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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS January 24-25, 2014 | 75¢

Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s unty y s Daily y News Newspaper

Brewfest and bluegrass

Latest Peninsula real estate values/C1

Page B1, Peninsula Spotlight

7,402 sign up for plan in area

Winning ways for Seahawks fans

State releases its insurance data PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Mark Ostroot, general sales manager of Price Ford Lincoln in Port Angeles, peers out the back window of a pickup truck adorned with 12th Man symbols. The automobile dealership won a bet with a Ford dealership in San Francisco with last Sunday’s Seattle Seahawks win over the San Francisco 49ers.

Bay Area bested in bet PA Ford dealership offers community spoils of NFL wager BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The public can enjoy on Saturday a 12-foot-long submarine sandwich and chocolates from San Francisco at Price Ford Lincoln, which won a friendly wager with a Bay Area Ford dealership when the Seahawks bested the San Francisco 49ers.

Mark Ostroot, general sales manager of Price Ford Lincoln at 3311 U.S. Highway 101 east of Port Angeles, said Drake’s U-Bake Pizza and Subs will bring the sub sandwiches to the dealership at noon to celebrate the Seahawks’ 23-17 win last Sunday.

National Football Conference championship game, Ostroot said. With the win, the Seahawks move on to play the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII on Feb. 2 in MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.

Fresh chocolates

12th Man promotion

A sampling of Ghirardelli chocolates fresh from San Francisco also will be provided, Ostroot said, with the sandwich and chocolate free and paid for by Henry Curtis Ford in Petaluma, Calif. The food comes as the Petaluma dealership’s side of a friendly bet on the

Ostroot said he came up with the idea for the wager after running a “12th Man” promotion on Price Ford Lincoln’s Facebook page last week in which the dealership would give away a custom 12th Man T-shirt for every 12 “likes” the Facebook page collected. TURN

TO

BET/A8

AND NEWS SOURCES

PORT ANGELES — At total of 7,402 North Olympic Peninsula residents signed up for health insurance on Washington’s health care exchange through December, according to new state data. Since health care reform launched Oct. 1, a combined 2,300 in Clallam and Jefferson counties were newly covered under Medicaid expansion as of Dec. 31, Washington Healthplanfinder reported Thursday. Another 3,168 Peninsula residents had enrolled in Medicaid but were eligible under old Medicaid eligibility rules, and 1,934 signed up for a private health care plan through Washington Healthplanfinder.

County breakdowns According to the latest county-by-county breakdown of the enrollments, 767 in Jefferson County purchased a private health plan — with or without a tax credit — in the first three months of the state-based insurance exchange. Jefferson County had 684 newly covered under Medicaid, and 1,202 were “Medicaid redeterminations,” which Washington Healthplanfinder defines as those who are newly enrolling but were eligible under old Medicaid eligibility rules. In Clallam County, 1,167 enrolled in a private health plan, 1,616 were newly covered under Medicaid, and 1,966 were Medicaid redeterminations. TURN

Parks plan is spurned BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — City Manager David Timmons said Jefferson County staff has turned down his plan to support recreation in East Jefferson County, and that the city and county will now go their separate ways. But County Administrator Philip Morley said he feels that the two entities can work together to solve the recreation shortfall. On Jan. 6, Timmons presented a plan that he said would support Memorial Field, the Port Townsend Community Center — both county properties — and Mountain View Commons, which the city leases

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

from the Port Townsend School money for the estimated repair of Mountain View, which could cost District. He proposed that the county as much as $5 million. use its bond capacity to secure TURN TO PARKS/A6

HEALTH/A6

Georgia man takes Worden postition BY CHARLIE BERMANT

From left, Bodie LaBrie, Sarah Rogers, Jamie Rogers and Gabe Petrick, all 13, play foosball Thursday at the Port Townsend Community Center.

TO

PORT TOWNSEND — A Georgia man who is a veteran of the hospitality industry intends to accept an offer by the Fort Worden Lifelong Learning Center Public Development Authority to become the fledgling organization’s general manager. “Over the past few years, I have specialized in unique projects,” said Michael Deighton from his home in Alpharetta, Ga., on Thursday. Deighton said he had verbally accepted the offer and intended to send in a formal acceptance. He will begin the new position

Feb. 3. The general manager’s salary is $85,000 per year with another potential $20,000 in incentives and bonuses, according to Deighton the offer letter. “This is a unique situation,” said Deighton, who declined to give his age. “With all its partnerships, it will be a critical part of Port Townsend’s economy.” TURN

TO

OFFER/A6

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BUSINESS B8 C1 CLASSIFIED B11 COMICS COMMENTARY A10, A11 B11 DEAR ABBY B10 DEATHS B11 HOROSCOPE *PS MOVIES A3 NATION/WORLD *PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA POLL PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS WEATHER

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A2

UpFront

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2014, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, ext. 5052 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2014, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Singer charged with resisting arrest, DUI WHEN HE DEBUTED five years ago, Justin Bieber was a mop-haired heartthrob, clean cut and charming. But a series of troubling incidents have put this image at risk, and none more so than his arrest on DUI charges Thursday. Police said they arrested Bieber — smelling of alcohol — after officers saw him drag-racing Bieber before dawn on a palm-lined residential Miami Beach, Fla., street, his yellow Lamborghini traveling at nearly twice the speed limit. The 19-year-old singer

home most of the year’s key hip-hop trophies, from the MTV Video Music Awards to the American Music Awards. The underground, independent Seattle group had made it, right? Not from the viewpoint of some members of the Recording Academy, according to a person who attended the general Grammy committee meeting. While Macklemore & Lewis are up for seven honors at Sunday’s Grammy Awards, including album of the year and best rap album for the platinum seller “The Heist,” most rap committee members felt the duo shouldn’t qualify for the rap categories because of their Grammy gamble success on mainstream Macklemore & Ryan radio and their appeal in the Lewis had a rousing 2013 pop world, the source said. in hip-hop: The Source mag“Because of the controversy azine named Macklemore with them as a rap group, it its “man of the year,” the duo became something the was Billboard magazine’s entire Grammy committee discussed,” the person said. top rap act, and they took later admitted smoking marijuana, drinking and taking a prescription medication, police said. Unlike previous dustups, this arrest has him facing potential jail time. Bieber was charged with DUI, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest without violence. He was arrested with R&B singer Khalil Amir Sharieff after police saw them racing two luxury vehicles at 4:09 a.m. A Miami-Dade County judge set Bieber’s bond at $2,500 on Thursday. Sharieff’s bond was set at $1,000 for a DUI charge.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

Passings

WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: Which is more important to you when thinking about NSA surveillance and data collection: national security or civil liberties?

By The Associated Press

JOHN J. MCGINTY III, 73, a retired Marine Corps noncommissioned officer who received the Medal of Honor for saving the lives of dozens of his men during an enemy attack in Vietnam but later relinquished it for religious reasons, died Friday in Beaufort, S.C. The cause was bone cancer, his son Michael said. Staff Sgt. McGinty, a platoon leader, had already been severely wounded in the left eye by shrapnel during heavy fighting July 18, 1966, when about 20 of his men became separated from the others and found themselves pinned down by enemy fire on three sides. He received the Medal of Honor for sprinting through gunfire and mortar shell blasts to reach them and lead them to safety. Mr. McGinty renounced the award in 1984 after becoming more ardent in his Christian faith; he came to view the medal as “a form of idolatry” because it bore an image of Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom and war — to him “a false god,” Michael McGinty said. But his decision did not change his relationship with his former comrades, his son added. He kept in touch with them for the rest of his life and saw many at conventions organized by the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Mr. McGinty, who joined the service in 1958 directly after high school, was a drill instructor at the Marine boot camp in Parris Island, S.C., and a brig officer at the Norfolk, Va., naval base before volunteering for duty in Vietnam in 1966. “I didn’t want to be earning my pay guarding a bunch of AWOL sailors,” he told Edwin F. Murphy, author of the 1987 book

Vietnam Medal of Honor Heroes. Mr. McGinty led one of four platoons in Company K of the Third Battalion, Third Marine Division, during a major sortie in July 1966 known as Operation Hastings. The mission was to block North Vietnamese troops from infiltrating the demilitarized zone between the Communist-led North and the American-backed South. After three days of fighting and severe casualties, American commanders ordered a withdrawal. The four platoons of Company K, led by Capt. Robert J. Modrzejewski, were assigned to provide cover for the pullback. Modrzejewski, who would also receive a Medal of Honor for his actions during the mission, said Wednesday in a telephone interview that “Company K was covering the rear, and Sgt. McGinty’s platoon was providing cover for the rear of the rear,” when about 1,000 North Vietnamese troops attacked July 18. Sgt. McGinty, who was 26, made his way through gunfire and jungle terrain to find two squads of his platoon cut off and almost surrounded. “Finding 20 men wounded and the medical

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

FOOTBALL IS NOT quite over yet, but spring daffodils are already on sale in stores and in full bloom at Sherwood Village in Sequim . . .

corpsmen killed,” his Medal of Honor citation said, Sgt. McGinty “reloaded ammunition magazines and weapons for the wounded men and directed their fire upon the enemy.” When North Vietnamese soldiers tried to outflank their position, “he killed five of them at point-blank range with his pistol,” the citation said, and called in artillery and airstrikes to within yards of his own position.

National security

42.5%

Civil liberties Undecided

51.4% 6.1%

Total votes cast: 1,038 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Peninsula Lookback

Setting it Straight

From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Corrections and clarifications

1939 (75 years ago) Two others involved in the embezzlement of $38,000 in Clallam County funds from the Treasurer’s Office pleaded guilty and were quickly sentenced by Superior Court Judge John M. Ralston to the state penitentiary at Walla Walla. Iva Foster, the former cashier in the office during the term of former Treasurer Walter A. Baar, was convicted of accessory to grand larceny and was sentenced to the maximum five years. Her husband, Robert D. Foster, also received the maximum five-year sentence for pleading guilty to a charge of second-degree forgery. Baar earlier was sentenced to a maximum of 15 years at Walla Walla for pleading guilty to grand larceny.

1964 (50 years ago)

The eastbound bus on a downhill curve skidded into a ditch after the Port Angeles driver applied the brakes when an oncoming car began fishtailing. After hitting the muddy ditch, the bus skidded further, struck a tree and was turned around by the force, according to a State Patrol report.

1989 (25 years ago) Survey flights along the Pacific coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca are failing to turn up additional evidence of oil from a Dec. 23 spill off Grays Harbor County. As the cleanup of birds and beaches continued, the Coast Guard said observers and equipment on a radar plane detected no more pollution. Bunker oil has been found on beaches and birds along the Pacific coast from Oregon to British Columbia from a punctured barge, including sheens as far east in the Strait as Protection Island.

Five people were hospitalized following the crash of a bus in Beaver Valley headed to the Hood Canal Bridge southeast of Port WANTED! “Seen Around” Townsend. Lottery items recalling things seen on the The five — including four North Olympic Peninsula. Send from Sequim and Port AngeLAST NIGHT’S LOTthem to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box les — were in satisfactory TERY results are available 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax condition at St. John’s Hosat 800-545-7510 or walottery. 360-417-3521; or email news@ pital in Port Townsend. peninsuladailynews.com. com/WinningNumbers.

■ Proceeds from the “Rock-A-Thon” benefit set by Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary No. 1024 at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., Port Angeles, on Saturday will go to two groups: Proceeds from the rocking chair event and the bake sale will go to the auxiliary, and those from the book sale and pet food donations will go to the group Voices for Veterans. An item Tuesday on Page B12 contained erroneous information. For more information, see the item on Page B2 today.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Laugh Lines A JAPANESE COMPANY bought the Jim Beam whiskey distillery for $16 billion. This morning, the Japanese company woke up in an alley and said, “I did what?” Conan O’Brien

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, Jan. 24, the 24th day of 2014. There are 341 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Jan. 24, 1942, the Roberts Commission placed much of the blame for America’s lack of preparedness for Imperial Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor on Rear Adm. Husband E. Kimmel and Lt. Gen. Walter C. Short, the Navy and Army commanders. On this date: ■ In 1742, Charles VII was elected Holy Roman Emperor during the War of the Austrian Succession. ■ In 1848, James W. Marshall discovered a gold nugget at Sutter’s Mill in northern California, a discov-

ery that led to the gold rush of ’49. ■ In 1924, the Russian city of Petrograd (formerly St. Petersburg) was renamed Leningrad in honor of the late revolutionary leader; however, it has since been renamed St. Petersburg. ■ In 1939, at least 28,000 people were killed by an earthquake that devastated the city of Chillan in Chile. ■ In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill concluded a wartime conference in Casablanca, Morocco. ■ In 1961, a U.S. Air Force B-52 crashed near Goldsboro, N.C., dropping its payload of two nuclear bombs, neither of which went off;

three crew members were killed. ■ In 1963, a U.S. Air Force B-52 on a training mission crashed into Elephant Mountain in Maine after encountering turbulence and losing its vertical stabilizer; seven of the nine crew members were killed. ■ In 1978, a nuclear-powered Soviet satellite, Cosmos 954, plunged through Earth’s atmosphere and disintegrated, scattering radioactive debris over parts of northern Canada. ■ In 1984, Apple Computer began selling its first Macintosh model, which boasted a built-in 9-inch monochrome display, a clock rate of 8 megahertz and 128k of RAM. ■ In 1989, confessed serial killer Theodore Bundy was executed in

Florida’s electric chair. ■ Ten years ago: NASA’s Opportunity rover landed on Mars, arriving at the Red Planet exactly three weeks after its identical twin, Spirit. ■ Five years ago: Pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, who’d safely landed a crippled US Airways jetliner in the Hudson River, received a hero’s homecoming in Danville, Calif. Brazilian model Mariana Bridi, 20, died after contracting an infection that had forced doctors to amputate her hands and feet. ■ One year ago: Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced the lifting of a ban on women serving in combat.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, January 24-25, 2014 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation College student charged after deadly shooting LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Prosecutors have filed murder charges against a Purdue University student in the shooting of a fellow student in a classroom. The Tippecanoe County prosecutor’s office filed the charges Thursday against 23-year-old Cody Cousins shortly before Cousins a scheduled initial court hearing. The court documents said 21-year-old Andrew Boldt of West Bend, Wis., suffered both gunshot and knife wounds when he was fatally attacked Tuesday in Purdue’s Electrical Engineering Building. The charging document said several other people were in the classroom and witnessed the attack, but it doesn’t give any possible motive for the attack. Police said an officer spotted Cousins with blood on his hands and clothes soon after the attack and arrested him without incident. Boldt’s funeral is scheduled for Tuesday in his Wisconsin hometown.

Lufthansa heist NEW YORK — More than 30 years after the crime, a reputed mobster was indicted Thursday in the $6 million Lufthansa

heist at Kennedy Airport that was dramatized in the Martin Scorsese movie “Goodfellas.” The wide-ranging indictment naming Vincent Asaro, his son Jerome and three other defendants alleges murder, robbery, extortion, arson and bookmaking. Asaro was accused of participating in the Dec. 11, 1978, armed robbery — one of the largest cash thefts in American history. Hooded gunmen invaded the airline’s cargo terminal and stole about $5 million in untraceable U.S. currency being returned to the United States from Germany. The cash was never found. Authorities said jewelry worth about $1 million also was taken.

Oil train crashes WASHINGTON — Warning that a “major loss of life” could result from an accident involving the increasing use of trains to transport large amounts of crude oil, U.S. and Canadian accident investigators urged their governments Thursday to impose new safety rules. The unusual joint recommendations by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board and the Transportation Safety Board of Canada include better route planning for trains carrying hazardous materials to avoid populated and other sensitive areas. Last month, an oil train derailed and exploded near Casselton, N.D., creating intense fires. In July, a runaway oil train derailed and exploded in LacMegantic, Quebec, near the U.S. border. Forty-seven people were incinerated and 30 buildings destroyed. The Associated Press

Panel calls for an end to phone data spying Obama’s plan for changes not as broad BY STEPHEN BRAUN

lar proposal from another panel of experts. That panel, the Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies, advised Obama in December to restrict phone surveillance to limited court-ordered sweeps.

Board not in agreement

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A sharply divided government task force that reviewed the National Security Agency’s surveillance program for four months has urged President Barack Obama to shut down the agency’s bulk collection of phone data and purge its massive inventory of millions of Americans’ calling records, The Associated Press has learned. The recommendation from the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board to abandon the NSA’s phone surveillance was more sweeping than Obama’s decision to curtail the program and a simi-

The oversight board’s new 234page report — a copy of which was obtained by the AP — contained strong dissents from two of the board’s five members — former Bush administration national security lawyers who recommended that the government retain its broad phone surveillance authority. The board disclosed key parts of its report to Obama earlier this month before he unveiled his plans during a speech last week to the nation. In that speech, Obama said the bulk phone collection program would continue for the time being.

He directed the Justice Department and intelligence officials to find ways to end the government’s control over the phone data. And he narrowed the NSA’s Obama bulk collection by insisting on close supervision by a secret federal intelligence court and reducing the wide chain of calls that the NSA may track.

Phone companies protest Phone companies have said they do not want to take responsibility for overseeing the data under standards set by the NSA. The recommendation to purge the phone database tackles one area that Obama sidestepped in his speech: what to do with hundreds of millions of files already in government hands.

Briefly: World Syria officials: Terrorism main topic at talks GENEVA — Syria’s government declared that its main priority was stopping terrorism — not ensuring peace — and the opposition hinted it was far from ready to negotiate directly with the government it wants to overthrow, casting sharp doubt Thursday on peace talks that have barely begun. On the day that the two sides were meeting separately with a U.N. mediator known for untangling diplomatic knots, their Al-Moallem comments affirmed positions hardened by nearly three years of civil war. Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem, speaking after the tense opening day of a peace conference that has nearly fallen apart at every step, said his government’s priority was “to fight terrorism.”

Romanian plane crash BUCHAREST, Romania — A small plane crash on a remote mountain wouldn’t normally be enough to anger an entire coun-

try or threaten the government. Romania, however, is dealing with just this scenario. So far, four senior officials including the interior minister have resigned or been fired after all those onboard a medical flight initially survived Monday’s crash in thick fog. One of the pilots and a medical student later died of hypothermia among other causes after waiting for hours in deep snow to be saved. Romanians reacted with fury, taking to social media and talk shows to accuse the government of incompetence and complacency after it emerged the least injured of the survivors called emergency services six times.

South Sudan pact ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — South Sudan’s government and rebels fighting against it have signed a cessation-of-hostilities agreement that should at the least put a pause to five weeks of warfare. Negotiators for the two sides have been meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for weeks. Thursday’s signing was the first real progress made. The agreement should put an end to violence that has claimed thousands of lives and uprooted a half-million people since fighting began Dec. 15 between the government and supporters of former Vice President Riek Machar. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PROTESTS

KEEP HEATING UP

A protester uses a large slingshot to hurl a Molotov cocktail at police in central Kiev, Ukraine, on Thursday. The capital city has been the epicenter of two months of protests against President Viktor Yanukovych that have grown increasingly violent this week. The chances of ending the violence that has convulsed the city are high, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, a top opposition leader, said late Thursday after a meeting with the president.

Virginia AG to combat state’s same-sex marriage statutes BY STEVE SZKOTAK THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RICHMOND, Va. — In a move that could give gay marriage its first foothold in the South, Virginia’s attorney general said Thursday he concluded the state’s ban on same-sex unions is unconstitutional and he will join the fight against it. Newly elected Democratic Attorney General Mark R. Herring said he would support gay couples who have filed lawsuits challenging the state’s ban. “After thorough legal review, I have now concluded that Virginia’s

Quick Read

ings in which federal ban on marriage between judges struck down gay same-sex couples violates marriage bans in Utah the Fourteenth Amendand Oklahoma. ment of the U.S. Constitution on two grounds: MarComing up in court riage is a fundamental right being denied to He said he announced some Virginians, and the his decision because oral ban unlawfully discrimiarguments are schednates on the basis of both Herring uled next week in one of sexual orientation and the Virginia cases chalgender,” Herring said. lenging the state’s ban. Herring stressed the same-sex Currently, the District of ban will be enforced despite his Columbia and 17 states allow gay challenge. marriage, most of them clustered Herring’s announcement in the Northeast. None of them comes on the heels of court rul- are in the old Confederacy.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Man convicted in Arizona temple slayings

West: Parents of boys in filthy home plead not guilty

West: Second moose with arrow in nose reported

World: 21-year-old woman convicted in acid attack

A JURY RETURNED guilty verdicts Thursday in the third trial of a man charged in the 1991 killings of nine people, including six monks, at a suburban Phoenix Buddhist temple. Johnathan A. Doody was 17 when he was accused of participating in the slayings at the Wat Promkunaram temple. He was found guilty in 1993 and sentenced to 281 years in prison. But an appeals court threw out his conviction in 2011 after ruling that investigators improperly obtained his confession. His second trial ended in mistrial. Doody’s sentencing is set for March 14. He faces multiple life sentences.

TWO PARENTS CHARGED with keeping their four young boys in a filthy Denver apartment have both pleaded not guilty to felony child abuse charges. Wayne Sperling and Lorinda Bailey arrived separately for their arraignment Thursday in Denver. The boys, ages 2 to 6, were removed from their parents’ home in October. Court documents said the children could communicate only in grunts, were malnourished and weren’t toilet trained. A doctor told authorities one of the children reeked of cigarette smoke, prompting a welfare check.

ALASKA STATE WILDLIFE Troopers said another moose is walking around the Fairbanks area with an arrow in its nose. State wildlife biologists in October tranquilized a moose north of the city and removed an arrow from its nose. The latest injured moose was seen south of Fairbanks near North Pole. Wildlife trooper Dave Bump responded to a call and arrived in time to see the animal with arrow fletching sticking out of its nasal area. Bump said it’s not known whether the moose was shot in the season that ended Nov. 27 or in an earlier hunt.

A YOUNG LONDON woman has been convicted of disguising herself in a veil and throwing acid on her friend’s face following an argument. Police said that Mary Konye, 21, was “obsessively jealous” of her friend Naomi Oni’s “good looks” and had spent several months hatching a plan for the attack. After following Oni home from work, Konye — disguised in a niqab — threw sulphuric acid on Oni in the early hours of Dec. 30, 2012. The attack left 21-year-old Oni with burns on her face, hand and thigh. Judge David Radford warned Konye will likely face “substantial” time in jail.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Briefly . . . PT extends moratorium on pot shops

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SHOWING

THEIR

SEAHAWKS

FEATHERS

An antique truck adorned with an illuminated “12 Man� sign sits in the parking lot of Ancient Auto Works at 2343 E. U.S. Highway 101 east of Port Angeles. With the Seattle Seahawks bound for the Super Bowl, football fever has taken hold of Northwest Washington, and the North Olympic Peninsula has not been immune to displays of support for the team.

Conservation districts seek nominations for board seats PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Conservation districts in Clallam and Jefferson counties are accepting nominations for positions on their boards. One elected position expires this year on each of the boards. The Jefferson County Conservation District also will fill a term for an appointed seat that

expires this year. The candidate filing deadline is 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 5, in Jefferson County and 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20, in Clallam County. The Jefferson County Conservation District election for the seat now held by Chairwoman Julie Boggs of Chimacum will be Wednesday, March 5, at the

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conservation district office at 205 W. Patison St., Port Hadlock. The Clallam Conservation District election for the seat now held by Linda Barnfather of Sequim, who also is an aide to 24th District Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, will be Thursday, March 20, at Armory Square, 228 W. First St., Suite F. Polls will open at 3 p.m. and close at 7 p.m. in both elections.

3-year terms

(serving the Peninsula since 1983)

Terms are for three years. Positions are unpaid. Anyone living and registered to vote in the appropriate county is eligible to run for the position of conservation district supervisor. Nomination petition forms, signed by 25 or more registered county voters, must be submitted by the filing deadline for the candidate’s name to appear on the election ballot. Voters who are unable to cast their votes at the polling place may request an

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absentee ballot. Absentee ballots must be requested for the Jefferson County election before 4 p.m. Feb. 12 and by 4 p.m. March 10 in Clallam County. Five positions make up each board. Registered Tapped for speech county voters elect three of WASHINGTON — Rep. the positions. The WashingCathy McMorris Rodgers, ton State Conservation Commission appoints the the highest-ranking GOP woman in Congress, will other two. give the party’s response to President Barack Obama’s March 31 deadline State of the Union address In Jefferson County, Tuesday. The Washington state applications and supporting materials for the appointed congresswoman chairs the seat now held by Glen House Republican conferHuntingford must be ence, is a mother with a received by the state com- new baby and two other children, and often speaks mission by March 31. Applicants must be reg- out on issues affecting famistered to vote in the state ilies. She’s in her fifth term but do not have to live representing a district in within the district. For more information or Eastern Washington. She grew up in a farm to obtain an application form, visit the Jefferson family and as a girl worked County Conservation Dis- at the family’s orchard and trict office or phone it at fruit stand in the small 360-385-4105, or visit the town of Kettle Falls. state Conservation Commission website at www.scc. Auditions slated wa.gov or 360-407-6215. PORT ANGELES — For other questions or to Auditions for the Feb. 28th get absentee ballots, drop Benefit Talent Show are by or phone the county set from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. office. Monday through WednesForms and information day. may be obtained from the The Port Angeles High Clallam Conservation Dis- School Leadership Class trict, 228 W. First St., Suite has scheduled the audiH, Port Angeles, WA 98362; tions in the school’s auditoby phoning 360-775-3747, rium, 304 E. Park Ave. ext. 5; by visiting www. Auditions are open to all clallamcd.org; or by con- on the North Olympic Pentacting the Washington insula, and students, staff State Conservation Com- and community members mission. are encouraged to be part

Charter schools SPOKANE — The first charter school in Washington will open in Spokane next year. The Spokesman-Review reported that the Spokane Public Schools board approved the application Wednesday for Pride Prep. Pride Prep is led by former Spokane Middle School Principal Brenda McDonald, who said it will take middle and high school students who are in danger of failing and prepare them for college. It plans to open in fall 2015 with sixth- and seventh-graders, and add another grade level every year. The location is yet to be determined. State voters in 2012 approved a charter school measure that allows up to 40 independent public schools to open over five years. Spokane Public Schools is the first to decide on a charter school since voters approved the law. No public schools on the North Olympic Peninsula applied.

Anti-bullying PORT ANGELES — “Stop Bullying! One Local School District’s Success Story� will be presented by Quillayute Valley School District Superintendent Diana Reaume at a Prevention Works! on Monday. The event will be held in Linkletter Hall in the lower level of Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Reaume will present the activities and outcomes of the district’s implementation of its program to stop bullying in school. She will share what Forks’ students, parents and teachers have experienced and put into practice. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, phone Prevention Works! coordinator Mary Doherty at 360-797-1490. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS NEW SOLID WASTE FEES effective February 1, 2014

National Veterinary Dental Health Month is Coming

Costs for disposing of household trash and other solid waste will increase on February 1, 2014 at Jefferson County’s disposal facilities in Port Townsend and Quilcene. At the Port Townsend transfer station the fee will increase to $144 per ton, with a minimum of $10.00 for up to 140 lbs of trash. At Quilcene a 32-gallon can will increase to $6.00 with similar increases for other items. The cost for disposing of refrigerators and freezers, which require special handling, will be by weight in Port Townsend plus an environmental fee of $20; at Quilcene the cost will be fixed at $30. Yard debris fees will not increase at this time.

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Jefferson County Public Works will continue to provide dependable solid waste services to county residents, including Recycling and Household Hazardous Waste disposal, in the most cost effective manner possible. Trash disposal fees provide about 96% of the funding for all operations and have not been increased since 1993. 41969073

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PORT TOWNSEND— The City Council has extended its moratorium on the establishment of home-based marijuana businesses for six months. The expectation is that it will be rescinded prior to that time, said City Manager David Timmons. “The council indicated they wanted to see this addressed sooner rather than later,� Timmons said. “They don’t want this to take another six months.� The extension, which now extends to Aug. 5, restricts the establishment of any home-based business outside of the commercial district. This does not affect retail operations, Development Services Director Rick Sepler said. “Some members of the council were concerned that the moratorium would prevent retail from going in, and that’s not the case,� Sepler said. “We are most concerned with what happens inside a person’s home and its effects on the neighborhood.� Sepler said the Upper Sims Way business district would be an approved location, but it would have to meet state standards. Sepler said the city has received several inquiries about home-based marijuana business, making it important to get a set of rules in place as soon as possible.

of the show. The annual talent show is a fundraiser organized by the Leadership Class to help an area family in need. To choose the recipient, each class’ students nominate a person in the community experiencing financial difficulties, usually because of a medical condition. Last year, money raised by entry fees and an auction before the show provided money for medical expenses for the family of Liz Romero, who died of a brain tumor in December 2012. Audition sign-ups can be made with Dana Snell in the high school guidance office, in the Leadership Room 109 during the advisory period or by phoning 360-565-1561. For more information, email Snell at dsnell@ portangelesschools.org.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

A5

Nominations sought for gifted Sequim students PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Nominations are being taken for Sequim School District students in third-through-seventh grades who may qualify for gifted-student services. Nomination forms for students for Highly Capable Program Services must be received at the district office, 503 N. Sequim Ave., by 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18. Nomination forms are available at Greywolf Elementary, Helen Haller Elementary and Olympic Pen-

These students may demonstrate exceptionally high intellectual ability, memory, creativity, curiosity and/or leadership ability. The identification procedures used by the Sequim School District have been developed to conform to state guidelines and are consistent with those used by other school districts in the state. Question concerning services in the Sequim School District should be directed to Margaret Whitley, program coordinator, at 360582-3561 or mwhitley@ sequim.k12.wa.us.

insula Academy school offices, or online at www. sequim.k12.wa.us under “Programs.” Students currently receiving Highly Capable Program services do not need to be nominated again and will continue to receive services.

Student potential Such students perform or show potential to perform at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared with other students of the same age, experience or background.

Jefferson chamber to hand out service awards Sunday PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND— The Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce will present three service awards at 11 a.m. Sunday. The finalists will be honored and winners announced at a brunch at Fort Worden Commons. Tickets to the brunch are $25 each, with event sponsorships available. Nominated for 2013 Citizen of the Year are Heather Dudley Nolette, Co-Lab cofounder; Le Hornbeck, president of the Rotary Club of Port Townsend; Bill James, past president and vice president of Rotary Club of

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JACK FROST

NIPPING AT THE TREES

Hoar frost hangs heavy on trees in the historic neighborhood around Summit Drive, Stevens Street and Cliff Drive in Spokane this week. Temperatures in the eastern portion of the state will remain well within the freezing range, but the North Olympic Peninsula will see more mild weather with temperatures in the high 40s and low 50s and perhaps a bit of sun this weekend. For a more complete forecast, see Page B12.

Port Townsend and member of the Olympic Community Action Programs board; and Ian Keith, Port Townsend Library advisory board member and community volunteer.

Susan Jacob and Finnriver Farm co-owner Crystie Kisler. The three finalists for the Young Professional of the Year award are Life in Harmony owner Annalisa Barelli, Jefferson County YMCA Director Erica Delma and Chauncey Tudhope-Locklear, who manages the ReCyclery. For information or reservations to the brunch, phone Laura Brackenridge at 360-385-7869.

Finalists The three finalists for the Tim Caldwell Business Leader of the Year Award are Michael Haberpointer of Active Life and Physical Therapy, Sport Townsend’s

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OLYMPIA — A guide to toxic chemicals is available for companies interested in finding safer alternatives in products. The state Department of Ecology worked with agencies in eight other states through Interstate Chemicals Clearinghouse, or IC2, to develop the voluntary guide. The guide provides technical assistance to companies that want to reduce or eliminate their use of toxic chemicals.

choices about their use of toxic chemicals. The process helps them consider the potential harm chemicals could have on human health and the environment. “This is an important tool that will help companies identify safer materials,” said Ecology Director Maia Bellon. “We commend businesses who are taking a proactive approach to remove toxic chemicals

from everyday consumer products.” Walmart and Target recently announced sustainable chemical and product standards that call for more ingredient disclosure, reducing or eliminating chemicals of concern and safer substitution, Ecology said. The guide is available on the IC2 website at http:// tinyurl.com/pdnchemicals-guide.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Parks: Sales tax

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GETTING

SOME CLOSURE

Workers position a boom lift Wednesday next to strand jacks being used to lift the 1,082-ton plutonium recycle test reactor from about 30 feet below ground level in the 300 Area at Hanford. The project is being done by Washington Closure Hanford as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s River Corridor Closure Project. The Tri-City Herald reported that it’s one of the most complex cleanup projects along the Columbia River near Richland. The reactor was used in the 1960s to test fuel containing recycled plutonium for possible use in commercial nuclear power reactors.

Health: Enrollment ends in March CONTINUED FROM A1 Health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act took effect Jan. 1. Statewide, 382,075 enrollments were completed through the exchange between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31. Of those, 314,875 were newly eligible, previously eligible but not enrolled or previously covered through Medicaid. Since the exchange opened in October, most of the newly insured signed up as individuals.

Nearly 80 percent of those buying private insurance earn less than $35,000 a year for an individual or $70,000 for a family of four. People are signing up for health insurance in every county, with most enrollments in the counties with the most people.

More women buying More women than men are buying insurance or enrolling in free health coverage through Medicaid. Shoppers are spread

across the age bands, but more than half of enrollees are between 45 and 64. The majority of shoppers chose a plan from Premera Blue Cross or its LifeWise Health Plan subsidiary. Premera and LifeWise are the only companies selling insurance in all 39 counties. A county breakdown of the demographics of new enrollees was not included in Thursday’s report. The total number of new enrollees on the North Olympic Peninsula was 1,390 in the first month,

3,691 through November and 7,402 through Dec. 13. Washington Healthplanfinder officials attributed a spike of 233 in December enrollments in private health plans to a Dec. 23 deadline for coverage that began Jan. 1. Open enrollment for private insurance through the exchange at www.wahealth planfinder.org ends March 31. Medicaid, known as Apple Health in Washington, does not have an open enrollment period.

