Issuu on Google+

Up high in the forest

Thursday Mix of sun and patchy clouds; warm C10

Story of a Jefferson County logging family C2

Peninsula Daily News 50 cents

Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

August 25, 2011

Port moves quickly on foot ferry Fast-track schedule fueled by $1.3 million federal grant By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port of Port Townsend has developed a schedule for the preparation and development of a passenger ferry service between Seattle and Port Townsend. “We need to move on this very quickly,” Port Director Larry Crockett told port commissioners Wednesday night as they discussed the ferry. “We have received this grant, and if we don’t accept it, we will

never get any federal money again.” The first step is a meeting Monday between port staff and representatives of the state Department of Transportation, which will administer the $1.3 million federal grant. Only one port commissioner, Lief Erickson, will attend that meeting, since a meeting of more than one commissioner would have to be advertised as a public meeting, Crockett said. The grant is only for construction of the boat, which port offi-

cials hope will take place at least partially in its own boat yard. Operating expenses are not included in the grant, and the port expects to bid the service contract out to a private corporation. The port will need to put that service out for bid, and a second bid process will be for construction of the vessel.

Business plan Commissioner John Collins suggested the port might want to develop a business plan for the operation of the vessel prior to the bid, but Crockett said the business plan should be part of the bid and will be part of the selection. The port plans to put out the

service bid first, then open the bid for the boat’s construction, which will be built to the service contractor’s requirements. The entire process, which includes the selection of a naval architect, design and construction of the vessel, and sea trials must be finished by the summer of 2013 or the port will not be reimbursed for the construction of the vessel, Crockett said.

“Early next week, we will need to schedule meetings with the city, the county, the Chamber of Commerce and all other stakeholders in order to get their input,” Crockett said. “We also will need to schedule open public meetings where anyone can tell us what they want from the service. “We will need to wrap all this up by Thanksgiving.”

Public meetings

Emails received

The first and most important step will be the scheduling of public meetings, since the project must be built to the specifications of what the people want, Crockett said.

Crockett said he has already received eight or nine emails about the project that have been “mostly positive” but with some concerns. Turn

to

Ferry/A4

YMCA assumes Is this a deer year in Port Townsend? middle school sports programs By Jennifer Jackson and Leah Leach Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend School District has signed an agreement with the Jefferson County branch of the Olympic Peninsula YMCA to offer intramural co-ed sports and afterschool activities for fourththrough eighth-graders at Blue Heron Middle School this year. Jeni Little, the Y’s program director, will be based in an office at Blue Heron at 3939 San Juan Ave. with volleyball, cross-country, basketball and wrestling — as well as such classes as cooking or chess club — offered through the program. “We’re really grateful to the Y for stepping in and working with us,” said Tom Kent, interim principal and former athletic director at Blue Heron. “This is going to be fun.” Sports at Blue Heron were

discontinued in June after the end of the 2010-2011 school year, said Kent, ending some 15 years of sports at the school. The school had offered co-ed cross-country and girls volleyball in the fall, boys and girls basketball and co-ed wrestling in the winter, and track in the spring. Eliminating sports saved the school district “in the neighborhood of $60,000,” Kent said.

Program ‘evolving’ Now, the school is “in partnership with the local Y to run programs” in an after-school program that is “evolving” as it begins its first year, Kent said. Kent and Little said a survey was taken last spring to see what students were interested in learning. “Cooking, martial arts and fencing were high on the list,” Little said. Turn

to

Heron/A4 Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

This year’s deer population is more plentiful and healthier than in recent years, some Port Townsend residents feel. Here, a doe and two fawns have a late lunch on Walker Street.

Animals seem bolder than usual, many residents say By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Art

transplant

Anna Nasset’s Artisans on Taylor Gallery had a good enough year that she is moving it to a more strategic location at 911 Water St. Here she discusses the non-artistic painting process with contractor Josh Bell in anticipation of the new gallery’s Sept. 1 opening.

PORT TOWNSEND — There is no deer census or official number about their presence, but many people in Port Townsend feel this year’s brood is healthier, more plentiful and bolder than in past years. “There was a deer in the middle of my garden eating my flowers, and I went out and made some noise, but she didn’t move,” said Caroline Littlefield of North Beach. “I ran at her, and she leaped over the fence and into the road but then looked me in the eye, still chewing the flowers.” “We were driving down the road and came upon a deer,” said Food Co-op general manager Kenna Eaton, who is new to Port Townsend.

ONLINE . . . ■ What do you think? Take today’s Peninsula Poll at www.peninsuladailynews.com

“He just looked at my husband, who was driving, and seemed to say, ‘Hey, dude, you’re in my road.’”

Love ’em or hate ’em The plentiful deer — now more so because those born in the spring are maturing — are either part of what makes Port Townsend quaint and interesting or are a tremendous annoyance. “I love the deer,” Littlefield said. “There is one doe that comes to my house every year and gives birth in the same place.”

Member FDIC

*First Federal was voted Best Place to Bank and Best Customer Service in 2010 Peninsula Daily News ‘Best of the Peninsula’ poll.

to

Deer/A4

95th year, 201st issue — 3 sections, 22 pages

125112408

800-800-1577 ourfirstfed.com

Turn

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News

Thank you for voting us Best Place to Bank for 15 years!*

Your Business Bank...

Shelly Randall of Port Town­ send has a different viewpoint. “I think of them as giant rodents,” she said. “I would like to see them hunted down, with the venison then offered at the food bank.” That isn’t likely to happen for two reasons. The Port Townsend Food Bank distributes only food that is prepared in a safe kitchen, so venison would have had to have been prepared properly, said manager Shirley Moss. Additionally, hunting is illegal within the city limit — and that isn’t likely to change, said City Manager David Timmons. Timmons said the city won’t get involved in deer control unless there is a serious health hazard.

Business B4 Classified C4 Comics B3 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby B3 Deaths A6 Horoscope B3 Movies A5 Nation/World A3

Peninsula Poll Puzzles/Games Sports Weather

A2 C5 B1 C10


A2

UpFront

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday

Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, see “Own the Moment,” bottom. Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Actor’s son ordered to rehab in case THE SON OF Ryan O’Neal and the late Farrah Fawcett pleaded no contest Wednesday to heroin possession and was ordered to spend the next year in an intense inpatient rehab program. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Keith Schwartz also told Redmond O’Neal O’Neal to serve five years on probation and gave him a threeyear suspended prison sentence, which would only be imposed if the younger O’Neal gets into trouble again. O’Neal, 26, also pleaded no contest to being a felon in possession of a firearm when he was arrested Aug. 2 after a traffic stop. He entered the pleas without an agreement with prosecutors, district attorney’s spokeswoman Jane Robison said. “The defense team appreciates that Judge Schwartz gave Redmond the help that he needs to turn his life around,” attor-

neys Richard Pintal and Michael Brewer said in a statement. Pintal said his client will be required to remain in a lockdown rehab facility and is facing a tough fight to beat his heroin addiction.

‘Scarface’ legacy Al Pacino said he got burned while making “Scarface.” Literally. He grabbed the hot barrel of a gun that had just shot 30 rounds during one of Pacino Tony Montana’s violent scenes. “My hand stuck to that sucker,” the 71-year-old actor recalled. He couldn’t work for two weeks. Pacino relayed the experience during a discussion with “Scarface” co-stars Steven Bauer, Robert Loggia and F. Murray Abraham and producer Martin Bregman at a party Tuesday heralding the film’s Blu-ray release. Part of the charm of the film, Pacino said, is that it wasn’t initially a hit. “It’s one of my favorites because of its whole evolution,” he said. “It [was] sort of eviscerated after it opened by the press. . . .

Nobody was fond of it, except it had good audience participation.” He said “it’s almost a miracle” audiences continue to discover and appreciate the film. He wanted to make it after being inspired by Paul Muni’s performance in the 1932 original. Sidney Lumet suggested he make the main character Cuban instead of Italian. Pacino’s “Scarface” is set in 1980s Miami, and Tony Montana is an ambitious immigrant who runs a growing drug empire until he eventually collapses under greed and addiction. Pacino’s performance as the gun-wielding, cokesnorting Montana is among his most memorable. He said that during the nine months he was shooting the film, his character practically inhabited him. When a friend’s yappy little dog lunged at him, Pacino said he cocked back his fist instinctively, as if threatening a punch. “So I love Tony Montana, man, because I couldn’t do that!” Pacino said Tuesday. Bregman called “Scarface” a “perfect, perfect movie.” Its timeless themes of greed, desire and ambition would make it controversial even if it were just released today, Pacino said.

By The Associated Press

Laugh Lines A COMPANY IN Seattle is coming out with a medical marijuana patch for dogs and cats. So finally, dogs and cats won’t have to buy their weed illegally. Jimmy Fallon

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you think the Obama administration has clearly explained what the United States is trying to achieve in Libya?

Yes 

Kind of 

No 

19.5% 9.2% 67.5%

Undecided  3.9% Total votes cast: 960 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Passings FRANK DILEO, 64, a music industry executive who managed Michael Jackson’s career in the 1980s and returned as his manager in the superstar’s final days, has died. Publicist Karen Sundell said Mr. Dileo died Wednesday morning. The cause of death was not Mr. Dileo immediin 2009 ately available, but he had recently experienced complications following heart surgery. The short, portly Mr. Dileo was a colorful figure in the entertainment industry and had movie roles as an actor, notably portraying a gangster in Martin Scorsese’s “Goodfell­as.” A native of Pittsburgh, Mr. Dileo began his career in the music industry working as a promoter for CBS subsidiary Epic Records. He signed so many stars that he was credited with catapulting the small company to the No. 2 label in the country. Jackson was at CBS Records at the time, and together, they worked on the phenomenally success-

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

ful “Thriller” album. In his book Moonwalk, Jackson credited Mr. Dileo as one of the people “responsible for turning my dream for ‘Thriller’ into a reality.” Jackson wrote that Mr. Dileo’s “brilliant understanding of the recording industry proved invaluable” and described how Mr. Dileo decided to release “Beat It” as a single while “Billie Jean” was still the No. 1 song in the country. “CBS screamed, ‘You’re crazy. This will kill Billie Jean,’” Jackson recalled. “But Frank told them not to worry, that both songs would be No. 1 and both would be in the Top 10 at the same time. They were.” In 1984, with “Thriller” soaring, Jackson recruited Mr. Dileo to leave Epic and manage his career. Mr. Dileo accepted and presided over one of the most productive periods for Jackson. He executive produced the full-length Jackson movie, “Moonwalker.” He also wrote, produced and negotiated a series of lucrative Pepsi commercials for Jackson.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

A COUPLE IN Diamond Point sneaking onto their neighbor’s property to put an eggshell and little rubber ducky under the rusty big bird statue in their yard . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

JAMES “GLEN” CROKER, 77, a lead singer for the Grammy Award-nominated Cajun band the Hackberry Ramblers, died Tuesday. Drummer and last surviving band member Ben Sandmel said Mr. Croker, a lifelong resident of Lake Charles, La., had been in declining health for several years and that his family thought he had a heart attack. Sandmel said Mr. Croker began playing with the band in 1959. The band’s website said Mr. Croker’s electric guitar helped evolve the band’s string-band sound, by adding a “swaggering honkytonk tinge” that included elements of the blues, R&B and rockabilly. The band was founded in 1933 by fiddler Luderin Darbone and accordionist Edwin Duhon. The group’s 1997 release “Deep Water” garnered a Grammy nomination in the best traditional/folk album category.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Wednesday’s Daily Game: 6-5-2 Wednesday’s Hit 5: 01-06-07-36-37 Wednesday’s Keno: 06-10-11-13-19-25-30-4142-44-46-47-49-54-57-6568-69-72-78 Wednesday’s Lotto: 08-11-18-20-22-48 Wednesday’s Match 4: 06-12-16-17 Wednesday’s Powerball: 09-13-47-49-53, Powerball: 39, Power Play: 5

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  An item that appeared in Michael Carman’s golf column Wednesday on Page B1 was incorrect. Only SunLand Golf & Country Club members, not the general public, can take advantage of the Patriot Golf Day Folds of Honor Foundation donation promotion over Labor Day weekend.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) Port Angeles Mayor Ralph E. Davis appointed Thomas N. Hibben, long prominent in youth work and the Boy Scout movement, as city juvenile officer to deal with juvenile delinquency problems. Part of Hibben’s duties will be to cooperate with the Juvenile Court judge, the prosecuting attorney, city and county peace officers, school authorities and local organizations in youth work, Davis said. The mayor called the move a “long-felt need in Port Angeles” as juvenile delinquency has increased. Davis said the American Legion will take a lead role in encouraging an anti-juvenile delinquency plan.

1961 (50 years ago) Clallam County Clerk Clyde Shore submitted his formal resignation, ending a 26-year career in county politics and community service. He will retire to his Black Diamond Road ranch south of Port Angeles and raise quarterhorses

and cattle. Shore started his county career in 1935-36 when he was county commissioner for the West End. He was chief deputy county treasurer from 1939 to 1943, then was elected and re-elected county clerk from 1943 until today. Before county service, he was a School Board member in Forks and also served on the county Library Board.

1986 (25 years ago) The Port Townsend School District board has adopted a stronger football athletic insurance waiver that some parents won’t sign. A crowd of more than 50, including a smattering of student athletes, gathered in the high school auditorium to discuss the new policy. The waiver now calls for parents to “assume all the risks of injury or death” to their children connected with the football program and to release the school district, its employees, agents, representatives, coaches and volunteers from any liability.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Aug. 25, the 237th day of 2011. There are 128 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Aug. 25, 1944, Paris was liberated by Allied forces after four years of Nazi occupation. On this date: ■  In 1718, hundreds of French colonists arrived in Louisiana, with some settling in present-day New Orleans. ■  In 1825, Uruguay declared independence from Brazil. ■  In 1916, the National Park Service was established within the Department of the Interior. ■  In 1921, the United States

signed a peace treaty with Germany. ■  In 1943, U.S. forces liberated New Georgia in the Solomon Islands from the Japanese during World War II. ■  In 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a measure providing pensions for former U.S. presidents and their widows. ■  In 1960, opening ceremonies were held for the Summer Olympics in Rome. ■  In 1981, the U.S. spacecraft Voyager 2 came within 63,000 miles of Saturn’s cloud cover, sending back pictures of and data about the ringed planet. ■  In 1985, Samantha Smith,

13, the schoolgirl whose letter to Yuri V. Andropov resulted in her famous peace tour of the Soviet Union, died with her father in an airliner crash in Auburn, Maine. ■  In 2009, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy died at age 77 in Hyannis Port, Mass. ■  Ten years ago: Mette-Marit Tjessem Hoiby, a single mother and former waitress, married Norway’s Crown Prince Haakon in Oslo. Rhythm-and-blues singer Aaliyah was killed with eight others in a plane crash in the Bahamas; she was 22. ■  Five years ago: A college student’s checked luggage on a

Continental Airlines flight that had arrived in Houston from Buenos Aires, Argentina, was found to contain a stick of dynamite, one of six security incidents that day that caused U.S. flights to be diverted, evacuated or searched. Joseph Stefano, who wrote the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho,” died in Thousand Oaks, Calif., at age 84. ■  One year ago: North Korea welcomed Jimmy Carter back to Pyongyang as the former U.S. president arrived to bring home Aijalon Mahli Gomes, an American jailed in the communist country since January 2010 for entering the country illegally from China.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, August 25, 2011

Second Front Page

PAGE

A3

Briefly: Nation Evacuations begin on island before hurricane

fited from unprecedented help from the CIA, a partnership that has blurred the line between foreign and domestic spying. The department has dispatched undercover officers, HATTERAS, N.C. — Tourists known as “rakers,” into minority neighborhoods as part of a began evacuating from a tiny human mapping program, barrier island off North Carolina on Wednesday as Hurricane according to officials directly involved in the program. Irene strengthened to a major They’ve monitored daily life Category 3 storm over the in bookstores, bars, cafes and Bahamas with the East Coast nightclubs. Police have also in its sights. used informants, known as So far, things were going smoothly, said Tommy Hutcher- “mosque crawlers,” to monitor son, owner of the Ocracoke Vari- sermons, even when there’s no evidence of wrongdoing. ety Store on Ocracoke Island. Neither the City Council, Cars had lined up at gas pumps which finances the department, to top off before leaving ahead nor the federal government, of Irene, which had winds near 120 mph as of Wednesday after- which has given NYPD more than $1.6 billion since 9/11, is noon. told exactly what’s going on. Irene was expected to get stronger over warm ocean waters and could become a Cat- Commander remains egory 4 storm with winds of at NORFOLK, Va. — The forleast 131 mph by today. mer commander of a nuclearThe evacuation was a test of powered aircraft carrier who whether people in the crosshairs produced raunchy videos aboard of the first major hurricane the USS Enterprise can remain along the East Coast in years in the Navy despite a finding would heed orders to get out of that he committed misconduct, a the way. Navy panel ruled Wednesday. Officials as far north as Capt. Owen P. Honors let out Rhode Island and Massachua sigh of relief after the board of setts in the U.S. also were getinquiry read its decision, then ting ready for Irene. embraced his wife after months of uncertainty about his career Mosque monitoring largely came to a close. The board was deciding NEW YORK — Since the whether to recommend to Navy Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the Secretary Ray Mabus that HonNew York Police Department ors should be kicked out of the has become one of the nation’s most aggressive domestic intel- Navy after nearly three decades of service because of the videos. ligence agencies, targeting ethAmong other things, the vidnic communities in ways that would run afoul of civil liberties eos included simulated same-sex rules if practiced by the federal shower scenes, anti-gay slurs and references to prostitution in government, an Associated foreign ports. Press investigation has found. The Associated Press These operations have bene-

Briefly: World Toll rises to 15 as floods rake Nigerian towns MAIDUGURI, Nigeria — Local authorities say floods have killed five people in the country’s north bringing the flood-related death toll to 15 over the past week. Local official Muhammad Baba said Wednesday that a river in the town of Numan overflowed during a five-hour rainstorm Tuesday. Baba said two children drowned in the floods and an 85-year-old man died after his mud house caved in. Authorities said 10 other people died in floods that ravaged other parts of Nigeria’s north over the last week. Nigeria’s emergency agency has warned that rains will be heavier this year than last year when some 500,000 people were displaced nationwide. Nigeria’s rainy season lasts roughly from June to September.

after Gbagbo and the FPI refused to accept their defeat at the polls. He was removed militarily in April and placed under house arrest. The country’s new president has asked the International Criminal Court to try him.

4 journalists abducted

ROME — Suspected regime loyalists kidnapped four Italian journalists and killed their local driver in Libya as the group traveled down a highway to Tripoli on Wednesday, the Italian foreign ministry said. The ministry said the four were abducted on a stretch of highway between Zawiya, a town 30 miles west of Tripoli, and the Libyan capital. The kidnapped include two reporters from Milan daily Corriere della Sera, one from Turin’s La Stampa and one from Avvenire, the daily of the Italian Catholic bishops Conference, the ministry said. Information also emerged on Wednesday that two French journalists were wounded in the fighting around Moammar Gadhafi’s compound in Tripoli. Corriere della Sera said on its Move back to HQ website that the four Italian jourABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — A nalists were stopped by a group spokesman said that the political of civilians, who then “handed party of Ivory Coast’s ex-presithem over to military men faithdent Laurent Gbagbo is planning ful to Gadhafi who brought them to move back into their offices in to a private house,” and that first Abidjan. contact from the Avvenire jourFranck Mamadou Bamba said nalist came hours later. leaders of the Ivorian Popular Avvenire’s foreign news editor, Front, or FPI, paid a visit to three Fabio Carminati, told Sky TG24 buildings Wednesday to assess TV in a telephone interview from the damage incurred after last the paper’s Milan office that its year’s election. reporter, Claudio Monici, called The damage exceeds $1 milthe newsroom to say all four jourlion, he said. nalists were OK and had been At least 3,000 people were taken to a house. killed in postelection violence The Associated Press

Libyan rebels hunt Gadhafi, hold capital By Ben Hubbard and Karin Laub

The Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya — Libyans hunting Moammar Gadhafi offered a $2 million bounty on the fallen dictator’s head and amnesty for anyone who kills or captures him as rebels battled Wednesday to clear the last pockets of resistance from the capital Tripoli. While some die-hard loyalists kept up the fight to defend Gadhafi, his support was crumbling by the hour. His deputy intelligence chief defected, and even his foreign minister said his 42-year rule was over. A defiant Gadhafi vowed from hiding to fight on “until victory or martyrdom,” in an audio message early Wednesday. He may have little choice. Asked by the British broadcaster Channel 4 if a negotiated settlement or safe passage for Gadhafi from Libya was still possible, Foreign Minister Abdul Ati al-Obeidi said: “It looks like things have passed this kind of solution.”

New government Rebel leaders were beginning to set up a new government in the capital. Their interim administration, the National Transitional Council, has been based in the eastern city of Benghazi, which fell under rebel control shortly after the outbreak of widespread protests in February. “Members of the council are now moving one by one from Benghazi to Tripoli,” said Mansour Seyf al-Nasr, the Libyan opposition’s new ambassador to France. Rebel officials are eager to prove they can bring a stable political future to Libya, and that their movement is more than an often-fractious collection of tribes, ethnicities and semiautonomous militias. Mahmoud Jibril, the head of the opposition government, outlined plans for a new constitution and elections and said officials were talking to the U.N. about sending up to 200 monitors to help ensure security in Tripoli.

The Associated Press

Rebel fighters celebrate as they stand on top of a monument inside the main Moammar Gadhafi compound in Bab Al-Aziziya in Tripoli, Libya, on Wednesday. But the capital was far from pacified. A day after rebels captured Gadhafi’s vast Bab alAziziya compound, the symbolic center of his regime, loyalists were firing into the compound from an adjacent neighborhood where intense clashes broke out. Pro-regime snipers cut off the road to the airport. Four Italian journalists were kidnapped on the highway to Tripoli around the city of Zawiya, 30 miles west of the capital. Tripoli’s streets were largely empty of civilians. Rebels manned checkpoints every few hundred yards, but little could be seen beyond the debris of days of fighting and weeks of accumulated garbage. Rebels found no sign of Gadhafi after storming his compound Tuesday, but rumors churned of

his possible whereabouts. White House spokesman Josh Earnest said there was no evidence he had left Libya, but rebel officials acknowledged they could not find him. “He might be in Sirte or any other place,” Jibril said in Paris, where he met French President Nicolas Sarkozy. Sirte, a coastal city 250 miles from Tripoli, is Gadhafi’s hometown and a bastion of regime support. Khaled al-Zintani, spokesman for the rebel military council for the western mountains, said it has set up an operations room with intelligence officers, military defectors and security officers who are trying to find Gadhafi, his family, regime members and his forces. They are collecting information on the location, size and direction of any convoys.

Is East Coast ready for an earthquake? Experts ponder By Ben Nuckols

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — There was a crack in the Washington Monument, and capstones were broken at the National Cathedral. In the District of Columbia suburbs, some people stayed in shelters because of structural concerns at their apartment buildings. A day after the East Coast’s strongest earthquake in 67 years, inspectors assessed the damage and found that most problems were minor. But the shaking raised questions about whether this part of the country, with its older architecture and inexperience with seismic activity, is prepared for a truly powerful quake. The 5.8 magnitude quake felt from Georgia north to Canada prompted swift inspections of many structures Wednesday, including bridges and nuclear plants. An accurate damage estimate could take weeks, if not longer. And many people will not be covered by insurance. In a small Virginia city near the epicenter, the entire downtown

Quick Read

business district was closed. School was canceled for two weeks to give engineers time to check out cracks in several buildings. At the 555-foot Washington Monument, crews found a 4-inch crack late Tuesday in the side of the monument’s pyramidium — the section at the top of the obelisk where it begins narrowing to a point.

Review by copter The damage was discovered during a visual inspection by helicopter. It cannot be seen from the ground. The monument, by far the tallest structure in the nation’s capital, was to remain closed indefinitely. It has never been damaged by a natural disaster, including earthquakes in Virginia in 1897 and New York in 1944, said Bill Line, a National Park Service spokesman. Tuesday’s quake was centered about 40 miles northwest of Richmond, 90 miles south of Washington and 3.7 miles underground. The Insurance Information Institute said earthquakes are not covered under standard U.S. homeowners or business insurance poli-

cies, although supplemental coverage is usually available. The institute said coverage for other damage that may result from earthquakes, such as fire and water damage from burst gas or water pipes, is provided by standard homeowners and business insurance policies in most states. Cars and other vehicles with comprehensive insurance would also be protected. The U.S. Geological Survey classified the quake as Alert Level Orange, the second-most serious category on its four-level scale. Earthquakes in that range lead to estimated losses between $100 million and $1 billion. Repairs were expected to cost millions of dollars — an expense not covered by insurance. Other major cities along the East Coast that felt the shaking tried to gauge the risk from another quake. An earthquake similar to the one in Virginia could do billions of dollars of damage if it were centered in New York, said Barbara Nadel, an architect who specializes in securing buildings against natural disasters and terrorism.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Street sign prank warns of ‘rogue panda’

Nation: Town frets its old, huge flagpole is hazard

Nation: Study links unrest to El Niño climate event

Nation: Patient ruled against in penis amputation

AUTHORITIES IN FLAGSTAFF, Ariz., are assuring residents there are no rogue pandas roaming the city after some pranksters got creative with an electronic street sign. The Arizona Department of Transportation-controlled sign was set up to warn drivers not to make left turns at a busy intersection. But motorists heading to work Monday morning got an entirely different message: “Rogue panda on rampage.” A passer-by reported the hacked sign to police at about 3 a.m. Monday. Police Lt. Ken Koch told the Arizona Daily Sun that it can rest assured there are no problems with rogue pandas.

A NORTHEAST OHIO community wants to wash its hands of a towering flagpole well over 100 years old that officials fear is a tempting hazard. Within the past year, two people thought to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs climbed up the 150-foot flagpole in front of the Portage County Courthouse in Ravenna. Ravenna Township Trustee Patsy Artz said both were lucky to survive and called the flagpole “an accident waiting to happen.” The Record-Courier newspaper reported that the township is asking that either the city of Ravenna or the county take responsibility for the steel flagpole, which resembles a broadcast antenna.

SCIENTISTS HAVE FOUND another thing to blame on the climate demon El Niño: civil strife in poor tropical countries. A new study released Wednesday finds a significant increase in unrest during the years of an El Niño, which is a regular climatic event that tends to warm up and dry out tropical regions. “When people get warm and uncomfortable, they get irritable, they are more prone to fight,” said Mark Cane, a professor of Earth and climate sciences at Columbia University and co-author of the study. “People do like to fight, and El Niño conditions help.”

A JURY WEDNESDAY ruled against a Kentucky truck driver who sued his urologist claiming the doctor amputated part of his penis without his consent. The six-man, six-woman jury deliberated briefly before coming back with the verdict in the lawsuit filed by 64-year-old Phillip Seaton and his wife, Deborah, in Shelby County Circuit Court. Jurors were told that Seaton had gone to Dr. John Patterson seeking a circumcision in 2007, but the doctor decided to amputate part of the organ after he found potentially deadly cancer during surgery.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, August 25, 2011 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Ferry: Single boat unlikely for year-round service Continued from A1 One email called it a “boondoggle,” while a few others said they did not want the service to turn Port Townsend into a “bed­ room community” that serves Seattle. Deputy Director Jim Pivarnik said that scenario is unlikely with the current plans, since the first avail­ able docking is now 10 a.m., which makes it impractical for anyone who needs to be in Seattle during normal business hours.

Pivarnik said the single boat would make it unlikely that the service would oper­ ate on a daily basis yearround, since it would need to be taken offline for ser­ vice and repairs. The initial plan is to run the service once or twice a day with a 49-passenger capacity, since a greater amount would require a larger crew and cost more to operate. The one-way fare would be $20 or $25, and the boat would be “no frills.”

“We have had some sug­ gestions that the boat should have public art, but it’s not going to be that kind of boat,” Crockett said. The port has already had to reconsider some of the “frills” that it has sought to omit, such as Wi-Fi and coffee service. “I think leaving Wi-Fi off the boat would be a mis­ take,” said Forest Shomer during the comment period. “Wireless is how people

work, and it will be a requirement for many pas­ sengers.” Shomer said a full-blown latte stand isn’t needed, but some type of small coffee service would be necessary. The 49-passenger limit could also be reconsidered if it was determined the demand was greater, Crock­ ett said. One potential market is transportation to the air­ port, since the boat dock is

Tour Our Gorgeous Model Home

tle Convention and Visitors Bureau was “extremely excited” about the Port Townsend-Seattle connec­ tion, and the cruise ship market could also supply a steady stream of tourists and visitors.

Car

101

accident on

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Washington State Patrol Trooper T. D. Beebe, right, stands next to his patrol car at the scene of a one-vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 101 at the intersection of Deer Park Road in Port Angeles on Wednesday. At left is Eugene Kingsley of Port Angeles. Beebe said Kingsley, 89, crashed his eastbound car after becoming distracted by mail inside the car that was being blown by wind. Kingsley’s car windows were rolled down at the time. The car went off the highway and into a rocky ditch. Beebe said Kingsley was wearing a seat belt and was not injured. Kingsley was issued a citation for the crash.

175126347

or take virtual tours of all our homes at LexarHomes.com

only a few blocks from light rail. “This connection to the airport could be very attrac­ tive for people who now drive to the airport and park their cars,” he said. “It could save them the cost of gas and parking and would be more convenient for travelers.” During the public com­ ment period, Port Townsend Marketing Director Chris­ tina Pivarnik said the Seat­

360.683.4949

92 Kala Square Place Port Townsend

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Deer: Problem of no predators

Tuesday Special

16 oz. T-Bone Steak includes rice, beans and pico de gallo MEXICAN RESTAURANT 165124425

(360) 452-3928 636 E. Front St. Port Angeles

enjoy

luxurious, pillowy, softness without sacrificing support

Continued from A1 everyone turned their heads.” Preston said many local “The problem is, there are no natural predators,” gardeners have a problem with deer eating valuable Timmons said. “There are no coyotes in plants and “hears some­ the area, so there are a lot thing about this every day.” As a result, deer repell­ more deer and rabbits.” Jefferson County Animal ent is one of the store’s big­ Control doesn’t get involved gest items, one that needs in deer management unless to be restocked every week. There is a commonly an animal is struck by a car and has to be removed or held belief that deer carry put down, said Bruce disease, originating from Turner, animal control offi­ the ticks that jump off the deer and onto people. cer. This isn’t much of a threat, said Jefferson Once a rarity County public health nurse “When I came to Port Lisa McKenzie, who cites Townsend 20 years ago, Washington state data that deer were a rarity,” said report only a handful of Dawna Preston, a sales­ locally originated cases of woman at Henery’s Nurs­ Lyme disease since 2005, ery. none from Jefferson County. “We were in a restau­ Deer pose the greatest rant, and someone said they health risk to vegetable saw a buck outside, and gardens because their feces

carry virulent bacteria, so it becomes important to keep them away from homegrown food, officials said. Preston doesn’t see this as an issue because it is easy enough to protect a garden with chemicals or a thorn hedge. And deer prefer flowers, anyway, she said. Some people feel they can communicate with the local deer.

