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Spray-paint spree Vandals tag at least 20 cars in PA

Statue stolen; reward offered for its return Peninsula Daily News

By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles police are searching for the vandals who spray-painted blue and silver lines on the sides of at least 20 vehicles in a west Port Angeles neighborhood earlier this week. Deputy Chief of Police Brian Smith said the cars and trucks were tagged Monday night in a trail that led from the 800 block of West Sixth Street to the 1100 block of West Seventh Street. “The aggregate of the crime puts it at the felony level,” Smith said. Police discovered 16 spraypainted vehicles in the area when they investigated a report of a

December 29, 2010

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Streaks of blue paint mark the side and a tail light of a Ford pickup parked near the intersection of A Street and West Sixth Street in Port Angeles on Tuesday. suspicious person at 8:56 p.m. One witness told police of seeing three people running from the area toward Shane Park. Police saturated the area but did not find anyone. Police received four reports of car vandalism in the same neigh-

borhood Tuesday morning. Meanwhile, four vehicles in the 500 block of West 11th Street were each reported to have one slashed tire. It is unknown if the punctured tires were related to the spray-painting, Smith said. Turn

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PORT ANGELES — The disappearance of a hand-carved statue worth more than $1,000 has a retailer offering a $200 reward for its return. Edna Petersen, owner of Necessities & Temptations gift shop in downtown Port Angeles, said the soapstone carving of a bear with a salmon in its mouth disappeared the Monday before Christmas. “It happened in a time frame of a morning when we were busy,” she said. “It was here, and then it was gone.” The statue, about 8 inches by 10 inches and weighing 20 pounds, was priced at $1,249. It was a one-of-a-kind item,

This statue was recently stolen from Necessities & Temptations gift shop in Port Angeles. Petersen said, carved by Wendy Hook of Douglas Creek Sculpture Co. of Riggins, Idaho. “It was beautiful,” Petersen said. Turn

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It’s a party — and everyone’s invited Radio drama cast to present preview of show By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — John Grissim may beat his chest at a “Mingle with the Cast Party” on Saturday, Jan. 8 — but if he does, it will be only to illustrate how he made the sound of rotating helicopter blades that will be heard in the radio drama, “Adrian Cross, For Hire.” Grissim — writer, director and producer of the show that will air at 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 16 — will share war stories and introduce the cast at a Grissim fundraising party that will predate the first broadcast of the locally produced show on Sequim’s nonprofit station, KSQM 91.5 FM. Admission will be free to the party from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Olympic Cellars Winery, 255410 U.S. Highway 101, between Port Angeles and Sequim.

Some of the cast members of “Adrian Cross, For Hire” at John Wayne Marina in Sequim Bay are, from left, Jim Dries, Greg Madsen, Ian Scott, Ron Graham, Shelley Taylor, Ric Munhall, Steve Berg, Frank Romeo, Graham Reaves and Jim Turn to Party/A4 Weldon.

As gasoline use drops, so does state revenue Recession, greater fuel efficiency reasons for decline The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — The trend toward lower gasoline consumption is like a flashing yellow light in the new 20-year plan from the state Transportation Commission. To improve or even maintain

mobility in the state, the commission is recommending new ways to raise money beyond the gas tax — wider use of toll charges, a new vehicle excise tax, local tax options and a tax on alternative-fuel vehicles. The fuel tax now pays 78 percent of the state’s transportation needs under the $8.8 billion twoyear budget. That money goes not only for major construction, but also for ferries, rail, the State Patrol and local government.

But average gasoline consumption has fallen steadily since 2000 and will continue to fall, according to projections, meaning there will be increasingly less money available for the state’s transportation system. Greater fuel efficiency is a big reason for the decline, along with the current economic recession. At the same time, efficient transportation is seen as a key to economic vitality in Washington, said Carol Moser of Richland, one

of the transportation commissioners. “Nearly half of the jobs in our state depend on freight mobility,” she said. According to the 20-year plan, the state will have unfunded transportation needs of about $175 billion to $200 billion through 2030, including $69 billion in local and regional projects. The state already is looking at cutting engineering and technical jobs, reducing ferry service and

Year-end Close out On All Chevrolets & Subarus

increasing ferry fares. The commission is recommending switching from a flat gas-tax charge to an indexed charge that would increase with inflation. Tolls, like those either collected now or to be collected on major Puget Sound projects, may become more widely used in the future, the commission said. The plan was developed over two years and includes a range of comments from across the state. More than 700 people participated in developing the plan.

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 94th year, 305th issue — 4 sections, 24 pages

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Business B4 Classified C3 Comics C2 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby C2 Deaths A6 Food D1 Movies C8 Nation/World A3

Puzzles/Games Sports Things To Do Weather

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UpFront

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe via the Internet at www.peninsuladailynews.com, or by e-mail: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday

Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Buy PDN Photos Online” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Elton John, husband are parents Sir Elton John is holding close a new tiny dancer. The piano man and husband, David Furnish, have become parents to a 7-pound, 15-ounce baby boy born Christmas Day. The news was first reported Monday night by USMagazine.com and confirmed to The Associated Press by John’s Los Angeles-based publicist. Zachary Jackson Levon Furnish-John was born in California via a surrogate, whose identity is being protected by the new parents. Zachary is 62-year-old John’s first child with the 48-year-old Furnish. The couple married in 2005. In a joint statement, the new parents told USMagazine.com that “Zachary is healthy and doing well” and they are “overwhelmed with happiness and joy at this very special moment.”

Witherspoon to wed Reese Witherspoon is

The Associated Press

Sir Elton John, left, and husband David Furnish at the ninth annual Elton John AIDS Foundation benefit “An Enduring Vision” at Cipriani Wall Street in New York on Oct. 18. engaged to Hollywood agent Jim Toth. A representative for the actress conWitherspoon firmed that the couple will wed and that they’re “extremely happy.” The engagement was first reported by Us Weekly. The 34-year-old actress

was previously married to actor Ryan Phillippe. She has two children with him, and they divorced in 2008. Witherspoon won an Oscar for her performance in “Walk the Line.” She stars in the recently released comedy “How Do You Know.” Toth is an agent for Creative Artists Agency. Witherspoon is a CAA client but is represented by another agent.

MONDAY’S QUESTION: Compared to before Sept. 11, 2001, do you think the country enters 2011 safer from terrorism or less safe from terrorism? Safer 

24.9%

Less safe

29.5%

About the same  Don’t know

Passings

42.3% 3.3%

Total votes cast: 1,002

By The Associated Press

Alfred E. Kahn, 93, who presided over the historic deregulation of the airline industry during the Carter administration, paving the way for JetBlue and other low-cost carriers, died Monday. Mr. Kahn, an economics professor at Cornell University, died of cancer at his home in Ithaca, N.Y., Mr. Kahn the school in 1978 said in a statement. University spokeswoman Claudia Wheatley confirmed his death. A leading scholar on public-utility deregulation, Mr. Kahn led the move to deregulate U.S. airlines as chief of the now-defunct Civil Aeronautics Board in 1977-1978. The board had to give its approval before airlines could fly specific routes or change fares. “Historically, the board has insisted on secondguessing decisions by individual carriers to offer price reductions,” Mr. Kahn said in early 1978 as socalled “super-saver fares” swept the industry. “During the last several

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

months, we have been abandoning the paternalistic role, leaving the introduction of discount fares increasingly to the management.” President Jimmy Carter embraced deregulation as a means of stimulating economic growth. Mr. Kahn was largely instrumental in garnering the support needed to push through the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 — the first thorough dismantling of a comprehensive system of government control since 1935.

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Bernie Wilson, 64, a baritone member of the rhythm and blues group that produced the 1972 hit “If You Don’t Know Me by Now,” has died. Mr. Wilson died early Sunday at Kresson View Center in Voorhees, N.J., following a stroke and a heart attack, his cousin, Faith Peace-Mazzccua, said Monday. Philadelphia International Records, the former record company for Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, said Mr. Wilson’s death leaves Lloyd Parks as the sole surviving member of the group’s lineup at the time. The lineup also featured Teddy Pendergrass and

Lawrence Brown. The group produced a string of R&B hits in the ’70s and helped define the Sound of Philadelphia.

––––––––

John Warhola, 85, the older brother who helped raise pop art icon Andy Warhol and later helped establish the Andy Warhol Museum in their native Pittsburgh, has died. Mr. Warhola died Christmas Eve after battling pneumonia at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Mr. Warhola according to in 2002 his son, Donald Warhola. He was one of three founding members of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and was its vice president for 20 years. The foundation established the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh in 1994, seven years after the artist — whose given name was Andy Warhola — died at age 58 from complications following gall bladder surgery.

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

  An incorrect photo credit appeared on Page 3 of Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight. The portrait of singer Sarah Shea was taken by David Cowan. The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com..

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

Angeles for several seaPreparations began yes- sons, reported that the ski school opening Jan. 14 will terday for the start of conbe operated by Ski Professtruction next week on sionals Inc. of Seattle. bridges that will carry It is the same company Eighth Street in Port Ange- that provides instruction at les over Tumwater and Val- White Pass in the Casley ravines. cades, at Sun Valley, Idaho, The current bridges will and other Northwest ski be barricaded to traffic areas. Monday morning as crews begin dismantling the nar1985 (25 years ago) row spans. The year 1985 appears The Nettleton Lumber to be headed for the record Co. of Seattle has begun books as possibly Forks’ the creosoting of framed timbers for the new Valley driest of the 20th century. Forks yesterday Creek bridge and will folrecorded 0.19 inch of prelow with the Tumwater cipitation — the first rain Creek project. since Dec. 14. Lumber from the old Did You Win? Known for averaging bridges will be used three State lottery results 117 inches of rain or more ways: by the city street each calendar year, Forks department for mainteTuesday’s Daily Seen Around will finish 1985 with only nance work, on the new Game: 0-9-5 Peninsula snapshots bridges construction project about 71 inches. Laugh Lines The record low rainfall Tuesday’s Keno: and cut up for sale as fireYOUNGSTERS WITHsince record-keeping in 05-11-14-20-25-28-29-38wood by Joe Hoare. Ukraine OUT COATS riding their Forks began in 1929 was 47-50-51-53-68-69-72-74announced plans to bicycles on a chilly Port 76.61 inches. 1960 (50 years ago) 75-76-78-80 open Chernobyl, their Townsend morning . . . At the Hoh River, nuclear disaster site, to Tuesday’s Match 4: weather recorder John Plans are under way to WANTED! “Seen Around” tourists. Fletcher reported 0.13 inch, provide top-notch ski 13-16-21-24 items. Send them to PDN News They say it’s just like bringing the total to 82.69 instruction at Hurricane Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port AngeTuesday’s Mega Milinches, which could make Ridge next month. les, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; Disneyland, except the lions: 06-18-36-40-49, 6-foot mouse is real. or e-mail news@peninsuladaily Henry Brown, connected 1985 the driest year in his Conan O’Brien Mega Ball: 7 news.com. with ski instruction in Port record books, too.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29, the 363rd day of 2010. There are two days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Dec. 29, 1910, the capital of Oklahoma was moved from Guthrie to Oklahoma City as the state Legislature approved a bill that was signed by Gov. Charles N. Haskell. Although the move was challenged in court, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the action. On this date: ■ In 1170, Thomas Becket, the archbishop of Canterbury, was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral by knights loyal to King Henry II. ■ In 1808, the 17th president of the United States, Andrew

Johnson, was born in Raleigh, N.C. ■ In 1845, Texas was admitted as the 28th state. ■ In 1851, the first American Young Men’s Christian Association was organized in Boston. ■ In 1890, the Wounded Knee massacre took place in South Dakota as an estimated 300 Sioux Indians were killed by U.S. troops sent to disarm them. ■ In 1916, Grigory Rasputin, the so-called “Mad Monk” who’d wielded great influence with Czar Nicholas II, was murdered by a group of Russian noblemen in St. Petersburg. ■ In 1934, Japan formally renounced the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922. ■ In 1940, during World War

II, Germany dropped incendiary bombs on London, setting off what came to be known as “The Second Great Fire of London.” ■ In 1975, a bomb exploded in the main terminal of New York’s LaGuardia Airport, killing 11 people. ■ In 1986, former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan died at his home in Sussex, England, at age 92. ■ Ten years ago: Presidentelect George W. Bush filled four more Cabinet slots, tapping Rod Paige to be secretary of education, Gale Norton to be secretary of the interior, Anthony J. Principi to return as secretary to the Department of Veterans Affairs and Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson to

be secretary of health and human services. ■ Five years ago: International monitors said they would review Iraq’s parliamentary elections in response to fraud complaints by Sunni Arab and secular Shiite groups. ■ One year ago: Brushing aside international appeals, China executed British drug smuggler Akmal Shaikh, who relatives said was mentally unstable and unwittingly lured into crime; it was China’s first execution of a European citizen in nearly 60 years. Mexico City enacted Latin America’s first law recognizing gay marriage and said it hoped to attract same-sex couples from around the world.


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 29, 2010

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Briefly: Nation Judge clears way for Alaska Senate win JUNEAU, Alaska — A federal judge Tuesday dismissed a lawsuit by Republican Joe Miller and lifted a stay on certification of Alaska’s U.S. Senate election, clearing the way for Sen. Lisa Murkowski to officially be declared the winner later this week. The rulings by U.S. District Judge Ralph Beistline mean Alaska state officials will certify the November election Miller results Thursday. That will allow Murkowski to be sworn in when the new term of Congress convenes next week, and make her the first U.S. Senate candidate since 1954 to win with a write-in campaign. Miller, a tea party favorite who defeated Murkowski in Alaska’s GOP primary only to be confronted with her moreenergetic November write-in campaign, could still appeal. His spokesman, Randy DeSoto, said Tuesday that Beistline’s decision was being reviewed.

not tell the ages or genders of those who died because their bodies were so badly burned. A 23-year-old man who escaped told the American Red Cross he could not get back in to help his friends because of the smoke, agency volunteer Thomas Butler said. Temperatures were just below freezing, not unheard of but unusually cold for New Orleans. The warehouse is in a blighted city neighborhood left even more so by the flooding that followed Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

NYC digs out of snow

NEW YORK — Hundreds of airline passengers were stranded for up to 10 hours on the tarmac at overworked Kennedy Airport. The weekend blizzard proved to be the curse that keeps on giving Tuesday, as confusion and frustration snowballed in New York and the rest of the country. Officials warned it could take until New Year’s to rebook all passengers and straighten out the transportation mess created by the storm, which shut down all three of New York’s major airports for 24 hours and caused a ripple effect across the U.S. New York’s airports struggled to get planes in and out. But some jetliners couldn’t even get to the gate. At Kennedy, a British Airways plane from London carrying 300 passengers waited five hours for an open gate, then two more hours for customs to open, said John Lampl, a spokesman for the Fire kills 8 in Louisiana airline. A Cathay Pacific flight that NEW ORLEANS — The dead- had been diverted to Toronto liest city blaze in decades killed spent 10 hours on the tarmac, eight homeless squatters who and a second Cathay Pacific were burning debris in an abanplane with 250 people was still on doned warehouse to stay warm the runway after eight hours as Tuesday, authorities said. of Tuesday afternoon. Firefighters said they could The Associated Press

Briefly: World S. African police seize weapons for Somalia JOHANNESBURG — South African police seized a shipment of guns they believe was bound for Somalia to be used against pirates in a possible violation of a U.N. arms embargo, authorities said Tuesday. Eight assault rifles fitted with telescopic and silencing devices, two AK-47s, two shotguns and a revolver were confiscated from a home near the port city of Durban. Police had been tracking the shipment and four people — two South Africans and two foreigners — were arrested in the Dec. 23 raid and are out on bail, said South African police spokesman Vincent Mdunge. Police are trying to determine whether a port official helped move the weapons. Mdunge would not disclose the two foreigners’ nationalities. The seizure follows weeks of speculation over a controversial program, involving an ex-CIA deputy station chief and a former U.S. ambassador, to train and fund antipiracy forces in Somalia.

ing with the top U.N. envoy in Ivory Coast. The U.N. was tasked with certifying the results of the election as part of a peace agreement Gbagbo that ended a 2002-2003 civil war. The U.N. declared that Ouattara won the runoff held one month ago but Gbagbo refuses to concede defeat. Gbagbo has been in power since 2000 and had already overstayed his mandate by five years when the long-delayed presidential election was finally held in October, with the runoff coming in November.

17 killed in Pakistan

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — Pakistani intelligence officials said a third suspected U.S. missile strike has hit a tribal area near the Afghan border, killing nine militants and bringing the total toll to 17 dead in the strikes. The two earlier strikes Tuesday in North Waziristan tribal region killed eight people. The officials said at least two of the dead killed in the second strike were retrieving bodies from the Leaders to confront site of the first hit. ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — A The officials said the third delegation of West African leaders strike hit some vehicles carrywent to Ivory Coast on Tuesday ing alleged militants who may to confront Laurent Gbagbo and belong to the Haqqani network, demand that he step down from one of several militant groups in the presidency or face possible North Waziristan. regional military intervention. The two intelligence officials The presidents of Sierra spoke on condition of anonymity Leone, Benin and Cape Verde because they are not authorized arrived in Abidjan, and are due to meet with Gbagbo at the pres- to speak to the media. The Associated Press idential palace after first speak-

This photo provided to The Associated Press by Betsy Twombly shows a skier being helped down from a lift chair, center, after the lift derailed on the state’s tallest ski mountain at the Sugarloaf resort in Carrabassett Valley, Maine, on Tuesday.

Resort’s ski lift fails; riders fall or get stuck Children among hospitalized, but ungroomed snow limits injuries By Glenn Adams

The Associated Press

CARRABASSETT VALLEY, Maine — A 35-year-old chair lift set for improvements failed Tuesday in high winds at a Maine resort, sending skiers — some of them children — plummeting into ungroomed snow far below that fell with the Northeast’s recent blizzard and softened the landing. At least eight people, the children among them, were taken to a hospital after the double-chair lift at Sugarloaf derailed during a busy vacation week at the resort 120 miles north of Portland, Maine. Dozens of skiers remained on the crippled lift for an hour or more until patrols could get them down. The resort was not operating the failed lift and two others early in the day because of winds but deemed them safe to use before the accident at 10:15 a.m., said Ethan Austin, spokesman for Sugarloaf. The resort said the cable that supports the chairs jumped off track, though the exact cause of the failure is being investigated.

Winds were gusting at 40 mph at the time. The resort said the lift, which went into service in 1975 and recently passed an inspection, was set for upgrades or repairs but declined to specify when. About five chairs fell 25 feet to 30 feet onto a ski trail below, officials said. Rebecca London, one of the skiers who tumbled to the snow, told The Associated Press that her face hit a retaining bar but that her goggles spared her from serious injury. She credited new snow underneath the lift with a soft landing; the resort said it got 20 inches to 22 inches in Monday’s storm. “Thankfully, they didn’t groom it last night, so they left it like it was,” she said. “So the snow was all soft.” Most of the skiers who fell appeared to be stunned but OK, she said, and the ski patrol was on the scene within minutes to treat the injured. London, 20, of Carrabassett Valley, said she wasn’t hurt badly

enough to go to a hospital. Jay Marshall, a ski coach who hunkered down in a cold wind while on a lift next to the broken one, said that his lift was moving but that the broken one was not. There was a “loud snapping noise” after the lift restarted, he said, then some screams. “The next thing I know, it was bouncing up and down like a yo-yo,” said Marshall, of Carrabassett Valley. He said it was too difficult to watch, so he looked away. “It was terrifying,” he said. There could have been as few as 50 people or as many as 160 on the lift at the time, according to Sugarloaf, owned by Boyne Falls, Mich.based Boyne Resorts. Sugarloaf workers used a pulley-like system to lower skiers to safety. Jill Gray, a spokeswoman for Franklin Memorial Hospital in Farmington, about 45 miles away, said eight adults and children were taken there but did not give details on the injuries. One of the injured was flown on to Maine Medical Center in Portland, she said. It’s unclear whether the accident was wind-related or mechanical.

New first-class stamps are ‘forever’ beginning in January By Douglass K. Daniel The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Rummaging around for 1- and 2-cent postage stamps when postal rates go up is heading the way of the Pony Express. Beginning in January, all new stamps good for 1 ounce of firstclass mail will be marked as “forever.” The move is designed to help customers cope with postage increases, a U.S. Postal Service official told The Associated Press on Tuesday. The official requested anonymity to discuss a policy that hasn’t been announced formally. Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe plans to announce the new policy Jan. 14, the official said. “I think that’s a great idea,” Sean Swilling, a research analyst for commercial property, said inside a downtown Washington post office during a mail run. “For me, a guy who uses snailmail regularly, it’s a hassle to get 1- or 2-cent stamps. Streamline

Quick Read

U.S. Postal Service

A postage stamp honoring jazz appreciation forever. things — that would be perfect.” When the Postal Service unveiled its first-class commemorative stamps for 2011 on Tuesday, all were marked “forever” instead of the current rate of 44 cents. The initial first-class stamp

under the new policy will be the Lunar New Year: Year of the Rabbit stamp, to be issued Jan. 22. It will be followed by stamps commemorating Kansas statehood Jan. 29 and, in February, the centennial of President Ronald Reagan’s birth. The Forever Stamp, first issued in April 2007 and featuring the Liberty Bell, was designed for use regardless of changes in postal rates. They are sold at the prevailing price of 1 ounce of domestic first-class postage. The Postal Service said that 28 billion Forever Stamps have been sold since, generating $12.1 billion in total revenue. The stamps without denominations already account for 85 percent of its stamp program, the service said. The Postal Service sought a 2-cent increase in postage rates for 2011, but the independent Postal Rate Commission rejected the request; the post office is appealing the decision in federal court.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Governor may unveil Obama’s birth records

Nation: Drunken driver reports himself to police

Nation: French fry dispute ends with unhappy meal

World: Israeli companies to help build West Bank city

DEMOCRATIC GOV. NEIL Abercrombie of Hawaii wants to find a way to release more information about President Barack Obama’s birth and dispel conspiracy theories that Obama was born elsewhere. The newly elected Democrat will ask the state Attorney General’s Office and health officials about how he can make public more of Obama’s birth documentation from Aug. 4, 1961, spokeswoman Donalyn Dela Cruz said Tuesday. It’s unclear what Abercrombie could do because Hawaii’s privacy laws have long barred the release of a certified birth certificate to anyone who doesn’t have a tangible interest.

IOWA CITY, IOWA, police said a 25-year-old man called 9-1-1 to report a drunken driver: himself. According to the Iowa City PressCitizen, police said Francisco Castro called the emergency number around 8:30 Christmas morning. Officers found Castro sitting in the driver’s seat of a running vehicle. Police said Castro told officers that he called 9-1-1 because he thought he was too drunk to drive. A follow-up test showed his blood-alcohol level was nearly three times the legal limit. There is no listed phone number for Castro. Online court records don’t yet list the case or his attorney.

POLICE SAID A dispute over the freshness of french fries got heated at a McDonald’s in Sandusky, Ohio. Authorities said a customer refused fries waiting Sunday night in their serving pouches at the restaurant in northern Ohio. The manager insisted the fries were fresh. Police said they were called when the customer said he wouldn’t leave until he got different fries. He told officers a McDonald’s employee struck him with a mop. No charges were filed. Police said the man got his money back and left without fries.

THE DEVELOPER OF the first modern Palestinian city in the West Bank said about 20 Israeli suppliers will be working on the project — after the companies promised they will not use products or services from Israeli settlements. Bashar Masri, the developer of the Rawabi city project, said Tuesday he tries to use Palestinian suppliers but when necessary has had to turn to Israeli suppliers on condition settlement products aren’t used. Jewish settlers have accused the Israeli suppliers of caving in to an international boycott of businesses connected to the settlements.


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Peninsula Daily News

Party: Fundraising done through donations Continued from A1 Olympic Cellars is donating the space, said Shelley Taylor, spokeswoman for the production and the voice of Christine Hale, Cross’ love interest, in the production that tells the tale of a “Sequim Bay boat bum” who “is hired to find a priceless artifact, leading to a deadly chase on the raging seas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca.” Fundraising will be accomplished through soliciting donations and through CD sales, which will allow holders to hear the show before it is broadcast, Taylor said.

Excerpts of show Those at the party also will hear some of the scenes from radio drama, made in the old-time tradition. Grissim, a Dungenessarea resident, plans to present about 30 minutes of excerpts from the show, which has expanded to one hour and 14 minutes. “We’ll center them around dramatic moments that will demonstrate some of the bells and whistles that we’ve been able to achieve but also to showcase our actors,” he said. He’ll talk about work done behind the scenes. Some sound effects can be purchased, Grissim said, but others are handmade.

Thumped his chest To get the sound of helicopter rotor blades — heard when a Coast Guard member is speaking — just right, Grissim thumped his chest “really fast.” It took about three takes to get the sound just right, so to record 30 seconds of

KSQM plans to expand reach Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Within three years, nonprofit radio station KSQM 91.5 FM officials and volunteers expect to be heard by a lot more people. Sequim Community Broadcasting received word a week ago that the Federal Communications Commission had granted it a construction permit for a new tower, expanding the station’s reach by increasing its effective radiated power — or ERP — from 700 watts to 2,400 watts, or 2.4 kilowatts. “That’s almost four times larger,” said Jeff Bankston, general manager of the station at 577 W. Washington St. The station now can be heard in Sequim and Dungeness Valley, some parts of Port Angeles and Port Townsend, and has some listeners in Joyce, Bankston said. And that’s just on the North Olympic Peninsula. “Our biggest audience is in Victoria” across the Strait of Juan de background sound, Grissim beat his chest for about a minute and a half. He was sore afterward, he admitted. The work is an example of the “lengths that a director will go through to get the right sound,” he said. In at least one case, inspiration struck him in his sleep. The crew wanted the sound of a safe-cracker turning the combination. “We wanted a tiny ratchet sound. We couldn’t find it anywhere,” Grissim said. “I woke up in the middle of the night and thought of my three-quarter socket wrench.

Statue: It was in full

view of cash register

Continued from A1 Chief Brian Smith said Tuesday that photos of the The statue had been on statue have been circulated display in front of the store’s to officers and that the theft fireplace. remains under investiga“It was right in full view tion. of the cash registers,” Anyone with information Petersen said. “It wasn’t in is asked to phone the police a corner.” department at 360-417When store personnel 4545 or North Olympic saw that it was gone, the Crime Stoppers at 800-222question was asked: “Did 8477. anyone sell it?” North Olympic Crime “No one had,” Petersen Stoppers pays up to $1,000 said. cash reward for information She said she is offering a that leads to arrest and the reward for the return of the filing of felony charges. statue. Tips can be provided Port Angeles Deputy anonymously.

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Fuca, Bankston said, adding that the station also has broadcast to listeners in the Orcas Islands, the San Juan Islands and Mount Vernon.

