.m. -0.3’

2:16 a.m. 7.8’ 11:29 a.m. 8.1’

6:10 a.m. 6.3’ 6:42 p.m. -0.6’

Dungeness Bay* 12:32 a.m. 6.6’ 9:25 a.m. 7.3’

4:14 a.m. 5.8’ 5:06 p.m. -0.3’

1:22 a.m. 7.0’ 10:35 a.m. 7.3’

5:32 a.m. 5.7’ 6:04 p.m. -0.5’

Port Townsend

Miami 85° | 70°

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

“The Lego Movie” (PG; animated) “Lone Survivor” (R) “The Monuments Men” (PG-13) “Ride Along” (PG-13) “Winter’s Tale” (PG-13)

“3 Days to Kill” (PG-13)

■ Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Endless Love” (PG-13) “Frozen” (PG; animated) “RoboCop” (PG-13)

■ The Rose Theatre,

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Mar 16

5:50 p.m. 7:02 a.m. 4:15 a.m. 12:43 p.m.

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 46 Casper 25 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 71 Albany, N.Y. 29 Cldy Charleston, W.Va. 61 Albuquerque 32 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 64 Amarillo 31 PCldy Cheyenne 38 Anchorage 23 Clr Chicago 35 Asheville 31 PCldy Cincinnati 59 Atlanta 44 Cldy Cleveland 45 Atlantic City 39 Cldy Columbia, S.C. 68 Austin 62 Cldy Columbus, Ohio 55 Baltimore 38 Cldy Concord, N.H. 48 Billings 12 .01 Snow Dallas-Ft Worth 75 Birmingham 41 PCldy Dayton 56 Bismarck 7 PCldy Denver 52 Boise 36 Cldy Des Moines 34 Boston 34 Cldy Detroit 37 Brownsville 69 Cldy Duluth 15 Buffalo 31 Cldy El Paso 74 Evansville 63 Fairbanks 16 WEDNESDAY Fargo 13 56 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 31 9:28 a.m. 9.1’ 3:30 a.m. 3.2’ Great Falls 19 10:46 p.m. 7.9’ 4:24 p.m. -0.4’ Greensboro, N.C. 65 Hartford Spgfld 51 23 1:17 a.m. 6.6’ 6:01 a.m. 5.2’ Helena 82 11:06 a.m. 6.6’ 6:22 p.m. -0.7’ Honolulu Houston 69 Indianapolis 55 2:54 a.m. 8.2’ 7:14 a.m. 5.8’ Jackson, Miss. 68 71 12:43 p.m. 8.1’ 7:35 p.m. -0.8’ Jacksonville Juneau 31 54 2:00 a.m. 7.4’ 6:36 a.m. 5.2’ Kansas City Key West 81 11:49 a.m. 7.3’ 6:57 p.m. -0.7’ Las Vegas 73 Little Rock 72 Hi 51 64 70 27 62 65 59 74 61 22 66 20 46 50 80 39

Now Showing ■ Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

Mar 8

Nation/World

Seattle 43° | 39° Olympia 45° | 39°

Mar 1

27 11 44 35 39 13 17 32 34 38 35 19 52 34 21 18 24 0 59 32 -15 0 26 18 6 36 28 13 72 60 30 43 48 13 25 74 51 41

.16

.20 .07

.03

MM .06 .10

Snow Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Snow Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr PCldy PCldy PCldy Snow PCldy Cldy Snow Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Rain Clr Cldy Clr Clr Cldy

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

76 64 76 67 85 80 31 14 68 69 54 59 40 72 39 79 43 59 79 53 46 47 48 64 25 60 65 73 62 77 54 74 69 66 85 58 21 73

53 33 41 44 70 43 13 1 39 59 43 33 20 42 22 64 36 38 53 31 31 38 31 34 12 31 34 43 31 68 36 64 54 46 73 24 8 50

.09 .21 .08

.02

.11

.12

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 85 at Opa Locka, Fla., and West Kendall, Fla. ■ -8 at Fosston, Minn.

Full Cold

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

CANADA

ORE.

Port Angeles

Atlanta 65° | 44°

Fronts

Mar 23

Victoria 39° | 34°

New York 35° | 34°

Detroit 24° | 13°

Washington D.C. 45° | 35°

El Paso 76° | 51° Houston 68° | 62°

First

FRIDAY

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: NE wind 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. Showers likely. Tonight, NE wind 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft.

LaPush

Chicago 23° | 7°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

Marine Weather

Tides

New

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 14° | -5°

San Francisco 67° | 50°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 43° | 39°

*Rainfall reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 44/39

Sunny

PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy PCldy Clr Cldy Rain Cldy Cldy Snow PCldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Clr Cldy Clr Snow PCldy Clr Cldy PCldy Clr Clr PCldy Snow Cldy

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington, Del.

