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Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

50 cents

December 23, 2010

Pool hopes kept alive

Sweets for Christmas

Port renews Kah Tai pact

— on 1.9 acres owned by the port next to Kah Tai Lagoon and Jefferson Transit’s Haines Place Park and Ride on 12th Street. The port land is now leased to the city of Port Townsend until By Charlie Bermant July 31, 2012. Peninsula Daily News Extending the agreement PORT TOWNSEND — The “allows the dialogue to continue,” Port of Port Townsend commis- said Port Director Larry Crockett. sioners have renewed an agreement that keeps options open for No commitment the possible construction of an “There is no commitment, aquatic center within Kah Tai which will only come after we sign Lagoon Nature Park. a lease agreement,” Crockett Commissioners extended a let- said. ter of agreement outlining a genOne question that must be eral agreement with Make Waves! answered before a lease agreeon Wednesday. ment is considered is whether the They had decided at their area is protected as an outdoorDec. 8 meeting to postpone the only recreation area under federal vote to gather more information. rules. The agreement, signed in The park was opened in the December 2009, was due to expire early 1980s with federal grant at the end of this year. money from the Land and Water Make Waves! seeks to build a Conservation Fund and may be $10 million facility — which would protected for outdoor recreation accommodate more than 2,000 under a rule called (6)(f). swimmers a year with a public pool and other recreational options Turn to Pool/A6

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Stephanie Redmond, left, of Elevated Ice Cream in downtown Port Townsend helps Val James pick out some Christmas candy Wednesday. Port Townsend stores are wrapping up their holiday shopping season with extended hours

Peninsula collector has more than 200 scenes ranging from music box miniatures to flower pot figures

A world of the Nativity — in all shapes, sizes By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker (3)/Peninsula Daily News

Collector Sandy Roedell holds a figurine depicting Joseph and Mary on their way to Bethlehem. Roedell’s china cabinet holds hundreds more.

PORT ANGELES — The Bible has two versions of the Nativity scene. Sandy Roedell has more than 200. Roedell started collecting cards and figurines depicting the birth of Jesus some 37 years ago, she said. The figurines typically show either the holy family — Mary, Jesus and Joseph — in the barn where they stayed because no inn had room for them, the shepherds celebrating the birth of the Messiah, the magi who brought gifts or the flight of the family to Egypt when small children were being killed by King Herod, who was in fear of losing his crown. The stories are told in the Bible in the books of Matthew and Luke. Since she began collecting creches, Roedell has found dozens. Family and friends have added dozens more — adding up to a Christmas scene at her house showing off her reason for the season. Turn

to

A snowglobe depicting the Nativity, above, and figures made from tiny flower pots are among Roedell’s collectables.

Nativity/A6

Student aid bids soar at Peninsula College By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

Applications for financial aid at Peninsula College have nearly doubled over the course of the past two years, even though enrollment has increased by only about 37 percent. “I am concerned with the future of the state budget in general and the sustainability of what we do,” said Krista Francis, direc-

tor of enrollment services and financial aid. Financial aid applications increased by about 92 percent in the last two years. In fall 2008, the college had 1,368 full-time students and 588 financial aid applications. By fall 2009, the enrollment had risen to 1,559 full-time students and 792 financial aid applications.

This fall quarter, the enrollment grew to 1,875 full-time students and 1,129 applications. By the time financial aid applications were due, many forms of financial aid had run out, Francis said. Some financial aid such as the federal Pell Grant or Stafford Loan never run out, but the state grants and institutional scholar-

ships were waning by Dec. 3, when the last applications for winter quarter were due, she said. “Our state-need grant allocation changes year-to-year based on served and unserved students from the prior year,” Francis said. “This year, we received more than we’ve received in the past. “So . . . it wasn’t reduced for us this year because we had so many

unserved students last year. “Even with the increase in state-need grant allocations, we still ran out early.” Although enrollment increased, because the applications for aid have increased by so much more, Francis said, she believes unemployment and other factors have played the primary roles in requests for aid. Turn

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Student/A6

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 94th year, 300th issue — 3 sections, 22 pages

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Business B4 Classified C4 Comics C3 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby C3 Deaths A6 Movies C1 Nation/World A3 Puzzles/Games C2, C5

Sports Things To Do 3rdAge Weather

B1 C1 C2 C10


A2

UpFront

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad on the Internet at www.peninsuladailynews.com or e-mail: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe via the Internet at www.peninsuladailynews.com, or by e-mail: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday

Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Buy PDN Photos Online” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Jamie Foxx: Kid helped his career Call her the guardian angel for Jamie Foxx’s music career. The Oscar and Grammy winner said Tuesday his 16-year-old daughter, Corinne, gave him the best advice when he began recording music. “When I first started, I was doing this little slow music, you know, just R&B . . . and my daughter walked in and said, ‘What you doing?’ I said, ‘I’m working on the album.’ “She said, ‘I hope you don’t put that on there because you going to put everybody to sleep,”’ Foxx said. His daughter told him to reach out to younger artists to aid in his music career. And that’s exactly what the 43-year-old performer did. In 2005, Foxx released “Unpredictable,” a doubleplatinum album that fea-

The Associated Press

Actor Jamie Foxx, right, holds up a star as he poses with his daughter, Corrine Bishop, as Foxx receives a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles on Sept. 14, 2007. tured production work and guest appearances from Kanye West, Ludacris and Tank. He followed that with 2008’s “Intuition,” another platinum CD that featured the Grammy-winning party jam “Blame It.” And this week, Foxx released “Best Night of My

Life”; the album has collaborations with top acts like Drake, Justin Timberlake, Rick Ross and T.I. “A lot of times in order to be successful with music, you have to listen and sometimes allow other people to sort of steer you in the right direction,” Foxx said.

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: How often do you “regift” — rewrapping a Christmas present you don’t want and giving it to someone else? Often 

Passings

Occasionally 

By The Associated Press

Fred Foy, 89, an announcer best known for his booming, passionate lead-ins to “The Lone Ranger” radio and television series, died Wednesday of natural causes at his Woburn, Mass., home, his daughter said. Nancy Foy said her father worked as an actor before landing the job as the announcer Mr. Foy and narrator on “The Lone Ranger” radio show in 1948. The show’s live lead-in introduced its masked cowboy hero and his trusted horse with the line: “A fiery

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

horse with the speed of light, a cloud of dust and a hearty ‘Hi-Yo Silver!’ . . . The Lone Ranger!” Mr. Foy’s dramatic introduction and narration, performed in a powerful baritone, were so good it “made many people forget there were others before him,” said radio historian Jim Harmon, who called him “perhaps the greatest announcer-narrator in the history of radio drama.” “He pronounced words like no one else ever had — ‘SIL-ver,’ ‘hiss-TOR-ee.’ “But hearing him, you realized everyone else had been wrong,” Harmon wrote in his book, Radio Mystery and Adventure and Its Appearances in Film, Television and

Other Media. Mr. Foy never tired of giving a spirited rendition of “The Lone Ranger” introduction to anyone, anywhere, who would ask, his daughter said. “Dad would do the intro at the drop of a hat,” she said. “He loved it. He loved for us to let people know so he would be asked to do it.” Mr. Foy was born in Detroit in 1921, graduated from that city’s Eastern High School in 1938 and landed a job on the announcing staff of radio station WXYZ in Detroit in 1942. He was drafted into the Army that year and served in an Armed Forces Radio unit in Cairo during World War II.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

Theodore C. Olson, Bonne­ In addition, there are 1935 (75 years ago) crabs, clams and oysters on ville Power Administration Roy Olmstead, convicted substation manager in Port which the waterfowl feed, king of Pacific Northwest said Bob Steelquist, direcAngeles. rum runners, received a tor of the Arthur D. Feiro The youths shot away Christmas present from Marine Laboratory who is 16 of 18 insulators from President Franklin D. skirts supporting a 15,000- heading the bird collection Roosevelt. effort. volt electrical line on the The gift was a full and The spill occurred when city’s west side. unconditional pardon, the tanker Arco Anchorage Had the last two insularestoring his civil rights ran aground in Port Angetors been shot away, “those and remitting his $8,500 les Harbor on Dec. 21. boys might have been fine and costs of $2,287. fried,” Olson said. Olmstead, a former Sheriff R.I. Polhamus Seattle police lieutenant Did You Win? said several .22-caliber carwhose ports of entry State lottery results tridge cases were found at included the Olympic Penthe scene, and his deputies insula, was sentenced to Wednesday’s Daily federal prison in March 28, are seeking youths witGame: 8-6-7 nessed in the vicinity. 1926, after an indictment Wednesday’s Hit 5: of him and 90 others on 04-25-28-30-36 charges of bringing in mil- 1985 (25 years ago) Wednesday’s Keno: lions of dollars worth of A mucky oil slick from 11-12-20-25-35-40-42-44liquor from foreign counPort Angeles Harbor 45-52-57-59-62-64-65-66tries during Prohibition. spread around the tip of 70-72-73-79 Olmstead and 20 others Dungeness Spit, threatenWednesday’s Lotto: were convicted. ing the Dungeness 07-17-20-27-30-47 National Wildlife Refuge. Wednesday’s Match 4: 1960 (50 years ago) The 5.5-mile spit 05-15-22-24 encloses an area of Two or more youths Wednesday’s Powermarshes and shallows estisharpshooting with a .22 ball: 11-33-44-46-47, Powrifle came within two insu- mated to be the home of erball: 12, Power Play: 2 lators of sudden death, said 50,000 birds.

Seldom 

5.1% 13.9% 21.6% 49%

Never That’s awful!

10.4%

Total votes cast: 944 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  A fire in Clallam Bay on Saturday was in the home of Kathleen Hamby. It occurred at 4:30 p.m. at 72 Seventh St. Patrice Porter, who was quoted as an emergency medical technician in a story Sunday, is not a member of the Clallam Bay Fire Department, said Clallam Bay Fire Chief Patricia Hutson-English, whose name was misspelled in a Sunday story. Stories on Page A12 Sunday and Page A4 Monday erroneously identified the occupant of the house as Kathy Hubbard. Hutson-English, who was not available for comment Saturday night since she was fighting the fire, had confirmed the name Sunday for the Monday story but said Wednesday that it had been corrected. The Sunday story erroneously said that the fire was on Sixth Street and quoted Porter as a paramedic. Hutson-English said Porter has not worked for the department for several months but may have been at the scene of the fire. The Sunday story also erroneously said that the fire started a little after 5 p.m. The Monday story corrected the time to 4:30 p.m. and corrected the spelling of the fire chief’s name in the Sunday story.

■  Sharron Fogel is no longer the chairwoman of Friends of Robin Hill, a group that opposed disc golf at Robin Hill Farm County Park. A Wednesday Page A8 story identified Fogel as the chairwoman. John Benham is the current chairman of Friends of Robin Hill, Fogel said. The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

SUV WITH 2-foot Christmas tree strapped on top . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Laugh Lines Americans chose the word “whatever” as the most annoying word of 2010. Especially when it’s given as an answer to the question, “Doctor, will I ever walk again?” Conan O’Brien

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

Today is Thursday, Dec. 23, the 357th day of 2010. There are eight days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Dec. 23, 1968, 82 crew members of the U.S. intelligence ship Pueblo were released by North Korea, 11 months after they had been captured. On this date: ■ In 1783, George Washington resigned as commander in chief of the Continental Army and retired to his home at Mount Vernon, Va. ■ In 1788, Maryland passed an act to cede an area “not exceeding 10 miles square” for the seat of the national government; about twothirds of the area became the District of Columbia. ■ In 1823, the poem “Account

of a Visit from St. Nicholas” was published anonymously in the Troy (N.Y.) Sentinel; the verse, more popularly known as “’Twas the Night Before Christmas,” was later attributed to Clement C. Moore. ■ In 1893, the Engelbert Humperdinck opera “Haensel und Gretel” was first performed, in Weimar, Germany. ■ In 1928, the National Broadcasting Co. set up a permanent, coast-to-coast network. ■ In 1941, during World War II, American forces on Wake Island surrendered to the Japanese. ■ In 1948, former Japanese Premier Hideki Tojo and six other Japanese war leaders were executed in Tokyo. ■ In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson held an unprecedented

meeting with Pope Paul VI at the Vatican. ■ In 1975, Richard S. Welch, the Central Intelligence Agency station chief in Athens, was shot and killed outside his home by the militant group November 17. ■ In 1980, a state funeral was held in Moscow for former Premier Alexei N. Kosygin, who had died Dec. 18 at age 76. ■ Ten years ago: Pro-democracy forces claimed a sweeping victory in Serbia’s parliamentary elections. Death claimed comedian Victor Borge in Greenwich, Conn., at age 91 and actor Billy Barty in Glendale, Calif., at age 76. ■ Five years ago: Chad declared itself in a “state of belligerence” with Sudan, accusing its neighbor of aggression.

An Azerbaijan Airlines passenger plane carrying 23 people crashed into the Caspian Sea, killing all on board. ■ One year ago: Richard and Mayumi Heene, the parents who’d pulled the “balloon boy” hoax in hopes of landing a reality TV show, were sentenced by a judge in Fort Collins, Colo., to jail — 90 days for him, 20 days for her. Gary Patterson, who’d guided TCU to its best season in 70 years, became the first Associated Press Coach of the Year from outside the six conferences with automatic BCS bids. Yitzhak Ahronovitch, captain of the Exodus during a 1947 attempt to take Holocaust survivors to Palestine, died in northern Israel at age 86.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 23, 2010

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Senate ratifies nuclear treaty with Russia WASHINGTON — The Senate on Wednesday ratified an arms control treaty with Russia that reins in the nuclear weapons that could plunge the world into doomsday, giving President Barack Obama a major foreign policy win in the closing hours of the postelection Congress. Thirteen Republicans broke with their top two leaders and joined 56 Democrats and two independents in providing the necessary two-thirds vote to approve the treaty. The vote was 71-26. The accord, which still must be approved by Russia, would restart onsite weapons inspections as successors to President Ronald Reagan have embraced his edict of “trust, but verify.” Vice President Joe Biden presided over the Senate and announced the vote. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton observed the vote from the Senate floor. Both had lobbied furiously for the treaty’s approval.

Miller 48 hours to plead any outstanding issues to him once the high court had ruled. Miller did not immediately comment. Miller The decision follows Miller’s appeal of a state judge’s decision to toss out his challenge to the state’s counting of ballots for Murkowski. Miller maintained that the state should be held to the letter of the law, which calls for write-in ballots to have the oval filled in and the last name of a candidate or the name as it appears on the declaration of candidacy.

9/11 package passed

WASHINGTON — Congress has passed a $4.2 billion aid package for survivors of the September 2001 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center and responders who developed illnesses because of breathing dust from the ruins. The House passed the bill 20660 Wednesday about two hours after the Senate cleared it. President Barack Obama has said he Miller claims thrown is eager to sign it. JUNEAU, Alaska — The The package provides money Alaska Supreme Court has to monitor rescue and cleanup upheld a lower court decision workers and treat illnesses Wednesday in the disputed U.S. related to Ground Zero. It also Senate race, saying the state cor- reopens a victims’ compensation fund for another five years to rectly counted write-in votes for cover wage and other economic Sen. Lisa Murkowski. The court in its decision said it losses of sickened workers and found “no remaining issues raised nearby residents. New York members of Conby [rival Joe] Miller that prevent this election from being certified.” gress had sought $2 billion more. A federal judge, who had put a They accepted the smaller amount in exchange for GOP crithold on certification to give the state courts time to rule on Millics dropping their opposition. The Associated Press er’s claims, said he would give

Briefly: World Medical goods for Afghanistan soldiers vanish

Christian leaders called off Christmas celebrations amid new al-Qaida threats. The tiny community is still terrified from a bloody siege on Baghdad’s Our Lady of SalvaKABUL, Afghanistan — U.S.- tion Church as its Catholic condonated medicines and pharma- gregation was celebrating Sunceutical supplies meant to keep day Mass; 68 people were killed. Days after the Oct. 31 attack, the new Afghan army and police healthy have been disappearing Islamic insurgents bombed before reaching Afghan military Christian homes and neighborhoods across the capital. hospitals and clinics, and the On Tuesday, al-Qaida insurgovernment said it is removing gents threatened more attacks the army’s top medical officer on Iraq’s beleaguered Chrisfrom his post as part of an tians, many of whom have fled investigation into alleged cortheir homes or the country since ruption. the church attack. Afghan Defense MinTravel chaos eases ister Gen. Abdul Rahim LONDON — Europe’s Wardak told Christmas travel crisis eased The Associslightly Wednesday, but there ated Press were still substantial airport that Surgeon and train delays, particularly at General London’s Heathrow Airport, Ahmad Zia where crews were still strugYaftali Yaftali was gling to remove ice. being removed from his post as Heathrow Airport officials part of the inquiry. Three offisaid hundreds of flights would cials from the country’s top depart Wednesday, but the flight medical facility, Dawood schedule was still significantly National Military Hospital in reduced as extra crews tried to Kabul, have been fired, he said. remove ice buildup and clear It’s unclear just how much the airfield of snow. has gone missing of the $42 milHeathrow reopened its seclion worth of medical goods the ond runway late Tuesday but U.S. has donated this year and travelers were still warned to whether any Afghan soldiers check online updates before have died as a result. going to the airport. U.S. officials said they do not Germany’s Frankfurt airport account for the supplies after said schedules were slowly delivering them to the Afghans. returning to normal after several days of widespread delays Iraqis fear yule attacks caused by winter weather. KIRKUK, Iraq — No decora- About 70 flights were canceled tions, no midnight Mass. Even Wednesday out of a daily total an appearance by Santa Claus of about 1,300. has been nixed after Iraq’s The Associated Press

The Associated Press

President Barack Obama gestures during a news conference in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday.

Obama toasts ‘season of progress’ after wins Revels in victories for tax cuts, civil justice, national security The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Buoyant in political victory, President Barack Obama on Wednesday wrapped up a long, rough year in Washington by rejoicing in a rare, bipartisan “season of progress” over tax cuts, national security and civil justice. Halfway through his term, he served notice to his skeptics: “I am persistent.” Obama spoke on the same day that he found enough allies in both parties to get Senate ratification of a nuclear arms treaty with Russia, a vote watched around the world as a test of international security and presidential clout. He also signed landmark legislation to allow gays to serve openly in the military, calling himself overwhelmed by the enormity of the moment. And that was on top of other achievements, including a hardfought deal to extend tax cuts and unemployment insurance even as it piled on more debt, a broad food security bill, a trade deal with South Korea and declarations of progress in the widening war

in Afghanistan. “If there’s any lesson to draw from these past few weeks, it’s that we are not doomed to endless gridlock,” Obama said. “We’ve shown in the wake of the November elections that we have the capacity not only to make progress, but to make progress together.” That spirit may be fleeting. Obama was able to get the votes he needed in a lame-duck session in which his party still controlled the House and Senate, retiring or ousted members could act knowing they would no longer face voters, and the potential of a politically devastating tax hike Jan. 1 forced lawmakers into action. None of those factors will be in play come January when Republicans take control of the House and have a greater voice in the Senate as well. To a nation long tired of political gamesmanship, Obama used the moment to try to put himself above it — and to challenge both parties to join him. He said voters wanted this “sea-

son of progress,” promising to stick with that mission and hoping “my Democratic and Republican friends will do the same.” He also did not get all he wanted, losing some fights and swallowing a two-year extension of tax cuts for wealthier people as part of the tax deal. Obama underscored his agenda ahead, much of it amounting to unfinished promises: deficit reduction, energy innovation, immigration reform, the closing of the Guantanamo Bay prison, education and research investments, and the biggest item of all: finding ways to create more jobs for millions of hurting Americans. In the course of questioning, Obama revealed that his position on gay marriage is “constantly evolving.” The president said civil unions are his baseline — at this point, as he put it. The slow progress on the economy continues to pull down the spirits of the country and threaten to overshadow many of Obama’s other successes. Obama sought to broaden the burden of responsibility to Republicans for a faster economic rebound, saying “people are going to be paying attention to what they’re doing as well as what I’m doing.”

Re-enlistment urged after Obama inks ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ repeal By Pauline Jelinek The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama signed a new law Wednesday that will allow gays for the first time in history to serve openly in America’s military. And he urged those kicked out under the old law to re-enlist. The new law ends a policy that forced gays to hide their sexual orientation or face dismissal. More than 13,500 people were discharged under the rule since 1993. “I hope those . . . who’ve been discharged under this discriminatory policy will seek to re-enlist once the repeal is implemented,” Obama said. The question of reinstating those previously discharged was addressed in a months-long study done by the Pentagon earlier this

Quick Read

year on how the armed forces might go about implementing a repeal of don’t ask don’t tell. The study recommended that the Department of Defense issue guidance to all the service branches permitting those previously separated on the basis of homosexual conduct “to be considered for reentry, assuming they qualify in all other respects.” It said the fact that they were kicked out for gay conduct should not be held against them but added that if they received an “other than honorable” discharge for accompanying reasons, those reason should be considered. “No longer will tens of thousands of Americans in uniform be asked to live a lie, or look over their shoulder in order to serve the country that they love,” Obama said. As military leadership and advo-

cacy groups have warned in recent days, Obama also noted that the repeal will not immediately go into effect until the government goes through additional steps to roll back the old policy. Former Air Force flight nurse Maj. Margaret Witt of Spokane and retired nurse Army Col. Grethe Cammermeyer of Whidbey Island were at the signing ceremony. Cammermeyer sued for reinstatement in 1992 after being drummed out for being a lesbian. She and Witt won reinstatement after courts found their dismissals unconstitutional. In September, a federal judge in Tacoma found that Witt’s dismissal was unconstitutional because it advanced no legitimate military interest. She expects to rejoin the Air Force Reserve early next year.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Death sentence recommended for father, son

Nation: Governor gives last ‘dog and pony show’

Nation: Man comes clean; returns book after 76 years

Nation: Show must go on for ‘Spider-Man’ performers

A JURY WEDNESDAY recommended that a father and his son be sentenced to death for planting a homemade bomb that exploded inside an Oregon bank two years ago, killing two police officers and maiming a third. In a Salem, Ore., trial that spanned three months, prosecutors portrayed Bruce and Joshua Turnidge as bigoted men who hated authorities, were desperate for money and feared that newly elected President Barack Obama would take away their guns. “It’s all in God’s hands. We don’t know what’s going to happen eventually,” said Janet Turnidge, who is Bruce’s wife and Joshua’s mother.

SOMETIMES DERIDED FOR his “dog and pony show” press conferences, outgoing Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas used his last one to trot out the real thing. The Republican governor, who leaves office next month after eight years, appeared at his weekly press conference Wednesday in Montpelier with a miniature horse and a Labrador retriever, in a lighthearted jab at his image. The press corps poked some fun, too, giving him a yellow Walmart greeter T-shirt and a set of scissors to kid him about his penchant for ribboncuttings and other ceremonial events.

MARK MCKEE IS lucky a Michigan library isn’t charging him a late fee. In 1934, 13-year-old McKee checked out A Dog of Flanders from the Mount Clemens Public Library in Michigan. Recently, McKee, now 89, said he discovered the book and mailed it to the library. McKee said he found the book among his possessions and wanted to do the right thing. “My conscience took over,” wrote McKee, a winter resident in Chandler, Ariz. Luckily, there won’t be a fine, the library’s director said.

PRODUCERS OF “SPIDER-MAN: Turn Off the Dark” said the show will resume today after canceling Wednesday’s sold-out show to put new safety procedures in place. The state Labor Department said it is satisfied that producers of Broadway’s troubled musical had made the adjustments to prevent a repeat of this week’s serious injury of a stunt double in a fall. Labor officials worked at the Foxwoods Theater on Wednesday with producers at the show, saying that a second person will be required for safety. There are 38 separate moves where actors are put in harnesses to go up in the air.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula gets salmon recovery grants Peninsula Daily News

North Olympic Peninsula agencies have received a total of $2,407,258 in state grants awarded by the state Salmon Recovery Funding Board from federal money. The grants are part of $20.7 million given to agencies throughout the state to fix damaged rivers and streams, replace failing culverts and replant riverbanks with the goal of helping recover salmon from the brink of extinction, the state Salmon Recovery Funding Board said Monday. Clallam County agencies have received $1,074,347. Jefferson County organizations have received $1,332,911. Jefferson County also will share an award with Mason County. The Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group will use $126,745 to remove invasive knotweed from five river systems: the Union, Tahuya, Dewatto and the Big and Little Quilcene rivers. The Hood Canal group will con-

tribute $110,880 from a federal grant and donations of equipment, labor and materials. The grant awards are funded by the federal Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund. The funding was approved by Congress earlier this year. The awards announced Monday are in addition to awards that the Salmon Recovery Board reported in October. Those grants — in which $696,459 went to three Peninsula projects — were funded by the Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration Fund. Then, Clallam County received $599,459 for two projects, on the Dungeness and Pysht rivers, while Jefferson County was given $97,000 for a Dosewallips River project. This week’s awards are to projects developed by local watershed groups to develop projects based on regional recovery plans, which are approved by the federal government.

