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October 12, 2011

Nature’s palette

Seconds-only power failure in PA area ‘took care of itself’ Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A momentary power outage darkened Port Angeles, shutting down computers and some traffic signals for a few seconds just after 4 p.m. Tuesday. The failure was located on Bonneville Power Authority feeder lines that lead to Port Angeles. The cause is a mystery, said Doug Johnson, spokesman for BPA. “It fell out of service and took care of itself,” Johnson said. “These things happen time to time,” he said. The Port Angeles Police Department reported no incidents as a result of the interruption of power. Clallam County Public Utility District spokesman Michael Howe said he was unaware of any power outages elsewhere in Clallam County. No outages were reported in East Jefferson County, which is served by Puget Sound Energy.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

A vine maple tree shows its fall coat of red in front of the Olympic National Park visitor center in Port Angeles on Tuesday. Many trees on the North Olympic Peninsula are converting from green to golds, yellows and reds as autumn descends upon the region.

Munitions barge arrives safely at Navy destination By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

The munitions barge St. Elias, which was aground in the San Juans the day before, arrives at Naval Magazine Indian Island on Tuesday afternoon.

INDIAN ISLAND — A munitions barge that ran aground early Monday morning arrived safely Tuesday at Naval Magazine Indian Island after the Coast Guard determined there was no damage to the vessel or the explosives onboard. Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound was notified Monday that the 322-foot barge St. Elias, containing about 9,000 pounds of naval munitions, was being towed

south through Rosario Strait by the 101-foot tug Henry Brusco when it ran aground at about 5:20 a.m. Coast Guard Air Station/Sector Field Office Port Angeles crews conducted a morning overflight, and Station Bellingham conducted an on-site review. Both reported no signs of pollution. As an environmental precaution, a containment dome was deployed around the vessel, the Coast Guard said. Turn

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Barge/A5

State cuts may let PA school enrollment rises — parolees walk free not enough to ease fund woes Peninsula Daily News news sources

OLYMPIA — As it faces budget cuts, the state Department of Corrections is considering ending supervision for about 12,000 felons on parole in the state. Union leaders for prison guards and the state employees who monitor released inmates said ending the supervision will endanger the public, The Seattle Times reported. The state has about 17,000 felons under supervision, also known as parole. Other “reduction alternatives” proposed by the department

include increasing inmates’ health care co-pays to $4 from $3 and releasing inmates judged to be low and moderate risks to reoffend 120 days early, as long as they had not been convicted of a sex offense. Cuts to the Department of Corrections are some of the decisions lawmakers will have to make at the state Legislature’s special session set for the end of November. Among expenditures that could be on the chopping block is a 1,000-bed prison that the department plans to open in Western Washington by 2016. Turn

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By Arwyn Rice

153 students compared with September 2010 enrollment count, representing a potential loss of $810,000 in state funding. PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles School DisState funding is based on an average of trict enrollment saw an increase of 73 students yearly enrollment September through June, and in October from September’s count but still numbers are usually lower at the end of the remains below the census in October 2010. year than the beginning, Frick said. Elementary school enrollment lost one stuThe additional students enrolled in October dent from September to October, and remains at were mostly late-start Running Start students more than 100 students below the district’s and students at the North Olympic Peninsula expectation for the year. Skills Center, she said. Enrollment increased in middle school, high Many of those came from the Forks area, school, the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Cenwhich started classes after the September count ter and in the Running Start program, district date, as did students at Peninsula College, she business manager Gail Frick told the School said. Board on Monday night. In September, the district reported a loss of Turn to Schools/A5 Peninsula Daily News

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UpFront

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Pop star Rain joins South Korean army SOUTH KOREAN POP star Rain bid farewell to tearful fans Tuesday as he put one of Asia’s most successful entertainment careers on hold to enter boot camp and begin nearly two years of military service. The 29-year-old singer and actor, his hair neatly cropped, gave a militarystyle salute to fans before he disappeared into an army base in Uijeongbu north of Seoul — more than 50 years after Elvis Presley was drafted in the U.S. Army from the heights of stardom. “Thank you for the 10 years of love,” Rain told hun­ dreds of gathered fans as tears welled in his eyes. Many of the fans were from Japan and China and held banners with messages meant to cheer him. Rain is fulfilling his com­ pulsory military service at a relatively late age and risks

NYC arts award

The Associated Press

South Korean pop singer Rain gives a salute to his fans in front of an army training center in Uijeongbu, South Korea, on Tuesday. losing career momentum during the 21 months he spends out of the public eye. But he could otherwise face a backlash given South Korea’s hostility toward draft dodgers. Rain, whose real name is Jung Ji-hoon, is not expected to receive any spe­ cial treatment in South Korea’s 650,000-strong mili­ tary.

Broadway composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim will receive New York City’s highest honor for achievement in the arts. The New York Times said Sond­ heim will receive the Handel Medallion on Nov. 1 at Alice Tully Sondheim Hall. Other honorees will include Mikhail Baryshnikov, arts advocate Alice Diamond, musician Jimmy Heath, artist Maya Lin and the Theater Development Fund. Sondheim has won more Tony Awards than any other composer. A revival of the 81-yearold’s “Follies” will be on Broadway until Jan. 22. His other hit musicals include “A Little Night Music” and “Sweeney Todd.” Sondheim also wrote the lyrics for “West Side Story.”

Passings By The Associated Press

ROBERT M. SCHAEBERLE, 88, who led Nabisco through two merg­ ers but retired as chairman and chief executive in 1986 as the company moved toward one of the biggest and most contentious lever­ aged buyouts in Wall Street history, died Sept. 29 at an assisted living facility in Exeter, N.H. The cause was complica­ tions of Alzheimer’s dis­ ease, his son Robert said. Mr. Schaeberle, who was with Nabisco for 40 years, became president and chief executive in 1976. He was at the helm when it merged with Stan­ dard Brands in 1981 and four years later when it merged with the R.J. Reyn­ olds tobacco company. When Nabisco joined Standard Brands, creating what was renamed Nabisco Brands, it brought together two powerful business executives who would try — in the end not success­ fully — to share leadership: Mr. Schaeberle as chair­ man and F. Ross Johnson

Laugh Lines THERE’S A PROPOSAL in Congress to allow rich people who feel they don’t pay enough income tax to voluntarily pay more. Economists say this could bring in as much as $75 a year. Jay Leno

Working mostly at ABC, CBS and Fox, Mr. Aceti was known for unorthodox and human-interest cam­ era shots: overhead views, tight close-ups and sequences capturing quick glimpses of figures on the field anticipating a key play. Mr. Aceti, an outstand­ ing catcher for the Colgate University baseball team, graduated with a fine arts degree, and he drew on a sense of artistic expression in his directing work. “I like to think what I do is humanize the ath­ lete,” he told The Chicago Tribune in 1987. _________ “I always look for dra­ JOE ACETI, 76, an matic replays. That comes innovative television direc­ from my art background. I tor who for three decades like to see a guy leaping helped shape network cov­ over a pile from a low erage of major sports angle. That makes it larger events, including the Olym­ than life.” pics, the World Series and His work also included the Ali-Frazier “Thrilla in coverage of college and pro­ Manila,” died Oct. 4 in fessional football and fig­ Kirkland. ure skating as well as seg­ The cause was a stroke, ments of ABC’s “Wide his wife, Barbara, said. World of Sports.” as president. At the time, both com­ panies were ranked among the top 10 in the processed food industry. Besides its signature brands Ritz and Oreo, Nabisco brought to the merger Lorna Doone, Uneeda and Cream of Wheat, while Standard Brands was marketing Planters, Baby Ruth, But­ terfinger and Fleisch­ mann’s margarine, among other products. The new company’s first big step was the $251 mil­ lion acquisition of Life Sav­ ers.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL MONDAY’S QUESTION: Is recycling important enough to you for you to pay a nominal monthly fee for the service?

Yes 

No 

24.6% 50.6%

Depends how much 

23.2%

Undecided  1.7% Total votes cast: 1,136 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  Port Townsend City Council candidate Bob Gray, who spoke at a forum last week, did not suggest that money could be saved if construction on the Port Townsend Library was halted. He was misquoted in a story on Page A1 of the Jeffer­ son County edition Friday. ■  George Schoenfeldt is not seeking re-election to the Port of Port Angeles Board of Commissioners on Nov. 8, and Jim Hallett is the sole candidate to replace him on the three-member board. A story Tuesday on Page A4 erroneously named the wrong commissioner Hallett likely will replace. Commis­ sioner Jim ­McEntire, a candidate for Clallam County commissioner, has not resigned from his port commis­ sioner position.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

Preliminary prepara­ tions to organize a Wolf Cub pack among boys of Jefferson and Washington schools in Port Angeles were instituted at a meet­ ing of parents with Boy Scout officials. The Cub work, believed to be first on the Olympic Seen Around Peninsula, would be for Peninsula snapshots boys 9-11 years and gives them excellent training IN A PORT ANGELES leading up to the Boy Scout parking lot, a man using a program, said William lint roller on a woman Hubbell of Seattle, Scout dressed in black . . . area executive. WANTED! “Seen Around” Hubbell said it is items. Send them to PDN News planned to form only the Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles one Cub pack at this time, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or expanding gradually with email news@peninsuladailynews. com. additional units later.

1961 (50 years ago) U.S. Forest Service offi­ cials in Port Angeles said the West Coast sale of logs to Japan has now reached its peak in the Northwest. North Olympic Penin­ sula mill owners have com­ plained that Japanese buy­ ers are forcing up the price of logs. That squeezes the local mills because they cannot buy logs at a low enough price to remain competi­ tive. Paul Orban, owner of Carlsborg Lumber Co., spoke for the small-mill owners by saying his mill will shut down when the current supply of logs is exhausted.

“The Japanese are over­ bidding us,” Orban said. “We are operating now only because we had a good inventory of logs when we started production July 5.”

1986 (25 years ago) A nine-hour operation by Jefferson County sher­ iff’s deputies ended with the capture of a man who escaped Sept. 23 from county jail custody while acting as an agent in an attempted drug purchase outside the jail. Sheriff Lee Smith said the man might be a sus­ pect in three burglaries committed in the past few days. But about the drug deal gone bad: A deputy state

attorney general and the Jefferson County prosecut­ ing attorney said the planned tape recording of the intended transaction was illegal and neither the recording nor the infor­ mant’s testimony would have been allowed in court.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Tuesday’s Daily Game: 5-4-0 Tuesday’s Keno: 04-0512-17-29-32-35-36-37-3941-42-45-52-60-63-65-6870-72 Tuesday’s Match 4: 06-17-21-23 Tuesday’s Mega Millions: 25-34-38-44-56, Mega Ball: 27

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, the 285th day of 2011. There are 80 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Oct. 12, 1492 (according to the Old Style calendar), Christopher Columbus arrived with his expedition in the presentday Bahamas. On this date: ■  In 1810, the German festival Oktoberfest was first held in Munich to celebrate the wedding of Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig and Princess Therese of Saxe-Hild­ burghausen. ■  In 1861, the Confederate ironclad Manassas attacked the northern ship Richmond on the Mississippi River. Both ships were badly damaged but survived the battle.

■  In 1870, Gen. Robert E. Lee died in Lexington, Va., at age 63. ■  In 1915, English nurse Edith Cavell was executed by the Germans in occupied Belgium dur­ ing World War I. ■  In 1933, bank robber John Dillinger escaped from a jail in Allen County, Ohio, with the help of his gang, who killed the sheriff, Jess Sarber. ■  In 1942, during World War II, American naval forces defeated the Japanese in the Battle of Cape Esperance. ■  In 1971, the rock opera “Jesus Christ Superstar” opened at the Mark Hellinger Theatre on Broadway. ■  In 1986, the superpower meeting in Reykjavik, Iceland, ended in stalemate, with President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader

Mikhail S. Gorbachev unable to agree on arms control or a date for a full-fledged summit in the United States. ■  In 2000, 17 sailors were killed in a suicide bomb attack on the destroyer USS Cole in Yemen. ■  In 2002, a bomb blamed on Islamic militants destroyed a nightclub on the Indonesian island of Bali, killing 202 people, many of them foreign tourists. ■  Ten years ago: NBC announced that an assistant to anchorman Tom Brokaw had con­ tracted the skin form of anthrax after opening a “threatening” letter to her boss containing powder. The United Nations and its sec­ retary-general, Kofi Annan, won the Nobel Peace Prize. ■  Five years ago: The United States introduced a draft resolu­

tion in the U.N. Security Council to punish North Korea for its nuclear test. Suspected Shiite militiamen broke into an Iraqi television sta­ tion and gunned down 11 execu­ tives, producers and other staffers. Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk won the Nobel prize in literature. Madonna and Guy Ritchie took custody of David Banda, a 1-yearold boy from Malawi, and received preliminary approval from a judge to adopt him. Italian filmmaker Gillo Pon­ tecorvo (“The Battle of Algiers”) died in Rome at age 86. ■  One year ago: The Obama administration announced it was lifting the six-month moratorium on deep water oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico imposed after the BP oil spill.