Offer: 2 performance bonuses CONTINUED FROM A1 Lodge and Cottages on California’s Monterey PeninState Parks is scheduled sula, which is where he to cede management of part heard about the public authority of the park May 1, accord- development ing to the terms of a 50-year position. During his career, he has lease signed Nov. 8. The public development worked in several shortauthority will oversee the term jobs in the hospitality campus portions of the 434- industry, many of them as a acre park, which includes consultant. While between jobs, he most of the buildings, for began looking in the Pacific educational purposes while Northwest to be closer to State Parks continues to manage the camping, beach his wife’s family in Poulsbo. Deighton and his wife, and recreation areas. Katherine, have three chilThe public development dren: two grown and one of authority board voted school age. unanimously Wednesday to Deighton will find a extend the offer to Deigh- rental property at first and ton. move his family at a later date, he said.

Deighton experience

Deighton’s experience dates back to 1992, according to his resume. Deighton has worked in a variety of locations but for the past few years has headquartered his operations in Alpharetta, north of Atlanta. Most recently, he served as interim general manager for the Ti Kaye Resort and Spa in St. Lucia in the Caribbean. Before then, he was general manager of Lighthouse

Well prepared Deighton said the public development authority is well prepared for the management transition. It has raised the more than $300,000 startup costs required in its lease agreement with Washington State Parks, Executive Director Dave Robison said last week. “The board and Dave Robison have done an excellent job of getting the wheels turning,”

Deighton said. “Everything has already been set into motion.” He added that he wants to focus on marketing. “We will need to find ways to better promote the facility, using social media as part of the marketing plan, so we can draw both the individual traveler and the conference business.” Board member Norm Tonina, who conducted the general manager job search, said about 120 people answered the job advertisement, which he winnowed down to 12 semifinalists. After interviewing all 12, he selected four, but two dropped out, one because of another job offer and another due to the salary, which is low for professionals in the hospitality industry, Tonina said. The other finalist was Port Townsend resident Maureen Mitchell Bennett, who owns and operates Casa Sirena Vacations Rental and Property Management — which she said she scaled back in 2012 to the point that she now manages only her own property — and has 30 years of experience in the hospitality industry. Tonina said “something

happened when I was checking Michael’s reference that has never happened to me before. “Three people used the exact same words, ‘calm, fair and firm,’ which are characteristics we are looking for in this position.”

Moving allowance The offer includes a relocation allowance of $7,500 and states that Deighton is eligible for two $10,000 “performance bonuses” in November and May, although he would not be eligible for a bonus until this November. While supporting Deighton’s hire, board member Bill James opposed the performance bonuses, saying he preferred permanent salary adjustments. With the offer to Deighton pending, the board has begun winnowing down applicants for the hospitality manager position. About 13 people will eventually work for the public development authority out of its office in Fort Worden State Park.

CONTINUED FROM A1 other obligations. “The county was not preThe city would assume pared to take on county the debt service and reallo- debt by issuing councilcate the sales tax funds for manic bonds for the city to support of Memorial Field repair Mountain View Comand the Port Townsend mons, a facility owned by Community Center begin- the Port Townsend School District,” Morley said. ning in 2017. Morley said the county The city’s obligation to provide funds generated by offered several alternatives a 2010 voter-approved sales for repairing the commutax increase to Memorial nity center, which was part Field and the community of the city’s proposal, as center expires in June 2015. well as funding for recreAn attempt to put a pro- ation programming and posal for a joint city/county that the city has expressed metropolitan parks district no interest in the county’s before voters was dropped proposals. last fall. “The county will conOn Jan. 11, Timmons tinue to manage the countytold the City Council that owned PT Community Centhe county had rejected the ter and Memorial Field and plan and that it was now off provide recreation prothe table. gramming within our finanThat includes options for cial means,” he said. continued funding that he “We continue to work had delineated in the plan with community partners that included the creation to help enhance recreation of a special-purpose parks programming that the and facilities district, a 0.02 county can provide, and we percent sales tax increase remain open to continued and a 10-cent special pur- cooperation with the city on pose levy, all of which would park and recreation issues.” require voter approval. On Thursday, Timmons Parent group meets said all city resources would A parent group has be devoted to Mountain View and that the other two taken matters into its own properties would become hands and plans a brainthe county’s sole responsi- storming session from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturbility. day to find creative ways to Done with collaboration keep recreation programs going. “We are done with our The session will be at the collaboration efforts,” Tim- Port Townsend Community mons said. Center, 620 Tyler St. “We will focus our atten“There is a difference tion on Mountain View. between sustaining certain “[The county] is going to programs and making them deal with finding their own sustainable for their kids,” solution. said Shelly Randall, one of Timmons is sending out a letter today to the Jeffer- the leaders of Parents son County commissioners Loudly Advocating for and the metropolitan parks Youth, or PLAY. “We hope that parents, district steering committee task force announcing the grandparents and anyone city’s decision to withdraw else who is involved with the care of children will the plan. “The County has politely take the time out of their but firmly rejected the City weekend to come out and Manager’s plan [and] has advocate for youth,” Rannot proposed an alterna- dall said. “It will give us a chance tive,” the letter says. Timmons said he has not to regroup from the effects received anything in writ- of recent budget cuts and ing from the county about have conversations about what we want our parks its rejection of the plan. County Administrator and recreation system to Philip Morley said the be.” ________ city’s plan was “multifaceted” and that the county Jefferson County Editor Charlie was not confident the city Bermant can be reached at 360could assume the bond 385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula debt considering all of its dailynews.com.

Death row prisoner’s release petition nixed THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — The state Supreme Court has rejected a petition for release from death row inmate Jonathan Lee Gentry, sentenced for the murder of a 12-year-old girl in 1988. Gentry was condemned in 1991 for the killing of Cassie Holden in Bremerton. The girl, in town from Pocatello, Idaho, to visit her mother for the summer, was killed with blows from a 2-pound rock after she went out for an afternoon walk near a golf course. ________ Gentry, who is black, Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360- argued that his trial was 385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula tainted by inappropriate, dailynews.com. racial comments from the

prosecutor and a witness; Holden was white. He sought to apply a decision the court made in an unrelated case in 2011 that was highly critical of race-based prosecutorial misconduct. In that case, State v. Monday, the court determined that when a prosecutor commits such misconduct, it’s the burden of the state to prove it didn’t affect the trial. Justice Debra Stephens wrote for the court Thursday that the possibility of such bias is “of extremely grave concern affecting the legitimacy of the jury’s verdict,” but the decision in Monday does not apply to earlier cases, including Gentry’s.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

A7

Report: Fatigue factor in fatal vessel crash BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAPUSH — Fatigue, fog and an “unfamiliarity with safety issues” led to a collision between two fishing vessels that killed a Port Angeles man in September 2012, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada said in a report this week. The 40-foot Maverick, homeported in LaPush, and 90-foot Viking Storm, out of Vancouver, B.C., collided in heavy fog 35 miles west of LaPush at about 4:30 a.m. Sept. 28, 2012. Three of the four crew members of the Maverick abandoned the rapidly sinking vessel before it sank and were rescued by the crew of the Viking Storm crew within five minutes. The survi-

vors were taken ashore in a U.S. Coast Guard rescue boat. A fourth crew member, Kelly Dickerson, 33, was trapped in a forward compartment of the Maverick and was presumed drowned after a daylong search by Coast Guard boats and a helicopter. The Coast Guard investigation has not been completed, said Petty Officer Katelyn Tyson, Coast Guard spokeswoman.

Canadian report In the marine investigation report released Tuesday, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada said the Maverick had been drifting overnight without a crew member on lookout duty. Meanwhile, the mate of the Viking Storm “had not main-

tained a proper watch” and “left the wheelhouse unattended just prior to the collision.” The mate had experienced “accumulated fatigue” before the collision, the report said. “At the same time as the mate on the Viking Storm left the wheelhouse, one of the deckhands on the Maverick got up to use the washroom and, through the deckhouse windows, noticed a bright light illuminating the fog,” the report said. “After returning from the washroom, the deckhand continued to monitor the light through the deckhouse windows for approximately one minute. The light was blinding until it passed above the deckhouse windows, at which time the Viking Storm’s bow wake became visible. The

Maverick’s deckhand then shouted a warning to the master.” The report determined that high-pressure sodium lights on the Viking Storm impaired the vision and ability of the Maverick’s deckhand to “determine the vessel’s proximity and delayed his taking of evasive action.” At the same time, the mate of the Viking Storm returned to the wheelhouse and noticed the Maverick about 100 feet directly ahead. The mate slammed the main engine into full reverse and made a hard starboard turn. “On the Maverick, the master heard the deckhand’s warning, but he had no time to take evasive action,” the report said. “Within seconds, the Viking Storm’s bow struck the Maverick’s

port side at an angle of about 90 degrees.” The Maverick rolled onto its starboard side and flooded. No sound signals were used by either vessel despite the heavy fog. Coast Guard officials estimated that visibility was about 40 feet on the morning the accident. Dickerson’s father, Darby Dickerson of Port Angeles, was among the three survivors. The Viking Storm had a full load of 130 tons of hagfish caught in Canadian waters that it was taking to Grays Harbor when the collision occurred. Both vessels had radar.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsuladailynews.com.

Briefly: State ‘Monkey business’ is all part, Sen. Cantwell parcel for research laboratory requests

medical examiner. It could take weeks to make identification, likely using DNA. Snohomish County detectives believe Dennis “Slick” Lilly lived under the alias of Dave Murray and SEATTLE — U.S. Sen. died at the age of 64. Maria Cantwell is asking They said his wife, Mary President Barack Obama Lilly, has been living under to take action to restrict or prohibit the development of the name of Amanda Murray. large-scale mining in the They moved to Gold bar Bristol Bay watershed. in 1993 and operated a In a letter sent Thursbusiness called The Mail day, Cantwell asked Station. Obama to invoke a rarely used authority under the federal Clean Water Act to Poulsbo principal protect the region that is POULSBO — The prinhome to the world’s largest cipal of Pouslbo Elemensockeye salmon fishery. tary School has been The Democratic senator placed on leave while the said thousands of jobs in district investigates her Washington state are tied use of the N-word to stuto Bristol Bay salmon fish- dents. ing. Superintendent Patty She, fishermen and oth- Page said Principal Clauers are rallying against the dia Alves went on a leave proposed Pebble Mine on of absence Wednesday that Thursday in Seattle. was not considered a disciThe U.S. Environmental plinary action. Protection Agency released The Kitsap Sun reported a report last week conclud- Alves used the N-word with ing that large-scale mining fifth-grade students who in the Bristol Bay waterwere uncomfortable with shed poses significant risks the word “Negro” while to salmon. rehearsing a play about Pebble Limited PartnerMartin Luther King Jr. ship spokesman Mike Alves said “Negro” was Heatwole said Cantwell’s not the same as the request is unprecedented N-word, and she used the and has never been used actual word. before a resource project Page said it is not has filed for permits. acceptable district policy to He said “it flies in the use the N-word to explain face of due process.” its meaning. He also criticized the EPA document as a political report intended to harm Frat suspended the project’s ability to PULLMAN — A Washapply for permits. ington State University fraternity has been susMissouri fugitive pended. Delta Sigma Phi’s chapEVERETT — Detectives believe they have found out ter in Pullman was suspended this week by the what happened to a man who escaped from the Mis- national organization. Delta Sigma Phi had souri Penitentiary 27 years more than 80 members in ago. Pullman. They think he changed The national organizahis name and lived in Gold tion cited numerous policy Bar until 2012 when he died of cancer and his wife violations, including disregard of the chapter facility, buried his body in the member misconduct, low backyard. academic performance and The Daily Herald failure to meet financial reported human remains obligations. discovered last week are The Associated Press being investigated by the

mine limits

BY AMY NILE THE [EVERETT] DAILY HERALD

EVERETT — It’s true. He does kill monkeys in his business. And those dead monkeys mean advances in human health. Mark Crane is second in command at the West Coast’s largest monkey lab, located in Everett. The former Connecticut high school health teacherturned-corporate vice president said the animal activists who protest outside the biomedical research facility should reflect more on what happens inside. SNBL USA, Crane said, is saving people’s lives through medical innovation. The Japanese-owned company tests pharmaceutical drugs on monkeys and also breeds the primates for sale to other scientific researchers. “We’re one of the few [groups of] people who can say we’re in the monkey business,” Crane said.

29-acre site SNBL’s U.S. headquarters in Everett sit on a 29-acre site tucked behind tall trees and security fencing along Seaway Boulevard. A Shinto shrine stands outside, honoring animals used in research. The facility, which currently houses 1,200 monkeys, has room for up to 4,000. That’s in addition to hundreds of rabbits and dogs, and thousands of rodents. The purpose-bred animals live and die in captivity. Researchers use them in the development of new drugs. Last month, SNBL again came under fire after animal activists obtained documents detailing the deaths of 40 monkeys at the company’s Texas breeding facility from 2010 to 2012. “When you’re killing ani-

status for their products. That’s a permission slip for a pharmaceutical company or research institution to move on to testing in humans. SNBL helps develop biological products, such as vaccines, cancer medicines or gene therapies that address major medical defects. “The testing is for significant human disease,” said Robert Rose, the lead veterinarian at the Everett lab. Rose said he joined the medical research industry because he could affect the lives of 4,000 monkeys, instead of caring for one animal at a time, while simultaneously improving human health. He said it’s fulfilling to SNBL USA know that those animals Cynomolgus monkeys are used by SNBL USA to are helping to develop new research pharmaceutical drugs. drugs, particularly those for children with serious medimals, that’s not supportive animal testing before phar- cal conditions. can be of their care,” said Michael maceuticals “My whole role here is Budkie with the Ohio-based researched in humans. animal welfare,” he said. Researchers use prigroup Stop Animal Exploimates to determine safety, Veterinarians watch tation Now. Since coming to Everett dosage and side effects. Rose said company vetin 1999, SNBL has kept a That comes after first low profile and its opera- studying the drug in test erinarians hold absolute veto power over any test or tubes and rodents. tions behind closed doors. “It puts a parentheses of procedure. “There’s a whole lot more If they determine an anito the story than ‘They kill safety around humans,” mal is suffering, research monkeys in there,’ ” Crane Crane said. SNBL keeps its primates stops. said during a visit to the “There’s this idea that in optimal condition as part facility last month. SNBL, Crane said, of its study protocols. Any we’re grabbing random embraces the same ethic health problem that a mon- things like mad scientists,” that guides medical doctors key experiences during an Rose said. “It’s all very preexperiment can be linked to scribed.” — do no harm. Rose is tasked with What people think about the drug being tested. keeping the monkeys com“My monkeys are much animal research and its reality are different, he healthier than you are,” fortable and alleviating said. Researchers conduct Crane said. “We want to pain during the testing. “I’ve never seen anyone take care of these things the studies humanely. because, frankly, that’s our take any pleasure in hurting an animal,” said Alan business.” ‘Cynos’ experiments Though SNBL’s client list Breau, a pharmacologist In Everett, the company remains under wraps due to specializing in analytical breeds, sells and conducts the controversy surrounding chemistry. tests on cynomolgus mon- animal testing, it includes He oversees SNBL’s keys, or “cynos,” which are several major public univer- multimillion-dollar lab. commonly used in medical sities that conduct medical The Everett operation experimentation. research, such as the Uni- does not test the safety of A research monkey can versity of Washington. consumer products such as sell for upward of $3,500. The company tries to cosmetics or shampoo. It The Food and Drug help researchers attain conducts research into Administration mandates investigational new drug human medicine.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Free game access State Patrol brass reassigned for letting pair into Seattle Seahawks match gratis MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

OLYMPIA — The district commander in charge of State Patrol troopers in Pierce and Thurston counties has been reassigned after he allowed his son and his son’s girlfriend into a Seattle Seahawks game even though they had no tickets. The former commander, Ken Noland, was removed Jan. 10 as the District 1 commander after State Patrol Chief John Batiste lost confidence in his ability to lead, agency spokesman Bob Calkins confirmed the News Tribune of Tacoma. Noland was reassigned as a lieutenant with the State Patrol’s Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Bureau, Calkins said. “I made a mistake, the chief made his decision, and I’m moving forward,” Noland told a reporter this week. Neither Noland nor Calkins would say what led

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HAND

DELIVERY

Alan Eaton, an estimator with a body shop in Spokane, walks a customer’s doorframe over to another shop two blocks away earlier this week.

up to the change of duties. However, a source familiar with the incident gave this account to the News Tribune: Noland was moonlighting at CenturyLink Field in Seattle, helping to provide security. Off duty but in uniform, Norland was stationed at one of the entrances to the stadium during the regular season game.

Ticket taker refused At one point, Noland asked a ticket taker to allow his son and the son’s girlfriend into the game even though they had no tickets. The ticket taker refused, but Noland later was able to get them admitted. Another State Patrol employee saw the exchange and reported Noland to superiors. Batiste then reassigned Noland. Noland joined the State Patrol in 1990 and was

made district commander in 2011. His total salary for the year, first as a lieutenant and then as a captain, was $106,044 in 2012, the latest year for which information is available on the state’s salary database. The spokesman noted that the agency terms Noland’s reassignment a “reversion,” and not a demotion, because the chief has discretion as to who leads each district. “We use the term reversion because it’s done at the chief ’s discretion, as opposed to a demotion, which would be the result of an [Office of Professional Standards] investigation,” Calkins said, adding that he was speaking generally about State Patrol process, not about any particular trooper. “For any reason, conceivably no reason, the chief could revert someone back to their Revised Code of Washington rank.”

Briefly: State Bill would see reports on lobbyist funds OLYMPIA — State senators want everyone to have better access to lobbyist reports.

A group of lawmakers led by Republican Sen. Joe Fain proposed a bill Thursday that would require lobbyists to pay a $200 annual fee to fund the development of an electronic reporting system. Detailed lobbyist reports are currently filed on paper, making it difficult to track

nated over three weeks last year to get a glimpse into how often lobbyists provide free meals to lawmakers. Over a four-month span, the state’s 50 most active lobbyists pampered legislators with hundreds upon hundreds of meals, totaling a projected value of more than $65,000.

details such as which lawmakers they are taking out to restaurants. The new bill in the Senate is similar to an idea proposed in the past by Democratic Rep. Jim Moeller. The Associated Press and a consortium of public radio stations such as KUOW and KPLU coordi-

Kurt Cobain Day ABERDEEN — Twenty years after his death, Kurt Cobain is getting more recognition in his home town. Aberdeen Mayor Bill Simpson said Cobain’s birthday Feb. 20 will be proclaimed Kurt Cobain Day in the city.

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Cobain was born in 1967, gained fame as the lead singer for the grunge rock group Nirvana and died by suicide in 1994 in Seattle. Aberdeen is on the Washington coast about 80 miles southwest of Seattle. The Associated Press

Bet CONTINUED FROM A1 The promotion proved so popular that Ostroot said he thought a wager with a San Francisco Bay Area Ford dealer would fit the bill of expanding Seahawks fever and started looking for similarly sized dealers along U.S. Highway 101 in the Bay Area.

Niners fans Ostroot found Henry Curtis Ford and saw that the dealer’s Facebook page was as teeming with 49ers faithful as Price Ford’s was with legions of the 12th Man. “And their sales manager is a big Niners fan,” Ostroot said. So Ostroot called his counterpart Roberto Galvez at Henry Curtis Ford and set up the wager: a sampling of San Francisco food specialities sent to Price Ford if the Seahawks win and the same from the North Olympic Peninsula sent south if Seattle lost. Ostroot said he planned to include locally caught fish and a sampling of beer and wine made in Port Angeles and Sequim. “Our goal was to showcase what we had to offer up here on the Olympic Peninsula,” Ostroot said.

Improved plan Ostroot said he got a call first thing Monday morning from Galvez with what both agreed was a better idea: Henry Curtis Ford would pay for the sandwiches and throw in some Ghirardelli chocolates for dessert. Looking toward the Super Bowl, Ostroot said he’s on the hunt for a Ford dealer in Colorado willing to take a similar wager. “We’re currently seeking out a Colorado dealer,” Ostroot said, “with a sales manager that’s a diehard Broncos fan.”

________

Fine jewelry deals of the day & doorbusters are only available at stores that carry fine jewelry. ³REG. & ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. ONE DAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT 1/24 & 1/25/14. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. ‡All carat weights (ct. t.w.) are approximate; variance may be .05 carat. ††Does not include watches, designer collections, fashion jewelry or diamond engagement rings; extra savings are taken off sale or clearance prices; “deal of the day” shows price after extra savings; does not apply to Everyday Values, super buys, specials or trunk shows. Jewelry photos may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores; log on to macys.com for locations. Almost all gemstones have been treated to enhance their beauty & require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or ask your sales professional. Extra savings are taken off already-reduced prices; “deal of the day” or “doorbuster” prices reflect extra savings. Doorbusters are available while supplies last. Advertised merchandise may not be carried at your local Macy’s and selection may vary by store. Prices and merchandise may differ at macys.com. Electric item shown carries warranties; to see a mfr’s warranty at no charge before purchasing, visit a store or write to: Macy’s Warranty Dept., PO Box 1026, Maryland Heights, MO 63043, attn: Consumer Warranties. N3120576.

Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

Growing pains? Andrew May’s garden column. Sundays in

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bill would reduce K-12 class sizes, add staff members BY LISA BAUMANN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — A bill introduced in the House this week would lower class sizes in state public schools and help encourage the hiring of more teachers and other staff members. Rep. Roger Goodman, sponsor of House Bill 2589, said Thursday that the goal is to make class size reduction a priority as the Legislature adds dollars to the education budget as mandated by the state Supreme Court. “Reducing class size is the right thing to do, and it’s time to do it,” Goodman said. The Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that the state isn’t meeting its constitutional obligation to amply pay for basic education. In response, the Legislature added about $1 billion to education funding last year. Lawmakers and other governmental officials estimate the full cost of closing the education funding gap would be between $4 billion and $5 billion. The bill would increase school staffing levels each year, with a priority on adding teachers to high-poverty schools. The proposal seeks a general goal of 17 students in the early grades and 25 in grades four through 12. Lower teacher-student ratios would be sought in high-poverty schools. Elementary grades averaged about 23 children per classroom in the state during the 2011-12 school year, according to statistics from the National Education Association. Katherine Jones, a parent of two students in

Renton schools, said that last year, her son’s fifthgrade class had 29 students and that the classroom environment was often chaotic. “I worry about my children’s ability to compete in the world,” she said. “I shouldn’t have to.” Mary Howes with Class Size Counts, a statewide organization of parents, teachers, students and community members advocating for smaller class sizes, said Washington state ranks 47th out of 50 states in class size, according to statistics from the National Education Association. “Forty-seventh in the nation isn’t good enough for our kids,” said Sen. Marko Liias, D-Mukilteo. Liias filed a companion bill in the Senate on Thursday.

How to fund? Goodman said money for the measure has not been identified yet, but it would be included in the funding needed to abide by the Supreme Court’s ruling, known as the McCleary decision. However, the decision talked about finding money to lower class sizes in kindergarten through third grade. It will cost considerably more to make all classes smaller. Liias said students at all grade levels can benefit from “small class sizes.” Although Howes, Goodman and Liias cited studies in which students in smaller classes performed better academically, research on the impact is not clear. The state Supreme Court set a 2018 deadline for fixing the way Washington pays for education.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

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Lawmaker seeks to hike minimum wage to $12 Bill faces tough fight in Olympia

“The goal here is that people should be able to pay . . . without government assistance.” REP. JESSYN FARRELL D-Seattle

BY RACHEL LA CORTE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — A state lawmaker has introduced a bill to increase what is already the highest state minimum wage in the nation to $12 an hour over the next three years, but the measure faces an uphill battle in a politically divided Legislature. Under state House Bill 2672, sponsored by Democratic Rep. Jessyn Farrell of Seattle, the rate would first increase — for workers 18 and older — from the current $9.32 an hour to $10 an hour Jan. 1, 2015. It would increase again to $11 a year later and would hit $12 an hour Jan. 1, 2017. After that, further annual increases would be based on inflation. More than 30 House Democrats have also signed on to the bill.

Resistance expected At a news conference Thursday to announce the bill, Farrell said the measure is meant to “promote the idea that a day’s work should produce a living wage.” “The goal here is that people should be able to pay their rent, pay for child care, pay for food, without government assistance,” she said. The measure is likely to face serious resistance in the state Senate, which is controlled by a predominantly

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rep. Jessyn Farrell, D-Seattle, speaks to the media Thursday in Olympia. Republican majority that has expressed misgivings about any increase’s potential impact on businesses. Sen. Janea Holmquist Newbry, a Republican from Moses Lake who is chairwoman of the Senate Commerce & Labor Committee, said the measure would not only discourage businesses from opening or expanding in the state, it could also lead business owners to potentially lay people off or hire fewer people. “If their intent is to help those in poverty, I think it’s a good intent, but I think this will do the exact opposite,” she said. The minimum wage issue has been in the political spotlight recently in the state. Voters in the airport city of SeaTac in November

narrowly approved a measure granting a $15-an-hour minimum wage for workers at the airport and related industries, like hotels and rental car companies.

SeaTac ruling A King County Superior Court judge ruled that the law applied to about 1,600 hotel and parking lot workers in SeaTac but not to employees and contractors working within SeattleTacoma International Airport, which is operated by the Port of Seattle. In Seattle, officials have been exploring the possibility of raising the minimum wage there to as high as $15 an hour. Earlier this month, newly elected Mayor Ed Murray directed his depart-

ment leaders to come up with a strategy for paying city employees more. Last week, Gov. Jay Inslee in his State of the State address called for the state minimum wage to increase by between $1.50 and $2.50 an hour. A bill introduced by Republican Sen. John Braun of Centralia would forbid cities, counties and port districts from changing the minimum wage beyond the state level, even if such an increase is approved by initiative. That measure is not likely to gain traction in the Democratic-controlled House. Voters in Washington state approved an initiative in 1998 that requires the state Department of Labor and Industries to make a cost-of-living adjustment to its minimum wage each year based on the federal Consumer Price Index for urban wage earners and clerical workers. The state is one of 11 that make such an adjustment, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. The state’s minimum wage applies to workers in both agricultural and nonagricultural jobs, although 14and 15-year-olds may be paid 85 percent of the adult minimum wage, or $7.92 per hour in 2014.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, January 24-25, 2014 PAGE

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Marines stunned by fall of Falluja BY RICHARD A. OPPEL JR. ADAM BANOTAI WAS a 21-year-old sergeant and squad leader in the Marine Corps during the 2004 invasion of Falluja, a restive insurgent-held city in Iraq. His unit — which had seven of 17 men wounded by shrapnel or bullets in the first days of the invasion — seized control of the government center early in the campaign. So when Sunni insurgents, some with allegiances to alQaida, retook the city this month and raised their black insurgent flag over buildings where Banotai and his men fought, he was transfixed, disbelieving and appalled. “I texted a couple of friends,” said Banotai, now a firefighter and registered nurse in Pennsylvania. “Everyone was in disbelief.” “I don’t think anyone had the grand illusion that Falluja or Ramadi was going to turn into Disneyland, but none of us thought it was going to fall back to a jihadist insurgency,” he said. “It made me sick to my stomach to have that thrown in our face, everything we fought for so blatantly taken away.” The bloody mission to wrest Falluja from insurgents in

November 2004 meant more to the Marines than almost any other battle in the 12 years of war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many consider it the corps’ biggest and most iconic fight since Vietnam, with nearly 100 Marines and soldiers killed in action and hundreds more wounded.

‘Lives were wasted’ “Lives were wasted, and now everyone back home sees that,” said James Cathcart. He fought as a private first class in the Marines in Falluja in 2004, and was discharged with post-traumatic stress disorder. For many veterans of that battle — most now working in jobs long removed from combat — watching insurgents running roughshod through the streets they once fought to secure, often in brutal close-quarters combat, has shaken their faith in what their mission achieved. Some now blame President Obama for not pushing harder to keep some troops in Iraq to maintain the stability. Others express anger at George W. Bush for getting them into a war that they now view as dubious in purpose and even more doubtful in its accomplishments.

Cities wrong to pre-empt marijuana sales PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA’S declaration that marijuana legalization experiments in Washington and Colorado are “important for society” should push more states to tear up prohibition laws and start anew. But someone needs to make sure Obama’s mesGUEST sage gets to city and EDITORIAL county councils across Washington that are moving in the opposite direction. Thirty-nine of the state’s 75 largest cities, including Kent, Renton and Federal Way, have bans or moratoriums on the new legal marijuana businesses authorized by 2012’s Initiative 502. These local officials, apparently basing their decisions on irrational fears, chose the failed policy of prohibition and the perpetuation of the black market. They choose illicit dealers over startup businesses. Attorney General Bob Ferguson’s opinion last week made clear that local governments can make the choice. Local laws often can pre-empt state law, except when state law specifically prohibits it. I-502 didn’t explicitly pre-empt local officials across the state from freezing out marijuana businesses. As wrongheaded as those decisions are, municipalities should be free to make them. Recreational marijuana sales are a luxury, not a fundamental right such as medical care or a civil right such as the freedom to marry, which demand state-level pre-emption. The Legislature is considering coercing municipalities to allow marijuana business with a threat to withhold liquor tax revenue. This heavy-handed approach would ensure a costly lawsuit and calcify resistance. Instead, the state should roll out this grand experiment in the willing municipalities. Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes had demanded more marijuana stores than the 21 proposed by the Liquor Control Board. Fine, the board should make Seattle a bit greener, soaking up, say, Renton’s allocation. In a year or two, the municipalities turning their backs on I-502 will see that the new approach is the better approach, and will open the business licensing windows. If not, voters have a ripe litmus test to judge their elected leaders. We’ve seen this pattern before. State law allows municipalities to ban liquor sales. Over the seven decades since liquor prohibition ended, the tally of entirely dry cities and counties shrank to zero. The Seattle Times

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But either way, the fall of the city to insurgents has set off within the tight-knit community of active and former Marines a wrenching reassessment of a battle that in many ways defined their role in the war.

Former adviser “This is just the beginning of the reckoning and accounting,” said Kael Weston, a former State Department political adviser who worked with the Marines for

globe had been frenetically sharing their feelings about the new battle for Falluja via email, text and Facebook. “The news went viral in the worst way,” he said. “This has been a gut punch to the morale of the Marine Corps and painful for a lot of families who are saying, ‘I thought my son died for a reason.’ ” Banotai has no regrets about supporting the war, and said it was a mistake MIKE LANE/CAGLE CARTOONS (2004) for the United States to withdraw troops when it did, which nearly three years in Falluja and he believes was done for political the surrounding Anbar province, reasons, not because the mission was accomplished. and later with Marines in But he also would not favor Afghanistan. sending troops back. [Among the Anbar province “It’s too late. Mistakes have casualties was Lance Cpl. Jason already been made,” he said. Hanson of Forks, who was killed “We can’t go back and rewrite in 2006 with three other Marines history.” when a truck-bomb exploded near ________ a building he and others were in.] Weston, who is now writing a Richard A. Oppel Jr. is a book but remains in close contact New York Times reporter who with scores of the men he served wrote from Iraq during the Iraqi with, said Marines across the War.

