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Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

November 20, 2011

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Strangulation-murder trial held up by probe

PENINSULA

Diane Urbani

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The trial of a Port Angeles man accused of strangling a developmentally disabled woman to death last month has been postponed. Kevin A. Bradfield, 22, is charged with second-degree murder in the death of Jennifer Pimentel, 27. He was originally scheduled to go to trial Dec. 5. A new trial date is expected to be set at a status hearing at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 2. In a brief status hearing Friday, attorneys told Clallam County Superior Court Judge Ken Williams that a trial won’t be possible in two weeks

because the investigation is ongoing. “We still have reports and parts of the investigation coming in,” Deputy Prose- Bradfield c u t i n g Attorney Ann Lundwall said. The Port Angeles Police Department led a multi-agency search for evidence at the bottom of Port Angeles Harbor on Tuesday. Lundwall said some of the evidence has been sent to a State Patrol crime lab, and it isn’t clear when the lab tests will be finished.

Bradfield and his girlfriend, Kendell K. Huether, led authorities to Pimentel’s body in a heavily wooded area near the Hood Canal Bridge in East Jefferson County on Oct. 19. Police alleged that Bradfield strangled Pimentel as she pleaded for her life Oct. 9. Lundwall added an exceptional sentence to the seconddegree murder charge because Pimentel was “particularly vulnerable or incapable of resistance.” The exceptional sentence means Bradfield faces a maximum of life in prison — as well as a $50,000 fine — instead of the 10 to 18 years he would have faced. Huether, 25, is charged with

first-degree rendering criminal assistance. Court papers allege that Huether stood idly by as her childhood friend was being strangled and that she helped Bradfield dispose of Pimentel’s body. Pimentel had been staying at Huether’s residence on Lauridsen Boulevard. Bradfield was being held in the Clallam County jail Friday on $1 million bond. Huether was being held on $100,000 bond. Lundwall filed a plea offer in Huether’s case Thursday. Defense attorneys have not filed a response. Huether faces a maximum of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

Millions of festive Array along U.S. 101 biggest on Peninsula

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

‘Revolutionize this’ by Diane Urbani

De la

for Peninsula Woman

Paz

W

ith two hands and her whole heart, Kia Armstrong takes on the big problems — by homing in on her immediate surroundings. Back East in college, it was the prison-industrial complex. And out here on the North Olympic Peninsula, it’s homeland security via local-food supply. And then there’s that work-life balance thing. Armstrong, at 31, has already lived lots of life. Born in southern Maine, she went off to Ithaca College in New York to study organizational communication. But “Ithaca has a phenomenal politics department,” she recalls. Armstrong dived in to various causes, such as the way the college’s food-service company was heavily invested in the private prison industry. She left school to keep working for change; eventually the food company divested. Meantime Armstrong waited tables to pay her bills and to save up enough to take an open-ended road trip across the United States. She had a thing for the West, for the high mountains — and after three months of traveling, found herself on the south fork of the Hoh River. She met friends who introduced her to the rest of the wonderland called

Something new

By Rob Ollikainen

De la

Kia Armstrong: Organic produce manager promotes North Olympic Peninsula’s year-round bounty

Organic from the source The newly expanded Nash’s Farm Store offers a full-service grocery — including free-range, organic turkeys, pork and Dungeness Valley produce — along with a lending library of books and DVDs about healthy living at 4681 Sequim-Dungeness Way. Nash’s produce is also available, thanks to manager Kia Armstrong and crew, at Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Farmers’ markets with produce from Nash’s and many other local growers include: ■ The Port Angeles market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays at The Gateway pavilion at Front and Lincoln streets; ■ Sequim’s winter Open Aire Market from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at Second Avenue and Cedar Street in downtown Sequim. For information, phone Nash’s Farm Store at 360-683-4642 or see NashsOrganicProduce.com. ■ In East Jefferson County, Nash’s produce outlets include the Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., Port Townsend. Peninsula Woman Olympic National Park. From that point forward, she went on a hike every week. “That was,” she recalls, “one of the best years of my life.” She got a house-sitting gig off Taylor Cutoff Road west of Sequim and a job waitressing at Petals, then the restaurant surrounded by Cedarbrook Lavender and Herb Farm. Armstrong turned 23 in February 2003, and she recalls thinking that this would be a turning point.

PENINSULA WOMAN has been expanded to a full-sized section from its original tabloid format. The larger page size allows for more features, ideas and inspiration related to

“I didn’t know what the year would bring,” she says now. She just knew that she was where she wanted to be.

The farm and store Around this time, Armstrong heard about Nash’s Organic Produce, the farm and the little store in Dungeness. She began shopping for vegetables there, got to know the manager, and one day was offered a job in the store. But after years of waitressing, Armstrong was a bit burned out on retail.

the North Olympic Peninsula’s only publication devoted solely to achievement and accomplishment among women. In addition to the regular Peninsula Woman columns and fixtures, we’ll be

When she saw a man carrying an armload of fresh produce into the farm store, she thought: That’s what I want to do. “Show up tomorrow morning at 5:30,” the manager told Armstrong. “You’re on the harvest crew.” Thus began the foundation for the next phase of her life. “I’ve always been a hard worker,” she said. But field labor “took it to a whole new level. All I did was pack at first,” which meant chasing after the harvesters, trying to box everything they picked. “They would just fly,” she remembers. Saturday mornings, Armstrong brought those vegetables into town, to the Port Angeles Farmers Market, the year-round, all-weather outlet for produce grown on the North Olympic Peninsula. At her market stand, Armstrong learned how to talk fresh food. She also learned the art of the cooking demonstration — and to this day, she loves to get out there with her skillet. “When you realize how easy stir-fry is, it changes your life,” Armstrong says. Ask what’s good right now, and she brightens even more: “We have gorgeous leeks, and delicata squash. You can sear up some Brussels sprouts, and at the very end, add some parsnips,” for ultimate flavor. Turn

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adding additional features in the next few weeks. Reader swuggestions are always welcome and can be sent to news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Peninsula Woman).

Peninsula Woman for Sunday, November 20, 2011 ■ Peninsula Daily news

Something new CHANGES IN YOUR Sunday Peninsula Daily News today: ■  Peninsula Woman switches from a tabloid format to a full-size section, allowing for more features and larger photographs, among other improvements. ■  Sports today appears on Pages B8-B10, including a report on Neah Bay’s victory over Lummi to move on in the state football playoffs. ■  Business, Politics and Environment today appears on Pages B11-14, including a report on a farm store opening.

Inside today

LiGHTS U

By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

BLYN — When the holiday season rolls around, it’s easily the biggest light show on the North Olympic Peninsula. Jerry Allen, 7 Cedars ALSO . . . Casino general manager, ■ Video on calls the lights of Blyn the Blyn the Jamestown lights: www. S’Klallam tribe’s “givepeninsula back to the community.” dailynews.com Six years ago, the tribe used about 35,000 lights to deck the casino and tribal offices. Today, the tribe’s Northwest nativestyle buildings are covered in about 1.5 million multicolored Christmas lights that glitter and glow along both sides of U.S. Highway 101. Visitors can get a better view of it by pulling over at the tribe’s Blyn rest stop on Highway 101 between Sequim and Port Townsend and walking around for photos.

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

Patrick Walker, responsible for more than a million holiday lights at the Jamestown S’Klallam village in Blyn Turn to Lights/A4 along U.S. Highway 101, stands in front of his original light show at 7 Cedars Casino.

Sequim policeman planning to scale peak in memorium

Sequim Police Officer Norman Simons wears a 40-pound pack over his shoulders while climbing steps in the gym at Clallam County Fire District No. 3’s station on North Fifth Avenue in Sequim after work Thursday night.

By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — At 58, Sequim Police Officer Norman Simons is as fit as a man half his age, and he hopes that will help him scale Cerro Aconcagua in Argentina, the highest mountain in the Western Hemisphere. Simons, a Port Angeles resident and law enforcement veteran of 33 years who is filling in for a Sequim officer on a military tour of Afghanistan, is one of eight lawmen in an

elite mountain-climbing team culled from throughout the nation that is called Cops on Top. Together, they plan to ascend Cerro Aconcagua in January to honor fallen Officer Jonathan Schmidt of the Trumann, Ark., Police Department. Schmidt was shot and killed April 12 when he pushed another officer out of the line of fire before he was fatally wounded. “We come from all over the country to support a fellow police officer and his family. It epitomizes

the climbing together for one officer and his family,” Simons said. “We will take a plaque of the officer to the top, photograph it and take it to the family,” he said. “It’s emotional healing for the family. It’s a pretty powerful healing tool.” Simons is a retired special agent with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and has served as a National Park Service ranger. Turn

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UpFront

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

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Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). ■  See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Regis feels ‘pretty good’ about exit REGIS PHILBIN SAID fans have told him he makes them happy every morning. “I’m glad I did that,” he said, “’cause it made me happy.” But his decades of regular vis- Philbin its with viewers ended Friday, when he stepped down from the New York-based show he has co-hosted for 28 years. “I feel pretty good,” he told reporters after Thursday’s edition of “Live! With Regis and Kelly.” But he noted that he may not feel that good this week. “I wasn’t looking forward to this moment,” said Philbin, who announced his decision to leave the syndicated show and try new things last January. “You never are in your life when you’re leaving a success that you worked your tail off to make.” The 80-year-old Philbin will now embark on a book tour for his new memoir, How I Got This Way. That’s fortunate, he said.

The Associated Press

Celebration

of

Dreams

Actresses Naya Rivera from the television show “Glee” performs at the 10th annual Celebration of Dreams in Santa Barbara, Calif., on Friday. It’ll take his mind off how he might be feeling Monday when “Live! With Kelly” goes on the air without him. His book tour will have taken him to Miami then. “I’ll probably watch the show from my hotel room,” he said, “and I’ll feel, ‘Omigod, it’s so far away.’ Maybe it’ll be better that I’m watching it from down there.” Jerry Seinfeld will join

Kelly Ripa on Monday as the first of a series of guest co-hosts. A permanent replacement will be named later. Joining Philbin in the studio for the press conference, Ripa said her new partner would necessarily have a different style and forge a different dynamic with her than she has enjoyed with Reege since joining “Live!” in 2001.

LAST NIGHT’S LOTTERY results are available on a timely basis by phoning, toll-free, 800-545-7510 or on the Internet at www. walottery.com/Winning Numbers.

Stronger 

The same 

Weaker 

19.6% 15.9% 59.8%

Undecided  4.8% Total votes cast: 1,154

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

By The Associated Press

Lottery

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Do you think labor unions in the future will become stronger than they are now, the same as now or weaker than they are now?

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

Passings WALT HAZZARD, 69, the former UCLA and Seattle Sonics star who played on the Bruins’ first NCAA championship basketball team in 1964 and later coached the team for four seasons in the 1980s, died Friday in Los Angeles. Mr. Hazzard’s family said he had been recuperating for a long time from complications following heart Mr. Hazzard surgery. The in 1964 school said Mr. Hazzard died at UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center. He had a stroke in March 1996 and made a strong recovery but became less publicly active. Mr. Hazzard was co-captain of the 1964 national title team that went 30-0 under coach John Wooden. He averaged a career-high 18.6 points as a senior playmaking guard. He was chosen college

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

basketball’s player of the year, having averaged 19.8 points in the NCAA tournament, where he was selected as the most valuable player. As a junior, Mr. Hazzard led the Bruins with a 16.3 scoring average and they won 20 games for the first time since 1957. In his sophomore season, he averaged 13.2 points, and the Bruins reached the Final Four for the first time in school history, losing by two points to eventual national champion Cincinnati in the semifinals. Mr. Hazzard transferred to UCLA after spending one season at Santa Monica College. In 1996, UCLA retired his No. 42 jersey. Mr. Hazzard helped the U.S. win a gold medal at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics and played 10 years in the NBA, including a stint with the

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots ON A THURSDAY morning on Sequim Avenue, an SUV with snow piled on the hood going north and a pickup truck with a surfboard going south . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Los Angeles Lakers, who made him the No. 1 overall Setting it Straight pick. Corrections and clarifications He also played for ■  The deadline for applications for the North Olympic Atlanta, Buffalo and Golden Peninsula Soroptimist International of the Americas VioState. let Richardson Award is Dec. 1. An item Thursday on Page B4 erroneously said the deadline for applications for the award is Dec. 15. Laugh Lines Another award offered, the Women’s Opportunity Award, has the deadline of Dec. 15 for applications. FACEBOOK IS HIRING. Good luck finding _________ workers who aren’t going The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairto mess around all day on ness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to Facebook. clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417Conan O’Brien 3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

the homemade catamaran Bert Sturdevant, consta- Usumacinta had a tough ble for the Port Angeles pre- time breaching their tiny cinct, died at Davidson and craft through the rocks Hay Hospital after a linger- around Tongue Point, but their destination is still ing illness. Born in Stanwood, Iowa, Mexico. The 20-foot, twin-hulled in 1884, Sturdevant came to Port Angeles in 1906 and sailer slipped out of Port Angeles Harbor two days opened the Sturdevant shingle mill in Eden Valley. ago and sailed west to Tongue Point, where the He married Hannah boat landed in rough Donahue in 1911, and the couple moved to Port Ange- weather. The port hull sufles where he was boom man fered a hole from a rock. at the Charles Nelson mill After spending the night until its closing in 1929. in the cooking shelter at Following a stint at Salt Creek Recreation CenOlympic Forest Products ter, the crew members Co., he was elected constamade repairs yesterday and ble in 1934 and held that got under way today. position until his death. Their destination is the Usumacinta River on Mexi1961 (50 years ago) co’s Yucatan Peninsula on a voyage that takes them Four crew members of

through the Panama Canal.

1986 (25 years ago) Reversing an earlier decision, the Port Angeles Planning Commission voted to recommend that the City Council approve building more fish pens on the south side of Ediz Hook. The re-vote came after sports fishermen dropped their objections to the project by Sea Farm of Norway after the company agreed to place the operation next to existing pens, rather than over a prime fishing spot. Sea Farm currently employs 19 people, including 13 from Port Angeles, and has an annual payroll of about $400,000.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Nov. 20, the 324th day of 2011. There are 41 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Nov. 20, 1789, New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill of Rights. On this date: ■  In 1620, Peregrine White was born aboard the Mayflower in Massachusetts Bay; he was the first child born of English parents in present-day New England. ■  In 1910, the Mexican Revolution of 1910 had its beginnings under the Plan of San Luis Potosi issued by Francisco I. Madero. ■  In 1911, “Das Lied von der Erde” (“The Song of the Earth”) by

Gustav Mahler was first performed in Munich, Germany, six months after the composer’s death. ■  In 1929, the radio program “The Rise of the Goldbergs” debuted on the NBC Blue Network. ■  In 1947, Britain’s future queen, Princess Elizabeth, married Philip Mountbatten, Duke of Edinburgh, at Westminster Abbey. ■  In 1959, the United Nations issued its Declaration of the Rights of the Child. ■  In 1967, the U.S. Census Bureau’s Population Clock at the Commerce Department ticked past 200 million. ■  In 1969, the Nixon administration announced a halt to resi-

dential use of the pesticide DDT as part of a total phaseout. A group of American Indian activists began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay. ■  In 1975, after nearly four decades of absolute rule, Spain’s General Francisco Franco died two weeks before his 83rd birthday. ■  In 1985, the first version of Microsoft’s Windows operating system, Windows 1.0, was officially released. ■  Ten years ago: The alliance controlling Afghanistan’s capital and much of its countryside agreed to attend power-sharing talks in Germany the following week. Federal health officials

approved sale of the world’s first contraceptive patch, Ortho Evra. ■  Five years ago: After a firestorm of criticism, News Corp. said it had canceled the O.J. Simpson book and TV special “If I Did It,” in which Simpson was to speak hypothetically about how he would have committed the 1994 slayings of his ex-wife and her friend. The book was later brought out by a different publisher. ■  One year ago: In comments released by the Vatican, Pope Benedict XVI opened the door on the previously taboo subject of condoms as a way to fight HIV, saying male prostitutes who used condoms might be beginning to act responsibly.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, November 20, 2011

PAGE

A3

Second Front Page

Briefly: Nation

Wood case re-probed; contradictions abound By Anthony McCartney The Associated Press

The Associated Press

A firefighter tries to save an outbuilding as a house burns in a 400-acre brush fire in south Reno, Nev., on Friday.

Power lines likely caused Reno fire RENO, Nev. — Fire investigators in Reno said arcing power lines likely caused the wind-fueled wildfire that destroyed 15 homes and damaged at least 40 more. Reno Fire Chief Mike Hernandez said Saturday the 2,000acre fire was 65 percent contained. The nearly 10,000 people who were evacuated Friday can start to return to their homes, Hernandez said. Hernandez said there’s no official cause yet, but all signs point to the power lines. He said investigators ruled out the possibility that teenage partiers or a homeless campfire

was to blame.

Today’s news shows WASHINGTON — Guest lineups for today’s TV news shows: ■  ABC’s “This Week” — Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Chris Coons, D-Del.; Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. ■  NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Sens. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., and John Murray Kerry, D-Mass. ■  CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Sens. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., and Joe Manchin, D-W.Va.; Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul. ■  CNN’s “State of the Union” — Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash.; former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. ■  “Fox News Sunday” — Reps. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, and Xavier Becerra, D-Calif.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Gadhafi’s son captured in southern Libya

trade route in the world. Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao offered a measured response after 16 of the 18 leaders attending a major Asian summit raised the issue of maritime security, primarily on the South China ZINTAN, Libya — Moammar Sea. Gadhafi’s former heir apparent The topic has been a thorny Seif al-Islam was captured by issue, with China laying claim to revolutionary fighters in the all of the sea, while several southern desert Saturday just Southeast Asian nations claim over a month after his father parts of it. was killed, setting off joyous celeThe U.S. official said Wen brations across Libya and closing seemed reluctant to discuss the the door on the possibility that dispute during a retreat by the the fugitive son could stoke furAsian leaders but responded ther insurrection. after President Barack Obama Seif al-Islam — who has raised it Saturday during a surundergone a transformation prise meeting on the sidelines of from a voice of reform in an the Asian summit. eccentric and reviled regime to one of Interpol’s most-wanted — Talks with U.S. now faces the prospect of trial KABUL, Afghanistan — Presbefore an international or Libident Hamid Karzai received a yan court to answer for the alleged crimes of his late father’s resounding endorsement Saturfour-decade rule over the oil-rich day from a traditional national assembly to negotiate a security North African nation. agreement that could keep a U.S. Seif al-Islam was detained military presence in Afghanistan about 30 miles west of the town of Obari in an area that borders past 2014, when most international forces are to have left. Niger, Mali and Algeria. The size of the force is subject He has been charged by the to negotiations, but a future deal International Criminal Court for could keep thousands of Americrimes against humanity. can troops here for years. The nonbinding resolution Disputed waters issued at the end of a Loya Jirga ABOARD AIR FORCE ONE assembly also suggested some — China signaled a gradual evo- conditions for the talks between lution toward resolving quarrels Afghan and American officials, with its Asian neighbors over including an end to unpopular disputed waters of the South night raids by military forces China Sea, a senior U.S. adminsearching for insurgents. istration official said Saturday, More than 2,000 people describing the development as attended the four-day meeting an encouraging step forward in of the assembly. easing tensions over the busiest The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Natalie Wood’s drowning death nearly 30 years ago came after a night of dinner, drinking and arguments, but the question remains: Was it anything more than a tragic accident? Conflicting versions of what happened on the yacht shared by Wood, her actor-husband Robert Wagner and their friend actor Christopher Walken have contributed to the mystery of how the actress died on Thanksgiving weekend in 1981. Two sheriff’s detectives are now diving into the mysterious events on the yacht Splendour, although whether they reach any different conclusions than their predecessors remains to be seen. They recently received new, seemingly credible information and heard from potential witnesses who weren’t included in the original investigation of Wood’s death, Sheriff’s Lt. John Corina said Friday.

Robert Wagner and Natalie Wood in 1980.

The Associated Press

Wood’s sister, Lana, was not on the boat but told CNN’s Piers Morgan on Friday that she has spoken with Davern many times and believes her sister did not fall off the boat. “I don’t think she fell, I don’t know if she was pushed, I don’t know whether there was an altercation and it happened accidentally, but she shouldn’t have died, and that does stay with me and hurt,” Lana Wood said. “I would prefer to always believe that RJ [Wagner] would never do anything to hurt Natalie Accidental, officially and that he loved her dearly, which But he said nothing has hap- he did, and I don’t believe that pened to change the official view whatever went on was deliberate. that Wood’s death was originally “I’ve always cared about him. I an accidental drowning. always will care about him.” Wagner, a veteran movie actor and star of TV’s “Hart to Hart” Skipper blames Wagner from 1979 to 1984, is not considThe skipper said on NBC’s ered a suspect, he added. Corina released few details “Today” on Friday that Wagner is about who investigators have con- to blame for the Oscar-nominated tacted or plan to re-interview, but actress’ death in the chilly waters the inquiry will certainly lead of Southern California in Novemthem to speak with the three sur- ber 1981 but didn’t offer many vivors of the trip — Wagner, specifics. For years he has maintained Walken and skipper Dennis Davthat he heard the famous couple ern.

arguing on the boat before Wood went missing and Wagner refusing to immediately search the waters nearby for his wife. Davern’s account is dramatically different from what he told investigators after Wood’s body was found in 1981, when no mention of an argument between the couple was made. The renewed investigation comes at a time when plenty of attention was sure to be focused on Wood, whose beauty and acting in films such as “West Side Story” and “Rebel Without a Cause” made her Hollywood royalty. Her death stunned the world, and CBS’s “48 Hours Mystery” has been looking into the case for a special that aired Saturday. Sheriff’s officials denied the renewed attention prompted their review, which could take months. “We’re not concerned with the anniversary date,” Corina said. “It may have jarred some other people’s memories.” Wagner said through a spokesman that his family trusts the sheriff’s department to conduct a fair investigation into Wood’s death.

The Associated Press

Egyptian riot police clash with protesters in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Saturday.

Police, protesters clash in Egypt The Associated Press

CAIRO — Egyptian riot police firing tear gas and rubber bullets stormed into Cairo’s Tahrir Square Saturday to dismantle a protest tent camp, setting off clashes that killed one protester, injured hundreds and raised tensions days before the first elections since Hosni Mubarak’s ouster. The scenes of protesters fighting with black-clad police forces were reminiscent of the 18-day uprising that forced an end to

Quick Read

Mubarak’s rule in February. Hundreds of protesters fought back, hurling stones and setting an armored police vehicle ablaze. Public anger has risen over the slow pace of reforms and apparent attempts by Egypt’s ruling generals to retain power over a future civilian government. Witnesses said the clashes began when riot police dismantled a small tent camp set up to commemorate the hundreds of protesters killed in the uprising and attacked around 200 peaceful

demonstrators who had camped in the square overnight in an attempt to restart a long-term sit-in there. Police fired rubber bullets, tear gas and beat protesters with batons, clearing the square at one point and pushing the fighting into surrounding side streets of downtown Cairo. A 23-year-old protester died from a gunshot, said Health Ministry official Mohammed el-Sherbeni. At least 676 people were injured, he said.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Airport tower ads seen as ticket to revenue

West: Pepper spray video triggers investigation by UC

World: Teen killed when police car hits oil slick

World: Man with U.S. passport blows himself up

OFFICIALS IN MEDFORD, Ore., have given the OK to place giant corporate logos on the control tower at the city’s airport. The City Council voted last week to amend the city code and allow 25-footby-25-foot signs on all four sides of the 100-foot-tall landmark. The tower’s ad space is expected to fetch $3,000 a month. Councilor Al Densmore said he would love to keep public buildings clear of advertising, but the money will help reduce landing fees, making the airport more attractive to new airlines. The planning commission had voted against the proposal last month.

THE CHANCELLOR OF the University of California, Davis, said Saturday that the school was launching an investigation after “chilling” video images surfaced online showing an officer using pepper spray on several protesters as they sit passively with their arms interlocked. “The use of the pepper spray as shown on the video is chilling to us all and raises many questions about how best to handle situations like this,” Chancellor Linda Katehi said in a message posted on the school’s website. A task force of faculty, students and staff will review the events surrounding the Friday protest and police response.

BAHRAINI AUTHORITIES SAID Saturday a police vehicle skidded on an oil slick poured by anti-government protesters, killing a teenage demonstrator in Manama. The death came days before international investigators were to release a report on the Shiite-led uprisings and the Sunni monarchy’s punishing crackdowns in the Gulf kingdom. An angry funeral procession for the 16-year-old was broken up by security forces firing tear gas in the latest sign of unwavering tensions after more than nine months of unrest. Bahrain’s majority Shiites want greater rights from the Sunni dynasty.

A SUSPECTED MILITANT who blew himself up in southern Pakistan during a raid by security forces was carrying a U.S. and a Pakistani passport, authorities said Saturday. According to a statement by Pakistan’s paramilitary Rangers, the man was identified as Saeed Abdul Salam. He detonated an explosive device Thursday when troops raided his apartment in the port city of Karachi. The U.S. Embassy could not immediately confirm the development. The Rangers’ statement said Salam had divorced his wife a month ago and was living with four children, who were unharmed.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, November 20, 2011 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Guilty plea likely in sales-tax fraud case By Paul Gottlieb Peninsula Daily News

QUILCENE — Rohn M. Rutledge will likely plead guilty in connection with the theft of at least $462,817 in sales tax proceeds generated at his closed Olympic Timber House and another restaurant he owns in Kingston, his lawyer said. It’s “a fair assumption” that Rutledge will plead guilty to one count of firstdegree theft and four counts of filing false or fraudulent

tax returns, Bainbridge Island attorney Steve Olsen said last week. “That’s my expectation,” Olsen said. Olsen said Rutledge may plead guilty at his arraignment on the charges at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 6 in Kitsap County Superior Court. The case focuses on the largest sales-tax fraud case in Jefferson, Clallam and Kitsap counties in at least 10 years and probably 20 years, a state Attorney General’s Office spokesman

said last week. Rutledge, who ran the businesses with his wife, Carin, also owns and operates the Dockside Bar & Grill in Suquamish. He did not return requests for comment left last week at the Suquamish eatery.

Allegations According to court records, Rutledge admitted to a Department of Revenue agent in 2010 that he deliberately falsified tax returns

filed with the agency. Rutledge allegedly said he wasn’t doing business at the Main Street Ale House in Kingston and at Olympic Timber House when he actually was, according to court records. “Rohn M. Rutledge stated he was struggling to meet expenses and filed ‘no business’ returns because he knew no way out of his dilemma,” a Department of Revenue agent said in court records. The agency was alerted

to the alleged fraud when they saw that Rutledge had advertised that the restaurants’ doors were open. He allegedly stole sales tax proceeds totaling $314,277 generated by the Ale House between July 2005 and June 2010 and $148,540 generated by the Olympic Timber House between July 2007 and June 2010. The Rutledges closed the Timber House in mid-October, leaving 14 employees without jobs and their final

paychecks, former restaurant manager Jim Marshall said last week. Their Sea Restaurants and Catering LLC of Indianola, doing business as Olympic Timber House restaurant, owes $12,272 in delinquent property taxes for 2010 and 2011, according to the Jefferson County Assessor’s Office.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

Lights: Installation has taken nearly two weeks Continued from A1 Patrick Walker’s light display installation has been going on for nearly two weeks and was completed Friday night when the last lights were switched on.

“It’s been something that’s grown with us for some time.”

Jerry Allen 7 Cedars Casino general manager

“My brother, Ron, has got great passion for this as Walker — whose excava- well.” tion, landscaping and Christmas lights company Holiday gift is based in Port Orchard — Jamestown S’Klallam figures the displays have grown to seven miles of Chairman Ron Allen has extension cords and at least publicly called the lights 100 miles of lights that he the tribe’s holiday gift to the carefully stores in large community. “Why do we do it? It’s trash cans stacked to the ceiling of a 24-foot-long because we feel good about the give-back on that,” Jerry trailer. He tows the trailer to Allen said. Blyn each year, along with The tribe has invested at two other pickup-truck- least $100,000 in lights and loads of lighting supplies equipment, and it costs and equipment. about $30,000 in labor to The spectacular display install each year, Jerry is known to slow nighttime Allen said. traffic that might otherwise Compliments from those zoom through the tribal vil- who appreciate the lights lage by Sequim Bay. Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News have “kept the energy “It’s been something going,” he said, and today, that’s grown with us for all the tribe’s buildings in lights burning have gone diode, or LED, energy-savsome time,” Jerry Allen Blyn are lit up like candles. down since the tribe began ing lights. Power costs to keep the converting to low-emitting said. Also decked out in lights

100 miles of lights

Patrick Walker, whose company has installed holiday season lights for the James­town S’Klallam tribe’s facilities from Blyn to Sequim to Dungeness in recent years, strings up lights about 20 feet up on the tribal offices above U.S. Highway 101 on Thursday. during the dark winter months are the buildings at the tribe’s Cedars at Dungeness 18-hole golf course, along with its bar and restaurant on Woodcock Road. The tribe’s medical clinic building on North Fifth Avenue in Sequim also is decorated by Walker’s lighting crews, who can have from two to 13 working on an installation.

Eight hours to wrap

Harbor area. “This is the biggest job I do every year,” Walker said Thursday. He was taking a break from placing lights on the trim of the tribal center while Scott Reynolds, who is normally a medical technician, worked the controls in the basket of a cherry picker about 20 feet up. Walker started putting up Christmas lights with his father in the landscaping off-season when he was 10. He said he services about 100 accounts — from homes to shopping centers to car dealerships — beginning in October. “When I first started this for the tribe, I only did the casino and five maple trees and the lights on the community center,” said Walker, now 30. “Now I am told I am going to die here,” he joked.

One of the maple trees fronting the casino can take ________ eight hours to wrap in lights. Sequim-Dungeness Valley EdiJerry Allen approached tor Jeff Chew can be reached at Walker after seeing some 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ of his work in the Gig peninsuladailynews.com.

Climb: Altitude sicknesses above 18,000 feet Continued from A1 He is an emergency medical technician and a former avalanche rescue instructor. He was tapped earlier this year to temporarily replace John Southard, who, along with fellow Sequim Police Officer Rick Larsen, was deployed to Afghanistan last summer for one year.

Greatest challenge Tackling Aconcagua in the Andes range is the greatest climbing challenge so far for Simons, who has been climbing mountains since high school.

At 22,841 feet, Aconcagua is the highest mountain outside Asia’s Himalayan mountain range. Simons’ mountainclimbing accomplishments include scaling Mount Kilimanjaro’s more than 19,000-foot elevation in Africa, Mount Rainier in Washington state, Mount Whitney and Mount Shasta in California, and several other mountains higher than 14,000 feet in Colorado’s Rockies.

Staying fit Simons does all he can to stay physically fit to conquer great heights. He runs and bikes long distances, climbs stairs and

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Jan. 8 to Feb. 4, Simons and his fellow Cops on Top officers have been conducting a fundraiser. They are selling blue bracelets that say “Cops on Top” on one side and “2012 Aconcagua” on the other. Each bracelet goes for a donation of $5 — $1 of which goes to Concerns of Police Survivors’ wilderness experience Outward Bound program. Outward Bound is designed for children of officers killed in the line of duty so they can experience the outdoors and be mentored through the trauma of Raising funds losing a mother or father. Simons has been setting To help support the expedition, planned from up displays about the expedition at Sequim shopping centers to generate donaHOME OF THE HAND TOSSED PIZZA tions and is talking locally to various civic groups. Donations can be made 1 Item Medium to Cops on Top, a nonprofit when you organization. purchase any Checks can be made out large or X-large specialty pizza to Cops on Top Inc. in care of the Aconcagua Memorial Fund, 6505 Logans Cove Place, Farmington, NM 87402. 417-1234 Local donors can contact 902 E. First St., Port Angeles Simons at 415-755-7267 or norm.simons220@sbc global.net or by mail at P.O. Box 1566, Port Angeles, WA Y O U R D I A B E T E S C A R E C E N T E R 98362. Simons said he already has contributed about $1,900 to his travel costs

works out at Clallam County Fire District No. 3’s North Fifth Avenue station gym in Sequim. Carrying a 45-pound vest over his shoulders, he climbs Klahhane Ridge in the Olympic Mountains south of Port Angeles. Now that there’s plenty of snow, he does cross-country skiing at Hurricane Ridge, a true full-body workout. He has logged his training in great detail since 1977, saying fitness is a lifestyle he takes seriously. “Climbing police officers are a little different than your normal police officers,” he said. “Training tends to be

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and about $1,000 toward climbing equipment. Upon his return in February, Simons will continue as a temporary Sequim police officer for five more months. He is uncertain where life will take him next. He received special permission from Police Chief Bill Dickinson to take the time off in January. The chief said that was no problem in light of the fact that few vacations leave his patrol squad short-staffed that time of year.

‘A noble program’ Dickinson called Cops on Top “a noble program.” “It creates a challenge for the individual officers and helps them accomplish something,” Dickinson said. “It helps them do good.” Simons has one last conquest on his list, however: Alaska’s Mount McKinley, a 20,320-foot peak. “I’ve skied around it but never climbed it,” he said. “I’ll see what happens when I get back from Aconcagua.” For more information about Cops on Top, visit www.copsontop.com.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, November 20, 2011

A5

Ex-Peninsula photographer Convicted back with Bhutan images PA woman seeks retrial

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Alongside the book Away Out Over Everything comes Between Heaven and Earth. M a r y Peck, the w o m a n behind both books, is a photographer whose habitat until last year was Peck the North Olympic Peninsula. Now she is back from a place where she found both similarity and inspiration: Bhutan. The landlocked Himalayan kingdom and the land beside the Salish Sea similar? Peck should know. She published Away Out Over Everything, a sweeping ode to the Elwha River and its hidden reaches, seven years ago. And this month, her Bhutan: Between Heaven and Earth was released, while Peck herself planned a return to her former hometown of Port Angeles for a talk on parallels.

By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Monday program Peck has invited a fellow student of the Olympic Peninsula, poet and nature writer Tim McNulty, to join her for a slide program and conversation at 7 p.m. Monday at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Admission is free, while copies of Peck’s newly published book will be available for purchase. Peck, who now lives in Santa Fe, N.M., made three trips to Bhutan between 1999 and 2005, staying for a total of six months. The place felt familiar to her in some senses: Bhutan is remote and mountainous, and the landscape is a powerful shaper of people’s lives. “One of the things that was really inspiring to me — one that’s directly related to the Peninsula — is how they have cared for their environment and how it’s so integrated to their way of life,” Peck said. The forests, birds and other creatures “are so abundant, so easy to see . . . there’s

Mary Peck

Mary Peck’s images of the Bhutanese people are part of a slide presentation the photographer, along with poet Tim McNulty, will give at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center on Monday evening. The talk and slide show will explore how Bhutan and the Olympic Peninsula, two beautiful and isolated places, share some similar challenges. a lack of automated things,” as in no gadgets nor power tools. “So the sounds you hear, when you’re in a village or walking along a trail — people talking, bird song, animal bells — are never complicated or muffled by the things we’ve become quite used to,” she said. “There are no airplanes flying over the countryside. So you hear the rivers run. You can hear a flock of birds take off.”

Protect environment At the fine arts center, Peck and McNulty will explore efforts to protect such parts of the natural world. McNulty has studied the environment from many angles.

He wrote an essay for Away Out Over Everything and is the author of 16 books, including Olympic National Park: A Natural History and the poetry collection In Blue Mountain Dusk. McNulty has not been to Bhutan, but as an admirer of Peck’s work, he’s learned that the small nation is now developing strategies to protect its biodiversity — while fostering ecotourism. “It’s a Buddhist culture, so it’s a little different,” McNulty said, adding, “I’m fascinated with the place.” Peck, for her part, said Bhutan is a place with “so many hopeful things.” It’s heartening for her to see that a country can care for its natural wonders — “and it’s possible without great affluence.”

It was important to Peck to give her first presentation on the new book here in Port Angeles, where she continues to have a community of friends. “To go so far away from home is possible when you know there are people supporting you and who know what you’re doing and why you’re doing it,” she said. “Besides the interesting parallel between the two projects, [the Olympic Peninsula] is a touchstone for me.” For information on Monday’s presentation and other activities at the fine arts center, visit www.PAFAC.org or phone 360-457-3532.

________

Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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Anderson said he doesn’t believe putting money into a bank account should qualify as money laundering. “In a legal sense, I think that’s overly broad and vague,” he said. Anderson also said he doesn’t believe there was enough evidence to support a theft conviction. “You don’t expect to win these motions, but you never know,” he said. If the case is not granted a retrial, Anderson said he would appeal both convictions. ________ Allison was convicted of Reporter Tom Callis can be stealing the funds by emp- reached at 360-417-3532 or at tying evidence bags con- tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. taining the money and com.

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Allison was placed into custody immediately after her conviction but has been out on a $10,000 bond since Oct. 24. She was the second former county employee convicted of stealing funds while on the job this year. The other, Catherine Betts, was sentenced to 12 years in prison in August for stealing between $617,467 and $793,595 in real estate excise tax proceeds between June 2003 and May 2009 while she worked as a cashier in the Treasurer’s Office. She is also required to pay $607,516 in restitution to the county. Authorities have said the thefts are not connected. None of the money from the cases was recovered.