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Former governor joins Senate race in Hawaii HONOLULU — Linda Lingle, a former two-term governor of Hawaii, announced Tuesday that she is entering the state’s U.S. Senate race, giving Republicans hope of capturing the seat being vacated by Democrat Daniel Akaka, who is retiring. Lingle, 58, sought to distance herself from GOP leaders in Washington and stressed that she would be an independent voice for Hawaii if elected. “I say I want to be very clear on this point. I don’t work for Mitch McConnell. I don’t work for President Obama. I work for the people of Hawaii,” she told The Associated Press. Lingle was the state’s first female governor and served from 2002-2010. She won with about 62 percent of the vote in her second race. Her victories indicated she can appeal to moderate Democrats, which could be critical in an election cycle that features Obama at the top of the Democratic ticket.

Pot brownies at funeral HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. — Pot-laced brownies served at a Southern California funeral sent three people to the emergency room over the weekend, Huntington Beach police said. Two 71-year-old women and an 82-year-old man were taken to a hospital emergency room Saturday following a friend’s memorial service, where a tray of pot brownies was offered. They complained of nausea,

dizziness and an inability to stand without assistance. The three, residents of Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, didn’t know the marijuana-laced sweets were being offered in memory of their friend, who ate marijuana brownies. Police said the baked goods were put out without any announcement about what was in them. Huntington Beach does not permit licensed medical marijuana dispensaries in the city limits. Federal authorities announced last week they plan to crack down on marijuana sales and growing operations throughout the state.

Shuttle title LOS ANGELES — NASA has transferred ownership of the retired space shuttle Endeavour to a California museum. A ceremony at the California Science Center on Tuesday was attended by several members of Endeavour’s last crew including Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords’ astronaut-husband Mark Kelly. Endeavour is expected to arrive next year at Los Angeles International Airport and then be towed through the streets to the museum near downtown Los Angeles. Museum President Jeffrey Rudolph said Endeavour will be housed in a temporary display until a permanent exhibit is built. NASA retired the space shuttle fleet in July after three decades of flying. Museums in suburban Washington, D.C., Florida and New York will receive the remaining shuttles and prototype vehicle. The Associated Press

U.S. thwarts plot on Saudi, implicates Iran By Nedra Pickler

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration accused Iranian government agents Tuesday of plotting to assassinate the Saudi ambassador in the United States and immediately used the thwarted plot to ratchet up sanctions and recruit international allies to try to further isolate Tehran. Two men, including a member of Iran’s special foreign actions unit known as the Quds Force, were charged in New York federal court with conspiring to kill the Saudi diplomat, Adel Al-Jubeir. Justice Department officials said the men tried to hire a purported member of a Mexican drug cartel to carry out the assassination with a bomb attack while AlJubeir dined at his favorite restaurant. “The idea that they would attempt to go to a Mexican drug cartel to solicit murder-for-hire to kill the Saudi ambassador, nobody

could make that up, right?” Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in an interview with The Associated Press. Clinton was blunt in saying the United States would use the case as leverage with other countries that have been reluctant to apply harsh sanctions or penalties against Iran. “This really, in the minds of many diplomats and government officials, crosses a line that Iran needs to be held to account for,” Clinton said. She said she and President Barack Obama want to “enlist more countries in working together against what is becoming a clearer and clearer threat” from Iran. The U.S. criminal complaint said the Iranian plotters hired a would-be assassin in Mexico who was a paid informant for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and told U.S. authorities all about their plot. FBI Director Robert Mueller said many lives could have been lost.

Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney in Manhattan, said no explosives were actually placed and no one was in any danger because of the informant’s cooperation. At a news conference with Mueller and Bharara, Attorney General Eric Holder was asked whether the plot was blessed by the very top echelons of the Iranian government. Holder said the Justice Department was not making that accusation, but he said the conspiracy was conceived, sponsored and directed from Tehran. The alleged target, Al-Jubeir, is a commoner educated at University of North Texas and Georgetown who was foreign affairs adviser to Saudi King Abdullah when he was crown prince. A month after the 2001 attacks, in which 15 of the 19 Arab hijackers were from Saudi Arabia, Abdullah sent al-Jubeir to the United States to rebuild Saudi Arabia’s image in the United States. He was appointed ambassador in 2007.

Briefly: World Israel, Hamas to trade soldier for prisoners

and the United States both condemned as politically motivated. Tymoshenko, the driving force of the 2004 pro-democracy Orange Revolution and now the nation’s top opposition leader, JERUSALEM — In a much- denounced the trial as rigged by President Viktor Yanukovych to anticipated prisoner exchange get rid of a political opponent. that could have broad implicaTymoshenko, 50, appeared tions, Israel and Hamas on unfazed by the verdict and Tuesday announced that an Israeli soldier abducted to Gaza began addressing reporters in five years ago would be swapped the courtroom without waiting for the judge to finish reading for about 1,000 Palestinians the lengthy ruling. held by Israel and accused of militant activity. Israel’s government approved Egypt anger grows the deal early today following a CAIRO — Videos of military three-hour debate after both armored vehicles plowing Israeli Prime Minister Benjathrough Christian protesters min Netanyahu and Hamas and images of their flattened leader Khaled Mashaal bodies are fueling rage against announced the agreement in the ruling army generals, even televised comments. beyond Egypt’s Christian comNetanyahu said the captured munity. soldier, Sgt. Gilad Schalit, would Activists accused the military return home within days. of fomenting sectarian hatred as Mashaal said the Palestinian a way to end protests and halt prisoners would be freed in two criticism. stages over two months. Anger was also turning on The deal maintains a state television, blamed for incitdecades-long tradition of loping attacks on Coptic Christians sided exchanges that have come as the military crushed a Chrisunder increasing criticism in tian protest late Sunday, leaving Israel — and ends a period of 26 dead in the worst violence tortured indecision by Israeli since the February fall of Hosni governments torn between Mubarak. securing the release of a single The bloodshed was seen by soldier and the risk that freed many activists as a turning point militants might return to vioin Egypt’s already chaotic transilence that could cost many more tion: the deadliest use of force lives. against protesters by the military, which has touted itself as Ex-Ukraine P.M. guilty the “protector of the revolution.” Criticism has been mounting KIEV, Ukraine — Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia that the military, which took power after Mubarak’s ouster, Tymoshenko was sentenced to has adopted the same tactics as seven years in prison Tuesday on charges of abuse of office in the former regime and has been signing a gas deal with Russia, slow to bring real change. a verdict the European Union The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney laughs as Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, makes a point during the Republican presidential debate Tuesday night.

Obama economic policies mostly hammered at debate The Associated Press

HANOVER, N.H. — Presidential candidate Mitt Romney took some less staunchly conservative stands than his rivals in their debate Tuesday night, declaring he can work with “good” Democrats and positioning himself closer to the center in line with his claim that he can draw crucial independent voters in next year’s general election. He even defended portions of the Wall Street bailout, a particular sore point with many conservative voters who will play an important role in choosing the Republican nominee next winter and spring. But the former Massachusetts governor joined the others in sharply criticizing numerous aspects of President Barack Obama’s economic policies. Romney said no one likes the idea of bailing out big Wall Street firms. However, he said, many of the actions taken in 2008 and 2009 were needed to keep the dollar’s value from plummeting and “to make sure that we didn’t all lose our jobs.”

Quick Read

ALSO . . . ■ The Senate kills President Obama’s jobs bill/B4

Romney also said he would work with “good” Democrats to lead the country out of economic crisis. He said that’s what he did as Massachusetts governor and what he would do if he wins the White House.

Christi endorsement Hours before the candidates met in Hanover, Romney picked up New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie’s endorsement, which he hopes will help cement his support among the GOP establishment and nurture an image that he’s the party’s inevitable nominee. In the debate, sponsored by Bloomberg News and The Washington Post, Texas Gov. Rick Perry said the government must open the way for more production of domestic energy sources. The nation must “pull back those regulations that are strangling American entrepreneurship,” Perry said.

Former pizza company executive Herman Cain repeated his call for replacing the U.S. tax code with a 9 percent national sales tax and a 9 percent levy on personal and corporate income. Many of Cain’s rivals went after his “9-9-9” tax plan — both seriously and in jest. “I thought it was the price of a pizza when I first heard it,” former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman joked. Given a chance to assail Wall Street, Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann blamed too much regulation. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich blamed Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke for the recession. “If they [Americans] want to really change things, the first person to fire is Bernanke, who is a disastrous chairman of the Federal Reserve,” Gingrich said. “The second person to fire is [Treasury Secretary Timothy ] Geithner.” Also criticizing aspects of Obama’s administration were Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania and Huntsman

. . . more news to start your day

West: Fish and Wildlife names boss in Nevada

World: Canada moves to ground attendants’ strike

World: Containers fall off ship stuck in New Zealand

World: Number of people with TB falls for first time

A FEDERAL WILDLIFE official with expertise in the threatened bull trout has been named the new Nevada state director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Edward “Ted” Koch has 23 years of experience with the agency, most recently as bull trout coordinator in Boise, Idaho. Federal protection of the fish in northeast Nevada’s Jarbidge River has been a source of controversy for more than a decade. Koch also has worked as the agency’s assistant budget director for the Southwest region and as an assistant to the national director.

CANADA’S CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT moved Tuesday to prevent a strike Thursday by 7,000 Air Canada flight attendants by sending the matter to the Canada Industrial Relations Board for review. “While the matter is before the CIRB, there cannot be a work stoppage,” Labor Minister Lisa Raitt said. Her comments come after the union rejected a second tentative agreement supported by union leaders. The referral buys the government time as it looks to pass back-to-work legislation. Parliament resumes sitting next week.

THE CONDITION OF a stricken cargo ship stuck on a reef and leaking oil off the coast of New Zealand worsened today, with about 70 containers falling overboard and the vessel moving onto a steeper lean. Meanwhile, the captain of the Liberian-flagged Rena was arrested and charged under New Zealand’s Maritime Act. He could face a year in prison if convicted. The ship has been foundering since it ran aground Oct. 5 on the Astrolabe Reef, about 14 miles from Tauranga Harbour on New Zealand’s North Island.

THE NUMBER OF people with tuberculosis has fallen for the first time, the World Health Organization said. In a report issued Tuesday, WHO estimated 8.8 million people fell ill last year, dropping from a peak of about 9 million in 2005. The small decline in reported cases is partly due to increased availability of medical treatment for TB, WHO said. The U.N. health agency also said estimates are now more accurate because countries have better surveillance of tuberculosis patients. Fewer people are now dying from the disease, though a third of cases worldwide are probably not reported.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Council OKs policy for future funding Health, human services to be affected in Sequim By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The City Council in a 4-3 vote created a policy to be used beginning next year for the often-debated distribution of city funding for health and human services such as the Dungeness Valley Health Clinic, the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula and the Sequim Senior Activity Center. The policy for funding decisions beginning in 2012 — approved with Sequim City Council members Ted Miller, Susan Lorenzen and Erik Erichsen voting against it Monday night — includes three-year contracts for designated amounts to each nonprofit social and health service organization the council chose to fund from what it budgets. Those contracts are intended to designate how the city expects funding to be used. Under the newly adopted health and human services funding policy, the council

health care, youth and senior activities, early learning for children, endof-life support and prevention of domestic violence and abuse. “A community that is unhealthy and has issues is a burden on the community,” Hays said.

until 2014 will designate 30 percent of its budgeted funding for the Dungeness Vall­ey Health & Wellness Clinic for indigent medical and dental care, 15 percent for Healthy Families of Clallam County, 25 percent to the Boys & Girls Clubs, 7 percent for the senior center, 7 percent for Parenting Matters, 7 percent for Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County and 7 percent for Serenity House of Clallam County.

