Issuu on Google+

Valuable coupons inside today

Y A D N SU

Sun appears this afternoon C14

Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

$1.25 Sunday

October 3, 2010

Revamp back in business

Poultry lucky to be alive

Downtown plans revived following series of festivals By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

Julie McCormick/for Peninsula Daily News

Mark Pokorny of Dabob Road east of Quilcene holds the young turkey attacked by a bear. Son Erik, 11, left, holds one of the family’s two dozen chickens. One chicken was killed in the bear raid.

When animals attack ‘Boost’ of bears, cougars seen in populated areas

‘Heck broke loose’ with scuffle in Quilcene coop

By Paige Dickerson

By Paige Dickerson

and

Peninsula Daily News

Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

A

  beekeeper living near Hooker and Olson roads west of Sequim is surprised to find two of his hives smashed and telltale bear tracks in the mud. State Fish and Wildlife agents shoot three cougars after three goats were found dead on the forested edge of Bridgehaven south of Port Ludlow, an area of the Toandos Peninsula where cougars had not been known to hunt. A Port Angeles man kills a cougar after it preyed on two goats on his property about three-fourths of a mile southeast of the town’s eastside Safeway. In Quilcene, a bear breaks into a chicken coop, killing a chicken and mauling a turkey. Those are just a few of the reports of close encounters with black bears and cougars on the North Olympic Peninsula that have poured into the state Fish and Wildlife Department within the past year, said Sgt. Phillip Henry, who oversees Clallam and Jefferson counties. “We’ve had a real boost in the last year or so” of bear and cougar complaints, Henry said last week. He estimated some 60 bear reports since October 2009, compared to a usual annual two dozen, and some 40 reports of cougars in the same period of time. Turn

to

and

Leah Leach

S

ome recent reports of close encounters with bears and cougars are from the fringes of populated areas — where, in some cases, the wild animals haven’t been seen before. The following reports are examples of what Sgt. Phillip Henry of the state Fish and Wildlife Department, called a “huge influx” of complaints on the North Olympic Peninsula within the last year. Mark Pokorny was asleep in his Quilcene home on Dabob Road on Sept. 23 when he was awakened at about 2:30 a.m. by the sounds of a scuffle in his poultry coop. “All heck broke loose,” he said. “We have five turkeys in there in addition to the chickens, and there was clucking and gobbling.” One chicken was killed and one turkey was severely injured before Pokorny’s 130-pound Anatolian shepherd dog, Das, chased the bear up a tree. Das managed to chase the bear off again Wednesday night when it crept onto the property. “We’ve seen a bear and bear signs before,” Pokorny said. “But we’ve never had one come that close to the house.

Boost/A6

Turn

to

Attack/A6

PORT TOWNSEND — Now that all the annual festivals are over, the city of Port Townsend will turn its attention toward the downtown development projects that were put on hold to accommodate the seasonal tourist influx. This week, city officials will begin mapping out a schedule for the completion of a variety of continuing projects that will change the complexion of the north end of town, development director Rick Sepler said. City officials had Sepler hoped in midsummer to have projects ready in time for the Wooden Boat Festival Sept. 9-11. They had hoped to have the more than $1.2 million Pope Marine Park finished, the restored Wave Gallery open to the public, the downtown visitor center complete and the Tidal Clock turned into a small amphitheater. It was clear by mid-August these projects would not be completed before the boat festival, or even the Port Townsend Film Festival on Sept. 24-26 or this weekend’s Kinetic Sculpture Race. So officials had to be satisfied with opening up the sidewalk along Water Street in front of Pope Marine Park. That sidewalk, now concrete, will be resurfaced with asphalt.

Wave Gallery One project that was finished was shoring up the Wave Gallery’s foundation, through replacing rotting wood supports with steel pilings. The total project cost for the Wave Gallery was estimated to be $530,412. The project is partially funded by a $265,206 Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation grant from state Fish and Wildlife’s Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account. The Wave Gallery can now support people, although the stairs and ramps that will provide access have not been constructed. Turn

Officials press sales tax measure

they float

Peninsula Daily News

Hundreds of onlookers watch as kinetic “skulptures” drift around Port Townsend Bay off the Northwest Maritime Center dock on Saturday to demonstrate their floating abilities to compete in the 28th annual Kinetic Skulpture Race, to be held in Port Townsend at “low noon” today. There are 21 official entrants in the race, which also runs over land, including a mud bog.

PORT TOWNSEND — One month before Election Day, Jefferson County officials’ trumpeting of the merits of a 0.3 percent sales tax increase on the Nov. 2 ballot is in high gear. “We are conducting an informational campaign,” said County Administrator Philip Morley. “We are telling people that if they pass this measure it will save certain programs. If they do not, these programs will not get funded.” Morley said that he “hopes that we don’t have to make those cuts,” but that’s the closest he will come to a statement of support. to

Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News

Measure/A7

2010 T! SUBARU

EOU CLOS

FORESTER 2.5X

94th year, 230th issue — 7 sections, 76 pages

19,875

$

STK#9516

Since 1975

Prices do not include tax, license and documentation fees. Vehicles are one only and subject to prior sale. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. VINs posted at dealership. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 10/10/10.

0A5098959

www.koenigsubaru.com

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News

SPECIAL EDITION

KOENIG Subaru 3501 Hwy. 101 E., Port Angeles 457-4444 • 800-786-8041

Downtown/A7

99.44% sure

By Charlie Bermant

Turn

to

Model Code AFA

Business/Politics C8 Classified D1 Clubs/Organizations XY Commentary/Letters A8 Couples *PW Dear Abby C5 Deaths C7 Movies C6 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

Puzzles/Games Sports Things To Do Weather

D10 B1 C6 C14


A2

UpFront

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad on the Internet at www.peninsuladailynews.com or e-mail: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe via the Internet at www.peninsuladailynews.com, or by e-mail: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday

Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Buy PDN Photos Online” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Singer Mars faces felony drug charges Bruno Mars, singer of the hit R&B song “Just the Way You Are,” faces a felony cocaine charge Mars stemming from his arrest after a performance at a Las Vegas nightclub last month. The Clark County district attorney’s office filed a criminal complaint Friday alleging the rising singersongwriter had 2.6 grams of cocaine when he was arrested Sept. 19 after being detained by a hotel security guard. Mars, whose real name is Peter Hernandez, is due in court Nov. 18 on the possession of a controlled substance charge. If convicted, he faces up to four years in prison and a $5,000 fine. After a show in Las Vegas, a bathroom attendant told police Hernandez was taking a long time in a stall with a bag of a white, powdered substance, according to the arrest report. The attendant alerted a security guard, who confronted Hernandez as he left the stall. The security guard said he asked Hernandez to hand over any narcotics he had, and Hernandez

The Associated Press

Farm Aid

still rocking

Dave Matthews performs during the 25th anniversary Farm Aid concert Saturday in Milwaukee. removed a bag of cocaine from his left-front jeans pocket, the arrest report said.

Stamos statement Actor John Stamos can’t make it to federal court in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula next week, but he still wants to be Stamos heard.

Federal prosecutors are asking a judge to allow them to read a statement from Stamos when two people are sentenced Friday for trying to extort $680,000 from him. In July, Allison Coss and Scott Sippola were found guilty of conspiracy and using e-mail to threaten a person’s reputation. They were accused of demanding money from Stamos in exchange for turning over embarrassing photos of him.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL THURSDAY’S QUESTION: How certain are you that there’s life like ours on other planets? Absolutely certain  Mostly certain 

22.6% 17.5%

Somewhat certain  Doubtful 

17.6%

20.6%

No life out there  Don’t know 

10.7%

11.0%

Total votes cast: 979 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Passings Setting it Straight

By The Associated Press

Stephen J. Cannell, 69, the voracious writer-producer of dozens of series that included TV favorites “The Rockford Files,” “The A-Team” and “The Commish,” died at his home in Pasadena, Calif., on Thursday night from complications associated with melanoma, his family said in a statement on Friday. During three decades as an independent producer, he was generally identified with action dramas full of squealing tires and tough guys trading punches. But his range was greater than for which he was given credit. “Tenspeed and Brown Shoe” was a clever detective drama starring Ben Vereen and a thenunknown Jeff Goldblum in 1980. “Profit” was a shocking saga of a psycho businessman that was unforgettable to the few viewers who saw it: Fox pulled the plug after just four episodes in 1996. With “Wiseguy” (198790), Mr. Cannell chilled

viewers with a filmnoir descent into the underworld that predated “The Sopranos” by more Mr. Cannell than a in 1999 decade. He was a producer of the feature film updating “The A-Team,” released earlier this year.

________

Joseph Sobran, 64, a hard-hitting conservative writer and moralist whose outspoken antipathy to Israel and what he saw as the undue influence of a Jewish lobby on American foreign policy led to his removal as a senior editor of National Review in 1993, died on Thursday in Fairfax, Va. Mr. Sobran was a paleoconservative, opposed to military intervention

abroad, big government at home and moral permissiveness everywhere. Unlike many of his colleagues, he took little interest in electoral politics or the machinery of government. At the same time, he nourished a libertarian streak that gradually took over, eventually pushing him to declare himself an anarchist.

Did You Win? State lottery results

■  Friday’s Daily Game: 7-7-8 (seven, seven, eight) ■  Friday’s Keno: 06-09-10-12-14-25-31-3236-40-41-44-48-51-53-6368-75-76-80 ■  Friday’s Match 4: 02-03-13-22 ■  Friday’s Mega Millions: 03-08-21-28-52, Mega Ball: 43 ■  Saturday’s Daily Game: 8-7-9 ■  Saturday’s Hit 5: 05-10-14-28-33 Seen Around ■  Saturday’s Keno: Peninsula snapshots 07-12-13-14-16-22-27-33CAR DRIVEN DOWN 42-45-51-52-58-62-66-6774-77-78-79 a Sequim street with a ■  Saturday’s Lotto: Laugh Lines purse atop the roof . . . 05-07-09-17-40-46 WANTED! “Seen Around” ■  Saturday’s Match Why did the cowboy items. Send them to PDN News 4: 07-13-20-22 buy a dachshund? ■  Saturday’s PowerSomeone told him to get Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or a long little doggy. e-mail news@peninsuladailynews. ball: 12-20-30-36-47, PowYour Monologue com. erball: 25, Power Play: 4

Corrections and clarifications

■  The city of Port Angeles is seeking volunteers for a variety of roles. A headline on a story on Page A5 Friday said that the city sought volunteers only for its recreation division.

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago) Saying that the heavy accumulation of business at the main office makes the move absolutely necessary, Sheriff Charles Kemp announced that he is moving his West End deputy, Walter Holenstine, from Forks to Port Angeles. Kemp said his office has had to let many matters “slide” because of the limited force. He expressed regrets at having to take away the West End deputy because “there is plenty to do out there.” Holenstine, said Kemp, has brought in more than his salary in fines paid by the offenders he has arrested.

in the game, broke a 6-6 tie to defeat a fighting Port Townsend squad 12-6 at Civic Field in Port Angeles. More than 2,000 fans witnessed the 70th meeting of the two schools since 1911.

1985 (25 years ago)

Unemployment on the North Olympic Peninsula hit a six-year low in August, dropping to 9.4 percent in Clallam County and 7.2 percent in Jefferson County. But the dip reflects a shrinking labor force rather than an increase in jobs, said Ron Wahlers, chief economist for the Employment Security Department in Olympia. Before the latest unem1960 (50 years ago) ployment figures, the most recent lowest percentages The Port Angeles High were in August 1979: 9.5 School football team, scoring on a four-yard dive play percent for Clallam and 6.8 with less than two minutes percent for Jefferson.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

Today is Sunday, Oct. 3, the 276th day of 2010. There are 89 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Oct. 3, 1990, West Germany and East Germany ended 45 years of postwar division, declaring the creation of a reunified country. On this date: ■  In 1789, President George Washington declared Nov. 26, 1789, a day of Thanksgiving to express gratitude for the creation of the United States of America. ■  In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day. ■  In 1929, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes for-

mally changed its name to the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. ■  In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Office of Economic Stabilization. ■  In 1951, the New York Giants captured the National League pennant by a score of 5-4 as Bobby Thomson hit a three-run homer off the Brooklyn Dodgers’ Ralph Branca in the “shot heard ’round the world.” ■  In 1960, “The Andy Griffith Show” premiered on CBS television. ■  In 1962, astronaut Wally Schirra blasted off from Cape Canaveral aboard the Sigma 7 on a nine-hour flight. ■  In 1970, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) was established

under the Department of Commerce. ■  In 1995, the jury in the O.J. Simpson murder trial found the former football star not guilty of the 1994 slayings of his former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and Ronald Goldman (however, Simpson was later found liable in a civil trial). ■  In 2008, O.J. Simpson was found guilty of robbing two sportsmemorabilia dealers at gunpoint in a Las Vegas hotel room. (Simpson was later sentenced to nine to 33 years in prison.) ■  Ten years ago: In their first debate of the 2000 race for the White House, Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush clashed over tax cuts, Medicare prescription drug benefits and

campaign finance. ■  Five years ago: President George W. Bush nominated White House counsel Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court (however, she withdrew three weeks later after criticism over her lack of judicial experience and Republican concerns about her conservatism). A Russian space capsule with American tourist Gregory Olsen aboard docked with the international space station. ■  One year ago: Iran’s president hit back at President Barack Obama’s accusation that his country had sought to hide its construction of a new nuclear site, arguing that Tehran had reported the facility to the U.N. even earlier than required.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 3, 2010

Second Front Page

Page

A3

Briefly: Nation Refueling hose falls from plane onto house

It was the GOP’s latest move to expand a playing field already heavily tilting its way. In the one-month dash to Election Day, both parties are zeroing in on races they have the best chances of winning, SAN DIEGO — A 75-foot recalibrating strategies and refueling hose fell from a large shifting advertising money by cargo plane that was part of an the day. air show Saturday and landed The state of play could on a house in a San Diego change repeatedly between now County neighborhood, according and Nov. 2. to military officials. Democrats are especially No one was injured. worried about House districts in Investigators were trying to the economically troubled Middetermine how the heavy-duty west, and their chances of pickretractable rubber hose became ing up GOP-held Senate seats detached from a C-130J Hercu- have dwindled. les, Maj. Jay Delarosa of Marine In the final stretch, the DemCorps Air Station Miramar said. ocratic Congressional Campaign The house in Carmel MounCommittee has reserved at least tain just north of the Marine $52 million to run TV ads in base sustained roof damage. more than 60 districts, nearly Fire officials evacuated both all held by their own party. Monroe’s house and a neighbor’s The National Republican house. Campaign Committee has set Fire officials estimated the aside $35 million in airtime in damage at $10,000. 55 races, and officials say more The mishap occurred as the is on the way. annual Miramar Air Show attracted tens of thousands of Today’s news guests people to the Miramar base. ■ ABC’s “This Week” — Town hall The incident did not affect meeting about the New York City the air show, Delarosa said. mosque, with the Rev. Franklin Gra-

Dems see seats going WASHINGTON — Democrats have all but written off at least three Senate seats — in North Dakota, Indiana and Arkansas — and at least six House seats in Tennessee, Louisiana, New York and elsewhere as they embark on a final-weeks advertising push to minimize congressional election losses. Emboldened by their prospects, Republicans are throwing $3.4 million into West Virginia in hopes of winning a Senate seat that was long thought out of reach.

ham; Daisy Khan, a co-leader of the project; Peter Gadiel of the 9/11 Families for a Secure America Foundation; and others. ■ CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Govs. Bill Richardson, D-N.M., and Ed Rendell, D-Pa.; independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont. ■ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Pre-empted by coverage of the Ryder Cup golf competition. ■ CNN’s “State of the Union” — Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Robert Menendez, D-N.J.; Husain Haqqani, Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States. ■ “Fox News Sunday” — Kentucky Senate debate between Republican Rand Paul and Democrat Jack Conway.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Palestinians back Abbas on slowdown RAMALLAH, West Bank — Dozens of senior Palestinians on Saturday backed President Mahmoud Abbas’ refusal to negotiate with Israel as long as it builds in West Bank settlements, dealing a new setback to troubled U.S. efforts to salvage peace talks. Israel refuses to extend a 10-month-old curb on settlement construction, while Abbas says there is no point in negotiating as long as settlements eat up more of the land the Palestinians want for a future state. Saturday’s unanimous decision by dozens of senior members of the Palestine Liberation Organization and Abbas’ Fatah movement makes compromise increasingly unlikely.

Key crossing locked ISLAMABAD — Pakistan kept a vital border crossing closed to U.S. and NATO supply trucks for a third day Saturday, a sign that Islamabad’s desire to avoid a domestic backlash over a NATO incursion that killed three Pakistani troops is — for now — outweighing its desire to stay on good terms with America. The closing of the Torkham border crossing to NATO trucks has exposed the struggles and contradictions at the heart of the U.S.-Pakistan alliance against Islamist militancy. Both sides need one another: The U.S. gives billions in military and other aid to Pakistan,

and the U.S. and NATO use Pakistani roads to transport the majority of their non-lethal supplies to troops in Afghanistan. But while the U.S.-led coalition is busy tackling every insurgent group they can along the Pakistani-Afghan border before America’s scheduled withdrawal from Afghanistan starting in mid-2011, Pakistan has only gone after certain groups sheltering on its side — the ones it deems most dangerous to its government, not to Westerners in Afghanistan.

Druids recognized LONDON — Druids have been worshipping the sun and earth for thousands of years in Europe, but now they can say they’re practicing an officially recognized religion. The ancient pagan tradition best known for gatherings at Stonehenge every summer solstice has been formally classed as a religion under charity law for the first time in Britain, the national charity regulator said Saturday. That means Druids can receive exemptions from taxes on donations — and now have the same status as such mainstream religions as the Church of England. The move gives an old practice new validity, said Phil Ryder, the chairman of the 350-member Druid Network. “It will go a long way to make Druidry a lot more accessible,” he said. Druids have practiced for thousands of years in Britain and in Celtic societies elsewhere in Europe. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

A crowd gathers at the Lincoln Memorial to participate in the “One Nation Working Together” rally Saturday.

Rally shows support for struggling Dems By Philip Elliott

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Tapping into anger as the tea party movement has done, a coalition of progressive and civil rights groups marched by the thousands Saturday on the Lincoln Memorial and pledged to support Democrats struggling to keep power on Capitol Hill. “We are together. This march is about the power to the people,” said Ed Schultz, host of “The Ed Show” on MSNBC. “It is about the people standing up to the corporations. Are you ready to fight back?” In a fiery speech that opened the “One Nation Working Together” rally on the National Mall, Schultz blamed Republicans for shipping jobs overseas and curtailing freedoms. He borrowed some of conservative commentator Glenn Beck’s rhetoric and vowed to “take back our country.” “This is a defining moment in America. Are you American?” Schultz told the raucous crowd. “This is no time to back down. This is time to fight for America.” With a month of campaigning to go and voter unhappiness high,

the Democratic-leaning organizers hope the four-hour program of speeches and entertainment energizes activists who are crucial if Democrats are to retain their majorities in the House and Senate. The national mood suggests gains for the GOP, and Republicans are hoping to ride voter anger to gain control of the House and possibly the Senate.

400 organizations involved More than 400 organizations — ranging from labor unions to faith, environmental and gay rights groups — partnered for the event, which comes one month after Beck packed the same space with conservatives and tea partystyle activists. Organizers claimed they had as many participants as Beck’s rally. But Saturday’s crowds were less dense and didn’t reach as far to the edges as they did during Beck’s rally. The National Park Service stopped providing official crowd estimates in the 1990s. AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka urged participants, including his union’s members, to band together.

That starts as soon as the crowds get back to their homes. “Coming out of here, we’ve got to go home and ask our friends to vote, ask our neighbors to vote,” NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous said. “Ever forward, never backwards,” he led the crowd in a cheer. But even participants recognized the challenge. “There may be an enthusiasm gap, but we’re not going to know until we have an election,” said Ken Bork, who came from Camas. “A lot of the noise from the extreme right-wing stuff, it’s been well orchestrated by big money. But it’s not as bad as they’re making it out.” Rose Dixon, a health care worker from Pawleys Island, S.C., said she hopes the rally sends a message to lawmakers on Capitol Hill. “Stop the obstructionism. Work together,” Dixon said. “Stop playing politics as usual and to put the American people first. We’re tired of the politics and the posturing and the games.”

U.S. may issue be vigilant advice to travelers in Europe The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is considering telling U.S. citizens to be vigilant as they travel in Europe, updated guidance prompted by fresh alQaida threats, American and European officials told The Associated Press on Saturday. Such a move could have negative implications for European tourism if travelers fear there’s a possibility of terror attacks. The State Department may issue a travel alert as early as today advising Americans to stay vigilant as they travel through Europe because of fresh threat information, U.S. officials told the AP. “We are considering issuing an ‘alert’ tomorrow,” a senior State Department official said following an interagency meeting to assess the threat and discuss the lan-

Quick Read

guage of the advisory. “The bottom line is travel, but be vigilant.” State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley declined to comment on the matter. But he said the administration remains focused on al-Qaida threats to U.S. interests and will take appropriate steps to protect Americans.

Few specifics A European official briefed on the talks said the language in the U.S. alert is expected to be vague. It won’t address a specific country or specific landmarks, the official said. European and U.S. officials have not identified any specific targets that terrorists might be considering, the official said. Officials have called the threat credible but not specific. Officials have been concerned that terrorists may be plotting

attacks in Europe with assault weapons on public places, similar to the deadly 2008 shooting spree in Mumbai, India. The U.S. has told European leaders that the State Department alert would be intended to raise the guidance to match the information about the would-be attack that surfaced last week, the European official said. There had not been strong opposition to the proposed alert from European leaders, the European official said. But some U.S. allies in Europe expressed concern that the U.S. guidance might include a warning for Americans to stay away from public places in Europe, saying that would be an overreaction to the threat information. Some administration officials agreed and the White House adamantly denied such a blanket warning was being considered.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Trout thieves take 600 pounds from farmer

Nation: Pet alligator seized at N.Y. liquor store

Nation: East Coast flood death roll rises to seven

World: Police colonels investigated after revolt

A North Carolina trout farmer thought something was fishy when one of her ponds wasn’t fishy enough. Sunburst Trout Farm owner Sally Eason and her husband noticed Thursday that the pond had virtually no fish in it. Thieves had made off with 600 pounds of trout. Eason said the thieves baited the water so the fish would come to the surface, scooped up the fish and got them into a getaway car. The farm had been locked, and there were no signs anyone broke in, she said.

A pet alligator has been seized from a liquor store on New York’s Long Island. The Suffolk County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said the 3-foot-long, illegally kept alligator was removed last week from Alpine Wines and Liquors in Wading River. Authorities said two employees of the store were issued tickets for possession of an illegal animal. The store’s proprietor told Newsday that an employee had asked her to take care of it while he was apartment hunting and that she believed the animal was a monitor lizard, not an alligator.

The rainstorms that caused flooding up and down the East Coast in recent days have claimed another life — this time in New York. State police said they recovered the body of a 55-year-old woman whose car had been swept off the road Friday by rising floodwaters near the town of Claryville in the Catskill Mountains. Searchers found Nancy Lavelle’s body Saturday in the Neversink Reservoir in Bradley, about 80 miles northwest of New York City. Her car had been discovered the day before, upside down in a remote part of the Neversink River about 10 miles upstream.

Three police colonels were under criminal investigation in Ecuador Saturday for failing to prevent a massive protest by their subordinates against President Rafael Correa that spun out of control, claiming at least five lives. The three are being investigated for negligence, rebellion and attempted assassination, said Prosecutor Gonzalo Marco Freire. Ordered arrested on Friday, they were released Saturday on their own recognizance by a judge who barred from leaving the country. Freire said they “should have known what their subordinates were doing.”


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Election forums set State House, commissioner candidates to square off Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Carving

music

Pat John of Port Angeles, left, a member of the Ahousaht First Nations tribe on Vancouver Island, sings a traditional song over a totem pole being carved from a cedar log by Jeff Monson of the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe on Friday at Peninsula College in Port Angeles. The totem will eventually be erected in front of the college’s House of Learning Longhouse. A pole raising ceremony is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26.

Veterans eligible for retroactive pay The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Military members whose service was involuntarily extended or whose retirement was suspended between Sept. 11, 2001, and Sept. 30, 2009, due to stop loss are entitled to retroactive payments of $500 for each month they were extended, according to Department of Defense officials.

But the deadline to apply for the benefits is Oct. 21. “You served with honor. You did your duty. And when your country called on you again, you did your duty again. Now, it’s time to collect the special pay that you deserve,” said President Obama during the recent White House announcement. Only about 58,000 of the 145,000 eligible claims have

been paid, leaving more than $300 million available to eligible veterans. The average payout for each veteran is close to $4,000. Eligible members should print, complete and sign Department of Defense Form 2944, Claim for Retroactive Stop Loss Payment. They must then select the appropriate method for

submitting their claim form based on their service requirements. The information can be found on their branch’s stop loss web site available at www.defense.gov/home/ features/2010/0710_stoploss, or phone the Army at 877-736-5554, the Navy at 901-874-4427, Marine Corps at 877-242-2830 or the Air Force at 800-5250102.

Flea

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

fun

PORT LUDLOW — An election forum with the four candidates for the two 24th District state House seats and the two candidates for Jefferson County commissioner will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday. It will be held at the Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place. Open to the public and sponsored by the Port Ludlow Village Council and Peninsula Daily News, the forum will feature written questions for the candidates from the audience. The schedule: 6 p.m., Position 1 — Incumbent state Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, 35, a Democrat from Sequim who is a firefighter and paramedic, and his challenger, Republican Dan Gase, 56, a Port Angeles real estate managing broker and consultant. 6:45 p.m., Position 2 — Republican Jim McEntire, 60, of Sequim, one of the three Port of Port Angeles commissioners and a retired Coast Guard captain, and Steve Tharinger, 61, also of Sequim, one of the three Clallam County commissioners. Tharinger and McEntire are vying to replace Rep. Lynn Kessler, D-Hoquiam, who is retiring this year from Position 2. 7:30 p.m. — Incumbent Jefferson County District 3 Commissioner John Austin, 69, D-Port Ludlow, and his Republican challenger, Jim Boyer, 64, a Port Ludlow home builder.

Other election forums

Stephen Reynolds and Tifanie Boekelman, both of Bremerton, examine a table filled with sale items at a flea market benefiting the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula on Saturday at the Elks Lodge in Port Angeles. The event continues from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today, followed by a spaghetti feed with live music from 4:40 to 7 p.m.

Mail-in ballots for the Nov. 2 general election will be sent to registered voters on Oct. 13. This week candidates will debate election issues in front of business groups across the North Olympic Peninsula (see the Business Briefly column on Page C8 today). Other forums this week and next week in Jefferson and Clallam counties are sponsored by the local chapters of the League of Women Voters. They are: ■  Monday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Clallam County commissioners meeting room, Clallam County Court-

house, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles — Clallam County commissioner, county director of community development and county treasurer candidates. Incumbent Mike Doherty, 67, a Port Angeles Democrat, is challenged by Republican Robin Poole, 61, a UPS driver living in Beaver, for the District 3 county commission seat. Incumbent John Miller, 61, of Port Angeles, faces Carlsborg resident Sheila Roark Miller, 51, a county code compliance officer, for the Clallam County community development director seat. The two Millers are not related. Incumbent Judith Scott, 59, is challenged by Selinda Barkhuis, 48, of Port Angeles, a county development planner, for the county treasurer’s post. Thursday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Masonic Lodge (located behind and uphill from the post office) in Port Townsend — state House candidates Tharinger, McEntire and Van De Wege (Gase has a conflicting obligation); incumbent Jefferson County District Court Judge Jill Landes and her opponent, John Woods. ■  Saturday, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., City Council chambers, Port Angeles City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. — Tharinger, McEntire, Van De Wege and Gase. ■  Wednesday, Oct. 13, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Sequim Senior Activity Center, 921 E. Hammond St. — Clallam County prosecuting attorney candidates and the pros and cons of state Initiative 1082 (workers’ comp). Republican Deb Kelly, 57, of Port Angeles, is seeking a third four-year term as prosecuting attorney. Her challenger, Democrat Larry Freedman, 72, is a Sequim attorney. ■  Thursday, Oct. 14, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., — Port Townsend Masonic Lodge (located behind and uphill from the post office) in Port Townsend — Austin and Boyer; Jefferson County prosecuting attorney candidates Scott Rosekrans and Paul Richmond.

Briefly . . . Lauridsen bridge closure set Monday PORT ANGELES — The Lauridsen Boulevard

bridge will be closed to all through traffic from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday. The closure will permit an annual inspection by the state Department of Transportation, said Teresa Pierce, city spokeswoman. Traffic will be detoured

Does your child need help with math? Won’t take advice from Mom or Dad?

Poetry readings PORT TOWNSEND — Poet-journalist-Chinese translator Mike O’Connor and retired Boeing engineer and poet Raymond Greeott will each give readings at the Northwind Arts Center, 2409 Jefferson St., beginning at 7 p.m. Thursday. O’Connor had a 15-year

Sign up for Success!

career in journalism in Asia, and has authored nine books, including Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories and Immortality. He is now publisher of the Empty Bowl Press in Port Townsend. Greeott is a product of Northern California’s wine country, and has won both the William Stafford Award and the Washington State Poetry Contest. Northwind readings are free, while donations help

KARON’S TIP:

Contact Rebecca to arrange a FREE consultation

rwanagel@gmail.com or text: 360-477-7792

Karon’s

Protect your old family photos AND enjoy them by having them framed at Karon’s

FRAME CENTER Mon.- Fri. 9:30 to 5:30 • Sat. 10 to 4 www.karonsframecenter.com

0A5099146

095095623

Rebecca Wanagel MA Special Ed.

Better To Tutor Now Than To Struggle Later

onto Eunice Street and Eighth Street to and from Race Street.

Peninsula Daily News

625 E. Front St. Port Angeles • 565-0308

30% OFF

035077140

on sale now

In one short procedure you can have a stable denture with no surgical sutures nor the typical months of healing.

Alleged Shane Park shooter arrested By Tom Callis

755 W. Washington Ste. A Sequim • 582-9275

~ Fendi Frames ~ The Largest Selection on the Peninsula

paper reported Saturday. the arts center stay afloat. For more information, He is believed to be drivphone organizer Bill ing a 2010 blue Nissan SenMawhinney at 360-437-9081. tra with Washington license plate number AAH4215. Man sought His family said he has periods of confusion and LACEY — The Lacey short-term memory loss. Police Department has He once lived in Port asked for the public’s help Angeles. in finding a 92-year-old Anyone with informaman who may be headed to tion about Quinn’s wherePort Angeles. abouts is asked to call the James W. Quinn left his Lacey Police Department home Thursday in Lacey at 360-459-4333. and has not been seen Peninsula Daily News since, The Olympian news-

knee, according to authorities. Henderson will be arraigned Friday in Clallam County Superior Court on charges of conspiracy to commit second-degree robbery, first-degree assault and second-degree unlawful possession of a fire arm. Perez was arrested shortly after the shooting. Henderson was believed to have fled the area. Authorities arrested him Wednesday for the shooting after he was convicted of a drug charge in Jefferson County. He was held in Jefferson County jail until he was transported Friday. Perez, 22, will be tried Nov. 29. He is charged with conspiracy to commit second-degree robbery and first-degree assault.

075080362

PORT ANGELES — A 20-year-old man from Seattle alleged to have participated in a shooting at Shane Park in 2009 was booked into Clallam County jail Friday, exactly one year after the crime occurred. Andraees Latrell Henderson is alleged to have shot Michael A. Rosche twice at the park at about 1 a.m. Oct. 1, 2009. Rosche was treated and released from Olympic Medical Center. Police say Henderson and Port Angeles resident Edward K. Perez met Rosche at the park to get money that they believed Rosche owed them. When he didn’t hand ________ over the money, Henderson Reporter Tom Callis can be shot at him at least four reached at 360-417-3532 or at times while he sat in a car, tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. hitting him in a wrist and com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Forks

Sunday, October 3, 2010

A5

celebrates its heritage

Pat Soderlind, one of the organizers of Forks’ Heritage and Hickory Shirt Days celebration, stands after passing the microphone to longtime Forks resident Walt Fuhrman during the Old Timers Roundtable at the Forks Community Center on Thursday. Fuhrman and others talked about the early mills, logging and other memories of Forks, Beaver and the surrounding areas. Mike McCracken, left, and Andy Fouts use an oldfashioned press to grind apples into cider Saturday at the Forks Timber Museum.

Lonnie Archibald (3)/for Peninsula Daily News

Larry Baysinger of Bear Creek carves a pumpkin during Saturday’s chain-saw pumpkin carving contest at the Forks Timber Museum. The contest was one of a myriad of activities celebrating the history and culture of Forks during the Heritage and Hickory Shirt Days celebration, which culminated Saturday.

Navy accepting final comments on increased training By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

The Navy is accepting public comment on the final environmental impact statement for expanding training activities for the Pacific Fleet both off the Pacific Coast — in an area that includes the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary — and near Whidbey Island and in Hood Canal. The public comment period will end Oct. 12. The proposal would allow the Navy to increase the number of training exercises in the Northwest Training Complex. Most of the complex is a massive area that extends 250 miles from the coastlines of Washington state, Oregon and northern California. It also includes areas around Whidbey Island and portions of Hood Canal. The Pacific Ocean area encompasses 122,400 nautical miles of military air, surface and subsurface space. The Navy is hoping to increase its current operations in the training range to include a multitude of new activities from the testing of new aircraft and guided missile submarines to the development of an underwater minefield. “The Navy already is training off the coast,” where most of the activity would be, said Sheila Murray, Navy environmental

public affairs officer for the Northwest. “What it is asking for is to be able to increase the number of activities it can do in that area.” She said the complex offers sailors realistic training opportunities in their backyard to help them prepare for deployment. After a three-year process, the Navy released a final report earlier this month.

About 3,000 pages The report, which is about 3,000 pages, analyzes the effects that two proposed options would have on the environment, and includes more than 1,000 comments received on the draft environmental impact statement and responses to them. “One whole volume of the EIS is the response to comments,” Murray said. The assistant secretary of the Navy is expected to make a decision after the comment period ends Oct. 12. The Pacific Fleet project is different from another Navy proposal in the same area, which is sponsored by the Keyport Naval Undersea Warfare Center. That proposal, which would allow the Navy to test unmanned underwater vehicles in three test ranges — on Dabob Bay and Hood Canal, and off the Olympic Coast from Kalaloch southward in West Jefferson County — is

Bill OK’d to expand protection in Strait By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Kyle Herr

Call For A Ride 360-457-7409

ts Sept. 30

Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can be reached at 360-4173531 or leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

hillcrest@wavecable.com

Locally Owned Franchise

136 E. 8th St. – PA Corner of 8 th & Lincoln

452-6602

19¢ Copies 3¢ Copies

* Black & White

* Valid at participating locations. 8.5” x 11”, standard paper. Restrictions apply. See an associate for details. Valid October 1-31, 2010

0A5098695

Cubbies: Preschool Age 4 Look Sparks: Kindergarten - Grade 2 What’s New! 24/7 Club: Grad e 7-12 T&T: Grade 3-6 Thursdays 6-8pm Guest Speakers: Nancy & Star

said. “We did not come to complete agreement about some of the materials that would be used up in the sanctuary,” Galasso said, “but we did agree to meet on an annual basis to work together to avoid to the maximum extent practicable any adverse impacts on resources in the sanctuary.” When the sanctuary was formed in 1994, it was within an already-existing Navy training area. “We do have exemptions from some of our regulations relating to some activities,” Galasso said. A Navy representative sits on the sanctuary’s council, and sanctuary officials communicate regularly with the Navy on a variety of issues, he said. “The Navy has a policy that the sanctuary is a nodischarge zone for waste from their vessels, which we appreciate,” Galasso said. For the full document, see the project’s website at www. NWTRangeComplexEIS.com or find a printed version at the Port Townsend Library, 1220 Lawrence St., or the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., Port Hadlock. Comments on the Navy document can be sent by e-mail through the project’s website or by U.S. mail to Naval Facilities Engineering Command Northwest; 1101 Tautog Circle, Suite 203; Silverdale, WA 98315-1101. Marked mailed comments to the attention of Kler — NWTRC EIS. ________

October is Customer Appreciation Month! * Color

Starts Sept. 29, 2010 Wednesday 6 - 8 pm HilLcrest Baptist Church 205 Black Diamond Rd., PA

See our

Respect

CITY CLOTHES Integrity

Responsiveness

Dignity

Pride

452-9206 • 116 East Lauridsen Blvd. • Port Angeles

PRICES

Call & make an appointment to consign your clothes today!

Charming Consignments

WOMEN’S & TEENS CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

Tue - Sat 10 am to 5 pm • Next to Karon’s Frame Center

629 E. Front • Port Angeles • 452-9863

0A5099161

Compassion

at Port Angeles

085093907

Congress passed a bill last week that will better protect the Strait of Juan de Fuca from oil spills. The Coast Guard authorization bill, sponsored by Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Mountlake Terrace, was approved by the House early Thursday and sent to be signed by President Barack Obama. The legislation improves safety standards for commercial fishing vessels and also extends the “high volume port area,” which applies federal requirements for oil-spill-response equipment, to Cape Flattery. The designation currently applies to Puget Sound and as far west as Port Angeles. The Makah tribe worked closely with Cantwell’s office to extend it to the entire Strait, said Chad Bowechop, the tribe’s marine affairs manager. Bowechop said he expects ________ it to result in additional oil spill response equipment at Reporter Tom Callis can be Neah Bay. But when that reached at 360-417-3532 or at will be accomplished, and tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. what equipment will be com.

095097802

added, has yet to be determined, he said. Bowechop said the bill also ensures that tribes have a seat on the incident command of the regional oil response team overseen by the Coast Guard. He said that will help better coordinate the response to an oil spill by state, local, federal and tribal governments. “We worked very hard to get the tribal interests written in this bill because we fill a gap in spill response capabilities,” Bowechop said. The legislation also reforms a multibillion Coast Guard contracting program and places more restrictions on what vessels can enter the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. Approximately 600 oil tankers and 3,000 oil barges travel each year through Puget Sound and carry about 15 billion gallons of oil to Washington refineries, according to Cantwell’s office.

the final process of compliance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act, seeking a permit from the National Fisheries Service for an incidental “take” in the sonar training. “A ‘take’ doesn’t mean that it is physically harming the animals,” Kler said. “It means they will hear the source.” The environmental impact statement charts the possibility of Navy activities affecting such species as whales, sea lions and sea otters. Sonar may affect blue whales, humpback whales, orca whales and stellar sea lions, among others, the chart says. Kler said the Navy received an opinion on June 15 from the National Fisheries Service that concluded that sonar likely would adversely affect, but not Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News threaten the continued existence of, endangered and threatened species. awaiting authorization from commercial fishermen. The sonar could affect Kimberly Kler, one of the the Secretary of the Navy. In the Pacific Fleet envi- project leads for the Navy, their path of travel. ronmental impact statement, said that the proposal the Navy evaluated two includes an increase of 10 Marine sanctuary options, both of which would tracking exercises for antiMurray said that most of increase training activities submarine warfare off the and weapons testing in the Pacific Coast, as well as an the activity in the area of the sea and air in the Northwest increase in the number of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary would be Training Range Complex, the exercises using sonar. in the air. principal training ground for “There’s not really a lot units based in Washington Use of sonar that happens in the water in state. The training exercises the sanctuary,” she said. The Navy’s preferred using sonar would increase George Galasso, assistant option increases activities to the greatest extent of the two by two, from 24 to 26 annu- superintendent of the sanctually. ary, said that sanctuary peroptions. “People have been con- sonnel had been concerned Environmentalists have raised concerns about the cerned about the sonar about the possibility of impact the increased training hours” and the effect on expendable material that is exercises, including underwa- marine mammals, Kler not biodegradable being left in the sanctuary after trainter explosions and sonar use, said. The proposal would ing exercises. would have on endangered Such materials could orcas, other whales and increase the number of sonar hours from 36 hours include parachutes or marine life. Others have worried per year to 43 hours annu- “EMATTs” — Expendable Mobile Anti-Submarine Warabout air quality, water pollu- ally, she said. Kler said the Navy is in fare Training Targets, he tion, noise and the effects on


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 3, 2010 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Boost: Cougars, bears near homes Continued from A1

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Fred Millar holds one of the beehive frames that was damaged by a black bear at his home south of Carlsborg.

Attack: Cougars kill

goats near Port Ludlow Continued from A1 “The coop is basically in a greenhouse which is right off of the house, so it basically came into an attachment of the house.� Henry said the situation was extremely rare. “That is very unusual. They do not usually break into something like a chicken coop,� Henry said. State wildlife agents delivered a bear trap Thursday and placed it near a stand of trees close to the Pokorny family home on Dabob Road, but the bear did not return, despite the lure of doughnuts left for bait.

A. J. Hatfield of Port Angeles poses with the cougar that he and his Three goats were slain Sept. 7 on the father shot after the animal killed forested edge of a 100-acre family com- two of the family goats. Cougars in a tree

pound in Bridgehaven near Port Ludlow. “We had trouble finding them because they were right above us,� Henry said. “They were actually in the tree looking at us.� A neighbor also had reported five chickens killed the night before. The agents shot the three cougars and no reports have surfaced from that area since. But the attacks were unusual, said the caretaker of the property, who asked to be unidentified to protect the privacy of the family that owns the land. Although cougars have been sighted and hunted on the Toandos Peninsula in years past, this particular portion of the peninsula “hadn’t had any problems,� the caretaker said. The attacks were in a forested section that’s “kind of on the edge of a housing area,� he said. “They weren’t in a populated area, but they probably would have eventually made their way there,� he said.

Beehives smashed In his 12 years of tending honeybees on Pike Place Road near Olson Road and Hooker Road east of Sequim and south of Carlsborg, Fred Millar had seen coyotes, deer and raccoons, but never bears. Yet, on Sept. 20. he awakened to find one of his honeybee hives crushed — and the mud at its base imprinted with bear tracks. The next morning, he found a second smashed hive. “As far as I can tell, it was in the early morning hours,� Millar said. “I didn’t hear him or see him, but he left prints around and it was all torn up.� The black bear was still around the area as of last week. “My neighbors saw him the other day,� Millar said. “I noticed the apples on my tree weren’t

falling to the ground, but we finally figured out that he was shaking the tree and when the apples would fall, he’d eat them up.�

Too close to use hounds Last month, Aaron Hatfield of Port Angeles hunted down a cougar that had killed two goats the family kept to control grass in their three acres of fields about three-fourths of a mile southeast of the Safeway on U.S. Highway 101. His wife, Candie Hatfield, saw a cougar take down one of the goats on Sept. 21 as she was barbecuing outdoors. Several nights later, the family lost their last goat to a cougar. Fish and Wildlife agents couldn’t use a hound to hunt the animal because of the proximity to human populations and roads, Henry said. “It’s a woodsy environment, but it’s right in the suburbs of town,� Henry said. “If you are standing on his property, there are woods all around,� except for a trailer park to the east, “but when we drove around the property, there are houses that are inserted all over.� A hound hunter “is reluctant to put his hounds out where there are lots of people, lots of traffic,� Henry said. Hatfield, who tried to kill the cougar on Sept. 7, but missed, received state permission to shoot the animal if it returned. Tuesday, he and his son, A.J., shot and killed it, he said. “We managed to set up a blind and sure enough, it came back, and my son and I got it,� he said.

________

Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladailynews. com. Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can be reached at 360-417-3531 or leah.leach@peninsuladailynews. com.

Strategic Plan Public Forum

Roxie Baxley said. “When my daughter saw Twelve is the estimated it, she did everything she number of cougar com- wasn’t supposed to and plaints reported on the Pen- came right back up.� insula in a year. Judging by the number Sightings not unusual of reports, “it’s the year of Seeing a bear isn’t the bear,� and of the cougar, unusual, Henry said. too, Henry said. “We are really close to The reason for the “huge influx� of complaints may [Olympic] National Park be multi-pronged, Henry and national forests where there are large populations said. He theorized that causes of animals like bears and could range from a cool cougars,� Henry said. “Sightings aren’t such a summer resulting in less rare event.� food in the higher elevaMore bears than usual tions to a cyclic spike in the cougar and bear popula- have been reported wandertions because of fewer hunt- ing into human settlements throughout the western ers. Also, he added, the Pen- United States. At least 83 bears have insula has a growing numbeen killed in New Mexico ber of urbanites who have moved into the woods and this year, more than three who aren’t accustomed to times as many as last year, signs of the more frighten- and increased reports of encounters — a few of them ing forms of wildlife. deadly grizzly bear attacks — have been reported in No human attacks Idaho and Montana. In a rare black bear No bear or cougar has been reported attacking a attack, Bellevue City Councilman John Chelminiak person on the Peninsula. Instead, reports are of was severely injured by an slain domestic animals or 8-to-10-year-old, 149-pound signs of trespass in a yard, female in the driveway of “destroying my bird feeder his vacation home near or getting into the garbage Lake Wenatchee on Sept. or they are on my deck look- 17. Black bear attacks on ing into my sliding glass door at my chihuahua,� humans are rare. Grizzlies are not found Henry said. Most of the reported inci- in the Olympics, which has dents bear encounters have only black bears. Bears may be seeking been in Jefferson County, with about a dozen originat- food. Donny Martorello, carniing in Clallam County. Conversely, the majority of cou- vore manager at the state gar complaints have been Fish and Wildlife Departfrom Clallam County, Henry ment, said that there is anecdotal evidence that bersaid. One bear was spotted at ries, nuts and pine cones a home near Mount Pleas- are in short supply this year throughout the west because ant Road in Port Angeles “The bear was at the end of poor growing conditions. of my 13-foot driveway,� Henry said it is unknown

________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com. Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can be reached at 360-4173531 or leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

County library’s request for expansion considered Peninsula Daily News

The three Jefferson County commissioners will consider a request from the Jefferson County Library to change the county code to permit an expansion of the library in Port Hadlock during the commissioners’ meeting Monday. The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. in the commissioners’ meeting room at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. The library is designated as a non-conforming use for its zoning of rural residential. The code says that nonconforming uses can’t expand more than 3,999 square feet. The library officials want to expand the building by about 9,000 square feet. Commissioners also will consider a resolution creating a road project to improve Paradise Bay Road from Milepost 0.37 to Milepost 1.53 at an estimated cost of $1,792,000. Commissioners will consider sending a letter to the state Department of Ecology

requesting an extension until Nov. 30 for submittal of the responsiveness summary for the Shoreline Master Program Comprehensive Update. During a county administrator briefing session at 1:30 p.m., commissioners will discuss Ecology’s proposed rules on aquiculture, hear an update on Port Hadlock sewer system financing, and discuss the courthouse roof stabilization project.

■  Historic Preservation Committee — 3 p.m. Tuesday, third floor conference room. ■  City Council Information and Technology Committee — 4 p.m. Wednesday, first floor conference room. ■  Non-Motorized Transportation Advisory Board — 4:30 p.m. Thursday, first floor conference room. ■  Hearings examiner — 1 p.m. Friday in City Council chambers, 540 Water St. A public hearing is scheduled on Quincy Street dock restoration and boat and seaplane float.

Port Townsend city

Public utility district

The Port Townsend City Council will consider adopting an ordinance extending its electrical franchise to Puget Sound Energy for up to three years. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. in council chambers at City Hall, 540 Water St. Other city committee meetings, which are at 250 Madison St., unless otherwise noted are:

Jefferson County Public Utility District commissioners will consider a resolution concerning its 2011 budget when they meet Monday. The meeting will be at 5 p.m. in the PUD office at 230 Chimacum Road, Port Hadlock. Also on the agenda is a tax upgrade, and appointment of a representative to a government relations committee.

Eye on Jefferson

Planning Commission

Wednesday, October 6 at 6 p.m. Olympic Memorial Hospital

The Jefferson County Planning Commission will consider a 2010 Comprehensive Plan Amendment Annual Cycle proposal when it meets Wednesday. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Washington State University Learning Center, Shold Business Park, 201 West Patison, Port Hadlock.

Cheese & Wine Tasting Event

939 Caroline Street, Lower Level, Port Angeles

$C?RSPGLEüüPRGQ?Lü'LRCPL?RGML?Jü!FCCQCQü ?LBüü5GLCQüDPMKüRFCü.?AGÛAü,MPRFUCQR

The Fireside %QHC@X ĂŚ.BSNADQĂŚ ĂŚOLĂŚ ĂŚOL

Hospital district

ĂŚODQĂŚODQRNM



The Jefferson Healthcare hospital board will discuss personnel matters and staff working conditions when it meets Wednesday. The meeting will begin at 3:30 p.m. in the hospital auditorium, 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend.

1DRDQU@SHNMRĂŚ   "GDDRDĂŚĂŚ6HMDĂŚ&DS@V@XĂŚ/@BJ@FDĂŚRS@QSRĂŚ@SĂŚNMKXĂŚ

October Events at The Fireside ĂŚĂŚ ĂŚĂŚ ĂŚ ĂŚ ĂŚ

%QDRGĂŚ/@RS@ĂŚ#@XĂŚ "GDDRDĂŚĂŚ6HMDĂŚ3@RSHMFĂŚ$UDMS .JSNADQEDRSĂŚ"DKDAQ@SHNM %QDRGĂŚ/@RS@ĂŚ#@X ,NMSGKXĂŚ#HMMDQRĂŚ QNTMCĂŚSGDĂŚ6NQKC

Fire district

%D@STQHMFĂŚ CJEG?LĂĽ!MKDMPRĂĽ$MMBĂĽĂĽ CCP

ĂŚĂŚ .JSNADQEDRSĂŚ"DKDAQ@SHNM ĂŚ ,NMSGKXĂŚ#@XĂŚVHSGĂŚ"GDEĂŚ#@MĂŚ ĂŚ%D@STQHMFĂŚ !MLQMKKĂ€ ĂĽ.SPĂ€CQ ĂĽ GQOSCQ ĂĽ!PC?KĂĽ?LBĂĽ4CJMSRĂ€Q 0A5099196

0A5097642

Our Path to Providing Excellence in Health Care Olympic Medical Center invites the Clallam County community to participate in a public forum as we update our Strategic Plan for 2011. We value the input of our community as we embark on our 2011-2014 Strategic Plan. OMC’s Strategic Plan is available online at olympicmedical.org or by calling (360) 417-7340.

exactly why cougar complaints have increased, but theorized that they could be following other animals who are seeking more abundant food supplies. Henry’s theory is that bear and cougar populations both have increased, to some degree because of less hunting. Such population surges are cyclic, and self-correcting, Henry said, referring to an upswing in the cougar population in the 1990s. Cool weather may have produced less food in the highlands, he said. Olympic National Park Wildlife Biologist Patti Happe said the weather this year would be indicative of a lower berry supply, but that park employees haven’t reported larger numbers of bears in lowlands. Some bears have showed up at higher-elevation campgrounds, she said. “At the higher elevations, they are kind of getting closer than in past years, but it is hard to tell if it is just one bear with bad behavior or if several are doing that,� she said. For more information, see the state Fish and Wildlife website at http://wdfw. wa.gov. Signs of bear or cougar, including attacks on wildlife, can be reported to Fish and Wildlife at 1-877-9339847.

/NQS+TCKNV1DRNQS BNLĂŚĂŚ[ĂŚĂŚĂŚ'DQNMĂŚ1N@C ĂŚ/NQSĂŚ+TCKNV ĂŚ6 ĂŚĂŚĂŚ

Jefferson County Fire Protection District No. 1 commissioners and the Joint Oversight Board will hold a budget workshop Wednesday. The meeting will be at 3 p.m. at 701 Harrison St., Port Townsend.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Measure: 40% would

be for Port Townsend Continued from A1 board, 7 p.m. Wednesday, location to be announced. ■  Chimacum Grange, He and other county staff members are prohib- 6:30 p.m. Oct. 13, 9572 ited from actually endors- Rhody Dr. ■  Jefferson County ing the measure. In the 10 informational Chamber of Commerce, presentations Morley is noon Oct. 18, 555 Otto St. During the presentamaking, five of which already have been held, tions, Morley outlines serattendees will never hear vices he says would be saved by passing the measure or him say “vote for this.” Instead he presents lost with its defeat, such as charts and graphs, lines a sheriff’s deputy position and figures explaining the and the ability to keep three situation, how a projected community centers opera$900,000 budget shortfall tional. He stresses that, even if in 2011 will grow to $1.7 the sales tax increase is million in 2015. approved, some program 8.4% to 8.7% increase cuts will be necessary. Attendance at the preThe measure would raise sentations has varied. The the Jefferson County sales largest number so far — 60 tax rate from the present — showed up at Thursday’s 8.4 percent to 8.7 percent, Tri-Area Rotary meeting. or three cents for every $10 Just 10 attended the Port purchase. Townsend Community CenForty percent of the tax ter presentation that same increase revenue, projected evening. to be $1,062,000, would, by While each presentation law, go to Port Townsend, draws new faces, a core which has agreed to use group of people attends some of the money to help every one. Aside from Morley, the support Memorial Field and the Port Townsend Commu- three county commissioners are present at each forum. nity Center. Commissioner David The rest would go toward helping to fill the county’s Sullivan said that Morley projected $900,000 shortfall has refined his message and tailors it to each group he in 2011. If approved, the new addresses, although some sales tax would take effect aspects remain the same. Sullivan and the other April 1. commissioners have heard Ballots in the all-mail election will be mailed Oct. the presentation several times before, and they 12. helped to craft its contents. Both Sullivan and MorPresentations slated ley say that a new revenue Five more presentations source is needed to mainare planned, with three set tain service levels. Neither takes passage of for Wednesday: ■  Sunrise Rotary, 7:15 the measure for granted. Sullivan said that few a.m. Wednesday, Highway 20 Roadhouse, 2152 West people have spoken against the measure at the forums, Sims Way; ■  Kiwanis, noon but he he finds no sense of Wednesday, Manresa Cas- security in this fact. “You think you know tle, 651 Cleveland St. ■  Conservation District how 1,000 people are going

to vote, then see there are 8,000 that you don’t.” Morley said he’d like to see the measure pass and avoid the cuts, but is preparing for its failure. Republican Jim Boyer, who is challenging incumbent Democrat John Austin for the District 3 seat, disagrees with his opponent on many issues, but favors theproposed sale tax increase “because there is no other option.”

