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September 11, 2011

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Ground Zero

9/11 anniversary tributes inside ■ Ten Years After: Where the nation is a decade later D1-D8 ■ A nation mourns: Dedication in Pennsylvania A3 ■ Rites today: Obama to visit all three 9/11 sites A3 ■ Sequim artifact: Rushed to be in town at noon A6 ■ PA monument: Ground Zero piece dedicated today A7 ■ Peninsula rites: 9/11 ceremonies in your town A7

‘I didn’t feel a thing . . .’ 6.4 quake in ocean barely scores a bump By Rob Ollikainen

Peninsula Daily News and news sources

MEMORIES

Peninsula people who were there on 9/11/01 ‘As I got off the bus . . . the first jet screamed past directly above’ EDITOR’S NOTE: Ten years ago, John Hamlin watched the twin towers burn after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and his life completely changed. After having lived in New York since 1996, he returned to Port Angeles in 2010 to run his own company, Angeles Computer, and put his life back together after the horror of that day. He tells what he saw in his own words.

By John Hamlin “It’s going to be a beautiful day tomorrow,” I told my sister. “You are on vacation. The first thing you should do in the morning is get to the top of the World Trade Center. “The view will be awesome. Get there early to beat the morning commute.” My sister, Lisa, and her little boy, Kelvin, agreed. Thank God she’s never on time. That morning, as she reached for the TV remote control to turn off the news and head down to the WTC, she saw the first images of the jet crashing into the tower. As I got off the bus to walk the couple of blocks to my office, the first jet screamed past directly above.

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

John Hamlin, who was in New York City to watch the World Trade Center towers collapse 10 years ago today, stands at the 9/11 memorial in Port Angeles with an I-beam from Ground Zero as its centerpiece.

‘The plan hit about 50 feet of my office’ EDITOR’S NOTE: Shirley A. Watters — who retired in December 2004 and moved to Port Angeles the following year — was an intelligence officer with the Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, working at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. Here is her recollection of that day. By Shirley A. Watters

NEAH BAY — The magnitude-6.4 earthquake centered off the coast of Vancouver Island on Friday afternoon went largely unnoticed on the North Olympic Peninsula. Shirley A. Watters was in the Pentagon on The 12:41 Turn to Hamlin/A7 9/11. p.m. quake was centered about 130 miles northwest of Neah Bay at a depth of 14.3 miles, the U.S. Geological Survey said. “There is no tsunami watch, warnNatural Resources Canada ing or adviEDITOR’S NOTE: The work to remove sory for the the two Elwha River dams begins this week Washington coast,” the Clallam County (see story on Page A8), with special events Sheriff’s Office said in a statement. planned also this week to commemorate the “There have been no reports of anyone beginning of the river restoration project. from the county who may have felt the Port Angeles writer and historian John earthquake. There are no damage reports Kendall has researched the history of the from the British Columbia area.” dams. Beginning today, the Peninsula Janine Bowechop, executive director of Daily News begins a seven-part look-back the Makah Cultural and Research Center on the dams, their role in North Olympic in Neah Bay, was working at the museum Peninsula development and their legacy as when the quake occurred. they come down. “I didn’t feel a thing,” Bowechop said. “But I’m in one of the biggest buildings in By John Kendall town.” For Peninsula Daily News Makah Marina Manager Bob BuckingDuring 1890, a 22-year-old Canadian ham was at his Neah Bay home during the Thomas T. Aldwell found in the North Olympic Peninsula the ideal arrived in Port Angeles. quake and did not feel the ground shake. place to stake an entrepreneurial It was, as he later described in his autobiography, “a wild frontier town. If I Turn to Quake/A8 claim.

As a survivor of the 9-11-01 attack on the Pentagon, I feel very fortunate to have survived and saddened that so many were less fortunate. I was sitting at my desk working when there was a very large explosion, my computer shook, and debris fell from the ceiling. Turn

to

Watters/A6

The Elwha Dams — Part 1

Aldwell stakes a claim to build ‘opportunity’ was looking for undeveloped country, I’d certainly found it; saloons, of course, 16 of them . . . and about 1,300 people. “No opportunities seemed to present themselves automatically. . . . If there were to be opportunities for me, I’d have to make them.” So Thomas Theobald Aldwell created opportunity as he worked many jobs — cigar store, insurance broker, newspaper editor, county auditor, deputy customs collector — and acquired real estate, including $300 for a claim on a river bottom of the Elwha River. In 1894, he and a partner agreed to “buy the three miles above the canyon [his earlier purchase] necessary for flooding when the power was developed. Turn

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Dams/A9

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 95th year, 215th issue — 10 sections, 98 pages

Business/Politics C6 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C2 Commentary/Letters A10 Couples *PW Dear Abby C2 Deaths C9 Movies C5 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Poll Puzzles/Games Sports Weather

A2 E6 B1 C10


A2

UpFront

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Sokurov’s ‘Faust’ wins Golden Lion

that began with “Moloch” in 1999 about Hitler, “Taurus” a year later about Lenin and the 2005 film “The Sun” about Japanese Emperor Hirohito. At a post-award news RUSSIAN DIRECTOR conference, Sokurov made ALEKSANDER Sokuan impassioned plea for rov’s “Faust,” a new take governments to continue on the German legend supporting culture with about the quest for knowl- state funds. edge at all cost, won the Golden Lion prize at the Paltrow skips Venice Film Festival on Gwyneth Paltrow said Saturday. she was “totally thrilled” to “Faust” be nominated for an Emmy tells the for her guest-starring role tale of a on “Glee,” but she won’t be professor, at the ceremony this weekplayed by end where the winner will Johannes be announced. Zeiler, who The craves 38-year-old knowledge Sokurov actress said and sells his soul for the love of Mar- she just garete, played by Isolda reunited Dychauk. The Mephiswith her topheles character is children in played by Anton Adasins- London and kiy. couldn’t Paltrow Dense and difficult to return to watch, “Faust” was neverLos Angeles for Saturday’s theless one of the critics’ Creative Arts Emmy top choices among the 23 Awards, where TV guest in-competition films at roles are honored. Venice this year. Paltrow would, however, It marks the final chap- return to “Glee” to reprise ter in Sokurov’s four-film the free-spirited substitute look at the relationship teacher Holly Holliday, if between man and power invited. She said she “loves

doing that show,” and Holly is “probably the most fun character I’ve ever gotten to play.” Meanwhile, Paltrow has been busy promoting her latest film, “Contagion,” where her role was probably not the most fun character she’s ever gotten to play. She’s Patient No. 1 in a killer pandemic.

Gibson film Mel Gibson, who reportedly made antiSemitic remarks during a drunken driving arrest five years ago, is now producing a film about the life of Jewish hero Judah Maccabee. Gibson’s publicist, Alan Nierob, told The Associated Press on Friday that Gibson Gibson is working on a deal with Warner Bros. to develop the film through his company, Icon Productions. What Gibson’s exact role will be — whether he might direct or even star in the film — hasn’t been determined.

Passings

Laugh Lines FORD IS BUILDING a new plant that will create 5,000 jobs in India. Or as President Obama put it, “You’ve got to be kidding me!” Jimmy Fallon

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Which one of the leading Republican candidates for president do you favor at this time? Michele Bachmann 

Ron Paul 

Rick Perry 

Mitt Romney 

By The Associated Press

CLIFF ROBERTSON, 88, who won an Oscar in 1968 for his portrayal of a mentally disabled man in “Charly,” died of natural causes Saturday afternoon in Stony Brook, a day after his 88th birthday, according to Evelyn Christel, his secretary of 53 years. Mr. Robertson never elevated into the top ranks of leading men, but he remained a popular Mr. Robertson actor from in 2004 the mid1950s into the following century. His later roles included kindly Uncle Ben in the “Spider-Man” movies. He also gained attention for his second marriage to actress and heiress Dina Merrill, daughter of financier E.F. Hutton and Marjorie Merriweather Post, heiress to the Post cereal fortune and one of the world’s richest women. Portraying President John F. Kennedy in “PT-109” presented other challenges. The president warned Mr. Robertson he didn’t want someone trying to imitate his distinctive New England accent. “That was fine with me,” the actor commented in 1963. “I think it would have been a mistake for me to say

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

‘Hahvahd’ or try to reproduce gestures. Then the audience would have been constantly aware that an actor was impersonating the president.” In 1977, Mr. Robertson made the headlines by blowing the whistle on a Hollywood financial scandal. He had discovered that David Begelman, president of Columbia Pictures, had forged his signature on a $10,000 salary check, and he called the FBI and the Burbank and Beverly Hills police departments. Begelman served time for embezzlement, but he returned to the film business. He committed suicide in 1995. Robertson said neither the studios nor the networks would hire him for four years.

_________

BRUCE DAN, 64, who as a leading federal researcher helped establish a link between the lifethreatening disease toxic shock syndrome and the use of tampons, prompting a major shift in the way tampons are produced, died Tuesday in Baltimore. The cause was complications of a bone marrow

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots PORT ANGELES SUPERMARKET math: Five-year-old boy plus 10-pound watermelon equals splat — cleanup on aisle 15 ... WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

transplant he received last year after learning he had leukemia, said his wife, Lisa Stark, a correspondent for ABC News. Dr. Dan, who later became a television medical commentator, was a member of the Toxic Shock Syndrome Task Force, which was created by the Center for Disease Control in 1980 after a virulent outbreak of the disease. Toxic shock syndrome, caused by a potent strain of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, is an infection that produces high fever, a drastic drop in blood pressure, organ failure, a skin rash that frequently covers the entire body and, if the patient lives long enough, a peeling of the skin in layers. Patients can die within days.

5.4% 12.6% 19.8% 11.9%

Other  4.6% None of the above 

45.8%

Total votes cast: 1,248 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

Throngs of people streamed up and down the streets of downtown Port Angeles last night to view the window display show that merchants put out to help shoppers prepare for winter. Traffic was slowed by so Did You Win? many people on foot lookState lottery results ing at the unusually adorned window displays Friday’s Daily Game: and in search of treasure 1-4-4 at clothing, shoe, furniture Friday’s Keno: 02-11and hardware stores. 12-21-24-25-27-29-36-44-52A dozen or more new 54-55-58-60-62-63-66-67-73 rugs in graceful patterns Friday’s Match 4: made a good looking back06-10-15-22 ground for the display in Friday’s Mega Milthe Angeles Furniture lions: 07-12-19-23-31, store window, while a Mega Ball: 45 handsome living room Saturday’s Daily ensemble won much comGame: 6-1-1 ment in the KaufmanSaturday’s Hit 5: Leonard window. 11-13-26-29-34 Saturday’s Keno: 06-07-13-16-21-24-25-29-31- 1961 (50 years ago) 42-45-47-55-56-58-67-69-75Charges were filed in 79-80 Clallam County Superior Saturday’s Lotto: Court against a Redwood 01-03-19-24-26-48 City, Calif., man for reckSaturday’s Match 4: less flying at Clallam 03-05-14-22 County Airport last weekSaturday’s Powerball: end. 04-19-22-32-53, Powerball: Dell Pipkin took off 24, Power Play: 4 from the airport and did a

few snap and barrel rolls over the runway, then buzzed the airport restaurant, according to Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Frank Platt. “During the war, this man would probably have been an ace P-38 pilot,” Platt said. Pipkin, apparently wanted for doing the same thing at an Oregon airport, was arrested at Boeing Field in Seattle and returned to Port Angeles by Trooper Dick Bradley of the State Patrol.

1986 (25 years ago) The Olympic Area Agency on Aging has trimmed approximately 3 percent, $28,814, from its 1986 budget to develop a 1987 budget of $1.1 million. The agency serves senior citizens in Clallam, Jefferson, Grays Harbor and Pacific counties. The cuts should not force any seniors to do without services they’ve received in the past, said Ruth Altis, program specialist.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Sept. 11, the 254th day of 2011. There are 111 days left in the year. This is Patriot Day. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  Ten years ago, on Sept. 11, 2001, America saw its worst day of terrorism as 19 al-Qaida terrorists hijacked four passenger jetliners. Two smashed into New York’s World Trade Center, causing the twin towers to fall; one jetliner plowed into the Pentagon; and the fourth was crashed into a field in western Pennsylvania. In all, nearly 3,000 people were killed. On this date: ■  In 1777, during the American Revolution, forces under Gen. George Washington were defeated by the British in the Battle of Brandywine.

■  In 1814, an American fleet scored a decisive victory over the British in the Battle of Lake Champlain in the War of 1812. ■  In 1857, the Mountain Meadows Massacre took place in present-day southern Utah as a 120-member Arkansas immigrant party was slaughtered by Mormon militiamen aided by Paiute Indians. ■  In 1911, California State University, Fresno, was established as Fresno State Normal School. ■  In 1936, Boulder Dam (now Hoover Dam) began operation as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a key in Washington to signal the startup of the dam’s first hydroelectric generator. ■  In 1941, groundbreaking took place for the Pentagon, now

headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense. In a speech that drew accusations of anti-Semitism, Charles A. Lindbergh told an America First rally in Des Moines, Iowa, that “the British, the Jewish and the Roosevelt administration” were pushing the United States toward war. ■  In 1961, Hurricane Carla struck the coast of Texas as a Category 4 storm; Carla was blamed for 46 deaths in Texas, Louisiana, Kansas and Missouri. ■  In 1971, former Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev died at age 77. ■  In 1973, Chilean President Salvador Allende died in a violent military coup. ■  In 2003, actor John Ritter died six days before his 55th birth-

day at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, Calif. — the same hospital where he was born in 1948. ■  Five years ago: The nation paused to remember the victims of 9/11 on the fifth anniversary of the terrorist attacks. In a prime-time address, President George W. Bush invoked the memory of the victims as he staunchly defended the war in Iraq, though he acknowledged that Saddam Hussein was not responsible for the 9/11 attacks. ■  One year ago: Speaking at the Pentagon, President Barack Obama appealed to the nation to honor the memory of the Sept. 11 victims by hewing to the values of diversity and tolerance. A gunman in rural eastern Kentucky killed five people before turning the shotgun on himself.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, September 11, 2011

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation NASA launches twin spacecraft to probe moon CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A pair of spacecraft rocketed toward the moon Saturday on the first mission dedicated to measuring lunar gravity and determining what’s inside Earth’s orbiting companion — all the way down to the core. “I could hardly be happier,” said the lead scientist, Maria Zuber. After two days of delays and almost another, “I was trying to be as calm as I could be.” NASA launched the near identical probes — named GrailA and Grail-B — aboard a relatively small Delta II rocket to save money. It will take close to four months for the spacecraft to reach the moon, a long, roundabout journey compared with the zippy three-day trip of the Apollo astronauts four decades ago. The spacecraft are traveling independently to the moon, with A arriving on New Year’s Eve and B on New Year’s Day.

Evacuees anxious BASTROP, Texas — After spending nearly a week wondering whether his home had been destroyed in massive wildfires sweeping across Central Texas, George Gaydos got the news Saturday: His house had burned down in the blaze. But Gaydos — who has been living at a hotel with his wife, two children and father since fleeing the fires nearly a week ago — still can’t return to his neighborhood to see what is left

of his home. Fire crews made progress Saturday fighting the wildfire but concerns over still smoldering hotspots have kept thousands of residents, including Gaydos, from returning home. Tensions flared during a news conference Saturday as some residents shouted questions at county officials, demanding to know when they could return to their homes — or what remains of them — in the Bastrop area, located about 30 miles east of Austin.

TV news shows WASHINGTON — Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows: ■  ABC’s “This Week” — Part of the network’s Sept. 11 coverage. ■  NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Part of the network’s Sept. 11 coverage. Giuliani ■  CBS’s “Face the Nation” — White House counterterrorism adviser John Brennan, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani. ■  CNN’s “State of the Union” — Vice President Joe Biden, former Bush White House chief of staff Andrew Card, former CIA Director Michael Hayden, Rumsfeld and others as part of the network’s Sept. 11 coverage. ■  “Fox News Sunday” — Brennan, Rumsfeld, Giuliani; Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Joe Lieberman, I-Conn.; Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Ship carrying 600 sinks off African coast STONE TOWN, Tanzania — An overcrowded ship carrying at least 600 people sank in deep seas near one of Tanzania’s top tourist destinations on Saturday, leaving at least 45 people dead and some 370 more believed missing or dead. Many of the missing are children. The ferry, MV Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam for an island north of the tourist destination of Zanzibar, said survivor Abdullah Saied, who said the boat was carrying at least 600 people. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. Boats frequently traverse the route, but travel times vary depending on the vessel. After the ship began to list, water rushed through the main cabin and stopped the engines, said Mwita Massoud, a survivor.

Red-carpet welcome TRIPOLI, Libya — The chief of Libya’s former rebels arrived in Tripoli on Saturday, greeted by a boisterous red carpet ceremony meant to show he’s taking charge of the interim government replacing the ousted regime of Moammar Gadhafi. But even as Libya’s new leaders tried to consolidate control over the vast country, Gadhafi loyalists pushed back hard

against an assault on the town of Bani Walid, one of Gadhafi’s remaining strongholds, in a sign that the battle is far from over. Abdul-Jalil Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, head of the antiGadhafi forces’ National Transitional Council, landed Saturday at an air force base on the outskirts of Tripoli. A faded red carpet was rolled out, and hundreds of fighters and officials in suits rushed toward the plane as he walked down the steps.

Embassy stormed CAIRO — Israel and Egypt’s leadership tried Saturday to limit the damage in ties after protesters stormed Israel’s embassy in Cairo, trashing offices and prompting the evacuation of nearly the entire staff from Egypt in the worst crisis between the countries since their 1979 peace treaty. The 13-hour rampage deepened Israel’s fears that it is growing increasingly isolated amid the Arab world’s uprisings and, in particular, that Egypt is turning steadily against it after the fall of Hosni Mubarak, the authoritarian leader who was a close ally. Egyptian security forces did nothing as hundreds of protesters massed Friday outside the Nile-side high-rise residential building where the Israeli Embassy is located and tore down a concrete security wall Egyptian authorities erected there only weeks earlier. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Former President George W. Bush, former first lady Laura Bush (partially obscured), former President Bill Clinton, Jill Biden and Vice President Joe Biden, from left, review the Wall of Names during the dedication of Phase 1 of the permanent Flight 93 National Memorial near the crash site of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa., on Saturday.

Rites already begin as U.S. mourns 9/11 Former presidents gather at memorial to Flight 93 heroes By Adam Geller

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Ten years on, Americans come together today where the World Trade Center soared, where the Pentagon stands as a fortress once breached, where United Airlines Flight 93 knifed into the earth. They will gather to pray in cathedrals in our greatest cities and to lay roses before fire stations in our smallest towns, to remember in countless ways the anniversary of the most devastating terrorist attacks since the nation’s founding, and in the process mark the milestone as history itself. As in earlier observances, bells will toll again to mourn the loss of those killed in the attacks. Americans will lay eyes on new memorials in lower Manhattan, rural Pennsylvania and elsewhere, concrete symbols of the resolve to remember and rebuild. On Saturday in rural western Pennsylvania, more than 4,000

people began to tell the story again. At the dedication of the Flight 93 National Memorial near the town of Shanksville, former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden joined the families of the 40 passengers and crew aboard Flight 93 who fought back against their hijackers. “The moment America’s democracy was under attack, our citizens defied their captors by holding a vote,” Bush said. “The choice they made would cost them their lives.”

‘Incalculable gift’ The passengers and crew gave “the entire country an incalculable gift: They saved the capital from attack,” an untold amount of lives and denied al-Qaida the symbolic victory of “smashing the center of American government,” Clinton said. They were “ordinary people given no time at all to decide and they did the right thing,” he said.

“And 2,500 years from now, I hope and pray to God that people will still remember this.” The Pennsylvania memorial park is years from completion. But the dedication and a service to mark the 10th anniversary of the attacks are critical milestones, said Sally Ware, one of the volunteer “ambassadors” who has worked as a guide at the site since the disaster. Today, the nation’s focus turns to ceremonies at the Pentagon, just outside Washington, D.C., and in lower Manhattan for the dedication of the national Sept. 11 memorial. President Barack Obama planned to attend ceremonies at all three sites and was scheduled to speak at a service at the Kennedy Center in the capital this evening. The New York ceremony begins at 8:30 a.m. (5:30 a.m. PDT), with a moment of silence 16 minutes later — coinciding with the exact time when the first tower of the trade center was struck by a hijacked jet. And then, one by one, the reading of the names of the 2,977 killed on Sept. 11 — in New York, at the Pentagon and in rural Pennsylvania.

Obama: Terrorism can’t break nation The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Summoning the nation to unity and service, President Barack Obama paid tribute to America’s resilience and the sacrifice of its war dead Saturday as the country prepared to mark 10 long years since the horrors of 9/11. A day before the anniversary commemorations, the president made a pilgrimage to Arlington National Cemetery, strolling with his wife, Michelle, among graves filled with dead from the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. And he invoked the common purpose that arose from carnage a decade ago in telling Americans that the nation cannot be broken by terrorism “no matter what comes our way.” Obama also visited a soup kitchen, where he and his family

Quick Read

helped prepare trays of gumbo for the needy in the nation’s capital, underscoring the call to national service that rang so loudly after the terrorist attacks. All this as the president and his national security team tracked the latest possible terrorist threat against the country, a tip that alQaida might be seeking to detonate a car bomb in New York or Washington. Obama met his senior national security team in the morning to review the latest developments and ensure the nation remains on a heightened state of vigilance during the anniversary commemorations. As of Saturday, U.S. intelligence agencies had not found evidence that al-Qaida had sneaked any terrorists into the country to carry out an anniversary attack.

The Associated Press

President Barack Obama pauses at Arlington National Cemetery on Saturday.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Amelia Earhart goggles up for auction

Nation: Residents routed by floods allowed to return

Nation: ‘Suspicious’ passenger interrupts flight

World: 10 oil workers missing as storm builds

AN OAKLAND, CALIF., gallery plans to auction goggles it says were worn by famed aviator Amelia Earhart during an early plane crash. The auction today will also feature negatives and photographs of Earhart, who disappeared while trying to circumnavigate the globe. Clars Auction Gallery, which is running the auction, said 15 of the photographs — the bulk of the lot — include shots of Earhart at a barbershop and making other preparations for the round-the-world flight, as well as the plane taking off March 17, 1937. That was one of two attempts Earhart made to circumnavigate the globe.

TENS OF THOUSANDS of people forced from their homes in Pennsylvania were allowed to return Saturday as the Susquehanna River receded from some of the highest floodwaters ever seen, swollen by remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Other residents evacuated from river towns in New York and Maryland were waiting for permission to return as officials surveyed flooding damage. In northeastern Pennsylvania, officials lifted an evacuation order for as many as 60,000 of 70,000 residents in and around Wilkes-Barre. The rest would likely be able to return later Saturday and into today.

A SOUTHWEST AIRLINES flight headed for Baltimore was diverted to Nashville after what he described as “suspicious behavior” by a passenger. The flight originated in Albuquerque on Saturday morning and landed in Nashville at about 1:10 p.m. CDT. Southwest Airlines spokesman Chris Mainz told The Associated Press that the passenger’s behavior on the plane wasn’t disruptive, but he declined to elaborate. No arrests were made. Mainz said police ordered all the passengers off the plane, sent them back through security and examined the plane before passengers were allowed back on.

AIR AND SEA search teams intensified their hunt Saturday for 10 missing Mexican oil workers as Tropical Storm Nate headed west, threatening new areas of Mexico’s gulf coast where hurricane conditions are expected. Meanwhile, fishermen groups reported that at least a dozen of their colleagues aboard two Mexican shrimp boats went missing in the gulf Friday. Nate was still moving toward the coast very slowly but was expected to pick up some speed Saturday, said the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami. Forecasters said the storm would reach the coast today, mostly likely with near hurricane intensity.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Brothers Wilderness fire up to 850 acres Blaze now considered ‘slow growing,’ team official says By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST — The Big Hump fire grew to 850 acres Saturday as crews increased helicopter water drops. The fire, restricted mostly to the forest floor, is located in The Brothers Wilderness, about 10 miles southwest of Brinnon. Its size was estimated at 809 acres Friday and 689 on Thursday, said Pam Sichting, spokeswoman for the Central Oregon Incident Management Team, which is managing the fire. The fire, named for a high point on the Duckabush River Trail, is considered slow-moving and is not threatening property.

been unable to reach the fire because of the area’s steep slopes. Helicopters have been relied on to dump water on the fire to slow its growth.

Sichting said Friday crews have received two more helicopters for containment efforts. That brings the total in the air to three since one was pulled away for the larger Monastery fire near Goldendale. “People are going to see more helicopters in the air to check that line in the east,” she said.

‘Really nasty smoke’ Smoke from the fire drifts into populated areas at night, said Karen Sickel, who lives about four miles from the fire on Duckabush Road and a few miles south of Brinnon. By about 8 p.m., “really nasty smoke” totally engulfs

‘Season-ending event’

Karen Sickel

Smoke rises off the eastern edge of the Big Hump fire on Saturday. the valley, and it’s completely fogged in until sometime between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. the next day, she said. The Duckabush and Mount Jupiter trails have

closed as a result of the fire. It remains at least three miles away from the nearest structure, said Ronda Bishop, information officer for the management team. Containment crews have

fire within The Brothers Wilderness area north of the Duckabush River, east of Olympic National Park, south of the Dosewallips River and west of a ridge line from the Dosewallips River south to the Duckabush River. Containment efforts will be increased if the fire reaches certain “management points,” Bishop said. She said those areas are where the fire would begin to threaten property. On the east side of the fire, they are located between three to five miles from its current boundary. It’s unclear, Bishop said, if the fire will reach those points.

It’s expected that it will continue to simmer until rainfall extinguishes it, likely sometime near the end of the month, Sichting said. “People are going to see smoke up there until we get a season-ending event,” she said. The fire started Aug. 31 and is believed to have been ignited by an abandoned campfire. Although it mushroomed quickly from three acres to ________ 150 in its first couple days, the fire is now considered to Reporter Tom Callis can be be growing “very slowly,” reached at 360-417-3532 or at Sichting said. tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. The plan is to keep the com.

Rep. Tharinger takes voluntary 3% cut in pay By Rob Ollikainen

cut state employee pay by 3 percent to help close a budget gap of more than Steve Tharinger has $5 billion. joined fellow Sequim lawmaker Kevin Van De Wege ‘Right thing to do’ in taking a voluntary pay Tharinger said his volcut from his salary in the state House of Representa- untary cut “seemed like the right thing to do.” tives. “Since state employees T h a rare making a sacrifice, it’s inger filed important for me, who voted paperwork on some of those cuts, to last week to show solidarity with them,” take a 3 perTharinger said. cent pay cut A handful of members, effective including Van De Wege and Sept. 1 House Speaker Frank through the Tharinger Chopp, asked for a 5 perend of 2012, cent cut, Dean said. said BerMost members of the nard Dean, part-time Legislature have deputy chief other jobs outside of Olymclerk of the pia. House. Tharinger makes T h a r$63,504 per year as a Clali n g e r lam County commissioner. became the 44th state Van De Wege He fulfilled a campaign promise to return a portion representaof his county salary — a tive to take little more than $400 — for a voluntary the county meetings that he pay cut, missed while he was conDean said. ducting state business in There are Olympia. 98 members Tharinger decided last in the spring that he will not seek House. a fourth term on the county B o t h Hargrove commission and will instead Tharinger focus on his duties as a and Van De Wege — who opted for a 5 state legislator. He said he hasn’t decided percent pay cut earlier this summer — represent the whether he will embark on 24th District, which covers a new career after the 2012 Clallam and Jefferson coun- legislative session ends ties and part of Grays Har- next spring. Van De Wege, the majorbor County. State Sen. Jim Hargrove, ity whip in the Legislature, D-Hoquiam — also repre- is a lieutenant and parasenting the 24th District — medic with Clallam County has decided not to take a Fire District No. 3 in Sequim. pay cut. Hargrove is a selfRank-and-file lawmakers earn $42,106 a year. A 3 employed forester who has percent cut amounts to served in the Senate since $105.26 per month or 1992 and the House for eight year before that. $1,263 per year. “The majority of the ________ members requesting pay Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be cuts have asked for 3 perreached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. cent,” Dean said. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. This year’s Legislature com. Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Saying

goodbye to loved one

Jamie Mendenhall, left, a close friend of Nathan Ruffcorn — a 29-year-old Port Angeles man and Jamestown S’Klallam tribe member who died in a single-car crash early Thursday morning — hugs Melissa Smith at a memorial service Friday for Ruffcorn in the field along Old Olympic Highway where Ruffcorn’s car ran into a ditch and overturned. Rochelle Blankenship and Gloria Smith, right, also hug during the event that drew about 70 people. “We know our loved one now is on his way to the spirit world,” said Pat John, who spoke at the ceremony. John is a member of the Ahousaht First Nation in British Columbia but has lived with the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe for several years.

Repair to slide area to slow traffic on Highway 101 for several weeks Peninsula Daily News

BRINNON — A wellknown slide area on U.S. Highway 101 south of Brinn­on will be repaired beginning Monday in a project that will slow traffic for several weeks. A temporary signal will direct one-way, alternating traffic 24 hours a day on Highway 101 about seven

+

miles south of Brinnon, just No overwide loads will north of the Jefferson- be permitted. Wide loads can use state Mason county line, until the project’s expected comple- Highway 3 as an alternate route, said Kelly Stowe, tion Oct. 7. state Department of Transportation spokeswoman. Single lane traffic The single lane through Common winter issue the work area will be 12 The project will slow feet wide, with 3 feet of the travel on the highway, lane gravel. which is used by some 2,000 vehicles a day, but it is expected to solve a common winter problem. = Slides after heavy rainfall often block at least part of the highway near the 19701142

BIG SAVINGS

Triton Cove State Park, Stowe said. “We had a slide there last winter,” she said. Transportation crews will reinforce the troublesome slope along the roadway by installing a “deephole patch” This requires digging out the slide area and replacing it with several layers of geosynthetic and gravel materials to reinforce the slope. The project is funded with emergency funds made available from the Federal Highways Association.

Briefly . . .

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CHENEY — Jamie Gladfelter of Port Angeles, has been awarded a $1,500 PORT TOWNSEND — AAUW Port Townsend will Dean’s Scholarship for the 2011-2012 academic year meet at Quimper Unitarat Eastern Washington ian Universalist Church, University. 2333 San Juan Ave., on The Saturday. The group will meet for award is given to refreshments at 9:30 a.m., new incomwith the meeting running ing freshfrom 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Current and prospective man who have demmembers are welcome to onstrated learn about the 2011-2012 outstanding Gladfelter program and interest groups on many topics (e.g., academic merit and achievements in books, art and hiking). high school. Poet and entertainer Gladfelter graduated Mary Lou Sanelli will give from Port Angeles High a presentation about the School in 2011, where she life cycle, mothers and was active in cross-country daughters and the evoluand track, senior class tionary process. president and co-editor of AAUW is open to those the annual. who hold an associate Jamie is the daughter of degree or higher from an Joe and Rebecca Gladfelter accredited institution. For more information, of Port Angeles. Peninsula Daily News email porttownsend@


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

A5

All Jefferson lakes open for recreation By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

The status of lakes containing blue-green algae blooms in East Jefferson County remained unchanged after the latest test results were received Friday, with all lakes open for recreation. Anderson Lake, which is near Chimacum, remains open to fishing and other recreation, though it is posted with a “caution” sign because of a light bloom of algae species known to sometimes produce such toxins as anatoxin-a, a fastacting nerve poison that can be fatal, and microcystin, which can damage the liver after

longtime ingestion. Anderson Lake was reopened Aug. 27 after having been closed since June 10 because of high levels of anatoxin-a, which can cause convulsions and death by respiratory paralysis. Anderson Lake State Park, which is around the lake, has never been closed to recreation. Lake samples are taken each Monday for testing by King County Environmental Labs, and results are received in Jefferson County each Friday. A trace of toxin was found in the Anderson Lake sample, said Mike Dawson, Jefferson County environmental health specialist,

but the amount remained with a “caution” sign below recreational guide- because of algae in the lake. Sandy Shore Lake south lines. of Port Ludlow remains clear.

Warning sign at Gibbs

Gibbs Lake south of Port Townsend is open for recreation but with a “warning” sign posted because of a heavy bloom, Dawson said. Lake Leland north of Quilcene is posted with a caution sign because it contains algae of a type that can produce toxins. Otherwise, it’s “in pretty good shape,” Dawson said. A slight bloom is visible, and a trace of microcystin was found in the latest test results. Silent Lake on the Toandos Peninsula is posted

Conditions can change Lake conditions can change rapidly, and lake status may have changed since the last sample was taken, health specialists said. Regardless of the posted sign at a lake, if a green paint-like scum or bloom is visible, then users should follow the recommendations listed at the “warning” level. The “warning” level means people should not swim in the lake or drink its water, that pets and live-

stock should be kept away from it, boaters should avoid scums and fish should be well-cleaned, with the guts discarded. The “caution” recommendations are the same except swimming should be avoided only in areas of scum. Blue-green algae growth itself is thought to be encouraged by warm, sunny weather when sufficient nutrients, such as phosphates, are present. But researchers don’t understand why some species of blue-green algae will begin to produce toxins, nor what fuels increases in the amount of toxins. Shallow, aging lakes are

more likely to become overgrown with algae and contain toxins. Clallam County lakes, most of which are deep and relatively free of algae, are not tested for toxins. To report algae blooms in Clallam County, phone 360417-2258. Information about Jefferson County lake quality is posted at http://tinyurl. com/6z64ofy. To report blooms in Jefferson County, phone 360385-9444.

________ Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can be reached at 360-4173531 or leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com.

PA cuts budget deficit

Doing a good turn

Shortfall now about $400,000 By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Gary Butler of Port Angeles moves a wheelbarrow down the path at Carrie Blake Park in Sequim on Saturday while participating in a Day of Service project. He and others were clearing brush near the park’s pond.

Day of Service volunteers work throughout Clallam which also kicked off its annual fundraising camVolunteers turned out paign that day. This year’s in droves for Day of Sergoal is to raise $1,002,011. vice projects throughout Projects included yard Clallam County on Saturwork, landscaping, paintday. ing, cleanup and home Since the terrorist repairs in Port Angeles, attacks 10 years ago, Joyce, Forks and Sequim, Sept. 11 has been set aside as a National Day of where the city of organized several community Service and Remembrance. Volunteer projects work details, in addition to the United Way projin Clallam County were ects. the day before the anniUnited Good Neighversary. bors in Jefferson County Projects were organized through the United plans Day of Service projWay of Clallam County, ects on Friday. Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Curtis Blevins, left, uses a roller brush to paint the stage at City Pier in Port Angeles as co-worker Natalie McNary watches Saturday. They were taking part in a United Way of Clallam County National Day of Service project.

Briefly . . . October trial in vehicular homicide case

A “Barstool Bingo” game will be held at the Hilltop Tavern, 2510 W. Sims Way, at 7 p.m. Friday. A garage sale will be held at Union Bank, 2200 W. Sims Way, from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 24. For more information, phone 360-379-4624.

1:30 p.m. and from 2:15 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. No appointments are necessary. Organizers are also seeking assistance in promoting future blood drives. ________ For more information, Reporter Tom Callis can be phone 360-681-7205. reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom. Peninsula Daily News callis@peninsuladailynews.com.

Blood drive slated SEQUIM — Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth St., will host a blood drive from 11 a.m. to

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cabins with bunk beds, with restrooms and showers in separate buildings. The cost of the retreat is $95 per person and includes all meals and lodging. This year, participants PORT ANGELES — may choose to write and Steve W. Boyd will face share poems in a poetry trial on a charge of vehicuworkshop or bring favorite lar homicide next month. poems to read in the circle. The 48-year-old Port As in every year, a clothAngeles resident, charged ing exchange and usedin the death of a Canadian book exchange go on all man last month, pleaded weekend, and women are not guilty Friday in Clalinvited to share their crafts lam County Superior Court. Womanfest retreat and skills during the afternoons and evenings. His trial is scheduled to LAKE CRESCENT — The retreat is hosted by begin Oct. 31 and is The Womanfest fall retreat, the Womanfest board of expected to last between two days and nights of directors, a nonprofit orgafour and seven days. relaxation on the north nization formed in 1983. On Aug. 25, Boyd struck shore of Lake Crescent, is For more details, email a Ford Ranger head-on with set for Sept. 23-25, and womanfest@gmail.com or his Isuzu Rodeo on state spaces are still available. phone 360-452-6814. Highway 112, killing one Reservations are due by passenger, Darrell E. Camp- Tuesday. bell, and injuring two othThe Camp David Junior Donate for heart ers, the State Patrol said. PORT TOWNSEND — lodge, deck and grounds The State Patrol said The Port Townsend branch are the setting for a weekBoyd had a 0.12 percent of Union Bank has planned end of feasting, reading, blood-alcohol level from a walking by the lake, canoe- two fundraisers this month blood sample taken 95 for the American Heart ing and sunbathing. Association. Accommodations are in minutes after the wreck. In a second test at 10:06 a.m., Boyd blew 0.079 percent on a portable Breathalyzer, State Patrol troopers said. The legal limit in Washington is 0.08 percent. Campbell, 49, was a member of the Ahousaht First Nation on Vancouver Island. Boyd remained in custody at the Clallam County jail Saturday, with a $50,000 bail.

PORT ANGELES — City staff said they have more than halved the 2012 projected deficit after a first round of budget cuts. Port Angeles city Finance Director Yvonne Ziomkowski said Friday the shortfall in the general fund is now at about $400,000, down from $900,000. The reduction was made through lots of small cuts, but some of the main contributors were reductions in fuel purchases, overtime and hours for temporary and part-time employees, said Ziomkowski and City Manager Kent Myers. An additional $150,000 in projected revenue, mainly through revised projections for building permit and utility tax revenue, also contributed, Ziomkowski said. Myers said the proposed cuts will not be noticeable to the public. That may change later this month when staff look at reductions in programs and services to make up for the rest of the gap. The budget includes no increases in staffing, nonmerit pay increases or program expansions, Myers said. “There’s nothing new in the budget,” he said. The preliminary budget will be released Oct. 1. A town hall meeting on the budget will be conducted at 5 p.m. Sept. 27 in council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. The City Council will approve the budget in December.

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A6

Sunday, September 11, 2011

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

9/11 still reverberates on Peninsula Readers share their stories of tragic day Peninsula Daily News

People from throughout the North Olympic Peninsula wrote the Peninsula Daily News and sent their thoughts and memories of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Here, they share their emotions and recollections with their neighbors.

Eckart Mildenstein’s visitor’s pass to the World Trade Center in New York.

Young mother watches veterans cry on 9/11

During the following 16 years, I travBy Shenna Straling eled daily Sept. 11 is a day I will never through its forget. subway staI was only tion to get to 22 at the time my office Army veteran Jeffrey J. Thayer stands next to a piece of and had just nearby. And World Trade Center Tower II. become a firstoften I rode time mom. its superfast Mildenstein Fisherman on vacation: National Guardsman I was on elevators my way to my We were at war prepared for action when visiting clients. Lions Club I remember: By Dan McGee By Jeffrey J. Thayer meeting when ■  The magnificent view of I heard on the Launched Zodiac at I served for 25 years in the Manhattan’s skyline from its radio about a 6 a.m. Silver King Resort. U.S. Army and the Washington windows, even more spectacular Straling plane crashArmy National Guard. AWESOME SUNRISE/Day in the evening with millions of ing into the I spent six years in the Army and fishing limits. lights, best seen from its restauWorld Trade Center. Store person stopped me brag- and the past 19 years as a rant on the 106th floor. At the time, I did not realize National Guardsman. ging mid-sentence at 2 p.m. and ■  A flyby of a space shuttle the World Trade Center was the I was mobilized for several filled me in re: event. on the back of a transport plane. Twin Towers, those amazing towVIVID MEMORY: When leav- tours in support of natural disas■  The building creaking like ers I was used to seeing in movters — fighting fires, helping a sailboat as it swayed in heavy ing Silver King on 9/12/01, all ies and in pictures. winds (3 feet in any direction). road equipment (massive project) with flooding at Fir Island and When I got to the restaurant the Battle of Seattle. On 9/11, during the terrorist had already been removed from where the meeting was, I saw a On Sept. 11, 2001, I was work- attack, I worked in midtown state Highway 112 EB to Joyce. huge hole in one of the towers on ing as a sales representative for Manhattan without a view of the We were at war. a big-screen TV. the local Budweiser distributor WTC. ________ The Lions Club I was in was and was a part-time National If we had not had a TV runprimarily made up of veterans Guardsman. Dan McGee, who now lives ning, we would not have noticed who had served our country dur- in Lake Stevens, was vacationing I first heard of the attacks in that, just few miles to the south, ing World War II. in Clallam Bay on Sept. 11, 2001. New York at 8:17 a.m. on that 2,800 people (including 400 I stood there in shock with fateful morning and instantly heroic firefighters and police offithem in front of the television and Teacher comforts kids realized that my life would cers) were perishing in an change forever. watched as the second plane hit. inferno. on day of tragedy, horror I received my first phone call My most vivid memory of Thankfully, tens of thousands By Jennifer Frazier from Fort Lewis at 8:25 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, was seeing our were saved. my cellphone and knew who it heroes who had served and I was a Special Education It hit close to home: Some of was before I answered the phone. fought for our country crying — teacher in Colorado Springs on my fellow commuters perished, We were put on our first alert crying as they realized we were 9/11. and their cars were left on our and were instructed to stay under attack, crying as our PenIt was the tagon was hit and crying as the within two hours of Fort Lewis at parking lot for days. The son of a colleague, just longest teachtowers fell. all times and be available for married, attended a conference ing day of my I was not used to seeing men immediate call-up. life. cry, especially men who could We went into extensive train- on the 106th floor and died. Five months earlier, a friend have been my grandpa. How do ing at our normal weekend drills I stayed there with them until you explain to for several months, and then my had quit his job in the WTC, and his successor was killed there. they wanted to go home. unit was activated, and we 5-year-olds An acquaintance got out but When I got home, I held my deployed to Iraq in April 2003. that they are remained disturbed by the horr­ baby differently than I had ever We were deployed there until safe? ors. before. May 2003. How do Sept. 11, 2001, was my sadFrazier Life had much more meaning. I was again activated in dest day, and it changed our To this day, I turn on the news you comfort a December 2005 and deployed to hysterical world. every morning before I leave to Afghanistan in February 2006. fifth-grader whose dad was in make sure our country is OK. I retired from military service ________ New York at the time? in August 2007. Eckart Mildenstein, a I gave more hugs and wiped Straling later wrote: The picture I have included is retired financial analyst, moved more tears that day than any me in Kabul, Afghanistan, in It is so important for our to Sequim from the New York other teaching day in my career. March 2006. country to remember and never area in 2003. When the school day was over, I am posing next to a piece of forget what happened. I went home and called my mom Tower II of the fallen Twin TowMy baby is now 11, and we ers in New York. to be reassured that I, too, was Woman shares despair just watched “CNN Presents safe! ________ 9/11.” of New Yorker husband We have talked about that Jeffrey J. Thayer, a military By Maureen McElravy-Beh Later, she wrote: day in detail, and I make sure retiree who works as a volunteer she knows that yes, we were While I am a local sett­ler’s There is a National Firefight- coaching youth sports, lives in attacked, but more importantly, daughter, my husband is from Port Angeles. ers Memorial in Colorado there were so many heroes that Long Island. Springs, and every year, I laid day from the fire departments, as We were glued to the televiflowers there to give thanks. Sept. 11, 2001, was well as the police officers and the sion that morning, and he was ________ ‘my saddest day’ heroes on United 93. especially solemn and sad. That is what we want to By Eckart Mildenstein Jennifer Frazier lives in After some time, I saw film remember most from that day. Port Angeles. She teaches Seattle footage taken from Battery Park, The sleek towers of the World Not the hate that caused it. City University students specialone place that was familiar to me Trade Center were part of my ________ izing in special education and from our visit there. life. works for Peninsula College in It was not until that moment, In the 1980s, for five years, I Shenna Straling is the the writing lab and as a math had an office there on the 34th I think, that I felt the slightest branch manager of the Sterling floor. measure of his despair. Savings Bank’s Port Angeles office. tutor.

All Americans were impacted, but none more so than those who call New York home. My father once said the people of our nation had no inkling, nor could they fathom, the number of times our nation had been a target, and the enemy thwarted. It is for our security, that we do not know. God bless America and those who choose to protect us.

________

Maureen McElravy-Beh lives in the Sekiu-Neah Bay area.

Army veteran imagines agony of families By Jim Boyer I heard the news while gett­ing ready for work. I turned on the TV and saw it live just as the second plane hit. That horrible image was subsequently eclipsed by the bodies Boyer falling from the towers. It is impossible to imagine what those people went through in the final moments of their lives when they had to choose how to die. The agony their families have endured, not knowing if one of those falling bodies was a person they loved, is something I still think about when that day is mentioned. Did they hug their children and kiss their spouse? Did they leave in a huff or rush off because they were late for work? Did they agonize over something they said or didn’t say? Later, we learned about the decision of the people on Flight 93 over Pennsylvania who chose to fight the hijackers in an attempt to stop them from completing their hateful mission of killing more innocent people on the ground. I read the account of Todd Beamer talking with his wife and then the 9-1-1 operator who prayed with him and recited the Lord’s Prayer during the last moments of the flight. I realized that how they lived is part of how they died, and that is true for all of us. We are blessed with the days we have and should live them with that understanding.

________ Jim Boyer, an Army veteran, lives in Port Ludlow.

Artifact will be in Sequim by noon Watters: Officers bringing piece from N.Y. in pickup

Dickinson said it has been a long trip for them all, though certainly worthwhile. It started Sept. 1 when they began traveling in Nelson’s truck to New York to pick up the artifact.

“It gave you a very precise idea of what people were facing and the terror that they went through.” By Tom Callis Although the memorial site Peninsula Daily News itself is still in the works, Dickinson said, he hopes the artifact will SEQUIM — A truck carry­ing Impact of attacks help ensure that the attacks and an 843-pound World Trade Centhose who died are not forgotten. ter artifact is expected to arrive What stands out in his mind, “It doesn’t really matter today in Sequim in time for the the police chief said, is how much where you go in America, people 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, the terrorist attacks have are extremely cognisant; they 2001, terrorist attacks. impacted people wherever they still remember,” he said. Police Chief Bill Dickinson, travel. “And we all hope that building Officer Randy Kellas and Detec“There is still a great deal of a memorial will make sure that tive Darrell Nelson were traveling sentiment in this country about the next generation will rememwith the 3-foot piece of metal that attack on our country 10 ber also.” through the mountains of Idaho on years ago,” he said. Former Police Chief Bob Saturday and should arrive at the Dickinson said they gain Spinks applied for the artifact Museum & Arts Center’s DeWitt admiration from those who disbefore he resigned in July 2010. building, 544 N. Sequim Ave., at cover what the dented piece of It will not be the only piece of noon as planned, the chief said. metal is from and what they plan World Trade Center wreckage on “We’re going to try to make to do with it. display on the North Olympic central Washington tonight,” “Mostly, they just want to Peninsula today. Dickinson said by phone. touch it,” he added. A 9/11 memorial will be dedi“We should be able to do a Before they returned home, cated today at 2 p.m. at Francis three- to four-hour drive in the the officers stopped at Ground Street Park in Port Angeles. morning to get us there by noon Zero, the Pentagon and the The park is located along the tomorrow.” United Flight 93 crash site in waterfront at the north end of The artifact will be on display Pennsylvania. at the DeWitt building from noon Dickinson said they found the Francis Street. The memorial features a until 3 p.m. today. United Flight crash site to have 1,400-pound steel beam from the It will be displayed at the Vetthe most impact on them. Twin Towers. erans of Foreign Wars Post 4760, “It was very, very touching,” ________ 169 E. Washington St., from 3 p.m. he said, referring to the tranto 4 p.m. scripts of voice mess­ages made Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at A permanent location for the by passengers to loved ones after 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsulaartifact has not been selected. dailynews.com. the hijacking.

Plane struck within 50 feet of her office I think about the seven coworkers in my unit who did not survive and just how lucky I was. The plane hit within about A day does not go by that I 50 feet of my office near corridon’t think about it. dor 5. On 9-11, it took me four hours We were advised to get out to get home where it normally as there was fire. only took me about 45 minutes, I barely made it out before the automatic fire doors closed and through Pentagon City and all the way home I played Lee in the corridor. Greenwood’s “God Bless The I remember thinking we USA” over and over again. had survived an earthquake, That got me through the ride but it was while we were in the Pentagon center courtyard dur- home, and I never was more ing evacuation that I found out proud to be an American than I it was a plane that hit the Pen- was that day. God bless America! tagon. Continued from A1

Lucky to be here I feel extremely lucky to be here writing this memory because if the plane had hit from a different angle, I more than likely would have been a casualty. There was a lot of confusion that day, and on every Sept. 11, I fly a 9/11 remembrance flag on our flagpole all day.

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(J) — Sunday, September 11, 2011

A7

PA monument dedication slated today

Piece recognizes public safety workers, fund organizer says vided by the Grand Olympic Chorus. PORT ANGELES — A piece A U.S. Coast Guard flyover is of Ground Zero transplanted planned as well as a color guard across the nation from where it ceremony that will include the fell in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorClallam County Sheriff’s Office ists attacks will be dedicated and Port Angeles High School today. NJROTC cadets. The 45-minute ceremony at Public safety officers — includFrancis Street Park in Port Ange- ing Coast Guard Capt. Tony Hahn, les will begin at 2 p.m. commanding officer of Air Station/ It will be standing-room only. Sector Field Office Port Angeles, There will be no seating. and representatives of police, fire Parking will be on-street in the and sheriff agencies — will speak. area and at Windermere at 711 E. Linda Dowdell of Sequim, who Front St., a block away. lived close to Ground Zero at the The monument, finished just time of the attack, will tell of her last week, incorporates a piece of experience. the fallen World Trade Center — a 9-foot-long, 1,400-pound I-beam Fire, police displays from the Twin Towers. It is a monument, not a Fire and police equipment will memorial, said Alan Barnard, be on display, and the American who organized fundraising and Legion Riders, assisted by the scheduling of the building of the Patriot Guard Riders, will provide new monument. a flag line. “We’re not there to grieve,” he All public safety personn­el — said. “This is a dedication for a local, state and federal — are monument in recognition of our invited in or out of uniform, and public safety workers.” the general public is invited, BarAmong the 2,753 victims who nard said. died in the attacks on the World Barnard will tell about the Trade Center were 343 firefight- development of both the original public safety monument, finished ers, 60 police officers and eight private emergency medical tech- in 2002, and the new one. Barnard, a managing broker nicians and paramedics. at Windermere Real Estate in Volunteers have installed the Port Angeles, founded the nonartifact on a concrete pedestal profit Public Safety Tribute beside an existing public safety Committ­ee to create the first monument that was dedicated monument to public safety workSept. 11, 2002. ers in the aftermath of 9/11. When the first monument was Dedication ceremony completed in 2002, Barnard felt Coast Guardsmen Andrew it was unfinished. Moravec and Sam Allen will The effort by Moravec and speak about their two-year effort Allen provided the missing piece. to bring the I-beam from Ground The Port Angeles Fire DepartZero to Port Angeles. ment Auxiliary served as the The ceremony will begin with sponsoring nonprofit required by the singing of the national the Port Authority of New York anthem by Port Angeles city and New Jersey to accept the spokeswoman Teresa Pierce. artifact. Patriotic music will be proBarnard revived the public Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Ray Apple, left, and Marni Rice touch the Ground Zero memorial in Francis Park in Port Angeles last week. The memorial is made up an I-beam from the World Trade Center towers in New York destroyed in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. safety tribute committee, of which he is the lone member, to carry out the plans. The monument cost $5,000, with funds donated by community members.

