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Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

Quilcene measure approved for vote BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

QUILCENE — Quilcene Fire Department commissioners have approved a levy lid lift question for the Nov. 5 general election ballot on a 2-1 vote. The dissenting commissioner said Monday that the property tax hike measure should be delayed to allow for more public input. “I would like to see this run next November 2014,” fire district Commissioner Gary Phillips said.

“This should be discussed among the entire community.” This year is too soon, he said, adding that the district can wait for the funds until 2015. Commission Chairman Herb Beck disagreed. “This needs to be done now. We are running in the negative,” Beck said. “We have equipment that doesn’t function. Some of these tires are 18 years old, and if we wait any longer, we won’t see anything until 2015.”

The resolution, which was approved by Beck and Commissioner Debbie Randall, proposes raising the levy rate from the current 75 cents per Beck $1,000 of assessed value to $1.25 per $1,000. It would raise property taxes

by $100 annually for a home valued at $200,000. The measure has been submitted to the Jefferson County auditor ahead of Tuesday’s deadline for placement on the November general election ballot, Beck said.

Call for special election Kit Kittredge, a Quilcene resident who also works as an emergency medical technician, has called for a special meeting prior to the submission deadline, but Beck said that won’t occur unless

an attorney determines the measure isn’t legally sound. “I have our attorney looking at this now,” Beck said. “If there’s a problem, we’ll call the special meeting. Otherwise, we are going ahead.” Beck is the only one of the three commissioners to have been elected. Randall and Phillips were appointed after voters recalled Commissioners Dave Ward and Mike Whittaker in November 2012. TURN

TO

LEVY/A7

Party for pool with storied past 50 years feted with PT splash PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Clips from the films of swimmer/actress Esther Williams and scenes filmed for the 1983 film “An Officer and a Gentleman” will be among the activities marking Mountain View Pool’s 50th anniversary during an all-day celebration today. “We didn’t get to do anything for our reopening in April,” said pool manager Anji Scalf. “So we decided to go a little bit overboard and celebrate. She added, “Some pools only last 20 years or so, and we’ve more CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Scalf than doubled that.” Mountain View Pool marks its 50th year today. Gina Holman, left, and Today’s programs at the city pool at lifeguard Olivia Cremeans are seen at the Port Townsend pool Thursday. 1919 Blaine St. are free and open to the public. giant bubble wands, as well as foam nooA demonstration of synchronized dles, inner tubes, dive rings and more. swimming will take place afterward by Bubble Party theme A reception with cake is scheduled synchronized swim students. Lap swim time will be from 6 a.m. to from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the pool lobby. Guests are invited to share pictures Water polo, splash balls 8 a.m. and again from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. An Aqua Power fitness class will run and stories. A special recreational swim with Clips from the swim-themed films of from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. water polo, an “Orca” wrestling contest A prize will be awarded to the swim- Williams and scenes shot in the Mounand a water war with balloons, super tain View Pool from the 1982 film “An mer with the best retro swim cap. An open swim is set from 1 p.m. to Officer and a Gentleman” will be shown soaker water guns and splash balls will 3 p.m. with a Bubble Party theme and run from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Actor Richard Gere is seen in the 1982 film “An Officer and a Gentleman,” much of which was filmed at Fort Worden State Park and Mountain View Pool. The pool closed in November and was scheduled for a March reopening, but that was delayed by a month when a valve failed. During that time, the liner was replaced, but the pool still needs a new heating system, according to Scalf. “Right now, we are manually adjusting the pipes, and that isn’t always accurate, and we don’t always get the right temperature,” she said. “It’s not a big problem now, in the summer, but in the winter, it will get harder.” Scalf said the pool’s popularity has increased and expects a crowd today. “We’re doing great, and we are busier than we’ve ever been,” she said.

PT credit rating is boosted

Union OKs pact at PA paper firm Six-year contract at Nippon plant restores wage level prior to strike

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY PAUL GOTTLIEB

Workers Local 155, said Thursday. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Nippon employees had not had a wage increase since they PORT ANGELES — Nippon received a 75-cents-an-hour Paper Industries USA union increase in 2010, Reetz said. workers approved a six-year contract this week, averting a possi- ‘A long stretch’ ble strike. “You are looking at six to seven The agreement restores the $3 per hour that was cut from work- years, more likely seven years, ers’ wages in a contract Nippon without any wage increases, and imposed in March — one that there is no cost-of-living increase,” prompted a five-day strike — and Reetz said. “That’s a long stretch there.” freezes wages at pre-strike levels The pact is effective immedifor the foreseeable future, Darrel Reetz, vice president of Associa- ately; runs through May 31, 2019; tion of Western Pulp & Paper “and is reflective of issues affect-

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Nippon Paper Industries USA was busy Thursday in Port Angeles. Workers staged a walkout there in March. ing the competitiveness of all manufacturers, including pulp and paper mills,” according to a statement Thursday from mill Manager Harold Norlund. Workers voted 62-46 for the contract during three union membership meetings held Wednes-

day at the Moose Lodge in Port Angeles, Reetz said. “If the numbers had swayed the other way, we would have been in unity to go out on strike,” Reetz said. “We were ready.” TURN TO NIPPON/A7

“Cruise into Fun”

PORT TOWNSEND — Standard & Poor’s Rating Services has notified the city that its credit rating is now A+ with a stable outlook. That is up from the A+ with a negative outlook rating that the city received one year ago. “This is like a credit score,” City Manager David Timmons said. “It shows that we are making progress in improving the city’s finances, and if the bond measure passes, we will get a better rate.” TURN

TO

RATING/A7

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UpFront

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

She told a British newspaper last year that as well as the ring, she’d bought a first edition of Austen’s novel Persuasion in the Sotheby’s sale.

U.K. to singer: Hands off Jane Austen’s ring THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT has stepped in to stop singer Kelly Clarkson from taking a ring once owned by author Jane Austen out of the country. The “American Idol” winner bought the gold and turquoise ring at auction last year for just Clarkson over 150,000 pounds ($228,000). But Thursday, British Culture Minister Ed Vaizey put an export bar on the item until Sept. 30 in hopes that a British buyer will come forward. Vaizey said Austen’s modest lifestyle and early death at age 41 “mean that objects associated with her of any kind are extremely rare, so I hope that a U.K. buyer comes forward so this simple but elegant ring can be saved for the nation.” The government has the

‘24’ character back

The iconic novelist’s ring is turquoise in a gold setting. power to temporarily halt the export of works judged to be national treasures. The author of Pride and Prejudice left the ring to her sister Cassandra, and it remained in the family until it was sold last year. The export ban can be extended until Dec. 30 if there is a British campaign to buy the ring at a recommended price of 152,450 pounds. Clarkson has agreed to sell the ring should a buyer come forward. Clarkson has sold millions of records since winning the first series of TV talent show “American Idol” in 2002.

Fan favorite Mary Lynn Rajskub is reteaming with Kiefer Sutherland for a 12-episode run of “24: Live Another Day,” to debut next May on Fox. The network said Thursday at the Television Critics Association press tour that Rajskub Rajskub will reprise her role as Chloe O’Brien, the faithful counter-terrorist sidekick of Sutherland’s Jack Bauer character. Rajskub joined the original “24” series in its second season and appeared in the second-most episodes of any actor during the show’s run from 2001-2010. Fox said the miniseries will take up Bauer’s story several years after the events of the final season, with viewers following his foreign exploits in real time.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: Should Anthony Weiner drop out of the New York City mayoral race? Yes No

Total votes cast: 956 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

By The Associated Press

_________ LILLIAN BONNER SUTSON, 99, a littleknown civil rights activist whose attempts to register as a voter in South Carolina set a precedent in the fight against segregation and voting discrimination in the South, has died in Massachusetts, her family announced Wednesday.

13.1%

Undecided 2.5%

Passings PETER FLANIGAN, 90, New York City native who served as an adviser to President Richard Nixon on economic issues, has died. His daughter, Megan Flanigan, said he died Monday. He was in a hospital in a small town Mr. Flanigan outside Salzburg, Austria. He had been splitting his time between homes in Austria and Purchase, N.Y. Mr. Flanigan graduated from Princeton University and worked at the investment bank Dillon, Read & Co. He served as deputy campaign manager for Nixon’s campaign in 1968 and later joined the administration as an assistant to the president on economic concerns. He was appointed director of the Council of International Economic Policy in 1972. He resigned from the administration in 1974. Mr. Flanigan returned to Dillon Read and remained there until 1992.

84.4%

Mrs. Sutson died of age-related causes Monday at a nursing home in Saugus, Mrs. Sutson Mass. In 1940, in 2012 Mrs. Sutson, the granddaughter of a slave, went with her mother and two other African-American women to register as Democrats in Gaffney, S.C. They were denied, threatened and verbally abused, sparking a federal criminal case. Eventual Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall served as their attorney in the case, during which the women endured death threats that sometimes warranted FBI protection. They lost, but Marshall eventually used the experience in civil-rights lawsuits that ultimately helped strike down voter discrimi-

nation and segregation. Mrs. Sutson’s feisty spirit was highlighted in 2011 when she fought off an assailant who attacked and robbed her at her home in Lynn, Mass. She managed to stab the intruder in the thigh during the struggle and screamed for help as he fled. She suffered head lacerations that required 14 stitches to close. A suspect eventually was arrested in the case.

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ Scott Nagel is the executive director of the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association. Vickie Oen is the organization’s president. A report on Page A1 Wednesday misstated the positions.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago)

“Some progress” was reported in fighting a 1,000-acre fire on the Toandos Peninsula in East Jefferson County. The forest fire near Hood Canal was one of 200 fires in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia reported out of control. However, the Toandos fire is the only one on the North Olympic Peninsula. Seen Around Resort and motel ownPeninsula snapshots ers, particularly in Port Angeles and on the West A PROSPECTIVE End, are angry because CLALLAM County juror, tourist reservations have asked if he is related to anyone in law enforcement, been canceled because of erroneous Seattle newspareplies: per reports that “highway “No, but I know all of the cops in town. . . . I used transportation is cut off” to own a doughnut shop.” and that the “Peninsula is enveloped in flames.” WANTED! “Seen Around” “Nothing could be furitems. Send them to PDN News ther from the fact,” grumDesk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles bled Port Angeles Evening WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or News Editor William Welsh email news@peninsuladailynews. in a front-page column. com.

1963 (50 years ago) The state Parks and Recreation Commission met in Port Angeles, in part to investigate possible new state park sites in Clallam, Jefferson and Skamania counties. State Parks Director Clayton E. Anderson said about a half-dozen sites have been explored by the department’s staff. None of the sites has been disclosed, though rumors of Salt Creek County Recreation Area in Clallam County as a possible state park were denied by Anderson.

1988 (25 years ago) State Lands Commissioner Brian Boyle, speaking to a Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce audience, said the state’s sawmills aren’t doing enough to sell their lumber

to Japanese buyers. With many mills unwilling to cut lumber to specifications that please customers in Japan, Japanese companies are building or buying sawmills in this state “in order to get the lumber they want,” Boyle said. Boyle called for more aggressive marketing of the state’s lumber products while arguing against a proposed ban on the export of raw logs cut from state lands.

Laugh Lines ROCKY IS BACK. Sylvester Stallone, who’s 67, is getting ready to star in a seventh “Rocky” movie. You can tell he’s getting up there because instead of running up those famous stairs, now Rocky just takes the elevator. Jimmy Fallon

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, Aug. 2, the 214th day of 2013. There are 151 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Aug. 2, 1943, during World War II, Navy boat PT-109, commanded by Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy, sank after being rammed in the middle of the night by the Japanese destroyer Amagiri off the Solomon Islands. Two crew members were killed; Kennedy led the survivors to nearby islands until they could be rescued. On this date: ■ In 1776, members of the Continental Congress began attaching their signatures to the Declaration of Independence. ■ In 1876, frontiersman “Wild

Bill” Hickok was shot and killed while playing poker at a saloon in Deadwood, Dakota Territory, by Jack McCall, who was later hanged. ■ In 1909, the original Lincoln “wheat” penny first went into circulation, replacing the “Indian head” cent. ■ In 1923, the 29th president of the United States, Warren G. Harding, died in San Francisco; Vice President Calvin Coolidge became president. ■ In 1964, the destroyer USS Maddox suffered light damage from North Vietnamese patrol torpedo boats in the Gulf of Tonkin. ■ In 1974, former White House counsel John W. Dean III

was sentenced to one to four years in prison for obstruction of justice in the Watergate coverup. Dean ended up serving four months. ■ In 1985, 135 people were killed when a Delta Air Lines jetliner crashed while attempting to land at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. ■ In 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait, seizing control of the oilrich emirate. The Iraqis later were driven out in Operation Desert Storm. ■ Ten years ago: Saddam Hussein’s two elder sons and a grandson were buried as martyrs near the deposed Iraqi leader’s hometown of Tikrit, where insurgents afterward attacked U.S.

troops with three remote-controlled bombs. ■ Five years ago: Police in southern Afghanistan reported a bus carrying a wedding party had struck a mine, killing 10 people, including the bride and groom; meanwhile, two French humanitarian aid workers kidnapped July 18 were released. ■ One year ago: Gabby Douglas became the third American in a row to win gymnastics’ biggest prize when she claimed the allaround Olympic title; Michael Phelps added to his medal collection with his first individual gold medal of the London Games in the 200-meter individual medley.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday. August 2-3, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Ohio kidnapper sentenced: ‘I’m not a monster’ CLEVELAND — The man convicted of holding three women captive in a house he turned into a prison and raping them repeatedly for a decade was sentenced Thursday to life without parole plus 1,000 years. Ariel Castro, 53, apologized in a rambling, defiant statement before he was sentenced. He blamed a sex addiction, his former wife and even the FBI for not thoroughly investigating the abductions while claiming most of the sex was consensual. “These people are trying to paint me as a monster,” he said. “I’m not a monster. I’m sick.” Before the sentencing, one of three women he kidnapped stood within feet of Castro and told him his life was over. “You took 11 years of my life away, and I have got it back,” said Michelle Knight. “I spent 11 years in hell. Now your hell is just beginning.” Knight, 32, was the first woman Castro abducted in 2002 after he lured her into his house with the promise of a puppy for her son. Relatives of the other victims spoke on their behalf. Judge Michael Russo dismissed Castro’s claims that the

women lived a happy life with him. “I’m not sure there’s anyone in America that would agree with you,” he said. Castro pleaded guilty last week to 937 counts including aggravated murder, kidnapping, rape and assault. A deal struck with prosecutors Friday spared him from a death sentence for beating and starving a pregnant victim until she miscarried.

Woman dies in fall NEW YORK — A woman on a first date plunged to her death Thursday after a railing on her 17th-floor New York City balcony gave way, police said. Jennifer Rosoff, 35, went outside for a cigarette around 12:50 a.m. when she either sat on the railing or leaned on it. Moments later, she apparently fell backward and landed on construction scaffolding at the first floor, authorities said. Police spoke to her date, and no foul play was suspected. Emergency crews pronounced Rosoff dead at the scene. The brick high-rise on Manhattan’s Upper East Side was built before World War II. Only the higher-floor corner apartments have balconies. The city’s buildings department ordered residents to stay off them. Rosoff worked at The New Yorker, Lucky Magazine and Cosmopolitan. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michelle Knight speaks Thursday in a Cleveland courtroom as her former captor, Ariel Castro, listens, at right.

Russia grants asylum to U.S. secrets leaker White House ‘disappointed’ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW — U.S. National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden left the transit zone of a Moscow airport and officially entered Russia after authorities granted him asylum for a year, his lawyer said Thursday, a move that suggests the Kremlin isn’t shying away from further conflict with the United States. Snowden’s whereabouts will be kept a secret for security reasons, lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said, making it even harder to keep track of the former NSA systems analyst, who has been largely hiding out at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport since his arrival from Hong Kong on June 23. The U.S. has demanded that Russia send Snowden home to face prosecution for espionage over his leaks that revealed wide U.S. Internet surveillance practices, but Russian President Vladimir Putin dismissed the request. In a statement released by WikiLeaks, Snowden thanked Russia and lashed out at the Obama administration. “Over the past eight weeks, we have seen the [Barack] Obama administration show no respect for international or domestic law, but in the end the law is winning,” he said. “I thank the Russian Federation for granting me asylum in accordance with its laws and international obligations.” The move already appears to have further strained tense U.S.Russian relations amid differences over Syria, U.S. criticism of Russia’s human rights record and other disputes. Putin has said granting asylum was contingent on Snowden’s not hurting U.S. interests, but the

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena on Thursday shows a document allowing Edward Snowden to cross the border into Russia from Sheremetyevo Airport outside Moscow. Kremlin could have interpreted that to exclude documents he had already leaked to newspapers that continue to trickle out. In its first public response, the White House said it was not a positive development for U.S.Russia relations, adding that it is re-evaluating whether Obama should attend an upcoming summit with Putin.

Snowden feared torture “We are extremely disappointed that the Russian government would take this step despite our very clear and lawful requests in public and private that Mr. Snowden be expelled and returned to the United States,” said White House spokesman Jay Carney. In his application for asylum, Snowden said he feared he could face torture or capital punishment if he is returned to the U.S.,

although the U.S. had promised Russia that is not the case. The U.S. revoked his passport, and the logistics of Snowden’s reaching other countries that offered him asylum, including Venezuela, Nicaragua and Bolivia, were complicated. The one-year asylum can be extended indefinitely, and Snowden also has the right to seek Russian citizenship. According to the rules set by the Russian government, a person who has temporary asylum would lose it if he traveled abroad. Kucherena said it would be up to Snowden to decide whether to travel to any foreign destination. Snowden’s father, Lon Snowden, said in remarks broadcast Wednesday on Russian television that he would like to visit his son, and Kucherena said he is arranging the trip.

Briefly: World Top Italian court upholds term for Berlusconi ROME — Italy’s highest court Thursday upheld ex-Premier Silvio Berlusconi’s fouryear prison sentence for tax fraud, the first time the former premier and billionaire media mogul has definitely been convicted of any crime. The tensely awaited ruling, however, ordered a review of a five-year ban on public office that was part of the lower court’s sentence. Another court now will have to determine the length of a public office ban. Berlusconi, 76, is unlikely to go to prison. Three years will be shaved off as part of a general pardon aimed at easing prison crowding, and it is unusual for defendants to serve sentences of just one year for a first offense, particularly at Berlusconi’s age.

central city of Homs on Thursday, triggering massive explosions in a weapons depot that killed at least 40 people and wounded dozens, an opposition group and residents said. The attack overshadowed a rare trip by President Bashar Assad to a former opposition bastion outside the capital, Damascus, during which he defiantly vowed in front of troops to defeat the rebels fighting to topple him.

Iran on nuke sanctions

TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s foreign ministry said possible new U.S. sanctions will not change Tehran’s nuclear policy but could complicate talks with world powers. Thursday’s state TV report follows U.S. House passage of calls to tighten sanctions on Iran’s oil sector. Iranian state TV quotes Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Araghchi as saying sanctions will not stop the country’s nuclear advance. Weapons depot blast Araghchi claims the new DAMASCUS, Syria — Rebels American proposals could set sent a wave of rockets slamming back efforts at dialogue. into regime strongholds in the The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOT

ENOUGH TO FRY EGGS ON PAVEMENT

A child in Jinan in east China’s Shandong province demonstrates earlier this week how raw shrimp and an egg can be fried in a pan on a manhole cover. A current heat wave — the worst in at least 140 years in some parts — has left dozens dead and pushed thermometers above 104 degrees in at least 40 cities.

Quick Read

. . . more news to start your day

West: Lightning in Colorado injures 12 soldiers at base

Nation: Military exchanges dropping ‘adult’ magazines

Nation: Texas prison system almost out of execution drug

World: Protester killed in Sri Lanka military shooting

TWELVE SOLDIERS WERE hurt, one critically, when lightning struck near them during a training exercise at Fort Carson, a base spokesman said. Maj. Earl Brown, deputy public affairs officer at the Army base near Colorado Springs, said six of the soldiers were still hospitalized, and five were treated and released after Wednesday’s strike. An engineering soldier was in critical condition. The soldiers were training with about 340 others when lightning struck at about 2:45 p.m. south of the Butts Army Airfield. The National Weather Service issued a warning just minutes earlier.

PLAYBOY, PENTHOUSE AND other sex-themed magazines will no longer be sold at Army and Air Force exchanges — a move described as a business decision based on falling sales and not a result of pressure from anti-pornography activists. The 48 “adult sophisticate” magazines are among 891 periodicals that no longer will be offered by the Army and Air Force Exchange Service. Other titles getting the ax include SpongeBob Comics and the New York Review of Books. Morality in Media, a Washingtonbased anti-pornography group, called the decision “a great victory.”

THE NATION’S MOST active death penalty state is running out of its execution drug. The Texas Department of Criminal Justice said Thursday its remaining supply of pentobarbital expires in September, and no alternatives have been found. It wasn’t clear whether two executions scheduled for next month would be delayed. The state has executed 11 deathrow inmates this year. At least seven more have execution dates coming up. “We will be unable to use our current supply of pentobarbital after it expires,” spokesman Jason Clark said. “We are exploring all options.”

ONE PERSON WAS killed Thursday and about 15 were wounded when Sri Lanka’s military shot at a protest demanding clean drinking water. At least 4,000 protesters had gathered in Weliweriya, some 12 miles (20 kilometers) northeast of the capital, Colombo. A protester who spoke on condition of anonymity, fearing reprisals, said chemical emissions from a factory into water sources have polluted drinking water in about 15 area villages. Residents have been demanding for more than a month that authorities close down the factory but to no avail, the protester said.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

First canoes arrive at final Former Sequim Paddle Journey destination chief of police dies in Tenn.

Quinault welcome other tribes

July 17 in Tennessee. Burge was to be buried in his hometown of Fairview ALCOA, Tenn. –– For- Heights, Ill. mer Sequim Police Chief Ken Burge died July 14 of Police career an undisclosed illness at his home in Alcoa, Tenn. His police career started Burge as an officer in his homeserved as town before serving as the chief in chief of police departments Sequim in Indianola, Iowa; Glendale, from OctoColo.; Sequim; and Alcoa. ber 2002 to Burge trained at the FBI September Academy in 1995 and was a 2004. lifetime member of the He was International Association of Burge hired as Chiefs of Police. chief in According to his obituary Alcoa but had been on leave from the Smith Funeral since November 2012, Home in Maryville, Burge according to The Daily was fond of Jimmy Buffet’s Times of Maryville, Tenn. music, traveling and sci“He was a great guy — ence, especially astronomy. full of energy and always He is survived by his with a joke,” said Walt wife of 45 years, Bettiann; Schubert, who was mayor of Sequim during the time two children; one grandson; a brother; and a sister. Burge served as chief. The family has estabBurge replaced Byron Nelson as Sequim police lished the Kenneth Burge chief. After taking the post Memorial Fund at the Alcoa in Alcoa, Burge was suc- Tennessee Credit Union, ceeded in Sequim by former P.O. Box 9001, Alcoa, TN 37701, or at www.atfcu.com. Chief Robert Spinks. ________ Burge had told the Peninsula Daily News that he Sequim-Dungeness Valley Ediwent to Tennessee to be tor Joe Smillie can be reached at closer to his children. 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at A funeral was held jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com. BY JOE SMILLIE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SOURCES

TAHOLAH — The annual tribal canoe journey in Washington waters reached its destination Thursday as more than 60 canoes arrived at Point Grenville on the Quinault Reservation. The Quinault tribe will host visitors for a week of celebrations ending Tuesday. The first event in 1989 was the Paddle to Seattle. It was organized by Emmet Oliver, a Quinault tribal elder.

Many stops Canoes have been visiting tribal points along Puget Sound and the coast this summer on this year’s Paddle to Quinault. Quinault Nation officials prepared for between 10,000 and 15,000 guests at Point Grenville, creating a compound with enormous tents, hundreds of portable

KXRO

One of the more than 60 tribal canoes paddles past the tall ship Hawaiian Chieftain at the Quinault Nation’s gathering of the participants in the 2013 Tribal Canoe Journey on Thursday. The Hawaiian Chieftain and its sister tall ship, Lady Washington, are based in Grays Harbor County, where the Point Grenville gathering will be held through the weekend. toilets and kitchens on wheels. The Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain escorted the canoes as they arrived on the Grays Harbor coast, KXRO News Radio of Aberdeen reported. The pair of tall ships had provided safety and logistical support for the canoe families while they were in the open Pacific Ocean after

leaving Neah Bay. The ships’ crews will join the canoe families in celebration of the historic 1788 first meeting between the original Lady Washington and the tribes. The wooden-hulled Lady Washington was launched in 1989. It is a replica of the original 18th-century brig and is the official ship of the state of Washington.

The 65-foot Hawaiian Chieftain, launched in 1988, is a steel-hulled modern ketch-rigged ship that was designed to resemble a 19th-century trader or packet ship. The nonprofit Grays Harbor Seaport Authority, based in Aberdeen, operates the replicas of historic ships.

State Department of Transportation spokeswoman Claudia Bingham Baker said the delays were caused by “dig-outs” on state Highway 20 outside of Port Townsend, where alternating traffic was getting through. “They were removing patches of bad asphalt and putting [new asphalt] back in place,” Baker said. Baker said crews had completed the dig-outs by Thursday afternoon. “We do have other areas on [Highways] 19 and 20

that are going to see a little more work going on,” Baker said. Transportation crews will chip-seal “various sections” of highways 19 and 20 in Jefferson County and state Highway 112 in Clallam County next week, Baker said. Crews will return to the repair sites to sweep up the following day. Earlier this week, state crews chip-sealed a 1.5mile section of state Highway 19 about 8 miles south of Chimacum, causing

short traffic delays, Baker said.

Briefly . . . Road work delays end in Jefferson PORT TOWNSEND — Road work that delayed both northbound and southbound traffic near the intersection of state Highways 19 and 20 on Thursday was finished that day. Waits were up to 30 minutes each way, according to the Jefferson County Department of Emergency Management.

Ludlow phones PORT LUDLOW — A contractor installing a guardrail inadvertently cut a telephone cable at about noon Thursday, leaving about 200 customers without phone service for several hours. CenturyLink spokeswoman Jan Kampbell said crews were dispatched to the 2900 block of Paradise Bay Road and expected to complete the repair by

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6 p.m. Thursday. Kampbell declined to name the contractor, saying that the incident was an accident. The Jefferson County Department of Emergency Management sent out an alert shortly after the incident, instructing residents to use cellphones to call 9-1-1 for emergencies.

GOP parks forum CHIMACUM — A Jefferson County Republican Party-sponsored forum on Jefferson County parks is planned for the Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, at 7 p.m. Thursday. Speakers from Save Our Community Parks will address the issues surrounding the city’s and county’s efforts to establish a metropolitan parks district, which will collect taxes to fund city and county parks. Save Our Community Parks describes itself as “an association of concerned citizens who want to maintain and preserve our parks and recreational facilities within our existing budgeting process.” Proponents of the park proposal also have been invited. The Save Our Community Parks website is available at www.saveour communityparks.com. For more information on the Jefferson County Republican forum, phone Chairman Gene Farr at 360-343-4041 or visit the party’s website at www.jeff gop.com.

West End meeting FORKS — Jefferson County commissioners will conduct a special meeting to hear from West End residents Thursday. The meeting will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Hoh Tribal Center, 2464 Lower Hoh Road. A facilitator will address questions or concerns that deal with the same issues. Note cards will be available at the meeting. For more information, phone 360-385-9100 or email llocke@co.jefferson.wa.us.

Kayaker overturns SEATTLE — A Coast Guard crew from Port Angeles hoisted a kayaker from the water near Birch Bay and took him to get medical attention after his kayak overturned. The unidentified kayaker was exhibiting signs of mild hypothermia, the Coast Guard said after the Wednesday rescue. A concerned citizen on shore contacted Coast Guard Station Bellingham at about 8 p.m. after seeing the man’s kayak flip over. The air and boat crews were under way conducting scheduled training and diverted to the scene. A second individual on shore was able to direct the rescue crews to kayaker. The air crew was able to safely hoist the kayaker into the helicopter and transport him to waiting emergency medical technicians at Bellingham International Airport. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

A5

Builder group’s new chief starts work BY ARWYN RICE

new communications and public relations director at Building Industry Association of WashingSEQUIM — A former Port ton. Orchard mayor is now leading the Coppola, who served as Port North Peninsula Building Associ- Orchard mayor from 2008-2012, ation. leads about 175 members and Lary Coppola oversees a $200,000 operating started work Monbudget. day and is com“When I was hired, the board muting between was very clear about where they Port Orchard and want the association to go, and it’s the association’s my job to take it there,” Coppola office at 350 W. said. Washington St., Suite 3, in Sequim. Coppola Association goals “I’m thrilled to be here,” Coppola said Thursday. Goals include increasing mem“I’m drinking out of a fire hose bership, raising the visibility of now, meeting people and learning the association in the community, what I need to know.” reinvigorating the Future Build“I’m having a great time.” ers Program and being more Coppola, 62, was named execu- active in government affairs, as tive director in July of the group well as refocusing on Built Green that represents builders and asso- of Clallam County, Coppola said. ciates of the building industry, The Future Builders Program, He replaces outgoing executive created in 1999, includes an eduofficer FaLeana Wech, 41, who cation partnership with area high had been the executive director schools and colleges to encourage since February 2009. youths to enter the building Wech is starting a new job in trades. Olympia on Monday. She is the Board President Garret DelaPENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Barre said the board had sought an executive with business savvy and good organizational and public outreach skills. He is “tasked with assuring compliance with governance procedures, developing, recommending and monitoring budgets and implementing the strategic vision of the board,” according to the job posting, which listed a salary range of $35,000 to $45,000 per year. Coppola said the amount of his salary is confidential. Wech’s last day at the Sequim office was Wednesday. She will be available to Coppola by phone and email, he said. “I’m ensuring we have a smooth transition,” Wech said. The past few years have been challenging, but before her departure, Wech predicted a recovery on the horizon, citing improvements in the Seattle market and the typical one-year-plus lag for outlying areas. For now, Coppola his wife, Dee Coppola — and their 9-year-old

grandson, Bryce — live in Port went into business for himself. Orchard, and he is commuting. Coppola has been a member of the Home Builders Association of Publishing business Kitsap County for almost 20 years The Coppolas own Wet Apple and a member of its board for Media, a publishing company that more than 15 years. He served as a state director produces the Kitsap Peninsula Business Journal, WestSound for the Building Industry AssociaHome & Garden magazine and tion of Washington from Kitsap Remodel Kitsap. The company County for about 20 years. He is a member of the state also builds websites and smartphone apps. association’s Legislative Policy Coppola said he lost re-election Committee and the Washington to the mayor’s post by only five Affordable Housing Council, and votes. is its 2013 vice chair. “One of my proudest achieveCoppola’s construction experiments was overhauling the [Port ence includes completion of the Orchard] permitting process so it National Electrical Contractors became the fastest — and most Association apprenticeship procertain — in Kitsap County,” Copgram and running residential, pola said. As Coppola settles into his new commercial and light industrial job, the family will re-evaluate construction projects for electrical contractors. their living situation, he said. ________ It isn’t Coppola’s first time in Sequim. In the 1980s, he lived in Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at Sequim and published real estate 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn. magazines, he said. rice@peninsuladailynews.com. His background is in construction. He did construction work for Managing Editor/News Leah Leach electrical contractors before he contributed to this report.

Audit: Some caregivers failed background checks BY MIKE BAKER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MARKET

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Two-year-old Westley French of Port Angeles enjoys a cupcake at the Wednesday farmers market at The Gateway transit center pavilion in Port Angeles. The youngster was out on a lunch-time visit to the market with his family.

Lauridsen Boulevard in PA to close Monday PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Detour The city of Port Angeles issued a detour map showing vehicular traffic from the major artery and unofficial U.S. 101 alternate

Stronger monitoring “We recommend strengthened monitoring processes to prevent caregivers who fail background checks from working with vulnerable populations,” said State Auditor Troy Kelley in a statement. State officials said in response to the findings that 100 percent compliance “is the only acceptable result for this process.” Officials said they are

working to conduct background-check training for service providers, reviewing background-check compliance and updating policies. The supported living program, within the Developmental Disabilities Administration, provides services to about 3,700 developmentally disabled people in the state at a cost of about $280 million in federal and state money under Medicaid. The state contracts with businesses, which hire caregivers to aid people in maintaining their homes, preparing meals and other basic needs. Along with the issue of background checks, auditors also raised questions about $17 million in program payments — about 6

percent of all spending. The audit identified $500,000 in overpayments and $5.5 million in payments that weren’t properly authorized. Officials said those problems were linked to a paperbased process that is being replaced by an electronic system. The audit also identified more than $11 million in questionable payments in which businesses did not have proper documentation, such as time sheets and schedules, to support the payments they received. The state said in response that it is working with a consulting firm to evaluate the payment process and examine strategies to improve efficiencies and compliance.

Stabbing suspect to be arraigned BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man who police say stabbed another man on a stretch of the Waterfront Trail along Hollywood Beach is scheduled to be arraigned on an assault charge today. Edward Paul Horner, 55, was charged last week with one count of first-degree assault with a deadly weapon after he allegedly stabbed John Harold Hann, 44, in the chest July 23. Horner remained in the Clallam County jail Wednesday on $30,000 bail. Hann was taken to Olympic Medical Center for the wound July 23 and had been treated and dis-

ing to the argument and charged as of Wednesday, without incident. hospital spokeswoman Hann told police he was Horner allegedly stabbing Bobby Beeman said. sitting with a woman friend Hann in his upper left along Hollywood Beach chest. Police account when Horner began to ________ harass her. Port Angeles police gave Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can Hann said he then told be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. this account of the incident Horner to leave, which 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula that led to Horner’s arrest: Horner refused to do, lead- dailynews.com. Guests at the Red Lion Hotel saw and heard Horner and Hann arguing on the stretch of Waterfront Trail that runs in front of the hotel at about 10 p.m. At least one guest called 9-1-1 to report that a man had been stabbed, and upon Music@McComb arrival, police found Horner holding a knife and Hann’s Sunday @ 1pm shirt covered in blood. The Sidekicks Police told Horner to drop the knife, which he O P E N DA I LY 9 a m - 6 p m • 3 6 0 - 6 8 1 - 2 8 2 7 did, and Horner was 751 McComb Rd., Sequim • www. mccombgardens.com placed into custody 38829792

PORT ANGELES — City Hall this afternoon announced that Lauridsen Boulevard will be closed at Race Street starting at 10 a.m. Monday for the balance of this year and into next year for the $4.5 million replacement of the Peabody Creek Bridge.

route detoured along Eunice Street to Eighth Street. Pedestrian traffic also will be detoured to Eighth Street or Park Avenue. Stop signs will stop traffic on Race Street/Mount Angeles Road at Park Avenue, near the Olympic National Park Visitor Center. Race/Mount Angeles is the route to Olympic National Park’s Hurricane Ridge recreation area. The bridge is expected to be finished by February or March.

OLYMPIA — Nearly two dozen people who failed criminal background checks were allowed to work with developmentally disabled clients in Washington state, according to a state audit released this week. In conflict with state policy, some businesses hired the 23 caregivers even though they had past legal problems involving assault, theft, drug charges, abuse and financial exploitation, according to the audit. The state audit did not release names or where the people worked. Officials said it wasn’t clear whether the caregivers had unsupervised access

to the clients — something that would violate state law — but assumed it happened in some cases within the supported living program. Auditors said the state does not have the staff to review the results of all background checks.

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A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

5 complete training for Girls Circle PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

activities to do.� Three Clallam Soroptimist clubs (Jet Set, Sequim and noon club) approached Juvenile and Family Services Director Pete Peterson two years ago to explore the possibilities of incorporating this program into services and support for at-risk girls and those in treatment programs. To date, 20 girls ages 13-17 have completed the 12-week training sessions. Expenses have been met with the help of a $1,500 grant from Soroptimist International of the Americas, matching contributions from each of the three clubs, plus staff and training provided from Juvenile Services. Five Clallam County Juvenile Services staff have completed the two-day Girls Circle Facilitator training. Soroptimists paid for registration for three of the five staff members and provided weekly snacks for the classes, a graduation celebration for the first two classes and gifts for each girl.