Objections

health and human services charitable giving from the city. That included $12,500 for the club’s teen program, a dramatic reduction in city health and human services funding for the club, which was $60,000 for each of the past two years. Jerry Sinn, the Boys & Girls Clubs’ board president, said the council’s decision was unexpected in light of the fact that city allocated the club $60,000 in each of the past two years and $100,000 in 2008. Other organizations and their city funding amounts approved were Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness

Miller, who moved to increase the amount for the senior center, said he objected to 25 percent of the funding going to the Boys & Girls Clubs while the senior center received only 7 percent, calling it disproportionate for a community dominated by seniors. Miller’s motion failed 4-3 Three-year contract with Hays, Dubois, HuizMayor Ken Hays, who inga and Don Hall voting with Mayor Pro Tem Laura against it. Dubois came up with a recMiller also called for ommendation for the coun- amending the contract to cil with the help of City two years instead of three, Manager Steve Burkett and but his motion died for lack City Attorney Craig Ritchie, of a second. said he believes the threeErichsen also said he year contract “provides sta- thought the amounts for bility in the community” seniors and youths were through guaranteed chari- disproportionate, and table funding. Lorenzen agreed that The policy says that the youths were getting more By Rob Ollikainen city designates health and funding than seniors. human services funding to The council approved in Peninsula Daily News benefit those needing medi- September for the coming PORT ANGELES — A cal care, dental care, mental year a total of $70,000 in dog that has been declared potentially dangerous in Clallam County would be eligible to be taken off the list after two years of good (Lunch OnLy) behavior and a satisfactory hOrt unch case review under a prowith any Entrée reak posed code amendment. County Commissioners n a urry See our top 10 Mike Chapman and Mike items listed for Doherty voted Tuesday to quick service table the proposal to reLunch Mon-Fri examine the liability issues and to give Commissioner or call and order ahead! Open at 11:30 am Steve Tharinger a chance to 1527 E. 1st, PA • 360-457-4113 Dinner 4-9 review the public testimony from a public hearing held that day. Fall harvest decorations Tharinger is working as both a county commissioner • Pumpkins • Gourds and a 24th District repre• Ghost pumpkins 261461 HWY. 101 WEST sentative in the state House SEQUIM (360) 683-8003 • Mini pumpkins of Representatives. He was EVERY DAY 8 A.M. - 8 P.M. • Corn stalks absent from the county ALL PRICES EFFECTIVE 10/12/11 through 10/18/11. meeting because he was MEDIUM attending to legislative F O SIZE R duties in Olympia, Chapman said. Tharinger announced last spring that he will not LB. seek a fourth term on the county board when his term LB. expires in December. Undersheriff Ron Perep cris grin said the Clallam net! LB. swe County Animal Issues Advisory Committee and Animal Control Deputy Tracey LB. Kellas have worked on the Mayan Jumbo proposal for more than a year. LB. LB. The Animal Issues Advisory Board recommended the changes unanimously, LB. Kellas said. Banana Butternut Chief Deputy ProsecutCUT ing Attorney Mark Nichols LB. LB. has vetted the ordinance and approved it.

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“A ‘potentially dangerous dog’ is casting a fairly wide net over an animal, for example, a 6-monthold Labrador puppy chasing chickens would receive a potentially dangerous dog classification.”

Ron Peregrin undersheriff

Failure to abide by the restrictions could result in the confiscation of the dog. “It is a case-by-case assessment of what this dog has done,” Kellas said. “It is not an automatic after 24 months these [potentially dangerous] dogs are declared inactive. They have to make a written appeal. We go over the case history.”

Opposes changes Corby Somerville of East Clallam County told ­commissioners that the proposed ordinance should be rejected. He said the licensing and restraint requirements in the existing ordinance are intended to control human behavior — not animal behavior — and require dog owners to provide adequate restraint for potentially dangerous animals. “A 24-month period during which a potentially dangerous dog has had no violations only proves that the legally required restraint of a potentially dangerous dog has been effective in controlling the risk to others,” Somerville said. “It does not prove that the dog is no longer dangerous, nor does it prove that the dog has had any change to its behavior or temperament,” Somerville said. “The behavior of a potentially dangerous dog can be entirely unpredictable and be influenced by unpredictable situations or events.” Somerville said the code should require the original complainant to be notified when the dog is declassified as potentially dangerous. Somerville raised the same concerns in a May 31 public hearing on the same proposal. Commissioners at that time sent the ordinance back to the Animal Issues Advisory Committee for review. “I’m comfortable with the work that’s been done,” Chapman said. “I think a number of issues were addressed since the last public hearing.” Doherty, who took part in the meeting by speakerphone, said Tharinger should have a chance to weigh in before the board takes action. The earliest that a decision will be made is Monday, Oct. 24. The draft ordinance is available at www.clallam. net/bocc/drafts.html.

________

Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews.com.

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“What this regulation provides is some flexibility for changing circumstances simply because each and every one of these events has their own set of circumstances that need to be examined and a decision made by our animal control deputy with some flexibility to give the animal and the owner some relief if it really isn’t dangerous,” Peregrin said. “It doesn’t actually remove the designation; it relaxes the restrictions. And that’s not going to be relaxed unless our animal control deputy is confident that that animal is not a dangerous anymore,” Peregrin added. A dangerous dog is one that has inflicted severe injury on a person or domesticated animal. The owner of a dangerous dog must keep the dog in an enclosed space, keep it muzzled, get liability insurance and pay the fee.

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“What they’ve done is eliminated the ambiguities that previously existed between dangerous dogs and potentially dangerous dogs,” Peregrin said. “A ‘potentially dangerous dog’ is casting a fairly wide net over an animal, for example, a 6-month-old Labrador puppy chasing chickens would receive a potentially dangerous dog classification,” he said. The owner of a potentially dangerous dog must pay a $150 licensing fee and restrain the dog. Declassification would free the owner of the restraint requirement and the fee. Under the current ordinance, the potentially dangerous label would last until the dog was too blind to see or too lame to walk, Peregrin said.

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dollars were needed for youths because there were fewer organized activities for youths in Sequim compared with mature members of the community, such as at the senior center and elsewhere. Huizinga, who had some early reservations about choices made for funding, walked away happy MonAdministrative fee day night. “I think it’s a really good United Way of Clallam compromise . . . I think this County, which recomm­ will work,” Huizinga said. ended the funding amounts ________ after the City Council asked for the agency’s advice, also Sequim-Dungeness Valley Edicharged a $1,000 adminis- tor Jeff Chew can be reached at trative fee. 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ Dubois said she felt more peninsuladailynews.com. Clinic, $15,000; Sequim Senior Activity Center, $10,000; Healthy Families of Clallam County, $9,000; Olympic Community Action Programs, $5,000; Parenting Matters Foundation, $5,000; Peninsula Community Mental Health Center, $7,500; and Volunteer Chore Services, $5,000.

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(C) — Wednesday, October 12, 2011

A5

Seattle mayor ‘patient’ with protesters The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn said he’s being patient with the Occupy Seattle protesters camping out for a second week in downtown Westlake Park. In a statement Tuesday, he said he’s supporting free speech while working to bring the group into compliance with city rules. McGinn is asking the group to move to City Hall, which can support protest campers.

Occupy Seattle issued its own statement Tuesday saying it will stage a march Saturday in coordination with the Occupy Wall Street protest against corporate power.

“Dktr” Sus Shawhan sits at an “Occupy Seattle” information table as protesters set up again for the day after dismantling for a morning cleaning of Westlake Park on Tuesday morning.

Tired, soggy About four dozen protesters were tired and soggy Tuesday morning after cold, rainy night. They put their bags and belongings on benches for the morning cleaning by park workers.

The Associated Press

Schools: Transportation, police costs discussed Continued from A1 with higher enrollment. The School Board also Running Start is a pro- approved in a 5-0 vote a gram in which high renewal of a bus-housing school students attend contract that will cost the classes at the college for district more but which in dual high school and college the end was found to be the credits, either part or full cheapest option. time, and the North Olympic Skills Center is a techni- Bus contract cal education high school Since 1996, the school level-program that includes district has contracted with students from five school Clallam Transit to house districts. buses serving west Port Angeles and Lower Elwha Task force Klallam Reservation stuA task force has been dents at the transit discreated to study how to trict’s bus barn at 830 W. reorganize the district to Lauridsen Blvd. This year, Clallam Tranhandle the loss of students sit asked the district for an and funds. The loss of students additional $50 per month to drops most Port Angeles rent the space, increasing elementary schools’ enroll- the space rental to $800 per ment levels below the month, said Karen Ross, state’s standard of 400 stu- district transportation dents. supervisor. Elementary schools The increase triggered with fewer than 400 stu- an investigation into the dents are funded at a cost of moving the west-end lower rate than schools buses to the school’s bus

The transportation department also received the donation of a $3,500 vehicle diagnostic unit from Rusty’s Foreign Auto, Ross said.

Enrollment changes HERE ARE THE changes in enrollment from September to October in the Port Angeles School District. Full-time enrollment, or FTE, represents how many full-time students attend classes. Kindergartners who attend half-day programs are counted as a half-student, as are high school students who attend school part time. ■  Elementary school enrollment declined from 1,718 to 1,717 FTE. ■  Middle school enrollment increased from 607 to 610 FTE. ■  High school enrollment increased from 1,180 to 1189 FTE. ■  Skills center enrollment increased from 122 to 152 FTE. ■  Running Start enrollment increased from zero to 33 FTE. Peninsula Daily News barn at 627 Monroe Road. When the cost of fuel, maintenance miles and driver hours were factored in, moving the buses back to Monroe Road would cost

Resource officer salary

the district $25,000, Ross said. The School Board approved renewing the contract with Clallam Transit with the added rent.

resource officer. Kuch said he has responded to more than 100 calls to schools each year since he took the position in 2006. While in the schools, Kuch gets to know the faculty, the students and the cultures in each school, he said. Kuch also provides educational programs and is often approached by students who want to report a crime. Some of the crimes that have been reported have been serious offenses, he said. “It’s good to be proactive instead of reactive,” said board member Cindy Kelly. The board did not make a decision Monday and will consider the request during the budget process.

The school district also received a formal request from the Port Angeles Police Department to share a portion of the school resource officer’s salary. There has been a discussion every year for the past several years, but this is the first time the district has received a formal request, schools superintendent Jane Pryne said. The amount of the district’s proposed contribution was not discussed. School resource officers are primarily based in the schools during the ________ school year, responding to calls at those schools and Reporter Arwyn Rice can be serving as police ambassa- reached at 360-417-3535 or at dors to the students, arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. said Tom Kuch, school com.

Parolees: Supervision cuts, elimination possible

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“We’re not willing to create a safety problem for [prison] guards, but you have to cut something,” Hunter said, adding that cutting community supervision is “certainly a concern, but it’s not personally my biggest concern.” “I would be more concerned about cuts to our higher-ed system and to our mental health system,” he said.

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It’s just really frightening,” said Tracey Thompson, secretary of Teamsters Local 117, which represents about 5,500 Corrections officers who work inside the prisons. House Ways and Means Chairman Ross Hunter, D-Medina, said lawmakers plan to review all 5 percent and 10 percent scenarios so they can “put things out on the table.”

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der, kidnapping, assault and other violent crimes also no longer would be supervised upon release. In addition to not having a probation officer with whom to check in, inmates being released would not have help finding services such as housing and treatment for mental health and substance abuse. Felons who would remain on community supervision would be drug and sex offenders courtordered to serve a reduced sentence, which includes a combination of incarceration and treatment. Felons ordered to serve probation for out-of-state crimes also would remain on supervision. “You’re talking about releasing inmates early, without any supervision.