Volunteers included Port Angeles artist Bob Stokes of Studio Bob and Gray Lucier of Lucier Studio, engineer Steve Zenovic, Alex Anderson of Alex Anderson Concrete, Jay Ketchum

of Affordable Crane, Laurel Black of Laurel Black Design, Bill Roberds and the Port Angeles Rotary Club, Nor’wester Rotary, Structures to Go and the city of Port Angeles.

Peninsula ceremonies mark anniversary of terrorist attacks police and EMTs with a Patriot Day celebration and dinner at 3 Observances marking the 10th p.m. at the VFW Post at 169 E. anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, Washington St. terrorist attacks on the United The event is open to the pubStates are planned across the lic, and there is no cost for the North Olympic Peninsula today. dinner. In Port Townsend, East JefferTo reserve a space, phone 360son Fire-Rescue Deputy Chief 683-9546. Ted Krysinski will lead a brief memorial service commemoratForks commemoration ing those lost Sept. 11, 2001. The 30-minute memorial serA memorial service to mark vice will be at 9 a.m. at the Bell the 10th anniversary of the Sept. Tower, corner of Jefferson and 11, 2001, attacks is planned in Tyler streets. Forks at 9 a.m. In addition to representatives The service will be at the Forks of the fire department, Port Transit Center, 551 S. Forks Ave. Townsend police will be in attendance. Patriot Day All members of the public are Sept. 11 was designated by forwelcome to attend. mer President George W. Bush as The Bell Tower is currently Patriot Day on Dec. 18, 2001. under renovation, so space may On Patriot Day, Americans are be limited. expected to fly their flags at halfstaff. VFW Patriot Day In addition, Gov. Chris Gregoire In Sequim on Sunday, Veterhas directed that flags at all state ans of Foreign Wars Post 4760 agency facilities be lowered to halfwill honor local firefighters, staff. Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Tessa Johnson, 8, hugs Clallam County Lt. firefighter Kevin Denton at an assembly at Roosevelt Elementary in Port Angeles held to honor public safety personnel as an observance of the tenth anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack. From left is Melissa Bornson, 8, Lt. Joe McFarland, Travis McFarland, Lt. Kevin Denton and Tessa Johnson.

Hamlin: No one realized it was until 2nd plane Continued from A1 and headed home. Above the fires, people had to make the choice to either burn to I shook my head in typical New Yorker fashion, thinking the death or jump to their deaths. Some held hands as they fell, pilot is an idiot for flying so fast until the fall pulled them apart. and low just to give passengers a After a firefighter was killed view of the Manhattan skyline. Then, everything changed as I by a falling body, firefighters watched the plane crash into the started crossing the plaza in pairs, one leading the way, the tower. other watching for falling objects. My stepdaughter attended Pieces of paper drifted down Stuyvesant High School, located like giant snowflakes against the in the shadow of the towers. perfectly blue sky. I headed that way. My brain didn”t know how to I remember a woman lying on process this information. the sidewalk crying hysterically. Others went about their busiGiant snow globe of horror ness, seemingly oblivious. Someone said a small comIt was a vivid, conscious muter plane hit the tower. nightmare. A giant snow globe of I said it was a jetliner. horror. No one realized it was war It was quiet as I joined the until the second plane hit the thousands of New Yorkers walkother tower. ing away from lower Manhattan. The students at Stuyvesant There was no panic, but the had already dispersed by the shock was palatable. time I got there. People abandoned their cars Before starting the 70-plusand started walking. block walk uptown to home, I Then, the sound of a jet watched the towers burn. pierced the surreal quiet. The masses stopped walking I should have turned away

and looked up, expecting to see another jet crash into the Chrysler Building or the Empire State Building. Someone said, “Here comes another one.” But the jet was ours and buzzed Manhattan after initially being sent out over the ocean in the wrong direction. There was a collective sigh of relief and nervous laughter as the mass of people began to move uptown again. When the first tower collapsed, the horrible news spread through the crowds like an electric current. Then, the second tower collapsed. Soon after came the smell.

Never forget the smell I”ll never forget the smell and pray I never smell it again. It was the smell of electrical burning death, like that sick burning-hair smell mixed with acrid electrical fumes and acidic dust, mud, steam and smoke. When I got home, everyone was there, safe and sound.

I told my son to never forget this day. This attack is worse than Pearl Harbor. The war to follow would be unprecedented. They don”t want our riches, land or women. They simply want us all dead. And they are willing to die to kill us. I did not personally know anyone who lost their life that day. But my daily commute to work took me past the National Guard Armory every day. For weeks, the walls of the building were covered with fliers and posters begg­ing for any news about the missing. I knew at the time the efforts to find these folks were futile. The faces on the walls are burned into my brain.

Not soldiers These were not soldiers. These were moms, dads, brothers and sisters. The company I worked for went out of business due

to the attack. My wife and I grew apart as a result of the attack. She went to law school and was determined to make a difference. I became introverted, afraid to socialize, paranoid. I was unable to focus on anything. My days were spent on the couch watching television because it’s safer than going out into the world. The images of the falling souls played in my head over and over. Despair and fear ultimately led to financial problems, divorce and a diagnos­is of post-traumatic stress disorder. My wife and I divorced, my son is off to college, and I”ve returned home to Port Angeles to rebuild my life. On Sept. 11, 2011, I hope I am able to touch the remnant of the towers that, like me, has found its way to Port Angeles. My recovery continues. It’s good to be home.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, September 11, 2011 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Glines Canyon Dam to be chipped at By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Elwha River will begin to be freed this week when workers start to take a little off the top of the Glines Canyon Dam. On Thursday, Barnard Construction will use a 200foot crane and an excavator stationed on a barge to begin chiseling away at the 210-foot structure.

“We expect production to be fairly slow at the start since the concrete we are removing is up to 28 feet above the water surface,” said Brian Krohmer, Barnard project manager, in an email. (Barnard of Bozeman, Mont., awarded the $27 million contract to remove the dams, is limiting media comments to email.) Krohmer previously said

he expects about 30 feet of the dam to be removed by November. The material will be allowed to fall behind the dam. It will be removed once the dam is lowered to the debris pile, he said.

Dam to allow crews to begin demolition of the 108-foot structure. The cofferdam has rerouted the river away from the right spillways and exposed a large amount of fill and sediment. A “ceremonial scoop” of the sediment will be Elwha Dam cofferdam removed during the dam Eight miles downstream, removal celebrations SaturBarnard has built a new day, said Barb Maynes, cofferdam at the Elwha Olympic National Park

spokeswoman. The first part of the Elwha Dam to be removed will be the right spillway gates and piers, Krohmer said. That work will begin late this month or early October, he said. Then the left spillway gates, piers and penstock intake structures will be removed, Krohmer said. By November, demoli-

tion of the powerhouse and penstocks will begin, he said. Demolition of both dams, part of the $325 million river restoration project headed by the National Park Service, is expected to take up to three years to complete.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom. callis@peninsuladailynews.com.

Commissioners to mull tracking system Peninsula Daily News

The three Jefferson County commissioners will consider requesting a software license for a public disclosure request tracking system at a meeting Monday. The meeting will be at 9 a.m. at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. The item was on the Sept. 6 consent agenda but was pulled for further scrutiny. Items on the consent agenda include: ■  A resolution regarding the vacation of Keesling Road.

■  An agreement to allocate an additional $10,000 for the Rick Tollefson Memorial Trail Project Phase 1, bringing the total to $29,230. ■  Allocation of $65,430 to support chemical dependency services under the auspices of Jefferson County Public Health. ■  Approval of an additional $26,721 to a contract with Jefferson County Public Health, bringing it to a total of $2,849,526. ■  Allocation of $57,750 to fund a school-based health center for Port Townsend, Chimacum and Quilcene school districts.

Eye on Jefferson PT City Council The Port Townsend City Council will discuss the revision of the charter governing the Public Development Authority at a special meeting Monday. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. in chambers, 540 Water St. The PDA began operating in 2010 as a governing body for historical resources but has since amended its focus to concentrate on Fort Worden State Park. Also on the agenda is the discussion of allowing new

signs for two businesses on Upper Sims Way. In other city meetings: ■  The Public Development Authority — 6 p.m. Monday, third-floor conference room, City Hall, 250 Madison St. ■  PEG Access Coordinating Committee — 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Gael Stuart Building, 1610 Blaine St. ■  The Council Community Support Services Committee — 9 a.m. to noon Friday, first-floor conference room, 250 Madison St.

the meeting.

Port of Port Townsend commissioners will discuss the next steps in the establishment of a passenger ferry between Port Townsend and Seattle when they meet Wednesday. The regular meeting will begin at 1 p.m. at 350 Hudson St. It will be preceded by a workshop at 9:30 a.m. Since receiving news of a federal grant in August, Port Director Larry Crockett has attended meetings and conducted research, and he will report those results back to the board at

Port Townsend schools

tion to call them. The man is described as tall, gangly and white male with brown hair.

Groping trial

courtroom when the verdict Continued from A1 was read. COUPEVILLE — An The newspaper said Island County jury has Clallam Bay Fire Chief Badley and his lawyers decided the husband of a Patricia Hutson-English could not immediately be state legislator groped and did not feel the quake. sexually touched his wife’s reached for comment. Gang tattoos “And I haven’t heard former campaign manager YAKIMA — A man reports from anyone who EVERETT — An EverCraigslist killing Yakima police said runs up ett man sentenced to more without her consent. felt it,” she said. TACOMA — The fourth behind women or even girls than seven years in prison Retired lawyer and lobbyist Karin Ashton, a volunBasil Badley was ordered and final defendant in the to grope them has teer at the Clallam Bayfor a deadly 2010 robbery to pay the woman $50,000 robbery and killing of a returned. Sekiu Chamber of Comhas been allowed two in damages. man who advertised a ring merce visitors center, said: The Yakima Heraldweeks free to remove his Friday’s verdict ended a on Craigslist has been sen- “This is the first I’ve heard Republic reported that a gang tattoos. two-week civil trial that tenced to nearly 124 years about it.” woman jogging in the early The Everett Herald dealt with events inside in prison. “We didn’t hear a rumble morning was groped Monreported a judge Thursday state Sen. Mary Margaret Twenty-four-year-old or anything,” Ashton said. day. The man jogged Haugen’s Camano Island allowed 32-year-old Derek Clabon Berniard was sen“It’s been very calm and behind the woman, groped home Dec. 2, 2008. tenced Friday in Pierce Boyd to remain free while quiet.” her breasts and fled. Jurors found that BadCounty Superior Court in he undergoes laser treatForks Mayor Bryon Police said that attack ley committed a battery Tacoma. ment to remove gang tatMonohon and Forks City followed the same pattern against Courtney Jones by Last month, a jury Attorney Rod Fleck both of at least eight other grop- toos. groping her and fondling found him guilty of robbery, Boyd said he doesn’t said they did not notice the ing reports. her breasts. burglary, assault and murwant to go to prison with earthquake there. Those reports included Jones was 28 at the der charges for the April gang-affiliated marks on Monohon said were no an incident in which two time and Badley 72. She 2010 home invasion shoothis skin. reports of the quake from 12-year-old girls on their sought $100,000 in daming of 43-year-old James Forks constituents. Prosecutors said Boyd way to their middle school ages, but her lawyer said Sanders of Edgewood. The Pacific Tsunami drove two other men to the she is pleased with the outwere also groped. The last Three others who went Warning Center said the attack happened in March. apartment of Alonzo Lopez- come. to the home pretending to quake did not generate a Gonzales, where they killed Police said the groper The Daily Herald be interested buyers were follows no real pattern and the man. Boyd pleaded reported that neither Bad- convicted and sentenced to tsunami but was felt as far away as Vancouver, B.C., guilty earlier this year. ask anyone with informaley nor Haugen was in the lengthy terms in prison. and San Francisco, with hundreds reporting feeling it in Seattle. While it was felt hun(Lunch OnLy) dreds of miles away — at hOrt unch the Vancouver Sun newswith any Entrée room in Vancouver, more reak than 180 miles away, lights Call 360-452-4507 swayed for a half-minute n a urry See our top 10 or 800-826-7714 when the quake struck — a items listed for www.peninsuladailynews. quick service Royal Canadian Mounted com Police dispatcher in the Lunch Mon-Fri Peninsula Daily News nearby town of Tofino, near or call and order ahead! Open at 11:30 am Ucluelet, said there were no damage reports and most 1527 E. 1st, PA • 360-457-4113 Dinner 4-9 people barely felt it. Seven people in Sekiu and five in Port Angeles reported to the USGS website that they felt the quake. Single reports originated from Sekiu, Sequim and Port Townsend. There were likewise no reports of damage in the

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The Port Townsend School Board will discuss placing a capital improvement levy on the February 2012 ballot at a meeting Monday. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. in the administration building, 450 Fir St.

Quilcene fire department Quilcene Volunteer Fire Department commissioners will discuss the recruitment of a permanent fire chief when they meet Monday. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at the fire station, 70 Herbert St.

Quake: Not felt

Briefly: State Groper back in Yakima, police say

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nearest parts of Washington state, including the San Juan Islands and on the North Olympic Peninsula. In Seattle, the state Transportation Department dispatched inspectors as a precaution to check for damage to the Alaskan Way Viaduct, the aging elevated highway along the Seattle waterfront, as well as the Deception Pass Bridge and the Highway 520 floating bridge across Lake Washington. The quake was centered offshore 73 miles westnorthwest of Ucluelet, a little less than halfway up the west coast of the island about 179 miles from Victoria. It was initially reported as a magnitude-6.7 earthquake but was later revised.

Secondary fault “It looks like a quake on a secondary fault — not on the megathrust, which was our big concern,” said John Vidale, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network at the University of Washington in Seattle. “It’s generating a fair number of aftershocks, but there’s a very small chance this will stimulate activity on the big fault on the coast.” Brent Ward, a professor in Simon Fraser University’s department of earth sciences in Vancouver, B.C., said the quake was probably too deep to generate a tsunami.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

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Peninsula Daily News

A9

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Clallam County Historical Society

The Elwha Dam during construction circa 1913 show the V shape of the canyon in which the dam was built. The first dam blew out in October 1912.

Dams: Site of dam was deep, V-shaped canyon before he knew it, [he] had Continued from A1 lacked the capital. To persuade investors, he pulled out his desk slide and “To acquire this took 12 needed commitments to buy was talking about loaning the power from his dam, so money.” years,” Aldwell wrote. What had drawn visitors “I accomplished it with- the Olympic Power and out anyone’s knowing the Development Co. was to the North Olympic Peninsula over the years — scenic reason for securing the land.” formed. Its board of directors photos — had clinched the In Aldwell’s telling, he and a partner envisioned a included R.D. Merrill, then area’s key investment. The Olympic Power Co. pulp mill, which would need principal owner of Merrill & Ring, and Michael Earles, a was capitalized with $2 milelectric power. “We looked at the can- timber baron who later lion. The financiers required yon,” he wrote. “Suddenly owned the “Big Mill” in Port that their engineering firm supervise construction. the Elwha was no longer a Angeles. He acquired commitstream crashing down to the Strait [of Juan de Fuca]; the ments from the city of Port Damned engineers Elwha was peace and power Angeles, Citizens Electric From the start, to Aldwell Co. of Port Townsend, Army and civilization.” the dam engineers were Forts Worden and Flagler damned engineers, and his and the Bremerton Navy Power and jobs autobiography reflected his Yard. During June 1910, doubts: The resulting dam — and “I’ve said many times later the Glines Canyon Aldwell and partner George Dam upriver — generated Glines — described by since the dam was completed power to mills and other Aldwell as “a wealthy real that never again would I be industries, which generated estate operator from Winni- connected with any enterjobs for generations across peg, Canada” — picked a prise where I had responsithe North Olympic Penin- firm in Chicago to make bility without control.” Delays meant customers their pitch. sula. were not getting power, so Glines made the proposal By the 1960s, shifting the bonds were not being attitudes regarding use of without Aldwell. “That decision was almost paid off. If the dam was done national park land, the enviin 1912, Aldwell wrote, it ronment, fisheries and tribal fatal,” Aldwell wrote. would have produced When Aldwell returned, rights along with new approaches to electrical gen- he knew Glines’ pitch had $54,000 income. Aldwell’s correspondence eration and transmission struck out. Aldwell asked to make to the financiers warning of eventually led to a new the problems went unheeded. owner of the dams — the his proposal. On April 18, 1912 — Initially rebuffed, he U.S. government, which bought them to tear them wrote, “I wish you’d let me almost two years since show you some of the pic- groundbreaking — Aldwell down. Aldwell built his dam tures anyway. Eventually sent a report “regarding without federal money, and everyone is going to be inter- extra costs, incomplete now federal money will raze ested in the Olympic Penin- machinery, lack of capable that dam and the second sula, and I want you to see management and doubt as to the foundation of the what it’s like.” one. dam.” The financier “consented Aldwell died in 1954, well By July, pressure had before any serious talk of his reluctantly. . . . I had views of worked. The financiers the canyon, the Elwha River, dam’s demise. Ever the entrepreneur and civic Lake Crescent and Lake agreed to oust the engineers. But pressure would build booster, such talk probably Sutherland. Who could resist elsewhere. them?” would have confused him. The site of the dam was a While he “looked at the After his arrival in Port Angeles, he climbed a bluff pictures, I could see the mag- deep, narrow-V-shaped cannificence of the country yon. overlooking the harbor. Engineers built a bridge “In my mind’s eye,” he growing on him. . . . Almost wrote, “I saw that harbor rimmed with vital industry with payrolls expanding. . . . “The raw material was here; raw material that called for the minds and hands of builders who would C a l l N a n c y f or think of this as a home to make for their children and a consultation their great-grandchildren. I 360-808-6005 felt I had met a challenge to help build a happy and prosperous community and I C o n f i d e n t i a l • S a fe • E f fe c t i v e decided to accept it.” Valley Dermatology • 565 Eureka Way, Sequim He saw the potential but

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above the future dam, then buckets of wet concrete were dropped between forms. For whatever reason, “they never excavated to the very bottom” of the canyon’s V, said Orville Campbell, resident engineer for Crown Zellerbach Corp. from 1973 to 1988.

So fill was sitting under the bottom of the dam. On Oct. 18, when the closed gates of the dam stopped water flowing down the river, pressure built up behind the dam. Then, on Oct. 31, the fill blew out. To the Elwha Klallam tribe downstream, it was

known as “the time there were salmon in the trees.” To Aldwell, “Two years work destroyed in an afternoon!” On Monday: The Elwha Dam is rebuilt and generates electricity, which Thomas Aldwell must sell.

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, September 11, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A10

Look at that long to-do list. LOL! THE INTERNET AND computers have made me so efficient I no longer can accomplish anything. I even have a computerized W. Bruce to-do list so that I can man- Cameron age my tasks electronically by printing the list. The list runs several pages and really bores me. Who can do tasks, anymore? By the time I’ve checked email, read my Twitter tweets and looked into what my friends on Facebook are doing, it’s time to check my email again. In fact, the only tasks I can cross off the list are the ones I add after I’ve already done them, like, eat some fudge. (Check!) Patty Mae Phillips writes, Just dropped peanut butter on my kitchen floor! LOL! LOL! I write back, Patty Mae!

Task: Write Patty Mae. (Check!) See what I mean? I don’t have time to balance the checkbook with Patty Mae making lunch, I need to LOL. (I have no idea who Patty Mae is, or how we got to be Facebook friends. I do know she drops a lot of stuff on her kitchen floor and should probably look into getting a dog.) Another problem with to-do lists is that too often, evil people such as my wife will find them sitting on the kitchen table and then read them, even though it is clearly privileged, classified information for which she lacks proper clearance. “You’re going to fix the screen door?” she asks. “No, I won’t have time for that today,” I reply. “It’s on your list!” she points out. “Yes, but . . . Honey, I can’t concentrate on this conversation. I’m busy writing.” I don’t know what kind of dog, Patty Mae, just one who likes peanut butter. LOL.

Speaking Out

Even worse is when evil people such as my wife add tasks to the already over-burdened to-do list. “Replace the light bulb in the kitchen?” I demand, outraged. “What’s that doing on my to-do list?” “It’s something which I would like you to-do,” my wife replies illogically. “You can’t write stuff on a man’s to-do list. That’s like going to Italy and throwing paint on the Mona Lisa.” “The Mona Lisa is in Paris,” she says. “Exactly!” I thunder. I tweet Nobody told me the Mona Lisa was in Paris. LOL. LOL people tweet back. “It’s a sign of an organized man that he only does the important tasks and skips the unimportant tasks,” I pontificate to my wife, who yawns in fascination. “I’d say it is pretty important to change the light bulb in the kitchen,” she says. “Why? Are you worried you’re going to drop peanut butter?” I shoot back.

“What on earth are you talking about?” I elect not to reply because I’m not really sure. My attention span has become so fractured by the barrage of communication from Facebook strangers that I no longer can remember things longer than a few seconds. “I just don’t want you adding things to my personal private to-do list. It’s long enough already,” I complain. “Maybe it wouldn’t be so long if you didn’t write things like, “‘Brush teeth.’” “I did brush my teeth,” I respond. (Check!) “What about this,” she challenges. “Put on left sock. Put on right sock.” (Check!) (Check!) “A man’s to-do list is his Mona Lisa,” I tell her. “Stop throwing paint on it.” “When are you going to fix the screen door?” she asks. “Is it on the list?” “Yes!” “Then never.” I change my status update to

read, My wife wants me to fix the screen door. LOL. Within 30 seconds, six people have “liked” it, and three people I don’t know from Facebook have written LOL. “If you don’t replace the light bulb in the kitchen, I won’t be able to see, and I won’t be able to cook dinner.” When evil people such as my wife use such confrontational tactics, it is a direct and reprehensible attack on my stomach. “OK, I’ll replace the light bulb,” I grumble. My to-do list explodes with tasks. Agree to change the light bulb. (Check!) Get stool. (Check!) Get light bulb. (Check!) Remove old bulb. (Check!) Put in new one. (Check!)

________ W. Bruce Cameron is a nationally syndicated humor columnist. His column appears on this page every Sunday. Email Cameron at www. tinyurl.com/pdnbcameron.

How much safer are we than 10 years ago?

Gayle Watkins

F.E. McMullen

Phyllis Waldenberg

Chris Jafay

Sonya Hagerman

Charles Gahimer

Dianna Fifield

Gerald Williams

Retired horse trainer Port Angeles

Retired principal Port Hadlock

Retired teacher Port Ludlow

Ski instructor Agnew

Homemaker Sequim

Laborer Port Angeles

General manager Joyce

Land developer Port Angeles

“On a scale of one to 10, a zero. The world is getting worse in every respect. There is more violence, more hunger, more war. We are much worse off than 10 years ago.”

“I feel safer. I think we’ve become more aware of the dangers that terrorism and fanatics pose to our country, and we’ve become more watchful of what could be a danger.”

“I don’t feel safer. I think we made a mistake and made more enemies by going to Iraq. We’ve given up a lot of liberties, and I don’t fly anymore.”

“We’re more aware today of the fact that we were not safe 10 years ago. We thought we were indestructible, and look what happened. Now airports are maddening. We’re not safer.”

“I think we’re less safe. Our government is spread out so thin, we don’t have enough protection. And the Internet today can be poison.”

“I don’t really think we are. They’ve improved the safety problems of the past. If terrorists really want to hurt us, they still can. Someone is going to find a way. We’re not too safe.”

“Probably just as safe. You can’t fear that something might or might not happen. They did catch a terrorist [Ahmed Ressam] right here in town. We’re as safe as we can be in our little corner.”

“We’re not as safe today. On a scale of one to 10, we’re at a seven, if one is really safe. We thought we were safe back then. The Patriot Act has taken away some of our legal rights, too.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices Cougar activity We have owned a sheep farm in Happy Valley, Sequim, for 23 years. The Aug. 30 PDN article about a cougar sighting [“Sequim-Area Resident Watches Cougar Make Tour Of Property”] doesn’t concur with what we’ve heard and experienced concerning cougars. In the past five years, we’ve lost 24 lambs and one ewe due to cougar, and many other lambs just disappeared. Our neighbors have found the remains of lambs on their property. I suspect cougar. I’ve seen five reports in the newspaper of people being threatened or attacked locally by a cougar in the past 23 years. Recently a Vancouver, B.C., boy was attacked by a cougar and is hospitalized and in serious condition. My brother-in-law living near Spokane says there have been recent cougar attacks on people in his area. A bimonthly trade publication, Sheep, had an article last year on the cougar problem. It claims a federal gov-

ernment survey reports the population of cougar is at an all-time high in the U.S., and they’re present in places where they weren’t before. In the past year alone, we have lost 11 lambs in two killings. Both have been reported and bodies viewed by state Fish and Wildlife officials. Afterward, I called Fish and Wildlife to report hearing cougar screams at night. My neighbors have also seen cougar during daylight, and one heard the screams at night. Two other local sheep breeders this past year have lost some animals with kill techniques identical to our cougar kills. I wonder at the denial by a Fish and Wildlife official who said in the article that there was not much cougar activity in this area. Fred and Joanne Hatfield, Sequim

‘Pandora’s box’? The Aug. 30 meeting of the Clallam County commissioners revealed the lack of knowledge the com-

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

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Sue Stoneman

Acting Advertising Director

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

missioners have regarding United Nations Agenda 21 (’92 Earth Summit) and ICLEI (International Council For Local Environmental Initiatives). Under the guise of sustainablity, which on its face sounds like a good thing, sure, we all want to save the environment. However, it is a Pandora’s box filled with the loss of our basic, God-given rights, with a tenet: nature above man. “ICLEI: Local Government for Sustainability,” is directing polices that cause inaccessible open space, prohibition of water supplies and managed control over our lives, including what we eat, to name a few. A 1997 interpretive map by Environmental Perspectives Inc. shows the entire United States, with plans to move humans from rural areas into stack-and-pack communities controlling our lives. Many more policies exist too numerous for this letter. I believe these plans are currently being implemented under U.N. Agenda

Our readers’ letters, faxes 21 and ICLEI. I urge every citizen to research the plan and demand that Clallam County withdraw from ICLEI immediately. It is unconstitutional, compromising our unalienable rights. There is no need to wait for the budget discussions. Withdraw now. Other counties and cities have begun withdrawing from this unconstitutional program to change the face of the United States of America. Act now. Evangeline Rivera-Levine, Sequim

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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Dave Logan

Peninsula Daily News

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cornered on the sidewalk. He was part of an Asian family, and the young man, maybe 30, had seemed like a very polite and peaceful person. Apparently he didn’t have papers and was obviously being profiled. As those of us who were still there looked on, they had the poor guy up against the car with his hands behind his back and were putting handcuffs on him. [“Border Patrol Arrests Man At Farmers Market/ Bystanders, Kin Watch As Korean National Cuffed,” Sept. 4 PDN]. These are quiet people who sell flowers, for God’s Border Patrol 1 sake. Why the handcuffs? I know, procedure, of On Saturday, Sept. 3, I observed a disturbing scene course, but this guy was not in the least bit uncoopafter the Port Angeles erative, and you could tell Farmers Market closed. it was very humiliating to I had finished playing music and was carrying my him and was upsetting to equipment to my truck and his whole family. I’m writing this to help noticed the Border Patrol agents who had swaggered flush the scene from my through the market earlier mind. I’m afraid this country in their green jumpsuits has been taken over by with guns and other toys thugs and bullies, and it hung all over their belts. will be very hard to take it They had a young man

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

by

back. They are the ones with the guns. I love this land for what it is without the politics and corruption, but if this is what the nation has come to, I don’t want any part of it. Howly Slim, Agnew

Border Patrol 2 When I read how Port Angeles Farmers Market Manager Cynthia Warne saw what happened and analyzed it so quickly [“Border Patrol Arrests Man At Farmers Market/ Bystanders, Kin Watch As Korean National Cuffed,” Sept. 4 PDN], my first thoughts were [Warne] should work for Homeland Security, or be an analyst for the Pentagon. If she can see a few actions and determine that the Border Patrol agents used racial profiling and were predatory and had targeted the man who is leading a productive life because his family doesn’t speak English except for the sister, she is good. Turn

to

Voices/A11

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 documenting the evolutionary histories of whales, If we had four people mammals, birds, hominids like this, we could station and many other organisms. one on each coast and one Numerous examples of on each border and sleep the operation of natural well at night, as nothing selection have been docuwill escape their notice. mented in observations We’ll sleep well, unless and experiments. the pesky Border Patrol The ability to sequence stations one of its do-noth- genomes has greatly ing — or is it have-nothing- increased our ability to test to-do agents — near our evolutionary theory and bedroom windows, where verify hypotheses concernthe constantly idling ing evolutionary relationengine and their snoring or ships and processes and tweeting will disturb us. how new species arise. The arrested man is New and fascinating probably no more a villain mechanisms of evolution than the person who drives and adaptation are being on a suspended license or discovered and elucidated. has no insurance or takes Contrary to the asserone more drink and then tion by the letter writer, attempts to drive home or these are being incorpoto a bar that will sell him rated in the teaching of another. evolution at every level. They don’t mean to An excellent new book cause problems, but quite on evolution for general often they do, and it is readers is Why Evolution is True by Jerry Coyne. usually someone else who Other fine books for pays dearly for the infracgeneral readers include tion. Richard Dawkins’ The Perhaps the agents Greatest Show on Earth, went there and knew who Peter and Rosemary to look for because someone gave them information. Grant’s How and Why SpeRobert Wilson, cies Multiply, Sean Carrol’s Port Angeles Endless Forms Most Beautiful and Neil Shubin’s Your Inner Fish. Evolution’s proof Readers interested in I am a retired biologist what published papers in with a Ph.D. in paleozoolevolutionary biology look ogy from the University of like could consult issues of Chicago and have conthe journal Evolution availducted research and taught able at Peninsula College. evolution at the undergradSteven Obrebski, uate and graduate levels. Port Angeles I keep up with current developments in the field Tea party and find that the referAfter reading the Aug. ences to Newtonian and 28 letter “Tea party critic,” quantum physics with I just want to set the respect to evolution in the record straight. Sept. 8 letter to the PDN The so-called tea party [“Evolution”] are meaning- is not a party at all. less. It is just millions of Nor is evolution studied average, everyday citizens or taught in an arrogant, who believe in a few simple dead-end manner as the principles and were willing author suggests. to take a public stand in The fossil record is now support of them. rich in transitional fossils Some tea party groups

Our readers’ letters, faxes

are more organized and get a lot of media coverage, but the principles are always the same. We believe our government should not be spending more money than it takes in through taxation. We believe cutting spending rather than additional taxation is the way to accomplish that goal. We believe our government should be run by the Constitution. We believe that “Obamacare” is an unconstitutional and unaffordable new entitlement that will destroy our health care as we know it now. We recognize that there are fiscal problems with Medicare and Social Security, and our goal is to save them for future generations without harming current recipients. The so-called tea party politicians are trying to do just what they promised to do when they ran for office. I, for one, have had enough of Democratic [Party] talking points and scare tactics. Bill Conn, Sequim

50 percent when compared with prior “do-nothing” years. Kidd’s budget-fussing cloaks her agenda to spend tax dollars on a decrepit building. The “historic fire hall” [on Lincoln Street] needed more than $1 million in fixes a decade ago. As an activist, consultant and while on the city Planning Commission, Kidd successfully derailed council attempts to sell the building in 2007, which could’ve resolved the repair problems using private-sector funds. She campaigned on her management and budget prowess. But her skill seems generally limited to publicly grilling staff on line-item purchases. While she preaches frugal effective government, she seems to favor meager budgets for all instead of useful budgets for essentials. Collins is a prolific career regulator. To deal with some noise complaints about several chickens a family had for fresh eggs, he authored a zoning code change that ignored “unintended conseKidd, Collins critic quences” by also outlawing The writer of the Sept. 1 koi ponds. The only control Port letter “PA budget” objects Angeles voters have in to Mayor [Dan] Di Guilio selecting the 2012 mayor and Deputy Mayor [Don] and deputy mayor is being Perry voting for a 25 peraware and cautious of cent larger city budget. potential candidates. While 250 words are With Kidd’s and Collins’ brief, grumbling about the deep collaborative roots, retwo while complimenting electing them makes them [City Council members both contenders for these Cherie] Kidd and [Brad] two influential, high-profile Collins is misleading. offices. Most revenue goes to Larry G. Williams, BPA for electricity and payOmak ing employees under union labor contracts. Larry Williams is a forEven modest capital mer member of the Port projects, such as restoring Angeles City Council. structures and environmental regulatory compliance, easily impact budget For Bruch Sissi Bruch is exactly totals by 25 percent to

Sunday, September 11, 2011

A11

and email

what the Port Angeles City Council needs. She has a Ph.D. in planning from Michigan State University. She spent many years working on construction, design, land-use issues, building codes and ordinance impacts. This level of experience means Sissi understands how government works. More than that, she understands that a City Council member should be working for the people of Port Angeles, protecting their interests and making careful use of resources and public funds. Sissi is not afraid to speak out, ask questions, research issues and encourage public input. Sissi is challenging Don Perry for a seat on the City Council. I have sat through a number of meetings where important issues were voted on and where Don was “Mr. Nice Guy.” He always voted in favor of whatever city staff proposed without asking a critical question, requesting additional information or requiring supporting documents. I think Port Angeles deserves better representation. For that reason, I encourage you to visit Sissi’s website at www. sissibruch.com to understand her enthusiasm and professionalism. Janet Marx, Port Angeles

Walt retired here after a long and productive career with Ford Motor Co., leading a group of highly creative engineers to create what became the world’s first Computer-Aided Design (CAD) system. While raising his family and working, he also found time to volunteer for a number of nonprofit organizations, including his local School Board. He has a great familiarity with the issues that schools face, and he knows well the kinds of skills and attitudes necessary for our students to succeed and lead. He in fact exemplifies those qualities. Walt is a problem-solver down to the bone. Where others get frustrated, Walt gets fascinated. He truly takes to heart the engineer’s creed: to solve problems to make life better. One of Walt’s notable accomplishments on the School Board has been to sponsor the annual engineering competition, in which teams of students work on such projects as Popsicle-stick bridges and drinking-straw egg catchers, learning all kinds of skills and attitudes without even realizing it — and bridging the gap between knowledge and imagination. Walt brings that same approach to everything he does. He serves on the board Consider Johnson not for the glory or with any particular agenda, but One contest for the Sequim School Board pits a for the challenge of making the most for our children highly visible challenger, Stephen Rosales, against a out of the resources at hand. less-visible incumbent, His candidacy deserves Walter Johnson. your serious consideration. Having known Walt for Ed Chadd, the past 10 years, I can recommend him highly. Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher EDITOR’S NOTE: Please send comments about articles in the Peninsula Daily News as signed letters to the editor. Many thanks!

Rave of the Week ERIC AND SARAH, thank you for rescuing us two gals and our dog when we got lost taking the road atop Striped Peak, leaving us nine miles from our campsite at Salt Creek. We were stung by hornets, and you were kind enough to help us get back to camp. Our many thanks!

. . . and other Raves HUGE RAVE TO Sergio’s [restaurant]. Last weekend, my friend left behind a custom-made jacket after lunch. The next morning I retrieved the jacket, untouched. It still had $1,800 in cash, shop keys and a paycheck for $4,000 in a pocket. He’ll be back with a major gratuity. Major honesty! Thanks again. JOB WELL DONE to all who worked on the Port Angeles Community Playhouse’s

refreshing new facelift. Look forward to the new season of entertaining plays performed by the many dedicated actors who share their talents to make the playhouse come alive. I WAS SO proud to see so many American flags flying all over Sequim. It made me proud to be living here. God bless America, and thank you, Sequim, for remembering this great nation. A SPECIAL RAVE and huge thank-you to the Joyce Fire Department EMTs for their valiant effort to save our special guy. You did all you could, and we so appreciate your efforts. It’s a tough job you have, and you do it well. Thanks so much. MICHELLE AND DENNIS at Arby’s in Sequim: We will miss you as we head for Arizona. Your service is unmatched, food is great and cleanliness is super. Have a great future and enjoy those grandchildren. A RAVE FOR parents who are teaching their kids that rules are made to be obeyed. Some children seem to believe rules are made to be broken when it comes to bicycles at the Sequim skateboard park. If these children keep

disobeying, it will be ruined for all. A HUGE RAVE to the Hoh Downers Square Dance Club [Forks] for a wonderful afternoon and evening of dancing, food and live music. It was a great party enjoyed by all. A GIANT RAVE to Northwest Inside Out Painting for the great job they have done on the Old Dungeness Schoolhouse [Sequim]! Wonderful job, guys! A RAVE FOR the city of Port Angeles. Thanks so much for making an effort to clean up downtown Port Angeles in time for the Sprint Boat races next weekend.

Rant of the Week A BIG, ANGRY kick to the homeowner who cornered a nursing doe in his yard and set off a firecracker in front of her to scare her away from his yard. You gave her no avenue for escape. There are less traumatic ways to deter this gentle species.

. . . and other Rants TO THE LADY who says

that dogs have germs: Look around, lady. I’d rather have dog germs than people germs! BIG RANT: I don’t believe this. I was in a market yesterday and saw this lady with two small dogs in the shopping cart. What is wrong with these people? Are you all sick? Leave your dogs at home or in the car. Only service animals are allowed in stores. I THINK IT is disgusting, people having sex in their car in the bike lane on Ediz Hook in Port Angeles on Sunday afternoon while other people are out walking their dog on the spit. I think they need to get a room and get a life. WHY DON’T THEY finish the soccer field at Carrie Blake Park [Sequim] so we can have our walking trails back? THEY SAY WE have “shovelready” jobs. If you would like to see the result of one, go to the Carlsborg Post Office and check out the new letter drop-off turn-out. The lane is too narrow for a car to use and as a result has never been used or even a dropbox installed.

A RANT FOR the boob I saw driving around in the convertible with the top up during one of the few warm-weather days we receive on the Peninsula. Why would you buy a convertible if you aren’t going to use it? RANTS TO THE people who recycle their glass in Sequim at the recycle bin near Gwennie’s Restaurant. They leave papers, empty boxes, plastic and other trash near the recycling bin. Also, to the city, which put out the recycle bins but no trash bin.

________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), email us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. On voice messages, spell out names for raves. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

New Rotary grant now available for Sequim teachers

Noon Rotary’s Teacher Grant Program will provide funding for classroom projects, teaching aids, field trips and other needs. Its purpose is to inspire students to learn and to help teachers present subject material required to meet state standards. The new outreach will be administered by Presidentelect Alice Roragen, Vocational Director Sara Maloney and committee Chairman Dick Hughes. The group will consider

teachers’ requests for classroom project funding up to $750. “Since the money is raised locally, we will encourage teachers to spend the money locally whenever possible,” Maloney said. The program is a community outreach of Rotary International’s recently inaugurated New Generations Avenue of Service. It is Rotary’s fifth avenue of service for clubs and their members. Others include Club Service, Community Service, Vocational Service and International Service. “I am very glad we are reaching out to help all schools in our community since we ask all residents and businesses to support our club fundraisers,” the Noon Club’s New Generations director Dick Hughes said. Teachers in Washington state-accredited Sequim schools can phone Hughes at 360-460-7465 for applications. For more information about the Rotary Club of Sequim, visit www.sequim rotary.org.

tact the Clallam Bay phone Bob Clark at 360branch at 360-963-2414 or 683-4431. ClallamBay@nols.org or the Forks Branch at 360-374New library event 6402 or Forks@nols.org. SEQUIM — Starting Saturday, the Sequim Flea market set Library will offer Paws to Read, a new children’s proSEQUIM — Sequim gram, at 10 a.m. the third Prairie Grange, 290 Saturday of each month Macleay Road, will host a from September through flea market from 8 a.m. to December. 3 p.m. Saturday. In collaboration with More than 40 vendors are expected to be on hand Olympic Gentle PAWS, kids can practice their for the event. Tailgaters are invited to reading skills by reading to a therapy dog. sell in the parking lot. During the program, a Food will be available, librarian first will read to and a bake sale will be the children, then each held. child will have the opportuFor more information,

nity to read to a therapy dog. All dogs and trainers are members of the Olympic Gentle Paws therapy dog group. This program is suited for children ages 6 and older. There is no preregistration necessary, and participants can stop by anytime between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. The Sequim Library is located at 630 N. Sequim Ave. For more information, visit www.nols.org or contact the Sequim Library at 360-683-1161 or Sequim@ nols.org. Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — A new grant program for teachers in Sequim School District boundaries was introduced by the Rotary Club of Sequim at a recent meeting. “Since we serve the entire Sequim community, the new program will be open to teachers in all Washington state accredited schools within the Sequim School District boundaries,” said Rotary President David Mattingley.

Help in classroom

Chris Tucker (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Dynamic

dancing duos

Top left, Joyce Johnston of Port Moody, B.C., and her border collie, Twinkle Toes, dance to “Me and My Shadow” during the 10th annual Boot Scootin’ Boogie freestyle dancing with dogs competition at the Guy Cole Community Center at Carrie Blake Park on Saturday. Top right, Carrol Haines of Beaverton, Ore., wears a superhero outfit while carrying her poodle, Tobi, on her back after the poodle jumped there during their performance. The competition continues today beginning at 10 a.m.

Briefly . . . Photographer to be profiled at libraries Lynne Iglitzin will present “Trailblazing Photojournalist: Margaret Bourke-White” at the Clallam Bay and Forks libraries this week. The free events will be held at the Clallam Bay Library, 16990 state Highway 112, at 7 p.m. Thursday and the Forks Library, 171 S. Forks Ave., at 7 p.m. Friday. The presentations will

explore the life of one of the early 20th-century’s eminent photographers. From images of the Great Depression to World War II photographs in Life magazine, Bourke-White’s groundbreaking work opened the door for women in photography. Iglitzen lives in Seattle and was a professor of political science at the University of Washington for many years. She also has authored several books. She is also a founding board member of Youth in Focus, a program that promotes photography as a

tool for motivating youth. This presentation is sponsored by Humanities Washington through its state-wide Speakers Bureau. The Speakers Bureau brings Washington’s finest scholars, historians, musicians and storytellers to local communities to give dynamic presentations at libraries, schools, museums and other community organizations. Additional support is being provided by the Friends of the Clallam Bay and Forks libraries. For more information visit www.nols.org or con-

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, September 11, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Prep Notes

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Huskies: Survival II

Merge Another Quimper close win rivals? at home NOBODY WOULD DARE suggest UW and WSU pool its athletic resources. Yet, with both Matt the Chimacum and Port Schubert Townsend athletic departments fighting for athletes, there are rumblings that should happen on the Quimper Peninsula. A merging of the Cowboys and Indians? Such an idea would have been scoffed at even a few years ago. Of course, we now live in a world in which those schools field combined teams in wrestling, swimming, cross country and tennis. So what’s the difference combining the rest of the schools’ sports? To answer succinctly: hometown pride. There’s a reason why one of the first things you see when you enter Port Townsend is a sign trumpeting the school’s 2004 state baseball title. People love to brag, especially to their neighbors. And merging those two institutions athletically would take away from that. “Some programs are pretty entrenched within our community,” Port Townsend Athletic Director Patrick Kane said. “It would be pretty difficult to [join those together]. “We do have our swimmers and wrestlers and that type of thing [joined together], but for an overall it would be pretty difficult. “Basketball has a stake in the community, and baseball for Chimacum.” Indeed, it’s hard to imagine Chimacum wanting to share any of its baseball championships with its neighbors to the north. Nor would many Port Townsend basketball fans want to share their rich history with the Tri-Area. Almost for that reason alone, it seems hard to imagine the programs coming together. “I don’t think it will happen anytime soon,” Chimacum athletic director Michael Cornachione said. “There’s too much individual pride or sense of ownership to the programs right now that the schools want to hold on to. “Eventually, enrollment and economics might play their a hand, but right now we’re still holding that off.”

By Tim Booth

Nisqually upheaval?

By Matt Schubert

One force that may affect both programs in the near future is the upcoming reclassification drama. At the heart of it is the future of the Class 1A Nisqually League. It appears possible that two, if not three, Nisqually teams — Orting, Cascade Christian and Life Christian — could be moving above or below 1A for 2012-14. Obviously, such an outcome would undermine the rest of the 1A Nisqually contingent that includes Chimacum, Charles Wright, Seattle Christian and Vashon Island. “No one is saying where they want to go, they are just saying these are the options,” Cornachione said. “Right now, we’re looking at the options of staying in the Nisqually League or looking to the Olympic League. It’s really open. “I think everybody would prefer that the Nisqually League would stay together. I really don’t want to speculate on how we’re going to move. We’ll see what happens.” Nobody wants to field a fourschool league. If Port Townsend were to decide to move from the Olympic to the Nisqually, however, that might make things a bit more palatable. Port Townsend is the lone 1A school in the Olympic League, and there are some legitimate reasons for it to move to the Nisqually. First of all, there’s the plus of competing against schools of the same size. Secondly, there’s the bonus of having clearly defined district playoff qualifications. (No more seemingly superfluous pigtail playoffs!) Kane said the school has yet to make a decision one way or another on whether it will ask to join the Nisqually, and there’s a “50-50 split” between coaches on whether it would be a good thing for Redskin athletics. Turn

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The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Keith Price wore his familiar grin and danced along with the beats playing through his headphones as he departed for an evening of celebration. Despite how it got there, a 2-0 start and six straight wins for a Washington program just three years removed from a winless season is a pretty heady start. Price connected on his first eight passes en route to a careerhigh 315 yards and four touchdowns, and Washington used a blistering start to hold off Hawaii’s late rally for a 40-32 win on Saturday afternoon. Washington (2-0) jumped to a 14-0 lead in fewer than 8 minutes, led 21-0 late in the first quarter, then played counterpunch with the Warriors, who could not overcome the Huskies torrid start. Price tossed his fourth TD to freshman Austin Seferian-Jenkins, a 14-yarder in the back of

The Associated Press

Washington’s Kevin Smith carries the ball eight yards while Hawaii’s Kenny Estes chases the play Saturday in Seattle.

ALSO . . . ■ Washington State 2-0/B4

the end zone with 10:02 left after Hawaii cut the Huskies’ lead to 31-26. Much like a week ago against FCS-champion Eastern Washington, the Huskies didn’t make this one easy.

Washington needed an interception from Desmond Trufant, a blocked extra point returned for two points by Trufant and the help of an onside kick that didn’t roll the required 10 yards to finally finish off the Warriors. “I’m getting old fast. That’s how tough it gets,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said. “It’s tough, but I kind of like it, I kind of love it. It’s what it’s

about.” It was Sarkisian this week that scolded his team publicly for their below-par performance in the opener against Eastern Washington. He used “embarrassing” and “unacceptable” liberally and challenged his talented team to do better. Turn

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Dawgs/B4

Prep Football

Sequim shocks Meridian Peninsula Daily News

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Forks running back Sergio Chase picks up yardage behind the blocking of Shane WhiteEagle (24) while Port Angeles defenders Skyler Gray and Eli Fiscalini, right, pursue during the nonleague game Friday in Forks.

Riders hold off Spartans Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — Tom Wahl didn’t care what the scoreboard read at the end of Friday night’s game at Spartan Stadium After seeing his football team start slowly, then submit an uninspiring finish against the Forks Spartans, the second-year Roughriders coach was not pleased. A year after turning the program from a doormat into a title contender, simply beating the Spartans 28-14 is no longer good enough for Port Angeles. “Tonight we won on the scoreboard, and I feel like a loser,” said Wahl, now 11-2 as

Riders head coach. “That bothers me a lot.” One might have thought the score was reversed following the end of Friday night’s nonleague affair. The Roughriders out-gained the Spartans 328-212 in total yards and converted two Forks special teams errors into touchdowns to move to 2-0 overall.

Happy Forks But it was first-year Forks coach Mark Feasel — whose team has now lost 11 straight — who was talking as if his team had won. “The effort was fantastic,” Feasel said. “They felt they could

come in here and play a heck of a game and have a chance at this, just because of how they ended last week and how we came into practice. “I’m super proud of them.” Port Angeles senior quarterback Keenen Walker put up 262 yards of offense and had a hand in all four Rider touchdowns in a performance befitting his older brother, former Rider star Stefan Walker. Yet it was Forks’ final offensive drive — a 10-play, 77-yard scoring march — and late goal line stand that had coach Wahl wanting to dodge questions following the game. Turn

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Rivals/B3

Redskins rout Cowboys Peninsula Daily News

CHIMACUM — Jewel Johnson scored four goals and Irina Lyons had a hat trick to spark Port Townsend to a 12-0 nonleague blowout over archrival Chimacum in girls soccer action Saturday. The Redskins, who lost a tough 3-0 defensive battle to Port Angeles on Tuesday, outshot the Cowboys 24-0. “Looking to bounce back after [Tuesday’s] tough loss, my Lady Redskins came out fierce, focused and ready to play Saturday,” coach Ryan Moss said. “We didn’t pull the trigger enough Tuesday night against Port Angeles, so I told them pull the trigger early and pull it often. “If you don’t shoot, you can’t Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News score, and if you can’t score, you Port Townsend’s Brenna Latchford (14) attempts a shot surely won’t win.”

between Chimacum defenders Rosie Wilcox, left, and

Turn

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Preps/B4 Samantha Cerna on Saturday at Chimacum.

BELLINGHAM — Sequim defeated Class 1A powerhouse Meridian 29-22 in one of its greatest football victories ever Saturday night. The Wolves were routed 54-16 by the Trojans last year in Sequim on Sept. 11. Meridian made it to the 1A state semifinals a year ago. The game went back-andforth the whole night with the Trojans marching down the field in the final seconds but came up short as time ran out. Frank Catelli threw a 35-yard touchdown pass to his favorite receiver, Tyler Forshaw, with 1:04 left in the game for the winning score. It was the second touchdown throw of the game for Catelli, who had 226 yards on 19-of-32 passing. He had no interceptions. The Wolves had 391 total yards on the night, 144 of them on the ground. Fullback Jack Wiker had one of the most exciting plays of the game with a 40-yard romp for a touchdown to tie the game at 14-all with 3:30 left in the third quarter. Sequim next opens Olympic League action at Klahowya in Silverdale on Friday night. Sequim 29, Meridian 22 Sequim Meridian

7 0 7 15— 29 6 0 8 8— 22 First Quarter S— Fields 24 pass from Catelli (Koontz kick) M—12 run (pass failed) Third Quarter M—1 run (pass good) S—Wiker 40 run (Koontz kick) Fourth Quarter S—Catelli 1 run (Koontz kick) M—8 run (run good) S— T. Forshaw 35 pass from Catelli (Catelli pass to Miles) Individual Stats Rushing— Sequim: Wiker 11-103, Catelli 13-39, Yasumura 2-2. Passing—Sequim: Catelli, 19-32-0, 226 yards; Wiker 2-2-0, 21 yards. Receiving—Sequim: T. Forshaw 4-71, Lidstrom 5-36, Fields 4-85, Ramierz 2-12, Ballard 3-23, Johnston 1-4.

Crescent 54, Clallam Bay 0 CLALLAM BAY — The Loggers got the kinks out the second time around while the youthful Bruins were overwhelmed in a Northwest Football League game Friday night. The Loggers (1-0 in league, 2-0 overall), who beat the Bruins (0-1, 0-2) 52-20 at home last week in nonleague action, rolled to a 54-0 halftime lead under the lights Friday as the same two teams opened league play. The game was called at the half because of the 40-point mercy rule. Turn

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Football/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Monday Volleyball: Sequim JV at Crescent, 6:30 p.m. Boys Tennis: Kingston at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.; Chimacum-Port Townsend at Bremerton, 4 p.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Sept. 8 Longhouse Market Men’s high game: Fred Pratt, 246; men’s high series: Fred Pratt, 653. Women’s high game: Debbie Halverson, 226; Women’s high series: Debbie Halverson, 523. Sept. 7 Lakeside Big Four Men’s high game: Bill VanGordon, 247; men’s high series: Joe Hartley, 702. Wednesday Seniors Men’s high game: Steve Campbell, 261; men’s high series: Steve Campbell, 629. Women’s high game: Catherine Woodahl, 184; women’s high series: Joan Wright, 493. Leading team: Dead Wood.