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BRINNON — Olympic National Forest officials, in partnership with representatives from the Wild Fish Conservancy and the Hood Canal Coordinating Council, will host a public meeting at the Brinnon Community

Center, 306144 U.S. Highway 101 in Brinnon, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30. The meeting will focus on a proposed series of engineered log jam restoration projects designed to stabilize the river channel, reduce flooding and improve fish habitat in the

PORT ANGELES — A judge will decide next month whether Staci Allison, a former Clallam County Sheriff’s Office employee who was convicted of stealing $8,644 from the office’s evidence room, should have a retrial. A n e i g h t woman, f o u r- m a n jury found Allison, 41, guilty of f i r s t d e g r e e Allison theft and m o n e y laundering last month in Clallam County Superior Court. Her attorney, Ralph Anderson, is seeking a retrial for the money-laundering conviction, claiming the charge was not justified. He also plans to appeal the theft conviction, saying the evidence didn’t support the conviction. A hearing will be held Dec. 15 in Superior Court. Allison, who faces up to 10 years in prison, would be sentenced that day if the retrial motion is denied. A sentencing hearing, set for last Thursday was delayed so that Anderson’s motions could be heard.

er attorney, Ralph Anderson, is seeking a retrial for the money-laundering conviction, claiming the charge was not justified. He also plans to appeal the theft conviction, saying the evidence didn’t support the conviction.


PeninsulaNorthwest Tree theft suspect pleads not guilty A6

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, November 20, 2011

man charged with chopping timber that was made into prized musical instruments TACOMA — A Brinnon down federally protected pleaded not guilty to felony theft on Friday. Reid Johnston, 40, who was arraigned before a U.S. magistrate judge in Tacoma, had been indicted last week on charges of theft of federal property and damage to federal property for trees the government said he cut down in Olympic National Forest. Federal prosecutors said the stolen timber included an 8-foot diameter Douglas fir, estimated by the U.S. Suzie Bennett, above, and Christopher Thomas are among the Native Forest Service to be 300 American writers who will read poetry and short stories Tuesday during years old, as well as cedar an open-mic night at the Elwha Heritage Training Center in Port Angeles. and prized maple trees.

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“Certain of the maple trees that were stolen were cut into blocks and sold for the production of musical instruments, such as cellos and guitars,” a statement from the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. Johnston has acknowledged cutting down the trees but believed they were from his family’s 270 acres of private forest land in Brinnon, defense lawyer John Henry Browne said. Brinnon lies on the eastern edge of the 633,600-acre Olympic National Forest. The region’s forest boundaries have not changed since the 19th century, prosecutors said in a statement, and a spokeswoman for the office, Emily Langlie, said “no amount of money can replace” the trees taken. If convicted, Johnston faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

How’s the fishing? Matt Schubert reports. Fridays in

Peninsula Daily News

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Lower Elwha event feast of viewpoints By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — It will be an unusual open-mic night — with emphasis on “open.” Brenda Francis, a poet and a member of the Indian Voices writing group, wanted to lay out a feast before Thanksgiving — a feast of viewpoints. So Francis, the communications manager for the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe, got together with Suzie Bennett, another Indian Voices writer, and planned an open-mic night not only for Native American tribal members, but for the whole community. And so the microphone will be switched on at 6 p.m. Monday at the Elwha ­Klallam Heritage Training Center, 401 E. First St. in Port Angeles, “and we would like to hear from everyone,” Francis said. Admission is free for readers and listeners. “It will be a great opportunity for everyone to express how they feel about Thanksgiving and about the holidays in general,” Francis said. “It will be a good forum, a safe forum, to express true feelings.” Bennett, the manager of the Elwha heritage center, said she wants to hold more

such events at the facility. “I’m really excited for it,” Bennett said of Monday’s open mic. To anyone who feels uncertain about taking part, she added: “Come and see that we’re very laidback. “And we’re totally supportive of anyone who wants to come and read.” Bennett, who is known for irreverence in her prose, wrote a Thanksgiving piece that speaks to oppression — and it’s not necessarily about herself. “I’m much better at developing characters,” she said, “and writing from their point of view.” And sometimes, while writing, she has “no control over what comes out. The story creates itself.”

Variety of views

“There are many different views and feelings that surround the Thanksgiving Day holiday for Native Americans, and we want to have a forum where people can share their feelings on this day,” Francis said. “I think you’ll get all types of emotions,” from gratitude to defiance to humor, she added. “I know for myself personally, Thanksgiving in our family is really important. We say a prayer, and then we go around the table and we all say what we’re thankful for.” But Francis also knows people who think Thanksgiving shouldn’t be celebrated at all. “One of my family members adores Thanksgiving,” Bennett added. Her own feelings are mixed — and not so adoring. “We’re looking forward,” however, “to hearing the voices of the community,” Bennett said. She expects the openmic night to run until about 8 p.m. For more information, phone the Elwha Heritage Training Center at 360417-8545.

What Bennett likes best about Monday’s preThanksgiving get-together is that it promises a variety of views. Brandan McCarty of the Makah tribe, Makah Executive Director Meri Parker and Christopher Thomas, a member of the Coeur d’Alene tribe, are among the Indian Voices writers ________ planning to read. Trent Crable, a Makah, Features Editor Diane Urbani and Juanita Edwards, a de la Paz can be reached at 360young member of the Elwha 417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com. tribe, will also step up.

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, November 20, 2011

A7

Quake upgraded near Omak Peninsula Daily News

OMAK — A Friday morning earthquake that shook the north-central portion of the state has been upgraded to a magnitude 4.6. The Pacific Northwest Seismic Network says it was upgraded from a 4.0 after a seismologist reviewed the data. The 5:09 a.m. quake— centered seven miles northwest of Omak, and eight miles northwest of Okanogan — was still described as light. That’s not how a former Port Angeles City Council

Not ‘normal’ swaying “This was not one of those ‘normal’ swaying, wave type movements like we experienced in Port Angeles in the Nisqually Quake of 2001,” Williams added. “It started as if there had been a big sonic boom or an explosion . . . The shaking then continued for a longer period and felt like you were

Shop talk

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member now living in Omak described it. The quake was “startling and immediate,” Larry Williams said in an email after the quake woke him up.

spree winner nets prizes

June Leise of Joyce, right, holds more than $1,800 worth of prizes while standing with Olympic Stationers owner Karen Reed at Olympic Stationers in Port Angeles on Tuesday. Leise won a $200 curling iron, a wine-themed serving tray and numerous gift certificates valued at more than $1,800 as part of the Holiday Extravaganza 2011 shopping spree. Eighteen Port Angeles merchants sponsored the shopping spree contest to spread the word on the diversity of shopping opportunities in town.

riding in a stiff-spring pickup truck while going too fast over a washboarded dirt road.” Williams, who grew up in San Jose, Calif., said that quakes are nothing new to him. “But I’ve never felt a quake hit as hard, rattle as bad, or scare me as much as this one.” A dispatcher in the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office, Sarah Gibson, said there were no reports of injuries or damage. It also was felt in Leavenworth, Tonasket, Chelan, Moses Lake and Colville.

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A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Coast Guard to be on Hood Canal to train Peninsula Daily News

SEATTLE — The Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit out of Bangor will conduct tactical, security and weapons training exercises on Hood Canal on Monday. The exercise will be from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. It will include boat tactics, security zone maintenance and weapons capabilities, the Coast Guard said. During the exercise, Maritime Force Protection personnel will fire blank rounds for weapons training. The blank rounds are not projectiles, and no person will have anything shot at them, but the live fire and blasts will mimic real engagement. “I doubt that the exercise will be in a location easily viewable by the public,” said Petty Officer Eric Chandler, Coast Guard spokesman. “They wouldn’t want to incite any kind of panic in people who didn’t know

that it was just a training.” Chandler said the Coast Guard doesn’t reveal the exact location of its security vessels to protect crews. The specific location of the exercise on Hood Canal could also change depending on the weather. Boats may be moving at high speeds during the exercise. The Coast Guard plans to set up a safety zone to ensure that no unauthorized boats wander into the training course unaware during those hours. “The Coast Guard will be making continuous announcements by VHF marine band radio to let people know there are vessels moving at high speeds and to be aware of increased activity,” Chandler said. “If, for whatever reason, a ship has its radio off, it will be approached by Coast Guard boats.” Marine mammal spotters will be on all Coast Guard vessels during the exercise, and if a marine mammal is spotted, the exercise will be stopped.

Peninsula Daily News

Park advocates fear deep cuts Olympic among 12 used to make case for funding Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Across-the-board cuts to national parks in 2012 could result in an eight-year low for funding for Olympic National Park, a park advocacy group said in a report that used 12 national parks as examples of the dangers of cuts in funding. The National Parks Conservation Association wrote in “Made in America: Investing in National Parks for Our Heritage and Our Economy” that Olympic National Park would be in the same situation it was in 2004 if additional cuts to the national park system are made to reduce the federal deficit. That year, the park cut its seasonal employees from 130 to 25, reduced the length of campground seasons, closed some entrance stations and backcountry trails, cut hours at visitor centers and had fewer law enforcement

patrols as it dealt with a $6 million shortfall. It also said it came close to having to close its Forks visitor center in 2005. In 2008, a funding increase allowed the park to extend its hours at visitor centers, add more staff and provide for more training for volunteers. But the report said maintenance funding for Olympic National Park is “still in short supply” and that the park relies heavily on $1.5 million in entrance fees annually for maintenance and repairs. A park spokesperson could not be reached for comment. Olympic National Park was one of 12 parks highlighted in the report, issued by the private foundation to make the case for avoiding more cuts to the National Park Service. The group said the parks featured in the 54-page report were chosen to represent “the breadth of the national park systemand the resource and staffing challenges facing so many areas within

the park system. “In highlighting these parks, we in no way intend to signal that these parks require more or less attention than others,” the foundation said. Friends of Olympic National Park President Larry Stetson said he could not comment because he had not viewed the report. The conservation association fears national parks could be subject to a 9 percent cut if Congress is unable to come up with a deficit reduction plan. It noted in its report released this month that funding for the National Park Service was reduced by nearly $140 million in 2011. Cuts equal or half that amount could be disastrous, the report said. For example, it said such cuts could result in the closure of campgrounds and visitor centers, law enforcement and ranger numbers would be reduced, monitoring of endangered species would suffer, and visitation, which helps local economies, would decline.

The report said $1 is added to the economy for every $4 invested in national parks. It also said that “the overall appropriation for the National Park Service is nearly $400 million (or 13 percent) less than it was 10 years ago.” Also featured in the report are Acadia National Park in Maine, Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico, Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia and North Carolina, Cumberland Gap National Historical Park in Kentucky and Tennessee, Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, Everglades National Park in Florida, Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee and North Carolina, Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area in Washington, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in Montana, Petersburg National Battlefield and Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park in Virginia. The report can be viewed at www.npca.org.

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Peninsula Daily News

(C) — Sunday, November 20, 2011

A9

Panel to mull transit plan Peninsula Daily News

The three Clallam County commissioners will consider adopting the six-year transportation plan after a public hearing Tuesday. The hearing will begin at 10:30 a.m. in the commissioners’ boardroom (160) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. In their 10 a.m. business meeting Tuesday, commissioners will consider the following: ■  Agreements with the state Department of Ecology for a site hazard assessment grant program and solid waste investigation, assistance and enforcement activities. ■  Agreements with the city of Port Angeles for arborist and archaeologist services. ■  A change order with C&J Excavating Inc. for the Clallam County Fairgrounds backflow prevention project. ■  A contract amendment with Berona Engineers Inc. extending an agreement through June 2012 for the Clallam County Courthouse and jail heating and airflow project. ■  Notice of Dec. 13 hearings on proposed amendments to county policies and county code.

Eye on Clallam The commissioners will meet in a work session Monday at 9 a.m. in the same boardroom to discuss several of the action items. At 9:40 a.m., county Engineer Ross Tyler will present his recommendations for winter storm services amid the county budget cuts. County Administrator Jim Jones will discuss the 2012 budget at 10 a.m. Monday.

Clallam Transit

Sequim School Board

The Clallam Transit board will conduct a public hearing on its 2012 budget at its monthly meeting Monday. The meeting will begin at 1 p.m. at the Clallam Transit System building at 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles. Action on the budget is anticipated at the December meeting. Another public hearing will be held Monday on proposed service improvements and efficiencies. Action is expected after the hearing. The board also will consider accepting an agreement with the city of Port Angeles related to The Gateway transit center project.

The Sequim School Board will discuss its search for a superintendent when it meets Monday. The board will meet for a 5 p.m. facilities workshop and a 7 p.m. regular meeting in its conference room at the historic Sequim High School, 503 N. Sequim Ave. It will consider approval of a school improvements plan at the 7 p.m. meeting. It will also consider policies regarding director districts, service animals in schools, enrollment and career and technical education when it meets Monday. Dave Ditlefsen, high school athletic director, will share a report on fall and

William Shore Memorial Pool commissioners will consider adopting the 2012 budget and the property tax levy for next year when they meet Tuesday. The meeting will be at 3 p.m. in the commissioners’ boardroom (160) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. The commissioners are expected to approve a budget with $1,660,250 in resources and $1,500,535 in expenditures. They are expected to refrain from authorizing the 1 percent levy increase allowed by state law. The collection of revenue in 2012 would be $468,000. Commissioners also will consider a contract with Peninsula College for client services and an amendment to the city of Port Angeles maintenance contract.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Pie

sale fundraiser

Jean Heikkila, left, and Viki Kocha, both of Port Angeles, set up part of a display of baked goods during a pie sale Saturday at Swain’s General Store in Port Angeles. The “Walk Around the Clock” Relay For Life team hosted the event as a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society.

Public utility district The Clallam County Public Utility District has canceled its Monday commissioners’ meeting. The next meeting will be held Dec. 5 at the PUD’s main office, 2431 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles.

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Other agenda items include: ■  A memorandum of commendation to Transit operator Jason McNickle for customer service. ■  Adoption of the 2012 board meeting schedule. ■  Ratification of a contract to purchase transit buses through LYNX. ■  Status updates. After the regular meeting, the Clallam Transit board will gather in an executive session for a performance evaluation of the general manager.

Fourth Quarter Catch Up Means Port Angeles Residents Get A Chance To Cash In On Their Old Car An Open Letter From Price Superstore:

Dear Neighbors, Here we are in the fourth quarter and 2011 is almost over. Every year businesses count on strong sales in the fourth quarter too. We call it the Fourth Quarter Catch Up. This year, we’ve got big goals but I’ve got a BIG PROBLEM! We’re running out of used cars and there’s no time to buy more. We need to find 56 additional used cars before the end of November in order to “catch up” and meet our goals for the year. I’m running out of ideas…so I need your help desperately. Will you sell your old car to me?

Here at Price Superstore we employ 32 people. Most of our team members have been with us for 5 years or more, and most of them have families. I have an obligation to take care of them. But I can’t do that without cars to sell. That’s why I’m in such a jam.

This whole problem started back in 2008. When the economy got in trouble, car companies slowed down production. Now, exactly three years Here’s what I’m proposing: later, there’s been a HUGE decline in bring in any and every car you have. If the number of three-year-old vehicles it’s really old, I still want it. If you’re still that we can normally buy at the auction. making payments, it doesn’t matter. If Plus, 2011 has been a record year for us, you’re upside down and owe more than so we���ve been selling cars faster than we it’s worth, let that be my problem. I need can get them. cars and I need them now. **Even if you owe $2,000 or $4,000 or $6,000 more than it’s worth, I still want it. **I’ll pay up to $4,000 more than appraised value for any car, running or not, paid off or not. It’s my Fourth Quarter Catch Up “Buy Back” Sale!

Past credit problems should not keep you from coming in. My For The People® Credit Approval Process was designed to help even the toughest customers get approved. Short sales, foreclosures, unpaid medical bills, late payments…not a problem! We want to help you find a loan that fits your budget. As an extra bonus, if you sell your old car to me this month, I’ll buy your family Thanksgiving dinner…as my way of saying thanks! Here at Price Superstore we believe that everybody deserves to drive a nicer, newer car. We’re on a mission to help everyone we can…but we need your help. Will you please help us out?

Now I have a real mess on my hands and this is the only solution I can Please call us at (360) 457-3333 think of. Will you help me? I promise I’ll to set an appointment or visit us in make it worth your while. person at Price Superstore, across from Frugals in Port Angeles. Of course, there’s no obligation to buy a car from me. But if it turns out Sincerely Yours, to be the right time, you’ll be able to use all the extra money you get for your old car to get the lowest possible payment on a nicer, newer car. Mark Ostroot Price Superstore 1B5139564

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, November 20, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A10

How to diet by eating more food I’VE TRIED SEVERAL diets over the past couple of years, not because I need to lose weight but because my pants are trying to cut me in two. I showed these defective W. Bruce pants to my Cameron wife, who suggested that perhaps it was an indication that I should drop a few pounds. “No, it isn’t,” I explained. OK, she said. If tight pants aren’t convincing enough, what about the fact that when I step on the scales, they make a sound like a falling elevator? “No,” I say. And what do the scales indicate is my actual weight, compared to the way it was, say, five years ago? “All the diet books say you shouldn’t check your weight all the time, that you should go by

how you feel. “And I feel great. I like walking around in my underpants. “Plus, look what happened to the housing market over the last five years — it went way up and then dropped. “So I’m not gaining weight, I’m just having what they call a bubble,” I say reasonably. What’s frustrating about this topic is not how wrong my wife is but that I actually have been trying several sure-fire, guaranteedto-work diets, some of which come from very reliable Internet ads. In fact, to ensure success, I’ve even modified the diets somewhat, customizing them to my specific needs. The Reduced-Calorie Diet: In my opinion, it has never been proven that food even has calories. When I bite into a hamburger, I see pickle and ketchup and bun and meat, but if there’s a calorie in there, it must be hidden. Hidden calories (meaning calories the body can’t see) cannot possibly cause you to gain weight.

Speaking Out

That’s my science-based analysis. But just to humor certain people to whom I am married, I calculated my caloric needs thusly: ■ I am a man who is over the age of 30. ■ I am very athletic (I watch both college and pro football). ■ I “eat emotionally,” which I promise you I read about somewhere. This means I need around 3,200 calories to maintain my ideal weight, so eating less will cause me to lose, like, 10 pounds a day. Here are the results: ■ Day 1: I calculate I ate 2,400 calories. ■ Day 2: 2,600 calories, plus a doughnut that was “off budget.” ■ Day 3: 4,500 calories. In other words, over a threeday period, I ate 100 calories less than I’m supposed to, but did I lose any weight? No. The Reduced-Calorie Diet is a complete sham. The Glutton Diet: This is actually one I developed in my own laboratory, though it is

simple enough for you to try at home and then just send me your fee. Basically, the theory is this: Your stomach is like an airplane, and the foods you eat are the passengers. As is true with most airlines, there is a tendency to overbook, particularly around the holidays. And what happens when they overbook? That’s right, you’re not getting on the airplane. Once you’ve surpassed your body’s capacity to absorb food, your body just issues credit vouchers, and the calories (yes, those again) are sent away. But what about standby, you ask? Simple ­— just keep filling up the plane, and eventually the calories will get frustrated and leave the airport. Let ’em take the bus. Results: Nutritionists will tell you that one of the biggest challenges in weight loss is to make sure people stick to their diets, so in that regard, this is a very effective program.

I’m thinking maybe a $100 sign-up fee, then $10 a month maintenance. The Vegetarian Diet: My sister does this one, and she’s a very crabby person. Enough said. Neutrino Diet: This is the one I’m currently trying. It turns out that billions of neutrinos bombard our bodies every day. They’re like little solar bullets. With all that lead pouring into us, what’s the point of even trying to lose weight? (Right, you can’t see them or feel them. See above about calories, wise guy.) What you should do instead is grab a doughnut and invest in a pair of pants with an elastic waist. It’s guaranteed to work!

________ W. Bruce Cameron is a nationally syndicated humor columnist. His column appears on this page every Sunday. Email Cameron at www. tinyurl.com/pdnbcameron.

What are you thankful for?

Robert Robertsen

Beth Jamieson

Richard Wiener

Angella Beavers

John Tilton

Barbara Morgan

Aaron Hodge

Jason Simons

Retired Clallam County Community Development director Port Angeles

Office manager Port Townsend

Innkeeper Port Townsend

Bartender Port Angeles

Retired farmer Lyre River

Ex-prep cook Sequim

“I’m thankful for living in the beauty of the Peninsula and taking advantage of the opportunities to be outdoors and in the mountains. There is always something to do.”

“I’m thankful for our country’s freedoms. For living in a special place like Port Townsend. It is a livable city for the semi-retired, with clean air [and] hardly any crime.”

“The Port Angeles Food Bank and other places that help out. I’ve gone there for food, and I have been volunteering lately. I’ve been putting together food baskets for Thanksgiving.”

Accountantcontroller Sequim

“I’ve a large group of newer friends. And I get to entertain them at my home. They’re all pinochle friends. We’re all old, and family is away, so I get to host Thanksgiving.”

“All the people that have been helpful. We’ve a 1-year-old, and we’ve had help from . . . Care Net. People have actually sought us out to help with clothing and diapers.”

Forest products harvester Forks

“For living here in the U.S. I’m an immigrant. I was born in Norway. Even though we have all these economic problems, I am thankful I live here.”

“That I have a job that keeps me fed and housed. I work for a waste company now. I’ve had the job for over a year. I lost my [other] job, as it was going to be outsourced to India.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices Ketchum memories Jay Ketchum is gone [“Businessman Jay Ketchum Found Dead. Sequim Man Shot Himself, Sheriff’s Office Concludes,” Nov. 13 PDN], but I knew him as a friend, a man who loved his wife, Jane; his daughter, Jenn; and his adorable grandchildren, Aspen and Hunter. One time I came home and found his crew cleaning my roof. They said it was a Christmas present for me from Jay and Jane. Another time, he cut down trees for me, and he cut up the wood and gave it to needy people. When trees blew down in a windstorm and blocked my driveway so I couldn’t get out, he was there in the blink of an eye to help me. I know that he did a lot for the community as well. He would take his crane and change the lights at

the high school, and I’m sure there are many other things he did without telling anyone. I don’t condone what he did or the events leading up to it, but now I choose to remember the best about him, as he deserves, as all of us deserve, and I hope that the pain his family is suffering will dim with time and leave them with memories of all the good things he was, too. Please remember him with kindness. May he rest in peace. Nora Brodie, Sequim

Thomas on scandal I’m not big fan of PDN columnist Cal Thomas in the best of times, but his latest column (“Penn State Sad Comment On Our Times, Nov. 17 PDN”) makes me question how the PDN can continue to publish what the man writes. Thomas trivializes what

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Sue Stoneman

Acting Advertising Director

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

Follow the PDN online

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

Peninsula Daily News

pendailynews

Our readers’ letters, faxes

IRS schadenfreude THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE has found itself on the unpleasant end of an audit. The Government Accountability Office just released a critical assessment of the IRS’ financial reporting, internal controls and information security. GAO auditors found, among other things: n The agency’s system for managing unpaid tax assessments uses software so deficient that it cannot detect and correct errors in taxpayer accounts in a timely manner. n The systems used to process taxpayer information lack security protections to prevent access by unauthorized users. That means confidential IRS and taxpayer records are at risk of being compromised. n The agency’s lack of controls has led to incorrect refunds. Peninsula Daily News sources appears to be college football interests (read “wealth and power”) trumping the need to protect young people from violent sexual predators. He seems to believe that

abuse of the less powerful is a modern sin — and that it stems directly from changes in laws that he doesn’t approve of. He further believes, oddly enough, that religion

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

by

Dave Logan

“For my mother’s health. She recently had a mild heart attack. Her blood pressure and cholesterol are high. We’ve been trying to coach her and encourage her to better health.”

and

Steve Mullensky

and email

prevents such abuse. Maybe he’s unaware of the well-documented role of the Catholic Church in tolerating violent sexual crimes against powerless young people and covering them up to preserve the status of the church. How does predatory child sexual abuse follow from modern acceptance of homosexuality and abortion? I’m a little confused here. Furthermore, in my country, you are presumed innocent until proven guilty. Thomas announces firmly that “Jerry Sandusky . . . crossed one of the few remaining lines of morality left in our culture.” Apparently, all the relevant evidence has been presented to Mr. Thomas, and he has judged it in his own court of law. Jerry Sandusky is accused of vicious crimes

that need to be taken very seriously, and I believe he should be dealt with harshly if proven guilty. I don’t believe that Cal Thomas should be making money from my hometown newspaper by equating Sandusky’s alleged behavior with modern, hot-topic, neo-conservative talking points. Please find a new commentator who reflects our town’s morality better than this. Bev Dulis, Port Angeles

Times hard, but . . . Regarding the Nov. 8 PDN article, “5 Businesses Shutter Or Plan To Close. Personal Or Economic Reasons Cited,” as the owner of Barhop Brewing, it was important to locate our new tasting room in the heart of our community — downtown [on Laurel Street]. Turn

to

Voices/A11

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 can earn your business. Cheers! Times are hard, but Tom Curry, others like us are investing Port Angeles in downtown businesses. At Barhop Taproom, our Those ‘cowboys’ business plan intentionally The 99-percent movedoesn’t include food so we ment is on the right side of can support our downtown justice with its grievances. restaurants. What the 99 percent are We want to complement complaining about is the the downtown dining experience, not compete with it. $681 trillion that the Wall Locating complementary Street cowboys stole from all of us — by surreptibusinesses in the downtiously pawning off the town corridor is a proven most debase elements on strategy for success. planet Earth with triple-ABut starting up a new rated securities utilizing business in this economy, in this community, is risky. credit-default-swap-derivaWe appreciate the city of tives as a means for doing so. Port Angeles and Clallam The Wall Street cowCounty for making our boys wiped out 40 percent start-up a great experience. of the entire world’s wealth A business-friendly during the Bush adminismunicipal government is tration’s eight-year reign of essential. As a novice retailer, my terror. That’s more than 10 hat is off to fellow mertimes the annual gross chants for their significant domestic product of every contributions to our comcountry on planet Earth — munity. Longtime cornerand we should keep quiet stone businesses downtown about that type of thievery? have my respect and Unfortunately, it wasn’t appreciation. just the toxic home mortIt’s not easy, as evigages that the Wall Street denced by the recent closcowboys bundled into these ing of the businesses, and aforementioned derivatives. it’s critically important to A quintessential examhave the support of our ple of Wall Street fraud at locals. its finest would be the It’s also equally impor$5 billion debt of Jefferson tant that we provide great County, Ala., if you care to research it. products — and even Derivatives such as greater service — so we

Our readers’ letters, faxes

They would say that THE WHITE HOUSE has taken the unusual step of denying a cover-up over the existence of alien life. Phil Larson, a senior space policy and communications official in the Obama administration, also said the government had no evidence that extraterrestrials had ever tried to contact humans. Larson’s comments were posted on the White House website in response to several inquiries by UFO believers. “The U.S. government has no evidence that any life exists outside our planet, or that an extraterrestrial presence has contacted or engaged any member of the human race,” he wrote. Peninsula Daily News sources options and forwards allow the Wall Street cowboys to transfer their risks associated with an uncertain future to someone else in exchange for a premium. In general terms, the Wall Street cowboys transfer all their risk to us — that’s you and me and everyone on Main Street — one way or another and receive all their risks while they reap exorbitantly gracious profits. The really amazing thing about all this, in the grand scheme of things, is that these masters of deception who orchestrated this whole debacle that culminated in the financial

crisis that the entire world is now suffering are still walking free. Rick Sindars, Port Angeles

No Saturday mail? The U.S. Postal Service has lost $5.1 billion in the past year and is now on the verge of default (“Postal Default Scenario Told,” Nov. 16 PDN). Ideas keep floating around about how to resolve the never-ending losses this agency continues to accumulate, but solutions never seem to be forthcoming other than to raise the price of a stamp. The postmaster general

Sunday, November 20, 2011

A11

and email

keeps wringing his hands, and Congress seems to be doing little or nothing to solve the never-ending Postal Service dilemma. A good start would be to stop Saturday deliveries, and this should become effective next Saturday. It would be a huge step, as workforce hours would need to be adjusted and layoffs might occur, just like most private companies have been doing for the past many years. If these streamlining steps are not taken and the losses continue, the only other option would be for the Postal Service to close its doors, and that doesn’t seem to be a viable solution. Harry Grandstrom, Sequim

Cain’s ‘ignorance’ It would appear that Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain’s staunch supporters are the kind of people who say, “I know what I know. Don’t confuse me with facts.” In the long run, that may prove true. However, I believe that now they are a cadre of individuals who are frustrated with a system that has produced 9 percent unemployment, a spaghetti of government rules and seeming abandonment of

the “American Dream.” I believe they see the unconventional Cain as a champion of a totally different approach to government. To them, Cain’s ignorance of conventional knowledge becomes a clean slate on which can be chiseled the wishes of his steadfast supporters. Cain’s followers believe he can do no wrong. It makes no difference how many women come forward with accusations of sexual harassment. His supporters have cloaked him with the trappings of perfection. They believe that he is incapable of such acts. Support for Herman Cain might be considered a rebellion of people against the status quo. Although with a different agenda, the citizens in the streets are expressing the same grievance: We want dramatic change, and we want it now, they say. Which of these diametrically opposed tacks will get something done? Maybe neither? And add to this the current deadlock in Congress, and it really gets dicey. What is going on now is the kind of stuff that seems headed for future history books. Louis Hamlin, Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

Rave of the Week RAVE TO THE Crescent School football kid (and Crescent School) who was seen as I waited at the light on Eighth and Lincoln streets [Port Angeles]. He left his doughnut-selling table and sprinted across the street to give a doughnut to the fine gentleman who walks the streets of Port Angeles every day picking up garbage. Nice job!

. . . and other Raves RAVES TO THE kind drivers who stop for bicyclists on Discovery Trail at Gasman Road [Port Angeles]. We don’t expect you to stop for us, but we appreciate it! THANK YOU TO the Hair School in support of students’ educations and its generous support of Port Angeles paraeducators. Educators, go have a spa day and support a student at the Hair School.

on 11-11-11. The food and service were great. MANY THANKS TO people who purchased breakfast for the veteran the Sunday after Veterans Day. He was most appreciative. A BIG THANK-YOU to whoever brought my wallet into the Sequim Safeway last Friday with everything intact after I dropped it on the ground without realizing it. It is so nice to know there are still honest people out there. May good karma come your way tenfold. BIG RAVE TO Discovery Memory Care [Sequim] for the beautiful veterans display, which included a 5-inch-by-7-inch photo of each veteran living there. A RAVE TO Preston Kayes, the Clallam County Drug Court coordinator, for his outstanding work with the addicted and his well-deserved 2011 state of Washington Drug Court Practitioner of the Year award.

THANKS AGAIN THAT they finished the Carrie Blake Park walkway [Sequim] that we THIS RAVE IS for all of the waited so long for. men and women who are, have or Now, please put the benches will serve in our military forces back where you found them. — and their families. People paid for those benches A big thank-you to you all. for memorials for people, and we May God bless you all! appreciate sitting on them. We need to tell our serviceSo we’d appreciate that you men and servicewomen and their get that done. families thank you every day. HUGE RAVE TO Lakeside WE WOULD LIKE to thank Industries’ George Peabody (genApplebee’s restaurant in Sequim eral manager); Dan Craver, who for its recognition of veterans coordinated the food (money)

drive at Swain’s [Port Angeles]; all the employees who lent a helping hand; Dan’s wife, Stacy, and his two daughters and sonin-law, Machon, Sam and Dani, who came from Tacoma to help; and the generous donors whose donations will truly help the less fortunate.

THIS RAVE IS for the owners and chefs at Kokopelli Grill [Port Angeles] and all of the guests who attended the first Guest Chef Dinner at the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center put on by the culinary arts classes Thursday night. You made the experience amazing for the students, and the food was outstanding! Thank you so much for the support and opportunity.

BIG RAVE FOR the two wonderful ladies at Papa Murphy’s on Wednesday who got down on their hands and knees to pick up my driver’s license and pictures that fell out of my Rant of the Week wallet. My hip had some surgery, and WHAT SOME PEOPLE I’m no longer able to do it myself. spend on their dogs and cats is Who says people no longer truly staggering — boneless care? chicken/duck breast; gourmet, organic, off-the-chart menu MANY, MANY RAVES to the items; the best beds, toys, etc. super professionals at Crestwood available; the best medical and Rehabilitation [Port Angeles]. beauty care. They have remade my life, All for a dog or cat that truly and I am walking again after doesn’t even care. four years. Honestly. Do you ever think about your RECENTLY, I WAS stuck in neighbor or friend who may be between Front and First streets unemployed, struggling or sufferin Port Angeles. ing with untreated health probAfter going to several busilems? nesses, I was told maybe I should seek help in a bar. Instead, Todd and Debi of Olympic Electric gave me a jump . . . and other Rants to get me back on the road. It’s nice to know there aren’t SMOKERS DOWNTOWN, all cold-hearted businesses out PLEASE follow the law — there. smoke 25 feet away from doorways. MANY THANKS TO the Let us nonsmokers breathe person who purchased breakfast fresh air, not stinky smoke! at the Mariner Cafe [Sequim] for us the Sunday after Veterans RANT AGAINST LOCAL Day. grocery store asking out loud if We are grateful, as a veteran you want to donate money. and his wife, that a person goes It’s a privacy issue! above and beyond and want to And you don’t know anything say thank you. about the organization.

ANY POLITICIAN WHO calls me loses my support. On Oct. 10, 11 and 15, I got taped calls at the dinner hour. If a caller doesn’t say hello immediately, I hit the “#” key seven times. Hope it messes up their computer. If I get the call, they are hung up on instantly. Friends need to say hello quickly. TO THE LOUD, obnoxious customer who visited our restaurant recently demanding that we honor two coupons per table when each one clearly states “one per table.” You were demanding and clearly are someone who is used to getting your way by being loud in a crowded space. Shame on you.

________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), email us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. On voice messages, spell out names for raves. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Also, only one rant or rave per writer. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


A12

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Retail analysis tool focus of talk in PA Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

A

PORT ANGELES — Business owners can learn how to get answers to some of their questions about what their customers want at a free presentation Tuesday. The Buxton Co., hired by the city of Port Angeles in August to conduct a retail market analysis, will describe software tools for identifying core customers at the presentation at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St.,

Sponsored by city

haven from the rain

Rain clouds drift out across the North Olympic Peninsula toward the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Port Angeles Boat Haven on Thursday.

It’s free, sponsored by the city Community and Economic Development Department, and is open to the public.

The information is geared toward business owners, said Roberta Korcz, assistant planner. It will describe software that will be available at City Hall sometime in the next few weeks, she said. “It will show where people spend their money,” Korcz said. Buxton’s vice president, Lisa Hill, will tell how the new tool can help business owners identify their primary customers, learn about local consumers buying trends, get customer profiles and learn of which products customers prefer. She will also “talk about leakages,” where people could be shopping if the businesses existed, Korcz said. “Electronics is identified as one of the areas that our

community leaks elsewhere,” such as to Sequim, Silverdale or online, Korcz said. Once the system is set up, perhaps as early as the end of this month, business owners will be able to make appointments for a computer-generated customer report, she said. Buxton will provide custom marketing materials and strategies that target the unique location requirements of retailers, developers and commercial real estate brokers, the city said. The City Council approved an allocation of $35,000 to fund the study. For more information, visit www.cityofpa.us/ EconDevelop.htm or contact Korcz at rkorcz@cityofpa.us or 360-417-4804.

Boys & Girls Clubs fundraiser short by $50,000; plan in works Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula raised $150,000 from “A Night to Sparkle,” its 23rd annual dinner and

auction, on Nov. 12. The goal for the fundraiser was $200,000. Mary Budke, the Sequim and Port Angeles clubs’ executive director, said the event nearly sold out at 300

people — but that bidding at the live auction seemed down. “The clubs will need to make up the $50,000 shortage, and we will be brainstorming fundraising

efforts,” said Budke. “It’s still essential to keep our annual membership fee an affordable $30 and provide high-quality programs for our community’s youth.”

“A Night to Sparkle” featured 250 silent and 30 live auction items, including a 1970 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia that went for $8,500, a 2009 Metropolitan scooter

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, November 20, 2011

SECTION

B

Our Peninsula

Sports and Business INSIDE

National Park Service

The Elwha Dam is a vestige of its former self after nearly two months of demolition. Barnard Construction crew members are now taking down the powerhouse, seen at the far right of the photo from Olympic National Park’s webcam.

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

National Park Service

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An 18-foot-diameter gap at the south side of the surge tank is all that remains of the large pipes that fed water into the turbines. For Krohmer, who is more used to building dams rather than taking them down, the pace is a bit refreshing.

Some of the powerhouse’s equipment, an old drill press and pieces of transformers, could be seen last week at the top of the dam. The river once provided electrical power for the developing cities of Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Poulsbo, as well as the Navy yard in Bremerton.

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Barnard Construction Co. project manager Brian Krohmer, who is overseeing the demolition of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams, said the building will be demolished by January. The surge tank adjacent to it should also be gone by then.

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WILDERNESS ™ LO

PORT ANGELES — A free-flowing and roaring Elwha River is quickly coming to once again dominate the valley that bears its name. After nearly two months of demolition, the dam that first conquered it 98 years ago and helped build Port Angeles has begun to recede from the landscape, leaving vestiges of its former self. Rubble and mud have replaced large portions of the 108-foot concrete structure of the Elwha Dam, where excavators and dump trucks now compete with the Elwha for the valley’s soundtrack. The powerhouse of the

Elwha Dam will be the next building to meet its fate as part of the $325 million federal project to remove the river’s two dams and restore its oncefamous salmon runs. The building has been gutted, and an excavator began tearing into its roof last week.

