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State probing PA city pacts, ex-officials Bridges contracts among papers sought; ‘unfounded,’ ex-mayor says By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The state Auditor’s Office is investigating a compliant filed against the city of Port Angeles. The anonymous complaint

asserts potential conflicts of interests and issues regarding contracts and travel expenses, according to an e-mail to the city from Kim Hurley, manager of special investigations for the Auditor’s Office. Hurley, in the November

e-mail, requested documents regarding a slew of topics, including some recent major construction projects. They are: ■  Contracts with Exeltech Consulting Inc. ■  Contracts for construction of the Eighth Street bridges and Dry Creek bridge. ■  Acquisition of property for The Gateway transit center. ■  Travel expenses for former

Mayor Karen Rogers and former City Manager Mark Madsen. ■  Payments to Fred Hill Materials, The Remediators Inc., Capacity Provisioning Inc., Clallam Business Incubator and Advanced Composite Technologies Inc. City Manager Kent Myers said two Auditor’s Office employees retrieved documents from City Hall on Dec. 13 in response to the complaint.

Hurley’s e-mail didn’t say specifically what the complaint alleges. Mindy Chambers, Auditor’s Office spokeswoman, said she could not comment until the investigation is completed. Myers said he has no “idea what the basis of it is.” “I think that our records are in order,” he added. Turn

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Probe/A4

Christmas might be the most wonderful day of the year, but for many . . .

It’s just another day on the job By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Tom Callis (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Cashier Trina Cochran stands behind the counter with Santa headwear at the Portside Texaco gas station in Port Angeles on Christmas Day.

While working a cash register Christmas morning, Trina Cochran saw no reason to have a case of the bah-humbugs. Wearing a Santa hat and a smile, she didn’t appear to lack an ounce of holiday spirit during her shift at the Portside Texaco gas station in Port Angeles.

But why work on one of the few days meant for relaxation? “Someone’s got to do it,” Cochran, 29, responded in a matter-of-fact tone. That nonchalant attitude toward forgoing a bit of leisure for labor on the holiday wasn’t hers alone. Other North Olympic Peninsula residents responsible for keeping the economy chugging along for one more day after weeks of pre-Christmas spending shared a similar outlook. KC Kiesling, manager of Port Angeles’ Royal Victorian Motel, said she didn’t mind working during the holiday; she was just happy to have a job. “It’s not so bad,” said the 55-year-old South Korean immigrant.

Enjoy working

Espressos are still needed on Christmas Day, as Steven Canepa, a barista at the Veela Cafe in Port Angeles, can attest.

“Why not enjoy working?” she added. For others without local family ties or a tradition celebrating the holiday, working Christmas seemed like the right thing to do. Julie Mason, a bartender at Sirens Pub in Port Townsend, said she opted to work Christmas because unlike some of her coworkers, most of her family is on the other side of the country. “My family is back in Virginia, so I thought I might help out some other coworkers who may have some family here,” said Mason, 30. Steven Canepa, a barista at the Veela Cafe in Port Angeles, said he volunteered to work because, as a Jehovah’s Witness, he grew up not celebrating holidays. Canepa, 20, said he had a few customers by 9 a.m. but expected a fairly laidback day. Turn

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How U.S. law blocked run for Jefferson sheriff Federal act kept state trooper from attempt at county office By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News CHIMACUM — Last July, after 37 years in law enforcement including the last 24 with the State Patrol, Sgt. Ken Przygocki was just seven months away from retirement.

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Peninsula Daily News that the Hatch Act restricts the political activities of state, county and municipal employees who perform activities partly or fully funded with federal loans and grants. “It appears more that it is more than likely that Sgt. [Przygocki] is covered by the Hatch Act restrictions,” Damerow concluded.

Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Commentary/Letters A10 Couples *PW Dear Abby C4 Deaths C7 Lottery Results A2 Movies C3 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

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UpFront

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Spider-Man actor walking after surgery THE STUNT ACTOR who fell 30 feet while playing Spider-Man on Broadway is walking again, and his father said Saturday that he can’t wait to return to the role despite injuries that have him confined to the intensive-care unit. Christopher Tierney walked Friday for the first time since his fall during Monday’s performance of “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark” and is spending Christmas with his mother and brother in the hospital while recovering from back surgery, Tim Tierney told The Associated Press. Julie Taymor, the director and co-writer of the $65 million production, visited the injured actor in the hospital Christmas Eve, Tim Tierney said. The show — the most expensive ever on Broadway — has been plagued by technical glitches, money woes and

three other injuries, including a concussion and two broken wrists. Tim Tierney said he believes his son will regain close to full mobility after recovering from a roster of injuries that included a hairline skull fracture, four broken ribs, a bruised lung, internal bleeding and cracks in three lumbar vertebrae. Christopher Tierney will remain in the intensive care unit until at least Monday, then stay in New York City for rehabilitation. The actor’s plunge from a ledge into a stage pit, despite a safety harness that should have prevented the spill, was not caused by equipment failure, Tim Tierney said. State Department of Labor officials have said the cause is still under investigation, and the Actors’ Equity Association union has said the fall was caused by human error.

Palin buys home Bristol Palin has bought a five-bedroom home in Pinal County

south of Phoenix. Paperwork showed the daughter of Sarah Palin is the sole purchaser of the house in the Palin town of Maricopa, Ariz. She bought it for $172,000 from a North Dakota couple. It’s not clear if Bristol Palin will be a seasonal visitor or permanent resident at the home, in a development called Cobblestone Farms. According to real estate websites, the residence is a two-level, brown stucco house with a tile roof, a landscaped front and back yard, and access to a community pool. The Arizona Republic reported that the 3,900-square-foot home was built in 2006 and was bought for a little under $330,000 at the time. It has 2½ baths and a three-car garage, and Bristol Palin closed on the home earlier this month.

Passings By The Associated Press

SALLY GOODRICH, 65, who through the Peter M. Goodrich Memorial Foundation helped build one school and support two other schools and an orphanage in Afghanistan, died of ovarian cancer Dec. 18 at her home in Bennington, Vt., her husband said. Just three months after losing her son Peter, 33, on Sept. 11, 2001, aboard United Airlines Flight Ms. 175 — the Goodrich second plane in 2005 to crash into the World Trade Center — Sally Goodrich received a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. For three years, through chemotherapy, grief for her son and thoughts of suicide, Ms. Goodrich fought depression and continued to work as a remedial reading teacher and program coordinator for at-risk children in the North Adams, Vt., school system.

early mark with the world premiere performance of Alexander Goehr’s “A Little Cantata for Proverbs.” Subsequent recordings, mainly for Argo, tackled modern composers, including Malcolm Williams, Harrison Birtwistle and Richard Rodney Bennett, but the choir repertoire reached back as far as the Renaissance. Choir members who later established solo careers, included Philip Langridge, John Shirley-Quirk and Ian Partridge. The Alldis Choir worked with Pink Floyd on the “Atom Heart Mother” album in 1970, and in 1973 on a recording of Ellington’s “Third Sacred Concert.” Mr. Alldis worked with choral ensembles for the _________ London Symphony OrchesJOHN ALLDIS, 81, tra and the London Philnarwhose choir ranged from monic. working with opera to colHe conducted the Amerilaborating with Duke Elling- can Choral Symposium in ton and Pink Floyd, died of Manhattan, Kan., from 1978 pneumonia Monday. to 1987, and was permanent He founded the profesguest conductor of the Nethsional, 16-voice John Alldis erlands Chamber Choir Choir in 1962 and made an from 1985 to 1998.

Then, in August 2004, an e-mail from a friend of Peter’s arrived from Afghanistan. Maj. Rush Filson, a Marine, asked if Ms. Goodrich and her husband, Donald, could collect school supplies for children in a village southeast of Kabul. “That was the beginning,” Ms. Goodrich later told The Boston Globe. “I call it the moment of grace. I knew Peter would have responded to that e-mail; I knew I had to in his name. For the first time, I felt Peter’s spirit back in my life.” With donations from friends, neighbors, schoolchildren, local clubs, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, the Goodrich Foundation has so far raised more than $1 million, her husband said.

Peninsula Lookback Mild weather with slight rain and fog helped create a quiet but joyful observance of Christmas Day on the Peninsula. In Port Angeles, religious services, sponsored by the Lutheran and Episcopal churches, were held in the Olympian Theatre. Several hundred people attended the Altruistic Club dance at Clyde’s Ballroom, and another well-attended dance was held at Evergreen Hall. There were no serious wrecks, bad fires or accidents to mar the holiday. But someone stole the 21-pound turkey from the cookhouse of the Bloedel-

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Some states are talking about making helmets mandatory for snow skiers and snowboarders. Should helmets be mandatory?

Yes 

Kids only 

No 

Undecided 

41.3% 19.9% 32.9% 5.9%

Total votes cast: 913 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  An outdated story on the Aldrich’s Market’s gingerbread house contest in Port Townsend was published on Page A10 Friday. The contest entries will be judged today at 2:30 p.m. Entries were being accepted through Christmas Day. For a story on the contest, see Page A6.

5 p.m. Monday through Friday. A Dec. 15 story on Page A1 said the clinic provides 24-hour emergency care. That does not mean that it has an emergency room, and the clinic requests that patients phone 9-1-1 for lifethreatening emergencies.

■  To clarify, the Jamestown Family Health Clinic at 808 N. Fifth Avenue in Sequim provides access to an on-call physician for emergency guidance after its regular hours of 8 a.m. to

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex. wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Did You Win?

Donovan Co. logging camp at Sekiu in the dead of night Christmas Eve.

fered cuts and abrasions, the State Patrol reported. Tucker was unhurt.

1960 (50 years ago)

1985 (25 years ago)

The North Olympic Peninsula had one fatal traffic collision on Christmas when George F. Houghton, 41, of Port Townsend was killed when his station wagon struck a gasoline truck. The truck driver, Floyd F. Tucker, said he had slowed the gasoline tanker to turn onto a Port Townsend street early Christmas morning when the truck was struck from behind by the Houghton vehicle. Houghton’s wife and the couple’s three children suf-

The patched oil tanker left Port Angeles Harbor for Cherry Point this morning. Most of the spilled oil from the single-hull tanker, which ruptured Dec. 21, has been cleaned up, and neither the national wildlife sanctuary at Dungeness Spit nor the bird sanctuary at Protection Island is in further danger. The Arco Anchorage apparently struck a 40-foottall boulder standing in 60 feet of water north of the ITT Rayonier pulp mill.

_________

Laugh Lines

State lottery results

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

Friday’s Daily Game: 6-5-9 Friday’s Keno: 02-0304-15-19-25-27-28-37-40-4755-57-59-60-65-66-70-73-75 Friday’s Match 4: 15-17-18-21 Friday’s Mega Millions: 15-16-27-40-52, Mega Ball: 16 Saturday’s Daily Game: 2-7-5 Saturday’s Hit 5: 03-07-12-13-27 Saturday’s Keno: 01-07-08-09-10-16-17-21-2627-29-30-32-43-52-54-61-7076-80 Saturday’s Lotto: 23-31-38-42-44-46 Saturday’s Match 4: 04-06-16-21 Saturday’s Powerball: 01-17-38-50-52, Powerball: 24, Power Play: 2

Several TSA officers have formed a holiday choir at the Los Angeles International Airport to entertain holiday travelers as they go through security. It’s not helping that the only song they sing is Journey’s “Loving, Touching, Squeezing.” Conan O’Brien

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

FULL-SIZE grocery cart being blown across a Sequim parking lot out onto Seventh Avenue by heavy winds . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Dec. 26, the 360th day of 2010. There are five days left in the year. The sevenday African-American holiday Kwanzaa begins today. This is Boxing Day. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Dec. 26, 1799, former President George Washington was eulogized by Col. Henry Lee as “first in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen.” On this date: ■  In 1776, the British suffered a major defeat in the Battle of Trenton during the Revolutionary War. ■  In 1908, Jack Johnson became the first African-American boxer to win the world heavy-

weight championship as he defeated Canadian Tommy Burns in Sydney. ■  In 1910, the London Palladium, Britain’s famous variety theater, first opened. ■  In 1941, Winston Churchill became the first British prime minister to address a joint meeting of the U.S. Congress. ■  In 1960, the Philadelphia Eagles defeated the Green Bay Packers, 17-13, in the NFL Championship game, played at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. ■  In 1972, the 33rd president of the United States, Harry S. Truman, died in Kansas City, Mo., at age 88. ■  In 1980, Iranian television footage was broadcast in the

United States showing a dozen of the American hostages sending messages to their families. ■  In 1990, Nancy Cruzan, the young woman in an irreversible vegetative state whose case led to a U.S. Supreme Court decision on the right to die, died at a Missouri hospital. ■  In 2004, some 230,000 people, mostly in southern Asia, were killed by a tsunami triggered by the world’s most powerful earthquake in 40 years beneath the Indian Ocean. ■  In 2006, former President Gerald R. Ford died in Rancho Mirage, Calif., at age 93. ■  Ten years ago: Michael McDermott, an employee at an Internet firm in Wakefield, Mass., shot and killed seven co-workers.

McDermott was later convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison without parole. ■ Five years ago: Survivors wept and prayed beside mass graves and at beachside memorials in Indonesia, marking one year since earthquake-churned walls of water crashed ashore in a dozen nations, sweeping away hundreds of thousands of lives. ■  One year ago: Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, a 23-yearold Nigerian man who claimed to have ties to al-Qaida, was charged with trying to destroy a Detroitbound airliner Christmas Day. Buddhist monks chanted on white-sanded beaches in Thailand, and thousands prayed at mosques in Indonesia to mark the fifth anniversary of the Asian tsunami.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 26, 2010

Second Front Page

Page

A3

Briefly: Nation Vial reveals coded message from Civil War

Then the world’s bestknown action star, Schwarzenegger conveyed an image of RICHMOND, Va. — A glass invincibility, vial stopped with a cork during persuading the Civil War has been opened, Californians Schwarzenegger revealing a coded message to that anything the desperate Confederate com- was possible if only they had mander in Vicksburg on the day the right mindset. the Mississippi city fell to Union “I know how to sell someforces 147 years ago. thing,” he said then. The dispatch offered no hope As he would come to learn, to doomed Lt. Gen. John C. selling a political idea is one Pemberton: Reinforcements are thing. Delivering on it is quite not on the way. another. The encrypted 6-line mesThe 63-year-old governor sage was dated July 4, 1863, the leaves office next month with a date of Pemberton’s surrender to Union forces led by Ulysses S. mixed record, winning praise for his precedent-setting environGrant, ending the Siege of mental activism and criticism Vicksburg in what historians say was a turning point midway for his failure to tame the fiscal mess, as he promised when Calinto the Civil War. ifornians recalled Gov. Gray The message is from a ConDavis and installed him instead. federate commander on the He had unprecedented goodwest side of the Mississippi will, a blazingly positive attiRiver across from Pemberton. “He’s saying, ‘I can’t help you. tude and arrived as an outsider I have no troops, I have no sup- who said he would not be beholden to special interests. plies, I have no way to get over there,’” Museum of the Confederacy collections manager Cath- Today’s news guests erine M. Wright said of the ■ ABC’s “This Week” — Army author of the dispiriting mesVice Chief of Staff Gen. Peter sage. Chiarelli. “It was just another punctua■ CBS’s “Face the Nation” — tion mark to just how desperate Year-in-review discussion with Washington correspondents. and dire everything was.”

Arnold’s legacy SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Arnold Schwarzenegger landed in the Governor’s Office after announcing his upstart bid on late-night TV and railing against government spending during raucous campaign rallies — at one playing a spirited round of air guitar to the rock anthem “We’re Not Gonna Take It.”

■ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett. ■ CNN’s “State of the Union”— White House press secretary Robert Gibbs; Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano; former CIA Director Gen. Mike Hayden; the former director of national intelligence, Vice Adm. Mike McConnell. ■ “Fox News Sunday” — Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla.; Cardinal Donald Wuerl, archbishop of Washington, D.C.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Top U.S.-NATO commander visits troops MARJAH, Afghanistan — The top U.S. and NATO commander in Afghanistan crisscrossed the country Saturday, making a Christmas visit to coalition troops at some of the main battlefronts in a show of appreciation and support in the 10th year of the war against the Taliban. Gen. David Petraeus started his visit by traveling in a C-130 cargo plane from the capital, Kabul, to the northern province of Kunduz, telling troops with the U.S. Army’s 1-87, 10th Mountain Division that on this day, there was “no place that [he] would rather be than here” where the “focus of our effort” was. The northern part of the country has seen increased fighting, with the Taliban stepping up their attacks as NATO focuses its sights on the militant movement’s southern strongholds. Petraeus was briefed on the situation in the region by German Maj. Gen. Hans-Werner Fritz, the commander of NATO’s northern regional command. In eastern Afghanistan, where NATO forces are focused on trying to prevent insurgents from slipping in from neighboring Pakistan, one U.S. platoon spent their Christmas as they do almost every other day — in a firefight with insurgents.

Somber Christmas VATICAN CITY — Iraqi Christians celebrated a somber Christmas in a Baghdad cathe-

dral stained with dried blood, while Pope Benedict XVI exhorted Chinese Catholics to stay loyal despite restrictions on them in a holiday address laced with worry for the world’s Christian minorities. Saturday’s grim news seemed to highlight the pope’s concern for his flock’s welfare. In northern Nigeria, attacks on two churches by Muslim sect members claimed six lives, while bombings in central Nigeria, a region plagued by Christian-Muslim violence, killed 32 people, officials said. Eleven people including a priest were injured by a bombing during Christmas Mass in a police chapel in the Philippines, which has the largest Catholic population in Asia.

12 Somalis detained AMSTERDAM — Dutch police have arrested 12 Somali men in the key port city of Rotterdam on suspicion of preparing a terrorist attack, the public prosecutor said Saturday. The men, aged 19 to 48, were detained Friday on a tip from the intelligence services that they were planning an attack shortly in the Netherlands. There was no immediate information on the alleged target, but Rotterdam is Europe’s biggest port and a hub of maritime commerce, with huge oil and gas storage facilities and dozens of massive docks. European officials stepped up security around the holidays this year after a Nigerian man in 2009 left Amsterdam airport Christmas Day and allegedly tried to blow up a plane over Detroit with explosives taped to his underwear. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Surfin’ Santas People dressed as Santa Claus carry surfboards and float in the waves in Cocoa Beach, Fla., on Friday at Surfin’ Santa George Trossett’s beach house.

At least 45 killed in aid center bombing Suicide attack was carried out by a female in Pakistan By Anwarullah Khan The Associated Press

KHAR, Pakistan — A burqaclad female suicide bomber in Pakistan lobbed hand grenades, then detonated her explosive belt among a crowd at an aid center Saturday, killing at least 45 people in militants’ latest strike against the authorities’ control over the key tribal region bordering Afghanistan. Police believed it was the first time Islamic militants have sent a woman to carry out a suicide attack in Pakistan, where the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan against al-Qaida and the Taliban insurgents continues to spill over despite Islamabad’s repeated claims of victory on its side of the porous border. The bomber, dressed in the head-to-toe burqa robes that women commonly wear in Pakistan and Afghanistan, was challenged by police at a checkpoint, officials said. She then charged toward a

group of 300 people lined up outside the food aid distribution center in the town of Khar, tossing two hand grenades before blowing herself up, officials said. The crowd was made up of people who have fled conflicts elsewhere in the area. President Barack Obama condemned the bombing as “outrageous.” In a statement released in Honolulu, where he was spending Christmas, Obama said, “Killing innocent civilians outside a World Food Program distribution point is an affront to the people of Pakistan and to all humanity.” The attack in Khar, the main city in the Bajur region of Pakistan’s northwest, came a day after 150 militants waged pitched gun battles against five security posts in the adjourning Mohmand tribal region to the south. The fighting, which left 11 soldiers and 24 militants dead, was an unusually strong show of strength by insurgents in border country that the military has

twice claimed to have cleaned of militants. Helicopter gunships backed by artillery continued the battle Saturday, pounding enemy hideouts and killing another 40 militants, said Amjad Ali Khan, the top government official in Mohmand. The tribal regions are of major concern to the U.S. because they have been safe havens for militants fighting NATO and American troops across the border in Afghanistan. The U.S. has long pressured Pakistan to clear the tribal belt of the insurgents. The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for Saturday’s suicide attack in Khar through its spokesman, Azam Tariq. The spokesman suggested the victims may have been targeted because most of them belonged to the Salarzai tribe, which was among the first to set up a militia — known as a lashkar — to fight the Taliban in 2008. Other tribes later formed similar militias to resist the militants. “All anti-Taliban forces — like lashkars, army and security forces — are our target,” he said. “We will strike them whenever we have an opportunity.”

Hundreds of flights canceled in South due to snowstorm By Kristin M. Hall The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A rare white Christmas in parts of the South was complicating life for some travelers as airlines canceled hundreds of flights, while snow was predicted for the nation’s capital and travel authorities warned of potentially dangerous roads. The National Weather Service said the storm could bring 6 to 10 inches of snow to the Washington region, beginning today. The Weather Service was also forecasting possible snow today for the New York and Boston areas, with overnight temperatures in the 20s and wind gusts up to 30 mph. United and Continental Air-

Quick Read

lines issued a news release Saturday saying that weather conditions would likely force delays and cancellations at their respective hubs at Washington Dulles and Newark Liberty International airports as well as at other Northeastern airports between Saturday and Monday. Airlines spokesman Michael J. Trevino said Saturday evening that he did not have an estimate of the number of cancellations but that the carriers are waiving fees for one-time changes in affected areas. The Carolinas got their first white Christmas in decades as snow began falling Saturday morning in Asheville, N.C., spread to Raleigh by noon and was forecast to stretch to the coast later in the day. The National Weather Service

issued winter storm warnings with forecasts calling for up to 6 inches of snow in central North Carolina with more in the mountains and less on the coast. In South Carolina, forecasts called for rain turning to snow after dark. It’s the first Christmas snow for the Carolinas since 1989, when a foot fell along the coast. For Columbia, S.C., it’s the first significant Christmas snow since weather records were first kept in 1887. In Asheville, the Weather Service said snow fell at the rate of about an inch an hour earlier in the day and mountain roads would be impassable for all but four-wheel-drive vehicles. As much as 10 inches could fall by today, which would break the previous Christmas Day record of 5.4 inches set in 1969.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Crews to inspect jet after emergency landing

West: Two killed, one injured in skiing collision

West: Balloon takes Santa Claus on wild ride

World: Earthquake, small tsunami hit near Vanuatu

Maintenance crews will inspect a Southwest Airlines jet that made an emergency landing at Oakland International Airport when the pilot received warning of an engine fire. Southwest Airlines spokesman Brad Hawkins said the Los Angeles-bound flight landed safely in Oakland, Calif., minutes after taking off from San Francisco International Airport around 9 p.m. Friday. As the plane was ascending, a warning siren indicated there was a fire in one of the plane’s engines. Hawkins said the pilot shut the engine down and diverted to Oakland. None of the 108 passengers and five crew members aboard was injured.

Authorities said two people have died and one is injured after a man on a snowboard collided with a woman and her daughter on skis at a Wyoming ski area. The Casper Star-Tribune reported that the 22-year-old man and the 5-year-old girl were pronounced dead at a Casper hospital after the collision Friday at the Hogadon Ski Area. The mother has been hospitalized, but her condition and injuries weren’t available. No names have been released. Natrona County Sheriff’s Lt. Mark Sellers said the mother and girl were stopped on a ski run when the snowboarder collided with them.

If only Santa was as good with hot air balloons as with reindeer sleighs. A man in a Santa outfit took a wild ride through Utah skies Christmas Eve when his balloon took off without a pilot. The Salt Lake Tribune reported that Santa was tossing candy to kids from the balloon during a Midvalley Elementary School fundraiser when the craft landed too hard and the pilot tumbled out. That left Santa alone, and the lighter balloon shot back into the air. Police Sgt. Torin Chambers said Santa traveled 1.7 miles across Midvale before the craft lost enough air to come down.

A powerful earthquake struck under the sea near Vanuatu early today, generating a small tsunami in the South Pacific. No damage or injuries were immediately reported. The 7.3 magnitude quake struck just after midnight about 140 miles south of Vanuatu’s capital, Port Vila. The U.S. Geological Survey said it was about 15 miles below the ocean floor. A tsunami wave measuring about 6 inches was recorded on some coastlines at Vanuatu, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said. New Caledonia and Fiji also were warned a tsunami was possible on their coasts, but the warning was canceled about an hour and a half after the temblor.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 26, 2010 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Hatch: ‘I feel cheated,’ State Patrol sergeant says Continued from A1 ited from running Damerow said Przygocki because the had worked about 21 hours department of federal grant-funded received federal funds overtime. Przygocki said he had “by a very also received FBI training n a r r o w and supervised troopers on interpreta- Benedict federally funded security tion” of its details for Hood Canal provisions, he said. Bridge. “The fedThe state Attorney General’s Office would not allow eral governDamerow to be interviewed ment subsifor this article, and the dizes virtuState Patrol would not ally every waive the attorney-client- S h e r i f f ’ s privilege relationship Office in the Hernandez between the two agencies state,” Benesaid, that would have allowed dict adding that three Sheriff’s that interview. “I feel cheated,” Przy- Office elections were won statewide Nov. 2 by Shergocki said. “I don’t negotiate these iff’s Office employees or things,” he said of the FBI state troopers. He said he was not aware training he received and his of its provisions until after federally funded duties. “I’ve got to do my job. he was elected, learning of Then it’s held against me. the Hatch Act during trainHow the heck can that be ing at the National Sheriffs’ fair? The only way I can Institute. actually do this is I have to “It takes two to tango, resign from the Patrol.” and I don’t think someone would have complained if ‘Law unevenly applied’ [Przygocki] had run.” Przygocki was afraid of But the law is “very unevenly applied,” Clallam exactly that, he said. He was alerted about County Sheriff Bill Benedict suggested Wednesday. Hatch Act restrictions last Benedict was a Clallam spring when Republican County Sheriff’s Office ser- Jefferson County Treasurer geant when he defeated Judy Morris “inferred she Sheriff Joe Martin in 2006 would file a complaint” but could have been prohib- under the Hatch Act if he

filed for sheriff, he said. That prompted him to approach his superiors to seek the opinion from the Attorney General’s Office, he said. Morris emphatically denied she considered filing a complaint — “absolutely not,” she said. “My suggestion was he look into it because it was conceivable if his agency received federal funds, then the Hatch Act might apply,” Morris said, adding she spoke with an associate of Przygocki’s about the matter. “The Hatch Act came up. I suggested [Przygocki] look into it so it would not turn out to be negative on his part.”

Stuck to account Przygocki stuck to his account, though he wouldn’t give the name of the associate. “My impression came from two different sources, and I believe these people,” he said. Morris was campaign manager for former Port Townsend Police Chief Kristen Anderson when Anderson unsuccessfully ran for county sheriff in 2002. The Hatch Act’s impact on Anderson’s ability to run “did not even come up,” Morris said. “None of us even knew

Probe: Anonymous

about the Hatch Act.” Hernandez was undersheriff in March 2009 when county commissioners appointed him to the position held by the retiring Mike Brasfield and was elected to fill out the term in November 2009. Government employees covered under Hatch Act provisions still can be appointed to elected positions. “If I had not gone through the appointment process, I would have had to potentially resign,” Hernandez said. A government employee who violates the Hatch Act can be removed from the position covered by the regulations and “could be debarred from holding another Hatch Act position for up to 18 months,” said Justin Martell of the federal Office of Special Counsel, which investigates Hatch Act violations. But ignorance of the law can lead to a different result. “When there is no evidence of a knowing or willful violation, our office is not likely to seek disciplinary action,” Martell said. Martell said the law covers only partisan elections. Przygocki would have run as an independent but leans toward the Republican Party, Przygocki said.

Congress passed the Hatch Act in 1939 in response to controversies sparked in the 1936 and 1938 campaigns over political donations by federal employees and the misuse of federal funds, Jason Miller said in a 2009 article, “The Unwise and Unconstitutional Hatch Act: Why State and Local Government Employees Should be Free to Run for Public Office,” in the Southern Illinois Law Journal. The law prohibits millions of public employees from running for office, Miller said.

‘Lack of quality’

Przygocki is not sure if he will seek election in four years. “I’m not ready to retire,” Przygocki said. “I love what I do.” State Patrol spokesman Bob Calkins said “a fair number” of retired State Patrol officers are now sheriffs, adding that some do not fall under the provisions of the Hatch Act. At the same time, Martell’s office commonly receives requests for advisory opinions and complaints about law enforcement officials for violating the Hatch Act, especially when those in law enforcement run for sheriff. Benedict suggested situations such as Przygocki’s prove the law needs to be changed. “The original intent was to prevent federal employees from using that influence to sway local elections,” Benedict said. “It’s a real mockery now.” Federal legislation is pending to exempt law enforcement agencies from the Hatch Act “just because it’s so confusing and convoluted,” Benedict added.

“At the same time, many elections in this country go uncontested, and communities suffer from a lack of quality candidates.” Martell said a goal of the Hatch Act is to ensure that public employees are politically neutral and don’t exert undue influence on government hiring and policies in their capacity as government employees. “The goal is to prohibit the government from becoming a partisan tool,” he said. But it also means that ________ Przygocki will be standing on the sidelines while HerSenior staff writer Paul Gottlieb nandez is sworn in at can be reached at 360-417-3536 8:30 a.m. Jan. 3 in the or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily county courthouse. news.com.

Job: ‘Just one of those

complaint spurs inquiry days,’ shop owner says Continued from A1

Rogers, who sat on the City Council from 2002 to 2010 and was mayor in 2006 and 2007, referred to the complaint in a written statement as being based on “unfounded allegations.” “The state auditor spends hundreds of thousands of dollars of taxpayers’ money on these anonymous allegations,” she wrote. “This latest anonymous allegation is another of these types of unfounded allegations.”

‘More than happy’ Rogers also wrote that she would be “more than happy” to meet with the person who filed the complaint to discuss his or her concerns. Exeltech, one of the companies named in the complaint, announced in April that it had hired Rogers to oversee its regional businessdevelopment efforts. The former mayor also has been a consultant for Fred Hill Materials and served on Clallam Business Incubator’s board. It’s unknown if her ties with the two companies or the Clallam Business Incubator were mentioned in the complaint. Exeltech has been awarded about $5.8 million in contracts from the city

“The state auditor spends hundreds of thousands of dollars of taxpayers’ money on these anonymous allegations. This latest anonymous allegation is another of these types of unfounded allegations.”

Former Mayor Karen Rogers in written statement

operates a fiber optic network in the city. The Port Angeles City Council approved a sevenyear use agreement with CPI on April 6. It cut the city’s monthly bill from $5,679 to $5,045 before tax. Clallam Business Incubator is a private nonprofit organization that assists Under fire entrepreneurs. The city has helped fund the organizaIn February, that design tion, which is floundering. contract came under fire City Manager Kent Myers from some City Council serves on the board. members who felt $164,800, about 25 percent of the proj- Incubator project ect’s $673,100 total budget, was too high. The Remediators is a Glenn Cutler, the city’s Port Angeles company that public works and utilities uses fungi to clean contamidirector, admitted then that nated property. It was an the design portion contract incubator project. ACTI is an aerospace was a bit higher than usual but said that Exeltech was company in Port Angeles. Mayor Dan Di Guilio the most qualified of the three companies inter- said he was told about a month ago that a complaint viewed for the job. Madsen resigned in 2008 was filed. He said he knew it after more than three years involved contracts for The as city manager. CPI is a Port Angeles Gateway and construction company that built and of the Eighth Street bridges but didn’t have any more information. over approximately eight years. The Lacey-based company managed the construction of the Eighth Street bridges and The Gateway transit center and, most recently, designed the pedestrian bridge being built over Dry Creek.

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The special meeting will be at 5 p.m. in council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. On Dec. 7, the City Council upheld an earlier Planning Commission decision to grant the permit. Seven environmental groups — Port Townsend AirWatchers, Olympic Forest Coalition, Olympic Environmental Council, No Biomass Burn of Seattle, the Center for Environmental Law and Policy of Spokane, the World Temperate Rainforest Network and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club — had appealed the granting of the permit to the City Council. Nippon plans to replace its biomass burner in a $71 million project that would produce steam for paper production at the plant on Ediz Hook and produce about 20 megawatts of electricity. Nippon also needs airquality permits from the state and waste discharge, stormwater and building permits from the city before construction can begin.

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Expecting few people downtown, he said he was going to remain closed but spend the day catching up on some work, such as restocking shelves.

In-store work “Today is just one of the days I can do other in-store work,” said Zeller, 50. Other than that, he said, he planned to just enjoy the “peace and quiet.”

________ Reporter Tom Callis, who also was on the job Christmas Day, can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Council to consider final permit findings

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rwanagel@gmail.com or text: 360-477-7792 www.beamathwiz.com

Continued from A1 said Jim Vaughan, nursing supervisor. “I honestly don’t expect to “With our job, it goes with see too many people because the territory,” he said. everyone is at home with “But the staff is remarktheir families,” he said. ably resilient about working “But for those people who on Christmas,” he added. work on Christmas or just out and about, they will be ‘Decent crowd’ able to stop by this warm Mason said the pub was place . . . and have a cup of expecting to get a “decent coffee.” crowd” since most other restaurants and shops in Port Medical personnel Townsend were closed. While many people try to Downtown Port Angeles get time off around the holi- also had few shops open on days, that’s not always an Christmas. option for medical personnel. But Don Zeller, owner of But at Jefferson Health- Zeller’s Antiques, said he care in Port Townsend, they welcomed the lull in shopalways make the best of it, pers.

Fourth St., Port Angeles. An agenda was not available Saturday.

Clallam commissioners Meetings of the three Clallam County commissioners that were originally scheduled this week have been canceled because of the holidays. The next meetings will be held Monday, Jan. 3, and Tuesday, Jan. 4, in Room 160 at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. The Jan. 3 work session will begin at 9 a.m., and the Jan. 4 business meeting will begin at 10 a.m.

Sequim City Council The meeting originally scheduled Monday has been canceled. The next meeting will be Monday, Jan. 10, at the Transit Center, 190 W. Cedar St. A 5 p.m. study session will be followed by a 6 p.m. regular meeting.

Public utility district The Clallam County Public Utility District meetings originally scheduled for Monday and Jan. 3 have been canceled. The next regular meeting will be at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 10 in the commissioners’ boardroom at the district’s main office, 2431 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles.

peninsuladailynews.com


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Peninsula Daily News

(C) — Sunday, December 26, 2010

A5

Mystery man’s Christmas legacy Stranger known as John gives $81,000 to churches By Jennifer Jackson

For Peninsula Daily News

1930s, he and his brothers attended Sunday school at First Presbyterian Church. The connection to St. Paul’s is unknown. “There is nothing like this, to receive something you did nothing to attain, that is pure gift,” said Elizabeth Bloch, rector of St. Paul’s. According to Camfield, his brother — born Richard Ernest Camfield but who changed his name to John Richard Ernest — was a loner who was estranged from his family in the last decades of his life. Except for a stint in the Air Force in the 1950s, Richard lived in the family home on Morgan Hill all his life, said Camfield, who referred to his brother as Richard. His brother wrote poetry, mostly about nature, which he had made into a book and peddled at the ferry dock in the ’70s, Camfield said. When their mother developed Alzheimer’s disease, it was Richard who took care of her for eight years until her death at the age of 96, he added.

PORT TOWNSEND — It is an old tale, told since medieval times, of the stranger who comes to the church door on a winter’s night and knocks. Asking for a bite of bread or a place to get in out of the cold, he is welcomed and given food. Then, pulling back the hood of his cloak, the visitor reveals himself to be a person of means who is able to return the charity. It is a story that echoes what happened to Wendell Ankeny, pastor of Trinity United Methodist Church this Christmas. The stranger was an elderly man Ankeny knew as John, who would stop by the church office on Clay Street from time to time. John was thin and stooped, his beard often unshaven, his gray hair sticking out of the watch cap he always wore. Ankeny said he and John knew each other for a couple of years, though John never came to a service. Changing his name

$27,000 check Last Tuesday, Ankeny had another visitor — John’s brother, who delivered a gift from John’s estate to the church. It was a check for $27,000. “It was out of the blue,” Ankeny said. The brother, Tom Camfield, also delivered checks for $27,000 each to two other uptown churches — First Presbyterian and St. Paul’s Episcopal. With the former, Camfield included a letter explaining that back in the

Then Richard lived alone in the house, changing his name and removing any connection with the family name. Other than occasionally seeing him at Safeway, Camfield had no contact with Richard, nor did any of the family, he said. “He became very secretive and hid away from the world,” he said. So when Richard became ill last summer, it was Ankeny who got the call from the hospital. It was the man he knew as John, asking if Ankeny would come and baptize

the funds for a planned addition. Part of any unspecified donation or funds raised is always set aside for mission work, Slater said, including Habitat for Humanity and the food bank. The church also maintains a 10-year relationship with a village in El Salvador, Santa Elena — sending work teams and funds to build houses, a community center and a well — and has a supportive partnership with the Evangelical Seminary in Cairo. “We feel fortunately blessed by this gentleman,” Slater said of the gift. At St. Paul’s, the gift came at a time when the church is expanding its local outreach to people beyond the walls.

Soup lunch

This photo of Richard Ernest Camfield was probably taken when he served in the Air Force from 1952 to 1956. A recluse later in life, he dropped his surname, calling himself John Richard Ernest. him. John also asked to become a member of the church. Ankeny fulfilled both of John’s requests, baptizing him in the name he adopted, as well as fulfilling another request — bringing him a chocolate malt from the local drug store. Ankeny visited John the next day, bringing another chocolate malt that John was unable to drink. On the third day, when Ankeny arrived at the hospital, the bed was empty. John died of cancer Aug. 28. He was 79 years old.

Three churches

“I hastened to get it here before Christmas in case Santa might have some financial shortfalls,” Camfield said. “He wanted to leave that money to those churches.” Said the Rev. Dr. Bob Slater, minister of First Presbyterian Church: “I do believe in Santa” The gifts come with no strings attached, so the churches are free to decide how they want to use the funds. All three churches are in historic buildings uptown that are more than a century-and-a-quarter old.

Use of funds

In his will, he left First Presbyterian is in bequests for the three churches, which Camfield the process of retrofitting delivered last week as early all the lights, Slater said, and also may use some of Christmas presents.

“He has blessed a need that he had no idea about,” Bloch said of John’s bequest.

Second windfall The unexpected gift is the second windfall for Trinity UMC, which nearly closed 12 years ago for lack of members. Since then, it has rebounded with the help of a woman who attended services but would arrive late and leave early. The woman wouldn’t give Ankeny her name, he said, even when he visited her in the hospital. When she died, Ankeny had to track down the relatives and arrange the service. In her will, the woman left her estate, including her Lincoln town car, her piano, all her household possessions and her large collection of hats, to Trinity. The church kept the hats, which people wear in the woman’s memory on Easter and Mother’s Day, but held a garage sale to sell the household items, realizing $30,000 to kickstart the building restoration. That included shoring up the bell tower, which was twisted in an earthquake, and placing a foundation under the unsupported building. Ankeny said it’s up to the church to decide how to use John’s gift but said part of it will probably be used for a mission project and part to finish projects in the building, which opened its door to a stranger. Camfield said people have told him that his brother was a kindly sort at the end of his life and would have liked people to know about his last gifts.

Last summer, parishioners started a weekly soup lunch that is drawing up to three dozen people, mostly working people who need help making ends meet, Deacon Karen Pierce said. The parish had plans to expand and had started raising funds. So when Bloch opened the envelope that Camfield handed her and saw the check, she whooped with joy. “It was like someone had popped a champagne cork in your spirit,” she said. “We had a specific need, and this kicked us over the top. It truly felt miraculous.” Slater said that while First Presbyterian Church has received bequests from people he doesn’t know, they are usually past members who had moved away or were no longer active for health reasons. None he remembers was half as large as John’s gift; ________ all were for a specific use. Bloch said St. Paul’s has Jennifer Jackson, who writes received anonymous gifts in the column Port Townsend Neighthe past but not one of this bor, can be reached at 360-3795688 or jjackson@olypen.com. size.

Dozens of volunteers deliver holiday meals By Julie McCormick

For Peninsula Daily News

CHIMACUM — They had to split the volunteer shifts in two at the annual free Tri-Area Community Center Christmas Dinner to accommodate the more than 70 people in Jefferson County who wanted to help out. Candy Drollinger signed up early and drew delivery duty, taking 32 grocery bags full of meals to senior and disabled people at the Admiralty Apartments in downtown Port Townsend. The load was light compared with Drollinger’s life right now. “This year has been very difficult,” said the single mother of two adolescent girls.

Drollinger’s partner left her, she’s scrambled for any kind of a job since being laid off as a computer programmer two years ago, and her children are visiting grandparents for the holidays. “This is the first year in 17 years that I haven’t been with family,” she said. “I could sit around and have a pity party or give what I have to give.” Residents trickled down into the vestibule to pick up their meals, and Drollinger delivered a few right to the door. “We can all survive, but it’s nice to save money,” said Doug Hurlburt with a smile, picking up his meal. Back at the community center, longtime volunteer Dell Noack matched up driver names with delivery

lists as the first people began trickling in for their holiday meal. There was a greeter outside with a merry bell and a “Merry Christmas” for each arrival and a greeter at the dining room door. Donna Valaske brought her neighbor Thelma Davis, 79, early to give her a chance to rest before the tables got crowded. Davis is only a week out of the hospital and still recovering from a torn esophagus. “We’re just all by ourselves, little orphans,” she said, beaming. By the time deliveries had been made, the first rush of what coordinator Chris Eagan predicted would be 300 diners had finished, with some lining

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people at the Admiralty Apartments in Port Townsend, courtesy of an annual program by Olympic Peninsula Community Action Programs and the St. Vincent de Paul Society of St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Catholic Church.