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Sept. 8 Men’s Club Medal Play Individual Event Gross: Bob Brodhun, 72; Steve Main, 76. Net: Larry Aillaud, 65; Tom Fryer, 67; Win Miller, 67; Bill Tiderman, 68; Greg Shield, 69; Steve Main, 69. Team Event Gross: Rick Parkhurst and Bob Brodhun, 67. Net: Steve Campbell and Andy Vanderweyden, 57; Steve Colvin and Win Miller, 58; Larry Aillaud and Brian Duncan, 59; Gordon Thomson and Dave Boerigter, 60; Kevin Borde and Greg Shield, 61; Bill Pampell and Steve Campbell, 61; Dick Goodman and Ray Dooley, 61; Terry McCartney and Chris Fiscalini, 61; Bill Pampell and Andy Vanderweyden, 61. SUNLAND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Sept. 9 Selective 9 Men’s Game Flight 1 (0-18) Gross: Jay Tomlin, 32. Net: Ken Orth, 25; Jack Real, 26; Bruce Mullikin, 26; Arlyn Nelson, 26.5; Tom Chirhart, 26.5. Flight 2 (19 plus) Gross: Russ McClelland, 37; Mike Lawrence, 37. Net: Ray Aldrich, 24.5; Alan Weinert, 25; Gene Mattson, 27; Jim Hanley, 27; Tom Caufield, 28. Sept. 8 SWGA Medal Play Flight 1 (0-24) Gross: Judy Nordyke, 92; Marine Hirschfeld, 92. Net: Dana Burback, 73; Carol Patterson, 63. Flight 2 (25-31) Gross: Dorene Berard, 99. Net: Nan Godfrey, 72. Flight 3 (32 and up) Gross: Rose Lauritsen, 105. Net: Shirley Mullikin, 74. Sept. 8 Lady Niners Low Net: Judy Kelley, 33; Lani Warren, 36; Patricia Palmeri, 36; Betty Armstrong, 36. CEDARS AT DUNGENESS Sept. 8 Merchant League Team Standings Team Points 1. Eric’s RV Repair 8.5 2. Bigg Dogg 8.0 3. Stymie’s Bar And Grill 2.5 4. The Alternates 2.5 5. McAleer Team USA 2.0 6. Jamestown Aces 1.5 7. Stymies Bar and Grill 0.0 8. Olympic Synthetics 0.0 Individual Results Low Handicap Division Gross: Gary Kettel, 35; Sid Krumpe, 36; Robert Mares, 39; Rob Wright, 39; Todd Reed, 39. Net: Dean Kruse, 34; Mike Schmidt, 34; Kris Lether, 35; Kevin Estes, 35; Andy Mildenberger, 35. Closest to pin: Hole No. 4 Low Handicap Division Rob Wright, 9 ft. 4 in. High Handicap Division Ken Hagan, 2 ft. 6 in. High Handicap Division Gross: George Penic, 41; Dean Rhodefer, 44; Bill Bailey, 45; Larry Blydenstein, 45; Ken Hagan, 47; Pete Nesse, 47. Net: Dean Norman, 28; Jeff Abram, 32; Clint Wetzel, 33; Ryan McCarthy, 33; Scott Chitwood, 33. Closest to pin: Hole No. 8 Low Handicap Division Konrad Sutterlin, 3 ft. 6 in. High Handicap Division George Penic, 11 ft. Merchants League Playoff Seedings First Round Sept. 8 Championship Bracket Dungeness Plumbing (98) defeated Raske Insurance (102) 9-1 Eagle Home Mortgage (94.5) defeated Kettel’s 76 ((1.5) 8.5-1.5 AM Systems (97.5) defeated Dungeness Golf Shop (93) 6-4 Mischmidt (78) defeated America’s Finest (93.5) 8-2 Championship Bracket Sept. 15 Dungeness Plumbing vs. Eagle Home Mortgage AM Systems vs. Mischmidt

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines

The Associated Press

Inches

from victory

Mississippi State quarterback Chris Relf, right, is upended short of the goal line on the final play of the game as Auburn defensive back Ryan Smith (24) defends in Auburn, Ala., on Saturday. Auburn won 41-34.

Consolation Bracket Raske Insurance vs. Kettel’s 76 Dungeness Golf Shop vs. America’s Finest Non Qualifier Bracket Eric’s RV Repair vs. Bigg Dogg Stymies Bar and Grill vs. The Alternates McAleer Team USA vs. Jametown Aces DISCOVERY BAY Sept. 8 Ladies Club Hidden Holes Sheila Kilmer, 45; Edna Chicarell, 46.5; Lynn Pierle, 49.4; Irene Helander, 49.5

Prep Sports Football Saturday’s Scores Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 52, Skyview 14 Decatur 33, Bremerton 20 Sequim 29, Meridian 22 Friday’s Scores Aberdeen 24, Elma 20 Almira/Coulee-Hartline 46, Liberty Christian 44 Arlington 49, Jackson 42 Auburn 48, Mt. Rainier 7 Auburn Mountainview 13, Eatonville 12 Auburn Riverside 37, Kent Meridian 14 Bainbridge 28, Kingston 14 Ballard 50, Franklin 20 Battle Ground 54, Fort Vancouver 13 Bellarmine Prep 45, Wilson, Woodrow 13 Bellevue 31, Skyline 17 Blaine 41, Squalicum 23 Blanchet 28, Granite Falls 0 Bonney Lake 26, Sumner 21 Brewster 39, Highland 21 Burlington-Edison 36, Sehome 13 Camas 31, Mountain View 0 Cascade (Leavenworth) 49, Naches Valley 21 Cashmere 50, Cle Elum/Roslyn 21 Central Kitsap 51, Olympic 0 Central Valley 41, Mead 28 Centralia 20, North Kitsap 15 Cheney 47, Timberlake, Idaho 24 Chiawana 22, Pasco 14 Colfax 20, DeSales 13 Colton 38, Salmon River, Idaho 30 Columbia (Burbank) 30, La Salle 20 Columbia River 40, Kelso 12 Connell 35, Chelan 0 Curtis 14, Spanaway Lake 0 Cusick 52, Odessa-Harrington 48 Davenport 40, Lake Roosevelt 14 Davis 26, Sunnyside 18 Deer Park 37, Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 19 Eastlake 42, Snohomish 14 Eisenhower 44, West Valley (Yakima) 13 Ellensburg 8, East Valley (Yakima) 7 Everett 31, Cascade (Everett) 24 Federal Way 33, Puyallup 13 Ferris 39, Shadle Park 19 Fife 42, Evergreen (Seattle) 14 Foster 41, Clover Park 26 Freeman 46, St. Maries, Idaho 0 Garfield 27, Sammamish 22 Garfield-Palouse 44, Selkirk 0 Gonzaga Prep 35, Mt. Spokane 19 Granger 52, Mabton 7 Grangeville, Idaho 51, Asotin 6 Hazen 17, Cedarcrest 14 Hoquiam 33, Kalama 7 Inglemoor 19, Juanita 0 Ingraham 39, Chief Sealth 6 Issaquah 23, Liberty (Renton) 13 Kamiakin 37, Moses Lake 21 Kennewick 34, Hermiston, Ore. 0 Kentlake 30, Kentridge 22 King’s 41, Coupeville 14

Kittitas 45, Pateros 0 Klahowya 22, Chimacum 6 LaCenter 35, Rochester 20 LaCrosse/Washtucna 42, Kootenai, Idaho 14 Lake Stevens 21, Kamiak 20 Lake Washington 39, Redmond 17 Lakeland, Idaho 31, East Valley (Spokane) 17 Lakes 49, Evergreen (Vancouver) 6 Lakeside (Seattle) 48, Vashon Island 7 Lakewood 43, Lynden Christian 3 Lewis and Clark 31, University 24 Liberty Bell 27, Soap Lake-Wilson Creek 0 Lind-Ritzville 27, Warden 21 Lummi 62, Rainier Christian 22 Lynden 45, Bellingham 7 Mariner 28, Mount Vernon 24 Marysville-Pilchuck 21, Edmonds-Woodway 13 Meadowdale 44, Marysville-Getchell High School 8 Mercer Island 36, Newport (Bellevue) 21 Montesano 45, Castle Rock 0 Morton/White Pass 12, Wahkiakum 0 Moscow, Idaho 42, Pullman 9 Mossyrock 34, Winlock 0 Mount Baker 14, Anacortes 13 Mount Tahoma 43, Foss 14 Naselle 47, Knappa, Ore. 6 Newport 40, Priest River, Idaho 13 Nooksack Valley 44, LaConner 0 North Central 49, Rogers (Spokane) 28 North Thurston 26, Timberline 19 Northport 48, Mansfield 8 O’Dea 24, Ferndale 21 Oak Harbor 30, Glacier Peak 27 Okanogan 62, Oroville 0 Olympia 10, Capital 7 Othello 48, Quincy 8 Peninsula 49, Eastside Catholic 21 Port Angeles 28, Forks 14 Prairie 55, Hockinson 7 Prosser 36, Ephrata 17 R.A. Long 21, Hudson’s Bay 0 Rainier Beach 41, Cleveland 6 Raymond 31, Willapa Valley 14 Reardan 48, Bridgeport 6 Richland 35, Hanford 21 Ridgefield 27, Woodland 20 River View 34, Goldendale 26 Riverside 31, Medical Lake 20 Rogers (Puyallup) 27, Emerald Ridge 17 Sandpoint, Idaho 27, Clarkston 13 Seattle Lutheran 35, North Beach 0 Seattle Prep 47, Highline 7 Sedro-Woolley 14, Stanwood 13 Selah 46, Wapato 21 Shorecrest 26, Mountlake Terrace 21 Shorewood 28, Lynnwood 16 South Bend 27, Onalaska 6 South Kitsap 42, Tahoma 35 South Whidbey 54, Concrete 34 Southridge 42, Walla Walla 22 Stadium 35, Lincoln 27 Stevenson 13, Corbett, Ore. 0 Sultan 41, Darrington 6 Tenino 51, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 0 Toppenish 15, Grandview 7 Touchet 50, Condon/Wheeler, Ore. 8 Toutle Lake 20, Pe Ell 0 Tumwater 57, Yelm 7 Union 49, Enumclaw 7 W. F. West 19, Lindbergh 6 Waitsburg-Prescott 60, Pilot Rock, Ore. 14 Washington 34, North Mason 0 Washougal 56, Columbia (White Salmon) 0 Waterville 28, Entiat 14 Wellpinit 18, Republic 0 Wenatchee 40, Eastmont 19 West Seattle 21, Nathan Hale 20

West Valley (Spokane) 37, Colville 0 White River 17, Orting 6 White River 17, Orting 6 Wilbur-Creston 26, Columbia(Hunters)-Inchelium 14 Woodinville 35, Monroe 0

Baseball Mariners 7, Royals 3 Friday’s Box Kansas City Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi AGordn lf 5 1 2 2 ISuzuki rf 5 1 4 2 MeCarr cf 5 1 1 0 Ryan ss 4 1 1 0 Butler dh 4 0 0 1 Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 2 0 Olivo c 5 3 3 2 Francr rf 4 0 1 0 Smoak 1b 4 1 3 2 Mostks 3b 4 0 2 0 W.Pena dh 4 0 2 1 Giavtll 2b 4 0 0 0 C.Wells lf 4 0 1 0 S.Perez c 4 0 1 0 TRonsn cf 4 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 1 1 0 Liddi 3b 4 1 1 0 Totals 37 3 10 3 Totals 38 7 15 7 Kansas City 200 000 100—3 Seattle 202 120 0 0x—7 DP—Kansas City 1. LOB­— Kansas City 8, Seattle 9. 2B—Olivo (15), W.Pena (3), Liddi (1). 3B—Me.Cabrera (5), A.Escobar (7), Olivo (1). HR—A.Gordon (21), I.Suzuki (5), Olivo (17). SB—A.Escobar (23), I.Suzuki 2 (39), Ryan (11). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Francis L,5/16 3 1-3 9 5 5 03 Adcock 2 2-3 4 2 2 15 J.Chavez 2 2 0 0 1 4 Seattle Beavan W,4/5 6 1-3 9 3 3 03 Kelley 1 2-3 1 0 0 01 J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBP—by J.Wright (A.Escobar). WP—Francis. PB—S.Perez. Umpires—Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Brian Runge; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Tim McClelland. T—2:59. A—14,805 (47,878).

American League All Times PDT West Division W L Pct GB Texas 82 64 .562 — Los Angeles 79 65 .549 2 Oakland 66 79 .455 15½ Seattle 61 83 .424 20 East Division W L Pct GB New York 87 56 .608 — Boston 85 60 .586 3 Tampa Bay 80 64 .556 7½ Toronto 73 73 .500 15½ Baltimore 58 86 .403 29½ Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 83 62 .572 — Chicago 73 71 .507 9½ Cleveland 71 72 .497 11 Kansas City 60 86 .411 23½ Minnesota 59 86 .407 24 Saturday’s Games Toronto 5, Baltimore 4 Chicago White Sox 7, Cleveland 3, 10 innings Detroit 3, Minnesota 2 Oakland 8, Texas 7 Tampa Bay 6, Boston 5, 11 innings N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, late Kansas City at Seattle, late Today’s Games Minnesota (Diamond 1-3) at Detroit (Fister 7-13), 10:05 a.m. Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 3-3) at Toronto (McGowan 0-0), 10:07 a.m.

Today 10 a.m. (7) KIRO Football NFL, Pittsburgh Steelers vs. Baltimore Ravens 10 a.m. (13) KCPQ Football NFL, Philadelphia Eagles vs. St. Louis Rams 10 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, Women’s Doubles Final 11 a.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, Philadelphia Phillies vs. Milwaukee Brewers Noon (47) GOLF LPGA, Arkansas Championship 1 p.m. (7) KIRO Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, Women’s Final 1 p.m. (10) CITY Football NFL, Seattle Seahawks vs. San Francisco 49ers 1 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Kansas City Royals vs. Seattle Mariners 1:15 p.m. (13) KCPQ Football NFL, Seattle Seahawks vs. San Francisco 49ers 5 p.m. (5) KING Football NFL, Dallas Cowboys vs. New York Jets (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Baseball MLB, Chicago Cubs vs. New York Mets 6 p.m. (6) KONG Basketball WNBA, Chicago at Seattle Storm Boston (Lester 15-6) at Tampa Bay (Shields 14-10), 10:40 a.m. Cleveland (U.Jimenez 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Z.Stewart 2-3), 11:10 a.m. Oakland (Outman 3-4) at Texas (C.Wilson 15-6), 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 11-7) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 11-10), 12:35 p.m. Kansas City (Teaford 0-0) at Seattle (A.Vasquez 1-2), 1:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.

National League All Times PDT West Division W L Pct GB Arizona 85 61 .582 — San Francisco 75 69 .521 9 Los Angeles 71 72 .497 12½ Colorado 68 77 .469 16½ San Diego 62 84 .425 23 East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 94 48 .662 — Atlanta 84 62 .575 12 New York 71 74 .490 24½ Washington 66 77 .462 28½ Florida 65 79 .451 30 Central Division W L Pct GB Milwaukee 85 62 .578 — St. Louis 78 67 .538 6 Cincinnati 71 74 .490 13 Pittsburgh 66 79 .455 18 Chicago 63 82 .434 21 Houston 49 96 .338 35 Saturday’s Games Chicago Cubs 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Colorado 12, Cincinnati 7 Florida 3, Pittsburgh 0 Houston 9, Washington 3 Philadelphia 3, Milwaukee 2, 10 innings St. Louis 4, Atlanta 3 Arizona 6, San Diego 5, 10 innings L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 6:05 p.m. Today’s Games Florida (Vazquez 9-11) at Pittsburgh (Ja. McDonald 9-7), 10:35 a.m. Houston (Sosa 2-3) at Washington (Strasburg 0-0), 10:35 a.m. Philadelphia (Worley 11-1) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 15-10), 11:10 a.m. Atlanta (T.Hudson 14-9) at St. Louis (Westbrook 11-8), 11:15 a.m. Cincinnati (Volquez 5-4) at Colorado (Pomeranz 0-0), 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 11-15) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-12), 1:05 p.m. San Diego (LeBlanc 2-5) at Arizona (Collmenter 9-8), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 8-10) at N.Y. Mets (Batista 4-2), 5:05 p.m.

Football NFL Schedule All Times PDT Thursday’s Game Green Bay 42, New Orleans 34 Today’s Games Atlanta at Chicago, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Seattle at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. Carolina at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Jets, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Games New England at Miami, 4 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 7:15 p.m.

College Football FAR WEST California 36, Colorado 33, OT Colorado St. 33, N. Colorado 14 Idaho 44, North Dakota 14 Idaho St. 44, Western St. (Col.) 7 Montana 37, Cal Poly 23 Montana St. 38, UC Davis 14 N. Arizona 58, Fort Lewis 13 Oregon 69, Nevada 20 S. Utah 35, Sacramento St. 14 TCU 35, Air Force 19 Washington 40, Hawaii 32 Washington St. 59, UNLV 7 Wyoming 45, Texas St. 10

SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 47, Memphis 3 McMurry 24, UTSA 21 Rice 24, Purdue 22 MIDWEST Drake 28, Grand View 21, OT Duquesne 22, Dayton 13 E. Michigan 14, Alabama St. 7 Illinois 56, S. Dakota St. 3 Indiana St. 48, Butler 34 Iowa St. 44, Iowa 41, 3OT Michigan St. 44, FAU 0 New Mexico St. 28, Minnesota 21

Northwestern 42, E. Illinois 21 Ohio 30, Gardner-Webb 3 Ohio St. 27, Toledo 22 South Dakota 30, E. Washington 17 W. Illinois 35, Jacksonville 21 W. Michigan 38, Nicholls St. 7 Wisconsin 35, Oregon St. 0 Youngstown St. 77, Valparaiso 13 SOUTH Appalachian St. 58, NC A&T 6 Auburn 41, Mississippi St. 34 Campbell 76, Apprentice 0

Chattanooga 38, Jacksonville St. 17 Clemson 35, Wofford 27 Coastal Carolina 20, Catawba 3 Davidson 28, Lenoir-Rhyne 10 Delaware St. 31, Shaw 27 E. Kentucky 28, Missouri St. 24 Florida St. 62, Charleston Southern 10 Furman 16, The Citadel 6 Georgia Southern 62, Tusculum 21 Georgia Tech 49, Middle Tennessee 21 Howard 30, Morehouse 27

James Madison 14, CCSU 9 Kentucky 27, Cent. Michigan 13 Marshall 26, Southern Miss. 20 Mississippi 42, S. Illinois 24 Murray St. 39, MVSU 0< NC Central 42, Central St., Ohio 3 North Carolina 24, Rutgers 22 Old Dominion 40, Georgia St. 17 Presbyterian 38, North Greenville 21 Richmond 21, Wagner 6 SC State 26, Bethune-Cookman 18 Samford 48, Stillman 6

South Alabama 30, Lamar 8 South Carolina 45, Georgia 42 Southern U. 21, Alabama A&M 6 Stanford 44, Duke 14 Tennessee 45, Cincinnati 23 Tulsa 31, Tulane 3 Virginia Tech 17, East Carolina 10 W. Carolina 52, Mars Hill 31 Wake Forest 34, NC State 27 William & Mary 24, VMI 7 EAST Alabama 27, Penn St. 11

Bryant 27, American International 16 Bucknell 28, Marist 14 Buffalo 35, Stony Brook 7 Delaware 28, West Chester 17 Georgetown 14, Lafayette 13 Holy Cross 37, Colgate 7 New Hampshire 48, Lehigh 41, OT Pittsburgh 35, Maine 29 San Diego St. 23, Army 20 Syracuse 21, Rhode Island 14 Towson 31, Villanova 10 West Virginia 55, Norfolk St. 12


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Rivals: Spartans give Riders trouble with 1:27 left in the second quarter. It gave Port Angeles a 14-6 half-time lead. “I wanted to call punt, but [the kids] wanted to fake punt it,” Feasel said. “I’m going to respect that, when they want to go and take that chance. “I’m behind my team all the way. I have a lot of confidence in them, and I want them to get that confidence in themselves. “I don’t regret standing up for my team and sticking with that at all.”

Continued from B1 “There were some bright moments in the middle . . . but I would say we started out poorly, and we ended poorly,” Wahl said. “I can understand a slow start, but then to finish the game like that means that I didn’t feel very much of a sense of accomplishment.” Indeed, it appeared as if the Class 1A Spartans might very well upset the 2A Riders as the sun set on the West End early Friday night. Port Angeles ran just three offensive plays the entire first quarter as Forks’ methodical Wing-T attack converted six first downs. That included four first downs on a 13-play, 55-yard scoring drive on Forks’ first possession that ended with Braden Decker’s 13-yard touchdown pass to Sergio Chase for a 6-0 lead. After the Riders fumbled the ensuing kickoff, the Spartans marched all the way down to the Port Angeles 2-yard line before being turned back on three successive plays. Given new life, the Riders took the ball 91 yards down the field for a 3-yard Walker touchdown run and 7-6 edge. Walker ran for 50 of those yards on four rushes, including a 27-yard scamper, and threw for the other 41 on 3-of-4 passing. “We definitely didn’t play as good as we know we can, but you’ve got to give some credit to Forks,” Walker said. “They came out and they smacked us pretty hard. It was ugly, but we won.” Walker finished the night with 128 yards rush-

Rushing score

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles receiver Cameron Braithwaite, left, goes high for the pass, which is just out of reach. Defending is Forks’ Tre Harris. ing and three touchdowns on 12 carries, and 134 yards and one touchdown through the air on 8-of-22 passing. The 5-foot-11, 205-pound two-way star also delivered several crushing hits at

safety position on defense. His one scoring pass — a 5-yard strike to Riley Hannam — came moments after the Riders stuffed a Forks fake punt attempt at the Spartan 31-yard line

Port Angeles scored on its second possession of the second half on a 1-yard Walker run, then all but put the game away early in the fourth quarter when Walker ran in another 18-yard score for a 28-6 lead two plays after Forks fumbled a punt in its own territory. Forks answered with the long scoring drive on its last possession of the game, capped by a 24-yard touchdown pass from backup quarterback Andrew Weltz to James Salazar. But by then, the damage had already been done . . . at least on the scoreboard. A final Spartan goal line stand to end the game — Port Angeles was stuffed on two runs inside the Forks 3-yard line — quelled any positive vibes on the Rider sideline. “We went out and we got beat up, and that’s why I’m so angry right now,” Wahl said. “I feel like our guys don’t understand when they go into a game, that they are in a fight. They are not getting that. “I get that, but I’m not getting them to get it.”

Forks running back Shane WhiteEagle ground out 79 yards on 20 rushes to lead his team. Weltz was 5-for-8 with 44 yards, one touchdown and one interception in relief of Decker. Between the first and fourth quarters, however, Forks managed just two first downs against the Rider defense. “This is such a game of momentum,” Feasel said. “When big plays happen against you, it’s hard to pick it back up. We were one pick away from the big play, but we didn’t get it.” Eli Fiscalini led the Riders with 64 yards on four receptions, while Skyler Gray had one 41-yard catch and an interception. Dylan Brewer added 47 yards on 12 rushes for the Riders, who totaled 194 yards on the ground. Still, Wahl left the West End on Friday night hoping his team wouldn’t repeat the same flat performance against Bremerton next Friday in the team’s Olympic League opener at home. “I want to see their response. I don’t want to hear it,” Wahl said. Port Angeles 28, Forks 14 Port Angeles 0 14 8 6— 28 Forks 6 0 0 8— 14 First Quarter F—Chase 13 pass from Decker (run failed) Second Quarter PA—Walker 3 run (Haskins kick) PA—Hannam 5 pass from Walker (Haskins kick) Third Quarter PA—Walker 1 run (Walker run) Fourth Quarter PA—Walker 18 run (Kick failed) F—Salazar 24 pass from Weltz (Penn pass from Weltz) Individual Stats Rushing— F: WhiteEagle 20-79, Chase 13-36, Penn 4-16, Pederson 3-13, Salazar 2-11, Decker 10-(minus 9). PA: Walker 12-128, Brewer 12-47, Fiscalini 3-7, Braithwaite 1-10, Gray 1-2. Passing—F: Weltz 5-8-1, 44; Decker 1-4-0, 13. PA: Walker 8-22-0, 134. Receiving—F: Salazar 1-24, Chase 1-13, Penn 2-11, Pederson 1-8, Dean 1-1. PA: Fiscalini 4-64, Gray 1-43, Hannam 2-18, Brewer 1-9.

Football: Neah Bay, Quilcene win Continued from B1 four turnovers, two fumble recoveries and two inter“I was pleased with our ceptions. Leading the defensive team’s response in rising ot the challenge we presented charge was senior captain them with,” Crescent coach Austen Hutto, who had nine tackles. Darrell Yount said. Crescent next plays at “We had made some dynamic adjustments on powerhouse Neah Bay on defense and moved more Friday night while the Bruinto our regular offense ins host Rainier Christian on Friday night. from a week ago. Both are league games. “The results speak for themselves. But more than that, our athletes really Crescent 54, Clallam Bay 0 Game called at halftime stepped up to the bar indi27 27 x x— 54 vidually and collectively as Crescent Clallam Bay 0 0 x x— 0 a team. First Quarter “Just a great group of C—Larson 65 run (Bamer kick) C—Bamer 2 run (Bamer kick) kids.” C—Findley 33 pass from Story (Bamer kick) The Bruins did not roll C—Williams 53 pass from Story (run failed) Second Quarter over. 28 pass from Story (Bamer kick) “Clallam Bay is a good C—Findley C—Larson 45 pass from Story (Bamer kick) football team,” Yount said. C—Williams 38 pass from Story (run failed) kick) “They will make their own C—Story 1 run (Bamer Individual Stats impact in future games this Rushing— Crescent: Larson 3-71, Story 7-63, Bamer 3-12, Zapien 1-1. season. Story 8-8-0, 232 yards. “They are a great group Passing—Crescent: Receiving—Crescent: Williams 3-110, Findley of kids to play against. 3-67, Larson 1-45, Bamer 1-10. Excellent attitudes and very competitive. Klahowya 22, “We nicked them up a Chimacum 6 little bit and that kid of took its toll. They will get better.” SILVERDALE — The Part of the offensive Class 1A Cowboys of the adjustment was putting Nisqually League gave the Joel Williams, last week’s 2A Eagles of the Olympic quarterback, back at his League all they could hanregular slot at wide receiver. dle Friday night in nonQuarterback Kai Story, league action. in his first start ever, went a Chimacum (0-2) quarterperfect 8-for-8 with 232 back Alex Morris was yards and five touchdowns 17-for-30 with a touchdown through the air. and an interception while He also rushed for amassing 161 yards another 63 yards for 295 through the air. yards of total offense, all in Trevor Hare caught the first half. three of the passes for 52 Williams, meanwhile, yards and he had the lone had three catches for 110 touchdown. yards and two touchdowns. Kyle Madayag caught The Crescent defense four passes for 28 yards completely shut down the while Rafael Pagasian Bruins, coming away with caught two for 31 and Derek

Ajax had four catches for 11 yards. The Cowboys earned 88 yards on the ground with Madayag leading the way with 38 yards on 10 carries. Morris ran for 28 yards on five carries. Madayag also led on defense with a team-high eight tackles, seven of them solo. Daryl Settlemire and Ajax had six tackles each. In addition, Austen Maples had two sacks and Justin Morris had an interception. The Cowboys open league play at home Friday night against Cascade Christian. No game statistics available.

Neah Bay 60, Evergreen Lutheran 20 NEAH BAY — Josiah Greene threw three touchdowns and ran for another to spark the Red Devils to the Northwest Football League rout Friday night. The game was called with 10:38 to play in the game because of the 40-point mercy rule. Neah Bay, 1-0 in league and 1-1 overall, led 24-6 at the end of the first quarter and 46-14 at halftime. Josiah Greene was almost perfect passing the ball as he made 10 of 12 passes with no interceptions for the three scores and 185 yards. The quarterback also ran for a team-high 165 yards on 10 carries and the touchdown for a total of 350 offensive yards. The Red Devils had 423

yards on the ground with Titus Pascua, Cody Cummins, Tyler McCaulley and Zeke Greene all earning rushing scores. Josiah Greene had TD passes of 13 yards to Leyton Doherty, Michael Dulik of 32 yards and to John Reamer of 31 yards. Pascua led on defense with seven tackles while Mitchell McGee had six. The Red Devils next will host undefeated Crescent (2-0) in a crucial Northwest Football League showdown this coming Friday night. Neah Bay 60, Evergreen Lutheran 20 Ever. Lutheran 6 8 6 x— 20 Neah Bay 24 22 14 x— 60 First Quarter EL— Kjenstad pass from Lawrence (run failed) NB—Pascua 6 run (J. Greene run) NB—Cummins 35 run (Pascua run) NB—Doherty 13 pass from J. Greene (T. McCaulley run) Second Quarter NB—J. Greene 9 run (pass failed) NB—Dulik 32 pass from J. Greene (J. Greene pass to Doherty) EL—Kjenstad 5 pass from Lawrence (Lawrence pass to Shannon) NB—T. McCaulley 1 run (Martinez run) Third Quarter EL—Goyns 71 run (pass failed) NB—Z. Greene 45 run (Doherty run) Fourth Quarter NB—Reamer 31 pass from J. Greene (end of game, no attempt) Individual Stats Rushing— Evergreen Lutheran: Goyns 5-79, Lawrence 15-69. Neah Bay: Z. Greene 2-102, Pascua 4-26, J. Greene 10-165, Cummins 3-89, Doherty 2-10; T. McCaulley 2-4, Martinez 10-30, Dulik 2-17. Passing—Evergreen Lutheran: Lawrence 8-16-0, 101 yards. Neah Bay: J. Greene 10-12-0, 185 yards. Receiving—Evergreen Lutheran: Kjenstad 4-89. Neah Bay: Doherty 3-44, Dulik 2-38, T. McCaulley 3-53, Pascua 1-19, Reamer 1-31.

Quilcene 36, Tulalip Heritage 8 QUILCENE — The Rangers opened the Northwest Football League season on a high note. Quilcene, 2-0, gave up an early touchdown but then scored 36 unanswered

points, leading 20-8 at halftime and 28-8 at the end of the third quarter. Jake Pleines threw two touchdown passes, both to Kolby Schreier, and Eddie Perez scored two touchdowns, including an 89-yard kickoff return, to spark the Rangers. “It is really tough getting the ball to everybody,” Quilcene coach Nic Dahl said. “We have so many weapons.” Pleines had an outstanding day, connecting on eight of 14 passes with no interceptions for 194 yards and two touchdowns. Schreier caught five of the passes for 141 yards and the two scores. Pleines also had 72 rushing yards on 12 carries while Perez had a teamhigh 75 yards on six carries. Colton Pol led the defense with three sacks and he forced two fumbles while Perez had two sacks and recovered two fumbles. Josh King had an interception for the Rangers. Quilcene next plays at Evergreen Lutheran on Friday night. Quilcene 36, Tulalip Heritage 8 Tulalip Herit. 8 0 0 0— 8 Quilcene 6 14 8 8— 36 First Quarter TH—Touchdown not available. Q—Perez 89 kickoff return (run failed) Second Quarter Q—Schreier 40 pass from Pleines (run failed) Q—King 18 run (Steele run) Third Quarter Q—Perez 10 run (Perez run) Fourth Quarter Q—Schreier 54 pass from Pleines (Pleines run) Individual Stats Rushing— Quilcene: Perez 6-75, Pleines 12-72, King 4-57, Steele 3-22, Schreier 1-15. Passing—Quilcene: Pleines 8-14-0, 194 yards. Receiving—Quilcene: Schreier 5-141, King 1-22, Perez 1-28, Pol 1-3.

B3

Preps Football Standings As of Sept. 9 Olympic League Conf. Overall Port Angeles 0-0 2-0 Sequim 0-0 2-0 Bremerton(3A) 0-0 1-0 Kingston 0-0 1-1 Klahowya 0-0 1-1 North Mason 0-0 0-2 North Kitsap 0-0 0-2 Olympic 0-0 0-2 Friday’s Games Port Angeles 28, Forks 14 Klahowya 22, Chimacum 6 Bainbridge 28, Kingston 14 Centralia 20, North Kitsap 15 Washington 34, North Mason 0 Central Kitsap 51, Olympic 0 Saturday’s Game Sequim 29, Meridian 22 Bremerton at Decatur Sept. 16 Games Sequim at Klahowya Bremerton at Port Angeles North Kitsap at North Mason Olympic at Kingston 1A/2B Nisqually League Conf. Overall Charles Wright 1-0 2-0 Cedar Park Christ. 0-0 2-0 Cascade Christ. 0-0 1-0 Life Christian 0-0 1-0 Chimacum 0-0 0-2 Orting 0-0 0-2 Vashon Island 0-0 0-2 Port Townsend 0-1 0-2 Thursday’s Game C. Wright 47, Port Townsend 14 Friday’s Games Klahowya 22, Chimacum 6 White River 17, Orting 6 Cedar Park Christian 47, Jenkins 14 Lakeside 48, Vashon Island 7 Saturday’s Games Tacoma Baptist at Life Christian Franklin Pierce at Cascade Christian Sept. 16 Games Cascade Christian at Chimacum Sept. 17 Games Vashon Island at Port Townsend Charles Wright at C.P. Christian Orting at Life Christian Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division Conf. Overall Hoquiam 0-0 2-0 Montesano 0-0 2-0 Tenino 0-0 2-0 Elma 0-0 1-1 Rainier 0-0 1-1 Forks 0-0 0-2 Onalaska 0-0 0-2 Rochester 0-0 0-2 Friday’s Games Port Angeles 28, Forks 14 Hoquiam 33, Kalama 7 Montesano 45, Castle Rock 0 LaCenter 35, Rochester 20 Aberdeen 24, Elma 20 South Bend 27, Onalaska 6 Toledo 20, Rainier 7 Tenino 51, NW Christian (Lacey) 0 Sept. 16 Games Hoquiam at Forks Rochester at Montesano Rainier at Tenino Onalaska at Elma Northwest Football League Conf. Overall Crescent 1-0 2-0 Lummi 1-0 2-0 Quilcene 1-0 2-0 Neah Bay 1-0 1-1 Highland Christian 0-0 0-1 Lopez 0-0 0-0 Muckleshoot 0-0 0-0 Evergreen Luth.(2B) 0-1 1-1 Clallam Bay 0-1 0-2 Rainier Chr. (2B) 0-1 0-2 Tulalip Heritage 0-1 0-1 Friday’s Games Crescent 54, Clallam Bay 0 Neah Bay 60, Ever. Lutheran 20 Lummi 62, Rainier Christian 22 Highland Christian at Muckleshoot Saturday’s Games Quilcene 36, Tulalip Hertiage 8 Sept. 16 Games Crescent at Neah Bay Rainier Christian at Clallam Bay St. Paul (Ore.) at Lummi Sept. 17 Games Lopez at Muckleshoot Highland Christian at Tulalip Quilcene at Evergreen Lutheran

PA tennis wins Peninsula Daily News

BELFAIR — The Port Angeles boys tennis team evened its season record at 1-1 by sweeping North Mason 7-0 on Friday The Riders didn’t drop a single set on their way to the convincing win. Hayden McCartney won at No. 1 singles by beating Cody Champine 6-0, 6-0. The players of the match were the duo of Alex Brown and Derek Schumacher. “Alex and Derek played their first match together and I thought they did a great job communicating and covering the court,” coach Brian Gundersen said. The Riders host Kingston on Monday.

Schubert: PA, Sequim likely to stay in Class 2A Continued from B1 No doubt, that decision would be moot if the Nisqually shrinks to an untenable size. “Obviously, for us the big advantage is we have all the programs to match the Olympic League as well as junior varsity programs, and the Nisqually League doesn’t have that,” Kane said. “We as a district must look out for that. “I was talking with Charles Wright baseball coach [at Thursday night’s football game] and for the Nisqually League.

“They are waiting to see what happens until any decision is made. “We don’t have to make any decisions until the first of the year, and then we’ll make a decisions on what’s best for the district and the kids.” Of course, if Chimacum and Port Townsend were to merge, it would create and 2A program that would fit perfectly in the Olympic League. Just sayin’.

More reclassification It appears there won’t be too many changes, if any, of Peninsula schools’ classifications for the 2012-14 cycle.

According to John Miller, assistant executive director for WIAA, the dividing lines for each classification will be the same enrollment figures used for 2010-12. That means area schools will stay with the status quo because none have likely grown enough — or shrunk enough — to cross one of those lines. Still, it’s possible things be more much difficult for 2A schools like Port Angeles and Sequim during the next two-year cycle. The reason? There is no edict to balance classifications by

number of schools, as there was the last time around. Thus, there’s a distinct possibility one classification will have significantly more schools than another. Indeed, Miller even stated that was going to be the case. “We’re fairly certain that we’re not going to have balance by classification,” Miller said. “For this next cycle there will be a discrepancy.” It’s easy to see how this could result in more 2A schools than the 64 it currently holds. Five 3A schools had

enrollment figures within 30 students of the 2A line (1,085) in 2010-12. Given how common shrinking enrollments are throughout the state, it seems more than possible a few of those schools will drop below 1,085. There’s also a few right on the 1A/2A line that could jump up as well (see Orting and Cascade Christian above.) Throw in the fact that 22 schools with 2A enrollment figures opted up to 3A in 2010, and you’re talking about several of new schools that could potentially be 2A.

Of course, the latter number includes 11 Metro League schools that are all but a cinch to opt up to 3A. But there are several others that may be in play. At the very least, 3A Bremerton seems a lock to be a 2A school when next fall begins. And that alone makes things tougher on an Olympic League 2A contingent that will expand from seven to eight.

________

Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt. schubert@peninsuladailynews.com.


B4

Sunday, September 11, 2011

SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Not your older bro’s Hawks Year 2 of Carroll era starts with new look By Tim Booth

things work out the way they do but you’re just forRENTON — In just two tunate you’re one of the seasons, Pete Carroll has guys to make it and then redefined NFL shelf life, at you circle the wagons least when it comes to the around the guys that are here and move forward.” Seattle Seahawks. It’s no secret When Seattle that Carroll and takes the field general manager today for its seaJohn Schneider son opener at San inherited an Francisco, the aging roster that Seahawks will feature only 10 Next Game needed an influx of youth and size. players on the Today Their overhaul active roster who vs. 49ers has taken less were playing for Seattle just two at San Francisco than two full seaTime: 1:15 p.m. sons to create an seasons ago. opening day rosSeattle’s roster On TV: Ch. 13 ter that features shuffle has just one player — included another 24 new additions since the defensive end Raheem Seahawks won a division Brock — born in the 1970s. Among Seattle’s title in Carroll’s first season back in the NFL, albeit with expected starting lineup is a 22-year-old offensive linejust a 7-9 record last year. “If you got here last year man, 22- and 23-year-old you’re used to it — if you starting safeties and eight got here last year and are players in their first, second still here. You kind of get or third years in the league. Youth typically means used to it,” said Seahawks receiver Mike Williams, one growing pains. Throw in unfamiliarity of the additions who came on board in Carroll’s first with another 24 new additions to the roster just from season. “The guys that come in the end of last season and and make an impact, they undoubtedly 2011 could be stick. I can’t speak on any- a struggle for a team in body’s situation and why transition. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

The Seattle Seahawks begin the season with a completely revamped roster from when head coach Pete Carroll, above, first showed up in 2010. And most of Seattle’s changes this offseason came on the offensive side. There were the big name additions of quarterback Tarvaris Jackson, offensive lineman Robert Gallery, wide receiver Sidney Rice and tight end Zach Miller, but also the drafting of offensive linemen James Carpenter and John Moffitt. Plus there was the addition of Tom Cable as the new offensive line coach in charge of Seattle’s run game, and Darrell Bevell as the Seahawks offensive coordinator.

Even with a division title, the status quo is not the way the Seahawks are operating. If all of Carroll’s options are healthy enough to play today, Seattle’s offense could have just two players who started the season opener a year ago. “Just to come in and start with the team, it gives you a little better presence. That first meeting is where they lay down the foundation of what you’re going to be looking for for the rest of the season,” said running back Marshawn Lynch, who came over in a trade last year.

“Coming in this year and actually being able to be a part of that first meeting where they did lay down the foundation, I got a better sense of where they’re coming from and what’s going on,” Lynch added. Carroll showed in Year 1 he was willing to part with anyone, perhaps most notably when he gave running back LenDale White — who played for Carroll with the Trojans — an opportunity during an offseason minicamp, only to cut him a short time later.

Cougars pound UNLV Dawgs: Close The Associated Press

PULLMAN — Washington State quarterback Marshall Lobbestael is not ready to get too excited about his team putting up 123 points on its first two opponents. In beating UNLV 59-7 on Saturday and Idaho State 64-21 a week ago, the Cougars dominated two overmatched opponents. “The next couple of weeks will pose real tough games for us,” said Lobbestael, who threw for career highs of 361 yards and five touchdowns on Saturday. Washington State (2-0) plays at San Diego State next Saturday, and follows that up with games at Colorado and at UCLA that are likely to provide a better test of whether these Cougars are for real. But Saturday was also about celebrating the first two-game winning streak in coach Paul Wulff’s four years at WSU.

Washington State scored touchdowns on its first five possessions and held a 35-0 lead at halftime to win its first two games of the season for the first time since 2005. The Cougars had 610 total yards of offense, compared to 158 for UNLV (0-2), and a 32-9 advantage in first downs. “The domination the defensive line displayed today was evident,” said linebacker Alex HoffmanEllis. The Rebels’ only score was on a 95-yard kickoff return by Tim Cornett late in the fourth quarter. “They looked like a competitive Pac-12 team and we looked like the team that everybody picked to finish at the bottom of the Mountain West,” Montana coach Bobby Hauck said. Lobbestael, who took over as starter after Jeff Tuel suffered a fractured collarbone last week, completed 24 of 32 passes.

The fifth-year senior was not intercepted. “We tried to pressure them but then they screened the heck out of us,” Hauck said. UNLV quarterback Caleb Herring completed just 11 of 20 passes for 60 yards and the Rebels got just 98 yards on the ground. Marquess Wilson caught five passes for 102 yards and a touchdown for WSU. Jared Karstetter had six receptions for 66 yards and two touchdowns. “This football team has answered every challenge that as coaches we put on them,” Wulff said. “We know there are more challenges moving forward.” This one was over early, as Rickey Galvin ran 48 yards for a touchdown on WSU’s opening drive. Galvin finished with 80 yards on five carries. On WSU’s second possession, Karstetter caught a 5-yard touchdown pass from Lobbestael.

Continued from B1 interception return for a touchdown from Richard He also took blame on Torres, tying the longest himself for being too conser- interception return in vative in the opener and Hawaii history. But on a very island-like made amends almost immediately with an aggressive afternoon where the thoufirst 18 plays that got the sands of green and black Huskies offense rolling. clad Warriors fans had to In those 18 plays, Wash- use their programs to stay ington scored 21 points, cool, Hawaii couldn’t overgained 255 yards and took come its own mistakes. control of the game. The Warriors had a pair “We just did some things of blocked extra points, one they weren’t use to and we leading to Trufant’s return, hadn’t displayed on film and a costly fumble on their and I think it caught them opening drive. off guard a little,” SeferianFurthermore, Hawaii Jenkins said. failed to convert on fourthWearing unique white helmets with the American down inside the Washingflag embodied within the ton 10 early while trying to ‘W’ on the side of the hel- stymie the Huskies 21-point mets in honor of the 10th run. “We learned some things anniversary of 9/11, the Huskies needed all of the about ourselves, but I learned also that they’re 21-point lead they built. Hawaii rallied on the not going to quit,” Hawaii strength of two short touch- coach Greg McMackin said. “They’re going to fight. down runs by Sterling Jackson, TDs running and pass- They were down 21-0 and ing from quarterback Bry- fought all the way to the ant Moniz and a 99-yard end.”

Preps: Riders 2nd in volleyball event while setter Emily Drake had 119 assists, 10 digs and two aces and Darian Foley had 14 kills, eight blocks and two aces. Danielle Rutherford added 12 kills and two aces.

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NORTH Conf. Overall California 0-0 2-0 Stanford 0-0 2-0 Washington 0-0 2-0 Washington State 0-0 2-0 Oregon 0-0 1-1 Oregon State 0-0 0-2 SOUTH Conf. Overall USC 1-0 2-0 Arizona State 0-0 2-0 Arizona 0-0 1-1 UCLA 0-0 1-1 Colorado 0-0 0-2 Utah 0-1 1-1 Thursday’s Game Oklahoma St. 37, Arizona 14 Friday’s Game Arizona St. 37, Missouri 30, OT Saturday’s Games Wisconsin 35, Oregon St. 0 Washington 40, Hawaii 32 Stanford 44, Duke 14 Oregon 69, Nevada 20 California 36 Colorado 33, OT Washington St. 59, UNLV 7 USC 23, Utah 14 UCLA 27, San Jose St. 17 Sept. 17 Games Colorado St. at Colorado Texas at UCLA Washington at Nebraska Missouri St. at Oregon Presbyterian at California Washington St. at San Diego St. Arizona St. at Illinois Syracuse at USC Utah at BYU Stanford at Arizona

Royals nip M’s The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Felipe Paulino struck out 11 and allowed two hits in seven innings, and Eric Hosmer his a two-run homer in the first to lead the Kansas City Royals a 4-2 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Saturday night. Paulino (3-10) gave up homers to Justin Smoak and Mike Carp, but he tamed the rest of the Mariners.

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pace,” Stevenson said. “But that was alright since it helped me do my best.” Port Angeles next hosts the Salt Creek Invitational. New this year will be a onemile race at 9:15 a.m. for elementary students. At 9:30 a.m. there will be a one-mile race for seventh and eighth graders.

Pacific-12 Standings

18701290

TACOMA — The Roughriders claimed eighth place in boys competition and 10th in the girls race at the 20-team Bellarmine Invitational on Saturday. Port Angeles was one of only two teams not on the 3A or 4A level. Rider boys were led by returning senior starter Nick Schindler, covering the 2-mile course in 10:47. “My race was a little slow, only one runner broke 10, which was somewhat surprising,” Schindler said. “Because I went out a little slower than I’d like to, there was a lot of traffic to run through and that further slowed me down. “All in all, I felt OK with

my effort. I’ll probably go out much faster at Salt Creek and try to hold a 5:10 pace.” Port Angeles will host the Salt Creek Inviational this coming Saturday. Also putting in a strong showing were newcomer sophomore Michael Ahrens with a time of 11:01 and junior Kyle Tupper in 11:32. On the girls side, freshmen runners Annika Pederson and Finley Wahto set the bar high with sixth and eighth place finishes, respectively, in the frosh girls race. Pederson’s time was 14:54 and Wahto’s time was 15:08. In the girls varsity race, Lizzy Stevenson led the way for the Riders with a good effort of 13:14 for 25th place in a race with state-championship caliber runners. Hannah Wahto made a strong showing of 13:50 for 50th place. “The race was dotted with state champions from the different state classifications, which made for a fast

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Continued from B1 the Riders13-3, scored in the 56th minute. Paxton Rodocker scored The Redskins led 9-0 at halftime and scored three the tying goal in the 74th minute on a Kaitlin Boston more in the second half. Lyons scored the first assist. “Klahowya has a very three goals of the game within the first six minutes. solid defense,” coach Scott Johnson had three of her Moseley said. Kearsten Cox, who was goals in the first and had her fourth in the 49th min- named defensive player of the game, had nine saves in ute. Also scoring goals were the goal in the second half, Megan Gambill, Nakaia many of them diving saves, Millman, Anne Meek, Moseley said. Rodocker was named Audrey McHugh and goaloffensive player while Kathkeeper Mia Henderson. Lyons also had two ryn Moseley received transiassists while Millman, tion player of the game honMcHugh and Taylor Mills ors. The Riders next play at had an assist each. “The Cowboys never North Mason on Tuesday in gave up and I think that a nonleague game. deserves a mass amount of recognition and credit,” Volleyball Moss aid. Port Angeles 2nd “Those girls showed a lot EVERETT — The of character, integrity and Roughriders captured secpride for their school and program by not giving up ond place at the 16-team and playing for the full 80 Mariner Tournament on minutes with heart and Saturday. Most of the teams were passion regardless of the 4A and 3A. score.” The Riders finished in Henderson had the shutsecond place in pool compeout in goal. The Redskins next play tition and overall to Meadowdale. Tuesday night in Sequim. The Riders split with Meadowdale in pool play, Port Angeles 1, 23-25, 25-18 but beat KentKlahowya 1 Meridian 25-15, 25-16 in the SILVERDALE — This is quarterfinals and Bainthe first time that the bridge 26-24, 25-16 in the Roughriders (1-1-1) have semifinals. not lost to the Eagles in But Meadowdale had the girls soccer. upper hand in the champiBoth teams scored in the onship match, 25-12, 25-15. second half of the nonleague Kiah Jones led the Ridgame. ers with 47 kills, 51 digs, The Eagles, who outshot five blocks and five aces

This offseason, however abbreviated because of the NFL lockout, saw Seattle part with two of its captains from a year ago, Matt Hasselbeck and Lofa Tatupu, and decide not to bring back veteran safety Lawyer Milloy, or three of Seattle’s starting offensive linemen from a season ago. Between Hasselbeck, Tatupu and Milloy alone, the Seahawks lost a combined 33 years of NFL experience. That’s led to countless questions about where Seattle will get any leadership and just how much Carroll’s persona needs to guide such a young team. But Carroll said he’s done having to sell his philosophy and believes the “buy-in” has already taken place and that now it’s on this roster to carry it forward. “We put so much emphasis on how we prepare and how we practice and on how fast we practice and our guys don’t have to say anything — when they do that, then I know that they get it,” Carroll said. “That’s probably why I’m so excited about this group that we have and I hope to keep it together as much as we can. “We don’t want a lot of changes now. We don’t need a lot of changes. We just need to get better and grow up. “We’re young and we need to grow with it.”


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, September 11, 2011

c Our Peninsula Wooden Boat Festival sail-by today SECTION

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — A sail-by of all the Wooden Boat Festival boats is set for 3 p.m. today at the Point Hudson Marina. Boat lovers have one more day of the three-day festival to enjoy — from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today — tours of sailboats, demonstrations, talks, movies and myriad other activities. Single-day tickets are $15, or $10 for Wooden Boat Foundation members, seniors and students at the gate.

300 boats Nearly 300 boats — ranging from kayaks and Native American canoes to double-ended cutters, tall ships, classic powerboats, working vessels, one-of-akind designs, rowboats, shells, experimental designs and models — are in Port Townsend for the festival this year. Dozens of boats are on land. Some are new. Some are restored, And some are being built while visitors watch.

BUSINESS, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, WEATHER, DEATHS In this section

Some 220 boats are in the marina for the weekend, while another 70 are displayed on land, said Kaci Cronkhite, director of the Wooden Boat Foundation. She said the festival had record crowds Saturday and that there were no unforeseen problems “except we are running out of a lot of things. “We ran out of wristbands on Saturday, and we had to go back to the old system of stamping hands.” Presentations and demonstrations are planned today. They include “Green Toilets” at 9:30 a.m. and Leif Terdal’s “Our Escape from Nazi-Occupied Norway” at 10:30 a.m. On the water, the festival’s experiences include three-hour sails on the restored 98-year-old schooner Adventuress, at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Tickets, available through the nonprofit Sound Experience of Port Townsend, are $55 for adults or $25 for sailors 17 and younger, or $45 and $20 for Sound Experience

Charlie Bermant (3)/Peninsula Daily News

Schooners jockey for position at the starting line of Saturday afternoon’s schooner race. members. The organization The festival is the priis selling tickets at its festi- mary fundraiser for the Northwest Maritime Cenval booth and at 206-353ter and Wooden Boat Foun6119.

dation and its educational programs at the maritime center and is expected to raise about $100,000 for

that cause. For complete information, visit www.Wooden Boat.org.