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Mixed Marriages”] in which she complains of the The North Olympic abuse heaped upon some Timber Action Committee black actress because she opposes the “new” Wild had married a white Olympics and Wild and reporter at Fox News. Scenic Rivers Act because The only trouble I have it does nothing to restore with that is “Fox” and the family-wage jobs that “news” in the same senwere lost due to the Northtence. west Forest Plan. She then relates the We have consistently similar vitriol she has presented an alternative received for marrying a that includes most of the white. proposed Wild Olympics I agree with her that act but also include specifithis is deplorable. cally selected areas for However, her assessrecurrent, perpetual and ment of the source of this sustainable commercial abuse is remarkable. So timber harvest. much so I wonder if the ing,” read no further. I am Peninsula as wilderness, I Under the Northwest woman is delusional. wasting your time. Forest Plan, approximately want to publicly thank She attributes it, of them for their work and For the rest of us, since 50,000 acres of previously course, to liberals and commitment to this prono one truly understands harvested timberland will assorted left-wing types, the complexities of global become off-based from any cess. which is not to say they They understand that environmentalism, it is timber harvest in the next can’t be snide and obnoxprotecting our wild places alright to be agnostic on two decades. ious at times. is crucial for the long term the subject. Two decades after that, But let’s get real here: health of the local economy Remember, 20,000 years approximately 100,000 The really nasty hate-monand environment. ago, Port Angeles was acres will move into de gering usually comes from They also understand under several thousand facto wilderness. the right-wing types. that wild places attract visfeet of ice that somehow Two decades after that, All too often right wing managed to melt away virtually all of the Olympic itors, boosting the local nastiness is accompanied economy year-round, and without the benefit of National Forest will be offby violence, even murder. attract young families like internal combustion base for any timber harThe prejudice against my own who are inspired engines. vest. mixed marriages and to live and start businesses More importantly, the We appreciate Rep. minorities comes overhere. [Derek] Kilmer’s efforts ignominious “scientific eviwhelmingly from conservaAs an owner of Pacific with the Olympic Penindence” offered by self-serv- tives. sula Collaborative but rec- Alpine Guides and resident ing extremists on this subThe interesting thing of the North Olympic Pen- ject, has been exposed as a ognize that it will not about this column is that insula, my family and I change the Northwest Forfraud so despicable that it she rails about behavior rely on places like those est Plan. would make Chicken Little that mostly comes from the that the Wild Olympics blush. We see it as a very people who are her bread This might be a good small and inadequate step Wilderness and Wild and and butter. Scenic Rivers Act would time to step back and wait toward fixing the terrible These are the people protect. for some real science to economic consequences of who read her regularly to Guiding visitors and emerge. the Northwest Forest Plan. get confirmation of what We certainly cannot Carol Johnson, locals alike in the Olymthey want to believe. trust our politicians to Port Angeles pics, we support the bill You know: All liberals that helps to protect a resolve this question. and Democrats and even place that is both an inteJudging from recent hisJohnson is executive Republicans who have gral part of our business tory, politicians would furdirector of the North Olymstrayed from far-right ther regulate our lives, pic Timber Action Commit- and our quality of life. orthodoxy are wrong and Thank you Rep. Kilmer, restrict travel and ration tee. un-American. Sen. Murray and Wild energy. Admittedly, whether you Olympics for working Economic destruction Wild Olympics II turn left or right on the toward this goal. would surely be the result. political spectrum, if you go As one of the more than Katy Reid, Charles Raab, 250 local business owners far enough, you’ll come to Port Angeles Port Angeles who had urged Rep. Crazy Town. [Derek] Kilmer and Sen. The difference is, if you Wait for science Mixed marriages [Patty] Murray to introturn right, you don’t have For the cultists who duce a bill to protect the I read the Michelle Mal- to go very far. genuflect at the shrine of wild forests, mountains kin column of Jan. 17 Richard Jepson, “man-made global warmand rivers of the Olympic [“Modern Bias Aimed at Sequim

Wild Olympics I

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MICHAEL FOSTER, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mfoster@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525; lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim news office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend news office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CommentaryViewpoints

Mitt movie suggests another run in 2016? From Salt Lake City

operative even told BuzzFeed that donors are so worried about IT’S HARD TO imagine any- 2016 now, many tell him, “I think thing more painful than going we need Mitt back.” through the presidential camIt seems preposterous that paign all over again with Mitt we’d go through a third Romney Romney. run, but with Chris Christie Unless it’s going through two imploding and Barbara Bush presidential campaigns with Mitt denouncing dynasties and shooRomney. ing Jeb out of the race, maybe But, yes, the 66-year-old sees an opening. that’s the narMaybe he no longer feels, as Maureen rative of a new he tells his family in the film on Dowd buzzed-about election night in 2012, stoically documentary writing his concession speech: that had its “My time on the stage is over, world premiere guys.” here last FriThe movie spans from Christday night at mastime 2006, with the family the Sundance gathered to make a decision on Film Festival. whether Mitt should run in 2008, Those who to after the 2012 election, when have seen he says goodbye to his Secret “Mitt” — which Service detail and returns to his debuts on Netfempty suburban Boston home, lix today — are agog that filmsadly staring out the window. maker Greg Whiteley has accomI dread to think what was plished what Romney himself, going through Romney’s mind as the gleaming, ever-replicating he watched a movie that made Romney clan and the candidate’s him more appealing than any of high-priced political strategists his campaign ads or his own concould not: vention, even though he paid Willard Mitt Romney seems Stuart Stevens and his other all too human. 2012 advisers ridiculously more He wells up. He prays with than the winning politicos who his family, kneeling on the floor delivered a second term for of hotel rooms, and plays with Obama were paid. them in the snow. But Whiteley, a charming He refers to himself sardoni44-year-old Mormon documentarcally as “the flipping Mormon” ian who brought along his adorand frets that he could become a able blond kids — 12-year-old loser like Michael Dukakis, who son, Henry, and 10-year-old “can’t get a job mowing lawns.” daughter, Scout — to his press He daringly steam irons the interviews, was trying to reveal French cuffs on a formal shirt Mitt, while Romney’s handlers while it’s on his body, just before were trying to obscure Mitt. he goes down in tails to the Al “Stuart Stevens’ feeling was Smith dinner at the Waldorf. that Mitt Romney was a fish out He stays calm when he learns of water,” Alex Castellanos, a that Barack Obama is winning 2008 Romney adviser who re-election: “Wow, that’s too bad,” crossed swords with Stevens in he tells an aide on the phone. “All that campaign, told me. those states, huh?” “He was a Northerner in a Drawn no doubt by word of Southern party. He was a centhe miraculous cinematic oil can trist in a conservative party. He for the Tin Man, Mitt came to see was an elite in a rural party. “Mitt” for the first time last Fri“Stuart didn’t think he could day night. sell Mitt Romney in the primaMaybe Romney sees the film ries. less as a eulogy than a prologue. “Stuart thought that every There are rumors in Republiday spent talking about Mitt can circles that he’s thinking Romney was a losing day and about another run. every day spent talking about A Republican fund-raising Barack Obama was a winning

day. It was criminal.” Romney was able to relax around his fellow Mormon, Whiteley, enough to seem less awkward and strange, but he’s still in the bubble of his faith and family, seemingly cloistered from the world of average Americans. The film glosses over one of the turning points in the campaign, the 47 percent fiasco. “I was insecure about that,” Whiteley admitted to me, noting that Romney didn’t give him a more lucid explanation than he gave the press. It also glides over the bad symbolism of building a four-car garage elevator at his La Jolla, Calif., house, which Stevens told Romney would be fine. And while Romney offers a portrait of a man reluctantly drawn into politics because he thinks it is his duty to save the nation from people like Obama, who “have not been in a setting where you’re trying to make it,” he never really explains how he would save it or gives any clue to the Vision Thing, except murmuring about high taxes on small businesses. In the end, despite all the campaign artifice and the brutal process, we do get to know the candidates in some primal way. The fact that Romney allowed his strategists to keep a fence around him and his faith, which is so central to his life, the fact that he basically had nothing to say about where he wanted to lead the country, the fact that the private equity leecher spoke so dismissively about the 47 percent of people he regarded as moochers, the fact that this supposedly top-notch businessman did not seem to realize his campaign was using 20th-century technology — all of this spoke to a certain tentativeness, obtuseness and callousness. But there’s always 2016.

________ Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email her at http://tinyurl. com/dowdmail.

Lessons for N.Y’s ‘shove guv’ Cuomo NOT SO FAST, Andrew Cuomo. We see what you did there. After publicly bashing conservative New Yorkers as “extreme” people who have no place in his state, the intolerant Democratic governor wants to blame the media for his unmistakable contempt for those who oppose abortion, support gun rights and defend traditional marriage. When he railed against Michelle socially conservative Republi- Malkin can candidates in a radio interview last week, Cuomo hyperbolically singled out those he called “right-to-life, pro-assaultweapon, antigay” citizens. Sounding unapologetically purge-tastic, the governor said these political opponents “have no place in the state of New York, because that’s not who New Yorkers are.” His bigoted comments provoked a fierce social-mediadriven backlash led by devout Catholics and Second Amendment activists in the Empire State. And now, he’s got job-creating, tax-paying conservative business people threatening to leave. Heckuva job, Andy! In a desperate damage control attempt, Cuomo issued a statement claiming that the New York Post “distorted” his words. It’s always the messenger’s fault. The “shove guv” also accused his critics of being “entirely reckless with facts and the truth.”

Really? There was no equivocation in Cuomo’s political eviction wish. Whether he was talking about conservative candidates and/or the voters and donors who support them, you can’t get any clearer than “have no place in the state of New York.” Translation: You don’t belong. Pack your bags. Don’t let the door hit ya on the way out. Scram. All of his lefty friends on MSNBC and at Soros Central may be cheering Cuomo on, but this marginalization strategy is bound to backfire. In Colorado, supposedly moderate Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper threw in with the radical gun-control crowd and is now paying the price. Major businesses have left the state. Two leading state Democratic legislators were recalled last fall by grass-roots campaigns outspent 8-to-1 by gun-control forces underwritten by New York Nanny Stater Michael Bloomberg and Bill Gates. Another state Democrat and staunch gun-control extremist, Evie Hudak, resigned in disgrace last November rather than face the wrath of the independent recallers. Once a hot 2016 Democratic presidential prospect, Hickenlooper’s approval ratings have plunged. As for Cuomo’s reckless dismissal of what he considers an “extreme” minority, a recent poll of New Yorkers showed that the vast majority “support sensible restrictions on abortions, with 80 percent opposing unlimited abortion through the ninth month of pregnancy and 75 percent opposing changes in current law so that someone other than a doctor

can perform an abortion.” Contrary to Cuomo’s distorted view, the 21st-century pro-life movement is a diverse convergence of increasingly young and minority activists, feminist prolifers, independents and social conservatives. And contrary to Cuomo’s reckless telling of history, pro-life activism is ingrained in New York history. The suffragists who famously met at Seneca Falls, N.Y., were ardent advocates for life. Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, as Susan B. Anthony List President Marjorie Dannenfelser pointed out in her review of pro-life feminism, was horrified by the abortion industry and the women who enabled it. Now we know where Andrew Cuomo would have stood had he been around when pro-life suffragists came knocking on New York’s doors: blocking their way. Cuomo insists he “respects” all of the people he dumped on last week. Yet, he continues to willfully mischaracterize their positions and smear them as dangerous haters. There are no do-overs: Cuomo rolled out the unwelcome mat and announced a new state of intolerance. His undemocratic extremism is as extreme as it gets. Out: “I Love New York.” In: “New York Hates You.” Let the homebuyer, business owner, taxpayer, voter and visitor beware.

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, January 24-25, 2014 SECTION

SPORTS, DEATHS, COMICS, BUSINESS In this section

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Other area events

IN BEER

Festival to test taste buds with new, creative brews

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — At the 10th annual Strange Brewfest this weekend, visitors can discover what is newest, best and most creative in the modern world of beer. “This is the premiere winter brewfest west of Seattle,” said American Legion Post Commander Joe Carey. “It is the place where 35 brewers and over 1,500 people get together to enjoy beer, bands and Port Townsend.” The brewfest will be from 5 p.m. to midnight today and from 1 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the American Legion Hall, 209 Monroe St. Tickets are $30 per person. Each ticket includes a souvenir tasting glass, four tasting tokens and a wristband to get the ticketholder in for both days. Additional tasting tokens are $1.50. CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS The vendors, which hail from Rich Dirk, left, of Elk Head Brewery of Buckley pours a beer for Don Lawe of Carnation across the region, will offer tastes at 2013’s Strange Brewfest. Beer enthusiasts from around the region will converge on within the Legion Hall and Port Townsend this weekend to imbibe a variety of craft brews. inside two large tents outside.

Good weather expected Water Street between the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St., and Madison Street will be closed for the festival, and good weather is expected, Carey said. This is the fourth year the Legion has hosted the festival. It took it over from Water Street Brewing, which closed in 2010. Former Water Street Brewing owners Nina Law and Mark Burr are involved as consultants, but the event belongs to the Legion, Carey said. Profits from the event are used to support the Legion’s activities, which include the winter shelter and other civic projects.

Carey said there will be no Budweiser at the event and few Budweiser drinkers. The attendees are more adventurous, and each year sees a different crop of creative brewers.

New brewery on tap One new arrival this year is Propolis Brewing, an emerging Port Townsend company that brews its handcrafted beers on a seasonal basis, offering two new beers a month tied to the time of year. These herbal brews include fruit beers in the summer, pumpkin in the fall and a special Valentine’s Day brew of chocolate and rose to be sold in February on a limited basis.

“We do strange brews all the time,” said Robert Horner, who owns and operates Propolis with his fiancee, Piper Corbett. “The people who come here for Strange Brewfest are adventurous and curious about what is new in the beer world,” Horner said. “They want to see what is out there, and these are the people that we want to talk to about our product.” If the word gets around, it could generate enough sales and publicity for Propolis to expand its orchards and open a tasting room. “We have people calling us all the time saying they want to visit us and try our beers,” Corbett said.

Evan Rachel Wood and Jim Sturgess in a scene from in “Across the Universe,” the movie to screen Saturday at Port Townsend’s Rose Theatre. Audiences will be urged to sing along with the film’s Beatlessoaked soundtrack.

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Juicy choice She chose “Across the Universe,” the 2007 musical tale of Jude, a Liverpool dockworker who goes to America to learn about life and love. His odyssey’s soundtrack: some 50 Beatles songs, from “I’ve Just

Big screen events The executive director of the Port Townsend Film Institute, Force seeks to show people great cinema — on the big screen — that they might otherwise miss. But alas, there’s no “Across the Universe” with on-screen lyrics. TURN

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“The level of integrity is important,” she said. “You are not just bringing this beer into your house; you are putting it into your body. “There has to be love in the beer; otherwise, it doesn’t taste good.” Strange Brewfest offers a kinetic learning experience for participants. TURN

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Diver to speak PORT ANGELES — Hal Everett, a diver and photographer, will speak and show photos on “The World Underwater” at the senior center, 328 E. Seventh St., at 7 p.m. tonight. He will show a series of underwater photographs and short videos taken from northern Canada to southern Tasmania, and share stories on the challenges facing the underwater world. His presentation is the third for the Adventure Travel Series, a fundraiser for the Peninsula Trails Coalition. On Jan. 31, the fourth and final presentation will be Dow Lambert’s slide show on “Photo-birding” on the North Olympic Peninsula. For more information, email Gunvor Hildal at gunvor10@washburnemarine. com.

Grill reopening PORT ANGELES — Kokopelli Grill, 203 E. Front St., has completed remodeling and is reopening for lunch at 11 a.m. today.

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PORT TOWNSEND — For her next movie singalong event, Janette Force sought one of those films with the song lyrics that appear on the screen. “The Sound of Music” and “Grease” have such versions, she knew; people all over the country have flocked to theaters to sing with Julie Andrews or

John Travolta. But those have been done here. Force was ready for something juicier.

Seen a Face” and “Come Together” to “Oh, Darling” and “Revolution.” This is the movie, Force decided, for the first Port Townsend Film Festival fundraiser of 2014.

‘Integrity is important’

Port Angeles

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Come together at PT movie theater Film featuring Beatles tunes to screen for sing-along event

“Having a tasting room would allow us to bring people into town, and they will support other merchants.” Propolis’ organic brew is unique, Corbett said, and healthy.

HATS FROM THE past, rocking for veterans, gardening talks, history lectures and a presentation on the idea of “ignorant certainty” are among this weekend’s attractions on the North Olympic Peninsula. For information about the annual Snowgrass festival and the young artist competitions, as well as other arts and entertainment news, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment magazine, in today’s edition. Also check the calendar of things to do at the PDN’s website, www.peninsuladailynews. com.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1700 tsunami topic of pair of lectures PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — One January night in 1700, tectonic plates shifted abruptly beneath the ocean floor off the Olympic Peninsula in a magnitude-9 earthquake, setting off the Cascadia Subduction Zone tsunami. Its impact was felt as far away as Japan, but it was several centuries before researchers began to recognize the connections between earthquakes and tsunamis in the

Pacific Northwest. These connections are the topic of a presentation by Dr. Brian Atwater, a geologist with the University of Washington and the U.S. Geological Survey, who will talk about the detective work behind current tectonic connections at two gatherings, both free and open to the public, today. Atwater will speak at 2 p.m. in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd.

Atwater has been a USGS sciHe will also give a presentation at 7 p.m. at the Crescent entist since the mid-1970s and is Grange at 50870 state Highway a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the 112 in Joyce. American Geophysical Union and an affiliate professor at the UniCascadia Subduction Zone versity of Washington. With the presentations of “The The Coastal Watershed InstiOrphan Tsunami of 1700,” the tute is a 501(c)(3) based in Port Coastal Watershed Institute and Angeles that is dedicated to proPeninsula College mark the 314th moting “understanding, protecanniversary of the Cascadia Sub- tion and wise management of watershed resources.” duction Zone tsunami.

For more information about the presentations, contact Barbara Blackie of Peninsula College at bblackie@pencol.edu or 360417-6253, or Nicole Harris of the Coastal Watershed Institute at nicole.harris@coastalwatershed institute.org or 360-461-0799. For information on other upcoming events at Peninsula College, visit www.pencol.edu or www.facebook.com/Peninsula College.

Movie: Two screenings PAFAC to honor new, CONTINUED FROM B1 pivotal period between 1965 and 1970, are a key element “We’ll be digging deep in of its swirling visual-musiour reptilian brains to cal journey. That, Force said, is remember the words,” Force thanks largely to its direcquipped. Two “Across the Uni- tor: Julie Taymor, whose verse” sing-along screen- other projects include the ings are slated Saturday: movie “Frida” and the one at noon for all ages and Broadway production of another at 10 p.m. for the “The Lion King.” 21-and-older crowd, since “Her sense of spectacle cocktails will flow. and the human body as Both will be at the Rose art,” said Force, “is so stunTheatre, 235 Taylor St., ning.” with tickets at $15. They’re available at the Rose box Vietnam War era office, at www.rosetheatre. “Across the Universe” com and at 360-385-1089. Festivities will include a captures the era of the Viet1960s-vintage costume con- nam War, the draft, the ristest, and those who enter ing tensions between genwill have a chance to win a erations — and, of course, weekend pass, worth $185, there’s a torrid love story to the Port Townsend Film going on, too. Evan Rachel Wood and Festival, slated for Sept. Jim Sturgess co-star. Bono 19-21. The outfits in “Across the and Joe Cocker make cameo Universe,” set during the appearances.

And the Beatles songs keep on coming: “If I Fell,” “It Won’t Be Long,” “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds,” “I Am the Walrus,” “Let It Be,” on and on. And just as it throbs with sound, the movie is saturated with color — what we need in January, Force added. “To see it on the big screen,” she said, “and to have the opportunity to sing together — oh, my gosh.” For more about Saturday’s “Across the Universe” showings and other Port Townsend Film Institute events, visit www.PTFilm Fest.com or phone the institute office at 360-379-1333.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

old board members PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The public is invited to an appreciation reception for Port Angeles Fine Arts Center Foundation retiring board members from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The reception will be in the gallery of the fine arts center at 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Light appetizers will be served along with the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center plein air wine blended at Camaraderie Cellars at the free reception.

Honorees Among those being given special acknowledgment will be longtime board member Jeanne Martin, who has been named a trustee emeritus by the board because

of long and devoted service, said Robin Anderson, fine arts center director. Martin became an active volunteer for the fine arts center soon after moving to Sequim in 1995 and was elected to the board in 1997. A certified public accountant and owner of an accounting firm, Martin was instrumental in the formation of the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center Foundation and the subsequent merger with the Friends organization. “She secured grants that supported the arts center’s educational program for many years and has been a constant advocate for the growth and financial stability of the center,” Anderson said. Arts center membership also will welcome the new board, which

includes Phillis Olson, new president of the arts center foundation board. Olson replaces Betsy Robins, who is retiring. Olson most recently was co-chair of the center’s annual gala dinner at C’est Si Bon restaurant in December. More than $10,000 was raised from tickets and auction sales. Olson is the wife of Byron Olson, chief financial officer for Port Angeles. The fine arts center gallery is currently closed for a winter hiatus until Feb. 6. Webster’s Woods, which features outdoor art, is open during daylight hours year-round. Admission is free. For more information about the center, visit www.pafac.org or phone 360-457-3532.

Events: Rocking for vets CONTINUED FROM B1 Friends of Animals Memorial Wall, is at 1 p.m. today. The event, which is open The restaurant will offer 10 percent off all food all to the public, will be at the Safe Haven shelter, 257509 weekend. The grill is returning to U.S. Highway 101. its winter hours: from Memorial tiles are avail11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays able by phoning Safe Haven through Thursdays and at 360-452-0414 or emailfrom 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fri- ing pfoa@olypen.com. days and Saturdays.

Turkish movie, talk CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Shelly Ament, left, gets a beer sample from Paul Wasik as Ned Herbert pours in the background at 2011’s Strange Brewfest in Port Townsend.

Beer: ‘Enjoyable time’ CONTINUED FROM B1 “It’s where different brewers get to celebrate the moment with no strings attached,” Horner said. “There is a lot of innovation and creativity, and no one wants to come back every year and do the same thing, although some of the beers are godawful.”

Carey agrees, saying it resembles “a chile cookoff where you have a bite of something and then spit it out, but the bad ones all disappear.” Said Corbett: “It’s relaxed, enjoyable and playful and people have a damn fine time. “Without Strange Brewfest, we’d be drinking the

same beer we always have. “It changes the perception of beer. “ For more information, visit www.strangebrew festpt.com.

________ Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula dailynews.com.

PORT ANGELES — Istanbul-born filmmaker Pelin Esmer will host a screening of her prize-winning dramatic feature, “Watchtower,” at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., today. Admission is free to the 7 p.m. screening in Maier Performance Hall, on the southeastern side of Esmer campus. Afterward, Esmer and film professor Bruce Hattendorf will invite moviegoers to stay for a conversation. For more details, visit www.PenCol.edu.

Mural unveiling set PORT ANGELES — Unveiling of the Rainbow Bridge mural, the focal point of the Peninsula

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Rocking for vets PORT ANGELES — Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary No. 1024 will hold a “Rock-A-Thon” benefit at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. The volunteers will take pledges for the time they spend in rocking chairs, offer books and baked goods for sale and take pet food donations. Proceeds from the rocking chair event and the bake sale will go to the auxiliary. Proceeds from the book sale and pet food donations will go to Voices for Veterans, a relief fund for military families in the area and auxiliary sisters in need. The auxiliary also will offer a small petting zoo for children. For more information, phone Venay Money at 360670-9950 or Pat Foster at 360-683-6519.

Dance music PORT ANGELES — The Jimmy Hoffman Band will play dance-friendly rock and country music at the Eagles Aerie 483, 2843 E. Myrtle St. just off U.S. Highway 101, from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $7 to this nonprofit dance, the first of what organizers hope will be a twice-monthly event on the Eagles’ “floating” dance floor. For information, see the “Let’s Go Dancing Clallam County” page on Facebook.

Roller derby classes PORT ANGELES — A prospect recruitment training and education series by the Port Scandalous Roller Derby team will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday. The 10-week program of Saturday classes will be at the Olympic Peninsula YMCA, 302 S. Francis St. The fee is $50 for the full program of classes to end April 5. The classes will teach attendees about becoming skaters or officials. The program is open to female skaters 18 and older and male or female officials (on or off skates) 16 and older. TURN

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in Vancouver, B.C. Classes are open to the public and are currently offered on Tuesday and Thursday from 4-5pm! Only $10/ class or $80/ 10 classes. First Advertise in Classes & Lessons class is always FREE! Only $20 per week for to 75 words. 25¢ Do something good for up each additional word. Also listed online at yourself today! peninsuladailynews. CageworX BJJ & Yoga com. Submit by calling Margot at  360-452-8435  103 Elwha Road, or  1-800-826-7714  or email her at  mconway@ Port Angeles, WA. peninsuladailynews. (Behind Traylor’s com. You may also come to our office at 305 W. Restaurant) First St., Port Angeles. www.cageworx.com Deadline is 12 noon each Tuesday for Friday or 360-504-2751. publication.

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DOG TRAINING CLASSES AT NEW LEASH ON LIFE Basic training and puppy socialization classes starting February 1. Classes are to be held at New Leash on Life in Port Angeles. Contact Cheryl, 360-670-5860. YOGA CLASSES AT CAGEWORX Don’t let your New Year’s Resolutions slip past you! CageworX Brazilian Jiujitsu and MMA is very proud to welcome our new Yoga Instructor Jenny Stewart-Houston to the Olympic Peninsula! Jenny received her training and certification in India and is certified in a variety of different styles, she has been teaching for the last several years at YYoga


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

B3

Battelle lab topic of director’s talk PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLES BRANDT/BATTELLE MARINE SCIENCES LABORATORY

The Sequim-based Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory is the subject of a presentation at the Dungeness Schoolhouse today.

SEQUIM — Charles Brandt, director of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Marine Sciences Lab, will talk about the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory at 10 a.m. today. He will speak at the Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road. Admission is $5 for members of the Museum & Arts Center in the Sequim-Dunge- Brandt ness Valley and $7 for nonmembers, payable at the door. Brandt will provide an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Marine Sciences Laboratory, which is part of the Pacific

Northwest National Laboratory. He will discuss the site’s history, features and its facilities that make it unique for certain kinds of research; and he will highlight work being done to support the region and federal missions. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. This program marks the third of eight local history presentations sponsored by the Museum & Arts Center on Friday mornings through Feb. 28 at the schoolhouse, which is ADA-accessible. For more information, visit www.macsequim.org or phone 360-681-2257.

peninsuladailynews.com

CLEARANCE

STARTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, WHILE THEY LAST

END OF SEASON

CLALLAM COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Members of the hat committee are, from left, Irene Wyman, Virginia Fitzpatrick, Ruth Fox, Adria Fuhrman and Dona Cloud. They will present a fundraiser fashion show of historical chapeaus.

Events: Show

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CONTINUED FROM B2 “I Know Nothing About Genealogy,” during its open Attendees should bring house at the research centheir own gear, but some ter, 402 E. Lauridsen Blvd., gear will be available to from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. borrow. A donation of $5 is Cost is $50 for the tenrequested from nonmemweek program. For more information or bers for the class, which to register, email Port starts at 1 p.m. There is no ScandalousRollerDerby@ charge for members. Resergmail.com or visit www. vations are requested. For more information, PortScandalous.com. phone the center at 360Hats for Heritage set 417-5000 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Tuesdays PORT ANGELES — The through Fridays. Clallam County Historical Society will present Hats Homebuyers class for Heritage, a luncheon and “fashion show with a PORT ANGELES — A past” fundraiser, at the Elks first-time homebuyers class Naval Lodge, 131 E. First will be held at Clallam St., from noon to 3 p.m. on Transit, 830 W. Lauridsen Saturday. Blvd., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets, $20 for histori- Saturday. cal society and Elks memThe class is free, but bers and $25 for nonmem- those interested must make bers, must be purchased in reservations. advance at the Elks Lodge Information from the or the historical society state Housing Finance office at 933 W. Ninth St. Commission on down-payIn the show, historical ment assistance and the society volunteers will wear home-buying process will stylish hats from the 1880s be covered. through the 1960s. Attendees will earn a Attendees will learn certificate to make them eliabout the hats and what gible through the commiswas taking place nationally sion for down-payment and locally when they were assistance. popular. Topics will include steps Hats on display will in the home-buying process, include the tarantula eye- owning versus renting, how lash, chicken and lamp- much home a buyer can shade hats, among others. afford, strategies for makEvent sponsors are First ing the best purchase and Federal and Jim’s Phar- reasons to use a real estate macy, and silent auction professional. items have been donated by To reserve a seat, phone Baby Grand, Aramark/Lake Sandra Fangen of Crystal Crescent Lodge, Kokopelli Properties at 360-457-2838. Grill and by private individuals. A photo from the College Goal Sunday society’s collection is courtesy of PixelPerfect and PORT ANGELES — Karon’s Frame Shop. College Goal Sunday, a free All those attending are event for students and parencouraged to wear hats. ents interested in federal financial aid and scholarGenealogy course ship opportunities, is set for Peninsula College on PORT ANGELES — The Sunday. Clallam County Genealogical Society will offer a class, TURN TO EVENTS/B4

SAVINGS!


B4

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Briefly . . . Rotary Club honors pair of students PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School seniors July Bain and Austin Roberson were honored recently as Students of the Month for November by the Port Angeles Noon Rotary Club. July is the daughter of Darren and Jacki Bain, and holds a grade-point average of 3.73.

July

Austin

She is the president of the vocal choir, vice president of the Christian Club and serves as a member of her church’s youth group. July also serves as team manager for the Roughriders football and wrestling teams.

Austin, the son of Joel and Sandi Roberson, holds a 3.869 GPA. He has received academic honors in multiple math classes and biology, and received a Technical Award of Excellence in business applications and digital communications tools. He plays football and baseball, and wrestles.

Students of month PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School seniors Madi Bradley and Ian Raphael were honored

Ian

Madi

recently as Students of the Month by the Port Angeles Noon Rotary Club. Madi, the daughter of Tami and Rick Bradley, ranks first in her class with a 4.0 grade-point average. She has been recognized as a National Merit

Scholar, an AP Scholar with Honors and a Soroptimist Student Activity award winner for her academic achievement. Madi has held elected positions as a class and ASB officer, and participates in dance, cross-country and track and field. Ian, the son of Justine Raphael and Richard Weinert, ranks sixth in his class with a 3.87 GPA. He is the captain and founding member of the school sailing team, and is a member of the school’s Science Club and Gay-

Straight Alliance. He has been recognized as PAHS ROTC Cadet of the Year and for math.

Dean’s list honoree CHARLESTON, S.C. — Charleston Southern University has named senior Madelyn Joy Macleery of Port Angeles to the dean’s list for the fall 2013 semester. In order to be named to the dean’s list, students must have earned a 3.5 or higher grade-point average and at least 12 credit hours. Peninsula Daily News

Events: Corvids in winter topic of Audubon talk CONTINUED FROM B3 The event will be held in Keegan Hall (Building M), 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Those who want to attend two- or four-year colleges can get information about the application process and funding. Help will be given for submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, form and information about scholarships, general financial aid or basic budgeting skills will be provided. Those needing FAFSA assistance should bring their Social Security numbers and driver’s licenses. Students 23 or younger should bring their 2013 income data (W-2s or a pay stub and/or 2013 tax return) along with a parent’s or guardian’s 2013 income data. Those 24 or older should bring their own 2013 income information. For details, phone 360417-6359.

A class in PiYo strength training will start at 8 a.m. The “Booty Barre” workout at the ballet barre, as well as a separate Zumba class, will start at 9 a.m. For more information, contact Robin Keehn at 360681-3979 or robin@aspireacademy.us, or visit www. AspireAcademy.us.

Aviation lecture

of the Mangrove Action Project, a nonprofit group that works to conserve and restore mangrove forests around the globe. Admission is by donation. His presentation will take viewers through the verdant mangrove forests of the tropics and subtropics, from Latin America to Southeast Asia and from South Asia to Africa. Mangrove forests are one of the most biodiverse and productive wetland ecosystems on Earth, according to Quarto; they are an important line of defense against climate change, as they sequester and store more carbon than any other plant species. For more information, visit www.mangroveaction project.org.

SEQUIM — Ron Ulbrich of Dynon Avionics will present “Making the Transition to Glass Panel” at a meeting of Chapter 430 of the Experimental Aviation Association at 10 a.m. Saturday. The meeting, open to the public, will be at Hangar 15 at Sequim Valley Airport, 468 Dorothy Hunt Lane. Dynon Avionics designs, manufactures and distributes a line of glass cockpit Art in the Muslim world avionics. PORT HADLOCK — Turkish filmmaker Pelin Annual MAC meeting Esmer will discuss the expeSEQUIM — The annual riences of female artists membership meeting of the working in the Muslim Museum & Arts Center in world during a talk at the the Sequim-Dungeness Val- Jefferson County Library, ley is set for the Dungeness 620 Cedar Ave., at 2 p.m. Sequim Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Saturday. Road, at 1 p.m. Saturday.. Admission is free. All current and life mem‘Corvids in Winter’ For details, visit www. bers, as well as those who JCLibrary.info and see SEQUIM — “Corvids in join or renew at the door, are related stories about Esmer Winter” will be presented at invited. on Page B2 and this page.) the Dungeness River Audubon Center, 2151 W. Hen- Wrestling raffle Buddhist nuns drickson Road in Railroad SEQUIM — Sequim Bridge Park, at 10 a.m. SatPORT TOWNSEND — Wrestling Boosters will hold Two Buddhist nuns, Ayya urday. In this lecture, Ken a raffle during the All-Com- Santussika and Sumedha Wiersema will talk about ers Tournament at Sequim Samaneri, will talk tonight crows and ravens. A local, High School, 601 N. Sequim and Saturday about the hisoff-site field trip will follow. Ave., on Saturday. tory of women in monastiTickets will be available cism. Admission is $10 for adults and free for youths at the event, which begins at Their presentation will at the Quimper Grange, younger than 18, and the 9 a.m. 1219 Corona Ave. class is for all ages and birdTonight’s talk will be ing backgrounds. Port Townsend area from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., and Registration is required Saturday’s presentation will through the river center, be from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. w w w. D u n g e n e s s R i v e r Mangroves lecture Admission is free. Center.org or 360-681-4076. PORT TOWNSEND — To RSVP, phone 360-379Alfredo Quarto will present 0258 or email kaymedgrp@ Free fitness class “Mangroves: The Vanishing gmail.com, and for more SEQUIM — Aspire Acad- Rainforests of the Sea” at information, visit www. emy is offering free fitness Quimper Unitarian Univer- facebook.com/bhikkunis. classes at 160 Harrison salist Fellowship, 2333 San Road off U.S. Highway 101 Juan Ave., at 7 p.m. tonight. Garden lectures from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. SaturQuarto serves as execuPORT TOWNSEND — day. tive director and co-founder Retired ecologist Fred Weinmann will present “Wild Plants of the Rain Shadow” and gardener-landscaper Ron Sikes will present “Native Plants & the Birds

Valentine’s Dinner!

They Attract” at 10 a.m. on Saturday. The two talks are part of the Jefferson County Master Gardener Yard & Garden Lecture Series at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St. Series tickets at $45 per person may still be purchased at the door Saturday, while tickets for this lecture only are $10 and may be purchased at the door if space is available. Weinmann is working with the Native Plant Society to protect and restore native plants near the Ford Worden State Park beach while Sikes works with the local Audubon chapter to improve wildlife habitat at Kah Tai Lagoon in Port Townsend. For more information, phone 360-301-2081.

Explorers walk PORT TOWNSEND — A 5K and 10K walk by Olympic Peninsula Explorers through Port Townsend to view historical homes and buildings will be at 9:15 a.m. Saturday. The walk departs from the Subway restaurant, 1300 Water St., across the street from the ferry terminal entrance. The difficulty of the walk is rated 2B for the 5K and 3B for the 10K participants. To carpool from Sequim, meet at the coffee station in the QFC supermarket, 990-B E. Washington St., at 8 a.m. A meeting after the walk will be at the Belmont Restaurant, 925 Water St., at noon. For more information about the walk, phone George Christensen at 360697-2172 or Frances Johnson at 360-385-5861, and for information about carpooling, phone Janet Lenfant at 360-681-5405.