Individual projects are reviewed by regional salmon recovery organizations and the state’s technical review panel before awards are made. “This local, state and federal partnership has made Washington a national model in salmon recovery,” said Steve Tharinger, chairman of the Salmon Recovery Funding Board. Grant awards are listed by county.

Clallam County ■  Jamestown S’Klallam tribe: $50,000. The Jamestown S’Klallam tribe will use this grant to build logjams in McDonald Creek to increase salmon habitat. The project is the second phase of a plan to return habitat to the creek. The tribe will contribute $13,277 in donations of labor and materials, while the state Department of Natural Resources is donating wood. ■  Lower Elwha Klallam tribe: $578,048. The Lower Elwha Klal-

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Receiving

a smile

Kierra Brandt with the Forks area Brownies Troop 42116 presents a gift to Pete Cassell at the Forks Long Term Care Center on Wednesday. Five of the Brownies gave decorated paper star gifts to residents of the center. Smiles were many as the Christmas gifts were given and accepted.

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lam tribe will use this grant to place logjams in the Elwha River. Removal of two hydroelectric dams is set to begin in 2011, and this project is an extension of the tribe’s efforts to restore the floodplain of the lower Elwha before the dams are removed. This project will extend restoration activities to a previously untreated portion of the river. The tribe will contribute $173,209 from federal and state grants and donations of labor and materials. ■  North Olympic Land Trust: $213,799. The North Olympic Land Trust will use this grant to buy and conserve 0.8 miles on the Pysht River and 0.5 miles of tributaries to permanently protect the river’s floodplain and channel migration area. The land trust will buy about 37 acres and protect another 57 acres using a voluntary land preservation agreement that will prevent development. This is the second phase of a multiphase, multiyear vision to protect up to 10 river miles reaching from the Pysht River’s estuary, which is protected by a Cascade Land Conservancy easement. The land trust recently purchased 22 acres of nearby Pysht River floodplain using a $417,459 grant. The land trust will contribute $277,331 in a state grant and donated property interest from the sellers. ■  Pacific Coast Salmon Coalition: $70,000. The Pacific Coast Salmon Coalition will use the money to complete a preliminary design for a project to upgrade a concrete fishway in Mill Creek, a tributary of the Bogachiel River near Forks, and a culvert crossing under Russell Road. The edges of the concrete fishway are being undercut, and two culverts are likely to

fail soon. ■  Pacific Coast Salmon Coalition: $162,500. The Pacific Coast Salmon Coalition will replace a culvert on Camp Creek, a tributary to the Sol Duc River, with a 70-foot-long bridge. The work will open nearly 1.5 miles of spawning and rearing habitat for coho, Chinook and steelhead trout. The coalition will contribute $87,500.

Jefferson County

■  Pacific Coast Salmon Coalition: $300,055. The grant will fund replacement of three undersized culverts on Donkey Creek. The culverts are under Clearwater Road, south of Quinault Ridge Road, and now block fish passage on Donkey Creek. The coalition will contribute $113,987 in cash, donated labor and another grant. ■  State Parks and Recreation Commission: $390,000. The commission will buy 129 acres along the south side of the Dosewallips River, another phase in extending a protected corridor for about five miles from Dosewallips State Park at the mouth of the river to Olympic National Forest. State parks will contribute $351,225 in donated labor and a state grant. ■  Wild Fish Conservancy: $302,699. The Wild Fish Conservancy will place logjams in the middle Dosewallips River in Olympic National Forest. The conservancy will contribute $97,000 from federal funding through the Pacific Salmon Treaty. In October, the Wild Fish Conservancy was granted $97,000 to place logjams in the middle and upper reaches of the Dosewallips River in the national forest. Information about the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and the Recreation and Conservation Office is available online at www.rco. wa.gov.

■  Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group: $35,000 This grant will go toward planning for conserving the Big Quilcene Estuary The salmon group hopes to buy 20 acres of land along the lower Big Quilcene River, below Linger Longer Road and within the estuary, and restore it for improved salmon habitat. ■  Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group: $35,820 This grant will fund the placement of logjams in the Little Quilcene River between Center Road and U.S. Highway 101 to improve salmon habitat. The group will contribute $30,785 from the state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Landowner Incentive Program. ■  North Olympic Salmon Coalition: $199,295. The funding will pay for designing projects to improve the salt marsh habitat in Snow Creek on land owned by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Jefferson Land Trust. The coalition will contribute $24,925 from a federal grant. ■  North Olympic Salmon Coalition: $70,042. The money will fund planting the shorelines of Salmon and Snow creeks. The coalition will contribute $14,000 in staff labor, a PORT TOWNSEND — A federal grant and donated pain management clinic that equipment. was the subject of a search warrant from the state Attorney General’s Office was open and treating patients Wednesday. On Tuesday morning, search warrants were executed at the Olympic Pain and Addiction Services at 1334 Lawrence St., which is owned and operated by Dr. James Kimber Rotchford, and at the doctor’s home. The Port Townsend Police Department and OPNET spokesmen said that both agencies were among those that assisted the Attorney General’s Office in the execution of the warrants. Assistant Attorney General Aileen Miller would not provide information about the warrants, which she said are sealed for 90 days. She said her department was concerned with Medicaid fraud. No arrests have been made. Port Townsend Police Sgt. Ed Green said Tuesday that nothing was found during the search of the doctor’s home. On Wednesday, Chief Criminal Deputy Ron Cameron, OPNET spokesman, said that the agency “has no investigative stake in this case whatsoever.” Rotchford did not respond to requests for comment Wednesday. In 2009, Rotchford was honored with a Jefferson County Heart of Service Award for his work treating patients at the JC MASH free medical clinic in Port Townsend. Rotchford was a primary motivating force in founding JC MASH in August 1994.

Briefly . . .

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Clinic reopens after search by drug agents

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PORT ANGELES — A 52-year-old man who accidentally shot himself while arguing with his girlfriend in August will spend six months in jail for seconddegree assault. Joseph P. Ciochon of Port Angeles was sentenced Wednesday in Clallam County Superior Court. He pleaded guilty to the charge Dec. 16. Police said that Ciochon assaulted his girlfriend by threatening her with what he claimed was a pipe bomb and a .44-caliber handgun. During an argument, the gun fired, and a bullet hit Ciochon in his right leg, police said. Peninsula Daily News


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Bald eagle undergoes surgery to clean wound SEQUIM — A juvenile bald eagle that was shot in the left wing last week underwent surgery Wednesday to treat the wound. “The veterinarians at Greywolf Veterinary Hospital have successfully cleaned and treated the wound,” said Matthew Randazzo, spokesman for the Northwest Raptor & Wildlife Center of Sequim. “No bullet fragments were recovered. “Due to a bad reaction to anesthesia earlier in the week, the eagle was not entirely ‘put under’ during this operation. “It was painful, but he is a fighter and is doing well.” The young bird, which was born in the summer, remained in stable condition in intensive care.

“We’re optimistic but won’t know more for a few days while we wait to see if the fractured ulna bone in the left wing can begin to heal itself,” Randazzo said. If veterinarians determine that the wing won’t heal naturally, then they may perform surgery on the wing to help close the gap in the bone, Randazzo has said. “This will be a long process, and it may be months before we know for sure if he will ever fly in the wild again.” Because the bird is a juvenile, its coloring is brown. It hasn’t yet developed the trademark white feathers of adult bald eagles. Both the Raptor Center and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife are seeking tips on who shot the bird in a field near Beaver on Dec. 15. “Tips are continuing to

come in, and the investigation is ongoing,” Randazzo said. “No one has been arrested yet, but we are very optimistic about the eventual outcome.” Bald eagles are protected under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, according to U.S. Fish and Wildlife. A first-offense violation of the act can result in a fine of $100,000, imprisonment for one year or both. Penalties increase for additional offenses, and a second violation of the act is a felony. Tips may be reported to the center by e-mailing Randazzo at Matthew@ NWRaptorCenter.com and by phoning state Fish and Wildlife at 877-933-9847. For more information on the Raptor Center, visit www. facebook.com/northwest raptorcenter.

Free community meals to be served on Christmas Eve, Day Peninsula Daily News

Free Christmas meals are scheduled Friday and Saturday on the North Olympic Peninsula. The Salvation Army in Port Angeles is hosting a Christmas dinner at noon Christmas Eve. The meal will be at 206 S. Peabody St. Capt. Kathleen Johnson said she expects about 175 people. For more information, phone 360-452-7679 or stop by the Salvation Army office. Also Friday, Hardy’s Market, 10200 Old Olympic Highway, will hold a free Christmas Eve meal. “We will start serving at 11 a.m. until we run out of food,” owner Randy DuPont said. “This is to thank all our customers for supporting our store, and everyone is welcome.” For more information, phone 360-582-0240.

Christmas Day feast

ment and Assisted Living Community, 1201 Hancock St., Port Townsend, plans a Christmas Eve service at 2:30 p.m. and a service Christmas Day at 1:30 p.m., when families will talk about their holiday memories. For more information about events at Seaport Landing, which welcomes visitors of all ages, phone 360-379-9376.

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On Saturday, a free Christmas Day feast will be served at the Tri-Area Community Center in Chimacum. The dinner will be from noon to 3 p.m. at 10 West Valley Road.

It is co-sponsored by Olympic Community Action Programs and the St. Vincent de Paul Society; it is open to anyone who wants to share a traditional meal with their neighbors. About 300 people are expected to be served, including meal deliveries. For more information, phone 360-385-2571, ext. 6357. Seaport Landing Retire-

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Peninsula Daily News


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, December 23, 2010 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Nativity: Shows what ‘Christmas is about’ Continued from A1 “I wanted to collect something meaningful,� she said. “I wanted it to be something that would show what I think Christmas is about.� Some of the creches are tiny — one set in a music box is not much bigger than Roedell’s palm, with miniscule figurines glued into place. “I don’t know how they make those people so tiny,� she said. Others figures are larger — nearly a foot tall — and are carved from wood, sewn in fabric and cast in metal. One of her oldest pieces is a creche with the traditional feel of sweeping robes and adoring angels. “That one was my mother’s — one of my oldest ones,� she said. Although she can’t remember the first one she collected, nearly every Nativity scene has a story, a person and a meaning behind it. “This one,� she said, pointing at a fabric set, “a friend of mine who loves to go to flea markets got — she has found a lot of them.� Others are the result of travel. A Faberge egg from France reminds her of a European adventure. A carved wooden creche invokes memories of Thailand. An all-white set is a gift from her son when he was in Switzerland.

This Nativity set was painted by Roedell and her daughter, Cindy Turner. Some of the creches are traditional, with Mary gazing lovingly at the baby Jesus, Joseph at her side. Others are more unconventional — banana plant sticks acting as the family, painted blue birds dressed up for a pageant, dogs playing the parts in the Nativity, even flower pots shaped to look like the characters. “Some of them are from missionary families who bring them back to sell to make money, and some are representative of different parts of the world,� Roedell said. Every year, Roedell carefully unwraps each one from the paper and boxes where they are stored and cleans off all available space

to set them up. A set of star-shaped plates are displayed in the china cabinet, surrounded by other figurines. Shadow box frames from the office, which normally are home to horse figurines, are brought downstairs for smaller sets. Window sills, the mantel of the fireplace and an art nook in the corner of her hallway all act as homes to the holy family. Once the home is in full holiday decor, she opens it to friends, family and even some strangers to take a look at her collection. This year, her open house was held Sunday, attracting a party-like atmosphere for the collection.

Chris Tucker (2)/Peninsula Daily News

This Nativity set is made from banana husks and came from Africa. The set is one of hundreds owned by Port Angeles resident Sandy Roedell. “I thought, ‘Why on earth should this just be for me?’� Roedell said. “I wanted other people to enjoy it as well.� Although she’s spent nearly four decades collecting the trinkets, she plans

to slow down. “Of course, if I get them as gifts, I will be happy,� she said. “And if I see a really, really special one, I’ll probably get one. “But it is a lot of work to

do this every year, and I’m thinking it is time to start scaling back.�

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Pool: Most who testified opposed the project Continued from A1 Whether this protection exists is open to legal interpretation, a matter that is being explored by port attorney Carolyn Lake. If it is determined that the (6)(f) rule does not apply, the aquatic center could go ahead, port Commissioner Leif Erickson said. “There may be a rider in the grant that states the land must be preserved in perpetuity.� Erickson said. “If that is true, so be it.�

A full environmental impact statement — or EIS — will be conducted if it is decided that the project can move ahead, said Karen Nelson, Make Waves! president. “We are not going to spend the money for an EIS if the project isn’t going to move ahead,� she said. At Wednesday’s meeting, John Collins, commission president, moved to renew the letter of intent, with Commissioner Dave Thompson seconding it.

Erickson, saying he favors both nature preserves and economic development, supported the extension. “Before the project proceeds, there are pages of procedures we will have to go through,� he said. “I am in favor of extending the agreement because at this point, I think we should be opening doors rather than closing them.� During a public comment period, most who testified opposed the project.

Student: Enrollment up Continued from A1 increase in the next two years. Even though it is too late “I think that the increase in financial aid applications to apply for financial aid for is a sign of how our economy the winter quarter, which is,� she said. begins in January, prospec“Yes, enrollment is up, tive students for the fall but financial aid applica- quarter can find out more tions are up even higher information at the College than enrollment.� Goal Sunday on Jan. 30. Coupled with economic The event, which will factors, students also face begin at 2 p.m. in the Scihigher tuition rates, with an increase of 14 percent in ence and Technology Buildtuition over the past two ing, will have information about the Free Application years. Gov. Chris Gregoire’s for Federal Student Aid. The application — compreliminary budget also suggested a 10 percent monly known as the FAFSA

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Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Death Notices Aurea Marie Schmitt Jan. 24, 1918 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dec. 22, 2010

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Aurea Marie Schmitt died peacefully in her Joyce home at 92. Her obituary and service information will be published later. Linde Family Funeral Service, Sequim, is in charge of arrangements.

Remembering a Lifetime

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â&#x2013; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceasedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, either in the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obituary Forms.â&#x20AC;? â&#x2013; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsula dailynews.com under â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obituary Forms.â&#x20AC;? For further information, call 360-417-3528.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would urge you to not to extend the letter of intent,â&#x20AC;? Richard Jahnke said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since it was signed a year ago, it has become clear that the status of the park and the regulations governing its development have been obscured by inadequate briefing materials and misinformation.â&#x20AC;? Port Townsend attorney Paul Richmond said there were unused facilities around the city that could be used to house a pool. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to look at the resources weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got,â&#x20AC;? he said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The whole history of Port Townsend is that we have these elaborate schemes, we build these elaborate structures, and we go bust. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are so many basic services we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have now, and to put this much money into a rec center that might go unused is obscene.â&#x20AC;? Nelson said the ratio of comments did not reflect community support. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had several community leaders testify at the last meeting because we did not want to take up the portâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time unnecessarily,â&#x20AC;? she said.

Nelson said the need for a new pool was considerable. She added that no public funds would be used to build it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The pool we have now will not last forever,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it goes away, there will be no place where the children and the senior citizens in Jefferson County can swim.â&#x20AC;?

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Death and Memorial Notice Margaret Clark Loucks September 26, 1920 December 15, 2010 Margaret Doreen Clark was born in 1920 in Shelton, Washington, to Jesse and Gladys (Burnett) Clark. Her death at home in Port Angeles came just three months after her husband, Jasper, died. Margaretâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early years were spent along Hood Canal, living in logging camps where her father worked. She attended schools during the Great Depression in Lilliwaup, Uncas (Discovery Bay) and Port Ludlow, and graduated from Shelton High School in 1938. After high school, she worked as a nanny and housekeeper in order to earn the $30 tuition needed to attend nursing school at Port Angeles General Hospital. The late Dr. J.J. Fairshter was one of her instructors, and Margaret graduated with her Registered Nurse degree in 1942. Mutual friends at Independent Bible Church introduced Margaret to Jasper. Two years later, they were married in Shelton, Washington, on July 3, 1942. She worked at Harborview Hospital while Jasper was stationed in Seattle with the Coast Guard, then at hospitals in San Francisco and New Orleans as Jasper was transferred to different Coast Guard schools. When he deployed to the South Pacific, she returned to Seattle and worked at Harborview until Jasperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s return. After the war, Jasper

Mrs. Loucks used his GI benefits to put a down payment on their first house in Port Angeles. The next 10 years brought them six children, and Margaret was content to be a homemaker. They built a new home in 1953, and the large garden and beautiful flower beds became their pride and joy. Margaret was a deaconess at Independent Bible Church and graciously entertained visiting missionaries and church speakers. She enjoyed baking, gardening, sewing, knitting, quilting, photography and genealogy studies of both the Clark and Loucks families. In her final 20 years, she completed quilts her mother had started, and made new quilts for all the grandchildren and greatgrandchildren, with four to spare for babies not yet born. Hiking and fishing with Dad were important, and her favorite spot in the Olympic Mountains was the High Divide. Our mother was a gracious lady who never spoke a bad word about anyone and who loved

each member of the family unconditionally. She faced her last years of discomfort with grace, acceptance, and never a complaint. We will greatly miss her quiet strength. Her life verse was Proverbs 3:5-6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make your paths straight.â&#x20AC;? Margaret is survived by her six children, Bryon (Donna) Loucks, Linda Eaton, Judy (Paul) Gruver, Jon Loucks, Jay Loucks and Nancy (Greg) Uvila; and her 15 grandchildren and 15 greatgrandchildren. She is also survived by a sister, Evalyn (Byron) Deffinbaugh, and brothers, Donald (Jean) Clark and Richard (Kathy) Clark. Margaret was preceded in death by her husband; her young brother, Jesse John Clark; sister, Betty Clark Townsend; son-in-law, David Eaton; and two great-grandsons. The family wishes to thank Pastor Mike Jones, Pastor Anthony Sachor, Dr. William Kintner and staff, caregivers, Hospice, and large number of friends who helped care for Margaret in her home. There will be a graveside service in the spring. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. The family asks that memorials be sent to Independent Bible Church Missions, 112 North Lincoln Street, Port Angeles, WA, 98362, or to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 23, 2010

Commentary

Page

A7

‘Greatest story’ well worth rereading Suppose what some call the “Christmas story” is true — all of it, from the angels, to the shepherds, to the virgin birth, to God taking on human flesh. By this, I don’t mean to Cal suggest it is true only for Thomas those who believe it to be true, but what if it is objectively true, no matter what the deniers say? What difference would it make? Should it make any difference? The narrative and the quotations written by the physician named Luke and by John, the closest disciple of Jesus of Nazareth, are unique and exclusive. The genealogical line of Jesus compiled by Matthew the tax collector is impressive

and compelling. The words spoken by Jesus and recorded by these men are phenomenal. They expose the inner darkness of Man, offering a roadmap out, while also revealing the light of God, offering directions into His presence. The information provided by witnesses to these events are either true, or not. The claims leave no room for middle ground, despite what some “theologians” claim. If they are not true, one must conclude “the greatest story ever told” was the result of the greatest conspiracy in history from which not a single “conspirator” later recanted. The One who spoke such heartwarming words, as C.S. Lewis has noted, was either a liar, a fool, or he told the truth. There are no other options. The “conspiracy” would have to have stretched over thousands of years, from the time of the prophets to the modern era when

millions continue to claim their lives have been transformed by this carpenter with no formal training, no college degree and no influence with the reigning religious and secular authorities of his day. Among other things skeptics have to contend with is why would so many people claim the story is true, including what would occur at the end of Jesus’ life on Earth, when they had nothing to gain in this life by promoting a lie? In fact, they invited persecution from the religious authorities, along with imprisonment and death from the Roman rulers, who treated any perceived or actual challenge to Caesar as a capital offense. Of course the story is fantastic. But who would want to follow a God that can be defined and understood by human logic? Such a God would not be worth knowing because he would be created in our image.

Peninsula Voices

I suspect even those who don’t believe the story secretly wish it were true. Who, or what else, offers the hope, cleansing and purpose for this life — as well as eternal life — like that presented by this child-man-God? In an age when love means lust and is too often conditional, this story offers a love that is personal, redemptive and unconditional. Christmas is the great story of God becoming human in order that humans might dwell with him. It is about the helper helping those who cannot help themselves no matter how hard they try. It is a gift better than anything the fictional Santa Claus could give. And it is a gift that keeps on giving into eternity, never losing its value, unlike stock portfolios. Come on, what have you got to lose — only everything — by considering this greatest of all stories? Maybe you believed the story

Our readers’ letters, faxes

as a child, but with maturity came skepticism and later unbelief. Try reading it again as an adult. It truly is the ultimate gift and it has your (and my) name on it. It fits all who try it on and has the additional benefit of having been paid for by someone else. This gift never wears out. Once accepted, it so satisfies that people rarely return it. For what could it be exchanged? Can anyone name a better gift that has produced more positive and welcome results around the world for more than 2,000 years?

________

Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and e-mail

Religious war

for him, but to stand on Regarding two letters in truth. Muhammad, however, Peninsula Voices, “Days of was a political leader, Infamy” [Dec. 12], and taught that Allah told him “Long Lists” (Dec. 17), this to kill anyone who wouldn’t particular discussion is fas- join him (or pay him and cinating to me. submit to his authority) There is so much to talk and endorsed lying deceit about, (although I am and any other means necbeginning to wonder how essary to further the much time we have left to spread of Islam. do the talking). This is why this particuThere are many people lar “religious war” has who call themselves “Chris- implications for all of us, tian” or “Muslim” or “Cath- religious and nonreligious olic,” etc., who are not true alike. followers of their leaders. Mark A. Gabriel, Ph.D, Since this particular summarizes it this way in discussion is about Chrishis book, Islam and the tians and Muslims, I would Jews: The Unfinished Battle: really encourage all who “Christians cannot jusare interested to read the tify fighting and killing in “manuals” of both groups the name of God by their (the New Testament for Bible or by the example of Christians; the Quran and Jesus. Hadith for Muslims). “Any time Christians do Three most important these sorts of things, they differences I see are that are going against their Jesus Christ came as a faith. On the other hand, spiritual teacher, taught Muslims can justify fighting that he is God and truly and killing in the name of loves us and that we are Allah by the Quran and by the example of Muhammad. not to take up the sword

“When Muslims do these sorts of things, they are being good followers of their faith.” As the writer of the Dec. 12 “Days of Infamy” letter said, “If you don’t believe me, read . . . ” Barbra Camper, Port Angeles

Online gift ideas

“gifts” that may be accessed for free on the Internet If you are thinking from home or at the Port about what to get your Angeles public library with child (or grandchild) as a a headset for audio: gift during this holiday ■ Khan Academy — season, consider one that The academy is used by would help them with their Bill Gates, his children and education. students from all around Here are three suggested the world.

It is a website that provides tutoring in mathematics (from arithmetic to differential equations), biology, chemistry, physics, etc. It has more than 100 videos that explain the solutions to the entire set of questions on the SAT mathematics test. Consider making an online donation to help support the website, www. khanacademy.org. ■ Brightstorm: This website provides online homework help videos in mathematics (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, trigonometry, pre-calculus, calculus), chemistry, biology and physics. It also has a free PSAT prep section. Its website is www.brightstorm.com. ■ LiveMocha — This is a website for learning a foreign language.This is an essential skill that is vital in the global environment we live in today. It’s at www.livemocha. com. Michael McCarty, Port Angeles

Obama’s yule gift to Internet giants One of President Barack Obama’s signature campaign promises was to protect the freedom of the Internet. He said, in November Amy 2007: “I will Goodman take a back seat to no one in my commitment to network neutrality, because once providers start to privilege some applications or websites over others, then the smaller voices get squeezed out and we all lose.” Jump ahead to December 2010, where Obama is clearly in the back seat, being driven by Internet giants like AT&T, Verizon and Comcast. With him is his appointed chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Julius Genachowski, his Harvard Law School classmate and basketball pal who just pushed through a rule on network neutrality that Internet activists consider disastrous. Free Press Managing Director Craig Aaron told me:

“This proposal appears to be riddled with loopholes that would open the door to all kinds of future abuses, allowing companies like AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, the big Internet service providers, to decide which websites are going to work, which aren’t and which are going to be able to get special treatment.” For the comedian-turned-senator, Al Franken, D-Minn., the new rules on Net neutrality are no joke. “Verizon could prevent you from accessing Google Maps on your phone, forcing you to use their own mapping program, Verizon Navigator, even if it costs money to use and isn’t nearly as good,” he said. “Or a mobile provider with a political agenda could prevent you from downloading an app that connects you with the Obama campaign (or, for that matter, a tea party group in your area).” AT&T is one of the conglomerates that activists say practically wrote the FCC rules that Genachowski pushed through. We’ve seen this flip-flop before. Weeks before his 2007 Net neutrality pledge, then-Sen. Obama took on AT&T, which was exposed for engaging in warrant-

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less wiretapping of U.S. citizens at the request of the Bush administration. AT&T wanted retroactive immunity from prosecution. Obama campaign spokesman Bill Burton told Talking Points Memo: “To be clear: Barack will support a filibuster of any bill that includes retroactive immunity for telecommunications companies.” But by July 2008, a month before the Democratic National Convention, with Obama the presumptive presidential nominee, he not only didn’t filibuster, but voted for a bill that granted telecoms retroactive immunity from prosecution. AT&T had gotten its way, and showed its appreciation quickly. The official tote bag issued to every DNC delegate was emblazoned with a large AT&T logo. AT&T threw an opening-night bash for delegates that was closed to the press, celebrating the Democratic Party for its getout-of-jail-free card. AT&T, Verizon, cable giant Comcast and other corporations have expressed support for the new FCC rule. Genachowski’s Democratic

Party allies on the commission, Michael Copps and Mignon Clyburn (the daughter of House Majority Whip James Clyburn), according to Aaron, “tried to improve these rules, but the chairman refused to budge, apparently because he had already reached an agreement with AT&T and the cable lobbyists about how far these rules were going to go.” Clyburn noted that the rules could allow mobile Internet providers to discriminate, and that poor communities — particularly African-American and Latino — rely on mobile Internet services more than wired connections. Aaron laments the power of the telecom and cable industry lobbyists in Washington, D.C.: “In recent years, they’ve deployed 500 lobbyists, basically one for every member of Congress, and that’s just what they report. “AT&T is the biggest campaign giver in the history of campaign giving, as long as we have been tracking it. “So they have really entrenched themselves. “And Comcast, Verizon, the other big companies, are not far behind.” Aaron added:

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

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“When AT&T wants to get together all of their lobbyists, there’s no room big enough. They had to rent out a movie theater. “People from the public interest who are fighting for the free and open Internet here in D.C. can still share a cab.” Campaign money is now more than ever the lifeblood of U.S. politicians, and you can be sure that Obama and his advisers are looking to the 2012 election, which will likely be the costliest in U.S. history. Vigorous and innovative use of the Internet and mobile technologies is credited with helping Obama secure his victory in 2008. As the open Internet becomes increasingly stifled in the U.S., and the corporations that control the Internet become more powerful, we may not see such democratic participation for much longer.