Don Martin of Vancouver, B.C., replenishes the supply of leaflets providing the details about his boat Friday.

Bella’s birthday cake to be cut today in Forks Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — A three-day celebration of vampires, teen love and everything else related to Twilight will culminate today with the cutting of Bella’s birthday cake. The fictional heroine of Stephenie Meyer’s best-selling novels — and the movies created from them — would turn 23 on Tuesday if she were a real person. To mark Bella Swan’s Sept. 13 birthday, the organizers of Forks’ annual Stephenie Meyer Day — which was actually three days of events that began Friday — will cut a birthday cake and throw a party at 1 p.m. today at the Stephenie Meyer Day stage in the vendor area along Spartan Avenue between A and D streets. In Twilight, the first of the four-novel series, Bella moved to Forks as a high school junior and met Edward Cullen and his “family” of vampires. In subsequent books — New Moon, Eclipse and Breaking Dawn — her romance with Edward and other adventures are portrayed. Today, several events will begin at 10 a.m.

■  The vendors fair reopens on Spartan Avenue. ■  A Twi-fashion exhibit, which will go on until 3 p.m., starts at the Bank of America, 481 S. Forks Ave. ■  A meet-and-greet with “Alice Cullen” will be hosted at Twilight Central/ Leppell’s Flowers and Gifts, 130 S. Spartan Ave., from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ■  A Twilight scavenger hunt will begin at Leppell’s. That will end at 1 p.m. At noon, a group photo is planned at the sign at Forks High School, 191 Spartan Ave. A book-signing for Images of America: Forks — written by Larry Burtness and Forks Forum editor Chris Cook with photos from the Forks Timber Museum — will be from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. today at the Chinook Pharmacy, 11 S. Forks Ave. All day in Tillicum Park, the Forks Post Office will offer a special cancellation, “Vampire Station,” while the LaPush Post Office will have a special cancellation, “Treaty Line Station.” Also today in Forks, the 27th annual West End Invitational Co-ed Softball Tournament will continue all day at Tillicum Park. A memorial service on the

10th anniversary of 9/11 is planned at 9 a.m. at the Forks Transit Center, 551 S. Forks Ave., and at 10 a.m., the final West End Thunder drag races of the season will Micah Breuland, 6, and his brother Noah, 11, of Coupeville frolic on a start at the Forks Munici- wooden boat replica as Miranda Deck, 8, of Kansas City, Mo., straightens the sail. pal Airport.

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Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Visitors’ children danger to breakables DEAR READERS: DEAR ABBY Today marks the 10th anniversary of the attacks then offered Abigail on the World Trade Center to replace a Van Buren and the Pentagon. shattered Please take a moment ceramic and join me in offering a bowl her prayer for those innocent son had individuals who lost their thrown like lives there and in the field a Frisbee. in Pennsylvania on that “It’s not horrific day. replaceIf 9/11 has taught us able,” I told anything, it is how strong her. “It the American people can be belonged to my greatwhen we are challenged. grandmother.” Her response was that I Dear Abby: How do should have put anything you prevent damage in valuable out of reach. your home from children It seems even the most whose parents will not con- polite suggestion to chiltrol them while they’re vis- dren angers their parents. iting? My parents would never I keep a box of toys and have allowed me to behave offer them to the children, disrespectfully in somebut they often prefer to one’s home. handle my personal objects, Must I show everyone many of which are heirthe door because their chilloom antiques. dren behave like animals? Who’s Minding One visitor allowed her the Menagerie? child to jump on my sofa,

Dear Who’s: That’s one intelligent option. Conscientious parents take the time to patiently teach their children, as yours did, that they can’t touch everything they see. They also think ahead and bring toys they know the kids will enjoy in case they become bored. In cases like this, visit lazy parents only on their own turf or when they’re child-free for an afternoon or evening. Dear Abby: I work in an office with mostly women. My husband and I bought a new car a few months ago. Whenever the car comes up in conversation, a few of my co-workers don’t hesitate to say what they don’t like about it. After I was nice enough to give one of them a ride home one night, she said

the “new car smell” gave her a headache. I would never say anything negative about something like that, but these women seem to enjoy it. I wish I could come back with some smart remark, but they are in higher positions than I am, and I don’t want to create problems. They don’t seem to care if they do, though. What should I say next time? I tell myself I’ll never offer a ride to them again. Let them walk. Am I being rude for thinking that? Driving Myself Crazy Dear Driving Yoursef: Your idea of not providing transportation to the complainers is a good one. My advice is, in the future, not to raise the subject of your new car — which should reduce the number of comments you

hear about it. It’s not rude to think something — but as your co-workers have demonstrated, it can be very insensitive to let everything you think pass your lips unedited. Dear Abby: I work for a package delivery company, and there is a problem that’s all-too-common for people in my line of work. Please tell dog owners to confine their dog before opening a door to accept a package. I have been bitten twice in the past two years by dogs that “don’t bite.” I have also been scared more times than I can count by dogs that have charged at me. When a customer takes the time to put their dog in another room before coming to the door, I make sure to let him or her know how

much I appreciate it. It’s difficult to be pleasant and professional when my heart is racing and adrenaline is raging because someone’s dog is barking and running at me. Thanks, Abby, from my fellow delivery drivers and me. Twice Bitten in Daytona Beach, Fla. Dear Twice Bitten: You’re welcome. If your letter convinces the owners of aggressive dogs to confine them faster than you can spell L-A-WS-U-I-T, then its purpose will have been served.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Clubs and Organizations Port Angeles Vets meet The Disabled American Veterans and the Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary meet the second Sunday of every month at 216 S. Francis St. There is a potluck at 1 p.m., followed by a meeting at 2 p.m. For more information, phone 360-417-9444 or 360-417-2630, or visit www.davchp9.org.

which participants can share experiences, discuss concerns and obtain information about the disease. For more information, contact the groups’ facilitators, Scott Buck, at 360775-0867 or sfbuck@olypen. com, or Mardell Xavier at 360-477-5511 or mxavier@ olypen.com.

Garden club meets

The Port Angeles Garden Club will meet Monday at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave. The business meeting Alzheimer’s group begins at 10 a.m. followed by a talk titled “Herbs in The Port Angeles Alzheimer’s Caregiver Sup- the Kitchen,” presented by Master Gardener Rita port Group, for caregivers, Dinger. family members and She will provide some friends of those suffering tasty examples of what to from memory loss, meets the second Monday of each do with the herbs grown. Guests and potential month at 9:30 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, members are welcome. For more information, 328 E. Seventh St. phone 360-457-8964. The support group, which is sponsored by the American Legion Alzheimer’s Association, provides a confidential, American Legion Walter Akeley Post 29 meets the comfortable setting in

Submit your club news The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

second Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Veterans Center at Third and Francis streets. Potential members are welcome. Military veterans as well as Merchant Marine personnel (December 1941-August 1945) may be qualified to become members. For qualifications, visit

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E. Seventh St. All interested people are welcome. For more information or to have your name placed on the mailing list, phone Emilia Belserene at 360457-3806 or email emiliab@ olypus.net.

The Olympic Orchard Society will meet Tuesday The Port Angeles Chris- at 7 p.m. in the commistian Women’s Connection sioners’ meeting room, will meet Tuesday from Clallam County Court11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. for house, 223 E. Fourth St. a buffet luncheon and proJeanette Stehrgreen, gram on the second floor of Clallam County Master the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Gardener, will present a Lincoln St. program on strawberries There will be a show of and blueberries. dolls from all over the www.legion.org and click For further information, world, Katrina and Kalisea on “Join the Legion.” phone Erik Simpson at Krause will provide the music, and Linda McDaniel 360-683-6684 or Marilyn Quilters meet Couture at 360-681-3036. will present “Living in a Peninsula Quilters Day Spa — Is That Fair?” members make baby quilts For reservations, phone Grandmothers meet for needy newborns and 360-452-4343 or 360-457Grandmothers Circle of meet the second and fourth 8261. Friends meets the second Monday of every month Wednesday of the month at from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Garden club meets noon in the dining room of First United Methodist Lincoln Heights Garden Pine Road Village apartChurch, 110 E. Seventh St. ments, 528 W. Lauridsen Club will meet Tuesday at Members have set a Blvd. 11:30 a.m. at Scandia Hall, goal of 100 quilts a year. 131 W. Fifth St. After a potluck lunFor more information, Hostesses for the luncheon, there will be a short phone Hayes Wasilewski at cheon will be Jackie meeting. 360-457-8051. Griffith, Joline Brearley, The meetings are open Julie Hall and Elaine to all who are interested in Blind/low vision Nichol. the group’s projects. The Port Angeles Blind/ The program discussion Projects include handLow Vision Group meets will be led by Valerie Hilt crafted items that are sent the second Tuesday of and Karen Sage. to Mary Bridges Hospital every month, through June, The topic will be in Tacoma and making at 10 a.m. at the Port “La Niña Weather Pattern candy bags for Rainier Angeles Senior Center, 328 and Its Effect on the State School at Buckley. For more information, phone 360-457-9314.

Things to Do online

Turn

The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . .

http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings

Clubs/C3

Olympic Medical Center

. . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

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Winter Garden.” There will be a plant exchange and a drawing for some larger plants. For further information, phone 360-452-4047, 360417-7531 or 360-457-9607.

Jessica Slowey and Jason Tupuola, Port Angeles, a daughter, Nataleigh Lynn Amata, 10 pounds 4 ounces, 1:50 a.m. Aug. 2. Jade and Luke Anderson, Port Angeles, a daughter, Summer Joy, 11 pounds 12 ounces, 10:36 a.m. Aug. 17. Rachel and Michael Weed, Port Angeles, a daughter, Sophie Paige, 7 pounds 8 ounces, 7:43 a.m. Aug. 21. Eligia Guizar and Joe Gradillas, Sequim, a son, Isaiah Ramon, 7 pounds 13.4 ounces, 12:28 p.m. Aug. 24. Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

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Neah Bay great place to spot puffins NEAH BAY AT the northwest tip of the North Olympic Peninsula is famous for more than fishing. If you want to see the farthest western point of land in the contiguous United States, your destination is Cape Flattery. West of Neah Bay, the newly paved road leads to tall coastal cliffs where the view of Tatoosh Island and a portion of the Flattery Rocks National Wildlife Refuge is breathtaking. The road ends in a paved parking lot near the trailhead. Most of those who hike the half-mile to the viewpoint are there to see the ocean and Tatoosh. They also want to see the coastal views they’ve admired on calendars, postcards and in books and magazines. On this latest trip, we discovered the best time of the day to view this part of the coast. Some of us make this trek almost annually, and our goal is to see the tufted puffins. This is probably the best place in the state for seeing them because they nest on the offshore rocks. It’s also good for viewing rhinoceros auklets, pigeon guillemots and common murres. These members of the Alcid family nest on the rocky northwest coast. Time of day is important when you are birdwatching, and we were getting to the viewing area in the late afternoon. Having the sun in our eyes was a concern. The cliff where the viewing area was constructed juts into the ocean so you can look south, west or north. You not only can work around the sun, but the views with sun-

BIRD WATCH light glinting off the water are perfect. When looking into the water below the cliffs, the birdwatching couldn’t be better. I’ve never enjoyed better views of coastal puffins than on

Joan

Carson

this trip. They were still feeding young, and this made it possible for us to see them with their mouths full of small fish hanging from both sides of their beaks. How they hold three fish and get a fourth in without losing the others is a mystery. Not only were they fishing, they were bathing. From high above them, we could see their legs and feet paddling wildly as they ducked their heads in the water and then came out of the water to shake their short, rounded wings.

Paul Carson

In Technicolor

A tufted puffin rests on a rock before fishing for food.

The sunshine highlighted them in Technicolor. The puffins were clearly the hit of the day with the birdertypes, but another event also had everyone oohing and ahhing. Fog can be a problem at this time of the year, and this day was no exception. Tatoosh Island’s foghorn reminded us of this from the start of the trail to the viewing point. It was foggy farther out, and the view of the ocean was somewhat obscured.

This was a strange fog, and after a short time, it began to look different. Parts of the fog bank grew dark, and it looked like something was happ­ening to it. Mysterious shapes started to appear, and as the mist grew thin, Tatoosh began to take shape. An emerald-green island bathed in soft, misty sunshine slipped into view and stopped all conversation. In moments, everyone began exclaiming at once, and their

cameras tried to capture the magical scene. Puffins, Tatoosh Island and the coast bathed in sunlight — what more could you want when visiting Cape Flattery? The Makah tribe have the trail in excellent condition. It is mostly uphill on the way back, but you cover much of it on a boardwalk where the stairs have handrails. Benches for resting are wellplaced on this beautiful hike through a mature coastal forest. Stop at the Makah Cultural

and Research Center, home of the Makah Museum, on your way into Neah Bay and get a visitor’s parking pass for $10. It’s a great bargain. August and September, in my opinion, are the best months to visit this area — especially if you have visitors from out of town.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. Email: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C2 presented by Roberta Korcz of the Port Angeles Peninsula Paddlers planning staff. For information on the The Olympic Peninsula Lions’ eyeglass and hearing Paddlers Club meets every aid recycling program, second Wednesday at phone 360-417-6862. 7 p.m. in the Vern Burton Community Center meetIntuitive Circle ing rooms, 308 E. Fourth The Intuitive Circle St. meets the third Thursday The meeting is open to of the month from 6 p.m. to the public. 8 p.m. at Olympic UnitarUniversalist Fellowship Harmonica Society ian Hall, 73 Howe Road, The Port Angeles HarAgnew. monica Society meets the A donation of $5 per second and fourth Wednes- meeting is requested to day of each month from help pay for facility rental 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at St. and speaker honorarium. Andrew’s Place Assisted The focus of the group is Living Community, 520 E. on the community, educaPark Ave. tion and the practice of All levels and ages of developing natural intuiplayers welcome. tive and psychic abilities For more information, and will feature a variety phone Bob Vreeland, secre- of guest speakers. tary, at 360-457-0239. For more information, phone Marie-Claire Bernards at 360-681-4411. MOPS meets Mothers of Preschoolers Mental health (MOPS) will meet Thursday from 9 a.m. to NAMI, a volunteer orga11:30 a.m. at Fairview nization that offers support Bible Church, 385 O’Brien for families, friends and Road. individuals suffering from Refreshments and child any mental illness, a local care will be provided. affiliate of the National For more information, Alliance on Mental Illness, phone 360-457-5905. will meet Thursday from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the basement of Olympic MediPA Lions Club cal Center, 939 Caroline St. The Port Angeles Lions Club will meet Thursday at noon at the Red Lion Hotel, OPEN meets 221 N. Lincoln St. The Olympic Peninsula Entrepreneurs Network The program will be

Clallam County Fire District 3

will meet Thursday from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 175 S. Bayview Ave., Unit 39. Participants are asked to bring a chair as seating is limited. OPEN meetings are intended to bring together inventors, innovators and entrepreneurs of all ages from around the Peninsula who share common interests and passions for inventing. Support-type services are also invited. Members can share resources, feedback and talent. For more information, phone Tim Riley at 360460-4655.

Green Party meets The Green Party of Clallam County meets the third Thursday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The public is invited to come and help bring about change. The location of the meeting place changes from month to month. For more information and for the meeting place, phone 360-683-0867 or 360-683-8407.

Coast Guard coffee Coast Guard Coffee Time meets the third Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. The meeting is open to the public.

For further information, phone 360-681-3777.

The Phone Tree The Phone Tree meets the third Saturday of each month at noon at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Garden club meets The Sequim Prairie Garden Club will meet Monday at 10:30 a.m. at the Pioneer Memorial Park clubhouse, 387 E.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

C5

Bonemeal, gardening’s miracle drug TODAY WE WILL discuss the miracle drug of fall gardening — bonemeal. But before we begin this discussion on this superb and readily available source of one of the major elements necessary for good plant growth, a very quick discourse is required on some very necessary jobs to be done in and around your yard now that we are fully into the month of September. As we close down on the last days of summer (today is the beginning of late summer), you need to be on our toes because weeds and slugs will resurface for one final assault on your yard, so defend against them this week, but remember: Always use pet-safe slug bait. Make sure that now, more than ever, you deadhead your flowering plants because heavy dew is present and lingers long into the day. It takes just a couple days of spent dahlia petals on the foliage to ruin the plant or other old blooms on flowers like zinnias, petunias and marigolds to quickly turn to botrytis and other powdery molds that in a matter of days destroy the plant as well. Go out and buy, as soon as you can, flowering plants like mums, asters, coral bells, grasses, ornamental cabbages and kales for your beds. Seek out pansies, violas, color-

A GROWING CONCERN ful ground covers, dusty millMay ers, Artemisia and snapdragons along with some fine woody ornamentals, too, and plant them. Planted this week, these items will root in enough to not only survive but bloom and look good well into winter and next year. But do so this week. Fertilize the lawn with a very low nitrogen fall/winter blend and try to use only organic brands like Milorganite. Stop pruning your plants until late fall or early winter, and of course, bonemeal the heck out of all your perennials (those plants that live more than two years). But why bonemeal? What’s so special about this organic nutrient? In the plant world, we have two types of elements; the major elements N-P-K and the minor elements or trace elements that can number as many as 19-23. Bonemeal is phosphorus, the P of NPK (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium). It is one of the three major

Andrew

elements required for good plant growth. If it is absent, in low supply or overabundant, this will cause catastrophic plant failure. Phosphorus in sufficient quantity is necessary for your plants to thrive. This is partially the reason I describe bonemeal as a miracle drug of gardening, but more to the point, and especially now as we prepare to enter the autumn season, let us fully explore why I declare it to be so. To begin, phosphorus is the key to plants blooming well (if at all).

Lack of phosphorus The No. 1 reason bulbs, flowers, trees, bushes and shrubs along with vines and perennials do not flower after a few years is a lack of phosphorus. After the first flowering season, spring flowering bulbs especially require a good dose of bulb booster fertilizer, which consists mainly of bonemeal. They need phosphorus in order to rebloom. Then, too, our Olympic soils are very nutrient-poor and most often consist of naturally occurring low amounts of available phosphorus. Also here on the Peninsula, we amend our yard’s soil with copious amounts of organic material — bark, manure, and compost, all which are inherently low in readily available phosphorus.

Phosphates are an essential component of DNA and RNA and crucial in building strong cellular membranes, so adequate amounts of phosphorus make for strong cells. This translates to perennial plants overwintering better, and we all would like our plants to survive through the winter and thrive next year. So phosphorus not only helps plants flower, but is critical to setting the bud eye (next year’s flower) in many a perennial plant and bulb as well as helping that plant survive the winter, which together is a powerful combination. Phosphorus also aids in making other nutrients, both major and minor elements, more easily absorbed and processed by the plant. Correct amounts of phosphorus in the soil ensure that other nutrients can be used by plants in their full and needed quantities. Bonemeal is the miracle drug because it is so easily found in numerous outlets and various sizes from small half-pound boxes to large 50-pound bags. It also comes in a variety of forms, the best being pelletized, a process that not only makes it break down in the soil faster, but because of the uniform pellet size is superior for getting even application rates over the area and will pass through a whirly bird hand spreader with no problem.

As always, it is a wise idea to have your soil tested so you know where you stand on the amounts of nutrient and the pH of your soil. You can go online to get local information on how to get your soil tested. It also takes several weeks for organic fertilizers like bonemeal to become usable to the plant, which is why you must do it now. I also got this recent letter, which echoes a concern about bonemeal that others have asked about: “Thanks for your column and all the useful info (and chores to do). “I see you will be writing about bonemeal. “Could you include any suggestions of alternatives for homes like mine where my dog has access to all my plants? “She sniffs, digs and eats the stuff.” Worthwhile alternatives would include rock phosphate, soft phosphate (i.e., colloidal — great in clay soils) and superphosphate, all easily found at farm stores, co-ops and good plant outlets.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or email news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C3 www.soroptimist.org, or email info@sisequim.com. The clubhouse and park grounds, owned and mainLadies auxiliary tained by the club, are supVeterans of Foreign Wars, ported through the rental of Ladies Auxiliary 4760 meets the clubhouse. the second Tuesday of each For information regardmonth at 1 p.m. at the VFW ing rentals, phone 360-683Post building, 169 E. Wash7206. ington St. For membership informaFor more information, tion, phone 360-683-8693. phone Bonnie Woeck at 360681-0434 or the post at 360Footprinters 683-9546. Olympic International Footprint Association Chap- VFW meets ter 74 meets the second Veterans of Foreign Wars Monday of every month at meets every second Tuesday the Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 of the month at 2 p.m. at the Port Williams Road. VFW Post building, 169 E. The group is an associaWashington St. tion of active and retired law For more information, enforcement and fire person- phone the post at 360-683nel and welcomes commu9546. nity members who support public safety. Brain-injury group Dinner begins at 6 p.m., The Brain Injury Associfollowed by the business ation of Washington meets meeting. the second Tuesday of every For more information, month from 3 p.m. to   phone 360-681-0533. 4:30 p.m. at the VFW Hall, 169 E. Washington St. Soroptimists meet Survivors of strokes or Soroptimist International brain injuries of any kind as of Sequim, a professional well as family, friends and women’s organization workcaregivers are welcome. ing to improve the lives of For more information, women and girls in local leave a message for Stephen communities and throughStratton at 360-582-9502. out the world, meets every second and fourth Tuesday Guild for hospital of the month from 7 a.m. to The Sequim Guild for 8:30 a.m. at Cedarbrook Children’s Hospital, preGarden Cafe, 1345 S. sided over by President Sequim Ave. Carol Labbe with Vice PresiVisitors are welcome. dent Molly Christianson, For further information, visit www.sisequim.com or meets the second Wednes-

n  Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997) “Buck” (PG) “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” (R) “Midnight in Paris” (PG-13)

The Peninsula LapBand Support Group meets the second Wednesday of every month at 6 p.m. in the basement of St. Luke’s Episcopal Parish, 525 N. Fifth Ave. Those attending should use the ramp on the left side of the building. For more information, phone 360-582-3788 or 360681-0202, or email PenLapBand@q.com.

Democratic Club The Clallam County Democratic Club meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Pioneer Memorial Park clubhouse, 387 E. Washington St. For more information, phone 360-683-4502.

Pinochle group A double-deck pinochle group meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the month at 6 p.m. Members host the card games once or twice a year in their homes. For more information, phone Brenda Holton at 360-452-5754 or Christine Hohman at 360-385-3396.

The Sequim Guild of Seattle Children’s Hospital will kick off its 2011-2012 year with two events this week. The group will meet in the second floor meeting room at the Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 W. Evergreen Farm Way, at 1 p.m. Wednesday. Subsequent meetings will be held on the second Wednesday of each month between September and June. The group’s first bunco game fundraiser will be held at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., at noon Friday. The game is $12 per person. Four bunco games each year provide a major source of fundraising for the Sequim Guild which donates its funds toward uncompensated care for patients at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Members of the guild provide salads, sandwiches, fruits and desserts for each event and prizes are provided by generous business owners, members and other donors from our community. The public is welcome to attend either event. To make reservations for the bunco game, email   BuncoSQGuild@hotmail. com or phone 360-797-7105.

Thursdays of each month at 1 p.m. in the conference room of The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-681-8677.

Auxiliary meets The monthly Coast Guard Auxiliary meeting will be held at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church at 525 N. Sequim Ave, at 7 p.m. Thursday. Potential members and visitors are welcome. It is not necessary to own a boat to become a member of the Auxiliary.

GMO awareness The GMO Awareness Group will meet Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. Learn about how genetically modified organisms are being put into the food supply and what can be done about it. For more information, email nogogmo@yahoo.com.

n  The Rose Theatre,

“The Debt” (R) “Passione” (NR)

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rwanagel@gmail.com or text: 360-477-7792 www.beamathwiz.com

“Apollo 18” (PG-13)

n  Wheel-In Motor Movie, Port Townsend (360-385-0859) “Planet of the Apes” (PG-13) “Conan the Barbarian” (R)

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Thank You Clallam County! Our heartfelt thanks to everyone that came out to support our long-standing County Fair, and to those who helped to make it happen. You once again showed that it is an important part of our community. Thank you for helping us “Rock With the Stock”, and we’ll see you in 2012 when we “Kiss a Pig, Dance a Jig”!

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n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883)

The Strait Knitting Guild meets the third Saturday of every month at   1 p.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., to share works in progress and completed projects and to provide support for each other’s endeavors. A $10 annual membership provides funds to purchase knitting books for the library.

Make an appointment today for your own renewal.

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A P L A C E F O R R E N E WA L

Olympic Minds, The Institute of Noetic Sciences community group for Sequim and Port Angeles, meets the first three

Rebecca Wanagel MA Special Ed.

The local chapter of the Christian Motorcyclists’ Association will meet Saturday at 9 a.m. for a breakfast buffet at Cameron’s Cafe & Catering in the Sequim Senior Center, 921 E. Hammond St., across from QFC and a block south of Washington Street. The cost is $10 for a complete meal plus tax. For more information, phone 360-379-4922 or 360-301-4685.

The West End Historical Society meets every second The Friday Book Club Tuesday at noon at JT’s meets the third Friday of Sweet Stuffs, 120 S. Forks every month at 1:30 p.m. at Ave., Forks. the Sequim Library, 630 N. Turn to Clubs/C8 Sequim Ave.

Barbara Brown

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“Apollo 18” (PG-13) “Contagion” (PG-13) “Cowboys & Aliens” (PG-13) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (PG-13) “The Help” (PG-13) “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (PG-13)

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day of each month. The meeting is at 1 p.m. at The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The group welcomes visitors and new members. For more information, phone Jackie Green at 360683-1002.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, September 11, 2011

Business

PAGE

C6  $ Briefly . . . Postmaster to address PA chamber

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

news services

Port Ludlow is topic

Sprint boats PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Business Association will hear all about sprint boats and the new track in west Port Angeles from a principal in the project. Keynote speaker at PABA’s weekly breakfast meeting Tuesday will be Randy Alderson of Wicked Racing, one of Alderson the teams that will be racing this coming weekend at the track’s opening. A special section on the sprint boats and the new race track appears in today’s Peninsula Daily News. Open to the public, Tuesday’s PABA meeting begins at 7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. There is a $2.16 minimum charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order breakfast.

Sequim farming SEQUIM — Dungeness Valley farmer Nash Huber will keynote Tuesday’s luncheon of the Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce. Huber is expected to discuss sustainable agriculture in the valley as well as the growth of his business, Nash’s Huber Organic Produce, including the opening of a new store. Since his start in the Dungeness Valley in 1979, Huber has expanded his operation to more than 110 varieties of vegetables, herbs, fruit and berries on about 400 acres. Tuesday’s chamber meeting begins with business networking at 11:45 a.m. and

Economists see hope in Obama’s jobs plan Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles Postmaster Lisa Jones will give an overview of postal operation at this week’s Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting on Monday. U.S. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe told a Senate panel last week that his agency is operating with only a week’s worth of cash nationally — and he increased the loss forecast for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30 to $10 billion. The agency is considering ending Saturday mail delivery, closing some post offices (none locally) and consolidating some regional processing plants. Open to the public, Monday’s chamber lunch­eon begins at noon in the upstairs banquet room at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier. PORT TOWNSEND — The president of the Port Ludlow Village Council will discuss issues affecting that community when he addresses this week’s Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting on Monday. Tom Stone will also discuss the council’s role in Port Ludlow and in Jefferson County. In addition, chamber members at Stone the meeting will vote on a bylaws change that reflects the chamber’s mission as a countywide chamber of commerce. The bylaws can be accessed on the Internet by going to http://tinyurl.com/3edrql3. Open to the public, Monday’s luncheon of the Jefferson County chamber, combining former chamber organizations in Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and the Tri-Area, begins at noon at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St. Subway of Port Townsend provides a variety of sandwiches available to the chamber audience for $8 each. Credit cards are not accepted.

Politics and Environment

food service at noon. Luncheon reservations closed Friday for the meeting at SunLand Golf and Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive. Seating is available for those who don’t have lunch. Further information is available by calling 360-683-6197 or emailing lynn@sequimchamber. com.

Lions Club feted FORKS — The work of the Forks Lions Club will be celebrated at Wednesday’s meeting of the Forks Chamber of Commerce. The meeting starts with no-host lunch at noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information.

Market partner SEQUIM — The Sequim Lavender Growers Association has become a year-round sponsor of the Sequim Open Aire Market and will have its floral logo and website links as part of the market’s informational brochure. “This is a perfect fit between the two major groups that represent the farming heritage and entrepreneurial spirit on the Peninsula,” said Sequim Lavender Growers Association president Terry Stolz. The Sequim Open Aire Market is held on Cedar Street between Second and Sequim avenues on Saturdays between May and December.

WASHINGTON — Could President Obama’s jobs plan work? Independent experts have answered with a qualified yes. The American Jobs Act would create jobs and help keep a struggling economy moving forward, several economists said. But they cautioned it wouldn’t shift the nation’s business gears into overdrive, and it offers modest benefits, given the head winds the economy faces. As only a short-term stimulus plan, the American Jobs Act wouldn’t address structural and external problems, such as the moribund housing sector and financial turmoil in Europe. And because the proposals’ design is transitory, it makes them difficult to compare against broad economic plans. Macroeconomic Advisers, a leading economic-forecast group, projected that Obama’s plan “would give a significant boost to (the gross domestic product) and employment over the near term.” There’s the rub. The plan aims to deliver only a short-term fix designed to keep the economy from falling back into recession. Then there’s the price tag, $447 billion. That would add to the sum that must be covered by a congressional deficit-reduction committee aiming to cut $1.5 trillion from federal spending over 10 years. Obama’s plan counts on this panel to find almost $2 trillion in cuts.

Raising GDP Macroeconomic Advisers predicted the plan would raise GDP — the annual sum of all goods and services produced in the country — by 1.3 percentage points through 2012, resulting in 1.3 million more people employed. It estimated the plan would add 0.2 percentage point to growth in 2013. That’s within estimates from economists at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, who in a research note Friday said the package could add between 1 and 1.5 percentage points to economic growth next year. They also noted that, for every percentage point of growth, the jobless rate falls by three-tenths of a percentage point. “If that holds, we would see the unemployment averaging 8.6 percent by the end of 2012, instead of 8.9 percent,” the economists said. Mark Zandi, chief economist for forecaster Moody’s Analytics,

The Associated Press

President Barack Obama gestures during a speech on his jobs bill Friday at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Va.

Jobs plan highlights HIGHLIGHTS OF OBAMA’S plan and estimated costs: n Employees: Extension and expansion of a payroll-tax cut for all workers through 2012, a savings of $1,500 for a typical family. $175 billion. n Businesses: Tax cuts — A 50 percent cut in the payroll tax for businesses with payrolls up to $5 million; a full payroll-tax holiday for additional wages resulting from hires or raises. $65 billion. Tax credits: — Up to $4,000 for businesses that hire people unemployed for more than six months. $8 billion. Equipment — Extend a tax break that allows businesses to deduct the full value of new equipment. $5 billion. Unemployed — Continued assistance to millions who are receiving extended benefits, with extra aid to states that help the long-term jobless through training programs. $49 billion. n Public works: Upgrade roads, bridges and schools. $105 billion. n Local help: Assistance to help states and municipalities avoid laying off emergency personnel and teachers. $35 billion. The Associated Press

was even more optimistic. He estimated a fully enacted package would create 1.9 million jobs, bringing the unemployment rate down to 8 percent by election time. “It’s a bold effort to provide more support to the economy, certainly bigger than widely anticipated,” Zandi said. Yet, he noted that benefits wouldn’t be lasting. “The plan also results in weaker growth in 2013, as most of the tax cuts and spending increases are temporary and fade during the year,” he said. “Presumably the economy will be strong enough to handle it by then, but that is far from certain.” Business trade groups were far less enthusiastic about Obama’s plan. Marty Regalia, chief economist for the U.S. Chamber of Com-

merce, said the proposed payroll tax cut fell short of what’s needed. “If you are trying to stimulate the economy and create jobs, there are better ways to do it, starting with a complete restructuring of the tax code for individuals and businesses,” he said.

Housing concerns William Dunkelberg, chief economist for the National Federation of Independent Business, a small-employer lobbying group, also doubts many more small companies will add workers. Dunkelberg said they don’t have confidence in the future. Another reason support for Obama’s plan is hedged among experts: There’s little to fix the housing sector, a huge drag on the economy. Turn

to

Jobs/C7

Hairstylist joins PORT ANGELES — Hairstylist Shawna Linn has joined the staff of Sassy Kat Salon, 105 E. First St. Linn specializes in men, women’s and children’s haircuts, and offers designer cuts, color and highlights as well as ear piercings. Linn She is available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and by appointment.

‘Fun at Lunch’ set PORT ANGELES — Strait Occupational & Hand Therapy, 708 S. Race St. Suite C, will host its new brown-bag luncheon called “Funch: Fun at Lunch” from 12:05 p.m. to 12:55 p.m. Thursday. This month’s craft project is making paper rose buds for bouquets or to adorn cards and journals. All materials and a dessert will be provided. Participants are asked to bring an item for the Port Angeles Food Bank to help support the organization’s Friday Food Bank for Kids. The program, which sends bags of food home with youth on Fridays to help sustain them over a weekend, is in need of soup, juice boxes, granola bars, fruit cups and other nonperishable individually wrapped snacks. Turn

to

Briefly/C7

The Associated Press

Bartender Anjuli Rodriguez, left, and manager Mike Gallagher tend Sunsets at the Pier Bar in San Clemente, Calif., with flashlights Thursday evening.

Southwest power back on, but blackout still a mystery Peninsula Daily News news services

LOS ANGELES — The failure of a single piece of equipment in Arizona ignited a massive blackout Thursday that left nearly 6 million people without power, baffling utility officials and highlighting the vulnerability of the U.S. electrical grid. Federal and state investigators this week will try to determine what went wrong — and how future problems can be prevented. Authorities in Arizona said Friday that safeguards built into the system should have prevented

the breakdown at a substation from cascading across Southern Arizona and into California and Northern Mexico. They didn’t, and the resulting instability led to the sudden shutdown of the San Onofre nuclearpower plant, about 50 miles north of San Diego, cutting off power to a large swath of Southern California. “We lost all connection to the outside world,” said James Avery, San Diego Gas & Electric’s senior vice president of power supply. “This happened in a matter of seconds.” Energy experts and utility officials agreed the breakdown

was troubling. “We’re struggling,” said Daniel Froetscher, vice president of energy delivery for Arizona Public Service, the largest electricity provider in Arizona. We have to take a hard look at the system design and figure out exactly what happened. “We don’t know the underlying causes.” Among other concerns, some experts said the failure of safeguards suggest the potential for a saboteur to take down a regional power system. Turn

to

Power/C7


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Jefferson boat expert teaches at Irish school FOR MORE THAN 30 years, the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port Hadlock has been teaching techniques that are unique to Puget Sound to students from around the world. More than 1,000 individuals — running the gamut from recent high school graduates and professionals making a career change to retirees seeking only to learn new skills — have earned associate degrees and diplomas in the art of traditional wooden boat-building. Tim Lee graduated from the school in 1990 and spent the next decade developing his skills at boat yards in Alaska and Washington. Tim has spent the past decade at the school as a member of the working faculty and currently serves as the school’s education coordinator. Recently, Tim returned from a summer in Ireland where he helped to develop programs and workshops for at-risk youths and the unemployed at the AK Ilen School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Limerick. During August, he was at Hegarty’s Boatyard in Old Court, Baltimore, Ireland, teaching the teachers as they and their students painstakingly work to rebuild the AK Ilen. She’s a 56-foot sailing ketch that was built in Baltimore on Ireland’s southwest coast and launched in 1926. The Ilen was sailed to the Falkland Islands off South America, where she spent close to 50 years transporting people, sheep, stores and mail to the various island communities scattered throughout South Falkland Sound. In the early 1990s, she was retired and by the mid-’90s was transported back to Baltimore and is now being rebuilt in Old Court. Although back home in Port Hadlock, Tim’s involvement with the Ilen continues. He and a group of his colleagues are arranging for a cargo of western larch to be exported to the school. The wood will be used for planking aboard Ireland’s lone remaining seagoing sailing ship.

C7

Jobs Continued from C6

ON THE WATERFRONT

County Sheriff’s Office. Sellars The new vessel, which replaces a 19-foot inflatable boat that was confiscated for transporting drugs, is powered by twin 175-horsepower outboards, seats four and is equipped with the latest array of navigational technology, including night vision capabilities. Eric Schneider, owner of Lee Shore Boats, said one of the requirements of the contract is that the boat is able to be stored in the sheriff’s boat storage facility in Sequim, which has an 11-foot height restriction. Eric explained that to accomplish this, they installed a folding radar arch and a folding searchlight, and all of the antennas aboard the patrol boat can be laid flush atop the roof of the boat’s cabin. Additionally a trailer was custom-made by All Fab Trailers of Sequim that has the boat nested lower in the trailer’s cradle than is typical. Clallam Sheriff’s Deputy Ralph Edgington is the project manager on the new-build and has been involved in the undertaking since 2009 when it was still in the conceptual stage. Ralph wrote the specs for the boat and assisted Patty Morris in assembling the port security grant that was ultimately awarded to the county by Federal Emergency Management Agency. Eric and his crew will conduct sea trials on the patrol boat beginning Monday that will continue throughout the week. On Monday, Sept. 19, the county will take delivery of the new boat at ceremonies that are scheduled to be held at the courthouse in Port Angeles. At the conclusion of the brief formalities, Deputy Edgington will have at his disposal a new patrol boat that can operate in heavier waters than the current inflatable, cruise at 35 mph, hit a Sheriff’s boat top speed of 50 mph and do all Lee Shore Boats, Port Angeles’ that on a projected 10 gallons of most recent entrant in the alumi- fuel an hour. num-boat manufacturing sector, is wrapping up construction of a Fishing boat work 26-foot mono hull law enforcePlatypus Marine of Port Angement patrol boat for the Clallam

Sunday, September 11, 2011

David G.

David G. Sellars (2)/for Peninsula Daily News

The new Clallam County Sheriff’s Office patrol boat, which will undergo sea trials Monday.

The Leroy on blocks in the Platypus Marine yard. les has had Melissa Lynn sitting on the hard for the past month or so. The 58-foot commercial fishing boat hails from Adak, Alaska, and is owned by Jeremy Winn of Hoquiam. Personnel removed the prop and installed new bearings as well as attached a newly fabricated set of prop cutters to go along with the existing set that were sharpened to a razor’s edge. A fair amount of welding took place on the decking, bulwarks and bulkheads requiring the diesel fuel remaining in the boat’s fuel tanks to be pumped off. Mar Vac of Seattle was called in to perform the task, and the company also pumped a cleaning solution into the tanks to remove any fuel residue to ensure a gasfree environment for welders. Craftsmen installed a new shower pan in the head and a couple of owner provided hatches into the aft deck. Melissa Lynn also received a new coat of paint from the cap rail down, and looks to be in fine shape for another season of fishing in Alaskan waters.

Turkish origin Leroy sat on the hard at Platypus Marine for a couple of days this past week. She is a 54-foot yacht built in 2006 by Barbaros Teknecilik in Istanbul, Turkey. The boat, which hails from Sausalito, Calif., was returning home after cruising Canadian waters surrounding Vancouver Island and running over a log in

the open seas off Cape Flattery. Limping into Port Angeles, an inspection revealed that — not surprisingly — the propeller shaft was knocked askew. Gomer, Platypus Marine’s guru for all things mechanical, was able to repair the lip seal and realign the shaft, and Leroy was back in the water Friday afternoon heading home.

Back in Port Angeles Princess, a 42-foot fiberglass commercial troller, arrived in Port Angeles on Friday night and is moored at N float on the west side of the Boat Haven. This is the second year that Heather Sears, who owns the boat, and her lone crew member, Mariah Warren, have stopped over in Port Angeles to sell albacore tuna off the stern of the boat. Heather told me that she and Mariah will be here this weekend only, selling whole albacore for $2.75 a pound.

Filling up Tesoro Petroleum in Port Angeles Harbor on Tuesday bunkered Glenda Melissa, a Liberian-flagged petroleum-products tanker that is 600 feet long with a 105-foot beam. On Friday, Tesoro provided bunkers to Tanir, a Russianflagged break bulk cargo ship with a 66-foot beam that is 436 feet long. Tanir, which is designed to operate in light ice conditions, has four cargo cranes from which she can reach her four cargo holds that have the capacity to store 250 containers each 40 feet long while stowing an additional 178 on deck.

________ David G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resident and former Navy boatswain’s mate who enjoys boats, ships and strolling the waterfront. Items involving boating, port activities and the North Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are always welcome. Email ­dgsellars@hotmail.com or phone him at 360-808-3202.

Obama talked about encouraging Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to refinance home loans to lower interest rates, but he gave few details. Lenders own 800,000 properties nationwide, and another 800,000 are in some stage of foreclosure. An additional 3.5 million mortgages are delinquent. Moreover, an estimated 30 percent of homes are worth less than the mortgage, known as underwater. That’s why support for the American Jobs Act is qualified. “These are useful changes, but the most important driving force for our current economy is that people will not increase their spending until their balance sheets are repaired and their houses are no longer underwater,” said Dean Croushore, chairman of the economics department at the University of Richmond. “These are things the government is not able to fix, so we should expect slow economic growth for several years to come.”

Power Continued from C6 Such incidents “remind us that on a day-to-day basis we rely on a very complicated electrical system,” said Sarah Ladislaw, a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies who specializes in energy security. An APS worker was switching out a capacitor, which controls voltage levels, outside Yuma, Ariz., near the California border. Shortly after, a section of a major regional power line failed, eventually spreading trouble further down in California and later Mexico, officials said. And the lights began to go out in a border region of about 6 million people. The outage knocked out traffic signals, causing gridlock on roads in the San Diego area. More than 2 million gallons of sewage spilled into the ocean off San Diego, closing beaches in the nation’s eighth-largest city. But no injuries or major crimes related to the blackout were reported, San Diego County officials said, although vandals shattered the windows of one taco shop and there were scattered complaints of loud parties. A local think tank, the National University System Institute for Policy Research, estimated the outage cost the San Diego-area economy more than $100 million. Power in most areas was restored by 3:30 a.m. Friday, less than 12 hours after the outage began and far more quickly than officials had initially expected.

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from C6 “Funch: Fun at Lunch” is held on the third Thursday of each month. Space is limited to 10. You must pre-register for the luncheon by Tuesday. Phone Strait Occupational at 360-417-0703 to register.

Finance awards DUPONT — The Washington Finance Officers Association has recognized five North Olympic Peninsula financial officers with its Professional Finance Officer Award for 2011. The award recognizes achievement of professional service and ongoing continuing education and training on the part of each individual. Those earning the honor were: ■ Jill Colvin, investment officer with the Clallam County Treasurer’s Office. ■ Rebecca Horton, senior accountant/treasurer with the city of Port Angeles. ■ Teresa Marchi, chief deputy treasurer with Clallam County. ■ Sherry Wright, senior accountant with the city of Port Angeles. ■ Yvonne Ziomkowski, finance director with the city of Port Angeles.

Horton recognized PORT ANGELES — Rebecca Horton, a senior accountant/treasurer for the city of Port Angeles, has earned the Certified Public Funds Investment Manager credential from the Association of Public Treasurers’ of the United States and Canada. Horton completed eight hours of continuing professional education credits and passed an exam. The credential was awarded during the association’s 46th annual conference in Oklahoma City.

The credential is a nationally recognized accreditation and recognizes its recipient as a qualified investment manager. The exam Horton passed focused on six modules — investment management; banks, brokers and advisers; governance and investment policy; safety, liquidity and yield; cash flow; and strategy.

Cider week set PORT TOWNSEND — Jefferson County cideries and restaurants will participate in Washington Cider Week through Sunday, Sept. 18, with events in Port Townsend, Port Hadlock and Seattle. Port Hadlock’s Ajax Cafe will offer Jefferson County cider tastes, one each from Alpenfire, Eaglemount, and Finnriver and a special entree that features cider. Sweet Laurette’s Cafe and Bistro in Port Townsend will offer brunch and bubbles with sparkling ciders from Finnriver. Both restaurants are holding the cider-themed offer Tasting events featuring Jefferson County ciders will be held in Seattle all week. For a full schedule of events, visit www.nwcider.com/washington-cider-week-2011.

Workshop attended PORT ANGELES — Professional portrait photographer Ernst-Ulrich Schafer recently attended a five-day workshop in Port Townsend on improving portrait work and Adobe Photoshop techniques. Master photographers Darton Drake from Chicago and Sam Gardner from Bellingham taught the class. Ernst Fine Art Photography is located in downtown Port Angeles; phone 360-808-6058.

KONP talk guests

PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio at 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and www.konp. com on the Internet outside the Port Angeles area. Station manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Monday through Thursday segments, and Karen Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. This week’s scheduled lineup: ■  Monday: Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict ■  Tuesday: Historian James Trekas will discuss the Elwha River dams. In the second segment, Larry Little, director of Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics, or VIMO, will discuss a fundraising Accountant moves dinner for the clinic. CARLSBORG — Karen A third segment will feature Spence, owner of Karen’s Sara Johnson of the League of Accounting Services Inc. has Women’s Voters discussing the moved her practice to Carlsborg group’s town meeting on affordto be closer to family and to do able care. more church-related activities. In the final segment, Pat John The practice is now located at expresses thanks to the commu260681 U.S. Highway 101. nity in support of his uncle, DarKaren’s Accounting will a offer ryl Campbell, fisheries manager for Ahousaht First Nation on a business records class beginVancouver Island, who was killed ning Tuesday, Sept. 20 and a in a head-on car crash on state basic tax preparation course Highway 112 last month. starting on Saturday, Oct. 1. For more information, phone ■  Wednesday: Randy Alderson of Wicked Racing will discuss Karen’s Accounting at 360-457the opening of the sprint boat 6822.

track in west Port Angeles this coming weekend. In the second segment, Bob Boekelheide, Dungeness River Audubon Center director, discusses the Dungeness River Festival later this month. In the final segment Don Allen and Ed Bedford preview the American Veterans Traveling Tribute coming to Port Angeles and Sequim. ■  Thursday: Clallam County commissioners. ■  Friday: Adam Stern, conductor of the Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra guests. Two separate segments will discuss the Dungeness River Festival in Sequim and a new performance space opening on the Peninsula College campus in Port Angeles.

Fuca resort unlikely VICTORIA — A controversial resort proposal for land adjacent to Juan de Fuca Provincial Park on Vancouver Island’s south shore seems certain to be defeated Wednesday when it goes to the Capital Regional District board. Three directors on the five-person committee that will make the decision said Friday that they will vote against the proposal after hearing vocal opposition at three nights of public hearings last week. Proposed are 257 cabins and other buildings to be built on 583 acres of Strait of Juan de Fuca shoreline directly across the Strait from Pysht on the North Olympic Peninsula. The Capital Regional District is a planning agency made up of Victoria and cities and communities surrounding the British Columbia provincial capital.

Victoria airport mark VICTORIA — Victoria International Airport reached the onemillion-passenger mark for the

year in August. Total passengers increased by 1.4 percent to 150,209 during the month from 148,122 in the same period last year. Year-to-date, a total of 1,007,407 passengers have gone through the airport. That’s down by 1.3 percent from 1,020,868 for the same period in 2010. Air Canada and WestJet both serve the airport.

Gas prices climb higher PORT ANGELES — North Olympic Peninsula gasoline prices are at an all-time high for the week following Labor Day and the end of the traditional summer driving season. The average price of regular gasoline in Jefferson and Clallam counties was $3.91 a gallon Saturday. That was an increase from $3.89 a gallon a week earlier, and it was 81 cents a gallon higher than the price a year earlier. Benchmark crude fell $1.81, or 2 percent, to finish at $87.24 per barrel in New York on Friday, “but there is too much demand for refined fuels in the rest of the world for prices to drop very far in the U.S.,” said Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst for the Oil Price Information Service.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Friday. Aluminum - $1.0727 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.1005 Cathode full plate, LME; $3.9875 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2423.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9958 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1851.00 Handy & Harman; $1856.40 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $42.100 Handy & Harman; $41.573 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum - $1842.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract); $1837.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri.

Peninsula Daily News, news sources


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

TO OUR READERS: Recognize favorite nurse Deadline is 5 p.m. Oct. 3 Peninsula Daily News

HAS AN EXCEPTIONAL nurse cared for you or a loved one? Now is the time to tell us your story for “Celebrating Nurses,” a Peninsula Daily News special section that will recognize the hard work, zeal and dedication of nurses in Jefferson and Clallam counties who go above and beyond the call of duty to better the lives of their patients. This section will be published in late October, but first, we’re asking you to help us find nurses who deserve to be spotlighted.

Deadline The deadline for your nominations is 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3. Nominate a nurse whose compassion, devotion, professionalism, knowledge and skill, patience or tenderness touched you in some way. Nominations can be made by individuals, clubs, churches, businesses, schools and other organizations. Nurses can come from a number of different work settings — adult or pediatric clinics, hospitals, addiction recovery, cancer treatment, labor and delivery, triage emergency departments, Alzheimer’s care, home health, assisted living facilities or any other environment that depends on quality care. Nominees must be

RNs, LPNs or ARNPs licensed by the state of Washington (caregivers and CNAs are super individuals, too, but for this section, they are not eligible). From your nominations, we will pick a handful of nurses to feature in the PDN’s October special section.

How to nominate n  Nominations should be made using the accompanying coupon — please PRINT it out, complete it and send it to the PDN by no later than 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3. n  IMPORTANT — A letter describing the merits and accomplishments of the nurse being nominated should be submitted (in person, or by regular mail) along with the coupon. n  If possible, the nomination should include supporting documents, such as copies (not originals) of awards, newspaper articles or letters of support. (This also needs to come to us with the coupon and letter by regular mail or in person.) n  Any RN, LPN or ARNP licensed by the state of Washington and working in Clallam or Jefferson counties can be nominated. Questions? Please phone PDN Special Sections Editor Jennifer Veneklasen at 360-417-7687 or email her at jennifer.veneklasen@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Briefly . . . FFA students seek votes for contest SEQUIM — Students from the Sequim High School Future Farmers of America Tractor Restoration Team need your vote. Five students have spent the past eight months rebuilding a 1954 Farmall tractor and have entered it into the Chevron DELO

Wednesday and Thursday. Tryouts will be held at the Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 7 p.m. There are roles for one woman in her late teens to 30s and four men ranging in age from their 20s to 50s. All actors must be able to sing cowboy tunes of the Audition on tap 1930s and 1940s and have PORT ANGELES — The fun. Singing will be required Port Angeles Community Players will hold tryouts for at the audition. Rehearsals will begin in the musical “Chaps! A Jingle late September, and the play Jangle Christmas” on Tractor Restoration Contest. The contest includes a video entry, and the public can vote on entrants at http://tinyurl.com/3mffhgj. Winners will attend the FFA National Convention in Indianapolis in October. Each email address can vote up to 10 times per day.

will run from Nov. 25 to Dec. 11. If you would like to try out but are unable to attend, phone director Robert Sommers at 360-452-7523. Copies of the playbook are available in the Port Angeles and Sequim libraries.

Marine course set PORT TOWNSEND — A nine-lesson Marine Electrical Systems course will be offered through the Point Wilson Sail and

Power Squadron starting Wednesday. Classes will meet at the Skookum Building, 385 Benedict St., at 7 p.m. The topics covered in the course and schedule for the classes are: ■  Wednesday: Properties of electricity. ■  Week two: Boat electrical wiring practices. ■  Weeks three and four: AC/DC power. ■  Week five: Galvanic and stray current corrosion.