‘Watchtower’ film PORT TOWNSEND — Turkish filmmaker Pelin Esmer’s award-winning “Watchtower” will screen at the Rose Theatre at noon on Sunday. Admission is free to the movie at the Rose, 235 Taylor St. (The movie will be shown at 7 p.m. tonight at Penin-

can-eat benefit breakfast is planned at the Crescent Bay Lions Club, state Highway 112 and Holly Hill Road, from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sunday. The cost is $6 for adults and $3.50 for children 12 and younger. Breakfasts are planned at the same time every Sunday morning, except holidays, until the Sunday before Mother’s Day in May. The menu includes eggs cooked to order, hot cakes, french toast, biscuits and gravy, hashbrowns, ham and sausage or bacon. Philip Hansten Proceeds help Crescent UW professor emeritus Bay Lions members support Crescent School yearsula College in Port Ange- books, scholarships for les; see story, Page B2). Crescent High School seniors, holiday food bas‘Ignorant certainty’ kets, glasses for the needy PORT TOWNSEND — and other community projA professor and author will ects. discuss “ignorant certainty” at 3 p.m. Sunday. Forks University of Washington professor emeritus Philip Hansten’s lecture will be the Garden club tea first program in the ClemFORKS — The Bogachiel ente Eclectic Lectures series Garden Club will present in the Port Townsend High its annual tea from 1 p.m. to School auditorium, 1500 3 p.m. Saturday. Van Ness St. The tea will be at St. General admission at Anne’s Church and Parish the door is $15, but for low- Hall at 531 Fifth Ave. income patrons, admission Tickets are $8. is by donation. Proceeds The theme for this year’s will benefit the Jefferson tea is “Revamp, Restore, Clemente Course in the Reuse.” The guest speaker is Humanities, a program offering college courses to Karen Chapman, author of Living Foliage. low-income students. For more information, Hansten is the author of Premature Factulation: The phone Linda Wells at 360Ignorance of Certainty and 374-2437. the Ghost of Montaigne. He will discuss the way Beauty and beast humans tend to come to a FORKS — “Beauty Lou conclusion first — then look and the Country Beast” will for evidence to support their be performed by 50 Forks belief — in a behavior called students and two Missoula “ignorant certainty.” He’ll Children’s Theatre actors at also talk about how to rec- 3 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturognize and avoid this. day. For more about the CleThe performances will mente series, which will be in the Forks High School bring speakers to Port Commons, 261 Spartan Townsend once a month Ave. Admission is $5 for through May, visit www. JeffersonClemente.org or adults, $3 for children 3-18 and free for those 3 and phone 360-732-0007. younger. The event is sponsored Joyce by the Forks Elementary School Parent-Teacher Organization and made Lions breakfast possible by a grant from the JOYCE — An all-you- Forks Lions Club.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, January 24-25, 2014 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

Salmon fishing on the upswing

Blackmouth in the harbor All that being said, Port Angeles is still the top spot on the North Olympic Peninsula for saltwater salmon fishing. “The [Port Angeles] Harbor is still the best place,” Bob Aunspach of Swain’s General Store (360-4522357) in Port Angeles said. This is the case, even though tides are set up to be best for outside-the-harbor fishing. “Why go outside the harbor when you’re catching so much in here?” Aunspach said. Aunspach said that if the water outside the harbor calms down, most anglers will probably venture out.

Steelhead update Some wild steelhead fishery are being caught, then released, on the West End rivers. Only one wild steelhead can be retained each year, but only between Feb. 16 and April 15. The paltry hatchery steelhead run is likely over, but some anglers might get lucky. Aunspach said an angler he talked to actually had some nice success catching hatchery steelies in February last year. Another river to try for hatchery steelhead is the Dungeness River. TURN

TO

HORTON/B7

Loggers led by Dodson and Walker PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JOYCE — The Crescent boys basketball team earned a North Olympic League victory over short-handed Clallam Bay 46-36. “Good game. Clallam gave us all we could handle and they only had five players,” Loggers coach Darren Heaward said following Wednesday’s game. “Our boys did a good job blocking out and taking care of the ball.” Travis Walker and Kaleb Dodson shared team-high scoring honors for Crescent, finishing with 15 points apiece. Martin Waldrip added 12 points. Despite only having five players, the Bruins played the Loggers tight in the final three quarters but were unable to overcome Crescent’s 13-7 advantage in the opening period. The Loggers play at topranked Neah Bay tonight in another league tilt. Clallam Bay, meanwhile, is hosting Quilcene for a nonleague game. Crescent 46, Clallam Bay 36 Clallam Bay Crescent

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Crescent’s Travis Walker, left, looks for the hoop around the defense of Clallam Bay’s Calvin Ritter in second quarter of the Loggers’ win at Crescent High School.

7 8 11 10— 36 13 7 14 12— 46 Individual scoring

Crescent Walker 15, Dodson 15, Waldrip 12, Peppard 3.

TURN

TO

PREPS/B7

Peninsula teams keep winning Pirates take two from Shoreline PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SHORELINE — The Peninsula College men’s and women’s basketball teams have both inserted themselves into the NWAACC North Division postseason race after beating their Shoreline counterparts on the road. The Pirate women beat the Dolphins 76-56, while the men won 89-80. Both Peninsula teams are on three-game winning streaks with Bellevue traveling to Port Angeles for a Saturday night doubleheader. In Wednesday’s women’s

games, freshman Madison Pilster set a new career-high with 26 points. She also had seven rebounds and five steals. Pilster hit 13 of 16 free throws, which highlighted the Pirates’ 27 for 34 performance at the line. The Dolphins shot only 13 free throws, making eight. Another Peninsula freshman, Gabi Fenumiai scored 22 points and ripped down 15 rebounds, five of which were offensive. As a team, the Pirates outrebounded the Dolphins 63-43. Alison Knowles, Peninsula’s leading scorer, finished with 15 points. The game was tied 34-34 at halftime. The Pirates held Shoreline (1-5 division, 3-11

College Basketball overall) to 22 points and 17 percent shooting in the second half. Peninsula (4-2, 7-9) opens Saturday’s doubleheader at 5 p.m. against the eighth-ranked Bulldogs (5-1, 12-7), who dropped their first division game of the season Wednesday against Skagit Valley, 62-59. Peninsula 76, Shoreline 56 Peninsula Shoreline

34 42— 76 34 22— 56 Individual scoring Peninsula (4-2, 7-9) Henderson 5, Pilster 26, Fenumiai 22, Knowles 15, Schmillen 6, Brumbaugh 2. Shoreline (1-5, 3-11) Benavides 14, Wilbur 6, Lloyd 5, Taylor 4, Dutro 18, McDaniels 9.

Manning helped Wilson Seahawks QB attended foe’s passing camp BY TJ COTTERILL MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

RENTON — Peyton Manning helped create Russell Wilson. Wilson said he attended Manning’s passing academy as a 10th-grader at Collegiate School in Richmond, Va. Of the thousands of kids at the academy, he somehow wound up in a group of about 15 kids who got to work specifically with Manning. Wilson met Manning again before the 2012 NFL draft. Wilson said the Broncos brought him to Denver, and he approached Manning in the locker room. “He said, ‘Have I seen you before? I think I’ve seen you before. Yeah, I think I’ve seen you somewhere,’” Wilson said in his attempt to impersonate Manning. “I was like, ‘Well, you actually coached me in the Manning Passing Academy.’ I loved him to death. He is a great person, first of all, and obviously a great football player.” Manning now goes from adviser to adversary. He is searching for his second Super

Bowl ring, while Wilson aims for his first in his second season. Wilson said he has reached out to several Super Bowl quarterbacks and other players this week. But because he’ll be facing Manning on Feb. 2 in East Rutherford, N.J., it’s unlikely Manning was one of them.

Seeking advice Drew Brees was. His New Orleans Saints beat Manning’s Indianapolis Colts in Super Bowl XLIV after the 2009 season. Brees was named MVP. “I talked to Drew Brees and a couple other players, and I talked to some guys who have done a good job in big games,” Wilson said. “I talked to some players who were there last year, and I actually went to the Super Bowl last year just to get a feel for it. “We are trying to win a Super Bowl, and we want to be the first ones to win it in this organization. “One of our things is we want to win a lot of Super Bowls, and

Men’s Game Peninsula 89, Shoreline 80 Xavier Bazile recorded a double-double and paced four Pirates in double figures as Peninsula defeated the Dolphins for the second time this season. Bazile finished with 25 points and 10 rebounds. Geno Horsley helped Peninsula with a nice all-around game, scoring 15 points to go along with six rebounds, four steals and three assists. Juwan Flowers added 15 points, and Markus Rawls finished with 14 points and seven rebounds (four offensive). TURN

TO

PIRATES/B7

Mariners

to do that, you have to win the first one.” Wilson has held his own camp, the Russell Wilson Passing Academy, the past two offseasons.

Lou Piniella joining M’s Hall of Fame

Seahawks schedule

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Seahawks are preparing this week as if they will play Sunday. Offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell said they installed plays into the offense during practice Wednesday and Thursday and will add more today before they travel to New Jersey on Sunday. “We will have the bulk of the game plan done by the time we leave,” Bevell said. “There will still be some things we fix, some things we look at and say, ‘Let’s change that up,’ maybe add a play or two. But for the most part, the bulk of the game plan will be done.” Wilson said instilling the game plan early should eliminate potential distractions affecting them once they reach the East Coast. “Once we get to New York, there are going to be a lot of possible distractions,” Wilson said. “You want to focus on just playing the football game, so once we get there, we will already have one week of instillation, and we can go over it again next week.”

SEATTLE — The Seattle Mariners will induct former manager Lou Piniella into the team Hall of Fame on Aug. 9. Piniella will become the eighth member inducted. The team inducted former outfielder Ken Griffey Jr. last season. Piniella was Seattle’s manger from 1993-2002. He led Seattle to its first division title in 1995 when the Mariners rallied late in the season to win the AL West. Piniella also was in charge in 2001 when Seattle matched the major league record with 116 wins in the regular season. For his career in Seattle, Piniella was 840-711. His .542 winning percentage with the Mariners was the highest of his managerial stops.

TURN

TO

HAWKS/B7

Another arm wanted The Mariners would like to add another veteran to their rotation before the start of spring training to bridge the experience gap between their aces a handful of promising prospects who lack experience. TURN

TO

M’S/B6

SPORTS/BUSINESS

THE BLACKMOUTH FISHERY isn’t only a Port Angeles party any more. Sequim has shown up fashLee ionably late. “Blackmouth Horton has turned on really good outside Protection Island,” Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and More (360-683-1950) in Sequim said. “It’s probably the best it’s ever been.” This is a bit of a surprise after the waters near Sequim have been, as Menkal said, “absolutely dead all season.” Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) was only recently invited to the blackmouth party (the season opened last week), and so far is off to a nice start. “Salmon fishing is pretty good in the eastern side [of Area 9] — Possession Bar and Bush Point — if you use the right techniques,” Ward Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist, said in an email. “All the blackmouth are gorging on candlefish, that oily baitfish that lives on or in the sand, plus these predators are ignoring the herring. “The anglers are ‘dredging the bottom’ with their down-rigger balls and running plugs deep. “Other candlefish imitations such as Coho Killer Spoons or needlefishstyle trolling squids will also work well, but it is harder to keep them from hanging up on the bottom, unlike plugs such as Silver Hordes or Pogues that float.” Norden added that deep trolling is a common tactic for this time of year, and sometimes anglers must drop their gear down 150 to 200 feet to find success. Another technique to try is jigging. “When the blackmouth are feasting on candlefish in the Port Townsend area, the other popular method to get them is with largersized Point Wilson Dart jigs (4-6 ounces) jigged right on the bottom to imitate those candlefish,” Norden said. “If you do want to try jigging, any of the non-stretching braided lines like Power Pro, dacron and several others really make this fishing easier and more effective. “In the PT area, this jigging has to be done on slack tides, of course.”

Crescent drops Bruins


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Today Boys Basketball: North Mason at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; Klahowya at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Hoquiam at Forks, 7 p.m.; Kingston at Sequim, 7 p.m.; Quilcene at Clallam Bay, 6:30 p.m.; Chimacum at Charles Wright, 7 p.m.; Crescent at Neah Bay, 7:15 p.m. Girls Basketball: Quilcene at Clallam Bay, 5 p.m.; Chimacum at Charles Wright, 5:15 p.m.; Crescent at Neah Bay, 5:45 p.m.; Sequim at Kingston, 7 p.m.; Port Townsend at North Mason, 7 p.m.; Port Angeles at Klahowya, 7 p.m.

Saturday Wrestling: Port Angeles at Dream Duals (East Valley, Spokane), 8 a.m.; Port Townsend at Lynden Tournament, 9 a.m.; Forks girls at Henry Foss (Tacoma), 9:30 a.m.; All-comers Meet at Sequim, 9:30 a.m.; Forks boys at Heritage Duals (Vancouver, Wash.), TBD. Men’s Basketball: Bellevue at Peninsula, 7 p.m. Women’s Basketball: Bellevue at Peninsula, 5 p.m.

Boys Basketball Olympic League Standings League Overall Bremerton 11-0 13-2 Sequim 8-2 10-4 Port Angeles 7-4 9-6 Olympic 7-4 8-6 North Kitsap 6-4 9-5 Kingston 6-5 6-9 Port Townsend 2-9 4-10 North Mason 1-10 4-11 Klahowya 0-10 1-12 Wednesday Adna 61, Winlock 52 Auburn Adventist Academy 101, Chief Leschi 84 Bellarmine Prep 52, South Kitsap 48 Central Kitsap 53, Stadium 48 Crescent 46, Clallam Bay 36 Foster 53, Tyee 39 Grace Academy 47, Providence Classical Christian 38 Hazen 65, Highline 46 Kalama 83, LaCenter 77 Kennedy 64, Lindbergh 62 Lincoln 68, North Thurston 42 Montesano 43, South Bend 32 Morton/White Pass 85, Pe Ell 48 Mossyrock 56, Onalaska 50 Napavine 46, Wahkiakum 45 Olympia 62, Shelton 40 Renton 61, Evergreen (Seattle) 41 Ridgefield 72, Toutle Lake 53 Steilacoom 66, Orting 31 Timberline 65, Foss 62 Wilson 86, Mount Tahoma 50 Yelm 83, Gig Harbor 75

Girls Basketball Olympic League Standings League Overall Port Angeles 10-1 12-3 Olympic 8-3 10-5 Kingston 8-3 9-4 Sequim 7-3 7-7 North Kitsap 6-4 9-5 Bremerton 5-6 6-7 Port Townsend 3-8 6-9 Klahowya 1-9 3-10 North Mason 0-11 0-14

Girls Basketball Scores Wednesday Bellevue 73, Sammamish 32 Central Kitsap 60, Stadium 18 Clallam Bay 41, Cresent 36 Cleveland 61, West Seattle 36 Columbia River 46, Ridgefield 41 Eastlake 55, Garfield 44 Eastside Catholic 66, Ingraham 44 Edmonds-Woodway 59, Monroe 45

PORT ANGELES SWIM CLUB

YOUNG

RECORD-BREAKER

Mackenzie DuBois, age 8, broke the Port Angeles Swim Club’s girls 8 and under 200-yard freestyle record with a time of 2:57.22 and placed first at the January Challenge Meet in Tacoma. In addition, DuBois broke her own 500-yard freestyle record with a time of 7:56.67, also placing first in the event. See below for more information about the meet. Franklin Pierce 52, Decatur 21 Gig Harbor 42, Yelm 35 Hazen 45, Highline 35 Holy Names 66, Seattle Prep 43 Inglemoor 56, Skyline 55 Issaquah 60, Redmond 46 Jackson 58, Arlington 56 Juanita 56, Lake Washington 46 Kennedy 72, Lindbergh 27 Lakeside (Seattle) 71, Rainier Beach 33 Lincoln 44, North Thurston 33 Lopez 60, Highland Christian Prep 31 Lynnwood 64, Snohomish 46 Mark Morris 57, Prairie 46 Mount Vernon 72, Cascade (Everett) 26 Newport 56, Woodinville 44 Olympia 48, Shelton 15 Raymond 68, Tenino 38 Renton 67, Evergreen (Seattle) 15 Timberline 59, Foss 35 Tyee 59, Foster 26 Wilson 67, Mount Tahoma 19

Wrestling Wednesday Port Angeles 53, Klahowya 20 145—Ricky Crawford (PA), pinned Dustin Parker (KSS), 0:58. 152—Brian Burchett (KSS), tech. fall Andrew Harrelson (PA), 5:05 16-0. 160—Gabriel Wallis (KSS), pinned Brandyn Fouts (PA), 4:36. 170—Haden Smith (KSS), pinned Jens Kondering (PA), 2:59. 182—Konner Langholf (KSS), dec. Matthew Robbins (PA), 4-3. 195—Evan Gallacci (PA), dec. Colton Kendall (KSS), 8-6. 220—Justin Moon (PA), maj. dec. Jesse Spencer (KSS), 12-1. 285— Roberto Coronel (PA), pinned Doug Cassidy (KSS), 0:50. 106—Ben Basden (PA), forf. . 113—Tyler Gale (PA), pinned Caden Haga

(KSS), 0:36. 120—Brady Anderson (PA), pinned Brycen Trask (KSS), 0:28. 126—Morgan Mower (PA), forf. . 132—Ozzy Swagerty (PA), forf. 138—Sam Burton (PA), maj. dec. JD Kerrigas (KSS), 11-3.

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City33 10 .767 — Portland 31 11 .738 1½ Denver 20 20 .500 11½ Minnesota 20 21 .488 12 Utah 14 29 .326 19 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 29 15 .659 — Golden State 26 17 .605 2½ Phoenix 24 17 .585 3½ L.A. Lakers 16 26 .381 12 Sacramento 15 26 .366 12½ Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 32 10 .762 — Houston 29 15 .659 4 Dallas 25 19 .568 8 Memphis 20 20 .500 11 New Orleans 16 25 .390 15½ EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 21 20 .512 — Brooklyn 18 22 .450 2½ New York 15 27 .357 6½ Boston 15 29 .341 7½

Philadelphia 14 28 .333 7½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 30 12 .714 — Atlanta 22 19 .537 7½ Washington 20 21 .488 9½ Charlotte 19 25 .432 12 Orlando 11 32 .256 19½ Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 33 8 .805 — Chicago 21 20 .512 12 Detroit 17 25 .405 16½ Cleveland 15 27 .357 18½ Milwaukee 8 33 .195 25 Today’s Games L.A. Lakers at Orlando, 4 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Dallas at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. New Orleans at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. San Antonio at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Charlotte at New York, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Chicago, 5 p.m. Memphis at Houston, 5 p.m. Washington at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Indiana at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago at Charlotte, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 4 p.m. Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Indiana at Denver, 6 p.m. Washington at Utah, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 7 p.m.

M’s: Chavez inks minor-league deal CONTINUED FROM B1 but a lot of questions after that. Manager Lloyd McClendon That was one of the messages said he would be disappointed if from Seattle general manager top prospect Taijuan Walker Jack Zduriencik on Thursday dur- didn’t make the rotation out of ing the club’s pre-spring training spring training, but he’s expected gathering. to contend with James Paxton, Seattle has a pair of stars at Erasmo Ramirez and Brandon the top of its rotation in Felix Her- Maurer for one of those final nandez and Hisashi Iwaukuma, spots.

Chavez returning Outfielder Endy Chavez is remaining with the Seattle Mariners and will report to spring training next month with a minor league contract. The agreement was announced on Thursday, giving Seattle additional outfield depth.

Chavez hit .267 for Seattle last year with two home runs and 14 RBIs in 266 at-bats over 97 games. He played all three outfield positions, with most of his time coming in right field. Chavez, who turns 36 on Feb. 7, has played for seven big league teams.

Briefly . . . Softball bake sale for June Japan trip PORT ANGELES — Fundraising efforts are continuing to raise the funds needed to send the PA Impact U-14 softball team to Mutsu City, Japan in June. A bake sale is planned at Swain’s General Store, 602 E. First St., from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Team members are trying to raise the $25,000 needed for them to go on the trip.

Join little league PORT TOWNSEND — Three

Friday 8:30 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, Bahamas Classic, Round 2, Site: Ocean Club Golf Course - Paradise Island, Bahamas (Live) Noon (47) GOLF PGA, Farmers Insurance Open, Round 2, Site: Torrey Pines Golf Club - San Diego, Calif. (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NBA, Los Angeles Clippers vs. Chicago Bulls, Site: United Center - Chicago, Ill. (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Boxing, Fight Night Williams Jr. vs. White, Site: Little Creek Casino, Shelton, WA (Live) 7:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Winter X Games, Site: Buttermilk Mountain - Aspen, Colo. (Live) Midnight (26) ESPN Tennis ITF, Australian Open, Women’s Championship, Site: Melbourne Park - Melbourne, Australia (Live)

Saturday

Preps

Boys Basketball Scores

SPORTS ON TV

separate Port Townsend Little League baseball and softball sign-up dates have been set. Parents and guardians can sign up their children at the Port Townsend Community Center (620 Tyler St.) from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1; Grant Street Elementary School (1637 Grant St.) from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11; and at Blue Heron Middle School (3939 San Juan Ave.) from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13. Registration is also open online at ptll.org. The cost for baseball and softball is $85 if paid by March 10. Tryouts will be conducted at the little league fields at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 1, and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday,

March 2. A make-up day for those that miss tryouts will be held from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 4. Children registered after the tryout dates will be put on a waiting list. An opening day jamboree and team picture day is set for March 22. Coaches and umpires are needed. For more information, phone Dick Stickney at 360-385-3153.

Swimmers medal TACOMA — Port Angeles Swim Club members recently swam at a January Challenge Meet in Tacoma. Eight-year old Mackenzie DuBois broke the girls 8 and under 200-yard freestyle record

with a time of 2:57.22 and placed first for this age group. She also won the 500-free event with a personal record time of 7:56.67. Mackenzie was second in the 100 individual medley and 25 butterfly. Nadia Cole, 11, placed first in the 50 and 200 breaststroke and was second in the 100 breast. Cole qualified for regionals in the 500 free by placing second in this event. Kenzie Johnson, 12, placed second in the 50 backstroke, qualifying her for a championship competition. She placed second in the 200 free and third in 50 breast. Kiara Schmitt, 10, placed second in the 500 free. Peninsula Daily News

9 a.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Florida State vs. Duke (Live) 9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Virginia Commonwealth vs. La Salle (Live) 10 a.m. (7) KIRO Basketball NCAA, Syracuse vs. Miami (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Farmers Insurance Open, Round 3, Site: Torrey Pines Golf Club - San Diego, Calif. (Live) 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Winter X Games 18, Site: Buttermilk Mountain Aspen, Colo. (Live) 11 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, West Virginia vs. Oklahoma State (Live) Noon (7) KIRO Golf PGA, Farmers Insurance Open, Round 3, Site: Torrey Pines Golf Club - San Diego, Calif. (Live) Noon (47) GOLF LPGA, Bahamas Classic, Round 3, Site: Ocean Club Golf Course - Paradise Island, Bahamas (Live) 1 p.m. (4) KOMO Winter X Games, 18 Site: Buttermilk Mountain - Aspen, Colo. (Live) 1 p.m. (5) KING Rugby U.S.A. Sevens, - Las Vegas, Nev. (Live) 1 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Tennessee vs. Florida (Live) 1 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Western Kentucky vs. LouisianaLafayette (Live) 1 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, San Diego vs. Portland (Live) 1 p.m. FS1 Basketball NCAA, St. Joseph’s vs. Richmond (Live) 2 p.m. PAC-12 NETWORK Basketball NCAA, Oregon State vs. Washington (Live) 3 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Pittsburgh vs. Maryland (Live) (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, San Jose State vs. Boise State (Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Toronto Maple Leafs vs. Winnipeg Jets, Site: MTS Centre - Winnipeg, Man. (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Michigan vs. Michigan State (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Louisiana State University vs. Alabama (Live) 4 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, Santa Clara vs. San Francisco (Live) 4 p.m. PAC-12 NETWORK Basketball NCAA, Colorado vs. Arizona State (Live) 5 p.m. FS1 Basketball NCAA, Georgetown vs. Creighton (Live) 7 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Anaheim Ducks vs. Los Angeles Kings, Site: Staples Center - Los Angeles, Calif. (Live) (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, BYU vs. Gonzaga (Live) Midnight (26) ESPN Tennis ITF, Australian Open, Men’s Championship, Site: Melbourne Park - Melbourne, Australia (Live)


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

Preps: Bruins

Super Bowl XXXVII trivia PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Super Bowl. NEWS SOURCES They will become the first team to play in the Football is a game of Super Bowl wearing one inches, but Super Bowls are games of numbers and color, then play in the Super Bowl wearing a difsuperstitions. ferent color, then play in Here are a few odds the Super Bowl wearing and ends shaping up for Super Bowl XXXVIII that the first color again. They’ll also be the first will pit the Seattle team to play in two Super Seahawks against the Bowls wearing two differDenver Broncos: ent primary jersey colors ■ Because the AFC with a uniform design will be the home team that is otherwise the this year at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, same. ■ The Seahawks will N.J., the Broncos will be the third team to lose wear their home orange one Super Bowl in one jerseys. Denver hopes to break uniform set, then go back to the Super Bowl in a difa jinx: The Broncos are ferent uniform set. 0-3 in orange in Super The others were the Bowls, 1-1 in white and Patriots, who did it twice, 1-0 in navy blue. The only other team to and the Washington Redwear three different colors skins. ■ This will be the 11th (i.e., two different colors plus white) in Super Bowl Super Bowl in which neither team’s helmet logo games is the New Engcontains any letters of the land Patriots. The Broncos will be the alphabet. The Broncos are the first team to change the only team to play in difprimary color of their home jersey after winning ferent Super Bowls with and without letters in the Super Bowl and their helmet logos (the returning to another

old-style Denver helmet showed a bronco raring out of the letter “D”). For the record, teams with letters in their logos have won 26 of the 47 previous Super Bowl games. They are 20-9 in Super Bowls against opponents who don’t have letters in their helmet logos. ■ Peyton Manning’s No. 18 and Russell Wilson’s No. 3 will represent the largest numerical difference — 15 — between numbers worn by starting Super Bowl quarterbacks. The current record is 12, back in Super Bowl II when Green Bay’s Bart Starr wore No. 15 and Oakland’s Daryle Lamonica wore No. 3. Wilson will tie Lamonica for the lowest number worn by a starting quarterback in the Super Bowl. The only other difference of 10 or more was in Super Bowl XXII, which featured Doug Williams wearing No. 17 and John Elway with No. 7. Peyton Manning is the

CONTINUED FROM B5

first quarterback to start in a Super Bowl wearing No. 18, doing so for the Indianapolis Colts in the 2007 Super Bowl. He’ll do it again for Denver. The only starting Super Bowl quarterback wearing a higher number was Johnny Unitas, who wore No. 19 for the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl V. Quarterbacks wearing double-digit numbers are 12-10 in Super Bowl games against opponents whose quarterbacks wore single-digit numbers. ■ More Super Bowl quarterbacks were born in Pennsylvania than any other state: Joe Namath, Johnny Unitas, Joe Montana, Jeff Hostetler, Dan Marino, Jim Kelly, Kerry Collins and Rich Gannon. For the record: Peyton Manning was born in Louisiana and Russell Wilson was born in Ohio. Only one Super Bowl quarterback was born in Washington state: John Elway, in Port Angeles on June 28, 1960.

ident Eric Grubman said that the date of the Super Bowl could change from Feb. 2 to any time between Jan. 31 and Feb. 3.

Breaking Omaha Manning offered an unspecific answer when asked last week what “Omaha” meant when he shouted it during his presnap reads. “Omaha is a run play, but it could be a pass play or a play-action pass, depending on a couple of things — the wind, which

Horton: More razor clam digs ■ Thursday: 6:11 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach and Mocrocks. Menkal reports a few ■ Friday, Jan. 31: 6:55 are still being caught there. p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin HarIt’s important to note that bors, Long Beach and the river will close to fishMocrocks. ing next Friday, Jan. 31. ■ Saturday, Feb. 1: 7:38 Razor clam digs p.m.; -1.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks Yep, another razor clam and Copalis. dig has been approved ■ Sunday, Feb. 2: 8:20 after marine toxin tests p.m.; -0.5 feet; Twin Harshowing the clams are safe bors, Long Beach and to eat. Mocrocks. Here are the proposed dates, evening low tides Speaking of clams . . . and participating beaches: Here is a fun story a ■ Tuesday: 4:36 p.m.; reader named Maureen -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors. ■ Wednesday: 5:25 p.m.; emailed me: “When my son was -1.2 feet; Twin Harbors and about 4 years old, his Long Beach. CONTINUED FROM B5

grandfather gave him a clam gun to play with. (My pioneering family never utilized them because the clams are easily broken),” Maureen wrote. “I took him down to the beach, where there are no clams, and showed him how it was used. He asked me then if it would work on moles!”

Send photos, stories Have a photograph, a

Wrestling Port Angeles 53, Klahowya 20

JOYCE — The Bruins took advantage of the Loggers’ foul trouble to pull out a win in a tightly contested North Olympic League matchup. Thursday’s game was tied 21-21 at halftime and 31-31 after three quarters. Early in the fourth, Crescent’s Lauren Hartley and Shannon Williams fouled out. “That turned the tables,” Loggers coach Brian Scott said. Clallam Bay proceeded to outscore Crescent 10-5 in the period to notch the win. Jeddie Herndon led the Bruins with 11 points, Inga Erickson had nine and Mariah LaChester finished with seven. For the Loggers, Haley Holgerson had 11 points and Hartley scored eight. Both teams are back in action tonight. Crescent plays at fourth-ranked Neah Bay, while Clallam Bay hosts Quilcene.

PORT ANGELES — The Roughriders improved their Olympic League record to 7-1 by defeating the Eagles on Thursday night. Port Angeles earned a chunk of its points on four quick pins. Brady Anderson pinned Brycen Trask in 28 seconds in the 120-pound match, and Tyler Gale pinned Caden Haga in 36 seconds in the 113-pound division. In the 145-pound class, Ricky Crawford pinned Dustin Parker in 58 seconds and Roberto Coronel pinned Doug Cassidy in 50 seconds in the 285-pound class. Also for the Riders, Justin Moon (220 pounds) won a 12-1 major decision over Jesse Spencer. Sam Burton won by major decision as well, beating J.D. Kerrigas 11-3. Port Angeles’ other headto-head win was by 195-pounder Evan Gallacci, who defeated Colton Kendall 4-3. The Riders won three more matchups by forfeit. Port Angeles (12-1 overall) travels to Spokane for the Dream Duals hosted by East Valley High School on Saturday morning.

Clallam Bay Crescent

way we’re going, the quarter, and the jerseys we’re wearing. It really varies, really, from play to play.” Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman said this week that he’s starting to believe the Omaha code doesn’t exist. “I feel like there is no Omaha code,” Sherman said. “I feel like he is just throwing it out there. “I don’t know if we’ll ever be able to break the Omaha code, because we don’t get soundbites in the film. If we did, I’d try my best, I’ll tell you that.”

fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique? Send it to sports@ peninsuladailynews.com or P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

________

8 13 10 10— 41 9 12 10 5— 36 Individual scoring

Clallam Bay Herndon 11, Erickson 9, LaChester 7, Wilson 6, Signor 5, McCoy 3. Crescent Holgerson 11, Hartley 8, Williams 6, Hutto 4,

Pirates: Streak CONTINUED FROM B5

The Bulldogs enter the game having lost two in a Point guard Erron row to Whatcom and Skagit Shamlin scored nine points, Valley, the division’s top two dished out three assists and teams. had three steals. After starting North Peninsula 89, Shoreline 80 Division play with an 0-3 Peninsula 47 42— 89 record, Peninsula now Shoreline 45 35— 80 Individual scoring stands at 3-3 (9-6 overall), (3-3, 9-6) which ties them for fourth Peninsula Bazile 25, Shamlin 9, Horsley 15, McKinney 4, place in the division. Flowers 15, Rawls 14, Hechanova 4, Erwin 3. Shoreline (0-6, 3-14) The Pirates face Bel5, Williams 14, Carroll 9, Jordt 6, Corbray levue (4-2, ) on Saturday at 9,Sharer Thompson 24, Drew Viena 2, Dean Viena 2, 7 p.m. Reyes 3, Kruk 2, Houston 4.

Browns hire Pettine as coach THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — After nearly a month of twists, turns and talk, the Browns found their man. Mike Pettine is Cleveland’s new coach.

Buffalo’s defensive coordinator, who met with team officials for the first time just a week ago, finalized a five-year contract Thursday to become the Browns’ seventh full-time coach since 1999.

Sports Editor Lee Horton’s outdoors column appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360-417-3525 or at lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com.

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Hawks: Cracking Omaha code CONTINUED FROM B5 they had less than a day to prepare for the game, Wilson said snow could make Wild weather? the game exciting. A winter storm slammed “I have tons of family on almost a foot and a half of the East Coast, and they snow Tuesday in parts of are all letting me know that New Jersey. there is 12 inches of snow On Thursday, the right now,” Wilson said. National Weather Service “It’s hopefully going to listed a 10 percent chance of pass over, but if not, we are snow when Super Bowl going to play in it. It’s XLVIII is scheduled to kick always fun to play in the off Feb. 2. snow.” Although NFL officials He said he has played in underwent a “dress one previous snow game. rehearsal” this week, shov- That was when he was at eling snow out of MetLife the University of Wisconsin. Stadium while pretending NFL executive vice pres-

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, January 24-25, 2014 PAGE

B8

Nutrition labels might see updates from FDA Agency: Growing info needs to be reflected MARY CLARE JALONICK THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Those nutrition labels on the back of food packages may soon become easier to read. The Food and Drug Administration said knowledge about nutrition has evolved over the past 20 years, and the labels need to reflect that. As the agency considers revisions, nutritionists and other health experts have their own wish list of desired changes.

