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Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

November 14, 2011

Small PT printer does big job for state agency ‘Wheel’ tool developed in nine languages

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Jefferson County Historical Society archivist Marsha Moratti pulls a volume from the new wing of the research center.

By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

Research given a head start

PORT TOWNSEND — The slogan “9-9-9” is now used by a political candidate to describe a tax plan. But the triple digits have a different meaning to a Port Townsend print shop. The Printery completed a nine-part job for the state in June, producing a child-rearing help tool in nine languages in just nine days. The final product, which is distributed through the state Department of Early Learning, helps parents judge their child’s development. “There is no training to be a parent. It just happens all of a sudden,” said Printery co-owner Mike Kenna. “A lot of parents have limited access to health care and might not know what to do, so this can give them some help without them needing to spend any money.”

Historical society’s new building useful before public opening By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — ONLINE . . . While public access to the new Jefferson County Research Center building is not yet allowed, visitors to the original facility already have seen an improvement. The front room of the center at 13692 Airport ■ What the Cutoff Road, which once research was jammed with shelves center has: and offered limited seat- http:// ing, is now wide open, with tinyurl.com/ pdnresearch several spacious tables. All the files and reference material that were in the center prior to the construction are still available. However, they are housed in the new building, which is next door, and can be requested for retrieval by a staff member. The Jefferson County Genealogical Society has also been given more space, in a corner of the reading room of the existing building. Turn

to

Inform parents

Shannan Callahan

Printery owners Pat and Mike Kenna show off the “birthing wheels” in nine different languages that the Port Townsend print shop prepared for the state Department of Social and Health Services.

The wheels are intended to inform parents of normal levels of vision, hearing and development, and encourage them to seek assistance if their child shows abnormal behavior in those areas. In June, the Printery received a call from the state Department of Social and Heath Services — or DSHS — for a rush job to complete nine different versions of a “birthing wheel” that outlines normal behavior for nine age ranges. For instance, parents can dial the wheel to the 18 months to 2 years slot and learn that normal kids of that age will scribble, move in time to music and mimic other children. The back of the wheel provides directions about its use, stating that it should be used as an observational tool and not when the child is tired, ill or irritable. Turn

to

Wheel/A4

Center/A4

4 joining local fire service Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Four new firefighters will join East Jefferson Fire-Rescue this week after graduating from the state Fire Training Academy last weekend. Identical twins Robyn Banks and Rachel Banks, and Nehemiah Killam and Kyle Louthan graduated from the academy last Sunday, Nov. 6, after 2½ months of study, physical exercise and fire training. They were among 18 recruits who started the 11-week course Aug. 19. Seventeen graduated in the ceremony in Renton. The 180-hour course meets National Fire Protection Association 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications at the Firefighter I, Hazardous Materials Awareness and Operations Levels. Turn

to

East Jefferson Fire-Rescue

New graduates of the Washington State Fire Training Academy who will join East Jefferson Fire-Rescue this week are,

Grads/A4 from left, Nehemiah Killam, twin sisters Robyn Banks and Rachel Banks and Kyle Louthan.

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A2

UpFront

Monday, November 14, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

First MAD men have rare reunion THINK OF THEM as the senior class of the “usual gang of idiots.” Or the original MAD men perhaps. Eight veteran MAD magazine contributors gathered over the weekend for a rare reunion in Georgia, to be honored by the Savannah College of Art and Design and the National Cartoonists Society. There was Al Jaffee, who at 90 still draws the optical illusion fold-in gags for MAD magazine’s back page. And Sergio Aragones, still whipping out eyestraining and gut-busting miniature cartoons in the magazine’s margins after 48 years. And Jack Davis, who was there at the beginning, drawing the horror spoof “Hoohah!” that appeared in MAD’s debut issue in 1952. Over six decades, they blended celebrity caricature, pop-culture parody and political satire in a way that would influence American comedy from “Saturday Night Live” to The Onion and more.

Aid from ‘Five-0’ THE STARS OF the CBS TV show “Hawaii

The Associated Press

Star

swap stories

Meryl Streep, from left, Vanessa Redgrave and James Earl-Jones enjoy each other’s company in London duirng Sunday evening’s “An Academy Salute to Vanessa Redgrave.” Five-0” will be lending a hand off-screen to military school kids at Pearl Harbor. Alex O’Loughlin, Scott Caan, Daniel Dae Kim and Masi Oka will be among the volunteers helping to plant a garden today at Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam. Husband and wife athletes Laird Hamilton and Gabrielle Reece will also be volunteering. The project is part of an initiative to support U.S.

veterans through community service. The American Heart Association Teaching Garden will serve as a handson way to educate children about the importance of healthy habits. First lady Michelle Obama, who launched her Joining Forces initiative in April with the vice president’s wife, Jill Biden, will be speaking at the base during a hiring fair for veterans.

Passings

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots A SHINY STRETCH limousine pulling into the parking lot of the Dollar Tree store in Port Angeles . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: Do you think Joe Paterno deliberately covered up alleged child abuse at Penn State?

Yes 

No 

Undecided 

52.1% 27.5% 11.5%

Who’s Joe Paterno?  8.9% Total votes cast: 1,654 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

By The Associated Press

CHARLIE LEA, 54, who was the first Frenchborn pitcher to throw a nohitter in the major leagues, has died. Born in Orleans, France, Mr. Lea pitched from 1980 until 1988. He spent six seasons with the Mr. Lea Montreal in 1984 Expos and one season with the Minnesota Twins. On May 9, 1981, Mr. Lea threw a no-hitter as the Expos beat the San Francisco Giants 4-0 in the second game of a doubleheader. The right-hander was an all-star in 1984. His career record was 62-48, with an ERA of 3.54. Mr. Lee had worked as a radio commentator for the minor-league Memphis Redbirds since 2002. Mr. Lea was found dead at his home by his wife at

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

feel intense gratitude,” author Karin Kallmaker told The Associated Press. “I have no doubt that books ________ save lives, and Barbara put BARBARA GRIER, 78, books into the lesbian unia founder of what once was verse at a rate no one in the world’s largest publish- that era matched.” ing house of literature Ms. Grier was born Nov. about gays and lesbians, 4, 1933, in Cincinnati and died of cancer Thursday at realized at an early age she a hospital in Tallahassee, was a lesbian, according to Fla. the Ohio Historical SociTallahassee-based Naiad ety’s Gay Ohio History IniPress was best known for tiative. publishing Lesbian Nuns: She began writing for Breaking Silence in 1985. The Ladder and later “It was her belief that became the editor of the through literature she San Francisco-based lescould make lesbians feel bian magazine. good about themselves and She met McBride, then a find a happy life,” said librarian, in 1967 while livDonna McBride, Ms. Grier’s ing in Kansas City, Mo. partner in life and busiThey launched the pubness. lishing house with two Naiad was publishing 36 other women in 1973 with books a year before a $2,000 investment, keepMcBride and Ms. Grier sold ing their regular jobs and the company to Bella working on Naiad from Books, another publisher of their home after hours. literature about lesbians, “We’re doing this and retired in 2003, because of commitment as McBride said. well as money,” Ms. Grier Ms. Grier was “a savior said in 1993. “We’re getting to isolated lesbians all over to live our lives exactly as the world, many of whom we want to — and make a living. We’re getting rich and we’re happy and what Did You Win? more can you ask for?” about 4:30 p.m. Friday. The cause of death was not immediately known.

State lottery results

Daily ■  Sunday’s Game: 5-2-4 ■  Sunday’s Keno: 02-0307-08-15-19-21-24-26-33-3442-47-51-52-53-61-65-73-79 ■  Sunday’s Match 4: 03-15-23-24

Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) The U.S. Forest Service and Clallam County commissioners signed an agreement in which about $16,000 worth of work will be done to improve Olympic Hot Springs Road. The Forest Service will provide a large bulldozer and other equipment, a powder monkey, a foreman and a work camp of up to 12 men. The county will provide the dynamite and gasoline supplies for equipment. The hardest part of the job, said County Engineer Herbert Pollock, will be from the viewpoint toward the hot springs because there’s a lot of rock work to be done and curves to be eliminated.

1961 (50 years ago)

Visitor travel to Olympic National Park will pass the 1.5 million mark this year, Park Superintendent Laugh Lines John E. Doerr said. At the end of October, ROAD KILL IS now the visitor total was legal to eat in Illinois. It’s 1,427,901 — already reprepart of their new “Meals senting a 32.6 percent Under Wheels” program. Jay Leno increase over last year’s

total. Hurricane Ridge travel through October for 1961 was 190,511. There were 150,846 visitors during the same 10-month period of 1960.

1986 (25 years ago) President Ronald Reagan signed into law legislation that adds Lake Ozette and a 57-mile strip of land along the Pacific coast to Olympic National Park. The bill also realigns the park’s boundaries along ridges and rivers, replacing old township and section lines. The bill, co-sponsored by U.S. Sens. Dan Evans and Slade Gorton, originally included an amendment to turn over the two Elwha River dams to the federal government, clearing the way for removing the dams to improve fish runs. That amendment met with opposition from several sources, including owner Crown Zellerbach and the city of Port Angeles, and was eventually dropped.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Nov. 14, the 318th day of 2011. There are 47 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Nov. 14, 1851, Herman Melville’s novel Moby-Dick; Or, The Whale was first published in the United States. On this date: ■  In 1881, Charles J. Guiteau went on trial for assassinating President James A. Garfield. (Guiteau was convicted and hanged the following year.) ■  In 1889, inspired by Jules Verne, New York World reporter Nellie Bly set out to travel around the world in fewer than 80 days. (She made the trip in 72 days.) Jawarharlal Nehru, the first prime minister of independent India, was born. ■  In 1910, Eugene B. Ely

became the first aviator to take off from a ship as his Curtiss Pusher rolled off a sloping platform on the deck of the scout cruiser USS Birmingham off Hampton Roads, Va. ■  In 1922, the British Broadcasting Corp. began its domestic radio service. ■  In 1940, during World War II, German planes destroyed most of the English town of Coventry. ■  In 1944, Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded “Opus No. 1” for RCA Victor. ■  In 1969, Apollo 12 blasted off for the moon. ■  In 1970, a chartered Southern Airways DC-9 crashed while trying to land in Huntington, W.Va., killing all 75 people on board, including the Marshall University football team and its coaching staff.

■  In 1972, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above the 1,000 level for the first time, ending the day at 1,003.16. ■  In 1986, the Securities and Exchange Commission imposed a $100 million penalty against inside-trader Ivan F. Boesky and barred him from working again in the securities industry. Ten years ago: The temporary rout of the Taliban in Afghanistan accelerated with the Islamic militia losing control of Jalalabad in the east, once-loyal Pashtun tribesmen joining in the revolt in the south and many of their fighters fleeing into the mountains to evade U.S. airstrikes. President George W. Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin continued their talks at Bush’s Texas ranch, a day after the two

leaders agreed at the White House to reduce their countries’ nuclear stockpiles. Five years ago: Gunmen kidnapped up to 200 staff and visitors in a raid on a Higher Education Ministry office in Baghdad, Iraq. President George W. Bush left the White House on a state visit to Vietnam. One year ago: A 21-member Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum meeting in Yokohama, Japan, concluded with a unanimous pledge by members to avoid raising more trade barriers and to roll back those they may have erected in the midst of crisis. Somali pirates released British couple Paul and Rachel Chandler, who were held for 388 days after they were abducted from their 38-foot-yacht.


Peninsula Daily News for Monday, November 14, 2011

Second Front Page

PAGE

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Briefly: Nation

The Associated Press

From left, U.S. President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Hawaii on Sunday.

Obama seeks U.S. jobs, boost to regional ties KAPOLEI, Hawaii — President Barack Obama on Sunday tied the hopes of a faster American economic recovery to the booming Pacific Rim region, saying “we’re not going to be able to put our folks back to work” unless the Asia-Pacific region is successful as an engine for the world. His administration is pouring in time and political capital to expand exports and business ties. The president spoke before he gathered with leaders of 20 other nations of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, whose nations account for roughly half the world’s trade and economic output.

Recall effort kicks off MADISON, Wis. — The effort to recall Wisconsin’s controversial Republican governor is

expected to begin today, although his opponents have yet to come up with a candidate to replace him. The recall effort comes in response to a Wisconsin law passed earlier this year that effectively ended collective bargaining for most public workers. Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal sparked weeks of protests that drew tens of thousands of people to the state Capitol, and two Republican state senators who supported it were ousted in recalls last summer. Seven other lawmakers targeted for their support or opposition of the law survived recall elections. Walker, who was elected last fall, isn’t eligible for recall until he has been in office for one year. Democrats have been working closely with union leaders on the effort, and they plan to kick off their petition drive today. They must gather more than 540,000 signatures by Jan. 17 to force a recall election. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Kurds ink oil search deal with ExxonMobil SULAIMANIYAH, Iraq — The Kurdish regional government has signed a deal with ExxonMobil to explore oil fields in northern Iraq, Kurdish officials said Sunday, putting them in sharp conflict with Iraq’s national government. The government in Baghdad wants to control all energy contracts signed in Iraq. With the deal, ExxonMobil becomes the first oil major to do business in the Kurdish region in defiance of the central government’s wishes. The deal was announced Sunday by Kurdish officials at an oil and gas conference in Irbil in comments carried on Kurdish television. Details of the deal were published Friday by the Financial Times newspaper. The Kurds, who control three provinces in northern Iraq, want to be able to sign contracts with international oil companies to develop their own fields, while Baghdad maintains it has final authority. Kurdish officials have already signed a number of contracts with smaller energy companies, but the deal with ExxonMobil is significant because it’s the first with an international oil major.

expressing confidence that the nation can beat the crisis if its people pull together. His selection came a day after Silvio Berlusconi reluctantly resigned as premier, bowing out after world markets pummeled Italy’s borrowing ability, reflecting a loss of faith in the 75-year-old media mogul’s leadership. Berlusconi quit after the Italian parliament approved new reform measures demanded by the European Union and central bank officials — but even those are not considered enough to right Italy’s ailing economy. Monti must now draw up a Cabinet, lay out his priorities and see if he has enough support in Parliament to govern.

Egyptian blogger

CAIRO — Egypt’s military ordered a prominent blogger to be held in custody for 15 more days Sunday in a move likely to focus criticism against the country’s ruling generals in the runup to parliamentary elections, due to begin later this month. The detention of Alaa AbdelFattah, a well known blogger and leader during the 18-day uprising that ousted President Hosni Mubarak in February, has elicited international condemnation and galvanized those who accuse the army of using Mubarak-era tactics to smear critics. His family has used his case to draw attention to the 12,000 Egyptians who have faced miliHealing in Italy tary trials this year — one of the key issues that have ROME — Economist Mario Monti accepted the monumental brought relations between activtask Sunday of trying to form a ists and the military to a new new government that can reslow. cue Italy from financial ruin, The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Queen

acknowledges the ultimate sacrifice

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II attends her country’s annual Remembrance Sunday tribute to the war dead at the central London Cenotaph war memorial. Similar ceremonies were held across Britain and its military outposts in Afghanistan and around the world.

Senator wary of woes layaways can cause By Michael Gormley The Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. — The return of layaway plans this holiday shopping season is raising concern that the break from credit cards might actually cost consumers far more. For example, a rock ’n’ roll Elmo doll that requires a $5 layaway fee and a 10 percent down payment for a month can equal a credit card that charged more than 100 percent interest, U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer said Sunday. Schumer is asking major retail associations to direct their members to more clearly present their layaway fees to customers. The Democrat said the ultimate cost of a layaway with a $5 fee can equal 40 percent interest over a month or two for many common purchases, compared with the annual rates of most credit cards. He said if stores don’t better present the cost of layaway purchases, he will ask the Federal

Trade Commission to determine whether the increasing use of layaway is a deceptive or misleading business practice. But it’s wrong to compare layaway fees to credit cards and the fees are already clear, a major retail association said.

Opposing viewpoint “It is a leap to suggest that $5 on a $100 purchase is twice the going rate on credit cards, which today averages 14.99 percent nationwide,” said Brian A. Dodge of the Retail Industry Leaders Association. “Layaway is not credit, period,” Dodge said Sunday. “Layaway programs provide consumers with a responsible, lowcost alternative to credit cards that allow customers to buy an item that they want but the flexibility to pay for it over time without accumulating debt. “These programs typically

accommodate a segment of consumers who are either unable to or unwilling to access credit,” Dodge said. “They are remarkably simple and transparent. And unlike credit cards, the fees and terms never change.” Stores have noted that any fee they charge shouldn’t be seen as a windfall. Often the fee covers the cost of handling a layaway account, the cost of keeping workers available to provide items when the layaway is paid off and the cost of storing items for weeks and disrupting what could be a faster turnover. The fee can also be a “restocking fee,” which covers the cost of returning the item to the shelves if the layaway isn’t completed. In addition, retailers say the feel helps reduce the loss if a layaway isn’t completed and item can’t be immediately resold.

Study: New drug cuts deaths, other post-heart attack ills The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — People recovering from a heart attack or severe chest pain are much less likely to suffer another heartrelated problem or to die from one if they take a new blood-thinning drug along with standard anticlotting medicines, a large study finds. But this benefit had a cost: a greater risk of serious bleeding, usually in the digestive tract. Still, some doctors said the drug, Xarelto, could become a new standard of care for up to a million Americans hospitalized each year for these conditions. A low dose of the drug substantially cut the risk of dying of any cause during the study. “Mortality trumps everything,” so a drug that improves survival is a win, said Dr. Paul Armstrong of

Quick Read

the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He had no role in the study, discussed Sunday at an American Heart Association conference in Florida and published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was sponsored by the drug’s makers — Johnson & Johnson and Bayer Healthcare — and some researchers work or consult for the companies. Xarelto is approved now at higher doses for preventing strokes in people with a common heart rhythm problem and for preventing blood clots after joint surgeries. It works in a different way than aspirin and older blood thinners do. Dr. C. Michael Gibson of Harvard Medical School led a study testing it in 15,500 patients

around the world who were leaving the hospital after a heart attack or severe chest pain from clogged arteries. All were prescribed aspirin and an older blood thinner. One-third also received a low dose of Xarelto, and one-third got a higher dose. After about a year on average, nearly 11 percent of those on just the usual medicines had suffered a heart attack, heart-related death or a stroke versus less than 9 percent of those on either dose of Xarelto. The lower dose proved better and safer. Fewer than 3 percent of those getting Xarelto died of any cause during the study, compared with 4.5 percent of those getting just the usual medicines. That translates to a 32 percent lower risk with Xarelto.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Alaska Army wives sought for reality TV show

Nation: ‘Immortals’ reigns with $32 million in opening

Nation: Drought-weakened tree snaps at Ga. Macy’s

Nation: Hyundai hopes Super Bowl ads pay off

A NEW REALITY television show is looking for cast members for “Army Wives of Alaska.” Its company, 44 Blue Productions, has produced shows such as “The True Story of Black Hawk Down,” “U.S. Navy Pirate Hunters” and “Cell Dogs.” Army Alaska is supporting the show and will host the company when it interviews spouses this month. Company co-owner Stephanie Dachkovitch said she was an “Army kid” herself and her mother was an Army wife. She said her company wants to show military spouses in extraordinary conditions.

THE STORY OF Greek hero Theseus ruled the weekend box office, taking in $32 million domestically, while Adam Sandler’s comedy “Jack and Jill” opened at No. 2 with $26 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. The new movies bumped the animated hit “Puss in Boots” to the No. 3 spot after two weekends at the top. “Puss in Boots” earned $25.5 million, raising its domestic total to $108.8 million. Director Clint Eastwood’s “J. Edgar,” a film biography starring Leonardo DiCaprio as longtime FBI boss J. Edgar Hoover, played in narrower release and opened at No. 5 with $11.5 million.

MACY’S AT ATLANTA’S Lenox Mall must cut down a new Christmas tree after the 60-foot, 11,000-pound white pine selected for the holidays snapped while being hoisted atop the department store Sunday morning. Melissa Goff with Macy’s said the store usually selects its tree from a Georgia forest, but drought conditions have made it difficult to find a healthy tree this year. A backup tree has been selected and will be brought in this week. The tree will be decorated between now and Thanksgiving Day, when the store will hold a lighting ceremony, a 63-year tradition.

HYUNDAI MOTOR CO. is hoping that five television spots before and during the Feb. 5 Super Bowl game will help to bolster its rising brand recognition and continue big sales gains from the past few years. North American CEO John Krafcik said the fast-growing brand is working on a 60-second spot that will run right before kickoff, plus two ads on the pregame show and two during the first and third quarters of the game. He wouldn’t say how much the Korean automaker is spending on the ads. Last year Super Bowl ads cost companies about $3 million for 30 seconds.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2011 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Center: Papers,

photographs, artifacts stored CONTINUED FROM A1 The genealogical society plans to hold an open house for its new space at noon Saturday. An open house for the new building has not been scheduled. It will take place after all the artifacts have been moved in, said Bill Tennent, director of the Jefferson County Historical Society, which operates the research center. While all the artifacts will be moved into the new building by the end of the year, Tennent said the grand opening celebration will probably wait until the spring.

“When people come here they will be amazed. No county of 30,000 people has a facility like this one.� BILL TENNENT director, Jefferson County Historical Society

Many of the artifacts were stored at Fort Worden State Park, where they may have attracted pests, and have been transferred to the Museum & Arts Center in the SequimDungeness Valley, where they are currently stored at freezing temperatures. Once they are thawed Huge collection and are returned to the research center, the pests The original research center opened in 2003 in a will be gone, Tennent said. converted church and was quickly filled to capacity Rural area with research materials — The new building proand researchers, according vides an unprecedented to the society’s website, resource for a rural area, www.jchsmuseum.org. Tennent said. There are about a half“When people come million documents, 20,000 here they will be amazed,� photographs and 15,000 he said. artifacts. “No county of 30,000 Available to the public, people has a facility like this documentation of the this one.� history of Jefferson County The research center is includes records dealing usually open Tuesdays with births through through Saturdays from deaths, with church, land, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., except census, maritime and the third Saturday of the other information in month, when hours are between. noon to 4 p.m. Written, video and It is closed the last two audio oral histories are in weeks of December. the collection. Weather can affect Grants and private operations, so phone 360donations funded the new 379-6673. $1.6 million, 7,800-squareAdmission is $4 for foot, two-story building. adults, $1 for children The outside has a nofrills corrugated metal fin- younger than 12 and free ish while the inside is a for historical society memmodern, climate-controlled bers. Jefferson County stuenvironment especially dents are admitted free by designed to preserve the prior arrangement. museum’s collection. For information on the Larger items such as an old hearse will be stored on historical society, see www. the first floor, which also jchsmuseum.org. contains a loading dock ________ that provides an air-lockJefferson County Reporter style opening, where arti- Charlie Bermant can be reached facts can be fumigated so at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. that pests don’t threaten bermant@peninsuladailynews. com. the entire collection.

JEFF CHEW/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

City Manager Steve Burkett and Finance Manager Sue Hagener confer in the newly remodeled front office of Sequim City Hall.