■  Week six: Lightning protection. ■  Weeks seven and eight: Troubleshooting and repair. ■  Week nine: Review and exam. The course is $40 for squadron members, $50 for the public. A discount will be offered to spouses. To register, phone Bob Monica at 360-385-2634 or email bomo44@msn.com. Peninsula Daily News

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C5 lunch and a program at the club’s building, 320 Garden Club Road. For more information, The program’s speaker phone 360-327-3318. will be Jadyne Reichner, formerly of Organic Seed Port Townsend and Alliance and now co-owner Jefferson County of Oatsplanter Farm Seeds, who will present “Saving and Preserving Seeds.” Utah pioneers The program is open to The Daughters of Utah any Marrowstone Island Pioneers meets the second woman interested in the Monday of each month club. through May. For further information, The historical organiza- phone 360-379-3777. tion works closely with If a club member is ancestry and family history bringing a guest or is research. unable to attend, phone the Membership is available hostess chairwoman at whether you have pioneer 360-385-6310. ancestry or not. For more information For more information, about the club, visit the phone Judy Hart at 360796-0391.

Quilcene Lions The Quilcene Lions Club will meet Monday at 6:30 p.m. at the Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, Quilcene. For more information, phone Harold Prather at 360-765-4008.

Puget anglers The East Jefferson Chapter of Puget Sound Anglers in Port Townsend will meet Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the Marina Room on Hudson Street at the Point Hudson Marina, 110 Hudson St., Port Townsend. The program will focus on beach fishing for salmon. Refreshments will be served, and the public is invited.

Garden club meets The Nordland Garden Club will meet Wednesday at 10 a.m. followed by

Death and Memorial Notice JANICE ‘JAN’ NICHOLS November 9, 1953 August 20, 2011 Janice “Jan” Nichols passed away August 20, 2011, due to complications from ovarian cancer. She was born in Port Angeles on November 9, 1953, to Wayne and Ida Nichols and graduated from Port Angeles High School in 1972. A memorial service will be held at the Hermiston, Oregon, High School gym on Saturday, September 17, 2011, at 10 a.m.

club website at nordland gardenclub.com.

Flotilla auxiliary Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 41, Port Ludlow, meets the second Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Port Ludlow Fire Station, 7650 Oak Bay Road, Port Ludlow. All are welcome. Participants are invited to make a contribution to the local community, meet new people and get involved in boating on the Puget Sound. (You don’t have to own a boat.) For more information, visit http://a1300401. uscgaux.info.

Submarine vets The Olympic Peninsula Base of the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. will meet Thursday at 7 p.m. at VFW Post 7489, 31 Matheson St., Port Hadlock. All submarine veterans are invited to attend. For further information or for sharing rides, phone 360-437-1143 or 360-6817247.

Rhody Os Dance The Rhody Os Dance Club holds dances every first and third Friday with rounds from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and mainstream

square dance from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road. There are also Tuesday night square dance lessons from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. For further information, phone 360-797-2106 or 360-457-8620.

members are welcome to learn about the 2011-2012 program and the organization’s interest groups on many topics (e.g., books, art and hiking). Poet and entertainer Mary Lou Sanelli will give a presentation about the life cycle, mothers and daughters, and the evoluAAUW to meet tionary process, which Sanelli says lasts a lifeThe American Associatime. tion of University Women AAUW is open to those Port Townsend will meet who hold an associate Saturday at 9:30 a.m. for degree or higher from an refreshments followed by a accredited institution. meeting from 10 a.m. to For further information, 11:30 a.m. at Quimper Uniemail porttownsend@ tarian Church, 2333 San aauw-wa.org or visit www. Juan Ave. Current and prospective aauwpt.org.

Death and Memorial Notice W. ALVIN GROSS May 15, 1921 August 20, 2011 W. Alvin Gross, D.D.S., passed away at home from pancreatic cancer on Saturday, August 20, 2011. Alvin was born in Hanford, Washington, and raised in Walla Walla, Washington. He was the first of four children, two boys and two girls, born to Myron Willis Gross and Charlotte Macomber Gross. He became an Eagle Scout and graduated from Walla Walla High School in 1939. After high school, he attended business school and worked various jobs until he enlisted in the Army Air Corps in November of 1942, for pilot flight training during World War

Dr. Gross II. In April of 1945, he graduated as a pilot 2nd lieutenant. After the war, he returned to the University of Washington and graduated from the University of Washington School of Dentistry in 1952.

Dr. Gross opened his dental practice in Port Angeles in August of 1952. In 1962, his marriage to Shelia May McCabe ended in divorce. In 1963, he married Darlene Seward Benson, who preceded him in death in 2003. Alvin was very active in the community. A few of his past activities included commodore of the Port Angeles Yacht Club, president of the Port Angeles Rotary Club, president of a Seattle dental study group and president of a square dancing club. He is survived by his sister, Shirley Marchbanks; sons Gary Gross (daughter-in-law Vicky), Chuck Gross (daughter-inlaw Terry), Chris Benson (daughter-in-law Sandra) and Laird Benson (daughter-in-law Cindy); daughter

Rebecca Riepe (son-inlaw Tom); 18 grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by sons Greg and Richard Gross. Shortly before his death, Alvin said that he greatly appreciated his life, his family and his many wonderful friends and patients. And that he felt very blessed to have lived the life he did. There will be a memorial service Saturday, September 17, 2011, at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., starting at 1:30 p.m., which will be followed by a celebration of life. Memorial contributions in his name may be directed to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.


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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

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Briefly . . . Volunteer tutor meeting set Sept. 22

tary level is set for Sept. 22. The meeting will be held at the Helen Haller Elementary School library, 350 W. Fir St., from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. It is intended for new SEQUIM — A meeting and past tutors to meet K-2 for those interested in volun- Literacy Specialist Krista teering as a reading tutor Chatters and learn about for students at the elementhe tutoring reading model.

For more information, phone Chatters at 360-5823200 or email kchatters@ sequim.k12.wa.us. To be a volunteer in the Sequim School District, you must complete the Volunteer Clearance Process each school year prior to being assigned to a volunteer position within a building.

Complete, sign and return a volunteer registration form with a copy attached of your driver’s license or state ID card to the school or district office at least one week prior to the date you wish to begin volunteering. For more information on volunteering, phone Patsene

Death and Memorial Notice MARANDA ANN MAZZIE May 21, 1974 August 27, 2011 Maranda Ann Mazzie of Port Angeles was born on May 21, 1974, in Spokane, Washington. She spent the majority of her childhood in Sequim and attended Sequim High School. She was the oldest of five sisters. Although she was the oldest, she often joked that it was not fair that she was the shortest. She was adorable at 4 feet and 11 inches tall. Maranda was never content to stay in one place. Throughout her life, she resided in several states including Washington, California, Oregon and Nevada, and she worked as a caregiver for most of her adult life. In 1993, she gave birth to her first child, Jesse Mazzie, and two years later, she had her daughter, Tenayah Manderscheid.

Ms. Mazzie Maranda was a truly selfless person with a very big heart and was always willing to help others. She always brought out the humor in every situation and had a laugh that was contagious. She was a very forgiving person and never held a grudge. She enjoyed music and loved to dance and recently stated that she wished she could dance again. She also liked col-

lecting dolls, and she adored spending time with her dog, Bella. Maranda was proud to have recently connected with her other siblings, Joe and Amber Mazzie. Maranda was taken from us too soon, and she will be missed tremendously. She will be in our hearts forever. She will always be young. She will always be beautiful. Maranda is survived by her parents, Theodore and Kathy McDonald of Sequim; her sisters, Marcia Mazzie of Puyallup, Washington, Ebony McDonald of Seattle, Moneek McDonald of Seattle and Kayleen McDonald of Sequim; and her children, Jesse Mazzie of Spanaway, Washington, and Tenayah Manderscheid of Tyler, Texas. Funeral services were previously held on Saturday, September 3, 2011, at Drennan-Ford Funeral Home. Please sign the online guestbook at www. drennanford.com.

Death and Memorial Notice KENNETH LEROY BOURM March 24, 1939 August 26, 2011 Kenneth Leroy Bourm, 72, of Port Angeles passed away on August 26, 2011, from medical complications. He was born March 24, 1939, in Port Angeles, to James and Virginia (Hoffman) Bourm. Mr. Bourm graduated from Joyce High School, class of 1957. He went on to work in the logging industry for 45 years for businesses including Koidahl, Hopkins, Harper Brothers, Band Trucking, Priest and Hermann Brothers. Kenneth married Earline Secor on June 22, 1957.

Mr. Bourm Mr. Bourm enjoyed playing golf at the Peninsula Golf Course, West End Thunder drag races, clamming and camping. He was a charter member of the Crescent Bay Lions, as well as president, treasurer and Tail Twister; a 50-year member of the Crescent Grange; and an

Bruce Thomas Granum Sept. 23, 1958 — Sept. 8, 2011

11 a.m., funeral Mass at Queen of Angels Catholic Church, 209 W. 11th St., Port Angeles. The Rev. Thomas Nathe will officiate. Burial will be at Mount Angeles Memorial Park, U.S. Highway 101 and Monroe Road, Port Angeles. www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com

Bruce Thomas Granum died at his Sequim home. He was 52. Cause of death is pending. His obituary will be published later. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. Sandalynne Tarbuck www.drennanford.com May 18, 1946 — Aug. 24, 2011

Margaret Mary Frick July 9, 1922 — Sept. 8, 2011

Port Angeles resident Mary Margaret Frick died at 89. Her obituary will be published later. Services: Tuesday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., viewing at Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, 105 W. Fourth St., Port Angeles; Wednesday at

Sequim resident Sanda­ lynne Tarbuck died of a stroke. She was 65. Her obituary will be published later. Services: Monday at 11 a.m., celebration of life at Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel, 108 W. Alder St. Pastor David Westman will officiate. A reception will follow.

Remembering a Lifetime

PORT ANGELES — There is a typographical error in the September

Death and Memorial Notice SANDRA RAE WORSEY June 11, 1948 September 1, 2011 Sandra Rae Worsey, 63, of Forks, passed away September 1, 2011, of cancer while at home with family by her side. She was born in Shelton, Washington, on June 11, 1948, to Cecil Ray and Joan Emma McHenry.

Sandra married Glen Worsey in Forks on July 25, 1981. Mrs. Worsey was the owner of Cutting Edge Vinyl Graphics in Forks. She is survived by her husband, Glen Worsey; son Donald Puderbaugh of Port Townsend; stepsons Christopher Worsey of Sequim, Nathan Worsey and his wife Sarah of Redlands, California; daughter Tami Gos-

sage of Port Angeles; brother and sister-in-law Rex and Debbie McHenry; sisters and brother-in-law Sharon and Rudy Purser, Margaret Tom and Diane McHenry; and seven grandchildren. Sandra was preceded in death by her parents and brother Mickey McHenry. A celebration of life will be held at a later date, to be announced.

Death and Memorial Notice RUTH ELIZABETH STORAASLI October 18, 1914 September 5, 2011 Ruth Elizabeth Storaasli, 96, of Sequim passed away on Monday, September 5, 2011, at home with her daughters at her bedside. Ruth was born October 18, 1914, in Glenville, Minnesota, to Tosten A. Storvick and Anna Flaskerud Storvick. She grew up in Glenville, graduated from Waldorf Academy in Forest City, Iowa, and Fairview School of Nursing in Minneapolis and enjoyed a long career as a nursing educator. On July 12, 1937, Ruth married her college sweetheart, Bardolf Andreas Storaasli, in Glenville. Throughout their 65 years together, she was a devoted wife, mother of four and a loving grandmother. She was a lifelong active member of the Lutheran church and delighted in singing soprano in several choirs. Bar and Ruth raised their

Mrs. Storaasli four children in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Upon retiring, they enjoyed traveling and living in Carmel, California, Durham, North Carolina, and finally made their home in Sequim. Known for her sprightly sense of humor, Ruth was especially fond of sharing the Midwestern “Ole and Lena” jokes dear to the hearts of many Norwegian Americans. Her ability to find humor and optimism in everyday life was a gift to all around her. Ruth is survived by her son, John Storaasli (Alison), of Ingleside, Illinois;

daughters Kathy King (Bill) of Sequim and Marie Storaasli of Durham; grandsons Jon Kirby of Los Angeles, Mikkel Storaasli (Sarah) of Ingleside, Olaf von Ramm of Raleigh, North Carolina, and Karl von Ramm of Padise, Estonia; greatgrandchildren James Kirby Jr., Heather Kirby, Michael Kirby and Noah Storaasli; and many nieces and nephews. Ruth was preceded in death by her parents, husband Bardolf Storaasli, daughter Ruth Anne Bishoff, sisters Mabel Hesla and Tena Iverson, brothers Alfred Storvick and Carl Storvick, and grandson James Kirby Sr. A memorial service will be held on Memorial Day weekend 2012 at Round Prairie Lutheran Church in Glenville, Minnesota. The family is grateful for the tender care provided by the Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County and would appreciate memorial donations directed to Volunteer Hospice at 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

Drennan & ForD Funeral Home anD Crematory

peninsuladailynews. com

260 Monroe Rd., Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-1210 ~ (360) 683-4020 ~ (360) 374-5678

www.drennanford.com www.facebook.com/drennanfordfuneralhome

In Memorium Patrick Elliott Bartholomew Patrick was born in Port Angeles, WA on February 2, 1981, to parents Lewis and Deborah Bartholomew. He was their only child. Patrick was raised in the Sequim school system until Middle School when his mother moved to Auburn where Patrick continued his education. A jack of all trades, Patrick worked at various businesses but always kept his hand in making music or his other hobby of motorcycle sports. He had his day job at Cycle Gear in Auburn but he was also known in the lower Puget Sound area as one of the leading DJ and music hosts in the evenings. This was a job he loved because of the joy his performance gave to others. Patrick’s life was cut short by a tragic automobile accident early in the morning of July 5, 2011 on the Key Peninsula. His loss to his community in King, Pierce and Clallam Counties is felt by many. Patrick is survived by his father, Lewis Bartholomew of Courtenay, BC, his mother Deborah Culp of Lakebay, WA, two step fathers, James Derry and John Culp, as well as several sets of grandparents, step siblings, aunts, uncles, and cousins. On July 12 Patrick was buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Auburn, WA. A Memorial Tribute will be held in Sequim, WA at the Red Cedar Hall at the Jamestown Tribal Center on September 24, beginning at 1:00 pm. All who knew him during his early years at school or tagging along with his father at theatre productions are most welcome to join this celebration of life. For further information you can email: mrbarth@alberniproject.org

195133014

■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at   area mortuaries or by downloading at   www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at   www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at www.

Newsletter error

2011 Port Angeles Senior Center Newsletter. At the bottom of the Senior Nutrition menu on page 15, the meal reservation telephone number is listed incorrectly. The correct telephone number for meal reservations is 360-457-8921. Peninsula Daily News

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Death Notices

Ediz Hookers Official Fire Builder. He had endless love for his family. Kenneth is survived by his wife, Earline Bourm; sons Cary (Melene), Carl (Cathy) and Craig Bourm; brothers Gene Bourm and Larry (Irene) Bourm; grandchildren Cassandra Romberg (Wes), Kelsey Bourm (Ann), Jon Bourm, Janelle Bourm, Tia Bourm, Ty Bourm, Grady Bourm and Jaxon Bourm; great-grandchildren Emma, Ella, Drew and Katie Bourm, Gage and Faith Romberg, and Deondre Howard. A celebration of life potluck will be held Sunday, September 25, 2011, at 1 p.m. at the Crescent Bay Lions Club, 181 Holly Hill Road, Joyce. Memorial contributions may be made to the Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 20, Joyce, WA 98343.

Dashiell of the Sequim School District Office at 360582-3260 or email mdashiell@sequim.k12. wa.us.


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WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 75

Low 49

68/50

64/49

64/47

65/46

Sunshine and pleasantly warm.

A moonlit sky.

Mostly sunny and pleasant.

Sunshine and patchy clouds.

Sunshine and patchy clouds.

More clouds than sunshine.

The Peninsula A ridge of high pressure aloft sitting off the Pacific Northwest coast will provide a nice day across the Peninsula again today with an abundance of sunshine. Afternoon temperatures will top out in the middle 70s, which is about 10 degrees above normal for Neah Bay Port this time of the year. Tonight will be clear and cool under 65/51 Townsend a moonlit sky. The ridge of high pressure will gradually Port Angeles 70/51 break down over the next couple of days. This will bring 75/49 lower temperatures Monday and Tuesday, but it will be Sequim mostly sunny both days.

Victoria 79/53

75/50

Forks 80/52

Olympia 87/47

Seattle 86/55

Spokane 94/58

Yakima Kennewick 94/53 92/54

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Sunshine and pleasant today. Wind east-southeast at 4-8 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear. A moonlit sky tonight. Wind light and variable. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear. Mostly sunny and pleasant tomorrow. Wind west 8-16 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Tuesday: Sunny to partly cloudy. Wind west 12-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear.

LaPush

12:03 a.m. 12:44 p.m. Port Angeles 2:20 a.m. 3:24 p.m. Port Townsend 4:05 a.m. 5:09 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:26 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Tuesday

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

7.7’ 7.6’ 5.8’ 6.6’ 7.0’ 8.0’ 6.6’ 7.5’

6:19 a.m. 6:41 p.m. 8:44 a.m. 9:22 p.m. 9:58 a.m. 10:36 p.m. 9:51 a.m. 10:29 p.m.

0.2’ 1.0’ 1.0’ 2.3’ 1.3’ 3.0’ 1.2’ 2.8’

12:45 a.m. 1:14 p.m. 3:09 a.m. 3:40 p.m. 4:54 a.m. 5:25 p.m. 4:15 a.m. 4:46 p.m.

6:55 a.m. 7:20 p.m. 9:19 a.m. 9:51 p.m. 10:33 a.m. 11:05 p.m. 10:26 a.m. 10:58 p.m.

7.7’ 7.8’ 5.9’ 6.6’ 7.1’ 7.9’ 6.7’ 7.4’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

ff o r d a b l e Roofing

AFFORS*06503

San Francisco 65/56 Denver 88/54

0.4’ 0.6’ 1.5’ 1.8’ 1.9’ 2.3’ 1.8’ 2.2’

High Tide Ht 1:25 a.m. 1:42 p.m. 3:55 a.m. 3:56 p.m. 5:40 a.m. 5:41 p.m. 5:01 a.m. 5:02 p.m.

7.6’ 7.9’ 6.0’ 6.6’ 7.2’ 7.9’ 6.8’ 7.4’

Low Tide Ht 7:31 a.m. 7:58 p.m. 9:53 a.m. 10:22 p.m. 11:07 a.m. 11:36 p.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:29 p.m.

0.7’ 0.5’ 2.0’ 1.3’ 2.6’ 1.7’ 2.4’ 1.6’

Sep 20

Sep 27

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

First

Oct 3

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 88 70 s Baghdad 102 68 s Beijing 77 59 pc Brussels 67 51 sh Cairo 95 72 s Calgary 82 48 s Edmonton 75 41 pc Hong Kong 88 80 r Jerusalem 80 62 s Johannesburg 79 48 s Kabul 96 54 sh London 69 54 sh Mexico City 68 52 r Montreal 73 57 s Moscow 59 51 r New Delhi 88 79 t Paris 65 57 r Rio de Janeiro 76 66 sh Rome 84 61 s Stockholm 66 63 r Sydney 66 50 s Tokyo 82 74 sh Toronto 74 57 pc Vancouver 79 57 s Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Detroit 77/60

New York 73/65

Washington 82/65

Kansas City 80/62

Atlanta 86/65 El Paso 88/71

Moon Phases New

Chicago 78/62

Los Angeles 76/63

Sunset today ................... 7:36 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 6:46 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 6:55 p.m. Moonset today ................. 6:11 a.m. Last

Minneapolis 82/59

0s

Houston 96/67 Miami 90/79

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 78 60 72 86 76 80 90 84 84 88 71 75 86 82 78 80 90 95 94 88 81 77 91 61 82 88 96 65

Lo W 60 pc 49 s 54 s 65 s 63 t 62 t 52 s 57 s 55 s 62 s 59 pc 59 t 66 pc 52 s 62 pc 60 t 52 s 53 s 67 s 54 s 62 s 60 t 49 s 40 pc 54 s 73 pc 67 s 38 s

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 80 94 84 76 90 76 82 86 88 73 86 80 92 96 78 99 90 88 87 83 82 81 98 73 65 84 77 82

Lo W 62 s 76 pc 65 t 63 pc 79 t 60 s 59 s 62 t 71 s 65 t 64 s 59 s 73 t 73 pc 65 t 80 t 60 s 62 pc 57 t 55 pc 66 t 58 t 69 s 64 pc 56 pc 59 s 50 pc 65 t

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 106 at Red Bluff, CA

Low: 27 at West Yellowstone, MT

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Billings 84/57

Sun & Moon

Sep 12

Everett 78/53

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 86/55

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 79 50 0.00 10.68 Forks 81 52 0.00 78.52 Seattle 84 56 0.00 24.26 Sequim 86 57 0.00 11.02 Hoquiam 79 49 0.00 45.79 Victoria 78 53 0.00 21.11 P. Townsend* 80 51 0.00 12.31 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 73/51 Bellingham 77/48

Aberdeen 75/53

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, September 11, 2011

Special commemorative section on the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks

Ten Years After

Dentsu America Cycle 1 85 Line Screen

CMYK Mark Lennihan/The Associated Press

The Tribute in Light rises above the office buildings of New York City in a test last Tuesday. The memorial, sponsored by the Municipal Art Society, is scheduled to light the lower Manhattan sky this evening.

How America changed (and hasn’t changed)

Because

love the thrill of stable returns.

By Nancy Benac The Associated Press

W

e are safer, but not safe enough. In the decade since the Sept. 11 attacks, the government has taken giant steps to protect the nation from terrorists, spending eye-popping sums to smarten up the federal bureaucracy, hunt down enemies, strengthen airline security, secure U.S. borders, reshape America’s image and more. Still, the effort remains a work in progress, and, in some cases, a work stalled.

Whole alphabets of acronyms have been born and died in pursuit of homeland security, a phrase that wasn’t even used much before 9/11. Hello, TSA, DNI, DHS, NCTC, CVE, NSI and ICE. Goodbye, TTIC, INS and more. How quaint that travelers used to be asked a few questions about whether they’d packed their own bags. Now, people routinely strip off their belts and shoes, dump their gels in small plastic bags, power up their laptops to prove they aren’t bombs and submit to full body scans and pat downs once reserved for suspected criminals. We have gone from “Let’s roll” to “Don’t touch my junk.”

towers in New York couldn’t talk to one other because their radios weren’t in sync? There’s still no nationwide communications network for disasters, as the commission envisioned, although individual cities have made progress. It’s understandable if you’ve never heard of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, created to ensure that the government doesn’t go overboard with new terrorism-fighting powers bestowed by the Patriot Act and other counterterrorism measures. The board has no members, no staff, no office.

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Despite a top-to-bottom reorganization of the country’s intelligence superstrucSept. 11 Commission ture, it’s still a challenge for analysts to tease out the critical clues needed to preThe bipartisan Sept. 11 Commission in 2004 laid out a 585-page road map to create vent an attack. On Christmas Day 2009, lots of people an America that is “safer, stronger, wiser.” in government had information about a Many of the commission’s recommendations are now reality. But in some cases, Nigerian man whose behavior was raising red flags. results haven’t lived up to expectations. But because no one had pieced all the Other proposals are just that — ideas information together, Umar Farouk Abdulawaiting action. “What I’ve come to appreciate is there’s mutallab managed to stroll on to a plane headed for Detroit with a bomb in his no magic wand on some of these things,” underwear. says Homeland Security Secretary Janet Only his failure to detonate the exploNapolitano, who says that progress overall sives properly saved the people on that has been significant. plane. But remember how some of the police and firefighters who rushed to the twin Turn to Changes/D3

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D2

9/11: Ten Years After

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

9/11 families walk painful journeys For some, tragedy becomes motivation for public service By Jennifer Peltz The Associated Press

NEW YORK — In some of the nation’s most wounded days, it became a deeply personal, wrenchingly public and wholly uncharted identity: “Sept. 11 family member.” Many who lost loved ones in the terror attacks felt themselves driven, or pushed, to become symbols of a country’s anguish — an unsought status so freighted that one widow recently wrote that she was “quitting 9/11.” But for others, it is still the emotional equivalent of a fulltime job. In the decade since the attacks, some have weighed in publicly on issues that rippled out from ground zero to a mosque proposed nearby, civilian trials for terror suspects, police radios, Osama bin Laden’s burial at sea and other issues — even as a strain of public sentiment questions why they haven’t moved on. Anthony Gardner is quick to point out that he feels the attacks affected everyone. Yet he realizes that others see him and other victims’ relatives as sitting atop a hierarchy of Sept. 11 sorrow.

Brother died He remembers prevailing on a woman to continue recounting her memories of the attacks after she abruptly stopped, having learned that his brother, Harvey, died at the trade center. But as much as Gardner might not want that special status, it gave him, at 25, an unexpected voice in public affairs. He helped lead a push to preserve the twin towers’ footprints and started an organization that developed a Sept. 11 curriculum now used in a few thousand schools. Those projects stirred his interest in history, leading the former corporate communications staffer to graduate school and a new career as head of the New Jersey State Museum. One of his first projects there

has been planning an exhibit surrounding the attacks’ 10th anniversary. He’d like to think the families’ activism carries a message beyond their causes. “I hope that people look at this and understand that they could do something similar in their own lives and have an impact on things they care about,” he says. “Regardless of whether they have a loss in their life or not.” Like it or not, relatives’ willingness to bare their grief and rage has shaped the shadow of Sept. 11, influencing everything from the analysis of intelligence and security failures that enabled the attacks to what is, and is not, being built at the World Trade Center site. But beyond specific projects, the families have, perhaps, changed a broader cultural conversation about victims, the bereaved and their role in defining the legacy of catastrophe. From the start, Sept. 11 victims’ families were an unmistakably public part of the narrative of the attacks, posting fliers and toting family photos they implored television reporters to broadcast in hopes of locating loved ones. They soon became, in the media and sometimes in their own word, not “attack victims’ relatives” but “9/11 families.” It’s convenient shorthand that also places them at the emotional center of the tragedy and suggests their loss makes them victims, too, an idea enshrined in the crime victims’ rights movement. Advocates often refer to relatives as “secondary victims.”

Talking about grief

The Associated Press

Anthony Gardner, executive director of the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton, stands with steel from the World Trade Center. Gardner lost his brother, Harvey, during the Sept. 11 attacks, which sparked his interest in history, preservation and government. a victim’s position as a single, long-term, defining platform does entail problems.” The 2001 attacks came amid ambivalence about the status and meaning of victimhood. While the rights movement gave victims a new prominence in the criminal justice system, some politicians and pundits were decrying “victimism,” or what they saw as people in the culture at refusing to take responsibility for problems in the culture at large, notes Alyson M. Cole, a Queens College political science professor and the author of The Cult of True Victimhood: From the War on Welfare to the War on Terror, published in 2007. As the war on terror became a defining issue of President George W. Bush’s administration, “the families of 9/11 were in fact privileged victims,” Cole said by email.

The Sept. 11 families’ public presence has built openness to talking about loss, crisis and recovering, says Elisabeth Schaefer-Wuensche, an American studies scholar affiliated with Germa- ‘Opposing ramifications’ ny’s University of Bonn, which is But to Diane Horning, who holding an upcoming conference became outspoken on issues on the attacks’ aftermath. related to Sept. 11 victims’ But, she said, “speaking from

remains after losing her son, Matthew, “the willingness to go public has had opposing ramifications” — on one hand encouragement and admiration, on the other criticism that the families’ public exposure is unseemly and attention-seeking. Conservative commentator Ann Coulter derided four trade center widows known as the Jersey Girls in a 2006 book, saying she had “never seen people enjoying their husbands’ death so much.” Another conservative pundit, Glenn Beck, said in 2005 that he wished some victims’ relatives would “shut up.” ‘‘They’re always complaining, and we did our best for them,” Beck said. Plenty of others spurn such views as insensitive. Still, the push-and-pull of public attitudes toward Sept. 11 victims’ families came to grate on Nikki Stern. She got involved in 9/11-related causes after her husband, James Potorti, died at the trade center. But she said on her blog in

July that she was “quitting 9/11.” Stern was, she wrote, tired of being treated “as if I were a victim or a moral beacon or, God forbid, an opportunist — a symbol of resilience; a receptacle for a nation’s fear, anger, resentment and confusion; someone forever defined by one unexpected, violent, and oh so public event.” Ask other 9/11 family members why they stay involved in fraught debates that keep their decade-old loss in the forefront of their lives, and the answer is neither pat nor uniform: because it was a way to channel anger about something they couldn’t do anything about into something they could; because other victims’ relatives would rather stay silent. Because journalists keep asking. Because they sense the pull of apathy on an event the world said it would never forget. Because the attacks’ aftermath has imbued them with frustration about politics and the calculus of power. Turn

to

Families/D4

19701328


9/11: Ten Years After

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

D3

A tumultuous decade Recapping a selection Recapping selection of worldwide worldwideevents eventssince sincethe theSept. Sept.11, 11,2001 2001,attacks: attacks

Sept. 18, 2001 Congress authorizes President George W. Bush to use force against the perpetrators of the 9/11 attacks. Bush introduces the phrase “war on terror” two days later in televised speech.

2001 Oct. 7 U.S. and British forces begin airstrikes in Afghanistan after the Taliban refuse to hand over Osama bin Laden. Nov. 13 Taliban fighters abandon Kabul after weeks of air assaults. Anti-Taliban Northern Alliance mujahedeen enter the Afghan capital. Dec. 7 Taliban stronghold Kandahar falls. Bin Laden and Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar escape.

Jan. 13, 2004 Army investigators are tipped about abuse at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Over the next two years, 11 U.S. soldiers are convicted of crimes for human rights violations.

Bin Laden May 1, 2011 President Obama announces bin Laden was killed in Pakistan in a U.S.-led operation.

Jan. 11, 2002 First detainees arrive at Guantanamo Bay detention center. There are 160 prisoners by the end of the month and a peak of 680 after 18 months.

March 20, 2003 The U.S.-led invasion of Iraq begins, two days after President Bush gave Iraqi President Saddam Hussein 48 hours to give up power.

March 11 Coordinated bombs strike commuter trains in Madrid three days before Spain’s general elections, killing 191.

July 7, 2005 Suicide bombers attack London’s transportation system, killing 52 and injuring hundreds.

July 11, 2006 Multiple bombs strike trains in Mumbai, India, killing 207 people and injuring more than 700 others.

Dec. 2007 The Great Recession begins. The longest and deepest recession since the 1930s lasts 18 months.

Nov. 4, 2008 Barack Hussein Obama is elected the 44th president of the United States.

Dec. 1, 2009 President Obama outlines his decision to rapidly expand the U.S. role in the war in Afghanistan.

Aug. 19, 2010 The last American combat troops leave Iraq. 50,000 American soldiers remain to advise Iraqis.

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Feb. 7 President Bush says the Geneva Convention applies to Taliban prisoners but not to captured al-Qaida terrorists. He refuses to classify either as prisoners of war.

May 1 On an aircraft carrier under a “Mission Accomplished” banner, President Bush declares “major combat operations in Iraq have ended.”

Oct. 6 The top U.S. arms inspector in Iraq finds no evidence that Saddam’s regime produced weapons of mass destruction after 1991 – the primary reason the Bush administration gave for going to war.

October Saddam goes on trial. He is executed Dec. 30, 2006, after being sentenced to death by an Iraqi court.

August The U.S. restricts liquids in carry-on luggage after a foiled terrorist plot intended to detonate liquid explosives on trans-Atlantic flights. Oct. 5 NATO takes over control of all security operations in Afghanistan.

Oct. 12 Nightclub bombings in Bali, Indonesia, kill 202. The majority of the victims are Westerners. Nov. 25 The Department of Homeland Security is founded.

Dec. 13 Saddam Hussein is captured by U.S. forces in Tikrit, Iraq, found in a tiny cellar at a farmhouse.

London attacked by terrorists.

Saddam Hussein is seen in this video image the day of his execution.

U.S. soldiers head home after their tour in Iraq, July 13, 2010.

June 22 President Obama announces Afghanistan troop withdrawals. July 22 An anti-Muslim, right-wing extremist kills more than 70 in a bombing and mass shooting in Norway.

2011 Aug. 6 Twenty Navy SEALs from the same unit that killed bin Laden are killed when their helicopter is shot down in Afghanistan, in the deadliest single loss for U.S. forces in the decade-long war. In all, 30 Americans died in the crash.

Nov. 2 President Bush is elected to a second term.

NATO soldiers from New Zealand stand guard in Afghanistan, Oct. 5, 2006. AP

Changes: Air passenger screening SEPT 11 TIMELINE 090811: Timeline shows the key events nationally and worldwide since the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001; 6c x 8 inches; with any related stories; staff; ETA 6 p.m.

Continued from D1 Lee Hamilton, a co-chairman of the Sept. 11 commission, says it’s probably a combination of hard work and good luck that’s kept the U.S. from experiencing another allout terrorist attack. But he worries that success is breeding complacency. “The lack of urgency concerns me,” Hamilton says. “The likelihood is that sometime in the future, we will be attacked again.” A look at some of the 9/11 commission’s recommendations, and the results: n  RECOMMENDATION: Tighter security checks on all airline passengers. The Transportation Security Administration and Congress “must give priority attention to improving the ability of screening checkpoints to detect explosives on passengers.” n  RESULT: There have been awkward moments as the government searches for a system that will protect passengers without infuriating them. A gravely ill 95-year-old woman had to remove her wet diaper before she could get through security in Florida in June. Video of a 6-year-old girl getting frisked in Louisiana in March went viral. “Don’t touch my junk,” became a national rallying cry. The TSA was created soon after the attacks, underscoring the priority placed on securing the sky. Since then, the U.S. has poured $50 billion into aviation security. The commission suggested specific actions for the agency: check travelers against terrorist watch lists and screen every passenger who warrants extra security for explosives. Both are now being done. But airport security procedures continue to evolve as the threat mutates. Those intrusive pat-downs began after Abdulmutallab boarded that flight for Detroit.

Editor’s Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when repurposing or editing it for publication

PDN special section from 9/12/01 republished online THE DEADLY EVENTS of Sept. 11, 2001, produced shocking photographs from New York, Washington, D.C., and the Middle East. They were chronicled by Peninsula Daily News staff in an eight-page special section, “America Attacked,” that appeared in the PDN on Sept. 12. In the aftermath of the terrorist attacks, four more special sections were published by the PDN (the sections’ pages had no advertising) each day for the rest of that tumultuous week. Most memorable of those sections, of course, was the first one, particularly with stunning, almost unbelievable photographs from The Associated Press. The section has long been out of print, but the PDN’s technical services director, Dave Weikel, last week produced an Internet version now available at www.peninsuladailynews.com. It can be accessed at http://tinyurl.com/ pdnsection911 or by scanning the QR code above with a smartphone or e-tablet. Rex Wilson, executive editor

few years. But since 2008 it has been dormant. President Barack Obama nominated two people to serve, but they have not been confirmed by the Senate. n  RECOMMENDATION: “Afghanistan must not again become a sanctuary for international crime and terrorism.” The commission called for a “long-term commitment to a secure and stable Afghanistan.” n  RESULT: And how: The U.S. commitment has been long term, both in dollars and military might. But Afghanistan is far from secure. Afghan civilian deaths remain alarmingly high. President Hamid Karzai’s corruption-riddled government has little power outside of Kabul. As Obama seeks to pull out combat troops over the next three years, the government’s hand may weaken further. Al-Qaida, however, has had to relocate much of its operational planning to Pakistan and Yemen, where weak governments leave terrorists an opening.

n  RECOMMENDATION: “The United States should support Pakistan’s government in its struggle against extremists with Overall, the intelligence budget is that the White House isn’t a forest fires to terrorist attacks. a comprehensive effort that But lawmakers, public safety has more than doubled since Sept. very good place to coordinate intelextends from military aid to supofficials and telecommunications 11. ligence, much less to integrate it.” port for better education, so long companies have spent years hagBut Hamilton says “it’s not The current director, retired as Pakistan’s leaders remain gling over the best way to build clear that the DNI is the driving three-star Air Force Lt. Gen. willing to make difficult choices the system, which would cost bilforce for intelligence community James Clapper, is said to be well of their own.” lions to construct and operate. integration that the commission thought of by the White House, n  RESULT: Pakistan has Legislation backed by the partly because he is openly deferenvisioned.” embraced democracy, after years Obama administration would ential to the CIA. The vision of a strong director under the military-led regime of After the 9/11 attacks, the gov- devote high-quality radio spectrum Pervez Musharraf. supreme over all the intelligence to a nationwide wireless public ernment did work to combine its agencies has yet to be fully realIncreased U.S. aid has helped safety network, and raise the terrorist watchlists. ized in large part because of the shore up the weak democratic govNow even a beat cop in Seattle money to pay for it by auctioning ernment and deliver some counterway the job is structured, with lots other airwaves to spectrum-huncan check to see if the person terrorism successes. of responsibility but not much gry wireless companies. pulled over for speeding is a Yet all of Washington’s money authority. Even if a law is enacted this known or suspected terrorist. and support haven’t severed links In a town where dollars equal There are some worries that all year, setting up the network would between militants and Pakistan’s clout, the intelligence director has take time. this broad sharing of information army and intelligence services. no ability to redirect, cut off or “Congress must not approach has made it too easy for national The Taliban can cross into increase spending at the different this urgent matter at a leisurely secrets to leak. Afghanistan freely to fight U.S. agencies. pace, because quite literally lives Think WikiLeaks. forces, and Pakistanis harbor The position, sometimes are at stake,” Hamilton and comextremely negative opinions of the derided as the “convener-in-chief,” mission co-chairman Tom Kean RECOMMENDATION: n  U.S. n  RECOMMENDATION: is fast becoming one of the most Creation of a nationwide radio net- said in a June letter to the Senate Relations between U.S. and “We recommend the establishment thankless jobs in Washington. Commerce, Science and Transpor- Pakistani authorities have been work to allow different public of a National Counterterrorism Three directors have come and tation Committee. safety agencies to communicate consistently difficult. Center. gone since the job was created in with one another during disasters. The U.S. discovery and killing “The current position of Direc2005. n  RECOMMENDATION: “Congress should support pendof Osama bin Laden in a military tor of Central Intelligence should Each was engaged in turf bat“There should be a board within ing legislation which provides for town near Pakistan’s capital in be replaced by a National Intellitles with the CIA and the National the expedited and increased the executive branch to oversee May only deepened the mutual gence Director.” Security Council. adherence to the guidelines we assignment of radio spectrum for mistrust and tension. n  RESULT: The government Retired Adm. Dennis Blair, who public safety purposes.” recommend and the commitment Pakistani officials were furihas turned its intelligence-sharing held the job from 2009 to 2010, the government makes to defend n  RESULT: Still no network, ous that the raid was carried out policies nearly upside down as it complained in a recent address our civil liberties.” legislation still pending. without any warning to authoritries to make it easier to manage that the White House had undern  RESULT: Within weeks of As fires raged at the World ties in Islamabad, and that has and share all the rushing streams mined his authority. Trade Center and the Pentagon on the attacks, President George W. jeopardized cooperation in the of information that flow through 15 “They sided enough with the Bush signed the Patriot Act, giving fight against al-Qaida. Sept. 11, firefighters, police and agencies. CIA in ways that were public the government powers to search other emergency personnel The U.S. has provided about There’s a new National Coun- enough that it undercut my posirecords and conduct roving wirecouldn’t effectively communicate $20 billion in assistance to Pakiterterrorism Center; its mission tion,” Blair said. taps in pursuit of terrorists. with one another because of their stan since 9/11, and many Ameriis to bring together intelligence Asked with whom the president archaic and incompatible radios. That generated worries that cans are questioning the wisdom and analysts from across the gov- would side among current officials To fix the problem, the commis- personal and civil liberties would of giving more. ernment. at the DNI, CIA and Pentagon, sion recommended creating a net- be overrun. The country’s direction is very There’s a new director of Blair said the White House would work that would allow different The five-person Privacy and unpredictable. national intelligence, a distinct do the coordinating. Civil Liberties Oversight Board public safety agencies to talk to agency, to coordinate it all. He then added: “My experience each other during disasters, from Turn to Changes/D4 was established and operated for a


D4

9/11: Ten Years After

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Americans willing to lose some liberties, poll shows retired high school teacher from Wynne, Ark., who WASHINGTON — Sursays he’s not ready to sacriveillance cameras in public More than half of Americans believe it is necessary to sacrifice any freedoms in return fice some personal rights and freedoms to avert terrorism. places? Sure. for more security. Body scans at airports? Do you sometimes think it is necessary for the government Others worry that givMaybe. to sacrifice some rights and freedoms to fight terrorism? ing up one freedom will Snooping in personal lead to the loss of others. Never necessary Sometimes necessary email? Not so fast. “It’s like opening a crack The same Americans 64% 33% in the door, and then the who are increasingly splashing their personal As a result of steps taken by the government to fight terrorism, door is opened wide,” says Keri Jean, a homemaker lives across Facebook and do you feel you lost some of your personal freedoms? from Elk Ridge, Utah. Twitter trace a meandering Yes No The poll asked people to path when asked where 48% 51% the government should grapple with some of same draw the line between proquandaries that the govtecting civil liberties and NOTE: Based on a telephone survey of 1,087 adults conducted from July ernment and the courts 28 to August 15, 2011. The margin of error is 4.1 percentage points. The pursuing terrorism. have been wrestling with responses don’t know and refused are not included. Ten years after the 9/11 over the past decade, and attacks led to amped-up AP even before the 2001 terSOURCE: The Associated Press-NORC Center government surveillance rorist attacks. for Public Affairs Research efforts, two-thirds of AmeriAnd it turns out that cans say it’s fitting to sacripolicymakers, too, have phone calls. fice some privacy and free- freedoms and protecting drawn a zigzag line as they people from terrorists, For some Americans, doms in the fight against make tradeoffs between they’d come down on the their reluctance to give up terrorism, according to a aggressively pursuing side of civil liberties. any freedoms is a reflection potential terrorists and poll by The Associated The public is particuof their belief that the terPress-NORC Center for preserving privacy and CIVIL LIBERTIES 090602: larly protective of the prirorists eventually POLL will sucPublic Affairs Research. civil liberties. Poll no shows how what. respondents feel vacy of U.S. citizens, voicceed matter A slim majority — 54 Two-thirds of those surabout civil liberties and securities; ing sharp opposition to percent — say that if they “If somebody wants to veyed believe the resulting 2c x 3 inches; with BC-Sept 11Editor’s Note: surveillance It is mandatory ofto do had to choose between pre- government something, they’ll policies are a mish-mash Civil Liberties Poll; JB;find ETA a5 a.m. all sources that accompany Americans’ emails and serving their rights and include way,” says David Barker, a created in reaction to this graphic when repurposing or events as they occur rather editing it for publication than clearly planned.

The Associated Press

Civil liberties and securities questioned

Email interception

The Associated Press

A police security camera, upper left, is in front of a mosque on Fulton Street in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant in New York City.

Consider the rules on government interception of email: Sometimes that’s legal and sometimes it’s not. It depends on how old the email is, whether it’s already been opened by the recipient, whether the sender and recipient are within the U.S., and which federal appellate court considers the question. Sometimes investigators need a warrant and sometimes no court approval is necessary. The AP-NORC poll found that about half of those surveyed felt that they have indeed lost some of their own personal freedoms to fight terrorism. Was it worth it? Close to half of those who thought they’d lost freedoms doubted it was necessary. Overall, six in 10 say the government is doing enough to protect Americans’ rights and freedoms as it fights terrorism. But people may not even be aware of what they’ve given up. The extent of government eavesdropping and surveillance is something of a mystery. Turn

to

Liberties/D5

The Associated Press

Sally Regenhard, who lost her son, Christian Regenhard, in the attacks on the World Trade Center and is the founder of the Skyscaper Safety Campaign, speaks at a public hearing in 2003.

Families: Mom

sues, taunts Mayor Giuliani

Continued from D2 many things are still wrong. . . . “I want to force the sysTen years out, 9/11 is tem to live up to their still central to Sally responsibility to protect Regenhard’s life. the public, and it’s not Her son, Christian, a being done as well as it probationary firefighter should be.” and former Marine, was Jim Riches initially killed at the trade center. Three months later, the didn’t stake out a public role as a 9/11 family memformer nursing home ber after losing his fireadministrator held her fighter son, Jimmy — then first press conference, a city Fire Department pressing for a federal investigation into why the deputy chief himself, the father was too busy dealtowers weren’t able to ing with the attacks’ afterwithstand the impact of math hands-on. the hijacked planes. Since then, Regenhard has successfully sued to Firefighters’ radios make officials let the pubBut Riches’ anger about lic hear tapes of 9-1-1 calls from the trade center and problems with firefighters’ radios during the attacks pushed to change city boiled over after Giuliani building codes to make launched his 2008 bid for skyscrapers safer. the Republican presidential nomination. Emergency center Riches got enmeshed in An emergency-response other issues. He traveled to Guantaresearch center named for namo Bay, Cuba, in 2009 her son has been established at a Manhattan col- to observe a military tribunal’s pretrial hearings lege. She has spoken out of admitted Sept. 11 mason a slew of subjects, and termind Khalid Sheikh not shyly. Mohammed. At a 2004 meeting of Riches opposed the the federal commission mosque planned near that investigated the attacks, she made a stir by ground zero, comparing it to putting “a Japanese culholding up signs reading “TRUTH” or “LIES” as she tural center at Pearl Harbor.” saw fit, and shouted at He realizes his experiformer Mayor Rudy Giuence is at once extraordiliani that her son “was murdered because of your nary and common; his private bereavement that of incompetence!” many parents, his public Still, Regenhard has place that of a Sept. 11 mixed feelings about continuing to be a public face family member. “I guess a lot of other of 9/11 grief. “I want to stop. I really people say, ‘I lost my son, do. It’s not a pastime,” she too,’” Riches says. “But they’re always said in a recent interview. paying attention because But “it’s very hard to get it was 9/11.” away from it when so

Changes: U.S.-Saudi relations sometimes strained Continued from D3 U.S. against Iran, yet has struggled to stem the flow of support for groups hosn  RECOMMENDAtile to the United States. TION: “The problems in The two countries also the U.S.-Saudi relationship haven’t seen eye to eye on must be confronted, the wave of protests in openly.” n  RESULT: The Saudi North Africa and the Midgovernment has fought al- dle East. The commission’s call Qaida on its own turf and proved a sturdy ally of the for a “shared commitment

to political and economic reform” is unfulfilled. n  RECOMMENDATION: A new approach to the Muslim world, one less tolerant of undemocratic governments. “One of the lessons of the long Cold War was that short-term gains in cooper-

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ating with the most repressive and brutal governments were too often outweighed by long-term setbacks for America’s stature and interests.” n  RESULT: The Obama administration has seized on the anti-government uprisings of the Arab spring to reposition U.S.

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foreign policy, moving away from support for strongmen such as Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak and more toward democratic reforms and respect for human rights. The administration hopes that new democracies in the region will offer frustrated young men greater dignity and new economic opportunities, leaving them less vulnerable to the appeal of extremism. But efforts to re-establish the U.S. as a moral leader around the globe have been hindered somewhat by the stalled U.S.-led peace effort between Israelis and Palestinians, high civilian death rates in Afghanistan and Obama’s failure to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay as he promised.

under Bush.

n  RECOMMENDATION: “Congress should create a single, principal point of oversight and review for homeland security.” n  RESULT: When the Sept. 11 commission issued its report, 88 congressional committees, subcommittees and caucuses claimed at least some jurisdiction over the Department of Homeland Security. The commission called the oversight system splintered, dysfunctional, an impediment to improving national security. It also was keenly aware of how hard it is to pry even one inch of turf away from a power-hungry member of Congress, warning presciently that “few things are more difficult to change n  RECOMMENDATION: “The United States in Washington than conshould engage other gressional committee jurisnations in developing a diction and prerogatives.” comprehensive coalition By 2011, the number of strategy against Islamist congressional panels claimterrorism.” ing jurisdiction had risen n  RESULT: Bush got to 108. strong backing from much In 2009 alone, the of the world after 9/11, but department calculated it that unity splintered when spent a collective 66 work the U.S. invaded Iraq in years responding to ques2003. tions from Congress. Still, countries are shar“We are constantly ing more intelligence and briefing staff, appearing at working together to combat hearings, preparing terrorist financing. reports, responding to No government has per- inquiries,” says Napolitano. mitted al-Qaida to operate “It is a problem.” freely within its borders. And the problem goes Obama’s election ushway beyond the hassle of ered in a new spirit of answering to lots of concooperation among coungressional chieftains. tries which had often comHamilton warns: “When plained of U.S. heavy-hand- everyone has oversight, edness and unilateralism nobody has oversight.”


9/11: Ten Years After

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

D5

A morning of terror On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists flew two hijacked planes into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York, killing 2,753 people. Another hijacked plane struck the Pentagon, killing 118 and an additional 40 others died when yet another plane crashed in a field near Shanksville, Pa. The moments and hours that followed left searing images of the unfolding tragedy.

AMERICAN

UNITED

UNITED

FLIGHT 11

AMERICAN

FLIGHT 175

FLIGHT 77

FLIGHT 93

WTC • NORTH TOWER

WTC • SOUTH TOWER

PENTAGON

SHANKSVILLE

plane takes off 7:59 a.m. The from Boston’s Logan

With 56 passengers and nine crew members, the plane takes off from Logan for Los Angeles.

8:14 a.m.

International Airport with 81 passengers and 11 crew members aboard, bound for Los Angeles. Five hijackers are aboard, including Mohamed Atta and Abdulaziz Alomari, seen below in a video still from the airport.

Flight 175 crashes into the south tower of World Trade Center between the 77th and 85th floors.

9:03 a.m.

plane takes off 8:20 a.m. The from Washington

Flight 93 takes off from Newark Liberty International Airport with 37 passengers and seven crew members on board bound for San Francisco.

Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport informs the Secret Service that an unknown aircraft is heading toward the White House. Soon after, Flight 77 makes a turn toward the Pentagon.

Passengers on board begin an assault on the cockpit. At least 10 passengers and two crew members had made phone calls to people on the ground and learned what had happened at the trade center. The cockpit voice recorder picks up the muffled sounds of the commotion outside the cockpit door. Ziad Samir Jarrah, the hijacker believed to be piloting the plane, rolls the aircraft from left to right and pitches the nose up and down in an apparent attempt to knock the passengers off balance.

Dulles International Airport bound for Los Angeles with 58 passengers and a crew of six.

9:33 a.m.

9:37 a.m.

Flight 77 crashes into the Pentagon.

The plane crashes into the north tower of the World Trade Center.

8:46 a.m.

10:28 a.m.

The north tower collapses.

9:59 a.m.

8:42 a.m.

9:57 a.m.

The military is first made aware of the American Flight 11 hijacking when the Boston air traffic control center informs the North American Aerospace Defense Command.

8:37 a.m.

All bridges and tunnels into Manhattan are officially closed.

9:21 a.m.

10:01 a.m.

A hijacker flying the plane asks “Shall we put it down?” Another hijacker responds “Yes.”

The FAA orders all aircraft to land at the nearest airport. More than 4,500 aircraft are in flight.

The plane plows into a former strip mining field near Shanksville, Pa.

11 a.m.

10:03 a.m.

The south tower collapses.

REACTION

9:42 a.m.

New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani orders an evacuation of lower Manhattan.

Plane’s flight paths Scheduled

Actual

Flight 93 departs from Newark; crashes near Shanksville Boston New York

Shanksville

Newark

San Francisco

Washington, D.C.

Los Angeles

Flight 77 departs from Dulles International Airport in Washington for Los Angeles; crashes into Pentagon

Destination of Flight 11 and Flight 175; both planes crash into World Trade Center towers

A triage area is set up outside the Pentagon after the crash.

