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Peninsula Daily News 50 cents

September 1, 2011

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Teen’s avowal allowed

Cinema REDISCOVERED

Confession lets murder trial start, prosecutor says By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County Superior Court Judge Ken Williams ruled Wednesday that Lauryn A. Last’s statement to police that she let her newborn son drown Dec. 30, 2008, can be used during her trial for second-degree murder. Williams will set a date for the longdelayed trial at a 9 a.m. hearing today, which is Last’s 19th birthday. Williams’ ruling can be appealed to the state Court of Appeals. Last’s lawyer, John Hayden, did not return calls for comment about Last the case Wednesday. Williams’ ruling “allows us to proceed to trial,” Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John Troberg said. “I don’t think that we could proceed to trial without her confession,” Troberg said. “It would be tough to prove anything.” If found guilty of second-degree murder, Last’s maximum sentence would be 18 years and four months.

Written waiver Last was 16 when she signed a written waiver giving up her Miranda rights to remain silent and have a lawyer present at the outset of three interviews with police over more than three hours Jan. 2, 2009. Hayden had argued that Last’s mental state was such that she could not make an informed decision about waiving her rights, while the prosecution disagreed. “In order to suppress statements under Miranda, there must be some police action which amounts to improper coercion,” Williams said in a 26-page opinion. “Here, the court cannot find that the police acted inappropriately in conducting their investigation and interrogation of Ms. Last.” Turn

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Randy Lester, left, and Johnnie Montice pause in front of ornate “Mayan motif” decor on the original ceiling of the defunct Elwha Theatre, which shut down as a cinema on Front Street in Port Angeles in about 1957. Below the false ceiling will be their relocated shirt shop. Story, more photos on Page A8

PA electricity bills to rise in ’12 $5.40 monthly average boost for most users By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Electrical power bills for Port Angeles residents are expected to increase next year for all but the city’s low-income disabled customers. The monthly energy bill for Teen/A4 city residents is anticipated to

increase by $5.40 per month on average as a result of a 14 percent increase in wholesale electrical rates from the Bonneville Power Administration, the City Council was told during a work session Tuesday. The City Council during the special meeting voiced support for exempting the approximately 300 participants in the city’s discount program for disabled residents who make less than $21,000 a year. Doing so would bump the anticipated monthly increase to about $5.70 per month for all other customers, a move the

council felt is justified. “It’s worth another 30 cents per month to me from someone who can afford it to make sure no poor person gets their power turned off,” Mayor Dan Di Guilio said.

No action taken No action was taken Tuesday. The utility rates are expected to be set in October. The BPA rate bump is expected to cost the city $2.62 million. Glenn Cutler, city public

works and utilities director, has said the city doesn’t have enough reserves to cover the increase because it has been using the utility’s rainy-day fund to lessen the impact of past BPA rate hikes. The majority of council members also voiced support for using the electrical base rate to cover the increase and not touch the consumption rate. That flat base rate is now $13 per month, effective in January; it would be between $18.40 and $18.70 per month with the increase. Turn

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Top gardeners are applauded for dedication By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Six longtime avid garden experts were handed the Golden Trowel Award on Wednesday, the highest honor bestowed on a Clallam Master Gardener. Those receiving the award during a luncheon at the Woodcock Road Demonstration Garden at 2711 Woodcock Road were Virginia Ahron on behalf of her late husband, Alf Ahron; Riley Bigler; Mary Flo Bruce; Michelle Mangiantini; Gail Nelson; and Dianne Thu. About 50 of the Master Gardeners’ 150 members attended the luncheon, many sharing fond stories about the honorees they have worked alongside over the years. “We take nominations, but they have to be a Master Gardener for 10 years, contribJeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News uting at least 1,000 volunteer hours,” said Six Master Gardeners recognized with Golden Trowel Awards for serving at least 10 years and 1,000 hours Muriel Nesbitt, Master Gardeners proworking for the Master Gardeners Foundation of the Olympic Peninsula are, from left, Virginia Ahron, on behalf gram coordinator.

of her late husband, Alf Ahron, plus Riley Bigler, Mary Flo Bruce, Michelle Mangiantini, Gail Nelson and Diane Thu. The stones they hold will be added to the Woodcock Road Demonstration Garden’s “Walk of Fame.”

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Business B4 Classified C3 Comics B3 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby B3 Deaths A6 Horoscope B3 Movies C10 Nation/World A3

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UpFront

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Alyssa Milano, husband have baby boy ALYSSA MILANO IS a mom. A publicist for the 38-year-old actress said Milano gave birth to a 7-pound baby boy Wednesday Milano morning: Milo Thomas Bugliari. This is the first child for Milano and her husband, David Bugliari, who wed in August 2009. Milano wrote on her Twitter page Wednesday that her heart “has tripled in size” and that she loves her new son “more than all the leaves on all the trees.” Milano starred in TV’s “Who’s the Boss?” and “Charmed” and can next be seen onscreen in the ensemble comedy “New Year’s Eve.” Bugliari is an agent with Creative Artists Agency.

T.I. leaves prison Atlanta-based rapper T.I. stepped off a motor coach bus Wednesday evening to start serving the rest of his time in a

halfway house for a probation violation, and he already has a new book deal and TV reality show T.I. waiting for him. The artist, whose real name is Clifford Harris, earlier left the Forrest City low-security prison in Arkansas, said Bureau of Prisons spokesman Chris Burke. T.I. had initially served about seven months at the prison in 2009 after he was arrested for trying to buy unregistered guns and silencers from undercover federal agents. He was on probation after he was released and ordered not to commit another crime or to illegally possess any controlled substances. He was arrested again in September 2010 in Los Angeles on drug charges after authorities said he was found with four ecstasy pills. He was sentenced in October to 11 months in prison for that violation, and had been set for release at the end of September. It appears a flock of cameras will follow T.I. regardless of where he goes

next. VH1 said Wednesday that the network will film T.I.’s journey home from jail and debut the show in December. T.I. has also finalized a book deal. A representative from HarperCollins told The Associated Press that T.I. has written a book called Power & Beauty that’s set to be released in October.

Settlement Mel Gibson will pay $750,000 to his ex-girlfriend and continue to provide housing and financial support for their young daughter to resolve a bitter legal fight that followed sexist, racist rants attributed to the actor. The settlement disclosed Wednesday is intended to end the bickering and accusations that have permeated the case handled in mostly secret proceedings for more than a year, Superior Court Judge Peter Lichtman said. Gibson’s payments to Russian musician Oksana Grigorieva are dependent on a lasting truce. As part of the agreement, their daughter will receive support equal to what the actor-director provides for his other seven children. The former couple will split custody of the girl, who turns 2 in late October.

Passings

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: How often in a year do you visit Canada?

None 

62.7%

1-2 times 

3-4 times  4.7%

5-9 times  1.4%

29.8%

More than 10  1.4% Total votes cast: 1,163 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

By The Associated Press

LEONARD HARRIS, 81, an arts and theater critic for New York’s CBS television affiliate who had his own dramatic turn playing a senator in Martin Scorsese’s classic film “Taxi Driver,” died Sunday in Hartford, Conn. The cause was complications of pneumonia, said Mary Hilliard, his longtime companion. He lived in Manhattan, N.Y. Mr. Harris began his career writing obituaries and book reviews for The Hartford Courant in 1955. In 1966, he became a culture critic at WCBS-TV, a position he held until 1974. Scorsese cast Mr. Harris as Sen. Charles Palantine in “Taxi Driver” (1976) because he knew him through the New York drama scene. When the film’s disturbed antihero, Travis Bickle, meets the senator, he delivers a tirade about flushing the “scum and filth” out of New York. The senator cautiously sympathizes with Travis, perhaps unknowingly leading to his later violent deeds. Mr. Harris also played the mayor in a 1980 romantic comedy, “Hero at Large,” and wrote three novels. His first, The Masada Plan, was called “gripping, fast-moving, expertly engineered” by the novelist Meyer Levin in The New York Times Book Review.

_________

PATRICK C. FISCHER, 75, a computer

scientist whose theoretical work helped make Internet searches possible but who was most widely known as an early target of the socalled Unabomber, died Friday in Montgomery County, Md. The cause was stomach cancer, his family said. Mr. Fischer was a professor of computer science at Vanderbilt University in Nashville when a pipe bomb concealed in a package addressed to him exploded in his office May 5, 1982, while he was lecturing in Puerto Rico. The package was opened by his secretary, Janet Smith, who suffered lacerations and powder burns on her chest, arms and hands. She returned to work after three weeks in the hospital. Investigators told Professor Fischer that he was apparently the fifth person targeted by the mail bomber, who was identified in 1996 after his arrest as Theodore Kaczynski, a Harvard-

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots ON MOUNT PLEASANT Road east of Port Angeles, a young woman riding her horse around the arena — texting as she rides ... WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

trained mathematician. Disturbing as it was because of the injuries Smith suffered, the attack came to represent a kind of unsolved equation for Professor Fischer. He later described scouring his memory for any possible links he might have had with Kaczynski in the late 1950s and early ’60s, when both were graduate students in Cambridge, Mass. But while they knew many of the same people, he could not remember ever having met Kaczynski. “He treated it like a puzzle,” said his daughter, Carolyn Fischer, an economist in Washington. “But there was no connection.” Professor Fischer said he concluded that Kaczynski had gotten his name from academic journals that published his research papers.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Wednesday’s Daily Game: 8-7-2 Wednesday’s Hit 5: 02-10-19-21-36 Wednesday’s Keno: 03-05-08-09-16-20-21-2629-30-31-41-56-59-65-7073-76-78-80 Wednesday’s Lotto: 03-04-07-16-34-48 Wednesday’s Match 4: 07-13-14-18 Wednesday’s Powerball: 13-19-35-47-57, Powerball: 29, Power Play: 5

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) A ski run for winter sports, a Boy Scout center, a pump project to store spring water in two towers, a community center for about 32 overnight campers and other improvements are under way at Deer Park under the direction of the U.S. Forest Service. A crew of 30 Civilian Conservation Corps workers from Quilcene are encamped at the 5,400-foot elevation laying out a mile-long skiway, widening the roadways and other work as the first stage of a comprehensive scheme to develop one of the scenic showcases of the North American continent, the Forest Service said. A crew of four men is making a new trail from Three Forks to Deer Park, a distance of three miles, working from the Three Forks end.

1961 (50 years ago) Alaska Reefer, a 174-foot refrigerator ship out of San Pedro, Calif., rolled over and sank off Indian Island after a fire broke out in the engine room. None of the crew of 12 was injured in the fire or aboard at the time of the sinking, the Coast

Guard said. The engine-room fire was subdued and a tug had hooked onto the partially submerged ship to tow it to Port Townsend when Alaska Reefer suddenly overturned and sank. The fire had broken out off Whidbey Island while the ship was inbound from Alaska, the Coast Guard said.

1986 (25 years ago) A Port Angeles fisherman has netted the $10,000 first prize from the Port Angeles Salmon Club for winning the 49th Salmon Derby. Jim Blore hooked and landed a 37-pound, 15-ounce salmon on the final day of the three-day derby. The 1986 derby attracted 3,502 anglers, 52 fewer than in 1985.

Laugh Lines DICK “KABOOM” CHENEY has written a book, and he says he wouldn’t change anything. He feels strongly about this. He’d still invade the wrong country. David Letterman

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Sept. 1, the 244th day of 2011. There are 121 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Sept. 1, 1939, World War II began as Nazi Germany invaded Poland. On this date: ■  In 1715, following a reign of 72 years, King Louis XIV of France died four days before his 77th birthday. ■  In 1807, former Vice President Aaron Burr was found not guilty of treason. Burr was then tried on a misdemeanor charge but was again acquitted. ■  In 1923, the Japanese cities of Tokyo and Yokohama were devastated by an earthquake that claimed some 140,000 lives.

■  In 1941, the first municipally owned parking building in the United States opened in Welch, W. Va. ■  In 1951, the United States, Australia and New Zealand signed a mutual defense pact, the ANZUS treaty. ■  In 1961, the Soviet Union ended a moratorium on atomic testing with an above-ground nuclear explosion in central Asia. A TWA Lockheed Constellation crashed shortly after takeoff from Chicago’s Midway Airport, killing all 78 people on board. ■  In 1972, American Bobby Fischer won the international chess crown in Reykjavik, Iceland, as Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union resigned before the resump-

tion of game 21. ■  In 1981, Albert Speer, a close associate of Adolf Hitler who ran the Nazi war machine, died at a London hospital at age 76. ■  In 1983, 269 people were killed when a Korean Air Lines Boeing 747 was shot down by a Soviet jet fighter after the airliner entered Soviet airspace. ■  In 1995, a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland. The hall opened to the public the next day. ■  Ten years ago: An explosion and fire at a gambling parlor in Tokyo killed 44 people. ■  Five years ago: Mexican President Vicente Fox was forced to forego his final state-of-thenation address after leftist law-

makers stormed the stage of Congress to protest disputed July elections; Fox instead gave his speech on television. An Iranian passenger plane caught fire on landing in Mashhad, killing 28 of the 148 people on board. Nellie Connally, the former Texas first lady who was riding in President John F. Kennedy’s limousine when he was assassinated, died in Austin, Texas, at age 87. ■  One year ago: President Barack Obama convened a new round of ambitious Mideast peace talks at the White House as he hosted Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the first face-to-face negotiations in nearly two years.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, September 1, 2011

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Rivers swollen by Irene drop; damage bared KILLINGTON, Vt. — Swollen rivers began falling Wednesday in much of the Northeast, easing the flooding that paralyzed parts of the region after Tropical Storm Irene and allowing emergency crews to reach all but one of the Vermont towns that had been cut off by floodwaters. Receding water revealed more damage to homes, farms and businesses across the floodscarred landscape. Repair estimates indicated that the storm would almost certainly rank among the nation’s costliest natural disasters, despite packing a lighter punch than initially feared. Of the 11 towns that had been cut off from the outside world, all except tiny Wardsboro had been reached by rescuers, and authorities were hoping to reach it shortly. National Guard helicopters continued to ferry supplies to mountain communities that had no electricity, no telephone service and limited transportation in or out.

Lakes cutoff sought TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Six attorneys general in the Great Lakes region called for a multistate coalition Wednesday that would push the federal government to protect the lakes from invasive species such as Asian carp by cutting off their artificial link to the Mississippi River basin. In a letter obtained by The Associated Press, the officials

invited colleagues in 27 other states to join a lobbying campaign to separate the two watersheds. “We have Asian carp Schuette coming into Lake Michigan and zebra mussels moving out of the Great Lakes and into the heart of our country, both of which are like poison to the ecology of our waters,” Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette said. Five of the Great Lakes states are suing the Army Corps over its operation of a Chicagoarea waterway network that creates an artificial pathway between Lake Michigan and the Illinois River, a Mississippi River tributary.

TRIPOLI, Libya — Two men claiming to be Moammar Gadhafi’s sons made conflicting appeals from hiding Wednesday night, with one of them calling for talks with rebel leaders and the other urging the regime’s loyalists to fight to the death. The dueling messages reflected the growing turmoil in Gadhafi’s inner circle on the eve of the 42nd anniversary of his rise to power. Rebel forces have been advancing toward three regime strongholds: the town of Sirte, Gadhafi’s hometown, as well as the towns of Bani Walid and Sabha, the latter hundreds of miles south of the capital of Tripoli. There has been speculation that Gadhafi is hiding in one of them.

left

High explosives used in building nuclear weapons sit in a bunker, above, waiting to be disposed of at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Above right, the bunker is exploded, and at right, technician Will Haynes tests for any radiation — of which there was none.

NYPD spy unit NEW YORK — From an office on the Brooklyn waterfront in the months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, New York Police Department officials and a veteran CIA officer built an intelligence-gathering program with an ambitious goal: To map the region’s ethnic communities and dispatch teams of undercover officers to keep tabs on where Muslims shopped, ate and prayed. The program was known as the Demographics Unit and, though the NYPD denies its existence, the squad maintained a long list of “ancestries of interest” and received daily reports on life in Muslim neighborhoods, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Gadhafi sons differ about Libyan turmoil

Nothing

and for taking aim at another person before his gun jammed. Although Germany has experienced scores of terrorist attacks Uka in past decades, largely from leftist groups like the Red Army Faction, the airport attack was the first attributed to an Islamic extremist.

Explosive fertilizer

MULTAN, Pakistan — The main ingredient in most of the homemade bombs that have killed hundreds of American troops in Afghanistan is fertilizer produced by a single company in Pakistan, where the U.S. has been pushing unsuccessfully for greater regulation. Enough calcium ammonium nitrate fertilizer for at least 140,000 bombs was legally produced last year by Pakarab Fertilizers Ltd., then smuggled by Killings admitted militants and their suppliers FRANKFURT, Germany — A across the porous border into Kosovo Albanian man confessed southern and eastern Afghanistan, according to U.S. officials. Wednesday to killing two U.S. The United States began airmen at the Frankfurt airport, talks a year and a half ago with saying in emotional testimony Pakistani officials and Pakarab, at the opening of his trial that he had been influenced by radi- one of the country’s largest companies. But there is still no regcal Islamic propaganda online. Arid Uka, 21, is charged with ulation of distribution and sale of calcium ammonium nitrate two counts of murder for the fertilizer. March 2 slaying of Senior AirInsurgents either grind or man Nicholas J. Alden, 25, from South Carolina, and Airman 1st boil the small, off-white granClass Zachary R. Cuddeback, ules to separate the calcium 21, from Virginia. from the nitrate, which is mixed He also faces three counts of with fuel oil, packed into a jug attempted murder in connection or box and then detonated. The Associated Press with the wounding of two others

The Associated Press (3)

Obama yields to GOP on date of jobs speech Republicans want time for their TV debate The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — In a retreat after an hours-long test of wills Wednesday, President Barack Obama agreed to deliver an address on jobs and the economy to a joint session of Congress on Sept. 8 — yielding to House Speaker John Boehner, who had balked at Obama’s request for a Sept. 7 speech. Obama’s address still gives him a grand stage to unveil his economic agenda, but it falls on the same evening as the opening game of the National Football League season. White House officials were working on the precise timing of the speech. The change now will allow a planned Sept. 7 Republican presidential debate in Simi Valley, Calif., to proceed without Obama

up-staging it. Still, by seeking a rare joint session of Congress as his audience, Obama will get a nationally televised address that puts him face Obama to face with Republican lawmakers who have bitterly opposed his agenda and who have vowed to vote down any new spending he might propose.

‘Bipartisan solutions’ “It is our responsibility to find bipartisan solutions to help grow our economy, and if we are willing to put country before party, I am confident we can do just that,” Obama wrote Wednesday in a letter to Boehner, R-Ohio, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. With new August unemployment numbers ready to be released Friday, Obama is under pressure to lay out his plan. The timing dispute created an

inauspicious start to the jobs debate and introduced tensions before Congress even returns from its annual s u m m e r recess. It began Boehner with the White House releasing the letter at noon Wednesday from Obama to Boehner and Reid requesting they convene a joint session of Congress for his address at 8 p.m. EDT Sept. 7. Usually, presidential requests to address Congress are routinely granted after consultations between the White House and lawmakers. In this case, the White House notified Boehner’s office on the same day it released the letter requesting the session. But Boehner, in his formal reply, said the House would not return until the day Obama wanted to speak and that security and parliamentary issues might be an obstacle.

Logger cuts off his own toes to free foot trapped by trailer The Associated Press

DENVER — Jon Hutt was doing logging work all alone in a remote Colorado forest when his six-ton trailer fell onto his right foot. The pain was excruciating, no one was around to hear his cries for help, and he couldn’t free himself from the big piece of equipment. So he pulled out his 3-inch pocket knife and cut off his toes to get free. “It hurt so bad,” the 61-yearold Hutt said, “I would cut for a while, and then I had to rest.” Hutt then climbed into his semi tractor-trailer, his foot wrapped in a shirt, and began driving for help. Hutt, who runs a crane business and does logging “for fun,”

Quick Read

had gone into the woods by himself Aug. 19 to retrieve a pile of fallen aspen trees to cut for winter firewood. A trailer that was attached to his truck slipped and landed on his foot.

Alone in the woods The wiry, 180-pound man told The Associated Press that he began cutting off his toes about 30 minutes later when he realized no one could hear his cries. Hutt said he couldn’t reach his cellphone, which was in his truck and out of range anyway. Hutt told his wife he would be back in several hours from a job 50 miles away, but he did not know when she might start

searching for him. “I cut off my boot to see my foot, and once I realized how bad it was, I started cutting off my toes,” Hutt said. Once he freed himself, Hutt stopped the bleeding with the shirt and drove toward his home outside Montrose, about 175 miles southwest of Denver. He called for help once he was in cellphone range. An ambulance met him on the way. Hutt said authorities retrieved his severed toes and took them to the hospital, but doctors said the toes couldn’t be reattached because they were too badly mangled. Instead, doctors sewed his foot shut and wrapped it in bandages. Doctors warned him he may face more surgery.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Judge blocks N.M. plan on driver’s licenses

Nation: Hurricane forms in Atlantic; direction unclear

Nation: Al-Qaida slipping, White House official says

World: Activists disrupt Brazilian oil operation

A NEW MEXICO judge blocked Republican Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration Wednesday from requiring tens of thousands of immigrants to recertify their driver’s licenses and verify whether they continue to live in the state. Martinez last month announced the residency verification plan, which represents the administration’s latest effort to focus attention on the state’s politically charged license policy, which the governor contends poses a security risk. New Mexico is one of three states — the others are Washington and Utah — where an illegal immigrant can get a driver’s license because no proof of citizenship is required.

KATIA BECAME THE second named hurricane of the season in the Atlantic Ocean on Wednesday, but forecasters said it was too soon to determine where it might head. The National Hurricane Center in Miami cautioned the public — still recovering along parts of the East Coast from Irene — not to stress over the storm. It is over warm waters and in a low wind shear environment, two ingredients that could propel it to become a major hurricane, likely by the weekend. But it’s too soon to tell if it will ever come near land.

WHITE HOUSE COUNTERTERRORISM chief John Brennan said alQaida is “on a steady slide” after the death of al-Qaida’s latest second-incommand in Pakistan. Brennan told The Associated Press on Wednesday that it’s a “huge blow” in the first official White House comment since Atiyah Abd al-Rahman’s reported killing by CIA drone strike in Pakistan’s tribal areas last week. “Al-Qaida is sort of on the ropes and taking a lot of shots to the body and the head,” Brennan said. “This is a time not to step back and let them recover,” a message he’s sending to his counterparts in Pakistan.

GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS DRESSED as oil-covered humpback whales shut down a petroleum services company Wednesday to protest oil exploration near a Brazilian sanctuary. Humpback whales breed near Abrolhos, an archipelago off the coast of the northeastern state of Bahia that is home to the Abrolhos Marine National Park. Greenpeace wants oil companies to agree to a 20-year moratorium on oil exploration near the islands so the whales have time to reproduce and increase their population, said Ricardo Baitelo, the organization’s energy-campaign coordinator for Brazil.


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Thursday, September 1, 2011 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

PT mercantile consultants sought By Charlie Bermant

ated at that location since 1996. It was a separate retailer PORT TOWNSEND — from Swain’s General Store The Quimper Mercantile in Port Angeles, which Co. is seeking two consul- remains open. tants to pave the way to opening a new general store Concept, store designs in Port Townsend by June. The two consultants are “We are proceeding as quickly as we can so things for a concept design and can fall into place,” said store design, the first to company board Chairman select store inventory and the second to test-fit the Peter Quinn. The publicly owned Qui- projected products into a mper Mercantile Co., or selected space as well as QMC, was formed in design the facilities. Contract projections are response to the closure of Swain’s Outdoor at 1121 up to $2,500 for the concept Water St. in Port Townsend, designer and up to $86,000 which shut its doors in Feb- for the store designer, according to requests for ruary. at www. QMC aims to provide a proposals place to purchase clothes, quimpermerc.com/jobs. sporting goods and other htm. Quinn said the two conitems that were offered by Swain’s, which had oper- sultants would work closely Peninsula Daily News

together, and he does not expect that one firm will bid for both jobs. The initial pay for the consultants, along with other startup costs, will come from $50,000 in seed money raised to get the process started. The request to submit proposals for the two positions was published about three weeks ago, and responses are just starting to come in, Quinn said.

Proposals due Sept. 15 Proposals are due by Sept. 15, at which time the board will vet the applications and choose the best candidate, Quinn said. Not included in the request specifications is the selection of a site for the store, which Quinn said will

“run in parallel” with the consultants’ functions. The former home of Swain’s Outdoor — the a p p r o x i m a t e l y 2,200-square-foot space has been vacant since the store closed — is still under consideration, as are several other locations that Quinn has declined to name. The concept designer will “test-fit” the product mix into a hypothetical space, listing rooms with projected square footage allotments, and develop a rendering to suggest the general character of the remodeled store. Lighting and furniture will be part of this proposal, with the work taking place in October and November. The product designer is expected to create a product development plan that

includes stocking the store, determining sources for all these products and creating a relationship between QMC and suppliers. The product designer’s job will take place between Nov. 30 and Feb. 29. Applicants for both jobs are asked to describe how they will accomplish the tasks as part of the application.

Product selection QMC’s product selection has yet to be determined, and representatives have said they could use all or part of Swain’s former location should they choose to lease the space. In addition to Quinn, board of directors members are Gigi Callaizakas, Shannon Davis, Frank DePalma,

James Frazier, Marty Gay, Ian Keith, Steve Moore, Shelby Smith, Deborah Stinson and Tim Whyte. Port Townsend/Jefferson County Leader Editor and Publisher Scott Wilson is on the advisory board. Questions about the proposal process can be sent to jobs@quimpermerc.com, which is also a channel for submitting the proposals. Proposals also can be delivered to 2410 Washington St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. For more information, visit www.quimpermerc. com.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Final tallies for Gardeners: Golden Trowel kudo Clallam primary Peninsula Daily News

The count of an additional 11 ballots Wednesday raised the primary election voter turnout in Clallam County to 44.67 percent. Outcomes in the Aug. 16 election remained unchanged when the last ballots were counted and the election results were certified Wednesday in the all-mail election. A total of 8,529 ballots were cast out of 19,092 issued in Clallam County. The election was only in the eastern part of the county. Final voter turnout in Jefferson County was 49.13 percent, with 10,723 ballots counted out of 21,827 mailed to registered voters.

Sequim Council race In the Sequim City Council race, Mayor Pro Tem Laura Dubois,who will face challenger John Miller, won 845 votes, or 52.88 percent, to Miller’s 516 votes, or 32.29 percent.

Ron Fairclough garnered 237 votes, or 14.83 percent, and was eliminated in the top-two primary. In the primary race, the top two vote-getters go on to the general election.

District No. 1 seat In the contest for the Clallam County commissioner District No. 1 seat, Republican Jim McEntire remained more popular than Democrat Linda Barnfather in the final vote count. McEntire won 4,751 votes, or 56.17 percent, to Barnfather’s 3,707 votes, or 43.83 percent. The two automatically advance to the November election. Both live in Sequim. McEntire is a Port of Port Angeles commissioner and retired Coast Guard captain. Barnfather is the executive legislative assistant to 24th District state Rep. Kevin Van De Wege of Sequim.

Continued from A1 was a great loss to the Master Gardener program, NesNesbitt was master of bitt said. Bigler, also with the class ceremonies at the awards of 2001 along with Alf Ahron, luncheon. Along with the Golden worked at the Woodcock garTrowel, honorees receive den early on. He worked in stones engraved with their the orchard and vegetable names that are embedded garden areas and became on the “Walk of Fame” at manager of both. In 2007, he moved his the 2.5-acre Woodcock Road garden, where just about efforts to the Robin Hill garanything that can grow on den, where he is still involved the North Olympic Penin- in the organic vegetable garsula is grown, from roses den and orchard. He is the organization’s and dahlias to orchard fruit trees and berries, ornamen- fruit tree expert, and Nesbitt tals and ornamental said he is always willing to grasses, leafy vegetables, make house calls on sick annuals and perennial trees and to offer public presentations on growing fruit. plants. Bruce is well-known This brings to 47 the number of honorees with among Master Gardeners for stones on the Walk of Fame her acerbic sense of humor since the award’s inception and contagious love of life, Nesbitt said. in 2005. She has been a Master Gardener since 1998. She Sudden death was the plant sale coordinaAlf Ahron, who died in a tor for her first two years and fall from a ladder this year has been active in several after joining the Master Gar- projects and committees. deners in 2001, was rememShe joined the organizabered as a modest, kind, tion’s Youth Enrichment Prointelligent person with a gram in 1999. wonderful sense of humor. Mangiantini joined the His sudden death in June Master Gardeners in 2003,

and because of her hearing impairment, she had to sit in the front row in the training class so she could read the instructors’ lips, Nesbitt said. Nevertheless, Mangiantini was able to score 100 percent on her final exam. As an intern, she participated in all the Master Gardener activities, including plant clinics, demonstration gardens, plant sales, garden tours and the Irrigation Festival Parade. She edited the Master Gardeners’ newsletter for several years and the Master Gardeners’ contributions to Sequim This Week. Nelson joined the Master Gardeners in 1997, and she and her husband, Harry, started Nelson’s Duckpond & Lavender Farm.