Three years The FCC’s construction permit approval gives the station three years to build a new tower. The plans are to replace the present tower at 1776 Atterberry Road with one at least 150 feet tall on Blue Mountain, Bankston said. The addition is expected to cost between $150,000 and $170,000, he said. “It’s an expensive undertaking,” he said. Expansion is a goal of every fundraiser the station has done, Bankston said, but in the future, a fundraiser will be created specifically for the new tower. Station officials also will seek grants. “Given the great generosity of our listeners, I feel certain we will

have this project come in before the deadline,” Bankston said. Once the new tower is erected, “I would imagine that we should go booming into Port Angeles,” Bankston said. “There will probably be very few places where you couldn’t hear us,” he added, though he doesn’t expect the station’s power to reach as far west as Forks.

‘Triple redundancy’ It will have “triple redundancy” in case of power failure, he added. “Because we are an emergency alert service participant, we expect to broadcast through any emergency,” he said. The studio now has emergency power, as does the tower on Atterberry Road. The new tower also will have emergency power available. “If the power goes out” at any one, or even two, of those places, “we will still be able to broadcast,” he said.

Rolling Stone magazine in San Francisco in the 1960s and ’70s and who is a former editor for Surfing magazine in Australia. Adam Stern, who conducts the Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra and the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra, wrote the score, which was recorded in November on the Port Angeles High School auditorium stage. The show stars Ron Graham as Cross, an adventurous, self-reliant loner who lives aboard an aging cabin cruiser in Sequim’s John All locally produced Wayne Marina and works It’s the first radio script as a jack-of-all-trades who for Grissim, who wrote for “regularly crosses paths “So that’s what you hear” when the safe is being opened. Another example: “We needed the sound of a sail exploding with air in a raging storm. . . . There’s a loud whumpf sound.” So the crew made a trip to The Home Depot in Sequim and bought a 6-footby-8-foot tarp. “On a count of three, we yanked it open.” January’s show is expected to be only the first installment in the Adrian Cross series, Taylor said.

Car ripped in half after police chase LAKEWOOD — A short, high-speed chase through Lakewood ended with the fleeing car torn in half after crashing into a tree, police said. The chase began when a Lakewood police officer spotted a car that had been reported stolen earlier Tuesday, Lakewood Police Lt. Chris Lawler said. Once the driver saw the officer, he sped off, reaching speeds of up to 70 miles per hour on city streets. But the chase didn’t last long. A couple of minutes after speeding off, the suspect driver hit a curb, flipping the car and hitting the tree. Lawler said the driver is lucky to be alive and unhurt. The car was completely torn in half, and debris was thrown around the street.

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Continued from A1 North Olympic Crime Stoppers at 800-222-8477. Smith said it is unusual Crime Stoppers pays up to have so many vehicles to $1,000 for information vandalized in such a con- that leads to an arrest with centrated area in a short the filing of felony charges. Callers can stay anonymous amount of time. “If someone knows some- if they wish. thing, we’d like to hear from ________ them,” he said. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be Those with information reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. can phone Officer Trevor ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. Dropp at 360-417-4545 or com.

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with Sequim’s police chief, with whom he has a flinty relationship,” Grissim has said. In addition to Graham and Taylor, listeners will hear announcer Steve Berg, Jim Dries as Preston Hale, Graham Reaves as E. Danforth Hale, Chandler Wendenborn as Mitchell Hodder, Ric Munhall as Audie Chambliss and as Roscoe the Parrot and Frank Romeo as LeRoy Purvis. And they will hear Sheri Burke as Sgt. Jennings, Jim Weldon as Chief Callaham, ________ Greg Madsen as Nelson Managing Editor/News Leah Paul, Erika Van Calcar as Leach can be reached at 360-417the Coast Guard dispatcher, 3531 or leah.leach@peninsula Ian Scott as the Coast dailynews.com.

Get a head start on your New Year’s resolutions today Sign up for a Community Education class at Peninsula College.

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T he Big Fine Daddies

When “Adrian Cross, For Hire” airs Jan. 16, listeners in Sequim and Dungeness Valley, and parts of Port Angeles and Port Townsend, can listen to it on their radios. But the 700-watt station’s reach is small. It will be accessible to all with computers, though. Just visit www.ksqmfm. com and click on “Listen Live.” The show also will be rebroadcast on as-yet-undetermined dates after the premiere. For more information, visit KSQM’s website at www.ksqmfm.com, e-mail the station at radio@ ksqmfm.com or phone 360681-0000.

SEATTLE — A SeattleTacoma International Airport spokesman said a Hawaiian Airlines flight diverted to Sea-Tac on Tuesday morning and The Associated Press landed without incident. Lakewood police officers Joseph Sandall, left, Spokesman Perry Cooand Sgt. Ralph Evans gather evidence at the per said the Boeing 767 scene of a car crash in which the vehicle split was flying from Portland, in two. Ore., to Maui when the flight crew received a The driver was taken to County sheriff’s spokeswarning of a possible aira local hospital. man said. craft trim problem. Sgt. John Urquhart said He said procedures call 2 teens shot it appears that an 18-year- for the plane to divert to old boy and his 16-year-old the nearest airport, which MAPLE VALLEY — girlfriend were both hit by was Sea-Tac. Two teens were shot and the same bullet. Cooper said the plane wounded Tuesday afterKIRO TV reported that landed at about 11:10 a.m. noon when they encountered two other male teens the boy is in serious condi- and went to an airport tion at Harborview Medical gate, where it was being on the Lake Wilderness Center in Seattle while the checked out. Trail in Maple Valley, southeast of Seattle, a King girl is in stable condition. The Associated Press

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During the “Mingle with the Cast Party,” CDs of “Adrian Cross, For Hire — The Schooner Mystic Rose” will be available for sale for $15. Those who donate $30 also will receive the CD. KSQM memorabilia will be for sale and also will be included in larger donations, Taylor said. That could include specially made Adrian Cross T-shirts. Wine will be served at a no-host bar. Hors d’œuvre by Mystery Bay Seafood Catering will be served at no charge.

Urquhart said the two other male teens have been arrested and a handgun was recovered. The spokesman said words were exchanged on the trail — “something to do with gang colors.”

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Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

A5

PT AAUW recognizes excellent women 2010 awards go to dean, Jumping Mouse founder Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Dott Kelly and Deborah B. Johnson were honored recently with the American Association of University Women Port Townsend’s 2011 Women of Excellence Award at a holiday luncheon at the Fort Worden State Park Commons. Since starting the Women of Excellence award in 1996, AAUW Port Townsend has annually honored women who have contributed significantly to the status of women through paid and/or volunteer work in Jefferson County.

Founder, therapist Kelly is founder, clinical director and therapist of Jumping Mouse Children’s Center in Port Townsend. Jumping Mouse is a nonprofit organization that provides expressive mental health therapy for children. “Expressive therapy is a way of exploring things that children can’t put into words,” Kelly said. Founded in 1999, between 60 and 80 children and their families are seen at Jumping Mouse each year, at minimal or no cost. Jumping Mouse is operated via grants, local funding and client fees that are determined by ability to pay. “Dott is a visionary with the ability to nurse an idea

front line of educational advancement in our community for 15 years,” said Matt Lyons, the director of the Jefferson Education Center who nominated Johnson for the award. “Her tireless work has expanded local opportunities and enabled a generation of women and men to be better prepared for work, education and life.” Johnson worked with Peninsula College and state officials to bring university and technical programs to east Jefferson County.

from inception through its 10th anniversary,” said Carol Brannan, a child therapist who nominated Kelly for the award. “She turned her dream into a reality by commitment, hard work and faith in the future. “She is the best therapist I’ve ever worked with.” Kelly’s advocacy for the safety of children has made her a force in court and Move to park with local children’s service Peninsula College agencies, the AAUW said. emerged from a Port Townsend loft to an Licensed practitioner expanded facility on Quincy She is a licensed private Street, followed by a move practitioner in mental to Fort Worden State Park. Currently, the Fort health; is trained in parent education and has facili- Worden location is under tated parent groups, taught consideration to become a seminars at Antioch Uni- full branch campus of the versity, Seattle University college and the cornerstone and Evergreen College; and of the Fort Worden Lifelong has facilitated workshops Learning Initiative. Johnson also has been in child development and active in local Big Brothers attachment. She is an active member Big Sisters efforts and of the National Association served as a big sister and of Counselors and Sandplay member of the organization’s advisory committee. Therapists of America. She has a master’s degree in child and family Past winners psychology with specialized Past Women of Exceltraining in adoption, foster lence honorees are Cheryl care and abuse. Bozarth (2010), Sally RobJohnson is Peninsula bins (2009), Judy D’Amore College’s dean of East Jefand Libby Palmer (2008), ferson County Education at Eveleen Muehlethaler the college’s Fort Worden (2007), Anne Schneider and State Park campus. Sue Sidle (2006), Roberta Frissell (2005), Ruth MerryEducational front line man (2004), Gay Eisen“Deb has been on the berger (2003), Pat Yearian

Lynne Bennett

Dott Kelly, left, of Jumping Mouse Children’s Center and Deborah B. Johnson of Peninsula College’s Fort Worden campus are the 2010 recipients of the American Association of University Women Port Townsend Women of Excellence Award, which annually honors women who have contributed significantly to the status of women through paid and/or volunteer work in Jefferson County. (2002), Peggy Thompson (2001), Judith B. Gunter (2000), Katherine Baril (1999), Helen Brink (1998), Dr. Elmira K. Beyer (1997) and Ella Sandvig (1996). Honorees receive personalized plaques and are listed

on the Women of Excellence plaque on permanent display at the Port Townsend Public Library, 1220 Lawrence St. The Port Townsend AAUW, with 208 members, is the largest branch of

AAUW in the state, and includes members from Chimacum, Marrowstone Island, Port Hadlock, Port Ludlow, Port Townsend and Quilcene. For more information, visit www.aauwpt.org.

PA man sentenced to 3 years for 9 crimes Pleads guilty to all but one By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Cody B. Runnion, 19, has pleaded guilty to nine crimes — but did not admit guilt in one of them, conspiracy to commit the April robbery at Fairmount Grocery — and been sentenced to three years in state prison. Clallam County Superior Court Judge S. Brooke Taylor sentenced Runnion on Monday after the Port Ange-

les man changed his plea from not guilty. Runnion signed a court statement Monday in which he admitted guilt in all of the charges except conspiracy to commit robbery. “I do not admit guilt,” he wrote. “But there is enough evidence to support a finding of guilt; and I want to take advantage of the plea offer.” Hundreds of hours of police work, particularly on

the part of Detective Kevin Spencer, led to the guilty plea, said Port Angeles Deputy Chief of Police Brian Smith. “This case is a who-doneit,” he said. “We didn’t have any information when it started.” Runnion is the third person to plead in the Fairmount case. Nicholas J. Sullivan, 24, of Kingston pleaded guilty to the armed robbery of the Fairmount store. He was sentenced to 65 months in prison and 18 months of probation Oct. 26

for spearheading the robbery. In September, a 16-yearold Port Angeles girl pleaded guilty to being an accomplice. She is not identified because she is a minor. Sullivan entered the store at 1137 U.S. Highway 101 armed with a rifle and demanded the clerk hand over all the money from the cash register. The clerk complied, and the suspect fled. Authorities have not released the amount of money taken. Runnion was arrested on

an unrelated crime July 31. He was charged Aug. 2 with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft in connection with a July 11 burglary at the All Animal Hospital in Port Angeles, in which a safe was stolen. Charges were amended Aug. 13 to include four counts of residential burglary stemming from breakins of homes in the Sequim area July 7, July 29 and July 30. Prosecutors added one count of possession of a controlled substance.

Runnion pleaded not guilty to the charges Aug. 13, Charges were amended again Monday to include another count of seconddegree burglary for alledgedly breaking into Smith’s Jewelry Repair in Port Angeles on July 23 and second-degree conspiracy to commit robbery at the Fairmount State on April 18.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Fish & Wildlife sets trap for black bear at PA home Department officer: Sightings are not unusual for area near creek By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

because he feared it could become aggressive. State Department of Fish & Wildlife Officer Wynn Miller set up a trap for the bear Tuesday. He said that seeing a bear in those parts isn’t necessarily unusual. “We live in an area with lots of bears,” he said. “There are also lots of raccoons and cougars and deer.”

PORT ANGELES — Every night since Christmas Eve, a black bear has wandered into Brad Burkett’s backyard. The bear, which Burkett said is an anomaly for his backyard, appears to have an injured back leg. “Every night, I’ve been making noise to scare it away,” he said. Many alert Burkett, who lives on a creek just off the intersection of Tumwater Truck Route and U.S. Highway 101, said he wanted others to know about the bear

Although some bears are hibernating at this point, many are alert during periods of the relatively warm winters of the North Olympic Peninsula. “On the Peninsula, they tend to go in and out of

9B123116

Lives on creek

hibernation,” he said. “It making him — and it makes isn’t like Colorado or in “On the Peninsula, they tend to go in and out us all — a little nervous Eastern Washington where of hibernation. It isn’t like Colorado or in when bears start coming it is really cold. around city limits, but he Eastern Washington where it is really cold. “They’ll come out and lives right on a creek, which eat a little bit and go back.” They’ll come out and eat a little bit and go is a perfect spot for this. If the bear is injured, it back.” “I set up a trap, and we’ll might be in too much pain Wynn Miller see what happens.” to sleep, Miller added. state Department of Fish & Wildlife officer __________ Burkett said he first spotted the bear on his surPaige Dickerson can “But I’ll assess if it is be Reporter veillance cameras in his easily, and then he will reached at 360-417-3535 or at really bad if we catch it. evaluate it for injuries. paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily backyard. “The main thing is it was news.com. If the wound is too severe to heal naturally in the No trash outside wild, the bear could be Although there are some killed, he said. apple trees nearby, he said, But if the wound could he does not keep trash out- heal on its own — or if the side. bear is not injured at all — Celebrating our 27th year “This is the first time in then the creature will be the two years that I’ve lived taken to a more remote area here that I’ve seen a bear west of Port Angeles, Miller here,” he said, adding that said. Susan Brothers, Tim Gillett, Owners. Susan he’s lived in other areas of Cannon, Administrative Assistant & Betty Owbridge, Manager. No rehab Port Angeles for 20 years. Miller said he expects “We won’t rehab it,” the trap to catch the bear he said.

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Federal bonus could save youths’ Medicaid coverage The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Efforts to enroll low-income children in Medicaid coverage have paid off for the state, which has won a $17.6 million federal bonus payment for having cut red tape and streamlined administrative hurdles for families. Advocates hope the justin-time grant, one of 15 announced Monday, could help rescue a related program, which now insures some 27,000 children who don’t qualify for Medicaid because they are not citizens or their parents cannot produce proper documentation for them. That program is now on the chopping block as lawmakers struggle to fill a $4.6 billion shortfall for the next biennium. Gov. Chris Gregoire has proposed ending the program March 1. Because undocumented children don’t qualify for Medicaid, the state spends $59 million per biennium for the program, a small part of a children’s health-

coverage umbrella known as Apple Health for Kids. Apple Health, begun three years ago, combines several different programs, including Medicaid, to insure more than 700,000 children. It is free for those whose families make less than 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Level ($36,620 for a family of three), and those at between 200 percent and 300 percent of the poverty level pay small premiums. Jon Gould, deputy director of the Children’s Alliance, an advocacy group, said the grant was in recognition of the state’s success in getting low-income children enrolled in health coverage.

Undocumented kids How the money will be spent is not yet known because it’s unrestricted, meaning it could be taken by lawmakers to plug gaps in other areas. But Gould hopes it will be used to continue the program for undocu-

mented children. “All children in the state should have health coverage, regardless of where they are born,” he said. “It’s not just the right thing to do; it’s the smart thing to do. Preventive health care avoids emergency visits” and other costly care. Cassie Sauer, spokeswoman for the Washington State Hospital Association, said: “The additional money should be safeguarded to preserve insurance for all Washington’s children, not diverted to fill the general budget hole.” Dr. Beth Harvey, president of the state chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, noted that many families have had a hard time keeping health insurance during the economic downturn. “Apple Health for Kids protects children by providing access to preventive health care, immunization and sick care with their usual medical provider,

before they require expensive ER or hospital care,” she said in a statement released by the Children’s Alliance. In all, the grants totaled more than $206 million. Alabama was the top grantgetter, with nearly $55 million. The grants went to states that enrolled more currently eligible children, not by expanding eligibility levels. According to the alliance, the latest Washington State Population Survey showed that the number of uninsured children statewide has dropped in the last two years from 4.6 percent to 3.4 percent, despite the tough economy. Washington enrolled 74,815 children more than in the previous year, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, but about 75,000 children in the state remain uninsured. Many are eligible, the state believes, but their parents don’t realize it.

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly: State Man, 92, chews tape after robbery

Viaduct work

SEATTLE — Major construction starts next week at the southern end of Seattle’s Alaskan Way Viaduct. The state TransportaSHORELINE — The tion Department said King County Sheriff’s crews Monday night will Office said a 92-year-old close busy First Avenue Shoreline man chewed South just west of Qwest through restraints to free Field. himself after two men The next day, the street robbed his house. Sgt. John Urquhart said will reopen with just one lane in each direction. that two men knocked on That will last through Lester Matteson’s door April 1, while workers tear Monday and asked to use down the existing northhis phone, claiming their bound onramp to the viacar had broken down. duct and start building a But once they entered, the men grabbed the victim temporary replacement. Later this winter, a new and used masking tape to southbound offramp will be tape him to a chair. built near Safeco and Urquhart said the men Qwest fields. ransacked the house and The work is the first more than $400 in cash and the victim’s 2000 Ford phase in the long-term project to replace the aging pickup truck. viaduct along Seattle’s It took Matteson two hours to chew through the waterfront. Transportation officials masking tape. said they are hurrying to Other than bruises, he get the work done before was not injured. baseball season starts. Matteson told KOMO In addition to going past TV he wasn’t frightened, the two stadiums, First but at his age, “you don’t Avenue is a major route to wrestle two young men.” And he said he’s learned Interstate 5 and the downhis lesson: “Watch out who town ferry terminal. you let in.” The Associated Press

Attorney general aiming to cut lawsuit payouts The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — As Washington’s budget woes compound, Attorney General Rob McKenna is making suggestions for how the state might reduce what it spends in legal judgments and settlements. Washington paid more than $50 million in such costs in 2009. McKenna said that’s between four and 12 times as much as comparably sized states, including Massachusetts, Arizona, Tennessee and Indiana. The issue has long bothered McKenna, a two-term Republican. He said legislators in the upcoming session could cap state damages, limit acts for which the state is liable or tie the state’s share of payouts to the state’s share of blame. “Our liability ought to be in line with other states. Even if we adopted a sys-

tem like Massachusetts has or Oregon has, we’d be better off,” McKenna told The Olympian newpaper’s editorial board Monday. Those two states have some limits on liability payouts.

Resistance expected His efforts are sure to meet resistance, especially from trial lawyers who are important Democratic donors. Larry Shannon, with the state’s trial attorney lobby, told Seattle NPR station KUOW for a story last week that he disagrees that Washington is too exposed to liability. The state’s taxpayers should be proud of its willingness to take responsibility when its mistakes hurt innocent people, he said. “These are real people going about their lives and have them destroyed and

shattered by incidents that could have fully been prevented,” Shannon said. And, he argued, savings from cutting such payouts are illusory because without them, victims of such cases are likely to wind up needing public assistance. McKenna said he agrees that the state should pay for damages when it is negligent and harms the public. But he also said the state unfairly pays out too much in cases where it’s partly to blame and simply is the party with deep financial pockets.

June 10, 1936 December 7, 2010 Joseph André Jonas passed away on December 7, 2010, surrounded by his family. Joe married Patricia Kelly, a Port Angeles native, in 1979 and had two children, Jared and wife, Naomi, of Seattle and Shalem of Chicago. They spent their summers hiking and camping all over Olympic National Park. He enjoyed his in-laws, Lucille and Elmer Kelly, and many other fine friends in Port Angeles. He worked with Duncan McKiernan in his foundry one summer. Joe loved nature, photography, cutting wood, his violin, making Christmas cards, feeding people, being in the woods and going to his cabin at the Place Beach. Joseph was born in 1936 in Marseille, France, to Gabriel and Shalem Jonas and lived there with his parents and nine siblings during World War II. His favorite childhood memories included drawing and painting with

Mr. Jonas paints he made with natural materials, climbing trees and having the kind American troops share food with the hungry children. At age 14, he came to the U.S. by himself and settled with his older siblings in Chicago. Eventually the whole family settled in Spokane, Washington, where he helped support his family by working in the commercial arts field. He put himself through college and received his Master’s in Art. He began his career as an educator and soon became an art instructor at North Idaho

The attorney general has offered several ideas to Democratic Reps. Ruth Kagi of Lake Forest Park and Deb Eddy, a Kirkland lawyer. Among them are limits on damage payments and apportioning costs of a judg-

College, where he founded the Commercial Program in 1977. He taught there for over 20 years until health problems forced him to retire. He continued his painting and sculptures, many of which can be seen at the North Idaho College campus, Hayden Lake Country Club, Painter’s Chair Gallery, Shriners Hospital in Spokane and the entrance to the Coeur d’Alene Resort. He received many artists’ distinctions, including the Mayors Awards for the Arts and a Nomination for the Idaho Governors Award in the Arts. Survivors include Mia, Zyah and Aaron Jonas; two brothers; five sisters; and many nieces and nephews. The celebration of Joe’s life was held December 16, 2010, at North Idaho College. Contributions can be made to the Joe Jonas Scholarship Fund c/o NIC Foundation, 1000 West Garden Avenue, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814. Please visit Joe’s online memorial and sign his guest book at www. yatesfuneralhomes.com.

Remembering a Lifetime

Eddy said she believes reformers and trial lawyers can find common ground. One idea she’s exploring is to better define where the state really is liable for child-safety and Department of Corrections errors,

at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

in effect defining a “standard of care” that could help clarify duties for state workers. Another is a sort of nofault fund that could be used to help those who are damaged in child-protection cases. The state recently settled one case for $8 million, involving a cyclist who was left paralyzed when his tire became stuck in the deck of Seattle’s Montlake Bridge. In another, the state had to share in a $30 million payout in a case where a

motorist was left paralyzed when another vehicle rearended his in a construction zone along Interstate 5 in Seattle. A traffic-flow meter had stopped the first vehicle, and both the contractor and second motorist were sued. The insurer wanted to go to trial, and the state ended up paying a share of damages. McKenna said the theory was that the state shared blame because a nearby overpass cast a shadow over the accident area.

Death Notices Darold M. Bullock

related causes. He was 74. Services: None, at his Dec. 12, 1962 — Dec. 27, 2010 request. Darold M. Bullock of Drennan-Ford Funeral Port Angeles died in Port Home, Port Angeles, is in Angeles at 48. charge of arrangements. His obituary and service www.drennanford.com information will be published later. Drennan-Ford Funeral Danny K. Johnson Home, Port Angeles, is in Dec. 17, 1955 — Dec. 3, 2010 charge of arrangements. Danny K. Johnson of www.drennanford.com Port Angeles died of esophageal cancer. He was 54. Cecil H. Carson Jr. Services: Sunday, Jan. June 11, 1936 — Dec. 24, 2010 2, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., celebraCecil H. Carson Jr. died tion of life at Mount Pleasin his Sequim home of age- ant Grange, 2342 Mount

Pleasant Road, Port Angeles. Linde Family Funeral Service, Sequim, is in charge.

Theodore ‘Ted’ Shaugnessy Nov. 27, 1948 — Dec. 20, 2010

Theodore “Ted” Shaugnessy died in Sequim at 62. His obituary will be published later. Services: Saturday, Jan. 8, 11 a.m., memorial service at Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel, 108 W. Alder St.

Death and Memorial Notice Judge Rothwell B. Mason

of 10 airplanes over the years. The FAA gave him the Wright Brothers Master Pilot award in 2007, recognizing over 60 continuous years of flying. A graduate of George Washington University and Fordham University School of Law, he was an FBI agent, an advertising representative, a federal prosecutor and in private law practice before being appointed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan to the Bench in California in 1973. He and his wife, Barbara, retired in 1991 and moved to Port Townsend, but he continued to accept assignments as a California Superior Court Judge several times per year, right up until his death. He was a member of

July 7, 1927 December 26, 2010 Roth Mason was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, and attended public schools there, where he was an Eagle Scout and worked as a radio announcer before graduating as valedictorian of his 1945 high school class. He enlisted on his 17th birthday and became a naval aviator, flying from four carriers in two fleet squadrons, and then affiliating with various Naval Air Reserve “weekend warrior” squadrons, retiring as a commander in 1964. He never lost his love of flying, owning all or part

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various honorary and professional societies, including Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Gamma Mu, Phi Delta Phi, Delta Phi Epsilon, the Association of Naval Aviation, and the Society of Former FBI Agents, the Sacramento Sheriff’s Squadron, the Jefferson County Pilots Association and the Tuesday Breakfast Club. His favorite activity was travel; with his wife, Barbara, he visited some 180 foreign countries and possessions, on all seven continents, including six circumnavigations of the globe. A celebration of his life will be held on Saturday, February 5, 2011, at 4 p.m. at Tailspin Tommy’s hangar at the Jefferson County International Airport.

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading

Common ground

Ideas offered

Death and Memorial Notice Joseph A. Jonas

ment according to a party’s share of blame. Another is to change the law so defendants in personal injury cases involving car wrecks can introduce evidence that a plaintiff did not wear seat belts.

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Commentary

Page

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Resolving to resolve in the New Year By now I think we’ve all had it up to here with know-itall, drive-by, lap-dog, cookie-cutter newspaper columnists preaching imaginary New Year’s resolutions they have no Pat intention of keeping them- Neal selves. As a wilderness gossip columnist, I have always strived to provide a shining beacon to humanity in a sincere effort to help others. Helping others is one of the more popular New Year’s resolutions. That must be why last year I volunteered to be a marmot surveyor in Olympic National Park. The Olympic marmots are unique little varmints whose numbers could be depressed.

If the marmots are depressed, they could be endangered. And if they are endangered, why, that’s like winning the Endangered Species lottery. Untold millions will be spent studying the problem. Maybe some of my marmot survey methods were a little extreme, but the hindsight of a Monday morning quarterback is always 20/20. I know now that shocking the marmots out of their holes was not a good idea. They don’t make extension cords that long, but how else was I supposed to get the marmots out in the open to count them? Someone said I should pipe rap music into the marmot holes to flush them out. That didn’t work, either. Shooting the marmots with paintballs was not a good idea, but one marmot looks pretty much like another.