Emergency workers look at the crater created when United Airlines Flight 93 crashed near Shanksville, Pa., Sept. 11, 2001. AP

SOURCES: The 9/11 Commission; The 9/11 Memorial

Muslim Americans say they’re watched SEPT 11 RECAP 090811: Timeline shows the events of the day of Sept. 11, 2001; 6c x 9 inches; with any related stories; JB; ETA 6 p.m.

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — More than half of Muslim Americans in a new poll say government antiterrorism policies single them out for increased surveillance and monitoring, and many report increased cases of name-calling, threats and harassment by airport security, law enforcement officers and others. Still, most Muslim Americans say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the U.S. and rate their communities highly as places to live. The survey by the Pew Research Center, one of the most exhaustive ever of the country’s Muslims, finds no signs of rising alienation or anger among Muslim-Americans despite recent U.S. government concerns about homegrown Islamic terrorism and controversy over the building of mosques. “This confirms what we’ve said all along: American Muslims are well integrated and happy, but with a kind of lingering sense of being besieged by growing anti-Muslim sentiment in our society,” said Ibrahim Hooper,

Singled out A majority of Muslim-Americans say they feel targeted by government anti-terrorism policies, according to a poll by the Pew Research Foundation. Do government anti-terrorism policies single out Muslims in the U.S.? No: 34%

Yes: 52%

had been physically threatened “People contact us every day or attacked. about concerns they’ve had, parOn the other hand, the share ticularly with law enforcement authorities in this post-9/11 era.” POLL MUSLIMS 082911: Chartof Muslim Americans who view U.S. anti-terror policies as “sinshows percentage of U.S. Under surveillance Muslims who say Muslims are cere” efforts to reduce international terrorism now surpasses out by U.S. anti-terror Insingled all, 52 percent of Muslim those who view them as insincere policies; 1c x 4 inches inches; 47 Americans surveyed said their — 43 percent to 41 percent. x 88 mm; BC-US--Poll- Four years ago, during the groupmm is singled outwith by governmentMuslim for terrorist surveillance. Americans; KSV; HFR presidency of George W. Bush, far Almost many — 43 percent more viewed U.S. anti-terrorism 12:01 as a.m. — reported they had personally Editor’s Note: It is mandatory to include allefforts as insincere than sincere experienced harassment in the sources that accompany this graphic when— 55 percent to 26 percent. past year, according thepublication poll repurposing or editingtoit for released last week. Living conditions That 43 percent share of people reporting harassment is up The vast majority of Muslim from 40 percent in 2007, the Americans — 79 percent — rate first time Pew polled Muslim their communities as either Americans. “excellent” or “good” places to live, Asked to identify in what even among many who reported ways they felt bias, about 28 per- an act of vandalism against a cent said they had been treated mosque or a controversy over the or viewed with suspicion by peo- building of an Islamic center in ple, while 22 percent said they their neighborhoods. were called offensive names. They also are now more likely About 21 percent said they to say they are satisfied with the were singled out by airport secu- current direction of the country rity because they were Muslim, 56 percent, up from 38 percent in while another 13 percent said 2007. That is in contrast to the they were targeted by other law general U.S. public, whose satisfaction has dropped from 32 perenforcement officials. cent to 23 percent. Roughly 6 percent said they

HOLD FOR RELEASE AT 12:01 A.M. EDT

Don’t know: 14% Based on a telephone survey conducted from April 14 to July 22 with 1,033 Muslims in the U.S. The margin of error is 5 percentage points. SOURCE: Pew Research Center

Editor’s Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when repurposing or editing it for publication

AP

spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Washington, D.C.-based Muslim civil rights group.

Andrew Kohut, Pew president, said in an interview that Muslim Americans’ overall level of satisfaction was striking. “I was concerned about a bigger sense of alienation, but there was not,” Kohut said, contrasting the U.S. to many places in Europe where Muslims have become more separatist. “You don’t see any indication of brewing negativity. “When you look at their attitudes, these are still middle-class, mainstream people who want to be loyal to America.” The latest numbers come amid increased U.S. attention on the risks of homegrown terrorism after the London transit bombings in 2005. The problem has been especially pressing for President Barack Obama, with federal investigators citing a greater risk of attacks by a “lone wolf” or small homegrown cells following the 2009 Fort Hood shooting and the Times Square bombing attempt last year. Such terror warnings have stirred raw emotions as the U.S. struggles to talk about religion in the context of terrorism.

Liberties: Everyone has definition of ‘too far’ Continued from D4 icans — just like policymakers and the courts — show far more There have been recent efforts willingness to allow intrusions into the lives of foreigners than in Congress — unsuccessful so into their own. far — to require the Justice While 47 percent of Americans Department to estimate how many people in the U.S. have had support allowing the government to read emails sent between peotheir calls and email monitored ple outside the United States under a 2008 law that gave the without a warrant, just 30 pergovernment more surveillance cent supported similar monitorauthority. And a recent AP investigation ing of emails sent between people revealed the existence of a secret inside the country, for example. police unit in New York that Foreign evesdropping monitored daily life inside Muslim communities. And while nearly half supTransportation Security ported government eavesdropAdministration chief John Pisping on phone calls between peotole, in a speech Tuesday at the ple outside the country without a Center for Strategic and Interna- warrant, only a quarter favored tional Studies, took note of the such surveillance of calls inside challenge of providing security the U.S. without trampling on civil liber“Countries have become ties, saying: bound with political correctness “We have to make sure we’re and I think need to be a little doing everything we can, while more strict,” says Jean, despite respecting privacy and civil liber- her warnings about surrendering ties — there’s a lot of debate more freedoms. about that — as to ensuring that “Stop being afraid to offend another 9/11 doesn’t happen.” others.” For all of their concern about The government can listen in protecting personal rights, Amer- on telephone calls made by for-

eigners outside the United States without a warrant. But government investigators are generally required to obtain orders signed by judges to eavesdrop on domestic phone calls and other electronic communications within the U.S. The rules are more complex for cross-border communication between foreigners and Americans. Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, which focuses on privacy and civil liberties, says Americans were surprisingly willing to accept new surveillance techniques in the years after the 9/11 attacks. But the pendulum now appears to be swinging somewhat in the other direction. “People are just not quite willing to accept these tradeoffs, particularly when they are ineffective,” he says.

Mixed reviews The U.S. effort to combat terrorism receives mixed reviews: Just 36 percent say it’s been extremely or very effective, 49

percent say moderately so. About a third of Americans are concerned that they or their family will be victims of a terrorist attack, and 37 percent believe the area where they live is at least at moderate risk of being attacked. Susan Davis, a medical transcriptionist from Springfield, Mo., answers for many Americans when asked whether sacrificing some freedom is warranted in order for the government to provide more security. “Yeah,” she says, “as long as they don’t go too far with it.” But everyone has their own definition of what’s too far. The poll found that Americans have different comfort levels with various scenarios in pursuing potential terrorist activity. For example: n  71 percent favor surveillance cameras in public places to watch for suspicious activity. n  58 percent favor random searches involving full-body scans or pat-downs of airplane passengers. n  55 percent favor government analysis of financial trans-

actions processed by U.S. banks without a warrant. n  47 percent favor requiring all people in the U.S. to carry a national ID card and provide it to authorities upon demand. n  35 percent favor racial or ethnic profiling to decide who should get tougher screening at airports. The first three scenarios already are legal; the latter two are not. The poll turned up sharp divisions among Americans on whether torture — banned by the government — should have any place in combating terrorism. Fifty-two percent said torture can be justified at least sometimes to obtain information about terrorist activity. Forty-six percent said it can never or only rarely be justified. The AP-NORC poll was conducted July 28 to Aug. 15. It involved landline and cell phone interviews with 1,087 adults nationwide, and has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.1 percentage points.


D6

9/11: Ten Years After

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Memorials mark the three sites of the Sept. 11 attacks A decade after the attacks of Sept. 11, three memorials marking the sites of the attacks are open or near opening. The National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial opened in 2008, and

the National Sept. 11 Memorial and the Flight 93 National Memorial are scheduled to open following the attacks’ tenth anniversary observances. All three memorials name the

The National September 11 Memorial, New York

victims and offer an environment for family and friends to grieve and reflect.

National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial, Washington Benches The first memorial to officially open features 184 benches honoring those people killed in the attack on the Pentagon. Underneath each bench, is a lighted pool and nameplate of a victim. Benches for the 125 who died in the Pentagon face the building. Benches representing the 59 passengers and crew face away.

Museum

Pools

Age lines The benches are sorted by age lines that cross the memorial.

Reflecting pools The pools, almost an acre each, mark the footprint of the Trade Center towers with the largest man-made waterfalls in North America. Names of the dead Everyone who died in the attacks of 1993 and 2001 are written in bronze panels around the pools.

Grounds More than 400 trees are to be planted around the plaza. A concrete table supports the plaza over a trough of soil for the trees. Trees came from a 500-mile radius of the Trade Center site and from Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania. The trees are expected to grow as high as 60 feet.

Pentagon

Benches

Age wall

Age wall The site’s western wall grows higher as it travels across the age lines, marking the years in age of the victims.

Grounds The site has 85 crape myrtle trees that can grow to about 30 feet tall, with a branch spread of 15-25 feet.

Flight 93 National Memorial, Shanksville, Pa.

Size The memorial occupies about 8 acres.

PENN.

Entry portal

Sustainability The site will use collected rainwater, stored in tanks below the plaza.

Field of honor An open field slopes to the crash site, circled by a tree-lined walkway of 40 groves.

Shanksville

The memorial is seeking environmental certification from the U.S. Green Building Council and New York state.

Memorial plaza A viewing plaza is in front of the crash site. Its 40-50 foot walls match the height of the plane as it passed. Names of the 40 passengers and crew will be inscribed in the plaza walls. Tower of voices The 93-foot tower will hold 40 wind chimes.

SOURCES: The memorials

AP

NYC recovers better than rest of U.S. SEPT 11 MEMORIALS 090811: Graphic gives some information on three Sept. 11 memorials.; 6c x 6 inches; 295.2 mm x 152 mm; with any related stories; ETA 6 p.m.

9/11 role in loss of jobs across nation

perspective. In New York, the memory of smoky devastation remains vivid, but the apocalyptic moment has already come and gone. While the last decade has come with bureaucracy By Samantha Gross and economic challenges, and Tamara Lush the dark fears that shadThe Associated Press owed this city after the attacks never seemed to For Kevin Wolford, the materialize. last decade has been a The ash and the rubble descent from security to are gone, and so — for the loss. most part — are the uniOnce steadily employed formed men carrying as a roofer in a booming The Associated Press machine guns. area of Florida, now his When New Yorkers look Kevin Wolford stands outside of a Fort Myers, unemployment checks are back now, many see Fla., business at which he had intended on gone, and he’s used up strength and perseverance. most of his savings and his applying for a job. Wolford decided against It is the fire they walked applying when he found out the job was only 401(k). through and survived. part-time instead of full-time. He and his wife are sep“There’s even more arated, partly because of pride that you get from finances. In his last decade he most hard-hit by these past that — that you made it He blames his problems helped wage a war, had two years of war, loss and ecothrough that dark time — on the economy. kids and stayed employed nomic hardship, 9/11 seems that cloud,” Bonilla says. But looking back over as he joined the crews the moment that every“That’s one of the reathe last decade, Wolford building the soaring skything started to go wrong. sons we get knocked down, feels like he’s been witness- scraper that will tower That sunny Tuesday is to learn how to get back over the trade center. morning took root as a lin- up.” ing a national decline — When he looks back at gering fear. one that began with the the transformation he has What if it was the beginattacks of Sept. 11. Sept. 11 in New York seen since 9/11, he sees ning of a downward slide? More than 1,000 miles rebirth. What if we were witnessaway, from his vantage In the days after Sept. 11, Like a phoenix rising up ing an empire in decline? point at the construction 2001, lower Manhattan was from the ash, he says. But talk to New Yorksite that tourists still call covered in grey ash from the For some, especially in ers about Sept. 11, and Ground Zero, Jose Bonilla demolished twin towers the parts of the country many will offer a different while stunned people posted has a different view. flyers of missing loved ones throughout the city. The rest of America watched the horror on TV, ™ helpless. There wasn’t much else to do. Massive blood drives

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were organized around the country, and folks lined up to donate. Yet few people had been pulled out alive from the World Trade Center debris, so no blood was needed. A decade later, New Yorkers are no longer stunned, said John Baick, a professor of history at Western New England University in Springfield, Mass. “New York got over 9/11 much faster than anyone expected,” said Baick, who is also a New York City historian. “New Yorkers are better at compartmentalizing. “Nowhere else in the world is there this kind of diversity, tension and strangeness. New Yorkers adapt and adjust remarkably quickly.” While the city of New York picked itself up, the rest of the country also mourned — then mourned again when soldiers died in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. And mourned yet again when the housing market went bust and when the Great Recession began. “Maybe in New York, they can see a phoenix rising out of the ashes,” said Tony Brunello, a political science professor at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Fla. “But to people around

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here, it’s a world of fear, with no evidence of the recovery.” New Yorkers weren’t spared the hardship of the recession and wars. But their morale might be higher a decade after 9/11 because they see evidence of progress and accomplishment at ground zero, Brunello and Baick said, while folks in places like Florida, Arizona and Nevada felt an ever-worsening string of events over the past decade, with no end in sight. “The rest of the country is still trying to grasp the meaning of these things, trying to make sense of them,” said Baick. “The rest of the country, which was not as affected by 9/11, is still coming to grips with this.”

A different world Wolford is finding that getting back up isn’t always so easy. Out of work yet again, the 54-year-old Fort Myers, Fla., construction worker is back at the unemployment office, trying to puzzle through the newly mandated process of applying for benefits online. When he first learned about 9/11, Wolford was in a different world. He’d been working for about a dozen years at the same roofing company. Lee County, halfway between Tampa and Miami, was booming. Houses were sprouting up everywhere on what were once orange groves. Unemployment that year hit a record low of 2.1 percent. Watching the twin towers burn on a hospital TV during a break from his roofing job, Wolford was shocked, sad, but not personally impacted. He figures most people outside of New York felt that way. Looking back now, it seems Sept. 11 heralded a shift. It’s not the same country that he grew up in, he says. There’s less confidence, less opportunity, especially for guys like him. He has a sense that America’s best days are gone. “I hear people talking on TV and radio about how we’re the greatest nation,” he said. “I just don’t believe that any more.” Columbus Brown Jr., a 46-year-old out of work construction worker, said he used to make upward of $175 a day pouring concrete foundations for homes during the boom. He noticed a slowdown in work right after Sept. 11, 2001, and it gradually tapered off over a sevenyear period. Now he’s lucky to make $175 a week. Turn

to

Jobs/D7


9/11: Ten Years After

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

D7

Border tension in Washington state Farmers, others irked over buildup in response to 9/11 The Associated Press and Peninsula daily News

LYNDEN, Whatcom County — For years, Larry DeHaan and his wife biked a few hundred yards up a dirt road from their dairy farm on the border to visit friends in Canada. No passports were needed. Canada has been, almost literally, their back yard for nearly 40 years. To them and many other residents along the 49th parallel in Whatcom County, the border separating the two nations was just on paper. Then the twin towers fell. A decade after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, life on the northern border has changed. A passport is required to cross, dozens of U.S. Border Patrol agents drive these rural roads — and surveillance helicopters hover above pasturing cows. Many community members, including DeHaan, have protested the government’s increased presence. “I’m all for border security, but they got to treat us right,” said DeHaan, who posted a sign on his dirt road asking government vehicles to stay off. DeHaan said he has had to retrieve many of his cows from a bog on his property after they were startled by low-flying helicopters. “I think some of them are nice guys,” he said, “[but] there are some agents who don’t have common sense or know how to work with people.”

“Even if [Groen] screwed up, there was a vendetta. They made an example out of him.” The community rallied around Groen, calling for community meetings with border officials and demonstrating in the streets.

North Olympic Peninsula

But Groen’s arrest is not the only incident that has riled up residents on Washington’s border. A debate about whether there was any need to expand the Port Angeles U.S. Border Patrol station gained strength this summer after one of the agents there, Christian Sanchez, said the station was a “black hole” that had “no mission, no purpose.” He spoke to the Advisory Committee on Transparency, a government watchdog group in Washington, D.C., on July 29. “I am not able to perform my duties as a Border Patrol agent here,” Sanchez said. “This is a waste of taxpayer money.” The U.S. Border Patrol is spending $5.7 million to construct a headquarters for 50 agents at Port Angeles. It will be completed in May 2012. There are currently 40 agents patrolling the area, compared to four in 2006, according to Sanchez. The Border Patrol attributes the reason for expansion to the increasing “amount of personnel, technology, and infrastructure” for improving security that needed a larger building to operate from. For a few months in 2009, agents set up road checkpoints that were halted after a wave of Deemed insecure complaints that included the local After the Sept. 11 attacks, the congressman, Norm Dicks. 4,000-mile northern border was International ferry runs and deemed insecure. bus stations continue to be monWorried that terrorist cells itored by agents, even after prowould try to cross into the country tests. from Canada, security was beefed “We reach out and educate [the up with hundreds of Border Patrol public]. We tell them what our job agents and other officers, and with is, what is our responsibility,” said new technology. U.S. Border Patrol agent spokesBut in this corner of the man Richard Sinks. nation, the manpower spike has “Their opinions are their own created tensions between local personal opinions. residents and U.S. Customs and “We’re just here to do our job. If Border Protection (CBP). somebody doesn’t understand our It reached a flashpoint earlier job, we’d love to educate them.” this year when DeHaan’s neighbor Despite the higher profile, — Wayne Groen — was arrested arrests of illegal immigrants by and subsequently sentenced to two the Border Patrol have declined months in federal prison for shinevery year since 2001 in the ing a big flashlight at a CBP surBlaine sector, which covers parts of veillance helicopter that was flying Washington, Alaska and Oregon. over his property. That number totaled more than “The air police are arrogant 2,000 in 2001 and dropped to [expletive],” said berry farmer Dar- fewer than 700 last year. ryl Ehlers, who lives on the border In the Spokane sector, which a few miles from DeHaan’s farm. covers Eastern Washington, the

Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press

With the Canadian border less than a quarter-mile behind him, Larry DeHaan stands with a sign he posted on his dairy farm near Lynden in Whatcom County. number dropped as well, from more than 1,300 ten years ago to fewer than 400 last year, according to agency figures. Sinks said the numbers have declined because they reflect deterrence brought by the number of agents now present and the technology being used. He also said the agency’s tasks have changed. It no longer does as many jail checks for illegal immigrants, or worksite enforcement actions. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement presently performs those tasks. Chief Thomas Schreiber, spokesman for CBP, says his agency’s goal is to keep the flow of people and commerce going smoothly at the U.S.-Canada border while also keeping the country safe. The Peace Arch crossing in Blaine, the third busiest in the nation, has been expanded by two lanes and retrofitted with technology to detect radiation and read license plates. Under national mandates, travelers now need to provide a passport or an enhanced driver’s license to enter the U.S. Before Sept. 11, the basic requirement was an oral declaration of citizenship. Away from the ports, more than

30 remote control cameras have been installed along an 89-mile stretch of land border. Numerous hidden motion sensors lay dormant until someone or something steps too close. Combined, CBP and Border Patrol have added about 400 hundred officers and agents to this region, bringing government paychecks to the local economy. The western side of the Canadian border in Washington stretches from the Cascade mountains, through forestlands and berry fields to Puget Sound. It has been a corridor for illegal activity for decades, from today’s South American cocaine to booze during the Prohibition. And while the added security was mandated after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the threat of terrorism was here well before that.

Ressam arrest in PA In December 1999, customs inspectors in Port Angeles spotted a nervous Ahmed Ressam, an Algerian national who later was convicted on multiple counts for plotting to bomb Los Angeles International Airport. Customs found explosives in the trunk of his rented car when he drove off the ferry MV Coho from Victoria.

Two years earlier, Border Patrol agents arrested Gazi Ibrahim Abu Mezer in Bellingham. Later on, after a federal judge reduced his bail, Abu Mezer went to New York where he tried to plot an attack on the subway system. The Border Patrol spokesman said the agency wants to hear from community members who feel they haven’t been treated well. Sinks said agents have been told to be friendly. “There are times agents are riding through a property, they’re so focused, they may not even think about a wave, they probably don’t have time to stop,” Sinks said. But “if it’s possible, it’s always nice to throw a wave in the air and if possible to stop and chat.” “Our agents are aware of what’s going on; they read the news,” Sinks added. DeHaan said air patrols seem to have decreased around his property since the Groen case. He’s still not happy, though, with how border life has changed.“This is not the southern border — this is not a war zone,” he said, moments after a Border Patrol vehicle drove up the dirt road. “They want to make into a war zone.”

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that the buildings around them — those massive structures — haven’t just been there forever. They go up — and they fall. When they do learn, 9/11 will be a “life lesson” to them, he says. His children won’t grow up with a false sense of security, thinking that they’re immune to the violence in the world. The story of the attacks, and the story of the build-

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behind him to that day, when he saw people falling from the sky. Even though he watched it on TV it seemed so real. “You got to pretend nothing ever happened,” he says now. Instead, he focuses on the city’s strength. “There’s nowhere like New York,” he says. “We drop, we fall, we come right back up. That’s who we are.” Bonilla believes his kids — now 2 and 6 — will be proud of his part in it all. One day. Once they realize

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Tower. Each day, he installs Continued from D6 9/11 on a television on a Marine base in Georgia. As drainage, waste and vent he stood in a briefing room pipes that will one day do Sometimes he takes his with the other Marines, all the daily work to allow this 13-year-old son to the of them crammed in close to building to support the poplibrary, so the teenager can ulation of a small city. help him file for unemploy- the screen, he saw wide eyes, mouths hanging open, Sometimes he wishes he ment on the computer. heard whispers of disbelief. could work on an upper He lives with his father He felt scared, shocked, floor, and whenever he’s after he moved out of the then angry. been able to, he’s gone up. apartment he shared with They didn’t see the sechis wife and four children ond tower fall. As soon as Up there, looking down so she could obtain food the first one collapsed, they stamps. From up there, looking all rushed to the phones “Before Sept. 11, everyout at the sweeping view and started calling reservthing was booming,” he from inside the changing ists to make sure their said. “There was a lot of skyline, it seems like he’s in paperwork was ready for work. Now, everywhere you a different city. the orders they assumed go, it’s very hard. America’s A silent one. Peaceful. were coming. not growing like it used to.” “Once it gets built this “From there, everybody Wolford points to the can be another beacon,” he put on their game face,” he economy when talking says. “That’s what it is to about his own troubles, but says. us.” Now he calls it unfortuthinks that the U.S. as a Far above, amid the dust nate, but at the time he whole probably began to and the clang of raw conwanted vengeance. decline on 9/11. crete and tools, Alignn The terror attacks and Edwards grins broadly Rebuilding today the housing bust were like under his blue construction one-two punches to America. helmet inside the building Today, he’s rebuilding Since he was laid off in what he saw knocked down. that will become 4 World the housing slowdown in And from where he stands, Trade Center. 2007, and then again last there’s work. Everything is Behind him, a breeze year after a two-year stint picking up. The builders are runs through the open netat a lower paying job, Wolstarting to build. ting, and here, above the ford’s applied for dozens of And Bonilla realizes he’s cranes, there is still a freshjobs and had zero interbeen luckier than many; air view out on the Hudson views. No one needs roofers, New York City, too, has River and on the Statue of not anymore. faced a tough economy. Liberty in the distance. He’s started looking for But whether it was servHe, too, takes special work in Orlando, some ing in the Marines in Gerpride in rebuilding this three hours away. New many, or on the crew at 1 piece of land. Like Bonilla, York, he thinks, will be OK World Trade Center, he’s he says that he feels safer because he believes lots of had a job. now than he did a decade bankers and rich people live Bonilla works in the ago — the Sept. 11-inspired there. bowels of the building that security measures at work “It’s doing better than he — like so many others sites have assured that. Lee County,” he says, shak- — still calls the Freedom He doesn’t like to look ing his head. For Bonilla, it was a different decade. At Laurel Black Design, the mantra is He watched the events of


D8

9/11: Ten Years After

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Rebuilding homage to fallen brother By Karen Zraick

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Rebuilding the World Trade Center is more than a job for Brian Lyons. It’s a way to pay homage to his younger brother Michael, a firefighter killed in the Sept. 11 attacks — and a way for Lyons to heal from his loss. Lyons has spent 10 years at the site. He rushed there with his brother’s firefighting gear to look for him after the attacks; he stayed to help in the rescue and recovery; and then to work on the rebuilding. Lyons has been a key player nearly everywhere on the site and is now a project manager for Tishman Construction, overseeing the $3.4 billion transportation hub that will link the PATH train, the subway and nearby buildings.

Preparing site Workers are rushing to prepare the site for the ceremony marking the 10th anniversary of the attacks. Lyons and his family will be among those seeing their loved ones’ names on the memorial for the first time. “Everything’s coming out of the ground now,” he said as workers busily readied the site. “There’s no more pit. I try to actually call this the World Trade Center now. We don’t refer to it as Ground Zero anymore.” The site’s signature skyscraper — formerly called the Freedom Tower and now called 1 World Trade Center — is visible for miles around. It will rise to 1,776 feet, making it the tallest building in the U.S. Tower 4 is rising quickly and the foundations for two other office buildings are almost at street level. The transportation hub, designed by architect Santiago Calatrava, is taking shape. “There’s so much to celebrate now,” said Lyons, whose experience was chronicled in the documentary “Rebirth” that followed five people whose lives were transformed by the attacks. The rebuilding was complicated and emotionally loaded. The site is huge, with parcels controlled by many different stakeholders. Train service continues through parts of it. Security concerns led to radical changes in the

Hudson River

The new World Trade Center is rising from ground zero. Two skyscrapers, a memorial, a museum and a transit hub are under construction. Three more towers and a performing arts center are planned. 1 World Trade Center

(Formerly Freedom Tower) 1,776 feet high, 102 stories 2.6 million square feet Construction began April 2006 Scheduled to open in 2013 It will have 69 office floors, a restaurant, an enclosed observation deck and a two-level broadcast facility.

The Associated Press

The 1 World Trade Center building is awash in the national colors for this weekend’s 10th anniversary commemoration. design, all while New Yorkers watched anxiously to see what would take shape.

Manhattan

2 World Trade Center 1,349 feet high, 88 stories 3.1 million rentable square feet The foundation construction began the summer of 2010.

Brooklyn

3 World Trade Center 1,170 feet high 80 stories 2.8 million square feet Construction began summer 2010 The building will include 53 floors of office space and five retail levels.

Transportation hub

4 World Trade Center 977 feet high 72 stories 2.3 million square feet It includes retail and commercial office space.

The National September 11 Memorial & Museum Reflecting pools where the Trade Center towers stood Names of 2,987 victims of the 1993 and 2001 attacks will be inscribed around pools in the 8-acre plaza. The above-ground memorial will open Sept. 11, 2011 and the museum will open in 2012.

World Trade Center Transportation Hub 800,000 square feet, comparable to Grand Central Terminal It will provide access to PATH commuter rail, subway lines and Hudson River ferries. It is expected to be completed by 2014.

5 World Trade Center There is no construction timetable yet. It will stand on the site formerly occupied by the remains of the Deutsche Bank building.

Among giants 1 World Trade

Queens

World Trade Center site

Performing Arts Center 1,000-seat venue with focus on modern dance No construction is scheduled while site is used as an exit from commuter trains.

Interna1 WTC World tional New York Taipei Financial Commerce 101 Center 1,776 Centre Taiwan Shanghai Hong Kong Incomplete 1,666* 1,614 1,588

Petronas Towers Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1,482

International 1 WTC Willis Finance Tower New York Zifeng Center Tower Chicago Guangzhou, 1,368** Nanjing 1,450** China Destroyed 1,476 1,439

The 800,000-square-foot Center will be transportation hub will among the resemble no other structure tallest buildings in the world. in New York, or perhaps The towering the world. Calatrava has Khalifa designed a distinctive glass Burj was completed and steel structure that last year. evokes a bird’s wings. Planners expect 250,000 Burj Khalifa people will pass through Dubai, UAE daily. Lyons said it will be 2,717 feet “grander than Grand Cen* Top of spire ** Top of roof tral.” “It gives you a sense of SOURCES: Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat; Silverstein Properties; The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey AP dignity on your way to work,” he said of the design. It also includes ample retail space. Construction has picked up over the last year and is scheduled to be completed SEPTand 11 GROUND 090811: Graphic state ofexecutives reconstruction The Associated Press It’s building install- ZERO visits the site, he said. shows theBenson will in 2014. of the World Center; 4c x 9 told inches; with any related ETAthis 6 p.m. “I always everyone head tostories; New York ing the exterior of twoTrade of NEW YORK — When here, ‘We have to do this week to try to land a third the skyscrapers, named 1 Memorial opening Lou Niles stood near 1 building,’” he when told The Ore- contract, to cover World all Trade Center and 4 Editor’s Note: It is mandatory to include sources that accompany this graphic repurposing or editingthis it forone publication World Trade Center last gonian newspaper. Today, the relatives of the base floors of 1 World World Trade Center. week, the president of Portthose lost will join with “‘If there’s anything we Trade Center. “We’re doing something land, Ore.-based Benson President Barack Obama “I can’t think of any to rebuild the World Trade ever do, we have to do this and other dignitaries at the Industries saw what it building.’” building on the planet that Center,” Niles said Friday would become: memorial opening. Benson’s work continues means more to this nation,” after he had returned to Five towers to honor the For families of victims on two skyscrapers, includ- Beaulieu said. Portland. two destroyed a decade ago. whose remains were never ing the building once called Thousands of miles “We’re just pleased and Niles said workers were recovered, like Michael the Freedom Tower. away, the company boosted happy to be involved.” Lyons’, having their names abuzz last week preparing It will stand 1,776 feet its workforce at its two for the 10th anniversary of Emotional visit permanently inscribed on tall and become the tallest Gresham, Ore., plants to the Sept. 11 attacks. the memorial can bring a building in the U.S. help meet the demand, Victims’ families will Although he made the sense of closure. The facade now covers Beaulieu said. gather today to dedicate a trip to New York City for After years of a long more than half of the 103Some of the glass pieces memorial in their names another reason, he always commute from Lake Carstory building. remain stacked in — but it will be several stops by the World Trade mel, N.Y., and time apart The company won the Gresham, awaiting shipfrom his wife and two teen- years before the towers Center site when he’s in $160.65 million project con- ment to Ground Zero. age daughters, Lyons is are completed. town. tract in 2007. “It’s changed our comlooking forward to showing Benson Industries has John Beaulieu, Benson’s It later won a $120 mil- pany in a lot of ways,” them the progress they’ve played a visible role in vice president, still gets a lion bid for the shell of the Niles said. “It’s made made. their construction. lump in his throat when he fourth tower. everyone proud.”

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Sunday, September 11, 2011

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Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

360 DEGREE VIEWS On 5 acres within city limits. This well structured home is situated on 5 acres and overlooks the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Mt. Baker, and the Olympic Mountains. The home is an oldie but quite special within itselfviews from every window, storage galore, and lots of sq footage to remodel if you do so desire $365,000 ML261463/250022 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Place your Ad With The New Classified Wizard

Homes

ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE COTTAGE! Lovingly cared for 3+ Br., 1 3/4 baths home with mountain view from several rooms. Spacious living room and a great country kitchen large enough for a small table. Sip your morning coffee on the cozy deck off the living area and enjoy a peek-a-boo water view. $195,000. ML261812/269076 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Beautiful home on 3.12 cross-fenced acres with guest quarters above the garage make this mini-farm an ideal property for horse lovers. Recently remodeled. Close to town. Lovely location. Four stalls. New metal roof on older barn. Second barn has six tons of hay and room for plenty more. $219,000. ML261811/268971 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED Close to town, open floor plan and hardwood floors, slab granite counters throughout, beautifully landscaped grounds. 4+ car/RV garage with heated shop and 1/2 bath. $519,000 ML138274/252089 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Convenient to shopping, SARC and medical facilities. Fireplace, private patio, landscaped greenbelt, storage area, 2 covered carport parking spaces. $210 monthly condo fees include water, sewer, trash pickup, insurance and outside maintenance. $140,000. ML261332. Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

CUSTOM BUILT DREAM HOME Private acreage just minutes from many recreational activities! 4 Br., 2 bath features open floor plan, large kitchen and grand master suite. 4.75 acres with orchard, garden space, pasture and additional detached 3 car garage with fully finished loft. $349,990. ML261802. Kimi Robertson 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company CUTE HOUSE WITH MANICURED YARD 4 Br., home with lots of storage space. Eat-in kitchen with appliances. Quiet street, flower beds, great location. Partially fenced backyard plus detached 2 car garage. $129,900. ML261019. Mark DeRousie Re/Max Evergreen 800-454-21340 ext. 7692 EASY LIVING IN HENDRICKSON PARK Open floor plan, 2 Br., 2 bath, kitchen with breakfast bar, dining room, living room. Master with large walk-in closet, Master bath with 2 closets. Low maintenance yard, 10x12 storage shed in back yard with power, close to Safeway, SARC, stores, Olympic Discovery Trail. Located at back of cul-de-sac so very little road noise. $79,000. ML261616 Sheryl and Jan 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East EXQUISITE CUSTOM HOME Exquisite custom home built in 2005 with a separate office/den. Exceptionally landscaped with a large deck and a private wooded backyard. Beautiful hardwood floors and a large gourmet kitchen. Three car garage and RV Parking. $294,900. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 FANTASTIC VIEWS Freshly painted inside and out, newly planted landscape, open floor plan, Br. on opposite sides of home, freestanding wood stove, large deck for enjoying the views. $235,000. ML198841/260592 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FSBO Great water/ mountain views from Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great rm, and rec rm. 2 full baths/4 bdrms. Private, near schools, shopping, busses. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on first floor. Shop. Warm, south facing tiled patio. Large lot, fruit trees/ garden. $325,000 457-2796

CUTE HOUSE/MANICURED YARD

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

FSBO: Cherry Hill Delguzzi 3 Br., 2 ba 1600 sf, quiet, remodeled, extras ++. $195,000. P.A. 928-4537454. GREAT NEW PRICE! 2.19 acres and a 1story home with a classy and elegant design. Gorgeous Whiskey Creek river rock fireplace. Peaceful views of a small valley with pasture and creek area. A few minutes walk to Whiskey Creek Beach. 3 Br., 2 bath, 2,438 sf, large family room, wonderful master, well maintained home. $259,000. ML260350. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY HIGHLAND ESTATES Make no compromises in your retirement living! Not one stair between you and stepping into this elegant home. Entertaining a few friends or the Highland neighborhood will be a treat in this top-ofthe-line kitchen. Tile and hardwood floors throughout the living areas. Enjoy some of the most open views of any Highland lot. $275,000. ML261765. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Immaculate 3 Br., 2 bath rambler. Features large nicely landscaped lot. 28x 36 garage/shop with wood stove. Generous paved area off alley for easy maneuvering. Bonus room with adjoining laundry and bath. Cozy fireplace, too. $229,000 ML261373 /243537 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Check out this 4 acre parcel, zoned Urban Moderate Density (MD) complete with a binding site plan approving an 18 space manufactured home park. Where will you get the water, you say? No sweat, PUD already provides it. Sewer? Rayonier has plans to run a sewer line right down the road in front of it by year’s end. What about county approval? Already approved! Great mountain view? Included already! $249,900. ML261711. Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

LOW BANK BEACH WATERFRONT Located in a private gated community. Private beach with tidelands. Watch all the ships go by, hear the roaring of the surf. Peace and contentment will be yours in this very unique property. Wall of windows affords maximum views. 1,800 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath. $385,000. ML261778 Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED HOME On a beautifully landscaped lot. Great room style with fireplace office/den, kitchen with breakfast bar. Spacious master with walk in closet. Finished double garage with work area and attic for storage. $219,000. ML196217 Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow NEW LISTING Centrally located 3 Br., 1 bath, two-story home with 1,665 sf. Beautiful period detail throughout including built-ins and wood floors. Newer roof, forced air furnace and basement storage. $129,000. ML261787. Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NEW, NEW, NEW Windows, floors, countertops, deck, copper plumbing and more. 2 decks, backyard pond, fruit trees and raised-bed garden. Master bath with walk-in closet, oversized shower & soak tub. Wood stove keeps house cozy. Built-in dining hutch and large kitchen. Attached carport, RV parking, circular driveway, detached garage and shop - all on .5 private acres close to town. $134,000. ML261291 Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Recently updated with laminate floors in living room, dining room and kitchen. 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 fireplaces. Interior doors upgraded. Home features vinyl siding, metal roof, trex decking, solar screens on living room windows (west side of home), new metal garage doors and low maintenance. 3705 Old Mill Rd. $199,900. ML261755 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

SUN. SEPT. 11 - 10-NOON

Homes

FSBO: Cute 2 Br., 1 3/4 bath home in P.A. Updated. 1,160 sf. Asking $162,000. Call 360-460-0086. NEW LISTING: By owner. Nice 3 Br., 2 bath home. Wood floors, deck. Near markets in Sequim. Landscaped, fruit trees. Mtn view, must see. $185,000. Call for details/appt. 681-2875 PRICE REDUCTION Beautiful custom home on 4.28 river front acres with end of the road privacy. 3 Br., 2.5 bath home has an open floor plan, river rock fireplace, hardwood floors, radiant floors, and lots of windows looking out to the natural garden and forest, plus an attached garage, detached garage with loft, and guest cabin. Just a short distance to the Railroad Bridge park and the Discovery Trail. $359,000. ML261217. Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 PRIVACY IN CRESTHAVEN This 4 Br. + a den, 3 bath, 3,506 sf Del Guzzi built cedar home was custom designed to take advantage of the views of the Strait. Enjoy a park like setting on this 1+ acre property adjacent to a ravine and landscaped with privacy in mind. As an extra bonus, there are two buildable lots on the north end of the property. $399,900. ML261839/270959 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

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Real Estate Auction Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000 876 Draper Road, Port Angeles 3 Br., 2 ba 1,782sf+/mobile/mnftd home. Sells: 3:00 PM Tue., Sep. 20 on site Open to the Public Visit williamsauction.com/ september or call 800-801-8003 for details. Many properties now available for online bidding! Williams & Williams WA Broker: JUDSON GLEN VANNOY. (206) 972-9023. Lic.# 13449. Auctioneer: Cody Shane Lowderman Auc Lic 2924 RECENTLY REMODELED 2 master suites and office area, large windows let in the light. Fully landscaped with raised garden/flower beds/ Fruit trees and manicured lawn. Located just minutes from downtown Sequim. Separate workshop, dog run, and RV parking. $329,000. ML229493/261144 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND STATELY SUNLAND ELEGANCE Spacious rooms with 9’ ceilings. Crown molding and hardwood floors, chef’s kitchen with granite counters. Master leads to yard with tiled patio and gazebo, upstairs loft with 2 Br. and full bath, 3 car garage with finished loft and RV bay/shop. $595,000. ML93595/251378 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND www.peninsula dailynews.com

OPEN HOUSE

TEE OFF TIME! This 3 Br/2 BA home is one block from the prestigious Peninsula Golf Club. Featuring water views & English style garden, new roof, carpet. This is a turn key home that needs nothing but a golf cart and lots of time to play golf. $239,900 ML#261732 D IR E C T IO N S : S . o n G o lf C o u rse R d ., g o fo r 5 b lo ck s , tu rn rig h t o n N a n cy L a n e a n d g o to 1810, h o m e is o n th e left.

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6A113352

EVERGREEN Mark DeRousie

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

360-457-6600 www.onlymark.com

360.565.2020 mrsjace@jacerealestate.com 1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

360.808.4142 barclay@jacerealestate.com

MOVE IN READY And priced right! Freshly painted inside, carpets have just been cleaned. Newer appliances and low maintenance yard care. $39,900. ML261090. Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Lots/ Acreage

A QUIET COUNTRY LANE Adds to the privacy of this traditional brick 3 Br., 2.5 bath home on 3.57 acres with a barn. On the west edge of the city, this newly listed property is a great value at $275,000. ML261022. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES 5 level acres on Hwy 112 in Joyce, huge parking area for trucks, boats, equipment with a truck shop, electricity, Crescent water and plenty of space for a home or other outbuildings. $125,000. ML261820 Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

DIRECTIONS: From Hwy 101 take River Road exit South. R. on Secor Road, L. onto Dungeness Meadows. Follow signs to 285.

1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

OPEN HOUSE

SUNDAY NOON - 2 PM

103 Olympus Court, SunLand BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME BUILT BY ESTES BUILDERS! Lg., 1-story w/ basement hobby room or shop, 3 BR/2 BA w/propane fireplace, dining w/china cabinet, den, office w/lots of cabinets & sink, laundry room off kitchen w/sound system, 2 refrigerators. Dbl. garage and much more... $319,000 MLS#261688 DIRECTIONS: Sequim Ave. N. to Taylor Blvd. L. on the SECOND Fairway Dr., R. on San Juan, L on Olympus Ct.

®

Barclay Jennings

Manufactured Homes

285 DUNGENESS MEADOWS, SEQUIM TIDY HOUSE with custom stained-glass entry & Pergo floor. Master BR has 2 closets & Mt. view. Wood-burning stove, double sink in kitchen & roomy family room with a BR tucked away from the other is ideal for home office. AHS Home Warranty for Buyer! Only $189,900 MLS#261556

TOM BLORE

Eileen Schmitz

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mrsjace@jacerealestate.com

SUN. SEPT. 11 - 12-3 PM

DIRECTIONS: From P.A., E. on Hwy 101, N. on Kitchen-Dick, driveway on the right to property. Behind the Legacy Canine Training Center.

WHAT A VIEW Unobstructed waterfront home on Discovery Bay. What a view to behold! Feel like you’re on vacation every day. Well cared for summer home for many years. New deck in 2011. New roof in 1998. $299,000. ML261829 Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

SEQUIM CONDO Sherwood Village, 3 Br., 2 ba, 1,378 sf, bright end unit, adult community. $162,000 360-461-5649

360.565.2020

www.johnlscott.com/18262 stevegates@olypen.com

DIRECTIONS: S. on Sequim Ave. L. on Miller Rd., R. on Emerald Highlands Way, L. on Coral Drive.

WELL MAINTAINED Manufactured home on 4.90 acres of partially cleared land. Beautiful sweeping view of the Straits and mountains. What else could you ask for? Efficient floor plan with 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Nice shop/barn with enclosed garage with storage and bathroom. Seasonal pond with lovely landscaping. This is a must see! $235,000. ML261838. Patti Morris 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

P.A.: 2 Br., 2 ba, all appliances, fixer upper mobile home. $45,000. 452-6524.

19407537

4 BR home with lots of storage space. Eat-in kitchen w/appliances. Quiet street, flower beds, great location. Partially fenced backyard plus 2-car detached garage. $129,900 ML#261019 Call 1(800)454-2340 x1012

STUNNING! Custom one level home. Great room style living room and kitchen. Custom cabinets throughout. Formal dining room. Breakfast nook. Den/office. Guest bedrooms separated from master. Spacious master. 4 attached garages. Elegant touches throughout the home. $425,000. ML261823/269768 Patty Brueckner 460-6152 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Homes

Eileen Schmitz

Steve Gates

262 KITCHEN-DICK ROAD, SEQUIM YOU’RE INVITED! Come by, have some cookies and take a look at the home on a 2.8 acre parcel. There’s plenty of room to roam & a pleasant little stream that winds its way through the trees. The spacious 3 BR/2 BA mobile is in the process of being freshly fixed up & painted so it will be ready for its next owner. Barn & workshop. Only $199,750 MLS#260602

FSBO: Lake Dawn 3 Br., 1 bath Heart ‘O’ The Hills home. Priced low at $114,000. 360-452-5803

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Office (360)457-8593

10 CORAL DRIVE, SEQUIM IDEAL SEQUIM HOME Open kitchen w/ shelf-happy pantry & water and island view. Large living & great room has views & fireplace. Master suite has 2 walk-in closets & 2 sinks. Low maintenance yard. Seller is offering a $2,000 Home Depot Gift card to buyer with full price offer. Only $294,000 MLS#261128

Homes

SUN. SEPT. 11 - 1-3 PM

Sun., Sept. 11 • 1-4 p.m.

19407541

19407536

And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

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Homes

19407542

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

Homes

19407543

Type your ad how you would like it to read.

Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

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Homes

19407533

Pick your ad package and rate that works for you.

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tom@sequim.com

360-683-4116 360-683-7814


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 54

Lots/ Acreage

City lots, 9,000’ residential lots in low impact development”. Utilities, curbs, sidewalks installed. $45,000. ML252458 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘L’ IS FOR LIQUID GOLD Spectacular river front property in Sequim with septic system, well, approved building site, over 400’ of Dungeness river frontage and 2 salmon resting and fishing holes. Extremely private and unique in every way. Additional acreage and home available. $299,900. ML260399 Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company SEQUIM: 2.5 wooded acres with potential water view, power and building pad in, on quiet country road, discount for cash, owner financing available. $65,000 360-460-2960

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Houses

1725 W. 5th P.A. 2 Br. $600, no smoking/pets. 457-1632. CARLSBORG: 2 Br., W/D, carport, mtn. view, yard. $750. 681-7300, 809-9997 CHIMACUM: 2 Br., 2 ba mfg. home, no smoking, pellet stove, garage, available Nov. 1st. $800 mo., 1st, last, $350 sec. dep. Cats ok, no dogs. 360-643-0945. Cozy 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 story log home on wooded acreage, westside P.A. $950 month, first, last & deposit. No smoking/pets. Please call Bobi 461-2152. Housing Problems? Habitat for Humanity is now selecting applicants to build homes in Port Townsend. Must attend one meeting: Wed, 9/14, 7-9p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 1111 Franklin Street, Port Townsend, OR Thu, 9/15, 7-9p.m., Port Ludlow Fire Station, 7650 Oak Bay Road. Childcare provided. Questions? Call Habitat 379-2827. Must be resident of or employed in East Jefferson County one year prior to applying. Equal Housing Opportunity.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. 61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished from $438480. 2 Br. $514-541, 3 Br. $685, + util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258 CENTRAL. P.A.: 1 Br., close to Safeway. $460/$500.477-3867 CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $600 plus dep. 1502 C St., P.A. No smoking/pets. 360-452-3423 COLLEGE P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba. No pets. $500. 457-1611 EAST P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage, upstairs unit. No smoke/pets. $625 + $500 dep. 452-8239. NEW MANAGEMENT 1st month free. New lower rent. Senior community. Call for details. 457-6827

P.A.: 1 Br. $600 mo., $250 dep., util. incl No pets. 457-6196. P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. great view, $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. Cats ok. Move-in cost negotiable for qualified applicants. 452-4409 P.A.: West side studio, clean, newer, quiet, W/D, util. incl. No smoke/pets. $650, $500 dep. 670-9329. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

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More Properties at www.jarentals.com JOYCE: 2 Br. chalet on the water, privacy. $975 mo. 681-6308.

Houses

P.A.: 2,200 sf new Energy Star home. 2 Br., 2.75 bath, rec room, office. Lease. $1,190. 808-0022. P.A.: 2413 Ryan Dr. 3 Br., no pets/smoke. $700, 1st, last, $700 dep. 417-1688 msg. P.A.: 3 Br., 1.75 bath, 1,100 sf, W/D, fridge. $950 mo, dep. No smoke. Pets neg. 461-0613 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, no smoking. $1,100 mo., $1,100 security. 417-0153. P.A.: 3 Br., 3 ba, Strait view near high school, laundry room, recent upgrades, single garage. $1,200 mo. 360-775-5327. P.A.: Available now, 2 Br. deluxe town house, 1,400 sf. 1.5 bath. $800. No pets. 457-6181 P.A.: Clean, small, new kitchen, bath, paint, 1+ Br., 1 ba, carport, W/D, fenced yard, close to hospital. No smoking/ pets $550. 457-4744.

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Houses

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

SEQUIM/BLYN: 2 Br., 2 ba w/den on 1 acre w/pond. W/D, D/W. Open floor plan, high ceilings, breakfast bar, deck. $950 mo. $900 dep. 461-2588.

SEQUIM: Room, by Dairy Queen. $375, deposit. 683-6450.

SEQUIM: 2+ Br., 1 bath. No smoking. Pets on approval. $800, 1st, last, dep. 683-8745

Space for rent, in park, for new mobile home in Pt. Hadlock. 360-385-3933

SEQUIM: Studio, private, in town, ADA. $450, 1st, last, sec. 681-4541 WANTED: Retired pastor 89, wife 79, no kids/smoke/pets, need 2 Br., 1 ba, P.A. Call 360-610-0572.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Private room and bath in lovely 6 Br. house near high school. Quiet professional wanted. $420 plus dep. No pets. 797-1245

66 68

Spaces RV/ Mobile

Commercial Space

Boardwalk Square Sequim. Spaces for rent. 683-3256. LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

P.A.: House with gar. $910. Duplex with gar. $795. 452-1395.

P.T. house share. Bedroom, private bath, shared living spaces. $425/split utilities. No pets. artgirl71@gmail.com

P.A.: Remodeled pvt lg. 2 Br. $675. Pics ezpa.net. 452-5140.

Room on water, incl. internet/cable. 683-3228

Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737

P.A.: Residential or comm’l, 834 W. 8th, 5 Br., 3 ba, garage. $2,000. 670-6627.

ROOM: No D/A or pets. $300 mo. Call for details 808-1135.

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

P.A.: Water view, 3 Br., 2 ba, 2 kitchens, 1,900 sf, dbl. detached garage. $1,200 mo. Steve 808-7502. PALO ALTO: 1 Br. loft, W/D, wood stove. $700. 360-683-4307. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: Exc. water view 2 Br. $765. tourfactory.com/397357 SEQ: Great loc., lg 3 Br., 1 ba, new appl., gar., W/D hook-ups. $850, 1st, last, dep. 626-232-0795

Managing: Residential, Furnished, Commercial and Storage Property Management is NOT our sideline

Free Investment Consultations 330 E. 1st St., Ste #1 360.452.1326 Port Angeles Fax: 360.457.3212 portangeleslandmark.com

Clallam County Tim Peterson, detached Quonset hut, 188 Wye Road, $35,424. Jeffrey and Katrina Weller, detached pole building, 382 Yellow Rock Lane, $46,731. Kevin and Vicki McCormack, 120-gallon above-ground propane tank placement, 81 Eastgate Place, $825. Robert Frix, two ADA ramps and remodel master bath, 60 Northridge Lane, $45,677. Margarette McNeece, manufactured home placement, 221 Sasquatch Lane, $85,000. Dungeness Farms Inc, pole building and riding arena, 101 Three Crabs Road, $11,000. Daniel Mulkey, single family dwelling with attached garage, 7102 Blue Mountain Road, $245,342. Deborah L. Clevenger, single family dwelling 33 S. Maple Lane, $95,533. Wesley C. Romberg, covered porch, 384 Shuwah Road, $5,934. Wesley C. Romberg, covered porch, 384 Shuwah Road, $1,669. Judy Russell, carport, 1458 View Vista Park Space 58, $11,126. Steven J. and Ann Marie Bennett, wood stove, 252 Riverside Road, $4,200. Lamont G. Crouch, 120-gallon above-ground propane tank placement and installation of stove, 42 Twin Peaks Lane, $3,000.