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the amount of time felons are imprisoned for violating terms of their probation, DOC officials said. Tim Welch, a spokesman for the Washington Federation of State Employees, which represents about 40,000 state workers, warned that the cuts to community corrections could endanger the public. “We view it as wiping out community supervision, and that’s going to harm public safety,” Welch said. “It’s a neutron bomb against public safety.” Welch, whose union represents about 1,200 community Corrections employees, said the union supports several options to achieve cost savings, including the possibility of putting a proposal before voters to raise taxes. If the 10 percent proposal is approved, most sex offenders not still in prison, including those supervised by GPS tracking bracelets, no longer would be supervised. Felons convicted of mur-

1A5136424

Continued from A1 three years by closing three prisons and slashing 1,200 “We’re certainly hearing jobs. that the funding for almost $200 million for a new Parole division cuts prison is in jeopardy,” Corr­ The deepest cut disections Secretary Bernie cussed by DOC would be to Warner said. the agency’s community The state, which is look- corrections, or parole, diviing to cut nearly $2 billion sion. from the budget this bienUnder the worst-case nium, has asked nearly all scenario of a 10 percent cut, major state agencies to sub- 12,000 convicts could be mit budget plans reflecting released from community both 5 percent and 10 per- supervision, a move that cent across-the-board cuts. would save the state about DOC’s budget for the $92 million over 18 months. current biennium, which It also would require layends in June 2013, is ing off 510 DOC community $1.6 billion. corrections officers and supHoping to head off some port staff, Corrections proposed cuts, Corrections spokesman Chad Lewis officials are making budget said. trims in advance of the speUnder the 5 percent scecial session. nario, DOC has proposed The department already reducing the average length has cut $250 million from of community supervision its budget over the past from 16 months to six months. Corrections officials estimate the move would save almost $45 million over 18 months. The 5 percent scenario Continued from A1 would result in the loss of A 2,000-yard safety zone 260 jobs and a reduction in also was cleared around the barge before Navy explosives experts determined that the explosives were secure and safe, said Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer A sprightly little market Robert K. Lanier. unlike any you’ve seen Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians Ten Reasons from Anacortes, along with a Sector Puget Sound to Shop at inspector, conducted a McPhee’s Grocery safety assessment onboard the St. Elias. 1. Our diet tea comes in pretty Once the vessel was little green boxes. $2.99 refloated, the safety zone 2. Our Wonder Bread comes in a was lifted, and Rosario pretty white bag-thing. $2.09 Strait was opened to all 3. Our potatoes come in a skin traffic. kind-of-thing. Divers who inspected 4. Our Pepsi Cola comes in a the barge found a 10-foot can whatchamacallit. 59¢ square hole on the forward 5. Our plantain chips ($2.99) are starboard side of the vessel. lightly salted, but our kosher The barge was not taksalt ($3.19) isn’t. It’s heavily ing on water, no pollutants salted. had leaked, and the hole did not threaten the vessel’s 6. We sell different flours, but don’t sell different flowers. stability, Lanier said. 7. Our peanut butter selection The cause of the incident runs the full gamut from A to B. is under investigation, 8. Is a special day coming up Lanier said. for a loved one? Get her a The St. Elias is owned necklace! (35¢) Ages 4 and and operated by Samson Older. Candy Tug and Barge of Sitka, 9. We sell candy bars–from Alaska. Abba-Zabas to Zagnuts. 90¢ Other cargo on the barge 10. Buying cookies here exhibits included produce, fish and maturity. Buying cookies automobiles, Lanier said. elsewhere exposes a sugar


A6

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Prevention plan for kids benefits told PORT ANGELES — State Sen. Jim Hargrove will present his findings on how investments in prevention programs have saved money for state taxpayers Thursday. The Democrat from Hoquiam will talk at the public launch of the FiveYear Prevention Plan for

Clallam County, planned from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Clallam County commissioners’ meeting room in the county courthouse at 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. The prevention plan was created by a broad selection of local interests including law enforcement, mental health providers, schools, court interests, medical interests, nonprofit agencies and volunteers. Five areas of improvement have been targeted: ■  Increase parent supp­ ort for families with children

from the prenatal period through 6 years of age. ■  Promote academic success in youths. ■  Identify children with social, emotional and behavioral problems in order to provide them and their parents, teachers and caretakers with support. ■  Reduce violent and aggressive behavior by children and adolescents. ■  Increase availability and access to local prevention and treatment resource information to all Clallam County residents.

Hargrove represents the 24th District, which covers Clallam and Jefferson counties and a portion of Grays Harbor County. For more information, phone 360-457-0151.

Occupy events set A carpool manned by the Clallam County MoveOn council to the marathon Occupy Seattle protest is planned Thursday. Those interested in traveling from Clallam County to Seattle’s Westlake Park

Death and Memorial Notice MARIAN MCEWAN FISKEN BYSE February 26, 1946 September 11, 2011 Marian McEwan Fisken Byse of Port Angeles died in a bicycle accident on state Highway 112 on September 11, 2011. She was 65 and doing one of the things she loved to do: pedal her bike out in the country between her home west of Port Angeles and the YMCA. Marian would go to the Y, do some weight training and then bicycle home to work in her garden on the bluff overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca. She was devoted to growing vegetables and flowers and loved to share her harvest with all of her friends, many of whom she met while teaching the Active Older Adults class at the Y. Over the past many years, she connected with all kinds of people at the Y, from the AOA students, who nicknamed her “Sarge,” to the rest of her “fitness friends” around the gym. Marian was born in Longview, Washington, on February 26, 1946, grew up in Tacoma, Washington, and went to the Bush

Mrs. Byse School in Seattle. She attended Scripps College in Claremont, California, where she played tennis every chance she got. Marian transferred to the University of Washington, where she studied German until her graduation in 1970. While a graduate student in anthropology at Washington State University, she went to work on the Ozette archeological dig at Cape Alava where, in 1974, she met the man who would become her husband. Marian and James Byse married on March 29, 1980, and honeymooned on Stubbs Island

off Tofino, British Columbia. The couple returned there many times in their 31 years of marriage. Marian planted gardens everywhere she and Jim lived: on a flat bank near the beach at Cape Alava, in Clallam Bay and then in Port Angeles, each time where people told her nothing would grow. She loved picking all those fresh, delicious vegetables. Marian also loved to run, in marathons and in other races including the Rhody Run, the Chimacum Chall­enge, the Sequim Run-Off, the Seattle Marathon and the Victoria Marathon. She was race director for the Derby Days run in Port Angeles and volunteered at lots of events over the years, from the North Olympic Discovery Marathon to the Port Angeles Senior Games. What was important to Marian was to encourage people to do their best. She liked to see people chall­enge themselves and grow fitter because she knew how fitness meant a high-quality life. Marian had her own chall­enges, including back and leg pain, but when she was on her bicycle,

that pain was gone. She did the Chilly Hilly bike ride on Bainbridge Island, the Seattle-to-Portland, Oregon, ride, and many others, all the while encouraging other cyclists of all levels to seek their best. When a woman friend from the YMCA told Marian she didn’t think she would ever make it over a particularly steep hill, Marian told her: “Pedal up to that place where you can’t go any farther and take one more pedal past it. Keep doing that, and if you give up, I’ll come after you.” In February 2010, Marian suffered many serious injuries in a bicycle accident and chose to go home, not to a facility, for her rehabilitation. She stuck to a weight-training regimen at the Y, and when the Y was closed, she worked out at Fitness West in Port Angeles. She got back into shape and got back on her bicycle for many long rides. With her smile and lighthearted greetings and with her obvious pleasure in being active in her garden, on her bike or in her classes at the Y, Marian showed us how to enjoy life.

for the ongoing urban rally, one of many across the nation in support of the Occupy Wall Street protest in New York City, can phone Sam Woods at 360-683-1954. Occupy Wall Street will come to Port Townsend on Friday, when the Jefferson and Clallam counties’ MoveOn councils will organize a rally for “Jobs/Not Cuts” from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the triangle in front of JPMorgan Chase Bank, at Kearney Street and Sims Way. That will be followed Sunday by a carpool from Port Townsend to Seattle. To carpool, phone Mark Stevenson at 360-385-9037. For more information about Friday’s rally in Port Townsend, phone Carol Gallup at 360-379-4795. To sign up for the rally, visit www.moveon.org.

February 3, 1920 October 4, 2011 Jannett McIlroy passed away at home October 4, 2011, of natural causes with her family by her side. There will be a memorial service Friday, October 14, at 3 p.m. at Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel, 108 West Alder Street, with a celebration of life following at El Cazador restaurant, 531 West Washington Street, Sequim. As everyone knew, Jan loved the color red, and the family is asking to please wear a bit of red in honor of her. Jan was born February 3, 1920, in Valdez, Alaska, to Randal and Katheryn Ashby. Jan had two older brothers, George and Harve. She had a wonderful childhood, growing up in a small town. One of her fondest memories was her first plane ride when she was 13 with the thenunknown pilot Bob Reeve. Jan attended the University of Nevada and University of Washington. During the summer of 1939, she met the new fellow in town, William (Bill) McIlroy. They were married December 14, 1941, and soon moved to Bill’s hometown of Victoria. Jan stayed there, and Bill joined the Canadian navy. In 1944, Jan returned

Mrs. McIlroy to Valdez and worked in the family grocery store until Bill returned after the war. She then stayed home and raised their two children. In 1956, the family moved to Anchorage, Alaska, and Jan was active in the Providence Hospital Auxiliary, Spenard Lionesses and worked for the city of Anchorage’s Traffic Department. While living in Anchorage, the family enjoyed weekends at their cabin on Big Lake. They returned to Valdez in 1962, and Jan was appointed deputy magistrate. After the earthquake in 1964, in which they lost their home and business, they moved to Juneau, Alaska. In Juneau, Jan worked for the Department of Health and Welfare and

the Department of Labor until she retired in 1983. Jan and Bill both enjoyed their weekends boating with friends and spending vacations at their cabin in Atlin, British Columbia. In Juneau, Jan was active with the Pioneers of Alaska, PEO and the Juneau Yacht Club. After Bill’s retirement in 1986, they moved to Sequim, where Jan kept her involvement with PEO and was active with the local nonprofit hospice organization. They continued spending time at their Atlin property and spent many enjoyable summers there with friends and family. Bill and Jan enjoyed traveling. They made several trips to England and Ireland and countless trips over the Alcan Highway. Even though her heart was always in Alaska and anyone that met her knew she was an Alaskan within five minutes, she decided to stay in Sequim after Bill’s passing in 1995. Jan had a full life, many friends and an unforgettable voice and laugh. Jan and several friends spent Thursday afternoons together reading and writing their memoirs, which were not to be shared with their loved ones until they were gone. These were their memories as they wanted to remember them, not as the family remembered them.

Paving today PORT ANGELES — Only one lane will be open on Ennis Street between Fourth and Fifth streets today. The section of the street will be paved, said Teresa Pierce, city spokeswoman.

Halloween display

YAKIMA — A gruesome Halloween display has returned to a home in Yakima. Board conference KAPP reported that PORT ANGELES — some neighbors are horriOlympic Medical Center fied. commissioners are attending This is the second year a conference in Seattle. Justin Tabert has hung an Commissioners are at the array of headless or bloody Washington State Hospital dolls from a tree, known as Association 79th annual the “naughty tree.” meeting held at the Bell Peninsula Daily News Harbor International Conand The Associated Press

Death and Memorial Notice ROBERTA BELLE GERTLAR November 13, 1931 September 15, 2011 Roberta Belle Gertlar, 79, a longtime resident of Sequim, went home to her savior on September 15, 2011. She was born on November 13, 1931, in Seattle to Robert and Ruth (Bena) Denend. The family moved to Sequim, where Roberta attended high school. In 1949, Roberta married Eugene L. Shaughnessy. Together, they had two daughters, Terry Lynne England and Constance Joann Knox. Mom moved to Spokane in 1979, where she met Howard E. Gertlar. They were married in 1983, and together, they moved back to Sequim in 1988. Mom enjoyed numerous activities including square dancing, sewing, cooking, reading, boating and birdwatching with her friends Lynn and Joan. She had a fervent love for flowers, her beloved dog, HoMay, and her Dungeness Community Church family. Roberta is preceded in death by her parents and her beloved husband, Howard. She is survived by her two daughters; four stepdaughters, Betty Harmon (Dave), Darlene James (David), Nancy Gertlar (Larry) and Dianna Peckham (Gill); 10 grandchil-

Death and Memorial Notice JANNETT MCILROY

ference Center. The conference, “Building a Will to Lead Together with Vision, Courage and Heart,” began Monday and will extend through Thursday. Commissioners Jim Cammack, Dr. John Miles, Jean Hordyk, Jim Leskinovitch and Arlene Engel are attending. No formal action will be taken.