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Peninsula Daily News

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Beginning of the end

Brian Krohmer, project manager with Barnard Construction Co., stands near the partially demolished Elwha Dam powerhouse last week.

TH E

Elwha River water surges over the remaining 178 feet of the Glines Canyon Dam in this shot from Olympic National Park’s webcam.


B2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Dams: Nov. 1 fish window will end in January Giant holes are from former windows and entryways are visible in the Elwha Dam power­house as Barnard Construct­ion Co. employees worked to demolish the structure last week.

Continued from B1 “It’s great to see so much of a difference made in such a short period of time,” he said. “Typically, when you build up, it’s a bit of a slower process.” But the dams still won’t be fully removed anytime soon.

Dam removal Barnard Construction crew members have removed 48 feet of the Elwha Dam, which was built in 1913 five miles from the mouth of the river, and 32 feet of the Glines Canyon Dam, built 14 miles upriver in 1927. The company’s small crew of about a dozen workers is barred from working in the river during fish migratory periods, known as fish windows. The concern is that any further lowering of the two Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News dams’ reservoirs will harm fish through the release of sediment. take up between five and end in January. Glines Canyon Dam inside the river still flows over the The windows, which last six months of the year; the Because of the fish win- Olympic National Park has top of most of the structure. At the Elwha Dam, the about two months at a time, first started Nov. 1 and will dow, demolition of the been put fully on hold since river flows through a channel blasted from concrete on its west side, where a spillway once stood. The fish windows will push full demolition of the Elwha Dam to early 2013 and the Glines Canyon Dam — at originally 210 feet tall, the largest ever removed in the nation — a year later. Still, there’s plenty of work to do. Along with the powerhouse and surge tank, nine miles of power lines will be removed over the next 1.5 months. Crews are also working to repair Whiskey Bend Road, which runs along the east side of Lake Mills, the reservoir of Glines Canyon Dam. Ecosystem restoration is also under way.

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About 2,300 plants have relocated to the lakeshore so far, with an additional 28,000 to be planted by February. David Allen, nativeplant center manager, said the plants are needed to control erosion and prevent the spread of non-native plant species. “It’s a clean slate,” he said, adding that they will watch to see what plants do well. That’s particularly important because the sediment is nutrient-poor, meaning it may be tough for some plants and trees to establish themselves. Allen said the crew is trying to plant the trees and bushes near logs and other organic material and may have to start adding soil from the nearby forest to give them a boost. “The site is going to tell us what’s going to work,” he said.

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the river since 1913. Larry Ward, tribal hatchery manager, said the tribe will release 600 coho above the Elwha Dam; 170 have been released since Nov. 1. The fish are tagged and will be monitored by the tribe. Additionally, the park began replanting native vegetation along the exposed portions of the lake bed behind Glines Canyon Dam. The dams’ reservoirs have been drained about 30 feet, exposing swaths of lake bed sediment. A handful of park staff and Washington Conservation Corps volunteers have been getting their hands dirty since Nov. 8 planting native vegetation where water once stood. The park’s native-plant center near Sequim has produced 24,850 plants for the project. Commercial growers have contributed an additional 5,000 Douglas fir trees and 2,600 bare-root shrubs.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, November 20, 2011

B3

Websites great resource for birding THE CLOSER THANKSGIVING gets, the more we think about Christmas shopping. I write down reminders that it’s time to think about it. It’s also time to come up with some gift ideas to pass along to this column’s readers. Websites are this year’s favorite. I like catalogs, too, but some of the websites I visit throughout the year keep improving. They continue to add a wealth of good information. I’ll share some of these in the coming weeks, and here are the first two. Thanksgiving weekend is the scheduled release date for the last map in the series “The Great Washington State Birding Trail.”

Puget Loop map This final map is the “Puget Loop.” It covers sites where 220 of the 346 bird species recorded for this region can be seen. Audubon chapters contributed the information for this map. Committees from the membership of the following groups did the legwork: San Juan, Whidbey, Kitsap, Tahoma, Rainier, VashonMaury, Eastside and Seattle. The map is designed for use when traveling by car,

son involves more than preparations for Thanksgiving and Christmas; it also means that a lot of us will be enjoying some vacation time. Enjoying the great outdoors is a good idea at any time, but during this busy season, it can almost be a mind-saver. Nothing wipes away stress like a day outdoors and a mind focused on something other than “lists.” The WDFW website can add to the fun.

BIRD WATCH Joan

Carson

bus, ferry and even by bike or paddle. The Puget Loop features popular birding spots from Seattle to Mount

Rainier. It includes Lake Washington, the Kitsap Peninsula and the islands of Vashon, Bainbridge, Whidbey and the San Juans. There are 42 main sites plus 18 locations popular for specific species. The maps in the Great Washington State Birding Trail Series cost $4.95 each, and the latest, the Puget Loop, can now be pre-ordered. You can order this map and others in the series at one of my favorite websites. It’s also an excellent source for information about birding and watching birds in this state. Visit Audubon Washington’s site, http://wa. audubon.org. Once on the site, click on “Birding.” The Puget Loop is a great companion map for another in the series, the Olympic Loop. Washington’s Depart-

Nearby, distant sites

Paul Carson

A bald eagle sits austerely on a branch. ment of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) maintains a website loaded with information. It can be educational or entertaining. It contains a lot of information for hunters and fishermen, but it is also heavy into watchable wildlife. After entering the website address, www.wdfw. wa.gov, take a tour of “Living with Wildlife,” “Attracting Wildlife” and “Backyard Wildlife.”

There are books by Russell Link, wildlife biologist, and maps for specific outdoor interests in places where there is public access and good possibilities for enjoying wildlife you are interested in: birds, whales, underwater sea life, etc. While you are exploring this site, make sure you click on the “Watchable Wildlife” section. This is where you can often view live cameras filming the activities of

bluebirds, eagles, herons, osprey, owls and more. Both seasonal conditions and technical difficulties can interrupt the live filming. However, once nesting season begins, activity increases, and the cameras give you a bird’s-eye view. The WDFW website is not only a wealth of information on wildlife, it is Washington’s wildlife, and the areas focused on are in this state. The coming holiday sea-

Committee membership is voluntary and is for a three-year term. The advisory committee was established in 1973 by the State Parks and Recreation Commission “to provide assistance and recommendations for the development and operation of Fort Worden State Park.” The Fort Worden committee is the longest-standing advisory committee for Washington State Parks and is the model after which committees at other state parks have been formed. The Fort Worden Advisory Committee is an active panel with representatives from park residential organizations and the community. There are also seven atlarge members. The committee meets

monthly the third Thursday of the month at noon at Fort Worden State Park. The charge of the committee is to serve in an advisory capacity and as a resource on matters relating to the development and management of the park. Applicants for the Fort Worden Advisory Committee should submit a letter of interest that outlines their interest in being a part of the advisory committee and the Fort Worden community to the Fort Worden Advisory Committee, 200 Battery Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368. Letters will be accepted until Dec. 2. Interviews of candidates will be scheduled prior to the Dec. 15 advisory committee meeting.

Banker Uptown Realty is collecting unwrapped toys in support of Toys for Tots of Clallam County and nonperishable food items for the Port Angeles Food Bank. Donations can be dropped off at the Coldwell Banker office at 1115 E. Front St. in Port Angeles until Dec. 22. For more information, phone 360-417-2796.

You can access information about nearby areas or those in more distant parts of the state. Visit the sites mentioned here and accomplish several things: You can get some Christmas shopping done, plan a holiday outdoor trip or just relax with some wildlife-viewing from the comfort of your home. As the holidays draw closer, I will cover at least two more websites that make shopping fun and even educational.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a self-addressed, stamped envelope for a reply. Email: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Briefly . . . Sequim VFW to host public holiday feast

Toys, food drive SEATTLE — Coldwell

Monday Musicale PORT ANGELES — Music lovers are invited to Monday Musicale, which will be at noon Monday in the St. Ann’s Room of Queen of Angels Church, 209 W. 11th St. A meeting will be followed with a program by “Happy Gang!” Proceeds from the $11 admission go to scholarships for local high school

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Marrowstone meet NORDLAND — The Marrowstone Island Community Association’s second meeting of the 2011– 2012 season will be Monday at 7 p.m., at the Nordland Garden Club, Nordland Garden Club Road, Marrowstone Island. Island residents are invited to attend. After a brief business meeting and announcements, guest speaker Jeff Randall of Power Trip Energy will discuss residential solar photovoltaic technology and installations. Attendees will be able to questions about the topic. Peninsula Daily News

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Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., will host the crafting workshop “Old Books into Ornaments” from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3. Attendees will learn to SEQUIM — The Sequim repurpose discarded library VFW will hold a commubooks into holiday ornanity Thanksgiving feast at ments, gift-wrapping paper the VFW Annex, 169 E. and bows. Washington St., from 1 p.m. Participants will be to 4 p.m. Thursday. taught to make an e-reader The public is invited to cover from a used-hardattend. back book binding. To make a reservation, The workshop will be phone 360-683-9546. led by Lauren Dahlgren, Sequim Library manager. She will be assisted by Harvest Dinner set library staffer Ambur Taft. SEQUIM — The ninth Materials will be proannual free Harvest Dinner vided by the Friends of will be held at Sunshine Sequim Library. Cafe, 145 W. Washington St., The event is suitable for from noon to 4 p.m. Thursages 11 and older. day. Preregistration for this Owners Allen and Diane program is encouraged to Drake hold the dinner each ensure enough supplies for year to give back to the com- all attendees. munity. For more information Donations are accepted about this and other each year, and this year, upcoming library prothey will benefit Violet grams, visit www.nols.org O’Dell, a 10-year-old Helen and click on “Events” or Haller Elementary School contact the library at student who is undergoing Sequim@nols.org or 360cancer treatment at Seattle 683-1161. Children’s Hospital. Reservations are sugHelp Fort Worden gested. PORT TOWNSEND — For more information, The Fort Worden Advisory phone 360-683-4282. Committee is seeking qualified applicants to fill two Books into gifts at-large positions expiring Dec. 31. SEQUIM — The

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Abused daughter’s pregnancy worries mom DEAR ABBY: Late last winter, a sheriff called to tell me that my daughter “Amy” had been found standing, bruised and battered, on a street corner in upstate New York. Her arm had been broken. He was convinced that the man she was living with had beaten her and kicked her outside to freeze. Her sister (my other daughter) paid to put her up in a hotel for the night. My husband and I were convinced early on in this relationship that this monster was determined to have us support him finan-

DEAR ABBY Abigail

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Van Buren because he

would leave us long, threatening messages demanding money or else our daughter would be

“homeless.” Amy moved back in with him, and I heard from her sister that the creep was bringing other women home for sex. It raised my hopes that Amy would give up on him.

Instead, she became pregnant. Now, Amy is hurt that I don’t call her and share in this exciting event. When I try to explain how I feel, she tells me, “It’s not about you, Mom.” She’s right. It’s about the baby. I am ashamed to not be able to change this baby’s future. What can I do? Paralyzed with Fear Out West Dear Paralyzed: Make every effort to prevent your daughter and grandchild from becoming isolated from your family.

Port Angeles Symphony invites you to Ring in the Season with

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At home Lara and David Updike, Sequim, a daughter, Susan Christine, 7 pounds 13 ounces, 10:52 p.m. Oct. 31.

Forks Community Hospital Tina and Steven

130 N. Sequim Ave.

Reserved Seating and Season Tickets at Symphony Office 216 C N. Laurel St., Port Angeles • 457-5579

Dear Abby: What would you say is the difference between a friendship and an emotional affair? Unhappy Wife in Pennsylvania Dear Unhappy Wife: A friendship is a relationship in which the spouse feels included. An emotional affair is one during which the spouse writes to Dear Abby and signs her question “Unhappy.”

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Dawn and Kevin Kreider, both formerly of Port Angeles, now of Oklahoma, a daughter, Evelyn Rose, 6 pounds 15 ounces, 12:26 p.m. Nov. 6. Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.

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and all your siblings care about them. Then arrange in advance one or more activities they can enjoy together that do not include Ray. That would be some steps in the right direction.

Out of town

Gaydeski, Forks, a son, Trustin Isaiah, 7 pounds 15 ounces, 6:44 a.m. Nov. 15.

Amanda Gebhardt and Jared Blevins, Port Angeles, a son, Jared Daniel, 9 pounds 3 ounces, 9:22 a.m. Oct. 22.

Morning Dress Rehearsal - PAHS 10am

In Port Angeles Port Book and News

I feel bad for my parents and other siblings — especially my sister, who doesn’t get to see them often and feels she can’t compete with the gifts and roughhouse game-playing. Do you have any suggestions for how I might temper the kids’ enthusiasm for Uncle Ray on this trip, so others get to have Dear Abby: We have meaningful bonding time two children, ages 9 and 6, with their nephew and and live in Northern Caliniece, whom they rarely fornia. see? We’ll be traveling to Marilyn Southern California soon to in San Francisco attend my cousin’s wedDear Marilyn: Enlist ding. We’ll be staying with my Ray’s help with this and start talking with your parents. children now about the My three unmarried special relationships you adult siblings will be comhad with your parents and ing from out-of-state to your siblings while growing attend the wedding. up. My brother “Ray” is a Share funny stories, clear favorite with my kids. which will make them He visits often and more “real” to the kids. showers them with attenTalk about the qualities tion, gifts and outings. that make each of your He loves them dearly, family members special, but when he’s around, he consumes all of their atten- and be sure to mention how much your parents tion.

Peninsula Births

Dec. 10, 7:30pm Pre-Concert Chat 6:40pm PAHS Auditorium, 304 E. Park Ave. Tickets $30, $20, $15, $12

Some abusers deliberately impregnate their victims in order to keep them dependent. Keep the contact and the conversation going so that when Amy finally realizes that her boyfriend is a danger not only to her, but also to her baby, she can come to you for help.

n  Deer Park Cinema,

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

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“Immortals” (R) “Jack and Jill” (PG) “Tower Heist” (PG-13)

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n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

“Happy Feet 2” (PG)

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, November 20, 2011

B5

Brighten garden with lights, greenery airy mat this mixture makes. This means your bulbs with will not emerge early, nor Andrew white will other plants want to May paper prematurely break out in birch, the nice, mild winter days of madrona, late January and February curled only to be ravaged by our willow, yearly (you just wait, watch coral bark and see!) hard, cold frost of maple or late February or early any other March. cool, Then you can be decorafunky col- tive by using your trimmed ored evergreens to make door branches wreaths or swaths. make a centerpiece have Bring branches indoors pizazz. or to holiday parties and lay One could add a more them the out on the table decorative touch by integrat- arranged in a great, festive ing fall and winter foliage, aroma. and, of course, lights add to Five or six different tipthe theme as well. pruned branches of everWhen laying out an ever- greens arranged in one of green arrangement made those numerous vases you have in a cupboard somefrom your pruned-off evergreens (and hopefully those where really can add such intriguing scents to the air from or traded with your and make for a multipleneighbors, friends and famsensory display. ily), use ornamental kale And let’s end by emphaand cabbages, plant various sizing those tip-pruned grasses or incorporate the big white dusty millers that branches because you would look absolutely marvelous in either have a lot of those or a bunch of thinned-out, an evergreen display. lengthy branches because Heathers and heaths that is only one of two ways look great, too, by adding you can and should be prunanother similar texture to ing your softwoods. the mix. Conifers respond Using a mixture of extremely poorly when evergreens in an arrangeheaded off (a prune anyment over your bulbs, where across the branch around the perennials as directly above a node) in well as in and among any aged wood of 3 years or sensitive plants acts as the older. perfect insulating, thermal In fact, most do not mulch cover. Various evergreens (more respond at all, so they look just as woody and dead than one — thus two or today as they did five years more particle sizes) when ago when you cut those crossed and displayed not evergreens back to the only look good, but effecdriveway and sidewalk line tively trap in heat and hold it in because of the loose and because they were headed off along old woody branches back in the interior and by their nature do not rebranch off old wood.

A GROWING CONCERN

Things to Do online

If you must remove a big piece of evergreen, use a thinning cut, which removes the branch of limb at the exact point it radiates off another branch, limb or main trunk. Thinning is a primary way to prune — you head off evergreens at their tips — because in turn, it makes them thicker and lusher (this is how Christmas trees are produced: by shearing,

or heading off the tips of all branches). Eventually, you have to thin out the thick canopy that grows in reaction to those heading cuts, and thus you harvest your conifers. So go harvest your evergreens, then arrange them in fabulous artistic works of horticultural masterpieces that will beautify your home and neighborhood, bring enjoyment to yourself and

others, all the while illuminating the darkness in an artful display of holiday and solstice cheer.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or email news@peninsula dailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

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    -  -        -- 

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OK, ON WITH “trimming” the home and garden. Last week, we used Gail’s house as the influential example of lights, landscape and art — and what a perfect example. Adding 2,500 more blue lights onto a blue upright pfitzer, along with a 700 light in a grass clump, both balancing off their prospective areas, we also added 2,500 amber lights on extremely yellow evergreens. The display went to 43,700 lights. In the dark, it is beautiful, and I hope you are designing and plotting your light show to be, too. Gail commented on how much easier it must have been to hang those multitudes of lights on the trees now that I had just finished pruning them. This brings us full circle to now. November-December are the primary and ideal months to prune coniferous evergreens on the Peninsula and in Pacific Northwest. Not only should you first prune any tree you are going to hang lights on, you should remove all deadwood, errant branches, crossover branches and those that rub upon another. With your evergreens, now is the time to “HARVEST” them for artistic, horticultural and decorative uses. First, harvest them as seasonal artistic pieces: Combine numerous types of evergreens arranged together and place them in pots, window boxes, planters and bare flower beds. Red or yellow twigged dogwood branches combined

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The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . .

http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings . . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

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Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . KONP, Lions Club team up for fundraiser PORT ANGELES — KONP and the Port Angeles Lions Club teamed up to raise $50,204 for the Port Angeles Food Bank in its annual Food-A-Thon. The Lions took over the radio station for 12 hours to raise money and food for the Port Angeles Food Bank. The total was swelled by $6,800 donation from the Black Ball Ferry Line board and its employees, $6,000 from Lakeside Industries employees and management, and $5,600 worth of peanut butter collected by elementary students in the Port Angeles School District and Olympic Christian School.

Meditation night PORT ANGELES — Meditators from all traditions are invited to join the Port Angeles Zen Community for an open meditation night at Shanti Yoga and Massage Studio, 118 N. Laurel St., on Tuesday. The first meditation period begins at 7 p.m., followed by walking meditation at 7:40 p.m. and a second meditation period at 7:50 p.m. The public can attend one or both periods. Participants should bring their own meditation cushions. Chairs will also be available for use. For more information, email PortAngelesZen@ gmail.com or phone 360477-5954.

Yoga benefit set PORT TOWNSEND —

Port Angeles Lions Club President Kevin Borde, in the KONP control room, solicits donations and pledges from the listening audience. Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship’s Social Justice Council will hold its annual Thanksgiving Day Yoga Benefit for the Jefferson County Food Bank at 10 a.m. Thursday. The event will be held in the Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship sanctuary, 2333 San Juan Ave. The 90-minute class will be taught by Terry Wagner, who has more than 30 years’ experience and will adapt the class to meet the needs of participants. Port Townsend Food Bank Manager Shirley Moss reports that November is the busiest month for the food bank, with the Wednesday before Thanksgiving being the busiest day of the year. A $1 donation to the food bank enables it to purchase 33 pounds of food from Food Life Line, a clearinghouse that provides surplus food to qualified charitable organizations. In addition to monetary donations, the food bank can also use nonfood items such as shampoo, condi-

tioner, cleaning products, diapers and pet food — even if these nonfood products have been opened. Participants will need to bring a yoga mat and any other needed props. For more information, phone Wagner at 360-3794155 or Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship at 360-379-0609.

Senior singles PORT LUDLOW — Reservations for the upcoming Senior Singles Group Christmas gettogether are due by Dec. 1. To make a reservation and for other event details, phone 360-437-9546. The hostess will prepare the main dish and attendees will supplement the meal by bringing an appetizer, side dish, salad, rolls or dessert. Participants are reminded to bring their own beverages, a wrapped $15 gift to exchange and to remember their name tag. Carpooling is encouraged. Peninsula Daily News

Nash’s

raffle winner

As part of its grand-opening week earlier this month, Nash’s Farm Store held a raffle for a full 2012 Farm Share to benefit the North Olympic Land Trust’s Farmland Fund. The winner of the raffle was Susan Molin, left, of Sequim, a longtime customer of Nash’s Organic Produce and a supporter of farmland preservation. The Farm Share Program, coordinated by Sid Maroney, right, is a weekly box of fresh, seasonal, organic fruits, vegetables and grains from the farm. The program is from July through November 2012, and the value of receiving a basket each week during that time is $450. The raffle raised $243.

Death and Memorial Notice JIM JENSEN October 18, 1946 November 12, 2011 On November 12, 2011, Jim was called to have cookies and milk. He was born in Bremerton, Washington, on October 18, 1946, to Charles James Jensen and Dorothy Ruth Jensen. Jim attended school in Bremerton and in 1946 went into the Army, where he served proudly for four years. He was a mechanic and served in both Korea and Vietnam and attained the rank of specialist E-5. Jimmer, as he was known to his friends, was a car salesman. He was enthusiastic in anything with wheels and had to

Mr. Jensen spit and polish to see what made it spin, no matter if it was an old car or the new cars of today. He worked throughout the Kitsap Peninsula. Jimmer was preceded

in death by his father in 1979, his mother in 2008 and his brother, John, in 1993. He leaves behind a son, Jayson of Bremerton; a grandson, Morgan, whom he was very proud of; six nephews, John Sr., Tom, Dana, John Edward, Eric and Michael; an aunt, Clara Jensen Gillam Barr of Silverdale, Washington; and numerous cousins in the area. At Jim’s request, there will be no services; however, donations in his name can be made to Clallam County Home Hospice, 24 Lee Chatfield Avenue, Sequim, WA 98382. Please sign the online guestbook at www. tuellmckeebremerton.com.

Death and Memorial Notice DARCELLE ANN ‘DARCI’ GASCHE October 1, 1957 November 10, 2011

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Offers good on new and unregistered units purchased between 11/1/11-12/31/11. *On select models. See your dealer for details. **Rates as low as 2.99% for 36 months. Offers only available at participating Polaris® dealers. Approval, and any rates and terms provided, are based on credit worthiness. Other financing offers are available. Applies to the purchase of all new ATV and RANGER models made on the Polaris Installment Program from 11/1/11-12/31/11. Fixed APR of 2.99%, 6.99%, or 9.99% will be assigned based on credit approval criteria. Warning: ATVs can be hazardous to operate. For your safety: Avoid operating Polaris ATVs or RANGERs R on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should always wear a helmet, eye protection, protective clothing, and a seat belt and always use cab nets (on RANGERR vehicles). Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Polaris adult ATV models are for riders age 16 and older. Drivers of RANGER vehicles must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license. All ATV riders should take a safety training course. For ATV safety and training information, call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887,See your dealer, or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. ©2011 Polaris Industries Inc.

camping, and her favorite place was Whiskey Creek Beach. Darcie will be deeply missed but live on forever in the hearts of her family and friends. She will be remembered for her beautiful smile, warm hugs, kindness to others and a love of animals. A celebration-of-life potluck will be held March 17, 2012, at the Port Angeles Yacht Club at 2 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362; or the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, 2105 West U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles, WA 98363. Please sign the online guestbook at www. drennanford.com.

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form is available at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. For further information, call 360-417-3528.


PeninsulaNorthwest B7 Sequim Kiwanis to begin Christmas tree sale Toy drive set Dec. 2 Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

The Sequim Kiwanis Club will begin its annual Christmas tree sale at Sequim Village Plaza, 609

W. Washington St., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday. Sales will continue daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. until all trees are sold. There also will be enve-

lopes provided for an afterhours honor system: Customers can take a tree, remove the tag and mail the tag with their check to Kiwanis.

Death and Memorial Notice

Death and Memorial Notice

MYRTLE LEMLEY

BEATRINO DELANEY RICHARDSON

November 9, 1921 November 14, 2011 Mrs. Myrtle Lemley, 90, of Sequim passed away from natural causes on November 14, 2011. She was born in New Haven, Minnesota, on November 9, 1921, to Andrew and Carol (Benson) Romo. Myrtle married Harold Lemley on September 2, 1940. He preceded her in death on July 28, 1973. Myrtle was a homemaker and consummate cook and baker. She was a member of Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, as well as the Ladies Auxiliary to Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4760. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law, Marvin and Joyce Lemley of Redding, California; daughters and sonsin-law Dee Lemley of Fredericksburg, Virginia, Mary Griffith of Sequim and Kathi and Jeff Hamilton of Tacoma, Wash-

Proceeds will fund Kiwanis projects assisting with youth activities and other charitable organizations.

April 10, 1936 November 13, 2011 Beatrino DeLaney Richardson, 75, of Sequim passed away November 13, 2011, of cancer. She was born in Bedford, Pennsylvania, on April 10, 1936, to Leslie and Birdie (Aveni) DeLaney. After Beatrino graduated from Morgan State University with a Bachelor of Science in education, she continued educating herself. She worked as a physical education teacher in Northway and Cordova, Alaska. Beatrino married Harold “Popo” Richardson on November 27, 1958, in Baltimore, Maryland. She is survived by her husband; son and daughter-in-law Harold B. “Bink” and Paula Richardson; daughters and son-in-law Tracey and David Laurion, and Heidi Richardson Gordon;

Mrs. Lemley ington; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held Saturday, November 26, 2011, at 2 p.m. at Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, 925 North Sequim Avenue, Sequim, with the Rev. Jack Anderson officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 North Fifth Avenue, Sequim, WA 98382. Please visit www. sequimvalleychapel.com.

April 17, 1943 November 16, 2011 Ginger passed away in her sleep Wednesday morning, November 16, 2011, of renal failure and other complications with her loving family at her side. Ginger was born April 17, 1943, in Joliet, Illinois. After graduating from high school, Ginger worked in retail in the Joliet area. On March 6, 1965, she married Don Alexander, whom she met in high school. She continued working in retail and the family business while raising two daughters. The family moved to Sequim in 1976, making it their permanent home. She and the girls loved exploring their new home, and she delighted in finding an agate, sea urchin,

Mrs. Alexander starfish and whatever else she could find. She loved beachcombing and rock hunting. In 1981, she became involved in museum work and became director of the Clallam County Museum in 1982. She resigned from that post to spend more time with her daughters. After the girls grew a little older, she became involved in the

Death Notices Jeanne Florence Mackenzie

December 30, 1961 October 21, 2011

brother and sister-in-law Dr. Page W. and Sherry DeLaney; sister Sandra DeLaney; grandchildren Nichelle Richardson Dean, Devon Richardson, Deonn Richardson, ­MacKenzie Laurion, Sarah Laurion, Sydney Laurion, Bryce Gordon and Brooke Gordon. Mrs. Richardson was preceded in death by her mother, Birdie DeLaney; her father, Leslie DeLaney; aunt Pearl Harris; uncle Don Harris; sister-in-law Shirley Richardson; and mother-inlaw Clarice Richardson.

Mr. Mike Bower, 49, of Lakewood, Washington, passed away October 21, 2011, from cancer. He was born December 30, 1961, in Port Angeles to Wilfred “Bill” and Beth (Bradford) Bower. He attended Clover Park Technical College and was the owner of Lakewood Automotive. Mike married Barbara in 1985 in Lakewood. God and family were first in Mike’s life. He loved spending time at his cabin on Lake Crescent. Mr. Bower is survived by his wife, Barbara of Lakewood; daughter Jordan Bower of Lakewood; his mother, Beth Bower;

Nov. 22, 1926 — Nov. 17, 2011

Jeannette I. Turman died in Port Angeles. She was 84. Her obituary will be pub-

Remembering a Lifetime

Oct. 8, 1915 — Nov. 13, 2011

Jean Saunders died of natural causes in Sequim. She was 96. Her obituary will be published later. Sequim Valley Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Kenneth A. hAnsen

January 8, 1963 November 12, 2011 Lydia, loving wife and mother, was born January 8, 1963, in Santa Rosa, California, and passed away unexpectedly at home in Forks on November 12, 2011. She was 48 years old. Lydia is survived by her husband of 23 years, Terry Schroeder; son Justin Schroeder; and daughter Mariah Schroeder. She also leaves her mother, Linda DesLauries, and sister, Leah Stollar. Her first grandchild, Linda Renee Schroeder, is due to be born on December 25 of this year. A celebration of her life will be held on

The family of Nellie Hefton would like to gratefully thank Sequim Health and Rehabilitation for the respect and loving care they showed our mom during her final years of life. We also would like to thank Dr. Clancy, Rose and Wendy. Thank you to Pastor Omer Vigoren and Bethany Church. Thank you to all our family and friends for cards, flowers and words of encouragement. Thank you to Drennan Ford for all your help. God bless you all. Mac Hefton, Bud and Donita Hefton, Sherry and Butch Dahl, Carol and Kent Wegener

Mrs. Schroeder December 10, 2011, at the Round House at 110 Business Park in Forks starting at 1 p.m. Anyone needing further information or wishing to contact Terry can reach him at 360-7800763.

The family of Tammy & Henry Pimentel wish to thank the community for their awesome support during the loss of our loved one and daughter,

Jennifer Pimentel

The outpouring of donations, flowers, sympathy cards, love and prayers was overwhelming. To Bethany Church, Drennan & Ford Funeral Home, our friends, co-workers and family,

Thank You

She will be forever in our hearts.

DONATE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES

More than 150,000 troops are serving overseas. Cell Phones for Soldiers is calling on all Americans to support the troops by donating old cell phones.

Would like to express our sincere gratitude to each of you who have shown your sympathy in the loss of our Husband, Father, Grandfather and Great-Grandfather. We truly appreciate the support we have received during his short illness. The phone calls, the food, flowers, cards and prayers have been so helpful. Thank you for the overwhelming attendance at the Celebration of Life, a success due to all of the people who assisted.

LOCAL DROP OFF CENTER:

Drennan & Ford

PROUDLY SERVING THOSE WHO HAVE PROUDLY SERVEDSM

075090614

Funeral Home and Crematory 260 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 www.drennanford.com www.veteransfuneralhomes.com

Sincere appreciation to Chuck Hyatt for presiding at the service and making it so personal. Special thanks to Rite Bros. Aviation, Jeff Well and Theresa Powell, Dry Creek Water & Grange, Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, Dr. Witham and his staff, Dr. Robert Scott and his staff, Mary of KWA, Kelly Hoch for singing and anyone we may have missed. The kindness and thoughtfulness of our friends and neighbors has helped ease the difficulty of our loss.

LYDIA RENEE SCHROEDER

HELP OUR TROOPS CALL HOME

The Family of

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday.

Jean Saunders

brothers and sisters-inlaw Dan and Laurie Bower, Jim and Ky Bower, and Jeremy Shields. He was preceded in death by his father, Bill Bower, and brother Donald Bower.

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Jeannette I. Turman

of God, 160 Washington St., Quilcene. The Rev. Dan Ward will officiate. LindePrice Funeral Service, Sequim, is in charge of arrangements.

Mr. Bower

Death and Memorial Notice

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at www.peninsuladailynews.com

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lished later. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in Dec. 25, 1924 — Nov. 15, 2011 charge of arrangements. Sequim resident Jeanne www.drennanford.com Florence Mackenzie died of age-related causes. She was Rose M. McClure 86. Sept. 29, 1949 — Nov. 12, 2011 Services: Memorial Port Angeles resident Mass on Monday at 10 a.m. at St. Joseph’s Catholic Rose M. McClure died of a Church, 121 E. Maple St., heart attack at Olympic Sequim. Private burial at Medical Center in Port Sequim View Cemetery. Angeles. She was 62. Her obituary will be pubSequim Valley Funeral Chapel is in charge of lished later. Services: Saturday at arrangements. www.sequimvalleychapel. 1 p.m., service at Assembly com

MIKE BOWER

Mrs. Richardson

Clallam County Republican Party. After spending about five years full time RVing, she spent the last twoand-a-half years in Sequim to facilitate medical treatment. She was preceded in death by her parents, Fred and Aileen Feil, and nephew, Michael Feil. Ginger is survived by her husband of 46 years, Don; daughters Colette and Dawn; five grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and a brother, Mike Feil. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362; and/or the Northwest Kidney Centers, 700 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122. A celebration of life will be held on Monday, November 21, 2011, at 2 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 Blake Avenue, Sequim.

Cultural Arts Center and the Sequim-Dungeness Museum and was responsible in the combining of the Sequim-Dungeness Museum, the art center, and the Dungeness Schoolhouse into one workable group. She was the director of the Sequim-Dungeness Museum & Arts Center of the Dungeness Valley for a number of years before retiring in order to care for her aging parents. Over the years, Ginger was also involved in the Clallam County Fair and spent five terms on the Clallam County Fair board. She was a lifetime member of the Sequim Prairie Grange and spent some summers as the director of the Grange Camp and many other activities. Ginger was a member of Trinity United Methodist Church, where she was also a Sunday school teacher. She was also active in the PEO and the

PORT ANGELES — The ninth annual Dancers Dancing for Toys toy drive will be held at the Peninsula College Little Theater, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2. Talia of San Diego’s Oriental Jewels Belly Dance Co. will headline the show. She has earned Best Oriental Dancer awards from her peers at Oasis Dance Camp, as well as a Spirit of Aphrodite award. Talia will be joined by Shula Azhar, a MiddleEastern dance group from Port Angeles, and the Wahine Ilikea Dancers, the largest hula dance group on the Peninsula. Admission is a donation of a new, unwrapped toy. Toys will be donated to the Port Angeles Salvation Army.

Death and Memorial Notice

Death and Memorial Notice VIRGINIA ‘GINGER’ ALEXANDER

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, November 20, 2011

Sports

PAGE

B8

Peninsula women reach final Rodgers scores penalty kick goal to put Pirates one win from title Peninsula Daily News

TUKWILA — The Peninsula College women’s soccer team is making history and is on the verge of putting an exclamation point on it. The Pirates shut out Clackamas 1-0 in the NWAACC

semifinals Saturday afternoon and now have an appointment against NWAACC powerhouse Walla Walla today in the championship final at 3 p.m. at the Starfire Sports Complex. Top-ranked Walla Walla earned the other final spot by blasting Everett 3-1 in the

other semifinal game Saturday. The Warriors, 21-0-1, are seeking a perfect season after outscoring opponents 102-6 in 22 games this year. The Pirates (17-2-3), meanwhile, are hoping to join the Peninsula men’s soccer and men’s basketball programs with an NWAACC championship. The Peninsula men may be going after their second title in a row but played too late in

ONLINE . . . ■ Pirate men’s game story at peninsuladailynews.com

Saturday’s semifinals for Sunday’s editions. Peninsula women’s coach Kanyon Anderson said he believes the Pirates have a good shot at beating the Warriors today. Turn

Pirates/B9

to

The Associated Press

Seattle quarterback Tarvaris Jackson is looking to guide the Seahawks to a second straight win as they take on the St. Louis Rams today in St. Louis.

Things get mild in West faceoff By R.B. Fallstrom The Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — Last January, when the St. Louis Rams played the Seattle Seahawks for the NFC West title, Chris Long wanted to play his best. No regrets, no what ifs. After the loss, Long was motivated. Not haunted. “I’m not that type,” Long said. “Some people say, ‘Well, you should be that type.’ That’s why I try to play Next Game really hard, so Today those things I can leave them vs. Rams at St. Louis on the field.” Set to face the Time: 1:05 p.m. Seahawks for the On TV: Ch. 13 first time since, that philosophy still applies for a player who’s developed into one of the NFL’s top pass rushers. Although for a much different reason. Each team is having a stinker of a season. Seattle (3-6) vs. St. Louis (2-7) long ago was slotted for a late afternoon marquee start. Instead, their total of five wins is the lowest among this week’s matchups. There’s only so much any one player can do about that. Long’s play has been a key to the Rams’ surge, most of it on defense, the last few games. Although it’s too late to save a season long gone sour, St. Louis finally bears some resemblance to the team that made a six-victory improvement in Year 2 under coach Steve Spagnuolo. Since getting manhandled by the Packers and Cowboys by a combined 58-10, the Rams have two wins and an overtime loss. Long got three sacks in an upset over the Saints and is among the league leaders with eight, blossoming as a force against the run, too, in his fourth season since being taken with the second overall pick of the 2009 draft. With seven games to go, the son of Hall of Famer Howie Long is a virtual lock for his first double-digit sack season. “I don’t know what I’d have to do to validate that. I got picked pretty high and I get paid a lot of money,” Long said. “I think I’d have to have about 20 sacks a year to validate that. I just try to be the best player I can be, maximize what I can do.”

Hawks show life The Seahawks lost three of four to start the year, then dropped three of four again. They showed surprising life last week with a 22-17 upset of the Ravens, but are four games behind the 49ers in the West. Time for a little commiserating from coach Pete Carroll, whose team has also been ravaged by injuries. Carroll referenced the Rams’ brutal early schedule and the Cardinals’ also-ran status. Turn

to

Hawks/B9

Andy Bronson/The Bellingham Herald

Neah Bay’s Cody Cummins (7) looks for the goal line as he dives in for a touchdown as Lummi lost to Neah Bay 58-40 in the quarterfinals of the Class 1B state playoffs at Civic Stadium on Friday in Bellingham.