PORT ANGELES — Five Clallam County girls recently celebrated the completion of a 12-week Girls Circle training course with a program and dinner. Among those attending were 18 members of the three local Soroptimist clubs and program facilitators and staff from Clallam County Juvenile and Family Services. Girls Circle is a nationwide model of structured support groups for girls ages 9 to 18 designed to foster selfesteem, help them maintain authentic connections with peers and adult women in their community, counter trends toward self-doubt and allow for self-expression through verbal sharing and creative activity, according to a prepared statement. It was created by the One Circle Foundation, based in San Rafael, Calif. The girls received gift bags and earlier that day were treated to a spa day at a local hair school. During the program, each Boys and men class girl got up and read a short Response to the program report about women who have become role models for has prompted the development of a Council for Boys other women. and Young Men class, another One Circle Founda‘Comfort and support’ tion program that is being They also shared their facilitated by Juvenile and thoughts about Girls Circle. Family Services staff. It A 13-year-old wrote: started this spring. “Girls Circle means a place of The Girls Circle training comfort and support. and Soroptimist partnership “All the girls are nice and is being folded into a pilot respectful to me and others. I program with True Star like coming here because it’s Behavioral Health, a statefun and amusing. I’m really certified chemical depenglad we have Girls Circle.� dency program and division Another 16-year-old of Juvenile and Family Serwrote: “Girls Circle is a safe vices. place for me to vent and The program recently express myself. received a grant for $250,000 “I can talk about anything a year for three years to I need and not worry about develop a program that being judged or looked at in a encourages the use of comdifferent way.� munity resources and family Another 16 year-old participation in treatment wrote: “Girls Circle means for youths and families in to get support from other crisis. girls, talk about feelings, For more information, help with triggers for being phone Juvenile and Family out of control, understand Services Behavioral Health each other, have happy posi- Manager Patty Bell at 360tive thoughts and fun sober 565-2631.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FIRE

CHARS WIDE SWATH OF LAND

A bridge and home owned by Phil and Cheri Rayburn were destroyed in the Colockum Tarps Fire east of Wenatchee. Firefighters worked Thursday to shore up the southern and western flanks of land in two counties, as they kept watch for thunderstorms that could bring dry lightning and erratic winds. The fast-moving Colockum Tarps Fire was 25 percent contained Thursday, but it has burned across nearly 113 square miles.

Pretrial issues are focus today at bulldozer-rampage hearing BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Gales Addition man who allegedly bulldozed several homes in a noon-hour rampage through his neighborhood May 10 will appear in court today for a hearing on pretrial issues, which may include a motion for a change of venue. Barry A. Swegle’s hearing was reset from Thursday morning to 1:30 p.m. today after defense attorney Karen Unger reported that she needed more time to speak with her client. “We have some issues to discuss,� Unger told Clallam County Superior Court Judge Erik Rohrer. County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John Troberg did not object to the one-day continuance.

Swegle, 51, has pleaded not guilty to one count of first-degree assault with a deadly w e a p o n , Swegle four counts of first-degree burglary with a deadly weapon — “to wit, a bulldozer� — and four counts of first-degree malicious mischief. He is being held in the Clallam County jail on $1 million bond.

Trial set Aug. 12 A one-week trial is scheduled to begin Aug. 12. No one was injured when Swegle allegedly used a logging bulldozer he owned to smash up four homes, mangle a pickup truck and

knock over a utility pole, cutting power to thousands of Clallam County Public Utility District customers. Authorities said he had been in a property line dispute with his next door neighbor Dan Davis, who owned the pickup truck that was flattened and two of the four destroyed or badly damaged homes. The property damage occurred near the intersections of North Baker Street and East Pioneer Road in Gales Addition just east of the city limit. In a July 19 hearing, Unger said she may seek a change of venue because of widespread pretrial publicity, particularly locally. The case made national and international news, and will be featured on ABC-TV’s “20/20� news-

magazine later this month in a segment on “extreme examples of neighborhood disputes,� producer Harry Phillips has said. Clallam County sheriff’s deputies arrested Swegle without incident about 10 minutes after they were dispatched. Unger filed an affidavit of prejudice stating a belief that Swegle “cannot have a fair and impartial trial� before Rohrer. She did not immediately return a phone call seeking clarification Thursday. Judge S. Brooke Taylor is scheduled to preside over Swegle’s hearing today.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula dailynews.com.

Man gets 13 years State upgrades burn ban for child-rape term unusually high, and the consequences could be catastrophic,� Goldmark added. “We have hundreds of firefighters fighting two major wildfires and numerous smaller fires in Washington state. Our resources are stretched thin.� Large wildfires are burning south of Wenatchee and north of Goldendale. The fire danger there remains high through today with the threat of lightning strikes from thunderstorms. The upgraded burn ban supersedes previous burn bans in Clallam and Jefferson counties, which applied to all outdoor burning except recreational cooking fires.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

33-year-old from PA also to pay $1,300 in victim assessment, fees BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man who pleaded guilty to multiple counts of child rape will spend nearly 13 years in prison for the crimes. Michael Donald Stephens, 33, was sentenced Tuesday to 155 months in prison after he pleaded guilty in June to three counts of second-degree rape of a child, according to documents filed in Clallam County Superior Court. Stephens also will pay

$1,300 in victim assessment and court fees. A victim restitution hearing is set for Sept. 20 in Clallam County Superior Court, according to court documents.

Inmate in Shelton Stephens was listed on the inmate roster of the Washington Corrections Center in Shelton as of Thursday. Stephens originally was charged with four counts of second-degree rape of a child, one count of third-

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While the burn ban is in effect, any illegal burning will result with the property owner being liable for all fire-suppressant costs, fines and fees, including prosecution, Clallam County Fire Marshal Sheila Roark Miller said in a statement. Roark Miller, who is also the county’s Community Development director and building official, said maintaining a 30-foot defensible space around structures will aid firefighters by creating a green zone of protection around personal property.

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degree rape of a child, one count of third-degree child molestation, one count of second-degree attempted rape of a child, one count of second-degree child molestation and one count of fourth-degree assault. According to court documents, Stephens was alleged to have sexually and physically abused five children, ranging in age from 9 to 15, with whom he previously was acquainted. Port Angeles police said they had investigated the child abuse reports March 30 at a home off Lauridsen Boulevard in west Port Angeles. After interviewing the children involved, police arrested Stephens without incident.

PORT ANGELES — The state Department of Natural Resources has banned all outdoor fires. The upgraded burn ban applies to all forestlands in the state, except federal lands, and prohibits campfires in all state, local and private campgrounds, DNR officials said. The new burn ban was prompted by active wildfires in Central Washington and hot and dry conditions on both sides of the Cascade Mountains. It will be in effect through Sept. 30. “Now is the time to be vigilant,� Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark said in a statement. Moderate danger here “It is everyone’s responsibility to be appropriately DNR listed the fire dancautious during this season. ger as moderate in Clallam, “The risk of wildfire is Jefferson and 15 other

Western Washington counties Wednesday. The fire danger was either high or very high/ extreme in Eastern Washington.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(J) — FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

A7

Jefferson voter turnout tops 27 percent PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Jefferson County voters had returned 4,147, or 27.52 percent, of the 15,070 ballots issued for Tuesday’s primary election as of Thursday, the Jefferson County Auditor’s Office said. Clallam County voters had returned 8,110, or 19.68 percent, of the 41,208 ballots sent out, according to the Clallam County Auditor’s Office.

Port Townsend voters had returned as of Thursday 2,685, or 37.05 percent, of the 7,246 ballots issued in the city, according to the Jefferson County Auditor’s Office. Port Townsend voters are deciding on two Port Townsend City Council seats, Positions 1 and 5, and Proposition 1, a $3 million library improvement bond. Primary election contests are generated in Washington’s top-two primary when more than two

candidates file for a petition. The two candidates who receive the most votes face off in the general election Nov. 5.

Port race Voters had returned as of Thursday 1,384, or 18.47 percent, of the 7,493 ballots issued for the Port of Port Townsend Commission District 2 seat. This district includes the communities of Cape

Registered voters in JefGeorge, Chimacum, Irondale, Kala Point and Nord- ferson County who have not received a ballot and anyland. one needing a replacement ballot can phone the elecFire district race tions division at 360-385The Auditor’s Office had 9117. received as of Thursday 78, The office is open from or 23.56 percent, of 331 bal- 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monlots issued to voters in Gar- days through Fridays. diner for the Position 3 seat All ballots must be postfor the Fire Protection Dis- marked by Tuesday or trict No. 3 commission. placed in an official drop The district crosses county box by 8 p.m. that day to be lines. No numbers specific to counted. the district are available from Official drop boxes are Clallam County. located in the rear parking

lot of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend; and in the parking lot of the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., Port Hadlock. A 16-page Primary Election Voter Guide for Jefferson and Clallam counties was included in the Peninsula Daily News on July 19. Free copies of the guide are available at local libraries, county courthouses, city halls and the PDN’s Port Angeles office, 305 W. First St.

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mployees also

Local 155 bargaining will no longer board member Frank Verreceive vision vaart of Port Angeles reccoverage and will see ommended approval of the proposed contract at the their medical 7 p.m. meeting Wednesday, Reetz said, adding that the insurance deductibles bargaining board’s actual increase from $200 to vote on the contract was not $600 and from $800 to disclosed to union members. The mood at the con- $2,000, depending on tract-vote meeting Reetz the insurance network attended was “somber, frusplan the employee tration,” he said. Workers will retroac- carries. They also will tively receive the $3 an no longer receive hour they lost when the company unilaterally company-paid postimposed a contract March retirement medical 18 following a lengthy dis- benefits that they have pute over terms of the until now been agreement. The employees went on receiving until age 65. strike March 20, effectively shutting the plant down and “You’ve got to hit the picketing near the Ediz Hook paper manufacturing plant. 40-hour mark now” to get They returned to work paid overtime Sundays, Reetz said. March 25. Norlund said the contract guarantees that NipWorker concessions pon remains viable in a Workers made several shrinking market for the concessions in approving paper that Nippon prothe pact, Reetz said. duces. Hourly wages ranging The Japanese-owned from $15.10 for laborers to company manufactures $30.73 for certified machin- paper for telephone books ists will be frozen until at and newsprint for the Penleast 2016 or 2017, accord- insula Daily News. ing to the agreement. “The printed pages per “If the mill shows a pre- day has been declining,” he tax profit during the fiscal said Thursday. “There is years 2016 or 2017, the mill nothing that is going to and the union will conduct change that. a limited re-opener for the “So the mills that remain sole purpose of negotiating have got to be very competiwage increases for bargain- tive,” Norlund said. ing unit members based on “That’s why [Nippon the amount of the mill’s Industries USA] and Local pretax profit,” the contract 155 have worked to have a says. contract that allows us to be Employees also will no competitive.” longer receive vision coverThere are 200 hourly age and will see their medi- and salaried employees at cal insurance deductibles the mill, a number that has increase from $200 to $600 remained constant in recent and from $800 to $2,000, years, Norlund said. depending on the insurance network plan the employee ‘Counting on a future’ carries. “When you reach a collective bargaining agreeMedical benefits ment, you are counting on a They also will no longer future. That’s why you have receive company-paid post- to make changes,” he said. retirement medical benefits “All employees at the that they have until now mill who are hourly or [salbeen receiving until age 65. aried] are joining united on “We took a hit on that,” wanting a future for the Reetz said. business.” Employees can retire Workers are completing when their age added to construction on a biomasstheir years of employment fueled electric co-generation at Nippon equals 90, he plant, electricity from which said. Nippon will use to power The contract also elimi- the mill and hopes to sell. nates “Sunday premium The start-up date has time,” under which employ- been moved back from midees were paid time-and-a- September, Norlund said. half for working Sundays. “It should be producing electricity in early October,” How’s the fishing? he said. Lee Horton reports. Fridays in

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DIANE URBANI

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THE

DE LA

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ARTS

Guitarist and cat lover Mike Pace will bring his band, the Soulshakers, to The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave. in Port Angeles, for this Saturday’s Rockin’ the Arts party for Peninsula Friends of Animals. The nonprofit organization, founded in 2000, has two no-kill cat shelters and about 75 animals in its care. The benefit lasts from noon to 6 p.m.

Levy: Concerns on the specifics CONTINUED FROM A1 people were supportive of the levy. They just wanted “With all the problems more information.” Beck feels the time leadwe’ve had, I think we should work to build a little trust ing up to the November in the community,” Phillips election offers the opportunity to provide the informasaid. Kittredge and Phillips tion. “We have 10 weeks to said some at Monday’s meeting wanted more explain this,” he said. “This is something that explanation. “They just wanted to see we need to do. The rate a reasonable business plan,” hasn’t been raised since Kittredge said. “Most of the 1988.”

In a letter to the commissioners, Quilcene resident Linda Herzog asked for more specifics about how the money would be spent before putting the levy before voters. “There is so much more work to do on these issues that I cannot imagine being adequately prepared to run this ballot issue in 2013, or even within the coming 12 months,” she wrote.

“A loss at the polls would not only be a bitter defeat for fire district officials and volunteers, but another serious blow to this community which is still reeling from the dramatic events of the past year,” she said.

________ Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula dailynews.com.

Rating: ‘Still have a lot of work’

CONTINUED FROM A1 both projections and last year’s totals. As of the end of July, the A measure to approve or reject the city’s purchase of city had collected $932,000 $3 million in general obliga- in sales tax revenue that tion bonds to support reno- was not tied to the sales tax vation of the Port Townsend hike voters approved in Library is on Tuesday’s pri- 2010 for recreation, as to $939,000 mary ballot for Port opposed through the same time Townsend voters. The measure, which period last year. Although this year’s revrequires a supermajority of 60 percent plus 1 to pass, enues are less than were would fund the renovation collected in 2012, Timmons and expansion of the Carn- said, this reflects an actual in revenues egie Library portion of the increase library at 1220 Lawrence because the 2012 figures were miscoded when sales St. The estimated cost to a tax collected from the Port taxpayer would be 14 cents Townsend Paper Corp. were per $1,000 assessed value, incorrectly allocated to the or $28 per year for the city. “We don’t know exactly owner of a $200,000 home. how much the miscoding cost us, but these numbers Improved economy show we are holding our Timmons said the revenue levels,” he said. improved rating is evidence The measure voters ________ of the city’s economic recov- passed in 2010 raised sales Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb taxes by 0.03 percent, such can be reached at 360-452-2345, ery. He said sales tax income as the maintenance and ext. 5060, or at paul.gottlieb@ so far this year has exceeded operation of Memorial Field peninsuladailynews.com.

and the Port Townsend Recreation Center. The sales tax revenue, which is collected countywide, increased from $121,000 by July of 2012 to $131,000 by July this year.

Real estate excise tax

According to Standard & Poor’s website, its ratings express an opinion about the ability and willingness of an issuer, such as a corporation or state or city government, to meet its financial obligations in full and on time. Ratings also can speak to the credit quality of an individual debt issue, such as a corporate note, a municipal bond or a mortgage-backed security, and the relative likelihood that the issue may default. The ratings are awarded from AAA to D, with an A rating defined as “having a strong capacity to meet financial commitments, but somewhat susceptible to adverse economic conditions and changes in circumstances.”

The real estate excise tax was nearly double, going up to $82,000 from the 2012 year-to-date figure of $43,000. “We had projected $70,000 for this, so we are already ahead,” Timmons said. Timmons said the lodging tax showed a decline from $143,000 to $138,000, a fact he atrributed to a wet spring. Permit revenue also increased, from $73,000 to $100,000 year-to-date from ________ last year, Timmons said. “We still have a lot of Jefferson County Editor Charlie work to do, but as long as it Bermant can be reached at 360keeps going in this direc- 385-2335 or at cbermant@ peninsuladailynews.com. tion, we’ll be OK,” he said.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 2-3, 2013 PAGE

A8

The politics of a screeching halt ONE OF THE least attractive legacies of Barack Obama will be the way he empowered freshman senators to believe that they were only one or two good speeches away from the presidency. Right now, the show horses Gail of the U.S. SenCollins ate are Rand Paul of Kentucky, Ted Cruz of Texas and Marco Rubio of Florida. All preparing for a 2016 presidential bid. All making visits to Iowa. They’re the new faces of the Republican Party. Really, really new. The three of them have an average age of 45 and an average tenure in Washington of 1.9 years. And all three are currently in the news for their efforts to get Republicans to promise not to vote to fund the government this fall unless the president cancels Obamacare. “I think it’s the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard,” said Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina, speaking on behalf of a large number of Republicans who regard the idea of shutting down the government with horror and who are never going to be mentioned in a Quinnipiac presidential poll. Rubio, Cruz and Paul weren’t the first senators to promote the shutdown idea. But they’re the ones with the national names, in a party that’s got a crush on crazy. They’re very different. Rubio is a Cuban-American with a background in Florida pol-

itics who keeps bouncing and hedging in a desperate attempt to look like a bipartisan statesman who is — wait! wait! — also a right-wing true believer. He was a key negotiator behind the Senate immigration reform bill, which he now says he will not lobby for in the House. Cruz is a CubanAmerican with a background in law whose father used to tell him, “You know, Ted, you have been gifted above any man that I know, and God has destined you for greatness.” Paul is the libertarian son of former Congressman Ron Paul with a background in ophthalmology. Paul and Cruz in particular tend to drive other Republican senators nuts. We probably have them to thank for the return of the pre2008 version of John McCain, who would rather be anyplace than in a party caucus listening to Cruz give a speech. Asked by The New Republic whether he would support Rand Paul or Hillary Clinton for president, McCain laughed and said, “It’s gonna be a tough choice.” Actually it wouldn’t. If Rand Paul got nominated for president, McCain would be the honorary national chairman of Republicans for Hillary. The ones who aren’t irate are terrified. John Cornyn of Texas, the No. 2 Republican in the Senate, is a clubhouse sort of guy, but he’s trying desperately to get renominated without a right-

wing primary opponent. So far, Cornyn has signed onto the letter promising to go along with the government shutdown threat, taken his name off the letter and then burrowed into the ground, where he will emerge in September, unless he sees his shadow. And imagine being Mitch McConnell, the senator previously known as “powerful minority leader.” McConnell already has a tea party opponent back in Kentucky, and he’s had to grovel to Rand Paul for support. (“Particularly important and means a great deal.”) His campaign manager is the junior senator’s nephew. Both Paul and Cruz spend their careers violating the old party dictum about never speaking ill of a Republican.

Peninsula Voices

Asked about speculation that Gov. Rick Perry might run again for president, Paul grinned and said there were three good reasons Perry could succeed: “You know, Texas is a big, successful state. He’s a long-term governor. I can’t remember the third one, but, uh.” Cruz told Glenn Beck that Republicans who didn’t like his idea were “scared.” He called the House’s votes to defund or dismember Obamacare “empty,” thus casting aspersion on the lower chamber’s entire reason for existence. The fight between the Shutdown Trio and their colleagues is not about the Affordable Care Act, which virtually every Republican in Congress loathes and gives speeches about constantly, even when the topic under consideration is supposed to be oil

OUR READERS’

drilling or the next secretary of labor. The fight is over whether the fortunes of the party would be improved if people connected it to the sudden closing of the national parks and the local passport office. “We’ve been down that road,” said Sen. Saxby Chambliss on MSNBC. “We shut down the government . . . and we got our butts kicked over shutting down the government.” Chambliss is 69 and about to retire. Nobody is ever going to invite him to give the keynote address at the Iowa Republican Party summer picnic. “The sort of cocktail chatter wisdom that ‘Oh, the shutdown was a disaster for Republicans’ is not borne out by the data,” Cruz said. The Democrats are sort of horrified and sort of enthralled by the whole drama. “Give a call to Newt Gingrich. He’ll return your phone calls. Ask him how it worked,” suggested Majority Leader Harry Reid. Gingrich, who led the House during the last government shutdown in 1995, was busy touring the Peoria Zoo, where he admired a parrot.

________ Gail Collins is a columnist for The New York Times whose work often appears on PDN Commentary pages. Email her via the website http://tinyurl.com/nytcollins.opfdq. Columnist Martha Ireland remains on hiatus.

LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

cide” will maintain wellIn a world unable to being, when in reality the find quiet repose, we fall Ever since we built our opposite is true. victim to the chaos of our inn in Port Angeles, I’ve Gerald J. Stiles, own invention. tried to encourage the local Sequim Noise pollution has leadership to dream a litbecome the most prolific IF YOU ARE among the certain voters of Jefferson tle. and dangerous environLincoln Park II Olympic National Park, and Clallam counties who pick the “top two” in mental toxin threatening a million-acre park with I am trying to underTuesday’s all-mail primary for the fall elections, there our lives today. unparalleled vistas, has no stand why the City Council one w week left to vote. Recently, while I was grand hotel like Banff wants to spend approxiThe latest information from the respective county auditors’ offices waiting on a red light, the Springs Hotel and Jasper mately $14.2 million to ground suddenly began to suggests that turnout will be poor in elections to decide finalists for such Park Lodge in my home make a beautiful natural shake. Resting sea gulls province of Alberta. important positions as port commissioner, Port Townsend City Council park into a “big city” park screeched and took flight; Port Angeles has a natu[“Port Angeles Adopts Linand Port Angeles School Board — not to mention the Port Townsend two panicked dogs began ral breakwater with an coln Park Plan With CondiLibrary bond issue. howling and fighting their amazing harbor, yet it tions,” PDN, July 18.] Don’t let the minority make the decisions for the majority! leashes. looks embarrassing with What is the purpose? It I thought it was an And to provide voters with information about the candidates in the ugly industrial wasteland won’t bring in any revenue earthquake. In fact, it was jurisdictions that have important primaries, the PDN’s Primary Election all around. to the city. the car that had pulled up Why couldn’t local leadVoter Guide can be viewed online at www.peninsuladailynews.com. It seems this all started next to me blasting music ership pair with cruise ship when the Federal Aviation Limited copies of the 16-page guide are available free of charge at so loudly the tires actually companies and see some Administration wanted a courthouses, city halls, libraries, senior centers — and the PDN’s Port came up off the pavement world-class destination better approach to the airfrom the force of the noise’s Angeles office at 305 W. First St. built. The sky’s the limit! port. vibrations. If you don’t vote, don’t complain. Cruise ships now just I’m not sure how or why I probably would have sail past. Peninsula Daily News this has been turned into a ranted at the car’s occuOn a recent morning, a plan for changing the park. pant had I not been hoarse couple of guests from GerCouldn’t just topping some from a screaming tirade many told us that they trees serve the same purover power tools the day began their trip in Alberta could do some more dream- Fairchild International Air- operations here, not lesspose? before. and stayed at both of these ing and expand their horiHere on the Olympic port, they make it harder efficient ones, in order to An anonymous Native grand hotels. Peninsula, we advocate zons in order to attract the and harder for Kenmore bring us well-being. shaman said: “The silence They told us that our natural beauty. right kind of business to Air to bring people and Port Angeles and this of the Great Spirit speaks inn was superior to both Lincoln Park has plenty this natural paradise. goods to the Peninsula. Peninsula have but to look to me. Listen to the silence.” Banff Springs Hotel and of natural trails to walk; it Dan Abbott, In turn, this restricts at business-penalizing We no longer hear that Jasper Park Lodge. (Well, is a beautiful natural place Port Angeles commerce and its attenDetroit to see the future. silence. Thought, reflection perhaps it will be when we and we don’t need to spend dant and sorely needed and meditation are insaniIn fact, portions of get finished!) millions of dollars to Abbott and wife, Janet, ties mocked by the mechawell-being. downtown Port Angeles It’s hard to improve on change it into an unnatural own and operate George nized roar of civilization. Kenmore’s marginally the panoramic view that already bear the hallmarks park. Washington Inn, 939 Finn Our spirits cannot find we enjoy. sustainable operations of Detroit of a decade ago I hope everyone goes to Hall Road. peace because there is no Here’s their comment depend on federal air sub— significant downtown Lincoln Park to see the peace to find. that they wrote in our sidies that likely will disap- vacancies, numerous taxnatural ponds with ducks Lincoln Park I All we can do is shake guest book when they pear with further sequespayer-funded agencies, etc. raising their babies. Once again, a few Port our heads, put in a set of checked out: tration. Let’s save the natural Wealth isn’t being added earplugs or turn on our “This place bests all the Angeles residents are compark. When this likely event to our community; rather, mitting community “podiown white noise to block five-star Grand Hotels Linda Edwards, the noise of the world around the globe. Now one cide” — shooting us, termi- happens, its “bye bye, Ken- it’s being consumed. Port Angeles more” and bye bye to the Come to think of it, that nally, in the foot. around us. of our favorite places on wealth it brings the Penin- which was good for General How? By continuously Quite an Eden we’ve earth! Thank you so much! Sounds of silence made, isn’t it? Motors was good for hugging Lincoln Park trees sula. We will be back! And we Said differently, KenDetroit — wasn’t it? When did we become so and thereby restricting Barbara Deak, love Bach, too!” aerial access to William R. more needs more-efficient Some folks think “podiaverse to silence? Sequim Perhaps our leadership

Dream a little

Get going and vote!

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

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NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CommentaryViewpoints

Quit is the way this guy should roll THE CRUELLY MISUNDERSTOOD Anthony Weiner has “no idea” if he’s about to be stabbed by another stiletto heel. “These are people who I thought were Maureen friends, people Dowd I trusted when I communicated with them,” he told Denis Hamill of the [New York] Daily News. “But who knows what they might do now?” Yes, who knows? Free-spirited young women having digital sex with a wellknown politician who loves to expose himself and talk raunchy can be so damnably unpredictable and untrustworthy. The delusional Weiner, who has turned shamelessness into performance art, was expecting the sexual equivalent of honor among thieves. He wasn’t counting on being out campaigning Tuesday morning while one of his online inamoratas, Sydney Leathers, was holding forth to Howard Stern about their fantasies of “a secret sex den,” her possible future in porn and Weiner’s satyriasis. “There were times he’d talk to me multiple times a day,” she said. “He’s like a needy girlfriend or something. He’s like this clingy person.” Aside from being a gift to clowns, hacks, punsters, rivals and the writers of The Good Wife, Carlos Danger is also a gift to political-scandal survivors. His behavior is so outlandish and contemptible — the sort of thing that used to require a trench coat and park — that it allows Eliot Spitzer and Bill Clinton to act huffy. When Chris Matthews asked Spitzer to verify that he would not vote for Weiner, the “governor-turned-hooker-booker,” as The New York Post poetically calls him, replied: “Fair point. That is correct.” Bill Clinton, who officiated at Huma and Anthony’s 2010 wedding, is shooting death rays at his political Chucky.

And Hillary is dining in Washington, D.C., with the president and the vice president, trying to remind everyone of her dignified career after conjugal martyrdom — the same conjugal martyrdom her protegee, who was in Washington helping Hillary with her high-level meetings, is now enduring. After years of literally following in Hillary’s footsteps, little did Huma know how fully she would follow in Hillary’s footsteps. Weiner continues to play the rebel without a pause. He shrugged off reports that the Clintons, who have been christened the careless Daisy and Tom Buchanan of politics, regard him, in the words of F. Scott, as the foul dust floating in the wake of their dreams. “I am not terribly interested in what people who are not voters in the city of New York have to say,” Weiner sniffed about the first couple of Westchester. Bill confessed, “I hadn’t been perfect” after the Gennifer Flowers story broke, so Weiner echoed: “I recognize I am not a perfect messenger. I get that.” Just as Bill sparked a tawdry debate on whether oral sex counted as intercourse, so Weiner has sparked a tawdry debate on whether cyber-sex is more or less forgivable than illicit sex the oldfashioned way. As voters grapple with whether to send Client No. 9 to spar with reporters in City Hall’s Room 9 as a comptroller without self-comptrol, as Stephen Colbert put it, the spectacle of Spitzer passing moral judgment on Weiner has led to arguments over gradations of perversity. Some people say Spitzer’s transgressions are more understandable because they were time-immemorial victimless transactions with well-paid humans in the flesh, while Weiner’s digital compulsions with women he didn’t know were peephole exhibitionism and insanely “reckless,” as the new front-runner Christine Quinn charged. Others think Weiner’s sins were no worse than enjoying pornography and that actual human contact is more harmful than cyber-horniness run amok. On one level, what Mark Sanford did — fall in love with a

beautiful, younger woman — may be the easiest for voters to fathom, but is it the hardest on the wife? Like Bill Clinton, Weiner can summon impressive political stamina under jaw-droppingly embarrassing circumstances. Ignoring the new Quinnipiac poll of New Yorkers that says a majority of likely Democratic voters think he should get out, Weiner put up a video Tuesday night vowing that he would not drop out because newspaper editors and other pols wanted him to. “Quit isn’t the way we roll in New York City,” he said, with dark circles under his eyes that even makeup wouldn’t hide, adding generously: “This is about helping New Yorkers.” He acknowledged that “if someone wants to come out with something embarrassing about you in your private life, you’ve got to talk about that for a little while.” Good luck with that. At an event Tuesday evening in Times Square with advocates for New Yorkers with disabilities, the 48-year-old seemed tired, slight and young as he was thronged by the fierce Hydraheaded press beast. He looked as if he were running on raw will. He apologized for being late, saying something about the “time-space continuum.” Weiner tried to focus on the issues at hand, like wheelchairaccessible cabs. The auditorium was mostly empty, except for reporters following Weiner to see if he was going to drop out or admit that he had sexted recently. One man stood up and complained that he had been let down once when Weiner was a Queens congressman and backed away from a bill he had promised to pass. “How can I trust you?” the man asked. The question of the hour lingered in the febrile air.

________ Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Email her via http://tinyurl.com/dowdmail. Her column appears here Fridays.

‘Vulture capitalist’ plays host to Obama IT’S GOOD TO be the king . . . of class warfare hypocrisy. While he lectures his political opponents about their neglect of middle-class America, President Barack Obama is headed to Martha’s Vineyard, Mass. Again. Because Michelle nothing spells Malkin populist like a $7.6 million, 9.5-acre estate owned by one of Chicago’s wealthiest corporate financiers. The sprawling summer manse of David Schulte is actually a downgrade from the Obama family’s previous summer digs. The $21 million, 28.5-acre Blue Heron Farm that had hosted Obama and his massive entourage since 2009 isn’t available for rental anymore because a British mogul snapped it up. But don’t be bumming. The Obamas won’t be slumming. Schulte’s Chilmark, Mass., complex boasts pond and ocean views, an infinity pool and a basketball court (natch!). Cell towers were installed around Schulte’s home to boost phone service. The Vineyard Gazette reports that the Secret Service has 70 rooms booked nearby. Homeowner Schulte deserves special attention. If this deep-pocketed donor and private-equity whiz were a

Republican, the Occupy hordes and left-wing super-PACs would have made him a household name by now. The Service Employees International Union already would have picketed his private residence. Cher, Bette Midler and Chris Rock would be tweeting furiously about this privileged white robber baron in all caps. Schulte, you see, earned his money in much the same way the demonized Mitt Romney did: through corporate restructuring and rescuing debt-burdened companies. He and his former partner, Sam Zell, have happily embraced the nickname “grave dancers” since the early 1990s. By 1993, their billion-dollar “vulture fund” based in Chicago had purchased all or part of Jacor Communications, the embattled media conglomerate; Sealy Corp., the mattress empire; and the distressed Schwinn Bicycle Co. The duo also scooped up Santa Fe Energy Resources (an oil and gas company) through a partnership and refinanced Revco D.S., the drugstore chain. Schulte called his financial playground “the land of broken dreams,” according to the Los Angeles Times, which described the partners as “bottom-fishing.” Team Obama had plenty of brutal depictions for GOP private-equity mavens during the 2012 campaign: “Looter.” “Corporate raider.” “Greedy Gekko.” “Heartless profiteer.” Liberal media outlets likened Romney’s cohorts to mobsters,

strip miners and cannibals. “Bain was just like the Donner Party,” comedian Stephen Colbert snarked. “They ate the weak.” Super-PAC Priorities USA Action, run by former Obama spokesman Bill Burton, teamed with shameless campaign mouthturned-CNN talker Stephanie Cutter to smear Romney’s private-equity record. They falsely accused Romney and Bain Capital of allowing laid-off steelworker Joe Soptic’s wife to die of cancer — even though she had insurance coverage after he lost his job. Romney no longer was with the company when Soptic’s plant closed, and the wife died seven years after Romney’s departure. Like Schulte, Romney’s Bain record includes many successful turnarounds that saved workers’ jobs, pensions and health benefits — including Staples and Sports Authority. When Democrats do it, it’s creative capitalism. But when Republicans do it, it’s a criminal enterprise. The double standards are rich. But Obama’s coffers are richer. Democratic demagoguery means never having to say you’re sorry for throwing stones at glass houses, while vacationing in the compounds that “vulture capitalism” built.

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bargains, concerts and readings are planned on the North Olympic Peninsula this weekend. For information about the Acoustic Blues Festival and Shakespeare in the Park in Port Townsend, and Midnight Rambler Rolling Stones tribute in Port Angeles, as well as other arts and entertainment news, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide, in today’s edition.

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JOYCE — The summertime combination of blackberries, pie, a parade and music will be celebrated at the 31st annual Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival on Saturday. As always, the festival’s centerpiece — a huge supply of wild blackberry pie, with vanilla ice cream to put on top — will be on sale from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Joyce Depot Museum, located at 50883 state Highway 112 next door to the Joyce General Store in the community west of Port Angeles. At least 300 blackberry pies are expected to be on sale. All are made with locally picked wild blackberries, which are in plentiful supply this year, said Ed McKay, Joyce Daze festival chairman.

‘They are sweet’ “I’ve been picking some on my property, and they are sweet,” McKay said. Saturday’s festivities also include the homemade blackberry pie contest — sponsored by the Peninsula Daily News — beginning at 11 a.m. Pies for the competition can be dropped off for judges between 9 a.m. and 10:55 a.m. at the Joyce Depot Museum.

Sequim Foreign policy talk

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Royalty for the Joyce Daze Festival, from left, princesses Ryan Lester, Larissa Garrison and Becca Bamer, and Queen Lauren Hartley wave from their float in the Sequim Irrigation Festival parade last May. The group will preside over this year’s Joyce Daze. This year, the contest will have separate categories for adult and youth pie bakers, McKay said. The pies must be made using the small, wild blackberries that are found growing low to the ground, common to the North Olympic Peninsula, and each

must be a two-crust pie, he said. In the adult category, prizes are $50 for first place, $25 for second place and $25 for third place. In the youth category, it is $25 for first and $15 each for second and third. The prizes are paid by the PDN in Port Angeles Downtown

Dollars, which can be used like cash at downtown restaurants and merchants. The festival opens with a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. through 11 a.m. at the Crescent Grange, 50870 state Highway 112. TURN

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SEQUIM — The Sequim Great Decisions Discussion Group will discuss “Iran and the U.S.” during a meeting today. The group will meet at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., from 10 a.m. to noon. Discussion topics, which concern domestic and foreign policy issues, are taken from the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions 2013 Briefing Book and from Foreign Affairs, the bimonthly publication of the Council on Foreign Relations. New members are welcome. For more information and a schedule, visit http://tinyurl. com/3h27utj.

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SEQUIM — The inaugural Tour de Lavender, with various routes suitable for families and hardcore cyclists, is set for this weekend. The lavender circuits Saturday and Sunday are paired with Ride the Hurricane, Sunday morning’s climb up to Hurricane Ridge Road above Port Angeles. “Ours is like Ride the Hurricane, but our hills are more spread out,” said Tom Coonelly of Sequim, the ride director. TURN TO LAVENDER/B2

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36-mile round-trip ride that begins at the Peninsula ColPORT ANGELES — lege parking lot at 1502 W. Those yearning to test their Lauridsen Blvd. endurance on a ride up to The official start time one of the most scenic places from both locations is 7 a.m. on the North Olympic PenRegistration is $35 and insula can register for Ride can be done either in the Hurricane right up to advance or the day of the the start Sunday. ride. More than 400 people Online advance registrahad registered for the ride tion can be done through the on a traffic-free Hurricane PayPal link at http:// Ridge Road as of Wednesday, tinyurl.com/mbuqtku. said Russ Veenema, execuIn-person registration tive director of the Port before the event will start Angeles Regional Chamber at 6 that morning in the of Commerce, which orgaPeninsula College western nizes the event, now in its parking lot. fourth year. Each registration fee will provide $5 for Olympic DisMore than 400 riders covery Trail maintenance Veenema expects some and expansion. 450 to 475 people to make All riders are required to the ride to Hurricane Ridge, sign a waiver, and all riders which is 5,242 feet above sea must wear a cycling helmet. level. Participants can begin Participants can choose after registering, but the between either the 24-mile Heart o’ the Hills access round-trip ride starting from gate will not open until the Heart o’ the Hills 7 a.m. entrance station on HurriTURN TO TOP/B2 cane Ridge Road or the

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Meteors to streak across August sky PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

before dawn, try looking to the east to find the elusive zodiacal light—a faint, broad glow pointing up along the sun’s path. This is the result of sunlight reflecting off grains of dust that extend far out into space in Earth’s orbital plane. August and September are the best months for spotting it in the morning, and it also can be seen after sunset in late winter. The summer apparition was dubbed the “false dawn” in the collection of poems called the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, translated by Edward FitzGerald.