Sequim City Hall remodeled PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Newly completed remodeling work on the interior of City Hall is expected to be approved when the City Council meets tonight. The Sequim City Council will consider accepting the work at its 6 p.m. meeting in its chambers at the Transit Center at 190 W. Cedar St. The $38,516 contract job by Maple View Enterprises of Sequim added lunch and conference rooms to the City Hall building at 152 W. Cedar St. and gives the entrance a more open and customer friendly look and feel, said

CONTINUED FROM A1 read onto a 10-inch diameter card. “We couldn’t be off by a If the children aren’t acting normally, the wheel pro- millimeter.� In June, the Printery vides a contact number for the Family Health Hotline was invited to bid on the (800-322-2588) to deter- camera-ready job, which mine what the situation would pay about $25,000 and be distributed throughrequires. out the state. The job, however, needed ‘It wasn’t easy’ to be completed by July 1 The job was a challenge, — nine days away — or the according to Printery co- Printery wouldn’t get paid. owner Pat Kenna. The rush was attribut“It wasn’t easy,� she said. able to the fact that the “Working on a tight grant paying for the service deadline, we had to format was about to expire. complex language informaMike Kenna said that he tion in text big enough to didn’t know why DSHS

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CONTINUED FROM A1 given to those who go above and beyond to help others, Killam received two hon- Beezley said. Killam also received the ors recognizing his accomplishments while at the First Due Engine Award, academy, said Bill Beezley, presented to a select few spokesman for the fire who, in the opinion of the academy instructors, are department. He was first among the ready to be hired on immedirecruits to receive the Bull- ately and who, Killam said, dog Award, a weekly award “know their stuff.�

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two parts took four days because it needed to be done by hand using metal grommets, Mike Kenna said. The wheel is printed on durable cardboard, so it’s likely that it could remain intact during the six years that it is in use, he said. The finished product is available statewide from the Department of Early Learning, 360-725-3500.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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Killam was one of only ter shape, but it was a good four of the 17 graduates who wake-up before we hit the books.â€? received this award. Their work wasn’t limited to weekends, Beezley Long days said. The four students trainEach candidate had up to ing for East Jefferson Fire- 24 hours of individual study Rescue left Port Townsend and skills practice during each Friday afternoon and the week. drove together to the academy in North Bend, arriving Work paid off before class began at 6 p.m. The four agreed that all After several hours of instruction that evening, the work paid off. “Not only do I know so they were back up at 6 a.m. Saturday for an hour of much more, but I’m also physical exercise before a much more confident in my day of classroom instruction, fire behavior and control drills and fire exercises that knowledge,â€? Rachel Banks said. ended at 6 p.m. Her sister Robyn agreed, This routine repeated adding, “I really enjoyed the itself each Sunday. “The PE really helped in search and rescue training. “They blindfolded us and several ways,â€? Killam said. “Not only did I get in bet- had us go through a house, room-by-room, to find a dummy representing an unconscious person. “That was my favorite part.â€? Louthan was nervous about the final practical drill. “It was tough to remember all we had learned, plus following protocol while COMPARE T HESE FEATURES using the radio,â€? he said. • Spacious dining room offering nutrionally balanced meals “It all came together, thoughâ€? • Light housekeeping bi-weekly including changing bed linens Louthan and Robyn • Activities and social programs Banks already have their emergency medical techni• Theater cian certifications, while • Beauty and Barber shop Rachel Banks and Killam • Transportation for shopping will attend EMT school trips, doctor visits, etc. beginning in January, Beez• Wellness clinic ley said. • Emergency call in each apartment Other departments with candidates in the academy • Beautiful landscaped grounds were Central Kitsap Fire Rent is 30% of and Rescue, King County your adjusted income. International Airport-Airand includes ultilities, except craft Rescue Firefighting, for phone & cable TV. North Whatcom Fire and SERVICE FEES $391/MONTH Rescue, Pierce County Fire INCOME LIMITS APPLY District No. 27 and Snoqualmie Pass Fire & Rescue. VISIT US TODAY YOU COULD BE ENJOYING YOUR For more information RETIREMENT YEARS RIGHT NOW ! about the academy, see 360-681-3800 TDD 711 www.wsp.wa.gov and click 251 S.FIFTH AVE. SEQUIM on State Fire Marshal. suncrestvillage@legacysrliving.com 095096601

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waited until the last minute to call for bids. “With a government agency, you never know what they’re thinking,� he said. The job included 45,000 copies of the wheel in nine languages; English, Spanish. Russian, Korean, Cantonese, Russian, Vietnamese, Japanese and Laotian. The data files were supplied to the printery in two parts, a spin top with a view window and a two-sided information circle. The printing took five days while attaching the

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The remodeling also involved the rearrangement of walls, new paint, lighting and counter space. The city engineer and facilities manager said the work meets all contract specifications. Burkett said the city is expected to sign a purchase and sale agreement sometime this week for new City Hall land, a $1.25 million deal for 22,000 square feet at the corner of North Sequim Avenue and West Cedar Street. The property is owned by Serenity House and includes commercial space for Serenity House, a hair salon and a 10-unit apartment complex for transitional housing.

Wheel: 45,000 copies produced

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City Manager Steve Burkett. A disabled-accessible counter was added to the remodeled service counter. Burkett, whose office was moved from the back of the building to the front facing West Cedar Street, said the remodeling will meet the city’s immediate needs until a new City Hall is built within the next two to five years. The city’s human resources office was moved back to City Hall from the remodeled city annex space at Sequim Village Plaza, next to the police station. A new room is available for handling passport applications and other city-related work.

BY JEFF CHEW


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Weatherization program for homes may grow By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Power Resources Manager Phil Lusk, because it helps reduce the cost of energy for some of the city’s poorest residents. “It’s equivalent to plugging up the hole in a bucket,” he said. The city has weatherized between 70 and 100 homes over the past three years, Lusk said. The head of Ministry Assisting Neighbors in Need of Agape, which helps struggling Clallam County residents with their utility bills, welcomed the news. “There’s no question there’s a lot of houses for low-income people in town that need weatherization,” Rick Dunlap said. “You can just look at their utility bills and see that.” For more information, phone Lusk at 360417-4703.

PORT ANGELES — The city of Port Angeles plans to expand its home weatherization program by about 40 residences next year. With the help of a Bonneville Power Administration grant, the city has another $200,000 to spend on insulating low-income homes. Currently, the program, which pays for the entire cost of weatherizing, is only for those who participate in the city’s utility discount program for low-income seniors and low-income disabled adults. The city plans to use the additional funds to weatherize homes owned by low-income residents who are not eligible for that program. _______ The only requirement is that the home be Reporter Tom Callis can be owned by the resident. reached at 360-417-3532 or at The program is tom.callis@peninsuladaily news.com. important, said city

A discovery: Park passes not cash cow

Monday, November 14, 2011

A5

Prevention Works! role helps earn lifetime award By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Florence Bucierka, a recently retired Clallam County Health and Human Services planner, received a lifetime achievement award for her work in substance abuse prevention. Bucierka, who retired in July after 13 years with the county, earned the state Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery award at the Washington State Prevention Summit in Yakima in Oct. 28. “I was surprised,” Bucierka said in a Friday telephone interview. “The nomination came from several people at the state level. Often, it’s a local coalition. I was very humbled.”

Prevention Works! Clallam County Treatment Coordinator Jude Anderson said Bucierka played a pivotal role in the development of Prevention Works!, a community coalition devoted to fostering healthy children and families in the county. Bucierka said the coalition has “lots and lots of talented volunteers.” “Our community is very fortunate to have so many talented people and businesses, and our three commissioners, that really believe in prevention who have stepped up to the plate,” Bucierka said.

Coalition is the key

Florence Bucierka, second from right, holds her state Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery award while standing with, from left, Brittney Henry, 2011 Miss Washington; David Dickinson, the division’s director; and state Attorney General Rob McKenna. A hallmark of the county program so far has been cooperation among the partners.

Grant preparation

District state Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam, whose mental health sales tax has supported prevention and treatment programs statewide since 2007. Hargrove represents Clallam, Jefferson and a portion of Grays Harbor County. “You do get a really good return working in prevention,” Bucierka said. “It will be most unfortunate if treatment or prevention dollars are cut.” Bucierka moved to Sequim with her husband, Michael, in 1997. “I couldn’t have done this without his support,” she said. The couple intends to remain on the North Olympic Peninsula.

“I’ve been working on other community projects as a volunteer,” she said. Anderson said Bucierka’s retirement had nothing to do with budget cuts at the county. Fifteen county employees are being laid off on Nov. 30. “My area is treatment, and we’re in the process of filling that prevention role,” Anderson explained. Bucierka said she was often the envy of health services planners across the state because of the support she received from the coalition and county officials. “I’m very thankful for having the opportunity to work in this incredible community,” Bucierka said. “I will continue to do so,”

Additionally, Bucierka brought the county more than $1 million in state and federal grants that she prepared for prevention programs, Anderson said. “It was a terrific honor, and very well-deserved,” Anderson said of her former colleague’s recent recognition. With the current recession and resulting budget cuts, drug and alcohol prevention and treatment programs are in danger of being slashed. Bucierka warned that cutting millions in preven________ tion programs may cost bil- Remain active lions in future incarceraReporter Rob Ollikainen can be Bucierka said she will reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. tions costs, not to mention the effect on people, citing remain active in prevention ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com. statistics provided by 24th programs.

“I could have never done ing their license tabs, which the kind of work I’ve done they have been able to do in Clallam County by only since late August when myself. TACOMA — Sales of a notices went out to drivers “One person can’t do parking pass for state lands whose tabs expired in Octo- what a coalition can do.” — the Discover Pass — are ber. Prevention Works! has not raising the cash officials more than 250 members expected. from various Clallam Revenue so far Disappointing sales of a County agencies, business, new parking pass in its first The passes brought in schools, organizations and three months leave the $6.5 million from July 1 to citizens. state parks system staring Sept. 30, with parks taking at an uncertain future, The the biggest share at 84 per(Tacoma) News Tribune cent and the rest divided reported in Sunday’s news- equally between the FOR OLD COINS Department of Natural Peninsula Daily News paper. Fair, a bake sale and Santa’s for the Greywolf Elementary If the program fails in Resources and the DepartKitchen provided by Old School PTA. SEQUIM — The Greythe long run, the state ment of Fish and Wildlife. Post Office Sweets and Gifts. For more information, wolf Elementary Holiday The state hopes to raise parks agency says it would The event is a fundraiser phone 360-990-6055. have to find new money or at least $64 million in the Bazaar will be held at the school, 171 Carlsborg Road, close most of the state’s 116 first two years. State parks officials con- from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturparks. day and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. On the North Olympic cluded from surveys that’s Sunday. Peninsula, state parks are how much visitors would The event will include Sequim Bay State Park, pay. more than 60 handicrafts Fort Flagler near Port Join us for lunch and Turn to Discovery/A6 booths, a Scholastic Book Townsend, Bogachiel State enjoy our hot and Park near Forks and Fort toasty homemade Where the rubber meets the road with Worden State Park. With certain exceptions, bread bowls with a the pass is required on vehiside salad cles during visits to state Monday-Thursday 11:30am-9:00pm parks — which receive the As low as a.p.r** Friday 11:30am-10:00pm • Saturday 4:00pm-10:00pm greatest share of the reve1527 E. 1st, PA • 360-457-4113 Sunday 9:00am-1:30pm & 4:00pm-9:00pm nue — boat launches, heriPurchase or refinance a new or used car or truck tage sites, wildlife and natand drive down your interest rate. ural areas, trails and trailheads managed by the state Call 360-385-3663 for details Offering The MOST Comprehensive Range Of Parks and Recreation Commission, the state Depart**Annual Percentage Rate – Subject to credit approval, some fees Assisted Living Services Available On The Peninsula and restrictions apply. Other rates and terms available and may ment of Natural Resources change at any time. and the state Department • 24 Hour In-House Nurses of Fish and Wildlife. • Daily Care Support If purchased at a Welcome All Ages • New & Medicare Patients manned state park office or • Short Term Support kiosk, the annual Discover • Delicious Food Choices Pass costs $30 per vehicle — with permits not trans• Various Apartment Sizes ferable between vehicles — and daily passes are $10. The passes are $35 and $11.50 at www.discover pass.wa.gov or by phone at 550 W. Hendrickson, Sequim • 360.683.3348 866-320-9933 from outlets www.SherwoodAssistedLiving.com Rachel Swett that sell hunting and fishKatherine Ottaway, MD Office Manager ing licenses. We help you clarify your personal health care priorities. The fine for using state Wellness & screening through all of life's stages. property without a pass is $99. Quimper Family Medicine Some officials hope sales 2120 Lawrence St., Por t Townsend • 360-385-3826 of the pass will improve during its first spring. The Associated Press and Peninsula Daily News

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But they worry people will continue to dislike the parking pass because it can’t be transferred from one car to another. That issue should come before the state Legislature this winter. “I heard from dozens of people personally that just said, ‘I’m not buying it,’” said state Sen. Kevin Ranker, who is writing a proposed update to the law he sponsored that created the pass. Other factors could pull Discovery Pass sales numbers down or up: weather, more aggressive marketing and an option for drivers to buy the pass when renew-

We’re having an


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Monday, November 14, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Forks City Council tackles 2012 budget Dahlgren annexation also on agenda for today’s sessions By Arwyn Rice

Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — The City Council will hold a budget workshop at 5:30 this afternoon, before the regularly scheduled 7 p.m. council meeting during which decisions will be made on the

on their department’s budgets. But this year, it will be a line-item by line-item council review of the entire Dahlgren annexation and expense budget, Monohon said. property taxes. “We’ll flat out go right through the budget,” Mayor Formal hearing Bryon Monohon said SunA formal budget hearing day. will be held at the 7:30 p.m. In the past, Forks coun- meeting after the workshop. cils have had department Pizza and soda will be on heads make presentations hand for those who attend

the workshop session. The budget is expected to be finalized and approved at the chamber’s Dec. 5 meeting. At the 7:30 p.m. regular meeting, a final decision will be made after a public hearing on the Dahlgren annexation. The annexation, covering 158.5 acres, has been in the works since spring. It was delayed after land identified as being part of the Dahl-

gren parcel was found to actually belong to another owner. The other landowner had to agree to the annexation before the city could continue.

Property tax rate

The council will also _________ review and vote on the propReporter Arwyn Rice can be erty tax rate, which by law reached at 360-417-3535 or at can be raised by 1 percent arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. each year. com.

Discovery: Day-use pass more popular

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Continued from A5 Seasonal differences aside, that’s an average of $2.7 million a month. Proceeds met that goal in July but dipped below it in August and then plummeted in September as summer faded. Sales of $30 annual passes are the problem, not the $10 day-use passes. Officials had estimated about three drivers would pay for a full year for every two who paid for a single day. In practice, the day passes are selling better. More than 156,000 annual passes were sold in three months, but day passes beat projections with more than 185,000 sold.

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Cheaper option Plenty of drivers hearing about the pass for the first time upon arriving in the woods decide to take the cheaper option, said Jennifer Quan, manager of Fish and Wildlife’s Lands Division. “A lot of people didn’t know they needed the pass,” Quan said. As the program goes on, she predicted, it won’t be such a surprise and drivers may plan ahead. Those who already hold certain types of fishing and hunting licenses — along with people camping in state parks — are among the many exemptions from the pass requirements, which are listed at www. discoverpass.wa.gov. In Oregon, the daily fee is still by far the most popular option 18 years after the state debuted an annual pass. Day passes are cheaper there, at $5. Some may park and bet they won’t be caught. DNR, which manages places such as Mount Si, Tiger Mountain and Capitol State Forest, has handed out just six tickets to violators. The agency has just eight officers to cover 1.9 million acres of Discover Pass territory statewide. It has “focused on education and compliance” by talking to thousands of drivers, spokesman Bryan Flint said. Park rangers and Fish and Wildlife police officers have together handed out more than 2,900 tickets. Revenue goes to the courts.

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Fiery crash kills two in Seattle The Associated Press

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Monohon said the city did not take the allowable 1 percent tax increase last year, and is unlikely to take it this year either. The council also will discuss water adjustment fees, medical and dental insurance for city employees and a taxi license request.

11/8/11 PM 11/8/113:15 3:15 PM

SEATTLE — At least two people died and three others were injured Sunday after a traffic crash and fire on a Seattle street. A sport utility vehicle traveling at high speed smashed into the back end of a small car on Lake City Way Northeast near the Northeast 110th Street intersection, Seattle Fire Department spokesman Kyle Moore told The Seattle Times. The car had stopped for a traffic light. The car caught fire and two people inside died. The SUV also burned, and three people inside were transported to Harborview Medical Center. The SUV driver, a man in his 40s, sustained lifethreatening injuries.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Monday, November 14, 2011

A7

Group ‘occupies’ Forks Bank of America By Arwyn Rice

Occupiers evicted in Portland

Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — Seventeen people “occupied” Forks over the weekend, standing in front of the Bank of America branch Saturday in pouring rain. “We got a lot of thumbs up and honking,” said Occupy Forks organizer Patt Doyle. “We only got one finger, and one thumbs down.

The Associated Press

The ‘99 percent’ Doyle and friend Linda Middleton organized the Occupy Forks protest in support of the national movement of the “99 percent” — purportedly the regular working population — in protest of corporate influence on the U.S. government. Patt Doyle The location was selected because Bank of America Occupy Forks demonstrators gather near the Bank of American branch, which was selected has the only large corporate because it is the only big U.S. corporate presence in the city and because of the company’s role presence in Forks, she said. in the current financial crisis. The branch will close in January as part of a wave of There were several older The second rally will be corporate service center clohe protest isn’t against the people who people who sat in their cars in support of a planned Nov. sures across the U.S. work inside, most of whom will be laid off nearby who showed up for 27 rally in Olympia aimed the protest and stayed to at state legislators meeting when the branch closes, organizer Patt Layoffs pending support it but were unable that week for an emergency to withstand the elements, budget session. The protest isn’t against Doyle said. “They’re totally the 99 percent.” she said. the people who work inside, ________ A second Occupy Forks most of whom will be laid Reporter Arwyn Rice can be hoped, considering the size rally is planned for noon reached at 360-417-3535 or at off when the branch closes, percent,” she said. The turnout of 17 was of the town and the bad Nov. 26 at the same loca- arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. Doyle said. com. tion, Doyle said. “They’re totally the 99 better than Doyle had weather, she said.

T

PORTLAND, Ore. — Several hundred protesters, some wearing goggles and gas masks, marched past authorities in a downtown street Sunday, hours after riot police drove Occupy Portland demonstrators out of a pair of weeks-old encampments in nearby parks. Police moved in shortly before noon and drove protesters into the street after dozens remained in the camp in defiance city officials. Mayor Sam Adams had ordered that the camp shut down Saturday at midnight, citing unhealthy conditions and the encampment’s attraction of drug users and thieves. Turn

to

Occupy/A8

Ex-Sequim police chief could get Mississippi post Peninsula Daily News news sources

The Columbus, Miss., City Council is expected to hear a recommendation on Tuesday for hiring a police chief out of a field of four finalists that includes former Sequim Police Chief Robert Spinks. The Commercial Dispatch reported Saturday that Columbus Chief Operating Officer David Armstrong and Human Resource Director Pat Mitchell are slated to give the report of the police chief

search subcommittee at the council meeting Tuesday evening, which will begin at 3 p.m. Pacific Standard Time. “We decided at the last meeting that we should have everything concluded . . . And then it’ll be up to [the council] to decide what they want to do from there,” Armstrong told the newspaper. Armstrong said he has “no idea” when the council will begin interviews. “We’re just going to make a presentation. That’ll be totally up to

them,” he said. Columbus Mayor Robert Smith has said he hopes to have the entire process complete and a new police chief selected by midDecember.

3 others at the top Besides Spinks, 52, the top selections are Curtis Brame of North Chicago, Ill.; Nathaniel Clark of Albany, Ga.; and Selvain McQueen of Columbus. Spinks was notified Oct. 17 that he was a finalist for the position.

He said then that he appreciated “the interest voiced by city of Columbus, Miss., because it is a very active community of 25,000, with a very strong economy. “But the employment process is a two-way process, too,” he added. “In my case, I am also evaluating potential employers, too.” Sequim City Manager Steve Burkett asked Spinks to resign in May 2010 after their management styles clashed. Spinks left the position July 2 without a new job.

He has sought work in law enforcement since. Spinks’ salary was $86,299 plus benefits when he left the job. Spinks, who lives in Sequim with his wife, Connie, worked as Sequim police chief from February 2005 to June 2010. He has been teaching online classes in victimology and criminology for Everest University and serves on the boards of the Sequim Senior Activity Center and Olympic Community Action Programs and is involved in the

Sequim Senior Meals Program. He is a part of the nonprofit KSQM-FM 91.5 radio management team, where he is an announcer. He also writes a column for the weekly Sequim Gazette. He last was a finalist for the Indiana University of Pennsylvania police chief position. Spinks has about 30 years of policing experience. Spinks earned a master’s degree in criminal justice in 2005 from the University of Cincinnati.

Fourth Quarter Catch Up Means Port Angeles Residents Get A Chance To Cash In On Their Old Car An Open Letter From Price Superstore:

Dear Neighbors, Here we are in the fourth quarter and 2011 is almost over. Every year businesses count on strong sales in the fourth quarter too. We call it the Fourth Quarter Catch Up. This year, we’ve got big goals but I’ve got a BIG PROBLEM! We’re running out of used cars and there’s no time to buy more. We need to find 56 additional used cars before the end of November in order to “catch up” and meet our goals for the year. I’m running out of ideas…so I need your help desperately. Will you sell your old car to me?

Here at Price Superstore we employ 32 people. Most of our team members have been with us for 5 years or more, and most of them have families. I have an obligation to take care of them. But I can’t do that without cars to sell. That’s why I’m in such a jam.

This whole problem started back in 2008. When the economy got in trouble, car companies slowed down production. Now, exactly three years Here’s what I’m proposing: later, there’s been a HUGE decline in bring in any and every car you have. If the number of three-year-old vehicles it’s really old, I still want it. If you’re still that we can normally buy at the auction. making payments, it doesn’t matter. If Plus, 2011 has been a record year for us, you’re upside down and owe more than so we’ve been selling cars faster than we it’s worth, let that be my problem. I need can get them. cars and I need them now. **Even if you owe $2,000 or $4,000 or $6,000 more than it’s worth, I still want it. **I’ll pay up to $4,000 more than appraised value for any car, running or not, paid off or not. It’s my Fourth Quarter Catch Up “Buy Back” Sale!

Past credit problems should not keep you from coming in. My For The People® Credit Approval Process was designed to help even the toughest customers get approved. Short sales, foreclosures, unpaid medical bills, late payments…not a problem! We want to help you find a loan that fits your budget. As an extra bonus, if you sell your old car to me this month, I’ll buy your family Thanksgiving dinner…as my way of saying thanks! Here at Price Superstore we believe that everybody deserves to drive a nicer, newer car. We’re on a mission to help everyone we can…but we need your help. Will you please help us out?

Now I have a real mess on my hands and this is the only solution I can Please call us at (360) 457-3333 think of. Will you help me? I promise I’ll to set an appointment or visit us in make it worth your while. person at Price Superstore, across from Frugals in Port Angeles. Of course, there’s no obligation to buy a car from me. But if it turns out Sincerely Yours, to be the right time, you’ll be able to use all the extra money you get for your old car to get the lowest possible payment on a nicer, newer car. Mark Ostroot Price Superstore 1B5139564

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A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Occupy: Demonstrators’ ranks swell after raid CONTINUED FROM A7 Police move in More than 50 protesters were arrested in the afternoon police action, said Portland police spokesman Sgt. Pete Simpson on KGWTV.

Post-raid swelling The number of demonstrators began to swell following the raid and increased throughout the afternoon. By early evening, hundreds of officers brandishing nightsticks stood shoulder-to-shoulder to hold the protesters back. Authorities retreated as protesters broke the standoff by marching through the streets. In the hours after the midnight eviction deadline, the anti-Wall Street protesters and their supporters had flooded the park area even as authorities in other cities across the nation stepped up pressure against demonstrators, arresting dozens of people. At one point overnight, the Portland crowd swelled to thousands. As dawn arrived Sunday, riot police had retreated and most of the crowds had gone home, but protesters who have been at the two parks since Oct. 6 were still there, prompting one organizer to declare the night a victory for the movement. “We stood up to state power,� Jim Oliver told The Associated Press.

Police moved in later as demonstrators held a midday “general assembly� meeting to discuss their next moves. An officer on a loudspeaker warned that anyone who resisted risked arrest and “may also be subject to chemical agents and impact weapons.� Demonstrators chanted “we are a peaceful protest.� “We were talking about what we were going to do and then they just started hitting people. Seems like a waste of resources to me,� protester Mike Swain, 27, told the AP. One man was taken away on a stretcher; he was alert and talking to paramedics, and raised a peace sign to fellow protesters, who responded with cheers.