Meditation

The food grown in the garden goes to the food bank, supplying several pounds each week of the growing season. Andrew Shoop of Port Hadlock is less hospitable, saying it is “ridiculous” to think of deer as friends. In 2005, Shoop shot a 4-point buck with an arrow in Port Townsend and was convicted of unlawful hunt­ ing of big game two years later, after the four-point buck took a while to die, he said. “They are like rats,” Shoop said. “There are mil­ lions of them. “I think you should be able to bow-hunt on your own property.”

Aaron Carver, who man­ ages a small vegetable gar­ den next to the Food Co-op, keeps the deer away through willpower. “I meditate near the gar­ den and put out that they ________ should please not touch this Jefferson County Reporter Chargarden,” Carver said. lie Bermant can be reached at 360“This has worked for 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ years.” peninsuladailynews.com.

Heron: After-school program 14701122

1114 East First, Port Angeles

Continued from A1 according to Jim Funaro, the YMCA branch director. But scholarships are The after-school pro­ available for students who gram will run Mondays through Thursdays after cannot afford the fees, Kent said. school, she said. “We hope to involve as That includes earlymany kids as possible,” he release Wednesdays. “In our school district, said. The Y is also working on we are trying something the possibility of seventhnew,” Kent said. “Every Wednesday, every and eighth-grade teams school will let classes out competing with other schools, Little said. two hours early.” “We are still part of The YMCA will provide programs at Blue Heron WIAA sports,” she said, School, ranging from tutor­ referring to the Washington ing to chess to cooking to Interscholastic Activities sports — or anything else Association. Schools that are mem­ that is in demand and pos­ bers of WIAA can compete sible to do. Fees will be $65 to $75 with other member schools. Intermural sports are for a six-week program,

Happy 60 Cal & Lu Mogck! We thank God for all the blessings He has & continues to shower on you both! Love, your family 185131342

“The wedding was 60 years ago today the celebration continues!”

Peninsula Daily Deal

50% OFF HAIR SERVICE

Available til midnight Thursday

Click on Daily Deal at peninsuladailynews.com

185126545

7/19/11 12:35 PM

not part of the present plan, Kent said. “We’re not in the busi­ ness now of building those teams so they can go play” other schools, he said. “We’re focused more on what we can do within the walls of our own school.” But because the school is a member of WIAA, parents and coaches can arrange such intermural matches on their own. Having a weekly afterschool program at Blue Heron blends well with the YMCA’s Building Futures program, where mentors meet weekly with students for activities. “Everybody will have a time and a space,” Funaro said.

Began planning in June

th -----

18405997

x8_SYK_SchoolK.indd 2

457-9412 1-800-859-0163 Mon.-Sat. 8:30 - 5:30

According to Funaro, the YMCA started planning in June how to offer sports at Blue Heron when word started circulating that the program would be cut. Taking on sports and the after-school classes is a big jump, he said, but it’s impor­ tant to the community. “This is what we do in many communities,” Fun­ aro said of the Y’s sports programs. “We work with commu­ nity leaders to fill gaps.” Funaro said Kent was a major partner in putting the offer together and helped the Y see what was lost and what gaps needed to be filled. The Y uses volunteer coaches and class leaders as much as possible, Little said. So far, she has two vol­ unteer volleyball coaches, two volunteer cross-country coaches and a volunteer basketball coach. “People are stepping for­ ward,” she said. Funaro said the Y is hop­ ing to work with other orga­

nizations that want to get involved in the school pro­ grams. Next June, the Soropti­ mists International of Port Townsend/East Jefferson County are planning to put on a triathlon for students at Mountain View Com­ mons, Little said. It will consist of a 100meter swim, a three-mile bicycle ride and a run of slightly less than a mile. Jefferson Healthcare hospital and the Port Townsend Marathon Asso­ ciation are working with the Soroptimists to put on the event, which organizers have been dubbed the Soroptithon. “We’ll gear spring train­ ing for that,” Little said. The partnership is based on a model that other mid­ dle schools in the nation have put into practice, Kent said. “Of course, there was disappointment when the sports program came to an end,” he said. “But it’s not unusual around the country.”

Seeking volunteers The school and the YMCA is seeking feedback on activities that should be offered as well as volun­ teers to teach and support the programs, Kent said. “We’re getting a lot of people who have expressed an interest in helping out,” Kent said, whether it’s chess club or homework club or tutoring. For more information or to volunteer, phone Little or Funaro at 360-385-5811.

________ Jennifer Jackson is a freelance writer and photographer living in Port Townsend. To contact her, email jjackson@olypen.com. Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can be reached at 360-4173531 or leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, August 25, 2011

A5

1st reprieves for new deportation policy EDITOR’S NOTE: We would like to hear from any illegal immigrants living on the North Olympic Peninsula whose deportation proceedings have been suspended because of the new Obama administration policy. Please contact Managing Editor Leah Leach at 360417-3530 or leah.leach@ peninsuladailynews.com. By Julia Preston The New York Times

MIAMI — The call came in the morning to the lawyer representing Manuel Guerra, an illegal immigrant from Mexico living in Florida who had been caught in a tortuous and seemingly failing five-year court fight against deportation. With the news early Thursday that federal immigration authorities had canceled his deportation, Guerra became one of the first illegal immigrants in the country to see results from a policy the Obama administration unveiled in Washington that day. It could lead to the suspension in coming months of deportation proceedings

against tens of thousands of immigrants. Administration officials and immigrant advocates said Monday the plan offered the first real possibility since President Barack Obama took office — promising immigrants and Latinos he would overhaul the law to bring illegal immigrants into the system — for large numbers of those immigrants to be spared from detention and deportation. For Guerra, who said he wants to remain in the United States to study to become a Roman Catholic priest, the news “was like something from above, from heaven. I don’t want to go back to Mexico,” he said, “and I’ve been fighting this for five years.”

300,000 cases A working group from the Homeland Security and Justice Departments met Friday to initiate a review of about 300,000 deportation cases currently before the immigration courts. Under the policy, immigration authorities will use powers of prosecutorial discretion in existing law to

suspend the deportations of most immigrants who, though they have committed immigration violations (which generally are civil offenses), have not been convicted of crimes. In particular, officials will look to halt deportations of longtime residents with clean police records who came here illegally when they were children or are close family of military service members or are parents or spouses of American citizens. “This is a great first step,” said Hector E. Sanchez, a Hispanic labor leader who oversees immigration policy for the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda, a coalition of the country’s major Latino groups. “We really need to see action on a common-sense approach to immigration and not just promises.” Obama had been facing increasingly vocal protests from disappointed Latino and immigrant groups after he made no progress in Congress on his immigration overhaul agenda, and enforcement authorities set a modern record for deportations, with nearly 800,000

Peninsula Daily News

But White House officials and Congressional Democrats said they expected the measures would lead to relief during the coming year

for virtually all young illegal immigrants facing deportation who might have won legal status under a bill called the Dream Act. A proposal to benefit illegal immigrant high school graduates who came to the country before they were 16 failed in the Senate last year. Guerra, now 27 and living in Indiantown, Fla., is one of those immigrants. He said he came to this country to escape a violent gang in Mexico. His lawyer, Richard A. Hujber, said Guerra’s efforts to straighten out his legal status went wrong because they were originally mishandled by an accountant claiming falsely to be a lawyer. In recent years, even though he was undocumented, Guerra has been a Florida leader of the illegal immigrant student movement, helping to organize a protest walk by four students to Washington and a mock university held by students wearing mortarboards on Capitol Hill. “That was so big to me, all these students organizing a school so we could go without our papers,” Guerra said.

If he can obtain a work permit, he and Hujber said, he could be legally eligible for the first time to apply for financial aid that would allow him to continue his religious studies. Some Latino Democrats who have been deeply critical of Obama on immigration issues praised the policy shift. “This is the Barack Obama I have been waiting for, that Latino and immigrant voters helped put in office to fight for sensible immigration policies,” said Rep. Luis V. Gutierrez of Illinois, a Latino leader on immigration issues who has been arrested twice in protests in front of the White House. Republican leaders reacted to Obama’s new policy by stepping up their rejection of his approach. Rep. Peter T. King of New York, chairman of the Homeland Security Committee in the House, said the president was making “a blatant attempt to grant amnesty to potentially millions of illegal aliens in this country,” which he called “totally unacceptable.”

Join us for this special 2-hour live show taping of the national radio program etown celebrating the elwha Dam removal!

with musical guests

CAKE Danny Barnes and

Eliza Gilkyson with radio show hosts

Nick & Helen Forster SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 17 • 7:30 PM

185131524

PORT ANGELES HS AUDITORIUM, 304 E PARK AVE Tickets $20 at www.artsnw.org or www.brownpapertickets.com Port Book and News, 104 E. 1st St, Port Angeles info: 360.457.9290 & www.etown.org

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat! SOLVE YOUR PLANT PROBLEMS WSU Master Gardener Plant Clinic Every Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Woodcock Demonstration Garden 2711 Woodcock Rd., Sequim Information about fall and winter gardening will also be available.

185130476

Now Showing

Relief during year

&

Injured PA skater, 22, is stable PORT ANGELES — A 22-year-old Port Angeles skateboarder who was hit by a pickup Tuesday was in stable condition in the intensive care unit at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle on Wednesday. Arthur Gagnon suffered a head injury after he rode his skateboard into an intersection at West Lauridsen Boulevard and C Street and was struck by a mirror on a passing utility truck at about 6:15 p.m. Tuesday. “He’s on a ventilator and heavily sedated,” said his mother, Barbara Gagnon of Neah Bay. She said doctors said her son has bleeding in his brain and that they expect his brain to swell in coming days. Harborview personnel said he was listed in stable condition. His mother flew home from a trip to Los Angeles after she was told of her son’s injury and has been near his bedside, she said. Police said witnesses told them Gagnon was wearing headphones and “charged into the street” on his skateboard just as the truck, a private utility truck, approached. The driver was not cited.

foreigners removed in the past two years. Homeland Security officials said Monday that their goal is to quickly identify noncriminals on swollen immigration court dockets and close those cases, clearing the way for speedier removals of gang members, drug traffickers or foreigners who repeatedly return after being deported. Wait times for a hearing in immigration courts can now be as long as 18 months. A senior Homeland Security official said deportations would be canceled case by case. While many immigrants in those cases will be eligible for work permits, he said, employment authorization will come only after a separate process. The immigrants will remain in a sort of legal limbo, not vulnerable to deportation but with no positive immigration status, which can be conferred only by Congress.

n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) “Captain America: The First Avenger” (PG-13) “Cowboys and Aliens” (PG-13) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (PG-13) “The Help” (PG-13) “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (PG-13) “Spy Kids: All the Time in the World” (PG)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Cars 2” (G) “Conan the Barbarian” (R) “Final Destination 5” (R) “Fright Night” (R)

n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089) “Another Earth” (PG-13) “The Help” (PG-13)

n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (PG-13)

Movie, Port Townsend (360-385-0859)

Back to School

fashion show

Little Kids Fashions

Juniors Fashions

brought to you by Teenie Queenie

brought to you by Sassy Kat Salon Clothing Boutique

We are excited to show you our brand new line for little kids!

Great for kids from middle school all the way through college!

at Sassy Kat Salon & Clothing Boutique Punch, Goodies to Eat and Champagne for Moms Gift with Purchases

Everything on SALE that Evening! 105 East First St. • Port Angeles, WA

(360) 417-0800

www.sassykatsalon.com

185130986

“Winnie the Pooh” (G) “The Smurfs” (PG) “Captain America: The First Avenger” (PG-13)

Saturday, Aug. 27th 4-6 pm

185130882

n  Wheel-In Motor

& Clothing Boutique


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, August 25, 2011 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Sequim survey contains surprises for City Hall By Arwyn Rice

20 percent said. The report cross-referenced data with respondents’ ages, neighborhoods and family situation, and compared Sequim’s results with similar-size cities nationwide. “It’s a little overwhelming,” said Mayor Ken Hays. The 3-inch-thick binder was reduced to an hourlong presentation, during which Ron Vine, vice president of ETC Institute — the market research firm that conducted the study — explained how to use the raw data. ETC sent out more than 1,000 questionnaires and expected to get 300 responses. Vine said. Some 450 returned the questionnaires, he said. “That tells us there is a lot of interest in the topic,” he said. City Council members said the most surprising results were the low priority people placed on a new City

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — City Council members received both exactly what they expected and several surprises this week when they heard a report on a study commissioned by the council to learn how Sequim residents see their city. Ninety-one percent of respondents said Sequim is a good place to live, but only 44 percent agreed it is a good place to work, according to the study presented to the Sequim City Council on Monday. Five percent of respondents gave the Sequim Police Department a “disapproval” rating, while 37 percent gave the city poor marks for land use, planning and regulations. City leaders should pay more attention to the availability of public transportation, said 41 percent, and less to bicycle lanes,

Hall and that a majority of the population found the city lacking in teen activities while few wanted more senior activities. They expected the high priority placed on reducing traffic congestion and improving traffic flow. Council members had strong and conflicting reactions to the people’s placing the proposed new City Hall as their lowest priority. “What concerns me is that the highest priority for the council is City Hall but that is the lowest priority for its citizens,” said Councilman Bill Huizinga. “Maybe what we need is to do more on educating the public on how much this city is paying in retail space,” said Mayor Pro Tem Laura Dubois. The council also questioned what kind of teen activities people want. “The most important thing I picked out is that

people want more for teens,” Councilman Don Hall said. “Do they want dances? Sports? More at the YMCA?” Hall asked. Other results that pleased the council included high approval rates of individual interaction with the Police Department and city staff. When compared with other communities nationally, the city’s services scored in the average range in most areas. “You’re a pretty consistent community,” Vine said. One area stood out, he said. “In public safety, you’re almost ‘best practices’ in the U.S.,” he said. The complete report is available for public review from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, or from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, at Sequim City Hall, 152 W. Cedar St.

Death and Memorial Notice ISHMAEL ‘DUANE’ BARNEY September 11, 1934 August 18, 2011 Ishmael “Duane” Barney, 76, of Brinnon passed away August 18, 2011, after a long-term illness. He was born September 11, 1934, in Palmyra, Utah, to Ishmael Wayne and Ruby (Carter) Barney. Duane married Ardella Chatwin on November 29, 1954, in Lehi, Utah. He was employed as a parks and recreation manager. Duane was a landscape artist and a loving father and grandfather. He is survived by his wife, Ardella Barney; sons Gary Barney, Jerald Barney, Barry Barney, Joel Barney and Ephraim Barney; daughters Kathy Hernandez, Anna Davis and Vella Tudor; brother McCoy Barney; and grandchildren Jerome

Mr. Barney Walker, Lorisa Tudor, Heidi Gonzalez, Christopher Martinez, Matthew Flores, Roger Hernandez, Amber Beranger, Jacquline Barney, Aaron Barney, David Gardner, Brandy Walker, Angela Hansen, Kristen Davis, Kristopher Davis, Brandon Barney, Tim Barney, Melinda Barney, Mandy Barney, Desere Barney, Danial Barney,

Teresa Barney, Elizabeth Barney and Brian Barney. He was preceded in death by his mother, Ruby Barney; father Ishmael Barney; brother Dal Barney; sisters Ann Chatwin and Nina Barney; son Perry Barney; granddaughter Teirsa Apodaca; and grandson Josh Barney. My Father, My Angel. Your battle is now over, no more tears flowing down your cheek, no more pain, no more suffering. Now the pain is gone, the pain that made you weak. I still do not understand why this had to happen to you, but I am proud to say you are my dad, the greatest, strongest man I ever knew. Although you will not be here to see me through the trials, when those days come, I know you will be by my side with your beautiful smile. You were always there

Death and Memorial Notice MARY F. ROON July 15, 1944 August 20, 2011

March 10, 1924 August 4, 2011 Daisy Jean Gummer of Sequim passed August 4, 2011, as a result of a series of strokes. Born in Portland, Oregon, on March 10, 1924, she is survived by her husband, Jack; daughter Patricia; grandchildren Susan and Vickie; and great-grandchildren Carson and MacKenzie. Daisy graduated from Darrington High School, where her grandmother ran the local variety store for many years. In her younger years, she enjoyed singing with the Sweet Adelines. Daisy was a secretary for many years in Seattle before she and her husband, Jack, moved to the country operating a successful U-pick raspberry

Mrs. Gummer farm for years in Snohomish, Washington. Her grandchildren have fond memories of growing up next door spending time with her and Jack on the farm. Retiring in the 1980s, they subsequently moved in the late 1990s to Sequim, where Daisy spent her days as a loving homemaker, mother, grandma and G-G.

Solution to Puzzle on C3 R O E G G O N O L I V E O L D E S T

O C T O

N E I M A I N N I C T T S R L C I N N O E N M E A I N T I T T Y

D A M A G E D

O N E N A M E

O M T A E X I E M L I A N C O C R O S T S

L A P D I N R I M N E M O I A S M U S S E E I O U N T S L L A T E D A P S R E N T I O N O M N I U S A T E S I S S O T H E R E A S E M C L A T E L A T U R E A S I T N M I K E T A T E S W O R I C A N A C K S

R I N G T O N E V A M P E D T O O T H

Sentence made in theft of public funds By Paul Gottlieb

immediately appealed the sentence. A man Oakley identified as a family member refused to comment about the verdict. County jail Superintendent Ron Sukert said Betts was transported almost immediately by county jail van to the Washington Corrections Center for Women at Purdy near Gig Harbor. A Superior Court jury found Betts guilty July 27 of stealing between $617,467 and $793,595 in real estate excise tax proceeds between June 2003 and May 2009 from a single cash drawer. Oakley, of Clallam-Jefferson Public Defenders, had asked for a 90-day sentence for Betts, whom he said has severe diabetes and nerve damage to her leg that forces her to be “essentially confined to a wheelchair.” Betts also has breast cancer, according to a doctor’s statement contained in court records. Betts, who admitted only that she stole a check for $877 from the Treasurer’s Office cash drawer, declined an offer by Taylor to address the court. “I don’t want to end up in the paper anymore,” she told Taylor. “I’m fine.” Betts has never said what happened to the money. Authorities have never determined the fate of the funds.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Continuing to maintain her silence about a theft of historic proportions, convicted public-funds embezzler Catherine A. Betts was driven to prison late Wednesday morning. Earlier Wednesday, Clallam County Superior Court Judge S. Brooke Taylor sentenced the former county Treasurer’s Office cashier to 12 years and ordered her to pay $607,516 in restitution for two counts of aggravated first-degree theft, a single count of money-laundering and 19 counts of filing false or fraudulent tax returns on behalf of the county. That’s the largest amount of restitution ever assigned to the county’s 8-year-old pay-or-appear program, court Administrator Keith Wills said. Taylor meted out the punishment in an hourlong hearing involving the 47-year-old woman who, her attorney and doctor said, has at least two severe diseases, including cancer. “This was an enormous theft of public funds,” Taylor said. “There is nothing mitigating in your favor,” he said. “The only conclusion I can reach is the motivation in this matter is a case of what I can only describe as worldclass greed.” With Betts sitting in a ________ wheelchair, Taylor addressed her in a courtroom that Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb included about 30 spectators. can be reached at 360-417-3536 Betts’ attorney, Loren or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily Oakley of Port Angeles, news.com.

P R I G

M M C L

S A S E

U N E M O T I O N A L

L I V E R

U S E M E

L O T T O

E L S E S

I M S O

D E N E A R N

Mary F. Roon, 67, of Port Angeles passed away August 20, 2011, of colon cancer. Mary was born to Anthony and Mary Andriese in Chicago, Illinois, on July 15, 1944. Mary married Robert J. Roon on July 16, 1966. “And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” Mary Roon embodied these words in her life and work. A lifelong advocate for equality and justice, Mary became a registered nurse at age 40 because of a strong desire to empower women. After working at the University of Minnesota for 10 years as an obstetrical nurse, her frustration with invasive birthing practices led her to pursue a master’s degree as a certified nurse midwife. She worked for five years for the Mayo Clinic Health System in rural Minnesota. In 2000, she moved to Port Angeles to become a practitioner at the Peninsula Women’s Clinic. Mary loved her work as a women’s health care provider, relishing the opportunity to treat the

Mrs. Roon whole person. She tried to see beyond her clients’ immediate clinical symptoms to focus on their overall nutritional and psychological health. She was beloved by many because of her concern and empathy. She persisted in her work as long as her health permitted, delivering her last baby about six weeks ago. She absolutely adored and was totally bonded to fellow midwives Debbie Bopp and Lyell Fox. Mary believed that her faith should be integrated into all corners of her life. She was an unabashed social and political liberal, insisting that humanitarian concerns should trump economic self-interest. Her concern for civil rights is mirrored by her

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form is at www.peninsuladailynews.com.

interracial family, achieved by birth and adoption. Her charitable interests, which were many and eclectic, included environmental advocacy groups and educational institutions. Mary clearly loved justice and mercy, but her humility needs a bit of an explanation: She was not humble in the meek and mild sense; in fact, she could be fiercely in-your-face if she thought the cause was just. Her humbleness centered on her conviction that all persons were created with equal rights and should be treated with love and respect. Mary loved life fiercely, always seeking adventure. She was a prolific reader and writer with a keen, uncompromising wit, as well as an avid gardener, cook and keeper of chickens. During the last few years, she rafted a   class IV waterfall in the Ecuadorian Andes, swam with sharks in the Galapagos and mantas in Hawaii, and ran a triathlon. She rarely slowed down but reveled in the beauty of creation, living her life as one extended hymn of praise. Mary is survived by her children, David Roon of Moscow, Idaho, Maria Roon of St. Paul, Minnesota, and Amy Roon of

Seattle; and by her husband, Robert Roon of Port Angeles. Her ragtag crew of grandchildren and extended family include Justice Roon, Benjamin Roon, Drew and McKenzy Bogden, Lisette Waits, Michelle Schuiteman, Jose Marin Jarrin, Shakeela Gibson, Anna Gifford and Kathy Balling. Her loving sister, Norma Schuiteman, of Olympia, Washington, was at Mary’s side for five weeks during her final struggle with colon cancer. We love you, Mary, and we will miss you deeply. A memorial service will be held Saturday, August 27, 2011, at 10:30 a.m. at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 East Lopez Avenue, Port Angeles; and on Sunday, September 11, 2011, at 2 p.m. at University Congregational United Church of Christ, 4515 16th Avenue Northeast, Seattle. The Revs. Richard Grinstad, Peter Ilgenfritz and Amy Roon will officiate. A reception will follow each service. Memorial contributions may be made at Natural Resources Defense Council, www.nrdc.org/joingive; Olympic Medical Center Foundation; the Patient Navigator Fund; or a charity of your choice. Please visit the online guestbook at www. drennanford.com.

Thank you to Olympic Medical Home Health Team, Chris, Lisa & Bill for taking wonderful care of my husband. Also a big thank you to Betty, Gayla & Brian of Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County.

I couldn’t have done it without you. Lois Collins

185131353

G R O R E E U E N L I S O N T O I E T D I I N A N R A O E O M I A

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice

DAISY JEAN GUMMER

P R O N R U M O O N E M E N E N J I F A M I L P A N A E D D Y D E I S N O M A G N A R N D I E C R A M O E L O N T V I D E O N E M C O E N E N D S

for me and never made me cry, until the day you closed your eyes and had to say goodbye. Now you are my Angel, so spread your wings out wide. Please wrap them around me whenever you see me cry. Our time together was memorable, and God took you way too fast, but the most precious thing to me was that you were there for my first breath, and I was there for your last. Save a place for me in heaven, my silver-haired dad. You gave me the best of times. They were the best I ever had. — Written in loving memory of my dad, Duane Barney, August 18, 2011, by Vella Tudor. Memorial services will be held at Brinnon Community Church, on Saturday, August 27, 2011, at   1 p.m. A potluck will follow the memorial at the church.

Catherine Betts is wheeled into Clallam County Superior Court on Wednesday morning for sentencing.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, August 25, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A7

Few freedoms on shores of Tripoli NAME A SINGLE Arab or Islamic state, which, after a revolution that has overthrown a dictator, came to embrace political pluralism, religious tolerance and equal rights for women. You can’t, can you? Cal The U.S. Thomas State Department publishes an annual report on human rights practices in Arab states (http://tinyurl. com/pdnarab). It consistently finds all are ruled by variations of dictatorial regimes that oppress their people, deny basic freedoms of press, speech, due process and are intolerant of any faith other than Islam, punishing converts to other faiths (a capital offense in some Islamic nations) and anyone who shares other faiths with their people. The Arab Human Development Report, sponsored by the United Nations Development

Programme and authored by Arab scholars, examined the world’s seven regions. It ranks Arab countries lowest according to their “freedom score.” What is the popular definition of insanity? Isn’t it repeating the same mistakes and expecting different results? After months of uprisings in Arab nations from Egypt to Yemen, we are now faced with one in Libya, which appears to have ousted Moammar Gadhafi. As with the other nations engaged in revolution, what follows is yet to be determined. So is a judgment on whether the replacements will be any better than their predecessors. In Libya, the National Transition Council has published online what purports to be a draft constitution for the new state. It contains much that sounds good — and at least one section that ought to be cause for serious concern. The good stuff includes “guarantees,” such as: “The state shall guarantee for woman all opportunities which shall allow her to participate

entirely and ONLINE . . . actively in political, economic and social spheres.” (Article 6) And: “The state shall guarantee for non■ State Muslims the Department freedom of pracreport: ticing religious http:// rights and shall tinyurl.com/ guarantee pdnarab respect for their systems of personal status.” (Article 1) There is much else to commend in the draft constitution, but then there is this: “Islam is the religion of the state and the principal source of legislation is Islamic jurisprudence (Sharia).” (Article 1) The legal system in Saudi Arabia is based on Sharia law. More than two-dozen other countries operate according to at least some aspects of Sharia law. None of them is known for any of the principles stated in the pluralistic-sounding Libyan draft constitution.

Peninsula Voices

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Article positioning

ing and the bell ringing from the names of the I opened my Sunday fallen heroes of that plamorning [Aug. 21] PDN and the only words I could toon was heartfelt. Each ring of the bell felt utter were: like a knife stabbing Are you serious? through the air. The headline was about I watched the pain on seagulls defecating in Port the faces of the men as Angeles [“Splat! Bombarthey tried to hold back the dier Sea Gulls Unusually, Um, Active”], which I didn’t tears. They were once again think would be newsworyoung men in Vietnam. thy enough for the front This story, this place in page of a newspaper. This isn’t exactly some- time, deserved a better place than below a story thing we in the Pacific about sea gulls and other Northwest haven’t dealt frivolous interests stories. with on some level. Nancy Green, But my ire came when Port Angeles below was the article about the 3041 Platoon reunion Articles and letters [“All-State Marine Unit From Viet era Reunites. The front page article, Recruit Buddies Still “Splat!,” lacked both class ‘Brothers’ 43 Years Later”]. and newsworthiness. That was beneath the One short paragraph in “poop” story. the (empty) “Seen Around” I attended that cerespot could have summamony. rized the topic if it was ediThe emotion on that torially viewed as essential. field, with the guns salutIn “Peninsula Voices” on ing the men, the flags flythe Commentary page,

By their fruits you shall know them and the fruit in countries where Sharia law is the legal standard is rotten when it comes to tolerance, religious pluralism, a free and independent press and equal rights for women. It is no jump to an unwarranted conclusion to say if Sharia law is the objective of the Libyan National Transition Council, or NTC, as expressed in its draft constitution, none of the other highsounding principles are likely to be achieved, much less guaranteed. None of the nations now experiencing revolutions or unrest have a history of democracy, freedom or human rights. That’s because they believe in a God who wants his followers to violently impose their religious beliefs on those who believe differently. Former Libyan justice minister Mustafa Mohammed Abdul Jalil, who now heads the NTC, said after resigning his post in protest over Gadhafi’s shooting of civilian demonstrators: “We are the same as people in other countries, and are looking for the same things.”

where citizen opinion reigns, I read in a letter to the editor [“Border Patrol (2)”], “my sailboat was boarded by armed Border Patrol agents while crossing the Strait of Juan de Fuca northbound.” So? Mention of “armed” bona fide peace officers

That remains to be seen. Based on the direction of revolutions in other Arab states and their history — not to mention the presence of the Muslim Brotherhood and other radical groups that could well hijack whatever yearning for real freedom might be in these movements — I’m not persuaded. By the way, since nations are unfreezing Libyan assets and the country is awash in oil, can we please send the NTC a bill for the help we’ve given them, directly and through NATO? That would help lower our national debt. This is a practice we should also apply to other countries seeking our assistance.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and email

factored into the government’s Cost of Living Index (COLI), which we loosely call the inflation rate. The news media have been reporting across-theboard higher food prices (e.g., 19 percent increase for a gallon of milk), reduced product amounts for the same existing price and the official COLI for the Seattle area is allegedly 0.78 percent. Sure it is. Blip. Our jobless rate is around 9.2 percent, or so. But people who are no longer receiving unemployment benefits are simply dropped off the charts and no longer counted. suggests to me a bias If only 12 percent of toward firearms, perhaps those who lost benefits are an anti-authority attitude still unemployed, that or mild paranoia. would seem to put the true Then I read in the letter, jobless number above 20 “McIntire critic,” “Inflation percent. is so low it has hardly regWhy don’t you do a istered a blip.” “Splat” front-pager about Really! un-neutered male bovine Fuel prices aren’t even excrement and relate it to

empty political promises, bogus government statistics and the numerous ways our nation is being dragged down by the globalists? Bill Henry, Port Angeles

Liked columns Thank you for carrying the columns by Joe Nocera [“Starbucks CEO’s Call For Boycott”] and Timothy Egan [“Nature . . . Without The Nanny State”] in the Aug. 22 Peninsula Daily News. It is refreshing and essential for folks living in relatively isolated communities such as those on the North Olympic Peninsula to be exposed to a variety of opinions, especially when the topics relate to local concerns, as both of these editorials do. Keep up the good work. John Wegmann, Port Angeles

Oil pipeline protest rocks White House THE WHITE HOUSE was rocked Tuesday, not only by the 5.8-magnitude earthquake, but by the protests mounting outside its gates. More than Amy 2,100 people say they’ll risk Goodman arrest there during the next two weeks. They oppose the Keystone XL pipeline project, designed to carry heavy crude oil from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada, to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast. A “keystone” in architecture is the stone at the top of an arch that holds the arch together; without it, the structure collapses. By putting their bodies on the line — as more than 200 have already at the time of this writing — these practitioners of the proud tradition of civil disobedience hope to collapse not only the pipeline, but the fossil-fuel dependence that is accelerating disruptive global climate change.