________

Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. E-mail her at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Thurston biomass project postponed The Olympian

OLYMPIA — The Thurston County commissioners approved an emergency ordinance Tuesday calling for a one-year moratorium on new wood-waste-toenergy projects in Thurston County. Meanwhile, engineers at Olympic Region Clean Air Agency have recommended approval of a permit that governs air pollution from the Adage wood wasteburning power plant in Mason County near Shelton. The two separate actions were the latest in a continuing debate over the merits of generating energy from wood debris. The Thurston County action, combined with state budget woes, could spell trouble for a $14 million proposed project to use wood waste instead of natural gas to heat The Evergreen State College’s campus. The commissioners invoked the moratorium in response to citizen concerns about plans for as many as five biomass projects on the Olympic Peninsula, including the Evergreen project. The moratorium gives the commissioners time to learn more about emerging biomass issues such as air emissions from wood-burning and gasification plants, fuel supply and how bio-

June 2011, Commerce official Bill Cole said. And the $3 million in capital budget funds for the project is not included in Gov. Chris Gregoire’s 20112013 state budget proposal.

2 Peninsula projects planned a legal brief explaining the findings of fact in its Dec. 6 decision to Two biomass projects are uphold the Planning Commission’s planned on the North Olympic approval of the shoreline developPeninsula. ment permit. Nippon Paper Industries USA’s The special meeting will be at mill in Port Angeles plans to spend 5 p.m. in council chambers at 321 $71 million to replace its present E. Fifth St. biomass burner with a newer The groups also plan to appeal model with additional pollution the project’s environmental impact controls, while Port Townsend statement to the state Pollution Paper Corp. plans a $55 million Control Hearings Board in the project to upgrade its biomass spring. burner. Five of those environmental The Nippon project would create groups have appealed a permit 20 megawatts of electricity, while issued by the state Department of the Port Townsend facility would Ecology for the Port Townsend projgenerate about 20 megawatts. ect. Both have opposition. That appeal was filed with the Seven environmental groups state Pollution Control Hearings lost an appeal of a city shoreline development permit for the Nippon Board in November. A hearing date is tentatively set plant. The Port Angeles City Council for early June, said Gretchen on Tuesday will consider adopting Brewer of Port Townsend AirPeninsula Daily News

mass plants would fit into the county land-use code, county Administrator Don Krupp said. The commissioners’ ordinance caught Evergreen college officials off-guard. “We haven’t had time to truly understand what the moratorium means for our project,” said college spokesman Jason Wettstein.

The college expects to decide by mid-March whether to proceed with the project, college relations Director Todd Sprague said. The goal of the project is to reduce the college’s carbon footprint by reducing reliance on fossil fuels to power the campus steam boilers.

Watchers, one of the groups. “We’re heartened that Thurston County commissioners recognize the environmental cost of these biomass incinerators and, rather than rushing into things, have chosen to step and take these costs into account,” Brewer said Wednesday. The seven environmental groups protesting the Nippon biomass project are Port Townsend AirWatchers, the Olympic Forest Coalition, the Olympic Environmental Council, No Biomass Burn of Seattle, the Center for Environmental Law and Policy of Spokane, the World Temperate Rainforest Network and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club. All but the Center for Environmental Law and Policy of Spokane and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club are protesting the Port Townsend project.

The project has come under fire from residents who claim it isn’t sustainable, a green-energy project or cost-effective. A public hearing on the Thurston County biomass project moratorium is set for 5:30 p.m. Feb. 7 in Building 1, Room 152 in the Thurston County Courthouse, 2000 Lakeridge

Shelton project

Drive S.W., Olympia. Proposed financing for the project includes a $3.7 million grant from the state Department of Commerce and $3 million in state capital budget funds. However, applicants of the Commerce grants are supposed to be under contract by the end of this state budget biennium, which is

The Olympic Regional Clean Air Agency staff recommendation Tuesday clears the way for a 40-day public-comment period on the permit for a controversial $250 million biomass power plant near Shelton. The Adage project would burn more than 600,000 tons of forest wood debris a year to generate enough electricity to power about 40,000 homes. The public can submit comments to the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency on the proposed Adage operating permit by using the electronic comment form at www.orcaa.org or by mailing them to ORCAA, 2940-B Limited Lane N.W., Olympia, WA 98502. Public hearings on the Adage permit are set for 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. Jan. 31 at the Shelton Civic Center, 525 W. Cota St. Copies of the ORCAA staff recommendation are at www.orcaa.org; the Shelton branch of the Timberland Regional Library, 710 W. Alder St., Shelton; and the ORCAA office in Olympia.

Two injured in wreck on U.S. Highway 101 Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Two people were injured Wednesday when the Ford Explorer they were riding in was hit from behind on U.S. Highway 101 near Dryke Road between Port Angeles and Sequim, State Patrol said. State Patrol said Carol Ann Kitts, 64, was driving the SUV when it was struck from behind by a Nissan pickup truck driven by Vanessa Bentley, 31, of Port Angeles on the eastbound shoulder. Kitts and her passenger, Phillip Kitts, 65, of Port Angeles, were taken to Olympic Medical Center

with neck and back pain, troopers said. They were discharged from the Port Angeles hospital by 5 p.m. Bentley was not injured. Troopers said the Kitts’ grandchildren, an 11-yearold girl and a 9-year-old boy, who were also in the SUV, were not injured. The children accompanied their grandparents to OMC, State Patrol said. Both vehicles were traveling eastbound and slowed down for traffic ahead. They had pulled onto the right shoulder when the collision occurred. Dryke Road is on the one-lane section of the state

highway, which the state Department of Transportation plans to widen to two lanes in both directions between Port Angeles and Sequim. Drugs or alcohol were not involved in the 11:35 a.m. wreck, State Patrol said. Both vehicles sustained reportable damage. The 2004 Ford Explorer was taken to Frankfurth Auto Body and Towing. The 2004 Nissan pickup was driven from the scene. All five people involved in the wreck were wearing seat belts, troopers said.

3 teens plead not guilty to tattoo shop burglary Peninsula Daily News

U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Janie Duff wears a festive Santa hat as she makes her rounds on West Front Street in downtown Port Angeles on Wednesday. The week before Christmas is traditionally one of the busiest of the year for postal workers and delivery service, and Duff said she had a lot of packages and letters to keep up with.

How’s the fishing? Matt Schubert reports.

Fridays in mischief Dec. 2. own recognizance. Hartman was released Second-degree burglary Peninsula Daily News is a Class B felony that car- one day after his arrest. ries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a 2 4 - H O U R C R I S I S L I N E $20,000 fine. A witness told Sequim of Clallam County www.healthyfam.org police that all three entered the building after the teens 3 6 0 . 4 5 2 . H E L P ( 4 3 5 7 ) broke storefront glass, court records showed. • Services for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, & Child Abuse Hartman and the juve• Parenting Classes & Support Groups, Safe Shelter nile were arrested near the • Supervised Visitation business. & Third Party Transfer of Children Townsend was not apprehended Nov. 29. He was • Speakers Bureau served with a warrant Dec. 1 and released on his 1210 E. Front St., Suite C • Port Angeles • 360-452-3811

HEALTHY FAMILIES

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Rep.-elect Herrera changes last name

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SEQUIM — Three Sequim teens accused of breaking into a Sequim tattoo parlor Nov. 29 have pleaded not guilty to felony burglary in Clallam County Superior Court. Tyler J. Townsend, 19, pleaded not guilty to second-degree burglary, second-degree malicious mischief and second-degree theft Friday. A two-day trial is set for Feb. 28. Jordan M. Hartman, 19, pleaded not guilty to second-degree burglary Dec. 10. His trial also is set for Feb. 28. Hartman and Townsend — along with a 17-year-old teen — are accused of breaking into The Tattoo Guy shop, 618 E. Washington St., during a power outage. Police alleged that the teens caused at least $1,500 in damage to “windows, doors and glass display cases,” and that several items, including $2,800 paintball guns, were taken, according to the certification for probable cause. The juvenile male pleaded not guilty to second-degree burglary and second-degree malicious

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Open Today 8:00 am – 10:00 pm Tomorrow December 24 8:00 am – 6:00 pm The “Original” Since 1957

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PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A. © 2010 Swain’s General Store Inc.

602 East First Street, Port Angeles, WA • 452-2357 • www.SWAINSINC.com

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OLYMPIA — U.S. Rep.elect Jaime Herrera is changing her name. She announced Wednesday that she has adopted the last name of her husband, Daniel Beutler. She will keep Herrera as her middle name. She is a Republican from Camas.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 23, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

BUSINESS, POLITICS & ENVIRONMENT Page B4

Outdoors

My wish list for the guy in red I KNOW HOW fickle your constituency can be this time of year, Santa. Deliver the wrong dump Matt truck to little Schubert Tony, and “Santa sucks” becomes trending topic on Twitter. Make a mistake with the color of precious Penelope’s My Little Pony, and a “Saint Nick smells like poop” Facebook group isn’t too far behind. Yes, those little tykes can be technological terrors when their demands aren’t met. But you won’t have to worry about that with yours truly. Not only do I have few material desires, but the only time I’ve ever tweeted anything was during a birding trip through Railroad Bridge Park. All I ask is that you give my athletic concerns some consideration. I’m pretty sure I’m deserving. As naughty as I might have been this year, I’m no Brett Favre. So, without further ado, here are my wishes: ■ Civic turf — This one might cost some money (OK, about $1.5 million), but it would be worth it to have an artificial turf field at Civic Field in Port Angeles. As Mrs. Claus probably already knows — I assume she’s an avid reader of Twilight — it rains a whole bunch out here. Having a field available that didn’t turn into a glorified marshland each fall and spring would be nice. Peninsula College got one paid for through grants and fundraising activities. And boy, is it pretty. You must have that fundraising capability too. How else do you pay for all those toys? ■ Save Sutherland — I’m sure you’re for fish conservation as much as the next fella, but even you must agree the possibility of a five-year fishing moratorium at Lake Sutherland is a bit much. It would be great to see sockeye salmon return to Sutherland after both dams are removed from the Elwha River (the reason for the possible closure). But couldn’t the spawners still be protected while having a seasonal trout fishery on the lake? Surely you have some sway with Fish and Wildlife to make that happen. Nobody is hunting your reindeer . . . yet. ■ Playoffs, please — Remember when bowl season didn’t start until you showed up at the Hula Bowl halftime show every Christmas? Well, now we have the Maaco, New Mexico and Beef ‘O’ Brady’s bowls (among others) days before you’ve even waxed your sleigh. Thus, we get the “pleasure” of watching two 6-6 teams battle it out for gaudy trophies adorned in corporate logos. Clearly, the tradition and pageantry that once made the bowl system unique and special is on life support. Why don’t you and I blow it up and put together a 12-team playoff? Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban is on board. He’s just your kind of guy. He loves to give gifts. Just look at the massive contracts he gave Brendan Haywood, Shawn Bradley and Erick Dampier. ■ More Association — The Seattle SuperSonics bolted for the Dust Bowl three years ago, and Pacific Northwest winters haven’t been the same since. As the region’s basketball talent attests — 13 former Puget Soundarea high school athletes now play in the NBA, with more to follow — the Association belongs in Seattle. Luckily, there happens to be a team primed for relocation: the NBAowned New Orleans Hornets. As sad as it might be to see another team torn from its fan base, I think it’s clear we need the Hornets more than New Orleans. Turn

to

Schubert/B3

Keith Thorpe (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles’ Brian Cristion, top, grapples with Shelton’s Jonathan Dennis in the 171-pound weight class during Wednesday’s Battle for the Axe eight-team wrestling tournament at Port Angeles High School.

PA takes the ax back Riders win their own tournament By Brad LaBrie

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The ax is back. It took five years, three grueling wins, a tie in the championship match and down to the fifth rule of a tie-breaker for the Port Angeles wrestling team to win its own Battle for the Axe tournament Wednesday for the first time in six years. The Roughriders, who won the first tourney back in 2004 and went wanting the next four years, took Class 1A powerhouse La Center to the wire in the dual-meet tourney format. Both teams, 3-0 in dual meets going into the championship match, tied 36-36. That was after La Center, which has seven returning state placers and participants, took 12-0 and 30-3 leads over the Riders. Port Angeles outscored the Wildcats 33-6 down the stretch to earn the tie. It took about 10 minutes for tourney officials to go down a list of tie-breaker criteria before declaring Port Angeles the winner. The Riders beat out the Wildcats 5-4 as the team having the greater total number of six-point wins such as falls, defaults, forfeits and disqualifications. Pins by Nathan Cristion, Jacob Dostie and Ozzy Swagerty and two forfeits put the Riders over the top. That was enough for Port Angeles coach Erik Gonzalez to pick up the trophy, which displays a real ax, and show it

La Center’s Gabriel Bunker, left, takes on Sequim’s Lopaka Yasumura in the 160-pound class on Wednesday at The Battle for the Axe tournament. around while his team cheered. “We’re excited,” Gonzalez said. “It’s been too long between tournament wins. “It was a very dramatic match with La Center. I couldn’t have scripted it better. I’m excited for our fans, coaches and the kids.”

Sequim gives up trophy Archrival Sequim, the defending champion, gave up the trophy after claiming fifth place with a young and inexperienced team. “This is the highlight of the year for us,” Nathan Cristion, who was named the outstanding wrestler of Pool 1, said. “We have been trying to win this for all four years I have been here.” Senior Andrew Symonds, who started the comeback rally with a decision in the third match of the night, also was happy with the tourney victory. “It feels great to win the ax,” he said. “We wanted it bad.”

Symonds won his match 9-3 to get the Riders on board after the team trailed 12-0. “I’m an older wrestler, and I wanted to set the tone for my team,” he said. “I wanted to go out and wrestle well.” The Wildcats scored the next 18 points, though, to take a major 30-3 lead and make it look bleak for a Port Angeles win. Many of the Riders were looking tired after competing in their fourth straight match of the day. “It was a grueling day for us and La Center, returning seven from state, is as tough as nails,” Gonzalez said. “They beat us up, and that was the strength of their roster.” That was until Nathan Cristion decided to do some beating up himself. His early first-round pin made it 30-9 and opened up the flood gates. Cristion, who is 13-0 on the year with 12 pins, came out aggressive from the get-go, not giving his opponent much time

to think. “That’s how I like to wrestle,” he said.

Perfect performance Cristion went 4-0 in the tourney, all pins. Dostie then earned a fall in the second round to keep the rally going. In pool play, the Riders ripped Ocosta 70-12, beat the JV Dream Team 54-21 and battered Shelton 42-29. La Center, meanwhile, beat Kingston 45-33, blasted Central Kitsap 66-10 and defeated Sequim 53-31 in pool play. The Sequim Wolves went 2-2 on the day, losing to the Wildcats and to Kingston, 46-26, but beating Central Kitsap 72-11 in pool play and the JV Dream Team 57-12 in crossover action. “It was a great day for us,” Sequim coach Len Borchers said. “We surrendered the trophy to Port Angeles but our young kids wrestled well.” Turn

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Battle/B3

PA boys use defense to beat Tyee Riders win two games; PT girls lose by 4 points Peninsula Daily News

SEA-TAC — The Port Angeles boys basketball team overcame poor shooting with solid defense to beat Tyee in a nonleague game Wednesday night. Port Angeles trailed 25-21 at halftime but held Tyee to 14 points in the second half to win 47-38. The Roughriders also beat North Kitsap 55-42 in Olympic League action Tuesday night to improve to 8-1 overall and 6-1 in league. Against Tyee, the Riders

played sloppy in the first half. “We shot miserable,” coach Wes Armstrong said. “But I was very pleased with our defense in the second half.” The Riders had two doubledouble performances as Colin Wheeler sank 16 points and had 10 rebounds while Ian Ward added 11 points and 10 rebounds. The Riders next play in the Port Townsend tournament against Class 4A Puyallup on Dec. 28. Port Angeles 47, Tyee 38 Port Angeles Tyee

10 11 10 16 — 47 9 16 9 4 — 38 Individual Scoring Port Angeles (47) Wheeler 16, Ward 11, Phair 2, Braithwaite 6, Antioquia 1. Tyee (38) Hakas 2, Hawthorne 8, Austin 10, Smith 7, Soggma 5, Wasuge 6.

Port Angeles 55, North Kitsap 42 POULSBO — The Roughriders had control over the Vikings (0-6, 0-8) from the beginning and survived after giving up 11 turnovers in the second half. “We played a great second quarter,” Port Angeles coach Wes Armstrong said. “And our defense did a great job adding pressure to North Kitsap.” Colin Wheeler had a gamehigh 18 points to spark the Riders. Port Angeles 55, North Kitsap 42 Port Angeles North Kitsap

12 23 14 6 — 55 12 6 12 14 — 42 Individual Scoring Port Angeles (55) Wheeler 18, Ward 10, Smith 8, Walker 5, Morgan 4. North Kitsap (42) Reitan 13, Waller 8, Ford 4, Roberts 4, Gill 4, Nguyen 4.

Girls Basketball North Mason 40, Port Townsend 36 PORT TOWNSEND — The Redskins’ attempted comeback just wasn’t enough to beat the Bulldogs on Tuesday after trailing by 11 points at halftime. “We didn’t show up until the second quarter,” Port Townsend coach Randy Maag said. Kylie Maag led Port Townsend with 10 points as well as being the game’s leading scorer. North Mason 40, Port Townsend 36 North Mason 14 12 2 12 — 40 Port Townsend 11 4 12 9 — 36 Individual Scoring North Mason (40) Stromberg 8, Hicks 8, Wylie 5, Johnson 4, Satral 3. Port Townsend (36) Maag 10, Evalt 9, Bella-Fox 8, Dowdle 2.


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

11 a.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Nevada Reno vs. Washington (encore) Noon (47) GOLF Dunlop, Phoenix Tournament, Round 3, Site: Phoenix Seagaia Resort - Miyazaki, Japan 4 p.m. (25) FSNW Rodeo, Pendleton RoundUp 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Navy vs. San Diego State, Poinsettia Bowl, Site: Qualcomm Stadium San Diego (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Georgetown vs. Memphis - Memphis, Tenn. (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, San Antonio Spurs vs. Orlando Magic, Site: Amway Center Orlando, Fla. (Live) 7 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Diamond Head Classic, Semifinal 2, Site: Stan Sheriff Center Honolulu, Hawaii (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Miami Heat vs. Phoenix Suns, Site: U.S. Airways Center - Phoenix (Live)

SPORTS SHOT

Today Boys Basketball: Neah Bay at Crosspoint Academy, 1 p.m. Girls Basketball: Mount Tahoma at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Neah Bay at Crosspoint Academy, 1 p.m.

Friday No events scheduled

Saturday No events scheduled

Monday Boys Basketball: Forks at Neah Bay, 1 p.m. Girls Basketball: Forks at Neah Bay, 1 p.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Dec. 21 Laurel Seniors Men’s High Game: Steve Campbell, 188 Men’s High Series: Steve Campbell, 562 Women’s High Game: Hazel Vail, 176 Women’s High Series: Hazel Vail, 466 League Leaders: Glads Dec. 21 Tuesday Brunch League High Score: Cheri Pysson, 191 High Series: Cheri Pysson, 489 League Leaders: Avon/Louise Ensor Dec. 21 Mixed Up Mix Men’s High Game: Tracey Almond, 234 Men’s High Series: Tracey Almond, 637 Women’s High Game: Brenda Haltom, 186 Women’s High Seried: Brenda Haltom, 489 League Leaders: Kim’s Kleaning

Golf PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Dec. 21 Men’s Club Throw Out Three Worst Holes Idividual Gross: Gary Thorne, 56; Rick Parkhurst, 57 Individual Net: Jay Bruch, 49; Jack Morley, 50; Jan Hardin, 50; Brian Doig, 52 Team Gross: Mike Dupuis and Gary Thorne, 65; Jan Hardin and Gary Thorne, 66 Team Net: Rick Parkhurst and Mike Sorenson, 62; Gene Norton and Jack Morley, 62; Bob Brodhun and John Pruss, 63; Rick Parkhurst and John Pruss, 63; Mike Sorenson andn John Pruss, 63; Rick Parkhurst and Bob Brodhun, 63

The Associated Press

Snow

damage

Work continues on the Metrodome in Minneapolis on Wednesday. Workers were close to clearing snow and ice from the roof. Bill Lester, executive director of the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission, said it’s still not clear how long total repairs will take, including whether it would involve replacing damaged pieces of the roof or replacing it entirely, and how much the repairs would cost.

Basketball

NFL STANDINGS

NBA Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 25 3 .893 Dallas 23 5 .821 New Orleans 17 12 .586 Houston 13 15 .464 Memphis 12 17 .414 Northwest Division W L Pct Utah 21 9 .700 Oklahoma City 20 10 .667 Denver 16 11 .593 Portland 15 14 .517 Minnesota 6 24 .200 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Lakers 21 8 .724 Phoenix 13 14 .481 Golden State 10 18 .357 L.A. Clippers 8 21 .276 Sacramento 5 21 .192 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 23 4 .852 New York 17 12 .586 Philadelphia 11 18 .379 Toronto 10 19 .345 New Jersey 9 21 .300 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 21 9 .700 Atlanta 19 12 .613 Orlando 16 12 .571 Charlotte 9 19 .321 Washington 7 20 .259 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 18 9 .667 Indiana 13 14 .481 Milwaukee 11 16 .407 Detroit 10 19 .345 Cleveland 8 21 .276 All Times PST Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 98, Cleveland 84 Detroit 115, Toronto 93 Chicago 87, Washington 80 Boston 84, Philadelphia 80 New York 112, Oklahoma City 98 Utah 112, Minnesota 107 New Orleans 105, New Jersey 91 San Antonio 109, Denver 103 Houston at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Today’s Games San Antonio at Orlando, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Miami at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games No Games Scheduled Saturday’s Games Chicago at New York, 9 a.m. Boston at Orlando, 11:30 a.m. Miami at LA Lakers, 2 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Football NFL Schedule All Times PST Thursday’s Game Carolina at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m. Saturday’s Game Dallas at Arizona, 4:30 p.m.

College All Times PST December 18 New Mexico Bowl Brigham Young 52, UTEP 24 Udrove Humanitarian Bowl Northern Illinois 40, Fresno State 17 R+L Carriers New Orleans Bowl Troy 48, Ohio 21 December 21 Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl Louisville 31, Southern Miss 28

GB — 2 81⁄2 12 131⁄2 GB — 1 31⁄2 51⁄2 15 GB — 7 101⁄2 13 141⁄2

GB — 7 13 14 151⁄2 GB — 21⁄2 4 11 121⁄2 GB — 5 7 9 11

St. Louis Seattle San Francisco Arizona

W L 6 8 6 8 5 9 4 10

T PCT 0 .429 0 .429 0 .357 0 .286

Philadelphia NY Giants Washington Dallas

W 10 9 5 5

L 4 5 9 9

T PCT 0 .714 0 .643 0 .357 0 .357

Chicago Green Bay Minnesota Detroit

W L 10 4 8 6 5 9 4 10

T PCT 0 .714 0 .571 0 .357 0 .286

Atlanta New Orleans Tampa Bay Carolina

W L 12 2 10 4 8 6 2 12

T PCT 0 .857 0 .714 0 .571 0 .143

Kansas City San Diego Oakland Denver

W L 9 5 8 6 7 7 3 11

T PCT 0 .643 0 .571 0 .500 0 .214

New England NY Jets Miami Buffalo

W L 12 2 10 4 7 7 4 10

T PCT 0 .857 0 .714 0 .500 0 .286

Pittsburgh Baltimore Cleveland Cincinnati

W L 10 4 10 4 5 9 3 11

T PCT 0 .714 0 .714 0 .357 0 .214

Indianapolis Jacksonville Tennessee Houston

W 8 8 6 5

T PCT 0 .571 0 .571 0 .429 0 .357

L 6 6 8 9

Wednesday Maaco Bowl Las Vegas No. 10 Boise State 26, No. 19 Utah 3 Today Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl Navy at San Diego State, 2 p.m. Friday Sheraton Hawaii Bowl No. 24 Hawaii vs. Tulsa, 2 p.m. Sunday LITTLE CAESARS BOWL Florida International vs. Toledo, 5:30 p.m.