Criticizes development Tom Thiersch, another frequent critic of the commissioners, said he will vote for the measure but does not like how it was developed. “They have told us that by passing the tax increase, these programs will be funded,” he said. “That means they have already made some decisions about the budget without a proper hearing.” Sullivan disagrees with Thierch’s interpretation, saying that budget hearings still will take place in December at which time the final program determination will be made. County staff members can say a program will be funded, but that is not final until the budget has been passed, Sullivan said. Programs that are expected to be kept can be cut at the last minute, and the county could end up cutting programs they have up to that point promised to preserve, he said. However, Sullivan says that such reversals won’t happen in this case. “If the measure passes, we are honor-bound to fund these programs,” he said.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant @peninsuladailynews.com.

( J) — Sunday, October 3, 2010

A7

Park plans road fix, other projects Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Autumn construction projects will close some roads — and cause delays on others — throughout the national park on the North Olympic Peninsula, beginning Monday. An Olympic National Park construction contract of nearly $2 million was issued recently to Erick Ammon, Inc. of Silverdale and Anderson, California, Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman, said in a statement. Port Angeles-based Bruch and Bruch Construction, Inc. and Northwest Rock, Inc. of Hoquiam are subcontractors on this multi-project contract, she said. Projects and closures are: ■  Elwha Valley, Olympic Hot Springs Road. The Olympic Hot Springs Road above Altair Campground will be closed for three weeks, beginning Monday. It will be reopened on Friday, Oct. 22, after crews repair damage from a slide that occurred last winter near the Glines Canyon Dam powerhouse, between the Altair Campground and Glines Canyon Dam. Access to the Boulder Creek trailhead will be reopened on Saturday, Oct. 23, and the trail will be open to hikers after it had been closed for a $1,037,000 rehabilitation project in mid-August. The bridge on the trail will be replaced in the summer, park officials said. Construction of a bypass lane at the Elwha Entrance Station will begin in late October. No closures or

Lake Mills to remain closed A channel was cut across the delta at the OLYMPIC southern end of Lake NATIONAL PARK — Mills to allow about 80 Lake Mills, which was percent of the Elwha originally expected to River to flow through reopen to boating on it. Crews finished the Monday, will remain channel in the $743,708 closed until the lake’s project and diverted the water level rises. river last week. The boat launch is The goal of digging not usable now, Barb the man-made channel Maynes, park spokeswas to give the river a woman. head start in eroding at Lake Mills, created least 13 million cubic by the 210-foot high Glines Canyon Dam in yards of delta sediment before the $351 million 1927, was lowered five removal of the Elwha feet earlier last month and Glines Canyon to expose the delta where the river empties dams, which will begin next September. into the lake. Peninsula Daily News

delays are expected. The bypass lane will provide streamlined access for construction traffic associated with removal of the Glines Canyon Dam, scheduled to begin next September. ■  Deer Park Road. The Deer Park Road will be closed Monday through Friday this week for repairs of the narrow gravel road. The road will be reopened Saturday, Oct. 9 and then will close for the season on Monday, Oct. 18. ■  Hurricane Ridge Road. Several repair projects along the popular Hurricane Ridge Road are scheduled for this fall. The road will remain open, but short delays are possible. ■  Staircase Road. Contractors will perform maintenance on the

Staircase entrance road and campground roads during the first two weeks of October. The road will remain open, but short delays are possible. The campground will remain open. ■  Upper Queets Road. Gravel will be placed and graded this week, from Monday through Friday. The road will remain open but short delays are possible. ■  North Shore Quinault Road. Contractors will perform maintenance on the North Shore Quinault Road during the first three weeks of October. The road will remain open, but short delays are possible. For more information, see www.nps.gov/olym or phone the Olympic National Park Visitor Center at 360-565-3130.

Downtown: Gathering

place reason for gift

begin no sooner than JanuContinued from A1 facility, he said. Also to be scheduled is ary 2012, Sepler said. This access won’t be built the repaving of Madison The city has secured until a permit to the remove Street in front of City Hall, Federal Emergency Manthe Tidal Clock has been which will result in the ren- agement grants for approved by the Army ovated intersection of Madi- $2,245,640 for the sidewalk Corps of Engineers. son Street and Water repair, leaving the city seekThe city has not received Street. ing an additional $334,520. word as to when that might “This is a long process occur, Sepler said. Filling voids and the federal government The plan is to fill in the Although not on the has very specific guidelines Tidal Clock’s bowl with consame block, several down- about how it must be done,” crete and create a stage town sidewalks will need to Sepler said. around it. be replaced, shoring up the ________ Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News “void” areas underneath. Tidal Clock Jefferson County Reporter These hollow spaces do Charlie Bermant can be reached at The downtown eyesore that is the Tidal Clock is scheduled to be The Tidal Clock was sup- not represent an immediate 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant replaced with an amphitheater as soon as the required permits are posed to be a community danger, Sepler said, but @peninsuladailynews.com. granted. gathering place created in would not withstand a 1987 with a gift of $200,000 major disaster such as an Jennifer Zaccardo from Ruth Seavey Jackson earthquake or a flood. CPA, Baker Overby of Port Townsend, who The city will soon begin & Moore, Inc. wanted a piece of commu- the process of interviewing nity art created to celebrate consultants to supervise the the waterfront. project which will probably The artists, Chuck Fahlen and Doug Hollis of the San Francisco Bay area, Fares as low as intended it to act as a tidal clock with graduated layers around the bowl filling with water and marine life as the tide changed. It never worked as envisioned. Instead, it collected debris and wood. Sepler plans to meet with project manager Tom Miller this week. October 1–December 31 Miller, in anticipation of the festival season, took all of his remaining vacation October Flight Schedule for the rest of the year in September and will return Depart Arrive Depart Arrive Monday. Port Angeles Sea-Tac Sea-Tac Port Angeles In addition to the new visitors center, the city will 5:30A 6:25A 6:45A 8:05A install a “big toy” as an 8:30A 9:25A 8:45A 10:05A activity for kids.

peninsuladailynews.com

$29 11:25A 3:25P 6:25P

11:45A 3:45P 5:45P

1:05P 5:05P 7:05P

*Special fare is one-way, non-refundable, available on limited seats on selected flights only, and bookable only through Kenmore Air. Other restrictions may apply. Regular fares range from $39 to $105 each way, depending on flight. Visit AlaskaAir.com to book single-ticket itineraries from Port Angeles to more than 90 cities across North America & Hawaii. And remember, every Kenmore Air Express flight segment earns 250 Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan miles!

Fairchild Airport, just off US-101, Port Angeles, Tel. 360.452.6371

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.

LIVE UNITED

®

Want to make a difference? Find out how at UNITEDwAyCLALLAM.ORG.

United Way of Clallam County • 360-457-3011

095099078

866.435.9524 KenmoreAir.com

0A5099334

It will also contain “Salish Sea Circle” a bronze sculpture commissioned from Gerard Tsutakawa. Sepler said the sculpture will be ready by the end of the year but will probably not be installed until spring. The installation is intended to coincide with the arrival of the second new Port Townsend ferry, coincidentally named the Salish. In the intervening months, the sculpture probably will be stored in a city

10:30A 2:30P 5:30P

From Sea-Tac

Bronze sculpture

To Sea-Tac

*


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 3, 2010

Commentary

Page

A8

Thanks for purchasing your ticket(s) Dear Mark: Thank you for purchasing your ticket(s) to “Resident Evil: Afterlife” for Monday, Sept. 20, 2010. Your confirmation number Mark is 542HJLD7. You can pick Bazer up the ticket(s) at the theater box office. Please remember to bring your credit card ending in 2764. — Your friends at ­Movietixdango.com

life.” We have heard great things. For tips on how to best enjoy “Resident Evil: Afterlife” and to chat with other people who are seeing this and other movies, please visit our website. — Your friends at ­Movietixdango.com

them before “Resident Evil: After- additional e-mails. — Your friends at life” begins. ­Movietixdango.com — Your friends at ­Movietixdango.com Dear Mark: We have some Dear Mark: We have been sad news. There are only 15 mintold the concession-stand lines utes left in “Resident Evil: Afterhave been quite long, because life.” Savor this time. Robbie didn’t show up for work. — Your friends at ­Movietixdango.com We apologize for any inconveDear Mark: “Resident Evil: nience this may have caused you Afterlife” is moments away. Dear Mark: It’s been three while purchasing popcorn and/or We hope you found a comfort- other snacks. days since you saw “Resident able seat, and that the person in Evil: Afterlife.” What did you If you missed the first scene, front of you isn’t tall. think about it? visit our website for a summary Remember when the ushers Share your thoughts on our of the scene as well as reviews of used to collect money for the Will it from the nation’s top critics. website! Rogers Institute before the — Your friends at — Your friends at movie? We do. ­Movietixdango.com ­Movietixdango.com Anyhow, just wanted to say hi. P.S.: Please don’t share your Dear Mark: Just a friendly Dear Mark: Holy &%*# this thoughts on “Resident Evil: Don’t forget to put on your reminder that there are only two 3-D glasses! movie is scary! Afterlife” with anyone else. days remaining until your — Your friends at — Your friends at screening of “Resident Evil: ­Movietixdango.com Dear Mark: It’s now been ­Movietixdango.com Afterlife.” FIVE days since you saw “ResiDo you need to rent a car to Dear Mark: We hope you are dent Evil: Afterlife.” What did Dear Mark: If our calculaget to the theater or buy pants to currently enjoying “Resident Evil: you think about it? tions are correct, you’re currently Afterlife,” and we thank you wear while you’re there? Share your thoughts on our enjoying previews before “ResiCheck out exclusive deals again for purchasing your website. from our partners at our website. dent Evil: Afterlife.” ticket(s). — Your friends at We can’t quite make you out — Your friends at ­Movietixdango.com Did you know there are other ­Movietixdango.com from our vantage point, but we P.S.: It’s OK if you’ve already movies playing right now? Take a are concerned you’re not enjoying break from the film to log on to shared your thoughts elsewhere. Dear Mark: Tonight’s the big popcorn and/or other snacks from our website to purchase ticket(s) the theater concession stand. night! We hope you enjoy your Dear Mark: You don’t call. to other great movies, view preticket(s) to “Resident Evil: AfterThere is still time to purchase views and sign up to receive You don’t write.

Speaking Out

William Lyon Police officer Port Angeles

“I agree with them. The more parties we have, the more opportunities to vote in someone different. A good thing, I believe.”

Barbara Hansen

Caregiver Sequim

Drug/alcohol counselor Port Townsend

“I don’t think too much of it. Our country could do a lot better if we all worked together rather than having several differing political parties. Togetherness, not divisiveness.”

“They’re taking us in the wrong direction. I’m for peaceful resolutions to conflict. The tea party is pretty hawkish, and the people involved are not supportive of environmental issues.”

Ted Clayton Laborer Joyce

“I like them. I feel they are influencing issues the way I like to see. Our excessive government is too much. Less debt, less spending, less government is the direction to go.”

Rob Robertsen

Peninsula Voices Indeed, Boyer’s hyperbolic outburst against John Austin was as irresponsible as his fear of U.N. domination is irrational. Boyer has been a regular contributor to the rightwing blog known as Free Republic, and it is clear that he has rather radical ideas and preconceived notions about most who disagree with his point of view. This is the man who has called current Commissioner Austin an “envirowacko”? Perhaps, Mr. Boyer, the wacko is that guy in the mirror. I would suggest Austin is the more thoughtful and rational of the two candidates. Larry Dennison, Port Townsend

Cloud listens Congressman Norm Dicks and his election opponent, Republican Doug Cloud, are just about as

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson

Suzanne Delaney

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 suzanne.delaney@peninsuladailynews.com

Executive Editor

Michelle Lynn

Interim Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Advertising Director

Sue Stoneman

Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

_________ Mark Bazer is a writer living a few blocks away from Chicago who hosts “The Interview Show,” a Chicago-based talk show available at The Huffington Post. He is one of a rotating group of columnists whose writings appear here every Sunday. Bazer can be reached via www. markbazer.com.

Retired community development director Port Angeles

Tammy Ratliff Jack Salmon Farmer Port Angeles

“They may have good “Not very intentions, but this much. Some of party stirs up a lot their issues to of division. Instead eliminate proof getting things grams are not pro- accomplished, it ductive. They’re does the opposite. too impatient and We need to be not giving Obama positive and stop enough time to blaming.” get things straightened out.”

opposite in demeanor to the voting public as any two can possibly be. Cloud’s 20 years of private law practice and being fully involved in his clients varied problems of law and government interference result in a concerned, respectful attitude to his listeners. He accepts endless questions about issues, taking follow-up questions until listeners are satisfied. He continues by greeting individuals who want to meet him. As long as Congressman Dicks has been in office, I have many times sat in small meetings with him. He acts like he is the master and roundtable groups are his slaves. I’ve seen how his staff protects him, especially when he departs a meeting. He has a car waiting for him at both exits. If citizens gather at one exit, he escapes out the other door and is quickly whisked away.

Our readers’ letters, faxes He swoops into town like he is Santa Claus bringing us great presents — huge projects he has bought for us using our credit cards, leaving us to spend the rest of our lives paying for his gifts. Take a chance. Come to a local gathering for Doug Cloud, and judge the difference for yourself. Lorraine Ross, Port Angeles

State races Has anyone checked to see where 24th Legislative District Position 2 candidate Steve Tharinger and Position 1 candidate Kevin Van De Wege are getting the majority of their campaign money? Much of it is from out of the district. Both say it does not mean anything. If you believe that, I have a bridge for sale. Would you vote for anyone who will raise your

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

Lynn McDonald

Retired college professor Cape George

“I think they are a lot of people with a lot of time on their hands. They are angry at just everything and have no solutions for their anger.”

Interviews

After reading the headline, “County Tied in to U.N.? Commissioner Candidate Worried by Park Designation” in the Sept. 12 PDN, I realized that Jefferson County commissioner candidate Jim Boyer’s agenda is based upon creating fear in place of rational and thoughtful political discourse. My grandfather was a member of the John Birch Society, and among other irrational fears, he was certain the U.N. was a communist plot to take over America. Fortunately, the “Birchers” were seen as fringe wing-nuts by the majority of Americans. It seems Boyer has revived that level of irrational paranoia right here in Jefferson County. Hopefully, this county is intelligent and emotionally well-grounded enough to see through these absurd “Glenn Beck cum Joseph Goebbels” tactics.

Dear Mark: We’re deeply sorry for our last e-mail. We were out of line. Also, if you enjoyed “Resident Evil: Afterlife” in 3-D, you may also enjoy the upcoming 3-D movie “Yogi Bear.” You can purchase your ticket(s) at our website. — Your friends at ­Movietixdango.com

What do you think of the tea party movement?

Debbie Bushnell

Austin ‘thoughtful’

WHAT IS GOING ON? We sell you ticket(s) to “Resident Evil: Afterlife.” Then, we offer you all kinds of deals, introduce you to fellow movie lovers, welcome you into our community. We give, give, give. And what do we receive from you? Silence. It’s a two-way street, pal — one we may, um, close for construction so you can’t ride on it!

by

Dave Logan

Retired steward Sekiu

“I love it. I’m a Christian conservative Republican. I feel that our country has gone downhill in honesty lately. I don’t trust our government anymore. It’s full of greed.”

and

Steve Mullensky

and e-mail

taxes, give your water to the fish and give your property rights away? Why are you or have you voted for Tharinger and Van De Wege? They have done this and will continue to do so. At least that is what I hear. I am proud to have been able to defend my country as an Army veteran and deputy sheriff who allows people like this to run for office and tries to take away our liberties. Tharinger is a real greedy politician. He wants to hold two elected offices at once. Van De Wege is also a Clallam County Fire District 3 employee. Conflict of interest? I say yes. Do Tharinger and Van De Wege deserve your vote? My opinion says no. Join me, and vote to elect Position 1 candidate Dan Gase and Position 2 candidate Jim McEntire. I feel they will properly

represent us, unlike what we have now. Ken Thomasson, Sequim

Gun safety Thank you for giving the story “Man Shot in Nose by Apparently Stray Bullet” [PDN, Sept. 27] front-page coverage. It may help to remind people of the importance of gun safety. The nose in this story belongs to my husband, Neil Turnberg. We would both like to express our thanks to everyone who helped us through this bizarre incident. The calm voice of the 9-1-1 dispatcher, the quick and efficient response from Fire District 3 medics and the Clallam County sheriff’s deputies, the staff of Olympic Medical Center emergency room — you were all wonderful. Turn

to

Voices/A9

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A8 minute to think about how you would feel if you were A heartfelt thanks to shot while sitting in your family, friends and even own backyard. strangers who have Lisa Turnberg, phoned, e-mailed and Sequim posted Facebook comments expressing concern and Food stamps good wishes. November elections are To the person who but a few weeks away. caused this accident, we I encourage all conwant you to know we have cerned citizens to get no anger toward you. engaged. What you did was careI try to look at both parless and negligent, not ties and see not so much malicious. what one gives me, but The next time you how much one takes away. choose to fire your weapThe food stamp program ons, please do so in a that we now have in place responsible manner, makis a perfect example of a ing sure that any bullet failed program. you discharge is directed This “safety net” for the toward an appropriate nation’s poor and needy is, backstop. in my opinion, in need of Better yet, enroll in a being cut to the bone. gun safety class. I believe that it not only We feel extremely lucky takes the incentive away that our story has a happy for people who use them, ending; it could have been but also for the person that tragic. is scratching and clawing We would like ask that and trying to make ends all recreational shooters meet as he sees this abuse and hunters exercise the almost every time he utmost caution while purchecks out of a grocery suing their sport. store. Most of you do — thank We now have a program you! that will deliver to your We can only hope that doorstep gourmet food off those who don’t will take a of a refrigerated delivery

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Sunday, October 3, 2010

and e-mail

Turning point in Illinois? ILLINOIS, THE STATE that launched Barack Obama toward the White House, could deliver a painful rebuke in November by handing Democrats a series of major defeats, thanks to a combination of bad politics and bad luck. Obama buddy Alexi Giannoulias, the Illinois treasurer, is struggling to capture the president’s former Senate seat against a Republican opponent damaged by his false claims about military accomplishments. Gov. Pat Quinn, successor to former governor and convicted felon Rod Blagojevich, trails a little-known conservative who readily admits he doesn’t have a plan to solve the state’s crippling budget crisis. And Democratic members of Congress find themselves on the defensive against challengers with little money or name recognition but plenty of antiincumbent fervor on their side.

truck, food stamps accepted. We have a wholesale membership store in Sequim that now takes food stamps or EBT cards. Employees I spoke with have told me their frozen food sales have skyrocketed.

The prospect of victory in such a Democratic stronghold — where Democrats hold both Senate seats and every statewide office — has energized Republicans. National political committees, including one linked to Republican strategist Karl Rove, are pouring money into the state. “Certainly the Republicans nationally have put a bullseye on Illinois. They would like nothing better than to win here,” said state Rep. Jay Hoffman, a member of the state’s Democratic Central Committee. Hoffman doubts Republicans will see the big victories they’re hoping for, but he acknowledges voters in Obama’s home state are frustrated with government, which Democrats dominate both in Washington, D.C., and the Illinois capital of Springfield. The Associated Press

We have local delis that advertise in the local paper EBT cards accepted for you-bake pizza, and throw in an extra dollar and we will bake it for you. It is fundamentally wrong for the federal government to take from some and give to others, regard-

A9

less of income levels. We would be much better served if we kept this “food distribution” at a local level, i.e., food banks, than to keep this broken system. Keep in mind we have more than 40 million people using food stamps.

If government can’t run this program any better than this, just think what they can do with your health care. Dennis Wilhelm, Port Angeles

No-brainer The boy pictured in the PDN on Sept. 30 certainly looks old enough to make the right decision — to wear a helmet while doing jumps on a bicycle. And, Charlie Bermant, the photographer, should have the brains to select a more responsible rider to feature in his “above the fold” photo. Why aren’t folks who use the Port Townsend skate park required to wear helmets? Who will pay when the city is sued for damages when someone sustains a tragic head injury? Oh yeah, my taxes will go up again! Excuse the pun, but isn’t this a “no-brainer?” Put on your helmet! And PDN, don’t feature someone who doesn’t have the brains of a billy goat. Pat Ryan Port Townsend

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

Rave of the Week A QUIET RAVE to all who worked to get new paving on Highway 101 east of Sequim. What a smooth ride. What a quiet ride. That won’t last long — so let’s enjoy it while we can.

. . . and other Raves DO YOUR FAMILY a favor and take them to see “Smoke on the Mountain: Homecoming” now playing at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse. It’s a wonderful evening — you’ll love it! WHAT A JOY to experience Port Angeles Community Players latest show “Smoke on the Mountain: Homecoming.” Everyone can relate to at least one member of the Sanders family. Great music, great show; better not miss it. EDITOR’S NOTE — Performances are today at 2 p.m.; Tuesday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and next Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets at the door. Phone 360452-6651 for information. GRATEFUL RAVE TO Irwin Dental Clinic: To Dr. Johnson for returning a call from someone, not his patient, and for helping me get in contact with someone who could help, and to Dr. Irwin and his assistant for coming out on a Saturday night (Port Angeles) to help someone, not a patient, with a very painful abscessed tooth. MY RAVE IS for Dr. Tierney and his staff and Dr. Peet and his staff, both of Sequim. When I came to them they did not know me. I came with an extremely painful dental emergency. They got me into their office as quickly as possible and dealt with it in an extremely professional, skillful and caring manner. MAJOR RAVES FOR Paratransit services. Dispatch is excellent and operators are caring and helpful. We’re lucky to have that system here.

ROAD DEPARTMENT PAINTERS: Big thanks for marking the curb going off to House Road (Sequim). It makes it more safe for us in the p.m.

Keith Vanderziel while he’s slowly ebbing away from cancer. Anyone who would like to send cards: 1111 E. Seventh St., Port Angeles. God bless you more than we can ever manage to do.

A HUGE RAVE for Port MY RAVE IS for the two Angeles Library for their “Visions employees of Baxter’s Auto Parts of the Universe” space party on (Port Angeles) who helped me Sept. 24. replace my windshield wiper blades a couple weeks ago. RAVES FOR THE beautiful Their helpfulness was far glass art show at the Sequim art more than I expected and was museum [MAC]. The work is by much appreciated. local and international artists. The glass objects are amazing TEARS WELLED UP when and show the great diversity of I saw that picture [PDN, Sept. this art form. Many thanks to those who put 29] of the dog lying on his comfy bed in his cramped cage at the this great show together. Olympic Peninsula Humane Society. THE GLASS FESTIVAL in It takes kindhearted people Sequim was terrific! The classes offered, the show- like Michelle who made those ings at the museum, the lectures dog beds to bring a little sunshine into their lives. Bless you! were such an asset to the art scene here on the Peninsula. A SWOONY HUG to my hero Thank you so much for the husband for displaying his maneffort and organization of the hood in a Sequim eatery. event. He challenged two foulmouthed girly-men in the adjoinA BIG RAVE to Discount ing booth with “Who’s moving? Tires (Sequim) for helping me You or us?” out on my all-weather tires and The wussy gangsta-wannabes giving me a wonderful deal. lurched away to the bar. Last year during the school year when I so desperately FOR DAN ESTES, who once needed it they really helped me again was responsible for bringout. The man’s name was Peter. ing a quality activity to athletes A THANKFUL RAVE to the on the North Olympic Peninsula and beyond. The Olympic Bike persons unknown who bought Adventure last weekend was permy breakfast at Traylors (Port fection from start to finish! Angeles) on Sept. 26. Dan’s hard work has brought What a kind thing to do! so many out-of-towners over the Thank you, thank you! years, and they have returned A BIG THANK you to all the because of the quality of events volunteers at West End Thunder in which they have participated. drag strip in Forks for making A HEARTFELT THANK you the 2010 race season a load of to the kind gentleman who found fun for all of us. our cell phone at the Port Angeles Goodwill store. It was wonI THINK IT would be fun if the train cars that sell ice cream, derful to experience firsthand your honesty and concern. pizza and candy at Discovery Chivalry is alive and well in Bay could find their way to the Port Angeles! Port Angeles waterfront. That would be fun for resiA RAVE FOR the lady in the dents and tourists alike. pickup truck who was picking up BIG RAVE AND thank you some ghastly roadside trash just to Olympic Medical Home Health outside west of Sequim on 101 on and Volunteer Hospice for their Thursday morning. care and help taking care of This mess was dumped last

week and had been strewn all over the two lanes. You are a true blessing to the community! Thank you!

Rant of the Week TO FLU SHOT providers for their available hours (1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday). Where can a person with a day job get a flu shot?

and we apologize for any misunderstanding or inconvenience. WITH ALL THE restaurants in Port Angeles and Sequim, why can’t we get a good buffet one — Golden Corral, Grannies or Old Country Buffet — one that you can afford to take the whole family to and pick what you want to eat rather than what they put on your plate?

. . . and other Rants

BIG RANT TO our local golf club which held the annual “Husband and Wife” golf tournament. REGARDING THE “SEEN The top winners were partAround” item in the PDN on Sept. 23 about the elderly woman ners but not husband and wife. Is this truly a “Husband and who fell. Big rant to the kind of person Wife” tournament? Shame on the ones who who submitted the item, and a entered without their spouses, second big rant to the kind of and shame on those who let newspaper which would actually them enter. print it. TIMBER COMPANIES ON the Peninsula who lock the disabled out of their land but the same timber companies let the healthy hunter walk, bicycle or ride horses behind locked gates should be questioned. If this isn’t illegal, it should be.

A NEW PLAY at the Olympic Theatre of Arts in Sequim was great. But many people in line were upset about the extra $1.50 charge for tickets. The ad said $15 general admission. It should say $16.50. EDITOR’S NOTE — We asked OTA business manager Loren Johnson for a response. Here it is: As a response to numerous requests from our patrons, Olympic Theatre Arts now offers reserved seating. The new ticketing system allows all of our audience members to have an assigned seat, with the added advantage of their being able to select their seats and purchase tickets from home online. To cover the expense of this system, a $1.50 service fee is added to the ticket price of each ticket sold. This fee was noted in our most recent newsletter and other places, but was overlooked in our initial advertising. It has since been corrected,

A BIG RANT to the dump truck driver on Edgewood Drive turning onto Lower Elwha Road. You almost sideswiped me on my road bike on Wednesday evening. Remember people, three feet! WE WOULD LIKE to take this time to thank my paranoid neighbors for all the dusk to dawn security lights. You are saving my money on my light bill. We feel so much safer in the crime-ridden Sequim country life we have moved to. (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), e-mail us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Also, only one rant or rave per writer. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


A10

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Farm

tour offers up-close views

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Emergency siren test is on Monday

Keith Thorpe (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Above: Coen Cronk, left, and Abby Sanford, both 5 from Port Angeles, watch as Constance Wiseman of Greenbank shears a sheep on the Lokalie Gaare farm in Agnew, one of nine farms participating in the 14th annual Clallam County Harvest Celebration on Saturday. Critters and crops were featured in the event honoring the county’s agricultural heritage. Left: Lucille Cassalery of Sequim, left, and her great-granddaughter, Lilly Sandberg, 9, of Port Angeles examine an alpaca at Trade Winds Alpacas near Agnew.

Management, phone 360417-2525.

Stormwater effects

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County All Hazard Alert Stormwater Work Group Broadcast System warnwill discuss recommendaing sirens will sound Mon- tions for addressing the day in communities along stormwater impacts of the North Olympic Penin- development and redevelopment when it meets sula coast. Thursday, Oct. 14. Sirens will sound at The meeting will be three sites in Port Townsend and in LaPush, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Room 160 at the Clallam Neah Bay, Clallam Bay, County Courthouse, 223 Lower Elwha, west Port E. Fourth St., Port AngeAngeles, Dungeness and les. Diamond Point. Members of the public Winchester chimes will are welcome to attend. be heard in Clallam Population growth and County, while tones will associated development, be heard in Jeffrson which will create more County. The sounds will be fol- impervious surfaces, is expected to increase lowed by a message statstormwater runoff. ing that they were just a That will impact water test. quality and quantity, habIn an actual emeritat, water resources and gency, people should check property, said Robert for messages from the Knapp, assistant county Emergency Broadcast planner, in a prepared System on their radios or statement. televisions if possible. The Clallam County These sound tests are Department of Commurun to verify the system’s nity Development created capabilities to send timely the work group to provide warning notification to recommendations on the state’s coastal commu- stormwater management nities. to the Clallam County For more information commissioners. from the Jefferson County Work group meetings Department of Emergency are open to the public. Management, phone 360For more information, 385-9368. see http://tinyurl. For more information com/2fd6wfe or phone from the Clallam County 360-417-2416. Peninsula Daily News Department of Emergency

‘Enjoy your normal days,’ true story urges Mad Hatter’s Tea annual cancer event By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

Lillian Gimmestad of Port Angeles sports headgear made of balloons and lingerie from Goodwill at the annual Mad Hatter’s Tea on Friday.

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Laura Rundle, left, and Michelle Bequette, both of Sequim, dress up for the annual Mad Hatter’s Tea. The event, a celebration of women who have survived breast cancer, is in its 13th year. Great Northwest, which provides breast, cervical and colon cancer screenings to people with too little or no medical insurance. Back to Fryer’s afternoon on the island.

Crashed the moped Riding her rented moped back to Friday Harbor, she crashed. She had to extricate herself from a thicket of bushes, and then push her vehicle back up a hill. When she arrived back at Friday Harbor, she discovered a snarl of grass stuck to the back of the mo-

ped, and a trickle of blood from a cut on her leg. She, Bernie and Nancy just laughed — so hard, they cried. “It took me a few days to recover,” Fryer said. “But it was worth it.” Her doctor found out, and wasn’t pleased. But Fryer was determined to be “normal,” for just that one day at least. “Enjoy your normal days,” she told her audience. And by example, she reminded them to laugh whenever it’s remotely possible.

When Fryer was her sickest, she was puffy, pale and hairless — “like Casper the friendly ghost,” she recalled. But then, around the time she’d been cancer free for five years, she celebrated her 50th birthday. And “let me tell you, 50 was great.” It’s been more than 10 years now since Fryer’s cancer diagnosis. This Mad Hatter’s Tea, the 13th annual, started as a party for Jan Chatfield, who in the mid-1990s was

A Wild ExpEriEncE

1 OFF

$ 00

ADMISSION

www.olygamefarm.com

(Valid for 2010 only. Limit one coupon per customer.)

PERFECTLY ENGINEERED. FOR YOUR HOME.

All the parts in a Lennox® system work together with precision to create absolute comfort. And because it performs heating, cooling, and purification functions with peak efficiency, it can reduce your heating and cooling bill up to half. To learn about the highest level of engineering for your home, call Peninsula Heat today!

TO

WNSEND

N

RT

WA S HI N

GT

O

Giddy Up to Girls’ Night Out

Kick up Your Heels! Thursday, October 7th, 2010 11 am to 8 pm

• Special Sales & Treats at 23 Businesses • Many Shops Open Later • Wear your Western get-up to Girls’ Night Out! • Round-up party at 8:00 p.m. at The Upstage • October 7th

Get your goody bags & cowgirl hats to support breast/cervical cancer testing for local women in need and PT Main Street at: ABOUT TIME • BICKIE’S COTTON CASUALS THE CLOTHES HORSE • ELEVATED ICE CREAM & CANDY CO. • THE GREEN EYESHADE MARICEE FASHIONS • THE PERFECT SEASON PERSONALIZE IT! • SPORT TOWNSEND

SPONSORED BY PORT TOWNSEND MAIN STREET PROGRAM, JEFFERSON HEALTHCARE & PARTICIPATING MERCHANTS www.ptmainstreet.org

0A5098891

“We set the Peninsula standard for Quality Work & Customer satisfaCtion”

07700687

360-681-3333

782 Kitchen-Dick Rd., Sequim

PO

1423 Ward Rd. • Sequim, WA 98382

1-800-778-4295

She quoted Hippocrates, going through her second battle with breast cancer. who said, “Everyone has a doctor in him or her; we just Hats in lieu of hair have to help it in its work. Her friends got together The natural healing force for tea and camaraderie — within each one of us is the and they donned hats, in greatest force in getting support of women who had well.” Since 2001, the Port lost their hair to chemoAngeles office of Planned therapy. The hats at this year’s Parenthood of the Great event were fabulous: feath- Northwest has funded cancer treatment for 47 women ered, flowery, fruit-topped. And the message was who discovered their illness educational as well as inspi- through screenings. More information about rational as Dr. Rena Zimmerman, a radiation oncolo- the Planned Parenthood gist at the Olympic Medical program is available by Cancer Center in Sequim, phoning 360-452-2012. ________ spoke about mind-body connections and the importance Features Editor Diane Urbani of vitamin D and exercise, de la Paz can be reached at 360including for people in treat- 417-3550 or at diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com. ment for cancer.

On October 7th, Giddy Up To Girls’ Night Out in Port Townsend

off Admission

0A5099019

SEQUIM — There was one day in the midst of chemotherapy that turned out to be one of the sweetest — and funniest — of Roxanne Fryer’s life. It was a sunshinedrenched morning, so her husband, Bernie, asked her what she’d like to do. How about a trip to the San Juan Islands, she responded. How about we fly to Friday Harbor, then ride mopeds over to Roche Harbor for cheeseburgers? And how about inviting my sister, Nancy? Fine, Bernie said, even if he wasn’t wild about mopeds. Off they went, for lunch on the Roche Harbor resort patio, where “it was a perfect summer day,” Fryer recalled. So began her true story, told to the crowd at the Mad Hatter’s Tea, an annual celebration of life after breast cancer, and an event to support awareness and early detection of breast cancer for women on the North Olympic Peninsula. The tea — in fact a lavish lunch with even more lavish headgear — drew 152 women to the Sequim Community Church on Friday. Proceeds from the $30 tickets are dedicated to cancer patient support services. At the close of the luncheon, mistress of ceremonies Cheryl Coulter presented two $1,500 checks, one each to the Olympic Medical Cancer Center, which offers support groups and other services, and Planned Parenthood of the


(J)

Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 3, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Prep Notes

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Revived

Rivals on collision Locker carries Dawgs course? in season-saving upset COACHES MAY LOATH looking ahead, but I certainly don’t. In fact, I’m going to do a little of that here. Go ahead and flip to Page B3 Matt and look at the Schubert Olympic League football standings. See who’s sitting at the top? Yep, archrivals Port Angeles and Sequim. All of the sudden, an idea that would’ve been scoffed at by some just one month ago, is gaining more and more steam as each week passes. If everything holds to form, the Roughriders and Wolves will be playing a de facto league championship game when they meet at Civic Field on Oct. 29. If that doesn’t get you excited, you either, A) don’t like sports, B) don’t like Port Angeles or Sequim or C) don’t have a pulse. “That would be great,” said Sequim coach Erik Wiker, who is 4-2 against Port Angeles. “My kids are looking forward to that. “I said at the beginning of the year, no matter Wiker what [the game is] way more dynamic because it’s league. “It’s going to be like a bowl game or something.” It would be one that almost nobody saw coming. While an Olympic League coaches’ poll conducted by the PDN and Kitsap Sun listed Sequim as the preseason favorite, Port Angeles was a distant seventh out of eight. Considering the Riders were coming off an 0-10 season, it was understandable, even if they were moving down to Class 2A. Yet all they’ve done under firstyear head coach Wahl Tom Wahl is win their first five games for the first time in 18 years. “I’m not too surprised that they are one of the top teams,” Wiker said. “We played them all year in the summer, and they have good athletes. “I thought that with this kind of league they are going to have more success. And once you start believing, you really do well.” Not surprisingly, Wahl wasn’t quite ready to warm up to the prospect with three games to go before that meeting. A close-to-the-vest man, he instead opted for some coach speak. “We’re just taking it one game at a time,” Wahl said. “We know ultimately that game is going to happen. Whatever our records are at that point, it doesn’t matter. It’s always a big game.”

Big obstacle The Riders will face perhaps their greatest obstacle to a winner-take-all rivalry game next week when North Mason comes to Civic Field. Wahl called the Bulldogs “our toughest opponent yet.” North Mason sits just behind Port Angeles (3-0 in league, 5-0 overall) and Sequim (3-0, 4-1) at 2-1 in league. That being said, Sequim’s next opponent, Kingston, seemed to pass the eye test a little more in its 14-9 loss to Port Angeles last week. They just looked more physical and disciplined than North Mason, which fell to Sequim 49-20 on Friday. “[That win] was our first league championship game,” Wiker said. “As long as we keep winning, we’re going to have more league championship games. “I think Kingston is probably going to be the tougher one out of those two, and that’s our next league championship game. “When we get through that, if PA is still undefeated or has one loss, than that’s our next league championship game.”

________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt.schubert@ peninsuladailynews.com.

The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — A moment after Southern California’s Joe Houston clanged a field-goal attempt off the Also . . . upright, Jake ■ Cougars Locker practically bounced fall short at onto the Coli- UCLA/B4 seum field, brimming with anticipation. Washington’s quarterback had just over 2½ minutes left for a career-defining — perhaps career-saving — drive.

Locker didn’t want to waste a second of it. And as it turned out, the Huskies needed every instant to finish another landmark win over USC. Locker engineered a long drive to set up Erik Folk’s 32-yard field goal as time expired, and Washington upset the 18th-ranked Trojans 32-31 on Saturday night, beating USC on a last-minute field goal for the second straight season. Turn

to

Dawgs/B4

The Associated Press

Washington head coach Steve Sarkisian, front, hugs his starting quarterback Jake Locker after Washington’s win over Southern California on Saturday in Los Angeles.

Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News

Chimacum quarterback Mason Moug (4) falls out of bounds to stop the clock with two seconds left in the first half of Friday night’s game against Life Christian Academy at Memorial Field in Port Townsend.

Extra painful defeat Chimacum sees lead slip vs. Life Christian Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Chimacum’s football team lost a 14-13 heartbreaker to Life Christian Academy on Friday night at Memorial Field.

A missed extra-point kick was the difference in the Nisqually League game between two teams fighting for a postseason spot. The Eagles (1-2 in league, 2-3 overall) now have the upper hand

against the Cowboys (0-3, 1-4). “Now we have to win out and hope to get some help to make the playoffs,” coach Shawn Meacham said. The Cowboys also got a scare when two-way starter Joe Modispacher suffered a shoulder injury. “We thought he might be out for the year but they say he will only miss a week,” Meacham said. “We won’t have him next

Prep Football week, but he will be back to help us after that. “That would have been a big loss for us.” Devin Manix had a part in both of Chimacum’s touchdowns. He threw at 41-yard touchdown pass to Mason Moug and scored on a 2-yard run. Turn

to

Football/B3

College Soccer

Pirates keep on winning Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula College men’s soccer team continues to justify its top ranking in the NWAACC. The Pirates scored two second-half goals and goalkeeper Jared Wilson recorded his fourth shutout in a 2-0 win over thirdranked Chemeketa on Saturday at Civic Field. Peninsula moved to 8-0-2 overall and 6-0-0 in West Division play with the win, its eighth in a row since beginning the season with two ties. The Pirates also exacted a measure of revenge, as it was Chemeketa (3-1-0, 9-2-0) that eliminated Peninsula from the NWAACC playoffs last year. “This was a big win for us,” said Pirates coach Andrew Chapman, whose team was ranked No. 1 earlier in the week. “The guys all did the right things in this game. They weren’t real nervous. They were ready to play hard.” A first-half adjustment — Chapman slid one of his forwards down to the midfield — allowed the Pirates to take control of the game early on. Turn

to

Pirates/B3

Steve Zugschwerdt/for Peninsula Daily News

Sequim running back Isaac Yamamoto busts loose during Friday night’s game against North Mason in Belfair. Yamamoto ran for 161 yards on 16 carries.

Wolves unleashed Sequim romps in 49-20 victory over North Mason By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

BELFAIR — Sequim’s shockand-awe spread offense wasted little time Friday night. Wolves head coach Erik Wiker wanted a fast start in Friday night’s Olympic League

showdown at North Mason. And that’s exactly what he got. Sequim scored its first touchdown in four plays and never looked back, dropping North Mason 49-20 to remain tied atop the league standings with archrival Port Angeles.

The Wolves (3-0 in league, 4-1 overall) rolled up 506 total yards — 242 passing and 264 rushing — in earning their eighth win in a row over the Bulldogs. “Our theory was come out fast, score fast, and that hurts their offense,” Wiker said. “We used to [rely on a heavy rushing attack like North Mason] too, and when you’re down 14 you start to panic fast.” Turn

to

Wolves/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Today’s Area Sports

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Bowling LAUREL LANES 7 Cedars Mixed Men’s high game: Tracey Almond, 229; men’s high series: Tracey Almond, 644. Women’s high game: Tracey Rooks, 208; women’s high series: Brenda Halto, 491. Leading team: Team 12. SEQUIM OLYMPIC LANES First Federal Senior Snipers Men’s high game: Bill Conn, 164; men’s high series: Pat Flanigan, 476. Women’s high game: Chris Getchman, 171; women’s high series: Chris Getchman, 429. Leading team: Muzzel Loaders. Wall Street Journal Men’s high game: George Kennedy, 186; men’s high series: George Kennedy, 506. Women’s high game: Kelly Meyer and Joan Wright, 188; women’s high series: Joan Wright, 500. Leading team: Want Ads. 9 Pin No Tap @ 10 a.m. Men’s high game: Pete Centino, 231; men’s high series: Bill Fowler, 472. Women’s high game: Linda Chansky, 199; women’s high series: Marilyn Hooser, 558. Les Schwab Mixed Men’s high game: Cliff Silliman, 204; men’s high series: Cliff Silliman, 504. Women’s high game: Rose Jaeger, 177; women’s high series: Rose Jaeger, 519.

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Mike Horton Memorial Scramble Final Gross: 1. Kevin Russell, Mark Leffers, Mark Mitrovich and Tim Lusk, 57; 2. Gary Thorne, Mike DuPuis, Greg senf and Rob Botero, 57; 3. Jeff Colvin, Eric Kovatch, Steve colvin and win Miller, 63. Net: 1. Joe Hudson, Lorraine Hudson, Randy Guimond and Cindy Guimond, 50; 2. Paul Reed, Bill Evenstad, Jim Brooks and Jay Kalla, 52.6; 3. Vern Elkhart, Fred Pratt, Don Edgmon and Joe Hartley, 57.4. Men’s Long Drive No. 10 (0 to 10): Bill Evenstad Men’s Long Drive No. 10 (11 and up): Troy Atwell. Ladies Long Drive No. 10: Kellie Reed. Men’s Closest to Pin No. 9 (0 to 10): Mike DuPuis. Men’s Closest to Pin No. 9 (11 and up): Steve Colvin. Ladies Closest to Pin No. 4: Deb Jacobs. Honeypot Closest to Pin No. 17: Gary Thorne. Team Closest to Pin No. 14: Dick Goodman, Dave Henderson, Tom Lowe and Ray Dooley. Oct. 2 Men’s Club Substitute Par Any Two Holes Gross: Gerald Petersen, 69; John Tweter, 73. Net: Jerry Sparks, 63; Bernie Anselmo, 64; Gene Ketchum, 65; Frank Randall, 65.

Prep Sports Football Friday’s Scores Adna 14, Toutle Lake 0 Almira/Coulee-Hartline 49, Easton-Thorp 0 Archbishop Murphy 35, Lakewood 28 Arlington 36, Lake Stevens 28 Auburn Riverside 55, Mt. Rainier 7 Bellarmine Prep 33, Central Kitsap 13 Bellevue 49, Mercer Island 31 Bellingham 49, Sehome 7 Black Hills 40, Aberdeen 31 Bonney Lake 34, Auburn Mountainview 7 Bothell 27, Inglemoor 3 Brewster 37, Liberty Bell 6 Burlington-Edison 20, Mount Vernon 6 Camas 55, Prairie 7 Capital 49, Yelm 13 Cashmere 56, Tonasket 7 Castle Rock 21, Columbia (White Salmon) 0 Chelan 77, Okanogan 49 Cheney 48, Deer Park 7 Chiawana 17, Richland 7 Chief Leschi 35, Darrington 8 Clarkston 21, East Valley (Spokane) 6 Clover Park 41, Sumner 34 Colfax 45, Reardan 13 Columbia River 34, Hudson’s Bay 19 Columbia(Hunters)-Inchelium 46, Northport 16 Colville 41, Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 21 Connell 63, Columbia (Burbank) 0 Curtis 48, Puyallup 7 Cusick 72, Curlew 24 Davis 51, Walla Walla 7 Dayton 13, Tri-Cities Prep 3 Eastlake 34, Newport (Bellevue) 21 Eastmont 38, Pasco 14 Eastside Catholic 56, Chief Sealth 6 Eatonville 28, White River 27, OT Edmonds-Woodway 52, Jackson 51, OT Eisenhower 21, Wenatchee 20 Enumclaw 42, Decatur 7 Ephrata 21, Wapato 7 Everett 48, Shorecrest 21 Evergreen (Vancouver) 38, Battle Ground 14 Ferris 31, Central Valley 10 Franklin 53, Ingraham 3 Franklin Pierce 34, Steilacoom 28 Garfield 35, Roosevelt 28 Gig Harbor 21, South Kitsap 14 Glacier Peak 42, Meadowdale 21 Goldendale 27, Cle Elum/Roslyn 10 Gonzaga Prep 47, Rogers (Spokane) 7 Graham-Kapowsin 47, Emerald Ridge 0 Granite Falls 28, Coupeville 21 Heritage 27, Grant, Ore. 26 Issaquah 38, Kamiak 6 Juanita 28, Liberty (Renton) 14 Kamiakin 37, West Valley (Yakima) 6 Kelso 28, Fort Vancouver 20 Kennedy 49, Foster 7 Kennewick 34, Sunnyside 7 Kent Meridian 38, Thomas Jefferson 34 Kentlake 33, Tahoma 21 Kentwood 19, Auburn 7

American League

American League W 90 79 79 61

L 71 81 82 99

PCT .559 .494 .491 .381

W z-Yankees 95 z-Tampa Bay 95 Boston 87 Toronto 84 Baltimore 66

L 65 66 73 77 95

PCT .594 .590 .544 .522 .410

W x-Minnesota 94 Chicago Sox 87 Detroit 80 Cleveland 69 Kansas City 67

L 67 74 81 92 94

PCT .584 .540 .497 .429 .416

x-Texas Oakland LA Angels Seattle

WEST GB HOME ROAD - 51-29 39-42 10.5 47-34 32-47 11 43-38 36-44 28.5 35-44 26-55 EAST GB HOME ROAD - 52-29 43-36 .5 49-32 46-34 8 44-35 43-38 11.5 45-33 39-44 29.5 37-43 29-52 CENTRAL GB HOME ROAD - 53-27 41-40 7 44-36 43-38 14 52-29 28-52 25 38-43 31-49 27 38-42 29-52

RS 785 654 675 507

RA 681 620 700 689

DIFF +104 +34 -25 -182

STRK L10 Won 1 6-4 Won 2 3-7 Lost 1 4-6 Lost 3 4-6

POFF 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

RS 849 799 803 753 611

RA 678 647 734 727 781

DIFF +171 +152 +69 +26 -170

STRK L10 Won 1 4-6 Won 1 5-5 Lost 4 4-6 Lost 1 8-2 Won 4 5-5

POFF 100.0 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

RS 780 746 747 641 674

RA 669 699 741 746 842

DIFF +111 +47 +6 -105 -168

STRK L10 Won 1 3-7 Won 1 8-2 Lost 6 4-6 Lost 1 7-3 Lost 1 5-5

POFF 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

National League WEST ROAD 43-38 45-35 31-49 35-46 25-54 EAST HOME ROAD 54-30 43-34 55-25 35-46 40-40 39-42 47-33 32-49 41-40 27-53 CENTRAL HOME ROAD 48-32 42-39 51-29 34-47 40-41 37-43 41-39 34-47 35-46 40-40 40-41 17-63

W San Francis 91 San Diego 90 Colorado 83 LA Dodgers 78 Arizona 65

L 70 71 78 82 95

PCT .565 .559 .516 .488 .406

GB HOME - 48-32 1 45-36 8 52-29 12.5 43-36 25.5 40-41

RS 694 665 769 661 710

RA 583 578 711 689 830

DIFF +111 +87 +58 -28 -120

STRK L10 Lost 2 6-4 Won 2 5-5 Lost 7 1-9 Lost 1 5-5 Won 1 6-4

POFF 94.0 52.3 0.0 0.0 0.0

W *-Philadelphi 97 Atlanta 90 Florida 79 NY Mets 79 Washington 68

L 64 71 82 82 93

PCT .602 .559 .491 .491 .422

GB - 7 18 18 29

RS 765 730 714 655 653

RA 632 622 715 650 741

DIFF +133 +108 -1 +5 -88

STRK L10 Won 3 7-3 Lost 2 4-6 Won 1 3-7 Won 2 5-5 Lost 3 5-5

POFF 100.0 53.7 0.0 0.0 0.0

W x-Cincinnati 90 St. Louis 85 Milwaukee 77 Houston 75 Chicago Cub 75 Pittsburgh 57

L 71 76 84 86 86 104

PCT .559 .528 .478 .466 .466 .354

GB - 5 13 15 15 33

RS 787 730 748 607 685 585

RA 683 640 801 729 763 861

DIFF +104 +90 -53 -122 -78 -276

STRK L10 Won 1 5-5 Won 4 8-2 Lost 1 7-3 Lost 3 2-8 Won 3 6-4 Lost 1 4-6

POFF 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

King’s 35, South Whidbey 0 Kittitas 37, White Swan 8 LaCenter 21, Ilwaco 6 LaCrosse/Washtucna 18, Colton 14 Lake Washington 38, Sammamish 14 Lakes 42, Peninsula 14 LaSalle 47, Granger 20 Liberty Christian 44, Garfield-Palouse 18 Lincoln 26, Foss 10 Lind-Ritzville 31, Liberty (Spangle) 7 Lynden 35, Ferndale 21 Lynden Christian 49, Friday Harbor 7 Manson 16, Entiat 13, 2OT Mariner 35, Cascade (Everett) 7 Mark Morris 53, Woodland 20 Mary Walker 28, Davenport 14 Marysville-Pilchuck 48, Stanwood 7 Mead 54, Shadle Park 7 Meridian 56, Nooksack Valley 14 Monroe 42, Snohomish 21 Moses Lake 33, Hermiston, Ore. 14 Mount Baker 45, Blaine 15 Mount Si 28, Interlake 7 Mountlake Terrace 22, Sedro-Woolley 13 Mt. Spokane 42, University 23 Naches Valley 33, Kiona-Benton 32 Napavine 55, Pe Ell 0 Northwest Christian (Lacey) 36, Raymond 21 Oak Harbor 53, Lynnwood 6 Odessa-Harrington 50, Selkirk 6 Olympia 45, Mount Tahoma 0 Omak 33, Cascade (Leavenworth) 28 Oroville 31, Kettle Falls 13 Othello 16, East Valley (Yakima) 13 Pateros 7, Bridgeport 6 Pomeroy 70, Sunnyside Christian 20 Prosser 23, Ellensburg 20 Pullman 37, Medical Lake 7 Quincy 28, Grandview 18 R.A. Long 36, Washougal 23 Rainier Beach 34, Nathan Hale 28 Renton def. Tyee, forfeit River View 62, Mabton 0 Riverside 49, Newport 0 Royal 49, Wahluke 7 Seattle Prep 21, Bainbridge 14 Shorewood 42, Lakeside (Seattle) 7 Skyline 45, Redmond 0 Skyview 49, Lincoln, Ore. 26 Southridge 24, Hanford 9 St. John-Endicott 36, Touchet 18 Stadium 28, Shelton 27 Stevenson 21, Ridgefield 12 Tacoma Baptist 33, LaConner 7 Taholah 56, Oakville 0 Timberline 17, Wilson, Woodrow 9 Toledo 21, Kalama 7 Toppenish 42, Selah 3 Tumwater 55, Hockinson 13 Union 10, Mountain View 0 W. F. West 35, River Ridge 0 Wahkiakum 25, Mossyrock 6 Warden 46, Waterville 6 Washington 30, Fife 24 Wellpinit 52, Republic 16 West Seattle 29, Cleveland 6 West Valley (Spokane) 35, Lakeland, Idaho 21 White Pass/Morton 28, Vancouver Christian 0 Willapa Valley 30, Naselle 0 Woodinville 50, Ballard 0 Zillah 53, Highland 7 Postponements and cancellations North Beach vs. Ocosta, ppd. to Oct 2.

Baseball Athletics 9, Mariners 0 Friday Oakland Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi RDavis cf 3 2 2 1 ISuzuki rf 3 0 1 0 Barton 1b 4 2 3 6 Halmn pr-rf 0 0 0 0 Larish 1b 1 0 0 0 Figgins 2b 4 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 5 0 1 1 FGtrrz dh 3 0 0 0 Cust dh 4 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 KSuzuk c 5 1 1 0 Lngrhn lf 3 0 1 0 Kzmnff 3b 4 0 0 0 J.Bard c 4 0 0 0 Carter lf 2 1 0 0 MSndrs cf 4 0 1 0 Hermid rf 4 1 1 0 Mangin 3b 3 0 1 0 Pnngtn ss 4 2 2 1 JoWilsn ss 3 0 1 0 Totals 36 9 10 9 Totals 30 0 6 0 Oakland 160 101 000 — 9 Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 DP—Oakland 2, Seattle 1. LOB—Oakland 5, Seattle 7. 2B—Barton (33). HR—Barton 2 (10). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Cahill W,18-8 7 5 0 0 2 6 H.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 1 Ro.Wolf 1 0 0 0 2 1 Seattle French L,5-7 4 8 8 8 2 3 Seddon 3 1 1 1 2 1 Olson 1 1 0 0 1 1 B.Sweeney 1 0 0 0 0 1 WP—Olson. Umpires—Home, Paul Emmel; First, Bill Hohn; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Bruce Dreckman. T—2:22. A—19,656 (47,878).