NEWS SOURCES

THE AUGUST SKY can be a trying month for North Olympic Peninsula stargazers. While the skies are full of celestial delights — several bright, sprawling constellations and one of the most reliable annual meteor showers — clouds often limit viewing opportunities. Well, we take what we can get. This month opens with the spectacle of a waning moon dropping past three planets over three mornings. First up is Jupiter, a beacon above the eastern horizon. Look an hour before sunrise this Saturday to see an old moon a little to the planet’s upper right. Next comes Mars. This Sunday, a thinner crescent appears to the Red Planet’s lower right. And Monday, look a halfhour before sunrise for a slip of a moon to Mercury’s lower right. Mercury is quite low, forming a slightly crooked line with Mars and Jupiter. You’ll need binoculars for this one.

Shooting stars This is a good year for the Perseid meteor shower, with prime viewing in the predawn hours of the 11th through

Spaceflight anniversary

A waxing crescent moon visits on the 9th, hanging below the planet to form a celestial semicolon in the sun’s afterglow. the 13th. High in the south floats the Typically bright, Perseids fly Summer Triangle of bright at up to 36 miles per second and stars: brilliant Vega, in Lyra the often leave persistent trails. lyre in the northwest corner; The meteors will radiate Deneb, in Cygnus the swan east from a point in the constellation of Vega; and Altair, in Aquila Perseus, which will be well up the eagle at the southern verin the northeast. tex. In the evening sky, Venus Deneb, from the Arabic for keeps blazing away, though it’s “tail” (of the hen), is also the rather close to the sunset horibrightest star in the grouping called the Northern Cross, zon.

Starwatch

which gives the swan its shape. As you gaze at Deneb, you’re looking in the direction our solar system is traveling through the disk of the Milky Way galaxy.

Red Moon August’s full Red Moon — so named by many Native American tribes because the summer haze can made it appear reddish — rises gorgeously round on the 20th shortly after sunset. If you’re up an hour or two

Gemini V blasted off Aug. 21, 1965, and remained in orbit for nearly eight full days, proving that human beings could function in space for days on end, a requirement for the upcoming Apollo flights to the moon. Gordon “Gordo” Cooper, who had flown the Mercury capsule Faith 7 in 1963, commanded Gemini V. Charles “Pete” Conrad, who later commanded Apollo 12 and became the third human to walk on the moon, served as pilot.

________ Starwatch appears in the Peninsula Daily News the first Friday of every month.

Top: Post-ride party set Joyce Daze festival schedule CONTINUED FROM B1 entrance fees for the cyclists at the Heart o’ the Hills Spectators can ride a entrance station from noon shuttle on a first-come, first- onward. The recreational bicycle served basis. The shuttle from All Points Charters & ride up Hurricane Ridge Tours will leave the Penin- Road is noncompetitive. sula College parking lot at Those who reach the summit 7 a.m. and Heart o’ the Hills will get Ride the Hurricane cycling caps and refreshat 7:20 a.m. It will leave the summit ments at the summit. at 9 a.m. Other round trips will leave Peninsula College ‘Made it to the top’ at 10 a.m., Heart o’ the Hills Celebratory “I made it to at 10:20 a.m. and the summit the top” photos also will be for the final trip back at taken and will be available 11:30 a.m. online after the ride. Olympic National Park New this year is an inforwill close Hurricane Ridge mal post-ride party in the Road to vehicle traffic, except Peninsula College parking for the shuttles, from 5 a.m. lot from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to noon, leaving it open for Riders need to be off the the cyclists to enjoy. road by noon, when HurriThe park will waive cane Ridge Road will open to

vehicle traffic. Four aid stations along the route will provide water and restrooms. Aid station sponsors include D.A. Davidson & Co., Kelly Johnson Windermere Realtor, Sound Bikes and Kayaks and The Bike Garage. Black Ball Ferry Line, which operates the MV Coho between Port Angeles and Victoria, is the presenting sponsor. Additional major sponsorship comes from First Federal, with hospitality from Aramark Properties, water from Olympic Springs and the after-ride party from Therapeutic Associates-Port Angeles. For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/ mbuqtku.

Lavender: All weekend CONTINUED FROM B1 Kingston and then visiting lavender farms across the Details of this weekend’s Dungeness Valley. Cyclists will use the Tour de Lavender rides — routes, registration, sites highways for part of the along the way — are at route, then turn onto Old w w w. To u r d e L a v e n d e r. Gardiner Road, Old Blyn wordpress.com and at the Highway and other back office of the Sequim Laven- roads, Coonelly said. der Farmers Association, The shorter, adjustable which is hosting the ride, at “family fun ride” can be 360-452-6300. done Saturday, Sunday or The lavender rides begin both. Saturday with a metric cenThat circuit can be up to tury — 100 kilometers, or 35 miles, with stopovers at 62.5 miles — starting in several lavender farms.

Growing pains? Andrew May’s garden column. Sundays in

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PLAYING PIANO IS REALLY FUN!

Registration for the family ride is $35 per person, including a T-shirt, water bottle and lavender souvenir.

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Advertise in Classes & Lessons Only $20 per week for up to 75 words. 25¢ each additional word. Also listed online at peninsuladailynews. com. Submit by calling Margot at  360-452-8435  or  1-800-826-7714  or email her at  mconway@ peninsuladailynews. com. You may also come to our office at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. Deadline is 12 noon each Tuesday for Friday publication.

JOYCE — Here is the schedule for the Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival on Saturday. ■ 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Pancake breakfast, Crescent Grange. ■ 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Vendors at Joyce Center. ■ 9 a.m. to 10:55 a.m.: Submit pies for judging, Joyce Depot Museum. ■ 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Blackberry pie sales, Joyce Depot Museum. ■ 9 a.m.: Eden Valley Strummers, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 9:45 a.m.: Vienna and

Gary, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 10:30 a.m.: Wanda Bumgarner, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 10:30 a.m. to noon: Parade judging, Crescent School. ■ 11 a.m. to noon: Judging of pies, Joyce Depot Museum. ■ 11:15 a.m.: Jim Lind, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Salmon bake by the Crescent Bay Lions Club at the mini-mall. ■ Noon: Luck of the Draw, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 1 p.m.: Grand parade

down state Highway 112. ■ 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.: Clallam County Fire District No. 4 and Elwha Police Department equipment demonstrations, free bloodpressure checks and refreshments at the minimall. ■ 2 p.m.: Yelling contest, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 2:15 p.m.: Olympic Mountain Cloggers, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 3 p.m.: Belly dancers, Joyce Depot Museum stage. ■ 3:15 p.m.: Button raffle drawing, Joyce Depot Museum.

Daze: Grand Parade set cent School, Clallam County Fair and state Highway 112 cleanup efforts. Their 1937 Chevy log truck and 1937 McAlpinSchreider log trailer are staples in truck shows and parades on the North Olympic Peninsula and elsewhere. Gene and Janet Kreaman are the Joyce Pioneers for 2013. Festival royal court members are Queen Lauren Hartley and Princesses John and Lelah Sing- Ryan Lester, Becca Bamer Grand Parade hose are the parade’s grand and Larissa Garrison. The Grand Parade will marshals. “They have been a part take over state Highway Yelling contest 112 beginning at 1 p.m. The of Joyce Daze forever,” parade starts at Crescent McKay said. There will be no beard John Singhose, a Joyce- and mustache contest or School, 50350 state Higharea native and longtime family and children’s games way 112. Horses, antique cars, community leader, and his at this year’s festival. trucks and tractors, floats wife, Lelah, are active in Instead, a yelling conand other entries in the Crescent Grange No. 1123, test, to test the strongest parade will make their way Joyce Daze Festival, Creslungs in the land, will be held at 2 p.m. at the Joyce Depot Museum stage. Vendors will be available all day, beginning at 9 a.m. next to the Joyce General A N D C O N V E N I E N C E S T O R E Store. Music and dance acts will entertain at the Joyce Depot Museum stage beginNobody can beat ning at 9 a.m. our prices on The Joyce Fire Departsmokeless tobacco! ment and the Lower Elwha Klallam Police Department WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS’ COUPONS! will offer equipment demonstrations, free blood-pressure checks and refreshments from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the mini-mall. Joyce-area businesses will participate with extended hours and specials. CONTINUED FROM B1 through the center of Joyce, celebrating the small comCost is $4 for adults and munity. The parade route, on the $2 for children. A salmon bake continues highway between the Joyce the gastronomic pleasures. Depot Museum and Wye The Crescent Bay Lions Road, will be closed to trafClub fundraiser includes fic between 12:30 p.m. and salmon, baked beans, cole 2:30 p.m. A detour will be availslaw, garlic bread and lemonade from 11:30 a.m. to 3 able, beginning in the west p.m. at the mini-mall across at Crescent School and the street from the Joyce rejoining Highway 112 east General Store and museum. of the Joyce Depot Museum. Cost is $12 for adults Parade notables and $7 for children.

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Family registration

The starting point is the Sequim unit of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula, 400 W. Fir St., which will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Registration for the longer ride is $50, including a cyclist’s cap, water bottle and souvenir at Village Green Park, 12850 Dulay Road N.E. in Kingston. Registration will be open at the park from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Saturday. For those who want to take on Ride the Hurricane, bus transportation will be available, Coonelly said. Cyclists should inquire about this when signing up for the Tour de Lavender.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

M–Th 7:30am–8:00pm Friday 7:30am–9:00pm (360) 457-1390 Saturday 9:00am–9:00pm 2851 Lower Elwha Rd. Port Angeles Sunday 10:00am–6:00pm

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

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Author to read adventures of Spam the Cat PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Nebula Award-winning author Elizabeth Ann Scarborough of Port Townsend will read and sign copies of her new series of comic “purranormal” detective stories narrated by Spam the Cat. The reading, set for 7 p.m. Saturday, is part of Port Townsend’s monthly Gallery Walk. Scarborough It will be held at Wynwoods Gallery & Bead Studio, 940 Water St. Spam lives in a town like Port Townsend, and his haunts include local businesses with the same names as iconic PT fixtures — such as Elevated Ice Cream and Sea J’s Cafe, where he stalks vampires (Spam Vs. the Vampire) and tries to rescue staff members from being turned into zombies (The Tour Bus of Doom). Scarborough originally wrote Spam Vs. the Vampire as a satirical answer to the popular Twilight books. “I was telling the girls at

Sea J’s about the zombie book I was writing, and they all wanted to be zombies, so they are,” Scarborough said. Both Elevated and Sea J’s are carrying The Tour Bus of Doom this summer and have sold out of the first batch. The third story in the Spam series is Father Christmas, Spam’s first Christmas.

Benefit sales All proceeds from Father Christmas, both paper copies and e-books, are being donated to the Jefferson County Humane Society shelter. Paper copies of the books will be available for sale at the event. All three stories are family-friendly, suitable for both adults and older kids. Scarborough won the Nebula Award for The Healer’s War, published in 1989. Her website is at www. eascarborough.com. For more information about the Port Townsend Gallery Walk, see Peninsula Spotlight in today’s Peninsula Daily News.

Forum-theater performance set for tonight in PT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Mandala Center for Change will present “Waging Peace — Designing Justice,” a public forum-theater performance and community dialogue, at 7 p.m. tonight. The combination of theater and community forum, which will be at the Masonic Center, 1338 Jefferson St., is the culmination of a weeklong intensive workshop on Theater of the Oppressed techniques.

Audience participation It is created and performed by the participants, including several members of the Mandala Center’s local Poetic Justice Theatre Ensemble. Admission is free, with donations benefiting the Boiler Room, Port Townsend’s coffee house and community center

for youths. Nearly 40 people, from teens to elders — and from across the United States and as far away as Montreal and Taiwan — are expected to participate. Under the guidance of facilitator Marc Weinblatt, the audience will choose from several pre-scripted short plays depicting social issues relevant to the community. The selected plays will be performed a second time, and the audience will be invited to stop the action and improvise solutions to the problems at hand. Themes from past year’s performances have included racism, sexism, homophobia, globalization, the education system, health care, disability and war. For more information, phone 360-344-3435 or email info@mandalafor change.com.

Events: Concert CONTINUED FROM B1 Genealogy group

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Relay For Life teams are throwing a big party today and Saturday to continue raising money for cancer research. The Forks Relay For Life will begin at 3 p.m. today with a “soft start” when walkers begin laps around the Forks High School track and will continue nonstop until noon Saturday. “It’s like a party weekend because everyone comes out,” said Chairwoman Cindy Mesenbrink. Forks High School is at 261 Spartan Ave., but the track is most easily reached via Elderberry Street, said Diane Edwards, a fellow organizer of the Forks event.

Music, games, food There, visitors will find music, games, Zumba and food such as carne asada, burgers, hot dogs, sno-cones, homemade goodies and hot chocolate. “It’s a good place to eat,” Mesenbrink said. “Come for dinner. Stay for the entertainment. Stay the night,” she added. In keeping with this year’s theme, “Pirates of the Cure-ibeen . . . Digging for a Cure,” a “pirate walk” around town, is planned to begin from the track at 4 p.m. today before the official opening ceremony and Survivor Victory Lap at 6 p.m. A scavenger hunt and pirate ship races and games also are planned. There will be live music — with Chuck DeOng, Crescent Blue, Dave Gedlund and Zane Johnson and his band — interspersed with music from DJ Camello of Forks. The luminaria ceremony will be at 10 tonight. Candles in some 500 paper bags will be lit in dedication to

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DeOng. ■ 10 p.m.: Luminaria ceremony. ■ 11 p.m.: Night games. ■ Midnight: Zumba. ■ 1 a.m.: Pajama and stuffed animal lap; karaoke.

Here is the schedule for the Forks Relay For Life, which starts today and ends at noon Saturday.

Today ■ 3 p.m.: Soft start. ■ 4 p.m.: Chuck DeOng performs; pirate parade through town. ■ 5 p.m.: Crescent Blue performs. ■ 6 p.m.: Opening ceremony; Survivor Victory Lap; sponsor recognition. ■ 6:30 p.m.: Dave Gedlund rock band performs. ■ 7:30 p.m.: Zane Johnson and band performs. ■ 8:30 p.m.: Games. ■ 9 p.m.: Chuck

Saturday ■ 6 a.m.: Wakeup. ■ 7 a.m.: Zumba. ■ 8 a.m.: Hula hoop contest. ■ 9 a.m.: Pirate ship races, games. ■ 10 a.m.: Fight Back by Forks High School cheerleaders. ■ 10:30 a.m.: SideShooter performs. ■ 11 a.m.: Drawing; award winners. ■ 11:30: Closing ceremony; awards. ■ Noon: Last lap.

loved ones, either those who have survived cancer or those who lost the battle. Night games and midnight Zumba will follow. “Because cancer doesn’t sleep, neither do the walkers,” Edwards said. “Teams will continue to walk the track all night guided by the light of the luminarias.”

Biscuits and gravy

The Forks Relay For Life fundraising teams already have reached more than half of their goal of $40,000. By Wednesday, 11 teams with a total of 111 participants had raised $22,989.55 for cancer research. Last year, the Forks relay raised $53,980, said Katelynn Rushing, community

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At daylight Saturday, festivities begin again with biscuits and gravy and more entertainment before the closing ceremony at 11:30 a.m. and the last lap at noon.

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relationship manager for the American Cancer Society, which receives all proceeds from Relay For Life events. “What’s great about Forks is the entire community gets involved,” said Rushing, who is based in Everett. “Every store supports it, and the whole town is filled with relay,” she added. “It’s fun to see a small town come together and make a huge difference.” “The sponsorship in Forks is one of the largest on the [North Olympic] Peninsula,” Rushing said, adding that the Quileute tribe and “pretty much every single business” sponsor the event. The Forks Relay For Life has 34 sponsors, Mesenbrink said. Mesenbrink said that’s just the way Forks people are. “Everything is like that in Forks: People come out and give support. They have generous hearts.” The Port Angeles Relay For Life was June 7-8. The Relay For Life of Jefferson County was July 27-28. The Relay For Life of Sequim will be from 3 p.m. to noon Aug. 9-10 at Sequim High School, 601 N. Sequim Ave. For information, contact Marie Meyers at mmeyers8@gmail.com or 360-461-6822.

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SEQUIM — Faith Lutheran Church, 382 W. Cedar St., will host a rummage and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. The sale has been an annual tradition for the church for more than 40 years. Proceeds are used to support church missions.

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SEQUIM — The Olympic Express Big Band will perform swing, standards and Dixieland from 6 to 8 tonight. Admission is free to the show, part of the North Olympic Library System’s Summertime Music Outdoors series. The concerts will continue each Friday night through Aug. 23 behind the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., using bleachers and an outdoor stage funded by the Friends of Sequim Library. Bring a blanket or lawn chairs for additional seating.

SEQUIM — Computer Genealogy Users Group member Jim Martin will present “Missouri Genealogy” during a group meeting at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. today. Martin has spent 30 years tracing his family ancestry. The meeting is free and open to all.

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Walkers with the Forks Relay For Life march toward the junction of East Division Street and Forks Avenue in downtown Forks in 2011.

Butter up a “farmer’s dozen”


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PeninsulaNorthwest

Go play in the mud Run A Muck challenge set for Saturday BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Billed as the “wildest mud dash on the Olympic Peninsula,” the Run A Muck Obstacle Course Challenge returns to Port Angeles this weekend. The down-and-dirty revelry gets under way at 9 a.m. Saturday as the first wave of weekend warriors plunge into the muddy 5-kilometer course at the Extreme Sports Park, 2917 W. Edgewood Drive. Gates for the second annual all-day event open at 8 a.m. Tickets to participate are $50 today and $60 Saturday. A $10 discount is offered to active military and students. “Every 20 minutes, we’ll let out a new group of runners,” said Kelie Morrison, event organizer and Extreme Sports Park coowner. “There are 50 to 100 people in each group.”

Lots of obstacles The mud runners will encounter more than two dozen obstacles along the way, including muddy bogs, tunnels, balance beams, concrete pillars, haybales, large tires and a 90-footlong water slide. “We always add a couple of surprises,” Morrison added. While the Run A Muck is not a chip-timed event, a digital clock will be positioned near the finish line for those who want to compete against their friends. “There’s going to be business-to-business challenges,” Morrison said. Each participant will

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Mark Dunaway, left, and Tiffany McKellard, both of Port Angeles, emerge muddy from crawling through a bog covered with netting as they get ready for the finish line at last year’s Run A Muck. receive a “mucky” headband and medallion, along with a beverage and snack. Primitive showers and dressing rooms will be available for the mud runners. A disc jockey will perform at the Extreme Sports Park throughout the day, and a beer garden will be open throughout the event. Prizes will be awarded to the “muckiest” runners and to those who show up in the most creative costumes. Last year’s inaugural Run A Muck drew close to 500 participants and about 150 spectators. “This year, we expect another 100 to 200 people,” Morrison said. Morrison reported a “big surge” in registrations in recent days. “We’re on the phone all day long,” she said Wednesday. “There’s lots of last minute-ers.” Morrison said the Run A

Muck has quickly gained a reputation as being one of the top mud runs in Western Washington. “Everyone absolutely loved it,” she said of the feedback from last year’s challenge. “They couldn’t say enough good things about it.”

Tickets

their friends can purchase a $10 spectator pass. All passes come with a $5 discount for those who bring a specially marked Pepsi can. About 30,000 such cans were distributed on the Olympic and Kitsap peninsulas and throughout the Olympia area for the Run A Muck and the upcoming sprint boat races at the Extreme Sports Park. Video clips of last year’s Run A Muck challenge are available on the Extreme Sports Park website, www. extremesportspark.net. Next Saturday, Aug. 10, the Extreme Sports Park will host the first of two sprint boat racing events of the summer. The second race will be the national finals Sept. 7.

Tickets are sold today at the Port Angeles locations of First Street Chiropractic Center, 1217 E. First St.; Lincoln Street Station Shipping, 403 S. Lincoln St.; Pen Print Inc., 230 E. First St.; RoundUp Alatte Espresso, 3231 E. U.S. Highway 101; and Sunset Do it Best Hardware, 518 Marine Drive, as well as Dog House Powder Coating, 503-C S. Third Ave. in Sequim. ________ Event-day tickets will be sold at the Extreme Sports Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be Park. reached at 360-452-2345, ext. Those who would prefer 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula to stay dry and cheer on dailynews.com.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Music CONTINUED FROM B3 books and more. Proceeds will benefit the For more information, center’s nonprofit operaphone Karen Niemi at 360- tions, with 10 percent going 683-9193 or email Jim Mar- to the center’s scholarship tin at jimartin@olympus.net. fund for Sequim High School seniors. Rendezvous of the Arts Last year’s sale raised more than $26,000. SEQUIM — The Port For more information, Angeles Symphony offers phone 360-683-6806. its first Rendezvous of the Arts — with live music and Ice-cream social 22 painters, sculptors and SEQUIM — A “Sweet ceramists — on Saturday. The gathering will be at Fun” ice-cream social will Lost Mountain Lodge, 303 be held at Sequim SeventhSunny View Lane, with two day Adventist Church, 30 seatings: at noon and at 2 p.m. Sanford Lane, at 6 p.m. Tickets are $25, includ- Sunday. ing gourmet hors d’oeuvres. The event will include Proceeds will benefit the items for the lactose-intolPort Angeles Symphony; a erant. portion of art sales will go For more information, to the organization. phone 360-683-7373. Participants include silk artist Karen Sistek of Port Sunday music series Angeles, porcelain artist SEQUIM — McComb Greg Felando, ceramist Steve Nylander, silversmith Ed Gardens, 751 McComb Road, Crumley, painter Lynne invites members of the pubArmstrong and Roberta Coo- lic to Music@McComb, a conper, who works with gourds. cert series featuring blueMembers of the sym- grass and country music phony orchestra will play performances on four conmusic throughout the event. secutive Sundays. The Old Sidekicks band For tickets, phone the symphony office at 360-457- will play from 1 p.m. to 5579 or Lost Mountain 3 p.m. in the shade garden. On Aug. 11, banjo player Lodge at 360-683-5524. Information about the Danny Barnes and mandoorchestra and its activities linist Matt Sircely will be can be found at www. featured performers. Music@McComb events PortAngelesSymphony.org. are free and open to the public. For more informaSenior center sale tion, visit www.mccomb SEQUIM — The public gardens.com. portion of the Sequim Senior Activity Center’s Port Angeles eighth annual benefit sale will be held in Suites E-104 and E-105 in the QFC shopping center, 990 E. Wash- Adventure Talk tonight ington St., from 9 a.m. to PORT ANGELES — Pat 3 p.m. today and Saturday. Neal, fishing guide and PenOrganizers said the sale insula Daily News columwill have 8,000 square feet nist, will discuss “Yearof bargains on furniture, round Fishing on the Olymclothing, household and pic Peninsula” at the Basekitchen goods, plants, bake camp Adventure Talk series sale and craft items, art- at the Red Lion Hotel from work, tools, shoes, baskets, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. tonight. toys, DVDs, office supplies, collectibles, a whole room of TURN TO EVENTS/B10

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 2-3, 2013 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

King of kings caught in Sekiu

Saltwater reports “The big story right now is the salmon fishing on the salt water,” Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and More (360-683-1950) in Sequim said. Menkal said that anglers are catching a lot of chinook near Port Angeles, despite having to contend with the loitering fog. Most anglers are targeting hatchery chinook, but some coho and pinks also are being taken. John Albiso of the Coastal Conservation Association’s North Olympic Peninsula Chapter said timing is the key at Freshwater Bay. “Fishing seems to be good at Freshwater Bay, but you need to get there early to avoid having top park in the overflow,” Albiso said. “Kings and pinks and few silvers all being caught.” Sekiu (Marine Area 5) remains the best option for all three salmon species. The catch numbers for pinks off Sekiu have increased recently — likewise for Port Angeles — but it’s likely the big invasion hasn’t happened yet. Probably. “Some years, they dribble in, other years they come through in one big run,” Menkal said. Ward Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist, said the big run of pinks should happen in the next few weeks. “More humpies are showing up every day, but the best is yet to come,” Norden said. “The main run of humpies never arrives before Aug. 8, and peaks on South Whidbey about Sept. 1.” ■ Port Townsend: Kings are still doing well Admiralty Inlet, especially near Midchannel Bank. “[Marine] Area 9 remains excellent for kings,” Norden said. Unfortunately, as I wrote about in Thursday’s column, the chinook limit has been decreased to one per day in Area 9. Menkal said the beach fishing also is picking up, especially for silvers and pinks. ■ Neah Bay: The wind has stopped blowing, so the fishing is great on the northern coast, according to Joey Lawrence of Big Salmon Resort (360-645-2374) in Neah Bay. “The fishing is great; the weather if finally cooperating,” Lawrence said. “The water is just like a lake. The fishermen deserve it; they’ve had to wait a while for good conditions.” Lawrence said kings, coho and pinks are being caught. The latter two are doing best on the Strait of Juan de Fuca portion of Marine Area 4. “There are lots of silvers and humpies,” Lawrence said. TURN

TO

HORTON/B7

Cal Poly assistant hired as men’s hoops coach PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Pirates have a new leader. Peninsula College has hired Mitch Freeman, an assistant coach at California State Polytechnic University in San Luis Obispo, as its men’s basketball coach, following the departure of Lance Von Vogt, who starts his new job as head coach at William Jessup University in Rocklin, Calif., next week. Freeman becomes the fifth head men’s basketball coach in the program was revived in 1997.

“I am fortunate for this incredible opportunity to serve as head coach at Peninsula College,” Freeman said in a release. Freeman, a Northwest native, has spent eight years as a member of head coach Joe Callero’s staff. He worked under Callero at Seattle University from 20052009, and then followed his mentor to Cal Poly, where he served as the lead scout in charge of game preparation and defense. As a recruiter with the Mustangs, his primary region was

Wa s h i n g ton, Oregon and California, which serve him well at Peninsula, as all three states are fall within t h e NWAACC’s Freeman permitted recruiting area. “We are thrilled to welcome Mitch to Peninsula,” said Jack Huls, Peninsula’s vice president of student services who chaired the hiring committee. “Mitch rose to the top in a very competitive pool, and we are fortunate to land a coach who will continue the established tradition at Peninsula

College of developing studentathletes that will be good students, good citizens, and compete for NWAACC championships.” Freeman not only worked under Collero, a former NWAACC championship coach at Highline Community College, at Cal Poly, but he also was on staff with Mark Amaral for two years before Amaral took the associate head coaching job at Pepperdine in 2011. Amaral was Peninsula College’s head men’s basketball coach in 1997 when the college resurrected the program that had been dropped in 1981. Amaral coached the Pirates for three seasons before to taking an assistant coaching position at UC-Santa Barbara. TURN

TO

PIRATES/B7

Injuries aside, Hawks look good Offense steps up in practice BY DAVE BOLING MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

RENTON – The Seattle Seahawks: Spanning the globe to bring you the constant variety of . . . treatments. Percy Harvin is in New York preparing for surgery by hip specialist Dr. Bryan Kelly, who happens to be a team doctor for the New York Giants. (Couldn’t they find a hip guy who didn’t work for an NFC opponent?) Sidney Rice reportedly is in Switzerland getting a bloodinjection treatment that isn’t yet FDA approved in the United States. (Not sure what will happen when a linebacker wants to go to Haiti to see the lady who fixes anterior cruciate ligaments with herbs and animal sacrifices). And tight end Zach Miller is still nursing a foot injury in a somewhat old-fashioned and mundane manner, on the sideline at the team headquarters. Those three, the Seahawks’ big-ticket acquisitions in recent seasons, occupy roughly $26 million of the team’s salary cap this season. And how much they will

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson runs the ball during a scrimmage Seattle’s training camp in Renton this week. contribute depends on recovery times. Harvin might be back late in the season; Rice could be good to go as soon as he clears customs, and Miller is mostly in wait-and-see mode since there’s no hurry to rush him back in

the exhibition season. Funny thing happened in their collective absence, though: The offense had perhaps its best day against a defense that has dominated almost every team session since the start of training camp.

Receiver Golden Tate had his usual array of acrobatic catches, but rookie Chris Harper also had two against perhaps the best secondary in the NFL. TURN

TO

HAWKS/B6

Wilder bats produce another win Area elite team’s title defense is off to a 2-0 start PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. — Wilder Baseball’s regional championship defense is off to a 2-0 start after the North Olympic Peninsula elite team defeated Centerfield 12-8. Wilder pounded out 17 hits in the win. “We hit .342 on the day as a team,” Wilder coach Chad Wagner said. “We needed this game, and I

Baseball was proud of my kids for not just giving up.” Wilder led 5-0 before Centerfield, the South Washington representative in the 16-18 Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament, scored five runs in the fourth inning to chase Wilder starter Jordan Shepherd. Wilder (22-8) jumped back ahead with six runs in the sixth inning before adding two runs in the seventh. Marcus Konopaski was a perfect 5 for 5 at the plate for Wilder, with five RBI and one run scored.

Kyle Kelly went 4 for 5, with two runs and two RBI. Brady Konopaski had two hits, two walks, scored three runs and drove in a run. Kevin Herzog scored three runs and stole to bases. Michael Konopaski earned the win, allowing four hits and just one run in 2 2/3 innings of relief.

Close to semis A win over Latah County (Id.) would give Wilder a 3-0 record in National Division play, and all but assure Wilder a spot in the semifinal round. The top two teams from each division, National and Ameri-

can, make it to Saturday’s semifinals. “We win [against Latah County], and we automatically make it to the weekend,” Wagner said. “Take care of business . . . and we can sit back and scout out who we will be seeing on Saturday.” In the semifinals, the top team from each division will play the second-ranked team from the other division. The winners of those two games will face off in the regional championship game. The regional champ will travel to the Babe Ruth World Series in Covington County, Ala., in mid-August.

Ibanez’s bat cooling off after hot streak Vet hasn’t homered since before break BY GREG JOHNS MLB.COM

BOSTON — After a torrid stretch during which he hit 15 home runs in 35 games in June and early July, Raul Ibanez has cooled considerably. The 41-year-old Mariners left fielder didn’t have a home run in his last 13 games going into Thursday’s contest against the Red Sox. He’d gone 11 straight games without an RBI since the AllStar break, hitting .135 (5-for35) in that span as his batting average dipped to .252. Ibanez still has 24 home

runs, but he’s been stuck on that number since hitting a pair on July 12. A c t i n g Next Game m a n a g e r Today R o b b y vs. Orioles Thompson at Baltimore acknowledged the Time: 4 p.m. club needs On TV: ROOT to be careful with the veteran’s playing time if he’s wearing down. “Sure, you have to worry about that,” Thompson said. “He’s 41 years old. You can’t forget about that.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle’s Raul Ibanez tosses his batting helmet after striking out against the Minnesota Twins. “But the stretch he went “He’s in great shape, he’s going to play every day, he’s not through doesn’t last forever. “That was a heck of a stretch going to say he’s tired. he was on. “It’s our responsibility to pick spots. TURN TO M’S/B7

SPORTS/BUSINESS

SOME GUYS SEEM to have all the luck. A prime example: Fred Lee Dockendorf of Horton Stanwood caught a 35-pound king in Marine Area 5 earlier this week, reports Jim Bartz of Curley’s Resort (800-542-9680) in Sekiu. That’s the biggest king I’ve heard about so far this year. Dockendorf is no stranger to reeling in big salmon. In Aug. 2001, he caught a 25.26pound chum salmon, which is still listed by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife as the state record for the biggest chum. Dockendorf’s catch this week might be the North Olympic Peninsula’s largest chinook for 2013, but it doesn’t come close to the state record. In fact, it’s only half as big as the 70.5-pound king that Chet Guasta caught near Sekiu in Sept. 1964.

Pirates pick Freeman


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

Today’s Today Baseball: Wilder vs. Buffaloes (Wyoming) at 16-18 Senior Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament in Klamath Falls, Ore., 9 a.m.

Saturday Baseball: 16-18 Senior Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament in Klamath Falls, Ore.: American Division No. 1 vs. North Division No. 2, TBA; National Division No. 1 vs. American Division No. 2, TBA.

Sunday Baseball: 16-18 Senior Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament Championship Game, winner to Babe Ruth World Series, Klamath Falls, Ore., TBA.

Area Sports Baseball 16-18 Senior Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament Klamath Falls, Ore. Tuesday Calgary (Alberta) 2, Siskiyou Jaxx (Ore.) 0 Buffaloes (Wyo.) 3, Latah County (Id.) 2 Wilder 6, Brookings Mavericks (Ore.) 2 Missoula (Mont.) 11, Siskiyou Jaxx (Ore.) 1 Klamath Falls (Ore.) 8, Columbia Basin River Dogs (Wash.) 5 Wednesday Wilder 12, Centerfield (Wash.) 8 Columbia Basin River Dogs (Wash.) 11, Missoula (Mont.) 0 Buffaloes (Wyo.) 4, Brookings Mavericks (Ore.) 3 Centerfield (Wash.) 14, Latah County (Id.) 2 Klamath Falls (Ore.), Siskiyou Jaxx (Ore.) 0 Thursday Missoula (Mont.) vs. Calgary (Alberta), late. Brookings Mavericks (Ore.) vs. Centerfield (Wash.), late. Columbia Basin River Dogs (Wash.) vs. Siskiyou Jaxx (Ore.), late. Latah County (Id.) vs. Wilder, late. Klamath Falls (Ore.) vs. Missoula (Mont.), late. Today Buffaloes (Wyo.) vs. Wilder, 9 a.m. Calgary (Alberta) vs. Columbia Basin River Dogs (Wash.), 11:30 a.m. Brookings Mavericks (Ore.) vs. Latah County (Id.), 2 p.m. Klamath Falls (Ore.) vs. Calgary (Alberta), 4:30 p.m. Centerfield (Wash.) vs. Buffaloes (Wyo.), 7 p.m. Saturday Semifinals American Division No. 1 vs. National Division No. 2, TBA. National Division No. 1 vs. American Division No. 2, TBA. Sunday Championship Game American Division No. 1/National Division No. 2 winner vs. National Division No. 1/American Division No. 2, TBA.

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Softball Port Angeles Adult Coed League Wednesday Gold Division Smuggler’s Landing 16, Koastalz 6 PA Hardwoods 8, Koastalz 2 Shirley’s Cafe 13, Smuggler’s Landing 6 PA Hardwoods 3, Shirley’s Cafe 11

Baseball Red Sox 5, Mariners 4 (15 innings) Wednesday’s Game Boston ab r hbi ab r hbi BMiller ss 5 2 2 0 Ellsury cf 6110 Frnkln 2b 7 0 0 0 Victorn rf 6120 Seager 3b 6 1 3 2 Pedroia 2b 6 2 2 3 KMorls dh 4 0 3 1 D.Ortiz dh 7010 Ryan pr-dh 2 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 5000 Ibanez lf 7 0 2 1 Sltlmch c 7020 Morse 1b 5 0 0 0 Carp lf 3000 EnChvz pr-rf 2 0 1 0 Nava lf 2000 MSndrs rf-cf 7 0 2 0 JGoms ph-lf 0 0 0 0 Ackley cf-1b 6 0 1 0 Drew ss 6021 Quinter c 6 1 2 0 Holt 3b 5110 BSnydr ph-3b 1 0 1 0 Totals 57 416 4 Totals 54 512 4 Seattle

Seattle 000 102 010 000 000—4 Boston 000 020 200 000 001—5 Two outs when winning run scored. E—Ackley (1), Franklin (8). DP—Seattle 3, Boston 3. LOB—Seattle 12, Boston 13. 2B— Seager (27), M.Saunders (14), Holt (1), B.Snyder (3). HR—Seager (17), Pedroia (8). SB—B. Miller (3). S—Ellsbury. SF—K.Morales. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Iwakuma 5 2 /3 7 2 0 2 4 1 O.Perez BS,1-3 /3 3 2 2 0 1 Medina 2 0 0 0 0 2 Furbush 1 0 0 0 1 2 Farquhar 3 0 0 0 0 4 2 Luetge L,0-2 2 /3 2 1 1 4 1 Boston Lackey 7 8 3 3 1 6 Tazawa BS,5-5 1 2 1 1 0 1 Uehara 2 0 0 0 0 3 Thornton 1 2 0 0 0 0 Breslow 2 1 0 0 2 0 D.Britton W,1-0 2 3 0 0 0 2 O.Perez pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. WP—Luetge, Breslow. Umpires—Home, Gary Darling; First, David Rackley; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Chris Conroy. T—5:03. A—35,059 (37,499).