Hockey NHL Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 33 21 8 4 46 110 92 Chicago 36 19 14 3 41 115 104 Nashville 33 17 10 6 40 84 83 Columbus 33 17 13 3 37 85 91 St. Louis 33 16 12 5 37 86 93 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 32 19 8 5 43 105 83 Colorado 34 19 11 4 42 121 110 Minnesota 32 15 13 4 34 79 91 Calgary 35 14 18 3 31 92 103 Edmonton 32 12 15 5 29 85 110 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 34 21 10 3 45 100 92 San Jose 34 18 11 5 41 102 95 Anaheim 38 18 16 4 40 98 111 Los Angeles 32 19 12 1 39 95 75 Phoenix 32 15 10 7 37 89 93

NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE NFC WEST HOME ROAD DIV CONF 4-3-0 2-5-0 2-2-0 4-6-0 4-3-0 2-5-0 3-2-0 5-5-0 4-3-0 1-6-0 3-1-0 3-7-0 3-4-0 1-6-0 1-4-0 2-8-0 NFC EAST HOME ROAD DIV CONF 4-2-0 6-2-0 4-1-0 7-3-0 5-3-0 4-2-0 2-3-0 7-3-0 2-5-0 3-4-0 2-3-0 4-7-0 2-6-0 3-3-0 2-3-0 3-7-0 NFC NORTH HOME ROAD DIV CONF 4-3-0 6-1-0 5-0-0 8-3-0 5-1-0 3-5-0 3-2-0 6-4-0 4-4-0 1-5-0 1-4-0 4-6-0 3-4-0 1-6-0 1-4-0 4-7-0 NFC SOUTH HOME ROAD DIV CONF 6-0-0 6-2-0 4-0-0 9-1-0 5-2-0 5-2-0 3-1-0 8-2-0 3-4-0 5-2-0 2-3-0 6-4-0 2-6-0 0-6-0 0-5-0 2-9-0 AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE AFC WEST HOME ROAD DIV CONF 6-0-0 3-5-0 2-3-0 5-5-0 6-2-0 2-4-0 2-3-0 6-4-0 5-2-0 2-5-0 5-0-0 5-5-0 2-4-0 1-7-0 1-4-0 2-8-0 AFC EAST HOME ROAD DIV CONF 7-0-0 5-2-0 3-1-0 8-2-0 4-3-0 6-1-0 3-2-0 8-3-0 1-6-0 6-1-0 2-3-0 5-6-0 2-5-0 2-5-0 1-3-0 3-7-0 AFC NORTH HOME ROAD DIV CONF 4-3-0 6-1-0 4-1-0 8-3-0 6-1-0 4-3-0 2-2-0 7-3-0 3-3-0 2-6-0 1-3-0 3-7-0 2-5-0 1-6-0 2-3-0 2-8-0 AFC SOUTH HOME ROAD DIV CONF 5-2-0 3-4-0 3-2-0 6-4-0 5-2-0 3-4-0 3-2-0 7-4-0 3-5-0 3-3-0 2-3-0 3-7-0 3-4-0 2-5-0 2-3-0 4-6-0

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 35 22 8 5 49 117 87 Pittsburgh 35 23 10 2 48 115 81 N.Y. Rangers 35 20 14 1 41 105 91 N.Y. Islanders 31 7 18 6 20 67 105 New Jersey 33 9 22 2 20 59 103 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 34 19 13 2 40 89 77 Boston 32 17 11 4 38 89 68 Buffalo 34 14 16 4 32 89 97 Ottawa 35 14 17 4 32 81 106 Toronto 33 12 17 4 28 75 102 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 36 20 12 4 44 109 100 Tampa Bay 34 19 10 5 43 105 111 Atlanta 36 19 12 5 43 117 104 Carolina 32 15 13 4 34 90 99 Florida 32 15 17 0 30 87 83 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. All Times PST Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 2, Tampa Bay 1, OT Pittsburgh 5, Florida 2 Detroit 5, Vancouver 4, OT Chicago 4, Nashville 1 Today’s Games Atlanta at Boston, 4 p.m. Florida at Buffalo, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Washington, 4 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 4 p.m. Detroit at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Nashville, 5 p.m. Calgary at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

SPORTS ON TV

PF 258 279 250 255

PA 295 363 314 370

DIFF -37 -84 -64 -115

STRK Lost 2 Lost 2 Lost 1 Lost 1

PF 412 360 268 354

PA 339 288 343 396

DIFF +73 +72 -75 -42

STRK Won 3 Lost 1 Lost 4 Won 1

PF 293 333 244 308

PA 242 220 314 329

DIFF +51 +113 -70 -21

STRK Won 1 Lost 2 Lost 2 Won 2

PF 369 354 280 183

PA 261 270 290 350

DIFF +108 +84 -10 -167

STRK Won 8 Lost 1 Lost 1 Won 1

PF 322 388 353 292

PA 281 260 330 415

DIFF +41 +128 +23 -123

STRK Won 1 Won 2 Won 1 Lost 5

PF 446 295 239 273

PA 303 259 261 353

DIFF +143 +36 -22 -80

STRK Won 6 Won 1 Lost 1 Won 2

PF 307 324 252 281

PA 220 253 271 362

DIFF +87 +71 -19 -81

STRK Lost 1 Won 2 Lost 2 Won 1

PF 381 319 322 333

PA 342 365 282 386

DIFF +39 -46 +40 -53

STRK Won 2 Lost 1 Won 1 Lost 3

Minnesota at Colorado, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games No games scheduled. Saturday’s Games No games scheduled. Sunday’s Games Columbus at Chicago, 4 p.m. Washington at Carolina, 4 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Montreal at NY Islanders, 4 p.m. Nashville at St. Louis, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 5 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 6 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League Boston Red Sox: Named Arnie Beyeler manager of Pawtucket (IL), Kevin Boles manager of Portland (EL), Bruce Crabbe manager, Kevin Walker pitching coach and Alex Ochoa hitting coach for Salem (Carolina), Dick Such pitching coach at Greenville (SAL), Carlos Febles manager and Paul Abbott pitching coach for Lowell (N.Y.-Penn), George Lombard manager and dave Tomlin pitching coach for Gulf Coast Red Sox. Kansas City Royals: Assigned INF Joaquin Arias and INF Lance Zawadzki outright to Omaha (AAA). Tampa Bay Rays: Named Dave Eiland as a special assistant. National League Houston Astros: Agreed to terms with LHP

Gustavo Chacin on a minor-league contract. Milwaukee Brewers: Agreed to terms with RHP Sean Green and INF Craig Counsell on one-year contracts. Pittsburgh Pirates: Designated RHP Joe Martinez for assignment. Named Dean Treanor manager of Indianapolis (IL), P.J. Forbes manager of Altoona (EL), Carlos Garcia of Bradenton (FSL), Gary Robinson manager of West Virginia (SAL), Dave Turgeon manager and Justin Meccage pitching coach for State College (NY-Penn), Brad Fischer advisor-player development, Frank Kremblas coordinator of instruction, Jeff Livesey hitting coordinator, Gary Green infield coordinator, Luis Dorante, Latin America field coordinator and Scott Mitchell assistant pitching coordinator. San Diego Padres: Named John Abbamondi vice president of strategy and business analysis. Washington Nationals: Assigned LHP Matt Chico outright to Syracuse (IL). American Association Wichita Wingnuts: Acquired INF Jason Diaz from Laredo (UL) for cash. Traded RHP Jae Jung to Grand Prairie for a player to be named. Winnipeg Goldeyes: Signed OF Jonathan Wyatt. Can-Am League Quebec Capitales: Sold the contract of OF Alex A. Nunez to Detroit (AL). Frontier League Florence Freedom: Named Wes Crawford pitching coach. Gateway Grizzlies: Traded RHP David Miller and LHP Eric Gilliland to Wichita (AA) for RHP J.R. Boling and future considerations.

Basketball National Basketball Association Charlotte Bobcats: Announced the resignation of coach Larry Brown. Los Angeles Clippers: Signed F Ike Diogu.

Football National Football League Arizona Cardinals: Placed WR Early Doucet on injured reserve. Signed LB Curtis Gatewood from the practice squad. Buffalo Bills: Signed DB Brett Johnson to the practice squad. Carolina Panthers: Signed FB Rashawn Jackson from the practice squad. Cincinnati Bengals: Claimed TE Garrett Mills off waivers from Philadelphia. Cleveland Browns: Placed TE Evan Moore on injured reserve. Denver Broncos: Placed FB Spencer Larsen on injured reserve. Signed G Stanley Daniels. Green Bay Packers: Signed G Adrian Battles and S Michael Greco to practice squad. Placed WR Terrance Smith on practice squad-injured reserve. Indianapolis Colts: Placed WR Austin Collie on injured reserve. Minnesota Vikings: Signed QB Rhett Bomar from the New York Giants practice squad. Waived QB R.J. Archer. New England Patriots: Signed DL Landon Cohen. Released DL Louis Leonard. Seattle Sehawks: Signed LB Michael Johnson from the Kansas City the practice squad. Signed LB Vuna Tuihalamaka to the practice squad. Placed DE Derek Walker on practice squad-injured reserve. St. Louis Rams: Promoted LB Curtis Johnson from the practice squad. Signed WR Joe West to practice squad. Washington Redskins: Placed DL Ma’ake Kemoeatu and DL Phillip Daniels on injured reserve. Signed LB Rob Jackson from the practice squad. Signed DL Darrion Scott. Signed DL Rashaad Duncan and OT Xavier Fulton to the practice squad. Released OT Jacob Bender from the practice squad.

Hockey National Hockey League Anaheim Ducks: Reassigned LW Josh Green to Syracuse (AHL). New York Islanders: Recalled F Josh Bailey from Bridgeport (AHL). New York Rangers: Recalled F Mats Zuccarello from Connecticut (AHL). Phoenix Coyotes: Recalled LW Mikkel Boedker from San Antonio (AHL). Placed LW Taylor Pyatt on injured reserve.

Soccer Major League Soccer D.C. United: Signed MF Andy Najar to a multiyear contract. Philadelphia Union: Signed MF Zach Pfeffer. Women’s Professional Soccer Sky Blue Fc: Signed M Therese Sjogran.

College Skyline Conference: Named Linda Bruno commissioner. Carthage: Named Sarah Johnson women’s soccer coach. Greensboro: Announced the addition of women’s golf and men{rsquo}s swimming programs, beginning with the 2011-12 academic year. Jacksonville State: Named Chris Boone defensive coordinator.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Huskies pound Nevada Thomas scores 24 to lead UW The Associated Press

Running club for marathon kicks off

area, receive injury screening and get expert tips to stay healthy and motivated. For more information, e-mail Audrey Elias at audrey@taiweb.com or call 360-452-6216.

Basketball tourney PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Department is hosting the Martin Luther King Invitational youth basketball tournament presented by Captain T’s Custom Stuff. The tournament will be held on Jan. 15-16 with divisions for boys and girls teams from grades five through eight. There is a four-game guarantee and a $235 entry fee. For more information or to register, call Dan Estes at 360- 417-4557 or e-mail at destes@cityofpa.us. Peninsula Daily News

Newton picked player of year The Associated Press

Jim Bates/The Seattle Times

Washington’s Matthew Bryan-Amaning (11) shoots over Nevada’s Olek Czyz (31) in the first half on Wednesday at Hec Edmundson Pavilion in Seattle. Wolf Pack, the most impressive was the five turnovers, after committing just four a few days earlier against San Francisco. “With as many possessions that we have each game, we’re OK with 13 turnovers in a game,” Romar said. “We don’t want any more that, but anything under we’re comfortable considering the possessions we have. “When you get it into single digits, you’re doing a really good job.” Dario Hunt led Nevada (3-9) with 16 points and 14 rebounds, while Deonte Burton added 14 points and Malik Story had 11 for the Wolf Pack. By halftime, Thomas

already filled the stat sheet. The junior moved into 21st place on Washington’s all-time scoring list with his 12 points in the first half, including eight in the final 6:30. The Huskies closed the half on a 14-4 run, capped by Thomas’ pass to a wide open C.J. Wilcox for 3 just before the halftime buzzer. It was one of Thomas’ three assists to go along with his six rebounds in the first half. Thomas wasn’t done in the second half adding another pair of 3-pointers and throwing a beautiful backdoor lob to freshman Terrence Ross for a twohanded dunk. Thomas finished 9 of 19

shooting with eight rebounds and four assists. His previous season high was 20 points against Portland. “I wanted to be highly aggressive, not just to score but to make plays,” Thomas said. “This was the last tuneup to Pac-10 and I just [had] to be more aggressive. I did that tonight, took what the defense gave me and we played well.” Washington played without pesky, defensive-minded guard Venoy Overton, who rested after hyperextending his knee in practice this week. The Huskies didn’t need his harassing style on the perimeter, as Nevada shot just 28 percent

Boise State rips Utah 26-3 The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — It wasn’t the bowl Boise State wanted to be in, and for the better part of the first half Wednesday night, the Broncos played as if they were thinking about the one that got away. Then Doug Martin raced 84 yards up the middle, and suddenly the MAACO Bowl didn’t look so bad after all. Martin shook Boise State out of its brief postseason funk with his long touchdown run midway through the second quarter, and the 10th-ranked Broncos dominated the rest of the way to beat No. 20 Utah 26-3 in a game that wasn’t as close as the final score indicated. “It was a startup for our team,” Martin said. “A momentum changer.” The victory was small consolation for Boise State, which missed out on a possible Rose Bowl appearance on two missed field goals last month at Nevada. But the dominating win against a team that was at one time ranked No. 6 in the country was a reminder why the Broncos rode high in the polls before suffering their only loss in two years. It may also be a reminder for next year’s poll voters not to write off a team that won every game over the last two years except the one that really mattered. The loss to Nevada not only cost the school millions of dollars in a BCS bowl bid, but some of the grudging respect others had finally given Boise State.

B3

Briefly . . .

PORT ANGELES ­— The North Olympic Discovery Marathon and its title sponsor, Therapeutic Associates Inc., are starting the 2011 North Olympic Running Club. All runners are invited to attend a kick-off party on Jan. 4 starting at 6:30 p.m. at Therapeutic Associates Physical Therapy in Port Angeles at 1114 Georgiana St. The cost is $30 annually and includes a discount on race entry. This will kick-start weekly group training runs with planned routes and support along with monthly motivation and educational activities. All levels of runners are welcome to meet and train with other runners in the

By Tim Booth

SEATTLE — For much of the non-conference slate, Isaiah Thomas noticeably deferred to others at times. Facing his final tune-up before Pac-10 play begins, Thomas was a bit more assertive on Wednesday night. And the rest of his team looked pretty sharp too. Thomas scored a seasonhigh 24 points, and Washington rolled in its last test before conference play with a 90-60 blowout of Nevada on Wednesday night. Thomas did a little of everything, as the Huskies finished out the majority of their non-conference slate at 8-3, the only losses coming to Kentucky, Michigan State and Texas A&M by a combined 13 points. Washington has one nonconference game remaining on Feb. 22 against city rival Seattle. “I just know the real season starts now,” Thomas said. That real season will begin next Wednesday night as the Huskies start with a tough two-step: at Southern California and UCLA. It’s a significant test for a team that played just one true road game during the non-conference slate, a 63-62 loss at Texas A&M. But if the Huskies play like they did against Nevada, there won’t be many teams beating them. Once again Thomas, the Huskies leading scorer at 15 per game, got plenty of help. Matthew Bryan-Amaning added 16 points and could have scored a lot more if not for a number of close misses. Justin Holiday added 12 points and nine rebounds for Washington, but provided coach Lorenzo Romar with his one major scare of the night, falling to the floor with an ankle injury with 5:04 left and the Huskies leading 83-49. Holiday limped to the bench, then locker room and was getting preliminary X-rays after the game, but Romar said he didn’t believe the injury was serious. Seven-footer Aziz N’Diaye scored 11 points and grabbed 10 rebounds. But of all the stats Washington posted against the

Thursday, December 23, 2010

AUBURN, Ala. — Cam Newton lifted Auburn from the back of the Top 25 to No. 1 in the nation. The Heisman Trophywinning quarterback led the Tigers into the national title game against No. 2 Oregon with a mix of flair and poise and enough highlight reel plays to widely split the vote among a handful of coaches and teammates asked for their favorite. Newton has already raked in the Heisman Trophy and Davey O’Brien and Maxwell awards for his spectacular season. He added AP Player of the Year to his collection on Wednesday. An NCAA investigation into Newton’s recruitment, which threw his eligibility into doubt during November, had no effect on how he played down the stretch — or the voting for the AP award. It was about as lopsided as the Heisman vote. Newton received 51 votes from the 60-member AP football poll panel. Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore received three, Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck got two and four ballots went unreturned. In less than a year, Newton has gone from the obscurity of junior college to helping transform a team that went 8-5 last season and started this one ranked No. 22 to a perfect Southeastern Conference championship. It wasn’t all about the big plays, though. Offensive coordinator

Gus Malzahn said he was more impressed by Newton’s leadership in repeatedly bringing the team from behind, including a 24-0 deficit at Alabama. “The sign of a special quarterback is one that has the abilities to make his teammates better and make his teammates believe in things that maybe they wouldn’t believe without him,” Malzahn said. “We’ve faced some major adversity earlier in the year when we didn’t know each other that well. “We were down to Clemson 17-0 at home and it was ugly as all get out. But he didn’t change then. He’s a rock, as far as all that’s concerned. Doesn’t panic.” It doesn’t hurt that Newton’s 6-foot-6 and 250 pounds with deceptive speed, nifty open-field moves, power and a nice arm. He broke the single-season SEC rushing record for a quarterback in the eighth game, a 28-carry, 217-yard effort against LSU. Malzahn also says Newton has proven he’s “not a good thrower, he’s an excellent thrower.” As the season wore on, Newton’s skills bloomed and not even a scandal could slow him. He deftly played through an NCAA investigation into a pay-for-play recruiting attempt involving his father, Cecil, at Mississippi State. The NCAA said Cecil Newton sought payment from the Bulldogs, but there was no evidence that his son or Auburn knew about it.

Battle: Preps

The Associated Press

Boise State head coach Chris Peterson and quarterback Kellen Moore celebrate their 26-3 win over Utah in the Maaco Bowl on Wednesday in Las Vegas.

Maaco Bowl Count Utah coach Kyle Whittingham among the believers. “This is a team that was the top ranked team that was setting itself up for a run at the national championship,” Whittingham said. “If they beat Reno [Nevada] and if Auburn or Oregon stumble, they’re in that game.” Neither of those things happened, of course, forcing Boise State to go begging for a decent bowl bid despite its gaudy record. The Broncos landed in this gambling city, where

the bookies quickly established them as 17-point favorites to beat a Utah team that also had its BCS dream dashed late in the season. But Boise State came out flat and seemed disinterested. Kellen Moore fumbled on the third play of the game and the Broncos turned the ball over three times to help Utah to a 3-0 lead. Martin then scampered up the middle and headed down the left sideline on the first play from scrimmage following a Utes punt. “It was huge,” Moore said. “We hadn’t been executing at a high level with our offense.

“Anytime you get a one play drive that results in a touchdown it’s a huge momentum swing and it gets everyone going.” Martin’s run came after a mistake-prone first quarter in which Boise State kept giving the ball away and making costly errors. Utah wasn’t much better, and when the Broncos began finding their stride the game quickly turned one-sided. Moore, who also threw an interception in the first quarter, rebounded with a 25-yard touchdown pass to Tyler Shoemaker in the closing seconds of the first half to give Boise State a 16-3 lead.

Continued from B1 seventh at state last year but is ranked No. 5 this Going undefeated on the season. day for the Wolves were “The La Center kid is Royhon Agostine at 103 very good,” Borchers said. pounds and Chris Falkey at “Dakota made a mistake and Kulla tood advantage.” 189. La Center’s Chris MayEarning 3-1 records were Mustang Riggins at 140, olo was named the most Dakota Hinton at 171 and outstanding wrestler for Pool 2. Clay Charley at 285. Hinton, who now has ________ only three losses on the Sports Editor Brad ­LaBrie can year, lost for the second be reached at 360-417-3525 or at time this year to La Cen- brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews. ter’s Ryan Kulla, who was com.

Schubert: Gifts Continued from B1 this winter? Signing Oakland Athletics castoff Jack Cust to be the team’s desigThey’ve already got nated hitter. Mardi Gras. What do we My solution: Let’s get have? Folklife? some of your elves down ■ Seattle slugger — I’ve been a part of Little here and see what they can League T-ball lineups that do. They can’t be much were more explosive than worse than the current rosthe Seattle Mariners last ter. summer. At least they might The M’s hit an MLBdraw some walks. worst 101 home runs while ________ scoring just 3.2 runs per Matt Schubert is the outdoors game for a starting rotaand sports columnist for the Pention that featured AL Cy insula Daily News. His column Young winner Felix Herregularly appears on Thursdays nandez. and Fridays. He can be reached at M’s general manager matt.schubert@peninsuladailyJack Zduriencik’s remedy news.com.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 23, 2010 Page

B4

Business

Politics & Environment

Ferry fare hike OK Attorney general clarifies earlier opinion The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Ferry riders will see a 2.5 percent fare increase starting Jan. 1. The increase comes after the state Attorney General’s Office issued a clarification to an informal opinion released earlier in the week concerning Initiative 1053’s effect on the state Transportation Commission’s authority to hike fares on state ferries. The clarification said the Transportation Commission does have the authority to make the proposed increase because the rulemaking order was completed Nov. 19, before the effective start date of Initia-

tive 1053, according to a memorandum from Senior Assistant Attorney General Bryce Brown. Initiative 1053 went into effect Dec. 2. Kristin Alexander, spokeswoman for the attorney general, said the lawyer who wrote the original opinion wasn’t aware of the date the state Transportation Commission approved the original fare increase. Initiative 1053, which voters approved by a 64 percent margin during the Nov. 2 general election, reinstated the two-thirds legislative majority requirement needed for tax increases. It also requires majority legislative approval for

fee increases. Deputy Solicitor General Jeff Even determined in the informal opinion released Monday that the “initiative accordingly rendered legislative approval granted before the enactment of I-1053 insufficient to authorize the increase or imposition of a fee.” Because of the opinion, the state Legislature will have to approve any future fare increase for Washington State Ferries. Imposition of highway tolls will also fall to the Legislature. State lawmakers are considering an additional 10 percent ferry fare increase proposed by the governor to offset a budget shortfall.

Most ages 25-29 sold solely on cell The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — In a first for any age group, more than half of Americans ages 25-29 live in households with cell phones but no traditional landline phones. A report by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also found that the younger children are, the likelier they live in homes with only wireless phones. That suggests younger parents are showing increasing comfort relying only on cell phones even as they adjust from being single to a more settled family lifestyle, according to one of the report’s authors. Taken together, the figures provide the latest evidence of how young people are leading the nation’s evolution away from landlines. “You could say that among that age group, wireless-only is the new norm,” said Stephen Blumberg, a senior scientist at CDC and an author of the survey. The shift is having a wide impact, changing not only how people communicate, but the telecommunications

industry and the work of pollsters and others who collect data. The survey showed that overall, 27 percent of U.S. households had only cell phones in the first half of this year, up 2 percentage points since the last half of 2009 That number has been growing rapidly; in the first six months of 2007, just 14 percent of households relied only on wireless service. Among 25- to 29-year-olds, 51 percent lived in homes with only cell phone service in the first half of 2010. That was up 2 percentage points from the previous six-month period.

Cell-only households For both age groups bracketing them — 18- to 24-year-olds, and 30- to 34-year-olds — four in 10 lived in cell-only households. After age 35, the likelihood that people have only wireless service falls off, with one in 20 age 65 and older living in homes that rely solely on cell phones.

The study also found that among children younger than age 3, nearly four in 10 live in wireless-only households. That figure drops to about a third of children age 3 to 5 and less among older children. Blumberg said this counters the perception — backed by previous data — that cell-phone-only households are likelier to be young, unattached people. The latest numbers suggest that as young people have families, they’re keeping their wireless-only habits. “It’s a sign that wirelessonly is no longer strictly tied to a lifestyle of being young and restless,” Blumberg said. The survey found an additional 16 percent of households have landlines, yet get all or nearly all their calls on their cell phones. Their landlines are usually hooked into computers. Combined with wirelessonly homes, this means that to call 43 percent of American households, the only practical way to do it is to dial their cell phones.