She was a wonderful woman who never met a stranger. She was kind and generous and had an unstoppable sense of humor. Her wit and humor were with her until the last. She will be remembered fondly by all who knew her. The family would like to thank Rainshadow Home Health for its services the past few years, as well as a special thanks to her longtime friend Josie Carroll and the employees of The Fifth Avenue retirement apartments. She was preceded in death by her son, Mike; husband Bill; and brothers George and Harve. She is survived by daughter and son-in-law Pat and Jim Miller of Palmer, Alaska; granddaughter Bebhinn McIlroyHawley of Lompoc, California; and great-grandchildren Christopher ­McIlroy, Darby and Sage McIlroy-Hawley; and several nieces and nephews. The family asks that in lieu of flowers, please donate to the Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County at 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or to your local nonprofit volunteer hospice organization. Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel was entrusted with the arrangements. Visit www.sequimvalleychapel. com if you wish to leave a guestbook message.

Mrs. Gertlar dren; three great-grandchildren; sisters Rosalie and Marian; and several cousins, nieces and nephews. Interment will be at Mount Tahoma National Cemetery, 18600 Southeast 240th Street in Covington, Washington, on Friday, October 28, 2011, at 1 p.m. A celebration of her life will be at Dungeness Community Church, 45 Eberle Lane in Sequim, on Saturday, October 29, 2011, at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. We, her family, are forever grateful to her medical team and all of her faithful friends at Dungeness Community Church. Mom loved her family, friends, church and heavenly father with an undying love. She is missed immeasurably and loved beyond description.

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

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obituary will be published Don R. Young later. Olympic Cremation April 2, 1934 — Oct. 10, 2011 April 3, 1921 — Oct. 10, 2011 Association, Port Angeles, is Port Angeles resident Orman “O.W.” Bieber, 90, in charge of arrangements. Don R. Young, 77, died of died in Port Angeles. His natural causes in Port obituary will be published Angeles. His obituary will later. Drennan-Ford Funeral Bobby Joe Wilburg be published later. Home, Port Angeles, is in Sept. 18, 1939 — Oct. 9, 2011 Services: Private. Drencharge of arrangements. nan-Ford Funeral Home, Bobby Joe Wilburg died www.drennanford.com in Port Angeles of cardio­ Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. respiratory arrest at 72. Ruth E. Goin www.drennanford.com Services: None. DrenAug. 5, 1927 — Oct. 10, 2011 nan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles resident Port Angeles, is in charge of Obituaries appear at Ruth E. Goin died in arrangements. peninsuladailynews.com www.drennanford.com Sequim. She was 84. Her

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A7

Where there’s firewood, there’s heat THERE WAS a sprinkling of fresh snow the other day on Mount Pat Olympus. Neal It’s a sign, of course, that winter is on its way. The great flights of geese and sandhill cranes heading south are another sign that winter is coming. Their departure also causes questions to be asked — for instance, if the birds are leaving, why are we staying here, to endure yet another winter in a frozen rain forest? This winter may not be as hard as the last. This initial forecast is based on the number of spider webs

and may require further research. For that, we’ll have to measure the fat on a big buck’s back. Skinning a buck to predict the weather is a long-lost art that is misunderstood by many, including the game warden, so it we’ll have to wait for deer season to open to collect more data. If I had to bet on it, though, I’d say this winter will be cold and wet and dark. You may need a big pile of wood to get through until spring. There are few things I enjoy more than cutting firewood, especially if I don’t have any. In a perfect world, we would all cut our wood in the spring so it would have time to dry in the summer to burn in the fall. Unfortunately, this is not a perfect world. I blame the government. They would rather let our public timber rot in the woods than let taxpayers salvage some

downed trees to heat their homes. Toughest thing about getting firewood these days is finding someplace to cut it. Whoever said cutting firewood warms you twice — once in the cutting and once in the burning — was a real greenhorn. Cutting firewood warms you in more ways than you can shake a stick at. First, you must start your chain saw, if you have one. Those of us who have tried to cut a winter’s worth of wood with a hand saw quickly find out why they are called misery whips. Starting a chain saw can be plenty miserable, too. There’s nothing like jerking a pull cord on a chain saw to warm you up. After five or 10 minutes, you may want to check for fuel. Got gas? Then you may have to get creative.

Peninsula Voices

Take out the spark plug and give it a few pulls. Put the spark plug back in. Continue pulling. Drag the saw back to the road. Tangle in a mess of blackberry vines. Step into a mountain beaver hole and go down in a pile of limbs, then land where a hidden stump catches you in the unmentionables. You should be plenty warm by now. This is before you have cut even a single stick of firewood. It’s once you get your chain saw started that the real fun starts. With a good sharp, chain pulling into the wood, the sawdust pours out of the log like water from a hose. The smell of the pitch, the roar of the saw and the ache in the lower back takes me back to

Our readers’ letters, faxes

________

Pat Neal is a fishing guide and “wilderness gossip columnist.” Neal can be reached at 360683-9867 or email at patneal wildlife@yahoo.com. Neal’s column appears here every Wednesday.

and email

Systems broken

it like it is. He points out that there It is time for Americans isn’t going to be any sound to awaken to the reality recovery of a traditional that our political system is capitalist market economy. broken, our economic sysA system whose health tem is broken and our depends on open-ended “leaders,” by and large, haven’t a clue as to what to “growth” on a finite planet do about Humpty Dumpty. is doomed. Back in 1973, a think Our country crawls with tank called Club of Rome Ph.D.s in economics and published a book titled business administration, most of whom in the 1980s Limits to Growth, which and ’90s were preaching the elicited howls of denial gospel of “free markets” as a from conservatives and most liberals, since it cure for capitalism’s ills. spelled the coming end of With Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan business as usual. While Woolf has an ecoleading the drive to slash nomic reorganization in government regulations mind that he thinks would and turn the public be workable in the modern chicken-house over to the world, he is well aware foxes of predatory capitalthat the sweeping societal ism (subprime mortgages, changes implied won’t even derivatives, hedge funds, be discussed until the curetc., ad nauseam), the rent economic crunch resulting bubble, which becomes unbearable. mostly benefitted the Wayne Ostlund, already rich, brought on Port Angeles the near economic meltdown that won’t go away. Tribal fishing Finally, an establishIn my opinion you can ment economist with remove as many dams as impeccable credentials, you want or rebuild as Richard Woolf of the Unimany rivers as you wish, versity of Pennsylvania’s but truth is, until you get famed Wharton School of the tribal nets out of the Business, has written a book titled Capitalism Hits bays and rivers, you are never going to have any the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What salmon. Since the Boldt ruling, to Do About It, which tells

an earlier, simpler time when loggers ruled the Earth. Splitting, loading, unloading and stacking the wood to dry allows you to become intimately familiar with each piece until you could almost name them all. These are often bad names, given after you bark your shin or smash your toe. Toughen up. Cutting firewood is a contact sport. It is all worthwhile at the end of the day when you have your first chimney fire. That is yet another one of the many ways that firewood can warm you.

School districts It seems lately that the state’s answer to tight budgets is cutting the pay of already financially stressed workers, teachers, police and such. Education has seen severe cuts in staffing, pay, and benefits. Here’s an idea whose time, I think, has come: school district consolidation. How many school districts does this state have? How many school superintendents? Wouldn’t it make sense to consolidate some of our rural districts under one superintendent, with one purchasing department and one payroll department? Maintenance and transportation would have to be fishing and hunting has Medical Center, Clallam unfairly on the backs of kept local as well as teachbeen going downhill fast. everyone else. County). ing, of course. But couldn’t The state Fish and The county elected offiIn spite of the budget the day-to-day business Wildlife Department’s cials and senior staff problems they all face, the operations be carried out hands are tied. should be congratulated for situation in which Social from a central office? Stewards of the land? Security recipients and oth- a willingness to sacrifice And couldn’t each school Not a chance. ers have had no cost-of-liv- their salaries. principal coordinate through Our fish and game are It is a time for sacrifice, a central education office ing increases for two years being wiped out all under and the decline of the econ- fairness and consideration with one superintendent the heading of “treaty omy and employment, thus for others. located in, say, Port Angeles? rights.” Self-interest behavior is reducing available tax reveHow does “Clallam Bill Kaye, nues, these unions all want not a strength in our comCounty Unified School DisBrinnon pay and benefit increases. munity. trict” sound? Dick Foster, There may be relevant I’m pretty sure the savMake the sacrifice merits in the various cases Port Angeles ings in administrative costs We have several unions for pay and benefit increases. would be considerable. Foster is a former Port of serving our local governHowever, the union Dennis R. Bertaud ment employees (Olympic Sequim workers should not benefit Port Angeles commissioner.

How bad can it get if recession returns? By Bernard Condon

gress that the recovery is “close to faltering.” ARE INVESTORS OVERGoldman Sachs said Europe REACTING to the prospect of a could fall into recession by the recession? end of the year — and push the The slightly better jobs report U.S. “to the edge” of one itself. last Friday notwithstanding, the A co-founder of the Economic odds of a recession appear to be Cycle Research Institute, a foreclimbing, and that’s bringing casting firm that called the last back scary memories. three downturns, made the Though rounds of TV news shows to say stocks may a U.S. recession was all but inevilook cheap table. thanks to With memories of the Great record corpoRecession so fresh, investors are rate profits, understandably spooked. that was also A year after that downturn true the last began in December 2007, profits time the U.S. at companies in the Standard & was heading Poor’s 500 index turned into into a downlosses. Condon turn. Three months after that, Based on stocks hit bottom at half their recent recessions, profits could fall pre-recession peak. a third if the economy crumbles. But recessions come in many Investors have been worried varieties, and most are less scary about a new recession for than the last one. months. A review of past ones shows Headlines last week ratcheted that: up the fear. ■  Profit drops range Federal Reserve Chairman widely. Ben Bernanke testified to ConFrom peak to trough, profits

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Sue Stoneman

Acting Advertising Director

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

at S&P 500 companies, excluding financial firms, fell an average 32 percent in the past five recessions, according to Adam Parker, U.S. equity strategist at Morgan Stanley. He excludes financial firms because their record write-offs in the last recession turned S&P profits into losses, and would exaggerate the drop at the average company in the index. The biggest fall in profits: 57 percent from the peak before the 2001 dot-com recession. Profits during the 1981-82 recession fell 17 percent. ■  Recessions usually last less than a year. A recession that began in January 1980 was over in six months. The Great Recession that ended June 2009 lasted 18 months, the longest since the Great Depression. The 11 recessions since World War II averaged 11 months. ■  Stock investors can get clobbered, but not always. Bear markets that accompany recessions have pulled stocks

down an average 38 percent in the last five downturns, based on data from Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at Standard & Poor’s. From their October 2007 peak before the last recession, stocks fell 57 percent. But in the bear market during the recession that began in July 1990, they fell only 20 percent. ■  By the time the economy falls into recession, much of the damage to stocks is usually over. The stock market famously looks forward six to nine months, and that’s mostly true on the cusp of downturns, too. Stocks had been dropping for a year by the time the 2001 recession began. That’s worth remembering if another recession is coming. The S&P 500 is already down 15 percent from its recent peak in April. Problem is, not even experts who study downturns can predict exactly what kind of recession may come next.

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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“Everyone wants a recession playbook, but there aren’t enough similarities with prior cycles to know which one to pick,” said Morgan Stanley’s Parker. To be sure, most Wall Street analysts and economists think one isn’t even likely now. Banks have fatter cushions against losses now than before the financial crisis. Companies in the S&P 500 are making more money than ever, and squirreling away some as cash reserves, a sort of rainyday fund. They’ve laid off so much staff and are running so lean, it won’t be as easy to cut jobs like they did in the last recession. So if a recession is coming, how bad might it get? That depends on whether the U.S. falls into one alone — or together with other countries, as it did the last time.