American League West Division W L Oakland 63 45 Texas 59 49 Seattle 50 57 Los Angeles 48 58 Houston 36 70 Central Division W L Detroit 61 45 Cleveland 59 48 Kansas City 53 51 Minnesota 45 59 Chicago 40 65 East Division W L Boston 65 44 Tampa Bay 64 44 Baltimore 59 49 New York 56 51 Toronto 50 57

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Pct GB .583 — .546 4 .467 12½ .453 14 .340 26 Pct GB .575 — .551 2½ .510 7 .433 15 .381 20½ Pct GB .596 — .593 ½ .546 5½ .523 8 .467 14

Wednesday’s Games Detroit 11, Washington 1 Toronto 5, Oakland 2, 10 innings Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 5, 10 innings Houston 11, Baltimore 0 Arizona 7, Tampa Bay 0 Boston 5, Seattle 4, 15 innings Texas 2, L.A. Angels 1 Kansas City 4, Minnesota 3 N.Y. Yankees 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 Thursday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, late. Kansas City at Minnesota, late. Arizona at Texas, late. Houston at Baltimore, late. Seattle at Boston, late. Toronto at L.A. Angels, late. Today’s Games Seattle (Harang 5-9) at Baltimore (Tillman 13-3), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 3-6) at Detroit (Fister 9-5), 4:08 p.m. Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Boston (Lester 10-6), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (U.Jimenez 8-5) at Miami (Fernandez 7-5), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (W.Davis 5-9) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-8), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-6) at Tampa Bay (Archer 6-3), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 5-5) at Minnesota (Deduno 7-4), 5:10 p.m. Texas (Ogando 4-3) at Oakland (Milone 9-8), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Redmond 1-1) at L.A. Angels (Hanson 4-2), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 9-9) at San Diego (Cashner 7-5), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. Texas at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 4:08 p.m. Arizona at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 5:40 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 5:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 10:08 a.m. Cleveland at Miami, 10:10 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. Arizona at Boston, 10:35 a.m. Seattle at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m.

San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m. Houston at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 1:10 p.m.

Pct .538 .514 .468 .459 .443

GB — 2½ 7½ 8½ 10

Pct GB .607 — .585 2½ .550 6 .458 16 .426 19½ Pct GB .583 — .481 11 .467 12½ .457 13½ .387 21

Wednesday’s Games Detroit 11, Washington 1 Cincinnati 4, San Diego 1 San Francisco 9, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 4 Arizona 7, Tampa Bay 0 Atlanta 9, Colorado 0 Miami 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Chicago Cubs 6, Milwaukee 1 N.Y. Yankees 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 Thursday’s Games N.Y. Mets at Miami, late. Arizona at Texas, late. San Francisco at Philadelphia, late. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, late. Colorado at Atlanta, late. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, late. Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 9-3) at Chicago Cubs (T. Wood 7-7), 1:05 p.m. Atlanta (Medlen 7-10) at Philadelphia (E. Martin 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Chacin 9-5) at Pittsburgh (Cole 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Boston (Lester 10-6), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (U.Jimenez 8-5) at Miami (Fernandez 7-5), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (W.Davis 5-9) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-8), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-6) at Tampa Bay (Archer 6-3), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (S.Miller 10-7) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 9-8), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 12-6) at Milwaukee (Gorzelanny 2-4), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 9-9) at San Diego (Cashner 7-5), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 5:40 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cleveland at Miami, 10:10 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m. Arizona at Boston, 10:35 a.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 1:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m.

Football NFL Preseason NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0 Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0 St. Louis 0 0 0 .000 0 East W L T Pct PF Dallas 0 0 0 .000 0 N.Y. Giants 0 0 0 .000 0 Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0 Washington 0 0 0 .000 0

South L T Pct PF 0 0 .000 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 .000 0 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Denver 0 0 0 .000 0 Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 East W L T Pct PF Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 0 Miami 0 0 0 .000 0 New England 0 0 0 .000 0 N.Y. Jets 0 0 0 .000 0 South W L T Pct PF Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0 Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 0 Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 0 0 0 .000 0 Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0 Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0 Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0 W Atlanta 0 Carolina 0 New Orleans 0 Tampa Bay 0

National League West Division W L Los Angeles 57 49 Arizona 55 52 Colorado 51 58 San Diego 50 59 San Francisco 47 59 Central Division W L Pittsburgh 65 42 St. Louis 62 44 Cincinnati 60 49 Chicago 49 58 Milwaukee 46 62 East Division W L Atlanta 63 45 Washington 52 56 Philadelphia 50 57 New York 48 57 Miami 41 65

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0

PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0 PA 0 0 0 0

Sunday’s Game Miami vs. Dallas at Canton, 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 8 Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Tennessee, 5 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Denver at San Francisco, 6 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9 N.Y. Jets at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Miami at Jacksonville, 4:30 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Kansas City at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Arizona at Green Bay, 5 p.m. Chicago at Carolina, 5 p.m. Dallas at Oakland, 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10 N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 11 Buffalo at Indianapolis, 10:30 a.m.

Transactions Football National Football League NFL—Suspended Minnesota OT DeMarcus Love first four games of the 2013 regular season for violating the NFL policy on performance enhancing substances. ATLANTA FALCONS—Signed CB Jordan Mabin. Waived CB Saeed Lee. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Released OL Geoff Hangartner. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Acquired OT Jason Weaver off waivers from Tampa Bay. Signed WR Jheranie Boyd. DALLAS COWBOYS—Released DE Cameron Sheffield and CB Devin Smith. Signed G Jeff Olson and OT James Nelson. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Waived G Robert Griffin and LB Scott Lutrus. Signed G Danous Estenor and C Thomas Austin. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed CB Kamaal McIlwain and OT Mike Tepper. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed DL Travis Chappelear, WR Johnathan Haggerty, WR Lavasier Tuinei and DL Scott Vallone. Released DB Stephon Morris. NEW YORK GIANTS—Placed WR Jeremy Horne on the waived-injured list. Signed WR Julian Talley. NEW YORK JETS—Activated S Rontez Miles from the PUP list. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Waived RB Ray Holley. Waived/injured WR Greg Herd. Claimed WR Perez Ashford off waivers from New England. Signed TE Andrei Lintz. Canadian Football League MONTREAL ALOUETTES—Fired coach Dan Hawkins. Announced general manager Jim Popp will take over coach. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Signed DB David James to the practice roster.

Soccer Major League Soccer SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC—Agreed to terms with MF Shalrie Joseph.

Hawks: Overcoming loss of Harvin CONTINUED FROM B1 touted his rare talents, but stressed that “we’re not going to change a lot of stuff, we’re just One was a leaping grab going to add him in . . . to combetween Richard Sherman and plement the guys we already Earl Thomas, and the other was have.” up the sideline against Brandon So, what’s going on in the Browner. minds of those still suiting up And one time, on a broken play, quarterback Russell Wilson every day, the guys in the locker room? scrambled a bit and smoked a It was time to consult one of ballistic marvel about 70 yards to the Seahawks’ most reliable tight end Sean McGrath. This voices of reason and veteran was not one of those lofted rainbows, this thing had a low trajec- leadership – fullback Michael Robinson. tory and left a vapor trail. “The luxury we have is that Granted, Harvin’s hip has to we weren’t getting Percy to be disappoint fans eager to see one the puzzle, just to be a piece of of the game’s best breakaway threats. The guy is a playmaking the puzzle,” Robinson said. “We came close to our goal game-changer. So, too, is this an obvious con- last year without Percy. “It’s all about competition. cern to a team that traded three When guys see opportunity, they picks including a first-rounder, and guaranteed Harvin $25 mil- want to capitalize, and I think we have more than enough playlion. makers around here.” On the day Harvin was brought in, coach Pete Carroll The Seahawks are a team

that wins with defense and a strong rushing attack. They threw the ball fewer times than anybody in the NFL. Robinson doubted that was going to change much no matter who they brought in as receiver. “Our identity is still there,” he said, adding that not only is the offensive line better this season, but “our quarterback is better at getting it to the right places now. Some people forget he was a rookie last year.” We fairly questioned back in March how Harvin would fit in the locker room, which can be a place of delicate chemistry. His reputation as a highmaintenance guy whose attitude needed massaging was not something that scared off the Seahawks, who have been successful in getting newcomers with sundry baggage to buy in to Carroll’s theme of unity through competition and shared aspiration.

In the wake of his injury, Carroll and general manager John Schneider have both said they want what’s best for Harvin’s health. But will Harvin be satisfied with the Seahawks’ reaction to his surgery, which was decided upon after he sought a second opinion? And will this eventually require an attitude rehabilitation as well as the physical rehab? In Robinson’s mind, the team can’t really miss somebody it’s never had. “Every year I’ve been in the league, there’s been something that’s happened; you’re always going to have challenges,” Robinson said. “It’s all about who can put those distractions aside, capitalize on the opportunities and go to work every day, focusing on one play at a time, one day at a time, one game at a time.” And one surgery at a time.

6 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Golf LPGA, British Open, Site: St. Andrews Royal & Ancient Golf Club Fife - Scotland 7 a.m. (47) GOLF Web. com, Mylan Classic, Site: Southpointe Golf Club - Canonsburg, Pa. 9 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, 3M Championship, Site: TPC Twin Cities Blaine, Minn. 11 a.m. (47) GOLF WGC, Bridgestone Invitational, Site: Firestone Country Club Akron, Ohio 1 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ATP, Citi Open, Site: William H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Center - Washington, D.C. 1 p.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Chicago Cubs, Site: Wrigley Field - Chicago 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Reno-Tahoe Open, Site: Montreux Golf and Country Club - Reno, Nev. 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ATP, Citi Open, Site: William H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Center - Washington, D.C. 4 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Baltimore Orioles, Site: Camden Yards - Baltimore 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Boxing, Friday Night Fights, Fortuna vs. Franco, Site: Buffalo Run Casino - Miami, Okla. 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis WTA, Mercury Insurance Open, Site: La Costa Resort & Spa - San Diego

Saturday 7 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Golf LPGA, British Open, Site: St. Andrews Royal & Ancient Golf Club Fife - Scotland 9 a.m. (47) GOLF WGC, Bridgestone Invitational, Site: Firestone Country Club Akron, Ohio 10 a.m. (5) KING Swimming FINA, World Championship - Barcelona, Spain 11 a.m. (7) KIRO Golf PGA, Bridgestone Invitational, Site: Firestone Country Club - Akron, Ohio 11 a.m. (47) GOLF Web.com, Mylan Classic, Site: Southpointe Golf Club Canonsburg, Pa. Noon (5) KING Motocross AMA, Amateur National Championship, Site: Loretta Lynn Ranch - Hurricane Mills, Tenn. Noon (27) ESPN2 Tennis ATP, Citi Open, Site: William H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Center - Washington, D.C. 12:30 p.m. (8) GBLBC Golf PGA, Bridgestone Invitational, Site: Firestone Country Club - Akron, Ohio 12:30 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, Texas Rangers vs. Oakland Athletics, Site: Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum - Oakland 1 p.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, 3M Championship, Site: TPC Twin Cities Blaine, Minn. 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis WTA, Mercury Insurance Open, Site: La Costa Resort & Spa - San Diego 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Reno-Tahoe Open, Site: Montreux Golf and Country Club - Reno, Nev. 4 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Baltimore Orioles, Site: Camden Yards - Baltimore 4 p.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Chicago White Sox vs. Detroit Tigers, Site: Comerica Park - Detroit 5 p.m. (13) KCPQ Soccer CONCACAF, TBA vs. Real Madrid, International Champions Cup, Site: Dodger Stadium - Los Angeles 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Auto Racing NASCAR, U.S. Cellular 250, Nationwide Series, Site: Iowa Speedway - Newton, Iowa 7:30 p.m. (5) KING Soccer MLS, Seattle Sounders FC vs. FC Dallas, Site: FC Dallas Stadium - Frisco, Texas 7:30 p.m. (10) CITY Soccer MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps vs. Portland Timbers, Site: Jeld-Wen Field - Portland 8 p.m. (25) ROOT Soccer MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps vs. Portland Timbers, Site: Jeld-Wen Field - Portland


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

B7

Horton: Crabbing still doing well in Sequim CONTINUED FROM B5 “Anglers are doing well fishing for them a couple miles east of Tatoosh Island, in 400 feet of water. “Kings are doing decent, particularly near Swiftsure Bank and Skagway Rock.

Port Angeles. “Sequim is the place to be for crabbing,” Menkal said. “I keep hearing bad things about Port Angeles. It doesn’t make sense, there is deeper water there.”

Skokomish salmon

River fishing class

The Skokomish River, from the mouth to the U.S. Highway 101 bridge, will open to recreational salmon fishing Saturday. Earlier this year, the state and Skokomish tribe were unable to reach agreement on the fishery during the annual salmon season-setting process, known as North of Falcon. The state announced last week that after several weeks of discussions, the two sides have come to an agreement. The hatchery chinook fishery on the Skokomish River from the U.S. Highway 106 bridge upstream will be open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays each

Menkal is teaching his two-part river salmon and steelhead fishing class on Tuesday, Aug. 6, and the following Tuesday, Aug. 13. Both sessions start at 6 p.m. and end at 8:30 p.m. The classes start with the basics of salmon and steelhead river fishing, and transitions into the intermediate-level knowledge. The cost for the class is $25. Bring a notepad, pen or pencil and a chair. Class attendance is limited to 20 participants. To reserve a spot or for more information, phone Menkal at 360-683-1950. The classes will be held at Brian’s Sporting Goods and More at 609 W.

CURLEY’S RESORT

Fred Dockendorf of Stanwood, center, shows off the 35-pound chinook he caught near Sekiu this week. week through Sunday, Aug. 25. Fishing is closed the other days to avoid gear conflicts, as well as limit impacts to wild chinook. Downstream from the U.S. Highway 106 bridge,

the fishery will be open seven days a week through Aug. 25. The daily limit is two hatchery kings, and anglers must keep the first two legal salmon they catch and stop fishing for

the day. Wild chinook and chum must be released.

Confusing crab The crab harvest is as it has been since it open July 1: Good in Sequim, bad in

Washington St. in Sequim.

CCA meeting The North Olympic Peninsula Chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association will meet Wednesday, Aug. 14, at 6:30 p.m. at the Sequim Library (630 N. Sequim Ave.). The topic of discussion will be bottomfish and halibut management and the local and state chapter activities.

Send photos, stories Have a photograph, a fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique? Send it to sports@peninsuladailynews.com or P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Pirates: New hoops coach a defensive guru CONTINUED FROM B5 He continues to be an influential Pirate supporter. “Mitch has been on staff with, and mentored by, some outstanding coaches including former P.C. coach Mark Amaral and current head coach Joe Callero,” Huls said. “Joe was the head coach at Highline Community College where I was also on staff in 1997-98 when [the Thunderbirds] won back-toback NWAACC championships, and went 62-3 over that two year period. “Mitch has learned from some of the very best, and we can’t wait to get up and running in the next few weeks.”

Recruit Pirates first Freeman said he will first attempt to recruit the players who were on Peninsula’s roster as freshmen last year, as well as those recruited by coach Von Vogt. He also is involved with student-athletes he was following in his recruiting efforts at Cal Poly.

“I am eager to connect with each player this week while getting to know them on a more personal level,” Freeman said. “I can’t express how excited I am to get started, and help build on the success that is Pirate basketball.” Freeman has a reputation of having a strong work ethic, strong values and a resume of success, having worked on highly regarded coaching staffs at Cal Poly and Seattle University. “Mitch is a great fit for us,” Peninsula College director of athletics Rick Ross said. “His roots are in the Northwest, he has the preparation and experience to win NWAACC championships, he has the values and ethics to do it the right way, and to produce a quality product that this college and this community can be proud of. “And more than all of that, he’s an outstanding human being, and one we are excited to bring into our Pirate family.” In addition to his role as

head men’s basketball coach, Freeman will serve as the college’s athletic development coordinator, in which he will be responsible for spearheading fund-raising efforts for athletic scholarships and managing the Pirate Athletic Association. Freeman admitted his new job will be bittersweet because he leaves behind a Cal Poly team to which he had become very attached. He met with the Mustang players earlier in the week to share the news.

Leaving mento “I am humbled and blessed to have worked for Coach Callero over the past eight years,” Freeman said. “Under his guidance, he has prepared me for this opportunity, and I am forever grateful.” “I also want to thank the current and former players here at Cal Poly,” Freeman continued. “They are the reason for the continued success of the program. A piece of my heart will always be with Cal Poly and the city of San Luis Obispo.”

During four-year his Callero said. stint at Cal Poly, Freeman “He’s one of the brightest helped construct one of the young coaches in the profestop defenses in NCAA Divi- sion.” sion I basketball.

Northwest roots Defensive background Under Freeman’s guidance during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons, Cal Poly twice ranked among the top 25 defensive programs in the nation. The Mustangs also led the Big West Conference in each of the previous three seasons in points allowed per game. Cal Poly’s defensive strength directly translated into historic on-court success. With Freeman on the bench, Cal Poly matched or exceeded its win total from the previous season each year — a feat not accomplished at Cal Poly for 41 years. Callero called Freeman “the heart and soul of the Mustang defense.” “His understanding of our philosophy has been key to our program’s improvement during the last four years,”

During his four years at Seattle University, Freeman helped the Redhawks to 75 victories, and aided the program to a successful transition to the Division I level. During Freeman’s final campaign in 2008-09, the Redhawks posted a 21-8 record that translated to the program’s highest single-season winning percentage in 45 seasons. Freeman began his coaching career in Washington, serving as an assistant for the boy’s varsity basketball team at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. His overall duties with the program included the improvement of guard play, coordinating off-season conditioning sessions, scouting the opposition and video editing. During his only season with the Tomahawks, Freeman helped the program reach the Washington state

district playoffs. A 2004 graduate of Washington State with a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology and an emphasis in health and fitness education, Freeman also served as a student assistant with the Cougars (1999-04). Under Dick Bennett, Freeman assisted with video exchange and other administrative duties. Freeman, who completed his master’s degree in education administration from Grand Canyon University in 2008, spent three years teaching in both the Seattle and Marysville school districts. “I want to personally thank President Dr. Luke Robins, Jack Hauls, Rick Ross and the entire search committee for placing their the confidence in me to head the Peninsula College basketball program,” Freeman said. “This will be a great move for my family, and I look forward to working and living in the beautiful city of Port Angeles.” Freeman and his wife Nicole have one son, Eli.

M’s: Morse will play first base CONTINUED FROM B5 ball around a little on him. “He’s a professional hit“After awhile, you don’t ter and he’ll make that see the ball as well for adjustment. whatever reason. If we all “But yes, we do have to knew that answer, nobody keep an eye on him. We’re would go into slumps and going into August and he’s everybody would be great 41 years old. And a good 41 hitters.” years old.”

‘A professional hitter’

Plan for Morse

Thompson has seen some positives in Ibanez’s last few games, and knows he’s constantly adjusting. “He had a couple good at-bats [the other] night,” Thompson said. “When you struggle a little, you start swinging out of the zone. “He’s done that a little with balls that were elevated or down in the dirt. “Guys knew what he’s going through and how he was swinging the bat. They’re going to move the

Michael Morse has played primarily outfield this year, with Justin Smoak and Kendrys Morales getting the bulk of time at first. But he’s played first base a lot in his career and will see time there sporadically going forward. “It’s taking it easy on the legs. And you’re looking at matchups,” Thompson said after sitting Smoak this week. “We’ve got to get [Morse] in there. In these six games

Wednesday in a Minor League deal for a player to be named or cash. Andino, 29, was playing for the Mariners’ Triple-A Tacoma club after being acquired from the Orioles last offseason for outfielder Trayvon Robinson. Andino was batting .229 with three home runs and 12 RBIs in 44 games for Tacoma after being outrighted by the Mariners on May 27. He began the season with Seattle and hit .184 in 29 games before being designated for assignment on May 24. Andino has eight seasons of Major League experience with the Marlins and Orioles. The 2002 second-round Andino dealt to Pirates draft pick started at second base for Baltimore for much Veteran infielder Robert of the 2011 and ‘12 seasons Andino was traded by the and is a career .232 hitter Mariners to the Pirates on in 468 games. [on the current road trip], we’re looking to get him in four of them. “I think that’s fair to him as far as with his leg and easing him back in. “We’ll see how he does tonight and how he comes out of it. He’ll move back around and play right field and maybe DH a little. “We’re going to have to juggle things a little bit, having him back. “We have other guys, too. Obviously, Smoaky is our best first baseman and probably one of the best in the league defensively. So we have to keep an eye on that and keep everybody fresh, yet keep them getting their at-bats.”

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 2-3, 2013 PAGE

B8

U.S. factories rebound; best growth in 2 years THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chevrolet Sonics move down the line at a General Motors assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich., in April 2012. second-half speed-up in U.S. industrial production,” said Jonathan Basile, an economist at Credit Suisse. Stronger growth at U.S. factories could aid a sluggish economy that has

S&P 500 index rose, led by banks and industrial stocks. There were several driving forces for the market’s advance. A jump in a key gauge of China business sentiment helped push up Asian markets overnight. Then the U.S. Labor Department reported that the number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dropped last week to the lowest since 2008, another positive sign for the U.S. jobs market. Earnings gains at several companies drove the market higher. The Associated Press

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registered tepid growth over the past three quarters. And it could provide crucial support to a job market that has begun to accelerate but has added mostly lower-paying service jobs. Businesses are placing more orders that are likely to be filled in the next few months.

Gains in new home sales Steady gains in new-home sales and construction are supporting strong growth in industries such as wood products, furniture, electrical equipment and appliances. Auto sales also are buoying growth in the production of metal parts and components. Auto companies reported solid sales gains for July on Thursday. Ford, Chrysler and Nissan each saw sales grow 11 percent compared with the same month a year ago. Bradley Holcomb, chair of the ISM’s survey committee, said production will likely fall back a bit after its big jump in July.

peninsuladailynews.com

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — The state Department of Ecology is launching an environmental review, unprecedented in scope, of a proposed coal-export terminal near Bellingham. The scope of the review will range from other Western states that would see increased numbers of coal trains to Asia, where coal combustion will create greenhouse gases. The state review of the proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal at Cherry Point is expected to take some two years to complete. It will be coordinated with more limited reviews conducted by Whatcom County and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The proposed terminal, which would export up to 48 million tons of coal a year to Asia, has emerged as one of the most controversial development proposals of recent decades. About 125,000 public comments were received by state, federal and local agencies during a 121-day period last fall and winter. Proponents praise the terminal, and a second one proposed for Longview, as important boosts to a

state economy heavily dependent on international trade. Opponents have decried the export of a carbon-rich fuel that contributes to climate change and the impact of increased train traffic in many communities. (In another development, opposition from the Lummi tribe could prevent the Corps of Engineers from approving a permit for the terminal; see article, Page A5 today.) The state review also includes an examination of impacts on human health in Washington, and cargo-ship impacts that stretch beyond Washington waters. Both opponents and proponents of the project agreed the scope of the review is unprecedented. Terminal opponents say that is a good thing. “The scope is a reflection of Northwest values — the depth and breadth of the scope is absolutely on target and appropriate given the impacts on our way of life,” said Cesia Kearns, campaign director for the Power Past Coal campaign. Terminal proponents say the state review is an overreach that could

If they relocate for a new job, the government will pay 90 percent of their moving expenses and provide an additional lumpsum relocation allowance of up to $1,250. The package of benefits was approved under the Trade Adjustment Assistance program, designed to assist U.S. workers who have lost their jobs as a result of overseas trade or outsourcing.

Gold and silver Gold futures for December delivery fell $1.80, or 0.1 percent, to settle at $1,311.20 an ounce on Thursday. Silver for September delivery fell a half-cent to end at $19.62 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News

scare off developers of future projects. “We are disappointed the state Department of Ecology has chosen to depart from the stringent, well-established process followed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,” said Courtney Wallace, a spokeswoman for BNSF Railway, which operates the trains that would carry coal from Montana and Wyoming. “This decision has the potential to alter the Northwest’s long and historic commitment to expanding trade, which today supports four in every 10 jobs in Washington state,” added Lauri Hennessey, a spokeswoman for the Alliance for Northwest Jobs & Exports. Josh Baldi, a Department of Ecology official, said Wednesday that the scope of this review does not signal that other projects will get similar treatment. State environmental reviews, he said, are decided on a case-by-case basis. Backers of the proposed Longview terminal say that’s the way it should be. Environmental review of that proposed terminal, at a site where an aluminum smelter once operated, is still months from getting under way.

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SEATTLE — Thanks to a federal program lined up by their unions, local workers laid off during the current dip in employment at Boeing Commercial Airplanes will enjoy a financial cushion that is much, much plumper than what the average unemployed state resident gets. The U.S. Department of Labor has approved Boeing workers — union or nonunion, production workers or engineers — laid off between April 2012 and June 2015 for a package of benefits that includes drawing unemployment pay for up to 2½ years, rather than the regular six months. The Labor Department ruling also means that if laid-off Boeing workers need to travel, say to California, for a job interview, the government will reimburse 90 percent of the costs.

State launches sweeping review of coal-export site

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Real-time stock quotations at

Extra help THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

S&P 500 crosses 1,700 points STOCKS ROSE ON Wall Street in New York on Thursday, sending the Standard & Poor’s 500 index above 1,700 points for the first time. The S&P 500, which investors follow as a gauge for the rest of the market, was up 17 points at midday, or 1 percent, at 1,702. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 121 points, or 0.8 percent, to 15,621. The Dow also is at a record high. The Nasdaq composite index rose 38 points, or 1 percent, to 3,665. All 10 industry sectors in the

Bank seeks school supply donations PORT ANGELES — School supplies can be donated to red wagons in all First Federal branches from this Monday through Monday, Aug. 26. Since bck-to-school time is around the corner, First Federal has joined the America’s Promise Alliance to ensure that students have the supplies they need, organizers said. Community members are encouraged to help fill the wagons with supplies, including paper, pencils, glue sticks, scissors, notebooks and backpacks.

Production rises with order surge WASHINGTON — U.S. factories revved up production, hired more workers and received a surge of new orders in July, helping them expand at the fastest pace in two years. The gains suggest manufacturing is rebounding and could provide a spark to economic growth. The Institute for Supply Management said Thursday that its index of factory activity jumped to 55.4 in July, up from 50.9 in June. A reading above 50 indicates growth. The ISM is a trade group of purchasing managers. A gauge of production soared 11.6 points to 65, the highest reading since May 2004. And a measure of hiring at factories rose to its best level in a year — the latest of encouraging signs ahead of today’s July employment report. “The report builds the case for a

$ Briefly . . .


FaithReligion Briefly . . .

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

‘Never forget’ Unity to move new site helps us focus into this Sunday on living well IN THE MIDDLE of summer, while we are joyously celebrating long, sunny days, Jews observe Tisha B’Av, a somber day of mourning for the destruction of the ancient temple in Jerusalem. It also has become a time to remember all the losses Jews have faced over the centuries simply because of their faith. We continue to remember these sufferings of the past because they never seem to end. Anti-Semitism is at an all-time high in many places in the world, and we Jews must somehow find a balance between becoming eternal victims while being ever-vigilant to potential dangers from hateful bigotry. “Never forget” is not an empty phrase for us. Jews have a passion for “remembering.” We light a special candle on every yahrzeit (year time) of a loved one’s death, which flickers for 24 hours, reminding us of the beauty they brought to our lives. Although tinged with sadness, the prayers cited at this time include beautiful, comforting words: “As this light burns pure and clear, so may the blessed memory of the goodness of my beloved illumine my soul.”

Yahrzeit names read When Jews speak of someone who has died, we say, “May their memory be for a blessing,” and every week in our synagogues, yahrzeit names are read. The entire congregation stands in support of the mourners and recites the kaddish, the mourner’s prayer, with them. The root of the word “kaddish” is the same as the word “holy,” recognizing that those now gone were holy souls. There is nothing about death in the kaddish, but rather the prayer exalts the glory of God and all the goodness in our lives. Thus, we are encouraged to move forward, living fully and compassionately, while honoring what our loved ones have bestowed upon us.

ISSUES OF FAITH A memorial DeBey service is held in which friends and family extol the virtues of the deceased, telling beautiful and uplifting stories of their life. Although never easy, these services help us focus on a life well-lived and serve as inspiration to become better, more caring and loving people. One of the most powerful services I attended was that of a good friend and mentor, gone well before his time. He was our children’s godfather, and the words spoken by his sons and friends became a healing, inspiring experience for my children and myself, who were going through a particularly difficult time in our lives.

Suzanne

Tributes for living I think of these moving tributes when I see that someone has requested no service or memorial be held, remembering that these times are not for the deceased but for the living. It saddens me that those left behind may be deprived of the opportunity to receive strength, inspiration and comfort from honors given to their beloved. Although some would see the constant reminders of loss in Judaism as macabre, it is always done with an uplifting beauty, nudging us to live a more holy life as God intended and to appreciate all our blessings. “As long as we live, they, too, will live, for they are now a part of us, as we remember them.”

PORT TOWNSEND — Unity Church of Port Townsend will move into its new home, the Unity Spiritual Enrichment Center, across from Blue Heron Middle School at 3918 San Juan Ave., on Sunday. The first service in the new location is set for 11 a.m. The community is invited to join Unity for this special inaugural service with an inspirational message and music. A potluck cookout will follow the service. Unity has been an active congregation in Port Townsend since the early 1980s, and the Rev. Pamela Douglas-Smith has served as its minister for more than a decade. For more information, visit www.unitypt.org or phone 360-385-6519.

Ludlow church busy PORT LUDLOW — Motorcycle ministry and missionary events are planned for Port Ludlow Community Church, 9534 Oak Bay Road. Ministry and music will be presented by Marv Astin and Christian Motorcycle Association members during the church’s annual Biker Sunday this Sunday. Only one worship service

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC PARISH

209 West 11th St. Port Angeles

360.452.2351

www.queenofangelsparish.org

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Old Latin Mass every 2nd & 4th Sunday 2:00 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

_________ Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven religious leaders on the North Olympic Peninsula. Suzanne DeBey is a lay leader of the Port Angeles Jewish community.

is planned Sunday: an outdoor service at 10:30 a.m., followed by a free barbecue. Donations are encouraged, with proceeds going to the Tri-Area Food Bank. On Aug. 11, missionaries Jeff and Pam Gregory of Asia Pacific Media Ministries will serve as guests in both the 8:45 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services. The Gregorys are home from Manila on furlough after five years of ministry, which includes training and equipping national churches to be users and producers of media tools in ministry. For more information, phone 360-437-0145.

Evensong service PORT TOWNSEND — An Evensong contemplative prayer service will be held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1020 Jefferson St., at 5 p.m. Sunday. The service, held the first Sunday of each month, will feature music from the Iona community in Scotland and the Taize community in France. All are welcome. For more information, phone 360-385-3075.

Cyclists speak PORT ANGELES — A team of 22 cyclists is riding ride from Seattle to Portland, Ore., this summer, using the International Justice Mission (IJM) Freedom Tour as a platform to address the ongoing issue of modern-day slavery.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Rev. John Wingfield

www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

Confession:

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

Bible school slated SEQUIM — A Vacation Bible School with the theme “Spirit of Service” will be held Monday through Thursday at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave. Anyone 6 and older is eligible to attend. Preschoolers younger than 6 may attend if accompanied throughout the event by an adult. For more information, contact Christian education coordinator Jan Eadie at 360-683-5367 or jan@ sequimtumc.org.

Unity service set PORT ANGELES — The Rev. John Wingfield will present “Prayer Template” at Unity in the Olympics’

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

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10:30 a.m. Sunday worship service. Special meditation will be from 10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. All events are open to the public.

Zen retreat set PORT ANGELES — NO Sangha, a Zen Community in Port Angeles, will host a “working” sesshin, a retreat with large breaks in the schedule so people can go to work during the day, from Wednesday through Sunday. There will be chanting services; opportunities for individual interviews with the teacher, Kristen Larson, a Master of the Diamond Sangha; and daily talks by the teacher. Four-times-daily meetings are planned: early morning at 6, at lunchtime, from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., followed by a silent dinner and meditation from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. For directions, contact 360-452-5534 or NOSangha@aol.com.

Nazareth school SEQUIM — A Hometown Nazareth Vacation Bible School for ages 5 to 8 will be held at Sequim Seventh-day Adventist Church, 30 Sanford Lane, from Aug. 13-16. The Bible school will meet each day from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. To register, phone 360683-7373 Peninsula Daily News

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers Worship Hours: 8:30 & 10:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services

“Running the Race”

101 E. Maple St., Sequim 360.683.6076

30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

IJM is a humanitarian nonprofit organization based in Minneapolis. The cyclists will speak at First Baptist Church, 105 W. Sixth St., at 7 p.m. Monday. They will share the realities of modern-day slavery and tangible steps individuals and groups can take to bring an end to these practices. A free dinner will be provided by the church, and a free-will offering will be accepted. Their next day’s stop will be in Forks. IJM is a human rights agency that brings rescue to victims of slavery, sexual exploitation and other forms of violent oppression.

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. August 4, 10:30 Daniel Whitaker

Universalism in America Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 301 E. Lopez Ave., PA (Disciples of Christ) 452-2323 Park & Race, Port Angeles Pastor Richard Grinstad 457-7062 Sunday Worship at 8:30 a.m. Pastor Neil Allen & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided SUNDAY Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 11 a.m. most Sundays 10:00 a.m. Worship www.htlcpa.com

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WAITING

TO BREAK FAST

& Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Summer Breakfast 11:00 a.m. Worship Youth Activities - Contact Church office@pafumc.org www.pafumc.org

847 N. Sequim Ave. • 683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Family friendly

34569893

Indian Muslim girls look at a message on a mobile phone as they all wait to break their Ramadan fast at Jama Mosque in New Delhi on Wednesday. Muslims throughout the world are marking the month of Ramadan, the holiest month in the Islamic calendar, during which devotees fast from dawn till dusk.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST


B10

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Fire district to teach first aid, CPR class CONTINUED FROM B4 The series will continue at the hotel at 221 N. Lincoln St. through August. The hotel launched the series of free talks, set from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. each Friday, to showcase outdoor activities and locations that can be explored on the Olympic Peninsula throughout the summer. Speakers include ecologists, tour guides, storytellers, filmmakers, historians, anglers and mountaineers. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served, and Happy Hour “Basecamp” drink specials will be offered. The schedule for August Basecamp Adventure Talks is: ■ Tyler Reid, operator of Pacific Alpine Guides, will present “Mountaineering on the Olympic Peninsula” on Aug. 9. ■ Tammy Harmon and Terry Messenger of Expeditions Northwest will present “Navigating the Strait of Juan de Fuca” on Aug. 16. ■ John Gussman and Jessica Plumb, makers of the film “The Return of the River,” will present “The Elwha Dam Removal and the Restoration of the River” and Ian Miller of Washington Sea Grant will present “Coastnerd” on Aug. 23. ■ Mary Brelsford, communications manager of the Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau, will present “Year-Round Tourism on the Peninsula” on Aug. 30.

Anniversary party PORT ANGELES — Necessities and Temptations department store and gift shop, 217 N. Laurel St., is holding a party to celebrate its 15 years in business. The party — offering coffee and punch, birthday cake, chocolate and cookies — takes place from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. today. KONP will broad- Petersen cast live from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and one of the promotions at the store will challenge customers to win a prize by guessing the age of veteran KONP announcer Howard “Scooter” Chapman. The celebration will feature gift certificate drawings, grab bags, special sales items and surprises for every 15th purchase.

Every purchase will enter buyers into a drawing for a $150 prize. Another game at the store, said owner Edna Petersen, is that pictures of her dog, Preston, will be sprinkled around the store. “Find a picture, and you win a prize,” Petersen said. For more information, phone 360-457-6400 or email nectemp@olypen.com.

First aid, CPR course PORT ANGELES — A first aid and CPR-AED training course will be offered by Clallam County Fire District No. 2 on Saturday. The training will be held at the Fire District No. 2 station at 508 N. Baker St. A full-day CPR-AED and first aid course will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost for this course is $40. First aid will be offered only from 8 a.m. to noon and is $30. The CPR-AED session will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and is $30. Class registration is available at the Fire District No. 2 administrative offices, 102 E. Fifth St. For more information, phone 360-417-4790.

NAMI picnic Saturday SEQUIM — All those who live with mental illness are invited to an annual picnic hosted by the Clallam County chapter of NAMI, the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, on Saturday. Family members and friends are welcome at the picnic from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Dungeness Recreation Area, the county park northwest of Sequim. In addition to a potluck dinner at 5 p.m., the picnic offers “conversation with people who understand and lots of hugs, smiles and laughter,” according to the invitation from NAMI Clallam County board President Sandy Garrison. “Bring chairs to sit by the fire and a coat in case you get chilly,” it adds. Potluck dishes and volunteers are welcome. To find the picnic, drive north on Kitchen-Dick Road, and after the road makes a hard right turn, take the next left turn onto Voice of America Road. Follow that to the Dungeness Recreation Area, and watch for the NAMI sign on the left.

For more information about Saturday’s picnic, phone 360-417-9248, and to learn about volunteer opportunities, leave a message for Angel at 360-4525244 or email her at ClallamVolunteerAngel@ gmail.com.

Ranger-guided walks PORT ANGELES — Beginning this Saturday, Olympic National Park rangers will lead interpretive walks along the Elwha River where Lake Aldwell once existed. The walk is free and at 1 p.m. every Saturday through Sept. 7. Rangers guide visitors through the landscape being created by the river since the removal of Elwha Dam in March 2012. Walks provide an upclose look at shifting sediments, old and new vegetation, giant stumps logged a century ago and the river re-establishing itself. The walks begin at the former boat launch located at the end of Lake Aldwell Road, which turns north off U.S. Highway 101 just west of the Elwha River bridge. Visitors should wear sturdy walking shoes or boots and be prepared for windy conditions with no shade. The guided portion of the walk will last about an hour. For more information about Elwha Discovery Walks, phone the Elwha Ranger Station at 360-4529191. For more information about Elwha River restoration, including links to the project webcams, weekly dam-removal blog and Elwha River restoration Facebook page, visit the Olympic National Park website at http://tinyurl. com/Elwha-Restoration.