Best thing she’s done

the Foundation Board as a member and as president. Nelson founded the Golden Trowel Award and Walk of Fame in 2005. Thu joined the Master Gardeners in 1995, and her primary activities then were in the area of publicity, which has become a continuing interest. She worked in the WSU Extension Office at the Clallam County Courthouse before any of the current staff were there. She has served on the Master Gardeners Foundation Board and worked on all the plant sales and garden tours. To join Master Gardeners, phone 360-565-2679 and leave a message requesting an application and volunteer screening form by leaving your name, address and phone number; or email Nesbitt at mnesbitt@co.clallam. wa.us.

Nelson said joining the Master Gardeners was the best thing she has done, particularly the Youth Enrich________ ment Program, which she has participated in since Sequim-Dungeness Valley Edi1997. tor Jeff Chew can be reached at She has chaired the gar- 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ den tour twice and served on peninsuladailynews.com.

Teen: Man who assaulted her in Colo. prison Continued from A1 his ruling. “She indicated she was Last later told police she tired, scared, confused and made statements to police ‘didn’t know what to do’ at that were incorrect and the time,” Williams said. “Ms. Last indicates that that she incriminated herself to have the interviews she finally just told the offiend, Williams said in cers what they wanted to

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hear. . . . However, the question before the court is whether or not the answers she gave were the result of having her will overborne by police coercion.” Port Angeles Detective Jesse Winfield and Detective Sgt. Steve Coyle conducted the interviews individually. Winfield and Coyle “were polite, and the conversations with Ms. Last were conversational in tone,” Williams said. Last was 15 and living in Colorado when she was impregnated by a friend of her mother’s, according to court records. The man, who was 37, is serving time for the child sexual assault of Last and pressured her for two years before assaulting her, according to Last’s statement to police. Her statement was recorded on a tape recorder and the transcript obtained by the Peninsula Daily News under a state Public Records Act request. Three times Last waived her right to remain silent and have an attorney present and also signed a written waiver, according to the transcript.

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ast was 15 and living in Colorado when she was impregnated by a friend of her mother’s, according to court records. The man, who was 37, is serving time. mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, which by the end of the interviews she denied doing. Some of the points in her final statements to police were: Last said she was a sophomore at Choice School in Port Angeles, eight months pregnant and scared when she gave birth on the toilet at her father’s Port Angeles home. She thought she just had a stomach ache before she sat on the toilet and the baby came out. She said she heard the infant gurgle, saw the child move its arms and intentionally did not lift the baby out of the toilet. Last said she placed the infant’s body in a garbage can. The body was later found at a Tacoma garbage transfer facility. The hearing on the admissibility of Last’s statements began in November and was continued several times, causing the trial date, last set for June 7, to be postponed pending Williams’ ruling. During one of the hearings, Troberg called a psy-

chologist to the stand who said Last had no “significant” emotional problems that would have prevented her from meeting the legal requirement for waiving her Miranda rights.

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knowing and intelligent waiver of her constitutional rights.” At the time of the birth, Last was taking methadone pills six to seven times a day, Williams said. Williams said the main issue was whether police coerced her into confessing. “It may well be that she was not fully capable of exercising her Miranda rights, but her incapacity to do so was not the result of police action or coercion which overcame her ability to resist talking,” Williams said. “The recorded interviews show Ms. Last as appropriately responsive to the questions asked and do not on their face indicate any impairment of mental functioning,” Williams added.

A psychologist called to the stand by Hayden said Last had complex posttraumatic stress disorder caused by traumatic events in her life. Those events included childhood sexual and physical abuse and living in a home in which domestic violence was an ongoing ________ occurrence. Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb Hayden said her mental can be reached at 360-417-3536 condition made it impossi- or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily ble for Last “to make a news.com.

Rates: Charge Continued from A1 City Councilwoman Cherie Kidd said the city should apply the increase to the consumption rate, arguing that it would make it easier for residents to lower their bill through conservation. Kidd said by applying the increase to the base rate, those who use little energy would be subsidizing everyone else. “And I don’t think that’s what we want to do,” she said.

On the same utility bill with electricity are charges for water, sewer, garbage collection, emergency medical service and the city’s sewage overflow elimination project. The approximately $40 million CSO project is expected to cut the number of annual sewage overflows from up to 100 to no more than four by 2016. The city raises the fee, now at $14.95 per month, by $2 plus inflation each year. The fee started in 2005. It will continue increasing at that rate until 2015, when it will reach $26.40 per month. The rate will expire after another 20 years.

When the council raised the base rate to $13 per month, intended to cover the cost of the utility’s infrastructure, it was the ________ first time it had been raised since 1993. Reporter Tom Callis can be The city has not raised reached at 360-417-3532 or at the electrical consumption tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. charge since 2007. com.


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Peninsula Daily News

FRIDAY AT 5 p.m. is the deadline for Clallam and Jefferson county readers to send the Peninsula Daily News your thoughts on the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States. Your submission for possible publication must be a maximum of 250 words. Include your full name, address and phone number. Please also include a high-resolution photograph of yourself that we can use to illustrate your submission. Both should be emailed to leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com. Here are topics you can address: ■  How has the nation changed since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon? ■  How have you changed? Did you lose someone close to you? Did the attack compel you to join the military or volunteer more of your time? Did it prompt you to draw closer to those you love? ■  What’s the most vivid memory you carry with you of Sept. 11, 2001? Peninsula Daily News

By Arwyn Rice

Peninsula Daily News

Human foot discovered on B.C. estuary news sources

VANCOUVER, B.C. — Police said a human foot inside a running shoe has washed ashore, the latest in about 10 such cases in British Columbia and Washington state since 2007. Police said the foot and leg bone were seen late Tuesday afternoon floating along the shore of Vancouver’s False Creek, an estuary near downtown that’s surrounded by high-rise buildings, wharfs and marinas. Police so far have no theories about how the foot ended up in the water.

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Historical Society will open the doors to the former Lincoln School site today for a membersonly preview of a garage sale so big it is organized like a department store. After today’s 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. preview — when some staff members will dress up in vintage clothing — the general public Friday and Saturday can dive into a vast array of everything from aprons to zippers, including tools, clothing, books, household items, furniture, crafts and collectibles. But those who aren’t members of the historical society now don’t have to wait to shop at the sale at the old school site at Eighth and C streets. “If you’re not a member yet, you can join at the door,” said Kathy Monds, executive director of the historical society. Memberships cost $35 for families, $30 for individuals, $25 for senior citizens and $10 for youths. Friday and Saturday, the sale will be open to the public

unidentified, though investigators said at least two of the feet found in the Strait of Georgia belong to men who were reported missing. The right foot found near the former Silver King Resort at Pysht in August 2008 was clad in a Levi’sbrand tube sock and a black hiking-style Everest-brand shoe, men’s size 11. Most of the feet found in Canada also have been right feet. Another “foot” found in June 2008 at the north end of the Strait of Georgia was determined to be an animal paw shoved inside an athletic shoe as a hoax.

All in shoes In the past four years, at least nine feet encased in shoes have washed up on Canadian beaches along the Straits of Georgia and Juan de Fuca — plus one near Pysht on the North Olympic Peninsula. A foot in a boot — instead of a running or hiking shoe — washed up in Tacoma last year. Most of the remains are

Briefly . . .

Continuing restoration The sale provides visitors a look at the continuing renovation of the former Lincoln School, which was purchased by the historical society in 1991 at a cost of $210,000 and will house the Clallam County Museum and Resource Center. Now, the site hosts both a research library and an artifacts center. “For our regulars, when they come in year after year, they’re always impressed with what we have done,”

hosted by the historical society. For the first few years, it was not an annual event, Monds said. Since it began a yearly tradition, some compete for first-day finds, she said. “We have one man who is always there waiting outside the door” before the sale opens, she said. Volunteers who worked at least 10 hours in preparation for the sale were allowed to purchase items before the sale began in any department except collectibles. “No one touches the collectibles until the sale begins,” Monds said. Every year, six to eight museum-quality items with connections to Clallam County history are donated for the sale, Monds said. Those items are put into the museum collection, she said. Sale grown since first For more information The sale has grown since about the garage sale, phone the first one, held in a large the historical society’s office storage shed behind the at 360-452-2662 or email artifact@olypen.com. museum office. ________ That sale brought in $4,000, Monds said. Reporter Arwyn Rice can be In 2010, the garage sale reached at 360-417-3535 or at raised $27,000. arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. This sale is the 18th com. Monds said. This year, that includes the removal of the south addition and the new front entryway. Many of the rooms that have been partially renovated house sale items, which have been sorted by dozens of volunteers. There is a kitchen department, men’s and women’s clothing departments, and a collection of collectibles, as well as holiday decorations, furniture and jewelry. The collectibles department includes several cott­on christening gowns, a full set of antique porcelain spice rack containers, several sets of sterling silverware, crossstitch items and an accordion. One wall is covered with paintings and picture frames, while another displays blanket hangings.

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Hall of Fame KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A former Associated Press photographer is among three photojournalists who are being inducted into the Missouri Photojournalism Hall of Fame in Washington, Mo. This year’s inductees are Cliff Schiappa, former photographer and assistant bureau chief for The Associated Press in Kansas City; J.B. Forbes, chief photographer for the St. Louis PostDispatch; and Alan Berner, a St. Louis native who has been a staff photographer for The Seattle Times for three decades. The three comprise the seventh group of inductees since the Hall of Fame was founded in 2005. The induction ceremony is scheduled for Oct. 20 in Washington. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. And it will reopen the following weekend from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. both Friday, Sept. 9 — which will be half-price day — and Saturday, Sept. 10, when remaining items will be sold for a “buck a bag.” The 1916 brick schoolhouse that will house the sale is also a primary recipient of the money raised, Monds said. The giant sale is the historical society’s biggest annual fundraiser, which helps fund the Museum at the Carnegie and other historical society operations as well as restoration of the old school site.

Live

Final Concerts on the Dock event today PORT TOWNSEND — The final performance in the Concerts on the Dock series is today. The Better Half will perform funk, rock and soul music from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Pope Marine Park plaza at Water and Madison streets. No chairs are provided at the free concert. Dos Okies barbecue will be available along with beer, wine and cider. The series is presented by the Port Townsend Main Street Program and the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce.

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Preview of big historical society garage sale at ex-school site set

Send PDN thoughts, memories of 9/11

Peninsula Daily News

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Thursday, September 1, 2011

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Clallam ties with world group faulted By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County commissioners got an earful earlier this week from those who oppose the county’s membership in ICLEI. ICLEI, which stands for International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives, is an association of more than 1,200 local governments worldwide that are “committed to sustainable development,” according to www.iclei.org. Its critics said it violates the Constitution, threatens individual liberty and promotes the United Nations Agenda 21, a global action plan for sustainability. Clallam County GOP Chairman Dick Pilling presented commissioners Tuesday with a resolution from the party that calls on the county to cut ties with ICLEI. County Administrator Jim Jones said Clallam County spends $1,200 per year on membership dues

to receive materials from ICLEI that give examples of what other cities and counties are doing to reduce energy consumption and help the environment. Commissioner Mike Doherty said he clicks through the material “looking for practical examples of what other local governments are doing.” The county has been an ICLEI member for three years, Jones said.

Criticism of ICLEI “Upon investigating various aspects of ICLEI, the Clallam County Republican Party has determined that the goals, aspirations and agenda of ICLEI are not consistent with the principles set forth in the U.S. Constitution or the Washington state constitution,” Pilling told the three commissioners. “Moreover, they are incompatible with the precepts of freedom and individual choice, which have been cornerstones of our

country throughout its history.” Pilling cited what he described as “egregious” examples of the organization’s doctrine. They include: ■  ICLEI and its associates believe land can’t be treated as an asset controlled by individuals, as it would contribute to social injustice. ■  It wants to move people from rural areas to cities to decrease environmental footprints. ■  It envisions turning half of America into a wilderness reserve where no human activity would be permitted. “Most damning, they say the individual right must give way to the collective,” Pilling said. “In order to accomplish all these goals, the members are reminded that they must be prepared to [take] radical action.” Jefferson County and the cities of Port Angeles, Sequim and Forks are not

members of ICLEI. The city of Port Townsend is a listed member. Pilling said ICLEI is composed of “faceless, nameless, unelected bureaucrats” who aspire to dictate to a free people how to run their lives. “This is not a partisan issue,” Pilling said. “Both Republican and Democrat organizations reject ICLEI. “Cities and counties across the United States are awaking to the hostile aspects of ICLEI, and they are demanding that their legislators cease to associate themselves with ICLEI.”

Took no action The three county commissioners took no action Tuesday on ICLEI membership. Doherty said it would be more appropriate to reconsider the membership during budget discussions this fall. “As one commissioner, I

Newest PA officer begins basic training this week Peninsula Daily News

1st school day for some on N. Peninsula

Members at market PORT ANGELES — Deputy Mayor Don Perry and City Councilwoman Cherie Kidd will be available to answer questions and hear comments from the public at the Port Angeles Farmers Market on Saturday. Members of the Port Angeles City Council will host a table at the farmers market in The Gateway pavilion the first Saturday of each month from 10 a.m. to noon. Tentatively scheduled for Oct. 1 are Kidd and City Councilman Brad Collins.

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Fund applications PORT ANGELES — Applications are available

Matthew Wolff is sworn in by Police Chief Terry Gallagher on July 11.

fortunate to have him as been to attract and recruit law enforcement. college students for jobs in “We are proud of Matt our newest member of the local law enforcement. and consider ourselves very Police Department.” “With his military service, education and demonstrated skills, he has shown himself to be particularly well-suited for a career in Maranda Ann Mazzie died Jeffrey A. Cummins at the age of 37. Cause of May 7, 1960 — Aug. 7, 2011 death is pending. Sequim resident Jeffrey Her obituary will be pubA. Cummins died at the age lished later. of 51. Services: Saturday Services: No services are planned. Sequim Valley from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., visiFuneral Chapel, Sequim, is tation at Drennan-Ford in charge of arrangements. Funeral Home, 260 Monroe 401 East First Street, Port Angeles Road, Port Angeles, fol360.417.8546 Maranda Ann Mazzie lowed by 11 a.m. funeral www. elwhagallery.com May 21, 1974 — Aug. 27, 2011 service. Mon–Fri 7am–6pm • Sat & Sun 9am–6pm www.drennanford.com Port Angeles resident

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Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Doherty said he does not see a threat in getting information from a source that relies on the consensus of responsible scientists. “It [ICLEI] does have affiliations with other groups, but as long as you take information from all sides, and being rational human beings trying to process it and come out with a responsible point of view I think is the right thing to do as a public official,” he said. Audience members clapped when others spoke against ICLEI. At one point, Doherty asked the crowd to refrain from applause. “We want you to know how we feel,” said Shelley Taylor of Port Angeles, a community activist and the former head of now-disbanded Property Owners for Predictable Tax Now.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Briefly . . .

Today is the first day of school for several public school districts on the North Olympic Peninsula. Port Angeles, Crescent and Cape Flattery school districts resume classes today. Sequim, Port Townsend, Chimacum, Brinnon and Quilcene schools will welcome students Tuesday. Quillayute Valley School District students begin school Thursday, Sept. 8.

PORT ANGELES — The newest member of the Port Angeles Police Department, Matthew Wolff, began training at the Criminal Justice Training Center in Burien this week. Wolff, a Port Angeles resident and 2001 graduate of Port Angeles High School, was sworn in by Chief Terry Gallagher on July 11. On Monday, he began an 18-week basic law enforcement academy in Burien. The basic training is an intensive program of classroom instruction, defensive tactics, field scenarios and physical training that is required for all entry-level law enforcement officers in Washington state. The basic academy will be followed by a 12- to 14-week field training and evaluation program at the Port Angeles Police Department. He will be assigned to at least three certified field training officers and will be evaluated through the three phases of the program, said Deputy Chief Brian Smith in a statement.

Wolff served in the Army as an intelligence analyst from June 2001 to June 2005, including a deployment to Iraq for more than a year beginning in 2003. He earned an associate degree in science from Cascadia College in 2009 and completed a bachelor’s in business management from Peninsula College in June. From late 2010 and through early 2011, Wolff completed a two-semester internship at the Port Angeles Police Department. Said Smith: “One of the objectives of the Police Department student intern program has

appreciate getting information from all sides of public issues,” Doherty said. “If you know Clallam County well, we have some water problems, the latest research on climate change saying that there’s some possibilities of change in the forest resources, which are the main economic driver of our county. “So the convergence of major public issues of energy, climate, weather, water, fossil fuels — a lot of things affecting our generation but also future generations — I think it behooves public officials to get information on all sides of issues.” Doherty said he has read scientific information from both ends of the political spectrum, including the John Birch Society. “ICLEI is the largest group of local governments who want to know what is the science right now regarding climate change, global warming, those sorts of issues,” Doherty said.

for Affordable Housing and Homeless Housing and Assistance Funds for 2012. The deadline for applications for the funds, available from the Clallam County Department of Health and Human Services, is Friday, Oct. 21. All applicants must attend a mandatory bidders’ conference from noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, in the Health & Human Services Conference Room on the basement level of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Housing and homeless funds are generated by recording fees collected by the county Auditor’s Office specifically for affordable housing and homeless housing and assistance projects within Clallam County. Funds may be used for projects listed in the 2010 Update to the Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness in Clallam County. The plan may be found at http://tinyurl. com/3ncvcr7. Applicants must be Clallam County 501(c)(3) agencies, for-profit entities, public housing authorities or governmental entities. To receive an application with instructions, contact Jill Dole at 360-5652608 or jdole@co.clallam. wa.us, or Jennifer Charles at 360-417-2384 or jcharles@co.clallam.wa.us. Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice DARLENE ANNE SHOFSTALL July 22, 1936 August 18, 2011 Darlene Anne Shofstall was born to Albert Boe Sr. and Ester Boe in Port Angeles on July 22, 1936. A lifetime resident of Clallam County, Darlene passed away on August 18, 2011, in Sequim. Darlene grew up at Royal on the Boe homestead. Mrs. Shofstall married Dale Roy Shofstall in June 1952 in Port Angeles. They enjoyed camping and RVing. He preceded her in death on February 19, 1994. Darlene loved to entertain people with her yodeling, singing and playing the accordion. She was a member of the Eagles Lodge, Ediz Hookers, Pig Club and the Royal Grange until it disbanded and moved to Forks. She is survived by six children, Darla Simpson, Darrell Shofstall, Dondi Shofstall and wife Tina, Doyle Shofstall, Daileen Martens and Devin Shofstall and wife Donna; 17 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister, Ethel Dinius, and

Mrs. Shofstall brother, Norman Boe, and wife Marilyn. Darlene was preceded in death by her brothers, Ivan Iverson and Albert Boe; and sister, Dolly Iverson Nicholas. A potluck celebration of life will be held Saturday, September 24, 2011, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 West Seventh Street, Port Angeles. Memorial contributions may be made to Bellevue Healthcare Peninsula, 325 West Pine Street, Sequim, WA 98382. Please sign the online guestbook at www. drennanford.com.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, September 1, 2011

Commentary

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Nightmare on Pennsylvania Avenue IN ADVANCE OF a “major speech” on the economy and jobs, President Obama has selected Princeton University professor Alan Krueger to be chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers. Krueger is no relation to the horror film Cal Thomas character Freddy Krueger, though if his ideas are implemented, they might further “slash” the economy. Alan Krueger is the latest in a long line of professors and academics to populate this administration. Few, if any, have held real jobs in the private sector. They are mostly theorists, whose theories are often proved wrong, but in academia as well as in government, being wrong rarely disqualifies one from a leadership post. Intentions are all that matter.

As an economic theorist, Krueger’s record for accuracy is not a good one and doesn’t produce confidence that adding him to the Obama team will revive an economy in the doldrums. Krueger, writing for The New York Times blog in 2009, proposed instituting a 5 percent consumption, or value added, tax on top of the income tax, which he said would “raise approximately $500 billion a year, and fill a considerable hold in the budget outlook.” He acknowledged, though, that a consumption tax would “reduce economic activity” and be a “greater burden for the poor, who spend a relatively high share of their income.” How many of those working in the private sector think government deserves more of our money when it has done such a dreadful job of spending what we have already provided it? In May 2011, Krueger said he wanted to raise taxes on energy producers (meaning an end to tax breaks for “big oil”). He assured us that “because

the U.S. is such a small producer [of oil], eliminating the subsidy would have very little effect in the long run and no effect in the short run on gas prices.” America would have more oil if the administration lifted restrictions on drilling in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico and other places in our backyard. If Krueger thinks raising the cost of energy production by eliminating tax breaks that encourage more exploration would not lead to higher prices, he’s been spending too much time in the faculty lounge. As if all of these new taxes weren’t enough, Krueger has also said he wants to raise taxes on some employers to help fund unemployment benefits. If employers have to pay more to pay for the unemployed, won’t they be forced to lay off more workers? It becomes a vicious cycle. Krueger favors a national capand-trade program, which he says would produce green jobs. He has claimed the $825 billion stimulus was growing the

Peninsula Voices Do your part

U.S. commonwealth that exploits and all but imprisMad as all get-out, and ons their workers, or workyou don’t want to take it ers here with decent beneanymore? fits? Who is the target of our A friend talked about his anger? regret at buying a tool Politicians who have to made out of country to save worry about contributors a dollar. and votes or the corporaTake on oil companies. tions and special-interest Carpool, take the bus, groups that are making our and run all your errands on political decisions and investing in equipment that the same day. Hang your clothes out to replaces a worker. dry when possible instead Take a look at how you of using energy to dry them. spend your money. The clothes last longer, I fired my bank for foresmell better and leave a closing on the homes of our soldiers serving in the Mid- smaller carbon footprint. Grow your own food or dle East. buy locally where you can. Are your institutions When you buy garden under fire for illegal forecloproducts, make sure the sures? company that makes that There are too many product is not exploiting banks around that still invest in people to give our small farmers by forcing the genetically altered businesses to the institutions that brought down our seeds on unwilling consumers and encouraging laws economy. Where are the goods you that ban farmers from keeping their seeds from buy made? In America? one year to the next. Which America, the As author James Northern Mariana Islands, a

economy, which can’t be taken seriously given the jump in the unemployment rate from 8.2 percent when the stimulus was passed, to the current 9.1 percent. Previous economic advisers Christina Romer and Jared Bernstein predicted that after the stimulus, unemployment wouldn’t rise above 8 percent. As The Washington Post fact checker Glenn Kessler noted last week: “Unless the economy turns around in the next 18 months, Obama is on track to have the worst jobs record of any president in the modern era.” In May 2001, when President George W. Bush had been in office just three months and unemployment was at 4.5 percent, Krueger told Jim Lehrer on PBS that it was hard to find a “silver lining” in the number since “the loss in total employment was almost a quarter of a million jobs” and that it was “quite a grim report.” Who wouldn’t settle for numbers like that today? The naming of Krueger is another indication that President

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Obama is not likely to adjust his “spread the wealth around” philosophy in light of the facts. With the words “fanatic” and “extremist” being applied by liberal Democrats to some of the Republican presidential candidates, the Obama administration continues to engage in economic extremism with its fanatical policies that don’t have a chance of producing jobs in the private sector, much less win congressional approval. Freddy Krueger terrorized his victims in their dreams. If Alan Krueger has his way, the dreams of too many Americans will soon become nightmares.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and email

draw your attention to is 125 — as in $125 million. That’s the current budget, including capital projects, for the city of Port Angeles. The budget for the year prior was $100 million. In other words, in one year, the City Council put the city budget on steroids and grew it 25 percent. That’s 25 percent growth during a recession. That’s 25 percent growth when we have extremely high unemployment. That’s 25 percent growth at a time when people are still losing their homes because they can’t Thurber once said: small amount. keep up with their mortWith topics like high “Do not look back in gage payments. unemployment, economic anger, or forward in fear, To me, this isn’t just stagnation and our collecbut around in awareness.” insane, it’s cruel. tive tax burden, it would be Terry L. Coe, Of the four current City Sequim easy to write a much, much longer letter than 250 words. Council members running Having said that, I for re-election, two of them PA budget would like to talk (as briefly voted for this abusive When you’re trying to as possible) about another abomination of a budget, address big topics in a letnumber that’s related to all bloated with your tax dollars. the topics I listed above. ter to the editor, about 250 Mayor Dan Di Guilio The number I wish to words can seem like a very and Deputy Mayor Don

Perry both voted to bloat the budget. Cherie Kidd voted against it, and Brad Collins expressed concerns about it in a statement to the council. I urge you all to keep this in mind when voting this fall. Sam Miller, Port Angeles

Half full, half empty An Aug. 25 PDN article, “Sequim Survey Contains Surprises For City Hall,” said 5 percent of survey respondents gave the Sequim Police Department a “disapproval” rating, and 37 percent gave the city “poor marks for land use, planning and regulations.” How about this take on the [city’s “DirectionFinder Survey”]: 95 percent gave the Sequim police approval and 63 percent gave the city approval for land use. Be positive, not negative. Don Wright, Sequim

Two dark artists of propaganda “WHEN ONE LIES, one should lie big, and stick to it,” wrote Joseph Goebbels, Germany’s Reich minister of propaganda, in 1941. Former Vice President Dick Amy Cheney seems Goodman to have taken the famous Nazi’s advice in his new book, In My Time. Cheney remains staunch in his convictions on issues from the invasion of Iraq to the use of torture. Telling NBC News in an interview that “there are gonna be heads exploding all over Washington” as a result of the revelations in the book, Cheney’s memoir follows one by his colleague and friend Donald Rumsfeld. As each promotes his own version of history, there are people challenging and confronting both. Rumsfeld’s book title, Known and Unknown, is drawn from a notorious response he gave in one of his Pentagon press briefings as secretary of defense.

In Feb. 12, 2002, attempting to explain the lack of evidence linking Iraq to weapons of mass destruction, Rumsfeld said: “There are known knowns; there are things we know we know. “We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. “But there are also unknown unknowns — the ones we don’t know we don’t know.” Rumsfeld’s cryptic statement gained fame, emblematic of his disdain for reporters. It stands as a symbol of the lies and manipulations that propelled the U.S. into the disastrous invasion and occupation of Iraq. One person convinced by Rumsfeld’s rhetoric was Jared August Hagemann. Hagemann enlisted in the Army to serve his country, to confront the threats repeated by Defense Secretary Rumsfeld. When Hagemann, an Army Ranger, received the call for his most recent deployment (his wife can’t recall if it was his seventh or eighth), the pressure became too much. On June 28, 2011, 25-year-old

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Jared Hagemann shot himself on Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle. The Pentagon notes that Hagemann died of a “selfinflicted” gunshot wound, but has not yet called it a suicide. Jared had threatened suicide several times before. He was not alone. Five soldiers reportedly committed suicide at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in July. It has been estimated that more than 300,000 returning troops suffer from PTSD or depression. Hagemann’s widow, Ashley Joppa-Hagemann, found out that Rumsfeld was doing a book signing on the base. On Friday, Aug. 26, she handed Rumsfeld a copy of the program from her late husband’s memorial service. She recounted: “I told him that I wanted him to see my husband, and so he would know — he could put a face with at least one of the soldiers that had lost their lives because of his lies from 9/11.” I asked her about Rumsfeld’s response: “All I remember is him saying, ‘Oh, I heard about that.’

“And after that, all I remember is being bombarded with security personnel and being pushed out and told not to return.” Unfortunately, it’s Staff Sgt. Hagemann who will never return to his wife and two little children. In his NBC interview, Cheney claimed to have played a role in the January 2005 resignation of then-Secretary of State Colin Powell. Powell’s former chief of staff, Lawrence Wil­ker­son, called the claim “utter nonsense.” More importantly, though, is Wilkerson’s unflinching call for accountability for those involved in leading the nation to war in Iraq — including punishment for himself. A central pillar of the invasion of Iraq was Powell’s Feb. 5, 2003, speech before the United Nations, which laid out the case of weapons of mass destruction. Wilkerson, who takes full responsibility for coordinating Powell’s address, told me: “It was probably the biggest mistake of my life. I regret it to this day. I regret not having resigned over it.” The Center for Constitutional Rights and lawyer/blogger Glenn Greenwald are among those who

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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have long called for criminal prosecution of Cheney, Rumsfeld and other Bush administration officials. Said Wilkerson: “I’d be willing to testify, and I’d be willing to take any punishment I’m due.” Wilkerson says Cheney’s book is “written out of fear, fear that one day someone will ‘Pinochet’ Dick Cheney,” referring to the former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, who was arrested in Britain and held for a year before being released. A Spanish judge had wanted him extradited to be tried for crimes against humanity. As we approach the 10th anniversary of 9/11, and the casualties mount on all sides, the books by Rumsfeld and Cheney remind us once again of war’s first casualty: Truth.