False sense of calm Choya Adkison, 30, said police moved in after giving demonstrators a false sense of calm. They thought they had time to rest, relax and regroup, she said “Camp was completely vulnerable, completely defenseless� when police moved in, she said. “I’m disappointed that they created a sense of trust by walking away and then completely trampled it.� City officials erected temporary barbed-wire fences around three adjacent downtown parks, chok-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Police officers push people away from the Occupy Portland encampment Sunday in, Portland, Ore. ing off access for demonstrators as parks officials cleaned up. “I think most people will go home or go about their day,� Simpson told the television station. Even ahead of the police raid, the camp was a shadow of what it had been before Saturday. A large segment of campers were homeless people drawn to the free food and

shelter offered by Occupy Portland. They are gone, after outreach workers went through the camp to help them find shelter elsewhere. And as the Saturday midnight eviction deadline neared, protesters themselves began dismantling tents. Around 4 a.m., dozens of police formed a line across from demonstrators who

had poured into the street. Protesters facing them appeared to be in festive spirits with some banging on drums and plastic pails, another clanging a cowbell while others danced in the streets as a man juggled nearby. Officials said that one officer suffered minor injuries when he was hit by some kind of projectile in the leg.

Police had prepared for a possible clash, warning that dozens of anarchists may be planning a confrontation with authorities. Officers seized pieces of cement blocks Friday, saying they were told some demonstrators had plans to use them as weapons against police. They said they believe some demonstrators were building shields and trying to collect gas masks.

of diluting programs as state dollars declined, going to a shorter year may stem any further erosion. There’s been talk about a shorter school year the past couple of legislative sessions. Washington is not the first to consider this path. California, for example, dropped from 180 days to

175 days in 2009, then decided earlier this year to let financially challenged districts teach as few as 168 days. Other states, such as Oregon, allowed districts to go to a four-day school week.

cer-involved shooting has left one person dead in Colville. KHQ-TV reported that the Colville Police Department was called to Benny’s Colville Inn near midnight on Saturday. They were called about a vehicle-prowling that ended with the suspect being shot and killed.

A firearm was recovered at the scene. The Spokane Investigative Regional Response team and Colville Police are investigating the incident. The name of the person killed was not immediately released. The Associated Press

Briefly: State Push made for shorter school year EVERETT — Washington school superintendents are pushing for a shorter school year as a budget fix. The Daily Herald

reported that in letters and meetings, educators are telling lawmakers that taking a week off the calendar spreads any budget cut more fairly than other money-saving proposals such as reducing state aid to rural or property-poor districts. School leaders also contend that after three years

Suspect killed COLVILLE — An offi-

Balanced budget, handguns among week’s topics PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

WASHINGTON — The House this week will debate a balanced-budget constitutional amendment and national standards for state laws that allow concealed handguns. The Senate will take up fiscal 2012 appropriations.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress� is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake

Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Bothell) and Rep. Norm Dicks (D-Belfair). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Dicks, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-2280514); Murray, 202-2242621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Dicks, 800-947-6676 (fax, 202-226-1176). Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; house.gov/dicks. Dicks’ North Olympic Peninsula office is at 332 E. Fifth St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. It is open from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays and by appointment. It is staffed by Judith

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■HIRING JOBLESS VETERANS: Voting 94 for and one against, the Senate on Nov. 10 expanded HR 674 (above) to include employer tax credits of $9,600 per person for hiring disabled veterans who have been out of work for at least six months. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., cast the negative vote. The amendment also would provide tax credits of $5,600 for employing other veterans who have been jobless for six months or longer, $2,400 for hiring veterans who have been out of work from four to 26 weeks and expanded educational and job-retraining benefits for veterans. This veterans-hiring program is the only part of President Barack Obama’s $447 billion jobs plan that the Senate has approved. A yes vote backed the amendment. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

wealthy and others and give presidents a line-item veto. The GOP plan was offered as an amendment to HR 674 (above). A yes vote was to pass the bill. Cantwell and Murray voted no.

Morris, 360-452-3370 (fax: providers from offering dif360-452-3502). ferent levels of broadband service and charging accordingly. State legislators Critics say the rules will Jefferson and Clallam hamper innovation and counties are represented in that the FCC lacks statuthe part-time state Legisla- tory authority to regulate â– CLEAN-AIR ture by Rep. Kevin Van the Internet. RULES REPEAL: Voting De Wege, D-Sequim, the A yes vote was to nullify 41 for and 56 against, the House majority whip; Rep. “net neutralityâ€? rules. Senate on Nov. 10 defeated Steve Tharinger, Cantwell and Murray a measure (SJ Res 27) that D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim voted no. sought to nullify the EnviHargrove, D-Hoquiam. ronmental Protection AgenWrite Van De Wege and â–  REPEAL OF 3 PERcy’s newly implemented Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 CENT LAW: Voting 95 for Cross-State Air Pollution (Hargrove at P.O. Box and none against, the SenRule. 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; ate on Nov. 10 repealed a The rule limits emisemail them at vandewege. law requiring 3 percent of sions from coal-fired power kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. the sum of certain governplants in 27 eastern, southsteve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. ment contracts to be withern and central states that jim@leg.wa.gov. held and deposited with the contribute to ground-level Or you can call the Leg- IRS as a credit against any ozone (smog) and fine-partiislative Hotline, 800-562- back taxes the contractor cle (soot) pollution in down6000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 owes the Treasury. The bill wind states. p.m. Monday through Fri- (HR 674) is now before the The rule requires offendday (closed on holidays and House. ing plants to install the best from noon to 1 p.m.) and The law targeted for available technology, such leave a detailed message, repeal affects companies as scrubbers, to ease the which will be emailed to that receive sizable conhealth impacts of their disVan De Wege, Tharinger or tracts on the federal, state â–  R E P U B L I C A N charges on nearby states. and local levels. Scheduled ECONOMIC PLAN: VotHargrove, or to all three. According to the EPA, Links to other state offi- to take effect in 2013, it is ing 40 for and 56 against, the rule by 2014 will result cials: secstate.wa.gov/ seen by critics as a paper- the Senate on Nov. 10 in $120 billion to $280 bilelections/elected_officials. work burden that will slow defeated a 28-point Repub- lion in annual health and job-creation, while defend- lican jobs bill that would, in related benefits, while costaspx. ers say it will crack down on part, institute a balanced- ing power plants up to tax cheats and boost IRS budget constitutional $2.4 billion in capital Learn more collections. amendment; reduce the top investments. Websites following our This bill would reduce corporate and individual While critics say the rule state and national legisla- federal revenue by $11.2 bil- tax rates from 35 percent to already has cost thousands tors: lion over 10 years and offset 25 percent; repeal the 2010 of jobs, the EPA says it will â–  Followthemoney. the loss by ending Medicaid health law and the 2010 prevent from 13,000 to org — Campaign donors by eligibility for at least Dodd-Frank financial regu- 34,000 premature deaths, industry, ZIP code and more 500,000 Social Security lation bill; bar the federal 19,000 cases of acute bronâ–  Vote-Smart.org — recipients who now qualify government from regulat- chitis and 400,000 cases of How special interest groups for the federal-state health ing greenhouse gases asso- aggravated asthma each rate legislators on the program for the poor. ciated with global warming; year. issues. A yes vote was to pass nullify or scale back other A yes vote was to nullify the bill. environmental regulations; the rule. â–  “NET NEUTRALCantwell and Murray close an array of tax loopCantwell and Murray ITYâ€? RULES: Voting 46 for voted yes. holes that benefit the voted no. and 52 against, the Senate on Nov. 10 refused to repeal Federal Communications Responsible Stewardship Continues Commission rules issued Beyond Our Lifetimes last December to keep the Internet equally accessible We are dedicated to reducing our carbon footprint by to all users. Funeral Home & Crematory • Donating eyeglasses, hearing aids, prosthetics & This defeated a measure medical appliances (SJ Res 6) that sought to • Recycling medical metals to reduce raw mining and use the Congressional planet scarring (360)385-2642 Review Act to void the regu• Providing options for Certified Green biodegradable casket and urns lations. 1615 Parkside Dr. • Using non-formaldehyde embalming fluids The FCC says the rules Port Townsend will preserve “net neutralCall us today to discuss your plans ityâ€? by preventing service 095096497

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Dr. K. Ben Skerbeck, DDS

Eye on Congress


Peninsula Daily News for Monday, November 14, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A9

Computer tablets for poorest of poor THERE IS A concept in telecommunications called “the last mile,” that part of any phone system that is the most difficult to connect — the part that goes from the main lines into people’s homes. Prem Kalra, the director of Thomas the new Indian Friedman Institute of Technology in Rajasthan, one of the elite MITs of India, has dedicated his school to overcoming a different challenge: connecting “the last person.” “How will we reach the last person?” Kalra asked me during a visit to his campus in Jodhpur in the Thar Desert of western India. The “last person” in his view is the poorest person in India. And the question consuming Kalra is can “the financially worst-off person” in India “be empowered” — be given the basic tools to acquire enough skills to overcome dire poverty. In a country where 75 percent of the people live on less than $2 a day, that’s a big question. It is why, one year ago, India’s Human Resources Development

Ministry put out a very specific proposal that Kalra and his technology institute decided to take up, when no one else would: Could someone design and make a stripped-down iPad-like, Internet-enabled, wirelessly connected tablet that the poorest Indian family, saving about $2.50 a month for a year, could afford if the government subsidized the rest? Specifically, could they make a simple tablet usable for distance learning, teaching English and math or just tracking commodity prices for under $50, including the manufacturer’s profit? The answer was yes. Last month, Kalra’s team — led by two IIT Rajasthan electrical engineering professors, one of whom comes from a village that still has no electricity — unveiled the Aakash tablet. Aakash is Hindi for sky. It’s based on the Android 2.2 operating system, with a 7-inch touch screen, three hours of battery life and the ability to download YouTube videos, PDFs and educational software like Virtual Labs. The government will subsidize the wireless connections for students. If Indians could only purchase tablets made in the West, the price points would be so high they’d never spread here, said

Kalra, so “we had to break the price point” in a big way. They did it by taking full advantage of today’s hyperconnected world: pulling commodity parts mainly from China and South Korea, using open-source software and collaboration tools and employing the design/manufacturing/assembly abilities of two companies in the West — DataWind and Conexant Systems — and Quad in India. The Aakash is a ray of hope that India can leverage technology to get more of its 220 million students enough tools to escape poverty and poor teaching, but it’s also a challenge to the West. In terms of hope, I was struck by a story that Kalra’s wife, Urmila, told about a chat she had had with their maid after the Aakash was unveiled Oct. 5. As Urmila recalled, her maid, who has two young children, said that she had heard “from the night watchman that Mr. Kalra has made a computer that is very cheap, and is so cheap that even she can afford to buy it. The watchman had given her a picture from the paper, and she asked me if it was true.” Urmila told her it was true and that the machine was meant for people who could not afford a big computer. Added Urmila: “She asked,

Peninsula Voices Publicity seeker? I am appalled to see that the Peninsula Daily News appears to welcome Kit Kittredge back to the Peninsula as though she were some kind of hero returning home. Rather than being an “activist,” as described by the newspaper, I see Kittredge as being much closer to being a terrorist and an opportunist. She goes to the independent nation of Israel to prevent Israel from checking vessels known to bring rockets to the terrorists in the Gaza Strip ­— rockets fired by terrorists, which kill and maim many Israeli men, women and children every year. How would Americans react were rockets fired on our children? I don’t believe we would roll over and do nothing

‘How much will it cost?’ I said, ‘It will cost you around 1,500 rupees.’ [$30.] She said: ‘15,000 or 1,500?’ I said, ‘1,500.’ “She was sure that if the government was doing something so good for the poor, it had to have a catch. “‘What can you do on it?’ she asked me. I said, ‘If your daughter goes to school, she can use it to download videos of class lessons,’ just like she had seen my son download physics lectures every week from MIT’s [OpenCourseWare]. “I said, ‘You have seen our son sitting at the computer listening to a teacher who is speaking. That teacher is actually in America.’ “She just kept getting widerand wider-eyed. “Then she asked me will her kids be able to learn English on it. “I said, ‘Yes, they will definitely be able to learn English,’ which is the passport for upward mobility here. I said, ‘It will be so cheap you will be able to buy one for your son and one for your daughter!’ ” That conversation is the sound of history changing. And not just for India. We’re at the start of a nonlinear move in innovation thanks to the hyperconnecting of the world — through social media, mobile/

Our readers’ letters, faxes

wireless devices and cloud computing — which is putting cheap innovation devices into the hands of so many more people, enabling them to collaborate on invention is so many new ways. This Great Inflection will be an opportunity and a challenge for every worker and company because we’re going to see more and more product “price points” broken in big ways. And that explains why Kalra tells recruiters for major companies to stay away from his campus. He wants his Indian students to think about inventing their first jobs, not applying for them. “I want them to start companies and become CEOs of their own. It is the only way we can catch China,” he says. India can’t wait for the world to solve India’s problems at India’s price points. It has to invent them. It now has tools to do so. This is about to get interesting.

________

Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears in the Peninsula Daily News on Mondays. E-mail Friedman via nyti.ms/ friedmanmail.

and email

while our children and loved ones were in this kind of jeopardy. I view Kittredge as a publicity seeker now looking to make money on a book deal while helping to terrorize the Israeli people. I further believe the coverage of this woman is disgusting. Ed Dost, Port Angeles

‘Poetic justice’ The occupiers of Wall Street, Seattle and other places have lost faith in the American system. They voted for Santa Claus, got their candidates elected and, as in Greece, Italy, Ireland and other countries, are finding he cannot deliver. He isn’t into magic. He paid off previous And levying more taxes generations but has on the elves aren’t enough reached the bottom of his to cut it. Howling in the middle sack.

of the street is not a solution. It is traditionally a poor way to do government.

Also, the idea of social justice is not clearly defined as to where it leaves off and where

theft cuts in. Poetic justice is in operation in that some of the members of the gangs are stealing from others. Redistributive justice is taking over. The lack of hypocrisy is the best aspect of the mob. The demands of the mob for jobs of $20 an hour, etc., show a remarkable lack of respect for other people’s property. It doesn’t say abolish private property — just phase it out. This has stifled the incentive to produce food and transportation and related jobs. When costs rise faster than the break-even point, people cut back and do not produce at a loss. Maybe it will work differently next time. Robert W. Robinson, Sequim

You can have a color TV and still be poor THE “POVERTY ISSUE” opens a vast highway system of social and economic observations headed in every direction. Froma Some say poverty is a Harrop national disgrace. Some say it’s the poor people’s own fault. Some say the government must end it through bigger subsidies and more services for the poor — others by reducing that help and instead expanding economic opportunity. The most interesting battle rages over the very definition of poverty in this land of plenty. Conservatives often argue that the official poverty line has been set too high. Many who live below it are actually doing reasonably well. Liberals frequently answer

that, no, poverty is worse and more widespread than the government count would suggest. Conservatives are right about one thing: The federal government’s longtime metric for drawing the poverty line is primitive and does exaggerate the hardship felt in this country. (It is being replaced by a more sophisticated model, also controversial.) Amazingly, the old measurement doesn’t count food stamps, tax credits and other government benefits in toting up incomes. But while conservatives stand on solid ground in their complaints over how poverty gets determined, their broader arguments can be fairly heartless. One of them requires rummaging through poor people’s possessions for signs of high living. That is neither nice nor revealing. Case in point is a recent Heritage Foundation report holding that most Americans defined as poor really aren’t. The evidence: In 2005, the

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typical “poor” household had a car and air conditioning. It had one or more color TVs, cable or satellite service and a DVD player. If there were children, it had a game system, such as Xbox or PlayStation. We all get the point, made by authors Robert Rector and Rachel Sheffield. But there’s some missing information. Who bought the Xbox? (A friend who pitied the child?) Where was it bought? (Thirdhand at the Salvation Army store?) When was it bought? (Two years earlier, before the parents were laid off?) A long time ago, I lost a job, and my income plummeted. Had Rector and Sheffield opened my closet the day I collected my first unemployment check, they would have spotted a swell leather jacket and real pearls. I was hardly poor, but suddenly, paying the rent had

become a concern. The authors’ list of “amenities” found in most poor households also irritates. It includes a refrigerator, stove and oven. This country is not Bangladesh or Albania, and so our definition of poverty need not compete with theirs. And whereas a car and air conditioning might be deemed nonessentials in San Francisco, that would be less the case in Phoenix. And Rector and Sheffield include “ceiling fans” among the amenities. Really. As an example of how well our impoverished neighbors are doing, they offer this quote by scholar James Q. Wilson: “The poorest Americans today live a better life than all but the richest persons a hundred years ago.” That may be true on a material level, but so what? Thomas Jefferson didn’t have running water in his treasurefilled, 24-room mansion, Monticello. Should running water be

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

considered a frill today? Meanwhile, some aspects of the old poverty definition understate the adversity. It doesn’t include money spent on taxes or health care, and it ignores regional differences in the cost of living. In 2009, the median rent in the Bronx was $875 a month. In Amarillo, Texas, it was $647. Here’s an experiment for our friends at The Heritage Foundation: Shut off the air conditioning at your Washington, D.C., headquarters for the month of August. Then come back and tell us whether a/c is a luxury. And no cheating with ceiling fans!

________

Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears here every Monday. Contact her at info@creators. com or at 40 Creators Syndicate Inc., 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A10

Peninsula Daily News

Monday, November 14, 2011

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Peninsula Daily News for Monday, November 14, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

COMICS, DEAR ABBY In this section

The Associated Press

Penn State students react to the football team’s loss to Nebraska on Saturday.

Elephant that’s not on the field STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Games are supposed to be about the guys who show up. Not this one. Penn State Jim didn’t lose 17-14 Litke Saturday to Nebraska just because Joe Paterno wasn’t there. Or because the Nittany Lions were emotionally exhausted or lacking effort after one of the most trying weeks any football team has had to withstand. They lost this particular game because they were offensively inept, something that was a problem even when Joe was around. Penn State won eight of its previous 10 games mostly because of a stout defense and good luck than almost anything he did. It won because of a few rugged goal-line stands late and the occasional game-tying field goal clanking off the upright. Paterno set the tone for the team, but he’s been more a CEO than head coach for several seasons. Now he’s out of a job, pushed aside after 46 seasons in the wake of a scandal that erupted a week ago, when former longtime assistant and one-time heir apparent Jerry Sandusky was charged with serial child sex-abuse. The team decided to mark his absence by leaving the first seat on the bus empty for the ride to Beaver Stadium. Asked where its usual occupant would be spending the day, Jay Paterno, Joe’s son and Penn State’s quarterbacks coach, replied, “Who knows? “Maybe he’s out cutting the grass,” Jay added, then thought about it some more. “I doubt it. He can’t now. There are 800 media cameras.”

Missing receivers coach From a practical standpoint, the Nittany Lions probably missed receivers coach Mike McQueary even more. Most weeks, McQueary is down on the field, signaling the plays he gets over his headset from offensive coordinator Galen Hall and Jay Paterno up in the press box, then making sure the personnel group in the huddle matches the call. This Saturday, McQueary was at an undisclosed location because he had received threats, yet one more unforeseen consequence of the events of the past week. McQueary was a 28-year-old grad assistant in March, 2002, when he walked into the team’s locker room one night to grab some game film, heard noises coming from the shower and headed in that direction. He would later tell a grand jury that he saw Sandusky assaulting a boy of about 10. Like Joe Paterno, McQueary has been vilified for not doing more to stop an alleged sexual predator though, so far, he’s been placed on administrative leave and not fired. Unsettling as it must have been for his fellow coaches and players to find out Friday night — via a conference call — that McQueary wasn’t going to be with them, they missed him even more on the very first play. Interim head coach Tom Bradley scrambled to come up with something simple to open the game — a fullback dive, Joe’s bread-and-butter play — and who knows how many fans assumed it was some kind of tribute. It wasn’t. Turn

to

Litke/B2

The Associated Press (2)

Seattle second-year safety Earl Thomas, right, blocks a pass intended for Baltimore rookie wide receiver Torrey Smith in the second half of Sunday’s game in Seattle.

Hawks shock Ravens Lynch has beast of game against strong Baltimore By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Marshawn Lynch caught the pass and was a few yards short of a critical Seattle first down late in Sunday’s game against the Ravens. The only guys standing between Lynch and the line were Ray Lewis and Jarret Johnson. He left Lewis and Johnson grasping at air and all but sealed the Seahawks’ surprising victory. Lynch finished with 109 yards rushing and Seattle’s lone touchdown, Steven Hauschka matched a franchise record with five field goals, and the Seahawks forced three turnovers in a 22-17 win. “He made like he was out there in the backyard playing against some of his cousins or something,” Seattle quarterback Tarvaris Jackson said. “He made a great move.” Seattle added yet another flop to the Ravens’ resume that already included slip-ups earlier this season at Tennessee and at Jacksonville, all three losses coming after important wins for Baltimore (6-3). And Seattle (3-6) gave coach Pete Carroll a perfect final drive

to use in his teaching. “Coaches love nothing more than to get that situ- Next Game ation in the fourth quar- Sunday ter and run vs. Rams the clock at St. Louis out,” Carroll Time: 1 p.m. said. On TV: Ch. 13 “ A n d think about who you did it against. That’s really cool that happens.” Seattle’s lead had been trimmed to 22-17 after Baltimore quarterback Joe Flacco hit Ed Dickson on an 11-yard TD on his 52nd pass attempt of the night. The Seahawks took over at their own 20 with 5:52 left and immediately picked up two penalties to back them up to the 10, creating a first-and-20 situation that in the past would lead to a short series and a punt. Not this time. They worked to a manageable third-and-5, and Jackson connected with Golden Tate for 24 yards.

Baltimore quarterback Joe Flacco, on ground, grabs Seattle linebacker David Hawthorne for the tackle Turn to Hawks/B2 after Hawthorne intercepted a Flacco pass.

Huskies open season at 2-0 Washington plays Portland tonight for tournament title The Associated Press

SEATTLE — C.J. Wilcox scored 19 points and Washington held off Florida Atlantic 77-71 Sunday night in the World Vision Classic. Kore White hit a 3-pointer to pull Florida Atlantic within 74-70 with 1:21 left, but missed another long attempt on the Owls’ next possession. Abdul Gaddy got the rebound, was fouled, and hit both free throws with 38 seconds remaining to put the Huskies comfortably ahead. Greg Gantt had 14 points to lead Florida Atlantic (0-2), which struggled at the free-throw line, hitting just 13 of 25 attempts. Washington (2-0) was 24 of 35 from the line. Gaddy finished with 15 points and six assists for the Huskies. Terrence Ross added 14 points, and Aziz N’Diaye had 13 points and 12 rebounds. Shavar Richardson scored 13 points, White 12 and Pablo Ber-

tone 11 for the Owls. Wilcox put Washington in front 51-37 with two free throws early in the second half, and later added a strange three-point play to keep the Huskies in front 56-44. Wilcox was fouled driving to the basket. As the ball came out of his hands while he was flying to the left, Wilcox batted it up with his right hand. It bounced off the glass and in, and Wilcox converted the free throw to complete the threepoint play. Still, Washington couldn’t shake FAU. Alex Tucker and Richardson hit back-to-back 3-pointers to cut Washington’s lead to 56-50, before Gaddy answered with a 3-pointer of his own for the Huskies. Washington opened the game on an 11-1 run as Florida Atlantic missed its first seven shots and committed four turnovers. The Owls didn’t get their first field goal until Richardson made

The Associated Press

Aziz N’Diaye of Washington draws a player control foul in the Huskies’ first game of the season against Georgia State on Saturday in Seattle. Washington beat Georgia State and then Florida Atlantic on Sunday. a 3-pointer with 13:45 on the clock. Florida Atlantic coach Mike Jarvis received a technical foul with 9:38 left in the half. The two made free throws

were accompanied by a threepoint play from Martin Breunig in the same possession, giving Washington a five-point possession and extending its lead to 20-8.