_________

Bernard Condon, a former Forbes magazine associate editor, writes on business matters for The Associated Press.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Carlsborg sewer is topic at debate By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Democrat Linda Barnfather on Tuesday called for the lifting of a development moratorium on Carlsborg while her Republican opponent, Jim McEntire, urged that a sewage treatment plant for the urban growth area be built immediately. The candidates for a Clallam County commissioner seat spoke before about 50 people attending a Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce luncheon at SunLand Golf & Country Club.

‘Economic driver’ “That’s a huge economic driver that’s waiting to happen,” said Barnfather, who is vying with McEntire in the Nov. 8 general election for the District No. 1 Dungeness Valley seat being vacated by Steve Tharinger,

C

lallam County has already committed $4 mill­ion to the sewer project. now a state representative. Carlsborg business owners face a 3-year-old moratorium while Clallam County officials address a ruling of the state Growth Management Hearings Board.

Growth area invalid That ruling declared Carlsborg’s 21-year-old urban growth area invalid — a decision the county is fighting in court. Since 2006, Clallam County and the Clallam County Public Utility District have teamed up to investigate the feasibility of building and funding a wastewater treatment and

water reuse system for the Carlsborg urban growth area. The Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board in 2008 ruled that, in fact, Clallam County was required to provide wastewater service to maintain its urban growth area designation. While Barnfather said the treatment system needed to be built in a “smart and efficient way,” McEntire said such a system needed to be built immediately. “If that measure is a wastewater treatment plant, let’s get it done yesterday,” said McEntire, a first-term Port of Port Angeles commissioner from Sequim. The issue has divided Carlsborg residents who oppose a sewer system and the business owners who support it because it would

Republican candidate Jim McEntire hands the microphone to Democratic candidate Linda Barnfather during a question-andanswer session at the Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce luncheon Tuesday. Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

lead to lifting the moratorium. County officials have said pollution from septic systems in Carlsborg threatens the groundwater supply.

Sewage system Clallam County has already committed $4 mill­ ion to the sewer project, which was approved for a $10 million state loan. Barnfather, a legislative assistant for Sequim Demo-

cratic state Rep. Kevin Van De Wege and a Sequim native, said a more exact cost of the proposal to build a sewage system for Carlsborg needs to be determined. The Carlsborg system, as proposed, would reclaim waste water and treat it for reuse, such as the system expanded last year for $11 million to serve the city of Sequim. McEntire supported rally­ing the community to

mobilize and volunteer to help government meet public needs. Barnfather said the county should be sensitive to the growing demands of an aging population. Tourism needs the supp­ ort of county government, both candidates said.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

BUSINESS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY In this section

Golf

Don’t miss autumn events I RECENTLY MISSED out on a chance to attend the Alpine Village Oktoberfest celebration in Los Angeles. Alpine Village is a curious mixMichael ture of German supermarket/ Carman deli/restaurant and other German retail shops. A little bit of Leavenworth in Los Angeles, if you will. A friend sent me a photo from the celebration on Saturday with his beer stein filled with a delicious looking amber-hued malted beverage. I was instantly envious. Learn from my mistake, and avoid missing out on the Oktoberfest golfing events popping up on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Cedars Golftoberfest Sign-ups are underway for Cedars at Dungeness’ Golftoberfest in Sequim on Friday, Nov. 11. Two-person teams will compete in nine holes of scramble, nine of best ball and nine of alternate shot beginning with a 9:30 a.m. shotgun start. There will be three divisions: Gross, Net and Callaway. Participants will receive a German-style lunch (I can taste the wurst and schnitzel!), cigars, range balls, carts, KPs, beer on every third hole and green fees for $70. Organizers also promise fun side games and $1,500 in prizes based on a field of 100 players. Entry forms are available at http://tinyurl.com/golftober by phoning the golf course at 360-6836344, or by stopping in at the pro shop.

OctoberFest 666 golf Port Townsend Golf Club will host its OctoberFest 666 tournament, consisting of six holes of Chapman play, six of scramble and six of best-ball play on Saturday, Oct. 22. The tournament is $30 per player and will tee off at 9 a.m. To sign up, phone the Port Townsend pro shop at 360-385-4547 or visit the course.

Kings and Queens On Saturday, Port Townsend will host its annual Kings and Queens Tournament. The one male, one female team event follows a modified alternate shot format. Cost is $30 for this tournament as well, and will start at 10 a.m. A sign-up board is available or you can phone the pro shop.

SkyRidge sets scramble SkyRidge Golf Course in Sequim will host a Family Scramble Golf Tournament on Saturday. The two-person, 18-hole medal play event is limited to the first 36 teams, and will kickoff with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $90 per team and includes green fees, range balls, KPs, team long putt, gross and net honey pots and a tasty lunch. The event is open to all blood or marital relations, and no GHIN handicap is needed. There also will be a $5 Skins game. Carts are $13 per seat. To sign up, phone SkyRidge at 360-683-3673.

Tiger back on scene Big week for Tiger Woods as he earned his first new sponsorship deal since his scandal, returned to competitive golf with a promising showing at the Frys.com Open and was startled by a man wielding a hot dog while putting during his final round. As far as I know, this is the only video footage of the hot dog “toss” at http://tinyurl.com/pdntiger. Turn

to

Carman/B2

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Clallam Bay’s Melissa Willis sets the ball as Crescent’s Becca Bowen, left, and Shannon Williams wait for the return in the second game of their North Olympic League volleyball match in Joyce on Tuesday.

Loggers blank Bruins Crescent still perfect on the year at 9-0 overall Peninsula Daily News

JOYCE — Every Crescent volleyball player got into the action as the Loggers rolled to their ninth straight victory Tuesday night. Crescent remained perfect by pounding Clallam Bay 3-0 in North Olympic League play. The Loggers improved to 3-0 in league and 9-0 overall by the scores of 25-10, 25-20, 25-12. “We came out very strong and we dominated from the beginning,” Crescent coach Alex Baker said. “All 11 players got to play.” The younger players received valuable experience, Baker said. Baker used all three of his setters, giving his two sophomore setters experience on the varsity level. “That will play off for us later,” he said.

Bonny Hazelett had a great match at the net and serving for the Loggers, making nine of 10 serves with an ace, and also pounding seven kills and earning a tip at the net. Sara Moore had six kills and she was 8 of 10 serving with an ace. Libero Kellie Belford was perfect serving at 16 of 16 with three aces. “Kellie had an excellent match in the back row with great passes all night,” Baker said. Freshman Shannon Williams had another powerful night at the net with four blocks, two kills and a tip, and she also was 6 of 9 serving with three aces. Starting setter Rachel Bowen had 16 assists and was a perfect 9 of 9 serving with an ace in just 1½ games. Sophomore setter Devanie

out 19 assists and had eight digs and three aces. Lauren Norton earned nine digs while Kendra Harvey had Christie had six assists and a five aces and three digs. Darian kill. She set for one game. Foley added eight kills. Catherine Youngman was 9 of The Riders now host North 11 serving for the Loggers with Mason in league action Thursday four aces and four kills. night. Jessica Criss played middle in the third game and went 1 for 1 North Kitsap 3, in serving with a kill, block and Sequim 1 an assist. The Loggers next put their SEQUIM — The Vikings, in a perfect mark on the line with a three-way tie with Sequim and nonleague date at 2A Klahowya Port Angeles for first in the (4-5) of the Olympic League in a Olympic League, knocked the 1B-2A varsity vs. varsity match Wolves into second place TuesThursday. day. North Kitsap won 23-25, Port Angeles 3, 25-21, 25-11, 25-20. The Wolves fell to 3-1 in Bremerton 0 league and 8-2 overall while the BREMERTON — The Vikings improved to 4-0 in conRoughriders breezed through the ference. Olympic League match to stay Setter Taylor Balkan had 22 unbeaten on the year at 4-0, 10-0 assists for Sequim, 12 digs and a in Tuesday action. stuffed block while Haleigh HarThe game scores were 25-13, rison had five stuffed blocks of 25-11, 25-16. her own, 10 kills, 13 digs and Kiah Jones led the Riders at nine perfect passes. the net with 14 kills and 10 digs Turn to Preps/B2 while setter Emily Drake dished

Preps

UW has freshmen galore Romar to coach youngest team

Men’s Hoops high school freshman in the country a few years back and eventually stayed home for his college career after starring at Seattle’s Garfield High.

By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — In Lorenzo Romar’s decade at Washington, he may not have broken in a younger team than the one that will begin practice later this week. Yes, the Huskies are exceedingly young with seven true freshmen on the roster and, as of now, only one certain to redshirt. But they’re also extremely talented. “We have an interesting blend,” Romar said during Tuesday’s media day for the defending Pac-10 tournament champions. “Half of this team has played in championship games and NCAA tournament games and road games, and the other half hasn’t played at all. It’s a unique mix.” Indoctrinating all these youngsters will be Romar’s first task for the Huskies, who will begin practice on Friday. But right up there with welcoming the cluster of true freshmen to the Huskies system will be the quick need to find replacements for do-everything point guard Isaiah Thomas and center Matthew Bryan-Amaning. Thomas and Bryan-Amaning were the Huskies’ two leading scorers from last season and provided the inside-outside complement that helped Washington reach the second round of the NCAA tournament before losing to North Carolina. Thomas could have returned

A lot of attention

The Associated Press

Washington coach Lorenzo Romar celebrates after the Huskies won the Pac-10 tourney last March. for his senior season but instead darted for the NBA and was a second-round pick by the Sacramento Kings, while BryanAmaning is now playing overseas after graduating.

A large offensive void More than 32 points per game departed with Thomas and Bryan-Amaning. Washington does get back guard Abdul Gaddy, who missed most of last season with a knee injury, while sophomore swingman Terrence Ross is getting hyped as a potential NBA lottery pick. But much of the focus is on the freshman class and specifically guard Tony Wroten, the most likely candidate to step into the Huskies’ starting backcourt. Wroten was lauded as the top

He’s played under a microscope since entering high school and that’s not going to change now that he’s across town and in college. “Since I was a young kid it’s always been like that,” Wroten said. “When I first started experiencing it I was like ‘man, if I make a mistake I’m going to be judged,’ but it comes with the territory. “For me, it’s a great thing but at the end of the day they come to watch the University of Washington, so I just play in with the team.” Of the freshmen, only Andrew Andrews, a 6-foot-2 guard from Portland, Ore., is already planning to redshirt. Any other redshirts will be determined as the Nov. 12 opener against Georgia State draws closer. Washington’s bevy of freshmen also includes length, especially in the backcourt where the Huskies have played with undersized guards in the past. But there is also some frontcourt size with the additions of forwards Martin Breunig (6-foot-8), Jenard Jarreau (6-10) and Shawn Kemp Jr. (6-9). “Everyone has to learn, the new guys especially have to learn our system,” Romar said. “They have to learn what is important to us, what Husky basketball is all about.”

MLB Playoffs

Tigers nip Texas 5-2 in Game 3 The Associated Press

DETROIT — Doug Fister shook off a frustrating first inning and Victor Martinez hurt himself while hitting a tying home run. The banged-up Detroit Tigers are teetering but still standing, and now they have a chance to even the AL championship series. Fister delivered another strong start in a game Detroit needed and Miguel Cabrera homered and hit a tiebreaking double to lead the Tigers past the Texas Rangers 5-2 Tuesday night in Game 3. Game 4 is this afternoon. Matt Harrison starts for Texas against Rick Porcello — both went 14-9 this season. “It’s going to be a long series,” Cabrera said. “Nobody said it’s going to be easy. You’ve got to be patient.” Detroit dropped the first two games in Texas before turning to Fister, who won the decisive fifth game of the division series at Yankee Stadium last week. He was sharp again, allowing two runs and seven hits with no walks in 7 1/3 innings. “In and out, moving the ball around, moving the ball both sides of the plate,” Detroit manager Jim Leyland said. “I thought it was a pitching clinic.” Martinez homered in the fourth to tie the score at 1, then stayed in the game after an injury to his ribcage.


B2

SportsRecreation

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

AREA SPORTS SHOT

Today Cross Country: Port Townsend and North Kitsap at Klahowya, 4 p.m.; Sequim and North Mason at Port Angeles (Lincoln Park), 4 p.m. Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Olympic, 4 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Olympic, 2 p.m.