Bill McKibben was among those already arrested. He is an environmentalist and author who founded the group 350.org, named after the estimated safe upper limit of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of 350 ppm (parts per million — the planet is currently at 390 ppm). In a call to action to join the protest, McKibben, along with others, including journalist Naomi Klein, actor Danny Glover, and NASA scientist James Hansen, wrote that the Keystone pipeline is “a 1,500mile fuse to the biggest carbon bomb on the continent, a way to make it easier and faster to trigger the final overheating of our planet.” The movement to oppose Keystone XL ranges from activists and scientists to indigenous peoples of the threatened Canadian plains and boreal forests, where the tar sands are located, to rural farmers and ranchers in the ecologically fragile Sand Hills region of Nebraska, to students and physicians. Asked why the White House protests are taking place while President Obama is away on a family vacation on Martha’s

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Sue Stoneman

Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

Vineyard, Mass., McKibben replied: “We’ll be here when he gets back, too. We’re staying for two weeks, every day. “This is the first real civil disobedience of this scale in the environmental movement in ages.” Just miles to the east of Martha’s Vineyard — and almost exactly 170 years earlier — on Nantucket, Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave, abolitionist, journalist and publisher, gave one of his first major addresses before the Massachusetts AntiSlavery Society. Douglass is famous for stating one of grass-roots organizing’s central truths: “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will.” Demanding change is one thing, while getting change in Washington, D.C., is another, especially with the Republicancontrolled House of Representatives’ hostility to any climatechange legislation. That is why the protests against Keystone XL are happening in front of the White House. President Obama has the power to stop the pipeline. The Canadian corporation

behind the project, TransCanada, has applied for a permit from the U.S. State Department to build the pipeline. If the State Department denies the permit, Keystone XL would be dead. The enormous environmental devastation caused by extracting petroleum from the tar sands might still move forward, but without easy access to the refineries and the U.S. market, it would certainly be slowed. TransCanada executives are confident that the U.S. will grant the permit by the end of the year. Republican politicians and the petroleum industry tout the creation of well-paying construction jobs that would come from the project, and even enjoy some union support. In response, two major unions, the Amalgamated Transit Union and the Transport Workers Union, representing more than 300,000 workers, called on the State Department to deny the permit. In a joint news release, they said: “We need jobs, but not ones based on increasing our reliance on tar sands oil. . . . “Many jobs could also be created in energy conservation,

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

Follow the PDN online

Peninsula Daily News

pendailynews

upgrading the grid, maintaining and expanding public transportation — jobs that can help us reduce air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and improve energy efficiency.” Two Canadian women, indigenous actress Tantoo Cardinal, who starred in “Dances With Wolves,” and Margot Kidder, who played Lois Lane in “Superman,” were arrested with about 50 others just before the earthquake hit Tuesday. McKibben summed up: “It takes more than earthquakes and hurricanes to worry us — we’ll be out here through Sept. 3. Our hope is to send a [magnitude] 8 tremor through the political system on the day Barack Obama says no to Big Oil and reminds us all why we were so happy when he got elected. “The tar sands pipeline is his test.”

________

Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Inspiration awaits in Chetzemoka Park By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — On Saturday, Margaret McGee plans a pilgrimage to one of her favorite spots — and she’s inviting others to walk, write and respond with her. The title of McGee’s languorous day is “Inspired by Place,” and the destination is Chetzemoka Park, the lush, beach-bordered expanse at Jackson and Blaine streets. Participants are urged to sign up by today to ensure the workshop goes ahead. McGee, a teacher and the author of Haiku — The Sacred Art, will serve as a guide, discussing the Japanese poetry known as haiku, offering a history of the park and then turning participants loose to roam in the park. The event, from 9:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. Saturday, costs $55 per person. Information is available at 360-477-0355, 360-3853489 and www.pilgrimage pt.com. What excites McGee about this, she said, is that it’s a chance to tune in to Chetzemoka Park’s charms — its sounds, sights and scents — and reflect them in a three-line haiku poem. “We can celebrate this place by seeing it,” she said. “When you can reflect back what you see, that celebrates and deepens its meaning, for you and the community.” McGee will start the day with a short talk on haiku poetry at the Uptown Com-

Chetzemoka Park, with its rose arbor, is the setting for “Inspired by Place,” a haiku workshop, this Saturday. munity Center, 620 Tyler St. Then, she’ll walk with participants to the park a few blocks away; there, she’ll give some historical background on it. “Then, people can just walk around on their own,” she added. “They can walk down to the beach” to inhale inspiration for a poem or several. A sack lunch is advised,

or poets can go over to Saturday’s Port Townsend Farmers Market at Tyler and Lawrence streets for portable food and drink. At the end of the day, participants will have the opportunity to share their writings back at the community center. And next week, McGee will work with park maintenance staff to post poems

under or around ChetzeMcGee, who teaches moka Park’s picnic shelter, haiku workshops around the so other park visitors can region, also hopes to offer enjoy them. such activities in other natural places in and near Port ‘Sacred places’ Townsend. She plans another “Haiku is traditionally “Inspired by Place” workshop associated with sacred in January at a location yet places, places of importance to be chosen. With this Saturday’s to society,” she said. “Places that are impor- workshop, she wants to protant to us carry feeling . . . I vide “a day of connecting to wanted to lift that up.” special places in our lives,

discovering special places just down the street” and writing brief poems to highlight the here and now. The Chetzemoka event “is kind of a kickoff for that,” she said. “I wanted to try it out.”

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Counties approve pact for shoreline plans By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam and Jefferson counties have inked an agreement to improve their respective shoreline master plans. The state-mandated updates to shoreline master programs are intended to achieve “no net loss” of ecological functions along shores. Clallam County was awarded a $1 million grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to define and achieve no net loss and to that apply that knowledge to other jurisdictions

in the Puget Sound basin. Jefferson County and the state Department of Ecology are partners in the grant. “Jefferson County has passed their shoreline master plan, and they are implementing it,” Clallam County Commissioner Steve Tharinger said Tuesday. “We’re developing ours. So the idea of the grant is to see how the implementation works, and we can take that information and apply it to our adoption process. “But the language, the no-net-loss language, we don’t have a choice. It’s in the state statute.”

Briefly . . .

Shoreline plans have sparked controversy in some jurisdictions, including Jefferson County, because of buffer zones that restrict certain development near waterways. Clallam County is in the

2 4 - H O U R

C R I S I S

L I N E

HEALTHY FAMILIES of Clallam County www.healthyfam.org

3 6 0 . 4 5 2 . H E L P

( 4 3 5 7 )

• Services for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, & Child Abuse • Parenting Classes & Support Groups, Safe Shelter • Supervised Visitation & Third Party Transfer of Children • Speakers Bureau

1210 E. Front St., Suite C • Port Angeles • 360-452-3811

“We’ll be doing another set of forums in the fall,” Lear said. Sometime next year, Clallam County will move from the technical phase to a regulatory phase and begin to “talk about policies a little more specifically,” Lear said.

Jefferson County

policy to restrict the practice without an outright ban. The interlocal agreement between Clallam and Jefferson counties was approved unanimously by both three-member boards. “What they [Jefferson County] will do is they’ll measure their indicators — for example, water quality,” Lear said. As Jefferson County finds out how well its indicators of no net loss are working out, Clallam County will apply that information to its own shoreline plan.

Jefferson County commissioners approved a shoreline master plan in 2009. In February, Ecology notified Jefferson County that it approved the plan on the condition that it reverse ________ its ban on fin-fish farming. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be Jefferson County Com- reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. missioner John Austin said ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. county staff are revising the com.

FaceliFt Without Surgery! More Beautiful with Beautiful Image™ Non-invasive, painless, needle-less anti-aging treatment

Offering the “lunch time face lift”

185128838

from the pole to the house are the owner’s responsibility, she said, adding that home owners shouldn’t trim within 10 feet of any energized power line. The city will de-energize PORT ANGELES — A the service wire free of ceremony to honor veterans and active-military ser- charge, Pierce said. For service or other vice members who have died in the past month will information, phone 360417-4731. ring out at Veterans Park Peninsula Daily News on Friday. The ceremony will start at 1 p.m. and last about 10 to 15 minutes. On the last Friday of every month, a ceremonial bell ringing is held at the The park on Lincoln Street next to the Clallam County Courthouse. Each name is read aloud. Members of various posts offer a formal presentation of colors, and taps is played.

Sparked controversy

midst of an exhaustive scientific survey of 800 miles of rivers, streams and marine shores. The county has held a series of public forums on the preliminary results. Clallam County is accepting public comment on shoreline inventory and characterization reports, which are available at www. clallam.net. “There’s so much information there,” Clallam County Habitat biologist Cathy Lear said. “We’ve been really excited about the response.” Updated versions of the inventory and characterization reports are due out in October. They will focus on waters that drain into the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

0A5100780

Veterans Park rites slated Friday

All cities and 39 counties in Washington must update their shoreline plans by 2014. Ecology must approve the updates. The state Supreme Court last week affirmed that the state, not local governments, has the final authority to approve shoreline management plans after a group of citizens sued Whatcom County and Ecology.

(360) 565-8000 • 332 E. 8th St., Port AngeleS

Elk Calling Seminar “Original” Since 1957

PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A. © 2011 Swain’s General Store Inc.

PA tree-trimming

Presented by:

Jim Walker

PRIMOS PRO STAFF REP

Tonight 6:30 to 8:00 pm

602 East First Street • 452-2357 • www.swainsinc.com

18701292

PORT ANGELES — Tree-trimming around power lines in the city of Port Angeles is expected to begin Tuesday and continue through September. The city has contracted with Asplundh Tree Expert Co. for the work, said Teresa Pierce, city spokeswoman. Trimming prevents limbs from growing into power lines, minimizes fire hazards and helps avoid power outages during windy conditions and winter storms, she said. A minimum of 10 feet of clearance is required from power lines, Pierce said. “Trees will be trimmed as little and as natural as possible,” she added. Trees on private property that grow into overhead service wires running

www.swainsinc.com

Jim Walker is from Auburn, Washington and has been married for 31 years and has a daughter (29) and a son (25). He is an avid, selftaught hunter and caller. Jim has beetn on the Primos’ Pro Staff going on 14 years. Although being retired, Jim keeps quite busy and looks forward to hunting elk, whitetail, mule deer and turkey each year and enjoys his time at the archery range. Jim is the President of Cedar River Bowmen, a member of the Washington State Bowhunters, the International Bowhunter’s Organization, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the National Wild Turkey Federation, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Elks of Auburn. Jim always looks forward to the fall and his next hunt. He also enjoys sharing his hunting experiences and calling techniques with fellow hunters and building friendships through a common bond; the love and art of hunting.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, August 25, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

BUSINESS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY In this section

Outdoors

A fish of a different color SEA-RUN CUTTHROAT trout don’t typically inspire the same sort of crowds as their salmon counterparts. Still, a day targeting the Matt anadromous Schubert trout is often much more eventful, largely because cutthroat are voracious feeders. The right dry fly presentation will often produce a fair amount of action on West End rivers during the summer months. Once the October Caddis hatch begins — as often happens in September, oddly enough — things really start to heat up for the fly fishers on rivers like the Sol Duc and Hoh. But one certainly doesn’t have to wait until then to start hooking cuts, according to Dave Steinbaugh of Waters West Fly Fishing Outfitters (360-417-0937) in Port Angeles. “Anybody who has been waiting for the fishing to get good has been missing out,” Steinbaugh said. “It’s been a good summer.” Curt Reed, who also works at Waters West, went out to the upper Sol Duc on Wednesday and hooked a couple of nice cuts on Green Drake flies. Anglers can also dead drift a variety of other dry flies — Golden Stones and Spruce Flies are also effective — as well as skate flies on top of the water. The latter gives anglers the added bonus of targeting summer steelhead at the same time they’re going after cuts. I’ve never experienced it, but I’ve been told that seeing an eight- or 10-pound steelhead rise to take a skated fly is a one-of-a-kind experience. While the same rising action from a cutthroat isn’t quite as dramatic — a larger cut only measures out to 14-18 inches — it’s certainly a lot less challenging to pull off. My own trips to the Sol Duc have produced a fair amount of action. If the fish are around, all it takes is the slightest twitch on a dead drifted Caddis to get cutthroat to rise. Reed said he saw the beginnings of a Caddis hatch during his day on the Duc earlier this week, but it has yet to truly start. “We’re still a little ways out from the main hatch, I’d say about three weeks,” Reed said. “We’re getting close, and certainly the cutthroat fishing is improving out there, for early sea-runs as well as resident ones. “The sea-runs are getting close, and it should just keep heating up all the way into September.” Reed said cuts can be found on rivers throughout the Peninsula around then. Depending upon the amount of water available, larger rivers like the Hoh and Quillayute System tributaries may see its runs begin earlier than smaller streams like the Pysht, Lyre and Hoko. “They’ve been coming into the Hoh in decent numbers,” Reed said. “The smaller that [the river] is, typically they are going to come in a little later. So some of the smaller creeks . . . it might not get good until October. “The larger rivers, we’re seeing them coming in starting right now and that will just continue to get better.”

Salmon closure Coastal kings have been given an early reprieve by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. Anglers must release any chinook caught in the state’s ocean waters beginning next Monday. The season was originally set to last through Sept. 18 in Marine Area 3 (LaPush) and 4 (Neah Bay), but the state estimates show coastal anglers are nearing the overall harvest quota for chinook. The requirement to release chinook salmon in those waters does not affect fishing for hatchery coho or other salmon species. Turn

to

Schubert/B2

The Associated Press

Seattle’s Wily Mo Pena, right, is congratulated by Kyle Seager after Pena drove him in with a two-run homer in the fourth inning at Cleveland on Wednesday. Pena drove in four runs in the game.

Felix earns 12th win M’s give Tomlin his worst outing By Tom Withers

The Associated Press

CLEVELAND — Nobody was going to take Felix Hernandez out of the game but King Felix himself. And the way the Seattle Mariners were hitting, there was no way he was leaving. Hernandez shook off banging his head while trying to make a fielding play and struck out 10, Wily Mo Pena drove in four runs and the hard-hitting Mariners chased Cleveland starter Josh Tomlin in the fifth inning Wednesday in a 9-2 rout that left the Indians’ playoff hopes flickering. Hernandez (12-11) allowed two runs in six innings, and the Mariners banged out 16 hits and became the first team to knock Tomlin (12-7) out before the sixth in his career. “For some reason, they beat us up,” Indians manager Manny Acta said of the young Mariners. “They’re a different team.” The last-place Mariners pounded out 51 hits while taking three of four in the series from the Indians, who dropped 6½ games behind AL Central-leading Detroit. Seattle rookie Kyle Seager, one of five first-year players in manager Eric Wedge’s starting lineup, went 4 for 4 with three doubles and batted .769 (10 for 13) in the four-game series. In three games, his batting average rose from .224 to .313. “It’s probably the best 24 hours I’ve had in a while,” Seager said.

“Hopefully it will Wedge said there was no pressing need continue for a little bit to and I can kind of ride the wave.” Hernandez certainly rode it to another win. On Tuesday, he joked ASK AN AVERAGE Seattle Mariwith teammates during ners fan who the most popular player their 12-7 win in the Next Game on the team is, and he or she is likely second game of a dou- Friday to say King Felix or Ichiro. bleheader to save some vs. White Sox But there’s a good runs for him. chance that the fan The Mariners at Safeco Field will name a player who obliged in his 200th Time: 7 p.m. doesn’t exist. career start, which On TV: ROOT Larry Bernandez, a nearly came to an early hard-throwing rightend because of his hushander with impressive tle. facial hair, will be the In the third, Cleveland’s Ezequiel Carsubject of a bobblehead Bernandez rera popped up a bunt to the right side. giveaway Saturday Hernandez, listed at 6-foot-3 and a genwhen the Mariners erous 225 pounds, made a diving attempt to host the Chicago White Sox at Safeco catch it in the air. Field. He came up a little short, and his fully The first 20,000 fans to arrive will extended body and head slammed down receive a Bernandez bobblehead. onto the grass. Bernandez got his start during Hernandez was dazed as a trainer and spring training as a character in one Wedge checked on him. The right-hander of the team’s annual commercials — remained hunched over and seemed unsure see it at http://tinyurl.com/pdnlarry. before throwing a few warmup pitches and Felix Hernandez, the reigning Cy staying in. Young Award winner, created the disThe Mariners continued to look him over guise as a way to pitch more often, so when he came back to the dugout. the story goes. “I hit my face,” Hernandez said. “I was a The poor disguise involves hornlittle bit woozy, but I was fine after that.” rimmed glasses, long fake sideburns Hernandez scoffed at the suggestion he and “Hernandez” on the back of his jersey respelled “Bernandez” with strawouldn’t continue. tegically placed black electrical tape. “No doubt,” Hernandez said. “No one was going to take me out of that game.” Turn to Larry/B2 Turn to Mariners/B2

Tribute to Larry

Putting brakes on Hawks’ Leon Rule changes will make TDs by returns rare The Associated Press

RENTON — Leon Washington put the Seattle Seahawks’ dominant special teams unit on full display with a two-touchdown performance in a win over San Diego last September. With the offense sputtering and a defense prone to giving up the big play, Washington returned two kickoffs for scores and nearly had a third in a 27-20 win over the Chargers on Sept. 26. It was not a surprise that Washington did so well — 2010 was the second season of his career in which he took three kicks back for touchdowns, and his work on special teams with the New York Jets in 2008 made him a first-team All-Pro. Under the NFL’s new kickoff return rules, none of those things would have happened. In an effort to curb collisionrelated injuries on high-speed returns, the league has implemented a number of changes to the structure of the kickoff. The ball has been moved up from the kicking team’s 30 to its 35, leading to many more balls going in the end zone of the

receiving team and reducing the incentive to bring the ball out. In addition, the kicker is the only player on the kicking team allowed to take a running start before the ball is put in play. The new rules have not affected yardage, but strategy has changed in a major way. In the 2011 preseason, kickoff returns have averaged 25.4 yards, actually ahead of the 2010 preseason average of 24.5. But the average weekly number of returned kickoffs has plummeted — from 123 per week in 2010 to 85 now. Asked about his first response to the changes, Washington was succinct — and definite. “Nothing I can say in public,” he said. “You have to understand with the NFL, safety is their priority. “So, I definitely understand that part. But for teams like us, Chicago, Arizona, Cleveland, it’s a big deal to win the field position battle with special teams, and now, they’re taking that part of the game away from us. “We can’t control the rule; we just have to take advantage of the opportunities that we do get.” And that’s an important aspect of the new rule. Former NFL vice president of officiating Mike Pereira, now an analyst for FOX Sports, has said that the rule unfairly penalizes teams that have put a roster

The Associated Press

Seattle’s Leon Washington will run more for the Seahawks this season. priority on their return units. One adjustment to the rule the league wanted to make that was voted down by the coaches was to put all touchbacks at the 25 of the return team instead of the 20. That was a step to balance things out, but as Washington noted, other coaches weren’t ready to make that sacrifice. “More defensive coaches were saying, ‘Oh, no, you can’t bring the ball out to the 25!’” he said. “That instantly flips the field position. It’s just going to be tough for those teams whose

offenses don’t play well. “And if you’re going to a place like Denver, where we are, and the air’s thin, your offense had better be clicking. Be prepared to have 80-yard drives.” Asked how teams are preparing differently on kick return blocking, Washington said that there’s little change so far. “We’re preparing the same. We’re not doing anything different, and the coaching that’s been given to me with the return team is that if you have the opportunity to bring it out, we’re going to do it.”


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Area Sports

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Today 6:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Johnnie Walker Championship (Live) 10 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ATP, Winston-Salem Open (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF USGA, U.S. Amateur (Live) 11:10 a.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Atlanta Braves vs. Chicago Cubs (Live) Noon (27) ESPN2 Tennis WTA, New Haven Open (Live) Noon (47) GOLF PGA, The Barclays (Live) 1 p.m. (26) ESPN Baseball Little League, World Series (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NFL, Washington Redskins vs. Baltimore Ravens (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Baseball Little League, World Series (Live) 5 p.m. (25) ROOT Boxing, Oscar De La Hoya’s Fight Night Club Card, TBA (Live)

SPORTS SHOT

BMX Racing PORT ANGELES BMX TRACK Tuesday 26-30 Cruiser 1. Zach Slota 2. Scott Gulisao 3. “Face Plant” Williams 5 and under Novice 1. Cash “Bash” Coleman 2. Joseph Ritchie 3. L.J. Vail 7 Intermediate 1. Moose Johnson 2. Aydan Vail 3. Caden Acosta 4. Matthew Rolley 5. Taylor Coleman 9 Intermediate 1. Talon Northern 2. David Mitchel 3. “American Idol” Tolliver 11 Intermediate 1. Mariah “The Wind” Fortman 2. Trey Mannor 3. Ezra Northern

Softball PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION Coed Softball Results Tuesday Shane West Westport Shipyard 18, Elwha River Casino 14 Westport Shipyard 10, Smuggler’s Landing 7 Smuggler’s Landing 14, Tracy’s Insulation 7 Shane East Blind Ambition/Lou’s Crew 4, Tracy’s Insulation 3 Elwha River Casino 10, Blind Ambition/Lou’s Crew 9

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Men’s Club Better Nine Tuesday Gross: Mark Mitrovich 32, Bob Brodhun 35 Net: Andy Duran 30.5, Ray Santiago 31.5, Jim Williams 32, Steve Jones 32, Steve Callis 32, Steve Main 32.5, Larry Aillaud 32.5, Doug Tissot 32.5 Team Gross: Mark Mitrovich-Steve Jones 67, Bob Brodhun-Rick Parkhurst 68 Team Net: Dick Goodman-Steve Jones 56, Gene Middleton-Steve Jones 58, Ray Santiago-Bernie Anselmo 59, Dave HendersonDaryl Jensen 60, Jim Williams-Daryl Jensen 60, Steve Main-Al Osterberg 61, Jim WilliamsRay Dooley 61, Herb Renner-Lyle Andrus 61, Ev Tozier-Lyle Andrus 61, Gene Norton-Steve Jones 61, Steve Callis-Duane Vernon 61 Women’s Club Putts Wednesday 18-Hole Women Deb Jacobs 31, Doris Sparks 32, Rena Peabody 34, Chris Anderson 34 9-Hole Women Dona Scarcia 16, Sandy Granger 16, Boots Reidel 18, Kitty Byrne 18 Chip Ins: Doris Sparks, No. 14

Baseball Mariners 9, Indians 2 Seattle Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Ichiro rf 6 1 2 1 Carrer cf 4 1 1 0 Ryan ss 5 1 2 2 Phelps 2b 5 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 5 1 3 0 CSantn c 4 0 0 0 Carp 1b 6 0 1 0 Marson c 1 0 0 0 C.Wells lf 5 0 0 0 Duncan lf 5 0 3 1 Olivo c 5 1 1 1 Fukdm rf 3 0 0 0 Seager 3b 4 3 4 1 Chsnhll dh 4 1 1 0 W.Pena dh 3 2 3 4 LaPort 1b 4 0 2 0 Roinsn cf 3 0 0 0 Hannhn 3b 4 0 1 1 FGtrrz cf 1 0 0 0 Donald ss 4 0 2 0 Totals 43 9 16 9 Totals 38 2 10 2 Seattle 000 240 300—9 Cleveland 001 100 000—2 E—Ryan 2 (14), Robinson (2), C.Wells (2). LOB—Seattle 13, Cleveland 11. 2B—Seager 3 (5), W.Pena (2), Chisenhall (9). 3B—Ryan (3). HR—W.Pena (2). SB—Ichiro (32), Carrera (7). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Hernandez W,12-11 6 7 2 2 2 10 J.Wright 2 3 0 0 0 5 Lueke 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cleveland Tomlin L,12-7 4 2/3 11 6 6 1 6 J.Smith 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 2 R.Perez 1 2 3 3 3 1 Durbin 1 1 0 0 0 1 Pestano 1 1 0 0 0 0

Pittsburgh Cincinnati

The Associated Press

Unbeaten

World Series

in

Maracay, Venezuela, catcher Carlos Narvaez, left, shows the ball to the umpire after tagging out Mexicali, Mexico’s Alvaro Valdez in the seventh inning at the Little League World Series in South Williamsport, Pa., on Wednesday. Mexico won 2-1 in nine innings to stay undefeated in World Series play at 3-0. HBP—by Durbin (W.Pena). WP—Tomlin. Umpires—Home, Bill Miller; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, James Hoye. T—3:17. A—16,037 (43,441).

American League West Division W L Texas 74 57 Los Angeles 70 59 Oakland 59 70 Seattle 56 73 East Division W L Boston 79 50 New York 77 50 Tampa Bay 70 58 Toronto 66 63 Baltimore 50 77 Central Division W L Detroit 70 59 Chicago 63 64 Cleveland 63 64 Minnesota 55 74 Kansas City 53 77

Pct GB .565 — .543 3 .457 14 .434 17 Pct GB .612 — .606 1 .547 8½ .512 13 .394 28 Pct GB .543 — .496 6 .496 6 .426 15 .408 17½

Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 7, Seattle 5, 1st game Oakland 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Seattle 12, Cleveland 7, 2nd game Kansas City 6, Toronto 4 Detroit 2, Tampa Bay 1 Boston 11, Texas 5 Baltimore 8, Minnesota 1 L.A. Angels 5, Chicago White Sox 4 Wednesday’s Games Seattle 9, Cleveland 2 Boston 13, Texas 2 Oakland 6, N.Y. Yankees 4, 10 innings Toronto 4, Kansas City 3 Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 2, 10 innings Baltimore 6, Minnesota 1 Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, late Today’s Games Oakland (Harden 4-2) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-4), 10:05 a.m. Baltimore (Jo-.Reyes 6-10) at Minnesota (Liriano 9-9), 10:10 a.m. Detroit (Fister 5-13) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 11-8), 10:10 a.m. Kansas City (Francis 4-14) at Toronto (Cecil 4-6), 4:07 p.m. Boston (A.Miller 5-1) at Texas (Ogando 12-5), 5:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.

Oakland at Boston, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.

National League East Division W L 83 45 78 53 62 66 61 68 58 72 Central Division W L Milwaukee 78 54 St. Louis 67 63 Cincinnati 64 66 Pittsburgh 61 68 Chicago 57 73 Houston 42 88 West Division W L Arizona 71 59 San Francisco 68 61 Colorado 63 68 Los Angeles 60 69 San Diego 60 70 Philadelphia Atlanta Washington New York Florida

Pct GB .648 — .595 6½ .484 21 .473 22½ .446 26 Pct .591 .515 .492 .473 .438 .323

GB — 10 13 15½ 20 35

Pct .546 .527 .481 .465 .462

GB — 2½ 8½ 10½ 11

Tuesday’s Games Arizona 2, Washington 0 Milwaukee 11, Pittsburgh 4 Philadelphia 9, N.Y. Mets 4 Cincinnati 8, Florida 6 Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 4 L.A. Dodgers 13, St. Louis 2 Colorado 8, Houston 6 San Diego 7, San Francisco 5 Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 0 N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 4 L.A. Dodgers 9, St. Louis 4 Colorado 7, Houston 6, 10 innings Florida 6, Cincinnati 5, 1st game Arizona 4, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Florida 2, 2nd game Chicago Cubs 3, Atlanta 2 San Diego at San Francisco, late Today’s Games Atlanta (Beachy 6-2) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 6-9), 11:20 a.m. Arizona (Miley 0-1) at Washington (Lannan 8-9), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Florida, ppd., rain Pittsburgh (Morton 9-6) at St. Louis (E.Jackson 2-2), 5:15 p.m. Houston (Sosa 0-2) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-3), 7:15 p.m. Friday’s Games Florida at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.

Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. Washington at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

Football National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF St. Louis 2 0 0 1.000 50 Arizona 1 1 0 .500 44 San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 20 Seattle 1 1 0 .500 31 East W L T Pct PF Washington 2 0 0 1.000 32 Dallas 1 1 0 .500 31 N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 51 Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 27 South W L T Pct PF Carolina 1 1 0 .500 30 New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 38 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 39 Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 36 North W L T Pct PF Detroit 2 0 0 1.000 64 Chicago 1 1 0 .500 23 Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 45 Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 23 West W L T Pct PF St. Louis 2 0 0 1.000 50 Arizona 1 1 0 .500 44 San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 20 Seattle 1 1 0 .500 31 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Miami 2 0 0 1.000 48 New England 2 0 0 1.000 78 N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 43 Buffalo 0 2 0 .000 13 South W L T Pct PF Houston 2 0 0 1.000 47 Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 27 Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 30 Indianapolis 0 2 0 .000 13 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 37 Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 55

PA 26 46 27 37 PA 10 43 33 30 PA 30 30 31 43 PA 31 44 47 21 PA 26 46 27 37 PA 33 26 27 34 PA 30 60 20 49 PA 26 47

1 1 0 .500 0 2 0 .000 West W L T Pct Denver 1 1 0 .500 San Diego 1 1 0 .500 Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 Oakland 0 2 0 .000

31 10

30 61

PF 47 37 13 21

PA 34 31 56 41

Today Carolina at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Baltimore, 5 p.m. Friday St. Louis at Kansas City, 5 p.m. Green Bay at Indianapolis, 5 p.m. Saturday, Jacksonville at Buffalo, 4 p.m. N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 4 p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 5 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Chicago at Tennessee, 5 p.m. New England at Detroit, 5 p.m. Seattle at Denver, 6 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 7 p.m. Sunday New Orleans at Oakland, 5 p.m. Thursday, Sep. 1 Detroit at Buffalo, 3:30 p.m. Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Baltimore at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at New England, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Jacksonville, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m. Kansas City at Green Bay, 5 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Tennessee at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Pittsburgh at Carolina, 5 p.m. Denver at Arizona, 7 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 7 p.m. Friday, Sep. 2 Oakland at Seattle, 7:30 p.m.