B2

SportsRecreation

Monday, November 14, 2011

Today’s

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

AREA SPORTS SHOT

Today Practice for all high school winter sports teams starts today at North Olympic Peninsula schools.

Tuesday No events scheduled

Wednesday No events scheduled

Area Sports Bowling SEQUIM OLYMPIC LANES Thursday 9 Pin No Tap Men’s high game: Wayne Hedges, 255; men’s high series: Gunter Kessler, 557. Women’s high game: Dona Eby, 175; women’s high series: Jean Henderson, 473. Tuesday SunLanders I Men’s high game: Jim Jones, 198; men’s high series: Ed Jones, 511. Women’s high game: Cheryl Coulter, 181; women’s high series: Cheryl Coulter, 478. Leading team: Swamp Rats. First Fedeal Senior Snipers Men’s high game: Jim Getchman, 216; men’s high series: Jim Getchman, 498. Women’s high game: Chris Getchman , 199; women’s high series: Chris Getchman, 486. Leading team: Enfields.

Youth Swimming Port Angeles Swim Club Bob Miller Sprint/Distance Classic Nov. 5-6 Girls 8 and under, 25 Free 4. Anne Edwards Girls 10, 500 Free 1. Shannon Campbell; 2. Sierra Hunter Girls 9 and 10, 100 IM 2. Sierra Hunter; 3. Shannon Campbell; 4. Kenzie Johnson; 5. Emily Bundy Girls 9 and 10, Back 2. Sierra Hunter; 3. Shannon Campbell; 6. Emily Bundy Girls 9 and 10, 50 Breast 1. Nadia Cole; 2. Shannon Campbell; 6. Kenzie Johnson Girls 9 and 10 Fly 2. Sierra Hunter; 3. Kenzie Johnson Girls 11 and 12, Free 1. Alicia Campbell; 5. Jaine Macias Girls 11 and 12, 500 Free 1. Alicia Campbell Girls 11 and 12, 50 Back 1. Alicia Campbell Girls 11 and 12, 50 Breast 1. Alcia Campbell; 4. Jaine Macias Girls 11 and 12, 50 Fly 1. Alicia Campbell; 4. Jaine Macias Girls 13 and 14, 50 Free 1. Carter Juskevich Girls 13 and 14, 1000 Free Carter Juskevich Girls 13 and 14, 100 Breast 2. Carter Juskevich Girls 13 and over, 100 Free 3. Carter Juskevich

Youth Basketball PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION 2011 Tipoff Tournament Port Angeles Saturday and Sunday Boys Varsity Division Final Standings: 1. Port Angeles Jammers; 2. S.Y.B. (Sequim Youth Basketball) Next Level; 3. Chimacum Cowboys; 4. Port Townsend. Sunday Scores: P.A. Jammers 59, Chimacum 45; Next Level 69, Port Townsend 49; Chimacum 45, Port Townsend 38; Championship: P.A. Jammers 67, S.Y.B. Next Level 61, OT Saturday Scores: P.A. Jammers 53 ,S.Y.B. Next Level 40; Chimacum 50, Port Townsend 38; Next Level 59, Chimacum 55; P.A. Jammers 43, Port Townsend 25. Girls Varsity Division Final Standings: 1. Central Kitsap Cougars; 2. 503 JV (Portland, Ore.); 3. Rainier; 4.Advantage (Kenmore); 5. 503 Varsity (Portland, Ore.) Sunday Scores: Rainier 36, Advantage 26; Advantage 41, 503 Varsity 35; CK Cougars 47, Rainier 29; 503 JV 58, 503 Varsity 35. Championship: CK Cougars 54, 503 JV 49. Saturday Scores: C.K. Cougars 55, Advantage (Kenmore) 32; Rainier 61, 503 JV 30; 503

Peninsula Daily News

SPORTS ON TV

Today 8 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Singapore Open, Final Round, Site: Sentosa Golf Club - Sentosa, Singapore Noon (25) ROOT Soccer EPL, Manchester City vs. Queens Park Rangers 4 p.m. (25) ROOT Women’s Volleyball NCAA, Stanford vs. Washington 5:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NFL, Minnesota Vikings vs. Green Bay Packers, Site: Lambeau Field Green Bay, Wis. (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, Portland vs. Washington (Live) 9 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Washington State vs. Gonzaga, NIT Season Tipoff (Live) 11 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Northern Iowa vs. St. Mary’s, NIT Season Tipoff (Live) Midnight (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, Portland vs. Washington 1 a.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Cal St Northridge vs. Hawaii, NIT Season Tipoff (Live) 3 a.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Drexel vs. Rider, NIT Season Tipoff (Live) 5 a.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Morehead State vs. College of Charleston, NIT Season Tipoff (Live) Jacksonville at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. Tennessee at Atlanta, 1:15 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 5:20 p.m. Open: Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Pittsburgh Monday, Nov. 21 Kansas City at New England, 5:30 p.m.

Seahawks 22, Ravens 17 Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Playing

for all the marbles

Reggie Burke of the Port Angeles Jammers, left, passes the ball around Jayson Brocklesby, center, and Rory Kallappa of Sequim Youth Basketball Next Level during the championship game of the Boys Varsity Division at the Tipoff Tournament on Sunday in the Port Angeles High School gym. The Jammers won 67-61 in overtime. Complete results on this page. JV 40, Advantage 27; CK Cougars 70, 503 Varsity 36; 503 JV 43, Rainier 38. Boys 5th Grade Division Final Standings: 1.Toledo; 2. Port Angeles Green; 3. Sequim Wolfpups; 4. Port Angeles White. Sunday Scores: P.A. Green 44, P.A. White 10; Toledo 25, Sequim 17; Sequim 40, P.A. White 8. Championship: Toledo 33, P.A. Green 25. Saturday Scores: P.A. Green 25, Sequim Wolfpups 24, OT; Sequim Wolfpups 32, Port Angeles White 13; Toledo 43, P.A. Green 32; Toledo 38, P.A. White 14.

Football NFL Standings NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco 8 1 0 .889 233 138 Seattle 3 6 0 .333 144 202 Arizona 3 6 0 .333 183 213 St. Louis 2 7 0 .222 113 223 East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Giants 6 3 0 .667 218 211 Dallas 5 4 0 .556 223 182 Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 220 203 Washington 3 6 0 .333 136 178

South L T Pct PF PA 3 0 .700 313 228 4 0 .556 212 196 5 0 .444 156 233 7 0 .222 190 237 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 8 0 0 1.000 275 179 Detroit 6 3 0 .667 252 184 Chicago 6 3 0 .667 237 187 Minnesota 2 6 0 .250 172 199 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 5 3 0 .625 222 184 N.Y. Jets 5 3 0 .625 199 163 Buffalo 5 4 0 .556 229 218 Miami 2 7 0 .222 158 178 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 7 3 0 .700 273 166 Tennessee 5 4 0 .556 186 172 Jacksonville 3 6 0 .333 115 166 Indianapolis 0 10 0 .000 131 300 North W L T Pct PF PA Pittsburgh 7 3 0 .700 220 179 Baltimore 6 3 0 .667 225 152 Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 212 164 Cleveland 3 6 0 .333 131 183 New Orleans Atlanta Tampa Bay Carolina

W 7 5 4 2

West W L T Pct PF PA Oakland 5 4 0 .556 208 233 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 216 228 Denver 4 5 0 .444 188 234 Kansas City 4 5 0 .444 141 218 Thursday’s Game Oakland 24, San Diego 17 Sunday’s Games Dallas 44, Buffalo 7 Denver 17, Kansas City 10 Miami 20, Washington 9 St. Louis 13, Cleveland 12 Arizona 21, Philadelphia 17 Tennessee 30, Carolina 3 Pittsburgh 24, Cincinnati 17 Houston 37, Tampa Bay 9 New Orleans 26, Atlanta 23, OT Jacksonville 17, Indianapolis 3 Seattle 22, Baltimore 17 San Francisco 27, N.Y. Giants 20 Chicago 37, Detroit 13 New England at N.Y. Jets, late Today’s Game Minnesota at Green Bay, 5:30 p.m. Thursday N.Y. Jets at Denver, 5:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20 Tampa Bay at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Oakland at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Carolina at Detroit, 10 a.m. Dallas at Washington, 10 a.m.

Baltimore Seattle

0 7 3 7—17 10 9 3 0—22 First Quarter Sea—Lynch 1 run (Hauschka kick), 8:07. Sea—FG Hauschka 22, 5:26. Second Quarter Bal—Dickson 1 pass from Rice (Cundiff kick), 9:11. Sea—FG Hauschka 38, 5:39. Sea—FG Hauschka 39, 1:52. Sea—FG Hauschka 35, :46. Third Quarter Sea—FG Hauschka 30, 12:26. Bal—FG Cundiff 35, :52. Fourth Quarter Bal—Dickson 11 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 5:52. A—66,522. First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Bal 25 323 12-75 248 4-30 5-109 0-0 30-53-1 1-8 4-47.0 2-2 4-34 24:59

Sea 16 327 42-119 208 1-12 3-77 1-34 17-27-0 1-9 5-43.6 1-0 13-100 35:01

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Baltimore, Rice 5-27, D.Reed 1-16, T.Smith 1-16, R.Williams 3-8, Flacco 2-8. Seattle, Lynch 32-109, Washington 3-9, Jackson 5-3, Forsett 1-3, Tate 1-(minus 5). PASSING—Baltimore, Flacco 29-52-1-255, Rice 1-1-0-1. Seattle, Jackson 17-27-0-217. RECEIVING—Baltimore, Dickson 10-79, Rice 8-54, Pitta 4-49, T.Smith 3-28, R.Williams 3-24, Boldin 2-22. Seattle, Lynch 5-58, Tate 3-46, Miller 3-24, A.McCoy 2-15, Rice 2-14, Baldwin 1-50, Obomanu 1-10. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Baltimore, Cundiff 50 (SH), 52 (WR).

Hawks: Shock Baltimore for important victory Continued from B1 A minute later, they faced the same down and distance from the Baltimore 46. Jackson threw short for Lynch, who slipped ahead for 8 yards and another clock-churning first down. “I’ve said it before: The man walks aggressively,” Seattle fullback Michael Robinson said. “Everything about him is moving forward aggressively and trying to gain yards. You’ve got to love that.” Lynch added four more runs that ensured all Jackson had to do was take a knee twice inside the Baltimore 20 to close out the victory. For a drive that produced no points and started with a pair of penalties, it couldn’t be more valuable for the young Seahawks.

“I don’t think we’ve ever had a four-minute drill quite like this before,” Seattle center Max Unger said. “I couldn’t tell you a time that we had that much time left on the clock with the lead and ran the ball out like that.” Hauschka kicked field goals of 22, 38, 39, 35 and 30 yards. Jackson was 17 of 27 for 217 yards and Lynch had another five receptions and 58 yards receiving as Seattle snapped a three-game losing streak. The Seahawks also picked up their second victory over a division leader this season after beating the New York Giants in early October. Lynch became the first Seattle running back to record consecutive 100-yard rushing games since Julius Jones early in the 2008 season, following up on his 135

yards rushing last week against Dallas. Lynch carried a career-best 32 times, and most of those equaled short gains, but the types of yards Seattle needed against Baltimore’s defense. After Lynch’s 1-yard TD run on Seattle’s second possession, the Seahawks got inside the Baltimore 25 on five other occasions, settling for field goals each time. That proved to be enough thanks to Seattle’s stout defense and special teams mistakes by the Ravens. David Reed fumbled twice on kickoff returns, leading to six points for Seattle. Flacco’s lone interception was returned by David Hawthorne inside the Ravens 10 and eventually led to another field goal from Hauschka. Along with Reed’s two fumbles,

Billy Cundiff missed field-goal attempts of 52 and 50 yards in the first half. The magic Flacco had in last week’s win over the Steelers was gone. He was rarely able to challenge the Seahawks secondary downfield due to strong coverage that forced him to throw underneath. When he did have opportunities to pick up chunks of yards, Flacco missed open receivers. Flacco was 29 of 52 for 255 yards. Ray Rice, who was visibly upset after the Ravens had to settle for a 35-yard field goal late in the third quarter, had five carries for 27 yards. He also caught eight passes for 54 yards. Carroll said he hoped Baltimore would abandon the run and

try to throw its way past the Seahawks. “We understand that we are going to be a target of a lot of criticism right now,” coach John Harbaugh said. “We understand that. We understand that it’s going to be local; it’s going to be national. “We understand the fans are very disappointed in the game. We’re very disappointed in the game. We had an opportunity here to do something to separate ourselves a little bit in our division and we didn’t finish.” Notes: Seattle lost G John Moffitt (knee), WRs Sidney Rice (concussion) and Doug Baldwin (concussion), DB Atari Bigby (hamstring), DE Anthony Hargrove (hamstring) and SS Kam Chancellor (concussion) during the game. None returned.

Litke: Paterno missed by players, coaches and fans Continued from B1 Rod Erickson late Wednesday night. Jay Paterno assumed “We had a little bit of confuMcQueary’s duties on the sidesion early,” conceded Bradley, line, in addition to his regular who didn’t begin preparing for role calling the pass plays. his new job until he received a After that rocky start, he setcall from new school president

tled down by remembering something his father said. “Joe was always telling us about ‘the blue line of practice.’ When you cross the blue line, the only thing you can control is what you’re doing right there,”

Jay recalled. “So we just had to imagine there was a blue line coming into this stadium and once we were here, we were focused on the task at hand. Just a little short.” Afterward, he talked about

dropping a letter off at his parents’ house earlier in the day, including a line that read, “Dad, I wish you were here.” So did plenty of others by day’s end.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Monday, November 14, 2011

B3

Saints nip Falcons in overtime Atlanta falls 1½ games behind first

Week 10 highlights Passing

Tony Romo, Cowboys, 23-26-0, 270 yds, 3 TDs, 148.4 PR Carson Palmer (Thursday), Raiders, 14-20-1, 299 yds, 2 TDs, 125.0 PR Drew Brees, Saints, 30-43-0, 322 yds, 2 TDs, 106.9 PR

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Atlanta quarterback Matt Ryan runs against New Orleans in the first half Sunday in Atlanta.

NFL Sunday three touchdown passes to lead the Cardinals (3-6). Larry Fitzgerald had two TD catches and made a sensational, over-the-shoulder diving catch to set up the go-ahead score. The defending NFC East champion Eagles were expected to be Super Bowl contenders after a slew of big-name acquisitions in the offseason. Instead, they’ve lost seven of their past eight home games.

Broncos 17, Chiefs 10 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Tim Tebow hit Eric Decker on a 56-yard touchdown pass, one of his two completions in the game, to lift Denver. Denver (4-5) played almost the entire game without leading rushers Willis McGahee and Knowshon Moreno. McGahee hurt his hamstring and Moreno went down with a knee injury in the first quarter. Lance Ball ran for 96 yards and Tebow added 44 yards and a touchdown on the ground, helping the Broncos win for the third time in four games with the former Heisman Trophy winner under center. Matt Cassel was 13 of 28 for 93 yards and a touchdown for Kansas City (4-5), which followed up a 31-3 loss to previously winless Miami with another miserable showing at home.

Steelers 24, Bengals 17 CINCINNATI — Rashard Mendenhall ran for a pair of touchdowns, and Pittsburgh intercepted rookie Andy Dalton twice in the fourth quarter. Pittsburgh (7-3) got a needed win by putting together long, balanced drives while thousands of Steelers fans waved Terrible Towels in the first sellout crowd of the season at Paul Brown Stadium. Dalton handled most of what Steelers defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau threw at him. He had two more touchdown passes, giving him 14 overall — the most by a rookie quarterback in his first nine games since the AFL-NFL merger in 1970. At the end, a Steelers defense that’s finally getting healthy and forcing turnovers got to him. Cornerback William Gay anticipated Dalton’s throw and stepped in front of Jerome Simpson for a clinching interception inside the Pittsburgh 20 with 2:27 left.

Jaguars 17, Colts 3

Texans 37, Buccaneers 9

from scrimmage and eclipsed 100 yards rushing for the first time since Oct. 2. Marc Mariani returned a punt 79 yards for a touchdown, and Matt Hasselbeck threw a 43-yard touchdown pass to Damian Williams.

Cowboys 44, Bills 7 ARLINGTON, Texas — Tony Romo guided touchdown drives on his first four possessions, throwing for the score on three of them, and Terence Newman returned one of his two interceptions for a touchdown. The Cowboys (5-4) have won consecutive games and could be at the start of a big surge. Their next three foes went into this weekend a combined 6-18. Romo completed his first 13 passes, including TD strikes of 34 yards to Dez Bryant and of 58 and 5 yards to Laurent Robinson. He finished 23 of 26, setting the franchise record for single-game accuracy by hitting 88.5 percent of his passes. The Bills are 5-4.

TAMPA, Fla. — Matt Schaub threw for two long touchdowns, while Arian Foster, Ben Tate and Derrick Ward each ran for scores to help AFC Southleading Houston. The Texans (7-3) extended their winning streak while playing without star receiver Andre Johnson to four consecutive games and head into their bye week with their best record through 10 games. The Bucs (4-5) have lost three straight and four of five following a 3-1 start. Jacoby Jones filled in for Johnson with an 80-yard TD reception on the first play from scrimmage. Foster turned a short pass into his second 78-yard scoring reception of the season for Houston. Meanwhile, the NFL’s Dolphins 20, top-ranked defense had Redskins 9 four sacks, three intercepMIAMI — Reggie Bush tions and recovered a fumscored two touchdowns and ble. Miami twice intercepted Rex Grossman to earn their Titans 30, first home victory in nearly Panthers 3 a year. CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Dolphins ended a Chris Johnson ran for a franchise-record streak of season-high 130 yards and seven consecutive losses in a touchdown, and Tennes- Miami since last Nov. 14. see used a stifling defense Grossman was a surto frustrate rookie Cam prise starter, replacing John Newton. Beck four weeks after being The Titans (5-4) sacked benched. Newton five times and took Grossman threw for 215 away Carolina’s long pass- yards but was sacked three ing game. times and had a passer ratCarolina (2-7) came in ing of 58.7. ranked fifth in the league Miami (2-7) won for the on offense and first in plays second week in a row after of 20-plus yards, but the starting 0-7. Titans limited Newton to The Redskins (3-6) 209 yards passing and held dropped their fifth consecuSteve Smith, the NFC’s tive game, the longest losleading receiver, to 33 yards. ing streak of Mike ShanahJohnson had 174 yards an’s career as a head coach.

Rams 13, Browns 12 CLEVELAND — Phil Dawson missed a 22-yard field goal attempt after a bounced snap with just over two minutes left as Cleveland bungled another chance to win a game. Dawson made four field goals in blustery conditions, but his line-drive attempt with 2:09 sailed left and capped a series of late gaffes by the Browns (3-6). Long snapper Ryan Pontbriand’s snap appeared to hit the right leg of one of Cleveland’s linemen, causing the ball to skip back to holder Brad Maynard, who did a great job of placing the ball. However, Dawson’s timing was thrown off and he missed the chip shot. Stephen Jackson rushed for 128 yard for the Rams (2-7).

Bears 37, Lions 13 CHICAGO — The Bears got two interception returns for touchdowns and a punt return for a touchdown from Devin Hester as Chicago dominated Detroit in a feisty NFC North battle from Soldier Field. Thanks to the play of the defense, which had four interceptions and two fumble recoveries, and the special teams, not much was needed from Jay Cutler and Matt Forte. Cutler passed for just 123 yards on 9-of-19 attempts while Forte finished with 64 yards and a score on 18 carries for the Bears (6-3), who have won four straight to get back into the playoff picture in the NFC.

Wished I Stayed Home

Michael Vick, Eagles, 16-34-2, 128 yds, 0 TDs, 40.1 PR

Matthew Stafford had one of the roughest games of his career as he was picked off four times. Detroit (6-3) was coming off a bye, but lost for the third time in four games after winning the first five games of the season.

49ers 27, Giants 20 SAN FRANCISCO — Defensive end Justin Smith batted down Eli Manning’s fourth-down pass late in the fourth quarter to preserve the San Francisco 49ers’ victory over the New York Giants. The Giants (6-3) used a 32-yard Hakeem Nicks touchdown reception to get within seven, 27-20, midway through the final period. Faced with a fourthand-2 from the 10 with 37 seconds to play, Smith put his arms up to knock down Manning’s pass. Alex Smith took a few kneel downs to seal San Francisco’s seventh straight victory, the club’s best run since it ripped off 11 straight victories during the 1997 season. The 49ers (8-1) got the win despite running back Frank Gore having zero rushing yards.

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INDIANAPOLIS — Blaine Gabbert threw for a touchdown and Maurice Jones-Drew ran for another score to keep Indianapolis winless. Jones-Drew carried 25 times for 114 yards and became the second player in franchise history to top 6,000 yards rushing. It was the first road win of the season for Jacksonville (3-6). Indianapolis remained

the NFL’s last winless team, dropping to 0-10 for the first time since 1997. Gabbert hooked up with Jarrett Dillard on an 11-yard TD pass late in the third quarter to break a 3-3 tie, and Jones-Drew capped an 8-yard drive with a 3-yard touchdown run late in the fourth to seal it.

0B5075441

PHILADELPHIA — John Skelton threw a 5-yard TD pass to Early Doucet with 1:53 left to lift Arizona. Michael Vick had another so-so performance and the Eagles (3-6) blew a fourth-quarter lead for the fifth time this season. Starting for the injured Kevin Kolb, Skelton threw

Rushing

Michael Bush, (Thursday) Raiders, 30-157, 1 TD DeMarco Murray, Cowboys, 20-135, 1 TD Chris Johnson, Titans, 27-130, 1 TD Steven Jackson, Rams, 27-128, 0 TDs Maurice JonesDrew, Jaguars, 25-114, 1 TD

145116474

Cardinals 21, Eagles 17

Receiving

Larry Fitzgerald, Cardinals, 7-146, 2 TDs Denarious Moore (Thursday), Raiders, 5-123, 2 TDs Harry Douglas, Falcons, 8-133, 0 TDs

0C5102239

ATLANTA — A disconsolate Mike Smith watched the chip-shot field goal sail through the uprights, then walked slowly across the field, his head down, to shake hands with the other coach. Smith knew this loss was on him. John Kasay kicked a 26-yard field goal in overtime after the Atlanta coach decided to go for it on fourth down deep in his own territory Sunday, a decision that backfired horribly and handed the New Orleans Saints a 26-23 victory over the Falcons. “I know it will be scrutinized all week long,” Smith said. “I want everybody to understand I take full responsibility.” New Orleans (7-3) took control of the NFC South race, snapping Atlanta’s three-game winning streak. But this one will be long remembered for Smith’s gutsy and ill-fated call, especially if this loss comes back to cost the defending division champion Falcons a return to the playoffs. Atlanta (5-4) rallied from a 10-point deficit in the fourth quarter, tying it on Matt Bryant’s 27-yard field goal on the final play of regulation. In overtime, Atlanta appeared to pick up a first down on a pass to Mike Cox, but he was ruled just short after referee Terry McAuley looked at the replay. Then, stunningly, Smith decided to go for it on fourth down from his own 29. Michael Turner was stuffed. Game over. “We were going to be aggressive in all that we did,” Smith said. “Unfortunately, it did not work out.” After each offense went three-and-out on its first possession of overtime, Atlanta faced third-and-1 from the 29. Matt Ryan flipped a pass to Cox, the backup fullback, who was met short of the 30 but stretched out the ball with his right arm, appearing to get it across the line. It was initially ruled a first down, but the replay showed he was bobbling the ball as he was going down along the sideline, and the spot was moved back. The Falcons initially sent on the punting team, then called timeout. After thinking it over, Smith decided to go for it, figuring his team could pick up the foot or so needed to keep the drive going. Boy, did that turn out to be a mistake. Ryan handed off to Turner, but the bruising runner never had a chance. He was swarmed by a pile of defenders and actually lost a couple of feet, and the jubilant Saints took over. Four plays later, Kasay won it with his fourth field goal of the game. “I just saw a guy in my face as soon as I got the ball,” Turner said. “I would like to have it back. I would love to be in that situation again.” New Orleans coach Sean Payton coached the game on crutches in his return to the sideline after a collision with one of his players left him with a broken left leg and severe knee injuries nearly a month ago. “I just felt like this was an important game,” Payton said. “That presence is important. I talked to the doctors this morning.” Drew Brees went 30 of 43 for 322 yards, including a pair of touchdowns.