How else could I keep from counting the same marmot twice? So forget about helping others. It’s just another road-to-nowhere, dead-end resolution that will only make you feel used. Ditto learning new things. You know what that famous French philosopher, “What’s His Name,” said about learning new things: “Knowledge is like a sphere. The larger it grows, the more it touches the unknown.” I knew learning new things was a waste of time when I tried to read the fishing laws. You have no idea how hard it was to translate 146 pages of the Washington state fishing laws into English. This was a monumental task. For example, the Hoh River is divided into six different regulatory zones, each with a different season and limit. This, on a river that is only 50 miles long! After a year of research, I was finally able to translate the fish-

Peninsula Voices

ing regulations into a language a normal person could understand. Translating a code this complex required an intense computer analysis that identified word patterns. These words were then reduced to their elemental linguistic rootstock. Using this computer model, I was able to translate 146 pages of modern fishing laws into a single page that contained only one word: “NO!” Sometimes, learning new things will only make you feel stupid. Getting organized is another New Year’s resolution you hear a lot about. Don’t bother. Last year, I was going to organize my tackle box. No more wasted days with fishing lures that didn’t work. I was going to organize my tackle box to the point where I only carried fishing lures that would catch fish. Before I could organize my

Our readers’ letters, faxes

tackle box, I had to find it somewhere in my extensive tackle box collection. One man’s tackle box collection is another’s hoarding disorder. I know that now but my fishing lures are like my best friends. It makes me very sad to lose one. Organizing my tackle box meant I might throw a lure away that might catch a fish some day. The fact is that most New Year’s resolutions leave you feeling useless, ignorant and demented. I say if it ain’t fixed, don’t break it. This year, my New Year’s resolution is to try to write good. Have a happy New Year.

________

Pat Neal is a North Olympic Peninsula fishing guide and ­“wilderness ­gossip columnist.” He can be reached at 360-6839867 or e-mail at patnealwildlife@ yahoo.com. Pat’s column appears here every Wednesday.

and e-mail

Letter was off base

Chris Dodd who, utilizing their positions of power, To paraphrase Ronald supported the “American Reagan, the problem is not Dream of Homeownership” what people don’t know but, to all, regardless of one’s rather, what they know to ability to either purchase or be true that simply isn’t so. maintain a home. This is aptly illustrated Lastly, the writer in the stunningly illappears oblivious of the informed statement by a duties of Realtors to conrecent letter writer (“Hous- sider the best interests of ing ‘Bubble,’” Dec. 24 PDN). the client, which requires The writer opined that concluding the transaction “rational people” “know” the to the satisfaction of both housing bubble was not due parties. to government regulation And, absent the thrust of but, rather, due to real government regulations estate brokers listing/selling and other outside interferproperties at high prices. ence, the final price is dicThe writer is apparently tated by prevailing market unaware of the Carter-insti- forces. gated Community ReinvestRealtors rarely encounment Act, further strength- ter sellers who wish to marened by Clinton, wherein ket their property for less lenders were encouraged, than what they could othereven forced, to make illwise receive. advised loans to home buyBut, if the letter writer ers who were unqualified ever wishes to sell his propwith respect to creditworerty, I am sure that, if so thiness, down payment abil- directed, his Realtor will ity or employment history. sell it at the lowest price Further, the letter writer possible. blithely dismisses the selfDick Pilling, promoting machinations of Broker-owner, Carroll Messrs. Barney Frank and Realty, Port Angeles

Ike’s GOP In response to the Dec. 3 letter, “It’s Socialism,” please Google the 1956 Republican platform, which said, according to The American Presidency Project (at http:// tinyurl.com/ycus5be): “We are proud of and shall continue our far-reaching and sound advances in matters of basic human

needs-expansion of Social Security, broadened coverage in unemployment insurance, improved housing and better health protection for all our people.” The platform also pledged continuously vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws; legislation to enable closer federal scrutiny of mergers which have

a significant or potential monopolistic connotations; procedural changes in the antitrust laws to facilitate their enforcement; continual study of additional ways to correct inequities in the effect of various taxes; provide assistance to improve the economic conditions of areas faced with persistent and substantial unemploy-

ment; revise and improve the Taft-Hartley Act so as to protect more effectively the rights of labor unions, management, the individual worker and the public. The Republican Party believes that the physical, mental and spiritual wellbeing of the people is as important as their economic health, stating principles that are neither partisan nor prejudiced, but warmly American. America does not prosper unless all American prosper, and government must have a heart as well as a head. In 1956, the top marginal tax rate on the wealthy was more than 90 percent, and we had the highest employment, wages and standard of living! I can see common ground with other political parties in this 18-page document. Can it be used as a starting point to work together? Eisenhower Republicans, please take back your party. Jackie Aase, Port Townsend

The best magazine essays of the year The Sidney Awards go to some of the best magazine essays of the year. Named after New York David writer and thinker Sidney Brooks Hook, the oneman jury (me) is biased against political essays, since politics already gets so much coverage. But the jury is biased in favor of pieces that illuminate the ideas and conditions undergirding political events. For example, there’s been a lot of talk this year about trying to reduce corruption in Afghanistan, Iraq and across the Middle East. But in a piece in The American Interest called “Understanding Corruption,” Lawrence Rosen asks: What does corruption mean? For Westerners, it means one set of things — bribery and nepotism, etc. But when Rosen asks people in the Middle East what corruption is, he gets variations on an entirely different meaning: “Corruption is the failure to share any largess you have

received with those with whom you have formed ties of dependence.” Our view of corruption makes sense in a nation of laws and impersonal institutions. But Rosen explains: “Theirs is a world in which the defining feature of a man is that he has formed a web of indebtedness, a network of obligations that prove his capacity to maneuver in a world of relentless uncertainty.” So to not give a job to a cousin is corrupt; to not do deals with tribesmen is corrupt. Reducing corruption in Afghanistan is not a question of replacing President Hamid Karzai with a more honest man. It’s a deeper process. In earlier ages, people consulted oracles. We consult studies. We rely on scientific findings to guide health care decisions, policy making and much else. But in an essay called “The Truth Wears Off” in The New Yorker, Jonah Lehrer reports on something strange. He describes a class of antipsychotic drugs, whose effectiveness was demonstrated by several large clinical trials. But in a subsequent batch of studies, the therapeutic power of the drugs appeared to wane precipitously.

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This is not an isolated case. “But now all sorts of wellestablished, multiply confirmed findings have started to look increasingly uncertain,” Lehrer writes. “It’s as if our facts were losing their truth: claims that have been enshrined in textbooks are suddenly unprovable.” The world is fluid. Bias and randomness can creep in from all directions. For example, between 1966 and 1995, there were 47 acupuncture studies conducted in Japan, Taiwan and China, and they all found it to be an effective therapy. There were 94 studies in the U.S., Sweden and Britain, and only 56 percent showed benefits. The lesson is not to throw out studies, but to never underestimate the complexity of the world around. There’s been a lot written about Detroit, but Charlie LeDuff’s essay, “Who Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones,” in Mother Jones packs a special power. It starts with a killing of a little girl in a police raid, then pulls back to the idiotic murder of a teenage boy that precipitated the raid — that murder victim may have smirked at his killer for riding a moped. Then LeDuff touches on the

decay all around — a city in which 80 percent of the eighthgraders are unable to do basic math, the crime lab was closed because of ineptitude, 500 fires are set every month and 50 percent of the drivers are operating without a license. LeDuff, a former reporter for The New York Times, travels from broad context to the specific details — from the collapse of the industrial economy to the fact that a local minister was left with the girl’s $4,000 funeral costs, claiming the girl’s father ran off with the donations. In an essay in Foreign Affairs called “The Demographic Future,” Nicholas Eberstadt describes the coming global manpower decline. Over the next two decades, for example, there will be a 30 percent decline in the number of Chinese between the ages of 15 and 29 — 100 million fewer workers. Tyler Cowen wrote a superb, counterintuitive piece on income inequality for The American Interest called “The Inequality That Matters.” It’s filled with interesting observations. For example, the inequality that really bites is local — the guy down the street who can spend three bucks more for a

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

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case of beer, not Bill Gates’ billions across the country. But his main insight is this: Smart people, especially in the financial sector, now have tremendous incentives to take great risks. If the risks fail, they still have millions in the bank. If the risks pay off, they get enormously rich. The result is a society with more inequality and more financial instability. It’s not clear we know how to address this phenomenon. Finally, two historical essays deserve mention. Adam Gopnik wrote a fresh piece on Winston Churchill for The New Yorker called “Finest Hours.” Anne Applebaum wrote a chilling essay on central Europe in the 20th century called “The Worst of the Madness” in The New York Review of Books. (The online version of this column, at http://tinyurl.com/ essays29, has links to the essays.) I’ve been doing these awards for several years now. This was the richest year, with the best essays.

________

David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times. He can be reached via e-mail link at http://tinyurl.com/nytdbrooks.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Deadline nears for plaque listings Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Listings received by Thursday for the North Olympic Land Trust plaque at the Clallam County Courthouse will be added in the new year. Every donation of $100 to the nonprofit organization can be used to purchase a listing.

By Jan. 30 The office needs to receive donations and forms by Jan. 30 so the next plaque engraving can be ordered. Donors can provide brief descriptions to honor or memorialize others or show their own support for the land trust’s work in protecting special qualities of area

lands, such as habitat for salmon and other wildlife, farmland, commercial timberland, clean water and air, scenic vistas, open space and cultural heritage. The plaques have been updated each year since the land trust presented artwork called “Elwha Return” to the county in 2007.

Local artists Local artists Clark Mundy, Darrell Charles Jr. and Al Charles Jr. created the artwork — made of cedar and hammered copper — to help the land trust fund its work. Land trust Executive Director Greg Good said forms can be downloaded at North Olympic Land Trust www.nolt.org or requested by phoning the office at 360- Donations received by Thursday will be listed next year on the North Olympic Land Trust plaque for Clallam County Courthouse artwork in the entry off Fourth Street. 417-1815.

PA affirms Nippon permit appeal decision By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The City Council affirmed Tuesday its Dec. 6 decision supporting a permit for a $71 million biomass cogeneration project by unanimously approving written findings of fact and conclusions of law. The Port Angeles City Council considered the written document at an eightminute special meeting. The council had voted 5-1 on Dec. 6, with council member Max Mania dissenting, to uphold the Planning Commission’s Sept. 21 decision to grant Nippon Paper Industries USA a shoreline substantial development permit for the biomass project. Seven environmental groups had appealed the commission’s decision to the City Council. The groups were Port Townsend AirWatchers, Olympic Forest Coalition, Olympic Environmental Council, No Biomass

Burn of Seattle, the Center for Environmental Law and Policy of Spokane, the World Temperate Rainforest Network and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club. The Nippon project would upgrade an existing biomass boiler. It would double the amount of wood waste burned to produce steam to make telephone book paper and newsprint. It also would generate up to 20 megawatts of electrical power. The company then could sell credits for the electrical power.

rie Kidd, Patrick Downie and Mania. In his earlier vote, Mania had disagreed with categorizing the biomass facility as an accessory to the mill. The appellants had said that the project should have been evaluated as an electrical utility, meaning it would have needed a more rigorous shoreline conditional-use permit. Not voting Tuesday were council members Brooke Nelson, who was stuck in an East Coast blizzard, and Brian Collins. Collins recused himself Follow-up action because he was not present at the Dec. 6 meeting In its follow-up action because of a death in his Tuesday to the Dec. 6 deci- family, City Manager Kent sion, the council voted 5-0 to Myers said. validate the permit by approving 27 written find- Reservations ings of fact and 25 concluMania, in joining the sions of law emanating from majority, expressed reservathe Dec. 6 session. Voting for the 27 find- tions about the process, notings and 25 conclusions ing a Planning Commission were Mayor Dan Di Guilio, member had “asked for Deputy Mayor Don Perry more time to consider releand council members Che- vant facts and issues.”

In doing so, Mania questioned Finding 18, which asserted “the Planning Commission was fully advised on the relevant facts and issues, and that its decision was supported by substantial evidence on the record.” But Perry had a different take. “I’m quite happy with it,” he said of the 11-page document. Di Guilio echoed Perry’s assessment of the findings and conclusions. “I feel that they accurately portray what took place that evening and what the council did,” Di Guilio said. Diana Somerville, who represents the groups that appealed the Planning Commission’s decision, said in an interview that project opponents are still mulling an appeal of the City Council’s decision. “We haven’t given up,” Somerville said. No public comment was

taken at the meeting, but Somerville submitted a 1½-page statement to the City Council calling for the enactment of a moratorium “on Nippon’s proposed incinerator” for a minimum of one year. “Port Angeles has spent more time and efforts to get public comment on new signage downtown than on informing citizens about a $70-plus-million-dollar project that threatens our personal health and the longterm health of our environment for decades to come,” the statement said.

‘Legal conclusion’

mation for the agency to consider an air emissions permit for the facility. Nippon also needs waste discharge, stormwater and building permits from the city. The seven environmental groups that appealed the planning commission’s decision also plan to appeal a 286-page environmental impact statement to the state Pollution Control Hearings Board in the spring. Five of the groups — excluding the Center for Environmental Law and Policy of Spokane and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club — have filed an appeal with that state board challenging a state permit for a proposed upgrade of a biomass facility at the Port Townsend Paper mill.

In an interview after the meeting, Nippon mill manager Harold Norlund described the City Council’s decision as “the legal conclusion for this particular procedure.” ________ Norlund said he next expects to hear from the Senior staff writer Paul Gottlieb Olympic Region Clean Air can be reached at 360-417-3536 Agency on whether Nippon or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladailyhas submitted enough infor- news.com.

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Golf

Looking back on eventful 2010 IT’S TIME TO put the 2010 golf season in the golf cart’s rearview mirror. Most golf carts don’t have Michael rearview mirCarman rors, but I ask you to bear with me. With a new year looming, the days are slowly getting longer and at some point in the next few months myself and all the other working duffers will actually have some light to play in after quitting time. The ability of Western Washington to host successful major USGA golf events, all in a three-week span, stands out as the most memorable golf event of the past year. I’ll have more on that when my yearly golf recap hits the months of July and August.

BUSINESS, POLITICS & ENVIRONMENT Page B4

Dawgs open Pac-10 play Washington hits road with game against USC By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — For a team with just one true road game during its entire non-conference schedule, Washington is beginning its quest as the preseason favorite in the Pac-10 with arguably its toughest road trip. It’s against a team it couldn’t figure out last season. Washington begins Pac-10 play on tonight at Southern California — not only as the class of the Pac-10 but also the target for everyone else in a conference lacking ranked teams. Washington was the preseason favorite in the conference for the first time. Its 8-3 mark during its nonconference schedule has done little to dissuade the belief the Huskies are the best in the league, even if their record lacks marquee wins. The Huskies seven home wins came by an average of 30.9 points, Washington’s largest margin for home non-conference games since 1947-48. Their closest victory was a 22-point win over Portland. The Huskies start conference play as the second-highest scoring team in the country, trailing

only VMI. “The real season starts now. It’s like a brand new season,” Washington guard Isaiah Thomas said. “Everybody is 0-0. You don’t really care about your non-conference now. You have to be ready.” The upcoming two-step in Los Angeles — the Huskies play at UCLA on Friday — will be the first time coach Lorenzo Romar’s team faces hostile environments in consecutive games this season. Spending a week on Maui and playing on a neutral floor doesn’t count, even if the competition Washington faced included two ranked teams. The Huskies lost to No. 11 Kentucky and No. 20 Michigan State. But Washington’s only game in an opponent’s arena came just a few weeks ago at No. 18 Texas A&M. The Huskies were held to a season-low in points and lost 63-62 when Thomas forced a game-winning attempt at the The Associated Press buzzer and was blocked. It’s a debate Romar’s been Washington head coach Lorenzo Romar talks with a player in a game against Texas Tech on Dec. 4 in questioned on before. Turn

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Seattle. The Huskies open Pac-10 play starting today in southern California against USC and UCLA.

January The PGA Tour, European Tour and other top level tour players began to use “Condition of Competition” clubs that conformed to the United States Golf Association’s golf club groove rule. That meant that the limits on grooves on all clubs, excluding drivers and putters, have been reduced and they will become shallower and narrower. Non-pros, unless specified otherwise, can use clubs with the current non-conforming grooves until 2024.

February On February 19, Tiger Woods delivered a televised speech in which he admitted he had been unfaithful to his wife. Without taking questions, Woods told the assembled in the studio and a national television audience that he used to believe he was entitled to do whatever he wanted to do, and that, due to his success, normal rules did not apply to him. By the end of 2010, Woods marriage will have come to an end and he will have lost Gatorade, AT&T, Accenture and Gillette as major sponsors.

March High school golf teed off in early March. Having covered the 2008 and 2009 seasons as a sports assistant for the PDN, I predicted success for the 2010 season and wasn’t disappointed. State qualifiers from the North Olympic Peninsula included Port Angeles golfers Jordan Negus and Garrett Payton; Sequim’s Ryan O’Mera, Steven Loerlein and Mallory Maloney; Port Townsend’s Ronnie Harrell, Cody Piper, Sean Anderson and Gabe Hensley; and Chimacum’s Mason Moug and Eric Nelson on the boys side. Port Angeles girls Tracie DuPuis, Ev Grier and Emily Cook made the Class 3A state tournament, Sequim’s Zoei Zbaraschuk, Kim Duce and Hailey Estes made the 2A tourney and Port Townsend’s Jenny Grauberger and Alexa Russell qualified for the 1A competition. The best finishes were turned in by Port Townsend’s Harrell and Sequim’s Zbaraschuk, each finishing fifth in their respective tournaments. Grauberger was sixth for the Port Townsend girls and Chimacum’s Nelson placed seventh in the 1A boys tournament. Chimacum finished in fourth place as a team and Port Townsend was sixth in 1A.

April I’ll never be one of those guys who loves Lefty, but Phil Mickelson’s pluck and resilience in winning his third Masters title certainly earned my respect. With Mickelson’s wife and mother both recovering from cancer, CBS announcer Jim Nantz’s call of “That’s a win for the family,” as Lefty holed his final putt was sweet without being schmaltzy. Turn

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Steve Mullensky (2)/for Peninsula Daily News

Port Townsend’s Jewell Johnson, left, out races Chimacum’s Olivia Baird on her way to score a basket during the fifth Annual Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School on Tuesday night.

PT girls hold off Chimacum PA, Sequim boys lose in first round Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Angeles and Sequim boys teams took their lumps while Port Townsend swept rival Chimacum on the opening day at the fifth annual Crush in the Slush basketball tourney Tuesday. Tournament action continues today (see Calendar in Scoreboard on Page B2 for times) for six area boys and girls teams and eight squads from outside the area, including Asker Aliens from Norway. Asker plays the Port Townsend girls in the featured game today at 7:30 p.m.

Girls Basketball Port Townsend 64, Chimacum 45 The host Redskins cruised to a 38-21 halftime lead and eased their way to the nonleague victory over their archrival. “It’s a good win anytime you beat your rival,” Port Townsend coach Randy Maag said. “Chimacum played hard. They have improved since the first time I saw them play this year. “They are headed in the right direction.”

Sequim’s Corbin Webb finds a narrow opening between a pair of Eatonville Cruisers and drives down court during the fifth annual Crush in the Slush on Tuesday. Kerri Evalt sparked the Redskins with 23 points to lead three players in double figures. Kiley Maag sank 15 and Caroline Dowdle added 12 for Port Townsend. “Kerri, Kylie and Caroline all tore it up in the first quarter when we scored 23 points,” Maag said. The Redskins improve to 4-4

on the year. The Cowboys had three players score in double figures as Cydney Nelson scored 12 while Malorie Cossell and Lauren Thacker had 10 points each. The Cowboys play Seattle Academy today at 12:30 p.m. in the second round of the tourney.

Port Townsend 64, Chimacum 45 Chimacum 11 10 12 12 — 45 Port Townsend 23 15 11 15 — 64 Individual Scoring Chimacum (45) Nelson 12, Baird 3, Costello 5, Cossell 10, Thacker 10, Hathaway 5. Port Townsend (64) Johnson 8, Evalt 23, Maag 15, Dowdle 12, Fox 4, Hossack 2.

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SportsRecreation

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Boys Basketball: Sequim (2A) vs. Orting (1A) at Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School, 10:45 a.m.; Port Angeles (2A) vs. Chimacum (1A) at Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School, 2:15 p.m.; Port Townsend (1A) vs. Eatonville (2A) at Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School, 5:45 p.m.: Forks at North Beach Invitational, 9 a.m. Girls Basketball: Chimacum (1A) vs. Seattle Academy (1A) at Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School, 12:30 p.m.; Port Townsend (1A) vs. Asker Aliens at Crush in the Slush Tournament at Port Townsend High School, 7:30 p.m.; Forks at North Beach Invitational, 9 a.m. Wrestling: Port Angeles and Sequim at North Mason Tournament, 10 a.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Clackamas Tournament, 2 p.m.

Thursday Boys Basketball: Forks at North Beach Invitational, TBD; Quilcene at Crescent, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Renton at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.; Sequim at Mark Morris, TBD; Forks at North Beach Invitational, TBD; Quilcene at Crescent, 5:30 p.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Clackamas Tournament, noon.

Friday No games scheduled.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Dec. 27 Monday Night Mixed Men’s High Game: Joseph Barrett, 279 Men’s High Series: Mike Rosendahl, 572 Women’s High Game: Brenda Haltom, 175 Women’s HIgh Series: Brenda Haltom, 481 League Leaders: Undiscovered Dec. 27 Les Schwab Mixed Majors Men’s High Game: Steve Campbell and Mike Van Winkle, 279 Men’s High Series: Mike Van Winkle, 1039 Women’s High Game: April Heilman, 187 Women’s HIgh Series: April Heilman, 655 League Leaders: Olympic Sewer Dec. 27 Baxter Auto Parts Old Timers Men’s High Game: Paul Jergens, 234 Men’s High Series: Paul Jergens, 570 Women’s High Game: Una Flanigan, 153 Women’s HIgh Series: Una Flanigan, 412 SEQUIM OLYMPIC LANES Dec. 21 Wall Street Journal Men’s High Game: Bill Sheets, 199 Men’s High Series: Bill Sheets, 496 Women’s High Game: Shirley Stoll, 181 Women’s HIgh Series: Joan Wright, 469 League Leaders: (tie) Wastebasket’s/International Exchange/Funnies Dec. 22 First Federal Sniper’s Men’s High Game: Jim Getchman, 187 Men’s High Series: Jay Cameron, 509 Women’s High Game: Marilyn Hooser, 174 Women’s HIgh Series: Marilyn Hooser, 489 League Leaders: Enfields Dec. 23 Thursday 9 Pin No Tap Men’s High Game: Cliff Silliman, 230 Men’s High Series: Pete Centeno, 607 Women’s High Game: Linda Chansky, 211 Women’s HIgh Series: Marilyn Hooser, 524 Dec. 23 Les Schwab Mixed Men’s High Game: Jesse Kessler, 222 Men’s High Series: Jesse Kessler, 575 League Leaders: Irritable Bowl Syndrome

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Dec. 16 Better Nine Individual Gross: Gary Thorne, 34; Tom Hainstock, 35; Paul Reed, 35 Individual Net: Bernie Anselmo, 30.5; Brian Duncan, 33; Ray Santiago, 34; Bob Brodhun, 34.5; Tom Jacobsen, 34.5 Dec. 24 Winter League Week 10 Standings 1. Triggs Dental Lab 80.5 2. Glass Services 67 3. Golf Shop Guys 57 4. Clubhouse Comets 1 57 5. Green Machine 56 6. Windermere 52.5 7. Laurel Lanes 48.5 8. The Brew Crew 44.5 9. Lakeside Industries 35 10. Clubhouse Comets 2 29 Individual Winners Gross: Gary Thorne, 34; Bob Dutrow, 39 Net: Ruth Thomson, 29; Daren Mast, 33; Sue Barber, 33; Tory Clayton, 34; Eric Schaefermeyer, 34; Brian Doig, 34; Steve Moreno, 34; Darrel Vincent, 35 Men’s Club Dec. 28 Sub Par Any Two Holes Individual Gross: Mike Dupuis, 70; Gary Thorne, 70 Individual Net: Al Osterberg, 64; Bernie Anselmo, 64; Ray Santiago, 65; Craig Jacobs, 65; Steve Callis, 65 Team Gross: Mike Dupuis and Gary Thorne, 67; Bob Brodhun and Mike Sorenson, 70 Team Net: Ray Santiago and Bernie Anselmo, 62; Gary McLaughlin and Bernie Anselmo, 62; Al Osterberg and Larry Aillaud, 62; Craig Jacobs and Jim Cole, 62; Steve Callis and Jerry Hendricks, 62 SUNLAND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Men’s Club Dec. 22 Selective 9 Flight One (0-17) Gross: Bill Dickin, 30 Net: Brad Ulin, 25.5; Dave Fluke, 26; Brad Littlefield, 27.5; Larry St. John, 29.5; Bruce Mullikin, 29.5 Flight Two (18 and Up) Gross: Frank Herodes, 37; Dennis Powell, 37 Net: Ed St. Charles, 25; Ray Aldrich, 29.5; Jim Hanley, 30; Phillip Walker, 30.5

Basketball NBA Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 27 4 .871 Dallas 24 6 .800 New Orleans 18 13 .581 Houston 15 15 .500 Memphis 14 17 .452 Northwest Division W L Pct Utah 21 10 .677 Oklahoma City 21 11 .656 Denver 16 13 .552 Portland 16 15 .516 Minnesota 8 24 .250

GB — 21⁄2 9 111⁄2 13 GB — 1⁄2 4 5 131⁄2

SPORTS ON TV

Today 11:30 a.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, East Carolina vs. Maryland, Military Bowl, Site: RFK Stadium Washington, D.C. (Live) 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Golf, Chick-Fil-A Bowl Challange, Site: Reynolds Plantation Lake Oconee, Ga. 3 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Illinois vs. Baylor, Texas Bowl, Site: Reliant Stadium - Houston (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Georgetown vs. Notre Dame - South Bend, Ind. (Live) 5:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Lafayette College vs. Gonzaga (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Marquette vs. Vanderbilt - Nashville, Tenn. (Live) 6:15 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Oklahoma State vs. Arizona, Alamo Bowl, Site: Alamodome San Antonio, Texas (Live) 8 p.m. (8) GBLBC Figure Skating, Shall We Dance on Ice 8 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Washington State vs. UCLA (Live) 9 p.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Scottish Open, Final Round, Site: Loch Lomond - Glasgow, Scotland

The Associated Press

Furry

handshake

Michigan wide receiver Joe Reynolds shakes hands with Patches, the Gator Bowl mascot, as the team enters Adventure Landing in Jacksonville Beach, Fla., on Tuesday. Michigan plays Mississippi State in the Gator Bowl on New Year’s Day.