Basketball WNBA Standings Western Conference W L PCT GB Minnesota 21 6 .778 Phoenix 15 11 .577 5 ½ Seattle 15 12 .556 6 San Antonio 13 13 .500 7 ½ Los Angeles 12 15 .444 9 Tulsa 1 24 .040 19 Eastern Conference W L PCT GB Indiana 19 8 .704 Connecticut 17 10 .630 2 New York 16 12 .571 3 ½ Atlanta 14 13 .519 5 Chicago 12 15 .444 7 Washington 5 21 .192 13 ½ Today Tulsa at Seattle, 7 p.m. Friday Phoenix at Connecticut, 4:30 p.m. San Antonio at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Washington at Chicago , 5:30 p.m. Tulsa at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

Mariners: Rip Indians 9-2 Schubert: Trout Continued from B1 the only two pitchers since 1919 to begin their careers so consisWedge didn’t see any reason to tently. Tomlin was one strike from pull his ace. “He was feeling a little groggy owning the record when the Mariwhen we went out there, but we ners got him. He gave up two singles, got two gave him a little time and then he outs and was ahead 1-2 in the was feeling better,” Wedge said. Seattle pitchers combined for count before Miguel Olivo hit an 16 strikeouts, raising the Indians’ RBI single to snap a 2-2 tie. Seager hit his third double, a league-leading total to 985. “Unacceptable,” Acta said, ground-rule shot that made it 4-2. “especially when you don’t have a Pena, who homered in his previous at-bat, then laced his double team loaded with sluggers.” Pena hit a two-run homer in to finish Tomlin. The Mariners came to town the fourth and his two-run double in the fifth was the final blow for having lost 20 of 23 road games, Tomlin, who pitched at least five but their roster of youngsters innings in each of his first 37 showed more signs that they’re growing up. career starts. “Good series for us,” Wedge The right-hander and current Toronto manager John Farrell are said. “We got contributions from a

lot of guys. I like the way we’re swinging the bats. “We’re seeing a lot of positive things.” NOTES: The Mariners are off today and will open a seven-game homestand on Friday against the White Sox. Seattle is 12-6 over the past four seasons in Cleveland. Hernandez has struck out 10 or more an AL-best seven times. Philadelphia’s Cliff Lee has done it eight times. Pena’s four RBIs were his most in a game since July 26, 2007, when he did it for the Red Sox in Cleveland Mariners OF Ichiro is batting .361 during an eight-game hitting streak.

Seahawks release Kentwan Balmer The Associated Press

RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks have released defensive lineman Kentwan Balmer. The former first-round pick of the San Francisco 49ers struggled

to find a role that fit in Seattle’s defense. Balmer was acquired from the San Francisco 49ers for a sixthround draft pick last August and appeared in all 16 games for Seattle in 2010.

Balmer started 11 games between defensive tackle and defensive end for the Seahawks after injuries forced him into an increased role. He finished the year with a career-high 43 tackles.

Continued from B1 salmon fishery had reached 90 percent of the overall chinook “Catch rates in the ocean for guideline of 30,100 fish, accordchinook salmon have been strong ing to Pattillo. throughout much of the season, Barring any further actions, but we still have substantial other ocean salmon fisheries are numbers of coho remaining currently scheduled to continue under the quota,” state salmon through Sept. 18 in Areas 3 policy coordinator Pat Pattillo and 4. said in a news release. ________ “This change allows anglers to Matt Schubert is the outdoors and continue catching coho, while ensuring catch limits for chinook sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on will not be exceeded.” Thursdays and Fridays. He can be As of last weekend, coastwide reached at matt.schubert@ catch totals for the recreational peninsuladailynews.com.

Larry: Bobblehead Continued from B1 ry’s head during Hernandez’s starts. Felix’s deadpan delivery — With so many rookies on the “I’m Larry” — to manager Eric big league roster, it can be hard Wedge captured the imagination to figure out who’s who during a of his personal Safeco Field Mariners game. cheering section, the King’s But Bernandez is suddenly one of the most recognizable Court. Mariners in years. Several of the well organized Peninsula Daily News fans come dressed as Larry Bernews sources nandez or hold up cutouts of Lar-


Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Opinions differ on walk down aisle

Dilbert

DEAR ABBY: A young bride-to-be who signed her letter “Touchy Decision in Ohio” prefers her stepdad walk her down the aisle at her wedding but is worried about what her biological father (whom she sees once or twice a year) and other relatives might think. In my many decades on this earth, especially during the last 10 or 15 years, I have seen all sorts of changes in wedding etiquette, including the customs governing who walks down the aisle. In “Ohio’s” case, the logical solution, and the more appropriate one, to me would be to have both gentlemen escort her down the aisle, one on either side. What could be lovelier? The bride-to-be should consider that the hurt feelings that often crop up on sensitive occasions such as this, if not attended to beforehand, can tarnish the memory of the event in the minds of loved ones forever. Barb H. in Springfield, Mass.

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Barb: Thank you for your response. Opinions regarding “Ohio’s” letter are numerous and varied. A majority of those I heard from agree with your suggestion that both dads share the task. However, others viewed it differently: Dear Abby: If the biological father wanted to be a part of his daughter’s life, he should have made more of an effort to be there for her. The stepdad no doubt put up with all the growing pains associated with raising a teenager as well as other parenting challenges. These are the prerequisites for walking a daughter down the aisle. Although most males can father a child, not all of them can truly be a father. Stepdad to a Wonderful Daughter

Frank & Ernest

DEAR ABBY Abigail

Van Buren

day a real man and father has looked forward to since the day you were born. And to any man who is asked to escort a bride down the aisle: Before agreeing, ask what her situation is with her father. You may be taking a spot you don’t deserve. Mary in Ohio

Dear Abby: My daughter wanted her stepfather and her biological father to be part of her wedding. So her stepdad (my husband) walked her down the aisle to where I was sitting in the first row. I stood up, gave her my handkerchief and kissed her cheek. Then her father stepped out from the row behind me, and her stepdad handed her over to her father, who walked her the rest of the way to the altar and gave her away. Everyone was happy with this amicable solution. Joyce in Alabama Dear Abby: I was in the same situation at my wedding. My solution was to have my stepfather walk me down the aisle and my father do the father/daughter dance. That way, both men were acknowledged and each one given his special time. Kathy in New England

Dear Abby: Rather than worry about her father’s feelings, the young woman could have her mother walk her down the aisle. Mom has been the constant in her life, and there’s no reason she shouldn’t accompany her daughter to Dear Abby: I can’t believe how ignorant, uncaring and selfish a bride the altar. That way, Mom gets recognition for would be to dump her dad on her wedding day. Everyone will notice, her part in raising her daughter, and and everyone will care. no feelings are hurt. Ladies, unless your father is a total Gretchen in the Heartland loser who was absent, a drunk, a jail_________ bird, an addict or a deadbeat, walking Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, you down the aisle is his privilege — also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was no one else’s. founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. LetIt also shouldn’t be based on how ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box much money he was able or willing to 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com. fork over for the wedding. This is the

Garfield

Momma

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19): Don’t make unnecessary alterations in your life. It’s important to keep things flowing. Problems at home will escalate if you get into a shouting match. Do whatever you can to ensure that the job you do leaves no room for criticism. 2 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do something that will mellow you out or make you feel good about yourself. Romance is in a high cycle. If you are single, engage in activities conducive to meeting someone special. If you are in a relationship, make plans for two. 4 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Get in touch with someone who has been on your mind. It’s best to find out firsthand whether you should be dwelling on the past instead of moving forward. Attending a reunion or revisiting old ideas, places or friends will help you rethink your future. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Emotions will surface, and sensitivity will mount. Don’t let anything or anyone get to you. It’s all about focus and refusing to let the little things bother you. Helping others will allow you to view your own situation with greater objectivity. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

Dennis the Menace

B3

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Changes due to situations beyond your control must be looked at carefully. You may need an outsider’s advice. You can make professional gains if you are practical and realistic. A new direction will be a refreshing change. 3 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Getting together with familiar faces will lead to benefits and renewed feelings, plans and expectations. Changes with regard to your current living arrangements are apparent. Do the right thing and avoid opposition. 4 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Proceed with caution. Don’t let your emotions overwhelm you at work. You can make promises as long as they are realistic and easy for you to honor. Once you have reached your goals, you will be able to help others. 2 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your drive, determination and convincing way of dealing with others will help you get your way. A trip that allows you to talk to someone faceto-face will help your project move along much faster. Set aside time to celebrate your gains with someone special. 5 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A stubborn attitude will not help you get your way. You will have to be upfront about the way you feel and your intentions. A relationship will be in jeopardy if you try to avoid issues or go behind his or her back. Take care of old business before you start something new. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t procrastinate. A contract or settlement can lead to greater financial freedom. Take a closer look at a partnership that has the potential to help you achieve your personal or professional goals. Love is in the stars. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You need to stimulate your mind and be creative. A change at home will help you develop a way to increase your assets. Make a deal, and you will be able to stabilize your situation and build a better future. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Accommodating others doesn’t have to mean giving in. Stipulate what you want in return, and you can build an equal partnership that can benefit all involved. Love and romance should be included in your agenda. 5 stars


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, August 25, 2011

PAGE

B4

Business

Politics and Environment

Jobs resigns at Apple By David Streitfeld The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Steven P. Jobs, whose insistent vision that he knew what consumers wanted made Apple one of the world’s most valuable and influential companies, is stepping down as chief executive, the company announced late Wednesday. “I have always said that if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expec- Cook tations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know,” Jobs said in a letter released by the company. “Unfortunately, that day has come.” He did not give a specific reason for his decision to step down. However, Jobs, 56, has been battling cancer for several years and has been on medical leave since January, his third such absence. He underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer in 2004 and received a liver transplant in 2009. But as recently as a few weeks ago, Jobs was negotiating business issues with another Silicon Valley executive. Apple said Jobs would become chairman of its board of directors. The board named Timothy D. Cook, its chief operating officer, as the new chief

so much of his DNA into Apple that Apple will continue,” said Guy Kawasaki, who was an Apple executive in the late 1980s. “Or you can make the case that without Steve, Apple will flounder. But you cannot make the case that Apple without Steve Jobs will be better. Hard to conceive of that.” The early years of Apple long ago passed into legend: The two young hippieish founders, Jobs and Steve Wozniak; the introduction The Associated Press of the first Macintosh computer in 1984; Jobs’ abrupt Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds the new iPhone 4 exit in a power struggle. during the Apple Worldwide Developers But it was his return to Conference in San Francisco in 2010. Apple in 1998 that started a executive. In his resignation entertainment and media streak that raised the company from the near-dead to letter, Jobs recommended world through the iPad. that Cook succeed him. Again and again, Jobs its current unmatched posiWhile Cook, 50, who has gambled that he knew what tion. been serving as interim the customer would want, chief executive since Janu- and again and again he was New iPhone ary, is an Apple veteran and right. Apple’s product pipeline is well respected in the Apple briefly exceeded is an unknowable thing, but industry and by Wall Street, Exxon Mobil this month as there has been strong indihe is little known outside of the most valuable United cation that the computer it. States company in market maker is very close to The news of Jobs’ resig- capitalization. revealing a new iPhone, nation came after the mar“The big thing about which would likely include ket closed Wednesday. In Steve Jobs key is not his a more powerful processor after-hours trading, the genius or his charisma but (possibly dual-core, to stock fell 5 percent. his extraordinary risk-tak- match some rival’s chips) to ing and his tenacity,” said handle the expanding mulBeyond computers Alan Deutschman, who timedia demands placed on mobile devices. Rarely has a major com- wrote a biography of Jobs. “Apple has been so innoThe upcoming iPhone is pany and industry been so dominated by a single indi- vative because Jobs takes also likely to be thinner and vidual, and so successfully. major risks, which is rare in lighter, as every new verHis influence went far corporate America. He sion has been since the origbeyond personal computers. doesn’t market test any- inal’s release in 2007. A higher-resolution rear In the last decade, Apple thing. It’s all his own judghas redefined the music ment and perfectionism camera has also been expected, as well as the posbusiness through the iPod, and gut.” “You could make the sibility of more powerful the cellphone business through the iPhone and the case that Steve has injected voice-recognition features.

Attorneys, creditors battle out WaMu reorganization By Randall Chase The Associated Press

Walrath ruled in January that the proposed settlement was reasonable, but she refused to confirm WaMu’s plan until certain changes were made.

Unwarranted The judge concluded, among other things, the protections from future legal liabilities the plan granted to the company’s directors, officers and professionals, as well as members of its creditors committee and certain third parties, were either unwarranted or too broad. Attorneys for the equity committee appealed Walrath’s ruling and argue that

The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Amazon.com Inc. is expanding its new local deals site to New York and other parts of the country, hoping discount-happy consumers will flock to its offerings as they have embraced market leader Groupon. With the additions, AmazonLocal will be operating in 30 locations in 10 states, all within about three months of the service’s initial launch in Boise, Idaho, in early June.

extension of our general mission,” he said. George wouldn’t say how many users AmazonLocal currently has. Overall, Amazon has more than 144 million active customers. The online retailer said AmazonLocal deals are coming to five locations in New York — Manhattan’s Upper East and Upper West Sides, Downtown and

Midtown neighborhoods, and Brooklyn. AmazonLocal will also come to Charlotte, N.C., Austin, Texas, and Orlando, Fla., northern Virginia and other locations. Amazon is making a formal announcement Thursday. The service already is available several neighborhoods in Los Angeles, Chicago and Seattle, where the company is headquartered.

Small compared to rival

SEQUIM — Hardy’s Market 2/Texaco, 33 Taylor Cut-Off Road, will hold a Customer Appreciation Day from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The event will include free hamburgers and hot dogs, free raffle drawings and kids prizes, a chance to name the Olympic Game Farm’s two new cougar cubs and live music from Old Sidekicks from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Weather permitting, the cougar cubs will be on hand from noon to 1 p.m. Ice-cream cones will be sold for $2, with proceeds going to fund school supplies for lowincome students at Grey- Nonferrous metals wolf Elementary School. NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous For more information, metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.0529 per lb., phone 360-681-4900.

Center relocates PORT ANGELES — Olympus Nutrition Center is moving to a new location at 3423 E. Masters Road. The state-certified business provides nutritional and herbal consultation and educational services. “We will provide the same great nutritional service provided in a more relaxing environment,” said owner Steve Halgrimson. For more information, phone 360-565-6632.

London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.0177 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.9970 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2324.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9833 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1770.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1754.10 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $40.500 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $39.157 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1862.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1826.30 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

LOCAL BUYER FOR OLD COINS

1/2 Price

Shoes, Sandals, Closeout Capris, Wedges and Shorts and $ Select Boots! Denim Skirts:

STEAMPUNK*

6-$8

portangelesdowntown.com

*

123 E. First Street, 1-A, P.A. 360-452-5615 www.tigerlily-online.com peninsuladailynews.com

5074779 8-25 Hot Tub

HOT TUB: 2 person Marquis, like new.

$1,600

683-9203

The Peninsula Daily News wants to congratulate North Olympic Peninsula businesses celebrating anniversaries in September. On Sept. 2nd, we will publish a FREE ad listing the businesses who respond to this special event by Aug. 29th. Is your business having an anniversary later this year? You can use this coupon now to let us know the date. Business Name _____________________________________________________________________ Address____________________________________________________________________________ City__________________ State________________ Type of Business________________________ Zip Telephone________________________________ What date is your anniversary?_______________________________________________________ Which anniversary is your business celebrating?______________________________________________ Please Mail or Bring to: Peninsula Daily News 305 W. 1st St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Attn: ANNIVERSARY EVENT

We’d like to help you celebrate! During your anniversary month, you can run an ad at the following discount prices: (One time only – any day of the week. No variations of size or price) PDN

(360) 417-3541 • FAX (360) 417-3507 • 1-800-826-7714

115105072

Full Page..............................$1000 Half Page...............................$650 Quarter Page..........................$450 Plus we will give you 1 COLOR FREE 185131124

Although it’s still small compared with the market leaders, Groupon and LivingSocial, it shows that Amazon is keen to leverage its popularity as an online retailer to compete in this nascent yet fast-growing market. Amazon also has an investment in LivingSocial. Mike George, vice president of AmazonLocal, said an online deals site seemed like a natural fit for Amazon because the company has always focused on helping customers find anything they want to buy. “This felt like a very comfortable and logical

peninsuladailynews.com

035074779

By Rachel Metz

four hedge funds that bought Washington Mutual debt and supported the reorganization plan used information gained in settlement negotiations to engage in insider trading. The hedge funds have denied any wrongdoing. One of the funds, Aurelius Capital Management, has objected to WaMu’s reorganization plan. Aurelius said Washington Mutual has been denied access to $4 billion in cash improperly held by JPMorgan, which is paying far less interest to WaMu under the settlement than it would otherwise.

GOLD & SILVER 360.452.3358

Real-time stock quotations at

Put together an awesome steampunk outfit with our new Victorian waistcinchers, jewelry, velvet waistcoast and long lace skirt!

155120120

Amazon.com to expand its local deals website

Market to thank its customers

185129136

WILMINGTON, Del. — Creditors who stand to receiving nothing under Washington Mutual Inc.’s reorganization plan are trying to block court approval of the plan, attorneys for WMI and supporters of the plan told a Delaware bankruptcy judge Wednesday. Attorneys for WMI, JPMorgan Chase & Co. and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. accused Washington Mutual’s official equity holders committee and a group of investors who purchased certain securities of trying to block confirmation of the plan in

order to win concessions from other creditors. The proposed reorganization plan is based on settling lawsuits that pitted Washington Mutual, the FDIC and JPMorgan against one another after the FDIC seized WaMu’s Seattle-based flagship bank in 2008 and sold its assets to JPMorgan for $1.9 billion in the largest bank failure in U.S. history. Under the proposed settlement, the competing lawsuits would be dismissed and some $10 billion in disputed assets would be distributed among Washington Mutual, JPMorgan and the FDIC.

 $ Briefly . . .


(J)

Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, August 25, 2011

Our Peninsula

c

SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, 3RDAGE, WEATHER In this section

Vet puckers up for ‘Kiss the Pig’ Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The 11th annual Clallam County 4-H “Kiss the Pig” contest was capped off with veterinarian Sandra Smith kissing Oreo, a pig owned by 4-H member Evan Galiacci. Smith raised $283 to outpace second-place veterinarian Nicole Burton. The two vets were neck-

T

tipped the scales in Smith’s favor. The final amount raised by all the participating veterinarians was $1,421.73. Proceeds will fund scholarships for 4-H members. “4-H would like to thank all the donors and the gracious veterinarians who allowed us to accept donaand-neck during the final tions in their names,” conweek of the contest until a test coordinator Gayle Taylarge donation Saturday lor said.

he final amount raised by all the participating veterinarians was $1,421.73. Proceeds will fund scholarships for 4-H members.

Veterinarian Sandra Smith puckers up before “kissing the pig” at the Clallam County Fair on Sunday.

Marine center seeking ’11 award nominations Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Marine Science Center is seeking nominations for the 2011 Eleanor Stopps Environmental Leadership Award. Nominations must be submitted by email or received at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center office at 532 Battery Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368, by 5 p.m. Wednesday. The application form can be downloaded at www. ptmsc.org. Nominees are North Olympic Peninsula citizens who are “stewards of the environment and have dem-

N

Olympic Peninsula citizens who are “stewards of the environment and have demonstrated leadership in efforts to protect the natural world.” onstrated leadership in efforts to protect the natural world.” Eleanor Stopps is an advocate for lasting protection of the North Olympic Peninsula environment.

With no special political base or powerful financial backers, she testified before the state Legislature and Congress and was instrumental in getting legislation and public support for protection of the area. She is responsible for the establishment of the Protection Island National Wildlife Refuge. The winner and nominees will be honored at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s Stewardship Breakfast at the Fort Worden State Park Commons at 8 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 29. For information, phone Smith won the 11th annual “Kiss the Pig” contest after collecting $283 Brian Kay at 360-385-5582 in donations to support scholarships for 4-H members. More than $1,400 was raised in total. or email info@ptmsc.org.

Rock, country, blues on stage this week THEY SANG, JUGGLED, danced, yodeled and performed their way into the inaugural Clallam County Variety and Talent Show stage Sunday at the Clallam County Fair, and in the end, it was the yodeling cowgirl, Wanda Bumgarner, taking first place. Judging by the applause, the large audience agreed with the judges (including me). The talent show next year will be bigger and better ’cause you’ll have a full year to get ready. Now, here’s what’s on stage this week.

7 p.m. to 10 p.m. ■  On Saturday at the Three Crabs Restaurant, 11 3 Crabs 101 and state Road, Paul Sagen plays from John Highway 112 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Nelson five miles west ■  On Wednesday, weather of Port Angeles, permitting, Howly Slim will Johnnie Mus- perform at Alderbrook Bistro, tang hosts the 139 W. Alder St., at 5 p.m. Sunday Junc■ At The Buzz, 128 N. tion Blues Jam Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas from 7 p.m. to and Victor Reventlow host the 11 p.m. There very popular and rousing open have been some mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to great jams and 9:30 p.m. blues improvi■  On Friday at Club Seven sations lately. Lounge, 7 Cedars Casino, Come and join in. Blyn, rock (dance) to the rock Next Wednesday, banjo crafts- (music) of Rock Candy, a great Port Angeles man Jason Mogi and bassist party and dance band, from ■  On Friday at Wine on the Paul Stehr-Green play from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Waterfront (WOW) at The 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. On Sunday, swing and sway to Landing mall at 115 Railroad ■  On Monday, Rusty and the Stardust Big Band from Ave., it will be “A Night to Duke entertain at Smugglers 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Remember” with Charlie Ferris Landing, 115 Railroad Ave., On Monday, we be jammin’ as he reprises the great pop, rock with some pickin’ and sweet sinwith host Barry Burnett and and country hits of the past. gin’ from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. friends, so bring your ax and/or There will be a folk, jazz or blues ■  Every Tuesday evening at vocal talents for the fun from tune in the mix as well. Catch the Port Angeles Senior Cen7 p.m. to 10 p.m. his Memories and Melodies Show ter, Seventh and Peabody at 7 p.m. $3 cover. streets, the Port Angeles Senior Port Townsend ■  Tonight at Castaways Swingers present Wally and the ■  Tonight at The Upstage, Restaurant and Night Club, Boys playing ballroom dance 923 Washington St., Brian 1213 Marine Drive, come on favorites for the dancing pleasure “Buck” Ellard plays roots, coundown for Jerry’s Country Jam of all adults 45 years and older try, blues and favorites from from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. If country’s from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 7 p.m. your style, come and dance or $5 cover, first-timers free! On Friday, The Upstage play plugged or unplugged. ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis proudly presents the multi■  On Friday at Bar N9ne, Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highawarded master blues guitarist 229 W. First St., Missionary way 101, Bob and Dave play Duke Robillard and the Duke Position plays modern rock from blues with a brew and barbecue Robillard Band at 8 p.m. 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., $5 cover, folfrom 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. $25 cover. lowed by Old School Dance On Saturday, folk/blues legend Party from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jack Williams performs at ■  On Friday, Les Wamboldt Sequim and Blyn ■  On Friday at the Oasis 6 p.m. ($10 cover) followed by and Olde Tyme Country perform at the Fairmount Restau- Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washing- Hot Rod’s Blues Revue at 8 p.m. $12 cover. rant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, ton St., the Old Sidekicks perform old country the old-fashOn Sunday, acclaimed multifrom 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Dave and Rosa- ioned way, complete with mando- instrumentalist and composer lie Secord and the Luck of the lin, guitar, banjo, harmonica and Carolyn Cruso performs at 7 p.m. Sliding scale cover from $5 Draw Band welcome the Black doghouse bass, from 5 p.m. to to $10. Diamond Fiddle Kids (various 7 p.m. On Wednesday, the Denny On Wednesday, youth music instruments and vocals) for a nonprofit Savor the Sound, which rousing evening of acoustic coun- Secord Trio plays from provides programs from prekintry, bluegrass and old-time music 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■  On Friday at Stymie’s Bar dergarten through high school, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Don’t be & Grill at Cedars at Dungepresents Garth Hudson — of late because this show will go ness, 1965 Woodcock Road, The Band fame — and Maud standing room-only. Rachel and Barry perform Hudson with friends in a benefit ■  At the Junction Roadhouse, junction of U.S. Highway acoustic rock and Motown from performance at 8 p.m. $25 cover.

LIVE MUSIC

Phone 360-385-2216 for reservations. ■  On Friday at the Port Townsend Brewing Co., 330 10th St., the Better Half plays funky tunes from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Saturday, rock icon Kip Winger (band Winger and Alice Cooper bassist) performs a powerful solo acoustic concert in the beer garden from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Sunday, folksy string band Shady Grove plays from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. On Wednesday, the Low Ones play pop, punk and folk rock from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  On Friday at Sirens Pub, 623 Water St., Leafeater, an indie/pop/rock band from Portland, Ore., plays at 9 p.m. $5 cover. On Saturday, Run On Sentence performs at 9 p.m. $5 cover. ■  On Saturday at Castle Key, Seventh and Sheridan streets, the Bassic Saxx Trio plays jazz from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. $10 cover. ■  Tonight at the Undertown, 211 Taylor St., The Solvents and Hive Dwellers play at 8 p.m. $3 cover. On Friday, Combo Choro performs at 8 p.m. $3 cover. ■  Steve Grandinetti will be performing at the Owl Sprit, 218 Polk St., today from 5:30 p.m. till closing. ■  On Friday, Howly Slim picks and grins at Banana Leaf, 609 Washington St., at 6 p.m.

Area concerts ■  Tonight in Port Townsend’s Concert on the Dock Series in the Pope Marine Park Plaza, funk and jazz fusion band Impulse plays the final summer concert at 5:30 p.m. ■  On Tuesday for Music in the Park at Sequim’s James Center for the Performing Arts, the Stardust Big Band plays the final concert from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Carol Hathaway will be giving dance lessons. There may be a movie, too!

■ On Wednesday, in Port Angeles’ Concert on the Pier, SuperTrees rock the waterfront with old and new rock ’n’ roll favorites from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

High notes ■  On Saturday, Olympic Peninsula Elks present Re-creation’s Everyday Heroes patriotic concert at the Port Angeles High School auditorium, 304 E. Park Ave., at 6:30 p.m. This is good family fun for everyone. Tickets are $10 each or $25 for a family of six or fewer, available at North Olympic Peninsula Elks lodges. For info, phone 360-6400296. ■  Saturday’s benefit at Olympic Cellars Winery, 255410 U.S. Highway 101, features Creme Tangerine at 7 p.m. with half the $10 cover going to the Planned Parenthood Gynocare Fund. ■  On Sunday at McComb Gardens, 751 McComb Road, Sequim, the Music at McComb 2011 Series continues with the Dixi-Blu Jazz Band playing music from the Great American Songbook at 1 p.m. ■  On Friday, the Sequim Library presents Abby Mae & the Homeschool Boys from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. outside, using the new bleachers and stage. ■  On Saturday, Abby Mae & the Homeschool Boys will be at the Port Angeles Farmers Market, under The Gateway pavilion at Front and Lincoln streets, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-5651139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews. com (subject line: John Nelson). Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.


3rdAge

Peninsula Daily News

C2 — (J)

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Jefferson family has deep roots in forests TORCAL “CAL” AND Hazel (Minor) Thompson settled in Port Townsend at the beginning of 1925 and operated a large truck farm on their property near the current hospital. They also sold milk and cream, as well as salvaging and reselling bricks. Cal Thompson was a finish carpenter and occasionally worked at Fort Worden as well. There were eight children in the family, which was all active in the Seventh-day Adventist Church community. As the Great Depression hit families across the nation, Roy — also known as A.R. and “Hardhat” Thompson, the third Thompson child — left home looking for work. In 1932, he obtained his first official job in a logging camp at Hamma Hamma, along Hood Canal. For a short time, Roy and younger brother Stanley “Earl” worked together as fallers. The dictionary refers to a person who fells, knocks or cuts down trees as a “feller”; in the industry, such a person is called a “faller.” A faller’s job was specific: He did not limb the trees, nor did he buck up the wood after the tree was down.

be seen hauling oil and gas cans for the chain saws and using a small ax to clear low brush from consider his around the trees, following his Pam McCollum demands. father as he logged in the woods. In 1950, Roy Clise By the following year, Danny and Muriel was helping to set chokers to commenced skid the logs. logging and About 1954, the family began milling timber working 30 acres that they on 260 wooded owned across from the Arcadia acres that they Inn. had previously It was Danny’s job to drive the purchased in tractor and yard the logs that Jefferson were sold as lumber. He was County. 8 years old at the time. Roy’s strong During his high school years, work ethic drove him to conhe piled slash to burn and helped stantly stay busy on one project in clearing the land. Once or another. He always made time cleared, the family planted hay, to champion local causes having which they would add to the hay to do with individual rights and they had already harvested. freedoms. Roy also worked outside the When the day’s work was area, cutting down trees for road done, as a hobby he was often rights of way and other projects heard cutting and polishing at Sequim, Neah Bay and elserocks, using his tumbler until where around Western Washingmidnight. The sound often lulled ton. his children, Danny and Shari, to He was highly sought after in sleep. the logging industry and was Roy went to county timber able to turn down jobs when he sales to pick up parcels of land at did not like the way they were “tax sales.” He surveyed the land operated. Because of Roy’s skill himself and then set to work log- level and dedication to doing a ging it with an eye on conserving good job, he was able to make the integrity of the timberlands. good money. At one point, Roy and one of When Roy was working as his brothers converted an Army superintendent of a Crown truck into a tractor, with huge Zellerbach logging operation, he duck wheels from a World War II hired his son, who had recently Paid according to output amphibious vehicle, a heavy-duty graduated from high school, for While Earl gave up on logging winch and other modifications his first “official” adult world job. to go to medical school, Roy conneeded to work in the woods. Danny headed off to college tinued working in the woods. At As an independent logger, Roy the following fall, ready for a that time, falling trees was based sold most of his pulpwood, which career in medicine. on piecework, and people were was the second stage of the logAs college progressed, he paid by each 1,000 board feet ging process, to the Crown Zeller- changed his major to philosophy, that they cut. bach mill in Port Townsend. realizing that being a doctor was The more skilled someone not what he wanted after all. became, the more money they Side by side He filled his summers with were able to make. Roy became logging jobs with his father and Logging was all handwork for one of those skilled men. for other people until Roy many years. Dale Judy worked In those early years, Roy Thompson died in 1970. Thompson roamed all over West- alongside Roy for about eight of After college, Danny made those years on various projects. ern Washington, working in the several career path changes Roy did tree falling and planning, logging industry and traveling through on-the-job experiences while Dale limbed the trees. from camp to camp. but once again returned to the A friend of Roy’s created a In 1943, he married Muriel special splitting gun that had an world of logging for “just a little Minchen, whom he met through while longer.” opening into which explosives his sister, and the two made a By the early 1970s, he settled were inserted. life for themselves while he on the logging industry as his Roy would drive the gun into worked at Long-Bell Logging Co. the tree butt, light it, and the career path and became what he in Ryderwood, once known as butt would explode into manage- calls a logging entrepreneur. “the world’s largest logging able pieces to be hauled off and Danny Thompson performs camp.” sold to Crown Zellerbach. music, writes analytical and philA strong anti-union man, he When Roy and Muriel’s son, osophical pieces as well as poetry, once staged a one-man strike and Danny, was 4 years old, he could is a self-taught law student, polwas able to get the company to

BACK WHEN

Thompson

family collection

Second-generation faller Dan Thompson is silhouetted while at work high above the ground. ishes rocks, is a photographer and still does tree falling and climbing at age 65. He has been tree-climbing for more years than he remembers. Danny downs, limbs or tops trees and does other tree services — and often finds beautiful views from his lofty position above the tree canopy. He enjoys being able to see the water, islands, rolling hills and wildlife from a view few people get. Like his father before him, Danny has inherited a family propensity for hard work and finds a sense of accomplishment in the process of falling trees. He and his father have

enjoyed adventurous and often dangerous work. At the end of the day, there is a clear view of exactly what all of the careful planning has resulted in.