CrossFit grand opening PORT ANGELES — Storm King CrossFit, 304 W. Front St., will host a grand opening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Attendees can enter to win a Storm King CrossFit T-shirt or a three-day-perweek one-month membership for new members. Visitors also can see demonstrations of CrossFit Workouts of the Day and meet coaches. Children activities are planned. For more information, visit www.stormking crossfit.com.

Council at market PORT ANGELES — Three members of the City Council will staff a table at the Port Angeles Farmers Market on Saturday. Council members Sissi Bruch, Patrick Downie and Dan Di Guilio will be available to hear comments and answer questions from the public from 10 a.m. to noon at the market in The Gateway pavilion at Front and Lincoln streets. The market is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Council members have a table at the market the first Saturday of each month. The tentative upcoming schedule is: ■ Sept. 7 — Mayor Cherie Kidd and Di Guilio. ■ Oct. 5 — Kidd and Downie. ■ Nov. 2 — Deputy Mayor Brad Collins.

Immigration group PORT ANGELES — The Stop the Checkpoints group will discuss the Sakuma Brothers farm workers strike and other immigration-related topics at 2 p.m. Saturday. The talk will be in the lower-level meeting room at the Museum at the Carnegie, 207 S. Lincoln St. For more information, phone 360-808-3196 or visit www.stopthecheckpoints. com.

Port Townsend First Friday Lecture PORT TOWNSEND — Author Lance Weller will discuss his novel Wilderness at the Jefferson County Historical Society First Friday L e c t u r e Weller tonight. The program will begin at 7 p.m. in historic City Council chambers, 540 Water St. Admission is by donation, which supports historical society programs. Wilderness is the story of Civil War veteran Abel Truman and his final journey over the Olympic Mountains as he attempts to reconcile the horrific war he fought with the great evil it ended. The book is available for purchase in the museum shop and will be available at the lecture for signing.

Death Notices Faye Sester died of cancer vices are planned. at her Sequim home. She Drennan-Ford Funeral May 15, 1948 — July 31, 2013 was 65. Home, Port Angeles, is in Sequim resident Patricia Services: Private ser- charge of arrangements.

Patricia Faye Sester

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at

www.peninsuladailynews.com

FREE

nch

r Lu Summe

Monday - F riday throu gh August 30th , 2013

New Schedule

can come and through 18 years of age 1 r ge na tee d an ild ch wing locations: ANY the summer at the follo g rin du ys da ek we on receive a free lunch 8 East 12th Street

– 21 fferson Elementary 11:55— 12:10 Je reet Playground– Race St m ea Dr 0 :3 12 0— ancis Street 12:2 irls Club– 2620 S Fr G d an ys Bo 5 :5 12:40—12 Street Park– 400-499 S G. e an Sh 25 1: — 10 W 18th Street 1: mily Village– 2203 Fa n ee gr er Ev 00 E. 6th Street 1:40—2: pport Center– 325 Su ily m Fa ep St t at First Step.) 2:10—2:20 Firs day lunch service only (Monday through Thurs s are taken. . No paperwork or name ren ild ch ir the th wi be Parents do not have to umed on site. Lunches must be cons

Yarn shop event

This week’s theme is Native American arts and crafts. The museum will offer free admission to patrons during the Port Townsend Gallery Walk from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. This will be the first Gallery Walk opportunity to see the exhibit “Maritime Art: 1880-2013,” which features an eclectic mix of pieces by area artists, including contemporary work by Branan Ward, Kim Kopp, Max Grover, Karen Hackenberg, Stephen Yates, Frank Samuelson and Linda Okazaki, and historic pieces by Port Townsend’s Victorian-era artists.

PORT TOWNSEND — The Bazaar Girls Yarn Shop will hold a “Spinners’ Extravaganza” during Port Townsend’s monthly Gallery Walk from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. The shop is located at 126 Quincy St. Amelia Garripoli, Lauralee Deluca and Karen Rose will spin during the event. Treats will be served. For more information, Bake sale visit http://tinyurl.com/ PORT TOWNSEND — kpglm44. The Occupy Port Townsend Move to Amend Working PT youth football Group will hold a bake sale PORT TOWNSEND — on the Port Townsend ComPort Townsend Youth Foot- munity Center lawn, 620 ball will conduct registra- Tyler St., from 10 a.m. to tion and equipment hand- 2 p.m. Saturday. outs for all third- to eighthThe group is raising grade students Saturday. money and support for a The sign-ups will be statewide initiative calling from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at for a constitutional amend1322 Washington St. in ment to control the influfront of the Port Townsend ence of money in politics Post Office. and end corporate personThis year, Port Townsend hood. is moving to the Kitsap For more information, Football League and will phone Dianne Diamond at field a seventh- and eighth- 360-385-2341. grade team. All football players in Navy band concert Jefferson County are eligiNORDLAND — Pasble to register for the pro- sage, the Northwest Navy gram. Band, will perform at Fort The cost per player is Flagler State Park’s Bat$75. Scholarships are avail- tery Bankhead, 10541 Flaable for those unable to pay gler Road, at 3 p.m. Sunday. the full cost. The band covers hits Conditioning practice from the 1960s through the will start at 5:30 p.m. Mon- present, lending its interday at the Blue Heron Mid- pretation to artists as dle School football field. diverse as Johnny Cash, Players can sign up at Led Zeppelin, Heart, JourBlue Heron all week if they ney, Radiohead, Lady Antemiss Saturday’s registra- bellum and Brandi Carlile. tion date. The concert is free, and For more information, no Discover Pass is needed, phone Butch Marx at 360- as Sunday is a “free day” in 821-1394. Washington state parks.

Fee-free admission PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Historical Society will offer free admission to its facilities to Jefferson County residents on Saturday. The historical society, which operates the Jefferson Museum of Art & History, the Commanding Officer’s Quarters and the Rothschild House Museum, offers fee-free days to county residents the first Saturday of each month. The Jefferson Museum of Art & History, 540 Water St., also will host “Family Fun” from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Port Hadlock Customer appreciation PORT HADLOCK — Hadlock Building Supply, 901 Ness’ Corner Road, will hold a customer appreciation day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Hot dogs will be served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and disc jockey music will be provided by Louie’s World Entertainment. Vendors will be on hand with information on construction materials. Attendees will be eligible for prizes.

Death and Memorial Notice She had two sons, David and Bill. The family moved in 1960 to Port Angeles, where she taught school at Roosevelt Junior High for 27 years. In her retirement from teaching, she was an AARP “55 Alive” maturedriving coordinator and instructor, and a captain in the Civil Air Patrol, where she worked in cadet education. She was also a member of the Retired Teachers Association. Vivian was known for her integrity, forthrightness and caring for others. She touched, in very positive ways, the lives of many

VIVIAN HALL SMITH October 15, 1921 June 16, 2013 Vivian Hall Smith passed away on June 16, 2013, at St. Joseph Medical Center in Tacoma. She was 91 years old. Vivian was born in Stevensville, Ontario, on October 15, 1921, and grew up in northern West Virginia. She married Robert Wade Smith and then graduated from West Virginia University while he was deployed in World War II as an Army combat engineer.

ce Voted 1 st Pla 2008 - 2012 e Hom l Best Funera nty in Clallam Cou

family members, students and friends during her time on this plane. She will always be respected and loved for her kind words, solid advice and good deeds. Throughout her life, she served as an inspiration for those who sought to do their very best in their own lives. Vivian was preceded in death by her husband, Robert “Bob,” in 1995 and by two older sisters. She is survived by two sons, David and Bill, and by two brothers who live on the East Coast. Vivian is also survived by four grandchildren.

The ONLY Locally Owned Funeral Home and Crematory Serving the people of Clallam County Immediate, Dependable and Affordable services 24 hours a day • Our staff has over 100 years experience

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Lunch That’s In, When School is Out!

In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. If you believe you have been treated unfairly, you may file a complaint of discrimination, by writing USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call toll free (866)632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339; or (800)845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Douglas Ticknor Jim Drennan

37814473

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Questions? Please call First Step Family Support Center at (360) 457-8355

Weller has published short fiction in several literary journals. He won Glimmer Train’s Short Story Award for New Writers and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Leah & Steve Ford

• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 email: info@drennanford.com

Visit our Website: www.drennanford.com


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Mike Du Jour

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

by Lynn Johnston

by Mike Lester

[“Doonesbury” is on hiatus; please email your comments on this strip to pdncomics@gmail.com]

by Bob and Tom Thaves

DEAR ABBY: I have been a lifeguard for more than 30 years, and I continually see parents and other adults putting children in harm’s way. Would you please remind your readers that they need to be vigilant around water? A drowning is nothing like they show in the movies. As you take your family to your favorite swimming hole this summer, please be careful. If your child isn’t a competent swimmer, never allow him or her to go beyond arm’s reach. Never exceed the ratio of two nonswimmers to one adult. If possible, stay where the child can touch the bottom. If your children can swim, and you allow them to go into the pool, lake, ocean without you, always watch them. Yes, lifeguards are observing the swimmers, but no one on this planet will watch your child with the same vigilance you will. So put down the book, the e-reader, the tablet, the cellphone and actively watch. If you’re chatting with friends, don’t look at them; watch your child. It can take as few as 10 to 20 seconds for a person to get into trouble and slip without a sound beneath the surface. I guarantee you: Your parent-tochild ratio is lower than that of any lifeguard-to-swimmer. Lifeguard John in Auburn

DEAR ABBY nightstands and the dresser. Van Buren I accommodate him, but frankly, it’s getting very old. Am I being nasty to want our furniture arranged the way we’re comfortable? Or must I allow him to rearrange it the way he wants it? He is here for only 24 hours and then leaves. Good Hostess in California

Abigail

Dear Hostess: Your brother-in-law may be a frustrated interior decorator or want the room to be the way he sleeps at home. A good hostess tries to accommodate the needs of her guests. However, if the furniture in your house has been moved, your brotherin-law should put it back the way it was before he leaves. Dear Abby: Do you or your readers think it’s acceptable for a father to ask his 21-year-old college student son whether he and his girlfriend of one year are sexually active? This is his first girlfriend. I am his mother, and I say it’s none of our business. My husband says it’s a reasonable question; he just wants to give him fatherly advice — like “be careful.” Mom in Colorado

Dear Lifeguard John: Your message is important and timely. Every year, we read about families basking in the sun near water, and children who have lost their lives because the person who was supposed to be watching them became momentarily distracted. I agree the best way to protect against tragedies like this is unremitting vigilance. Thanks for giving me a chance to say it again.

by Jim Davis

Dear Mom: Would you still say it’s none of your business if your son made his first girlfriend pregnant? I would, however, caution your husband to be more tactful about how he approaches the subject because a blunt question like the one he’s contemplating could be off-putting. If he has birth control information he wants to impart, a better way to approach it would be to raise the subject without putting his son on the spot.

Dear Abby: I have a brother-inlaw whom I love dearly who lives out of state and stays in our guest room frequently. I try hard to be a thoughtful hostess. When he comes, we spend the first 45 minutes rearranging the guest room furniture because he likes the bed to face west. Currently, it faces north, as do the by Mell Lazarus

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Impulse is the enemy. Avoid being pushed around or being taken advantage of. Keep things in perspective when dealing with domestic matters, friends and relatives. Look outside the box for solutions to any problems you face. Communicate openly and honestly. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your perception will be fine-tuned and you will be quick to pick up on what others are thinking. Although relationships are highlighted, emotions may interfere with how you react toward others, especially if your intuition tells you one thing and the signals being sent are different. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Stretch your skills and talents to the limit. Don’t give anyone the chance to meddle in your affairs. Emotions will be difficult to control and must not be allowed to cause discord due to a misunderstanding between you and someone you love. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

by Hank Ketcham

Pickles

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

doesn’t want to follow the same path as you. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Conflicts are likely to lead to a situation that LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): will encourage you to make an Visit a place that entices you emotional decision. Change is or that will take your mind off required, and although it may whatever is troubling you. be difficult in the end, it will be Problems with additional interesting and helpful and responsibilities may need to be lead to greater encourageput on the back burner in order ment. 3 stars to allow you time to determine CAPRICORN (Dec. your next move. 4 stars 22-Jan. 19): An emotional VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): response to a financial, legal Emotional reactions will stand or medical issue will end up between you and productivity. being costly. Take a deep Pay attention to detail and fin- breath and consider your ish what you start. Offering options before you jump to positive solutions and direction conclusions or into action. A will help you avoid being rail- practical approach is the only roaded into situations that are route to take. 3 stars likely to lead to discord. 2 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): 18): Rely on past situations to A mini vacation will help reju- help you make the right choice venate you and allow you time now. Use emotional tactics to to think and put other situaget your way when dealing tions you face into perspective with a matter concerning chilbefore making a decision that dren or your lover. Don’t limit is apt to change the way you what you can do to avoid conmove forward personally or flict. Face matters head-on. professionally. 5 stars 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Get involved in an event or activity that brings you in CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take a creative, imagina- contact with new people, tive approach to love, life and places or pastimes. Sharing the way you want to move for- your plans will increase your ward personally, professionally chance of being successful. and philosophically. Share your Romance is in the stars and feelings but don’t stop pursu- relationships enhanced. ing your desires if someone 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

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Summer swims can turn tragic quickly

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

The Family Circus

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Share creative ideas and look for means of entertainment that will inspire you to move forward with your plans. Love is on the rise, and an important relationship can help you establish future direction if you are willing to compromise. 5 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013 Neah Bay 54/53

ellingham elli el e lin n 69/56

Olympic Peninsula TODAY AY Y WERS A M SH OWE

RS

63/55

AM

O SH

Port P Townsend 65/56

Sequim 66/55 Olympics Port Ludlow Freezing level: 10,500 ft. 66/55

AM

Forks 64/53

Yesterday

SH

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 62 52 0.00 10.34 Forks 67 55 Trace 56.95 Seattle 71 55 0.00 16.71 Sequim 69 53 0.00 5.60 Hoquiam 60 55 0.00 31.73 Victoria 64 53 0.00 13.67 Port Townsend 68 50 0.00 10.79

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NationalTODAY forecast Nation

Forecast highs for Friday, Aug. 2

OW ER S

Aberdeen 64/53

Billings 79° | 57°

New

First

Chicago 81° | 68°

Denver 93° | 63°

Miami 90° | 77°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

SATURDAY

Low 55 Night of clouds

62/53 Mostly cloudy

Marine Weather

SUNDAY

64/59 Mostly sunny skies

MONDAY

65/52 Sunshine, a cloud or two

TUESDAY

Fronts

65/55 Some sun and some clouds

Aug 28 Aug 6

8:48 p.m. 5:53 a.m. 3:03 a.m. 5:53 p.m.

-10s

-0s

Nation/World Hi 81 94 93 72 76 80 83 103 82 88 90 80 95 79 98 78

Tides

Pressure Low

High

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 83 64 Casper 87 52 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 89 74 CANADA Albany, N.Y. 64 Rain Charleston, W.Va. 73 65 Victoria Albuquerque 74 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 84 71 66° | 52° Amarillo 70 PCldy Cheyenne 83 56 Anchorage 54 Cldy Chicago 75 61 Asheville 67 .02 Cldy Cincinnati 77 69 Seattle Atlanta 71 .31 Cldy Cleveland 80 68 Spokane 70° | 57° Ocean: SW wind to 10 kt. Atlantic City 70 Rain Columbia, S.C. 85 73 73° | 52° Columbus, Ohio 75 68 Austin 75 PCldy Wind waves 1 ft. NW swell 3 Tacoma 82 55 Baltimore 67 .36 Rain Concord, N.H. Olympia ft at 7 seconds. A chance of 68° | 52° Billings 63 Cldy Dallas-Ft Worth 102 80 68° | 52° showers. Tonight, W wind to 74 66 Yakima Birmingham 70 1.09 PCldy Dayton 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft. NW 92 62 Bismarck 48 PCldy Denver 88° | 61° swell 3 ft at 7 seconds. 86 63 Boise 67 PCldy Des Moines Astoria 77 65 Boston 66 PCldy Detroit 66° | 55° 78 58 76 PCldy Duluth ORE. © 2013 Wunderground.com Brownsville 98 75 Buffalo 65 .38 Cldy El Paso Evansville 81 67 Fairbanks 81 56 TODAY TOMORROW SUNDAY Fargo 78 54 84 MM High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 72 62 LaPush 10:59 a.m. 5.6’ 4:33 a.m. 0.3’ 11:47 a.m. 5.9’ 5:21 a.m. -0.1’ 12:27 p.m. 6.3’ 6:02 a.m. -0.4’ Great Falls 86 59 10:12 p.m. 7.6’ 4:11 p.m. 3.3’ 11:00 p.m. 7.7’ 5:05 p.m. 3.1’ 11:44 p.m. 7.9’ 5:52 p.m. 2.7’ Greensboro, N.C. 80 70 Hartford Spgfld 83 59 90 60 Port Angeles 2:47 p.m. 6.2’ 6:47 a.m. 0.1’ 7:27 a.m. -0.2’ 12:24 a.m. 5.8’ 8:04 a.m. -0.3’ Helena Honolulu 84 77 11:32 p.m. 5.9’ 7:25 p.m. 5.6’ 3:23 p.m. 6.4’ 8:12 p.m. 5.4’ 3:52 p.m. 6.5’ 8:47 p.m. 5.1’ Houston 98 77 Indianapolis 77 64 Port Townsend 12:17 a.m. 7.4’ 8:00 a.m. 0.1’ 1:09 a.m. 7.3’ 8:40 a.m. -0.2’ 2:01 a.m. 7.2’ 9:17 a.m. -0.3’ Jackson, Miss. 94 76 Jacksonville 90 73 4:24 p.m. 7.7’ 8:38 p.m. 6.2’ 5:00 p.m. 7.9’ 9:25 p.m. 6.0’ 5:20 p.m. 8.0’ 10:00 p.m. 5.7’ Juneau 75 54 Kansas City 83 65 Dungeness Bay* 7:22 a.m. 0.1’ 12:25 a.m. 6.6’ 8:02 a.m. -0.2’ 1:07 a.m. 6.5’ 8:39 a.m. -0.3’ Key West 89 83 3:30 p.m. 6.9’ 8:00 p.m. 5.6’ 4:06 p.m. 7.1’ 8:47 p.m. 5.4’ 4:35 p.m. 7.2’ 9:22 p.m. 5.1’ Las Vegas 107 85 Little Rock 93 73 *To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. A chance of showers. Tonight, W wind 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft.

Warm Stationary

Aug 14 Aug 20

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 117 at Death Valley, Calif. ■ 36 at Truckee, Calif.

Atlanta 90° | 70°

El Paso 97° | 72° Houston 102° | 77°

Full

New York 84° | 72°

Detroit 81° | 61°

Washington D.C. 86° | 72°

Los Angeles 77° | 61°

Cold

TONIGHT

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 84° | 59°

San Francisco 72° | 54°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 70° | 57°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 68/59

Sunny

Rain Los Angeles PCldy Louisville .38 Rain Lubbock .06 Cldy Memphis .10 Rain Miami Beach .02 PCldy Midland-Odessa .46 Clr Milwaukee Cldy Mpls-St Paul .06 Cldy Nashville Cldy New Orleans .28 Cldy New York City Cldy Norfolk, Va. Cldy North Platte .02 Cldy Oklahoma City Cldy Omaha PCldy Orlando .10 Cldy Pendleton PCldy Philadelphia PCldy Phoenix PCldy Pittsburgh PCldy Portland, Maine PCldy Portland, Ore. Rain Providence .18 PCldy Raleigh-Durham Rain Rapid City .35 Rain Reno Rain Richmond Rain Sacramento Clr St Louis PCldy St Petersburg .02 PCldy Salt Lake City .02 PCldy San Antonio .12 Rain San Diego Cldy San Francisco PCldy San Juan, P.R. PCldy Santa Fe Clr St Ste Marie .01 Clr Shreveport

73 78 96 91 90 100 77 83 84 93 83 84 84 92 86 92 87 83 109 76 79 78 82 83 86 92 84 88 82 95 101 103 71 70 89 93 75 97

62 68 71 76 80 76 63 59 69 77 73 72 63 75 61 75 59 70 92 65 57 59 63 70 56 59 71 57 67 82 77 78 65 56 78 64 56 79

.26 .21 .03 .07 .10

.04 .15 .15

.51 .40

.20 .02 .53

Cldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Rain Rain Rain PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Rain Clr Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy Rain Cldy Clr Rain Clr Clr Cldy Clr Clr Cldy Clr Rain Cldy PCldy PCldy

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls 81 Syracuse 81 Tampa 91 Topeka 88 Tucson 101 Tulsa 91 Washington, D.C. 82 Wichita 87 Wilkes-Barre 81 Wilmington, Del. 81

55 64 75 66 87 71 70 67 67 69

.01

Cldy Rain Cldy PCldy Cldy Clr .37 Rain PCldy .02 Rain .20 Rain .28

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo 60 54 109 79 89 74 91 69 92 64 98 74 67 46 85 59 88 81 90 66 64 41 97 70 81 59 80 54 74 58 70 56 93 80 92 65 86 62 91 72 65 47 86 74 76 61 68 59

Otlk Sh Clr Ts Clr Clr Clr Sh Ts Ts/Wind Clr Clr Clr Sh Ts PCldy Sh Ts Clr Clr Clr Clr PCldy Ts Cldy

All Wheel Drive!

New 2014 Chevrolet Koenig E-Price .....................$32,238 Price Guaranteed Cash Back ................................ -$500 USAA Membership ...................-$750

Loaded with Extras including Best 8 Way Power Seat with Lumbar Front Bottom Center Side Impact Airbag System Line & Trailering Equipment! Price SALE PRICE IS PLUS TAX, LICENSE

38837045

AND A $150 NEGOTIABLE DOC FEE. SALE PRICE IS $30,988. SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. VINS POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAHICAL ERRORS. AD EXPIRES 8/31/13.

38795225


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013 C1

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N I L D A E D on’t Miss It! D

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

s

T O D AY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

10’ NAVIGATOR sailboat/rowboat. See our online ad for full description or call (360)683-0915 at Diamond Point, Sequim. Sale price is $2,200. (360)683-0915.

BUSY family-or iented restaurant needs experienced chef/line cook 4-5 days shifts per week. Pays well! Pt. Townsend (360)301-4213

CHAIRS: (4) Low breakfast room castered armchairs, excellent meduim b l u e u p h o l s t r y, p l u s brass and wood. Nearly new condition, little use. Cost $1,300. Must sell now. $500, or any rea- P.A.: 320 Fogarty Ave. 2 sonable offer! br., 1 ba. Comfor table (360)775-3449 duplex. W/D, deck, garage. Great location. No HOME: 3 Br., 2 bath, s m o k i n g / p e t s . F i r s t / n i c e n e i g h b o r h o o d , Last/Deposit. $700. Forks. $750 per mo. (360)457-2195 (360)640-8286

3010 Announcements

3023 Lost

SENIOR LADY Would like to meet nice s e n i o r g e n t l e m a n fo r companionship and maybe more. Mail response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#715/Senior Port Angeles, WA 98362

L O S T: C a t . G ray, fe male, short hair, microchipped, last seen near Pe n i n s u l a C o l l e g e i n P.A. (360)460-4636.

3020 Found FOUND: Cat. Female, l o n g h a i r, b r ow n a n d white tabby, Happy Valley/Bell Hill area. (360)681-4822

LOST: Diamond ring. 3 .5 karat diamonds on gold band, in Port Angeles area. REWARD: $1,000. (360)477-1992 L O S T: D o g . F e m a l e m i n i Au s s i e , 2 0 l b s , black and brown, white chest, West Joyce. REWARD: $500. (360)928-9538

FOUND: Dog. Black dog, Swains in P.A., old- LOST: Keys at Sunny er, wounded leg. Email Farms on Sunday, July stephylynn21 28. REWARD. @yahoo.com 681-0477. FOUND: White spor ts glove with name “Cole”. LOST: Lawnmower. Ariens brand, last seen in 452-3651. carport of 2200 block of FOUND: Young cat. Do- 4th Ave., P.A. mestic short hair, Dilute (360)461-5638 Torti, tipped ear, spayed fe m a l e. 8 t h a n d V i n e Street area, P.A. Amber, 4026 Employment General 461-7709

FORD: ‘98 Ranger. 4 door, king cab, 4WD, auto, air, CD, new trans., radiator, alternator, battery. $5,500/obo. (360)683-8145 FREE: Piano. 1916 Upright antique piano, with bench, good condition. Call 417-6881 between 9-6 p.m. MINI COOPER: ‘07 Convert. Loaded! Miles 23k. $18,000. 477-8377.

MOVING Sale: Inside/ outside; rain or shine. 421 East 10th St., P.A. 9 - 5 p. m . S a t . - S u n . Tr uck canopy, dualspor t motorcycle, mountain bike, camping and backpacking gear, weight machine, barbell set, tools, gas cans, paint sprayer, window box A/C, window fans, fur niture, lamps, persian carpets, area rugs, kitche n g a d g e t s , m i c r o, etc., fur niture, 51” hdtv, guitar, tab books, music stuff, music cds, DVD Blue-Ray movies, anime, PS1, PS2, PS3, Gamecube, Sega Saturn and PC v i d e o g a m e s, P S 1 , PS2, Gamecube Sega Saturn consoles, books, maps, framed art, etc.

MOVING Sale: Sat., 11-5 p.m., 309 S. Albert St.

M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Fri.-Sat., 9-4 p.m., 2228 E. 4th Ave. Halloween decorations, appliances, furniture, household stuff and more!

WA N T E D : R u g e r GP-100, 357, 3 or 4 inch barrell, double action, stainless revolver, or S&M, heavy frame, new condition. 460-4491.

WOODWORKING Equipment: Band saw, 12”, 6 new blades, $200. Scroll saw, $100. Planer, $200. Router with table, $50. Jig saw, $25. Table saw, $100. Drill press, $100. Lathe, $100. (2) 16 gal. shop vacs, $50 ea. Sawzall, $40. etc. Cash only! (360)683-6130 SATURN: ‘97 SL. 4 door A/T, runs well. $1,000 cash. (360)808-2861. YA R D S a l e : L a r g e yard sale at 2006 W. 4th St. We have bikes, TABLE: Teak dining ta- mower, recliner, dinble. Oval, 48”-90”, with ning room table with ( 2 ) e x t e n s i o n s , ( 6 ) insert and chairs. Sofa chairs. Very good condi- and ottoman, Amish tion. $300. h e a t e r, a n d m o r e . (360)417-3893 Runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fr iday through Sunday. TRIUMPH: ‘72 GT6. $2,500. (360)683-5557. www.peninsula dailynews.com SALE: 1128 W. 12th St., In Alley. Lots of baby clothes, shoes and play items. Kerosene heater, wheelchair, mens and womens clothes, surfboard, snowboards and much more! Sat.-Sun. 9-3 p.m. No early birds.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General General

Are you energetic and willing to work hard? Are you looking for a career instead of “just a job”? Do you have the following skills? • Positive work ethic • Ability to follow directions • Strong willingness to learn • Ability to show on time daily Then we want you to join our team! Prior sawmill or production line experience is a plus! Excellent wage and benefits package. Shift work required. Apply in person immediately at Interfor 243701 Hwy 101 W. Port Angeles EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer CNA/RNA: Immediate openings, part/full-time, all shifts. Wright’s Home Care (360)457-9236.

ASEService Technician. Experienced automotive technician. Wages DOE, paid vacation holidays. Medical, dental, vision life insurance after 90 days. Drop off resume at Rudy’s Automotive or call 360-457-0700.

BE A NEWSPAPER CARRIER FOR OUR HOMETOWN PAPER! Earn extra $$ per month. Applicant must be dependable, have reliable vehicle, possess a valid WA driver’s license and proof of insurance. No carrier collections. Apply in person at: 147 W. Washington, Sequim. Ask for Dave in Circulation. BUSY family-or iented restaurant needs experienced chef/line cook 4-5 days shifts per week. Pays well! Pt. Townsend (360)301-4213 CAREGIVERS NEEDED $100 hire bonus. Training available. Call Caregivers. P.A. 457-1644 Sequim 683-7377 P.T. 379-6659

BUSY SALON: Experienced, licensed hair stylist wanted, with professional attitude and motivated, fun personality. Call Paula or Joe Sequim Beauty Salon (360)683-5881 CAREGIVER needed, prefer CNA, HCA, but n o t n e c e s s a r y. C a l l Cherrie, (360)683-3348

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Angeles area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., P.A. No phone calls.

HAIR STYLIST Full time, for established salon in Port Angeles. (360)461-2438

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Sequim area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early mor ning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., P.A. Call Dave at (360)460-2124.

GRAPHIC ARTIST AD DESIGNER Full-time position in a daily newspaper environment. Must be fluent in InDesign, PhotoShop, and Illustrator. Macintosh OS ex p e r i e n c e h e l p f u l . Ability to work under pressure with tight deadlines. Email resume to: jobs@peninsula dailynews.com

PAINTERS WANTED Experience requried. In P.T. (360)379-4176.

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General Graphic Design/ Production Assistant Versatile, detail-oriented, team player with great attitude needed for proofing, typesetting, checking job tickets, etc. Adobe CS5 Suite experience req. Resume to art@olympicprinters.com or 310 E. First St., Port Angeles. HOME Health Care givers. Immediate o p e n i n g s fo r F T / P T workers. $11 to $12/hr to start DOE and shift. Call Rainshadow Home Services. (360)681-6206

HOUSEKEEPERS Detail oriented. Wage based directly on quality of work, with bonus opportunities. Apply in person at 140 Del Guzzi Dr. Port Angeles. No calls please. KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 LAND-SURVEYING Company has a position open for party chief/chainman. Construction exp. pref., send resume to: Attn. Survey Supervisor, at P.O. Box 2 1 9 9 , S e q u i m , WA 98382. NOW HIRING! FT Cook and FT Dietary Aide Avamere Olympic Rehab of Sequim 1000 S. 5th Ave Apply in person or call 360-582-3900

MARINE Joiner Shop Foreman. 20-30 years’ experience in boatyard operations focusing on cabinetr y, hardware, hatches, doors, windows, interior repairs and remodels, traditional shipwright work. Leadership skills and crew direction are part of the job. Pay DOE. Email resume to hr @platyusmarine.com. 360-417-0709

RECEPTIONIST: Par ttime, fast paced office, ex p e r i e n c e r e q u i r e d , people skills and team player. Drop off resume at Sequim Animal Hospital, 202 N. 7th Ave., Seq SALES/OFFICE ASSISTANT NEEDED Full-time position with benefits. Must be proficient with Excel/Word documents and spread sheets. Apply in person: Price Ford Lincoln Mercury 3311 E Hwy. 101 Port Angeles

Correctional Officer 1 Pay starts at $16.99 hr. Plus full benefits. Closes 08/13/13.

SCHOOL Garden A s s t / J C Fa r m t o School Prog. Help kids learn to grow and eat foods from school gard e n s. 1 5 - 2 5 h r s / w k during 2013/14 sch yr. $ 1 2 - 1 3 / h r . jcfarm2school.org. Application from jennkas@hotmail.com

Apply on-line: www.careers.wa.gov. For further information please call Laura at (360)963-3208 EOE

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

Permanent and On-call positions available now at Clallam Bay Corrections Center

RECEPTIONIST Par t-time, 20 hours per week with some full-time for vacation fill in. If you have an outgoi n g p e r s o n a l i t y, a sense of humor and can multi-task, this is the job for you. The r ight candidate should have excellent telephone manners, gr e a t p e o p l e s k i l l s, phone sales and accounting experience. $10 per hour. Please email resume and cover letter with 3 references to: hbotts@peninsula dailynews.com No phone calls, please

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

SIGN ON BONUS

$$$$

RUDDELL AUTO MALL is looking for a highly motivated, goal orientated automotive sales person to join our team! You would be able to sell new GMC trucks, SUVs and Cadillac product as well as Hyundai and the Peninsula’s largest selection of pre-inspected pre-owned vehicles. We offer a very very competitive pay plan with bonus 401K medical and dental. Will train the right person. Call for an appointment today at

37836187

Air Flo Heating Co. is Hiring the Best! Service, Installation and Sales positions availL O S T: B i l l fo l d . R e d , a bl e. To p wa g e s a n d many important papers, benefits. DOE. Apply in c o u l d b e i n Po r t A n - person at 221 W. Cedar St., Sequim. geles. (360)775-9921.

3023 Lost

ESTATE Sale: Sat.Sun., 10-3 p.m., 1527 W. 1 2 t h S t . 1 9 5 0 s hutch, antique dresser with mirrors, end tables, chairs, desks, outdoor sink, portable heaters, mattress and box spr ings, linens, sheets, dishes, glasse s , s t e m w e a r, f l a t ware, books, artwork, decor, clothes and accessories, jeans and lots more! You don’t want to miss this one! Cash only, please!

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

5000900

allstarestatesales.com Sat.-Sun, 10-4 p.m. 121 S. Alder Ln. Pics and info at website!

ESTATE Sale: 1111 W. 16th., Sat. 10-4, Sun., 10-3. 1/2 price Sun. 100’s of Vintage b o o k s, Z a n e G r ey, Victor Hugo, Cooper, Agatha Christie, Perry Mason, Nancy Drew, Goose Bumps just to name a few. Moody Blues collection, CD’s, 3 3 1 / 2 ’s, 4 5 ’s, 7 8 ’s plus the AM/FM Stereo to play them on, nice Antique piano, sheet mus i c , Ya m a h a G u i t a r , P o c k e t Knives,Duncan Phyfe style table, love seat, sewing machine with cabinet, kitchen glass ware and a fiberglass g r e e n h o u s e . To o many unusual unique items to list.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

(360)452-6822.

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

C2 FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. CHRIS HADFIELD — ASTRONAUT Solution: 5 letters

Y T I D D O C T O R A T E H C By Jack McInturff

DOWN 1 Not meant to be public 2 Airport security req. 3 Over 4 Filmmaker Riefenstahl 5 Cupcakes-to-be 6 Like curtains to be installed 7 Role for Marty Feldman 8 Currency until 2002 9 Leader after Mao 10 Pinched 11 Where some thank-yous are written 12 Divested (of) 13 Howdies 21 Clod 22 False friends 26 Sludge 27 Wire wearer 29 Latin case: Abbr. 30 Guardian of Narnia 31 Co-star of Carroll, Jean and Sally 32 Cross-shaped letter 37 Not as prevalent

8/2/13 Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

E N O I T A R O L P X E C O G

X D A M I S S I O N L N M N H

P E R R A L B U M U U M I O E

© 2013 Universal Uclick

E C S O E S E S S A U N N R L

D I T I E M B E T A T I Y L F W ‫ګګګ‬ B A I O M E C A T A R A P E C T L I R R N A A S I R D L O E L E R O J A B I T A Y K L A

www.wonderword.com

Wastewater Source Control Specialist City of Port Angeles $4199-$5014/mo. plus benefits. AA degree in environmental science, engineering or related field. 4 years experience in inspection, permitting, or environmental water resource programs or water/wastewater utility. To view full job posting and application instructions go to www.cityofpa.us. Closes 8/5/13. COPA is an EOE.