B4

Monday, November 14, 2011

Fun ’n’ Advice

Peninsula Daily News

Child harmed by bad birthday date

Dilbert

DEAR ABBY: Sept. 11 was the 10th birthday of our neighbors’ little girl, “Megan.” At church that day there was a lovely memorial prayer for the victims of 9/11, but no mention of Megan’s birthday among the other special occasions of the week. Megan’s family went to the cemetery, put flowers on the memorial there and then went home. There was no party or cake for Megan. When I took over a card and a small gift, her mom thanked me but said the day was too sad for Megan to celebrate her birthday. She said they had never done so, not even on an alternate date. I don’t know this family very well. They’re new to the neighborhood. But I was flabbergasted that they would act this way. When I asked about the birthdays of the other family members, I was told that since none of them fall on a “bad day” they are celebrated with parties, gifts and everything. Megan was allowed to accept my gift and thanked me, but her mom made it clear this was to be an exception to the rule. Abby, what gives? Completely Baffled in Wyoming

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Completely Baffled: I have no idea. That family’s behavior is bizarre. What could possibly be gained by punishing a child for being born on a particular day? What you have described isn’t respect for a day that was tragic for our country; it is cruelty to an innocent child.

Frank & Ernest

Dear Abby: My wife and I disagree about what we should do on our date nights away from our daughters. She’s nine years younger than I am. I don’t feel comfortable going to dance clubs. I don’t like crowds, fighting to get the bartender’s attention for a drink or dancing with 25-year-olds. I’d prefer listening to live music, staying home and enjoying an empty house, or going somewhere quiet for dinner. My wife thinks what I like is “boring” and this is creating issues in our marriage. I want her to be happy and for both of us to enjoy each other’s com-

Garfield

Momma

Abigail

Van Buren

pany. We’re having a difficult time finding a compromise. I feel like I’ll never live up to her standards of what’s fun and entertaining. Any suggestions? Date Night Dilemma in Chicago

Dear Dilemma: Yes, two of them. The first is to take turns choosing what you’ll do on your date nights, so that you both have some of what you want. The second is to find some new activities you can enjoy as a couple. Shared interests will help you grow together. Dear Abby: A woman at work is having a baby. I didn’t get around to contributing to her group gift. I also didn’t sign the card or mention my omission at the time of the baby shower. A few days later I received a thank-you note. The mother-to-be obviously assumed I contributed. Money is extremely tight right now. Saving the $20 I was going to spend will help my budget. I don’t think anyone picked up on my faux pas. Should I keep quiet? Conflicted in Minnesota Dear Conflicted: You didn’t commit a faux pas; you chose to abstain. I see no reason to announce that you didn’t participate in the baby gift. Not contributing because it would have caused financial strain wasn’t a breach of etiquette; it was prudent. If your name wasn’t on the gift card, you misled no one.

________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last

you might fall behind. 3 stars

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Jumping from one thing to another will be your downfall. Concentrate on what’s important and keep your actions out in the open where you will get the best constructive suggestions possible. Separate your emotions from the task that needs your attention. 2 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Finish the jobs expected of you before you decide to socialize. Someone will talk behind your back if you don’t take care of your responsibilities. Love is in the stars, but don’t let it interfere with your work. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Listen and learn. Now is not the time to be stubborn or unwilling to see the possibilities. Engage in conversations that will bring you in contact with people who are experienced or knowledgeable. Compliments will win you favors. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You can make a creative move if you market your skills and talents to fit a wider range of services. A partnership can turn out to be more than just a business arrangement. Enjoying the company you work with will lead to superior results. 3 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Your emotions will be difficult to control, and inconsistency will lead to partnership problems. Try to stick to one thing and don’t let the people around you cause confusion. Be responsible and ask for help if you feel

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Doonesbury

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Review your responsibilities and adjust your day to suit your needs. Changes that can make your home life better should not be put off to appease others. It’s up to you to make your moves at the best possible time. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t let what others do anger you. It’s important to focus on what’s important. Problems at home or with friends, family or your lover can be expected. Best to say little and do a lot. Actions will speak louder than words. 2 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You can make your point heard if you are honest about what you want. Good fortune can be yours if you look at your assets and liabilities and make fundamental adjustments to suit the economic times. Downsize if necessary. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Friendships will be important and must be given your full attention if someone you care about needs help. Your ability to mediate will come in handy, but don’t get left doing the work when all you should be doing is making suggestions. 2 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s time to buckle down and get things done. Use your knowledge and experience to guide you in the right direction and you’ll find a responsible yet creative way to make things happen that will benefit you emotionally and financially. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t be erratic when it comes to your finances. Overspending on luxury items or social pleasures will lead to regret. Make your money work for you. Set a strict budget and make sure you and anyone you are responsible for sticks to it. 5 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your heart is in the right place, but you will still face opposition if you communicate too openly about the way you feel or what you think. Meddling will not go over well, but working to make your home a better place will. 5 stars

The Family Circus

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Peninsula Daily News for Monday, November 14, 2011

c Our Peninsula “Wild Olympics

SECTION

Artist and educator Frances Rice will lead a two-hour interactive art workshop, also known as a “TASK” party, for kids and adults Saturday at the Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road in Sequim. Renee Mizar

Interactive art for all ages TASK at hand Having fun, being creative goals of session Peninsula Daily News

common household odds and ends, such as cardboard paper towel and toilet paper tubes, empty thread spools, unused craft supplies, old photo calendars and old CDs. Participants are encouraged to bring such items to use in the workshop, though supplies will be provided. Program fees are $5 for children (age 17 or younger) and $10 for adults. Fees support continued MAC programming and will be collected at the door. Advanced registration and payment is accepted at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St. in Sequim. For more information, visit www.macsequim.org or phone the MAC Exhibit Center at 360-683-8110.

Roy Nott

President and CEO, Paneltech Intl., Hoquiam, WA

The son and grandson of Pacific County loggers, I was proud to take a well-paying job in the northwest logging industry when I finished college. During a long stint with ITT Rayonier, I developed the company’s northwest forest business plan and managed its timberlands operations in Forks before I was sent east. But the magnificent forests and rivers of the wild coast eventually drew me back “home,” where I helped start Paneltech, a company that now employs 50 people at the Port of Grays Harbor.

This area badly needs new familywage jobs. Some will come from our commercial forests. But we also need to attract more entrepreneurs that create more valueadded jobs. They will need uniquely-skilled people, the kind drawn here, as I was, because our ancient forests and river watersheds provide clean water, healthy salmon runs, world-class hunting and fishing and an unrivaled quality of life. The Wild Olympics plan will permanently protect these natural amenities vital to our economic future. But the plan also shows great sensitivity toward private property and the commercial timber base. Most public land considered in the proposal is already off limits to logging. It gives timber landowners an option to sell certain lands to the Park, but only if they want to. A healthier timber industry adding more value locally can contribute toward the restoration of our area’s economic vitality. But we also need new companies with new ideas, new value-added jobs and new sources of raw material. With the Wild Olympics plan, we can have both.

Join the conversation. www.WildOlympics.org

Paid for by Wild Olympics Campaign, 706 Simpson Avenue, Hoquiam, WA 98550

1B5139839

SEQUIM — Local artist and educator Frances Rice will hold an interactive art party for kids and adults Saturday. The two-hour workshop, “Interactive Art for All Ages,” will begin at 10 a.m. at the Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road, and is presented by the Museum & Arts Center in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Workshop participants will brainstorm tasks that might include anything from building a structure to performing an action and beyond, which are written down and randomly selected by others to then interpret using the materials at hand. Modeled after improvisa-

tional “TASK” parties developed by New York artist Oliver Herring, the workshop is intended to actively engage participants in thinking outside the box while providing a participatory creative outlet to express those ideas. “The goal is to have fun, spark your creative side and collaborate with others or do your own thing. It’s a morning of hands-on fun doing art,” said Rice, an art teacher for Olympic Peninsula Home Connection through the Crescent School District. “It is also a chance for people to see how others interpret their ideas.” For art supplies, Rice said she plans to use largely recyclable materials and

will protect our economic future.”

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

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Monday, November 14, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Champagne breakfast in Sequim on Sunday

Choreographer

gives free master class

Peninsula Daily News

Eugene Ballet Co. choreographer Toni Pimble, second from left, taught a free master class Oct. 29 at the Port Angeles Dance Center, just before staging her ballet “Romeo and Juliet” at Port Angeles High School. Pimble, who has choreographed dozens of ballets for companies across the country, worked with about 18 Port Angeles girls including, from left, Jackie Gipe, Sophia Breithaupt, Corrine Pierson and Sarah Kauffman. The master class was sponsored by the Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts, which paid for it with a grant from Westaff.

Juan

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SEQUIM — A Fall Champagne Breakfast will be presented by the Sequim Elks Clubs and the International Footprint Association Olympic Peninsula Chapter 74 on Sunday. Open to the public, the breakfast will be at the Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event will include pumpkin waffles made fresh to order. Cost is $9 with champagne, $8 without champagne and $5 for children younger than 12. Attendees are asked to bring a nonperishable food donation for the Sequim Food Bank.

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Peninsula Daily News

Monday, November 14, 2011

C3

Toxins’ effect on food web is topic Jefferson County waters part of talk Peninsula Daily News

$1,019

for

Trap, Neuter

and

Return

Audrey Hetherington, left, of The Lodge at Sherwood Village recently held a silent auction to benefit Peninsula Friends of Animals’ Trap, Neuter and Return Program. Hetherington and her friends raised $1,019 for the program. Receiving the donation from Hetherington are JoAnne Alford, center, and Diane Lopez of Peninsula Friends of Animals.

PORT TOWNSEND — As part of a new focus on toxic chemicals in the marine environment, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center is presenting a lecture on “Toxic Contaminants in Puget Sound Food Webs with a Special Look at Jefferson County Waters.” The talk will be held at the Natural History Exhibit at Fort Worden State Park at 7 p.m. Thursday. Admission is by donation. Jim West and Jennifer Lanksbury from the state Department of Fish and Wildlife will discuss how

pollutants get into the food chain and describe the geographic extent of contamination of fish with special attention to Jefferson County.

Classes of contaminants “The talk will focus on four major classes of toxic contaminants in this ecosystem, including PCBs, flame retardants (PBDEs), hydrocarbons (PAHs) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs),” center Executive Director Anne Murphy wrote in a news release. “The speakers will also introduce their plans to

develop a Sound-wide network of sampling for toxics in mussels, including recruiting local volunteer groups such as PTMSC to participate in the field work.”

Learn about program This is an opportunity to learn about the work of the Puget Sound Assessment and Monitoring Program, a network of regional scientists who have been monitoring key indicators of the Puget Sound Ecosystem’s health since 1988. For more information, phone 360-385-5582, email info@ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

4-H’ers off to higher education with scholarships Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County 4-H Leaders’ Council recently awarded seven scholarships to club members. Scholarship awards are available to all 4-H members when they graduate

from high school. Funds awarded depend on years of service to the club in grades 8-12. Proceeds from the annual 4-H Kiss the Pig Contest funded the scholarships. Scholarship recipients included:

■  Brooklyn Bauer of 4-H Rascals received a $250 scholarship and is attending Southern Oregon University. ■  Ciara Carlsen of Calawah Country received a $250 scholarship and is attending Central Washington University and major-

ing in accounting. ■  Keely Gustin of Silver Spurs received a $200 scholarship and is attending the University of Kentucky and majoring in equine business. ■  Scott Konovalov of Pony/Cattle Express received a $100 scholarship

Briefly . . . Christmas sale offered by preschool

and is attending Peninsula College and majoring in botany plant science. ■  Courtney McConaghy of Energetic 4-H’ers received a $250 scholarship and is attending Peninsula College. ■  Lauren Bergstrom of Crafty Critters received a

Pharmacy

$250 scholarship and is attending Pacific Lutheran University and majoring in nursing. ■  Katelyn McLean of Crafty Critters received a $200 scholarship and is attending Peninsula College and majoring in nursing.

donates to charity

Margie Warren, right, of Jim’s Pharmacy, presents a $999.57 donation to Char Fink, a board member from Operation Uplift. Operation Uplift was Jim’s “Shop with Loyalty & Shop Locally” charity of the month. Along with a portion of the profits from over-the-counter and used book sales, Jim’s held a silent auction and raffle to help raise funds. Also, Warren made a breast cancer awareness quilt and donated it to the auction. Jim’s charity of the month for November is Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County.

55th annual bazaar

SEQUIM — St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Women’s 55th annual Christmas Bazaar will be held at the church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., SEQUIM — Faith from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Lutheran Preschool’s Christmas bazaar will be at Saturday. The event will include 354 W. Cedar St., from 9 handmade gifts, handknits, a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. ornaments, plants, baked There will be handcrafted gifts, baked goods, a goods and raffles. A luncheon will be warm lunch and a silent served from 11 a.m. to 1 auction. p.m. For more information, Peninsula Daily News phone 360-681-7126.

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ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


ACROSS 1 Out of the office 6 NRA part 11 La-la lead-in 14 Madison Square Garden, e.g. 15 How some losses are shown 16 French water 17 Big corporations, lawsuit-wise 19 Sprint alternative 20 Alan of “M*A*S*H” 21 Retriever restraint 22 Folk music’s Kingston __ 23 Divining implement 25 Native blanket makers 27 Godiva choice 32 Sch. in the smallest state 33 Bull: Pref. 34 Petite pastries 37 Money maker 39 More factual 42 Hop, __ and jump 43 Lox holder 45 Hollywood Walk of Fame feature 47 Campus URL ender 48 Anonymous fan 52 Shapewear fabric 54 Quaint stopover 55 Sir __ Belch of “Twelfth Night” 56 Lavish celebrations 59 Bangkok tongue 63 Play for a sap 64 “For your ears only” ... and a hint to first words of 17-, 27- and 48-Across 66 V.P. Biden’s state 67 March march VIP 68 U or I, e.g. 69 Armani competitor, initially 70 Flashy tank fish 71 Part of a college application DOWN 1 Nothin’

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22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

Community Notes

When your aging mother needs more care, call the Wild Rose Adult Family Home in Sequim. We solve problems. 683-9194

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Lost and Found

FOUND: Cell phone. 8th and Cherry St., P.A. around Sept. 1. Call to describe. 452-8435

Place your Ad With The New Classified Wizard Pick your ad package and rate that works for you.

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. THE SCOVILLE SCALE Solution: 9 letters

D I R A G U S H Y L D C S T S By Betty Keller

2 Baseball’s Hershiser 3 Ready for kickoff 4 Out of gear, as a car 5 Hammock snooze 6 Paddy product 7 Durante song title word 8 City ESE of San Francisco 9 Murderous 10 Newspaper VIPs 11 Two-hanky film 12 Betting odds, e.g. 13 Traffic jam components 18 Passé 22 Breezy bye-byes 24 Leaf-peeping mo. 26 Winery container 27 Idiotic 28 “La Traviata” number 29 Sounds familiar 30 Pronoun for you and me 31 Sicilian pizza has a thick one 35 Ocean phenomenon 36 Cowpoke’s prod Lost and Found

FOUND: Silver and black earring in Albertsons parking lot, P.A. 928-3440. LOST PROPERTY? Always check with Clallam County Sheriff’s Office for lost property. 360-417-2268 LOST: Bracelet. Silver cuff, three rows of rose garnet, Sequim or P.A. area. 928-3900 LOST: Cat. Gray and black Tabby, Hwy. 101 between Sequim and P.A. Jumped out of vehicle. 797-3089. LOST: Dog. 10 yr old small female lab. Lost in Sequim. A good Samaritan-lady stopped by Diamond Pt. Rd to catch her, and a nice fellow offered to hold on to her. To those people that may know where my dog is, or who she is with please call 360-461-6256. LOST: Dog. Shepherd mix, gray and white, male, red collar, missing from west side of P.A., may be headed east towards Sequim. 461-3928.

Type your ad how you would like it to read. See your ad before it runs exactly how it will publish. Add a border, graphic, picture, Yellow on Sunday Pay for your ad on our secure site.

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

By DAVID OUELLET

FOUND: Glasses. Marchon by P.A. Courthouse. 452-5458

22

Classified

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

SPORTS WRITER

31

11/14/11 Friday’s Puzzle Solved

D R D I U T A B I A R E P I L

D U A N H Y A E N E T E L O N

© 2011 Universal Uclick

A P I G E C D A N T R B H L Y

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S C N T N E M E R U S A E M K

11/14

Join us on Facebook

Added, Alcohol, Aleppo, Anaheim, Banana, Bell, Blended, Cascabel, Cayenne, Cherry, Chili, Class, Climate, Cook, Datil, Define, Dried, Factor, Habaneras, Heat, Hottest, Legacy, Level, Macho, Mathematical, Measurement, Mild, Nagas, Oils, Pepper, Pure, Rate, Skin, Soak, Soil, Spicy, Sugar, Supermarket, Sweet, Taste, Tests, Units, Vary, Water, Weight, Wilbur Yesterday’s Answer: Goblet THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

RHUCN ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

UPOEC (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 Itsy-bitsy 40 Expected coming-in hr. 41 Red root veggie 44 HDTV feature, often 46 LBJ follower 49 Prove wrong 50 Not subject to taxes 51 Paired up 52 Hit the books

Help Wanted

Business Marketing Coordinator/Advertising Designer. Marketing degree with graphic design minor or relevant work experience Ideal candidate has the ability to create ads for magazine publications by deadlines, conduct market research and analyze responses and create ad campaigns for the company and specific products. Small family owned company needs an employee who is a self-starter and able to work with limited supervision. Must work well with others and have excellent written, verbal skills. Travel once or twice per year may be required. Website maintenance skills a plus. Part time position with possibility of growing into full time. Interested candidates send cover letter, resume, and portfolio of past work.

Caregiver jobs available now Benefits included. Flexible hours. Call PA, 452-2129, Sequim, 582-1647. El Cazador is hiring experienced delivery drivers. Apply in person at 535 W. Washington St., Sequim. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. NURSING ASSISTANTS FT POSITIONS Run don’t walk!! Very few openings so these will fill fast!! Bring your license and come fill out an application for an immediate interview! (NAR’s also welcome if you’re waiting for State Boards)

Part-time position available. Peninsula Daily News sports department is looking for a sports reporter to help compile area sports stories and put together the sports statistics page. The position, for 20 hours a week, requires a self-starter who is reliable, a quick learner and good on the phone with coaches, athletes and the public, and can write short sports stories. Basic sports knowledge is a must. The reporter also will help with the football preview each year and the special sections honoring top athletes at the end of each season. The position is for evenings on Tuesday through Saturday from about 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. each day. Experience with Macs is a plus. The reporter gets vacation and holidays off. For further information, contact Sports Editor Brad LaBrie at 360-417-3525 or e-mail brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com

E E L E V E L C E R B A S U W

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31

Help Wanted

CASE MANAGER 32.5 hrs. wk., located in the Information & Assistance Sequim office. Provides case mgt to seniors and adults with disabilities who are receiving in home care. Good communication & computer skills a must. Bachelor’s degree behavioral or health science and 2 yrs paid social service exp. or BA and 4 yrs exp., WDL, auto ins. required. $16.51/hr, full benefit pkg, Contact Information & Assistance, 1-800801-0050 for job descrip. & applic. packet. Closes 4:00pm 11/16/11. I&A is an EOE. Port Townsend Goodwill Now Hiring Donation Attendant and Key Holder Must have 2 years retail exp at supervisor level Apply at 602 Howard Street Port Townsend Technician. Will train right person. Clean driving record, good attitude and work ethic a must. Smoke free environment. Full time with benefits. Call 681-0722 between 9:30-4:30. Must pass a background check. The Bushwhacker is looking for a lead cook. Apply in person. 1527 E. 1st St.

34

Work Wanted

DENNY’S SAW AND TOOL SHARPENING Serving Jefferson Co since 1983. Will sharpen carbide blades for 1/3 of price of buying new. For fast, courteous, fair prices, some items done while you wait. Call Denny 360-385-5536 Get a clean house for the holidays. Call Cathy, 457-6845. HANDYMAN: No job too big! House/yard PA-PT 360-301-2435 HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Residential and commercial cleaning also R.V.’s Now scheduling for holiday cleanings call to schedule an appointment. 360-808-3017 Hi, my name is Hannah. I do housecleaning and would like very much to clean your home. I am fast, reliable, efficient,licensed, insured, and good company My phone number is (360) 7751258 HOUSECLEANING Organizing. Hardwrkg. Call Lisa 683-4745. HOUSEKEEPING Experienced, have references. 477-4538.