________

Historian Pam McCollum Clise acknowledges Dan Thompson for his assistance with today’s column. Pam’s column on Jefferson County history, Back When, appears in Peninsula 3rdAge on the last Thursday of every month. She can be reached by emailing pamm@olympus.net. Her next Back When installment will appear Sept. 29.

Boomer sex? It’s not a taboo in Jane Fonda’s book JANE FONDA’S NEW book features several chapters devoted to encouraging sexuality in old age, a topic she knows is uncomfortable for many people. Young people, that is. “It’s young people that have the hang-up,” the 73-year-old icon said while chatting at a chic Toronto hotel this week. “I think as the population ages in general, the taboo around sex at an older age will be lessened. Because after all,

baby boomers think they invented sex, you know? Their knees and hips will go before their sex [drive] will. “So I think it’s going to become a much easier topic to talk about, and I just happen to be a pioneer in it right now.” Of course, sex is only one part of the equation in Prime Time, a book that Fonda hopes will inspire readers — young and old — to make the most of their later years. The book covers love, fitness,

HIGHEST

food, meditation and self-analysis. Yet much of the buzz around the book has surrounded Fonda’s between-the-sheets straight talk. She offers advice on choosing the right sex toys, on managing the practical physiological hurdles that face older sexually active people and on the other sensory elements that can improve a couple’s sex life — as Fonda calls it, the “friction and fantasy.”

QUALITY HOME CARE.

“It’s very unusual that a book like this goes into sexuality with the detail that I go into,” she said. “We’re living 34 years longer than our great-grandparents did. That’s an entire second adult lifetime. Why should we pack it in in any way when you have all that time?” Fonda recently nabbed worldwide headlines with the admission that she took the male hormone testosterone to boost her libido.

MOST

She said it is “fantastic” for women whose doctors recommend it but that she stopped the treatments because she got acne. “I was going to be photographed and on TV a lot, and you can break out, and so I stopped taking it for a while,” she said. “Trust me — today’s the last day of my book tour, I’m going right home and popping some testosterone.” The Globe and Mail, Toronto

AFFORDABLE PRICE.

kwahomecare.com

Call t o and day get

For a FREE consultation:

*œÀÌʘ}iiÃÊÎÈä‡{xӇӣәÊUÊ-iµÕˆ“ÊÎÈä‡xnӇ£È{ÇÊUÊ*œÀÌÊ/œÜ˜Ãi˜`ÊÎÈä‡Î{{‡Î{™Ç UÊ7Êœ“iÊ >ÀiʈÃÊ>Û>ˆ>LiÊ>ÊœÛiÀÊ Ê *Õ}iÌÊ-œÕ˜`]ÊÓ{‡Ç]ʈ˜VÕ`ˆ˜}ʅœˆ`>ÞÃ

UÊ7ʅi«ÃÊޜÕÊÀi“>ˆ˜Êˆ˜`i«i˜`i˜Ìʈ˜Ê Ê Ì…iÊVœ“vœÀÌʜvÊޜÕÀʜܘʅœ“iÊ

UÊ/>ˆœÀi`Ê̜ÊޜÕÀʘii`Ã]ÊvÀœ“Ê>ÃʏˆÌ̏iÊ>ÃÊÊ Ê ÌܜʅœÕÀÃÊ̜ÊÓ{ʅœÕÀÃʜvÊV>Ài

CALL FOR A FREE ASSESSMENT TO HELP DETERMINENE YOURR NENEED NEEDS EDS. THERE’S NO OBLIGATION. WE’LL EVEN GIVE YOU A COUPON THAT CCANAN BE REDEEMED FOR $100 WORTH OF FREE HOME CARE.

CARE

! 165124992

UÊ7ʅ>ÃÊLii˜Ê>ʘœ˜‡«ÀœwÌ]Ê`i«i˜`>LiÊ Ê …œ“iÊV>ÀiÊ«ÀœÛˆ`iÀÊȘViÊ£™n™Ê

$100

FREE


3rdAge

Peninsula Daily News

C3

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Realities of Alzheimer’s subject of talk I ENDED LAST week’s column by saying,”Next week, we’ll get back to our ‘Boomer Primer’ thing. Hey, if aging were easy, everybody would do it.” And, of course, everybody does, and from Day 1: You’re older today than you were yesterday, and you’ll be older by lunchtime than you were at breakfast, blah, blah. Obvious, right? Sure. And in a lot of day-to-day ways, it doesn’t really matter until all those day-to-day days add up to months and years and years and years and suddenly, boom! It matters! And when it starts to matter, it often starts to matter a lot because that little voice we usually bury under the day-to-dayness begins to get through and begins to point out that all those day-to-day days won’t go on forever, which means we could actually measure (in a very general sort of way) the distance between “here” and “there,” and we all know where “there” is. The whole idea of this “Boomer Primer” thing (try saying that six times fast!) is to get us all to think about things we need to think about if we’ve figured out that our days won’t go on forever — if we’re on the threshold, as it were — and there are two subjects I know of that will turn a room full of energetic, opinionated boomers into a collection of deer-in-the-headlights zombies, one being Medicare.

HELP LINE Medicare will usually Harvey induce group coma because of what’s perceived as its sheer complexity: This “part” and that “part,” which connects to this over here if you’ve selected one of 87 plans of that part depending upon your income and whether you’re working and where you live and if your doctor does or doesn’t and . . . And then, of course, there’s the daunting aspect of attempting to decipher “explanations of benefits” that were never meant to be deciphered. Oh, sure, there are always a few in the room who helped Mom or Dad with their Medicare stuff and so have concluded that they understand the “elephant,” usually only to discover that what they understand is Mom’s or Dad’s side of the elephant, but don’t panic! Medicare is not what I’m here to talk about (today!). No, today I want to talk about the other subject that will generally lobotomize a room of full of booming boomers: Alzheimer’s disease. There are very few two-word

Mark

A

us at the Sequim Senior Activity Center, 921 E. Hammond St. in Sequim, on Friday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. to be a part of what we hope will be, someday, the “solution.” I’m told I’m going to “moderate” this gathering, and I have absolutely no idea what that means, but I don’t care because it isn’t about me; it’s about you and the sixth leading cause of death, phrases I know of that will what you know and what you’ve and the only one in the “top 10” induce that level of fear: learned and what you need and causes without a way to prevent, “Alzheimer’s disease.” what you worry about and what cure or even slow its progression. It terrifies us because most of would actually help. Convinced? Me, too. us have seen it, one way or the The chapter will collect input So now the question becomes, from around the state and presother, to one degree or another, in what do we need that National one place or another. ent it to the Department of Alzheimer’s Plan Act to actually We know there’s no cure, no Health and Human Services, the do? hope and no way back, and we federal agency responsible for After all, if you were inventing actually creating said plan. know that as the “me” fades away, Medicare, would it look the way it we are likely to take people we No way you can get to the currently looks? have purported to love with us. Sequim Senior Activity Center? Probably not, so the AlzheimAnd most of us, if the truth be OK, I’m not going to pretend I er’s Association’s Western and known, would trade away a fair don’t get it. Then visit www.alz. number of our remaining days to Central Washington State Chap- org/napa and see what you see, ter is putting on a series of public but the best thing would be to see avoid that. Toward the end of last year, in input sessions to hear from you you tomorrow, and here’s why: what may have been the last gen- — us! — about what this plan This is about thousands and should include, which actually uinely bipartisan effort of Conmillions of people’s lives, so we borders on uncommon common gress — nothing unites grossly need the smartest folks around. sense. disparate factions quicker than We need you. Nobody — I repeat, nobody — fear — in our collective memory _________ and at right about the time I sug- knows as much about the day-toMark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefday realities of this disease as do ferson gested it (he said, humbly), the Information & Assistance, which the people who are living with it National Alzheimer’s Plan Act got operates through the Olympic Area or have. passed. Agency on Aging. He can be reached at And it doesn’t really matter if 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), That was a good idea because 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360(a) there are 5.4 million folks liv- it is or was Alzheimer’s or any (West End); or by emailing form of dementia or memory loss. 374-9496 ing with Alzheimer’s in the U.S. harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can right now, and that could rocket If you’ve walked the walk, you be found on Facebook at Olympic Area to 16 million by 2050, which is know. Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance. only 39 years away, and (b) it’s So we’re hoping you’ll join

lzheimer’s disease terrifies us because most of us have seen it, one way or the other, to one degree or another, in one place or another. We know there’s no cure, no hope and no way back, and we know that as the “me” fades away, we are likely to take people we have purported to love with us.

Birthday CORNER May Young Carrell

A local pioneer, May Young Carrell, will celebrate her 90th birthday Saturday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the activity room of Apostolic Faith Church, 221 W. Eighth St. All friends are welcome. May Young was born Aug. 30, 1921, to Orville and Ruth Young in Sequim at the intersecMrs. tion of Priest Carrell and Hendrickson roads in a house that still stands. When she was 3, her family moved to Port Angeles, where she later attended Washington

Elementary School and Roosevelt Junior and Senior high schools, graduating in 1940. Mrs. Carrell was employed at Sears from 1940 to 1958 and was on the staff of First National Bank, now Bank of America, from 1958 until her retirement in 1983. Music has been a big part of her life. She started playing cello in seventh grade and played through high school as well as many years with the Apostolic Faith orchestra. She sang in the choir and small musical groups for many years. Mrs. Carrell has enjoyed relaxing at her cabin at Lake Dawn, where she served as a board member of the Heart O’ the Hills Water Association. She has also been active in the Christian Women’s Club. Traveling and helping others are two of her passions. The Jesus Film Project, Moody

by working on the local ferry and digging and selling clams for $3.75 a bushel. He milked cows by hand on a local farm to Mr. pay for his Woodley room and board. Mr. Woodley worked for Crown Zellerbach for 20 years building roads and logging and started his own business, Woodley Trucking. He is currently owner of Woodley Backhoe & Cat and the Hadlock Motel, as well as co-owner of Hadlock Realty and Development Co. Mr. Woodley has three children, eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren, many of whom he has taught how to

Bible Institute, Wycliffe Bible Translators and Apostolic Faith Church are especially important to her.

Earl Woodley Earl Woodley of Port Hadlock will celebrate his 80th birthday with family and friends Wednesday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the New Hadlock Conference Center, 175 Chimacum Road, next to the Hadlock Motel. Mr. Woodley was born and raised in Port Hadlock, graduating from Chimacum High School in 1951. He learned to be independent from an early age. He lost his mother at the age of 3 and his father when he was 15. He drove a school bus at the age of 16 to make ends meet and supplemented that income

run equipment from his business.

________

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle UNDERWATER SEARCH

1

BY ALAN ARBESFELD / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ When this puzzle is done, look for a name (hinted at by 37-Down) hidden 17 times in the grid, each reading forward, backward, down, up or diagonally, word search-style. ACROSS 61 Dues payer: Abbr. 113 Tyson nickname 62 Mark Twain, 116 Suffix with planet 1 One going into an e.g., religiously outlet 119 “Just a sec” speaking 6 Sonata movement 121 Hillary Clinton 64 Sp. miss and Nancy Pelosi 11 Org. for Lt. 65 Human, e.g., Columbo 124 “Fargo” director foodwise 15 331/3 and others 125 “This ___!” 67 Salad orderer’s 19 Buzz 126 Inner tube-shaped request 20 Huge quantity 127 Perplexed 70 Mercedes 21 Cross letters 128 Objectives competitor 22 “___ la Douce” 129 Firm part: Abbr. 73 Bothered 23 Again 130 Bag of chips, 74 Attractive maybe 25 “I before E except 77 Mother of Horus, after C” and in Egyptian myth 131 Unlocked? others 79 “Mona Lisa” 27 Tampa-to-Orlando feature DOWN dir. 82 Prince Valiant’s son 1 Maven 28 Swelling of the 83 Part of the Hindu 2 Bit of Viking writing head Godhead 3 Sign 30 Carry illicitly 88 Summer hangout 4 Ladies’ club 31 Modern: Ger. 89 Italian 10 restriction 33 Old Turkish 91 Organic compound 5 Miracle-___ V.I.P.’s 92 Rights of passage 6 Nicolas who directed 34 “Now you ___ …” “The Man Who 94 1936 Loretta Young 35 Skippy alternative Fell to Earth” title role 38 Attachment points 96 Pioneering 7 Twice tetraunder the hood computer 8 Big name in upscale 42 Finnish city near retail 99 Back end of a time the Arctic Circle estimate 9 Cracked or torn 46 Oodles 100 Carolina 10 What Rihanna or 48 Street on old TV university Prince uses 49 Racketeer’s 101 Terminology 11 City of the Kings activity? 104 ___ Banos, Calif. 12 Former Texas 51 “Ideas for life” governor Richards 105 Skipping syllables sloganeer 13 Like the alarm 107 Edible Andean 53 Skips on water on many alarm tubers 55 “The Canterbury clocks 108 Cousin on “The Tales” pilgrim Addams Family” 14 Least hopeful 56 Sight near a drain 110 Prepared for 15 Notes to pick up on? YouTube, say 57 Also

2

3

4

5

6

19

36

37

46

11

41

67

69

59

70

83 90

71

95

100

101

72

85

96

87

97

98

88

99 103

104 108

113 120

114

109

115

116

121

122

124

125

126

127

128

129

130

131

86 “___ Wood sawed 98 O.K. Corral gunfighter wood” (old tongue-twister) 102 Senior 75 Sans-serif typeface 87 Hears again, as a 103 Capital of Eritrea 76 Field of stars? case 106 Little hopper? 78 Will of the Bible 90 Treats with scorn 109 Crown holder 80 Pick 6, e.g. 93 It often has dashes 110 Viva ___ 81 Someone ___ 95 Fatigue may be a 111 Home ___ symptom of it: 84 Zero 112 One may be good Var. or dirty 85 “Sense and Sensibility” sister 97 Approaches boldly 113 Wee, informally 74 One concerned with el niño

SOLUTION ON PAGE A6

81

93

107

119

80

61

79 86

102

112

45

73

92

106

44

66

78

91

94

43

55 60

77 84

18

50

65

76

105

54

64 68

82

111

53 58

75

89

42 49

52

63

17

34

40

57

16

30

33 39

15

26

48

56

14

22

29

47

62

13

25

32 38

12

21

51

110

10

28 31

74

9

24 27

35

8

20

23

16 Self-righteous sort 17 Mid 22nd-century year 18 Ed.’s convenience 24 French island WSW of Mauritius 26 Non’s opposite 29 Tryster with Tristan 32 Slippery ones 34 Awake suddenly 35 Teased 36 “Have ___ myself clear?” 37 2003 Pixar film 39 “___ further …” 40 U.S.A. or U.K. 41 ___ Bator, Mongolia 43 Stoic 44 Occasional ingredient in turkey dressing 45 1972 Bill Withers hit 47 Applies, as paint 50 Banks and Pyle 52 PC key 54 Lower layer of the earth’s crust 58 Suffix with Capri 59 Magazine with an annual Hot 100 60 Neighbor of Que. 63 Stood like a pigeon 66 Improvised musically 68 “Lord, is ___?” 69 In concert 71 Hope grp. 72 Spot

7

117

118 123

114 Suffix with arthr115 Sergeant in “The Thin Red Line” 117 “___ sorry!” 118 One of them does? 120 Annual b-ball event 122 Has been 123 Palindromic girl’s name


C4

Classified

THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011

SNEAK A PEEK •

BACK YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun.-Mon. 8-? 1027 E. 8th St. Something for all! Assortment pieces of plywood, wall panels, nails, screws, etc. Some antiques. sliding glass insulated patio door, $150. Solid wood door, $125. Books, toys, clothes. 3+ Br., 2 bath on 4 acres. Fenced yard, new Energy Star appliances, pet neg, 1,512 sf, well/septic, 12 min west of P.A., newly remodeled. $1,195/mo., $900 dep. 360-461-4278. CAMPER 10’ Alaskan. $400. 477-0105 COMMUNITY GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8:30-3 p.m., 673 Strait View Dr., 4Seasons Clubhouse. Clarinet, furniture, rifle, CDs, DVDs, tools, games, plants, household, holiday, craft, books, plus more. No earlies. DOUBLE GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 2033 E. 6th Ave., Gales Addition. Furniture, new appliances, Gazelle female bicycle. DRIVER/LOADER Local company looking for a motivated Class B CDL truck driver/roof loader. Job requires repetitive heavy lifting, and a safe appreciation of heights. Great attitude, great customer service, and CDL required. Mail resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#227/Driver Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ECLECTIC Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., 153 E. Prairie St. (Corner of Prairie and Sunnyside). ESTATE Sale: Sat. only, 8-2 p.m., 710 W. Fir. No earlies. Furniture, kitchen, car. 3 FAMILY Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., 1022 S. Lincoln St. Washer and dryer, ladders, microwave, lawn mower, glass table top, and more! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 10-4 p.m., no early birds. 446 W. Cedar St. Lots of furniture, misc. and tools.

ECLECTIC ESTATE Sale: Thurs.-Fri.Sat.-Sun., August 25-28, 9-3 p.m. 1130 Wilson Street, off Sheridan and 12th in Port Townsend. Com kitchen supplies, lawn/garden, PA speakers, recorders, Yamaha, audio system, compressors, power amps, Hammond piano, Hobart organ, rugs, antiques, retro, Brother sewing ($1,200), appliances, CD’s, Holton furniture, grills, smoker, Biogrill, ‘80 Honda CM400 ($1,000), ‘90 Dodge Caravan ($2,000), Com ChefMate meat/cheese slicer, Cuisinarts, juicers, bakeware, microphones, art, barware, ex equip, speakers, Panasonic FS TV, HealthRider exercise bike, BodyGear bench, microphones, cookbooks, office.

Expansive mountain view + 1 bedroom ADU, 2 car garage in Sequim. 3 acres, pasture. All utilities in for main home construction: 4 bedroom septic, 40 GPM well, 440 amp power, phone, internet. Separate RV pad with 50 amp power, water, sewage dump. Adjacent to lovely vineyard. $339,000. 360-301-0871

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford and Farmall A Tractor. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. '41 Farmall A tractor elec start and mower not running $500. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg.

23

With your

2 DAY

Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m. No earlies! 16 Juniper Mobile Estates, behind Red Ranch. Display case, furniture, storage shed, GMC pickup, tools, glass, kitchen, and more! GARAGE Sales: Sat.Sun., 9-2 p.m., multiple houses in Mt. Pleasant Estates, 1 mile up Mt. Pleasant Rd. Mirror with birds eye frame, furniture, tools, Chev. truck mirrors, books, garden items, beveled mirrors 3’x4’ and 3’x3’, Nordictrack, misc. No earlies please. GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 9-3 p.m. 542 Cedar Park Dr., behind C’est Si Bon restaurant. A lot of good stuff!

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m. 4515 Old Mill Rd. Wooden furniture, home decor, toys, kids and adult clothes, baby stroller, jogger stroller, minitrampoline, baby ride-on toys, and more! GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m., 125 W. 11th St., in alley. Sofa, stereo, Pioneer speakers, and misc. No early birds. Rain or shine! GREAT YARD Sale: Sat., 8/27, from 8-4 p.m. 512 W Summer Breeze Ln, Sequim. Loads of great stuff! Happy Valley 2-Family Sale: Fri. 9-2, Sat. 9?, Happy Valley to Lakeview, to 52 Coyote Meadow Lane. Bike, tools, clothes, household items, toys, antiques, furniture, birdhouses, driftwood yard art, 96ish sf river rock.

HONDA: ‘87 Prelude 168K, 38 mpg, extras. 1 owner. $2,100. 504-2154. HOT TUB: 2 person Marquis, like new. $1,600. 683-9203. HUGE YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 883 Lemmon, off Old Olympic Hwy. Houseware, furniture, misc.

P.A. Construction Co. seeks Payroll Clerk/ Office Assistant, 30-40 hrs/wk. DOE, benefits, EOE. Pls send resume to: futureemployer2011 @yahoo.com by Sept. 9, 5:00 pm

MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-3 p.m. 156 Rebel Lane, 1/4 mile up Blue Mtn Rd. 60+ years collection of antique tools, farm equipment and supplies. Household and kitchen items, twin bed, and dressers. Absolutely NO early birds!

PIANO: Fischer baby grand, good cond., bench and metronome, $3,000/ obo. VIOLA: Becker size 14, Romanian, like new, in case, $200/obo. 452-9605. RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath home, nice cond., 2 car garage, $950 mo. Leland 683-4015. SHOP SALE for men: Fri.-Sat., 7-3 p.m. 1627 Port Williams Rd. Roundabout at Sequim Ave., go right to Port Williams. Hand and power tools; drill press; band, table, radial arm, scroll chop, circular and chain saws, etc. TRUCK RACK: Kargo Master, great condition. $400. 417-2047 YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 8-4 p.m. 85 Wall St., up Deer Park Rd. Bunk bed, kids clothing and toys, and much, much more! YARD Sale: Fri.-Sun., 8-3 p.m., 192 Marshall Rd. 14” band saw, chipper shredder, plus garage, household and many other items. Too much to list.

MOVING Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m. 821 W. 6th St. Tons of good stuff! MULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 9-3:00 p.m. 1103 Grant Ave., off Race St. Lots of guy stuff, fishing poles, woodworking tools, golf items, books, fabrics, clothes, too much to list. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat., 9-12 p.m. 208 Dolan Ave., off Laurel, behind Albertsons. Household items, womens, mens and childrens clothing, some furniture, and more! MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m., 1323 Sequim Dungeness Way. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. 2354 E. 3rd Ave., in Gales Addition. Lots of clothing, antiques, baby furniture, household goods, kitchenware, linens, toys, etc. Something for everyone! MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-4 p.m. No earlies! 127 E. Park Ave., near P.A. high school. Furniture, household items, books, etc.

GRASS FED BEEF $1.50 lb. hanging weight. 928-3733.

LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714.

23

31

31

31

Lost and Found

LOST: Dog. Small black female Sheltie. Carlsborg area. Please do not chase, call Joe at 460-1967.

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-1 p.m. 707 Seamount Dr., 1 block from 7th and N Streets. Household items, appliances, sporting goods, kitchenware, silver and china, musical instruments, gardening tools and supplies, cameras, binoculars, etc.

Help Wanted

AD SERVICES Organization and multi-tasking are major priorities in this position. Must be proficient with MS Office Suite, have excellent grammar and spelling skills. 40 hours per week, vacation and sick leave. Medical and dental benefits are available. Please email your resume to:

LARGE YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 7-3 p.m. 2366 E. 6th Ave., Gales Addition. Men’s, Women’s. PS2 games, and much more! Priced to sell.

Help Wanted

Assistant for Sequim financial planner. Quality software and phone skills required. 681-2325 ASSURED HOSPICE OF CLALLAM AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES PROUD MEMBER OF LHC GROUP PT/PRN Employment Opportunities in our Sequim Office RN and CNA

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT/ AR CLERK Manufacturing company seeks an organized and selfmotivated individual with excellent attention to detail for a full-time position as an ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT/AR CLERK in Port Townsend. Position will provide accounting support specific to A/R, some general ledger, coordinate and be responsible for all shipping records along with general support to the Accounting Department. Candidate will be proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel. Experience with QuickBooks or QuickBooks Enterprise software strongly preferred. $15/hour DOE, plus benefits. Qualified team players with problem-solving skills willing to work under pressure and to tight deadlines should send resume to: hr@imspacific.com

sue.stoneman@ peninsuladailynews. com No phone calls, please.

For further Information or an application call 360-582-3796 You may also apply online at www.lhcgroup.com

CFO/COO Forks Community Hospital seeks an experienced Chief Financial Officer/Chief Operating Officer. This individual will direct departments and financial functions connected with overall Hospital operations. Position is also responsible for Hospital leadership in the Administrator/CEO’s absence. Requires at least ten (10) years financial/administrative leadership in healthcare (preferably rural). Masters degree in related field is preferred. Submit resume to: Forks Community Hospital Human Resources 530 Bogachiel Way Forks, WA 98331 or email to: geoffr@forkshospital. org

BARN/STABLE HELP Must be avail. mornings, must have hands-on horse exp. 457-5561 lv msg.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

CNA/NAR Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com

SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

Chef Assistant Needed, for Gray Wolf Ranch, an intermediate residential care facility for chemically dependent young men. This is a full time position with benefits, and competitive pay. Applicant must have good social skills and be comfortable in an open kitchen setting. Must have experience, be able to lift up to 50 lbs., and be available weekends and holidays.

Help Wanted

CONSTRUCTION SUPERINTENDENT For nonprofit organization. npba.info/futurebuilders Submit resume to: info@npba.info or mail to: P.O. Box 748, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Customer Service/ Retail Sales Experience is a bonus, but will train the right person. Send resume including previous jobs and hobbies. Must be able to work weekends and pass drug test. Driver license not necessary. Must have computer experience. Full-time. Reply to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#225/Cust Svc Port Angeles, WA 98362 Director Human Resources for 260employee critical access hospital. Forks Community Hospital has a service area of 2200 square miles. Functions include employment, compensation, benefits, employee relations, labor relations, training, safety, workers comp, unemployment insurance. Requires minimum 4-year degree in related field with at least 6 years HR experience. SPHR preferred. Send resume to: FCH Human Resources, 530 Bogachiel Way, Forks, WA 98331; or email to: geoffr@forkshospital. org DRIVER/LOADER Local company looking for a motivated Class B CDL truck driver/roof loader. Job requires repetitive heavy lifting, and a safe appreciation of heights. Great attitude, great customer service, and CDL required. Mail resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#227/Driver Pt Angeles, WA 98362

YARD Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m. No earlies! 423 N. Gales St. Lots of kids stuff! Tools, and misc. YARD Sale: To help me pay for my last year of college!. Sat., 8/27, 7:304:00. 2226 Black Diamond Road. Hundreds of books including mysteries, romance, gardening, cookbooks, etc. Spinning wheel, dressage saddle, toys, baby clothes, some women’s clothes, jewelry, antique trunk, horse harness, 1800’s fainting couch, set of antique china, and much more, including my horse! No Early birds please.

31

Help Wanted

DRIVER: Dump truck and pup trailer, available to work out of town. Requirements: Join Teamster Union, min. 5 yrs. exp. 683-5447 ext. 5226. Fabrication & Assembly. Full time position with benefits for experienced self-starter, proficient with TIG and MIG. Welding of Steel, Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Pipe structural components preferred. Wage DOE. Qualified individual should send resume to: hr@imspacific.com or fax to: 360-385-3410 JOURNEYMAN PLUMBER Licensed, full-time, benefits, new construction and repair service exp. Angeles Plumbing. 452-8525. Looking for experienced insulation applicator. Must have clean, valid driver’s license. Apply in person: C&F Insulation 258315 Hwy 101, Port Angeles. 681-0480.

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

31

31

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com

BARBER: Fill in, P/T for established shop. Appt. call 477-3867.

OLYMPIC LODGE Is now hiring for fulltime Night Audit and Front Desk; must have excellent interpersonal and computer skills, with stable work history. Pay and benefits DOE. Housekeeping positions avail. Please apply in person at Olympic Lodge, 140 Del Guzzi Dr., Port Angeles. No phone calls please.

Yoga, Swimming, and Cross Fit. SARC is looking for Yoga Instructors, Swim Coaches, and Cross Fit Instructors. Applications are at the front desk. Inquiries? Call 683-3344 or email: sarc@olypen.com

ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. $11.13-12.05/hr. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE P.A. Construction Co. seeks Payroll Clerk/ Office Assistant, 30-40 hrs/wk. DOE, benefits, EOE. Pls send resume to: futureemployer2011 @yahoo.com by Sept. 9, 5:00 pm PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

THE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Circulation Department Telemarketer Phone Sales Position available part-time, 20 hrs wk. Hours are 3-7 p.m., Mon.–Fri. Base plus commission. Phone skills are a must. Customer service is minimal but necessary. Required to reach monthly goals. Please come to 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles, to fill out an application or e-mail: jasmine.birkland@pe ninsuladailynews. com

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840

Sequim unit is seeking to find an individual who has a passion for working with children and an interest in athletics and/or teens. Please pick up an application at 400 W. Fir St.

34

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034. All around handyman, anything A to Z. 360-775-8234 Construction Administrator 460-6508 Dave’s Clean Up Lawn care, yard work and landscape maintenance, hard work and a fair price. 360-461-5255 Eddy’s Small Engine Repair. Mowers, trimmers, saws. 360-681-3065 HOME CLEANING Reliable, dependable, flexible. Call Meredith 360-461-6508. HOUSECLEANING Organizing. Thorough. Call Lisa 683-4745. LAWN & YARD CARE SERVICES. Mowing, weeding, hedge trimming, landscape maintenance, general clean-up of lawns, yards, lots garages. Tom at 452-3229 Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fast, friendly, reliable, experienced, reasonable rates. Mow, blow, edge, weed, pulling, whacking, brush clearing, debris, hauling. Sequim /P.A. area. 681-3521 Cell: 541-420-4795.

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

AFFORDABLE HORSE PROPERTY Near the Discovery Trail. This 3 Br., 2 bath home sits on 3.10 usable acres, and features an open living area with vaulted ceiling, woodstove, and south facing windows. The barn is 960 sf, with a heated tack room. There are also 4 to 5 paddocks adjacent to the barn, along with a sand riding arena. The property is mostly cleared, with a fringe of trees around the perimeter, for privacy. $255,000. ML260811. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

By Owner: $799,900 NW style home and grounds. Close-in SWEEPING View 2006, 3 + Br., 3.5 bath, 4,050 sf, 13+ acres, large garage open beams, granite slab, fir doors, gated and paved. 212 Scenic View Ln - off Mt Pleasant Heights Lane. See www.peninsuladailynews.com ad for more. 360-461-5321.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading 41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

41

Business Opportunities

LATTE DRIVE-THRU Up and running, Sequim. 460-9035.

Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim Are you looking for a rewarding career? Come work with the best team on the Peninsula!

Now Hiring

LUBE TECH

Nurses & Certified Nursing Assistants

25-35 hrs. wk. valid WSDL required. Apply at 110 Golf Course Rd., P.A. Accepting applications through September 2, 2011.