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Men’s Club Throw out three worst holes Saturday Individual gross: Larry Aillaud, 55. Individual net: (Tie) Al Osterberg and Gary McLaughlin, 49; Stan Feldman, 50; (Tie) Jim Williams and Eric Schaefermeyer, 51. Team gross: Rick Parkhurst-Bob Brodhun, 66. Team net: Larry Aillaud-Paul Stutesman, 58; John Tweter-Paul Stutesman, 59; Larry AillaudGene Ketchum, 60; (Tie) Larry Aillaud-John Tweter, Bernie Anselmo-Gary McLaughlin and Jim Williams-Ray Dooley, 61.

CEDARS AT DUNGENESS GOLF COURSE Men’s Club Ace Day Oct. 5 First Flight Gross: Robert Mares, 73; Warren Cortez, 76; Fred Harrison, 77; John Raske, 79. Net: Walter Stetter, 63; John Magee, 66; (Tie) Brian Anderson and Arni Fredrickson, 69. Second Flight Gross: Bob Young, 79; Mike Sutton, 81; Larry Batson, 84; Pat Lauerman, 86. Net: (Tie) J.C. Schumacher and KO, 64; (Tie) Bob Bullinger and Gayle Doyle, 69 Third Flight Gross: Darrell Waller, 89; Ron Fye, 91; Jay Howard, 92; Ted Johnson, 93. Net: Ed Fjerstad, 61; Whitey Best, 68; (Tie) Ted Larsen and Dave Inglesby, 70. KP’s Low Division 8th hole: Bill Berry, 1’2”

Today 1 p.m. (13) KCPQ MLB Baseball, Texas Rangers at Detroit Tigers in ALCS Game 4. 5 p.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, Milwaukee Brewers at St. Louis Cardinals in NLCS Game 3. Boys U-12 Pacific Primary Care 4-1-1 13 points Smugglers’ Landing 2-0-1 7 points Maria’s Cilantro 2-1-0 6 points PA Power 1-4-0 3 points Thomas Building Supply0-3-0 0 points Scores: PA Power 2, Maria’s Cilantro 1; Pacific Primary Care 6, Thomas Building Supply 2; Maria’s Cilantro 1, Pacific Primary Care 0; Pacific Primary Care 8, PA Power 5; Smugglers’ Landing 2, Thomas Building Center 0. Boys U-10 Scores Fiesta Jalisco 3, Swain’s 0; Windermere Real Estate 3, Frank’s Auto 0. Girls U-10 Scores Mighty Max 1, Athlete’s Choice 0; Cherry Hill Florist 2, Reetz Insurance 0.

Area Sports

Winter League Friday Team standings: Glass Services, 9; Taylor Made Const., 8; Triggs Dental Lab No. 1, 7; Brew Crew, 6; Golf Shop Guys, 5; The Green Machine, 4; Team Fireball, 3; (TIe) Triggs Dental Lab No. 2 and Windermere, 1½. Gross (Div. One): Mike DuPuis, 34; Mel Triggs, 38. Net (Div. One): Barry Tate, 34; (Tie) Ken Fisher and Jacob Oppelt, 35; Steve Moreno, 36. Gross (Div. Two): Kui Solomon, 41. Net (Div. Two): Mike Hammel, 33; (Tie) Deke Temres, Randy Barber, Keith Lawrence and Mike Schaefermeyer, 35. Gross (Div. Three): Ward Dunscomb, 42; Warren Taylor, 43. Net (Div. Three): Ruth Thomson, 30; (Tie) Kevin Pugh, Sam Schoessler and Dona Scarcia, 34.

SPORTS ON TV

Baseball MLB Playoffs

Receiving Canadian

honors

Port Angeles BMX riders cleaned up at the Canada Grand National races in Chilliwak, British Columbia, recently. Bringing home the hardware were, from left, Adam Finch, who was second both days; Kortney Beutler, fourth and second finishes; Jennifer Spencer, second both days; Mariah Fortman, fourth and fifth finishes; and Travis Beutler, who didn’t make main. 11th hole: Walter Stetter, 5’5” KP’s High Division 8th hole: Gary Williams, 7’6” 11th hole: Darrell Waller, 8’6” Women’s 18-Hole Group Oct. 4 First Division: (Tie) Barb Barrows, Carolyn Gill and Olympia Brehm, 41.5. Second Division: Elaine Fredrickson, 34.5; Jackie Davis. 38.5. Closest to the Pin (First Division) 4th hole: Olympia Brehm 11th hole: Barb Barrows Closest to the Pin (Second Division) 11th hole: Elaine Fredrickson Putts First Division: Carolyn Hill, 34. Second Division: Elaine Fredrickson, 33 DISCOVERY BAY GOLF CLUB Women’s Club Team Scramble Thursday First place: (Tie) Barb Aldrich-Mary Pat Griswold-Pat Burns-Sheila Kilmer and Irene Helander-Janet Nelson-Janie Marcus-Vicki Young. Men’s/Women’s Club Octoberfest Tournament Sunday Low gross: Lynn Pierle-RoySutherland.

Low net: 1, Janie Marcus-Rich Boyd; 2, Marc Hilt-Alan Hilt; 3, Norma and Neil Lupkes; 4, Edna and Don Chicarell; 5, Janet and David Nelson; 6, Molly and Jack Hilt.

Bowling SEQUIM OLYMPIC LANES First Federal Senior Snipers Oct. 5 Men’s high game: Wayne Hedges, 180. Men’s high series: Cliff Silliman, 516. Women’s high game: Eva Rider, 167. Women’s high series: Eva Rider, 441. League leading team: Enfields by 3 points. Thursday 9 Pin No-Tap Thursday Men’s high game: Bill Fowler, 205. Men’s high series: Gunter Kessler, 580. Women’s high game: Joan Wright, 203. Women’s high series: Ginny Bowling, 507.

Soccer PORT ANGELES & SEQUIM YOUTH SOCCER As of Sunday Boys U-15 Maria’s Cilantro 5-1-1 16 points Pacific NW Vet 5-1-1 16 points

Everwarm 1-5-0 3 points All Safe Storage 1-5-0 3 points Scores: Everwarm 3, All Safe Storage 2; Pacific NW Vet 2, Maria’s Cilantro 1; Pacific NW Vet 3, Everwarm 1; Maria’s Cilantro 8, All Safe Storage 0; Pacific NW Vet 3, All Safe Storage 0. Girls U-15 Haworth Dental 3-0-1 10 points Destination Salon 2-2-0 6 points Rocket Transportation 1-1-1 4 points First Federal 1-4-0 3 points Scores: Haworth Dental 1, First Federal 0; Destination Salon 4, First Federal 0; Rocket Transportation 0, Haworth Dental 0; Rocket Transportation 4, First Federal 1; Haworth Dental beat Destination Salon. Girls U-12 Drakes 5-1-0 15 points Jim’s Pharmacy 4-0-0 12 points Network Funding 2-2-1 7 points Under Construction 2-2-0 6 points Soils Application 1-3-1 4 points Sound Bank 1-3-0 3 points Payne Law Firm 0-4-0 0 points Scores: Under Construction 3, Soils Application 1; Jim’s Pharmacy 4, Sound Bank 1; Drakes 2, Under Construction 1; Sound Bank 5, Payne Law Firm 0.

LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) American League All games televised by Fox Texas 2, Detroit 1 Saturday, Oct. 8: Texas 3, Detroit 2 Sunday, Oct. 9: Detroit at Texas, ppd. rain Monday, Oct. 10: Texas 7, Detroit 3, 11 innings Tuesday, Oct. 11: Detroit 5, Texas 2 Today: Texas (Harrison 14-9) at Detroit (Porcello 14-9), 1:19 p.m. Thursday: Texas at Detroit (Verlander 24-5), 1:19 p.m. x-Saturday, Oct. 15: Detroit (Scherzer 15-9) at Texas, 5:05 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 16: Detroit (Fister 11-13) at Texas, 5:05 p.m. National League All games televised by TBS Milwaukee 1, St. Louis 1 Sunday, Oct. 9: Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 6 Monday, Oct. 10: St. Louis 12, Milwaukee 3 Today: Milwaukee (Gallardo 17-10) at St. Louis (Carpenter 11-9), 5:05 p.m. Thursday: Milwaukee (Wolf 13-10) at St. Louis (Lohse 14-8), 5:05 p.m. Friday: Milwaukee at St. Louis, 5:05 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 16: St. Louis at Milwaukee, 1:05 or 5:05 p.m. x-Monday, Oct. 17: St. Louis at Milwaukee, 5:05 p.m. WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) All games televised by Fox Wednesday, Oct. 19 at National League Thursday, Oct. 20 at National League Saturday, Oct. 22 at American League Sunday, Oct. 23 at American League x-Monday, Oct. 24 at American League x-Wednesday, Oct. 26 at National League x-Thursday, Oct. 27 at National League

Preps: Port Angeles ties Bremerton in soccer Continued from B1 annual breast cancer awareness match next Tuesday night against Kyla Martin added 10 kills and Montesano. nine digs while Hannah Hudson got down for 12 digs and had 12 North Mason 3, perfect passes. Port Townsend 0 Alexas Besand was the top BELFAIR — The Redskins server for the day by going 19 for (0-5, 0-11) were dealt another 19 with three perfect passes. The Wolves next play at Port Olympic League setback on the road Tuesday night, falling 25-11, Townsend on Thursday. 25-14, 25-18. Abbie McGuire had three digs, Forks 3, Elma 0 six assists, three kills and two FORKS — The Spartans (5-4, aces in the loss, and teammate 6-4) had little trouble dispatching Christine Unrue had four digs the SWL-Evergreen Division’s and seven assists. last place Eagles (0-9, 0-9) on Ellie Forbes and Megan Lee Tuesday night. each came up with seven digs for Forks maintained its grip on the Redskins. Enani Rubio added fourth place in league with the three kills and two digs. 25-19, 25-12, 25-23 victory. Port Townsend, which has lost Casey Williams led the team 25 straight matches, hosts Sequim with six kills in the win while on Thursday. Sydney Christensen added five kills and Addie Reed three aces. Girls Soccer Setter Jillian Raben spread the Port Angeles 1, ball around with eight assists and Bremerton 1 also had three aces serving. Forks travels to Rochester on BREMERTON — The Thursday before hosting its Roughriders tied the Olympic

League-leading Knights on Tuesday. Port Angeles, now 1-1-2 in league and 5-4-3 overall, has a good opportunity to make the playoffs, coach Scott Moseley said. Wins against their next two opponents would open the playoff door, according to the coach. The Riders host North Mason on Thursday at Civic Field (6:45 p.m.) and then play archrival Sequim. The Knights outshot the Riders 10-7 in an evenly played game, taking the lead two minutes into the second half. Kylee Jeffers tied the game with a goal in the 50th minute on a Kathryn Moseley corner kick. The two teams stayed tied after 10 minutes of overtime. Jeffers was named the offensive player of the game while Kathryn Moseley was picked as the transition player. “Our entire defense played well but goalie Kearsten Cox played sure-handed and had an excellent game.” Cox took defensive player hon-

ors with seven saves.

Elma 12, Forks 0 FORKS — The Spartans (0-8, 0-10) were kept winless on the season after falling to the Eagles in Tuesday night’s Southwest Washington League match. Forks will next travel to Rochester on Thursday for another league game. Elma 12, Forks 0 Elma Forks

6 6 — 12 0 0 — 0

Port Townsend 4, North Mason 0 BELFAIR — Audrey McHugh dished out two assists and Irina Lyons had a goal and an assist to boost the Redskins to their first Olympic League win of the season Tuesday night. Port Townsend (1-4-0, 4-7-0) broke a five-match losing streak with the win, with both of McHugh’s assists coming in the first 28 minutes on goals by Lyons and Taylor Mills.

PORT ANGELES — The adult indoor Peninsula Volleyball League is taking registration for the 2011-12 coed season. The six-person per team league is for intermediate to advanced players, ages 16 and older. The program begins with open gyms on Oct. 20 and Oct. 27 at 6:30 p.m. at Peninsula College. League play, scheduled for Thursday nights, begins Nov. 3 and runs into February. The entry fee is $200 per team, and there is no player fee. Individuals interested in participating are invited to attend one of

host

Port Townsend 4, North Mason 0 Port Townsend 2 2 — 4 North Mason 0 0 — 0 Scoring Summary First half: 1, Port Townsend, Lyons (McHugh), 10th; 2, Port Townsend, Mills (McHugh), 28th. Second Half: 3, Port Townsend, Meek (Lyons), 71st; 4, Port Townsend, Whipple, 80th.