4080 Employment Wanted ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. (360)452-2034 CAREGIVER available for private care. Very experienced, good local refs. Seeking long hours. $10-15/hr. (360)504-2227 MOWING, PRUNING, BARKING Honest and dependable. (360)582-7142

11 CORAL Dr.: Beautiful,custom 3 br., 2.5 bath single story home offers numerous amenities.The gorgeous water, mountain, and country views are the cherry on top! Open House will be held July 19-21 from 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. For information please contact Russell at (360)-5829568. Priced at $329,500 this one won’t last long! AN ABSOLUTE TREAT! Completely remodeled ever ywhere, with new windows, floor coverings and baths! A wonderful open kitchen with island and breakfast bar. 5 Br, 3 b a t h , 2 f i r e p l a c e s, huge family room. Beautiful yard with fruit trees and a large deck. $259,000. MLS#271663. KATHY LOVE 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY Beautiful home in a peaceful setting on 1.58 acres. 3 Br, 2 bath plus den/office. Upgraded cabinets, floors, windows, custom master b a t h . Tw o p r o p a n e stoves, large Trex deck for enjoying garden and mountain views. Auto irrigation, 4 car garage. $289,900. ML#271433. Gail Sumpter: 477-9361 Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-477-9189

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E A R T H C A N A D I A N Z P

S O H E L E N E E L T T U H S 8/2

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

HISUS ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

MUDHI (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

38 Draft pick 39 Mer land 40 One of the fam 41 Bolted down 42 Hesitating sounds 43 Whopper topper 46 Unavailable, in a way 47 Become irritated 48 Cook’s “Food’s ready!” 50 Baseball’s “Iron Horse”

CENTRAL LOCATION Charming 1950s home is centrally located, features a large kitchen, 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,709 SF and a fenced in backyard. $190,000. MLS#271421. Kimi 360-461-9788 JACE The Real Estate Company Charming home with city, par tial mountain, and partial water views. Central to all services. Many improvements made to home, new roof, new electric panel, new ex t e r i o r a n d i n t e r i o r paint, new carpet and linoleum, new baseboard heaters, new tub enclosure, new water heater, and new basin in bath. New garage door, foundation completely repaired. All work done by licensed contractors. MLS#271655 $139,000 Clarice Arakawa (360)460-4741 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL Excellent location, topography and views of Strait Juan De Fuca to the nor th and Olympic Mountains to the south. Walking distance to Peninsula College, contiguous to Assisted Retirement home and Skilled Nursing care. Current zoning is RMD, Parcel is within the high density city’s Master Plan. MLS#270296. $695,000. JEAN (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East EXQUISITE DESIGN CRAFTSMANSHIP 3 Br., 2 bath, 2837 SF, Born in 2006, gourmet kitchen, formal dining, media room, library with built-in shelving, den/office, spacious master, heated tile floor in bath, stunning wood finishes throughout, 1 acre / a contiguous 1 acre for sale. MLS#264283. $498,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

A S U O I M I L T O N O V F C

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Mowing, trimming, mulch and more! Call Ground Control Lawn Care for honest, dependable lawn care at your home o r b u s i n e s s . G r o u n d BEAUTIFUL HOME on 19.6 acres between SeControl Lawn Care quim and Port Angeles, 360-797-5782 5 br., 5 bath, great for enter taining, gour met RUSSELL kitchen, deck, dramatic ANYTHING master suite, fireplace, 775-4570 or 681-8582 walk-in shower, hydroYOUNG COUPLE early t h e ra py t u b. G a r d e n s s i x t i e s . Ava i l a bl e fo r and vineyard. Perfect spring cleanup, weeding, mother-in-law apt with t r i m m i n g , m u l c h i n g , own entrance or home moss removal, complete office or B&B. 3182 Blue WEST SIDE P.A.: New garden restoration and Mountain Road. h o m e , 3 B r. , 2 b a . $799,900 misc. yard care. Excel$165,000. 460-8891. NWMLS 40941 lent references. Appt (360)461-3926 (360)457-1213

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

N B N I I R Y U H O G N Y L E

Album, Award, Bowie, Camera, Canadian, Capsule, Coins, Communication, December, Doctorate, Earth, Ed Robertson, Eleanor, Evan, Expedition, Exploration, Fame, First, Flights, Float, Fly, Gold, Guitar, Hall, Helene, Honorary, Kyle, Launch, Major, Masters, Medals, Milton, Mission, Navy, Oddity, Orbit, Shuttle, Spacewalk, Station, Training Yesterday’s Answer: Stews

8/2/13

51 Obama’s “Dreams From My Father,” e.g. 52 Olympics chant 53 Terrible twos cries 58 City in Kansas 59 Go after, as flies 60 Slip in the pool? 61 Some reddish deer 62 Rent 63 Beach transp.

LISHEG

DOTDES

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: ADOPT DROOP PERSON SPRUCE Answer: The four-star general hated following the — DOCTOR’S ORDERS

4026 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses Clallam County General Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County TIMBER COMPANY 3 log truck drivers, min. 2 y r s. ex p. a n d g o o d driving record. Processor/harvester operator, for thinning application. Log loader opeator, for sorting and laoding logs. Buncher operator, for clearcut production logging. Logging truck mechanic, full-time, own tools, self started, professional. Compettive wage, steady work. Resumes to: RyfieldProperties@ hotmail.com Or call (360)460-7292, please leave message or fax (360)417-8013 (360)417-8022 All positions open for immediate employment.

O R O I T T S Y S A O A M O W

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

READY TO MOVE IN Many upgrades to this 3 bedroom charmer in Carlsborg including teak engineered hardwood f l o o r s, c a r p e t , p a i n t , kitchen cabinets and many more! Come see! Fully fenced front yard, spacious rooms and location with country charm but close to town. MLS#270826. $130,000. Brooke Nelson (360)417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

FOR SALE By Owner. $185,000. Immaculate, spacious 1,848 sf on 1.01 acres, between Sequim and Port Angeles. 2004 doublewide, 3 br., 2 bath, large kitchen, with breakfast bar, dining room, living room, large family rm. Attached 2-car garage, storage REAL HOT PROPERTY shed. Private septic and Spacious Home is in a ver y well kept 55 and well. (360)457-8345. older park. This unit is well located on a corner lot - has work shop as well as car por t. Ver y well landscaped for-privacy. MLS#271527. $15,000. Emilie Thornton (360)912-3934 COLDWELL BANKER FSBO $237,000 Open UPTOWN REALTY plan triple wide 2300 sf, 3 br., 2 bath, large bonus room or 4th bedroom. Mountain view on 1.01 acres, close to Discovery Trail, not in the Carlsborg Urban Growth Area. Covered front porch, large rear deck, SALE or RENT extra large 28 x 36 (1008 sf) detached gar- 3 Br., 2 bath, all appliances included+ w/d. age and workshop. built in surround (360)582-9782 sound, French doors to patio, big backyard, IT’S GOT IT ALL V i e w s o f t h e v a l l e y, shed, double garage, Straits, Mt. Baker, an ex- fireplace, crown moldceptional home, 4 Br, 3+ ing. Cul-de-sac neighbaths, over 4,400 sq. ft., borhood! Rental price beautiful yard, fenced, $1200 monthly. Call gardens, pond, 3 car Tammy now (360)457-9511 or garage, acreage and pri(360)461-9066! vacy! $545,000. ML#271064. Kathy Brown This is one of a kind! (360)417-2785 Beautiful flowers and COLDWELL BANKER fruit trees. Big master UPTOWN REALTY suite with all tiled master bath. Large sit down dining room that over looks LOTS OF ROOM! Great central Por t An- the grand living room. geles location on lower Family room with a cozy Cherry Hill. Over 2,000 fireplace. Adorable adu SF that can be config- in the back of the home ured into six bedrooms! that anyone would love New floor coverings in to live in! Great big deck! most rooms. Check this With hot Tub. Too much to tell you, please come out! $159,000. MLS#271453. and see! Extra garaage in the back for all your Dan Gase toys. View could be im(360)417-2800 proved of the water by COLDWELL BANKER trimming a few trees out UPTOWN REALTY front. MLS#252297. $525,000. PRIME DOWNTOWN THELMA DURHAM SEQUIM (360)460-8222 Commercial property, 33 WINDERMERE f t . o f Wa s h i n g t o n S t . PORT ANGELES frontage, 1 1/2 blocks from city center, rental on rear of property, great PLACE YOUR investment opportunity. AD ONLINE ML#270180/440563 With our new $99,900 Classified Wizard you can see your Terry Peterson ad before it prints! (360)683-6880 www.peninsula WINDERMERE dailynews.com SUNLAND

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 Track 5 Put up 10 Agile 14 Song in the musical “Kismet” 15 1973 Stones ballad 16 Small music group 17 Custard concoction 18 Sticking point 19 Big refs. 20 Gap that’s easy to bridge? 23 Chemical ending 24 Animal enclosure 25 They’re found in mines and minis 28 Prize for neatest coloring? 33 Icelandic literary collection 34 Look down on the clouds, perhaps 35 Ice cream entrepreneur Joseph 36 Kiss while hiking? 41 Diving bird 44 __ vodka: ristorante phrase 45 Ally of Roderigo 49 Alien adopted by Herman and Lily? 54 Big name in beauty 55 That, in Madrid 56 Inc. abroad 57 “If you don’t go to bed, Santa won’t come,” e.g.? 62 Lion portrayer 64 Words to a kidder, and a hint to how this puzzle’s five longest answers were created 65 “__ off?” 66 It’s not a big case 67 __ lazuli 68 Sandy shade 69 Family fare letters 70 Plato’s market 71 Soccer broadcaster Messing

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

UPSCALE SUNLAND HOME 3 bed, 2.5 bath, over 2200 SF, beautifully landscaped on a cul-desac. Patio view of the 18th fairway and green, marble tile entr y and hardwood floors, Granite counters and new fixtures (kitchen/baths). 3 car 951 sf garage. ML#519503/271680 $359,900 Tyler Conkle (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

605 Apartments Clallam County

HOME: 3 Br., 2 bath, nice neighborhood, Forks. $750 per mo. (360)640-8286

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. Attractive, spacious 1 (360)417-2810 Br., $545, 2 Br., $645 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. i n P. A . N ew c a r p e t , A 1 br 1 ba ...............$525 vert blinds, pvt patio, A 1 br 1 ba ...............$585 updated appliances, H 2 br 1 ba ..............$600 laundr y r ms, views, A 2 br 1 ba util incl ...$600 on-site mgr. Ask abt A 2 br 1 ba ...............$700 our current discount. www.olympic H 2 br 2 ba ...............$750 square.com H 3+ br 2 ba .............$875 (360)457-7200 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1000 H 4 br 2 ba .............$1200 VERY IMMACULATE STORAGE UNITS HOME CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 Great Mt. View, close to $40 MO.-$100 MO. ba, no smoking/pets t ow n , c o r n e r l o t , l ow Complete List at: $500. (360)457-9698. maintenance landscap- 1111 Caroline St., P.A. i n g . P r i va t e s o u t h e r n d e ck . A t t a c h e d 2 c a r P.A.: 2 Br. 1 bath, car- CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent garage, with smaller 1 port, no pets. $785, dep. r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . (360)457-7012 bay garage has French $700. (360)452-3540. doors to outside, great for Studio, R/V Parking P.A.: 320 Fogarty Ave. 2 br, 1 ba. Clean, com- P. A . : 1 B r. a p t . $ 6 0 0 with power. fo r t a bl e d u p l ex . W / D, mo., $300 dep., util. in$224,950 deck, garage. Great lo- cluded, no pets. ML#271324/500093 (360)457-6196. cation. No smoking/pets. Jeff Biles First/Last/Deposit. $750. 360-477-6706 Tel: 360-457-2195. TOWN & COUNTRY P. A . : 1 B r. a p t . $ 6 0 0 mo., $300 dep., util. inP.A.: 320 Fogarty Ave. 2 cluded, no pets. 308 For Sale br., 1 ba. Comfor table (360)457-6196. Lots & Acreage duplex. W/D, deck, garage. Great location. No S E Q U I M : 2 . 5 a c r e s . s m o k i n g / p e t s . F i r s t / P.A.: Quality, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, NS, NP. Good well area, power Last/Deposit. $700. $650. (360)796-3560. to property, county ap(360)457-2195 proved septic, partially Properties by w o o d e d , v i e w, q u i e t P.A.: 4 Br., 3 ba, waroad. Owner financing t e r / m t n . v i e w, 1 y r . Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com available. $85,000. l e a s e . $ 1 , 1 5 0 m o. , (360)460-2960 $1,150 dep. 457-3099. WANTED: 2+ acres on B l a c k D i a m o n d , P. A . Please know your price before you call, thank you. (360)452-4403.

408 For Sale Commercial Panoramic view of the Port Angeles Harbor and the Strait from the living areas of this 1427 sqft home. The home sits on a nicely landscaped double lot overlooking the PA Harbor. Features include mahogany cabinets, tiled breakfast bar, tile entry, brick veneer siding and a great patio. $350,000. MLS#271699. Tom Blore (360)683-4116 PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE

505 Rental Houses Clallam County CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, fireplace. $875 mo. (360)457-0014 DOWNTOWN SEQUIM 1,800 sf, 3 Br., 2 ba, 2 car gar., fenced, clean, extras, near park/ schools. $1,200 mo. 582-9848 or 477-5070

P.A.: Amazing 2 Br., 2 ba, fenced. $795 mo., no pets. (360)452-1395.

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

ROOMMATE WANTED P.A.: View, new 3 Br. 3 bath, office, family room. To share expenses for very nice home west of Lease $1,400. 457-4966 P.A. on 10+ acres. $450 mo., includes utilities, DiProperties by Landmark. portangeles- rectTV. Must see. Call L o n n i e a f t e r 5 p. m . landmark.com (360)477-9066. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, laundry room, 1 car gar., R O O M : w i t h p r i v a t e no smoking. $850 incl. bath, off Mt. Angeles, water/septic. 683-0932. $450, f/l/d neg. Incl. utilities. Cable is extra. Special Sequim Acre Refs. Pets? 461-6542. 1 Br., cute, tidy, $620. Lovely 2 Br., 2 ba, $975. 1163 Commercial Lease (360)504-2905

Rentals

605 Apartments Clallam County Enjoy Your First Month FREE and Pay Only $99 TO MOVE IN! EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 2 and 3 Br. apts avail. $685 and $760. Some restrictions apply. Call today! Managed by Sparrow, Inc.

EAST SIDE P.A.: 37x30, (2) 10x10 doors, bathroom, $550 mo. 23x14 with bathroom, 9x7 door, $ 2 2 5 m o. 1 8 x 1 4 a n d 16x30 with 1/2 bath, 9x7 entry door, $350. (360)460-1809 (360)461-3367 or (360)457-9527

6005 Antiques & Collectibles

M I S C : A n t i q u e t a bl e, oak, (5) leaves, makes 13’, with (8) oak chairs, $600. Carved maple coffee table, $300. Antique oak hutch, $600. TV table, black, moder n, 3 glass shelves, $50. Floor lamp, $25. (360)457-3169

MODEL TRAINS: O Gauge. Various manufacturers, specializing in steam and diesel locomotives. Plenty of accessories, incl. houses, construction equip., display cases, display tables, etc. $50,000. (360)683-6855

6010 Appliances

MISC: GE glass-top s t o ve , $ 1 5 0 . Wa s h e r and dryer set, Maytag, $150. (360)460-1377.

6025 Building Materials

C A R P E T: B e i g e w i t h b r ow n f l e ck s, 1 0 . 5 ’ x 13.5’, with pad, great shape. $240. (360)461-0321

6035 Cemetery Plots

CEMETERY PLOT: In S e q u i m C e m e t e r y, $1,995 plot in Division 5. Asking $1,200/obo. (360)683-3317

6042 Exercise Equipment

BIANCHI Road Bike. Bianchi XL EV2 Reparto Corse aluminum road bike (58 cm) Campi Chorus components. M av i c o p e n p r o r i m s made in Italy. Used, very good condition. $600. (360)417-6923

TREADMILL: Profor m Crosswalk Spor t, progra m m a bl e, l i ke n ew. $375. (360)457-5143.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

MISC: Smith & Wesson, 9 mm, 15 shot, 2 clips, like new, $700. 380 auto, 8 shot, $350. (360)452-3213

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

RIFLE: Winchester 1886, 40-65 Cal., Serial Number 7044, good condition, original Ideal No. 6 reloading tool in box, with papers. $2,700. Call between 6-7 p.m., (360)808-2328

SEQUIM: Office/retail space 850 sf. $800 mo. (360)460-5467

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

GARAGE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013 C3

&

YARD SALES O n t h e Pe n i n s u l a 8120 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales Jefferson County Sequim Sequim Sequim PA - Central PA - West PA - West PA - East PA - East GARAGE/PLANT Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 10-4 p.m., mile #6, 6044 Oak Bay Rd., Port Ludlow. Tables of exciting new additions and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve added new selections to our perennials and cedar planter boxes. G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . 10-4, Sun. 11-3, 283652 US Hwy 101, 1 mi. south of Fat Smittys. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plus size clothes and menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shirts, tools, kitchen gagets, puzzles, kids books and toys. No early birds.

ESTATE SALE Please join us on Satu r d ay, Au g u s t 3 r d , from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at 755 W. Washington, Sequim, (Hollywood V i d e o ) fo r a H U G E sale. We will be offering for your consideration antique/collectible furniture/china/silverp l a t e , a r t , j e w e l r y, PURSES, BASKETS, POTTERY, books, retro, lawn/garden, sewing, holiday, tools, and so much more. See you there! Please bring a donation of non-perishable food items for the Salvation Ar my Soup Kitchen. Swallowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nest Antiques & Estate Sales www.swallowsnest antiques.weebly.com

HUGE YARD Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-5 p.m., 21 Glen Ave., Chimacum. 1979 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Barth class A motor home, 1947 CJ Jeep with many extras, 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; flat bed, double axle trailer, tools, wood working, carpet, electrical and air, Japense rest a r u a n t d i s h e s, t oy s, crafts, clothings and lots F I S H E R M A N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S S a l e : Olympic Peninsula and of misc. No early birds. Greywolf Fly Fishers Annual Sale to support civ8142 Garage Sales ic activities for kids and Sequim vets. Sat., 8-2 p.m. at t h e P u m p k i n Pa t c h , EPIC Sale: Too big for a H w y. 1 0 1 a t K i t c h e n garage sale; yard sale, Dick. Fishing, outdoor over 40 tbls of items. and household items. 100s of Items under $1.00 along with some GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., high end items ever y- 7am- 1pm. 821 East Althing in-between. Gath- der. Misc. tools, rugs, e r e d f r o m 7 d i f fe r e n t clothing, small appliancstorage units. tools, fur- es, household and more. niture, baby clothes, jewelry, totes, kitchen items, GARAGE Sale. Fri.-Sat., camping, antiques. too 8-4 p.m., Sun., 8-2 p.m. much to list everything Recliners, camera, furnipr iced to sell quickly. ture, collectables...clothFr i / S a t 8 : 0 0 - 4 : 0 0 . 5 3 ing. Rain or shine. 153 Falcon Dr. in Sequim. E. Diane Dr. Nor th on MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat. Elizabeth Lane, across 8-3 p.m., follow signs on from â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Lodge,â&#x20AC;? turn Medsker to 131 Sunrise Right on E. Diane Dr. Follow road to dead end. View. Too much to list.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6080 Home Furnishings

WA N T E D : R u g e r GP-100, 357, 3 or 4 inch barrell, double action, stainless revolver, or S&M, heavy frame, new condition. 460-4491.

M AT C H I N G l t c a r m e l colored couch, love seat, med walnut colored coffee table/end table, $475. Country maple 30â&#x20AC;? x 48â&#x20AC;? kitchen table with 4 chairs, $100. TV with built in DVD/VCR, $75. Port Angeles. 460-4655.

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 8-2 p.m., 512 N. 7th Ave. Jewelry, holiday items, linens, garden tools, misc. household items, furniture, lots of like-new items priced to sell! Cash only, please! HUGE Garage Sale: Sat. 8-5 p.m., Sun. 8-3 p.m., 634 Heron Hill Rd (off E. Sequim Bay Rd.) To o l s , w a s h e r / d r y e r, camping and phot o / v i d e o e q u i p. , k i d s quad/motorbike and t oy s , r a f t , t a b l e s e t , books, computers, etc... MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 9-3 p.m. 451 Cays Road. All must go! PLANT Sale: Sat., 8-3 p. m . , P u m p k i n Pa t c h Flea Market, off of Hwy. 101. Now taking orders! Day lilies, $5. Foxglove, yarrow, orange sedge, cape fuscia, $4. Sweet flag, and monkshood, blue star creeper, $3. scotch moss, $2. Large hy d r a n g i a , $ 1 5 . C a l l 681-0477, or stop by Denny D.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at the Pumpkin Patch Flea Market!

YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., Aug.3-4, 9-5 p.m., Fri.S u n . , Au g . 9 - 1 1 , 9 - 5 p.m., 1024 Deseret Ave. Vintage and antique furniture/items from many eras, dishes and linens, gently used clothing, and seasonal decor, lots of PUMPKIN PATCH misc. items. Too much FLEA MARKET too list! Cash only! No Sat., 8-4 p.m., corner of earlies, please! Hwy. 101 and KitchenDick Rd. Absolutely no e a r l y s a l e s . $ 1 5 p e r 8180 Garage Sales space, no reservations PA - Central needed. More info: (360)461-0940 allstarestatesales.com UNIQUE Sale: Fri.-Sat., Sat.-Sun, 10-4 p.m. 9-3 p.m., 111 Bell St., 121 S. Alder Ln. Sequim. Store fixtures, Pics and info at website! furniture, lamps, light fixtures, tables, etc. E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . , 10-2 p.m., 211 W. 9th GARAGE SALE ADS St. Glassware, dishes, Call for details. tools, and some furni360-452-8435 ture, misc. items. 1-800-826-7714

6125 Tools

7035 General Pets

WOODSPLITTER: Electric wood splitter, 5 ton, by Dr. Power, new. See a t S t eve â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s R e p a i r i n Carlsborg. $400. (360)457-6243

FREE: Cat. Less than 1 year old, spayed and has all shots. For mer owner has passed on. Likes to hide or sit at the window, uses litter box. Beautiful moddled gray color, medium hair. (360)565-3051

WOODWORKING Equipment: Band saw, 12â&#x20AC;?, 6 new blades, $200. Scroll saw, $100. Planer, $200. Router with table, $50. Jig saw, $25. Table saw, $100. Drill press, $100. Lathe, $100. (2) 16 gal. shop vacs, $50 ea. Sawzall, $40. etc. Cash only! (360)683-6130

MISC: Patio furniture, tabl e, 6 c h a i r s, c h a i s e l o u n g e , sw i n g , g o o d FIRE LOGS Dump truck load, $300 condition, $400. Shotplus gas. Madrona, $400 gun, 20 gauge Remington, semi-automatic, plus gas. (360)732-4328 good condition, $265. FIREWOOD: $179 deliv(360)504-0216 ered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for 6100 Misc. $499. Credit card ac6140 Wanted Merchandise cepted. 360-582-7910. & Trades www.portangeles COMMERCIAL RACK firewood.com BOOKS WANTED! We Cantilever commercial love books, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll buy WANTED: Firewood. ra ck s u i t a l e fo r p i p e, yours. 457-9789. (360)452-3200 steel or lumber. (4) uprights, 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; tall, with (20) 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; arms. Overall length of 6135 Yard & 6065 Food & 18â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. $650. Garden Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market (360)457-0171 BLUEBERRIES: Certified organic, big, sweet. FUEL TANK with tool box for pickup, 100 galU-Pick. $3.25/lb. lon, hand pump, $500. (360)582-1128 360-374-6661.

GEMSTONES, OPALS Cabs and Faceted. Cabs $20-$100 per carat. Facâ&#x20AC;&#x153;RASPBERRIESâ&#x20AC;? U-Pick, $20 per flat. We eted $40-$100 per carat. (360)670-3110 pick, $29 per flat. Green beans, $14.95 for 10lb case. (360)417-6710. GENERATOR: Coleman Powermate 5,500 watt, like new. $375. 6075 Heavy (360)683-0146

Equipment

SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Electric tar p system, excellent condition. $6,500/obo. (360)417-0153

6080 Home Furnishings BUNK BED: Tan bunk bed with desk/dresser in one. Top bank, 6 small drawers, pulled out shelf fo r w r i t i n g , c o m p u t e r keyboard, or whatever you would like to use it. The bottom bunk is a pull out. No mattress included. There is a ladder and behind the drawers and desk is an opening t h a t c a n b e u s e d fo r storage or a for t for a young childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s imagination. My son has outgrown the bed and would love to see it go to another family. $500. If interested call (360)460-3291

RIDING MOWER: RX75 John Deere. 9 hp, 30â&#x20AC;? b l a d e , g r e a t m o w e r. $350. (360)461-5069. SWING SET: Large, sturdy swing set and p l ay s t r u c t u r e w i t h slide, ladders, and bars. Unbolt for transport. Excellent value. $650. (360)457-8421.

7025 Farm Animals & Livestock

ANGUS STEERS: (2), MISC: High end car au- 20 months old. $1,200 dio equip, $500. Bear each. (360)732-4241. c o m p o u n d b o w, $ 7 5 . G o l d G y m s w e i g h t DONKEYS: (3). Male, b e n c h , $ 1 0 0 . 7 5 g a l . female, and 5 week old s a l t w a t e r a q u a r i u m , youngster. $750 for all! (360)452-2615 $100. 3 lg dog kennels, $30 ea. New Echo JD 955 Hydrostatic chainsaw, $100. CrabTractor. 1996 4WD compots, $25 ea. Air compact tractor ; mid and pressor, $50. Kenmore rear PTO; 70A loader; dryer, $50. Call after 3 33 HP; 744 hours; alp.m. (360)797-1198. ways stored inside; excellent condition. No PELLET STOVE: Lopi, t r a d e s . $ 1 1 , 5 0 0 / o b o. ( 5 4 1 ) 7 4 0 - 0 4 5 1 L e ave black. $750. message. (360)683-0986 SEWING MACHINE Commercial. $450. (360)452-9460

PASTURE HAY $3 bale off the field. Local (206)790-0329

WA N T E D : D o n key o r mule for a wedding on STORAGE CABINETS Sept. 15th, must be able F l a m m a b l e s s t o r a g e to be ridden for 5 min. or cabinets, (2) 43â&#x20AC;? x 65â&#x20AC;? x less. Call Jen 18â&#x20AC;?, 45 gallon capacity. (503)758-9296 or email $300 each. jendeegoff@gmail.com (360)457-0171

7030 Horses CHAIRS: 2 cranberr y W A L K E R : S i t - d o w n c o l o r e d o v e r s t u f f e d walker, like new. $125. (360)681-2340 chairs. Good condition. HORSE: Pretty little $110 each. 477-1362. Morgan horse, 14.2 6105 Musical hands, good to ride and CHAIRS: (4) Low breakInstruments good with kids. 18 years fast room castered armold. Great horse, but too chairs, excellent meduim b l u e u p h o l s t r y, p l u s FREE: Piano. 1916 Up- small for my husband to ride! $700/obo. right antique piano, with brass and wood. Nearly (360)457-6584 new condition, little use. bench, good condition. Cost $1,300. Must sell Call 417-6881 between S A D D L E S : E n g l i s h , now. $500, or any rea- 9-6 p.m. 17.5â&#x20AC;?, $350. Dressage, sonable offer! 17.5â&#x20AC;?, $450. Wester n, (360)775-3449 PIANO: Stor y & Clark 14â&#x20AC;?, $150. Call or text spinet. $300. 452-9121. (360)460-6098 DESK: Large, oak executive desk, file drawers, excellent condition, 6115 Sporting 7035 General Pets comes apar t to move, Goods $150. (360)457-7774. BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call (360)477-9659.

FREE: Cat. Male, neutered, 1.5 years old, extremely playful and friendly. Likes kids. Must go to good home. (360)452-1599

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 8-4 p.m. 128 Hancock. Whicker, Pianorg a n , m a s s a g e t a bl e , cannon printer, Mac software, toys, child chairs, 1940s vintage wearables, 78 albums, mirror, potter y, books, c h i l d r e n â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s b o o k s a n d crafts, misc. M OV I N G S a l e : S a t . Sun., 9-3 p.m., 201 Fogarty, south of Lauridsen Blvd., between Cherry and Laurel Streets. No a l l ey a c c e s s , p l e a s e park on Fogarty St., sale is at back of proper ty. Good stuff! Something for everyone!

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

ESTATE Sale: Sat.Sun., 10-3 p.m., 1527 W. 1 2 t h S t . 1 9 5 0 s hutch, antique dresser with mirrors, end tables, chairs, desks, outdoor sink, portable heaters, mattress and box spr ings, linens, sheets, dishes, glasse s , s t e m w e a r, f l a t ware, books, artwork, decor, clothes and accessories, jeans and lots more! You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss this one! Cash only, please!

ALICEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 4 Family Garage Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m., Sun., 10-3 p.m., 2207 Edgewood Dr., across from the garden store. Ceramics, Barbies, tattoo gun, bicycles, and SALE: 1128 W. 12th St., In Alley. Lots of baby something for everyone! clothes, shoes and play GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., items. Kerosene heater, 9-4 p.m., 1926 W. 6th wheelchair, mens and St. Lots of treasurers. womens clothes, surfboard, snowboards and YARD Sale: Fri.-Sun., much more! Sat.-Sun. 8-3 p.m., 917 W. 13th 9-3 p.m. No early birds. St. Air conditioners!

YA R D S a l e : L a r g e yard sale at 2006 W. 4th St. We have bikes, mower, recliner, dinning room table with insert and chairs. Sofa and ottoman, Amish h e a t e r, a n d m o r e . Runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fr iday through Sunday.

8183 Garage Sales PA - East

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-5 p.m., 394 S. Alder Ln., 4 Seasons Park 1/2 mile east of Walmar t-follow signs. 30+ year accumulation of antiques and collectibles! Including cast-iron 1000 LP records, BC pottery, cobalt blue glass, cranberr y glass, lots of other glass, furniture, chairs, hundreds of items too numerous to mention! No early admission!

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1840 E. Woodhaven Ln., up Golf Course Rd., on right. Oak coffee table with (2) end tables, household items including kitchen, bath, linens, s m a l l a p p l i a n c e s, ( 2 ) grocer y car ts, lamps, mirror, pictures, microwave, ironing board, iron s e n t r y s a fe, p h o n e s, BUILDER FAMILY Sale: decorations, and barbeSat., 9-3 p.m., 173 Mt. cue. P l e a s a n t R d . To o l s , hardware, br ick, tem- G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . pered glass, windows, Sun., 9-?, 654 S. Alder camping, sports, diving, Ln. Car parts, household many boats, Jeep, mo- goods, appliances, misc. torcycle, camper, wood. HUGE GARAGE Sale: G A R AG E S a l e : C h i l - Fri.-Sat., 9-1 p.m., Third drenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s items, tools, some and Penn St., P.A. Pool furniture. Sat.-Sun., 9-4 table, crab pots, wood p.m. 103 Willow Lane, 4 chipper, tools, desks, Seasons Park. misc. fur niture, books and clothes! GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-?, 351 Klahhane Rd. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Electronics, tools, anFri.-Sun., 8-4 p.m., 66 tiques, books, furniture, Cougar Ln. Up Monroe, housewares, chainsaw, left on Draper, left on and more! We have an Cougar. (2) Gas fireplaca bu n d a n c e o f eve r y es, wedding reception thing! equipment, wall oven, M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : cook top, compactor, (2) Fri.-Sat., 9-4 p.m., 2228 wood lathes, refrigerator, E. 4th Ave. Halloween tools, clothes, Goldwing decorations, appliances, motorcycle. Follow the furniture, household stuff yellow plates to our awesome sale! and more! A BA R N S a l e : S wa p meet in barn behind Port Angeles Les Schwab, 9-3 p.m., Fri.-Sat., 10-3 p.m., Sun. 3 new people, featuring Chevron, Barbie and military collections, household items, tools. Come join us for a large space, just $15 per day. 452-7576 for info.

MOVING Sale: Inside/ outside; rain or shine. 421 East 10th St., P.A. 9 - 5 p. m . S a t . - S u n . Tr uck canopy, dualspor t motorcycle, mountain bike, camping and backpacking gear, weight machine, barbell set, tools, gas cans, paint sprayer, window box A/C, window fans, fur niture, lamps, persian carpets, area rugs, kitche n g a d g e t s , m i c r o, etc., fur niture, 51â&#x20AC;? hdtv, guitar, tab books, music stuff, music cds, DVD Blue-Ray movies, anime, PS1, PS2, PS3, Gamecube, Sega Saturn and PC video games, PS1, PS2, Gamecube Sega Saturn consoles, books, maps, framed art, etc. MOVING Sale: Sat., 11-5 p.m., 309 S. Albert St.

8435 Garage Sales - Other Areas HAPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BIG BARN SALE 30+ vendors. Antiques and collectibles, new and old! Come and have a great day and tons of fun! Sat., 8-6 p.m., Sun., 9-5 p.m. 2718 Rude Rd., Poulsbo , WA. (360)930-0226

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9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

PUPPIES: Chihuahua/ Pomeranian pups: 10 wks. $200 ea. (360)582-0384

ROADRUNNER: 2008 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roadrunner by Sun Valley travel trailer. Purc h a s e d n ew i n 2 0 0 9 . Cheapo bias ply tires reWANTED: AKC STUD For service to 3 yr. old placed with quality radiAKC Golden female in als 2,000 miles ago. 3 season now, excellent burner stove top, micropedigree. (360)681-3390 wave, A.C., Double bed, s h o w e r, T V a n t e n n a . Everything works. Very ightweight, can be 9820 Motorhomes ltowed with V-6. $8,950. (360)379-1882 MOTOR HOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 29â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S u n S e e ke r C l a s s C. Only 8,000 mi., 2 tip- 9802 5th Wheels outs, loaded, canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use, must sell. $40,000 firm. 5TH WHEEL: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; La(360)452-7870 after 6. kota. Ver y nice cond., MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 23H kept in shed. $12,500. (360)452-1308 Winnebago View. 20K, Mercedes diesel, 16-20 mpg, excellent condition. 5th WHEEL: 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alpenlite. No leaks. $3,295. $63,000. (253)312-9298 (360)775-1288 MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;84 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5TH WHEEL: 26â&#x20AC;&#x2122; AlpenSpor tscoach III. 454 eng., rear queen bed, lite. New fridge/freezer, full bath, new convection toilet, A/C, micro, dual micro, new fridge, wood batteries and propane c a b i n e t s , r u n s w e l l , tank, nice stereo, queen air adustable bed, awnclean, 47K miles. $6,800 ing, all in good condition, (360)683-1851 clean and ready to go. MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;85 21â&#x20AC;&#x2122; $3,850/obo. Leave mesToyota Rogue. 56K mi., sage at (360)452-4790. manual trans, sound engine, 6 new tires, needs 5TH WHEEL: 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Crossroads Patriot upgrade work, rear bath, A/C cab a n d b o d y, s l e e p s 4 . model, used twice overnight, immaculate, tow$6,000/obo. able with half ton. Below (360)504-2619 or book value at $38,750 (360)477-8807 mornings includes slider hitch. 683-5682 or MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;87 21â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 541-980-5210 Toyota Slumberqueen. Low miles, 4 cyl., good s h a p e . S a l e d u e t o 5TH WHEEL: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;89, 34â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Au t o m a t e, ex . c o n d . , health. $7,500/obo. must see!, $4,500/obo. (360)452-7246 670-5957, or 460-5128. MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 35â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fleetwood Southwind, 5 T H W H E E L : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 4 2 7 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Class A, 27,500 original C o a c h m a n C a t a l i n a . miles, dual roof AC, lg. Great cond., single slide, s l i d e, Fo r d â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 4 6 0 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; , hy - new tires. $3,900/obo. (360)417-8840 draulic levelers, 2 TVs, rear camera, Onan gen- 5TH WHEEL: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 29â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alerator, neutral interior, pen Lite, single slide, must see. $23,999. l ow u s a g e, ex c e l l e n t (360)452-4136 shape. $11,500/obo. (615)330-0022 MOTORHOME: Dodge â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;76 Class C. 26â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, good 5TH WHEEL: Carriage c o n d . , n ew t i r e s, l ow â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 4 C a m e o . T h r e e miles, nonsmoker, in PA. slides, center kitchen $5,000 firm. 460-7442. with island. King bed. Automatic HDTV Sat. on roof. In great condition, 9832 Tents & this has been a nonTravel Trailers smoking unit and no aniCAMPER TRAILER: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80 mals. $19,250. Contact Holiday Rambler, Presi- via e-mail: bjgarbarino@hot dential 28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. New fridge mail.com or and furnace. $3,500. (360)390-8692 (360)928-9436 TRAILER: Airstream â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;76 Tr a d ew i n d . Tw i n r e a r bath, ver y well maintained. $7,500. (360)808-2344

ESTATE Sale: 1111 W. 16th., Sat. 10-4, Sun., 10-3. 1/2 price Sun. 100â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Vintage b o o k s, Z a n e G r ey, Victor Hugo, Cooper, Agatha Christie, Perry Mason, Nancy Drew, Goose Bumps just to name a few. Moody Blues collection, CDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 3 3 1 / 2 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 4 5 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 7 8 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plus the AM/FM Stereo to play them on, nice Antique piano, sheet mus i c , Ya m a h a G u i t a r , P o c k e t Knives,Duncan Phyfe style table, love seat, sewing machine with cabinet, kitchen glass ware and a fiberglass g r e e n h o u s e . To o many unusual unique items to list.

5TH WHEEL: Fleetwood â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 Wilderness. Hitch included, 24L5C, clean, smoke-free, 1 slide, full bath, A/C, elec. jacks. $5,195. (360)452-7967.

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TRAVEL TRAILER Fleetwood â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00, 26â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, slide 5TH WHEEL: Sportking 1981, 18â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. $850. out, great cond., $9,500. (360)808-7545 (360)452-6677

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9808 Campers & Canopies

SHOP LOCAL

CAMPER: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alpenlite. TV, micro, self cont., excellent cond. $6,000. (360)928-9770 after 5.