Football NFL Glance NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 2 1 0 .667 72 Arizona 2 1 0 .667 48 St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 57 San Francisco 0 3 0 .000 38 East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 83 Washington 1 2 0 .333 56 Dallas 1 2 0 .333 54 N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 55 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 2 1 0 .667 77 New Orleans 2 1 0 .667 63 Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 50 Carolina 0 3 0 .000 32 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 66 Green Bay 2 1 0 .667 78 Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 43 Detroit 0 3 0 .000 56 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 68 San Diego 1 2 0 .333 72 Denver 1 2 0 .333 61 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 52

College Football Far West

Southwest

Baylor 55, Kansas 7 Oklahoma 28, Texas 20 Sam Houston St. 38, Lamar 10

Midwest

Ball St. 31, Cent. Michigan 17

Buffalo 28, Bowling Green 26 Campbell 27, Butler 10 Dayton 48, Valparaiso 14 Drake 42, Marist 0 Idaho 33, W. Michigan 13 Indiana St. 56, Quincy 22 Miami (Ohio) 27, Kent St. 21 Michigan 42, Indiana 35 Michigan St. 34, Wisconsin 24 Missouri St. 35, Youngstown St. 25 N. Illinois 50, Akron 14 N. Iowa 24, S. Dakota St. 14 Northwestern 29, Minnesota 28 Ohio 30, E. Michigan 17 Ohio St. 24, Illinois 13 S. Illinois 38, Illinois St. 17 SE Missouri 28, E. Illinois 13 South Dakota 27, North Dakota 17 W. Illinois 28, N. Dakota St. 16

South Auburn 52, Louisiana-Monroe 3 Bethune-Cookman 69, Morgan St. 32

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard

Air Force 14, Navy 6 Boise St. 59, New Mexico St. 0 Colorado 29, Georgia 27 E. Washington 35, Weber St. 24 Montana 30, N. Colorado 7 Montana St. 64, Sacramento St. 61, OT N. Arizona 26, S. Utah 23 Oregon 52, Stanford 31 Oregon St. 31, Arizona St. 28 Portland St. 38, Idaho St. 3 TCU 27, Colorado St. 0 UC Davis 14, San Jose St. 13 UCLA 42, Washington St. 28 UTEP 38, New Mexico 20 Washington 32, Southern Cal 31

Peninsula Daily News

Delaware 13, James Madison 10 E. Kentucky 58, Kentucky St. 7 Elon 24, Samford 19 Florida St. 34, Virginia 14 Georgia St. 37, Morehead St. 10 Grambling St. 25, Alabama A&M 22 Howard 28, Lincoln, Pa. 14 Jacksonville 35, San Diego 28 LSU 16, Tennessee 14 Maryland 21, Duke 16 McNeese St. 24, Northwestern St. 7 Miami 30, Clemson 21 Mississippi 42, Kentucky 35 Mississippi St. 49, Alcorn St. 16 North Carolina 42, East Carolina 17 Old Dominion 14, Gardner-Webb 7 Prairie View 34, MVSU 13 Richmond 41, Coastal Carolina 19 S. Carolina St. 19, Florida A&M 0 South Florida 31, Florida Atlantic 3 Tennessee St. 37, N. Carolina A&T 7 VMI 24, Presbyterian 13

PA 57 77 49 87 PA 62 67 53 85 PA 46 58 59 71 PA 51 47 38 78 PA 38 61 65 76

Saturday’s Games Minnesota 5, Toronto 4 N.Y. Yankees 6, Boston 5, 10 inn., 1st game Chi. White Sox 6, Cleveland 2, 6 inn. Baltimore 2, Detroit 1 Tampa Bay 4, Kansas City 0 Texas 6, L.A. Angels 2 N.Y. Yankees at Boston, late, 2nd game Oakland at Seattle, late Today’s Games Detroit (Coke 7-5) at Baltimore (Bergesen 8-11), 10:35 a.m. N.Y. Yankees (Undecided) at Boston (Lackey 13-11), 10:35 a.m. Cleveland (Germano 0-2) at Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 3-2), 11:05 a.m. Tampa Bay (W.Davis 12-10) at Kansas City (O’Sullivan 4-6), 11:10 a.m. Toronto (Rzepczynski 3-4) at Minnesota (Blackburn 10-11), 11:10 a.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 4-4) at Texas (C.Lewis 12-13), 12:05 p.m. Oakland (Braden 10-14) at Seattle (Rowland-Smith 1-10), 1:10 p.m.

National League Saturday’s Games St. Louis 1, Colorado 0, 11 innings Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 4 N.Y. Mets 7, Washington 2 Philadelphia 7, Atlanta 0 San Diego 4, San Francisco 2 Chicago Cubs 8, Houston 3 Florida 2, Pittsburgh 0 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late Today’s Games Milwaukee (Ra.Wolf 13-11) at Cincinnati (Harang 6-7), 10:10 a.m. Pittsburgh (Burres 4-4) at Florida (Ani. Sanchez 12-12), 10:10 a.m. Washington (Li.Hernandez 10-12) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 15-9), 10:10 a.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 16-9), 10:35 a.m. Chi. Cubs (Dempster 15-11) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 11-12), 11:05 a.m. Colorado (E.Rogers 2-2) at St. Louis (Suppan 2-8), 11:15 a.m. San Diego (Latos 14-9) at San Francisco (J.Sanchez 12-9), 1:05 p.m. Arizona (R.Lopez 7-15) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 9-12), 1:10 p.m.

East L T Pct PF PA 1 0 .667 68 47 1 0 .667 52 51 1 0 .667 90 82 3 0 .000 47 87 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 2 1 0 .667 77 78 Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 89 61 Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 78 42 Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 40 83 North W L T Pct PF PA Pittsburgh 3 0 0 1.000 72 33 Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 59 55 Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 44 41 Cleveland 0 3 0 .000 45 57 Today’s Games Denver at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Detroit at Green Bay, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Carolina at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Houston at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1:15 p.m. Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 5:20 p.m. Open: Kansas City, Dallas, Minnesota, Tampa Bay W N.Y. Jets 2 Miami 2 New England 2 Buffalo 0

AP College Top 25 Fared No. 1 Alabama (5-0) beat No. 7 Florida 31-6. Next: at No. 20 South Carolina, Saturday. No. 2 Ohio State (5-0) beat Illinois 24-13. Next: vs. Indiana, Saturday. No. 3 Boise State (4-0) beat New Mexico State 59-0. Next: vs. Toledo, Saturday. No. 4 Oregon (5-0) beat No. 9 Stanford 52-31. Next: at Washington State, Saturday. No. 5 TCU (5-0) beat Colorado State 27-0. Next: vs. Wyoming, Saturday. No. 6 Nebraska (4-0) did not play. Next: at Kansas State, Thursday. No. 7 Florida (4-1) lost to No. 1 Alabama 31-6. Next: vs. No. 12 LSU, Saturday. No. 8 Oklahoma (5-0) beat No. 21 Texas 28-20. Next: vs. Iowa State, Saturday, Oct. 16. No. 9 Stanford (4-1) lost to No. 4 Oregon 52-31. Next: vs. No. 18 Southern Cal, Saturday. No. 10 Auburn (5-0) beat Louisiana-Monroe 52-3. Next: at Kentucky, Saturday. No. 11 Wisconsin (4-1) lost to No. 24 Michigan State 34-24. Next: vs. Minnesota, Saturday. No. 12 LSU (5-0) beat Tennessee 16-14. Next: at No. 7 Florida, Saturday. No. 13 Utah (4-0) did not play. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday. No. 14 Arizona (4-0) did not play. Next vs. Oregon State, Saturday. No. 15 Arkansas (3-1) did not play. Next: vs. Texas A&M at Arlington, Texas, Saturday. No. 16 Miami (3-1) beat Clemson 30-21. Next: vs. Florida State, Saturday. No. 17 Iowa (4-1) beat No. 22 Penn State 24-3. Next: at No. 19 Michigan, Saturday, Oct. 16. No. 18 Southern Cal (4-1) lost to Washington 32-31. Next: at No. 9 Stanford, Saturday. No. 19 Michigan (5-0) beat Indiana 42-35. Next: vs. No. 24 Michigan State, Saturday.

Today 4 a.m. (5) KING Golf, Ryder Cup at Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, Wales 6 a.m. (2) CBUT 2010 Commonwealth Games, Opening Ceremonies at Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in India. 10 a.m. (5) KING USEF Equestrian, Kentucky Horse Park in Louisville, Ky. 10 a.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Seattle Seahawks at St. Louis Rams. 10 a.m. (26) ESPN NASCAR Auto Racing, Price Chopper 400 Sprint Cup Series at Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan. 10:30 a.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. 11 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS Golf, Ensure Classic at Rock Barn Golf & Country Club in Conover, N.C. 11 a.m. WGN MLB Baseball, Cleveland Indians at Chicago White Sox. 11:55 a.m. (27) ESPN2 SPL Soccer, Deportivo La Coruna at Real Madrid. 1 p.m. (7) KIRO NFL Football, Indianapolis Colts at Jacksonville Jaguars. 1 p.m. (10) CITY (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Washington Redskins at. Philadelphia Eagles. 1 p.m. (25) FSNW MLB Baseball, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners. 1 p.m. (47) GOLF NWT Golf, Soboba Classic at The Country Club at Soboba Springs in San Jacinto, Calif. 5 p.m. (5) KING NFL Football, Chicago Bears at New York Giants. 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 MLS Soccer, Chivas U.S.A. at Los Angeles Galaxy. No. 20 South Carolina (3-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 1 Alabama, Saturday. No. 21 Texas (3-2) lost to No. 8 Oklahoma 28-20. Next: at No. 6 Nebraska, Saturday, Oct. 16. No. 22 Penn State (3-2) lost to No. 17 Iowa 24-3. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. No. 23 North Carolina State (4-1) lost to Virginia Tech 41-30. Next: vs. Boston College, Saturday. No. 24 Michigan State (5-0) beat No. 11 Wisconsin 34-24. Next: at No. 19 Michigan, Saturday. No. 25 Nevada (4-0) at UNLV. Next: vs. San Jose State, Saturday.

Golf Ryder Cup CELTIC MANOR RESORT Newport, Wales Yardage: 7,37; Par: 71 As of Saturday UNITED STATES 6, EUROPE 4 Fourballs United States 2½, Europe 1½ Lee Westwood and Martin Kaymer, Europe, def. Phil Mickelson and Dustin Johnson, United States, 3 and 2. Stewart Cink and Matt Kuchar, United States, halved with Graeme McDowell and Rory McIlroy, Europe. Tiger Woods and Steve Stricker, United States, def. Ian Poulter and Ross Fisher, Europe, 2 up. Bubba Watson and Jeff Overton, United States, def. Luke Donald and Padraig Harrington, Europe, 3 and 2. Foursomes United States 3½, Europe 2½ Zach Johnson and Hunter Mahan, United States, def. Edoardo Molinari and Francesco Molinari, Europe, 2 up. Rickie Fowler and Jim Furyk, United States, halved with Lee Westwood and Martin Kaymer, Europe. Padraig Harrington and Ross Fisher, Europe, def. Phil Mickelson and Dustin Johnson, United States, 3 and 2. Tiger Woods and Steve Stricker, United States, def. Miguel Angel Jimenez and Peter Hanson, Europe, 4 and 3. Ian Poulter and Luke Donald, Europe, def. Bubba Watson and Jeff Overton, United States, 2 and 1. Stewart Cink and Matt Kuchar, United States, def. Graeme McDowell and Rory McIlroy, Europe, 1 up. Session 3 Foursomes (Play suspended) Luke Donald and Lee Westwood, Europe, 4 pp on Steve Stricker and Tiger Woods, United States. Graeme McDowell and Rory McIlroy, Europe, 3 up on Zach Johnson and Hunter Mahan, United States. Session 3 Four-balls (Play suspended) Padraig Harrington and Ross Fisher, Europe, 1 up on Jim Furyk and D. Johnson, United States. Peter Hanson and Miguel Angel Jimenez, Europe, 2 up on Bubba Watson and Jeff Overton, United States Eduardo Molinari and Francesco Molinari, Europe, 1 up on Stewart Cink and Matt Kuchar, United States. Ian Poulter and Martin Kaymer, Europe, 2 up on Phil Mickelson and Rickie Fowler, United States.

Oakland drops Mariners Virginia Tech 41, N.C. State 30 W. Carolina 24, The Citadel 13 William & Mary 31, Villanova 24 Wofford 38, Furman 17

East

Albany, N.Y. 23, Yale 20 Cent. Connecticut St. 24, Sacred Heart 14 Colgate 34, Georgetown, D.C. 3 Columbia 42, Princeton 14 Connecticut 40, Vanderbilt 21 Cornell 21, Bucknell 12 Harvard 35, Lafayette 10 Holy Cross 36, Fordham 31 Maine 16, New Hampshire 13, OT Massachusetts 27, Towson 14 Monmouth, N.J. 44, Duquesne 17 Penn 35, Dartmouth 28, OT Pittsburgh 44, Fla. International 17 Rhode Island 27, Brown 24, OT Robert Morris 35, St. Francis, Pa. 14 Temple 42, Army 38 Tulane 17, Rutgers 14

lost 100 games two of the last three seasons and five times in their 34-year history. The Associated Press Chris Carter also David Pauley (4-9) connected for the A’s, SEATTLE — Mark who have outhomered gave up all three homEllis and Jack Cust ers. He allowed four the Mariners 7-1 in hit back-to-back hom- the first three games hits and four runs in ers to lead the Oakseven innings. of the four-game set. land Athletics over Seattle’s Justin Both teams entered Seattle 5-3 on SaturSmoak had two douthe series with a day night, handing the major league-low 100 bles to extend his Mariners their 100th career-high hitting homers. loss of the season. The Mariners have streak to nine games.

Seattle reaches 100 loss mark for second time in past three seasons


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Preps Football Standings As of Sept. 25 Olympic League Conf. Overall Port Angeles 3-0 5-0 Sequim 3-0 4-1 Kingston 2-1 3-2 North Mason 2-1 3-2 Bremerton(3A) 1-2 2-3 North Kitsap 1-2 1-4 Klahowya 0-3 0-5 Olympic 0-3 0-5 Friday’s Games Port Angeles 55, Olympic 25 Sequim 49, North Mason 20 Kingston 49, Klahowya 13 Bremerton 35, North Kitsap 7 Oct. 7 Games Sequim at Kingston, 7 p.m. Oct. 8 Games North Mason at Port Angeles, 7 p.m. North Kitsap at Olympic, 7 p.m. Klahowya at Bremerton, 7 p.m. 1A/2B Nisqually League Conf. Overall Cascade Christ. 3-0 5-0 Orting 3-0 3-2 Cedar Park Christ. 2-1 4-1 Charles Wright 2-1 3-1 Vashon Island 1-2 2-3 Life Christian 1-2 2-3 Chimacum 0-3 1-4 Port Townsend 0-3 0-5 Friday’s Games Life Christian 14, Chimacum 13 Cedar Park Christian 57, Port Townsend 6 Orting 19, Vashon Island 0 Cascade Christian 42, Charles Wright 15 Oct. 8 Games Vashon Island at Chimacum, 7 p.m. Port Townsend at Life Christian, 7 p.m. Charles Wright at Orting, 7 p.m. Oct. 9 Games Cedar Park Christian at Cascade Christian, 7 p.m.

(J) — Sunday, October 3, 2010

B3

Football: Quilcene loses to Neah Bay Robert Ristick snagged an interception for the RedDylan Brown-Bishop’s skins. Port Townsend next kick for the second touchdown put the Cowboys ahead plays at Life Christian on Friday night. 13-7. Life Christian, though, came back to win it by scor- Cedar Park 57, Port Townsend 6 ing a touchdown with less Port Townsend 6 0 0 0— 6 C. Park Christian 6 14 30 7— 57 than three minutes to play: a First Quarter 35-yard pass from Kingston PT—Matt Juran 22 interception return (kick failed) statistics not available Kuehner to his brother Kar- Cedar Park scoringIndividual Stats son. Rushing— PT: Thornton 12-42. CP: Dinsmore Continued from B1

Life Christian 14, Chimacum 13 Life Christian 0 7 0 7— 14 Chimacum 0 6 7 0— 13 Second Quarter LC—Huber 6 run (Kuta kick) C—Moug 41 pass from Manix (kick failed) Third Quarter C—Manix 2 run (Brown-Bishop kick) Fourth Quarter LC—Ka. Kuehner 35 pass from Ki. Kuehner (Kuta kick) Individual Stats Rushing— C: Manix 19-75, Moug 13-51, Settlemire 5-8, Groff 4-8. Passing—C: Moug 6-13-2, 117 yards. Receiving—C: Brown-Bishop 2-27, Manix 1-41, Settlemire 3-45.

Cedar Park 57, Port Townsend 6

REDMOND — Cedar Park Christian (4-1) of Bothell repaid the favor after losing 62-6 to the Redskins last year. Port Townsend (0-3, 0-5) lost a lot of seniors from last year’s team and its inexperienced players couldn’t keep up with the Eagles in the Southwest Washington League Nisqually League game at Evergreen Division Lake Washington High Conf. Overall School on Friday night. Montesano 3-0 5-0 The Redskins took a Onalaska 2-1 4-1 quick 6-0 lead two minutes Elma 2-1 3-2 into the game on a 22-yard Rainier 2-1 3-2 Hoquiam 2-1 3-2 interception return by Matt Rochester 1-2 1-4 Juran — the second defenTenino 0-3 1-4 sive touchdown by Juran in Forks 0-3 0-5 two weeks — but it was all Friday’s Games Eagles the rest of the way. Onalaska 52, Forks 15 “We played well in the Montesano 41, Tenino 6 Rainier 32, Elma 14 first quarter but injuries Hoquiam 28, Rochester 0 hurt us in the second half,” Oct. 8 Games Port Townsend coach Tom Forks at Montesano, 7 p.m. Webster said. Tenino at Onalaska, 7 p.m. “Games are 48 minutes Elma at Rochester, 7 p.m. Hoquiam at Rainier, 7 p.m. long, and we have to learn to play the whole game.” Northwest Football League The Eagles took a 20-6 8-man lead at halftime but a Conf. Overall 30-point third quarter blew Neah Bay 3-0 4-1 the game open. Quilcene 2-0 3-1 Lummi 1-0 3-1 “We had a meltdown in Crescent 2-1 2-1 the third quarter,” Webster Muckleshoot 1-1 1-1 said. Evergreen Lutheran 1-2 1-2 Mel Thornton ran 12 Clallam Bay 0-3 0-3 times for 42 yards and he Highland Christian 0-4 0-4 Friday’s Games completed 8-of-13 passing Neah Bay 66, Quilcene 16 attempts for another 43 Lummi 2, Clallam Bay 0 (forfeit) yards. He also had an interE. Lutheran at Muckleshoot, NA ception for Port Townsend. Saturday’s Games Kyle Kelly caught two of Crescent 52, Highland Christian 6 Oct. 8 Games the passes for 23 yards while Crescent at Easton/Thorpe, 3 p.m. Juran had nine tackles, Highland Christian at Clallam Bay, seven solo. Marko Herr had 7 p.m. Evergreen Lutheran at Lummi, 7 p.m. eight tackles, six solo, and Thornton seven tackles, five Oct. 9 Games Muckleshoot at Quilcene, 1 p.m. solo.

17-179 (4 TDs), Walts 11-86, Girgus 9-55, O’Regan 2-14. Passing—PT: Thornton 8-13-1, 43 yards. CP: Girgus 12-27-2, 170 yards. Receiving—PT: Kelly 2-23. CP: O’Regan 9-94, Cole 1-43, Dinsmore 1-27, Kragerud 1-6.

Onalaska 52, Forks 15 FORKS — Penalties and mistakes killed the Spartans (0-3, 0-5) in Friday nights’ SWL-Evergreen Division games. “Onalaska ran the ball well and they passed it well, and we didn’t have much of an answer for them,” Forks coach Andrew Peterson said. “We made a lot of mistakes and had a lot of penalties. We took a step backward.” Onalaska improved to 2-1 in league and 3-2 overall. Fullback Cameron Leons had a long run that set up the Spartans’ first touchdown. Senior running back Luke Brown rushed three yards for the score while Alexis Ayala kicked the extra point. Brian Santman scored Forks’ second touchdown of the game but Santman’s quarterback sneak on the two-point conversion try failed. Statistics were not available for the game. The Spartans next play at Montesano (3-0, 5-0) on Friday night.

Crescent 52, Highland Christian 6 JOYCE — The Loggers shook off some rust from a two-week layoff due to a lack of players then rolled in Northwest Football League action Saturday. The Loggers (2-1, 2-1) had just enough players to put a team on the field but still aren’t up to full strength. “We definitely were rusty at times,” coach Tim Rooney said. “We will get a couple of more kids back next week and a couple more the week after that.

“We won’t be at full strength for another two weeks.” That’s bad news to the rest of the league because the Loggers completely bottled up Highland Christian of Bellevue. “The key to the game was defense,” Rooney said. “Defensive coordinator Mike Hazelett did an outstanding job.” The Loggers won by mercy rule with 9:12 left in the game. Kai Story led Crescent on defense with nine tackles, a forced fumble, two fumble recoveries and an interception. Joey Barnes had eight tackles, a forced fumble, a fumble recovery and two passes defensed. Eric Larson earned nine tackles and had a fumble recovery while Gene Peppard led the team with 12 tackles. Larson also had three rushing touchdowns for Crescent. Quarterback Derrick Findley had 81 yards on the ground with two touchdowns. He passed for another 99 yards and had two scores through the air. Barnes caught one touchdown pass, finishing with 68 yards on four catches. Crescent next travels to Thorp High School near Ellensburg to take on Easton-Thorp in a nonleague game 3 p.m. on Friday. Crescent 52, Highland Christ. 6 H. Christian Crescent

6 0 0 0— 6 22 8 14 8— 52 First Quarter C—Larson 8 run (Barnes pass from Findley) C—Barnes 16 pass from Findley (Findley run) C—Bamer 23 pass from Findley (run failed) HC—Wood 70 interception return (pass failed) Second Quarter C—Findley 39 run (Barnes run) Third Quarter C—Findley 25 run (run failed) C—Larson 6 run (Larson run) Fourth Quarter C—Larson 36 run (Barnes run) Individual Stats Rushing— C: Findley 5-81, Barnes 11-51, Larson 12-18. Passing—C: Findley 7-11-1, 99 yards. Receiving—C: Barnes 4-68.

Neah Bay 66, Quilcene 16 NEAH BAY — Josiah Greene ran for three touchdowns and passed for two more to spark the Red Devils to the easy nonleague win Friday night. Neah Bay (3-1, 4-1) has won four in a row after opening with a loss to powerhouse Lummi while Quilcene (2-0, 3-1) suffered its first loss of the season. The Red Devils went ahead 22-0 in the first quar-

ter and never looked back. They led 38-0 at halftime and ended the game with their second touchdown in the fourth quarter to trigger the 45-point mercy rule. Titus Pascua had two rushing touchdowns for Neah Bay while Drexler Doherty caught three touchdown passes and threw for another. Eli Monette led the Red Devils on defense with 16 tackles, nine solo, and 4½ sacks. Joey Monje had 14 tackles, five solo. Josh King and C.J. Schreier had TD runs for the Rangers while Brandon Bancroft had a 53-yard interception return to slow Neah Bay. The Rangers next host Muckleshoot on Saturday at 1 p.m. The Red Devils have a bye. Neah Bay 66, Quilcene 16 Quilcene Neah Bay

0 0 16 0— 16 22 16 14 14— 66 First Quarter NB—D. Doherty 4 pass from Jo. Greene (pass failed) NB—Pascua 21 run (Jo. Greene run) NB—Greene 21 run (D. Doherty pass from Jo. Greene) Second Quarter NB—Pascua 66 run (D. Doherty pass from Jo. Greene) NB—D. Doherty 1 pass from Jo. Greene (Pascua run) Third Quarter NB—D. Doherty 11 pass from L. Doherty (run failed) Q—King 37 run (Schreier run) NB—Manuel 40 pass from D. Doherty (Pascua run) Q—Schreier 3 run (Bancroft run) Fourth Quarter NB—Jo. Greene 72 run (D. Doherty pass from Greene) NB—Jo. Greene 52 run (no attempt made) Individual Stats Rushing— Q: Schreier, 12-42. NB: Jo. Greene 11-254, Pascua 9-110, D. Doherty 4-22. Passing—Q: Bancroft, 2-6-0, 26 yards. NB: Jo. Greene, 10-18-2, 75 yards; D. Doherty, 3-4-0, 72 yards. Receiving—NB: Greene 9-53.

Port Angeles 55, Olympic 25 PORT ANGELES — The Roughriders just keep rolling. After not tasting victory once in the 2009 season, the Riders (3-0, 5-0) are feasting on victories in 2010 after blowing out the Trojans (0-3, 0-5) in Olympic League action Friday night. Quarterback Keenan Walker passed for two touchdowns, both to Colin Wheeler, and ran for another two as the Port Angeles’ offense came to life after struggling the past couple of weeks. “That was pleasing,” coach Tom Wahl said about the offensive performance. “The summer was totally focused on passing, so we

spent the last six weeks totally focused on running. “We figured this was a good time to go back to the passing game and balance our attack. Last night moved a lot closer to that goal.” Walker did a little of everything for the Riders, accounting for 308 yards from scrimmage, rushing for 178 and passing for another 130. “That’s what happens when we’re completing passes,” Wahl said. “That just opens up a lot of things.” The Riders had two runners pass the century mark as Ken Sewell ran for 102 yards and two touchdowns. The coaches moved some players around, including putting defensive standout Wheeler into a wide receiver slot. “He’s a very good athlete, so that was just a little bit more of an opportunity for him to show his skills,” Wahl said about Wheeler’s performance. The Riders get more of a test next week as they host North Mason (2-1, 3-2) on Friday night. Port Angeles 55, Olympic 25 Olympic 0 6 6 13— 25 Port Angeles 14 14 14 13— 55 First Quarter PA—Wheeler 11 pass from Walker (Hansen kick) PA—Walker 74 run (Hansen kick) Second Quarter PA—Sewell 5 run (Hansen kick) O—Brown 1 run (pass failed) PA—Porter 15 run (Hansen kick) Third Quarter O—Brown 20 run (pass failed) PA—Wheeler 1 pass from Walker (Hansen kick) PA—Walker 2 run (Hansen kick) Fourth Quarter PA—Sewell 20 run (kick failed) O—Gesicki 20 pass from Kudera (Hansen kick) PA—Brewer 7 run (Haskins) O—Gesicki 39 pass from Kudera (kick failed) Individual Stats Rushing— O: Brown 27-227. PA: Walker 13-178, Sewell 9-102, Sullivan 6-31, Brewer 4-69, Hannam 1-27, Porter 1-15. Passing—O: Kudera 16-48-2, 233 yards. PA: Walker 12-22-0, 130 yards. Receiving—O: Gesicki 10-200, Muier 2-14. PA: Wheeler 5-40, Morgan 4-58, Ward 2-17.

Lummi 2, Clallam Bay 0 BELLINGHAM — Injuries kept the Bruins off the field because of low numbers, giving the Blackhawks (3-1) the forfeit victory Friday night. The Bruins (0-3) had only 10 players after last week’s loss to Quilcene and lost one more this week. Clallam Bay is scheduled to host Highland Christian this Friday night in Northwest Football League action if it can get healthy enough.

Wolves: Offense rolls up yards Continued from B1

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula College’s Ellen Rodgers (6) heads the ball as teammate Michelle Groshong, rear, and Chemeketa’s Mia Robles, front, look on during Saturday’s game at Port Angeles Civic Field.

Pirates: Win 2-0 Continued from B1 It wasn’t until the 49th minute in the second half, however, that Lucas Costa broke open a scoreless game with a goal off a David Astudillo corner kick. Tyler Hindmarch gave the Pirates an insurance goal in the 77th minute off a Jeff Mullen pass. Wilson made eight saves in goal, keeping the NWAACC’s top scoring team off the board. “I think [the players] enjoy being in the position that they are in right now,” Chapman said. Peninsula 2, Chemeketa 0 Chemeketa Peninsula

0 0 — 0 0 2 — 2

Scoring Summary First half: No scoring. Second Half: 1, Peninsula, Costa (Astudillo), 49th minute; 2, Peninsula, Hindmarch (Mullen), 77th minute.

Women’s Soccer Peninsula 2, Chemeketa 2 PORT ANGELES — The Pirates saw a lead slip away for the second straight game Saturday afternoon. Kimberly Jones and Jessica Farrell scored goals in the first and second half, respectively, off corner kicks to give the Pirates a 2-0 lead. Yet Chemeketa (2-2-1, 3-5-1) was able to squeeze two into the goal in the final 15 minutes to hand Peninsula (3-1-2, 3-3-3) its second straight tie.

In this case, the Bulldogs (2-1, 3-2) went down 15-0 in the first quarter before they could muster a response — an 85-yard kickoff return from burner Tevin Williams. They played catch up the rest of the night as Sequim quarterback Drew Rickerson, wide receiver Joey Hall and running back Isaac Yamamoto took turns punishing their defense. “I’d hate to be a [defensive] coordinator against us,” Wiker said. “We’ve got so many areas of the field that we can attack, that it’s tough to stop.” North Mason had a particularly hard time covering the middle of the field against Sequim’s aerial attack. Rickerson and Hall hooked up for 22-, 18- and 32-yard touchdown passes on routes down the middle during the first half. “The spread, it’s a hard thing to defend,” North Mason coach Jeff Bevers said. “You’ve got to have athletes in all of those areas out there, and you’ve got to be able to tackle in space, and we didn’t.”

Rickerson completed 13-of-19 passes for 186 yards and three touchdowns with three interceptions. He also ran for 64 yards and a score on seven carries. Hall was clearly the senior quarterback’s favorite target, hauling in nine receptions for 189 yards. The duo’s three first-half scores — combined with Frank Catelli’s strip of Bulldog running back Kameron Crosswhite and subsequent 28-yard touchdown return — helped give Sequim a 29-14 halftime lead. “We saw that in certain formations the safety would be on the other side, and they would just let me run free,” said Hall, who now has 343 receiving yards. “Drew just made great passes and just gave me a shot to go and get the ball and make a play.”

Ground attack The Wolves’ ground game continually picked up chunks of yardage throughout as well. Yamamoto gashed North Mason for 161 yards and two touchdowns on 16 carries.

His runs of 10 and 15 yards set up a 55-yard scoring scamper by Rickerson on an option read play in Sequim’s first possession of the second half. Sequim scored again two possessions later on an 8-yard Yamamoto run that essentially put the game away at 36-14 early in the fourth quarter. Yamamoto added another touchdown on a 15-yard run to cap the team’s next possession for a 49-14 edge. The Wolves have now scored 150 points in the three games since losing to Class 1A No. 2 Meridian 54-16. It was Sequim’s worst loss in five years. “I wouldn’t trade this team up for any other team right now,” said Yamamoto, who played on Sequim’s last two state teams in 2008 and ’09. “I’m just so proud of how the guys are playing right now. “I can’t ask for anything more.” Friday’s score may have been even more lopsided if not for the Wolves’ five turnovers, four coming in Bulldog territory. That included two Wil-

liams interceptions of Rickerson near the goal line. North Mason racked up 261 yards but only managed two offensive touchdowns and turned the ball over three times itself. The Bulldogs’ last score didn’t come until the final play of the game. “They are a good football team, there’s no doubt about that,” Bevers said. “The one thing we’re learning to do is to start games and we haven’t started one yet.” Sequim 49, North Mason 20 Sequim 15 14 7 13— 49 North Mason 7 7 0 6 — 20 First Quarter S—Hall 22 pass from Rickerson (Hall pass from Rickerson) S—Hall 18 pass from Rickerson (Koonz kick) N—Williams 85 kick return (Bielec kick) Second Quarter S—Catelli 28 fumble return (Koonz kick) S—Hall 33 pass from Rickerson (Koonz kick) N—Renne 1 run (Bielec kick) Third Quarter S—Rickerson 55 run (Koonz kick) Fourth Quarter S—Yamamoto 8 run (Pass failed) S—Yamamoto 15 run (Koonz kick) N—Hoiser 15 pass from Becker Individual Stats Rushing— SE: Yamamoto 16-161, Rickerson 7-64, Catelli 8-43, Wiker 2-7, Law 1-3, Yasumura 2-(minus 3), Miles 3-(minus 11). NM: Renne 17-96, Becker 23-54, Williams 5-38, Crosswhite 4-12, Bielec 8-10. Passing—SE: Rickerson 13-19-3, 189; Catelli 3-3-0, 53; Law 0-1-0, 0. NM: Becker 4-14-0, 51; Bielec 0-2-0, 0. Receiving—SE: Hall 9-189, Yamamoto 3-24, Forshaw 2-11, Bigger 1-13, Ramirez 1-2. NM: Bielec 1-22, Hoiser 1-15, Williams 1-10, Crosswhite 1-4.

Rider tennis sweeps Olympic PA doesn’t drop a set in victory Peninsula Daily News

SILVERDALE — The Port Angeles boys tennis team recorded another sweep in a 7-0 pasting of Olympic in North Olympic League action Friday. Port Angeles didn’t drop a set in picking up

Chris Campbell and Danny Sullivan 7-5, 6-2. “Olympic’s two best players play No. 1 douthe win. bles, so A.J. and Sam had “Olympic had a tough their hands full, but they time dealing with our depth,” coach Brian Gun- played some of their best tennis of the year,” Gundersen said. Gundersen singled out dersen said. The Riders next look to No. 1 doubles players A.J. Konopaski and Sam Beas- avenge their only loss of the season Monday when ley as the players of the match after they beat they host North Kitsap.

Port Angeles 7, Olympic 0 Singles No. 1 : Micah Roos, PA, defeated Alijohn Gaviola, 6-1, 6-0. No. 2: Hayden McCartney, PA, defeated Harry Furusho, 6-3, 6-0. No. 3: Connor Reid, PA, defeated Kyle Cleveland, 6-0, 6-0. Doubles No. 1: A.J. Konopaski/Sam Beasley, PA, defeated Chris Campbell/Danny Sullivan, 7-5, 6-2. No. 2: Michael and Marcus Konopaski, PA, defeated James Harvey/Joe Stevick, 6-2, 6-0. No. 3: Easton Napiontek/Derek Crain, PA, defeated Marvine Valderrama/Mitchell Brown, 6-0, 6-1. No. 4: Jordan Negus/Tavish Casey, PA, defeated Emory Everson/Alex Tracy, 6-1, 6-0.


B4

SportsRecreation

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Seattle not facing same pushovers St. Louis Rams look like tough road challenge I PICKED THE Seahawks to beat the Rams Friday. The way the uniBrad verse is LaBrie lining up against my Hawks picks, that means the Rams will win. So far I’m 0-3 on my Hawks picks. I should just pick against them the rest of the way and maybe they’ll win out. That won’t happen, of course, because the Hawks will never finish 15-1. Even during their magical Super Bowl year they went 13-3. That included the firstgame blowout loss to Jacksonville on the road, and the gimme loss to the Colts at the end of the season when Mike Holmgren rested most of his starters. I’m a little concerned about today’s game, though, for a few reasons. First of all, the Hawks are bound to have a letdown after their improbable win against the Chargers last week thanks to the two long kickoff return touchdowns from Leon Washington. And they are on the road. Except for that Super Bowl year, they have never done well on the road, especially in the 10 a.m. Pacific time slot. Plus, the Hawks have beaten the Rams 10 straight times. That streak has to end sometime. Lastly, these Rams don’t seem like pushovers. They played the Cardinals close in Week One and then lost a heartbreaker to the Raiders in Week Two. They broke through in Week Three, dominating the Redskins 30-16 at home. They could be dangerous with a taste of blood in their mouths. No. 1 draft pick Sam Bradford has been making some mistakes, of course, but overall he looks like the real deal. Add to that the emergence of little wide receiver Mark Clayton, rejected by the Ravens, but now the No. 1 target for Bradford. I have a bad feeling about today’s game. OK, I’m officially changing my pick to the Rams beating the Hawks. There, that should do it. Now, on to the top six and bottom six teams in the NFL.

Time/TV — Today, 10 a.m., Ch. 13. Opening Line — Seattle by 1 Series Record — Seahawks lead 14-9 Last Meeting — Seahawks won 17-7 in St. Louis Nov. 29, 2009 Seahawks Unit Rankings — Offense overall (29), Rush (24), Pass (21); Defense overall (28), Rush (5), Pass (30). Rams Unit Rankings — Offense overall (24), Rush (20), Pass (20); Defense overall (24t), Rush (25), Pass (24). Seahawks streaks, stats and notes — Seahawks QB Matt Hasselbeck 8-0 as starter against Rams. Seattle’s 10-game winning streak vs. Rams is franchise’s longest against any team. Five of wins in streak decided by six or fewer points, including two on game-winning kicks by Josh Brown, now with St. Louis. RB-KR Leon Washington became only 10th player in NFL history to return two kickoffs for TDs last week, and has six for career. S Earl Thomas had two interceptions last week and is team’s first rookie to do it since Terry Taylor in 1984. Seahawks allowing 67.5 yards rushing per game, fifth best in NFL. Rams streaks, stats and notes — Rams snapped 14-game home losing streak with win over Redskins last week. Rams posted season highs of 365 yards, 133 rushing yards last week. St. Louis defense held Redskins to 1-for-10 on third-down conversions last week. RB Steven Jackson has 6,921 career yards rushing and needs 39 yards to pass Marshall Faulk for second on franchise list; playing status uncertain. Jackson has rushing TD in all six career games vs. Seattle at home.

UCLA runs over Cougs

Bottom Six

________

Brad LaBrie is the sports editor for the Peninsula Daily News. He can be reached at brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com.

Conf. Overall Oregon 2-0 5-0 Arizona 1-0 4-0 Oregon State 1-0 2-2 Washington 1-0 2-2 USC 1-1 4-1 UCLA 1-1 3-2 Stanford 1-1 4-1 California 0-1 2-2 Arizona State 0-2 2-3 Washington State 0-2 1-4 Saturday’s Games UCLA 42, Washington St. 28 Oregon St. 31, Arizona St. 28 Washington 32, USC 31 Oregon 52, Stanford 31

The Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. — A friendly competition between two running backs is paying off for UCLA. Derrick Coleman rushed for 185 yards and three touchdowns, Johnathan Franklin added 216 rushing yards and the Bruins scored twice in the fourth quarter for a 42-28 victory over Washington State on Saturday. The Bruins rolled up 565 yards against the Cougars, including 437 on the ground in another standout performance by their running game, which was among the nation’s worst last season. With Coleman and Franklin taking turns churning through Washington State’s struggling defense, UCLA had two rushers with more than 180 yards apiece for the first time in school history. “Me and Johnathan got a little competition going,” Coleman said. “We always want to see who has the most yards, and that competition brings out the best in the team.” Coleman and Franklin each established career highs, running with con-

The Associated Press

Washington State quarterback Jeff Tuel fails to score under pressure from UCLA safety Tony Dye during the fourth quarter of Saturday’s game in Los Angeles. trasting styles of power and speed that proved to be a handful for the Cougars to contain. “I feel it’s hard to stop us,” Franklin said. “Me and Derrick, we compete every day in practice.” Richard Brehaut passed for 128 yards and scored the go-ahead TD on a keeper early in the fourth quarter while filling in for injured starter Kevin Prince for the Bruins (3-2, 1-1, Pac-10), who won their third straight after an 0-2 start.

“They’re a heck of a running back duo,” Washington State coach Paul Wulff said. “You look at what they’ve done running the ball with everybody so far this year, they’ve done a pretty dang good job.” Despite its success on the ground, UCLA still trailed Washington State (1-4, 0-2) by eight points in the second half before rallying to avoid a letdown in the Bruins’ first game since a stunning 34-12 road win over Texas last week.

Jeff Tuel went 20 for 37 for 311 yards and two touchdowns for Washington State, which lost its 13th straight game against Football Bowl Subdivision opponents. Washington State thought it had reclaimed the lead on a 1-yard keeper by Tuel early in the fourth quarter, but replay officials ruled the quarterback down at the 1. James Montgomery was then stopped short of the goal line on fourth down. “I figured the worst-case scenario if we didn’t get it, that they would have to go 99 yards,” Wulff said. “We struggled stopping them, so I felt we needed a touchdown.” UCLA promptly marched 99 yards, highlighted by Coleman’s 73-yard run and Brehaut’s go-ahead score with 10:08 remaining. Following a missed field goal by the Cougars, Coleman ran in from 4 yards out with just over three minutes left to cushion the lead.

Oregon takes down Cardinal Ducks offense explodes in win The Associated Press

EUGENE, Ore. — Swarmed by fans after he led No. 4 Oregon to a victory over No. 9 Stanford, Darron Thomas surveyed the chaotic scene and quietly smiled.

6. Green Bay Packers (2-1) — If they plan to play in the Super Bowl like a lot of experts are predicting, they better get their sputtering running game going. 27. Jacksonville Jaguars (1-2) — Shoot, I can’t put the Cowboys here again this week because they won, and I was really close to putting the New York Giants here because of their infighting, but the Jags won out because they are starting to look like the same old Jags. 28. San Francisco 49ers (0-3) — How does a team picked to win the NFC West go from losing a heartbreaker to the Saints at home to getting ripped by the Chiefs the next week on the road? The Chiefs aren’t that good. 29. Carolina Panthers (0-3) — Talk about quarterback problems. Rookie Jimmy Clausen is learning on the run (literally). 30. Cleveland Browns (0-3) — At least the Browns are playing teams close. But this isn’t a game of horseshoes. Ex-Hawk Seneca Wallace is playing well enough not to stink the place up but not well enough to win in replacing hurt Jake Delhomme. Does that sound familiar? 31. Buffalo Bills (0-3) — They moved up a spot because they scared the Patriots on the road last week. 32. Detroit Lions (0-3) — Starting to look like the same old Lions after strong games against the Bears and the Eagles in the first two weeks.

Pacific-10 Standings

Late scores seal victory for Bruins

“We did a good job,” he said simply when a reveler congratulated him. Thomas contributed in a big way by throwing for 238 yards and three touchdowns, and running for 117 yards and another score in Oregon’s come-

from-behind 52-31 win. The Ducks (5-0, 2-0 Pac-10) fell behind 21-3 in the first quarter of the frenzied game, but forced two crucial turnovers and held the Cardinal scoreless in the second half. LaMichael James ran for a career-high 257 yards and three touchdowns.

Oregon State 31, Arizona State 28 CORVALLIS, Ore. ­— Jacquizz Rodgers ran for 145 yards and two touchdowns and Ryan Katz threw for 260 yards and two scores Saturday to lead the Beavers to a win over Arizona State in its conference opener.

Dawgs: Pull off another upset Continued from B1 ter finishing touch in the field goals.” USC 33 on the next play. first meeting between USC USC took the lead on The Huskies moved into “It feels awesome to have coach Lane Kiffin and Houston’s 27-yard field goal position for Folk, who made the team compete like that Sarkisian, who ran the Tro- with 10 minutes left, and a 22-yard field goal with 3 for four quarters and then jans’ offense together as Washington’s next drive seconds left in last season’s ended on downs near mid- win over USC. win it in the end,” said assistant coaches. “Unfortunately for us, field. “I knew if I hit it well, it Locker, who hadn’t yet done much to remember this fall we had so many opportuniAfter Houston missed would go through,” said after skipping the NFL ties to finish the game out,” his 40-yard attempt, Locker Folk, who waited through draft to stay in school. Kiffin said. “If you’re going converted a fourth-and-11 three consecutive timeouts “The reason I stuck to be a championship team, from the Washington 24 on before his kick. around was to play for this you have to finish people off a long pass to D’Andre “I wasn’t thinking about team and these guys.” when you have the ball. Goodwin, and Chris Polk the situation. I’ve been in it Folk’s kick set off a cele“You can’t go and kick rumbled 26 yards to the before.” bration of the Huskies’ first win at the Coliseum since 1996 with their impressive Your source for… cheering section of fans in the southeast end. Such celebrations are Car Audio & In-Car Video becoming a familiar scene at the formerly imposing stadium, where the Trojans had won 47 of 48 games before losing three of their last five. Locker made the purple people party possible, throwing for 310 yards and 532 East First St. • Port Angeles • 457-1102 • www.mobilemusic.com rushing for 110 more as the Huskies (2-2, 1-0 Pac-10) racked up 537 yards of offense. “What a performance by No. 10,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said. “Legendary. That’s where legends are made. He showed how big his heart is, that’s for sure.” Washington’s 16-13 win over USC (4-1, 1-1) at Husky Stadium last September was the signature moment of Sarkisian’s first season in Seattle — and this one was every bit as impressive. The Huskies had a bet-

GREAT for over

30 Years!

0A5099159

Top Six

0R NOW’S THE TIME TO PURCHASE THE YAMAHA OUTBOARD YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED—AND SAVE OFFER VALID FROM SEPTEMBER 15 — NOVEMBER 8, 2010

Computer Desk… 31 Frederick Street on Highway 20 Port Townsend, WA 360-385-1488

Desk is $200. Chair is $75. Both for $250. 360-344-3706

YamahaOutboards.com © 2010 Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. All rights reserved.

0A5099121

…and leather computer chair. Beautiful cherry computer desk from Home Decorators, leather computer chair. Both like new.

035074779

1. New Orleans Saints (2-1) — Yes, there are three unbeaten teams, but none of them have defeated the Saints, and the only reason the Saints lost to the Falcons in overtime last week is because their kicker missed a couple of sure goals. OK, not quite sure goals. 2. Pittsburgh Steelers (3-0) — Third-string quarterback Charlie Batch had a great game against Tampa Bay last week, but I doubt he could do that against the Saints. That said, the new Steel Curtain is a defense to drool over. 3. Chicago Bears (3-0) — Maybe they are for real. However, I can’t see them finishing on top of the NFC North. 4. Kansas City Chiefs (3-0) — I can’t ignore the Chiefs any more. They have beaten the Chargers and 49ers at home and Browns on the road. Most teams would like to be able to say that. 5. Indianapolis Colts (2-1) — That Peyton Manning-driven offensive machine is rolling again. And second-year wide receiver Austin Collie might just knock Reggie Wayne off his No. 1 perch one of these days soon.

Seattle (2-1) at St. Louis (1-2)

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 3, 2010

Our Peninsula

c

SECTION

BUSINESS, THINGS TO DO, OBITUARIES In this section

“They’re honest buildings. They work hard; they do their job with no extra fluff.”

Barns past and present focus today By Diane Urbani

de la

Peninsula Daily News

Paz

PORT ANGELES — They were authentic before “authentic” was in. The barns of Dungeness Valley — the big, the medium-size, the falling-down — have long fascinated Cat Bennett of Sequim. So the artist and semiretired computer systems analyst began shooting and collecting photographs of them — and learning their back stories. And now, after many of the barns have been burned or torn down, Bennett has preserved their memories on a prairie of a website, www.DungenessBarns. com. The site has hundreds, from the Mantle barn that used to be at the corner of Sequim-Dungeness Way and Port Williams Road to the Sofie barn that still stands on Palo Alto Road. There are also the 120-yearold Wayside Farm barn, now the Olympic Cellars winery on U.S. Highway 101, and the Cedarfield barn, which once presided over an ostrich farm. It’s become a horse-boarding facility and the venue for the Five Acre School’s “Beat the Blues” barn dance in February.

Presentation today This afternoon, Bennett and Bob Clark, a lifelong resident of the valley, will give a free, illustrated presentation on about 75 of the barns they know. The hourlong program opens the History Tales series from the Clallam County Historical Society, and will start at 2:30 p.m. in the Port Angeles City Council

chambers, 321 E. Fifth St. “She has the pictures and the facts. And I enlarge on the facts,” Clark promised. He knows from barns; in his nearly 80 years of living in the valley, Clark has worked in many of them, and watched dozens give way to gravity or hay fires. Not his, though: the Clark family’s barn, a 48-foot-high structure built in 1922, is the storage space for several generations’ worth of stuff. “My father was Scots. He didn’t get rid of anything,” Clark said. “I inherited that trait.” What is it about barns that captivated Bennett, who was a Southern California girl before moving to Sequim 16 years ago?

Cat Bennett

Dairyman Willis Chambers once owned this barn, built 120 years ago on the south side of U.S. Highway 101. Today, the oldest standing barn in Clallam County is home to Olympic Cellars Winery.

Woodcock Road. Today the surrounding land is leased to Nash’s Organic Produce, which grows vegetables on it. Bennett and Clark gave a similar presentation on barns last January at the Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, and met many fellow fans of the old farm buildings. ‘Honest buildings’ “A lot are like me: They saw them but they didn’t see them,” “They’re honest buildings. They work hard; they do their job said Bennett, 60. with no extra fluff,” she said. Sequim’s history The ones that still stand, she added, are a reflection of the And to her mind, those hulkregion’s dairy-rich past. ing structures, homely as they “What I’m trying to show,” might be, represent one of the Bennett said, “is how we’ve sweeter aspects of Sequim’s hischanged,” as the barnscape has. tory. Several on her website are Which makes her hungry for labeled “GONE!”, such as the more. Heath barn, demolished to make “I want people to continue to way for a housing tract near Spy- visit the website, and if they glass and Keeler roads, the Priest know something about a barn, let barn, which stood where the Jen- me know about it,” she added. nie’s Meadow development is “The best way to preserve hisnow, and the Kerby-Evans barn torical knowledge is to share it as on East Washington Street, widely as possible.” whose silo stands beside a real Each page of Bennett’s webestate office. site provides a link to her e-mail In one case, however, the barn address, barninfo@Dungeness was demolished but the milk Barns.com. house was left intact. ________ That’s the Rex McInnes barn, the moss-topped building that Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz once stood on the east side of can be reached at 360-417-3550 or at diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com. Taylor Ranch Road north of

Dungeness ‘Crabfest’ begins 3-day run Friday Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The ninth annual Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival begins Friday night and runs all day Saturday and Sunday. Best known as simply “Crabfest,” the festival is an annual celebration of the region’s diverse bounty — the seafood, agriculture and maritime traditions, and the coastal environment that is home to the Dungeness crab. The festival takes place downtown at the Port Angeles City Pier, Gateway Center and Red Lion Hotel. Admission to the festival is free, as are some of the activities. There is a cost for crabs, other food and some of the other events. An old-fashioned crab feed with kettles of fresh, locally caught whole crabs ready to be served with fresh corn and coleslaw will be in the 8,000-square-foot Windermere Real Estate Crab Central food tent each day. There will be live music and wine tasting provided by the Olympic Peninsula Wineries Association, plus Northwest beer and other beverages. Food located at Crab Central and throughout the grounds will include: crab cakes, grilled wild salmon, fish tacos, crab enchiladas, crab Rangoon, clam chowder, crab bisque, seafood gumbo, Northwest paella, fish and chips, crab puppies, barbecue oysters, oyster shooters, steamed clams, oyster stew, mussels, grilled scallops, roasted corn and potatoes, oyster po’boy, baked goods including sweets and savories, local homemade organic berry and pumpkin pies, and more.

“Locals only’ Friday Crabfest kicks off with the special “locals only” Community Crab Feed sponsored by the Peninsula Daily News (yes, any tourists in town can attend, too).

They’re in a ‘pinch’ Volunteers are needed for the ninth annual Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival to be held next weekend, at City Pier and the Red Lion Hotel parking lot in downtown Port Angeles. Volunteers are needed during the festival itself and also in the days preceding the event. Each volunteer will receive a volunteer T-shirt and a halfcrab dinner. To volunteer, fill out an application at www.crabfestival.org or phone 360-452-6300 to receive an application by mail. The Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival is produced by Olympic Peninsula Celebrations and the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce with support from the city of Port Angeles. Peninsula Daily News It will be held in the Crab Central food tent at the Red Lion from 4 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday. A coupon for $5 off the regular $25 price for a crab dinner (whole crab, hot or chilled, with sweet corn and coleslaw) is on Page C3 of today’s PDN. The festival runs from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. The High Tide Seafood and Wilder Auto Grab-A-Crab Tank Derby will run Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the Port Angeles Pier. A $5 entry fee allows participants to crab, using snares and bait, for 10 minutes; no license or gear needed. Festival volunteers will demonstrate how to catch, cook and clean the crabs. Whole cooked or uncooked crabs may be purchased. The First Federal Education Program will present a chef demonstration stage at The Gateway center. There will be an educational area on City Pier with environmental and marine exhibits. Also on the pier will be more than 60 craft and merchant booths,

children’s activities, food and picnic tables. On Hollywood Beach, there will be a volleyball tournament and a raptor demonstration by Northwest Raptor and Wildlife Center at 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10. Crabfest is produced by Olympic Peninsula Celebrations and the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce. Presenting sponsors are Westport Shipyard and the Elwha River Casino. Other sponsors include Black Ball Ferry Line, First Federal, High Tide Seafood, Jim’s Pharmacy, Olympic Restaurant Equipment Inc., Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, Peninsula Daily News, Red Lion Hotel, Wilder Auto and Windermere Real Estate. A portion of the festival proceeds will be channeled to watershed education in the Dungeness River and Dungeness Bay habitats and other environmental educational organizations, including the Feiro Marine Life Center. For more information visit www.crabfestival.org, e-mail info@ crabfestival.org, or phone 360-4526300.

Hans Stevenfeldt

The west side of the Sofie barn southeast of Sequim gets a blanketing whenever snow falls in the Palo Alto Road neighborhood. The Sofie family built their dairy barn in 1923.

Cat Bennett

The front went first on the Mantle barn, which stood at the corner of SequimDungeness Way and Port Williams Road for more than eight decades until it was demolished in 2007 and early 2008.