________

Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


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Thursday, September 1, 2011

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Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker (4)/Peninsula Daily News

A portable lamp illuminates the projection room at the former Elwha Theatre on Wednesday. The walls of the room were lined with metal to reduce the risk of fire should one break out. The nitrate film stock that used to be used in theaters was a fire hazard.

A hidden treasure Business owners unearth old Elwha Theatre at ex-gift shop By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — When the owners of Captain T’s Shirt Shoppe bought a new downtown building for their business in April, they thought they were simply getting a better location. But Johnnie Montice and Randy Lester soon found they had acquired something much more. While poking around the building at 116 E. Front St., which most recently housed the Blue Dolphin gift shop, a piece of Port Angeles’ past was unveiled before their eyes. They found an old projection room, brightly colored walls and a ceiling painted with a pattern described as “Mayan motif,” as well as chandeliers all hidden from view by a false ceiling installed about 50 years ago.

Remnants of theater What they discovered was the remnants of the Elwha Theatre, one of Port Angeles’ early cinemas. The movie theater opened in 1932 and closed about 1957. “We didn’t have any idea of this,” Lester said. “We were just looking for a good location.” “That was just like an added bonus,” Montice said. After Lester discovered the old theater, he shouted to Mon-

tice to come upstairs, she recalled. “Holy moly, that changed everything,” Montice said. The couple said they were amazed by the find and have no intention of keeping it to themselves.

Open to the public soon They have been at work over the past five months to make the remaining theater artifacts open to the public through Don Perry’s Heritage Tours — something likely to happen within the next few weeks. Perry, the city’s deputy mayor, said he has been waiting for 25 years for a light to be shown on this piece of Port Angeles’ history. “I literally dreamed of this,” he said. And he doesn’t spare Montice and Lester compliments. “They have really been working so hard on this,” Perry said. “They are turning this dream into a reality,” he added. Those who go on a tour shouldn’t be disappointed. After walking up newly built stairs, the original multicolored walls and ceiling stretch down the entire length of the building and quickly catch the eye’s attention from what used to be private seating booths.

From left, Don Perry, Johnnie Montice and Randy Lester stand inside the main business area of what will be the new location for Captain T’s Shirt Shoppe. The building has been used by many businesses over the decades, including as the Elwha Theatre. Next to that is the projection room, which from the inside resembles a large tin box. Its walls and ceiling are covered in metal used as a fire retardant. The projectionist’s toilet, situated a few feet from where the projection machine stood, is still there. So are the projection machine’s wall mount and seven hatches through which movies used to be shown, though the machine itself has long been removed.

Golden age While peering through the hatches, it’s not hard to imagine a large screen on the far wall illuminated by images of Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn and other

Johnnie Montice and Port Angeles historian Don Perry look at tilework Wednesday that shows the scar of the theater ticket booth.

stars of Hollywood’s golden age. It’s that imagery that Montice and Lester want to recreate. They plan to make their own makeshift screen that would display the first movie ever shown there: the 1931 film “Cracked Nuts.” And, yes, Montice has the DVD. She said they feel like they were given a gift and want the rest of the town to enjoy it. “Port Angeles needs to embrace its uniqueness,” Montice said, adding that she worries this piece of history could be hidden forever if nothing is done. The couple also uncovered and restored tile on the building’s facade and reopened access to the basement where the theater’s original bathrooms still exist. Montice said they may be able to get them working again.

But when may the public get a glance? Montice said they may move the store within the next couple of months from its current location at 124 W. Railroad Ave. but plan to open the upstairs to Perry’s tours soon. The restoration won’t be done by then, but they have no intention of stopping halfway. “This is our opportunity,” she said. “Once work begins, you don’t step back again.” For more information about the Heritage Tours of Port Angeles, visit www.portangelesheritage tours.com.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsula dailynews.com.

A zigzag, decorative strip marks the outside of the former Elwha Theatre building.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, September 1, 2011

Sports

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Outdoors

Hunting season opens today ARCHERY DEER SEASON begins today on the North Olympic Peninsula. Those who want to bag a Matt buck ought to Schubert think about heading east. The West End may have the best steelhead streams on the Peninsula, but the timberland between Port Angeles and Hood Canal is deer country. And in recent years, that area — which falls inside the Olympic and Coyle Game Management Units — has been particularly productive. According to game harvest reports compiled by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, the last two seasons have been as good as any since the turn of the millennium. Both the Coyle and Olympic GMUs turned in its two best seasons in terms of the number of deer harvested. And in terms of hunter success — the percentage of hunters to deer taken — each is in the top three. Such an uptick could be attributed to a number of factors, according to Fish and Wildlife regional wildlife program manager Mick Cope. Among the most common are increased access to private lands in a particular area and rises in the deer population. Whether or not it was the latter — and, surely, deer hunters hope it is — Cope could not say for certain. But as hunting season kicks off today — cougar and grouse seasons also begin — it’s at least worth noting.

Salmon recall It appears the state jumped the gun on its coastal chinook closure. Fish and Wildlife announced it will reopen chinook retention in Marine Area 3 (LaPush) and 4 (Neah Bay) starting Labor Day after updated harvest data showed anglers still had enough quota to sustain a fishery through Sept. 18. State fishery managers approved the change a week after announcing anglers would be required to release any chinook caught in coastal waters. Pat Pattillo, state salmon policy coordinator, said updated data showed ocean catch rates slowed down enough prior to the chinook closure last Monday to allow the fishery to reopen for 14 more days. “When we announced the chinook closure, harvest rates were at record levels,” Pattillo said. “Since then, the catch has slowed substantially and we’re confident that we can keep the fishery open through the end of the season.” As of Aug. 28, coastwide catch totals for the sport fishery had reached 91 percent of the annual 30,100-fish chinook quota, and 59 percent of the 67,200-fish coho quota.

Crab closure Peninsulites have one more weekend to stock up on crab. Recreational crab season is set to close at sunset on Labor Day in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, as well as Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) and 12 (Hood Canal). Crabbers will then have until Oct. 1 to submit catch record cards to Fish and Wildlife. Those who don’t must pay a $10 fine when they purchase a 2012 crab endorsement. “Catch reports play a major role in determining how much crab is still available for harvest during the winter season,” state shellfish policy lead Rich Childers said in a news release. “It’s important that we receive reports from everyone licensed to fish for crab in Puget Sound – whether or not they caught crab this year.” Crabbers can submit catch record cards to Fish and Wildlife by mail at CRC Unit, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091. Turn

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BUSINESS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY In this section

King Felix subdues L.A. M’s take 2-1 lead in their 4-game series The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Felix Hernandez pitched a five-hitter and Mike Carp hit a two-run double with two outs in the eighth inning to lead the Seattle Mariners to a 2-1 comeback victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Wednesday night. The loss prevented the Angels from gaining ground on firstplace Texas in the AL West. Next Game T h e R a n g e r s , Today who earlier vs. Angels lost to at Safeco Field Tampa Bay Time: 7 p.m. 5-1, main- On TV: ROOT tain a 3½-game lead. Hernandez (13-11), who dueled with Angels starter Dan Haren all night, gave up five hits, walked one and struck out nine in his fifth complete game of the season. At one point, Haren (13-8) retired 15 batters in a row. After a one-out double to Kyle Seager, he didn’t allow another baserunner until Franklin Gutierrez’s one-out single in the seventh. Haren allowed two earned runs, walked one and struck out

The Associated Press

Seattle’s Felix Hernandez throws in the first inning Wednesday at Safeco Field. seven in 7 2/3 innings. The Mariners built a rally in the seventh. With two outs, Seager singled to left and Casper Wells reached on an error by third baseman Alberto Callaspo. That brought up Brendan Ryan with the bases loaded. Haren induced Ryan to hit a one-hopper back to the mound for an easy putout. But Haren could not escape the eighth.

With two outs, the Mariners rallied again. Gutierrez singled and Dustin Ackley singled, moving Gutierrez to third and chasing Haren. Scott Downs entered and on a 1-2 pitch, Carp drilled his double against the left-center-field wall. That gave him 25 RBI in August, tying Danny Tartabull for the most for a rookie in any month. Carp also had a game-winning two-run home run Monday

to beat the Angels. The Angels’ run came in the third. Mike Trout opened with a single to center. Expecting a lowscoring game, Angels manager Mike Scioscia chose to manufacture a run. He had Jeff Mathis sacrifice Trout to second with bunt. Erick Aybar struck out, giving Hernandez 1,240 career strikeouts. Turn

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Zduriencik signs for extension M’s GM to stay at least one more season The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Jack Zduriencik signed a contract extension with the Seattle Mariners on Wednesday to continue as the team’s general manager. Terms of the deal were not released, but it’s believed to be for at least one year with an option for 2013. Zduriencik has been credited with replenishing Seattle’s depleted talent level in the minor league system and was named MLB’s executive of the year after the Mariners went from 61 wins in 2008 to 85 in his first full season. Zduriencik took over in

October 2008 after five years under former GM Bill Bavasi in which the team had just one winning season and one of the worst farm Zduriencik systems in baseball. Six weeks after taking over, Zduriencik orchestrated a 12-player, three-team deal during the Winter Meetings to set the stage for the farm system’s revival.

‘Build from ground up’ “When I took over the job three years ago, one of the first things we said was we were going to do was build this thing from the ground up and accumulate as much talent as we could,” said Zduriencik. “If you look at what’s on the

field here, we’re starting to see that. Things are coming to fruition. “The fact that they’ve asked me to stay is important to the whole process. Certainly, it means a lot to me.” A handful of players remain on Seattle’s roster from 2008. Of the 32 players on the active roster, including the disabled list, 28 were acquired by Zduriencik and his staff. Fifteen came through trades, three in the draft, nine as major league or minor league free agents and one waiver claim. He has traded for first baseman Justin Smoak, outfielders Franklin Gutierrez, Casper Wells and Trayvon Robinson, and first baseman/designated hitter Mike Carp. Zduriencik also drafted and promoted second baseman Dustin Ackley and third baseman Kyle Seager. Four of the five starting

pitchers have been added since Zduriencik arrived, and he also signed staff ace Felix Hernandez to a five-year extension. He has made some mistakes as well, signing or trading for such nonproductive players as third baseman Chone Figgins, outfielder Milton Bradley and designated hitter Jack Cust. Don Wakamatsu was hired as manager in 2009, but Zduriencik fired him after the team took a few steps back with 61 victories in 2010. “We didn’t even know each other when all this started,” said manager Eric Wedge, hired before this season. “I was real impressed by him. He’s one of the main reasons I came here. “Our relationship has grown immensely in a short time. We’re aligned with our thoughts. As leader of what we’re trying do here, he’s the guy who can get this thing done.”

Price is right for Washington Post-Locker era scheduled to kick off The Associated Press

SEATTLE — It’s really the last thing for Keith Price still to prove. The flash came last year in the most difficult of circumstances when Price — then a redshirt freshman for Washington — was asked to make his first college start against the No. 1 team in the country — Oregon — on the road. But that was as unique a situation as Price could be put in, a one-off performance while filling in for an injured Jake Locker. The real moment when Price takes center stage as the next in line in Washington’s lengthy quarterback lineage comes on Saturday, when the Huskies open the season against Eastern Washington. It’ll conclude a three-year journey for Price, who originally committed to come north from Southern California at a time when Tyrone Willingham was the head coach and the Huskies ran a modified spread offense that catered to Price’s skills. None of what Price commit-

ted to join at Washington remains. But Price does, as a testimony to his willingness to Next Game change and his aptitude Saturday for learning. vs. EWU “I didn’t at Seattle mind it. I Time: 4 p.m. just love On TV: ROOT playing football,” Price said. “I’m willing to adjust my game a little bit and it’s helping me.” Price’s makeup doesn’t fall in line with Washington’s long history of producing NFL QB prospects. He’s not big (6-foot-1, 195 pounds) and doesn’t have the strongest arm or the fleetest feet. But he brings a bit of all those pieces to Washington’s offense with an endless smile and the understanding he doesn’t have to do it all. It helps that Price’s welcome to being the Huskies starter comes at a time when Washington’s skill talent is as deep as it’s been in the last decade. Price will be handing off to running back Chris Polk — once he returns from minor knee surgery — who is coming off the

The Associated Press

Keith Price leads the Washington Huskies in a drill early in the preseason. second-best rushing season in Washington history. On the outside, the Huskies return 91 receptions and 14 touchdowns from its top two of receivers. And there are the newcomers, lauded freshmen Kasen Williams and tight end Austin SeferianJenkins, to throw into the mix.

“I’ve gotten no indication to think that he’s going to come out Saturday, or a week from Saturday, or a week from that, that he’s not going to perform,” coach Steve Sarkisian said. “But not every game is going to be his best ball game. So there are going to be points in these games that he’s going to have to learn from.”


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Area Sports

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Today 6 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, European Masters - Crans sur Sierre, Switzerland (Live) 10 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, Men’s and Women’s Second Round (Live) 12 p.m. (47) GOLF NWT, Mylan Classic (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, Men’s and Women’s Second Round (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, UNLV vs. Wisconsin - Madison, Wis. (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Los Angeles Angels vs. Seattle Mariners (Live)

AREA SPORTS SHOT

BMX Racing PORT ANGELES BMX TRACK Tuesday 11-12 Open 1. Mariah “The Wind” Fortman 2. Moose Johnson 3. Taylor “American Idol” Tolliver 11 Girls 1. Mariah “The Wind” Fortman 2. Maddie “The Moocher” Cooke 3. Taylor “American Idol” Tolliver 26-30 Cruiser 1. Laura “Amazon” Cooke 2. “Face Plant” Williams 3. “Scary” Geri Thompson 7 Intermediate 1. Trey Mannor 2. Moose Johnson 3. Caden Acosta 4. David Mitchell 5. Taylor Coleman 6. L.J. Vail 7. Aydan Vail

Colorado San Diego

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Women’s Club Medal Play Wednesday 18-Hole Ladies Sherry Henderson 73, Linda Beatty 74, Cindy Schlaffman 75, Doris Sparks 75, Dolly Burnett 76 9-Hole Ladies Kitty Byrne 31, Sandy Granger 33.5, Adrienne Heinz 35.5. Barb Thompson 38.5 Chip Ins: No. 9, Ruth Thomson; No. 18, Dolly Burnett SKYRIDGE GOLF COURSE Tuesday Night League Standings Spontaneous Combustion 45 points; Brian’s Drafting Serice 41; Ridge Runners 34; Sky Chips 33; Team Ramhome 30, Langston Professional Services 30, Bubba’s Boys & K 26

Baseball

Well-hydrated

youth football

Grocery Outlet of Sequim came to the aid of the Sequim Wolfpack Youth Football program this week. The business donated bottled drinks for the young football players. The season starts Sept. 17.

Mariners 2, Angels 1 Los Angeles Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 Ichiro dh 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 1 1 FGtrrz cf 4 1 1 0 BAreu dh 4 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 3 1 1 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 0 Carp 1b 4 0 2 2 Trumo 1b 4 0 1 0 Olivo c 3 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 2 0 0 0 Seager 3b 4 0 2 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 C.Wells rf 3 0 0 0 Trout lf 3 1 1 0 Ryan ss 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 Roinsn lf 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 5 1 Totals 31 2 6 2 Los Angeles Seattle

001 000 000—1 000 000 0 2x—2

E_Callaspo (12). LOB_Los Angeles 4, Seattle 7. 2B_Carp (12), Seager (7). SB_Aybar (27), Tor.Hunter (4), Callaspo (7). S_Mathis. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Haren L,13-8 7 2/3 5 2 2 1 7 S.Downs BS,2-2 1/3 1 0 0 1 0 Seattle Hernandez W,13-11 9 5 1 1 1 9 Umpires_Home, Brian Knight; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T_2:15. A_18,520 (47,878).

American League West Division W L Texas 77 60 Los Angeles 73 63 Oakland 60 76 Seattle 58 77 East Division W L Boston 83 52 New York 81 53 Tampa Bay 74 61 Toronto 68 68 Baltimore 54 80 Central Division W L Detroit 75 61 Cleveland 68 65 Chicago 68 66 Minnesota 57 79 Kansas City 56 81

Pct GB .562 — .537 3½ .441 16½ .430 18 Pct GB .615 — .604 1½ .548 9 .500 15½ .403 28½ Pct GB .551 — .511 5½ .507 6 .419 18 .409 19½

All Times PDT Tuesday’s Games Detroit 2, Kansas City 1, 10 innings Cleveland 6, Oakland 2 Baltimore 6, Toronto 5, 10 innings

N.Y. Yankees 5, Boston 2 Texas 2, Tampa Bay 0 Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 6 L.A. Angels 13, Seattle 6 Wednesday’s Games Detroit 5, Kansas City 4 Minnesota 7, Chicago White Sox 6 Cleveland 4, Oakland 3, 16 innings Toronto 13, Baltimore 0 Boston 9, N.Y. Yankees 5 Tampa Bay 4, Texas 1 Seattle 2, L.A. Angels 1 Today’s Games Oakland (G.Gonzalez 11-11) at Cleveland (Carmona 6-12), 9:05 a.m. Toronto (L.Perez 3-2) at Baltimore (Tom. Hunter 3-2), 9:35 a.m. Kansas City (Duffy 3-8) at Detroit (Ja.Turner 0-1), 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-11) at Boston (Lester 14-6), 4:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Niemann 9-5) at Texas (C.Wilson 13-6), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 10-9) at Seattle (Furbush 3-6), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 4:05 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m.

Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Texas at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.

National League East Division W L 86 46 80 55 65 69 63 71 60 75 Central Division W L Milwaukee 81 56 St. Louis 72 64 Cincinnati 67 69 Pittsburgh 62 74 Chicago 59 78 Houston 47 90 West Division W L Arizona 78 59 San Francisco 72 65 Los Angeles 65 70 Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Florida

Pct GB .652 — .593 7½ .485 22 .470 24 .444 27½ Pct .591 .529 .493 .456 .431 .343

GB — 8½ 13½ 18½ 22 34

Pct GB .569 — .526 6 .481 12

64 73 .467 60 77 .438

14 18

Tuesday’s Games Florida 6, N.Y. Mets 0 Philadelphia 9, Cincinnati 0 Washington 9, Atlanta 2 Houston 8, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 2, Milwaukee 1 Arizona 9, Colorado 4 L.A. Dodgers 8, San Diego 5 Chicago Cubs 5, San Francisco 2 Wednesday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 2 San Francisco 4, Chicago Cubs 0 N.Y. Mets 3, Florida 2 Philadelphia 3, Cincinnati 0 Atlanta 3, Washington 1 Houston 2, Pittsburgh 0 St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 3 Arizona 4, Colorado 2 Today’s Games Philadelphia (Worley 9-1) at Cincinnati (Leake 11-8), 9:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Eveland 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Lincoln 1-0), 1:05 p.m. St. Louis (Dickson 0-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 15-8), 1:10 p.m. Florida (Hensley 2-5) at N.Y. Mets (Batista 3-2), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Wang 2-2) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 13-8), 4:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Atlanta, 4:35 p.m. Milwaukee at Houston, 5:05 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 7:05 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

Basketball WNBA Standings Western Conference W L PCT GB Minnesota 24 6 .800 Phoenix 17 12 .586 6 ½ Seattle 17 13 .567 7 San Antonio 14 15 .483 9 ½ Los Angeles 13 17 .433 11 Tulsa 3 26 .103 20 ½ Eastern Conference W L PCT GB Indiana 19 10 .655 Connecticut 18 12 .600 1 ½ New York 17 13 .567 2 ½ Atlanta 16 13 .552 3 Chicago 14 16 .467 5 ½ Washington 5 24 .172 14

Mariners: Beat Los Angeles Angels Schubert

Continued from B1

Continued from B1 with a 0.82 ERA and 26 strikeouts in his three starts. Haren was 1-1 with a 0.83 That moved him ahead of Jamie Moyer for second place on ERA and 18 strikeouts. Aybar had a bunt single in the the franchise strikeout list. Randy Johnson leads with eighth — the team’s major leagueleading 34th — to extend his hit2,162. Howie Kendrick followed with ting streak to 11 games. Ichiro went hitless in his four a two-out single through the left side. at-bats to end his 13-game hitting Trout scored without a throw. streak. Notes: NASCAR driver Kurt This was a typical HernandezHaren matchup. The right-hand- Busch threw out the first pitch. Scioscia said that RH Jerome ers had opposed each other three Williams, who has had two strong times previously. Coming in, Hernandez was 1-0 starts, “definitely has pitched well

ERA) takes the mound in the enough to continue to start.” He said the club will adjust the final game of the four-game series rotation over the final months to today. rest or move up starters. He has worked at least seven innings in his last eight starts, Players coming up going 6-1. He is 10-5 with a 3.68 ERA in The Mariners will bring up 24 career starts against Seattle. two and possibly three players Seattle will start LHP Charlie today when rosters expand. All three are likely to be pitch- Furbush, who is 2-3 with a 6.48 ers. Mariners manager Eric ERA in his six appearances since Wedge said two more players will arriving in a July 30 trade with be promoted when the minor Detroit. In his first big-league start July 4 when he was with the league seasons end. RHP Ervin Santana (10-9, 3.24 Tigers, he lost to the Angels, 5-1.

They can also report their catch online at http://bit.ly/ WkXeA from Sept. 5 through Oct. 1. Fish and Wildlife will announce winter crab seasons for Puget Sound in early October, after completing its assessment of the summer fishery.

________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt.schubert@peninsuladai-

Briefly . . . BMX Track to shut down couple of days PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles BMX Track will be closed Monday and Sept. 18 for the Reno “BlackJack” national and the Washington state finals held in Orting. All ABA members are eligible to race these races out of town. The BMX Track will be opened for regular times for practice on Thursdays from 3 p.m. to 7p.m. The track will be back racing Sept. 11, 13 and 25 with regular Sunday racing from there until the last weekend in October. Anyone can start BMX racing at any time because it is a yearlong sport with Port Angeles BMX racing from April until October. In October, an indoor track opens up in Port Orchard where riders can finish out this year and start up next year. Private parties are still available and are free on a regular practice day. For more schedule informa-

tion, visit pabmxtrack.com or contact Geri Thompson at 360461-9103.

back of the net. Peninsula next plays at 1 p.m. today against Yakima.

Pirates split at Starfire Soccer challenge TUKWILA — The Peninsula College men’s soccer team beat Columbia Basin 3-1 on the first day of the NWAACC Friendlies tournament at Starfire Complex. The Peninsula men defeated Columbia Basin at the NWAACC semifinals last year. Dean Gaynor scored the first goal for the Pirates at 12 minutes with Aaron Jeffery assisting. Jake Hughes scored at 55 minutes with an assist by Miguel Gonzalez. Sergio Oliveira scored at 80 minutes with an assist by David Gonzalez. “We played well and moved the ball,” Peninsula coach Andrew Chapman said. The Pirates next and final game at Starfire is at 11 a.m. today against Evergreen State College. In women’s action, Columbia Basin shut out the Peninsula women 1-0. The Pirates gave up an early goal but then were able to control the tempo but couldn’t find the

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Youth Soccer Club is hosting the 2011 WRPA Soccer Challenge Skills competition, set for Sept. 10 at 4:30 p.m. at Wally Sigmar Field on the Peninsula College campus. The Soccer Challenge is a soccer skills competition for boys and girls ages 14 and younger. The skills tested are goal shooting, timed dribbling, and throw-in and kick for distance and accuracy. There is no charge to participate, and the top two finishers in each age group have the opportunity to advance to the state competition. Participants should bring a copy of their birth certificate. For more information, call 360-808-6521 or email at ttucker@pencol.edu.

Sparks beat Storm LOS ANGELES — Candace Parker is doing her best to keep the Los Angeles Sparks in the thick of the postseason race.

Parker scored a season-high 27 points and the Sparks beat Seattle 68-62 on Tuesday night, denying the Storm a chance to clinch a playoff berth. The win helped the Sparks (13-17) remain 1½ games behind San Antonio for the final playoff spot in the West with less than two weeks left in the regular season. Parker, playing in her seventh game since missing 15 with a knee injury, scored 10 of her team’s 17 points in the fourth quarter, including hitting three free throws in the final 30 seconds to seal it. Sue Bird had 15 points for the Storm (17-13), who snapped a four-game winning streak and remained on the cusp of the postseason. Seattle is looking to extend its playoff run to eight consecutive years , which would match Los Angeles (1999-2006) for the league’s longest streak. The defending WNBA champions had surged up the standings with their recent run, but fell a half-game behind second-place Phoenix in the race to host a first-round series. The Storm and Mercury play each other Sept. 9 in a game that

figures to have seeding implications on the line. “We’ve still got four games left,” Bird said. “We have a shot at second place, which would give us home-court advantage.”

Sounders nip Dallas TUKWILA — Fredy Montero missed on the spectacular goal. He was perfect moments later with the most simple of fundamentals. Montero finally cashed in on Seattle’s numerous chances with a curling left-footed goal late in the first half, and the Sounders earned their shot at a third straight U.S. Open Cup title with a 1-0 semifinal victory over FC Dallas on Tuesday night. Moments after sending an electrifying bicycle kick wide of the net, Montero collected a pass just outside the penalty area. He stopped, cut back to his left and curled a left-footed shot around the outstretched arms of Dallas goalkeeper Kevin Hartman and just inside the far post in the 40th minute after Seattle had controlled play for most of the first half. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press


Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Young mom torn between beaus

Dilbert

DEAR ABBY: I am 19 and have a 10-month-old daughter. Her dad and I broke up five months ago because we were fighting a lot, most of it caused by him. I have been dating a new guy, “Ron,” for three months. Lately, my baby’s dad has been trying to convince me he has changed, and he wants me to take him back. I still have feelings for him, but I’m in love with Ron. I don’t want to lose what I have for a shot in the dark, but what if my ex really has changed? Plus, the relationship I have with Ron is a long-distance one. As much as I’d love it to work, I don’t know how to deal with the distance. Do you have any advice on how to make it less heartbreaking when we are apart? Young Mom in Florida

For Better or For Worse

DEAR ABBY Abigail

Van Buren

always thought it was a good idea for them to take lessons. The kids are now involving my mother, who is taking their side. What should I do? Discordant Family, New Castle, Pa.