Turning the tables Neah Bay knocks off Lummi, gets revenge Peninsula Daily News

BELLINGHAM — The Neah Bay football team exorcised some serious demons Friday night. Actually, they were Blackhawks. The Red Devils finally took care of their old tormentors in a Class 1B state quarterfinal, knocking off the Lummi Blackhawks 58-40 with a dramatic come-from-behind win at Civic Stadium in Bellingham.

Prep Baseball

Cray signs on to play at Seattle Peninsula Daily News

CHIMACUM — Seattle University has locked up another Chimacum High School baseball star. Landon Cray, a three-time PDN prep baseball MVP and allstate selection, signed a letter-ofintent to play for the Division-I Redhawks start- Cray ing in the 201213 academic year when they join the Western Athletic Conference. Cray will be the second Cowboy to suit up for Seattle U in recent years. Former Chimacum standout Arlo Evasick pitched for the private Jesuit university during the 2010 and ’11 seasons after two years at Everett Community College. Turn

to

Cray/B10

The win puts Neah Bay (10-2 overall) in the 1B semifinals for the third straight year. The game will be at either the Tacoma Dome or east of the Cascades. It also gives the team a measure of revenge, as it was the defending state champion Blackhawks (12-1) who eliminated Neah Bay from the 1B semifinals each of the past two years.

“This is just a payback,” said Red Devils coach Tony McCaulley, whose team lost to Lummi twice during the regular season. “They did this exact same thing to us two years ago [when Neah Bay went into the semifinals undefeated and lost to the Blackhawks]. “They beat us in the semifinals instead of the quarters, but it was the same kind of thing. They beat us twice [this year], and then we beat them in the playoffs. It feels really good. We got the one that counted.” The Red Devils pulled it off with a dominating run game that gashed Lummi for 467 yards on 46 carries.

1B Playoffs Neah Bay senior Titus Pascua had one of his most productive games of the season, running for 240 yards and three touchdowns on 27 carries. He also ran in three two-point conversions. Quarterback Josiah Greene added another 190 yards and four TDs on 13 carries, including an 88-yard scoring run in the first quarter that ignited a Red Devil rally after being down 20-0 early on. “This is great, the whole team played hard,” McCaulley said. Turn

to

Devils/B10

Dawgs denied again UW falls to OSU; offense struggles The Associated Press

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Sean Mannion threw for 339 yards and two touchdowns as Oregon State beat Washington 38-21 Saturday. The Beavers (3-8, 3-5 Pac-12) beat the Huskies for the seventh time in their last eight meetings. Nick Montana was 11 of 21 passing for 79 yards for the Huskies (6-5, 4-4) in his first career start. Oregon State went up 24-14 with 11:14 left in the game after Mannion connected with Obum Gwachum for a 58-yard pass that set up a Jovan Stevenson touchdown. Montana fumbled on the next drive deep in Husky territory and Stevenson scored again to put the Beavers up by 17. Keith Price relieved Montana in the fourth quarter and led a 10-play, 58-yard touchdown drive to shave Oregon State’s lead to 31-21. But Price was intercepted after The Associated Press the Huskies recovered an Oregon State fumble during kickoff and the Oregon State’s Dylan Wynn (45) pushes back Washington’s Chris Polk (1) during the first half of Beavers went 99 yards for a touchSaturday’s game in Corvallis, Ore. down.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Today’s

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Today Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College at NWAACC Final Four Tournament, finals, TBA. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at NWAACC Final Four Tournament, finals, TBA. Women’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Clark Igloo Invitational in Vancouver, Wash., time TBA.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Lakeside Big Four Nov. 16 Men’s high game: Frank Carpenter, 258; men’s high series: Joe Gentry, 696. Leading team: Road Hogs. Birch’s Molar Bowlers Nov. 16 Men’s high game: George Hamlin, 233; men’s high series: George Hamlin, 609. Women’s high game: Jeanne Phelps, 192; women’s high series: Catherine Woodahl, 516. Leading team: Screamin Eagles. Laurel Lanes Seniors Nov. 15 Men’s high game: Steve Campbell, 199; men’s high series: Steve Campbell, 550. Women’s high game: Hazel Vail, 162; women;s high series: Abbey Boyd, 435. Mixed Up Mixed Nov. 15 Men’s high game: Joe Gentry, 248; men’s high series: Joe Gentry, 618. Women’s high game: Karen Paulson, 203; women’s high series: Karen Paulson, 534. Leading team: Certified Hearing. Tuesday Brunch League Nov 15 High game: Holly Brown, 181; high series: Lila Petroff, 518. First place team: Quilted Strait. Baxter Auto Parts Old Times Nov. 14 Men’s high game: Ken McInnes, 215; men’s high series: Jay Cameron, 580. Women’s high game: Joan Wright, 178; women’s high series: Joan Wright.

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Better Nine Men’s Club Competition Nov. 17 Individual Event Gross: Gary Thorne, 33. Net: Jim Root, 32; Jeff Colvin, 32.5; Greg Senf, 32.5; Win Miller, 33; Rob Botero, 33. Team Event Gross: Gary Thorne and Mike DuPuis, 64. Net: Jeff Colvin and Steve Colvin, 59; Jeff Colvin and Win Miller, 60; Jim Root and Keith Lawrence, 60; Rob Botero and Greg Senf, 61;

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Steve Jones and David Boerigter, 62; Steve Callis and Duanne Vernon, 62; Mike DuPuis and Kevin Russell, 62. Skyridge Golf Course Players Day Competition Nov. 13 Gross: Carl Taylor, 80. Net: Dan Dougherty, 69; John Naples, 69; Marty Pedersen, 70;Don Tipton, 72; Paul Boucher, 72; Gene Potter, 72; Dan Reeves, 73; Bud Bowling, 73. Ridge Cup Final Standings Nov. 14 Champion: Shane Price; 2. Robb Reese; 3. Dale Erickson.

A Brewed Awakening Espresso 25, DA Davidson 18 A Brewed Awakening Espresso 25, DA Davidson 18 DA Davidson 25, A Brewed Awakening Espresso 20 Zbaraschuk Dental Care 25, Nuts & Honey 23 Nuts & Honey 25, Zbaraschuk Dental Care 19 Zbaraschuk Dental Care 25, Nuts & Honey 21 Zbaraschuk Dental Care 26, Nuts & Honey 24

CEDARS AT DUNGENESS GOLF COURSE Men’s Club Stableford Results Nov. 16 First Flight Gross: Karl Dryfhout 30, tie, Warren Cortez 28, Robert Mares 28. Net: Andy Anderson 42, Paul Ryan 41, Jay Howard 39. Second Flight Gross: Gary Williams 21, Robert Purser 20, Ted L. Johnson 19. Net: Rober Hammond 41, Robert Bowling 39, tie, Darrell Waller 38, John Cameron 38. KP No. 4: Low Division, Arni Fredrickson;; High Division, Mike Sutton. KP No. 11: Low Division, Warren Cortez; High Division, Brian McArdle. KP No. 8: Open, Karl Dryfhout.

Friday’s scores 3A Football Championship Quarterfinal Bellevue 35, Lakes 14 2A Football Championship Quarterfinal W. F. West 33, Lakewood 18 2B Football Championship Quarterfinal Colfax 42, White Swan 37 Napavine 25, Tacoma Baptist 22 1B Football Championship First Round Almira/Coulee-Hartline 52, Touchet 8 Neah Bay 58, Lummi 40

Basketball

Prep Football

Football NFL Standings

PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION ADULT LEAGUE League Standings through Nov. 19 Team W L Seven Cedar’s Casino 1 0 Langston Services 1 0 Blue Sharks 1 0 Elwha River Casino 1 0 Gray Motors 1 0 Anytime Fitness, PA 0 1 PA Swimmin Hole 0 1 Northwest Builders 0 1 Cougars 0 1 Peninsula College 0 1 Nov. 16 Results PA Swimmin Hole & Fireplace Shop 66, Elwha River Casino 76 Leading scorers PA: Buddy Schumacher, 25; Ben Lierly, 15 ER: Danny Angulo, 22; Woody Stangle, 21 Blue Sharks 77, Northwest Builders 40 Leading scorers BS: Brent Bevers 21; Scott Helpenstel 14 NB: Randy Veenstra 12; Darren Mills, 9

Volleyball PORT ANGELES RECREATION COED Nov. 16 Results Hutchinson Construction 25, Zak’s 9 Hutchinsn Construction 25, Zak’s 11 Hutchinson Construction 25, Zak’s 22

NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF San Francisco 8 1 0 .889 233 Seattle 3 6 0 .333 144 Arizona 3 6 0 .333 183 St. Louis 2 7 0 .222 113 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 6 3 0 .667 218 Dallas 5 4 0 .556 223 Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 220 Washington 3 6 0 .333 136 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 7 3 0 .700 313 Atlanta 5 4 0 .556 212 Tampa Bay 4 5 0 .444 156 Carolina 2 7 0 .222 190 North W L T Pct PF Green Bay 9 0 0 1.000 320 Detroit 6 3 0 .667 252 Chicago 6 3 0 .667 237 Minnesota 2 7 0 .222 179 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Oakland 5 4 0 .556 208 Denver 5 5 0 .500 205 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 216 Kansas City 4 5 0 .444 141

PA 138 202 213 223 PA 211 182 203 178 PA 228 196 233 237 PA 186 184 187 244 PA 233 247 228 218

East L T Pct PF PA 3 0 .667 259 200 4 0 .556 229 218 5 0 .500 228 217 7 0 .222 158 178 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 7 3 0 .700 273 166 Tennessee 5 4 0 .556 186 172 Jacksonville 3 6 0 .333 115 166 Indianapolis 0 10 0 .000 131 300 North W L T Pct PF PA Pittsburgh 7 3 0 .700 220 179 Baltimore 6 3 0 .667 225 152 Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 212 164 Cleveland 3 6 0 .333 131 183 Today’s Games Tampa Bay at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Oakland at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Carolina at Detroit, 10 a.m. Dallas at Washington, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. Tennessee at Atlanta, 1:15 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 5:20 p.m. Open: Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Pittsburgh Monday’s Game Kansas City at New England, 5:30 p.m. W New England 6 Buffalo 5 N.Y. Jets 5 Miami 2

Hockey NHL Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 20 10 7 3 23 49 48 Dallas 18 11 7 0 22 48 50 San Jose 16 10 5 1 21 49 41 Phoenix 17 9 5 3 21 47 43 Anaheim 19 6 9 4 16 39 57 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Minnesota 19 11 5 3 25 44 38 Edmonton 18 9 7 2 20 41 43 Vancouver 19 9 9 1 19 56 56 Colorado 20 9 10 1 19 55 61 Calgary 18 8 9 1 17 41 47 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 20 12 5 3 27 69 58 Nashville 18 10 5 3 23 50 44 Detroit 18 10 7 1 21 49 41 St. Louis 18 10 7 1 21 46 40 Columbus 18 3 13 2 8 39 66 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 19 11 5 3 25 71 58 Pittsburgh 19 11 5 3 25 58 47

Briefly . . . PA’s Cowan headed for Century Link

Israel Gonzalez finished third in the boys 6-7 division. Kamron Noard also competed well in the boys 8-9 division but did not place in the top three.

Holiday basketball

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Department will host the Holiday Hoops tourney on Dec. 10 and 11. There will be divisions PUYALLUP — Riley for boys and girls basketCowan of Port Angeles earned himself a spot in the Soccer Challenge ball teams from fifth grade NFL Punt, Pass and Kick AUBURN — Israel Gon- through eighth grade. Team Championship after Teams get a four-game zalez took second place in winning a Sectional title. guarantee and must pay a the boys 7-8 year-old diviCowan claimed the boys sion at the Soccer Chal$250 entry fee. 10-11-year-old division at For more information, or lenge State Championships the Sectional Championship to lead a strong contingent to register, contact Dan held at Heritage Recreation of Port Angeles athletes Estes at 360-417-4557 or Center in Puyallup. destes@cityofpa.us. last Sunday. The winning score was It was the second year one of the top five out of in a row that Gonzalez Rain-Deer run several Sectional events in took second at the event, PORT ANGELES — Washington, Oregon, Idaho, which tests participants’ Port Angeles Parks and RecMontana and Alaska, putaptitude in four individual reation Department is now ting him in the Team soccer skills — shooting, taking registrations for the Championship at Century dribbling, throw-ins and annual Rain-Deer Fun Run/ Link Field in Seattle on Satdistance kicking. Walk set for Dec. 17. urday. Also taking second at Those who register by Cowan and the rest of the event from Port AngeDec. 10 receive a $5 disthe competitors from the count, with the early regischampionship will be recog- les was Michael Scott in the boys 11-12 division. tration fee $25 per person nized during halftime of and $15 for those 18 and Seattle Seahawks game the Gavin Johnson was just one point behind in third. younger. following day. Jonathan Scott took The 5- and 10-kilometer Port Angeles’ Lenora fourth in the same division run/walk will start at Port Hofer also had a first-place Angeles City Pier at 1 p.m. finish at the Sectional, win- as Gonzalez. Other Port Angeles ath- and follow the Waterfront ning the girls 14-15 division, letes competing but not Trail out and back. but her total score wasn’t placing were Levi Boyd in There will be shirts and high enough to advance. boys 6U, Emma Krepps in antlers for participants and Second-place finishers girls 7-8, Grace Baillargeon a raffle drawing for prizes. from Port Angeles at the in girls 9-10, Scott Nutter For more information, or Sectional were Emma to register, contact Dan Krepps in the girls 6-7 divi- in boys 9-10 and Laura Nutter and Bella Johnson Estes at 360-417-4557 or sion and Bella Johnson in destes@cityofpa.us. the girls 10-11 division. in girls 11-12.

Rider athlete PORT ANGELES — Lauren Norton was named the Port Angeles High School athlete of the week for Nov. 12-17. The senior volleyball player earned the distinction after leading the Roughriders with 46 digs and 84 serve-receive passes at the Class 2A state tournament last weekend. Norton was also 36 for 36 at the service line with one ace and received the sportsmanship award for the team’s match against Ephrata. After taking over at libero for the first time this fall, she was named Olympic League defensive MVP.

Storm re-sign Agler SEATTLE — Seattle Storm coach Brian Agler signed a three-year contract extension Friday to stay with the WNBA team through 2015. Agler has a 91-45 record in four seasons as coach. He’s also director of player personnel. The Storm reached the playoffs all four years and won the 2010 championship. The Storm is one of six independently owned teams in the women’s professional basketball league. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Pirates: Women advance to title game Continued from B8 “We, the coaches, watched Walla Walla play today and saw, like any team, that they have weaknesses,” he said. “I think we match up to those weaknesses pretty well.” The Warriors like to wear teams down with a style that Anderson compares to a basketball team that runs a full-court press the entire game.

Anderson planned ahead for that by substituting freely against the Clackamas Cougars on Saturday. “Our legs are good and fresh,” he said. Peninsula’s Jackie Rodgers, the West Division MVP, scored the winning goal against Clackamas at 29 minutes on a penalty kick and the Pirates made it stand. Pirate All-Region for-

ward Shelby Solomon was tackled in the box by a defender to get the penalty. Then Rodgers kicked it hard into the left corner for the score. The game wasn’t nearly as close as the score might indicate as the Pirates outshot the Cougars 12-5 and kept the ball on the Clackamas side of the field most of the game. “They bent but they

didn’t break,” Anderson said about the Cougars. The entire Peninsula backfield played well, Anderson said. That includes Aubrey Briscoe, Ashlyn Frizzelle, Kimmy Jones and Felicia Collins. And midfielder Tabitha Bare received special mention from her coach. “Tabitha had a fantastic game for us,” Anderson said.

B9

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Today 9 a.m. (5) KING PGA Golf, President’s Cup Final at Royal Melbourne Golf Club in Melbourne, Australia. 10 a.m. (7) KIRO NFL Football, Cincinnati Bengals at Baltimore Ravens. 10:30 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA Golf, CME Group Titleholders at Grand Cypress Golf Club in Orlando, Fla. 1 p.m. (10) CITY (7) KIRO NFL Football, San Diego Chargers at Chicago Bears. 1 p.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Seattle Seahawks at St. Louis Rams. 2:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Puerto Rico Tournament at Coliseo de Puerto Rico in San Juan, Puerto Rico. 3 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, Paradise Jam Tournament. 4:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Puerto Rico Tournament at Coliseo de Puerto Rico in San Juan, Puerto Rico. 5 p.m. (5) KING NFL Football, Philadelphia Eagles at New York Giants. 5:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, Paradise Jam Tournament. 6 p.m. (26) ESPN MLS Soccer, Houston Dynamo at Los Angeles Galaxy in MLS Cup Championship. N.Y. Rangers 16 10 3 3 23 New Jersey 17 9 7 1 19 N.Y. Islanders 16 5 8 3 13 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Buffalo 19 12 7 0 24 Toronto 19 10 72 22 54 Ottawa 20 10 9 1 21 Boston 17 10 7 0 20 Montreal 19 8 8 3 19 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Washington 17 10 6 1 21 Florida 18 9 6 3 21 Tampa Bay 18 9 7 2 20 Winnipeg 20 8 9 3 19 Carolina 20 6 11 3 15 NOTE: Two points for a win, one overtime loss. Friday’s Games Buffalo 1, Carolina 0 Colorado 3, Dallas 0 Calgary 5, Chicago 2

47 34 45 48 35 50 GF GA 56 47 65 61 68 58 39 49 49 GF GA 57 49 53 46 52 56 58 65 46 68 point for

Hawks: Travel Continued from B8 Carroll thinks the Seahawks are a better team than last year’s 7-9 division champs, just a bit young. Nearly half of the roster is in its first season with the franchise. “I think we’ve all started slowly, other than the Niners who got off to a racehorse start, and we didn’t,” Carroll said. “So we’ll see what happens. There’s a lot of ball left, a lot of games out there.”

Beast mode Maybe, if they can keep playing like last week, when they capitalized on three turnovers and Marshawn Lynch’s second straight 100-yard rushing game to beat their second division leader. Besides scoring Seattle’s lone TD, Lynch had four big runs and a first-down catch in the drive that ran out the final 5:52. “That’s pretty much the way you see the game being won, running out the clock being up like that,” Lynch said. “It just so happened it was against the Ravens. That one is done, now we have to get ready for this one.” Lynch has consecutive 100-yard games for the first time in his career, a big boost for a run game ranked near the bottom of the NFL. “He has a nasty stiff-arm and he’s explosive,” Rams middle linebacker James Laurinaitis said. “He’s looking to score every carry.” And he’s about to go up against the NFL’s worst team against the run, although the Rams have held two of the last three opponents below 100 yards. The Rams’ Steven Jackson can do Lynch one better.

Still bowling over tacklers in his eighth season, the 240-pound Jackson has stepped up in an effort to prevent the season from total collapse, and has three straight 100-yard games. “Steven Jackson is roaring,” Carroll said. Though he’s missed most of three games, Jackson is ninth in the NFL with 707 yards rushing and a 5.1yard average — the best of his career. “Jack means everything to our offense,” quarterback Sam Bradford said. “When Jack gets rolling, it just makes everything a lot easier for us.”

QB struggles Not easy enough for Bradford, the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year last season who’s battled injuries and personnel turnover in his second season and is running the NFL’s lowestscoring offense. Since returning from a high left ankle sprain that sidelined him for two games, Bradford has one TD pass and two interceptions. Bradford has only four touchdown passes on the year and two of his top anticipated targets are on injured reserve (Danny Amendola) or elsewhere (Mike Sims-Walker, with the Jaguars). But he offers no excuses about what’s been a disappointing year. “It’s obviously nowhere near where it needs to be,” Bradford said. What to do? Just keep playing. “You know my attitude, we can play in the parking lot tomorrow with no cameras and I’ll be ready to go,” Laurinaitis said. “Forget about the last one, on to the next one, looking for a win.”


B10

SportsRecreation

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Martin additions approved Stadium will receive $80 million upgrade The Associated Press

PULLMAN — The Washington State University Board of Regents gave final approval Friday for an $80 million project to add premium seats and a new press box on the south side of Martin Stadium. Construction will begin Monday, following the final home football game of the season against Utah on Saturday. The athletics department plans to have the press box completed before the first home game of next season. The luxury seating should be completed soon after. “I feel strongly that we are at a time in Cougar athletics where we can truly

make a statement and show that we can and will be competitive in the Pac-12 Conference,” said Bill Moos, Washington State’s athletic director in a press release. The project will be paid for with funds from ticket sales, increased television revenues and donations, the university said. Estimated annual debt service for the stadium project is $5.4 million, the school said. The addition of suites, loge boxes and club seating is expected to bring in $3 million more per year, Moos said. A major financing component is increased revenue from the recently completed Pac-12 television contract,

An artist’s rendering of what Martin Stadium will look like once scheduled improvements are finished by next fall. which goes into effect beginning with the 2012-13 academic year, he said. Washington State’s share from that contract will range from $10.4 million in 2012-13 to $22.4 million in 2024-25.

There is also a second phase of the Martin Stadium project which involves construction of a football operations building behind the west end zone. That building would include a weight room, training facili-

ties, locker rooms, coaches’ offices and meeting rooms. The school will assess the costs of that project next summer, and decide if they should ask the regents for permission to more forward, the university said.

Devils: In 1B semis for 3rd straight year Continued from B8 Added, McCaulley, “They fought until the end and never gave up after going down by 20 early. It was a total team effort.” Neah Bay trailed the entire first half of the eightman football game and went into the locker room down 26-16. The Red Devils didn’t get their first lead until Pascua ran in his second touchdown of the night from 40 yards out in the third quarter. The lead changed hands four more times, with Lummi scoring touchdowns in between Cody Cummins’ 13-yard scoring run early in the fourth. But with the Red Devils’ run game eating up yardage, they exploded for three unanswered touchdowns to finish out the game.

That included runs of 9 and 29 yards from Josiah Greene and 85 yards from Pascua. “Titus Pascua played one heck of a game,” McCaulley said. “It could have been his last game, and he played lights out. “[Lineman] John Reamer had a heck of a night. We ran right over him all night, and Tyler McCaulley had a heck of a game at fullback, really blowing some holes open for Titus and Josiah. “We wore them down. The conditioning paid off.” Blackhawks quarterback Jared Tom finished with 160 yards passing and one touchdown on 14-of-24 passing with no interceptions before he was injured and missed the last part of the game. Teammate Logan Toby completed 6 of 8 passes for 70.

Tom also ran for another 137 yards and two scores on 18 carries. Lummi had 475 yards of total offense but also saw three of five fumbles taken away by the Red Devils. Zeke Greene also came up with a critical interception of Toby in the final frame. Three of those turnovers came inside the Red Devil 20-yard line. Another Blackhawk drive ended inside the Red Devil 10. “I told our guys coming in that mistakes like that were probably going to decide this game,” Lummi coach Jim Sandusky told the Bellingham Herald. “In games like this, whoever wins the turnover battle is going to win the game, and they won the turnover battle today. We made too many costly mistakes.”

“They return a lot next Lummi had beaten Neah Bay six times in a row prior year — maybe not as much as us, but a lot.” to Friday’s game. Among those wins were a Neah Bay 58, Lummi 40 pair of mercy-rule defeats at the Tacoma Dome in 2009 Neah Bay 8 8 14 28— 58 Lummi 20 6 6 8— 40 and ’10. First Quarter Now, it’s the Red Devils L—Tom 72 run (kick failed) who will be moving on to the L—Tom 2 run (Brockie pass from Tom) L—Cooper 70 fumble return (pass failed) 1B semifinals once again. NB—J. Greene 88 run (Pascua run) They will take on Second Quarter Odessa-Harrington, which NB—Pascua 12 run (Greene run) from Tom (pass failed) beat King’s Way Christian, L—Brockie 23 passThird Quarter next Saturday at a to-be- NB—J. Greene 74 run (Pascua run) NB—Pascua 49 run (run failed) announced time and place. from Tom (pass failed) “These are great games L—Deardorff 9 pass Fourth Quarter between these two teams,” NB—Cummins 13 run (Pascua run) L—Brockie 26 pass from Toby (Cooper pass from Sandusky told the Herald. “The guys play hard, and Toby) NB—J. Greene 9 run (run failed) there is no bad blood between NB—J. Greene 29 run (Z. Greene pass from J. the schools. But for the 48 Greene) NB—Pascua 85 run (run failed) minutes on the clock, both Individual Stats teams give everything Rushing—NB: Cummins 4-21, Pascua 27-240, J. Greene 13-190, McCaulley 2-16. L: Scott 8-60, they’ve got. Hoskins 8-28, Tom 18-137, Toby 1-2, Cooper 1-6. “These games are a lot of Passing—NB: Dulik 1-4-0-17. L: Tom 14-24-0fun, and they’re going to con- 160, Hoskins 1-1-0-12, Toby 6-8-1-70. Receiving—NB: Z. Greene 1-17. L: Hoskins 2-2, tinue to be that way for the Brockie 8-93, Cooper 4-53, Scott 2-30, Deardorff next couple of years. 5-64.

Cray: Playing baseball for Seattle University Continued from B8 U coaches’ willingness to let him pitch and play in the “I knew Arlo really well. field factored heavily into his We were really good friends decision. because my cousin, [Cow“I wanted to play was the boys pitcher Devin Cray], big thing for me,” Cray said. was around his age,” Landon “They told me if I worked said. hard and keep up my end of “I wouldn’t say he had a the deal, I have a good big part of why I went there, chance to start for them but definitely having a kid freshman year. That was a from my hometown having big thing. And also I will be the experience of Seattle U able to pitch for them, too. I and being able to share what wanted to keep doing that they have helped with my after high school as well.” decision a lot.” Most of all, Redhawks Cray has been the Cow- head coach Donny Harrel boys’ ace pitcher since his said he hopes to put Cray in freshman season. center field and utilize his After leading Chimacum fielding skills and powerful to the Class 2A state semifi- bat. nals and finals in his first Cray had a .575 batting two years, he was the game- average as a junior last winning pitcher in the team’s spring, belting a school state championship win over record nine home runs in the Tenino last May. process. He also had 11 douThe 5-foot-9, 168-pound bles, four triples and 53 runs left-hander said the Seattle scored in 26 games.

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ALL-NOL Best Hitter: Rebecca Thompson (Neah Bay) Best Blocker: Melissa Willis (Clallam Bay) Best Setter: Rachel Bowen (Crescent) Team Melissa Willis (Clallam Bay) Jamie Parker (Clallam Bay) Sara Moore (Crescent) Brandy Swan (Neah Bay) Rebecca Thompson (Neah Bay) Rachel Bowen (Crescent) Coach: Cheryl Erickson (Crescent)

Girls Soccer ALL-NISQUALLY LEAGUE League Co-MVP: Madison Hibbard (Seattle Christian), Sr., MF; Kayla Williams (Orting), Jr., MF. Off. Player of the Year: Catherine Amick (Vashon), Sr., F Co-Def. Player of the Year: Katie Mayer (Charles Wright), Jr., D; Kimber Howard (Seattle Christian), Jr., D. Goalie of the Year: Lauren Patefield (Cas.Christian) Jr. Coach of the Year: Lisa Peterson (Cas. Christian) Team Sportsmanship: Cascade Christian First Team Erin Swain (Sea. Christian), Fr., F; Megan Mitchell (Sea. Christian), Sr., MF; Faith Pizzey (Sea. Christian), Jr., D; Taylor Hentschell (Sea. Christian), Jr., D; Lena Deguzman (Vashon), Jr., MF; Denise Griffith (Vashon), Sr., MF; Sierra Boyce (Orting), Jr., GK; Bailey Bare (Orting), Sr., F; Rachel Peters (Orting), Jr., D/F; Jensen Berry (Cas. Christian), Sr., MF; Madi Carrier (Cas. Christian), Sr., D Second Team Shaina Mitchell (Sea. Christian), So., MF; Makalah Mumm (Sea. Christian), Sr., GK; Mikayla Wrolstad (Sea. Christian), Jr., D; Morgan Gaston (Sea. Christian), Fr., F; Harper Howard (Vashon), So., MF; Kayla Reed (Orting), Sr., D; Jayna Inderbitzin (Cas. Christian), Sr., MF; Laura Warren (Cas. Christian), So., F; Paige Dougherty (Cas. Christian), So., D; Olivia Powell (Charles Wright), So., MF

Seattle U reinstated its baseball program in 2010 and will finally gain conference affiliation next spring. “I think it’s a great idea [Cray going to Seattle U],” Chimacum baseball coach Jim Dunn said. “There’s some other schools that were kind of bigger-name schools that were kind of interested in him, but I think he made a good decision.”

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VANCOUVER, Wash. — The new-look Peninsula College women’s basketball team opened the year by splitting two games at the Clark Igloo Invitational on Friday and Saturday. The freshman-dominated Pirates beat Southwestern Oregon (SWOCC) 75-67 in overtime in the first round Friday but then lost 48-26 in a defensive struggle to sophomore-dominated Columbia Basin in the semifinals Saturday. Peninsula plays for third place today. “We went against a pretty experienced team in Columbia Basin,” coach Allison Crumb said. “We learned something from this game.” Freshman guard Jesse Ellis led the Pirates with 17 points and 11 rebounds in the first game. Freshman post Taylor Larson also had 17 points and shot 8 of 12 from the field.

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Volleyball ALL-NISQUALLY LEAGUE MVP: Christina Gleb (Vashon), Sr. Coach of the Year: Kara Sears (Vashon) Sportsmanship Award: Charles Wright First Team Leah Andrews (Vashon), Sr.; Shelby Fisher (Charles Wright) So.; Jessica Walters (Cas. Christian), Jr.; Grace Bouffiou (Life Christian), Jr.; Johnnise Moore (Life Christian), So.; Sammy Fall (Vashon), Sr.; Riley Kimmel (Vashon) Sr. Second Team Hannah Sasaki (Seattle Christian), Sr.; Elysia Keith (Orting), So.; Ashlee Hamilton (Life Christian), So.; Victoria Kassebaum (Seattle Christian), Sr.; Catherine Moffett (Cas. Christian), Jr.; Alyssa Gale (Chimacum), Sr.; Arin McGovern (Charles Wright), Sr.

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Matt’s little brother, had a two-year stop at Lower Columbia Community College before moving on to Gonzaga in 2010. Cray said he received interest from Washington and Washington State but ultimately decided Seattle U was the best choice. He will play on a partial athletic scholarship and receive money for some private scholarships. He plans to study business. “There were a bunch of schools from around the nation that contacted me, but I guess when it was time to get down to business, Seattle U was the one that was right there,” he said. “We were always keeping in touch. I really liked what they had to offer, and it seemed like the perfect fit for me, not just from a baseball standpoint.”

155120120

Pirate women split first two games of year

“Landon is a true leadoff hitter,” Harrel said in a news release. “He is tough, fast and hates to lose. He will push the club with his work ethic and attitude. “Landon will fill our void in center field and will be a defensive key when we play in the bigger parks of the Western Athletic Conference. This kid will excite our fans.” Cray is the first North Olympic Peninsula baseball player to be successfully recruited out of high school by a Division I university since 2003. Port Angeles’ Matt Lane (Washington) and Forks’ Wayne Daman Jr. (Washington State) both went D-I immediately after high school that year. While Evasick’s path to Seattle went through Everett, Port Angeles’ Eric Lane,

Preps


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, November 20, 2011

Business

PAGE

B11

Politics & Environment

This week’s business meetings ■  Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce: Weekly luncheon Mondays at noon in the second-floor meeting room at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. This Monday’s scheduled keynote speaker will be Jeff Robb, executive director of the Port of Port Angeles. Wilder Nissan is the meeting sponsor. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier. ■  Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce: Weekly luncheon Mondays at noon at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., Port Townsend. This Monday’s scheduled keynote speaker will be Judy Alexander of the sustainability organization Local 20/20. She will lead a round-table discussion on local food, health care, emergency preparedness and investing. Catered lunch is in the $6-$12 range (cash; no credit cards). ■  Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce: Luncheons the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month — with business networking at 11:45 a.m. and food service at noon — at SunLand Golf & Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim. However, there will be no luncheon this week because of Thanksgiving, the chamber said. ■  Forks Chamber of Commerce: Luncheons on Wednesdays at noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. This Wednesday’s scheduled speaker is Bill Sperry on the 1808 wreck of the Russian schooner Nikolai at Rialto Beach and the Nikolai Shipwreck Monument project Sperry heads. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup, $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. ■  Port Angeles Business Association: Breakfasts on Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive, Port Angeles. There is a $2.16 minimum charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order breakfast. This Tuesday’s speaker will be Port Angeles City Manager Kent Myers with a “state of the city” report. Peninsula Daily News

 $ Briefly . . . Village names family support specialist in PA PORT ANGELES — Karen Bert has been named the new family support specialist for Evergreen Family Village, 2201 W. 18th St. The village is a Serenity House of Clallam County transitional housing program designed to help homeless families with children Bert achieve self-sufficiency. “I’m looking forward to helping families reach their goals,” said Bert. In addition to being a mother, Bert operated Black Sheep Farm, was manager of the Port Angeles Farmers Market, was active in the local natural food movement, was involved in starting the community garden at Olympic Vineyard Christian Fellowship and managed Olympic Community Action Programs’ senior nutrition program until it lost funding. In January, Bert became the first site-services coordinator at Maloney Heights Apartments. The 28-unit apartment building, which serves single adults who have been chronically homeless, is owned by Serenity House and staffed by Peninsula Community Mental Health. “I missed the interaction of parents and kids,” said Bert. “Evergreen Family Village suits me well — it even has a garden.” For more information, phone Serenity House at 360-452-7224.

Park campus director PORT ANGELES — NatureBridge has named Stephen Streufert as its new Olympic National Park campus director. Streufert brings more than 25 years of experience in program and instructional leadership to NatureBridge, the largest nonprofit residential environmental education partner of the National Park Service. He has held leadership roles at the North Carolina Outward Bound School, National Outdoor Leadership School and other environmental and marine education-based organizations. Prior to his position at NatureBridge, Streufert was the executive director at Salish Sea Expeditions, a nonprofit that provides opportunities for students to design and conduct scientific research from the decks of a 61-foot sailing vessel on Puget Sound. “We are very excited to add

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Patty and Nash Huber cut the grand-opening “carrot ribbon” in front of Nash’s Organic Produce’s new Farm Store at 4681 Sequim-Dungeness Way.

Nash’s celebrates Farm Store opening Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Nash and Patty Huber and the team at Nash’s Organic Produce celebrated the opening of their full-grocery Farm Store with about 150 supporters, friends and neighbors. “This store is the result of the hard work and planning of many people who are dedicated to getting the best, organic and local food to our community,” Nash Huber said before he cut the grand opening “carrot ribbon” to the applause of

the crowd. “It starts with all the folks who work so hard in the fields to get the produce here — and continues with the innovative staff at the store who made this celebration possible,” he added. The Farm Store is at 4681 Sequim-Dungeness Way. It has a children’s corner where youngsters can play, read or color while their parents shop. It is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.

Deficit deadline lurks, but doomsday unlikely Still, panel’s failure could spook markets By Christopher S. Rugaber and Daniel Wagner The Associated Press

someone with such an extensive background in environmental education to our senior leadership team,” said Susan Smartt, president and CEO at NatureBridge. Celebrating its 40th year, NatureBridge reaches approximately 30,000 students from 600 schools each year through its three- to five-day field science programs at Olympic National Park, Yosemite National Park, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area and Channel Islands National Park. For more information, visit www.naturebridge.org.

Third anniversary SEQUIM — Koto Teriyaki and Sushi is celebrating its third anniversary at 1252 W. Washington St. in Sequim Byung and Soo Ki Yun own and operate the restaurant. They also offer catering services for all events, including family gatherings, office dinners and other get-togethers. Koto Teriyaki and Sushi is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, phone the restaurant at 360-681-3220.

KONP talk guests PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio, at 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and www.konp.com on the Internet outside the Port Angeles area. Turn

to

Briefly/B14

WASHINGTON — Just as the U.S. economy is making progress despite Europe’s turmoil, here come two new threats. A congressional panel is supposed to agree by Thanksgiving on a deficit-reduction package of at least $1.2 trillion. If it fails, federal spending would automatically be cut by that amount starting in 2013. Congress may also let emergency unemployment aid and a Social Security tax cut expire at year’s end. Either outcome could slow growth and spook markets.

Analysts not panicking Analysts are concerned, but most aren’t panicking. Many said the economy and markets will likely muddle through. It’s possible the supercommittee will reach a partial deal that might

The Associated Press

Supercommittee member Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass. meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., as he and fellow supercommittee members emerge from a closed-door meeting last week. limit the impact of the automatic cuts in 2013. Congress could also pass legislation next year to ease the scope or timing of the spending cuts. And investors expect so little from the congressional panel that they’re unlikely to overreact whatever it does. “There’s no doomsday scenario in reducing government spending,” said David Kelly of JP Morgan Funds.

The 12-member bipartisan panel, or supercommittee, was created in August to defuse a political standoff over raising the federal borrowing limit. If it can’t agree on a deficitreduction plan, automatic spending cuts would hit programs prized by both parties: social services such as Medicare for Democrats, defense for Republicans. Turn

to

Debt/B12

FDA revokes approval of Avastin for breast cancer Side effects trump benefit; use still possible, but insurance dicey By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The blockbuster drug Avastin should no longer be used in advanced breast cancer patients because there’s no proof that it extends their lives or even provides enough temporary benefit to outweigh its dangerous side effects, the government declared Friday. The ruling by the Food and Drug Administration was long expected, but it was certain to

disappoint women who say they’ve run out of other options as their breast cancer spread through their bodies. Impassioned patients had lobbied furiously to preserve Avastin as a last shot.