Adult listings dropped by Craigslist worldwide The Associated Press

Food bank funds raised by salon

general sent a joint letter to the website demanding its removal. A Craigslist official told U.S. lawmakers during a House Judiciary Committee panel a few weeks later that the website has no plans to resume its adult services section. Craigslist, which is largely free, has been under prosecutors’ scrutiny for years. It tried to police the postings on its adult services page by charging a fee to post the ads and requiring them to be vetted and approved. The section carried ads for a variety of erotic services that critics say veered into prostitution.

The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Washington state paid out $4.7 billion in unemployment benefits in 2010, the most in history. The state Employment Security Department said by the end of the year, more than 500,000 Washington residents will have received unemployment benefits this year, compared with 475,000 in 2009 and 290,000 in 2008. Last year, the state paid $4 billion in unemployment claims; in 2008, it paid out $1.2 billion. This year, the state unemployment rate reached 9.5 percent in March, which was the highest since the early 1980s. In November, the unemployment rate was 9.2 percent for the state. The state reached another all-time high in February, when 363,160 people were out of work and actively looking for a new job (the state doesn’t count those who had given up finding a job). In November, that number had fallen to about 323,000. “This has been another demanding year for Employment Security but even more challenging for those who still can’t find a job after months and months of looking,” said Joel Sacks, deputy commissioner of the Employment Security Department, in a statement.

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

OROVILLE — A federal inspection report has cited an artisan cheese maker for unsanitary practices. Sally Jackson Cheese of Oroville has voluntarily recalled all of its cheese after the Food and Drug Administration warned that the products could be contaminated by E. coli. The company’s cheese has been linked to eight people in Washington, Oregon, Minnesota and Vermont who have been sickened, one of whom was briefly hospitalized, the FDA said. The inspection report released Wednesday said the owner wore manuresoiled clothing during cheese production and milked livestock and stirred cheese curds with bare hands that hadn’t been washed. The owner, Sally Jackson, disputed the report but said she will close down the business. The report also said her facility is run-down and needed to be rebuilt.

equal to the amount of their debt. Some were Canadian citizens who had never paid any U.S. income tax. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Seattle said the IRS flagged the majority of fraudulent returns, but some got through. A federal indictment alleges that one client received a return of Eyman initiative $359,000 and another OLYMPIA — Initiareceived $369,000. tive activist Tim Eyman Brekke appeared in plans to introduce U.S. District Court in another initiative in 2012 Seattle for a detention requiring a two-thirds supermajority for the Leg- hearing Wednesday. A magistrate judge islature to raise taxes. ordered him released on Eyelectronic monitoring man’s Inipending trial. tiative 1053 was Gluten-free crust overwhelmPORT ANGELES — ingly Van Goes Gourmet Pizza approved & Mexican, 814 S. C St., by voters Eyman is now offering gluten-free in Novempizza crusts and gourmet ber. wraps and personal-sized It requires the Legisla- pizzas. ture to get a two-thirds The business accepts majority on tax-hike votes EBT cards and Visa, Masrather than the simple terCard and Discover majority required for cards. most legislation. Gift certificates are Lawmakers also could also available. send taxes to Washington Van Goes is open Monvoters for approval. day through Saturday It took effect Dec. 2. from 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. However, lawmakers and Sunday from are allowed to change or 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. suspend initiatives after For more information, two years. Eyman said that start- phone 360-417-5600. ing in 2012, he’ll introNonferrous metals duce a similar initiative every two years to try to NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. keep that from happenAluminum - $1.0783 per lb., ing.

Tax conspiracy SEATTLE — Federal prosecutors say a California man led a vast tax fraud conspiracy in which hundreds of people claimed $763 million in refunds from the IRS — more than $10 million of which was actually paid out. Ronald L. Brekke of Orange County, Calif., is accused of encouraging and helping his clients to prepare tax returns on the incorrect theory that they could claim refunds

London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.2677 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.2705 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2465.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0411 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1387.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1388.20 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $29.375 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $29.376 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1730.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1721.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

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PORT ANGELES — Shear Elegance Beauty Salon, 210 E. Fourth St., recently raffled off a basket of hair products to raise funds for the Port Angeles Food Bank. The raffle raised $63, and the salon chipped in and brought the donation to $100. Golda Reed won the gift basket. The salon also collected canned food donations during November and December for donation to the food bank. For more information, phone 360-457-7993.

Jobless benefits record set

Report says cheese firm unsanitary

0A5099905

HARTFORD, Conn. — Craigslist has confirmed that it removed its controversial adult services section from its international sites, Connecticut’s attorney general said Tuesday, four months after it did the same for its U.S. sites. September’s action came under pressure from officials, including Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, over whether Craigslist was adequately policing illegal ads. Blumenthal, who is also a U.S. senator-elect, said Craigslist representatives confirmed to his office Tuesday that it had removed erotic services listings from

hundreds of sites in dozens of other countries. Representatives of San Francisco-based Craigslist did not immediately return messages about when the change went into effect. Blumenthal called the company’s decision a victory against sexual exploitation of women and children, and against human trafficking connected to prostitution. “This move is another important step in the ongoing fight to more effectively screen and stop pernicious prostitution ads,” he said. Craigslist replaced the adult services section’s link on U.S. sites with a blackand-white “censored” bar Sept. 4 after Blumenthal and 16 other state attorneys

The commission-approved 2.5 percent fare increase is expected to bring in an additional $2.8 million through 2011. Beginning Jan. 1, riders will pay $9.35 to drive their car onto the Port Townsend to Coupeville ferry, up from $9.15. The price for a one-way car-and-driver ticket on the Kingston, Bainbridge Island and Bremerton routes would rise from $11.85 to $12.15. Monthly ticket books good for 10 round trips will go from $189.60 to $194.40. Passengers will pay $7.10 instead of $6.90 for a round trip, and their monthly passes would bump from $88.35 to $90.90.

 $ Briefly . . .


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 23, 2010

c Our Peninsula Need a gift? Then give a night out SECTION

As we enter the Christmas weekend, fill your heart and soul with the spirit of Christmas with carols and songs of the season. Need a last-minute gift idea? Make up a coupon that can be redeemed for an evening of live music and/or dance at a favorite night spot! Here’s a list of some places, followed by a list of New Year’s Eve events.

Port Angeles ■  The Junction Roadhouse, junction of U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112 five miles west of Port Angeles, has Barry Burnett doing his Sunday Jam from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. On Wednesday, Jason and friends play roots music and more from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. ■  Chuck Grall and the Sounddogs will feature local country icon Denny Secord Jr. on Monday at Smuggler’s Landing, 115 Railroad Ave., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  On Wednesday, Howly Slim, vocal and guitar, is at Kokopelli’s Underground, 203 E. Front St., for your dining pleasure at 6 p.m. ■  Every Tuesday eve-

3RDAGE, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY, CLASSIFIEDS, WEATHER In this section

Live Music ning at the Port Nelson Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets, the Port Angeles Senior Swingers presents Wally and the Boys playing ballroom dance favorites for the dancing pleasure of all seniors 45 years and older from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover; first-timers free! ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues with a brew and barbecue from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  Victor Reventlow hosts the acoustic jam at the Fairmount Restaurant, on U.S Highway 101 west of Port Angeles, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Tuesday. Don’t be left out!

John

Sequim and Blyn ■  On Monday at the Oasis Sports Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., dance to Mary Lou

Montgomery and Nostalgia from 5:30 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. On Wednesday, join Jubilee for a trip into the past from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■  On Saturday (Christmas Day), join Howly Slim at Las Palomas Mexican Restaurant, 1085 E. Washington St., at 5:30 p.m. — perhaps to relax after a hectic day? ■  On Friday (Christmas Eve), join Jimmy Hoffman and Buck Ellard for an evening of music at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  On Friday, Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, has Sarah Shea and Chez Jazz for an evening of jazz and dancing from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Sunday, enjoy dancing to the Stardust Big Band with guest vocalist Jenny Davis from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Things to Do Today and Friday, Dec. 23-24, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Open to the public. Phone 360457-1456. Newborn parenting class — “You and Your New Baby,” third-floor sunroom, Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Phone 360-417-7652.

Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Today For those with mental disorPA Vintage Softball — ders and looking for a place to Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellow- socialize, something to do or a ship and recreation. Phone hot meal. For more information, Gordon Gardner at 360-452- phone Rebecca Brown at 3605973 or Ken Foster at 360-683- 457-0431. 0141 for information including Senior meal — Nutrition time of day and location. program, Port Angeles Senior Guided walking tour — Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Historic downtown buildings, 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per an old brothel and “Under- meal. Reservations recomground Port Angeles.” Cham- mended. Phone 360-457ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- 8921. road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 Knit, crochet and spin — p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, All ages and skill levels, Veela $6 ages 6 to 12. Children Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. younger than 6, free. Reserva- to 6 p.m. tions, phone 360-452-2363, Sacred meditation healing ext. 0. — Unity in the Olympics Port Angeles Fine Arts Church, 2917 E. Myrtle St., Center — “Art Is a Gift” show 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. To regisand sale. 1203 E. Lauridsen ter, phone 360-457-3981. Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven Volunteers in Medicine of days a week through Friday. the Olympics health clinic — Free. Phone 360-457-3532. 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 Mental illness family sup- p.m. Free for patients with no port group — For families and insurance or access to health friends of people with mental care. For appointment, phone disorders. Peninsula Commu- 360-457-4431. nity Mental Health Center, 118 Tai chi class — Ginger and E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. Phone Rebecca Brown, 360- Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., 6:30 p.m. $12 per class or $10 457-0431. for three or more classes. No First Step drop-in center experience necessary, wear — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 loose comfortable clothing. p.m. Free clothing and equip- Phone 360-808-5605. ment closet, information and Olympic Peninsula Entrereferrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, preneurs Network — Coldwell computers, fax and copier. Banker Uptown Realty, 1115 E. Front St., 6:30 p.m. Inventors, Phone 360-457-8355. innovators and entrepreneurs Museum at the Carnegie of all ages welcome. Members — Featured exhibit, “Strong cane share resources and talPeople: The Faces of Clallam ent. Phone Tim Riley at 360County.” Miniature exhibit till 460-4655. Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ChilChristmas light tours — dren welcome. Elevator, ADA All Points Charters and Tours. access and parking at rear of Meet bus at Safeway, 110 E. building. Phone 360-452-6779. Third St., 6:30 p.m. $7.50 adults, $3.50 children 6-15, Gastric bypass surgery children younger than 5 free. support group — 114 E. Sixth Tour is about two hours long. St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Refreshments served. For res-

Port Angeles

Now Showing n Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176) “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (PG) “The Fighter” (R) “Little Fockers” (PG-13) “The Tourist” (PG-13) “Tron: Legacy” (PG)

n Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Due Date” (R) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (PG13)

“Unstoppable” (PG-13) “Yogi Bear” (PG)

n The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089) “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” (R) “The Fighter” (R)

n Uptown Theater, Port

Townsend (360-3853883)

“The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (PG)

Port Townsend ■  Tonight at The Upstage, 923 Washington St., the Steve Grandinetti Band will be performing all original music from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. $3 cover; all ages welcome. Phone 360-385-2216 for reservations. ■  On Friday at the Uptown Pub, 1016 Lawrence St., Sylvia Heins will treat you to some jazz standards at 5 p.m.

New Year’s Eve Party List Port Angeles ■  The Junction Roadhouse, junction of U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112 five miles west of Port Angeles: Deadwood Revival, roots, rock and a fun time — goodies, champagne, favors — from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. $15 single, $25 couple. Phone 360-452-9880 for reservations. Phone 360460-7131 for All Points Charters & Tours shuttles to and from beginning after 7 p.m. and until closing. ■  Castaways Restaurant and Night Club, 1213 Marine Drive: Spence Brothers Band, classic rock, 9 p.m. to

1 a.m. Appetizers, prizes. $5 cover. ■  Elks Club, 131 E. First St.: Hilda’s Hope for Life Orphan Benefit dinner buffet, raffle, silent auction, champagne; Big Fine Daddies classic rock. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. $65 per person, $480 per table. ■  Eagles Aerie 483, 110 Penn St.: Last big party in this building, with Jimmy Hoffman Band, country rock, 8 p.m. to midnight. Appetizers, favors. $15 advance, $20 at door. ■  Rick’s Place, 102 W. Front St.: Final Approach, boomer music, 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. ■  Bushwhacker Restaurant, 1527 E. First St.: Prun’d, classic rock, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Sequim and Blyn ■  Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St.: George Snyder’s Oly Jazz Band, big-band music, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Favors, champagne. $5 cover. ■  Old Mill Cafe, 721 Carlsborg Road: John Erskine, piano jazz, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Phone 360-5821583; dinner reservations suggested. ■  7 Cedars Casino, Blyn: At Club Seven,

Kate Lily, vocals, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Pop Culture, rock and roll, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. At the Events Center, Stardust Big Band with vocalist Katie Paige, 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.

Port Townsend ■  The Upstage, 923 Washington St.: Mark Dufresne Band, blues, 8 p.m. to midnight. Dinner package with favors, prizes, champagne. $25 per person. ■  Castle Key, Seventh and Sheridan streets: Ricky Kelly, jazz, 8:30 p.m. to midnight. $8 cover. ■  Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St.: Ragged Mountain, square dance with caller Tim Jenkins. Suggested donation: $6.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or e-mailing news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: John Nelson). Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

ervations, phone 360-460-7131 per meal. Reservations recomor 360-565-1139. mended. Phone 360-4578921. Bariatric surgery support group — Terrace Apartments, PA Peggers Cribbage Club 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 — Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. St. Check-in, 5:30 p.m. Games, 6 p.m. New members welcome. For more information, e-mail Friday papeggers@hughes.net, Guided walking tour — phone 360-808-7129 or visit Historic downtown buildings, www.papeggers.com. an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” ChamFriendship Dinner — First ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- United Methodist Church, Sevroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 enthth and Laurel streets. p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 Doors open, 3 p.m. Dinner, senior citizens and students, 5:30 p.m. Free. Phone 360$6 ages 6 to 12. Children 457-8971. younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, Christmas light tours — ext. 0. All Points Charters and Tours. Meet bus at Safeway, 110 E. Port Angeles Fine Arts Third St., 6:30 p.m. $7.50 Center — “Art Is a Gift” show adults, $3.50 children 6-15, and sale. 1203 E. Lauridsen children younger than 5 free. Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Last Tour is about two hours long. day of exhibit. Free. Phone Refreshments served. For res360-457-3532. ervations, phone 360-460-7131 or 360-565-1139. Bingo — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh Sequim and the St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 360-457-7004. Dungeness Valley Museum at the Carnegie — Featured exhibit, “Strong People: The Faces of Clallam County.” Miniature exhibit till Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Children welcome. Elevator, ADA access and parking at rear of building. Phone 360-452-6779. Introduction to line dance for beginners — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Phone 360-457-7004. The Answer for Youth — Drop-in outreach center for youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

Today Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www. sequimyoga.com.

Chess Club — Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Sequim Ave. 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Bring clocks, sets and boards. All are welcome. Phone 360-681-8481. Health clinic — Free medical services for uninsured or under-insured, Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218.

Sequim Senior Softball — Co-ed recreational league. Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for practice and pick-up games. Phone John Zervos at 360681-2587. Parent connections — First Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 10 a.m. Phone 360-461-9992.

Spanish class — Prairie Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-6814:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 0226.

East Jefferson County Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to noon. Open to men 50 and older and women 45 and older. Phone 360-437-5053 or 360-437-2672 or 360-379-5443.

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses Meditation class — 6 p.m. of Puget Sound and the Strait 92 Plain Jane Lane. Admission of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360by donation. 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Gamblers Anonymous — Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Jefferson County HistoriRoad, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360- cal Museum and shop — 540 460-9662. Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Food Addicts in Recovery children 3 to 12; free to historiAnonymous — Calvary Cha- cal society members. Exhibits pel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. include “Jefferson County’s Phone 360-452-1050 or visit Maritime Heritage,” “James www.foodaddicts.org. Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone Friday 360-385-1003 or visit www. Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain jchsmuseum.org. Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit Rotary Club of East Jefwww.sequimyoga.com. ferson County — Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Walk aerobics — First Bap- Valley Road, Chimacum, 11:45 tist Church of Sequim, 1323 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch meeting, Sequim-Dungeness Way 8 salad $7, meal $10. Phone Ray a.m. Free. Phone 360-683- Serebrin 360-385-6544 or visit 2114. www.clubrunner.ca/Por tal/ Home.aspx?cid=705. Circuit training exercise class — Sequim Community Northwest Maritime CenChurch, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 ter tour — Free tour of new a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. headquarters. Meet docent in Phone Shelley Haupt at 360- chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@ p.m. Elevators available, chilwavecable.com. dren welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone Free Christmas Eve din- 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or ner — Hardy’s Market, 10200 e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. Old Olympic Highway, 11 a.m. till supplies last. Friday Family Caregivers support group — 411 W. Washington St., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Phone Carolyn Lindley, 360-4178554.

Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., noon Phone 360-6814308, or partnership 360-6835635.

Strength and toning exerFrench class — 2 p.m. For cise class — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth more information, phone 360Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per 681-0226. class. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or e-mail Port Townsend and jhaupt6@wavecable.com. Line dancing lessons — High-beginner, intermediate and advanced dancers. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Dropins welcome. $3 per class. Phone 360-681-2826.

Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visitors welcome. Phone: 360-7653164.

Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art.

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden Jefferson County State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for chilToday dren 5 and younger. Exhibits JeffCom 9-1-1 administra- interpret the Harbor Defenses tive board — Port Ludlow Fire of Puget Sound and the Strait Hall, 7650 Oak Bay Road, Port of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Ludlow, 8:30 a.m. Phone Kathy 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ Young at 360-385-3831, ext. olypen.com. 588, e-mail kyoung@jcpsn.us or visit www.jeffcom911.org. Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Port Townsend Aero Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Museum — Jefferson County Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for International Airport, 195 Air- children 3 to 12; free to historiport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. cal society members. Exhibits Admission: $10 for adults, $9 include “Jefferson County’s for seniors, $6 for children ages Maritime Heritage,” “James 7-12. Free for children younger Swan and the Native Amerithan 6. Features vintage air- cans” and “The Chinese in craft and aviation art. Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. Chimacum TOPS 1393 — jchsmuseum.org. Evergreen Coho Resort Club Turn to Things/C2 House, 2481 Anderson Lake


3

Peninsula Daily News

C2

Thursday, December 23, 2010

rdAge

Some things to think about, act on Well! In this very space, two weeks ago today, Dec. 9, 2010, I made a plea for a concerted, national effort to do away with Alzheimer’s disease, all the while feeling guardedly certain that I was, well, spitting in the wind. As it turned out, a number of you agreed with me, potential saliva-based consequences notwithstanding. As it further turns out, the night before said plea (Dec. 8), the U.S. Senate passed the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA) and sent it on to the House of Representatives, and on Dec. 15, the House passed it overwhelmingly.

Help line Mark

were in jail in Harvey Canada, and she was given a number to call back to verify the “truth” of the matter. Understandably, she was more than a bit upset and promptly called the number; indeed, she spoke with “Officer So-and-So, badge number blah, blah,” who confirmed the plight of President’s signature her hapless family. Mom/Grandma panNow all we lack is the icked and wired $5,000president’s signature. plus to the designated desMy goodness! If I’d had any idea that I tination, and Mom/ had that kind of influence Grandma is now $5,000(he said, humbly), I would plus poorer. have had a whole lot more to say about a whole lot Con game more things a whole lot Daughter and grandsooner! daughter were fine, having Speaking of influence, managed to elude Canacould I have some, please? Specifically, I’d like your dian authorities by being nowhere near Canada or permission to influence any Canadian jail. you, because “it” has hapGood for daughter/ pened again. granddaughter; not so A local gal got a call to great for grandma. the effect that her daughLook: This is just a variter and granddaughter

ation on the grandsoncalls-from-Canadian-jail scam, with the call-backand-talk-to-the-officer twist. Phony, bogus, con game! So, may I offer a thought? Unless somebody is having a heart attack or some equally urgent medical event, there is nothing that can’t wait five minutes while you run this by somebody you trust.

Kin incarcerated Any of us would be seriously shook up if we honestly thought that kin (at least, those who aren’t given to routine incarcerations) were incarcerated, so if this happens to you, please, just take a couple of minutes to call somebody you trust and tell them what you just heard, then listen to their advice! Whoever that is won’t be as shook up as you are and will be able to see forests through trees. Please.

Tom Loveday directed the game Friday, Dec. 10, with winners: Brian Robbins-Jack Real, first; Tom Markley-Jodi O’Neill, second; Fay Coupe-Ted Rogers, third; Judy Hagelstein-Bob MacNeal, fourth (north/ south); Bob Wilkinson-Mary Norwood, first; Frank Herodes-Nancy Herodes, second; Vern Nunnally-Jim

Wiitala, third; Gerry PaulBarbara Spoerri, fourth (east/west). Vern Nunnally directed Monday, Dec. 13, with winners: Larry Phelps-Bob Wilkinson, first; Mona VanDyke-Ted Rogers, second; Jim De Vogler-Fay Coupe, third; Tom Markley-Jodi O’Neill, fourth (north/south); June Nelson-Gert Wiitala, first; Frank Brown-Dave Jackson, second; Ted Miller-

Tom Loveday, third; Sharon Hills-Eileen Rogers, fourth (east/west).

Chimacum Duplicate Bridge Club — The winners Tuesday, Dec. 14, were: Jim Tilzey-Vern Nunnally, first; Suzanne Berg-Tom Loveday, second; Mike Edwards-Fay Coupe, third; Thomas Larsen-Leonard Hills, fourth.

Things to Do Continued from C1 youth (6-17); free for science

center members. “Whales in Port Townsend Marine Sci- Our Midst” until Dec. 31. Phone ence Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for org.

We need hope Now, Friday is Christmas Eve, and the day after that is Christmas Day. You may be admiring a Christmas tree or a menorah, holding your breath ’til Boxing Day or pacing yourself in preparation for New Year’s Eve. Or, you may be totally overdosed on the whole thing and, like a lot of the rest of us, feeling scared for yourself or your family or whomever else you might care about in one of the scariest times that’s come along in a long time. I get it. Me, too.

Something different

So, let’s try something different: Let’s try fooling ourselves, and everybody else, by acting like life is OK. Medicare deadline By acting like there’s a And do we realize that reason to look forward to there are only eight calentomorrow, that things will dar days left in the openget better, that “this, too, enrollment period for Medi- shall pass,” that we’ll make care Part D and Advantage it (somehow) — by acting like there’s hope. Plans?

Duplicate Bridge Results Sequim

After that, unless your Advantage plan is leaving the area, you’re out of luck and out of choices until October 2011. And that concludes our business for today.

Yes, I am talking about pretending; some might call it “make believe.” Whatever your religious, cultural or philosophical bent might be, why not just think of it as an “excuse?” Well, really! We all kind of agree on other holidays that don’t require anyone to be a card-carrying member of any particular religion, and this season doesn’t have to represent a gun-to-your-head approach to salvation. It could just represent “hope.”

Have we forgotten everything we’ve ever learned about courage? About attitude? About faith? About hope?

Our ‘job’

This is our “job,” and now is the time to do it. We will make it; we can do this! And, in the meantime, we can treat each other gently. I don’t care where you are or how you are or how grim things might look to you right now. They need Step up, elders us! Now, let me say someSo we need to quit thing specifically to whining, quit hiding and “elders,” and we know who quit being afraid. we are. We’ve seen worse, but Ready? maybe they haven’t. Come on, you guys! So be who they need us They need us! to be and stop worrying If there was ever a time in recent memory when the about what you can’t afford, because the gift rest of these folks need us they need won’t cost us any to jump in and lead by example, here it is! We can money. The gift they need is do this! hope. We’ve been there, done ________ that, and we’re still standing (well, more or less, Mark Harvey is director of sometimes)! Clallam/Jefferson Information &

Looking for purpose We say we’re looking for “purpose?” Well, here it is! Speak up!

Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port AngelesSequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360-374-9496 (West End), or by e-mailing harvemb@ dshs.wa.gov.

Fair looks for vendors crafters, including members of the Sequim Lavender SEQUIM — Applications Growers Association with are available to participate lavender and lavender prodin the 2011 Sequim Lavenucts, line Fir Street in der Festival Street Fair. downtown Sequim. The 15th annual festival brings visitors from across Participant booths the country and around the world to the weekend’s All participant booths events, including the juried must be open Friday, July Street Fair. 15, and Saturday, July 16, During the Street Fair, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and more than 120 artists and Sunday, July 17, from Peninsula Daily News

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. All items presented for sale must be made by the artist. Street Fair applications must be postmarked by Jan. 25 and include photographs of items and the participant’s booth. For more information on booth requirements or to download an application, phone 877-681-3035 or visit www.lavenderfestival.com.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military,

millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com.