NFL STANDINGS National Football Conference St. Louis Seattle San Francisco Arizona

W 7 6 5 5

L 8 9 10 10

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .467 .400 .333 .333

HOME 5-3-0 4-3-0 4-3-0 4-4-0

Philadelphia NY Giants Washington Dallas

W 10 9 6 5

L 5 6 9 10

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .667 .600 .400 .333

HOME 4-3-0 5-3-0 2-5-0 2-6-0

Chicago Green Bay Minnesota Detroit

W 11 9 6 5

L 4 6 9 10

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .733 .600 .400 .333

HOME 5-3-0 6-1-0 4-4-0 3-4-0

Atlanta New Orleans Tampa Bay Carolina

W 12 11 9 2

L 3 4 6 13

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .800 .733 .600 .133

HOME 6-1-0 5-2-0 4-4-0 2-6-0

NFC WEST ROAD DIV 2-5-0 3-2-0 2-6-0 3-2-0 1-7-0 3-2-0 1-6-0 1-4-0 NFC EAST ROAD DIV 6-2-0 4-1-0 4-3-0 2-3-0 4-4-0 2-3-0 3-4-0 2-3-0 NFC NORTH ROAD DIV 6-1-0 5-0-0 3-5-0 3-2-0 2-5-0 1-4-0 2-6-0 1-4-0 NFC SOUTH ROAD DIV 6-2-0 4-1-0 6-2-0 4-1-0 5-2-0 2-3-0 0-7-0 0-5-0

CONF 5-6-0 5-6-0 3-8-0 3-8-0

PF 283 294 267 282

PA 312 401 339 396

DIFF -29 -107 -72 -114

STRK Won 1 Lost 3 Lost 2 Won 1

CONF 7-4-0 7-4-0 4-7-0 3-8-0

PF 426 377 288 380

PA 363 333 360 423

DIFF +63 +44 -72 -43

STRK Lost 1 Lost 2 Won 1 Lost 1

CONF 8-3-0 7-4-0 5-6-0 4-7-0

PF 331 378 268 342

PA 276 237 328 356

DIFF +55 +141 -60 -14

STRK Won 2 Won 1 Won 1 Won 3

CONF 9-2-0 9-2-0 7-4-0 2-9-0

PF 383 371 318 186

PA 278 284 305 360

DIFF +105 +87 +13 -174

STRK Lost 1 Won 1 Won 1 Lost 1

CONF 6-5-0 6-5-0 5-6-0 3-8-0

PF 356 408 379 316

PA 295 294 361 438

DIFF +61 +114 +18 -122

STRK Won 2 Lost 1 Lost 1 Won 1

CONF 9-2-0 8-3-0 5-6-0 3-8-0

PF 480 329 266 276

PA 306 297 295 387

DIFF +174 +32 -29 -111

STRK Won 7 Lost 1 Lost 2 Lost 1

CONF 8-3-0 8-3-0 3-8-0 3-8-0

PF 317 344 262 315

PA 223 263 291 382

DIFF +94 +81 -29 -67

STRK Won 1 Won 3 Lost 3 Won 2

CONF 7-4-0 7-4-0 3-8-0 4-7-0

PF 412 336 336 356

PA 368 385 316 410

DIFF +44 -49 +20 -54

STRK Won 3 Lost 2 Lost 1 Lost 4

American Football Conference Kansas City San Diego Oakland Denver

W 10 8 7 4

L 5 7 8 11

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .667 .533 .467 .267

HOME 7-0-0 6-2-0 5-3-0 3-4-0

New England NY Jets Miami Buffalo

W 13 10 7 4

L 2 5 8 11

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .867 .667 .467 .267

HOME 7-0-0 4-3-0 1-7-0 2-6-0

Pittsburgh Baltimore Cleveland Cincinnati

W 11 11 5 4

L 4 4 10 11

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .733 .733 .333 .267

HOME 5-3-0 6-1-0 3-4-0 3-5-0

Indianapolis Jacksonville Tennessee Houston

W 9 8 6 5

L 6 7 9 10

T 0 0 0 0

PCT .600 .533 .400 .333

HOME 5-2-0 5-3-0 3-5-0 3-4-0

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

Pacific Division W L Pct 21 10 .677 13 16 .448 12 18 .400 10 22 .313 5 23 .179

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 24 5 .828 New York 18 13 .581 Philadelphia 12 19 .387 Toronto 11 20 .355 New Jersey 9 22 .290 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 24 9 .727 Orlando 20 12 .625 Atlanta 20 13 .606 Charlotte 10 19 .345 Washington 7 22 .241 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 20 10 .667 Indiana 13 16 .448 Milwaukee 12 18 .400 Detroit 10 21 .323 Cleveland 8 23 .258 All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Orlando 110, Cleveland 95 Boston 95, Indiana 83 Miami 106, New York 98 Chicago 90, Milwaukee 77 Toronto 84, Dallas 76 San Antonio 97, L.A. Lakers 82 Portland at Denver, LATE

GB — 7 81⁄2 111⁄2 141⁄2

GB — 7 13 14 16 GB — 31⁄2 4 12 15 GB — 61⁄2 8 101⁄2 121⁄2

AFC WEST ROAD DIV 3-5-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 5-0-0 1-7-0 1-4-0 AFC EAST ROAD DIV 6-2-0 4-1-0 6-2-0 3-2-0 6-1-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 1-4-0 AFC NORTH ROAD DIV 6-1-0 4-1-0 5-3-0 3-2-0 2-6-0 1-4-0 1-6-0 2-3-0 AFC SOUTH ROAD DIV 4-4-0 3-2-0 3-4-0 3-2-0 3-4-0 2-3-0 2-6-0 2-3-0

Today’s Games Golden State at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Indiana at Washington, 4 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Denver at Minnesota, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Miami at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Memphis at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Utah at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games New York at Orlando, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Portland, 7 p.m.

Football NFL Scores Thursday’s Game Pittsburgh 27, Carolina 3 Saturday’s Game Arizona 27, Dallas 26 Sunday’s Games Kansas City 34, Tennessee 14 St. Louis 25, San Francisco 17 Chicago 38, N.Y. Jets 34 Baltimore 20, Cleveland 10 New England 34, Buffalo 3 Detroit 34, Miami 27 Washington 20, Jacksonville 17, OT Indianapolis 31, Oakland 26 Denver 24, Houston 23 Cincinnati 34, San Diego 20 Green Bay 45, N.Y. Giants 17 Tampa Bay 38, Seattle 15 Minnesota at Philadelphia, ppd., snow Monday’s Game New Orleans 17, Atlanta 14

Tuesday’s Game Minnesota 24, Philadelphia 14

2011 Pro Bowl Rosters AFC OFFENSE Quarterbacks * Tom Brady, New England Philip Rivers, San Diego Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Running Backs * Maurice Jones-Drew, Jacksonville Arian Foster, Houston Jamaal Charles, Kansas City Fullback * Vonta Leach, Houston Wide Receivers * Andre Johnson, Houston * Reggie Wayne, Indianapolis Brandon Lloyd, Denver Dwayne Bowe, Kansas City Tight Ends * Antonio Gates, San Diego Marcedes Lewis, Jacksonville Centers * Nick Mangold, N.Y. Jets Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh Guards * Kris Dielman, San Diego * Logan Mankins, New England Brian Waters, Kansas City Tackles * Jake Long, Miami * Joe Thomas, Cleveland D’Brickashaw Ferguson, N.Y. Jets AFC DEFENSE Defensive Ends * Dwight Freeney, Indianapolis * Robert Mathis, Indianapolis Jason Babin, Tennessee Interior Linemen * Haloti Ngata, Baltimore

* Vince Wilfork, New England Richard Seymour, Oakland Inside-Middle Linebackers * Ray Lewis, Baltimore Jerod Mayo, New England Outside Linebackers * James Harrison, Pittsburgh * Cameron Wake, Miami Terrell Suggs, Baltimore Cornerbacks * Nnamdi Asomugha, Oakland * Darrelle Revis, N.Y. Jets Devin McCourty, New England Strong Safety * Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh Free Safeties * Ed Reed, Baltimore Brandon Meriweather, New England AFC SPECIALISTS Punter Shane Lechler, Oakland Kick-return Specialist Marc Mariani, Tennessee Place-kicker Billy Cundiff, Baltimore Special-teamer Montell Owens, Jacksonville NFC OFFENSE Quarterbacks * Michael Vick, Philadelphia Matt Ryan, Atlanta Drew Brees, New Orleans Running Backs * Michael Turner, Atlanta Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Steven Jackson, St. Louis Fullback * Ovie Mughelli, Atlanta Wide Receivers * Roddy White, Atlanta * Calvin Johnson, Detroit DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia Greg Jennings, Green Bay Tight Ends * Jason Witten, Dallas Tony Gonzalez, Atlanta Centers * Andre Gurode, Dallas Shaun O’Hara, N.Y. Giants Guards * Jahri Evans, New Orleans *Chris Snee, N.Y. Giants Carl Nicks, New Orleans Tackles * Jason Peters, Philadelphia * Jordan Gross, Carolina Chad Clifton, Green Bay NFC DEFENSE Defensive Ends * Julius Peppers, Chicago * John Abraham, Atlanta Justin Tuck, N.Y. Giants Interior Linemen * Ndamukong Suh, Detroit * Jay Ratliff, Dallas Justin Smith, San Francisco Inside-Middle Linebackers * Patrick Willis, San Francisco Brian Urlacher, Chicago Outside Linebackers * Clay Matthews, Green Bay * DeMarcus Ware, Dallas Lance Briggs, Chicago Cornerbacks * Asante Samuel, Philadelphia * Charles Woodson, Green Bay DeAngelo Hall, Washington Strong Safety * Adrian Wilson, Arizona Free Safeties * Nick Collins, Green Bay Antrel Rolle, N.Y. Giants NFC SPECIALISTS Punter Mat McBriar, Dallas Kick-return Specialist Devin Hester, Chicago Place-kicker David Akers, Philadelphia Special-teamer Eric Weems, Atlanta *Starters

Hockey NHL Scores Tuesday’s Games Carolina 4, Toronto 3 Pittsburgh 6, Atlanta 3 Washington 3, Montreal 0 Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3 St. Louis 3, Chicago 1 Dallas 4, Nashville 2 Buffalo 4, Edmonton 2 Anaheim 3, Phoenix 1 Philadelphia at Vancouver, late Today’s Games N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Carolina at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 6 p.m.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

B3

Pirates open with victory Peninsula Daily News

OREGON CITY, Ore. — The Peninsula College men’s basketball team overcame a chilly first half to drop Blue Mountain 86-75 in the first round of the Clackamas Tournament on Tuesday. The Pirates, who shot only 21 percent from the floor and managed only one 3-pointer in six attempts, found themselves trailing by 12 at halftime. Peninsula then lit it up for a 58 percent shooting clip in the second half and drained 9-of-15 treys to win going away. Mitrell Clark led Penin-

Clackamas Tournament sula with 25 points, six assists and four steals while Sammeon Waller canned 19 points. Four players scored in double figures as Thad Vinson sank 15 and DeShaun Freeman added 12 points and eight rebounds. Anthony Williams contributed nine boards. The Pirates will play the winner of Tuesday’s Clackamas vs. Yakima game in the tournament semifinal tonight at 7.

Preps: Hoops The Associated Press

Philadelphia wide receiver DeSean Jackson (10) reacts after a pass to him was intercepted by Minnesota Vikings safety Husain Abdullah (39) in the first half of Tuesday’s game in Philadelphia.

Vikings smash Eagles 24-14 The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Considering everything else the Minnesota Vikings have endured this season, it was silly to think two extra days sitting around a hotel room would bring ’em down. No way a determined rookie quarterback named Joe Webb was going to let that happen. Webb threw for 195 yards and ran for a touchdown in his first career start filling in for an injured Brett Favre, and the lowly Vikings stunned Michael Vick and the NFC East champion Philadelphia Eagles 24-14 in the NFL’s first Tuesday game since 1946. “It was a big win, especially with what we have gone through,” Webb said. “It was a long trip for us and to get a win against the Eagles, we are trying to fin-

ish the season on a high note.” Adrian Peterson ran for 118 yards and a score, helping the 14-point underdogs knock Philadelphia out of contention for a first-round playoff bye. The Eagles (10-5) could’ve secured a firstround bye with a victory over the Vikings (6-9) and Dallas and with a loss by either Chicago or Atlanta next week. “We don’t deserve it after that performance,” Eagles coach Andy Reid said. “Every phase was terrible. We didn’t coach well enough. We didn’t play well enough. I’m disappointed in myself. It’s embarrassing.” Now the Eagles are locked into the NFC’s No. 3 seed and will host the No. 6 seed on Jan. 8 or 9. Their final game against the Cowboys is meaningless

in the standings, so it’s likely Vick and most of the starters will rest. Two days after a winter storm forced a postponement, there wasn’t even a snowflake visible at the Linc. The game was switched from Sunday because of a howling storm that dumped about a foot of snow in the area — perhaps a good idea considering Philadelphia’s history of snowball-throwing fans. But 42 years after fans got a bum rap for tossing snowballs at Santa — the man in the costume said it was playful pelting — the Eagles said snowballs didn’t factor in the decision to move the game. “There were a lot of issues considered, but that was absolutely not among them,” said Pamela Browner White, the Eagles senior

vice president of public affairs and government relations. Nine days after rallying from a 21-point deficit in the final 7:18 to beat the New York Giants on DeSean Jackson’s 65-yard punt return on the final play, there would be no miracle at the Linc for the Eagles. Fans started leaving before the two-minute warning. The Vikings looked more like a team with a lot at stake rather than a group that’s ready to start a vacation. The win could help interim coach Leslie Frazier get the job permanently. “It was a great effort by our players to battle the way that they had to all week and they showed perseverance that has become the hallmark of our team over the last few weeks,” Frazier said.

Carman: A look back at year Continued from B1 72 layout, converting the sixth and 18th hole into Tiger Woods returned par-4s. from scandal in this event, Johnson parred both finishing fourth, five shots holes both days. back from the lead. If the USGA hadn’t cut Also in April, 28-year the two strokes and the cut old Lorena Ochoa, women’s line remained the same, golf’s No. 1 ranked player, Johnson would have played announced her retirement. on the weekend. She said she wanted to Still, he played some raise a family and work fantastic golf when I folwith her charitable founda- lowed him around the tion. course on the tournament’s second day. May I was impressed with his play, his demeanor and Host SunLand Golf and his sense of the moment. Country Club of Sequim He knew it was the bigclaimed the second annual gest stage he had ever Peninsula Cup Tournament played and didn’t freeze up in mid-May. after a tough first round. Local knowledge paid off Johnson kept up the with SunLand’s team drop- chatter and stepped up his ping Port Townsend by a shot-making and putting. team total of 26. I enjoyed the opportuSunLand team memnity to cover his round and bers were Ray Aldrich, Tom to see the stars I’d watched Caufield, Jim Coulter, Ray growing up go about their DeJong, Bill Dickin, Bill business. Engle, Tom Fitzgerald, Bob It was fun to hear FredFuller, Jim Hanley, Mike die Couple’s caddie tell Novotny, Dennis Powell, tales out of school while Jack Real, Larry St. John, “Boom-Boom” drained John Sims and Jeff 5-foot putt after 5-foot putt Velarde. on the practice green just It looks like the 2011 feet away from me. cup will be held at Port Ludlow Golf Club, so start August practicing. In an event dubbed a June dress rehearsal for the 2015 U.S. Open, Chambers Graeme McDowell of Bay Golf Course hosted the Northern Ireland won the 2010 U.S. Amateur TournaU.S. Open at Pebble Beach ment. by one stroke over France’s More than 30,000 fans Grégory Havret. attended the week-long In doing so, McDowell event, which was won by became the first European Oklahoma State Universito win the U.S. Open since ty’s Peter Uihlein. 1970 and the first to wear “I think this place hit a a V-neck cardigan sweater home run this week,” in more than 65 years. gushed Golf Channel Sweater records are announcer Steve spotty, however. Burkowski to the Tacoma News Tribune. July I agree. The course looked great on television, Port Angeles native with the Tacoma Narrows Jerry Johnson had the and Mount Rainier providhonor of opening the 2010 ing a spectacular scenic U.S. Senior Open in his home state at Sahalee backdrop to the unique Country Club in Sammacourse. mish. The final major of the Before the tournament, 2010 PGA Tour season may the United States Golf have had the most draAssociation cut two strokes matic finish of any event off the course’s regular par all year.

Dustin Johnson held a one-shot lead entering the 72nd hole. He faltered and bogeyed the hole, which put him into a three-hole playoff with Bubba Watson and Martin Kaymer. But it was determined that Johnson had ground his club in a bunker, giving him a tie for fifth place and touching off controversy over what exactly constituted a bunker on the sand-strewn course. Kaymer went on to win the tourney in a playoff. Johnson gained a lot of fans for his humility afterward, and I think his game is set up well to win a major tournament. You can bet his caddie will have the course’s rule sheet memorized each week.

September Men’s and women’s club champions were crowned across the North Olympic Peninsula in 2010. Champions included: ■ Port Ludlow: Bonnie Vahcic and Pete Smith. ■ Peninsula: Dolly Burnett and Mark Mitrovich. ■ Cedars at Dungeness: Pat Schumacher (women’s); Sid Krumpe (men’s); Tim Trosin (senior’s). Schumacher has won the club championship 19 times since 1986 and Krumpe has 14 titles since 1988. Bragging rights indeed! ■ Discovery Bay: Roy Sutherland.

October The European Ryder Cup team withstood a furious late charge by the U.S. to win the 38th Ryder Cup competition 14.5 to 13.5. Europe might have won but their lead may have awoken the sleeping competitor in American Rickie Fowler. More known for his awful, awful haircut and his curious clothing choices,

Fowler rallied from four holes down through 12 to give the U.S. hope of an improbable comeback. That comeback didn’t happen but he did end winning PGA Tour Rookie of the Year in 2010, and I’d put some coin on this kid to win his first PGA Tour tournament in 2011. I’ve also got a feeling he will soon move on the cover of the PGA Tour’s video game in the coming years as Tiger Woods is slowly moved out of the picture. Just get a haircut. Please.

November Yani Tseng of Taiwan won the LPGA’s Mathematically-devised LPGA Player of the Year award. I can see the arguments for giving the award to Ai Miyazato of Japan, who won five times in 2010, but Tseng won three times, including two major championships. Hard to argue with giving the award to the player who played the best when it mattered most.

December USGA Executive Director David Fay 60, retired after leading the organization for the past two decades. Fay’s lasting legacy will likely focus on his decision to bring the U.S. Open to affordable public courses, including New York state’s Bethpage State Park’s Black Course on Long Island in 2002 and 2009, and the city of San Diego’s Torrey Pines in 2008. Washington residents will also benefit from his decision-making, as Pierce County’s Chambers Bay will host the U.S. Open in 2015. Let the countdown begin!

________

Michael Carman is the golf columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. He can be reached at 360417-3527 or at pdngolf@gmail. com.

Continued from B1 2:15 p.m. at the Crush in the Slush tourney.

Boys Basketball Eatonville 58, Sequim 51 The Class 2A Wolves came out rusty after a long layoff and paid for it at Crush in the Slush on Tuesday. Sequim, which lost only its second game of the year, trailed 29-20 at halftime to the 2A Cruisers but came back in the second half, almost drawing even at 52-51 in the fourth quarter before running out of gas. “We did not shoot the ball well in the first half,” Sequim coach Greg Glasser said. “We came out cold. “Our kids battled but we were showing a little bit of rust.” The Wolves are 8-2 overall and 5-1 in the Olympic League. Corbin Webb led the Wolves with 13 points while Jayson Brocklesby and Nick Camporini were right behind with 12 each. Gabe Carter sank nine points and added six assists and four rebounds while Brocklesby also grabbed four rebounds. Eatonville 58, Sequim 51 Eatonville Sequim

17 12 13 16 — 58 10 10 18 13 — 51 Individual Scoring

Eatonville (58) Scores not available. Sequim (51) Hill 3, Meier 2, Carter 9, Brocklesby 12, Camporini 12, Webb 13.

Puyallup 88, Port Angeles 76 The Class 2A Roughriders had a tough time keeping up with the 4A Vikings after they took off with a strong third quarter. “Overall, I was pleased with our effort,” Port Angeles coach Wes Armstrong said. “But we turned the ball over too many times.” Ian Ward led the Riders with 24 points but it was Puyallup’s Jay Balmer who stole the show by shooting 9-for-13 behind the 3-point line and scoring 27 points as the game’s leading scorer. Port Angeles will next face Chimacum today at

Puyallup 88, Port Angeles 76 Puyallup Port Angeles

15 24 30 19 — 88 11 23 15 25 — 76 Individual Scoring

Puyallup (88) Balmer 27, Holub 24, Barber 20. Port Angeles (76) Ward 24, Phair 10, Wheeler 10, Morgan 6, Walker 6, Smith 6, Burke 6.

Port Townsend 51, Chimacum 41 The Cowboys gave a good battle to their archrival Redskins in the featured game at the end of the first night of the Crush in the Slush tourney. “It was a basic good Port To w n s e n d - C h i m a c u m game,” Port Townsend coach Tom Webster said. “It was a hard-fought game by both teams. We did a lot of good things to win, and they also did a lot of good things.” The Redskins led 20-18 at halftime but outscored the Cowboys 31-23 in the second half to earn the win. Seiji Thielk scorched the nets for 26 points for the Redskins while Hab Rubio added 10. Landon Cray paced the Cowboys with 14 points while Dylan Brown-Bishop sank 12.

Wrestling Forks at Vashon VASHON ISLAND — The Spartans took ninth place out of 12 teams at the tough Vashon Island Invitational, called The Rock. “At our level there was a group of tough 1A schools,” Forks coach Bob Wheeler said. Forks next opens Southwest Washington League dual meet action next Wednesday against powerhouse Montesano. Cutter Grahn just missed an individual championship at Vashon by two points, losing 6-4 in the 119pound title bout, claiming runner-up honors. Also performing well for Forks were Joe Ward, who took fourth place at 215, and Tyler Cortani, who claimed fifth at 125.

Huskies: Play Continued from B1 in L.A. they should have the services of starting forward Five seasons ago, Wash- Justin Holiday and backup ington played zero road guard Venoy Overton. Holiday sustained a games during its non-conference schedule and still right foot strain late in the went 13-5 during league Huskies 90-60 rout of Nevada last Wednesday. play. While Holiday says he The experience on his roster often plays a role in doesn’t feel like he has the how Romar views playing same explosiveness, he said road games, but he doesn’t he expects to play against believe the Huskies need the Trojans. Same goes for Overton, more than a couple of games away from home to get the Huskies pesky guard. ready for conference play. Overton sat out the win Washington won its final over Nevada after hyperexfour road games of the 2009- tending his knee. 10 conference season and Washington will be trycan set a new school record ing to avoid its Pac-10 start for consecutive conference from a year ago when the road wins by beating the Huskies began 1-3 and were Trojans. “This isn’t a team that 3-5 before closing strong. “We probably get the has never played on the toughest road trip right out road in their careers before,” of the gate,” guard Abdul Romar said. “I disagree with ‘you Gaddy said. “And that’s really good have to play three or four road games to get you ready for us, so we can start out strong. We can come out for conference.’ “Everybody doesn’t do with more of a mental focus that. I don’t think it’s neces- and we can’t lay down sary to schedule three, four against these guys. “We can’t come out thinkroad games every year. One ing this is an easy road or two are fine.” When the Huskies arrive trip.”


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 29, 2010 Page

B4

Business

Politics & Environment

Where are the jobs? For many companies, the hiring is overseas By Pallavi Gogoi

in the U.S. Caterpillar stock is up 64 percent this year. “There is a shift in economic power that’s going on and will continue. China just became the world’s second-largest economy,” said David Wyss, chief economist at Standard & Poor’s, who notes that half of the revenue for companies in the S&P 500 in the last couple of years has come from outside the U.S.

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Corporate profits are up. Stock prices are up. So why isn’t anyone hiring? Actually, many American companies are — just maybe not in your town. They’re hiring overseas, where sales are surging and the pipeline of orders is fat. More than half of the 15,000 people that Caterpillar Inc. has hired this year were outside the U.S. UPS is also hiring at a faster clip overseas. For both companies, sales in international markets are growing at least twice as fast as domestically. The trend helps explain why unemployment remains high in the United States, edging up to 9.8 percent last month, even though companies are performing well. All but 4 percent of the top 500 U.S. corporations reported profits this year, and the stock market is close to its highest point since the 2008 financial meltdown. But the jobs are going elsewhere. The Economic Policy Institute, a Washington think tank, said American companies have created 1.4 million jobs overseas this year, compared with less than 1 million in the U.S. The additional 1.4 million jobs would have lowered the U.S. unemployment rate to 8.9 percent, said Robert Scott, the institute’s senior international economist. “There’s a huge difference between what is good for American companies

New markets

The Associated Press

A technician works on an engine at the Caterpillar company in Friedrichsort near Kiel, northern Germany. versus what is good for the ics, according to MasterAmerican economy,” said Card’s SpendingPulse. Scott. “Companies will go where there are fast-growOverseas buyers, too ing markets and big profits,” said Jeffrey Sachs, gloAmerican jobs have been moving overseas for more balization expert and economist at Columbia Univerthan two decades. In recent years, though, sity. “What’s changed is that those jobs have become companies today are getmore sophisticated — think semiconductors and soft- ting top talent in emerging ware, not toys and clothes. economies, and the U.S. has And now many of the to really watch out.” With the future looking products being made overseas aren’t coming back to brighter overseas, companies are building there, too. the United States. Caterpillar, maker of the Demand has grown dramatically this year in signature yellow bulldozers emerging markets like and tractors, has invested in three new plants in China India, China and Brazil. Meanwhile, consumer in just the last two months demand in the U.S. has been to design and manufacture equipment. subdued. The decision is based on Despite a strong holiday shopping season, Americans demand. are still spending 18 perAsia-Pacific sales soared cent less than before the 38 percent in the first recession on furniture, and nine months of the year, 10 percent less on electron- compared with 16 percent

Take the example of DuPont, which wowed the world in 1938 with nylon stockings. Known as one of the most innovative American companies of the 20th century, DuPont now sells less than a third of its products in the U.S. In the first nine months of this year, sales to the Asia-Pacific region grew 50 percent, triple the U.S. rate. Its stock is up 48 percent this year. DuPont’s work force reflects the shift in its growth. In a presentation on emerging markets, the company said its number of employees in the U.S. shrank by 9 percent between January 2005 and October 2009. In the same period, its work force grew 54 percent in the Asia-Pacific countries. “We are a global player out to succeed in any geography where we participate in,” said Thomas M. Connelly, chief innovation officer at DuPont. “We want our resources close to where our customers are, to tailor products to their needs.”