Dear Discordant: Your older children have had many years to learn to love the piano. If it hasn’t happened by now, forcing them to continue won’t improve the situation. Because you would prefer your daughter practice the piano rather than surf the Net or play video Dear Young Mom: If you were games, ask your 13-year-old what in love with your baby’s father, you wouldn’t have fallen in love with Ron constructive activity she plans to substitute in its place. You might be so fast. pleasantly surprised by her answer. If you were in love with Ron, you Tell your 11-year-old and 5-yearwouldn’t be debating whether to old that they will be taking lessons reunite with your argumentative ex until they are 13, at which point because he’s geographically closer. they, too, will be given the choice of The way adults deal with what they would like to substitute — extended separations from the peosubject to your approval. ple they love is to stay busy. They If you do, there will be less conwork, take classes, volunteer their flict, and your youngest child will no extra time to causes they believe in. longer be surrounded by the same They do not bounce like tennis level of negativity. balls from romance to romance. And if they have a 10-month-old, Dear Abby: In years past, I have they devote their attention to helping their little one go from a crawl to lost three friends. Because we lived a walk. many miles apart, I learned the sad news when their widows informed Dear Abby: My daughter, 13, me by letter of their deaths. and son, 11, have been taking piano In each case, the widow had lessons for six years. My 5-year-old blackened out the name of her has just started. They are all bright spouse on the return address labels. children, and the lessons were at My mother-in-law did the same their request. thing when her husband died. I told them they would not be What prompts these women to able to quit until they were “older,” eliminate evidence of their loved one but now the two older kids are fight- so quickly? ing me to quit. I tell them I have Gone But Not Forgotten never met anyone who was glad he or she stopped taking piano lessons. Dear Gone But Not Forgotten: I say the lessons are good for Pragmatism. their brains, teach them discipline, _________ and it sure beats surfing the comDear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, puter or playing video games. known as Jeanne Phillips, and was Not only are they making me mis- also founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Leterable, but their attitude is rubbing ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box off on the little one. 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com. My husband is deceased, and he

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): Stubbornness and overreacting are likely to put you in a tight spot. Before acting or saying something you’ll regret, back up and rethink your strategy. Although patience isn’t your strong point, it will be necessary to take a wait-and-see attitude. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Own whatever situation you face. Love is in the stars, and time should be put aside to nurture a relationship that means a lot to you. Selfimprovement projects will go well. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You can talk all you want, but if you aren’t getting your point across, you will have to resort to taking action. Disciplined actions will make a far greater impression than inconsistency and empty promises. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Think matters through. Don’t make changes unless you are sure you can live with the outcome. A sudden move will result in anger and disappointment. Someone is likely to force you to be honest about what you really contribute. 2 stars

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

Dennis the Menace

B3

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take care of responsibilities without making a fuss. Your ability to follow through will impress someone who is considering you for a better position. Opportunities are present; all you have to do is a good job and to be a team player. 4 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Jump in and do whatever it takes to make things work. Your hands-on contribution will impress someone. Don’t be afraid to do things a little differently. Your ability to think outside the box and offer feasible suggestions will win praise. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You can offer suggestions, but don’t offer to take on a responsibility that doesn’t belong to you. Emotional upset is apparent due to a disagreement with a business or personal partner. Focus on learning something new or helping a cause in which you believe. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Say less and do more. You have to show others what you can do. A personal relationship will lead to greater opportunity. Opportunity is within reach; don’t hesitate to grab what you want and move forward. 3 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You may be able to talk your way in or out of a situation you face, but when it comes to affairs of the heart, it won’t be so easy. Don’t take anyone for granted or you will suffer the consequences. A promise made is one you must keep. Travel delays can be expected. 4 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Strive for perfection and advancement. You can make changes at home that will improve your living situation and your money matters. Make the first move and you will set a standard that everyone else will have to live up to. 4 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Remember past experiences before you dive into a situation that will cost you emotionally, physically or financially. It is best to clear up any situation before you make a decision that will alter your personal life. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Opportunity knocks personally and with regard to partnerships. Look at your options and prepare to get involved in something that you’ve wanted to do for some time. Money is heading your way through an investment, settlement, rebate or winning. 5 stars


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, September 1, 2011

Business

PAGE

B4

Politics & Environment

U.S. sues to block AT&T, T-Mobile merger By Joelle Tessler and Pete Yost The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department took the unusual step Wednesday to try to block AT&T’s $39 billion purchase of T-Mobile USA, arguing that the proposed merger would lead to higher wireless prices, less innovation and fewer choices for consumers. Now AT&T, the nation’s No. 2 wireless carrier, and

No. 4 T-Mobile are plotting a legal response to challenge federal regulators. In its civil antitrust lawsuit, the Justice Department said the merger would stifle competition in the wireless industry. The deal, which is still under review at the Federal Communications Commission, would catapult AT&T past Verizon Wireless to become the nation’s largest wireless carrier, leaving Sprint Nextel as a distant third-place player and cer-

tain to struggle. AT&T quickly signaled that it won’t abandon the transaction, leading to expectations of a fierce court battle. AT&T has several incentives to take up a legal fight with regulators. In court, the burden is on the Justice Department — not AT&T — to show that the combination would harm competition. If the deal doesn’t go through, the company will be forced to pay T-Mobile a

 $ Briefly . . . New hours for Sequim restaurant

$3 billion break-up fee and give it some wireless spectrum rights. AT&T said it will ask for an expedited court hearing “so the enormous benefits of this merger can be fully reviewed.” In a statement, T-Mobile’s owner, the German company Deutsche Telekom, said it is disappointed by the Justice Department’s action and “will join AT&T in defending the contemplated merger.”

Redbox’s golden opportunity: Netflix’s sticker-shock prices By Michael Liedtke The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix is giving Redbox a golden opportunity to gain some ground. Beginning Thursday, Netflix, the largest U.S. video subscription service, will hit its nearly 25 million U.S subscribers with rate increases of as much as 60 percent. The sticker shock is expected to make Redbox, which rents DVDs for $1 per day through kiosks, even more enticing to movie lovers.

Sticker shock “We are very cognizant of the value of the dollar,” said Gary Cohen, Redbox’s senior vice president of marketing and consumer experience. “Redbox is all about simplicity, convenience and value.” Netflix Inc.’s higher prices will drive business to video rental chain Blockbuster and other home entertain-

ment rivals too, but none is better positioned to take advantage of the disruption than Redbox, according to Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter. That’s because millions of people are expected to keep paying for a Netflix service that streams video over high-speed Internet connections, but will look for other places to rent DVDs at a low price. Most people won’t have to go far before coming across a Redbox kiosk; two-thirds of the U.S. population now lives within a five-minute drive of one of the company’s red vending machines, which are largely stationed in WalMarts, drug stores, supermarkets and convenience stores.

Little reason to stray Netflix, which is based in Los Gatos, has given its subscribers little reason to stray until now. Its service emerged as a household staple during the past few years while bun-

The Associated Press

Gary Cohen, senior vice president of marketing and customer experience at Redbox, stands by a working kiosk at the company’s offices in Oakbrook Terrace, Ill., on Aug. 26. dling rented DVDs through the mail with unlimited Internet video streaming for little as $10 per month. Keeping both of those options will cost $16 per month under Netflix’s new pricing system. Netflix predicts about 10 million customers will avoid the higher prices by limiting their subscriptions

to an $8-per-month streaming plan that doesn’t include the latest theatrical releases available on DVD and pay-per-view. Pachter believes somewhere between 2 million to 3 million customers will simply close their Netflix accounts and abandon the service entirely to protest the higher prices.

Federal judge takes U.S. bureau to task over mustang roundups The Associated Press

July 20, is scheduled to end this week. McKibben said his order didn’t preclude BLM from completing the roundup because Justice Department lawyers representing the agency indicated there would be no further use of helicopters at that roundup.

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SEQUIM — Lipperts’ Restaurant, 134 S. Second St., has new business hours. The restaurant is open for lunch Monday through Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, reservations for large groups or to make an order, phone 360-6836727.

Redistricting OLYMPIA — The panel tasked with redrawing Washington’s congressional and legislative districts will release draft proposals in two weeks. Each of the four voting members of the Washington State Redistricting Commission will unveil their ideas Sept. 13. The bipartisan panel will then begin collecting public comment on the draft proposals before working on a final plan later this year. The redistricting process that takes place every 10 years can shape the political makeup of districts. The state is also gaining a 10th congressional seat, and potential candidates are closely watching how the district takes shape.

Wiretapping

nies can be barred under a law changed by Congress in 2008 and that the people who sued the government directly did not suffer specific harms that give them legal standing to sue. The government has refused to confirm whether the domestic surveillance program exists.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.0704 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.1393 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.1870 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2496.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0239 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1813.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1828.50 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $41.765 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $41.699 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1850.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1856.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

SEATTLE — A federal appeals court panel in Seattle will consider Wednesday whether to revive two cases claiming the government has monitored the communications of millions of Americans since 9/11. One involves customers who sued telecommunications companies, alleging that they illegally turned over emails and Peninsula Daily News phone calls to the and The Associated Press National Security Agency without warrants. The other involves law- peninsuladailynews.com suits that some of those same plaintiffs brought against the government, saying the surveillance violated their constitutional rights. FOR OLD COINS A San Francisco judge dismissed the lawsuits, saying such claims against telecom compa-

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appeared to him the horse was hit with the skid, but even if it wasn’t, the helicopter flew “dangerously or unreasonably close” to the animals in violation of the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971. The roundup of nearly 1,300 horses, which began

185132214

RENO, Nev. — A federal judge in Nevada is taking the U.S. government to task for misconduct by a helicopter contractor during one of the biggest mustang roundups in the West, granting a rare emergency order sought by wild horse protection advocates who argue all of the gathers on public lands are inhumane and illegal. U.S. District Judge Howard McKibben denied a request late Tuesday to halt the roundup at the Triple B complex in northeast Nevada near the Utah line. But he did issue a temporary restraining order banning any mistreatment

of mustangs like the Wild Horse Freedom Federation caught on camera earlier this month. Laura Leigh, the vice president of the Texasbased group that filed the lawsuit against Interior Secretary Kenneth Salazar, who oversees the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, said it was a small but important victory in a larger effort to bring attention to what she said is the BLM’s routine violation of federal laws protecting the horses. BLM officials denied the group’s claims that the helicopter pilot on the video actually struck a horse with a helicopter skid Aug. 11. McKibben said it

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, September 1, 2011

c Our Peninsula Liven up weekend with live variety SECTION

IT’S SEPTEMBER, AND summer just got here, and now school starts. Where’s the justice in that? Take some time off this holiday weekend and relieve the stress with some live music, be it country, blues, rock, jazz, bluegrass or something else. You’ll find it all on our beautiful Peninsula this week.

CLASSIFIEDS, PUZZLES, 3RDAGE In this section

LIVE MUSIC

and join in. Nelson Next Wednesday, banjo craftsman Jason Mogi and bassist Paul Port Angeles Stehr■  Tonight at CastGreen away’s Restaurant and play from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Night Club, 1213 Marine ■  On Saturday, local Drive, come on down for jazz diva Sarah Shea, ridJerry’s Country Jam ing on the coattails of her from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. If successful new CD, “The country’s your style, come Nearness of You,” returns and dance or play plugged to the intimate setting of or unplugged. Wine on the Waterfront On Friday, the Jimmy (WOW) at The Landing Hoffman Band rocks mall at 115 Railroad Ave. Castaway’s country style at 8 p.m. $3 cover. from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. ■  On Friday at Front Jimmy and the band do Street Alibi, 1605 E. classic country, rockin’ Front St., the Bucky country and a pop tune or Briggs Band featuring two with Neil Diamond’s Jenn Smith plays from “Sweet Caroline,” a crowd 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. $2 cover. favorite. ■  On Friday, Les Wam■  On Saturday at the boldt and Olde Tyme Junction Roadhouse, Country perform at the junction of U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112 Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, five miles west of Port Angeles, dance to the sage- from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Dave and brush blues of Ravin’ Wolf Rosalie Secord and the from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. This Luck of the Draw Band Washington Blues Society play a rousing evening of award-winning duo puts out a great dance program. acoustic country, bluegrass and old-time music and Johnnie Mustang hosts the Sunday Junction country selections by Charlie Ferris from Blues Jam from 7 p.m. to 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Don’t be 11 p.m. There have been some great jams and blues late because Charlie’s improvisations lately. Come Angels will be there, too.

John

■  On Monday, Rusty and Duke entertain at Smugglers Landing, 115 Railroad Ave., with some pickin’ and sweet singin’ from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  Every Tuesday evening at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets, the Port Angeles Senior Swingers present Wally and the Boys playing ballroom dance favorites for the dancing pleasure of all adults 45 years and older from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free! ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues with a brew and barbecue from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn ■  On Friday at the Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., those ol’ rascals the Discovery Bay Pirates will raid the club from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. On Saturday, renowned Chicago blues artist Keith Scott performs from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Wednesday, dance to the smooth tunes of the Blue Hole Quintet from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■  During the First Friday Art Walk at Damiana’s Best Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., Locozonly will be rockin’ from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  On Saturday at the Wind Rose Cellars Tasting Room, 155 W. Cedar St., enjoy the musical tal-

ents of Jake Reichner from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■  On Friday at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, the lovely Robyn Lynn performs from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. ■  On Friday at Club Seven Lounge, 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, rock to Mister Sister featuring the vocal talents of Rachael bringing top 40 classic rock to the dance floor from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Saturday, groove to the top 40 party and dance band Gruv Box from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Sunday, 3 Miles High, led by Dana Osborn, will play your favorites (just ask him) from (note the holiday time) 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. On Monday, we be jammin’ with host Barry Burnett and friends, so bring your ax and/or vocal talents for the fun from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Port Townsend and Port Hadlock

■  BBR entertains Saturday at the Ajax, 271 Water St., Port Hadlock, with its rousing acoustic classic rock at 6 p.m. ■  Tonight at The Upstage, 923 Washington St., Port Townsend, there may be a repeat of Wednesday’s concert by Garth Hudson, Maud Hudson Dentsu America and Fridich. Cycle 1 Eric 85 Line Screen Phone 360-385-2216 for info. On Friday, the Meklit Hadero Band performs a wide and diverse range of

Passes on sale for 12th PT film festival Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Passes are on sale for the 12th annual Port Townsend Film Festival set for various venues Sept. 23-25. All passes include a year’s membership ($30 value) that entitles purchasers to film-library privileges and discounts from The Rose Theatre, Pane d’Amore and more. ■ The One-Up Pass: Provides access to one screening at any venue. $35. ■ The Four-Up Pass: Four screenings at any venue and can be shared

with one other person at a time. Price: $85. ■ The Festival Pass: Access to unlimited screenings, opening night dinner on Taylor Street, awards gala Saturday evening. Price: $185. ■ The Director Pass: Go-anywhere, do-anything pass includes concierge service. Price: $650. A $450 tax deduction is available. ■ The Mogul Pass: All the benefits of the Director Pass, with an invite to filmmakers reception, a Port Townsend Film Festival Messenger Bag and a $1,000 tax deduction. Price: $1,250.

■ Rush tickets: Rush tickets are $10 and are sold at any venue that has seats still available 15 minutes before the movie begins and ending when the lights go down. To purchase, visit www. ptfilmfest.com/Festival/ Passes.html, stop by the Port Townsend Film Festival office at 221 Taylor St., Suite 32-A, or phone 360379-1333. During the festival, passes can be purchased at the festival’s hospitality center at 607 Water St., Cotton Building, Civic Plaza, next to the Pope Marine Park.

be credited toward the winning bid of one item. The evening will include wine and appetizers and music. Mary Stuart, Vicki Tallerico, Ginger Steger and Karen Griffith are cochairs of the auction. For more information, phone Stuart at 360-4378140.

phoning 360-457-7933 or emailing michellekelley@ olypen.com. Submissions must be received by Friday, Sept. 16. Proceeds from the Heroes Dinner support the American Red Cross on the Olympic Peninsula.

jazz, soul, hip-hop, art rock and folk from the Americas to the East African nation of Ethiopia at 8 p.m. $12 cover On Saturday, Jim Nyby and the F Street Band provide a tasty gumbo of blues, rock and jazz at 8 p.m. $6 cover. On Wednesday at 7 p.m., the Old Crusty Minstrels perform a benefit in support of live music. Voluntary $10 cover. Phone 360-385-2216 for reservations. ■  On Friday at the Port Townsend Brewing Co., 330 10th St., Locust Street Taxi brings its pop rock sound complete with horns and intelligible lyrics to the outdoors under the sun stage from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Sunday, John Nelson (not me, but I wish I had his talent!) plays acoustic folk, blues and country on guitar from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. On Wednesday, the Tool Shed Trio plays American roots-rock with an everchanging lineup of special guests from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  On Friday at Sirens Pub, 623 Water St., Quenby and the West of Wayland Band plays Americana/country/roots music at 9 p.m. $5 cover. On Saturday, Southern rock meets Northwest grunge in the original music of The Pitfalls at 9 p.m. $5 cover. ■  On Saturday at Castle Key, Seventh and Sheridan streets, the Skip Morris Trio jazzes it up from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. $8 cover. ■  Lickity Split, a 20-year-ago local band that used to pack ’em in, reunites for a gig at the Highway Twenty Road

Because

House, 2152 W. Sims Way, on Saturday at 9:30 p.m. $7 cover. ■  The Blue Crows get together Saturday from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., bringing vintage jazz, blues and ragtime to the Undertown, 211 Taylor St.

Area concerts ■  The final community concert of the summer is Wednesday in Port Angeles’ Concert on the Pier, featuring the gypsy jazz of Ranger and the Rearrangers from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

High notes ■  The sixth annual Quilcene Shindig, on Saturday outside the old Quilcene Theater, features the Morels at 2 p.m., the Low Ones at 3 p.m., Irish Salt at 4 p.m., the Steve Grandinetti Band at 5:30 p.m. and Locust Street Taxi at 7 p.m. So, as they say, bring your boots, lawn chair or sofa, neighbor, children and second cousin to this rousing Quilcene community event. Food will be available for purchase. ■  On Saturday, Howly Slim performs at the Port Angeles Farmers Market from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews.com (subCMYK ject line: John Nelson). Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

love the thrill of stable returns.

Briefly . . . Port Ludlow group to host silent auction

SM

Help fund walkers

SEQUIM — The Society of St. Vincent de Paul SEQUIM — Do you Queen of Angels Conferknow someone who used ence will hold their fourth CPR to save a life, pulled a annual Friends of the Poor person from a burning Walk at the Sequim High building or raised money to School track, 601 N. help someone in need? Sequim Ave., from noon to The Olympic Peninsula 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25. Chapter of the American The group is seeking to Red Cross is seeking nomiraise $2,750 to replace the nations of ordinary individEmergency Shelter Grant uals who have performed they have previously extraordinary deeds. The Red Cross will pres- received. In 2010, the group proent awards to local heroes vided emergency housing who saved lives, exemplified the Red Cross mission to 43 households housing 110 individuals, a total of or made significant, posi$8,143. tive differences in their To raise funds, individucommunities in the areas als can sponsor a walker, of emergency response, premake a monetary donation paredness and prevention to the event or walk themat a Heroes Dinner on selves and seek sponsorNov. 3. The nominee must be a ships. For more information, resident of or employed within Clallam or Jefferson email svdppa@olypen.com, phone St. Vincent De Paul County at 360-457-5804, Barbara Information about the Townsend at 360-461-0642 nominations and the form or Dorthy Amiot at 360are available online at 457-5996. http://peninsularedcross. org/Heroes/index.html, by Peninsula Daily News

Red Cross heroes

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PORT LUDLOW — The Community Enrichment Alliance of Port Ludlow will host a silent auction with a theme “The Beauty of Autumn.” Normally held in November, this year’s event will be held at the Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15. The alliance is accepting gently used or new auction items until Monday, Sept. 12. The following Port Ludlow residents have volunteered to collect items at their homes: ■  Art: Teresa Forrest, phone 360-437-1191. ■  Gift certificates: Janet Force, phone 360437-0419. ■  Collectibles: Alana Morris, phone 206-9204794 or Roz Plorde, 360437-5071 ■  Jewelry: Pat Nesbitt, phone 360-437-0323 ■  Theme baskets: Marilyn Durand, phone 360-437-7677 The proceeds from the auction will benefit the TriCounty Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse Victims. A $5 entrance fee will

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Peninsula Daily News

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Thursday, September 1, 2011

rdAge

Think ‘moderation’ when leaving legacy A COUPLE OF weeks ago (or maybe three, I don’t know; shortterm memory is the second thing to go), I went on about money. I went on about money because (a) this is America, and (b) we’re working on a “Boomer Primer,” which simply means a list of things to think about regarding the whole “aging thing” if you’re in your early-to-mid-60s or rapidly closing in on same and not immortal. If you are immortal, your financial concerns far outstrip the purview of this little column, and I urge you to consult a more . . . galactic, if not spiritual, resource. But for the rest of us who are a little closer to the ground, this will have to do. The points that I attempted to make, back when I remembered what those points were, had to do with planning for and balancing “income” vs. “debt” if retirement was a piece of our “aging thing,” remembering that most of us will live noticeably longer than our parents and grandparents. Now, if your employment and/or income-generating prospects (and endurance!) are excellent and lucrative, your views on the subject(s) might be somewhat different, but here’s a “think about it” question that comes up for almost everybody: Leaving it to the kids. Acknowledging different strokes, feel free to delete “kids” (I

HELP LINE Mark

Harvey

know, I thought of that, too) and substitute “grandchildren,” “dog,” “favorite charity,” “national debt,” etc., but for most of us, most of the time, it’s about leaving it to the kids, and there are myriad views

on the topic. For some, leaving a tangible inheritance of money/assets/house/ Beatles’ “White Album,” etc., is extremely important — it’s an inheritance, yes, but it’s also a legacy. It’s a way of declaring, “I was here,” a way of saying, “I lived, I struggled, I worked, and I did the best I could with what I had, and this is what I leave behind.” A way of saying, “I love you.” And, certainly, given the economy and the employment-related realities and prospects of many an offspring, “legacy” and “necessity” may blur. The other end of this particular spectrum, of course, is financial exploitation, a la Mickey Rooney, but for now, we’ll assume honorable intentions on the parts of

Birthday Betty Dunlap Betty Dunlap of Sequim has celebrated her 93rd birthday. She was born Aug. 30, 1918, in Erie, Pa. She married Richard Dunlap when she was 19 years old. He is Mrs. deceased. Mrs. Dun- Dunlap lap worked as a housekeeper for bandleader/TV star Desi Arnaz for 11 years in Hollywood, Calif. She moved to Sequim in 1981. Mrs. Dunlap has two children, Jacquelyn Kennedy of Del Mar, Calif., and James Dunlap of DeRidder, La. She also has five grandchildren and numerous

going out with nothing (and you can do the same). I know that sounds a little hostile, but I’m going to the extreme to make the point. Actually, it rarely is “hostile”; it’s just a different view of life and the world and is often seen as a way of empowering kids who are genuinely loved to make it on their own, learn the good lessons and earn the sense of confidence and achievement that comes with doing that. Amen. The shoot-yourself-in-the-foot piece can be that we’re so busy spending it — using it up cuz I ain’t gonna leave it! — that we don’t have “it” when we need “it.” Oops. Think “moderation.” Again. Just one more, for now: “I don’t want the kids to have to wait till I’m dead to share the bounty (or ‘they need it now,’ or whatever), so I’m going to start giving it to them a bit at a time while I’m still alive to enjoy watching them enjoy it!” Is there a shoot-yourself-in-thefoot piece to this? Maybe. Medicare does not now, nor has it ever, paid for “long-term care.” Medicaid does. Medicaid eligibility is based, in part, on your income and assets, so what’s the “worst case”? Well, Dad descends into Alzheimer’s disease (or something that looks like it), and things get to

all parties. The “kicker” here is that, for many of us, if we’re going to leave an inheritance, we’re going to have to plan, save and, in all likelihood, do without. “Without” what? Well, it could be without that next cruise, or it could be without that next prescription – I’ve seen both. It could be stubbornly staying in a too-big, too-expensive, toomuch-work house — and paying a significant physical price for doing it! Because I’m going to by-Godleave-the-house-to-the-kids! That can be lovely and loving and generous. It can also be a shoot-yourselfin-the-foot kind of strategy because we don’t do what we need to do to take care of ourselves, so the “kids” end up having to take care of us, and everything goes down the drain, and everybody ends up being worse off than they were before. Think “moderation.” For others, the view can be expressed as “leaving you an ‘inheritance’ suggests bad planning on my part!” In other words, I’m going to do what I want, when I want, the way I want! I earned it, and I’m going to do what I need to do. I came in with nothing (and you can do the same) and I’m

the point where he requires 24/7 institutional care, and all his money gets spent paying for same. Kids help Dad apply for Medicaid. It’s then discovered that Dad gave away money to the kids, and a complicated mathematical formula is employed to calculate the number of months/years that Dad is ineligible for Medicaid, so guess who pays for the care? Is it “legal” to give money to your kids? Of course. It’s only a “problem” if/when Medicaid is expected to help pay for care. So, what’s the best way to go in all this? I don’t know. I know what my biases and beliefs are, but that has nothing to do with what you might conclude, and that’s the conclusion of every piece of this “Boomer Primer:” Put it on your list of “things to think about,” then actually think about it. Hey, if aging were easy, everybody would do it.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

CORNER

He was born in Minneapolis great-grandchildren. She loves to dance and enjoys and at age 2 moved with his gambling. parents, two sisters and three brothers to Seattle. After high school, he joined Bob Whiting the Army and served during World War II. The family of Sequim resiWhile stationed in Australia dent Bob Whiting asks friends and New Guinea, he was active to join them in wishing their in an infantry division that father a happy 90th birthday trained horses for the war effort. Tuesday. Upon returning from the Mr. WhitPacific, he graduated from Seating jokes that tle University and married his he didn’t like wife, Jean. having his The Whitings settled in West birthday in Seattle and raised four children. early SepMr. Whiting had a successful tember career in the food brokerage because as a industry and retired in 1983 to child, he spend more time with his wife. always Mr. On most weekends, they received Whiting could be found golfing, clam digschool supplies as birthging and gardening at their day gifts. cabin on Hat Island. These days, he looks forward Later, retirement brought to his birthdays, enjoying fried them to Sequim, where Mr. oysters and a cold beer with his Whiting loves spending time family. with his wife, reading, caring for

his flowers, feeding the ducks in Carrie Blake Park, rooting for the Mariners and Seahawks, and enjoying visits from his children, five grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

with her oldest daughter and her family for the past six years. She has seven children, 13 grandchildren and 23 greatgrandchildren.

Lois Sanders

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

Lois Sanders celebrated her 90th birthday Aug. 27 and enjoyed a birthday party with family and friends Aug. 28. Born in California, Mrs. Sanders has lived the majority of her life in Yakima and Lakebay. She married Richard Mrs. D. Sanders Sanders on Oct. 4, 1939. He died in September 1995. Mrs. Sanders moved to Sequim and has been living

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The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

PARDON ‘E’ INTERRUPTION

BY PATRICK BERRY/ EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Director 6 Stereo syst. component 10 Recipe abbr. 14 Number crunchers, for short 18 State capital whose name comes from the French for “wooded area” 19 Mississippi River’s largest tributary 20 The Hermit Kingdom, once 21 Lie a lot 22 Island from which Tiberius ruled 23 Lively dance performed as a sixpack is being laid to rest? 26 Canine king’s regime? 28 Small chain component 29 Baker of jazz 30 Dominant theme 31 West African monetary unit 32 Ones crunched during crunch time? 35 Tanned skin 38 Hostile feelings 41 Eco-warriors? 48 Grammatical topic 49 Earth tone 50 Smoke 51 Web address component 54 Beat soundly 56 Encounter with an Alaskan bear?

59 Beneficiary of a 2008 bailout 63 Expected 64 Very unpleasant 65 Red Scare prosecutor Roy 67 Mr. of old cartoons 68 1813-14 vice president 70 Fan club focus 71 Stockpile 73 Hundred Acre Wood young ’un 74 Not permanent 76 Set of shot glasses for Christmas? 80 A man or a mouse 83 ___ equivalent (measure of explosive strength) 84 Eggs served raw 85 W.W. II title 88 Native New Zealander 89 Sharpshooter Oakley when she was a charming young musician? 93 Have an emotional impact 96 “Or ___ what?” 97 Interject 98 Canning seal 99 Paterson’s successor as New York governor 104 Newborn on a ranch 107 Sneaky trick 108 Interstellar valet’s job? 113 Ship info kept for the Spanish Armada?