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone

360-385-3628, ext. 102, or e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

HOPE FOR CLEAR SKIES

BY KEVIN G. DER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ AC R O S S 1 Not live 7 Author Roald 11 Shop dresser 15 How something may be veiled 21 “Ball Four” author 22 Big name in athletic footwear 23 Rama’s kingdom 24 Whence the line “I fear Greeks even when they bring gifts” 25 Feature of some pool balls 26 A long time past 28 Enthrones 29 At night 31 Football’s Sanders 32 Long-shot candidate 33 ___-to 34 ___ Kippur 35 What the focus of a 125-Across will do at its climax 37 “___ said …” 38 Glossy black bird 40 One way to stop 42 Mil. address 44 Driller?: Abbr. 45 Kisser 47 Clone of an optical medium’s contents 49 Wang of fashion 50 Lulus 52 Drinking and gambling 54 Basic solutions 55 Breach 57 Dummies 61 Six-time All-Star third baseman for the 1970s Dodgers 63 Remove drapes from, as a room 66 Objects of interest in a 125-Across

69 First female U.S. secretary of state 72 Not yet delivered 74 How some things are made 75 Jackie’s #2 77 Think probable 78 Pliny possessive 79 Beach seen from Diamond Head 80 Once, in the past 81 1914 Edgar Rice Burroughs novel set in an underground land 88 Like many cakes 89 “Honor is ___ scutcheon”: Shak. 91 Bygone European capital 92 Subterfuge 93 Track star Owens 94 Many an avid observer of a 125-Across 100 Atlantic City locale, with “the” 103 Loser to McKinley 104 Duff Beer vendor 105 Spaceship attire 106 Slump 109 Slugger Roberto 111 Jackie’s #1 114 Proust’s “___ Way” 116 Book set? 119 Italian lover’s coo 120 Indian royal 122 Deep-dish dishes 123 Heads outside together? 124 Novelty glasses 125 Event on Dec. 21, 2010, viewable in North and South America, depicted visually in this puzzle 128 Turkish pooh-bahs

131 Flying Cloud, e.g. 132 Student’s stat. 133 Dub 137 With 146-Across, what the center of this puzzle is doing during a 125-Across 140 Folds 146 See 137-Across 149 To whom Hamlet says “Get thee to a nunnery” 150 There from the start 151 It marks the target on a curling rink 152 Munchkins 153 Pardner, say 154 Commodore’s insignia

27 Youthful prank in a car 30 Superhero played by Liam Neeson in a 1990 film 32 Era of ignorance 33 Kind of lane 35 How things may be laid 36 Key of Bach’s “The Art of Fugue” 39 Director Anderson 41 Yankee great Joe, colloquially 43 Amorous skunk in cartoons 46 Golden State campus inits. 48 How things may be lit or remembered 50 Lincoln Center production DOWN 1 Delivery people, briefly 51 1974 Japanese Nobelist 52 Feeling 2 Zero 53 Extended solo 3 Battle over domain 56 Crackerjacks 4 Haggling 5 Sailor who debuted in a 58 Tundra or wetland 59 Terbium or thulium 1929 comic 60 Father-and-son actors 6 Juan’s January 62 Actor Morales 7 Glen Canyon ___ 8 Actress Gardner 63 Promising proposal 9 Dharma follower 64 Prepare to fight 10 Tiramisu features 65 “Grey’s Anatomy” extra 11 Catalog 67 One of the Islamic 12 Steak ___ virtues 13 Veer back 68 Grateful response 14 Comic Philips 69 Big name in athletic 15 Aircraft gauges footwear 16 Kind of couplet for 70 Column in a dating Chaucer questionnaire 17 “___ out?” 71 Optimist’s focus 18 Paper for which 73 Aquarium fish Murray Kempton and Jim Dwyer won 76 One getting a lift? Pulitzers 82 “___ yellow ribbon …” 19 Trace of blood? 83 Place to put bags 20 Football meas.

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Solution on Page A5

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84 Laugh part 85 E.M.T.’s training 86 Science 87 Reagan and others 90 Tactic used against Britain by Napoleon 93 Boarding aids 95 Out-and-out 96 Protective membrane 97 Beethoven’s “Appassionata,” e.g. 98 One that overflows 99 Fender bender, e.g.

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118 Castaway’s locale 120 The year 1045 121 Japanese “thanks” 126 Need for KenKen 127 Bistro offering 128 Rent-___ 129 Hang open 130 1968 U.S. Open champ 134 Mine entrance 135 Bart Simpson’s grandmother 136 Pitcher

138 Suffix with vir139 Never: Ger. 141 Lennon’s lady 142 “Charlotte’s Web” inits. 143 Dawn 144 Italian God 145 Forest game 147 Clinton or Obama, once: Abbr. 148 Laugh part


Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

Fun ’n’ Advice

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Exclusion not part of the holidays DEAR ABBY: I am writing about the letter from “Turkey Eater in Texas,” who resented having a vegan Thanksgiving to accommodate two family members. I think your answer missed what being a gracious host is about. The entire meal shouldn’t have to consist of vegan items. However, it wouldn’t be a big deal to serve a vegan main dish and have those individuals also bring their favorite items. Making them bring a complete meal excludes them from a family gathering, and what fun is that? After your column ran, my father called to tell me that holiday dinners would no longer accommodate my daughter’s celiac disease. She’s 9 and struggles with being “different.” When she ingests gluten, she has cramps and vomiting, loses weight and risks significant long-term consequences. Next year, we will host the holiday dinners. Our extended family can join us — or not. The bottom line is that if you exclude family (for being vegan or having celiac disease), you’ve done the opposite of what holidays are about. Kaye in Alabama

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Dear Kaye: That’s true. What bothered me about the letter from “Turkey Eater” was the idea that his brother expected him to cater the entire Thanksgiving dinner to his nieces’ preference to eat vegan. If the writer had said he had been asked to ensure there were dishes that would not inflame (literally) his nieces’ serious medical condition, I would have answered differently. What has surprised me about the comments I have received from readers about that letter has been the amount of prejudice and anger expressed against vegetarians by more than a few. But read on for some responses from vegans:

Garfield

Dear Abby: I am a vegan in a meat-and-potatoes family. For 15 years, I have spent every holiday and family gathering listen-

Momma

dear abby ing to them degrade my food Van Buren choices and try to “convert” me back to my “senses.” I have never expected them to cook for me. I always pack my own foods since they are unwilling to branch out and try new foods. When I have brought a dish, they all loved it, as long as they didn’t know it was vegan and that I had prepared it. I find many people are resentful if we host a dinner party with only vegan food. They expect us to accommodate them by cooking meat but feel we should fend for ourselves at a function they hold. I encourage people to please get over the stigma of vegan/vegetarian and sample something new once in awhile. If I can endure every family gathering taking place at a steakhouse, I don’t think it’s unreasonable to have one night when they experience how tasty food without meat in it can be. Rachel in Seattle

Abigail

Dear Abby: I am 31 and have been a vegetarian my entire life. I come from a meat-loving family and have never insisted they change an entire meal to accommodate my eating habits. Instead, I take food I know I will eat and share it with everyone else. “Turkey Eater’s” vegan relatives should realize they’re in the minority. If they each brought a veganfriendly dish or two, they’d have three to six things to choose from — and that’s plenty. Eating Well in New Mexico

––––––––

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your interest will lead to something you least expect. Putting your best foot forward and showing your generous spirit and charm to everyone you come in contact with will teach you a valuable lesson about life, love and success. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You may feel as if you have to explain your current position but, the more you talk, the more complicated things will get. Be entertaining and cheerful but avoid discussing any of your considerations for the new year. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Elaborate all you want but, when it comes to the bottom line, doing will make what you say believable. Go the distance. Your thoughtfulness will be well received and rewarded in ways you cannot imagine. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Get to the bottom of any emotional situation that is looming. This is not the time to let on that you are disappointed but it is the time to make sure you don’t let someone else down. A change of plans is likely. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Money matters will be of concern. Stay within your budget and you will enjoy the last week of the year. A pending agreement can be settled if you work fast and hard to do whatever legwork is required. 4 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t overdo it or let anyone push responsibilities on your shoulders that you really cannot handle. Less will be more this year when it comes to spending money, travel and commitments. Follow your intuition. 2 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): A last-minute change will be the icing on the cake this festive season. Use your imagination and you will thrill the people you love. Taking on a work responsibility to ensure that it’s finished on time may require your taking it home with you. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Not everyone will share your opinion or your attitude. Observe before you make a move that may not be in your best long-term interest. You can stabilize your situation by accommodating someone who helped you in the past. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s not too late to make changes. If you aren’t happy with something or someone, make it clear what you want and expect. You have the upper hand but must act upon it if you want things to turn in your favor. 5 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t leave work unfinished even if you have to put in extra hours. Unless you finish what you started, it will be difficult to enjoy the festivities. Someone you love will be proud of you and will reward you accordingly. 3 stars

By Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Spend time with the person you can share and reflect with or who makes you laugh and feel good about yourself. Change is heading your way and clearing the dead weight in your life is a must. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You may not like what someone at home is doing but grin and bear it or emotions will flare up and make your world difficult. No matter what it is that you do not like, know that it will pass or change very quickly if you don’t make a fuss. 2 stars

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

Dennis the Menace

C3

Doonesbury

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!


C4

Classified

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

DRIVER: Looking for LOST: Large gold BULL: 8 mo. an exp. Class A-CDL nugget on long gold $550. 683-2304. driver. Motivated, chain. Possibly one CHEV: ‘99 Monte hard worker, Local month ago. Reward. Carlo. 84K mi. delivery, home every 457-1329 $2,000. 461-6758. night. Must be able CHEV: ‘91 S-10. Runs to make repeated SEMI-END DUMP hand truck deliveries ‘85 Freightliner, Cum$800 down a ramp. Dou461-6246 mins 400BC, 24 yard bles and hazmat a DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 plus. Will need a end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ bath. $695. TWIC card. Contact obo. 417-0153. 360-681-0140 Tony 461-2607. GLASPLY: ‘86 15’ LHASAPOOS: 2 black STUDDED TIRES Runabout. Exc. females, $350 ea. (1) (4) Big Horn Maxxis, cond. $3,000. LT265/75R 16. With 3 mo. old black Toy 360-461-0157 (4) Chev 6-hole ultra Poodle, $300. mag wheels. Used 477-8349 HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini one season. $500. bike. Runs good. Peninsula Classified 360-808-2934 $600/obo. 681-8023. 360-452-8435

23

22

Community Notes

BANANA BELT KELLY Help celebrate 1 1/2 years by Christmas Shopping in the cozy old barn. Home decor, garden, silk flowers, jewelry from Bali, purses, soaps, lotions, and gifts. Take River Rd. exit, head south to Secor and follow signs to 481 Riverside Rd., Sequim. Tues.-Sat., 10-3. PRENATAL YOGA Feel a sense of support and community with other pregnant women as you increase flexibility, strength, circulation and balance. A regular yoga practice can help to reduce swelling, insomnia, back and leg pain commonly associated with pregnancy. The class is safe for all three trimesters. 8-week class for expecting moms begins Sunday, Jan. 9. For more information or to register, please e-mail Jennifer Veneklasen at jennven@hotmail.c om or phone 360775-8746. Space is limited.

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

FOUND: Bike. Boys, red/black, QFC area, Sequim. Call to identify. 797-4985. LOST: Cat. Sequim. Short-haired adult neutered male, gray w/white bib, feet. Downtown area. 681-0403 LOST: Cat. Siamese Blue Point, blue collar with tags, middle aged female, Mains Farm, Sequim. 582-9227 LOST: Dog. Chihuahua, black, Samara, 14th and N Street area, P.A. 452-4662 LOST: Large gold nugget on long gold chain. Possibly one month ago. Reward. 457-1329 LOST: Wallet. With pilots license and passport, between Peabody and Valley, P.A. Friday, Dec. 17th. 360-477-3865. MISSING: Black wallet w/silver star, from my car behind P.A. Peninsula Children’s Clinic, Mon., 12/20. Reward. Any info call 360-477-8607

24

Personals

JOSH, used to work for 10 Forward. Please call, have a job for you 452-4809

25

Personals

I’M STILL TRYING TO FIND that special country lady who wants a life full of love, togetherness, being best friends with a partner that she has never had before. NS, ND, HWP. A lady 40-55 with a sense of humor, a lady that loves the outdoors from boating, snow and water skiing, fishing, shooting, taking a trip on a Harley and 4x4ing up on logging roads or ocean beaches plus a lot more activities. Bottom line, just having fun together. This is for a white male, 60, 6’, HWP, brown hair, hazel eyes, beard, excellent health, who is very affectionate, romantic, caring, giving from the heart, NS, loves the outdoors and animals, home life also. Email: wildcard@ olypen.com

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures!

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. City of Sequim is seeking qualified professionals for the following positions: Engineer Engineering Tech II WRF Electronics Tech PW Admin Asst II Accounting Asst III Finance Project Manager Details at http:// www.ci.sequim.wa.u s. Send cover letter, resume and job application to Kathy Brown-HR Manager, 152 West Cedar St., Sequim, WA 98363, or email kbrown@ ci.sequim.wa. EOE. DRIVER: Looking for an exp. Class A-CDL driver. Motivated, hard worker, Local delivery, home every night. Must be able to make repeated hand truck deliveries down a ramp. Doubles and hazmat a plus. Will need a TWIC card. Contact Tony 461-2607. Marine Painter. Seeking applicants proficient at painting Boot Stripes, Show coats, topside, hull and interior. Work with Fiberglass, Wood and Metal surfaces of vessels. Apply epoxy’s, grind corrosion and fair hulls. Two years of experience with application of urethane paints, as well as prep, fairing and or body work. Ability follow directions & procedures. 360-417-0709 hr@platypusmarine.c om

Grab Their ATTENTION!

Help Wanted

DELIVERY DRIVER Part-time. 3-7 p.m., Mon.-Fri., rotating weekends. Clean driving record req. Durable medical equip. set up/maintenance exp. preferred. Apply at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. LOGGING COMPANY Looking for log truck driver. Experienced only, clean driving record, current CDL and medical card. Drug testing required. Immediate opening. Paid on percentage. 360-460-7292 OPERATIONS SUPPORT PERSON With a good background in accounting and in tools such as Excel, QuickBooks, etc. Good pay and benefits with a longestablished local company. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#189/Support Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Accounts Payable Technician Part-time, 10 hrs. wk. complete job description and application at www.crescentschooldistrict.or g or contact 360928-3311, ext. 100. RECEPTIONIST/ BOOKKEEPER For Sequim accounting firm. Must have good communication skills. Call for appt. 683-4149. RESIDENTIAL AIDES FULL-TIME OR ON-CALL Assist chronically mentally ill adults in daily living skills, cooking, and housekeeping. Req h.s./GED, exp pref’d. $10.13-$11.05/hr, DOE. FT w/benes, or add $1.hr for on-call work. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE RESIDENTIAL STAFF For new Maloney Heights 28-unit residence for chronically homeless: º Site Coordinator, Bachelor’s degr with 3-5 yrs. relevant exper. $29$31K, DOE. º Residential Aides, Assist w/daily living skills, cooking & housekeeping. Req h.s./GED; exper pref’d. $10.13-$11.05 hr., DOE. Both posns FT w/benes. resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE

31

Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SWITCHBOARD/ RECEPTIONIST/ GENERAL CLERICAL Peninsula Community mental Health Center seeks versatile and mature team player for busy front office. Must have excellent interpersonal and customer svc skills and be able to type and use gen off equip. Recent exper in health care office is a plus. F.T. w/benefits. Some eve hrs. $10.50-$11.00/hr start, DOQ. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325 The Museum & Arts Center located in Sequim, WA, is seeking applicants for the position of executive director. Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. The complete position description is available on the Museum & Arts Center website: www.macsequim.org. Copies are also available at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim. Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest with resume to: MAC Executive Director Search Committee PO Box 2056 Sequim, WA 98382

34

Work Wanted

HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, move out’s, rentals, offices, RVs, help with holiday messes, No Job is too big or too small. Call for your free estimate 360-808-3017, Port Angeles and surrounding area.

DIGITAL ADVERTISING SALES PROFESSIONAL WE’RE LOOKING FOR an Internet-savvy advertising sales professional. www.peninsuladailynews.com is the area’s number 1 website with over 600,000 impressions every month. This is a high-profile opportunity for you to showcase your strengths as a self-starter and make a real impact on our continued success by growing our online advertising. At least one year of proven experience selling advertising for a Web site preferred. Experience with online advertising plus demonstrated ability to generate sales through in-person, business-to-business sales are required.

Pictures

Strong selling and closing skills required.

Borders

We will be providing competitive compensation -- base plus commission -- based on proven experience.

Bold Lines Yellow Highlight on Sunday

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

www.peninsula dailynews.com

www.peninsula dailynews.com

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Work Wanted

I Do Errands, Chores and More ∞Organize closets, cupboards, drawers and files. ∞Grocery shop, prepare a meal/do the laundry. ∞Water plants, walk the dog, light yard work. ∞Holiday special, Christmas lights, decorations, gift wrapping. Lynn 360-797-3555 P.A. AUTO TINTING 20% discount. 360-912-1948 PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com. We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@ helpertek.com

Compensation based on experience and will include medical, dental, vision, 401K and more. Free parking and no tiring commute. We are family-focused, community-minded -- we are the main news provider for people in two counties on the North Olympic Peninsula. E-mail resume, with a detailed cover letter addressing our requirements (above) and your salary requirements plus three references, to suzanne.delaney@peninsuladailynews.com Please include “Digital Sales Professional” in the subject line. Many thanks.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officelive.com I'm Sew Happy! WHO ECONOMY MUSIC SERVICE. 582-3005. Yard Work and Odd Jobs. Xmas light hanging, tree and hedge trimming, weed-eating, weeding, gutter cleaning, hauling, and any odd job you can find. Experienced and dependable. 2 men at $35 per hr. 461-7772

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Master bath newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertop. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 30x24 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $208,000 360-460-7503

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

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All inquiries must be directed to the mailing address above. The search committee will only consider applications received on or before Wed., Dec. 29, 2010.

Add:

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34

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

Homes

1.4 ACRES IN THE CITY Solid brick, 4 Br., 3 full baths, 3,408 sf nicely remodeled homefenced yard, huge south deck, 672 sf finished garage, living room, family room and rec room with wet bar. Large master with huge walk-in closet and bath. Excellent central location. Can not be seen from the street - very private! $360,000. ML251910. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Beautiful 3 Br., 2 bath home on the waterfront. Great views through the expanse of windows in the great room. Large deck, hot tub, dock, 30 AMP RV hook-up with dump, oversized attached garage with storage. $529,000 ML251181/80935 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Beautiful, century old home, with an amazing view of the P.A. harbor. Also enjoy an unstoppable view of the Olympics from your backyard. Hardwood throughout the home, although most of the home is currently carpeted. Many updates still needed, but allows the opportunity to make this your home. $325,000. ML252095/138514 Shawnee Hathaway Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED AND AFFORDABLE 3 Br., 1.5 bath home in Sequim. Large sun room and patio in the back yard. Great convenient location near schools and shopping. New kitchen counter and sink. Laminate floors and upgraded vinyl windows. $174,900. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 BUILT TO MAXIMIZE THE VIEW Of Ediz Hook to Mt. Baker and beyond! Well designed and custom built 2 Br., 2.5 bath home with granite countertops, hickory cabinets and allergy friendly cork floors. $389,000. ML251854/144655 Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. COUNTRY CHARMER Picture perfect home, beautifully landscaped and private. 3 Br., 2 baths, formal dining, eat-in kitchen. $235,000. ML241697/29098253 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Homes

COUNTRY LIVING, CITY CONVENIENCE Home is a 2 Br., 2 bath, 2005 model in excellent shape situated on a beautiful country acre parcel. The location? You can have it both ways being perfectly positioned between Sequim and Port Angeles – it’s just a short drive either way. You won’t find many newer homes on an acre for this price! Check it out and call it home. $189,000. ML252040. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East COZY UP FOR WINTER In this home with a wonderful fireplace in the country kitchen. View the snow in the mountains from this 3 Br., 1.75 bath home, be equidistant from Sequim and Port Angeles, and have over 3 acres of land to call your own. $279,900. ML251626. Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East ESTATE SETTING Only 3 minutes from town, open floor plan with hardwood floors, slab granite counters throughout, beautifully landscaped grounds, motor home garage and heated shop. $575,000 ML252089/138274 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GORGEOUS FAIRWAY TOWNHOME Desirable Sunland 2 Br., 2 bath plus den townhome located on the 10th fairway with many extras. Light airy kitchen, large living room with cathedral ceiling. Master bath has jetted tub, large tiled shower and powder room. $287,000. ML252435/161644 Roland miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY GREAT DEAL FOR YOU This huge 1,936 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath home is well laid out with open floor plan, big kitchen, and a large living room. And check out the walkin granite shower! And don’t miss the covered back porch. Located next to a green belt in an area of nice homes, it will surely appreciate in time. Priced well below assessed value. $259,000. ML252453 Dan Blevins Carroll Realty 457-1111

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22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

Lost and Found

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Office Hours

Homes

GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD This Port Angeles home is located in a wonderful neighborhood, close to schools and parks. 3 Br., 2.5 bath with an easy flow floor plan, new roof, large kitchen, brick fireplace and large lot (.24 acres). The attached two car garage is easily accessed via a paved alley. $189,000. ML251906. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9189 ‘H’ IS FOR HO HO HOME Bright, light and spacious single level home with new flooring, upgraded kitchen counters and bathroom fixtures. Large lawn backyard with deck for entertaining and the fun life. Large family room off kitchen and dining area adds spaciousness and flow for comfort and connection. 3 hall closets for your linens, pantry and all those holiday decorations! Bright windowed rooms, 2 car garage with additional carport and 2 sheds for your storage pleasure. $184,999. ML251174. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company HIGH BANK WATERFRONT Private beach with boat launch, fire pit and oysters! 2 Br., 2 baths. Large kitchen, living room has vaulted ceilings with large stone propane fireplace. 600’ deck. On 1.81 acres. $369,000. ML156039. Nancy Rathke 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow Located feet away from trails at Lincoln Park, schools nearby. New vinyl. Updated master bath. Newer carpet on stairs and upper level. Room for RV parking in back alley. $169,000 ML252431/161445 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NEW LISTING 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,758 sf. Gotta see this one! Hardwood floors? Got ‘em! New carpeting? Got it! New (nearly) roof? Got it! Fenced back yard? Got it! Updated kitchen? Got it! Charm? Got that, too! $165,000. ML252432 Brook Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

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DOWN 1 Stockpile 2 Old air fare?