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pic Peninsula Community Eagan said. Action Programs, and it’s More than 70 people volPeople across the North entirely self-supporting, unteered to help. Olympic Peninsula enjoyed free holiday feasts Christmas Eve and Christmas A P L A C E F OR R E N E WA L Day. The Salvation Army in Port Angeles served 104 For the finest in free Christmas meals therapeutic treatments: Christmas Eve, cooks there said. Barb Brown, Owner Acne • Pigmentation • Rosacea Last year’s free meal — Licensed Aesthetician a Christmas Day lunch that was a first for the organizaMake an appointment today for your own renewal. tion — served more than 200. 545 Eureka Way • Sequim • 360 - 681-4363 Meanwhile, Hardy’s T E N D E R T O U C H E S Hours: Mon.- Thurs. / 9 am to 5 pm Market near Sequim served SKIN CARE www.tendertouchesspa.com 130 free meals Christmas Eve, owner Randy DuPont said. The market served the meals to thank customers for their support, he said. On Christmas Day, a free feast at the Tri-Area Community Center in Chimacum The fashion served about 300, including accessory those who were delivered that happens meals. to tell time. The annual Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners Interchangeable leather bands and at the center in Chimacum faces. Variety of colors & styles are a joint project by the St. Vincent de Paul Society of or... St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Peel & Stick Watch Face to Catholic Church and OlymPeninsula Daily News

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Free feasts served on Peninsula

up for some turkey, dressing and fixings to take home. The annual Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners at the center in Chimacum are a joint project by the St. Vincent de Paul Society of St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Catholic Church and Olympic Peninsula Community Action Programs, and it’s entirely self-supporting, Eagan said. Diners, many of whom come as much for the sense of fellowship as need, make donations as they enter, and, miraculously, there’s always enough. Julie McCormick/for Peninsula Daily News “People have been very, very generous,” Eagan said. Candy Drollinger delivers Christmas meals to 32


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Coburn’s Cafe stays in the family From mother to mom, son, PA eatery changes hands By Rob Ollikainen

[Brady] works here, my cousins — so pretty much a family operation still, minus me,” Darla Coburn said. “We’ve had some dear friends that have worked here that are more like family than friends.” As for her future, Darla Coburn will spend a few months traveling through California and Arizona. She plans to return to Port Angeles in the early spring, when she will become a new grandmother, then decide what to do next. “I have no plans, no reservations,” Darla Coburn said. Customers, many of whom are regulars at the cozy eatery, learned of the change in ownership about two weeks ago.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Coburn’s Cafe regulars had cake with their morning coffee Friday. The Christmas Eve cake was a tribute to 15-year owner Darla Coburn, whose last day was Friday. “Today, I wanted to work with my mom one last time,” she said. Coburn sold the neighborhood restaurant at 824 S. C St. in Port Angeles to her mother, Gloria, and son, Ryan. Ryan Coburn, 28, will run the small family business. “He’s a fantastic cook,” Darla Coburn said. “He’s been here since he was a little kid.” Gloria will help her grandson run the eatery as Home away from home she did her daughter. “It’s like a home away “My niece [Chrelle] from home for a lot of these works here, my other son guys,” Darla Coburn said.

Bob Philpott, one of Coburn’s Cafe’s loyal customers, said Ryan Coburn is more than capable of running the restaurant. “Oh, I think he’ll do a wonderful job,” Philpott said. “He’s been doing so much of it at different times that he knows all facets of the work, and we’ll continue to have lots of people coming here for meals.” Some of the regulars are so familiar with the breakfast and lunch menus that they don’t even need one, Darla Coburn said. “Our customers are even really a part of our family because you see they’re so loyal,” she said. “They come in here every day, some of them — every day. This is their social hour.” Some of the most popular items on the menu are biscuits and gravy, clam chowder and hash browns, which are made from scratch, Darla Colburn said. Everything on the menu, which includes specialty

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Lynn Logelin, John Logelin and Bob Philpott, from left, chat with Darla Coburn at Coburn’s Cafe on C Street in Port Angeles on Friday. omelettes, specialty burgers and sandwiches, is $10 or less. The small business relies on word-of-mouth advertising, Darla Coburn said. Coburn’s Cafe is open from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. “Everything will run just

like it did before,” Darla Coburn said. “Nothing’s going to change except for the name on the piece of paper.” Darla Coburn has worked in the restaurant industry since she was 15. She said she will miss the people and the social aspect of the job. She thanked her custom-

ers “for the love and support and friendship through the years.” “It’s been a lot of fun,” she said. “I’m going to miss them a lot.”

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Hearing set on proposed fishing moratorium Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIA — The state Fish and Wildlife Commission will conduct a public hearing Friday, Jan. 7, on a proposed five-year fishing moratorium for the Elwha River and its tributaries. The hearing is scheduled for 1:15 p.m. in Room 172 on the first floor of the Natural Resources Building, 1111 S.E. Washington St., Olympia, during a two-day meeting of the commission. The panel, which sets policy for the state Department of Fish & Wildlife, is scheduled to make a deci-

sion on the proposed fishing moratorium, which would begin next fall, at its Feb. 4-5 meeting in Olympia. The commission will convene at 8:30 a.m. both days. The proposed rule has stirred concerns about the possible closure of Lake Sutherland, west of Port Angeles. Most of the 125 people at a Dec. 15 hearing in Port Angeles showed support for a fishing moratorium for the river as long as it didn’t include the lake.

Fish & Wildlife is proposing the moratorium for the Elwha River to help protect fish runs during and after removal of the 108foot Elwha Dam and the 210-foot Glines Canyon Dam. Dam removal, the focus of a $350 million federal project to restore the 70-mile river’s ecosystem and encourage a return of the waterway’s historic salmon runs, will begin in September and last until March 2014. The proposal — which will be presented to the

commission by Fish & Wildlife Regional Fish Program Manager Ron Warren, who spoke at the Port Angeles meeting — would establish a fishing moratorium on “all fisheries in tributary and mainstream waters across the 321 square miles of the basin from the river mouth near Port Angeles to the headwaters in the Olympic Mountains.” The proposal said that the moratorium “may” also include Lake Sutherland, which is connected to the Elwha River through Indian Creek. After the Port Angeles

meeting, Warren said that he would brief the Fish and Wildlife Commission on the concerns of residents. “They got a voice, and I’m going to carry that voice forward,” Warren said. Warren had said at the Port Angeles meeting that the lake was under consideration for closure to help the anadromous sockeye salmon survive, possibly by breeding with kokanee, which are landlocked sockeye, in the lake. After dam demolition, fish in the two reservoirs will have to adapt to a river

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ecosystem, and anadromous fish below the dams will find the lower river less hospitable as waves of sediment blocked behind the dams are washed downstream. Warren said the moratorium will give those populations a better chance of survival by giving them a boost before the dams come down and by protecting them for a few years after demolition.

Puget Sound crabbing At the January meeting, the commission also will discuss Puget Sound crabfishing seasons, with fish managers briefing them on how changes to proposed crab regulations conform to a policy the commission approved in October to expand sport-fishing opportunities for Puget Sound crabbers. The commission is set to vote on proposed crabbing amendments in February. The agenda is at www. wdfw.wa.gov/commission/ meetings.html. A link in the agenda goes to the fishing moratorium proposal. Comments on the proposed fishing moratorium can be submitted to Fish & Wildlife rules coordinator Lori Preuss at lori.preuss@ dfw.wa.gov or at 600 N. Capitol Way, Olympia, WA 98501.

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contest at Aldrich’s Market will be chosen today. A panel of judges composed of Aldrich’s employees will select the winners beginning at 2:30 p.m. (A story published in the Peninsula Daily News on Friday had erroneous information about the contest judging.) Entries in this year’s contest — including those based on the new MV Chetzemoka ferry and the boat it replaced, the Steilacoom II — can be seen at the market at 940 Lawrence St. in Port Townsend. Houses can be entered in one of three categories: under 12 years of age, over 12 years of age and as a group or family. Entrants are asked to supply a name for their project. Gingerbread dough must be the basis for all the houses, though inedible decorations are allowed. Contestants will receive extra credit if they use the actual dough instead of gingerbread crackers. The entry fee was a nonperishable food item for county food banks. For more information, phone 360-385-0500.


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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 26, 2010

A7

Hospice takes on more, needs more Volunteer organization looks at $280,000 deficit By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Soon after she moved here, Sue Hynes crossed paths with the woman in whose footsteps she would follow — into a job full of rewards and uncertainty. Twenty years ago, Hynes met Rose Crumb, the founder and director of an organization that helps hundreds of Clallam County families each year while charging nothing for its services. “I was overwhelmed by Rose,” Hynes remembered. She was also mightily impressed by Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, the nonprofit Crumb and a small team established in 1978. Hynes went to work as a nurse for the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe and stayed 16 years. Then, in 2005, her mother developed terminal cancer, and Hynes turned to Volunteer Hospice for help. She wanted her mom, Joanne Schalk, to stay at home, not in a hospital. The hospice helped make that happen. The agency’s nurses and volunteers provided hospice care — comfort and attentiveness to matters both practical and emotional — that gave Hynes precious time with her mother during her last days. “[Volunteer Hospice] allowed me to be the daughter and not the nurse,” she said. Last year, Crumb retired as director of Volunteer

Hospice, and Hynes was chosen as her successor. “I feel so blessed to be in this position,” Hynes said in a recent interview at the Volunteer Hospice office at 540 E. Eighth St. But the post brings with it a worrisome set of circumstances. “It’s a perfect storm,” said Pam Gates, a member of Volunteer Hospice’s board of directors. Clallam County’s population is growing older and needing more hospice services, more people lack health insurance, and the economy is still in the dumps, so Volunteer Hospice’s reserve fund isn’t earning the income it once did. Donations are affected, too.

Using reserves now For the first time, the agency has had to withdraw operating funds from its reserve account, said Bruce Busch, another board member. “Until this year, we always took in more money than we paid out,” he said. The only paid people at Volunteer Hospice are Hynes and the seven nurses, who are on call 24 hours a day to respond to clients’ families’ needs. Their salaries total $315,000; with operating expenses, the agency’s annual budget is $470,000. Volunteer Hospice is anticipating revenue, from bequests and other local donations, of just $190,000 in 2011. So the agency is looking at an estimated deficit of

some $280,000 next year, Busch said. There are no plans, however, to start charging for hospice services. They are wide-ranging and delivered by the seven nurses and more than 100 volunteers: home health care and pain management, delivery and setup of equipment such as special beds, respite care so the patient’s caregiver can take a breather, help with funeral arrangements and support for loved ones who are grieving. Sometimes, a widowed spouse is at a complete loss, Hynes said, and doesn’t know how to keep the household books nor cook meals. Hospice volunteers help with those things, too. “Our mission,” Hynes said, “is to take care of the people in the community,” including those who can’t afford to pay for home health care and other help. Hospice care is patientdriven; insurance doesn’t come into the equation, she added. Yet Volunteer Hospice’s mission cannot be accomplished without support from local residents. So Hynes and the Volunteer Hospice board are hoping to convey a message to their community: We can’t continue without you.

Could cease to exist “In five to seven years, if we don’t have more help,” said board member Ray Weinmann, “we will cease to exist, which would be a tragedy for the community.” “Think about the amount of money Hospice has saved the community over the years,” said Hynes, adding that end-of-life care in hospitals is a large portion of all health care costs in

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/Peninsula Daily News

From left, Volunteer Hospice Director Sue Hynes and board members Bruce Busch and Pam Gates say the nonprofit agency, which provides a wide range of hospice services free of charge, is facing a $280,000 deficit in 2011. this country. Helping people come home for their last days is better all around, she believes. Volunteer Hospice provides services for some 300 families in a year, Hynes noted. “With the uncertainty of health care [coverage] now, there’s going to be a need for more community-based health care,” she said. Volunteer Hospice is not seeking only monetary gifts. The agency also needs people who can share their time. A training for volunteers who work directly with patients is set for February; for those who prefer to work in the Volunteer Hospice office, Hynes provides a less-complex orientation each month or so. Busch, who is on the board’s long-range planning committee, became a volunteer after firsthand experience with Volunteer Hospice. Immediately after he

and his wife, Dottie, moved to Sequim from Rocklin, Calif., six years ago, Dottie was diagnosed with throat cancer. Soon, she needed 24-hour care. Hospice worker Holly Daniel came over to give her foot massages and just to talk. “Dottie adored that,” Busch said. He stayed at his wife’s side, at home, until her death Nov. 10, 2005. Not long after, Busch started volunteering as a bed delivery man for Volunteer Hospice. It helped him to keep busy with the agency that had been there for him and Dottie. “You’ll never have a more difficult time in your life” than when you are saying goodbye to your beloved, Hynes said. Volunteer Hospice is there to provide support and companionship throughout that time. As she enters her second year as director, Hynes

expressed gratitude for the volunteers and for nurses Laura Kinsley, Linda Mellon, Marty Melcher, Paula Richter, Gayla SprattNuffer and Bette Wood. “It takes a special nurse to be a hospice nurse,” Hynes said. Gates added that the Volunteer Hospice business model — which has worked for more than three decades — relies on generosity and caring. “We don’t have a CEO,” she said. “The stockholder is the community.” To find out more about supporting Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, phone the office between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays at 360-452-1511, e-mail HOCC@olypen.com or visit www.HospiceofClallam County.org.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Sister: Discovery of slay victim brings sad relief The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The sister of Becky Marrero, believed to be a victim of the Green River Killer nearly three decades ago, said the discovery of her sister’s

Briefly . . . Chiropractor fined $21,538 in fraud case SEQUIM — A former Sequim chiropractor has been fined $21,538 for defrauding the state Department of Labor & Industries. Marc A. Ferrin, who now practices in Jefferson City, Mo., was fined Nov. 19 after pleading guilty to thirddegree theft and attempted criminal liability. He won’t serve jail time. Ferrin, 45, was initially charged with one count of first-degree theft and nine counts of making false statements or concealing information. He was accused of defrauding L&I of $11,538.52 between 2006 and 2008. The state Attorney General’s Office said he billed L&I for appointments that never happened. L&I’s own investigation concluded that Ferrin did this 176 times. His trial was scheduled for Monday, Jan. 10.

find you, honey,”’ Mary MarHe pleaded guilty two rero said Thursday to seattle years later, agreeing to help pi.com. “‘Hang in there. It’s authorities locate as many remains as possible in just a matter of time.”’ exchange for avoiding the 48 murder confessions death penalty and is now serving life without release. Gary Ridgway confessed Becky Marrero wasn’t to 48 murders in the Green one of the 48 but was added River case and is suspected to the list of his possible in dozens of others. victims in July 1984. He preyed upon women and girls, most of them run- Not enough evidence 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. — Monday the New Year’s holiday. aways, prostitutes or drug Ridgway told investigathrough Friday near the Long Beach, Twin Haraddicts, in a spree that terWalmart entrance, Transbors, Copalis, Mocrocks and rorized Seattle and its south tors he thought he had killed her, but prosecutors portation said. Kalaloch will be open for suburbs in the 1980s. didn’t think at the time they Crews will work on clam digging Friday and Several victims were had enough evidence to Marrowstone Island to Saturday from noon to dumped in or posed along support a murder charge. replace a telecommunicamidnight. the Green River. King County detectives tions line. One beach, Twin HarHe was arrested in 2001 and prosecutors said In Grays Harbor bors, will also be open from after advances in DNA techthey are reviewing the County, the Highway 101 noon to midnight Sunday, nology enabled authorities investigation into Becky Simpson Avenue bridge Jan. 2. to link a saliva sample he Marrero’s disappearance has been closed until furFish & Wildlife Depart- gave authorities in 1987 to and death. Marrero’s ther notice. some of the bodies. family hopes it will lead to The best weekend times ment shellfish manager Dan Ayers said more than to travel westbound 22,000 razor clam diggers through the area is before 3 p.m. and after 7 p.m. Fri- have flocked to Washington beaches during previous days, Transportation said. New Year’s Eve openers. Eastbound travel is best before noon and after 5 p.m. Peninsula Daily News Sundays. and The Associated Press The bridge was closed after severe degradation of piles in the easterly pier were discovered, Transportation said. remains brings sad relief. Teenagers found the remains Tuesday afternoon in a ravine in Auburn, 25 miles south of Seattle. Dental records determined it was Marrero’s.

A picture of Becky has been near Mary Marrero’s bed for years. Every day, Marrero said, she looked at the picture and talked to her sister. “I’d say, ‘They’re gonna

another conviction. Becky Marrero lived with her family in White Center, south of Seattle. The young mother was 20 when she was last seen Dec. 3, 1982, leaving a motel near Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Her daughter is now 30 and has three children of her own. The family was frustrated that years ago investigators didn’t do a more thorough search the area where Becky Marrero’s remains were found. Ridgway led investigators to victim Marie Malvar in the same general area. Transcripts of his interviews indicate he tried to recall where Marrero was left, but his memory was spotty.

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A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Pot holder sales help no-kill shelter By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — This fundraiser is hot. The group — which has grown to six women who routinely get together to create pot holders, pet beds and aprons — started out as two friends trying to raise $500 for a charity they believed in: Peninsula Friends of Animals. Peninsula Friends of Animals is a no-kill shelter that takes in cats and, on a smaller scale, finds foster homes and adopts out dogs as well. Almost four years ago, Lori Miller and Carol Gearey teamed up to make pot holders, sell them for $12 a pair and make a few hundred dollars for a cause they both believe in. “By March or so, we already had over $800,” Miller said of the effort that began in January 2007. “After that, we went to them to see if it was something they were interested in selling more of.” Since then, the two have been joined by Sue Cram, Lynda Larison, Pat Matland and Donna Baxter. Cindy Wingerter, Lenell Savage and Cindy Caldicott also help out but don’t attend the monthly gettogethers.

Once a month, the group compiles kits for the pot holders. Each kit contains a 9-inch fabric square designed top, a coordinating back side, flannel in three colors to create a colorful design on the back side and a border fabric. The women then take the kits home to make as many pot holders as they can in the month. The finished products are taken to holiday bazaars, craft fairs and several locations in Sequim and Port Angeles to sell. Pot holders are available at the Lavender Festival, Paws in the Garden and Sequim’s Open Aire Market. They also can be purchased at the Department of Labor and Industries in Port Angeles, Red Rooster Grocery in Sequim and Hair Trix in Carlsborg. Gearey said that some people even inquire at the door of holiday bazaars if they are there. “Evidently, if the pot holders weren’t there, they weren’t interested,” she said. In the first three years, the group raised more than $40,000 for Peninsula Friends of Animals. This year, the group made an additional $29,000,

Some of the fabric squares used to make pot holders. Miller said. Originally, the group would hold “sew-a-thons” and stitch up the pot holders right in the shop tucked in the barn at Miller’s house. “Now with six of us, it just gets too crowded,” Gearey said. “So now, we make up kits and take them home.” Recently, Gearey branched into creating bags decorated with fabric with a dog print. Although time-intensive,

she has been selling them for $25 a piece. For more information on the Peninsula Friends of Animals, visit www.safe havenpfoa.org or phone 360452-0414. To donate 100 percent cotton fabric or thread to the ongoing pot holder fundraiser, phone Miller at 360461-0348.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Chris Tucker (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Lori Miller, left, and Carol Gearey stand inside the shop where they make pot holders, bags, aprons and more. In the foreground are fabric squares used to make the pot holders. With the women is J.R. the dog.

PT to celebrate New Year’s with games, fireworks Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Historical Society will usher in the new year with games, films, stories, crafts and fireworks. Volunteers are needed to help set up the fireworks display and clean up after it, as well as to provide similar services and security at Memorial Field. All activities will take place in and around Port Townsend’s historic City Hall at 540 Water St. between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.

New Year’s Eve. A Chinese heritage theme will tie together many of the events this year at the annual alcohol-free community celebration that focuses on art, culture and heritage. “First Night is for everyone,” said Lynne Sterling, historical society president. “It has something for families, singles and couples of all ages.”

place in historic City Hall at 540 Water St. Musical performances will be in City Council chambers. An art exhibit by Port Townsend High School students will be mounted in the Hildt Room. Actors will perform in the fire hall. A hands-on “history hunt” and a Chinese history project will occur in the courtroom. The Port Townsend High City Hall School Interact Club will Many activities will take have children’s games in

the old jail cells.

Other venues New this year, the Port Townsend Film Festival will screen three of its most popular shorts in the Theater Gallery. The Port Townsend Athletic Club, 229 Monroe St., will be a venue for children’s stories presented by Key City Public Theatre. At Jefferson Community School, 280 Quincy St., children will create Chinese lanterns, and the Key City

Mon. - Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 Sundays Noon - 4 Until Christmas

Playhouse will feature “The Best of PT Shorts.” Elevated Ice Cream, 631 Water St., will feature face painting and live music. Those who want to dance, will find square, line, round and folk dancing at the Cotton Building, 607 Water St. Live music and art will be offered at the Boiler Room, 711 Water St.

Fireworks At 9 p.m., Port Townsend will get the jump on the rest of the West Coast with the raising of an illuminated anchor created by sculptor Thaddeus Jurczynski, followed by a busting fireworks display provided by David Chuljian. Suggested donation admission is $5. Proceeds benefit the society’s programs. Admission passes are now available at the Jefferson County Museum in historic City Hall. “We encourage people to get their passes in advance this year to avoid the rush when the event starts,” said Bill Tennent, historical society executive director.

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PORT ANGELES — The Good Home Store Inc., 1006 W. 11th St., is selling purse and diaper-bag organizers to benefit the Daughters of Ruth, an American ministry that runs a safe house for disadvantaged children in Chiang Mai, Thailand. These children are from the lowest rungs of Thai society, many with parents who are dead, in jail for serious offenses or who have abandoned their responsibility. The purse organizers are $20 and will hold checkbooks, cell phones, pens and other items that get lost in purses. The diaper-bag organizers are $30 and have compartments for bottles, formula, toys, diapers, wet wipes and more. Both items are machinewashable. All proceeds will go toward Daughters of Ruth. For more information on the program, visit www. daughtersofruththailand. org. For more information on the local sale, phone 360457-0377.

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Each pass holder will receive a raffle ticket for prizes from the historical society’s museum shop. The raffle will be held following the fireworks. It will not be necessary to be present to win. First Night is organized by the Jefferson County Historical Society and sponsored by First Federal. “We couldn’t do it without all of our partners — Jefferson County Public Health, Jefferson County Parks and Recreation, the City of Port Townsend, Key City Public Theatre, Port Townsend Film Festival, Port Townsend Athletic Club, Elevated Ice Cream, the Boiler Room, the students from Interact, PTHS and Jefferson Community School, and all of our wonderful artists, musicians and volunteers,” historical society event coordinator Phyllis Snyder said. To volunteer, phone the historical society at 360385-1003. For more information about the historical society, phone 360-385-1003 or visit www.jchsmuseum.org.

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Burglary suspect OLYMPIA — When a deputy pulled over a Tumwater burglary suspect, the driver had a gun, four pit bulls and a bag of women’s underwear in his car. Court papers said 59-year-old Royce Lynn Baxter of Long Beach is infatuated with a women he worked with 10 years ago. Baxter was charged Monday in Thurston County Superior Court with burglary and stalking. He was jailed on $50,000 bail with arraignment set for Jan. 4. The Olympian reported that Baxter had been friends with the woman and her husband until seven years ago, when they obtained an anti-harassment order. They moved and didn’t tell Baxter their new address in Tumwater. The husband was awakened by an intruder Dec. 15 and wrestled with a man he recognized as Baxter who fled with the underwear. The Associated Press 1423 Ward Rd. sequim, Wa 98382

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block-long, three-story building housing six to eight businesses. Toledo officials are urging residents to conserve water because firefighters have spent hours pouring LACEY, Thurston water on the flames. County — Organizers are At least six businesses already accepting applicahave been damaged, tions for the 2011 Northincluding an antiques west Conservation and Fly store, a bookstore, a hardFishing Academy to be held ware store and a bank. in June. Firefighters told KIRO“The academy can be a TV it’s too early to know life-changing experience of what caused the fire. There our youth’s attitude about have been no reported injustewardship, conservation ries. and fishing,” said co-Director Mike Clancy. Grandma and drugs “The knowledge they SPOKANE — Police learn about the abundance said a 54-year-old woman of life in our rivers and drove her 14-year-old streams is invaluable, and grandson around Spokane it is imperative so that they become our conserva- to sell crack cocaine. The Spokesman-Review tionists of the future.” reported that Tyna A. HillThe academy is a joint iard appeared in Spokane venture between Trout Unlimited and The Federa- County Superior Court on Thursday on a drug delivtion of Fly Fishers. It is hosted by the South Sound ery charge and had her Fly Fishers and the Olym- arraignment set for Jan. 3. Police arrested the boy pia Trout Unlimited Chapand his grandmother Tuester. day after an undercover Last year, 23 boys and drug buy. girls, ages 12-16, attended Police said Hilliard’s the session. Many caught their first daughter — the boy’s fish on a fly they learned to mother — was arrested on tie, Clancy said. This year’s academy will be held June 20-26 on Hicks Lake at the GwinA Wild ExpEriEncE wood Conference Center in Lacey, five miles east of Olympia. For more information, e-mail Clancy at mtclancy@ earthlink.net.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 26, 2010

Commentary

Page

A10

What matters? Celebrity news ARE YOU READY for 2011? By that I mean, are you ready for Mariah Carey’s twins? To be sure, there will be Mark other topics deserving of Bazer attention next year: A presidential election will start to heat up, 9/11 will have its 10th anniversary, WikiLeaks will publish every e-mail you’ve ever sent . . . But in 2011, nothing or nobody is going to be able to touch Mariah’s twins. Except the photographers stylizing them for the covers of US Weekly, People and In Touch. Get ready for the exclusives about how having children has shown Mariah what’s truly important. Get ready for the eight-page pullout section of babies Octave and Inspire (or whatever their

names end up being) with the Mariah pull-quote: “I want to keep my children out of the public eye.” Get ready for the beach photos the week after delivery of Mariah’s perfectly toned post-pregnancy body. In other words, get ready for wanting to stay as far away as possible from a grocery-store checkout line for much of 2011. Other than Mariah Carey and her husband, the only one to benefit from the birth of her twins will be Peapod. None of this is a knock on Mariah Carey — Lambs, put down your pens! — because right now she should be all about her husband and future family. And when people ­— and I hesitate to use that word when describing gossip journalists ­— come asking Mariah about what she cares about most, it’s hard to blame her for answering them. “My taste bud situation is unparalleled,” she recently told TV’s “Extra.” “I don’t know what it is, but

Speaking Out

I’m just about fruit for some reason.” Say such a thing to your friend over lunch or post it as your Facebook status and nobody blinks an eye. Say it on national TV, and you sound a bit like a moron. It’s not (completely) her fault a reporter asked her about her wacky pregnancy cravings. There are three types of celebrities who end up on the cover of US Weekly and, hard to believe I’m saying this, its less-classy competitors. You’ve got the Angelina Jolies, Brad Pitts, Jennifer Anistons — major celebrities with actual talent who, for whatever their faults, know better than to want anything to do with the gossip industry. You know the stories about them are untrue, and you want to avoid them. Then you’ve got the D-list celebrities whose only talent is their ability to live terrible lives and who seem to exist because of gossip magazines. People like Kate Gosselin

Mariah Carey and her husband, Nick Cannon make an unspoken deal with the gossip industry: I’ll share everything I do, and thank you for keeping me in the public eye. It’s a win-win for everyone, except 99.9 percent of the country. You know the stories about them are true, and you want to avoid them. And then there is the category Mariah Carey falls into: celebrities who have talent, who are famous for something more than being famous, who are fabulous

and beautiful — and who still show up at the “Extra” studios or the US Weekly editorial offices. Why do they do it? What do they possibly have to gain? They can’t be doing it just for a free family portrait taken by a professional photographer, can they? Don’t they know about the good deals right now at the Sears Portrait Studio? Whatever the reason, the stories about them are usually true, and you usually want to avoid them. But . . . it’s hard. Because OMG! Mariah’s having twins! ________ Mark Bazer is a humorist who hosts “The Interview Show,” a Chicago-based talk show available at www.huffingtonpost.com. He is one of the four columnists who appear here every Sunday. Contact him at mebazer@ gmail.com or at Tribune Media Services, Attn: Mark Bazer, 435 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 1500, Chicago, IL 60611.

What is your personal highlight for 2010?

Jamie Gladfelter

Mark Twain Stevenson

Virginia Ashby

Mike Hanson

Verna Parker

David Wood

Krisy Henry

Chris Weideman

High school student Port Angeles

Sculptor Port Townsend

Caregiver Port Townsend

Artist’s assistant Sequim

Letter carrier Port Angeles

Homemakerreal estate agent

Janitor Forks

“I started my senior year at high school. It’s exciting to know that I’m almost done. This year is special. Also, I’ve enjoyed being able to spend time with my family.”

“For me, a highlight for 2010 is the very memorable trip we took to the southern Utah desert last spring. Plus, the romance between my wife and I continues unabated.”

“My highlight is going back to school to finish my degree in human development online at WSU. After 30 years, it is very hard, but I like it.”

Retired construction worker Neah Bay

“I was the cover woman in the PDN’s Peninsula Woman [magazine]. I was featured with all my bubbles. All year, people recognized me as the ‘Bubble Lady.’ Very positive experience.”

“Turning 50. When I was a lot younger, I never thought I’d reach that age. I promised myself that at 50, I would buy a brand-new car. Instead, I bought a 75-yearold home.”

“Baby No. 4 in April. We named him Fletcher. That was our biggest highlight of the year, Also, we celebrated our 10th anniversary.”

“We went on a vacation to California, specifically to Sacramento to see relatives. We drove down. We saw a lot of nice things. It was a good vacation just to get away.”

“It started out on a low with my house burning down last January. But the tribe has helped me out, and I’m back in a home. I’ve learned there is a good side to everything.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices ‘Bogus’ closure I’m responding to the state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s proposed five-year Elwha River fishing moratorium, including closure of Lake Sutherland [as part of the removal of the two Elwha River dams]. Sutherland should not be included in the moratorium. I know it’s in the drainage, but it’s hardly consequential in overall significance. I’m a native Washingtonian and a retired fishery biologist. I have a Bachelor of Science degree from Oregon State University in fish and game management. The last 25 years of my career were spent managing trout and kokanee fisheries in California. I supervised more than 200 lakes and streams in 12 California counties. I’m offering my expert opinion regarding the closing of Lake Sutherland: It’s bogus. The proposed Elwha watershed closure has a number of serious flaws:

■ There’s no baseline of data on numbers and species of fish in the system now. ■ There are no target numbers of fish or species to be reached in the recovery plan. Without numbers, one cannot know when the objective is reached. Sample surveys are not very accurate when expanded. ■ There’s no proposed compensation for the loss of Lake Sutherland. Serious losses will hit small businesses selling tackle, bait and related items. There will certainly be a decline in the sale of fishing licenses. ■ There’s no way to mitigate for this existing fine fishery in Sutherland with hypothetical numbers many years from now in the river and saltwater. We are being bullied by the very people who are supposed to represent us and maintain and improve fishing for the sportsmen. In my opinion, Lake Sutherland is presently managed for its highest

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Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

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Our readers’ letters, faxes

and best use.

for almost a year. The family practitioners James Ryan, Sequim I saw (my doctors for at least 10 years) prescribed a pain medication that not Defends doctor only was ineffective but There are always people made me sicker than I’d among us who attack and been all my life. are suspicious of those who They were not just act outside the norm of self- unhelpful. They did not interest. believe me and acted as Dr. James Kimber though I were senile. Rotchford [“U.S., Local When I finally found Dr. Drug Agents Raid Clinic Of Rotchford, he treated me PT Doctor,” Dec. 22 PDN] is with respect, prescribed suspect by some in the pub- and carefully monitored the lic and medical community different medication use because he has shunned a and reaction and greatly lucrative medical practice alleviated the pain until I for a controversial one. was able to have total hip Dr. Rotchford treats peo- replacement surgery. I do ple the world rejects — the not know what I would addicted. have done without him. He does it in a nonjudgHe is now enduring a mental way, with kindness long, drawn-out investigaand professionalism. tion. I have great concern He treats the poor. for the people who will go He set up the JC Mash without his care and their free clinic in Port Townsend essential medications and donates his medical during this witch hunt. expertise there as its docMarilyn Muller, tor. He is also a pain spePort Townsend cialist. He successfully treated Lead levels me more than five years The U.S. Environmental ago when I was in extreme, Protection Agency did the disabling pain from a people of Clallam County a severely deteriorated hip. I could not have surgery great favor by cleaning up

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

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dangerous levels of toxic wastes in Salt Creek Park. The toxins included incredibly high levels of lead and other heavy metals left behind when the old shooting range at the park was closed in 1968. EPA tests confirmed that the toxic wastes threatened the health of park users — especially children — and that the toxins were moving off-site, toward the Strait of Juan de Fuca, where they would someday endanger shellfish beds. Even though county officials knew of these toxic wastes and knew that these wastes posed a health risk to park users, they did nothing to protect the public. In fact, county officials tried to block testing of the site and its eventual cleanup. The county even tried to prevent posting of warning signs to keep people out of areas where their health could be harmed by exposure to soil or fungi, such as edible mushrooms, that absorb lead. County officials were responding to pressure

from a special-interest group that wants to develop a sensitive wetlands area at the headwaters of Sadie Creek into a complex of shooting ranges, in violation of federal bestmanagement practices. County park officials didn’t want the community to know that shooting ranges are extremely harmful in sensitive environments. The EPA simply worked through the local politics and found the money and expertise to clean up Salt Creek Park. The agency deserves our thanks. Josey Paul, Joyce EDITOR’S NOTE — EPA’s on-site study of the site was prompted by Paul’s concerns. We asked Joel Winborn, Clallam County Parks, Fair and Facilities manager, for a response. Here it is: ■ No claims were made by the Environmental Protection Agency that there was a specific threat to children. Turn

to

Voices/A11

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, weekend commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 Rather, there were concerns raised about those individuals who might wander into this remote and difficult-to-access location of the park. ■ County officials did not block any testing attempts. ■ The county did not try to prevent posting of signage. ■ The county was not responding to any specialinterest group. ■ The Sadie Creek proposal will not violate EPA Best Management Practices. ■ The county has not hidden any information from the “community.” ■ The county and the state both worked through existing protocol for assessing this site under the state Model Toxics Control Act, and this site did not receive a high ranking for cleanup.

The county Parks Department holds outdoor recreation for all, and a clean environment in which to enjoy recreational pursuits, paramount to our mission.

Biomass project I belong to a group of people whose health is worsened by airborne pollutants. Everyone with allergies, asthma and sinusitis should be concerned about the Nippon project, as well as folks with heart problems.  ■ Our health: Nippon proposes reducing some pollutants but increasing others, including nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and nanoparticles. Nanoparticles, so small they pass directly into the bloodstream, are not even addressed. Our bodies have no

Our readers’ letters, faxes

defense against nanoparticles crossing the blood-brain barrier and the placenta. Health professionals researching birth defects, cancer, diabetes, respiratory and cardiac diseases discovered their dangers only in the last five years. Nanoparticles are completely unregulated. Burning more fuel releases more nanoparticles. Nippon will double its biomass combustion. Winds will carry all pollutants into our gardens, farms, waters and our bodies. ■ Healthy forests: Our economy depends on timber and tourism. How much slash wood is available, and how much can we remove from our forests before trees won’t grow as quickly? Our Department of Natural Resources

launched a study to find out, but we won’t have the results until late in 2011. Let’s wait and find out. ■ Elwha’s water: Nippon’s environmental impact statement says it will use up to 3.2 million gallons of additional water every day from the Elwha, where we’re trying to restore the fishery after the dams come down. The Elwha’s critical low September and October flows will get even worse as our snowfields and glaciers recede. And they are. Will this endanger the fisheries? Shouldn’t the fishermen, agencies, the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe and all of us care? River flows and fisheries are not even addressed in the environmental impact statement.  Bob Lynette Sequim Lynette is co-chair of the

Sunday, December 26, 2010

A11

and e-mail

North Olympic Group of the Sierra Club, which has advocated delaying the biomass project.

Israel’s security In response to the Dec. 20 letter to Peninsula Voices, “Peace process,” facts about the Middle East, in particular Israel, are important. ■ Our military is not “fighting and dying for Israel’s security.” It is important that we know where our troops are fighting. ■ When peace for land was on the table, the Palestinians turned it down. Remember Arafat? When Israel became a state, Israel agreed to proposed borders. Her Arab neighbors did not. War was their answer. ■ In 2000, land was given up for peace in Lebanon.

The result was the Lebanon war of 2006. ■ In 2005, Gaza was given back. The result was Hamas’ Gaza operation of 20082009. When Israel agreed to give up for land for peace, the peace part by the Palestinians has not followed. To make it clear, Israel defends her right to exist. There are Arabs living in Israel who have said they would choose to remain Israelis rather than move to a newly formed “Palestinian state.” Iran’s leader has vowed to destroy Israel. What if he does? Which country will be next? Where is the outcry for Iran’s activity? A fact is a fact is a fact. Personal opinions are just that, personal opinions. Linda Cutler, Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

He and I will be talking about that moment for a long time.

Editor’s Note: Please submit comments about news stories (such as the new federal food safety bill, airport terminal pat-downs, the bus stop in front of the new Port Angeles Walmart and city of Port Angeles building permits) as signed letters to the editor. Many thanks!

A BIG THANK-you to our Sequim Police Department and also the animal control person for taking care of the situation in which a dog was continually barking, and also thanks to the neighbor who cooperated with them. It’s just nice to have some good sleep.

Rave of the Week RAVES TO THE gentleman who sits in his front yard in Port Angeles come rain or snow, dressed like Santa, and waves to people as they pass by. The spirit of Christmas lives within you, and you help share that spirit with others.

I WANT TO rave in gratitude to the anonymous and hardworking volunteers who all year keep Robin Hill Farm County Park looking beautiful. Those trails are wonderful, and it’s due to your hard work. Don’t think you are not appreciated. You definitely are. Thank you for a year of beautiful trails.

resolve all of our septic problems. A RAVE TO the Sequim Boys & Girls Club for helping host the toy drive for kids in the Sequim area, and a personal thank-you from Saffie and Cathy and Melissa for letting us have a Christmas this year. A BIG RAVE to the employees of the Clallam County Auditor’s Office for collecting everything from kitty litter to toys, food and cleaning supplies, for the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society and donating cash to the Welfare for Animals Guild. Merry Christmas.

If I had taken one step forward through my walk sign at the crosswalk you would have killed me.

gold, the other, a large one, is inlaid with lumpy turquoise. Return, and have a free conscience for the Christmas season.

RANT TO HIGH school girl who made change at a fast-food drive-through who didn’t know what a Kennedy half-dollar was. The bill was $2.49. I gave her two $1 bills and a Kennedy half-dollar, and she gave me 51 cents back. Kids in this country can graduate and not know their country’s currency and simple math.

TO DEC. 19 rant regarding RSVP. Some people mistakenly think that RSVP means you only have to respond if you are attending. This has happened to me when I have sent out invitations, and I now word them in a way that cannot be mistaken by people who may not know the meaning. We shouldn’t assume everyone knows what we do.

WHY DO THEY always schedule those eclipses in the middle of the night when everyone is asleep?

THE U.S. FLAG at the Port Angeles Fire Department should have been retired months ago. It’s a disgrace. THIS IS A rant to the town of Port Angeles for letting bums TO THE PERSON who cut take over the stairs leading to . . . and other Raves the little blue car off in the interthe downtown fountain. section near Walmart in Sequim, There’s trash everywhere. causing me to hit the curb and It smells like human waste, A rave for Ken at the WE WERE TOTALLY and it’s scary for anyone who has harm my rim. Sequim off-leash dog park and delighted when we had our I have a license plate number. to walk it at night. weekly informal luncheon at our his dog, Poncho. Please help me out and do the They found the bracelet that neighborhood restaurant, right thing. A HUGE RANT to people was given to me by my grandCoburn’s Cafe (Port Angeles). A report has been filed. who mistreat and abuse their When we arrived at our table mother and was worth more than pets by leaving them outside all $2,000. and found Christmas cards Rant of the Week REGARDING THE RANT night during the winter. I put up signs that I had lost addressed to us, it made us feel It’s not enough that these ani- about drivers backing out of it, and he called immediately. very special. parking spaces in parking lots, mals have fur. He even refused the reward MEN, IF YOU would like to That’s not going to keep them I’d like to rant about the inconmoney that I offered. see better results from your THANK YOU TO the rural siderate dimwits who don’t have women, why not try some regular warm in freezing temperatures Thank you for being a wonChristmas carolers who sang to the courtesy to allow drivers praise and encouragement and below. derful human being. our family at Freshwater Park backing out to get out. instead of constant criticism? Bring them inside at night. (Port Angeles) last Sunday night. In most cases, the backing-out And to the truly wonderful They are just miserable in A BIG RAVE to the Cosy They were riding on a trailer driver must be two-thirds to (though rare) guys out there who these conditions. Quilters of Carlsborg for all the decorated with lights. three-quarters out before being unselfishly understand and The moon was bright, and the beautiful quilts they gave to able to see if there are cars comAdventist Community Services to bestow this on the lucky women Christmas spirit was, too! PERHAPS READERS OF ing at them. in their lives, hallelujah! give to people needing them. Rants & Raves would give some ________ And, God bless you, each and THANKS TO THE lady who viewpoint on why people would every one. bought two strangers their try to burn wet slash on a rainy A RAVE FOR the little old (CLIP AND SAVE) breakfast Sunday at the Mariday with no prevailing wind. man who walks miles around To participate, call our Rants & . . and other Rants ners Cafe in Sequim. The smoke drifts into homes. Port Angeles each day picking up Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 What a wonderful surprise. garbage. (works 24 hours a day), e-mail us at God bless, and Merry ChristYou are appreciated! Rant To all the rude and TO WHOEVER STOLE letters@peninsuladailynews.com or mas. inconsiderate people whose three out of four of my sons’ drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., phone conversations I don’t need Port Angeles, WA 98362. bikes a week before Christmas. RAVE TO THE better one, to TO VERNA AND Bobby to hear while I am in the grocery Keep comments brief — 50 I call them The Grinch That words or less. a family member whom I have Yaun, who adopted Geva, a store, the pharmacy, the bakery, Stole Christmas. And, please, no libel, no chastised both publicly and at senior Dalmatian diagnosed with the restaurant, etc., or to dodge I have very upset boys, and responses to letters to the editor or family gatherings. terminal cancer, from the Olymyou while your thumbs are busy it’s really not cool. news stories; no personal attacks on I have said malicious things pic Peninsula Humane Society. texting away instead of looking individuals or on businesses identieven to the point of using the Because of your tender love I’M A NATIVE AMERICAN where you’re walking. fied by name; no thank you notes to court system to discredit you. and compassionate care, Geva senior citizen. your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, I’ve tried to demoralize you in lived another year to the fullest. ROBIN HILL MEANS soliIn a downtown Port Angeles grandchild (we simply don’t have more ways than one. You are heroes of our community. store, as soon as I walked in, an tude and tranquility, mixed in enough room for those); no inaccuI am sorry for my actions and with gunshots from the next-door rate information or unverified rumors; employee immediately began to no calls for boycotts; no political for what they have cost you. A HUGE THANK-you to Ray shadow me and was not even dis- gun range. endorsements; no charity fund at Brother’s Plumbing! creet about it. appeals; no commercial pitches; no RAVES TO THE Port You were so quick to respond I AM SURE that many will My wife and I make it a point rants or raves on articles, issues in Angeles High School boys basket- to our plumbing emergency, and recognize two men’s belts that to shop there in hopes that it will the news or decisions by government ball team. you helped us avoid a potential were taken from a terminally ill not become a victim of the econofficials. You made my 5-year-old son flood. senior in Sequim. omy. They just lost my business. Also, only one rant or rave per feel like a superstar with your You truly went above and They were his prize posseswriter. high-fives and T-shirt. beyond the call of duty, and we sions. Rant To the SUV that Don’t forget to tell us where What a classy group of young are incredibly thankful that you One has a large silver chamran a red light on Water Street in things happen — Port Angeles, Chimen you are! have a level of expertise to pion Indian buckle inlaid with macum, Sequim, etc. downtown Port Townsend: A RAVE TO the Dec. 19 Rant of the Week to the ladies. I got a good laugh out of it. Considerate men with genuine respect for their better half who keep themselves cleaned up don’t have your problems. Wonderful women aren’t rare, they’re smart. They see you coming and make themselves scarce. My sympathies to your keeper.