Only small effect on tumor But repeated studies found the drug had only a small effect on tumor growth. The research didn’t show evidence that patients lived any lon-

ger or had a better quality of life than if they had taken standard chemotherapy. The FDA concluded that the drug presented an array of risks, including severe high blood pressure, massive bleeding, heart attack or heart failure, along with perforations in the stomach and intestines. “I did not come to this decision lightly,” said the FDA commissioner, Dr. Margaret Hamburg. But, she said, “Sometimes despite the hopes of investigators, patients, industry and even the FDA itself, the results of rigorous testing can be disappointing.” Turn

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FDA/B16


B12

Sunday, November 20, 2011

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Debt: Social Security tax

Medicare Annual Enrollment Period

Continued from B11 The panel appears to be deadlocked. Many economists hoped an extension of the Social Security tax cuts and unemployment benefits would be part of a supercommittee deal. Congress could extend those benefits separately. But it would be under pressure to offset the cost to avoid raising the deficit. The Social Security tax cut gave most Americans an extra $1,000 to $2,000 this year. Unemployment benefits provide about $300 a week. Most of that money quickly and directly boosts consumer spending, which drives the economy. By contrast, an expiration of those benefits could cut growth by about threequarters of a percentage point, economists said. Throw in other cuts, like those passed in the August debt deal, and all told, federal budget policies could subtract 1.7 percentage points from growth in 2012, according to JPMorgan Chase and Moody’s Analytics.

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Could be damaging Given the tepid economy, such a hit could be damaging. “It would be very difficult for an economy that’s doing well to digest, let alone one that’s barely growing at potential,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s. “That could unwind a lot of the improvement we’ve seen so far.” The economy grew at an annual rate of 2.5 percent in the July-September quarter. Some analysts fear it could fall below 2 percent next year, especially if the emergency unemployment benefits and Social Security tax cuts aren’t renewed. The U.S. economy faces other threats, too — from persistently high unemployment to Europe’s spreading debt crisis, which could hasten a recession.

“It’s certainly going to be a more challenging environment [next year].”

Wes Bush CEO of Northrop Grumman

If the automatic spending cuts take effect, the defense budget could be cut by nearly $500 billion over nine years. Some contractors are nervous. Wes Bush, CEO of Northrop Grumman, has told analysts that the company is bracing for spending cuts. “It’s certainly going to be a more challenging environment” next year, he said. Another wild card: Some investors fear the supercommittee’s failure would spark fresh downgrades of U.S. debt. Standard & Poor’s downgraded the government’s long-term debt in August. That contributed to a stock market plunge. It’s possible a deadlocked supercommittee would lead the two other major rating agencies — Fitch and Moody’s — to follow suit. Yet S&P’s downgrade did little to tarnish U.S. debt. Treasury prices rose, and yields fell. Bond investors still saw Treasurys as a super-safe investment. Federal borrowing costs actually declined.

Little impact “S&P showed that when a rating agency downgrades the best-known security in the world, it has little impact,” Kelly said. The market for U.S. Treasurys is so broad, accessible and transparent that ratings downgrades don’t pose much threat, he noted. Kelly said Wall Street is unlikely to panic given that expectations for the supercommittee “are so low as to be subterranean.” Even so, some traders appear to be positioning for

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Other changes Other changes could also be made next year. Tax cuts enacted during the Bush administration, and extended in 2010, are set to expire after 2012. Republicans will push to renew them. Extending those tax cuts, though, could require further spending cuts. “Given we are dealing with a number of different scenarios with wide-ranging outcomes, it seems foolhardy to try and quantify the economic impact at this juncture,” economists at RBC Capital Markets said in a note to clients Friday. Some economists said the automatic spending cuts could actually boost confidence a bit: They would reassure the world that the U.S. government can make progress in shrinking its deficit. Even so, the supercommittee seems likely to fall short of its goal to help reduce the federal debt load. And there’s more pressure to come. Priya Misra, an analyst at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, estimates that Congress will need to find $2 trillion more in cuts by August 2013 to prevent another credit downgrade.

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a shock. So-called “defensive” sectors of the stock market, like health care companies and utilities, which tend to retain their value in a weak economy, have been outpacing the S&P 500 index as a whole. In the past month, the economy has shown surprising strength. Reports last week showed that manufacturers are producing more goods and consumers are spending more. The number of people seeking unemployment benefits for the first time is at a seven-month low. Still, more than once since the recession officially ended more than two years ago, the economy has displayed vigor only to stumble again. High gas and food prices and Japan’s earthquake sharply slowed growth in the first half of the year. Congress’ debt-ceiling fight sent consumer confidence to recession levels. Sweet thinks there’s a good chance Congress will end up extending the Social Security tax cut. Partly on that assumption, Moody’s foresees 2.6 percent growth next year. For this year, analysts generally estimate less than 2 percent growth. The supercommittee could also agree on less than $1.2 trillion in cuts. Doing so would reduce the automatic spending cuts that would start in 2013.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, November 20, 2011

B13

Sailboat blown off anchor in PA again

Lu-Lu Belle’s trials Capt. Fred has had his own travails this year aboard Lu-Lu Belle. The 75-foot yacht ran aground May 14 about 50 miles south of Valdez, Alaska, at the Hinchinbrook Entrance to Prince William Sound. Her composite hull was severely damaged, and she

David G. Sellars (2)/for Peninsula Daily News

The 58-foot Commander is taken on the TraveLift to the Platypus Marine Inc. Commander Building.

ON THE WATERFRONT

The tug Norton Bay, right, and her barge, Macy-Renee, find safe harbor in Port Angeles before proceeding to the Sea of Cortez between Baja California and mainland Mexico.

Jim said the weather along the West Coast has been too rough, but he expected to depart Port Angeles for the 15-day voyage Friday.

spending nearly a month in Platypus Marine Inc.’s Commander Building to have a custom bulbous bow was conDavid G. sidered a and a bow thruster installed. Sellars total loss Tradition returns Verne Braghettia and by the his crew in Platypus’ fiberinsurance Steve DeBiddle, who is glass department also company. the current commodore of increased the size of the Fred the Port Angeles Yacht rolling chocks, which are purClub, has garnered a lot of now 22 inches deep by 27 chased support for reviving a feet long. the vesChristmas tradition that sel from Platypus Marine is has fallen by the wayside in the insur- the past few years — the working on Commander, ance which is also a 58-foot Christmas season lighted company boat parade. Delta that hails from and within a couple of Steve said members of Petersburg, Alaska, and she months of his mishap the yacht club as well as is stowed in, of all places, began rebuilding Lu-Lu the greater Port Angeles the Commander Building. Belle. Boat Haven community are According to Capt. CharIn early October, the looking forward to adorning lie Crane, Platypus’ director yacht was back in the their craft with lights and of sales and marketing, the water and Fred expected to cruising along the shoreline commercial fishing vessel be under way for Port past City Pier to Olympic will be at Platypus for the Angeles by about the midMedical Center, where the next couple of months as dle of the month — but parade boats will turn personnel install stainless that was not to be. about and go back along steel railings as well as I understand that Fred the shoreline to the marina. sandblast and paint the has opted to leave Lu-Lu Steve said four dates are hull, house and mast. Belle in Alaska for the win- scheduled for the parades, ter and will soon be flying which of necessity are Harbor filler-up home to Port Angeles. weather-dependent. The inaugural parade Tesoro Petroleum again Safe harbor will begin this coming Sat- was busy in Port Angeles urday at 6 p.m. to coincide Last week’s windy with the Port Angeles weather forced Norton Bay, Downtown Association’s a 70-foot tug, and her tow, Christmas tree-lighting cerMacy-Renee, a 192-foot emony at 5 p.m. barge, to come into Port On Dec. 3, 10 and 17, Angeles Harbor to await a the parades will start from break in the weather the marina’s entrance at 5 before continuing on their p.m. journey south. Steve encourages boat According to Jim Campowners who would like to bell of Astoria, Ore., who partake in re-establishing a owns Norton Bay, the tug tradition that has not and barge are on their way graced the waterfront since to the Sea of Cortez — aka the middle of the past Gulf of California — in decade to phone him at Mexico with a load of pile360-477-2406. driving equipment and related machinery that is North to Alaska owned by Vancouver Pile Driving Ltd. of North VanAleutian Belle, a 58-foot couver, B.C. Delta, will be on her way to The equipment is Kodiak, Alaska, within the needed in Mexico to build next couple of days. an export dock at a newly She was put back into opened mine. the water Thursday after

Harbor. On Monday, Tesoro provided bunkers to New Irene, a Korean-flagged, 728-foot bulk cargo ship with a 105-foot beam. On Friday, Tesoro refueled SeaRiver American Progress, a 600-foot petroleum products carrier that hails from Norfolk, Va. Then Saturday, Tesoro refueled the Crowleyowned articulated tug and barge, Vision. Today, Tesoro will bunker Alaskan Explorer, a 941-foot crude oil tanker, and Nord Crest, a 656-foot-

long bulk cargo ship that made her way to Port Angeles from the marine terminals at the Port of Kalama on the Columbia River.

________

David G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resident and former Navy boatswain’s mate who enjoys boats and strolling the waterfront. Items involving boating, port activities and the North Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are always welcome. Email dgsellars@hotmail.com or phone him at 360-808-3202. His column, On the Waterfront, appears every Sunday.

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ESTHER MARIE, THE 46-foot sailboat that has been anchored in the west end of Port Angeles Harbor for most of the past three years, broke free from her moorings last week. The gale-force winds that were lashing the area at the time blew the boat east until it was spotted in the vicinity of the fish pens off Ediz Hook. The Coast Guard intercepted the wayward craft, returned her to the west end of the harbor and secured her to the Coast Guard’s buoy. This is not the first time that Esther Marie, whose hailing port is Juneau, Alaska, roamed free in the harbor. On the night of Dec. 14, 2008, she broke loose from her moorings and was blown onto the rocks at Hollywood Beach in Port Angeles. Doug Zimmerman of Sequim owns the boat — which is constructed of ferro­cement and was built by his father in 1973 when the family lived in Alaska. At the time, Doug had few options available in removing the boat that was slowly beating itself upon the rocks in front of the Red Lion Hotel. For more than two days, the sailboat was subjected to the pounding waves until Capt. Fred Rodolf, owner of Lu-Lu Belle, a 76-foot Alaskan tour boat, offered to help. Shortly before 7 a.m. on the morning of Dec. 17, 2008, Capt. Fred brought his boat from her side slip in the Boat Haven and positioned her bow within about 100 feet of the stern of the grounded sailboat. A line was attached between the boats and Capt. Fred backed Lu-Lu Belle down until it was taut. Maintaining a steady strain on the line, the sailboat, aided by the cresting waves of high tide, slowly floated off the rocks. Once Esther Marie was back in the water, it was determined there was no significant damage to the hull, and she was temporarily moored between two float-guide pilings at City Pier until she was moved out into the harbor — where she has been riding her hook for the past three years.

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B14

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from B11

Send us your business news

Station general manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Monday through Thursday segments, and Karen Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. This week’s scheduled lineup: Station manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Monday DO YOU HAVE a business expansion planned, through Thursday segstaffing change or a new product line? Are you ments, and Karen Hanan starting a new business? hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention This week’s scheduled news of your business in our daily Business Briefly lineup: column. ■  Monday: Local Simply send in the information — including a author Dorothea Hoverphone number for us to get additional information, Kramer discusses her new if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following book, Healing Touch. methods: In the second segment, ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. Jody Copeland talks about ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port the Port Angeles High Angeles, WA 98362. School senior party fund■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. raiser. Photos are always welcome. If you’re emailing a ■  Tuesday: Steven photo, be sure it is of high resolution. Burke, director of the William Shore Memorial Pool. Please note: We cannot publish items by ■  Wednesday: Clallam private businesses soliciting business — e.g., County commissioners. merchandise sales, paid seminars, openings in ■  Thursday: No show preschools or other paid educational or training because of Thanksgiving. programs. These need to be addressed as paid ■  Friday: eTown advertisements. shows that were recorded For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form live Sept. 17 as part of the faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 Elwha River dams removal weekdays. celebration in Port Angeles, featuring the music of eninsula aily ews Cake, Eliza Gilkyson and Danny Barnes; Congressman Norm Dicks and Jon Jarvis, director of the “We are proud to have Default feared National Park Service. gained this status and left OLYMPIA — State Treawith a good feeling that surer James McIntire is Lavender meeting we are heading in the urging lawmakers to pass SEQUIM — Three right direction with our legislation to prevent a bond members of the Sequim festival business plan and default for a Wenatchee Lavender Growers Associa- marketing.” events center, saying a tion, producers of the 16th For more information, Sequim Lavender Festival, click on www.sequimlaven- default would significantly impact borrowing costs for joined 160 other lavender dergrowers.com or phone Washington’s other public growers and lavender asso- 360-582-1907. entities. ciations from throughout The Greater Wenatchee the U.S., Great Britain and Buys ski area Regional Events Center Canada at the recent STEVENS PASS — On Public Facilities District has Northwest Regional Lavenbeen unable to pay off a $42 the eve of the ski season, der Conference in Everett. million debt for the Town the Stevens Pass ski area The conference focused Toyota Center, a 4,300-seat has been sold to the same on the lavender market, facility completed in 2008 Orlando, Fla., company agri-tourism and festival that hosts hockey games that owns the ski areas at productions. and other events. Snoqualmie Pass. Attending were Mary The proposal announced CNL Lifestyle ProperJendrucko, co-owner of the Friday would enable the ties said Friday it paid Sequim Lavender Co. and state to pay the debt on Dec. Sequim Lavender Festival Harbor Properties of Seat- 1 by tapping the sales tax tle $20.5 million for the director; Donna Green, revenues from the districts Greenhill Farm; and Mau- 1,125-acre property. that helped build the arena. No immediate changes reen Hanson, Lil’s LavenThe loan would be repaid in operations or on-site der Inc. within 10 years. management are planned, “Almost every introducMcIntire’s office said the the companies said. tory remark and recogniloan would not affect the Stevens’ season passes tion at this event menstate’s budget deficit or comand other commitments tioned Sequim and the pete with state operating, Sequim Lavender Festival will be honored. capital or transportation But Snoqualmie season budgets. as the birthpace and passes won’t be honored at matriarch of the lavender Stevens. industry,” said Jendrucko. Food stamp scam SEATTLE — A 57-yearold Seattle woman has been COMMUNICATION WIRING sentenced to 18 months in prison and ordered to pay TELEPHONE & COMPUTER WIRING $400,000 in restitution for taking part in a food stamp scam.

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Kindle loss? NEW YORK — Amazon. com Inc.’s Kindle Fire tablet, which started shipping last week, costs $201.70 to make, a research firm said Friday. That’s $2.70 more than Amazon charges for it. The analysis by IHS indicates that Amazon is, at least initially, selling the tablet at a loss that it hopes to cover through sales of books and movies for the device. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos told The Associated Press in September that the company’s goal was to make a small profit from the hardware, but as a retail company, Amazon was willing to live with a smaller margin than most electronics companies would.

Supplier dropped MINNEAPOLIS — McDonald’s Corp. said Friday it has dropped a Minnesota-based egg supplier after an animal-advocacy group released an undercover video of operations at the egg producer’s farms in three states. The video by Mercy for Animals shows what the group calls animal cruelty at five Sparboe Farms facilities in Iowa, Minnesota and Colorado. The move also followed a warning letter to Sparboe Farms dated Wednesday from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that said inspectors found “serious violations” at five Sparboe facilities of federal regulations meant to prevent salmonella. NEW YORK — Benchmark crude oil fell $1.41 Friday to finish at $97.41 per barrel in New York. Brent crude gave up 69 cents to end the week at $107.40 per barrel in London. In other energy trading, gasoline futures fell 2.87 cents to end at $2.4784 per gallon.

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Curbside Collections: There will be no garbage and recycling collections on Thanksgiving Day. Thursday collections will be on Friday and Friday collections will be on Saturday.

Due to weather, collections may be on a later schedule. Leave containers out until collected. City offices closed Thursday & Friday for the holidays.

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32.9 percent in 2009, but dropped slightly to 32.8 last year. Cesarean deliveries are sometimes medically necessary. But health officials have worried that many C-sections are done out of convenience or unwarranted caution, and in the 1980s set a goal of keeping the national rate at 15 percent.

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GOV. CHRIS GREGOIRE, who already has announced that she will not seek a third term next year, said Friday that she is “worn out” from all the budget cutting she has been forced to do the past three years. The governor gave a gloomy budget assessment during a noon talk to a National Philanthropy Day luncheon in Seattle, Gregoire confessing that the state’s social services are “badly frayed.” “Three years of trying to do the kind of budget cutting I’ve had to do has me worn out,” Gregoire said. The governor will propose further cuts when she proposes a supplemental budget Monday. “Frankly, we are developing holes in our safety net,” Gregoire added. The governor made clear to the assembled givers that they have to fill some of those holes. “We’re going to get out of [the Great Recession] because of people like you,” Gregoire said. “I wish I could go out there and hug every one of you and say, ‘Thanks!’” the governor declared. Peninsula Daily News news sources

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ATLANTA — U.S. births dropped for the third straight year, especially for young mothers, and experts think money worries are the reason. A federal report released last week showed declines in the birthrate for all races and most age groups. Teens and women in their early 20s had the most dramatic dip, to the lowest rates since records started being kept in the 1940s. Also, the rate of cesarean sections stopped rising for the first time since 1996. Experts suspected the economy drove down birthOutlook brightens rates in 2008 and 2009 as WASHINGTON — The women put off having chillatest evidence that the dren. economy is making steady With the 2010 figures, gains emerged Friday from suspicion has turned into a gauge of future economic certainty. activity, which rose in Octo“I don’t think there’s any ber at the fastest pace in doubt now that it was the eight months. recession,” said Carl Haub, A string of better-thana demographer with the expected economic reports Population Reference this month has led some Bureau, a Washington, D.C.analysts to revise up their based research organization. forecasts for growth. Still, He was not involved in they caution that their the new report. brighter outlook remains U.S. births hit a record in under threat from Europe’s 2007, at more than 4.3 milfinancial crisis. The most recent sign was lion. During the next two years, the number dropped Friday’s report by the Conference Board that its index to about 4.2 million then about 4.1 million. of leading economic indicaLast year, it was down to just over 4 million, according to the new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For teens, birthrates dropped 9 percent from 2009. For women in their early 20s, they fell 6 percent. For unmarried mothers, the drop was 4 percent. Another surprise: the HEARTH & HOME C-section rate. 257151 Highway 101 • 452-3366 It rose steadily from nearly 21 percent in 1996 to

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NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Friday. Aluminum - $0.9457 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.4025 Cathode full plate, LME; $3.4020 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $1975.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8670 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1719.00 Handy & Harman; $1724.70 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $32.095 Handy & Harman; $32.413 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum - $1592.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1588.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri.

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OPPONENT WINTER PARENT MEET. @ WF WEST VS. KINGSTON VS. NORTH MASON @ OLYMPIC @ PORT TOWNSEND VS. BREMERTON @ KLAHOWYA VS. NORTH KITSAP WINTER BB CLASSIC WINTER BB CLASSIC @KINGSTON @NORTH MASON @SEQUIM VS. OLYMPIC VS. PORT TOWNSEND @BREMERTON VS. KLAHOWYA @ NORTH KITSAP VS. SEQUIM

2011-12

1B5140184

WINTER SPORTS

PAHS Boys Varsity Basketball DATE 11/21 11/30 12/02 12/06 12/09 12/12 12/14 12/16 12/20 12/28 12/29 01/06 01/10 01/13 01/17 01/20 01/24 01/27 01/31 02/07

B15

Sunday, November 20, 2011

2012

2011

Peninsula Daily News


B16

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

WeatherNorthwest Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 38

Low 30

45/37

49/43

48/35

42/34

Mostly cloudy and cold.

Some clouds with a little snow late.

Rain.

Rain, some heavy; windy.

Rain.

Cloudy with rain possible.

The Peninsula Cold air will remain in place across the Peninsula today with a mostly cloudy sky. However, no precipitation is expected. High temperatures Victoria in most places will only be in the 30s and lower 40s. A storm 45/37 system approaching the region will spread a bit of snow Neah Bay Port across the region later tonight that can accumulate a coat43/39 Townsend ing to an inch by morning. A southerly flow will allow for Port Angeles 42/37 some milder air to work in on Monday, so snow levels 38/30 will rise to around 3,000 feet, so rain is expected Sequim across the lower elevations.

41/35

Forks 44/35

Olympia 40/29

Seattle 36/31

Spokane 29/18

Yakima Kennewick 29/20 36/25

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Mostly cloudy and chilly today. Wind east 6-12 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear. Some clouds tonight with a little rain late. Wind east 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Rain tomorrow. Wind east-northeast 8-16 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Tuesday: Rain of varying rates. Wind east 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles.

LaPush

7:31 a.m. 7:55 p.m. Port Angeles 9:47 a.m. 11:06 p.m. Port Townsend 11:32 a.m. ----Sequim Bay* 10:53 a.m. -----

Sunset today ................... 4:31 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:29 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 1:40 a.m. Moonset today ................. 1:41 p.m.

Moon Phases

Nov 24

Everett 40/31

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sun & Moon

First

Full

Last

National Forecast

Sunday, November 20, 2011 Seattle 36/31 Billings 34/18

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

7.9’ 6.6’ 7.4’ 4.9’ 8.9’ --8.4’ ---

1:04 a.m. 1:59 p.m. 3:06 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 4:20 a.m. 6:14 p.m. 4:13 a.m. 6:07 p.m.

1.4’ 1.6’ 2.2’ 1.5’ 2.8’ 2.0’ 2.6’ 1.9’

8:21 a.m. 9:06 p.m. 10:20 a.m. ----12:51 a.m. 12:05 p.m. 12:12 a.m. 11:26 a.m.

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht

8.5’ 7.0’ 7.5’ --5.9’ 9.0’ 5.5’ 8.5’

2:03 a.m. 2:59 p.m. 4:09 a.m. 5:39 p.m. 5:23 a.m. 6:53 p.m. 5:16 a.m. 6:46 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

1.6’ 0.6’ 3.0’ 0.4’ 3.9’ 0.5’ 3.7’ 0.5’

High Tide Ht 9:09 a.m. 10:10 p.m. 12:33 a.m. 10:54 a.m. 2:18 a.m. 12:39 p.m. 1:39 a.m. 12:00 p.m.

9.0’ 7.3’ 5.7’ 7.6’ 6.9’ 9.2’ 6.5’ 8.6’

Low Tide Ht 3:00 a.m. 3:54 p.m. 5:12 a.m. 6:20 p.m. 6:26 a.m. 7:34 p.m. 6:19 a.m. 7:27 p.m.

1.8’ -0.3’ 3.8’ -0.7’ 4.9’ -0.9’ 4.6’ -0.8’

Dec 2

Dec 10

Dec 17

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 61 46 s Baghdad 65 41 sh Beijing 48 28 s Brussels 55 43 s Cairo 67 57 pc Calgary 18 5 pc Edmonton -4 -17 s Hong Kong 77 66 pc Jerusalem 52 43 sh Johannesburg 74 56 t Kabul 67 35 pc London 54 48 pc Mexico City 79 52 pc Montreal 54 25 c Moscow 25 10 c New Delhi 86 59 pc Paris 58 48 s Rio de Janeiro 79 69 s Rome 64 52 pc Stockholm 43 34 sh Sydney 84 65 t Tokyo 64 48 pc Toronto 54 28 c Vancouver 43 37 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Minneapolis 27/22

Detroit 54/33

Chicago 44/36 San Francisco 56/43

Denver 48/29

New York 61/47 Washington 62/51

Kansas City 43/32

Los Angeles 62/53 Atlanta 70/57

El Paso 70/50

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice -10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 2 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 38 32 0.26 13.58 Forks* 39 28 1.34 101.05 Seattle 41 32 0.29 30.76 Sequim 41 31 0.14 14.10 Hoquiam 43 32 0.20 58.16 Victoria 37 28 0.16 25.86 P. Townsend 40 35 0.19 13.87 *Data from Friday

New

Port Ludlow 41/35 Bellingham 37/28

Aberdeen 46/35

Peninsula Daily News

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 82/69 Miami 83/73

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 58 40 pc 22 11 pc 47 35 pc 70 57 pc 62 46 c 62 48 c 38 24 pc 34 18 s 23 8 s 40 29 pc 65 43 c 53 30 c 75 53 pc 44 30 pc 44 36 c 59 48 r 30 20 c 44 32 pc 83 67 t 48 29 pc 42 31 pc 54 33 c 39 32 pc -19 -31 s 28 14 pc 83 71 pc 82 69 pc 20 19 c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 43 61 73 62 83 41 27 68 81 61 50 39 82 69 62 72 40 68 47 55 49 48 80 64 56 31 31 62

Lo W 32 c 45 pc 60 t 53 r 73 pc 32 s 22 s 59 t 64 pc 47 c 38 c 26 pc 62 pc 51 pc 48 c 54 pc 33 pc 54 pc 27 pc 37 r 44 c 32 pc 70 t 54 c 43 r 21 pc 21 pc 51 c

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 95 at Falfurrias, TX

Low: -9 at Utica, MT

1B5140122

FDA: Avastin world’s best-selling cancer drug Continued from B11 scribe it — but insurers may not pay for it. Including infusion fees, a Avastin is the world’s best-selling cancer drug and year’s treatment with Avasalso is used to treat certain tin can cost $100,000. Some insurers already forms of colon, lung, kidney had quit covering the drug’s and brain cancers. use in breast cancer after So even though the FDA FDA’s advisers twice — once formally revoked its approval last year and once this sumof the drug to treat breast mer — urged revoking the cancer, doctors still could pre- approval.

peninsuladailynews.com

But Medicare said Friday that it will keep paying for now. In a statement, the agency said it “will monitor the issue and evaluate coverage options as a result of action by the FDA but has no immediate plans to change coverage policies.” Hamburg said any

woman wishing to remain on Avastin should have an indepth discussion with her doctor about the risks and what the research into the drug showed. Avastin manufacturer Genentech, part of Swiss drugmaker Roche Group, had argued that the drug should remain available

while it conducted more research to see if certain subsets of breast cancer patients might benefit, perhaps people whose tumors contain certain genetic characteristics. After all, some doctors had argued that they do see a few patients who seem to do better with Avastin than

without it. Hamburg said she considered that argument but that scientifically, there are no clues yet to identify such women. She urged Genentech to do that research, saying the FDA “absolutely” would reconsider if the company could find the right evidence.”

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Includes Sage Stuffing, Mashed Potatoes & Gravy, Fresh Vegetable, Cranberry Relish, Butter Roll. Ice Cream for Dessert.


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

SUNLAND CONDO

HIGH BANK WATERFRONT

WONDERFUL HOME W/SHOP

Perfectly located in quiet cul-de-sac between Sequim & Port Angeles. 3 BR/2 BA, 1,856 SF. Well kept and improved rambler with private backyard and manicured front yard. Walk-in closet in master, living room and family room, open bright kitchen. Large utility room with storage, 3rd BR very large with exterior entry. $177,400 ML#261658. 40 Blueberry Place, Sequim. Call Brooke (360) 417-2812 for a private showing.

1B4079128

Perfect future home site. Nice level lot with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. ML#251872 $250,000

Want a gorgeous home? Located on 4.78 private acres, beautifully landscaped. Eat-in kitchen with Corian countertops, SS appliances, Bosch stove oven, skylight, laminate flooring & dark wood cabinetry. 3 BR/2 BA, Master suite w/soaking tub. Walk-in closets. Large shop w/RV parking & lots of storage! ML#260917 Only $315,000 ®

WRE/Port Angeles

Kim Bower

360-477-0654 360-683-3900

IMMACULATE

Tammy Newton 360.417.8598

UPTOWN REALTY Brooke Nelson Office: (360) 417-2812 www.RealtorBrooke.com BrookeNelson@olypen.com

Quint Boe Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

GREAT LOCATION

C1

1B407950

190 Priest Rd. PO Box 1060 Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

MOVE-IN READY!

1B407963

1B407948

Super nice and clean, updated SunLand condo on the golf course. 2 BR/2 BA with propane stove, custom “Murphy” bed in guest room, Japanese style screen, 2-car attached garage. This immaculate home is the perfect place to live while enjoying the SunLand amenities that include swimming pool, beach access and tennis. $159,000. ML#262279 Call Kim Bower 360-683-3900/477-0654

Sunday, November 20, 2011

tammy@jacerealestate.com 1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

IT’S EASY AS PUMPKIN PIE

AFFORDABLE HOUSING! E

NG

I ND

to buy this 3 BR home in Port Angeles - built in 1995 and has a water view - you can possibly move in for zero/low down with some of the financing options available. Your monthly payment could possibly be no more than you’ve been paying for rent. With a list price of $150,000 - this is bound to be gobbled up fast. Call SHERYL. ML#261557/253752

PE

1B407958

1B407967

1B407947

1B407960

Beautiful, spotless, 2,090 SF home with 3 BR/2.5 BA. Great kitchen w/wood floors and dining area, formal dining room, living room w/propane fireplace, master suite with separate shower and soaking tub, huge family or media room, fully fenced backyard w/large concrete patio and hot tub, covered front entrance w/sitting area. ML#260426 $259,000

3 BR/2 BA rambler. Features large, nicely landscaped lot. 28 x 36 garage/shop w/wood stove. Generous paved area off alley for easy maneuvering. Bonus room w/adjoining laundry and bath. Cozy fireplace, too. ML#261373 $229,000

L SA

Yes, it’s affordable for many first time buyers. This 3 BR/1 BA home has over 1,000 SF and is ready to move in. West side location is convenient to Lincoln Park and the Fairgrounds. Come on, call and check this out for yourself. $114,900 ML#262168

WRE/Sequim - East

WRE/Port Angeles

Paul Beck

(360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

460-9363 sheryl@olypen.com www.sequimwa.com

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

WELCOME HOME

JUST LISTED

1B407962

GREAT LOCATION on the corner of 9th and Albert. This Fixer Upper is assessed for $109,319. The RIGHT neighborhood for your restoration project. 960 SF, 2 BR, 1-car garage, 2 yr. old roof. Only $79,900 ML#262244

MANY POSSIBILITIES

1B407931

1B407957

Find us on Facebook.com/alwayscalljace

Dan Gase

Office: (360) 417-2804

BRIGADOON AREA

1B407965

3 BR/1.75 BA tidy home with custom stained -glass entry & Pergo floor. Wood-burning stove in living room, double sink in kitchen & roomy newer family room. Two storage areas in the backyard including one with power. Mt. view corner lot. AHS Home Warranty for Buyer! ML#261556 Only $189,900 Always Call JACE for Land and Homes on Land!

UPTOWN REALTY

Sheryl Payseno Burley

Tom Blore tom@sequim.com

• Views of Strait & The Olympics • Low Maintenance Landscaping • Skylights & Open Floor Plan • Large Garage & Laundry Room • Large Deck to Enjoy the Views

Main house is 966 SF w/2 BR/2 BA, open floor plan, HW floors, 2-car attached garage. The additional 1,150 SF dwelling is perfect for guests or artist studio. One space has an attractive design scheme and the rest can be finished to your liking. Back of property runs along the Dungeness River, mature evergreens & fruit trees on 1.88 acres w/beautiful Mt. view. ML#261832/270696 $249,000

ML#198841/260592 $235,000

WRE/SunLand

Jace Schmitz, REALTOR®

Deb Kahle

UPTOWN REALTY DAVID A. RAMEY Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

360.565.2020

www.calljace.com jace@jacerealestate.com 1234 E. Front St., Port Angeles

PRIVACY IN THE CITY

SUNLAND CHARMER!

670-9418 teamtopper@olypen.com

COUNTRY ROADS TAKE YOU HOME

...and you’ll love this home! 3 BR on 4+ acres between Port Angeles and Sequim. Lots of sunny space to garden plus a seasonal creek. Got critters? Big barn also double as a workshop. Don’t miss this idyllic setting and welcoming home. Great new price at only $179,900 ML#260603 Preview at www.Pili.net

WRE/Sequim - East Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157 chuck@portangelesrealty.com www.portangelesrealty.com

REDUCED PRICE IS NICE

C

PRI

PRICE REDUCED!

on private 5 acres! If you want privacy, this is it. Large 4 BR/2.5 BA house mostly fenced in a great area for horses. Kitchen has been updated w/granite, hardwood floors, large laundry room and lots of trees. $299,000 ML#261102

TOWN & COUNTRY

MARGARET WOMACK (360)461-0500 mwomack@olypen.com www.MargaretWomack.NET

SERIOUS INVESTOR ALERT

D

UCE

ED ER

(360) 437-1011 Direct: (360) 301-2929 laura@olypen.com

1B407884

Office: (360) 452-7861/Direct: 417-2781 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 BeckyJ@olypen.com Website: www.BeckyJ.com

LARGE HOUSE

Laura Halady

1B407911

UPTOWN REALTY Rebecca Jackson, CRS, GRI

UPTOWN REALTY PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

1B407959

1B407954

This 3 BR/2 BA home is located just East of the 7 Cedars Casino. Features a newer 3-car garage, historic restored cabin and situated above year-round creek. Take a nature walk or just enjoy your natural surroundings. 2.18 AC. Price is now $259,900 ML#261050

No bank waterfront in the Resort of Port Ludlow. Finished w/maple cabinetry, granite tile counters, Bosch stainless appliances & hardwood. 2 BR plus den, propane fireplace in living room and master bedroom. ML#232465 $598,950

WRE/Port Ludlow

CAROLYN & Robert DODDS Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

Chuck Turner

1B407951

Remodeled with updated kitchen & laminate floors throughout. Spacious bedrooms, large family room and open kitchen/dining area. Attached 2-car garage. $229,000 OLS#262232 NWMLS #292885 Call CAROLYN or ROBERT 460-9248 or 8090439

BEACHFRONT TOWNHOME

1B407955

1B407966

1B407927

Spacious 3 BR/3 BA rambler on 3 lots with family room and den. Tastefully updated, this contemporary home w/large private patio is perfect for year-round entertaining. Just listed at $279,000! ML#262264

TOWN & COUNTRY

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.debkahle.withwre.com

13.26 acres of magnificent Sequim farmland, perfect for small farm, home or investment uses. Year round creek & Olympic Mountain views. Irrigation rights. Owner Financing possible. ML#241762 Only $139,000 Always Call JACE for Land! Find us on Facebook.com/alwayscalljace

Jace Schmitz, REALTOR® 360.565.2020

www.calljace.com jace@jacerealestate.com 1234 E. Front St., Port Angeles

Popular apartment complex in central Port Angeles location for sale. A 38 unit investment opportunity for the serious investor. Call for a confidential appointment to review the numbers and the possibilities. $3,100,000 ML#261504

UPTOWN REALTY

Dan Gase

Office: (360) 417-2804 dan@dangase.com


C2

Classified

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula

MARKETPLACE

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

51

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

GREAT LOCATION Beautiful, spotless, 2,090 sf home with 3 Br. and 2.5 baths. Great kitchen with wood floors and dining area, formal dining room, living room with propane fireplace, master suite with separate shower and soaking tub, huge family or media room, fully fenced back yard with large concrete patio and hot tub, covered front entrance with sitting area. $259,000 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 Immaculate 3 Br., 2 bath rambler. Features large nicely landscaped lot. 28x 36 garage/shop with wood stove. Generous paved area off alley for easy maneuvering. Bonus room with adjoining laundry and bath. Cozy fireplace, too. $229,000 ML261373/243537 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

IT’S EASY AS PUMPKIN PIE To buy this 3 Br. home in Port Angeles, built in 1995 and has a water view. You can possibly move in for zero/low down with some of the financing options available. Your monthly payment could possibly be no more than you’ve been paying for rent. $150,000. ML261557 Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East JUST LISTED Great location on the corner of 9th and Albert. This fixerupper is assessed for $109,319. The right neighborhood for your restoration project! 960 sf, 2 Br., 1 car garage, 2 year old roof. $79,900. ML262244 Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LARGE HOUSE On private 5 acres! If you want privacy, this is it: large 4 Br., 2.5 bath house on 5 acres, mostly fenced, in a great area for horses. Kitchen has been updated with granite, hardwood floors, large laundry room, and lots of trees. $299,000 ML261102/226757 Margaret Womack 461-0500 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

51

51

Homes

BRIGADOON AREA Views of the Straits and the Olympics. Low maintenance landscaping. Skylights and open floor plan. Large garage and laundry room. Large deck to enjoy the views. $235,000 ML198841/260592 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND MANY POSSIBILITIES Main house is 966 sf has 2 Br., 2 bath, open floor plan, hardwood floors, 2 car attached garage. The additional 1,150 sf dwelling is perfect for guests or artist studio. One space has an attractive design scheme, and the rest can be finished to your liking. Back of property runs along the Dungeness River, mature evergreens and fruit trees on 1.88 acres with a beautiful mountain view. $249,000 ML261832/270696 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY MOVE-IN READY! Perfectly located in quiet cul-de-sac between Sequim and Port Angeles, 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,856 sf. Well kept and improved rambler with private back yard and manicured front yard. Walk-in closet in master, living room and family room, open bright kitchen. Large utility room with storage, 3rd Br. very large with exterior entry. $177,400. ML261658. Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Homes

51

P.A./SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath manuf. home, freshly painted inside, laminate flooring in kitchen, dining and laundry, W/D, range, fridge, dishwasher, added room for crafts or office, upgraded bathrooms, covered concrete deck, 24x24 garage, 24x42 metal building, 1.12 acres. $178,500 or make me an offer I can’t refuse. 452-5891 or 206-618-5268.