11/12/11

53 Prepares to be photographed 57 Old Russian despot 58 Bluesy James 60 “__ it going?” 61 Word with dining or picnic 62 Lazy way to sit by 64 Hrs. in Phoenix, Arizona 65 Eden’s second resident

34

Work Wanted

I DO housecleaning, dog walking, errands Experienced, dependable. 683-4567. PARTY ENTERTAINER. Give your Party/ Event a Special Touch! Live Entertainment. 250 song repetoire. Holiday tunes.Fast Friendly quotes. Charlie Ferris Vocalist/Entertainer/MC. 460-4298 www.charlieferris.co m Perfection Housekeeping, client openings, Seq./Carlsborg, and eve. business janitorial. 681-5349. RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

4 SEASONS RANCH Updated one level 3 Br., 2 bath home. Kitchen includes granite counter tops, stainless refrigerator, recessed lighting, and tiled back splash. Cozy sunken living room with fireplace insert. Very close to Discovery Trail. Buy a lifestyle, golfing, horse and barn, swimming pool. Walk to the beach or fish from the creek. $229,900. ML262219 Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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MOTRPP

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

C4

OMEODZ Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday’s

Homes

AGNEW CHARMER! This salt-box style home is located on 1.57 acres. 1,870 sf includes 3 Br., 2 bath, brand new kitchen, sunroom, vaulted-ceilings with loft space and wood stove. Detached 2 car garage has partially finished upstairs! $299,000. ML261867 Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE 683-0660 CHARMING COTTAGE BY THE SEA With lovely cameo water views, private community beach access and a private airport nearby. Updated baths and a gourmet kitchen with new stainless appliances including a Jenn-Air convection oven. This is special and unique home has vaulted ceilings, maple laminate flooring and a lovely covered porch. $229,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 CLOSE TO SCHOOL Neat 3 Br., 2.5 bath on low-traffic street. Kick back on front deck and check out the Strait and Mt. Baker. Or enjoy family BBQs in the big backyard. Large garage. Family rooms upstairs and down allow for separate entertainment areas. $214,000. ML262033 Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

(Answers tomorrow) OUNCE PADDLE PLEDGE Jumbles: PIZZA Answer: Having a crossword in the Jumble did this — PUZZLED PEOPLE

51

Homes

Country Living Ranch Home On Acreage For Sale By Owner. Beautiful end of the road privacy on 2.5 acres w /optional adjacent parcels available up to 20 acres. 3 spacious bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1996 custom built 1825 sq. ft. home. $295,000. Jerry 360-460-2960 DID I MENTION THE VIEW? Enjoy the view of the Straits all the way to Victoria. In-town convenience on a quiet, dead-end street. Bright, cheery and spacious home with an indoor swim/spa. Master Br. and bath, another 2 Br. and full bath all on the main floor. Large finished daylight basement with family room, 2 more Br. and a 3/4 bath $329,000. ML261045. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY EXCELLENT INVESTMENT 5 Br., on .73 acre sold as is. Adjacent to McDonald Creek, Discovery Trail and Robin Hill Rec Park is nearby. Detached garage needs alterations/repairs. Fenced backyard play area. Interior features include larger master Br. with unique math bath. Nice large kitchen, very bright living room with bay windows, plenty of room for guests. $190,000. ML261272 Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Golf Course Condominium. Very cozy condominium that sits on the 1st Fairway of the 7 Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course. Sequim is the driest climate in Western Washington and the golf course is at the top. Restaurant and lounge are a stones throw from your condominium. Granite counters, electric fireplace, vaulted ceiling, view of mountains and golf course. Home comes completely furnished down to the kitchen ware and sheets. All you need to bring is yourself. This is a great 2nd home, vacation rental, or investment property. $69,000. 360-643-7925 #1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

EXPANSIVE DUAL VIEWS Large enough to be comfortable, small enough for easy care. Adorable home with great garage and shop with wood stove. Full views of the Straits and the Olympics. 3 Br., 2.5 baths. This is a must see. $230,000. ML261559/225881 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GORGEOUS OLYMPIC MTN VIEW Located on a very nice .93 acre of land right on the corner of Billy Smith and Monroe Rd.1934 cottage that has been freshly painted and has new carpeting. Newer propane stove to keep you cozy. Deck on the south has southern exposure and has great mtn view. Very cute house and a great piece of property fenced and cross fenced. $149,500. ML262140 Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Great investment property, or make this cute little bungalow your home. Updated electrical, plumbing, and double pane windows. This property has numerous fruit trees, partial views of the ocean and mountains. All of this on an oversized lot $99,500 ML261959/277355 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GREAT MOUNTAIN VIEWS Beautiful 1,918 sf custom home on 1.26 acres located north of Sequim. Features include an impressive entry, living room with tall ceilings, great kitchen with granite counter tops, and large south facing deck, new high efficiency heating system, new carpet, interior paint, and appliances. $325,000 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 LIGHT AND AIRY 3 Br., 2 bath rambler with skylights to illuminate the large living area with bay window. Kitchen with eating bar opens to an entertainment size deck. Double car garage. $189,000. ML262189. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

MORSE CREEK! Sunny location on Morse Creek. Lot features septic, power and water. Also 2 Br., 1984 manufactured home that has been a rental and needs some TLC. Possible owner terms with 1/2 down. $42,000. ML261855 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. MOUNTAIN VIEW HOME Great 4 Br., 2.5 bath, 2,600 sf home on .49 acres with a fantastic mountain view. Large kitchen and a walk-in pantry. Oversized attached 2 car garage plus an additional detached 2 car garage for your toys. $367,000 ML262169/289415 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS Rambler on private 9.89 acres. Large deck overlooks large yard. Artist’s log cabin above creek. Detached garage with roughed in apt. Close to town and surrounded by nature. $235,000. ML252160/261542 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND OUTSTANDING VALUE Large split level floor plan home on lot and a half (.33 acre) near Lincoln Park. Living room with fireplace and new laminate flooring, 3 Br., 1 bath plus daylight basement with 2 Br., 1 bath, living room and kitchenette. Fenced backyard, lots of storage, workshop area and rooftop deck. $164,000. ML261726 Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 PRICED TO SELL Immaculate 3 Br., on 1/2 acre on dead end st. New laminate and freshly painted. Great back port to relax and take in the almost 360 degree panoramic view of the mts. A separate 840 sf mother-in-law quarters, or rental, for an extra income. Large private yard in the back with space for garden and fruit trees. Nice separate 520 sf storage shed and very clean enclosed concrete garage with lots of cupboards and workshop. $199,500. ML262157. Sue Dachs 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2011

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C6

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2011

51

Homes

51

A FEW NICKS AND BRUISES Yet solid basics make this budget priced 5plex a wise investment. Good rental history and location. $200,000. ML262234. Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. RECENTLY REMODELED 2 master suites and office space. Fully landscaped (raised garden, flower beds), fruit trees, separate workshop, RV parking, minutes from downtown Sequim. $329,000 ML229493/261144 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND REMODELED MANY UPGRADES Wonderful Dungeness Meadows home with 30 year roof. New laminate floors, 6’ cedar fence, carpet, carport, bathroom counters, sink and toilet, dishwasher and refrigerator. 2 Br., 1.75 bath, new baseboards, drapes, landscaped front and back, patio in back yard. New French door for separate entrance. Converted garage with mini kitchen. $174,500. ML262233 Jan Sivertsen 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SERIOUS INVESTOR ALERT Popular apartment complex in central Port Angeles location for sale. A 38 unit investment opportunity for the serious investor. Call for a confidential appointment to review the numbers and the possibilities. $3,100,000 ML261504 Dan Gase 417-2804 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SUNLAND CHARMER! Remodeled with updated kitchen and laminate floors throughout. Spacious bedrooms, large family room and open kitchen/ dining area. Attached 2-car garage. $229,000. ML262232 Carolyn & Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SWEEPING MOUNTAIN VIEWS 3 Br., 2 baths, 1,872 sf home. One story. Vaulted ceilings.1.32 fully fenced acres. Southern exposure. Two car attached garage. Remodeled 1992. Septic, well. Wall-to-wall carpet, laminate, tile. Heat pump, electric, propane. Disabled access. $249,000. ML261976/278946 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY This 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,380 sf home was beautifully remodeled on the inside in 2008. The kitchen features stainless steel appliances, granite counters, and maple cabinets. The open living area has bamboo hardwood floors and lots of windows. It is located near Shane park. $177,500. Call at 360-477-8014 VIEWS, VIEWS, VIEWS Strait, golf course and Mt. Baker. Complete main living area, complete guest area, too. Dining area leads to wraparound deck. Too many amenities to list. Must see. $329,000. ML166733/260007 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Homes

BEAUTIFUL HOME WITH VIEW! Beautiful home with remarkable view! 3 Br., 2.25 bath, 3,355 sf view of shipping lanes and Cascades. Well maintained, built by Kelly Shields. $379,000. ML203881. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536. WANTED: Work for rent. Older white male. Call 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 775-1135.

54

Lots/ Acreage

BEAUTIFUL CITY LOT Nearly the last view lot on W. 4th St. in P.A. Spectacular strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Lot is ready to build on Easy access, utilities in at street or alley. Located in a fine established area, across from Crown Park, close to trails. Oversize city lot gives plenty of room to build. $79,950. ML261167 Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East FRESHWATER BAY! You’ll love these beautifully treed 5 acre parcels just minutes to the beach and public boat launch. 2 parcels are located off of Freshwater Bay Road on a private cul-de-sac and one parcel can be accessed from either road. Power, water and phone are in at the road. Buyer will need to purchase a Crescent Water Share. Septic will be needed. $115,000 each. ML261577. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. PRICE REDUCED! 13.26 acres of magnificent Sequim farmland, perfect for small farm, home or investment uses. Year round creek and Olympic Mountain views. Irrigation rights. Owner financing possible. $139,000. ML241762. Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company RARE OPPORTUNITY Develop your dream property. 128’ of Sequim Bay frontage tidelands. Ranch style brick home. Unique property. Spectacular views and tidelands. $350,000 ML289688/262176 Alan Burwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SEQUIM: 2.5 wooded acres with potential water view, power and building pad in, on quiet country road, discount for cash, owner financing available. $65,000 360-460-2960

58

Commercial

CLEAN UP! This is your opportunity to own Sequim’s leading dry cleaning and laundry business. Full service, well equipped with mostly newer environmentally friendly equipment. Complete turn key operation. Owners willing to train and assist new owner. Perfect corner location with high visibility window frontage and free street and shopping center parking. $165,000. ML262073. Dave Sharman or Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Classified 58

Commercial

GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY For this prime commercial property. Includes 2 contiguous vacant lots bordering very busy Race St. Race St. is one of the main thoroughfares in Port Angeles, traveled by locals and tourists for year round exposure. This property has many permitted uses – call us for more information! $195,000. ML251067. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Two commercial lots on busy “C” St. Commercial neighborhood zoning has many permitted uses including retail, food and beverage, residential with business, and many more. Great value, and Owner may carry financing with 15% down, subject to seller approval and terms. $119,000. ML260214. Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

61

Apartments Furnished

64

Houses

4322 S. C St., P.A. 3 Br., 2 ba, no smoking/pets, ref. req. $850. 928-2165. Blue Mtn area - 3 yr old clean 3+2 on 5 acres - settle before holidays. Mtn view, quiet, horse ok, pet extra dep. n/s. $1,150. 452-2988. CARLSBORG: 3 Br., 1 ba, W/D, frige, pet ok, fenced yard. $800. 681-7300. EAST SEQ: 2 cabins; W Seq. horse prop. J.L. Scott. 457-8593. Home w/acreage. 4.39 acres w/Aframe. 2 Br. in loft. Needs TLC. Orchard & marketable timber, hunting & fishing. Lot adjoins timber co. land. $130,000. Shown by appt only. 360-963-2156 House Share in large 3 Br. mobile. Big furnished bd pvt entrance shared bath, $450 mo. W/D. TV, WIFI, close to downtown Sequim. On the bus route No pets, no smokers. References, $200 dep. 360-460-7593.

NO LAUNDROMATS! W/D in spacious P.A. 2 Br. $600 plus dep. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423

P.A.: 1 Br., remod., carport, great location. $550. 452-6714

P.A.: 933 E. 2nd. 2 Br. No smoke/pets. $760. 457-4023. P.A.: Clean 1 Br., $600/last/dep. No smoke/pet 452-4671 P.A.: S. Peabody, 2 Br., garage, dbl. view, 2 lots. $700. 457-6753, 460-0026 P.T.: Avail. Dec. 1. Snug bungalow, 2 sm. Br., ample storage, easily heated w/sm propane stove. Solar panels = low elec. bill. W/D, W/G paid. Quiet uptown location. $850. 360-385-3214 P.T.: Private, 2 Br., 1 ba, W/D, water/elec. incl. You pay propane. 1st/last/dep. $675. 385-3589.

63

501 RHODES RD: 2 Br., no pet/smoke. $700, dep. 477-0408.

SEQ: 2 Br., 2 bath mobile, W/D, $700. 460-4294

P.A.: East side, quiet 2 Br., deck, carport. $675. 452-6611.

SEQ: Sun Meadows, 2 Br. + den, 2 ba. $1,050 incl. W/S, upgrades. 461-4817.

64

Houses

1012 W. 10th, P.A. 2 Br., wood stove, no smoking/pets. $700, reference check. 928-2165

SEQ STORE FRONT Top exposure: 1,000 sf. 7th and Washington. Decorate to suit. 461-2689

JOYCE/LYRE RIVER 35’ 5th wheel, private. $500. W/S/G incl. 206-784-8239

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

SEQUIM: Very lg. clean 2 Br, den, 2 ba, gar., all app., fenced, mtn. view yard, no smoke/pets. $900 mo., plus $900 sec. dep. 360-681-5216.

LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

360-417-2810

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Duplexes

EAST P.A.: Warehouse/workshop. 20x32 $300. 2,200 sf $600. 457-9732, 457-9527

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

PA: Westside 4 Br., 2 bath. Clean, 3 views! Gourmet kitchen, all app. + W/D. Fenced yard, garage, deck. $1,185 + dep. 1 yr lease, credit check, references. No smoke, pet ok? Avail. about Nov. 16. 477-6532

P.A.: Central, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, no smoke/pets. $650. Lease, credit check. 360-796-3560

68

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

62

Nice downtown Sequim 2nd story 800 sf 1 Br. + study, 1 ba. Incl W/S/G and laundry. No Pets or smokers $650/m. 360-460-6505

SEQUIM: Room. $350 No drugs/drink/smoking. 457-6779.

HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 1/1 util incl...$575 H 1 br 1 ba......$600 A 2 br 2 ba......$625 H 3 br 1 ba......$800 H 2 br 1.5 ba...$990 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 HOUSE/APT IN SEQ A 2 br 1 ba......$725 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$825 H 3/2 custom $1350

P.A.: 40’ 5th wheel, 3 slide outs, W/S/G cable and Wifi included. $550. 457-9844, 460-4968

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540

LADY NEEDS IMMEDIATE HELP! Lady in recent home explosion needs a serene place to stay and recuperate temporarily, possibly long-term if able. Call ASAP. 808-0962.

PEABODY PLAZA 1 or 2 person, 7th and Peabody. $375 mo. 452-1232 ext. 11

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath. No smoke/ pets. Newer! $1,100. 457-4626.

Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

SEQUIM CONDO 3 Br, 2 ba, adult comm $900. 461-5649.

Apartments Unfurnished

65

SEQUIM: 3.5 Br., 1 ba remodeled, $1,050 mo. 51 Foxfire Ln. Possible rent to own. 477-6859

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

House Share. Room with closet, kitchen & bath. Laundry facilities, utilities, TVInternet. $450 plus $200 deposit. 360-452-5967

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

RANGE: White, smooth cook-top, great condition. $300. 477-9584 or 477-9585

72

Furniture

1930’S BEDROOM SET 2 dressers, vanity table and double bed frame, good condition. $350. 452-9611 leave message BEDROOM SET Southern cannon ball queen with premium mattress set, night stand, dresser/ hutch. $1,250. 681-2196 DINETTE SET: Top quality, oak, double pedestal, 4 deluxe captain’s chairs. 40” with 18” leaf. Like new condition. Must see. $350. 681-4284 DINING SET: 6 chairs, small lighted hutch, 61” oval table with 17” leaf. $550. 452-9130 DINING SET: Dining table and 6 chairs, solid cherry, double pedestal table. 2 capt. chairs, 4 side, upholstered seats. Perfect condition. $700. 504-2017. ENT. CENTER: Corner model, custom oak. Black glass doors, comes with 36” Toshiba TV. Good condition. $150. 460-1974. FURNITURE SET Sunroom or reception office furniture set, 5 piece deluxe, like new. Includes love seat, chair, tables, stool, and lamp. $500/obo. 681-6076.

72

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

73

Furniture

DINING TABLE: Oak w/tile top, 4 chairs, 1 leaf, 48” round or 60” oval. $225. 683-1006 MISC: Crib, full size, natural, gently used, $165. Infant car seat, very good cond., $35. Dresser, well made w/5 drawers & 2 matching bedside tables, $285. Sturdy round dining table w/2 lg leafs and 4 chairs, and pads, $300. 683-8921. RECLINER: La-Z-Boy wall hugger recliner. Light blue fabric, great shape. $250/obo. 681-3299.

73

General Merchandise

ASSORTED ITEMS Large blonde pedestal dining table and 4 chairs, $150. (2) coffee tables, small $30, lg $40. Call for info. 681-4429 BONE CHINA: Old Country Rose, service for 12, with gold plated flatware, many extras. $3,000. 457-1091 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 DINNERWARE SET Christmas 32 piece set plus service pieces. Waechtersbach. $400. 683-8645 FIREPLACE: Brand new gas/propane Majestic fireplace. Complete corner assembly with wood trim and top and a decorative rock front. VERY NICE. $1500/ obo. 360-461-2607. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com GO GO CART: Pride Elite. 4 wheel, larger wheels and battery. $550. 683-6268. HOT TUB: Bradford stainless steel, 4 person, steps, cover, umbrella. $1,995. 681-5178 LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg. MISC: 5 person jacuzzi, runs wonderful, $2,800. 1950’s dining table, four chairs, leaf, green and silver, collapsible side table for wall, $250. Call after 5 p.m. 809-0913 MISC: CZ semi-auto 12 ga. shotgun with 5 choke tubes, $395. Stoeger SxS 12 ga. shotgun tuned for cowboy action, $350. Craftsman 6 1/8” jointer-planer. Newly sharpened blades. $200/obo. 461-6808 MISC: Dancers of Dolphins, Lennox 1991, $75 and Adventures of the fur seal, Lennox 1994, $150 or $200 both. PIllow top queen size mattress, box spring and frame, $200. Dining room set, 4 chairs, $75. 808-2811. MISC: Dinnerware, Desert Rose, serves 8, extras, never used, $250. Ladies red pantcoat, size 10/12, $45. Ladies red SAS shoes, 6.5 narrow, never worn, $40. Stainless steel 4 pc travel mug set, new, $15. 457-5720

76

General Merchandise

MISC: Kenmore portable dishwasher, new, $250. Garmin GPS system, $75. 1978 Star Wars toys, $300. 460-2260.

Sporting Goods

POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746. REVOLVER: Ruger GP100, 4” barrel, caliber 327 federal mag, new in box. $450. 460-4491.

MISC: New Trex accents decking madera color $2.70 ft. Diamond plate truck toolbox $135. Sony 50” lcd tv $300. Makita 3 1/4” portable power planer $95. 360-683-2254

RIFLE: Rem 700 3006 like new, 4Xscope, load dies, brass, Nosler bullets, primers, 2 powders, etc. $550. 681-0814.

MISC: Noritake PreWar dinner set, $3000. Dorothy Doughty birds, $2,500/pair. Dresden dancers, $700. Staffordshire cats, sheep, $700/pair. Empress Eugenie porcelain, $1,500. RCD vase, $800. 775-0054

RUGER 77: 30-338 Winchester Magnum. Comes with brass and dies. $850. 640-3843. SUN X3AX TRIKE Adult 3 wheel bike. 24 spd drive train. Fenders, rear view mirror. Feet height 20”. X-Light and charger. Fitness, fun, and freedom! $1,000 cash/card. 477-9672

MISC: White leather swivel recliner $125. 3 pc bedroom set, $200. Antique rocker, $150. Many other items, moving must sell, $10-$275 ea. No reasonable offer refused. Call for details. 452-8011, Sequim

WINCHESTER: M-1 Garand. New barrel, bedded action. NM sights. $900/obo. 477-9721

79

MISC: Wood stove, like new, heats 8001400 sf, takes 18” logs, $525/obo. 5th wheel tailgate, fits full size Dodge, $125/obo. 681-7293.

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 Private party buying gold and silver. 670-3110

Mobility Scooter Rascal 600 Model, red, almost new, 2 baskets. $899. 452-5303

WANTED: Fill dirt, easy access, 642 Kitchen-Dick Rd., Sequim. 809-3481.

Need Extra Money? Sell your items in locked showcases at the P.A. Antique Mall. 109 W. 1st. 452-1693 Roseville Jardiniere And pedestal. Overall, 27” high. Rose colored blossoms on a darker green shade. $650. 457-7579.

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TICKETS: Seahawks vs. Redskins, Nov. 27th. Vs. Eagles, Dec. 21. Row T, Section 337, Seat 20-21. $80 ea. 360-461-3661

81

TOOLS: Shop Fox band saw, $325. Shop Fox drill press, $200. Craftsman shaper, $80. McLane edger, $95. Boat winch, $35. 775-0054

Locker Beef. References. Natural. No hormones or antibiotics. High Quality. $2.25 lb.; 1/4 or 1/2. Order for December delivery. 360-681-8093

UTILITY TRAILER 12’ Hallmark, tandem axle, electric brakes, spare tires, mount, 7,000 gross. $1,600. 360-796-4502

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WANTED SUV: Late model, excellent condition. Private buyer. 452-3200, 452-3272

Pets

A Winter Lap Warmer Cats and kittens available for adoption. $85. PFOA 452-0414

Home Electronics

FREE: To good home. Affectionate short haired, neutered black male cat, 5 yrs old. 417-8558 or 681-8548.

LAPTOP: Dell Inspiron 1525, 2.13 Ghz processor, 1 gig memory, Windows Vista, like new. $250. 360-808-2984

Golden Retriever Puppies! Purebred registered AKC. Just in time for Christmas! Great family dogs! 7 boys and 3 girls. Available 12/14/11. $600. Serious inquiries only. Call or text 360-477-9214 for more info.

Musical

PA SPEAKERS TAPCO (by Mackie) #6915’s. Like new in box, perfect for band, school, church, bar. Paid $500+. $375. Also Peavy KBA/100 guitar/keyboard 3 channel amp w/EQ. Mint cond. $180. 460-4298.

Maltichon Puppies Born Oct. 2nd, 4 male puppies, to the proud parents of Molly and Harley. They will be ready for adoption Nov. 27 for $450. A $200 nonrefundable deposit will hold your precious one. 775-7454

VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $125/obo. 775-9648

76

Food Produce

Leyland Cypress & Blueberry Bushes G&G Farms, 95 Clover Ln. off Taylor Cutoff, Sequim. 683-8809.

UTILITY TRAILER 10’x7’28” with spare tire. $675. 681-2196.

75

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

Sporting Goods

PUPPIES: (2) male chihuahuas, pure bred, no papers. Tan and white coloring. $350/obo. Call Sara at 912-2332

DRIFT BOAT: 17’ Willie, plus trailer, in excellent shape with many extras. Must see to appreciate! $3,900 firm. 683-4260

PUPPIES: Alaskan Malamute, AKC, Champion bloodlines, loving and adorable, all colors available. $1,000. 360-701-4891

GOLF CART: New batteries. $1,200/ obo. Sequim. 461-5572

Pets

PUPPIES: Black Lab mixed breed. $50. 452-5290 PUPPIES: Bot-chis! Boston Terrier and Chihuahua mix, 2 males, born Aug. 26. Adorable! 1 takes after mom, 1 takes after dad, completely different sizes! Great family pets. $150 each. 683-7882. PUPPY: English Springer Spaniel, male, AKC registered from championship lines, all shots, dewormed, eyes normal, health guarantee, microchipped, housebroke $675. 457-1725. RAT TERRIERS Adorable. Black and white tri, UKC tails, shots, dewclaws, wormed. $300 neg. 360-643-3065 Siberian Husky pups. Purebred, blk/wht and grey/wht, blue eyes, brown eyes, and both. Shots and wormed. Ready to go. Our priority is to find good homes for special dogs. $400. John or Leslie 360-301-5726 360-302-0964 Training Classes Nov. 15th. Greywolf Vet. 683-2106.

83

Farm Animals

ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817. CALL DUCKS: 2 pairs, $25 ea. pair, 1 free Drake. 683-3914 HAY: Local, no rain, barn stored. $4 bale, delivery available. 683-7965

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TABLE SAW: Rockwell, contractors, 10”, heavy duty. $250. 683-7455.

74

82

Horses/ Tack

2 HORSES: Plus trailer, tack, elec. fence. All for $2,800. 681-5349, lv message BAY GELDING: 15 yr., TB, anyone can ride, mellow, safe, 17hh. $1,200/obo. 452-3961 HORSE TRAILER: ‘88 Circle J. 2 horse, straight load. $2,000. 360-808-2295 NICE ALL AROUND MARE Flashy, black, 9 year old finish rope horse. She has started on barrels and is a nice trail horse. Anyone can ride. Sound and up to date. Come try her out! $3,200/obo. 360-460-4643

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Farm Equipment

TRACTOR: 1952 JOHN DEERE MODEL B. Newly overhauled, new paint w/John Deere No. 8-7 ft. Hay Mower, hydrauliclift, 3 cycles. IT RUNS! $2,800. 460-8092

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

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Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DOZER: ‘94 550 Long track Case. With brush rake. $15,000. 683-8332.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2011

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Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘94 30’ Komfort Travel Trailer. Great shape, living room slide-out, A/C, micro, refrigerator/freezer. $4,000. Brinnon area. 360-535-2078 TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730 AIR COMPRESSOR Sears, 1 hp, 8 gal. $50. 683-9295. ANTIQUE: Pump organ. Beautiful, ornate carving. $200. 457-0171 AQUARIUM: 10 gal, filter, pump, etc. Plus 2 gal tank. $15. 452-1661 ATV WHEELS: (4) new steel, fits Yamaha ATV. $100 set of 4, 457-5002 BARBIE DOLLS: Holiday. Still in box. $75. 452-0161 BED FRAMES: (8) raised garden bed, treated wood, 5’. $25 ea. 681-5092. BED: Twin boxspring and mattress. Good condition. $30/obo. 360-385-7772 BICYCLE: Cypress Giant, size 19, with manual/helmet. $200. 683-0033. BICYCLE: Girls 20” red with whtie tires, basket. $30. 808-2296 BIG D SHEET Like new. $40. 457-6997 BIRD CAGE: 20x16x 30. With accessories. $25. 452-0711 BOOKS: Harry Potter, hardback, #1-7. $70. 808-2296 BOWLING ALLEY Counter top, w/10 pins, spots. 63”x43”. $200. 385-5536. CHAIN SAW: Homelite. $25/obo. 928-3464 CHAINSAW: Husqvarna 359, needs carb work. $200. 683-2639 CHAISE LOUNGE Vibrating, brown leather look, adjust. $75. 928-1148. DRYER: Propane. $50. 683-9528.