A12

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 26, 2010

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 26, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

SCOREBOARD Page B2

The Associated Press

Seattle’s Ichiro was expecting a new winning era to start for the Mariners in 2010, he told a Japanese newspaper in an interview.

Ichiro looks back on 2010 EDITOR’S NOTE: This interview with Ichiro originally appeared in Mainichi Daily News in Japan last week. Mainichi Daily News

SEATTLE — In 2010, Ichiro extended his major league record for consecutive 200-hit seasons to 10. The Seattle Mariners star also tied Pete Rose’s career mark of 10 200-hit seasons while making his 10th All-Star Game appearance and winning his 10th Gold Glove. The Mariners, though, suffered yet another disappointing season, finishing last in the AL West — 29 games behind the American League champion Texas Rangers. Ichiro has been piling up hits at a pace no one else can match in the history of baseball. But there has been no postseason for the Mariners since they last played in 2001 after winning a major league record-tying 116 games in Ichiro’s rookie year. In a recent interview with Kyodo News, Ichiro shared his thoughts on his 10th season in the major leagues. Q: You had high expectations for your team at the beginning of the season, but it turned out to be a disappointing year. A: When Randy Johnson threw out the ceremonial first pitch in our season home opener, he was joined on the mound by Dan Wilson, Edgar Martinez, Jay Buhner and Junior (Ken Griffey Jr.). It was good to see them all together but at the same time made me wonder if there is a real teammate for me. I hoped that Felix (Hernandez) or (Chone) Figgins would become one and that 2010 would be the start of a new Mariners era. But we stumbled from the outset. Q: Griffey abruptly ended his career by announcing his retirement (on June 2). Was it the most shocking thing for you this year? A: He had a Hall of Fame career. It seems as if he’s living a life of his own, but indeed he is a person who takes good care of others. It was hard to see such a great player have to leave the field in despair. Griffey was Ichiro’s one and only idol long before he began his major league career in 2001. Ichiro: I never thought I would have a chance to play alongside Junior on the same team. It was so special to spend time with him. Q: The Mariners suffered 101 losses for the second time in three seasons. The 2010 team consisted mainly of young players. A: Most members of the 2008 team have gone, so everyone knows the situation is not the same. But I’ve been a member of the Mariners the past 10 seasons. After all this time I wonder why we still lose this many games. Q: In recent years, the team has repeated a brief rise and a long downward slide. Turn

to

Ichiro/B3

The Associated Press

Atlanta’s Ovie Mughelli, center, rushes against the Seattle Seahawks, including defensive tackle Kentwan Balmer, right, in the first half of last Sunday’s game. The Seahawks play at Tampa Bay today.

Hawks in playoff hunt Today’s opponent, Bucs, also eying postseason By Fred Goodall

The Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — One team has lost three of its past four games, while the other has dropped six of eight. Surprisingly, Tampa Bay and Seattle not only remain in playoff contention with two weeks left in the regular season, but the Seahawks (6-8) actually still have a shot at winning the NFC West — maybe even with a losing record. The prospect that the NFC West winner could have a losing record has sparked debate over whether that team would be deserving of hosting a firstround playoff game against a wild-card team with a better record. Under current NFL guidelines, no division champion can be seeded lower than No. 4.

Pete Carroll, in his first season with the Seahawks after a suc- Next Game cessful run as a national Today c h a m p i o n - vs. Buccaneers s h i p - w i n - at Tampa Bay ning coach Time: 1 p.m. at Southern On TV: Ch. 13 California, likes the rule the way it is. “The system is already set up,” Carroll said. “I’m always a system guy. Remember back in the BCS days, I was always a system guy. It is what it is. “You win the division, you’ve done what you needed to do to position yourselves as the system allows. “You get a home game, here

you go, whatever the record is. I know there are teams that have 10, maybe 11 wins that aren’t in as good a situation as we are right now. “That’s their lot right now. We’re fortunate to be where we are and we’ll see what we can do with it.”

Two wins equals title Wins against the Bucs and Rams, who enter Sunday tied with Seattle for first place, will give the Seahawks the division title. There’s even a chance what happens against Tampa Bay will be irrelevant. If the Rams beat San Francisco in a game that will end around the time the Seahawks and Bucs are getting under way, then next week’s season finale between Seattle and St. Louis at Qwest Field will decide the division title. Carroll shrugged off questions about whether his team would approach Sunday’s game with less urgency if it turns out

the result will be insignificant. “It’s classic that everyone would think that’s the issue, ‘Oh, now we’re going to be all fired up or we’re not.’ That’s not what’s going to take place. If it does, then we’re not where we’re supposed to be yet,” the coach said. “We have to be over and above that stuff, and we have to stay with what’s at hand. “That’s really the great challenge, I think, as we continue to learn how to compete on a regular basis and play like we’re capable regardless of the circumstances.” The Bucs (8-6) are clinging to hopes, too, but will need outside help in addition to winning out. “When we started this thing, we talked about ‘Race to 10’ and people thought we were crazy,” Bucs coach Raheem Morris said. “But it was my mentality, it was my vision, it was what I set out for our team to do. These guys have done nothing but back me. Turn

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Hawks/B4

Heat scorches Lakers by 16 LeBron goes wild vs. L.A. By Greg Beacham

The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — LeBron James and Kobe Bryant ran their mouths while they jogged downcourt, not quite making eye contact during an unpleasant conversation in the closing minutes. “Just asked him what he got for Christmas,” James said. Although the two superstars wouldn’t reveal what angry words they exchanged, it wasn’t tough to pick out a few statements Saturday. While Kobe and the Los Angeles Lakers got a disturbing first look at the Miami Heat, LeBron got the last word at Staples Center yet again. James had 27 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists while hitting a season-high five 3-pointers, and the Heat thrived on the holiday stage in a 96-80 victory. Although both teams called the game a television curiosity rather than a potential NBA finals preview, it clearly meant something to James, who had his third triple-double with Miami and the 31st of his career. James also outplayed Bryant, who scored 17 points, in his second straight Christmas win in the Lakers’ home arena, following last season’s victory for LeBron’s Cavaliers.

The Associated Press

Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Kobe Bryant, left, takes a fall next to Miami’s LeBron James during the second half of their game Saturday in Los Angeles. “We’re not trying to make a statement to anyone,” James said. “We’re trying to show each other that we can play at a high level and try to get better every game. This is one game. We’re happy because we got better today.” While the Heat realize Boston and Orlando are much more important obstacles to their championship hopes, and while

the Lakers don’t get terribly excited about playing anybody until the playoffs, there was a palpable edge in the crowd at Staples Center for this intersectional matchup — until the Heat’s steady defensive effort flattened the Lakers in the second half. Chris Bosh had 24 points and 13 rebounds, Dwyane Wade added 18 points on a sore knee and the Heat won for the 14th

time in 15 games while flustering the two-time defending champions into a terrible offensive performance, starting with Los Angeles’ 14-point first quarter. “Our whole thing is just playing solid defense the whole game,” Bosh said. “That’s the primary part of our identity.” Turn

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NBA/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today No events scheduled

Monday Boys Basketball: Forks at Neah Bay, 1 p.m. Girls Basketball: Forks at Neah Bay, 1 p.m.

Tuesday Boys Basketball: Chimacum, Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend at Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School, 9 a.m. Girls Basketball: Chimacum and Port Townsend at Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School, 9 a.m. Wrestling: Forks at Vashon Island Invitational, 10 a.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Clackamas Tournament, 2 p.m.

Area Sports Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Dec. 23 Men’s Club Better Nine Gross: Mike DuPuis, 31. Net: Tom Hainstock, 32; Jay Bruch, 32.5; Quint Boe, 32.5; Eric Kovatch, 32.5; David Boerigter, 34; Sam Hurworth, 34. Team Event Gross: Mike DuPuis and Gary Thorne, 64; Mike DuPuis and Kevin Russell, 64. Net: David Boerigter and Gene Norton, 61; Steve Callis and Sam Hurworth, 61; Tom Hainstock and Duane Vernon, 61; David Boerigter and Gene Middleton, 63; Eric Kovatch and Steve Colvin, 63.

Preps Basketball BOYS As of Dec. 23 Olympic League Standings League Overall Kingston 6-0 7-1 Port Angeles 6-1 8-1 Sequim 5-1 9-1 Bremerton(3A) 3-3 4-4 Olympic 3-3 4-5 Klahowya 2-4 3-5 North Mason 2-4 3-5 Port Town. (1A) 1-6 1-7 North Kitsap 0-5 0-7 Dec. 13 Games Port Angeles 53, Port Townsend 45 Sequim 77, Bremerton 66 Kingston 63, North Mason 40 Klahowya 76, North Kitsap 61 Dec. 15 Games Sequim 58, Klahowya 54 Kingston 45, Port Townsend 42 Port Angeles 66, Bremerton 64 Olympic 60, North Mason 58 Dec. 17 Games Sequim 57, North Kitsap 45 Olympic 62, Port Townsend 55 Port Angeles 84, Klahowya 49 Kingston 62, Bremerton 48 Dec. 18 Games Olympic 63, Peninsula 52 Dec. 21 Games Port Angeles 55, North Kitsap 42 North Mason 39, Port Townsend 36 Kingston 82, Klahowya 54 Bremerton 58, Olympic 53 Sequim 49, Forks 29 Dec. 22 Game Port Angeles 47, Tyee 38 Thursday Game Yelm 61, Olympic 60 Tuesday Games Bremerton at Capital North Kitsap at Peninsula Port Townend at Crush Port Angeles at Crush Sequim at Crush Wednesday Games Kingston at Sehome Port Townsend at Crush Port Angeles at Crush Sequim at Crush North Mason at Yakima Tourn. Kingston at Lynden Christ. Tourn. Bremerton at Capital Tourn. Thursday Games Kingston at Bellingham Bainbridge at North Kitsap North Mason at Yakima Tourn. Kingston at Lynden Christ. Tourn. Bremerton at Capital Tourn. Jan. 4 Games Kingston at Sequim Port Townsend at Bremerton Olympic at North Kitsap North Mason at Klahowya 1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Seattle Christian 2-0 5-1 Cas. Christian 2-0 5-1 Life Christian 1-1 5-2 Chimacum 1-1 3-2 Vashon Island 1-1 4-2 Charles Wright 0-2 4-5 Orting 0-2 1-4 Dec. 14 Games Cascade Christian 85, Chimacum 27 Life Christian 83, Orting 41 Seattle Christian 55, Charles Wright 41 Vashon Island 80, Auburn Adventist 53 Dec. 17 Games Chimacum 56, Charles Wright 55 (OT) Vashon Island 61, Life Christian 59 Seattle Christian 51, Cedar Park Christian 43 Cascade Christian 87, Orting 51 Dec. 18 Games Chelan 63, Life Christian 59 Dec. 20 Game Northwest Yeshiva at Orting Dec. 21 Game Charles Wright 70, Tacoma Baptist 18 Vashon Island 52, Steilacoom 35 Cascade Christian 72, Spanaway Lake 60 Dec. 22 Game Cascade Christian 81, Foster 69 Tuesday Games Life Christian at Chelan tournament Orting at Crush Chimacum at Crush Wednesday Games Seattle Christian at Lynden Christian tournament Life Christian at Chelan tournament Vashon Island at Sun Dome Showdown Orting at Crush Chimacum at Crush Thursday Games Seattle Christian at Lynden Christian tournament Life Christian at Chelan tournament Vashon Island at Sun Dome Showdown

The Associated Press

NBA-sized

wingspan

Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard, right, blocks a shot by Boston Celtics center Glen Davis during the first half of Saturday’s NBA game in Orlando, Fla. The Magic took a 13-0 lead and held on to an 86-78 victory on Christmas day. The Celtics suffered only their fifth loss of the season.

Jan. 4 Games Chimacum at Seattle Christian Cascade Christian at Vashon Island Charles Wright at Orting Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Hoquiam 2-0 6-1 Onalaska 2-0 5-1 Rainier 2-0 5-0 Montesano 1-1 3-2 Forks 1-1 2-3 Tenino 0-2 3-3 Elma 0-2 2-5 Rochester 0-2 1-5 Dec. 14 Games Rainier 49, Forks 29 Onalaska 71, Tenino 63 Hoquiam 78, Rochester 48 Montesano 51, Elma 41 Dec. 16 Games Central Linn 67, Elma 49 Dec. 17 Games Hoquiam 78, Tenino 46 Forks 62, Rochester 36 Elma 56, Taft 50 Dec. 18 Games Tenino 55, Wishkah 17 Onalaska 57, Montesano 15 Elma 57, Astoria 43 Dec. 21 Games Hoquiam 66, Castle Rock 43 Toledo 54, Onalaska 52 Rainier 64, Elma 45 Dec. 22 Games Rainier 58, Raymond 42 Monday Game Forks at Neah Bay Tuesday Games Rainier at Adna Hoquiam at Aberdeen Napavine at Montesano Wednesday Games Montesano vs. Woodland Rochester at Adna Forks at North Beach Invite Thursday Games LaCenter at Rochester Rainier at Napavine Forks at North Beach Invite Northwest Christian at Tenino Jan. 3 Games Rainier at Onalaska Montesano at Hoquiam Jan. 4 Game Tenino at Forks Elma at Rochester North Olympic League League Overall Neah Bay 0-0 6-1 Clallam Bay 0-0 5-2 Crescent 0-0 1-5 Dec. 15 Game Clallam Bay 51, Crescent 46 Dec. 16 Game Neah Bay beat Rainier Christian Dec. 18 Game Taholah beat Clallam Bay Dec. 20 Game Neah Bay 53, Lummi 48 Dec. 21 Game Tulalip Heritage 55, Neah Bay 49 Thursday Game Neah Bay 62 Crosspoint Academy 59 Monday Game Forks at Neah Bay Thursday Game Quilcene at Crescent Jan. 5 Game Clallam Bay at Wishkah GIRLS As of Dec. 23 Olympic League Standings League Overall Port Angeles 7-0 7-1 Sequim 5-1 8-1 Kingston 5-1 6-2 Port Town. (1A) 3-4 3-5 Olympic 3-3 4-5 North Kitsap 2-4 3-4 Bremerton(3A) 2-4 3-6 North Mason 1-5 2-6 Klahowya 0-6 1-7 Dec. 13 Games Port Angeles 86, Port Townsend 36 Sequim 41, Bremerton 37 Kingston 61, North Mason 30 North Kitsap 60, Klahowya 49 Dec. 14 Games Sequim 53, Aussies 34 Dec. 15 Games Sequim 55, Klahowya 44 Kingston 53, Port Townsend 30 Port Angeles 69, Bremerton 43

Olympic 33, North Mason 31 Dec. 17 Games Sequim 50, North Kitsap 48 Port Townsend 55, Olympic 54 Port Angeles 69, Klahowya 37 Kingston 57, Bremerton 35 Dec. 18 Games Olympic 53, Peninsula 45 Dec. 21 Games Port Angeles 78, North Kitsap 27 North Mason 40, Port Townsend 36 Kingston 56, Klahowya 25 Olympic 57, Bremerton 49 Thursday Games Mount Tahoma 78, Port Angeles 48 North Mason 50, Shelton 27 Tuesday Games Peninsula at North Kitsap Port Townsend at Crush Wednesday Game Kingston at Henry Foss Tumwater at Olympic North Mason at Lakes Port Townsend at Crush Sequim at Mark Morris Tourn. North Mason at Kennedy Tourn. Kingston at Spanaway Tourn. Thursday Games Bremerton at Fife Renton at Port Angeles Sequim at Mark Morris Tourn. North Mason at Kennedy Tourn. Kingston at Spanaway Tourn. Bremerton at Capital Tourn. Jan. 3 Game Port Angeles at South Kitsap Jan. 4 Games Sequim at Kingston Bremerton at Port Townsend North Kitsap at Olympic Klahowya at North Mason 1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Seattle Christian 2-0 5-1 Cas. Christian 2-0 4-1 Vashon Island 1-1 4-1 Orting 1-1 1-4 Chimacum 1-1 1-5 Life Christian 0-2 1-4 Charles Wright 0-2 4-4 Dec. 14 Games Cascade Christian 58, Chimacum 21 Seattle Christian 54, Charles Wright 20 Orting 52, Life Christian 40 Vashon Island 43, Auburn Adventist 24 Dec. 17 Games Chimacum 30, Charles Wright 26 Vashon Island 52, Life Christian 34 Cascade Christian 72, Orting 29 Dec. 18 Games Seattle Christian 36, Tahoma 24 Dec. 21 Games Tacoma Baptist 43, Charles Wright Academy 39 Vashon Island 46, Steilacoom 38 Tuesday Games Seattle Christian vs. River Ridge Cascade Christian at Northwest Christian Orting at Crush Chimacum at Crush Wednesday Games Seattle Christian vs. Foster Vashon Island at Sun Dome Showdown Orting at Crush Chimacum at Crush Thursday Games Seattle Christian vs. Lindbergh Franklin Pierce at Cascade Christian Life Christian at Mount Rainier Lutheran Vashon Island at Sun Dome Showdown Jan. 4 Games Chimacum at Seattle Christian Cascade Christian at Vashon Island Charles Wright at Orting Jan. 5 Game Life Christian at Muckleshoot Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Onalaska 2-0 5-1 Hoquiam 2-0 2-5 Rainier 1-0 4-2 Elma 1-0 4-2 Forks 1-1 2-3 Rochester 0-2 2-4 Montesano 0-2 1-5 Tenino 0-2 0-5 Dec. 14 Games Rainier 60, Forks 20 Elma 47, Montesano 41 Hoquiam 63, Rochester 34 Onalaska 42, Tenino 28 Dec. 16 Games Madras 74, Elma 35

Dec. 17 Games Forks 61, Rochester 33 Hoquiam 49, Tenino 45 Onalaska 63, Montesano 37 Elma 70, Taft 29 Dec. 18 Games Elma 53, Astoria 51 Dec. 21 Games Castle Rock beat Hoquiam Naselle 37, Montesano 36 Northwest Christian (Lacey) 45, Tenino 39 Dec. 22 Games Rainier 54, Raymond 26 Rochester 42, Winlock 30 Napavine 47, Onalaska 33 Dec. 23 Games Rainier at Napavine Ryamond vs. Onalaska Monday Game Forks at Neah Bay Wednesday Games Aberdeen at Hoquiam Rochester at Centralia Tenino at North Beach Invite Forks at North Beach Invite Thursday Games Rainier at Elma Tenino at North Beach Invite Forks at North Beach Invite Jan. 4 Games Onalaska at Rainier Montesano at Hoquiam Tenino at Forks Jan. 5 Games Rochester at Elma North Olympic League League Overall Neah Bay 0-0 7-0 Clallam Bay 0-0 5-2 Crescent 0-0 0-4 Dec. 15 Game Clallam Bay 43, Crescent 21 Dec. 16 Game Neah Bay beat Rainier Christian Dec. 18 Game Clallam Bay 41, Taholah 38 Dec. 20 Game Neah Bay 57, Lummi 49 Dec. 21 Game Neah Bay 65, Tulalip Heritage 24 Thursday Game Neah Bay 56, Crosspoint Academy 37 Monday Game Forks at Neah Bay Thursday Game Quilcene at Crescent Jan. 4 Game Neah Bay at Port Angeles C Jan. 5 Game Clallam Bay at Wishkah

Basketball NBA Glance All Times PST WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 21 9 .700 — Phoenix 13 15 .464 7 Golden State 10 18 .357 10 L.A. Clippers 8 22 .267 13 Sacramento 5 22 .185 141⁄2 Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 25 4 .862 — Dallas 23 5 .821 11⁄2 New Orleans 17 12 .586 8 Houston 14 15 .483 11 Memphis 12 17 .414 13 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Utah 21 9 .700 — Oklahoma City 20 10 .667 1 Denver 16 11 .593 31⁄2 Portland 15 14 .517 51⁄2 Minnesota 6 24 .200 15 EASTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 18 10 .643 — Indiana 13 14 .481 41⁄2 Milwaukee 12 16 .429 6 Detroit 10 19 .345 81⁄2 Cleveland 8 21 .276 101⁄2 Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 23 5 .821 — New York 18 12 .600 6 Philadelphia 11 18 .379 121⁄2 Toronto 10 19 .345 131⁄2 New Jersey 9 21 .300 15

SPORTS ON TV

Today 10 a.m. (13) KCPQ Football NFL, San Francisco 49ers vs. St. Louis Rams, Site: Edward Jones Dome St. Louis, Mo. (Live) 11 a.m. (2) CBUT Figure Skating ISU, Grand Prix Final, Men’s Dance and Free Programs, Site: Capital Indoor Stadium - Beijing, China Noon (5) KING Snowboard Cross USSA, World Cup, Site: Telluride Ski Resort - Telluride, Colo. 1 p.m. (7) KIRO Football NFL, New York Jets vs. Chicago Bears, Site: Soldier Field - Chicago (Live) 1 p.m. (10) CITY Football NFL, New York Giants vs. Green Bay Packers, Site: Lambeau Field - Green Bay, Wis. (Live) 1 p.m. (13) KCPQ Football NFL, Seattle Seahawks vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Site: Raymond James Stadium - Tampa, Fla. (Live) 5:15 p.m. (5) KING Football NFL, Minnesota Vikings vs. Philadelphia Eagles, Site: Lincoln Financial Field - Philadelphia, Pa. (Live) 5:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Florida International vs. Toledo, Little Caesars Pizza Bowl, Site: Ford Field - Detroit (Live) Southeast Division W L Pct GB 23 9 .719 — 19 12 .613 31⁄2 18 12 .600 4 9 19 .321 12 7 20 .259 131⁄2 Saturday’s Games New York 103, Chicago 95 Orlando 86, Boston 78 Miami 96, L.A. Lakers 80 Denver at Oklahoma City, late Portland at Golden State, late Today’s Games Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 12 p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 3 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 3 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 4 p.m. Washington at San Antonio, 4 p.m. Memphis at Indiana, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 5 p.m. Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington

Football NFL Standings All Times PST NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 258 Seattle 6 8 0 .429 279 San Francisco 5 9 0 .357 250 Arizona 5 10 0 .345 282 East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 10 4 0 .714 412 N.Y. Giants 9 5 0 .643 360 Washington 5 9 0 .357 268 Dallas 5 10 0 .345 380 South W L T Pct PF x-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 369 New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 354 Tampa Bay 8 6 0 .571 280 Carolina 2 13 0 .133 186 North W L T Pct PF y-Chicago 10 4 0 .714 293 Green Bay 8 6 0 .571 333 Minnesota 5 9 0 .357 244 Detroit 4 10 0 .286 308 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 9 5 0 .643 322 San Diego 8 6 0 .571 388 Oakland 7 7 0 .500 353 Denver 3 11 0 .214 292 East W L T Pct PF x-New England 12 2 0 .857 446 N.Y. Jets 10 4 0 .714 295 Miami 7 7 0 .500 239 Buffalo 4 10 0 .286 273 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 8 6 0 .571 381 Jacksonville 8 6 0 .571 319 Tennessee 6 8 0 .429 322 Houston 5 9 0 .357 333 North W L T Pct PF x-Pittsburgh 11 4 0 .733 334 Baltimore 10 4 0 .714 324 Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 252 Cincinnati 3 11 0 .214 281 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturday’s Game Arizona 27, Dallas 26 Today’s Games Tennessee at Kansas City, 10 a.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Chicago, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 10 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Detroit at Miami, 10 a.m. Washington at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Denver, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m.

PA 295 363 314 396 PA 339 288 343 423 PA 261 270 290 377 PA 242 220 314 329 PA 281 260 330 415 PA 303 259 261 353 PA 342 365 282 386 PA 223 253 271 362

College Football The AP Top 7 Fared No. 1 Auburn (13-0) vs. No. 1 Oregon, BCS Championship, Jan. 10. No. 2 Oregon (12-0) vs. No. 2 Auburn, BCS Championship, Jan. 10. No. 3 TCU (12-0) vs. No. 4 Wisconsin, Rose Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 4 Wisconsin (11-1) vs. No. 3 TCU, Rose Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 5 Stanford (11-1) vs. No. 12 Virginia Tech, Orange Bowl, Jan. 3. No. 6 Ohio State (11-1) vs. vs. No. 8 Arkansas, Sugar Bowl, Jan. 4. No. 7 Michigan State (11-1) vs. No. 15 Alabama, Capital One Bowl, Jan. 1.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 26, 2010

B3

Arizona nips Cowboy rally By Bob Baum

The Associated Press

Three-on-three

champions

These Port Angeles Basketball players won the Clallam County Family YMCA’s 3-on-3 basketball championship. The players, who went undefeated in the tournament, are Dane Bradow, Ethan Miles, Rweha Munyagi and Easton Joslin. The coach, at right, is Nylene Charles.

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Third-string quarterbacks when the season began, John Skelton and Stephen McGee had lead parts in a Christmas night drama staged by a pair of NFL teams headed nowhere. Jay Feely’s 48-yard field goal inched over the crossbar with 5 seconds to play, giving the Arizona Cardinals a 27-26 victory over the Dallas Cowboys. “Really, nothing’s bigger than beating the Dallas Cowboys on Christmas Day right now,” Cardinals rookie QB Skelton said. “Whiz [coach Ken Whisenhunt] was shaking my hand before the game and I said, ‘We have one last gift to unwrap.’ Sure enough, it took the last minute, but we got it.” Dallas (5-10) rallied from 18 points down to take a 26-24 lead when Stephen McGee, in his first NFL game, threw 45 yards to

Miles Austin for a touchdown with 1:46 to play. But David Buehler’s extra point went wide left. “I’m not feeling too good,” Buehler said. “I feel bad for Stephen. He drove the team down there and got the touchdown. “PATs are something that is something automatic. You have to put them through the uprights. I think I just rushed it a little bit.” Arizona (5-10) was in deep trouble after the kickoff, but Skelton, on fourthand-15 from the Cardinals 19, threw 26 yards to Larry Fitzgerald, his only catch of the game. Then Skelton threw 19 yards to fellow rookie Max Komar. An illegal formation penalty moved the ball back 5 yards but still well within Feely’s range. Feely, who had a 49-yarder earlier, has missed three kicks all season, including a 49-yard attempt Saturday night.

Butler defeats NBA: Miami stomps L.A. Lakers WSU for crown The Associated Press

HONOLULU — Shelvin Mack scored 20 points to pace Butler to an 84-68 victory over Washington State in the championship game of the Diamond Head Classic on Saturday night. A 15-0 second-half run fueled the Bulldogs (9-4) to their fifth straight win. Klay Thompson scored a game-high 31 points to lead the Cougars (10-2), whose five-game winning streak ended. Butler, which made a magical run in last season’s NCAA tournament before

Continued from B1 Our backbone right now is defense.” James played a balanced, patient game, even after a technical foul near halftime for an under-the-basket scuffle with Lakers defensive stopper Ron Artest. James’ teammates contributed enough to keep the Heat comfortably ahead, with Bosh playing an outstanding first half and Mario Chalmers contributing 13 points in a reserve role, including three 3-pointers. “Offensively, it’s probably the most trust and the most poise we’ve played with this season,” Miami coach Erik Spoelstra said. Pau Gasol scored 17 points for the Lakers, who fell behind early and never caught up to the tantalizing new contenders for their title. Although Bryant wore garish green shoes for the holiday, his Lakers simply didn’t raise their games to meet the spotlight that follows Miami, falling well behind in the first half and never making a run. Bryant, who picked up his third technical foul in two games, was visibly displeased with his teammates throughout the second half. “It’s like these games mean more to our opponents than they do to us,” Bryant said. “I think we need to get that straight — play with more focus, put more emphasis on these games. “I don’t like it. We know what we’re capable of doing, and that’s part of the problem.” Lamar Odom had 14 points and nine rebounds for the Lakers, who have lost two straight at home after winning five in a row on the road, following up Tuesday’s collapse against Milwaukee with this highprofile flop. While Odom thinks the Lakers are overconfident, Bryant believes the problems start in practice. “Individually, you have to make that decision on what’s important,” Bryant said. “The game has to be the most important thing. This is serious stuff. You don’t

Ichiro: Interview

The Associated Press

Miami Heat forward LeBron James, top, yells at Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant after Bryant was called for an offensive foul during the second half of their game Saturday. just have two rings and say, ‘That’s enough. We’re satisfied with what we’ve got.’ I’m not going to let that slide.” Coach Phil Jackson dislikes the Lakers’ annual spot on the NBA’s Christmas schedule, and perhaps for reasons beyond the season: Los Angeles dropped to 4-8 on Christmas since 1999, including last season’s

one-sided loss to Cleveland, which ended with dozens of giveaway foam hands getting thrown on the court. Players on both teams broke out festive holiday sneakers for the occasion, including lime-green Nike kicks on Bryant, Gasol and Odom. James and Bosh wore holiday-red shoes with garish green laces.

James got his T shortly afterward for shoving Artest under the basket with 10 seconds left in the first half after Artest wrapped nearly his entire arm around James’ neck while battling for rebounding position. “I was in a WWE headlock, and I was trying to get out of it,” James said.

Federation: Taurasi tests positive The Associated Press

NEW YORK — WNBA standout and former UConn star Diana Taurasi tested positive for modafinil while playing in a professional women’s league in Turkey, the country’s basketball federation said Friday. Neither her lawyer nor her team, Fenerbahce, would confirm that Taurasi tested positive for the stimulant, which has been involved in several major doping cases, including that

losing to Duke in the national title game, shot 50 percent from the field, including 11-of-27 on 3-pointers. The Bulldogs scored on their first six possessions of the second half, including three straight 3-pointers. Two came from Zach Hahn, who finished with 14 points. Andrew Smith and tournament MVP Matt Howard also had 14 points. Mack and Thompson also made the all-tournament team. Florida State defeated No. 15 Baylor for third place.

of U.S. sprinter Kelli White. Modafinil is used to counter excessive sleepiness due to narcolepsy, shiftwork sleep disorder or sleep apnea, according to the website for the prescription drug Provigil, which contains the substance. The Turkish Basketball Federation statement cited a report from the lab at Hacettepe University. “We’re not going to confirm what the drug is,” Taurasi’s lawyer, Howard

Jacobs, told The Associated Press Friday. “We’ll revisit it after the “B” sample returns. They shouldn’t be speaking about it at all.” White won the 100- and 200-meter races at the 2003 world championships in Paris, but both her medals were stripped after she tested positive for the stimulant. Jacobs said Taurasi’s “A” sample came back positive last week and that the sub-

stance “was not a steroid or recreational drug.” Taurasi has been provisionally suspended pending the testing of her “B” sample, sometime early next month. She has already missed three games with Fenerbahce. The team’s website said she and another player were asked to submit to a test on Nov. 13, following the game against Istanbul. The other player tested negative.

Continued from B1 (the Orix BlueWave) for permission to go to the majors unless I was ready A: The whole team had to take risks. high hopes for the 2010 Q: A lot of Japanese season because we thought we made good additions to players have come to the major leagues after you. the roster (such as leftJapan won the first two hander Cliff Lee and seceditions of the World Baseond baseman Figgins). ball Classic. And we ended up like People in Japan think this (with 101 losses). From Japanese baseball and the now on, maybe we major leagues are closer shouldn’t even voice our than before. goals. A: A lot of Japanese Q: You had the worst players? I think the numbatting average and the lowest number of hits ever ber is still far from many. The number of Japanese in July. This year you had a who have experienced hard time in the summer. A: I wasn’t in good form major league baseball is so since April, so I knew I was small, and only a short period of time has passed going into a slump sooner since we started playing or later. But the down time came baseball in the majors. I wonder if there is anylater than I thought. I don’t one who can evaluate the know why I managed to Japanese and major get hits in the first few leagues fairly. months of the season. Every year, April is the This offseason Ichiro is month to get used to live doing something different pitching. I often have a from the past nine years. good year after struggling Q: What have you been in April. doing this offseason? If I do well in April, it A: I’ve been playing golf. gets hard for me to decide I don’t get blisters from whether I need to make swinging the bat, but I get adjustments to my blisters all over my hands mechanics. from golfing. Things get even harder Blisters are signs that if I find problems late in you’re not a good baseball the season. Hitting is always an adjustment. The player or not a good golfer, I think. word “difficult” is not enough to explain what Q: You usually take bathitting is. Hitting is never ting practice and play catch easy. even at this time of year. A: I haven’t grabbed the Ichiro also looked back bat or the ball. I hit my golf at the start of his major ball all over the course, so I league career 10 years ago. have to go look for the ball. A: I wanted to play in the majors as early as pos- It might be harder than my usual training. sible. The posting system Q: Do you feel uncomwas the only way for me. I imagined that I would have fortable for not swinging a hard time if I had to wait the bat? A: I hate it when I don’t until I became a free agent. Q: Your agent, Tony hit my tee shot straight Attanasio, has said you down the middle. It’s been were prepared to accept 10 years since I came over anything — from the team here. I think it’s time for to contract terms — to play me to play some golf. in the major leagues. Q: Does that mean you A: Under the posting think you can finally relax system, you can’t pick your after 10 major league seateam and you have a limsons? ited time for negotiations. A: I don’t know if I’ve It looks like an unfavorearned relaxing time or able system for players. what, but I think my mind But back then I hadn’t has been at ease after I done anything in the completed 10 years of play United States. in the majors. I couldn’t ask my club


B4

Sunday, December 26, 2010

SportsRecreation

Jockeying for that NFC Worst crown WELL, MATT HASSELBECK failed the test we gave him last week. All we asked, well, me specifically, was Brad that he show some of that Pro Bowl form he LaBrie displayed for a couple of years. All we wanted was for him to throw the ball to the guys in the Seattle uniform and not to toss or fumble the ball away like he was playing for a youth football team. All we asked is that he play a little more like Tom Brady and a little less like Brett Favre. But nooooo, he had to prove my sisterin-law and his other detractors right by throwing two interceptions and losing a fumble against the Atlanta Falcons last week for a quarterback rating, are you ready for this, of a whopping 28.9. Don’t strain yourself Matt. At least my sister-in-law and her husband, Sequim residents, were able to let Hasselbeck know what they thought about him in person. They went to the Falcons’ game at Qwest Field last Sunday. “Everyone booed him off the field,” Dennis Lord, my brother-in-law, said during the family’s Christmas Eve party. “We were booing along with everyone else.” Trust me, you don’t want my sister-inlaw, Dagny, screaming at you. Seachicken fans literally yelled Hasselbeck off the field as coach Pete Carroll benched him in favor of backup Charlie Whitehurst. “Charlie played well,” Dennis Lord said. Actually, anyone would have looked good next to Hasselbeck. Well, my in-laws and a few other fans are going to be upset because Carroll said he was starting Hasselbeck today at Tampa Bay instead of Whitehurst. Carroll says he believes the Seachickens (not his word) have a better chance of winning with Hasselbeck at the helm. The maligned quarterback has two games to show it. Ironically, the 6-8-and-two-games-left Seachickens don’t even have to win today’s game as long as they beat the St. Louis Rams at home the following week, the last Sunday of the season. The Rams are tied with Seattle at 6-8 and the two will square off for the NFC Worst title Jan. 2. The whole sports world is drooling over this match-up. The BCS Championship Bowl Game, who cares? Hah! We have the Seachickens and Rams. So, there are some who are saying Seattle should rest up some players and put all of its marbles on the table for next week’s game with the Rams. But to Carroll’s credit, he told The Associated Press that the Seachickens (again, not his word), would not think about not giving their all for today’s game even if a win would be meaningless to making the playoffs. This team is struggling in too many ways to think about letting up in a game. The Seachickens need to go all-out in every game in a try to hit some kind of consistent rhythm and get a positive

Peninsula Daily News

Seattle (6-8) at Tampa (8-6)

momentum going. Or just to go down the field and score a touchdown without turning the stupid ball over. Expect the Bucs (8-6) to be ready to rumble today. They were shocked in a 23-20 overtime loss to Detroit in Tampa last week. They are now in a must-win mode to make the playoffs. Even though they have a second-year starter at quarterback (Josh Freeman) and the youngest team in the NFL, expect the Seachickens to lose another road game.

Top Six 1. New England Patriots (12-2) — The Packers, who are running out of time, game the Pats a scare last week with little-used backup Matt Flynn at the helm, but Stephen King’s team is still the elite of the elite. At least for right now. 2. Atlanta Falcons (12-2) — Last week’s results shouldn’t count since it came against the woeful Seachickens. 3. Pittsburgh Steelers (11-4) — The only 11-win team because they were lucky enough to host beyond-woeful Carolina on Thursday. They were ahead 20-0 at halftime and 27-0 going into the final quarter before winning 27-3. 4. New Orleans Saints (10-4) — They do more with less than any other team in the league. They have less elite players than any of the other top teams. 5. Baltimore Ravens (10-4) — They have a few problems (which team doesn’t this year) but they’re hanging in there. 6. Philadelphia Eagles (10-4) — They get the nod over the Jets and the Bears (both 10-4) because of the outstanding comeback they had against the Giants last week. It will be interesting to see if the tank has anything left in it after that.

Bottom Six 27. Arizona Cardinals (4-10) — They are a little higher than I would normally put them because they were leading Dallas 21-10 at halftime Saturday while I was writing this. They’re finally showing some life. Of course, I could have egg on my face by today if the Cowboys have an Eagles-like comeback. But then, I would look normal anyway. 28. Detroit Lions (4-10) — They finally won a road game when they beat the Bucs last week. Their first road win in a century-and-a-half or something like that. 29. Buffalo Bills (4-10) — A big win when they held off Miami on the road last week. 30. Cincinnati Bengals (3-11) — They did beat the Browns last week but they’re only this high because the last two teams are so awful. 31. Denver Broncos (3-11) — Talk about stink city. If you’re an unhappy Seachickens fan, just imagine being a Broncos fan. Paper bags must be hard to find on game days. 32. Carolina Panthers (2-13) — Some Panther fans were angry when Carolina beat Arizona last week. They were thinking about the draft, of course, and dreaming about Andrew Luck, projected to be No. 1. I don’t think Panther fans have to worry about that.

TIME/TV — Sunday, 1:15 p.m., FOX OPENING LINE — Buccaneers by 6 RECORD VS. SPREAD — Seattle 6-8; Tampa Bay 7-6-1 SERIES RECORD — Seahawks lead 7-3 LAST MEETING — Buccaneers beat Seahawks 24-7, Dec. 20, 2009 LAST WEEK — Seahawks lost to Falcons 34-18; Buccaneers lost to Lions 23-20, OT SEAHAWKS OFFENSE — OVERALL (27), RUSH (31), PASS (16) SEAHAWKS DEFENSE — OVERALL (29), RUSH (21), PASS (29) BUCCANEERS OFFENSE — OVERALL (20), RUSH (9), PASS (19) BUCCANEERS DEFENSE — OVERALL (20), RUSH (29), PASS (t11) STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES — Despite struggling past month, both teams remain in playoff contention. Seahawks have dropped four of five, yet still have shot at winning NFC West. Bucs, who’ve lost three of four, need to win last two and receive help from others to earn wildcard spot. Tampa Bay 3-4 at home compared to 5-2 on road. With 2,977 yards passing, Seahawks QB Matt Hasselbeck closing in on seventh 3,000-yard season. He is 3-1 as starter against Tampa Bay, which beat him in Seattle last season. Seahawks WR Mike Williams is Tampa native who’s making most of opportunity to play for former college coach Pete Carroll. After sitting out past two seasons, former first-round draft pick of Lions has 60 receptions for 720 yards and one touchdown. Bucs counter with Mike Williams of their own. The rookie receiver leads Bucs with 58 catches for 880 yards and eight TDs. Seattle RB Marshawn Lynch, who’s rushed for 609 yards, has four touchdowns in past three weeks. Seahawks next to last in rushing in NFL at 85.2 yards per game, however Tampa Bay coming off yielding 188 yards on ground to Washington and 181 to Detroit past two weeks. Redskins’ Ryan Torain ran for 172 yards and Lions’ Maurice Morris went for 109. Bucs QB Josh Freeman has thrown for 517 yards, two TDs and no interceptions in past two games. He nearly pulled off sixth fourth-quarter rally of season last week, producing late field goal that gave Tampa Bay a lead with under two minutes to go against Detroit. But Tampa Bay’s defense faltered, allowing Lions to drive for tying field goal in regulation and game-winning kick in OT. Tampa Bay’s Mike Williams and Arrelious Benn have combined for 82 receptions, most by any NFL rookie receiving tandem. Bucs TE Kellen Winslow has reception in 74 consecutive games, third longest streak among active tight ends.

Trufant ready to play today By Tim Booth

Injury Report

The Associated Press

RENTON — Seahawks coach Pete Carroll has not seen an injury report this small in more than two months. And it couldn’t come at a better time for his Seattle Seahawks. Carroll said Friday the Seahawks (6-8) will face Tampa Bay as healthy as they have been in quite awhile, heading into a crucial game with playoff implications for both teams. Wins by Seattle in its final two games will wrap up the NFC West title. The best piece of news Seattle got regards cornerback Marcus Trufant, who will be able to go after leaving last week’s game against Atlanta with back spasms. “There’s just a couple questions going into the game at all, and what we were hoping to have,” Carroll said. “So we’re very fortunate in that, and again like I said, I hope that that helps us.”