Natural gas-fired plant advances The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Owners of a natural gas-fired power plant in Grays Harbor County are one step closer to expanding production. A state panel recommended to Gov. Chris Gregoire last week that Chicago-based Invenergy LLC be allowed to go forward with the $400 million project. The governor has 60 days to make a decision. Invenergy wants to add two combustion-turbine generators and a single steam generator to double

production at its power plant in Satsop. The expansion could generate enough electricity to power about 1 million homes. Invenergy business development director Brent Oakleaf said Monday there’s no timetable for when the expansion would begin. He said in an interview earlier this year it may be a year to 10 years before the company starts work on the expansion. The state’s Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council concluded the project would

provide the region with significant energy benefits while having minimal effects on surrounding land, wildlife and aquatic life. But some of the 30 or so residents who live near the project have worried about noise from the existing and expanded plant. Oakleaf said the company will install additional acoustic walls and silencers in the existing plant and the proposed expansion. The company also has the air and water quality permits needed to operate. Duke Energy Corp.

started construction of the gas-fired Satsop plant but pulled the plug on the project in 2002. Invenergy bought the project in 2005 for $210 million and completed it. Nancy Hirsh, policy director of the NW Energy Coalition, said high-efficiency gas power plants such as Satsop generate roughly one-half to onethird of the greenhouse gas emissions of a coal plant. “There is some need for more natural gas plants as coal plants go down,” she has said.

 $ Briefly . . . Coal export study found to be lacking

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OLYMPIA — Cowlitz County did not go far enough in evaluating greenhouse gas emissions from a proposed port upgrade in Longview, according to the state Department of Ecology. The redeveloped port would export coal to Asia. Ecology officials Tuesday filed a motion to intervene in an appeal of the county’s decision to allow the upgrade, saying the department wants to ensure its concerns are adequately addressed. The officials said the county’s environmental review should have analyzed greenhouse gas emissions more broadly and not just in the immediate boundaries of the Longview project. In November, Cowlitz County approved shoreline permits for a subsidiary of Australia-based Ambre Energy to redevelop an existing port to handle 5 million tons of coal annually. The project would serve mines in Montana and Wyoming. Conservation groups have also appealed the project to the state Shorelines Hearings Board. A hearing is set for April.

tors have always demonstrated in order to enhance the quality of life for us all,” Landvik said Jim Wahlsten, the broker/coowner of Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty. “We at Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty are proud of Steve and the work he does that benefits so many of our neighbors and friends.”

Special menu

Masseuse moves

PORT ANGELES — Michael McQuay, the chef and owner of Kokopelli Grill, will usher in the new year by presenting a special gourmet multicourse “prix fixe” menu on New Year’s Eve. The special menu at the restaurant at 203 E. Front St. in Port Angeles will include a four-course meal, including wine and champagne, all at one price. Phone 360-457-6040 for information and reservations.

PORT ANGELES — Licensed massage practitioner Debbie Collins of Body in Balance has moved to 1225 E. Front St. “For the past 10 years, massage therapy has been, and is, my passion,” Collins said. For an appointment, phone 360-460-9155.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Tuesday. Aluminum - $1.0890 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.2590 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.3240 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2435.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0305 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1400.80 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1405.20 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $30.200 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $30.297 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1755.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1751.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

Realtor honored PORT ANGELES — Steve Landvik of Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty recently received the Port Angeles Association of Realtors’ 2010 Community Service Award. He was acknowledged for exceptional contributions and public service in the community and always exhibiting the giving spirit of Realtors. “Steve exemplifies the rich heritage of service to his community that Real-

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Fisheries told to get tougher on sea lions The Associated Press

SEATTLE — A group advising the federal fisheries service says a program to remove or kill sea lions that eat imperiled salmon near Bonneville Dam hasn’t been effective at saving the fish. In its three-year review, the group made up of fishermen, tribes, state agencies and others urged the National Marine Fisheries Service to ease rules so more California sea lions can be trapped, removed or shot from land and boat. The report comes as the federal agency is deciding whether to appeal a court decision last month that

halted the program. In 2008, the federal government allowed Oregon, Washington and Idaho to kill the hungriest of the sea lions that preyed on salmon and steelhead at the base of the dam east of Portland, Ore. So far, 27 sea lions have been killed, while 10 were relocated to zoos or aquariums. The fisheries service gave the states permission to kill up to 85 a year until 2012. The Humane Society of the United States had challenged that decision, and the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in November

that the federal government failed to explain why it let state officials kill sea lions, while humans are allowed to take comparable or larger catches of endangered salmon and steelhead. The agency has until early January to decide whether to appeal or take other action, Garth Griffin, branch chief of the fisheries service’s protected resources division in Portland, said Tuesday.

More must go In its review, the task force said the current program was able to reduce the sea lions’ take of endangered salmon to between

2 percent and 3 percent, down from 4 percent in 2004, according to 2010 estimates. But the program goal was less than 1 percent. “More animals must be trapped in order to be removed,” the group said. It recommended more traps and more staff available to work the traps seven days a week. A majority of the group also recommended that more sea lions should be shot from land and boat and that areas where the animals could be hauled out and shot should be increased. None of the 27 animals

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 29, 2010 SECTION

c

Our Peninsula

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

Karen Griffiths/for Peninsula Daily News

Wanting her children, Marticia, 2, and William, 4, to grow up with a better home life than she had, Victoria Zmuda turned to OlyCAP and the Peninsula Daily News’ Peninsula Home Fund.

Home Fund helps young mother of two By Karen Griffiths

For Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — V is for vital, for victory and for Victoria Zmuda. The 20-year-old mother has chosen not to be owned by her past but to create a healthier future for herself, her family and, she says, any of those she can help in the future. In the beginning, Victoria’s road to independence was rocky, and she made many mistakes — but she says people showed her great kindness and never gave up on her. “It’s really nice to have positive people to look to as an example and to help guide me as to what I need to learn and do to get on my feet,” she says. Now, she says, she’s proud to be known as the “Go-to Girl” for other teens in need. “So many kids aren’t aware of all the programs out there to help,” says Victoria. “I like to be a resource they can approach and ask where to get help.” Pregnant at 16, she dropped out of high school and tried to make a life with the baby’s father. But both were too young, and the pressure pushed them apart. She sought help at OlyCAP’s Port Angeles office where she was referred to the First Step Family Support Center, an organization she says changed her life forever. OlyCAP is the nonprofit Olympic Community Action Programs, the No. 1 emergency care agency in Jefferson and Clallam counties. It also screens the applicants for the Peninsula Daily News’ “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund and distributes the funds. “Growing up, I never had a responsible adult tell me I needed to learn to get up on my feet, become independent and learn to give help back to others,” says the mother of two, William, 4, and Marticia, 2. “Now, I’m a big activist for First Step. Last year, I helped them raise $18,000 just by talking.”

Helped by Home Fund Since 1971, First Step Family Support Center, an award-winning nonprofit at 325 E. Sixth St. in Port Angeles, has provided support and education services to encourage the healthy development of families in Clallam County. As a guest auctioneer at a fundraiser for First Step last year, Victoria helped raise more than $12,000. More than $5,000 was raised when she spoke at other meetings. “When people started donating just because I was talking, I started bawling my eyes out I was so happy. “After that, I started to feel everything in my life coming into place.” The Peninsula Daily News’

Give voice to your heart A GIFT OF any size is welcome. The Peninsula Home Fund has never been a campaign of heavy hitters. If you can contribute only a few dollars, please don’t hesitate because you think it won’t make a difference. Every gift makes a difference, regardless of its size. To donate, write a check to “Peninsula Home Fund” and attach it to the coupon that accompanies this story. Mail both items to Peninsula Home Fund, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Or drop them at the newspaper’s offices in Port Townsend, Sequim or Port Home Fund supported her as she began moving toward self-sufficiency, providing bus passes and fuel vouchers to help her get to work and deliver her children to day care. Other organizations have further aided Victoria on her road toward her goal of self-sufficiency and providing her children with the stable family life she experienced before her father died when she was 7. She received assistance from Serenity House’s Evergreen Family Village transitional housing programs. She was also accepted into OlyCAP’s community jobs program. It provides on-the-job training in conjunction with the state Department of Social and Health Services. Subsequently, she got hired at Family Planning of Clallam County as an administrative assistant. “Family Planning opened my eyes to nonprofits,” says Victoria, adding, not only did she get a job, but she also learned the importance of giving to charity. Now she feels it’s a privilege, not even a burden or sacrifice, but a privilege to help others. “I feel good helping raise money for these programs.”

Peninsula College Victoria is spreading her wings. She now works for an accounting firm. She is leaving Serenity House’s transitional housing and, thanks to a federal program, is moving in to her own home. She earned her GED certificate in August and plans to begin classes soon at Peninsula College. She may become a counselor to those with chemical dependency or get an Associate of Arts degree and someday be a

Angeles (addresses on page A2 of the PDN daily). Again, all contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. The fund’s IRS number, under the auspices of OlyCAP, is 91-0814319. You can also donate online by credit card — just visit www.peninsuladailynews.com, then click near the top of the home page on “Peninsula Home Fund.” Whether you donate by coupon or online, you will receive a written thank-you and acknowledgment of your contribution. To delay may mean to forget. business administrator.

No deductions — a ‘hand up’ The PDN’s Peninsula Home Fund — a safety net for local residents when there is nowhere else to turn — is seeking contributions for its annual holiday season fundraising campaign. From Port Townsend to Forks, from Quilcene and Brinnon to LaPush, it’s a “hand up, not a handout” for children, teens, families and the elderly. All the money collected for the Home Fund goes — without any deductions — for hot meals for seniors, meeting rent, energy and transportation needs, warm winter coats for kids, home repairs for the low-income, needed eyeglasses and prescription drugs, dental work, safe, drug-free temporary housing . . . The list goes on and on . . . Begun in 1989, the Home Fund is supported entirely by Jefferson and Clallam residents. Individuals, couples, businesses, churches, service organizations and school groups set a record for contributions in 2009 — $230,806.95. With heavy demand this year, the carefully rationed fund is being rapidly depleted. Since Jan. 1, the Home Fund has helped more than 2,200 individuals and families like Victoria Zmuda’s on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Money almost gone The last of the money collected in 2009 is expected to be exhausted this week. Peninsula Home Fund is a unique, nonprofit program: ■ No money is deducted for administration or other overhead. Your entire donation — 100 percent, every penny — goes

to help those who are facing times of crisis. ■ All contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. ■ Some people call the PDN’s Peninsula Home Fund “shoestring philanthropy.” Money from the Home Fund is usually given out in small amounts, normally up to $150. And assistance is limited to one time in a12-month period. But even though the dollar figures are small, the impact can be big, in huge, life-changing ways. ■ Instances of help are designed to get an individual or family through the crisis — and every effort is made to put them back on the path to self-sufficiency. That’s the “hand up, not a handout” focus of the fund. In many instances, Peninsula Home Fund case managers at OlyCAP work with individuals or families to develop a plan to become financially stable — and avoid a recurrence of the emergency that prompted aid from the fund. And, as necessary, Peninsula Home Fund contributions are often used in conjunction with

money from other agencies, enabling OlyCAP to stretch the value of the contribution. ■ Your personal information is kept confidential. Peninsula Daily News does not rent, sell, give or otherwise share your address or other information with anyone, or make any other use of the information.

Applying for a grant To apply for a grant from the fund, phone OlyCAP at 360-4524726 (Port Angeles and Sequim) or 360-385-2571 (Jefferson County). There’s also an OlyCAP office in Forks — 360-374-6193. If you have any questions about the fund, contact John Brewer, Peninsula Daily News editor and publisher, at 360-4173500. Or e-mail him at john.brewer@ peninsuladailynews.com. Peninsula Daily News publishes stories every Sunday and Wednesday during the fund-raising campaign listing contributors and reporting on how the fund works.


C2

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Fun ’n’ Advice

Peninsula Daily News

Grandparents too busy to handle kids

Tundra

DEAR ABBY: I moved from New Jersey to Florida 20 years ago, married my wife and started a family. My parents relocated here a few years later. When I asked if they would be living nearby, I was told, “No way! We raised our kids already.” Hearing it felt hurtful. As time has passed, they have made themselves available to a family who lives near them for baby-sitting and help running their business when the family is on vacation. We have asked my parents on several occasions if we could have some help watching our children, but they said they were too busy or it was too much to handle. We feel we should take priority over “outsiders.” But when we bring up the subject, it is met with strong opposition. We just feel like we’re not good enough, and don’t know how to answer our children when they ask about their grandparents. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Bewildered in Florida

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Bewildered: Your situation is sad, but my advice is to accept that you won’t be getting any help from — or becoming any closer to — your parents. They may have refused your requests for help because they don’t care for your spouse, or your children really are too much for them to handle. I’m sorry.

Frank & Ernest

Dear Abby: I lost my 84-year-old mother in an accident. I called Mom’s friends, many of whom are also elderly. Several of them talked on and on about their problems, their poor health, their spouses’ poor health — and one even went on and on about her hot water tank “blowing up.” Would you please remind people that when they get a courtesy call from a grieving family member to please listen, say, “Thank you for calling to let me know,” and to offer condolences for their loss. Bereaved Daughter, Livonia, N.Y.

Garfield

Dear Bereaved Daughter: Allow me to offer my condolences for the loss of your mother. I’m pleased to print your letter because not everyone

Momma

knows how to handle a phone call Van Buren such as you had to make. It’s possible that the folks you called were either uncomfortable with the subject, and so they tried to deflect it by discussing what was going on in their lives — or they have heard about death so often at their age that they have become accustomed to hearing such sad news. (As for the woman who mentioned her water heater — I hope you were kind enough to refer her to a plumber.)

Abigail

Dear Abby: My husband travels a lot — three to four days a week. Sometimes when he’s intoxicated and we’re having sex, he acts like he doesn’t know who I am. I asked him once, “Are you married?” He said, “No . . .” Another time I asked, “Do you have a girlfriend?” and he said, “No, but you’re fine . . .” The next day, he has no idea he said any of this. Should I be worried? Wrong Answer in Chicago Dear Wrong Answer: Absolutely. You should be worried not only about the fact that your husband is probably having extracurricular sex, but also that he has a drinking problem so severe he doesn’t always know who he’s sleeping with. You should be worried that after a night of drinking, he can’t remember clearly the next day what he has said (or has possibly done). If he won’t admit he has a problem and seek help, you should contact AlAnon (it’s in your phone book, or find it online at www.al-anon.org). And you should schedule an appointment with your physician to be tested for STDs because I’m worried he may have given you one — or more.

__________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You need time to rethink your strategy for the new year. Hanging on to plans that you haven’t been able to execute may be the problem. Don’t limit what you can do by living in the past. Forward thinking is your best bet. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t think about work or what you need to get done. Consider your next vacation or what courses you want to sign up for. You will take in information easily and can impress whoever you are with by putting it into practice quickly. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Charity is fine but take care of your responsibility to family and close friends first. Changing mid-stream will confuse someone trying to get you to agree on a deal you’ve been working toward. Let others know exactly where you stand. 5 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Socializing with peers will lead to favorable changes in your life. Setting up meetings and dates for the new year will give you something to look forward to. Plan some romantic action. 5 stars

Dennis the Menace

dear abby

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Be consistent. If you keep changing your mind or exaggerating, you will confuse or make someone angry. Emotional problems with someone you are close to will develop if you try to dictate new rules. Going out will keep you out of trouble. 2 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Be nice to the people around you and to those who need your help and you will bypass conflict. Someone you may be able to partner with will remind you of an interesting idea you had years ago. Accept an inevitable change at home. 4 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Talk to a friend, neighbor or relative who can help you get things ready for an activity or event you plan to attend. You will get the cooperation and backing you require. Collaboration will lead to your success. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll have to keep a poker face if you don’t want to rock the boat. Your observations will be insightful and, the less you do or say, the better your chance to counteract what’s happening when the time is right. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’ll have to take matters into your own hands and follow through with your plans if you want things done properly and on time. Keep your emotions in check and refuse to let someone’s inadequacy ruin your day. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t let love disrupt your plans. You cannot give in to someone putting demands on you. Focus on what you can do to stabilize your life financially, emotionally and physically. Put your resolutions into play. 5 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t hide your feelings or play games. Get things out in the open. The time is right to make tough decisions about the future. You can reach your goals if you get rid of the dead weight you’ve been carrying. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Go over any last-minute details to make a project you are working on bigger, better and more efficient. Don’t be afraid to make unusual changes. Stick to basics and the truth. Honesty will play a role. 3 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Things to Do Today and Thursday, Dec. 29-30, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

First Step drop-in center — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free clothing and equipPort Angeles ment closet, information and referrals, play area, emergency Today supplies, access to phones, Dance lessons by appoint- computers, fax and copier. ment — Phone Carol Hatha- Phone 360-457-8355. way at 360-460-3836 or e-mail Museum at the Carnegie carolha@olypen.com. — Featured exhibit, “Strong German conversation — People: The Faces of Clallam All ages invited to German chat County.” Miniature exhibit till group. Must speak and under- Friday. Second and Lincoln stand German. Discussion top- streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Chilics include current events, dren welcome. Elevator, ADA music, food and other topics. access and parking at rear of Phone 360-457-0614 or 360- building. Phone 360-452-6779. 808-1522. Women’s belly dancing Biz Builders — August exercise class — Focus on Glass office building, 312 E. toning upper arms, chest, waist Fifth St., 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Open and hips. Port Angeles Senior to business representatives. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Drop-ins Phone 360-460-0313. welcome. Cost: $45 for six Walk-in vision clinic — weeks or $8.50 per class. Information for visually impaired Phone 360-457-7035. and blind people, including Braille training — Vision accessible technology display, Loss Center, 228 W. First St., library, Braille training and vari- Suite N, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Phone ous magnification aids. Vision 360-457-1383, e-mail info@ Loss Center, Armory Square visionlossservices.org or visit Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. www.visionlossservices.org. Phone for an appointment 360457-1383 or visit www.vision The Answer for Youth — lossservices.org/vision. Drop-in outreach center for youth and young adults, providArt classes — Between ing essentials like clothes, food, Port Angeles and Sequim. 10 Narcotics and Alcoholics Anona.m. to 12:30 p.m. For direc- ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. tions and costs, phone Susan Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Spar 360-457-6994. Domestic violence supAcupuncture sessions — port group — Healthy Families Licensed acupuncturist Jim of Clallam County, 1210 E. Fox. Port Angeles Senior Cen- Front St., Suite C, 3:30 p.m. to ter, 328 E. Seventh St., 10 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Free to attend. Free $20 members, $25 nonmem- child care. Phone 360-452bers. Walk-ins are welcome. 3811. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0.

Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Port Angeles Fine Arts 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per Center — “Art Is a Gift” show meal. Reservations recomand sale. 1203 E. Lauridsen mended. Phone 360-457Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. 8921.

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. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Phone 360-457-3532. Bingo — Eagles Club Auxiliary, 110 S. Penn St., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunch available. Open to the public. Phone 360-4523344.

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Phone 360-417-7652.

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Overeaters Anonymous — Bethany Pentecostal Church, 508 S. Francis St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360-457-8395.

road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0.

Live music — Dave and Rosalie Secord’s Luck of the Draw Band and guests perform at Smuggler’s Landing, 115 E. Port Angeles Fine Arts Railroad Ave., 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Center — “Art Is a Gift” show and sale. 1203 E. Lauridsen Bingo — Masonic Lodge, Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Phone 360-457-3532. Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and pull tabs available. Mental illness family supPhone 360-457-7377. port group — For families and friends of people with mental Al-Anon — St. Columbine disorders. Peninsula CommuRoom, Queen of Angels nity Mental Health Center, 118 Church, 209 W. 11th St., 7:30 E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Phone Rebecca Brown, 360457-0431. Live music — Good Medicine Band, The Junction, First Step drop-in center 242701 U.S. Highway 101. 6:30 — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. No cover. p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and Christmas light tours — referrals, play area, emergency All Points Charters & Tours. supplies, access to phones, Meet bus at Safeway, 110 E. computers, fax and copier. Third St., 6:30 p.m. $7.50 Phone 360-457-8355. adults, $3.50 children 6-15, children younger than 5 free. Museum at the Carnegie Tour is two hours long. Refresh- — Featured exhibit, “Strong ments served. For reservations, People: The Faces of Clallam phone 360-460-7131 or 360- County.” Miniature exhibit till 565-1139. Friday. Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Children welcome. Elevator, ADA Thursday access and parking at rear of PA Vintage Softball — building. Phone 360-452-6779. Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowGastric bypass surgery ship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-452- support group — 114 E. Sixth 5973 or Ken Foster at 360-683- St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. 0141 for information including Open to the public. Phone 360457-1456. time of day and location. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail-

tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 Mental health drop-in cen- a.m. Free. Phone 360-683ter — The Horizon Center, 205 2114. E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Bird walk — Dungeness For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to River Audubon Center, Railsocialize, something to do or a road Bridge Park, 2151 W. hot meal. For more information, Hendrickson Road, 8:30 a.m. phone Rebecca Brown at 360- to 10:30 a.m. Phone the Audubon at 360-681-4076 or e-mail 457-0431. rivercenter@olympus.net. Senior meal — Nutrition Cardio-step exercise class program, Port Angeles Senior — Sequim Community Church, Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Phone meal. Reservations recom- Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 mended. Phone 360-457- or e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. 8921. com. Knit, crochet and spin — Line dance class — PioAll ages and skill levels, Veela neer Park, 387 E. Washington Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. St., Sequim, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Beginning, intermediate and advanced classes. $5 per class. Volunteers in Medicine of Phone 360-681-2987. the Olympics health clinic — Free blood pressure 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Free for patients with no checks — Cardiac Services insurance or access to health Department, Olympic Medical care. For appointment, phone Center medical services building, 840 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 360-457-4431. noon. Tai chi class — Ginger and Free karate lessons — Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., Ideal for people fighting cancer 6:30 p.m. $12 per class or $10 for three or more classes. No encouraged by medical providexperience necessary, wear ers to seek physical activity. Kathrin J. Sumpter at Sequim loose comfortable clothing. Martial Arts, 452 Riverview Phone 360-808-5605. Drive, 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Space limited. For reservaChristmas light tours — tions, phone 360-683-4799. All Points Charters & Tours. Meet bus at Safeway, 110 E. Kids crafts — First Teacher, Third St., 6:30 p.m. $7.50 220 W. Alder St., 10:30 a.m. adults, $3.50 children 6-15, Phone 360-582-3428. children younger than 5 free. Tour is two hours long. RefreshIntuition workshop — ments served. For reservations, “Introduction to Intuitive Develphone 360-460-7131 or 360- opment,” Center of Infinite 565-1139. Reflections, 144 Tripp Road, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Kristine Walsh, Bariatric surgery support metaphysician and facilitator. group — Terrace Apartments, Phone at 360-582-0083. 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 Sequim Open Aire Market p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. — Sequim Avenues and Washington Street. Noon to 4 p.m. Sequim and the E-mail manager@sequim or phone 360-460Dungeness Valley market.com 2668.

Today Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m., 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit www.sequimyoga.com.

Overeaters Anonymous — Newborn parenting class Men’s meeting, St. Luke’s Epis— “You and Your New Baby,” copal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., third-floor sunroom, Olympic 7 a.m. Phone 360-582-9549. Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Walk aerobics — First Bap-

Italian class — Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-6810226. Good News Club — Ages 5 through 12. Greywolf Elementary School Room 136, 171 Carlsborg Road, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Phone 360-683-9176 or visit www.cefop.us.

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Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video Office Hours Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 Monday - Friday IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY 8AM - 5PM

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3 Br., 2 bath, O’Brien Rd. Pets ok. Possible horse. $900 + dep. 360-461-7428 DELIVERY DRIVER Drive our truck approx. 30 hrs. per week in the summer months and 20 hours per week in the winter. Must be available Saturday mornings. Must be able to lift heavy bundles. Must have drivers license, insurance and good driving record.

Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News Advertising Operations Mgr. PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 or email susan.stoneman@ peninsuladaily news.com

No phone calls please

LINCOLN: ‘90 Towncar. Nearly $4,000 spent on car in last 2 years. $1,700. Bill at 360-582-3727

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Peninsula Classified is here to lend a helping hand. Computers, vehicles, jobs, real estate, pets… you name it! We’re here to meet your everyday needs!

4C235382

or fill out application at 305 West First, Port Angeles

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

Community Notes

PRENATAL YOGA Feel a sense of support and community with other pregnant women as you increase flexibility, strength, circulation and balance. A regular yoga practice can help to reduce swelling, insomnia, back and leg pain commonly associated with pregnancy. The class is safe for all three trimesters. 8-week class for expecting moms begins Sunday, Jan. 9. For more information or to register, please e-mail Jennifer Veneklasen at jennven@hotmail.c om or phone 360775-8746. Space is limited.

Grab Their ATTENTION! Add:

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Matthew finds 200 in garage $

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CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

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Lost and Found

FOUND: Gift certificate, near high school in P.A. Call to describe. 452-8464.

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

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Lost and Found

LOST: Cat. Female calico, orange and black, med. length hair, white collar, Gupster Rd., P.A. 504-5663, 565-6221

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Lost and Found

LOST: Large gold nugget on long gold chain. Possibly one month ago. Reward. 457-1329

LOST: Dog. 7 mo old black lab/chow mix. Pure black. Missing from Hwy 112 and Nordstrom, Camp Hayden area. Reward. 477-7013. LOST: Earing. Double loop copper, with turquoise bead, P.A. or Sequim. 460-3391 LOST: Gold single speed mountain bike on 12/27, somewhere between Joyce Access and Carlsborg Rd. 360-477-2788

STOLEN ATV 63 year old disabled man Had his 2002 orange Honda Rancher stolen from 203 Dan Kelly Rd., P.A. on Thurs., Dec. 2. If you know somebody who got a new orange ATV around Christmas, please call the P.A. Police or 457-5647. Reward for info leading to an arrest and conviction of persons involved.

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Sequim

Health & Rehabilitation NOW HIRING

43231723

TO PLACE YOUR AD CALL 452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714 OR ONLINE AT WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

OR

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

Maintenance Asst. • CNA Dietary Mgr. • Activity Asst.

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Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

360-582-2400

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx EOE

0C5106532

Who knows how much money you might find hidden away in your home? With a $16.50 super seller ad (3 lines, 4 days) you can sell your item! So look around, then call us!