College holds International Week events Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Peninsula College will celebrate International Week Tuesday through Friday with a special residency by visiting Kuwaiti Fulbright Scholar Fahad Al-Naser. The events are free and open to the public and will take place on the main campus, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Al-Naser will give his main address “Family, Marriage, Values & Social Change: A Comparative Perspective in Traditional and Modern Societies” in the Pirate Union Building conference room at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. The event will last an hour. Al-Naser will also present with two Peninsula College professors in their classrooms. The first presentation will be with Rita Lauer, professor of international studies, in a global issues class in Room D-215 from 9:10 a.m. to 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. The topic will be “Western Perception on Human Rights in the Muslim World.” The lecture will be followed by a question-and-answer session. A second classroom presentation will be with Lara Starcevich, drama and speech professor, in Room M-115 from 10:20 a.m. to 11:20 a.m. Thursday. The two will address “Ethics and Morality in the Role of Public Speaking: A Cultural Perspective.” Al-Naser received a bachelor’s degree from Kuwait University and a master’s and doctorate from Michigan State University. Other International Week events include:

■  A special Flags of Nations ceremony in the Pirate Union Building cafeteria at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday. The event is intended to welcome this year’s international students to Peninsula College. ■  The school’s Studium Generale program will present a program spotlighting the Peninsula College Foundation’s “American Conversations” guest speaker Ellis Marsalis, one of the premier jazz pianists in the world, in the Little Theater at 12:35 p.m. Thursday. He also will perform that evening in the Pirate Union Building. “Ellis Marsalis, A Night in New Orleans” begins with cocktails and New Orleans-style hors d’oeuvres at 6 p.m. and the performance at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $125 per person and can be purchased at www.pcfoundation. ctc.edu or by phone at 360-4176264. Proceeds will support college programs and provide scholarship assistance to students. ■  Peninsula College students Jibril Gude and Samuel Dafala will share their personal stories in “Escape from Sudan” in the Pirate Union Building conference room at 11:30 a.m. Friday. The discussion will be facilitated by Peninsula soccer coach Andrew Chapman. International Week events will close Friday evening with a screening of the Global Lens Series film “Becloud” in the Little Theater at 7 p.m. The film is in Spanish with English subtitles. General admission is $5. For more information on International Week events, visit www.pencol.edu.


C2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Army seizes grisly photos Troops allegedly shared pictures like trading cards By Gene Johnson

The Associated Press

JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — Those who have seen the photos said they are grisly: soldiers beside newly killed bodies, decaying corpses and severed fingers. The dozens of photos, described in interviews and in e-mails and military documents obtained by The Associated Press, were seized by Army investigators and are a crucial part of the case against five soldiers accused of killing three Afghan civilians earlier this year. Troops allegedly shared the photos by e-mail and thumb drive like electronic trading cards. Now 60 to 70 of them are being kept tightly shielded from the public, and even defense attorneys, because of fears they could wind up in the news media and provoke anti-American violence. “We’re in a powder-keg situation here,” said Eugene R. Fidell, president of the National Institute for Military Justice and a military law professor at Yale University. Since the images are not classified, “I think they have to be released if they’re going to be evidence in open court in a criminal prosecution,” he said. Maj. Kathleen Turner, a spokeswoman for Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, where the accused soldiers are stationed,

Jeremy Morlock acknowledged that the images were “highly sensitive, and that’s why that protective order was put in place.” She declined to comment further. At least some of the photos pertain to those killings. Others may have been of insurgents killed in battle, and some may have been taken as part of a military effort to document those killed, according to lawyers involved in the case. Among the most gruesome allegations is that some of the soldiers kept fingers from the bodies of Afghans they killed as war trophies. The troops also are accused of passing around photos of the dead and of the fingers. Four members of the unit — two of whom are also charged in the killings — have been accused of wrong-

fully possessing images of human casualties, and another is charged with trying to impede an investigation by having someone erase incriminating evidence from a computer hard drive. “Everyone would share the photographs,” one of the defendants, Cpl. Jeremy Morlock, told investigators. “They were of every guy we ever killed in Afghanistan.” The graphic nature of the images recalled famous photos that emerged in 2004 from the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Those pictures — showing smiling soldiers posing with naked, tortured or dead detainees, sometimes giving a thumbs-up — stirred outrage against the United States at a critical juncture. The photos were a major embarrassment to the American military in an increasingly unpopular and bloody war. In a chilling videotaped interview with investigators, Morlock talked about hurling a grenade at a civilian as a sergeant discussed the need to “wax this guy.” Morlock’s attorney, Michael Waddington, said the photos were not just shared among the defendants or even their platoon. He cited witnesses who told him that many at Forward Operating Base Ramrod in Kandahar Province kept such images, including one photograph of someone holding up a decapitated head blown off in an explosion. That photo had nothing to do with Morlock, he said. It’s not clear whether it’s among the photos seized in the case. On Sept. 9, Army prosecutors gave a military representative of the defendants, Maj. Benjamin K. Grimes, packets containing more than 1,000 pages of documents in the case. Included were three photographs, each of a different soldier lifting the head of a dead Afghan, according to an e-mail Grimes sent to defense lawyers. Later that day, before the documents could be shared with the defense lawyers, the prosecutors returned to

The Associated Press

In this courtroom sketch, Army Cpl. Jeremy Morlock of Wasilla, Alaska, left, is shown as Col. Thomas Molloy, right, the Article 32 investigating officer, and Morlock’s attorney, Michael Waddington, center, look on last week at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Grimes’ office and demanded to have the packets back, Grimes wrote, according to a copy of the e-mail first reported by The New York Times. The prosecutors cited national security interests and a concern that the photos could be released to the media. Grimes said his staff initially refused to return the photos, but the next day, the

Army commander at LewisMcChord who convened the criminal proceedings, Col. Barry Huggins, ordered them to do so. They complied. At a preliminary hearing in Morlock’s case Monday, Army officials confirmed that the number of restricted photos is 60 to 70. The investigating officer said he would view the photos in private.

Defense attorneys will also be allowed to see them if they visit the criminal investigations office on base, but they cannot have copies — an arrangement that did not satisfy Grimes. The defendants have been detained and cannot travel to see the photos to assist in their own defense, he noted, and most of the defense lawyers are based out of state.

Army investigates plot warning from soldier’s dad The Associated Press

SEATTLE — A spokesman says the Army is investigating claims that a soldier’s father tried to issue a warning early this year about a plot to kill civilians in Afghanistan. Christopher Winfield, the father of Spc. Adam Winfield, says he received troubled messages from his son in February, saying his colleagues had murdered one civilian and planned to kill more. Christopher Winfield’s phone records show he made calls that day to Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, where his son’s unit is based, and spoke to a sergeant. He also said he left a few messages.

No suspects were arrested until May, after two more civilians had been killed. Winfield is among those charged. Also charged is the alleged leader of the plot, Staff Sgt. Calvin Gibbs of Billings, Mont. Spc. Jeremy Morlock of Wasilla, Alaska; Pvt. 1st Class Andrew Holmes of Boise, Idaho; and Spc. Michael Wagnon II of Las Vegas, Nev., are also facing charges. Col. Tom Collins said Friday that the Army has not uncovered evidence that the elder Winfield left messages. But he says investigators have determined with whom Winfield spoke.

Briefly: State The Associated Press

The images are “highly sensitive,” so a protective order was put in place, says Army Maj. Kathy Turner, a spokeswoman for Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Taxi in this Weekend

Best Breakfast, Lunch & Slice of Pie

(Closed for Sprucing up The Goose Oct. 4th-20th)

roadblock. Chief Deputy Dean Byrd said the driver rammed his car through the roadblock. Byrd said gunshots were fired at that point. ALLYN — Mason A deputy ended up with County authorities have a wounded leg, but it arrested a 28-year-old man wasn’t immediately clear sought on a robbery warwho fired. rant after a wild chase that The deputy was treated included a deputy wounded at a local hospital. by gunfire. The fleeing car soon The chase began Friday crashed and the driver fled, when deputies pursued a but Byrd said deputies white car on state Highway with tracking dogs found 3 after recognizing it from the man in a creek bed in an earlier incident. nearby woods. Byrd said Kristofer Other deputies set up a

Steppin’ Out Salon Specializing in

Human Hair Extensions

0A5099018

310 Airport Rd., Port Townsend (360) 385-3185

Man arrested after Mason deputy shot

Half off in October

together for a cure Look inside for this week’s deals!

That’s our promise... that’s Ingredients for life.

Creating Beautiful Homes Since 1958

SEQUIM

279 W. Washington St. • 683-7500

STORE HOURS: MON.-SAT. 9 AM-5:30 PM

Andrea Gilles andrea@mccrorie.com

0A5098818

SES1

0A5097873

Always great

SHELTON — A bear hunter suspected of fatally shooting a man who was picking floral greens in the woods near Shelton has been arrested for investigation of manslaughter. Mason County sheriff’s Chief Deputy Dean Byrd said the man was booked into jail and released Friday on his promise to appear in court Monday in Shelton. A 24-year-old Shelton man, Carlos Pablo Carrillo, was picking salal for use in the floral industry on Wednesday when he was hit. Two hunters who later came forward told deputies they thought they saw a

“I help make choosing the right flooring and the right colors easy for my clients. Simply loving your new room is my ultimate goal.”

EXTREME

VALUE PACK

Club Card Specials

Hunter arrested

Style, Your Style. Our Expertise.

Show your support while you save.

PLUS

0A5099204

125 W. First St. • P.A. • 417-8828

Looking for a stylist and nail tech $250 for 3 month chair rental Call for an appointment Walk Ins Welcome

Nickerson of Bainbridge Island was arrested. He had been sought on a $250,000 arrest warrant in a Kitsap County armed robbery. During the chase, the North Mason School District briefly put schools under lockdown.

bear and one fired. They left the area because they thought they missed.

Refinery blast TUMWATER — State officials plan to release the results of their investigation of last April’s Tesoro refinery explosion on Monday. The state Department of Labor and Industries conducted a six-month investigation of the Anacortes blast that killed seven people. They focused on determining if there were any violations of state workplace safety and health regulations. Tesoro announced earlier this week that it would begin bringing its Anacortes facility back online starting on Wednesday. The company said its refinery units will be brought back into operation on a staggered basis, with a goal of having the whole facility working by Friday, Oct. 15.

Story pole down OLYMPIA — An historic 71-foot-tall story pole carved by a tribal artist in the 1930s is coming down from its location on the Capitol Campus in Olympia. The Department of General Administration said consultants this week confirmed the rotting pole is in imminent danger of collapse and can’t be salvaged. Agency spokesman Jim Erskine told The Olympian it will work with the state Office of Indian Affairs for a replacement. The Associated Press


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 3, 2010

C3

Right grass seed big step toward good lawn Last week, we learned that grass is actually an acronym: grueling, repetitive annual seasonal service. We then found out there are seven tenets that must be followed if one wants a lawn that consumes less time, money and resources. So now, the rubber meets the road, and I am sure that more than half my readers have been turned off by the combination of three of these tenets, which dictate a raised mower height (3.5 to 3.75 inches), going fully organic in your weed and feed requirements, and finding out that a few weeds in your lawn are natural, tolerable and to be expected. And that’s OK because people who are entrenched in ritual and cultural habit are extremely hard to change, and I will not continue to beat myself against a brick wall. And besides, for the rest of you, I will now be preaching to a choir wanting to learn a new song.

order it. If they cannot or will not, find a new vendor because that one Remember: Andrew really does not care much for The crux of this your business or really cannot be May is switching bothered for your money. your lawn to Second: Quality is the name of fescue and rye the game. grasses and Get the highest quality seed away from available. High-quality seed Kentucky directly translates into high gerblues. mination, high survivability, betNext week, ter vitality of seed, way fewer we will examweeds and a more consistent ine these two lawn and overseed. species and In fact, the $10 to $30 you pay their inherent for the highest quality seed veradvantages. Today, I will answer questions sus low or lowest quality seed will be the least of your cost. about grass seed itself. Less than gas for the mower, First: Go to co-ops or farm and less than a bag of fertilizer or feed stores for your purchase or to order grass seed because they lime, far less than the water bill and less than the “priceless” cost have large bags, 30-, 40- and of headaches. 50-pounders. Third: Get the right seed for They also have the best prices the sunlight conditions. because the bags are simply Always purchase full sun for marked — no slick photos or full sun, shade mixes for the advertising gimmicks. Next, they have a variety of shade, and then blend the two for suppliers, so if you do not see the the filtered light areas. bag of seed you need, ask them to When grass seed is sown in

A growing concern

the wrong conditions, only the weeds will do well! Fourth: Get the lowest possible weed-seed count mix you can purchase. I only buy seed that starts with “0.00” and then whatever numbers follow because grass seed may germinate at 85 percent to 95 percent, but weed seed will sprout at 110 percent (don’t ask me how; must be a lot of twins). We are trying to eradicate weeds, not grow new ones! Fifth: Find the highest germination percentage possible. Some grass varieties only germinate in the 80 percentiles, but as a whole, look and demand, if possible, grass seed that has a high 80s or in the 90s percent rate of germination. Remember, we are trying to plug bare spots on the ground so we want to be able to rely on high germination and true rates of application. Inexpensive seed almost always means lots of weeds and low germination rates. Sixth: Always use mixes or

blends because conditions vary in your lawn, and blends of seed are formulated to colonize the entire area by each variety seeking out its ideal requirements. Seventh: Get mixes that are only rye and fescues! Remember, that is what started this whole expose about grass: Finding a mix that is disease- and drought-tolerant and will naturally stay green during our dry summers. As a side note, if you have moss in your lawn, that is a function of poor drainage. So either aerate or put in a drain field because overseeding will do nothing to kill the moss, and that seed will mostly die out. Talk with you about ryes and fescues next week.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations TOPS meetings There are four weekly meetings of TOPS groups in Port Angeles. TOPS 125 meets on Wednesdays with weigh-in at 5:45 p.m. followed by a meeting at 7 p.m. at the Veterans Center, 216 Francis St., Port Angeles. TOPS 1163 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 8:45 a.m. and meeting at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew’s Church, 510 E. Park Ave. TOPS 1493 meets Wednesdays at 10 a.m., with weigh-in from 9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., in Jace The Real Estate Co.’s meeting room, 330 E. First St. For more information, phone Pat Ferns at 360504-2143. TOPS 1296 meets on Mondays with weigh-in at 10:30 a.m. followed by an 11 a.m. meeting at 2531 E. Helm Drive. Phone Carol Packer, 360-452-1790. For more information about all chapters, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Dream Machines The Peninsula Dream Machines will meet Sunday at 11 a.m. at the Fairview Grange, 161 Lakefarm Road. For more information, phone 360-452-3597.

VW club Strait Air Volksgruppe, a club for Volkswagen owners and enthusiasts, will meet Sunday at noon at Joshua’s Restaurant, 133 DelGuzzi Drive. For more information, phone 360-452-5803.

Boys & Girls club The Mount Angeles Unit of Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula meets regularly on weekdays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., at 2620 S. Francis St. For information on membership, phone 360417-2831.

Tennis club meets

Toastmasters

Fibromyalgia group

Fly fishers club Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishers club meets monthly on the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in the Rotary Club-sponsored Log Cabin at Lincoln Park, off West Lauridsen Boulevard. The public is invited. For more information, phone Darlene Whitney at 360-457-2799.

Men’s chorus The Olympic Peninsula Men’s Chorus meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the Monterra Community Center in the Agnew area between Sequim and Port Angeles. Take Gunn Road to Finn Hall Road, turn left onto Finn Hall, then turn right on Monterra Drive. Monterra Community Center will be straight ahead. The chorus, a chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, is open to men who have an interest in music and singing. There are no requirements to read music, nor is solo singing a requirement to join. The chorus sings songs in four-part harmony in the barbershop style and also other a cappella song styles. Visitors are welcome at any meeting. For more information, phone 360-681-7761.

Garden Club meets Lincoln Heights Garden Club will meet on Tuesday at 11:45 a.m., in Scandia Hall, 131 W. Fifth St. After a noon luncheon, members will convene for a business meeting, followed by a program on autumn gardening. Members are reminded to bring a food staple item for the food bank. For more information, phone 360-452-4047, or 360-457-6907.

For more information, visit the club’s website at www.shotpagc.com or phone Karen Rogers at 360-417-1143.

Methodist women The United Methodist Women will meet Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. in the church parlor of United Methodist Church, 110 W. Seventh St. Barb Maynes, Olympic National Park spokeswoman, will talk about the Elwha River restoration. Lunch will follow.

tain Terrace Apartments, 114 E. Sixth St., in the multipurpose room. A licensed practical nurse is one of the group’s starting members. There will be a broad spectrum of people, some beginning the process to get a gastric bypass and some who have already

The Port Angeles Lions Club will meet Thursday at noon at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, 221 N. Lincoln St. Associate City Planner Scott Johns will present a program on the shoreline master plan. For information on the Public employees Lions recycling program for Retired Public Employeyeglasses and hearing ees Council Chapter 23 will aids, phone 360-417-6862 meet Thursday at 11 a.m. at the North Olympic Pen- Woodworkers meet insula Skills Center, 905 W. The Peninsula WoodNinth St. workers Club, a group of An $8 buffet lunch will people interested in all be served at noon. phases of woodworking, The program will presfurniture and cabinet makent candidates for state ing, wood turning, carving, legislative District 24: boat building, instrument Kevin Van De Wege and making and construction, Dan Gase for Position 1 meets the first Thursday and Steve Tharinger and evening of every month. Jim McEntire for Position Location varies. 2, followed by a general Phone Ed McKay at business meeting. 360-928-3331 or Gary For more information, Haubold at 360-452-4919. phone Jean Hordyk at 360457-1041. Turn to Clubs/C4

Ninth Annual

Soroptimists The Soroptimist International Port Angeles Jet Set meets every Thursday morning at 7 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets. The group’s mission and core purpose is to improve the lives of women and girls in local communities and throughout the world. Those wishing to volunteer in an atmosphere of support, friendship and fun are invited to join. For more information, visit the group’s website at www.sijetset.com.

presented by the Elwha River Casino & Westport Shipyards Inc.

MOPS meets Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS), will meet Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Fairview Bible Church, 385 O’Brien Road. Refreshments and child care will be provided. For more information, phone 360-457-5905.

Port Angeles City Pier Gateway Center & Red Lion Hotel

Surgical weight loss Surgical Weight Loss Support Group meetings are on Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Moun-

• • • • • •

German speakers A German conversation circle, der Stammtisch, for those who speak and understand German, meets weekly on Wednesdays at varying times and locations. They discuss current events, movies, books, music, food, evolving and changing language or other subjects. For more information, phone 360-457-0614 or 360-808-1522.

Gun club Port Angeles Gun Club Shotgun Shooting on Wednesdays and Sundays begins at 10 a.m. at U.S. Highway 101 across from Deer Park Road.

WHOLE CRAB DINNERS 20 LOCAL RESTAURANTS BEER & WINE GARDEN COOKING DEMONSTRATION GRAB A CRAB DERBY FAMILY PROGRAMS

Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. • Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. www.crabfestival.org • 360-452-6300 MAJOR SPONSORS

Last Chance To Paddle Lake Aldwell Canoe/Kayak Rentals

Hourly Rates/Free Delivery

360.452.1443

123 Lake Aldwell Rd., PA www.RaftandKayak.com

Produced by Olympic Peninsula Celebrations and the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce

SAVE ON YOUR FRIDAY NIGHT CRAB FEED

5

$

with

this

coupon

Crab Feed 00 Community Offer good only for Friday, October 8th Dinner event. Regular price of dinner is $25 per person. OFF Good for up to 4 people 00

The Fibromyalgia support group meets on the first Monday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St. The support group is for

The Port Angeles Garden Club board will meet on Monday at 1 p.m. in the home of Nancy Grier, 1845 E. Woodhaven Lane. For driving directions, phone 360-457-8625.

The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Lions meet

075087200

The Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 meets Mondays from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Clallam Transit Office, 830 W. Lauridson Blvd. For more information, phone Bill Thomas at 360460-1040 or Leilani Wood at 360-683-2655.

Garden Club board

Submit your club news

had surgery and are willing to help those acquire vital information on the process. Guest speakers assist with information and a question and answer time. For more information, phone Janet E. Boyce at 360-417-2896.

0A5098152

The Peninsula Tennis Club, a nonprofit Community Tennis Association, meets regularly for free community play at Erickson Park, Fourth and Race streets. The Peninsula Tennis Club promotes tennis play and supports improvements to tennis facilities in Clallam County. For information on club activities, visit the website at www.olypen.com/ peninsulatennisclub, or phone 360-460-2588.

those diagnosed with fibromyalgia and for family and friends to understand it better. For more information, phone Penny Brewer at 360-681-3045.

Port Angeles


C4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Be ready: ‘Puddle events’ are rewarding Puddles have a special attraction whether you are a 6-year-old wearing boots or a “legal-age” adult using binoculars. I have been both and will admit I still enjoy sloshing through small streams and puddles. When it comes to birding, there is a puddle rule to remember: “Don’t pass one up without looking in it.” They can be pint-sized treasure-troves full of surprises. There are “puddle events” I still remember from years ago, and a new one was recently added to the list. Sunshine, mild temperatures and a soft breeze set the scene for a great day of birding in the Sequim and Dungeness region. Add to that the activity generated by the fall migration, and you know the day went by too quickly. The Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge topped the list of favorite stops, but the uplands took so much time

Bird Watch we skipped Carson the Spit. There were other places we didn’t want to miss. It was frustrating the way the sun insisted on dropping lower and lower as late afternoon started shortening the day. We decided to “head for the farm puddles.” I don’t know what else to call them, but we always check them out because they rarely disappoint us. Even with the heavy rains we’ve been experiencing, much of the expected water had dried up. Things weren’t looking good until a small muddy pond-puddle popped up right by the side of the road.

Joan

There were birds in it! Shorebirds had been on the wish list and there they were — 12 of them. Remember, good things come in small packages. That’s why puddles and small ponds are so great. They hold interesting mixes of bird species and also force them into a small area. That makes the birding easy and exciting. Well, it’s not always easy. Fall-plumaged sandpipers can have you grabbing for your field guide hoping your identification is correct. Seven long-billed dowitchers, probably juveniles, were probing the pond’s mud and staying very close to the road. It was a rare opportunity to compare them with a bird they are sometimes confused with. Three Wilson’s snipes were mixed in with the dowitchers, and seeing the

two side-by-side emphasized the plumage differences. Bold striping on the snipe’s back and head make it easy to tell the two apart. In the middle of this shorebird study session, another one dropped in and added a new dimension to the mix. A greater yellowlegs looks really big when mixed in with dowitchers and snipes. It looked really, really big when seen beside the shorebird that came running from the grass and joined the others feeding in the mud. The least sandpiper is a tiny bird and the smallest of our “peeps,” those sandpipers like the Western and the semipalmated. Size difference and shape of bill can be challenging, but their greenish leg color is an excellent identification mark. These four shorebird species were easy to see and identify in their pud-

Paul Carson

A greater yellowlegs looks really big when mixed in with dowitchers and snipes. dle-pond setting. If seen on the tide flats near open water, they could have been in large flocks or seen at a distance, which makes identification even more challenging. When it comes to great birding habitat, I’ll take the ponds over the mud flats every time. Of course, there is some-

thing to be said about seeing shorebirds in the hundreds, even thousands, but that’s for another day.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a self-addressed, stamped envelope for a reply. E-mail: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C3 Korean War Veterans group and Korean Defense Noon Soroptimists Veterans Chapter No. 310 meet on the second Friday Soroptimist Internaof the month at 1:30 p.m. tional Noon Club meets in the Elks Naval Lodge every Friday at noon at The Bushwhacker, 1527 E. second-floor boardroom, 131 E. First St. First St. Anyone who served in Soroptimist is an international organization with Korea during the war and a focus on making a differ- after the truce was signed in 1953 is eligible for memence for women. bership. Locally, the club supFor more information, ports the community though scholarships, Oper- phone Gerald P. Rettela at ation Uplift and other com- 360-457-6994. munity projects.

visit the website at www. olypen.com/ccgs or call the library/research center at 360-417-5000 Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Chorus invitation

9A5058058

den-related topics. The members break for The Grand Olympics a brown-bag lunch, folChorus invites women who lowed by the business enjoy singing to join the meeting at 12:30 p.m. Sweet Adelines practice Dessert, coffee and tea any Monday at 6:30 p.m. at are provided. the Sequim Bible Church, On Saturday from Veterans for Peace 847 N. Sequim Ave. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the club’s No formal training or Veterans for Peace, Tony Harvest Festival at the van Renterghem chapter, experience is needed. clubhouse will feature will meet Saturday at 2:30 For more information, bulbs and plants to plant p.m. at Olympic Unitarian phone 360-683-0141; from Universalist Fellowship Port Townsend, phone 360- now for spring blooms, baked goods, produce from Hall, 73 Howe Road, off 385-4680. Yakima Valley, locally North Barr Road. grown produce, fall decor, All veterans of military Sequim City Band pumpkins, gourds, cookservice, foreign or domestic, The Sequim City Band Cribbage club are eligible for full membooks, garden books, fresh rehearses each Monday, Nicotine group bership. popped popcorn, green An American Cribbage 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., at Swisher Nonveterans are weltomato recipes, Halloween The Nicotine AnonyCongress Grass Roots CribHall behind the bandstand mous Fellowship Group items and a variety of rafbage Club, P.A. Peggers No. comed as associate memat the James Center for the bers. meets every Friday at fle items gathered by mem357, plays Saturdays at The group includes vet- Performing Arts, 202 N. 5 p.m. at Cedar Grove bers, including a filled gift 1 p.m. at the Eagles Lodge, Blake Ave. Counseling, 1020 Caroline basket and a round-trip 351 E. Penn St., Port Ange- erans and nonveterans For more information, St. from Clallam and Jefferson les. plane ride from Sequim to phone 360-683-4896 or For more information, counties. The weekly events are Port Townsend with a stop check the website at www. phone 360-452-2443. VFP works to support nine games played against at the Port Townsend Aero sequimcityband.org. veterans and bring about nine different opponents. Museum. HOPE meets peaceful solutions to interThe season runs from The clubhouse and park Duplicate bridge national problems the first of September to grounds, owned and mainHumorous OpenFor more information, The Sequim Duplicate the end of May. Minded Parent Educators, tained by the club, are supphone David Jenkins at Bridge Club meets each For more information, HOPE, is an inclusive ported through the rental 360-385-7612. Monday and Friday at phone Jim or Lisa Duff at group of home-schooling of the clubhouse. 12:30 p.m. at the Masonic 360-808-7129 or e-mail parents and children who For information regardTemple, 700 S. Fifth Ave. papeggers@hughes.net. Coin club meets meet on Fridays. ing rentals, phone 360-683The club is affiliated Time and location vary. 7206. The Port Angeles Coin All are welcome. Genealogy society Club will meet on Saturday with the American ConFor membership infortract Bridge League, which mation, phone 360-683For more information, at 4 p.m. in the Raymond The Clallam County phone Lisa Harvey-Boyd at Carver Room at Port Ange- provides sanctions for stan- 8693. Genealogical Society will dard duplicate, unit and 360-452-5525, or visit les Library, 2210 S. Peameet Saturday from championship games. online at http://groups. body St. 10 a.m. to noon in the First yahoo.com/group/HumerPlay is open to the pub- Deaf Coffee House The public is invited The Deaf Coffee House ousOpen-mindedParentEd- Presbyterian Church Parlic and visitors are welcome ish Hall, 139 W. Eighth St. and all age groups are wel- at any time. will meet Monday from ucators or, http://groups. come. Susan Karren from the yahoo.com/group/hHumerCoffee and refreshments 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at The group will be disNational Archives, Seattle ousOPen-mindedParentEdthe Sequim Community are offered at each game. branch, will present: “If you cussing U.S. coins of the ucators. Church in Geneva Hall, For more information, past. think the National 960 N. Fifth Ave. and Cape phone 360-691-4308; for For more information, Archives don’t have anyPilots breakfast Hope Way. partnership arrangement, thing for you, think again!” phone 360-928-0239 phone 360-582-1289. There will be a party to The Clallam County Karren will discuss the celebrate the third year of Pilots Association Safety archives’ online resources Square dance club Food addicts meet the organization. Breakfast will be on Friday as well as resources in Strait Wheelers Square Refreshments to share at 7:30 a.m. at the FairFood Addicts In RecovSeattle that may not be Dance Club meets the secand donations are apprecimount Restaurant, 1127 W. available online. ond and fourth Saturday of ery Anonymous meetings U.S. Highway 101. are Mondays at 2 p.m. and ated. The meeting is free and the month from 7:30 p.m. open to prospective as well to 10 p.m. at Mount Pleas- Thursdays at 7 p.m. at CalVeterans of Korea as current members. Vegetarian potluck ant Community Hall, 2432 vary Chapel of Sequim, The Olympic Peninsula 91 S. Boyce Road. For more information, This group meets to Mount Pleasant Road. enjoy a vegetarian/vegan The cost is $5. Garden club meets potluck and program on For more information, A P L A C E F OR R E N E WA L the first Monday of every phone 360-452-6974. The Sequim Prairie month at 6 p.m. in the felGarden Club meets the For the finest in specialized skin care: lowship hall of the Sevfirst Monday of the month Sequim enth-day Adventist Church, • Anti-Aging Treatments at 10:30 a.m. at the Pio30 Sanford Lane. neer Memorial Park club• Therapeutic Treaments Cooties meets This month, the group house, 347 E. Washington Barb Brown, Owner - Rosacea Cooties meets on the Licensed Aesthetician will exchange recipes and St. - Acne first Sunday of the month talk about what’s new in The guest speaker this Make an appointment today for your own renewal. at 3 p.m. in the VFW Hall month will be Maria McCo- nutrition. at 169 E. Washington St. Future programs might nney, an expert in growing For more information, 545 Eureka Way • Sequim • 360-681-4363 include cooking demonstrabegonias and orchids. phone the post at 360-683Hours: Mon.- Thurs. / 98 am to 5 pm T E N D E R T O U C H E S tions and lessons on Each month, a speaker SKIN CARE www.tendertouchesspa.com 9546. presents a program on gar- healthy living. For more information or directions, phone Heather Reseck at 360-385-0150 or Walter Grant at 360-6831414.

Spa

Quality • Comfort • Style NEW

NO DELIVERY FEE NO HAZMAT FEE

Propane is a "GREEN" Alternative Fuel!

French Club The French Club invites anyone who knows French or would like to learn to meet every week at Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St. Beginners meet Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; intermediates on Tuesdays, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.; and advanced, Fridays for a reading and conversation group from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. For more information, phone 360-681-0226.

Lift Chair $699

24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

Propane Fueled Appliances Leave A Smaller Carbon Footprint than their Electric Counterparts And it’s available today!

Commercial and Residential Fuel Delivery Tanks Leased and Sold Propane Fireplaces 0A5098819

MOUNTP198306

Lifetime Warranty on Lift Mechanism Available for most models.

Bereavement group 095098520

360-385-6883 or Sequim 360-683-1881 265 Chimacum Rd., Port Hadlock Normal Hours: M–F 8-5 www.mountainpropane.com

The Sequim Bereavement group meets Tuesdays from 1:30 p.m. to

3 p.m. at the Assured Hospice Office, 24 Lee Chatfield Ave. For more information, phone 360-582-3796.

Senior Softball Sequim Senior Softball Recreational Club meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. at Carrie Blake Park (weather permitting) for practice and pickup games. All levels of players, men 55 years and older and women 50 years and older, are welcome to participate for good fun and exercise. For more information, phone John Zervos at 360681-2587 or e-mail jazervos @gmail.com.

Bonsai society Dungeness Bonsai Society meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. in the Pioneer Park clubhouse, 387 E. Washington St. Each month a speaker presents a program or workshop related to bonsai or general garden topics. Guests are welcome. For more information, phone Herb Senft at 360683-2294.

Just Dolls The Just Dolls of Washington Doll Club meets on the first Tuesday evening of every month and is open to anyone interested in dolls and/or bears. Club members conduct business and share dolls, engage in community service and organize an annual doll show. New members are welcome. For more information and location, which varies from month to month, phone Dori Beachler at 360-683-1006.

Toastmasters SKWIM Toastmasters meets the first and third Tuesdays promptly at 7 p.m. at Blue Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest Road. Arrival at the meeting is requested for 6:50 p.m. Guests are welcome. The president and chairman can be contacted at 360-808-2088.

Outriders meet The Olympic Peninsula Outriders, an organization of informal retired motorcycle riders, meets Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at The Mariner Cafe, 707 E. Washington St. There are no dues or rules; just friendship among retired riders. The group has day and other rides throughout the year.

TOPS 1135 TOPS 1135 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 9:15 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. Visitors are welcome. For more information, phone Lynnette Baughman at 360-683-7178. Turn

to

Clubs/C5


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 3, 2010

C5

Organ transplants precious gift of life DEAR ABBY: My dad was on the kidney transplant list for almost four years. Last week, he received a call that there was a kidney for him. As I sat in the waiting room during his transplant surgery, I became aware that two other families were in the same situation. One’s relative was also getting a kidney transplant, the other a liver. As we talked, it became apparent that every transplant surgery that evening was from the same donor. I can’t help but think of the family who lost this young man, who helped to save the lives of three people while grieving their loss. I would like to extend my deepest gratitude to

It will make the decision for them much easier. Thank you for allowing that family Abigail me the opportunity to Van Buren and to all the families speak out and perhaps save someone’s life the way who have donated the someone saved my dad, whom I love very much. organs of Grateful Daughter their loved in Owensboro, Ky. ones. Because Dear Daughter: Your of one perletter touched my heart. I son, my hope it will remind everyfather and one what a precious gift two other dads got a new each of us can give if we lease on life. wish. My plea is for people to Readers, I encourage all mark the back of their of you to discuss the subdriver’s license to indicate their willingness to become ject of organ donation with your families. Let them an organ donor. Also let know you would like to your families know that give the “gift of life” and you want your organs donated if, God forbid, any- ensure that a part of you thing were to ever happen. lives on. Your generosity

Dear Abby

can make the difference between life and death for someone. For more information about organ donation, contact the National Kidney Foundation at Box DA, 30 E. 33rd St., New York, N.Y. 10016; call toll-free 800622-9010; or log in to www. kidney.org. Dear Abby: My girlfriend has asked me to be her maid of honor. Of course I agreed, but my husband doesn’t want me to for a couple of reasons. First, he says I shouldn’t be a maid of honor because I am married. Second, he’s uncomfortable about my walking down the aisle with another man (the best man) and being photo-

graphed with him. I want to be there for my friend but I don’t want to create tension between my husband and me. He has made it clear that if I choose to be in this wedding he won’t attend as a guest. The wedding is scheduled for a year from now, and I don’t want to be stressing about this until next September. What should I do? Torn Between My Friend and My Husband

party at the reception while he sat in “Siberia,” I would understand. However, his idea that a married woman cannot be a maid of honor is incorrect, and his objection that there’s something wrong with your walking down the aisle or being photographed with the best man is ridiculous. So tell your husband (sweetly) that he’ll be missed at the wedding, and if he’s more comfortable not attending it’s OK with you.

Dear Torn: It appears you have married a man who is insecure and controlling. If he had said he’d be uncomfortable if you were seated with the bridal

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

________

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C4 phone 360-683-3197 or 360-683-0120.

Quilters meet

The Sunbonnet Sue Quilters meet every Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the Sequim Masonic Temple, 700 S. Fifth Ave. The second Wednesday of the month is the business meeting. At the close of the business meeting, birthdays of the current month are celebrated with cakes and the gift of a fat quarter (an 18-by-22-inch piece of fabric popular with quilters). On the last Wednesday of the month, the guild meets to work on community quilts, which are distributed to fire victims, Habitat for Humanity home recipients, foster children and other needy or worthy causes. All meetings are open to the public. For more information, phone Joan Mack at 360681-0795.

Driftwood sculpting The Olympic Driftwood Sculptors will meet on Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. Visitors are welcome. There will be a short meeting to take care of club business and a review of the club’s participation in the Dungeness River Festival in September. For information on upcoming driftwood sculpture classes taught by certified LuRon instructor Tuttie Peetz, phone 360683-6860. Prior to an available class, prospective members are invited to attend a meeting the first Wednesday of each month to pick up some instruction from experienced club members. For more information, phone 360-681-2535, e-mail info@olympicdriftwood sculptors.org or visit the club’s website at www. olympicdriftwoodsculptors. org, which includes a listing of upcoming shows on the “Events” page.

RV club meets Hurricane Ridge RV Club meets on the first Wednesday of every month. This month they will gather for dinner at 6 p.m., followed by a 7 p.m. meeting, at Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave. RV owners or those interested in RV’ing are welcome. For more information,

VFW men’s auxiliary The Veterans of Foreign Wars men’s auxiliary meets every first Wednesday of the month at 6 p.m. at the VFW Hall at 169 E. Washington St. For more information, phone the post at 360-6839546.

SMUG meets The October meeting of the Strait Mac Users Group, SMUG, will be Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave. Richard Serkes will present a program on free and almost free software found on the Internet that will add to the use, functionality and fun of using a Mac computer. There will also be the normal session of answering questions regarding Mac use. Snacks will be provided.

Spanish club A Spanish club with conversation and study for intermediate Spanish students meets every Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m. at Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St. For more information, phone 360-681-0215.

Help for gamblers Gamblers Anonymous meets Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Road. For more information, phone 360-460-9662.

Olympic Minds Olympic Minds, The Institute of Noetic Sciences community group for Sequim and Port Angeles, meets on the first three Thursdays of each month at 1 p.m. in the conference room of The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-681-8677.

attend meetings. There are no dues or other obligations.

Stamp society Strait Stamp Society will meet Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. After the general business meeting, there will be a presentation by Dick McCammon on “Tools you can use to handle, look at and mount your stamps.” This will be followed by a silent auction. Bring items for sale. Auction forms can be downloaded at www.olypen. com/mccammon. Strait Stamp Society is a chapter of the American Philatelic Society and the Northwest Federation of stamp clubs, and receives current news on new stamp releases, stamp shows and other information to help collectors find and sell stamps. There are no dues, though donations are welcome. For more information, phone 360-683-6373.

Peninsula Scribes Peninsula Scribes meets on the second Friday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Parkwood Clubhouse across from Sunny Farms in Sequim. Participants will learn more about calligraphy and paper arts. There is a new project each month. Those coming may bring a bag lunch, and coffee and refreshments will be provided. For more information, phone Linda O’Neill 360477-4356, or e-mail _Fontluvr@aol.com_

Fiddlers play Washington Old Time Fiddlers play music the second Saturday of every month through May, with an all-players jam from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and performance from

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Flu shots are underway at Jim’s EVERY

424 East 2nd • Port Angeles • 452-4200 • www.jimsrx.com

AAUW meeting AAUW, Clallam Branch, will meet Saturday at 11:45 a.m. at Las Palomas Restaurant for a luncheon and speaker. The featured speaker will be Carolyn Lindley from Senior Information & Assistance who will describe the array of services available to seniors in our communities. These services include legal assistance, medical and home health services, ombudsmanship, residential options and more. The public is invited. AAUW membership is open to women and men who hold an associate degree or equivalent or higher degree from a qualified educational institution. Reservation should be made by Wednesday by phone to Joyce Greene at 360-681-6666.

West End

org or phone the message line at 360-374-3332.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County TOPS on Mondays The Port Townsend Chapter of Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meets every Monday at 5:30 p.m. in the Church of Christ, 230 A St., Port Townsend. For more information, phone 360-385-1081.

TOPS 879 meets Thursdays with weigh-in at noon followed by a meeting at 1 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge, 130 Division St., Forks. For more information, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Forks animals Friends of Forks Animals monthly meetings are on the first Wednesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at the Forks Community Center, 91 Maple St. The public is welcome. For more information, visit the FOFA website at www.friendsofforksanimals.

The Port Townsend Camera Club meets on the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St. Participants will share and critique digital, print and slide photographs. Anyone interested may come for the guest speakers, refreshments, photo contests, field trips, classes and public showings of work.

Rhody Os dance The Rhody Os Square and Round Dance Club has lessons every Tuesday from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at Gardiner Community Cen-

and get second entreé

1/2 OFF

of equal or lesser value

PRESENT THIS COUPON TO SERVER

Open 7 Days A Week 7 a.m.-3 p.m.

ter, 980 Old Gardiner Road. Dances are every first and third Friday of the month, with rounds from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and mainstream square dance from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., also at the Gardiner Community Center.

Car club

Camera club meets

TOPS meeting

sponsorship programs, contact Linda@adoption advocates.org.

Rakers Car Club, a 50-year-old organization, meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Highway 20 Roadhouse, 2152 Sims Way, Port Townsend. People 21 or older who are interested in old cars and trucks are invited.

Grange talk On Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., Quimper Grange will present a talk by water quality expert Pat Pearson, who will discuss how to use, care for and enjoy water though the use of rain gardens The presentation will be preceded by a potluck dessert/finger food social from 7 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A donation of from $5 to $10 is suggested. For more information, phone Charlotte Goldman at 360-385-3455. Turn

to

Clubs/C6

Buy One Late Lunch Entreé and get second entreé

1/2 OFF

of equal or lesser value

PRESENT THIS COUPON TO SERVER

Valid Monday - Saturday

Arrive for late lunch, after 1:30 pm Valid Monday - Saturday

Not valid with any other promotional offers

Not valid with any other promotional offers

Expires 11-06-2010

Expires 11-06-2010

929 East Front Street • Port Angeles • 452-8344

You are invited to attend an informational meeting, to be held directly following the County’s annual budget meetings, to discuss projects listed on the 6-Year Transportation Improvement Program. We are also asking your input on what County road improvements you feel are needed either in your neighborhood or on roads that you encounter in your driving. Comments or suggestions regarding County trails, particularly the Olympic Discover Trail, are also welcome. The annual budget and road improvement meetings are: Port Angeles - Commissioners’ Meeting Room in the Courthouse, Oct. 5, 2010 at 6 pm. Forks - Forks City Hall, Oct. 6, 2010 at 6 pm. Carlsborg - PUD Operations Center Conference Room, Oct. 12, 2010 at 6 pm. For a listing of projects on the Draft 6-Year Transportation Program please go to www.clallam.net/roads or call us at (360) 417-2319.

0A5098121

VOTED BEST PHARMACY IN CLALLAM COUNTY

0A5098519

Thru October 14

Melaku is a sweet and sensitive 9-year-old boy. He participates in his schoolroom classes and seems to be a bit shy in new situations. He is always the one to be up front to be picked for teams, and he gets along well with his peers. He will be a loving addition to the right family. For details on Melaku, phone Adoption Advocates International at 350-4524777. Families interested in adoption must be approved by a licensed agency. If adoption is not an option for you, but you would like to support the

CLALLAM COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT - SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT

Must be 18 years and older

Monday thru Thursday 3 to 5 pm

Melaku

0A700877

$30 or we will bill Medicare Part B Uniform Medical or DSHS

Adopt a Youth

Buy One Breakfast Entreé

Retired scientists Retired Scientists of Sequim meets the first Thursday of every month at 1:30 p.m. in the Sequim Library meeting room, 630 N. Sequim Ave. North Olympic Peninsula residents with scientific training and background are invited to

1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. It is free and open to the public. Donations support fiddler scholarships. For more information, phone Hershel Lester at 360-417-6950 or e-mail handrlester@olypen.


C6

Sunday, October 3, 2010

PeninsulaNorthwest

Port Scandalous Derby Dolls

help

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Births

Humane Society

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society veterinarian Suzy Zustiak, left, receives a $100 donation from Port Scandalous Derby Dolls referee P.K. “Mr. Tuesday Night” Strom and team members Tiffany “Sk8tality” Passaro and Randa “Randamonium” Maxhimer, right. The Port Angeles-based roller derby team raised the money during a recent concert at the Coo-Coo’s Nest. The Derby Dolls will hold another Humane Society fundraiser, a haunted house, around Halloween. For more information, visit the team’s Facebook page at tinyurl.com/23935vc.

Olympic Medical Center Nathalie Maynock and Isaac Miles, Sequim, a daughter, Inara Corbin, 7 pounds 15 ounces, 2:03 a.m. Sept. 22. Harrison Memorial Hospital Hillary and Shane VanNess, Port Hadlock, a daughter, Sept. 17.

At home

Angela and Shane Tillotson, Sequim, a son, Henry Colter, 8 pounds 15 ounces, 11 p.m. Sept. 7, midwife Karla Morgan. Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.

Things to Do Today and Monday, Oct. 3-4, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today Hike — The Olympic Outdoor Club hikes the Silver Lake Trail. This is a moderately difficult hike of 11 miles round trip, with an elevation gain of 3,400 feet and a high point at 5,700 feet. Hikers from Port Angeles will meet at 8 a.m. at the Clallam County Courthouse. Hikers from Port Angeles and Sequim will rendezvous at 8:45 a.m. at the southeast corner of the Walmart parking lot in Sequim. Hikers from the Quimper Peninsula will meet at 9 a.m. at the Quimper Credit Union in Hadlock. All participants will rendezvous at 9:30 a.m. at the junction of state Highway 20 and U.S. Highway 101 in Discovery Bay. E-mail olympic. outdoors@yahoo.com. PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information including time of day and location.

Walk-in vision clinic — Information for visually impaired and blind people, including accessible technology display, library, Braille training and various magnification aids. Vision Loss Center, 228 W. First St., Suite N, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 360-457-1383 or click on www.visionlossservices.org/ vision. Olympic Coast Discovery Center — Second floor, The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0. Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics health clinic — 909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 p.m. Free for patients with no insurance or access to health care. Appointments, phone 360-457-4431. First Step drop-in center — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and referrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, computers, fax and copier. Phone 360-457-8355.

Olympic Coast Discovery General discussion group Center — Second floor, The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 1:30 p.m. to Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4 p.m. No specified topic. Open Feiro Marine Life Center to public. — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. The Answer for Youth — Admission by donation. Phone Drop-in outreach center for 360-417-6254. youth and young adults, providPort Angeles Fine Arts ing essentials like clothes, food, Center — “Safe Harbor.” 1203 Narcotics and Alcoholics AnonE. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. p.m. Free. Open Wednesday Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. through Sunday through Oct Mental health drop-in cen10. Phone 360-457-3532. ter — The Horizon Center, 205 Port Angeles Community E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Market — The Gateway, First For those with mental disorand Lincoln streets, 11 a.m. to ders and looking for a place to 3 p.m. through mid-October. socialize, something to do or a Phone 360-417-0486 or e-mail hot meal. For more information, mimi@por tangelesmarket. phone Rebecca Brown at 360com. 457-0431. Musical — Smoke on the Mountain: Homecoming. Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 2 p.m. matinee. Tickets $12 general, $6 students at Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St.; www.shop.nw performingarts.com; or at the door.

Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-4578921.

Bingo — Masonic Lodge, 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Doors at 4 p.m. Food, drinks Dance — Sons of Norway and pull tabs available. Phone Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. 360-457-7377. with 30 minutes of instruction, Quilt Guild — Veterans followed by folk and ballroom dance. $2 members, $3 non- Center, 216 S. Francis, 6:30 members. Refreshments, 9 p.m. Bring own project or lend a hand with gratitude quilts for p.m. Phone 360-457-4081. local veterans. Phone JoAnn Vickery, 360-461-0506.

Monday

Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 — Clallam Transit Business Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Open to public. Phone Bill Thomas at 360-460-4510 or Clallam-WSU Master Gar- Leilani Wood 360-683-2655. deners plant clinic — WSU Extension Office, Clallam Sequim and the County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free. Dungeness Valley Open to the public. Bring samples of plants for identification. Today Phone Muriel Nesbitt, program Hike — The Olympic Outcoordinator, at 360-565-2679. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone 360-477-1858.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

door Club hikes the Silver Lake Trail. This is a moderately difficult hike of 11 miles round trip, with an elevation gain of 3,400 feet and a high point at 5,700 feet. Hikers from Port Angeles will meet at 8 a.m. at the Clallam County Courthouse. Hikers from Port Angeles and Sequim will rendezvous at 8:45 a.m. at the southeast corner of the Walmart parking lot in Sequim. Hikers from the Quimper Peninsula will meet at 9 a.m. at the Quimper Credit Union in Hadlock. All participants will rendezvous at 9:30 a.m. at the junction of state Highway 20 and U.S. Highway 101 in Discovery Bay. E-mail olympic. outdoors@yahoo.com.

Whole Person Drumming drum series — Beginners Mind with Zorina Wolf. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Center of Infinite Reflection, 144 Tripp Road. Until Oct. 25. Visit www.village heartbeat.com. Phone 360681-5407 or e-mail vhb@ villageheartbeat.com.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County Today

Hike — The Olympic Outdoor Club hikes the Silver Lake Trail. This is a moderately difficult hike of 11 miles round trip, with an elevation gain of 3,400 feet and a high point at 5,700 feet. Hikers from Port Angeles will meet at 8 a.m. at the Claltist Church of Sequim, 1323 lam County Courthouse. Hikers Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 from Port Angeles and Sequim a.m. Free. Phone 360-683- will rendezvous at 8:45 a.m. at 2114. the southeast corner of the Walmart parking lot in Sequim. Exercise classes — Sequim Hikers from the Quimper PenCommunity Church, 1000 N. insula will meet at 9 a.m. at the Fifth Ave. Cardio-step, 9 a.m. to Quimper Credit Union in Had10:15 a.m. Strength and toning lock. All participants will renclass, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. dezvous at 9:30 a.m. at the Cost: $5 a person. Phone Shel- junction of state Highway 20 ley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or and U.S. Highway 101 in Dise-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. covery Bay. E-mail olympic. com. outdoors@yahoo.com.

Free bike clinic — Chauncey Tudhope-Locklear offers “Port Townsend ReCyclery,” Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone 360-643-1755. North Olympic Exchange currency group— Hosts an orientation to explain how this trading system works for skills, services, and goods. 5 p.m. Dundee Center, 32nd and Hancock streets, Port Townsend. Phone Mike Dobkevich, 3792627, or e-mail dobkevich1@ msn.com.

Monday

Cabin Fever Quilters — TriArea Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum, 10 a.m. Open to public. Phone Free blood pressure Port Townsend Aero Laura Gipson, 360-385-0441. screening — Faith Lutheran Museum — Jefferson County Puget Sound Coast ArtilChurch, 382 W. Cedar St., 9 International Airport, 195 Airlery Museum — Fort Worden a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360- port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 683-4803. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for for seniors, $6 for children ages children 6 to 12; free for chilSequim Duplicate Bridge 7-12. Free for children younger dren 5 and younger. Exhibits VFW breakfast — 169 E. Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth than 6. Features vintage air- interpret the Harbor Defenses Ave., 12:30 p.m. All players craft and aviation art. p.m. Cost: $5 per person. of Puget Sound and the Strait welcome. Phone 360-681-4308 of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Chimacum Grange Farm- 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ Pittsburgh Steelers Fan or partnership 360-582-1289. ers Market — 9572 Rhody olypen.com. Club — Watch the team with Women’s weight loss sup- Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 other black and gold fans at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars port group — Dr. Leslie Van p.m. Jefferson County Historiat Dungeness Golf Course, Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim cal Museum and shop — 540 Puget Sound Coast Artil- Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 1965 Woodcock Road. 10 a.m. Ave. lery Museum — Fort Worden Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Phone 360-775-8663. Family Caregivers support State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. children 3 to 12; free to historiAdult Scrabble — The group — Trinity United Meth- Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for cal society members. Exhibits Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 odist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 children 6 to 12, free for chil- include “Jefferson County’s p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Carolyn dren 5 and younger. Exhibits Maritime Heritage,” “James Lindley, 360-417-8554. interpret the Harbor Defenses Swan and the Native AmeriChorus concert — The of Puget Sound and the Strait cans” and “The Chinese in Grand Olympics Chorus of German class — Sequim of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360- Early Port Townsend.” Phone Sweet Adelines International Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ 360-385-1003 or visit www. will present “Harmony Ahoy” at Ave., 2 p.m. Phone 360-681- olypen.com. jchsmuseum.org. the Sequim High School Audi- 0226. torium, 601 N. Sequim Ave., 2 Quilcene Historical Jefferson County Historip.m. Tickets are $10 in advance Health clinic — Free medi- cal Museum and shop — 540 Museum — 151 E. Columbia at Port Book and News, 104 E. cal services for uninsured or Water St., Port Townsend, 11 St. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and by First St., in Port Angeles; or under-insured. Dungeness Val- a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for appointment. Artifacts, docuFrick Drugs, 609 W. Washing- ley Health & Wellness Clinic, adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; ments, family histories and ton St.; or $12 at the door. 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 free to historical society mem- photos of Quilcene and surPhone Wendy Foster at 360- p.m. Phone 360-582-0218. bers. Exhibits include “Jeffer- rounding communities. New 683-0141 or visit www.grand son County’s Maritime Heri- exhibits on Brinnon, military, olympicschorus.org. Trivia night — The Islander tage,” “James Swan and the millinery and Quilcene High Pizza & Pasta Shack, 380 E. Native Americans” and “The School’s 100th anniversary. Play — “Arms and the Man.” Washington St., 5:30 p.m. Free. Chinese in Early Port Phone 360-765-0688, 360Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Prizes awarded. Must be 21. Townsend.” Phone 360-385- 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or Sequim Ave. 2 p.m. Phone 360- Phone 360-683-9999. quilcenemuseum@ 1003 or visit www.jchsmuseum. e-mail 683-7326. Tickets are $15, or olypen.com or quilcene org. $13 for OTA members. Theatermuseum@embarqmail.com. Sign language group — goers can now choose their Commanding Officer’s seats online at www.Olympic “Deaf Coffee House,” portable Silent war and violence TheatreArts.org or visit the box building next to playground at Quarters museum tour — protest — Women In Black, office at the theater on North Sequim Community Church, Fort Worden State Park, 11 Adams and Water streets, 1:30 Sequim Avenue at Alder 950 N. Fifth Ave., 5:30 p.m. to a.m. to 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Participants commu- children. Phone 360-385-1003. Street. nicate using American Sign Overeaters Anonymous — Port Townsend Marine Sci- St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Trivia night — Oasis Sports Language. E-mail sdch_2010@ Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washing- comcast.net, Gerilee Gustason ence Center — Fort Worden 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. ton St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360- at gerileeg@aol.com or Diane State Park. Natural history and Phone 360-385-6854. Dickson at dianed52@comcast marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. 582-3143. .net. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for Port Townsend Camera youth (6-17); free for science Club — Port Townsend ComMonday Women’s barbershop cho- center members. “Whales in munity Center, Lawrence and Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain rus — Singers sought for Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone Tyler streets, 7 p.m. Open to Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Grand Olympics Chorus of 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ public. Share and critique digiPhone 206-321-1718 or visit Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. tal, print and slide photographs. Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., org. Guest speakers, refreshments, www.sequimyoga.com. 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster photo contests, field trips, Walk aerobics — First Bap- at 360-683-0141. Quilcene Historical classes and showings.