Hawks: Buccaneers

Continued from B1 certainly it’s a great chance to be in December playing “We’ve got two more meaningful games. Sports Editor Brad ­LaBrie can be reached at 360“It’s a great job for both 417-3525 or at brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com. games to reach our goal and what we set out to do,” Mor- of these teams to be right in ris said. the playoff hunt, and we’re “Don’t know that it’s just proud to be in that posigoing to end up with the tion.” results that we want, but Tampa Bay’s playoff and orchestrated two block- team.” buster trades suddenly Jameer Nelson (12 looks awfully scary in the points) and J.J. Redick (10 Eastern Conference after a points) each made a jumper pair of victories over Boston in the final minutes to help and San Antonio. Orlando rally from 12 points “You see what the possi- down in the second half to bilities are,” Magic coach cap another big come back. Stan Van Gundy said. The Magic also ended “You see that you have a San Antonio’s winning chance to be a really good streak at 10 games Thursteam. We’re not there yet by day night. The lowest fares are always on any means, but you have a Kevin Garnett had 22 the Web! Book online for fares chance to be a very good points.

________

hopes were damaged — though not ruined — by a 23-20 overtime loss at home to Detroit. A loss will eliminate the Bucs from contention. A win will keep them in the running until at least Monday night.

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ORLANDO, Fla. — The remolded Magic are the NBA’s new streak-busters. Brandon Bass scored 21 points, Hedo Turkoglu had 15 and the Orlando Magic ended the Boston Celtics’ winning streak at 14 games with an 86-78 victory Saturday for back-to-back wins against the NBA’s best. A Magic team that had dropped eight of nine games

Back gets better

Trufant said his back started to loosen up as the game progressed but not enough that he could return. The injury also sparked a little worry in the veteran cornerback after missing the first six games of the 2009 season with back issues. But after talking with the doctors early in the week, Trufant was put at ease that this was not related to his previous back problems. “That was one of the first things that came to my mind, but not a lot of the same feelings,” Trufant said. “So after I got it checked out, after the doctors looked Seahawks health at it, I was pretty confident Carroll isn’t kidding that I’d be back.” when it comes to the Seahawks health. Injured reserve The only player listed as Siavii was placed on questionable on Friday’s injury report was linebacker injured reserve Thursday Will Herring, who has a and his injury proved more hamstring injury. serious than the Seahawks It’s the first time since first thought. Seattle’s bye week in early Siavii suffered a stinger October that there isn’t at when he collided with Atlanleast more than one player ta’s Michael Turner in the listed as questionable, fourth quarter last Sunday. doubtful or out on the final But Carroll said Friday injury report. that Siavii has an “issue A large number of those with his spinal cord,” but players have ended up being that he’s not in any danger. put on injured reserve — Carroll said there was such as defensive tackle concern about bruising of Junior Siavii earlier this the spinal cord that didn’t week. Trufant did not practice show up on an MRI, but Wednesday or Thursday, but Siavii showed all the sympreturned to practice on Fri- toms. “He just needs time. It’s day. He was listed as proba- the right thing to do for us ble, along with linebacker and it’s going to be about a Lofa Tatupu (knee), Chris month, at least,” Carroll Spencer (shoulder) and said. Chris Clemons (ankle). “So not knowing what Trufant left just before we’re going to do, we needed halftime last week against to make a move right now.”

Magic holds off Boston Celtics The Associated Press

the Falcons and Atlanta’s Matt Ryan immediately picked on backup Kennard Cox, including a 24-yard touchdown pass to Michael Jenkins just before halftime to give the Falcons a 17-10 lead.

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 26, 2010

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SECTION

Our Peninsula

WEATHER, DEAR ABBY, THINGS TO DO, OBITUARIES In this section

Karen Griffiths/for Peninsula Daily News

Life is anything but boring at the Strid household. From left are visiting cousin Megan Hull, Brett, 13, Ryan, 8, dad Brad, cousin Jacob Hull, mom Leah, Caleb, 1½ months, and Eric, 11. A voucher for their landlord from the Peninsula Home Fund says the couple was the “first step to help us avoid eviction and get current on the rest of our bills.”

Home Fund helps family avoid eviction EDITOR’S NOTE — For 21 years, Peninsula Daily News readers in Jefferson and Clallam counties have supported the Peninsula Home Fund. Today, we feature another in a series of articles that provides a window into how the fund operates and who benefits from our readers’ generosity. The next article will appear Wednesday. By Karen Griffiths

For Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — When it rains, it pours in Forks — and that’s not simply a metaphor in the Strid household. When Brad Strid, 36, and his wife, Leah, felt the floodwaters of financial debt sucking them under, the Peninsula Daily News’ “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund was the first to throw them a lifeline. “The Home Fund saved us by giving my landlord a voucher for $100,” says the father of four boys, Brett, 13, Eric, 11, Ryan, 8, and Caleb, 1½ months. “He was able to cash that in and then allowed me to work off the rest working for him in the trailer park.” The Home Fund grant was the “first step to help us avoid eviction and get current on the rest of our bills,” says Brad. “If people hadn’t helped us out, we’d be living out on the streets or in a family shelter.” It’s been a rough year, but things are looking up. Starting in January, Brad will start work full time for a commercial trucking company that freights frozen foods for large companies. When he starts driving, he will make $450 a week for five weeks and then 28 cents a mile, “which is supposed to average out to $750 a week driving their truck,” says Brad.

Give voice to your heart A GIFT OF any size is welcome. The Peninsula Home Fund has never been a campaign of heavy hitters. If you can contribute only a few dollars, please don’t hesitate because you think it won’t make a difference. Every gift makes a difference, regardless of its size. To donate, write a check to “Peninsula Home Fund” and attach it to the coupon that accompanies this story. Mail both items to Peninsula Home Fund, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Or drop them at the newspaper’s offices in Port Townsend, Sequim or Port

ordered Leah on mandatory bed rest for the last two months of her pregnancy. Baby Caleb was born Oct. 21. Leah, 32, tried to prepare in advance for her loss of income while caring for an infant by signing up to work part time as a mystery shopper, a job that typically involves visiting a store, making predetermined purchases and evaluating the customer service. While this can be a legitimate job, in Leah’s case, it turned out to be scam that resulted in $900 stolen from her checking account. “We were so stressed with the whole thing of losing all that money,” says Leah. “We just kind of looked at each other and said, ‘What do we do now?”’ Moral lessons The family found help through Experiences over the last year OlyCAP. OlyCAP is nonprofit Olympic of needing — and receiving — Community Action Programs, the help emphasized moral lessons No. 1 emergency care agency in that Leah has instilled in her Jefferson and Clallam counties. sons. It also screens the applicants “I’ve always tried to teach my for the Home Fund and distribboys to be empathic toward othutes the funds. ers,” says Leah. Leah says Rachel Chilson at “I was really proud of Brett. OlyCAP “just stepped in and “There was a child who found programs to help us out.” couldn’t buy a composition noteThrough an Olympic Workbook he needed for music. [Brett] got a new one and gave it to him.” force program, Brad received In spite of being one of scores training and graduated with a commercial driver’s license. laid off in the flailing economy, Through the same program, between his unemployment stihe was able to get a job as a pend and his wife’s work as a truck driver. home care aide, the family had It required him to take a bus been able to squeak by finanto Salt Lake City for a four-week cially while Brad hunted for a training course. new job. He didn’t like being away Then they found they were from the family, “but I need to do expecting a fourth child. what I can to provide,” says Brad. In September, the doctor

Angeles (addresses on page A2 of the PDN daily). Again, all contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. The fund’s IRS number, under the auspices of OlyCAP, is 91-0814319. You can also donate online by credit card — just visit www.peninsuladailynews.com, then click near the top of the home page on “Peninsula Home Fund.” Whether you donate by coupon or online, you will receive a written thank-you and acknowledgment of your contribution. To delay may mean to forget.

No deductions — a ‘hand up’ The PDN’s Peninsula Home Fund — a safety net for local residents when there is nowhere else to turn — is seeking contributions for its annual holiday season fundraising campaign. From Port Townsend to Forks, from Quilcene and Brinnon to LaPush, it’s a “hand up, not a handout” for children, teens, families and the elderly. All the money collected for the Home Fund goes — without any deductions — for hot meals for seniors, meeting rent, energy and transportation needs, warm winter coats for kids, home repairs for the low-income, needed eyeglasses and prescription drugs, dental work, safe, drug-free temporary housing . . . The list goes on and on . . . Begun in 1989, the Home Fund is supported entirely by Jefferson and Clallam residents. Individuals, couples, businesses, churches, service organizations and school groups set a record for contributions in 2009 — $230,806.95. With heavy demand this year, the carefully rationed fund is being rapidly depleted. Since Jan. 1, the Home Fund has helped more than 2,200 individuals and families like Brad Strid’s on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Money almost gone The last of the money collected in 2009 is expected to be exhausted this week. Peninsula Home Fund is a unique, nonprofit program: ■  No money is deducted for administration or

other overhead. Your entire donation — 100 percent, every penny — goes to help those who are facing times of crisis. ■  All contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. ■  Some people call the PDN’s Peninsula Home Fund “shoestring philanthropy.” Money from the Home Fund is usually given out in small amounts, normally up to $150. And assistance is limited to one time in a12-month period. But even though the dollar figures are small, the impact can be big, in huge, life-changing ways. ■  Instances of help are designed to get an individual or family through the crisis — and every effort is made to put them back on the path to self-sufficiency. That’s the “hand up, not a handout” focus of the fund. In many instances, Peninsula Home Fund case managers at OlyCAP work with individuals or

families to develop a plan to become financially stable — and avoid a recurrence of the emergency that prompted aid from the fund. And, as necessary, Peninsula Home Fund contributions are often used in conjunction with money from other agencies, enabling OlyCAP to stretch the value of the contribution. ■  Your personal information is kept confidential. Peninsula Daily News does not rent, sell, give or otherwise share your address or other information with anyone, or make any other use of the information.

Applying for a grant To apply for a grant from the fund, phone OlyCAP at 360-4524726 (Port Angeles and Sequim) or 360-385-2571 (Jefferson County). Turn

to

Fund/C2


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Sunday, December 26, 2010

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Fund: Focus is a ‘hand up, not a handout’ ■  Danna M. Owens, Port Townsend. ■  Margo PetersenThere’s also an OlyCAP Pruss and John F. Pruss, office in Forks — 360-374Port Angeles. In loving 6193. memory of Maxine Manhas. If you have any ques■  Sandy and Nancy tions about the fund, conGoldstien, Sequim. tact John Brewer, Penin■  Naomi and Tom sula Daily News editor and Foley, Sequim. In memory publisher, at 360-417-3500. Many thanks also to of Glenn Holtzer. Or e-mail him at john. ■  Kristin Ecklund and brewer@peninsuladailynews. these donors (who Stewart Harris, Sequim. In requested that the com. honor of Clallam and JefPeninsula Daily News amount of their donaferson counties’ emergency publishes stories every tion be kept private): responders and logistical Sunday and Wednesday ■  Dottie Hopkins, Port volunteers who delivered during the fund-raising Angeles. services and supplies to campaign listing contribu■  Don and Edna Haiti this year. Thank you! tors and reporting on how Chicarell, Sequim. ■  Bruce and Margaret the fund works. ■  Nancy and Mary, Port Shaver, Sequim. In memory Angeles. In memory of Unc of Bill Oliver. Contributions so far Ron and Brother Ron ■  Pacific Mist Books, While most of the Farrington. We are so glad Sequim. money is raised between we had you in our lives. You ■  Pat Wisen, Sequim. Thanksgiving and Dec. 31, not only left us with great ■  Bob and Carol Philthe fund itself never closes. memories but brought us so pott, Port Angeles. Donations of any much joy. We really miss ■  Lois Barner, Port amount are always welyou. Love you forever. Angeles. come. ■  Nancy, Angie, Eric ■  Jean Tyson, Port Here is a list of donors and Ronald Hansen, Port Angeles. whose contributions were Angeles. In memory of Cliff ■  Dana and Sally Dollreceived between Dec. 16 and Cliffy Hansen. You off, Jacksonville, Fla. and Dec. 22 — thank you brought such joy to our ■  Karla Strutzel, very much for making a lives. Now we are left with Sequim. difference in the lives — only memories. These will ■  Bob and Kathi Pressand futures — of your never be enough. We love ley, Port Angeles. In honor neighbors: and miss you more than of Florence Swanson. ■  Wayne and Charlotte any words can say. ■  Kathy Grissom, Port Duchow, Port Angeles — ■  Deborah Willis, Port Angeles. $100. Angeles. In memory of ■  Helen Kushman, Port ■  Lorna Konopaski, Mom, Dad and Derek. Angeles. Port Angeles — $100. In ■  Dorothy C. Melly, ■  Theresa Gross, memory of Warren and Port Angeles. Sequim. In memory of Jack Marty Konopaski. ■  Robert and Marinette L. Gross. ■  Sonny Chaussee, Howard, Sequim. In ■  Janet and Leo Dodge, Betty White and Nancy memory of Ellen and Jo. Port Angeles. White, Port Angeles — ■  Dale and Judy Burke, ■  Don and Vicki Hin$200. In honor of our won- Sequim. richsen, Port Angeles. derful family and friends. ■  Russ and Janet Holt, ■  Robert and Karen Have a great Christmas Sequim. Eldridge, Sequim. and 2011. We love you all ■  Tom and Michelle ■  Arnold and Debbie very much. Gagnon, Port Angeles. In Schouten, Port Angeles. ■  John W. Warrick and memory of Dayle Seaton. ■  Janet Bartlett, Ruth Jenkins, Port Angeles ■  Bob and Lucille Sequim. — $125. Schmitt, Port Angeles. ■  Rolland and Diane ■  Hugo and Bev ■  Bob and Verna Kenitzer, Port Angeles. Velasquez, Sequim — $100. Edwards, Port Angeles. In ■  Lucille M. Peet, Port For whoever needs it most. honor of Ruth Mix. Angeles. ■  The Sons of Norway, ■  Betty H. Paulk, ■  Kevin and Sue Ryan, Port Angeles — $100. Sequim. Port Ludlow. ■  Carlene Brown, ■  Gordy and Pat Sex■  Wayne and Tracy Sequim — $100. In honor ton, Port Angeles. Fitzwater, Port Angeles. of Jan and Dan Cummings. ■  Linda Button, Port ■  Carol and Chick Car■  Joe and Dee Angeles. In honor of those michael, Port Angeles. Blanchard, Sequim — $50. who have lost everything. ■  Mary J. Klay, Sequim. ■  Jerry and Jackie ■  Frederic Robinson, ■  Pat Beltz and Don Schwagler, Port Angeles — Sequim. Claussen, Sequim. $250. ■  Marc Reinertson, ■  Glenn and Betty ■  J&J Construction of Port Angeles. Armstrong, Sequim. Port Angeles Inc., Port ■  Dan and Eve Farrell, ■  Randi and Heather Angeles — $250. In honor Port Angeles. In memory of Hansen, Port Angeles. In of employees of J&J C.J. Sommer. memory of Phyllis Arndt. Construction. ■  John and Darlene ■  Freia Palmer, Port ■  Lynn Langford, Port Mjoen, Port Ludlow. Angeles. Angeles — $100. ■  April Kilgore and ■  Craig Williams, ■  Mark and Diana Monroe Stringham, Port Sequim. In memory of Schildknecht, Sequim — Angeles. Astid L. Williams. $250. In memory of Fred ■  Philip and Beverly ■  Donna and Eric Balser. Rich, Port Townsend. Miner, Sequim. In honor of ■  Mary Jane Schmidt, ■  Don and Clare all single-parent dads. Port Townsend — $100. In Hatler, Sequim. In memory ■  David Brubaker, memory of Bernard and of Stuart Macrobbie. Sequim. In honor of David, Mary Andrews. ■  Mr. and Mrs. George Anita and Laura Brubaker. ■  Joanne Fleming Norris, Port Angeles. In ■  John Schuy, Sequim. Mann, Sequim — $200. In honor of our son, Steven In memory of Berni. memory of Jack and Katie. Norris. ■  William and Sherry ■  Andrea Alstrup, ■  Eugene and Lois Lar- Evans, Sequim. In memory Sequim — $100. In memsen, Port Angeles. of Capt. James G. Evans. ory of Kenneth Alstrup. ■  Bill and Sandy Bloor, ■  Kent F. and Nancy M. ■  Jerry and Margaret Port Angeles. Osborne, Redmond. In King, Forks — $1,000. In ■  Ray and Sandy memory of Maxine Manhas. memory of Olive King. Thomas, Carlsborg. ■  Lissa Munro and ■  Judith Beaver, ■  Jon and Sheri Judd, Paul Butler, Sequim. In the Sequim — $250. In honor Port Angeles. name of the Maurie Munro of my extended family. ■  Betty Gordon and family of Dallas, Texas. ■  Beta Sigma Phi, Michael Moss, Sequim. ■  James and Barbara Sequim — $50. In memory ■  Larry Davidson, Johnson, Walla Walla. of Pat Pringle. Sequim. ■  Douglas Cudd, Port ■  Grace Covenant Fel■  Penny Ervin, Port Angeles. In memory of lowship of Sequim, Sequim Angeles. In honor of all our Carole Cudd. — $300. men and women in uniform. ■  George C. Curington, ■  Olympic National ■  Carolyn Gill, Sequim. Port Angeles. Park Employees’ AssociaIn honor of the Money fam■  Brenda Mosler, tion, Port Angeles — $200. ily and Smith family. Sequim. ■  Ron and Merine ■  M.D. Van Rossen, ■  Roy and Pat Jones, Allen, Sequim — $250. In Port Angeles. Port Angeles. In honor of honor of Bill and Norma ■  Homer and Karla Bob and Jean Steele’s 70th Allen. Muto, Port Angeles. wedding anniversary. ■  Ron, Kathy and ■  Shirley K. Peterson, ■  D.B. and M.J. RichKelsey Hansen, Boulder Sequim. In memory of ards, Sequim. City, Nev. — $300. In honor Arnold Peterson. ■  Robbin and Patricia of the Hansens, Slacks and ■  Gary and Linda Hammel, Port Angeles. In Meeks. Reidel, Port Angeles. memory of Dayle Seaton. ■  Gail Tate, Port Ange- Christmas love and happi■  Norm and Sondya les — $200. In memory of ness and good health in the Rose, Port Angeles. In Judith Pettersen. She New Year to our dear memory of Maxine Manhas. believed in the goodness of cousin Jan Harrison and ■  Don and Phyllis most and was sad for in memory of her husband, Thompson, Port Angeles. In the rest. memory of Mathilda Bob. Wishing Christmas ■  Henry and Judith joy and New Year blessings Thompson. Bernard, Eatonville — ■  Velma Magner, Port to our dear friends Mary Brelsford and $100. In honor of Rachel Angeles. In memory of Mike Sorenson. John Magner. Fondren. Continued from C1

■  Park View Villa Residents Fun, Port Angeles — $500. ■  Chul and Kay You, Port Angeles — $300. ■  Ken and Marge Hansen, Port Angeles — $300. In honor of Ron, Sheryl and Kristi.

■  Margaret Weed, Port Angeles. In honor of Merelene and John Helpenstell. Merry Christmas! ■  Jacob and Karin Dethlefs, Sequim. ■  Ray and Donna Guerin Family Foundation, Sequim. Happy Holidays! Our thanks to you for making the world a better place. ■  Shirley and Bob Widdicombe, Sequim. ■  Margo Donzé-Sanders, Sequim. In memory of my brother. ■  Barbara Hughes, Sequim. ■  Velma (Winters) Springfield and Robert L. Springfield, Port Angeles. In loving memory of Harold Winters and Lee Springfield. ■  The Safeway Pharmacy Crew, Safeway Store No. 1492, 110 E. Third St., Port Angeles. In honor of our many friends and customers who help make our job fulfilling. And in memory of the wonderful people we have lost over the year. ■  The Toggery, Port Angeles. ■  Marie L. Beam, Port Angeles. ■  Steve and Linda Bailey, Carlsborg. ■  Bill and Robin Bains, Port Angeles. ■  Carmelinda Wiley, Port Angeles. ■  Betty H. Paulk, Sequim. ■  Diane Kaufman, Port Angeles. ■  Marci Newlon, Sequim. ■  Mad Maggi, Sequim. ■  Annemarie Mende, Port Townsend. In loving memory of Sue and Don Mende. ■  Dave and Kath Gronning, Port Angeles. In honor of the Eighties, one Ninety and Finley. ■  Dave and Kath Gronning, Port Angeles. In memory of Kathy, Agnes, Randy and Stan. ■  Sharon Lohman, Sequim. In honor of Dave and Dee Morris and family. ■  Judith West, Port Townsend. In memory of Jenny. ■  Mr. and Mrs. Neil Eklund, Sequim. ■  Emery and Lila Winters, Port Angeles. In memory of our parents, Maxine Willis and Emery and Nancy Winters. ■  Walter and Bonnie Davison, Port Angeles. ■  Barry Savage, Quilcene. In honor of The Quilcene Godfather. ■  Thelma J. Claplanhoo, Neah Bay. In memory of my wonderful husband, Edward Claplanhoo. I miss you so much. Also in honor of our dear friends Pastor Frank and Jean Cole. Thank you. ■  Rob and Cindy Tulloch, Port Angeles. ■  Gary and Ann Colley, Port Angeles. ■  Dick and Judy Owen, Port Angeles. ■  Larry and Pat Ledbetter, Port Angeles. ■  Jeff and Barb Dixon, Port Angeles. In memory of family and friends — Joan Dixon, Patti Long and Don Kitchen. ■  Cindy Weidenheimer, Port Townsend. In memory of Bill Babcock and Kenneth Hafner. You defined integrity and character. Still missing you. ■  Nancy Hafner, Port Townsend. In memory of Ken Hafner and Bill Babcock. ■  Grant and Patsy Simpson, Sequim. ■  Fred and Michele Bailey, Port Townsend. In memory of Herman Logsdon. ■  Rudy and April Hiener, Port Angeles. In memory of Ken and Charlotte Bradford. ■  Bob and Cathy Claney, Port Angeles.

■  Don and Barbara Smith, Port Townsend. ■  Milton and Roberta Mickey, Sequim. ■  Paula Schwabe, Carlsborg. In honor of all my friends. ■  Chad and Janine Bowechop, Neah Bay. May the good Lord shine a light on you like the morning sun. ■  Monte Reinders and Sally Pfaff, Port Townsend. In memory of Jane Anna Athy. ■  Suzanne W. Hadley, Forks. In memory of Ben and Christina Wilson. ■  Donald Eggert, Sequim. ■  Jack Murphy, Port Angeles. ■  John and Sue Miles, Port Angeles. ■  Susan Cange, Sequim. ■  Charles and Corrine Horton, Sequim. In memory of our parents. ■  Bruce and Carol Von Borstel, Sequim. ■  Jim and Julie Rukstad, Port Angeles.

Many thanks also to these donors (who requested anonymity): ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Sequim — $25. ■  Port Townsend — $100. In honor of Robert Larson. ■  Port Angeles — $500. ■  Port Angeles — $500. ■  Port Angeles — $25. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $150. In honor of Valerie Cunningham. ■  Sequim — $870. In honor of God. For several years, we have been setting aside our tithe money to give away. At first, we gave it anonymously to people we would see working hard at the malls. Then we began to pray for direction to people who really needed it throughout the year. The following are some of the recipients: ■  A soldier so he could go home to see his family before going to Afghanistan. ■  A Northwest Indian Nation to help their senior citizens. ■  A mother of two who had just left an abusive husband. She was able to buy heat for her home for the winter. ■  A couple who was behind in their mortgage payments. ■  A woman who needed $1,000 for the deductible to buy a diabetes monitor. These people were brought to our attention when we least expected it. We both have been the recipients of this kind of gift, so all we suggested was when their lives turned around, if they could, they would pass the gift along in some manner. This year, we are happy to find an organization that helps many people and does an excellent job of reaching them when they are in need. Since this not our money but God’s, we feel privileged to be able to pass His money along to others. Thank you for your service. Merry Christmas to all, and God bless. — Anonymous in Sequim. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $50. In memory of Neil Jervis. ■  Port Angeles — $50. ■  Brinnon — $300. ■  Port Angeles — $250. In the name of Christ. ■  Sequim — $1,000. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Livingston, Texas — $50. ■  Sequim — $25. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $200.

■  Port Angeles — $300. In honor of Lillian K., Dorothy R., Timothy R. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $500. ■  Sequim — $1,000. For peace, justice and tolerance. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Carlsborg — $150. In memory of George and Louise Simonson. ■  Port Angeles — $25. In memory of Harold Andreson. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $1,000. In honor of Kay, Scott, Andrew, Stuart, Maggie, Ren and Sam. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Forks — $1,000. ■  Port Angeles — $25. ■  Port Angeles — $25. In memory of Bob Boardman. ■  Port Hadlock — $100. In honor of Christopher Cross. ■  Sequim — $25. ■  Port Angeles — $50. In memory of Oma and Granny. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Sequim — $25. ■  Sequim — $200. ■  Port Ludlow — $10. ■  Carlsborg — $5,000. ■  Sequim — $200. ■  Port Townsend — $100. ■  Port Townsend — $50. In honor of our daughter. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Ludlow — $25. ■  Sequim — $10. ■  Port Angeles — $200. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Townsend — $20. ■  Port Angeles — $200. ■  Port Angeles — $25. ■  Port Townsend — $25. ■  Port Townsend — $20. ■  Port Ludlow — $100. ■  Sequim — $1,000. ■  Sequim — $1,350. ■  Port Angeles — $25. ■  Forks — $150. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Nordland — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $30. ■  Port Angeles — $50. In honor of our Lord Jesus, the Reason for the Season. ■  Port Angeles — $110. In honor of Rachel Corrie. ■  Port Angeles — $30. ■  Carlsborg — $15. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Townsend — $100. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Chimacum — $50. ■  Neah Bay — $200. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $25. In honor of Nina Rumore. ■  Port Townsend — $100. In memory of loved ones and colleagues. ■  Port Angeles — $1,000. ■  Port Townsend — $75. ■  Port Angeles — $75.

________ HANDWRITING CAN BE hard to decipher at times. Please report any errors in this list to John Brewer, 360-417-3500 (there’s voicemail if he’s away) — or e-mail him at john.brewer@ peninsuladailynews.com. We’ll rerun the listing correctly. Our sincerest appreciation again to our donors.

Briefly . . . PT Shorts to present Ray Carver PORT TOWNSEND — Key City Public Theatre will present “Fat and Lean: Stories by Raymond Carver” as part of its monthly PT Shorts series at the Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

Fifth St., at 2:30 p.m. SunPT Shorts is sponsored by the PT Arts Commission. day, Jan. 2. Crockford is a former For more information, visit keycitypublictheatre.org. trial lawyer who turned to journalism in the 1990s when he started working at History Tales talk The Prague Post, an EnglishPORT ANGELES — language newspaper in Ross Crockford, an awardEastern Europe. winning Canadian freelance In 1998, he became the writer, will be the featured editor of Victoria’s Monday speaker at the Clallam Magazine. County Historical Society’s In 2006, he wrote VictoHistory Tales of Clallam ria: The Unknown City, County in Port Angeles City and his “Unknown City” Council Chambers, 321 E. column appears in

Monday Magazine. Ross will talk about the “quirky” aspects of the city across the Strait. He will give an overview of Victoria’s development and concerns from its founding that still exist today. He will also discuss Victoria’s history as a tourist destination and some of the odd characters that have passed through and form much of the local mythology. The History Tales series is free and open to

the public. For more information, phone the society’s office at 360-452-2662.

Country dance PORT TOWNSEND — A free English country dance will be held at the RoseWind Common House, 3131 Haines St., from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 2. The dancing will be taught by Nan Evans of

Portland, Ore. Fred Nussbaum and Friends will provide music. The dance will be followed by a potluck dinner. RoseWind Common House is a fragrance-free facility, and street shoes are not allowed. It is part of the RoseWind Cohousing community. For more information, phone Dan Post at 360554-0417 or e-mail dan. post@frandango.org. Peninsula Daily News


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 26, 2010

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Take a peek at what piqued interest “HOW DO WE get into birdwatching more?” a reader asked. If you’ve been watching birds for a long time, you have to think back to when you first became involved in this activity. It’s important to understand why you asked the question in the first place. What piqued your interest in birds? It was a male house finch with its red head that caught my eye. When one particular bird claims your attention for longer than a few moments, you’re hooked. You want to know what the bird is called. Where did it come from? Is it common or rare? The best way to answer these questions is by using a field guide for birds.

Bird Watch

I loved looking at the picCarson tures and thinking of the day when I would see some of the beautiful and interesting birds shown in the book. This lengthy poring over the illustrations paid big dividends when I spotted one of these avian celebrities. I had looked at the drawings so many times that when I did see the bird, I could immediately identify it. Familiarity with your field On the market guide is important when you become more involved with There are many good ones on watching and identifying birds. the market. They range from A good pair of binoculars is guides that cover all of North required if you want to really America’s birds to just the birds enjoy this activity. in the Western part of the counBirds that visit our feeders try. Others focus on the Northwest are easy to see, but once you venture farther afield in the pursuit or Washington state. of new species, binoculars are Several are designed to cover the birds commonly found in dif- important. Hawks and other raptors fly ferent regions of the state. overhead, perch high in trees or Bookstores and stores that on tall cliffs. Water birds are deal primarily in bird-related items usually carry a good selec- often far from shore. Sandpipers are small, move fast and travel tion of guides. My first field guide sat on the in large flocks. Tiny warblers dart in and out of trees and kitchen table for years. Yes, I bushes and are difficult to see used it when a new bird was seen in the yard, but that wasn’t well with the naked eye. Learning to use your binocuthe primary reason it sat there.

Joan

Paul Carson

Assorted shorebirds search for food along the surf. lars is as important as studying your field guide. It’s not only children who struggle with finding an object with binoculars. Speed in finding your subject and speed in bringing it into focus are equally important. Eventually, you will also want to own a good spotting scope. It will make it possible to see birds that are too far away for binoculars. Once you have your optical

gear and your well-studied field guide, the next step is to “go a-birding.” The world is yours — literally. You can bird almost anywhere. Start close to home in a nearby park. Visit a wildlife refuge. For some special fun, join a local birding club. Audubon chapters offer a great variety of field trips, and the old hands in the group love sharing their knowl-

First entry in lecture series slated for Jan. 7 Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Lifelong Sequim-area resident Art Rogers will recall memories of his youth during “Remembering Dungeness” at the Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road, at 10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 7. Rogers’ presentation is the first entry in the Museum Lecture Series presented by Peninsula College and hosted by the Museum & Arts Center in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Rogers will lead the first hour of the class and will be

followed by area historian Doug McInnes, who will discuss “Sequim Yesterday.” Museum Lecture Series classes will be held at the schoolhouse from 10 a.m. to noon Fridays from Jan. 7 to Feb. 25. Registration for this noncredit community education course, #S-SF 041 in the Peninsula College course catalog, is available through Peninsula College by phoning 360452-9277 or visiting www. pc.ctc.edu. The complete series schedule, including class

topic details, is available on the Museum & Arts Center website at www.macsequim. org. Additional topics for the eight-week series are: ■  “The Manis Mastodon Archeological Site” with Clare Manis Hatler on Jan. 14. ■  “Barns and Farms: Then and Now” with Catherine Bennett and Bob Clark on Jan. 21. ■  “Clallam County Schools, East to West” with Irene Wyman, Kathy Monds and Esther Nelson on

Jan. 28. ■  “History of Railroads in Clallam County” with Steve Hauff on Feb. 4. ■  “Early Resorts of the Olympic Peninsula through Postcards” with Cliff Brehan on Feb. 11. ■  “The Past, Present, and Future of the New Dungeness Lighthouse” with Roberta DeWitt, Rick DeWitt and Steve Reed on Feb. 18. ■  “Triangle of Defense: Fort Casey, Fort Worden and Fort Flagler” with Terry Buchanan on Feb. 25.

edge with beginners. A new year is waiting, and there’s some great birding ahead. So get out and enjoy yourself — beginner or old-timer. Happy birding. Happy New Year.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. E-mail: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Now Showing n Deer Park Cinema,

“Yogi Bear” (PG)

Port Angeles (360-4527176)

n The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089)

“The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (PG) “The Fighter” (R) “Little Fockers” (PG-13) “The Tourist” (PG-13) “Tron: Legacy” (PG)

n Lincoln Theater, Port

“True Grit” (PG-13) “The Fighter” (R)

n Uptown Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997)

Townsend (360-3853883)

“Gulliver’s Travels” (PG) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (PG13)

“The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (PG)

Happy Holidays Local expertise for all your health care needs. Call 1-888-DOC-6260 to locate a provider.

Erik Borgnes, MD Radiology Olympic Medical Center

Jennifer Brown, MD Primary Care Family Medicine of Port Angeles

Patricia Christiansen, PA-C Orthopaedic Surgery OMP Orthopaedic Clinic

Raj Deol, MD Pulmonology OMP Specialty Clinic

Ianir Divinsky, MD Hospitalist Olympic Medical Center

Kathleen Farrell, DO Primary Care Jamestown Family Health Clinic

Bernadette Gonsalvez, PA-C Primary Care OMP Primary Care Clinic

Laurie Johnson-Driese, ARNP Certified Nurse Midwife OMP Women’s Clinic

Heather Irwin, MD Obstetrics & Gynecology Jamestown Family Health Clinic

Matthew Levy, MD General Surgery OMP Surgery Clinic

Erin Nelli, DO Medical Oncology Olympic Medical Cancer Center

Michael Shevach, MD Radiation Oncology Olympic Medical Cancer Center

Rebecca Sorg, PA-C Primary Care OMP Primary Care Clinic

Grace Yelland, MD Pediatrics Peninsula Children’s Clinic

we welcomed these fine providers to the community. From Olympic Medical Center, we wish you a happy and healthy new year!

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Not pictured: Christopher Frank, MD, Primary Care, Family Medicine of Port Angeles; Joshua Jones, MD, Psychiatry, Peninsula Community Mental Health Center; Rienera Sivesind, MD, Primary Care, Family Medicine of Port Angeles

In 2010,


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Take calls from high-level boss/spouse DEAR ABBY: When my husband, “Mac,” calls me on the phone, he expects me to look at the caller ID and immediately interrupt whatever conversation I’m having to take his call. Unless I expect an important call (from a doctor or my children’s school), I do not look at the caller ID. I give my full attention to the person I’m speaking to. If I hear someone “beep,” I’ll attempt to quickly bring the conversation to a polite and natural end before calling back the person who tried to reach me. Mac believes that anyone I’m talking to should understand that he takes priority. Today, he called seven

dear abby Abigail

times in

Van Buren two min-

utes to then berate me for not instantly taking his call about an unimportant matter. Abby, in Mac’s defense, he’s a highlevel executive with limited free time during the day. He is not otherwise demanding and usually calls me only once a day. I make every effort to quickly wrap up my phone calls and return his within minutes. Who is right? On a Short Phone Leash

Dear On a Short Phone Leash: As your husband is a high-level executive, his time may be tightly scheduled. Because he calls you only once a day, it’s not too much to ask that you take the call. I can understand that he finds it frustrating that you refuse. If I were you, I’d start taking these calls — unless you would prefer getting your messages from your husband via his personal assistant. Dear Abby: My mother-in-law, “Thelma,” came to live with us two years ago because at 82, she was no longer financially able to support herself. Because she likes to

Things to Do Today and Monday, Dec. 26-27, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today

served. $7.50 adults, $3.50 children 6-15, children younger than 5 free. Reservations may be made by phoning 360-4607131 or 360-565-1139.

Monday Overeaters Anonymous — St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone 360-477-1858.

Walk-in vision clinic — Information for visually impaired and blind people, including accessible technology display, library, Braille training and various magnification aids. Vision Loss Center, 228 W. First St., Suite N (Armory Square Mall). Feiro Marine Life Center Phone for an appointment 360— City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. 457-1383 or click on www. Admission by donation. Phone visionlossservices.org/vision. 360-417-6254. Guided walking tour — Port Angeles Fine Arts Historic downtown buildings, Center — “Art is a Gift.” Holi- an old brothel and “Underday art marketplace. 1203 E. ground Port Angeles.” ChamLauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 ber of Commerce, 121 E. Railp.m. Free. Show runs till Janu- road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 ary 9. Phone 360-457-3532. p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, Liz and friends concert — $6 ages 6 to 12. Children Port Angeles natives, including younger than 6, free. Reservaharpist Elizabeth Morgan-Ellis tions, phone 360-452-2363, and violinists Kyle Purnell and ext. 0. Chandra Johnson return for a recital. Free. 2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Volunteers in Medicine of Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park the Olympics health clinic — Ave. 909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 p.m. Free for patients with no Dance — Sons of Norway insurance or access to health Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. care. Appointments, phone with 30 minutes of instruction, 360-457-4431. followed by folk and ballroom dance. $2 members, $3 nonFirst Step drop-in center members. Refreshments, 9 — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081. p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and Christmas Light Tours — referrals, play area, emergency All Points Charters and Tours supplies, access to phones, offers tours of decorative computers, fax and copier. Christmas light displays in Port Phone 360-457-8355. Angeles this holiday season. General discussion group The approximately two-hourlong tours will leave the Lincoln — Port Angeles Senior Center, Street Safeway, 110 E. Third 328 E. Seventh St., 1:30 p.m. to St., at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments 4 p.m. No specified topic. Open to public. Lions Breakfast — All-youcan-eat breakfast served at the Crescent Bay Lions Clubhouse, corner of Holly Hill Road and state Highway 112, from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. $6 adults, $3 for children.

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews. com

Peninsula Daily News

The Answer for Youth — Drop-in outreach center for youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

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Odette Wolfley

210 E. 4th St. Port Angeles

Get in on the Things to Do

Health clinic — Free medical services for uninsured or under-insured. Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218.

The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431. Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-4578921. Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 — Clallam Transit Business Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Open to public. Phone Bill Thomas at 360-460-4510 or Leilani Wood 360-683-2655. Bingo — Masonic Lodge, 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Doors at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and pull tabs available. Phone 360-457-7377. Christmas Light Tours — All Points Charters and Tours offers tours of decorative Christmas light displays in Port Angeles this holiday season. The approximately two-hourlong tours will leave the Lincoln Street Safeway, 110 E. Third St., at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments served. $7.50 adults, $3.50 children 6-15, children younger than 5 free. Reservations may be made by phoning 360-4607131 or 360-565-1139.

Sequim and Dungeness Valley

Pittsburgh Steelers Fan Club — Watch the team with other black and gold fans at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course, 1965 Woodcock Road. 10 a.m.

Women’s barbershop chorus — Singers sought for Grand Olympics Chorus of Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster at 360-683-0141.

Phone 360-775-8663. Adult Scrabble — The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 p.m. Phone 360-681-2619.

✙ Long Term Care

A GREAT LOCAL AGENCY, PROVIDING GREAT LOCAL SERVICE!

360-683-9284 • 348 W. Spruce St. Sequim

Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com.

Today

Cabin Fever Quilters — TriArea Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum, 10 a.m. Open to public. Phone Laura Gipson, 360-385-0441. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. jchsmuseum.org. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com. Silent war and violence protest — Women In Black, Adams and Water streets, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854.

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Trivia night — Oasis Sports Port Townsend Aero Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360- Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Air582-3143. port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 Monday for seniors, $6 for children ages Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain 7-12. Free for children younger Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. than 6. Features vintage airPhone 206-321-1718 or visit craft and aviation art. www.sequimyoga.com. Chimacum Grange FarmWalk aerobics — First Bap- ers Market — 9572 Rhody tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 a.m. p.m. Free. Phone 360-683-2114. Puget Sound Coast ArtilExercise classes — Sequim lery Museum — Fort Worden Community Church, 1000 N. State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fifth Ave. Cardio-step, 9 a.m. to Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for 10:15 a.m. Strength and toning children 6 to 12, free for chilclass, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. dren 5 and younger. Exhibits Cost: $5 a person. Phone Shel- interpret the Harbor Defenses ley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or of Puget Sound and the Strait e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ com. olypen.com. Free blood pressure Jefferson County Historiscreening — Faith Lutheran Church, 382 W. Cedar St., 9 cal Museum and shop — 540 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360-683- Water St., Port Townsend, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for 4803. adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; Senior Singles— Hiking free to historical society memand a walk. Meet at 9 a.m. bers. Exhibits include “Jefferson Phone 360-797-1665 for loca- County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native tion. Americans” and “The Chinese Sequim Duplicate Bridge in Early Port Townsend.” Phone — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth 360-385-1003 or visit www. Ave., noon Phone 360-681- jchsmuseum.org. 4308, or partnership 360-683Commanding Officer’s 5635. Quarters museum tour — Women’s weight loss sup- Fort Worden State Park, noon port group — Dr. Leslie Van to 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim children. Phone 360-385-1003. Ave. Port Townsend Marine SciFamily Caregivers support ence Center — Fort Worden group — Trinity United Meth- State Park. Natural history and odist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m.

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husband need to understand that what’s happening may be progressive. A point may come when, if a fire should start while she’s cooking, she would no longer remember what to do. You and your husband should consult his mother’s physician and a geriatric specialist. You should also contact the Alzheimer’s Association. And at the end of the day, you should “all” prepare your evening meals together.

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Dear Hungry: Food is the least of your problems. Your mother-in-law is showing signs of dementia. Does her doctor know about this change in her? If not, that should be the first thing on your agenda. If so, then you and your

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increasingly less appetizing, to put it mildly. My mother-in-law is so kind, I don’t want to offend her. My husband refuses to discuss it with her because he doesn’t want to upset her. Please help. I’m worried about the length of time the food sits out after being prepared. Plus, I’d really like to have a good meal! Hungry in Missouri

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Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 Today E. Fifth St. , 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. VFW breakfast — 169 E. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost: $5 a person.