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

5000900

$10 per hour

PUPPY: Female Chihuahua, 9 months old, very good dog, paper trained, to good home only. $100 cash. 4529888, leave mesJPM: ‘09 Raptor sage. Cruiser. Under 1,500 mi., gray and silver, STOLEN ATV dual exhaust, dual 63 year old front disc brakes, disabled man water cooled, chain Had his 2002 orange drive, saddle bags, Honda Rancher exc. condition! stolen from 203 $2,195. 360-390-8287 Dan Kelly Rd., P.A. LOVE SEAT: Blue fabon Thurs., Dec. 2. If ric, over stuffed, you know somegreat shape. $200/ body who got a obo. 681-3299. new orange ATV around Christmas, Oak Entertainment please call the P.A. Center. 3 years old, Police or 457-5647. 7’x6’, TV stand, 2 Reward for info towers, bridge, lots leading to an arrest of storage. and conviction of $200/obo. 775-5840. persons involved. P.A.: 2 Br. senior cottage, all utilities incl. TIRES/WHEELS: (4) except phone, W/D, Michelin all season housekeeping and (snow/mud) low dining services avail miles, one season, upon request. Inquire 225/60/18, Dodge at Park View Villas, Charger wheels, 18” corner of 8th and G caps, lug nuts, polSt., P.A. 452-7222 for ished. $400 ea. showing. 683-7789 PUPPY: Jack RussellSchipperke mix, 8 UTILITY TRAILER wks., pad trained. Heavy duty tandem $125. 457-6608. axle trailer, all steel, TRAILER: ‘82 19’ 4’x8’, 5’ drop down ramp, front tongue Terry Taurus. $500. storage, new tires 360-681-0561 with spare, 2’ sideVW: ‘71 Camper. boards. $1,750/obo. In Sequim. Good cond. $2,500. 206-940-1849 360-820-0339


ACROSS 1 Sound return 5 Suspension bridge support 10 Obtain forcibly 14 Miller, for one 15 Shoelace tip 16 Stubbs of the Four Tops 17 *Unquestioning devotion 19 Scored 100 on 20 Bozo 21 “When the smog clears in California, UCLA,” e.g. 22 Hitchcock title 23 Dice-rolling game 26 The King or Prince 29 Repugnant reaction 30 Pound sounds 32 Treatment plant input 33 Tie up, in a way 35 Home of Duke U. 37 Looks bad, comparatively 38 5- or 40-Down ... or what the start of each answer to a starred clue can be 41 Parisian daily, with “Le” 44 Singer Amos 45 Latin 101 verb 49 Signs into law 51 Pool room supply 53 Amigo 54 Reaches 56 Chesapeake Bay city 58 Televise 59 Physicians’ org. 61 Precisely 62 Fall 63 *Knee-slapper 67 Green climber 68 Title owner of a sitcom bookstore 69 Homeland of the folk-singing Clancy Brothers 70 Two out of three, say 71 Teacher’s directive 72 Pringles-like Lay’s product DOWN 1 Flow back

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31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

Help Wanted

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT 2 F/T, benefits. Prepares accounts payable checks, prints accounts payable reports, assists with payroll, collection calls, and filing. Must be organized, able to meet deadlines, perform in a fast paced work environment, able to multi-task. Requires strong attention to detail, work independently. Fax resume to Caregivers 360-457-7186 or email to accounting2@caregiversonline.com AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. DELIVERY DRIVER Drive our truck approx. 30 hrs. per week in the summer months and 20 hours per week in the winter. Must be available Saturday mornings. Must be able to lift heavy bundles. Must have drivers license, insurance and good driving record. $10 per hour Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News Advertising Operations Mgr. PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 or email susan.stoneman@ peninsuladaily news.com or fill out application at 305 West First, Port Angeles No phone calls please

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. OL ‘FACT’ ORY FACTS

S M O K E R E H P S O M T A I By Gary Cee

12/29/10

2 Place to see Bugs? 3 Dwarfs’ song 4 Self-contradictory afterthought 5 Joe’s stimulant 6 Turkish authority 7 Plane, in a control tower 8 Relax 9 Cultural group 10 *Pitchers and tumblers 11 Conservatory event 12 Like Joe? 13 Bridge action 18 Half asleep 23 “De-lish!” 24 Gone by 25 Theme park acronym 27 Toon Le Pew 28 Hi-__ graphics 31 Flavor 34 *Like treatment for visiting dignitaries 36 Aired again 39 Bigfoot cousin 40 Smoker’s stimulant 41 “Give __ holler!” 42 Province bordering four Great Lakes Help Wanted

City of Sequim is seeking qualified professionals for the following positions: Engineer Engineering Tech II WRF Electronics Tech PW Admin Asst II Accounting Asst III Finance Project Manager Details at: http://www.ci.sequim. wa.us. Send cover letter, resume and job application to Kathy Brown-HR Manager, 152 West Cedar St., Sequim, WA 98363, or email kbrown@ ci.sequim.wa.us EOE DELIVERY DRIVER Part-time. 3-7 p.m., Mon.-Fri., rotating weekends. Clean driving record req. Durable medical equip. set up/maintenance exp. preferred. Apply at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE.

Due to continued expansion and growth, urgently require LPNs, NACs and NARs. Competitive wages and benefits. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. RESIDENTIAL AIDES FULL-TIME OR ON-CALL Assist chronically mentally ill adults in daily living skills, cooking, and housekeeping. Req h.s./GED, exp pref’d. $10.13-$11.05/hr, DOE. FT w/benes, or add $1.hr for on-call work. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE

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S N I F F T U P L E A S A N T

S R O D O M S E N S E S F I N

R I O R A E B A E S T O A M E

© 2010 Universal Uclick

Y O N N U A T A T I R S Z A G

Solution: 8 letters

F V S U K E R E M M A L Z L N

B E A I S C N U A R R A I S U

M R N E H C L T N R O C P O P

E G A P H A I K O F M I S S E

www.wonderword.com

T E C I T O N O S I A M I R R

S C E E N F O O E R N E G E F

Y D N A C R T C A E R H N Y U

S H S I F U E E F F O C A A M

G A S O L I N E S M E L L L E

L S C E N T F R A G R A N C E

12/29

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Animals, Aroma, Atmosphere, Baking, Bear, Brain, Candy, Chemicals, Coffee, Cook, Fire, Fish, Food, Fragrance, Fruit, Gasoline, Heavy, Humans, Information, Inhale, Layers, Nasal, Neurons, Nose, Notice, Odors, Perfume, Pizza, Pleasant, Popcorn, Pungent, React, Scent, Search, Senses, Signal, Sinus, Smell, Smoke, Sniff, Stench, Stimulate, System, Taste Yesterday’s Answer: Religion

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

YARAR ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

HECKT (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

43 League of __ 46 What a “Me and My Shadow” singer might be 47 Mineo in movies 48 Mountain lion prey 50 Catches 52 Ray who said, “It requires a certain kind of mind to see beauty in a hamburger bun”

Help Wanted

RESIDENTIAL STAFF For new Maloney Heights 28-unit residence for chronically homeless: º Site Coordinator, Bachelor’s degr with 3-5 yrs. relevant exper. $29$31K, DOE. º Residential Aides, Assist w/daily living skills, cooking & housekeeping. Req h.s./GED; exper pref’d. $10.13-$11.05 hr., DOE. Both posns FT w/benes. resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE SWITCHBOARD/ RECEPTIONIST/ GENERAL CLERICAL Peninsula Community mental Health Center seeks versatile and mature team player for busy front office. Must have excellent interpersonal and customer svc skills and be able to type and use gen off equip. Recent exper in health care office is a plus. F.T. w/benefits. Some eve hrs. $10.50-$11.00/hr start, DOQ. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE The Museum & Arts Center located in Sequim, WA, is seeking applicants for the position of executive director. Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. The complete position description is available on the Museum & Arts Center website: www.macsequim.org. Copies are also available at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim. Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest with resume to: MAC Executive Director Search Committee PO Box 2056 Sequim, WA 98382 All inquiries must be directed to the mailing address above. The search committee will only consider applications received on or before Wed., Dec. 29, 2010.

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Help Wanted

RECEPTIONIST/ BOOKKEEPER For Sequim accounting firm. Must have good communication skills. Call for appt. 683-4149.

12/29/10

55 The parenthesis in :-) 57 Counterfeits 60 Competent 62 Pet physician’s deg. 64 Pro __: for now 65 Pitcher’s stat 66 Oscar winner Harrison

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Work Wanted

TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325 Veterinary Kennel and Grooming Assistant Part-time fast paced position. Resume and cover letter to: PO Box 339 Sequim, WA 98382 WELDER & FITTER. Opening for a selfmotivated, productive welder with mechanical skills. Must be proficient with TIG & MIG, experience in gas welding small pipe a plus. Full-time position with benefits. Email resume to hr@imspacific.com fax to 360-385-3410 or mail to: P.O. Box 2028, Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Work Wanted

PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com. We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@ helpertek.com

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officelive.com I'm Sew Happy!

CALKAJ Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: A

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

104 PARKWOOD Low maintenance landscaped front/ back yards will make you the envy of your neighbors and friends. House interiors are sure to please. Extra roomy triplewide in Parkwood Community for 55+. Clubhouse and outdoor rec features make this a winning combination. Call the agents for a viewing – vacant and ready to buy! $89,500. ML252439. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

Yesterday’s

Homes

P.A. AUTO TINTING 20% discount. 360-912-1948

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SARC is now accepting applications for the part time evening custodian. Please pick up application 610 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. 683-3344 ext 11 for more info.

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FACTRY

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Master bath newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertop. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 30x24 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $208,000 360-460-7503 3 private acres in the city! Open floor plan, hardwood floors, wood stove, bonus room would make great office or craft room. Close to everything yet feels miles away from anything. $299,000. ML251416/96541 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN VIEWS From this 2 Br., 2 bath home on 1.25 level acres between Sequim and Port Angeles. Newer laminate floors, carpets, windows and roof. Two sided rock mantel with a fireplace on the living room side and a wood stove on the dining room side. Large kitchen with a separate pantry. $189,900 ML252417/156860 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

(Answers tomorrow) NEWSY PARODY INJECT Jumbles: PARCH Answer: What the lumberjacks enjoyed when they went rafting — “CHOPPY” WATER

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Homes

COUNTRY LIVING Solid cedar perimeter walls inside and out add to homey feeling and charm. Hardwood floors under wall-to-wall carpet. Large open living area with many windows makes home cheery and bright. Many trees; fruit and shade. New roof 2008. New septic system/exterior paint 2010. Short distance to community beach. $229,900. ML252379. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East ‘D’ IS FOR DECK THE HALLS Exceptional custom built 4,947 sf home on 5.12 acres. Huge master Br. and bath with walk-in closet. Amazing open kitchen. Incredible landscaping, a pond, a fountain, separate storage shed/shop, pool table, black aluminum fence, huge deck, brick patio, and a great floor plan make this a magnificent opportunity. Beautiful high efficiency windows help bring the outside in. Enjoy the water views and Mt. Baker. Just reduced over $75,000! $599,900. ML251498. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company ESCAPE TO BLACK DIAMOND Just minutes from town, fantastic 4 Br., 2 bath on 3+ acres. 2,128 sf, recently treated to a tasteful kitchen update, new paint inside and out plus windows. Master Br. with walk-in closet and jetted tub in master bath. Large detached shop all nicely landscaped with evergreens and fruit trees. Move in ready! $259,500. ML251628 Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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51

Homes

AFFORDABLE 3 BR. Nice location at the end of a dead end street. Attached garage with large workspace. Great starter home or rental investment. $129,000 ML251658/112072 Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. FRESH CONTEMPORARY CUSTOM Country home situated on 1.70 partial mtn view acres. Open floor plan with 9’ ceilings, 3 Br., 2 bath and den, fabulous kitchen with hickory cabinets, pantry, island and eating bar. Exterior 400 sf shop/storage building. Poured patio with a water feature, and southern exposure makes for great entertaining. $369,000. ML251739 Margo Petersen-Pruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY GREAT LOCATION Great Del Guzzi built 4 Br. home in great condition. Mt. view, some water view, waterfall with a little pond, fantastic deck out back, fenced backyard, also cement patio, brick barbeque. Custom fireplace in living room. Garage has large workshop. Home has hardwood floors throughout; some are carpeted. $219,500. ML252125. Beep Adams 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GREAT WATERFRONT HOME Terrific unlimited view of Dungeness bay, shipping lanes and Victoria B.C. 2 Br., 2.5 bath. Check out the recently remodeled sitting room and Dining room. Tidelands included for harvesting clams and beach combing. $569,000 ML251519/103275 Gary Halsey 461-3283 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

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Homes

BEAUTIFUL HOME Sitting quietly on 1.63 manicured acres. Spacious rooms including elegant dinning room and cozy fireplace in the living room. French doors leading out to adorable guesthouse and hot tub. $550,000. ML252297. Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. LAST CHANCE CLOSING COSTS With an offer accepted in December, buyer qualifies for a 2% credit for closing costs. Time’s running out! Take advantage of the estate’s desire to sell and check this out. Built in 1990, this home has a great layout with bedrooms separated by the living areas. Nice deck off the kitchen. Plan for summer! $185,000. ML252233 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LOW MAINTENANCE HOME This newer singlelevel home is a great alternative to a condominium with very low maintenance. Home is bright with many architectural skylights. Features beautiful hardwood floors, gas fireplace, water views, upgraded finishes, central heat, attached 2-car garage, upgraded flooring and appliances. Distinctive architecture and located in excellent neighborhood. Close to everything inc. Olympic National Park! $179,950. ML251311 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company

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New Medical Office space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

97315731

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS By DAVID OUELLET

CAREGIVERS Needed for in-home care. Experience preferred. Salary DOE and license. Call 681-6206

31

Classified

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

C4

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Homes

GREAT OPPORTUNITY Convenient location in Sunland. 3 generous Br., 1.75 bath, nice entertainment spaces, approx. 1,566 sf has newer roof and systems, easy care landscaping. $195,000. ML251993/131039 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND MARIAH WINDS Built with skilled craftsmanship and quality products in 2004. Beautiful 3 Br., 2.5 bath, open concept living space plus family room and a den/office. Stunning hardwood floors, open staircase. Gorgeous master with 2 walk-in closets and bath with Jacuzzi and separate shower. Upscale neighborhood, 2.75 acres. $415,000. ML252233 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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51

Homes

IT’S TIME Interest rates have started inching up, so now is the time to think about buying. You’ll want to consider this 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage, 1,474 sf home. Great floor plan and on a quiet dead-end street in a great neighborhood. $199,700. ML251563. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY MOUNTAIN ESTATE Majestic 10 acre mountaintop estate with breath taking views of the water. Exceptionally high quality construction and craftsmanship is evident in every room of this fine home. Beautiful hardwood floors, superb master bedroom suite with fireplace and a fully customized 1,075 sf shop and garage. $749,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

51

Homes

MOVE IN READY 3 Br., 2 bath condominium in desirable Sherwood Village in excellent condition and move in ready. Recently painted and most appliances recently purchased. Close to medical facilities, Sequim Aquatic & Recreation Center, shopping, and near Olympic Discovery Trail. $240,000 ML250531/39416 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY NEW LISTING Beautifully updated 3 Br., 1.5 bath home located on Cherry Hill. Built in 1937, this home offers a beautiful kitchen, hardwood floors, 1 car garage with workspace, and fenced yard. Quiet and private with all the convenience of in-town living. $249,500. ML252449. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

51

Homes

JUST LIKE NEW Cute 2 Br., 1.5 bath condo, completely updated throughout. New kitchen, appliances and fixtures, new heating system and window coverings, newer roof and close to medical facilities. $145,500. ML251993/131039 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND PRIVATE SETTING This 3 Br., 2 bath 2,158 sf home on 3.22 acres has a spacious kitchen with an island, breakfast bar and plenty of counter space and cabinets. The living room features vaulted ceilings, wood stove and a sliding door out to the gazebo with hot tub and small pond. There is also a family room large enough to accommodate a pool table. Huge 3 car/RV shop. $275,000. ML 252058/135819 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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Homes

GREAT PRICE ON THIS HOME! Wonderful fixer! 2 Br., 1.5 bath on .74 acre lot. Needs TLC but is a great opportunity for the right Mr. Fixit! Home is sold “asis”. $161,000. ML157761 Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow READY TO GO Like new 3 Br., 2 bath manufactured home on 1.4 acres with great mountain views, located between Sequim and Port Angeles. The home features a large south facing living room with propane fireplace, formal dining area, large kitchen with island, two concrete patios, entrance ramp, large detached pull through style RV garage with RV hook-ups. Agnew irrigation water is piped to the property. $210,000. ML251556 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010

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Homes

PRIVATE WILDLIFE HABITAT With a finely crafted 2 Br., 2 bath home on the edge of a forest bordering the Straits! Savor brilliant sunsets, eagles on their nests, and exceptionally eco-friendly home. $565,000. ML241505/143543 Alan Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. RING IN THE NEW YEAR With a quality home in Sun Meadows, close to downtown, John Wayne Marina, and Discovery Trail. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,758 sf home, quality materials throughout. Propane fireplace, heat pump, hickory cabinets, hardwood floors, easy care landscaping with sprinkler system and more. $269,000. ML251365 Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9189

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Homes

SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO 2 Br., 2 baths, nice sunroom, propane stove, murphy bed, shoji screen. $185,000 ML252226/145314 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND The clean lines and style of the craftsman have been maintained while updating this beautiful home to today’s standards. Pride in ownership shows throughout with warm colors and rich hardwoods. The master suite allows for complete comfort and natural light fills your sanctuary. $189,900 ML252433/161579 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Lots/ Acreage

DIAMOND POINT Brand new garage built in 2006. Adjacent to the airport, residential side ready to build on. Water, septic, electric, cable and telephone in. 12x10 room with loft inside garage. $115,000 ML250356/26644 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Commercial

NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Great opportunity to be the owner of your own beauty salon; a turn key business. Just bring your scissors and clients. Very busy salon. Low overhead. Great visible location in downtown Sequim. $14,900. ML252426 Sheryl Payseno Burley and Cathy Reed 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540.

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Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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HOMELAWN/YARD SERVICES CARE RESTORATION

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

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Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

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Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting

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BY APPOINTMENT


C6

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010

62

Apartments Unfurnished

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Hilltop Ridge Apts. 1914 S. Pine, P.A. 457-5322 P.A.: 1 Br., nice, no pets/smoke. 1st/last dep. $395. 452-1234 P.A.: East 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage. $650 plus dep. 452-8239 P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244

63

Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br. senior cottage, all utilities incl. except phone, W/D, housekeeping and dining services avail upon request. Inquire at Park View Villas, corner of 8th and G St., P.A. 452-7222 for showing. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

64

Houses

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Houses

3 Br., 2 bath, O’Brien Rd. Pets ok. Possible horse. $900 + dep. 360-461-7428 A Furnished 3 Br., 2 bath VIEW Home in Port Townsend. Remodeled & Upgraded. $1,400. Also for sale @ $399,900 MLS# 96766 24 Hr FREE Recorded Info 1-888-873-5447 ext. 400 CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath. $695. 360-681-0140 DISCOVERY BAY Waterfront, 3 Br., 2 ba, deck, great view. $790. 360-385-3840 evenings.

360-417-2810 More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $600 mo., $600 dep. 460-5290.

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73

Furniture

EXERCISER: Tony Little’s Gazelle Free Style. $50. 928-9617 or 360-460-9224.

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $1,100. 452-1395.

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746

SEASONED FIREWOOD $170 cord. 360-670-1163

P.A.: 3 Br., 3 bath. Upscale, location, 2 car garage, yard, energy efficient. No smoking, no pets. $950. 360-452-9458. P.A.: 4 Br, 1.5 ba, no smoking. $1,000 mo, $1,000 sec. 417-0153 P.A.: Nice, furnished. 1 Br. $900. Call for details. 461-9684. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1.5 ba carport, fenced, gar. $775. 683-1530. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced, in town, $500 deposit. $1,100. 683-1695.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

WANTED: Room to Rent. Quiet female looking for long-term room to rent Sequim/surrounding areas. Service dog well-trained. No drug use! 360-477-8368. tessnmolly@yahoo.co m

66

Spaces RV/ Mobile

RV SPACES: $375 mo., incl. W/S/G, WiFi, Cable. 461-6672.

68

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

69

Storage Space

NEW YEARS MOVE IN SPECIAL! Need some extra space? Remodeling? Or just need room to get a little more organized? Call for our amazing MOVE IN special! On site security, family owned! Call Joyce Self Storage today. 360-928-2560

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

APPLIANCES AVAILABLE. Whirlpool side-by-side fridge, white, with water hookup, $300. GE convection oven with glass top, works great, $200. Kenmore washer and dryer set, they work great, super capacity, heavy duty, $300. 461-3164 pl lv msg. Hot water heater. GE, 50 gal., HYBRID. Brand new in box. $1,200. 683-7990. evermore@olypen.co m

72

Furniture

COFFEE TABLES: 2 blonde finish coffee tables, 1 large, $40 and 1 small $30, very good condition. 681-4429

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. LOFT BED: Metal, desk & shelf. $100/ obo. 415-420-5809. LOVE SEAT: Blue fabric, over stuffed, great shape. $200/ obo. 681-3299. Oak Entertainment Center. 3 years old, 7’x6’, TV stand, 2 towers, bridge, lots of storage. $200/obo. 775-5840. SOFA: Like new. $500/obo. 670-5948.

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General Merchandise

CHRISTMAS TIME Beautiful coat, leather and suede. $100/ obo. Call Debbie at 360-452-6034 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504 FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $489. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com HP Mini Case and portable mouse with 4 GB flash drive. $25. Open but never used. 452-6439. MISC: ‘95 F150 4x4, parts, $500. Cont. Gem Topper, cost $1,600, sell $500. 3 Husqvarna chainsaws, $300-$500. Leister plastic heat welder, $200. 48 Jeepster tranny, 3 sp with electric O/D, $500. 461-8060. MISC: Drew dining set, table, 8 chairs, china hutch, credenza buffet, $1,000. Sportsart recumbent bike, $350. DuncanPhyfe table, $200. 2 lg. chest of drawers, $75 ea. Antique needle point chair with stool, $100. Retro bar, $50. Glass/brass shelf, 2 end tables, $150. All OBO. 477-4785 MISC: Ladies dresser, excellent shape, big mirror, black lacquer with gold trim, 6 drawers and middle cupboard with shelf, $250/obo. 10” table saw, $45. 683-9829. MISC: Regency, wood burning stove, gold door and 5.5’ piping, excellent shape, $1,200/obo. Sanio 24” TV w/stand, $75/obo. Mini fridge, brand new, $75. 360-461-2894 Ten cords fir firewood $165 ea or trade for truck/big saw. Cut, split, delivered. FULL cords, not dry. came from big trees, nice, straight grain and lots of dense heartwood. will haul to west side or P.T. for extra. 670-5655. UTILITY TRAILER Heavy duty tandem axle trailer, all steel, 4’x8’, 5’ drop down ramp, front tongue storage, new tires with spare, 2’ sideboards. $1,750/obo. In Sequim. 206-940-1849

RUN A FREE AD FOR ITEMS PRICED $200 AND UNDER • 2ADS PER HOUSEHOLD PER • Bargain BoxAds will run as WEEK space permits Mondays & • Private parties only Tuesdays • 4 lines,2 days • No firewood or lumber • No pets or livestock • No Garage Sales

Ad 1

Ad 2

Name Address Phone No.

Mail to:

General Merchandise

DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $140. 681-4429

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 2 ba......$650 H 2 br 1 ba......$700 H 2 br 2 ba......$750 A 3 br 1.5 ba...$925 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 HOUSES IN SEQUIM H 1 br 1 ba.......$800 H 2 br 1 ba.......$900 H 3 br 1 ba.....$1100

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P.A.: 2 Br., no smoking/pets, vicinity of Civic Field. $750. 457-4023

P.A.: Room $450 mo, util. and cable incl. No pets. 460-4408

3 Br., 1.5 bth, new carpet/paint. LR w/fireplace insert. Two car garage. Hot tub. $1125 First, last, dep. Non-smk/pets. Contact (206)8983252 Address: 1527 W. 10th.

Classified

Bring your ads to:

Home Electronics

STEREO SPEAKERS. Cambridge Soundworks New Ensemble II bookshelf speakers w/stands and subwoofer. Great sound! $100. 360-683-9485

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Musical

GUITARS: 1968 Gibson Les Paul Gold Top. Serious inquiries only, $12,000. ‘63 Gibson ES120T, $850. ‘75 Gibson Grabber, $750. ‘67 Gibson SG Standard, $1,500. 360-681-8023 VIOLIN: Becker 3/4, with case. $350. 360-452-3402

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Sporting Goods

DOWNRIGGERS: (2) Cannon Unitroll. New, $475. Used twice, $190. $350 for both. 683-3887. FLY RODS: 2 bamboo with extras. $450. 360-301-4721 FLY TYING EQUIP. Includes manual, vice, bobbins, hooks, threads, feathers and all, $1,000 value. Asking $600. 683-8437, leave msg. KAYAK: Riot 10’. Bought for $1,100, asking $700/obo. Call for details. 683-4042

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Bargain Box

TIRES: Studded snow, 175 SR 14. $40. 417-1593.

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Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

MOVING Sale: Thur Sat., 8-3 p.m., 63 Majesty Way. Every thing must go. All furniture: living room furniture, dinning room furniture, bedroom furniture, all must go. Stainless steel cookware, silverware, flatware all must go. Kenmore Elite glass top convection oven priced to go. Many collectable knickknacks.

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Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: STERLING SILVER Any cond. Coins, pre 1965. 360-452-8092. WANTED: Used tools for college student. 417-9204

Pets

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Marine

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Recreational Vehicles

PUPPIES: Holiday Hunt Terriers, 1 male, 1 female, cute, registered, shots. Ready now. $400 ea. 582-9006 PUPPIES: Purebred Shih-Tzu, ready now, will hold for Christmas. $500. 360-912-3855 PUPPY: Female Chihuahua, 9 months old, very good dog, paper trained, to good home only. $100 cash. 4529888, leave message. PUPPY: Jack RussellSchipperke mix, 8 wks., pad trained. $125. 457-6608. Purebred Miniature poodle pups, male excellent disposition, natural tail, cafe au lait. 6 wks on 12/13. Crate trained and 1st set of shots. $350. 461-4576 Training Classes Jan. 11. Greywolf Vet. 683-2106.

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Farm Animals

BULL: 8 mo. $550. 683-2304. HAY: Local good grass horse hay, $4.50 bale. 683-4427 PIGS: 2 bred gilts, a red Duroc-Berk, white York-BerkDuroc, $200 ea. 775-6552

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Horses/ Tack

Horse Boarding. 60x 120 indoor arena, 12x12 stalls, turnout available. Self care $275. Full care $350. Call Betsy at 360-670-6704 SADDLE: 16” men’s, heavy, Tex-Tan. $250. 681-7270.

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Farm Equipment

MISC: 3 pt. 48” box blade, $300. Grader blade, $200. Rake, $200. Rotary tiller, $600. 452-4136. MISC: Tractor, Kubota L210, 2WD, 21 hp, diesel, 265 orig. hrs, exc. shape, $2,850. 60” brush hog mower, $485. 360-681-4256

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles. LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480 RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

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Motorcycles

APOLLO: ‘07 Orion 110. Exc. cond., some riding gear. $1,000. 683-8558. HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $8500/OBO. 360-797-1254

HONDA: ‘03 150 CRF. Lots of BBR, bored to 175. $1,500. 928-9423 or 670-5282. 91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

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Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023. HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023.