Now Showing

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C5 noon at Discovery View Retirement Apartments, 1051 Hancock St., Port TOPS meeting Townsend. TOPS 1393 meets on For information on joinThursdays with weigh-in at 8:15 a.m. and meeting at ing the organization, visit 9 a.m., in the Beacon Light the website at www. soroptimistpt.org. Center, 1820 Irondale Road, Port Hadlock. Rhododendron club For more information, phone Maria Goss, area The Olympic Peninsula captain, at 360-275-2179. Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will Soroptimists meet meet Thursday from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Tri-Area Soroptimist InternaCommunity Center, 10 tional of Port Townsend/ Jefferson County, a profes- West Valley Road, Chisional businesswomen club, macum. Bill Bischoff will talk meets the first three Thursdays of the month at about cyclamens and pro-

Museum — 151 E. Columbia St. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcenemuseum@embarqmail.com.

vide a 13-page color handout on the 18 species in his British Columbia garden. Cyclamens are excellent companion plants for rhodies, can bloom year-round and are deer- and rabbitproof. Bring questions and/or answers about these plants. Refreshments are served.

Port Townsend. For more information, phone 360-385-0318.

Used book sale

Friends of the Port Townsend Library will have a used book sale Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Uptown Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St.. Members of the Friends of the Port Townsend Food Addicts Library will be admitted at Food addicts in Recovery, Anonymous, a support 8 a.m. Drop off donations by group, meets Saturdays Friday at the library, 1220 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Lawrence St., Port at the First Baptist Church, 1202 Lawrence St., Townsend.

n Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-452-7176) “The American” (R) “Legend of the Guardians” (PG) “Resident Evil: Afterlife” (R) “The Social Network” (PG-13) “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” (PG-13) “You Again” (PG)

n Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997) “Devil” (PG-13) “Easy A” (PG-13) “The Town” (R) “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (PG-13)

n The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360-385-

1089)

“Mademoiselle Chambon” (NR) “The Social Network” (PG-13) “The Town” (R)

n Uptown Theater, Port Townsend (360-385-3883) “Winter’s Bone” (R)


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 3, 2010

C7

Death and Memorial Notice Briefly . . . Sally Britton

Lake Ozette salmon group sets meeting

November 11, 1931 September 24, 2010 Sally Britton, 78, of Sequim passed away at home on September 24, 2010. She was born on November 11, 1931, to Joseph and Anne (Hanson) Salberg in Chicago, Illinois. She married Leonard Britton on June 28, 1954, in Waukegan, Illinois. He preceded her in death on April 7, 2010. Mrs. Britton was a Registered Nurse, held her Master’s Degree of Nursing Education and ARNP Certification, and taught nursing at Kauai Community College on Kauai, Hawaii. Her interests included family, church, volunteering and a strong dedication to the nursing profession. She volunteered with the Sequim Boys & Girls Club and Habitat for Humanity, and was active in the Sequim Senior Center Glee Club and Walking Group. Sally was an active

Mrs. Britton member of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law, Ronald Britton and Lovey Young-Britton; daughters and sons-in-law, Cheryl Britton and Robert Stewart, and Patricia and Karl Rohlfing; sister, Joanne Birkin; and four grandchildren, Matthew Stewart, Michael Stewart, Brandon Britton and Norah Britton. A reception and open house will be held on Saturday, October 9, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., at 71 Perch Drive, Sequim.

Death and Memorial Notice Susan Elizabeth Clark Cavanaugh 1948-2010 Susan Elizabeth was born to Carroll and Christabel Clark on October 23, 1948, in Ontario, Oregon. The family lived in Weiser, Idaho, where her father operated Clark Wholesale Company. Susan graduated from Weiser High School and she attended Northwest Christian College and Boise State University. Susan married Patrick Cavanaugh in 1970. Patrick and Susan have four children: Miquette Kim, Alisha, Roman and Angelina. Roman and Angelina were adopted from Magadan, Russia. Patrick and Susan Cavanaugh lived in Boise, Idaho, Missoula, Montana, and Billings, Montana. Later they moved to Weiser, Idaho to care for Susan’s father. Then the couple lived in both Sequim and Boise, Idaho. They also owned a condo on Maui, Hawaii. Throughout her life, Susan taught swimming lessons to hundred of infants, children and adults. She was employed by the YMCA and Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana, and she had her own private swimming teaching business. Her daughters assisted in the swim-teaching business for several years. Susan has had a special love for orphans worldwide, and she has donated for many years to orphanages and orphan-support organizations. Susan bravely fought Stage IV breast cancer for 3½ years. Her loving attitude and strong faith made it possible for her

sources; updates and planning for recovery plan implementation; developing a three-year implementation plan; outreach and education; and an update on activities since the SEKIU — The Lake group met in June. Ozette Steering Committee The committee meets on will meet to discuss Lake an ad hoc basis. Ozette Sockeye Salmon Over the last four years, recovery and implementait has helped to develop the tion issues at the Sekiu Lake Ozette Sockeye Community Center, 42 Rice Salmon Recovery Plan and St., from 10:15 a.m. to 3:15 is now providing input for p.m. Wednesday. the implementation plan. Agenda topics will Its open membership include short- and longincludes landowners, interterm funding needs and ested citizens, timber com-

panies and representatives from local, state, federal and tribal governments. For more information, contact Pat Crain at 360565-3075 or patrick_crain@ nps.gov or Rosemary Furfey at 503-231-214 or rosemary.furfey@noaa.gov.

All humans and their properly restrained animal friends, large or small, are welcome. The church will have water as well as petfriendly treats in addition to the blessing, giving God thanks for the love and companionship animals provide. Animal blessing Donations of dry dog or PORT ANGELES — St. cat food or nonclumping Andrew’s Episcopal Church kitty litter will be accepted will offering a blessing of for the Olympic Peninsula animals at 2 p.m. today at Humane Society. The Gateway center in celFor information, phone ebration of St. Francis of 360-457-4862. Assisi Day. Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice Letha Maxine Clay January 22, 1933 September 26, 2010 On September 26, 2010, our mother and devoted wife, Letha Maxine Clay, finally found peace under the care of the exceptional staff at Olympic Rehabilitation Center in Sequim. Being born from a Sequim pioneer family of dairy farmers, she came into this world as Letha Maxine Schmuck on January 22, 1933, the first-born daughter of Max and Iris Schmuck. She was always very proud of her father’s lineage, many of whom came over from Germany and landed at Port Williams in the early 1900s. She graduated from Sequim High School in 1951 at the top of her class, and took great delight in helping to plan many class reunions. Her home was always filled with the laughter of class members before and after

Mrs. Clay each one. Shortly after graduation, she married her first husband, Gabe Schmidt, and they had their first daughter, Michaelle. After moving to Port Angeles, they had two more daughters, Darlene and Susan. It did not take long before they moved back to Sequim, in 1969, so she could live next door to her parents — and she lived there until her death. During 23 years of

marriage with Gabe, she was active in bowling leagues and volunteer work, and was a leader and board member of our local and state chapter of Camp Fire Girls. Whatever she devoted her time to, she did with all her heart and soul. After her divorce in 1974, Letha went to work at Safeway in Port Angeles. She loved being back in the work force and it was there that she met her next husband, Clyde Fasola, who was also from a Sequim pioneer family. They had 16 years together before she lovingly buried Clyde from lung cancer. It took awhile for her to commit to a relationship again until she came to know Albert Harry Clay. What started as a mutual friendship ended up in marriage in 2000, and lasted until her death. Letha was preceded in death by both of her parents; her brother, Ronald; and her sister, Shirley. She is survived by her husband, Harry, and all

three of her children: Michaelle (Alan) Barnard, Darlene (Rick) Murphy and Susan Weatherbee. She has four grandchildren, Brian (Tami) Sofie, Jeremy Sofie, Sarah (Nathan) Ribordy and Danielle Weatherbee; and two great grandchildren: Brittany Sofie and Brandon Sofie. There are also numerous relatives that she always cared and thought about. In honor of mom’s wishes, there will be no service, but there will be a memorial celebration of her life at her home, 255 Cameron Road, Sequim, on October 9, 2010, beginning at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, we request that any memorial contributions be given to the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, P.O. Box 3124, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Mom always had a special place in her heart for cats and dogs, and always had at least one pet throughout her lifetime.

Mrs. Cavanaugh to live a quality life while she underwent treatment and traveled the world. She was a positive example in her last life journey. She leaves behind her husband, Patrick Cavanaugh; her four children, Miquette Kim Cavanaugh, Alisha Palmer, Roman Cavanaugh and Angelina Cavanaugh; and three grandchildren, Shydyn Palmer, Kya Palmer and Huxley Palmer. She also leaves behind a sister, Patricia Nelson of Boise, Idaho; and a brother, David Clark of Sandy, Utah; as well as many other family members. Her many friends also mourn her loss. She was preceded in death by her parents, Carroll Clark and Christabel Beem Clark. We loved her as she loved all of us. We know she is now in the arms of her Lord and Savior. A memorial service will be held 11 a.m., Monday, October 11, 2010, at the University Christian Church, 1801 West University Drive, Boise, Idaho, 83706. Burial was held at Cloverdale Memorial Park in Boise. To share memories with the family please, visit Sue’s memorial Web page online at www. CloverdaleFuneralHome. com.

Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at

peninsuladailynews.com

Death and Memorial Notice Ernest W. Humphrey May 24, 1915 September 23, 2010 On September 23, 2010, Capt. Ernest W. Humphrey (U.S. Navy, retired), a 30-year resident of Sequim, passed away peacefully at the age of 95. Ernest, whom his friends and family knew as Ernie, was born May 24, 1915, in Hastings, Nebraska, the son of Robert William Humphrey and Georgia May Kelso. His family briefly moved to Woodburn, Oregon, where Ernie fell in love with the beauty of the Pacific Northwest. His family returned to Nebraska, where he continued his hard work in school. In 1932, Ernie earned a Senatorial Appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy after winning a competitive entrance exam. He graduated from the Academy in 1936, and became a commissioned officer. He served in the Navy for 31 years. In 1937, Ernie was stationed aboard the aircraft carrier USS Lexington, performing duties as a navigator. When Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Electra aircraft disappeared during her flight from New Guinea to Howland Island in the Pacific, the USS Lexington was assigned responsibility for coordinating the search effort. As the search pro-

Remembering a Lifetime downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.”

gressed, there were volumes of reports and data being gathered, a lot of which was conflicting. In order to reduce the confusion, Ernie plotted all navigation data for the route to Howland Island. In 1997, Ernie was invited to speak at a forum discussing her disappearance during the 100th anniversary of Amelia Earhart’s birth. On June 11, 1938, Ernie and the former Evalyn Christina Sears were married in a military wedding ceremony. At the conclusion of the service, the newlyweds passed under crossed swords, which were raised by fellow officers, of whom six were Ernie’s shipmates. In 1940, Ernie became a naval aviator in Pensacola, Florida. In World War II, he served with distinction in the Pacific Theater, and saw action in the Battle of Midway.

After World War II, his first assignment was with the Office of Naval Research, where he was involved with a variety of scientific endeavors. Ernie’s interest in scientific and technological advancements continued for long after his working career ended. Included in his many tours of duty with the Navy were Port Lyautey, Morocco (1954-55), where he attained the rank of Captain, and London, England (1961-62), where he was the U.S. Navy liaison to NATO. From 1953-54, he was a student and lecturer at the Naval War College in Rhode Island. He also worked at the Naval Aviation Safety Center in Norfolk, Virginia. Ernie retired from the Navy in 1963, after which he worked with Stanley Aviation in Denver and later with Aircraft Mechanics Inc. in Colorado

HELP OUR TROOPS CALL HOME DONATE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES

More than 150,000 troops are serving overseas. Cell Phones for Soldiers is calling on all Americans to support the troops by donating old cell phones. LOCAL DROP OFF CENTER:

■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Drennan & Ford

Funeral Home and Crematory 260 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 www.drennanford.com www.veteransfuneralhomes.com PROUDLY SERVING THOSE WHO HAVE PROUDLY SERVEDSM

075090614

■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by

Capt. Ernest W. Humphrey, USN retired

Springs, Colorado. Ernie had many interests, including a desire to give back to the community. He was a lifetime member of the Kiwanis Club of Sequim-Dungeness and a charter member of the Association of Naval Aviators — Olympic Squadron. He was also a member of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA). Ernie was an avid photographer, stamp collector and model-railroad enthusiast. He also enjoyed reading several scientific periodicals. Ernie was predeceased by his mother, father and sister, Lou Markoff of Truckee, California. He is survived by his wife, Evalyn Sears Humphrey; his son, Robert Humphrey and wife, Mary, of Anchorage, Alaska; his daughter, Lynn Cain and her husband, Jerry, of Sequim; and two grandchildren, Christopher Cain and Meghan Humphrey. There will be a memorial service at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 North Fifth Avenue in Sequim, on October 8 at 1 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made in his name to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Arrangements made by Drennan-Ford Funeral Home and Crematory of Port Angeles. An online guestbook is available at www.drennan ford.com.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 3, 2010

Business

Page

C8

Politics & Environment

 $ Briefly . . . Commissioner forums set by two chambers Two North Olympic Peninsula chambers of commerce will focus on the Clallam County commissioner race between incumbent Mike Doherty and challenger Robin Poole this week. The two are scheduled to appear before the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce membership on Monday, then before Doherty the Forks chamber membership on Wednesday. Doherty, D-Port Angeles, is seeking his fourth four-year term on the Board of County Commissioners, District 3. Poole, a Republican from Beaver, is the challenger in the Nov. 2 allmail election, for which ballots will be sent to registered voters Poole on Oct. 13. Here is a summary of the Port Angeles and Forks chambers’ forums, both open to the public: ■ Port Angeles: Begins at noon Monday in the secondfloor meeting room of the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier. Featured business at the lunch will be Work Source. ■ Forks: Begins with no-host lunch at noon Wednesday at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch will cost $7; a bowl of soup, $4; a cup of soup, $3; and beverage-only, $1. Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information.

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

The Associated Press

Surrounded by razor wire, inmates at Clallam Bay Corrections Center exercise in the yard at the combination maximum-, medium- and close-custody prison south of Clallam Bay in this 2008 photo. Prisoners will now be confined to their cells one day monthly.

Inmates to be locked in cells part-time to deal with fewer corrections staff members move for one day only to the Clallam County Courthouse parking lot, at Fourth and Peabody streets, this coming Saturday. The market is moving to allow the Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival to use the Gateway Pavilion. “The Crab Festival has grown into a very successful festival that brings many visitors from out of town to our downtown area every second weekend in October,” said farmers market Manager Cynthia Warne. “The farmers market is happy to move out of our space for this one weekend a year to allow them to grow and expand on all the wonderful eating, drinking and crabbing festivities they bring to our downtown area.” For more information, contact Ware at 360-460-0361 or visit the market’s website at www. portangelesfarmersmarket.com.

Prosecutor forum

PORT ANGELES — The two candidates for Clallam County prosecuting attorney/coroner, Deb Kelly and Larry Freedman, are scheduled to appear before Prosecutor hopefuls this week’s Port Angeles BusiPORT TOWNSEND — The ness Association breakfast meettwo attorneys seeking to become ing on Tuesday. Jefferson County’s top prosecuKelly, a tor are scheduled to appear Port Angeles before this week’s Jefferson Republican, County Chamber of Commerce is seeking her luncheon meeting on Monday. third fourDeputy year term. Prosecuting Freedman, Attorney Scott a Sequim priRosekrans, a vate attorney, Democrat, is is running as Freedman running for a Democrat county prosein the allcuting attormail Nov. 2 election. ney/coroner Tuesday’s against Paul PABA meetRichmond Richmond, in ing, open to private practhe public, tice in Port Townsend who is begins at 7:30 running without party prefera.m. at Joshence. ua’s RestauBoth Richrant, 113 Delmond and Guzzi Drive, Rosekrans Port Angeles. seek to There is a replace Juelie Kelly Dalzell, who $2.16 miniis retiring mum charge by Joshua’s for after three those who do not order breakfast. terms. Ballots in Service offered the all-mail Rosekrans SEQUIM — Licensed electrolelection will ogist Nancy Anseth is now offerbe sent to registered voters on Oct. 13, and ing permanent hair removal for men and women in association voting closes Nov. 2. with Valley Dermatology, 565 Open to the public, Monday’s Eureka Way. luncheon meeting of the JefferTo schedson chamber, which was formerly ule a free the Port Townsend Chamber of consultation Commerce before it combined or an ap­point­ with the Tri-Area and Port Lud- ment, phone low chambers, begins at noon at 360-808-6005 the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, or visit the 555 Otto St. spa. Following Lunch costs $12 for a full 600 hours of meal, $9 for soup/salad or $5 study, Anseth dessert/beverage. Prices include Anseth successfully tax, beverage and dessert. passed the licensing exams in Oregon and New winter hours Nebraska, where she was among SEQUIM — Olympic Restau- the first group of electrologists rant Equipment Inc., 51 Dryke to be licensed by each state. Road, will switch to winter Before moving to Sequim this hours beginning Monday. summer, Anseth provided perThe store will be open Monmanent hair removal services in day through Friday from 9 a.m. Lincoln, Neb., for 15 years. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, phone New Red Lion GM 360-582-1050 or visit www.olymPORT ANGELES — Tahnya picrestaurantequipment.com. Shafer has been named as the new general manager of the Red Market moves Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Farmers Market will Turn to Briefly/C8

Prisons hit hard in latest cutbacks Peninsula Daily News news services

OLYMPIA — The state prisons chief said that to slash more than $50 million from his budget, the agency will be taking the unprecedented measure of ordering inmates to spend one day each month locked in their cells. Department of Corrections Secretary Eldon Vail said budget analysts had to get crafty in their ways to trim the agency’s already lean budget. Over the past three years, members of the corrections staff say, they have cut more than $220 million from their budget, frozen or cut more than 1,200 jobs, closed two prisons, slashed Vail inmate populations and cut the number of offenders on community-supervision probation. Vail said that nearly all of the new budget cuts announced on Friday will go into effect immediately. The cuts — which prompted the head of a lawenforcement group to label them a risk to public safety — include the loss of 300 jobs; the reduction of education and substance-abuse treatment programs for prisoners; and the implementation of more employee furlough days and cuts to employee pay. The agency’s electronic-home-monitoring program also will be curtailed, except for sex offenders, and inmates will not be taken to visit dying relatives or to attend funerals unless the inmate’s family pays for the expense.

There will be only one recreation leader per prison, and corrections officers will be removed from the kitchen in medium-security prisons, although one sergeant will remain. Vail said those were the cuts that troubled him the most in terms of potential for trouble. One major cut includes the closure of Larch Corrections Center in central Clark County, a minimum-security facility that houses about 240 inmates. When that prison closes Feb. 1, inmates will be transferred to other prisons throughout the state, Vail said.

‘We can survive’ Because of slumping revenues, Gov. Chris Gregoire recently ordered spending cuts of 6.3 percent at all general-fund state agencies. For the Department of Corrections, that meant $52.7 million between now and June 30, 2011. The cuts being implemented will cut $51.3 million — $1.4 million short of the target. Vail said he can’t reach the goal without increasing risk to staff, inmates and the public. Vail said the agency needs more time to reach the target, and may ask the Legislature for budget help. In recent weeks, members of the state Corrections’ staff have experimented with running a prison lockdown as a budgetary saving. Vail said the test run at the Monroe Correctional Complex went smoothly. During the once monthly lockdowns, inmates will be ordered to remain in their cells for 24 hours, except offenders in cells that do not have toilets. Turn

to

Prisons/C10

Bills for sales tax break bogged down in Senate Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON – A tax break that has saved Washington residents up to $500 million annually is once again caught up in Congress’ rush to adjourn. But this year the maneuvering has become entangled in electionyear politics and the race between Democratic Sen. Patty Murray and Republican challenger Dino Rossi. Over the past week, Republicans and Democrats on the Senate floor have both blocked efforts to extend the break, which allows residents of Washington and six other states without an income tax to deduct the amount they paid in state sales tax on their federal returns. The issue has always been an end of the session item with sharp disagreements, particularly over how to pay for it. But it has escalated into the latest flashpoint in the contentious Senate race. “I am going to keep fighting to get this done, but I am deeply disappointed that Senate Republicans continue to treat this as an election year game when families across my home state of Washington are counting on us to get something done,” Murray, D-Freeland, said after Republicans blocked her push Wednesday night to pass a one-year extension. On Monday night, after Democrats blocked a Republican effort

to pass a permanent extension, Rossi said: “Instead of finishing the work the people of Washington state elected her to do, Senator Murray Murray opted instead to put politics first and gamble with the jobs and paychecks of every Washingtonian.”

Baird said the deduction has saved Wa s h i n g t o n state taxpayers between $350 million and $500 million annually. Others have said Rossi nearly 900,000 taxpayers in the state apply for the deduction annually, with each of them saving an average of $600 or more on their federal returns. 2010 taxes The deduction issue erupted on the Senate floor a week ago, The sales tax deduction expired when Murray asked for unaniat the end of last year. mous consent to approve the sales Unless Congress acts, the tax deduction as part of a larger state’s taxpayers won’t be able to package of tax extensions. use it on their 2010 taxes. Congress will return for a Broader bill lame-duck session after the November election. The broader bill was written But, there are no guarantees, by Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., said Rep. Brian Baird, D-Vancou- chairman of the Senate Finance ver, who is not seeking re-election Committee. but has been instrumental in the Baucus’ bill paid for the tax House over the years in renewing extensions by increasing some the sales tax deduction. taxes. “Sometimes brinksmanship Though Republicans support can take you over the brink,” most of the extensions, they Baird said, adding that he would oppose raising taxes to pay for find it “reprehensible” if either them and instead want spending side was holding the measure cuts. hostage to advance their candiSen. John Thune, R-S.D., dates at the expense of middle- objected to Murray’s unanimous class taxpayers. consent request. In addition to Washington, On Monday, it was the Repubother states with only sales taxes licans’ turn. are Texas, Florida, Nevada, South Turn to Bills/C14 Dakota, Tennessee and Wyoming.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 3, 2010

C9

Squadron’s classes keep boaters aware It’s fall, and the end of the recreational boating season looms on the horizon. And that means boaters have more land time to bone up on seamanship skills through classes offered by the North Olympic Sail and Power Squadron. Whether a prospective, fledgling or “old salt” boat owner, there’s a class that will help the mariner know and understand the strange and sudden contingencies of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Puget Sound. The North Olympic Sail and Power Squadron, which goes by the abbreviation NOSPS, is a unit of the United States Power Squadron, a nonprofit educational organization that was founded in 1914 and has more than 45,000 members in 450 squadrons nationwide. The squadron promotes seamanship, piloting, celestial navigation, plotting and position finding, engine maintenance and sailing — just to name a few. In the October issue of Straitlines, the monthly newsletter of the NOSPS, the executive officer, Doug Swartz, touted a website for weather information called Boater Information System Portal. The site, developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration with a grant from the state, allows the user to obtain data on wind speed and direction as well as information on tides, currents

On the waterfront and water temperature. To access Sellars the site, go to www.calmseas. org (which is the website for the NOSPS). Click on “Boating Links” and then click on the “Weather” tab. Scroll down to the BIS portal — note also the 19 additional weather-related websites under this tab. The NOSPS meets on the second Monday of each month, and the Oct. 11 meeting will be held at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, northwest of Sequim. Capt. Bill Larson is the featured speaker and will share some of his sailing experiences as former master aboard the tall ships Lady Washington and Adventuress. For more information, phone Torben Blichfeld at 360-477-4575 or visit the NOSPS website.

David G.

Big visitor Just after low tide on Friday morning, Kodiak moored to the Port of Port Angeles’ Terminal 1 North. According to Chandra “Holly-

David G. Sellars/for Peninsula Daily News

Scaffolding surrounds a Tesoro Petroleum tank normally used to store bunker fuel for ships in Port Angeles Harbor. The tank, assembled in 1985, is getting rehabilitated. wood” McGoff of Washington Marine Repair, the topside repair company at the foot of Cedar Street, the 869-foot crude oil tanker will be pierside until the middle of next week. “Hollywood” said personnel will make repairs to a boiler, swap out a steering motor and replace some of the piping.

beginning on Monday contractors will be preparing those areas for testing to determine what repairs are necessary. It is anticipated that some of the suspect areas can be welded and ground smooth while others will need to be cut out and new inserts welded in their place. When the 3 million gallon oil tank was assembled in 1985, the Tanks for the memories pre-rolled sheets of steel used to form the tank arrived on site During a routine inspection with a coat of primer — except earlier this year, Tesoro Petroalong the edges where the sheets leum identified a potential trouwould be welded together. ble spot in one of its storage It is those edges that now tanks at Tesoro’s tank farm on require repair. Ediz Hook. Once all repairs are delinSince then, the tank has been taken out of service and cleaned. eated, the tank will be encased in a tent-like shroud, sandblasted, Within the past two weeks, repaired and painted. the outer protective skin and all The insulation and outer proof the insulation have been tective skin will be reattached, removed. and the tank should be back in Additional areas of concern have been visually identified, and service around Thanksgiving.

Marine survey

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

The Northern Song, an 85-foot yacht, is on blocks in the Platypus Marine Inc. yard in Port Angeles for a marine survey before she heads to Mexico for charter fishing duty on the Sea of Cortez.

Platypus Marine hauled out Northern Song, and she is sitting on the hard in Platypus’ yard on Marine Drive. The 85-foot Metal Craft was out of the water to allow access for Reisner McEwen & Associates of Seattle to conduct a marine survey for the yacht’s new owners. Platypus personnel also will install zincs and paint the bottom. Northern Song will join Alaska Sea Adventures in the next few days in southeast Alaska and be available for charters. During the winter months, she will be in Baja California, Mexico, for charters on the Sea of Cortez. Meanwhile, Thunder, a 70-foot Delta, was out of the water for two days so that she, too, could be surveyed for her new owner. Angela, a 58-foot West Bay SonShip built in Delta, British Columbia, hung in the slings of the 330-ton TraveLift for a few hours while new props were installed.

The props were custom-made by VEEM Engineering Group and built at its facility at Canning Vale, Western Australia. Last week, Jerry Dow of Sequim had Island Belle hauled out by Platypus to have the bottom painted. Personnel also increased the surface area of the rudder to counter a slow-responding helm. Island Belle was built by Pelagic Boats in Victoria in 1973 as a commercial fishing vessel. For years she trolled for salmon out of Ucluelet, B.C., and is now used as a pleasure boat. Jerry bought her a couple of years ago. She is a pretty 35-footer that looks like she should be featured on a postcard docked in front of a restaurant specializing in seafood. The fish hold has been converted to a berthing space with a full-size head, and there is a chart table in the wheelhouse that pulls down from the overhead. The charming lady is pushed through the water by a 471 Jimmy.

Harbor refueling In Port Angeles Harbor on Wednesday, Tesoro Petroleum had its refueling barge alongside Port Phillip, a 591-foot bulk cargo ship. The Port Phillip then left Port Angeles and headed for Coos Bay, Ore. On Saturday Tesoro provided bunkers to Orient Saori, a 577foot “bulker” that made her way to Port Angeles after picking up cargo in Grays Harbor.

________

David G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resident and former Navy boatswain’s mate who enjoys boats and strolling the waterfront. Items involving boating, port activities and the North Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are always welcome. E-mail dgsellars@hotmail.com or phone him at 360-417-3736. His column, On the Waterfront, appears every Sunday.

$700 billion bailout program is ending Peninsula Daily News news services

Most repaid Of the $245 billion injected into 707 financial institutions, all but about $54 billion has been repaid. Of that outstanding amount, $30.75 billion is owed by big global banks that were subjected to special “stress tests” by regulators last year. The federal government still holds $16.5 billion of common stock issued by Citibank, for example. However, several large regional banks, including SunTrust Bank, Regions Bank, KeyCorp and Fifth Third Bank, respectively, still owe $4.85 billion, $3.5 billion, $2.5 billion and $3.4 billion. The Treasury Department expects to be fully repaid, with interest and profit from its TARP cash injections. “These weren’t made as individual investments to save individual companies. They were meant to stabilize the system and the overall economy. And in that regard, this program has really been a success, and I think anyone who looks at it objectively will

realize that,” said Tim Massad, the acting assistant Treasury secretary for financial stability. TARP also is unlikely to be fully repaid for the rescue of General Motors and Chrysler. GM has bounced back better than expected, and the company has announced its intent to issue stock either this year or early next year. However, that isn’t expected to recoup fully the $49.5 billion in taxpayer aid to GM. Full repayment will take longer.

Political hot potato TARP has been politically poisonous. People considered it free money for Wall Street executives whose recklessness dragged the world into the Great Recession. Now those executives are wallowing in bonuses while taxpayers remain plagued by 9.6 percent unemployment. “Objectively, TARP has been an economic success. — politically, it’s been a miserable failure,” said Darrell West, director of governance studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., a center-left policy-research center. Unsavory as it was politically, economists credit TARP efforts with helping

to stabilize the financial sector and preventing an even worse outcome. “I think it was a great success. The bank bailout part of TARP was an astounding success.Couldn’t have gone any better,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist with forecaster Moody’s Analytics. For politicians who voted for TARP, however, the challenge remains how to sell voters on the idea it prevented something bad from happening. “I don’t know of a single person who says if we hadn’t done this, we’d be better off today,” said Senate Banking Committee Chairman Chris Dodd, D-Conn., who is retiring and won’t face the voters’ wrath in November. Even though TARP was a Bush administration initiative and got strong congressional support from Republicans in 2008, today’s GOP has painted TARP alternately as a Wall Street bailout or a cash kitty to fund Democrats’ wish list. “TARP turned out to be a slush fund,” said Sen. Mike Johanns, R-Neb. “I would come to the office in the morning and see the latest thing the president has spent money for out of the TARP fund. “It just turns my hair gray.” West said President Obama “has not done as good a job communicating

as he should. He’s allowed the opponents to frame the issue unfavorably.” In the recently released “Pledge to America,” a campaign document from House Republicans, GOP lawmakers vow billions in savings by eliminating TARP. The problem is, recently

passed legislation to revamp financial regulation already did that, and set today, Oct. 3, as the TARP expiration date. That legislation also prevents the Obama administration from taking repayments to TARP and directing them to other priorities.

…helping people live better

Health Care Services • Skilled Nursing • Long Term Care • Post Operative Care • Palliative Care Services

Comprehensive Rehabilitation Program • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy • Speech Pathology

360-582-2400 650 West Hemlock St., Sequim www.sequimskillednursing.com EOE

9C5067968

WASHINGTON — An unpopular government-rescue program credited by economists with preventing another Great Depression is now officially out of business, two years to the day it was created. Effective today, the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), known as the bankbailout bill, loses authorization to make new expenditures. From now on, TARP will be in wind-down mode, although much of money lent out has been repaid and at a profit for taxpayers. Originally envisioned as a blank check for the government to spend up to $700 billion to rescue the financial system, the cost to taxpayers is estimated now to be only one-seventh of that amount. The government has earned almost $13 billion in dividends from the bank stock it received in exchange for the taxpayers’ investment, and it earned $8.2 billion more from the sale of preferred stock. The Treasury Department estimates taxpayers are still on the hook for about $100 billion, a number expected to shrink with continued repayments and asset sales. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office

recently put the estimated total TARP cost at about $66 billion. White House spokesman Robert Gibbs on Thursday said the latest internal estimates put the number at less than $50 billion.


C10

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

California eases penalty for marijuana Possession now like traffic ticket By Marcus Wohlsen The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO — A new law makes possessing up to an ounce of marijuana in California no more serious than getting a speeding ticket — a development both sides battling over a marijuana legalization ballot measure hope to exploit with the vote just a month away. The law signed late Thursday by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger reduces possession of an ounce or less of pot from a misdemeanor to an infraction with a maximum punishment of a $100 fine. But even as a misdemeanor, possession of up to an ounce of pot in California had been punishable only by a $100 fine and no jail time. But offenders also faced arrest, a possible court appearance and a criminal record. Schwarzenegger reiter-

ated his opposition to the Nov. 2 ballot measure known as Proposition 19 when he signed Senate Bill 1449 ��� but said the new law would save the state courts money. “In this time of drastic budget cuts, prosecutors, defense attorneys, law enforcement and the courts cannot afford to expend limited resources prosecuting a crime that carries the same punishment as a traffic ticket,” the governor said in a statement. Other opponents of Proposition 19 said the new law helped their cause by negating the argument that legalizing pot would let police focus on more dangerous crimes, said Roger Salazar, a spokesman for the No on Prop 19 group. “From our perspective, it takes away the last reason anyone would have to vote for Proposition 19,” Salazar said.

‘We can’t rest’ Meanwhile, backers of Prop 19 called the new law a step in the right direction but said the ballot measure was still needed. “So long as there are any penalties on marijuana

The Associated Press

Lanette Davies, co-owner of Canna Care, a medical marijuana shop in Sacramento, Calif., is among medical marijuana rights advocates in California opposing Proposition 19, the November ballot initiative that would legalize the drug for recreational use. They say the measure contains inadequate protections for medical marijuana patients. users, and so long as the production and sale of cannabis are illegal, we can’t rest,” Jeff Jones, a spokesman for the Yes on 19 campaign, said in an e-mail to supporters. Proposition 19 would more or less make the new law irrelevant by legalizing

possession of up to an ounce for personal use for adults 21 and older. The ballot measure also would allow small marijuana gardens on private property and let local governments set rules for taxing and selling the drug. The bill making posses-

sion an infraction was authored by San Francisco Democratic Sen. Mark Leno and supported by the Judicial Council of California — the official policymaking body of the court system — and by the California District Attorneys Association. California’s major police

associations all opposed the legislation. Those groups said reducing possession to an infraction would discourage people cited for the offense from seeking state-funded drug treatment as provided for drug offenders under a ballot measure passed in 2000. Other marijuana advocates praised the change made by the law as they pointed to the spike in misdemeanor marijuana arrests in the state in recent years. “Californians increasingly recognize that the war on marijuana is a waste of law enforcement resources,” said Dale Gieringer, director of the California chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws and co-author of the state’s landmark medical marijuana law. Authorities made more than 61,000 arrests for marijuana-related misdemeanors in 2008, the latest year for which data exists, California Department of Justice records show. In the prior decade, such arrests averaged about 48,000 until 2006, when the figure exceeded 50,000 for the first time.

San Francisco considers sanctioning McDonald’s Happy Meals The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco has a long history of bold public health and environmental stances, going after everything from plastic bags in grocery stores to cigarettes to sugary drinks. The latest target: Ronald McDonald. A proposed city ordinance would ban McDonald’s from putting toys in Happy Meals

unless it adds fruit and vegetable portions and limits calories. The proposal would apply to all restaurants, but the focus has been on McDonald’s and its iconic Happy Meals. Supervisor Eric Mar said he proposed the law to protect the health of his constituents, but McDonald’s has waged an aggressive fight to block the measure. A battery of McDonald’s Corp. executives showed up at

city hall to argue that the legislation is a heavy-handed effort that threatens the company’s decades-old business model and the free choice of its customers. The proposed Happy Meal law is just the latest in a string of San Francisco ordinances aimed at regulating public health. The city recently expanded a law banning tobacco sales in pharmacies to include grocery stores and big-box stores that

also have pharmacies. Mayor Gavin Newsom signed an executive order earlier this year banning sweetened beverages like Coca-Cola and Pepsi from vending machines on city property. Local leaders considered but ultimately abandoned laws recently that would have imposed a fee on businesses that sell sugary drinks and alcohol. Newsom has slowed down in

his support of some health measures after he was attacked by his opponent in next month’s lieutenant governor’s race, Lt. Gov. Abel Maldonado, for being the “food police.” Newsom vetoed the alcohol and soda fees, and he’s indicated he’ll do the same for Ronald McDonald. The Board of Supervisors could overturn a veto but needs the votes of eight of 11 supervisors to do so.

U.S. sorry for ’40s syphilis study in Guatemala By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — American scientists deliberately infected prisoners and patients in a mental hospital in Guatemala with syphilis 60 years ago, a recently unearthed experiment that prompted U.S. officials to apologize and declare outrage over “such reprehensible research.” The discovery dredges up past wrongs in the name of science — like the infamous Tuskegee syphilis study in this country that has long dampened minority participation in medical research — and could complicate ongoing studies overseas that depend on cooperation from some of

the world’s poorest countries to tackle tough-to-treat diseases. Uncovering it gives “us all a chance to look at this and — even as we are appalled at what was done — to redouble our efforts to make sure something like this could never happen again,” Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, said Friday. The NIH-funded experiment, which ran from 1946 to 1948, was uncovered by a Wellesley College medical historian. It apparently was conducted to test if penicillin, then relatively new, could prevent some sexually transmitted infections. The study came up with

no useful information and was hidden for decades. “We are outraged that such reprehensible research could have occurred under the guise of public health,” Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said Friday.

Obama’s phone calls President Barack Obama called Guatemala’s president, Alvaro Colom, later Friday to apologize. Clinton had called to apologize the night before. “Obviously this is shocking, it’s tragic, it’s reprehensible,” said White House press secretary Robert Gibbs.

“It’s tragic and the U.S. by all means apologizes to all those who were impacted.” Guatemalan Embassy official Fernando de la Cerda said his country hadn’t known anything about the experiment until Clinton called to apologize Thursday night. “We appreciate this gesture from the USA, acknowledging the mistake and apologizing,” he said. “This must not affect the bilateral relationship.” Strict regulations today make clear that it is unethical to experiment on people without their consent, and require special steps for any work with such vulnerable populations as prisoners. But such regulations

didn’t exist in the 1940s. The U.S. government ordered two independent investigations to uncover exactly what happened in Guatemala and to make sure current bioethics rules are adequate. They will be led by the prestigious Institute of Medicine and the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. Wellesley College historian Susan Reverby made the discovery while combing the archived records of Dr. John Cutler, a government researcher involved in the Tuskegee study that from 1932 to 1972 tracked 600 black men in Alabama who had syphilis without ever offering them treatment.

She discovered that Cutler also led the Guatemala project that went a step further. A total of 696 men and women were exposed to syphilis or in some cases gonorrhea — through jail visits by prostitutes or, when that didn’t infect enough people, by deliberately inoculating them. They were offered penicillin, but it wasn’t clear how many were infected and how many were successfully treated. She reported that the U.S. had gained permission from Guatemalan officials to conduct the study, but did not inform the experimental subjects. Turn

to

Syphilis/C11

Prisons: Union finds job actions ‘unacceptable’ C8 have visitors, Vail said. onCselect models Tracey A. Thompson, Eurotop Set secretary-treasurer of TeamOn Queen these days, inmates will not be allowed $299to work, sters Local 117, which repspend time in the yard, resents 5,800 Corrections

“These reductions, along with the state’s proposals in bargaining, are simply unacceptable,” Thompson said in a news release. “Our members work side attend educational or sub- employees at 13 prisons, by side with some of socistance-abuse programs or opposes the cuts. ety’s most dangerous criminals. “We will not stand idly by and allow the state to dismantle protections that help keep them safe.” Thompson said Corrections employees are planning a rally at the state Capitol in Olympia on Dec. 9 as a way to “demand dignity and respect for correctional workers.” The union also says it will sue the state over the ontinued from

cuts. Sixty percent of the Corrections employees represented by Local 117 have rejected the state’s most recent contract proposal — which includes wage freezes, an increase in health-care costs and furlough days, the union said. The union and Corrections will return to the bargaining table in coming weeks, Thompson said. Don Pierce, executive director of the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, said he understands Corrections had to make reductions, but he believes the cuts have gone too deep and that public

old fashioned service

095097917

SINCE 1951

free local Pick-Up & delivery 0A5094106

“Enjoy Life For Less”

NEW FURNITURE & MATTRESSES 2830 HWY 101 EAST • Port Angeles • 452-3936

schedule your appointment today

www.pabargainwarehouse.net

2010 S. Oak St., P.A. • 457-5372

Monday - Saturday 9:00AM - 5:30PM • Sunday 11:00AM - 4:00PM

pectacular

safety is at risk. “I think we have gone past the maximum of what the Department of Corrections can do,” Pierce said. “You cannot close an institution and do less electronic monitoring without a consequence. “We’re way past doing more with less, and the citizens of this state need to realize that because of the budget cuts we’ll be doing less with less.”

DSHS, Medicaid cuts Vail said he is preparing for another round of cutbacks in the next biennium. Another 10 percent is expected to be cut from Corrections’ budget, he said. Last month, a new staterevenue forecast projected an additional $1.4 billion drop in tax collections between now and June 2013. In response, Gregoire ordered a $520 million reduction in state spending through June, although the Legislature could intervene and make adjustments when it starts its session in January. Last Wednesday, the Department of Social and Health Services announced reductions nearing $281 million. The 6.3 percent acrossthe-board cuts include nearly $113 million in state

funding for Medicaid programs. The cuts will end subsidized health insurance coverage for about 27,000 in the state’s Apple Health for Kids program and end outpatient pharmacy benefits for thousands of Medicaid patients — both in March. Other cuts in January will eliminate a host of services including dental, vision, hearing and hospice care for thousands of Medicaid patients. DSHS said it will also eliminate 30 inpatient beds at Western State Hospital; reduce services for mentally ill clients; and reduce payments to nursing homes. It will eliminate 380 jobs by June 30. Other agencies also announced cuts. The state’s community and technical colleges, which served a record 161,000 fulltime-equivalent students last academic year, are absorbing a loss of $167 million per year. “Increased enrollments during times of economic downturn are not a new phenomenon for community and technical colleges,” said Charlie Earl, head of the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. “But the record budget cuts alongside record enrollments for two years running is unprecedented.”


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 3, 2010

C11

Is this push-button age creating a generation of simpletons? By Beth J. Harpaz The Associated Press

S

econd-graders who can’t tie shoes or zip jackets. Four-year-olds in Pull-Ups diapers. Five-year-olds in strollers. Teens and preteens befuddled by can openers and ice-cube trays. College kids who’ve never done laundry, taken a bus alone or addressed an envelope. Are we raising a generation of nincompoops? And do we have only ourselves to blame? Or are some of these things simply the result of kids growing up with push-button technology in an era when mechanical devices are gradually being replaced by electronics? Susan Maushart, a mother of three, says her teenage daughter “literally does not know how to use a can opener. “Most cans come with pull-tops these days. “I see her reaching for a can that requires a can opener, and her shoulders slump and she goes for something else.”

Throwing clothes on floor Teenagers are so accustomed to either throwing their clothes on the floor or hanging them on hooks that Maushart says her “kids actually struggle with the mechanics of a clothes hanger.” Many kids never learn to do ordinary household tasks. They have no chores. Take-out and drive-through meals have replaced home cooking. And busy families who can afford it

often outsource house cleaning and lawn care. “It’s so all laid out for them,” said Maushart, author of the forthcoming book The Winter of Our Disconnect, about her efforts to wean her family from its dependence on technology.

‘So much comfort’

Consumer Product Safety Commission

“Having so much comfort and ease is what has led to this situation — the Velcro sneakers, the Pull-Ups generation. “You can pee in your pants, and we’ll take care of it for you!” Mark Bauerlein, author of the bestselling book The Dumbest Generation, which contends that cyberculture is turning young people into know-nothings, says “the absence of technology” confuses kids faced with simple mechanical tasks. But Bauerlein says there’s a second factor: “a loss of independence and a loss of initiative.”

Problem-solving problems He says that growing up with cellphones and Google means kids don’t have to figure things out or solve problems anymore. They can look up what they need online or phone mom or dad for step-bystep instructions. And today’s helicopter parents are more than happy to oblige, whether their kids are 12 or 22. “It’s the dependence factor, the unimaginability of life without the new technology, that is making kids less entrepreneurial, less initiative-oriented, less independent,” Bauerlein said. Turn

to

Kids/C12

Syphilis: ‘Sad legacy’ Continued from C10 nia bioethicist. “The sad legacy” of past While secretly trying to unethical experiments is infect people with serious that “they still shape who it diseases is abhorrent today, is that we can get to trust the Guatemalan experi- medical researchers.” A continuing ethical ment isn’t the only example from what Collins on Fri- dilemma in developing day called “a dark chapter countries is what Caplan in the history of medicine.” calls the “left-behind synForty similar deliberate- drome,” when the people infection studies were con- who helped test a treatducted in the United States ment can never afford the during that period, Collins resulting care. said. “It’s still ethically con“We’ve made some obvi- tentious as to how we ought ous moral progress” in pro- to conduct, or whether we tecting the poor and power- ought to conduct, certain less, said Dr. Arthur Caplan, forms of research in poor a University of Pennsylva- nations today,” he said.

NEW

The revelation of abuses by a U.S. medical research program is only the latest chapter in the United States’ troubled history with the impoverished Central American nation, which has a per capita gross domestic product about half of that of the rest of Central America and the Caribbean. The U.S. helped topple the democratically elected president Jacobo Arbenz in 1954 and backed several hardline governments during a 36-year civil war that ended in 1996 and cost 200,000 lives.

A baby doll is shown on a sleep positioner. The government is warning parents and caregivers to stop using infant sleep positioners — a soft fabric product that anxious parents put in the crib to try to keep babies safely sleeping on their backs.

Infant sleep positioners pose risk, officials say The New York Times

WASHINGTON — Twelve infants have been suffocated and dozens have been endangered by sleep positioners marketed as protecting against sudden infant death syndrome, according to federal officials. The officials, from two federal agencies, said the devices — flat or inclined mats with side bolsters — should be taken off the market. “We are very concerned about the risk that this product poses to babies,” said Inez Moore Tenenbaum, chairwoman of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The positioners, sold in baby-supply stores, are supposed to keep infants lying on their back. But the government said most of the infants suffocated after rolling from a side to a stomach position. The officials said that none of the many products being promoted for

SIDS prevention had ever been proved effective and that nearly all should be avoided. “Many products are out there making these claims, and these must stop,” said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, principal deputy commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. “They are illegal devices.” Dr. Rachel Moon, chairwoman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ task force on the syndrome, said that other worrisome anti-SIDS products on the market included crib bumpers, “cosleepers,” breathable mattresses, wedges and foam pads. “There are hundreds of these products out there that could potentially cause harm,” said Moon. Products that have extensive foam, memory foam, significant cushioning or anything else on which a baby might suffocate should never be used in a crib, Moon said.

Tribe wins recognition battle The Associated Press

GARDEN CITY, N.Y. — A small eastern Long Island tribe seeking federal recognition since the 1970s declared victory Friday after an Interior Department appeals panel rejected a pair of challenges to its application. The decision, which found the challengers lacked legal standing in the case, clears the way for the Shinnecock tribe to proceed with plans to open a casino

at a still-to-be-determined site on Long Island and makes tribal members eligible for federal benefits. “We’re very pleased that the judges have had the wisdom to see through the charade; clearly they have done that,” said Randy King, chairman of the Shinnecock board of trustees. “Now the hard work of the nation starts; the work of building for the future. It’s going to be challenging, but exciting.” Mark Tilden, an attor-

ney representing the Shinnecocks in the recognition bid, said the Interior Board of Indian Appeals ruling is effective immediately, making the Southampton-based tribe the 565th to be formally recognized by the United States government. “Today is a very jubilant day for the nation,” Tilden said. “This ruling firmly establishes them among the family of Indian nations and tribes within the United States.”

peninsula connections Local, Confidential and FUN

Why wait any longer to find someone new? North Olympic Peninsula men and women looking for romance and friendships. Place your ad for FREE! Call 360-452-8435 or go online - see below for details. AvAilAble Active fun loving lady who is a young 77 yrs. old, 5’1”, 130 lbs. and enjoys ocean beaches, lakes, boats, movies, plays, dinner, dancing and walking. I live in two places, Washington and Florida. I play golf, tennis, cards and enjoy life. Would like to share and have fun with a gentle man with similar interest. No smoking, casual drinker ok. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#170/Available Pt Angeles, WA 98362

iMAgine. Female 62, NS imagines getting to know you, getting to know all about you for friendly pursuits, nature, arts, movies, music. Single, sincere guy with similar interests. Email reply pdn102@peninsuladailynews.com

looking for best friend And pArtner. I am a 63 yr. female, 5’6” 160 lbs, young country woman. Looking for a friend and soulmate, no drugs, that likes to be in the woods, hunting, fishing, camping. I love farm life, sun sets, beaches. If I sound like the one you have thought about for you, give us a chance because you just might be my dream life. Country Woman Peninsula Daily News PDN#173/Country Pt Angeles, WA 98362 intelligent, hAndsoMe 5’9” 90 yr. old, healthy, independent male seeking fun outgoing female, hopefully to spend the rest of my days with. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#174/Intelligent Pt Angeles, WA 98362 JAson, i wAs silly for not talking to you more! Then the rain, my friends; I just wasn’t thinking. Hope to see you again. PTLady2010@gmail.com

i’M 6’5” tAll, single, white male, 47 yrs. old, 265 lbs, average build, love to cuddle and cook, seeking single white female, 28-40 yrs. old. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#167/Cuddle Pt Angeles, WA 98362 i sAw you! It was Sept. 14. I was walking my bike on the Waterfront Trail before the Red Lion when I you gave me the most perfect “Hello” a girl could ever ask for. I hope you read this. There could be many more “Hellos” in our future. Me: Long hair, white shirt, pink skirt, beige cruiser bike. You: dark hair, dark eyes, around 5’9 and positively adorable. JenniferinPA@hotmail.com holidAy/sAntA The holidays are coming and Santa has a very special early gift for that right lady who is a non-smoker, no drugs, HWP. Santa has been looking for that right lady to make this Norwegian male, 60, 6’, HWP, excellent health, dreams come true. He is very affectionate, caring, giving from his heart, down to earth, loves the outdoors and animals, home life, with a sense of humor, honesty and respect are very important also. Now Santa is just waiting for the right lady to unwrap her early gift which could be her soul mate for eternity. littlewilddeer@yahoo.com

hello. My nAMe is scott. 5’10” 265 lbs., jet black hair, baby blue eyes, well built, 39, in Marine Corp. Reserve seeks female for companionship possible LTR, kids ok, knows how to spoil and treat a lady right. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#171/Hello Pt Angeles, WA 98362 67 yr. old MAle, 6’, 200 lbs., seeking easy going, versatile, retired lady in her 50s or 60s that likes walking, live theater, short hikes, exploring, camping, festivals and road trips. Send response to PO Box 2323 Pt Angeles, WA 98362 woMAn, shAring, curious, active, happy, peaceful, independent, strong desires confident, spiritually generous man, compatible with, wanting above 48-65 DOS and like to dance? Send reply to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#163/Happy Pt Angeles, WA 98362 for the tAll, slender lady at the paperback fiction table at William James in PT. You recommended Stegner, while I suggested Maxwell. Outside, I was talking to a bud, but could not break free. If you see this — let’s talk literature and photography. Booklover36@hotmail.com

AvAilAble gentleMAn seeks pArtner WWII Army discharge papers, will verify, age beyond his 80s. All the following traits: World traveler, high intelligence, became a leader in every activity or group starting with Boy Scouts. Army schools (graduate degree) tutoring, service club (Kiwanis), own retail business, rental property, mountain home, 2 happy marriages, walking, drive own car, Christian. May move anywhere in west. Prefers California, Oregon, or Arizona. Owns homes. Adequate finances. Searching for some of the above in partner. Serious female only. Send reply to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#161/WWII Pt Angeles, WA 98362 73 yr. old, 6’ 210 lbs., MAle widower looking for petite fun loving lady to enjoy life with me. Mail reply to Peninsula Daily News PDN#162/Fun Pt Angeles, WA 98362 55 yeAr old feMAle recently out lesbian. I’m looking for female in similar situation hoping to find companionship and fun. Nonsmoker, non-drinker and no drugs. Must love animals, especially cats. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#165/Companion Pt Angeles WA 98362

Visit peninsuladailynews.com - click classifieds

0A5099259

Med. size guy with dog and foreign accent, 60. NS, ND, good groomer, my socks don’t clash. U can drink, but no tobac. Enjoy cooking, reading, the blues, maybe travel; walking grocery aisles, flat forest trails, beaches, side street sidewalks. I believe our planet is best and laughter is the answer. Ladies, if you are a punctual ditherer, please tell me about yourself. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#164/Laughter Pt Angeles, WA 98362

Middle Aged MAn’s coMpAnionship wanted for hiking and ballroom dancing by solidly middle-aged woman. Peninsula Daily News PDN#172/Hiking Pt Angeles, WA 98362


C12

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Stonehenge find linked to Mediterranean This teenager was important 3,500 years ago The Associated Press

LONDON — A wealthy young teenager buried near Britain’s mysterious Stonehenge monument came from the Mediterranean hundreds of miles away, scientists said Wednesday, proof of the site’s importance as a travel destination in prehistoric times. The teen — dubbed “The Boy with the Amber Necklace” because he was unearthed with a cluster of amber beads around his neck — is one of several sets of foreign remains found around the ancient ring of imposing stones, whose exact purpose remains unknown. The British Geological Survey’s Jane Evans said that the find, radiocarbon dated to 1,550 B.C., “highlights the diversity of people who came to Stonehenge from across Europe,” a statement backed by Bournemouth University’s Timothy Darvill, a Stonehenge scholar uninvolved with

the discovery. “The find adds considerable weight to the idea that people traveled long distances to visit Stonehenge, which must therefore have had a big reputation as a cult center,” Darvill said in an e-mail Wednesday. “Long distance travel was certainly more common at this time than we generally think.” The skeleton, thought to be that of a 14- or 15-year-old, was unearthed about two miles southeast of Stonehenge, in southern England. Clues to the adolescent’s foreign origins could be found in the necklace, which isn’t a recognized British type. But he was traced to the area around the Mediterranean Sea by a technique known as isotope analysis, which in this case measured the ratio of strontium and oxygen isotopes in his tooth enamel.

Different element mixes Different regions have different mixes of elements in their drinking water, for example, and some of those are absorbed into a person’s tooth enamel as he or she

The Associated Press (2)

Although it cannot be seen in this photograph, this teenager was buried wearing a necklace made from amber beads. grows up. Analysis of the isotopes of oxygen and strontium carried in the enamel can give scientists a good but rather general idea of where a person was raised. The teen, whose necklace suggests he came from a rich family, is one of several long-distance travelers found near Stonehenge. The “Amesbury Archer,” socalled because of the stone arrowheads he was found with, was

buried three miles (5 kilometers) from Stonehenge but is thought to have come from the Alpine foothills of central Europe. The “Boscombe Bowmen,” also found nearby, are thought to have come from Wales or possibly Brittany. It isn’t clear precisely what drew these people to Stonehenge, a site which has existed in various forms for some 5,000 years. It clearly had an important

ceremonial function, and the area around it is dotted with the remains of prehistoric monuments and tombs. Some say it was at the center of a sun-worshipping culture or that it served as a kind of astronomical calendar. Others, like Darvill, also say it might have been an important healing site, drawing pilgrims from across Europe like a prehistoric version of Lourdes.