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cook, she has done most of the meal preparation. It has been a big help since my husband and I work full time. Over the last year, Thelma’s judgment has deteriorated and so have her cooking skills. She’ll often prepare meals by 2 p.m. that won’t be served until 6 or 7. The food sits on the stove or kitchen counter for hours. She also overcooks to the point of burning, and meats are tough and difficult to eat. If she doesn’t have something on hand that goes into a recipe — or she can’t remember — she’ll “substitute.” Her choices generally do not work. Everything has become


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 26, 2010

C5

Resolving to keep thumbs green I HOPE EVERYONE had a most joyous and memorable Christmas, sharing the special day with family and friends. For our family, it was wonderful; my mother stayed with us again, spoiling the grandchildren with food, love and presents. And as we gathered around the beautiful noble fir Christmas tree, hand-selected and cut down by the grandkids and Grandma from our local Lazy J Tree Farm, we all could not help but realize how gorgeous it is here, fireplace ablaze, weather mild, the Strait of Juan de Fuca in stark contrast to the sky and islands. So as the year wraps up and the fat lady is practicing the proverbial swan song, let me take today to write what in the business is considered the annual ritual of New Year’s and make my 2011 predictions and resolutions. To begin, I will start with a Christmas card I received from Peninsula College, where I teach horticulture.

friendly — lower carbon footprint form of production. But I definitely foresee the Upon openAndrew residents of the Olympic Penining the card, sula will do so in droves and thus May juxtaposed next continue being trendsetters for to the script the nation like we already have was the same been. scene stylized And home-grown, organic prowith a blackduce, fruit, berries, nuts, greens and-white and vegetables will really sepia-like advance this year both here on effect. Across Paradise Peninsula and the the page, the United States, as well as many words read “’Tis the season countries around the world. However, the virtual-light dis… for Light play card I received will be unforand Joy.” tunately an ever-growing trend Now, I love lights — lots of as well. lights. Bring on the light sculpAnd indeed, among the youth tures, let winter’s illuminatedand “younger crowd,” this “e” light art cheer up the darkness. form of whatever is where it is — So here is the big prediction. and for my 12- and 14-year-old Although organic gardening, boys, where is has always been. lawn and tree care continue to So a lot of good gardening, gain greater and greater market great display work, and wellshare, they are still far from thought-out presentation will go their potential; we should continue to jump on this eco-friendly to the form of “performance art” — fish-, aquifer- and watershedon the computer today, deleted

A growing concern

tomorrow — or in this case, read, hung and soon discarded. Plastic, artificial trees — even for the outdoors — as well as petroleum-based wreaths, garlands and swags will be in evergrowing stacks of boxes next year, and now the Walmart Supercenter has even higher ceilings to facilitate the need. Science is great; I truly believe that, so I guess the offshoot of pine spray for these plastic pieces of decorations is expected, and I look forward to a designer line soon. “Oh, honey, look — new alpine noble fir [with fresh glacier scent]. I have always wanted the smell of a real noble fir, and it’s on sale for $5.49.” So for my column-appropriate resolution: I will keep on giving the information suited for this climate, your soil and our light and moisture conditions. I will continue to be the cheerleader to the health, ease, art and reward of fine gardening and

to likewise inspire you. I resolve to do this by writing more “series” articles like the ones on grass, insects or pruning using three, four or five weeks to really impart the information needed and to articulate just how easy it is to garden here. I also resolve to accomplish this by writing less seasonal fluff, which means I must bring this column to an end, but not before I finish by saying, “The card from the college was beautiful and heartfelt.” To them and to all of you, Happy New Year. May all your thumbs be green and your yard have only virtual weeds.

New Year’s Eve

son County. Suggested donation is $5 to $15. Performing at the concert will be The Party Club, Solvents, Pitfalls, The Mages Guild, Damn the Dooms, Low Ones and special guests. ‘’For the past few months, I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to work as a volunteer with the sixth-grade choir class at Blue Heron Middle School,” event organizer and Solvents member Jarrod Paul Bramson said. “It’s been an amazing experience for me and made me realize how important art and music is for these kids. “The folks at Sirens, all the bands and I decided that it would be a great idea to donate all the door money made from the New Year’s gig to the Music Boosters and support the music programs that are on the edge of being cut [budget-wise] completely.” Peninsula Daily News

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Briefly . . . Lions to meet Thursday at CrabHouse

tures large touch pools and aquariums. This holiday week, its hours are the same as the Natural History Exhibit. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for youths and The Port Angeles Lions Club will meet Thursday at free for science center members. noon at the Port Angeles For more information, CrabHouse Restaurant, phone 360-385-5582, e-mail 221 N. Lincoln St. info@ptmsc.org or visit On the program will be www.ptmsc.org. induction of new member Eric Hedin. Officers elected For information on the Lions hearing aid and eyeSEQUIM — The glass recycling program, Sequim PC Users Group phone 360-417-6862. recently held board of director elections for 2011. Exhibit to end Ron Helsley was elected president; Tom LaMure, PORT TOWNSEND — “Whales in Our Midst” will vice president; Tom Flanik, treasurer; Diana Schildend its four-month run as the featured exhibit at the knecht, secretary; and Don Port Townsend Marine Sci- Klinger, assistant secretary ence Center at Fort Worden and webmaster. State Park this week. Monthly classes offered It can be seen from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday in the Natural History Exhibit, which also houses permanent displays on the zone where land meets sea. The Marine Exhibit, which is on the pier, fea-

by the group in 2010 covered topics such as TurboTax, creating videos, spreadsheet applications, word processing, file management, online sources for research and reference, and Linux. Among the guest speakers were the public information officer from the Sequim Police Department, on identity theft, scams and Project Lifesaver, and the director of Sequim’s community radio station, KSQM FM, on its plans and its affiliation with the Emergency Alert System. The club donated throughout the year to Sequim High School and its Future Business Leaders of America for programs related to energy, multimedia and business. Members also donated labor to the Sequim Senior

Activity Center to help install cameras and a new phone system and to assist in the computer lab. The group is working on its first Technology and Media Fair, which will be held March 19 at Sequim High School. The high school’s Future Business Leaders organization will be a major participant at this free event. The club meets at 10 a.m. Saturdays in the Sequim High School computer lab, Room E-3, 601 N. Sequim Ave. Dues are $25 for 2011. Classes are free for members but the club requests a $5 donation from nonmembers attending the presentations. For more information, visit spcug.net or e-mail spcug1@gmail.com.

SEQUIM — Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., will hold a “Raging Praise” New Year’s Eve celebration starting at 7 p.m. Friday. The event will serve as a benefit for Haitian refugees, with proceeds going toward providing clean drinking water. Six Christian rock bands will perform, and snacks, desserts and espresso will be served. The event is alcohol-free and family-friendly. Child care will be provided.

Localpalooza set PORT TOWNSEND — Localpalooza, a concert featuring local alternative music talent, will be held at Sirens, 823 Water St., at 9 p.m. Friday. Proceeds from the show will benefit The Music Boosters, an independent group that supports school music programs in Jeffer-

Adopt a Youth

Peninsula Births

Fay Fay, born Jan. 19, 2005, is a beautiful girl with Down syndrome but a strong desire for knowledge. She can count from one to 10, write simple characters and is self-sufficient in daily care. She is a lovely and cute girl that would flourish in a forever family. She resides in the People’s Republic of China. For more information on this little girl or the adoption process, please e-mail Ky Bower at ky@adoption advocates.org or phone Adoption Advocates International at 360-452-4777. Families interested in adoption must be approved by a licensed agency.

Olympic Medical Center Janessa Scott and Kyler Caldwell, Port Angeles, a son, Brayden James, 7 pounds 15 ounces, 9:57 p.m. Dec. 6. Crystal and Javier Chavez, Sequim, a daughter, Johonna Francisca, 9 pounds 4 ounces, 6:26 a.m. Dec. 7. Sarah and Adam Barton, Sequim, a daughter, Audrey Marie, 7 pounds 8 ounces, 5:46 a.m. Dec. 7. Brenda and Matthew Lawson, Sequim, a daughter, Kaylee May, 8 pounds 10 ounces, 8:18 a.m. Dec. 9.

Forks Community Hospital

Harrison Memorial Hospital

Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.

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Brinnon

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10706 recognized efforts of 2010 during its annual Brinnon Awards Banquet at the Brinnon Booster Club. Recipients and their awards are, from left, Donna and Bob Steinbrugge, Citizens of the Year; Jefferson County Sheriff Sgt. Andy Pernsteiner, Law Enforcement Officer of the Year; Nick Fields, Fire Fighter of the Year; Matthew Draper, Emergency Medical Technician of the Year; and Melissa Baker, Geoduck Restaurant owner, Patriotic Business of the Year. At right are John Dowd, VFW Post 10706 commander, and Jenny Loring, VFW Ladies Auxiliary president.

If adoption is not an option for you but you would like to support the sponsorship programs, e-mail Linda@adoption advocates.org.

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Anna Stephan and Joseph Colfax, Neah Bay, a daughter, Mikaela Rose Marie, 6 pounds 3.7 ounces, 8:47 p.m. Dec. 16. Tara and Trinston Rigby, Forks, a son, Gaige Sam, 6 pounds 13.3 ounces, 3:18 p.m. Dec. 19.

Recognition


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Sunday, December 26, 2010

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

State to sell ads on ferries website Legislature OKs $75,000 for yearlong revenue test The Associated Press

other state agencies, she said Thursday. Because ads can’t be sold on dot-gov websites, the pages will be converted to dot-com addresses, but they’ll be instantly linked when users click, she said. One state lawmaker who supports advertising on the government websites, Rep. Reuven Carlyle of Seattle, told KOMO News they could generate $4 million to $5 million a year.

said state Transportation Department spokesman Steve Pierce. The ads will relate to travel or tourism. The Legislature approved spending $75,000 on the yearlong test to determine if the ads can make money without disrupting people looking for ferry information. “We join a handful of government agencies across the country exploring website advertising and how it might benefit taxpayers,” Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond said in a statement.

SEATTLE — Desperate for revenue, Washington will test the waters of Internet advertising with advertisements from the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau on the state ferries website. The ads will begin Jan. 3 on pages that provide ferry schedule information and track vessels on Puget Sound, said Karina Shagren, a spokeswoman in the New revenue? Governor’s Office. No pushing, popups Depending on how things “This could potentially go, advertising could be The ads won’t pop up or generate new revenue at a expanded to websites of push products like Viagra, time when it’s badly needed,

“We join a handful of government agencies across the country exploring website advertising and how it might benefit taxpayers. This could potentially generate new revenue at a time when it’s badly needed, as well as offer businesses a new way to reach potential customers.”

Convention Bureau. Now, it’s paying about $12,800 for its ads on the ferry website pages in January. The Transportation Department will receive about $7,000 of that, with the remainder going to an ad sales company.

as well as offer businesses a new way to reach potential customers.” The Transportation Department’s Web pages get about 410 million page views a year. The 12 schedule pages and the ferry tracking page receive nearly 1.2 million page views a month.

The department expects its website viewership will be attractive to businesses selling to drivers, travelers and tourists in Washington, said Jeff Doyle, director of the Public-Private Partnerships Office. The pilot will test revenue and cost assumptions and evaluate how the public feels about seeing ads on the pages.

Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond in a statement. Tourist-driven The Ferries Division already has been selling ad space onboard ferries and in terminals since 2007.

$474,000 this year That advertising brought in $474,000 this year. One of those advertisers is the Hawaii Visitors and

Navy a danger to marine life? Environmentalists “I’m not convinced by worry about the assurances that the expanded testing Navy gives that there The Associated Press

BELLINGHAM — Environmentalists are worried that plans to expand Navy testing off the Washington, Oregon and California coasts will pose a danger to whales. A proposal for increased sailor training and weapons testing, as well as an underwater training minefield for submarines in the Navy’s Northwest Training Range, have been approved by the Obama administration.

Used since before WWII The area — 122,400 nautical square miles of space, equal roughly to the size of California — has been used for Navy training since before World War II. Environmentalists are concerned about plans to expand training there. In a letter to the Navy, the Natural Resources Defense Council said the plan “would pose significant risk to whales, fish and other wildlife.” The group is concerned about hazardous materials in the water from both spent and unexploded weapons.

150 orcas Environmentalists worry about the safety of the 150 orcas known to live in Puget Sound and along the Pacific coastline from Washington to California. “They’re all very susceptible,” said Howard Garrett, the president of Orca Network, a nonprofit group based in the San Juan Islands. “The Navy is singleminded, and they’re focused, and the whales are very much a secondary concern to them.” The group is among the many opponents in Washington state and California lining up against the Navy’s plan. Navy officials have been assuring the public that the marine life will be safe. “We are not even permitted to kill even one marine mammal . . . What people don’t seem to understand is we share the environment with everybody,” said Sheila Murray, a Navy spokeswoman.

will be no effect. I can’t imagine that there won’t be mortalities.”

Howard Garrett president of Orca Network

“It’s our environment, too. Of course we want to take care of it. “The Navy goes to great lengths to protect the marine environment.” Of the Navy’s expanded operations at the site, she said: “This training is important. It allows naval forces to be prepared.” Opponents fear that missile and sonar testing and the dumping of depleted uranium could hurt the whales.

Hazardous materials The Natural Resources Defense Council worries that the Navy will release a variety of hazardous materials into coastal waters, including “thousands of rounds of spent ammunition and unexploded ordnance containing chromium, chromium compounds, depleted uranium” and more. The council also believes the mid-frequency sonar the Navy uses to detect submarines and underwater objects interferes with whales’ ability to navigate and communicate and that the chronic noise can interfere with whales’ brain development and depress reproductive rates.

‘Not convinced’ “I’m not convinced by the assurances that the Navy gives that there will be no effect,” Garrett said. “I can’t imagine that there won’t be mortalities.” Murray called that concern a myth. “The Navy’s been training on that range since before World War II: 70 years,” she said. “Nobody was even aware that the Navy was there. “And if what they were saying was true, they would see dead marine mammals floating up on shore. “It’s not true.”

Norma Turner

Passing

the bucks

The D.A. Davidson & Co. investment firm of Port Angeles donates $1,500 to the Mount Angeles unit of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday. From left are George Rodes, director of the Mount Angeles unit at 2620 S. Francis St.; Kurt Anderson, senior vice president and financial consultant at the investment firm; and Joe Denhart, senior vice president and branch manager of the firm. The donation will support programs at the Mount Angeles unit.

State cuts to kill Salmon in Classroom program; teachers upset about loss The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Each year, 40,000 school children in the state have been introduced to the life of the salmon through the Salmon in the Classroom program. But beginning in January, the 20-year-old program is ending because of state budget cuts. Teachers who rely on the program to teach schoolchildren to raise salmon and release them into the wild are upset. “We heard it was on the chopping block,” said Steven Garlid, who teaches at Bryant Elementary School in Seattle. “It’s been a wonderful program at Bryant for my entire career, 17 years. “There’s no substitute for watching salmon eggs develop and hatch.” The fifth-grade teacher said his students teach younger ones about salmon,

and it is an all-school science program. “I can only guess what the loss will be,” said Garlid. “It’s losing a tradition. “You can’t learn this online. We’re losing something that binds the community, and it shows how desperate the state has become.”

Special session Craig Bartlett, spokesman for the state Department of Fish & Wildlife, said it was eliminated during the Legislature’s special session and also was proposed to be eliminated in Gov. Chris Gregoire’s proposed budget for the next two years. The department had paid for the program. It had been available at an average of 495 schools each year. Eliminating the program will save $110,000 the rest

of this school year and $442,000 for the next biennium. All of the money for the program came from the federal government, but the federal funds will be used for other fish and wildlife projects, such as fish-catch assessment and keeping track of salmon in the wild. “We are sorry to lose the program,” said Christy Vassar, program manager with the department’s fish program. “Tens of thousands of young people learned about the natural world for the last 20 years, but these are extremely tough economic times, and all state agencies are required to cut back.” The elimination of the program is part of a $6.2 million cut in the Fish & Wildlife budget, plus an additional $4 million in lost revenue in the state wildlife fund. “This is just one of a number of cuts,” said Bartlett.

James Chandler has been running the program for Fish & Wildlife for the past 12 years and worries that if it is eliminated, it will never come back. “Not only does Salmon in the Classroom affect students, it bleeds over into adults,” he said. “A lot of kids go home with this connection and share it with their parents. “My concern is we’re taking another hit in education. “I’m deeply hurt; this is a program I fell in love with, and I truly understand the value for students.” Garlid said saving the program would take a grass-roots effort because he doubts Seattle schools could afford it. “I’ve talked to a few parents about this, and they’re shocked, and the outcry will be heard,” he said. “It’s such an important program.”

How to use that gift card wisely: Tips to make after-yule dollars go farther By Mae Anderson

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — It’s traditional for many to cap a long season of Christmas shopping with more shopping once the holiday has passed. They spend gift cards and cash and exchange clothes that were the wrong size, wrong color or just plain wrong. However, people tend to treat gifts as “found money” and worry less about using

How’s the fishing? Matt Schubert reports. Fridays in

Peninsula Daily News

the dollars wisely. But a little thought can make your after-Christmas dollars go a lot farther: n Know what a deal is. Don’t blindly assume you’re getting a good deal just because you’re shopping after Christmas. Stores know people will be spending gift cards and are less likely to scrutinize prices. You can find good discounts on items like coats, hats and snow shovels that get less likely to sell with each passing day, because stores know they have to unload them. But more evergreen items like video game systems are much less likely to be on sale. n What to target. You

will probably find the best deals on clothing, said Dan de Grandpre, editor-in-chief of Dealnews.com, as clothing stores clear out what’s left of their inventory and get ready for new merchandise. However, retailers stocked up somewhat cautiously this year. You might find a great deal on, say, a coat, but it might not be the ideal color or style. There were probably better toy deals before Christmas, during price wars among Target, Walmart, Toys R Us and other toy sellers, de Grandpre says. Also, the hottest toys like Monster High dolls were scarce even before Christmas.

Don’t expect to find them now. You aren’t likely to find great deals on most electronics, either, de Grandpre said. For most items, January will probably be better. Stores discount TVs then to draw buyers who want to upgrade before the Super Bowl. For gadgets like smart phones, price cuts are likely in January ahead of the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, when manufacturers get shoppers excited about the next big thing. One electronics category that might have good sales now is computers, said Morningstar analyst R.J. Hottovy.

Computers “haven’t seen the sales traction retailers were hoping for,” he said. Don’t look for markdowns, though, on tablet computers, such as Apple’s iPad. n Start shopping now. “You can beat some people to the punch and find things that could be sold out by next day,” said de Grandpre. n Get there early. If you’re shopping clearance sales, the earlier you get to the store, the more you’ll have to choose from. n Stock up early. Some people are planners, and some aren’t. But there’s never a better time to save money on greeting cards, gift wrap and other holiday staples

than after the holiday has just passed. One warning: Don’t do it unless you have a safe, dry place to store the items. Rolls of gift wrap that get bent and bruised will just mean you’ll throw it away and buy more. n Save the cash. If you got what some consider the sweetest present of all, remember this: You don’t have to spend it. Not right away, anyway. And there are uses for it that could wind up making the gift bigger in the long run. Paying down debt or investing the money can make the gift keep on giving long after the holiday is a dim memory.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 26, 2010

C7

Briefly . . . Academic achievers get awards in PA PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Education Foundation recently honored 12 Port Angeles High School students at its inaugural Outstanding Academic Achievement Awards ceremony and reception at the high school auditorium. The award recognizes seniors who have maintained a weighted 3.5 grade-point average over three years and have taken or are presently enrolled in at least six yearlong honors or advanced-placement courses. The 2010 awards were presented to Alexis Corn, Lauren Corn, Derek Crain, Kendra Elliott, Jamie Gladfelter, Taylyn Jeffers, Alison Maxwell, Louisa Rogers, Tally Swanson, Kirby Uranich, Carter Urnes and Thomas Williams. The mission of the Port Angeles Education Foundation is to provide support for students and programs and to promote creativity, innovation and excellence in partnership with the Port Angeles School District. For more information, visit the foundation website at www.portangeles educationfoundation.org.

Port Angeles School District

Port Angeles High School students, from left, Thomas Williams, Carter Urnes, Tally Swanson, Alison Maxwell, Taylyn Jeffers, Jamie Gladfelter, Lauren Corn, Alexis Corn, Derek Crain and Kendra Elliott were honored during the Port Angeles Education Foundation’s inaugural Outstanding Academic Achievement Awards ceremony. Louisa Rogers and Kirby Uranich, not pictured, also received awards.

Death and Memorial Notice Colleen Jeannette Grady Earl-Ripley

Director honored SEQUIM — At a recent meeting of the Film Festival Planning Committee, retiring Sequim Education Foundation Director Michelle Grinnell was presented the foundation’s Award for Outstanding Service. “Michelle has been an outstanding member of our board,” foundation President Dick Hughes said. “Everyone likes her ‘let’s get it done’ attitude, and she will be hard to replace. “We are really grateful Michelle found time to continue to help on our Film Festival Planning Committee.” Grinnell’s award was approved by the group’s board of directors in November, but she was unable to attend the December board meeting to receive it. She served on the Sequim Education Foundation board of directors dur-

August 7, 1936 December 19, 2010

Sequim Education Foundation

Sequim Education Foundation directors, from left, Elna Kawal, Kathy Schock and Katie Gilles present an award to Michelle Grinnell at a Film Festival Planning Committee meeting. ing both the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school years, but increasing business demands required her to give up her directorship this year. During her tenure on the board, Grinnell helped in every Sequim Education Foundation-sponsored program and fundraiser.

Last year, she played a key role as a foundation representative to the Senior Party Planning Committee. Sequim Education Foundation is gearing up for its sixth annual Student Film Festival Competition and Family Dinner, to be held at Sequim High

Death and Memorial Notice Jack William Stewart December 9, 1947 December 13, 2010 Jack William Stewart III was born on December 9, 1947, in Port Angeles, and passed away at his home in Seattle, Washington, on December 13, 2010. He graduated from Port Angeles High School class of 1966 and Peninsula College, followed by Western Washington University. He was ambitious and worked at many seasonal jobs to have his spending money while attending school and college. Picking strawberries was probably his first job; which he hated. Then haying, K&K Grocery, J.C. Penney, Peoples Department Store, meter reading for the City of Port Angeles, a fish processing

Mr. Stewart plant in Alaska and summer construction working on the replacement of sewer and water lines at Olympic Memorial Hospital. He retired from Albertsons with his pension through Retail Clerks. His last employer was Boeing, where he worked in their computer department.

He loved his computer, but his love of music and art was his passion and obsession. Friends were constantly amazed by his extensive music collection and encyclopedic knowledge of rock ’n’ roll in all of its many forms. His cat, Doodle Bug, was a constant joy for him. He is survived by his parents, Jack and Dolores Stewart, and his brother Jerry, all of Port Angeles; and his companion of many years, Debbie Levenstein of Seattle. He was preceded in death by his brother, Robert, and his grandparents, Jack and Marie Stewart and Thomas and Mae Reandeau. A celebration of Jack’s life will be held on December 30, 2010, at DrennanFord Funeral Home, 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, at 1 p.m.

Remembering a Lifetime downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.”

Ms. Earl-Ripley She is survived by son, Brian Robert Earl Ripley; daughter, Cary Lorene Earl Samuelson; sisters, Lois GradyEdwards, Manan GradyCashman and Patricia Grady-Harper; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Graveside service will be December 28, 2010, at the Park Hill Cemetery in Vancouver, Washington, at 2 p.m.

Death and Memorial Notice Herman Voss September 15, 1929 December 20, 2010 Herman Voss of Port Ludlow died Monday, December 20, 2010, in Bremerton after a sevenyear battle with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. He was born in Austin, Texas, on September 15, 1929, to Herman and Dorothy Voss. Herman received his degree in Chemistry from University of Texas. He served his career in the Navy on a destroyer escort. He married Carolyn McIntyre in 1957, and began a long career with Boeing in many of its facilities, retiring from Boeing in March 1990. After moving to his retirement home in Port Ludlow, he joined the Coast Guard Auxiliary and

Mr. Voss was an active member. He also donated much time to ministering to the poor as a part of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. He loved skiing, sailing, kayaking and just being around boats and the water. He was an accomplished handyman and could fix anything! He especially loved

spending time with his wife, sons and grandchildren. Herman is survived by his wife of 54 years, Carolyn; his three sons, Ken (Kay), Eric (Carol) and Jeff (Laveille); and his six grandchildren, Nick, Edward, Curtis, Kara, Elliot and Michelle. He is also survived by his two brothers, John and Terry. The funeral Mass, celebrated by Father John Topel, will be held at 12:05 p.m. December 30, 2010, at St. Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church, 1335 Blaine St., Port Townsend. A reception will follow in the parish hall. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to St. Vincent de Paul Society at St. Mary’s, to the Coalition for Pulmonary Fibrosis (www.coalitionforpf.org), or to your favorite charity.

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■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, phone 360-417-3528.

Drennan & Ford

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Phone 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by

School on April 15. Information on both the upcoming third annual Engineering Challenge Mars Rover Contest and the 2011 Student Film Festival may be found on the Sequim Education Foundation website at www. sequimed.org. Peninsula Daily News

A beautiful soul, longtime Port Angeles resident Colleen Jeannette Grady Earl-Ripley, passed at home in South Seattle on December 19, 2010. She will be remembered by her family for her brilliant “Irish” smiling eyes, her love of Christ continued among life’s difficulties and her compassion towards all people. She married David Earl in 1956 and moved with him to Crescent City, California. In 1963, she married again to Harvey Ripley in Port Angels. She was preceded in death by her parents, William John Grady and Marion Genevieve Loren, and niece, baby Teresa.


C8

WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 44

Low 32

43/34

43/30

38/30

37/27

Rain.

Frequent showers, possible snow mix.

Rain.

Rather cloudy with a chance of rain.

Cloudy and cold with a chance for snow.

Cold with partial sunshine.

The Peninsula An active weather pattern will continue across the Olympic Peninsula over the next few days. Frequent showers are expected today. Temperatures will continue to trend cooler. Highs this afternoon will be in the lower to middle 40s across the area. The Neah Bay Port jet stream will send another storm toward the area later 45/38 Townsend Monday. Rainfall tonight and Monday will be mostly light, Port Angeles 46/37 but another round of heavy rain could reach the area 44/32 Monday night into early Tuesday. Yet another significant Sequim storm could affect the region late Wednesday.

Victoria 47/39

44/35

Forks 44/33

Olympia 45/32

Seattle 43/37

Spokane 39/27

Marine Forecast

Rain today. Wind southeast 8-16 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Occasional rain and drizzle in the evening; otherwise, plenty of clouds tonight. Wind southwest 7-14 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 4 miles at times. Rain tomorrow. Wind southwest 8-16 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Tuesday: Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Today

LaPush

Low Tide

Tomorrow Ht

4:08 a.m. 8.2’ 10:03 a.m. 2.0’ COme see the 3:48 p.m. 7.6’ 10:17 p.m. 0.3’

BEST OF the BEST

Port Angeles

Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

6:46 a.m. 5:54 p.m. 8:31 a.m. 7:39 p.m. 7:52 a.m. 7:00 p.m.

8.1’ 5.0’ 9.7’ 6.0’ 9.1’ 5.6’

1:20 p.m. ----12:46 a.m. 2:34 p.m. 12:39 a.m. 2:27 p.m.

3.3’ ---0.2’ 4.3’ -0.2’ 4.0’

San Francisco 55/46

First

High Tide Ht 4:51 a.m. 4:52 p.m. 7:19 a.m. 7:32 p.m. 9:04 a.m. 9:17 p.m. 8:25 a.m. 8:38 p.m.

8.3’ 7.0’ 8.0’ 4.6’ 9.6’ 5.5’ 9.0’ 5.2’

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

11:03 a.m. 11:08 p.m. 12:17 a.m. 2:25 p.m. 1:31 a.m. 3:39 p.m. 1:24 a.m. 3:32 p.m.

5:38 a.m. 6:04 p.m. 7:52 a.m. 9:45 p.m. 9:37 a.m. 11:30 p.m. 8:58 a.m. 10:51 p.m.

12:08 p.m. ----1:06 a.m. 3:25 p.m. 2:20 a.m. 4:39 p.m. 2:13 a.m. 4:32 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

wilder You Can Count on us!

8.5’ 6.4’ 8.0’ 4.6’ 9.6’ 5.6’ 9.0’ 5.3’

Best Auto Deale r

Jan 12

Kansas City 26/12

1.4’ --2.2’ 1.3’ 2.9’ 1.7’ 2.7’ 1.6’

City Hi Lo W Athens 62 55 c Baghdad 67 43 s Beijing 38 26 s Brussels 36 23 sf Cairo 76 56 s Calgary 39 23 pc Edmonton 34 21 c Hong Kong 61 52 s Jerusalem 66 47 s Johannesburg 77 52 t Kabul 50 20 pc London 38 36 pc Mexico City 68 39 pc Montreal 16 9 pc Moscow 32 27 sn New Delhi 73 41 s Paris 34 31 c Rio de Janeiro 87 75 pc Rome 48 34 sh Stockholm 27 21 sn Sydney 85 64 t Tokyo 52 37 s Toronto 27 14 c Vancouver 43 39 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Bes Auto R t ep Finali air st

Atlanta 33/19 El Paso 58/31

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Full

Jan 19

Washington 30/21

0s

Houston 53/30

Fronts Cold Warm

Miami 68/42

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi Lo W 51 29 s 22 14 sn 48 37 r 33 19 pc 36 25 sn 34 22 sn 37 26 sn 51 30 pc 22 8 s 42 30 c 33 29 sn 25 17 sn 44 27 sn 50 27 s 29 13 sf 31 16 sf 40 28 sn 44 37 r 46 29 s 51 25 s 21 8 pc 31 18 sf 43 37 r -21 -32 c 35 22 c 79 72 pc 53 30 s 28 17 sf

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 26 59 39 62 68 28 13 33 46 33 42 23 57 68 34 65 42 35 44 53 29 44 54 61 55 15 34 30

Lo W 12 s 42 c 21 s 46 pc 42 pc 15 sf 4 pc 23 c 29 s 26 sn 20 s 6s 32 pc 46 pc 24 sn 46 pc 36 r 20 sn 22 sn 38 r 15 pc 25 sn 30 s 49 pc 46 c 6s 19 sn 21 sn

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 77 at Key West, FL

Bes Oil Ch t an Finali ge st

Low: -13 at Big Piney, WY

Be salesp st erson Bil schlic l hting

Be salesp st e Fin rson ellen D alist earinge r

0C5105133

Auto Thanks You!

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht 1.8’ 1.0’ 1.0’ 2.3’ 1.3’ 3.0’ 1.2’ 2.8’

Jan 4

New York 33/26

Chicago 29/13

Denver 51/25

Los Angeles 62/46

Moon Phases New

Minneapolis 13/4 Detroit 31/18

Sunset today ................... 4:26 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:04 a.m. Moonrise today .............. 11:33 p.m. Moonset today ............... 10:58 a.m.

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 35/25 44/33

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Ht

Billings 51/30

Sun & Moon

Dec 27

Everett 45/35

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 43/37

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 51 43 0.10 13.80 Forks 50 47 2.74 133.92 Seattle 54 45 0.63 46.22 Sequim 56 47 0.03 9.99 Hoquiam 49 46 0.57 72.20 Victoria 51 46 0.23 35.82 P. Townsend* 50 43 0.09 16.31 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Last

Port Ludlow 46/36 Bellingham 45/34

Aberdeen 47/36

Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, December 26, 2010

Business

SECTION

D

 $ Briefly . . . Business group to install 2011 leaders Tuesday PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Business Association will install its 2011 officers and directors at its weekly breakfast meeting Tuesday. The group held elections at last Tuesday’s meeting. Installed will be Kaj Ahlburg as president, Dick Pilling as vice presiAhlburg dent, Paul Coover as secretary, Karen Spence as treasurer and Mike Sturgeon, Harry Bell and Stan Forsell as board members. Rob Onnen is the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce representative on the board. Tuesday’s PABA breakfast meeting, open to the public, begins at 7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive, Port Angeles. There is a $2.16 minimum charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order breakfast.

Forks chamber FORKS — The Forks Chamber of Commerce will hold its weekly luncheon meeting Wednesday. A speaker for the event has not been announced. The membership meeting, open to the public, starts with no-host lunch at noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information.

Port Angeles holiday PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, which usually holds weekly membership luncheons on Mondays, is taking the Monday between Christmas and New Year’s days off. The next meeting, Jan. 3, will be the chamber’s annual installation and awards event. The chamber meets upstairs at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St.

Jefferson chamber PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce will take Monday off from its weekly membership luncheon schedule. When the chamber reconvenes Jan. 3, it will focus on the future of Fort Worden State Park’s higher eduction collaboration. The Jefferson County chamber, combining former chamber organizations in Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and the Tri-Area, meets at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St.

Insurance types taken PORT ANGELES — Olympic Acupuncture & Natural Wellness Clinic, 603 E. Eighth St., is now accepting insurance billing for Premera Blue Cross and Lifewise Health Insurance. Owner Pat Flood has been practicing, teaching and speaking on acupuncture and traditional Chinese Medicine since Flood 1993. For more information, phone the clinic at 360-417-8870.

Health and healing PORT ANGELES — Strait Health and Healing has opened at 720 S. Peabody St. The business offers massage, body wraps, body scrubs, paraffin wax treatments, locally sourced soaps, bath salts, candles and wind chimes. A Zumba class will be offered starting in January. Strait Health and Healing is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and by appointment on Monday. All credit cards, checks and cash are accepted. Gift certificates and gift baskets are available.

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Markets were closed Friday for the Christmas holiday. Strait Health and Healing is owned by Tina Sperry. For more information, phone her at 360417-1000.

Burwell designated SEQUIM — Alan Burwell has been named designated broker for the Windermere SunLand office, 137 Fairway Drive, Windermere Real Estate on the North Olympic Peninsula announced. SunLand was the dream of Jess Taylor in the 1950s and has had its own real estate office since the early 1970s. “When you work and Burwell play in a magnificent place like SunLand, with an attractive atmosphere and friendly residents, it’s hard not to be excited,” Burwell said. For more information, phone Burwell at 360-683-6880.

Wirta partnership SEQUIM — Bret Wirta, CEO of Wirta Hospitality Worldwide, announced that his company had entered into a partnership with Sharon DelaBarre, owner of DelaBarre & Associates Inc. Wirta Hospitality operates the Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center in Sequim. “DelaBarre & Associates will provide a high level of expertise and support for those clients wishing to plan a conference or exhibit at the Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center here in Sequim,” Wirta said. DelaBarre Associates was founded in 1974 and specializes in providing basic management consulting and support in servicing conferences and exhibition programs for the public and private sectors. “Sharon has over 30 years experience in conference and exposition planning, program development, management, public relations and support services,” Wirta said. “We are so fortunate to be partnering with an expert in her field. “With Sharon’s expertise, we have the capability to provide full service quality support for meetings, conferences, exhibits and special events right here at our hotel in Sequim.”

KONP talk guests PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio at 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and on www.konp. com on the Internet outside the Port Angeles area. Station general manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Monday through Thursday segments, and Karen Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on Smith Fridays. This week’s scheduled lineup: ■  Monday: Master Gardeners Jeanette Stehr-Green, Judy English and Bill Wrobel. ■  Tuesday: To be announced. ■  Wednesday: Cheryl Smith, “The Petsmith.” ■  Thursday, Friday: To be announced.

Region/Nation/World Tribal casino rivalry? PORTLAND, Ore. — The news that the Cowlitz tribe of Washington state has won federal approval for a casino a few minutes drive from Portland has given the tribe with Oregon’s largest casino yet another source of competition. Leaders of the Grande Ronde tribe said they’re still going to fight the proposed casino just off Interstate 5 near La Center. The Grande Ronde run a casino about 60 miles from Portland. Turn to Briefly/D5

Politics and Environment

Seeking an early start on your taxes? Congress’ late approval of income tax breaks forces IRS to reboot its processing procedures Peninsula Daily News

T

and news services

he filing of federal tax returns by thousands of Washington state residents will be delayed by up to a month or more because of processing issues caused by a new federal tax law. The Internal Revenue Service said that taxpayers claiming certain tax breaks will have to wait until mid-tolate February to file their returns.

Tax-filing season typically starts in mid-to-late January, so the delay could range from a few weeks to a month — or longer. The problem will also affect many families seeking financial aid for college. The IRS could not say exactly when it will begin accepting the affected returns for processing. The agency said it will announce “in the near future” a specific date. At issue is the big federal tax bill that was approved by Congress and signed into law by President Obama on Dec. 17. Among other things, the law made changes to federal tax law that will affect the returns that people file during the coming taxfiling season. At the time the new law was enacted, the IRS was well along in the process of preparing its computers for the season based on

provisions of prior law. In essence, the IRS now must go back and make changes to its computer systems and related processes.

Four deduction types To allow for that, the agency said it will have to delay — until mid-to-late February — the processing of returns from taxpayers in the following situations: n  Those who make a separate list of their deductions on Schedule A of the U.S. Form 1040 (a process known as itemizing), instead of claiming a lump-sum deduction (called the standard deduction). n  Those who claim a deduction for state and local sales tax. n  Those who claim the new higher education tuition and fees deduction for parents and students, covering up to $4,000 paid to a post-secondary institution.

n  Kindergarten-throughgrade 12 educators who have outof-pocket classroom expenses of up to $250 for which they are not reimbursed. Of the four categories, the one with the broadest impact in Washington state relates to itemized deductions and deductions for sales tax. Most taxpayers who file early in the season are due refunds, said Patricia A. Thompson, head of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ national tax executive committee. So the delay is “unfortunate for those people that want to file early to get their refunds early,” she said. The delay in processing “will delay their refunds,” she said. For tax preparers, the delays will “cause a bottleneck,” said Gregory A. Porcaro, who teaches taxation at Bryant University and is president of Otrando Porcaro & Associates Ltd., a CPA firm in Warwick, R.I. “That’s going to be a pain in the neck.” The delay could also cause a problem for the IRS, because the agency’s system probably will have to handle a surge in returns in late February, Porcaro said. Turn

to

Delay/D3

Sales-tax deduction continues Peninsula Daily News and news services

WASHINGTON — The new $858 billion tax measure signed into law by President Obama will allow residents of Washington and six other states that don’t have state income taxes to continue to deduct state sales taxes on their 2010 and 2011 federal returns. In 2008, nearly 860,000 taxpayers in Washington state, or 27 percent, itemized their sales taxes, according to the Internal Revenue Service. The deductions averaged $2,011, or worth $563 per return, assuming a 28 percent marginal tax rate.

The other six states that have only sales taxes and no state income taxes are Texas, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Tennessee and Wyoming. When the federal tax code was simplified in 1986, the deduction for state sales tax was eliminated. Taxpayers in states with income taxes were allowed to continue deducting what they paid in state income tax on their federal returns. The sales tax deduction was restored in 2004, but Congress has refused to make it permanent. Instead, it’s been a sweetener used by congressional leaders looking for votes on controversial bills near the end of a session.

Mortgage tax break could die in new deficit-hawk Congress Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — Fifteen years ago, Carol Nietmann and her husband bought a spacious house in Maryland near Chesapeake Bay. Thanks to the time-honored tax deduction for mortgage interest, she said, their new place was a little bigger and a little nicer than they otherwise could afford. Much the same has been true for millions of Americans up and down the income scale. Perhaps the most sacred of all sacred cows in the tax code, the mortgage deduction long has been seen as crucial to a piece of the American dream — owning a home. But nearly a century after coming into existence, the mortgage deduction may face a day of reckoning next year when the new Congress — including a lot more deficit-hawk Republicans — takes over. In part, the deduction has a target on its back as a result of

T

he mortgage tax deduction may face a day of reckoning next year when the new Congress — including a lot more deficit-hawk Republicans — takes over. policymakers rethinking the issue of homeownership. In the wake of the havoc that followed the latest housing bust — a calamity that still shadows the U.S. economy and will for years — it’s no longer so clear that near-universal homeownership should be a paramount goal.

Not equitable The deduction has been a boon to homebuilders, construction workers, the financial-services industry and local governments that benefited from fatter realestate tax revenue. Scholars long have argued that

the mortgage deduction and other tax subsidies supporting housing, including a deduction for property taxes and tax exemptions for profits on home sales, are neither equitable nor economically efficient. Some say they’ve helped skew the economy’s reliance on an industry that has little export potential and often encourages overconsumption. “It’s fair to ask whether [government money] is best spent on housing — or plants and equipment or other investments,” said Richard Green, director of the Lusk Center for Real Estate at University of Southern California. More important, despite the deduction’s grip on the public and politicians, changing it as part of a package of other revisions offers Washington a chance to do something meaningful about the country’s surging debt — generate billions of dollars more in federal revenues while inflicting surprisingly little pain on most middleclass homeowners. Turn

to

Mortgage/D3


D2

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Victoria tall ships festival is scuttled Lack of money sponsors ends event for 2011

from Russia and Mexico, both of which exceeded 300 feet in length. Victoria also held a tall ships fest in 2008 which Peninsula Daily News featured a rare news sources Pacific coast Girouard VICTORIA — Tourism profes- visit of the sionals in Victoria say they are 295-foot U.S. Coast Guard tall worried about the loss of revenues ship, Eagle. likely from the cancellation of the 2011 Tall Ships Festival in Inner 2011 gathering nixed Harbour. But the tall ships won’t gather Tourism Victoria CEO Rob in Victoria in 2011, Girouard said Gialloreto, whose organization represents hotels, restaurants Dec. 16. “The gap between the funds we and other tourist-dependent businesses, called the cancellation have raised in the community and what it will cost to stage the festi“extremely disappointing.” “We were extremely surprised val is too large to bridge,” he said. The 2011 Tall Ships Festival, to hear this. It’s shocking that it’s not happening,” Gialloreto said of which was expected by Tourism the event scheduled for next June. Victoria to inject $8 million of The cancellation, announced visitor spending into the Victoria earlier this month by Victoria Tall economy June 9-12 next year, had Ships Society President Roger 22 ships signed up to visit. They were to use Victoria as Girouard because of the lack of sponsors, will also have a minor the second port of call of an Amereffect in Port Angeles and Port ican Sail Training Association Tall Townsend, where many tall ships Ships Challenge tour that begins at past festivals came to enter the June 7 near Vancouver, B.C., with U.S. ports of entry and dock for scheduled visits at San Francisco, Long Beach, Calif., and Honolulu. provisions. The Victoria Tall Ships Society The ships were popular waterfront attractions, and a few have — a volunteer group of people allowed tours and staged mock who are passionate about bringbattles offshore before moving on ing tall-ships festivals to the picturesque provincial capital — in their West Coast tour. Notable among the visits in needed to have corporate sponsors Port Angeles were the 2005 to accommodate the ships at Inner appearances of giant tall ships Harbour.

Peninsula Daily News

The Amazing Grace, an 83-foot topsail schooner from Gig Harbor, heads toward Victoria’s Inner Harbour during the opening day Parade of Sail to start the 2008 Tall Ships Festival. “This is a fiscally responsible decision by our board of directors,” Girouard said of the Victoria cancellation. “The society is not prepared to spend money it doesn’t have or to make promises to the community and our partners that we will be unable to keep.”

$250,000 short The estimated budget for the festival, which drew 32,000 people in 2008, is $1.2 million. Girouard said the organization was about $250,000 short when it pulled the plug. “It was clear the trend line in terms of cash and our capacity to pull it all off was not getting to where it needed to be,” he said. “The society carried a bit of a

war chest over from the last festival so from a pure cash position it seemed fine, but we realized at this time in past years we had promissory notes and handshakes that covered a lot of things that we don’t have yet this year.” Gialloreto, the Tourism Victoria CEO, said the festival was to play a big role in Tourism Victoria’s 2011 marketing plans — it had set aside $30,000 to promote the event — to say nothing of boosting tourism revenues. Tourism Victoria even had a tall ships image set for the front of its annual visitors’ guide. It’s now looking for a new cover shot. Girouard, a retired Canadian Navy rear admiral and former commander of the Pacific fleet, said there is a slight chance the

festival could be revived but that window of opportunity is small. “If someone calls and says, ‘Here’s a quarter-million dollars,’ then sure we will aim to do it, but the challenge, of course, is we have started to talk to stakeholders and partners and we’ve initiated the process of disassembly so it is a limited-time offer,” he said. Girouard said the society will work to bring the festival back ahead of the usual three-year cycle that would have it in Victoria again in 2014. “We intend to be back,” he said.