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&&5jkh7njik5R5&--#Ĺ&#x20AC;H*(#(-/&#&3(1-8)' *COMMERCIAL VEHICLES NOT INCLUDED IN THIS SPECIAL

02864

TABLE: Teak dining table. Oval, 48â&#x20AC;?-90â&#x20AC;?, with (2) extensions, (6) chairs. Very good condition. $300. (360)417-3893

SEQUIM SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTER 8th ANNUAL BENEFIT SALE! Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. Furniture, books, tools, clothing, shoes, toys household and kitchen items, electronics, DV D â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, l a m p s, c ra f t items, linens, mobility scooters, and a BAKE SALE too! 8,000 sf of Bargains! Proceeds benefit SSAC and SSACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scholarship Fund for high school seniors. 990 E. Washington St., Suites E104 and E105, in the QFC shopping center. Call 683-6806 for more info

GARAGE Sale: Month of August, starting Aug. 2, through Aug. 31, Mond ay t h r o u g h S u n d ay, 10-4 p.m. 415 E. Front St. Uniques and antiques, books, tools, arts and crafts, designer c l o t h i n g i n X X s i ze s, school supplies and aquarium equipment. Everything but the kitchen sink. You could furnish your entire house with all this stuff!


Classified

C4 FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013 9808 Campers & Canopies

9808 Campers & Canopies

CAMPER: ‘04 Lance Lite 835. 8.5’, elec. j a ck s, T V, ex . c o n d . , $7,995. With Chev ‘04 Silvarado 2500 HD/LS, ext. cab, 8’ bed, 6 L gas engine, 4WD, airbags, ex. cond, $23,995. (360)582-0094

CAMPER: 1995 LANCE SQUIRE 5000 9’10”. Ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n Completely self contained Roof top air Elec. jacks Everything works Call (360)681-0346 or (360)513-4938. $5,000.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

10’ NAVIGATOR sailboat/rowboat. See our online ad for full description or call (360)683-0915 at Diamond Point, Sequim. Sale price is $2,200. (360)683-0915.

APOLLO CRUISER: 21’, new 165 OMC with heat exchanger, recently serviced outdrive, custom trailer, new tires and brakes, pot puller, extras. $3,600/obo. (360)582-0892

BOATS: 14’ Livingston, with Shorelander trailer, $495. New, 10’ Walker B ay, w i t h E Z L o a d e r, $995. (360)452-6677.

12.5’ ZODIAC with motor. 1998 Mark II C Zodiak, set up with a 30 HP Johnson jet. 12 gal. fuel t a n k , o a r s, a i r p u m p. Motor has just been to the shop for a complete check up and is ready to go fishing. Great setup for rivers or salt water. $3,500. Inquiries please call, (360)531-0402.

LANCE Lite: 2003 845 Truck Camper. Great condition-used twice. Roof air, queen bed, d i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o bed. Shwr stall/pan full h g h t . B l u e i n t e r i o r. Lots of storage. Length-16.5 ft. $8,995. Call (360)681-0172

9829 RV Spaces/ Storage SEQUIM: RV space for rent, $400, $100 dep. all inclusive. (360)683-8561

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9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

SHOP LOCAL

1979 Classic! 17.5’ SeaRay pleasure c r u i s e r. M e r c r u i s e r ‘470’ 4 cylinder Inboard, Mercruiser outdrive. Never been in salt water. 781 total lifetime hours. Professionally serviced spring and fall. Classy Classic! $3,200. (360)775-7670

APOLLO: 17’ Classic Runabout. 140 hp OMC BOAT HOUSE: ExcelI / O, t ra i l e r, ex c e l l e n t lent shape, 43’ x 20’, condition. $3,500. P.A. Marina. $5,000 firm. (360)683-0146 (360)452-2039

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

BRIG and triler: Brig and EZ lift trailer, 10’, hard b o t t o m . B o a t Tr a i l e r, 1klb cap. $1,200. BAYLINER 2859. Price (360)582-1529 reduced from $26,000 to CANOE: 18’ Wilkenson $20,000. Selling because of health. Engine cedar strip, made in Port overhauled last year, Townsend. $850. (360)683-0146 outdrive replaced 3 yrs ago, 10 hrs on 25 hp CRESTLINER: ‘03 12’ kicker. Great electronics including radar, color aluminum, 8 HP Johnfish finder, GPS char t son motor, new trailer, plotter. Diesel heater, w i t h a c c e s s o r i e s . c u s t o m c a b i n e t s a n d $2,000. (406)531-4114. master bed. Great boat D O W N R I G G E R S : 2 f o r f i s h i n g . E l e c t r i c Pe n n Fa t h o m M a s t e r downriggers, rods and 800, electric. $300 ea. gear. Comfortable week(360)928-3502, lv msg end travel with stove, refrigerator, shower and FLYBRIDGE: 23’ Cruishead. Excellent condi- er. Full canvas, galvation. Call 327-3695. n i ze d t ra i l e r, e l e c t r i c winch, 1,100 hours total BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w time, always garaged. Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruis- $4,500 to a good home. (360)460-9226, P.A. er, freshwater cooling. $3,900/obo. HEWE: 17’ River Run(360)775-9653 ner. 115 Mercur y jet, new 5 hp Ricker, depth BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, sounder, GPS, lots of trailer, 140 hp motor. extras. $7,950. $4,980. (360)683-3577. (360)452-2162

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9817 Motorcycles

PRICE REDUCED 16.5’ Searay with stern drive and MerCruiser, completely restored, $13,500 invested, new engine, upholstery, galvanized trailer, stainless steel prop and canvass cover. MUST SEE! $4,400 firm (360)504-2113

S A I L B O AT : H o l d e r 14/Hobie One-Fourteen. Excellent cond., EZ Loader galvanized trailer. $1,700. (360)681-8528

BMW: ‘99 K1200RS. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 miles. Throttlemiester. BMW touring hard cases. Corbin saddle. BMW aftermarket alarm. $4,350. (425)508-7575. Goldspace@msn.com

KAYAK: $2,500. Cust o m b u i l t 1 6 ’ K ay a k . Newfound Boat Works E x p l o r e r. B e a u t i f u l sculptured cedar and basswood strip planked deck. A work of art. Paddled once, I have too many Kayaks! S A I L B O AT : 1 5 ’ I a n (360)316-9420 Oughtred whilly, sailing/rowing, better than LONESTAR: 17’, 100 hp n e w, c o m p l e t e w i t h Johnson motor, 9.5 kick- oars, trailer, many uper, motor in great shape, g r a d e d a c c e s s o r i e s . g a l va n i ze d E Z - l o a d e r $7,250/obo. t r a i l e r, d e p t h f i n d e r, (360)774-6720 $2,500. (360)928-9436. MANTA RAY: ‘97 19.5’, S A I L B OAT : 2 1 ’ , r e tractable keel, trailer, 7.5 I/O . Needs work. HP motor, exceptionally $1,500. (360)461-2056 clean. $3,950. (360)477-7068 MISC: 7.5’ Livingston, with mounting brackets to attach to your yacht, SAILBOAT: 32’ Clipper, plus extras, also has Yanmar diesel, wheel electric motor, $275. (2) s t e e r i n g , f u r l i n g j i b, Scotty downriggers, $85 sleeps 4. $9,995. ea. 7.5 hp 4 stroke Hon(360)457-8221 da O/B, $550. (360)681-4684. SAILBOAT: ‘81 25’ C&C with sails and new 8 hp RACING SAILBOAT 28’ Star. Sails, genoa engine, sleeps 4, toilet/sink. $3,500/obo. and trailer. $3,500. (360)808-7913 (360)963-2743

SEA-DOO: ‘96 Speeds t e r . T w i n R o t e x . DIRTBIKE: Honda ‘04 CRF100. Looks and $5,000. (360)452-3213. runs great. $750/obo. (360)670-5282

DUCATI: ‘00 ST4. 16.7K yellow, pristine, many upgraes. $4,900. Bryan (360)681-8699 SEA SWIRL: 18’ Sierra Cuddy Classic. 120 Johnson, 7.5 Honda kicker. galv. trailer, life jackets, 2 downriggers, ski pole, water skis, rope, canvas and many extras. $6,000/obo. Located in Sequim. (360)477-1011

H A R L E Y: ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 Sportster, 7k miles, mint. $6,900. (360)452-6677.

H.D.: ‘84 FLHS. Only 500 ever made. 33.4k original miles, too much to list. Call for details. $12,000 to loving home. (360)460-8271

HONDA: ‘00 XR100R. Excellent cond., low T I D E R U N N E R : 1 8 ’ , miles. $1000/obo. (360)477-9777 great boat, good shape, lots of extra goodies. HONDA: ‘06 CRF 250X. $8,000/obo. 374-2646. Excellent shape. $2,900.

(360)461-3415 TRAILER: EZ Loader, HONDA: ‘70 Trail 90. tandem axle, 22-24’. High-low range, extras. $1,250. (360)460-9680. $1,000. (360)461-0491.

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D •I •R •E •C •T •O •R •Y


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

For Better or For Worse

9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others

by Lynn Johnston

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013 C5 9556 SUVs Others FORD: ‘95 Bronco 4X4. Good rubber, runs great, 139k. $4,500/obo. (360)457-9148

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

TOYOTA: ‘92 4Runner. GMC: ‘94 Suburban 4x4. 4WD, V6, auto, sunroof, Auto trans, A/C, ‘350’, 199,500 mi., fair to good 2 4 7 , 9 0 0 m i , s e a t s 8 , cond. $1,950. 461-0054. great cond, well cared for. $1,999. Call 9730 Vans & Minivans (360)531-0854

Others

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9817 Motorcycles 9292 Others Others Others BUICK ‘02 LeSABRE K AWA S A K I : ‘ 0 5 K X SEDAN 250F. Few aftermarket accessories, 2 stands, 3.8L V6, automatic, alloy wheels, tinted winset of tires. $2,500. d o w s , key l e s s e n t r y, (360)670-5321 p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, cd stereo, dual front airbags. Only 61,000 original miles! Clean Carfax! Immaculate condition inside and out! This garage-kept Buick shows the absolute best of care! 29 KAWASAKI: ‘08 Vulcan M P G h i g h w ay r a t e d ! 9 0 0 C l a s s i c L T . Come see the PeninsuRed/Black. Showroom la’s most trusted source condition. One owner. for Buick cars for over Ridden easy. Only 4,400 55 years! Stop by Gray Miles. Upgraded: Pas- Motors today! $6,995. senger floorboards and GRAY MOTORS luggage rack. $5,000. 457-4901 (360)582-1080 graymotors.com

SCOOTER: 2007 Roketa Bali 250 Scooter. Fun and economical, 60 mpg. Original owner selling. 1055 miles on it. This bike gets up and goes! Includes helmet and gloves. (360)374-6787 YA M A H A : ‘ 0 6 V i r a g o XV250. Low mi., good cond. $2,450. 461-9022. YAMAHA: ‘77 TT500. Custom and spare parts. $1000/obo. (360)477-4007

9805 ATVs THE TOTAL Package ‘04 Honda 250 EX Good Cond. Runs great. Includes: 2 helm e t s , c o ve r, s a d d l e bags and rack. Custom graphics and modified headlights great for night riding! Recent oil change and new battery. $1,600. (360)461-5827

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect. AMC: ‘78 Pacer. Nice body. $2,250. (360)452-2892 CADILLAC: ‘72 Sedan Deville. Mint condition, original owner, 74,874 mi., garaged. $4,500. (360)683-1288 afternoon CADILLAC: ‘78 Seville. Looks and runs like new, always garaged, nonsmoker, gold, 76K mi. $4,850. (360)928-9724. CHEV: ‘79 Corvette L82. $3,200 or possible trade. (360)457-6540

CHEV: ‘86 El Camino, Conquista package. PS, P B , P W, P D, A / C , cr uise, filt, full gages i n c l . t a c h . , V 8 , a u t o, Gaylord bed cover with l i n e r, f a c t o r y r a l l e y wheels, low miles, not smoked in, garage kept, gold/brown color, tan int. Very original! $11,586.86. (360)683-7789

F O R D : ‘ 3 2 R o a d s t e r. 540 all aluminum Hemi, The Blower Shop 871 blower, custom ever ything, the best money could buy. Serious inquiries only. $250,000 (360)461-4665 FORD: ‘62 Galaxie 500 Conver tible. Excellent, all original, ‘390’ V8, all p owe r, 6 9 , 7 0 0 m i l e s. $18,200. (360)683-3385, Rrobert169@Qwest.net TRIUMPH: ‘72 GT6. $2,500. (360)683-5557.

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C H E V : ‘ 0 7 A v e o . 5 HONDA: ‘06 Accord LX. speed, Ex. cond., low V6, 49K. orig. owner, rem i l e s , 3 5 - 4 0 m p g . cent maint. $12,500. (360)417-8859 $5,500. (360)683-7073 before 5:00 p.m. HONDA: ‘07 Civic HyC H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 2 P T brid. $9,000. Cruiser LTD. Silver. 93K. (425)508-7575 $3,750/obo. 457-0238. HYUNDAI ‘11 ACCENT CHRYSLER: ‘05 PacifiGLS ca Touring. AWD. Leath- Very economical 1.6 lier seats. Heated seats. t e r, 4 c y l , a u t o, A / C, C D. R e d w i t h 9 2 , 0 0 0 A M / F M / C D, s i d e a i r m i l e s . $ 8 , 0 0 0 . G r e a t bags, only 38,000 miles. condition. Balance of factory 5/60 (360)477-5510 warranty, very clean, 1 owner, spotless AutoCHRYSLER ‘08 TOWN check vehicle history reAND COUNTRY port. Non-smoker. Just Touring edition, 3.8 ltr, reduced by $1,000. Ideal v-6, auto, dual A/C, heat, student car. Shop and tilt wheel, cruise, power compare. windows, locks, mirrors $9,995 and dual power heated REID & JOHNSON seats, AM/FM/CD with MOTORS 457-9663 hard disk drive, back-up reidandjohnson.com camera, trip computer, 7 passenger quad seating, KIA ‘06 SPECTRA 5 swivel center seats and HATCHBACK “Sto-n-go,” dual power 1 owner, low miles, fuel sliding doors and tail- efficient, 4 cyl., auto, gate, leather inter ior, A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, rear ent. system with power windows, locks, dual DVD, privacy glass, mirrors, AM/FM/CD, alroof rack, electronic trac- loy wheels, remote start t i o n c o n t r o l , a l l o y and remote entr y, low wheels, remote entr y miles. and low miles! $8,995 $16,995 VIN#361047 VIN#701045 Expires 08/10/13 Expires 08/10/13 Dave Barnier Dave Barnier Auto Sales Auto Sales *We Finance In House* *We Finance In House* 452-6599 452-6599 davebarnier.com davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA MERCURY ‘06 DODGE: ‘03 Caravan. MARINER PREMIER Looks good. $3,500. 4X4 (360)457-9162 1 owner with only 1,526 miles! V6, auto, A/C, tilt DODGE ‘08 CALIBER w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r SXT HATCHBACK windows, locks, mirrors, 4 C y l , a u t o, A / C, t i l t seat, AM/FM/CD stackw h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r er, leather interior with windows, locks, mirrors, h e a t e d s e a t s , p o w e r AM/FM/CD< electronic sunroof, back-up senstability control, alloy sors, r unning boards, wheels, remote entr y privacy glass, roof rack, and more! front and side airbags, $10,995 alloy wheels, tow packVIN#729977 age, remote entry, more! Expires 08/10/13 Save 1/2 over new at Dave Barnier only Auto Sales $15,995 *We Finance In House* VIN#J08088 452-6599 Expires 08/10/13 davebarnier.com Dave Barnier 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA Auto Sales *We Finance In House* FIAT 2012 500 POP 452-6599 This compact car took davebarnier.com Europe by storm when it 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA came out in 2007. It was introduced to the U.S. MINI COOPER: ‘07 Conmarket in 2012. It’s pepvert. Loaded! Miles 23k. py, ver y fuel efficient, $18,000. 477-8377. and most of all fun to drive! Auto, 4 cyl, anti- M I T S U B I S H I : ‘ 0 3 lock brakes, A/C, CD, E c l i p s e. B l a ck , gr e a t power windows/locks, al- c o n d . , 1 8 8 k m i l e s . um. wheels, and more. $5,700. (360)460-2536. $12,500 Preview at: NISSAN ‘00 FRONTIER heckmanmotors.com EX-CAB 4X4 Heckman Motors V6, auto, A/C, cruise, 111 E. Front, P.A. AM/FM/CD, sliding rear (360)912-3583 window, alloy wheels, spray-on liner, rear jump FORD ‘07 FOCUS seats, running boards, ZX3 SE H/B Economical tow package and more! 4 cyl, 5 speed, A/C, tilt $7,995 wheel, power windows, VIN#434985 l o ck s, m i r r o r s, p owe r Expires 08/10/13 sunroof, street appearDave Barnier ance package, Auto Sales A M / F M / C D , a l l o y *We Finance In House* wheels, remote entr y 452-6599 and more. davebarnier.com $6,995 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA VIN#104646 Expires 08/10/13 PONTIAC: ‘03 BonneDave Barnier ville SSEi. Great-riding Auto Sales car, 90k miles, power *We Finance In House* everything, always gar452-6599 aged. $7,000/obo. davebarnier.com (360)809-0356 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA PORCHE ‘00 BOXTER FORD ‘12 FOCUS SEL CONVERTIBLE SEDAN The Boxter convertible is Ford Focus, one of the all sports car! Powered best selling cars in the by 2.7l, 6 cyl mid engine, world today. Excellent 5 speed manual trans., performance, handling, producing 217 HP and and economy. This Fo- still gets over 28 mpg cus is fully equipped with while cruising in and out leather, moonroof, 6-way of cars on the highway! power seat, CD, SYNC, Ve r y l o w 8 9 k m i l e s ! p o w e r w i n d o w s a n d Come in and test drive locks, aluminum wheels today! and more! The gray meONLY $14,950 tallic paint is str iking Preview at: when cruising down the heckmanmotors.com road with the roof open Heckman Motors and the tunes playing! 111 E. Front, P.A. $15,490 (360)912-3583 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com PORCHE: ‘88 944. 1 Heckman Motors owner, 129,500 mi. , ex111 E. Front, P.A. cellent condition. $6,995. (360)912-3583 (360)452-4890 FORD: ‘94 Crown Victoria. New tires, good shape. $1,500. (360)928-9920

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

GMC ‘04 YUKON DENALI 4X4 V8, auto, dual A/C, tilt w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r windows, locks, mirrors, dual power heated seats, adjustable pedals, power sunroof, electronic traction and stability control, Bose AM/FM/CD and cassette with 6 disc stacker, leather interior, third row seating, privacy g l a s s, r o o f ra ck , t ow package, running boards, alloy wheels, remote entry and more! $13,995 VIN#292233 Expires 08/10/13 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

NISSAN: ‘89 300 ZX. Red. V6. Automatic. Tt o p. M a ny n ew p a r t s. $4,500/obo. (360)681-3579

SUBARU ‘08 IMPREZA 2.5i 5-DOOR HATCHBACK WAGON Economical 2.5 liter, 4 cyl., auto, AWD, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r windows and locks, privacy glass, side airbags, 64,000 miles, very clean local car, non-smoker, spotless Autocheck vehicle history report. Black pearl, sharp car. $12,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

TOYOTA ‘01 COROLLA CE SEDAN 1.8L VVT-i 4 cylinder, automatic, air conditioni n g , c a s s e t t e s t e r e o, dual front airbags. Only 71,000 original miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! 38 MPG Highway! Where else do you find such a nice low mileage economy car? Come see the guys with over 55 years exper ience providing the best in quality used cars! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA: ‘09 Prius. 47k, white, nav., leather, 5 CD change. $18,990. 1 (805)478-1696 VW: ‘79 Dasher. 4-door, good shape. $2,000. (360)452-2711

9434 Pickup Trucks Others BRUSHFIRE TRUCK 1981 4X4 1 ton dually, 4 speed manual with granny low, 5.7L V8, 250 gallon H2O tank, 4 yr old Honda GX690 generator, dual side diamond plate tool boxes, everything is in great operating condition and was meticulously maintained by an Eastern Washington fire depar tment. Try and find one this nice! $10,500 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 CHEV: ‘80 2 ton. ‘454’ engine, 4 sp, 2 sp rear axle, 3’ deck with 13’ dump bed, 70 gal. diesel tank. $2,000/obo. (360)457-4521 or 477-3964 after 6 p.m. CHEV: ‘88 Dually. Crew cab. $1,500. (360)477-1761 CHEV: ‘98 1 ton flat bed dump. $6,800. 457-3120 or (360)808-1749.

CHEVY: ‘01 S-10 Enhanced Cab 4 speed Auto V6. Runs great; nice looking with bed liner and Snug Top. 93,200 mi. AM/FM with cassette. 4.3 liter V6; auto fuel inj. $6,200/obo. Call (360)477-4697 DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 2WD Hard-to-find Long Box! Cummins turbo diesel, auto, SLT package, A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM/CD, sliding rear window, running boards, spray-on liner, chrome wheels, tow package, adjustable airbags, remote entr y and more! Local trade with low miles! $24,995 VIN#176717 Expires 08/10/13 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 4X4 This truck literally has it all. 5.7 L HEMI V8 bighor n package, lift kit, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, tow package, sliding rear window, running boards, oversized off-road tires, premium alloy wheels and much more! What a truck! This lifted 4WD cruises down the highway remarkably smooth and cruises over almost any obstacle with its professionally installed liftkit. Talk about power! The 5.7 HEMI V8 has it all over the competition. One fine, well-appointed truck! $22,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors SATURN: ‘97 SL. 4 door 111 E. Front, P.A. A/T, runs well. $1,000 (360)912-3583 cash. (360)808-2861. DODGE: ‘06 Ram. VOLSWAGEN: ‘08 Jetta Manual, 59k miles, ex2 . 0 T. B l a c k . 6 8 , 0 0 0 cellent cond., reg. cab. Very good condition. 6 $9,800. (360)477-6149. disc CD changer. Leather seats, winter packDODGE: ‘10 1/2 ton age. $12,300. white 4x4, 1 owner, (360)477-5510 very good condition. $23,000 VW: ‘78 Super Beetle (505)927-1248 conver tible. Runs good, good cond., DODGE: ‘92 Dakota manual trans. $5,500. 4WD. $2,000/ obo. (360)683-8032 (360)797-1198

G M C : ‘ 9 9 Yu ko n 4 x 4 . 173K mi., A/C not working, good shape. $2,000/ obo. (360)477-6501.

CHEV: ‘03 Venture ext. CARGO van. Only 13K orig. Carfax mi. 3 seats. $8,800. (360)775-3449.

NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier 4 x 4 S E C r ew C a b. 4 door, low miles 82,400. Extended warranty. 6’ bed. Excellent Condition. GMC: ‘01 Yukon. Ver y JEEP: ‘80 CJ5 ReneCHEV ‘08 G1500 EXG o o d T i r e s . To w i n g nice, below KBB, sacri- g a d e. O r i g i n a l , g o o d PRESS CARGO VAN Package. V6 4 liter. Bed fice at $6,850. 460-8610. shape. $3,750. AWD Tool Box. $16,900. 5.3 liter V8, auto, A/C, (360)385-2792 (360)504-2374 cruise, tilt, power winGMC ‘12 TERRAIN J E E P : ‘ 8 8 C h e r o ke e. dows, locks, keyless enSLT-2 V6 AWD TOYOTA ‘05 This one must have a Plus near new studded try, power heated mirTACOMA TRD rors, safety bulkhead, k i t c h e n s i n k h i d d e n tires. $1,200 all. DOUBLE CAB 4X4 nice bin package, very (360)681-3747 somewhere, because it 4.0L VVT-i V6, automatclean, 1 owner corperate ic, locking rear differen- has everything else. 6 lease return, non-smokNISSAN ‘08 tial, alloy wheels, good s p e e d a u t o , l e a t h e r er, spotless Autocheck XTERRA SE tires, tow package, rear heated seats, traction report, very hard to find s l i d i n g w i n d ow, 1 1 0 v control, moon roof, tow A true outdoor enthu- an AWD model. package, XM satellite rasiast’s SUV, the Nissan outlet, tinted windows, 4 $13,495 full doors, keyless entry, dio, rear-view camera X T E R R A i s e q u i p p e d REID & JOHNSON p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r system, OnStar, 19” pre- with everything a person MOTORS 457-9663 FORD: ‘01 F150. 2WD, l o c k s , a n d m i r r o r s , mium alloy wheels and needs to get away anyreidandjohnson.com extended cab, 103,600 cruise control, tilt, air tires and more! This is a where, including roof mi. $4,950. 460-4957. conditioning, CD stereo, p r e m i u m l u x u r y rack and skid plate. This CHEV: ‘96 Conversion c r o s s o v e r. W h y b u y XTERRA is in great conFORD: ‘01 Ranger. 4x4, dual front airbags. Kelley new? Only 5,500 miles! dition. Fully loaded, run- Van. 133k, V8, TV, automatching canopy, good B l u e B o o k v a l u e o f Balance of factory war- ning boards, auto, V6, matic bed, good tires, $27,731! Only 48,000 automatic trans. running. $6,500. low miles. original miles! Immacu- ranty! $3,750/obo. 379-5663. 1-360-269-1208 or $29,950 $15,950 late condition inside and 1-360-269-1030 Preview at: Preview at: F O R D : ‘ 9 6 A e r o s t a r. out! Top of the line TRD heckmanmotors.com heckmanmotors.com 4 x 4 , n ew s n ow t i r e s, FORD: ‘04 F150 Sup- Package with an e-LockHeckman Motors Heckman Motors brakes, 115K, great Crew Lar iat, 4x4, V8, er! This is one Toyota 111 E. Front, P.A. 111 E. Front, P.A. shape. $4,500/obo. tow package, canopy, anyone would be proud (360)912-3583 (360)912-3583 (360)460-9375 l o a d e d , c l e a n , 1 1 4 k . to own! Stop by Gray Motors today! $13,500. 775-0372. $24,995 harryalford@yahoo.com 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices GRAY MOTORS Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County FORD: ‘06 F-450 4X4 457-4901 utility SCELZI. 11’ comgraymotors.com bo body with rack, NOTICE OF TRUSTEED SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 36,000 miles. $27,000. 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH APN No.: 063022-330240 Title Or9556 SUVs (360)531-1383 der No.: 6552740 Grantor(s): JAYNA STORY LAFFERTY, ARTHUR D LAFFERTY Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, Others FORD ‘10 RANGER INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPA4-DOOR SUPERCAB C H E V: ‘ 0 3 S u bu r b a n NY - ARLINGTON BRANCH. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2008SPORT 1220032 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of 4.0 liter, 5 speed manu- Z71 4X4. Black, loaded, Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main al, 4X4, A / C , too many features to list. entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, AM/FM/CD, fender flairs, $8,500. (360)460-6098. WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the bedliner, tow package, form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks CHEV ‘04 TAHOE LT alloy wheels, chrome from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following de4X4 SUV step bars, fog lamps, priscribed real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washingvacy, only 32,000 miles. 5.3L Vortec V8, Perfor- ton, to-wit: Parcel “A” That portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Balance of factory 5/60 mance Exhaust, auto- Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 North, Range 6 warranty, spotless Auto- matic, alloy wheels, tow West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at check vehicle history re- p a c k a g e , r u n n i n g the point on the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter por t. Beatiful black on boards, roof rack, sun- of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87°19’20” East 485.11 feet from the roof, privacy glass, keyblack, nice truck. less entr y, power win- Southwest corner thereof; Thence continuing South 87°19’20” East along said $18,995 dows, door locks, and South line 95 feet; Thence North 2° 40’ 40” East 450 feet; Thence North 87° REID & JOHNSON mirrors, power program- 19’ 20” West 95 feet; Thence South 2° 40’ 40” West 450 feet to the POINT OF MOTORS 457-9663 mable heated leather BEGINNING; EXCEPT the South 255 feet thereof. Situate in the County of reidandjohnson.com seats, adjustable pedals, Clallam, State of Washington. PARCEL “B” An easement for ingress, egress FORD: ‘84 Bronco. Re- third row seating, cruise and utilities over and across that portion of the Southwest Quarter of the control, tilt, air condition- Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter and the Northwest Quarter of the liable. $500. ing, rear a/c, bose cd Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 (360)808-0565 stereo, dvd video sys- North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as folFORD: ‘86 F250 XLT. tem, information center, lows: Beginning at a point of the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Matching canopy. onstar, dual front air- Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87° 19’ 20” East $1,500. 1-360-269-1208 bags. Kelley Blue Book 286.31 feet from the Southwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southor 1-3601269-1030. Value of $15,852! Clean west Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 87° 19’ 20” East along said South line 403.80 feet to the Southeast corner of said SouthFORD: ‘89 4X4 Long- Carfax! Loaded with op- west Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence bed. Auto/air, runs great. tions! Leather, a sunroof, North 2° 31’ 40” East along the East line of said Southwest Quarter of the and DVD video for the $2,500/obo. 457-5948. passengers! Plenty of Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter 20 feet; Thence North 87° 19’ 20” West parallel with the said South line 387.27 feet; Thence North 8° 19’ 20” F O R D : ‘ 9 0 R a n g e r . room with 3rd row seat- West 178.27 feet; Thence South 87° 19’ 20” East parallel with said South line Canopy, recent tune up, ing! Sparkling clean in- 311.33 feet; Thence North 2° 40’ 40” East 60 feet; Thence North 87° 19’ 20” side and out! Non-smok5 speed. $2,000. er! You just don’t find West 95 feet; Thence North 2° 40’ 40” East 399.52 feet to the point on the 452-2766 or 477-9580 them this nice very of- North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the SouthFORD: ‘96 F150 Pickup. ten! Come see your val- west Quarter lying South 87° 19’ 24” East 481.66 feet from the Northwest cor6 cylinder, manual trans- ue leader for over 55 ner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest mission, 2 WD, clean, years! Stop by Gray Mo- Quarter; Thence continuing North 2° 40’ 40” East 5.28 feet to the South margin of the Plat of Brunch’s Panoramic Heights, as recorded under Auditor’s File r u n s g r e a t . 1 5 3 , 0 0 0 tors today! No. 373011 in Volume 6 of Plats, page 23; Thence North 87° 57’ 05” West miles. Has new tires, $12,995. along said South margin 60 feet; Thence South 2° 40’ 40” West 4.62 feet to Tonneau cover. Call GRAY MOTORS the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the (360)477-4195 457-4901 Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 2° 40’ 40” West 399.52 feet; graymotors.com FORD: ‘98 F150. Rims, Thence North 87° 19’ 20” West 188.37 feet; Thence South 8° 19’ 20” East tinted, black, extended CHEV: ‘97 Blazer. V6, 259.77 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Situate in the County of Clallam, cab. Priced to sell! 4WD, moon roof, all pwr, State of Washington. More commonly known as: 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, $1,875. (360)460-0518. tow pkg., incl. snow tires PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 4/23/2008, recorded 4/28/2008, under 2008-1220032 records of CLALFORD: ‘98 Ranger. 4 on rims. $2,600. LAM County, Washington, from JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAF(360)280-7380 door, king cab, 4WD, auFERTY, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to JOAN H. ANDERSON, EVP to, air, CD, new trans., ON BEHALF OF FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB., as Trustee, to secure an obligation radiator, alternator, bat- DODGE: ‘01 Durango in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., S LT. N e w t i r e s . tery. $5,500/obo. (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY $4,800/obo. 683-0763. (360)683-8145 ARLINGTON BRANCH., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was FORD: ‘99 box tr uck. FORD: ‘04 Explorer. Ex- assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY cellent condition, new 14’, Diesel, 133k, good tires/brakes, all power, ARLINGTON BRANCH, (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if truck. $7,200. 452-4738. trailer hitch, 102K mi. any), to Nationstar Mortgage, LLC . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in M A Z DA : ‘ 8 4 P i c k u p. $7,000. (360)683-5494. any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation Runs good, low miles. $1,200. (360)452-5126. F O R D : ‘ 8 7 B r o n c o I I . secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this fore4x4. $1,500. 1-360-269- closure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following ADD A PHOTO TO 1208 or 1-360-269-1030. amounts which are now in arrears: $74,534.32 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $265,428.27, toYOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! F O R D : ‘ 9 2 E x p l o r e r. gether with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2010, and such other www.peninsula Runs, needs work. $400. costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real properdailynews.com ty will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the (360)775-8251 Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices expressed 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/29/2013 Clallam County Clallam County (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the TrusNo. 13-4-00279-5 tee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or cerNOTICE TO CREDITORS tified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be termiIN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF nated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before THE STATE OF WASHINGTON the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and adIN RE THE ESTATE OF: vances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of LUCAS LEO LAHMEYER, Deceased. The personal administrator named below has been Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transappointed as the personal administrator of this es- mitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the followtate. Any person having a claim against the dece- ing address(es): NAME JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAFFERTY, dent must, before the time of the claim would be WIFE AND HUSBAND ADDRESS 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, PORT ANbarred by any otherwise applicable statute of limita- GELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in tions, present the claim in the manner as provided the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally in RCW 11.40.070, by serving on or mailing to the served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of personal administrator or the personal administra- Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in tor’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or the claim and filing the original claim with the court. posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/26/2012. VII. The TrusThe claim must be presented within the later of :(1) tee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyThirty days after the personal administrator served one requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided un- sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those der RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. The bar is ef- who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-defective as to claims against both the decedent’s pro- scribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if bate and non probate assets. they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to Date of First Publication: Friday, August 2 bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidatPersonal Representative: Debra L. Lahmeyer ing the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purAttorney for Personal Representative: chaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the H. Clifford Tassie 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the Address for Mailing or Service: owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including ocJOHNSON RUTZ & TASSIE cupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchas804 South Oak Street er has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedPort Angeles, WA 98362 ings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser (360) 457-1139 shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. Pub: August 2, 9, 16, 2013 Legal No. 501953 THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF S U P E R I O R C O U RT O F WA S H I N G TO N F O R YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Sam to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR Chadd, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00261-2 PROBATE OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situaNOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The co- tion and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your Personal Representatives named below have been home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing appointed as co-Personal Representatives of this counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If estate. Any person having a claim against the de- you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep cedent must, before the time the claim would be your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limita- for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Houstions, present the claim in the manner as provided ing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r co-Personal Representatives or the co-Personal ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States DepartRepresentatives’ attorney at the address stated be- ment of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or Nalow a copy of the claim and filing the original of the tional Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling claim with the court in which the probate proceed- agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/inings were commenced. The claim must be present- dex.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The stateed within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the co- wide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsePersonal Representatives served or mailed the no- l o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : tice to the creditor as provided under RCW http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entifirst publication of the notice. If the claim is not pre- tled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Pursented within this time frame, the claim is forever chaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further rebarred, except as otherwise provided in RCW course against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged to claims against both the decedent’s probate and through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this nonprobate assets. loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s Date of First Publication: July 19, 2013 against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT Co-Personal Representatives: Charles M. Chadd, A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT Susan Chadd, Edward A. Chadd PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit Attorney for co-Personal Representatives: report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report Stephen C. Moriarty, WSBA #18810 agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 04/04/13 Address for mailing or service: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, AsPLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM sistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, (360) 457-3327 CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Court of Probate Proceedings: Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Clallam County Superior Court (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com Probate Cause Number: 13-4-00261-2 TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH, A-FN4375305 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 Pub: July 19, 26, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 497443 Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494521 DODGE: ‘99 Ram 4X4 Flatbed tr uck. Low miles, recent oil change, transmission flush and filter changes. 3/4 ton 360 engine. call 461-4151. Photos available by request. Price reduced to $3500/obo.