Stonehenge in present-day England may have drawn pilgrims as a healing site, a prehistoric version of Lourdes, according to scholars.

NASA gets orders that bypass moon By Kenneth Chang The New York Times

WASHINGTON — NASA, best known as the agency that put the first man on the moon, is about to end its moon program for the foreseeable future. Under legislation passed by the House late Wednesday, the nation’s spaceflight program will take a new direction NASA — the National Aeronautics and Space Administration — will turn to private companies to launch astronauts into space, while it starts work on a larger rocket for travel to more distant destinations — an asteroid, perhaps, and eventually Mars. The bill “helps put the

U.S. space program on a more sustainable trajectory,” Lori B. Garver, NASA’s deputy administrator, said Thursday during a telephone news conference. “We now have an important framework.” The House, in a 304-to118 vote on Wednesday, approved a Senate-written bill authorizing $58 billion for NASA over the next three years and setting priorities for the agency. The Senate passed the bill in August, and it now goes to President Obama for his signature. As requested by the administration in February, it cancels Constellation, the ambitious program that was to have sent astronauts back to the moon to estab-

$1000 Brow Wax with with any hair service in Oct! Come see what we have for your dance and holiday hair!

457-7993 Walk-ins Always Welcome Open 7 Days a Week

0A5099332

Shear Elegance

210 E. 4th St. Port Angeles

MOUNTAIN VIEW HEARING

MOUNTAIN VIEW HEARING AID CENTERS, INC.

85309511

Monday through Thursday, 9am- 4pm

625 N. 5th Ave, Ste. 3 • Sequim

The bill also extends the space shuttle era. Instead of retiring the shuttles in February, it provides money for one more flight to take supplies to the International Space Station in the second half of 2011. To pay for the additional shuttle flight and the heavylift rocket, the authorization cut deeply into money for future space technologies that NASA had hoped to develop, like orbiting fuel stations.

Just e-mail us the facts — topic, contact, phone number, name, etc. — and our staff will check it out.

Shannon & Robert

(360) 681-4481 • 1-800-467-0292

Space shuttle

Got an idea for a story?

BETTER HEARING with a human touch www.mtnviewhearing.com

lish an outpost, but which no longer fits in the budget. NASA has spent more than $10 billion on Constellation in the past five years, mostly on the Ares I rocket and Orion crew capsule. However, the compromise legislation does not cancel all of Constellation, as Obama had originally sought. Development of Orion, capable of deep space missions, is to continue, and the bill directs NASA to develop a heavy-lift rocket able to propel a payload of at least 70 tons. The legislation calls for NASA to report to Congress in 90 days with a plan for the heavy-lift rocket.

news@peninsula dailynews.com

Peninsula Daily News

Religious knowledge waning? Mormonism; knowledge of world religions; atheism and agnosticism; and the role of religion in public life. WASHINGTON — Did you know Among the findings: that most people in Indonesia are Musn Atheists, agnostics, Jews and Morlim? mons scored the highest, outperforming That American public-school teachers can read from the Bible as an exam- evangelical and mainline Protestants and Catholics on the survey. ple of literature? n Mormons and white evangelicals That only Protestants traditionally knew the most about Christianity and teach that salvation comes through the Bible. faith alone? n Jews, atheists and agnostics were Chances are you did not. most knowledgeable about world reliA new survey by the Pew Forum on gions and the role of religion in public Religion & Public Life suggests that large numbers of Americans know little life, including what the U.S. Constitution says about religion. about the world’s major religions, n Nearly half of all Catholics surincluding their own. veyed did not know their church The U.S. Religious Knowledge Survey, a first-of-its-kind attempt to gauge teaches that the bread and wine in Communion actually become the body the nation’s religious literacy, found and blood of Christ. wide gaps. n More than half of Protestants More than 3,400 people asked 32 could not identify Martin Luther as the questions over seven topics: the Bible; elements of Christianity, Judaism and catalyst for the Protestant Reformation. Peninsula Daily News news services

Kids: Postage skills Continued from C11 way smarter than we give them credit for: “They know how to change a photo caption on a digital photo and send it to a Teachers in kindergarten have always had to show patience with children learn- friend. “They can add the smiley face without ing to tie shoes and zip jackets, but the colon and parentheses! They never thanks to Velcro closures, today’s kids took typing, but they can type faster than often don’t develop those skills until they I can!” are older. Some argue it’s wrong to indict a whole Sure, harried parents are grateful for generation for the decline of skills they Velcro when they’re trying to get a kid dressed and out the door, and children don’t need. learn to tie shoes eventually unless they After all, we no longer have to grow have a real disability. crops, shoot deer, prime a pump or milk a But if they’re capable of learning to tie cow to make dinner, but it was just a coutheir shoes before they learn to read, ple of generations ago that you couldn’t shouldn’t we encourage them? survive in many places without that knowledge. Roman numerals Bauerlein, a professor at Emory University who has studied culture and Some skills, of course, are no longer useAmerican life, sees a reason to rail against ful. Kids don’t need to know how to add the ignorance of youth. Roman numerals, write cursive or look “That’s our job as we get old,” he said. things up in a paperbound thesaurus. “A healthy society is healthy only if it But is snail-mail already so outmoded has some degree of tension between older that teenagers don’t need to know how to and younger generations. address an envelope or put the stamp in “It’s up to us old folks to remind teenthe right spot? agers: ‘The world didn’t begin on your Ask a 15-year-old to prepare an enve13th birthday!’ lope some time — you might be shocked “And it’s good for kids to resent that at the result. and to argue back. Lenore Skenazy, who writes a popular “We want to criticize and provoke blog called Free-Range Kids, based on her them. It’s not healthy for the older generabook by the same name, agrees that we tion to say, ‘Kids are kids, they’ll grow up.’ are partly to blame for our children’s “They won’t grow up,” he added, apparent incompetence, starting when “unless you do your job by knocking down they are infants. their hubris.” But Skenazy thinks today’s kids are


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 3, 2010

C13

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from C8 Shafer comes from the Warwick Seattle Hotel, where she was director of sales and marketing. She has worked in the past for Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express, Doubletree and WestCoast Hospitality, and has extensive experience as a general manager, director of sales and marketing and in revenue management. For more information, phone the Red Lion at 360452-9215.

Richmond training PORT TOWNSEND — Port Townsend attorney Paul Richmond recently completed a two-day trial skills workshop offered by the Northwest Justice Project and the National Institute of Trial Advocacy. Richmond is a candidate for Jefferson County prosecuting attorney/coroner and will face Deputy Prosecutor Scott Rosekrans in the Nov. 2 election. Earlier this month, Richmond completed a twoday training by the National Consumer Law Center and Northwest Justice Project, focused on helping those facing foreclosure and helping those who are being abused by debt collectors. His law office is at 210 Polk St., Suite 3, or visit www.olympicpeninsulalaw. com or phone 360-379-5575.

New hours, name PORT ANGELES — Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County ReStore, 728 E. Front St., will be switching to winter hours beginning Wednesday. The store will be open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Donations may continue to be dropped off from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Additionally, the store will be changing its name from ReStore to The Habitat for Humanity Store. This change is consistent with all Habitat for Humanity ReStores throughout the state. New signs will soon be placed on the building. For more information, phone the store at 360-4177543.

Send us your business news Do you have a business expansion planned, staffing change, new product line or something newsworthy? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

Peninsula Daily News City Manager Kent Myers ■  Tuesday: Kacey Eichacker, women’s program supervisor Hodge for Olympic Medical Imaging Center. ■  Wednesday: Josette Hodge, the “Iron Baroness,” from the Port Scandalous Derby Dolls, a Port Angeles roller derby team. In a separate segment, Becca Korby, executive director of Healthy Families of Clallam County, discussing Domestic Violence Awareness Month. ■  Thursday: Clallam County District 3 commissioner candidate interviews scheduled with incumbent Mike Doherty, Port Angeles Democrat, and his challenger, Robin Poole of Beaver, a Republican. ■  Friday: Cherie Trebon discusses the 16th Forest Storytelling Festival. In the second segment, Waterfront Art Gallery’s Artist of the Month, Diana Miller. In the final segment, Port Angeles Fine Arts Center Director Jake Seniuk.

in order to better the environment. The Innovation Award is given to individuals and hotels that have identified, developed or implemented new innovative practices to increase guest satisfaction or hotel efficiency. The Support Staff Service Excellence Award is given to individuals and hotels that went above and beyond to surpass a guest’s service expectations. For more information, phone the hotel at 360-6832800.

Spa turns 10

Nation/World New HP direction NEW YORK — The appointment of a German software executive as Hewlett-Packard Co.’s next CEO sends an unmistakable signal that the board of the world’s largest technology company is prepared to gamble big on an aggressive push into the software business. And analysts say it will need to do just that to avoid being left behind in its core personal comApotheker puter and printer businesses that no longer offer much room for growth or big profits. In a conference call that served as his formal introduction to Wall Street on Friday, former SAP AG CEO Leo Apotheker called software the “glue” that will hold together the different parts of the company.

GMC Terrain surged more than 200 percent. Some new small cars also saw strong sales.

Sanchez fired ATLANTA — CNN fired news anchor Rick Sanchez on Friday, a day after he called comedian Jon Stewart a bigot in a radio show interview where he also questioned whether Jews should be considered a minority. Sanchez, who was born in Cuba and had worked at CNN since 2004, was host of the twoSanchez hour “Rick’s List” on CNN’s afternoon lineup. He did a prime-time version of that show in recent months, but that ended this week because the time slot is being filled by a new show featuring former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and columnist Kathleen Parker. CNN issued a statement late Friday that said Sanchez “is no longer with the company.” In it, the network also thanked Sanchez “for his years of service” and wished him well.

Reason for plunge WASHINGTON — A trading firm’s use of a computer sell order triggered the May 6 market plunge, which sent the Dow Jones industrial average careening nearly 1,000 points in less than a half-hour, federal regulators said. A report by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission determined that the so-called “flash crash” occurred when the trading firm executed a computerized selling program in an already stressed market. The firm’s trade, worth $4.1 billion, led to a chain of events that ended with market players swiftly pulling their money from the stock market, the report said.

62 mpg target

curb oil dependence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Airline deal done United and Continental closed the deal on Friday that will create the world’s biggest airline, although it will be months before it looks that way to travelers. By early 2012, travelers will see a combined airline called United Airlines, with Continental’s blue and gold colors and globe logo on the tail. Between now and then, the new company, United Continental Holdings Inc., will run the two as separate operations, with each airline’s customers checking in at Continental or United websites and airport counters. Their frequent flier programs will stay separate for now, too. The company said travelers should begin to see a more unified brand in the spring.

Foreclosures held WASHINGTON — Bank of America is delaying foreclosures in 23 states as it examines whether it rushed the foreclosure process for thousands of homeowners without reading the documents. Bank of America isn’t able to estimate how many homeowners’ cases will be affected, Dan Frahm, a spokesman for the Charlotte, N.C.-based bank, said Friday. The move adds the nation’s largest bank to a growing list of mortgage companies whose employees signed documents in foreclosure cases without verifying the information in them. Two other companies, Ally Financial Inc.’s GMAC Mortgage unit and JPMorgan Chase, have halted tens of thousands of foreclosure cases after similar problems became public.

Oil tops $80 NEW YORK — Benchmark oil for November delivery added $1.61 to settle at $81.58 a barrel in early trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It’s the first time the price has topped $80 a barrel since early August. In London, Brent crude rose $1.64 to $83.75 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange.

WASHINGTON — Cars and trucks averaging 62 miles per gallon? Seems extraordinary now, but the government suggested Friday that automakers could be required to build new line- Nonferrous metals ups by 2025 that make NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous today’s high-mileage metal prices Friday. hybrids seem conventional Aluminum - $1.0491 per lb., and turn gas guzzlers into London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.6527 Cathode full relics of the past. plate, LME. It’s all included in - $3.6460 N.Y. Merc Government aid lift potential efficiency ranges spotCopper Thu. the government is considLead - $2261.00 metric ton, WASHINGTON — A ering for new cars and London Metal Exch. flurry of new data Friday trucks starting in 2017. Zinc - $0.9865 per lb., London showed the economy is By a decade and a half Metal Exch. improving — with tempofrom now, in 2025, a carGold - $1316.25 Handy & Harrary help from the governman (only daily quote). maker’s fleet of new vehiment. Gold - $1307.80 troy oz., NY cles may need to meet a Consumer spending rose Merc spot Thu. standard somewhere from in August and incomes Silver - $22.125 Handy & Har47 mpg to 62 mpg, the man (only daily quote). increased by the largest Transportation DepartSilver - $21.798 troy oz., N.Y. amount in eight months, ment and Environmental Merc spot Thu. the Commerce Department Protection Agency said. Platinum - $1683.00 troy oz., said. The new standards, N.Y. (contract). Still, the income gain Platinum - $1652.00 troy oz., while years away, are was propelled mostly by closely watched by the auto N.Y. Merc spot Thu. the government’s shortindustry as it develops Peninsula Daily News, term extension of unemfuture vehicles and enviVictoria Times Colonist ployment aid, not wage ronmental groups trying to and The Associated Press gains. A big jump in governBLOWER OR TABLETOP ment building projects lifted construction spendTEMPEST TORCH ing in August, Commerce said in a separate report. with purchase of Those offset the weakest level in private construcGas or Wood Stove* tion spending in 12 years.

FREE

0A5098808

Auto sales sluggish DETROIT — New models and Labor Day promotions didn’t do much to fire Americans’ appetites for new cars in September. Sales at Chrysler Group LLC and Ford Motor Co. rose slightly from August. Sales fell at General Motors Co. and Honda Motor Co. and were flat at Toyota Motor Corp. Car companies say a recovery is still happening, but it’s not as strong as they had hoped following a terrible 2009. There were a few winners. Redesigned crossovers, which are SUVs on car frames, saw big jumps across the industry. Sales of the 2011 Ford Edge, Jeep Grand Cherokee and Toyota RAV4 doubled, while General Motors’

* Expires Oct 15, 2010 Tax Credit Ends Dec. 31. Up To $1500 on Wood & Pellet Stoves

Everwarm Hearth & Home 257151 Highway 101 • 452-3366

www.mikes-bikes.net Specialized

GOT LIGHTS? All New Nite Rider 150 W. Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim 360-681-3868 • M-F 10-6; Sat. 10-5

0A5097704

SEQUIM — Tender Touches Spa, 545 Eureka Way, is celebrating its 10th anniversary this month. The spa’s offerings include microdermabrasion, peels, treatments for rosacea, acne, antiBrown aging and scar revision. Owner Barbara Brown Tax planning event is a licensed aesthetician with credentials in Vodder SEQUIM — Certified Manual lymph drainage, financial planner James D. reflexology and scar reviHallett will present “Tax sion. Planning Can Be Fun,” the Brown has expanded second in a free series of Three new hires services to include a farfinancial planning proSEQUIM — Primary infrared sauna which, she grams sponsored by the Care Sequim & Walk-In says, reduces inflammation, Dungeness River Audubon Clinic, 520 N. Fifth Ave., provides pain relief for Center. has hired three new staff some conditions and The free members: 90-minute ■  Nurse Sara Heineman increases metabolism. Anniversary specials will program provides primary care and be offered this month. will be wellness care for chronic Brown is also the offered health care conditions. founder of the Promise of twice at the She is a graduate of Hope Foundation. Audubon Montana State University Tender Touches reguwith a background in public Center, larly offers promotions to heath nursing. located at Hallett Heineman is also a certi- support the foundation. Railroad For more information, Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hen- fied lactation counselor. ■  Wendy Black, also phone Tender Touches at drickson Road, from 3:30 from Montana, is working p.m. to 5 p.m., and again 360-681-4363. from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., on in the front office. Her background is in the B.C. ferry fares cut Thursday, Oct. 14. banking and the mortgage During both seminars, WHISTLER, B.C. — industry. Hallett will take a look at British Columbia Ferries is ■  Lori Herrin has also proposed 2011 tax rate joined the clinic in the front reducing ferry fares by 2 increases, discuss specific percent on all of its routes office. She has lived in steps to take, show how to starting Oct. 18 as part of a worked in the Sequim area use social capital to deal that will see the Canafor many years and has a increase income, cut taxes dian federal government background in contracting and benefit nonprofits and sales. return $119.4 million in help provide context for tax The clinic accepts excise tax. rules and how to benefit Molina, DSHS, Medicare The reduction means from this knowledge. and most private insurance the adult passenger fare Attendees can bring coverage. for major routes drops to their 2009 tax return for For more information, $13.75 from $14, a saving reference while preparing phone Primary Care at 360- of 25 cents, while the fare for their 2010 return and 582-1200. for a car and driver drops planning strategies for to $59.50 from $60.75, a Quality workers 2011. savings of $1.25. Pre-registration is SEQUIM — Sequim In addition, a portion of advised. Quality Inn & Suites the rebated tax — which To register phone Julie Hotel’s Roy Howell, Damian was collected last year Jackson at 360-683-1355, Humphreys and Bret Wirta when B.C. Ferries imported or e-mail juliejackson@ have received honors in the four German-made ferries wavecable.com. Choice Hotels’ Awards for — will go toward a longProperty Excellence. term infrastructure mainKONP talk guests Howell earned the Ecotenance program for the Excellence Award, Humfleet. PORT ANGELES — phreys the Innovation The deal is part of a Here is this week’s schedAward and Wirta the Supmuch larger announcement ule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 port Staff Service Excelat a conference in Whistler p.m. local talk show seglence Award. that the Canadian government on KONP radio at Choice Hotels is the ment is wiping out a 25 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and on franchisor of the Quality percent excise tax on large www.konp.com on the Inn brand. ferries, tankers and general Internet outside the Port The three men were rec- cargo vessels imported into Angeles area. ognized at a dinner event Canada. Station general manager held in San Francisco. Todd Ortloff hosts the MonThe Eco-Excellence day through Thursday seg- Award is given to individu- Bank closed ments, and Karen Hanan SHORELINE — State als and hotels that are hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. making strides and impleregulators on Friday shut This week’s scheduled down Shoreline Bank, citmenting initiatives in ing “inadequate capital and achieving increased green lineup: ■  Monday: Port Angeles operations at their property severe loan losses,” making

it the 10th Washington bank to fail this year. Most of the small bank’s assets and Williamson liabilities were assumed by Los Angelesbased GBC International Bank under an agreement with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Shoreline has three branches, all in Shoreline, a suburb of Seattle. All will open Monday as branches of GBC. “This is another case of banks with tremendous concentration in construction lending not being able to overcome their problems and raise capital,” said Brad Williamson, director of the state’s division of banks. GBC is assuming all of Shoreline Bank’s deposits and is buying about $65.7 million of the failed bank’s assets; the FDIC agreed to share in potential losses on $49.2 million of those assets. The FDIC will retain the balance of the assets “for later disposition,” officials said. The total cost to the FDIC’s insurance fund is estimated at $41.4 million. There have been 129 U.S. bank failures so far this year Shoreline’s failure came a week after regulators seized Snohomish County’s North County Bank.


C14

WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 59

Low 43

58/39

58/45

59/44

60/44

Low clouds followed by some sun.

Mostly cloudy with a passing shower late.

Mostly cloudy with a couple of showers.

Partly sunny.

Sun and some clouds.

Partly sunny.

The Peninsula Low clouds will start the day across the Peninsula, then some sunshine will appear. It will be cool with temperatures running a few degrees below normal for this time of the year. Tonight will be mostly cloudy with a passing shower later on as a cold front Neah Bay Port approaches the Pacific Northwest. That front will bring a 57/47 Townsend mostly cloudy day Monday with a couple of showers. Port Angeles 59/48 Tuesday will be a partly sunny and cool day, but it will 59/43 be rain-free. Wednesday will have sunshine and some Sequim clouds.

Victoria 64/46

62/46

Forks 61/44

Olympia 63/44

Seattle 62/50

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Spokane 68/49

Marine Forecast

Low clouds breaking for some sun today. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Mostly cloudy tonight with a passing shower late. Wind west 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mostly cloudy tomorrow with a couple of showers. Wind west 7-14 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Tuesday: Partly sunny. Wind southwest 4-8 knots. Waves 1-2 feet.

LaPush

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

6.7’ 7.4’ 6.7’ 5.5’ 8.1’ --7.6’ ---

2:53 a.m. 3:17 p.m. 5:05 a.m. 6:28 p.m. 6:19 a.m. 7:42 p.m. 6:12 a.m. 7:35 p.m.

0.5’ 2.5’ 0.1’ 3.8’ 0.1’ 4.9’ 0.1’ 4.6’

10:23 a.m. 10:19 p.m. 1:09 p.m. ----12:45 a.m. 2:54 p.m. 12:06 a.m. 2:15 p.m.

COme see the

9:32 a.m. 9:12 p.m. Port Angeles 12:41 p.m. 11:00 p.m. Port Townsend 2:26 p.m. ----Sequim Bay* 1:47 p.m. -----

BEST OF the BEST

San Francisco 67/54

Full

7.4’ 7.8’ 6.8’ --6.6’ 8.2’ 6.2’ 7.7’

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht 3:51 a.m. 4:18 p.m. 6:05 a.m. 7:08 p.m. 7:19 a.m. 8:22 p.m. 7:12 a.m. 8:15 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

0.2’ 1.5’ 0.4’ 2.8’ 0.5’ 3.6’ 0.5’ 3.4’

11:07 a.m. 11:19 p.m. 12:27 a.m. 1:36 p.m. 2:12 a.m. 3:21 p.m. 1:33 a.m. 2:42 p.m.

8.1’ 8.1’ 5.7’ 7.0’ 6.9’ 8.4’ 6.5’ 7.9’

Low Tide Ht 4:44 a.m. 5:14 p.m. 6:58 a.m. 7:49 p.m. 8:12 a.m. 9:03 p.m. 8:05 a.m. 8:56 p.m.

0.1’ 0.6’ 0.8’ 1.7’ 1.0’ 2.2’ 0.9’ 2.1’

Best Auto Deale r

Oct 30

City Hi Lo W Athens 76 62 s Baghdad 101 70 s Beijing 73 50 s Brussels 74 56 pc Cairo 98 71 s Calgary 64 41 s Edmonton 64 41 s Hong Kong 85 76 pc Jerusalem 89 64 s Johannesburg 86 54 s Kabul 91 40 s London 65 57 r Mexico City 73 43 s Montreal 52 39 s Moscow 43 23 pc New Delhi 97 70 s Paris 73 59 pc Rio de Janeiro 69 64 r Rome 74 57 pc Stockholm 55 46 pc Sydney 70 60 sh Tokyo 74 70 c Toronto 55 38 pc Vancouver 62 51 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Bes Auto R t ep Finali air st

Atlanta 68/44

El Paso 86/58

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Last

Oct 22

Washington 66/50

Kansas City 61/39

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 82/54 Miami 86/73

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 81 52 60 68 66 64 70 83 69 83 60 53 77 75 56 58 66 73 74 79 62 57 70 47 81 86 82 50

Lo W 55 t 37 sh 44 pc 44 pc 54 sh 50 sh 38 sh 52 s 38 s 55 pc 49 s 42 pc 54 pc 44 s 40 pc 40 pc 48 t 48 sh 49 s 47 s 37 s 38 pc 46 sh 31 pc 50 pc 73 pc 54 s 38 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 61 94 70 78 86 55 62 63 75 64 70 62 85 95 64 101 67 67 80 81 62 86 85 71 67 62 80 66

Lo W 39 s 69 t 43 s 61 pc 73 pc 40 pc 39 s 41 s 56 s 52 pc 45 s 36 s 62 pc 67 pc 49 sh 75 s 50 c 47 sh 48 pc 52 s 38 s 57 pc 54 s 64 pc 54 pc 37 s 50 pc 50 sh

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 104 at Death Valley, CA

Bes Oil Ch t an Finali ge st

Low: 26 at Embarrass, MN

Be salesp st e Fin rson ellen D alist earinge r

Be salesp st erson Bil schlin l gting

wilder

Auto Center You Can Count on us!

0A5099129

Thank You!

High Tide Ht

Oct 14

Chicago 56/40

Denver 79/47

New York 64/52

Los Angeles 78/61

Moon Phases First

Minneapolis 62/39 Detroit 57/38

Sunset today ................... 6:50 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:17 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 1:54 a.m. Moonset today ................. 4:35 p.m.

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 75/41 74/48

Today

Billings 83/52

Sun & Moon

Oct 7

Everett 61/48

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 62/50

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 61 55 0.00 7.50 Forks 65 49 0.01 84.16 Seattle 64 57 0.00 28.01 Sequim 69 58 0.00 7.98 Hoquiam 64 56 0.00 44.12 Victoria 65 48 0.00 22.25 P. Townsend* 66 50 0.00 10.38 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 60/47 Bellingham 63/47

Aberdeen 61/46

Peninsula Daily News

97 Deer Park Road • Port Angeles • 1-800-927-9395 • 360-452-3888 • www.wilderauto.com

Both sides claim win in BIAW suit The Associated Press

Vivian Elvis Hansen/Peninsula Daily News

Downtown

association business mixer

Downtown business owners and members of the Port Angeles Downtown Association gather for a recent morning business mixer at Tiger Lily Clothing’s new location at 123 E. First St. From left, back row, are Bob Lumens, Suzanne Delaney, Phil Fauth, Marilyn Shay, Richard Stephens, Marilyn Lamb, Barb Frederick, Lynn Green, Steve Seibert; front row, Lyndi Lumens, Edna Petersen, Lyn Fauth, Melissa Abrams and Jan Harbick.

OLYMPIA — Both sides are claiming victory in an Olympia court ruling Thursday on a three-year-old lawsuit against the Building Industry Association of Washington. Thurston County Superior Court Judge Carol Murphy found the association violated its duties when it kept more than $400,000 in interest earnings from an industrial insurance trust it managed for members since 1994. But Murphy found no harm to plaintiffs — although she found at least three other violations of trust rules in her decision, which she read aloud in court. While she said BIAW must stop retaining interest earnings on trust funds., she declined to order the group to pay back any wrong­fully held interest to any of the five contractors that sued. BIAW spokeswoman Erin Shannon said it couldn’t have asked for a better outcome. A lawyer on the other side, Knoll Lowney of Seattle, said the case will force BIAW to change its practices. He also said the suing

Bills: Murray speaks on Senate floor Continued from C8

Port Angeles Hardwood LLC 333 Eclipse Industrial Pkwy Port Angeles, WA 98363

take a look at it and run it by his colleagues. Rossi’s campaign said Murray was offering a bill no one had seen, no one had read and was doing it after the Senate had voted to adjourn.

Peninsula Community Health Center is offering a free Depression Screening.

Tel: (360) 452-6041 • Fax: (360) 417-6805

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL ECONOMY! KEEP YOUR ALDER SAWLOGS ON THE PENINSULA! Partner Agency

Date: Thursday, October 7, 2010 Location: 118 East 8th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Just walk in and ask for a free screening.

Restaurateur By Farmer Bob

I’ve got my farmer’s hat on, it’s harvest season! Nash’s Sequim Valley grown hard red wheat berries are milled and delivered by Bell Street Bakery. They sure make those buttermilk waffles delicious at our $10.99 All U Can Eat Sunday breakfast buffet. Kids -12 / Seniors 55+ $7.99

Winter Specials take flight this Sunday. All You Can Eat Spaghetti Sunday. Monday buy 1 All U Can Eat Soup & Salad Bar and get the 2nd half off from 11:30 am to 9 pm. Tuesday we have All U Can Eat Fish & Chips. Wednesdays we are introducing our 5 Items for $5... from 11 am to 9 pm, we will offer Chicken Strips, Fish & Chips, Shrimp or Chicken Salad, Deep Fried Zucchini & Mozzarella Fingers.

1527 East First Street

0A5098945

Contact Vail Case at 460-1661

Murray’s campaign said her bill was 73 words, the Senate had voted to adjourn but didn’t adjourn for three more hours and during that time 23 other bills and resolutions were approved by unanimous consent.

Confessions of a

0A5099013

Washington state in the coming weeks, then wanted to substitute Republican language for the sales tax deduction and another tax deduction and pay for them with spending cuts. Democratic Whip Richard Durbin of Illinois objected to Thune’s language and then Thune objected to the Murray bill. Murray asked Thune to reconsider. Thune said he would

065087458

Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., asked unanimous consent for passage of a measure originally introduced by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas, that would have permanently extended the sales tax deduction. But the bill didn’t include a way to pay for it. Baucus objected. Murray wasn’t about give up. The senator persuaded Democrats to accept the Barrasso bill but with one modification: Rather than extending the sales tax deduction permanently, the measure would have extended it for one year. On Wednesday night, after the Senate had voted to adjourn but before the final gavel, Murray asked the Senate for unanimous consent to approve the oneyear extension.

Murray argued it was exactly the same as the Barrasso bill, except it called for only a one-year extension. “Frankly, this issue shouldn’t be controversial, and the livelihoods of middle-class families shouldn’t be used as a political football in election-year games,” Murray said in a floor speech. Thune, who is expected to campaign for Rossi in

parties might appeal — “we’re confused by how she found they breached the trust, took a half-million dollars and can keep it.” Among the violations Murphy found was that BIAW co-mingled its own accounts with money meant for the Washington Builders Benefit Trust, which Lowney described as a serious violation of the trust rules. Murphy ordered builders to keep the funds separate in the future and to provide yearly accounting to members.

(360) 457-4113

www.bushwhackerpa.com


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

PANORAMIC WATER VIEWS

GREAT VIEW

PRIVATE ACREAGE

0A405177

0A405217

Beautiful custom home in an upscale subdivision. Great mountain views from the kitchen and living areas. Features include plenty of nice woodwork, tile flooring, fireplace in the living room, large kitchen with plenty of storage, south facing garden room, large master suite, beautiful landscaping including a waterfall in the back yard. Plenty of parking. Price has been slashed to only $300,000 ML#242603

2.5+ Acres, Great home sites, wooded, cleared building site, power, phone, surveyed. Soils registered for conventional septic. Just 10 minutes from Port Angeles. Want more land? 2 additional parcels avail. Starting at $89,900 MLS#250051 Virtual tour: www.visualtour.com/shownp.asp?T=2077289

D1

OH DEAR... A DEER

0A405149

0A405143

Panoramic water and island views for this contemporary style home on one acre. Exceptional potential in this nearly 2,000 SF home. Expansive deck allows you to look out over the Sequim Valley and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Soaring windows fill this home with soft light and allow exceptional viewing of the ships as they pass by. Call Jim $245,000 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.com

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Deer and other wildlife wander about on this secluded half-acre lot. Minutes from town but with a country feel, this 3 BR/2 BA rambler sports a vaulted ceiling living room, a formal dining room exiting onto the private deck and a spacious garage. The heat pump will warm you in winter and cool you during summer. There is even a place for your RV. Motivated seller has dropped the price and wants offers. $215,000 ML#251707 Call Amy

CARROLL REALTY TOM BLORE

UPTOWN REALTY

FISH FROM YOUR PATIO!

Office: (360) 457-1111 www.carrollrealtyteam.com

Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

EZ LIVING!

WATER VIEW

WONDERFUL 3 BEDROOM

0A405158

0A405218

3 BR/2 BA, 2,158 SF home located on a very private 3.22 acre parcel. This home has a large detached garage with room to park all your toys, a circular driveway and is located at the end of a long country road. $275,000 ML#252058/135819. Call Nason or Terry for more information.

3 BR/2 BA, 1,930 SF rambler, well maintained, 1.03 acre with large vaulted ceilings, excellent natural lighting with windows all along the north side of home to take advantage of views of the Strait and Canada. Large north deck with water views from hot tub access from dining room and master suite with garden soaking tub, separate shower and large walk-in closet. 1683 Place Rd. Port Angeles ML#251808 $399,000

WRE/Port Ludlow

WRE/Port Angeles

UPTOWN REALTY

Bryan Diehl (360) 437-1011 Cell: (360) 821-9056

SPACIOUS SUNLAND HOME

0A405151

0A405169

Team Thomsen Realtors®

Unique NW water view home! Watch the shipping lanes from your living room. Artistically updated gourmet kitchen with granite tile and garden window. Dining area in kitchen with breakfast bar. Upper level includes hardwood floors and master BR. Lower level has 2 BR/Bath. Large lot w/fenced backyard and area for parking a boat or RV. Just listed. $274,500 MLS#252032 www.jeanirvine.com

3 BR/2 BA home in a convenient location. Quality built in the Northwest Custom Craftsman style. Exterior accents include board and batt, stone and shingle. Interiors include granite tops, painted millwork, 9’ ceilings, hardwood floors, stainless appliances and more in a home thoughtfully designed for an easy living lifestyle. The neighborhood is fully maintained allowing you freedom to travel or winter elsewhere. Only $299,950 MLS#252057

• 3 Bedroom/3 Bath Home on Corner Lot • 2 Fireplaces • Nice Deck w/ Mountain Views • 2-Car Garage plus Golf Cart Area • Nice Landscaping & Fruit Trees www.sequim4sale.com ML#252062/136048 $289,000

1

WATER VIEW!

OUTSTANDING CUSTOM HOME

0A405216

0A405152

2 contiguous lots bordering very busy Race St., one of the main thoroughfares in Port Angeles. Traveled by many locals & tourists for year-round exposure. This property has many permitted uses. Call us for more information! $195,000 ML#251067

T

(360) 457-0456 (360) 477-9027 nason@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2812 www.RealtorBrooke.com BrookeNelson@olypen.com

477-5322 heidi@olypen.com

7TH & RACE - PRIME COMMERCIAL

Nason Beckett

BROOKE NELSON

Heidi Hansen

0A405199

0A405150

Well-maintained home with formal living room, dining room and a family room. Large master suite with walk-in closet, guest bedroom and full guest bath. Kitchen has oak cabinets and lots of storage and counter space; built-in desk and breakfast bar. Inside laundry room. Two sets of French doors open out into the large patio area in backyard. $98,000. Call Heidi for more details 360-477-5322. MLS#252044/134760

Rare opportunity to own a nearly new waterfront home in close-knit community! Private marina & clubhouse. RV parking. Beautiful kitchen. Flowers galore! MLS#29161371 $460,000.

Amy Powell

tom@sequim.com

David A. Ramey

Call Brody at 360.477.9665

Brody Broker

UPTOWN REALTY

Tom Cantwell

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

E RIC

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR

®

Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

UNBEATABLE

GREAT EXPECTATIONS

GREAT CURB APPEAL

UPTOWN REALTY

www.welcomehomesequim.com

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 • 808-4612 1-800-359-8823 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

W NE

761 N. Sequim Ave. Cell: 360-477-9665 email: Brodybroker@olypen.com

WRE/SunLand

UNOBSTRUCTED WATER & MT VIEWS

P

You don’t usually find such a great master suite at this price! You’ll love the deck off the kitchen. Built in 1990, this 3 BR/2 BA home is light and bright. Terrific floor plan puts the master at an opposite end from the other bedroom. Preview it at www.PiliMeyer.com $205,000 ML#251496

A half acre right on the Discovery Trail in Carlsborg. Property is site registered for septic; power in to lot. Zoning allows for a wide variety of uses. Manufactured homes are allowed. Reduced to $49,900!

On 3.77 acres. The main house boasts vaulted ceilings with exposed beams, a large brick fireplace and large master BR and BA. The guesthouse is a studio design with a loft. $599,900. ML#251745/118957

ML#240846 Call Ed (360) 808-1712

WRE/Port Angeles

0A405157

0A405181

0A405153

0A405200

Corner lot home with 2 BR/1 BA. Open floor plan with a fireplace and hardwood floors throughout the home. Mountain view and a fenced backyard with a garden. $133,400 ML#251784/118379.

Ed Sumpter

Shawnee Hathaway-Ochs

190 Priest Rd. 360-808-1712 PO Box 1060 edseds@olypen.com Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

UPTOWN REALTY

Broker

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

Cell: (360) 460-4794 shawnee@olypen.com shawnee.mywindermere.com

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

VIEW OF THE STRAIT!

GRIFFITH FARM

Kathy Love

Office: 452-3333 1-800-453-9157 klove@olypen.com

www.portangelesrealty.com

0A405144

Impeccable inside & out. Original oak floors & open living/dining concept. Custom master has built-in vanity & walk-in closets. Family room, exercise room & storage! New heat pump & electric furnace. Fenced backyard, est. landscaping, sprinkler sys. & perfect patio for BBQ! Detached dbl. garage. All this PLUS WATER & MOUNTAIN VIEWS! $269,000 ML#250976

WRE/Sequim-East

Cathy: 460-1800 Sheryl: 460-9363 www.sequimwa.com

FANTASTIC NEIGHBORHOOD

0A405166

Private setting on 1.18 acre. Custom 1,632 SF, 3/2 home. Great room concept, lots of cabinets & counters in kitchen. Vaulted ceiling, large windows, light and bright. Dbl. garage, detached single garage. Covered deck and immaculate landscaping! Your opportunity to have it all. $315,000. Call Cathy or Sheryl about ML#252013

Cathy Reed Sheryl Payseno Burley

477-5582

lynnmoreno@olypen.com

MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE!

0A405165

0A405170

This home was just reduced to $189,000 for a quick sale! 3 BR/1 BA home on a large lot features great water views from the kitchen, dining room, living room and library. Bring your paint brush and make this house your own. Only $189,000 MLS#242014. Call Kimi for a showing or more information 360-461-9788

Lynn Moreno

3 BR/2.5 BA, 3,053 SF on .87 acre. Wonderful sunroom tiled on the south side of home to sit and enjoy the stunning mountain & valley views. Room for your RV or boat. Only $355,000 MLS#232594

Fifth Avenue Liz Parks

(360) 460-7322 (360) 683-1500

www.sequimagent.com


D2

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula

MARKETPLACE

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM 1134 East Front Street Port Angeles (800) 446-8115 (360) 457-8593

Come check out our office website!

portangelesbuyersguide.com Open 7 Days a Week Ask about our Seller’s FREE Home Warranty Program Visit www.johnlscott.com & enter 5 digit code

1

johnlscott.com/62616

INGE BAUMWELL GRI, Managing Broker

GREAT STARTER HOME OR INVESTMENT PROPERTY This 2 BR/2 BA home is move-in ready, large living room, laundry/mud room, good size kitchen with dining area. Master BR with private bath and second BR at the other end of the home for that little extra privacy. Full fenced backyard with a separate fence for animals. Large outbuilding/workshop & covered area for your toys. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

ML#251943

$128,700

5

2

johnlscott.com/96622 THE PERFECT HOME FOR RELAXATION & HOBBIES This BEAUTIFUL & PRIVATE FAMILY HOME This 3 BR/2 BA spacious 3 BR/3 BA home has a spa, open kitchen and windows that allow plenty of light. The oversized 3+ car garage has a large shop, 3/4 bath and extra outlets for all your needs. A large deck and gazebo overlooking the grounds and the separate garden shed. All of this is conveniently located near the Dungeness River and Olympic Discovery Trail. Call Tanya Ker (360) 670-6776

johnlscott.com/56975

DON EDGMON ABR, GRI 460-0204

6

9

johnlscott.com/92729

JEANETT HEAWARD Realtor® 461-4585

johnlscott.com/63523

SUN MEADOWS This 2 br/2 ba home is located in Sun Meadows on a corner lot. Great floor plan, very open with large rooms, kitchen/dining/family room separate from living room, plus an office/den. Master Suite with walk-in closet & private bath. Nice home. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

GREAT BIG HOME ON GREAT BIG LOT! This 4 BR/2 BA home has all the amenities, is on a huge lot and is in a great neighborhood. This home is priced to sell, needs some TLC. Call Steve Gates (360) 460-8189 $190,000

10

johnlscott.com/81818 johnlscott.com/18262 ENJOY THE VIEW OF THE STRAIT. This 3

johnlscott.com/ what a great place for those romantic nights. A covered country front porch plus a large back deck to enjoy the view of the strait, Mt. Baker and the Dungeness Lighthouse. Master Suite has a walk-in closet, a private bath/ADA walk-in tub-shower. This is a must see! Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

13

14

johnlscott.com/49032

$239,900

ML#251613

7

8

Oct. 9th, 2010

johnlscott.com/32564

12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Stop by our office or call for advance directions (360) 457-8593 1134 E. Front St., P.A.

LINDA LAPE FRENCH Owner

johnlscott.com/12617

ROOM FOR EVERYONE! This 4 BR/3 BA home is on 1.45 acres, Master Suite has a sitting room, jetted tub, walk-in closet and private deck with mountain and garden views. Mature landscaping with fruit trees, flower garden and a fenced yard for Fido. Outbuilding for office/shop with two separate spaces. Call Tanya Kerr to see (360) 670-6776

ML#251681

$421,500

11

12

johnlscott.com/46429

TANYA KERR Designated Broker 457-8593 x311 670-6776

johnlscott.com/37294

Sequim. The breathtaking views of Sequim Valley and the water, to the tranquil sound of 2 waterfalls from the private pond, this home beckons you to relax and enjoy your new home. To see, call Tanya Kerr (360) 670-6776

CED EDU R JUST

ML#251580 $115,000

15

johnlscott.com/54970 johnlscott.com/36206 PLAYHOUSE FOR ALL For Mom, we have a WONDERFUL SPLIT-ENTRY HOME This 3

turnkey 5 BR/3 BA home complete with all appliances, landscaped yard & separate guest quarters for Dad’s extreme man-cave. 3-car shop/ garage with RV parking with 220 power, water, & dump. Storage galore, shop bench & loft. This is a must see. Call Steve Gates (360) 460-8189

$184,995

the famous Elwha River. The building site cleared, water, and power & phone all installed. Is waiting and ready for your dream home. Call Steve Gates to see (360) 460-8189

BD/2 BA home is on an extra large lot, superb fenced back yard that is landscaped & has fruit trees. Deck off dining area, kitchen offers beautiful cherry cabinets, 2 fireplaces, living room & family room. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204 ML#251322 $184,900 ML#251525

ML#251115

BEST OF THREE + ACRES Located in the heart of the fertile Dungeness Valley, with unobstructed views of the Olympic Mountains, includes water shares. Call Steve (360) 460-8189 $250,000 johnlscott.com/49225 ML#250039

16

SEPTIC, POWER & WATER ALL INSTALLED!!! If you are looking to build in a beautiful area, this is it. All you have to do is bring your plans, building site is cleared and all utilities are already in. What could be simpler? Call Jeanett (360) 461-4585 $129,000 johnlscott.com/96343 ML#242659

STEVE GATES Realtor® 457-8593 460-8189

0A405141

BA home is spacious & offers high ceilings, Master Suite on main level. Family room & formal dining along with kitchen on main level. Upper level features 2 BR and full BA. Call Don Edgmon to see (360) 460-0204

ML#241436

$168,000

BANK OWNED HOME TOUR

ML#251697 $265,000

ML#251392 $310,950

WONDERFUL NEWER HOME IN ROLLING HILLS ESTATE. This 3 BD/2.5

ML#251912

4

johnlscott.com/41907 OWNER SAYS “BEST OFFER OVER $150,000” Deal before Oct. 29th, 2010, close by Dec. 17th, 2010. Great little house with wheelchair ramp, built-in storage, laundry/sunroom in back of huge kitchen. Large lot room for a garden & RV, 2-car garage with workshop. Roof, flooring etc., new in 2007. Call Vallerie Lape (360) 461-7019.

BREATHTAKING VIEWS! Beautiful 2 BR/2 BA A MOUNTAIN VIEW THAT IS STUNNING BR/2.5 BA home is very well maintained and on A pristine piece just a stone’s throw away from 1.02 acres. Living room offers a wood fireplace, with den/office just minutes from downtown

CED EDU R JUST

VALERIE LAPE GRI, Realtor® Property Manager 461-7019

ML#251869

$172,500

johnlscott.com/ johnlscott.com/21102

home is on almost 2500 SF of quiet acreage and has a great open floor plan. The master bedroom has a large bath and dressing room, and lots of closet space. Extra large pantry and a huge family media room for those family movie nights. Easy care landscaping featuring a hot tub in the back yard. Call Jeanett Heaward 360-461-4585

ML#251935 $335,000

$219,500

johnlscott.com/35780 johnlscott.com/19158

THE TIME IS RIGHT Gardener’s paradise, fertile soil, Majestic maples, and your own private creek. 4.62 acres all backed by DNR land. Owner financing available. Call Steve for more information (360) 460-8189 $99,900 ML#251775

3

johnlscott.com/60467

It’s a terrific way to reach a whole new market for anything you might want to sell. www.peninsuladailynews.com 61246807

For details on how your ad can be on the internet call: 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7724


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

51

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

FALL IN LOVE Spacious country home on 1.37 acres. Home features gorgeous master suite with a dream bath, 100 year old fir floors, light and bright sunroom overlooking the truly unique property with gardens, a “woman cave” studio with 3/4 bath, old homestead outbuildings, fruit trees and privacy. $355,000. ML252007. Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

FANTASTIC VIEW AND PRICE Nice home on a .3 acre lot. Mtn and Strait views, watch the ships from your deck. Overlooks wildlife refuge. Nicely landscaped. 2 car garage and RV/boat plus shop. Open floor plan with woodstove. $234,000. ML251108/76011 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FISH FROM YOUR PATIO! Rare opportunity to own a nearly new waterfront home in close-knit community! Private marina and clubhouse. RV parking, beautiful kitchen. Flowers galore. $460,000. ML29161371 Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

51

51

Homes

COMPLETELY REMODELED Ready to sell, 2 Br., 1 bath, 14x56, includes separate storage shed, nice quiet country setting. $25,000 ML241972/29115823 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GARDENER’S DREAM Country living only minutes from downtown Sequim. 3 Br., 2 bath rambler. 2.98 acres with irrigation water. Large outbuilding with charming features. $265,000. ML251536. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GREAT EXPECTATIONS You don’t usually find such a great master suite at this price! You’ll love the deck off the kitchen. Built in 1990, this 3 Br., 2 bath home is light and bright. Terrific floor plan puts the master at an opposite end from the other bedroom. $205,000. ML251496. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Open House

GREAT PRICE

Sunday, Oct. 3 • 1-3 pm

51

Homes

GREAT EXPECTATIONS You don’t usually find such a great master suite at this price! You’ll love the deck off the kitchen. Built in 1990, this 3 Br., 2 bath home is light and bright. Terrific floor plan puts the master at an opposite end from the other Br. $205,000. ML251496. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Great Home, Great Location, Great Price. 622 W 11th, PA. FSBO 2 bedroom, 1 bath home, 840 sq feet. Private setting between the bridges on a deadend. Wood stove, private deck. New flooring, windows, paint inside and out. Close to Elks Playfield. Can't beat the price. $134,900. Call Katie at 457-6788. LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

On this 2 BR/2 BA + loft, 1,237 SF, fully furnished with enclosed, covered back porch located in gated Maple Grove on Lake Sutherland. Steps from the lake, includes your own boat slip. Only $290,000 MLS#231198

GREAT CURB APPEAL Corner lot home with 2 Br., 1 bath. Open floor plan with a fireplace and hardwood floors throughout the home. Mountain view and a fenced backyard with a garden. $133,400. ML251784/118379 Shawnee Hathaway Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GREAT LOCATION Quiet cul-de-sac, fantastic landscaping, 3 Br., 2 bath, close to the strait, eat in kitchen with formal dining room, covered patio. $235,000. ML241697/29098253 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT OPPORTUNITY Sunland for less than $200,000. Comfortable, easy to live with floor plan. Cozy fireplace for those chilly evenings. Great kitchen and dining area combo for easy living. All appliances included. $195,000. ML251993/131039 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND www.peninsula dailynews.com

Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

Fifth Avenue Liz Parks

(360) 460-7322 (360) 683-1500

WRE/SunLand

Cath Mich, CRS

www.sequimagent.com

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

51

Homes

GREAT VIEW Beautiful custom home in an upscale subdivision. Great mountain views from the kitchen and living areas. Features include plenty of nice woodwork, tile flooring, fireplace in the living room, large kitchen with plenty of storage, south facing garden room , large master suite, beautiful landscaping including a water fall in the back yard. Plenty of parking. Price has been slashed. $300,000. ML242603 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 GRIFFITH FARM Private setting on 1.18 acre. Custom 1,632 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath home. Great room concept, lots of cabinets and counters in kitchen. Vaulted ceiling, large windows, light and bright. Double garage, detached single garage. Covered deck and immaculate landscaping! Your opportunity to have it all. $315,000. ML252013. Cathy Reed or Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Homes

GREAT OPPORTUNITY Water view, 3 Br., 2 bath with heat pump, vaulted ceilings and skylights, wraparound deck. $175,000 ML252064/135857 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

HOOD CANAL SEAMOUNT ESTATES Brinnon: Nice 3 Br., 2 bath, private 1/2 acre, new carpet, paint and huge deck. Wood stove, newer roof. Large private community beach area with access to shellfish, adjacent lot avail. Priced to sell! $89,000. 460-2667. Large A frame with beautiful view of the river. Detached garage and office. Open concept with fireplace to keep it warm and friendly. 3 Br., 3 baths. $269,900 ML251513/103085 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

SUNDAY • 2 - 3:30 PM

SUNDAY • 12 - 1:30 PM

117 PRATER PLACE ~ SEQUIM This home is on a generous corner lot with easy care landscaping. Approx. 1,566 SF with owner-friendly floor plan for daily living and entertaining. All appliances included. Deck recently refreshed. ML#251993/ 131039 $195,000 Directions: Sequim/Dungeness north to Medsker (across from cemetery entrance), stay on Medsker as it turns right, left on Prater Place to 117.

51

Homes

0A405168

TIPS

Sell your Treasures!

EZ LIVING Well-maintained home with formal living room, dining room and a family room. Large master suite with walk-in closet, guest Br., and full guest bath. Kitchen has oak cabinets and lots of storage and counter space; built in desk and breakfast bar. Inside laundry room. Two sets of French doors open out into the large patio area in backyard. $98,000. ML252044/134760 Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Homes

D3

0A405167

www.peninsula dailynews.com

NEED EXTRA CASH!

51

Homes

0A405142

Compose your Classified Ad on

COMPLETELY REBUILT Vaulted wood beam ceilings, hand-milled rustic pine floors, Bleimeister custom cabinets, one Br., one bath in house, detached studio/ office with bath. $197,900 ML251685/113851 Marti Winkler 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Del Guzzi built home on .63 acres in Port Angeles. 2,800 sf, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Spacious living room with large windows and fireplace. Two family rooms with fireplace and wood stove. Straight views in upstairs living, family and bed rooms. Two car carport, shop, fruit trees. $325,000. 457-2796

51

0A405145

CEDARS AND STREAM Wonderful cedars, creek, paths, and patio from this lovely remodeled and updated 2 Br., 2+ bath home in Dungeness Meadows. Fully fenced backyard with sun deck, awning and TV/ stereo. 2 car garage plus extra storage. Beautiful granite and exotic hardwood floors. $259,000. ML250869 Claire Koenigsaecker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Homes

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

1412 Aurora Court, Port Angeles

3002 Oakcrest Loop, Port Angeles

QUALITY CRAFTSMAN STYLE HOME built in 2006. Features teak floors, vaulted ceiling in main living area that brings outside in. Mission style doors, handcrafted designer touches throughout. Master enjoys sitting room/office area. Customized pantry/laundry room. Extra lighting features. Low-maintenance landscaping & Trex® deck. ML#251926

SEE IT ALL FROM HERE... Spruced up home with remodeled kitchen, hardwood floors & super media/family room. It’s got that homey feeling with a warm wood stove, family “hub” & lots of light. Refreshing! 4 BR/2 BA, 2,456 SF, Dbl attached garage. ML#251840 JUST REDUCED TO $259,900

Margo Petersen-Pruss

Margo Petersen-Pruss

Cell: 460-4251 Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157 margo@olypen.com

Cell: 460-4251 Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157 margo@olypen.com

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 460-7950 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

SUNDAY, OCT. 3

1PM-3PM

UPTOWN N REALTY

0A405159

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, October 3, 2010

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

328 Dungeness Meadows

IMMACULATE COTTAGE HOME Pond & golf course views. Fenced backyard, deck & hot tub. Vaulted, beamed ceilings, skylights, fireplace. Versatile upstairs suite. Walk to pool & clubhouse. Come see! OLS#251175 NWMLS#80465 $239,900

12:00 pm to 1:30 pm

12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

12:30 pm to 3:30 pm

IP

US PL

Directions: S. on River Rd., W. on Secor Rd., cross Riverside, down hill at Y. Keep right around golf course to #328.

AT BO

IP

SL

US

T OA

SL

B

PL

New Medical Office

97315731

space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

DEBORAH NORMAN Assoc. Broker 360.681.8778

SHERRY SIEGEL

CERTIFIED ECOBROKER®, Accredited Buyer Representative (ABR)®

360.681.8778 cell: 461-6871

123 Lake Sutherland Rd., Port Angeles

230 Jnell Lane, Port Angeles

BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BA. Built in “1997”, w/both LR & family rooms. All 3 BR have own study. Sits on a majestic 2.74 acres w/incredible Mt. views. Lake Sutherland access w/shared dock. Lake Crescent just minutes away. Many more amenities accompany this property. See it today! $369,900 MLS#251566.

GREAT GETAWAY PLAYHOUSE at Lake Sutherland. Great price, Great fun and Great memories to be made. 2 BR/1 BA, big decks, shed, firepit, fully furnished. Move in ready and also includes boat slip. Very little upkeep needed... $139,500 buys a Great escape and abundant beauty at the lake. MLS#251265 JOYCE will greet you!

Directions: Hwy 101 W, S. on Lk. Sutherland Rd. (just past Shadow Mtn. Store)

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Directions: 101 W to Lake Sutherland - Maple Directions: 101 to Maple Grove, thru gate, keep Grove - turn right after entering through gate, then stay left to CBU sign. right, cross bridge, turn left, 2nd house on left.

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

Associate Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

1:30 pm to 3:30 pm Whether you are selling or buying, browsing or creating, looking or booking… classified has it all! As low as 4 days for $16.50

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Lot 25 Maple Grove Rd., Port Angeles ONLY LOT LEFT WITHOUT HEIGHT RESTRICTIONS at Maple Grove. Ready to build your year-round or summer home. Includes boat slip, and all the amenities of the development. Wonderful lake and mountain views. Good price at $89,500 MLS#250195 Questions? See JOYCE

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

Associate Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

1:30 pm to 2:30 pm

S!