________ Andrew A. Duffy of the Victoria Times Colonist, a news partner of the Peninsula Daily News, contributed to this report.

Lasers aimed at pilots worry aviation officials By Joan Lowy The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Federal Aviation Administration officials are worried about a substantial increase in the number of people pointing lasers at aircraft cockpits. They say the intense light can distract and temporarily blind pilots and has caused some to relinquish control to co-pilots or abort landings.

No ‘On the Waterfront’ Columnist David G. Sellars is taking the week off from his maritime column.

This year, there have been more than 2,200 incidents reported to the Federal Aviation Administration, up from fewer than 300 in 2005. California, Texas and Florida have recorded the most, but the problem is widespread across the country. There hasn’t been an air crash so far, but the incidents have aviation officials concerned. “It sounds silly, but this is a serious problem,” FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt wrote in a Transportation Department blog. “We know that laser pointers are an important tool for astronomers and casual stargazers,” Babbitt wrote. “But we just can’t stress enough the importance of being careful when you are shining them into the night sky.”

The rise in incidents has coincided with a growing hobbyist market for handheld lasers that are far more powerful — and potentially dangerous — than the typical laser pointer. At the same time prices have dropped. Lasers that once cost more than $1,000 can now be bought online for a few hundred dollars or less. Some lasers are marketed with holsters that can be clipped onto a belt, creating a gunslinger-like appearance. Earlier this year, Lucasfilm threatened legal action against Wicked Lasers, a Hong Kong-based company whose lasers have aluminum handles that resemble the lightsabers of the “Star Wars” movies. Lucasfilm later dropped the threat. “Wicked Lasers defeats

dark forces of George Lucas,” respond to an e-mail request the laser company’s website for comment. brags. Dozens of people in the United States and around Eye damage the world have been arrested for pointing lasers at aircraft The American Academy of Ophthalmology issued a cockpits, most often near airstatement in September ports during takeoffs and warning parents that new, landings. Those are the most critipowerful laser devices can easily cause eye damage and cal phases of flight, when pilots need to be their most blindness. The academy pointed to alert. Interference with air the case of a 15-year-old boy navigation is a federal who suffered severe eye crime. Last year, an Orange, damage while playing with a Calif., man was sentenced to laser in front of a mirror. Lasers don’t have to be 2½ years in prison for aimpointed at someone’s eyes to ing a handheld laser at two cause harm — reflected light Boeing jets as the passenger planes were about to land at can cause damage as well. A laser pointer like those John Wayne Airport. In August, a Baltimore used by lecturers typically generates about 5 milliwatts police helicopter pilot was temporarily “flash blinded” of power. Wicked Laser’s website by a laser, preventing him offers a 1,000-milliwatt from helping fellow officers chasing a suspect. handheld laser. The laser company didn’t The pilot recovered, cir-

cled around and spotlighted the house where the beam had come from as officers on the ground rushed in to arrest the culprit. The same month, green lasers were pointed at the cockpits of two medical helicopters transporting patients in Pittsburgh, including a 5-year-old boy injured in a bicycle accident. There are red, blue and violet lasers as well, but the green is the most visible against a night sky. The green lasers are also 35 times brighter than equivalently powered red lasers because humans are much more sensitive to green light, according to the Congressional Research Service. Last year, pilots of dozens of planes taking off and landing at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport reported being flashed with green lasers.

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soon be a thing of the past. mum sound levels for hybrid Auto safety regulators and electric vehicles under WASHINGTON — Silent hybrid vehicles may will be required to set mini- a bill that will be signed into law by President Obama. Blind pedestrians have Perception drives all of your market’s pushed for the changes, saydecisions and behaviors. ing the quiet purr of hybrids ��������������������������������������������������������������� can pose risks for them That’s where we come in. We’ll help you craft a compelling because they use sound message and create the tools you need to get cues to travel safely. Hybrids such as the Toythe results you want. ota Prius and Honda Insight Let LBD be a partner in your success — are well-regarded for their call for a free consultation. L�UREL BL��K D���GN high gas mileage, but they are virtually silent when ���������������������������������������������������������������������� propelled by electric motors �������������������������������������������� ������������ at low speeds. With more hybrids and new electric cars coming onto the market, automakers and advocates for the blind have raised concerned about potential safety problems for blind pedestrians. “The trend toward putting more environmentally friendly, quiet vehicles on the road has unintentionally jeopardized the safety and independence of the blind and other pedestrians,” said Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y. The House passed the bill 379-30. The Senate approved its version, sponsored by Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., and the measure now awaits Obama’s signature. EXTREME Rep. Cliff Stearns, a Look inside VALUE Florida Republican, said PACK today’s insert the bill would protect blind pedestrians along with jogfor savings! SES1 gers, children and others The Associated Press

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who need to be alerted to approaching traffic. Automakers and the National Federation of the Blind support the plan.

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Car manufacturers have started developing artificial sounds that will be emitted from electric cars and future hybrids. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said in a research report last year that hybrid vehicles are twice as likely to be involved in pedestrian crashes at low speeds compared with conventional vehicles. The study looked at circumstances in which vehicles were slowing down or stopping, backing up or entering or departing a parking space. The government has been researching the safety risks that hybrids and electrics can pose for blind pedestrians for vehicles traveling at 20 mph or less. When a car accelerates beyond 20 mph, the friction between the tire and the road’s surface makes the vehicle louder. Nearly 4,100 pedestrians were killed and 59,000 were injured in 2009, according to the most recent data available.


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Sunday, December 26, 2010

D3

The Sequim Association of Realtors recently held its annual awards ceremony and officer installation. Recognized were, from left, Alan Burwell, Gail Sumpter, Marguerite Glover, Butch Glover, Leland Schwab, Bill Humphrey, Mike Aleer, E. Michael McAleer, Lin Ulin and Jo Cummins.

Sequim Realtors hold recognition ceremony, officer installation Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Sequim Association of Realtors held its annual awards ceremony and officer installation at 7 Cedars Casino. Award winners for 2010: ■  Realtor of the Year Award — Marguerite Glover. ■  Realtor Achievement

Award — Heidi Hansen. Service ■  Community Award — Michael McAleer. Recognition ■  Special Award — Leland Schwab. ■  Affiliate of the Year — Sound Community Bank. ■  Rookie of the Year Award — Gail Sumpter. ■  Most Innovative Market-

ing Award — Deborah Norman. ■  Best Wednesday Open House — Barb Butcher. ■  Active Social Networker — Arthur Buhrer. ■  Best Nonprofessional Stager — Colleen McAleer. ■  Citizens of the Year — Brown and Sara Maloney.

2011 officers The association’s 2011 officers are: ■  President — Heidi Hansen. ■  Past President — Bill Humphrey. ■  Vice President — Bill Schroepfer ■  Secretary — Jo Cummins.

Delay: ‘Smooth’

Mortgage: Half of population Continued from D1 The National Association of Realtors already is running ads warning that tampering with the deduction would hurt “hardworking American families.” The ads note that 65 percent of taxpayers who take the deduction make less than $100,000. What the group doesn’t say is that about 75 percent of the $85.5 billion that people saved in taxes from the mortgage-interest deduction in 2008 went to individuals or couples making $100,000 or more, according to an analysis by the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation of the latest data available. Based on those numbers, taxpayers who took the mortgage deduction saved, on average, $2,330 in 2008. But the average savings were nearly triple that amount for those reporting incomes of at least $200,000. About half of all U.S. homeowners — and only one-quarter of all taxpayers — benefit from the mortgage-interest deduction. That’s because most people don’t have home loans or don’t pay enough mortgage interest to take advantage of the benefit. Also left out are many homeowners in cheaper housing markets, although people with pricier homes and larger mortgages — many of them are affluent younger Americans in coastal cities — reap a disproportionately large share of the tax savings. Couples filing joint federal returns last year needed mortgage interest and other deductions exceeding $11,400 to make it worthwhile to file itemized tax returns and take advantage

I

t won’t be easy for policymakers to discard the mortgage-interest deduction. It’s been around since 1913, having survived the last big tax overhaul in 1986 and subsequent efforts. of this tax preference. The plan offered by President Obama’s debt commission would do away with itemized deductions altogether and allow every homeowner to receive a tax credit equal to 12 percent of interest paid on mortgages up to $500,000. In the vast majority of the country, that would mean a benefit for people who now receive nothing under the current system. Even in big coastal states, many people don’t live in high-priced housing markets.

Washington state For example, about onequarter of Washington state residents live in counties where home prices average $200,000 or less — and many others, especially older homeowners, have relatively small mortgages. The average nationwide mortgage loan as of October was $215,000, according to the Federal Housing Financing Agency. On the other hand, homeowners in wealthier areas such as Seattle-King County, where the median home price was $359,950 in November, are likely to feel the biggest pinch. If the debt panel’s proposal were adopted, the holder of a 3-year-old, $500,000 mortgage with an interest rate of 6.4 percent would pay interest payments of about $32,000. Based on rough estimates, mortgage deductions under the current system would save about $6,600 in tax, said James Nunns of

deduction would be disastrous, they said. Many experts, however, don’t believe an elimination of the mortgage deduction will hurt homeownership, although they say it is likely to influence the size of homes people buy — and eventually what builders put up — as well as other personal financial decisions. Analysts also note that other countries, such as Canada and Australia, have high home-ownership rates similar to the United States, now at 67 percent, without such housing-tax subsidies.

the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. The debt commission’s plan would slice that to about $3,800, although Nunns said the difference could be offset significantly by lower tax rates and other changes under the panel’s proposal. The possible tax changes are still too imprecise to calculate exactly how they Not easy to discard would affect people. Even so, it won’t be easy for policymakers to discard Effects on housing the mortgage-interest Replacing the mortgage deduction. deduction with a tax credit It’s been around since “would reduce the tax sub- 1913, having survived the sidy by a decent amount for last big tax overhaul in 1986 a small fraction of the popu- and subsequent efforts that lation and increase it by a would have eliminated the small amount for a large provision. number of lower-income The issue pits lawmakhouseholds,” said Todd ers in high-end housing disSinai, a real-estate and tax- tricts against those repreation specialist at Univer- senting less-expensive sity of Pennsylvania’s Whar- areas. ton School. Americans never have He predicted the upper- been comfortable with govend housing market could ernmental redistribution of see a decline of a few per- income, yet many are centage points relative to increasingly uneasy about what would happen without the widening gap between a tax-code change. the rich and poor. That means home prices Alice Rivlin, a former top wouldn’t necessarily drop as budget official in the Clina result, but if values in ton administration and a those markets increased 10 member of Obama’s debt percent, they would grow a commission, said any big few points less. change in the mortgage Even that may be too deduction won’t happen by much for the banged-up itself. housing market to absorb, It will be part of a homeowners and industry broader makeover of a tax executives fear. system that she and leadWith prices still ers in both parties agree is depressed and more than too complicated and ridone-fifth of homeowners dled with special deducowing more than their prop- tions and exclusions. erties are worth, reducing or “It’s got to be a wholesale eliminating the mortgage reform,” she said.

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Continued from D1 term help for the jobless. Without the law, milThe delay will also lions of Americans would affect those families that have been hit with file their tax returns early increases starting on New so that they can also file Year’s Day. early the form that is used The package retains to determine the amount Bush-era tax rates for all of financial aid for which a taxpayers, including the student may be eligible, wealthiest Americans, a said Thompson, tax part- provision Obama and conner at Piccerelli Gilstein & gressional liberals Co. LLP, a CPA firm in opposed. Providence, R.I. It also offers 13 months Families will still be of extended benefits to the able to file the form — unemployed and attempts called a Free Application to stimulate the economy for Federal Student Aid, or with a Social Security payFAFSA — early in the roll tax cut for all workseason. ers. But later on, when their Meanwhile, a board tax returns are filed, they that reviews IRS operawill essentially have to file tions said examinations of an amended FAFSA, she returns increased by 8 said. percent this year on taxOverall, “the majority payers with incomes above of taxpayers will be able to $1 million. fill out their tax returns Examinations of indiand file them as they nor- viduals with incomes mally do,” IRS Commis- below $1 million, small sioner Doug Shulman said and large corporations, in a statement. and collections, remained “The IRS will work steady from last year. through the holidays and The rate of returns filed into the New Year to get electronically rose slightly our systems repro- to 69 percent, while revegrammed and ensure tax- nue from enforcement payers have a smooth tax action was up from $48.9 season.” billion in 2009 to $57.6 billion this year. Tax savings The IRS Oversight Board, which consists of The new tax law gives nine members, was crebenefits ranging from tax ated by Congress under a cuts for millionaires and 1998 law to oversee the the middle class to longer- agency’s operations.

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Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Obama mixes Hawaii trip with duties Peninsula Daily News news services

The Associated Press

President Obama plays a round of golf at the Kaneohe Klipper Golf Course at Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

KAILUA, Hawaii — Almost immediately after he walked off Air Force One on Oahu early Thursday, a beaming President Obama had a green lei around his neck. It was the first sign that while the president will be working during his vacation, it’s not a “working vacation.” Administration aides emphasized that the president wanted real down time after the intense seven weeks since Election Day, and Obama started his 11-day trip with several hours of golf Thursday. The Obamas are renting a luxurious five-bedroom oceanfront home in Kailua, about 15 miles from Honolulu, far from tourists in the center of the city for the third straight Christmas. Dubbed the “Obama Winter White House” by the real-estate company that owns it, the “Plantation Estate” is listed on rental websites as costing $42,000 a week, although it’s unknown how much the Obamas are paying.

Biden: Gay marriage ‘inevitable’ ‘Don’t ask, tell’ repeal shows attitude change Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — Attitudes toward same-sex marriage are “evolving,” and a national consensus favoring gay marriage is inevitable, Vice President Joseph Biden said Friday. Biden gave a somewhat more optimistic view than President Obama, who earlier in the week told reporters: “I think this is something that we’re going to debate, and I personally am going to continue to wrestle with, going forward.” Biden on Friday cited the administration’s successful push to repeal the military’s 17-year “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy toward gays and lesbians as a sign of the change in public attitudes. He saw the trend as lead-

The Associated Press

“I think the country’s evolving,” Vice President Joe Biden said Friday. ing to support of same-sex marriage. “I think the country’s evolving,” he said on “Good Morning America.” “And I think there’s an inevitability for a national consensus on gay marriage.” He discussed the change in military attitudes and recalled how Obama told military officials to prepare to end the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy.

“I think the same thing is happening across the country with regard to the issue of marriage,” Biden said. Congress approved overturning the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy last week with bipartisan support, and Obama signed the legislation Wednesday. But in letters to the troops after the new bill was signed into law, the four military service chiefs warned that

1 cigarette too many, top doc says The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Think the occasional cigarette won’t hurt? Even a bit of social smoking — or inhaling someone else’s secondhand smoke — could be enough to block your arteries and trigger a heart attack, says the newest surgeon general’s report on the killer the nation just can’t kick. Lung cancer is what people usually fear from smoking, and yes, that can take years to strike. But the new report says

there’s no doubt that tobacco smoke begins poisoning immediately — as more than 7,000 chemicals in each puff rapidly spread through the body to cause cellular damage in nearly every organ. “That one puff on that cigarette could be the one that causes your heart attack,” said Surgeon General Regina Benjamin. Or the one that triggers someone else’s: “I advise people to try to avoid being around smoking any way that you can,” she said.

About 443,000 Americans die from tobaccocaused illnesses every year. While the smoking rate has dropped dramatically since 1964, when the first surgeon general’s report declared tobacco deadly, progress has stalled in the past decade. About 46 million adults — one in five — still smoke, and tens of millions more are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke. The government had hoped to drop the smoking rate to 12 percent by this year, a goal not only missed but that’s now been put off to 2020. Exclusive coupon discounts all the time at peninsuladailynews.com

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NEW YORK — U.S. life expectancy has dropped slightly — by about a month — after mostly inching up for many years. The preliminary report indicates that a baby born in 2008 can expect to live to 77.8 years if current trends continue. That’s down a bit from an all-time high of 77.9 years for 2007. A similar dip occurred in 2005, and life expectancy also dropped in 1993. The lead author of the report, Arialdi Minino,

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Thus far, Obama’s excursions in Hawaii have been mostly to the gym and golf course. The first family has no public events planned dur-

Official: Thermos alert an attempt to think ahead The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A top military official says new warnings about insulated beverage containers are an example of federal officials trying to anticipate terror tactics. Adm. James Winnefeld told The Associated Press that the Transportation Security Administration is “always trying to think ahead.” Winnefeld is the head of the U.S. Northern Command, which is charged with protecting the homeland. TSA officials had said that in coming days, passengers flying within and to the U.S. may notice additional security measures related to insulated beverage containers such as thermoses. Winnefeld says officials responsible for homeland security are always a bit more alert over the holiday season. He says there has been a lot of chatter online about potential terror activity, but nothing specific. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama’s counterterrorism chief, John Brennan, held an interagency conference call Friday to review steps the government is taking to ensure vigilance, including enhanced security measures and coordination with foreign partners. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and FBI Director Robert Mueller were among those on the call.

called the 2008 change minuscule and said it would take years of data to determine if that’s a trend. Life expectancy was down for both men and women. The gap between blacks and whites closed a little, to a 4.6-year difference in life expectancy; black men for the first time topped 70 years. Overall, women continue to live longer, until about 80, compared to 75 for men. What’s behind the slip in overall life expectancy isn’t known. “It’s something to keep our eyes on,” said Ken Thorpe, a health policy professor at Emory University in Atlanta. He suggested it could be related to rising obesity rates. The new report was released by the National Center for Health Statistics, which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. It’s based on nearly all the death certificates for that year; a final report will be issued later. “2008 was not much different from 2007,” said Minino. “Once you look under the hood, and look at the trends and the causes, you do find differences. “But overall, it wasn’t that different.”

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ing their vacation. They are expected to stay in Hawaii through Jan. 2. White House spokesman Bill Burton said Obama would spend time “recharging his batteries, spending time with family and dealing with presidential duties.” To be sure, a president is never truly off. He has spoken to Russian President Dmitry Medvedev about the nuclearweapons treaty between the United States and Russia that the Senate ratified Wednesday, and Obama receives a daily briefing on national-security issues. The president also is preparing for a critical stage of his presidency in which he must work with a House now controlled by the Republicans and also start laying the groundwork for his re-election campaign in 2012. Aides said he is reading President Reagan: The Role of a Lifetime, a biography by Lou Cannon, and a biography of President Clinton by Taylor Branch.

Life expectancy slips; women still live longer

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the ban was still in place, and that implementing the policy change in full was still months away. Finding consensus on gay marriage could take some time, despite Biden’s optimism. A Pew Research Center survey released in October, based on two polls taken over several months, found that 48 percent opposed allowing gays and lesbians to legally marry, while 42 percent were in favor. Still, a Pew analysis noted, “for the first time in 15 years, fewer than half oppose samesex marriage.” Obama himself has been circumspect on the issue. “At this point, what I’ve said is, is that my baseline is a strong civil union that provides them the protections and the legal rights that married couples have,” he said Wednesday. “And I think that’s the right thing to do. But I recognize that, from their perspective, that’s not enough.”

The first family celebrated Christmas with a small circle of friends and family, including some of Obama’s childhood friends and the president’s sister, Maya Soetoro-Ng, who lives here on Oahu, the island where Obama was born and spent much of his childhood. The Obamas dined on steak, roasted potatoes, green beans and pie, and the sports-obsessed president got a chance to relax and watch some NBA basketball. The president’s Christmas was been far quieter than last year’s holiday, when a 23-year-old Nigerian man allegedly attempted to blow up a plane bound for Detroit. The incident raised questions about the nation’s terror readiness and consumed the rest of Obama’s vacation.

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Life expectancy figures for Hispanics have not been included in the annual reports because of unreliable data. In October, the CDC released its first-ever calculation for Hispanics, which showed that those born in 2006 could expect to outlive

whites by more than two years and blacks by more than seven. In other highlights from the report: n  Stroke fell from the No. 3 leading cause of death for the first time in five decades. It was surpassed by chronic lower respiratory diseases, which include asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. While the death rate from stroke dropped by 4 percent, the swap in position may be due in part to changes in the definition of the respiratory disease category, which increased 8 percent. age-adjusted n  The death rate fell for the ninth year in a row, to a low of about 759 deaths per 100,000 people. The number of deaths increased by more than 49,300 to about 2.5 million deaths in 2008. n  Death rates declined for six of the 15 leading causes of death: heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, homicide and accidents. In addition to chronic lower respiratory diseases, death rates went up for Alzheimer’s disease, flu and pneumonia, high blood pressure, suicide and kidney disease. n  Heart disease and cancer continue to be the two top killers, accounting for about half of all deaths. n  The infant mortality rate, which has been at about the same level for years, dropped about 2 percent to a record low of 6.59 deaths per 1,000 births. The rate for black infants is about twice that of whites. Birth defects, prematurity and low birth weight are the leading causes.


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Peninsula Daily News

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1

WASHINGTON — Economic reports suggest that employers are laying off fewer workers, businesses are ordering more computers and appliances, and consumers are spending with more confidence. Combined, the data confirm the economy is improving, and further job gains are expected in 2011. The economy’s outlook is brightening even though hiring has yet to strengthen enough to reduce an unemployment rate near 10 percent. The number of people applying for unemployment benefits fell the week of Dec. 13 to a seasonally adjusted 420,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. That’s the second-lowest level since July 2008.

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By Michael D. Shear The New York Times

WASHINGTON — The iPad is coming to Capitol Hill. Tucked into new rules proposed by the incoming House Republican majority is one that could fling the chamber — for good or ill — into the 21st century: Members may use an electronic device on the House floor as long as it doesn’t “impair decorum.” The new rule would relax the complete ban on the use of gadgets such as the iPad, iPhone or BlackBerry on the House floor. Mobile phones, tablet computers and the burgeoning universe of applications that run on them will be officially available to House members as they conduct business. Members still may not talk on the phone in the chamber and are supposed

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Mobile technology has already started to sneak onto the floors of the House and the Senate. While the rules of the 111th Congress officially banned iPads and other devices from the floor, there has been a “wink and a nod” approach to a lawmaker who takes furtive glances at his BlackBerry, according to a senior Republican aide. That was obvious last week, when Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., was seen, head down, tapping out messages as he sat directly behind Sen. Arlen Specter, D-Pa., who was giving his farewell address.

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As the Emily Post etiquette website states: “Tapping on a handheld device is OK if it’s related to what’s being discussed, but taking care of personal business is unprofessional. “

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to use the devices for official business only, according to a spokesman for the soon-tobe speaker, John Boehner, R-Ohio. But as long as the mute switch is on, lawmakers will be free to tap away. “Mr. Boehner has deep respect for the institution and its traditions,” said Brendan Buck, a spokesman for the Republicans. “This is not free license to Skype or pay bills online. “But we recognize that people consume information electronically these days. “It’s just silly that the House wouldn’t accommodate that.” The decision represents a vivid concession of oldfashioned tradition to new technology. But while the nation’s lawmakers will be fully plugged in, they will also be in danger of tuning one another out.

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WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency says it will regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and oil refineries next year, targeting the nation’s two biggest sources of carbon dioxide. The move, which comes as part of a legal settlement with several states, local governments and environmental groups that sued EPA under the Bush administration for failing to act, highlights the Obama administration’s intent to press ahead with curbs on carbon — despite congressional resistance. Collectively, electric utilities and oil refineries account for almost 40 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Under the agreement, EPA will propose performance standards for new and refurbished power plants in July 2011 and

NEW YORK — General Motors Co. is recalling almost 100,000 vehicles to fix two problems that could cause the rear axle to lock and the passenger-side airbag not to work. GM says in postings with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that the airbag recall affects almost 96,000 2005 to 2007 model year versions of the Cadillac CTS. The axle recall affects almost 1,300 2011 model year versions of the Cadillac Escalade, Chevrolet Avalanche 1500 and Silverado 1500, as well as the GMC Sierra 1500.

their condition, while decreasing their risk of falling.” Hahn’s pro­fes­ Hahn sional interest lies in orthopedics and sports medicine, but also in women’s health including treatment of incontinence and pelvic pain. To learn more about the Olympic Medical Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation program and the services provided, visit www.olympic medical.org (click on Services and then Rehabilitation Therapy). Or phone the Port Angeles office at 360417-7728 or the Sequim office at 360-582-2601.

Texting while legislating? iPads OK’d for House floor

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New EPA rules

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New staff therapists

NEW YORK — Most Cowlitz Tribal ChairNorth Olympic Peninsula man William Iyall said the drivers woke up Friday casino will be open within morning to find the Grinch three years. had pumped up gasoline In November, Oregon prices. voters shot down Measure The average price for a 75, which would have gallon of regular unleaded allowed the construction gasoline in Jefferson and of the state’s first nonClallam counties was up 2 Send us information tribal casino in a suburb to 4 cents a gallon heading about staff changes, of Portland. into the Christmas holiday new product lines, weekend from a week ago. Ex-chief charged moves or expansion and The average Peninsularelated information. MONTESANO — Monwide price for unleaded on tesano officials say Ray Saturday was $3.18. news@peninsula Sowers has been charged Nationwide, prices late dailynews.com with theft and falsification Thursday rose above $3 for of accounts when he was the first time since October the city’s police chief. Peninsula Daily News 2008, the AAA auto club City Administrator said, reaching an average of Kristy $3.013. Powell told A year ago, prices for for new refineries in The Daily December 2011, and it will gasoline hit $2.45 a gallon. World of Gas prices are following issue final standards in Aberdeen the ascension of crude oil May 2012 and November that proseprices, which also reached 2012, respectively. cutors foltwo-year highs last week Rules for existing lowed the after eclipsing the $90 per plants would come later. recommenCharles Drevna, presi- barrel mark on Wednesday. Sowers dation of The U.S. Energy Infordent of the National PetWashingmation Administration said rochemical & Refiners ton State Patrol investiga- Association, said that the on Wednesday that crude tors. oil inventories in the proposal EPA was enviThey reported in United States fell by 5.3 sioning was unrealistic August that Sowers had million barrels, which parand that his industry made more than $10,000 tially contributed to the rise would urge lawmakers to in illegal credit card purin oil prices and seen as block EPA’s move. chases over 1½ years. “There is no best avail- bullish development for The charges were filed able technology — the commodities traders. by the Thurston County According to a Reuters only thing you can do is Prosecuting Attorney’s poll this week, the Organicut production,” Drevna Office. zation of Petroleum said. Sowers was relieved Exporting Countries will from his job in June and Renomination due be pressured to produce resigned in September. He more oil earlier than foreWASHINGTON — had been with Montesano President Barack Obama casted due to record-setforce since 1987 and chief will resubmit the failed ting demand this winter since 1994. and higher than expected nomination of a Nobel demand in early 2011. Prize-winning economist Monday closures Consumer and business to the Federal Reserve, OLYMPIA — Thoueven though he faces even demand also increased due to an unusually cold sands of Washington state stronger opposition from winter, spurring more employees will have an the next Congress. homes to consume higher extended Christmas weekThe amounts of heating oil end with an unpaid day nomination earlier. off Monday. of Peter Analysts don’t expect oil More than 50 state Diamond prices to come down at all, agencies and boards and fizzled pointing to higher demand commissions will also be when the going into 2011 and little closed Monday. Senate action from OPEC. It is the fifth of 10 furadjourned All signs point to higher lough days the state has Wednesday oil prices and bullish sentiDiamond scheduled in the two-year without ment on oil-producing budget to save $60 million acting on firms. through mid-2011. it. “With OPEC set to be The next furlough day But the White House reactive rather than proacwill be Jan. 28. said Thursday that the Public health and president will press ahead tive, the route to $100 appears fairly unobstructed safety workers are exempt on the nomination. at this time,” said analysts from furloughs. Services Diamond, a professor at Barclays Capital in New provided by child protecat the Massachusetts York. tion workers, community Institute of Technology, is OPEC members, for corrections officers, emeran authority on Social their part, believe that gency public health and Security, pensions and higher prices are justified. patient safety workers and taxation. “It’s fair to say it’s about the State Patrol will be in He shared the Nobel right, but still I think that full operation Monday. Prize in economics that it needs to improve a little Universities, colleges was awarded in October. bit more — about $100 and agencies headed by But Senate Republiwould be a fair price for independently elected offi- cans have opposed his the time being,” OPEC cials are staying open by nomination, questioning member Shokri Ghanem using layoffs or other his practical experience told Reuters in Cairo alternatives to reduce pay- and research. ahead of the OPEC meetroll. ing on Thursday. GM recalls

Fewer layoffs

Sunday, December 26, 2010


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Sunday, December 26, 2010

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on selected items throughout our store

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PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A. © 2010 Swain’s General Store Inc.

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Peninsula Daily News

NEW LISTING

Sunday, December 26, 2010

MARIAH WINDS

AFFORDABLE 3 BEDROOM

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MOVE IN READY! D

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MOUNTAINTOP ESTATE

Majestic 10-acre Mountaintop Estate with breathtaking views of the water. Exceptionally high quality construction and craftsmanship is evident in every room of this fine home. Beautiful hardwood floors, superb master suite w/fireplace and a fully customized 1,075 SF shop and garage. $749,000 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.com

Please visit the photo gallery at www.windermere.com/tid305954

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Sitting quietly on 1.63 manicured acres. Spacious rooms including elegant dining room and cozy fireplace in the living room. French doors leading out to adorable guesthouse & hot tub. $550,000. ML#252297 Call Thelma

PRIVATE SETTING

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0C405774

Exceptional custom built 4,947 SF home on 5.12-Acres. Huge master BR & BA with walk-in closet. Amazing open kitchen. Incredible landscaping, a pond, a fountain, separate storage shed/shop, pool table, black aluminum fence, huge deck, brick patio and a great floor plan make this a magnificent opportunity. Beautiful high efficiency windows help bring the outside in. Enjoy the water views & Mt. Baker. Just reduced over $75K! Now Only $599,900. ML#251498 Always call JACE for Land & Homes on Land!

(360)461-4116 rolandmiller@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

BEAUTIFUL HOME

'D' IS FOR DECK THE HALLS

Roland Miller

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456 boeq@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

3 BR/2 BA condo in desirable Sherwood Village in excellent condition and move-in ready. Recently painted and most appliances recently purchased. Close to medical facilities, SARC, shopping and near Olympic Discovery Trail. $240,000 ML#250531/39416

UPTOWN REALTY

Quint Boe

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR

0C405794

WRE/Port Angeles

UPTOWN REALTY

0C405788

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0C405787

Built with skilled craftsmanship & quality products in 2004. Beautiful 3 BR/2.5 BA, open concept living space plus family room & a den/office. Stunning hardwood floors open staircase. Gorgeous master w/2 walk-in closets & bath w/Jacuzzi & separate shower. Upscale neighborhood - 2.75 acres. $415,000 ML#252233

Nice location at the end of a dead-end street. Attached garage with large workspace. Great starter home or rental investment. $129,900 MLS#251658/112072

Beautifully updated 3 BR/1.5 BA home located on Cherry Hill. Built in 1937, this home offers a beautiful kitchen, hardwood floors, 1-car garage with workspace and fenced yard. Quiet and private with all the convenience of in-town living. ML#252449 $249,500 www.jeanirvine.com

This 3 BR/2 BA, 2,158 SF home on 3.22 acres has a spacious kitchen with an island, breakfast bar and plenty of counter space and cabinets. The LR features vaulted ceilings, wood stove and sliding door out to the gazebo with hot tub and small pond. There is also a FR large enough to accommodate a pool table. Huge 3-car/RV shop $275,000 ML#252058

®

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/Port Angeles Thelma Durham

Jace Schmitz, REALTOR®

360.565.2020

Kelly Johnson

Realtor®, SRS, SFR

(360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com

www.calljace.com jace@olypen.com

933 East First St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

RING IN THE NEW YEAR!

Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

www.u-saverealestate.com

LAST CHANCE CLOSING COSTS

GREAT PRICE ON THIS HOME!

LOW MAINTENANCE HOME

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ML#251365 Call Ed (360) 808-1712

0C405775

0C405789

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With an offer accepted in December, buyer qualifies for a 2% credit for closing costs. Time’s running out! Take advantage of the estate’s desire to sell and check this out. Built in 1990, this home has a great layout with bedrooms separated by the living areas. Nice deck off the kitchen. Plan for summer! Preview it at www.PiliMeyer.com. Now just $185,000! ML#251496

With a quality home in Sun Meadows, close to downtown, John Wayne Marina and Discovery Trail. 3 BR/2 BA, 1,758 SF w/quality materials throughout. Propane fireplace, heat pump, hickory cabinets, hardwood floors, easy care landscaping with sprinkler system and more. $269,000!

Wonderful fixer! 2 BR/1.5 BA on .74 acre lot. Needs TLC but is a great opportunity for the right Mr. Fix-it! Home sold “as-is” MLS#157761 $161,000.

This newer, single-level home is a great alternative to a condo with very low maintenance. Home is bright with many architectural skylights. Hardwood floors, gas fireplace, water views, upgraded finishes, central heat, attached 2-car garage, upgraded flooring and apps. Close to everything. Only $179,950 MLS#251311 Call Brody at 360.477.9665 ®

Ed Sumpter

190 Priest Rd. 360-808-1712 PO Box 1060 edseds@olypen.com Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

Bryan Diehl

761 N. Sequim Ave. Cell: 360-477-9665 email: Brodybroker@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978

(360) 437-1011 Cell: (360) 821-9056

www.welcomehomesequim.com

email: pili@olypen.com

3 PRIVATE ACRES

COUNTRY LIVING

WRE/Port Ludlow

Brody Broker

UPTOWN REALTY

It's TIME

GREAT WATERFRONT HOME D

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David A. Ramey

(360) 460-3831 (360) 457-0456 Email: jennifer@olypen.com

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CUSTOM COUNTRY HOME situated on 1.70 partial Mt. view acres. Open floor plan with 9’ ceilings, 3 BR/2 BA & den, fabulous kitchen with hickory cabinets, pantry, island & eating bar. Exterior 400 SF shop/storage bldg. Poured patio with water feature and southern exposure makes for great entertaining. $369,000 ML#251739

Margo Petersen-Pruss

TOM BLORE

Broker • Graduate Realtor Institute

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

margo@olypen.com www.portangelesrealty.com

tom@sequim.com

RURAL COMMERCIAL

0C405792

Like new 3 BR/2 BA mfg home on 1.4 acres with great Mt. views, located between Sequim and Port Angeles. The home features a large southfacing living room w/propane FP, formal dining, large kitchen w/island, 2 concrete patios, entrance ramp, large detached pull through style RV garage with hook-ups. $210,000 ML#251556

(360) 461-3283 email: ghalsey@olypen.com

FRESH CONTEMPORARY

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0C405790

GREAT DEL GUZZI BUILT 4 BR home in GREAT condition. Mt. view, some water view, waterfall with a little pond, fantastic deck out back, fenced backyard, also cement patio, brick BBQ. Custom fireplace in living room. Garage has large workshop. Home has Hardwood floors throughout, some carpeted. Good buy at $219,500 ML#252125. Call Beep to see, 417-2794.

GARY HALSEY

Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

READY TO GO!

GREAT LOCATION

0C405793

UPTOWN REALTY

Jennifer Holcomb

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891 linulin@olypen.com

Terrific unlimited view of Dungeness Bay, shipping lanes and Victoria, BC. 2 BR/2.5 BA. Check out the recently remodeled sitting room and dining room. Tidelands included for harvesting clams and beach combing. $569,000 MLS#251519/103275

Virtual tour: www.visualtour.com/shownp.asp?T=2220948

WRE/Port Angeles

Linda Ulin

0C405786

0C405770

0C405785

WRE/Sequim-East

(360) 417-2794 beep@olypen.com TOLL FREE (800) 292-2978

Interest rates have started inching up so now is the time to think about buying. You’ll want to consider this 3 BR/2 BA, 2-car garage, 1,474 SF home. Great floor plan and on a quiet dead-end street in a GREAT neighborhood. Only $199,700 MLS#251563

In the City! Open floor plan, hardwood floors, wood stove, bonus room would make great office or craft room. Close to everything yet feels miles away from anything. JUST CALL JENNIFER HOLCOMB $299,000 ML#251416/ 96541

Solid cedar perimeter walls inside & out add to homey feeling & charm. Hardwood floors under w-2-w carpet. Large open living area w/ many windows makes home cheery & bright. Many trees; fruit & shade. New roof 2008. New septic system/exterior paint 2010. Short walk to community beach. Call LINDA ML#252379/156602 $229,900

UPTOWN REALTY BEEP ADAMS

E UC

Cell: 460-4251 Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157

This 1.17 acre parcel West of Carlsborg has a 6,200 SF building and separate 936 SF garage. Zoned for a wide variety of commercial uses. Located in an area of other, quality commercial buildings! $495,000 ML#252175

Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE Mark McHugh

Office: (360) 683-0660 Toll Free: 1-800-708-0660 Fax: (360) 683-2527 www.marknmchugh.com


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

104 PARKWOOD Low maintenance landscaped front/ back yards will make you the envy of your neighbors and friends. House interiors are sure to please. Extra roomy triplewide in Parkwood Community for 55+. Clubhouse and outdoor rec features make this a winning combination. Call the agents for a viewing – vacant and ready to buy! $89,500. ML252439. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Master bath newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertop. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 30x24 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $208,000 360-460-7503

Grab Their ATTENTION! Add: Pictures Borders Logos Bold Lines Yellow Highlight on Sunday

Homes

3 private acres in the city! Open floor plan, hardwood floors, wood stove, bonus room would make great office or craft room. Close to everything yet feels miles away from anything. $299,000. ML251416/96541 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. AFFORDABLE 3 BR. Nice location at the end of a dead end street. Attached garage with large workspace. Great starter home or rental investment. $129,000 ML251658/112072 Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFUL HOME Sitting quietly on 1.63 manicured acres. Spacious rooms including elegant dinning room and cozy fireplace in the living room. French doors leading out to adorable guesthouse and hot tub. $550,000. ML252297. Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN VIEWS From this 2 Br., 2 bath home on 1.25 level acres between Sequim and Port Angeles. Newer laminate floors, carpets, windows and roof. Two sided rock mantel with a fireplace on the living room side and a wood stove on the dining room side. Large kitchen with a separate pantry. $189,900 ML252417/156860 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. COUNTRY LIVING Solid cedar perimeter walls inside and out add to homey feeling and charm. Hardwood floors under wall-to-wall carpet. Large open living area with many windows makes home cheery and bright. Many trees; fruit and shade. New roof 2008. New septic system/exterior paint 2010. Short distance to community beach. $229,900. ML252379. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East ‘D’ IS FOR DECK THE HALLS Exceptional custom built 4,947 sf home on 5.12 acres. Huge master Br. and bath with walk-in closet. Amazing open kitchen. Incredible landscaping, a pond, a fountain, separate storage shed/shop, pool table, black aluminum fence, huge deck, brick patio, and a great floor plan make this a magnificent opportunity. Beautiful high efficiency windows help bring the outside in. Enjoy the water views and Mt. Baker. Just reduced over $75,000! $599,900. ML251498. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

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Homes

ESCAPE TO BLACK DIAMOND Just minutes from town, fantastic 4 Br., 2 bath on 3+ acres. 2,128 sf, recently treated to a tasteful kitchen update, new paint inside and out plus windows. Master Br. with walk-in closet and jetted tub in master bath. Large detached shop all nicely landscaped with evergreens and fruit trees. Move in ready! $259,500. ML251628 Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East FRESH CONTEMPORARY CUSTOM Country home situated on 1.70 partial mtn view acres. Open floor plan with 9’ ceilings, 3 Br., 2 bath and den, fabulous kitchen with hickory cabinets, pantry, island and eating bar. Exterior 400 sf shop/storage building. Poured patio with a water feature, and southern exposure makes for great entertaining. $369,000. ML251739 Margo Petersen-Pruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY GREAT LOCATION Great Del Guzzi built 4 Br. home in great condition. Mt. view, some water view, waterfall with a little pond, fantastic deck out back, fenced backyard, also cement patio, brick barbeque. Custom fireplace in living room. Garage has large workshop. Home has hardwood floors throughout; some are carpeted. $219,500. ML252125. Beep Adams 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GREAT OPPORTUNITY Convenient location in Sunland. 3 generous Br., 1.75 bath, nice entertainment spaces, approx. 1,566 sf has newer roof and systems, easy care landscaping. $195,000. ML251993/131039 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT PRICE ON THIS HOME! Wonderful fixer! 2 Br., 1.5 bath on .74 acre lot. Needs TLC but is a great opportunity for the right Mr. Fixit! Home is sold “asis”. $161,000. ML157761 Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow GREAT WATERFRONT HOME Terrific unlimited view of Dungeness bay, shipping lanes and Victoria B.C. 2 Br., 2.5 bath. Check out the recently remodeled sitting room and Dining room. Tidelands included for harvesting clams and beach combing. $569,000 ML251519/103275 Gary Halsey 461-3283 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

IMMACULATE SINGLE LEVEL Beautifully landscaped. Spacious living, 10’ ceilings, tall doors/windows. Gourmet kitchen, cherry cabinets, honed granite counters, wide planked cherry floors, breakfast bar and pantry. $335,500. ML156557. Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow IT’S TIME Interest rates have started inching up, so now is the time to think about buying. You’ll want to consider this 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage, 1,474 sf home. Great floor plan and on a quiet dead-end street in a great neighborhood. $199,700. ML251563. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY JUST LIKE NEW Cute 2 Br., 1.5 bath condo, completely updated throughout. New kitchen, appliances and fixtures, new heating system and window coverings, newer roof and close to medical facilities. $145,500. ML251993/131039 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND LAST CHANCE CLOSING COSTS With an offer accepted in December, buyer qualifies for a 2% credit for closing costs. Time’s running out! Take advantage of the estate’s desire to sell and check this out. Built in 1990, this home has a great layout with bedrooms separated by the living areas. Nice deck off the kitchen. Plan for summer! $185,000. ML252233 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LOW MAINTENANCE HOME This newer singlelevel home is a great alternative to a condominium with very low maintenance. Home is bright with many architectural skylights. Features beautiful hardwood floors, gas fireplace, water views, upgraded finishes, central heat, attached 2-car garage, upgraded flooring and appliances. Distinctive architecture and located in excellent neighborhood. Close to everything inc. Olympic National Park! $179,950. ML251311 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company MARIAH WINDS Built with skilled craftsmanship and quality products in 2004. Beautiful 3 Br., 2.5 bath, open concept living space plus family room and a den/office. Stunning hardwood floors, open staircase. Gorgeous master with 2 walk-in closets and bath with Jacuzzi and separate shower. Upscale neighborhood, 2.75 acres. $415,000. ML252233 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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Homes

MOUNTAIN ESTATE Majestic 10 acre mountaintop estate with breath taking views of the water. Exceptionally high quality construction and craftsmanship is evident in every room of this fine home. Beautiful hardwood floors, superb master bedroom suite with fireplace and a fully customized 1,075 sf shop and garage. $749,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 MOVE IN READY 3 Br., 2 bath condominium in desirable Sherwood Village in excellent condition and move in ready. Recently painted and most appliances recently purchased. Close to medical facilities, Sequim Aquatic & Recreation Center, shopping, and near Olympic Discovery Trail. $240,000 ML250531/39416 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Homes

NEW LISTING Beautifully updated 3 Br., 1.5 bath home located on Cherry Hill. Built in 1937, this home offers a beautiful kitchen, hardwood floors, 1 car garage with workspace, and fenced yard. Quiet and private with all the convenience of in-town living. $249,500. ML252449. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY PRIVATE SETTING This 3 Br., 2 bath 2,158 sf home on 3.22 acres has a spacious kitchen with an island, breakfast bar and plenty of counter space and cabinets. The living room features vaulted ceilings, wood stove and a sliding door out to the gazebo with hot tub and small pond. There is also a family room large enough to accommodate a pool table. Huge 3 car/RV shop. $275,000. ML 252058/135819 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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51

Homes

READY TO GO Like new 3 Br., 2 bath manufactured home on 1.4 acres with great mountain views, located between Sequim and Port Angeles. The home features a large south facing living room with propane fireplace, formal dining area, large kitchen with island, two concrete patios, entrance ramp, large detached pull through style RV garage with RV hook-ups. Agnew irrigation water is piped to the property. $210,000. ML251556 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 RING IN THE NEW YEAR With a quality home in Sun Meadows, close to downtown, John Wayne Marina, and Discovery Trail. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,758 sf home, quality materials throughout. Propane fireplace, heat pump, hickory cabinets, hardwood floors, easy care landscaping with sprinkler system and more. $269,000. ML251365 Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9189 www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

PRIVATE WILDLIFE HABITAT With a finely crafted 2 Br., 2 bath home on the edge of a forest bordering the Straits! Savor brilliant sunsets, eagles on their nests, and exceptionally eco-friendly home. $565,000. ML241505/143543 Alan Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO 2 Br., 2 baths, nice sunroom, propane stove, murphy bed, shoji screen. $185,000 ML252226/145314 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND The clean lines and style of the craftsman have been maintained while updating this beautiful home to today’s standards. Pride in ownership shows throughout with warm colors and rich hardwoods. The master suite allows for complete comfort and natural light fills your sanctuary. $189,900 ML252433/161579 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

Lots/ Acreage

CARLSBORG: 1 acre lot, mtn. view, flat, PUD water, power, phone. $49,500. 681-3992 DIAMOND POINT Brand new garage built in 2006. Adjacent to the airport, residential side ready to build on. Water, septic, electric, cable and telephone in. 12x10 room with loft inside garage. $115,000 ML250356/26644 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Commercial

NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Great opportunity to be the owner of your own beauty salon; a turn key business. Just bring your scissors and clients. Very busy salon. Low overhead. Great visible location in downtown Sequim. $14,900. ML252426 Sheryl Payseno Burley and Cathy Reed 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 58

Commercial

DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION Own a piece of P.T. history. High viability/potential. 1 block south of Thomas Street roundabout, 3,800 sf, circa 1920s, R3 zoning. $235,000 360-385-7653

64

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

Houses

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $1,100. 452-1395. P.A.: 3 Br., 3 bath. Upscale, location, 2 car garage, yard, energy efficient. No smoking, no pets. $950. 360-452-9458. P.A.: 4 Br, 1.5 ba, no smoking. $1,000 mo, $1,000 sec. 417-0153 P.A.: Nice, furnished. 1 Br. $900. Call for details. 461-9684. Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540. CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., no smoke, new carp. $650. 457-8438. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Hilltop Ridge Apts. 1914 S. Pine, P.A. 457-5322 P.A.: 1 Br., nice, no pets/smoke. 1st/last dep. $395. 452-1234 P.A.: East 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage. $650 plus dep. 452-8239 P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244

63

Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br. senior cottage, all utilities incl. except phone, W/D, housekeeping and dining services avail upon request. Inquire at Park View Villas, corner of 8th and G St., P.A. 452-7222 for showing. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

64

64

Houses

64

Houses

P.A.: Small 1 Br., water view, W/D, near Albertsons. $575 mo., dep. 452-8092.