We offer excellent career opportunities, as well as highly competitive compensation packages. To join our team, qualified candidates may apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave., Sequim

MEDICAL ASSISTANT Join multi-disciplinary team supporting consumers with chronic mental illnesses in an outpatient setting. FT w/benes. Must be program grad and license-eligible. Mental health exper pref’d. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring Bath Aides & Restorative Aides Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim is looking for 3 Bath Aides & Restorative Aides to complete our care team. Please call Jeannie Russell at 582-3900 for more information.

185130783

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More!

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-noon, 2481 Anderson Lake Rd, lot 651. Anchor with rode and chain, Briggs and Stratton gas engine with track puller, 4 hp and 6 hp outboard motors, crab and shrimp traps, pickup metal toolbox, 10 cf Kenmore refrigerator, hardwood flooring 400 sf, fishing, dishes, toaster oven.

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

185128918

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., 45 Sheldon Ln., off Old Olympic Hwy. Toys, washer, dryer, lawn and garden equip., tires.

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 p.m., Mesa View Ln., up Mt. Angeles, left on Scrivner, right on Doss, left on Mesa View. Desk, dresser, NEC phone system, household items.

LAWN & YARD CARE SERVICES. Mowing, weeding, hedge trimming, landscape maintenance, general clean-up of lawns, yards, lots garages. Tom at 452-3229

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 10-5 p.m., 574 Old Olympic Hwy. Variety of treasures for all.

FREE: To good home. Mastiff/Rottweiler mix. Big, friendly, neutered, 2 year old boy. Can no longer keep him. 565-1284.

Lost and Found

FOUND: Hooded sweatshirt. Under bleachers at Clallam county Fairgrounds, P.A. Call to describe. 457-6150 FOUND: Keys. On road near old Marketplace Foods, P.A. bottle cap opener. Call 683-7976, eves. FOUND: Puppy. Female hound, black body, tan face, spotted legs, Dan Kelly area, P.A. 452-6680. FOUND: VW key. On the road near Port Angeles High School track. 457-7180. LOST: Cat. Black, with white paws and patch under chin, W. 10th and the bluff, P.A. 452-2977. LOST: Dog. Chow/lab mix, orange with crooked leg, near Sequim Ave. on 8/23. 808-4725.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1951 Finn Hall Rd. Lots of parking. Portion of proceeds to RELAY FOR LIFE. Household items, clothing, some furniture and tools. Please, no early birds.

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-3 p.m., 375 Hoare Rd. (1.8 miles up Black Diamond Rd., follow signs). Leak finding equipment, van, trailers, antique furniture, women’s and mens clothes, mens stuff jewelry, tools, boat, canvas garage and canopies, etc. NO EARLY BIRDS!

OLYMPIC LODGE Is now hiring for fulltime Night Audit and Front Desk; must have excellent interpersonal and computer skills, with stable work history. Pay and benefits DOE. Housekeeping positions avail. Please apply in person at Olympic Lodge, 140 Del Guzzi Dr., Port Angeles. No phone calls please.

LOST: Cat. Black short hair, clipped ear, Parkwood, Seq. 681-4129

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2:00 p.m. 129 W. Park Ave. Large inside dog kennel, coats, appliances, household items, bike, and much more!

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

5TH WHEEL: ‘86 25’ Alpenlite. Good condition, new tires, awning, tinted windows, TV. $3,600. Call between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. 461-2810

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 Boaters and bowlers 2 Auditorium sign 3 “Leading With My Chin” author

51

Homes

BEAUTIFUL HOME Sitting quietly on 1.63 manicured acres. Spacious rooms including elegant dinning room and cozy fireplace in the living room. French doors leading out to adorable guesthouse and hot tub. $550,000. ML261617. Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. CLOSE IN LOCATION Zoning is office commercial. Convenient to court house, city hall, and shopping. Super well loved and maintained with mtn view. Use as your residence or it could be a great property for attorney office, beauty shop, etc. Come see this very special home. $149,000. ML260419. Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CUSTOM LUXURY HOME 4 Br., 3 bath home with views of Sequim Bay. Kitchen has propane cook top, granite counter tops, oak flooring and pecan-maple cabinets. Large master Br. suite, with jetted tub and his and hers walk in closets. All bedrooms have their own private baths. $685,000 ML261691/260452 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY DOWN BY THE RIVER! This 4 Br., 2.5 bath home on .56 acres borders Morse Creek! Go out your back door and go fishing! You may need to share the fish with the eagles! It is located at a dead-end road for privacy. Large family and living room. Garage is 840 sf. Covered RV parking, back yard is fenced. $175,000. ML261618. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY EVERGREEN RETREAT Nestled in the middle of 20 wooded acres and located between Sequim and P.A., this 2,450 sf custom home has it all! Multiple outbuildings include a woodshop, equipment shed, potting and green houses. This sunny spot, surrounded by beautiful gardens is one of a kind. $675,000. ML261680. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

51

C5

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. WEB CHECK-INS Solution: 8 letters

C  H  R  G  S  E  P  A  D  N  P  D  S  L  E  By David Poole

4 Film with a creepy motel owner 5 Archie’s heartthrob 6 Denny’s competitor 7 Diamonds, but not emeralds 8 Robin Williams forte 9 Tight braid 10 Gone by 11 Shop specializing in Winnie the Pooh merchandise? 12 Lotte who played Rosa Klebb in “From Russia With Love” 13 German steel town 21 Fashion designer Michael 22 Anthem contraction 26 Pontiac muscle cars 27 Slightly cracked 28 Angler’s need 29 Money set aside for garden mazes? 30 Drink brand with a lizard logo 31 Mars pair 35 __ rock Homes

CABIN IN THE WOODS AND BAY Cute cabin in the woods by the bay with huge windows and expansive deck with peek-a-boo views of Ludlow Bay. $185,000. ML250026. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow EXCELLENT CONDITION Within minutes of downtown Sequim, nice floor plan, great room, formal living room and dining room, fully landscaped for low maintenance, 55+ community has many amenities. $68,500. ML255353/261603 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Extensively remodeled in the mid-80’s and updated in 2008. Features vinyl windows, custom tile work, quartz counters, Victorian-style light fixtures, upstairs social room, lots of storage including a lighted attic above the master suite. Updated plumbing and electrical. Lots of natural light. Very nice dual views from master, kitchen and dining area. $239,500. ML261630 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘F’ IS FOR FINISH ME Incredible 20 acre water and mountain view property with a beautiful home that needs finishing. RV hook-up ready to go live on site while you finish the home that already has framing, fireplace, wiring, ducting and some bathroom fixtures installed. Acres of mature timber and massive natural rock formation make this property a work of art. $449,000. ML261717 Eileen Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company FEEL RIGHT AT HOME The front steps welcome you into this comfortable 3 Br., 2 bath home on a 1/2 acre lot, just on the outskirts of town. You’ll love the landscaped yard, the 3 car garage/shop, greenhouse and large private sunny deck. $225,000. ML261682 Kathy Brown 417-2794 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

51

8/25/11

Y O A E T O D R R R E P K C T

T T M N G A F A E R A P O H A

E I I M D N I F R M A O O A L

© 2011 Universal Uclick

T R C R E L E R I G I N B N E

P E S K U R I S L C P U G G W

E Q G X E C C N S I E U M E T

A A U N R T E I G A N U N S R

www.wonderword.com

S R C E U N S S A T P E A C O

Y E I C U O E C N L R F S L P

S L R M E E L E E E L P M I S

F S B V E S G H R T C E L E S

S R ҹ E N ҹ A A ҹ T L ҹ I P A C S L L M O E C T A S T Y E S N T A P

K C I L C R E S E R V E M O H

8/25

Join us on Facebook

Access, Agent, Airlines, Arrange, Board, Book, Change, Class, Click, Client, Commercial, Easy, Fast, Flier, Gate, Handling, Home, Late, Locate, Lounge, Luxury, Maps, Meals, Number, Office, Open, Passenger, Passport, Plan, Preferences, Premium, Print, Queue, Renew, Reserve, Screen, Seat, Security, Select, Service, Simple, System, Tickets, Times, Upgrade Yesterday’s Answer: Inhibitors

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

LAZWT ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SAFHL (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

37 Alone 38 Joyce’s homeland 40 Ostentatious behavior 42 “__ With Morrie”: Albom best-seller 45 Salts on the ocean 47 Hip bones 50 Star Wars prog. 52 German sub? 53 Present itself, as a thought

Homes

FOR OWNER/USERS Many possible uses for this beautiful multi-purpose property. 3,392 sf on 1.90 acres. For investors present owner would consider sale/lease back for at least 2 years. Shown by appointment only. $425,000. ML260991. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East FSBO Great water/ mountain views from Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great rm, and rec rm. 2 full baths/4 bdrms. Private, near schools, shopping, busses. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on first floor. Shop. Warm, south facing tiled patio. Large lot, fruit trees/ garden. $325,000 457-2796 GOOD LOCATION 3 Br., 1.75 bath, lots of windows, new countertops, new fixtures and more. Private patio, mtn view. $165,000 ML197376/260570 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GORGEOUS ESTATE On the Lyre River. Wander down your private trail to the river and do a little steelhead fishing! 3 Br., 2.5 bath home. Setting includes 15+ acres, 3 car garage with attached and finished workshop, barn, greenhouse and a lovely landscaped yard. $497,500. ML261104. Mark DeRousie Re/Max Evergreen 461-3973

51

Homes

CONDO: Unit 301 at 710 Del Guzzi Dr., P.A. overlooks Peninsula Golf Course, 2 Br., 2 ba, study, covered parking, storage, deck. $229,000. 808-5290

LEASE PURCHASE AVAILABLE In Sequim on 1.25 acres. 4 Br., 3 bath, country style home. This home is one of a kind! 2 separate sinks in kitchen, kitchenette upstairs, lofts, high ceilings and more. This is a REALLY COOL place! If you have a large family or want to start a home based business - this place is for you. New carpet, paint, tile etc. Move in ready. Priced way below current appraisal! $219,900 Leave message at 360-681-0765 or pinkhands@me.com NEW LISTING Unique 2 Br., 2 bath home on 2.97 acres with water and Mt. views. Bamboo floors, marble counter tops and free standing wood stove with brick accents. Enjoy your beautiful tranquil gardens from your deck with wonderful Mt. Views. Horse lovers, we have a 30x60 barn or storage building. Nice pasture area too. 2 car garage with a wine cellar or bunker, you decide. $279,000. ML260575. Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

GREAT INCOME Immaculate duplex with great rental history. Units feature 2 Br. and 1.5 baths each, updated windows, carports with storage areas and convenient location. Rents produce $1,500 per month $211,900. ML251403. Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

OASIS IN THE CITY! Custom built in 2008. Water view 3 Br., 2 bath home in a great Port Angeles neighborhood. Large beautiful windows. Elegant hardwood floors and exceptional architecture make this a truly special home. $194,900. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

INCREDIBLE 180º MTN VIEW! Almost new (2010) 5 acres. Partially fenced. Custom built. Chef’s kitchen, stainless steel appliances, wall oven and gas cooktop. Granite counters and eating bar, 2 master suites. 6’ glass block shower. Large den. Fireplace, covered deck, patio. 2 car attached garage. RV parking. Possible owner financing. $489,000. ML261579 Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

OUTSTANDING VALUE Large split level floor plan home on lot and a half (.33 acre) near Lincoln Park. Living room with fireplace and new laminate flooring, 3 Br., 1 bath plus daylight basement with 2 Br., 1 bath, living room and kitchenette. Fenced back yard, lots of storage, workshop area, and rooftop deck. $179,000. ML261726 Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

8/25/11

54 Tolkien ringbearer 55 1975 Tonywinning play about a stableboy 59 The munchies, e.g. 60 Cruise stop 61 Dark purple fruit 62 Eternities, seemingly 63 Midterm or final 65 “Golly!”

51

Homes

FOR SALE 2 Br., 1 bath, full basement on 2 lots. Valley St., P.A. $125,000. 360-452-4085 PICTURE PERFECT Excellent curb appeal, Good Cents certified home, private sun lit deck overlooks landscaping, lots of storage and attention to detail, newer appliances and leaf guard system. $219,900. ML221703/260987 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND RENTAL INCOME Great location close to the college for these 2 duplexes. Total of 4 one Br. units. Make your investments work for you. Many improvements made in last 4 years. $249,000 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SPACIOUS HOME Larger landscaped corner lot, oversized 2 car garage with work bench, enclosed patio, master Br. with sitting area, separate living room for entertaining. $115,000. ML108036/251593 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND UNIQUE HOME One of the most unique homes on the Olympic Peninsula. Nearly 4,000 sf of modern architecture blending steel siding, soaring lines, indoor “sandstone” waterfall and Koi pond, full formal soundproofed theater with 120” screen and 7.1 sound. Computer controlled lighting and heating. Too many upgrades to mention here. $1,350,000 Margaret Womack 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY Updated home on acreage with water views. Hardwood and bamboo floors, tiled counter tops. A gardener’s delight! Wonderful deck on the south side with views of the gardens. Master Br. is on the upper level with loft area for library or den. Detached garage and detached barn/storage or shop 30x60. Great useable land for horses as well. All inspections have been completed. $267,000. ML261303. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

51

RNWIYE

RDAAEP Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: Yesterday’s

Homes

P.A.: Fixer upper 2 Br., 1 bath, livable but needs TLC. $52,500. 460-9035 SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO 2 Br., 2 baths, nice sunroom, propane stove, murphy bed, shoji screen. $175,000 ML145314/252226 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND WANTED: Mfg or stick home w/gar. on private land between Blyn/ Agnew, under $90K. 460-8978. WELCOME TO PRIVACY Private serene courtyard and open floorplan perfect for entertaining. Enjoy golf course views from living, kitchen, dining, office/den, and master Br. Master bath with separate tub/shower. Cook’s kitchen, big pantry and pullout shelving. Lots of counter space and new cooktop make meal preparation and serving a snap. Guest room separate from master. $289,000. ML261337. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

52

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

ACROSS 1 Beatles film 5 Globetrotter’s need 9 TV choice 14 x, y and z, in math 15 Israel’s Barak 16 Curved moldings 17 Hard to spot 18 Muddy up 19 Chestnut-hued horses 20 Chicken, beef, or fish? 23 Bar order 24 Sweetie 25 Three-time Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film 27 Saw 32 Membership list 33 Slangy morning cup 34 Tabloid exclusive 36 Inferior 39 Director of the last episode of “M*A*S*H” 41 Concerning 43 Hershey’s toffee bar 44 First name in daytime TV 46 Worldweariness 48 Gin maker Whitney 49 Jazz and swing periods 51 Word with crew or key 53 Gridiron call 56 Respectful title 57 French vineyard 58 Expensive bottle of wine? 64 River including Livingstone Falls 66 Major in astronomy? 67 Balm ingredient 68 Milk dispenser 69 Hardly handsome 70 Loads 71 Run for the __: Kentucky Derby 72 Understands 73 Gusto

THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011

Manufactured Homes

Light and bright, Super Good Cents, 28x48 home in a peaceful, 55+ park. ADA ramp access with attached carport and wood storage shed. New formica counter tops, hot water heater and entry doors. Updated with porcelain sinks, newer carpets and laminate flooring. $54,000. ML261451. Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NEW Gorgeous Low maintenance landscaped front/back yards. House interiors are sure to please. Extra roomy triplewide in Parkwood Community for 55+. Clubhouse and outdoor rec features make this a winning combination. $74,900. ML252439. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East P.A.: 2 Br., 2 ba, all appliances. $50,000. Call 452-6524. SEQUIM: ‘01 Skyline, 1,568 sf, 3 Br., 2 ba, Super Good Cents, fenced, new heat pump, garage. $78,995. 452-4867.

(Answers tomorrow) DRAFT GOSSIP GOALIE Jumbles: CLIMB Answer: The Olympic runner liked to remember the — GOOD TIMES

54

Lots/ Acreage

Beautiful parcel on quiet street in the Mount Pleasant area with mountain views and some trees which has been recently surveyed and has a well. $95,000. ML252221. Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. DEER PARK AREA Four 5 acre private and treed parcels available, each for under $50,000. At that price, why not buy a few so you could have a 10, 15 or 20 acre home site? Or, a family compound? Power is in at Lisel lane, well and septic will be needed. $44,900+. ML261560. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Expansive mountain view + 1 bedroom ADU, 2 car garage in Sequim. 3 acres, pasture. All utilities in for main home construction: 4 bedroom septic, 40 GPM well, 440 amp power, phone, internet. Separate RV pad with 50 amp power, water, sewage dump. Adjacent to lovely vineyard. $339,000. 360-301-0871 HAPPY VALLEY ACREAGE Private road, wells, power, phone, parked out, no manufactured homes, 1 lot with garage. $125,000 and $190,000. 808-5290. Property and hangar for sale by owner. 1.5 view acreage with 46 X 60 hangar on private airstrip near Sequim. Runway is adjacent to the hanger which has a full bathroom, walk in closet and lots of storage. Ready for an RV with hookups both inside and outside, has a septic system and the driveway and apron are asphalt. Overhead propane heaters keep you and your airplane(s) warm in the winter. Buyers agents welcome. $299,000. 360-912-0030 ‘T’ IS FOR TOP OF THE WORLD Spectacular water, island and Cascade Mtn views from this dividable parcel below Bell Hill. Great investment parcel with top of the world building site. City utilities, owner financing available! $149,000. ML261266. Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

58

Commercial

COMMERCIAL/ RESIDENTIAL Property is zoned C1 commercial, but is financeable as residential with current home on site. Renters. Value is in land. For more information, contact listing agent. Do not contact or disturb tenants. $225,000. ML261305. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

61

Apartments Furnished

Furn 1 Br., 1 bath, 1st floor condo on golf course. $700/mo incl all util except pwr. Call Gail at Blue Sky PM. 360-683-3900.

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540 CENTRAL. P.A.: 1 Br., close to Safeway. $460/$500.477-3867 CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $600 plus dep. 1502 C St. #6, P.A. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423. EAST P.A.: 1 Br., W/S/G paid, no pets /smoking. $475, plus $450 dep. 683-1012. NEW MANAGEMENT 1st month free. New lower rent. Senior community. Call for details. 457-6827

P.A.: 1 Br., clean, cozy, no pets/smoking, storage, references. $475 mo., $450 deposit. 809-9979. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com STUDIO: Dungeness, view, util incl. $550, 6 mo. lease. No pets. Refs. 683-4503.

63

Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba. $700. 360-460-4089 mchughrents.com

64

Houses

20 MIN. TO SEQ. OR P.T.: 3 Br, 2 ba, water view, lg. deck, 3-car gar., all appl., boat ramp near by, cr. ck, ref $1,175. 683-2799 3 Br., 2 bath, West End. 9 mo lease, 1st mo., $1,050 dep., credit check. No pets, new carpet. 760-271-1362 3+ Br., 2 bath on 4 acres. Fenced yard, new Energy Star appliances, pet neg, 1,512 sf, well/septic, 12 min west of P.A., newly remodeled. $1,195/mo., $900 dep. 360-461-4278.

Between P.A. & Sequim. 123 Amarillo Rd. 2 bed, 1 bath with W/D on 1.5 acres. Storage Shed. No smoking or pets. $800. 360-452-7721. CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, no smoke/pets. $750 mo. 457-5352. CENTRAL P.A.: Cozy 1 Br., weatherized, no pets, references. $550. 514 E. 3rd St. E P.A. Custom contemp villa. 1 Br., 1350’, water view. Lg artist studio. Huge grg. Lse $975 mo. 360-504-0184 Fab Sunland 3 Br. home w/fireplace. Open House: 106 Leslie Ln. Sun., 8/21 1-3 and Tues., 8/23 4-6. JACE TREC 565-2020

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba......$500 H 2 br 1 ba......$575 A 2 br 2 ba......$700 H 2 br 1 ba......$750 H 2 br 1 ba......$850 A 2 br 1 ba......$875 H 3 br 1 ba......$900 H 3 br 2 ba......$950 H 3 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 4 br 2 ba....$1200 H 3 br 2 ba....$1250

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 1 Br., lg yard, pets negot., W/D. $650. 452-1573. P.A.: 2 Br., 2 full bath. West of town. No pets. $700, first, last, $500 dep. 417-0234. P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ pets. $600, last, dep. 452-1694 eves. P.A.: 2 Br., shop, lg yard, pets neg. $850/ mo. 461-7599. P.A.: 2,200 sf new Energy Star home. 2 Br., 2.75 bath, rec room, office. Lease. $1,250. 808-0022. P.A.: 2413 Ryan Dr. 3 Br., no pets/smoke. $700, 1st, last, $700 dep. 417-1688 msg.


C6

THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011

64

Houses

64

Classified 68

Houses

72

Commercial Space

P.A.: 3 Br., 1 bath, pets ok. $1,000, 1st, deposit. 477-8643.

SEQUIM: 4 Br., water view. $950. tourfactory.com/525687

CARLSBORG: Office space. 461-4085.

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, no smoking. $1,100 mo., $1,100 security. 417-0153.

View house, pets OK 2 Br., 1 bath, deck, fenced yd, garage, RV pkg, no smkg, $895 + utils. 206-225-7207

Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737

P.A.: 3 Br., gar., house, $925. 3 Br. gar., dplx, $795. 452-1395. P.A.: 4525 S. Fey Rd. 3+2, on 1 ac. 14 ac pasture poss. Sept 1. $1,000. 477-0865. P.A.: 920 E. 10th St., near college, 3+2, 2 car gar., Sept. 1. $1,000. 477-0865. P.A.: Cozy small 2 Br. 1 ba, lg. yd. $695. 805-245-0900 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: 3 Br., 2 bath. Mountain view. Excellent condition. $998. 683-1648. SEQ: Exc. water view 2 Br. $799. tourfactory.com/397357 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath home, nice cond., 2 car garage, $950 mo. Leland 683-4015.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

GARDINER: Room, furnished, cable, util. inclu. No D/A, parties or pets. $300 mo. 360-808-1135

Room for rent. Nice quiet area 10 minutes from Sequim private bath, no smoking, no drugs. Someone who is clean and picks up after themselves. Must have a job. $400/mo. 683-8792.

WEST SIDE P.A. 1,100 sf, $675 mo. 460-3646/452-0226

SEQUIM: Room, by Dairy Queen. $425, deposit. 683-6450.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

P.A.: 1 Br. mobile, cable, Wi-Fi. $500, screening. 504-2159. P.A.: RV or manufacutred home property with 20x20 garage. $400 mo. 808-0970.

MISC: New twin mattress/box spring, $125. Vintage/antique wooden file cabinet, $50. Antique small caned wood rocker, $75. Lamps, $3-$20. 3x5 hunter green rug, $5. Outdoor furniture, $10. Folding tables, $20. By appt. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 417-8154.

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

72

Spaces RV/ Mobile

Furniture for sale: Sofa, loveseat, chair colonial blue button tufted set. Very good condition, nonsmokers. Solid oak coffee table, 2 end tables, oak cabinet with brass. $775 all/obo. 928-2223 for info and photos. MISC FURNITURE View Picture & Prices online. Leather love seat and sofa, dining room table glass with upholstered chairs, 2 coffee tables. Prices FIRM (interested parties only!) Call 360-565-6381

P.A.: Private room and bath in lovely 6 Br. house near high school. Quiet professional wanted. $420 + dep. No pets. 797-1245

66 WATERFRONT 2/1, Sunny & beachfront. Stunning views. 1196 sq ft. Rental is top floor. Pets negotiable. 460-5360.

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

72

Furniture

Furniture

DINING TABLE: 73” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very nice set. $130. Two matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429.

TV ARMOIRE: Solid oak and cedar TV armoire. Two piece construction, large cedar cabinet below, Four cedar built drawers with solid oak fronts, and large TV cabinet with tray for DVD player. Immaculate condition, Paid $3,700 new, sell for $1,000 or good offer. Call to see 457-0820. Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

73

Furniture

HUTCH: Large and in perfect condition. $400. 457-9162. MISC: Oak lighted entertainment center. $75. (2) oak base cabinets, 1 with 1 bar sink, 1 with two bar sinks, $150 both. 683-6539 SOFA BED: Green leather, good condition. $300. 681-3060

73

General Merchandise

ANTIQUE: Ben Franklin free standing fireplace, Franklin Stove Co. Portland, Maine, with accessories. $300. 683-2463 BOOK SALE: Tons of books! $2/bag, fill as many bags as you want! FOL Book Store, Ray Carver Room, P.A. Library. Aug. 26-27, 10-4:30. CEMETERY PLOTS 2, Mt. Angeles View Garden of Devotion, side-by-side. $1,150. 452-4136 CEMETERY PLOTS 4 together in Mt. Angeles Cemetery, original purchased in 1962. Individually $1,000 each or all 4 for $3,000. 253-952-7109 DESK: Solid oak teacher desk, apx 75 years old, perfect for furniture refinishing enthusiasts. $250/obo. 457-9770.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

General Merchandise

DRY SUIT: Ladies sealed nylon medium dry suit. Turquoise/ black with latex arm, ankle, neck cuffs. Lightly used. $100. 360-379-4977 Euro Body Shaper. The latest technology in fitness. The “all in one” machine is a massager/vibrator. Excellent condition. Review it online at You Tube. Paid $1,800. Asking $900/obo. 360-452-8664 FIREWOOD: $120/ chord. You haul. 775-1939 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Dry fir. $200 cord. 452-1162 FIREWOOD: Seasoned, ready to burn, come see quality. $150+. 461-6843 Hobby Train Set for sale! N Scale. Some supplies. The set is on a 4x6x3ft table. $500/obo. Created by my father Mike Wells, a PA local. Looking for a person to enjoy it as he did. Contact 360-580-4374

73

General Merchandise

FREE: Wainscoting from old building. Also, free wood building, you move or tear down. 457-0643 HOT TUB: 2 person Marquis, like new. $1,600. 683-9203. HOT TUB: 4 mo. old, paid $4,395, must sell due to health. Selling for $3,295. 360-457-9037 MISC: Bunk bed set, complete, desk, chair, chest, shelves, mattresses, good cond., clean, $575. Tile saw, $40. 1/2” drill, $35. Commercial fan, $55. Bakugan cards, $25. 775-1035 MISC: Celestron star gazing telescope, never been used, $75. ION USB turn table, compatible with any recording software. Never been used, $60. All OBO. 457-9770. MISC: English string holder, $45. Pictures, $25. Child’s table and chair set, $25. Carved wooded goose, $50. Carbide lamp, $15. Antique shuttle, $75. Cast iron toys, $75. 775-1035 MISC: Logging boots, 16” tops, sz 11, $125. Rubber logging boots, sz 11, $75. (4) airplane head set, $75 ea. Roofing nail guns, $100 ea. 461-8060.

73

73

General Merchandise

General Merchandise

MISC: Student flute, Selmer, $250. Student violin, Scherl & Roth 3/4, $275. Spin bike, like new, purchased from Costco, $400. 452-5332, leave message.

MISC: Full size mattress and box sping, $175. Sofa sleeper, forest green, $150. Lift chair, Mocha microfiber, $275. 683-1006 MISC: Painting van with supplies, $4,000. Dinette set, $400. Sony stereo with Klipsch speakers, $1,000. 1.5 karat diamond ring, paid $6,500 will sell for $4,000. 452-7938.

MISC: Yamaha trombone, with Pro-Tec case, $300. Small boat or jet ski trailer, $250. 457-4931. RIDING MOWER: ‘11 Snapper, 5 speed rear riding mower with electric start, brand new, never used, Briggs & Stratton OHV engine. $1,250. 417-0808.

MISC: Queen/king bed spread, drapes, shams, valiance, new in box, Penney’s, $275. Antique parlor desk, art deco and chair, $325. Oval antique picture frame, $65. 775-1035

RV GENERATOR Onan 6.5 Genset, electric start, inside or outside, gas powered, newer model, 6.5 kw, AC volt 120/240, 54/27 amp, 1800 rpm. $850/obo. 670-2633

MISC: Skis Volunt Genesis marker M44, 180 mm, $100. Bicycle, 23” ‘70 Campognolon and Chinelli, $650. ‘48 Jeepster transmission, 3 sp with electric OD, $650. 461-8060

SOCKEYE & KINGS Fresh, local. 360-963-2021 TICKETS: Preseason Seahawk vs. Raiders, Sept. 2nd, Row T, Section 337, Seat 20-21. $80 ea. Will sell $120 both. 360-461-3661

PROPANE INSERT Regency Panorama P121 two sided see-through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate. GREAT PRICE! $1,300. 477-8826.

TRAILER: 4X7 New rims, lights, hitch and safety chains. Great tires, paint and tabs. $550. 360-461-1438. UTILITY TRAILER 4x8 single axle, nice condition. $500. 681-5349. after 6 p.m.

185130625

LAWN/YARD WINDOW WASHING CARE LOG HOMES

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s TTractor ractor SService er vice

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

360-670-1350 360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

#BAURLH*023DJ

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Done Right Home Repair

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Larry Muckley

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

(360) 683-8332

AIR DUCT CLEANING

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

Yard Service • Odd Jobs Hauling • Property Clean up Moving • Brush Removal Hedge Trimming Roof/Gutter Cleaning Tree Pruning Accepting New Contracts

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

COLUMC*955KD

ASBESTOS

No job to small! Serving Diamond Point, Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Asbestos Inspections - Testing Surveys

WANTED: Wind Damaged

& Leaky Roofs

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

D

360

457-5186

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

452-9995

0A5100969

G

ARLAN ROOFING

75289698

Quality roofing at a reasonable price Honest & Reliable 155120082

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

ROOFING

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

Columbus Construction

5 582-0384 82-0384

WINDOW CLEANING

APPLIANCES

JJami’s ami’s

86313195

155122063

457-6582 808-0439

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

REPAIR/REMODEL

155119356

In sid e , O u tsid e , A nysid e

Reg#FINIST*932D0

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

SERVICES PROPERTY PROPERTY MAINTENANCE M AINTENANCE

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

Lic#DONERRH943NA

Call NOW To Advertise

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

LARRYHM016J8

125111256

Painting & Pressure Washing

Glen Spear, Owner

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

78289849

FOX PAINTING

Call NOW To Advertise

Windows & Doors Concrete

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

115108502

PAINTING

Remodels Handicap Access Painting

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

s Handyman Services JPSHAHS92BE

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

John Pruss 360 808-6844

(360)

360-681-7878

HOME REPAIR

PAINTING

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

(360)

Home & Bus.

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

HANDYMAN

JP

24 yrs. experience

Paul Baur, owner 135114329

#LUNDFF*962K7

93313234

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

Moss Prevention

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

115105618

Chad Lund

Pressure Washing

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

Baur Log Homes

Window Washing

Small jobs is what I do!