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51

Homes

MOUNTAIN VIEW NEW CONSTRUCTION On 2.53 acres, east of Port Angeles. Great room with 9’ ceiling, 2 Br., 2 bath, plus study, and a 1 Br., 1 bath guest cottage. Top quality throughout the 2,487 sf. $364,000. ML240981. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY Remodeled 1920’s 2 Br., 1 bath. Large updated kitchen with new countertops, flooring and appliances. Bath has new tile floor and new fixtures. New carpet and paint throughout. $145,000. ML252232/145784 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SALTWATER AND COURSE VIEWS Gas stove, cherry cabinets, granite counters, 2 decks off kitchen/dining, 2 master suites, separate golf cart garage. Enjoy Sunland amenities. $515,000. ML250630/46530 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SANTA’S CHOICE New granite counters, new carpeting. Move right in condition. 2,487 sf, 2 lots, outside water feature and 4 Br., 3 baths with room to entertain. Daylight basement features wet bar and family room. Plenty of room for guests or family. Great home, great price. $334,000. ML252056 Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SANTA’S CLOSING COSTS With an offer accepted in December, buyer qualifies for a 2% credit for closing costs. Beautifully remodeled 4 Br. home with all the character of the old days combined with the convenience and style of today. The updated kitchen is awesome. The accessory building is a bonus to use as an office, fitness room, or your own personal time-out room. $280,000. ML250181. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

New Medical Office

97315731

space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. THINGS TO DO IN THE SNOW

S S K T S S A S T F I R D L C By John Lampkin

3 Kind of ray emitted by a supernova 4 Greek mount 5 Venomous arachnid 6 It may be medicinal 7 Nuke-testing dept. 8 Much modern business 9 Continue the journey, oaterstyle 10 Corrode 11 Seasonal smoked salmon? 12 Dated 13 Paired pullers 21 Ger. setting 22 Blue toon 26 Dating concern 28 Sixth-day creation 29 Seasonal rooftop noises? 31 British nobleman 32 Kid 33 “Rubáiyát” poet Khayyám 34 One-time pal of Baker and Charlie? 35 Seasonal Homes

SILENT NIGHT And joy-filled days can be yours in this water view home, great room with wood stove, efficient kitchen, wraparound deck, secret garden, fenced, community beach. Delightful, tranquil, and yours for only $249,999. ML251501/102383 Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SPACIOUS AND COMFORTABLE Home in West Alder Estates. Short distance to Safeway and medical offices. 3 Br., 2 bath, 3rd Br. has built-ins for a great office. Room for a small garden in back. Storage shed is big enough to be a small shop. Easycare landscaping. $34,900. ML252327. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SPACIOUS SUNLAND HOME 3 Br., 3 baths, upper level has 2 and 2, lower level has 1 and 1. Formal dining and nook, 2 fireplaces plus oversized garage. Enjoy Sunland amenities. $289,000 ML252062/136048 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND TERRIFIC CLASSIC HOME Great downtown location. 1 Br., full bath, formal dining and kitchen all on the main floor. 2 more bedrooms and bath upstairs. Seller says that there are fir wood floors under the carpeting. Good size, fully fenced backyard. $185,000. ML252386/42881 Mark Macedo 477-9244 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

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C5

Lots/ Acreage

Great lot at Lake Sutherland’s Maple Grove to build your summer home or year-round home base. Great mountain views, lake views, and lot includes boat slip, plus all the amenities of the development. Great price at $70,000 so start thinking and make plans. ML252442. Beep Adams 417-2794 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

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12/23/10

N N K S D E A A C R E Y I E T

I A I E L S V H O P E M A L N

© 2010 Universal Uclick

C B D I T I E E U R B E O D I

I I G L K S D G N I B U T M R

R H E L S S M E T S Y G I S P

T N L E E R U T A R E P M E T

www.wonderword.com

N A M W O N S R R E K K E B O

B A O T A P E E Y H T C A E O

G L S L O V M N C T O S A L F

P L P R I G L O O N E C A T F

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Ball, Banks, Bases, Castle, Chill, Climb, Count, Dance, Days, Deep, Delight, Drifts, Event, Flakes, Footprints, Games, Hats, Hockey, Icing, Igloo, Inches, Kids, Layer, Leader, Merry, Moment, Plan, Play, Plow, Ride, Roads, Safety, Settle, Shiver, Shovel, Skating, Skid, Skiing, Slide, Snowman, Snowmobile, Sport, Stack, Storm, Streets, Taste, Temperature, Time, Tubing Yesterday’s Answer: Folklore

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

DEVEL ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

CHITK (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

costume? 37 Pianist Laredo 40 Like trailers on the road 41 Ottoman 44 “At Seventeen” singer Janis 46 Cloverleaf cover 48 Political refugee 50 Cleverness 52 Join 54 Tippecanoe’s

Commercial

DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION Own a piece of P.T. history. High viability/potential. 1 block south of Thomas Street roundabout, 3,800 sf, circa 1920s, R3 zoning. $235,000 360-385-7653 MINI STORAGE BUILDING 12 unit mini-storage building in down town Sequim. Perfect central location for long term tenants. (9) units are 10x22, (2) units are 12x22, (1) unit is 11x22. All units have power and garage doors. $153,000. ML251173 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 RURAL COMMERCIAL This this 1.17 acre parcel west of Carlsborg has a 6,200 sf building and separate 936 sf garage. Zoned for a wide variety of commercial uses. Located in an area of other, quality commercial buildings! $495,000. ML252175 Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE 683-0660

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

12/23/10

partner, in an 1840 campaign 55 Last in a series 56 Sonoran smackeroos 57 Saint with a fire 58 Hurt severely 60 “Mon Oncle” director 61 Nymph who loved her own voice 63 Put on

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Lots/ Acreage

CARLSBORG: 1 acre lot, mtn. view, flat, PUD water, power, phone. $49,500. 681-3992 HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Ready to build. 1.86 acre parcel with inyour-face mountain views. Paved streets and a location convenient to both Sequim and P.A. add to the appeal. CC&Rs to protect your investment in this newer neighborhood of nice homes. $79,950. ML252427. Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company There are 3 nice, level 5 acre parcels just west of Joyce for only $69,000 each. Near fishing, camping and hunting. Power, water and phone in at the road. Buyer will need to purchase a Crescent Water share. Owner will consider financing. Manufactured Homes are okay but must be at least 1,200 sf and must be less than 8 years old. $529,000. ML252411. Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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G K S I N T D C T N S E A L S

Solution: 9 letters

Houses

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EMBACE

YODMEB Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

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Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540. CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., no smoke, new carp. $650. 457-8438. P.A.: 1 Br. Spectacular water and mtn view on the bluff. Quiet building. No smoking/ pets. $625. 360-582-7241 P.A.: 1 Br., nice, no pets/smoke. 1st/last dep. $395. 452-1234 P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244

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Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br. senior cottage, all utilities incl. except phone, W/D, housekeeping and dining services avail upon request. Inquire at Park View Villas, corner of 8th and G St., P.A. 452-7222 for showing. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

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Houses

3 Br., 1.5 bth, new carpet/paint. LR w/fireplace insert. Two car garage. Hot tub. $1125 First, last, dep. Non-smk/pets. Contact (206)8983252 Address: 1527 W. 10th. A Furnished 3 Br., 2 bath VIEW Home in Port Townsend. Remodeled & Upgraded. $1,400. Also for sale @ $399,900 MLS# 96766 24 Hr FREE Recorded Info 1-888-873-5447 ext. 400

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Beautifully furnished 1 bd, 1 ba home with carport on 5 quiet acres, e. of PA. 180 degree marine views. $850/month incl cable TV/Internet, and $110/month electricity credit. No pets. 360-452-9471.

Yesterday’s

Houses

CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath. $695. 360-681-0140

WEST P.A.: Newer 3 Br., 2 ba, W/D, NS. $1,000 + deposit. 460-7454, 670-9329

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Room $450 mo, util. and cable incl. No pets. 460-4408 WANTED: Room to Rent. Quiet female looking for long-term room to rent Sequim/surrounding areas. Service dog well-trained. No drug use! 360-477-8368. tessnmolly@yahoo.co m

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Spaces RV/ Mobile

RV SPACES: $375 mo., incl. W/S/G, WiFi, Cable. 461-6672.

Great view, central P.A. 119 Fogarty. 3 bd, 1.5 bath. Credit/refs. Occupied, don't knock. 805-448-7273

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Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. H 2 br 1 ba......$700 H 2 br 1 ba......$850 H 3 br 2 ba......$950 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 3 ba....$1350 HOUSES IN SEQUIM H 2 br 1 ba.......$900 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1100 STORAGE UNITS FROM $40-$100 MO.

360-417-2810 More Properties at www.jarentals.com MONTERRA: 3 Br., 2 bath. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. Credit check. 360-582-1589 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $600 mo., $600 dep. 460-5290. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $1,100. 452-1395. P.A.: 3 Br., 3 bath. Upscale, location, 2 car garage, yard, energy efficient. No smoking, no pets. $900. 360-452-9458. P.A.: 4 Br, 1.5 ba, no smoking. $1,000 mo, $1,000 sec. 417-0153 P.A.: Nice, furnished. 1 Br. $900. Call for details. 461-9684. P.A.: Small 1 Br., water view, W/D, near Albertsons. $575 mo., dep. 452-8092. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced, in town, $500 deposit. $1,100. 683-1695.

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

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Appliances

APPLIANCES AVAILABLE. Whirlpool side-by-side fridge, white, with water hookup, $300. GE convection oven with glass top, works great, $200. Kenmore washer and dryer set, they work great, super capacity, heavy duty, $300. 461-3164 pl lv msg. Hot water heater. GE, 50 gal., HYBRID. Brand new in box. $1,200. 683-7990. evermore@olypen.co m

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Ans:

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, on 20 acres, livestock ok, beautiful view. $1,300/mo. 1st, last, dep., references. 683-9176.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

ACROSS 1 Ptolemaic constellation that is now divided into Carina (the keel), Puppis (the poop deck) and Vela (the sails) 5 Utter 10 Exxon forerunner 14 Miller’s product 15 Grade leader? 16 Peak 17 West Point team 18 Mountain nymph 19 Hammock support 20 Seasonal cheeses? 23 Place purveying potent pints 24 Grab from the shelves 25 Miller’s salesman 27 Dickens’s Heep 30 Fried chicken piece 33 Klutzes 36 “What’s cooking?” elicitor 38 Race with batons 39 Finance major’s deg. 40 Fuming 42 Sitcom planet 43 Pooped 45 Con __: briskly, on scores 46 Wheelbarrow feature 47 Empathize 49 Gallery events 51 Troll 53 Peak 57 Feathered runner 59 Seasonal seasoning? 62 Put down 64 “__ under pressure”: guts, to Hemingway 65 Potent pints 66 Japanese soup 67 Retirement plans, informally 68 Kids’ new block since 1958 69 Foreshadowing 70 “Cats” poet 71 Musical syllables

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

Furniture

BED: Sealy Backsaver, full matt/ box, metal headboard, footboard, frame, great shape. $300/obo. 681-3299. COFFEE TABLES: 2 matching, 1 large, $50/obo and 1 small, $40/obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685.

(Answers tomorrow) SINGE HICCUP CHEERY Jumbles: KNAVE Answer: An autumn walk in the park can lead to this — SCENIC “CHANGE”

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Furniture

DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $140. 681-4429 DINING TABLE: With 6 chairs, good condition, light oak. $125. 360-461-1767 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. LOFT BED: Metal, desk & shelf. $100/ obo. 415-420-5809. LOUNGE CHAIRS: (2) matching swivel rockers. 1 never used, 1 used 1 month, light gold fabric, $100 each or both for $175/obo. 360-683-4898

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General Merchandise

2 Antique Radios. (1) 1930s(?) Airline Shortwave Tube Radio; excellent wood and working condition, $190/ obo. And (1) 1945 Westinghouse Model H-127; excellent working condition, $165/ obo. Great Christmas gift! 360-457-3444 BATH CHAIR: Goes down at the press of a button, and comes up at the press of a button when you’re ready to get out of the tub. $650. 360-681-0942 BLACKBERRY CAFE 50530 Hwy. 112 W. Christmas Eve Special: Prime Rib and Surf and Turf 7 a.m.-6 pm. Call for reservation 928-0141 CHRISTMAS TIME Beautiful coat, leather and suede. $100/ obo. Call Debbie at 360-452-6034 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504 FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $489. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

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General Merchandise

EXERCISER: Tony Little’s Gazelle Free Style. $50. 928-9617 or 360-460-9224. HP Mini Case and portable mouse with 4 GB flash drive. $25. Open but never used. 452-6439. MISC: 6 Whalen Shelf Units. Heavy-duty. 5 shelves ea. 72x48x 18. $60 ea. or 6 for $325. Like new. 452-8264 MISC: ‘95 F150 4x4, parts, $500. Cont. Gem Topper, cost $1,600, sell $500. 3 Husqvarna chainsaws, $300-$500. Leister plastic heat welder, $200. 48 Jeepster tranny, 3 sp with electric O/D, $500. 461-8060. MISC: Bird cage, 6’x 4’x30”. $200. Parrot play stand, $50. Recumbent Schwinn exercise bike, $175. 452-9302 MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,600. Queen size brass bed, with mattress and accessories, $700. 681-0131. MISC: Drew dining set, table, 8 chairs, china hutch, credenza buffet, $1,000. Sportsart recumbent bike, $350. DuncanPhyfe table, $200. 2 lg. chest of drawers, $75 ea. Antique needle point chair with stool, $100. Retro bar, $50. Glass/brass shelf, 2 end tables, $150. All OBO. 477-4785 MISC: Ladies dresser, excellent shape, big mirror, black lacquer with gold trim, 6 drawers and middle cupboard with shelf, $250/obo. 10” table saw, $45. 683-9829. MISC: Regency, wood burning stove, gold door and 5.5’ piping, excellent shape, $1,200/obo. Sanio 24” TV w/stand, $75/obo. Mini fridge, brand new, $75. 683-2680 SEASONED FIREWOOD $200 cord. 360-670-1163 Ten cords fir firewood $165 ea or trade for truck/big saw. Cut, split, delivered. FULL cords, not dry. came from big trees, nice, straight grain and lots of dense heartwood. will haul to west side or P.T. for extra. 670-5655.

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GUITARS: 1968 Gibson Les Paul Gold Top. Serious inquiries only, $12,000. ‘63 Gibson ES120T, $850. ‘75 Gibson Grabber, $750. ‘67 Gibson SG Standard, $1,500. 360-681-8023 Martin, Taylor, Breedlove Guitars. Prices too low to advertise! Crossroads Music, P.T. 360-385-1471.

76

FLY RODS: 2 bamboo with extras. $450. 360-301-4721 FLY TYING EQUIP. Includes manual, vice, bobbins, hooks, threads, feathers and all, $1,000 value. Asking $600. 683-8437, leave msg. KAYAK: Riot 10’. Bought for $1,100, asking $700/obo. Call for details. 683-4042

77

Bargain Box

TIRES: Studded snow, 175 SR 14. $40. 417-1593.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Sail boat trailer. For 27’ keel boat that weighs 2,300 pounds. 360-379-6960 WANTED: STERLING SILVER Any cond. Coins, pre 1965. 360-452-8092. WANTED: Used tools for college student. 417-9204 WANTED: Would like to purchase young male parakeet. Excellent home with three other male ‘keets. Please call 457-8385

UPHOLSTERY: Equipment and supplies. $1,500. 452-7743.

74

82

DISH 500 SYSTEM Dish SD-PVR, smart card and remote. $175/obo. 683-4898.

Sporting Goods

DOWNRIGGERS: (2) Cannon Unitroll. New, $475. Used twice, $190. $350 for both. 683-3887.

81 82 83 84 85

Home Electronics

Musical

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

Pets

AKC Pembroke Welsch Corgi. 1 yr old neut. male. $450. 681-2486


C6

Classified

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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82

Pets

CAGE: One very large wire cage free standing for birds, rabbits or ?. $15 you haul or we will haul with gas money included. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays. CHIHUAHUA PUPS 1 female, $200. 2 males, $175 ea. 683-6597 CHRISTMAS AKC GOLDEN PUPS Pedigreed. Loving and steadfast, blonde, loving little faces! Paper trained, Ready Christmas Eve, prefer Jan. 6. $550. 681-3390 or 775-4582 evenings. Christmas Chihuahuas. Purebred Chihuahuas cute and friendly 11 weeks old one male one female. Shots wormed and paper trained. $200-$300. 360-670-3906 Dachshund Puppies. Purebred Dachshund females, 6 weeks old. Black/tan and silver dapple. Wormed and will have first shot. $250 each. 360-681-3490, evenings only. Email best. deermor@q.com IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS Really nice male Lab puppies. Just had 2nd shots, 10 wks. old. $125. 417-0808. KITTENS: 1 free male. 1 polydactyl male, $75. 1 polydactyl female, $100. 681-3838

82

Pets

Yorkshire Terrier male, 20 mos. old. Friendly, outgoing temperament. He’s been neutered, had his shots, is papertrained. Weighs 8 lbs. $350. Please ask for Debbie: 360-6832732, 360-775-4255.

83

Farm Animals

ALFALFA GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn. 683-5817. BULL: 8 mo. $550. 683-2304. GRASS HAY: Excellent local orchard grass. $9 bale. 460-0085 HAY: Local good grass horse hay, $4.50 bale. 683-4427

84

Farm Equipment

MISC: 3 pt. 48” box blade, $300. Grader blade, $200. Rake, $200. Rotary tiller, $600. 452-4136.

TRACK LOADER: ‘06 Bobcat T300. Heat and A/C, contact me for details and pics. tterfuu7@msn.com 425-671-0192

MINIATURE CHIHUAHUA 3 mo. old male. $500. 452-9114. MISC: Mini pinto mare and stud, $250 and $350. Corn snakes and tank, $150. Parrot cages, $100$350. 457-9775. Old English Sheepdog Puppies. (3) males, (3) females, purebred non papered, DOB Oct. 2, very socialized, very smart, playful, adorable fluff balls. Both parents on site. $300 males, $350 females. 360-775-4182 PUPPIES: AKC Registered Mini-Schnauzer puppies. Born 08/14/2010. First shots, dew claws removed, tails docked. 2 males and 1 female left from litter. $350. Call 360-460-7119 PUPPIES: Black Lab, champion sired, AKC registered, great blood lines, 3 left, 11 wks. old. $350. 912-2785 PUPPIES: Holiday Hunt Terriers, 1 male, 1 female, cute, registered, shots. Ready now. $400 ea. 582-9006 PUPPIES: Purebred Shih-Tzu, ready now, will hold for Christmas. $500. 360-912-3855 Purebred Miniature poodle pups, male excellent disposition, natural tail, cafe au lait. 6 wks on 12/13. Crate trained and 1st set of shots. $350. 461-4576 Toy Aussie Pups. One male blue merle and one female black tri pup. Tails are docked, dew claws removed, 1st shots, wormed, vet checked. Just in time for Christmas! $450. Call 360-374-5151.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

GLASPLY: ‘86 15’ Runabout. Exc. cond. $3,000. 360-461-0157

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles.

GN 33’ FLAT-BED EQ TRAILER. $4,900. Like-new, 25ft deck includes 5’ pop-up beavertail for a flat deck, 5’ loading ramps with storage. 14,000 lbs. GVWR. MSRP $7,990. 808-5636 b6942@hotmail.com SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

93

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 10 Capt. Sanders 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023.

CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426.

KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973. POLARIS 2008 330 TRAILBOSS 4 stroke, auto, reverse Competitive finance rates. 11 Harleys and street bikes in stock! VIN#316882 Expires 12/22/10 $3,650 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982

QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213.

94

Motorcycles

APOLLO: ‘07 Orion 110. Exc. cond., some riding gear. $1,000. 683-8558. HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $8500/OBO. 360-797-1254

HONDA: ‘03 150 CRF. Lots of BBR, bored to 175. $1,500. 928-9423 or 670-5282. HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. KAWASAKI 2009 KX250 F 4 stroke, pro circuit exhaust. 0 down financing available! Ask for details. Income tax special buy now! Pay later! Ask for details. VIN#005708 Expires 12/22/10 $3,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘05 SILVERADO 1500 4X4 5.3 liter Vortec V8, auto, lift kit, cold air intake, aftermarket exhaust, 17” alloy wheels, BFG A/T tires, Bilstein Reservoir shocks, tow package, trailer brake controller, nerf bars, spray-in bedliner, tool box, Kenwood DVD player, Cobra CB radio, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $17,970! Clean Carfax! Immaculate inside and out! Very nice lift kit with Reservoir shocks! Stop by Gray Motors today! $14,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $8,900. 797-1625

MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461.

SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Snowbird. 1 slide, like new condition. $10,000. 452-2929.

QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210

RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

95

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020.

LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761.

SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 FORD: ‘64 Ford 350. Dump Truck. Truck runs great! Recent upgrades such as: Rebuilt 312Y-Block, New Clutch, Battery & Hydraulic Brakes. 2 Speed Browning Manual High & Low Transmission Alternator Conversion Scale weight is 4,470 Gross weight 10k $1,900/obo. Please contact Mark at 850- 890-2783.

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023.

RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480

LHASA APSO: Christmas Puppies! Ready to go, Tuxedo and Parties, 2 litters to choose from, 5 girls, 5 boys. $350-400. 477-8349 LHASAPOOS: 2 black females, $350 ea. (1) 3 mo. old black Toy Poodle, $300. 477-8349

94

Marine

Horses/ Tack

SADDLE: 16” men’s, heavy, Tex-Tan. $250. 681-7270.

85

93

RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177 SUZUKI 2005 RM250 2 stroke, 5 speed, local trade! Home of the buy here! Pay here! 7 dirt bikes in stock! 8 quads in stock! VIN#100566 Expires 12/22/10 $2,650 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $14,000. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itasca Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, serviced, ready to roll. $18,500. 452-2148 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177. WANTED: Later model truck camper. Cash. 360-770-2410

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895 YAMAHA 2006 350 BRUIN 4x4, auto, reverse, local trade! Use your tax refund now! Ask how! VIN#029697 Expires 12/22/10 $3,750 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

96

Parts/ Accessories

STUDDED TIRES (4) Big Horn Maxxis, LT265/75R 16. With (4) Chev 6-hole ultra mag wheels. Used one season. $500. 360-808-2934 TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $1,000 for all, will separate. 683-7789 WANTED to buy: Canopy for a ‘00 Chevy King cab short bed. 360-374-2534

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘02 SILVERADO 1500 LT EXTRA CAB 4X4 5.3 liter vortec V8, auto, alloy wheels, bedliner, tow package, trailer brake controller, ride controller, privacy glass, keyless entry, 4 opening doors, power windows, locks, and mirrors, power programmable heated leather seats, CD/cassette stereo, air, tilt, cruise, OnStar, dual front airbags. This truck is immaculate inside and out! Leather seats and all the options! Ride control to ensure smooth travel even with a load! Priced under Kelley Blue Book! $13,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

CHEV: ‘85 S10. 4x4, king cab, auto, canopy. Straight, dependable, clean. PS, PB, A/C, tilt, CC, AM/FM/cassette. New shocks, battery, tires. 2.8 V6. Runs great! No rust. Drive anywhere. $3,300. 360-452-7439 CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512. DODGE ‘01 RAM 3500 CLUB CAB DUALLY 4X4 5.9 liter Cummins turbo diesel, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, tow package, trailer brake controller, 5th wheel plate, spray-in bedliner, auxiliary fuel tank, rear sliding window, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, cruise control, tilt, air, CB radio, CD/cassette stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Only 83,000 miles! One owner! Immaculate condition inside and out! You will be hardpressed to find one nicer than this! Stop by Gray Motors today! $18,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: '97 EXPLORER XL 4X4. V6, lots of miles but reliable and well-maintained. Power windows/ locks. "As is" price of $1,500 cash. Call 461-0420.

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

peninsula dailynews.com

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘91 S-10. Runs $800 461-6246

CHEV: ‘95 Ext Cab Z71 4x4. Black. 5 sp. $3,600. 461-5180. DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556 FORD: ‘87 Super Cab manual, 4x4 and Eaton rear end. $1,000. Call after 11 a.m. 457-1457. FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 GMC: ‘97 4WD. Runs good, 140K mi. $3,000. 683-4401. GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com. LEXUS ‘06 RX330 4WD 3.3 liter V6, auto, air with climate control, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette/CD changer, power windows, locks, and seats, power moonroof, keyless entry, full leather, side airbags, power rear hatch, fog lamps, chrome alloy wheels, privacy glass, luggage rack, 66,000 miles, very, very clean local car, garage kept, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $22,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com NISSAN ‘00 PATHFINDER SE 4X4 3.3 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, privacy glass, power windows, door locks and mirrors, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $6,535! One owner! Immaculate inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $6,000/obo. 457-7097

FORD: '83 F-150. XLT EXT CAB, 351 manual, auxiliary fuel tank. Well maintained, runs great, canopy, tow package. $950. Call 457-1491 after 6:00 p.m. FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $5,900. 457-0655. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘87 Econoline. New wheels/tires, very clean. $1,200 firm. 683-8249. FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929. FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133. FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876

99

Cars

BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,200/ obo. 206-272-0220. BUICK ‘99 PARK AVE Economical 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette, power windows, locks, and seat, full leather, alloy wheels, keyless entry, very clean and reliable local trade in, nonsmoker, garage kept, service history, spotless Carfax report, affordable luxury. $5,495 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV ‘06 MALIBU LT 3.5 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, power moonroof, rear spoiler, side airbags, 62,000 miles, beautiful 1 owner local trade-in, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $9,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA 2004 B3000 DUAL SPORT 3.0 V6, 5 speed, AC, DS pkg., 87K mi.! Home of the 5 min. approval! We finance everyone. VIN#M10917 Expires 12/22/10 $5,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486.

CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440 CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863

NISSAN: ‘87 pickup. 4 cyl, 5 spd. $1,250. 683-7516 PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL

98

C7

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619.

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 FORD ‘07 FOCUS SE 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD/MP3 player, remote entry, and more! Expires 12-2510. $7,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

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Your Peninsula • Your Newspaper


C8

ClassifiedAutomotive

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Jeep’s radio on the fritz Dear Doctor: I own a 2008 Jeep Grand Cherokee with 14,000 miles on it. Every once in a while, my radio stops working while I’m driving. It comes back on randomly. And on one occasion, the power windows did not work. The dealer changed the radio, but the problem is still there. Any advice? Arnold

the auto doc Junior

Damato

Changing spark plugs

Dear Arnold: Your Jeep, like many other newer vehicles, has multiple control modules to operate accessories. The first step is to check for trouble fault codes in the body control module. This requires a professional scan tool, not a small, inexpensive universal scan tool. An updated revised computer software reprogram may be needed. The loss of the power window operation can also indicate a loss of 12-volt power from the ignition switch. The technician will need to check all possibilities.

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Cars

CHEV: ‘99 Monte Carlo. 84K mi. $2,000. 461-6758. FORD 2000 FOCUS ZX3 5 speed, 4 cylinder, tinted windows, alloys. Income tax special! Buy now! Pay later! All vehicles 72 point safety checked & serviced. VIN#252024 Expires 12/22/10 $3,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 FORD: ‘01 Explorer Sport. 2WD, 5 sp, 126K, good cond. $3,000. 928-9430. FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403 FORD: ‘67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053 FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542.