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced, in town, $500 deposit. $1,100. 683-1695.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

65

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1.5 ba carport, fenced, gar. $775. 683-1530.

WANTED: Room to Rent. Quiet female looking for long-term room to rent Sequim/surrounding areas. Service dog well-trained. No drug use! 360-477-8368. tessnmolly@yahoo.co m

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, on 20 acres, livestock ok, beautiful view. $1,300/mo. 1st, last, dep., references. 683-9176.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

65

E3

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Room $450 mo, util. and cable incl. No pets. 460-4408

66

Spaces RV/ Mobile

RV SPACES: $375 mo., incl. W/S/G, WiFi, Cable. 461-6672.

68

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Clallam County Steven R. Freeman, replacement of flat roof to truss roof, 321 Discovery Way, $26,141. Craig and Carol Wagner, single family dwelling with attached garage, 130 Fencebird Lane, $239,740. Operating Company LP, walk-in cooler, 116 Quillayute Road, $55,000. Kenyon Nattinger, detached art studio, 4227 Deer Park Road, $33,780. Kurtis C. Hansen, single family dwelling with attached garage and 120-gallon above-ground propane tank, 414 Lisel Lane, $137,336. John H. Lemker, pellet stove, 2113 E. Fourth Ave., $2,800. Karen K. Kuznek, pellet stove, 876 Towne Road, $3,457. Charles and Kandace Schmidt, 62.5-gallon above-ground propane tank with piping, 700 McFarland Drive, $200. Andrew and Robin Kirsch, wood stove, 641 S. Still Road, $3,000.

Port Angeles Marc Kalla, re-roof, 1823 W. Seventh St., $8,450. Robert W. and Kristina M. Lawrence, heat pump, 430 W. Fifth St., $9,684. Rudolph and Nancy Meyer trust, heat pump, 1703 Lambert Lane, $4,739. Steven E. Hauff, heat pump, 1827 E. Lauridsen blvd., $5,707. Ida Louise Ensor, furnace, 716 E. Seventh St., $2,830. Port of Port Angeles, demolition, 403 Tumwater Truck Route, $0. Marietta Ellen Hoover Anicker, demolition, 2715 S. Oak St., $0. JP Morgan Chase Bank, fire abandon tank inspection, 126 W 14th St., $1,089.

Sequim

Houses

3 bd/1 ba, on acreage, pet ok. 361 Lewis Rd., Agnew, $750 mo. 509-220-4423.

3 Br., 1.5 bth, new carpet/paint. LR w/fireplace insert. Two car garage. Hot tub. $1125 First, last, dep. Non-smk/pets. Contact (206)8983252 Address: 1527 W. 10th. A Furnished 3 Br., 2 bath VIEW Home in Port Townsend. Remodeled & Upgraded. $1,400. Also for sale @ $399,900 MLS# 96766 24 Hr FREE Recorded Info 1-888-873-5447 ext. 400 CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath. $695. 360-681-0140

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. H 2 br 1 ba......$700 H 2 br 1 ba......$850 H 3 br 2 ba......$950 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 3 ba....$1350 HOUSES IN SEQUIM H 2 br 1 ba.......$900 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1100 STORAGE UNITS FROM $40-$100 MO.

360-417-2810 More Properties at www.jarentals.com MONTERRA: 3 Br., 2 bath. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. Credit check. 360-582-1589 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $600 mo., $600 dep. 460-5290. P.A.: 2 Br., no smoking/pets, vicinity of Civic Field. $750. 457-4023

New Medical Office

97315731

space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

Jefferson County Heather Dosch, relocate greenhouse foundation, 341 Verner Ave., $8,023. Heather Dosch, relocate craft shack, 341 Verner Ave., $26,618. John Olivera, addition to garage and second-story art room/shop with bathroom and utility sink, 78 Terrace Dr., $58,415. Zachery Dean, single family residence with attached garage, 180 Cape George Road, $219,932. Randy Powers, shop addition, 31 Fredericks St., $15,000. Frank Kiefer trustee, single family residence with attached garage and 120-gallon propane tank, 181 Quinault Loop, $318,353.

Port Townsend Christopher F. English and Jean M. Tarascio, single family residence, 1485 U St., $79,246.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 28 building permits issued from Dec. 13-17 with a total valuation of $1,619,462.17: Port Angeles, 8 at $32,499; Sequim, 4 at $359,921.17; Clallam County, 9 at $501,454; Port Townsend, 1 at $79,247; Jefferson County, 6 at $646,341.

0C5101101

Great view, central P.A. 119 Fogarty. 3 bd, 1.5 bath. Credit/refs. Occupied, don't knock. 805-448-7273

H30 LLC, single family dwelling with attached garage, 91 Rolling Hills Way, $160,155. H30 LLC, single family dwelling with attached garage, 81 Jara Way, $195,766.17. Andre Mercier, wood stove fireplace insert, 417 E. Willow St., $3,000. Choice Development LLC, two wall mounted signs, 10167 Old Olympic Highway, $1,000.

The Last Word in Astrology LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t lock yourself away when you have friends and relatives who really want you to take part in the festivities. Get what you want to do out of the way early so you can be a participant and contribute to the fun and games. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Take care of details with agencies, banks and institutions, in order to avoid extra cost. You don’t want to leave too much time to think about emotional issues or you may make a mistake or say something you’ll regret. 2 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The more traveling you do, the better. You can research a destination or a hobby you want to begin in the new year or get together with friends or relatives for more festivities. Love is on the rise. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Travel plans can be made or executed. Spending quality time with youngsters will give you a better sense of the younger generation. Something you discover will lead you to consider offering a service for today’s kids. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Money will come to you from an unusual source. You will realize how to close a deal you’ve been working on for a long time. A relationship you cherish can be enhanced if you offer special thanks and a token of your appreciation. 5 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Listen to what your heart tells you about the relationships you have and you will know what you must do in the new year. Cutting ties with people who ask for too much or restrict what you can do will be liberating. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Stick close to home and get things done that will ease your stress and prepare you for the upcoming week. Serious talks with someone you feel can help you get ahead or shed light on a situation you face will be beneficial. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Consider the changes you want to make with regard to your work, your status and your life goals. Entertain friends and spend time with that special person and you will enhance your relationships. Make home alterations conducive to your changing lifestyle. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Walking down memory lane will bring both happy and sad emotions to the surface. Remembering your losses and gains will help you size up your year and assess your situation. This is a good day to organize, complete and prepare. 4 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Sort through your personal papers and figure out your best course of action with regard to finances, medical issues or legal matters. Once you make a decision, you will feel better about your future and be in a better position to help the people who can use your knowledge and services. 3 stars

BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t let anyone bully you into doing something when what you need is rest, relaxation and a moment to gather your thoughts. Spend time going over what needs to be done before the year ends. Discuss plans with your partner. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Love and happiness can be yours if you do a little give and take today. Remembering old friends and touching base with people you miss will help you reconnect, catch up and make plans. 3 stars


E4

Classified

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO

DIAMOND POINT

• Brand New Garage Built in 2006 • Adjacent to Airport • Residential Site Ready to Build On • Water, Septic, Electric, Cable & Phone In • 12 x 10 Room w/Loft inside Garage

ML#250356/26644 $115,000

WRE/SunLand

WRE/SunLand

Carol, Managing Broker Nelson, Broker Cell: (360) 670-9418 www.sequimteamtopper.com

140 PARKWOOD

NEW YEAR

(360)550-6042 (360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

Cathy: 460-1800 Sheryl: 460-9363 www.sequimwa.com

Just minutes from town, fantastic 4 BR/2 BA on 3+ acres. 2,128 SF recently treated to a tasteful kitchen update, new paint inside & out plus windows. MABR w/walk-in closet & jetted tub in MABA. Large detached shop all nicely landscaped with evergreens and fruit trees. Move-in ready! $259,500 ML#251628/110448 Call ALAN

WRE/Sequim-East

From this 2 BR/2 BA home on 1.25 level acres between Sequim & Port Angeles. Newer laminate floors, carpets, windows and roof. Two sided rock mantel with a fireplace on the living room side and a wood stove on the dining room side. Large kitchen with a separate pantry. Photo Gallery link: www.windermere.com/tid305950 $189,900 ML#252417/156860. Call Terry or Kelly for more information, 477-5876

WRE/Port Angeles

Alan Burwell 460-0790 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

TERRY NESKE 1-800-786-1456 360-457-0456

0C405800

0C405773

0C405772

Cell: 461-0613 Office: 457-0456

BEAUTIFUL MT. VIEWS

PRIVATE WILDLIFE HABITAT

UPDATED CRAFTSMAN

WRE/Port Angeles DOC REISS

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

0C405771

Cathy Reed Sheryl Payseno Burley

The clean lines and style of the Craftsman have been maintained while updating this beautiful home to today’s standards. Pride in ownership shows throughout with warm colors and rich hardwoods. The master suite allows for complete comfort and natural light fills your sanctuary. $189,900 ML#252433/161579

Brenda Clark

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 460-7950 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

0C405784

WRE/Sequim-East

LORI TRACEY CHUCK MURPHY

WRE/SunLand

Cath Mich, CRS

0C405783

NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - Great opportunity to be the owner of your own beauty salon - a turn key business - just bring your scissors and clients. Very busy salon. Low overhead. Great visible location downtown Sequim. A sweetheart deal at $14,900 Call SHERYL or CATHY, 683-5056 ML#252426

WRE/Sequim-East

• Cute 2 BR/1.5 BA Condo • Completely Updated Throughout • New Kitchen w/New Appliances & Fixtures • New Heating System & Window Coverings • Newer Roof & Close to Medical Facilities ML#251967/129757 $149,500 www.brendaclark.mywindermere.com

ESCAPE TO BLACK DIAMOND

0C405782

Low maintenance landscaped front/back yards will make you the envy of your neighbors and friends. House interiors are sure to please. Extra roomy triplewide in Parkwood Community. Clubhouse and outdoor rec features make this a winning combination. Vacant and ready to buy! $89,500 ML#252439 Call LORI or CHUCK

• Convenient Location in SunLand • 3 Generous Bedrooms, 1 3/4 Baths • Nice Entertainment Spaces • Approx. 1,566 SF has Newer Roof & Systems • Easy Care Landscaping ML#251993/131039 $195,000 www.catherinemich.mywindermere.com

WRE/SunLand

Kim Bower 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

0C405779

0C405778

0C405777

• Two Bedrooms/Two Baths • Nice Sunroom • Propane Stove • Murphy Bed • Shoji Screen ML#252226/145314 $185,000 Visit www.kimbower.mywindermere.com

JUST LIKE NEW

A GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

with a finely crafted 2 BR/2 BA home on the edge of a forest bordering the Strait! Savor brilliant sunsets, eagles on their nests and exceptionally ecofriendly home for only $565,000 ML#241505/143543 Call Alan (360) 461-0175

WRE/Port Angeles ALAN BARNARD (360) 461-0175 Email: mlee@olypen.com

Making money is easy with a Peninsula Classified garage sale ad. Gather your items, call Peninsula Classified to place your ad, and go! We make it easy to reach thousands of potential shoppers with one simple call. We’ll even give you a garage sale kit complete with everything you need for a successful sale. Say as much as you want* for 2 days

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4B235385

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 360-452-8435 • 1-800-826-7714

*15 line maximum


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

E5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK•A•PEEK 23 TODAY ’ S HOTTEST NEW CLASSIFIEDS !

AUCTION: ANGELES MINI STORAGE, 12 noon on 12/29 at 919 W. Lauridsen, P.A. Unit A37. 452-2400 to verify. P.A.: 2 Br., no smoking/pets, vicinity of Civic Field. $750. 457-4023 SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1.5 ba carport, fenced, gar. $775. 683-1530.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

23

LOST: Large gold nugget on long gold chain. Possibly one month ago. Reward. 457-1329 MISSING: Black wallet w/silver star, from my car behind P.A. Peninsula Children’s Clinic, Mon., 12/20. Reward. Any info call 360-477-8607

25

Personals

I’M STILL TRYING TO FIND that special country lady who wants a life full of love, togetherness, being best friends with a partner that she has never had before. NS, ND, HWP. A lady 40-55 with a sense of humor, a lady that loves the outdoors from boating, snow and water skiing, fishing, shooting, taking a trip on a Harley and 4x4ing up on logging roads or ocean beaches plus a lot more activities. Bottom line, just having fun together. This is for a white male, 60, 6’, HWP, brown hair, hazel eyes, beard, excellent health, who is very affectionate, romantic, caring, giving from the heart, NS, loves the outdoors and animals, home life also. Email: wildcard@ olypen.com

Lost and Found

FOUND: Bike. Boys, red/black, QFC area, Sequim. Call to identify. 797-4985. FOUND: Dog. Male terrier of some kind, found at Crown Park, P.A., taken to humane society. 457-8206 LOST: Dog. Chihuahua, black, Samara, 14th and N Street area, P.A. 452-4662

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

31

Help Wanted

INFANT TODDLER SPECIALIST-2 positions in Port Angeles, 30 hours per week, year round. $1722 $2151 DOE. Minimum of a Child Development Associate Credential in Early Childhood with an emphasis on Infants and Toddlers required, Associate Degree in ECE preferred. Position open until filled, apply by 12/29/10 for best consideration. FAMILY EDUCATORS, 2 temporary positions, Sequim & Port Angeles Head Starts, 3540 hours per week, working with children 3-5 years. Application and job descriptions are available online www.olycap.org or call 360-385-2571.

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. CAREGIVERS: Hiring, P.A., Sequim, P.T. Paid Training. Benefits. 360-457-1644. City of Sequim is seeking qualified professionals for the following positions: Engineer Engineering Tech II WRF Electronics Tech PW Admin Asst II Accounting Asst III Finance Project Manager Details at http:// www.ci.sequim.wa.u s. Send cover letter, resume and job application to Kathy Brown-HR Manager, 152 West Cedar St., Sequim, WA 98363, or email kbrown@ ci.sequim.wa. EOE. CLALLAM COUNTY Administrative Specialist II Health & Human Services Part-time (17.5 hrs. wk.), $19.43 to 23.67 hr.; retirement and union eligible. No benefits. Must have strong MS Excel skills. Application/job description available online at www.clallam.net/employment/, in front of Human Resources at 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, or by calling Clallam County Jobs Line 360-417-2528. Resume in lieu of application not accepted. Faxed or emailed applications not accepted. Closes December 29, 2010 at 4:30 PM. EOE/ Drug Free Workplace DELIVERY DRIVER Part-time. 3-7 p.m., Mon.-Fri., rotating weekends. Clean driving record req. Durable medical equip. set up/maintenance exp. preferred. Apply at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. DRIVER: Looking for an exp. Class A-CDL driver. Motivated, hard worker, Local delivery, home every night. Must be able to make repeated hand truck deliveries down a ramp. Doubles and hazmat a plus. Will need a TWIC card. Contact Tony 461-2607.

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT

31

Due to continued expansion and growth, urgently require LPNs, NACs and NARs. Competitive wages and benefits. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LIVE AND WORK IN PARADISE! Nippon Paper Industries is currently interviewing for a Senior Project Engineer. Job Requirements: •Requires 7-10 years of Engineering experience in the Pulp and Paper field. Up to 5 years of Engineering experience in an industrial plant not related to the manufacture of pulp and paper may be substituted. •Requires a BS degree in Engineering (Mechanical, Electrical, Civil or Equivalent) and registration as a Professional Engineer. We offer competitive salaries and an excellent benefits package. Must meet minimum job requirements for consideration. Please send resume with cover letter specifying position applying for, as well as salary requirements to: HR Representative NPI USA PO Box 271 Port Angeles, WA 98362 AA/EOE No Phone Calls Please LOGGING COMPANY Looking for log truck driver. Experienced only, clean driving record, current CDL and medical card. Drug testing required. Immediate opening. Paid on percentage. 360-460-7292

With your

2 DAY

Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Marine Painter. Seeking applicants proficient at painting Boot Stripes, Show coats, topside, hull and interior. Work with Fiberglass, Wood and Metal surfaces of vessels. Apply epoxy’s, grind corrosion and fair hulls. Two years of experience with application of urethane paints, as well as prep, fairing and or body work. Ability follow directions & procedures. 360-417-0709 hr@platypusmarine.c om

Sequim

Health & Rehabilitation NOW HIRING

Maintenance Asst. • CNA Dietary Mgr. • Activity Asst.

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

360-582-2400

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx EOE

Help Wanted

Accounts Payable Technician Part-time, 10 hrs. wk. complete job description and application at www.crescentschooldistrict.or g or contact 360928-3311, ext. 100. RECEPTIONIST/ BOOKKEEPER For Sequim accounting firm. Must have good communication skills. Call for appt. 683-4149. RESIDENTIAL AIDES FULL-TIME OR ON-CALL Assist chronically mentally ill adults in daily living skills, cooking, and housekeeping. Req h.s./GED, exp pref’d. $10.13-$11.05/hr, DOE. FT w/benes, or add $1.hr for on-call work. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE RESIDENTIAL STAFF For new Maloney Heights 28-unit residence for chronically homeless: º Site Coordinator, Bachelor’s degr with 3-5 yrs. relevant exper. $29$31K, DOE. º Residential Aides, Assist w/daily living skills, cooking & housekeeping. Req h.s./GED; exper pref’d. $10.13-$11.05 hr., DOE. Both posns FT w/benes. resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE SWITCHBOARD/ RECEPTIONIST/ GENERAL CLERICAL Peninsula Community mental Health Center seeks versatile and mature team player for busy front office. Must have excellent interpersonal and customer svc skills and be able to type and use gen off equip. Recent exper in health care office is a plus. F.T. w/benefits. Some eve hrs. $10.50-$11.00/hr start, DOQ. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

31

Help Wanted

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325 The Museum & Arts Center located in Sequim, WA, is seeking applicants for the position of executive director. Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. The complete position description is available on the Museum & Arts Center website: www.macsequim.org. Copies are also available at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim. Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest with resume to: MAC Executive Director Search Committee PO Box 2056 Sequim, WA 98382 All inquiries must be directed to the mailing address above. The search committee will only consider applications received on or before Wed., Dec. 29, 2010.

34

Work Wanted

P.A. AUTO TINTING 20% discount. 360-912-1948 PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com. We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@ helpertek.com

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officelive.com I'm Sew Happy!

34

Work Wanted

WHO ECONOMY MUSIC SERVICE. 582-3005. Yard Work and Odd Jobs. Xmas light hanging, tree and hedge trimming, weed-eating, weeding, gutter cleaning, hauling, and any odd job you can find. Experienced and dependable. 2 men at $35 per hr. 461-7772

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

APPLIANCES AVAILABLE. Whirlpool side-by-side fridge, white, with water hookup, $300. GE convection oven with glass top, works great, $200. Kenmore washer and dryer set, they work great, super capacity, heavy duty, $300. 461-3164 pl lv msg. Hot water heater. GE, 50 gal., HYBRID. Brand new in box. $1,200. 683-7990. evermore@olypen.co m

72

Furniture

BED: Sealy Backsaver, full matt/ box, metal headboard, footboard, frame, great shape. $300/obo. 681-3299.

72

Furniture

COFFEE TABLES: 2 blonde finish coffee tables, 1 large, $40 and 1 small $30, very good condition. 681-4429 DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $140. 681-4429 DINING TABLE: With 6 chairs, good condition, light oak. $125. 360-461-1767 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. LOFT BED: Metal, desk & shelf. $100/ obo. 415-420-5809. LOUNGE CHAIRS: (2) matching swivel rockers. 1 never used, 1 used 1 month, light gold fabric, $100 each or both for $175/obo. 360-683-4898

73

General Merchandise

COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504 EXERCISER: Tony Little’s Gazelle Free Style. $50. 928-9617 or 360-460-9224. FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $489. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com HP Mini Case and portable mouse with 4 GB flash drive. $25. Open but never used. 452-6439. MISC: ‘95 F150 4x4, parts, $500. Cont. Gem Topper, cost $1,600, sell $500. 3 Husqvarna chainsaws, $300-$500. Leister plastic heat welder, $200. 48 Jeepster tranny, 3 sp with electric O/D, $500. 461-8060. MISC: Bird cage, 6’x 4’x30”. $200. Parrot play stand, $50. Recumbent Schwinn exercise bike, $175. 452-9302

SOFA: Like new. $500/obo. 670-5948.

73

General Merchandise

BATH CHAIR: Goes down at the press of a button, and comes up at the press of a button when you’re ready to get out of the tub. $650. 360-681-0942 CHRISTMAS TIME Beautiful coat, leather and suede. $100/ obo. Call Debbie at 360-452-6034

The Sequim Police Department is accepting applications from Sequim/Clallam County residents interested in becoming a

RESERVE POLICE OFFICER

Application deadline is January 15th, 2011 Minimum Qualifications: • Sequim/Clallam County resident • No felony convictions • Good character and standing in the community • Ability to pass a drug screening • Ability to pass a background investigation Applications are available at: Sequim Police Department 609 W. Washington Street, #16 Sequim, WA 98382 www.ci.sequim.wa.us/police

Join our team. Make a difference.

DIGITAL ADVERTISING SALES PROFESSIONAL WE’RE LOOKING FOR an Internet-savvy advertising sales professional. www.peninsuladailynews.com is the area’s number 1 website with over 600,000 impressions every month. This is a high-profile opportunity for you to showcase your strengths as a self-starter and make a real impact on our continued success by growing our online advertising. At least one year of proven experience selling advertising for a Web site preferred. Experience with online advertising plus demonstrated ability to generate sales through in-person, business-to-business sales are required.

Current openings include:

MARKETING DIRECTOR CHIEF NURSE EXECUTIVE PATIENT ADVOCATE

Visit: www.jeffersonhealthcare.org for all current openings.

Strong selling and closing skills required. We will be providing competitive compensation -- base plus commission -- based on proven experience. Compensation based on experience and will include medical, dental, vision, 401K and more. Free parking and no tiring commute. We are family-focused, community-minded -- we are the main news provider for people in two counties on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Competitive salary & benefit packages because exceptional professionals have choices.

E-mail resume, with a detailed cover letter addressing our requirements (above) and your salary requirements plus three references, to suzanne.delaney@peninsuladailynews.com

And because where you live also matters Port Townsend is an outstanding small city.

Please include “Digital Sales Professional” in the subject line. Many thanks.

For more information - call the jobline 360-385-2200 x2022 or visit www.jeffersonhealthcare.org

Jefferson Healthcare - Human Resources 834 Sheridan, Port Townsend, WA 98368

0C5106247

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

31

Help Wanted

0C5106532

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

Help Wanted

0C5107198

PRENATAL YOGA Feel a sense of support and community with other pregnant women as you increase flexibility, strength, circulation and balance. A regular yoga practice can help to reduce swelling, insomnia, back and leg pain commonly associated with pregnancy. The class is safe for all three trimesters. 8-week class for expecting moms begins Sunday, Jan. 9. For more information or to register, please e-mail Jennifer Veneklasen at jennven@hotmail.c om or phone 360775-8746. Space is limited.

31

Lost and Found

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

1 6 11 20 21 22 23

25 26 27 28 30 31 33 35 37 40 43 47 48 50 51 52 54 55 56 57 58 59 61 62 63 64 68 71 73 74 76 78 79 81 82 83 84 85

118 Backyard buildings 119 One you might not want to meet? 120 Carried on DOWN 1 Sternward 2 Italian vintner 3 Subject of the book “The Best of Time” 4 Tough test metaphor 5 Stir-fry additive 6 Former bumper car trademark 7 Like “waitress,” e.g. 8 “Ha ha” 9 L.A.-to-N.Y. dir. 10 Champs 11 More copious 12 Preconception 13 MCCC halved 14 Cult following? 15 City on the Guadalquivir River 16 Insignificant one

12/26/10

73

General Merchandise

76

Sporting Goods

FLY RODS: 2 bamboo with extras. $450. 360-301-4721

SEASONED FIREWOOD $200 cord. 360-670-1163

WANTED: Used tools for college student. 417-9204

Ten cords fir firewood $165 ea or trade for truck/big saw. Cut, split, delivered. FULL cords, not dry. came from big trees, nice, straight grain and lots of dense heartwood. will haul to west side or P.T. for extra. 670-5655. UPHOLSTERY: Equipment and supplies. $1,500. 452-7743.

75

Musical

GUITARS: 1968 Gibson Les Paul Gold Top. Serious inquiries only, $12,000. ‘63 Gibson ES120T, $850. ‘75 Gibson Grabber, $750. ‘67 Gibson SG Standard, $1,500. 360-681-8023

76

Sporting Goods

DOWNRIGGERS: (2) Cannon Unitroll. New, $475. Used twice, $190. $350 for both. 683-3887. FLY TYING EQUIP. Includes manual, vice, bobbins, hooks, threads, feathers and all, $1,000 value. Asking $600. 683-8437, leave msg.

KAYAK: Riot 10’. Bought for $1,100, asking $700/obo. Call for details. 683-4042

Bargain Box

TIRES: Studded snow, 175 SR 14. $40. 417-1593.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

AUCTION: ANGELES MINI STORAGE, 12 noon on 12/29 at 919 W. Lauridsen, P.A. Unit A37. 452-2400 to verify.

79

52 Hair piece 53 Seed covering 56 Publisher Chandler 57 “September 1, 1939” poet 58 Lt. Columbo’s employer 60 Starting place? 61 Painter of ballerinas 62 Small and weak 65 St. Clare’s town 66 Word with deck or drive 67 __ colada 69 Unmoving 70 Scene with stuntmen 72 Shenandoah Natl. Park site 75 Wire service?: Abbr. 76 Code contents, maybe 77 Webzine 78 Scolds, with “out” 79 High tech/lowlife sci-fi genre 80 Hands across the water?

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: STERLING SILVER Any cond. Coins, pre 1965. 360-452-8092.

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

AKC Pembroke Welsch Corgi. 1 yr old neut. male. $450. 681-2486 CAGE: One very large wire cage free standing for birds, rabbits or ?. $15 you haul or we will haul with gas money included. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays. Dachshund Puppies. Purebred Dachshund females, 6 weeks old. Black/tan and silver dapple. Wormed and will have first shot. $250 each. 360-681-3490, evenings only. Email best. deermor@q.com

89 92 93 94 95 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 107 110 111 113 114

Skyline obscurer Half a fish Falling-out Eternal “Overnight” surprise for some Turnpike alert Sports page deals Ship designation Eye-related Flatten Kama __ Stick “Tomorrow” musical Starkers, across the pond Romance novelist Victoria Eclectic assortment Show recorder Crisscross pattern Tony’s cousin Dissatisfied cry Bar quaff Medical suffix Alter, perhaps

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. WINTER WONDERLAND

C F Y A D I L O H O C K E Y P

E A R M U F F S H O V E L T A

T Z R A T N A S W E A T E R J

A E E N C H E S T N U T S E A

L T M E I S K A T I N G E E M

O I E P R V E M R O T S M T A

Solution: 7 letters

C H S D E F A A B B N H A T S

O W L S I R R L S E O O G S G

www.wonderword.com

H O A O S L A O T O C O E S O

C L L L O N S T S O N I T E L

T A U G K H I L U T T H Z S O

O S R E I M C G L R G E T O O

H S T O V E H S A I E O F C W

Join us on Facebook

S E V O L G N P L N H W I K N

H E A T E R O A S T I N G I G

12/25

Blanket, Boots, Carnival, Carol, Chestnut, Coat, Cough, Earmuffs, Freeze, Frost, Games, Gift, Gloves, Hats, Heater, Hills, Hockey, Holiday, Hot Chocolate, Igloo, Lights, Logs, Mittens, Pajamas, Parties, Roasting, Salt, Santa, Scarf, School, Season, Shovel, Skating, Slide, Slush, Sneeze, Sock, Storm, Stove, Sweater, Temperature, Tree, White, Wool Friday’s Answer: Mansfield THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

MAROA ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SURUP PENGOS

GYSSAR

A: A Friday’s

82

Pets

Christmas Chihuahuas. Purebred Chihuahuas cute and friendly 11 weeks old one male one female. Shots wormed and paper trained. $200-$300. 360-670-3906 IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS Really nice male Lab puppies. Just had 2nd shots, 10 wks. old. $125. 417-0808. KITTENS: 1 free male. 1 polydactyl male, $75. 1 polydactyl female, $100. 681-3838 LHASA APSO: Christmas Puppies! Ready to go, Tuxedo and Parties, 2 litters to choose from, 5 girls, 5 boys. $350-400. 477-8349 LHASAPOOS: 2 black females, $350 ea. (1) 3 mo. old black Toy Poodle, $300. 477-8349 MINIATURE CHIHUAHUA 3 mo. old male. $500. 452-9114. MISC: Mini pinto mare and stud, $250 and $350. Corn snakes and tank, $150. Parrot cages, $100$350. 457-9775.

82

Pets

Yorkshire Terrier male, 20 mos. old. Friendly, outgoing temperament. He’s been neutered, had his shots, is papertrained. Weighs 8 lbs. $350. Please ask for Debbie: 360-6832732, 360-775-4255.

83

Farm Animals

BULL: 8 mo. $550. 683-2304. HAY: Local good grass horse hay, $4.50 bale. 683-4427 PIGS: 2 bred gilts, a red Duroc-Berk, white York-BerkDuroc, $200 ea. 775-6552

84

Horses/ Tack

SADDLE: 16” men’s, heavy, Tex-Tan. $250. 681-7270.

85

Farm Equipment

MISC: 3 pt. 48” box blade, $300. Grader blade, $200. Rake, $200. Rotary tiller, $600. 452-4136.

PUPPIES: AKC Registered Mini-Schnauzer puppies. Born 08/14/2010. First shots, dew claws removed, tails docked. 2 males and 1 female left from litter. $350. Call 360-460-7119 PUPPIES: Black Lab, champion sired, AKC registered, great blood lines, 3 left, 11 wks. old. $350. 912-2785 PUPPIES: Holiday Hunt Terriers, 1 male, 1 female, cute, registered, shots. Ready now. $400 ea. 582-9006 PUPPIES: Purebred Shih-Tzu, ready now, will hold for Christmas. $500. 360-912-3855 Purebred Miniature poodle pups, male excellent disposition, natural tail, cafe au lait. 6 wks on 12/13. Crate trained and 1st set of shots. $350. 461-4576

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

GN 33’ FLAT-BED EQ TRAILER. $4,900. Like-new, 25ft deck includes 5’ pop-up beavertail for a flat deck, 5’ loading ramps with storage. 14,000 lbs. GVWR. MSRP $7,990. 808-5636 b6942@hotmail.com SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

93

Marine

BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 10 Capt. Sanders 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us GLASPLY: ‘86 15’ Runabout. Exc. cond. $3,000. 360-461-0157 LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480 RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

94

Motorcycles

APOLLO: ‘07 Orion 110. Exc. cond., some riding gear. $1,000. 683-8558. GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

FORD: ‘64 Ford 350. Dump Truck. Truck runs great! Recent upgrades such as: Rebuilt 312Y-Block, New Clutch, Battery & Hydraulic Brakes. 2 Speed Browning Manual High & Low Transmission Alternator Conversion Scale weight is 4,470 Gross weight 10k $1,900/obo. Please contact Mark at 850- 890-2783.

93

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Old English Sheepdog Puppies. (3) males, (3) females, purebred non papered, DOB Oct. 2, very socialized, very smart, playful, adorable fluff balls. Both parents on site. $300 males, $350 females. 360-775-4182 81 82 83 84 85

83 84 85 87 88

© 2010 Universal Uclick

Solution on E7

MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,600. Queen size brass bed, with mattress and accessories, $700. 681-0131. MISC: Drew dining set, table, 8 chairs, china hutch, credenza buffet, $1,000. Sportsart recumbent bike, $350. DuncanPhyfe table, $200. 2 lg. chest of drawers, $75 ea. Antique needle point chair with stool, $100. Retro bar, $50. Glass/brass shelf, 2 end tables, $150. All OBO. 477-4785 MISC: Ladies dresser, excellent shape, big mirror, black lacquer with gold trim, 6 drawers and middle cupboard with shelf, $250/obo. 10” table saw, $45. 683-9829. MISC: Regency, wood burning stove, gold door and 5.5’ piping, excellent shape, $1,200/obo. Sanio 24” TV w/stand, $75/obo. Mini fridge, brand new, $75. 683-2680

77

17 Othello’s betrayer 18 Like many a palette 19 “Little” Dickens girl 24 Bother 29 Suffix with Capri 32 Cries of clarity 34 Novus __ seclorum: Great Seal motto 35 Bother 36 Kisser 38 Lick 39 “Me too!” 40 Quick look across the moat? 41 Bluff in Banff 42 Small samplings 43 House party setting 44 Serengeti grazer 45 Fowl injustice? 46 Key of Bizet’s most popular sym. 49 Bomb 51 Chicago Sting org.

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

86 Fighting practice 88 Kemo __ 89 Like the Finger of Fate on “Laugh-In” ACROSS 90 Friday, e.g.: Hussein : Abbr. Obama :: __ : 91 What Red Garfield Riding Hood Comforter wisely didn’t Taking badly? do? Dunces 95 Betty Grable’s Informal bid were insured Zap 96 Show again “Honest, 97 Source of inside Professor, I info? studied very 102 Suite spot hard for this 105 “Mr. Mom” test”? actress Visibly shaken 106 Do some king? bartending Circus leaper 108 Wrist-to-elbow Ad gp. bone U.S. tender 109 Green poet? Oddly amusing 112 Effect of Pepé It affects your Le Pew battling take-home pay a romantic Civil War rival? authority Shelby 115 Pretends to be Per what one isn’t Rejection at 116 All, to Caesar McDonald’s? 117 Els on the links Things used in semi circles? Bucky, in “Get Fuzzy” Concludes Photographing giraffes, perhaps Reunion attendees Technology prefix Pico de gallo holders Pronto, to execs Scarlett’s refuge Like granola Deck out Bar orders for the calorieconscious Laser alternatives Expected to land Gloomy atmosphere Dedicated verse Error that just got bigger? PC panic button The “Y” in YSL Wise guys Detailed Unlock the door for House reporter? Harlem sch. Princess born on Polis Massa Love, to Caesar Acts skittish Vidal’s Breckinridge Lurches

“MANY HAPPY RETURNS” By KATHLEEN FAY O’BRIEN

By DAVID OUELLET

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $8500/OBO. 360-797-1254

HONDA: ‘03 150 CRF. Lots of BBR, bored to 175. $1,500. 928-9423 or 670-5282. HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153.

” (Answers Monday) VAPOR CRABBY FUTILE Jumbles: JOLLY Answer: The very top can be achieved from this — POVERTY

94

Motorcycles

95

Recreational Vehicles

HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023. HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023. JPM: ‘09 Raptor 300. Cruiser style, very low mi., excellent cond., beautiful and fast. A real bargain at $2,495. 360-390-8287 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973.

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Snowbird. 1 slide, like new condition. $10,000. 452-2929.

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210 QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213. RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $8,900. 797-1625 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177. WANTED: Later model truck camper. Cash. 360-770-2410

96

Parts/ Accessories

FREE PICK UP Unwanted cars and trucks in area. State licensed and bonded auto wrecker. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552 STUDDED TIRES (4) Big Horn Maxxis, LT265/75R 16. With (4) Chev 6-hole ultra mag wheels. Used one season. $500. 360-808-2934 WANTED to buy: Canopy for a ‘00 Chevy King cab short bed. 360-374-2534

97

4 Wheel Drive

MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071

CHEV: ‘85 S10. 4x4, king cab, auto, canopy. Straight, dependable, clean. PS, PB, A/C, tilt, CC, AM/FM/cassette. New shocks, battery, tires. 2.8 V6. Runs great! No rust. Drive anywhere. $3,300. 360-452-7439

MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $14,000. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itasca Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, serviced, ready to roll. $18,500. 452-2148 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512.

FORD: '97 EXPLORER XL 4X4. V6, lots of miles but reliable and well-maintained. Power windows/ locks. "As is" price of $1,500 cash. Call 461-0420.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

97

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409.

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213 LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

97

4 Wheel Drive

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056. CHEV: ‘95 Ext Cab Z71 4x4. Black. 5 sp. $3,600. 461-5180. DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556 FORD: ‘87 Super Cab manual, 4x4 and Eaton rear end. $1,000. Call after 11 a.m. 457-1457. FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460

98

4 Wheel Drive

Pickups/Vans

GMC: ‘97 4WD. Runs good, 140K mi. $3,000. 683-4401.

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876

CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139

NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400

CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $6,000/obo. 457-7097 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210.

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘91 S-10. Runs $800 461-6246

FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com.