17 Puts on the ballot 20 Mathematician Gödel 24 Comrade 25 Continuing to criticize unnecessarily 27 Pop name 32 Border 33 “What nonsense!” 34 Plan for the evening? 36 Start of a Wagner title 37 Biblical priest at Shiloh 39 Stable sounds DO W N 40 Hurt badly 1 1970 #1 hit for the Jackson 5 42 Opposing 2 Waterfall sound 43 Snug retreat 3 Sufficiently aged 44 “Wall Street” character 4 “Hamlet” courtier Gordon ___ 5 Consider carefully 45 ___ Chicago Grill 6 Stiffly awkward. as 46 Far-away connector movement 47 Notorious investor 7 One doing course work 51 Brabantio’s fair daughter 8 ___ Minh (1940s independence 52 Not deceived by movement) 53 “Gotta go,” in chat 9 “Miss Julie” rooms composer Ned 55 “Last Time I Saw 10 Shinto shrine ___” (Diana Ross entrance song) 11 Filled in 57 Seer’s perception 12 Cook so as to lock 58 Blue uniform in the flavor, say wearer 13 Comrade 60 All-Star Dick of the 1960s-’70s Knicks 14 Bogeymen’s hiding places 61 Dumbfounded 15 Hoi ___ 62 Knuckle-headed action? 16 Compound also called an olefin 65 U.S.N. rank

115 Foo Fighters frontman Dave 117 Golf rarities 118 Drew on a screen 119 A.L. M.V.P. in 2005 and 2007, informally 120 House that won’t catch fire 121 Old Harper’s Weekly cartoonist 122 Wheelless vehicle 123 Desires 124 Bygone communication

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, September 1, 2011

C3

Toddler in hospital after cougar attack By Cindy E. Harnett Victoria Times Colonist

VICTORIA — An 18-month-old boy attacked by a cougar on Vancouver Island on Monday remained in serious condition in B.C. Children’s Hospital in Vancouver. Julien Sylvester’s mother, Sarah Hagar, was at the hospital in Vancouver with her injured son. “The patient is in serious condition, which means he is being monitored closely,” hospital spokeswoman Tracy Tang said. The attack happened at 6 p.m. Monday at Swim Beach in the Kennedy Lake day-use area of the national park, about 10 east of Ucluelet on the Pacific coast and 70 miles north of the U.S. border. The family had packed up and was leaving the beach. Julien was walking about 10 feet in front of his grandfather and another unidentified adult when the cougar leaped on the boy from a forest at the edge of the beach, Armstrong said. The cougar was momen-

tarily daunted by Julien’s grandfather, then lunged at the boy’s 4-year-old sister. The cougar did not make contact with the girl, who was unharmed, Parks Canada spokeswoman Arlene Armstrong said.

flown to B.C. Children’s Hospital, where he was in the intensive care unit. “The family is focusing all of their energy on their son’s recovery and are asking the media to please respect their privacy today and in the days ahead, so ‘Quick encounter’ they can concentrate on “The cougar surprised their son’s health,” Tang them really quickly from said in a statement. the forested edge,” Armstrong said. “It was a very Full-scale search quick encounter.” Four officers from the The adults stopped the Conservation Officer Serattack by screaming and vice, tracking dogs, Ucluelet challenging the big cat. The detachment of the Royal cougar was scared off iniCanadian Mounted Police tially but didn’t run away. The couple continued to and West Coast Search and aggressively stare and Rescue launched a fullshout the cougar down, scale search to track and picked up both children and trap the cougar. About 20 Parks Canada slowly backed away from the predatory animal while staff are also involved in tracking, coordinating the continuing to make noise. “The family members search and communicadid everything right,” Arm- tions. If found, the cougar will strong said. “There’s no indication the family is at be killed because it poses a public safety risk, according fault.” The grandfather imme- to Parks Canada. The Kennedy Lake daydiately “got the child to medical attention,” Arm- use area of the park is closed. All other areas of the strong said. Julien was taken to a national park reserve Tofino hospital nearby, then remain open.

Downtown Victoria introducing Wi-Fi Victoria Times Colonist

VICTORIA — Part of the downtown will have free Wi-Fi computer service by the new year. “We are in the midst of pursuing this and are very close to coming to a conclusion,” Downtown Victoria Business Association general manager Ken Kelly said this week. Kelly said a decision on a service provider should be

perceived as a forward-looking downtown.” The association has earmarked $25,000 for startup costs. To gear up, a mass Wi-Fi test was held at Centennial Square on Wednesday, where the public was invited to participate. Hundreds of cities in the U.S. provide free public Wi-Fi service, but fewer do in Canada.

made in the next couple of months, and the association will have to decide where the free Wi-Fi access goes. “It will likely be an incremental service. We wouldn’t be able to afford to provide the entire downtown with it in one fell swoop but we’d start off in strategic locations,” Kelly said. “This is no longer something we consider to be optional. It’s necessary to be

SNEAK

The Associated Press

Washington state Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Mark walks past a display of a Backpage.com ad following a news conference about action being taken against the adult services site Wednesday in Seattle.

Backpage.com asked to explain procedures The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Attorneys general in Washington and 44 other states are asking a classified ad website to explain how it handles postings for adult services. The attorneys general said in a letter to Backpage. com on Wednesday that hundreds of ads on the website are for prostitution. The letter says the site attracts people who seek to exploit minors. State leaders want Backpage.com to prove that it is monitoring the site to prevent illegal activity. They are asking the company to willingly provide information in lieu of a subpoena. Craigslist closed its adult services section last year after attorneys general and others raised concerns it could not effectively screen out illegal ads.

McKenna in lead Attorney General Rob McKenna on Wednesday said he and 45 of his colleagues nationwide have told the Village Voice Media website to “put up or shut

up” and prove that it’s taking active efforts to fight sex trafficking. “Let’s be clear about this, prostitution is a form of human trafficking, a form of human slavery,” McKenna said at a news conference in Olympia. Previously, the mayors of Tacoma, Spokane, Bellingham, Shoreline, Pullman and three other Washington cities backed Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn’s speaking out against Backpage.com. In a statement, McGinn thanked McKenna and the other attorneys general. “Today’s announcement by 46 attorneys general is further evidence of the broad and deep public desire for Village Voice Media to protect our children and change its practices,” McGinn said Wednesday. In a letter to Backpage. com’s lawyers, the attorneys general say that the website claims to have strict policies to prevent illegal activity. Yet the chief legal officers of Washington state, Missouri and Connecticut have found hundreds of ads on Backpage.com’s regional

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A•PEEK

T O DAY

5TH SEMI ANNUAL GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Just like a mini flea market. Last one of the season, don’t miss this one. Lots of great items. Watches, jewelry, tools, linens, collectibles, furniture. Items added each day. 60 Tyee Ln., Port Ludlow. Lots of signs. Cell 425-918-2197 Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817.

Another astronomical Clallam County Historical Society GARAGE SALE 8th and C Streets Members only Sept. 1, 4-6 Public Sale Sept. 2 & 3, 8-2 Call 452-2662 for more info about sale or to become a member. BAYLINER: ‘84 20’ Capri. Cuddy, Volvo IO, full top, 8 hp Merc kicker, trailer. $3,200/obo. 452-5652 BB’S GETTIN’ MARRIED! Everything must go! Fri.-Sat., 7 a.m.-? 928 W. Lauridsen/C St., upstairs, Apt. #2. 5’ Christmas nutcracker, vintage collector Monopoly games, overstuffed love seat, 5.5x3’ mirror, huge corner desk, 100+ worldly shot glasses, kitchen stuff, oval hanging pot rack, 7x5 2 tone leather woven rug, tons of clothes: scrubs, jackets etc. draperies, huge Broyhill coffee table, Super Q. rattan bed. CASH ONLY! BIG SALE OF STRICTLY UPSCALE STUFF Sat., 7:30-3 p.m. 321 Brittany Lane, off Brigadoon. Don’t miss it! CELLO OUTFIT: Kohr 3/4 cello with bow, case, and cello stand. Excellent shape/quality. $675 360-460-6373

’S

HOTTEST

Cancer Fundraiser GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. 10 Winterhawk St. Alta Vista in Carlsborg. Adult and kids clothing, misc. CHINA: 40 pc. Royal Albert Petit Point English bone china dinner set, Hampton shape, floral pattern, reg. #778676, circ. 1932, 7 place settings, 4 cup teapot with creamer, sugar. $300. 360-379-0974. ESTATE Sale: Sat., 812 p.m. Parkridge Dr., near Courtesy Ford, at red barn on left, P.T. Antiques, 3 cast iron stoves, junk. All must go! Rain or shine! ESTATE Sale: Sat., 9? 72 Avellana Rd., off River Road exit, turn right. Tons of furniture, great items, appliances. House and garage full! ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., Sept 24, 9-4 p.m. 431 Glen Cove Rd., Pt. Townsend. Tools, misc hardware, plumbing, electrical, garden tools, furniture, housewares. 8 hp generator, table saw, radial arm saw, new 3/4” drive socket set (to 2 1/4”), wood stove, wood cook stove, combo wrench set 1 3/8-2”, 5 pc pipe die set 1/2-2”. ESTATE Sale: Years of stuff for guys and gals. Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 413 South Bagley Cr. ESTATE Sale: ATTENTION: MEN WOMEN Estate sale unlike any other! Sat.-Sun. 9-5 p.m., Mon. 9-3 p.m. 133 Blue Mountain Rd. Misc. animal horns skulls, fish memorabilia, die cast model Mustangs, antiques, tools, air compressor, car jacks, car cover, garden tools yard decor, deer decoys, washer dryker, small freezer refrigerator, oak table with four chairs, oak china hutch, lift chair-new; electric hospital bed, walkers and plenty of household goods, etc. FORD: 98 Windstar. 84K mi., excellent cond., white. $2,495/ obo. 683-4505. GARAGE Sale: Fri., 10-4, Sat., 9-3 p.m. 3016 S. Regent St. Nice girls mtn. bike, clothes, books, exercise equipment, kids telescope, etc. ROOM: No D/A or pets. $300 mo. Call for details 808-1135.

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., West Alder Storage, 325 N. 5th Ave. #19. Leaf blower, quilt, 2 computer monitors, Landmark printer, George Foreman grill, knickknacks, little bit of everything. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m. Sun., 12-4 p.m. 870 Old Gardiner Rd., next to Gardiner Community Center. Wide variety of items. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-2 p.m. 820 N. Rhodefer Rd., just beyond QFC off Washington. 26’ Interstate car trailer. 14’ Larson boat w/ 65 hp motor. 21’ travel trailer, rebuilt, everything new. Tools and household items.

NEW

CLASSIFIEDS

Garage/Yard Sale: Sat.-Sun.-Mon, 114, 1133 W 6th St. Lots of good quality stuff! Clothes, DVD’s, Furniture, Books Household/ Kitchen Monitors Pet stuff, Computers, Tools, Collectables, See online ad. “GET ER DONE” GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 7 a.m.-6 p.m., 344 House Rd., Get your man cave ready for football season, Matilda Bay Cooler neon bar sign, 19”x19”. $100. 360-379-0974 GOLF CART: ‘94 Yamaha gas powered, fully enclosed, headlights, tail lights, ball and club washer. $1,600. 808-2834. HUGE MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 71 Mariners Dr., off Old Olympic, east of 5th Ave. Some antiques.

GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-2 p.m., 2555 Mt. Pleasant Rd. 457-9038. Toys, game console and games, anchor, clothes, furniture, entertainment center, heavy bag, bike, workout equipment, kitchen stuff, etc.

Labor Day Hay Sale Second cut Oregon Orchard Timothy mix, $11.50 bale. 452-1400 Leitz Farms

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 1203 Caroline. Washer, dryer, refrigerator, tools, children’s clothing, books and more.

LARGE GARAGE Sale: Sat.-Sun., 93 p.m. 685 Cameron Rd. Lots of oldies but goodies. Nice stuff, no junk.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m. Airport/ Courtney Rd. Vintage cookbooks, sofa, chest freezer, electric fencing, ladies/mens XL clothes, VW tow bar, stove hood, iRoomba vacuum, stainless sink, microwave, craft supplies, mirrors, and lots more!

LARGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 50590 Hwy. 112, Joyce. Tools, collectibles, just about anything.

GARAGE Sale: Sat. 83, Sun. noon-3, Mon. 8-3, 220 S. Oak St. in alley. Children’s clothes, toys, books, furniture, 2 jogging strollers, household goods, hand tools, garden tools, building supplies, 36” solid core birch door, 6040 vinyl windows, dryer, 36” Sony Wega, 2 printers, and lots more. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 8-2 p.m., 229 W 13th, in alley off Cherry St. Desks, ent center, bureau, Singer sewing, cosleeper, tables, wrought-iron plate rack, drapes, rugs, chairs, clothes, paperdolls, crafts, more. No earlies. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8 a.m.-?, 602 E. 10th St. Wood burning stove, lg. grill, material and various items.

20 MIN. TO SEQ. OR P.T.: 3 Br, 2 ba, water view, lg. deck, 3-car gar., all appl., boat ramp near by, cr. ck, ref $1,175. 683-2799 MISC: Solid Oak pedestal dining table 54” round, excellent condition, $500. Serger, never used $200. 360-437-0268. MISC: (2) Leather recliners, burgundy and tan, $75 ea. 40” Drop leaf table, with 2 chairs, $75. Floor lamp, $25. Microwave, $25. Beautiful antique armoire, $150. (4) Padded folding chairs, $40. 683-0999 MOVING Sale: Sat., 12-6 p.m. 156 Marsden Rd., up Mt. Pleasant. Bed, entertainment center, huge TV, kitchen table with chairs. Mostly furniture, some kitchen, some collectibles, some toys and lots of books. P.A.: 511 E Lopez. 3 Br., 2 bath, w/ garage, $1000 mo. No pets/smoking. Call 809-0538.

MOVING Sale: Sat., 8-1 p.m., 578 Elk Horn Lp. Lots of nice furniture, kitchen items, 52” LCD TV, Miller clocks, refrigerator, freezer, Yamaha Clavinova piano, desks, bookcases. Everything must go. MOVING Sale: Sat. only, 8-4 p.m., 2809 Sunnybrook Meadow Ln. Misc household, furniture, tools, glider, BBQ, clothing all ages, books, cameras, cars, Christmas, and antiques. MOVING/GARAGE Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-12 p.m. 881 W. Sylvester Ct. Just south of intersection of Olympic Hwy and Kendall. Living room, dining room, and bedroom furniture, office desk, and much more. MUSEUM & ARTS CENTER SWAP MEET Sat., 9-2 p.m. 544 N. Sequim Ave., across from Sequim High School. Info: 360-683-8110 www.macsequim.org NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com OPEN HOUSE By owner. Fri.-Sat., 11-3, 505 S. Washington, P.A. 4 Br., 1 ba, garage/workshop, great location, exceptional condition. $175,000 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, shop/carport, W/D, sm pet. Busy location. 3143 E. Hwy. 101. $575. 417-8250 PARTING OUT: ‘91 Ford Explorer. $10$100. 460-0262 or 681-0940. PIANO TUNING and repair. Gary Freel Piano Service. Since 1984. 360-775-5480. PUPPIES: Half Blood Hound, half Pit Bull, shots, wormed. $150/obo. Serious inquiries only. 461-0095 ROOFERS Experienced. Must know how to shingle. LABORERS NEEDED ALSO. 683-1483. WANTED: Vintage interior door, would love stained glass/ leaded glass. 417-8097 days

!

RUMMAGE Sale: Sat., 9 a.m.-?, 820 W. Washington St. (off Bracket St. behind Sequim Consignment Company.) Everything from A-Z, some furniture, TVs, outdoor equipment, some restaurant equipment, small wares. Everything must go. RUMMAGE Sale: Fri., 8-2 p.m. 114 E. 6th Terrace Apts community room, use parking lot entrance. Collectibles, records, knickknacks, books and more. Sequim: Garage Sale: Sept. 2 and 3 from 95. 91 Madera Place, Sequim in Solmar. Some fishing, tools, clothing, full size loft bed, dresser, stroller and car seat, books and toddler toys. TICKETS: Preseason Seahawk vs. Raiders, Sept. 2nd, Row T, Section 337, Seat 20-21. $80 ea. Will sell $120 both. 360-461-3661 WANTED: Dodge pickup ‘98-’01, 1/2 or 3/4 ton quad cab, short bed, loaded, 4x4, excellent condition, 50K mi. or less. 683-8810 WEEK-LONG Sale: Fri.-Sat., August 27Sept. 3? 9-5 p.m. 1112 E. 6th St. No earlies! Sofa, love seat, dressers, mens tools, pickup truck, camper trailer, and much more! WEEKEND GARAGE Sale: Sat. 8-5, Sun. 9-3, 6495 Flagler Road, Nordland. Misc goods, sporting goods, tools, mower, books, and lots more. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 2347 Edgewood Drive. Misc. items. YARD SALE CHEAP PRICES. Collectible glassware/Crystal/ vintage items. Large dollhouse/furniture. Upright piano. Saturday 9/3, 8AM. Everything goes. 719 W. 5th St. between Tumwater and A Street. YARD Sale: Thur.-Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 538 W. 6th St., between bridges. Last of California’s things. Everything must go! Make an offer! Good deals! YARD Sale: Fri., 8-4 p.m., Sat., 8-3 p.m., 615 S. Chambers. Lots of boy’s clothes, garage stuff, chest of drawers, linens, and household misc.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Dog. Small female, found on west side of P.A. 928-9482 FOUND: Envelope. downtown P.A., on bench, call to describe contents. 452-3764 FOUND: Glasses. Ladies red frame prescription glasses with stars on side, City Hall Parking Lot, P.A. Call 457-0411. FOUND: Glove. HydroSkin, along Parrish Road, in Carlsborg. 683-7667. FOUND: Keys. Near fish hatchery in Sequim on 08/28. Dropped off at Sequim QFC, lotto counter. FOUND: VW key. On the road near Port Angeles High School track. 457-7180. LOST: Cat. Black short hair, clipped ear, Parkwood, Seq. 681-4129 LOST: Cat. Black, “Smokey”. Last seen on Freshwater Pk, PA, 8/29 p.m. Wearing collar, tags. Any info, please call 460-5747, 928-9454 LOST: Cat. Long haired Siamese female. Missing from Carlsborg area. 683-6839 LOST: Dog. Boston Terrier, black and white brindle, 20 lbs., very fit, 4 yrs. old, spayed, no collar. W. Woodcock and Kitchen-Dick, Seq. 477-7408

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

sites that are for illegal services, McKenna said. “It does not require forensic training to understand that these advertisements are for prostitution,” the attorneys general wrote in their letter. McKenna said Backpage.com should “end it’s adult services section,’ something Craigslist did after complaints. If Backpage.com does not reply with the attorneys general’s requests, ­McKenna said he and his counterparts would see “what type of leverage” they have under the law. “We’re going to find some laws we can bring to bear here. We’d rather that Backpage do the right thing.” Village Voice Media LLC, which owns 13 weekly newspapers nationally including Seattle Weekly, admitted its involvement in advertising illegal services, the Washington state attorney general’s office said. Village Voice’s stake in adult services advertisements is worth about $22.7 million in annual revenue, McKenna’s office said.

Lost and Found

LOST: Duck. Large male, from Golden Sands Pl., Seq. Dark grey, white mottled chest. Child devastated. Indoor, handraise pet, on special diet, has a mate. Please bring BB home! 681-5349. LOST: Engraved iPod Touch. Missing out of car 8/29/11, engraved with “Merry Christmas Lacey Belle”. 360-809-3123 LOST: Wallet. Black, women’s, was on roof of car when left Lincoln St. Safeway, P.A. Call 460-3037 or drop off at Swains.

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Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. Bagels & Bagels Opening Baker, dependable, early riser, exp. A+. Training provided. PT-FT Olympic Bagel Co. 802 E. 1st St., P.A. BARBER: Fill in, P/T for established shop. Appt. call 477-3867. CAREGIVERS needed all shifts. 12 hr weekend shifts. Assist meals, bathing, toileting, transfers. Caregivers 457-1644, 683-7377, 379-6659. Will train.

Personals

White male, 60, 6’, HWP, non-smoker, affectionate, caring, loves the outdoors, home life. Looking for that lady to build a special friendship and see where it goes from there. Mail responses to: PDN#228/Outdoors Pt Angeles, 98362

CNA/NAR Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com DISHWASHER/PREP Day & night shifts. Apply in person Cafe Garden Restaurant.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

A CAREGIVER Needed at adult care home in Sequim, cooking skills needed. 683-9194. ACCOUNTING CLERK NEEDED Must have spreadsheet knowledge and be experienced in front desk procedures, payments processing, cash reconciliations, data entry. Must be able to pass drug screening and a criminal background check. Please send resume by email only to: Bonnie Meehan, Controller Peninsula Daily News bonnie.meehan@ peninsuladailynews. com

DRIVER/LOADER Local company looking for a motivated Class B CDL truck driver/roof loader. Job requires repetitive heavy lifting, and a safe appreciation of heights. Great attitude, great customer service, and CDL required. Mail resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#227/Driver Pt Angeles, WA 98362 IMMEDIATE OPENING Experienced HVAC service tech with exp. in the servicing and repair of heat pumps, furnaces. Radiant systems a +. Benefits, wages DOE. Call 681-3333. IMMEDIATE OPENING HVAC technician with O6A card, with experience in the installation and servicing of ductless heat pumps Benefits, wages DOE. Call 681-3333 for more information. Kitchen manager needed for a retirement/assisted living community in Clallam County. Experience working with special diets and senior citizens helpful. Budgetary experience preferred. Full-time with benefits and 401K. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#229/Kitchen Pt Angeles, WA 98362


Classified

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

ACROSS 1 “Close!” 7 Cartoon monkey 10 __ bonding 14 Create trouble 16 Mount near Olympus 17 See 64-Across 19 Marx’s “__ Kapital” 20 Smallish quarrel 21 With attitude 22 It may be painted 23 NASA moon lander 24 See 64-Across 33 “Alfred” composer, 1740 34 Study fields 35 Something golfers often break 36 Martial arts facility 37 Molasses-like 38 LaBeouf of “Transformers” films 39 Latin 101 word 40 Drummer in Goodman’s band 41 Crammer’s concern 42 See 64-Across 46 Quite a while 47 Unsafe? 48 It’s sometimes shaved 51 Smith’s item 53 Contend 56 See 64-Across 60 “__Cop”: 1987 film 61 Plant-based weight loss regimen 62 Former cygnet 63 Scale notes 64 Clue for this puzzle’s four longest answers DOWN 1 Riding sch., e.g. 2 Dharma teacher 3 Rose Parade flowers 4 Home of the Woody Hayes Athletic Ctr. 5 Electric eye, e.g.

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Help Wanted

Experienced caregivers needed, All shifts. Please call 452-2396 LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com OLYMPIC LODGE Is now hiring for fulltime Night Audit and Front Desk; must have excellent interpersonal and computer skills, with stable work history. Pay and benefits DOE. Housekeeping positions avail. Please apply in person at Olympic Lodge, 140 Del Guzzi Dr., Port Angeles. No phone calls please. ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. $11.13-12.05/hr. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. CARGO PANTS Solution: 5 letters

C W M A E ҹ I N S ҹ I T U B N A E N G D K H B L A E S D I I C W By Steve Salitan

6 Capital SSW of Seoul 7 Going head to head 8 Vita 9 Spigoted vessel 10 Parisian words of friendship 11 Sale caveat 12 WWII transports 13 Lenient 15 Short stop? 18 Windows openers 22 Palm in one’s palm? 23 Reporter’s source 24 Co-Nobelist with Begin in 1978 25 Teaser 26 One variety of it remains green when ripe 27 Book after Micah 28 Kvetch 29 Hard nut to crack 30 Questionnaire catchall 31 Certain believer 32 Election prizes 37 Air__: Southwest subsidiary Help Wanted

Medical Asst needed for dermatologist office. Exp. preferred but will train the right person. Please apply at 360-681-6900, fax 360-681-6222, email sequimderm@yahoo. com Order Fulfillment/ Customer Service Must lift 50 lbs. consistently, Customer and computer experience a must, team player, detail oriented, full-time, $9 hr. Please email resume to: hpatterson@starmani nc.com P.A. Construction Co. seeks Payroll Clerk/ Office Assistant, 30-40 hrs/wk. DOE, benefits, EOE. Pls send resume to: futureemployer2011 @yahoo.com by Sept. 9, 5:00 pm PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Is taking applications for a part-time delivery driver. Job includes delivering newspaper bundles to carriers and servicing single copy locations in Sequim and Port Townsend areas. Hours are 11:30 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. Monday night through Thursday night. Minimum wage plus mileage Applicant must have a clean driving record, reliable vehicle, and be able to lift repetitively. Please pick up application at PDN office at 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles.

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9/1/11

T R L O N F A S T O R E S D A

R S C A T C L R S I N L T U I

O I N L S T O A Y N T S R R L

www.wonderword.com

F Z E A E T O O G S G C O A S

M E L K P V I N L E D I H B C

O D C D E R U C E S D L S L D

C O L O R S R O O D T U O E E

P Z I P P E R S P O R T Y F D

S M E H C T E R T S H A P E A

B E L T R E V N O C I R B A F 9/1

Join us on Facebook

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

AVLCO ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

CEHKC (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 BA or HR 40 Titan of publishing 43 Put trust in 44 Where distasteful humor often goes 45 Hopi home 48 Violas, cellos, etc.: Abbr. 49 Bad thing to eat 50 “Rubáiyát” rhyme scheme

31

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

Permanent ranch help. Jack of all trades: Good hourly wage and benefits. Gardiner area. Applicant must pass background check. Apply by phone or email. 461-2954 or richard@mountbake rblock.com Lincare, leading national respiratory company seeks Healthcare Specialist for well established and rapidly growing Port Angeles center. Responsibilities: Disease management programs, clinical evaluations, equipment set up and education, and excellence in patient care. RN, LPN, RRT, CRT licensed as applicable. Great personalities with strong work ethic needed. Desirable hours, competitive salary, benefits and career paths. Drugfree workplace. EOE. To apply bring resume to 1905 E. Front St., Port Angeles or fax to 360457-3263 Attn: HCS Position.

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring 185130783

Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim is looking for 3 Bath Aides & Restorative Aides to complete our care team. Please call Jeannie Russell at 582-3900 for more information.

© 2011 Universal Uclick

O E C E U T L S T I H G U O T

Basic, Belt, Buttons, Camouflaged, Casual, Classic, Cloth, Coin, Colors, Comfort, Convert, Cool, Cotton, Designs, Details, Durable, Elastic, Fabric, Faded, Folds, Genuine, Hems, Khaki, Kids, Legs, Loose, Military, Outdoor, Oversized, Pocket, Secured, Shape, Shorts, Snap, Sporty, Stores, Stretch, Topstitch, Tough, Velcro, Waistband, Wide, Women, Zippers Yesterday’s Answer: Orange

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

Help Wanted

Bath Aides & Restorative Aides

R ҹ C O V ҹ M M L O O I O O U P C T L U A K S A S S I K C X D E

Help Wanted

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 ROOFERS Experienced. Must know how to shingle. LABORERS NEEDED ALSO. 683-1483. Sawmill Production Manager Min. 10+ yrs. progressive sawmill supervisory exp. with at least 2 yrs as manager, strong financial understanding, Proven leadership abilities, Strong computer skills. Excellent wage and benefits package. Send Resume to: Interfor Pacific; 243701 Hwy 101 W; Port Angeles; WA 98362; EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer. Teacher’s aide needed for preschool aged children. 14 morning hrs per week, $9/hr. School located in the Fairview area. Please submit resume to: pastorderrell@live.co m THE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Circulation Department Telemarketer Phone Sales Position available part-time, 20 hrs wk. Hours are 3-7 p.m., Mon.–Fri. Base plus commission. Phone skills are a must. Customer service is minimal but necessary. Required to reach monthly goals. Please come to 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles, to fill out an application or e-mail: jasmine.birkland@pe ninsuladailynews. com

9/1/11

TWRHOG 51 Georgia and Latvia, once: Abbr. 52 Fireplace shelf SARDUB 53 Gold source Now arrange the circled letters 54 Really ticked to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon. 55 Some attendance figs. Print answer here: A 57 TV dial letters 58 Herd dining area (Answers tomorrow) TRUNK BUSILY FUSION Jumbles: CABIN 59 Prof’s address Yesterday’s Answer: He finished second at the family reunion race letters behind this — HIS FIRST COUSIN

34

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034. FOR QUILT TOPS Hand quilting done. 683-6901 HOME CLEANING Meticulous and honest. Amie 452-4184.