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 26’ Alpenlite DL. With hitch, loaded. $4,000. 452-3402. 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Snowbird. 1 slide, like new condition. $10,000. 452-2929. CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426. CAMPER: Hydraulic jacks, gas and electric fridge, gas range and heater. Clean. $600/obo. 477-6098. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $8,900. 797-1625 MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $14,000. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itasca Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, serviced, ready to roll. $18,500. 452-2148 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry Taurus. $500. 360-681-0561 WANTED: Later model truck camper. Cash. 360-770-2410

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Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

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Pets

AKC Pembroke Welsch Corgi. 1 yr old neut. male. $450. 681-2486 Christmas Chihuahuas. Purebred Chihuahuas cute and friendly 11 weeks old one male one female. Shots wormed and paper trained. $200-$300. 360-670-3906 FREE: To good home. Male Bengal cat. Neutered, good indoor/outdoor, not with other cats. 928-3625 LHASA APSO: Christmas Puppies! Ready to go, Tuxedo and Parties, 2 litters to choose from, 5 girls, 5 boys. $300-350. 477-8349 LHASAPOOS: 2 black females, $300 ea. 477-8349 MISC: Mini pinto mare and stud, $250 and $350. Corn snakes and tank, $150. Parrot cages, $100$350. 457-9775. Old English Sheepdog Puppies. (3) males, (3) females, purebred non papered, DOB Oct. 2, very socialized, very smart, playful, adorable fluff balls. Both parents on site. $300 males, $350 females. 360-775-4182 PUPPIES: (2) male Pit Bull mix. 7 mo old, $50 each. Only serious inquiries, To good home only. 360-463-1699 PUPPIES: AKC Registered Mini-Schnauzer puppies. Born 08/14/2010. First shots, dew claws removed, tails docked. 2 males and 1 female left from litter. $350. Call 360-460-7119 PUPPIES: Black Lab, champion sired, AKC registered, great blood lines, 3 left, 11 wks. old. $350. 912-2785

FORD: ‘64 Ford 350. Dump Truck. Truck runs great! Recent upgrades such as: Rebuilt 312Y-Block, New Clutch, Battery & Hydraulic Brakes. 2 Speed Browning Manual High & Low Transmission Alternator Conversion Scale weight is 4,470 Gross weight 10k $1,900/obo. Please contact Mark at 850- 890-2783. GN 33’ FLAT-BED EQ TRAILER. $4,490. Like-new, 25ft deck includes 5’ pop-up beavertail for a flat deck, 5’ loading ramps with storage. 14,000 lbs. GVWR. MSRP $7,990. 808-5636 b6942@hotmail.com

JPM: ‘09 Raptor Cruiser. Under 1,500 mi., gray and silver, dual exhaust, dual front disc brakes, water cooled, chain drive, saddle bags, exc. condition! $2,195. 360-390-8287 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973.

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982

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QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 10 Capt. Sanders 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176 GLASPLY: ‘86 15’ Runabout. Exc. cond. $3,000. 360-461-0157

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

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SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com

CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409. DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

CHEV: ‘85 S10. 4x4, king cab, auto, canopy. Straight, dependable, clean. PS, PB, A/C, tilt, CC, AM/FM/cassette. New shocks, battery, tires. 2.8 V6. Runs great! No rust. Drive anywhere. $3,300. 360-452-7439

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213 FORD: ‘87 Super Cab manual, 4x4 and Eaton rear end. $1,000. Call after 11 a.m. 457-1457. FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘87 Econoline. New wheels/tires, very clean. $1,200 firm. 683-8249. FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157

FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 GMC: ‘97 4WD. Runs good, 140K mi. $3,000. 683-4401. GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486.

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com. NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400

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Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $6,000/obo. 457-7097 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210. CHEV: ‘91 S-10. Runs $800 461-6246

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876

FORD: '83 F-150. XLT EXT CAB, 351 manual, auxiliary fuel tank. Well maintained, runs great, canopy, tow package. $950. Call 457-1491 after 6:00 p.m. FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $5,900. 457-0655. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512.

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FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

4 Wheel Drive

QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213. RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

4 Wheel Drive

Parts/ Accessories

TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $400 ea. 683-7789

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FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929.

PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

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Cars

Abandoned Vehicle Auction In accordance with RCW 46.55.130, the following vehicles will be auctioned at 808 EAST FRONT STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 on 12/30/10 at 11:00:00 AM. Sign Up at office from 10:00 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., absolutely no late sign ups!! VIEWING AT THIS TIME. Chris’ Towing 1984 Toyota Corolla WA license #444YJW 1987 Ford P/U WA license A75329T 1997 Olds Cutlass WA license #827WQL 1981 Holiday Rambler WA license #1542ML 1982 Chev PU WA license #B69813B 1984 Volvo 4D TX license # RGY384 1988 Toyota COA4D WA license #177SQA 1993 Chev Astro WA license #978ZOC 1996 Dodge Caravan WA license #752SKU 1998 Plym NEOCP WA license #068RSG 1998 Dodge NEO4D WA license #802XHL Evergreen Towing Port Angeles 1979 Datsun 280ZX WA license #559TDK 1971 GMC PU WA license B58665H 1982 Datsun MAX4D WA license #162WQN 1984 Toyota Supra WA license #988YJV 1986 Chrysler Las2D WA license #369YJW 1987 Dodge Van MT license #4C3984E 1987 Dodge OMI4D WA license #341WGX 1988 Ford Taurus WA license #979SAE 1988 Dodge ARISW WA license #665XAQ 1988 Olds Cut2D WA license #516XAQ 1989 Mercury Cougar WA license #893YJV 1989 Ply ACC4D WA license #190SSU 1989 Subaru GLSW WA license #501RQV 1989 Chev PU WA license #B36572F 1992 Olds Cut4D WA license #667SEC 1992 Toyota Previa WA license #081SWO 1993 Ford ESC3D WA license #233PNK 1993 Honda ACD4D WA license #476WDX 1993 Pont. Grand AM WA license #195YJY 1994 Ford Explr. WA license #972YJW 1994 Volks Jet4D WA license #208YJV 1996 Jeep Che MT license #1C28638 1997 BMW M34D WA license #694YJV 1997 Dodge Caravan WA license #614VFZ 1998 Ford ESCCP WA license #205VGA 1998 Isu Rodeo WA license #112YJY 1997 Kia Sep4D WA license 734WQM Peninsula Towing 1981 Toyota PU WA license B78194N 1985 Nissan PU WA license #B53274D 1999 Pont GRMCP WA license #359XZE

Rock ‘N’ Roll.

SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510

Sell your skates and just about anything else starting at only $16.50. Reach more than 36,000 readers of the Peninsula Daily News every day!

URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

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YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

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Peninsula Daily News Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 305 West 1st St., Port Angeles Port Angeles, WA 98362 or 150 S. 5th Ave. Ste 2, Sequim NO PHONE CALLS or FAX to: (360) 417-3507

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Where buyers and sellers meet!


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

99

Cars

99

Cars

CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425.

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619. BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,200/ obo. 206-272-0220. BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327

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Cars

HONDA: ‘85 Civic Station Wagon. Needs work. $500/ obo. 360-477-0702.

CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915 CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440 CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHEV: ‘99 Monte Carlo. 84K mi. $2,000. 461-6758.

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TIPS

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Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 FORD: ‘01 Explorer Sport. 2WD, 5 sp, 126K, good cond. $3,000. 928-9430. FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403 FORD: ‘67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053 FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

101

Legals Clallam Co.

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866 LINCOLN: ‘90 Towncar. Nearly $4,000 spent on car in last 2 years. $1,700. Bill at 360-582-3727 MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204

NASH: ‘50 Statesman. Needs work, runs great, extra engine and tranny. Must sell. $3,995 or make offer. 681-0717

OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. PLYMOUTH: ‘76 Volarie. 4-door, 76k miles, slant 6, runs and looks good. $1,300/obo. 460-8271 PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909

MAZDA: ‘08 Miata GT. Black/tan, 6 sp, 8,800 mi., like new. $18,900. 452-5387. MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $3,750/ obo. 582-1292. MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,000/ obo. 360-460-0385. MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062. MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828 MERCURY: ‘97 Mystique. Needs tranny. $500/obo. 417-2130.

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619.

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

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Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

NISSAN: ‘97 Sentra. 103,648 miles. $3,500. 457-3636.

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

99

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington Chapter 61.24, et seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 28th day of January, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock a.m. in the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street in the city of Port Angeles, state of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county of Clallam, state of Washington, to-wit: Lots 5 and 6 in Block 6 of Englewood Addition to Port Angeles, as recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 115, records of Clallam County, Washington, commonly known as 2362 East Fifth Avenue, Port Angeles, Washington, which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated and recorded May 30, 1997, under Auditor's File Number 755595, records of Clallam County, Washington, from RUSSELL R. SMITH and JANELLE L. SMITH, both unmarried persons, as joint tenants with right of survivorship and not as tenants in common, Grantors, to LAND TITLE COMPANY OF KITSAP COUNTY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of FRANCIS M. CUMMINGS and MARGUERITE C. CUMMINGS, husband and wife, as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary's successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: 6 monthly payments of $271.31 each for the months of May through October 2010, inclusive: $1,627.86; 6 reserve account payments of $75.00 each for the months of May through October 2010, inclusive: $450.00; 6 late charges of $10.00 each for the months of May through October 2010, inclusive: $60.00; TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS, LATE CHARGES & OTHER ARREARAGES: $2,137.86. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $25,906.65, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from the 1st day of April, 2010, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 28th day of January, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 17th day of January, 2011(11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, the Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest, any guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest at the following address: Russell R. Smith and Janelle L. Smith, 2362 East Fifth Avenue, Port Angeles, WA 98362; Russell R. Smith and Janelle L. Smith, c/o Jamie L. Kirkman, 26312 - 171st Pl. SE, Covington, WA 98042-8362; Resident(s) of Property Subject to Foreclosure Sale, 2362 East Fifth Avenue, Port Angeles, WA 98362; by both first class and certified mail on the 27th day of August, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee. A written Notice of Default was also posted in a conspicuous place on the premises located at 2362 East Fifth Avenue, Port Angeles, Washington, on the 30th day of August, 2010, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS. The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants other than tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants other than tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. Pursuant to the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2009, a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that is purchased at the trustee’s sale, under any bona fide lease entered into before the notice of foreclosure, has the right to occupy the property until the end of the remaining term of the lease, except that the purchaser (or a successor in interest) who will occupy the property as a primary residence may terminate the lease by giving written notice to the tenant at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice. The purchaser (or a successor in interest) may give a written notice to a tenant to vacate the property at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice to a bona fide month-to-month tenant or subtenant in possession of the property, or a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property without a bona fide lease. A lease or tenancy shall be considered bona fide only if: (1) the tenant is not the mortgagor/grantor or the child, spouse, or parent of the mortgagor/grantor under the foreclosed contract/Deed of Trust; (2) the lease or tenancy was the result of an armslength transaction; and (3) the lease or tenancy requires the receipt of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property or the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a Federal, State, or local subsidy. DATED this 19th day of October, 2010. GARY R. COLLEY, Trustee, 403 South Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362, (360) 457-3327. Pub: Dec. 29, 2010, Jan. 19, 2011

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NO. 10 4 01549 9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH In Re the Estate of: DONALDSON H. GRAYBILL. Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney of record at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred., except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FILING: December 10, 2010 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 15, 2010 BRADLEY D. GRAYBILL Personal Representative ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Thomas F. McDonough Attorney at Law ADDRESS FOR MAILING 510 Bell Street Edmonds, WA 98020 (425) 778-8555 Pub: Dec. 15, 22, 29, 2010

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Case No.: 10-4-00331-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM L. CAMPBELL, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: December 15, 2010 Deborah J. Palmer Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: Dec. 15, 22, 29, 2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington Chapter 61.24, et seq. FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES v. WALSH; LOAN NO. 2012618955. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 28th day of January, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock a.m. in the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street in the city of Port Angeles, state of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county of Clallam, state of Washington, to-wit: THAT PORTION OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 6 WEST, W. M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE WEST LINE THEREOF, A DISTANCE OF 135 FEET; THENCE EAST PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE THEREOF 322 FEET; THENCE NORTH 135 FEET; THENCE WEST 322 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; AND THAT PORTION LYING EAST OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 3421 (TILLER ROAD), AS DISCLOSED BY CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 2001-1073188. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON, commonly known as 4007 South Tiller Road, Port Angeles, Washington, which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 22, 2006, and recorded December 29, 2006 under Auditor's File No. 2006-1193834, records of Clallam County, Washington, from STEPHEN D. WALSH and JOSEPHINE J. WALSH, husband and wife, Grantors, to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary's successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Partial payment of $1,392.93 for the month of December 2009: $1,392.93; 10 monthly payments of $1,826.75 each for the months of January through October 2010, inclusive: $18,267.50; 11 late charges of $91.34 each for the months of December 2009 through October 2010, inclusive: $1,004.74; Deferred late charges: $1,106.08; Other fees or charges: $45.00; TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS, LATE CHARGES & OTHER ARREARAGES: $21,816.25 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $270,072.16, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from the 1st day of December, 2009, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 28th day of January, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, the Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest, any guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Amended Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest at the following address: Stephen D. Walsh and Josephine J. Walsh, 30081 Jamaica Dunes Dr., Tehachapi, CA 93561-7427; Timothy Walsh and Kathie J. Walsh, 4007 S. Tiller Rd., Port Angeles, WA 98362, by both first class and certified mail on the 11th day of September, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee. A written Amended Notice of Default was also posted in a conspicuous place on the premises located at 4007 S. Tiller Road, Port Angeles, Washington, on the 11th day of September, 2010, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS. The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants other than tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants other than tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. Pursuant to the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2009, a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that is purchased at the trustee’s sale, under any bona fide lease entered into before the notice of foreclosure, has the right to occupy the property until the end of the remaining term of the lease, except that the purchaser (or a successor in interest) who will occupy the property as a primary residence may terminate the lease by giving written notice to the tenant at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice. The purchaser (or a successor in interest) may give a written notice to a tenant to vacate the property at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice to a bona fide monthto-month tenant or subtenant in possession of the property, or a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property without a bona fide lease. A lease or tenancy shall be considered bona fide only if: (1) the tenant is not the mortgagor/grantor or the child, spouse, or parent of the mortgagor/grantor under the foreclosed contract/Deed of Trust; (2) the lease or tenancy was the result of an arms-length transaction; and (3) the lease or tenancy requires the receipt of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property or the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a Federal, State, or local subsidy. DATED this 19th day of October, 2010. GARY R. COLLEY, Trustee, 403 South Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362, (360) 457-3327. Pub: Dec. 29, 2010, Jan. 19, 2011

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington Chapter 61.24, et seq. FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES v. TYNDALL; LOAN NO. 0328613827. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 7th day of January, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock a.m. at the main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street in the city of Port Angeles, state of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county of Clallam, state of Washington, to-wit: LOT 17, BLOCK 434, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 27, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON, commonly known as 1417 West 16th Street, Port Angeles, Washington, which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated April 24, 2002, recorded April 25, 2002, under Auditor's File Number 2002-1083946, records of Clallam County, Washington, from CHRISTINE A. TYNDALL, a single woman, Grantor, to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary's successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: 6 monthly payments of $616.86 each for the months of April through September 2010, inclusive: $3,701.16; 6 late charges of $30.84 each for the months of April through September 2010, inclusive: $185.04; TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS AND LATE CHARGES: $3,886.20 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $81,387.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from the 1st day of March, 2010, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 7th day of January, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 27th day of December 2010 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 27th day of December, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 27th day of December, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, the Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest, any guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest at the following address: Christine A. Tyndall, 1417 West 16th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98363, by both first class and certified mail on the 16th day of August, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee. A written Notice of Default was also posted in a conspicuous place on the premises located at 1417 West 16th Street, Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington, on the 16th day of August, 2010, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS. The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants other than tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants other than tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. Pursuant to the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2009, a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that is purchased at the trustee’s sale, under any bona fide lease entered into before the notice of foreclosure, has the right to occupy the property until the end of the remaining term of the lease, except that the purchaser (or a successor in interest) who will occupy the property as a primary residence may terminate the lease by giving written notice to the tenant at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice. The purchaser (or a successor in interest) may give a written notice to a tenant to vacate the property at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice to a bona fide month-to-month tenant or subtenant in possession of the property, or a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property without a bona fide lease. A lease or tenancy shall be considered bona fide only if: (1) the tenant is not the mortgagor/grantor or the child, spouse, or parent of the mortgagor/grantor under the foreclosed contract/Deed of Trust ; (2) the lease or tenancy was the result of an arms-length transaction; and (3) the lease or tenancy requires the receipt of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property or the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a Federal, State, or local subsidy. DATED this 20th day of September, 2010. GARY R. COLLEY, Trustee, 403 South Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362, (360) 457-3327. Pub: Dec. 8, 29, 2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington Chapter 61.24, et seq. FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES v. FLETCHER, LOAN NO. 0711019805. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 28th day of January, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock a.m. in the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the city of Port Townsend, state of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county of Jefferson, state of Washington, to-wit: Tract 4, of Boundary Line Adjustment recorded June 16, 1993, in Volume 418 of Deeds, page 13, under Auditor's File No. 361209, being portion of Block 39, Irving Park Addition to Port Townsend, as per plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 42, records of Jefferson County; and vacated Cedar Avenue and 7th Street abutting thereon, as vacated by Resolution No. 96-92 recorded October 21, 1992 under Auditor's File No. 354260, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington, commonly known as 108 Cape George Road, Port Townsend, Washington, which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated September 3, 2008, recorded September 8, 2008, under Auditor's File Number 537034, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from DONNA M. FLETCHER, as her separate estate, Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary's successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Partial payment of $237.59 for the month of January 2010: $237.59; 9 monthly payments of $703.38 each for the months of February through October 2010, inclusive: $6,330.42; 10 late charges of $35.17 each for the months of January through October 2010, inclusive: $351.70; Deferred late charge: $386.87; TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS AND LATE CHARGES: $7,306.58 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $108,695.97, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from the 1st day of January, 2010, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 28th day of January, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 17th day of January, 2011 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, the Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest, any guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Amended Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor or the Grantor's successor in interest at the following address: Donna M. Fletcher, 108 Cape George Road, Port Townsend, WA 98368, by both first class and certified mail on the 27th day of August, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee. A written Amended Notice of Default was also posted in a conspicuous place on the premises located at 108 Cape George Road, Port Townsend, Washington, on the 30th day of August, 2010, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS. The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants other than tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants other than tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. Pursuant to the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2009, a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that is purchased at the trustee’s sale, under any bona fide lease entered into before the notice of foreclosure, has the right to occupy the property until the end of the remaining term of the lease, except that the purchaser (or a successor in interest) who will occupy the property as a primary residence may terminate the lease by giving written notice to the tenant at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice. The purchaser (or a successor in interest) may give a written notice to a tenant to vacate the property at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice to a bona fide month-to-month tenant or subtenant in possession of the property, or a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property without a bona fide lease. A lease or tenancy shall be considered bona fide only if: (1) the tenant is not the mortgagor/grantor or the child, spouse, or parent of the mortgagor/grantor under the foreclosed contract/Deed of Trust; (2) the lease or tenancy was the result of an arms-length transaction; and (3) the lease or tenancy requires the receipt of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property or the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a Federal, State, or local subsidy. DATED this 19th day of October, 2010. GARY R. COLLEY, Trustee, 403 South Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362, (360) 457-3327. Pub: Dec. 29, 2010, Jan. 19, 2011


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Mostly cloudy and chilly.

Mostly cloudy; rain and snow at night.

The Peninsula A cold air mass will reside over the region today and temperatures will fail to get out of the 30s in most places. A rain and snow shower will occur from time to time. Drier air will filter into the Northwest Thursday and Friday, and this will result in more in the way Neah Bay Port of sunshine. However, temperatures will still be on the cold 40/31 Townsend side. Highs will remain 5-10 degrees below seasonal Port Angeles 38/30 averages. A Pacific system may bring precipitation back 38/26 over the Olympic Peninsula over the New Years’ holiSequim day weekend.

Victoria 38/28

38/28

Forks 42/27

Olympia 38/23

Everett 38/25

Seattle 39/27

Spokane 32/12

Yakima Kennewick 34/15 40/21

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

A passing shower during the morning; otherwise, chilly with clouds and sun today. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Cloudy tonight. Wind north 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility clear. Cold tomorrow with sun and some clouds. Wind east 8-16 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility clear. Friday: Chilly with periods of clouds and sun. Wind east 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet.

LaPush

6:30 a.m. 7:23 p.m. Port Angeles 8:27 a.m. 11:51 p.m. Port Townsend 10:12 a.m. ----Sequim Bay* 9:33 a.m. -----

Today

Billings 32/3

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

8.6’ 6.2’ 7.9’ 5.5’ 9.5’ --8.9’ ---

12:05 a.m. 1:15 p.m. 2:03 a.m. 4:18 p.m. 3:17 a.m. 5:32 p.m. 3:10 a.m. 5:25 p.m.

1.8’ 1.0’ 3.5’ 0.4’ 4.5’ 0.5’ 4.2’ 0.5’

7:25 a.m. 8:42 p.m. 9:03 a.m. ----1:36 a.m. 10:48 a.m. 12:57 a.m. 10:09 a.m.

8.7’ 6.2’ 7.8’ --6.6’ 9.4’ 6.2’ 8.8’

Friday

Low Tide Ht 1:06 a.m. 2:20 p.m. 3:13 a.m. 5:08 p.m. 4:27 a.m. 6:22 p.m. 4:20 a.m. 6:15 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

High Tide Ht

2.5’ 0.5’ 4.6’ -0.5’ 6.0’ -0.6’ 5.6’ -0.6’

8:22 a.m. 9:56 p.m. 1:05 a.m. 9:43 a.m. 2:50 a.m. 11:28 a.m. 2:11 a.m. 10:49 a.m.

8.9’ 6.6’ 6.4’ 7.6’ 7.7’ 9.2’ 7.2’ 8.6’

Low Tide Ht 2:09 a.m. 3:20 p.m. 4:34 a.m. 5:54 p.m. 5:48 a.m. 7:08 p.m. 5:41 a.m. 7:01 p.m.

3.0’ 0.0’ 5.4’ -1.0’ 7.0’ -1.3’ 6.6’ -1.2’

Jan 12

Jan 19

Los Angeles 60/46 El Paso 61/43

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Last

Jan 26

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 53 41 pc Baghdad 70 42 s Beijing 27 14 s Brussels 44 36 sh Cairo 75 58 sh Calgary 14 -1 sn Edmonton 2 -21 pc Hong Kong 67 57 pc Jerusalem 74 50 pc Johannesburg 80 57 t Kabul 47 20 c London 46 41 pc Mexico City 70 37 pc Montreal 26 15 pc Moscow 20 15 sn New Delhi 69 51 sh Paris 45 40 c Rio de Janeiro 81 71 pc Rome 48 37 pc Stockholm 25 14 pc Sydney 82 66 s Tokyo 49 36 s Toronto 34 24 pc Vancouver 38 26 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

HADLOCK BUILDING SUPPLY 360-385-1771 / Fax 360-385-1980 1-800-750-1771

Things to Do Continued from C3 jhaupt6@wavecable.com. Open mic — Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host. The Buzz Cafe, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Music, comedy, poetry and dance. Phone 360-681-5455.

Thursday Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www. sequimyoga.com.

Line dancing lessons — High-beginner, intermediate and advanced dancers. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Dropins welcome. $3 per class. Phone 360-681-2826. Sequim Senior Softball — Co-ed recreational league. Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for practice and pickup games. Phone John Zervos at 360681-2587.

Fronts Cold

Miami 73/62

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 44 28 c 22 19 sn 43 30 pc 54 34 pc 35 17 s 38 20 s 30 17 sf 32 3 c 26 3 pc 33 18 sn 35 24 s 34 23 c 54 31 s 46 13 c 34 34 pc 36 35 pc 32 15 sn 44 32 sn 64 50 r 52 18 c 36 35 sh 34 27 pc 40 31 sn -13 -19 pc 24 0 sn 80 69 sh 67 55 r 19 16 c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 46 54 48 60 73 34 32 46 64 37 58 38 64 66 37 55 40 46 36 50 40 38 72 62 52 34 28 38

Lo W 41 sh 35 sh 45 r 46 r 62 pc 33 pc 31 pc 36 pc 58 r 26 s 42 r 37 pc 47 s 47 sh 22 s 46 sh 30 sn 23 s 15 sn 30 r 38 r 17 sn 47 r 47 r 39 sh 33 pc 9 sn 26 s

(For the 48 contiguous states)

SAVE OVER $85*

Low: -14 at Big Piney, WY

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0C5107705

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Houston 67/55

High: 75 at Zapata, TX

2000 Watt

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Atlanta 54/34

National Extremes Yesterday

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City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

STEELE® Building partnerships since 1984

New York 37/26

Washington 38/26

Kansas City 46/41

Moon Phases Full

Detroit 34/27

Chicago 34/34 Denver 52/18

Sunset today ................... 4:28 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:04 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 2:08 a.m. Moonset today ............... 12:10 p.m. First

Minneapolis 32/31

San Francisco 52/39

Sun & Moon

Jan 4

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 39/27

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 43 36 0.00 13.99 Forks 45 35 0.16 136.34 Seattle 48 40 0.20 46.90 Sequim 44 33 0.00 10.06 Hoquiam 47 42 0.36 73.88 Victoria 42 34 0.34 36.47 P. Townsend* 43 35 0.00 16.55 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 36/28 Bellingham 39/16

Aberdeen 44/31

Peninsula Daily News

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681- port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 0226. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages Chess Club — Dungeness 7-12. Free for children younger Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. than 6. Features vintage airSequim Ave., 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 craft and aviation art. p.m. Bring clocks, sets and boards. All are welcome. Phone Puget Sound Coast Artil360-681-8481. lery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Health clinic — Free medi- Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for cal services for uninsured or children 6 to 12; free for chilunder-insured, Dungeness Val- dren 5 and younger. Exhibits ley Health & Wellness Clinic, interpret the Harbor Defenses 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 of Puget Sound and the Strait p.m.. Phone 360-582-0218. of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ Family Caregivers support olypen.com. group — 411 W. Washington St., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Phone Jefferson County HistoriCarolyn Lindley at 360-417- cal Museum and shop — 540 8554. Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Meditation class — 92 children 3 to 12; free to historiPlain Jane Lane, 6 p.m. Admis- cal society members. Exhibits sion by donation. include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Gamblers Anonymous — Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Swan and the Native AmeriRoad, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360- cans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 460-9662. 360-385-1003 or visit www. Food Addicts in Recovery jchsmuseum.org. Anonymous — Calvary ChaKiwanis Club of Port pel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. Phone 360-452-1050 or visit Townsend — Manresa Castle, Seventh and Sheridan streets, www.foodaddicts.org. noon. For more information, phone Ken Brink at 360-385Port Townsend and 1327.