Port Angeles Westlake Olympic LLC, siding, 908 E. Eighth St., $1,500. Bowman Holdings, re-roof, 116 N. Albert St., $6,980. Michael R. and Tami L. Djernes, re-roof, 1935 Westview Drive, $3,260. Donna Marie Morris, add carport, bedroom, bath and decks, 1804 W. Fourth St., $34,920. Key Bank of Washington, re-roof, 1633 E. First St., $146,340. Aloma L. Anderson, re-surface back deck, 1507 B St., $1,900. William Petty, re-roof, 232 W. Ninth St., $1,103. R&R Partnership, heat pump, 829 E. Eighth St. B, $9,229. Lila Jacobs trust, plumbing permit, 931 E. Ninth St., $4,200. Timothy J. and Cheryl A. Morgenroth, re-roof, 232 W. 11th St., $3,870. David K. Shortess, add bathroom and closet, 733 W. 14th St., $9,945. Green Creek Wood Products LLC, commercial construction, 436 Eclipse West Drive, $100,000. Port Angeles Community Players, covered area and siding, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., $8,131.

Sequim Don and Nataliya Nivens, fire alarm system, 401 W. Salal Place, $5,500. Columbia State Bank, signs, 645 W. Washington St., $11,300. James F. and Jayne T. Selander, attached shed, 511 S. Sequim Ave., $448.50. Ronald M. Hatch, re-roof, 336 W. Cedar St., $5,600. James F. and Jayne T. Selander, three sinks, 511 S. Sequim Ave., $2,000.

Duplexes

Jefferson County

P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba. $700. 360-460-4089 mchughrents.com SEQ: Super 1 Br., 1 ba, in town, all new int. & gar. $600, 1st last, dep. 681-4541. SEQUIM: 1 Br., no pets/smoking. $550 plus dep. 683-6924.

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Apartments Unfurnished

HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 1 br 1 ba......$575 A 2 br 2 ba......$585 H 2 br 1 ba......$785 H 3 br 1.5 ba...$800 H 3 br 1 ba......$925 A 2/2 upscale.$1050 H 4 br 2 ba....$1200 HOUSE/APT IN SEQ A 2 br 2 ba....$825 H 2 br 2 ba....$850

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011

Houses

1012 W. 10th, P.A. 2 Br., wood stove, no smoking/pets. $700, reference check. 928-2165

123 Amarillo Rd. Between P.A. & Sequim. 2 bed, 1 bath with W/D on 1.5 acres. Storage Shed. No smoking or pets. $800. 360-452-7721.

Port Townsend Laura Ovette, residential addition of dormer, 3190 Landes St., $39,971.40. Steve K. Enge and Kathleen C. Pool, joint trustees with right of survivorship, residential addition and remodel, 806 Foster St., $64,000. Ralph E. and Christal A. Ericksen, residential re-roof and building of solarium on deck, 1414 Jefferson St., $14,317. Jeffrey T. and Frances C. Fawcett, residential re-roof, 1931 49th St., $4,950. Gary Wessen and Gloria Gould-Wessen trustees, demolish shed, 905 56th St., $0.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 45 building permits issued from Aug. 29 through Sept. 1 with a total valuation of $1,265,358.90: Port Angeles, 13 at $331,378; Sequim, 5 at $24,848.50; Clallam County, 13 at $591,461; Port Townsend, 6 at $142,213.40; Jefferson County, 7 at $175,458.

195132219

20 MIN. TO SEQ. OR P.T.: 3 Br, 2 ba, water view, lg. deck, 3-car gar., all appl., boat ramp near by, cr. ck, ref $1,175. 683-2799

Admiralty Homeowners Association, replace existing deck and posts, 120 Admiralty Lane 351, $15,000. Charles Thrasher, install three new heat pumps, 294963 U.S. Highway 101, $17,181. Robert Bates, swap-out 500-gallon above-ground propane tank, 611 Cedar Ave. 48, $0. James Michelson, re-roof, 1370 Irondale Road, $5,200. Tonya Shrum, freestanding deck and flood development permit, 762 Mountain Trail Road, $7,727. Michael Bair, detached shop with bathroom, 5411 State Route 20, $130,350. Peter Messerschmidt, 250-gallon above-ground propane tank and lines to gas dryer and cook stove, 11 Coleman Drive, $0.


E4

Classified

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

EASY LIVING

OPEN SUNDAY 1 - 4

OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE

Directions: N. on 5th, L. into Sherwood Village, L. on Little John, R. into Canterbury Ct. to #840.

3705 Old Mill Rd., Port Angeles

19407527

Convenient to shopping, SARC and medical facilities. Fireplace, private patio, landscaped greenbelt, storage area, (2) covered carport parking spaces. $210 monthly condo fees include water, sewer, trash, insurance and outside maintenance. $140,000 ML#261332 Call JEAN

19407508

19407509

19407510

IN HENDRICKSON PARK. Open floor plan, 2 BR/2 BA, kitchen w/breakfast bar, dining room, living room. Master w/large walk-in closet, MABA w/2 closets. Low maintenance yard, 10x12 storage shed in back yard w/power, close to Safeway, SARC, stores, Olympic Discovery Trail. Located at back of cul-de-sac so very little road noise. $79,000 ML#261616 Call SHERYL & JAN

SUNLAND ELEGANCE

• Spacious Rooms w/9 Ft. Ceilings • Crown Molding & Hardwood Floors • Chef’s Kitchen w/Granite Counters • Master Leads to Yard w/Tiled Patio & Gazebo • Upstairs Loft (2 BR/Full BA) • 3-Car Garage w/Finished Loft + RV Bay/Shop ML#251378/93595 $595,000

Recently updated with laminate floors in living room, dining room & kitchen. 3 BR/2 BA, 2 fireplaces. Interior doors upgraded. Home features vinyl siding, metal roof, Trex decking, solar screens on living room windows (west side of home), new metal garage doors & low maintenance. Call LINDA ML#261757 $199,900

WRE/SunLand WRE/Sequim - East

WRE/Sequim - East

Jan Sivertsen 360-461-4306 sequimhomes@olypen.com

RECENTLY REMODELED

TEAM SCHMIDT 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim Irene: 460-4040 Mike: 460-0331 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland teamschmidt@olypen.com

WRE/Sequim - East

Jean Ryker Managing Broker 360-477-0950 rykerproperties@olypen.com

Linda Ulin Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891

BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED

OPEN HOUSE SEPT. 11

IMMACULATE

-3

1 N.

SU

WRE/SunLand

Brenda Clark Terry Peterson

WRE/Port Angeles

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 brendac@olypen.com www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 (360) 797-4802 tpeterson@olypen.com www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

CITY LOTS

WRE/Port Angeles

Jennifer Felton

Paul Beck

(360) 460-9513 800-786-1456 feltys@olypen.com

(360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

BIG MOUNTAIN VIEWS

ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE COTTAGE!

Lovingly cared for 3+ BR/1.75 BA home with mountain view from several rooms. Spacious living room and a great country kitchen large enough for a small table. Sip your morning coffee on the cozy deck off the living area and enjoy a peek-a-boo water view. ML#261812/269076 $195,000

WRE/Port Angeles

19407545

18407420

19407514

19407516

WRE/Port Angeles

3 BR/2 BA rambler features large, nicely landscaped lot. 28x36 garage/shop w/ wood stove. Generous paved area off alley for easy maneuvering. Bonus room w/adjoining laundry and bath. Cozy fireplace, too. For more information call Paul Beck. ML#261373 $229,000

Directions: West from Sequim, L. into Parkwood entrance. Follow Parkwood Blvd. to 150.

ML#252089/138274 $519,000

WRE/SunLand

9,000’ residential lots in “Low Impact Development”. Utilities, curbs, sidewalks installed. ML#252458 Only $45,000 each. www.harrietr.com for more details and photos.

150 Parkwood Blvd. Move in ready and priced right! Freshly painted inside, carpets have just been cleaned. Newer appliances and low maintenance yard care. Jennifer Felton will greet you. ML#261090 $39,900

19407517

• Close to Town • Open Floor Plan & Hardwood Floors • Slab Granite Counters Throughout • Beautifully Landscaped Grounds • 4+ Car/RV Garage w/Heated Shop (1/2 Bath)

19407535

19407529

19407530

• 2 Master Suites + Office Area • Large Windows Let In The Light • Fully Landscaped (Raised Garden/Flower Beds) • Fruit Trees & Manicured Lawn • Located Just Minutes From Downtown Sequim • Separate Workshop, Dog Run & RV Parking ML#229493/261144 $329,000

• 2 Bedroom Suites, 2.5 Baths • 2,296 SF on 1.25 Acres • Upscale Quality Construction • Light & Airy w/Southern Exposure • Observatory Equipment Negot. • Solar Power ML#263139/261727 $399,000

WRE/SunLand

Deb Kahle Harriet Reyenga (360) 457-0456 (360) 460-8759 harriet@olypen.com

Helga Filler helga@olypen.com (360) 461-0538

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

Subscriptions Simplified. Paying for your subscription is just a click away. Visit us online and click on the Subscriber Services tab to make your payment securely and conveniently.

175126326

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Classified Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

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22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

LOST: Wedding band. Yellow gold, small size, lost on Monday, 9/5, east side/IGS P.A. 452-5578.

23

25

Lost and Found

FOUND: Dog. Female Boxer mix, on Monday evening, E. 11th St., between Albert and Vine, P.A. Taken to Humane Society. Call 452-2516.

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

LOST: Cat. Brown tiger stripe, tail is black and white, big green eyes. Male, Del Guzzi and Lindberg Rd. 670-1089. LOST: Cat. Tiger striped, small, female, short hair, wearing striped flea collar, last seen 9/4, Viewcrest and Peabody, P.A. 360-362-9604 LOST: Dog, Chihuahua brown with floppy ears name is Hucules. Joyce Peidmont Rd., Joyce. REWARD. 928-3578.

52241068

LOST: Dog. Mini-Pin, male, no fixed, no collar, east side Safeway area, P.A. 452-2108

31

Help Wanted

Two year round Head Start positions. Infant Toddler Specialist Jefferson County. 30 hours. Working with children birth to 3 years in the classroom and working with families providing case management. Must have experience working with children ages birth-3 and have a minimum of CDA for Infant/Toddler Caregivers. Family Educator, Sequim. 40 hours. Requires AA degree in ECE or related field plus experience working with pre-school children in a classroom setting. Application and job descriptions are available at OlyCAP, 226 N Sequim Ave., Sequim; 228 W 1st St #J, Port Angeles; 803 W Park Ave., Port Townsend 360385-2571 or apply online at www.olycap.org. Closes when filled. EOE.

• www.PRICEFORD.com • www.PRICEFORD.com • www.PRICEFORD.com •

Best in Class Fuel Economy in the #1 Selling Truck for 34 Straight Years!

The Time is NOW! The Savings are HUGE!

2011 FORD RANGER 4X4 SUPERCAB

2011 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW

MSRP $27,295. Price includes $$5,000 Ford Factory Rebates and $2,250 Ford Factory Trade-In Assistance! One at this price. Stk#TN11142.

MSRP $30,755. Price includes $500 Ford Factory V6 Bonus Cash, $1,000 Ford Credit Rebates, $2,000 Ford Factroy Rebate and $1,000 Ford Factory Trade-In Assistance Rebate. One at this price. Stk# N11176.

$

OVER

11,000

$

41,777

$

22,907

TOTAL SAVINGS! This Diesel truck is second to none! Packed with options like Power Rear Sliding Glass, Tailgate Step & SYNC – Tow 15,700 lbs, Haul 2,620 lbs & Carry Six!

$

actors!

Contr ttention

A

SAVE OVER

4,500!

Watch your production increase with the help of this impressive tool! Complete with Power Equipment, Cruise Control, Tow Package & Sliding Cargo Doors!

2011 FORD F-250 CREW CAB 4X4

2011 FORD E-150

MSRP $52,795. Price includes $3,500 in Ford Factory Rebates, $1,000 Ford Credit Financing, $1,000 Ford Factory Trade-In Assistance and $500 Ford Factory Commercial Upfit Rebate. One at this price. Stk# N11213.

MSRP $27,425. Price includes $1,500 in Ford Factory Rebates, $1,500 Ford Factory Commercial Upfit Rebate. One at this price. Stk# N11272.

2012 FORD FOCUS SE

You Pay

$

219/mo.

40

$

9,999!

MPG

Enjoy amazing fuel economy with this efficient four cylinder

Based on initial payment coupled to a six speed automatic! Enjoy your favorite music through the six speaker stereo system complete with Sync! Improved due at signing and $219 aerodynamics, increased efficiency, and world class style! per month for 39 monthly One at this price. Stk#N12016. lease payments.

2011 FORD FIESTA SE 41 MPG

You Pay

$

189/mo.

Based on initial payment due at signing and $189 per month for 36 monthly lease payments.

$

7,999!

Cheating Gas and taking names! World Class Design and 40+mpg makes this sedan a favorite for commuters. MSRP $13,995. Price includes a $500 Ford Factory Rebate and $500 Ford Military Rebate. One at this price. Stk#N11249 Ford Credit Loans and Red Carpet Leases are based on credit approval, all vehicles are one at this price unless otherwise listed. Add tax, license, and a $150 document fee to all prices. Fordís First Time Buyer Rebate matches down payment up to $500 for qualified first time buyers. Fordís College Student Rebate is for current enrollees or recent graduates. Fiesta lease has a residual of $10,032 and a 1.5% money factor with $1,375 down payment in cash or trade equity. It is for a 36 month lease allowing 10,500 annual miles. This lease includes a $250 Ford Factory Rebate and $500 Ford Factory First Time Buyer Rebate. Focus lease has a residual of $11,875 with 3.5% money factor. It requires $1,750 down payment in cash or trade equity. It is for a 39 month lease allowing 10,500 annual miles. This lease includes a $500 Ford Factory College Student Rebate. Additional mileage options are available on all leases. All advertised leases include the first monthly payment in the down payment. Best in class Fuel Economy claims are based on Federal EPA testing for current model year 1/2 Ton trucks (yes, we counted the Tundra as a 1/2 Ton too). Dominate the truck market claim is based on we donít know what else to call 34 straight years as the #1 selling truck on the planet Earth.

USED CAR BLOWOUT SALE!

2010 Hyundai Elantra GLS 2008 Ford Fusion SE

U30642.............................................................................................$14,999

2005 Nissan Xterra SE

2007 Honda Civic Hybrid

2008 Ford Mustang GT Premium

2010 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer 4x4

2001 Dodge Ram 2500 SLT Quad Cab

U30535D..............................................................................................$5,495

2008 Ford Ranger

U30599.................................................................................................$9,999

2006 Ford Freestar SEL

P30609A...........................................................................................$10,990

2005 GMC Canyon SL Z85

TN11279A........................................................................................ .$11,990 U30619.............................................................................................$14,795

P30574C...........................................................................................$15,990 N11087C...........................................................................................$15,990

2010 Dodge Avenger R/T

U30618.............................................................................................$17,895

2011 Toyota Camry LE

U30581.............................................................................................$18,299

2008 Subaru Outback 2.5i

U30580.............................................................................................$18,599

2008 Lincoln MKZ

U30623.............................................................................................$21,899 U30649.............................................................................................$24,990 P30613.............................................................................................$24,495

2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS

TN12033A........................................................................................ .$30,495

2008 GMC Yukon XL Denali

N11243A...........................................................................................$39,990

PRICE FORD LINCOLN MERCURY 1527 E. FRONT STREET, PORT ANGELES

1(800)922-2027 www . PRICEFORD . com

19701327sun

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 452-8435

LOST: Dog. Large female Dachsund. Bella’s been gone since 5/20, near 4 Corners Rd. and Hwy 20, P.T. Any info appreciated. 360-340-2524

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

SAVE OVER

24,977 5,700!

IN SAVINGS!

$

LOST: Cat. Black male, has a kink at the tip of his tail, green eyes, and he is chipped, P.A. Ben at 477-9796.

$

www.PRICEFORD.com

5000900

LOST: Bird. Cockatiel, gray and yellow, near Pro Lumber on Pearson Lane, Sequim. 683-6179.

OVER

9,000

FOUND: Prescription glasses. At garage sale on Fir St. in Sequim on Sunday. 461-0796

18,299

$

www.PRICEFORD.com

FOUND: Dog. Small black lap dog, a few white markings, not neutered, wearing collar, 16th and C Streets, P.A. 670-5849

White male, 60, 6’, HWP, non-smoker, affectionate, caring, loves the outdoors, home life. Looking for that lady to build a special friendship and see where it goes from there. Mail responses to: PDN#228/Outdoors Pt Angeles, 98362

$

DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

Personals

2011 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB MSRP $27,215. Price includes $500 Ford Factory Bonus Cash, $1,000 Ford Factory Trade-In Assistance, $1,000 Ford Credit Rebate and $2,000 Ford Factory Rebate. One at this price. Stk#N11172.

www.PRICEFORD.com

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

2011 FORD RANGER R/C MSRP $18,985. Price includes $3,000 Ford Factory Rebates and $1,000 Ford Factory Trade-In Assistance Rebate. One at this price. Stk#N11271.

LOST: Dog. Small black/white female Sheltie, very scared, Last seen Roberson Rd., Carlsborg. Joe at 460-1967.

www.PRICEFORD.com

• Lost and Found

www.PRICEFORD.com

WASHER/DRYER Whirlpool Energystar, matching set, top load/front load, like new. $600. Sunland. 360-281-9185

23

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

If you re looking for the best home for your lifestyle, turn to the best source for real estate information —Peninsula Classified. It only takes MINUTES to find a home that s just what you want.

TRANSPORTATION DRIVER Immediate opening, early morning shift. Need clean driving and criminal record, pass drug screen. Paid training, uniform provided. Apply to linda.r@aroundthe-sound.net

Your friends called and they want you to get your OWN TRUCK!

MERCURY: ‘91 Grand Marquis Runs, drives $300. 683-1902.

To apply: oesd.wednet.edu 360-479-0993 EOE & ADA P.A.: Available now, 2 Br. deluxe town house, 1,400 sf. 1.5 bath. $800. No pets. 457-6181 SEQUIM: 1 Br., no pets/smoking. $550 plus dep. 683-6924. WANTED: ‘02-’07 Toyota Tundra extended cab. 963-2122. WANTED TO BUY Stove pipe. 8” metalbestos. 928-9645.

SAVE OVER 21,977 $5,200!

$

www.PRICEFORD.com

FSBO: Cherry Hill Delguzzi 3 Br., 2 ba 1600 sf, quiet, remodeled, extras ++. $195,000. P.A. 928-4537454.

Family Advocate

TRAILER: ‘92 30’ Airstream. Excellent condition, upgrades, ‘01 Ford 3/4 ton heavy duty diesel. Priced to sell together or could separate. Unit price $25,000. 681-8612

13,997

EAST P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage, upstairs unit. No smoke/pets. $625 + $500 dep. 452-8239.

Olympic ESD 114 is hiring for:

Sofa and Loveseat Each with two recliners, from a clean, smoke free environment, pet free, nice condition. $1,095/ obo. 683-3384

www.PRICEFORD.com

DUCK HUNTING 2 openings at prime Dungeness location. $3,000 per person for upcoming season. 683-9783.

Olympic Peninsula YMCA in Jefferson County is hiring subs for the after school child care program. Visit the website at: Olympicpeninsulaymc a.org Or stop by an office for details. P.A.: 3 Br., 1.75 bath, 1,100 sf, W/D, fridge. $950 mo, dep. No smoke. Pets neg. 461-0613 P.A.: Private room and bath in lovely 6 Br. house near high school. Quiet professional wanted. $420 plus dep. No pets. 797-1245

CRESTWOOD CONVALESCENT CENTER 1116 E. LAURIDSEN BLVD. PORT ANGELES, WA 98362. EOE.

Great Economy at a Great Price!

$

www.PRICEFORD.com

CNA/NAR Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com

Northwest Farm Terrier Puppies: The breed that began on the Olympic Peninsula! Versatile, medium-sized, healthy, and intelligent. Eager to please, easy to train. Born 7/21/11, $350 for males, $400 for females. Papers, flea and tick treatment, and vaccinated and wormed twice included. Great dogs! Leave msg at 360-928-0273 or sg1953@yahoo.com

Real Estate Auction Nominal Opening Bid: $10,000 876 Draper Road, Port Angeles 3 Br., 2 ba 1,782sf+/mobile/mnftd home. Sells: 3:00 PM Tue., Sep. 20 on site Open to the Public Visit williamsauction.com/ september or call 800-801-8003 for details. Many properties now available for online bidding! Williams & Williams WA Broker: JUDSON GLEN VANNOY. (206) 972-9023. Lic.# 13449. Auctioneer: Cody Shane Lowderman Auc Lic 2924

CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $600 plus dep. 1502 C St., P.A. No smoking/pets. 360-452-3423

NURSING ASSISTANT CERTIFIED Crestwood Convalescent Center is n search of “two experienced NAC’s to complete our team!! Bring your current license, your motivation to be part of the best team on the Peninsula and help provide health care that “really cares”! Interested applicants apply in person and ask for Lee for an immediate interview!!

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

CHIMACUM: 2 Br., 2 ba mfg. home, no smoking, pellet stove, garage, available Nov. 1st. $800 mo., 1st, last, $350 sec. dep. Cats ok, no dogs. 360-643-0945.

HAIR STYLIST AND NAIL TECH: Qualified, booth rental or commission. New salon. 417-0800. Licensed registered nurses aide, available for in home care, flexible hours, references available. Call Mary Hedberg at 360-385-2307 MISC: Women’s bike, 21 speed Innova Giant, $30. Craftsman riding mower, $325. 683-0377.

www.PRICEFORD.com

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following full time job opportunities: • Customer Service Manager • Customer Service Rep For job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com EOE

CARLSBORG: 2 Br., W/D, carport, mtn. view, yard. $750. 681-7300, 809-9997

www.PriceFord.com

Two year round Head Start positions. Infant Toddler Specialist Jefferson County. 30 hours. Working with children birth to 3 years in the classroom and working with families providing case management. Must have experience working with children ages birth-3 and have a minimum of CDA for Infant/Toddler Caregivers. Family Educator, Sequim. 40 hours. Requires AA degree in ECE or related field plus experience working with pre-school children in a classroom setting. Application and job descriptions are available at OlyCAP, 226 N Sequim Ave., Sequim; 228 W 1st St #J, Port Angeles; 803 W Park Ave., Port Townsend 360385-2571 or apply online at www.olycap.org. Closes when filled. EOE.

www.PRICEFORD.com

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

Hurry In for Your Best Selection!

www.PRICEFORD.com

SNEAK A PEEK

Up to 7,250 rebates on 20 11 Ford Rangers! $ $

www.PRICEFORD.com

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

FORD FACTORY REBATES

www.PRICEFORD.com

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

E5

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Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword 17 Old Bruin nickname 18 Senior member 21 “Whose radiant DOWN eyes your __ 1 Part of a seder brows adorn”: 2 Bun, for one Dryden 3 Makes faint 25 Singer 4 Resell quickly Kristofferson 5 Petty of “A League of Their 27 One following dogs Own” 6 Culture medium 31 Minimum 33 Combine 7 Subject of an 34 Pants you can’t annual Ottawa wear festival 35 Worshiper of the 8 Poems whose rain god Tlaloc structure is 36 “Pauses are based on the number six normal” adage? 37 49-Across’s 9 Whistle blower Bobby et al. 10 Turning point 38 Vegas 11 Inscribed alternative monument 12 City on the Elbe 40 They may be last 13 At exhilarating 42 Like kittens and times? puppies? 14 Conductor __Pekka Salonen 43 Sierra __: African republic 15 Son of 44 Church holding Abraham 46 Important stars 16 Hook or Cook: 48 Countrified Abbr.

129 Ones who swear in court

9/11/11

31

31

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Compose your Classified Ad on

Juvenile Corrections Officer $17.60 to 21.45 hr., full-time, on-call, union-eligible position with benefits. Continuous testing; open until filled. For information about the testing process and to schedule your test, visit the National Testing Network website at www.nationaltestingn etwork.com or phone them directly at 425-423-9922. You must successfully complete the online testing process prior to submitting an application.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

CNA/NAR Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com James & Associates Inc. Property Management is seeking candidates for a part time position approximately 30 hours per week. The successful candidate must have a skill set that includes exceptional customer service skills and a strong knowledge of computer programs. This position requires the ability to multi task in a fast paced environment. Salary DOQ. Email Resume to goodlife@ olypen.com.

91 Kicked up, as a fuss 94 University of Cincinnati player 96 “The Red” guy 99 Neeson of “Schindler’s List” 101 1959 Fiestas hit 103 Got off the chair 104 Approvals, in 105-Down 105 Much street talk 107 Helper: Abbr. 108 Shoulder troublemaker? 109 Prepare to fire 111 Bygone cutter 113 Tent part 114 Red Muppet 115 Times when Cognac heats up? 116 Venom 117 Part of USA: Abbr. 118 The lady’s 120 Some tech sch. grads 121 __-80: old computer

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. ON BEING SINGLE Solution: 8 letters

O B V M H R G N  I T S  I X E H

F P E A E A R F R E E D O M E

S E P N R A B I I B E T O T A

T P E O E I L I U N A L I L L

Y W O L R F E S T E A R O E T

© 2011 Universal Uclick

N A A N I T I T R S I N V F H

C O I T T N U T Y P E A C L Y

G O I E E A G N S T R N I E T

www.wonderword.com

J M N S V L N S I T R B J S S

E F S T I I A E C T E A E O P

T D O S R V T E O R I V P A Y

A D N B A E R W T C H O C R R R O U E G O S S S P L E R C I X E T A A E U I L R N S E A E P R C M S L R L U O S B O S S ҹҹҹҹ

Join us on Facebook

9/10

Active, Alone, Benefits, Boss, Business, Career, Club, Control, Date, Enjoy, Existing, Feelings, Finances, Flirt, Focus, Freedom, Goal, Grow, Habits, Happy, Healthy, Invest, Join, Learn, Liberties, Listen, Meet, Opportunities, Pamper, Party, Read, Relax, Renew, Respect, Savor, Self, Soul, Spirit, Spontaneous, Time, Tour, Travel, Treat, Variety, Vision Friday’s Answer: Hot Button THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

GNATE ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

FIUNT YSPBSA

PYFIYT

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Friday’s

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

CLALLAM COUNTY

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following full time job opportunities: • Customer Service Manager • Customer Service Rep For job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com EOE

50 Double’s doing 52 One skilled at expressing relief? 54 Lead 56 Union exchanges 58 Turn in place 59 Plastering strip 63 “... a Loaf of Bread ...” poet 67 At risk of capsizing 68 Italian wine area 70 Cereal brand 73 “On the Beach” novelist Shute 74 Rub the wrong away 76 Pay 78 Sq. mi., e.g. 80 Adrift, perhaps 81 Dame intro? 84 Ambush, perhaps 86 FRONTLINE target 87 Disney’s “__ and the Detectives” 89 Restaurateur Toots

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

“LET ME 98 Novelist INTERJECT” By Deighton ROBERT H. WOLFE 99 Rob of “Parks and Recreation” ACROSS 100 Tropical starch 1 Low tide sources revelations 102 Swimming pool 9 Dorm bosses, concern briefly 103 Word in some 12 Give out carriers’ names 15 Like some tea 106 Show saver 19 Coda relative 107 Capital near 20 Nonresident Lake Volta doctors 110 Exams during 22 Letter-bottom which students letters can talk 23 Sea brass 112 Complaint about 24 Frat for a weak morning complainers? cup? 26 “Look! 119 Unfriendly store Ghosts!”? owner? 28 Spill clumsily 122 Shop in airport 29 Point a finger at stores, say 30 Doctor’s order 123 Incites to attack 32 Natural to a 124 “Roots” Emmy region winner 34 Gainesville 125 Pottery worker, gridder on occasion 39 Twisted look 126 Road across 41 Baa maids? Penn. 42 Bottom-row key 127 Retired flier 45 Islands to which 128 Some ranges canaries are native 47 Firefighter Red 49 17-Down’s org. 50 __’ Pea 51 Chest protectors 53 __ muffin 55 First printing, say 57 Public role 58 Like most mules 60 “An Inconvenient Woman” author Dominick 61 Biol., e.g. 62 White water? 64 Jazzy Vaughan 65 Inception 66 Place to see a sched. 69 Drop 71 Jared of “Mr. Nobody” 72 Indy additive 73 Drinks for Radar 75 Side with 77 Bud 79 Creator of Auric and Julius 82 Blow 83 Diagnostic school exam 85 Mention 88 Minx-like 90 Poor, as an excuse 91 David, to some scholars 92 “My word!” 93 It’s heard in Isr. 95 Bottle size 97 One with net gains?

By DAVID OUELLET

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Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. BOOKKEEPER Part-time to start. QuickBooks proficient. Construction background helpful but not req'd. Send resume: Peninsula Daily News PDN#230/Book Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Marketing and Property Manager The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Marketing & Property Manager. The Marketing & Property Manager is responsible for developing the Port’s overall marketing strategy which is designed to retain & create business & job opportunities in Clallam County. This position is also responsible for the management of the Port’s commercial & industrial property. The ideal candidate will have 5-10 yrs experience in sales, marketing, property management/development, communications and/or public relations. A college degree or equivalent & experience working for a public agency are preferred. Travel will be required. Salary is DOE with an anticipated hiring range of $60-75K. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Port Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., Port Angeles between 8am & 5pm M-F or online at www.portofpa.com. Applications will be accepted until 5pm September 30, 2011. Letters and resumes without an application will not be accepted. Drug testing is required.

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring

Help Wanted

Licensed Massage Therapist For chiropractic office. Please send resume to 601 Race St., Port Angeles, WA 98362.

CARPENTER/ REMODELER Truck, tools and experience required. Leave msg 417-6990

NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com

HAIR STYLIST AND NAIL TECH: Qualified, booth rental or commission. New salon. 417-0800. JOURNEYMAN PLUMBER Licensed, full-time, benefits, new construction and repair service exp. Angeles Plumbing. 452-8525. MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Medical office experience preferred. Multi-tasking, team player, heavy phone, patient contact and computer usage. Part-time position. Send resume to: 240 W. Front St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 Mt Townsend Creamery Sales Assistant. Mt Townsend Creamery is seeking a responsible and organized person to pack, ship, and deliver orders. Must be able to lift 50lbs and be on your feet for extended periods of time. Must have a valid drivers license. 25-30 hours/week. $9-$11/hr (DOE) + benefits. Please send resume and references to Sarah Gustner at: sgustner@mttownsen dcreamery.com NURSING ASSISTANT CERTIFIED Crestwood Convalescent Center is n search of “two experienced NAC’s to complete our team!! Bring your current license, your motivation to be part of the best team on the Peninsula and help provide health care that “really cares”! Interested applicants apply in person and ask for Lee for an immediate interview!!

CRESTWOOD CONVALESCENT CENTER 1116 E. LAURIDSEN BLVD. PORT ANGELES, WA 98362. EOE.

NOW HIRING Insulation installers. Good driving record, work ethic, respectful. Apply in person at Tracy’s Insulation, 261372 Hwy. 101, Sequim. 582-9600. NW Driving School accepting apps for a 4 mo. training program/in-car instructor. Bonus/wages upon completion of training. Apply at northwestdriving schoolinc.com/ employment.htm

The Last Word in Astrology BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t share your thoughts. You will get far more accomplished if you work quietly on your own. You don’t want to waste time explaining your reasons for doing things. Don’t let personal matters slow you down or put a damper on your mood. 4 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): An outsider may lead you astray. You must focus on what needs to be done at home or on the promises you made to those close to your heart. Love is on the rise and will be directly linked to how you treat others. 2 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Take a creative approach when dealing with acquaintances. Questioning the motives of others can be tricky and can lead to suspicion.Your best bet is to show what you have to offer and what you expect in return. Honesty is favored, no matter who it will hurt. 5 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Step up and take over. You can enjoy the benefits of being the center of attention if you take on the responsibilities that go along with being the leader. Love is highlighted, but you should-

n’t feel compelled to overspend to impress someone. 3 stars

A passionate but honest approach will win you the support you need. 2 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Prepare to make whatever changes are necessary to make your life better. Financial gains can be made, but you may have to give up something to turn things around. Figure out what you can do without, then put those assets on the market. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): It is best to keep your thoughts to yourself until you fully understand what you are up against. You can be true to yourself, but question your motives before moving forward. 4 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Helping others can be a beautiful experience. By volunteering your services, you will open doors to greater opportunities. Align yourself with people who have as much to offer as you, and you will find that you are included in an extraordinary group. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Do things differently and, most of all, show how creative and intelligent you can be. You will attract attention, both good and bad. You have plenty to contribute, and the only crime will be not saying what’s on your mind. 5 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You have to scope out the whole scenario if you want to react to what’s going on around you. Stand up for your rights and your beliefs.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Someone from your past may bring back emotional memories that cloud your vision. You may need to rely on a trusted friend’s judgment to make a personal decision. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Consistency will help to stabilize your life. Honesty regarding your feelings and where you see yourself heading in the future will help you make a positive move. Strategize and set a workable budget that will allow you to invest more in you and your surroundings. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Impulse must be avoided. You have to pick a direction. If you start changing your mind, you can expect to be questioned. Spending downtime with someone who has your best interest at heart will be enlightening. 3 stars

Olympic ESD 114 is hiring for: Family Advocate To apply: oesd.wednet.edu 360-479-0993 EOE & ADA OLYMPIC PENINSULA OPPORTUNITY 2 Internal Medicine Hospitalists sought for Olympic Hospitalist Physicians, P.S. in Port Angeles, WA. Must have proof of legal authority to work in the US. Must be Board Certified/ Board Eligible. Send resume ASAP to: Dr. Edward Gacek, Owner, PO Box 2027, Port Angeles, WA 98362; or email resume to: boiseed@aol.com ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. $11.13-12.05/hr. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

You can help us protect America! Call 1-866-247-2878 to report suspicious activity on the water and along our coastline.

1-866-247-2878

The mission of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Air and Marine (OAM), the world’s largest aviation and maritime law enforcement organization, is to protect the American people and the nation’s critical infrastructure through the coordinated use of integrated air and marine forces to detect, interdict and prevent acts of terrorism and the unlawful movement of people, illegal drugs and other contraband toward or across U.S. borders.

135114275

Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim is looking for 3 Bath Aides & Restorative Aides to complete our care team. Please call Jeannie Russell at 582-3900 for more information.

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CAFE GARDEN Now hiring full-time experienced professionals. Server and night cook. Apply in person.

185130783

Bath Aides & Restorative Aides

Help Wanted

(Answers Monday) RISKY PEWTER TYCOON Jumbles: RUGBY Answer: The relationship between the bodybuilders wasn’t — WORKING OUT


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

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Furniture

LIFT CHAIR: Brand new from Fricks. Full adult size. Never been sat it, all paper work with it. $600/obo. 681-7270. MISC: (2) sofas: taupe or off white contemporary, $150 each. Glass and brass coffee and sofa tables, $30 ea. Faux oak entertainment center, $50. All like new. 683-1006 MISC: Butcher block dining table, solid red oak 1 5/8” thick, 60x42”, $300. german beech top office desk, slide out keyboard, 47x31”, $50. 2 small danish office cabinets on wheels, will fit under desk, black and beech, $45 ea. 2 high back office chairs, black fabric, has all the adjustments, $40 ea. 582-0158

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Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. Olympic Peninsula YMCA in Jefferson County is hiring subs for the after school child care program. Visit the website at: Olympicpeninsulaymc a.org Or stop by an office for details. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Is taking applications for a part-time delivery driver. Job includes delivering newspaper bundles to carriers and servicing single copy locations in Sequim and Port Townsend areas. Hours are 11:30 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. Monday night through Thursday night. Minimum wage plus mileage Applicant must have a clean driving record, reliable vehicle, and be able to lift repetitively. Please pick up application at PDN office at 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles.

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Help Wanted

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 ROOFERS Experienced. Must know how to shingle. LABORERS NEEDED ALSO. 683-1483. TRANSPORTATION DRIVER Immediate opening, early morning shift. Need clean driving and criminal record, pass drug screen. Paid training, uniform provided. Apply to linda.r@aroundthe-sound.net

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Work Wanted

FOR QUILT TOPS Hand quilting done. 683-6901 HOUSE CLEANING For a clean house, call Cathy at 457-6845. Licensed registered nurses aide, available for in home care, flexible hours, references available. Call Mary Hedberg at 360-385-2307 Professional Window Washing. 20 years experience in window washing, weatherization, repair and replacement. Call Jack for an estimate at 360-201-6409 See my online add at Peninsula Marketplace. Remodels and additions. 460-6508 RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586

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ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034. Speech Language Pathologist Terrific 20 hr. week position now available. Enjoy a great work schedule while staying professionally challenged. Excellent pay and outstanding benefit program. We pay 100% of the employee insurance premium for medical, dental, life, short term and long term disability! Generous retirement plan as well. Apply online at www.olympicmedical.org Or email nbuckner@olympicm edical.org EOE

Eddy’s Small Engine Repair. Mowers, trimmers, saws. 360-681-3065 House Cleaning and Errand Service. Reliable, experience, mature and dependable. Reasonable rate. Call 683-0176. Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fast, friendly, reliable, experienced, reasonable rates, mow/ blow/edge, weed pulling/ whacking, brush clearing, debris hauling. Sequim/ P.A. area. 681-3521 or cell: 541-420-4795

MISC: So.lid oak twin headboard with light plug-in, $200/obo. Flat computer desk, $150/obo. 775-6137. Sofa and Loveseat Each with two recliners, from a clean, smoke free environment, pet free, nice condition. $1,095/ obo. 683-3384 WATERBED. Solid Oak Cal King size frame with 4 large under bed drawers, headboard with lights and mirror. Excellent condition, NO MATTRESS $250. 951-454-4217 (CELL)

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General Merchandise

BUTCHER BLOCK 25x19x34, has knife drawer and wine rack below, made by Bowman Shop and Studio. $100. 417-3773 CAMERA: Nikon camera, with several Vivitar lenses and case, $60. 457-3078.

WAREHOUSE/ DELIVERIES F-T, Tues.-Sat. Apply at Angeles Furniture.

Work Wanted

MISC: Microwave, large, chrome, wonderful condition, $20. (4) Padded folding chairs, very nice, tweed material on back and seat, $5 each. 683-0999.

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

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Appliances

CHINA: 40 pc. Royal Albert Petit Point English bone china dinner set, Hampton shape, floral pattern, reg. #778676, circ. 1932, 7 place settings, 4 cup teapot with creamer, sugar. $300. 360-379-0974. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

WASHER/DRYER Whirlpool Energystar, matching set, top load/front load, like new. $600. Sunland. 360-281-9185

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Furniture

BED: Queen size mattress and box spring, Simmons Beauty Rest, pillow top. Great shape. Paid over $1,200 new. Asking $400/obo. 681-3299

FLATBED TRAILER 20.5’ dual axle trailer with new brakes, wiring, battery, wheel bearings and paint. Licensed and ready for your choice of decking. Must sell! $1,500/obo. 477-0903

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General Merchandise

CIDER PRESSES New, single or double tub presses, hard wood tubs, motorized. $495 or $625. 461-0719 FIREWOOD: White fir. $130. 670-9316. Get your man cave ready for football season, Matilda Bay Cooler neon bar sign, 19”x19”. $100. 360-379-0974 LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg. MISC: Dresser, very nice, 1 yr old, beautiful, $450. 17.5” truck rims, $95. Reconditioned claw-foot bathtub, $900/obo. Nice baby gates, $85 both. Pictures available. 452-9445. MISC: English string holder, $45. Pictures, $25 all. Carved wooden goose, $45. Carbide lamp, $10. Antique shuttle, $65. Cast iron toys, $65 all. 775-1035. MISC: Land Pride grooming mower, runs off PTU, $800. Floor scrubber/ buffer, new, commercial,175 rpm, 13” pads, $700. 683-8693 MISC: Old claw foot tub, $100. Old Maytag washer with ringer, electric, $50. Jack Lalanne juicer, never used. $75. 360-374-9850 MISC: Queen/king bed spread, drapes, shams, valiance, new in box, Penney’s, $200. Antique roll top parlor desk with chair, art deco, $300. Childs table and chairs, $25. 775-1035 MISC: Women’s bike, 21 speed Innova Giant, $30. Craftsman riding mower, $325. 683-0377. Pride Victory mobility scooter. Originally $2,300. Never used, mint condition. $995. 360-504-2570 360-797-3518

PROPANE INSERT Regency Panorama P121 two sided see-through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate. GREAT PRICE! $1,300. 477-8826. RIDING MOWER Craftsman, 19 hp, new rear tires and mower belt. Excellent condition, runs and mows great. $500 firm. 683-6130. SALMON Fresh ocean Coho. 360-963-2021

Build a Loving Legacy Online

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SPA: Apollo, sits 6-8, barely used, like new condition. $3,000. 681-4405 SPA: Working. $500/ obo. Your haul. 582-0188 TABLE NEW PRICES! Comforter with extra Pillows, Coffee Table 360-565-6381 View www.pensuladailynew s .com TRAILER: ‘50 Ford pickup bed trailer conversion, new jack, 2” hitch, straight body, canopy, needs paint (pick your color). $800. 460-6979 TRAILER: Single axle flatbed trailer. 12’x 5.5’, 3,500 lb. capacity. $400. 460-0262 TRUNKS: (2) Turn of the century large steamer trunks, $50 ea. 683-2362, Laura. UTILITY TRAILER Coleman. $800/obo. 683-7002. Wood Stove Pellets Eureka, Olympus, Pacific. $185-$240 ton. 452-1400. Wyndham Timeshare Branson, Missouri, can be traded for other places. Orig. $8,000, sell for $1,000 plus lawyer transfer fee. 683-3546

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Upload photographs, provide video, invite others to sign your online guest list and contribute loving recollections. Visit bit.ly/pdnobituaries

Home Electronics

TV: Sony, 37”, works well, flat screen. $200. 683-2972.

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Musical

(3) Concert tickets Chicago/Tacoma Symphony. Puyallup Fair day pass 9/13/11, Pd $175. sell $50 ea. Near stage. 670-6613. Beautiful 3/4 Gliga violin. Includes case, bow, extra bridge. Made in Romania. $650. 452-5658. CELLO: Engelhardt full-size with hard case, very good condition, plays well. $550. 457-0663. GUITARS: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $200. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $150. Both in new condition, great sound! Make an offer! 477-0903. MISC: Bach student trombone, 2 mouth pieces, stand, hard shell case, cleaning kit, $500/obo. Banjo, soft case, $150/obo. 775-6137. MISC: Gemeinhardt flute in excellent condition, $250. Vito clarinet, $$250. Just tuned and ready to go. 460-1718. MISC: Yamaha clarinet, $250/obo. Beginner percussion kit with bells and drum, $100. 460-6159 PIANO TUNING and repair. Gary Freel Piano Service. Since 1984. 360-775-5480. PIANO: Samick SU343, bench included, country French oak. $1,800. 683-6901.

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Now you can memorialize a loved one on PeninsulaDailyNews.com as well as in the print edition of the PDN.

General Merchandise

Sporting Goods

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DUCK HUNTING 2 openings at prime Dungeness location. $3,000 per person for upcoming season. 683-9783. ELLIPTICAL: Nordictrack Elite 1300, model #NTEL4255.0, excellent condition. $500. 683-6812. GOLF CART: ‘94 Yamaha gas powered, fully enclosed, headlights, tail lights, ball and club washer. $1,600. 808-2834. GUN: Dixie Southern Mountain Rifle (aka Tennessee Poor Boy). .50 cal percussion cap. Lots of extras. $830. 360-683-1065 HANDGUN: Ruger Super Blackhawk, 44 mag. $450. 360-8081531 MISC: Smith & Wesson MP15-22, NIB, $400. Colt M4 carbine cal 22, LR, $400. 460-9854. Sig P226R rail with both 40SW & 357SIG barrels; CT Laser grips; night sights; Sig Custom Shop trigger job, feed ramp & SRT; 3 mags; case. Less than 5 months old. Excellent condition. $1,150 360-477-0321

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011

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Bargain Box

SCRUBS: (23) Women’s XL, like new, variety. $4. 683-5401

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Garage Sales Central P.A.

ESTATE Sale: Sat. 84, Sun. 9-2, 3829 Canyon Edge Drive, end of S. Peabody, left on Ahlvers, right on Canyon Edge. 100 yr. old table, collectibles, quality women’s clothing, electric scooter, queen bed, wicker furniture, beautifully carved desk from Bancock. Lots, lots more. See you there!

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m. Wind whirls, Holy clothing, books, bat house, bird condo, household items, sports cards. Can be seen in the barn behind Les Schwab.

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Garage Sales Sequim

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat,.-Sun., 7-2 p.m., 502 W. Hemlock. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-5 p.m., 4784 Lost Mountain Road. Tools, tack, electronics, furniture and more. No early birds. HUGE Sale: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., no earlies, 820 W. Hendrickson Rd. Large supply of Avon, scrubs, books, wind surfing items, clothes, misc. and lots more. SEQUIM Yard Sale This Weekend. 10th 11th ~ 9-4 p.m. 262 Washington Harbor Road. Rare ‘06 Shelby GT~H $29K. Mercedes 1980 300 TD $4K. 1983 300 SD $4K. 04 Circle J Aluminum 2 Horse Trailer $6K. Quality Wool House Rug. 10’ Hawaiian surfboard. Saddles shooting supplies. Household.

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Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED TO BUY Stove pipe. 8” metalbestos. 928-9645. WANTED: ‘02-’07 Toyota Tundra extended cab. 963-2122.

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Pets

Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org PEKINGESE 2 females, 6 weeks. $350. 452-9553. PUPPIES: Chocolate Labs, $350 females, $300 males. 477-6712 or 360-808-7851 PUPPIES: English Springer Spaniel, AKC championship lines, 1st shots, dewormed, eyes normal, health guarantee. $800. Call to see, available Labor Day. 457-1725 PUPPIES: Half Blood Hound, half Pit Bull, shots, wormed. $150/obo. Serious inquiries only. 461-0095 PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, registered, 6 mo. old. great lines, beautiful. $400-$500 565-6104 PUPS: NW Farm Terrier, 4 males. $100 ea. 477-9590 Short Jack Russell Puppies and Young adults ranging from $100 - $900. Vaccinations and dewormings up to date. Please contact Rob or Jaime for more info at 360-477-4427

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Farm Animals

ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817.

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

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Horses/ Tack

Mini-horse looking for pasture to rent. Looking for pasture to rent for mini-horse (mare) in Port Angeles area. Prefers some company from another mini. Please call Martine at 460-3842 QUARTER HORSE 7 yrs. old, sure footed, well trained, trail riding horse, 16 hands, soral colored, beautiful must see. $900/obo. Text message or call 360-912-1122 Please Serious inquires only

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Farm Equipment

Black and white parti boys, red factor girls, various ages and sizes. $150-$500. Call for more information 452-2579. BOXER PUPPIES 3 fawn colored, 1 brindle, Internaiontal Grand Champion bloodlines. $2,000 ea. 360-797-4106. Northwest Farm Terrier Puppies: The breed that began on the Olympic Peninsula! Versatile, medium-sized, healthy, and intelligent. Eager to please, easy to train. Born 7/21/11, $350 for males, $400 for females. Papers, flea and tick treatment, and vaccinated and wormed twice included. Great dogs! Leave msg at 360-928-0273 or sg1953@yahoo.com Peke-Pom Puppies 3 adorable females, both parents on site, 8 wks., 1st shots, wormed. $250. 4576317 for more info.

ARIMA: ‘91 17’. Johnson 90 hp, exc., new top, galv. trailer. $11,500. 477-3884. BAYLINER: 19’ project boat. $800. 477-7012 after 6 BAYLINER: ‘84 20’ Capri. Cuddy, Volvo IO, full top, 8 hp Merc kicker, trailer. $3,200/obo. 452-5652 BOAT: 12’ aluminum with trailer, 6 hp motor and accessories. $1,500/obo. 808-0156 BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523. BOATHOUSE P.A. Boat Haven, 50’x18’. $5,000. 360-417-0604 BOSTON WHALER ‘95 13’, galv. trailer w/spare tire, 8 hp Merc, very low hours, ext steering and shift arm, sounder, boat cover. $3,500/obo. 437-7658 CAMPION: 21.5’ Explorer. Suzuki 225 hp, Yamaha 8 hp 4 stroke, radar, fish finder plotter, lots of extras. Exc. shape. 30 mile offshore boat. Call for details. $12,500. 385-7728. CHAMPION: ‘78 16’. 80 hp Merc., runs great. Caulkin trailer. $2,000. 477-3884. DINGHY: Mint condition sailing nesting dinghy including trailer, motor, mast, boom, sails, canvas cover. $3,200. 360-379-1616

DIVE BOAT: Inflatable 14’, heavy duty Hypalon, 40 hrs. on Honda 9.9 4 stroke, Transom wheels. $2,950 971-226-0002 GLASPLY: ‘76 23’ I/O, Must sell, make offer! $3,000/obo. 437-7658 GLASTRON: 16’ ‘80 85 hp Johnson, EZ Loader trailer. No salt, must sell! $1,800. 928-9645. HEWESCRAFT: 14’ with trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford and Farmall A Tractor. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg. Kubota Tractor. 136.7 hours new. Tractor equipment included: rake, tiller and field mower/brush cutter. All in almost new condition. $12,000. 460-5483

Pets

ADORABLE PEKINGESE PUPPIES FLUFFY AND PLAYFUL, 10 week old male puppies are ready to be a part of your family. $350 each. 360-457-4965 or 360-460-0575

Marine

PASTURE HAY No rain, in barn. $4 bale. 461-6347.

WANTED: Vintage interior door, would love stained glass/ leaded glass. 417-8097 days

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E7

LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. LIVINGSTON: 12’, Merc 25 4 stroke, elec. start/tilt, kicker, galv. tlr, seats, console, many extras, all new condition. $5,800. 681-8761. LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,000. 683-1957. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 MERC: 2004, 25 hp. Good condition. $1,450. 457-6163. OUTBOARD: ‘87 Merc 9.9 short shaft. Better than average. $425. 417-2165.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

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Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325 SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618

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Marine

ALUMINUM BOAT: 17’ Bass Tracker, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684.

RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714 RESORT BOAT: 15’ fiberglass. ‘07 40 hp Yamaha 4 stroke, low hrs., manual start, tiller handle. $3,000. 452-4384, msg RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: Prettiest boat in the Marina. ‘81 Catalina 22, new sails, roller furler, 4 hp kicker, Slip E12 John Wayne Marina. $9,500. 582-0147. SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E8

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011

93

Marine

94

TIDERUNNER: ‘03 20’. 140 hp Suzuki 4 stroke, 15 hp Honda Kicker, Garmin GPS, VHF radio, used less than 100 hrs. Excellent condition. All accessories. $16,950. 582-9640. TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384

Classified 94

Motorcycles

HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950

HARLEY: ‘03 Anniversary model Electra Glide Standard. 6,500 mi., black, always garaged, leathers, helmet, manuals, extras, 1 owner, serv. & maint. w/care. Senior citizen owned. $13,000. 640-1688.

HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677.

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

&$+ 135114426

REID & JOHNSON

HARLEY: ‘90 SportsterXLH 883. Cust. pearl paint w/ wolf/moon emblem, Screaming Eagle pkg, Corbin saddle, windshld, fwd contrls, saddlebags w/ quick-release brackets, Kuryakyn ISO grips, more. Stock seats, svc manual, HD sissybar/rack incl. Lots of power and modified gearing for hwy speeds. 20,900 mi. $3,600. 360-683-2182 HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633

FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

94

Motorcycles

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com • mj@olypen.com

94

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874 HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,900. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,200/obo. 457-1533

94

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘95 Scooter. 80cc, 1,400 mi. $900 683-3119 KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. KAWASAKI: ‘93 KLX 650. $1,800. 460-3530 MOPED: New, 16 mi., needs battery. $900. 452-2795.

HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. KAWASAKI: ‘01 Vulcan 1500 Nomad Fi. Cruiser. Exc. cond. $3,800 360-640-9670

HONDA: ‘04 750 Aero Shadow. Gorgeous black and silver. $4,500. 452-0837.

QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 SCOOTER 2002 Derbi GP1. 50cc, liquid cooled, disc brakes, $950. 360-808-1767

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Motorcycles

SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bon. Exc. cond., extras. $5,500. 460-6780. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701. YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957.