98

E7

FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $5,900. 457-0655. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844

FORD: '83 F-150. XLT EXT CAB, 351 manual, auxiliary fuel tank. Well maintained, runs great, canopy, tow package. $950. Call 457-1491 after 6:00 p.m. Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

HOMELAWN/YARD SERVICES CARE RESTORATION

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

Bob’s Tractor Service Bob’s

Jason Tickner

360.477.1191

KITCHENS/BATHS/DOORS

Window Washing

Clean-up Fruit Trees All Shrubbery

Call Bryan or Mindy

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

25% off

Free Estimates Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

Call now for your appt. 17 yrs. experience

(360) 477-4374 (360) 461-2788 Licensed • Insured

CONSTRUCTION

Reg#FINIST*932D0

(360) 477-1805

Jeff Hudson

360

Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

Carruthers Construction “From Concrete to Cabinets”

ASBESTOS

457-6582 (360) 808-0439 (360)

457-5186

72289323

360/460•9824

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

RENOVATION/REPAIR

360-440-2856 Licensed • Bonded - Cont#SUTTEC99401

LIC

#JKDIRKD942NG

UPHOLSTERY

Sutter Craft

Quality Home Renovation & Repair Free Estimates and Consultation Kitchens • Bathrooms • Decks • Cedar Fencing Interior Remodel • Interior & Exterior Painting Framing to Finish Woodwork • Small Jobs Welcome

jkdirworks@wavecable.com

After Hours Upholstery 20 years experience 0C5106860

Tr e e s Shrubs Hedges

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER

095096373

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

MOLE/PRUNING

1-888-854-4640

Holiday Special 10% off all labor thru 12/31/10 FREE ESTIMATES

360-683-7198 360-461-1148

0B5102768

(360) 683-8332

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

035075404

Tile Work • Kitchens Bathrooms Drywall & Framing Decks • Fences Windows • Ramps

9C5066307

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

Mole Control

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

LANDSCAPING

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up •Post Holes & Field Mowing • John Deere Services

945036615

REMODELING

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

025073138

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

EXCAVATING

452-9995 DIRT WORK

Contr#KENNER1951P8

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

360

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Inspections - Testing Surveys

0A5100969

D

75289698

G

ARLAN ROOFING

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

Full 6 Month Warranty

Asbestos

& Leaky Roofs Quality roofing at a reasonable price Honest & Reliable

Small Jobs A Specialty

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

Moss Removal

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

COLUMC*955KD

WANTED: Wind Damaged

8C313094

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

Let the Sunshine in!

Insured - GUTTEA*95ONS - Bonded

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Any House Any Size

ROOFING

452-3480

Port Angeles Sequim

Columbus Construction

WINDOW/CARPET CLEANING

RS SCHMIDT ENTERPRISES

Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

FOX

Licensed

LET US CLEAN YOUR... WINDOWS • CARPETS • GUTTERS plus DEBRIS HAULING

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right! FREE Estimates

REPAIR/REMODEL

0B5104177

0B5104227

360-460-0147

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs

86313195

78289849

085093109

Professional, Honest & Reliable FREE ESTIMATES

360-460-6176

Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting

GUTTER Gutter Cleaning & Services

• Kitchen and Bath Updates and Remodels • Additions, Garages, Framing and Siding • Finish Carpentry, Cabinets, Trim, Doors, etc. • Tile: Floors, Showers, Walls and Countertops • Concrete Driveways, Walks and Retaining Walls • Drywall: New, Repair, Painting and Texture • Creative Help with Design and Layout • Small Jobs, OK

APPLIANCES

670.1122

ANYTIH5904MN

AIR DUCT CLEANING

Licensed & Insured #CARRUC*907KJ

Done Right Home Repair

Interior/Exterior Home Repairs Masonry Carpentry I DO ODD JOBS

interior painting

No Job Too Small

From Curb To Roof

72289360

Lic#BOBDADT966K5

CLEARVS9010W

TIME TO PRUNE

Moss Prevention

HOME REPAIR

ANYTIME HANDYMAN SERVICES

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

FALL/WINTER

085091454

360-670-1350

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

0A5101705

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

93313234

#LUNDFF*962K7

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

-Painting -Limbing/Pruning -Free Estimates -Yard/Debris Removal -View Enhancement -Gutter Cleaning -Moss Removal -Windfall Cleanup -Light Replacement

C allahans Landscape Maintenance

0C5105031

Chad Lund

Pressure Washing

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

Clearview Services 40’ Bucket Truck

HANDYMAN

PAINTING

075090631

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Small jobs is what I do!

PRUNING

0C5107490

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Lic# LOVESHR940CB

Call NOW To Advertise

LANDSCAPING

PRINTING Scott A. Campbell, Owner afterhours.upholstery@q.com

RENOVATION & MAINTENANCE Lawn Care • Pruning • Chipping Fertilizing & Spray Services Hydroseeding Irrigation - Install & Repair

PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL Scanning Scanning & & Printing Printing Services Services

C o m m ercial & R esid en tial QualityLandscapes@cablespeed.com Bonded and Insured CONTR#QUALIL*123DG

DESIGN DESIGN SCANNING SCANNING FILM FILM OUTPUT OUTPUT PRINTING PRINTING PACKAGING PACKAGING MEMENTOS MEMENTOS

360-417-8862

TREE SERVICE S EM PER F I T R EE S ER VIC E Licensed – Bonded – Insured

Free Quotes! (3 60)461 -1 89 9 – OR – river1966@msn.com Lic# DELUNE*933QT

0A5100336

360 385-6663

015068170

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

BY APPOINTMENT


E8

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

98

Pickups/Vans

99

Cars

FORD: ‘87 Econoline. New wheels/tires, very clean. $1,200 firm. 683-8249.

FORD: 1929 Model “A�. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133.

FORD: ‘67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053 FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542.

99

HONDA: ‘85 Civic Station Wagon. Needs work. $500/ obo. 360-477-0702. HONDA: ‘98 Accord EX. 4 door sedan, 6 cyl., 1 owner, 34,850 mi., many accessories. $7,500 firm. 683-1894

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619.

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866

PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

99

Cars

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619. BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,200/ obo. 206-272-0220. BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915 CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440 CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHEV: ‘99 Monte Carlo. 84K mi. $2,000. 461-6758.

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 FORD: ‘01 Explorer Sport. 2WD, 5 sp, 126K, good cond. $3,000. 928-9430.

MAZDA: ‘08 Miata GT. Black/tan, 6 sp, 8,800 mi., like new. $18,900. 452-5387.

MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966

FOR YOUR CAR 1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

WWWREIDANDJOHNSONCOMsMJ OLYPENCOM

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF ADOPTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Growth Management Act, Chapter 36.70A, RCW, that the Board of Clallam County Commissioners adopted the following ordinance under the authority of the Growth Management Act. Ordinance 871 was adopted on December 14, 2010: Ordinance No. 871, amending Title 31, Comprehensive Plan Map, and Title 33, Zoning Map, of the Clallam County Code. This ordinance amends Clallam County code, Title 31, Comprehensive Plan Map, and Title 33, Zoning Map of Clallam County Code by changing the classification of Rural Low or Western Region Rural Low (R5 or RW5) to Rural Neighborhood Conservation (NC) for those parcels as reflected on maps 1 through 8 attached to the ordinance. Copies of the above ordinance are available for public inspection during normal business hours at the office of the Department of Community Development, Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA or anytime at http://www.clallam.net/Board/html/code.htm. Pursuant to RCW 36.70A.290, all petitions to the Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board relating to whether or not the adopted ordinance is in compliance with the Growth Management Act (RCW 36.70A) or chapter 90.58 or 43.21C RCW must be filed within sixty (60) days of the date of publication of this notice. Pub: Dec. 26, 2010

103

Legals City of Sequim

103

Legals City of Sequim

CITY OF SEQUIM NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING & PUBLIC HEARING Proposed amendments to the Sequim Municipal Code (SMC) Titles 18 & 20 (Zoning -Land Use and Development) Ordinance #2011-003 ************************************************************ Notice is hereby given that the City of Sequim proposes to amend Titles 18 & 20 of the Sequim Municipal Code. The purpose of this amendment is to resolve the issue of having standalone residential uses within the Mixed Use and Commercial zones and an evaluation of uses within each zoning district. Furthermore the proposed amendment provides a maximum residential density allowance in the Mixed Use and Commercial zones and would require neighborhood meetings for major Type B, C1 & C2 land use applications. Notice is hereby given that the City of Sequim Planning Commission will consider the proposed amendments to the Sequim Municipal Code, along with written and oral public comments, at a Public Meeting on: January 4, 2011 6:00 P.M. Sequim Transit Center 190 W. Cedar St. These items are considered legislative actions and must be approved by ordinance by the City Council. The Council will review a draft ordinance based on the Planning Commission recommendation, and written and oral public input at an Open Record Public Hearing to be held: January 24, 2011 6:00 P.M. Sequim Transit Center 190 W. Cedar St. The City Council will make a final determination on the proposed Sequim Municipal Code amendments following the public hearing. SEPA: Based on review of existing environmental documents, including the City of Sequim Comprehensive Plan EIS and environmental checklist prepared for these amendments, the City anticipates making a threshold determination that the amendments do not require the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement. The City anticipates that a Determination of Non Significant Impact (DNS) and Adoption of an Existing Environmental Document, i.e., the E.I.S. for the Sequim Comprehensive Plan adopted in 1996, will be adopted for these amendments. Interested parties may review the environmental documents at the City of Sequim Planning Department, (SEPA File #10/007). Future projects developed on properties affected by these additions will be subject to environmental review and documentation under state and local regulations based on the size and nature of the project. REVIEW OF MATERIALS: Written and oral comments may be presented at the Public Meeting and at the Public Hearing. All written comments must be received by close of business on January 3, 2011. The applications, plans and files for these items may be reviewed during normal working hours, at the City of Sequim Planning Department, 615 North Fifth Avenue. The SEPA checklist is also available on the City’s Planning Department website: www.ci.sequim.wa.us/planning. PLANNING DEPT. CONTACT: Joseph D. Irvin, Interim Planning Director 615 North Fifth Avenue, Sequim, WA 98382 Phone 360-683-4908 Fax 360-681-0552 Approved for publication: Joseph D. Irvin Interim Planning Director City of Sequim Pub: Dec. 26, STW Dec. 29, 2010

Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

99

Cars

MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062.

MERCURY: ‘97 Mystique. Needs tranny. $500/obo. 417-2130.

MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828

OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183.

NASH: ‘50 Statesman. Needs work, runs great, extra engine and tranny. Must sell. $3,995 or make offer. 681-0717

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959

101

101

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

CLALLAM COUNTY PARKS, FAIR & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT The Clallam County Parks, Fair & Facilities Department will accept Statements of Qualifications and Letters of Interest from Architectural and Engineering firms for the following work for the year 2011: 1. Architectural: Building construction and remodel projects consisting of re-roofs; building alterations/additions; ADA upgrades/improvements; fire alarm upgrades; office remodels; floor covering; painting; parks and fairgrounds facility and grounds improvements; park and site planning; feasibility studies and other associated work to be determined. 2. Engineering: Parking lot design; drainage and storm water design; water system improvements; septic, lift station and drain-field design; HVAC system improvements; building access control and security upgrades and design (e.g., control equipment/video/ camera/recording surveillance systems); structural analysis/design; surveying, other parks and fairgrounds facility and grounds related improvement projects; environmental analysis/mitigation and permitting; utilities design; building energy analysis/assessment; feasibility studies and other associated work to be determined; . Analysis of existing conditions, As-built documentation, design, budgeting, permitting, bid documentation, specifications and construction administration are required. Interested Firms shall submit a full statement of their qualifications with a Letter of Intent and examples of specific projects of similar scope of work by 4:30 p.m. January 28, 2011 to: Clallam County Parks, Fair & Facilities Department 223 East 4th St., Suite 7 Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 Attn: Joel G. Winborn, Director PH: 360.417.2429 EMAIL: jwinborn@co.clallam.wa.us Do not include fee schedules. Firms shall include staff profiles of those who will be directly involved and responsible for Design, Construction Documentation and Construction Administration. The selected firm(s) must be able to begin work upon notice by February of 2011. Approved this 21st day of December, 2010. Board of Clallam County Commissioners Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Attest: Trish Holden, Clerk of the Board, CMC Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 2, 2011

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

99

Cars

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7345.23527 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC Grantee: Ronald G. Allie, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 953 101 401 Abbreviated Legal: LTS 1-4, BLK 14, 2/18 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of JEFFERSON, State of Washington: Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Block 14 all in GISE's Addition as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 18, Records of Jefferson County, Washington, together with those portions of vacated Carroll Avenue and Fifth Street, abutting upon said lot which would attach by operation of Law. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 71 S 6TH ST PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/26/06, recorded on 08/02/06, under Auditor's File No. 513986, records of JEFFERSON County, Washington, from Ronald G Allie, a single person, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for CTX Morgage Co., LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 553580. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $8,598.36 Late Charges $335.64 Lender's Fees & Costs $97.14 Total Arrearage $9,031.14 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $417.34 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,133.84 Total Amount Due: $10,164.98 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $77,301.55, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS RONALD G. ALLIE 71 S 6TH ST PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Ronald G. Allie 71 S 6TH ST PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/17/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/17/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7345.23527) 1002.177823-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010

99

Cars

PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965. TOYOTA: ‘01 Camry XLE. 98K mi., very good condition, service up to date, 2 new tires. $7,000. 452-2929

101

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS ARCHITECTURAL/ENGINEERING CONSULTING SERVICES

095098073

NISSAN: ‘87 pickup. 4 cyl, 5 spd. $1,250. 683-7516

MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204

CA$H 101 REID & JOHNSON

MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486.

99

Cars

MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,000/ obo. 360-460-0385.

If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951

99

Cars

MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $3,750/ obo. 582-1292.

FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157

Classified

Legals Clallam Co.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183. www.peninsula dailynews.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909 VW: ‘00 New Beetle. Turbocharged, 1.8L engine (only 25K mi. on factory purchased and dealer installed motor), 108K vehicle mi., airbags, ABS brakes, loaded and dependable. $4,200. 461-6460. Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Housing Authority of the County of Clallam Request for Proposals Project-Based Section 8 Vouchers The Housing Authority of the County of Clallam (HACC) is soliciting proposals from housing providers who are interested in receiving Section 8 Project-Based Voucher (PBV) subsidy for their existing rental housing units. The area of operation for the Authority is the contiguous area of Clallam and Jefferson Counties. Section 8 PBV is a program established by the Department of Housing and Urban Development and administered by HACC, which provides rental assistance to landlords on behalf of low-income people. HACC will enter into a contract with the successful landlord of this request for proposals to guarantee rental assistance, which will be paid to the landlord on behalf of qualified tenants for the term of the contract. Rental assistance will remain with the unit for the term of the contract. The term of the contract shall be for a period of up to 15 years with an exclusive right by HACC to extend for additional five-year periods. Rental assistance payments, as provided by HACC will be established by the Department of Housing and Urban Development based on market rate comparable units. Respondents may propose all or a portion of units in a development for PBV assistance. However, in a multi-family building (five or more units) no more than 25 percent of the units may receive PBV assistance unless the PBV units proposed are specifically made available for: 1. Elderly Households (head of household or spouse 62 or older); or 2. Disabled Households (head or spouse disabled); or 3. Households receiving supportive services. To qualify, a household must have at least one member receiving at least one qualifying supportive service (See Exhibit 4). This selection process will generally favor projects which meet one of the above categories with the lowest incomes. Priority will be given to projects which provide services appropriate to the needs of the individual or family as part of the design. At least five (5) of the vouchers shall be project-based in Jefferson County, subject to eligible proposals. MAXIMUM SECTION 8 VOUCHERS AVAILABLE FOR THIS PROJECT IS TWENTY (20) Complete details regarding this Request for Proposals, including application and program requirements, rating process and federal program requirements are contained in the HACC’s Project-Based Section 8 Voucher Selection Policy which may be obtained at www.hacchousing.org/Opportunitiespage.html Only applications submitted in response to this notice will be considered. Proposals must be received at the HACC administrative office at the address listed below no later than 4:00 p.m. on February 8, 2011. Housing Authority of the County of Clallam RFP – Project-Based Section 8 Voucher 2603 South Francis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 2, 9, 2011

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File No.: 7523.21604 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. OneWest Bank, FSB Grantee: Brad Burlingame and Kay Burlingame, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 702131022 Abbreviated Legal: PTN NE 13-27-2W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: That portion of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 13, Township 27 North, Range 2 West, W.M., Jefferson County, Washington, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point 376 feet East of the Center of Section 13; thence North 296 feet; thence West 63.5 feet; thence North 16.5 feet; thence West 16.5 feet; thence North 424.5 feet; thence West 296 feet; thence North 565 feet; thence East 361 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence continuing East 180 feet; thence South 310 feet; thence West 180 feet; thence North 310 feet to the Point of Beginning; Together with and subject to an easement for ingress and egress, over and along the existing road in Section 13, Township 27 North, Range 2 West, as disclosed by Auditor's File No. 214541, recorded August 10, 1972, and by Volume 16 of Surveys, Page 135, and Judgment in Jefferson County Superior Court Case No. 95-200373-6; Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 432 Elkhound Pass Quilcene, WA 98376 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/03/07, recorded on 01/23/07, under Auditor's File No. 519776, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Brad Burlingame and Kay Burlingame, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Indy Mac Bank, F.S.B., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Indy Mac Bank, F.S.B. to OneWest Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 550263. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/01/2010 Monthly Payments $10,533.06 Late Charges $468.16 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,748.12 Total Arrearage $12,749.34 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $508.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $112.00 Recording Costs $127.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $817.00 Total Amount Due: $13,566.34 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $203,294.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Brad Burlingame 432 Elkhound Pass Quilcene, WA 98376 Kay Burlingame 432 Elkhound Pass Quilcene, WA 98376 Brad Burlingame 176 Lake Sutherland Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Kay Burlingame 176 Lake Sutherland Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Brad Burlingame 1812 Lindsay Hill Road Quilcene, WA 98376 Kay Burlingame 1812 Lindsay Hill Road Quilcene, WA 98376 Brad Burlingame 8760 State Highway 303 Northeast #5 Bremerton, WA 98311-9265 Kay Burlingame 8760 State Highway 303 Northeast #5 Bremerton, WA 98311-9265 Brad Burlingame P.O. Box 351 Quilcene, WA 98376-0351 Kay Burlingame P.O. Box 351 Quilcene, WA 98376-0351 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/29/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/01/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7523.21604) 1002.161656-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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File No.: 7023.78563 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Shane M. Goin and Shirley K. Goin, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-08-581868 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 13, BK 18, Pennsylvania Park Add Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 13 Block 18, Pennsylvania Park Addition to Port Angeles, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 66, Records of Clallam County. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1029 Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/09/07, recorded on 11/15/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1212170, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Shane M Goin and Shirley K Goin, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/23/2010 Monthly Payments $21,615.84 Late Charges $864.62 Lender's Fees & Costs $15.00 Total Arrearage $22,495.46 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $543.75 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,305.94 Total Amount Due: $23,801.40 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $179,670.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Shane M Goin 1029 Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Shirley K Goin 1029 Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Shane M Goin 1029 West Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Shirley K Goin 1029 West Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/14/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/15/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.78563) 1002.170069-FEI Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 16, 2011 File No.: 7713.21269 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank, N.A. Grantee: James S. Hall, a married man as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 0330314390600000 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 3, SP 19/82 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 3 of Finnerty Short Plat No. 1 recorded November 13, 1989 in Volume 19 of Short Plats, Page 82, under Clallam County Auditor's No. 624746, being a portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 10 Atwood Ridge Place Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/31/07, recorded on 11/05/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1211704, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James S. Hall, a married man as his sole and separate property, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to U.S. Bank, N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1256790. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/21/2010 Monthly Payments $18,624.12 Late Charges $823.44 Lender's Fees & Costs $241.00 Total Arrearage $19,688.56 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,502.19 Total Amount Due: $21,190.75 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $170,120.01, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James S. Hall 10 Atwood Ridge Place Sequim, WA 98382 James S. Hall P.O. Box 2903 Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James S. Hall 10 Atwood Ridge Place Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James S. Hall P.O. Box 2903 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/01/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/02/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7713.21269) 1002.168658-FEI Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 16, 2011

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2010

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File No.: 7283.26396 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Michael E. Schmitt and Amy Schmitt, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 0530101490700000 Abbreviated Legal: L4, Vol 5, PG 36, Clallam County, WA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 4 of Lunn Short Plat recorded July 14, 1978, in Volume 5 of Short Plats, page 36 under Clallam County Auditor's File No. 484442, being a portion of the West half of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 10, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 732 GASMAN RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/18/06, recorded on 04/24/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1179016, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Michael E Schmitt, a married man, and Amy Schmitt, a married woman, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1256744. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/04/2010 Monthly Payments $12,396.36 Late Charges $401.45 Lender's Fees & Costs $25.00 Total Arrearage $12,822.81 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $726.28 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,508.84 Total Amount Due: $14,331.65 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $212,961.22, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS MICHAEL SCHMITT 732 GASMAN RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of MICHAEL SCHMITT 732 GASMAN RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/02/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/03/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/04/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26396) 1002.168756-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010

File No.: 7261.26647 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the C-BASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-MH1 Grantee: Wanda Fay Harrison, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 0530343291200000 Abbreviated Legal: LT.1, HARRISON SP, 25/67 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Harrison Short Plat, recorded September 28, 1993 in Volume 25 of Short Plats, Page 67, under Clallam County Recording No. 693920, being a portion of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 34, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 417 Miles Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/28/05, recorded on 04/08/05, under Auditor's File No. 20051154092, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Wanda Fay Harrison, who also appears of record as Wanda Harrison, a single woman, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Argent Mortgage Company, LLC to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the C-BASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-MH1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2007-1201046. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/02/2010 Monthly Payments $37,300.71 Late Charges $1,747.90 Lender's Fees & Costs $4,925.38 Total Arrearage $43,973.99 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $405.00 Total Costs $405.00 Total Amount Due: $44,378.99 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $160,081.27, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Wanda Fay Harrison 417 Miles Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Wanda Fay Harrison 417 Miles Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/22/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/22/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/02/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7261.26647) 1002.122754-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010

File No.: 7023.78593 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Loren Ellery and Nina Lee Ellery, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-03511-6 Abbreviated Legal: W5' L 4 & All L5, E 10' L6, Blk 351, TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The West 5 feet of Lot 4, all of Lot 5 and the East 10 feet of Lot 6, Block 351, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. More accurately described as follows: The West 5 feet of Lot 4, all of Lot 5 and the East 10 Feet of Lot 6, Block 351, of the Townsite of Port Angeles. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 820 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/27/03, recorded on 07/08/03, under Auditor's File No. 2003 1112097 and Rerecorded on: 7/18/2003 under Auditor's File No.: 2003 1112849, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Loren Ellery and Nina Lee Ellery, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Unitified Solutions Group, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Amerigroup Mortgage Corporation, a Division of Mortgage Investors Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1257239. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/23/2010 Monthly Payments $4,411.08 Late Charges $122.64 Lender's Fees & Costs $60.00 Total Arrearage $4,593.72 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $455.28 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,165.90 Total Amount Due: $5,759.62 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $84,195.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Loren Ellery 820 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Loren Ellery 1525 Appaloosa Court Carson City, NV 89701 Nina Lee Ellery 820 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Nina Lee Ellery 1525 Appaloosa Court Carson City, NV 89701 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/16/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/16/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.78593) 1002.170343-FEI Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 16, 2011

File No.: 7283.26405 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Emma Adcox, an unmarried woman and Bernice Massey, an unmarried woman, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship and not as tenants in common Tax Parcel ID No.: 0230155503800000 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 5, Block M, Sunshine Acres Industrial Park, according to the Plat thereof filed in Volume 8 of Plats at Page(s) 36, 37 and 38, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/31/08, recorded on 04/01/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1218687, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Emma L Adcox, an unmarried woman, Bernice Massey, an unmarried woman, as joint tenants with rights of survivorship and not as tenants in common, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Lender and Lender's successors and successor assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. . *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/02/2010 Monthly Payments $30,476.16 Late Charges $1,110.48 Lender's Fees & Costs $88.75 Total Arrearage $31,675.39 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $800.00 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,592.12 Total Amount Due: $33,267.51 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $294,397.61, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 7, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/27/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Emma L. Adcox 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Emma L. Adcox 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Bernice Massey 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Bernice Massey 22 Industrial Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/26/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/26/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/02/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26405) 1002.167973-FEI Pub: Dec. 5, 26, 2010


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PENINSULA

Tonni Mansfield

■  What’s the best gift Peninsula women have ever given? ■  Wife needs to ask husband for help to get it

Peninsula Daily News Sunday, December 26, 2010

e un at k o FREEin f t ’ S he Se De ha W e Pa li Salck C eek ad ge af : e 3

■  Let kids decide on family’s New Year’s resolutions

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Sunday, December 26, 2010

Readers cheer on Let the kids make up New Year’s resolutions lovelorn woman Parent ANNIE WAS THE 43-year-old woman who has given up on finding love. Today, two fellow travelers on the road to romance offer her advice.

Elisha My darling Annie, I’m also 43-years-old, separated and soon to be divorced. I concur that dating is a new world, but from my perspective, and in the words of Auntie Mame, “Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving to death.” Why do I say that? Because I have a flourishing dating life, and I

Cheryl Lavin

Tales from the Front

don’t experience this rumored quid pro quo sexfor-dinner scenario. Do men want to have sex with women? Yes. Is that news to you? It’s in their DNA. It ensures the continuation of the human race. I imagine the men who take me to dinner want to

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Weddings, anniversaries

Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

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0C5104683

Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned.

to Parent

by offering a FREE deep conditioner treatment with your cut & color scheduled this month. On your second appointment, we offer you 20% OFF your cut & color. Make a third appointment and your hair cut will be FREE.

10 items. If eating right and exercising is a major concern, keep these as a priority by implementing gradual changes. Try to involve family members in buying and preparing healthier meals. Kids seem to get more excited about eating and trying new food if they have helped to choose and cook it. Another suggestion is to exercise with your kids by encouraging them to create music and dance moves everyone can enjoy.

Can you help? Is it possible to go overboard with too many academic requirements in second grade? Our 7-year-old twins’ teacher took maternity leave for two months and now have a new teacher who feels the entire class is academically behind. My son and daughter loved school until this change occurred, and now it’s a huge hassle to even get them up in the mornings. How can we research or compare what other second-graders are doing in various schools?

________ Write to Jodie Lynn at Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040 or direct2contact@parenttoparent. com via e-mail.

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Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

EACH YEAR OUR entire family makes a list have sex with me. I’m of resolutions for the New neither surprised nor Year, but we all seem to fail offended. I’m past the to follow through. age of being offended by We could all stand to men and their urges. I’m lose at least 10 or so pounds actually flattered. to be in better physical conJodie Lynn What I am surprised dition, especially by the end to learn is that most men of the holidays. I meet simply enjoy the How can we stick to our company of a woman working because it’s now goals and feel OK should who enjoys the company we not adhere to the exact more like a personal comof a man. A woman who petition and completely fun. plan? truly appreciates him for Making things not quite who he is and enjoys so serious has been a huge Texas family spending time with help. Each year our family of — The Williams another human being. five strive to lose weight in Arlington, Texas I’m staggered by the and get better organized. degree this is true. With three kids, it seems From Jodie Does dating really almost impossible to stay come with strings? Annie, Keeping resolutions can on track. I invite you to consider become more of a chore than Recently, the kids’ stepthat you pull the strings. mom came up with the sug- something to look forward You sound like a woman gestion we allow everyone to to, achieve and complete. who has found profescome up with their own Allowing kids to think sional success and can individual plans and up and write down their take care of herself. another for the entire family. own goals and lists is a I’m curious if someWe check the things off great idea. In fact, it could where along the way you that we are on track with be the perfect opportunity forgot how glorious it is and add one new goal to to interact as a family and to delight in the comtry to achieve during the learn interesting perspecpany of a man. A man next 90 days if everything tives from each individual. who enjoys taking pleais going well. Although as parents we sure from your company, If we back track, we put may not agree with everyfrom the beauty of a $5 into a jar. If we redo the thing that they feel is woman. one that was messed up, we important to them, try to get to take the $5. It’s accept their ideas and let Turn to Lavin/11 them attempt to accomplish as many as possible without constant prodding or a deadline that may cause guilt, should it not be met. Wholistic Healing with Humility, Honesty & Respect for Nature However, try to keep Quality each list to a minimum of

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Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Generations

Sunday, December 26, 2010

3

Peninsula women share their thoughts Photos

and interviews by

Dave Logan

THIS WEEK BRINGS another installment of our new Peninsula Woman feature, “Generations.” Here, we ask three local women of varying ages the same question, with an eye toward what their responses tell us about the differences ­— and similarities ­— among Peninsula women’s points of view. Peninsula Woman

This week’s question: What’s the best Christmas gift you have ever given?

“My husband and I helped out another family about 15 years ago. The family was having some real problems. We arranged to get them a Christmas tree, kids clothes and toys and a collection of food. That was my best present, as it was really meaningful to give where there was a need.”

“Giving my newborn daughter some educational books and toys that she would use to learn. I usually give other people clothes, but giving to my own daughter is special. She’s about 1½ now, and this Christmas, hopefully, she’ll probably remember most of what happens.”

Shirley Gregory, 78 homemaker Sappho

Ilene Keend, 52 homemaker Port Angeles

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“Getting my family all together and at one time. We don’t really exchange gifts anymore. In the past 20 years, we have had a big family, so we haven’t done gifting. We have seven kids and 17 grandchildren. As far as a specific present, I would have to say it’s taking all kinds of photos and sharing them with each other. We have a lot of photo albums since we now use digital cameras. We have lots of family photos to give and share.”


Defining 4

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

beauty Permanent-makeup artist gives women — and men — fresh starts

By Diane Urbani

T

de la

For Peninsula Woman

Paz

onni Mansfield understands what it means to begin again — and how a slim line of definition here, a blush of color there, can make all the difference. Mansfield, born and raised in Port Angeles, She’s been busy applying permanent lip color, eye liner launched a new life and a new career in and eyebrow color, and cam2010. It’s the career of her own choice, after scars and tattoos years of working in other people’s industries. ouflaging until they’re all but invisible. It may, however, sound to an outsider like And Mansfield has also donated her time, and her an occupation based on vanity, on surface steady hand, to give makeprettiness. overs to women who have But women such as Mansfield — and her survived abusive relationdaughter, Meagan Myrick — know better. ships. “I know there are a lot of They beleive ermanent cosmetics and profesbattered women out there,” sional hair and skin care provide the confisays; Mansfield is herself dence that can help propel a woman forward she a survivor of domestic vioin her life. lence. And Mansfield hasn’t merely completed Wanted to volunteer the requirements to practice as an esthetician, cosmetologist and permanent-makeup For a long time, she’s wanted to volunteer at the artist. This past summer, she finished the Rose House, Healthy Families years-long program required for her license of Clallam County’s shelter as a permanent-cosmetics instructor, and is for women and children who now one of the few licensed teachers in have come out of abusive households. Washington state.

Diane Urbani

So this fall, Mansfield got in touch with Leslie Bond, Healthy Families’ domestic violence program manager, and the two worked out a plan. Mansfield, with help from Meagan, would give makeovers to women not only living at Rose House, but also to other Healthy Families clients embarking on new beginnings. “These would be clients who are going on job interviews, starting a new job, moving out of the shelter or just turning a new leaf in their life,” Bond said. She expressed gratitude for Meagan and Mansfield’s gifts — which, as it turned out, they gave on a Sunday shortly before Christmas. “I got to see one of the women,” Bond said. “She looked fabulous.”

Mansfield, for her part, is delighted to be using her skills to help women. But she’s more than a makeup artist; as a licensed permanent-cosmetics practitioner, she also uses intradermal pigment to cover unwanted marks and to repair “beauty treatments” that have deteriorated. “A lot of people don’t realize that permanent cosmetics have been created to help men and women with scars and tattoo removal,” Mansfield says. She uses colors, meticulously matched to her client’s natural skin tone, to conceal tattoos. One client, a 67-yearold man, recently had her cover up a small teardrop he’d had inked onto his cheek. “He’s pretty tickled,” to have it gone, she said.

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Paz/for Pe

Mansfield also has many clients whose permanentmakeup eyebrows or eyeliner has migrated or turned an unnatural color. To repair them, she uses organic pigments: the type that don’t change color. And for women who have undergone mastectomies or other procedures that changed the appearance of their breasts, she can use per manent cosmetics to re-create a natural look.

You’re not stuck

The message from Mansfield to those with tattoos or scarring: You are not stuck with this. And to those who have been burned by glycolic acid in attempts to remove a tattoo, she offers a gentler alternative: camouflaging it.


Anniversary

rte

c

Sunday, December 26, 2010

5

Wedding Fallan — Baker

Meagan Myrick, left, and her mother, Tonni Mansfield of Port Angeles, attended beauty school together and have built careers based on their artistic abilities.

eninsula

r

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Woman

Permanent cosmetics are themselves like tattoos, as they use needles and pigment. But in Mansfield’s hands, they blend in, rather than make a big statement. “I’m conservative,” she says. “I don’t want people looking ‘decorated.’ I start out with the smallest amount of pigment, and then maybe add more in a second session,” to define brows, eyes or lips. There will be no Groucho Marx or Tammy Faye Bakker looks coming from her salon, Mansfield added with a smile. The treatments stimulate the body’s natural collagen, she adds. This brightens the skin, which Mansfield says can give it an effect similar to that of a laser treatment or even a face lift. Turn

to

Mansfield/6

Carissa Irene Baker and Wesley Robert Fallan, both of London, were married June 10 in St. Helena, Napa County, Calif. Kurt Hansen officiated at the 3 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mark Baker and Tawny Baker of Port Angeles. The groom is the son of Peter and Lorainne Fallan of London. Cynthia Baker, the bride’s sister, was maid of honor, and Kristie Baker, Jamie Kirk and Carlia Foot were bridesmaids. Tyran Fallan, the Don and Bobbie Thompson on their wedding day. groom’s brother, was best man, and Alex Bone, Joseph Phillips and Mark Kitchen were groomsmen. Krissy Marvelle, Calista Baker and Charlotte Foot were flower girls, and Carissa and Caleb Baker was ringbearer. Friends and family from nine countries flew in for the wedding. The bride graduated from Crescent High School in 2000, Central Washington University in 2004 and Roehampton University, London, in 2009. She is selfemployed.

Wesley Fallan The groom graduated from Forest School in 1997 and from Nottingham University in 2000. He is employed by Lloyds Bank. The couple honeymooned in Peru, Venezuela and the Turks and Caicos islands. They live in London.

Marriage Licenses Clallam County

Bobbie and Don Thompson today.

The Thompsons Don and Bobbie Thompson of Port Angeles will celebrate their 65th anniversary with family at Christmas. Don Thompson married Bobbie Lindberg on Dec. 2, 1945, in Port Angeles. Mr. Thompson worked for the city of Port Angeles, and Mrs. Thompson worked in retail. They were both born and raised in Port Angeles. The couple’s family includes Diane Kirk of Olympia, and Garry Thompson, Dona Smasal and Brenda Tassie, all of Port Angeles. They also have 10 grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren.

Leigh Bryant; both 21, and both of Sequim. Amos David Charles, 55, of Bellingham, Alberto Villana Roldan, 26, and and Johanna Frances Bowechop, 47, of Esperansa Marie Avila, 25; both of Forks. Port Angeles. Christina Marie West, 48, of Olympia, Jefferson County and Michael Ralph Schrock, 46, of Sequim. Beverly Jean Gaunlett, 84, of Port Dorothy Jane Parsell, 49, of Sequim, Hadlock, and William Orland Gruber, 90, and Frankie Dean Shea, 38, of Nordland. of Port Townsend. Brandy Joy James, 24, and Gery Adrienne Marie Gentle, 47, and Edward Thorne Jr., 26; both of Port Richard Ross Thomas, 52; both of Allyn. Angeles. Kristy Leigh Anderson, 31, and Ren Adam Lucas Dakota Hoenack and Cori Eugene Malin, 25; both of Port Ludlow.

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

Peninsula Daily News


6

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Mansfield: 70% of her work is corrective Meagan Myrick has her eyebrows done by her mother, permanent-makeup artist Tonni Mansfield.

Continued from 5 Aside from the fact that permanent makeup is easier than plastic surgery, it’s considerably less costly: Eyeliner ranges from $200 to $375, lip liner $325 to $425, cheeks with blush are $350 and eyebrow design is $275. Prices are lower for corrective work on existing eyeliner or eyebrows. Concealing a scar or other mark starts at $50 per session, depending on the size of the mark. “I’ve seen a lot of people with scarring from laser treatments,” Mansfield says. “Seventy percent of what I do is corrective work,” as in fixing the effects of the old-style pigments containing iron Mansfield says. oxide. “You really need to be confident,” she says. Which is why she chose to earn Iron-oxide free her instructor’s certificaMansfield uses only iron tion. oxide-free pigments; they Shara Smith, owner of last three to five years the Hair School in Port before needing a touch-up, Angeles for the past 30 she said. years, has long been Yet giving a woman the impressed by Mansfield’s look she wants — enhancwork ethic. ing rather than changing After attending the Hair her natural features — School, “she went for every takes more than just the advanced certification right color. It takes careful that’s available,” Smith design and focus, said. “She just has really

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daughter, Meagan; they moved together back to Mansfield’s home town. While Meagan was still a teenager, she and her mother enrolled in the Hair School, and then went on to the Hair Academy in Port Hadlock. Once licensed, both women started out cutting hair at Patti’s Hair Design at Peabody and Front streets in Port Angeles. For Mansfield, this was a new experience. She’d always worked with men and had male bosses. “I thought, how am I going to Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Woman work with a bunch of women,” in the close quarhigh standards. What I Mansfield jumped at the ters of a hair salon? “It worked out really admire about her most is chance to take part, Smith well,” Mansfield said, addshe just doesn’t take any said. ing that she and Meagan short cuts. That’s outstandcomplemented each other ing in this business.” Construction, casinos at Patti’s. Mansfield is a woman of Mansfield, 46, has “She’s a better hair cutintegrity who believes in worked in many industries, ter than I am,” Mansfield sharing her talents with starting with construction said. “I would refer my others who have had a when she was a teenager. long-haired clients to her, rough time, Smith adds. Her family moved from and she would send her Port Angeles to South Lake short-haired clients to me, Random kindness Tahoe, Calif., before she since I did more short-andEvery spring at the Hair could finish high school, sassy cuts.” School, Smith holds a “ran- and she spent the next 17 Meagan, 21, still works dom acts of kindness” day, years putting together at Patti’s, and has built up in which stylists give free blueprints and house plans a clientele in her three haircuts all day to women for building projects. She years at the salon. from the Rose House and also worked as a waitress Mansfield, meanwhile, homeless youth from the in the gambling casino was interested in skin Dream Center — an averindustry just across the treatments as well as hairage of 200 people on the Nevada border. cuts and color. She’s also earned her esthetician cerone day, for the past 12 Divorce disrupted her tification along with her years. life and the life of her

Permanent makeup allows her to work with a variety of clients: men who want their tattoos gone; older women who have trouble seeing well enough to apply cosmetics; cancer survivors for whom a little color enhancement lifts the spirits. Camille Frazier of Port Angeles is one such client who came to Mansfield where she now works at Hair Connections, 2937 E. U.S. Highway 101 in Port Angeles. Frazier had Mansfield apply permanent eyeliner: just a thin line, after she lost her eyelashes during treatment for breast cancer. Turn

to

Mansfield/7

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cosmetology license. “I’m artistic, and I’m meticulous; that’s a good thing in this business,” she says. All of it came together when Mansfield realized she could also earn a teaching certificate from the American Institute of Intradermal Cosmetics. The Arlington, Texas, institute offers a two-year program for cosmetologists who want to add permanent makeup to their repertoires — and Mansfield knew this was the program for her.

PERMANENT COSMETIC MAKE-UP


Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Lavin: Advice

Where to reach her TONNI MANSFIELD can be reached at Hair Connections, 2937 E. U.S. Highway 101 near the Blue Flame restaurant; the salon phone numbers are 360-452-8804 and 360-477-6607. Hairstylist Meagan Myrick can be reached at Patti’s Hair Design, 330 E. First St.; her phone numbers are 360-457-1131 and 360-477-7655. Peninsula Woman

Continued from 2 after we “give up,” so I have high hopes for Annie! But Internet “dating” I’m not surprised to often leads to disappointhear that you find many women who agree with you ment. It requires a thick skin, perseverance and because women complaindetermination not to settle ing about men is not new. for less than what you’re Many women have looking for. invested a great deal of I’ve met three women time and energy in this practice. In many cases, it’s who’ve met their husbands on the Internet — but I a habit passed down have a very large social cirthrough generations. cle. I invite you to consider One told me that it took a new possibility: that a a year, and she met hunman can be a great partdreds of men before she ner, that you can have it all, that you can take your found the one she married. She met two or three men pleasure and have your every week. way with the world at 43 or whatever age you are. ________ Don’t take my word for Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales it. Pick up Regena Thomfrom the Front at her home office ashauer’s Mama Gena’s in Arizona, where she writes a School of the Womanly blog at www.talesfromthefront. com. Arts. Give it a quick read, Her column appears weekly in and do the exercises. Peninsula Woman. At any age, in any stage, go on. Be fabulous. Why deny the rest of the world the glory of your pleasure?

Mansfield:

‘Really patient’ Continued from 6 “I’ve had people fall asleep on my table,” she said. For Mansfield, 2010 has “She was really patient been a year of new beginwith me; she went real nings both personal and slow,” Frazier said. professional. She married With the new look, “I Jim Mansfield in July — get compliments all the “that would be the No. 1 time.” And Mansfield “is really highlight” of the year — and she got her intradergood at explaining everymal cosmetics instructor’s thing,” as she designs the license in October. line and then applies it. Another high point “It’s not that it hurts,” Frazier said. The sensation, came when she did a cominstead, is “just annoying.” plete facial makeover for Donna Knifsend, herself in the midst of making a Pain threshold whole set of changes in her Everyone’s pain thresh- life. old is different, Mansfield “She is an artist,” Knifsaid: She did her own eyesend said of Mansfield, and brows without anesthetic, “very dedicated.” while Meagan needed In the new year, Mansplenty of the stuff for hers. field plans to organize Most people are at least a classes for cosmetologists little fearful that it’s going who want to learn permato hurt, so they have trounent makeup, as well as ble relaxing. All underone-on-one training. She standable, Mansfield says. already has two students Then there are those planning to start their who have no qualms at all. studies in February.

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

Tonni Mansfield designs her daughter Meagan Myrick’s permanent eyebrow makeup. “When I do something, I give it my all,” Mansfield says. The artistic aspect of permanent cosmetics, combined with the opportunity to use her gifts to help people feel more self-confident, make this work her passion.

You Can Count on Me!

Jamie

Meanwhile Meagan, over at Patti’s, also knows the effect her handiwork can have. The best part about doing hair, she said, is simple: “Making people feel better.”

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Wife must ask husband for help to get it DEAR JOHN: MY husband is a good guy, but there are times when I need his help and he seems completely oblivious. Is he being selfish or does he not care about my needs anymore? We both work full time and are talking about starting a family. If I can’t get more help from him, my life will really be unmanageable once we have kids to care for as well. — Needing Help in Oak Park, Ill. Dear Needing Help: If you are not getting the support you want in your relationship, there is a strong possibility that you don’t ask enough or that you are asking in a way that simply does not work. You should not interpret that failure as a sign to stop asking. In truth, feeling free to ask for love and support is essential to the success of any relationship. But remember this: If you want to G-E-T what you want, then you must

Mars vs.

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________ John Gray is the author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus. If you have a question, write to John in care of this newspaper or by e-mail at: comments@mars venusliving.com.

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