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Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325 DUMP TRUCK: ‘76 Kenworth. Big cam400 engine. Runs well, maintained. $15,000. 327-3342 DUMP TRUCK: ‘79 Mack. 10 yard, 3 axle, good on fuel, everyday worker. $10,000. ‘97 Beal pup trailer, 4 axle, aluminum box, straight, clean, good tires. $25,000. 460-6230

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Marine

ALUMINUM BOAT: 17’ Bass Tracker, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684. BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350 BAYLINER: ‘87 3450 Tri-Cabin. $19,500 or trade. 683-1344 or 683-5099. BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: 15’ custom aluminum, with motor and trailer. $3,500. 461-7506. BOAT: ‘67 26’ Chris Craft Cavalier with trailer. 350 Mercruiser, bow thruster, toilet, electro scan, windlass, refer, radar, GPS, sounder, full canvas, dinghy, 2 hp Honda. Asking $17,995. 775-0054 DINGHY: Mint condition sailing nesting dinghy including trailer, motor, mast, boom, sails, canvas cover. $3,200. 360-379-1616 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

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LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 360-504-2623 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new electronics. Roller furling. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. Take as is, $10,000. 760-792-3891

TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384

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Motorcycles

DIRTBIKE: ‘00 110 off brand. Lots of extra, after market parts. $700/obo. 582-7519. HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $12,000 452-2275 HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950 HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HARLEY: ‘90 SportsterXLH 883. Cust. pearl paint w/ wolf/moon emblem, Screaming Eagle pkg, Corbin saddle, windshld, fwd contrls, saddlebags w/ quick-release brackets, Kuryakyn ISO grips, more. Stock seats, svc manual, HD sissybar/rack incl. Lots of power and modified gearing for hwy speeds. 20,900 mi. $3,600. 360-683-2182

FREE: Car speakers. 452-6272 FREE: Chain link fencing. Take all. 775-6375 FREEZER: Whirlpool, 19.6. $100. 417-5587 GREEN HOUSE: Windows. $10-$20 ea. 360-797-4178 GUN CASES: (2) Long, hard gun cases. $50 ea. 457-6494 HAT: Stetson flat rim, size 7 1/4. $25. 457-4387 HEDGE TRIMMERS Sears, 19”/22”. $20 ea. 683-9295. HELICOPTER: RC Hirobo Shuttle, with flight accessories. $200. 683-0033. HIGH CHAIR: Barely used, great condition! Animal print. $20. 457-1219. HORSE BLANKET 72”, Dover, turnout, like new. $60. 457-6997 JACKET: Leather, men’s XL, brown. $40. 460-6979. JEWELRY: Victorian, 2 sets: necklace/earings. Crystal/garnet. $75/set. 477-3286. JOINTER: 6”, with stand and motor. $100. 457-1251. JUNGLE GYM: Very clean, easy assembly! $75. 457-1219. LADDER: Extension, aluminum. $80. 670-3302 LEATHERS: Classic motorcycle leathers. Great quality/cond. $200. 928-1148.

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,500. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,200/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. HONDA: Fat-Cat. New battery, new oil, fresh tune up, carburator rebuilt, rack to haul out your deer. $1,600 cash 683-8263 HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $950. 460-1377. QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $1,999/obo. 582-0841 SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. WANTED: Quad and riding gear. Todd at 452-5290 YAMAHA: ‘04 Raptor 660 limited edition, black. Brand new clutch, carrier baring in back axel, extra header and pipe. aluminum wheels and meaty tires. this a great looking quad not to mention fast. I’m asking $2,800. Great price. 360-670-6366 YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $7900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701.

YAMAHA: ‘09 XTR 250. 80 mpg, brought new 2 months ago for $4,900, 700 mi. 1st $3,390 cash. 670-2562

HONDA: ‘01 XR 250. Low hrs., $1,700. 683-4761.

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HONDA: ‘03 XR100R. Excelelnt condition. $1,500. 808-3953.

5TH WHEEL: ‘03 37’ toy hauler. $19,900/ obo. 460-9556.

Recreational Vehicles

HONDA: ‘04 750 Aero Shadow. Gorgeous black and silver. $3,990. 452-0837. HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376 HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096.

5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

HONDA: ‘81 Goldwing. $1,200. 360-963-2659

5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075

HONDA: ‘83 Ascot. $1,500. 360-963-2659

SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

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FREE: Cabinet for garage. 452-6272.

SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347. EXCAVATOR: Runs great! $8000. Call 360-928-0273 for details. PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071.

RECLINER: Swivel/ rocker, tan, with ottoman. $50. 452-2739

LIFT CHAIR: Electric, lifts 325 lbs, reclines, blue. Exc. cond. $150. 477-6985.

LOVE SEAT: With cover. $100. 360-912-2032 LUGGAGE: Samsonite, never used, dark red, wheels, $195. 360-202-0928. LUMBER RACK: For van. $100. 360-809-0355 MATTRESS TOPPER Foam, queen, like new. $50. 457-4847. MISC: Desk chair, $20/obo. Collector plates, $10/obo. 928-3464 MISC: Oak end table, coffee table. $40 ea. (2) Terra cotta lamps, $35. 417-5587. MULCHER/CHIPPER Electric. $185/obo. 452-7225 MUST SELL: TV, VCR, around 200 movies. $140. 775-6375 OFFICE CHAIR: Gray, upholstered. $35. 683-4063 PELLET GUN: Sheridan 5 mm, great cond. $125/obo. 452-9685 PLANER: DeWalt DW675 3-3/8”, portable, electric. $80. 461-1960. PLEXIGLASS: (2) 4x8 sheets, 3/16 thick. New. $45 ea. 681-5092 POOL TABLE Chatsworth 8’ slate/ slatron. $150. 683-9882 eves. PRINT: Collectible, Byron Birdsall, ltd print, “Coming In”. $175. 477-3286. RADIO FLYER Spring Horse “Liberty” Model. $75. 360-460-7048 RECLINER: Good condition. $75. 360-912-2032 SKI PANTS: New, Solstice, size L, black. $60. 457-5002

CHAR BROIL: Electric patio grill. Blue w/lid & cover. Never used. $50. 457-5291 Christmas Decor W/tree, all kinds, several boxes. Take all, $50. 797-1179. COAT: Wool and mohair, women’s size 12. $40. 460-6979 COMPACTOR: Trash, commercial. $150. 360-797-4178 COMPRESSION TESTER New. $20. 457-4387. COMPUTER DESK With shelves. 29”x 35”. $35. 683-4063. DESK CHAIR: Swivel, solid, on coasters. Exc. cond. $25. 797-1179 DESK HUTCH: Oak, like new, 4 cubbies, book shelf. $125. 452-8264 DINING TABLE: Oval, quality wood, 6 matching chairs. $200. 683-4413. DROP CEILING Framework/diffusers for 12’x12’ space. $50. 681-4768. DUCK DECOYS: (12) With lines and weight. $25. 683-4413 DUSTER: Australian Outback, brown, oilcloth coat size M. $75. 928-1148. EXERCISE BIKE Schwinn Airdyne Deluxe. Stationary. $75/obo. 452-9685. FAX: Brother FAX575. New, never used. $50. 461-1960 FISH TANK: 29 gal., complete, w/stand. $50. 417-9064. FLY ROD: Old 4 piece Fenwick. $100. 808-2949 FOOD PROCESSOR Black and Decker, new. $10. 683-0146.

HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing 1200. 30K mi. $2,400. 461-2627.

CAMPER: ‘03 10.6’ Bigfoot truck camper. 2500 series, color bamboo, model 25C106E. Highest quality, excellent condition. $9,000/obo. 360-379-1804

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘90 28’ Kit. Average cond. $3,500/obo. 360-683-6131 CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615.

RECLINERS: (2) Matching, green, good shape. $125. 417-5515 REFRIGERATOR Magic Chef, in really good shape. $75. 452-0161 RIMS: (4) 17” and wheel covers, with lug nuts, for ‘02 Nissan. $100. 417-0826 ROASTING PAN: For Turkey, stainless, new in box. $25. 683-0146 ROY ROGERS: Movie collection. 100+ VHS, all or none. $200. 683-2685. SIGMA LENS: For Nikon digital camera. 18-125mm zoom. $150. 477-4776. SLICER: Deli style, 63/8” blade. $30. 457-4847 SNOW TIRES: (4) Mounted with studs, fit Dodge Caravan. $140. 731-8439. SOFA: Dark green and blue, like new, $200. 681-0227 SOFA: Ethan Allen, floral, good shape. $125. 417-5515. STOVE TOP: Gas, black, with vent, like new. $125. 452-7225 STUD TIRES: (3) P215/70R15. $15 ea. 457-5817 TABLE SAW: Craftsman, with carbide blade, rip fence and miter. $75. 385-5536. TABLE: 3’x5’ natural finish and tiles, with 4 chairs. Great cond. $200. 681-8713. TABLES: Small, misc. $20. 681-0227. THREAD: Box of crochet thread, variety. $5. 452-2739.

Recreational Vehicles

MOTORHOME: Southwind by Fleetwood and a Honda Accord tow car, a package deal. Will not separate. We are the original owners. $18,500 COD. Less than the cost of a new car! Call 360-681-0144

DODGE: ‘68 200 pickup with camper. 383 eng. Good cond. $2,500. 797-1508. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 30’ Winnebago Brave. Low mi., always garaged, must see/ Vortec 8.1, $35,000. 683-4912 MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 MOTOR HOME: ‘75 Newell Coach 35’. Cat, Allison. Will take 20’-24’ cargo trailer or Ford 12’ cube van part trade. $15,000/obo. 460-6979. MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436.

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RV: 1998 22F 97,000 , needs handyman, roof leaks into walls. Nice, runs well, new tires. $5,500. 360-477-6968 TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. No slide, exc. cond. $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514 TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 TRAILER: ‘09 16’ Casita. Fiberglass, very nice. $10,125. 683-5871

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Call for Bids You are invited to bid the janitorial service for the corporate and salaried personnel offices at Nippon Paper Industries. The contract term will be for calendar year 2012. Bids will be taken until Dec. 9. Award will be Dec. 16. Start date will be Jan 1, 2012. All potential contractors must be licensed and bonded. Please contact Max Clemons, at 360 565-7014 for a bid package. Pub: Nov. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 2011 No. 11-2-00596-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF PHILLIP B. WHITEFEATHER; CAROL M. MYERS; SHERYL ZELIGSON; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Phillip B. Whitefeather; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after October 24, 2011, and defend the real property foreclosure action in Clallam County Superior Court, and answer the complaint of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, (“Plaintiff”). You are asked to serve a copy of your answer or responsive pleading upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff at its office stated below. In case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The purpose of this lawsuit is to obtain a judgment, and if not immediately paid, to be satisfied through the foreclosure of real property located in Clallam County, Washington, and legally described as follows: LOT 4 IN BLOCK 292 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 27, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 114 Ninth Street West, Port Angeles, WA 98362. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/ Janaya L. Carter, WSBA #32715 Lauren Davidson Humphreys, WSBA #41694 Valerie I. Holder, WSBA #42968 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th Street, Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 Pub: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2011

TILLER EXTENSION For OB motor, 29”. $30. 457-6494, TIMBER RACK: Fits large pickup, old. $40. 670-3302. TIRE CHAINS: Cable type, fit P165R13 P165/70R365 tires. $10. 457-0817. TIRE CHAINS: Cable type, P245/70R-14 P285/352R-17 tires. $10. 457-0817. TOOL BOX: Large, rigid, job site. $80. 808-2949 TRANSFER BENCH In carton, never used. $35. 477-1490. TRASH BURNER: For cabin/small area. Wood burning. $110. 360-379-1099 TV: 27” Sony Trinitron, color, great shape. $50. 452-9146. TYPEWRITER: Nakajima Electronic, programmable. $135. 928-3447 U-HAUL BOXES: (25) small and 5 med. Gently used once. $25. 360-582-9160. VACUUM: Kirby upright, with attach./ cleaning equip. $90. 360-379-1099 VCR: Magnavox VR3460 video cassette recorder. $12. 928-3447 WASHER/DRYER: Both run well, you haul. $50. 477-2630. WHEELS: (4) ‘98 Toyota, 14”. $5 each. 457-5817 WINTER COAT: Mens warm, gray, knee length. Never worn. $50. 360-202-0928. WOMENS CLOTHES Plus sizes, tops and pants, 20 pieces. $30. 681-4768. X-COUNTRY SKIS Good condition. $75. With shoes, $100. 681-8713

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Parts/ Accessories

ENGINES AND TRANSMISSIONS IHC DT 466 engine, $950. Perkins HT6354 engine, $750. Onan NH engine, $75. Onan CCK generator engine, $100. Allison MT643 tranny, $500. Fuller FS 4005-B 5 speed, $100. All OBO. 417-5583. SNOW TIRES: (4) Michelin non-studded, used 1 season Sequim to PA. 225/60R18. $500. 683-7789 WANTED: Spare tire and wheel for 2000 VW Jetta. Call 808-1767, 457-7146 WHEELS/TIRES: ‘01 Mercury Grand Prix wheels on studs. Cash. $950. 582-0347, 461-0780

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4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘03 S10 ZR5 CREWCAB 4X4 4.3 liter Vortec V6, auto, loaded! Black exterior in great condition! Black leather interior in excellent shape! Dual power seats, CD, cruise, tilt, privacy glass, air, dual airbags, bed liner, tow, diamond plate tool box, alloy wheels with Goodyear rubber, local truck, excellent condition! Very nice S10 at our no haggle price! $9,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $7,950. 360-477-6969

Recreational Vehicles

TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032 TRAILER: ‘87 27’ Aluma-lite. Great condition. Upgrades included for comfortable living use. Trailer skirt available. Everything works. Mattress and micro included. $6,500/ obo. 360-437-4172 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $5,900. 681-7381

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29’

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $4,500. 460-8155. CHEV: ‘03 Tahoe 4WD 4.8 liter V8, runs great, cloth interior excellent shape, power seat, windows, locks, newer tires, custom rims. $9,900. 460-7901.

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $36,500. 683-2342.

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Legals City of P.A.

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS Lauridsen Boulevard Bridge Replacement PROJECT TR42-99 City of Port Angeles 321 E. Fifth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 The City of Port Angeles, Public Works and Utilities Department is requesting qualifications (RFQ) for Professional Engineering services necessary to complete the above titled project for replacement of the concrete bridge structure. Scope: The intent of the request for proposals is to select an engineering firm and enter into negotiations for an agreement to provide engineering and other services as necessary to complete the project. TASK 1 Services for this task are anticipated to be authorized in and three phases. The consultant’s engagement to complete subsequent phases depends upon the consultant’s satisfactory performance on prior work and upon negotiation of an agreement for the subsequent phases. • Phase I will include supporting engineering and studies, surveying, geotechnical, schedule analysis, preliminary engineering, permitting, and environmental (National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA), Biological Assessment, Hydraulic Project Approval (HPA), Critical Areas, and related studies. • Phase II will include final design, specifications, and cost estimate for bidding documents. • Phase III will include construction administration, testing, inspection, project closeout and other services as needed.

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CHEV: ‘05 Colorado Ext Cab. 61,600 miles with Z71, Toyo A/t tires, bed liner, tool box, running boards. Interior options include Cruise, A/C, Tilt, power windows and doors, cd/mp3 player. $12,800. Call 460-3586 CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 DODGE ‘01 RAM 2500 SLT QUAD CAB SB 4X4 Cummins turbo diesel! Auto! 2 owner! Brown/silver exterior, gray cloth interior in good shape. Power windows, door locks and mirrors, 4 door, power seat, cruise, tilt, privacy glass, tow running boards, 16” alloys! We’re asking literally half of Kelley Blue Book retail value at our no haggle price. $6,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD ‘03 F250 LARIAT CREWCAB SB 4X4 Powerstroke turbo diesel! Auto! Loaded! White/silver exterior in great condition! Gray leather interior in excellent shape! Dual power seats, power adjustable peddles, 6 disc CD, park sensors, wood trim, cruise, tilt, running boards, tow, premium alloys with 80% rubber! $5,000 less than Kelley Blue Book at our no haggle price. $15,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD ‘92 F150 4X4 LONG BED PICKUP 4.9 liter (300) inline 6 cylinder, 5 speed manual transmission, dual fuel tanks, air conditioning, Kenwood CD stereo, upgraded door speakers. Legendary 300 inline 6 cylinder engine! Sparkling clean inside and out! This truck is a true must-see! Stop by Gray Motors today! $3,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967 CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $6,500. 683-4830. FORD ‘99 EXPEDITION XLT 4X4 113K original miles! 4.6 liter Triton V8, auto, loaded, 2 owner! Green exterior in excellent shape! Gray cloth interior in great condition! Power seat, cruise, tilt, tow, privacy glass, 3rd seat, 6 disk CD with premium sound, running boards, roof rack, rear air, 26 service records on Carfax! Very nice Expedition at our no haggle price. $5,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD: ‘00 F150 Lariat Ext. cab. Fiberglass cover, 162K mi., 1 owner, new tires/battery. $8,000/obo. 452-2225 FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. 4WD, exc cond, loaded, V6, tow, CD changer, 3rd seat, more. 122K, books $7,740. Sacrifice $6,800. 457-4363. FORD: ‘03 F150. 4WD 5.4L, 117K, leather CD, new Nokian tires, dark green/tan, very nice. $12,500. Curt at 460-8997.

FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659 FORD: ‘92 F150. 4x4 “Flair side” short box, bedliner, tool box, 302 V8, auto, ps, pb, pw, int. wipers, A/C, AM/FM, cass, sliding rear glass, 94K, very clean. $5,500. 582-0208

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No. 11-2-00460-3 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUDOLPH A. LANGE; ALVIN STEPHENS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; FLAURA’S ACRES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Rudolph A. Lange; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after October 31, 2011, and defend the real property foreclosure action in Clallam County Superior Court, and answer the complaint of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., (“Plaintiff”). You are asked to serve a copy of your answer or responsive pleading upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff at its office stated below. In case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The purpose of this lawsuit is to obtain a judgment, and if not immediately paid, to be satisfied through the foreclosure of real property located in Clallam County, Washington, and legally described as follows: LOT 39 OF FLAURAS ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 5, 1966 IN VOLUME 5 OF PLATS, PAGE 75, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 861 Blair Avenue East, Sequim, WA 98382. DATED this 31st day of October, 2011. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/ Janaya L. Carter, WSBA #32715 Lauren Davidson Humphreys, WSBA #41694 Valerie I. Holder, WSBA #42968 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th Street, Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 Pub: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2011 CR RESOLUTION 12, 2011 CALL FOR HEARING FOR SIX YEAR TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 2012-2017 THE BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS finds as follows: 1. R.C.W. 36.81.121 and W.A.C. 136-15-010 requires the Board of County Commissioners to annually adopt a Six Year Transportation Improvement Program.

TASK 2 Provide a traffic analysis and study for the intersections of Lauridsen Boulevard and Lincoln Street (US 101) and Lauridsen Boulevard and Laurel Street evaluating alternative to the signal. The study will also include coordination with WSDOT, identifying potential funding sources, and potentially writing the grant application for the funding.

2. W.A.C. 136-20-060 and W.A.C. 136-14-050 requires that the Board has the Engineer's Bridge Report and the Priority Array available to consider at the time of determining the program.

The full RFQ, and other documents, for this project are available on-line through Builders Exchange of Washington, Inc. at http://www.bxwa.com. Click on: “Posted Projects”, “Goods and Services”, “City of Port Angeles”. Those interested in submitting a Statement of Qualifications are encouraged to provide contact information to (BXWA) by email to cheri@bxwa.com or telephone at 425258-1303. The consultant must check online at BXWA for any addenda, new documents, or cancellation of the RFQ. Offeror’s shall submit questions no later than December 2, 2011 at 5:00 PM. Interviews will be held on December 15, 2011.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Clallam County Board of Commissioners, in consideration of the above findings of fact:

The City of Port Angeles, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights of 1964, 78 Stat.252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary , Part 21, Non-Discrimination in Federally Assisted Programs of the Department of Transportation, issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all Bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contact entered into pursuant to this advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award. Pub: Nov. 14, 21, 2011

3. A public hearing is required to be held so all taxpayers have a chance to comment on the proposed program.

1. A public hearing be held on the Six Year Transportation Improvement Program at 10:30 a.m., Tuesday, November 22, 2011, in the Commissioners' Public Meeting Room, County Courthouse, Port Angeles, Washington. All members of the public are invited to attend the meeting and provide input into the Six Year Transportation Improvement Program. 2. That a Bridge Inspection Report and Priority Array will be available during the determination of the Six Year Transportation Improvement Program. 3. That the original resolution and Draft Six Year Program is on file in the County Commissioners' office, and copies are available at the County Commissioners' office or the County Public Works Department office, Clallam County Courthouse, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. PASSED AND ADOPTED this eighth day of November 2011 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Stephen P. Tharinger Michael C. Chapman ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: Nov. 11, 14, 2011


C8

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FORD: 1989 F250 4WD 460, canopy. 101K mi. $4,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: ‘87 F250. 4x4 standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $3,200. 457-5649 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347 FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323. JEEP: ‘97 Grand Cherokee Limited. 174K, everything. $3,000. 417-8841. LEXUS 00 RX300 ALL WD 3.0 liter, 24 volt, V6, auto, loaded! Gold/gray exterior in great condition! Tan leather interior in great shape! Dual power heated seats, 6 disk CD w/premium sound, moon roof, side airbags, privacy glass, roof rack, wood trim, cruise, tilt, premium alloys, superb condition! Very nice, very well kept Lexus at our no haggle price! $9,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891 TOYOTA ‘03 TUNDRA TRD EXTRA CAB SR5 4X4 4.7 liter iForce V8, auto, alloy wheels, new tires, spray-in bedliner, tow package, rear sliding window, endless entry, four opening doors, power windows, door locks and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Only 64,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Loaded with options! Stop by Gray Motors today! $15,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA: ‘87 4-Runner 4x4. As is. $1,800. 477-0577.

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Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘79 1 ton service truck, 88K, 4 sp, 350, 7K Onan generator, 3 air tanks, 110 outlets, etc. $4,500. 360-302-5027 CHRYSLER: ‘96 Town and Country LXI. 140K. $3,499/obo. 460-9556 DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756 FORD ‘95 ECONOLINE 150 CARGO VAN 4.9 liter (300) inline 6 cylinder, auto, shelving, passenger protection cage, drivers airbag. Only 89,000 miles! Legendary 300 inline 6! Great work van! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949 FORD: ‘78 F350. Ext. cab, 2WD, 20+ mpg. Isuzu 6 cyl. diesel conv. New tires! $2,600/obo. 808-2202 FORD: ‘85 F150. Cherry, 61K original miles, turn key and start, runs great. $4,250. 928-2181. FORD: ‘89 1/2 ton. Runs excellent, clean $1,500. 504-5664. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. FORD: ‘98 Windstar. 234K, cracked windshield. Runs great. $1,500/obo. 808-2202 GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425. GMC: ‘72 pickup. Strong engine and tranny, fresh tabs, decent tread, great work truck. $700. 477-0829. TOYOTA: ‘93 Ext. cab. SR5, 5 spd, V6. Low miles, nice! $4,500/obo. 461-2021

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Cars

WANTED SUV: Late model, excellent condition. Private buyer. 452-3200, 452-3272

ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154.