AT RE

W IE

V

G

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

76 & 78 Thompson Point Rd., Port Angeles

451 Maple Grove Rd., Port Angeles

FANTASTIC 3.95 TOTAL ACRES w/300’ +/- of lake frontage w/house & cabin. (2) parcels for sale, (3) ways to buy, (4) separate lots, all w/lake frontage. (1) House, (1) Cabin, each with 1 additional buildable lot. All (4) could be sold separate, all with water, septic & power. Starting at $320,000 MLS#252019

DON’T MISS THIS fabulous 3 BR home at Maple Grove with its private community beach on Lake Sutherland, a boat launch & dock with a boat slip included. You’ll love this spacious, open & light home with its awesome views, perfect for year-round living. $385,000! MLS#251043 The gate will be open & JOYCE will greet you!

Directions: Hwy 101 W, L. at Thompson Point Rd. (directly across from Shadow Mtn. Store)

Directions: West 8th, N. on Cedar (between Directions: Hwy 101 W, to Maple Grove Rd. at bridges) to corner of Cedar & W. 6th. Lake Sutherland. (directly across from Shadow Mtn. Store)

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

537 West 6th, Port Angeles A CLASSIC HOME close to downtown on a 100 x 140 lot. This 2 BR/2 BA home has a heat pump, security system, detached garage, informal and formal eating areas and extra parking. Another great feature is the enclosed front porch to view the mountains. Come see for yourself. $212,500! MLS#250865

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

Associate Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

Gail Shaw

Office: (360) 417-2801 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978

0A405219

4C235420

Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty 1115 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.7861 • Toll Free 1.800.292.2978 • www.UptownRealty.com


D4

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

51

Homes

LOOKING FOR... Mountain view, southern exposure, clean as a whistle, 1,700 sf with loads of storage. 1,800 sf of RV garage, shop, possible ADU. $349,000. ML251450/98961 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE! Impeccable inside & out. Original oak floors and open living/dining concept. Custom master has built-in vanity and walk-in closets. Family room, exercise room and storage! New heat pump and electric furnace. Fenced backyard, established landscaping, sprinkler system and perfect patio for barbeque! Detached double garage. All this plus water and mountain view! $269,000. ML250976 Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY MOUNTAIN AND PASTURE VIEWS “Man cave” with fireplace and 1/2 bath in double garage with room for office and workout. Separate garage with shop and storage. RV dump, water, power and covered carport. New 4 stall barn with tack room. Fenced and cross fenced, pond. 2 Br., 2 bath, serene covered deck to entertain on. Apple, pear, cherry, 2 kinds raspberries. $385,000. ML252059. Lori Tracey and Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East We will PRINT and DISTRIBUTE over 17,500 copies of your ad every day! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

MAGICAL SETTING Grand water views, quality custom home, detached selfcontained guest apartment, barn and hay storage areas, upper and lower pastures, convenient workshop and lovingly landscaped. $765,000 ML240911/29049719 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND NORTHERN LIGHT Backing onto one of SunLand’s common area greenbelts, the view and light coming in to this home are wonderful. 3 Br., 2 bath, with living room and family room. $197,000. ML251645 Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NORTHWEST CONTEMPORARY HOME Designed by local owner/artist, lots of windows bring in light and views of lush vegetation. Almost half acre with nearly 200 rhodies, several madronas and old growth evergreens. Private feel, yet close to town. 2 Br., 2 bath, open greatroom/dining area. $189,000. ML250453 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NOW WITH NEW PRICE Enjoy open floor plan with water views. Light and bright condo. All one level, 2 decks facing south/one north. Sunland amenities, close to pool/clubhouse. $235,000. ML251669/113078 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Classified 51

Homes

Mountain view 32.50 acre ranch, retreat, expansive pastures and more. Home has 4 Br, 2.5 bath. Minutes from Sequim and Port Angeles. $995,000. ML250670 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. OH DEAR… A DEER Deer and other wildlife wander about on this secluded half-acre lot. Minutes from town but with a country feel, this 3 Br., 2 bath rambler sports a vaulted ceiling living room, a formal dining room exiting onto the private deck, and a spacious garage. The heat pump will warm you in winter and cool you during summer. There is even a place for your RV. Motivated seller has dropped price and wants offers. $215,000. ML251707. Amy Powell Carroll Realty 457-1111 ON ACREAGE If you are looking for a refuge in the trees, this modest 2 Br. home surrounded by peaceful privacy may just fit the bill. Great shop/garage. Economy forces short sale. $185,000. ML251502. Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ON-SITE SECURITY Swimming pool, golf course, club house, pool house. All new in 2008: 40 year roof, cedar fence, appliances and more. New paint inside/out, new bath counters and toilets. Great wood burning fire place. 3rd Br. can be used as rec room has counters, sink, cook top and fridge. $205,000. ML252067. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

51

51

Homes

OUTSTANDING CUSTOM HOME 3 Br., 2 bath home in a convenient location. Quality built in the Northwest, custom craftsman style, exterior accents include board and batt, stone and shingle. Interiors include granite tops, painted millwork, 9’ ceilings, hardwood floors, stainless appliances and more in a home thoughtfully designed for an easy living lifestyle. The neighborhood is fully maintained allowing you freedom to travel or winter elsewhere. $299,950. ML252057. Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company P.A.: 1980 manufactured home, 3 Br., 2 ba, new roof, septic pumped, fully chain linked fenced, heat pump, water softener, lots of outbuilding, lg. pond with fountain, new barn, good horse property. $279,000. 457-7977 or 460-0150, msg. PANORAMIC WATER VIEWS Panoramic water and island views for this contemporary style home on one acre. Exceptional potential in this nearly 2,000 sf home. Expansive deck allows you to look out over the Sequim Valley and Straits of Juan de Fuca. Soaring windows fill this home with soft light and allow exceptional viewing of the ships as they pass by. $245,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

BUILDING PERMITS

Homes

PICTURE PERFECT Enjoy time outside with the covered porch and sheltered deck. 3 spacious Br., 2 baths, practical kitchen with pull-out shelving, kitchen bar and dining space. Living room with exquisite marble wrapped fireplace and mantle. $249,500. ML250762. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East PRIME LOCATION 3 Br., 2 bath, Sherwood condominium, prime private location, sunny private patio, open green spaces, 2 car garage. $249,000. ML251606/108765 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND REMODELED 3 Br., 2 bath, in beautiful Diamond Point. Area features airfield, boat launch and community beach. Property lush with fruit trees, native trees and plantings. Fenced garden area, site-built workshop, detached 1 car garage and room to park RV’s, etc. $129,900. ML251521. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

51

Homes

For sale by Owner. New home one acre, Mtn view, 1,770 sf, attached garage, 3 Br., 2 bath, computer rm. Mt. Pleasant area. Private financing. $225,000. 360-460-2625 SALT WATER VIEW HOME Sits on private 3.37 acres. Hardwood floors and custom oak cabinets. Master Br. suite has 2 separate baths. Shared dual shower and Whirlpool tub. Propane fireplace in living room, loft family room with wet bar. $499,900 ML251054/72643 Marti Winkler 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Sequim 2 bed 1 ba, must see gardens! Close to downtown. New laminate flooring, nearly new roof, fenced all around, gardens, water feature, auto propane 'wood' stove. Appliances included. $160,000. Shown by appt only. Call Hall Stuart-Lovell, 360670-1003. Many pics: SequimSecretGarden.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

51

51

Homes

SINGLE LEVEL TOWNHOUSE Adjacent to the fairway, beautiful kitchen, extra large double garage, lovely deck, generous sized rooms throughout. $314,500. ML251966/129689 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPACIOUS SUNLAND HOME Corner lot, 3 Br., 3 bath, 2 fireplaces, nice deck with mountain views, 2 car garage, and golf cart area, nice landscaping and fruit trees. $289,000. ML252062/136048 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND UNBEATABLE A half acre right on the Discovery Trail in Carlsborg. Property is site registered for septic, power in to lot, zoning allows for a wide variety of uses. Manufactured homes are allowed. Reduced. $49,900. ML240846 Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

UNOBSTRUCTED WATER AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS On 3.77 acres. The main house boasts vaulted ceilings with exposed beams, a large brick fireplace, and a large master Br. and bath. The guesthouse is a studio design with a loft. $599,900 ML251745/118957 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY WATER VIEW 3 Br., 2 bath 1,930 sf rambler well maintained 1.03 acre with large vaulted ceilings, excellent natural lighting with windows all along the north side of home to take advantage of views of the strait and Canada. Large north deck with water views from hot tub access from dining room and master suite with garden soaking tub, separate shower and large walk in closet. 1683 Place Rd., Port Angeles. $399,000. ML251808 Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

Homes

$207,000. 3 plus Br., 2 bath, 3.99 acres new hot tub fenced yard adjacent to national forest. 360-461-4278 VIEW OF THE STRAITS! This home was just reduced to $189,000 for a quick sale! 3 Br., 1 bath home on a large lot features great water views from the kitchen, dining room, living room and library. Bring your paint brush and make this house your own. $189,000. ML242014 Kimi Robertson 360-417-8595 JACE The Real Estate Company WATER VIEW Unique NW water view home! Watch the shipping lanes from your living room. Artistically updated gourmet kitchen with granite tile and garden window. Dining area in kitchen with breakfast bar. Upper level includes hardwood floors and master Br. Lower level has two Br. and bath. Large lot with fenced backyard and area for parking a boat or RV. Just listed. $274,500. ML252032. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

HOW LONG WILL THIS AD RUN?

Clallam County

Carl and Susie Wyman, single family dwelling, 2415 E. Sequim Bay Road, $141,920. Steven and Terri Camp, activity room, 133 Flanders Road, $24,079. Lorraine C. Lambeth, 120-gallon above-ground propane tank with piping, 270 Meadow Lark Lane, $1,505. Beth M. McHugh, single family dwelling with attached garage, 144 Foxtrot Lane, $191,454. Sharon L. Skill, game room, full bath and utility addition, 1596 W. Sequim Bay Road, $45,525. Jerald and Jennifer Lone, steel frame outbuilding, 1446 Henry Boyd Road, $53,136. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., tenant improvement, 3411 E. Kolonels Way, $32,000. Jerry D. Brinkman, ductless heat pump, 101 Crestview Drive, $3,920. Jim and Suzi Schuenemann, detached garage/shop, 162 Solar Lane, $33,846. George Eifert, single family dwelling with attached garage and 120-gallon above-ground propane tank, 92 Park Forest Drive, $235,953. Port Angeles Paul J. Hopkins, re-roof, 1437 W. 11th St., $9,697. Dennis W. Hill, re-roof, 2311 Samara Drive, $7,000. Gerald J. Scott, re-roof, re-side, re-plumb, 2213 S. Laurel St., $6,400. Scott C. and Vicky J. Alward trust, heat pump, 318 W. 12th St., $12,466. Clallam County Courthouse, historic upgrade, 315 S. Lincoln St., $77,500. Clallam County Courthouse, repair walls and new exterior door, 223 E. Fourth St., $100,000. North Peninsula Home Builders Association, single family dwelling, 1014 Dunker Drive, $135,189. Jon C. Webster and Terri Lyn Carr, wood stove, 205 W. Fourth St., $1,469. Richard Hutchison and J. M. Cooper, wood stove, 1737 W. 14th St., $1,293. Richard T. Elmer, overhang and enclose porch, 731 S. Alder St., $8,700. Larry and Debra Waldron, re-roof, 1230 W. 16th St., $2,537. Daishowa America Co. LTD, replace deck, 2131 W. Seventh St., $3,724. Glenn P. Baker, heat pump, 538 W. Fourth St., $3,901. Danny L. Volkmann, replace deck, 1506 W. 11th St., $2,000. Gary A. Meier, deck, 1120 E. Eighth St., $12,800.

Got a vehicle to sell?

Nothing moves it faster than a guaranteed classified ad. You get a 3 line ad that runs daily until you sell your truck, car, boat or motorcycle.*

All for just $

19

Up to 90 Days Maximum (Only $4.00 for each additional line).

Sequim

Beverly Brown, gas fireplace with lines and 100-gallon propane tank, 31 Opal Lane, $6,800. Richard J. Schoenfeldt, re-roof four apartment buildings, 300 S. Sunnyside Ave., $48,000. Jefferson County

Laurie Crawford, 111 A St., new replacement mobile home, $0. Michael Ball, detached garage/shop, 155 Gybe Ho, $96,000. Rickie Dance, residential addition, 75 Warbler Lane, $23,748. Linda Pedersen, detached garage, 121 Evergreen Lane, $20,000. Christine Creasman, detached pole building/garage, 113 Stagecoach Lane, $13,163. Harold Bohman trustee, single family residence with attached garage and 250-galon above-ground propane tank, 473 Dietz Drive, $700,000.

Call today for the only classified ad you’ll ever need. CALL 452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714

Port Townsend

Sea Breeze Shell, new convenience store and car wash, 1408 Sims Way, $800,000. Karen P. Knowlton, residential addition and remodel, 923 19th St., $31,505.68. Cornelis A. and Helen H. Kolff, single family residence, 335 37th St, $14,003.18.

PeninsulaMARKETPLACE http://marketplace.peninsuladailynews.com/

Department reports

A

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PROPERTY

www.peninsuladailynews.com

Call 452-8435 • classified@peninsuladailynews.com *COMMERCIAL VEHICLES NOT INCLUDED IN THIS SPECIAL

02862

0A5099266

Area building departments report a total of 36 building permits issued from Sept. 20-24 with a total valuation of $3,060,233.86: Port Angeles, 15 at $384,676; Sequim, 2 at $54,800; Clallam County, 10 at $763,338; Port Townsend, 3 at $1,005,508.86; Jefferson County, 6 at $851,911.

95


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

51

Homes

USED 1979 24x64 2 Br. 1979 28x66 3 Br. Buy Rite Homes 681-0777 Wonderful 3 Br., 2 bath, 2,158 sf home located on a very private 3.22 acre parcel. This home has a large detached garage with room to park all your toys, a circular driveway and is located at the end of a long country road. $275,000. ML252058/135819 Nason Beckett 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. YOU HAVE TO SEE THIS ONE! Golf course, Strait, and Mt. Baker views. Main living area has everything. Guests have own kitchen area, bath, and privacy. Spacious wrap around deck. Wood burning fireplace, built-in sound system. Bar with sink, refrigerator, and ice maker. $498,800. ML251737/117675 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

WEST: Lindal cedar home, 10 ac, pond. $450,000 cash. 928-9528

52

Manufactured Homes

Enjoy amenities at Cape George Village on Discovery Bay, outside Port Townsend. Owner selling older manufactured 1-bedroom home that needs some work. Separate 2-car garage would make a good workshop. Septic for 2 bedrooms. View of Protection Island. Cape George community offers marina, pool, exercise room, clubhouse. Dues: $686 per year includes water. Property at 161 Pine Drive, Cape George Village. $105,000. 360-385-9771 SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, single wide, 55+ park, owner may carry contract. $23,500. 683-5120. SEQUIM: Updated single wide mobile home in 55+ park, must see to appreciate. $22,950. 461-2554, 681-0829

54

Lots/ Acreage

7TH AND RACE ST. PRIME COMMERCIAL 2 contiguous lots bordering very busy Race St. Traveled by many locals and tourists for yearround exposure. This property has many permitted uses. $195,000. ML251067. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Bigfoot Ridge Forest Reserve. Six view 2.7 acre ridge top forested parcels and 16 acre community forest. 11 miles from Port Townsend near Port Hadlock. Available individually from 139k or as a single unit. Great family estate potential. Big photos and more information at forestgems.com 360-732-0095

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

54

Lots/ Acreage

For Sale By Owner 2.5 acre parcel. Great water and mtn views. Partially wooded, pri. road. Owner financing available. Good well area, power to property. Near Seq. Bay State Park. $80,000. 460-2960. GOT LAVENDER? Bring your house plans or lavender plants. Beautiful acreage in Agnew, breath taking mountain views, Sequim School District, owner finance available. $199,000. ML250847/56475 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT FUTURE HOMESITE Nice level lot ready for your dream home, with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. Beautiful area only minutes from downtown Port Angeles. Priced to sell! $55,000. ML251879. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

54

Lots/ Acreage

64

Houses

WEST P.A.: 30 acres, utilities. $100,000 discount. $150,000 cash. 928-9528.

Lake Front Condo 2 Br., 1.5 bath. $950 mth water/garb included, 6 mth lease. Available now. 360-461-4890 MAINS FARM: 2 Br., 2 bath, gar. $875. 928-9528 61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br., ground floor, excellent refs. req. $700. 360-460-3124 CENTRAL. P.A.: 1 Br., close to Safeway. $475 mo. 477-3867. EAST SIDE: 1,200 sf 2 Br., 2 ba., deck, all appl.$725. 452-5572 LRG 2 Br. apt, $650. Owner paid W/G, P.A Pet ok. 417-6638.

NEED A RENTAL?

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

64

Houses

Houses

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $990. 452-1395.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

P.A.: 6 Br., 2 bath. $1,000 mo. Call for details. 457-7216.

SEQUIM: 2 room studio. $600. tourfactory.com/367154

P.A.: 636 Georgiana, large shop/garage, 4 Br., 2 ba, great location. $1,150, dep. 460-7516 P.A.: Cute mobile, 2 Br., 1 ba, lg. detach gar., lovely fenced yard with trees. $625. 775-7129.

Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com

P.A.: Studio, fully furn, Wi-Fi, secluded. $700. 452-6014.

P.A.: 1131 Columbia. 3 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $825. 477-3051.

P.T.: 2 Br., 1 bath cottage nestled in the woods. W/D, P/W incl. $750 mo., $750 dep. 385-3589.

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, newly remodeled, no pets/smoking. $690 mo., $700 deposit. 460-5290

64

RENTAL WANTED: 3 Br., 2 ba, w/garage. Section 8. Around $950. 775-1486.

P.A.: 218 W. 8th. 2 Br., W/D, no smoking/ pets. $600. Credit check. 460-5639.

RV SPACES: Monroe Estates, P.A. $375 mo., incl. W/S/G, WiFi, Cable. 461-6672.

P.A.: 4 Br., 2 bath, beautiful mtn/water views, all new carpeting/paint. Fireplace, garage. $950. 775-7129.

Sequim Condo: Penthouse on golf course, 1 Br., furn. 2 decks, incredible view, EVERYTHING inc. $950 mo. 460-9917

65

D5

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Private room and bath in lovely 6 Br. house near high school. Quiet professional wanted. $385/mo. 797-1245.

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $1,095 mo, last, dep. 683-0123.

P.A.: Share, furnished, male/female, light smoke/drink ok. $375. Avail. immediately. 452-6045, eves

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, 1800 sf, 5 quiet acres, mtn view. $1,200. 477-0747.

ROOM FOR RENT $400-$500 mo., Sherwood Village in Sequim. For details, call Betty 504-2685.

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2.5 ba, 231 sf office or family room, living room with fireplace, lg. pantry, 13x21 solarium, 16x 32 rear deck, lg. carport, $1,150 mo., 1st, last, security deposit. 477-8180 SEQUIM: Nice, clean 2 Br. mobile in town. W/D, no pets. Refs., $675. 582-1862. WATER VIEW: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, between Sequim and P.A. No smoking/pets. $900. 457-5766. WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153 WEST SIDE P.A.: 4 Br., 2 ba, pets neg. $1,100 mo., 1st, last, dep. 530-410-2806.

SEQUIM: Shared kitchen and living space. $450 mo. includes utilities. 681-2184

66

Spaces RV/ Mobile

P.A.: Full RV hook up, 1/3 acre, incl. elec. $325. 460-4107 SEQUIM: Idle Wheels Park on 5th Ave. RV or mobile. 683-3335.

68

Commercial Space

P.A.: Rent or sale, 1409 E. 1st. 2 lots. 4,400 sf. 457-5678. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

P.A.: 1 Br. Spectacular water/mtn view, on the bluff. Quiet building. No smoking/pets. $550. 360-582-7241 P.A.: 2 Br. quiet, clean. No smoke/pets$700 mo., dep. 457-0928. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoking. $665. 360-670-9418 P.A.: Lg. 2 Br. $625. Lg. 1 Br. $560. Now accepting pets. 360-452-4524

63

Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br. duplex lg., carport, fenced, quiet. $750, deposit. 417-5589, 460-5358 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, 433 1/2 E. 1st St., P.A. No smoking/pets. 1st, last, deposit. $575 mo. 417-1688. P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016.

64

Houses

611 CHERRY, P.A.: 1 Br. $625. Pets OK. Avail. 10/1. 417-8250

Between P.A. and Sequim. 123 Amarillo Rd. 2 bed, 1 bath with W/D on 1.5 acres. Storage shed. No smoking or pets. $775 mo. 452-7721. CENTAL P.A. 3 Br., den, 1 ba, big fenced yard, no smoke/pets $925. 775-8047. CENTRAL P.A.: Clean and newer 2 Br., 1 bath, garage. No smoking/pets. $795. Duane 206-604-0188. DIAMOND PT: 3 Br., 2 ba, fireplace. $950. 681-0140 EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. P.A. APTS & HOUSES A 2 br 1 ba......$550 A 2 br 1 ba......$650 H 2 br 1 ba......$675 H 2 br 1 ba......$750 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$750 H 3 br 2 ba......$850 H 3 br 2.5 ba.$1400 H 2+ br 2 ba..$1750 SEQ APTS/HOUSES A 2 br 1 ba.......$750 A 2 br 1.5 ba....$875

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

Reward Yourself With EasyPay! Sign up for EasyPay and get a FREE $10 Gift Card. EasyPay is the subscription plan that automatically bills your credit card or debit card. It’s a more efficient way to get your newspaper.

Take care of your subscription the EasyPay way. Call 360-452-4507 or 1-800-826-7714 Your $10.00 gift card will be sent to you by mail within four to six days of converting your subscription to EasyPay.

06700641

Your Peninsula • Your Newspaper


D6

Classified

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

FANTASTIC VIEW & PRICE

PRIME LOCATION

NOW WITH NEW PRICE

ED

ED

GREAT OPPORTUNITY

UC

UC

D RE

www.sequimandportangeles.com

D RE

WRE/SunLand

Brenda Clark

Carol, Managing Broker Nelson, Broker Cell: (360) 670-9418

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 460-4040 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland teamschmidt@olypen.com

www.sequimteamtopper.com

COMPLETELY REMODELED

SALTWATER VIEW HOME

MAGICAL SETTING

WRE/SunLand

WRE/SunLand

Irene Schmidt

Deb Kahle

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

• Water View • 3 BR/2 BA w/Heat Pump • Vaulted Ceilings & Skylights • Wraparound Deck ML#252064/135857 $175,000

• 3 BR/2 BA Sherwood Condominium • Prime Private Location • Sunny, Private Patio • Open Green Spaces • 2-car Garage ML#251606/108765 $249,000 www.brendaclark.mywindermere.com

WRE/SunLand

0A405212

• Enjoy Open Floor Plan with Water Views • Light and Bright Condo • All on One Level • 2 Decks; One facing South, One North • SunLand Amenities/Walking Distance to Pool/ Clubhouse ML#251669/113078 $235,000 www.sequimlandandhomes.com

0A405211

0A405210

0A405206

• Nice home on a .30 acre lot • Mountain and Strait Views • Watch Ships From Your Deck • Overlooking Wildlife Refuge • Nicely Landscaped • 2-Car Garage RV/Boat + Shop ML#251108/76011 $324,000 www.debkahle.mywindermere.com

REMODELED

D

CE

U ED

R

Marti Winkler

www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

PICTURE PERFECT!

ON ACREAGE

1-800-786-1456 360-477-9027

If you are looking for a refuge in the

trees, Beckett this modest two-bedroom home Nason

surrounded by peaceful privacy may just (360) 457-0456 fit the477-9027 bill. Great shop/garage. Economy (360) forces short sale. Call Doc Reiss for nason@olypen.com more information. $185,000 ML#251502

WRE/Port Angeles DOC REISS Cell: 461-0613 Office: 457-0456

0A405173

TERRY NESKE

GREAT FUTURE HOMESITE

0A405205

0A405204

0A405203

WRE/Port Angeles

(360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com

(360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

GARDENER'S DREAM

Country living only minutes from downtown Sequim. 3 BR/2 BA rambler. 2.98 acres with irrigation water. Large outbuilding with charming features. $265,000 ML#251536/104928. Call Nason or Terry for more information.

WRE/Port Angeles Thelma Durham

CLARICE ARAKAWA

477-5744 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

0A405202

0A405201

0A405164

0A405163

Jane Manzer

FALL IN LOVE

With a beautiful view of the river. Detached garage & office. Open concept with fireplace to keep it warm and friendly. Three bedrooms, three bathrooms. $269,900. ML#251513/103085

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/Sequim-East

(360)550-6042 (360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

LARGE A-FRAME

32.50 acre ranch, retreat, expansive pastures and more. Home has 4 BR/2.5 BA. Minutes from Sequim and Port Angeles. Call Clarice for details. $995,000 MLS#250670

WRE/Sequim-East

0A405162

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Backing onto one of SunLand’s common area greenbelts, the view and light coming into this home are wonderful. 3 BR/2 BA, with living room AND family room $197,000 ML#251645 Call JANE

LORI TRACEY CHUCK MURPHY

Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

460-0790 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

NORTHERN LIGHT

“Man Cave” with fireplace & 1/2 BA in dbl. garage w/room for office & workout. Separate garage w/shop & storage. RV dump, water, power and covered carport. New 4-stall barn w/tack room. Fenced & cross fenced, pond. 2 BR/2 BA, serene, covered deck to entertain on. Apple, pear, cherry, 2 kinds of raspberries. Call CHUCK or LORI ML#252059/135869 $385,000

Carolyn & Robert Dodds

Alan Burwell

477-5718 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 KarenK@olypen.com

MTN & PASTURE VIEWS

WRE/Sequim-East

WRE/Sequim-East

Karen Kilgore

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-460-4903 www.wellcomemat.com/clairek

Designed by local owner/artist, lots of windows bring in light & views of lush vegetation. Almost half acre w/nearly 200 Rhodys, several madronas & old growth evergreens. Private feel, yet close to town. 2 BR/2 BA, open great room/ dining area. $189,000 ML#250453/33316 Call the DODDS

Swimming pool, golf course, clubhouse, pool house. All new in 2008: 40 yr. roof, cedar fence, appliances & more. New paint inside/ out, new BA counters & toilets. Great woodburning fireplace. 3rd bedroom can be used as rec room - has counters, sink, cooktop & fridge. Call ALAN $205,000 ML#252067/ 136244

WRE/Sequim-East

Claire Koenigsaecker

NORTHWEST CONTEMPORARY HOME

0A405161

Enjoy time outside with covered porch and sheltered deck. 3 spacious BR/2 BA, practical kitchen w/pull-out shelving, kitchen bar and dining space. Living Room with exquisite marble wrapped fireplace and mantle. $249,500 ML#250762/ 52343 Call KAREN

WRE/Sequim-East

Linda Ulin

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891 linulin@olypen.com

ON-SITE SECURITY

0A405160

0A405221

Wonderful cedars, creek, paths & patio from this lovely remodeled & updated 2 BR/2+BA home in Dungeness Meadows. Fully fenced backyard w/sun deck, awning & TV/stereo. 2-car garage + extra storage. Beautiful granite & exotic hardwood floors. $259,000 ML#250869/59073 Call CLAIRE

WRE/Sequim-East

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823 Cell: (360) 477-8277

CEDARS & STREAM

(360) 460-3831 (360) 457-0456 Email: jennifer@olypen.com

0A405220

Cath Mich, CRS

Jennifer Holcomb

3 BR/2 BA in beautiful Diamond Pt. area. Features airfield, boat launch & community beach. Property lush with fruit trees, native trees & plantings. Fenced garden area, site-built workshop, detached 1-car garage and room to park RV’s, etc. Call LINDA for more information on ML#251521 $129,900

Kim Bower

WRE/SunLand

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 460-7950 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

WRE/Port Angeles

• Ready to Sell • 2 Bedroom/1 Bath, 14x56 • Includes Separate Storage Shed • Nice Quiet Country Setting ML#241972/29115823 $25,000 Visit www.kimbower.mywindermere.com

WRE/SunLand

WRE/SunLand

Spacious country home on 1.37 acres. Home features gorgeous master suite with a dream bath, 100 year old fir floors, light & bright sunroom overlooking the truly unique property with gardens, a “woman cave” studio with 3/4 bath, old homestead outbuildings, fruit trees and privacy. JUST CALL JENNIFER HOLCOMB $355,000 ML#252007

0A405215

0A405214

0A405213

• Sits on Private 3.37 Acres • Hardwood Floors & Custom Oak Cabinets • Master Suite has 2 Separate Baths • Shared Dual Shower & Whirlpool Tub • Propane Fireplace in Living Room • Loft Family Room w/Wet Bar ML#251054/72643 $499,900 www.martiwinkler.com

• Grand Water Views • Quality Custom Home • Detached, Self-Contained Guest Apartment • Barn & Hay Storage Areas • Upper & Lower Pastures • Convenient Workshop & Lovingly Landscaped ML#240911/29049719 $756,000 www.catherinemich.mywindermere.com

Nice level lot ready for your dream home with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. Beautiful area only minutes from downtown Port Angeles. PRICED TO SELL! $55,000 MLS#251879

WRE/Port Angeles Quint Boe

Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456 boeq@olypen.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

D7

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video Office Hours Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 Monday - Friday IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY 8AM - 5PM

23

SNEAK A PEEK •

FOUND: Dog. Female, white with orange coloring, no collar, Port Williams Rd., Sequim. 683-2289

FOUND: Tabby cat. Found near Jefferson School. 452-6704.

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. Litter of 2 male, 3 female puppies. Tails docked and dewclaws removed. Black/silver and salt/pepper coloring. First shots. $500 each. 360-460-7119 CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292 CLALLAM CO. YMCA Play Care Aide, $8.55/ hr., 3:30-7:30 p.m., Mon.-Fri. Childcare Group Leader Substitutes, $9/hr., 1:306:00 p.m., Mon-Fri., as needed. Member Services Rep., $8.75/hr, P-T, hours to be determined. Apply in person at 302 S. Francis St., P.A. JEFFERSON CO. YMCA Childcare Group Leader Substitute, $9/hr., 2-6 p.m., Mon.-Fri., as needed. Apply in person, 1919 Blaine St., (Mountain View School), P.T. CLINIC ADMINISTRATOR Family Medicine of Port Angeles is seeking an experienced full-time clinic administrator. We offer a competitive salary and benefit package. Required Qualifications: 5 yrs. healthcare mgmt. BA degree in a relevant field. Leadership, supervisory, human resources, risk mgmt., accounting, QuickBooks, Excel. CQI or Lean Thinking. Send a cover letter and resume to: Katrina Weller MD, Family Medicine of Port Angeles PLLC, 240 W. Front St., Suite A, Port Angeles, WA 98362. See our website at FMPA.net, or email katrinaweller@ gmail.com. Computer desk and leather computer chair. Beautiful cherry computer desk from Home Decorators, leather computer chair. Both like new. Desk is $200. Chair is $75. Both for $250. Contact: 360-344-3706 COMPUTERS: Desktops, laptops. Rock solid computers, Rock bottom prices. Guarantee 683-9394 DENTAL HYGIENIST NEEDED. High tech, pleasant dental office needs hygienist 3 days a week. Fax resume to 360385-0899 or mail to P.O. Box 870, Port Hadlock, WA 98339. EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747.

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 53K. $28,000. 971-226-0002 DOG: 1 yr. old Cairn Terrier, energetic, need to find a good home, illness forces sale. $250/obo. 452-4243

In the Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, Washington *Home Health RN/Case Manager 1.0 FTE *Home Health Physical Therapist 0.8 to 1.0 FTE *Home Health Occupational Therapist 0.4 FTE *Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) 0.6 to 0.8 FTE *Certified Nursing Assistant Per Diem

HONDA: ‘05 Odyessy EX-L. 36.300 miles, excellent condition. $24,000. 504-2404.

This is the opportunity you have been looking for! Live and work on the beautiful Olympic Peninsula where outdoor activities abound! Just 90 minutes from Seattle. A chance for great quality of life while doing the work you love with an organization that is committed to superior care.

HOOD CANAL SEAMOUNT ESTATES Brinnon: Nice 3 Br., 2 bath, private 1/2 acre, new carpet, paint and huge deck. Wood stove, newer roof. Large private community beach area with access to shellfish, adjacent lot avail. Priced to sell! $89,000. 460-2667.

For other openings Check our website www.jefferson healthcare.org or call our jobline at 360-385-2200 ext. 2022 Jefferson Healthcare Human Resources 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-2200 ext. 2085 Fax 360-385-1548

HORSE TRAILER: 2 horse, straight load, Safari 1969, good condition. $950/obo. 683-1179

We offer competitive wages and benefits, up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus, Relocation Assistance, education assistance and more.

Janitorial Services. Honest, reliable and hardworking. Looking for business’s that need cleaning in the evenings and on weekends. Licensed and Bonded. Ready to keep your office clean. Call Bailey. 477-9256

Professional Medicine, Personal Treatment MENTAL HEALTH Crisis Intervention Specialist for mobile crisis interventions/ assessments/stabilization svcs. Req. Master’s degr. or RN plus 2 yrs mental health exp. Case Manager/Therapist for chronically mentally ill adults. Pref. Master’s w/2 yrs exp. Resume and cvr ltr: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE

Call Kirsten at 360 385-2200 Ext 1210 Or email kgolden@jeffersonh ealthcare.org Check our website at www.jeffersonhealth care.org JOBLINE 360 385-2200 ext 2022 Professional medicine, Personal treatment

MASSAGE THERAPIST Sequim Chiropractic office. Send resume to: PO Box 1824, Sequim, WA 98382.

Gas lawn mower. $45. 457-8656. HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, offices, RV’s, and event/party clean up. No job too small or too big. Move out’s, rentals, foreclosures, or for sale. Call for your free estimate. 360-808-3017

MISC: Bedroom set, hunter green, full bed, 5 drawer chest, bedside stand, $500. Love seat, southwest print, $150. 4 drawer chest, $50. small table and two chairs, $50. Wing arm chairs, rose, $100. brown recliner, $75. 582-0185

MOTOR HOME: ‘95 Pleasureway Class B. 36,330 miles, toilet, A/C, furnace, range, fridge, hot water heater. Outside shower, No generator, sleeps 2, seats 4, NADA book value of $10,514. Asking $8,900/obo. 582-0903

23

23

23

Lost and Found

SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. Black, Old Olympic and Dungeness River, Sequim. 681-4129. FOUND: Dog. Beagle mix, brown, Port Williams Rd., Sequim. 681-6440.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

o Electrician (Hourly) •Requirements: Journeyman status and credentials. Candidates must have their own tools and be willing to work rotating shifts. o Process Engineers (2 openings) •Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering or Paper Science Engineering. Ability to effectively communicate verbally and in writing with all levels of the Mill organization. Be part of the Nippon Team. We work hard, we play hard, and we enjoy both. We offer competitive salaries and an excellent benefits package. Please send resume with cover letter specifying position applying for, as well as salary requirements to: HR Representative NPI USA PO Box 271 Port Angeles, WA 98362 AA/EOE No Phone Calls Please

MOTORHOME: ‘96 25’ Class A Winnebago Brave. One owner 42,000 mi. Chevy 7.4 Parked inside. Onan 4kw gen-set, HWH levelers, full awning, all manuals & records. Super clean $16,500. 360-452-7721

NEED A RENTAL? Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

P.A.: Private room and bath in lovely 6 Br. house near high school. Quiet professional wanted. $385/mo. 797-1245. P.A.: 6 Br., 2 bath. $1,000 mo. Call for details. 457-7216.

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

800-656-4414 AACO Nursing Agency

Sequim

Health & Rehabilitation NOW HIRING

MDS Coordinator Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx

LOST: Chainsaw. Lost a STIHL chainsaw out between mile post marker 216 and 218, late afternoon Sept. 26. Reward for return. 327-3615. LOST: Surfboard. Foam, color white and yellow, left at Bullman Beach. Reward. 775-5994.

Pellet Stove: Whitfield Pellet Stove for sale. Oldie but goodie. Burns hot. Stovepipe included. $600. 681-7595 RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. No job too small! Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586. ROOM FOR RENT $400-$500 mo., Sherwood Village in Sequim. For details, call Betty 504-2685. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, single wide, 55+ park, owner may carry contract. $23,500. 683-5120. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, 1800 sf, 5 quiet acres, mtn view. $1,200. 477-0747. Tele-medicine Call Center Facilitator. Positions available in Port Hadlock. Computer and people skills necessary. Salary + benefits. 1-877-907-4911

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520 TRAILER: ‘03 30’ Airstream. Interior in great condition, some dents on exterior, reconstructed title. $9,995. 971-226-0002 TRAILER: Snowmobile, quad, utility trailer, 7x12, always garaged, excellent condition, 3,500 lb. axle. $1,495. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

XBOX ELITE: With Grand Theft Auto 4, and wireless controller, like new condition. $400/obo. 775-5767/681-7771 YAMAHA: 8 hp long shaft, 2 cycle, excellent condition. $750/obo. Call Terry 461-6462

Wilder Auto has the largest selection of new and used vehicles on the Olympic Peninsula. Come join our team of friendly sales professionals. No experience necessary, extensive training program and a great working environment await you. Benefits include a 401K program, medical and dental insurance, paid vacation and a great college tuition package for your children. Please stop into Wilder for an application package or go to www.wilderauto.com/employment for more information and an opportunity to experience the Wilder difference.

95 Deer Park Road • Port Angeles

1-800-927-9379 • 360-452-9268

31

Help Wanted

CLINIC ADMINISTRATOR Family Medicine of Port Angeles is seeking an experienced full-time clinic administrator. We offer a competitive salary and benefit package. Required Qualifications: 5 yrs. healthcare mgmt. BA degree in a relevant field. Leadership, supervisory, human resources, risk mgmt., accounting, QuickBooks, Excel. CQI or Lean Thinking. Send a cover letter and resume to: Katrina Weller MD, Family Medicine of Port Angeles PLLC, 240 W. Front St., Suite A, Port Angeles, WA 98362. See our website at FMPA.net, or email katrinaweller@ gmail.com. DENTAL HYGIENIST NEEDED. High tech, pleasant dental office needs hygienist 3 days a week. Fax resume to 360385-0899 or mail to P.O. Box 870, Port Hadlock, WA 98339. DENTAL HYGIENIST Part-time position available for busy family practice in uptown Port Townsend. Send resume to Dr. Clark Sturdivant at 608 Polk St., Port Townsend, WA 98368.

Help Wanted

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE BOOKKEEPER Accounting degree or 4 years relevant exp. w/automated accounting systems & electronic med. records. F-T w/bene. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE CLALLAM CO. YMCA Play Care Aide, $8.55/ hr., 3:30-7:30 p.m., Mon.-Fri. Childcare Group Leader Substitutes, $9/hr., 1:306:00 p.m., Mon-Fri., as needed. Member Services Rep., $8.75/hr, P-T, hours to be determined. Apply in person at 302 S. Francis St., P.A. JEFFERSON CO. YMCA Childcare Group Leader Substitute, $9/hr., 2-6 p.m., Mon.-Fri., as needed. Apply in person, 1919 Blaine St., (Mountain View School), P.T.

WANTED: Stock trailer, good condition. 683-1179

Curious About Auto Sales?

TOP PAY

LOST: Cat. Bellway Rd., Sequim. LARGE GRAY MALE neutered, gold eyes, crooked tip of tail. PLEASE call 360797-3657.

P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016.

YO U C A N C O U N T O N U S !

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

EOE

Nippon Paper Industries is located in Port Angeles on the beautiful Olympic Peninsula. With the Olympic National Forest in our backyard, and Victoria B.C. across the water, this is one of the most picturesque places in the state. We truly are “Where the mountains meet the sea”. We are currently interviewing for the following positions:

P.A.: 1131 Columbia. 3 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $825. 477-3051.

Lost and Found

for RN’s, LPN’s, CNA’s, CMA’s. $2000 Bonus! FREE Gas!

360-582-2400

LIVE AND WORK IN PARADISE!

OUTBOARD: 2010 Yamaha 4 hp, 3 hrs., no salt ever, as new. $875. 681-0151.

075091320

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

Up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus* plus relocation assistance for some positions. Excellent compensation and benefits.

0A5099135

FOUND: Camera attachment with bag, night of 9/29 on bench at Dream Park in P.A. Call to describe! 670-3323.

•Home Health Physical Therapist* •Emergency/ICU Director •Home Health Staff RN/Case Manager* •Clinic RN* •Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) •Home Health Occupational Therapist* •Medical Staff Services Coordinator •Sleep Technician •Patient Account Rep, Temporary •Surgical Services Staff RN*, per diem •Radiology Tech CT/ Mammo per diem •Home Health Aid per diem

0A405140

23

Lost and Found

In the beautiful Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, has the opportunity you have been looking for! Great quality of life while working for an organization that is committed to giving superior care

Great computer skills, Desktop Publishing, fast learner, compassionate attitude, dependable, good team player, need only apply. Call Mt. Angeles Monday afternoon: 452-6255 or email resume to randall.baugh@scius.com

Excellence with Compassion and Innovation

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? 22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED Port Townsend. Waste Connections has two openings for Garbage Truck Drivers. Very laborintensive positions. Class A or B CDL required. F/T, MonFri, some weekend, O/T work required. $16.86/hr. Family benefits, 401k, vacation. Apply online at wasteconnections.c om or call Lance at 360-281-9919.

Lost and Found

Clinical Educator, RN Will plan, coordinate and evaluate clinical educational programs. Requires a BS in Nursing, MS preferred. Previous experience in staff development, or nursing education highly desired. PharmacistFull Time Previous hospital pharmacy experience is preferred, including decentralized services, IV admixtures, pharmacy automation, and Meditech experience. House Supervisor, RN-As Needed Responsible for management of nursing units/hospital in conjunction with Department Directors. BSN preferred with strong clinical and mgmt experience. Laboratory Technologist 12 hour night shifts. Must be registered with one of the national registries associated with laboratory practice; experience is a plus! Contact: Human Resources, Olympic Medical Center 939 Caroline Street, Port Angeles, 98362 C: 360-417-7231 F: 360-417-7307 Email:nubuckner@ol ympicmedial.org EOE

Excellence with Compassion and Innovation In the Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, Washington *Home Health RN/Case Manager 1.0 FTE *Home Health Physical Therapist 0.8 to 1.0 FTE *Home Health Occupational Therapist 0.4 FTE *Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) 0.6 to 0.8 FTE *Certified Nursing Assistant Per Diem This is the opportunity you have been looking for! Live and work on the beautiful Olympic Peninsula where outdoor activities abound! Just 90 minutes from Seattle. A chance for great quality of life while doing the work you love with an organization that is committed to superior care. We offer competitive wages and benefits, up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus, Relocation Assistance, education assistance and more. Call Kirsten at 360 385-2200 Ext 1210 Or email kgolden@jeffersonh ealthcare.org Check our website at www.jeffersonhealth care.org JOBLINE 360 385-2200 ext 2022 Professional medicine, Personal treatment F/T Tech Support Representative. Automotive product and equipment repair facility seeking an enthusiastic person with great people/phone skills and the ability to multi-task productively. Automotive experience a must for equipment repair. Computer experience necessary for data entry. Sales experience a plus. Business located in the chimacum area. Wage based on experience and work quality with advancement opportunities. If you have a serious inquiry please fax or email resume to 1360-732-0826 and salessupport.1@oly pen.com We will PRINT and DISTRIBUTE over 17,500 copies of your ad every day! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

31

Help Wanted

Expanding Preschool needs afternoon Aide ASAP. Part time/minimum wage. Check out online add for description or send me an email: rr2larsen@msn.com Call me if you have any questions. Regan, 683-9572. GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED Port Townsend. Waste Connections has two openings for Garbage Truck Drivers. Very laborintensive positions. Class A or B CDL required. F/T, MonFri, some weekend, O/T work required. $16.86/hr. Family benefits, 401k, vacation. Apply online at wasteconnections.c om or call Lance at 360-281-9919. Great computer skills, Desktop Publishing, fast learner, compassionate attitude, dependable, good team player, need only apply. Call Mt. Angeles Monday afternoon: 452-6255 or email resume to randall.baugh@scius.com

In the beautiful Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, has the opportunity you have been looking for! Great quality of life while working for an organization that is committed to giving superior care •Home Health Physical Therapist* •Emergency/ICU Director •Home Health Staff RN/Case Manager* •Clinic RN* •Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) •Home Health Occupational Therapist* •Medical Staff Services Coordinator •Sleep Technician •Patient Account Rep, Temporary •Surgical Services Staff RN*, per diem •Radiology Tech CT/ Mammo per diem •Home Health Aid per diem Up to $4,000 Recruitment Bonus* plus relocation assistance for some positions. Excellent compensation and benefits. For other openings Check our website www.jefferson healthcare.org or call our jobline at 360-385-2200 ext. 2022 Jefferson Healthcare Human Resources 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-2200 ext. 2085 Fax 360-385-1548 Professional Medicine, Personal Treatment ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES Life Care Center of Port Townsend Full-time position available with flexible hours. Qualified candidate must be a dependable, qualityoriented individual with housekeeping, janitorial or laundry experience. Health care experience a plus. We offer excellent pay and benefits including comprehensive medical coverage, 401(k) and paid time off. Contact Deborah Bezona, or email résumé to Angela_Cerna@LCCA .com 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, 98368 Visit us online www.LCCA.com. EOE/M/F/V/D Job #18300

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


D8

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

31

Help Wanted

31

CAREGIVERS: Hiring, P.A., Sequim, P.T. Paid Training. Benefits. 360-457-1644. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840.

LIVE AND WORK IN PARADISE! Nippon Paper Industries is located in Port Angeles on the beautiful Olympic Peninsula. With the Olympic National Forest in our backyard, and Victoria B.C. across the water, this is one of the most picturesque places in the state. We truly are “Where the mountains meet the sea”. We are currently interviewing for the following positions: o Electrician (Hourly) •Requirements: Journeyman status and credentials. Candidates must have their own tools and be willing to work rotating shifts. o Process Engineers (2 openings) •Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering or Paper Science Engineering. Ability to effectively communicate verbally and in writing with all levels of the Mill organization. Be part of the Nippon Team. We work hard, we play hard, and we enjoy both. We offer competitive salaries and an excellent benefits package. Please send resume with cover letter specifying position applying for, as well as salary requirements to: HR Representative NPI USA PO Box 271 Port Angeles, WA 98362 AA/EOE No Phone Calls Please

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. MANAGER: For small RV park, salary negotiable. 460-4968. MASSAGE THERAPIST Sequim Chiropractic office. Send resume to: PO Box 1824, Sequim, WA 98382. MENTAL HEALTH Crisis Intervention Specialist for mobile crisis interventions/ assessments/stabilization svcs. Req. Master’s degr. or RN plus 2 yrs mental health exp. Case Manager/Therapist for chronically mentally ill adults. Pref. Master’s w/2 yrs exp. Resume and cvr ltr: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL Per diem staff for mobile crisis interventions, clinical assessments and stabilization services to adults, children and families. $19.45 hr. for day shift; $300 per 24- hr. shift. Req. WAC 246-810 credential, Master’s degree or RN, plus 2 yrs. mental health exp. Resume and cover letter to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE PIANIST needed for Sunday worship service, 10-11:30. Call 457-3981, or 452-6750. RETAIL HARDWARE SALES POSITION FT, benefits, exp. preferred. Thomas Building Center, 301 W. Washington, Sequim Contact Tony or AJ. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 Tele-medicine Call Center Facilitator. Positions available in Port Hadlock. Computer and people skills necessary. Salary + benefits. 1-877-907-4911

Classified 34

34

Work Wanted

Work Wanted

Aaron’s Garden Needs. Hand weeding, weedeater, pruning, clean-up, hauling. Whatever your garden needs. 808-7276

MOWING, pruning. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142.

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding and mowing. 452-2034

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations and new projects... Call me today! Appointments in my central Port Angeles home. Patti Kuth, 417-5576. isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy!

Best Choice Lawn Care. Maintenance and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/ P.A. 248-230-0450. ESTATE MANAGER WORK WANTED I am experienced in all phases of maintenance, inside and out. I have excellent references. Call John 360-683-2991 Handyman/Vacation Home Caretakers. Handyman with knowledge of all types of repairs and minor projects. Vacation home services. Reliable, good ref’s. Reasonable rates. John 360-683-2991. HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, offices, RV’s, and event/party clean up. No job too small or too big. Move out’s, rentals, foreclosures, or for sale. Call for your free estimate. 360-808-3017 HOUSECLEANING Organizing. Reliable. Call Lisa 683-4745. Janitorial Services. Honest, reliable and hardworking. Looking for business’s that need cleaning in the evenings and on weekends. Licensed and Bonded. Ready to keep your office clean. Call Bailey. 477-9256 Lawnmowing, yardwork, yard debris hauling. 457-5205. Pick up, launder and deliver your linens. Bed, bath or both. Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly. Special occasions. Ruth 360-775-4089 RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. No job too small! Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586.

Yard work & Odd Job Services. Mowing & yard work, gutter cleaning, debris pickup/hauling, small painting projects, experienced motivated and dependable. 2 men at $35 per hour. 360-461-7772.

72

Furniture

BEDROOM SET. Five piece, including large dresser with mirror, highboy chest, night stand, and king size headboard. Medium oak color in good condition. $400/obo. 461-5768 Black Lacquer Screen - Oriental. One side black lacquer with design painted on other has semi-precious stones in each panel depicting women, trees and writing. See photos. $2,500/obo. 425-243-2618 Computer desk and leather computer chair. Beautiful cherry computer desk from Home Decorators, leather computer chair. Both like new. Desk is $200. Chair is $75. Both for $250. Contact: 360-344-3706 DESK Medium sized, black, shabbychic. Very cute, vintage piece. $75/obo. 360-775-8746

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

41

Business Opportunities

SEQUIM: 3 station salon, great opportunity to own your own business. 582-3073.

DINING ROOM TABLE With 4 chairs. Very nice set. $175/obo. Call 681-4429. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746 LIFT CHAIR: Nearly new, warranty, was $900. Asking $400. 457-0226

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

WASHER/DRYER Kemmore stacker. $500. 461-3164.

LOVE SEAT Blue. $60. 477-7834 or 452-9693 MISC: Bedroom set, hunter green, full bed, 5 drawer chest, bedside stand, $500. Love seat, southwest print, $150. 4 drawer chest, $50. small table and two chairs, $50. Wing arm chairs, rose, $100. brown recliner, $75. 582-0185

72

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Furniture

MISC: Dining set, very large heirloom quality 4-piece, 6 high back chairs. $1,099/ obo. Sofa, large plush velour fabric living room, very comfortable, light color green-blue, tan & brown, $249/obo. 452-9562 MISC: Oak entertainment center 5’x6’ x20”, with 30”x36” TV opening, $200. 34” Toshiba HDTV, flat screen, tube TV, $200. 565-8131, leave message. MISC: Sofa, $100. Matching hutch and dining table w/6 chairs, $225. Sewing machine in cabinet, $100. 7 drawer dresser, with mirrored top, $150. All obo. 460-8675. OAK ENTERTAINMENT CENTER FOR SALE. Large modern oak center with lots of shelving and storage. On wheels for easy moving. Paid $1,500 4 years ago, no room since I moved! $300/obo. tcrod@olypen.com OTTOMAN Gorgeous, large and covered in deepred fabric. Dark studs all the way around the bottom edges. Great condition. $60. 360-775-8746 RECLINER: Brown leather recliner, barely used, excellent condition. $500. 681-0477.

73

General Merchandise

BLACKBERRY CAFE 50530 Hwy. 112 W. Fall/winter hours 7 a.m.-8 p.m. daily Call for specials. 928-0141 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 CEMETERY PLOT Sequim View, division 2, 6 lots. $700 ea./ obo. 425-353-8818. Pat or Dave CHAINSAW: Husqvarna. $175. 683-3386

73

General Merchandise

CHIPPER-VAC: TroyBilt, 5 hp, like new. $600. 683-3843. CIDER PRESS Hydraulic. Make money! $5,800. 928-9528 CIDER PRESSES New, double tub model. Allows grinding and pressing at same time. Motorized. $595. 461-0719 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DOGWOOD: (2) 5’ yellow twig Dogwood shrub, well taken care of. $40 ea. 681-0477. DRESSES: 5 nice prom dresses 4 size small, 1 size med, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 417-3504. FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910 www.portangeles firewood.com F I R E W O O D : D R Y. 100% fir. $200 cord. 452-1162 FIREWOOD: Fir, $175 a cord or $185 delivered. 808-5891.

73

General Merchandise

Gas lawn mower. $45. 457-8656. MISC: Dryer, $50. Snow tires, $100. Recliners, $75/$125 Elliptical and exercise bike, $150 ea. Power vacuum unit, truck mounted, works, $1,000/obo. Glider and ottoman, $125. 457-2784. MISC: Gas smoke house, 5Wx7Lx7H, all aluminum inside and out, 4” insulated walls, $500. Pellet stove, insulated stainless steel pipe, new hot vacuum, $550. 452-2162. MISC: Generic 5,000 watt generator, never used, $385. Truck bed tool box, $65. Air impact wrench and air chisel set, $30. Makita plane, $50. Small chipper, new, $38. 5th wheel hitch, $150, Welding helmet, new, auto, dark, $25. Chainsaw, $65. In Sequim, call Fred, 457-6174. MISC: Sleigh style crib/toddler bed, $65. Eddie Bauer stroller, $35. Barely used. 452-7778. MOBILITY CART New, paid $2,399. Will sell for $1,550. 775-9669

FIREWOOD: Mixed, stacked, you haul. $125 cord. 928-3872

Mobility Scooter Go-Go, new battery, new condition. $425. 452-9183

For Sale: 2006 8 horse Honda short shaft 4 stroke boat motor 30 hrs $1500. 430sq ft Forest green Champion snaplock metal roofing $1000. Stainless Steel Protech full size full polish tool box $500. Nautilus weight gym $400. Please call 360-460-2533

Mobility Scooter Must sell 1 yr. old Golden Companion II, dual batteries, swivel seat, tilt handlebars, shopping basket, light and horn, disassembels for easy transport, cost $5,500. Sacrifice $2,500/ obo. 360-477-4774.