51

Work Wanted

HOME CLEANING Reliable, dependable, flexible. Call Meredith 360-461-6508. HOUSE CLEANING For a clean house, call Cathy at 457-6845. LAWN & YARD CARE SERVICES. Mowing, weeding, hedge trimming, landscape maintenance, general clean-up of lawns, yards, lots garages. Tom at 452-3229 Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fast, friendly, reliable, experienced, reasonable rates. Mow, blow, edge, weed, pulling, whacking, brush clearing, debris, hauling. Sequim /P.A. area. 681-3521 Cell: 541-420-4795. Professional Window Washing. 20 years experience in window washing, weatherization, repair and replacement. Call Jack for an estimate at 360-201-6409 See my online add at Peninsula Marketplace. Remodels and additions. 460-6508 RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

34

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

C4

43

Money Loaned/ Wanted

Money Wanted: Need $190,000 secured by 1st TD, beautiful water front property, valued at least $500,000. 2 years interest only, 15% with Balloon. Please Call Art at 360-681-0168

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

A TRADITIONAL FAVORITE This Dutch Colonial in desirable Sunrise Heights offers over 3,500 sf, 4 Br., 2.5 baths. It’s a classic design with many smart upgrades that add to its character and livability and sits on a large corner lot. $474,500. ML261735. Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Beautiful 3 Br. 2 bath home on the waterfront. Great views through the expanse of windows in the great room. Large deck, hot tub, dock, 30 AMP RV hook-up with dump, oversized attached garage with storage. $489,000 ML260645/202240 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

Homes

BIG MOUNTAIN VIEWS 2 Br. suites, 2.5 baths, 2,296 sf, 1.25 acres, upscale quality construction, light and airy with southern exposure, observatory equipment negotiable. $399,000 ML263139/261727 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND CLEAN, LIGHT, AND BRIGHT Home in Sun Meadows! Well-maintained house with 2 Br. + den/2 baths, a fenced rear yard and patio is ready to go! Hardwood entry, vaulted ceilings, newer carpet, inside laundry. Great price for a great home! $169,900 ML261587/254814 Marti Winkler 477-8277 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY Don’t miss this opportunity to view this historic craftsman 4+ Br., 2 bath home on a double lot with beautiful mountain views. This home features fir floors and trim, a parlor with French doors, formal dining room with built-in hutch, 3 covered porches and a formal living room. The farmhouse style kitchen has a wood stove, built-ins with stained glass, huge pantry and a breakfast nook. In the basement you’ll find a workshop, 2nd kitchen, storage and a wine cellar. $249,900 ML261771/265682 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Homes

CONDO: Unit 301 at 710 Del Guzzi Dr., P.A. overlooks Peninsula Golf Course, 2 Br., 2 ba, study, covered parking, storage, deck. $229,000. 808-5290 EXCELLENT VIEWS From this older, twostory home of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, shipping lanes, San Juan Islands, Victoria and Mt Baker. Located in a settled, well-kept neighborhood. Home currently separated into two rental properties: one upstairs and one downstairs (both have views!). 2-car attached garage plus parking in back off alley. $255,000. ML261246 Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Extensively remodeled in the mid-80’s and updated in 2008. Features vinyl windows, custom tile work, quartz counters, Victorian-style light fixtures, upstairs social room, lots of storage including a lighted attic above the master suite. Updated plumbing and electrical. Lots of natural light. Very nice dual views from master, kitchen and dining area. $239,500. ML261630 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. FABULOUS MTN VIEW 1.2 acre, 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,568 sf home with 2 car garage and fabulous mountain view. Built in 1984, this manufactured home has new energy efficient windows, PUD weatherization, healthy well water, irrigation and underground utilities. Neat, clean, move-in ready! Seller financing available. $175,000. ML261703. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435

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51

Homes

FSBO Great water/ mountain views from Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great rm, and rec rm. 2 full baths/4 bdrms. Private, near schools, shopping, busses. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on first floor. Shop. Warm, south facing tiled patio. Large lot, fruit trees/ garden. $325,000 457-2796 FSBO: Lake Dawn 3 Br., 1 bath Heart ‘O’ The Hills home. Priced low at $114,000. 360-452-5803 HOME SWEET HOME Move right in to this sweet 2 Br. on a quiet street. You’ll be amazed at how much kitchen you will enjoy at this price. Lush landscaping in the front yard affords lots of privacy. Bonus is the detached double garage on the back of the lot. You can use the single attached garage for storage! $165,000. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY INNER HARBOR CONDO Beautiful 2 Br., 2 bath condo. Top floor, open floor plan with lots of storage. Well maintained. Attached oversized 1 car garage. Private balcony. $155,000. ML258554 Lois Chase Johnson 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow MOVE-IN READY! Perfectly located in quiet cul-de-sac between Sequim and Port Angeles, 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,856 sf. Well kept and improved rambler with private back yard and manicured front yard. Walk-in closet in master, living room and family room, open bright kitchen. Large utility room with storage, 3rd Br. very large with exterior entry. $177,400. ML261658. Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

91190150

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Homes

LEASE OPTION $219,900 Large 4 Br., 3 bath, 2,600 sf, 2 story home. 2 car garage, fenced yard. Sequim/Dungeness area. Move-in ready. By owner. Purchase price: $199,900. Leave message at 360-681-0765 or pinkhands@hotmail. com NEW LISTING: By owner. Nice 3 Br., 2 bath home. Wood floors, deck. Near markets in Sequim. Landscaped, fruit trees. Mtn view, must see. $185,000. Call for details/appt. 681-2875 NEW SHERWOOD VILLAGE CONDO 3 Br., 2 bath, finished 2 car garage, one of Sequim’s nicest neighborhoods, mountain view, convenient location close to town. $299,500 ML260630/201322 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND OLE CRABBY On the 3rd fairway at Cedars Dungeness Golf Course. Completely remodeled, like new. Granite counters, stainless appliances, maple flooring, fantastic views of the Olympic Mountains, separate golf card parking in basement area. $325,000 ML189839/260396 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Recently updated with laminate floors in living room, dining room and kitchen. 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 fireplaces. Interior doors upgraded. Home features vinyl siding, metal roof, trex decking, solar screens on living room windows (west side of home), new metal garage doors and low maintenance. $199,900. ML261757 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Partially wooded 2+ acre setting near Sequim with a 2,383 sf custom rambler overlooking a lovely irrigation fed pond. Open floor plan with views out to the pond from many large picture windows. Plus 3 car garage and orchard. $365,000 ML260686/204322 Alan Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. PRICE REDUCED! 2 Br. home in great neighborhood near shopping and downtown amenities. Kitchen with lots of counter space, cabinets, eating nook, living/ dining area and enclosed laundry porch. Nicely fenced back yard with alley access, garden shed and room for RV parking. Seller is motivated must sell! Bring all offers! $102,000. ML261544 Deborah Norman Brokers Group Real Estate Professionals 681-8778 RECENTLY UPGRADED Carpets, paint, and heat pump. Spacious kitchen, formal dining/living room, oversized 2 car garage and golf cart garage, nice landscaping and brick patio, back yard on the greenbelt. $245,000 ML261324/240543 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND REDUCTION ALERT! Come and get it. 4 Br., home with 2 lots, 2 levels. Great water feature which tumbles under entry deck. Main floor features kitchen with new granite and formal dining, office, two bedrooms and laundry. New carpeting, new roof, new paint and added new lawn with fencing in side yard. Lower level family room has wet bar and two bedrooms for guests. $299,900. ML252056 Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY ROOM TO ROAM Plenty of room to roam on this 2.82 acre parcel. The barn is away from the mobile unit as is the workshop and storage shed. The 3 Br., 2 bath mobile has been freshly cleaned and painted and is ready for move in. $199,750. ML260602. Barclay Jennings 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company SO MANY POSSIBILITIES! Estate sized property with tri-level home is waiting for you. 6 Br., 3 bath, 2,952 sf. It has a kitchen up/ kitchen down. Mother-in-law? Teenagers? South facing sunroom enjoys the privacy of a fenced back yard, fruit trees and outbuilding. $275,000. ML261475. Margo PetersenPruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

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Homes

SEQUIM CONDO Sherwood Village, 3 Br., 2 ba, 1,378 sf, bright end unit, adult community. $162,000 360-461-5649 SUNLAND PRICE REDUCTION Enjoy Sunland ambience and amenities with this 4 Br., 2.5 bath home in a great location at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Formal dining room, vaulted ceilings, skylights, fireplace, and large kitchen. Sunland’s serene lifestyle includes a clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis and beach access. $239,900. ML261296. Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 TAKE A LOOK From this delightful rambler with both mountain and salt water views! 2 Br., 2 bath in main house; 1 Br., 1 bath in guest quarters. On 5 acres, plenty of parking. Close to golf courses, hiking trails. Sit on your deck and just enjoy life with space around you. Irrigation water available, too! $439,000. ML261147/229541 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East This well kept 4+ Br., 1,962 sf home has a large living room and dining area with a propane fireplace, southern exposure back yard and a large 2 car garage with a workshop. Upgrades include newer windows, updated electrical and forced air heat. $175,000 ML261675/259008 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WHAT A JEWEL! Really well done upgraded 1940’s home on 2 lots. 3 Br., full bath on main level plus 1,519 ft of finished basement with 3/4 bath and outside access. Oversized carport off alley with single car garage. $245,000. ML261091/226486 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WONDERFUL COUNTRY HOME Beautiful panoramic view of Olympic Mountains. Propane brick fireplace, large master bath with separate tub/shower and walk-in closet. Large built-in pantry. 725 sf attached garage and additional 352 sf garage/ workshop area. Sun room off master Br. Gorgeous landscaping, fruit trees, sprinkler system. In area of newer homes. $249,000. ML261180. Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East WOW! In town, very clean/ private 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,472 sf. Large bonus room. Covered deck, hot tub, fenced yard. Room for R.V. Paved alley. $189,950 ML261278/237584 Jeff Biles 477-6706 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY YOUR GARDEN AT MERRILL ESTATES Beautiful 3 Br. home on 3+ acres offers all kinds of choices. Lots of windows let in lots of sunshine in the main living areas including the aptly named sunroom. Downstairs could be a separate apartment. There’s a sweet balcony off the master Br. that overlooks the gardens. Lots of spaces for enjoying the outdoors especially the patio. $425,000. ML261752. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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Manufactured Homes

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Lots/ Acreage

130 FEET OF LAKEFRONT Recreational lot with water and power. Stream, sandy beach and deep water area. Year round spot to call your own. Price is for 1/2 interest in property. Public boat launch close by. $28,900. ML261203. Paul beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘B’ IS FOR BLACK DIAMOND At the end of treelined driveway this property opens up to a cleared homesite with sunshine and views and madrona trees. Beautiful 5 acre parcel in the desirable Black Diamond Area. Great sloping topography with wonderful mountain views and a partial salt water view that has potential to be opened up into spectacular Strait view. If you are looking for privacy then this is the place to build your dream home. Power, water and telephone available. $139,000. ML261744 Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Expansive mountain view + 1 bedroom ADU, 2 car garage in Sequim. 3 acres, pasture. All utilities in for main home construction: 4 bedroom septic, 40 GPM well, 440 amp power, phone, internet. Separate RV pad with 50 amp power, water, sewage dump. Adjacent to lovely vineyard. $339,000. 360-301-0871 GET AWAY To the beach! This RV lot is close walking distance of a sandy beach on the Strait, in Sequim! It comes with a 1998 5th wheel that is in good condition. Water and power to the lot. Property is mostly chain link fenced. Would make a great base of operations, for your trips to the rivers, mountains, and all that the Olympic Peninsula has to offer! $39,000. ML26124 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 HAPPY VALLEY ACREAGE Private road, wells, power, phone, parked out, no manufactured homes, 1 lot with garage. $125,000 and $190,000. 808-5290. Property and hangar for sale by owner. 1.5 view acreage with 46 X 60 hangar on private airstrip near Sequim. Runway is adjacent to the hanger which has a full bathroom, walk in closet and lots of storage. Ready for an RV with hookups both inside and outside, has a septic system and the driveway and apron are asphalt. Overhead propane heaters keep you and your airplane(s) warm in the winter. Buyers agents welcome. $299,000. 360-912-0030 WHAT A VIEW Nearly the last 2 view lots on W. 4th Street in P.A. Spectacular strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Lots are ready to build on: easy access, utilities in at street or alley. Established area across from Crown Park, close to trails. Oversized city lots give plenty of room to build. Owner is licensed real estate broker. $79,950 each. ML261276. Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

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Apartments Unfurnished

Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

COLLEGE P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba. No pets. $500. 457-1611 EAST P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage, upstairs unit. No smoke/pets. $625 + $500 dep. 452-8239. NEW MANAGEMENT 1st month free. New lower rent. Senior community. Call for details. 457-6827

P.A.: West side, 2 Br. $520 rent, $300 deposit. Refs. 457-2242

Houses

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath home, nice cond., 2 car garage, $950 mo. Leland 683-4015. SEQUIM: 4 Br., water view. $950. tourfactory.com/525687

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba. $700. 360-460-4089 mchughrents.com

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Spaces RV/ Mobile

P.A.: RV or manufacutred home property with 20x20 garage. $400 mo. 808-0970. SEQUIM RV SITE Country setting, close to town. $395. 360-912-2067

Commercial Space

Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Houses

1725 W. 5th P.A. 2 Br. $600, no smoking/pets. 457-1632.

3 Br., 2 bath, West End. 9 mo lease, 1st mo., $1,050 dep., credit check. No pets, new carpet. 760-271-1362

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

RANGE: Kenmore glass top, stainless steel. $150. 797-7311 Between P.A. & Sequim. 123 Amarillo Rd. 2 bed, 1 bath with W/D on 1.5 acres. Storage Shed. No smoking or pets. $800. 360-452-7721. CENTRAL P.A.: (2) 2 Br., 1 ba., avail. now. $650. 460-0392. CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, no smoke/pets. $750 mo. 457-5352. CHIMACUM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fruit trees, view, 1 yr lease. $1,200 mo. 1st, last dep. Avail Sept. 1. Credit check. 732-4402. Fab Sunland 3 Br. home w/fireplace. Open House: 106 Leslie Ln. Sun., 8/21 1-3 and Tues., 8/23 4-6. JACE TREC 565-2020 HOUSE & SHOP W. SIDE P.A. 3+ Br., 1 bath & 3 bay, RV sized, garage/shop w upstairs storage. Fully fenced yd. $1,000 per mo. + utilities. Bkgrd. check req. No smoking/pets neg. Call 360-457-8126.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba......$500 H 2 br 1 ba......$575 A 2 br 2 ba......$700 H 2 br 1 ba......$750 H 2 br 1 ba......$850 A 2 br 1 ba......$875 H 3 br 1 ba......$900 H 3 br 2 ba......$950 H 3 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 4 br 2 ba....$1200 H 3 br 2 ba....$1250

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba, 1 car gar., small yard, nice neighborhood. $475. References, avail. Sept. 504-2599. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, shop/carport, W/D, sm pet. Busy location. 3143 E. Hwy. 101. $575. 417-8250 P.A.: 2 Br., 2 full bath. West of town. No pets. $700, first, last, $500 dep. 417-0234. P.A.: 2,200 sf new Energy Star home. 2 Br., 2.75 bath, rec room, office. Lease. $1,250. 808-0022.

P.A.: 3 Br., 1.75 bath, 1,100 sf, W/D, fridge. $950 mo, dep. No smoke. Pets neg. 461-0613 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, no smoking. $1,100 mo., $1,100 security. 417-0153. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba. $900 mo. 1st + dep. Pets negot. No smoke. Year lease & screening req. Avail. Sept. 5th. 360-461-9735. P.A.: 511 E Lopez. 3 Br., 2 bath, w/ garage, $1000 mo. No pets/smoking. Call 809-0538. P.A.: House with gar. $910. Duplex with gar. $795. 452-1395.

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, 4+ acres, near town, horses okay. $750 mo., 1st, last, dep. 683-9176. SEQUIM: 2+ Br., 1 bath. No smoking. Pets on approval. $800, 1st, last, dep. 683-8745

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

FIREWOOD: Seasoned, ready to burn, come see quality. $150+. 461-6843

P.A.: In town 2 Br., 1 ba, new appl., W/D, garage, utilities incl. $850. 417-9088.

20 MIN. TO SEQ. OR P.T.: 3 Br, 2 ba, water view, lg. deck, 3-car gar., all appl., boat ramp near by, cr. ck, ref $1,175. 683-2799

FIREWOOD: $120/ cord. You haul. 775-1939

ROOM: No D/A or pets. $300 mo. Call for details 808-1135.

CARLSBORG: Office space. 461-4085.

Duplexes

General Merchandise

FIREWOOD: Dry fir. $200 cord. 452-1162

SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 Br., in quiet 8-plex. $600. 809-3656.

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Room on water, incl. internet/cable. 683-3228

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SEQ: Exc. water view 2 Br. $749. tourfactory.com/397357

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished from $438480. 2 Br. $514-541, 3 Br. $685, + util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258

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Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Open House

OPEN HOUSE By owner. Fri.-Sat., 11-3, 505 S. Washington, P.A. 4 Br., 1 ba, garage/workshop, great location, exceptional condition. $175,000

CENTRAL. P.A.: 1 Br., close to Safeway. $460/$500.477-3867

P.A.: 2413 Ryan Dr. 3 Br., no pets/smoke. $700, 1st, last, $700 dep. 417-1688 msg.

SEQUIM: ‘01 Skyline, 1,568 sf, 3 Br., 2 ba, Super Good Cents, fenced, new heat pump, garage. $78,995. 452-4867.

USED MFG HOME ‘81 24x52, 2 Br., delivered and set to your site, new carpet, wood stove, W/D. Buy Rite Homes 360-681-0777

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540

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P.A.: 2 Br., 2 ba, all appliances. $50,000. Call 452-6524.

SWEET HOME SEQUIM This well maintained 2003 manufactured home is clean as a whistle and move-in ready. The home has 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,546 sf and is light and bright with vaulted ceilings, a large kitchen, and beautiful flooring. Located close distance to shopping and near the Discovery Trail. $89,000. ML261350. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

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Furniture

BED: Queen size mattress and box spring, Simmons Beauty Rest, pillow top. Great shape. Paid over $1,200 new. Asking $500/obo. 681-3299 DINING TABLE: 73” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very nice set. $130. Two matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429. Furniture for sale: Sofa, loveseat, chair colonial blue button tufted set. Very good condition, nonsmokers. Solid oak coffee table, 2 end tables, oak cabinet with brass. $775 all/obo. 928-2223 for info and photos. MISC: (2) Leather recliners, burgundy and tan, $75 ea. 40” Drop leaf table, with 2 chairs, $75. Floor lamp, $25. Microwave, $25. Beautiful antique armoire, $150. (4) Padded folding chairs, $40. 683-0999 MISC: (2) sofas: taupe or off white contemporary, $150 each. Glass and brass coffee and sofa tables, $30 ea. Faux oak entertainment center, $50. All like new. 683-1006 MISC: New twin mattress/box spring, $125. Vintage/antique wooden file cabinet, $50. Antique small caned wood rocker, $75. Lamps, $3-$20. 3x5 hunter green rug, $5. Outdoor furniture, $10. Folding tables, $20. By appt. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 417-8154. MISC: Solid Oak pedestal dining table 54” round, excellent condition, $500. Serger, never used $200. 360-437-0268. RECLINERS: (2) Leather. $200 each. 452-9199 SOFA: 6’x3.5’, light brown in color, fair condition. $100. 582-1132

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General Merchandise

ANTIQUE: Ben Franklin free standing fireplace, Franklin Stove Co. Portland, Maine, with accessories. $300, or any reasonable offer. 683-2463 BUTCHER BLOCK 25x19x34, has knife drawer and wine rack below, made by Bowman Shop and Studio. $100. 417-3773 CEMETERY PLOTS 2, Mt. Angeles View Garden of Devotion, side-by-side. $1,150. 452-4136 CHINA: 40 pc. Royal Albert Petit Point English bone china dinner set, Hampton shape, floral pattern, reg. #778676, circ. 1932, 7 place settings, 4 cup teapot with creamer, sugar. $300. 360-379-0974. Euro Body Shaper. The latest technology in fitness. The “all in one” machine is a massager/vibrator. Excellent condition. Review it online at You Tube. Paid $1,800. Asking $900/obo. 360-452-8664

FREE: Wainscoting from old building. Also, free wood building, you move or tear down. 457-0643 Get your man cave ready for football season, Matilda Bay Cooler neon bar sign, 19”x19”. $100. 360-379-0974 Hobby Train Set for sale! N Scale. Some supplies. The set is on a 4x6x3ft table. $500/obo. Created by my father Mike Wells, a PA local. Looking for a person to enjoy it as he did. Contact 360-580-4374 MISC: Dresser, very nice, 1 yr old, beautiful, $450. 17.5” truck rims, $95. Reconditioned claw-foot bathtub, $900/obo. Nice baby gates, $85 both. Pictures available. 452-9445. MISC: English string holder, $45. Pictures, $25 all. Carved wooden goose, $45. Carbide lamp, $10. Antique shuttle, $65. Cast iron toys, $65 all. 775-1035. MISC: Land Pride grooming mower, runs off PTU, $800. Floor scrubber/ buffer, new, commercial,175 rpm, 13” pads, $700. 683-8693 MISC: Logging boots, 16” tops, sz 11, $125. Rubber logging boots, sz 11, $75. (4) airplane head set, $75 ea. Roofing nail guns, $100 ea. 461-8060.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

75

Musical

DRUMS: Congas. 10” and 11”, almost new. Toca midnight blue laminate, with stand. Matching bongos with stand. $225. 582-1820 MISC: Gemeinhardt flute in excellent condition, $250. Vito clarinet, $$250. Just tuned and ready to go. 460-1718. PIANO TUNING and repair. Gary Freel Piano Service. Since 1984. 360-775-5480. PIANO: Fischer baby grand, good cond., bench and metronome, $3,000/ obo. VIOLA: Becker size 14, Romanian, like new, in case, $200/obo. 452-9605. PIANO: Samick SU343, bench included, country French oak. $1,800. 683-6901.

76

Sporting Goods

ELLIPTICAL: Nordictrack Elite 1300, model #NTEL4255.0, excellent condition. $500. 683-6812. GOLF CART: ‘94 Yamaha gas powered, fully enclosed, headlights, tail lights, ball and club washer. $1,600. 808-2834. GUN: Dixie Southern Mountain Rifle (aka Tennessee Poor Boy). .50 cal percussion cap. Lots of extras. $830. 360-683-1065 GUNS: S and W .38, nickel or stainless, +p rated, new, $495 ea. Ruger .38, DAO, uncataloged, 1 of 300, new, $495. S and W 1957 .44 magnum 4 screw, 80%, $795 firm. 452-4003 GUNS: Savage 110C 30-06, $200. Marlin 917 17HMR, $200. Also, metal detector, Whites XLT, new, used once, ear phones, mini-probe, $1,100 value, $850 firm. 808-2134.

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

MISC: Oak dining set, seats 6, 1 extension, in great shape, $500. Nikon camera, with several Vivitar lenses and case, $80. 457-3078

GARAGE Sale: Fri., 10-4, Sat., 9-3 p.m. 3016 S. Regent St. Nice girls mtn. bike, clothes, books, exercise equipment, kids telescope, etc.

MISC: Queen/king bed spread, drapes, shams, valiance, new in box, Penney’s, $200. Antique roll top parlor desk with chair, art deco, $300. Childs table and chairs, $25. 775-1035

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8 a.m.-?, 602 E. 10th St. Wood burning stove, lg. grill, material and various items.

MISC: Skis Volunt Genesis marker M44, 180 mm, $100. Bicycle, 23” ‘70 Campognolon and Chinelli, $650. ‘48 Jeepster transmission, 3 sp with electric OD, $650. 461-8060 MISC: Sofa sleeper, forest green, $150. Lift chair, Mocha microfiber, $275. 683-1006 PAINT SPRAYER & TOOLS. Graco paint sprayer, cart, hose, nozzle $300 or best offer. Elec. chain saw & extension pole $50. Cordless saw, cordless drill, carrying case $50. 360-531-1569 Pride Victory mobility scooter. Originally $2,300. Never used, mint condition. $995. 360-504-2570 360-797-3518

PROPANE INSERT Regency Panorama P121 two sided see-through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate. GREAT PRICE! $1,300. 477-8826. SPINNING WHEEL & ALPACA FIBER. Luet S15 spinning wheel in excellent condition $225. Alpaca roving $25/lb, alpaca yarn $10/ skein. Leave msg. 360-461-5437 TICKETS: Preseason Seahawk vs. Raiders, Sept. 2nd, Row T, Section 337, Seat 20-21. $80 ea. Will sell $120 both. 360-461-3661 TRUNKS: (2) Turn of the century large steamer trunks, $50 ea. 683-2362, Laura. UTILITY TRAILER Tandem axle, 4’x8’. $500. 460-3530. Wyndham Timeshare Branson, Missouri, can be traded for other places. Orig. $8,000, sell for $1,000 plus lawyer transfer fee. 683-3546

74

Home Electronics

TV: Sony, 37”, works well, flat screen. $200. 683-2972.

75

Musical

ALTO SAX: Yamaha YAS 52 intermediate alto sax. Fabulous condition, great step-up horn. One owner and ready to play! $850. See online ad for photos. 360-379-1839 CELLO OUTFIT: Kohr 3/4 cello with bow, case, and cello stand. Excellent shape/quality. $675 360-460-6373

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 8-2 p.m., 229 W 13th, in alley off Cherry St. Desks, ent center, bureau, Singer sewing, cosleeper, tables, wrought-iron plate rack, drapes, rugs, chairs, clothes, paperdolls, crafts, more. No earlies. GARAGE Sale: Sat. 83, Sun. noon-3, Mon. 8-3, 220 S. Oak St. in alley. Children’s clothes, toys, books, furniture, 2 jogging strollers, household goods, hand tools, garden tools, building supplies, 36” solid core birch door, 6040 vinyl windows, dryer, 36” Sony Wega, 2 printers, and lots more. RUMMAGE Sale: Fri., 8-2 p.m. 114 E. 6th Terrace Apts community room, use parking lot entrance. Collectibles, records, knickknacks, books and more. YARD Sale: Fri., 8-4 p.m., Sat., 8-3 p.m., 615 S. Chambers. Lots of boy’s clothes, garage stuff, chest of drawers, linens, and household misc. YARD Sale: Thur.-Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 538 W. 6th St., between bridges. Last of California’s things. Everything must go! Make an offer! Good deals!

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Another astronomical Clallam County Historical Society GARAGE SALE 8th and C Streets Members only Sept. 1, 4-6 Public Sale Sept. 2 & 3, 8-2 Call 452-2662 for more info about sale or to become a member. BB’S GETTIN’ MARRIED! Everything must go! Fri.-Sat., 7 a.m.-? 928 W. Lauridsen/C St., upstairs, Apt. #2. 5’ Christmas nutcracker, vintage collector Monopoly games, overstuffed love seat, 5.5x3’ mirror, huge corner desk, 100+ worldly shot glasses, kitchen stuff, oval hanging pot rack, 7x5 2 tone leather woven rug, tons of clothes: scrubs, jackets etc. draperies, huge Broyhill coffee table, Super Q. rattan bed. CASH ONLY! GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m. Airport/ Courtney Rd. Vintage cookbooks, sofa, chest freezer, electric fencing, ladies/mens XL clothes, VW tow bar, stove hood, iRoomba vacuum, stainless sink, microwave, craft supplies, mirrors, and lots more!

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Garage/Yard Sale: Sat.-Sun.-Mon, 114, 1133 W 6th St. Lots of good quality stuff! Clothes, DVD’s, Furniture, Books Household/ Kitchen Monitors Pet stuff, Computers, Tools, Collectables, See online ad. LARGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 50590 Hwy. 112, Joyce. Tools, collectibles, just about anything. YARD SALE CHEAP PRICES. Collectible glassware/Crystal/ vintage items. Large dollhouse/furniture. Upright piano. Saturday 9/3, 8AM. Everything goes. 719 W. 5th St. between Tumwater and A Street. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 2347 Edgewood Drive. Misc. items.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

ESTATE Sale: ATTENTION: MEN WOMEN Estate sale unlike any other! Sat.-Sun. 9-5 p.m., Mon. 9-3 p.m. 133 Blue Mountain Rd. Misc. animal horns skulls, fish memorabilia, die cast model Mustangs, antiques, tools, air compressor, car jacks, car cover, garden tools yard decor, deer decoys, washer dryker, small freezer refrigerator, oak table with four chairs, oak china hutch, lift chair-new; electric hospital bed, walkers and plenty of household goods, etc. ESTATE Sale: Years of stuff for guys and gals. Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 413 South Bagley Cr. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 1203 Caroline. Washer, dryer, refrigerator, tools, children’s clothing, books and more. GARAGE Sale: Labor Day weekend, Sat: 9-3 p.m. Sun: 10-3 p.m. Mon: 10-3 p.m. 818 N. Baker St. off of Hwy 101, P.A. Family style items including children’s toys, women’s clothing, kitchen household items, mens fishing sporting goods, books and so much more, with parking available on site, everything must go! GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-2 p.m., 2555 Mt. Pleasant Rd. 457-9038. Toys, game console and games, anchor, clothes, furniture, entertainment center, heavy bag, bike, workout equipment, kitchen stuff, etc. MOVING Sale: Sat. only, 8-4 p.m., 2809 Sunnybrook Meadow Ln. Misc household, furniture, tools, glider, BBQ, clothing all ages, books, cameras, cars, Christmas, and antiques. MOVING Sale: Sat., 12-6 p.m. 156 Marsden Rd., up Mt. Pleasant. Bed, entertainment center, huge TV, kitchen table with chairs. Mostly furniture, some kitchen, some collectibles, some toys and lots of books.