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. Trivia night — One to four players per team, $8 per team. Winner takes all. Sign-up begins at 6:45 p.m. Game at 7:15 p.m. Hosted by Corey Knudson. Uptown Pub, 1016 Lawrence St. Phone 360-3851530.

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com.

Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historiParent connections — First Strength and toning exercal society members. Exhibits cise class — Sequim Com- Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 10 include “Jefferson County’s munity Church, 1000 N. Fifth a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. Thursday Maritime Heritage,” “James Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per Swan and the Native AmeriSpanish class — Prairie class. Phone Shelley Haupt at Port Townsend Aero cans” and “The Chinese in 360-477-2409 or e-mail Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Air- Early Port Townsend.” Phone port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 360-385-1003 or visit www. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 jchsmuseum.org. for seniors, $6 for children ages Rotary Club of East Jef7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage air- ferson County — Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West craft and aviation art. Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (PGn Deer Park Cinema, Valley Road, Chimacum, 11:45 13) Port Angeles (360-452Chimacum TOPS 1393 — a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch meeting, “Yogi Bear” (PG) 7176) Evergreen Coho Resort Club salad $7, meal $10. Phone Ray House, 2481 Anderson Lake Serebrin, 360-385-6544, or “The Chronicles of Narnia: n The Rose Theatre, Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visi- visit www.clubrunner.ca/Portal/ The Voyage of the Dawn Port Townsend (360tors welcome. Phone: 360-765- Home.aspx?cid=705. Treader” (PG) 385-1089) 3164. “The Fighter” (R) Northwest Maritime Cen“Little Fockers” (PG-13) “True Grit” (PG-13) East Jefferson County ter tour — Free tour of new “The Tourist” (PG-13) “The Fighter” (R) Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. headquarters. Meet docent in “Tron: Legacy” (PG) Jefferson County Chess — Dennis McGuire, Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Drive, chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 Port Townsend Public Library, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to noon. p.m. Elevators available, chiln Lincoln Theater, Port n Uptown Theater, Port Today 1220 Lawrence St., 2 p.m. to 4 Open to men 50 and older and dren welcome and pets not Angeles (360-457-7997) Townsend (360-385p.m. Learn to play or improve women 45 and older. Phone allowed inside building. Phone Port Townsend Aero 3883) Museum — Jefferson County skills. Open to all ages. Phone 360-437-5053 or 360-437-2672 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or “Gulliver’s Travels” (PG) International Airport, 195 Air- 360-385-3181. “Gulliver’s Travels” (PG) “Harry Potter and the or 360-379-5443. e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org.

Now Showing

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 29, 2010 SECTION

D

Features

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND

NOTICE Washington’s Reprocessed Car Sale

0

CARS, TRUCKS, MINIVANS, SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES AND MOTORCYCLES

$ Relish Magazine

Bengali Breakfast Grains epitomizes high-quality calories.

Exotic taste for a simple meal By Jo Marshall Relish

magazine

Cardamom is the fruit of a perennial herb related to ginger. In its native India, it’s hailed as “The Queen of Spices.” Dried pods are oblong,

typically green in color and about the size of a cranberry. Each pod contains about 20 tiny seeds, the primary source of scent and flavor. Ground cardamom loses its flavor quickly. For optimum taste, buy whole

pods. Soak them in milk and scrape the seeds into your dish. You can also grind the whole pod with a mortar and pestle or crush pods lightly and simmer them in stews or rice dishes.

Bengali Breakfast Grains Makes 6 servings 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup coarse grind bulgur 11⁄2 teaspoons fennel seeds 21⁄4 to 21⁄2 cups fatfree milk, divided 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1⁄4 teaspoon salt 1⁄2 teaspoon ground cardamom 1⁄2 teaspoon ground cinnamon Pinch nutmeg 1 cup fresh or 1⁄2 cup dried blueberries

Heat oil in a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add bulgur and fennel seeds and cook, stirring frequently, until bulgur is toasted, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in 2 cups milk, vanilla, salt and spices. Return to heat and bring just to a boil. Reduce heat to lowest simmer, cover and simmer until most, but not all, of the liquid has been absorbed, 12 to

14 minutes. Note: For softer bulgur, add another 1⁄4 cup milk and continue to cook 5 to 8 minutes. Spoon into serving dishes. Pour about 1 tablespoon milk over each serving. Garnish with blueberries. Note: If desired, use vanilla-flavored soymilk instead of regular fatfree milk and omit the vanilla extract.

DOWN Sign and Drive! With Approved Credit

around and sells them for thousands more.”

PORT ANGELES, WA — This week, a consignment of reprocessed vehicles, deed vehicles and dealer overstocks will be eliminated in what could be the largest automotive sales event in Washington’s history.

Special elimination vehicles will be clearly marked with two prices. The first price is the retail price. This is the price that you would expect to see if you went used car shopping at local car dealers. The second price is the drastically reduced elimination price. This is the price that the vehicle will be sold for. This type of pricing will make it quick and easy to find the car you want at a price you can afford. The selection of cars, trucks, minivans, sport utility vehicles and motorcycles will be huge.

Truckloads of cars, trucks, minivans, sport utility vehicles and motorcycles from around the Northwest have been assembled on the property of Koenig Chevrolet Subaru, 3501 E. Highway 101 (across from Walmart), in Port Angeles for this special 5-day event with over 150 vehicles to choose from. During this sale, financing assistance will not be a problem. Local banks, finance companies and credit groups have agreed to help buyers finance these vehicles regardless of past credit history.

Buyers will find best-selling models from Chevrolet, Ford, Dodge, Buick, GMC, and Cadillac. Popular import models from Subaru, Mercedes, Kia, Hyundai, Honda, Toyota and Nissan, as well as scooters and motorcycles by Honda, Vespa, Piaggio, Moto Guzzi and Harley Davidson will also be available. There will be approximately 20 vehicles priced below $8,995 to choose from.

According to the Event Finance Director, because all of the vehicles will be sold below the Kelley Blue Book value, little to no down payment will be necessary to obtain preferred financing. Even buyers with less than perfect credit will be able to obtain on-the-spot credit approval. This is a great opportunity to get a fantastic price and get the best financing terms available.

If you or anyone that you know is in the market for a great car, truck, minivan, sport utility vehicle, scooter or motorcycle, then you need to make plans to attend this special sale this week.

The Event Coordinator for this event said, “We will help the banks and finance companies by selling these vehicles. Banks would prefer selling to the general public at a great price rather than taking them to private auctions where the dealer buys them and turns

This special event will be held for 5 days only beginning this Monday, Dec 27th. Doors open at 8:30 AM. For further information, buyers are encouraged to call the Reprocessed Sale Hotline at:

800-786-8041 opt.#1

0

Ask for the Repro Department to reserve your car now!

$ Relish Magazine

Creamy Braising Greens Soup uses kale, a dynamo, nutritious green.

By Jo Marshall Relish

magazine

Kale’s vibrant, ruffled leaves are almost too pretty to eat — but never push it aside as a mere garnish. Nutritionally, kale is a

dynamo. A member of the brassica family that includes cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, kale has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Look for crisp leaves, store in the coldest place in

the fridge and use quickly for best flavor. Kale is sturdier than spinach and holds up well in soups and stews. It can be sauteed, used in pasta sauces, casseroles and frittatas, and added raw to salads.

Creamy Braising Greens Soup Serves 10 1⁄2 1⁄4

cup heavy cream teaspoon hot sauce (optional) 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt Finely ground black pepper

quently, until sausage is lightly browned, about 5 to 8 minutes. Add potatoes and broth; stir to combine. Bring to a boil over medium heat. _______ Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, stirring Saute bacon in a large occasionally, until potapot or Dutch oven over medium heat until crisp. toes are fork tender, Remove bacon with a about 15 minutes. Add greens and cream slotted spoon and set and continue to simmer aside, reserving dripuntil soup is thoroughly pings in pan. heated, about 5 minutes. Add onion and carrot Add hot sauce, if to pan; cook over medium heat until soft and trans- using. Add salt and pepper. lucent, stirring occasionLadle into soup bowls ally. and garnish with Add garlic and saureserved bacon. sage; cook, stirring fre-

With Approved Credit

KOENIG CHEVROLET SUBARU

3501 E. HIGHWAY 101, PORT ANGELES, WA

800-786-8041 PAY UP TO

*$100000 * VALID THROUGH FRIDAY, DEC. 31, 2010

ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS & 00/00 CNTS

GOOD TOWARD THE PURCHASE OF ANY PRE-OWNED VEHICLE IN STOCK*

Authorized Signature

* Good toward the purchase of any pre-owned vehicle in stock over $5,999. Must be signed by authorized signer to be valid. Only one coupon allowed per purchase. Not good with any other offers or advertised specials. Not negotiable for cash. Expires at close of business Friday, Dec 31, 2010.

WASHINGTON’S REPROCESSED CAR & MOTORCYCLE SALE MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

DEC 27 DEC 28 DEC 29 DEC 30 DEC 31

KOENIG

CHEVROLET SUBARU OF PORT ANGELES 3501 E. Highway 101, Port Angeles, WA 98362 WASHINGTON’S REPROCESSED CAR SALE

150 vehicles

WILL BE SOLD STARTING AS LOW AS

99

$

PER MO.**

**Limit two vehicles per household. With approved credit. Example: 2002 Chevrolet Trailblazer selling price: $5,125 plus tax, license and a negotiable doc fee of $150 down, financed for 60 months, 4.7% APR on approval of credit, total of payments $5,940. Additional down payment may be required for credit approval. Subject to credit approval and prior sale. Subject to lender’s final approval. ‡Used vehicles. °Acceptance does not mean approval. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only.

peninsuladailynews.com

0C5107581

1 slice thick-cut bacon, diced 1 large onion, peeled and diced 1 large carrot, peeled and diced 2 garlic cloves, minced 1⁄2 pound sausage, dried chorizo or smoked sausage, diced 6 medium potatoes, peeled and diced 71⁄2 cups reducedsodium chicken broth 21⁄2 cups mixed braising greens, such as kale, Swiss chard, mustard greens and dandelion greens, thoroughly washed, stems removed and cut into very fine strips

Sign and Drive!

WASHINGTON’S REPROCESSED CAR SALE

NOT A CHECK

Popular vegetable sweetens soup

DOWN

TRUCKLOADS OF CARS, TRUCKS, MINIVANS, SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES, AND MOTORCYCLES ASSEMBLED FROM AROUND THE NORTHWEST AND DISCOUNTED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE!


D2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Appreciation event scheduled in Sequim Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Readers Theatre Plus will hold its annual appreciation event at the Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road, at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 9. Certificates stating the gratitude of the group to those who participated in the previous year’s activities will be handed out. All those who have ushered, performed, donated to a silent auction, sold raffle

tickets and filled other roles for Readers Theatre Plus are asked to attend. A display of the group’s productions and accomplishments will be shown. Refreshments will be served. A new activity at this year’s event will be an open reading event. Anyone who would like to participate as an actor, director, stage manager, playwright or just have a hand in deciding what Readers Theatre Plus will

present is welcome to come. Those with original plays are asked to select a scene of no more than 10 minutes. Those submitting should make enough copies for all cast members in that scene plus one for the director. Those copies and the entire script must be given to board Chairwoman Carol Swarbrick Dries by Jan. 7. For more information, phone Dries at 360-6813862.

Coast Guard Auxiliary holds change of watch Peninsula Daily News

PORT LUDLOW — Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 41 recently held its annual change of watch ceremony. Flotilla Cmdr. Richard Moore of Brinnon handed over command to Ian McFall, who served as the flotilla’s vice commander this year. Under Moore’s leadership, the flotilla has been the most active unit in U.S. Coast Guard District IV, which includes flotillas in Port Angeles, Port Ludlow, Port Townsend, Bainbridge Island and Bremerton, with detachments in Brinnon and Forks. Flotilla 41 conducted the most marine patrols, vessel safety examinations, search and rescue, and training missions in the division. Moore was also responsible for establishing the

Briefly . . . Photographer to present visual tour PORT ANGELES — Photographer David Woodcock will present a visual aerial tour of the North Olympic Peninsula at a Newcomers Club meeting at the Red Lion Inn, 221 N. Lincoln St., on Tuesday. Woodcock took the photos used in the book From the Air: Olympic Peninsula. Social hour begins at 11:30 a.m. with a luncheon set for noon. Members and visitors should RSVP by Thursday to 360-775-8747.

Market open PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Farmers Market will be open for business at The Gateway transit center, corner of Front and Lincoln streets, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

detachment in Brinnon, where the flotilla now has three privately owned boats that are equipped as auxiliary facilities to conduct qualified operations under orders from the Coast Guard. The flotilla has 49 members, 19 boats — including 10 kayaks — and one radio station. Simeon Baldwin will serve as vice commander. Flotilla staff officers for 2011 are: ■  David Aho — marine safety and environmental protection. ■  John Ammeter — communications. ■  Simeon Baldwin — paddle craft operations. ■  Al Burgan — public education. ■  Mark Gibson — communications services. ■  Steve Hyman — marina/marine industry liaison.

■  Robert Knutson — vessel safety examinations. ■  Ian McFall — public affairs. ■  Dee Meek — operations. Meek — ■  Sara finance. ■  Kevin Ryan — personnel services. ■  Ed Taylor — information systems. ■  Herman Voss — aids to navigation services. ■  Peggy Welker — secretary. ■  Brett Oemichen — member training. ■  Gene Thompson — materials acquisition. Members of the public who are interested in joining the auxiliary should e-mail Kevin Ryan at kcryan@ecryan.com. Applicants must be older than 18. Flotilla 41 meets at the Port Ludlow Fire Station at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month.

Kits for book clubs looking for their next good read are available from the Jefferson County and Port Townsend libraries.

Jefferson, PT libraries offer book club kits Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County and Port Townsend public libraries are offering kits to help book clubs searching for their next good read. Clubs can choose from current titles like The Big Burn by Timothy Egan or The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein as well Hula” will be held at the “We think there is no better way to start off the Port Angeles Senior Center, as favorites like Atonement by Ian McEwan and Angle new year than to make a 328 E. Seventh St., from of Repose by Wallace commitment to yourself to 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on six Stegner. take better care of your consecutive Tuesdays from body by eating healthier Jan. 4 to Feb. 8. Plastic tote foods,” said Cynthia Warne, The class will explore market manager. The book club kits are the history and traditions “The beginning of a new packaged in a plastic tote. of ancient hula, including year is a great time to try One member of the club Hawaiian language, chantnew things, and that checks out the book club kit ing and dancing to the includes switching from and is responsible for disprepackaged and fast foods sound of the ipu, a Hawai- tributing the books and ian gourd instrument. to more nutritious food then returning the kit with choices made from scratch. No experience or ability the books to the library. “The dark winter is necessary to participate months are perfect for ven- in this class. turing into the homeIt is taught by Barbara cooked-meal arena because Kaleialohonalani Lott, a standing around a stove is graduate of Halau Ha'a a warm and comfortable Hula 'o Kekau'ilani na Pua place to be,” she said. Hala 'o Kailua, a tradi“We have everything you need to begin enjoying tional hula school that was Peninsula Daily News the benefits of local organic led by the late Lani Kalama of Kailua, Oahu. foods.” PORT TOWNSEND — For more information, The fee for the six-week Jefferson County Residents phone Warne at 360-460class is $60, or $54 for Port for Transit meets at Under0361 or visit www.port Angeles Senior Center town, 211 Taylor St., at angeles farmersmarket.com. members. 7:30 a.m. Monday mornFor more information or ings. Ancient hula set to register, phone 360-417The citizens group sup1613. ports the upcoming sales PORT ANGELES — “The World of Ancient Peninsula Daily News tax proposition to help fund

Kits are available for an eight-week-long checkout, allowing time for a club to distribute and read the book. Club members may place a hold on a title or visit a library and search to find available titles.

Available titles For a list of titles, search “Book Club Kit” in the subject field in the CLAN library catalog accessible at www.jclibrary.info or www. ptpubliclibrary.org. New kits will be added during the year. The libraries’ staffs recognize that some clubs plan their reading schedules months in advance, but they are not able to schedule holds on titles into the future at this time.

Holds can be placed and put in a suspended status to help manage availability.

Guides and information For reader’s guides with author information and questions, library staff recommend visiting a book publisher’s website, author’s website, www.reading groupguides.com or www. bookbrowse.com. For more information, phone Meredith Wagner at Jefferson County Library at 360-385-6544 or Cris Wilson at Port Townsend Public Library at 360-3794441. Jefferson County Library is located at 620 Cedar Ave. in Port Hadlock. Port Townsend Public Library is at 1220 Lawrence St. in Port Townsend.

PT pro-Transit group meets Mondays; supports Prop 1

McPhee’s Grocery

The Peninsula Daily News wants to congratulate North Olympic Peninsula businesses celebrating anniversaries in January. On Jan. 7th, we will publish a FREE ad listing the businesses who respond to this special event by Jan. 3rd. Is your business having an anniversary later this year? You can use this coupon now to let us know the date.

We’d like to help you celebrate! During your anniversary month, you can run an ad at the following discount prices: (One time only – any day of the week. No variations of size or price) PDN 115105052

0C5105422

(360) 417-3541 • FAX (360) 417-3507 • 1-800-826-7714

Kevin Tracy

Financial Planner - FSC Securities Corporation

1051⁄2 East First Street, Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-9080

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Get a head start on your New Year’s resolutions today Sign up for a Community Education class at Peninsula College. Take Back Your Yard With

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proposition will not only keep our vital public transportation service accessible on a daily basis, it will allow Jefferson Transit to maintain and grow its regional three-county connection with access to both the Olympic Peninsula and the [Interstate 5] corridor.” Donations for the campaign can be mailed to Jefferson County Residents for Transit, 1044 Water St., No. 356, Port Townsend, WA 98368.

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Jefferson County Transit. The Transit Authority Board authorized placing Proposition 1 on the Feb. 8 ballot, citing the need to increase sales tax 0.3 percent in order to maintain Jefferson Transit’s current service levels. “Without a majority yes vote on the sales tax Proposition 1, Transit will have to eliminate Sunday service, including Dial-A-Ride,” said campaign Chair Tim Caldwell. “Passing the sales tax

Community’s College


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Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

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PEAK Leadership has list of class projects Peninsula Daily News

The PEAK Leadership group recently announced the regional impact smallgroup projects for its 20102011 PEAK Leadership class. The projects include the development of Phase 2 of a regional small-business economic emergency preparedness plan submitted by the Peninsula Development District, as well as a regional health care assessment submitted by Olympic Medical Center that answers questions concerning the recruiting and retaining of physicians on the North Olympic Peninsula. The small-group projects are a prerequisite to graduating from the PEAK Leadership Program. This year’s PEAK Lead-

ership class marks the third class of leaders since the program’s inception in September 2008. PEAK Class III, which distinguishes itself as the “Tri-PEAK Tribe,” includes the following residents from Jefferson and Clallam counties: ■  Small Group on Regional Small Business Economic Emergency Preparedness: Kathleen Haney, Clallam Bay, homemaker; co-owner, Eklektas Interior Design, Market Place & Learning Center; Ellen Matheny, Forks, education outreach for the Olympic Natural Resources Center; Nate Holmes, Port Townsend, city of Port Townsend police officer; Kevin Short, Chimacum, beef sales manager of Short’s Family Farm.

■  Small group on Physician Recruitment: Pat Bello, Neah Bay, Makah community health representative; Jayapax Banwell, Port Townsend, Local 2020 Community Action volunteer; Susan Hillgren, Port Angeles, self-employed; founder and executive director of The Answer for Youth Drop-in Center; Robert Whipple, Agnew, assistant professor for the California State University Dominguez Hills online program. The mission of the PEAK Program is to foster community leaders who are purposeful, effective, authentic and who exemplify the keystone of quality leadership. For more information, visit www.peak leadershipnw.net or e-mail info@peakleadershipnw.net.

Olympic Community Action Programs’ Janet Anderson, middle, accepts a donation of 1,000 prepaid calling cards from Michelle Kelley, left, and Ellen Crockett of the Olympic Peninsula Chapter of the American Red Cross.

1,000 calling cards donated Peninsula Daily News

The Olympic Peninsula Chapter of the American Red Cross recently donated 1,000 prepaid calling cards to Olympic Community Action Programs clients. The gift was made pos-

sible by a partnership between the American Red Cross and Sprint Nextel. The cards will help OlyCAP clients keep in touch with family or make appointments for health care or employment opportunities.

Each card has 250 prepaid minutes for domestic long-distance usage. OlyCAP staff are working on plans to distribute the cards to people in need throughout Jefferson and Clallam counties.

Briefly . . . Students give Salvation Army $500 PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Christian School student council recently donated the proceeds from its student store to the Salvation Army’s Adopt a Family program. The student council operates a small store that sells school supplies, baked goods and more at lunchtime. The $500 the students raised went to purchase gifts of clothes and toys for a family with two children, a box full of food and a $75 gift card from Safeway.

Hilary Gonia, middle, receives a $1,500 continuing education grant from the Philanthropic Education Organization’s Lucille Schmitt, left, chairwoman of the Education Committee, and Dottie Foster, committee member.

Dean’s list made SEATTLE — Paige Witherow made the fall quarter dean’s list at the University of Washington after earning a 3.67 gradepoint average. To qualify for the quarterly dean’s list, students must be pursuing their first undergrad- Witherow uate degree and attain a quarterly grade-point average of 3.5 or higher. Witherow is studying international relations in the Political Science Department and working

Olympic Christian School student council members, from left, Lily Robertson, Annie Robertson, Hailey Newton, Hollund Bailey and Lora Rudzinski buy gifts at Walmart for their adopted family. Student council members not pictured are Jeff DeWees, Kelsey Brown and Anthony Barcellos. on prerequisites for law school. She is a 2010 graduate of Port Angeles High School.

Methodists meet PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles United Methodist Women will meet in the parlor of the church, 110 E. Seventh St., at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 5. George Rodes, director

of the Mount Angeles Unit of the Boys & Girls Clubs, will thank the women’s group for its $500 donation and will discuss the mission of the organization. All women are invited. For more information, phone 360-452-8971.

Food policy council PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Food Policy Council organizing committee will meet at the Port Angeles Library, 2210

S. Peabody St., from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 6. Discussion topics will include the council’s mission and organizational structure and initial reports on possible policy issues such as community gardens, meat processing and county regulatory review. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, phone Mark Ozias at 360681-2004.

Grant given

Contra dance

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles Chapter IV of the Philanthropic Education Organization presented Hilary Gonia with a $1,500 Program for Continuing Education grant. The grant is for women who have returned to college and are within two years of completing their course of study. Gonia is working toward an associate of science degree with an emphasis in environmental science at Peninsula College. She plans to graduate in June 2012. Gonia works as a barista at the Cracked Bean Coffee Co.

PORT TOWNSEND — The monthly second-Saturday contra dance will be held at Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., from 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8. Airstream Travelers will be playing tunes from both north and south. Wisconsin resident Tim Jenkins will be calling contras and related sets for the dance. Cost is $6 for adults, $3 for 18 and younger. For more information, visit www.ptcommunity dance.blogspot.com or e-mail edavidt@gmail.com. Peninsula Daily News

Olympic Medical Center offers free cardiac, pulmonary prevention lectures in January Peninsula Daily News

Olympic Medical Center has released its schedule of free cardiac and pulmonary prevention and management education lectures for Port Angeles and Sequim in January. All lectures will be from noon to 1 p.m. Port Angeles event

attendees should checkin at the Cardiac Services Department, First Floor East, Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St. The Port Angeles schedule is: ■  “Diabetics’ Risk of Heart Disease” on Wednesday, Jan. 5. ■  “Irregular Heart Beats? When to be Con-

cerned” on Wednesday, Jan. 12. Your ■  “Maximize Lung Care” on Friday, Jan. 21. Heart ■  “Basic Healthy Nutrition” on Monday, Jan. 31. Sequim event attendees should check in at the Cardiac Services Department on the second floor of the

OMC Medical Services Building, 840 N. Fifth Ave. The Sequim schedule is: with ■  “De-stress Chair Yoga” on Friday, Jan. 7. ■  “Reduce the Damage Done by Hardened Arteries” on Friday, Jan. 14. ■  “The Relationship of High Blood Pressure

and Heart Failure” on Tuesday, Jan. 18. ■  “How to Exercise for Long-term Health” on Wednesday, Jan. 26. Following each educational session, there will be an explanation of cardiac rehab, pulmonary rehab and “Healthy U,” Olympic Medical Center’s new heart program.

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PORT ANGELES — The schedule of slide shows for the fifth annual Adventure Travel Series has been released. The series is presented by the Peninsula Trails Coalition All slide shows are held at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., on Fridays and start at 7 p.m. The schedule is: ■  Elston and Jackie Hill present “Midway Atoll, A Most Unusual Wildlife Preserve” on Jan. 7. ■  Steve Hauff, “Building the Spruce Railroad” on Jan. 14. Wegmann, ■  John “Travels in Mongolia: From the Gobi to the Taiga Forest” on Jan. 21. ■  Hal Everett, “The World Underwater” on

Jan. 28, about the oceans of the Pacific Northwest, Caribbean, southeast Pacific and the southwest PacificIndian Ocean regions. Admission is $5, with children 12 and younger free. Proceeds from the series buy supplies and lunches for volunteers working on the Olympic Discovery Trail. For more information on the slide shows, phone 360452-8641 or 360-808-4223.

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Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . OSU student from Sequim on honor roll CORVALLIS, Ore. — Robert H. Blenk of Sequim was named to the Scholastic Honor Roll at Oregon State University for his academic performance during the fall term. Blenk is a sophomore majoring in zoology. The list requires a 3.5 or higher grade-point average.

Master’s degree SEATTLE — Former Port Angeles resident

Liane McGarvie recently received a master’s degree in business administration through online courses of the University of Maryland. She also holds a master’s degree in health care administration. McGarvie is a 1989 graduate of Crescent High School and is employed as a patient safety specialist at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle.

Marines sworn in PORT ANGELES — The Mount Olympus Detachment of the Marine Corps League recently installed its 2011 officers.

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The newly sworn-in are Commandant Mark Schildknecht; Senior Vice Commandant John Spriggs; Junior Vice Commandant Jeremy Johnson; and Judge Advocate Tom Flanik. The league recently helped with the Toys for Tots program at various locations in Port Angeles and Sequim. Its members thank the donors of toys and cash who made it another successful year for this project. One of the goals for 2011 is to increase membership. The league meets at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., at 6 p.m. the last Tuesday of each month. For more information, phone 360-417-9144 or Installer Terry Roth, left, delivers an oath to Mount Olympus Detachment 360-582-0271. of the Marine Corps League officers, from second to left, Mark Peninsula Daily News Schildknecht, Jeremy Johnson, John Spriggs and Tom Flanik.

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