SUNLAND CHARMER Remodeled with updated kitchen and laminate floors throughout. Spacious bedrooms, large family room and open kitchen/ dining area. Attached 2-car garage. $229,000. ML262232 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

PRIVACY IN THE CITY Spacious 3 Br., 3 bath, rambler on 3 lots, with family room and den. Tastefully updated, this contemporary home with a large private patio is perfect for yearround entertaining. $279,000. ML262264. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

SUNLAND CONDO Super nice and clean, updated Sunland condo on the golf course. 2 Br., 2 bath with propane stove, custom “Murphy” bed in guest room, Japanese style screen, 2 car attached garage. This immaculate home is the perfect place to live while enjoying the Sunland amenities that include swimming pool, beach access, and tennis. $159,000. ML262279. Kim Bower Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

REDUCED PRICE IS NICE This 3 Br., 2 bath home is located just East of the 7 Cedars Casino. Features a newer 3 car garage, historic restored cabin and situated above year-round creek. Take a nature walk or just enjoy your natural surroundings. $259,900. ML261050 Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

This 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,380 sf home was beautifully remodeled on the inside in 2008. The kitchen features stainless steel appliances, granite counters, and maple cabinets. The open living area has bamboo hardwood floors and lots of windows. It is located near Shane park. $177,500. Call at 360-477-8014

SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Open House Sunday

Open House Sunday Nov. 20th • 12 - 2 pm

Nov. 20th • 2:30 - 4:30 pm

214 W. 5TH, PORT ANGELES

128 W. 3RD, PORT ANGELES

3179 OLD OLYMPIC HWY., PORT ANGELES

Nov. 20th • 12 - 2 pm

51

Homes

Homes

This well kept 4+ Br., 1,962 sf home has a large living room and dining area with a propane fireplace, southern exposure back yard and a large 2 car garage with a workshop. Upgrades include newer windows, updated electrical and forced air heat. $169,900 ML261675/259008 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WELCOME HOME 3 Br., 1 3/4 bath tidy home with custom stained-glass entry and Pergo floor. Wood-burning stove in living room, new cabinet fronts and roomy newer family room. Two storage areas in the backyard including one with power. Mountain view corner lot. AHS Home Warranty for buyer! $189,900. ML261556. Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company WONDERFUL HOME WITH SHOP Want a gorgeous home? Located on 4.78 private acres, beautifully landscaped. Eat-in kitchen with Corian countertops, stainless steel appliances, Bosch stove oven, skylight, laminate flooring and dark wood cabinetry. 3 Br., 2 bath, master suite with soaking tub. Walk-in closets. Large shop with RV parking and lots of storage! $315,000. ML260917. Tammy Newton 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

54

Lots/ Acreage

HIGH BANK WATERFRONT Perfect future home site. Nice level lot with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment $250,000. ML251872. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br., unfurnished $478. 2 Br., $514-541. 3 Br., $695. + fixed util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258 NO LAUNDROMATS! W/D in spacious P.A. 2 Br. $600 plus dep. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423 P.A.: Central, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, no smoke/pets. $650. 360-796-3560 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

SUNDAY, NOV. 20

Open House Sunday

1PM-3PM

1B407953

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

COUNTRY ROADS TAKE YOU HOME And you’ll love this home! 3 Br. on 4+ acres between Port Angeles and Sequim. Lots of sunny space to garden plus a seasonal creek. Got critters? Big barn also doubles as a workshop. Don’t miss this idyllic setting and welcoming home. Great new price! $179,900. ML260603. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Homes

Being held open TODAY Cherry Hill Traditional 2 BR/1.5 BA. Spacious rooms throughout with hardwood & vintage linoleum floors, fireplace with an insert, vinyl windows, plus a balcony off upstairs with great mountain view. Come check it out. Harriet will be there to answer any questions. $149,500 ML#261810/276593

This well-kept 4+ bedroom, 1,962 SF home has a large living room and dining area w/propane fireplace, southern exposure backyard and a large 2-car garage w/workshop. Upgrades include newer windows, updated electrical and forced air heat. ML#261675/259008 Only $169,900. Directions: From Lincoln, West on 3rd.

Directions: Between Oak & Cherry. WRE/Port Angeles

Harriet Reyenga (360) 457-0456 (360) 460-8759 harriet@olypen.com

WRE/Port Angeles

Kelly Johnson Cell: 477-5876

kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

BEAUTIFUL HOME well constructed in a secluded, tranquil setting. Aesthetic upgrades in the kitchen include Hickory cabinets w/pullouts, convection oven and a breathtaking Mt. view. Spend time on the large covered porch. 3 BR/2.5 BA on over 6 AC w/stocked pond, putting green, mini tree farm. Priced below value at $598,000 ML#260451/192932 Directions: From Port Angeles, E. on Old Olympic Hwy approx. 3 miles to address marker on L. Home at end of private road and through gate.

1B407956

Sell your Treasures!

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

1B407964

NEED EXTRA CASH!

BEACHFRONT TOWNHOME No bank waterfront in the Resort of Port Ludlow. Finished with maple cabinetry, granite tile counters, Bosch stainless appliances and hard wood. 2 Br. plus den, propane fireplace in living room and master Br. $589,950. ML232465. Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow CHERRY HILL TRADITIONAL 2 Br., 1.5 bath. Spacious rooms throughout with hardwood and vintage linoleum floors, fireplace with an insert, vinyl windows, plus a balcony off upstairs with great mountain view. $149,500 ML261810/276593 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Golf Course Condominium. Very cozy condominium that sits on the 1st Fairway of the 7 Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course. Sequim is the driest climate in Western Washington and the golf course is at the top. Restaurant and lounge are a stones throw from your condominium. Granite counters, electric fireplace, vaulted ceiling, view of mountains and golf course. Home comes completely furnished down to the kitchen ware and sheets. All you need to bring is yourself. This is a great 2nd home, vacation rental, or investment property. $69,000. 360-643-7925

51

1B407961

AFFORDABLE HOUSING! Yes, it’s affordable for many first time buyers. This 3 Br., 1 bath home has over 1,000 sf and is ready to move in. West side location is convenient to Lincoln Park and the Fairgrounds. Come on, call and check this out for yourself. $114,900. ML262168 Dan Gase 417-2804 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Beautiful home, well constructed, in a secluded, tranquil setting. Aesthetic upgrades in the kitchen include hickory cabinets, a plethora of pullouts, convection oven and a breathtaking mtn view. Spend time on the large covered porch, go golf or go fishing when you live in this spacious 3 Br., 2.5 bath home on over six acres with a stocked pond, putting green, and a mini tree farm. Welcome home to the good life! $598,000. ML260451/192932 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Homes

220 Cline Rd., Sequim MAINS FARM CHARMER Great location! Lightfilled inside with newer windows & roof. Remodeled bathroom w/Italian tile & soak tub. Outside features large front yard, playset, expansive deck & room to park an RV. Private backyard borders woods. Bonus 380 SF finished space in basement. Great Community! OLS#262149/NWMLS287979 $172,000 Directions: From Hwy. 101, N. on Kitchen Dick, E. on Lotzgesell, N. on Cays, W. on W. Nelson, R. on Cline Rd. to 220.

WRE/Port Angeles

DOC REISS Cell: 461-0613 Office: 457-0456

DEBORAH NORMAN Assoc. Broker 360.681.8778

SHERRY SIEGEL

CERTIFIED ECOBROKER®, Accredited Buyer Representative (ABR)®

360.681.8778 cell: 461-6871

It’s a terrific way to reach a whole new market for anything you might want to sell. www.peninsuladailynews.com For details on how your ad can be on the internet 61246807

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 63

Duplexes

501 RHODES RD: 2 Br., no pet/smoke. $700, dep. 477-0408. P.A.: East side, quiet 2 Br., deck, carport. $675. 452-6611. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 ba, garage, lawn care. $850. 683-6935.

1012 W. 10th, P.A. 2 Br., wood stove, no smoking/pets. $700, reference check. 928-2165

Commercial Space

LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

68

C3

Commercial Space

EAST P.A.: Warehouse/workshop. 20x32 $300. 2,200 sf $600. 457-9732, 457-9527 PEABODY PLAZA 1 or 2 person, 7th and Peabody. $375 mo. 452-1232 ext. 11 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

Managing: Residential, Furnished, Commercial and Storage Property Management is NOT our sideline

Free Investment Consultations 330 E. 1st St., Ste #1 360.452.1326 Port Angeles Fax: 360.457.3212

195133101

64

Houses

68

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

portangeleslandmark.com

1725 W. 5th P.A. 2 Br. $600, no smoking/pets. 457-1632. 4322 S. C St., P.A. 3 Br., 2 ba, no smoking/pets, ref. req. $850. 928-2165. AGNEW: Pvt, nice 1 Br., $725 on 5 wooded acres. 460-9710. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., near college, pet ok. $550, dep. 452-6611 CENTRAL P.A.: 502 E. 7th St. 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, no smoking / pets. $850 mo. 360-417-6639 COTTAGE P.A.: Small 1 Br., dog friendly. $750. 683-3457. DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath. $795. 360-681-0140 EAST P.A.: Lg.. 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, view, basement. $1,175 plus dep. 452-6611. Home w/acreage. 4.39 acres w/Aframe. 2 Br. in loft. Needs TLC. Orchard & marketable timber, hunting & fishing. Lot adjoins timber co. land. $130,000. Shown by appt only. 360-963-2156 House Share in large 3 Br. mobile. Big furnished bd pvt entrance shared bath, $450 mo. W/D. TV, WIFI, close to downtown Sequim. On the bus route No pets, no smokers. References, $200 dep. 360-460-7593.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 1/1 util incl...$575 H 1 br 1 ba......$600 A 2 br 2 ba......$625 H 3 br 1 ba......$800 H 2 br 1.5 ba...$990 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 HOUSE/APT IN SEQ A 2 br 1 ba......$725 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$825 H 3/2 custom $1350

Clallam County Mark Norbisrath, wood stove, 2015 Burnt Mountain Road, $2,800. John Damitio, water damage repair, replace shower pan, floor joists and studs, 208 Fairway Drive, $5,000. Michelle Payton, detached garage, 21 Steve Place, $44,292. John Ferera, single family dwelling with attached garage, 5142 Happy Valley Road, $181,762. Arland Elstrom, single family dwelling with attached garage, Lower Elwha Road, $178,557. Joe Pullara and Laura Bullen, 1,000 gallon above ground propane tank placement, 433 Lake Dawn Road, $5,000. James Moore, exterior piping to generator, 1322 Fox Hollow Road, $0. Alan Loghry, detached garage, 1553 Township Line Road, $500. Sharon Everson, 120 gallon above ground propane tank placement with exterior piping, 387 La Paloma Lane, $800.

Port Angeles James P. and Jeani G. Hill, commercial remodel, 1006 W. 11th st. A, $2,500. Malik V. Atwater and Vivian Wai, industrial remodel, 538 Marine Drive, $25,000. Rick Surratt, heat pump, 126 Fogarty Ave., $2,647. Brian Martin, remove wall and insert beam, 512 W. Sixth St., $100. Arnold W. and Dana H. Squire, wood stove, 804 E. 10th St., $0. Kari Shields and David H. Pigors, re-roof, 1303 W. Fifth St., $6,840. Patrick and Lynne Bartholick, heat pump, 1125 E. Second St., $8,081. Lois Manke, manufactured home, 229 E. Ninth St., $120,000. Christopher J. and Suzanne McMahon, solar panels, 602 S. Alder St., $28,665. John Miletich, hood and duct suppression system, 117 E. First St B, $2,300.

Sequim

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 315 Wolcott. Lg storage rm, cvered park, pets ok. $750. 670-6160.

City of Sequim, buried power cables, North Fourth Ave., $38,000. Baritelle Vineyards, Ltd., move door and window and install commercial fryer and range, 175 W. Bell St., $5,000. Walmart Real Estate Business trust, hood and duct suppression system, 1284 W. Washington St., $1,500. Westerra Homes, LLC, single family dwelling with attached garage, 181 W. Lobelia Drive, $184,093.18. Patricia Y. Vautier, excavate and foundation repairs, 129 S. Second Ave., $16,200. David Fickes and Pauline Geraci, heat pump and indoor coil, 20 Redbud Court, $4,325. Gary L. Sund, re-roof, 630 S. Fifth Ave., $6,700.

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, mobile w/add. 1/2 ac. $700. 504-2599.

Jefferson County

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

P.A.: 2-3 Br., 1 ba, W/D, carport & garage, fenced. Clean, quiet. No pets/smoking 1424 W. 5th. $850 mo or negotiable with lease. 360-374-3259 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath. No smoke/ pets. Newer! $1,100. 457-4626. P.A.: 634 E. 9th St. 3 Br., 1 ba. $895, dep. 460-7516, 460-6172

Sheila Gifford, wood stove, 304 Gifford Hill Drive, $0. Entrust Administration Inc., single family dwelling, 102 Cleveland St., $215,435. Entrust Administration Inc., detached garage, 102 Cleveland St., $23,500. Bruce Jensen, detached garage, 1670 Shine Road, $18,030. John Fabian, replacement stairs to the beach, 100 Shine Road, $4,500.

Port Townsend

P.A.: 805 S. D St. 4 Br., 1.75 ba, views! Lg. fireplace insert, 2 family rooms, deck, fenced yard, garage, all appliances plus W/D, $1,175 plus dep., 1 yr. lease. No smoking. 477-6532.

Port of Port Townsend, re-roof Blue Moose Cafe, 311 Haines Place, $5,600. James W. and Bonnie G. Landreth, garage, 146 Austin Matthew Lane, $8,009.60. Plunder Properties LLC, re-roof, 837 McPherson St., $4,000. Ian D. Groves trust, partial demolition of carport, 309 Cosgrove St., $0.

P.A.: Clean 1 Br., $600/last/dep. No smoke/pet 452-4671

Department reports

P.A.: East, 3 Br., 2 ba, very clean, no pets/ smoking. $1,050, 1st last, dep. 670-3895.

P.T.: Private, 2 Br., 1 ba, W/D, water/elec. incl. You pay propane. 1st/last/dep. $675. 385-3589. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: 2 Br., 1 bath mobile, W/D. $700. 460-4294 SEQUIM CONDO 3 Br, 2 ba, adult comm $900. 461-5649. SEQUIM: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, on acre with view, close to shopping. $1,000. 681-8455 SEQUIM: 3 Br. l bath, garage, pets ok. $950. 460-9917 SEQUIM: Cute 2 Br., 1 ba in Dungeness. $700 mo. 683-7847.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

House Share. Room with closet, kitchen & bath. Laundry facilities, utilities, TVInternet. $450 plus $200 deposit. 360-452-5967 SEQUIM: Room. $350 No drugs/drink/smoking. 457-6779.

1B5138303

P.T.: Avail. Dec. 1. Snug bungalow, 2 sm. Br., ample storage, easily heated w/sm propane stove. Solar panels = low elec. bill. W/D, W/G paid. Quiet uptown location. $850. 360-385-3214

Area building departments report a total of 35 building permits issued from month/dates with a total valuation of $1,149,736.78: Port Angeles, 10 at $196,133; Sequim, 7 at $255,818.18; Clallam County, 9 at $418,711; Port Townsend, 4 at $17,609.60; Jefferson County, 5 at $261,465.

The Last Word in Astrology BY EUGENIA LAST

tional setback. 2 stars

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Someone you share information and knowledge with will inspire you to change your beliefs. Not everyone you are close to will agree with your new outlook or attitude, but you have to follow your heart and whatever direction you feel is best for you. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Plan to travel or engage in a challenging activity you enjoy. You will attract plenty of attention as well as interest in what you are up to and what you have to offer. Someone exceptional will want to partner with you. 4 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A day trip will help settle your nerves and bring you information that will contribute to something you want to pursue in the future. Share your thoughts and engage in activities that allow you to expand your knowledge and friendships. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You can expect to face opposition, no matter what you do or say. Retreat or go out with friends who are more forgiving of your idiosyncrasies. Travel, shopping or taking a class of some sort is your best bet. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): You’ll hit a wall and experience frustration if you underestimate the extent of what needs to be done. Focus on home, family and your financial security. Less spending and more budgeting will pay off. 5 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): An emotional problem will escalate if you take part in a secretive act that can damage a relationship you have with someone close to you. You may be trying to keep the peace, but your efforts will backfire, leaving you in an awkward position. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Love is in the stars, along with partnerships and doing something you are proud of. Collaborating with someone you respect will lead to a great friendship as well as information that can help you financially, contractually or legally. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A great idea can turn into a lucrative investment. Ask questions and solicit help if you need it, but be realistic and listen to suggestions and warnings. You can make a profit by starting small and building slowly. 4 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s what you do that will bring you good fortune, not what you say or who you befriend. Don’t let ulterior motives lead you in the wrong direction. You must think and do for yourself or you will be accused of taking someone for granted. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Get chores out of the way. You are best to keep busy. Idle time will be the enemy that leads to a disagreement with someone to whom you are emotionally attached. Set up a new budget or update your personal papers. 2 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Stick to what you know and do best. You don’t want to challenge someone who is looking for a fight. Meddling will leave you sitting in a precarious position. A change to your home or lifestyle will cause an emo-

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Listen and learn. You will be caught if you do something wrong or you exaggerate about something you did. You may just want to have fun, but don’t do so at someone else’s expense. Kindness and diplomacy will get you further ahead. 2 stars


C4

Classified

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1B5140344

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s Tractor Service

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

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GEORGE E. DICKINSON CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair Larry Muckley

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1B5139281

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175126326

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

C5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

23

WANTED: Seeking support services for Strait Action Area ERN/LIO. Request for Proposals located at http://www. jamestowntribe.org AVON HOLIDAY PARTY At Coburn’s Cafe, 824 S. C St., P.A. Sun., Nov. 20, 3-5 p.m. Introducing Four Door Cookies by Gloria Coburn and Kristi Barto. We will be taking Avon and cookie orders for Christmas delivery. Free cookies, coffee and tea.

BLUE HEELER: 1 yr. old, needs space and loving home. $200. 452-2806 after 5 p.m. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., near college, pet ok. $550, dep. 452-6611 COTTAGE P.A.: Small 1 Br., dog friendly. $750. 683-3457. EAST P.A.: Lg.. 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, view, basement. $1,175 plus dep. 452-6611.

ESTATE SALE

Sat.-Sun., 8-5 p.m., 128 Koeppe Drive, Sequim Miscellaneous household Items, Danish style table and chairs, hutch, entertainment systems, oak bedroom set, tools, patio furniture, electronics, small boat. No early birds. NWES. FIREWOOD: $200 cord. 797-1414. P.A.: East side, quiet 2 Br., deck, carport. $675. 452-6611.

Fisheries Mgmt Biologist Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe seeks fisheries professional to manage salmon & marine fish populations, analyze data, negotiate harvest plans, develop fishing regs & identify enhancement activities. Requires Fisheries BS w/ emphasis in stock assessment, aquatic ecology, population dynamics & biology of native salmonids & 5 yrs professional exp; knowledge of fish harvest mgmt & rearing practices; good communication, computer skills, ability to work independently. Prefer MS, supervisory & Tribal fisheries exp. Indian preference for qualified candidates. 32 hrs. wk; benefits. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com 360-681-4616 GENERATOR: Powermate Pro 6750. Running watts: 6,750. Max watts: 8,500. $600. 928-3077 Golden Retriever Puppies! Purebred registered AKC! Just in time for Christmas! Great family dogs! 5 boys and 1 girl left. Available 12/14/11. $600. Serious inquiries only. Call 360-477-9214 for more info. Green House Glass New, 24 sheets, tempered. Enjoy your hobby while saving money on fresh produce! Cost $2,400. Sell $480. Can deliver. 360-643-0356. House Share. Room with closet, kitchen & bath. Laundry facilities, utilities, TVInternet. $450 plus $200 deposit. 360-452-5967

LICENSED NURSES Life Care Center of Port Townsend Part-time positions are available for Washington-licensed RNs and LPNs. Long-term care experience is preferred. We offer competitive pay in a team-oriented environment. Please apply in person, or submit résumé to Rachel_Sondie@LCC A.com. 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D - 27897

LAB MIX: 3 yr black Lab mix needs home. Awesome dog and great with kids. Hannah 775-1258. Local State Job-The Department of Natural Resources is recruiting for a Natural Resource Technician. This position is assigned to the local DNR office in Chimacum. For details see http://www.dnr.wa.g ov/AboutDNR/Emplo yment/Pages/Home. aspx MISC: Dining table solid wood, 64” round with built in lazy susan, 8 chairs, country style white, $400. Hot Point refrigerator freezer, white, $75. 683-0888 MISC: Burn fan, new prop, runs good, $325. Hydraulic dog grooming table, $75. 582-9048

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 315 Wolcott. Lg storage rm, cvered park, pets ok. $750. 670-6160. Private party buying gold and silver. 670-3110 PUPPIES: Toy Aussie pups, ready in 2 weeks, serious dog lovers only. $600, females. $1,000 male. 707-277-0480. RECUMBENT BIKE NordicTrack, used very little. Cost over $600. Sell for $495. 582-0339 SEQUIM: Cute 2 Br., 1 ba in Dungeness. $700 mo. 683-7847.

SEQUIM: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, on acre with view, close to shopping. $1,000. 681-8455 TRAILER: ‘05 27’ Okanagan. Excellent, hardly used $12,000/ obo. 417-0549. TV: 40” Samsung LED “Smart TV” Series 6, access the web, apps, WiFi, 1 mo. old. $600. 670-2092. WANTED: Guns. One or whole collection. New and old, but older the better. Call 683-9899, 452-1016 Workforce Education Coordinator Peninsula College is recruiting for a Coordinator to provide leadership in the development and coordination of new grant activities supporting the college’s Composite Technology Training Program. Position information and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu. EEO.

AVON HOLIDAY PARTY At Coburn’s Cafe, 824 S. C St., P.A. Sun., Nov. 20, 3-5 p.m. Introducing Four Door Cookies by Gloria Coburn and Kristi Barto. We will be taking Avon and cookie orders for Christmas delivery. Free cookies, coffee and tea.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

FRIDAY AT 4 PM for Sunday & Monday publication.

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

1B5139865

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Local State Job-The Department of Natural Resources is recruiting for a Natural Resource Technician. This position is assigned to the local DNR office in Chimacum. For details see http://www.dnr.wa.g ov/AboutDNR/Emplo yment/Pages/Home. aspx LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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Help Wanted

Family looking for TUTOR/TEACHER to work with their 5th grader. References required; Special Ed. experience preferred. M-F 8 a.m. to +/- 2 p.m. Email resume to: sequimjob@ gmail.com Looking for truck drivers. Min 2 yrs exp. Excellent driving record. Must be able to drive nights. Rate of pay DOE. Peninsula Daily News PDN#236/Driver Pt Angeles, WA 98362

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Help Wanted

WANTED: Seeking support services for Strait Action Area ERN/LIO. Request for Proposals located at http://www. jamestowntribe.org MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Medical office experience required. Multitasking, team player, heavy phone, patient contact and computer usage. Full-time position. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#237/Reception Pt Angeles, WA 98362

Caregiver jobs available now Benefits included. Flexible hours. Call PA, 452-2129, Sequim, 582-1647. Fisheries Mgmt Biologist Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe seeks fisheries professional to manage salmon & marine fish populations, analyze data, negotiate harvest plans, develop fishing regs & identify enhancement activities. Requires Fisheries BS w/ emphasis in stock assessment, aquatic ecology, population dynamics & biology of native salmonids & 5 yrs professional exp; knowledge of fish harvest mgmt & rearing practices; good communication, computer skills, ability to work independently. Prefer MS, supervisory & Tribal fisheries exp. Indian preference for qualified candidates. 32 hrs. wk; benefits. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com 360-681-4616 LICENSED NURSES Life Care Center of Port Townsend Part-time positions are available for Washington-licensed RNs and LPNs. Long-term care experience is preferred. We offer competitive pay in a team-oriented environment. Please apply in person, or submit résumé to Rachel_Sondie@LCC A.com. 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D - 27897

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description

Help Wanted

We are an integrated health care system partnering with Swedish Medical Center for our telemedicine stroke program, six community-based clinics, orthopedic/ gynecologic/urologic/general surgery, and much more. We offer competitive pay and benefits, ongoing training programs and educational opportunities. We are well equipped with technological equipment including fully digitized radiology. You will appreciate the talent and commitment of our diverse team of employees bringing our mission to life every day:

Excellence with Compassion and Innovation.

We are currently recruiting for the following positions:

DIRECTOR OF HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT RAD T ECH II HEALTH UNIT COORDINATOR ICU RESOURCE RN SURGICAL SERVICES RN HOME HEALTH PHYSICAL T HERAPIST PATIENT ADVOCATE Port Ludlow Clinic is Now Open For other job openings and further information please check our website at:

www.jeffersonhealthcare.org Jefferson Healthcare - Human Resources Accredited with DNV

834 Sheridan, Port Townsend, WA 98368 fax: (360) 385-1548

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring Certified Nurses Assistant

LEGAL ASSISTANT. Jefferson County has an opening for a Legal Assistant. Knowledge of legal procedures, MS Word, Excel and Access required. Union, $13.56/hr +benefits. Apply before EOB 11/30/11, to BOCC, PO Box 1220, Port Townsend, WA 98368, www.co.jefferson.wa.us.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

SPORTS WRITER

Looking for fun, caring and energetic CNAs. Sign on bonus and competitive wages. Inquire at 1000 South 5th Ave or call at 582-3900 for more information.

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring Registered Nurse Assistant

Are you a NAR waiting to test? Come see us about employment opportunities. Contact Kathy at 582-3900 for more information.

Part-time position available. Peninsula Daily News sports department is looking for a sports reporter to help compile area sports stories and put together the sports statistics page. The position, for 20 hours a week, requires a self-starter who is reliable, a quick learner and good on the phone with coaches, athletes and the public, and can write short sports stories. Basic sports knowledge is a must. The reporter also will help with the football preview each year and the special sections honoring top athletes at the end of each season. The position is for evenings on Tuesday through Saturday from about 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. each day. Experience with Macs is a plus. The reporter gets vacation and holidays off. For further information, contact Sports Editor Brad LaBrie at 360-417-3525 or e-mail brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com

Sequim

1B5139394

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

Business Marketing Coordinator/Advertising Designer. Marketing degree with graphic design minor or relevant work experience Ideal candidate has the ability to create ads for magazine publications by deadlines, conduct market research and analyze responses and create ad campaigns for the company and specific products. Small family owned company needs an employee who is a self-starter and able to work with limited supervision. Must work well with others and have excellent written, verbal skills. Travel once or twice per year may be required. Website maintenance skills a plus. Part time position with possibility of growing into full time. Interested candidates send cover letter, resume, and portfolio of past work.

ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY I City of Port Angeles $4,798-$5,734 mo. plus benefits. Must be admitted to practice law in the State of WA and eligible to be admitted to practice in Federal courts. To apply go to www.cityofpa.us or call Human Resources at 4174510. Closes 12/2/11. COPE is an EOE.

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1A5138205

Compose your Classified Ad on

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Help Wanted

Help Wanted

1A5138202

Community Notes

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

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NOON for next day publication

FOUND: Cat. Female, 5 mo old, tortoise shell, found in post office parking lot in Sequim, on Thurs., 11-17. 504-2023. FOUND: Cat. Gray and white, 800-900 block of W. Fir in Sequim. 683-4430. FOUND: Cat. Large orange/yellow, friendly, Fasola Rd. in Sequim. 775-4658 FOUND: Cat. Orange and white, Kendall area, Sequim. 681-4830 LOST PROPERTY? Always check with Clallam County Sheriff’s Office for lost property. 360-417-2268 LOST: Cat. 8 yr. old male, 16 lbs., orange tabby, long hair, no collar, downtown Sequim. 461-9737.

SEQUIM: 3 Br. l bath, garage, pets ok. $950. 460-9917

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

New Classified Ad Deadline

Lost and Found

Health & Rehabilitation NOW HIRING

Certified Nursing Assistants Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

360-582-2400

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx EOE

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


C6

Classified

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

1 6 10 14 19 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 37 40 41 42 43 47 50 54 58 59 60 61 62 63 65

68 70 71 76 78 79 80 83 85 88 90 91 92

ACROSS Gut feeling Vegging out Bratz product “Ain’t happening” Receive useful information about “East of Eden” director Kazan French story Ring from Chuck Berry? Bizarre “Off the Court” author Willingly Lummox Small batteries Frat party purchase Tiny decathlon entrant? Writer who worked on Friday? Monopolize Bank features Nueve menos ocho Off! ingredient Duck, say Cybermemos Contest for a free night at the inn? Respite “Flash of Genius” actor Alan Entrance See eye to eye Lofty home Tex-Mex snacks World leader who said “Every little thing counts in a crisis” __-en-Provence, France Homer’s neighbor Trait of a gentleman in training? “That’s it!” Downed Passé Party catchphrase Like frat parties Timbuktu’s land [Oh my God!] “Star Trek: T.N.G.” counselor Potent start? Show that makes teens cringe?

96 98 99 100 101 103 105 107

115 116 117 118 119 123 125 129 130 131 132 133 134 135

Lipton rival “Bummer” Small monkey Summer overseas Perp’s cover “Uh-uh” Grannies Fixture that refunds money for unused time? Affair twosome? General on a menu Dull finish? Worm, often Egg cell Perp’s cover Mess hall handout? 9 to 5, e.g. “The Neverending Story” author Some bed makers Offspring “Agreed!” Spanish cordial Letter-shaped opening

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

DOWN Tourist city SE of New Delhi Metros and Prizms, at first Longing Grow fond of __ carte Hindi is a subgroup of it 12-time All-Star Jeter Bath sponge Photographer’s order: Abbr. Morning brew order Norwegian king, 995-1000 Rap name adjective “Deck the Halls” sequence Some anchors Suffix with Capri Verse often about nature Fairy tale baddies Divisive element

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. NOW HIRING Insulation installers. Good driving record, work ethic, respectful. Apply in person at Tracy’s Insulation, 261372 Hwy. 101, Sequim. 582-9600. Part Time Office Clerk Port Ludlow Fire & Rescue is seeking a dependable, detail oriented person to perform a variety of office duties to include: data entry, filing, answering phones and billing. Strong computer background preferred. Excellent people skills and confidentiality required. Hourly rate DOQ. Non-benefited position with a flexible schedule of less than 20 hours per week. Applications available at www.plfr.org or Station 31, 7650 Oak Bay Road, Port Ludlow, WA. Application deadline 12/2/11.

92 93 94 95 97 102 104 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 120 121 122 124 126 127 128

Big pipes “Gracias” reply High-fiber fruit “Ladies dancing” carol contingent Joy Was gaga over Got a grip Kitchen drawers? Dreads Big name in supplemental insurance Last Supper question Brief interview? “Family Matters” nerd Civilian garb Ohio natives Divulge Concealing garb Erase Has to Short life story? “Wheel of Fortune” buy FDR home loan org. ER staff member

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. COURT STENOGRAPHERS Solution: 6 letters

S E C T F Y P D L P D S R E E

L H S O F I R L H I D E N R V

Y A O I M O G O A R S C E E R

F R R R C P N U O I O T R P E

P E A E T E U W R D N B E D S

V R R M T H R T E E A T E N B

A E O I M I A P E L S F I P O

S T C C T U L N E R E N I F R

www.wonderword.com

T S T E E A S E D N D M E L F

C A F E S I G E R B R R E A R O Y E C O W R H M S E I N T B V D N E A E A I I Y D X T N N E E A A G I W  T C D O H O A T ҹ E ҹ A C L I O N ҹ T A F E T T ҹ H M

L A T I G I D E S K S K I L L

11/19

Join us on Facebook

Absorb, Archive, Attorneys, Care, Computer, Data, Defendant, Desk, Detail, Digital, Element, Encode, Enter, Exact, Facts, Fast, Figures, File, Flow, Index, Ink, Lawyers, Listen, Literal, Machine, Merit, Oath, Observe, Phonetic, Plaintiff, Precise, Proceedings, Record, Register, Shorthand, Skill, Speed, Summary, Verbal, Verify, Words, Writer Friday’s Answer: Neutron THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

TOMHU ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

TIWYT NIAIGM

ANPHUC

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: Friday’s

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Help Wanted

53 Vehicle on a Christmas card, perhaps 55 Half a fish 56 Central Utah city 57 Average 62 Rink maneuver 64 Our Gang assent 66 Covering up 67 Golfer Gary Player’s homeland: Abbr. 69 Place to be 72 Pixar fish 73 “Let __!” 74 One way to cope 75 Drilling gp. 76 Like Mr. X 77 Main website page 81 Main artery 82 Evenings, in ads 84 George Harrison learned it in the ’60s 86 Rack up 87 Bar code? 89 __-fi

© 2011 Universal Uclick

11/20/11

31

20 Attending a Dodgers home game, say 24 Tenant 30 Google revenue source 33 Prynne’s stigma 34 “I Feel Bad About My Neck” author Ephron 35 Abbr. on a shingle 36 Neapolitan song title opening 37 Boxer who held titles at four different weights 38 __ Gay 39 What-eats-what orders 44 Wraps up by 45 Tokyo, before 1868 46 Govt. security 48 Fine-tune 49 Special effects technique, briefly 51 Gets jealous 52 “Night” author Wiesel

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

“PAIR OPTIONS” By DON GAGLIARDO and C.C. BURNIKEL

Help Wanted

PICTURE FRAMER Part-time, exp. Framing Source 457-1240 Workforce Education Coordinator Peninsula College is recruiting for a Coordinator to provide leadership in the development and coordination of new grant activities supporting the college’s Composite Technology Training Program. Position information and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu. EEO.

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©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on C7

Work Wanted

DENNYÕS SAW AND TOOL SHARPENING Serving Jefferson Co since 1983. Will sharpen carbide blades for 1/3 of price of buying new. For fast, courteous, fair prices, some items done while you wait. Call Denny 360-385-5536

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Work Wanted

HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Residential and commercial cleaning also R.V.’s Now scheduling for holiday cleanings call to schedule an appointment. 360-808-3017

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Work Wanted

RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586

HOUSECLEANING, dog walking, errands Experienced, dependable. 683-4567.

Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fast, reliable, reasonable rates. Fall clean-up gutter cleaning, weed pulling/whacking, brush clearing, debris hauling. Sequim/P.A. area . Local: 681-3521 Cell: 541-420-4795 Perfection Housekeeping, client openings, Seq./Carlsborg, and eve. business janitorial. 681-5349.

BEDROOM SET Southern cannon ball queen with premium mattress set, night stand, dresser/ hutch. $1,250. 681-2196 DINETTE SET: Top quality, oak, double pedestal, 4 deluxe captain’s chairs. 40” with 18” leaf. Like new condition. Must see. $350. 681-4284

HOUSECLEANING Organizing. Hardwrkg. Call Lisa 683-4745.

HOUSEKEEPING Experienced, have references. 477-4538.

Furniture

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

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Appliances

RANGE: White, smooth cook-top, great condition. $300. 477-9584 or 477-9585

Port of Port Angeles Commissioner

ENT. CENTER: Corner model, custom oak. Black glass doors, comes with 36” Toshiba TV. Good condition. $150. 460-1974. LIFT CHAIR: Pride, maroon, new condition. $500. 460-3708 MISC: 6’ corner hutch, wsolid wood entertainment cabinet, $100. 23” RCA TV, $20. 452-4184. MISC: Crib, full size, natural, gently used, $165. Infant car seat, very good cond., $35. Dresser, well made w/5 drawers & 2 matching bedside tables, $285. Sturdy round dining table w/2 lg leafs and 4 chairs, and pads, $300. 683-8921. RECLINER: La-Z-Boy wall hugger recliner. Light blue fabric, great shape. $250/obo. 681-3299.

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General Merchandise

ASSORTED ITEMS Large blonde pedestal dining table and 4 chairs, $150. (2) coffee tables, small $30, lg $40. Call for info. 681-4429 BEDROOM SETS Headboard, 2 nightstand (each), dressers, hutch, mattresses/box springs. King, $700/obo. Queen, $600/obo. 206-999-7139

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL 1B5140292

The Port of Port Angeles is accepting applications to fill a vacancy for District #1 (East end) on the Port Commission. The Port Commission consists of three elected Commissioners from three districts within Clallam County. This position will complete the remaining two years of a six year term that will be vacant on January 1, 2012. A vacant position is appointed by the two remaining Commissioners until the next general Port election (2013) in accordance with the RCW provisions. The Commission, like a City Council, is the Port district’s policy making and regulatory body responsible for making the policy decisions of the district in both internal and external matters and providing for their implementation. The Port’s Mission is to be the primary leader in economic development in Clallam County by marketing and developing properties and facilities for the long-term benefit of our stakeholders while fulfilling the Port’s environmental stewardship role. To apply, please submit a letter of interest, resume and an application. Applications may be obtained from the Port Administration Building (338 West 1st Street, Port Angeles WA 98362) or on the Port’s website at: www.portofpa.com. Application deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Friday, December 2, 2011.

DINING SET: 6 chairs, small lighted hutch, 61” oval table with 17” leaf. $550. 452-9130

peninsula dailynews.com

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General Merchandise

BONE CHINA: Old Country Rose, service for 12, with gold plated flatware, many extras. $3,000. 457-1091 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 DINNERWARE SET Christmas 32 piece set plus service pieces. Waechtersbach. $400. 683-8645 FIREPLACE: Brand new gas/propane Majestic fireplace. Complete corner assembly with wood trim and top and a decorative rock front. VERY NICE. $1500/ obo. 360-461-2607.