LAWN CARE

155121476

TRACTOR

9C5066307

FENCING

TREE SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN TREES

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

Small Jobs A Specialty

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

FREE S ATE ESTIM

Contr#KENNER1951P8

(360) 460-0518 165122885

anthonystreetop@gmail.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges 72289323

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection Full 6 Month Warranty

LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

DIRT WORK

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

025073138

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

EXCAVATING

JK DIRTWORKS INC. 360/460•9824

PAINTING Jim Green Painting

JIMGRP*044PQ

COMMERCIAL SEALCOATING Striping • Crack Filling Parking Lots • Community Roads

360-871-6607 Guaranteed Workmanship • SEALCAM953J1 • 23+ years experience

PAINTING

LANDSCAPING

C

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER contact@jkdirtworks.com

GUTTER CLEANING PRESSURE WASHING DEBRIS HAULING • CARPET CLEANING

LIC

CALL FOR ESTIMATE

452-3480

Landscapes by

LIC#GUTTEA*950NS Bonded/Insured

. 35 yrse on th la su in Pen

FREE Estimates

Call NOW To Advertise

Free Estimates Plants • Design Construction Sprinkler Systems

681-0132 165124112

Visit our website www.dungenesslandscaper.com Certified Horticultural Specialist Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

175127220

(360) 457-8102

#JKDIRKD942NG

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY ADVERTISE

DAILY FOR AS LITTLE AS

Landscapes for The Northwest Lifestyle

Interiors, Exteriors, Drywall Repair Pressure Washing, Sandblasting New and Existing

Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

WINDOW CLEANING

ockburn.INC

Residential • Commercial Industrial • Marine

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

RS SCHMIDT ENTERPRISES

165122599

Davis Painting

Call NOW To Advertise

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

$90 FOR 4 WEEKS! RATES 1 1 1 2 2 2

AND SIZES: X 1” X 2” X 3” X 1” X 2” X 3”

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

AT

NOON

To advertise call 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

945036615

175128559

360-457-6747

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

WINDOW CLEANING

175125821

EXT./INT. RESIDENTIAL/COMM.

FREE Estimates

SEALCOATING

Call NOW To Advertise

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

74

Home Electronics

TRUCK/RV GPS Cobra 7700 Pro. 2010 model. 7” wide screen. Attachments included. $100. 360-379-4977 TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

75

Musical

ALTO SAX: Yamaha YAS 52 intermediate alto sax. Fabulous condition, great step-up horn. One owner and ready to play! $850. See online ad for photos. 360-379-1839 FLUTE: Gemeinhardt, don’t pay $400 new, we have one in excellent condition, one owner, for only $200. 775-0492. ORGAN: Electronic, Rodgers classical church organ, three manual, full foot pedal board and bench, excellent condition. Asking $595/obo. 683-4200 leave msg. PIANO: Fischer baby grand, good cond., bench and metronome, $3,000/ obo. VIOLA: Becker size 14, Romanian, like new, in case, $200/obo. 452-9605.

76

Sporting Goods

GUNS: S and W .38, nickel or stainless, +p rated, new, $495 ea. Ruger .38, DAO, uncataloged, 1 of 300, new, $495. S and W 1957 .44 magnum 4 screw, 80%, $795 firm. 452-4003 GUNS: Savage 110C 30-06, $200. Marlin 917 17HMR, $200. Also, metal detector, Whites XLT, new, used once, ear phones, mini-probe, $1,100 value, $850 firm. 808-2134. RIFLE: Custom Ruger M77, 7mm RM, Leupold, sling, case, ammo. $1,000. 417-2165 SHOTGUN: Mossberg 12 gauge with case, as new. $400/obo cash. 683-7161.

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

3 FAMILY Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., 1022 S. Lincoln St. Washer and dryer, ladders, microwave, lawn mower, glass table top, and more! BOOK Sale: Tons of books! $2/bag, fill as many bags as you want! FOL Book Store, Ray Carver Room, P.A. Library. Aug. 26-27, 10-4:30. GARAGE & MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-2 p.m., 228 Dolan Ave. Leather sofa, love seat and chair, 36” TV, stainless steel glass-top stove and microwave, side-byside refrigerator, lawn mower, wood chipper, rototiller, fountain, deep seating patio set, boys clothes, dishes, garden stuff. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m., 125 W. 11th St., in alley. Sofa, stereo, Pioneer speakers, and misc. No early birds. Rain or shine! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m. 4515 Old Mill Rd. Wooden furniture, home decor, toys, kids and adult clothes, baby stroller, jogger stroller, minitrampoline, baby ride-on toys, and more! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2:00 p.m. 129 W. Park Ave. Large inside dog kennel, coats, appliances, household items, bike, and much more! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 p.m., Mesa View Ln., up Mt. Angeles, left on Scrivner, right on Doss, left on Mesa View. Desk, dresser, NEC phone system, household items. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-3 p.m., 375 Hoare Rd. (1.8 miles up Black Diamond Rd., follow signs). Leak finding equipment, van, trailers, antique furniture, women’s and mens clothes, mens stuff jewelry, tools, boat, canvas garage and canopies, etc. NO EARLY BIRDS! MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-4 p.m. No earlies! 127 E. Park Ave., near P.A. high school. Furniture, household items, books, etc. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat., 9-12 p.m. 208 Dolan Ave., off Laurel, behind Albertsons. Household items, womens, mens and childrens clothing, some furniture, and more! YARD Sale: Thur.-Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 538 W. 6th St. Emptied storage from California.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-1 p.m. 707 Seamount Dr., 1 block from 7th and N Streets. Household items, appliances, sporting goods, kitchenware, silver and china, musical instruments, gardening tools and supplies, cameras, binoculars, etc.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

MOVING Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m. 821 W. 6th St. Tons of good stuff! YARD Sale: To help me pay for my last year of college!. Sat., 8/27, 7:304:00. 2226 Black Diamond Road. Hundreds of books including mysteries, romance, gardening, cookbooks, etc. Spinning wheel, dressage saddle, toys, baby clothes, some women’s clothes, jewelry, antique trunk, horse harness, 1800’s fainting couch, set of antique china, and much more, including my horse! No Early birds please.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

BACK YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun.-Mon. 8-? 1027 E. 8th St. Something for all! Assortment pieces of plywood, wall panels, nails, screws, etc. Some antiques. sliding glass insulated patio door, $150. Solid wood door, $125. Books, toys, clothes. COMMUNITY GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8:30-3 p.m., 673 Strait View Dr., 4Seasons Clubhouse. Clarinet, furniture, rifle, CDs, DVDs, tools, games, plants, household, holiday, craft, books, plus more. No earlies. DOUBLE GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 2033 E. 6th Ave., Gales Addition. Furniture, new appliances, Gazelle female bicycle. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1951 Finn Hall Rd. Lots of parking. Portion of proceeds to RELAY FOR LIFE. Household items, clothing, some furniture and tools. Please, no early birds. GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 9-3 p.m. 542 Cedar Park Dr., behind C’est Si Bon restaurant. A lot of good stuff! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 10-5 p.m., 574 Old Olympic Hwy. Variety of treasures for all. GARAGE Sales: Sat.Sun., 9-2 p.m., multiple houses in Mt. Pleasant Estates, 1 mile up Mt. Pleasant Rd. Mirror with birds eye frame, furniture, tools, Chev. truck mirrors, books, garden items, beveled mirrors 3’x4’ and 3’x3’, Nordictrack, misc. No earlies please. HUGE YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 883 Lemmon, off Old Olympic Hwy. Houseware, furniture, misc. LARGE YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 7-3 p.m. 2366 E. 6th Ave., Gales Addition. Men’s, Women’s. PS2 games, and much more! Priced to sell. MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-3 p.m. 156 Rebel Lane, 1/4 mile up Blue Mtn Rd. 60+ years collection of antique tools, farm equipment and supplies. Household and kitchen items, twin bed, and dressers. Absolutely NO early birds! MULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 9-3:00 p.m. 1103 Grant Ave., off Race St. Lots of guy stuff, fishing poles, woodworking tools, golf items, books, fabrics, clothes, too much to list. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. 2354 E. 3rd Ave., in Gales Addition. Lots of clothing, antiques, baby furniture, household goods, kitchenware, linens, toys, etc. Something for everyone! YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 8-4 p.m. 85 Wall St., up Deer Park Rd. Bunk bed, kids clothing and toys, and much, much more! YARD Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m. No earlies! 423 N. Gales St. Lots of kids stuff! Tools, and misc.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

ECLECTIC Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., 153 E. Prairie St. (Corner of Prairie and Sunnyside). ESTATE Sale: Sat. only, 8-2 p.m., 710 W. Fir. No earlies. Furniture, kitchen, car. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 10-4 p.m., no early birds. 446 W. Cedar St. Lots of furniture, misc. and tools. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m. No earlies! 16 Juniper Mobile Estates, behind Red Ranch. Display case, furniture, storage shed, GMC pickup, tools, glass, kitchen, and more! GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., 45 Sheldon Ln., off Old Olympic Hwy. Toys, washer, dryer, lawn and garden equip., tires.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 123 Foxtail Lane. GREAT YARD Sale: Sat., 8/27, from 8-4 p.m. 512 W Summer Breeze Ln, Sequim. Loads of great stuff! Happy Valley 2-Family Sale: Fri. 9-2, Sat. 9?, Happy Valley to Lakeview, to 52 Coyote Meadow Lane. Bike, tools, clothes, household items, toys, antiques, furniture, birdhouses, driftwood yard art, 96ish sf river rock. MOVING Sale: Fri, 9-4 p.m. FIRM. Sat., 9-2 p.m. FIRM. 240 Dungeness Meadows, off River Rd. Antique furniture, household necessities, small and large helps for every household, exercise bike. Items of great help, don’t miss this! MOVING Sale: fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 390 Thornton Dr., Dungeness area. Everything must go. Building materials, kitchen things, some furniture, tables, chairs, bed, and more. MULTI-FAMILY Big Yard Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. 136 Forrest Rd. in Sequim, off West Sequim Bay Road. Tools, roof racks, bike racks, wheels, sporting goods, rifle scopes, fishing, hunting, and household items, books, yarn, boat motors and parts. UPICK Himalayan blackberries, too! MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 182 Meadow Valley Ln., off Hogback. Old car parts, small boating supplies guy stuff, old tools, antique sewing machine, household/ kitchen items, clothes and collectibiles. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m., 1323 Sequim Dungeness Way. MULTI-FAMILY Yard Sale: Sat., 8-1 p.m., 163 Forest View Drive: Lake of the Hills. Legos in packages, games, backpacks, lunch boxes, kids/adult books, baby items, Leap Pad and Leapster with games/books/ carrying cases, NEW Clear Blue Hawaii Kayak, boys clothing, Disney VHS and so much more. Like new items will make great Christmas gifts. Please, no earlies. SHOP SALE for men: Fri.-Sat., 7-3 p.m. 1627 Port Williams Rd. Roundabout at Sequim Ave., go right to Port Williams. Hand and power tools; drill press; band, table, radial arm, scroll chop, circular and chain saws, etc. YARD Sale: Fri.-Sun., 8-3 p.m., 192 Marshall Rd. 14” band saw, chipper shredder, plus garage, household and many other items. Too much to list.

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

ECLECTIC ESTATE Sale: Thurs.-Fri.Sat.-Sun., August 25-28, 9-3 p.m. 1130 Wilson Street, off Sheridan and 12th in Port Townsend. Com kitchen supplies, lawn/garden, PA speakers, recorders, Yamaha, audio system, compressors, power amps, Hammond piano, Hobart organ, rugs, antiques, retro, Brother sewing ($1,200), appliances, CD’s, Holton furniture, grills, smoker, Biogrill, ‘80 Honda CM400 ($1,000), ‘90 Dodge Caravan ($2,000), Com ChefMate meat/cheese slicer, Cuisinarts, juicers, bakeware, microphones, art, barware, ex equip, speakers, Panasonic FS TV, HealthRider exercise bike, BodyGear bench, microphones, cookbooks, office. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-noon, 2481 Anderson Lake Rd, lot 651. Anchor with rode and chain, Briggs and Stratton gas engine with track puller, 4 hp and 6 hp outboard motors, crab and shrimp traps, pickup metal toolbox, 10 cf Kenmore refrigerator, hardwood flooring 400 sf, fishing, dishes, toaster oven.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED USED LAPTOPS!. Working or broken! We’ll even pick them up! All laptops we receive are wiped clean using military grade utilities preventing any data recovery. 775-2525, helpertek.com WANTED: Small older crawler (bulldozer) any model/condition, running or not, related equipment, skid steer, excavator, farm tractor, etc. Also, old gas pumps, advertising signs, old vending machines, Cash. 360-204-1017

79

Wanted To Buy

WANTED: Military items, web belts, packs, medals, helmets, knives, what have you. 457-0814. WANTED: Toyota. ‘00-’04 Tacoma, 4x4, ext. cab. 963-2122.

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

84

Horses/ Tack

FREE: 2003 Pinto Stallion. Unbroke, but worth looking at if you have the time and/or money to train him. Call Kim at 360-460-2634

85

Farm Equipment

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford and Farmall A Tractor. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. '41 Farmall A tractor elec start and mower not running $500. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg.

BEEF: 2 yr. old Angus beef by the side. $1.75 lb. 928-3493 or 460-4970. GRASS FED BEEF $1.50 lb. hanging weight. 928-3733. SUMMER HAY-DRIED IN THE FIELD-TAIL FEATHER FARM These are 2 string bales. In July we cut 1 of our Grass Fields sold out. We cut half the Alfalfa/Grass Mix Field sold out in July. We do not cut our fields a 2x time in 1 year. In August we had an opportunity of nice sun, heat we finished cutting the Alfalfa/Grass Mix field for this year. THIS IS FIRST CUT HAY-not a second cut. Come check it out-we sell it for $5.00/bale PLUS TAX of 8.4%. Yes I know most of the time you don’t see the tax but that doesn’t mean it isn’t being paid by farmers. This year we needed to add it rather than take it out of the cost. Call Scot 360-681-5476 or 360-460-7500. We do sell one bale so you can try it and see if your animals like it and how it stores. We welcome inquiries.

82

Pets

Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org American Bulldogs Puppies, 2 mo. old, first shots, dewormed, good family dogs, parents on site. $400/obo. 360-797-3394 AQUARIUMS: 55 gallon glass aquarium with metal stand, complete tropical set up including filter, hood and lights, heater, background, gravel and decorative rock, like new. Clean and ready for fish! A steal at $150. 20 gallon long aquarium also available, filter, light, gravel, and heater included. $55. 360-481-8955, leave message.

FREE: To good home only. 7 year old Jack Russell needs a home with large fenced yard and someone to scratch his ears. He will run away when loose. Very active, hates cats, and has never been around children. 360-808-0108 FREE: To good home. (7) kittens, housebroke. From Calico mother, short haired. 683-7743 leave message, or call eves. FREE: To good home. Mastiff/Rottweiler mix. Big, friendly, neutered, 2 year old boy. Can no longer keep him. 565-1284.

PEKINGESE PUPPIES Adorable, purebred. Ready for new home $350-$400 457-4965 PUPPIES: Mini Schnauzer puppies. 12 weeks. Outstanding no-shed coats. Very loveable and attentive. Tails cropped, dew claws removed, 3 times wormed, first and second shots. Leash and potty training started, well puppy vet checked. Both parents on site. $475. 681-7480. PUPPIES: Shih-tzu, 2 male, 1 female, 9 weeks. Need good home. $200 ea. 360-460-8793

83

FREE: Need home for lonely llama that lost pasture mate, comes with hay. 452-1853. HAY: Local, no rain, barn stored. $5 bale, delivery available. 683-7965 NO RAIN HAY $5/bale. 460-8586. QUALITY HAY: Just baled. $5.50/bale in field. Seq. 775-5166. WEANER PIGS: $65 ea. Pet, $40. Other pigs about $1/lb. Yearling male goats, $70 ea. 775-6552.

Marine

HEWESCRAFT: 14’ with trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 LIVINGSTON: 12’ fiberglass, Calkins trailer, brand new Honda 5 hp 4 stroke, 2 seats, fishfinder/ fathometer, numerous extras. $2,500 cash. 457-8254. LIVINGSTON: 12’, 10 hp Honda, good cond., dependable. $1,600. 461-2627. LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. LIVINGSTON: 12’, Merc 25 4 stroke, elec. start/tilt, kicker, galv. tlr, seats, console, many extras, all new condition. $5,800. 681-8761. LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,000. 683-1957.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

‘95 Pete 379 tractor, nice cab + front, all recent rebuilt Super 10, 391 rears, failed N-14, more. $5,000, will separate. 360-732-4071 DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325 FORD ‘00 F-750 SUPER DUTY BUCKET TRUCK 5.9 liter 6 cylinder Cummins turbo diesel, Allison auto, air, 31’ Telsta manlift, Kubota/Onan diesel generator, service body, only 39,000 miles, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, service history, spotless Carfax report. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618

93

Marine

ARIMA: ‘91 17’. Johnson 90 hp, exc., new top, galv. trailer. $11,500. 477-3884. BASS TRACKER: 17’, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, boat could use some cosmetic work, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684. BAYLINER: 19’ project boat. $800. 477-7012 after 6

LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 MISC: 18”x11” trim tabs, $300. Saturn compass, $75. All priced to sell, must call for details. 360-385-6643 MISC: E-Z Loader trailer, for 22’ boat, $600. 6 hp Johnson long shaft, $500. 360-301-2701 RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714 RESORT BOAT: 15’ fiberglass. ‘07 40 hp Yamaha 4 stroke, low hrs., manual start, tiller handle. $3,000. 452-4384, msg RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: Prettiest boat in the Marina. ‘81 Catalina 22, new sails, roller furler, 4 hp kicker, Slip E12 John Wayne Marina. $9,500. 582-0147. SAILBOAT: ‘07 16’ Daysailer. Wood double-ender, modified Bolger design, in storage since built in ‘07 in Port Townsend, w/trailer PURPLE sail, extras. $3,500/obo. 360-385-0122 SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384 WATER QUEST: 9.4 lake boat, 2 hp Honda 4 stroke, 2 oars, 6 sp elec. motor, 2 life jackets, $500/obo. 670-1560

94 BAYLINER: ‘86 32’, 3270 twin diesel, 8 knots at 2,100 rpm, tops out 12-14 knots, all standard features plus radar, gps, depth sounder, anchor, windless, RIB tender, G14 John Wayne $54,995 360-670-6166 BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523. BOSTON WHALER ‘95 13’, galv. trailer w/spare tire, 8 hp Merc, very low hours, ext steering and shift arm, sounder, boat cover. $3,500/obo. 437-7658 BOSTON WHALER ’96 15’ Dauntless, 75 hp Merc, 6 hp Merc kicker, EZ Loader, like new. $11,000/ obo. 360-460-4950. CAMPION: 21.5’ Explorer. Suzuki 225 hp, Yamaha 8 hp 4 stroke, radar, fish finder plotter, lots of extras. Exc. shape. 30 mile offshore boat. Call for details. $12,500. 385-7728. CHAMPION: ‘78 16’. 80 hp Merc., runs great. Caulkin trailer. $2,000. 477-3884.

Farm Animals

ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817.

93

DIVE BOAT: Inflatable 14’, heavy duty Hypalon, 40 hrs. on Honda 9.9 4 stroke, Transom wheels. $2,950 971-226-0002 GLASPLY: ‘76 23’ I/O, Must sell, make offer! $3,000/obo. 437-7658 GLASTRON: 16’ ‘80 85 hp Johnson, EZ Loader trailer. No salt, must sell! $1,800. 928-9645. HARBERCRAFT: 12’ aluminum, rigged for crab, late 8 hp Mercury, depth finder, rebuilt trailer, oars, etc. $2,200. 683-0904

Motorcycles

3-WHEELER: ‘84 Yamaha YT60L, helmet. $500. 681-7904. HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950 HARLEY: ‘03 Anniversary model Electra Glide Standard. 6,500 mi., black, always garaged, leathers, helmet, manuals, extras, 1 owner, serv. & maint. w/care. Senior citizen owned. $13,000. 640-1688. HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HONDA ‘03 VTX1800 X-ULTIMATE Vance and Hines exhaust, tons of accessories, only 7,500 miles!! VIN106997 Expires 8/24/11 $5,900 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HONDA ‘05 RUCKUS MOPED 49cc 4 stroke, watercooled. VIN200989. Expires 8/24/11 $1,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HONDA ‘81 GL1100 GOLDWING Vetter fairing, hard bags, a good runner. VIN117518 Expires 8/24/11 $1,750 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HONDA: ‘02 Shadow (ACE) 750 V Twin. Mid-size cruiser, water cooled, runs and looks great, red on black color. Extras include bags, windshield, backrest, hwy bars. Only 5429 miles always garaged and never driven in rain. $3,000 /obo. 360-385-6370.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011

94

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874 HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,900. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great, low mi. $2,450/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘95 Scooter. 80cc, 1,400 mi. $900 683-3119 HONDA: ‘98 XR100. Excellent condition. $1,200. 797-4518. HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. KAWASAKI: ‘01 Vulcan 1500 Nomad Fi. Cruiser. Exc. cond. $3,800 360-640-9670

KAWASAKI: ‘06 KLX 250. Great bike!! dual sport, knobby back tire, street legal with new tabs. $2,995. 477-6873. KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. KTM: ‘08 XCFW 250. New, about 30 hrs. $4,500. 417-8840. MOPED: New, 16 mi., needs battery. $900. 452-2795.

95

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER 10’ Alaskan. $400. 477-0105 CAMPER: 6’ Six-Pac cabover, fits small truck. $2,700. 808-0153 CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 32’ Georgetown. 2 slides, 25K, tow bar pkg., King Dome TV system, extra brake system, many extras inside. $35,000. Bill 452-2287 or 360477-7155. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887.

SCOOTER: ‘05 Honda Reflex. Like new condition, very low mi., 50+ mi. to the gal., Versahaul, other extras. $2,600. 360681-7102 for appt.

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 29’ Itasca. 2 slides, sleeps 6, 2 TVs, queen bed, auto levelers, lots of storage, 50K mile transferable all coach warranty. Great cond, ready to go! $60,000/obo. 683-2958 MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 MOTOR HOME: ‘07 31.6’ Winnebago Outlook. Good condition, extras, located Chimacum, WA. $58,950 928-210-7044 www.rollinrollin.com/ motorhome

SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $2,099/obo. 582-0841

MOTOR HOME: ‘76 Tioga. Good shape. $2,300. 477-1478.

QUAD: ‘06 Eton Viper 70. New battery, tires, chain. $550 firm. 457-2780. QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 SCOOTER 2002 Derbi GP1. 50cc, liquid cooled, disc brakes, $950. 360-808-1767

SUZUKI ‘05 RM250 DIRT BIKE 2 stroke, local bike. VIN100566 Expires 8/24/11 $1,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643. SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911.

MOTOR HOME: ‘91 Toyota Odyssey. V6, 5 speed, low miles, new tires, brakes exhaust, batteries. Willing to trade for camper. $8,500. 460-4420. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 21’ Damon Ford Hornet. Close to 70K mi., good condition. Fast sell for college student. $9,500. 461-0867

95

C7

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘94 29’ Komfort. Fire damage one side, still livable inside. $1,800. Jerry. 360-970-2877. TRAILER: ‘98 35’ Jayco. Lg. slide, self cont. $10,550 ave. retail. $8,980/obo. 360-775-1316

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

96

Parts/ Accessories

ENGINE STAND Mobile engine test stand and station, $300. 683-9394. ENGINE: 1995 Mercedes C280, 160K, will start and run for you. $600. 460-0262. ENGINE: ‘70-’73 Chev ‘406’ complete, completely rebuilt. $1,500/obo. 457-6540 TIRES: (4) Toyo A/T all terrain 33x12.5 R15, 60% tread, fits Dodge Ram 1500, 5 bolt pattern. $350. 670-5418 TRUCK RACK: Kargo Master, great condition. $400. 417-2047 WHEELS: (4) 15”, 6 lug, ‘01 Nissan trk, 6 spoke. $2K new. $600. 683-2743.

97

4 Wheel Drive

'99 Dodge 1500 SLT 4x4 122,000 mi. 5.2L V8, Airbags, ABS, AC, Alloy whls, cruise, pwr locks/ windows/mirr, tilt wheel, tinted glass, Tow pkg, Bedliner and Canopy. Clean interior. Carfax. Mike 360-912-1892 BMW ‘01 325 XI ALL WD 2.5 liter 6 cylinder, 5 speed manual, all wheel drive, air, cruise, AM/FM CD, keyless entry, power windows, locks and seat, full leather, heated seats, side airbags, power moonroof, alloy wheels, fog lamps, beautiful local trade, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV: ‘04 AWD full size contr. van. $7,850. 452-5803.

TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bon. Exc. cond., extras. $5,500. 460-6780. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701. YAMAHA: ‘76 TT-500C. Original, beautiful. $1,700. 452-5803. YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

2009 27’ Salem with slideout. Sleeps 6 or 7. Only used a handful of times. $17,000. 253-820-7237 Rob. 5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957. 5th WHEEL: ‘04 Jayco Eagle. 3 slides, very good condition. $20,000 obo. 360-302-0966 5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222 5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroad. Fireplace, used one trip. $45,000. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210. 5TH WHEEL: 29’, clean, good condition. $3,500/obo. 809-0365 5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075 5TH WHEEL: ‘86 25’ Alpenlite. Good condition, new tires, awning, tinted windows, TV. $3,600. Call between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. 461-2810 5TH WHEEL: ‘92 32’ Jayco. 2nd owner. $4,988. 379-0575.

5TH WHEEL: ‘94 29' Fleetwood Prowler. Used, but in good condition. Plenty of room for multiple people. Has everything you'll need for a comfortable vacation. $5,500/obo. Call Kim after 6 p.m. 460-2634

HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 31’ Alpenlite Hillcrest RX. 2 slide-outs, extras. Excellent cond. $8,500/obo. 859-248-7566

HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 35’ Nuwa Snowbird. Triple slide. Exc. cond., low mileage. $16,900. 775-5105.

RV: ‘98 22’ 97,000 mi., needs handyman, roof leaks into walls. Nice, runs well, new tires, $5,500. 360-477-6968 TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457. TRAILER: ‘00 23’ Sierra Classic. Excellent condition. $9,500. 683-1508. TRAILER: ‘03 25’. Slightly used, front bedroom, rear bath, single slide. $9,500. 681-7110 TRAILER: ‘04 19W Jayco Jay Feather LGT, Ultra Light. 2,835 lbs., aluminum frame, vacuum laminated construction, low mileage, excellent condition, many extras, 2 batts, 12 volt TV, CD, fishing rods and lures, BBQ, etc. Ready to roll. Must see. $9,500. 360-385-2318 TRAILER: ‘05 25’ Jayco Jay Flight. Always garaged, microwave, slide out, only used 6x. A/C, $12,500. 460-0139 TRAILER: ‘07 27’ Rainier. 3x12’ tip out, a list of extras, excellent condition. $16,500. 928-2099. TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

CHEV: ‘04 Silverado. 2500HD 6 L, ext. cab tow pkg, cmpr shell 43K miles, like new. $20,500. 681-2620. CHEV: ‘83 3/4 ton diesel. 6” lift. $2,500. 477-6098. CHEV: ‘83 Suburban. 4x4, newer ‘454’ engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435 CHEV: ‘84 Silverado Classic. K20/pu 4x4; PS, PB, PW, PL, CD Very good condition. $5,495. 670-6592. CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 CHEV: ‘95 Suburban 1500. 4WD, 7 pass., tow pkg., well cared for, low mi., priced well below book. $2,500. 457-0406. CHEV: ‘96 Blazer. 4door, 4x4, new tires, excellent, all the elec., 149K. $3,500, would consider RV trade. 460-4488. DODGE: ‘03 Ram 1500 SLT quad cab. 5.9 V8, auto, A/C, cruise, P/W, P/L, seat, AM/FM with CD, matching Leer fiberglass canopy, rear air suspension, 62K, excellent cond. $16,000. 640-3709 in Forks, WA.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Christine J. Nevaril, Deceased. NO. 11-4-00206-3 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: August 11, 2011 Personal Representative: Rhion H. Nevaril Attorney for Personal Representative: Stephen C. Moriarty, WSBA #18810 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 11-4-00206-3 Pub: Aug. 11, 18, 25, 2011


C8

THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011

97

4 Wheel Drive

97

Classified 97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967

FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100

DODGE: ‘05 Dakota Laramie. 30K mi., V8, loaded! $14,900. 452-5402

FORD: ‘99 F150 Sport 4x4. V8, ext. cab, 111K mi., excellent cond, Sony Xplod sound system, remote start, no A/C, located in Flagstaff. $6,000 delivered to P.A. Phone Brandon at 928-221-8564 (will email photos).

FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. Exc cond., V6, air, tow, CD changer, 119K mi. $7,950. 457-4363 FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘94 Bronco. Midnight black pkg, tow pkg, newer tires, trailer brake, leather seats, tint, power locks/windows, auto, 351 ci, well-maintained, recently serviced. Nice truck. Great for grad or dad. 200K. $4,000. 477-1874

GMC: ‘02 Sierra SLE. Ext. cab, 4WD, 75K, excellent. $13,900. 683-6935 GMC: ‘94 Sonoma. 4x4, ex. cab, new tires, A/C, AM/FM CD, tow pkg, needs trans. $1,500/obo. 808-4648 GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SLE. 4.3 Vortec, 2” lift kit, grill guard, shift kit, running boards, roof rack, excellent cond. $4,000/obo. 477-4838

97

4 Wheel Drive

JEEP ‘04 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4 4.0 Inline 6, auto, alloy wheels, roof rack, tow package, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors and drivers seat, cruise, tilt, air, CD, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $11,325! Absolutely immaculate inside and out! One owner! Only 78,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com JEEP: ‘00 V8 Laredo. All power leather heated seats fully loaded CD player 132K in good shape, has exhaust leak needs minor work. $6,000/obo. 477-1782 call or text.