SCOOTER: ‘05 Honda Reflex. Like new condition, very low mi., 50+ mi. to the gal., Versahaul, other extras. $2,600. 360681-7102 for appt. SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $2,099/obo. 582-0841

5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222 5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075 5TH WHEEL: ‘86 25’ Alpenlite. Good condition, new tires, awning, tinted windows, TV. $3,200. Call between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. 461-2810

5TH WHEEL: ‘94 29' Fleetwood Prowler. Used, but in good condition. Plenty of room for multiple people. Has everything you'll need for a comfortable vacation. $4,500/obo. Call Kim after 6 p.m. 460-2634

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 35’ Nuwa Snowbird. Triple slide. Exc. cond., low mileage. $16,900. 775-5105. CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887.

95

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 32’ Georgetown. 2 slides, 25K, tow bar pkg., King Dome TV system, extra brake system, many extras inside. $35,000. Bill 452-2287 or 360477-7155. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 29’ Itasca. 2 slides, sleeps 6, 2 TVs, queen bed, auto levelers, lots of storage, 50K mile transferable all coach warranty. Great cond, ready to go! $60,000/obo. 683-2958

HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376

KAWASAKI: ‘06 KLX 250. Great bike!! dual sport, knobby back tire, street legal with new tabs. $2,995. 477-6873.

WINDOW WASHING

SERVICES

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

HOME REPAIR

JJami’s ami’s

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Done Right Home Repair

SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643.

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601

195132990

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s Tractor Service

360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

HANDYMAN

JP

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

(360) 683-8332

AIR DUCT CLEANING

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

155122063

457-6582 808-0439

BIRD-B-GONE

Columbus Construction

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Reg#FINIST*932D0

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

ASBESTOS

Call Dan for FREE estimate 360-808-2357

Asbestos Inspections - Testing Surveys

& Leaky Roofs

D

457-5186

452-9995

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

TREE SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN TREES

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

Small Jobs A Specialty

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

FREE S ATE ESTIM

Contr#KENNER1951P8

(360) 460-0518 165122885

anthonystreetop@gmail.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges 72289323

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

EXCAVATING

LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

025073138

Full 6 Month Warranty

360

0A5100969

G

ARLAN ROOFING

75289698

Quality roofing at a reasonable price Honest & Reliable 155120082

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

COLUMC*955KD

WANTED: Wind Damaged

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

STAINLESS! STEEL BIRD SPIKES BY DAN PERRY & ASSOC., LLC

ROOFING

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

#DANPEPA958NA

WINDOW CLEANING

APPLIANCES

Quality Work

86313195

In sid e , O u tsid e , A nysid e

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured 125111256

Painting & Pressure Washing

REPAIR/REMODEL

195132358

FOX PAINTING

Call NOW To Advertise

LAWN CARE

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684 78289849

PAINTING

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

Lic#DONERRH943NA

Call NOW To Advertise

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

LARRYHM016J8

Bird Control Service

115108502

JPSHAHS92BE

Glen Spear, Owner

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

s Handyman Services

John Pruss 360 808-6844

(360)

582-0384

Windows & Doors Concrete

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right

Larry Muckley

PAINTING

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

(360)

No job to small! Serving Diamond Point, Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

Remodels Handicap Access Painting

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

155121476

Call Bryan or Mindy

Moss Prevention

Yard Service • Odd Jobs Hauling • Property Clean up Moving • Brush Removal Hedge Trimming Roof/Gutter Cleaning Tree Pruning Accepting New Contracts

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

9C5066307

#LUNDFF*962K7

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

93313234

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

Pressure Washing

115105618

Chad Lund

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

155119356

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Window Washing

Small jobs is what I do!

DIRT WORK JK DIRTWORKS INC. 360/460•9824

PAINTING

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Davis Painting

Cockburn.INC . 35 yrse on th la su Penin

FREE Estimates

Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

LIC

#JKDIRKD942NG

CALL FOR ESTIMATE

Call NOW To Advertise

452-3480

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

LIC#GUTTEA*950NS Bonded/Insured

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

165122599

Visit our website www.dungenesslandscaper.com Certified Horticultural Specialist

contact@jkdirtworks.com

GUTTER CLEANING PRESSURE WASHING DEBRIS HAULING • CARPET CLEANING 175127220

Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER

Free Estimates Plants • Design Construction Sprinkler Systems

6 81-0132 165124112

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience

WINDOW CLEANING

Landscapes for The Northwest Lifestyle

Interiors, Exteriors, Drywall Repair Pressure Washing, Sandblasting New and Existing

(360) 457-8102

RS SCHMIDT ENTERPRISES

Landscapes by

Residential • Commercial Industrial • Marine

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

WINDOW CLEANING

945036615

Call NOW To Advertise

LANDSCAPING


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘76 Tioga. Good shape. $2,300. 477-1478. MOTOR HOME: ‘91 Toyota Odyssey. V6, 5 speed, low miles, new tires, brakes exhaust, batteries. Willing to trade for camper. $8,500. 460-4420. TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457. TRAILER: ‘00 23’ Sierra Classic. Excellent condition. $9,500. 683-1508. TRAILER: ‘03 25’. Slightly used, front bedroom, rear bath, single slide. $9,500. 681-7110 TRAILER: ‘04 19W Jayco Jay Feather LGT, Ultra Light. 2,835 lbs., aluminum frame, vacuum laminated construction, low mileage, excellent condition, many extras, 2 batts, 12 volt TV, CD, fishing rods and lures, BBQ, etc. Ready to roll. Must see. $9,500. 360-385-2318 TRAILER: ‘05 25’ Sportsmaster All Amenities. Only used 5 times. Clean. Wellkept. $10,750. 360-582-1531 TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326. TRAILER: ‘92 30’ Airstream. Excellent condition, upgrades, ‘01 Ford 3/4 ton heavy duty diesel. Priced to sell together or could separate. Unit price $25,000. 681-8612 TRAILER: ‘94 29’ Komfort. Fire damage one side, still livable inside. $1,800. Jerry. 360-970-2877. TRAILER: ‘94 30’ Komfort Travel Trailer. Great shape, living room slide-out, A/C, micro, refrigerator/freezer. $4,000. Brinnon area. 360-535-2078 TRAILER: ‘98 35’ Jayco. Lg. slide, self cont. $10,550 ave. retail. $8,490. 360-775-1316

96

Parts/ Accessories

Tires & Wheels- BF Goodrich Mud Terrain T/A KM. Set of 5 LT 255/75 R17 removed new from 2009 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon. Fits newer Jeep Wrangler or Grand Cherokee. Asking $750. Call 360-681-0286. TIRES/RIMS: Set of 4, for Ford Ranger. Chrome, like new. $500. 683-5239.

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘01 Silverado 1500. Vortec 5.3L V8 4WD Ext Cab 6 inch lift. Power windows, locks and seats, tinted windows, chrome wheels, tow package. Runs strong, interior in excellent condition, dent on passenger side. 160,000 miles. $8,000. 808-0937 or 452 1237 CHEV: ‘03 Tahoe 4WD 4.8 liter V8, runs great, cloth interior excellent shape, power seat, windows, locks, newer tires, custom rims. $9,900. 460-7901. CHEV: ‘04 AWD full size contractor van. $7,850. 452-5803.

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $38,500. 683-2342. CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967 CHEV: ‘96 Blazer. 4door, 4x4, new tires, excellent, all the elec., 149K. $3,250, would consider RV trade. 460-4488. CHEV: ‘97 Tahoe. 4x4, leather interior, air conditioning, tow pkg., runs/drives great, must sell. $3,995. 775-9648. DODGE: ‘03 Ram 1500 SLT quad cab. 5.9 V8, auto, A/C, cruise, P/W, P/L, seat, AM/FM with CD, matching Leer fiberglass canopy, rear air suspension, 62K, excellent cond. $13,750. 640-3709 in Forks, WA. DODGE: ‘05 Dakota Laramie. 30K mi., V8, loaded! $14,900. 452-5402 DODGE: ‘95 Dakota. Extra cab, 130K mi., matching canopy, bedliner, good cond. $3,500. 457-9038. FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. Exc cond., V6, air, tow, CD changer, 119K mi. $7,950. 457-4363 FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 FORD: ‘94 Bronco. Midnight black pkg, tow pkg, newer tires, trailer brake, leather seats, tint, power locks/windows, auto, 351 ci, well-maintained, recently serviced. Nice truck. Great for grad or dad. 200K. $4,000. 477-1874

WHEELS: (4) black Raceline 891/Renegade 6, 16x8 w/ stems, lock & lugs. $300/obo. 360-774-6446

JEEP: ‘00 V8 Laredo. All power leather heated seats fully loaded CD player 132K in good shape, has exhaust leak needs minor work. $6,000/obo. 477-1782 call or text.

105

105

Legals General

Legals General

97

4 Wheel Drive

JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988 JEEP: ‘96 Grand Cherokee Laredo. White. One-owner. Additional 6 CD changer. air, power everything. Interior and exterior in excellent condition. Current registration. Great tires. 204K miles. $3,500. 425-241-2050 KIA ‘02 SPORTAGE SPORT UTILITY 4X4 2.0 liter 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual trans, alloy wheels, running boards, privacy glass, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, air, Pioneer CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $5,985! Sparkling clean inside and out! Great mpg! Excellent all-weather performance! Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com PKG: GMC ‘03 Sonoma 4x4 ext. cab with ‘90 18’ Fleetwood Prowler 5th wheel. Both for $13,600. 457-4247 TOYOTA ‘07 TACOMA QUAD CAB TRD 4X4 4.0 liter VVT-i V6, auto, locking rear differential, alloy wheels, running boards, tow package, sliding rear window, composite bed, 110V A/C converter, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, privacy glass, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, compass/ temperature display, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $28,755! Like new inside and out! Well equipped! Save a bundle at Gray Motors today! $24,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘82 F250 Great work truck, must sell. $775/obo. 452-3963.

WANTED: Dodge pickup ‘98-’01, 1/2 or 3/4 ton quad cab, short bed, loaded, 4x4, excellent condition, 50K mi. or less. 683-8810

FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911.

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV ‘04 G2500 EXPRESS EXT. CARGO VAN 4.8 liter V8, auto, air, cruise, tilt, safety bulkhead, bin package, ladder rack, tow package, heavy duty 3/4 ton chassis, very clean 1-owner corporate lease return, detailed service history, hard to find extended body. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

NOTICE TO OWNERS OF UNCLAIMED PROPERTY. Did you know the state of Washington is holding over $800 million dollars in unclaimed property? Some of it may be yours or relatives. The following are options to check for unclaimed property: 1. Search for your name by visiting our web site at http://claimyourcash.org 2. Call 1-800-435-2429 (in WA) or (360) 7056706 Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. OR 3. Write to our office at Department of Revenue Unclaimed Property Section PO Box 47477 Olympia, WA 98504-7477 Pub: Sept. 11, 2011 NOTICE OF SPEED LIMIT REDUCTION (US 101 Near Triton Cove State Park) 35 MPH, US 101 NB, MP 314.53 to MP 314.42 35 MPH, US 101 SB, MP 313.87 to MP 313.98 25 MPH, US 101 SB & NB, MP 313.98 to MP 314.42 Notice is hereby given by the Washington State Department of Transportation that the posted speed limit on the above listed route and mile posts noted will be reduced to the legal speed limit as noted above and will be signed accordingly, beginning September 12, 2011. This contract is scheduled for 20 working days. The existing speed limit between the above listed milepost is 50 MPH. This speed reduction is necessary to do work on an emergency slide repair. The roadway will be reduced to one lane with alternating traffic controlled with a temporary signal. The roadway surface will be uneven with pavement and partly gravel to one side. This speed reduction is to remain in place until final pavement markings have been applied. Washington State Department of Transportation Kevin J. Dayton Olympic Region Administrator Pub: Sept. 11, 2011

HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Excellent condition. 93K. $6,500. 360-385-6702 TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535

CHEV: ‘06 Minivan. Low mi. $10,900. 683-3147

2000 Honda CRV Very Good Condition, just detailed in & out. All scheduled maintenance has been done over the years. All wheel drive, tinted windows, auto start w/alarm, 4 mounted snow tires. 200,700 hwy mi. $5,500. 681-5157 or 360-801-1931

DODGE 1995 RAM 2500 DIESEL 3/4 ton, Laramie SLT. Extra cab. 2WD. B & D exhaust brake, big injectors, locking rear end, K & N filter, air bags, running boards, sliding tonneau cover, 5th wheel hitch and tail gate, trailer brakes, towing mirrors. $8,500/obo. Andy 360-477-8826 DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756

102

Legals City of P.A.

Summaries of Ordinances Adopted by the Port Angeles City Council On September 6, 2011 Ordinance No. 3434 This Ordinance of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, authorizes the issuance of an electric revenue refunding bond of the City in the principal amount of $1,662,056.10 to finance the cost of refunding certain outstanding electric revenue bonds of the City; establishes the date, form, terms, maturities and covenants of the bond; and approves the sale of the bond. Ordinance No. 3435 This Ordinance of the City of Port Angeles, Washington revises Chapter 3.05, of the Port Angeles Municipal Code relating to Purchasing Policies and Procedures. The full texts of the Ordinances are available at City Hall in the City Clerk’s office, on the City’s website at www.cityofpa.us, or will be mailed upon request. Office hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Friday 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. These Ordinances shall take effect five days following the date of publication by summary. Janessa Hurd City Clerk Pub: Sept. 11, 2011

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF BUDGET REDUCTION IN THE FUND LISTED

State of Washington Department of Revenue Unclaimed Property Section

FORD: ‘97 F-250 heavy duty super cab. V8, tow package, auto, air, super clean! $3,500. 452-9978 or 460-5908

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FORD: ‘85 Econoline 150 wheelchair van. 58K mi., $2,000/obo. 360-640-1970 or 360-461-8709

CHEV 1996 Silverado 1/2T 2 WD S/Box extcab 3 door P/U. 5.7 12K miles since rebuild p/s p/b cruise -tilt-p/w pdl p/m p/s, am-fm cd-cassette H/D tow pkg 700R4 blue interior. $4250. 360-808-3993

FORD: ‘10 Transit Connect XLT VAN. 25 mpg, 19,000 mi. $19,800/obo. Wrnty. P.A. 210-232-2046.

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JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee. 31K. $11,900. 683-2175.

TOYOTA: ‘77 Land Cruiser FJ40. Original 2F engine, aluminum body, lift with 34’s, ARB lockers, snorkel. Warn winch. Many extras!!! Motivated seller! $10,000/obo (617) 510-9935

Legals City of P.A.

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Notice is hereby given Clallam County will adopt by Resolution of the Board, a reduction in the fund listed below on September 27, 2011 at 10 a.m. in the Commissioners' Meeting Room, 223 East 4th Street, Room 160, Port Angeles, Washington. Clerk – Project originally budgeted in 2010 and not completed/($10,000) A copy of the budget change form may be reviewed at the office of the Board of County Commissioners from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Date: September 27, 2011 Pub.: September 11, 18, 2011 NO. 11-4-00237-3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: DAVID JAMES ROBERTS, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any persons having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: Sept. 4, 2011. Personal Representative: Lori H. Roberts MICHELLE R. AHRENS, WSBA #16794 Attorney for Personal Representative 405 South Peabody Street, Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 565-1215 Pub: Sept. 4, 11, 18, 2011

Cars

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2000 HONDA CIVIC 120,000 miles, good condition, runs perfect. Good mpg. $4,700 457-7146/808-1767 BUICK: ‘06 LaCrosse. 3.8L V-6, 58,900, very good condition $9,500. 582-1888. BUICK: ‘94 Park Avenue. 108K, well maintained. $3,250/ obo. 460-2493.

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FORD: ‘76 LTD. 2 dr, 351, good cond., runs exc., very dependable, some new. $1,200. 460-6979. FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. FORD: ‘96 T-Bird LX. Runs good, nice car. $3,500. 452-2150.

CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419

FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,500 477-1805

CHEV: ‘65 Impala. All original, excellent. $24,000. 452-6840.

FORD: ‘99 Escort Sport. 114K, 2 dr, exc. running cond. $2,700. 808-0825.

CHEV: ‘67 El Camino. Excellent. $15,000/ obo. 360-531-3901. CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767.

CHEV: ‘87 Corvette. Auto, black/graphite, 350/240, all power, leather, air, original, 2nd owner, always garaged, excellent condition, 46K mi., beautiful car! $13,500. 582-1260. FIAT: ‘72 Model 850 Spyder. $2,000. 681-4119

CHEV: ‘97 Corvette Coupe. America’s sports car. C5 Sebring Silver coupe in excellent condition. Low miles 107K. Many extras including headers, Corsa exhaust, K N filter, drilled/slotted rotors, ceramic pads, C6 Z06 shocks anti sway bars. Z06 rims, Continental Extreme Contact DW tires with only 8K miles usage. Cosmetic upgrades as well. Many pictures available. 6 speed, 30 mpg. $14,500. All serious offers considered. No trades. Jay at 425-241-2050.

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FIERO: ‘88 GT. 5 speed, good driver, straight body, needs paint and TLC to be first class. $5,000. firm. 928-3728. FORD ‘08 EDGE SE 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, alloy wheels, back up sensor, privacy glass, side airbags, only 3,7000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $20,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598. FORD: ‘62 Thunderbird. Runs great, good paint/chrome. Red/black. $11,000. 683-2958

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No. 11-4-00242-0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM In Re the Estate of: WILLIS ALVIN GROSS, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070, by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: September 11, 2011 Personal Representative: Rebecca A. Riepe Attorney for Personal Representative: David V. Johnson Address for Mailing or Service: JOHNSON RUTZ & TASSIE 804 South Oak Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-1139 Pub: Sept. 11, 18, 25, 2011 NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS BUDGET MEETING Notice is hereby given Clallam County will adopt by Resolution of the Board supplemental budget appropriations pursuant to RCW 36.40.100, at 10 a.m. on September 27, 2011 in the Commissioners' Meeting Room, 223 East 4th Street, Room 160, Port Angeles, in the following funds: Sheriff/Community Projects – Reallocation of funding from the Bureau of Justice Assistance grant/$8,100 Information Technology, Capital Projects • Project budgeted for the Clerk 2010 and not completed/$10,000 • Receipt of reimbursement from Washington Counties Risk Pool/$7,924.26 Health and Human Services, Environmental Health • Additional funding from the EPA National Estuary Program pathogen grant/$3,975 • New contract with the Department of Ecology/$7,155 Prosecuting Attorney, Local Crime Victims Comp – Adjusts STOP grant billing receipts/$9,118 Operation Stonegarden – Receipt of grant funding/$505,904 Olympic Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Team (OPNET) – Multijurisdictional gang-drug task force program grant/$150,200 Sheriff’s Office, Jail – Funding from services contracted by the US Forest Service/$41,225 General Fund, Auditor – Help America Vote Act (HAVA) grant/$1,935.31 Department of Community Development, Environmental Quality • Grant from the Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO)/$35,900 • Receipt of EPA and RCO grants/$125,300 Alcohol/Drug Abuse – New biennium contract with the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery/$29,705 Copies of the budget change forms may be viewed at the office of the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 East 4th Street, Room 150, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Date: September 6, 2011 Pub.: September 11, 18, 2011

GEO ‘91 PRIZM SEDAN 1.6 liter 4 cylinder, auto trans, cassette stereo, air. Only 66,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Clone to a Toyota Corolla! Great gas mileage! $3,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com HONDA: ‘07 Accord. Good condition, 70K. $12,500. 208-559-4023 HONDA: ‘10 Fit. 4 dr hatchback, 5 speed, metallic copper, like new condition, average 32 mpg, 36-40 on Hwy., great to drive. $16,500. 360-301-9061

HONDA: ‘87 Prelude 168K, 38 mpg, extras. 1 owner. $2,100. 504-2154. HONDA: ‘93 Accord LX. 4 door, 112K, auto, excellent. $3,900. 460-9580.

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HONDA: ‘95 Accord. 4 dr, 133K, new tires sunroof, great cond. $4,500. 457-3078. MAZDA ‘02 MIATA MX-5 CONVERTIBLE 1.8 liter 16V 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual trans, alloy wheels, power windows and mirrors, CD stereo, air, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Sparkling clean inside and out! Only 47,000 miles! Sporty! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com MAZDA: ‘06 MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $15,500/obo. 681-0863

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966 MERCURY ‘07 MARINER PREMIER 3.0 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD with Audiophile audio, power windows, locks and seat, full leather, heated seats, privacy glass, back up sensor, alloy wheels, fog lamps, 59,000 miles, very very clean, 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Cars

HONDA: ‘11 Fit Sport. 72 miles. $20,000. 683-6352 MERCURY: ‘68 Monterey, 4 door sedan, 88K, 1 owner. $2,500. 379-0575. MERCURY: ‘91 Grand Marquis Runs, drives $300. 683-1902. MG: ‘79 BCV series. Color blue, excellent condition. $7,000. 683-5614 PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768. PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577 SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 98K, auto, power windows/seats, moon roof, great condition. $11,900. 461-1539 SUZUKI: ‘04 XL7. 4x4, 48,500 mi., red, excellent shape. $8,500. 775-9671. TOYOTA: ‘96 Camry. 5 speed, low miles. $3,500. 681-3023. VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184. VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs well, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,295/obo. 775-9648 ZAP: ‘06 Xebra. Electric car. Emits no CO2 for global warming. $5,000. Ask for Jack, 683-2259

NOTICE

HYUNDAI ‘09 ELANTRA GLS Economical 2.0 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD/XM, with iPod port, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, only 3,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, non-smoker, like new local trade-in, spotless Carfax report. $14,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Call Dale

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We Need Pre-Owned Vehicles and RVs!

We will buy your vehicle – PAID FOR – OR NOT! –

WILDER AUTO

565-2369

Legals Jefferson Co.

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195131712

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

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File No.: 7090.24067 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series ARSI 2006-M3 Grantee: Glenn D. Baker & Cynthia L Baker, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 514012 Tax Parcel ID No.: 996400803 Abbreviated Legal: LTS 5 & 6, BLK 8, SOUTH PT Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lots 5 and 6 in Block 8 in South Port Townsend, as per plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 10, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 40 A Street Port Hadlock, WA 98339 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/21/06, recorded on 08/03/06, under Auditor's File No. 514012, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Glenn D. Baker and Cynthia L. Baker, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, by Citi Residential Lending Inc., as Attorney in Fact to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee, in trust for the registered Holders of Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series ARSI 2006-M3, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 534144. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/21/2011 Monthly Payments $61,424.97 Late Charges $3,617.43 Lender's Fees & Costs $13,233.85 Total Arrearage $78,276.25 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $202.50 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $202.50 Total Amount Due: $78,478.75 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $205,994.85, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Glenn D. Baker 40 A Street Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Cynthia L. Baker 40 A Street Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Glenn D. Baker PO Box 813 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Cynthia L. Baker PO Box 813 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Glenn D. Baker c/o Jeffrey E. Foster, Attorney 720 3rd Avenue, Suite 2010 Seattle, WA 98104 Cynthia L. Baker c/o Jeffrey E. Foster, Attorney 720 3rd Avenue, Suite 2010 Seattle, WA 98104 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/26/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/27/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/21/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7090.24067) 1002.158184-FEI Pub: Aug. 21, Sept. 11, 2011


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File No.: 7763.26900 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA Grantee: Lloyd S. Carmin, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20071204008 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043004520500 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 50 Dungeness Estates #3 9/13 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 50 of Dungeness Estates Division No. 3, as recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, Page(s) 13 and 14, records of Clallam County, Washington. More accurately described as: Lot 50, of Dungeness Estates, Division No. 3, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, Page 13, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 381 Ridge View Drive Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/19/07, recorded on 06/25/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1204008, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Lloyd S. Carmin, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/16/2011 Monthly Payments $23,993.37 Late Charges $987.39 Lender's Fees & Costs $644.10 Total Arrearage $25,624.86 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $54.20 Total Costs $526.70 Total Amount Due: $26,151.56 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $240,076.57, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 07/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Lloyd S. Carmin 381 Ridge View Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Lloyd S. Carmin 381 Ridge View Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Lloyd S. Carmin PO Box 99756 Seattle, WA 98139 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Lloyd S. Carmin PO Box 99756 Seattle, WA 98139 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/27/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/27/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/16/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.26900) 1002.154680-FEI Pub: Aug. 21, Sept. 11, 2011

File No.: 7827.20183 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Financial Freedom Acquisition LLC Grantee: Machel E. Fox, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1176161 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000045835 Abbreviated Legal: 7 Blk. 458. TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 7, Block 458, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1230 West 19th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/03/06, recorded on 03/08/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1176161, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Machel E. Fox, as her separate estate, as Grantor, to Pacific Northwest Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, a subsidiary of IndyMac Bank, FSB, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. ("MERS"), a Delaware Corporation, its successors or assigns, as nominee for Financial Freedom Acquisition LLC to Financial Freedom Acquisition LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20111267601. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Note and Deed of Trust pursuant to paragraph 9(a)(i) a Borrower dies and the property is not the principal residence of at least one surviving Borrower: Amount due to satisfy by 07/12/2011 Unpaid principal balance Due in full (Maturity Date 11/26/2010) $99,599.68 Interest $19,528.41 Lender's Fees & Costs Mortgage Insurance Premium $1,980.00 $6,836.26 Total Arrearage Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $493.22 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,218.24 Total Amount Due: $129,162.59 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $99,599.68, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/26/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 14, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale, the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with accruing interest, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Machel E. Fox 1230 West 19th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Machel E. Fox 835 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Machel E. Fox 1230 West 19th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Machel E. Fox 835 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/09/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/09/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/12/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. 1002.195654-FEI Pub: Sept. 11, Oct. 2, 2011

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7713.21679 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank, National Association Grantee: Scott C. Winn and Karen C. Winn, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1227876 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630000181150000 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 5 Bk. 181, 1/27 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 5, Block 181, Townsite of Port Angeles, as per Plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1418 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/03/08, recorded on 10/14/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1227876, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Scott C. Winn and Karen C. Winn, husband and wife, as Grantor, to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to U.S. Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1266299. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/21/2011 Monthly Payments $6,714.40 Late Charges $287.42 Lender's Fees & Costs $126.00 Total Arrearage $7,127.82 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $559.34 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,401.46 Total Amount Due: $8,529.28 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $122,306.37, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Scott C. Winn 1418 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Scott C. Winn 4559 Deerfield Drive Antioch, CA 94531 Karen C. Winn 1418 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Karen C. Winn 4559 Deerfield Drive Antioch, CA 94531 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/23/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/23/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/21/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7713.21679) 1002.188739-FEI Pub: Aug. 21, Sept. 11, 2011 File No.: 7023.92684 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Michael D. Wallace, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1151842 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-99043210 Abbreviated Legal: Lot A SP 16/62, PTN BK 432, TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot A of Short Plat recorded on May 19, 1986, in Volume 16 of Short Plats, page 62, under Auditor's File No. 577885 and as amended by Auditor's File No. 580567 being a portion of Lots 11 and 12 in Block 432 of the Townsite of Port Angeles; Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1515 South F Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/24/05, recorded on 03/05/05, under Auditor's File No. 2005 1151842, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Michael D. Wallace, an unmarried person, as Grantor, to Clallam Title First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Washington Mutual Bank f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2006 1193349. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/21/2011 Monthly Payments $7,850.96 Late Charges $250.24 Lender's Fees & Costs ($602.01) Total Arrearage $7,499.19 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $559.34 Statutory Mailings $28.68 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,279.52 Total Amount Due: $8,778.71 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $124,182.78, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Michael D. Wallace 1515 South F Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Michael D. Wallace 1515 South F Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Michael D. Wallace 16539 Northeast 27th Street Bellevue, WA 98006 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael D. Wallace 16539 Northeast 27th Street Bellevue, WA 98006 Michael D. Wallace 16211 Northeast 19th Street Bellevue, WA 98008 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael D. Wallace 16211 Northeast 19th Street Bellevue, WA 98008 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/01/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/01/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/21/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.92684) 1002.189498-FEI Pub: Aug. 21, Sept. 11, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7023.92607 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Todd G. Huber and Neomi M. Huber, who also appears of record as Noni M. Huber, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1175908 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-08-550440 Abbreviated Legal: Lots 17-21 & W2 Lot 22, BK 4, Mallett's 2nd Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Parcel A: Lots 17 through 21, inclusive, in Block 4 of Malletts Second Addition to Port Angeles, as recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 54, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Parcel B: The West Half of Lot 22 in Block 4 of Malletts Second Addition to Port Angeles, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 54, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 3819 South Bean Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/22/06, recorded on 03/03/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1175908, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Todd G. Huber and Noni M. Huber, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for First Horizon Home Loan Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1265247. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 6/20/2011 Monthly Payments $45,820.75 Late Charges $2,291.00 Lender's Fees & Costs ($254.92) Total Arrearage $47,856.83 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $692.68 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,393.74 Total Amount Due: $49,250.57 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $188,434.17, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS TODD G. HUBER 3819 South Bean Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 NONI M. HUBER AKA NEOMI M HUBER 3819 South Bean Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/29/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/29/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 6/20/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.92607) 1002.189131-FEI Pub: Aug. 21, Sept. 11, 2011 File No.: 7713.21619 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank, National Association Grantee: Brian M. Gagnon, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1182975 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06300858-12000 Abbreviated Legal: LTS 1 & 2, BLK 12, PENNSYLVANIA PARK ADDN 2/66 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 1 and 2, Block 12, Pennsylvania Park Addition to Port Angeles, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 66, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 4104 South C Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/21/06, recorded on 06/27/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1182975, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Brian M. Gargnon (unmarried), as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to U.S. Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1266931. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/20/2011 Monthly Payments $10,514.07 Late Charges $437.94 Lender's Fees & Costs $245.34 Total Arrearage $11,197.35 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $775.00 Title Report $603.79 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,496.31 Total Amount Due: $12,693.66 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $147,328.06, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Brian M. Gagnon 4104 South C Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Brian M. Gagnon 4104 C Street Extension Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Brian M. Gagnon 4104 South C Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Brian M. Gagnon 4104 C Street Extension Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/18/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/18/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/20/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7713.21619) 1002.193655-FEI Pub: Aug. 21, Sept. 11, 2011


Tammy Hartley

Volunteer EMT Joyce Fire Department

Inside ■  Generations: How has Sept. 11, 2001, affected your life?

Peninsula Daily News Sunday, September 11, 2011

■  Best friend’s meanness worries teen girl ■  ‘Loser’ pulls fast one on his lover Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman


2

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Teen worried about best friend’s meanness DEAR JOHN: I’VE just discovered that my best friend, “Brit,” has been punking the ugliest girl in our class via Facebook. Brit set up an account as an imaginary guy from a rival school. She then contacted Miss Ugly and has arranged a date with her. “He” has asked her to wear a coat with nothing underneath. When this girl shows up to meet “him,” Brit and some other of our friends will show up instead. Brit can’t understand why I think this is mean. She wants me to go to the rendezvous, too. I’m afraid that if I say no, I’ll be next. I’d like to warn Miss Ugly, but if I do, Brit will

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Generations

his or her acts. If Brit wants to be a mean girl, that doesn’t mean you have to be one, as well. Friendship is a two-way street. If she’s afraid of losPhotos and interviews by Dave Logan ing your respect, she’ll listen to your warning. If John Gray she’s set on being cruel, stand firm on your decision not to have anything to do with her head games. be so mad at me that I’m If that’s a deal breaker, afraid I’ll be next on her she wasn’t much of a friend hit list. to begin with. I’m guessing What should I do? — With Friends Like you already know that. These in Palo Alto, Calif. Dear John: I guess this is a stupid question to ask, Dear With Friends but I’ll do so anyway: Like These: You’ve got a Should I get braces, even conscience. Obviously, Brit though I’m over 30? does not. My teeth have always Everyone is judged by bothered me all of my life. I’ve got an overbite that would rival Goofy at Disneyland. I’m guessing that women think I’m as stupid as I look. arrive 10 days before publicaPeninsula Woman, which But the expense is one tion. appears Sundays in the Peninissue — not to mention ■ Hand-deliver it to any of sula Daily News, welcomes that I’ll have to wear them items about coming North Olym- our news offices at 305 W. First pic Peninsula events of women’s St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims for a couple of years. Is it Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. interest. worth the embarrassment? Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 Sending information is easy: — Frowning, Not “Only that my “I distrust our “My older brother is in days before publication. ■ E-mail it to news@ Smiling in Tallahassee, awareness of terrorism Photos are always welcome. government more now. the National Guard, and peninsuladailynews.com in time If you’re e-mailing a photo, be Fla. has been heightened. It Since 9/11, it feels like he has been in Egypt for to arrive 10 days before Friday sure it is at least 150 dots per

Mars vs.

Perspectives of three Peninsula women

Venus

This week’s question: How has Sept. 11, 2001, affected your life?

May we help?

publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Weddings, anniversaries Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned. Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned. Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

Dear Frowning: I feel your pain when you point out that braces are expenses. One suggestion: If you want to cut the cost by anywhere from one-third to a half, consider having it done at a nearby school of dentistry, which has an ortho department. Also, have an assessment to find out whether you are a good candidate for Invisalign braces, which do not show as much as metal braces. If it makes you feel more confident in yourself, then the embarrassment and expense of wearing them for a couple of years will be worth it. Turn

to

Gray/6

has heightened our suspicions of any foreigners, too. Also there are a lot more dangers when we travel. “We recently were in Germany and heard of how two U.S. servicemen were killed at the airport just three days before we arrived. As a result, we heard that servicemen no longer need to wear their uniforms when traveling abroad.”

there is a conspiracy in what we hear and the information we get. Things have happened that we don’t even know about. “I’m more afraid of domestic terrorists than foreign terrorists, though. My husband has had some bones fused together, so we have to go the airport hours earlier to get through special security. He can’t bend over and take off his shoes, for instance. Yes, it’s affected us.”

a year. He’s doing his duty for our country. “I remember that day well, back when I was in third grade. My teacher cried. I remember my father got upset at me that day for crying over a little broken CD of mine when over 3,000 lost their lives in New York. “I also remember that an old baby sitter of mine was in New York and saw it happen, and she recorded it on her video.”

Kathy Steinkamp, 62 retired nurse Port Angeles

Tarky Petersen, 48 biotech coordinator Port Angeles

Mariah Merkwan, 18 student Port Angeles


Peninsula Woman

Ready

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, September 11, 2011

3

Duty for

Hartley serves community as volunteer EMT

By Diane Urbani for

de la

Peninsula Woman

Paz

JOYCE — When Tammy Hartley first moved to Joyce, she cried for three days. She’d just come from Seattle. She was 17. She proceeded to spend her senior year at tiny Crescent School, while her parents Ken and Dianna Fifield ran the Family Kitchen across from the Joyce General Store. Today, Hartley personifies the best aspects of life in a rural community, and especially in this small town. Ask her how long she’s been volunteering, though, and Hartley hesitates. Then she understands that you’re asking specifically about her work as a first responder with the all-volunteer Joyce Fire Department, which is just one of her volunteer capacities. As an emergency medical technician, Hartley keeps a police radio in her kitchen throughout the day, except when she carries it outside when she does her gardening. Turn

to

Hartley/4

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

Tammy Hartley is one of eight women who volunteer as first responders in and around Joyce.


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Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Hartley: Has natural ability

Anniversary

to comfort people in trauma Continued from 3 Four years ago, Hartley did phase one of her journey with Joyce Fire: six months of pre-EMT training volunteer work with the department, riding along with responders. After that, the department voted her in so she could earn her EMT certificate through Peninsula College’s program. In the years since, Hartley has become known for her natural ability to comfort people in the midst of trauma.

June and Bob Bowlby on their wedding day.

Scenarios of all types Joyce is at least 20 minutes from Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, so the Joyce volunteers are first responders in the fullest sense: They arrive on all kinds of scenes to do basic life support, Hartley says. That means cardiopulmonary resuscitation for an elderly man suffering a heart attack. Or clearing the airway for a choking baby. Then there are the motorcycle and automobile accidents. Sometimes the volunteer responders help people walk away from the wreckage, but sometimes they must comfort family members who have lost their loved ones in a crash. Alex Baker, chief of the Joyce Fire Department, remembers one of Hartley’s first medical calls. Despite the EMTs’ efforts, the patient did not survive. “It was her first CPR call; it’s always a struggle because it’s a hectic situation,” Baker said. “She was able to come in and work with everybody without missing a beat. “She was very heartfelt

June and Bob Bowlby today.

The Bowlbys

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

Tammy Hartley pauses for a minute with Chopper, left, and Balto in her Joyce front yard. with the husband, and with the family afterward. She helped him call relatives,” Baker said. “She just naturally took

that role on.” Since then, Hartley has become one of the department’s busiest volunteers. She averages 100 calls a

year: 50 percent of the calls that come in over a 12-month stretch. Turn

to

Hartley/6

Bob and June Bowlby will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Saturday, Sept. 17, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. with an open house at the Sekiu Community Center, 42 Rice St., Sekiu. Bob Bowlby married June Doran on Sept. 7, 1951, in the Clallam Bay High School auditorium, with a reception following at the Sekiu Center. Mr. Bowlby retired from

Peninsula Telephone and Telegraph in Forks, and Mrs. Bowlby is a homemaker and artist. They both were born on the Olympic Peninsula: Mr. Bowlby in Clallam Bay and Mrs. Bowlby in Sekiu. The couple’s family includes their children Paul and Kim of Clallam Bay and Karen Nangle of Maple Valley. They also have nine grandchildren.


Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Sunday, September 11, 2011

5

Anniversaries The Charlie Johnsons Charlie and Janet Johnson will celebrate their 65th wedding anniversary with close friends at their home Wednesday. Charlie Johnson and Janet Johnson were married Sept. 14, 1946. They had been high school sweethearts in Lincoln, Neb., and were married when Mr. Johnson returned from serving in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. The couple moved to Colorado where their daughters were born. Mr. Johnson worked for U.S. Plywood and was transferred to Burlingame, Calif. Mrs. Johnson worked for United Airlines at the maintenance operations center in San Francisco. When they retired, they first moved to Santa Rosa, Calif., and then to Sequim in 1990, where they live in SunLand. The couple’s family includes daughters Jennifer Grenon of Denver, Carol Conroy of Gainesville, Fla., and Gwen Olsen of Millbrae, Calif. They also have three grandchildren. Celebrations will continue through this year during family visits.

Janet and Charlie Johnson on their wedding day. Janet and Charlie Johnson today.

Marriage Licenses Clallam County

Walt and Vi Johnson on their wedding day.

Walt and Vi Johnson today.

The Walt Johnsons Walt and Vi Johnson of Port Angeles celebrated their 65th anniversary with a family gathering Aug. 13 at their home. Walt Johnson married Vi Flatau on Aug. 10, 1946, in Perham, Minn. Mr. Johnson was a shareholder and employee of PenPly for 18 years.

Mrs. Johnson has been a volunteer guardian for the mentally handicapped for 30 years. Both have been involved in the United Methodist Church. Their family includes son Wally Johnson, son and daughter-in-law Norris and Jennifer Johnson and

daughter Debra Schoeneman, all of Sequim; daughter and son-inlaw Kristin and Jon Peterson of Bothell; and daughter and son-in-law Judy and Lee Schooler of Kona, Hawaii. They have 15 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Brett Christopher Payseno, 29, and Brookann Allsop Howat, 23; both of Sequim. Anthony Mickle Jowers, 19, and Marissa Ann Berhow, 21; both of Port Angeles. Darryl Dane Bott, 61, and Susan Alice Rinehart, 58; both of Port Angeles. Molly Rose Kruckeberg, 30, and Todd Stephen Forsman, 46; both of Sequim. Jason Charles Engel and Sara Jean Kropp; both 25, and both of Sequim. Michael James Burlingame, 29, and Olivia Dawn Swann, 24; both of Port Angeles. Johanna Frances Bowechop, 48, and Raymond Lee Pitchford, 50; both of Port Angeles. Jason Lee Whidden, 31, and Ladawn Kay Justus, 27; both of Forks. Anita Marie Davis Padron and Maclain David Carnes; both 31, and both of Forks. Douglas Michael Parker,

49, and Rhonda Ann Tucker, 55; both of Sequim.

Jefferson County Joshua David Nash, 31, and Kelsey Suzanne Booth, 27; both of Port Townsend. Melissa Dawn McCarthy, 42, and Robert Dillard Fossum, 44; both of Port Townsend. Ezequiel Borrayo Juarez, 29, and Patricia Lizbeth Martinez Mora, 21; both of Port Hadlock. Darryl Lynn Marshall, 61, of Sequim, and Veda Rae Wilson, 54, of Quilcene. Karen Renee Kenyon and Rodney Allen Clark; both 47, and both of Quilcene.

Keepsakes for sale Purchase a PDN photo — on T-shirts, drink mugs or just the photo itself. www.peninsuladailynews. com Click on “Photo Gallery”


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Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Gray: Worried Hartley: ‘You’re there to help’

about kids’ eating habits

Continued from 2 demic, both here in America and around the globe, is an unfolding Dear John: I’ve been dating a divorced man with health disaster. The best thing you two children: a boy, 8, and a girl, 6. can do is to lead by “Bob” is a sweet guy, example. and the kids are nice as Suggest, for example, well. But sadly, both the a family picnic and load children are considerably the basket with healthy overweight. treats. Bring along I know that Bob hates drinks with no added to say “no” to his kids when sugars. Exchange chips he has them on weekends. for almonds and sweet Part of that means taking cranberries. Try ripe melthem for ice cream and ons and strawberries having their favorite foods with a light chocolate and treats waiting for them dipping sauce. at his house. There are a lot of But by indulging their great books with countbad dietary habits, Bob is less ways to eat smart doing his kids no favor. I and eat well. want to say something The myth about diet because all of them are is that the solution is to caught in this unhealthy cycle and something has to eat less. No, not really. The lasting solution to give. being overweight is to What can I say without getting myself into trouble eat healthy. When Bob and his and perhaps causing a riff children begin to eat between Bob and myself? — Health Matters right, the change you are in Hartford, Conn. hoping to see will happen naturally. Dear Health Matters: ________ Your concern is well John Gray is the author of intended. The obesity epi-

peninsuladailynews.com

hours a week there, and loves it. Hartley smiles at the The Joyce Fire Departcontrast between her job as ment’s 24 volunteers — a “scrub” in the sterile eight women, 16 men — microsurgery rooms and cover quite a stretch, along Alex Baker her work as an EMT, in state Highway 112 from fire chief which she must walk into the Lyre River to the Joyce Fire Department all manner of chaotic Freshwater Bay area. For each call they respond to, scenes. the volunteers are paid Yet Hartley would not EMTs just arrive in time to ting a good example for her give up any of it. She $18. And that’s regardless minister to a critically children, and she replies, of rank, from EMTs such expresses admiration for injured person. The patient “My kids are awesome.” as Hartley on up to Chief her fellow Joyce Fire volunlives. And later, a family The last week of August Baker. teers, adding that the member comes up to was busy, Hartley adds, Hartley doesn’t go on department leadership proexpress pure gratitude. with 14 calls in Joyce. And much about why she convides unflagging support Hartley acknowledges on a recent Saturday, she tinues to serve as an EMT. for their continued learnthat on many calls, she’s responded to a call at 3 In fact, to her, this voluning. a.m., stayed up to set up a teering isn’t even newswor- coming to the aid of someIn a way, Hartley is one she knows well from garage sale she had thy. completing a circle that the Joyce community. planned for 9 a.m., and “It’s humbling,” she began when she moved to then got another call to a says. Joyce in 1990. Not long Active in kids’ school fire. And on this 10th anniafter that, she was in a sigOne of the tougher versary of the attacks of nificant car accident. Some She’s on a team of paraspects of this work is the Sept. 11, 2001, Hartley is of the volunteer EMTs who ents who orchestrated the fact that, to preserve remembering the emerresponded then are still return of Crescent School’s patients’ privacy, she can’t gency workers who entered end-of-the-year party. She volunteering today, she talk about it with friends the World Trade Center on volunteers at the school says. or family. that morning. and with the local Lions “You have to separate it” Club. And her children Family oriented from the rest of your life, Good and bad Fischer, 11, and Lauren, 14, Hartley says. Hartley “has a huge are involved in sports — As a first responder, Working as a volunteer commitment” to serving baseball, football, volley“you’re not there for yourEMT means “a tremendous her community, Chief ball, basketball — so she’s self. You’re there to help,” contribution to the commu- Baker says, adding that even if the situation seems part of the parents’ carnity,” adds Susan Hildebshe and the rest of the pooling cooperative. hopeless. rand, who has known Hart- department are “a familyHer husband, Rick, also ley through various activiIn her own community, oriented bunch.” a Joyce Fire EMT, Hartley “there have been a lot of ties in Joyce over the years. They have summer picadds, is “hugely supportive” bad calls,” Hartley says. nics together, and the of her volunteer service. So Team player Highway 112 and the awards banquet is a potare the kids. She’ll be in the web of rural roads around luck. Those are sweet times Hildebrand’s husband kitchen baking on a weekit have been the scene of together, shared by those Dave Benzick is also a night and a call will come far too many wrecks. Joyce Fire Department vol- who respond to emergency “But nothing has hit me in on her radio. There are calls that come at all hours, 23 other volunteers, but unteer who responds to so hard to where I can’t all year long. Lauren and Fischer will keep doing it,” she says. calls that keep him out all Hartley, for her part, say, “Mom! You have to go!” night, even all weekend in “And then there will come says volunteer service “is Tell Hartley she’s seta good call,” one where the some cases. There are also the two-hour meetings and just normal to me. It doesn’t take away anything drills held every Tuesday from my life, except maybe night at the fire station. “She is invariably pleas- some dinners that go uncooked. ant and soft-spoken,” Hil“I could be home watchdebrand says of Hartley. ing TV — which we don’t “Her strength,” adds have,” she adds, smiling. Benzick, “is in her teamEyeliner, Brows, At some point, “I would work.” Lipcolor & Liner love to get my paramedic In addition to being a Feather Extensions available mother and volunteer, [certification],” Hartley Hartley has yet another says finally. But this life is job: as a surgical assistant a full one. at Northwest Eye Surgeons “I’m content,” she says. Janie Dicus, BSN in Sequim. She works 40 “I love it out here.” Continued from 4

Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus. If you have a question, write to John in care of this newspaper or by e-mail at: comments@ marsvenusliving.com.

Celebrating our 27th year

PERMANENT COSMETIC MAKE-UP

195132442

9B123116

Susan Brothers, Tim Gillett, Owners. Susan Cannon, Administrative Assistant & Betty Owbridge, Manager.

“It was her first CPR call; it’s always a struggle because it’s a hectic situation. She was able to come in and work with everybody without missing a beat.”

360•683•5374


Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

7

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Mop heads safer than dirt bikes CAN YOU PLEASE explain the difference between riding a mop head to school or riding a dirt bike, which has a smaller motor? Our kid’s school will allow kids ages 14 to 16 to ride and park mop heads but not the other. Our son, who is in the eighth grade, has a dirt bike that he feels safer driving to school, but they will not permit him to have it on school property.

Cincinnati dad Mop head bikes are safer than various types of motorcycles, which is basically what a dirt bike

Parent to Parent

From Jodie

It would be a surprise if your son’s dirt bike has a smaller motor than a mop head. Generally speaking, it’s usually the other way around. Jodie Lynn Both have different legal restrictions, depending on where you live. Of course, there are always falls under. exceptions to rules, but for Unless you live in a the most part, dirt bikes rural area on a dirt road are used for recreational with very little traffic to experiences in “off road” the school, the school’s goal areas, usually for motois probably looking at keepcross racing. Plus, it has a ing kids safe. In this case, larger, more powerful the school officials are cor- motor for race competition. rect. Mop heads can be — Paul Jones driven on paved roads but in Cincinnati, Ohio normally aren’t allowed to

go any faster than around 30 miles per hour, and in many areas, not more than 20 to 25 mph. This saves a substantial amount on gas, making it gas-efficient, which is pretty much what it is all about. However, in some cities and towns it can, and is allowed, to go faster and have larger engines. For example, in Kansas, the engine can go up to 130 cc, which is 7.9 cubic inches, allowing it to perhaps go up to around 35 mph. The age requirements also vary in different states and countries, as well as laws pertaining to helmets. In the scenario you have described in your question,

the mop head is the safest and most logical choice the school district could make.

Can you help? Our 17-year-old daughter met someone online and has been dating him for around three months. She only sees him twice a week after she gets off of work and goes straight to the place where they are meeting. One of my friends said she saw her having dinner with an older guy at a nice restaurant, but my daughter ignored her and of course did not introduce her to the person. We asked her about it but said it was

really none of our business, since she will turn 18 in two months. Now, we are wondering if this is the person she met online and if he is way too old for her. We certainly don’t want to run her off, but how is the safest way to find out what she is really doing and with whom?

_______ Jodie Lynn shares parenting tips through her weekly column. Write her at Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040 or direct2 contact@parenttoparent.com via e-mail. Tips and questions can also be sent through the contact form at ParentToParent.com.

‘Loser’ of a man pulls fast one on lover Cheryl Lavin

Tales from the Front

covered that he had been sleeping with several other women while he was married and having an affair with me,” she said. Imagine her surprise when she found out that this dork, who didn’t know how to dress and had no game, actually had enough game to get her and several other women as well. And he wasn’t even apologetic about it. “When I confronted him with the evidence, this fool said I should get over it,” she said. “He honestly believes that he has the right to other women. He is not Tiger Woods!” As of now, the worm has fully and completely turned. Yola is still living with Seth, and he still believes he is entitled to as many women as he can seduce. “I’ve lost all respect for him and pray constantly that I can move on one of these days,” she said. “I can’t bear to have him

touch me. I’ve been ruined. I wish I could turn back time.”

________ Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales from the Front at her home office in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.talesfromthefront. com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.

Reunion!

Peninsula Midwives Annual Potluck

Sunday, Sept. 18 5:30 pm Fort Worden Kitchen Shelter

Parking passes available at the event

New Children’s Clothing at Affordable Prices Shoes & Accessories Toys, Games & Books

Huge Clearance sale up to 50% off OPEN MON.-SAT. 10AM - 5PM

(360) 582-1700 990 E. Washington St., Ste. E103 • Sequim www.dungenesskids.com

195132300

had no game. He didn’t even know how to dress,” she said. If that wasn’t enough, he was miserable at home. For three years, Yola listened to Seth complain about his problems with his wife. “I started to believe that he was just in a bad marriage,” she said. In other words, all of his problems would disappear if he were just with another woman. What about her? “He made me feel like I was the most fantastic woman in the world, which isn’t at all true,” she said. “I was raised by a realistic

mother and who told me I was a beast. I’ve been around and learned that she was right.” They started an affair. While the affair was going on, Yola would suggest that Seth, this shleppy, loser kind of guy, take his wife out to dinner and buy her flowers. She was really trying to help him get his life together. She enjoyed the sex they had, the jewelry he bought her and the trips he took her on, but she didn’t think they had a future. She says she never asked him to leave his wife for her. But these things have a way of turning around. “He grew on me like a fungus,” said Yola. “I fell in love with him.” Then Seth’s wife left him and filed for a divorce. She didn’t want him anymore, and Yola inherited the poor loser. They moved in together. “That was when I dis-

195132489

DID YOU FEEL feel sorry for someone and when all was said and done realized the person you should have been feeling sorry for was you? Did you ever meet someone and immediately feel you were better than them? That you were smarter, maybe better looking, more successful, happier? Did you ever feel you had your life together and theirs was a disaster? Did you ever feel you had the upper hand in the relationship and somewhere along the line you lost it? When Yola first became friends with her co-worker, Seth, she was in a very good place. She was happy and independent, divorced with a son and not looking to marry. “I didn’t want a man around my son who wasn’t serious,” Yola said. And then there was Seth. “I felt sorry for him. He


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Sunday, September 11, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Business Directory

Gift Registry •

Event Venues

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