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Cars

BUICK ‘00 REGAL LS Economical 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette, power windows, locks and seat, alloy wheels, fog lamps, 91,000 miles, clean and reliable local trade, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $5,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com BUICK: ‘99 LaSabre Custom. Beautiful emerald green, only 69K miles. Leather interior. Mint condition in and out. Rust free, always garaged. Estate sale. Clear title. Must see in Sequim. 683-3405 days only. CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiful, must see. $6,800. 681-3093. CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $10,500. 452-7377. CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419 CHEV ‘06 AVEO LS 5 DOOR Very economical 1.6 liter 4 cylinder, 5 speed, AM/FM CD, side airbags, 42,000 miles, clean local trade, spotless Carfax report. $5,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV: ‘67 El Camino. 400/T400. $12,000. 707-241-5977 CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767. CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170. CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. Reduced $3,000. 808-3374. CHEV: ‘98 Malibu. 4 door, needs engine. $600. 461-7224. FORD: ‘76 LTD. 2 dr, 351, good cond., runs exc., very dependable, some new. $950. 460-6979. FORD: ‘87 Crown Victoria. Full power, low mi., excellent shape, 22 mpg. $1,500. 452-4827.

TOYOTA: ‘88 4WD. V6, new exhaust/ tires, runs good. $1,900/obo. 681-0447 TOYOTA: ‘94 4-Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. $4,500. 452-9693

Classified

Legals Clallam Co.

FORD: ‘92 Mustang LX convertible. 5.0 auto, 71K mi., excellent condition. $3,800. 928-0213. FORD: ‘93 Taurus. Plus studded snow tires. $1,000/obo. 360-649-3907 FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,000 477-1805

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7021.29782 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Kari M. Horton, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007 1200413 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0530175501050000 Abbreviated Legal: FOUR SEASONS PARK DIV 3 VOL 6 PG 38 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: All that portion of Four Seasons Park, Division 3, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 38, Records of Clallam county, designated as "Community Area" lying between Lots 19 and 20 in said Four Seasons Park, Division 3. Situated in the County of Clallam and State of Washington. Commonly known as: 33 Alder Lane South Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/12/07, recorded on 04/30/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1200413, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Kari M. Horton, an unmarried person, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/22/11 Monthly Payments $24,349.44 Late Charges $1,217.52 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $25,566.96 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $775.00 Title Report $634.14 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,512.66 Total Amount Due: $27,079.62 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $142,670.58, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/11/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kari M Horton 33 Alder Lane South Port Angeles, WA 98362 Kari M Horton P.O. Box 3075 Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kari M. Horton 33 Alder Lane South Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kari M. Horton P.O. Box 3075 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/20/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/22/11 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.29782) 1002.199930-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

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Cars

99

Cars

FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $8,500/ obo. 360-808-1242.

HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006.

FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858

KIA: ‘03 Spectra GSX. Hatchback, auto, 131K, new trans in 6/11, runs great, maint. records avail. $3,500/obo. 417-9040

HONDA ‘01 ACCORD VP SEDAN 2.3 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book value! Only 65,000 miles! Great gas mileage! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com HONDA ‘03 ACCORD EX Economical 2.3 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks and seat, power moonroof, keyless entry, alloy wheels, side airbags, 104,000 miles, very very clean local trade-in, spotless Carfax report, sharp car! $9,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com HONDA ‘05 ACCORD V6 HYBRID Only 54,000 miles and loaded including auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM CD stacker, leather interior with heated seats, 8 airbags, electronic traction and stability control, alloy wheels and more! VIN003139. Exp. 11-19-11. $15,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com HONDA: ‘00 EK Hatch. New swap, B18C type R suspension, yellow HID lights, Apexi exhaust, intake, 118K miles. $5,500. 452-9693, 461-6506 HONDA: ’06 Civic Hybrid. 112K hwy. mi., tinted windows, nice wheels, mounted snow tires, very clean. Just retired. $8,500 360-731-0677 HONDA: ‘99 Accord EX. V6, 111K miles, excellent cond., leather, 1 owner, no smoke. $6,900/obo. 681-4502

HYUNDAI: ‘89 Excel, 2 dr hb. 94K, auto. $1,500. 683-1260.

LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, excellent condition. $1,900 452-9693 eves. MAZDA: ‘06 Miata MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $14,500/obo. 681-0863 MERCURY: ‘95 Grand Marquis. Good transportation. $1,750/obo. 4575500. MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353. MG: ‘65 Midget. 85,672 orig. mi., mostly orig. interior. In running cond. $4,800. 417-2606. MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165. MITSUBISHI: ‘08 Convertible Spyder Eclipse. Must sell, sacrifice, beautiful dream car, low mi. First reasonalbe offer takes it. $14,000, worth much more. 360-797-3892 OLDS: ‘95 Cutlass Sierra SL. Nice car, runs ok. $800. 460-0262, 681-0940 PONTIAC ‘03 GRAND AM GT 4 DOOR V6, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD, leather interior, power sunroof, premium alloy wheels and more! VIN677794 Exp. 11-19-11. $6,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com PONTIAC ‘04 VIBE 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM CD, power sunroof, alloy wheels, remote entry and more (made by Toyota). VIN422591. Exp. 11-19-11. $6,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata Limited. Black beauty, all the options plus tinted windows and navigation system, extra set of wheels and tires. $17,800. 477-3191.

PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768. PONTIAC: ‘98 Sunfire. 117K mi., auto, serviced by local dealer, garaged. $3,500. 928-9700. SATURN ‘00 SL2 SEDAN 92K original miles! 1.9 liter DOHC 16 valve 4 cylinder, auto! Silver exterior in fantastic condition! Dark gray cloth interior in excellent shape! AM/FM stereo, dual airbags, air, tilt steering wheel, traction control, over 30 mpg! Local trade-in! Looks, runs, and drives fantastic! Great little fuel sipper at our no haggle price. $3,495

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 STUDEBAKER: ‘50 Champion. Starlight coupe, complete frame off restoration, 3 speed flat head 6 cylinder engine, all original, excellent condition. $12,000/ obo. 683-8810. STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963 SUBARU: ‘97 Legacy Outback. Clean, in good shape, excellent body. New water pump and radiator. Needs engine. $1,500/trade. 681-3968, 808-0443 TOYOTA ‘03 AVALON XLS 4 DOOR V6, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM CD and cassette, power sunroof, leather interior with heated seats, front and side airbags, electronic traction control, alloy wheels remote entry and more! VIN278571 Exp. 11-19-11. $8,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com TOYOTA ‘94 CAMRY XLE 3.0 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette, power windows, locks and seat, power moon roof, alloy wheels, clean and reliable. $3,495 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Excellent, dark blue, extras $18,000/ obo. 928-3669. VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,200. 681-7381. VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184.

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 8318.20082 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Sound Community Bank Grantee: Dave F. Clemons, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009-1233736 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043023 570050 (41013) Abbreviated Legal: LOT 5, WOLFGANG ACRES, VOL. 14, PG. 53 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 5 of Wolfgang Acres, as recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 53, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 80 Mary Jo Lane Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/04/09, recorded on 03/13/09, under Auditor's File No. 2009-1233736, records of Clallam County, Washington, from David F. Clemons, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Sound Community Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/22/2011 Monthly Payments $11,361.00 Late Charges $496.72 Lender's Fees & Costs $228.73 Total Arrearage $12,086.45 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $848.77 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,627.29 Total Amount Due: $13,713.74 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $250,524.73, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David F. Clemons 80 Mary Jo Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David F. Clemons 80 Mary Jo Lane Sequim, WA 98382 David F. Clemons P.O. Box 283 Sequim, WA 98382-0283 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David F. Clemons P.O. Box 283 Sequim, WA 98382-0283 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/19/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/22/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8318.20082) 1002.199397-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7037.06615 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: James C. Hunt and Suzanne S. Hunt, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1210559 Tax Parcel ID No.: 053020-129020 Abbreviated Legal: LT 2 SP 16/87 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 of revised Jewell Short Plat recorded on August 20, 1986 in Volume 16 of Short Plats, Page 87 under Auditor's File No 581275, being a portion of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter in Section 20, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, Willamette Meridian, Clallam County, Washington. Situated in the County of Clallam and State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1485 South Deer Park Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/25/07, recorded on 10/12/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1210559, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James C. Hunt, Suzanne S. Hunt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1251485. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/18/2011 Monthly Payments $43,235.08 Late Charges $1,846.32 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,352.25 Total Arrearage $46,433.65 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $77.00 Recording Costs $127.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $271.00 Total Costs $1,270.00 Total Amount Due: $47,703.65 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $219,337.21, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James C. Hunt 1485 South Deer Park Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Suzanne S. Hunt 1485 South Deer Park Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/28/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/18/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.06615) 1002.154883-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 7713.21710 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association Grantee: Kendrick R. Borland and Patricia M. Borland, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 200501157402 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630095216280000 Abbreviated Legal: Lts 11-12 & E15' Lt 13, Blk 16, Fogarty and Dolan's Addn 2/18 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 11, 12, and the East 15 feet of Lot 13, in Block 16 of Fogarty and Dolan's Addition of the Town of Port Angeles, as recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, page 18, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 124 Motor Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/25/05, recorded on 05/27/07, under Auditor's File No. 200501157402, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Kendrick R Borland and Patricia M Borland, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Brian Lynch, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors and assigns to U.S. Bank National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1269366. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/24/2011 Monthly Payments $13,491.24 Late Charges $565.56 Lender's Fees & Costs $831.00 Total Arrearage $14,887.80 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $625.47 Statutory Mailings $9.76 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $75.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,346.73 Total Amount Due: $16,234.53 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $151,594.83, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kendrick R Borland 124 Motor Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Patricia M Borland 124 Motor Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/27/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/27/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/24/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7713.21710) 1002.191762-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7021.29572 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: Ronald A. Roblan and Christinana Devoney, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009-1241100 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063015239050 Abbreviated Legal: SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 6 WEST, W.M. CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 3 of MOFFETT SHORT PLAT, recorded September 11, 1986 in Volume 16 of Short Plats, Page 98, under Auditor's File No. 582071, being a portion of the East half of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 15, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 135 East Ahlvers Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/22/09, recorded on 08/04/09, under Auditor's File No. 2009-1241100, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Ronald A. Roblan and Christiana Devoney, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Stewart Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for KeyBank National Association, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for KeyBank National Association, its successors and assigns to Bank of America, N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1268620. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/23/2011 Monthly Payments $9,493.25 Late Charges $394.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $40.00 Total Arrearage $9,928.05 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $926.82 Statutory Mailings $9.76 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,709.58 Total Amount Due: $11,637.63 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $291,135.42, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Ronald A. Roblan 135 East Ahlvers Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Christiana Devoney 135 East Ahlvers Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/21/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/23/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.29572) 1002.200073-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

File No.: 7763.27438 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA Grantee: Paul J. Beck and Oi Lin Beck, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20071208322 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000028670 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 14 BL 286 TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 14, Block 286, Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More accurately described as: Lot 14 in Block 286 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 617 East 10th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/27/07, recorded on 08/31/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1208322, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Paul J. Beck and Oi Linn Beck, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/17/2011 Monthly Payments $23,254.56 Late Charges $991.68 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,157.99 Total Arrearage $27,404.23 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $472.50 Total Amount Due: $27,876.73 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $132,207.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Paul J. Beck 617 East 10th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Oi Linn Beck 617 East 10th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Paul J. Beck 511 Lake Farm Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Oi Linn Beck 511 Lake Farm Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/28/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/17/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27438) 1002.164526-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7021.29492 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Abigale A. Grace, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 525329 Tax Parcel ID No.: 985 209 605 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 7 and 8 in Block 96 of Pettygrove's Second Addition Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 7 and 8 in Block 96, Pettygrove's Second Addition to the City of Port Townsend, according to the Plat thereof filed in Volume 2 of Plats at Page 17, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Together with the Easterly 1/2 vacated Chestnut Street as vacated under Ordinance No. 1811 of the City of Port Townsend, that would attach by operation of law. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 330 P Street Port Townsend, WA 98368-2604 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/12/07, recorded on 07/13/07, under Auditor's File No. 525329, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Abigale A. Grace, an unmarried woman, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 8/20/2011 Monthly Payments $45,520.20 Late Charges $2,276.12 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $47,796.32 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $775.00 Title Report $976.64 Statutory Mailings $29.28 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,864.92 Total Amount Due: $49,661.24 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $303,865.11, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Abigale A. Grace 330 P Street Port Townsend, WA 98368-2604 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Abigale A. Grace 330 P Street Port Townsend, WA 98368-2604 Abigale A. Grace 3574 Nyland Way Lafayette, CO 80026 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Abigale A. Grace 3574 Nyland Way Lafayette, CO 80026 Abigale A. Grace 25th and Sherman Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Abigale A. Grace 25th and Sherman Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/20/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 8/20/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7021.29492) 1002.199810-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 7021.28206 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Carney MickHager, as her separate estate and David T. Fletcher, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 533082 Tax Parcel ID No.: 936902504 Abbreviated Legal: Lts 8,9 &10, Bk. 25, 2/99 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lots 8, 9, and 10, Block 25, California Addition to the City of Port Townsend, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 99, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/10/08, recorded on 04/15/08, under Auditor's File No. 533082, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Carney Mick-Hager, a single woman and David T. Fletcher, a single man, as Grantor, to First American Title Company of Spokane, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS" as nominee of Lender, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS" as nominee of Lender, its successors and assigns to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 561186. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/19/2011 Monthly Payments $18,730.53 Late Charges $745.38 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $19,475.91 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $828.00 Statutory Mailings $55.12 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,708.12 Total Amount Due: $21,184.03 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $270,798.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Carney Mick-Hager 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Carney Mick-Hager 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 David T. Fletcher 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David T. Fletcher 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/28/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/28/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/19/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7021.28206) 1002.189067-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2011

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

C9

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7021.29575 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Grantee: Brandon E. Schultz, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 551574 Tax Parcel ID No.: 935900009 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of JEFFERSON, State of Washington: Lot 9 of Bridgehaven Division 8, as per Plat recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Pages 53 and 54, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. More accurately described as follows: Lot 9, Bridgehaven Division No. 8, as per plat recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Pages 53 and 54, and amended in Volume 6 of Plats, Pages 236 and 237, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 70 Sparrow Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/26/10, recorded on 05/03/10, under Auditor's File No. 551574, records of JEFFERSON County, Washington, from Brandon E Schultz, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to ReconTrust Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/23/2011 Monthly Payments $5,027.40 Late Charges $214.35 Lender's Fees & Costs $15.00 Total Arrearage $5,256.75 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $682.34 Statutory Mailings $9.76 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,451.10 Total Amount Due: $6,707.85 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $159,969.60, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Brandon E Schultz 70 Sparrow Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Brandon E Schultz 70 Sparrow Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/21/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/21/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/23/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7021.29575) 1002.200190-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 7763.27177 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, acting as receiver for the Savings Bank and pursuant to its authority under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. section 1821(d) Grantee: Scott Waltenbaugh and Terri Waltenbaugh, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 533575 Tax Parcel ID No.: 001181031 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1 of SP 3/171 & 172 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Harold Harvey Short Plat, as per Plat recorded in Volume 3 of Short Plats, Pages 171 through 172, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 353 and 355 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/22/08, recorded on 04/30/08, under Auditor's File No. 533575, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Scott Waltenbaugh and, Terri Waltenbaugh, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/19/11 Monthly Payments $64,186.60 Late Charges $2,567.60 Lender's Fees & Costs $4,193.26 Total Arrearage $70,947.46 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $57.36 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $72.50 Sale Costs $162.60 Total Costs $1,017.46 Total Amount Due: $71,964.92 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $405,855.84, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 353 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Terri Waltenbaugh 353 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 355 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Terri Waltenbaugh 355 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh P.O. Box 309 Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Terri Waltenbaugh P.O. Box 309 Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 32 Kala Square Place Port Townsend, WA 98368-9804 Terri Waltenbaugh 32 Kala Square Place Port Townsend, WA 98368-9804 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 371 Crutcher Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Terri Waltenbaugh 371 Crutcher Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Michael P. Klein, Ch. 7 Trustee 755 Winslow Way East #201 Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 David Carl Hill, Attorney 2472 Bethel Road Southeast, Suite A Port Orchard, WA 98366 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/07/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/08/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/19/11 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7763.27177) 1002.159358-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011


WeatherNorthwest

Monday, November 14, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Tuesday

Wednesday

Yesterday

Thursday

Friday

High 48

Low 30

45/33

47/37

44/31

38/31

Cloudy with a passing shower.

Mostly cloudy and chilly with a shower.

Cloudy.

Breezy with rain.

Chance for a couple of showers.

Cloudy, rain and snow possible; chilly.

The Peninsula A strong northwest flow aloft will bring a series of disturbances across the region much of this week. One weak disturbance will produce a thick cloud cover with a passing shower today. Snow levels will be around 2,500 feet. Tonight will be mostly cloudy with Port a shower around early. Watch for icy spots on the roads Townsend later tonight as temperatures drip below freezing in many 49/38 places. A cloudy and chilly day is expected for tomorrow, but it should be precipitation-free for the most part.

Victoria 51/41 Neah Bay 48/38

Port Angeles 48/30

Sequim 48/36

Forks 48/35

Olympia 48/30

Seattle 49/34

Spokane 41/19

Yakima Kennewick 53/23 58/27

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Cloudy today with a passing shower. Wind west 8-16 knots becoming southeast. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mostly cloudy tonight with a shower. Wind east-southeast increasing to 15-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Considerable cloudiness tomorrow with a passing shower. Wind southwest 12-25 knots. Waves 2-4 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Table Location High Tide LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

2:41 a.m. 1:35 p.m. 5:57 a.m. 2:38 p.m. 7:42 a.m. 4:23 p.m. 7:03 a.m. 3:44 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

7.1’ 8.2’ 7.4’ 6.1’ 8.9’ 7.3’ 8.4’ 6.9’

8:05 a.m. 8:45 p.m. 11:16 a.m. 10:44 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 11:58 p.m. 12:23 p.m. 11:51 p.m.

3.2’ -0.1’ 5.4’ -0.8’ 7.0’ -1.0’ 6.6’ -0.9’

High Tide Ht 3:24 a.m. 2:14 p.m. 6:39 a.m. 3:06 p.m. 8:24 a.m. 4:51 p.m. 7:45 a.m. 4:12 p.m.

wednesday

Low Tide Ht

7.0’ 7.8’ 7.4’ 5.8’ 8.9’ 7.0’ 8.4’ 6.6’

8:48 a.m. 9:27 p.m. 12:21 p.m. 11:28 p.m. 1:35 p.m. ----1:28 p.m. -----

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Briefly . . . St. Joseph’s has bazaar for holidays SEQUIM — St. Joseph’s Church, 101 E. Maple St., will hold a holiday bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The event will include arts and crafts, a bakery, boutique and silent auction. A soup and pie lunch will be served from 11 a.m.

First

3.3’ 0.2’ 5.2’ -0.5’ 6.8’ --6.4’ ---

High Tide Ht 4:08 a.m. 3:03 p.m. 7:20 a.m. 4:10 p.m. 9:05 a.m. 5:55 p.m. 8:26 a.m. 5:16 p.m.

6.9’ 7.5’ 7.4’ 5.4’ 8.9’ 6.5’ 8.4’ 6.1’

Low Tide Ht 9:37 a.m. 10:14 p.m. 1:46 p.m. ----12:42 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 12:35 a.m. 2:53 p.m.

3.4’ 0.5’ 4.9’ ---0.6’ 6.4’ -0.6’ 6.0’

Nov 24

Dec 2

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 57 48 sh Baghdad 73 50 s Beijing 52 34 s Brussels 61 32 s Cairo 70 54 sh Calgary 34 19 pc Edmonton 31 14 sf Hong Kong 77 70 pc Jerusalem 63 47 sh Johannesburg 83 48 s Kabul 63 33 s London 55 48 pc Mexico City 78 45 s Montreal 61 44 pc Moscow 36 35 c New Delhi 86 54 s Paris 61 41 pc Rio de Janeiro 87 75 t Rome 63 43 s Stockholm 45 32 pc Sydney 89 66 pc Tokyo 58 48 sh Toronto 56 46 r Vancouver 51 41 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Denver 63/32

Atlanta 70/60

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

Houston 82/66

Fronts Cold

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi Lo W 55 38 s 21 9 c 52 34 c 70 60 s 65 56 c 67 53 c 48 29 c 44 18 sf 44 22 pc 50 30 pc 65 53 c 63 45 r 76 58 s 52 32 pc 56 41 r 70 53 t 38 17 c 53 39 c 80 64 c 63 32 pc 57 38 pc 59 40 r 51 38 c -1 -25 c 37 12 sf 83 69 s 82 66 pc 32 25 sf

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 61 66 79 69 83 57 50 75 80 64 71 57 83 72 66 70 53 72 57 63 71 51 80 64 61 51 43 66

Lo W 41 c 48 s 59 c 55 pc 73 pc 38 c 32 pc 60 pc 68 pc 54 c 50 c 31 pc 64 s 52 s 54 c 52 s 36 c 55 pc 32 pc 42 pc 50 r 32 pc 65 pc 57 pc 49 pc 26 pc 20 pc 56 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 91 at Kingsville, TX

Low: 12 at Bodie State Park, CA

Things to Do online The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . .

“Courageous” (PG-13) “Footloose” (PG-13) “In Time” (PG-13) “J. Edgar” (R) “Puss in Boots” (PG) “Tower Heist” (PG-13)

PORT ANGELES — The “Walk Around The Clock” Relay For Life team will hold a pie sale fundn  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997) raiser at Swain’s General Store, 602 E. First St., from “A Very Harold and Kumar Christmas” (R) 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. “Immortals” (R) All pies will be home“Jack and Jill” (PG) made, and event organizers n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360-385-1089) promise they will be “delicious.” “Margin Call” (R) “Puss in Boots” (PG) Proceeds will support the American Cancer Socin  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-385-3883) ety. Peninsula Daily News “Tower Heist” (PG-13)

Miami 83/73

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-452-7176)

Pie sale fundraiser

Kansas City 61/41

El Paso 67/47

Now Showing to 2 p.m. Saturday.

New York 64/54 Washington 66/56

Los Angeles 69/55

Full

Dec 10

Detroit 59/40

Chicago 56/41

San Francisco 61/49

Moon Phases New

Minneapolis 50/32

Billings 44/18

Sunset today ................... 4:38 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:20 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 7:44 p.m. Moonset today ............... 10:48 a.m.

Nov 18

Everett 48/34

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

Seattle 49/34

-10s -0s

Bellingham 45/28 Aberdeen 52/34

Monday, November 14, 2011

Sun & Moon

Last

Port Ludlow 49/38

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 53 46 trace 13.05 Forks 47 41 0.33 98.81 Seattle 49 41 0.15 29.91 Sequim 51 45 0.00 13.76 Hoquiam 51 48 0.18 56.76 Victoria 50 33 0.03 25.27 P. Townsend* 49 38 0.01 13.45 *Data from www.ptguide.com

http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings . . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@ peninsuladailynews.com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

incoln

Serving You for

66 Years!

INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION INC. DBA Lincoln Welding

Come Celebrate 66 Years ~ Going Strong and Planning for the Future! Saturday, November 19, 2011 10am to 2pm Lunch will be served at Noon

The Most Innovative Log Trailer Manufacturer in the Northwest! Paint & Body • Manufacturing • Steel Fabrication & Erection Sand Blasting • Hand Railing • Spiral Staircases N

4130 Tumwater Truck Route, Port Angeles, WA

360.457.6122

W. 8th St.

101 E. 5th St.

101 101

117 1 Mile

E. Lau ridse n Blv d

E. Fro nt St. E. Fir st St.

1B5136939

www.lincolnindustrialcorp.com

Port Angeles 117

S. Ra ce St.

TonighT

S. Lin co S. ln Pe St. ab od yS t.

Today

Peninsula Daily News

S. CS t. Tu mw ate rT ruc kR te.

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