Play up calories The number of calories should be more prominent, they said, and the amount of added sugar and percentage of whole wheat in the food should be included.

They also want more clarity on how serving sizes are defined. “There’s a feeling that nutrition labels haven’t been as effective as they should be,” said Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Unfamiliar names “When you look at the label, there are roughly two dozen numbers of substances that people aren’t intuitively familiar with,” he said. For example, he said, most of the nutrients are listed in grams, the metric system’s basic unit of mass. Michael Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods, said 20 years ago, “there was a big focus on fat,

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and fat undifferentiated.” Since then, health providers have focused more on calories and warned people away from saturated and trans fats more than all fats. Trans fats were separated out on the label in 2006. The nutrition facts label “is now 20 years old, the food environment has

changed, and our dietary guidance has changed,” said Taylor, who was at the agency in the early 1990s when the FDA first introduced the label at the behest of Congress. The FDA has sent guidelines for the new labels to the White House, but Taylor would not estimate when they might be released.

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WASHINGTON — William S. Simon, chief executive of Wal-Mart for the United States, said Thursday at the United States Conference of Mayors that the company was providing a $10 million fund to promote American manufacturing in a public push to sell more American-made products.

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production back from overseas. Showcasing Wal-Mart’s power with manufacturers as the nation’s largest retailer, Simon told the mayors that one of its suppliers, Kent International, a maker of bicycles, planned to move its operations to South Carolina from overseas, where it would create at least 175 jobs and assemble a half-million bikes annually by 2016.

Minimum wage This announcement comes in the face of growing clamor for a higher minimum wage in the United States. In November, White House officials said they would support an increase in the federal minimum wage to $10.10, from $7.25 an hour, but fierce opposition in the Republican-controlled House means that the chance of an increase, at least in the near term, are slim.

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Kitsap Bank announces new officer PORT ORCHARD — Kitsap Bank has named Alan Crain as executive vice president and chief financial officer. Crain comes to the bank with more than 25 years of experience in community banking. He most recently served as chief financial officer at Seattle Bank, where he worked with management and local investors to restore the distressed bank to profitability. Crain also spent 14 years as the CFO at Cashmere Valley Bank, where he worked with management and the board to grow the bank from $275 million in assets to more than $1 billion. During his tenure, he started and managed the bank’s public finance division and managed the bank’s investment portfolio while overseeing all accounting and finance functions of the bank. “Alan has a broad background in finance, accounting, investment management, information technology, public finance, mortgage banking and overall bank operations,” said Anthony George, president and chief operating officer at Kitsap Bank. “Alan’s experience and background are the perfect addition to our executive team as we look to the future of our organization. “We are very pleased to welcome him to Kitsap Bank.” Crain is an executive committee member and chairman of the Governance Committee for the Washington Business Alliance and serves on the advisory boards of Mont Vista Capital, an alternative energy investment bank, and Central Washington University’s College of Business. He is also active in the American Bankers Association, the Washington Society of CPAs and various other local nonprofit organizations.

Jobless rate low SEATTLE — Washington state’s unemployment rate is at its lowest point in more than five years. The state Employment Security Department said Thursday that the jobless rate had fallen to 6.6 percent in December, down from 6.8 in November. The last time the numbers were that low was in November 2008, when the state’s unemployment rate was at 6.5 percent. Figures for Clallam and Jefferson counties will be released Tuesday. State officials estimate that Washington added 4,800 jobs between Novem-

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com Market watch Jan. 23, 2014

-175.99

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4,218.87

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Standard & Poor’s 500 Russell 2000

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1,030

Declined:

2,105

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84 3.9 b

Nasdaq diary Advanced: Declined:

800 1,791

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121 2.1 b AP

ber and December and a total increase of about 47,000 jobs for the year. Washington’s unemployment rate rose as high as 10.2 percent at the start of 2010 but has been falling steadily ever since. The state said some 227,900 people are still looking for work. The national unemployment rate was 6.7 percent in December.

Climbing ladder WASHINGTON — Young Americans from low-income families are as likely to move into the ranks of the affluent today as those born in the 1970s, according to a report by several top academic experts on inequality. The study, published this week by the National Bureau of Economic Research, runs counter to the widespread belief that a widening gap between rich and poor has made it harder to climb the economic ladder. Democratic and Republican lawmakers alike have expressed alarm over what had been seen as diminishing opportunities for economic advancement through hard work and ingenuity. Instead, the study found that 9 percent of children born in 1986 to the poorest 20 percent of households were likely to climb into the top 20 percent — little-changed from 8.4 percent for such children born in 1971. “Absolutely, we were surprised” by the results, said Harvard University economist Nathaniel Hendren.

Gold, silver Gold futures for February delivery rose $23.70, or 1.9 percent, to $1,262.30 an ounce Thursday. Silver for March delivery rose 17 cents, or 0.9 percent, to $20.01 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

The U.S. Navy INVITES YOU TO PARTICIPATE IN THE Northwest Training and Testing EIS/OEIS The U.S. Navy has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement (EIS/OEIS) to evaluate potential environmental impacts from military training and testing activities conducted within the Northwest Training and Testing (NWTT) Study Area, to include the use of active sonar and explosives, as well as pierside sonar maintenance and testing.

Crestwood has been awarded Tier Three recognition from the American Health Care Association in the Quality Initiative Recognition Program. Crestwood achieved increased customer satisfaction, safely reducing hospital readmissions, and safely reducing unnecessary medications.

Public Meetings:

Open House Information Sessions: 5 to 8 p.m. Navy Presentation: 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014

Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014

Friday, Feb. 28, 2014

Oak Harbor High School Student Union Building 1 Wildcat Way, Oak Harbor

Cascade High School Student Commons 801 E. Casino Road, Everett

North Kitsap High School Commons 1780 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo

Individuals requiring reasonable accommodations: please contact Liane Nakahara, Navy Region Northwest Public Affairs Specialist, at 360-396-1630 or liane.nakahara@navy.mil.

“Let our staff make a difference in your life” 41951060

Medicare quality measure rating

$ Briefly . . .

SUBMIT WRITTEN COMMENTS TO: Naval Facilities Engineering Command Northwest Attention: Ms. Kimberly Kler - NWTT EIS/OEIS Project Manager 1101 Tautog Circle, Suite 203 Silverdale, WA 98315-1101

Comments will be accepted during the public meetings, by mail or online at www.NWTTEIS.com. All comments must be postmarked or received online by March 25, 2014, for consideration in the Final EIS/OEIS.

Visit www.NWTTEIS.com to view and submit comments on the Draft EIS/OEIS, and for additional public meeting locations in Oregon, California and Alaska͘


FaithReligion

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

B9

Faith that moves our mountains IT’S THE BEGINNING of a new year with fresh hopes and dreams as well as new and ongoing challenges. Those challenges are part of a package deal. In order to view more expansive vistas, some walls may need to come down. To scale mountains, there will be obstacles to overcome. Sometimes these obstacles can appear pretty daunting. Some of them may have accompanied us our entire lives. Yet Jesus promised, “if you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; and nothing will be impossible to you” (Matthew 17:20-21). As a child, I understood this to mean that if I believed with all my soul that God answers prayer, then I could ask God to do or give me anything I wanted, and I would receive it. Some of my prayers were answered. Others were not.

ISSUES OF FAITH Luther King Jr. Wilson powerfully stated: “The belief that God will do everything for man is as untenable as the belief that man can do everything for himself. It, too, is based on a lack of faith. We must learn that to expect God to do everything while we do nothing is not faith but superstition.”

Barbara

Look deeper

Disappointments and apparent failures are not the result of our inherent shortcomings or because God has abandoned us. They are simply opportunities to look deeper into ourselves and to seek a closer relationship with God. Most of our most daunting challenges lie within us rather than outside us. Shift in understanding They are our judgments against ourselves and othWhen my prayers were ers. not answered, it was easy They are our limiting for me to believe that it views on God and life, and was because I or God or the possibilities of the both of us were lacking. human spirit. As an adult, my underMy personal experience standing has shifted with has been that the closer I regards to faith. stay to my heart, the more It really does not empowered I am to meet require an enormous my fears and the greater amount of faith to move my trust in God to do the mountains. rest. It simply requires a litIn a working partnertle bit of willingness to face ship with God, we move one’s greatest fears, one’s mountains, or, at the very deepest insecurities. least, we whittle them Faith also has two parts. down to molehills. One part is faith in __________ God’s unconditional love Issues of Faith is a rotating and support. column by seven religious leaders The other part is faith on the North Olympic Peninsula. in one’s ability to do the The Rev. Barbara Wilson of Port task at hand. Angeles is an ordained Unity pastor-at-large. The Rev. Dr. Martin

Briefly . . . Baha’i meet set at library in Sequim SEQUIM — Members of the Baha’i faith will hold a meeting at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., at 10:30 a.m. Saturday. The meeting is open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Unity service set PORT ANGELES — The Rev. Eva McGinnis will present “Activating our Divine Superpowers to Create Heaven on Earth” at Sunday’s Unity in the Olympics worship service at 10:30 a.m. A time for meditation is held every Sunday from 10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. for those who wish to participate. Fellowship time follows the worship service. Everyone is welcome to attend all church activities. Unity in the Olympics is located at 2917 E. Myrtle St.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A MAGH MELA

CELEBRATION

A Sadhu, or Hindu holy man, performs evening rituals at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers, during the annual traditional fair Magh Mela in Allahabad, India, on Thursday. Hundreds of thousands of devout Hindus are expected to take holy dips during the astronomically auspicious period of more than 45 days.

Holy See: Interreligious dialogue needed on Syria THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

UNITED NATIONS — The Vatican’s permanent observer to the United Nations says interreligious dialogue must be part of the Syrian peace process. In a U.N. speech, Arch-

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC PARISH

209 West 11th St. Port Angeles

360.452.2351

www.clallamcatholic.com

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Old Latin Mass every 2nd & 4th Sunday 2:00 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

bishop Francis Chullikat noted that the millions of refugees displaced by the violence in Syria and other parts of the Mideast include Christians whose roots in the region go back nearly 2,000 years.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

the chorus while experiencing the calming effect of being in God’s presence,” according to organizers.

Oneness blessings AGNEW — The Peninsula Oneness Blessings Group will host its monthly Oneness Blessings Circle on Thursday, Feb. 6. The group will meet at Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 73 Howe Road, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. All are welcome to receive special blessings from certified Oneness Blessing Givers and to join in fellowship at the end of the evening. There is no special religion connected to the blessings, and no dogma is presented. Blessings are free, but donations are accepted to cover facility rental. For more information, phone 360-640-1254 or visit www.oneness university.org.

Meet with pope

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Worship Hours: 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services Sunday School for all ages: 9:45

PENINSULA Worldwide

CHURCH OF GOD A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 pm Gardiner Community Center 980 Old Gardiner Road

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

Joseph Bednarik

The Content of Our Character: Reskins, Lawn Jockeys, and Getting Gypped explores the energized issue of racism using examples current, local and personal. Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. January 26, 10:30

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

FIRST UNITED METHODIST

301 E. Lopez Ave., PA 452-2323 Pastor Richard Grinstad Sunday Worship at 8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Sunday School at 9:45 a.m. Nursery Provided Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 11 a.m. most Sundays www.htlcpa.com

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) Park & Race, Port Angeles 457-7062 Pastor Joe Gentzler SUNDAY

9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship

CHURCH

7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 & 11 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School FRIDAY 5:30 p.m. Friendship Dinner for all – FREE Contact us for info about the Clothes Closet & other programs for all ages office@pafumc.org www.pafumc.org

847 N. Sequim Ave. • 683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Family friendly

41954024

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will meet with Pope Francis at Taize service set the Vatican as part of a SEQUIM — An ecumen- European trip scheduled for March. ical Taize service is The White House said planned at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Obama “looks forward to discussing with Pope FranAve., at 7 p.m. Monday. cis their shared commitment The service is open to to fighting poverty and the public. Taize services provide a growing inequality” during meditative, candlelit atmo- their March 27 meeting. Obama had an audience sphere that includes singing simple, repetitive songs. with the previous pope, Benedict XVI, in 2009. Attendees may “simply Peninsula Daily News sit peacefully during the and The Associated Press hourlong service or join in

www.clallamcatholic.com

reconciliation and restore Syria’s historic religious pluralism. He said Pope Francis, “as a witness to peace,” intends to make his visit to the Holy Land in May a “pilgrimage of prayer.”

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

“Seeing the Light”

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH 101 E. Maple St., Sequim 360.683.6076

The Holy See’s permanent U.N. observer lamented what he called “a worrying exodus” of Christians who are being targeted “by fundamentalist and extremist forces.” Chullikat called for interfaith dialogue to bring about


B10

PeninsulaNation

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Virus may be At 50, first lady Obama cause of death finds her own path in D.C. for honeybees

BY JENNIFER STEINHAUER THE NEW YORK TIMES

WASHINGTON — She has perfected a mean forehand and is working on her yoga poses. She dishes with girlfriends over Brussels sprouts and dirty martinis (one olive) at Zaytinya, a hotspot Mediterranean restaurant in D.C., and pushes her two daughters to play two sports — one of her choosing and one of theirs. And she said that the wonders of modern dermatology, like Botox, are in the realm of possibility for her. Michelle Obama is in many ways the embodiment of the contemporary, urban, well-heeled middleaged American woman. She likes to take “me time,” as she did during an extra vacation week this month without family in Hawaii — it was girl time at Oprah Winfrey’s Maui mansion — but it also set off a tabloid furor over the state of her marriage and that taxpayers were paying for the extended holiday. She frets that her older daughter, 15-year-old Malia, hangs out with the boys a grade above her. She gardens, although unlike the rest of us, she has significant weeding help. She toys with false eyelashes.

500 at her party Last Saturday night, Mrs. Obama celebrated her 50th birthday (which was the day before) with dancing and sweets throughout the state floor of the White House, drawing the nation’s attention away from her husband, who turned 50 in 2011, at least for an evening. About 500 guests — from Vice President Joe Biden, Bill and Hillary Clinton and Paul McCartney to Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder and tennis great Billie Jean King — sipped fine American wines, consumed delicate macarons and were entertained by Beyoncé. No word on what the first lady received in the way of gifts. The mix of Hollywood and quirky individualism (American caterers, ready yourself for the onslaught of dessert-and-cocktails-only party requests) underscores the conflicting diptych of glamorous mystery woman and regular PTA mother that defines America’s first lady. When she turned 50 last

Death and Memorial Notice JOHN G. GARROW June 26, 1918 January 19, 2014 John was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on June 26, 1918, and moved with his family to Hoquiam, Washington, as a child. John served 20 years in the U.S. Army during World War II and the Korean War. He retired as a master sergeant, then worked as a civilian gate guard at the Coast Guard Air Station in Port Angeles for 10 years. John was a friend to everyone, always willing to help. At his request, there will be no service.

BY MICHAEL WINES THE NEW YORK TIMES

WASHINGTON — The mysterious mass dieoffs of honeybees that have wiped out roughly a third of commercial colonies each year since 2006 may be linked to a rapidly mutating virus that jumped from tobacco plants to soy plants to bees, according to a new study. The research, reported this week in the online version of the academic journal mBio, found that the increase in honeybee deaths that generally starts in autumn and peaks in winter was correlated with increasing infections by a variant of the tobacco ringspot virus.

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Michelle Obama last week at a White House event on expanding college opportunity. Friday, she showed off her AARP card. “Excited to join Barack in the 50+ club today . . . check out my @AARP card!” the first lady told her more than 600,000 Twitter followers in a post that included a photo of her smiling and holding up the red-and-white membership card that bears her name. Five years in, she has cobbled together a full life in Washington. Sometimes she moves so discreetly through the area that a customer at a local Target store, not recognizing her, asked the first lady to reach for some highly perched toilet paper. At other times, Mrs. Obama is on plain view around town as a parent on the sidelines of the soccer games of her daughter Sasha, 12. Marc Howard, whose daughter Zoe once played on the soccer team with Sasha, recalled how his daughter drained the tiny water bottle he had brought for her one hot Washington day on the field. Mrs. Obama lightheartedly chided him. “She said, ‘What kind of water bottle is that?’ and gave Zoe hers,” Howard said. “Those are things far away from the cameras.”

controlling East Wing. Accounts of her life here are culled from interviews with staff members, friends and parents of Malia and Sasha’s schoolmates. The accounts also draw on Mrs. Obama’s public speeches and comments, including a recent interview with People magazine. While Mrs. Obama has been careful not to define herself or her role strictly through race, she has paid steadfast attention to her role as a model and mentor to minority children from poor backgrounds like her own, and has built much of her policy agenda around them. “She is more self-determinative than prior first ladies because she very rarely allows herself to be drawn into distracting conversations,” said Carl Anthony, a historian of first ladies. In addition, he said, “she speaks to a demographic pretty much ignored by the White House by all first ladies except for Eleanor Roosevelt.” He cited trips Mrs. Obama has made to the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington and White House invitations she has extended to local workingclass African-Americans.

Eat together as a family Private zone For all of her complaints about the scrutiny and isolation that come with living in the White House, Mrs. Obama has created a vibrant life in Washington as well as a policy agenda that at times dovetails with her husband’s, particularly on education. But she maintains a powerful zone of privacy, aided by discreet friends and a

The Obamas and their daughters usually eat together as a family at the White House, but the president and first lady also give small dinner parties at home with a mix of friends, notable local columnists and others. A typical menu is grilled shrimp with tomatoes and peppers, followed by lean fillet of steak (the first lady’s favorite) with pota-

toes and a selection of pies for dessert. Guests should not expect bread. Mrs. Obama also frequents Washington’s restaurants of the moment. She has been spotted more than once sweeping into B.L.T. Steak on I Street with a gaggle of female friends, headed for a private room. She eats roasted cauliflower and stuffed grape leaves at Zaytinya and guacamole and margaritas at Oyamel. She has grown fond of Bibiana, an upscale Italian restaurant downtown. “She is interested in local food,” said Eddie Gehman Kohan, the executive editor of obamafood orama.com, an obsessive digital archive of the food ways and nutrition agenda of the Obamas. “Her typical meal is whatever is going on at the restaurant that is seasonal and best.”

Her friends Mrs. Obama’s group frequently includes her closest friend, Sharon Malone, a prominent obstetrician and wife of the attorney general, Eric H. Holder Jr. Often on hand are old friends from Chicago, like Valerie B. Jarrett, a senior adviser to the president; Cindy S. Moelis, the director of the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships; and Angela Acree, who was one of Mrs. Obama’s roommates at Princeton. Mrs. Obama also is known to wander the city’s museums and screen films at the White House, where she is partial to those that explore themes of poverty and struggle.

Linda Lou Benson of Sequim died January 7, 2014, at the age of 77. Linda was born and raised in South Dakota and moved to Bellevue, Washington, in 1964. She lived and worked in Bellevue for 27 years before moving to Sequim in 1991. Linda worked and retired from the Clallam County Co-op, where she was the accounts payable clerk for many years. She is survived by her three daughters, Laurie (Dusty) Henry of Sequim, Lynn (Shawn) Fedina of Sedro-Woolley, Washington, and Lana (Mike) Johnson of Arlington, Washington; 10 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. She also leaves behind her beloved dog, Bitty.

The virus is found in pollen that bees pick up while foraging, and it may be spread as the bees mix saliva and nectar with pollen to make “bee bread” for larvae to eat. Mites that feed on the bees may also be involved

Contributing causes But most researchers, including the study’s authors, suspect that a host of viruses, parasites and, perhaps, other factors like pesticides are working in combination to weaken colonies and increase the death rate. The infection of bees by the tobacco ringspot virus, spotted by chance during a screening of bees and pollen for rare viruses, is the first known instance in which a virus jumped from pollen to bees. About one in 20 plant viruses is found in pollen, the researchers wrote.

Automakers get serious about fuel-cell future THE NEW YORK TIMES

LAS VEGAS — Like thick-rim glasses, Doc Martens and so many other things that fell out of favor only to spring back to popularity years later, fuel-cell cars have resurfaced. Last week at the International Consumer Electronics Show here, Toyota announced plans to release a fuel-cell car in 2015. At the fall auto shows, Honda and Hyundai revealed their take on this headlinegrabbing technology. All three have unveiled design studies intended to signal that fuel-cell vehicles, which produce zero tailpipe pollutants, are close to production. Each concept vehicle demonstrated progress in the efficiency and packaging of their fuel-cell systems, which generate electricity onboard by combining hydrogen and oxygen and emit only water vapor. Most hydrogen in the

United States is produced by steam reforming natural gas. Researchers are experimenting with alternative ways to produce it, including fermentation and solar and wind power. What these automakers failed to deliver in terms of specifics they offset with lofty promises of a real and rapidly approaching hydrogen-based future. Before you file this news with reports of the imminent arrival of flying cars, consider this: For the past four months, I have been living with fuelcell technology, logging more than 2,500 miles at the wheel of a Toyota Highlander FCHV-adv test bed. The technowonder that visited my driveway was based on a 2008 Highlander midsize crossover. It offered nearly 300 miles of driving range and five-minute fill-ups — a combination that no battery-electric car offers.

Death Notices

Death and Memorial Notice LINDA LOU BENSON

Found in pollen

in transmitting the virus, the researchers said. Among the study’s authors are leading researchers investigating the bee deaths at the Agriculture Department’s laboratories in Beltsville, Md., as well as experts at U.S. universities and at the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing. Bees have died at more than twice the usual rate since it was identified seven years ago.

Donna Joyce Puckett will officiate.

Olympic Cremation Kosec Funeral Home & Association, Port Angeles, is Crematory, Port Townsend, is in charge of arrangements. Donna Joyce Puckett of in charge of arrangements. Port Townsend died at Jef- www.kosecfuneralhome.com Ray T. Birdwell ferson Healthcare. She was July 3, 1938 — Dec. 14, 2013 67. Former Port Angeles resHer obituary will be pub- Harold Richard Baar ident Ray T. Birdwell died lished later. April 24, 1925 — Jan. 18, 2014 in Olympia. He was 75. Services: Funeral serPort Angeles resident Services: Celebration of vice at Kosec Funeral Home & Crematory Chapel, 1615 Harold Richard Baar died life at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at Evergreen Christian Parkside Drive, Port at home. He was 88. Services: Celebration of Center, 1000 Black Lake Townsend, at 4 p.m. Wednesday. Visitation will be from life from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sat- Blvd S.W., Olympia. urday, Feb. 1, at the Crescent Funeral Alternatives of 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Pastor Coe Hutchison Grange, 50870 state High- Washington, Lacey, is in charge of arrangements. of Grace Lutheran Church way 112, Joyce. March 2, 1946 — Jan. 21, 2014

Mrs. Benson A celebration of Linda’s life will be held Saturday, February 15, at 1 p.m. at John Wayne Marina, 2577 West Sequim Bay Road in Sequim. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in Linda’s name to the American Lung Association, www.lung.org, or the American Heart Association, www.heart.org.

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Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Doonesbury

Garfield

DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend, “Chad,” proposed two months ago, but he didn’t ask my parents for my hand in marriage. My parents are upset about it. When I realized that Chad hadn’t gone to them, I asked him why. He said he was following what his father had done: proposing first and then speaking to the parents. But Chad still hasn’t done it. In fact, he has yet to be around them at all. How do I get my boyfriend to speak to my parents? They are no longer as angry as they were, but they still would like to talk to him. I spend lots of time with Chad’s family, but I can’t get him to even go to lunch with mine. Dad said that if Chad doesn’t clear the air with him, he may not bother showing up at our wedding. What do I do, Abby? Fiancee in a Fix

by Lynn Johnston

by Garry Trudeau

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

We have been together for 24 Van Buren years. We have two beautiful children and have made a wonderful life together. I love her as much today as the first time I met her. How should we answer people when they ask about how we met and fell in love? I know it was wrong and against the law. Mike in California

Abigail

Dear Mike: You do not have to quote chapter and verse when someone asks a question. In a case like yours, you could say that you met when you were both quite young without going into the specifics. For a 21-year-old to see a 16-yearold girl is not against the law, as long as her parents approve and they are not having sex. The laws regarding statutory rape were enacted to prevent predators from preying on minors. Dear Abby: When I buy a sweater, I usually get an extra button in a little clear baggie attached to the garment. Today, I bought a sweater with a piece of matching thread in the tiny plastic bag. Why do manufacturers insist on adding something to every article of clothing even if it is just a piece of thread? Inquisitive in Illinois Dear Inquisitive: The thread is provided in case the garment needs to be rewoven in the event you get a hole in it or a tear. It’s a courtesy to the customer, so stop looking a gift horse in the mouth.

_________

Dear Abby: My wife and I disagree on whether to tell our kids and friends how we met. When my wife and I met, she was underage. She was 16, and I was 21. We fell in love; it was true love. by Brian Basset

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do what you are supposed to do without complaint. Make entertaining plans that are sure to bring romance into your life. Whether single or in a relationship, opportunity knocks where love is concerned. Plan something unusual. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You have choices to make regarding work and what you have to offer. Broaden your horizons; spend time with someone who has mastered something you want to learn. Emotional blackmail will not help you get your way, but knowledge will. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Love, excitement and adventure should be high on your to-do list. Explore new ways to use your talents and you will impress someone special. A personal relationship needs nurturing, not control or aggressive behav-

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Watch your back. Someone may be jealous or trying to oust you out of a position you currently occupy. Use intelligence, knowledge and professionalism when dealing with peers or partners. Do the best job possible. Be amicable and generous. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

Dear Fiancee: You appear to be quite young. If I were you, I would take a step backward and see this from your parents’ point of view. It appears that Chad wasn’t entirely honest with you when he gave his reason for not talking to them. Could he be intimidated? When a daughter marries, most parents want to know something about the young man — not only where he has been but also what are his plans for the future, including where the two of you will be living and whether he has a job. That Chad is hiding from them isn’t a good sign. When most couples become engaged, the parents of the bride and groom usually get together and start to form a relationship. If your father hasn’t met your fiance, it makes it harder for your parents to reach out to his. When the in-laws are friendly, it makes for a more harmonious marriage. As it stands, it appears Chad is not interested in having any relationship with your family. Frankly, I can’t blame your father for being upset about it.

by Jim Davis

Red and Rover

B11

New fiance avoids future in-laws

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

Pickles

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

ior. Offer romance and affection. 5 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Telling a story will put you in the spotlight, LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Problems at home will esca- but make sure that you don’t late if you leave someone out exaggerate, or someone may or you don’t take the time to expect something from you deal with your responsibilities that you cannot deliver. Too before you engage in social much spent on entertainment or luxury items will leave you activity. You do need a short on cash. 3 stars change, but only after you have taken care of business. CAPRICORN (Dec. 2 stars 22-Jan. 19): Open up about VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s time to make a move. Get your plan up and running and do not look back. You deserve to follow your dreams, hopes and wishes. A relationship you have with someone will improve if you compromise. Don’t overspend. 4 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t feel pressured to make a choice. You have to wager the pros and cons as well as other options. Don’t let a relationship you have with someone hold you back. Act on principle as well as what’s best for you. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Take one step at a time. You may not be thinking straight when it comes to emotional situations at home or concerning a loved one. Don’t take the path of least resistance if a little effort will bring better results. 3 stars

The Family Circus

the way you feel. You are best to lay your cards on the table and find out where you stand. Don’t waste time and money on someone or something that isn’t likely to give you anything in return. 4 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Change direction if you are not making the progress you crave. Not everyone will see things your way, so consider going it alone. Actions speak louder than words. Set your course and don’t stop until you reach your destination. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Invest in something you believe in or that you feel you can master enough to bring in extra cash. Mixing business with pleasure and offering to help others will raise your profile and help you position yourself for advancement. 5 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 Neah Bay 55/39

Bellingham g 50/35

Olympic Peninsula TODAY AY PAT C

HY F OG

P

50/36

H AT C

OG Y F

Townsend T 50/37

Sequim 49/36 Olympics Port Ludlow Freeze level: 11,000 feet 51/36

Forks 59/35 BR EE

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 45 31 0.00 2.82 Forks 53 34 0.00 9.78 Seattle 49 39 0.00 2.45 Sequim 44 34 0.00 1.08 Hoquiam 51 41 0.01 4.90 Victoria 45 38 0.00 3.52 Port Townsend 44 36 *0.01 1.57

Forecast highs for Friday, Jan. 24

ZY

Last

New

Billings 51° | 32°

San Francisco 65° | 48°

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Denver 55° | 22°

45/34 Mostly cloudy; blip of sun

Marine Weather

46/36 Lots of clouds, less sunshine

47/40 Cloudiness dominates

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: E wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. Patchy fog in the morning. Tonight, E wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. Ocean: E wind 20 to 30 kt easing to 15 to 25 kt in the afternoon. Wind waves 3 to 5 ft. W swell 11 ft at 17 seconds. Tonight, E wind 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 9 ft at 15 seconds.

Los Angeles 76° | 52°

CANADA Victoria 47° | 38° Seattle 50° | 38° Olympia 50° | 32°

Spokane 34° | 25°

Tacoma 52° | 35° Yakima 37° | 23°

Astoria 53° | 40°

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Dungeness Bay*

© 2014 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 5:38 a.m. 8.6’ 12:37 p.m. 2.1’ 6:40 p.m. 6.1’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 6:35 a.m. 8.7’ 12:05 a.m. 3.4’ 8:01 p.m. 6.2’ 1:48 p.m. 1.5’

7:46 a.m. 7.1’ 10:58 p.m. 4.9’

1:14 a.m. 4.2’ 3:16 p.m. 1.2’

8:25 a.m. 7.1’

2:20 a.m. 5.1’ 4:10 p.m. 0.4’

9:23 a.m. 8.8’ 4:29 p.m. 1.3’

2:27 a.m. 4.7’

12:35 a.m. 6.0’ 10:02 a.m. 8.8’

3:33 a.m. 5.7’ 5:23 p.m. 0.4’

8:29 a.m. 7.9’ 11:41 p.m. 5.4’

1:49 a.m. 4.2’ 3:51 p.m. 1.2’

9:08 a.m. 7.9’

2:55 a.m. 5.1’ 4:45 p.m. 0.4’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Atlanta 33° | 14°

Miami 70° | 56°

Cold

Jan 30

Feb 6

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

-10s

Burlington, Vt. -2 Casper 30 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 45 Albany, N.Y. -1 Snow Charleston, W.Va. 15 Albuquerque 32 Clr Charlotte, N.C. 36 Amarillo 19 Cldy Cheyenne 37 Anchorage 35 .35 Rain Chicago 15 Asheville 17 Cldy Cincinnati 13 Atlanta 24 PCldy Cleveland 12 Atlantic City 6 PCldy Columbia, S.C. 42 Austin 43 Rain Columbus, Ohio 13 Baltimore 5 Cldy Concord, N.H. 14 Billings 16 .03 Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 60 13 Birmingham 23 Cldy Dayton 42 Bismarck -11 Clr Denver 20 Boise 26 Cldy Des Moines 11 Boston 6 Cldy Detroit -2 Brownsville 59 PCldy Duluth 64 Buffalo 3 .01 Snow El Paso Evansville 25 Fairbanks 31 SUNDAY Fargo -4 55 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 12 7:37 a.m. 9.0’ 1:17 a.m. 3.8’ Great Falls 29 9:15 p.m. 6.6’ 2:54 p.m. 0.8’ Greensboro, N.C. 29 Hartford Spgfld 16 34 12:29 a.m. 5.6’ 3:42 a.m. 5.8’ Helena Honolulu 80 9:10 a.m. 7.1’ 5:03 p.m. -0.4’ Houston 69 Indianapolis 16 Jackson, Miss. 49 2:06 a.m. 6.9’ 4:55 a.m. 6.4’ Jacksonville 49 10:47 a.m. 8.8’ 6:16 p.m. -0.4’ Juneau 45 Kansas City 37 1:12 a.m. 6.2’ 4:17 a.m. 5.8’ Key West 68 9:53 a.m. 7.9’ 5:38 p.m. -0.4’ Las Vegas 67 Little Rock 51 Hi 9 46 48 37 28 38 15 68 15 31 39 3 26 18 73 7

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Feb 14

5:01 p.m. 7:50 a.m. 2:27 a.m. 10:28 a.m.

Nation/World

ORE.

Tides

51/40 Clouds keep cap on region

Washington D.C. 22° | 10°

Fronts

Feb 22

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

New York 19° | 8°

Detroit 16° | -2°

Full

Low 36 Increasing cloudiness

Chicago 25° | -6°

El Paso 51° | 27° Houston 40° | 32°

First

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 35° | -11°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

SATURDAY

Sunny

Seattle 50° | 38°

Almanac

Brinnon 52/38

TONIGHT ★

National TODAY forecast Nation

Yesterday

Rainfall reading taken in Nordland

Aberdeen 55/35

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

-15 Clr Los Angeles 77 52 17 .07 PCldy Louisville 20 7 29 PCldy Lubbock 50 27 14 Snow Memphis 39 28 20 PCldy Miami Beach 66 47 7 .13 Clr Midland-Odessa 63 34 -2 Clr Milwaukee 14 -1 5 .03 Snow Mpls-St Paul 6 -15 10 .06 Snow Nashville 31 17 23 PCldy New Orleans 51 39 6 .02 Clr New York City 18 09 -1 PCldy Norfolk, Va. 23 13 41 Cldy North Platte 38 -6 2 Clr Oklahoma City 52 21 9 .10 Snow Omaha 25 -5B -5 Clr Orlando 56 37 4 .05 Snow Pendleton 30 27 -18 .04 Clr Philadelphia 16 8 41 Clr Phoenix 78 50 6 Cldy Pittsburgh 12 8 22 Snow Portland, Maine 17 -3 -18 1.52 Clr Portland, Ore. 44 31 20 PCldy Providence 19 3 7 .05 Cldy Raleigh-Durham 30 16 10 .24 PCldy Rapid City 28 -7 17 Cldy Reno 58 25 2 Cldy Richmond 23 7 23 .13 Cldy Sacramento 66 37 66 .24 PCldy St Louis 30 2 48 Rain St Petersburg 53 46 -2 .01 Clr Salt Lake City 34 23 30 Cldy San Antonio 71 51 29 PCldy San Diego 71 52 44 1.20 Rain San Francisco 65 45 1 PCldy San Juan, P.R. 90 76 56 Clr Santa Fe 44 26 43 Clr St Ste Marie 5 -4 28 Cldy Shreveport 58 40

PCldy Cldy Clr Cldy Clr Clr .02 Clr .01 Clr Snow PCldy Cldy PCldy Clr Clr Clr Clr Rain PCldy Clr Snow PCldy Clr PCldy PCldy Clr Clr Cldy Clr Clr Clr Cldy Rain PCldy Clr PCldy Clr .09 Clr Cldy .01

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 85 at Fillmore, Calif. ■ -36 at Crane Lake, Minn., and Embarrass, Minn. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington, Del.