26 46 78 58 80 69 64 64 50 59

8 35 67 28 52 35 46 29 26 35

PCldy Cldy .18 PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo Otlk 74 58 PCldy 80 54 Clr 56 35 Clr 53 34 Clr 56 44 PCldy 73 51 PCldy 15 -8 Clr 80 47 PCldy 70 62 PCldy 64 46 Clr 75 61 Sh 51 34 PCldy 57 47 PCldy 79 50 Clr 17 5 Snow 37 27 Cldy 75 52 Clr 59 44 PCldy 96 75 PCldy 60 38 Clr 78 66 Clr 55 37 Clr 18 8 Snow/Wind 41 32 Cldy

Briefly . . . Port Townsend (360385-1089)

can apply for cash assistance, basic food assistance “Gloria” (R) and child-care services. “The Lego Movie” (PG) Participants can drop off “Philomena” (PG-13) paperwork, complete an eligibility review or mid-certi■ Uptown Theatre, Port The state Department of fication review or make Townsend (360-385-3883) Social and Health Services, changes to an existing case. For more information, or DSHS, Mobile Commu“Labor Day” (PG-13) phone 877-501-2233 or nity Service Office is coming visit www.dshs.wa.gov/ to Brinnon and Clallam Bay. mobileoffice. The mobile office will be at the Brinnon Community Marine resources Center, 306144 U.S. HighPORT TOWNSEND — way 101, from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 5. The Jefferson County It will be at the Clallam Marine Resources Committee will meet in the Port of Bay Sunsets West Co-Op, Port Townsend Commis16795 state Highway 112, sioners’ Building, 333 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Benedict St. Thursday, March 6. Community members

State Health mobile unit to make stops

The meeting is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 4. The agenda will be posted online at www. jeffersonmrc.org.

Deaf Coffee House SEQUIM — Sequim Deaf Coffee House will meet in Sequim Community Church’s Geneva Hall, 960 N. Fifth Ave., from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 8. Bring refreshments and ideas. For more information, email sdch_2010@comcast. net or purplelav4me@ gmail.com. Peninsula Daily News

Bergstrom’s Sewing Machines Established 1968

360-385-5050

The most precious things in life.

42970507

Memories

We Repair All Makes Specializing in Singer

841 Nesses Corner Rd • Port Hadlock

LOWER ELWHA SMOKE SHOP AND CONVENIENCE STORE 42971731

42969645

Nobody can beat our prices on smokeless tobacco!

WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS’ COUPONS! Effective Immediately:

PRICES REDUCED ON ALL CARTONS OF TOBACCO See store for details

(360) 582-9309

651 Garry Oak Dr., Sequim, WA

Serving:

www.dungenesscourte.com

Port Angeles • Sequim Port Townsend • Discovery Bay Kingston • Edmonds • Greyhound Amtrak • Downtown Seattle Sea Tac Airport • Seattle Hospitals

“Household Hazardous Wastes” include: Pesticides & Weed Killer Oil-based Paints & Stains, Thinners & Solvents

(800) 457-4492

www.dungenessline.us

42987454

Outside the area toll free

2851 Lower Elwha Rd. Port Angeles

Hours of Operation Wed & Sat, 11am - 4pm At No Extra Charge To All Residents

Hobby Chemicals Cleaning Supplies Old Gasoline & Used Motor Oil Anti-Freeze & Car Batteries

The MRW does not accept:

41970493

(360) 417-0700

(360) 457-1390

Moderate Risk Waste Facility

• Free WiFi on board • Providing complimentary home-made chocolate chip cookies from “Cockadoodle Doughnuts” in Port Angeles.

Port Angeles/Sequim

M–Th 7:30am–7:00pm Friday 7:30am–8:00pm Saturday 9:00am–8:00pm Sunday 10:00am–6:00pm

Old Owner Left It For The New Owner!

Olympic Bus Lines is an independent agent of Greyhound. You can now purchase your Greyhound tickets locally at your only nationwide reservation location on the Olympic Peninsula.

Late night or early morning flight? Ask us about special hotel rates!

SURGEON GENERAL’S WARNING: CIGARETTE SMOKE CONTAINS CARBON MONOXIDE. SMOKING CAUSES LUNG CANCER, HEART DISEASE, EMPHYSEMA, AND MAY COMPLICATE PREGNANCY.

latex paint • leaking or empty containers asbestos • explosives • compressed gas containers • business waste For more information, please call Clallam County Environmental Health at (360) 417-2258 or the City of Port Angeles Transfer Station Information Line at (360) 417-4875

CLALLAM COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (360) 417-2258 www.clallam.net

PDN20140224C  
PDN20140224C  
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