78E

C5

Garage Sales Sequim

“GET ER DONE” GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 7 a.m.-6 p.m., 344 House Rd., MOVING Sale: Sat., 8-1 p.m., 578 Elk Horn Lp. Lots of nice furniture, kitchen items, 52” LCD TV, Miller clocks, refrigerator, freezer, Yamaha Clavinova piano, desks, bookcases. Everything must go. MOVING/GARAGE Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-12 p.m. 881 W. Sylvester Ct. Just south of intersection of Olympic Hwy and Kendall. Living room, dining room, and bedroom furniture, office desk, and much more. MUSEUM & ARTS CENTER SWAP MEET Sat., 9-2 p.m. 544 N. Sequim Ave., across from Sequim High School. Info: 360-683-8110 www.macsequim.org RUMMAGE Sale: Sat., 9 a.m.-?, 820 W. Washington St. (off Bracket St. behind Sequim Consignment Company.) Everything from A-Z, some furniture, TVs, outdoor equipment, some restaurant equipment, small wares. Everything must go. Sequim: Garage Sale: Sept. 2 and 3 from 95. 91 Madera Place, Sequim in Solmar. Some fishing, tools, clothing, full size loft bed, dresser, stroller and car seat, books and toddler toys.

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

5TH SEMI ANNUAL GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Just like a mini flea market. Last one of the season, don’t miss this one. Lots of great items. Watches, jewelry, tools, linens, collectibles, furniture. Items added each day. 60 Tyee Ln., Port Ludlow. Lots of signs. Cell 425-918-2197 ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., Sept 24, 9-4 p.m. 431 Glen Cove Rd., Pt. Townsend. Tools, misc hardware, plumbing, electrical, garden tools, furniture, housewares. 8 hp generator, table saw, radial arm saw, new 3/4” drive socket set (to 2 1/4”), wood stove, wood cook stove, combo wrench set 1 3/8-2”, 5 pc pipe die set 1/2-2”. ESTATE Sale: Sat., 812 p.m. Parkridge Dr., near Courtesy Ford, at red barn on left, P.T. Antiques, 3 cast iron stoves, junk. All must go! Rain or shine! WEEKEND GARAGE Sale: Sat. 8-5, Sun. 9-3, 6495 Flagler Road, Nordland. Misc goods, sporting goods, tools, mower, books, and lots more.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Picture boxes, flat, large, small. 457-3903.

WEEK-LONG Sale: Fri.-Sat., August 27Sept. 3? 9-5 p.m. 1112 E. 6th St. No earlies! Sofa, love seat, dressers, mens tools, pickup truck, camper trailer, and much more!

WANTED: Small older crawler (bulldozer) any model/condition, running or not, related equipment, skid steer, excavator, farm tractor, etc. Also, old gas pumps, advertising signs, old vending machines, Cash. 360-204-1017

78E

WANTED: Used 120 gal upright propane tank. 452-1582.

Garage Sales Sequim

BIG SALE OF STRICTLY UPSCALE STUFF Sat., 7:30-3 p.m. 321 Brittany Lane, off Brigadoon. Don’t miss it!

WANTED: Vintage interior door, would love stained glass/ leaded glass. 417-8097 days

Cancer Fundraiser GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. 10 Winterhawk St. Alta Vista in Carlsborg. Adult and kids clothing, misc. ESTATE Sale: Sat., 9? 72 Avellana Rd., off River Road exit, turn right. Tons of furniture, great items, appliances. House and garage full! GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-2 p.m. 820 N. Rhodefer Rd., just beyond QFC off Washington. 26’ Interstate car trailer. 14’ Larson boat w/ 65 hp motor. 21’ travel trailer, rebuilt, everything new. Tools and household items. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m. Sun., 12-4 p.m. 870 Old Gardiner Rd., next to Gardiner Community Center. Wide variety of items. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., West Alder Storage, 325 N. 5th Ave. #19. Leaf blower, quilt, 2 computer monitors, Landmark printer, George Foreman grill, knickknacks, little bit of everything. HUGE MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 71 Mariners Dr., off Old Olympic, east of 5th Ave. Some antiques. LARGE GARAGE Sale: Sat.-Sun., 93 p.m. 685 Cameron Rd. Lots of oldies but goodies. Nice stuff, no junk.

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

SUMMER HAY-DRIED IN THE FIELD-TAIL FEATHER FARM These are 2 string bales. In July we cut 1 of our Grass Fields sold out. We cut half the Alfalfa/Grass Mix Field sold out in July. We do not cut our fields a 2x time in 1 year. In August we had an opportunity of nice sun, heat we finished cutting the Alfalfa/Grass Mix field for this year. THIS IS FIRST CUT HAY-not a second cut. Come check it out-we sell it for $5.00/bale PLUS TAX of 8.4%. Yes I know most of the time you don’t see the tax but that doesn’t mean it isn’t being paid by farmers. This year we needed to add it rather than take it out of the cost. Call Scot 360-681-5476 or 360-460-7500. We do sell one bale so you can try it and see if your animals like it and how it stores. We welcome inquiries.


C6

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

2001 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW HARLEY-DAVIDSON ED. 2WD

2004 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER AWD

2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA POLICE INTERCEPTOR

2006 FORD E350 XLT SUPERDUTY 12 PASS VAN

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

72K ORIG MILES! 5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! BLACK W/BLACK LEATHER IN EXCEL SHAPE! PWR SEAT, MOONROOF, SLIDER, TOW PKG, CHROME 20” WHLS, PRIV GLASS, 6 DISC & MORE! SPOTLESS CARFAX! THOUSANDS LESS THAN KBB RETAIL @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

76K ORIG MILES! 4.0L SOHC V6, AUTO, LOADED! 2-TONE SILVER W/BLACK LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! PWR SEAT, CD, 3RD ROW SEAT, TOW PKG, ROOF RACK, MOONROOF, DUAL AIRBAGS, TINTED WINDOWS, RUNNING BOARDS, CRUISE, TILT, ALLOYS, SPOTLESS CARFAX! VERY NICE MOUNTAINEER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF

4.6L V8, AUTO, WHITE IN GOOD COND W/TAN IN GREAT COND!, PWR SEAT & MIRRORS, DUAL AIRBAGS, AM/FM, AC, EX-WA STATE POLICE CAR, FLEET-MAINTAINED! RELIABLE, WELL-MAINTAINED MODE OF TRANSPORTATION @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

51K ORIG MILES! 5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! SILVER IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT SHAPE! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CD, REAR AC, CRUISE, TILT, PRIV GLASS, BARN DRS, TOW PKG, EXTREMELY NICE 12 PASS @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$11,995

$9,995

$3,495

$12,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2001 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

2001 FORD F-150 XLT SUPERCREW 4X4

2002 TOYOTA TUNDRA SR5 ACCESS CAB 2WD

2001 BMW 740iL

2.4L 4 CYL W/AUTO, SILVER IN GOOD SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN GOOD COND! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, 10 DISC CD CHANGER, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL AIRBAGS, PRIV GLASS, AC, LOCAL TRADE! GOOD LITTLE PT @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! GOLD IN GREAT SHAPE W/TAN CLOTH IN GREAT COND! PWR SEAT, PWR ADJ PEDALS, CASS, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, DUAL AIRBAGS, CRUISE, TILT, CHROME RUNNING BOARDS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, MATCHING LEER TONNEAU COVER, TOW PKG, ALLOYS, 2 OWNER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! GREAT TRUCK @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.7L V8, AUTO, LOADED! SILVER IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN EXCEL SHAPE! CD/CASS, CRUISE, TILT, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, LUND RUNNING BOARDS, TOW PKG, AC, ALLOYS, TIMING BELT HAS BEEN REPLACED, 2 OWNER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! VERY NICE TUNDRA @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.4L V8, AUTO, LOADED! SILVER IN GREAT SHAPE W/TAN LEATHER IN GREAT COND! DUAL PWR HTD/MASSAGING SEATS, MOONROOF, CD/CASS W/PREM SOUND, NAV, PWR ADJ HTD STEERING WHEEL, SIDE AIRBAGS, TRAC CTRL, 19” ALLOYS & MUCH, MUCH MORE! VERY NICE 7 SERIES BMW @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$3,995

$9,995

$7,995

$8,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2001 CHEVROLET TAHOE LS 4X4

2004 FORD F-350 XLT SUPERCAB SUPERDUTY FX4 4X4 OFF ROAD

2000 CHEVROLET BLAZER LT 4X4

2000 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LXi

5.4L VORTEC V8, AUTO, LOADED! PEWTER MET IN EXCEL SHAPE W/ GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT COND! DUAL PWR SEATS, 3RD ROW SEAT, REAR AC, ONSTAR, ALPINE CD W/AUX INPUT, CRUISE, TILT, PRIV GLASS, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW PKG, SIDE AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX! CLEAN TAHOE @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

46K ORIG MILES! POWERSTROKE TURBO DIESEL, AUTO, 2-TONE BLACK/ SILVER IN EXCEL SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN EXCEL COND! PWR SEAT, PWR ADJ PEDALS, 6 DISC, CRUISE, TILT, AC, PRIV GLASS, RUNNING BOARDS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, ALLOYS, ONLY 1 PREV OWNER! NEARLY $7,000 LESS THAN KBB @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, LOADED! WHITE IN EXCEL SHAPE W/ BLACK LEATHER IN GREAT COND! DUAL PWR SEATS, MOONROOF, CD/CASS, AC, CRUISE, TILT, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, DUAL AIRBAGS, POLISHED 15” ALLOYS, SPOTLESS CARFAX! VERY CLEAN, LOADED-UP BLAZER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

105K ORIG MILES! 3.8L V6, AUTO, LOADED! GOLD IN EXCEL SHAPE W/TAN LEATHER IN EXCEL SHAPE! DUAL PWR SEAT, CD/CASS W/INFINITY S0UND, QUADS, 3RD SEAT, DUAL SLIDING DRS, CRUISE, TILT, WOOD GRAIN TRIM, ROOF RACK, DUAL AIRBAGS, PRIV GLASS, ALLOYS, SPOTLESS CARFAX! OVER $2,000 LESS THAN KBB @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$9,995

$19,995

$4,995

$5,695

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

1997 FORD F-250 XLT SUPERCAB 4X4

2001 HONDA ACCORD EX COUPE

2001 GMC SLE TRUCK

1997 FORD F-250 XLT LARIAT

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE PAY HERE!

90 DAYS SAME AS CASH!

5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! LT BLUE MET IN GREAT COND W/ GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT SHAPE! CASS, CRUISE, TILT, PRIV GLASS, PWR SEAT, MATCHING RAIDER CANOPY W/LARGE REAR MAIN DR, CHROME WHLS W/80% TOYO RUBBER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! CLEAN, WELL-KEPT F-250 @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$5,995

2.3L VTEC 4 CYL, AUTO, LOADED! RED IN GOOD COND W/TAN CLOTH IN GOOD SHAPE! PWR DRV SEAT, 6 DISC CD CHANGER, MOONROOF, CRUISE, TILT, SIDE AIRBAGS, AC, ALLOYS, REAL NICE LITTLE ACCORD @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

WHY PAY MORE? WE HAVE THE LOWEST INHOUSE RATES!

4X4, AUTO, CREW CAB HD, ALLOYS, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS NO CREDIT CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: CHECKS! WWW.THEOTHERGUYSAUTO.COM

NO CREDIT CHECKS!

MILITARY DISCOUNTS!

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

4X4, EXT CAB, 7.3L DIESEL, AUTO, AC, CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: 90 DAYS WWW.THEOTHERGUYSAUTO.COM WHY PAY

SAME AS CASH!

MORE? WE HAVE THE LOWEST INHOUSE RATES!

$5,995

$10,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

WE FINANCE

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

1999 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 4X4

1997 NISSAN 200SX SE SPORT COUPE

1998 FORD WINDSTAR GL MINIVAN

2000 TOYOTA TACOMA 4X4

3.3L V6, 5 SPD, ALLOYS, RUNNING BOARDS, ROOF RACK, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD/CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! HARD-TO-FIND 5 SPD MANUAL TRANSMISSION! YOU WON’T FIND ONE NICER THAN THIS! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

1.6L 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, REAR SPOILER, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, PIONEER CD W/MP3, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! GREAT GAS MILEAGE! LEGENDARY NISSAN RELIABILITY! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

3.8L V6, AUTO, ROOF RACK, PRIV GLASS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, 3RD ROW SEATING, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 84,000 ORIGINAL MILES! PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

2.7L 4 CYL, 5 SPD, ALLOYS, NEW TIRES, BEDLINER, BUCKET SEATS, TILT, AC, CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 39,000 ORIGINAL MILES! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! THIS TRUCK IS LIKE NEW! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

(360) 417-3788

19407472

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS

$7,995 WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

$5,995

$4,995

$3,995

$12,995

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Michelle @ 360-417-3541 TODAY for more information


ClassifiedAutomotive

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Oil pressure falls below normal Dear Doctor: The oil pressure gauge in my 1993 Lincoln Continental falls below normal. The bell rings, and the light flashes, showing low oil pressure. That continues for a while, and then it comes right back up to normal. Daily checking of the oil level is normal, and we have it changed before every 3,000 miles. We’ve changed all sensors and the oil sensor twice. We also had the electrical system checked on the computer, and the results were normal. How can this be corrected? Ralph Dear Ralph: The first step is to check the actual oil pressure with a mechanical oil pressure gauge. With the gauge connected, start the engine (oil pressure will be higher when the engine is cold). As the engine warms up it’s normal for the oil pressure to drop. It’s normal for the oil pressure to be at 15 to 20 pounds at hot idle in gear. When the engine speed is raised, the oil pressure will also rise. If the engine is older, such as yours, and

THE AUTO DOC has 90,000 Damato miles-plus, then the use of highmileage oil with a higher viscosity such as 15w-40 can raise the oil pressure. Highperformance oils also can be a solution to low-oil pressure at a hot idle.

Junior

Issues with Jag? Dear Doctor: I am 55 years old and going to retire soon. My wife and I saw a 2011 Jaguar XK and loved the look. I talked with a few friends, and they said they are full of trouble. What are your thoughts on these cars? Melvin Dear Melvin: In the old days, the Jags did have issues. I will tell you my wife owned two XJR sedans over the past five years, and both were trouble-free. I spent a week in a 2011 XK coupe with rear-wheel

drive, and it was a joy to drive. Everything from the 385-hp V-8 to the 6-speed automatic offered smooth power and seamless shifting. There is a very muscular and pleasant exhaust note when the gas pedal is depressed. The fit and finish were perfect, and the design of the car brings neighbors over to admire it. The only complaint I have is the center information screen does take time to get used to. If you plan to drive the RWD car during winter storms, then snow tires are a must. Personally, I would leave it in the garage during the snow. Enjoy your retirement.

Timing belt Dear Doctor: I own a 2004 Honda Odyssey minivan with 115,000 miles. I had the timing belt replaced at 110,000 miles. Shortly after the replacement of the belt, I heard a noise that seemed to come from the front left side of the vehicle. It sounded like I was dragging a small tree branch.

The sound lasted about three seconds. I can go for days with no sound, and then the sound returns whether just driving a few miles or 80 miles. My mechanic drove it to his house and back to the service station (about 40 miles) and could not duplicate the sound. They checked for a code but found none. Do you have any suggestions? Tom Dear Tom: You may not like this, but my recommendation is that you allow your mechanic to drive your minivan for several days to home and work. It will increase the probability of him experiencing the intermittent noise coming from your vehicle. Unless the noise can be reproduced, there is no way to tell what it is — or it’s exact source.

––––––––

Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

C7

Car of the Week

2011 Cadillac Escalade BASE PRICE: $66,080 for RWD base ESV; $68,580 for AWD base; $72,195 for RWD Luxury; $75,185 for RWD Premium; $85,160 for RWD Platinum; $87,660 for AWD Platinum. PRICE AS TESTED: $88,610. TYPE: Front-engine, all-wheel-drive, six-passenger, large, luxury sport utility vehicle. ENGINE: 6.2-liter, overhead valve, Vortec V-8. MILEAGE: 13 mpg (city), 18 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: NA. LENGTH: 222.9 inches. WHEELBASE: 130 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 5,963 pounds. BUILT IN: Arlington, Texas. OPTIONS: None. DESTINATION CHARGE: $950. The Associated Press

2007 CHEVROLET UPLANDER LS

2009 TOYOTA MATRIX “S” AWD

2008 FORD EDGE SE

AWD

2004 CHEVROLET IMPALA

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

3.9L V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, ONSTARREADY, PRIV GLASS, ONLY 28K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/100 WARR, VERY, VERY, CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

ECONOMICAL 2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD CHANGER/MP3, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, PWR MOONROOF, SIDE AIRBAGS, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALLOYS, FOG LAMPS, ONLY 34K MILES! SUPER CLEAN 1 OWNER LOCAL CAR, BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, NON-SMOKER, GARAGE-KEPT, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

Expires 10/1/11

Expires 10/1/11

$13,495

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$18,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

3.5L V6, AUTO, AC, ALL WHEEL DRIVE, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/ CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, SIDE AIRBAGS, KEYLESS ENTRY, PRIV GLASS, ALLOYS, ONLY 37K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, SPOTLESS CARFAX! DETAILED SERVICE HISTORY, NEAR-NEW COND! Expires 10/1/11

$20,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

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$8,695

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

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2007 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

2005 DODGE DAKOTA EXT CAB 4X4

WE FINANCE!

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DUAL REAR DRS, SPORT PKG, 3.7L V6, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, AM/FM/CD, TOW PKG, ALLOYS, REMOTE ENTRY & ONLY 65K MILES! VIN#309427

Expires 9/10/11

Expires 9/10/11

$13,995

360-452-6599

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

$12,995

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

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Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Michelle @ 360-417-3541 TODAY for more information

It’s a terrific way to reach a whole new market for anything you might want to sell. www.peninsuladailynews.com For details on how your ad can be on the internet 61246807

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714


C8

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

81

Food Produce

81

Classified 82

Food Produce

82

Pets

BEEF: 2 yr. old Angus beef by the side. $1.75 lb. 928-3493 or 460-4970.

Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org

www.peninsula dailynews.com

BEEF: 2 yr. old Angus beef by the side. $1.75 lb. 928-3493 or 460-4970.

TIPS

GRASS FED BEEF $1.50 lb. hanging weight. 928-3733.

Black and white parti boys, red factor girls, various ages and sizes. $150-$500. Call for more information 452-2579.

Compose your Classified Ad on

Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

82

Pets

ADORABLE PEKINGESE PUPPIES FLUFFY AND PLAYFUL, 10 week old male puppies are ready to be a part of your family. $350 each. 360-457-4965 or 360-460-0575

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs:

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

Farm Animals

ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817. Labor Day Hay Sale Second cut Oregon Orchard Timothy mix, $11.50 bale. 452-1400 Leitz Farms

PUPPIES: Half Blood Hound, half Pit Bull, shots, wormed. $150/obo. Serious inquiries only. 461-0095

NO RAIN HAY $5/bale. 460-8586.

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

www.peninsula dailynews.com

PUPPIES: Mini Schnauzer puppies. 12 weeks. Outstanding no-shed coats. Very loveable and attentive. Tails cropped, dew claws removed, 3 times wormed, first and second shots. Leash and potty training started, well puppy vet checked. Both parents on site. $475. 681-7480.

FENCING

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s TTractor ractor SService er vice

Window Washing

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

Call today!

83

92

Farm Equipment

Kubota Tractor. 136.7 hours new. Tractor equipment included: rake, tiller and field mower/brush cutter. All in almost new condition. $12,000. 460-5483

Short Jack Russell Puppies and Young adults ranging from $100 - $900. Vaccinations and dewormings up to date. Please contact Rob or Jaime for more info at 360-477-4427

PUPPIES: Chocolate Labs, $350 females, $300 males. 477-6712 or 360-808-7851

PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, registered, 6 mo. old. great lines, beautiful. $400-$500 565-6104

Buying Selling Hiring Trading

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

FREE: To good home. Mastiff/Rottweiler mix. Big, friendly, neutered, 2 year old boy. Can no longer keep him. 565-1284.

85

Pets

WEANER PIGS: $65 ea. Pet, $40. Other pigs about $1/lb. Yearling male goats, $70 ea. 775-6552.

85

Farm Equipment

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

‘95 Pete 379 tractor, nice cab + front, all recent rebuilt Super 10, 391 rears, failed N-14, more. $5,000, will separate. 360-732-4071

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

93

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325 SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618

93

93

Marine

93

Marine

BAYLINER: 19’ project boat. $800. 477-7012 after 6

BAYLINER: ‘86 32’, 3270 twin diesel, 8 knots at 2,100 rpm, tops out 12-14 knots, all standard features plus radar, gps, depth sounder, anchor, windless, RIB tender, G14 John Wayne $54,995 360-670-6166

Marine

BOAT TRAILER: 1416’ boat, new tires and wheels. $400/ obo. 683-9274, cell 206-276-6438

ARIMA: ‘91 17’. Johnson 90 hp, exc., new top, galv. trailer. $11,500. 477-3884. BASS TRACKER: 17’, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, boat could use some cosmetic work, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684.

BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523. BOSTON WHALER ‘95 13’, galv. trailer w/spare tire, 8 hp Merc, very low hours, ext steering and shift arm, sounder, boat cover. $3,500/obo. 437-7658

BAYLINER: ‘84 20’ Capri. Cuddy, Volvo IO, full top, 8 hp Merc kicker, trailer. $3,200/obo. 452-5652

CAMPION: 21.5’ Explorer. Suzuki 225 hp, Yamaha 8 hp 4 stroke, radar, fish finder plotter, lots of extras. Exc. shape. 30 mile offshore boat. Call for details. $12,500. 385-7728.

DIVE BOAT: Inflatable 14’, heavy duty Hypalon, 40 hrs. on Honda 9.9 4 stroke, Transom wheels. $2,950 971-226-0002 GLASPLY: ‘76 23’ I/O, Must sell, make offer! $3,000/obo. 437-7658 GLASTRON: 16’ ‘80 85 hp Johnson, EZ Loader trailer. No salt, must sell! $1,800. 928-9645. HARBERCRAFT: 12’ aluminum, rigged for crab, late 8 hp Mercury, depth finder, rebuilt trailer, oars, etc. $2,200. 683-0904 HEWESCRAFT: 14’ with trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445

Marine

LIVINGSTON: 12’, Merc 25 4 stroke, elec. start/tilt, kicker, galv. tlr, seats, console, many extras, all new condition. $5,800. 681-8761. LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,000. 683-1957. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 MERC: 2004, 25 hp. Good condition. $1,450. 457-6163. MISC: 18”x11” trim tabs, $300. Saturn compass, $75. All priced to sell, must call for details. 360-385-6643 MISC: E-Z Loader trailer, for 22’ boat, $600. 6 hp Johnson long shaft, $500. 360-301-2701 RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford and Farmall A Tractor. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. '41 Farmall A tractor elec start and mower not running $500. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg.

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

SERVICES

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

HOME REPAIR

JJami’s ami’s

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Done Right Home Repair

Yard Service • Odd Jobs Hauling • Property Clean up Moving • Brush Removal Hedge Trimming Roof/Gutter Cleaning Tree Pruning Accepting New Contracts

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

No job to small! Serving Diamond Point, Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Larry Muckley

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

CHAMPION: ‘78 16’. 80 hp Merc., runs great. Caulkin trailer. $2,000. 477-3884.

LIVINGSTON: 12’, 10 hp Honda, good cond., dependable. $1,600. 461-2627. LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714.

RESORT BOAT: 15’ fiberglass. ‘07 40 hp Yamaha 4 stroke, low hrs., manual start, tiller handle. $3,000. 452-4384, msg

185131668

HANDYMAN

JP

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

(360) 683-8332

REPAIR/REMODEL Call NOW To Advertise

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

155122063

457-6582 808-0439

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

(360) 477-1805

COLUMC*955KD

ASBESTOS

WANTED: Wind Damaged

& Leaky Roofs

G

D

ARLAN ROOFING

457-5186

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

TREE SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN TREES

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

Small Jobs A Specialty

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

FREE S ATE ESTIM

Contr#KENNER1951P8

(360) 460-0518 165122885

anthonystreetop@gmail.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges 72289323

Full 6 Month Warranty

452-9995

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

360

0A5100969

155120082

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Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Inspections - Testing Surveys

ROOFING

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

Asbestos

WINDOW CLEANING

APPLIANCES

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

Reg#FINIST*932D0

Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

Quality Work

86313195

In sid e , O u tsid e , A nysid e

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125111256

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s Handyman Services JPSHAHS92BE

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Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

John Pruss 360 808-6844

(360)

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

PAINTING

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

(360)

5 582-0384 82-0384

155121476

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461-4609

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9C5066307

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CONSTRUCTION, INC.

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right

115105618

#LUNDFF*962K7

93313234

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

Pressure Washing

155119356

Chad Lund

PROPERTY P ROPERTY MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

Small jobs is what I do!

LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

025073138

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

EXCAVATING

DIRT WORK JK DIRTWORKS INC. 360/460•9824

PAINTING

Cockburn.INC

Residential • Commercial Industrial • Marine

. 35 yrse on th la su in n Pe

FREE Estimates

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER contact@jkdirtworks.com

Free Estimates Plants • Design Construction Sprinkler Systems

681-0132 165124112

Visit our website www.dungenesslandscaper.com Certified Horticultural Specialist Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

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LIC

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WINDOW CLEANING

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LANDSCAPING

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

93

Marine

OUTBOARD: ‘87 Merc 9.9 short shaft. Better than average. $425. 417-2165. RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: Prettiest boat in the Marina. ‘81 Catalina 22, new sails, roller furler, 4 hp kicker, Slip E12 John Wayne Marina. $9,500. 582-0147. SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950 HARLEY: ‘03 Anniversary model Electra Glide Standard. 6,500 mi., black, always garaged, leathers, helmet, manuals, extras, 1 owner, serv. & maint. w/care. Senior citizen owned. $13,000. 640-1688. HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HILLCLIMB September 3-4 Gates open 8 a.m. Entrance 1 mi. up Deer Park Rd., P.A. Follow signs 1st bike up at 11 a.m. 417-7509 HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633 HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376 HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874 HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,900. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great, low mi. $2,450/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘95 Scooter. 80cc, 1,400 mi. $900 683-3119 HONDA: ‘98 XR100. Excellent condition. $1,200. 797-4518. HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. KAWASAKI: ‘01 Vulcan 1500 Nomad Fi. Cruiser. Exc. cond. $3,800 360-640-9670

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222 5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075 5TH WHEEL: ‘86 25’ Alpenlite. Good condition, new tires, awning, tinted windows, TV. $3,600. Call between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. 461-2810

5TH WHEEL: ‘94 29' Fleetwood Prowler. Used, but in good condition. Plenty of room for multiple people. Has everything you'll need for a comfortable vacation. $4,500/obo. Call Kim after 6 p.m. 460-2634 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 31’ Alpenlite Hillcrest RX. 2 slide-outs, extras. Excellent cond. $8,500/obo. 859-248-7566 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 35’ Nuwa Snowbird. Triple slide. Exc. cond., low mileage. $16,900. 775-5105.

QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 SCOOTER 2002 Derbi GP1. 50cc, liquid cooled, disc brakes, $950. 360-808-1767 SCOOTER: ‘05 Honda Reflex. Like new condition, very low mi., 50+ mi. to the gal., Versahaul, other extras. $2,600. 360681-7102 for appt. SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $2,099/obo. 582-0841 SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643. SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bon. Exc. cond., extras. $5,500. 460-6780. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701. YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

2009 27’ Salem with slideout. Sleeps 6 or 7. Only used a handful of times. $17,000. 253-820-7237 Rob. 5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957.

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘05 25’ Sportsmaster All Amenities. Only used 5 times. Clean. Wellkept. $11,250. 360-582-1531 TRAILER: ‘07 27’ Rainier. 3x12’ tip out, a list of extras, excellent condition. $16,500. 928-2099.

CHEV: ‘96 Blazer. 4door, 4x4, new tires, excellent, all the elec., 149K. $3,500, would consider RV trade. 460-4488.

TRAILER: ‘98 35’ Jayco. Lg. slide, self cont. $10,550 ave. retail. $8,980/obo. 360-775-1316

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

JEEP RACK: Tilting Wild Boar rack, fits Jeep Unlimited 07present. Came on 2010 Unlimited, kayak cradle included. $450. firm. 775-7984 refirestar@yahoo.com

MOTOR HOME: ‘07 31.6’ Winnebago Outlook. Good condition, extras, located Chimacum, WA. $58,950 928-210-7044 www.rollinrollin.com/ motorhome MOTOR HOME: ‘76 Tioga. Good shape. $2,300. 477-1478. MOTOR HOME: ‘91 Toyota Odyssey. V6, 5 speed, low miles, new tires, brakes exhaust, batteries. Willing to trade for camper. $8,500. 460-4420. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 21’ Damon Ford Hornet. Close to 70K mi., good condition. Fast sell for college student. $8,900/obo. 461-0867 MOTOR HOME: ‘95 Pleasure Way Class B 19’ Dodge V8. 60,500 mi., 15 mpg, kitchen, queen bed, bath, solar panel, non smoking, no pets. $18,500. 360-808-1405

RV: ‘98 22’ 97,000 mi., needs handyman, roof leaks into walls. Nice, runs well, new tires, $5,500. 360-477-6968 TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457. TRAILER: ‘00 23’ Sierra Classic. Excellent condition. $9,500. 683-1508.