(Answers Monday) AROSE SMOOTH AVATAR Jumbles: FETCH Answer: When he caused trouble in calculus class, the student worried about the — AFTERMATH

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General Merchandise

GO GO CART: Pride Elite. 4 wheel, larger wheels and battery. $550. 683-6268. MISC: (4) 17” 10 ply tires with wheels, all weather, $500. Bagpipes, $100. Various wheels, $5-$100. 452-5803. MISC: 5 person jacuzzi, runs wonderful, $2,800. 1950’s dining table, four chairs, leaf, green and silver, collapsible side table for wall, $250. Call after 5 p.m. 809-0913 MISC: Burn fan, new prop, runs good, $325. Hydraulic dog grooming table, $75. 582-9048

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General Merchandise

MISC: Generator, used very little, gas, $150. Treadmill, $75. Lots of books, $1 ea. Bookshelves, $15$50. Kitchen table nook, benches with storage, $100. Firewood, close to 1 cord $100. 460-7761 MISC: Noritake PreWar dinner set, $3,000. Dorothy Doughty birds, $2,500/pair. Dresden dancers, $700. Staffordshire cats, sheep, $700/pair. Empress Eugenie porcelain, $1,500. RCD vase, $800. 775-0054 MISC: White leather swivel recliner $125. 3 pc bedroom set, $200. Antique rocker, $150. Many other items, moving must sell, $10-$275 ea. No reasonable offer refused. Call for details. 452-8011, Sequim

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

MISC: Coleman 5 hp air compressor, $125 Craftsman 7.5 hp chipper, $200. 4 265/70 R17 wheels and tires, fits Dodge, $200. 683-4430, before 8 p.m.

FIREWOOD: $200 cord. 797-1414.

MISC: CZ semi-auto 12 ga. shotgun with 5 choke tubes, $395. Stoeger SxS 12 ga. shotgun tuned for cowboy action, $350. Craftsman 6 1/8” jointer-planer. Newly sharpened blades. $200/obo. 461-6808

Need Extra Money? Sell your items in locked showcases at the P.A. Antique Mall. 109 W. 1st. 452-1693

MISC: Dancers of Dolphins, Lennox 1991, $75 and Adventures of the fur seal, Lennox 1994, $150 or $200 both. PIllow top queen size mattress, box spring and frame, $200. 808-2811

TABLE SAW: Rockwell, contractors, 10”, heavy duty. $250. 683-7455.

GAME: 5-cent 1950s pistol/arcade game “Junior Deputy Sheriff” in great shape, perfect for Christmas! 63”H, pics available by email. $555/obo. 683-5216. GENERATOR: Powermate Pro 6750. Running watts: 6,750. Max watts: 8,500. $600. 928-3077 Green House Glass New, 24 sheets, tempered. Enjoy your hobby while saving money on fresh produce! Cost $2,400. Sell $480. Can deliver. 360-643-0356. HEALTH MATE INFRARED SAUNA: Deluxe stereo sound system, complete with CD player AM/FM and remote control. Ceiling Ventilation. Extra back rest. Can be used indoors or outdoors comes with the outdoor cover. $3000. Call 460-8175 LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

Roseville Jardiniere And pedestal. Overall, 27” high. Rose colored blossoms on a darker green shade. $650. 457-7579.

TICKETS: Seahawks vs. Redskins, Nov. 27th. Vs. Eagles, Dec. 21. Row T, Section 337, Seat 20-21. $80 ea. 360-461-3661

MISC: Dining table solid wood, 64” round with built in lazy susan, 8 chairs, country style white, $400. Hot Point refrigerator freezer, white, $75. 683-0888

TOOLS: Shop Fox band saw, $325. Shop Fox drill press, $200. Craftsman shaper, $80. McLane edger, $95. Boat winch, $35. 775-0054

MISC: Dinnerware, Desert Rose, serves 8, extras, never used, $250. Ladies red pantcoat, size 10/12, $45. Ladies red SAS shoes, 6.5 narrow, never worn, $40. Stainless steel 4 pc travel mug set, new, $15. 457-5720

UTILITY TRAILER 10’x7’28” with spare tire. $675. 681-2196.

MISC: New Trex accents decking madera color $2.70 ft. Diamond plate truck toolbox $135. Sony 50" lcd tv $300. Makita 3 1/4" portable power planer $95. 360-683-2254

WANTED SUV: Late model, excellent condition. Private buyer. 452-3200, 452-3272 WANTED: Old clocks. Working or not. 360-928-9563 WHEELCHAIR Hover Round, as new. $2,500. 452-3470.

74

Home Electronics

TV: 40” Samsung LED “Smart TV” Series 6, access the web, apps, WiFi, 1 mo. old. $600. 670-2092.

75

Musical

PA SPEAKERS TAPCO (by Mackie) #6915’s. Like new in box, perfect for band, school, church, bar. Paid $500+. $375. Also Peavy KBA/100 guitar/keyboard 3 channel amp w/EQ. Mint cond. $180. 460-4298. VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $125/obo. 775-9648

76

Sporting Goods

DRIFT BOAT: 17’ Willie, plus trailer, in excellent shape with many extras. Must see to appreciate! $3,900 firm. 683-4260 GOLF CART: New batteries. $1,200/ obo. Sequim. 461-5572 POOL TABLE: 1920s Billiard, 3” slate, new felt, accessories. $800/obo will trade for small O/B motor. 460-9512, after 4:30 p.m. POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746. RECUMBENT BIKE NordicTrack, used very little. Cost over $600. Sell for $495. 582-0339 RUGER 77: 30-338 Winchester Magnum. Comes with brass and dies. $850. 640-3843. SUN X3AX TRIKE Adult 3 wheel bike. 24 spd drive train. Fenders, rear view mirror. Feet height 20”. X-Light and charger. Fitness, fun, and freedom! $1,000 cash/card. 477-9672 WANTED: Guns. One or whole collection. New and old, but older the better. Call 683-9899, 452-1016

77

Bargain Box

FISH TANK: 29 gal., complete, w/stand. $50. 417-9064.

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

GARAGE/ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., possibly Sun., 9-3 p.m., 121 E. 14th St. Jewelry, dressers, kitchen table/chairs, cabinets, antiques, tools, tons of yarn and sewing stuff, fabric, doll making stuff, Christmas stuff.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $12,000 452-2275 HARLEY: ‘90 SportsterXLH 883. Cust. pearl paint w/ wolf/moon emblem, Screaming Eagle pkg, Corbin saddle, windshld, fwd contrls, saddlebags w/ quick-release brackets, Kuryakyn ISO grips, more. Stock seats, svc manual, HD sissybar/rack incl. Lots of power and modified gearing for hwy speeds. 20,900 mi. $3,600. 360-683-2182 HONDA: ‘01 XR 250. Low hrs., $1,700. 683-4761.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

ESTATE SALE

Sat.-Sun., 8-5 p.m., 128 Koeppe Drive, Sequim Miscellaneous household Items, Danish style table and chairs, hutch, entertainment systems, oak bedroom set, tools, patio furniture, electronics, small boat. No early birds. NWES. HUGE Sale: Fri.-Sat. 8-3, Sun. 9-2, 14 Banana Way, Carlsborg. Indoor/outdoor furniture, housewares, decor, clothes, Thomas the Train collection, store closeout, Lincoln welder. LARGE Multi-Family Garage Sale: 466 W Hammond St, FriSat-Sun, 9-2 p.m. Truck tire rims, furniture, baby items, books, kitchen dishware, artificial Christmas tree, bedding, duck decoys, etc. No earlies. PPC AND EMPLOYEE OUT OF BUSINESS GARAGE SALE! Sat., 8/19/11, 8-4 p.m. 154 W. Washington St. Peninsula Paint out of business garage sale! Racking, office and paint equipment, discounted paint and stains, art supplies, electronics.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOAT MOTORS WANTED Running or not, cheap or free. 808-7018.

82

Pets

LAB MIX: 3 yr black Lab mix needs home. Awesome dog and great with kids. Hannah 775-1258. PUPPIES: Black Lab mixed breed. $50. 452-5290 PUPPIES: Smart border collie, 1/4 Aussie pups need smart, dog-loving people. First shots and wormed. $200. Mornings, 9-1 p.m. 775-1788 PUPPIES: Toy Aussie pups, ready in 2 weeks, serious dog lovers only. $600, females. $1,000 male. 707-277-0480. PUPPY: English Springer Spaniel, male, AKC registered from championship lines, all shots, dewormed, eyes normal, health guarantee, microchipped, housebroke $675. 457-1725. RAT TERRIERS Adorable. Black and white tri, UKC tails, shots, dewclaws, wormed. $300 neg. 360-643-3065 Shorty Jacks 3 Young Adults and 2 Pups Available. Our Jacks are raised with our 3 children and are very well rounded. They are great companions! They are up to date on vaccinations and de-wormings. Please contact Rob or Jaime at 360-477-4427

83

Farm Animals

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

HAY: Local, no rain, barn stored. $4 bale, delivery available. 683-7965

Private party buying gold and silver. 670-3110

84

WANTED: (4) 16” trac tires for a 3/4 ton 4x4 truck. 452-5803.

2 HORSES: Plus trailer, tack, elec. fence. All for $2,800. 681-5349, lv message

Horses/ Tack

FARRIER SERVICE Experienced Farrier and Natural Trimmer. Openings for a few more clients. Call Tom Pehrson. 360-649-2255 HORSE TRAILER: ‘88 Circle J. 2 horse, straight load. $2,000. 360-808-2295 81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

Leyland Cypress & Blueberry Bushes G&G Farms, 95 Clover Ln. off Taylor Cutoff, Sequim. 683-8809. TUNA: Fillets, 10 lb. bags. $50 ea. 360-374-2093

82

Pets

NICE ALL AROUND MARE Flashy, black, 9 year old finish rope horse. She has started on barrels and is a nice trail horse. Anyone can ride. Sound and up to date. Come try her out! $3,200/obo. 360-460-4643

85

Farm Equipment

MISC: Irrigation pipe with sprinklers, 2”x40’, 12 sections, misc. pipes and elbows, irrigation pump, $400. Ford 1948 8N tractor, $1,000. 460-7761.

A Winter Lap Warmer Cats and kittens available for adoption. $85. PFOA 452-0414

BLUE HEELER: 1 yr. old, needs space and loving home. $200. 452-2806 after 5 p.m. Golden Retriever Puppies! Purebred registered AKC! Just in time for Christmas! Great family dogs! 5 boys and 1 girl left. Available 12/14/11. $600. Serious inquiries only. Call 360-477-9214 for more info. PUPPIES: (2) male chihuahuas, pure bred, no papers. Tan and white coloring. $350/obo. Call Sara at 912-2332 PUPPIES: Alaskan Malamute, AKC, Champion bloodlines, loving and adorable, all colors available. $1,000. 360-701-4891

TRACTOR: 1952 JOHN DEERE MODEL B. Newly overhauled, new paint w/John Deere No. 8-7 ft. Hay Mower, hydrauliclift, 3 cycles. IT RUNS! $2,800. 460-8092

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘79 Mack. 10 yard, 3 axle, good on fuel, everyday worker. $10,000. ‘97 Beal pup trailer, 4 axle, aluminum box, straight, clean, good tires. $25,000. 460-6230

EXCAVATOR: Runs great! $8000. Call 360-928-0273 for details. PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071.

93

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams! Jan. 10 Capt. Sanders 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us ALUMINUM BOAT: 17’ Bass Tracker, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684. BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350 BAYLINER: ‘87 3450 Tri-Cabin. $14,999 or trade. 683-1344 or 683-5099. BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: 15’ custom aluminum, with motor and trailer. $3,500. 461-7506. BOAT: ‘67 26’ ChrisCraft Cavalier with trailer. 350 Mercruiser, bow thruster, toilet, electro scan, windlass, refer, radar, GPS, sounder, full canvas, dinghy, 2 hp Honda. Asking $17,995. 775-0054 DINGHY: Mint condition sailing nesting dinghy including trailer, motor, mast, boom, sails, canvas cover. $3,200. 360-379-1616 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445 LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 360-504-2623 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new electronics. Roller furling. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. Take as is, $10,000. 760-792-3891 SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347.

Motorcycles

DIRTBIKE: ‘00 110 off brand. Lots of extra, after market parts. $700/obo. 582-7519.

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘76 Kenworth. Big cam400 engine. Runs well, maintained. $15,000. 327-3342

HONDA: ‘03 XR100R. Excelelnt condition. $1,500. 808-3953. HONDA: ‘04 750 Aero Shadow. Gorgeous black and silver. $3,990. 452-0837. HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096. HONDA: ‘81 Goldwing. $1,200. 360-963-2659 HONDA: ‘83 Ascot. $1,500. 360-963-2659

94 91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800. 7K miles. $4,700. 504-2599.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED

HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing 1200. 30K mi. $2,400. 461-2627. HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,500. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,200/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. HONDA: Fat-Cat. New battery, new oil, fresh tune up, carburator rebuilt, rack to haul out your deer. $1,600 cash 683-8263 HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $950. 460-1377. QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $1,999/obo. 582-0841 SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. TRAILER: Lil-Gem 2004. 4.5x9 ft. steel trailer with wood bed and full ramp tailgate. Perfect for your dirt bike, quad, or golf cart. 683-4877. YAMAHA: ‘04 Raptor 660 limited edition, black. Brand new clutch, carrier baring in back axel, extra header and pipe. aluminum wheels and meaty tires. this a great looking quad not to mention fast. I’m asking $2,800. Great price. 360-670-6366 YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $7900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165.

YAMAHA: ‘09 XTR 250. 80 mpg, new 2 mo. ago for $4,900, 700 mi. 1st $3,100 cash. Street/Trail. 670-2562

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘03 37’ toy hauler. $19,900/ obo. 460-9556.

5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 5TH WHEEL: ‘90 28’ Kit. Average cond. $3,500/obo. 360-683-6131 CAMPER: ‘03 10.6’ Bigfoot truck camper. 2500 series, color bamboo, model 25C106E. Highest quality, excellent condition. $9,000/obo. 360-379-1804

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435

CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615.

peninsula dailynews.com

DODGE: ‘68 200 pickup with camper. 383 eng. Good cond. $2,200. 797-1508.

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘02 30’ Winnebago Brave. Low mi., always garaged, must see/ Vortec 8.1, $35,000. 683-4912 MOTOR HOME: ‘75 Newell Coach 35’. Cat, Allison. Will take 20’-24’ cargo trailer or Ford 12’ cube van part trade. $15,000/obo. 460-6979. MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436. MOTORHOME: Southwind by Fleetwood and a Honda Accord tow car, a package deal. Will not separate. We are the original owners. $18,500 COD. Less than the cost of a new car! Call 360-681-0144 TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. No slide, exc. cond. $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514 TRAILER: ‘05 27’ Okanagan. Excellent, hardly used $12,000/ obo. 417-0549. TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 TRAILER: ‘09 16’ Casita. Fiberglass, very nice. $10,125. 683-5871 TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032 TRAILER: ‘87 27’ Aluma-lite. Great condition. Upgrades included for comfortable living use. Trailer skirt available. Everything works. Mattress and micro included. $6,500/ obo. 360-437-4172 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $5,900. 681-7381

29’

96

Parts/ Accessories

97

4 Wheel Drive

Hauling and Buying Unwanted cars and trucks. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552 SNOW TIRES: (4) Michelin non-studded, used 1 season Sequim to PA. 225/60R18. $500. 683-7789 WANTED: Spare tire and wheel for 2000 VW Jetta. Call 808-1767, 457-7146 WHEELS/TIRES: ‘01 Mercury Grand Prix wheels on studs. Cash. $950. 582-0347, 461-0780

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘98 TAHOE LT 4X4 SUV 5.7 liter (350) Vortec V8, auto, alloy wheels, BFG All-Terrain tires, running boards, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seating, cruise, tilt, air with rear air, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $7,510! Clean inside and out! Last one of the 350 Vortec! Stop by Gray Motors today. $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $7,950. 360-477-6969

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $4,500. 460-8155. CHEV: ‘03 Tahoe 4WD 4.8 liter V8, runs great, cloth interior excellent shape, power seat, windows, locks, newer tires, custom rims. $9,900. 460-7901.

TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730

CHEV: ‘05 Colorado Ext Cab. 61,600 miles with Z71, Toyo A/t tires, bed liner, tool box, running boards. Interior options include Cruise, A/C, Tilt, power windows and doors, cd/mp3 player. $12,800. Call 460-3586

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

102

Legals City of P.A.

102

Legals City of P.A.

TRAILER: ‘94 30’ Komfort Travel Trailer. Great shape, living room slide-out, A/C, micro, refrigerator/freezer. $4,000. Brinnon area. 360-535-2078

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

Call for Bids You are invited to bid the janitorial service for the corporate and salaried personnel offices at Nippon Paper Industries. The contract term will be for calendar year 2012. Bids will be taken until Dec. 9. Award will be Dec. 16. Start date will be Jan 1, 2012. All potential contractors must be licensed and bonded. Please contact Max Clemons, at 360 565-7014 for a bid package. Pub: Nov. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 2011

Summaries of Ordinances Adopted by the Port Angeles City Council On November 15, 2011

Ordinance No. 3440 This Ordinance of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, levies ad valorem property taxes for the fiscal year 2012, and directs the City Clerk to certify said amount to the Board of Clallam County Commissioners. Ordinance No. 3441 This Ordinance of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, revises Chapters 5.32, 14.40, 16.04, 16.08, 16.12, 17.08, 17.24, 17.34, 17.94, and 18.04 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code relating to updating and clarifying sections of the Code. The full texts of the Ordinances are available at City Hall in the City Clerk’s office, on the City’s website at www.cityofpa.us, or will be mailed upon request. Office hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Friday 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. These Ordinances shall take effect five days following the date of publication by summary. Janessa Hurd City Clerk Pub: Nov. 20, 2011 CITY OF PORT ANGELES NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT APPLICATION AND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on November 15, 2011, the CITY OF PORT ANGELES received an application for a conditional use permit to allow off site signage on property located in the IH Industrial Heavy zone. The proposal is for two signs with one sign 100 sq.ft. in area (directional) and one being a 100 sq.ft. off site advertising sign. The signs will advertise direction to the Elwha River Casino. The application was considered to be complete on November 16, 2011. The CITY OF PORT ANGELES PLANNING COMMISSION will conduct a public hearing on DECEMBER 14, 2011 in consideration of the matter. Interested parties are encouraged to comment on the request and to attend the public hearing that will begin at 6 p.m., City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, Port Angeles, Washington. Written comment must be submitted no later than DECEMBER 5, 2011, to be included in the staff report. Information may be reviewed at the City Department of Community & Economic Development, City Hall, P.O. Box 1150, Port Angeles. City Hall is accessible to persons with disabilities. Interested parties are invited to attend the meeting . STATE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT: It is anticipated that a determination of non significance will be issued for the proposal per WAC 197-11-355 following the required public notification period that ends on DECEMBER 5, 2011. APPLICANT: LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE LOCATION: The proposal includes two locations along the 2500 foot frontage of the subject site: (1) a directional sign on the north side of Edgewood Drive immediately north of the intersection of Dry Creek Road and Edgewood Drive; and (2) at the southeast corner of the intersection of Edgewood Drive and Lower Elwha Road. For further information contact: Sue Roberds, (360) 417-4750 Pub: Nov. 20, 2011

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $36,500. 683-2342. CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $5,500. 683-4830.

FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659

105

Legals General

LEGAL NOTICE The Quinault Family Services Department hereby notifies Theresa M. Vitalis and Tyler Bryson that their presence is required on December 13, 2011 at the hour of 9:30 a.m. for a hearing in the Quinault Children’s Court in Taholah, Grays Harbor County, Washington. For more information, please call (360) 276-8215, ext. 222 or 390. Pub: Nov. 20, 27, Dec. 4, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE The Quinault Family Services Department hereby notifies Angela Reeves and Jeffrey Rosander that their presence is required on December 6, 2011 at the hour of 10:30 a.m. for a hearing in the Quinault Children’s Court in Taholah, Grays Harbor County, Washington. For more information, please call (360) 2768215, ext. 222 or 390. Pub: Nov. 20, 27, Dec. 4, 2011

101

Legals Clallam Co.

97

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘00 F150 Lariat Ext. cab. Fiberglass cover, 162K mi., 1 owner, new tires/battery. $8,000/obo. 452-2225 FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. 4WD, exc cond, loaded, V6, tow, CD changer, 3rd seat, more. 122K, books $7,740. Sacrifice $6,800. 457-4363.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE

C7

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘03 F150. 4WD 5.4L, 117K, leather CD, new Nokian tires, dark green/tan, very nice. $12,500. Curt at 460-8997. FORD: 1989 F250 4WD 460, canopy. 101K mi. $4,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: ‘87 F250. 4x4 standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $3,200. 457-5649

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NO. 11-2-00597-9

This is to certify that the Public Notice and List of Property in the Clallam County foreclosure sale was posted as of November 20, 2011. Clallam County Treasurer’s Office, Clallam County Courthouse, Port Angeles City Hall and the Forks City Hall in the State of Washington are the posting sites for the list of foreclosure properties. The foreclosure sale will be held on Friday, December 9, 2011, at 9:00 a.m. in the Commissioner’s Meeting Room in the Clallam County Courthouse, located at 223 East Fourth Street, in the City of Port Angeles, County of Clallam, State of Washington. Bidders should register in the Treasurer’s Office from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. on Dec. 9th. SELINDA BARKHUIS, CLALLAM COUNTY TREASURER Pub: Nov. 20, 27, 2011 NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS BUDGET MEETING Notice is hereby given Clallam County will adopt by Resolution of the Board supplemental budget appropriations pursuant to RCW 36.40.100, at 10 a.m. on December 6, 2011 in the Commissioners' Meeting Room, 223 East 4th Street, Room 160, Port Angeles, in the following funds: Health and Human Services, Environmental Health • Receipt of funds through Jefferson County for low interest loans for septic repairs/$85,000 • Additional funding from the Washington State Department of Health for onsite sewage system local management plan/program/$22,500 Nine-One-One Enhanced – Additional revenue from wireline/wireless/internet phone taxes/$163,000 Department of Community Development, Environmental Quality – Receipt of Recreation and Conservation Office grant/$21,080 Department of Community Development, Long Range Planning – Change in Recreation and Conservation Office grant funding procedure/$24,000 Noxious Weed Control – Supplemental revenue from the Washington State Department of Agriculture/$4,500 Sheriff’s Operations – Receipt of state funding for Registered Sex Offender Address and Residency Verification Program/$23,067 Copies of the budget change forms may be viewed at the office of the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 East 4th Street, Room 150, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Date: November 15, 2011 Pub.: Nov. 20, 27, 2011

File No.: 7021.29783 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Grantee: Coleman M. Cariker and Kareen Thompson, each as their separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009 1240865 Tax Parcel ID No.: 132808 520240 Abbreviated Legal: 5, BLK 2 MANSFIELD 3RD Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 2, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 5, Block 2, Mansfield Third Addition to the Townsite of Forks, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 5 of Plats at Page(s) 66, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 900 H Street Forks, WA 98331 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/22/09, recorded on 07/30/09, under Auditor's File No. 2009 1240865, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Coleman M. Cariker and Kareen Thompson, each as their separate estate, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/24/2011 Monthly Payments $6,462.90 Late Charges $234.84 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $6,697.74 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $775.00 Title Report $614.63 Statutory Mailings $39.04 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,512.67 Total Amount Due: $8,210.41 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $136,363.78, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 2, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/21/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/21/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/21/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Coleman M. Cariker 900 H Street Forks, WA 98331 Coleman M. Cariker P.O. Box 523 Forks, WA 98331 Kareen Thompson 900 H Street Forks, WA 98331 Kareen Thompson P.O. Box 523 Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Coleman M. Cariker 900 H Street Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Coleman M. Cariker P.O. Box 523 Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kareen Thompson 900 H Street Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kareen Thompson P.O. Box 523 Forks, WA 98331 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/20/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/24/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.29783) 1002.199543-FEI Pub: Oct. 30, Nov. 20, 2011


C8

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

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4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘92 F150. 4x4 “Flair side” short box, bedliner, tool box, 302 V8, auto, ps, pb, pw, int. wipers, A/C, AM/FM, cass, sliding rear glass, 94K, very clean. $5,500. 582-0208 FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347 FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323. JEEP: ‘97 Grand Cherokee Limited. 174K, everything. $3,000. 417-8841. NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891

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Pickups/Vans

CHEV ‘99 S10 PICKUP LS EXTRA CAB 2WD 2.2 liter 4 cylinder, alloy wheels, new tires, bedliner, soft Tonneau cover, privacy glass, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Immaculate condition inside and out! Great little gassaving pickup! Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘79 1 ton service truck, 88K, 4 sp, 350, 7K Onan generator, 3 air tanks, 110 outlets, etc. $4,500. 360-302-5027

TOYOTA: ‘94 4-Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. $4,500. 452-9693

FORD ‘92 F150 ‘NITE’ SHORTBED 2WD 5.0 liter (302 CID) V8, auto, alloy wheels, spray-in bedliner, tool box, tow package, dual tanks, power windows and door locks, Pioneer CD stereo, air, rear sliding window. Clean inside and out! Mirror-like black paint! Hard to find ‘Nite’ special package! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $3,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

WANTED SUV: Late model, excellent condition. Private buyer. 452-3200, 452-3272

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

TOYOTA: ‘87 4-Runner 4x4. As is. $1,800. 477-0577. TOYOTA: ‘88 4WD. V6, new exhaust/ tires, runs good. $1,750/obo. 681-0447

&$+ FOR YOUR CAR REID & JOHNSON

135114426

If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com • mj@olypen.com

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Legals Jefferson Co.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

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Pickups/Vans

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Pickups/Vans

CHRYSLER: ‘96 Town and Country LXI. 140K. $3,499/obo. 460-9556

Wheelchair Lift Van ‘88 Ford Econoline 150. $2,500. 457-5352

FORD ‘96 F250 XLT LONGBED 2WD PICKUP 5.8 liter (351) EFI V8, engine, auto, alloy wheels, good rubber, bedliner, tow package, power windows, door locks and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, cassette stereo. Only 91,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $3,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949 FORD: ‘78 F350. Ext. cab, 2WD, 20+ mpg. Isuzu 6 cyl. diesel conv. New tires! $2,600/obo. 808-2202 FORD: ‘85 F150. Cherry, 61K original miles, turn key and start, runs great. $4,250. 928-2181. FORD: ‘89 1/2 ton. Runs excellent, clean $1,500. 504-5664. FORD: ‘90 Ranger. Excel. cond., lots of extras, tow vehicle. $3,850. 460-6046. FORD: ‘92 E250 van. Ladder rack, interior racks, good runner. $1,800. 460-9257. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. FORD: ‘98 Windstar. 234K, cracked windshield. Runs great. $1,500/obo. 808-2202 GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425. GMC: ‘72 pickup. Strong engine and tranny, fresh tabs, decent tread, great work truck. $700. 477-0829. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey EX. Runs great, 212K $4,000. 385-2012.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7301.27423 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, Inc. Grantee: The Heirs and Devisees of William R. Tidd, deceased Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 500555 Tax Parcel ID No.: 964900022 Abbreviated Legal: Apartment no. 1034, Kala Point Condominiums no. 1 as fully described on page Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Apartment No. 1034, Kala Point Condominiums No. 1, a condominium intended for residential use according to the Condominium Plan and Survey Map, Delineating said apartment, recorded in Volume 1 of Condominiums, pages 43 to 45 and as amended by as-built survey recorded in Volume 1 of Condominiums, pages 57 to 59, inclusive, under recording nos. 238847 and 251029, records of Jefferson County, Washington, located as 1023 Harborview Drive, Port Townsend, WA 98368; Together with an undivided 1.782% interest in the common areas and facilities appertaining to said apartment; And together with those limited common areas and facilities so appertaining, according to the Condominium Declarations recorded under Jefferson County Recording no. 238236, and amended by auditor's file no. 251028. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 261 Sailview Drive 6 Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/05/05, recorded on 07/12/05, under Auditor's File No. 500555, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from William R. Tidd, a single man, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Aegis Wholesale Corporation, and its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Aegis Wholesale Corporation, and its successors and assigns to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 561792. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/20/2011 Monthly Payments $6,313.02 Late Charges $258.79 Lender's Fees & Costs $332.94 Total Arrearage $6,904.75 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $588.60 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $77.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,362.62 Total Amount Due: $8,267.37 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $114,765.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS William Tidd 261 Sailview Drive 6 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of William Tidd 261 Sailview Drive 6 Port Townsend, WA 98368 William Tidd 7 Greenwood Ct Utica, NY 13501-5731 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of William Tidd 7 Greenwood Ct Utica, NY 13501-5731 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/15/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/17/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/20/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7301.27423) 1002.199152-FEI Pub: Nov. 20, Dec. 11, 2011

Cars

ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154. CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiful, must see. $6,800. 681-3093. CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $10,500. 452-7377. CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767. CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170. CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. Reduced $3,000. 808-3374. CHEV: ‘98 Malibu. Needs engine. $600/ obo/trade. 461-7224 COLLECTORS: Olds Cutlass 442 1986, sharp lines, new int. $5,500. 683-8332.

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Cars

FORD: ‘76 LTD. 2 dr, 351, good cond., runs exc., very dependable, some new. $950. 460-6979. FORD: ‘92 Mustang LX convertible. 5.0 auto, 71K mi., excellent condition. $3,800. 928-0213. FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,000 477-1805 FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858 HONDA: ‘00 EK Hatch. New swap, B18C type R suspension, yellow HID lights, Apexi exhaust, intake, 118K miles. $5,500. 452-9693, 461-6506 HONDA: ’06 Civic Hybrid. 112K hwy. mi., tinted windows, nice wheels, mounted snow tires, very clean. Just retired. $8,500 360-731-0677 HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006. HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata Limited. Black beauty, all the options plus tinted windows and navigation system, extra set of wheels and tires. $17,800. 477-3191.

FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $8,500/ obo. 360-808-1242.

KIA: ‘03 Spectra GSX. Hatchback, auto, 131K, new trans in 6/11, runs great, maint. records avail. $3,500/obo. 417-9040

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Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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99

Cars

HYUNDAI: ‘89 Excel, 2 dr hb. 94K, auto. $1,500. 683-1260.

MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353.

MAZDA: ‘06 Miata MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $14,500/obo. 681-0863

STUDEBAKER: ‘50 Champion. Starlight coupe, complete frame off restoration, 3 speed flat head 6 cylinder engine, all original, excellent condition. $12,000/ obo. 683-8810.

MERCURY: ‘95 Grand Marquis. Good transportation. $1,750/obo. 4575500.

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Cars

STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963 TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Excellent, dark blue, extras $18,000/ obo. 928-3669.

Cars

VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,200. 681-7381. VW: ‘68 Karmann Ghia convertible. Project. $2,500. 683-1344, 683-5099 VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184.

SUBARU: ‘97 Legacy Outback. Clean, in good shape, excellent body. New water pump and radiator. Needs engine. $1,500/trade. 681-3968, 808-0443

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A summary and detail of the proposed budget are available in the Board of Commissioners' Office, 223 East 4th Street, Room 150 or on our website at http://www.clallam.net/bocc/2012Budget.html.

OLDS: ‘95 Cutlass Sierra SL. Nice car, runs ok. $800. 460-0262, 681-0940

SUBARU: ‘98 Legacy GT Limited Sedan AWD, $4500, 159K, White/blk leather, AC, CC, sunroof, auto trans, AM/FM cassette w/CD player. Call 360-477-2196

PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768.

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MG: ‘65 Midget. 85,672 orig. mi., mostly orig. interior. In running cond. $4,800. 417-2606. MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165. MITSUBISHI: ‘08 Convertible Spyder Eclipse. Must sell, sacrifice, beautiful dream car, low mi. First reasonalbe offer takes it. $14,000, worth much more. 360-797-3892

PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577 PONTIAC: ‘98 Sunfire. 117K mi., auto, serviced by local dealer, garaged. $3,500. 928-9700.

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7037.07936 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1217530 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000513905 Abbreviated Legal: LT. 2, BK. 39, K/1 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2, Block 39, Norman R. Smith's Subdivision of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume K of Plats, Page 1, records of said County; except the East 10 feet of the North half of said Lot 2; also except that portion conveyed to June Price by deed recorded September 9, 1999 under Auditor's File No. 1999-1035736, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 2, said point also being the True Point of Beginning; thence North 33 degrees 22'22" East, along the East line of said Lot 2, a distance of 58.84 feet; thence North 56 degrees 38'00" West, a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 34 degrees 39'57" West, a distance of 25.11 feet; thence South 32 degrees 14'08" West, a distance of 33.74 feet to the South line of said Lot 2; thence South 56 degrees 38'00" East, along said South line of said Lot 2, a distance of 9.90 feet to the True Point of Beginning; also except that portion conveyed to Bonnie A. Fidler, individually and as Personal Representative of the Estate of Clarence H. Fidler, by deed recorded September 9, 1999, under Clallam County Auditor's File No. 1999-1035737, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 2; thence North 32 degrees 22'22" East along the East line of said Lot 2, a distance of 58.84 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence continuing North 32 degrees 22'22" East, a distance of 11.15 feet; thence North 56 degrees 38'03" West, a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 33 degrees 22'22" West, a distance of 11.15 feet; thence South 56 degrees 38'00" East, a distance of 10.00 feet to the True Point of beginning. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 734 Georgiana St Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/07/08, recorded on 03/11/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1217530, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254561. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/19/2011 Monthly Payments $19,388.16 Late Charges $831.96 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,466.63 Total Arrearage $23,686.75 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Sale Costs $54.20 Total Costs $536.70 Total Amount Due: $24,223.45 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $143,020.87, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John W. Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/19/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/19/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7037.07936) 1002.163454-FEI Pub: Nov. 20, Dec. 11, 2011

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY given that public testimony on the proposed final 2012 Clallam County Budget and the consideration of the County general fund and road levies for 2012 will be accepted in the Commissioners' Meeting Room 160 at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street, Port Angeles, on December 6, 2010 at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. All interested citizens are invited to attend.

Dated this fifteenth day of November 2011 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub.: Nov. 20, 27, 2011

BUDGET RESOLUTION 19, 2011

CALL FOR HEARING FOR DEBATABLE EMERGENCIES IN THE FUNDS LISTED BELOW THE BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS finds as follows: 1. Pursuant to RCW 36.40.140, the following facts constitute a public emergency in the following funds that could not reasonably have been foreseen at the time of making the budget: Prosecuting Attorney, Coroner – Increased number of autopsies/$17,000 Superior Court – Increased number of trials, use of pro tem(s), jury and witness fees, and expert services/$70,100 Public Works, Roads – Transfer employee salaries, benefits, and indirect costs to Carlsborg Sewer Project/$700 Carlsborg Sewer Project – Set up payroll expenditure lines for new fund added to Public Works/$700 Public Works, Roads – Transfer to equipment rental and revolving for capital improvements at the Sequim road shop/$76,000 Equipment, Rental, and Revolving • Transfer from Public Works, Roads for capital improvements at the Sequim road shop/$76,000 • Increase budget line for intergovernment payment for state contract capital co-op fees and supplies and other services for Sequim road shop improvements/$18,000 Clallam Bay/Sekiu Sewer Maintenance and Operations – Increase budget line for taxes due to increased revenue and excise tax rate increase/$4,750 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, in consideration of the above findings of fact that a public hearing on the debatable emergencies shown above be held on December 6, 2011 at 10:30 a.m. in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street, Port Angeles. PASSED AND ADOPTED this fifteenth day of November 2011 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Stephen P. Tharinger Michael C. Chapman

ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub.: Nov. 20, 2011

File No.: 7301.25977 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, Inc. Grantee: Keith L. Burfitt and Carol A. Burfitt, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1219817 Original NTS Auditor File No. 2010-1255076 Tax Parcel ID No.: 032902310430 Abbreviated Legal: Pcl J, BLA 45/25 NESW 2-29-3 Amended Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel "J", as delineated on Boundary Line Adjustment Survey, recorded in Volume 45 of Surveys, page 25, under recording no. 2000 1051862, being a portion of Parcels 10, 11, and 14 of Sequim Bay Estates #3 Survey recorded in Volume 8 of Surveys, page 148, being a portion of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of Section 2, Township 29 north, Range 3 west, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/16/08 and recorded on 04/22/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1219817, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Keith L. Burfitt and Carol A. Burfitt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Legacy Group Lending, Inc., and its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Legacy Group Lending, Inc., and its successors and assigns to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254837. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 11/07/2011 Monthly Payments $83,839.80 Late Charges $3,663.36 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,694.02 Total Arrearage $91,197.18 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $992.94 Statutory Mailings $82.80 Recording Costs $79.00 Postings $473.84 Sale Costs $2,101.34 Total Costs $4,337.42 Total Amount Due: $95,534.60 Other known defaults are as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $363,874.97, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 23, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/12/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Keith L. Burfitt 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Keith L. Burfitt P.O. Box 773 Carlsborg, WA 98324 Carol A. Burfitt 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Carol A. Burfitt P.O. Box 773 Carlsborg, WA 98324 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/30/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/30/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor, and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor, of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com EFFECTIVE: 11/07/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7301.25977) 1002.161890-FEI Pub: Nov. 20, Dec. 11, 2011


PENINSULA

DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ/FOR PENINSULA WOMAN

Kia Armstrong: Organic produce manager promotes North Olympic Peninsula’s year-round bounty

‘Revolutionize this’ BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

FOR PENINSULA WOMAN

W

ith two hands and her whole heart, Kia Armstrong takes on the big problems — by homing in on her immediate surroundings. Back East in college, it was the prison-industrial complex. And out here on the North Olympic Peninsula, it’s homeland security via local-food supply. And then there’s that work-life balance thing. Armstrong, at 31, has already lived lots of life. Born in southern Maine, she went off to Ithaca College in New York to study organizational communication. But “Ithaca has a phenomenal politics department,” she recalls. Armstrong dived in to various causes, such as the way the college’s food-service company was heavily invested in the private prison industry. She left school to keep working for change; eventually the food company divested. Meantime Armstrong waited tables to pay her bills and to save up enough to take an open-ended road trip across the United States. She had a thing for the West, for the high mountains — and after three months of traveling, found herself on the south fork of the Hoh River. She met friends who introduced her to the rest of the wonderland called

Something new

Organic from the source THE NEWLY EXPANDED Nash’s Farm Store offers a full-service grocery — including free-range, organic turkeys, pork and Dungeness Valley produce — along with a lending library of books and DVDs about healthy living at 4681 Sequim-Dungeness Way. Nash’s produce is also available, thanks to manager Kia Armstrong and crew, at Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Farmers’ markets with produce from Nash’s and many other local growers include: ■ The Port Angeles market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays at The Gateway pavilion at Front and Lincoln streets; ■ Sequim’s winter Open Aire Market from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at Second Avenue and Cedar Street in downtown Sequim. For information, phone Nash’s Farm Store at 360-683-4642 or see NashsOrganicProduce.com. ■ In East Jefferson County, Nash’s produce outlets include the Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., Port Townsend. Peninsula Woman

Olympic National Park. From that point forward, she went on a hike every week. “That was,” she recalls, “one of the best years of my life.” She got a house-sitting gig off Taylor Cutoff Road west of Sequim and a job waitressing at Petals, then the restaurant surrounded by Cedarbrook Lavender and Herb Farm. Armstrong turned 23 in February 2003, and she recalls thinking that this would be a turning point.