15 5 54 41 77 47 19 44 9 14

-12 -4 39 3 45 16 12 8 -2 5

Clr Snow PCldy Clr Clr Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo Otlk 76 64 Clr 66 46 Clr 43 20 Clr 22 11 PCldy 42 33 PCldy 71 51 Clr 42 32 Clr 73 43 PCldy 70 61 Clr 60 45 PCldy 83 63 Clr 50 27 Snow 46 45 Rain 70 42 PCldy 4 2 PCldy 5 -8 PCldy 67 47 PCldy 42 39 Rain 95 76 Clr 51 40 Rain 75 64 Clr 57 46 Cldy 15 13 Snow/Wind 47 39 PCldy

Stop in and test drive the

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C1

-HOME INSPECTION26640437

Serving the Entire Olympic Peninsula Since 2006

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim, Port Angeles, Port Townsend & Beyond

Alan R. Jogerst  Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; www.inspecthost.com/hadlock

WSDA # 73667 WHI # 640

THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEW REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

BLACK DIAMOND AREA

WHATA WATER VIEW

OUTSTANDING 12TH FAIRWAY VIEW

2 PARCELS

S

TIE

NI ME

DA

N NLA

SU

WRE/Port Angeles

14TH FAIRWAY OF SUNLAND

WATER VIEW & EASY CARE

US

T

IGH

BR

Each parcel is 2.09 acres priced at $50,000 each. Manufactured homes are ok. Great potential Nursery or Greenhouse or residential home. PUD water installed, Great Perk, and Agnew Irrigation. Small barn on lot 3, Located between Port Angeles and Sequim, Call Jean Irvine for more Info 360-460-5601

â&#x20AC;˘ 3 BR 2 BA Over 1800 SF â&#x20AC;˘ Formal Dining Opens To Great Room â&#x20AC;˘ Large Kitchen With Eating Space â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Decks For Entertaining â&#x20AC;˘ Nice Landscaping â&#x20AC;˘ Newer Roof, Heat Pump & Appliances MLS#578852/280024 $269,000

WRE/SunLand TEAM SCHMIDT 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim Mike: 460-0331 Irene: 460-4040 www.teamschmidt.withwre.com teamschmidt@olypen.com

UPTOWN REALTY DICK PILLING Office: (360) 417-2811 Cell: (360) 460-7652 rightguy@olypen.com

Kelly Johnson

RealtorÂŽ, SRS, SFR Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

41970933

3Bed/3Ba has great view and deck to view it from. Private back yard with hot tub. Beautifully landscaped. In home movie theater. Neat shop with dust prevention system. Lots to like. MLS#272287 $279,000

41971038

41970798

41970990

Well kept ADA accessible home on 1.73 acres w/a 1,740 sq ft pole barn. Sunny, pastoral setting w/a small pond & abundant wildlife. The home features a master suite, 2nd bedroom, office area, main bathroom plus another bonus room. Sunny living room, dining area & the kitchen features an island w/breakfast bar, pantry & sliding glass door to the back deck w/hot tub. Southern exposure patio. Room for horses & a garden. Barn has water & electricity, hay loft, office & RV hook up. MLS#280069 Only $229,000

IO PAC S &

UPTOWN REALTY Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

- MOVE IN READY- VERY NICE & CLEAN RAMBLER -

- 81 TYEE SEQUIM, WA -

D

L SO

â&#x20AC;˘ 3 Bedroom/2 Bath/1228 SF/ Yr 1979 â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Car Attached Garage / 0.21 Acre lot â&#x20AC;˘ Cul de Sac / Nice Established Neighborhood â&#x20AC;˘ Back Yard very private, fully fenced â&#x20AC;˘ Newly painted, New vinyl windows, new flooring MLS#272275 $160,000

41970801

41970803

41970796

41971037

This Water View home is in perfect condition, enjoys an updated kitchen including stainless appliances, an awesome master suite with a balcony, outbuildings, & a beautiful yard with private stone patioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & water features. MLS#272185 $245,000

â&#x20AC;˘ 3 BR 3 BA Over 3000 SF â&#x20AC;˘ Lower Level Multi Purpose Room â&#x20AC;˘ Large Workshop & Golf Cart Garage â&#x20AC;˘ Well Designed Kitchen Has 2 Eating Areas â&#x20AC;˘ Decks Off Kitchen & Living Areas MLS#467295/270840 $379,000

â&#x20AC;˘ 2 BR plus Den / 2 BA / 2596 SF â&#x20AC;˘ Built in 1974 / 0.84 Acre Lot â&#x20AC;˘ Vaulted Wood Beamed Ceiling â&#x20AC;˘ Wall to Ceiling Rock Fireplace â&#x20AC;˘ Attached 2- Car Garage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 720 SF â&#x20AC;˘ PLUS Workshop / Drive thru Garage MLS#272245 ONLY $235,000

WRE/SunLand

Deb Kahle

UPTOWN REALTY Kathy Brown, CRS, ABR, GRI Office: (360) 417-2785 Cell: (360) 461-4460 www.RealEstateinPortAngeles.com

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 â&#x20AC;˘ (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.debkahle.withwre.com

PORT ANGELES ACREAGE

UPTOWN REALTY

GREAT HOME

G

UPTOWN REALTY

Team Thomsen

Team Thomsen

Previews Property Specialists (360) 808-0979 mthomsen@olypen.com

Previews Property Specialists (360) 808-0979 mthomsen@olypen.com

GREAT LOCATION

NEW LISTING

IN ST

EW

LI

N

2 suite medical office, near OMC hospital campus in Port Angeles. This is an investment quality property, constructed in 1986, tile roof & a heat pump. The property consists of 3 city lots, and includes off street parking. Purchaser may have opportunity to expand the building, verify your plan with the City of PA. Seller will consider carrying a contract to purchase, via a note & deed of trust, with a qualified buyer & acceptable purchase price. MLS#272306/561098. $399,000

(360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 â&#x20AC;˘ (360) 670-5978 tylerconkle.withwre.com

TOWN & COUNTRY

460-6470 hegge@olypen.com www.sequimrealestate.com Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll SEE the Difference

41970726

Thelma Durham

Tyler Conkle

GREAT 3BD + Bonus Rm, 1BA, 1,448 sq ft home for starting out or downsizing! Move-in ready with many great new updates! Updated hardiplank siding, porches, exterior paint, fencing, recessed lighting, new interior and exterior doors, laminate counter tops and tile backsplash, and new hot water tank. This home wont be on the market long! MLS#280083 $139,000!!!

Eric Hegge

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/SunLand

41970809

41970793

41970988

41971040

With room for everyone. Open concept living room, kitchen, & dining. Hardwood floors in these areas along with tile counters & an island in the kitchen. Back door leads out to covered deck and a step down open deck. New roof year ago. Updated vinyl double pane windows. Guest & master bath updated with tile counters & newer floors. 3BR, 2BA on upper level along with kitchen, living room, & dining. Main floor has the entry, large family room with bar, 4th bedroom, utility room, 3/4 bath, & a storage MLS#280066 $239,000

â&#x20AC;˘ Over 5 Level Acres â&#x20AC;˘ Property Is Perimeter Fenced â&#x20AC;˘ Nice Cedar Framed Barn â&#x20AC;˘ Horse Stalls & Hay Storage â&#x20AC;˘ Several Good Bldg. Sites MLS#583025/280078 $169,000

UPTOWN REALTY

Holly LOCKE (360) 417-2809 HollyLocke@olypen.com

PRIVATE CITY RETREAT WITH SALT WATER VIEWS

This house has been completely remodeled and showcases views of the City, Harbor, Straits and Edizâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hook from almost every room! 4 bedrooms, 3 bathroom, 2 1/2 City lots and much more! Call Kimi directly at 360-461-9788 to set up a private tour. MLS#271995 Kimi Robertson 41971433

Price Newly Reduced to

JACE 360.461.9788

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Go Online!

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Start Unpacking! Find your Advertise Here new home Call Shanie in the Peninsula Daily News 360-452-2345


Classified

C2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

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NOON E N I L D A DE ’t Miss It!

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Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

T O DAY ’ S

HOTTEST

NEW

s

CLASSIFIEDS!

A LT E R AT I O N S a n d Sewing. Alterations, mending, hemming and some heavyweight sewing available to you from me. Call (360)531-2353 ask for B.B. BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection Including Estates. Call (360)477-9659 CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba, no smoking/pets. $500. (360)457-9698. EASEL: Large Manhattan Easel by Richeson C o m p a n y, m o d e l #887120 “H.” Unboxed, brand new. Retail price $1995. Asking just $1,200. James, (360)582-6905

3020 Found

Clinical Educator, RN 24 hours week ICU, RN As needed schedule Home Health Case Manager, RN Full Time MT/MLT FT evenings, or PT days Sleep Tech As needed schedule Medical Assistant FT, Women’s Clinic FT, Primary Care Clinic Home Health Aide FT, must be CNA Arrhythmia Tech 32 hrs wk, eves Certified Tumor Registrar 16 hours week, days Physician Biller Rep FT, Days To apply online or for information on these, and other openings, visit www.olympic medical.org. EOE

HAY: Good quality grass hay. $6 bale. (360)670-3788

MOTORHOME: Itasca ‘12 Reyo. 25.5’, beautiful, on sprinter chassis, Mercedes-Benz diesel, under 5k miles, loaded with extras, Onan gen., inver ter, drivers, door, UTILITY TRAILER: 18’ moor. $89,500. tandem, 7,000 lb. with (360)928-3692 aluminum tool box and ramp. $2,500. P.A.: Refurnished 2 br. (360)681-8694 or N o s m o k e / p e t s , g a r. (360)460-5282 $675, dep. 457-4023.

3023 Lost

4026 Employment General

FOUND: Cat. Male, white with gray tabby, silver collar, on W. 18th St., P.A. (360)457-8462.

LOST: Dog. White and tan, no collar, medium, 23 lbs, female, “Dixie,” needs medication, JanuF O U N D : D o g . M a l e , ary 18, E. Bay St., P.A. (206)235-0729 Australian shepherd, Seq u i m , o n e we e k a g o, distinct markings. 4026 Employment (360)681-0828

General

FOUND: Glasses. Cooper colored women’s prescr iption, Lees Creek Road, P.A. (360)460-6814

3023 Lost L O S T: C a t . O r a n g e / w h i t e, n e u t e r e d m a l e short hair, lean, above PAHS. (360)461-4327. L O S T : D o g . Te a c u p Chihuahua, red, female, “Dolce,” short hair, last seen near Clallam Fairgrounds. (360)477-8732.

ADULT CARE HOME IN SEQUIM needs a good c o o k / c a r e g i ve r fo r 4 shifts, Sat.-Tues., 12-7 p.m. (360)683-9194. Executive Director S e q u i m ’s Fr e e C l i n i c seeks part-time experienced leader. Qualified applicant will have good communication skills, experience with development and budget management. For further info see website at sequmfreeclinic.org. No phone calls. Deadline Jan. 30.

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE We are looking for individuals interested in a carrier route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Wed. Fill out application at 147 W. Washington, Sequim. Call Jasmine at (360)683-3311, ext. 6051 KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497

Bar Tender/Manager Elk’s Naval Lodge Bring resumes to 131 E. 1st St., P.A. by 1/31/14. COMMERCIAL Credit Underwriter. Craft3 is a non-profit Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) with a mission to strengthen economic, ecological and family resilience in Pacific Nor thwest communitiesPosition is responsible for underwriting commercial loans. Underwr iter is responsible for the financial analysis of potential new borrowers, existing borrowers, and also assisting lenders with the process of closing loans and maintaining updated financial statements and ongoing financial a n a l y s i s . To l e a r n about Craft3, visit www.craft3.org. To apply, please complete the application at: https://home.eease.ad p.com/recruit/ ?id=7777401 Application deadline is Friday- February 24, 2014. A hiring decision is scheduled for March 2014. Craft3 is an equal opportunity employer; women and minor ities are encouraged to apply. Position l o c a t e d i n Po r t A n geles.

Clinical Educator, RN 24 hours week ICU, RN As needed schedule Home Health Case Manager, RN Full Time MT/MLT FT evenings, or PT days Sleep Tech As needed schedule Medical Assistant FT, Women’s Clinic FT, Primary Care Clinic Home Health Aide FT, must be CNA Arrhythmia Tech 32 hrs wk, eves Certified Tumor Registrar 16 hours week, days Physician Biller Rep FT, Days To apply online or for information on these, and other openings, visit www.olympic medical.org. EOE Facilities Maintenance Electrician The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Facilities Maintenance Electrician. Applicants mu s t h ave a t l e a s t 5 years of experience as a l i c e n s e d j o u r n ey m a n commercial electrician. Must be a team player who also has skills and experience in HVAC, fire alarm, marine structure, air por t infrastr ucture, and/or building and grounds maintenance. Construction, estimating and material procurement, computer skills are preferred. The starting hourly rate range is $26.67 to $28.70 DOE, plus an outstanding benefit package. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Por t Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., PA between 8am-5pm M-F & also online at www.portofpa.com . Applications will be accepted until 5 p m Fr i d ay, Ja n u a r y 24th. Drug testing is required. Other testing may be required. MEDICAL ASSISTANT Diploma from Certified program. No phone calls. Pick up app. at Peninsula Children’s Clinic, 902 Caroline St., P.A.

LUBE TECH 25-35 hrs. wk. valid WSDL required. Apply at 110 Golf Course, P.A. MASSAGE THERAPIST Full-time, table provided in naturopathic clinic. (360)457-1515 MEDICAL BILLER Small office, part-time. Bring resumes to 908 Georgiana, P.A. N OW H I R I N G R N ’s and LPN’s for Pediatric Private Duty Nursing shifts in Quilcene. Vent and Trach experience preferred-training available. Apply online now at AllianceNursing.com or call, 800-473-3303. EOE. PHYSICAL TherapistPa r t t i m e. L i c e n s e d physical therapist for outpatient clinic. Varied caseload with an emphasis on or thopedics a n d m a n u a l t h e r a py. Call Sequim Physical Therapy Center, (360)683-0632 RECEPTIONIST Join our team of insur a n c e p r o fe s s i o n a l s . Greg Voyles Insurance located in Armory Square Mall is seeking a personable, efficient, energetic full time receptionist. Resumes to 228 W. 1st St., Suite P, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RIGBY’S Autobody is seeking an experienced auto body repair tech/painter. Collision repair, painting, repairing dents/dent pulling, assembly and disassembly, prep vehicles for paint and vehicle modific a t i o n . M i n . 2 ye a r s exp. and ability to perform with little supervision. Email or fax your ltr of interest to: 360.374.2150 rigbysauto body@gmail.com Support/Care Staff To work with developmentally disabled adults, no exper ience necessary, will train. $10 hr. to start. CNAs encouraged to apply. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. from 8-4 p.m.

PARKS MAINTENANCE I PART TIME

SOLID WASTE OPERATOR III

Jefferson County Public Works Dept Parks & Recreation Division seeks a Parks Maintenance I for a part-time (.5 FTE), union position to work primarily at Memorial Field. The job is seasonal, approximately 3 to 4 days per week for 8 months (March - October). Duties include general maintenance of facilities & parks including athletic field maintenance & preparation for sports, park equipment repair, landscape maintenance & general custodial work. Must have the ability to operate small tractors, power equipment & various hand tools. Job requires excellent communication & cooperation with coaches, event planners, park users & the general public. Minimum Qualifications: High school diploma/GED & valid WA State Driver License; ability to obtain a basic First Aid card & CPR certification.

Salary: $19.90/hour; Union Position; Full Benefits. Applications & full job description available at the Board of County Commissioners Office, Jefferson County Courthouse, PO Box 1220, 1820 Jefferson Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368; by calling (360) 385-9100; or, at www.co.jefferson.wa.us. Application, cover letter & resume must be postmarked/received by 4:30PM, Fri, Jan 31, 2014. EOE

Salary: $15.99/hour, Union Position. No Benefits.

41969628

41966891

Jefferson County Public Works Dept seeks Solid Waste Operator III to work at Transfer Station & as backup at Moderate Risk Waste facility. The Operator III performs duties required in the efficient and safe disposal of solid waste & includes directing customers, inspecting refuse to prevent dumping of non-acceptable materials & performing equipment & facility maintenance tasks that require basic welding, carpentry & plumbing skills. Must have ability to operate a loader, 5-yard dump truck, tractor-trailer, backhoe, knuckle-boom crane & various hand tools. Duties associated with scale house operation include cash handling and using a computer. Education/Experience: High school diploma/GED & 6 years related experience; or equivalent combination of education & experience. Valid Class A Commercial Drivers License required.

Steve Perry Advertising Director Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 sperry@peninsuladaily news.com

Employment Opportunities

F O R K S A bu s e P r o gram is hiring a skilled advocate to work in a multicultural context providing advocacy, public speaking and support group services for survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence. Call 360371-6411 EOE.

Application & job description available at the Board of County Commissioners Office, Jefferson County Courthouse, PO Box 1220, 1820 Jefferson Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368; by calling (360) 385-9100; or, at www.co.jefferson.wa.us. Application, resume & letter of interest must be received by 4:30 pm, Friday, Feb 7, 2014. EOE

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

5000900

The Olympic Lodge is now hiring for a Housekeeping Supervisor Will train the right candidate. Wage $11-$17 hr. DOE. Apply in person at: Olympic Lodge 140 Del Guzzi Drive Port Angeles

Employment Opportunities

E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . S u n . , 9 - 3 p. m . , 1 1 7 Viewcrest. House classically adorned! Mid century modern, primitives, antiques, vintage clothes, dress form, furniture Danish modern. We have an eclectic collection of high end art a n d p o t t e r y, s t a i n e d glass door and window. Go back in time when LPs were all the rage, library of hundreds. Rugs, trunks, kitchen full, fishing tackle, electronics, garden items. So many unique items, hard to list everything. Must see to believe. Bring a bag! Estate Sale by Doreen!

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE The Peninsula Daily News is expanding it’s sales force. Opening for a well organized, creative professional with the ability to develop strong customer relationships. Manage an existing account base as well as developing new clients to meet ever changing marketing needs. Solid presentation skills and the ability to work in a team environment a must. Competitive compensation package including full benefits and 401K plan. Submit cover letter and resume to:

4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale General Wanted Clallam County

The Olympic Lodge is now hiring for a Housekeeping Supervisor Will train the right candidate. Wage $11-$17 hr. DOE. Apply in person at: Olympic Lodge 140 Del Guzzi Drive Port Angeles

I Sew 4U *Hemming *Alterations *Zippers replaced *Any project Don’t wait! Call today for an appointment Patti Kuth, 417-5576. I’m Sew Happy! RUSSELL ANYTHING 775-4570 or 681-8582

4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Wanted A LT E R AT I O N S a n d Sewing. Alterations, mending, hemming and some heavyweight sewing available to you from me. Call (360)531-2353 ask for B.B. CERTIFIED healthcare provider. Avail. for nights and occasional days, for elderly or young women. Refs. avail., serval years experience. (360)683-7817

14TH FAIRWAY OF SUNLAND 3 Br., 3 bath, over 3,000 sf, lower level multi purpose room, large workshop and golf cart garage, well designed kitchen has 2 eating areas, decks off kitchen and living areas. MLS#467295/270840 $379,000 Deb Kahle (360) 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

COMPUTER Care Sales and Repairs 24+ years exp. Desktop/Office/Laptop computers upgraded, free estimates in Sequim. Virus/Malware remova l . D i s c o u n t s ava i l , drop offs welcome. chet@olypen.com (360)808-9596

2 PARCELS Each parcel is 2.09 acres priced at $50,000 each. Manufactured homes are ok. Great potential Nursery or Greenhouse or residential h o m e. P U D wa t e r i n stalled, Great Perk, and Agnew Irrigation. Small barn on lot 3, Located between Por t Angeles and Sequim. Dennis’ Yard Work MLS#272275. $160,000. Pruning, hauling, etc. Jean Irvine (360)457-5205 (360)417-2797 QUALITY Caregiving: COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY 25 years exp., housecleaning and cooking incl., offered with love P.A.: 2 Br., across from and understanding, Se- Lincoln Park. $750 mo. (360)249-0064 quim area. Many local refs. Call Patricia (360)681-0514 CHECK OUT OUR RN has room in private home, 24 hour care, for elderly or end-of-life resident, ex. refs. 775-8590.

NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

81 TYEE SEQUIM, WA 2 br., plus den, 2 bath, 2,596 sf., built in 1974, 0.84 acre lot, vaulted wood beamed ceiling, wall to ceiling rock fireplace, attached 2 car garage is 720 sf., plus workshop/drive-through garage. MLS#272245. $235,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

BLACK DIAMOND AREA We l l ke p t A DA a c cessible home on 1.73 acres with a 1,740 sf pole barn. Sunny, pastoral setting with a small pond and abundant wildlife. The home features a m a s t e r s u i t e, s e c o n d bedroom, office area, main bathroom plus another bonus room. Sunny living room, dining area and the kitchen features an island with b r e a k fa s t b a r, p a n t r y and sliding glass door to the back deck with hot tub. Southern exposure patio. Room for horses and a garden. Barn has water and electricity, hay loft, office and RV hook up. MLS#280069. $229,000. Kelly Johnson (360)461-2153 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

F O R S A L E : M o ve - i n ready. 2,300 sf, 3 bed/2 bath plus a large bonus room. Large living area, dining room, kitchen with island. Mountain view, 1.01 landscaped acres, close to Discovery Trail. Covered front porch and large rear deck. 1,008 sf detached garage with workshop. $229,000. (360)582-9782

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C3

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County GREAT HOME With room for everyone. Open concept living room, kitchen, and dining. Hardwood floors in these areas along with tile counters and an island in the kitchen. Back door leads out to covered deck and a step down open deck. New roof year ago. Updated vinyl double pane windows. Guest and master bath updated with tile counters and newer floors. 3 br., 2 bath on upper level along with kitchen, living room, and dining. Main floor has the entr y, large family room with bar, 4th bedroom, utility room, 3/4 bath, and a storage MLS#280066. $239,000. Thelma Durham (360)461-2153 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

NEW LISTING Great 3 br., + Bonus Rm, 1 bath, 1,448 sf home for starting out or downsizing! Move-in ready with many great new updates! Updated hardiplank siding, porches, exterior paint, fencing, recessed lighting, new interior and exterior doors, laminate counter tops and tile backsplash, and new hot water tank. This home wont be on the market long! MLS#280083. $139,000. Holly Locke (360)417-2809 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

PORT ANGELES ACREAGE Over 5 level acres, property is perimeter fenced, nice cedar framed barn, h o r s e s t a l l s a n d h ay storage, several good bldg. sites. MLS#583025/280078 $169,000 Tyler Conkle (360)670-5978 WINDERMERE SUNLAND “WHATA WATER VIEW!” 3 Br., 3 bath, has great view and deck to view it from. Private back yard with hot tub. Beautifully landscaped. In home m o v i e t h e a t e r. N e a t shop with dust prevention system. Lots to like. MLS#272287. $279,000. Dick Pilling (360)417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PRIVATE CITY RETREAT WITH SALT WATER VIEWS This house has been completely remodeled and showcases views of the city, Harbor, Strait and Ediz’s Hook from almost every room! 4 bedrooms, 3 bathroom, 2 1/2 City lots and much more! MLS#271995. $299,995 Kimi Robertson (360)461-9788 JACE The Real Estate Company

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

WATER VIEW AND EASY CARE This Water View home is in perfect condition, enjoys an updated kitchen including stainless appliances, an awesome master suite with a balcony, outbuildings, and a beautiful yard with private stone patio’s and water features. MLS#272185. $245,000. Kathy Brown (360)417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

505 Rental Houses Clallam County A Business Executive Seeks quiet, affordable, fully furnished, upscale rental in P.A. or Seq., mo. to mo., stating Feb. 1st. Send reply to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#732/Wanted Port Angeles, WA 98362

C A R L S B O R G : 2 B r. , P. A . : 2 1 6 C o l u m b u s W/D, carport, yard, pet Ave., 3 Br., 1 ba, all appliances and W/D, carok. $750. (360)683-8912 por t, well-maintained, DISCO BAY: Waterfront, good neighborhood, no newly renovated 3 Br., 2 p e t s / s m o k i n g , g o o d ba, 20 min. to Seq./P.T. credit/refs. $795, 1st, $900. (360)460-2330. last and dep. 461-9680 or 452-3895. JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, excelProperty Mgmt. lent condition, 1521 W. (360)417-2810 6th St. $1,100 mo. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. (360)808-2340 A 1 br 1 ba ...............$475 A 2 br 1 ba ...............$575 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, gar. A 2 br 1.5 ba ............$695 $1,100 mo. $1,100 seH 2 br 1 ba ..............$750 curity. (360)417-0153. D 3 br 1 ba ...............$750 P.A.: West side, 2 Br., H 2 br 1.5 ba ...........$800 W / D, n o p e t s / s m o ke, H 3 br 2 ba .............$1100 $595, $550 dep. H 3 br 2 ba ...............$680 (360)809-9979. H 3 br 3 ba wrt vw ....$850 STORAGE UNITS Properties by $40-$100 month Landmark. portangelesComplete List at: landmark.com 1111 Caroline St., P.A. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, P.A.: 1 Br., centrally lo- laundry room, 1 car gar., cated, pets allowed. no smoking. $850 incl. $550. (360)809-0432 water/septic. 683-0932.

OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, Jan 26 Noon to 2:30 pm Saturday, Jan 25 2 PM - 3:30 PM

Saturday, Jan 26 12 PM to 1:30 PM

CARRIE BLAKE PARK AREA

1410 E 2nd, Port Angeles

851 E. Spruce St., Sequim

Lovely Del Guzzi built home with large living room with attractive fireplace with wood insert. Coffered ceilings in both living Rm and formal dining Rm. Hard wood flooring on the main level. Cozy breakfast nook in the kitchen. This home is so light and bright. Super well built. Downstairs has a 2nd kitchen/laundry room, 3rd bedroom down, 3/4 bath, plus rec rm. This has been a much loved home. Oodles of storage throughout the home. Lots of cabinets throughout the home. Great neighborhood. 1 1/2 lots. Dead end street. 2450 sq’ MLS#272045 $209,000

Beautiful recently updated 1526 sqft home with hardwood flooring through out, updated kitchen with all new appliances, living room with propane stove, baths with skylights, master suite with double closets, new roof and paint both interior and exterior. Large patio out back plus fenced in back yard. MLS#280098 $235,000

Directions: South on Ennis then left on E 2nd

WRE/Port Angeles

UPTOWN REALTY Vivian Landvik, GRI Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

Kelly Johnson

Realtor®, SRS, SFR Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

41970936

SUNSRISE HEIGHTS

Friday, Jan 24 Noon to 2 pm

41971417

Best deal on the market!!! Like new 3bed,2 bath home w/radiant floor heat, updated kitchen & bathrooms w/tile back splash & tile floors, laminate flooring throughout main living areas & bedrooms, Mostly fenced back yard w/a small patio off. MLS#272099 ONLY  $105,000

41970939

1209 Campbell Ave, Port Angeles

Directions: From 1st or Front Street, South on Race which becomes Mt. Angeles, Left onto Campbell

MOUNTAIN VIEW 3 BR, 2 bath, 1395 SF, handicap access, laundry room, walk in tub, heat pump furnace w/central air. Amazing yard: Gazebo & garden boxes! $159,500. 681-2604.

OUTSTANDING 12TH FAIRWAY VIEW 3 br., 2 bath, over 1,800 sf, formal dining opens to great room, large kitchen with eating space, 2 decks for entertaining, nice landscaping, newer roof, heat pump and appliances. MLS#578852/280024 $269,000 Team Schmidt Mike: 460-0331 Irene: 460-4040 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

41970995

GREAT LOCATION 2 suite medical office, near OMC hospital camp u s i n Po r t A n g e l e s. This is an investment quality proper ty, constructed in 1986, tile roof and a heat pump. The proper ty consists of 3 city lots, and includes off street parking. Purchaser may have opportunity to expand the building, verify your plan with the City of PA. Seller will consider carrying a contract to purchase, via a note and deed of trust, with a qualified buyer andacceptable purchase price. MLS#272306/561098. $399,000 Eric Hegge (360)460-6470 TOWN & COUNTRY

MOVE IN READY VERY NICE AND CLEAN RAMBLER 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1,228 SF, 1979, 2 car attached garage, 0.21 acre lot, cul de sac, nice established neighborhood, back yard very private, fully fenced, newly painted, new vinyl windows, new flooring. MLS#272275. $160,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

GRACIOUS LIVING AT ITS BEST

1401 S Cherry, Port Angeles

Directions: E. Washington St to N. Brown Rd. go north on Brown Rd. to E. Spruce, turn right on E. Spruce and follow to 851 E. Spruce.

Absolutely Charming Cherry Hill Classic. You will admire the spacious living RM with high ceilings and beautiful wood trim. Attractive fireplace with propane log. Formal Dining . Cozy office/Den with glass doors. Leaded pane windows. Updated kitchen with oak flooring, granite countertops, new cabinets. Wonderful breakfast nook. Oak flooring under carpeting on main floor. All bedrooms are large. 4 Bd 2 Bath. 2365 sq’ plus unfinished basement. Heat Pump. MLS#272272 $265,000 Directions: corner of 14th and Cherry.

UPTOWN REALTY Vivian Landvik, GRI Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

Tom Blore

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Classified

C4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

DOWN 1 Be extremely excited 2 Modern messages 3 Devours

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. PORTERHOUSE STEAK Solution: 8 letters

G T B R O I L E D E E T U A S 1/24/14

By Daniel Nierenberg

4 Showed reverence, in a way 5 “The Gold-Bug” author 6 Once, old-style 7 Fragrant compounds 8 North or South follower 9 God of shepherds 10 Whisking target 11 Broad size 12 “The Simpsons” character who says “Okilydokily!” 14 “Got it!” 19 Bring to life 21 Submerged 24 Cat’s perch, perhaps 26 Diner freebies 27 Anxious 28 Glaswegian’s negative 29 Original Dungeons & Dragons co. 32 Brand originally named Brad’s Drink 34 “__ you” 35 One just born

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

K A E S E C I P S K I L L E T

N O R E H C T U B L U E S D N

I C A L G I H E A T T U E O A

© 2014 Universal Uclick

P O R T I O N S U E O C I T E

L E M O N C A R N H I N H F M

L L I R G G M D K L O G E I F

L A R G E E E A S E I R F L P

www.wonderword.com

L L I D R R E S A L A D A E T

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1/24

Aged, Barbecue, Beef, Blue, Broiled, Brush, Butcher, Buttery, Coat, Cow, Dill, Fat, Filet, Flame, Flat, Flips, Fries, Garlic, Ginger, Grill, Heat, Juicy, Large, Lemon, Light, Mean, Onion, Pepper, Pink, Portions, Rare, Rub, Salad, Salt, Sauce, Sautéed, Sides, Skillet, Sliced, Soy, Spices, Steakhouses, Strip, T-bone, Tenderizer, Tenderloin, Thick, Turmeric Yesterday’s Answer: Selfies THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

FUINT ©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

AGBYG (c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

36 Change symbols, in math 37 Wee bit 38 It may be inflatable 39 Father 40 Cheerleader’s shout 43 “Holy cow!” 44 Accompany 45 Spots on a peacock train 46 Astronomical distance

1/24/14

48 Resistancerelated 50 Slangy “Superb!” 51 Corinthian cousin 53 90-year-old soft drink 55 Missouri hrs. 56 Sound at a spa 57 “There’s __ in ‘team’” 58 Prevailed 59 Sign of perfection

PANIDU COIYDI

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 Start of a word ladder 5 Word ladder, part 2 9 Word ladder, part 3 13 Muscat native 15 Rough words 16 “A Death in the Family” author 17 Tech giant 18 Alienated 20 Parts of wedding scenes 22 Word ladder, part 4 23 Buttocks muscle 25 Clothing 30 Deadly biter 31 Bites playfully 33 Touch-y service company? 34 It might be twisted 36 “!” on a road sign 37 “West Side Story” song, or a hopedfor response after experiencing the transition in this puzzle’s word ladder 39 Positive particle 41 Advertising target 42 Like some cereals 43 Filter 44 Political initials since 1884 47 Tut, e.g. 49 Pudding starch 52 Word ladder, part 5 54 Picnic downer 55 Get-together request 60 Blue dyes 61 Word of dismissal 62 “__ kidding?” 63 Part of an address, maybe 64 Word ladder, part 6 65 Word ladder, part 7 66 End of the word ladder

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: APART DODGE FONDLY CURFEW Answer: The animals in the forest got along so well because they were all — GOOD-NATURED

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 1 bath, 1 car gar. $900. Sequim - Dungeness Meadows, No pets/smoke. (360-683-4449)

WEST P.A.: 3 Br., 1.5 bath, garage, shop, no smoke/pets. $975, first, last, dep. (360)477-6817

520 Rental Houses Jefferson County

BRINNON: 2 Br. mobile home, near senior center. $400 mo. (360)796-4270

605 Apartments Clallam County

CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba, no smoking/pets. $500. (360)457-9698.