Parts/ Accessories

PARTING OUT: ‘91 Ford Explorer. $10$100. 460-0262 or 681-0940. TIRES: (4) Toyo A/T all terrain 33x12.5 R15, 60% tread, fits Dodge Ram 1500, 5 bolt pattern. $350. 670-5418 TRUCK RACK: Kargo Master, great condition. $400. 417-2047 WHEELS: (4) 15”, 6 lug, ‘01 Nissan trk, 6 spoke. $2K new. $600. 683-2743.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘00 S10 EXTENDED CAB ZR2 4X4 4.3 liter Vortec V6, auto, alloy wheels, good rubber, sprayin bedliner, tow package, keyless entry, power windows, door locks and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $9,265! Clean inside and out! Only 92.000 miles! Shows the best of care! Stop by Gray Motors to save some bucks on your next truck! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV ‘03 SILVERADO K2500 HD CREW CAB LONGBED 4X4 630 liter Vortec V8, auto, premium wheels, oversize BFGoodrich all-terrain tires, spray-in bedliner, privacy glass, tilt, air, Pioneer CD plater, upgraded door speakers, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $16,405! Clean inside and out! Only 95,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘01 Silverado 1500. Vortec 5.3L V8 4WD Ext Cab 6 inch lift. Power windows, locks and seats, tinted windows, chrome wheels, tow package. Runs strong, interior in excellent condition, dent on passenger side. 160,000 miles. $8,000. 808-0937 or 452 1237

CHEV: ‘02 Avalanche Z71 4x4 Off-Road Pkg. Power, heated leather seats. Power windows, mirrors, sunroof. Keyless, CD, A/C. New brakes, tires, battery. One owner, nonsmoker, $9,459. 360-461-1705

CHEV: ‘04 Silverado. 2500HD 6 L, ext. cab tow pkg, cmpr shell 43K miles, like new. $19,950. 681-2620.

TRAILER: ‘03 25’. Slightly used, front bedroom, rear bath, single slide. $9,500. 681-7110 TRAILER: ‘04 19W Jayco Jay Feather LGT, Ultra Light. 2,835 lbs., aluminum frame, vacuum laminated construction, low mileage, excellent condition, many extras, 2 batts, 12 volt TV, CD, fishing rods and lures, BBQ, etc. Ready to roll. Must see. $9,500. 360-385-2318

CHEV: ‘83 Suburban. 4x4, newer ‘454’ engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435

TRAILER: ‘94 29’ Komfort. Fire damage one side, still livable inside. $1,800. Jerry. 360-970-2877.

CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779.

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 29’ Itasca. 2 slides, sleeps 6, 2 TVs, queen bed, auto levelers, lots of storage, 50K mile transferable all coach warranty. Great cond, ready to go! $60,000/obo. 683-2958

CHEV: ‘83 3/4 ton diesel. 6” lift. $2,500. 477-6098.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967

ENGINE: 1995 Mercedes C280, 160K, will start and run for you. $600. 460-0262.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887.

CHEV: ‘04 AWD full size contractor van. $7,850. 452-5803.

TRAILER: ‘86 18’ Prowler. $700/obo. 808-1648

CAMPER: 6’ Six-Pac cabover, fits small truck. $2,700. 808-0153

MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710

96

MOTOR HOME: ‘02 32’ Georgetown. 2 slides, 25K, tow bar pkg., King Dome TV system, extra brake system, many extras inside. $35,000. Bill 452-2287 or 360477-7155.

97

TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326.

CAMPER 10’ Alaskan. $400. 477-0105

MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 KAWASAKI: ‘06 KLX 250. Great bike!! dual sport, knobby back tire, street legal with new tabs. $2,995. 477-6873. KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. KAWASAKI: ‘93 KLX 650. $1,800. 460-3530 KTM: ‘08 XCFW 250. New, about 30 hrs. $4,500. 417-8840. MOPED: New, 16 mi., needs battery. $900. 452-2795.

95

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $38,500. 683-2342.

DODGE: ‘03 Ram 1500 SLT quad cab. 5.9 V8, auto, A/C, cruise, P/W, P/L, seat, AM/FM with CD, matching Leer fiberglass canopy, rear air suspension, 62K, excellent cond. $16,000. 640-3709 in Forks, WA. DODGE: ‘05 Dakota Laramie. 30K mi., V8, loaded! $14,900. 452-5402 DODGE: ‘87 Ram 50. 4x4, auto, very clean, 27K on new motor. $2,700. 683-2314. FORD ‘05 EXPLORER XLT 4x4, auto, 3rd row, air, CD, power windows and locks. Sale price! Was $11,995. No credit checks! Lowest in house financing, guaranteed! 90 day same as cash! Military discounts! www.theotherguys auto.com $8,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. Exc cond., V6, air, tow, CD changer, 119K mi. $7,950. 457-4363 FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 FORD: ‘94 Bronco. Midnight black pkg, tow pkg, newer tires, trailer brake, leather seats, tint, power locks/windows, auto, 351 ci, well-maintained, recently serviced. Nice truck. Great for grad or dad. 200K. $4,000. 477-1874 GMC: ‘02 Sierra SLE. Ext. cab, 4WD, 75K, excellent. $13,900. 683-6935 GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SLE. 4.3 Vortec, 2” lift kit, grill guard, shift kit, running boards, roof rack, excellent cond. $4,000/obo. 477-4838 HONDA ‘06 ELEMENT EX-P 4X4 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM CD, rear sunroof, dark glass, roof rack, alloy wheels, and more! One owner! VIN#004592 Expires 9-3-11. $11,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com JEEP ‘03 LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM CD, dark glass, roof rack, styled steel wheels, remote entry and more! VIN#710476. Expires 9-3-11. $6,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com JEEP: ‘00 V8 Laredo. All power leather heated seats fully loaded CD player 132K in good shape, has exhaust leak needs minor work. $6,000/obo. 477-1782 call or text. JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988 JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee. 31K. $11,900. 683-2175. JEEP: ‘99 Wrangler Sport. 4.0 6 cyl. 5 speed, hardtop also comes with a soft top, air, tilt, CD, tinted glass, new front brakes, only 49,000 miles, great condition! $9,500. 460-6814. MERCURY: 98’ Mountaineer AWD. V8, leather, moonroof, power, tow package, 112K miles. 360-461-4483 PKG: GMC ‘03 Sonoma 4x4 ext. cab with ‘90 18’ Fleetwood Prowler 5th wheel. Both for $13,600. 457-4247 TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma TRD. 4 door, V6, auto, 48K. $22,500. 452-6316 TOYOTA: ‘77 Land Cruiser FJ40. Original 2F engine, aluminum body, lift with 34’s, ARB lockers, snorkel. Warn winch. Many extras!!! $12,000/obo (617) 510-9935 WANTED: Dodge pickup ‘98-’01, 1/2 or 3/4 ton quad cab, short bed, loaded, 4x4, excellent condition, 50K mi. or less. 683-8810

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV ‘08 G1500 EXPRESS CARGO VAN 5.3 liter V8, auto, air, cruise, tilt, power windows and locks, keyless entry, trip computer, safety bulk head, BIN package with work bench, ideal for lock smith, 63,000 miles, balance of factory 5/100 warranty, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report, near-new condition. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV: ‘06 Uplander. 29K miles, DVD player. $12,000. 683-3147 CHEV: ‘89 3/4 ton PU. V8, auto, clean body, sharp interior, 127K, new brakes/tires, ext. cab. $2,500. 457-6156 DODGE 1995 RAM 2500 DIESEL 3/4 ton, Laramie SLT. Extra cab. 2WD. B & D exhaust brake, big injectors, locking rear end, K & N filter, air bags, running boards, sliding tonneau cover, 5th wheel hitch and tail gate, trailer brakes, towing mirrors. $8,500/obo. Andy 360-477-8826 DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756 FORD: ‘66 Flatbed. Recent rebuilt engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435 FORD: ‘84 F-150. Body in very good cond., w/many amenities incl. (2) brand new front tires w/less than 100 mi. $1,495. 683-4200 leave message. FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911. FORD: ‘85 Econoline 150 wheelchair van. 58K mi., $2,000/obo. 360-640-1970 or 360-461-8709 FORD: 98 Windstar. 84K mi., excellent cond., white. $2,495/ obo. 683-4505. FORD: 98 Windstar. 84K mi., excellent cond., white. $2,495/ obo. 683-4505. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Excellent condition. 93K. $6,500. 360-385-6702 JEEP: ‘96 Grand Cherokee Laredo. White. One-owner. Additional 6 CD changer. air, power everything. Interior and exterior in excellent condition. Current registration. Great tires. 204K miles. $3,500. 425-241-2050 TOW TRUCK ‘77 1 ton 350 4 spd. Runs, drives, and tows. $1,450/obo. 670-1459 TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535

99

Cars

2000 HONDA CIVIC 120,000 miles, good condition, runs perfect. Good mpg. $4,700 457-7146/808-1767 America’s Sports Car Chev ‘97 Corvette Coupe. C5 Sebring Silver coupe in excellent condition. Low miles 107K. Many extras including headers, Corsa exhaust, K N filter, drilled/slotted rotors, ceramic pads, C6 Z06 shocks anti sway bars. Z06 rims, Continental Extreme Contact DW tires with only 8K miles usage. Cosmetic upgrades as well. Many pictures available. 6 speed, 30 mpg. $14,500. All serious offers considered. No trades. Jay at 425-241-2050.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

2000 Honda CRV Very Good Condition, just detailed in & out. All scheduled maintenance has been done over the years. All wheel drive, tinted windows, auto start w/alarm, 4 mounted snow tires. 200,700 hwy mi. $5,500. 681-5157 or 360-801-1931 BUICK: ‘68 Skylark Special. 1 owner, runs good. $1,500/ obo. 461-4475. BUICK: ‘73 Centurion Convertible. ‘455’ engine, new top and interior, recent white paint. $6,995/obo. 683-8567 BUICK: ‘94 Park Avenue. 108K, well maintained. $3,250/ obo. 460-2493. CADILLAC: ‘94 El Dorado. Northstar, good cond. $3,000. 457-4066 CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419 CHEV: ‘65 Impala. All original, excellent. $24,000. 452-6840. CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767.

CHEV: ‘87 Corvette. Auto, black/graphite, 350/240, all power, leather, air, original, 2nd owner, always garaged, excellent condition, 46K mi., beautiful car! $13,500. 582-1260.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

99

Cars

FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598. FORD: ‘62 Thunderbird. Runs great, good paint/chrome. Red/black. $11,000. 683-2958 FORD: ‘78 Ranchero GT. ‘351’, low mi., good condition, runs excellent. $1,500. 460-6979 FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. FORD: ‘96 T-Bird LX. Runs good, nice car. $3,500. 452-2150. FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,500 477-1805 FORD: 99 Escort Sport. 114K, 2 dr, exc. running cond. $2,700. 808-0825. FORD: ‘99 Escort Sport. 114K, 2 dr, exc. running cond. $2,700. 808-0825. HONDA ‘08 CIVIC LX 4-DOOR Very economical 1.8 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, only 35,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

No. 11 4 00219 5 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM In Re the Estate of: LEANNE BROWN, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070, by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: August 25, 2011 Personal Representative: David Lyle Brown Attorney for Personal Representative: David V. Johnson Address for Mailing or Service: JOHNSON RUTZ & TASSIE 804 South Oak Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-1139 Pub: Aug. 25, Sept. 1, 8, 2011

Cars

HONDA: ‘07 Accord. Good condition, 70K. $12,500. 208-559-4023

MG: ‘79 BCV series. Color blue, excellent condition. $7,000. 683-5614

HONDA: ‘10 Fit. 4 dr hatchback, 5 speed, metallic copper, like new condition, average 32 mpg, 36-40 on Hwy., great to drive. $16,500. 360-301-9061

PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768.

HONDA: ‘11 Fit Sport. 72 miles. $20,000. 683-6352

HONDA: ‘87 Prelude 168K, 38 mpg, extras. 1 owner. $2,100. 504-2154. HONDA: ‘95 Accord. 4 dr, 133K, new tires sunroof, great cond. $4,500. 457-3078. MAZDA ‘02 MIATA MX-5 CONVERTIBLE 1.8 liter 16V 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual trans, alloy wheels, power windows and mirrors, CD stereo, air, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Sparkling clean inside and out! Summer fun with the top down! Only 47,000 miles! Sporty! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com MAZDA: ‘06 Miata Sport. 8,900 miles. An as new garaged, babied car. 6 spd manual. A/C, power steering, locks, windows, mirrors. Cruise, tilt wheel, 17” alloy wheels. Galaxy gray w/black cloth. Black vinyl top. $16,600. 681-0151.

PLYMOUTH: ‘94 Acclaim. 4 cyl., low mi., good on gas. $1,600. 360-379-4100 PONTIAC ‘02 GRAND AM SE Auto, alloy wheels, CD, air, gray cloth, sunroof, power locks and windows. Very sharp! Low miles! The original buy here, pay here! Military discounts! Why pay more? We have the lowest in house rates. www.theotherguys auto.com $6,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577 SUBARU: ‘98 Impreza Outback Sport Wagon. 5 spd, AWD, 2.2 liter. 196K miles. Good condition. $4,400. 681-4422. SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 98K, auto, power windows/seats, moon roof, great condition. $12,200. 461-1539 SUZUKI: ‘04 XL7. 4x4, 48,500 mi., red, excellent shape. $8,500. 775-9671.

99

Cars

TOYOTA ‘06 COROLLA LE 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM CD, remote entry, and more! VIN708161. Expires 9-3-11. $9,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com TOYOTA ‘09 MATRIX ‘S’ ALL WD Economical 2.4 liter 4 cylinder, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD changer/MP3, power windows and locks, power moonroof, side airbags, keyless entry, alloy wheels, fog lamps, only 34,000 miles, super clean 1 owner local car, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, non-smoker, garage kept, spotless Carfax report. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com TOYOTA ‘98 CAMRY LE SEDAN 3.0 liter 24 valve V6, auto, alloy wheels, new BFGoodrich tires, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Only 93,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! loaded with leather and power options! Legendary Toyota reliability! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA: ‘96 Camry. 5 speed, low miles. $3,500. 681-3023.

MERCURY: ‘68 Monterey, 4 door sedan, 88K, 1 owner. $2,500. 379-0575.

TOYOTA ‘03 AVALON XLS 4 DOOR V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, leather interior with heated seats, AM/FM CD and cassette, power sunroof, front and side airbags, electronic traction control, remote entry, alloy wheels, and much more! VIN#278571 Expires 9-3-11. $8,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

VW: ‘04 Beetle TDI (Diesel). Up to 50mpg! 78K, great shape, leather, moonroof, turbo. $11,000. 460-0572. VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184. ZAP: ‘06 Xebra. Electric car. Emits no CO2 for global warming. $5,000. Ask for Jack, 683-2259

104

104

104

MAZDA: ‘06 MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $15,500/obo. 681-0863

FIERO: ‘88 GT. 5 speed, good driver, straight body, needs paint and TLC to be first class. $5,000. firm. 928-3728. FORD ‘08 TAURUS SEL ALL WD 3.5 liter V6, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD/MP3, power windows, locks, seat, power moonroof, full leather, back up sensor, fog lamps, alloy wheels, side airbags, only 27,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very very clean 1-owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report, near new condition. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

99

C9

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966

Legals Jefferson Co.

Legals Jefferson Co.

Legals Jefferson Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 30th day of September, 2011, at the hour of 10 o'clock A.M. at the lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street, in the City of Port Townsend, County of Jefferson, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington, to-wit: Lots 3 and 4 in Block 25, Hill’s Addition to the City of Port Townsend, according to the Plat thereof filed in Volume 1 of Plats at Page 95, records of Jefferson County, Washington; EXCEPT the Northerly 20.00 feet of Lot 3 in Block 25 of said Hill’s Addition to the City of Port Townsend, all in Section 4, Township 30 North, Range 1 West, W.M., Jefferson County, Washington Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated May 7, 2008, recorded May 9, 2008, under Auditor's File No. 533892, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Marily Jean Baxter individually and/or Marilyn J. Baxter as Trustee of the Marilyn Jean Baxter Living Trust Agreement, dated September 17, 2002, as Grantor, to First American Title of Jefferson County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Ronald Little and Nancy N. Little, husband and wife, as Beneficiary(ies). II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Grantors or Borrowers default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: A Monthly Payments $2,516.31 B. Total Arrears $2,516.31 C. Trustee s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $1,000.00. Title Report $ 331.70 Statutory Mailings $ 17.60 Recording Fees $ 64.00 Publication $ 600.00 (estimated) Service $ 75.00 Total Costs $2,088.30 Total Amount Due $4,604.61 (including estimate of Publication costs) Other potential defaults do not involve payment of the Beneficiary. If applicable, each of these defaults must also be cured. Listed below are categories of common defaults, which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action/documentation necessary to cure the default. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any defaults identified by Beneficiary or Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. Other default Action necessary to cure Nonpayment of Taxes/Assessments Deliver to Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the property are paid current Default under any senior lien Deliver to Trustee written proof that all senior liens are paid current and that no other defaults exist. Failure to insure property against hazard Deliver to Trustee written proof that the property is insured against hazard as required by the Deed of Trust. Waste Cease and desist from committing waste, repair all damage to property and maintain property as required in Deed of Trust. Unauthorized sale of property (Due on Sale) Revert title to permitted vestee. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is Principal Balance of $35,105.87 together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 10/01/2010 and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 30th day of September, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 19th day of September, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 19th day of September, 2011, (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 19th day of September, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. The Borrower and Grantor were personally served on the 26th day of January, 2011, with a written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. Stephen W. Gillard Attorney at Law Trustee Address 210 Taylor St. #10 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Phone 360.379.3633 Pub: Sept. 1, 22, 2011


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 62

Low 49

67/46

70/46

71/48

69/49

Clouds yielding to some sun.

Mostly cloudy with a stray shower.

Clouds and sun.

Partly sunny.

Partly sunny.

Partly sunny.

The Peninsula Cool weather will be the rule across the Peninsula today. After a cloudy start to the day, some sunshine will work in during the midday and afternoon hours. A ridge of high pressure will build into the region at the end of the workweek and over the weekend. Neah Bay Port The result will be a return of mild temperatures, with many 58/50 Townsend places getting into the 70s in the afternoon. Sunshine will Port Angeles 62/51 mix with some fair-weather clouds. Most of the first full 62/49 week of September will be dry with a fair amount of Sequim sunshine.

Victoria 67/55

65/51

Forks 64/48

Olympia 72/46

Seattle 71/54

Spokane 72/50

Yakima Kennewick 79/45 80/50

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Mostly cloudy today. Wind from the west at 12-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Rather cloudy tonight with a stray shower. Wind from the west at 15-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Clouds and sun tomorrow. Wind from the west at 12-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Saturday: Partly sunny. Wind east 4-8 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear.

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

3:14 a.m. 3:27 p.m. 5:47 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 7:32 a.m. 7:15 p.m. 6:53 a.m. 6:36 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

8.0’ 8.9’ 6.1’ 7.2’ 7.4’ 8.7’ 7.0’ 8.2’

9:16 a.m. 9:56 p.m. 11:29 a.m. ----12:40 a.m. 12:43 p.m. 12:33 a.m. 12:36 p.m.

0.2’ -0.6’ 2.2’ --0.5’ 2.9’ 0.5’ 2.7’

High Tide Ht 4:07 a.m. 4:09 p.m. 6:59 a.m. 6:06 p.m. 8:44 a.m. 7:51 p.m. 8:05 a.m. 7:12 p.m.

Seattle 71/54 Billings 68/51

San Francisco 72/58

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Moon Phases

7.4’ 8.7’ 6.0’ 7.1’ 7.2’ 8.6’ 6.8’ 8.1’

SaTurday

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

10:00 a.m. 10:48 p.m. 12:18 a.m. 12:18 p.m. 1:32 a.m. 1:32 p.m. 1:25 a.m. 1:25 p.m.

5:04 a.m. 4:56 p.m. 8:22 a.m. 6:46 p.m. 10:07 a.m. 8:31 p.m. 9:28 a.m. 7:52 p.m.

10:49 a.m. 11:46 p.m. 1:13 a.m. 1:14 p.m. 2:27 a.m. 2:28 p.m. 2:20 a.m. 2:21 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

1.0’ -0.4’ -0.2’ 3.2’ -0.2’ 4.1’ -0.2’ 3.9’

6.8’ 8.4’ 5.9’ 7.0’ 7.1’ 8.4’ 6.7’ 7.9’

1.8’ -0.1’ -0.4’ 3.9’ -0.5’ 5.1’ -0.5’ 4.8’

Sep 12

Last

Sep 20

New

Sep 27

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 91 75 s Baghdad 104 68 s Beijing 81 65 pc Brussels 68 58 pc Cairo 92 72 s Calgary 63 44 pc Edmonton 69 42 s Hong Kong 87 79 sh Jerusalem 79 58 s Johannesburg 77 47 s Kabul 75 65 sh London 71 58 pc Mexico City 75 57 t Montreal 77 63 c Moscow 67 50 sh New Delhi 92 77 t Paris 78 65 sh Rio de Janeiro 66 56 pc Rome 82 66 pc Stockholm 64 51 sh Sydney 66 54 sh Tokyo 82 75 r Toronto 78 64 t Vancouver 67 57 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

New York 82/66

Chicago 90/74

Denver 98/59

Washington 86/66

Kansas City 100/74 Atlanta 90/68

Houston 95/75 Miami 89/78

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 90 62 66 90 78 84 76 68 80 76 76 82 86 88 90 96 71 82 104 98 92 86 78 62 67 89 95 55

Lo W 68 pc 50 s 53 pc 68 pc 61 s 62 pc 42 s 51 t 50 pc 50 s 58 s 65 t 64 s 52 pc 74 pc 69 pc 45 pc 49 pc 78 s 59 pc 72 s 70 pc 45 pc 45 c 45 t 75 pc 75 pc 48 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 100 100 98 81 89 86 87 94 96 82 104 94 90 103 84 108 74 86 86 92 99 83 100 74 72 86 68 86

Lo W 74 s 83 s 73 pc 63 pc 78 t 74 pc 70 pc 72 pc 79 t 66 pc 76 s 70 pc 73 t 79 s 64 pc 90 pc 57 pc 62 pc 53 s 58 s 74 s 55 s 76 pc 67 pc 58 pc 66 pc 42 s 66 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 114 at Bullhead City, AZ

Low: 25 at Bodie State Park, CA

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Detroit 86/70

El Paso 94/72

Sunset today ................... 7:56 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 6:33 a.m. Moonrise today .............. 11:27 a.m. Moonset today ................. 9:20 p.m. Full

Minneapolis 87/70

Los Angeles 81/63

Sun & Moon

Sep 4

Everett 67/52

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Thursday, September 1, 2011

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 68 47 0.00 10.68 Forks 67 48 0.00 78.50 Seattle 69 52 0.00 24.26 Sequim 69 46 0.00 11.02 Hoquiam 63 51 0.00 45.79 Victoria 69 49 0.00 21.11 P. Townsend* 65 54 0.00 12.29 *Data from www.ptguide.com

First

Port Ludlow 66/51 Bellingham 66/52

Aberdeen 62/53

Peninsula Daily News

(360) 379-1591

Major credit cards or terms on approval.

Briefly . . . Adventuress to set sail Saturday

vices, Peninsula College on sale at Odyssey Books in Family Literacy, First Step Port Angeles and Pacific parent support, foster parMist Books in Sequim. ent groups and low-income The cost is $12 per perclinics. son or $20 for two. The Northwest playwright describes “Fort Dun- Oktoberfest on tap Joint reunion set PORT TOWNSEND — A SEQUIM — Alumni from can” as “an assortment of sail to Protection Island PORT ANGELES — stories that take place in a Port Angeles’ Roose-velt aboard the historic wooden Tickets are now on sale for typical small town on the schooner Adventuress will be High School classes of 1941, Oktoberfest 2011, a benefit Olympic Peninsula.” 1942, 1943, 1944 and 1945 held from 10 a.m. to for the residents of St. Tickets for the perforwill hold a joint reunion at 4 p.m. Saturday. mances of “Fort Duncan” are Andrew’s Place Assisted 212 Fasola Road, Sequim, at Participants will enjoy a 11 a.m. Wednesday. day of learning about the The event is a potluck. wildlife of the area and the For more information, marine environment. Twelve tickets remained phone Thelma at 360-4527745 or Jack at 360-681Wednesday, said Christina The daily Things to Do calendar, Pivarnik, who handles mar- 2818. the North Olympic Peninsula’s most keting for the Port comprehensive listing of public First Book benefit Townsend Marine Science events of all kinds updated daily, Center. SEQUIM — Readers appears exclusively online at . . . Sponsored by the Port Theatre Plus will perform Townsend Marine Science “Fort Duncan” by John http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings Center, the sail departs from Stone at the Old Dungeness the Northwest Maritime Schoolhouse, 2719 Towne Center’s dock in downtown . . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or Road, Sept. 16-18 and Sept. Port Townsend. tablets. 24-25. “Experiencing a sail on Performances will be Submitting items of events open to the public is the Adventuress is a lifetime held at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16, 17 easy and free: memory,” said Anne Murphy, and 24 and at 2 p.m. Sept. ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@ the center’s executive direc- 18 and 24-25. peninsuladailynews.com or via the “Things to Do” tor. Proceeds from ticket link at peninsuladailynews.com. “Add to that the opportu- sales will benefit First Book■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, nity to view the wildlife that Clallam County, a nonprofit Port Angeles, WA 98362. inhabits the island — like organization whose single ■ FAX: 360-417-3521. eagles, puffins, elephant mission is to give children seals, plus more — and from low-income families you’ve got a perfect day for the opportunity to read and the whole family.” keep their own first new Cruises are $80 per perbooks. son or $75 for Port In the past 14 years, Townsend Marine Science First Book has provided Center, Burke Museum or over 41,500 new books to Washington Ornithological such Clallam County organiSociety members. zations as Head Start, Proceeds from the sail Quileute Tribal School, Boys will benefit the marine sciand Girls Club, Lower ence center educational pro- Elwha Head Start, First per gallon Teacher, Juvenile Court Sergrams. Reservations are required and may be made by phoning 360-385-5582 or 800-566-3932 or emailing cruises@ptmsc.org.

Living Community. The event will be held at the Port Angeles Masonic Temple, 622 S. Lincoln St., from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oct. 1. The evening will include a German buffet, wine and beer, live music and live and silent auctions, including a dessert auction. Tickets are $20 in advance and are available in Port Angeles at St.

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Things to Do online

Solution to Puzzle on C2 W R E O I B G N O H E T H I N I C E S H T I B M A S R Y I N R O E I T T N A T G E P S P E C A S L

C H E F

V I E T

R T O K O R B U R E R R I M O T I

D E A L G U S I E N K O A N K G O O O O G G I F I L D L E O R E C U O M A R K I R G A L R E Y E D

A N D

B R I E F E R D A I A D U E R R A

G E T U C E P H E E L O N G M L E O A R O Y E N

S P C E A L A L P O R I S L E N M I T I A N S C I G K M O M E N A R Y I S A B L M A M M A A N A N S E C A L F E T E O N G R D I G S T E

P O L L O I

A L K E N E

S L A T E S

D E S D E M O N A

O N T O

T T Y L

A R I D

L I E D

R O L L

S H L O O E X

Wall & Trim

“Cowboys and Aliens” (PG-13) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (PG-13) “The Help” (PG-13) “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (PG-13) “Spy Kids: All the Time in the World” (PG) “30 Minutes or Less” (R)

n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089) “The Debt” (R) “The Help” (PG-13)

n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (PG-13)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997)

n  Wheel-In Motor Movie, Port Townsend (360-385-0859)

“Conan the Barbarian” (R) “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” (R) “Fright Night” (R)

“Winnie the Pooh” (G) “The Smurfs” (PG) “Captain America: The First Avenger” (PG-13)

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A R R O B O I S C A P R R E I C A B S B O T A U S A G T H R A C I C O H N A M A S P A R T T N T L R E S O O R I N D O D G M I L E A C E S N A S T

20 per 5 gallon

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n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

mail-in

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Andrew’s Place, 520 E. Park Ave., or Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. Second St.; or at Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., in Sequim. They will be available for $30 at the door. For more information, phone 360-417-3418 or visit www.portangeles oktoberfest.com. Peninsula Daily News


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