PENINSULA WOMAN HAS been expanded to a full-sized section from its original tabloid format. The larger page size allows for more features, ideas and inspiration related to

“I didn’t know what the year would bring,” she says now. She just knew that she was where she wanted to be.

The farm and store Around this time, Armstrong heard about Nash’s Organic Produce, the farm and the little store in Dungeness. She began shopping for vegetables there, got to know the manager, and one day was offered a job in the store. But after years of waitressing, Armstrong was a bit burned out on retail.

the North Olympic Peninsula’s only publication devoted solely to achievement and accomplishment among women. In addition to the regular Peninsula Woman columns and fixtures, we’ll be

When she saw a man carrying an armload of fresh produce into the farm store, she thought: That’s what I want to do. “Show up tomorrow morning at 5:30,” the manager told Armstrong. “You’re on the harvest crew.” Thus began the foundation for the next phase of her life. “I’ve always been a hard worker,” she said. But field labor “took it to a whole new level. All I did was pack at first,” which meant chasing after the harvesters, trying to box everything they picked. “They would just fly,” she remembers. Saturday mornings, Armstrong brought those vegetables into town, to the Port Angeles Farmers Market, the year-round, all-weather outlet for produce grown on the North Olympic Peninsula. At her market stand, Armstrong learned how to talk fresh food. She also learned the art of the cooking demonstration — and to this day, she loves to get out there with her skillet. “When you realize how easy stir-fry is, it changes your life,” Armstrong says. Ask what’s good right now, and she brightens even more: “We have gorgeous leeks, and delicata squash. You can sear up some Brussels sprouts, and at the very end, add some parsnips,” for ultimate flavor. TURN

TO

ARMSTRONG/5

adding additional features in the next few weeks. Reader swuggestions are always welcome and can be sent to news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Peninsula Woman).

Peninsula Woman for Sunday, November 20, 2011 ■ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


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Peninsula Woman

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Father’s assaults splits family for decades Tales from the Front

TANYA’S PARENTS MARRIED young. They were Catholic and had four children in four years, all girls. Her father was in the Air Force, and they moved often. She went to 14 different elementary and high schools. When she was 10, something happened that changed her life and the lives of all her family. “My father came into my room, kissed me, groped me and made me do things to him. I knew it was wrong. “My mother and three sisters were home at the time. He told me not to tell, but as soon as he let me go, I ran to my mom and told her.” Tanya’s mother told all the girls to go outside.

and her mother eventually remarried. “We saw our dad once a year for an hour after that. When I was 11, he asked if I’d like to come visit him and his mother for a month. I knew that he Cheryl Lavin would mind himself with her there. “But one day, he came Tanya says she heard her home and saw Grandma parents fighting, but neiwas taking a nap. I was ther her mother nor her watching TV with earfather said anything to her. phones and had my back to “Everyone acted like the doorway. nothing happened. We lived “Dad came up behind that way for six months.” me and started kissing my Then her mother neck like a man would do announced that she and to a woman. I slapped him the girls would be moving and told him to quit and he to Kansas where her pardid — probably because he ents lived. Her father didn’t want a scene.” would be staying in New Jersey where he was staNever to return tioned. Tanya returned to KanHer parents divorced sas and never told anyone what had happened. “It just wasn’t talked about, and I felt safe since he lived so far away.” arrive 10 days before publicaPeninsula Woman, which Tanya saw him three tion. appears Sundays in the Peninmore times over the next ■ Hand-deliver it to any of sula Daily News, welcomes three years, each time for items about coming North Olym- our news offices at 305 W. First pic Peninsula events of women’s St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims an hour. She married right Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. interest. out of high school. Sending information is easy: Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 “We all did because our days before publication. ■ E-mail it to news@ mom kicked us out two Photos are always welcome. peninsuladailynews.com in time If you’re e-mailing a photo, be weeks after graduation. No to arrive 10 days before Friday sure it is at least 150 dots per car, no money, no job, no publication. inch resolution. education. We all married ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 Questions? Features Editor and divorced. I had asked no later than 10 days before Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is publication. Dad to walk me down the editor of Peninsula Woman, can ■ Mail it to Peninsula be reached at 360-417-3550 aisle. He said no.” Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port weekdays or at diane.urbani@ It wasn’t until all the peninsuladailynews.com. Angeles, WA 98362 in time to girls were adults that the abuse was finally discussed. That’s when Tanya Weddings, anniversaries learned that her father had molested her oldest sister years or longer, then-and-now Weddings and engagefrom 10 to 14. ments: Nuptial announcements photographs of the couple are

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about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

accepted along with information. The photos will be returned.

“When she finally told him to stop or she would tell, he came to me, the youngest. “ The news was, of course, shocking. Tanya’s second sister was living in Phoenix where their father had retired. She “flipped out” because she had been letting her daughter visit her father. “That stopped. My niece was no longer allowed to be alone in a room with him. But we still told no one. We were ashamed and hated him for what he did.” Tanya’s mother told the girls she was sorry she hadn’t done things differently. But, she said, that was many years ago and you didn’t talk about it openly. It wasn’t in the papers and on TV like it is now. She told the girls that she couldn’t have left him immediately because she had no place to go.

One of 10 children Tanya’s father was one of 10 children. One of her four sisters asked her to go to a reunion of her father’s family. “I didn’t want to, but by then, I was 32 and had two kids. The wounds had healed, so I went.” Tanya’s father had remarried and had two young sons. They were at the reunion. Her stepmother asked Tanya why their dad didn’t talk to them. “How do you tell a wife

that her husband molested two of his daughters? We didn’t.” Each of the 10 siblings stood up in front of the 200 people at the reunion and introduced himself and his family. When it was Tanya’s father’s turn, he said his name and where he lived, he said what he did for a living and then he introduced his wife and his sons. “All I remember is 200 people turning to look at us girls with sadness. He didn’t even mention that he was a father to four girls who were right there in the room and everyone knew it. “So I got up, wanting to yell at him about his shame, but instead, I gathered up my kids and left. I have never spoken to him nor seen him since. “That was 21 years ago. I know he’s still alive and 77 years old. “I have no relationship with my half-brothers because one of them recently told me via Facebook that whatever I have to say about Dad is a lie. Dad had told them that my mother had poisoned us against him. When I told him that Dad sexually abused my sister, and me he cut off all communication. “I haven’t gotten professional therapy, but I have read self-help books. The molestation had a huge impact on me until I truly cut my dad out of my life. “I was just a sexual toy

for men for a lot of years after my divorce. I felt the only way to get attention was with sex. “But I found God, and I healed as much as I could. I have a wonderful life today with a caring husband. I’m blessed in so many ways. “My oldest sister who was molested for years has struggled most of her life. She’s nearing 60 now and has finally gotten some peace. “We always made excuses for her wild and crazy life by saying, ‘Well, you know what Dad did to her and how it screwed up her head.’ I believe we would be different people if he hadn’t done this to us, his children. “What I didn’t realize until I was older was that my dad gave all his attention to my oldest sister and I was jealous. That’s why I let him do what he did, once. “I didn’t even know what sex was, but I did know that I wanted my dad’s attention. Just not that way. The whole time it was happening, I felt that it was wrong but it was 1968, I was only 10, and no one talked about it. “My father is dead to me. God will take care of him.”

________ Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales from the Front at her home office in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.talesfromthefront.com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.

Nicotine primes brain to embrace cocaine, study says

Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

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Nicotine appears to be a potent “gateway” drug that enhances the effects of cocaine and possibly boosts the chances of becoming addicted, researchers said Wednesday in a landmark

paper on addiction. While the study was performed in lowly mice, the findings suggest that reducing smoking and the use of other tobacco products -and even nicotine replacement products and exposure

to secondhand smoke — in humans may have the bilateral impact of curbing addiction to other addictive substances. Researchers led by Dr. Amir Levine at Columbia University in New York

o d o G Things

treated mice with nicotine and then exposed them to cocaine. The mice whose brains had been exposed to nicotine responded differently to the cocaine (exhibiting more characteristics of addiction).

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Peninsula Woman

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Generations AND INTERVIEWS BY

DAVE

This week’s question: Whom are you thankful for?

“After what has happened in my life, I am thankful that I have God in my life. “I’m thankful for my family, my son and my daughter, who have been so supportive. They mean the world to me. “I’m most thankful for my doctors and the [Olympic Medical] Cancer Center in Sequim. What with breast cancer and the chemo and loss of hair, it has been some year. “Thanks to all of them, for I can now say I am cancer-free.”

“My whole family: my husband and my daughter and my son and even my dad. It’s all because we have a good relationship between us. “My daughter, who is 14 now, and I love to paint together. Painting on easels side by side, we paint landscapes and abstracts and familiar subjects. “We also have a microfarm with goats, rabbits and chickens. I home-school my daughter. I am thankful for our relationships.” to heaven. “A real inspiration.”

Debi Jackson, 56 Christine Wasankari, 45 grocery clerk homemaker Port Angeles Port Angeles

Keeping divorce confusion at bay MY HUSBAND AND I got divorced about one year ago. Neither one of us remarried and there were not other people involved in our lives. My 5-year-old daughter lived with him so she could attend the same elementary school as her friends. All of a sudden he died recently. I have been dating a guy for around three months and am not sure when a good time would be to introduce him to her or even if I should, at least for a while. She is in kindergarten and misses her dad. Is there a proper time for this?

another three to four months to be sure that there is something there before moving forward with LOGAN any type of family inclusion. Also, depending on what the counselor suggests, the Jodie Lynn situation may demand even more time than that. Listen to your daughin involving her and her ter’s opinion and body lankids in our lives. guage when you do talk They are currently with other men like at the doing well and enjoy it grocery store, school, when all of us go out to eat library, etc. or to a movie. Discuss your observa— K.M. tions with the counselor in Boca Raton, Fla. and make adjustments accordingly for the best From Jodie results for your daughter and for yourself. The proper time to introduce another male Can you help? into your daughter’s life is From K.M: when she has had time to My 6-year-old-son is in a properly grieve for her dad boys’ club that teaches boys My ex-wife died sudand has a healthy underdenly five years ago when how to do various hands-on standing about what hapmy boys were 6 and 8. I activities. pened. shared custody of the kids The leader has sugMost likely, she will and moved into an apartgested that they camp out need to see a professional ment in the same school “I’d have to say my as a group for a stronger counselor, especially since district so they could congrandpa. He passed bonding. There are about she lived with her dad. tinue going there, see the 10 other boys in the club. away just last Jan. 25. If you involve another same people and play with However, my son is pet“He was full of male in her life too early, it rified of spending the night same friends. wisdom. He tried to pass theHaving no idea of when could easily backfire, away from home. How can on his wealth of wisdom to introduce them to the resulting in an even more I introduce him to the good by his stories and his person I was dating, I actu- devastating situation. things about staying away ‘Grampa things.’ When parents divorce ally stopped seeing her and from home and the fun he “He would make and there are young chilconcentrated on trying to will have from doing so? birdhouses and he would help them adjust. dren in the picture, for ________ whatever reason, they see After about seven talk to us about what he other individuals as a months, I met someone was doing and why he Parent to Parent appears Sunpotential mom or dad. days. new at one of their soccer was doing it. To share parenting tips or sub“He was only 66, and games and decided to move That’s why it’s not OK to mit questions, write to: Parent to introduce every single perforward with my personal had cancer. He was not Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite son you date. 131, Wildwood, MO 63040. Email fearful of dying, either. In life. Since you have only I introduced her to the direct2contact@parenttoparent. fact I would say he was been seeing this guy for boys at one of the school or go to www.parenttoparent. looking forward to going functions and moved slowly three months, at least wait com, com.

Perspectives of three Peninsula women PHOTOS

Ashley Gourley, 22 day-care attendant Port Angeles

Braving winter weather hinges on how you fall

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Parent to Parent

Right way to boil eggs, despite what Mom says

Mother knows best? It’s a truism that has served us well in the kitchen. But if your mom — like her mom — made hardcooked eggs by boiling the bejeebers out of them, then SPECIAL TO PENINSULA WOMAN partnered with companies “A set of winter boots like boot-makers Baffin and dear mother didn’t know Complaining about wincan go up to $300, but Mark’s Work Wearhouse to best. ter is a Pacific Northwest Her method of hardbetter, potentially ritual. We complain about the relative cost is not create boiling eggs no doubt life-saving boots. snow banks, driving condiresulted in rubbery whites, “A set of winter boots comparable [to the cost tions, too much salt, wind green-hued yolks and can go up to $300, but the of breaking a hip].” chills and runny noses. shells that clung tenarelative cost is not comparaBut we never complain JENNIFER HSU ble [to the cost of breaking ciously to their ovoid form. about winter-health compliresearcher a hip],” said Hsu. It doesn’t have to be cations. that way this holiday seaBeyond designing footBeing winter-resistant is son when the typical Amerwear, WinterLab researchtied to our regional identity; down stairs. StreetLab ers are also examining sim- ican mom purchases at we’re led to believe any true looks at how people navileast two dozen eggs. ple clothing solutions: A gate busy streetscapes. Northwesterner can endure Only about 30 percent of winter jacket that has an WinterLab, with its ice even the harshest bout of cold. American moms are preadjustable padded belt that floor and two industrial The reality is that winparing their hard-cooked can help shield hips from fans, tests how people can ters — even mild ones — eggs correctly, according to breaking if you fall. best survive the colder half pose serious threats to our the American Egg Board. Or, a mask made with health. From falls to spikes of the year. Why so many eggs gone tiny copper wires so when When placed on top of in blood pressure, cold temwrong? Because most peoyou exhale warm air, it the motion simulator, these peratures can be deadly for ple were taught incorrectly, heats up the coils making pods can be lifted into the many people. said Howard Helmer, the your next inhalation much air, rotated and shaken. “Winter is underestiegg board’s “eggspert.” warmer. Stationary, WinterLab’s mated as a problem,” says “I don’t know how else Or, a small fabric add-on ice-rink floor is flat but once Geoff Fernie, vice president to put it. I’m trying to say inside the right breast of a on the simulator, researchof research at the Toronto it gingerly, but there’s no ers can watch how people puffy winter jacket that Rehabilitation Institute in other way: The method was walk up — or more hazardhelps people with mobility Canada, a nation that wrong,” Helmer said. “More ously — down a slippery issues get dressed for the cold. knows cold. slope. “We want people to have often than not, the eggs Fernie is the visionary were a failure because they “If you fall and break a larger understanding of behind a new set of simulawere boiled to death.” your hip on the ice, around winter,” said Hsu. tion centers at a Toronto Because eggs are hugely 50 percent do not recover “Sure, most people know hospital. high in protein (which from it and will pass away they should wear a hat. But Called CEAL (Challengmakes them an excellent within a year,” said Jennifer really why should you wear ing Environment Assesssource of protein in our a hat and how much does ment Laboratory), the facil- Hsu, one of WinterLab’s diet), boiling them a long researchers. that actually impact people? ity consists of three pods time toughens them. ProThe Ph.D. candidate in That’s what we want to and a motion simulator. tein fibers are very sensibiomedical and mechanical answer.” Each pod is a self-conengineering is studying tained laboratory, looking winter boots and looking at like a cube-shaped trailer what is the best sole for and meant to mimic a difwalking on actual ice in ferent daily obstacle in a subfreezing temperatures controlled environment. and 25 mph winds. StairLab studies how CEAL researchers have people can avoid falling »/FX$IJMESFO¶T$MPUIJOH

Celebrating our 27th year

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


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Peninsula Woman

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Chickenpox by mail in lieu of vaccine? facilitate the exposure of their children to chickenpox and other diseases like measles, mumps and rubella. The parents say they would rather their children acquire these diseases and develop natural immunity than run the risk of vaccine side effects. On Facebook the groups go by names like “Chicken Pox Party Line” and “Find a Pox Party.” As one group notes on its Facebook page, “Consider this your ‘registry’ so that if any other members have an infected kid, you’ll be notified and have the option of setting up a pox playdate.” Kari Campbell Soto, a mother of four young children in San Bernardino County, Calif., founded one of the groups, “Chicken Pox Party — Southern California,” about six months ago. It now has several dozen members. Campbell Soto said she recently took her children to a play date at the home of a young girl who had chickenpox, but her children did not get sick. She then noted on the group’s page that she was looking for another infected child in the area, or an adult with shingles, which is caused by the same virus, varicella zoster. “You can get chickenpox from someone with shingles,” she said. “I have made the other members aware that that’s what I’m looking for. I think that would be another avenue to go down.”

Some parents call exposure safer than shots BY ANAHAD O’CONNOR SPECIAL

TO

PENINSULA WOMAN

The offer — for lollipops infected with chickenpox virus — appeared on Facebook last month and quickly circulated among parents who oppose vaccinating their children against diseases. “I have PayPal and plenty of spit and suckers,” the message read. “It works too because that’s how we got it! “Our round was FedEx’d Martin from Arizona. We’ve spread cooties to Cookeville, Knoxville and Louisiana!” Other parents on the same message board posted requests for shipments of a variety of chickenpox-infected items — towels, children’s clothes, rags. By getting their children to touch the contaminated items or suck on tainted candy, they believe their children will get the stronger immunity that surviving a full-blown natural infection of chickenpox affords, without the hazards they say come with vaccines. The posts advertising the infected lollipops have since been taken down, and there is no evidence that anyone actually bought them. But public health experts warn the practice is misguided, and dangerous. “I think it’s an incredibly bad

idea, whether you’re getting it from a lollipop or somewhere else,” said Dr. Rafael Harpaz, a medical epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Chickenpox can cause severe disease and death. Before the vaccine was available, we were approaching 100 children who died every year in the United States. You’re basically playing a game of Russian roulette.” This month, law enforcement officials began clamping down. Jerry E. Martin, the United States attorney in Nashville, Tenn., where the tainted lollipops

were advertised at $50 for overnight delivery, issued a warning last week that sending infected items “through the flow of commerce” was a federal crime, punishable by up to 20 years in jail.

Pox parties So-called pox parties, where parents would arrange play dates with infected children, were practiced before the introduction of the varicella, or chickenpox, vaccine in 1995. Now some parents are turning to Facebook and other social media sites, using the Internet to

Medical field Although she works in the medical field, Campbell Soto said she became distrustful of vaccines after one of her children, who was vaccinated regularly, developed a neurological disorder as a toddler.

“I feel that I have a vaccineinjured child; that’s what led me to go down this road,” she said. She added that she and others in her group disagreed with sending chickenpox through the mail. “It puts a negative light on our crusade,” she said. “We’re all aware that it’s illegal to do that.”

Unwanted maladies Whether the varicella virus would even survive in the mail is unclear, but a major concern is that they would carry not only varicella but “God knows what else,” said Dr. Walt Orenstein, associate director of the Emory Vaccine Center and a member of the committee on infectious diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics. “Whatever is in the mouths of those kids at the time can also go on to those lollipops,” he said. “I’d be concerned about other bacteria or strep or whatever is in the throats of kids who sucked those lollipops.” Orenstein said he was also concerned that parents were deliberately looking to infect their children. Chickenpox is rarely thought of as a severe disease, he said, but it can lead to serious complications, as well as pneumonia and other infections that crop up when children scratch their blisters. It also raises the likelihood of shingles, a painful eruption of blisters that can occur years after a case of chicken pox and typically affects adults, he said. “The vaccine virus is far less associated with shingles than the wild virus,” he said. “But my hope is not to have children suffer needlessly when they can be protected from this virus. It is not a trivial disease.”

Making up after a fight can lose its luster DEAR JOHN: IN the past, whenever my girlfriend and I fought, we’d have great sex afterward. Lately, however, that is not been the case. Now not only does she not care to have sex afterward, she also acts as if she couldn’t care less if we resolve our problems. I really care about her, and I want this to work. Please help! —Loving and Fighting in Falls Church, Va. Dear Loving and Fighting: You’ve fallen into a pattern of “make-up sex.” This can be great in the beginning, but eventually women lose interest because they get tired of re-examining their trust issues in the relationship, and trust is what women need to stay turned on to their partner. You need to ask yourself: Are you picking fights in order to have great sex? If so, you have yet to learn that the best sex is created in a loving, trusting,

really true? up to think like this? —Wanting to Make If the answer is, “no,” This Work in Marietta, then the divide between Ga. you is too great and your search for a compatible Dear Wanting: Like a mate should continue. lot of great expressions, the idea that opposites attract Bygones John Gray is true, but only to a limDear John: I said ited extent. Shared values something hurtful to my are very important and respectful relationship, not when they don’t exist they wife, and now I don’t know how to make amends. from feeling the relief that, can drag a relationship We’ve only been married down. once again, you two are for six months, and this Let me give you a simback “on.” was our first big fight. I’m ple example: If you don’t want to lose embarrassed over my From what you write, her, now is the time to behavior and not sure of one of you is an outdoor rebuild your relationship my next step. enthusiast and the other by demonstrating your — Seeking Forgivelikes to stay close to home. desire to be worthy of her ness in Fort Myers, Fla. That can be wonderful trust. because there are pleaDear Seeking: Over sures in both, and you can Online opposites the years of any relationintroduce each other to Dear John: I just met a new aspects of life because ship, we learn that we are both human, and we both of your differences. great looking guy and to have our imperfections. If on the other hand, my surprise, we met online. You screwed up. But you want to raise your chilMy one concern is that true love is stronger than dren to believe in social he has a lot of different our moments of anger or justice and he believes views from my own — from that’s just silliness, than times of thoughtless behavconservative to liberal, the divide can be too great. ior. from outdoor sports to It takes time to sort all Do something loving homebody. this out, but ask yourself a that sends that clear mesI’ve always heard that simple question: Would I sage. Flowers, a special opposites attract. Is that want my children to grow date night or doing some-

Mars vs.

Venus

Gift Registry •

thing that is special to both of you. Best of all, would be a heartfelt note that acknowledges your misdeed (don’t repeat those hurtful words) and reminds her of your deep and abiding love. You will be forgiven, and, in a short time, you’ll both put this time behind you.

Sex time Dear John: My husband and I are happily married, but one issue always comes up: sex. We are very affectionate with one another, but often our schedules are so busy that I just don’t think about sex. He feels that I am not attracted to him anymore, but I don’t agree. I just think that after the “lust phase” has worn off in a relationship, sex isn’t as important to women as it is to men. I’m troubled by how much value he puts on sex, or the lack thereof. What

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can we do about it? — Not Always in the Mood in Springdale, Ariz. Dear Not Always: You are correct in assuming that when life becomes busy, many women minimize the importance of sex. However, most men still require regular sex even during times of stress. For a man, sex is a direct pathway to his heart. It allows him to feel good about every aspect of his life. For a woman, romance, communication, cooperation and attention all nurture her need to feel good. Through sex, men connect to many of those feelings. Without it, they loose this connection, and the relationship, from their point of view, is no longer fully satisfying.

________ John Gray is the author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus. If you have a question, write to John in care of this newspaper or by e-mail at: comments@mars venusliving.com.

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

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Armstrong: Local food system CONTINUED FROM 1 In the ensuing years, Armstrong took her demos and her vegetables on the road. Nash’s Organic Produce has stands at four year-round farmers’ markets now: Port Angeles, Seattle’s University District and Ballard neighborhood and, on Tuesday afternoons, Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles. Armstrong and the Nash’s crew have watched as organic food and farmers’ markets have taken off in popularity. And Armstrong finds it gratifying that the Women, Infants and Children, or WIC, and Senior Nutrition Programs have made fresh produce markets more accessible to more shoppers. She notes that WIC and senior nutrition are on the chopping block again, however; she counts advocating for those programs’ survival as part of her job. Nash’s Organic Produce founder Nash Huber marvels at Armstrong’s unflagging passion. For going on nine years now, he’s watched her spread the good-food message for people of all ages. The message is simple: “Health care is what you eat, not the medicines you take,” Huber said. “That’s the answer to health care. But the status quo has so much inertia,” with big companies selling food to school districts and hospitals. Armstrong, nevertheless, has worked for years on a farm-to-cafeteria program to bring local produce into school cafeterias, and to start classroom discussions about the food that’s grown on nearby farms.

DIANE URBANI

“We used to wholesale 90 percent of what we grew,” to distributors across Western Washington. “Now it’s closer to 50 percent,” Armstrong notes.

shelves, Nash’s Farm Store will offer classes and workshops on healthy living. Armstrong, whose title at Nash’s is simply “manager,” is part of the planning team for these initiaHoliday dinners tives. Every step of the way, though, she and the At this time of year, when people are focused on crew — fellow farmers of various ages — contend holiday dinners, Armwith forces beyond their strong’s farmers’ market Hospitals changing message is about including control. Local hospitals, meanThere’s bad weather — at least one locally grown time, are starting to change or produced food in their all too plentiful last winter their vision when it comes and spring — along with Thanksgiving and Christto food service, Huber adds. mas feasts. troubling climate trends Olympic Medical Center You don’t need to overand varying availability of in Port Angeles has its own haul your entire meal plan. good seeds, land and water. farmers’ market, and JefJust think, Armstrong Nash’s owns just 10 of ferson Healthcare hospital urges, about some sweet the 390 acres it farms in Port Townsend has Dungeness Valley carrots, across the Dungeness ValArran Stark, a chef who is or local pumpkin in the pie. ley, Armstrong notes. The integrating local foods. “Imagine the power if other 380 are leased. This new way of thinkeverybody had one thing,” Yet “we have a lot going ing, Armstrong believes, from a local farm. “It would for us in this valley,” she not only invigorates the revolutionize this local body; it also has the power economy . . . it would create adds, referring to the community of farmers. to restore our economic so many jobs.” In them, Armstrong Nash’s took a step in health. finds renewal. The best that direction last month “There is so much thing about her life, she potential,” she said. “There when it opened its said, is the people with expanded grocery store at are so many things we whom she works — in 4681 Sequim-Dungeness could be making for ourDungeness and across the Way, in the Dungeness selves. . . . region. area north of Sequim. “Our local food system “I’m also inspired by This is a milestone after is, I think, what’s going to how many amazing women years of planning, Armturn us around.” farmers there are on the strong said, but it’s just a Nash’s is an example: Peninsula,” Armstrong The company has increased taste of what’s to come. adds. From Karyn Williams In addition to the lendthe proportion of produce ing library, children’s play of Red Dog Farm in Chimasold locally as opposed to cum to Jane Vanderhoof of that sent off the Peninsula. area and loaded grocery

tinued cooking and marketing for the farm while Cort, having changed his band’s name to Blue Rooster, continued giving concerts around the Northwest. Then, one Memorial Day weekend at the Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts in Port Angeles, Kia saw a woman playing the upright bass — except she wasn’t just playing it. She was dancing with the tall instrument, and planting a new seed in Kia’s mind. So she got Cort to teach her to play the bass, beginning in 2009. Now she Musical inspiration brings her stringed companion, affectionately One evening about six known as Mona, to a variyears ago, she went to a ety of gigs. friend’s party; she was in Beside her at the charge of the outdoor Friends of the Fields Harkitchen there, while Cort vest Celebration dinner in Armstrong and his band, fall 2009 was Linda Jangle Bones, were in Dowdell, a jazz pianist, charge of the music. Jangle Bones’ sound got composer and arranger her. She booked the band who had recently moved to play Nash’s next fall from New York City to barn dance, a celebration of Dungeness. the harvest that happens Dowdell, who had inside the packing shed dreamed of living out in each October. the country like this, And from the barn became friends with Huber dance on, Cort and Kia and his wife Patty courted; they think of that McManus-Huber, and October night as their offered to play at the haranniversary. vest dinner; she invited The Armstrongs marArmstrong to learn a slew ried in 2008, and Kia conof songs with her.

West Wind Farm in Joyce, women are among the builders. “Even though times are tough, in this country and across the world, I really do believe in the power of our local food economy,” Armstrong said. “I have a lot of hope for our future.” At Nash’s, “We’re always learning from our comrades,” she adds. “We’re not doing this by ourselves.” And Armstrong’s life is not entirely consumed by work.

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They reappeared as a duo in Dowdell’s musical revue “Here’s to the Ladies!,” at the Key City Playhouse in Port Townsend in fall 2010, and then took that show to Port Angeles the following winter. In that version of “Ladies,” Armstrong not only played her bass, she sang a solo: “If,” a comic number that moves at breakneck speed. “‘If’ is the most daunting [song],” Dowdell said. But Armstrong isn’t one to shrink from a challenge. Dowdell sums up her approach as “so this is the name of the game? I get it. Let’s do it.” Armstrong, for her part, said playing music is a delicious way to spend her time away from work. It requires a whole different focus, and it gives her quality time with her husband. “Cort continues to inspire me, with his musicianship and skill,” Armstrong says. “Playing bass gets me off the farm,” she adds with a smile. “It feeds another part of me.”

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ORLANDO, Fla. — Doctors say a woman’s heart breaks more easily than a man’s. A nationwide study finds that females are more likely to suffer “broken heart syndrome,” when sudden or prolonged stress causes overwhelming heart attack-like symptoms. It happens when a surge of adrenaline and other stress hormones cause the heart’s main pumping chamber to balloon and not work right. Usually patients recover with no lasting damage after a few weeks, but in rare cases it proves fatal.

The study was discussed last week at an American Heart Association conference in Florida.

TONNI PETTY

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DE LA

Kia Armstrong pauses in the lending library at Nash’s Farm Store in Dungeness. In planning the long-awaited grocery store, Armstrong envisioned a place with free information and, in the future, classes and workshops on healthy living.

TAKE THE STAIRS OR RIDE THE ELEVATOR UPSTAIRS TO OUR WOMEN’S OR KIDS DEPARTMENT

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Peninsula Woman

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Marriage Licenses

Couples

Clallam County Linzie Renae Petersen, 19, and Matthew Blake Roberts, 21; both of Port Angeles. David Arthur Desautel, 64, and Maria Elena Ramirez Posadas, 46; both of Sequim. Ciernan Kai Latenser, 31, and David Edward Smith, 40; both of Sequim. Alan Wayne Hawley and Trudi Ann Smith; both of legal age, and both of Sequim. Jarrett Lloyd Lister, 35, and Taava Leneigh Norgard, 22; both of Port Angeles. Fredrick Alan Christian, 49, and Ye Pan, 36; both of Port Angeles.

Ivan and Angela Sorensen

Sorensen — Cisneros

Jeffery and Heidi Hampton

Hampton — Hockaday Heidi Ann-Marie Hockaday and Jeffery Scott Hampton, both of Port Angeles, were married Sept. 10 at the Red Lion Hotel in Port Angeles. Collin King officiated at the 3 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mike and Kathy DeRousie of Port Angeles and Harvey and Kathleen Hockaday of Kennewick. The groom is the son of Jimmy and Debbie Hampton of Port Angeles. Kristin Beverford was matron of honor and Kara Money, Molly Herring and Allison Hampton were bridesmaids. Willy Hampton was best man and Andy Pittman, Brian Win-

ters and Shane Skelley were groomsmen. Jenna Hampton, Ali Money and Keira Beverford were flower girls and Julia Hampton and Bella Money were ringbearers. The bride graduated from Port Angeles High School in 2000, and from The Hair School in 2001. She is employed by Barnard Construction Inc. The groom graduated from North Kitsap High School in 1990, and completed a millwright apprenticeship in 2002. He is employed through Local 96. The couple honeymooned on Maui in Hawaii and live in Port Angeles.

Angela Cisneros of Sequim and Ivan Sorensen of Revelstoke, B.C., were married Sept. 24 at the Sequim Worship Center. Pastor Dave Westman officiated at the 3:30 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Maria G. Cisneros and Ismael Cisneros of Sequim. The groom is the son of Soren and Lisa Sorensen of Denmark. Lourdes Lopez was maid of honor and Leif Sorensen was best man. Zipporah Neathery, Aaliyah Lara and Julie Phillips were

flower girls and Noah Phillips was ringbearer. The couple included Mexican traditions and had a reception with a mariachi band, Mexican food and traditional Mexican wedding games. The bride graduated from high school in Mexico and from Peninsula College in 2001. She is employed by Northwest Eye Surgeons. The groom graduated from high school in Revelstoke, B.C. The couple honeymooned in Italy, and live in Port Angeles.

Alexander James Macomber and Robyn Lynn Bauder; both 22, and both of Port Angeles. Christina Jo Ahmann, 29, and Douglas Edward Nevill II, 25; both of Port Angeles. Ariana Marie Gallo and Jerad Michael Sorensen; both 21, and both of Port Angeles.

Jefferson County Ariel Rosamond BordenDeal and Eli Danitz Waite; both 31, and both of Port Townsend.

When the formal wedding is delayed WHEN AN UNEXPECTED event like a military deployment advances the wedding date, many couples choose to have a wedding ceremony and reception at a later date to celebrate with family and friends. If the couple are already married, what they would really be celebrating is a renewal of their wedding vows, whether the original vows were made in a secular or religious ceremony. Send invitations to your relatives and friends stating what you are asking them to attend:

o d o G Things

“Please join us for a renewal of our wedding vows and a celebration/reception to follow. . . .” For the most part, you can plan a traditional ceremony, complete with, say, bridal gown, your father walking you down the aisle and sealing your renewed vows with a kiss. Or you can forgo the bridal aspects and focus on those that reflect your commitment to each other. As to the reception, you may choose any and all of the traditional wedding elements. The New York Times

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‘TIS THE SEASON FOR GIFT GIVING

WOMEN’S BOOTIE SLIPPER: This bootie from Old Friend has soft sheepskin fleece lining for added warmth and comfort with every step. Wear them as is or rolled up for extra coziness; $62.95. WHERE: Sequim Shoe Repair, 425 E. Washington St., Sequim; 360-683-8637.

PUNCH CARD: The gift of fun and fitness on sale the day after Thanksgiving until Dec. 31. Punch cards, good for 20 visits within a year, for adults $130 (reg. $150) and youth $75 (reg. $85). WHERE: Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center (SARC), 610 N. Fifth Ave., Sequim; 360-683-3344 or www.sarcfitness.com.

ARTWORK: Reminiscent of Tiffany blown glass, this exquisite 5-inch tall perfume bottle, in the Silver Heart Design, will delight that special someone. Created by hot glass artist Marc Boutté, the collection includes bowls and vases; prices vary. WHERE: Landing Art Gallery, ground floor of the Landing Mall, 115 Railroad Ave., Port Angeles, 360-452-2604.

TASTY MEATS: Create a gift basket they’ll love with smoked salmon, summer sausage, brats, pepperoni, seasoned beef, jerky and more. Prices vary depending on poundage WHERE: Sunrise Meats, 1325 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-3211 or www.sunrisemeats.com.

LEGGINGS: An extensive selection of retro nylons makes choosing the gift as fun as giving it. Find opaque stripes, Bohemian patterns, leopard print and much more, starting at just $4.99. WHERE: Twisted, 108 E. First St. Port Angeles; 360-417-8978.


Peninsula Daily News

â–  for November 20, 2011

Sunday Fun

Dilbert by Scott Adams


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Sunday, November 20, 2011

Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau

Sunday Fun

Classic Peanuts by Charles Schulz

For Better or For Worse by Lynn Johnston

Dennis the Menace by Hank Ketcham

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News

Sunday Fun

Blondie by Dean Young and John Marshall

H A G A R the horrible by Dik Browne

The Wizard of Id by Jeff Parker

Sunday, November 20, 2011

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Sunday, November 20, 2011

Sunday Fun

Zits by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

B.C. by Mastroianni and Hart

Born Loser By Art and Chip Sansom

Peninsula Daily News


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