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent references required. $700. (360)452-3540.

DIAMOND POINT: 1 Br. apt., laundr y, storage, water view, no pets and smoking. $600, plus deposit. (360)683-2529. PA: 1 Br., no pets/smoking $550. (360)457-1695

P.A.: 1 Br. Storage, no pets/smoking. $485 mo., $450 dep (360)809-9979

P. A . : 2 B r. , n o p e t s. $675 mo., 1st, last, dep. (360)670-9418

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pet/smoke. $790, W/S/G incl. 683-2655.

P.A.: Refurnished 2 br. N o s m o k e / p e t s , g a r. $675, dep. 457-4023.

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

HOUSE Share: Room with bath, walk in closet, W / D, g a r d e n s p a c e , quiet. References needed, stable, cat must approve you. $450/month + utilities. (360)582-3189 leave msg.

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising , whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescis sion of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Momma

6105 Musical Instruments

by Mell Lazarus

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C5

For Better or For Worse

by Lynn Johnston

DIGITAL PIANO: Yamaha Portable Grand Digit a l P i a n o. D G X - 5 3 0 YPG-535. Weighted Keys. Includes keyboard stand, foot pedal, manual and disk. Still in box. Never used. Purchased 12/2013. $495/obo. (360)683-3816

6115 Sporting Goods 1163 Commercial Rentals

6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6100 Misc. Merchandise

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

MISC: Flexsteel full-size s l e e p e r s o fa , c u s t o m navy blue and white floral upholstr y with teal stripe, excellent cond. $500. Chair, custom uph o l s t r y, m e d . g r e e n , from 1920s, ex. cond, $300. (360)477-1362.

EASEL: Large Manhattan Easel by Richeson C o m p a n y, m o d e l #887120 “H.” Unboxed, brand new. Retail price $1995. Asking just $1,200. James, (360)582-6905

SEWING MACHINE Singer 1958 Featherweight, works great, collectible. $300. (360)797-1774

TWO OFFICES IN DOWNTOWN SEQUIM GAZETTE BUILDING FOR SUB-LEASE 448-sq-ft for $550 mo., 240-sq-ft for $350 mo. Perfect for accountant or other professional. S h a r e d c o n fe r e n c e room, restroom, wired for high-speed Internet. Contact John Brewer, publisher, (360)417-3500

WAREHOUSE/WORK SPACE FOR RENT E a s t P. A . ( 2 ) 5 6 0 s f. $250 ea. (360)460-1168.

SECTIONAL SOFA: 4 piece, foam green, like new, includes 2 recliners, plus pillows. $400. (360)681-0943 S O FA : I k e a , g r e e n leather, 7’ x 3’. $300. Call for more info and photos! (360)582-3025.

6100 Misc. Merchandise

MISC: 4 piece king poster-bed set, $975. 10 piece cherry dining set, $650. 7 piece dinette, $375. (2) leather bar stools, $120. Frigidaire w a s h e r / d r y e r, $ 3 2 5 . Kenmore side-by-side fridge, water/ice in door, $375. Dryer, $75. Pivoting TV stand, cherr y, $65. Antique globe, $35. Standing bird cage, metal, $40. Marble table, $40. (2) desks, $30 ea. (360)460-9946

BERNINA Embroidery. MOBILITY SCOOTER Embroidery attachment Pace Saver. $400. 6010 Appliances for use on a Bernina Au(360)683-4761 rora QE 440. (2) embroidery CDs included MOUNTING PRESS UPRIGHT FREEZER along with embroidery Seal 210M dr y mount G E , 2 1 c f. ex c e l l e n t presser foot No. 26 and press, near mint. $395. cond., about 5 yrs. old. carrying case. $500. (360)457-5604 $300. (916)768-1233. (360)683-4028 PIPE TRAILER: Big Tex CAMERA: Hasselblad 16’ pipe trailer, manauoutfit. VG to EX. 3 factured 1997, GVWR 6040 Electronics 500C lenses and many acces- 7,000 lbs, GAWR 2,998 sories. $1,600-$2,000. lbs., dual axle. $1,200. (360)457-5604 T V: S o n y B r av i a 4 6 ” (360)461-0860 LCD TV. Excellent conLIFT CHAIR: Slightly S C O OT E R a n d L i f t : dition, virtually unused, with storage/stand. Was u s e d , p u r c h a s e d Pr ide Mobility Victor y $ 2 , 0 0 0 , a n d r e c o n d i - 12/31/13, sell for half Sport scooter lift. Barely used. $3,500. tioned ones can go for price. $350. (360)775-8976 (360)683-1921 $899. Asking only $475. (360)683-5216

UTILITY TRAILER: 18’ tandem, 7,000 lb. with aluminum tool box and ramp. $2,500. (360)681-8694 or (360)460-5282 WEDDING rental business for sale in Sequim (niche market). This is the opportunity of a lifetime for someone to buy all event inventory (from the ground up) for $27,500. Inventor y: dance floor, 20’ x 30’ tent, tables, chairs, decor, chocolate fountain, dinnerware, beverage containers, rolling beverage car ts, 5 industrial size bakers rack. Too much too list. Begin renting this equipment for this years’ wedding events. We are the only rental service in Clallam C o u n t y. O n l y s e r i o u s cash buyers call (360)808-6160

BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection Including Estates. Call (360)477-9659

Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 6081 Bargain Box 8142 Sequim 7035 General Pets PA - Central

RIGBY’S Autobody is seeking an experienced auto body repair tech/painter. Collision repair, painting, repairing 6140 Wanted dents/dent pulling, assembly and disassem& Trades bly, prep vehicles for WANTED: Reloading, paint and vehicle modififishing, knives, BB and c a t i o n . M i n . 2 ye a r s pellet guns, old tools, exp. and ability to perform with little supervimisc. (360)457-0814. sion. Email or fax your ltr of interest to: 6135 Yard & 360.374.2150 Garden rigbysauto body@gmail.com T I L L E R : Tr o y b i l t , “Horse” model, 7 hp Kohler engine, Harrow 8120 Garage Sales Jefferson County engine guard, and other accessories. Need you! $375/obo. Call for more SALE: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. information: Chimacum, take Center (360)417-0605 Road 2.7 miles to Country Meadow Road [Finn River Cidery sign]. FolPlace your ad low signs. Antiques; muwith the only sical instruments; potDAILY tery, artwork. LPs. Full Classified garage: tools, marine, Section on the garden. Much more!

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 1272 Jamestown Rd. Kitchen, bath, living room, sofa, chair, Flow snowboard bindings, men’s board pants, king size antique type 5 pc bedroom set, brand name teen clothes, drill set. Everything must go! A lot more added!

8180 Garage Sales PA - Central

E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . S u n . , 9 - 3 p. m . , 1 1 7 Viewcrest. House classically adorned! Mid century modern, primitives, antiques, vintage clothes, dress form, furniture Danish modern. We have an eclectic collection of high end art a n d p o t t e r y, s t a i n e d glass door and window. Go back in time when LPs were all the rage, library of hundreds. Rugs, trunks, kitchen full, fishtackle, electronics, 8142 Garage Sales ing garden items. So many Sequim unique items, hard to list everything. Must see to WA R E H O U S E S a l e : believe. Bring a bag! S a t . - S u n . , 8 - 4 p. m . , Estate Sale by Doreen! 1400 E. Washington St. #5. 48” Kohler sink, slate HUGE Sale: Sat.-Sat., flooring, cabinets, cabiJan. 18-25, 10-4 p.m. net parts, furniture, moveach day, 105 W. 1st St. ing boxes, etc.

MOVING Sale: Saturday, Jan. 25, 10-3 p.m., 607 W. 13th St. Washer, dryer, dining room set, bookcases, lawn mower, recliner, golf clubs, and more. Great bargains! No earlies.

8183 Garage Sales PA - East

DOG training classes s t a r t i n g Fe b 1 s t . i n Por t Angeles. Basic training and Puppy socialization classes star ting Feb 1st. Classes are to be held at New Leash on Life in Port Angeles. Contact Cheryl, (360)670-5860

GERMAN SHEPHERD MOVING Sale: Sat. only. 2 yrs. old, female, beau9-3 p.m., 83 Orvis St., tiful, smart, needs space no earlies. to run. $250. (360)683-7397

7025 Farm Animals & Livestock

MINI-POODLES: Ready to go Feb. 1st, 3 boys, 2 gir ls, shots, wor med, COWS/CALVES: 2 Wa- tails done. $500-$700. tusi cows with calves. (360)385-4116 $3,500 all. PUPPIES: Mini-Dachs(360)452-2615 hund puppies. One beautiful black and tan coat male and 7035 General Pets smooth one adorable chocolate and white smooth coat CAT: Aggressive 4 yr. m a l e . 1 s t s h o t a n d old neutered male, black wormed. Ready now. $550. (360)452-3016. a n d w h i t e, n e e d s h i s own home. $1. (360)683-5460 7045 Tack, Feed &

Supplies DOG: 7 month old miniChihuahua. $325. HAY: Good quality grass (360)582-0384 hay. $6 a bale. (360)670-3788 FREE: NW Farm Terrier, 6.5 yr. old male, good EMAIL US AT with kids, gentle, needs classified@peninsula loving home. dailynews.com (360)477-9590

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment TRACTOR: Mahindra 28 hp, hydrostatic transmission with attachments, approx 175 hrs., excellent condition. $10,500/ obo. (760)594-7441.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition RIFLE: AK-47. Extra clips, ammo. $1,500. (360)670-3053

10008 for 4 weeks!

$

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Seasoned maple. $170 cord. (360)670-9316 NICE, DRY FIREWOOD $190 cord (360)477-8832

6075 Heavy Equipment C AT / Tr u ck / Tra i l e r Combination. 1997 Ford F250 “Heavy Duty” 4x4: 7.3 Power Stroke with Manual Trans. This rare low milage truck (130k) is in excellent condition and has been well maintained by a single owner. Truck comes with New Tires and Canopy. 2005 Caterpillar 247B MultiTe r r a i n w i t h l o w h r s (104). This unit is also in excellent condition and comes complete with side windows and a front door kit. The following quick connect attachments are included and are original CAT equipment: Auger A14B with 9 inch Bit; 78” Angle Blade; 72” bucket and pallet forks.2005 Trailm a x 1 2 U T E Tr a i l e r . Trailer has very little usage. $58,000. (360)681-8504

other papers charge $80 for one ad once a week. • More space to promote your business daily. • A variety of low priced ad sizes available • 18,000 Peninsula Daily News subscribers daily. 1 column x 1”...........................$100.08 (4 Weeks) 1 column x 2”...........................$130.08 (4 Weeks) 2 column x 3”...........................$250.08 (4 Weeks)

• Reach 41,400 readers daily in the Peninsula Daily News. • No long term commitments. • Daily exposure on the world wide web 1 column x 3”...........................$160.08 (4 Weeks) 2 column x 2”...........................$190.08 (4 Weeks) 3 column x 3”...........................$340.08 (4 Weeks)

EQUIPMENT TRAILER 24’, 3 axle with ramps. $3,200/obo (360)683-3215 GMC: ‘98 C7500 series truck, propane new Jasper engine under warranty, flat bed, lumber racks and tool boxes, Allison tranny. $10,200/ obo. (360)683-3215.

SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: High lift-gate, ex. cond. $15,000/obo. (360)417-0153 SEMI Trailer: 53’ 1992 make: TRLMO. 53’ Semi Box Van low pro 24.5 -75% rubber spare, wheel $7,999 inspected road worthy! Moving out of state! Pack at your speed sell when you get to your destination! Do the logistic-cost-it works save $$ (909)224-9600 TRUCK/TRACTOR: ‘56 Kenworth , new batteries, excellent r unning condition. $6,500/obo. (360)683-3215

only

$100

08

(4 Weeks)

only

$190

08

(4 Weeks)

16008

only $

(4 Weeks) only

$13008

(4 Weeks)

6080 Home Furnishings A L L H A R D LY U s e d : 417-6373 (pics online) $2500-cedar indoor sauna. $1500-wood tables with entertainment armio r e. $ 1 0 0 0 - l ove s e a t with reclining chair with ottoman. $100-46” tv 2 0 0 2 . $ 5 0 - o a k DV D cabinet. (360)417-9245.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

To advertise call Holly at 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

04915

TABLE: Elegant, glass top, 3’x6’, marble pedestal base with brass supp o r t s, t a bl e o n e o f a kind. $500. (360)385-2927

Deadline: Tuesdays at Noon


Classified

C6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9820 Motorhomes

AIRSTREAM: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;93 34â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Excella 1000. 3 axles, nice. $14,500. In Por t Angeles. (206)459-6420. TRAILER: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 Kit Companion Extreme. Small slide. $4,500. 461-6130. MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 38â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dutch Star. 20,230 mi., tr iple slide-out, new fridge, micro., gas oven, queen bed, sm freezer, many extras, Cat 3808, 6 sp. Allison Trans. Book $127,000. Asking $80,000. (360)457-3718 or (360)565-6408.

TRAILER: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;13 23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Visa by Gulfstream. $19,950. (360)681-7601 TRAILER: 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; self contained. $1,750. (360)452-9853 or (360)670-2354

9802 5th Wheels

MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Itasca. Class C, 30K low mi., two queen beds. 5TH WHEEL: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 34â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Al$43,950. (360)683-3212. penlite. 2-slides, great condition, going south or MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;89 Toy- live in the best park on ota Dolphin. Sleeps 4+, the Peninsula. $19,000. low mi., clean, strong, (509)869-7571 reliable, economical. $4,495/obo (425)231-2576 or (425)879-5283 MOTORHOME: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;94 32â&#x20AC;&#x2122; F l e e t wo o d C o r o n a d a . Only 67K mi., good condition, too much to list, call for info. $11,000. 5TH WHEEL: 27â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alu(360)457-4896 m a s c a p e 2 0 0 2 , 3 p. M OTO R H O M E : Fo u r s l i d e s , w i t h F o r d Winds â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98, Class C, 22â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. F250 460 V8 custom HD Gas and electric fridge, trans pull 15K. Interior good cond., trailer hitch, l i ke n ew, q u e e n b e d . Truck 1992 all power, 98,330 miles. $7,200. 85000M. Package ready (360)582-9769 to go anywhere MOTORHOME: Holiday $19,000/obo. (360)649-4121 Rambler 2000 Endeavor, 38â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, (2) slide-outs, 5TH WHEEL: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 Wild330 HP Cat, Allison Tr a n s , 7 9 k , s i x - w a y wood. 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, good cond., leather pilot and co-pilot e v e r y t h i n g w o r k s . seats, 4 dr. fridge with $2,900/obo. 565-6017. ice maker, hyd. leveling jacks, 7.5 diesel gen., 9050 Marine rear vision sys., combo Miscellaneous washer/dryer, solar panel, 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; side awning, satellite dish, (2) color TVs, BELLBOY: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;72 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;19 boat, many other extras! Ask- 1 4 0 H P J o h n s o n â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 8 6 , Evenrude 15 HP kicker, ing $59,000. In Sequim, many extras! Call for de(360)301-2484 tails. $1,995. (360)683-7297

MOTORHOME: Itasca â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;12 Reyo. 25.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, beautiful, on sprinter chassis, Mercedes-Benz diesel, under 5k miles, loaded with extras, Onan gen., inver ter, drivers, door, moor. $89,500. (360)928-3692 MOTORHOME: Newmar 2001 Mountainaire for sale, 38â&#x20AC;&#x2122; with 63,100 miles. In very good condition. Asking $31,000. Call Bill, (360)582-0452 to find more info and/or see the unit.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

TRAILER: Rare resealed 1978 Argosy by Airstream. $11,500! All crevices have been resealed for extra protect i o n w / n ew p a i n t t o o. Stored indoors! Weighs 1,000s less but Same Airstream quality. Interior exactly as in 1978 when it came off the factory floor. 28 ft. Comes w i t h l o a d s o f ex t r a s (awning,sway bars) please only serious cash buyers only! Sequim, (360)808-6160.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9730 Vans & Minivans 9730 Vans & Minivans 9817 Motorcycles 9292 Others Others Others Others Others Others YA M A H A : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 3 V- S t a r HONDA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 ACCORD Classic. Air cooled, VLX SEDAN Twin 5 sp, many extras. 2.3L VTEC 4 Cyl., 5 $3,800/obo. 683-9357. speed manual, new tires, power windows, 9180 Automobiles door locks, and mirrors, control, tilt, air Classics & Collect. cruise conditioning, cassette stereo, dual front airCHEV: 2000 SS Cama- b a g s . O n l y 1 0 8 , 0 0 0 ro. Top condition, cherry original miles! One ownred, new wheels/tires, er! Clean Carfax! New recent big tune-up. tires! Excellent fuel mile$9,500/obo. age! You just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t beat (360)457-9331. a Honda Accord for reC H E V : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 5 7 N o m a d . liability and fuel econo$27,000. (360)452-9697. m y ! P r i c e R e d u c e d ! Come see the PeninsuCHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;66 Impala con- laâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value leaders since ve r t i bl e. R u n s g r e a t , 1957! Stop by Gray Mobeautiful, collector! tors today! $17,000. (360)681-0488. $5,495 GRAY MOTORS FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;63 Fairlane 500. 457-4901 Hard top. $10,000/obo. graymotors.com (360)808-6198 JAGUAR: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 XJ6. Well MAZDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;84 RX7. Al- kept, low miles. $4,999/ ways housed, top condi- obo. (360)670-1350. t i o n , o r i g i n a l o w n e r, 5,000 mi. on new en- KIA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Sportage 4X4. g i n e , w o u l d m a k e a 190k, very good cond., great show car. $2,500. new tires, 25-32 mpg, (360)683-0736 runs strong, nice stereo T R I U M P H : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 7 4 T R 6 with CD. $2,750/obo. (360)460-1277 Classic British Spor ts Car. Excellent runner, MAZDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 RX-8. Top c o nve r t i bl e w i t h h a r d condition, 15,000 origitop, rare over-drive, lots nal mi., black, loaded, of extra original and new extra set of tires/wheels, parts. $19,900. Serious for winter. $10,000/obo. inquiries. (360)460-2931 (360)460-1393

9292 Automobiles Others

CHEV â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 IMPALA LS 4 door, V6, auto, A/C, tilt w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r windows, locks, mirrors and seat, leather int., power sunroof, AM/FM/CD, rear spoiler, alloy wheels, remote entry and low miles. $6,995 VIN#136863 Exp. 2-1-14 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com FIBERFORM: 17â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 50 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA a n d 6 h p Ya m a h a s . CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 Camaro T$2,750. (360)460-6647. Top. 115K, runs great, LAVRO: 14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; drift boat, 2 n e e d s t ra n ny. $ 2 , 0 0 0 sets oars, trailer. $1,000. fir m. Ser ious inquires (360)928-9716 only. (360)461-2367.

NISSAN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 Altima. 4 door, 90k, good cond. $5,000/obo. (360)775-0028 PONTIAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 Vibe SW. Twin to Toyota Matrix, 4 cyl., auto, A/C, new tires, 110k. $5,600. 457-9784.

DODGE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 DAKOTA Ex. cab, 4x4, 4.7 Ltr., V8, auto, A/C, tilt, cruise, S LT p a c k a g e , p o w e r windows, locks, mirrors, seat, AM/FM/CD and c a s s . , 4 w h e e l A B S, spray-on bed liner, tow package, alloy wheels, matching fiberglass canopy, remote entr y, more. $7,995 VIN#214530 Exp. 2-1-14 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Ram 2500. 4X4, service box, Cummins turbo diesel, 5 sp., q u a d - c a b, 2 0 0 k , we l l maintained, good tires. $9,000/obo. (360)775-7703 DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Ram XLT. 4x4, quad cab, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;360â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, tow pkg., runs great. $5,500. (360)797-3326 DODGE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 RAM 1500 ST 4-DOOR QUAD CAB Economical 3.7 liter v6, 5-speed, A/C, cruise, tilt, A M / F M / C D, b e d l i n e r, tow package, alloy wheels, only 89000 miles, very very clean local truck, non-smoker, spotless autocheck vehicle history report. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 2500 Se- I S U Z U : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 4 p i c k u p . r ies. Deisel, ext. cab, 4WD, good condition. utility box, new trans. $2,250. (360)460-6647. $9,400. (360)565-6017.

9556 SUVs FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 Ranger XLT. FX4 Off Road, 6 CylinOthers der, Manual 6 Speed, 5 8 , 0 0 0 m i . E x c e l l e n t CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 Tahoe 4WD. Condition. $13,750. Black, leather int., newer (360)461-2032 tires/shocks, recent mechanical work. $3,495/ FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;73 1 Ton Pickobo. (360)461-7478. up. Flat bed, with side racks, newly painted, FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 Expedition. 68K original mi., winch. $4,500. (360)640-8155. E x . c o n d . , 1 o w n e r, 135k, new tires, ecoFORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 F150 4WD. nomical 2WD. $5,395. (360)683-7176 Eddie Bauer package, All Star bed liner, 132k. $5,750. (360)681-4672. GMC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;95 Yukon. Runs we l l , l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r. GMC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;76 GMC 1/2 ton. $2,500/obo. 350 with headers. 3 (360)461-6659 speed auto new tires. Over $11,000 invested. ISUZU: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;94 Trooper 4x4. Asking $3,500/obo 5 sp, runs/drives good, (360)531-1681 all works. $2,200/obo. (760)594-7441 MAZDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 4X4. Extra cab, 6 cyl., almost JEEP: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 Grand Cheronew tires, has lift kit, kee 4.0. In-line 6, auto, d e t a i l e d i n s i d e a n d reg. 4WD, leather int., o u t , n o d e n t s, n i c e heated seats, sunroof, paint, very good over- privacy glass, roof rack, all condition. $4,500. custom wheels and tires. (360)457-7009 $5,600. (360)582-0892. NISSAN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 TITAN CREW CAB PRO-4X4 PICKUP 5.6L V8, automatic, rear locking differential, 18 inch alloy wheels, hard tonneau cover, spray-in bedliner, tow package, trailer brake, parking assist sensors, power sliding rear window, tinted windows, keyless entry, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, mirrors, and seats, adjustable pedals, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, 6 cd mp3 player, steering wheel audio controls, dual front airbags. only 24,000 or iginal miles! carfax certified one owner with no accidents! This Titan is in the same condition as when it rolled off the factory floor, for a fraction of the price! Top of the line PRO-4X Package! You just wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find a nicer used truck! Come see the Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s truck experts since 1957! Stop by Gray Motors today! $24,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

JEEP â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 GRAND P O R S C H E : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 9 9 1 1 . CHEROKEE LAREDO SPECIAL EDITION 4X4 7 2 K , b e a u t i f u l s i l ve r / 4.0L Inline 6, automatic, black. $20,500. alloy wheels, tow pack(360)808-1405 age, roof rack, sunroof, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r 9434 Pickup Trucks w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, mirrors, and seats, Others cruise control, tilt, air CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;93 S10 pickup. conditioning, CD stereo, N e e d s m o t o r , g o o d navigation, information c e n t e r. O n l y 5 5 , 0 0 0 body. $500. or iginal miles! Carfax (360)452-1060 certified one owner with C H E V : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 8 E x t . c a b. no accidents! Like new Camper shell, 125K, 4 condition inside and out! cyl., 5 speed. $2,600. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find one nicer than this! Come see the (360)683-9523, 10-8. Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4X4 experts CHRYSLER â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 for over 55 years! Stop CHEVROLET â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 9817 Motorcycles 3.5 literPACIFICA by Gray Motors today! SILVERADO 1500 LS V6, auto, all $10,995 EXTENDED CAB 4X4 wheel drive, A/C, cruise, GRAY MOTORS t i l t , A M / F M / C D, d u a l 5.3L Vor tec V8, autoHONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;82 XL80S. 457-4901 power seats, power win- matic, alloy wheels, new $400. (360)683-3490. graymotors.com dows, locks and moon- tires, spray-in bedliner, MOTORCYCLES: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 roof, keyless entrty, pri- tow package, keyless C R F - 1 0 0 a n d â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 5 vacy glass, alloy wheels, entry, tinted windows, 4 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices CRF-150, both like new. only 68,000 miles very opening doors, power Clallam County Clallam County $2,500. (360)477-3080. c l e a n 1 - o w n e r, n o n - w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, smoker, spotless â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auto- and mirrors, cruise conNOTICE OF APPLICATION AND checkâ&#x20AC;? vehicle histor y trol, tilt, air conditioning, PUBLIC HEARING dual zone climate conreport. Just reduced! t r o l , C D s t e r e o, d u a l $8,995 f r o n t a i r b a g s . O n l y NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to CCC REID & JOHNSON 46,000 original miles! 26.10.410, that the Clallam County Department of MOTORS 457-9663 Clean Carfax! Priced un- Community Development, has scheduled a public reidandjohnson.com der Kelley Blue Book! meeting before the Clallam County Hearings ExamSparkling clean inside iner for February 12, 2014 beginning at 11:00 DODGE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 CALIBER 4 d o o r, h a t c h b a ck , 4 and out! Stands tall on a.m. in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courtcyl., auto, A/C, tilt wheel, brand new tires! Come house, 223 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA cruise, AM/FM/CD, alloy s e e t h e Pe n u n s u l a â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 98362. A public hearing is not required for this proMOTOR SCOOTER truck experts for over 55 posal unless requested by an affected party within Aprilia â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 500ie. Beau- wheels and more! years! Stop by Gray Mo- 15 days of the date notice as required by CCC $7,995 tiful like new, silver â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 tors today! VIN#213048 Aprilia 500cc Scooter. 29.45.300(2)(b). $18,995 Exp. 2-1-14 <1,000 miles garaged GRAY MOTORS Dave Barnier year round. Great comAPPLICATION: (LDV2013-00027) The applicants, 457-4901 Auto Sales muter bike with 60+ Arthur and Wanda Schneider, are proposing to adgraymotors.com miles per gallon! Won- *We Finance In House* just the common property line between Lots 3 and 5 452-6599 d e r f u l fo r s h o r t / l o n g of the EG Enterprises Inc Plat, Volume 14, Page FORD â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 F150 XLT davebarnier.com hauls.Includes (2) hel98. The proposal is to add 2.12 acres from Lot 3 to 4-DOOR SUPERCAB 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA mets keys/remotes, 5.4 liter V8, auto, 4X4, Lot 5, creating 3.12 acre and 6.8 acre parcels. owners manual and new batter y! ONLY serious DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 Charger. A / C , c r u i s e , t i l t , cash buyers call. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t 109K, runs great, new AM/FM/CD, Power win- LOCATION OF PROPOSAL: The subject properdows, locks and seat, ties are located west of Cays Road, north of Carlspay dealers freight and tires. $7,000 firm. (360)797-1774 keyless entry, power ad- borg, being with Section 10, Township 30 N, Range set up charges. This is a justable pedals, back up 4 W, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. The pardeal at $3,600. SUBARU: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;84 GL SW sensor, tow package, cels are referenced as Assessorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tax Parcel Num(360)808-6160 2x4WD, low mi., new privacy glass, running bers 043010-530030 and 043010-530050. TRADE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 new Kawa- clutch, WP, rad, hos- boards, matching canosaki Vulcan 900 Classic e s, s e a l s, m o r e. 5 x py, only 50,000 miles, Compliance with the State Environmental Policy Act beautiful 1-owner, non- (SEPA): This proposal is categorically exempt from trike with only 60 miles, stud. $3,000/obo. smoker, spotless â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auto- SEPA, pursuant to WAC 197-11-800. factoy Lehman trike val(360)460-9199 checkâ&#x20AC;? report. Reduced! ued at $20,000 (sell) or $16,995 trade for older restored HYUNDAI: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 Elantra COMMENTS & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Any REID & JOHNSON pickup truck, will consid- Touring. 31K, sunroof, interested person may submit written or oral comMOTORS 457-9663 er any make and model. very clean. $12,500/obo. ments on the proposal prior to the close of the open reidandjohnson.com (360)452-5891 (360)681-4809 record hearing. DCD will prepare a staff report seven days prior to the hearing. The decision on the application will be made by the Hearing Examiner within 10 days after the record closes. Any person may also submit a written request to DCD to receive a notice of the decision once it is made. The application and above referenced material is available for public review at the DCD, Monday through Friday, between 8:30AM-4:30PM. For additional information please contact the project planner Donella Clark at DCD, 223 East Fourth Street, S u i t e 5 , Po r t A n g e l e s, WA 9 8 3 6 2 . P h o n e 332 Benson Rd., adding 12 four-foot track doors at south (360) 417-2594. Pub: Jan. 24, 2014 Legal No. 539565 566590

BUILDING PERMITS

01/24

Clallam County

Donald L. Corson, edge of crush pad, $3,000. Peninsula Housing Authority, 2341 E. Seventh Ave., apartment complex, installing 130 sprinkler heads, $20,243. Stephen Canale, 4223 Reddick Rd., basement bathroom remodel includes tile shower, $8,775. Joanne Dawson, 212 Tanager Lane, placement double-wide manufactured home, 28â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 60â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, $89,000. Lawrence J. Alice, Alice Rd., install woodstove, $4,498. PUD No. 1 of Clallam County, 991 Old Olympic Highway, well house building IRUJSPZHOOĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHKHDWHG PUD No. 1 of Clallam County, 152 Bobcat Hollow Rd., well house building for JSPZHOOĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHKHDWHG Elden and Joan Ross, Jr., 1520 Jamestown Rd., install ductless heat pump, $10,820.

Port Angeles Unavailable.

Sequim None reported.

Jefferson County No permits with valuations issued.

Port Townsend Stephen C. and Deborah J. Moriarty, 1041 Jefferson St., replace six window sashes, $3,500.

Department Reports Area building departments report a total of 9 building permits issued from Jan. 10-16 with a total valuation of $253,917: Port Angeles, Unavailable Sequim, Unreported; Clallam County, 8 at $250,417; Port Townsend, 1 at $3,500; Jefferson County, none.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to CCC 26.10.410, that the Clallam County Department of Community Development has scheduled a public hearing before the Clallam County Hearings Examiner for February 12, 2014 beginning at 11:00 a.m. in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. The purpose is to review public testimony regarding the following permit application: APPLICATION: (LDV2013-00034) The applicant, Mark Hays, is proposing to alter the existing Freshwater Bay Estates in order to create 5 developable lots. A property line will be adjusted with the adjacent parcel in order to create a developable portion associated with the large open space tract. Potable water will be provided by a Group B water system and sewage will be provided by individual on-site septic systems. Access is proposed by 2 private roads to be constructed from Ranger Road. LOCATION OF PROPOSAL: The subject property is located west of the Elwha River, north of Highway 112, being within Section 33, Township 31 N, Range 7 W, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. The properties are referenced as parcel number 073133-320010 and 073133-329040. Compliance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA): A SEPA Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) was issued January 15, 2014 by the Clallam County Responsible Official pursuant to WAC 197-11-340. Within 14 days of the Hearing Examinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision on the underlying permit, the final threshold determination may be appealed with the underlying permit. Contact the Department of Community Development for SEPA appeal procedures. COMMENTS & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Any interested person may submit written or oral comments on the proposal prior to the close of the open record hearing. DCD will prepare a staff report seven days prior to the hearing. The decision on the application will be made by the Hearing Examiner within 10 days after the record closes. Any person may also submit a written request to DCD to receive a notice of the decision once it is made. The application and above referenced material is available for public review at the DCD, Planning Div i s i o n M o n d a y t h r o u g h F r i d a y, b e t w e e n 8:30AM-4:30PM. For additional information please contact the project planner Donella Clark at DCD, 223 East Fourth Street, Suite 5, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Phone (360) 417-2594. Pub: Jan. 24, 2014 Legal No. 539568

DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 1 Ton Cargo Van. 360 V8, auto, A/C, new tires, 42,600 miles, can be seen at Ace Auto Repair, 420 Marine Drive. $6,200. (505)927-1248 CHRYSLER â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09 TOWN & COUNTRY Touring edition mini-van, 25th anniversary edition, 4.0 ltr., V6, auto, dual A/C and heat, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows and locks and dual power heated seats, leather int., dual power sliding doors and tailgate, quad seatin with Sto-n-Go, Am/FM hard disc drive sound system with CD stacker, rear back-up camera, nav. system, rear ent. system with DV D p l a y e r s , A l l o y wheels, roof rack, electronic traction control, remote ent. and more! $17,995 VIN#642435 Exp. 2-1-14 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 Chevy Astro Cargo Van: Good cond, exclnt tires, 94k miles, $6000 obo. (360)477-8591.

CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;95 Cargo Van. 3/4 ton, runs great, ladder rack, ready to go to work. $2,250. 808-4234 or (360)452-5457.

CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 Mark III Conversion van. 4.3 V6, new tires, 65K, great shape, must see to appreciate! $4,200. (360)683-0146. FORD â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 E350 SUPERDUTY CARGO VAN 5.4 liter V8, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, power windows, locks and mirrors, safety bulkhead, spray on bedliner cargo floor, heavy duty 1-ton chassis, clean and reliable local truck. Spotless â&#x20AC;&#x153;Autocheckâ&#x20AC;? vehicle history report. $5,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

TOYOTA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Sienna. 7 passenger, leather, good condition, moon roof. $4,800. (360)457-9038.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

NOTICE OF TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH APN No.: 063022-330240 Title Order No.: 6552740 Grantor(s): JAYNA STORY LAFFERTY, ARTHUR D LAFFERTY Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (â&#x20AC;&#x153;MERSâ&#x20AC;?), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY - ARLINGTON BRANCH. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 20081220032 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 2/28/2014, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: Parcel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;? That portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the point on the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87Âş19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;20â&#x20AC;? East 485.11 feet from the Southwest corner thereof; Thence continuing South 87Âş19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;20â&#x20AC;? East along said South line 95 feet; Thence North 2Âş 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? East 450 feet; Thence North 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? West 95 feet; Thence South 2Âş 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? West 450 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; EXCEPT the South 255 feet thereof. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. PARCEL â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bâ&#x20AC;? An easement for ingress, egress and utilities over and across that portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter and the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at a point of the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? East 286.31 feet from the Southwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? East along said South line 403.80 feet to the Southeast corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence North 2Âş 31â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? East along the East line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter 20 feet; Thence North 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? West parallel with the said South line 387.27 feet; Thence North 8Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? West 178.27 feet; Thence South 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? East parallel with said South line 311.33 feet; Thence North 2Âş 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? East 60 feet; Thence North 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? West 95 feet; Thence North 2Âş 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? East 399.52 feet to the point on the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 24â&#x20AC;? East 481.66 feet from the Northwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing North 2Âş 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? East 5.28 feet to the South margin of the Plat of Brunchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Panoramic Heights, as recorded under Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s File No. 373011 in Volume 6 of Plats, page 23; Thence North 87Âş 57â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 05â&#x20AC;? West along said South margin 60 feet; Thence South 2Âş 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? West 4.62 feet to the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 2Âş 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40â&#x20AC;? West 399.52 feet; Thence North 87Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? West 188.37 feet; Thence South 8Âş 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20â&#x20AC;? East 259.77 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More commonly known as: 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 4/23/2008, recorded 4/28/2008, under 2008-1220032 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAFFERTY, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to JOAN H. ANDERSON, EVP ON BEHALF OF FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (â&#x20AC;&#x153;MERSâ&#x20AC;?), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY ARLINGTON BRANCH., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (â&#x20AC;&#x153;MERSâ&#x20AC;?), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY ARLINGTON BRANCH, (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage, LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $86,437.84 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $265,428.27, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/28/2014. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 2/17/2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 2/17/2014 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 2/17/2014 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAFFERTY, WIFE AND HUSBAND ADDRESS 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such ser vice or posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/26/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n Wa s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c e s / h s g / s f h / h c c / f c / i n d ex . c f m ? we b L i s t A c t i o n = s e a r c h a n d a m p ; s e a r c h state=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Agent, or the Beneficiaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders rightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: OCT. 28, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH A-FN4424326 01/31/2014, 02/21/2014 Pub: Jan. 24, Feb. 14, 2014 Legal No. 538649


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014 C7

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01-FEE-128250 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on February 28, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST FOURTH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 227 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Tax Parcel No: 06-30-00- 022720, commonly known as 518 EAST 7TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/23/2009, recorded 3/30/2009 , under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 2009-1234516, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JAMIE LYNN STROUF AND SCOTT BRADLEY STROUF WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor, to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR USA DIRECT FUNDING, AN OREGON CORPORATION ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by EverBank. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 1/1/2013, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of October 30, 2013 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2013 9 payments at $ 1,340.15 each $ 12,061.35 1 payments at $ 1,258.43 each $ 1,258.43 (01-01-13 through 1030-13) Late Charges: $ 425.58 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES OTHER FEES $ 100.00 RECOVERABLE BALANCE $ 295.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 14,140.36 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $186,925.31, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 28, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by February 17, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before February 17, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after February 17, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: JAMIE LYNN STROUF AKA JAMIE L. SCHULTZ, 15190 BUTTERCUP LANE, JULIAETTA, ID, 83535 JAMIE LYNN STROUF AKA JAMIE L. SCHULTZ, 518 EAST 7TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA, 98362 SCOTT BRADLEY STROUF, 518 EAST 7TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA, 98362 SCOTT BRADLEY STROUF, 15190 BUTTERCUP LANE, JULIAETTA, ID, 83535 by both first class and certified mail on 9/24/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 9/24/2013, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-984-4663) Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc wide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 10/28/2013 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee BRIAN WELT, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4425304 01/24/2014, 02/14/2014 Pub: Jan. 24, Feb. 14, 2014 Legal No. 537531

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-13-587912-SH APN No.: 033019-5801100000 Title Order No.: 130157102-WA-MSO Grantor(s): GRILLIEN S MORRILL SR, SISA L MORRILL Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WARD LENDING GROUP, LLC Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2012-1275949 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 1/31/2014, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 3 OF C. F. SEAL’S SUBDIVISION OF SUB-LOT 4, CENTRAL PLAT OF TOWNSITE OF SEQUIM AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 4 OF PLATS, PAGE 52, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 421 WEST ALDER STREET, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 2/17/2012, recorded 2/24/2012, under 2012-1275949 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from GRILLIEN S. MORRILL, SR. AND SISA L. MORRILL, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WARD LENDING GROUP, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WARD LENDING GROUP, LLC (or by its successors-ininterest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $7,716.20 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $119,110.01, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 2/1/2013, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/31/2014. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/20/2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/20/2014 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 1/20/2014 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME GRILLIEN S. MORRILL, SR. AND SISA L. MORRILL, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 421 WEST ALDER STREET, SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/28/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n W a s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c e s / h s g / s f h / h c c / f c / i n d ex . c f m ? we b L i s t A c t i o n = s e a r c h a n d a m p ; s e a r c h state=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: SEP. 30, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-587912-SH A-4414707 01/03/2014, 01/24/2014 Pub: Jan. 3, 24, 2014 Legal No. 534080

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-13-587856-SH APN No.: 0430073401250000 Title Order No.: 130156555-WA-MSO Grantor(s): GROVER R STARK, DONNA M STARK, ROBERT L STARK, THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GROVER R STARK, ESTATE OF GROVER R STARK Grantee(s): WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2002-1088602 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 1/31/2014, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THE WEST 208 FEET OF THE SOUTH 416 FEET OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER IN SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 101 SPRING RD, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/5/2002, recorded 7/15/2002, under 20021088602 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from GROVER R STARK AND DONNA M STARK, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $5,743.55 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $76,716.77, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 3/1/2013, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/31/2014. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/20/2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/20/2014 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 1/20/2014 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME GROVER R STARK AND DONNA M STARK, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 101 SPRING RD, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/27/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: SEP. 30, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-587856-SH A-FN4414394 01/03/2014, 01/24/2014 Pub: Jan. 3, 24, 2014 Legal No. 534082

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Matt Andersen in concert | This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new movies

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE WEEK OF JANUARY 24-30, 2014


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PS

Show open to artists of all types PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — The “Love Is . . .” show is open to artists in all media, from painting to jewelry, this February at the Local Artists Resource Center (LARC) Gallery, 425 E. Washington St. The intake days for this exhibition are Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 3 and 4, while information about the exhibition awaits at 360-775-9816. The entry fee is $5 per item for up to four entries. This non-juried show is all about supporting local artists, according to the LARC Gallery invitation; no commissions will be taken and any art medium will be considered. Those who

Coming Up page or by emailing turn_ the_paige@yahoo.com. The show’s proceeds will fund transportation expenses for people on the Olympic Peninsula who are living with HIV and must travel to Seattle for care. All styles of performance are welcome, while acts that are upbeat while raising consciousness about HIV and AIDS will be given preference.

Poet to read work tonight in Sequim SEQUIM — Tim McNulty, the noted poet and nature writer who lives in Sequim, will read from Ascendance, his new collection of poems, tonight. In this month’s episode of the Fourth Friday Readings, McNulty will step up at 6 p.m. at Rainshadow McNulty Coffee Roasting Co., 157 W. Cedar St., and admission is free. Listeners are urged to come early to choose a seat and have a beverage; they may also put their names in the hat to participate in the open-mic reading later in the evening. For more details about the Fourth Friday Readings, which are open to writers of just about every stripe, email coordinator Ruth Marcus at rmarcus@ olypen.com.

enter paintings, collages or photography, though, are asked to submit framed works of 16 by 20 inches or smaller. People’s choice voting will be open when the show starts Feb. 6; the “Love Is . . .” art will stay on display till Feb. 27.

People’s choice Prizes for winners of the people’s choice awards include a $25 gift certificate for Colors of Sequim, the art supply store at 139 W. Washington St. To find out more, stop by the gallery, open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, or visit LARC GallerySequim.com.

Cirque Ziva

peninsuladailynews.com

PORT ANGELES — The Golden Dragons, a 23-member acrobatic troupe from China, will arrive in Port Angeles next Friday, Jan. 31, in time for the start of the Chinese new year. In its show titled Cirque Ziva, the globe-trotting company combines dance, music, theater and acrobatics in a 7:30 p.m. show at the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts

May we help?

‘Clowns’ in Sequim

AMITAVA SARKAR

The Cirque Ziva acrobatics troupe will celebrate the Chinese New Year next Friday, Jan. 31, in the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center. Center, 304 E. Park Ave. Tickets are $10 for children 14 and younger, and range from $15 to $35 for older teens and adults. To purchase, visit the Juan de Fuca Foundation for the Arts at www.JFFA. org or Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., Port Angeles, or Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., Sequim. More details also await at the Juan de Fuca Foundation office, 360-457-5411.

Calling comics . . . PORT ANGELES — Performers — magicians, stand-up comedians, burlesque artists, dancers, poets and beyond — are invited to take part in a benefit show at the Alle Stage at Studio Bob, 118½ E. Front St., on March 1. The deadline to apply is Monday, Jan. 27, so participants are urged to contact Angie River, aka Paige Rustles, via her Facebook

SEQUIM — “A Thousand Clowns,” Herb Gardner’s comedy about a New York City television writer and the 12-year-old nephew he cares for, is the next Readers Theatre Plus production, with opening night next Friday, Jan. 31. The play, featuring Ric Munhall, Damon Little, Valerie Lape, Don White and Jeff Clinton, will take the stage at the Sequim Prairie Grange Hall, 290 Macleay Road, for just two weekends: at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 31, Feb. 1 and Feb. 7, and at 2 p.m. Feb. 1, Feb. 8 and Feb. 9. Tickets are $10 in advance at Odyssey Books, 114 W. Front St., Port Angeles, and Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., Sequim, or $12 at the door. Proceeds will benefit Captain Joseph House, a haven being built in Port Angeles for families who have lost loved ones in military service. For more information, visit www.ReadersTheatre Plus.com or phone 360-7973337. Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

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Heat wave

FORECAST FOR PA Andersen to bring blistering blues to Little Theater BY DIANE URBANI

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — One may wonder: What made Matt Andersen, the big bear of a blues singer, name his new album “Weightless”? In the briefest of interviews from McPherson, Kan., a stop on his 60-date tour, Andersen explained. Being weightless is about making a leap of faith. Putting it all out there. That’s what this young man has always wanted to do with music — and his fans have responded. Andersen is well-known for his scorching performances, including the sold-out show he did here last year. Andersen and his guitar will arrive for a 4:30 p.m. show Sunday at the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Tickets are $17 via the Juan de Fuca Foundation for the Arts, www.JFFA. org, and at Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., Port Angeles, and Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., Sequim.

… But oh, I don’t wanna give in We don’t need to be a part of it all We don’t have to fit in. There’s more to life than being one of the crowd … They’ve got the paper and pen They tell me that they’re my friends From now until the deal ends They’ve got the paper But I, oh I, I don’t wanna give …

February 1, 2014 A Vista to the Universe: Bach’s Chaconne

Ticket Information General Admission In Port Angeles:

Port Book and News

104 E. First, Port Angeles ~ 452.6367 In Sequim:

The Good Book/Joyful Noise Music Center 108 W. Washington, Sequim ~ 683.3600

Sequim Village Glass of Carlsborg

761 Carlsborg Road, Sequim ~ 582.3098

Reserved Seating/Season Tickets In Port Angeles:

Symphony Office:

216 C North Laurel, Port Angeles By Phone: 457.5579 Email: pasymphony@olypen.com Online: portangelessymphony.org Tickets are also available at the door.

BACH

Chaconne in D

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS

Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra, featuring Chris Olka

TCHAIKOVSKY

Symphony No. 1 in G “Winter Dreams” Evening Concert PAHS Auditorium 7:30 PM Pre-concert Chat 6:40 PM 304 E. Park Avenue Tickets: $30, $20, $15, $12 Free Admission - 16 yr & under when accompanied by an adult

Morning Dress Rehearsal 10 AM $5 Individual, $10 Family

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That’s followed by “Fired Up”: I’m running nonstop day after day I’ve got it all spent with nothing left to pay I hear you coming from a mile away Oh, how I love that sound I tossed all my wishes down the wishing well Spoke my last words with nothing left to tell You came along to catch me just before Made the rounds I fell You are my saving grace Andersen began singing the blues in Andersen lives for that moment of connightclubs — well, “the bar scene,” he calls nection with his listeners. it — 11 years ago. He was a 22-year-old “The payoff for the long drives, the gaslogger’s son from Perth-Andover, a rural station sandwiches,” he said, comes when town in the maritime province of New he shares his music. Brunswick. And with “Weightless” to be released Andersen chose the blues for its honthis April, Andersen is reveling in the new esty, and for its power to convey emotion. He estimates 200 shows a year for a good songs. On this tour, between now and May, eight years now, in clubs, theaters and fes- he’ll go to the expected places: Seattle, Portland, Calgary, Toronto, Vancouver. tivals across the continent. In 2010, he He’ll also come to Aberdeen in Grays Harbecame the first Canadian to have won bor County, and to remote Campbell River, the International Blues Challenge in B.C. His itinerary, which extends to July’s Memphis, and has recorded a half-dozen Worldfest in Grass Valley, Calif., can be albums now, including “One Size Never Fits” and “Coal Mining Blues,” recorded at seen, along with video footage of Andersen, the Levon Helm Studio in Woodstock, N.Y. on his www.StubbyFingers.ca website. As for Port Angeles, the singer rememThat record is studded with songs of bers it well. love and desire, such as “I Don’t Wanna “It was a great crowd last time,” he Give In”: said. “I’m looking forward to getting back I hear them calling to me out there.” Be what we want you to be

Canadian bluesman Matt Andersen blows into Port Angeles for a concert Sunday at 4:30 p.m. at Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd.


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

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abor

Annual Snowgrass festival to benefit First Step center

The Kings of the Wild Frontier — aka Joey Gish, foreground, and David Rivers — are among the bands playing the Snowgrass festival Saturday night at Port Angeles High School.

Snowgrass-goers are likely to recognize “This is my first Snowgrass. And what Witherow’s singer, Abby Latson, though, I came away with is how eager everyone is to help First Step,” said Matthes, devel- since she was leading lady in Abby Mae & PORT ANGELES — You could say the the Homeschool Boys, a quartet that disopment director — read chief fundraiser gathering has snowballed. banded in 2012 after much success. Mean— at the 42-year-old agency since April. Over a dozen Januaries, the Snowgrass while, David Rivers For Snowgrass 2014, festival has fallen on Port Angeles, bringand Joey Gish, two Matthes has assembled ing bluegrass music in its many colors. of the Homeschool six local bands, with Boys, have graduplayers of washtub ated to the Kings of bass, upright bass, fidthe Wild Frontier. dle, guitar, mandolin “It’s cold, dark, and even sand blocks. FIRST STEP FAMILY Support and dreary, and we They will all take the Center offers parenting classes, a all need a joyful stage Saturday at the clothing closet for babies and childose of bluegrass,” Port Angeles High dren and many other services from declared Rivers. At School Performing its central location at 325 E. Sixth Snowgrass, “you’ll Arts Center, 304 E. St., Port Angeles. There, a drop-in hear incredible repcenter with emergency supplies of Park Ave. resentations of the baby food, diapers and formula as The Fiddle Kids, great bluegrass and well as the clothing closet are open Crescent Blue, Luck from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday old-time traditions, of the Draw, Withthrough Thursday. A drop-in center, as well as the uperow, Good Machine where English and Spanish are spoand-coming, conand the Kings of ken, is also open from 1 p.m. to temporary ‘Norththe Wild Frontier 4 p.m. Mondays at St. Luke’s EpiscowestGrass.’ complete the pal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., “Youngsters to Sequim. More information is availlineup, to begin at senior citizens from able at 360-457-8355, www.firststep 6:30 p.m.; doors across the Peninfamily.org and on First Step Family will open at sula will be sharing Support Center’s Facebook page. 5:30, with tickets Peninsula Daily News the stage,” he at $12 in added. “Get ready advance, $14 at to hoot-n-holler.” the door, $9 for The Kings of the seniors, and free he t Wild Frontier and Good Machine will be o t ic s . mu for youth 10 and under. playing together Saturday night, Matthes ng their in Por t Angeles ri b l il w “This is a new show for sure,” g noted. And there’s a good chance all of the Witherow y evenin said Matthes, adding that Withnd Dillantival this Saturda a n o s musicians will hop back onto the stage for t a L s e e f a s M s erow, Good Machine and Kings of a song or two at the end of the show. Abby owgra n S l a u n the Wild Frontier are the new 12th an names on the bill. TURN TO LOVE/5 BY DIANE URBANI

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Come snow or starshine, the event has raised money for First Step Family Support Center, the nonprofit organization providing help for moms, dads and their kids across Clallam County. For Staci Matthes, though, it’s a whole new ballgame.

First Step helps Clallam families


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

Love: Two new hosts CONTINUED FROM 4 do a double-banjo duet with his daughter Rochelle. ■ The Fiddle Kids, Another new feature: jazz songstress Sarah Shea the six-player ensemble of Port Angeles and Forks- from Port Angeles, are back based filmmaker Vern Hes- after their Snowgrass tand will serve as hosts, as debut in 2013. The band consists of fiddlers Chartraditional master of ceremonies Denny Secord takes lotte Hertel and Lael Butler, singer and sand blocks a break this year. player Imogen Fraser — at Everyone’s a volunteer 7 the youngest Snowon Saturday night, said grasser — plus her cousins, Matthes. The Snowgrass bassist Adam Watkins and money goes to First Step guitarist-singer Elizabeth for its drop-in centers in Watkins, and just one big Port Angeles and Sequim, kid, their dad Al Watkins, a where needy parents find emergency supplies of baby mandolinist and singer. ■ Witherow, a folk and food, formula and diapers, Americana quartet with along with a baby- and their roots in bluegrass, children’s-clothing closet. has Abby Mae Latson sing“This is a labor of love ing, Dillan Witherow on for the bands. It’s humguitar and vocals, Jason bling, actually,” Matthes Taylor on the bass and added. “I have more bands Josh Kirsch on drums. and volunteers than I have Known for their harmotime.” nies — Latson and WithThere are sweets to be erow are sweethearts after had during Snowgrass, too: all — this Sequim-Port As is traditional, NorthAngeles band appeared in west Fudge & Confections November on Seattle’s pubof Port Angeles will offer lic television station, KCTS. refreshments during inter■ Luck of the Draw, mission. one of the longest-playing Here’s a little more bands on the North Olymabout the music. pic Peninsula, ranges from ■ Crescent Blue, a bluegrass to rock ’n’ roll on 7-year-old band, will start Dave Secord’s mandolin, Snowgrass off with their banjo, strumstick and lead West End-bred sound. And guitar; Rosalie Secord’s for Snowgrass, Crescent rhythm guitar, mandolin Blue’s Barney Munger will and singing, Dennis Schos-

beck’s fiddle and Barbara Priebe’s washtub bass. ■ Good Machine is a folk trio composed of banjoist Cole Gibson, cellist Taylor Thomas-Price and upright bass player Hayden Pomeroy, also known for his work with Abby Mae & the Homeschool Boys. Having recently toured the United States to busk in cities from San Francisco to New Orleans, Good Machine is back in town for Snowgrass. ■ The Kings of the Wild Frontier are David Rivers and Joey Gish, who was the fiddler in Abby Mae & the Homeschool Boys. Their sound, Rivers notes, “is big, joyful and just plain silly.” Snowgrass tickets are available in advance in Port Angeles at Odyssey Books, Port Book and News, Strait Music, Sound Community Bank, Necessities & Temptations and at First Step Family Support Center. In Sequim, they’re on sale at Pacific Mist Books downtown, and on the West End the place to buy is Forks Outfitters. For more about Snowgrass and First Step, phone Matthes at 360-457-8355 or visit www.firststep family.org.

Good Machine, with cellist Taylor Thomas-Price, left, banjoist Cole Gibson and bassist Hayden Pomeroy, are returning from a trip across the country to play at Saturday’s Snowgrass festival in Port Angeles.

Terry Grasteit’s abstract work has been selected for the Collective Visions Gallery show in Bremerton.

Clallam artists part of statewide show vivid orange, teal blue and gold, and Armstrong’s “Kalaloch Beach,” a response to the West Coast’s windBREMERTON — The Collective swept rocks and trees. In this acrylic, Visions Gallery’s statewide juried show, Armstrong sought what she calls “the an annual event opening Saturday at unique vibrancy of summer color.” the Bremerton gallery, includes three To be included in the 116 works at artists from Clallam County this year. Collective Visions Gallery, Armstrong Lynne Armstrong, Mary Franchini added, “is a great honor . . . I think that and Terry Grasteit, all members of says something about the quality of art Sequim’s Blue Whole Gallery cooperaavailable to our community.” tive, have been accepted into the exhibition, and they’ve brought with them Through March 1 plenty of variety. Collective Visions’ juried show will Environmental focus stay up through March 1, with people’s Grasteit’s paintings, “GW-Underwa- choice voting to start on opening day ter” and “GW-Faultline,” both highlight this Saturday. The gallery, at 331 Pacific Ave. in downtown Bremerton, is the artist’s concerns about global open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday warming. The first abstract work reflects the predicted rise in sea levels. through Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. And “Faultline,” Grasteit said, “deals To learn more about the show — with population and human responsiand about the concerts and other bility for global warming, and resisevents scheduled today through Suntance to addressing the problem.” day — see www.CollectiveVisions.com Then there are Franchini’s acrylic, or phone 360-377-8327. “Viewing in Mid Value,” a splash of BY DIANE URBANI

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Young Artist competitions set Saturday at PA church BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Chopin nocturnes, sonatas from Beethoven and Mozart, music by Bach, Taktakishvili and Vivaldi: All will come alive, with youthful drive, as an annual tradition unfolds this Saturday. The Port Angeles Symphony’s 28th annual Young Artist Competition and the eighth annual Junior Young Artist Competition give music lovers a chance to hear the Peninsula’s outstanding young players, noted contest chairwoman Bonnie Christianson. These students range in age from 8 to 19, from third grade to college, and will come from Port Townsend, Port Angeles and Sequim to perform for the judges’ panel. The place for Saturday’s contests is Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave.; doors will open at 9:30 a.m., and admission is free to the public. Listeners are invited to stay as long as they like, Christianson said, and they may leave and come back any time as the competitions continue till 3 p.m. They’re asked not to leave, though, in the middle of a student’s performance. A $500 cash prize will go to the winner of the Young Artist Competition,

Manno

Stern

Gailey

which is open to musicians younger than 22; second prize is $250 thanks to a donation from an anonymous supporter. The Junior Young Artist Competition, open to students in ninth grade or younger, will award $250 to the top competitor and $125, again a donation, for second place. At the competition, four adjudicators will offer the students feedback after their performances; this year’s judges are Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra harpist and theater director John Manno, Port Angeles Symphony music director Adam Stern, Port Angeles High School band director Doug Gailey and Phil Morgan-Ellis, director of the Sequim Community Orchestra. The Junior Young Artists Competition will start the day, running from 9:30 a.m. till 12:20 p.m. Contestants will include pianists Elizabeth Watkins, Bronwyn Davis, Tristan Davis, Keon Deng, Lum Fu and Tyler Messinger of Port Angeles and Keith Wilwert

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of Sequim; violinists Camille Ortloff of Port Angeles and Marley Erickson of Port Townsend; cellist Adlai Erickson of Port Townsend, and violists Leah Haworth, Calista Mordacai-Smith and Lauren Waldron of Port Angeles. After a 25-minute break, the Young Artist Competition is scheduled to start at 12:45 p.m., with performers to include flutists Natalie Tagg and Joshua Gershon of Port Angeles; clarinetist Jeffrey Mordecai-Smith of Port Angeles; pianists Cole Urnes, Wei-Yan Fu and Katie Rivers of Port Angeles and Shannon Gordon of Sequim; violinists Selbey Jelle and Leah Marsh of Port Angeles and Kate Powers of Sequim, and double bassist Michael Helwick of Port Angeles. For more about the competitions and other Port Angeles Symphony activities, phone the Symphony office at 360-457-5579 and visit www.PortAngeles Symphony.org.

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113 DelGuzzi Dr. Port Angeles 452-6545

KAITLIN BANFILL

Ian McFeron brings his songs and stories to Port Townsend’s Sirens pub tonight.

PS

Nightlife

Port Angeles

Blvd.) — Matt Andersen (blues concert), Sunday, 4:30 p.m. Tickets $17.

Barhop Brewing (124 W. Railroad Ave.) — Dan and the Juan de Fuca Band (original rock), tonight, 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Port Angeles High School (304 E. Park Ave.) — 12th annual Snowgrass bluegrass festival. Saturday, 6:30 p.m. Tickets $14 at door.

Clallam County

Castaways Night Club Port Angeles Senior Cen(1213 Marine Drive) — Jerry’s ter (328 E. Seventh St.) — country jam, Thursdays, 5 p.m. Wally’s Boys (ballroom favorto 8 p.m. ites), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first-timers free. Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) Sequim and Blyn — Dave and Rosalie Secord Nourish Restaurant (1345 with Luck of the Draw band S. Sequim Ave.) — open mic, and guest Tony Flaggs Band Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 (bluegrass), tonight, 6 p.m. to p.m. 8:30 p.m.; country jam, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Next Door Gastropub (113 Grill (301 E. Washington St.) W. First St.) — Mick and Barry — Dukes of Dabob (Dixie(acoustic rock), Sunday, 4 p.m. land), tonight, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Stardust Dance Band (1940s and ’50s dance), Peninsula College Little Saturday, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Theater (1502 E. Lauridsen

Keith Scott (blues), Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — Club Seven: Billy Shew Band (top 40, classic rock and blues), tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Whiskey River (Southern rock), Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Rainforest Bar: Jeremy Pederson (guitar and vocals), tonight, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Cris Switzer (guitar mix), Saturday, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sequim Elks Lodge (143 Port Williams Road) — Stardust Dance Band (1940s and ’50s dance music), Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., $5 cover. Stymies Bar and Grill at Cedars at Dungeness (1965 Woodcock Road) — Rachael and Barry (acoustic classic rock and Motown), tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

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PS At the Movies: Week of January 24-30 Port Angeles “August: Osage County” (R) — A look at the lives of the strong-willed women of the Weston family, whose paths have diverged until a family crisis brings them back to the Oklahoma house they grew up in and to the dysfunctional woman who raised them. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 6:50 p.m. daily, plus 4:30 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. today and Saturday. “The Book Thief” (PG-13) — While subjected to the horrors of World War II Germany, young Liesel finds solace by stealing books and sharing them with others. Under the stairs in her home, a Jewish refugee is being sheltered by her adoptive parents. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes: 7:40 p.m. daily, plus 12:30 p.m. and 2:55 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Where to find the cinemas ■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■ Starlight Room: above Silverwater Cafe, 237 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. Partnership between Rose Theatre and Silverwater Cafe. A venue for patrons 21 and older. ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883. have trapped the kingdom in eternal winter. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes: 5 p.m. daily, plus 12:35 p.m. and 2:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Gravity” (R) — A medical engineer and an astronaut work together to survive after an accident leaves them adrift in space. In 3D. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:55 p.m. “Frozen” (PG — Animated) daily, plus 12:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. — Fearless optimist Anna teams up with Kristoff and a “The Hobbit: The Desolahilarious snowman named tion of Smaug” (PG-13) — In Olaf in an epic journey, encountering Everest-like con- the second film in this trilogy, ditions, in a race to find Anna’s the dwarves, along with Bilbo Baggins and Gandalf the Grey, sister Elsa, whose icy powers

PS

continue their quest to reclaim Erebor, their homeland, from the dragon Smaug. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes: 4:45 p.m. and 7:55 p.m. today and Saturday and 6:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday. “I, Frankenstein” (PG-13) — Frankenstein’s creature finds himself caught in an allout, centuries-old war between two immortal clans. At Deer Park Cinema. 3D showtimes: 5 p.m. daily, plus 9 p.m. today and Saturday and 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 2D showtimes: 7 p.m. daily, plus 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit” (PG-13) — Jack Ryan, as a young covert CIA analyst, uncovers a Russian plot to crash the U.S. economy with a terrorist attack. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5:15 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. daily, plus 9:45 p.m. today and Saturday and 12:55 p.m. and 3:05 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Lone Survivor” (R) — Based on the failed June 28, 2005, mission “Operation Red Wings.” Four members of SEAL Team 10 were tasked with the mission to capture or kill notorious Taliban leader Ahmad Shahd. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 6:50 p.m. daily, plus 9:20 p.m. today through Sunday, and 2:25 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “The Nut Job” (PG — Animated) — Surly, a curmudgeonly, independent squirrel is banished from his park and forced to survive in the city. Lucky for him, he stumbles on the one thing that may be able to save his life and the rest of park community as they gear up for winter. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7 p.m. daily,

plus 5 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. today through Sunday.

Theatre. Showtimes: noon and 10 p.m. Saturday.

“Saving Mr. Banks” (PG13) — Author P. L. Travers reflects on her difficult childhood while meeting with filmmaker Walt Disney during production for the adaptation of her novel, Mary Poppins. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 9:35 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

“August: Osage County” (R) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At The Uptown Theatre. Showtimes 7:30 p.m. daily, plus 4 p.m. today through Sunday.

Port Townsend “American Hustle” (R) — A con man, Irving Rosenfeld, along with his seductive British partner, Sydney Prosser, is forced to work for a wild FBI agent, Richie DiMaso. DiMaso pushes them into a world of Jersey powerbrokers and mafia. Directed by David O. Russell. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes: 4 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 12:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“The Invisible Woman” (R) — At the height of his career, Charles Dickens meets a younger woman who becomes his secret lover until his death. At Starlight Room. Showtimes: 4:30 p.m. and 7:45 p.m. daily. “Saving Mr. Banks” (PG13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes: 4:20 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily, plus 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

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“Across the Universe” (PG-13) — The music of the Beatles and the Vietnam War form the backdrop for the romance between an upperclass American girl and a poor Liverpudlian artist. At Rose

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Nightlife CONTINUED FROM 6 (209 Monroe St.) — 10th

Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) — Gil Yslas (blues), tonight, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Sarah Shea and Chez Jazz, Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Cort Armstrong and Friends (traditional acoustic), Thursday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Jefferson County Port Ludlow

Port Townsend

American Legion No. 26

The Cellar Door (940 Water St.) — Jam session, Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., no cover. Quimper Grange Hall (1217 Corona St.) — Skookumband with Jack Dunton calling, Saturday, 7:30 p.m. to

Sirens (823 Water St.) — Ian McFeron Band (folk), today, 9 p.m. $5; Omega Moo (punk-surf-rockabilly), Saturday, 9 p.m. $5. Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — Sue Logg (soul), tonight, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Todd Fisher and Dream City (blues, reggae and rock), 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.; open mic Tuesday, 8 p.m. This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live entertainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladailynews.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-4173521.

BULK

Hosts

LOCAL

RainShadow Chorale

HONEY

of PORT TOWNSEND

In concert Friday, January 31, 2014 at 7pm. Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 301 N. Lopez St., Port Angeles

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Alchemy (842 Washington St.) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — open mic Thursday, 8 p.m., sign-ups at 7 p.m., all-ages.

11 p.m. Adults $5, free for 16 and younger.

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Resort at Port Ludlow in Fireside Room (One Heron Road) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Thursday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

annual Strange Brewfest: Lowire (jam band), tonight, 7 p.m.; Swindler (groove), 9:30 p.m.; Joy in Mudville (Americana, rock), Saturday, 2 p.m., Rippin’ Chicken (funk, boogaloo, soul, jazz), Saturday, 3:30 p.m., Polyrhythmics (Afrobeat, funk originals), Saturday, 6 p.m., Lucky Brown and Funk Revolutions, Saturday, 9:30 p.m. Day pass is $30 online at www.strange brewfestpt.com or at door.

Tickets at the door. Suggested donation $15. Handicapped accessible.


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 2014

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

FEBRUARY 2ND

Tailgate Party - Go Hawks $10 entry includes BBQ dinner & more Advance tickets online or at the Gift Shop

Garratt Wilkin & The Parrotheads | February 1st A tribute to the music of Jimmy Buffett

Annual Ms. Point Casino Bikini Contest | 7:30 PM

Queen Nation | February 8th A tribute to the music of Queen

Heart By Heart | February 15th

Winter Wheel of Cash THIS SATURDAY, January 25th 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Prizes on the wheel up to $1,000

A tribute to the music of Heart

STARTS NEXT WEEKEND! Live music at the beach every weekend Get your tickets today Doors open 7:00 PM | Shows 8:00 PM $10 advance • $15 day of show Full schedule available online

SpunkMonkey Upcoming Live Music Line Up | No Cover

Close to Home... Far From Ordinary.®

Tickets available now at these locations: In the gift shop | On our website For more information Call 866.547.6468 | Ages 21 and over The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. See the Wildcard Players Club for complete details. You must be a member of The Point Casino’s Wildcard Players Club to participate in some programs. Some restrictions may apply. Point Casino promotions, offers, coupons and/or specials may not be combined without marketing management approval. Management reserves all rights to alter or cancel without prior notice. You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, to attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.

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SpunkMonkey | Friday, January 24th The Jim Basnight Band | Friday, January 31st The Blues Counselors | Friday, February 7th Erotic City - Music of Prince | Friday, February 14th

Kingston, WA www.the-point-casino.com 1.866.547.6468


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