C6 FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-08-224252-SH APN No.: 063008-550570 Title Order No.: 080146772-WA-GNO Grantor(s): JOSH ARMSTRONG Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2005 1159435 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 19 AND 20, BLOCK 5, MALLETTE’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; TOGETHER WITH THE SOUTH HALF HALF OF VACATED ALLEY ADJOINING, PUSUANT TO CR RESOLUTION NO. 8, 1996 RECORDED UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 734777; EXCEPT THE WEST 3.5 FEET OF SAID LOT 19; ALSO EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO CLALLAM COUNTY FOR RIGHT-OF-WAY PURPOSE BY DOCUMENT RECORDED UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 298062. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 1247 SPRUCE STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/21/2005, recorded 6/27/2005, under 2005 1159435 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JOSH ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc., GreenPoint Mortgage Funding Trust 2005-AR4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-AR4. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $54,188.84 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $137,791.19, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOSH ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN ADDRESS 1247 SPRUCE STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph 1 above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/23/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 04/04/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-08-224252-SH, A-4375385 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494540

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-08-225914-SH APN No.: 0630000086200000 Title Order No.: 080154401-WA-GNO Grantor(s): JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007 1200533 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: ALL OF LOTS 5 AND 6 IN BLOCK 86, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, LOT 4 IN BLOCK 86, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 27, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPT ANY PORTION THEREOF LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT, 40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 4 TO A POINT 40 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY IN A DIRECT LINE TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 3; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 25 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY IN A DIRECT LINE TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3 A POINT 25 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3 TO A POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 318 WEST 4TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 4/26/2007, recorded 4/30/2007, under 2007 1200533 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSUAL TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc. Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust 2007-AR4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-AR4. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $32,344.99 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $175,066.24, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 3/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE ADDRESS 318 WEST 4TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/25/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RC W 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Tollfree: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 04/04/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-08-225914-SH, A-4375384 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494529

NOTICE OF TRUSTEED SALE TS No.: WA-11-484853-SH APN No.: 0430201290200000 Title Order No.: 110565726-WA-GNO Grantor(s): SHELLEY K SHAMP, MARK WARNER SHAMP Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007-1202947 Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL “A” LOTS 1, 2 AND 3 OF ALAN ROHNOW SHORT PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 30 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 5, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 2002 1077685, BEING A SHORT PLAT OF LOT 1 AND A PORTION OF LOT 2 OF SHORT PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 14 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 18, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHD? 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. PARCEL”B” LOT 2 OF D. MCLEAN SHORT PLAT RECORDED MAY 17,1984 IN VOLUME 14 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 18, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 554549, BEING A PORTION OF THE EAST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPT THAT PORTION DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2 OF SAID SHORT PLAT, SAID POINT BEING THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 87 degrees 59’ 31” EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 2, OF SAID SHORT PLAT, A DISTANCE OF 302.07 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 1 degrees 57’26” WEST, PARALLEL TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 2 OF SHORT PLAT, A DISTANCE OF 280.53 FEET;THENCE NORTH 75 degrees 00’22” WEST PARALLEL TO THE CENTERLINE OF HIGHWAY 101, A DISTANCE OF 310.26 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE NORTH 2 degrees 00’ 29” EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF LOT 2, A DISTANCE OF 210.81 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 259052 HIGHWAY 101, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/29/2007, recorded 6/7/2007, under 2007-1202947 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from SHELLEY K SHAMP AND MARK WARNER SHAMP, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $73,036.93 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $582,218.03, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 1/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME SHELLEY K SHAMP AND MARK WARNER SHAMP, WIFE AND HUSBAND ADDRESS 259052 HIGHWAY 101, SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/10/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RC W 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/8/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-11-484853-SH,A-4376854 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494663

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Midnight Rambler in concert | This week’s new movies

Peninsula

Shakespeare in the Park

PHILIP L. BAUMGAERTNER

Benedick (Jeff Allen Pierce) and Beatrice (Amy Sousa) do battle in “Much Ado about Nothing,” the Shakespeare in the Park production opening tonight in Port Townsend.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2013


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Bad-boy

“Mick Jagger,” known during the day as Mike Zimmerman, brings his band Midnight Rambler back to Port Angeles this Saturday night.

APPEAL

Midnight Rambler channels Rolling Stones on Saturday BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

“I have so much fun . . . and the music is amazing,” PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Zimmerman said. Midnight Rambler’s musicians “are PORT ANGELES — so good. There’s so much “Mick Jagger” admits it: He energy. They’re my favorite went kicking and screamband.” ing into this band. And then there are all He was a student of those songs: “Can’t You audio engineering at Belle- Hear Me Knocking” is his vue Community College favorite; he remembers and a bass guitarist and lying on his bed and listensinger from Seattle’s ing to it in headphones. grunge scene. So “I came into this as Set list kind of a snob,” said Mike “Knocking,” “Under My Zimmerman, now the Thumb,” “Jumpin’ Jack prancing, preening lead Flash,” “Shattered,” singer in Midnight Ram“Respectable,” “Gimme bler, the Rolling Stones Shelter,” “Brown Sugar,” tribute band coming to “Live with Me,” “Miss You” town Saturday night. By now, though, he’s not — those and lots more are on the set list for Saturafraid to say how his feelday’s gig at Olympic Celings have changed.

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sion: “I was a closet Mick Jagger impersonator, ever since I saw them.” Zimmerman’s out and proud now, proclaiming that those who come see Midnight Rambler will “have more fun this time.” Last September, the band did a couple of shows on the North Olympic Peninsula with a different Mick. He Closet Mick was David Christensen, and Zimmerman was in he had the crowd dancing. eighth grade when he went As it turned out, Christo see the Stones at Seattensen was temporary. tle’s Kingdome; that was Zimmerman was taking 1981’s “Tattoo You” tour. time away from Midnight So here’s another admis- Rambler, and now he’s lars, 255410 U.S. Highway 101. Tickets are $13 at www.OlympicCellars.com until 4 p.m. Saturday; then they’re $15. Gates will open at 6 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show, and a portion of proceeds will benefit the Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts (www.jffa.org).

back, going into his ninth year as Mick. “I see myself as an actor now, more than as a musician,” Zimmerman said, adding that “Mick” and the boys do about 25 gigs a year. When he’s not a Stone, he’s a fiscal specialist — a purchaser of equipment and chemicals — for the University of Washington Chemistry Department. Zimmerman’s not surprised that the Rolling Stones still have the power to bring people out. They’ve got that bad-boy appeal. “It’s going to be a rock

‘A Stones show’ “We’re not going to be too much tongue-in-cheek. I might adjust my wig,” Zimmerman quipped. But “we’re going to be in character. It’s going to be a Stones show.” As with each of Olympic Cellars’ summer concerts, wine and food — this time from the Nourish restaurant in Sequim — will be available, and lawn chairs, blankets and warm clothes are advised. For more details, phone the winery at 360-4520160.

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

show” Saturday night, replete with Stu Gordon as Bill Wyman, Bruce Erickson as Charlie Watts, Mike Horan on keyboard and Albert Ceccacci as Ronnie Wood. Ciggy Cater portrays Keith Richards, eyeliner, animal-print shirt and all. “I look like I’ve arrived on a bicycle, through a hedge backwards,” Cater has said. “The egos are there,” too, added Ceccacci, a Montreal, Canada-born guitarist who is quite the Wood doppelganger.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

3

i shakespeare BY DIANE URBANI

‘Much Ado’ to take over Port Townsend’s Chetzemoka Park

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — There is a moment of revelation in “Much Ado about Nothing,” and it’s both terrifying and romantic. For actor Amy Sousa, this passage is one of the most delicious in a Shakespeare comedy that’s full of juicy moments. “Much Ado,” opening tonight on the outdoor stage at Chetzemoka Park, is a story of love, misunderstanding and courage. It stars Sousa as Beatrice opposite Benedick, the one guy who can keep up with her. Both have both spoken loud and often about how neither will ever marry. But there comes a time when, well, they must reveal a deeper truth. When asked to choose one word for Beatrice, Sousa picked “passionate.” So if she’s going to have a man at her side, he’d better be equally fierce. And “Much Ado” is all about each finding out what the other is made of.

Desirable role

PHILIP L. BAUMGAERTNER (2)

Claudio (David Traylor, in headlock) and Benedick (Jeff Allen Pierce) struggle with their love lives in “Much Ado about Nothing,” the Shakespeare in the Park production opening tonight in Port Townsend.

Benedick is played by Seattle actor Jeff Allen Pierce, recently seen in “The Big Bang” at the Key City Playhouse. Like Sousa, he’s wanted to play his “Much Ado” character for a long time — and like his leading lady, Pierce is enamored with this treatment of the play. Longtime Key City Public Theatre principal and New York City-trained thespian Amanda Steurer is directing “Much Ado” for just three weekends. Show times are at 6 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays tonight through Aug. 18 at Chetzemoka Park at Jackson and Blaine streets; seating starts at 5:30 p.m. Advance tickets aren’t needed, and admission is a suggested donation of $18 to $20, or $10 for students. Information awaits at 360-385-5278 and www.KeyCity

Beatrice (Amy Sousa), left, and Hero (Emily Huntingford) star in “Much Ado About Nothing.” PublicTheatre.org. Steurer is just plain rapturous about this play. The young couple Hero (Emily Huntingford) and Claudio (David Traylor) “are so innocent, and they remind me of those love-atfirst-sight moments you believe in so fully at one time in your life (OK, maybe still believe in). Then I watch Benedick and Beatrice,” she said, “and the emotional roller coaster that their love/hate journey goes on and hits a chord, deep. “[‘Much Ado’] is updated a lot,” the director noted; Josh Whedon’s movie version is one of the latest treatments. “This production,” Steurer declared, “is going to have a beautiful look as well as telling a great story.” Steurer and Sousa studied together at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and at the Stella Adler Conservatory of Acting, so “it is crazy,” says Sousa, “that this is the first major creative collaboration we have had since college.” She trusts Steurer completely. And Sousa believes in her vision of “Much Ado” so fully, she said, that she’s been able to push herself to

moments of emotion she’s not sure would have come with another director. Pierce, meanwhile, calls Steurer’s plan for the play “different and wonderful.” The words are still Shakespeare’s, he adds, “but you have never and will never see a production like this again.” “Much Ado” has its lead players rhapsodizing too about the meaning of it all. “Love comes in many different sizes and shapes. It isn’t always fluffy and easy,” Pierce says. “Sometimes you find love in the places you least expect it. The key to having love is to be open and accepting of it in whatever form it takes.” Sousa feels it, too. “We can be so afraid,” she says, “that we keep ourselves shut up rather than feel any pain. “We can be so insecure that we misjudge and attack those we love the most . . . [but] if we allow ourselves to love, we become stronger and bigger people,” she believes. We become “more generous, more loving, more free.”


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

Flavors of Brazil Rio con Brio to perform at PA winery PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — This weekend will bring two concerts, one ticketed and the other free, to Camaraderie Cellars, 334 Benson Road just west of town. Rio con Brio, a duo specializing in the sounds of Brazil, will arrive for the first in a series of occasional live music events at the winery this Saturday.

‘Really cool music’ “We saw them at Argyle Winery [in Dundee, Ore.] and really enjoyed them,” said Camaraderie co-owner Vicki Corson. Theirs is “just really cool music.” Tickets are $15 per person for Rio con Brio’s 7 p.m. performance, and

DANIEL STARK

Rio con Brio, with Tim Connell, left, and Mike Burdette, will offer Brazilian-style music at Camaraderie Cellars this Saturday evening. patrons are welcome to bring lawn chairs.

Free Sunday show Then on Sunday afternoon, flutist Carlos Xavier and cellist Marlene Moore, aka Buttons & Bow, will

play from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. “There’s no admission charge. Just come and wander and sip,” Corson said. For more details, see CamaraderieCellars.com or phone 360-417-3564.

SATURDAY AUGUST 3 • 12 - 6 PM

ROCKIN’ THE ARTS BENEFIT FOR SAFE HAVEN

PS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Coming Up

‘Becket’ calls from PA stage PORT ANGELES — “Becket,” a story of morality and power, has its final performances at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., this weekend. Curtain times for the play, written by Jean Anouilh and Jeremy Sams and directed by John Manno, are 7:30 tonight and Saturday night and 2 p.m. Sunday. Admission is by donation. “Becket” stars Zachary Luke King Moorman in the title role, Sean Peck-Collier as King Henry II and Amy Meyer as Eleanor of Aquitaine, the king’s wife. Lola Hassan-Adams portrays Queen Maud of England, Henry’s mother; Ean Henninger is King Louis VII of France; Tim Macausland is Gilbert Folliot, Bishop of London; and Daniel Iredale and Robert Stephens appear in many supporting roles. Due to its themes and situations, “Becket” is not suitable for children. For information, see www.PACommunity Players.com or phone 360452-6651.

KATE CARTER

Becket (Zachary Luke King Moorman), right, has a talk with a young monk (Daniel Iredale) in the Port Angeles Community Playhouse production of “Becket.” Segar and Stefan Milenkovich, violist Alan Iglitzin and pianist Julio Elizalde. The program, to begin at 2 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday, will go from Brahms’ Piano Quintet in

Castle rhythms

Gypsy music

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FREE!

F IMALS AN

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QUILCENE — The Olympic Music Festival continues this weekend with “Gypsy Reflections,” two concerts featuring internationally known players: cellist Matthew Zalkind, violinists Andrea

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THE LANDING MALL

Matthew Zalkind is a featured cellist in this weekend’s “Gypsy Reflections” concerts at the Olympic Music Festival farm in Quilcene.

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F minor to Bartok’s Romanian Folk Dances. The concerts take place inside a restored dairy barn on the festival farm at 7360 Center Road, so patrons can choose to sit inside or outside on the lawn where the music is broadcast. The farm gates open at 11 a.m. for picnicking and shopping in the snack-CD-souvenir store. Barn doors open at 1 p.m. For information, see www.OlympicMusicFestival. org or phone 360-732-4800.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — John Speck, a New York City-based trombone player born and raised in Port Townsend, will bring AfroCuban mambo, son and cha cha to Manresa Castle, 651 Cleveland St., this Tuesday evening. Joining Speck for the 7 p.m. concert will be local musicians Michael Townsend on the traditional tres guitar, Vickie Townsend on accordion and flute, Russell Clark on upright bass and Bill Kiely on congas. For information, phone 360-531-1641 or email upwestarts@gmail.com. Peninsula Daily News


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Harvest of art crops up at PT Gallery Walk BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

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PT Shorts celebrates nerdy kids with reading PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — “Nerdy Kids Rock” is the title of this Saturday night’s PT Shorts, the monthly literary reading presented by Key City Public Theatre. Admission is free to this all-ages performance at 7:30 p.m. at the Pope Marine Building, 603 Water St. In this hourlong reading, 13-year-old Kaya Wiant is the featured actor. “The Math Book,” a tale of an awkward 14-year-old who gets hold of

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

a magic tome, is her story to fill the first half. Then comes Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time — just the first chapter — and another look inside teenagers’ lives. Joining Kaya to bring these stories to life are Sebastian Bowerman as the 5-year-old Charles Wallace in A Wrinkle, and Key City actors Michelle Hensel, Michelle Stay, Peter Wiant and Catherine McNabb. For details about PT Shorts and other Key City presentations, see www.KeyCityPublicTheatre.org.

The Gallery at the Fifth Opening Reception Sunday, August 4 • 1-3 pm

“On A LARC” Views of Yosemite National Park by Carol Stabile await visitors to the Port Townsend Gallery during this month’s Gallery Walk. art, chosen from 336 entries, are on display in “Expressions Northwest,” the annual Art Port Townsend show at the Northwind Arts Center, 2409 Jefferson St. just off Sims Way. ■ “Undercurrents” is the new show by multimedia artist Jeannie McMacken at Pippa’s Real Tea, 636 Water St. Silks, bamboo-rayon and other fibers, dyed, monoprinted and otherwise transformed, along with wearable art inspired by tea and botanical drinks, fill the place. ■ The new “Maritime Art: 1880-2013” show, with paintings by Port Townsend’s Victorian-era artists as well as contemporary painters including Kim Kopp, Linda Okazaki,

Karen Hackenberg and Max Grover, has arrived at the Jefferson Museum of Art & History. During Gallery Walk Saturday, admission is free to the museum inside City Hall at 540 Water St. ■ “Dissolution-Disillusion” is the title of David Eisenhour’s new show at the Simon Mace Gallery, 236 Taylor St. In it are bronze sculptures of pteropods — microscopic sea life writ large — plus jellyfish hanging from the ceiling. They undulate against a backdrop of tidal creatures, all in this commentary of humans’ and fossil fuels’ effects on the Earth. The show’s opening reception is Saturday evening; it will stay on display through Sept. 2.

LARC Gallery artists and adult student artists present a collection of diversity and challenge. Artists include: Mary Leone Shirley Mercer Sunny Benham Jeanne Engesath Jim Watson – Linda Parcell Gove Jack Parcell Jan Canale Pat Donlin Gary McRoberts Diana Whitney Flo Hansen Jim Gift The LARC Gallery is a group of 27 artists sharing space in a unique gallery setting. No artist pays commission…ever. Our group is as diverse as our work and we hope you enjoy it.

500500 W. W. Hendrickson Rd.,Rd., Sequim, WA WA 98382 360-6833345 Hendrickson Sequim, 98382 360-683-3345 www.thefifthavenue.com

peninsuladailynews.com

83830707

PORT TOWNSEND — Bronze marine life, images high in Yosemite National Park, Victorian-era paintings of Port Townsend: They’re all here for Gallery Walk this Saturday night. The free tour, which has refreshments and new art at many venues, will be open from 5:30 p.m. till 8 p.m. Saturday. Here’s a cross-section of what to see. ■ “Dreams and Colors of the Spirit,” with dreamlike images by David Haight and chakra-inspired beaded jewelry by Judith Komishane, is the August show inside Gallery 9 at 1012 Water St. Both of the featured artists will be on hand during Gallery Walk. ■ Yosemite National Park’s Olmstead Point, Burney Falls and other California vistas are part of Carol Heath Stabile’s new show at the Port Townsend Gallery, 715 Water St. Also on display inside the gallery are flame- and lamp-worked glass marbles, vessels and beads by newcomers Beau and Shani Barrett. ■ Meanwhile, out in the Port Townsend Gallery garden, mosaics, ceramics and repurposed glass art await visitors. Melinda Bryden, Carmelle Minor Callow, Dennis McDaniel and Adrienne Robineau are among the artmakers planning to join Saturday evening’s reception. ■ Steam-punk ice cream art by “Nhoj Yesdnil” awaits at Elevated Ice Cream, 631 Water St., through August. The artist, also a bicycle designer, is working on several children’s books; his website is http://funnyfarmart.com. ■ Seventy-six works of

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

MELLOW MELLO

YELLOW (and all the other colors of the world) Sequim Art Walk rolls out new creations BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

“Kathy” is among 69 portraits of women in “Faces and Masks,” paintersculptor Pamela Hastings’ new exhibition at the Museum & Arts Center in Sequim.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ROBERT HASPEL

Photography by Robert Haspel is among the highlights of tonight’s Sequim Art Walk. Haspel’s images are on display at Crumb Grabbers Bakery.

FIRST FRIDAY

SEQUIM

Refreshments

Friday, Aug 2nd 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.

38838611

art walk

Wooden It Bee Nice! Christian Speidel Wood Sculpture

SEQUIM — There’s no time like now for bright, eye-popping yellow — as in sunflowers and sunshine — on the street and in fresh art. It just so happens yellow is the theme color for tonight’s First Friday Sequim Art Walk. Coordinator Renne Brock-Richmond chooses a color for each month, and invites people to dress, accessorize and express it any way they choose during the walk from 5 p.m. till 8 p.m.

Carl Baker Wood Turning

BlueWholeGallery.com

129 W Washington, Sequim•681-6033•BlueWholeGallery.com

peninsuladailynews.com

38838613

Opening Tonight • August 2, 5-8pm

There’s no charge to visit the many venues, and a map and information are at www.SequimArtWalk. com. Here’s a sampling of places to find new art exhibits, refreshments and conversation with art lovers this evening. ■ “Faces and Masks,” a show of 69 paintings and nine sculptures of women — many of them local — by Pamela Hastings, is open at the Museum & Arts Center, 175 W. Cedar St. And it’s just one of two exhibitions. Also on display at the MAC is “Small Art with Big Dreams: Artist Trading Cards,” the Sequim Humanities and Arts Alliance show of original works just 2½ inches by 3½ inches. This is an

open-entry show, and artists can find details about becoming part of it at www. SequimArtsAlliance.org. ■ “Flowers, Etc.,” a photography show by Robert Haspel, has flowers in full bloom, refreshments and music at Crumb Grabbers bakery, corner of Fifth Avenue and Cedar Street. ■ Art by Tracie Gulit and Jean Wyatt awaits at Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., with refreshments by Cameron’s Catering. ■ Paintings by Lee Oskar and Henning Erben

are at Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., while two sets of live music are planned tonight: Howly Slim and Sandy Summers from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Tim Scallion from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. ■ “Wooden It Bee Nice” is the exhibit of wood sculpture — including a beehive — by Carl Baker and Christian Speidel at the Blue Whole Gallery, 129 W. Washington St. ■ Two dozen Sequimarea artists are showing their creations at the

LARC, or Local Artist Resource Center gallery, 166 E. Bell St. ■ Art by the late Saundra Cutsinger adorns the Red Rooster Grocery, 134½ W. Washington St. ■ Free make-and-take craft “happy hours” will be open from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Doodlebugs, 138 W. Washington St. ■ New venues on the Art Walk include Kaboom Salon, 168 E. Bell St., with a collection of images by local photographers, and Nourish restaurant, 1345 S. Sequim Ave., where wine tasting and a reception for artist Maia Waye are on tap tonight.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Saturday Aug 3rd

art walk

NORTHWIND ARTS CENTER SHOWCASE GALLERY 360 379 1086 northwindarts.org

5:30 - 8:30pm

Juried Show

2409 Jefferson Street

The Photography of D.E. Manning

vibrant pastels

Summer Garden Artists

Build your own Terrarium $15

recent works in our waterview garden

5pm - 8 pm with Erin Lebens. 38838610

2B697924 38838603

636 Water Street Port Townsend

715 WATER ST • 360.379.8110 www.porttownsendgallery.com

38838600

All supplies included.

port townsend gallery fine art and jewelry by local artists

Thursday – Monday noon – 5PM

34764107

Undercurrents Aug 3 – Sept 30, 2013

August 24 – 25 10 AM—4 PM

“Blind Taste Test”

38838605

Carol Heath Stabile

Studio Tour

38838608

15 T H ANNUAL

Jeannie McMacken Mixed Media Textile Artist

and

August 2 – September 1

PORT TOWNSEND

Crosscurrent 2

7

Conservatory 639 WATER ST Coastal Home PORT TOWNSEND

9 4 0 Water Street Port Townsend

(above the Bead Store on the mezzanine)

Featured Artist for August:

“Dreams and Colors of the Spirit” Featuring Graphic Artist David Haight and Jeweler Judith Komishane

The exquisite jewelry of Arlee Kasselman

38838599

914 Water Street , Port Townsend 360-385-3630 • www.williams-gallery.com

37818700

38838609

1012 Water St. Port Townsend gallery-9.com 379-8881

34764102

PORT TOWNSEND

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Nightlife

Clallam County Port Angeles Barhop Brewing (124 W. Railroad Ave.) — RMB (classic rock/Motown), tonight, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., no cover. Bar N9ne (229 W. First St.) — Eggplant (blues/rock), tonight, 9 p.m.; DJ Esteban, Saturday, 9 p.m.; Karaoke, Sunday, 8 p.m.; Karaoke, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Jerry’s Country Jam, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Concert on the Pier (City Pier) — Retro Guys (classic rock/country), Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Dupuis Restaurant (256861 U.S. Highway 101) — Bob and Dave (blues), tonight and Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) — Olde Tyme Country Band, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; open mic, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Charlie Ferris (pop standards), Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Junction Roadhouse (U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112, junction) — Tim Hall Band (blues), tonight, 8 p.m. to midnight, cover; Chesnut Junction, Thursday, 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. The Landing mall (115 E. Railroad Ave.) — Rockin’ the Arts benefit show with Getta Rogers, Chesnut Junction, the Retro Guys, Redwing and the Soulshakers; Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Olympic Cellars (255410 U.S. Highway 101) — Midnight Rambler (Rolling Stones tribute), Saturday, 7 p.m., $15 cover, a benefit for Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts. Port Angeles Senior Cen-

Port Angeles Community Players Second Stage Presents

(209 Monroe St.) — Janiva Magness (blues), tonight, 7:30 p.m., $30.

ter (328 E. Seventh St.) — Wally’s Boys (ballroom dance favorites), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first-timers free.

The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — Open mic, Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue.

R Bar (132 E. Front St) — Karaoke, Thursday, 8 p.m.

Fort Flagler State Park (10541 Flagler Road) — Passage (U.S. Navy band), Sunday, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn McComb Gardens (751 McComb Road) — The Old Sidekicks (country), Sunday, 1 p.m.

Highway Twenty Roadhouse (2152 W. Sims Way) — Brian “Buck” Ellard (country), tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

James Center for the Performing Arts (563 N. Rhodefer Road) — Music in the Park with Twisted Roots (folk), Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) — Discovery Bay Pirates (Irish folk and pub songs), tonight, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Blue Hole Quintet (jazz), Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sequim Branch Library (630 N. Sequim Ave.) — Olympic Express Big Band, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sequim Senior Activity Center (921 E. Hammond St.) — Victor’s All the Buzz open mic, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (sign up 6 p.m.)

Manresa Castle (651 Cleveland St.) — John Speck (Afro-Cuban jazz), Tuesday, 7 p.m.

Former Port Townsend resident John Speck will bring Afro-Cuban jazz to Manresa Castle in Port Townsend on Tuesday at 7 p.m. 7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — Doublewide (country), tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; M-80s (’80s rock), Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Jimmy Hoffman Band (country), Sunday, 5:30 to 9 p.m.; Larry Hill (solo piano), tonight in the Rainforest Bar, 7 p.m. to

Becket

By Jean Anouilh And Jeremy Sams Directed by John Manno

10 p.m.; Thom Davis (solo guitar), Saturday in the Rainforest Bar, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) — Howly and Sandy, tonight, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Tim Scallion (singersongwriter), tonight, 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Cort and Kia Armstrong (country blues), Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Cort Armstrong and Friends (country blues), Thursday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Jefferson County Port Hadlock

Admission by Donation at the door For Mature Audiences

Port Townsend

38829776

37834823

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

The Owl Sprit (218 Polk St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Port Townsend Brewing Co. (330 10th St.) — The Better Half (blues), tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Howly Slim (singersongwriter), Sunday, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Joy in Mudville (roots), Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Pourhouse (2231 Washington St.) — Port Authority Shakedown (funk), tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Yogoman Burning Band (reggae/funk), Saturday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Chris Chandler and Paul Benoit, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sirens (823 Water St.) — Ajax Cafe (21 N. Water St.) — Mick and Barry (classic rock Pigs on the Wing (Pink Floyd and country), Saturday, 6 p.m. tribute), Saturday, 10 p.m., $5. to 9 p.m./ Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — Meredith (singerPort Ludlow songwriter), tonight, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Billy and Chris, SaturThe Resort at Port Ludlow day, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. (1 Heron Road) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), WednesThis listing, which appears each day, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, announces live entertain-

July 26, 27, August 2, 3 • 7:30 pm July 28 & August 4 • 2:00 pm

Port Angeles Community Playhouse 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. www.pacommunityplayers.com

Northwest Maritime Center Cafe (421 Water St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, noon to 2 p.m.

Alchemy (842 Washington St.) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. American Legion Hall

ment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@peninsuladaily news.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladaily news.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-417-3521.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

Phil Wiggins is among the score of bluesmen and -women playing in this Saturday’s Acoustic Blues Showcase at Fort Worden State Park.

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Got an idea for a feature story?

THIS SHOW BENEFITS THE JUAN DE FUCA FOUNDATION

Peninsula Profile is always looking for suggestions. Please e-mail yours to . . . durbani@ peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA PROFILE

Saturday, August 3, 2013 Olympic Cellars Winery 7:00pm

Blues to groove into PT venues Migliazza and a gospel choir; then come Orville Johnson with Hill, Boo Hanks and Dom Flemons of the Carolina Chocolate Drops. The Uppity Women — Gaye Adegbalola and Andra Faye — step up with Clay Swafford next; then it’s a women-in-blues set with Del Rey, Eleanor Ellis, Lauren Sheehan, and Mary Flower. Rich Del Grosso, Jonn Del Toro Richardson and Jon Parry; zydeco artists Sunpie Barnes, Leroy Etienne, and Michael Harris; Warner Williams and Jay Summerour and a set with Daryl Davis, Phil Wiggins, Billy Flynn, and Dean Mueller fill out the showcase. TURN

TO

SHOWCASE/11

This is an outdoor event, part of the Olympic Winery Summer Concert Series Tickets $13 at olympiccellars.com or $15 at door

37831703

foundation’s week of Acoustic Blues Festival workshops. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Free Fridays at the Fort PORT TOWNSEND — features George Rezendes, Today and Saturday, this Dave Meis and Jon Parry community celebrates playing at noon today on American music — from Nora Porter Commons at gospel to country blues and Fort Worden, 200 Battery beyond — in the Port Way. Music lovers are Townsend Acoustic Blues invited to bring a picnic Festival. Some three dozen blanket, chairs and lunch men and women, from for the hour-long perforaccordion-harmonica player mance. Sunpie Barnes to slide guitarist Orville Johnson to Blues showcase singer Angela Hill, will The centerpiece Acoustic give public concerts at Fort Blues Showcase also takes Worden State Park and at place at the fort in the six downtown venues. 1,200-seat McCurdy PavilThese shows, which start with a Free Fridays at the ion at 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Fort concert today, are finThis show’s lineup starts ishing off the Centrum with Angela Hill, Arthur BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

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PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

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PS At the Movies: Week of August 2-8 Port Angeles

Where to find the cinemas

“2 Guns” (R) — Two crooked undercover officers — one from the DEA (Denzel Washington) and the other from the Navy (Mark Wahlberg) unknowingly lead investigations on each other in this crime thriller. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:10 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. daily, plus 5 p.m. today through Sunday. “The Conjuring” (R) — A film based on the true story of Ed and Lorraine Warren, world-renowned paranormal investigators, who were called to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in a secluded farmhouse. Forced to confront a powerful demonic entity, the Warrens find themselves caught in the most horrifying case of their lives. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 6:45 p.m. and 9 p.m. daily, plus 4:30 p.m. today through Sunday. “Despicable Me 2” (PG — Animated) — Gru is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to help deal with a powerful new super criminal in this sequel to the 2010 animated hit. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5 p.m., 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. daily, plus 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Grown Ups 2” (PG-13) — Lenny (Adam Sandler) has relocated his family back to the small town where he and his friends grew up. This time

■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883. ■ Wheel-In-Motor Drive In: 210 Theatre Road, Discovery Bay; 360-385-0859.

Hugh Jackman stars as Logan in “The Wolverine,” screening in Port Angeles at Deer Park Cinema. around, the grown ups are the ones learning lessons from their kids on a day notoriously full of surprises. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 7:20 p.m. and 9:25 p.m. daily, plus 3:15 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. “Pacific Rim” (PG-13) — As a war between humankind and monstrous sea creatures wages on, a former pilot and a trainee are paired up to drive a seemingly obsolete special weapon in a desperate effort to save the world. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 6:50 p.m. daily. “Red 2” (PG-13) — Retired black-ops CIA agent Frank Moses reunites his unlikely team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a missing portable nuclear

device. The mission takes Frank and his motley crew to Paris, London and Moscow. Outgunned and outmanned, they have only their cunning wits, their old-school skills, and each other. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m. daily, plus 12:30 p.m. and 2:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “R.I.P.D.” (PG-13) — A recently slain cop joins a team of undead police officers working for the Rest in Peace Department and tries to find the man who murdered him. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 9:25 p.m. daily, plus 4:45 p.m. today through Sunday. “The Smurfs 2” (PG — Animated/live action) — The Smurfs team up with their

human friends to rescue Smurfette, who has been kidnapped by Gargamel since she knows a secret spell that can turn the evil sorcerer’s newest creation — creatures called the Naughties — into real Smurfs. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. daily, plus 12:50 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Turbo” (PG — Animated) — A freak accident might just help an everyday garden snail achieve his biggest dream: winning the Indy 500. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:20 p.m. daily, plus 1:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “The Wolverine” (PG-13) — Summoned to Japan by an old acquaintance, Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) becomes embroiled in a conflict that forces him to confront his own demons. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:45 p.m.,

7:15 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. daily through Tuesday, plus 2:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Port Townsend “20 Feet from Stardom” (PG-13) — The untold true story of the backup singers behind some of the greatest musical legends of the 20th century. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4:20 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 1:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Red 2” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listing. At the Uptown Theatre. Showtimes 5 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today; 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. “Stop Making Sense” (PG) — Director Jonathan Demme’s concert documentary on newwave/rock group Talking Heads, comprised of David

Byrne, Chris Franz, Tina Weymouth and Jerry Harrison. The film was made during a threeday concert gig at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood in 1983. At Rose Theatre. Showtime 10 p.m. Saturday. “The Way Way Back” (PG13) — Fourteen-year-old Duncan (Liam James) is on summer vacation with his mother Pam (Toni Collette), her overbearing boyfriend Trent (Steve Carell) and his daughter Steph (Zoe Levin). Having a rough time fitting in, the introverted Duncan finds an unexpected friend in gregarious Owen (Sam Rockwell), manager of the Water Wizz water park. Through his friendship with Owen, Duncan opens up and begins to find his place in the world. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily, plus 1:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “World War Z” (PG-13) — United Nations employee Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) traverses the world in a race against time to stop a pandemic that is toppling armies and governments and threatening to decimate humanity itself. “The Purge” (R) — A family is held hostage for harboring the target of a murderous syndicate during the Purge, a 12-hour period in which any and all crime is legalized. At the Wheel-In Motor Movie. Box office opens at 8 p.m. today through Sunday with showtime at dusk.

Blues: PT to heat up with music in city’s clubs CONTINUED FROM 9 Tickets are $20, $30 and $40 at www.centrum.org, 800-746-1982 or at the Centrum box office near McCurdy Pavilion an hour before the concert. Blues in the Clubs, another part of this annual tradition, happens tonight and Saturday from 8 p.m. till midnight. This year, the Boiler Room at Quincy and Water streets is one of the venues, with free admission for all ages. As for the rest, a nightly $25 pass, avail-

able at any participating venue, covers all locations. The schedule goes like this.

Tonight ■ American Legion, 209 Monroe St.: Gaye Adegbalola and Andra Faye with Daryl Davis; Blues Dance with Davis, Dean Mueller and Billy Flynn with Angela Hill and Jay Summerour. ■ The Boiler Room, 711 Water St.: Eleanor Ellis, Jerron Paxton,

Jake Heck and Maria Woodford. ■ The Public House, 1038 Water St.: Tim Sparks; Dom Flemons and Phil Wiggins; Orville Johnson and Grant Dermody. ■ Alchemy Bistro & Wine Bar, 842 Washington St.: Clay Swafford; Arthur Migliazza and Del Rey; Chase Garrett. ■ Khu Larb Thai Restaurant, 225 Adams St.: Lightnin’ Wells; Boo Hanks; Elijah Wald and Sandrine Sheon. ■ The Cotton Building, 607 Water St.:

Mary Flower; Lauren Sheehan and Jon Parry; Rich Del Grosso and Jonn Del Toro Richardson.

Warner Williams and Jay Summerour; Rich Del Grosso, Jonn Del Toro Richardson, and Jon Parry; Billy Flynn, and Dean Mueller with Angela Hill. Saturday ■ Alchemy Bistro & Wine Bar: ■ American Legion Hall: Chase Garrett; Jerron Paxton; Zydeco Dance with Sunpie Arthur Migliazza and Del Rey. Barnes and the Louisiana Sunspots, ■ Khu Larb Thai Restaurant: with Caitlin Romtvedt, plus Gaye Mary Flower; Jake Heck and Adegbalola with Clay Swafford. Maria Woodford; Tim Sparks. ■ The Boiler Room: ■ The Cotton Building: Elijah Wald and Sandrine Dom Flemons and Boo Hanks; Sheon; Lauren Sheehan; Andra Orville Johnson and Grant DerFaye. mody; Eleanor Ellis and Phil Wiggins. ■ The Public House:


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

EVENT CENTER

Woodstock Revisited Day One | Friday, August 9th | Doors open 7:00 PM Randy Linder - 8:00 PM | Randy Hansen - 10:00 PM Day Two | Saturday, August 10th | Doors open 4:30 PM Mantra - 6:00 PM | The Who Show - 8:00 PM

New Lunch Menu | 11:30 AM - 3:00 PM Serving Salads, Burgers, Sandwiches & Lunch Specials. Begins August 5th. Buffet is served for Dinner daily and for Saturday & Sunday Brunch Buffet!

Woodstock Revisited TWO DAY EVENT! Friday, August 9th & Saturday, August 10th Tickets $10 each day | $15 for both days Visit www.the-point-casino.com for details.

Ride For A Cure Muscular Dystrophy Association & Legend Harley Davidson Fun Run Saturday, August 10, 2013

Close to Home... Far From Ordinary.®

Tickets available now at these locations: In the gift shop | On our website For more information Call 866.547.6468 | Ages 21 and over The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. See the Wildcard Players Club for complete details. You must be a member of The Point Casino’s Wildcard Players Club to participate in some programs. Some restrictions may apply. Point Casino promotions, offers, coupons and/or specials may not be combined without marketing management approval. Management reserves all rights to alter or cancel without prior notice. You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, to attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.

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Begins at Legend Harley Davidson in Silverdale. Ends at The Point Casino. Go to the-point-casino.com, call (253) 573-7575 or email Kjones@mdausa.org

Kingston, WA www.the-point-casino.com 1.866.547.6468


PDN20130802J