GUNS: Buy, Sell, or Consign at the P.A. Antique Mall Gun Shop. Tues.-Sat. 109 W. First St. 457-6699 MISC: Chainsaw, Dolmar 5100S, 20” bar, $350. Mower, Hustler model M1, commercial, $800. Line trimmer Kawa-saki model KGT27A, $150. Hedge trimmer, Stihl HS80, 24” blade, $250. 460-9178

MOVING SALE: Love seat, $125. Computer desk, $25. Lamp, $5. Standing mirror, $15. Bookcases, $45. Beauty sink, hydraulic chair, hair dryer, $250. Cardioglide, $20. 928-2115. MOVING: Garden tool, Dr. Moore, 10.5 hp, like new, $1,150. 300 gal regular gas tank, with fixtures, $495. Propane tanks, 10 gal., $40/obo. 928-2115

73

General Merchandise

Pellet Stove: Whitfield Pellet Stove for sale. Oldie but goodie. Burns hot. Stovepipe included. $600. 681-7595 POWER CHAIR CARRIER Craftsman 2/1 550. Manual. Better than new, fits most vehicles with 2” receiver. Mat and $300 cover incl. $400/obo. 457-0261 THOMAS GUPTILL Famous Port Angeles artist’s oil painting from the 1920’s, of Lake Crescent with storm brewing. $2,995. 808-5088. TIMESHARE WEEK Hot August Nights! RENO August 6th-13th Tons of old cars and old time music. LOCAL SELLER. Great Christmas Gift! $500. 460-6814. TRAILER: Snowmobile, quad, utility trailer, 7x12, always garaged, excellent condition, 3,500 lb. axle. $1,495. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 VENDORS WANTED Eagles Crafts Fair and Flea Market. Nov. 6th. Table rental, $25. 360-683-6450 XBOX ELITE: With Grand Theft Auto 4, and wireless controller, like new condition. $400/obo. 775-5767/681-7771

74

Home Electronics

CAMERAS: Minolta 35 mm, Maxxum 430 si R2 camera with bag and 4 lenses, 50 mm AF, 28-80 mm AF, 100-200 mm AF, 2x AF teleconverter plus wireless remote flash, $200 firm. JVC Everio G series hard disk camera and camcorder, model GZ-MG630, 60 GB, 40x Dynamic zoom, will take 9,999 pictures, 4 hr. 15 min. recording time, extra lg. battery pack and case, $200 firm. Call Walter 360-452-8122 or cell 477-8575.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FENCING

LAWN/YARD LAWN CARE CAREROOFING

TRACTOR

KITCHENS/BATHS/DOORS

PRUNING

MANUFACTURED/MOBILE HOMES

PAINTING

AIR DUCT CLEANING

HANDYMAN

HOME REPAIR

REPAIR/REMODEL

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

HANDYMAN

ROOFING

APPLIANCES M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges Full 6 Month Warranty We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

72289323

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

PRINTING

0A5098724

SERVICE DIRECTORY


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

74

Home Electronics

COMPUTERS: Desktops, laptops. Rock solid computers, Rock bottom prices. Guarantee 683-9394

75

Musical

Band Instrument Rentals. Drum lessons. 417-9011. GUITAR: Acoustic left handed Carlos brand adult size, like new condition with semi soft case and two beginning books. $350 firm. 452-9401. Marshall & Wendell upright piano. No bench. You provide mover. Easy access only one step. Sequim, Wa. $850. 360-683-0645. Call after 3 p.m. VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $150. 452-6439

76

Sporting Goods

GUNS: Glock 23 40 cal., plus accessories, $500. Interarms 44 mag. single action, $300. Thompson 54 cal. black powder, plus accessories, $200. 360-385-7728 PISTOL: Smith & Wesson, model 686, 4” barrel, stainless steel finish, wood grip, great condition. $500/obo. 461-9585. SKATES: Bauer aggressive skates, black, size 11 good shape $20. 460-0845

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

79

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-3 p.m., 1118 S. Cedar. Our usual different stuff.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB FALL FLEA Sat., 9-4 p.m., Sun., 10-3 p.m. Eagles Annex, 110 Penn St. Tables full of jewelry, household, antiques, collectibles, knives, furniture, and more! Sunday, 4-7:30 p.m. spaghetti feed with music by Chantilly Lace, raffle, and silent auction, too! For more info, call John at 775-9128. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-2 p.m. 472 Leighland Ave., Lee’s Creek Park, #22. Misc. items, some tools. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-3 p.m., 1616 Monroe Rd. Compound bow, hunting stuff, camping gear, men’s clothes, books, lamps, jr. girl clothes, saddles, tack and packing equipment.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

GARAGE Sale: Sat. 10/2 only, 9-3 p.m. Sequim. 408 Eunice. No earlies. Collectibles, housewares, camping, tools, compressor, radial saw. Too much to list.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 BUYING FIREARMS Fair honest prices, 1 or collection. Northwoods Firearms federal and state licensed. 477-9659.

Wanted To Buy

LOOKING FOR HAND CARVED HITTY DOLL Please call 417-7691 WANTED: 9’ Livingston dinghy, in good condition. 582-0158 WANTED: Stock trailer, good condition. 683-1179

82

Pets

BEAUTIFUL DESIGNER SILKY/ YORKIE PUPS Wormed, 1st shots, tails and dew claws docked, very healthy and socialized, going to be very small to small. $400. 452-9650 or 509-429-5368 BLUE PITBULL Puppies born Aug. 25th, bottle fed, ready now, 4 boys, must see. $300 ea. 457-4905 CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 3 females, 2 males, ready to go after Oct. 11th. $350 ea. 452-7746

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

CYPRESS: 6’-7’, $13 ea. G&G Farms, 95 Clover Lane, off Taylor-Cutoff. 683-8809.

82

Pets

AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. Litter of 2 male, 3 female puppies. Tails docked and dewclaws removed. Black/silver and salt/pepper coloring. First shots. $500 each. 360-460-7119 Allergies force me to give up loving pets. Beautiful purebred Abyssinian, (red) with amber eyes 1 year and 6 mos. old, $100, (serious inquiries only, have papers). Cream colored Persian, free to a good home, 15 years old and still going strong. No health issues, just a great mellow cat. Both cats are indoor only.

DESIGNER POWDER PUFF CHINA-JACKS 1 boy, 1 girl, beautiful, IDCD registered, 4 weeks, puppy kit, 1st shots, wormed, reserve yours now. $950. 360-809-0871. DOG: 1 yr. old Cairn Terrier, energetic, need to find a good home, illness forces sale. $250/obo. 452-4243 FREE: 2 male Poodles, need permanent home, 11 yrs. old, must go together. 457-1828. FREE: To loving family, friendly female 2 yr. old Pit Bull, great with kids/dogs, loving, hyper, needs more attention, big yard, with kennel, current with shots. 206-375-5204 or 360-683-0082 JACK RUSSELL TERRIER PUPPIES 1 girl, 3 boys, smart, farm raised, CKC registered, show quality, champion lines, health certificate, 1st shots, wormed, ready 10/10/10. $1,000. 582-9006

82

Pets

30 gallon aquarium with stand for sale. $45. 457-1560. Loving Staffy. American Staffy, 5 years old, male. Great watch dog and very loving! Needs home with no other dogs or cats and no small children. Call for details. Free to good home. Great companion! 460-2446. MINI DACHSHUNDS Beautiful. (2) shaded red long coat females. (1) black and tan long coat female. (1) shaded red smooth coat male. Born 8/1, 1st shots. $450 females. $400 males. 452-3016 PARROT CAGE 76”H, 40”W, 30”D, for Amazon or Macaw, on wheels. $350. firm. 681-2022.

83

Farm Animals

BULL: 6 mo. $550. 683-2304. SHEEP: Katadin hair sheep. 3 ewes, 1 ram, 6 lambs. $600. 928-3198

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE TRAILER: 2 horse, straight load, Safari 1969, good condition. $950/obo. 683-1179 HORSE: 22 yr. old mare, great 4-H or beginner horse. $800, price negotiable. Call Tawny at 360-460-6816

85

Farm Equipment

TRACTOR: John Deere Model H. Resotred. $3,200. 457-3120

Pug for sale. Needs home to call his own. Black, not fixed, no papers. 1.5 years old. $500. Leave a message at 360-457-0587 PUPPIES: Adorable Chihuahua 1 male, $300. 2 females, $250 ea. Ready to go home. 808-1242 or 808-1598. PUPPIES: AKC registered Golden Retrievers, ready now, 2 female $450. 1 male $400. 808-2959. PUPPIES: Golden Retrievers, beautiful AKC, dark golden, championship lines on sires side, ready 10/15. 6 males, $450 ea. 4 females, $500 ea. 1st shots, wormed. 681-3160, after 4 p.m. Training Classes Oct. 12. Greywolf Vet. 683-2106.

83

Farm Animals

HAY: Alf/grass. $5.50 bale. Grass, $4.50. In barn. 683-5817.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DOZER: ‘70s John Deer 450c, 2 cylinder, gas, blade, winch, rebuilt. $4,000. 928-3669. DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirror and windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, excellent inside and out, all new brakes. $42,000. 460-8325. FLAT BED: ‘73 Ford F600 with liftgate, needs work. $1,000. 457-3120 GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383. PARTS: John Deere 440 skidder for parts. $50 and up. 928-3872

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

91

Aircraft

ULTRALITE: Avenger/Hurricane. 503 Rotax engine, 10 gal tank, new tires, 4 year old sails, always hangered, full instruments including CHT, EGT, RPM, airspeed, recording G meter, hr meter, hydraulic disc brakes, ballistic chute. $7,500. 360-640-1498 360-374-2668

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153. TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843 TRACTOR: Kubota B21 Industrial grade backhoe loader. $15,000. Dual axle Big Tex trailer with ramps. $1,500. 461-3986

93

Marine

APOLLO: ‘77 20’. Must see! Very clean in and out. Rebuilt 302 IB OMC OB. Fresh water cooled, hydraulic trim tabs, head, galley. Priced to sell. $3,800/obo. 681-0411

93

93

Marine

D9

Marine

Aluminum 17 ft., C/C, 2 Mercury 4 strokes. $8,000 firm. 452-2779

JET SKI: ‘96 ZXI750. Low hours. $2,600/ obo. 928-3450.

ARIMA: ‘89 17’, 70 hp Yamaha, canvas top, galv. trailer, with extras. $8,000. 928-3900

MALIBU: ‘01 Sportster LX. Fuel injected 350, great shape, only 240 hours. $17,000. 808-6402.

BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887

MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461.

BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698 COOKIE MONSTER ‘78 Sloop, 30’. 4 head sails, main, 3/4 and 1/2 oz. spinnakers. Head foil and hydraulic backstay. All new halyards, knot, depth, and wind meters in ‘08. Best of all, new 14 hp FWC Yanmar diesel in ‘09. Propane 2 burner stove and cabin heater. Marine UHF radio and Sony AM/FM CD radio. Sleeps 5. See at slip Q-5 in P.A. Boat Haven. $18,500. 457-8382. GLASPLY: ‘79 19’. 30 years of super fishing experience. Fully equipped, galvanized trailer, electric winch, stored inside, ready to go. $7,000. 360-417-2606 GLASPLY: They don’t make ‘em like they used to! ‘77 24’. Lots of extras. $12,000/obo 360-374-2234

MOTOR: ‘00 25 hp Johnson longshaft hand tiller, 2 stroke. $1,600. 683-3289 evenings.

MOTOR: 2000 9.9 Mercury, 2 stroke long shaft. $900. Call 360-797-3621 or email roxietime@yahoo.com OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $16,000/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 OUTBOARD: 2010 Yamaha 4 hp, 3 hrs., no salt ever, as new. $875. 681-0151. RADAR: Raytheon. 24 mile dome type, 7” CRT display, complete with manual and all cables. $150. 582-0158 REINELL: ‘95 19.5’ V6 I/O. EZ-Load galvanized trailer, half cutty. $4,800/obo. 452-2459 RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

WINDOW/CARPET CLEANING

REMODELING

HOME/YARD SERVICES

MOLE CONTROL/PRUNING

RENOVATION/REPAIR

TREE SERVICE

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714 PRINTING

RESTORATION

DIRT WORK

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

LANDSCAPING

ASBESTOS

ELECTRICAL

COMPUTERIZED ALIGNMENT

CARPET CLEANING

Call NOW To Advertise Here 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

0A5098727

SERVICE DIRECTORY


D10

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword 92 94 96 97

18 Attacks, with “into” 24 In the first place 26 In full bloom 29 Mtge. payment DOWN part 1 French grape32 __ town: skin brandy recently arrived 2 Hard exam 35 Make it 3 “La Bohème” 36 “The quality of heroine mercy is not 4 Plan strained” 5 Maker of the speaker fragrance 37 Common Opium soccer score 6 Silly bit 7 Record-setting 38 Ebert’s longtime co-host miler Jim 39 On a pension: 8 Aptly named Abbr. flight 40 Gabor and 9 Edberg of others tennis 10 Paddock parent 41 Exercise units 42 Single-named 11 Disappearing supermodel sea 43 Get the goods 12 Family feud on 13 N.Y. neighbor 44 Cafeteria staple 14 Violinist 47 Storage site Menuhin 15 Sicilian seaport 51 Pizarro’s treasure 16 Soon after 17 Cowboys’ city, 52 Party cheese 53 Back off familiarly

130 Final word 131 Vat sediment 132 Kids

10/3/10

93

Marine

SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 30’ sloop. Yanmar diesel, low hrs., VHF radio, depth and knot meter, working galley and head, color TV, CD player, wheel steering, sleeps 5. $10,500. 457-0684. SAILBOAT: 12’ wooden, extra sail, trailer. $990. 683-6889. SAILBOAT: 16’ classic daysailer. Very stable, very good condition, a beauty, trailer and more incl. $10,000/obo. 360-582-1683 SANGER: ‘76 Super Jet. Built 455 Olds, Hardin in water exhaust, seats 5, upholstery good, dog house fair, turnkey ready. $2,500/obo. 681-3838

Sea going sailing canoe. Project wood boat partially restored, all parts including good sail, mast, tiller,dagger board, lines, mast and rudder with all fittings except for oars. 17 feet long with a wide beam. $500. 360-683-6575 or 360-808-5200 TOLLY CRAFT ‘69 24’ ‘350’ Chev, gal. trailer. $4,950. 582-1330 YAMAHA: 8 hp long shaft, 2 cycle, excellent condition. $750/obo. Call Terry 461-6462

94

Motorcycles

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘08 1200C. 450 miles. $8,495/obo. 452-6448 HARLEY: ‘02 1200 Sportser. Black, lots of chrome. Saddle bags, detachable windshield, beautiful bike! $5,995. 360-461-0961

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677 HONDA: ‘04 CFR 100F. Less than 60 hrs., original owner. $1,500. 417-1151. HONDA: ‘04 XR650L. Only 3,000 mi., excellent condition, includes hitch carrier. $3,500. 460-4420. HONDA: ’06 Shadow VLX 600. Saddle bags, windshield, custom paint, lots of chrome, 1,800 mi., super clean, must see. $4,000/obo. 452-5813 HONDA: ‘07 Rebel Sport 250. Low miles $3,000. 461-6469. HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,950. 461-1202 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153.

Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670

KAWASAKI: ‘09 KLX 250s Dual-Sport Excel. cond., 1,600 mi., street legal, 65 mpg, elec start, 6 speed, liquid cooled, new tires, Comes w/ riding gear and helmet, perfect for commute and trail! $3,850. 360-477-7589

90 Abbey resident 91 Teaching 93 First NYC subway 95 Tells 100 Streak 101 Up __: indignant 102 Skit part 103 “Farm to Fork” author 104 Curt refusal 106 What you will 109 Pittypat and Polly 110 Alice’s chronicler 111 Cub’s place 112 Up-in-smoke sound 114 Shows amazement 115 “Do __ others ...” 116 Architectural Scurve 118 Crazily 119 Unadulterated 120 Office IDs 122 Long on screen 124 Stinker

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. FACIAL BEAUTY TIPS

T O N I C M T L A P P E A R F

S N I M A T I V S E Y E N A S

R R E S T N N S E G M N I K S

E E U M E N T L T U R R S R A

X F D R T A S O F O E A E A L

© 2010 Universal Uclick

Solution: 10 letters

F E A W R A S R N R M E R D U

O C C S O R E L A E C N O C M

L E O A R P Z R I T R C P A R

www.wonderword.com

I G P S F O A M T P N A K C O

A A E S M C L E A N S E R S F

T S N P S E G O C B U E C H Y

I S H A D E T A C P A E S S A

O A M A E T S I E M O L E A R

N M S N O L A S C R U B M L P

S G L O S S L E T S A P A D S

10/2

Join us on Facebook

Acne, Appear, Area, Balm, Cleansers, Colors, Concealer, Cosmetics, Cream, Dark, Exfoliation, Eyes, Face, Fair, Foam, Formulas, Glaze, Gloss, Lash, Liner, Lips, Makeup, Mascara, Masks, Massage, Mist, Mole, Open, Pads, Pastels, Peels, Perfume, Pores, Powder, Rest, Rouge, Safe, Salons, Scent, Scrub, Shade, Skin, Spa, Spray, Stars, Steam, Tints, Toner, Tonic, Treatment, Vitamins Friday’s Answer: Black Star THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

GLIEB ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

FRACT YOHRFT

CAMEZE

A:

Motorcycles

KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906 KAWASAKI: ‘01 Ninja EX 500R. Excellent condition, recent tune-up. $1850/obo. For details call, 360-477-1630

94

Motorcycles

95

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

5TH WHEEL: ‘93 30’ Komfort. 18’ slide out. Needs some work. $4,000. 681-8860

95

CAMPER: ‘72 Kit. Cab over, 9’, excellent condition, nonsmoker. Must see. $995. 457-9028 or 360-457-3157

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘72. Fits 8’ bed, no leaks. $350. 797-4518 QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘00 Polaris. 250cc, plus extras. $1,500. 417-9170.

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803

QUAD: ‘04 Honda 250 EX Sportrax. Low mi. $2,200. 683-2107.

ROKETA: ‘08 250cc scooter. ABS, CVT, tail trunk. $1,750. 360-457-8824

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 461-9558 YAMAHA: ‘03 V-Star 1100. Excellent condition, windshield, bags, air kit, crash bars, 15K mi. $4,300. 452-7184. YAMAHA: ‘05 FJR 1300. 8,400 miles, lots of extras. $8,750. 460-3162. YAMAHA: ‘09 250 Star. Under 500 mi., mint cond. $3,500. 765-4775, leave msg

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 53K. $28,000. 971-226-0002

QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki 250. Like brand new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 ROKETA: ‘05 150cc scooter. ABS, 700 miles. $950. 360-301-3433

CAMPER: ‘94 11.5’ Northland. Always under cover, needs some work. $3,500. 360-374-8761

5TH WHEEL: ‘05 34’ Montana Mountaineer 348RLS. 3 slides. Great condition. Extended warranty. 50 amp, central heat/air. Kelley Blue Book is $32,000. Asking $25,500/obo. Call Steve at 360-477-3949

MOTOR HOME: ‘04 30’ Damon Daybreak Class A. Two slideouts, like new condition, 11.400 miles, Ford V10, 5KW gen, two A/C’s, walkaround queen bed, loaded. Email photos available. $54,000. 477-9493 MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Bounder diesel pusher. Loaded. $95,000/obo. 360-460-0432

5TH WHEEL: 2007 Mckenzie Lakota 33SKT 4 SEASON. 3 slides, no smoke/ pets, dual Euro recliners, king bed, large corner shower, washer/dryer closet, large wardrobe closets, central vac, more than adequate storage, very nice little one bedroom on wheels. Over 11,000 under dealer value at $37,900. elgreengos@hotmail.com for more pictures or come see. 683-7411 or 477-5621. 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 25’ Alpenlite DL. Gas stove/oven, electric/gas freezer, fridge, air, microwave, antenna, AM/FM cassette stereo, roof ladder, storage, new tires, Hijacker Ultraslide hitch with mounting brackets, Super Shade awning, ONAN gen. set, low hours, very good condition. $5,000. 360-452-3402

MOTOR HOME: ‘74 23’ Dodge. 41K, new tires, needs TLC. $2,500/obo. 775-5465 MOTOR HOME: ‘99 34’ Coachmen Catalina. Loaded, 20K, V10, basement, lg. slide, excellent condition. $29,999. See at 2372 Hwy. 101 E., P.A. 457-4101. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 38’ Country Coach Affinity, their best model. Mint condition, loaded, 325 Turbo Cat, 7,500W diesel generator, solid oak and leather throughout, air ride and leveling, was $400,000 new, very livable. Reduced again! $52,000/ obo. 360-460-1071. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625

The Last Word in Astrology

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914

(Answers Monday) PYLON BRIDLE PILFER Jumbles: GULLY Answer: The gymnast won the event when she did this — “FLOPPED”

Friday’s

94

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

OF

©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on D11

KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290. BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334

54 Med. care provider 55 Hungers 59 Pick on 61 Eat one’s words 64 Clear out 65 Boxing biopic 66 Lipton alternative 68 Unit of pressure 70 Hwy. mishap respondent 71 1939 Garland co-star 73 Steam n’ Mash maker 74 Entered 75 Bride of July ’81 77 “__ Mir Bist Du Schoen”: 1937 hit 79 Fill, as another’s shoes 81 Sometime 82 Oscar night rental 83 Twice DLII 84 TV alien’s word 85 Green’s sci. 87 Composer Bruckner

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

CBer’s handle? Qatar bigwig Wine opener? Listening to ACROSS every word 1 Tot’s call 98 Completed 6 LAX listings 99 Like permissive 10 Cabbage with dog owners? crinkly, curled 105 Historic leaves Honolulu 15 Knopf, e.g.: palace Abbr. 107 Sri __ 19 Domingo solos 108 Latin word of 20 No, to Nureyev affection 21 Adler who 109 Author __ outwitted Morrow Sherlock Lindbergh Holmes 110 Andean beast 22 Capital on 113 Removed with Upolu island a chisel 23 Width of a 117 Generational freeway exit? disconnects 25 Collection of 121 Lazy time for complaints? Huck Finn? 27 Ad writer’s 123 Idiot driving a award semi? 28 Treacherous 125 Long sentence place 126 Force 30 Flips 127 “Law & Order: 31 Potentially SVU” actor offensive, in a 128 Oak-to-be way 129 Remnants 33 TV chef Martin 34 Venerable one 36 Movie buff’s collectible 39 Apartment party? 45 Covert maritime org. 46 Use a towel on 48 Old pros 49 Bradley in uniform 50 “I slept about eight hours”? 53 Indifference to Dr. Dre? 56 “O patria __”: “Aida” aria 57 Bamboozled 58 Deck out 60 No more than 62 Seine views 63 Navigable connection 65 In concert 67 Measure out 69 Mai tai decoration? 72 Scroogean look 76 Former jockey Smith who was married to Fred Astaire in the ’80s 78 Online exchange 80 Surveyor’s measure 81 Writer Leonard 84 Below, in verse 86 Finished 88 Damone of song 89 Slam dunk component?

“ARGOT” By ARTHUR S. VERDESCA

By DAVID OUELLET

BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Have fun but play it safe when it comes to love. Jealousy is likely to flare up if you flirt and can lead to relationship situations that can affect your future. There is no halfway when it comes to love. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Stick to the truth and don’t bend the rules. As long as you are open and honest, you will not face opposition but trying to get away with something will backfire. Emotional issues that concern children or a partner can be expected. 2 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Love, coupled with entertainment, should be on your agenda. A little pampering will go a long way. Some interesting changes at home will add to your comfort, enjoyment and ease when it comes to getting chores done. 4 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t count on getting any help and you won’t be disappointed. There will be plenty to talk about but conversations will lead to disagreements. Actions will pave the way to a better relationship with someone you love. 3 stars

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘95 Pleasureway Class B. 36,330 miles, toilet, A/C, furnace, range, fridge, hot water heater. Outside shower, No generator, sleeps 2, seats 4, NADA book value of $10,514. Asking $8,900/obo. 582-0903

95

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Get out of the house and engage in activities that allow you to explore new avenues and learn new skills. Taking on a disgruntled partner or someone you reside with will be a waste of time and energy. Preparation should be your goal. 3 stars

and show everyone what you have to offer. The ease at which you present your talent and deal with the people you meet will impress someone who can use your type of savvy approach. Travel may be necessary. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Someone will try to take advantage of you. Don’t be swayed by compliments or emotional tactics. If you don’t want to do something, say so. Put your time and energy into home, family and personal improvements. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): You may have to work long hours. Not everyone will be happy with your choices and demands will be put on you if you fall short when it comes to the expectations of friends and family. Travel will be riddled with delays, detours and restrictions. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your hard work and dedication to a cause will pay off and bring you opportunities that you cannot turn down. Don’t let someone’s jealousy stop you from fully enjoying what’s being offered. A talent you have can be turned into a profitable service. 4 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll be feeling pressured and anxious about what’s going on in your life, personally and professionally. Prepare for every possible outcome so you don’t leave anything to chance. Don’t neglect someone you love. 2 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Strive for attention

Recreational Vehicles

MOTORHOME: ‘03 29’. Ford Sunseeker, under 8,000 mi, double tipout. $55,000/ obo. 360-808-6392. TRAILER: ‘04 25’ Prowler. With slide, 4 new tires. $12,995. 582-9061 TRAILER: ‘04 28’ Sunnybrook. $10,000. 452-0835 or 460-9146 TRAILER: ‘05 22’ Arctic Fox. 1 slide, most options on board. $14,000. 417-5082.

MOTORHOME: ‘96 25’ Class A Winnebago Brave. One owner 42,000 mi. Chevy 7.4 Parked inside. Onan 4kw gen-set, HWH levelers, full awning, all manuals & records. Super clean $16,500. 360-452-7721 TRAILER: ‘00 24’ SandPiper By Forest River. Built in the Northwest, for the Northwest, w/queen bed up front, sofa & dining areas convert to bed, awning. In Sequim. $8,000. 602-615-6887

TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $13,000. 477-3695.

95

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Follow your heart and you will make the right decision. A problem with a past lover or someone trying to take advantage of what you have will arise. Don’t fall for insincere gestures of friendliness. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Getting together with someone who has as much to contribute as you can result in a worthwhile investment of both time and money. Make sure you put everything in writing and that you have discussed the division of responsibilities, so there are no surprises. 3 stars

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘94 40x10 Woodland Park. 2 slide outs, micro, W/D, air, full length porch with metal awning, refrigerator ice maker. $10,500. 425-776-5816 or 206-853-5546

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520 TRAILER: ‘03 30’ Airstream. Interior in great condition, some dents on exterior, reconstructed title. $9,995. 971-226-0002

TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504 TRAILER: ‘88 21’ Nomad. New tires, lights, battery. In good shape. $4,500/ obo. 681-0595 Jeff. TRAILER: ‘91 26T Cimmaron Wilderness by Fleetwood. Every option, fully livable. $4,200/obo. 360-460-6937

TRAILER: ‘09 24' Jayco. W/slideout. AC, queen bed, large solar panel, 2 batteries, RVQ. $12,500. 360-681-8466 TRAILER: 22’ Terry. New tires/propane bottles. $1,500/obo. 417-3579

95

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘62 20’. No leaks, self contained, most everything works. $850. 360-385-3336 TRUCK CAMPER ‘07 Starcraft Starmate. Pop-up, like new. Fridge, toilet, shower never used. $8,000. 457-1020.

96

Parts/ Accessories

FORD: ‘89 F250 2WD. Good runnig fuel injected ‘302’ never fully installed, good tranny and rear end, good tires, parting out. $1,000. 477-6512 TRAILER HITCH Reese. Weight distribution hitch. Complete kit. 10,000 lbs. New, $321. Asking $150. 928-2428 or 808-3956 WE PICK UP Unwanted cars and trucks in area. State licensed and bonded auto wrecker. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘68 Camaro Z28. 302, 4 speed, stock. $29,999/obo or trade. 683-7965.

FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929.

CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649.

GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522 GMC: ‘88 Rally. Wheel chair van, needs minor work. $1,500. Scott. 504-2478. GMC: ‘95 Short bed. V6, 1500 Sierra, 5 speed, 130K. $3,500. 452-5427.

Parts/ Accessories

97

4 Wheel Drive

MOTOR: Ford, ‘66 289, fresh, low miles. $300. 461-3132.

97

CHEV ‘99 3500 CREW CAB DUALLY LONGBED 4X4 7.4 liter Vortec V8, auto, dual batteries, alloy wheels, tool box, spray-in bedliner, gooseneck hitch, tow package, trailer brake controller, keyless entry, privacy glass, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seats, full 4 doors, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Only 44,000 miles! This truck is immaculate inside and out! Shows the very best of care! $13,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CHEV: ‘80 Stepside. 350, V8, $3,500/ obo. 460-8056. CHEV: ‘88 S-10 Blazer. Runs/drives perfect. $1,200. In P.A. 541-727-8047 CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362 CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056. CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292 CHEV: ‘90 1 Ton 4x4. 454. New trans, rear end, and u joints, canopy, wheels and tires, black, 195K. $3,850. 461-1229. DODGE ‘08 DAKOTA SXT 4-DOOR QUAD CAB Economical 3.7 liter V6, auto, air, 4x4, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, privacy glass, bedliner, alloy wheels, 34,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 warranty, super clean 1 owner non-smoker. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com DODGE: ‘88 3/4 ton long bed. $850/obo. 452-2459 DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556 FORD: ‘09 F150 4x4. XLT super cab, 15K mi. $26,500. 360-765-4599 FORD: ‘79 Bronco. Full size, ‘351’ Cleveland, good body. $2,000. 797-3436. FORD: ‘85 Bronco. Sat. radio, 33� tires. $1,300. 640-8996. FORD: ‘88 F150 super cab. Tow package, 1 owner, 183K miles. $2,800. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘93 F150. 5 spd, 4.9L, runs great. $5,000/obo. 797-4748 FORD: ‘94 Explorer. All power, auto, air, runs/drives great. $1,500. 457-8193 or 460-7534 FORD: ‘98 Expedition XLT. Leather, loaded, very clean, 97K mi., new tires, $7,000. 775-6673 FORD: ‘03 Ranger. V6, extra cab, O/D 4x4, 40,000 mi., nice wheels/tires. $9,000. 360-640-8749 GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 GMC: ‘73 3/4 ton. Runs good, ugly. $1,495. 582-1381. GMC: ‘96 Sonoma. Two color, extra cab. $3,800/obo or trade for equal value SUV/ car. 360-460-3756.

HONDA: ‘06 Element EX AWD. $18,000. 43K mi. Excellent cond, Automatic, Air cond, Roof rack, 2" tow receiver, Hood and window wind deflectors, Warranty to 2014. Call 360-477-2196 between 10 AM and 10PM ISUZU: ‘91 Trooper. Runs good, new tires. $1,500/obo. 670-6041

CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton. ‘350’ V8, auto, nice. $2,000. 681-7632.

CHEV: ‘95 S10 Drag Truck. 383 stroker, Brodix Heads built turbo 359 trans. Nod 9 inch, 4 link rear, spindle front end 14x32 slicks. Price reduced. $14,000 360-640-0887 CHEV: ‘95 G-20 cargo van. Ladder rack, new radiator, tires and trans, tow package, clean. $1,900. 460-9178

JEEP: ‘02 Grand Cherokee Overland 4WD, V8, fully loaded, excellent cond., 85K miles, class III tow pkg, power memory seats, moonroof, etc. Blue Book $11,300, call to see and drive. 360-457-1168 MAZDA: ‘03 Tribute ES. Loaded, leather, great shape, 62K, towing pkg. $10,510. 928-9527 NISSAN: ‘01 Frontier SC. 3.2l V6 Auto. 11 inch lift w/SAS kit. Leather seats, power locks and windows, tinted windows, 6 disc CD player, canopy. Big truck with many extras. $11,250. 808-0937 or 808-2654. SUZUKI ‘02 XL-7 TOURING SPORT UTILITY 4WD 2.7 24V V6, auto, alloy wheels, privacy glass, sunroof, 3rd row seating, power windows, locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, rear air, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $9,370! Only 86,000 miles! Third row seating and good gas mileage! Clean inside and out! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA ‘06 TUNDRA DOUBLE CAB 4X4 SR5 package, 4.7 liter V8, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, TRD suspension package, AM/FM CD and cassette, alloy wheels, power sliding rear window, chrome tube running boards, factory tow package, remote entry and more! Extra clean. One week special, expires 10-9-10. $18,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

TOYOTA: ‘94 4Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. Needs tranny work. $2,800. 452-9693 TOYOTA: ‘01 Tacoma SR5. 4x4 extra cab, brand new 3.4 V6 engine installed by Toyota dealer, auto, PW, PDL, CD, tow pkg. with air bags and electric trailer brakes, canopy. $13,000. Call Bill at 460-3429 TOYOTA: ‘95 T100. 4WD, extra cab, auto, 3.4 liter, canopy, bedliner, tow A/C, cruise. Runs perfect! $5,900. 417-9141

98

Pickups/Vans

BOX TRUCK: ‘00 GMC. 12’ box, runs great. $10,500/obo. 582-9006 CHEV: ‘00 Silverado. $10,000. 808-1731 or 360-477-7864. CHEV: ‘05 Suburban. Excellent, 1/2 ton. $16,800. 681-5403

HONDA: ‘05 Odyessy EX-L. 36.300 miles, excellent condition. $24,000. 504-2404.

CHRYSLER ‘05 TOWN & COUNTRY MINI-VAN V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD, sto-n-go, with quad seating, roof rack, dark glass, and more! One week special, expires 109-10. $7,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com DODGE ‘06 CARAVAN SXT 3.3 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD and cassette, power windows, locks, and seat, power sliding door, side airbags, 7 passenger with quad seating, alloy wheels, privacy glass, luggage rack, 62,000 miles, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker. $10,695 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com DODGE: ‘05 Grand Caravan SE. 86K, good condition. Trailer hitch. $7,725. 460-0351 DODGE: ‘69 Flat bed. Strait 6, needs tune up. $285. 683-6597. DODGE: ‘86 D350 1 ton stakeside, 7’8�x 12’6� bed, new carb, seats, battery, hitch. 119K, Runs great. $2,300/obo. 360-504-9954 DODGE: ‘95 Grand Caravan SE. 43K with lift and scooter. $5,000. 457-4837 leave message. FORD ‘03 E150 CARGO VAN 4.2 liter V6, auto, AM/FM stereo, air, dual front airbags, only 27,000 miles! Ex-municipal vehicle means immaculate maintenance! V6 means good gas mileage! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844

GMC: ‘03 3500 Box Van. GMC heavy duty 12 foot box van. 3500 series Savanah. Power windows, AC, power locks, power steering, cloth seats, v-8 power, dual rear wheels, access door to box from cab, 23,000 miles, very clean, wood floor box, roll top lockable rear door, white truck and box, step rear bumper, good tread on all tires, runs great! Drives great! Beautiful truck, just dont need anymore. $12,500. 460-1168. See pictures online at Penninsula Daily News site.

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. NISSAN: ‘86 EX cab. 2.4L eng., good mpg, auto w/over drive, power steer., Pioneer stereo, rear jump seats, dark tint, 95,354 orig. mi., good tires/shocks, well taken care of, senior owned, bought locally. Must see to appreciate. $3,800 firm. 461-2709 PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

CHEV: ‘87 305 Van conversion, great condition, clean, no dents, 79K mi. Only $2,145. 460-4488. CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHRYSLER: ‘06 300C Hemi, 63K, super clean, every option, silver, leather, must see and drive, sold new for $39,000. $14,900. 582-0696. CLASSIC: ‘59 Cadillac model 62, 4 door hard top, red, good shape. $14,000. 360-683-7640 DAEWOO: ‘01 Lanos S . 60,780 orig. mi., 2 door hatchback, burgundy/gray, 4 cylinder, auto, 32+mpg, tabs July ‘11, newer tires plus windshield, A/C, heat, radio cassette. $2,900. 681-5326. DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514 FORD: ‘05 Focus ZX4. Auto, 73K, new tires, all power. $8,000/obo. 460-4693 FORD: ’62 Thunderbird Coupe. Mostly all restored, approx. $30,000 put into it. $15,900/obo. 460-0401, 582-9597 FORD: ‘73 Mustang. Fast back, 351C, black on black. $13,000. 460-8056. FORD: ‘98 Mustang convertible. 3.8 V6, 73,000 mi., power locks-trunk-left front seat, power top, leather seats, sharp car! $8,500/ obo. 457-6156. FORD: 1929 Model “A�. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

PLYMOUTH: ‘94 Voyager. Auto, seats 7, 128K. $800. 460-4693

GMC: ‘97 Suburban. Maroon, 4x4, studded tires and rims. Good condition. $2,800. 681-7032.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Tacoma. Auto., reg. cab, 6’ bed, matching canopy, A/C, tape player, manual windows, 68K mi., excellent condition, $9,000/obo. 775-0051

HONDA: ‘05 S2000. Fabulous 2 seater convert., wonderful handling, great mpg, exc cond., 27K mi. $19,900. 461-1202

VW: ‘93 Eurovan Weekender edition. 183K miles, good cond., runs well. $8,500. 477-6149

99

Cars

BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Nice old man must part with his 2nd love! Beautiful blue, exc. condition, spoke wheels, loaded. 30K miles on new motor; 112k total miles. $3,400. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: 1951 Coupe DeVille. 46,600 original miles, powerful, great driving car. Nice chrome, paint & upholstery, WW tires, Auto, V8, Sequim, $27,900. 360-683-3385 Rrobert169@Qwest. net CHEV ‘01 MONTE CARLO SS COUPE 3.8 liter V6, auto, premium wheels, dual Magnaflow exhaust, traction control, keyless entry, tinted windows, sunroof, power windows, locks, and mirrors, power heated leather seats, CD/cassette stereo, dual zone air conditioning, cruise, steering wheel audio controls, OnStar, information center, Homelink, dual front airbags, Kelley Blue Book value of $9,110! Triple black/tinted windows. This SS has been babied! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘00 Cavalier. 126K mi., very clean, maroon, 2 tone brown/beige interior. $3,500. 452-8098 or 360-670-9199

CHEV: ‘78 Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition. Fully restored interior and exterior. Silver twotone paint with sport striping. L48 automatic. Runs excellent. $18,500. 425-888-4306 or 425-941-4246

HONDA: ‘06 Civic. Top 5 best mpg car, red/tan int., auto, CD, sunroof, exc. cond., 38K mi. $15,750. 461-1202. HONDA: ‘06 Civic. 67,000 mi., 2 door coupe, clean, white with black/ gray interior. $10,000/obo 460-0845

102

Legals City of P.A.

99

Cars

GEO: ‘93 Storm. Runs great. $2,500/obo. 775-9612

HONDA: ‘08 Fit-Sport. Auto, 7,500 mi., Service records current, the original owner was a nonsmoker and did not transport pets, exterior/interior show minimal wear. $14,995. 683-1044. KIA: ‘02 Sportage. Black, low 66K miles, 5 speed, great cond., great mileage. $4,500. 670-5375. LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272 LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $4,200. 452-9693 eves. MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $12,000/obo 206-375-5204 MAZDA: ‘99 Miata. Perfect autumn car! Mint condition. 5 spd, Bose audio. 25K original miles. $8,200. 683-0146.

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCURY: ‘89 Cougar. Hobby stock race car, fully loaded, seat belts, window net, ready to race. $1,000/obo. 477-9602 MERCURY: ‘91 Capri. Runs good, fair condition, 239K mi., convertible. $995. 360-928-2115

99

Cars

MISC: ‘91 Toyota Corolla, ‘89 Honda Accord, both auto. $1,800/obo each. 452-8663 PONTIAC ‘09 VIBE Very economical 1.8 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, OnStar ready, side airbags, great mpg, balance of factory 5.100 warranty. $12,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com PONTIAC ‘09 VIBE Very economical 1.8 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, OnStar ready, side airbags, great mpg, balance of factory 5.100 warranty. $12,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

SUBARU: ‘05 STI Black STI with tinted windows and silver BBS wheels. Stock except for headers, down pipe and complete stainless steel exhaust and muffler. Manual boost controller and front and rear alum skid plates. Tuned on a 4 wheel dyno and produced 300 hp and 364 ft/lb torque at the wheels. A fantastic daily driver with 65,000 miles. Adult owned and maintained. $14,900/ obo. Call Tim at 360-912-1467 Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

102

Legals City of P.A.

CITY OF PORT ANGELES NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT APPLICATION AND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on OCTOBER 13, 2010, the CITY OF PORT ANGELES PLANNING COMMISSION will consider a request for EXTENSION of a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT to permit the continuation of an outreach center for youth and young adults in the Commercial Office zone. The extension request is to extend days of operation to 7 days a week with the same hours: The public hearing will begin at 6 p.m., City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, Port Angeles, Washington. Application information may be reviewed at the City Department of Community & Economic Development, City Hall, P.O. Box 1150, Port Angeles. City Hall is accessible to persons with disabilities. Interested parties are invited to attend the meeting. APPLICANT: SUSAN HILGREN dba The Answer for Youth LOCATION: 711 East Second Street For further information contact: Sue Roberds, (360) 417-4750 Pub: Oct. 3, 2010 CITY OF PORT ANGELES PUBLIC NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT APPLICATION AND PUBLIC HEARING On September 14, 2010, the City of Port Angeles received a shoreline substantial development permit application to allow work within a shoreline area within the Public Buildings and Parks zone. The application was determined to be complete on September 28, 2010. The proposed elements include removal of concrete, asphalt, and fill materials and replacement with gravel and sand between the road edge and the water and will include planting of native vegetation. The site is described as being along the inner harbor side of Ediz Hook Road in the area of the old “A� Frame, railroad dump site. The site is legally described as being in Section 3, Township 31N Range 6 W.W.M, Port Angeles, Washington. Written comments on the proposed development must be submitted in writing to the Port Angeles Department of Community & Economic Development, P.O. Box 1150, Port Angeles, Washington, 98362, no later than October 24, 2010. The PORT ANGELES PLANNING COMMISSION will conduct a public hearing on the proposal on October 27, 2010, 6 p.m., in the City Council Chambers, 321 East Fifth Street. The application materials may be reviewed at the City’s Department of Community & Economic Development. Interested parties are invited to attend the meeting, make comment on the application, and may request a copy of the decision once it is made. City Hall is accessible for persons with disabilities. STATE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT: The Department of Natural Resources issued a Determination of Nonsignificance on this proposal on August 5, 2010. APPLICANT: DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES LOCATION: East of 1431 Ediz Hook Road along the inner harbor area For additional information please call Scott Johns at (360) 417-4752 Pub: Oct. 3, 2010

99

Cars

PLYMOUTH: ‘67 Fury Sport coupe 2 door, ‘383’, runs. $1,000/ obo. 417-3579.

PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 477-4865 SUBARU: ‘05 Forester. Mint condition, 30K mi. $16,000. 457-9183 SUBARU: ‘83 wagon. 4WD. Runs great, new parts. $1,000/ obo. 683-2281. SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 24,500 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $18,250. 452-6014 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132.

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183. TOYOTA: ‘09 Camry LE. 4 cyl., 7,200 miles, new cond. $17,000. Bank can finance. 683-1646. TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774. TOYOTA: ‘98 Avalon. White, great! 88K miles. $5,900. 808-0505 VW: ‘07 Bug convertible. Leather, exc. cond., 16K, all options. $19,500. 460-0462 after 6 p.m. VW: ‘70s Super Beetle. Body has very little rust. $300. 477-2610

SUZUKI: ‘07 Reno. $9,000/obo. Keyless entry alarm system excellent condition & perfectly maintained excellent mpg 7 yr powertrain warranty, AAA service 1 more year. Maureen Osterberg, 360-670-5335. TOYOTA: ‘01 Celica GT. Silver, sunroof, auto, spoiler, 136K, excellent condition. $8,000. 732-0689. TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527. TOYOTA: ‘93 Celica GT Coupe. Higher mileage but runs great, much new. $2,700. 477-6873.

FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

REID & JOHNSON

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

WWWREIDANDJOHNSONCOMsMJ OLYPENCOM

Legals Clallam Co.

D11

PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332

CA$H

101 MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

99

095098073

CHEV: ‘02 Trailblazer LTZ. Low mi., all power, air, leather, new tires/brakes, Bose audio & more. Low book. $9,250. 460-4765

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘59 Apache pickup. All original, rebuilt engine, new chrome, runs great. $7,300. 683-2254.

4 Wheel Drive

BUICK: ‘04 Rainier. V8, AWD, leather, 87K, premium sound, wheels, all power. $12,800. 460-3037

98

Cars

DODGE: ‘96 Caravan. Great condition, gold color. $2,100. 683-3851

FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 4 cyl, 5 spd, 87K, sb. $3,400/obo. 683-8328

96

99

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $3,295/obo. 775-9648

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS SMALL WORKS ROSTER The district is seeking to add responsible contractors to the small works roster. The district procedures and RCW 28A.335.190 require good faith request quotations from all contractors on the small works roster who have indicated the capability of performing the kind of public works being constructed. Responsible contractors shall be added to the list at any time they submit a written request to Crescent School District, P.O. Box 20, Joyce, WA 98343, Attn: Randy Rooney. Kathy Silva Administrative Assistant Pub: Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7301.25977 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, Inc. Grantee: Keith L. Burfitt and Carol A. Burfitt, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 032902310430 Abbreviated Legal: Pcl J, BLA 45/25 NESW 2-29-3 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 12, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel "J", as delineated on Boundary Line Adjustment Survey, recorded in Volume 45 of Surveys, page 25, under recording no. 2000 1051862, being a portion of Parcels 10, 11, and 14 of Sequim Bay Estates #3 Survey recorded in Volume 8 of Surveys, page 148, being a portion of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of Section 2, Township 29 north, Range 3 west, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/16/08, recorded on 04/22/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1219817, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Keith L. Burfitt and Carol A. Burfitt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Legacy Group Lending, Inc., and its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Legacy Group Lending, Inc., and its successors and assigns to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254837. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/06/2010 Monthly Payments $45,730.80 Late Charges $1,946.16 Lender's Fees & Costs $306.50 Total Arrearage $47,983.46 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $992.94 Statutory Mailings $23.90 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,723.34 Total Amount Due: $49,706.80 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $363,874.97, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 12, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/01/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/01/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/01/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Keith L. Burfitt 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Keith L. Burfitt P.O. Box 773 Carlsborg, WA 98324 Carol A. Burfitt 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Carol A. Burfitt P.O. Box 773 Carlsborg, WA 98324 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/30/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/30/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/06/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7301.25977) 1002.161890-FEI Pub: Oct. 3, 24, 2010


D12

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Classified 101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS Clallam County, State of Washington November 2, 2010 General Election NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Canvassing Board of Clallam County, or their appointed designees, pursuant to RCW 29A.60.160, will hold open public meetings at the dates and times listed below. The meetings of the Canvassing Board are open, public meetings under the applicable provisions of chapter 42.30 RCW, and each meeting shall be continued until the activity for which the meeting is held has been completed. Oct.25, 2010 9:00 a.m.

Pre Logic and Accuracy Test of Accessible Voting Unit Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Oct. 25, 2010 11:00 a.m.

Logic and Accuracy Test of Voting System Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Oct. 14 – Nov. 23, 2010 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Processing of Ballots Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Nov. 2, 2010 8:00 p.m.

First Tabulation of Ballots Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Nov. 22, 2010 9:00 a.m.

Public Canvassing Board Meeting Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Nov. 23, 2010 11:00 a.m.

Conclude Canvassing Ballots/ Certification of Election Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Dated at Port Angeles, Washington, this 3th day of October, 2010. PATRICIA M. ROSAND CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR Pub: Oct. 3, 2010 File No.: 7023.75770 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: John Andriolo Jr, as trustee and not personally under provisions of a trust agreement dated the 19th of February, 2008, known as the 242071 Highway 101 Land Trust Tax Parcel ID No.: 073015410100 & 073015-140150 Abbreviated Legal: Nenese N Hwy 1.17A Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 5, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: All that portion of the East half of the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 15, Township 30 North, Range 7 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, lying Southerly of the Olympic Highway as established and existing on and prior to September 14, 1920, and Northerly of the present existing Olympic Highway (State Road No. 9); and all that portion of the Northeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of said Section 15, lying Northerly of the Olympic Highway (State Road No. 9) as the same is now established. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 242071 West Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/13/03, recorded on 06/27/03, under Auditor's File No. 2003 1111469, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Doug W. Harsh a married man as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for New Freedom Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20071211391. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/03/2010 Monthly Payments $23,129.04 Late Charges $886.65 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,991.49 Total Arrearage $28,007.18 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $543.75 Title Report $522.49 Statutory Mailings $57.36 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,193.60 Total Amount Due: $29,200.78 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $113,300.90, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 5, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS DOUG W HARSH 242071 West Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 DOUG W HARSH 528 Farrington Road Suite 100 Port Angeles, WA 98363-8707 DOUG W HARSH 1743 Freshwater Bay Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 JOHN ANDRIOLO Jr. 242071 West Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 JOHN ANDRIOLO Jr. 528 Farrington Road Suite 100 Port Angeles, WA 98363-8707 JOHN ANDRIOLO Jr. 1743 Freshwater Bay Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of DOUG W HARSH 242071 West Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of DOUG W HARSH 528 Farrington Road Suite 100 Port Angeles, WA 98363-8707 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of DOUG W HARSH 1743 Freshwater Bay Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JOHN ANDRIOLO Jr. 242071 West Highway 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JOHN ANDRIOLO Jr. 528 Farrington Road Suite 100 Port Angeles, WA 98363-8707 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JOHN ANDRIOLO Jr. 1743 Freshwater Bay Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/30/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/01/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/03/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.75770) 1002.161836-FEI Pub: Oct. 3, 24, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7021.27212 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Steven R. Phillips and Jacklan R. Phillips, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 033008-760010-3010 Abbreviated Legal: Unit 1A Survey 40/89 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 5, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Unit 1A of Survey recorded on November 3, 1998 in Volume 40 of Surveys, Page 89, being a Survey of Lot 1 of Sunland Division 17, Phase 1, as recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 6, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 31 Mount Baker Drive Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/27/08, recorded on 03/13/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1217614, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Steven R. Phillips and Jacklan R. Phillips, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS", as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS" to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20101253892. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/3110 Monthly Payments $7,452.13 Late Charges $313.60 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $7,765.73 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $758.80 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,601.92 Total Amount Due: $9,367.65 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $232,500.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 5, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Steven R. Phillips 31 Mount Baker Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Jacklan R. Phillips 31 Mount Baker Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Steven R. Phillips 14209 Cotton Ranch Road Bakersfield, CA 93306 Jacklan R. Phillips 14209 Cotton Ranch Road Bakersfield, CA 93306 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/12/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/12/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/31/10 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.27212) 1002.156549-FEI Pub: Oct. 3, 24, 2010 File No.: 7301.25861 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, Inc. Grantee: Bryan Rodenberger and Paula Burdick, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 03-30-18-810560 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 56 Eagle Mountain Estates 14/62 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 56, Plat of Eagle Mountain Estates, as per plat recorded in the Volume 14 of Plats, Pages 62, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 261 Choice Loop Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/23/06, recorded on 07/03/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1183329, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Bryan Rodenberger and Paula Burdick, huband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company of Clallam, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Westsound Bank, DBA Westsound Mortgage Corporation, and it's successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Westsound Bank, DBA Westsound Mortgage Corporation, and it's successors and assigns to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20101253000. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/13/2010 Monthly Payments $48,539.82 Late Charges $2,039.00 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,189.74 Total Arrearage $51,768.56 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $925.73 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,581.35 Total Amount Due: $53,349.91 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $330,176.30, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 15, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/04/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Bryan Rodenberger 261 Choice Loop Sequim, WA 98382 Bryan Rodenberger P.O.Box 1601 Sequim, WA 98382 Paula Burdick 261 Choice Loop Sequim, WA 98382 Paula Burdick P.O.Box 1601 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/09/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/09/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7301.25861) 1002.159638-FEI Pub: Sept. 12, Oct. 3, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7037.07358 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Abbigail Lee Gates, who acquired title as, Abbigail Whitehead, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 132803520600 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1, Blk 6 Replat of Blks 6 & 7 Ford Park 6/69 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 5, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Block 6 of Ford Park Replat of Blocks 6 and 7, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 69, record of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1611 OZETTE ST FORKS, WA 98331 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/26/08, recorded on 08/04/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1224817, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Abbigail Lee Gates, unmarried, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Advanced Financial Services, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1252444. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/03/2010 Monthly Payments $17,275.95 Late Charges $644.98 Lender's Fees & Costs $603.61 Total Arrearage $18,524.54 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $652.50 Title Report $603.78 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,374.28 Total Amount Due: $19,898.82 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $143,517.09, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 5, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Abbigail Gates aka Abbigail Whitehead 1611 Ozette St FORKS, WA 98331 Abbigail Gates aka Abbigail Whitehead 610 W 11th St PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Abbigail Gates aka Abbigail Whitehead 1611 Ozette St FORKS, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Abbigail Gates aka Abbigail Whitehead 610 W 11th St PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/29/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/03/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07358) 1002.158485-FEI Pub: Oct. 3, 24, 2010 File No.: 7023.76013 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Michael A. Ditto and Julia Little, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-043895 Abbreviated Legal: Lot: 20, Blk: 438, Twp: TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 5, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 20, Block 438, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1801 West 16th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/15/08, recorded on 10/20/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1228148, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Michael A Ditto and Julia Little, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for M&T Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254060. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/03/2010 Monthly Payments $9,984.48 Late Charges $332.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $45.00 Total Arrearage $10,362.28 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $543.75 Title Report $697.02 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,343.89 Total Amount Due: $11,706.17 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $223,943.89, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 5, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/25/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS MICHAEL A DITTO 1801 West 16th Street PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 MICHAEL A DITTO 2132 W 10TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98363-5006 JULIA LITTLE 1801 West 16th Street PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 JULIA LITTLE 2132 W 10TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98363-5006 MICHAEL A DITTO 1312 West 5th Street PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 JULIA LITTLE 1312 West 5th Street PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/01/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/02/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/03/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.76013) 1002.162050-FEI Pub: Oct. 3, 24, 2010


PDN 10/03/2010