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619. HONDA ‘03 ACCORD EX 4 DOOR Extra clean and loaded including V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, 4 wheel ABS and electronic traction control, power moonroof, leather interior, front and side airbags, AM/FM CD stacker, remote entry, premium chrome wheels and more! Expires 12-25-10. $10,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com HONDA: ‘85 Civic Station Wagon. Needs work. $500/ obo. 360-477-0702. HONDA: ‘98 Accord EX. 4 door sedan, 6 cyl., 1 owner, 34,850 mi., many accessories. $7,500 firm. 683-1894

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866 MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204 MAZDA: ‘08 Miata GT. Black/tan, 6 sp, 8,800 mi., like new. $18,900. 452-5387. MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $3,750/ obo. 582-1292. MERCEDES: ‘91 2.3L, 4 door, 125K, runs great. $3,700. 360-681-4253 MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,000/ obo. 360-460-0385.

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Dear Doctor: I own a 2008 Dodge Charger with the Hemi engine with 18,000 miles on the odometer. I change the oil every five months with synthetic oil and quality filters. The owner’s manual requires that the spark plugs (16) be changed every 30,000 miles or three years. This will cost $500. I know that many cars now have plugs that are good for 100,000 miles. Are these also available for the Hemi? George Dear George: I do not recommend or believe in the 100,000-mile spark plug replacement.

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MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062.

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802 PONTIAC 2004 GRAND AM SE V6, auto, AC, power pkg., alloys, 62K mi. Competitive finance rates, use your tax refund now! Ask for details. VIN#257219. Expires 12/22/10 $5,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959 TOYOTA ‘05 SOLARA SE COUPE 3.0 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, alloy wheels, 69,000 miles, very clean local trade in. Spotless Carfax report. $10,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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It would be great to have the problem examined when the radio is not working. Unfortunately, there are no easy fixes.

Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828 NASH: ‘50 Statesman. Needs work, runs great, extra engine and tranny. Must sell. $3,995 or make offer. 681-0717 PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332

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I have seen too many spark plugs rot, blow out, and as well, I’ve seen stripped and torn-out heli coils in aluminum cylinder heads. I recommend you replace the spark plugs with the original brand and type every three years or 40,000 miles in Snow Belt areas. Sun Belt areas where rust is not a problem can go five years or 60,000 miles. Always use an anti-seize compound on the tread and die-electric grease on the wires before putting the wire back on the spark plug.

Civic has 2 problems Dear Doctor: I have two problems with my 1993 Honda Civic. First, with the cold weather, the trunk gets really wet. How can I prevent this? Secondly, the car is burning too much gas lately. I was getting 30 miles per gallon, but now I’m getting only 24 mpg. Why? Frank Dear Frank: Water or wetness in the trunk needs to be checked for its port of entry.

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Dampness can sometimes be found under the spare tire in the bottom of the fender wells. A water test can also be performed to locate the source of entry by running water over the rear roof section slowly to see where it may entering the trunk. A loss in gas mileage during cold months is due in part to a change in the gas mixture, the engine running colder, plus lights and heat causing the alternator to work harder. On all fuel-injected engines, attention should be paid to the air filter, spark plugs and the oxygen sensor. I also recommend a backpressure test for partly blocked exhaust systems and catalytic converters. The engine temperature is an important part of engine operation. It has to be at 185-plus degrees for optimum performance and economy.

––––––––

Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

Cars

TOYOTA 2003 MATRIX 5 DOOR 5 speed, AC, custom wheels and tires, 111K miles, new clutch. 0 down financing available, use your tax refund now, ask for details. VIN#113636. Expires 12/22/10 $6,250 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

MERCURY: ‘97 Mystique. Needs tranny. $500/obo. 417-2130.

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965. TOYOTA: ‘01 Camry XLE. 98K mi., very good condition, service up to date, 2 new tires. $7,000. 452-2929

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Cars

Car of the Week

2011 Jaguar XJ Supersport BASE PRICE: $72,700 for base XJ; $87,700 for base supercharged XJ; $110,200 for top supercharged XJ. AS TESTED: $111,075. TYPE: Front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, four-passenger, large, luxury sedan. ENGINE: 5-liter, double overhead cam, supercharged V-8. MILEAGE: 15 mpg (city), 21 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: 155 mph. LENGTH: 201.7 inches. WHEELBASE: 119.4 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 4,281 pounds. BUILT AT: United Kingdom. OPTIONS: None. DESTINATION CHARGE: $875. The Associated Press

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Cars

OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183.

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VW: ‘00 New Beetle. Turbocharged, 1.8L engine (only 25K mi. on factory purchased and dealer installed motor), 108K vehicle mi., airbags, ABS brakes, loaded and dependable. $4,200. 461-6460.

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Legals Legals Legals Clallam Co. Clallam Co. Clallam Co. Legals Clallam Co. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF

SALE OF TIMBER AND SALVAGE LONE FORK LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled "Proposal for the LONE FORK Logging Unit," addressed to the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday January 25, 2011, for the purchase of timber on the LONE FORK Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, Washington. This logging unit contains approximately 116 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 5,263 MBF of sawlogs including 4,880 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, 198 MBF of western redcedar sawlogs, 111 MBF of red alder and other hardwood sawlogs, 52 MBF of Sitka spruce sawlogs, and 22 MBF of Douglasfir sawlogs; and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs are removable at the Purchaser’s option, except for western redcedar cull and utility, which must be left on site. Western redcedar salvage may not be removed. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier's check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of Forty-Two Thousand Dollars ($42,000.00) must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of Seventy Thousand Dollars ($70,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder's failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering. The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington 98587. Dated this 3rd day of December, 2010 at Taholah, Washington, Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: Dec. 9, 23, 2010

No. 10-2-01074-5 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON A. CURRY, DECEASED; BENEFICIAL WASHINGTON INC. DBA BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO. OF WASHINGTON; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Ruth E. Curry, deceased; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Gordon A. Curry, deceased; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after December 16, 2010, and defend the real property foreclosure action in Clallam County Superior Court, and answer the complaint of BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, (“Plaintiff”). You are asked to serve a copy of your answer or responsive pleading upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff at its office stated below. In case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The purpose of this lawsuit is to obtain a judgment, and if not immediately paid, to be satisfied through the foreclosure of real property located in Clallam County, Washington, and legally described as follows: Lot 37, Block "H", Second Plat of Sunshine Acres, as per plat recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 19, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 273 Fleming Drive, Sequim, WA 98382. DATED this 16 day of December, 2010. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By Janaya L. Carter, WSBA #32715 Lauren Davidson Humphreys, WSBA #41694 Valerie I. Holder, WSBA #42968 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th Street, Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 Pub: Dec. 16, 23, 30, 2010, Jan. 6, 13, 20, 2011

WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. TS No: WA-226499-C Loan No: 0359501766 APN: 04-30-26-119020 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 1/21/2011, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL A: LOT 2 OF SHORT PLAT RECORDED JULY 28, 1982 IN VOLUME 11 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 66 UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 532932, BEING A SHORT PLAT OF PARCEL 3 OF SURVEY RECORDED MAY 27, 1977 IN VOLUME 2 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 22, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 467996, BEING A PORTION;OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 26 AND A PORTION OF THE NORTH HALF OF. THE, NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M. PARCEL B: AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS THE NORTH 30 FEET OF PARCELS 1, 2 AND 4, AS DELINEATED ON THE WRIGHT SHORT PLAT RECORDED MAY 6, 1977 IN VOLUME 3 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 13, UNDER AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 467222, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, ALSO AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS THE NORTH 30 FEET OF PARCELS 1 AND 2 AS DELINEATED ON A.D. ERICRSON SHORT PLAT RECORDED JULY 12, 1983 IN VOLUME 13 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 15, UNDER AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 544650, BEING PARCEL 3 AS DELINEATED ON SHORT PLAT RECORDED ON MAY 6, 1977 IN VOLUME 3 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 13) UNDER AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 467222, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 203 RONDALE DRIVE SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 2/9/2007, recorded 2/15/2007, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1196237, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from DOUGLAS HAWES AND VICKI R. HAWES, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to LAND TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY OF CL, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 10/14/2010 NO.PMT 15 AMOUNT $2,119.40 TOTAL $31,791.00 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 10/14/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 14 TOTAL $1,289.26 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 2/9/2007 Note Amount: $500,000.00 Interest Paid To: 7/1/2009 Next Due Date: 8/1/2009 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $42,580.36. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $551,682.98 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $534,017.23, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 8/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/21/2011. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/10/2011, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/10/2011 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 1/10/2011 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): DOUGLAS HAWES AND VICKI R. HAWES, HUSBAND AND WIFE 203 RONDALE DRIVE SEQUIM, WA 98382 DOUGLAS HAWES and VICKI R. HAWES 93 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 9/13/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 10/14/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 13920 SE Eastgate Way, Ste. 115 Bellevue, WA 98005 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3777761 12/23/2010, 01/13/2011 Pub.: Dec. 23, 2010, Jan. 13, 2011

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Cars

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Cars

SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909

TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $600. 928-9774. Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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Legals Jefferson Co.

Legals Jefferson Co.

NO. 10-4-00104-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY Estate of VERNON J. DeROCO Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim be be barred by any otherwise applicable statue of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in R.C.W. 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented with the later of : (1) 30 (thirty) days after personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (3); or (2) 4 (four) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of Filing Copy of Notice to Creditors: December 3, 2010 Date of First Publication: December 9, 2010 Alan P. DeRoco, Personal Representative Stephen W. Gillard WSBA #9273 Attorney for the Personal Representative Address for Mailing or Service: Law Offices of Stephen W. Gillard 210 Taylor Street, #10. P.O. Box 1007 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Pub: Dec. 9, 16, 23, 2010 NO. 10-4-00119-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY Estate of SAXON MCCLELLAND Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim be be barred by any otherwise applicable statue of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in R.C.W. 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented with the later of : (1) 30 (thirty) days after personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (3); or (2) 4 (four) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of Filing Copy of Notice to Creditors: December 3, 2010 Date of First Publication: December 9, 2010 Darren D. McClelland, Personal Representative Stephen W. Gillard WSBA #9273 Attorney for the Personal Representative Address for Mailing or Service: Law Offices of Stephen W. Gillard 210 Taylor Street, #10. P.O. Box 1007 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Pub: Dec. 9, 16, 23, 2010 NO. 10-4-00120-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY Estate of GEORGE H. BOND Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim be be barred by any otherwise applicable statue of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in R.C.W. 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented with the later of : (1) 30 (thirty) days after personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (3); or (2) 4 (four) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of Filing Copy of Notice to Creditors: December 3, 2010 Date of First Publication: December 9, 2010 Brian McLoughlin Personal Representative Tim Borden, Personal Representative Stephen W. Gillard WSBA #9273 Attorney for the Personal Representative Address for Mailing or Service: Law Offices of Stephen W. Gillard 210 Taylor Street, #10. P.O. Box 1007 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Pub: Dec. 9, 16, 23, 2010


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

LOAN NO. xxxxxx8346 T.S. NO. 1291804-12 PARCEL NO. 0530362200502001 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation of Washington, will on January 07, 2011, at the hour of 10:00am, At the county courthouse, 223 east 4th in the city of Port Angeles, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington to-wit: That part of the northwest quarter of section 36, township 30 north, range 5 west, w.m., described as follows: beginning at a point on the north line of said section 36, 660 feet east of its northwest corner; running thence east along said north line, 660 feet; thence south parallel with the west line of said section 36, 1620 feet; thence west parallel with said North line 330 feet; thence north parallel with said west line 660 feet; thence west parallel with said north line 330 feet; thence north parallel with said west line 960 feet to the point of beginning. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington.. Commonly known as: 2517 Blue Mountain Road Port Angeles Wa 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated January 25, 2006, recorded January 31, 2006, under Auditor’s File No. 2006-1174155, Book xx, Page xx, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Dean Henry and Charlene Henry, Husband And Wife as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company. as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Greenpoint Mortgage Funding, Inc. as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by to Aurora Loan Services, Llc. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $77,250.98 (together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due). IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $637,970.07, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from November 01, 2009, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession or encumbrances on January 07, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, must be cured by December 27, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before December 27, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after December 27, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: DEAN HENRY 2517 BLUE MOUNTAIN R PORT ANGELES WA 98362 CHARLENE HENRY 2517 BLUE MOUNTAIN R PORT ANGELES WA 98362 DEAN HENRY 2517 BLUE MOUNTAIN RD PORT ANGELES WA 98362 CHARLENE HENRY 2517 BLUE MOUNTAIN RD PORT ANGELES WA 98362 CHARLENE HENRY 2517 BLUE MOUNTAIN ROAD PORT ANGELES WA 98362 DEAN HENRY 2517 BLUE MOUNTAIN ROAD PORT ANGELES WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on August 05, 2010 proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on August 09, 2010 the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in the paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 60th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 60th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants say summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. Date September 09, 2010 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation of Washington P.O. Box 22004 525 East Main Street El Cajon CA 92022-9004 (800) 546-1531 Signature/By. R-342610 12/03/2010, 12/23/2010 Pub: Dec. 3, 23, 2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Loan No: 0475566642 APN: 06-30-00011345 TS No: WA-220949-C PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 1/3/2011, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: THE EASTERLY ½ OF LOT 18; THE WESTERLY 25 FEET OF LOT 19; AND THE NORTHERLY 40 FEET OF THE EASTERLY 25 FEET OF LOT 19; ALL IN BLOCK 113 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 1105 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/21/2007, recorded 11/30/2007, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1212858, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from PATRICK G. NICKERSON AND STACEY M. NICKERSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM THRU NO.PMT AMOUNT TOTAL 5/1/2010 6/30/2010 2 $881.58 $1,763.16 7/1/2010 9/28/2010 3 $879.55 $2,638.65 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM THRU NO. LATE CHARGES TOTAL 5/1/2010 6/30/2010 2 $72.20 7/1/2010 9/28/2010 3 $108.30 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 11/21/2007 Note Amount: $104,000.00 Interest Paid To: 4/1/2010 Next Due Date: 5/1/2010 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $8,216.36. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $115,824.54 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $108,420.96, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/3/2011. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/23/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME PATRICK G. NICKERSON AND STACEY M. NICKERSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 1105 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 PATRICK G. NICKERSON AND STACEY M. NICKERSON 75 PAULINE RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 8/25/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. Loan No: 0475566642 T.S. No.: WA-220949-C VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 9/28/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory State of California ) ss. County of Los Angeles) On 9/28/2010, before me, Corine Zacarias, a Notary personally appeared Karen Balsano who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she/they executed the same in his/her/their authorized capacity(ies), and that by his/her/their signature(s) on the instrument the person(s), or the entity upon behalf of which the person(s) acted, executed the instrument. I certify under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct. WITNESS my hand and official seal. Signature: Corine Zacarias ASAP# FNMA3755423 12/02/2010, 12/23/2010 Pub.: Dec. 2, 23, 2010

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File No.: 7021.26215 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Grantee: Shaun Davies, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630000442100000 Abbreviated Legal: LT 2, BLK 442 TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 in Block 442 of the Townsite of Port Angeles; Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 906 West 16th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7430 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/19/06, recorded on 10/20/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006-1190019, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Shaun Davies, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to LS Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1249081. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/28/2010 Monthly Payments $21,393.14 Late Charges $840.14 Lender's Fees & Costs $49.42 Total Arrearage $22,282.70 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,492.63 Total Amount Due: $23,775.33 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $169,998.72, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Shaun Davies 906 West 16th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7430 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Shaun Davies 906 West 16th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7430 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/20/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/21/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/28/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7021.26215) 1002.144343-FEI Pub: Dec. 2, 23, 2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. TS No: WA-226263-C Loan No: 7470083155 APN: 06-30-00-015725 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 1/3/2011, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 157, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON Commonly known as: 920 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/25/2006, recorded 9/1/2006, under Auditor's File No. 2006-1187170, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from CHRISTOPHER A DOWNEY, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION to DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE FOR RALI 2006QA8, by: RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY, LLC, ATTORNEY IN FACT . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2009 THRU 6/30/2009 NO.PMT 2 AMOUNT $737.19 TOTAL $1,474.38 FROM 7/1/2009 THRU 9/28/2010 NO.PMT 15 AMOUNT $746.31 TOTAL $11,194.65 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2009 THRU 6/30/2009 NO. LATE CHARGES 2 TOTAL $62.26 FROM 7/1/2009 THRU 9/28/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 15 TOTAL $466.95 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 8/25/2006 Note Amount: $94,800.00 Interest Paid To: 4/1/2009 Next Due Date: 5/1/2009 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $22,027.09. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $110,626.43 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $91,856.25, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/3/2011. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/23/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): CHRISTOPHER A DOWNEY, AN UNMARRIED MAN 920 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 CHRISTOPHER DOWNEY 920 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on 8/25/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 9/28/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3755498 12/02/2010, 12/23/2010 Pub.: Dec. 2, 23, 2010

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7314.20905 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. GMAC Mortgage, LLC Grantee: Scott H. Chandler and Juanita C. Chandler, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 063001-790030 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 3, 14/87 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 3, Rolling Hills Estates as per Plat recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 87, Records of Clallam County, Washington. More particularly described as: Lot 3, Rolling Hills Estates, as per plat recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 87, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/18/07, recorded on 10/22/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1210962, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Scott H. Chandler and Juanita C. Chandler, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to GMAC Mortgage, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1256466. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/24/2010 Monthly Payments $15,488.48 Late Charges $632.00 Lender's Fees & Costs $120.50 Total Arrearage $16,240.98 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $792.40 Statutory Mailings $28.68 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,646.08 Total Amount Due: $17,887.06 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $243,696.26, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Scott H. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Juanita C. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Scott H. Chandler P.O. Box 2436 Port Angeles, WA 98362-0312 Juanita C. Chandler P.O. Box 2436 Port Angeles, WA 98362-0312 Scott H. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Juanita C. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/23/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/24/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/24/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.20905) 1002.167618-FEI Pub: Dec. 2, 23, 2010 File No.: 7258.25437 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank Nat'l Trust, as trustee for WaMu Series 2007-HE1 Trust Grantee: James B. Walters, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 032902-500010 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1 John Henry Knapman Jr. Subdivision 14/67 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1, John Henry Knapman, Jr. Subdivision, as per plat recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, page 67, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/21/06, recorded on 11/30/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1192181, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James B. Walters, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, acting as receiver for the Savings Bank and pursuant to its authority under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. degrees 1821(d) to Deutsche Bank Nat'l Trust, as trustee for WaMu Series 2007-HE1 Trust, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2009 1239785. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/23/2010 Monthly Payments $74,130.00 Late Charges $4,447.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $4,015.13 Total Arrearage $82,592.93 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $405.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $405.00 Total Amount Due: $82,997.93 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $317,688.69, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James B. Walters 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 James B. Walters 3908 154th Avenue Southeast Bellevue, WA 98007 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James B. Walters 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James B. Walters 3908 154th Avenue Southeast Bellevue, WA 98007 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/26/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/26/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7258.25437) 1002.126471-FEI Pub: Dec. 2, 23, 2010


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 44

Low 35

45/38

46/34

44/35

43/33

Rain.

Rain at times.

Rain.

Cloudy with a chance of rain.

Cloudy with a chance of rain.

Cloudy with rain possible.

The Peninsula Periods of rain will be heaviest across western parts today as a cold front slowly approaches the Olympic Peninsula. Periods of rain will continue through tonight and Friday as the front creeps forward only a few miles a day. Snow levels will be around 5,000 feet. Neah Bay Port This front will not actually push through the Peninsula until 46/42 Townsend this weekend, ensuring a chance of rain on Christmas. Port Angeles 44/38 The wet weather will continue into early next week as 44/35 an onshore flow behind this front produces showers Sequim across coastal Washington.

Victoria 44/43

44/37

Forks 46/38

Olympia 45/35

Seattle 46/38

Everett 44/38

Spokane 34/24

Yakima Kennewick 32/23 33/27

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Rain today. Wind from the east at 15-25 knots. Wave heights 3-5 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Periods of rain tonight. Wind east-southeast at 20-30 knots. Wave heights 3-5 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Rain tomorrow. Wind east 20-30 knots. Wave heights 4-7 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Saturday: Cloudy with a chance of rain. Wind east 10-20 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles.

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

2:06 a.m. 1:12 p.m. 5:07 a.m. 2:16 p.m. 6:52 a.m. 4:01 p.m. 6:13 a.m. 3:22 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

7.8’ 9.0’ 8.0’ 6.7’ 9.6’ 8.1’ 9.0’ 7.6’

7:29 a.m. 8:05 p.m. 10:10 a.m. 10:03 p.m. 11:24 a.m. 11:17 p.m. 11:17 a.m. 11:10 p.m.

2.7’ -1.1’ 5.3’ -1.6’ 6.9’ -2.1’ 6.5’ -2.0’

High Tide Ht 2:47 a.m. 2:00 p.m. 5:40 a.m. 3:20 p.m. 7:25 a.m. 5:05 p.m. 6:46 a.m. 4:26 p.m.

Moon Phases New

Seattle 46/38 Billings 32/20

7.9’ 8.7’ 8.0’ 6.2’ 9.6’ 7.5’ 9.0’ 7.1’

SaTurday

Low Tide Ht 8:16 a.m. 8:47 p.m. 11:08 a.m. 10:47 p.m. 12:22 p.m. ----12:15 p.m. 11:54 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

2.5’ -0.8’ 4.9’ -1.0’ 6.3’ --5.9’ -1.2’

High Tide Ht 3:27 a.m. 2:52 p.m. 6:13 a.m. 4:32 p.m. 7:58 a.m. 6:17 p.m. 7:19 a.m. 5:38 p.m.

8.1’ 8.2’ 8.0’ 5.6’ 9.6’ 6.7’ 9.0’ 6.3’

Low Tide Ht 9:07 a.m. 9:31 p.m. 12:13 p.m. 11:32 p.m. 12:01 a.m. 1:27 p.m. 1:20 p.m. -----

2.2’ -0.3’ 4.2’ -0.2’ -1.3’ 5.4’ 5.1’ ---

Jan 4

First

Jan 12

Full

Jan 19

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 66 56 s Baghdad 67 46 pc Beijing 26 11 s Brussels 30 27 sf Cairo 72 55 pc Calgary 20 12 pc Edmonton 15 6 s Hong Kong 68 61 pc Jerusalem 64 47 s Johannesburg 82 56 t Kabul 48 16 s London 34 28 c Mexico City 73 39 s Montreal 27 14 pc Moscow 17 8 c New Delhi 76 44 s Paris 37 35 sn Rio de Janeiro 84 72 t Rome 61 52 r Stockholm 21 12 pc Sydney 84 66 pc Tokyo 58 41 s Toronto 28 19 s Vancouver 46 44 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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New York 37/28 San Francisco 55/46

Denver 43/22

Chicago 32/22

Detroit 32/18 Washington 38/25

Kansas City 38/25 Los Angeles 62/48 Atlanta 50/32 Houston 67/55

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Fronts Cold Warm

Miami 74/59

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 48 32 sh 10 -8 s 49 41 r 50 32 s 39 22 pc 38 24 s 37 21 c 32 20 pc 22 11 sn 41 28 pc 38 24 sn 30 19 sf 51 27 s 36 19 sn 32 22 c 36 19 c 36 23 pc 46 35 r 48 43 c 43 22 sn 30 20 sn 32 18 pc 44 35 r -29 -35 pc 30 10 pc 80 70 pc 67 55 c 25 14 c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 38 57 45 62 74 30 26 46 60 37 41 30 66 66 39 63 45 44 44 52 36 46 66 58 55 26 35 38

Lo W 25 c 42 pc 30 pc 48 pc 59 s 22 c 7c 26 pc 42 pc 28 pc 35 pc 21 c 45 s 46 s 25 pc 46 pc 35 r 26 s 24 pc 36 c 27 pc 22 pc 59 c 48 pc 46 c 16 sn 21 sn 25 s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 86 at Edinburg, TX

Low: -20 at Poplar, MT

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Minneapolis 26/7

El Paso 62/35

Sunset today ................... 4:24 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:03 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 7:36 p.m. Moonset today ................. 9:42 a.m.

Dec 27

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sun & Moon

Thursday, December 23, 2010

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 49 33 trace 13.65 Forks 48 40 0.46 129.61 Seattle 50 42 0.01 45.35 Sequim 51 37 0.00 9.96 Hoquiam 49 42 0.30 71.34 Victoria 51 42 trace 35.27 P. Townsend* 49 43 0.01 16.19 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Last

Port Ludlow 44/37 Bellingham 44/36

Aberdeen 48/42

Peninsula Daily News

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Merry Christmas to One and All

OH...AND MY DAD WANTS TWENTY SQUARE OF ROOF SHINGLES IN HICKORY. HE SAID, “JUST LEAVE IT ON THE ROOF!”

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas and a winter filled with fun, remodeling projects. Celebrating 50 Years

Holiday Hours 7 - noon Fri., Dec. 24 Closed on Christmas Day

3111 Hwy 101 E, Port Angeles 452-8933 • hartnagels.com

Thank you for shopping locally at our employee owned and operated lumber Traders stores.

0C5107474

1601 S “C” St., Port Angeles 457-8581 • angelesmillwork.com


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