98

4 Wheel Drive

GMC: ‘89 3/4 ton. V8, runs/looks good. $1,500. 460-1760. JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988 JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee. 31K. $11,900. 683-2175. MERCURY: 98’ Mountaineer AWD. V8, leather, moonroof, power, tow package, 112K miles. 360-461-4483 PKG: GMC ‘03 Sonoma 4x4 ext. cab with ‘90 18’ Fleetwood Prowler 5th wheel. Both for $13,600. 457-4247 TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma TRD. 4 door, V6, auto, 48K. $22,500. 452-6316

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘89 3/4 ton PU. V8, auto, clean body, sharp interior, 127K, new brakes/tires, ext. cab. $2,500. 457-6156 DODGE ‘08 GRAND CARAVAN SE 3.3 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, side airbags, power windows and locks, 7 passenger half stow and go seating, privacy glass, only 29,000 miles, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

98

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Pickups/Vans

DODGE 1995 RAM 2500 DIESEL 3/4 ton, Laramie SLT. Extra cab. 2WD. B & D exhaust brake, big injectors, locking rear end, K & N filter, air bags, running boards, sliding tonneau cover, 5th wheel hitch and tail gate, trailer brakes, towing mirrors. $8,500/obo. Andy 360-477-8826 DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756 DODGE: ‘93 3/4 ton. Cummins diesel, A/T, sleeper canopy, power tailgate, straight, runs very well. $3,499. 582-0841. EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

98

98

Pickups/Vans

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘06 Uplander. 29K miles, DVD player. $12,000. 683-3147

FORD: ‘66 Flatbed. Recent rebuilt engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435

FORD ‘03 RANGER XLT SUPER CAB 2WD 3.0 liter V6, 5 speed manual, canopy, keyless entry, power windows, door locks and mirrors, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags, Kelley Blue Book value of $7,520! Great running little truck! Priced to move! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911.

FORD: ‘84 F-150. Body in very good cond., w/many amenities incl. (2) brand new front tires w/less than 100 mi. $1,495. 683-4200 leave message.

FORD: ‘85 Econoline 150 wheelchair van. 58K mi., $2,000/obo. 360-640-1970 or 360-461-8709

98

Pickups/Vans

TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535

99

Cars

FORD: ‘87 F150. 6cyl. 4 spd. Camper shell. $1,800. 565-0361. FORD: ‘91 Explorer. Good shape. $1,750. 582-0360 lv msg. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Excellent condition. 93K. $6,500. 360-385-6702 TOW TRUCK ‘77 1 ton 350 4 spd. Runs, drives, and tows. $1,450/obo. 670-2633

2000 Honda CRV Very Good Condition, just detailed in & out. All scheduled maintenance has been done over the years. All wheel drive, tinted windows, auto start w/alarm, 4 mounted snow tires. 200,700 hwy mi. $5,500. 681-5157 or 360-801-1931

2008 HONDA CIVIC LX 4DR

2009 TOYOTA MATRIX “S” AWD

2008 CHEVROLET G1500 EXPRESS CARGO VAN

2008 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

VERY ECONOMICAL 1.8L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SIDE AIRBAGS, ONLY 35K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

$15,995

Expires 9/24/11

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

ECONOMICAL 2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD CHANGER/MP3, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, PWR MOONROOF, SIDE AIRBAGS, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALLOYS, FOG LAMPS, ONLY 34K MILES! SUPER CLEAN 1 OWNER LOCAL CAR, BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, NON-SMOKER, GARAGE-KEPT, SPOTLESS CARFAX! Expires 9/24/11

$18,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

5.3L V8, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, TRIP COMPUTER, SAFETY BULKHEAD, BIN PKG W/WORK BENCH, IDEAL FOR LOCKSMITH, 63K MILES, BAL OF FACT 5/100 WARR, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! NEAR-NEW COND! Expires 9/24/11

$13,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

18407427

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS

3.5L V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD/MP3, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, SEAT & MOONROOF, LEATHER, BACKUP SENSOR, FOG LAMPS, ALLOYS, SIDE AIRBAGS, ONLY 27K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! NEAR-NEW COND! Expires 9/24/11

$18,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

2006 TOYOTA COROLLA LE 4DR

2003 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

2006 HONDA ELEMENT EX-P 4X4

2003 TOYOTA AVALON XLS 4DR

WE FINANCE!

WE FINANCE!

WE FINANCE!

WE FINANCE!

4 CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AM/FM/CD, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#708161

V6, AUTO, AC, TILT, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AM/FM/CD, DARK GLASS, ROOF RACK, STYLED STEEL WHLS, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#710476

4 CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AM/FM/CD, REAR SUNROOF, DARK GLASS, ROOF RACK, ALLOYS & MORE! 1 OWNER! VIN#004592

V6, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, LEATHER W/HTD SEATS, AM/FM/CD/CASS, PWR SUNROOF, FRT & SIDE AIRBAGS, ELEC TRAC CTRL, REMOTE ENTRY, ALLOYS & MUCH MORE! VIN#278571

$9,995

Expires 9/3/11

Expires 9/3/11

360-452-6599

$6,995

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

Expires 9/3/11

$11,995

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

Expires 9/3/11

$8,995

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

1998 TOYOTA CAMRY LE SEDAN

2000 CHEVROLET S10 EXT CAB ZR2 4X4

2002 MAZDA MIATA MX-5 CONVERTIBLE

2003 CHEVROLET SILVERADO K2500HD CREW CAB LB 4X4

3.0L 24V V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, NEW BFG TIRES, KEYLESS TIRES, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD/CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 93K MILES! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! LOADED W/ LEATHER & PWR OPTIONS! LEGENDARY TOYOTA RELIABILITY! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, GOOD RUBBER, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $9,265! CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 92K MILES! SHOWS THE BEST OF CARE! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TO SAVE SOME BUCKS ON YOUR NEXT TRUCK!

1.8L 16V 4 CYL, 5 SPD MAN, ALLOYS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CD, AC, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, PRICED UNDER KBB! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! SUMMER FUN WITH THE TOP DOWN! ONLY 47K MILES! SPORTY! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

6.0L VORTEC V8, AUTO, PREM WHLS, OVERSIZE BFG ALL-TERRAIN TIRES, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, PRIV GLASS, TILT, AC, PIONEER CD, UPGRADED DR SPEAKERS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $16,405! CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 95K MILES! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY TO SAVE SOME BUCKS ON YOUR NEXT TRUCK!

$7,495

$7,995

$9,495

$12,995

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2002 PONTIAC GRAND AM SE

2005 FORD EXPLORER XLT

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE PAY HERE!

NO CREDIT CHECKS!

90 DAYS SAME AS CASH!

AUTO, ALLOYS, CD, AC, GRAY CLOTH, SUNROOF, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, VERY SHARP! LOW MILES! CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: WWW.THEOTHERGUYSAUTO.COM WHY PAY

MILITARY DISCOUNTS!

MORE?

$6,995 WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

WE HAVE THE LOWEST INHOUSE RATES!

MILITARY DISCOUNTS!

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

4X4, AUTO, 3RD ROW, AC, CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE: WWW.THEOTHERGUYSAUTO.COM 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH!

LOWEST IN-HOUSE FINANCING GUARANTEED!

$8,995 WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information


ClassifiedAutomotive

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, August 25, 2011

4-, 6-cylinder Accords different Dear Doctor: I own a 2010 Honda Accord with the 4-cylinder engine. I like the car, but its fuel mileage is a bit disappointing, especially in city driving. The EPA ratings are 21 city/31 highway/25 combined. Now, I see that the 2011 Honda Accord with the 4-cylinder is advertised at 24⁄34 mpg. Was the onboard computer reprogrammed, perhaps to change the shift points? If so, would this degrade performance? Could the 2010’s computer be reprogrammed to achieve this? Art Dear Art: Honda says improvements to aerodynamics, engine friction and transmission gear ratios all contribute to fuel economy improvements for 2011. The dealer cannot alter your 2010 Accord’s computer. All vehicles both have to be certified for emissions before they can be sold in the U.S. The best way for you to increase gas mileage is keep the tires inflated to the proper pressure, clean air filter, no extra junk in the trunk and use full-syn-

99

Cars

99

THE AUTO DOC Junior

Damato

BUICK: ‘06 Rendezvous. Excellent. new tires, 40K. $10,500. 681-2875. BUICK: ‘68 Skylark Special. 1 owner, runs good. $1,500/ obo. 461-4475. BUICK: ‘73 Centurion Convertible. ‘455’ engine, new top and interior, recent white paint. $6,995/obo. 683-8567 BUICK: ‘94 Park Avenue. 108K, well maintained. $3,250/ obo. 460-2493. CADILLAC: ‘88 Eldorado. 4.5 V8, 60K org. mi., pristine condition. $3,000. 602-369-5617 CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419 CHEV ‘10 IMPALA LT 3.5 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD with Bose audio, power windows, locks and seat, full leather heated seats, power moonroof, keyless entry, HomeLink, side airbags, OnStar ready, alloy wheels, rear deck spoiler, only 17,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/100 warranty, beautiful local tradein, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV: ‘65 Impala. All original, excellent. $24,000. 452-6840. CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $4,500. 450-3767.

CHEV: ‘87 Corvette. Auto, black/graphite, 350/240, all power, leather, air, original, 2nd owner, always garaged, excellent condition, 46K mi., beautiful car! $13,500. 582-1260. CHRYSLER ‘04 PT CRUISER WAGON 2.4 liter 4 cylinder, auto, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows and door locks, air, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, dual front airbags. Only 69,000 miles! Extra clean! Sharp! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHRYSLER: ‘78 Lebaron. Very nice. $1,200. 457-8656 FIERO: ‘88 GT. 5 speed, good driver, straight body, needs paint and TLC to be first class. $5,000. firm. 928-3728. FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598. FORD: ‘62 Thunderbird. Runs great, good paint/chrome. Red/black. $11,000. 683-2958 FORD: ‘78 Ranchero GT. ‘351’, low mi., good condition, runs excellent. $1,500. 460-6979

Oil odor

Dear Doctor: We own a 2004 BMW 325Ci. For three years now, we have been detecting a Dear strong oil odor in the inteDoctor: I rior and trunk. recently Oddly, BMW service bought a said they do not detect any 2006 Honda Accord V-6. odor, which I can’t believe. My wife feels that the Our friends have concar rides harder over firmed the strong odor bumpier roads than my when they’re in the car. previous Chevy Impala. Recently, the “check Is there a way to soften engine” light came on, and the ride with a different set I had it serviced by a comof tires? Larry pany other than BMW. Dear Larry: Your car The technician found has a performance tire and fault code P0174 and noted tires size. that the engine had excesThe aspic ratio of the 50 sive crank case ventilation. series tire vs. a 60 or 70 He replaced the crank series will deliver a stiffer case vent valve, vent pipe, ride. connection line, return pipe A lower aspic ratio, such and engine air filter. The engine light was as your 50 series, has less reset, but the oil smell is tire sidewall to rim. The 70 series would give still present. Any suggestions? Anne you the most flexibility. Dear Anne: If an oil You have to make sure odor is being detected the outside diameter is with in 1⁄4 inch of the origi- inside the cabin, then the source is likely coming nal tire size. You may even have to from under the hood or the

Cars

FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. 2008 Volkswagen Beetle S Convertible. Red with blk top. 2.5L 5cyl. 5-spd. 36k miles. Blk interior. Fun car. Comes with almost $1000 in extras. Also Class 1 Hidden hitch installed. $15000. Call 360-460-7119

thetic oil. Driving habits also play a big role in fuel mileage.

change to a 16-inch wheel size. This also means you need to buy a new set of rims, including a spare.

Accord bumpy

99

Cars

HONDA: ‘10 Fit. 4 dr hatchback, 5 speed, metallic copper, like new condition, average 32 mpg, 36-40 on Hwy., great to drive. $16,500. 360-301-9061

104

104

FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,500 477-1805 HONDA: ‘01 Accord. EX, 1 owner, exc cond., 135K mi. $6,150. 582-0891.

Legals Jefferson Co.

Cars

99

Dear Doctor: What can you tell me about the new Fiat 500 cabrio? I saw one, and it looked great for parking in the city. Mary Dear Mary: I test-drove the 2012 Fiat 500c with the manual transmission. My $21,750 cabrio tester didn’t have a lot of power but was a blast to drive. The gas mileage was 35-plus miles per gallon, average. The soft top can be opened/closed while driving and there was minimal wind noise.

_________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

Cars

Legals Jefferson Co.

99

Cars

HONDA: ‘11 Fit Sport. 72 miles. $20,000. 683-6352 HONDA: ‘87 Prelude 168K, 38 mpg, extras. 1 owner. $2,100. 504-2154. HONDA: ‘95 Accord. 4 dr, 133K, new tires sunroof, great cond. $4,825. 457-3078. MAZDA: ‘06 Miata Sport. 8,900 miles. An as new garaged, babied car. 6 spd manual. A/C, power steering, locks, windows, mirrors. Cruise, tilt wheel, 17” alloy wheels. Galaxy gray w/black cloth. Black vinyl top. $16,600. 681-0151.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant To the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. on September 02, 2011 at 10:00 AM inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., in the city of Port Townsend, WA, (subject to any conditions imposed by the trustee to protect the lender and borrower) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Tax Parcel ID no.: 921 183 0220 PARCEL 2 OF DONOVAN SHORT PLAT, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 77, RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF JEFFERSON, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly Known as: 2901 OAK BAY ROAD, PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/02/2002, recorded on 07/10/2002, under Auditor's File No. 457749 and Deed of Trust re-recorded on ___, under Auditor's File No. __, records of Jefferson County, Washington from BRADLEY LEO MALONE, AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as grantor, to JEFFERSON TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. to BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 559302. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: A. Monthly Payments $10,658.40 B. Late Charges $980.36 C. Escrow Deficiency $2,796.77 D. Suspense Balance $ 0.00 E. Other Fees $ 0.00 Total Arrears $14,435.53 F. Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $337.50 Title Report $739.16 Statutory Mailings $64.45 Recording Fees $66.00 Publication $ .00 Posting $100.00 Total Costs $1,307.11 Total Amount Due: $15,742.64 Other potential defaults do not involve payment of the Beneficiary. If applicable, each of these defaults must also be cured. Listed below are categories of common defaults, which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action/documentation necessary to cure the default. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any defaults identified by Beneficiary or Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT ACTION NECESSARY TO CURE Nonpayment of Taxes/Assessments Deliver to Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the property are paid current Default under any senior lien Deliver to Trustee written proof that all senior liens are paid current and that no other defaults exist. Failure to insure property against hazard Deliver to Trustee written proof that the property is insured against hazard as required by the Deed of Trust. Waste Cease and desist from committing waste, repair all damage to property and maintain property as required in Deed of Trust. Unauthorized sale of property (Due on Sale) Revert title to permitted vestee. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $188,728.88, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 12/01/2010 and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of the sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on 09/02/2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 08/22/2011 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 08/22/2011 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 08/22/2011 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, and Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): BRADLEY LEO MALONE 11705 SILVER WAY EVERETT, WA 98208 BRADLEY LEO MALONE 2901 OAK BAY ROAD PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 BRADLEY LEO MALONE 22508 80TH AVENUE WEST EDMONDS, WA 98026 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested, or registered mail on 04/12/2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/13/2011 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060 and/or any applicable Federal Law. DATED: May 31, 2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. By: Steven Arredondo Its: Authorized Signer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. P.O. BOX 10284 VAN NUYS, CA 91410-0284 PHONE: (800) 281-8219 (TS# 11-0026962) 1006.132711-FEI Pub: Aug. 4, 25, 2011

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘02 Cougar. 21K, PS, PB, PW, air, 4 cyl., 5 sp, great mpg, garaged. $6,500. 452-6458, no calls after 8 p.m. MERCURY: ‘68 Monterey, 4 door sedan, 88K, 1 owner. $2,988. 379-0575. www.peninsula dailynews.com

101

Car of the Week

exhaust system. The fault code p0174 indicates a lean condition caused by too much unmetered air entering the engine. Take the vehicle to an independent shop and have them check for oil leaks under the car.

HONDA: ‘07 Accord. Good condition, 70K. $12,500. 208-559-4023 MAZDA ‘02 MIATA MX-5 CONVERTIBLE 1.8 liter 16V 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual trans, alloy wheels, power windows and mirrors, CD stereo, air, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Sparkling clean inside and out! Summer fun with the top down! Only 47,000 miles! Sporty! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: ‘96 T-Bird LX. Runs good, nice car. $3,500. 452-2150.

99

C9

Legals Clallam Co.

MG: ‘79 BCV series. Color blue, excellent condition. $7,000. 683-5614 NISSAN: ‘08 Sentra. 49K miles, Bluetooth, keyless entry $11.000. 461-5302. OLDS: ‘90 3.8L V6, runs/looks good. $600. 460-1760. PLYMOUTH: ‘94 Acclaim. 4 cyl., low mi., good on gas. $1,600. 360-379-4100

2011 Kia Forte BASE PRICE: $16,895 for EX with manual; $17,895 for EX with automatic; $18,395 for SX manual; $19,395 for SX automatic. PRICE AS TESTED: $23,695. TYPE: Front-engine, front-wheel-drive, fivepassenger, mid-size hatchback. ENGINE: 2.4-liter, double overhead cam, inline four cylinder with CVVT. MILEAGE: 23 mpg (city), 32 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: NA. LENGTH: 170.9 inches. WHEELBASE: 104.3 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 2,944 pounds. BUILT IN: South Korea. OPTIONS: SX technology package (includes navigation system, automatic temperature control, push-button start with smart key) $1,800; leather package (includes heated front seats and leather seat trim) $1,700; power sunroof $750. DESTINATION CHARGE: $750. The Associated Press

99

Cars

SUZUKI: ‘04 XL7. 4x4, 48,500 mi., red, excellent shape. $11,000. 452-9857. TOYOTA: ‘96 Camry. 5 speed, low miles. $3,500. 681-3023. VW: ‘01 Passat wagon. Stylish, practical, fuel efficient, Extra wheels and one season Blizex snows, heated seats, sunroof, $4,450. 360-531-1175 VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184.

SUBARU: ‘98 Impreza Outback Sport Wagon. 5 spd, AWD, 2.2 liter. 196K miles. Good condition. $4,400. 681-4422.

ZAP: ‘06 Xebra. Electric car. Emits no CO2 for global warming. $5,000. Ask for Jack, 683-2259

101

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant To the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. on September 23, 2011 at 10:00 AM inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., in the city of Port Angeles, State of Washington, (subject to any conditions imposed by the trustee to protect the lender and borrower) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Tax Parcel ID no.: 06-30-00-022135 THE WESTERLY 5 FEET OF THE NORTHERLY 90 FEET OF LOT 8 AND THE NORTHERLY 90 FEET OF LOT 9 IN BLOCK 221 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly Known as: 701 S CHAMBERS, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/27/1998, recorded on 05/07/1998, under Auditor's File No. 1998 1008789 and Deed of Trust re-recorded on ___, under Auditor's File No. __, records of Clallam County, Washington from DEAN L. THROOP, AN UNMARRIED INDIVIDUAL, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of SECRETARY OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, as beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by SECRETARY OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, to DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY FKA BANKERS TRUST COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20111266000. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: A. Monthly Payments $6,229.89 B. Late Charges $ 96.93 C. Escrow Deficiency $0.00 D. Suspense Balance ($254.20) E. Other Fees $ 57.70 Total Arrears $6,130.32 F. Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Title Report $303.52 Statutory Mailings $19.29 Recording Fees $66.00 Publication $ .00 Posting $200.00 Total Costs $1,061.31 Total Amount Due: $7,191.63 Other potential defaults do not involve payment of the Beneficiary. If applicable, each of these defaults must also be cured. Listed below are categories of common defaults, which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action/documentation necessary to cure the default. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any defaults identified by Beneficiary or Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT ACTION NECESSARY TO CURE Nonpayment of Taxes/Assessments Deliver to Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the property are paid current Default under any senior lien Deliver to Trustee written proof that all senior liens are paid current and that no other defaults exist. Failure to insure property against hazard Deliver to Trustee written proof that the property is insured against hazard as required by the Deed of Trust. Waste Cease and desist from committing waste, repair all damage to property and maintain property as required in Deed of Trust. Unauthorized sale of property (Due on Sale) Revert title to permitted vestee. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $42,604.83, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/2010 and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of the sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on 09/23/2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 09/12/2011 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 09/12/2011 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 09/12/2011 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, and Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): DEAN L. THROOP 701 S CHAMBERS PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 DEAN L. THROOP 701 S CHAMBERS STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 DEAN L. THROOP 701 S Chambers St Port Angeles, WA 98362-6428 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested, or registered mail on 05/04/2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/04/2011 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060 and/or any applicable Federal Law. DATED: June 20, 2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. By: Steven Arredondo Its: Authorized Signer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. P.O. Box 10284 Van Nuys, CA 91410-0284 Phone: (800) 281-8219 (TS# 11-0034294) 1006.135209FEI Pub: Aug. 25, Sept. 15, 2011

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Makah Environmental Restoration Team Request for Proposal (RFP) Environmental Restoration Services

The Makah Tribe is requesting proposals from qualified contractors for conducting environmental restoration activities on the Makah Indian Reservation, Neah Bay, Washington. The work will be conducted on Tatoosh Island and includes the deconstruction and removal of a concrete slab and foundation associated with a former powerhouse, removal of petroleum-contaminated water from beneath the foundation, and excavation and removal of petroleum-contaminated soil from beneath the foundation. The concrete, contaminated water and contaminated soil requires proper disposal off of the Reservation at a licensed disposal facility. The restoration activities are scheduled to be completed by October 3, 2011. Proposals are due by 4:00 PM on September 9, 2011. To request a copy of the complete RFP, contact Steve Pendleton of the Makah Environmental Division at (360) 645-3289 or Marge Sawyer at (360) 645-3286. The Contractor must be bonded and insured and must comply with the Makah Employment and Contacting Rights Act (MERCA) as administered by the Makah Employment and Contracting Rights Office (MECRO). Pub: Aug. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 2011 SALE OF TIMBER FAR FAR WEST LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled "Proposal for the FAR FAR WEST Logging Unit," addressed to the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday September 27th, 2011, for the purchase of timber on the FAR FAR WEST Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, Washington. This logging unit contains approximately 140 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 8,060 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, an undetermined volume of red alder and other hardwood sawlogs, and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species except western redcedar). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs (except western redcedar) are removable at the Purchaser’s option. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier's check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of Eighty-Two Thousand Dollars ($82,000.00) must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of One Hundred and Thirty-Five Thousand Dollars ($135,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder's failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering. The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington 98587. Dated this 4th day of August, 2011 at Taholah, Washington, Wayne Moulder, Acting Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: Aug. 11, 25, 2011 No. 11 4 00219 5 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM In Re the Estate of: LEANNE BROWN, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070, by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: August 25, 2011 Personal Representative: David Lyle Brown Attorney for Personal Representative: David V. Johnson Address for Mailing or Service: JOHNSON RUTZ & TASSIE 804 South Oak Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-1139 Pub: Aug. 25, Sept. 1, 8, 2011


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 72

Low 50

69/50

67/46

72/47

67/48

Sunshine and patchy clouds.

Patchy clouds.

Pleasant in the morning; mostly sunny.

Mostly sunny.

Partly sunny.

Partly sunny.

The Peninsula A large area of high pressure stationed off the Oregon coast will strengthen over the next several days, promoting rain-free and Victoria pleasant weather across the region. Coastal locations should 72/51 expect morning clouds, giving way to afternoon sunshine. A Neah Bay Port weak upper-level disturbance will slide through northern 62/50 Townsend California and Oregon on Friday, bringing a few showers Port Angeles 67/51 to that region; however, the northern part of the Pacific 72/50 coast will remain dry. This current weather pattern will Sequim continue into next week.

72/52

Forks 72/49

Olympia 83/49

Seattle 83/57

Spokane 92/59

Yakima Kennewick 90/56 94/58

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Sunny to partly cloudy today. Wind west-northwest increasing to 15-25 knots. Waves 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Partly cloudy tonight. Wind west 8-16 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Beautiful tomorrow morning; otherwise, sun and patchy clouds. Wind west-northwest 10-20 knots. Waves 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Saturday: Sunshine and patchy clouds. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 2-4 feet. Visibility clear.

LaPush

10:41 a.m. 10:07 p.m. Port Angeles 2:27 p.m. 11:25 p.m. Port Townsend 12:01 a.m. 4:12 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:33 p.m. -----

Moon Phases

Aug 28

Everett 76/54

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sunset today ................... 8:10 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 6:23 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 2:12 a.m. Moonset today ................. 5:58 p.m. Full

Seattle 83/57

Billings 94/60

San Francisco 66/54

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

6.2’ 7.8’ 6.4’ 6.1’ 7.2’ 7.7’ 7.2’ ---

4:07 a.m. 4:10 p.m. 6:25 a.m. 7:09 p.m. 7:39 a.m. 8:23 p.m. 7:32 a.m. 8:16 p.m.

0.4’ 2.9’ -0.3’ 4.7’ -0.4’ 6.1’ -0.4’ 5.7’

11:31 a.m. 11:02 p.m. 2:48 p.m. ----1:10 a.m. 4:33 p.m. 12:31 a.m. 3:54 p.m.

6.8’ 8.2’ 6.6’ --7.3’ 7.9’ 6.9’ 7.4’

SaTurday

Low Tide Ht 4:58 a.m. 5:06 p.m. 7:12 a.m. 7:47 p.m. 8:26 a.m. 9:01 p.m. 8:19 a.m. 8:54 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

-0.1’ 2.2’ -0.5’ 4.2’ -0.7’ 5.5’ -0.7’ 5.2’

High Tide Ht 12:14 p.m. 11:54 p.m. 12:31 a.m. 3:09 p.m. 2:16 a.m. 4:54 p.m. 1:37 a.m. 4:15 p.m.

7.4’ 8.5’ 6.2’ 6.7’ 7.5’ 8.1’ 7.1’ 7.6’

Low Tide Ht 5:44 a.m. 5:57 p.m. 7:56 a.m. 8:26 p.m. 9:10 a.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:03 a.m. 9:33 p.m.

-0.6’ 1.5’ -0.7’ 3.5’ -0.9’ 4.6’ -0.8’ 4.3’

Sep 4

Sep 12

Last

Sep 20

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 91 72 s Baghdad 110 74 s Beijing 76 66 r Brussels 74 61 sh Cairo 96 75 s Calgary 76 46 pc Edmonton 69 39 pc Hong Kong 90 79 t Jerusalem 83 63 s Johannesburg 73 43 s Kabul 97 67 sh London 68 55 r Mexico City 77 57 t Montreal 75 59 t Moscow 69 51 s New Delhi 91 78 t Paris 78 61 pc Rio de Janeiro 84 73 s Rome 91 67 s Stockholm 70 60 r Sydney 71 51 s Tokyo 84 75 sh Toronto 76 55 pc Vancouver 74 57 s Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Affordable Dentures And Implants To Look And Eat Your Best

Detroit 76/57 New York 86/70

Chicago 81/58

Denver 96/64

Washington 90/72

Kansas City 86/64 Atlanta 94/71 El Paso 95/76

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 102/76 Miami 90/80

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 93 60 73 94 84 90 88 94 94 100 85 77 91 93 81 83 88 86 106 96 84 76 88 68 94 88 102 57

Lo W 69 t 48 sh 52 s 71 pc 70 t 69 t 51 s 60 t 59 s 68 s 66 t 60 t 74 t 62 s 58 s 63 t 51 s 57 s 81 s 64 t 62 s 57 s 55 pc 46 pc 57 t 74 s 76 s 47 c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 86 109 93 85 90 78 80 92 96 86 100 83 92 107 89 110 88 92 96 92 84 96 100 76 66 81 86 90

Lo W 64 s 89 s 68 pc 66 s 80 t 60 s 64 s 68 t 80 pc 70 t 69 pc 65 s 77 t 87 s 70 t 92 pc 61 s 71 s 64 s 58 s 65 s 70 s 77 s 68 pc 54 pc 62 s 56 s 72 t

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 119 at Bullhead City, AZ

Low: 32 at Stanley, ID

Why skip foods you love or feel embarrassed to smile? FREE evaluation. Call today.

Greg Barry, DDS

0C5106424

Quality makes a big difference in the looks, fit, comfort, and function you’ll experience. We help you afford the best your budget allows. See one practitioner, pay one price for your personalized treatment – preparation, fitting and follow-ups.

Minneapolis 80/64

Los Angeles 85/66

Sun & Moon

First

Thursday, August 25, 2011

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 77 51 0.00 10.68 Forks 80 53 0.00 78.50 Seattle 84 57 0.00 24.25 Sequim 80 54 0.00 11.02 Hoquiam 77 56 0.00 45.79 Victoria 77 54 0.00 21.11 P. Townsend* 73 57 0.00 12.28 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 71/52 Bellingham 73/50

Aberdeen 72/53

Peninsula Daily News

(360) 379-1591

Major credit cards or terms on approval.

Briefly . . .

Now you can place your classified ad 24/7!

Humane Society needs pet supplies

Try our new Classified Wizard — www.peninsuladailynews.com

PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society is in need of nonlumping cat litter, kitten food, cat food and dog food. To make arrangements for a donation, phone Kandace Schmidt at 360-4612810. Meanwhile, the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, 2105 W. U.S. Highway 101, will hold a microchip clinic from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17. Cost is $25.

SUMMER DEcking EvEnt ED

CK A -P

FO

IN

FRiDay, aUgUSt 26th • 10 am -2 pm Create a vacation retreat in your own backyard. see DeCKING PRODUCTs:

Ace MichAels

Film submissions

mike Caudill 417-9579

home improvement & maintenance brad Griffith 461-4686

Kathol ConstruCtion

Frank Kathol 417-5594

KC ContraCting Charles Drabek & lance Phair 460-5807

Northwest Builders Jeff berry 461-6246

Want a new deck, but don’t know where to start? Come get all your questions answered at our info-packed, Summer Decking Event!

üMark your calendar üSee decking products üMeet deck builders üMeet our paint & stain guru

üGet $100 decking coupon üEnjoy a BBQ lunch üEnter to win prizes üBring your deck ideas

Come meet hartnagel’s Paint & stain Guru, mike Dubeau! SoliD SEMi-SoliD SEMiTranSparEnT TranSulCEnT

3111 E Hwy 101 Port Angeles Find us on Facebook

452-8933

hartnagels.com

Already have a wood deck?

ClEar

SaVE $5 oFF Cabot Stain Off regular retail price on one gallon cans, thru Aug. 31.

Where employee owners care about your building and home improvement projects.

185130775

PORT ANGELES — The Celebrate Elwha! artistic planning team is looking for filmmakers interested in screening their work during the Elwha River Film Festival planned for Sept. 15-17. Screenings will be held in Room 205 of The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., each night at 6 p.m. A full day of films is planned for Saturday, Sept. 17. The room holds up to 100 people. Filmmakers will have the chance to introduce their film and may choose to hold a question-andanswer session following the screening. Films selected for the festival will focus on any one of several themes related to Elwha River restoration, Olympic National Park or the North Olympic Peninsula. These themes might include area history, geography, flora or fauna; other large-scale restoration or dam removal projects; Pacific salmon and other anadromous fish; or tribes of the Pacific Northwest. Interested filmmakers should mail a sample DVD to: Olympic National Park Attn: Celebrate Elwha! 600 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles, WA 98362. For more information on the Elwha River Film Festival, email Harry von Stark at vonstark photography@gmail.com or phone the Olympic National Park public affairs office at 360-565-2985. Peninsula Daily News

meeT These bUIlDeRs:


pdn08252011j