North Kitsap 6, Sequim 0 SEQUIM — Delanee Nilles scored two goals in the first four minutes to lead spark the Vikings to an Olympic League win over the Wolves (1-3-0, 2-8-0) on Tuesday night. Sequim travels to Port Townsend for its next match on Thursday. North Kitsap 6, Sequim 0 North Kitsap Sequim

4 2 — 6 0 0 — 0 Scoring Summary First half: 1, NK, Nilles, 1st, 2, NK, Nilles, 4th. 3, NK, Cole (Levato), 13th 4, NK, Wright (PK) 25th. Second Half: 5, NK, Cates (Nilles) 63rd. 6, NK, Brennan (Cates) 70th.

Carman: Golf

Briefly . . . Adult indoor volleyball set to begin

The Redskins next Sequim on Thursday.

the open gyms. Those wishing to enter teams should contact Peninsula College athletic director Rick Ross at 360417-6533 or rross@pencol. edu.

ing contest, a dunk contest and giveaways, prizes and contests.

Youth baseball

PORT ANGELES — The October board meeting of the North Olympic BaseMadness hoops ball and Softball program PORT ANGELES — will take place at 7 p.m. The Pirate Madness Hoops Thursday at Vern Burton Extravaganza on Oct. 22 is Community Center. the tip-off for the Peninsula The board will be preCollege men’s basketball seented with a calendar season. and a budget for the coming year, as well as proThe Pirates are the defending NWAACC cham- posed revisions to the softball pitching rules, and pions. The event, free, starts at demographic data to assist the board in making deci5 p.m. and will be in the sions about the program college gymnasium. for 2012. The extravaganza will feature introductions to the men’s and women’s basket- Riders JV football ball teams, men’s Black vs. PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles High Gold intrasquad scrimSchool JV football team mage, coed Black vs. Gold scrimmage, a 3-point shoot- beat North Mason 32-18

this week. The Roughrider defense came up big with 11 turnovers in leading the team to the victory. Leading the way was Matt Robbins, who had a 99-yard interception return for a touchdown. Also intercepting passes were Steven Lauderback with two, Damon Johnson, Carl Lawrence and Nathan Angevine. Recovering fumbles for the Riders were Tyler Philp with two, Kyle LaFritz, Roberto Coronel and Angevine, who forced and recovered a fumble after a massive hit from his cornerback sport. Scoring for the Riders were Robbins with two long runs and Micki Andrus with a run and a catch from Larsson Chapman. Peninsula Daily News

Continued from B1 den and was trying to make a joke and not trying All uploaded copies of to pull a Monica Seles-like the event on YouTube have attack. been taken down, probably The PGA Tour does for the same reason broad- have security out on the casters refrain from showcourse and I would bet that ing streakers or drunks who run onto baseball and Tiger has his own security, but a look into what hapfootball fields, i.e., they pened and how to prevent don’t want to encourage something similar while similar acts. still allowing fans to get I don’t condone that close to golf’s stars does type of behavior but I will seem to be in order. laugh at it. ________ Thankfully, it seems that the alleged Hot Dog Golf columnist Michael CarTosser was probably a bit man can be reached at 360-417over-served in the beer gar- 3527 or at pdngolf@gmail.com.

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Wife worries about racist remarks

Dilbert

DEAR ABBY: I have always felt DEAR ABBY proud that I have never had any racist thoughts. realize it’s her Since the births of my three chilAbigail house and she’s an dren, I have tried to instill in them Van Buren adult, but I can’t that we are all God’s children, no help feeling disapmatter the color of our skin. pointed and disreThe problem is my husband is a spected. racist. He doesn’t like anyone who Still isn’t just like him. Mourning He makes rude and crude in Pennsylvania remarks in front of our kids, and I’m always trying to discredit his Dear Still remarks so the kids won’t end up Mourning: Talk with his bigoted way of thinking. to your mother as I have tried talking to my husone adult to band about it, but he doesn’t seem to another. get it. How can I get through to him? Tell her you were shocked when Unbiased in Idaho Warren spent the night and that his being there “all the time” seems Dear Unbiased: You can’t. His rushed so soon after your father’s racism isn’t rational. He learned it death. from the environment in which he Tell her, too, that you feel that was raised, as your children may if hiding him from your siblings is a he continues. mistake. In the time you knew your husThen hear her out. This isn’t band before you married him, I’m about you. Your mother is an adult. surprised that you didn’t notice his She and Warren have some shared racist beliefs. history, so it’s not as if he’s a comIf you are truly as unbiased as you say, it seems to me that a couple plete stranger out of nowhere. While I agree that she would be of uncensored remarks from him wise to take things more slowly, this would have killed the romance. However, please don’t give up the isn’t our decision to make. Sooner or later, you may have to fight. Your children need to hear conmake some living arrangements of sistently that not all people feel as your own so you can both move on your husband does. with your lives. Start thinking about it now. Dear Abby: My father passed away six weeks ago. He and Mom Dear Abby: I’m in love with a were married 42 years. After his death, because my living man who is a lot younger than I am. He lives in France. We were supsituation was unhealthy, I moved posed to marry late last year, but his back home with Mom. visa was delayed, and he had to Three weeks ago, she began seereturn home. ing an old boyfriend she had before Since then, I have heard from him she married Dad. I am the first to meet “Warren.” Mom is keeping him only a few times, and he never answers my letters. I love him so a secret from my three siblings. much. I still wear his engagement Warren has visited the house a few times during the day. ring. What do you think I should do? He recently came for dinner and Oceans Apart in Illinois spent the night on the sofa in the living room. Dear Oceans Apart: I think you I was hurt and shocked by it. She should remove the ring because it appears the romance is over. Je suis could have at least told me he’d be desolee, Madame. staying. I want to talk to her about this, _________ but I don’t know how. I want her to Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, be happy, but Warren’s here all the also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was time now. Isn’t it a little too soon? I founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letmiss my father. ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box Mom hasn’t considered my feel69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by ings or asked how I feel about this. I logging onto www.dearabby.com.

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): Too much pressure will bring about an impulsive move that will be difficult to reverse. Step back from the situation and take a look at the big picture. Don’t feel the need to act fast or to give in. Time is on your side. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Avoid overindulgent people. Quality, not quantity, should be your goal. A problem with a co-worker, supervisor, government agency or large institution can be expected if you don’t abide by the rules and regulations. Don’t leave anything to chance. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Rein in your emotions and you can control whatever situation you face. Use your head and apply practical solutions to whatever is being requested of you. Change can be positive as long as you or someone else doesn’t use force. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Call in favors and you will receive more than you ask for. Socialize, even if someone is trying to take up your time with demanding requests. You will broaden your horizons and your circle of friends by getting out and trying new things. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

Dennis the Menace

B3

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll make wise choices and create opportunities if you are positive and productive. Good fortune will come through a partnership that is equal and complimentary. A change in location will inspire you to make last-minute arrangements that can alter your lifestyle. 5 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Hold on to what you’ve accumulated. Consider every facet of a situation you face before you make a move. You will discover valuable information that can help you get ahead as long as you don’t let emotions stand in your way. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Irrational behavior will cause setbacks, regardless of who is being difficult. Don’t overextend yourself emotionally, financially or physically. Work hard to help someone in need, but don’t give in to demands made by those who can fend for themselves. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t let a personal problem lead to anger. Focus on being the best you can be and developing an idea or skill you have that can lead to higher returns. Keep your thoughts to yourself until you have what you want secured. 3 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Having a better understanding of the current economic situation is necessary. There is money to be made if you are in the right place at the right time. Don’t fear doing things differently. Standing out can be what gets you in the door. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may have some leverage at home or at work, but when it comes to discussions with friends and neighbors, you’d better know what you are talking about. Expect to be challenged by someone who doesn’t see things your way. 2 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Overreacting will lead to trouble. An incident from your past will come back to haunt you. Look for an unusual opportunity, give it a unique twist and you will make financial gains. An improved living arrangement is attainable. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A past partner, peer or colleague can help you get ahead now. Be the first to make contact and rectify any problem that may have occurred in the past. Your maturity and ability to put the past behind you will help you advance now. 3 stars


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Business

PAGE

B4

Politics and Environment

Senate kills jobs bill By Andrew Taylor and Ben Feller The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — United against Barack Obama, Senate Republicans voted Tuesday night to kill the jobs package the president had spent weeks campaigning for across the country, a stinging loss at the hands of lawmakers opposed to stimulus-style spending and a tax increase on the very wealthy. The $447 billion plan died on a 50-49 tally that garnered a majority of the 100-member Senate but fell well short of the 60 votes needed to keep the bill alive. The tally had been 51-48, but Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., switched his vote to “nay” so that he could force a future revote. The demise of Obama’s jobs package was expected, despite his campaign-style efforts to swing the public behind it. The White House and leaders in Congress were already moving on to alternative ways to address the nation’s painful 9.1 percent unemployment, including breaking the legislation into smaller, more digestible pieces and approving longstalled trade bills. The White House appears most confident that it will be able to continue a 2-percentage-point Social Security payroll tax cut through 2012 and to extend emergency unemployment benefits to millions of people — if only because, in the White House view, Republicans won’t want to accept the political harm of letting those provisions expire. White House officials are

also hopeful of ultimately garnering votes for the approval of infrastructure spending and tax credits for businesses that hire unemployed veterans. Democrats Ben Nelson of Nebraska and Jon Tester of Montana — both up for reelection next year in states where Obama figures to lose — broke with their party on Tuesday night’s vote. Every Republican present opposed the plan. Earlier in the day, Obama capped his weekslong campaign for the measure in an appearance typical of the effort — a toughtalking speech in a swing state crucial to his re-election. Like earlier appearances, it seemed aimed more at rallying his core political supporters heading into the election than changing minds on Capitol Hill. “Any senator who votes no should have to look you in the eye and tell you what exactly they’re opposed to,” Obama said to a union audience in Pittsburgh. “I think they’ll have a hard time explaining why they voted no on this bill — other than the fact that I proposed it.”

Democrats not united Democrats were not wholly united behind the measure. In addition to Nelson and Tester, Sens. Jim Webb, D-Va., Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Joe Lieberman, a Connecticut independent who aligns with Democrats, said they oppose the underlying measure despite voting to choke off the filibuster.

The Associated Press

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., left, and Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., confer as they arrive at the Capitol for the vote on the jobs bill. Obama’s plan would combine Social Security payroll tax cuts for workers and businesses and other tax relief totaling about $270 billion with $175 billion in new spending on roads, school repairs and other infrastructure, as well as unemployment assistance and help to local governments to avoid layoffs of teachers, firefighters and police officers. Obama said that the plan — more than half the size of his 2009 economic stimulus measure — would be an insurance policy against a double-dip recession and that continued economic intervention was essential given slower-thanhoped-for job growth.

Unlike the 2009 legislation, the current plan would be paid for with a 5.6 percent surcharge on income exceeding $1 million. That would be expected to raise about $450 billion over the coming decade. The White House and Democratic leaders were pleased that the great majority of Democrats voted for the plan. Support among Democrats was shored up by replacing Obama’s tax increases — particularly a proposal to limit the value of itemized deductions for families making more than $250,000 — with the surcharge on annual income over $1 million.

China could face higher tariffs The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Senate voted Tuesday to threaten China with higher tariffs on Chinese products made cheap through an artificially undervalued currency, which lawmakers blame for destroying American jobs. The House, though, is unlikely to take up the bill, which some American businesses warn could trigger a trade war. The 63-35 vote showed a broad bipartisan consensus that it is time to end diplomatic niceties with China and confront it over its aggressive trade policies. “There are always people

who don’t want to stand up to China and I think they are, frankly, undercutting our ability to stop the hemorrhaging in our manufacturing jobs,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio.

Death in the House Still, the bill could die in the House, where a companion measure has the sponsorship of more than half the members but lacks the support of the GOP leadership. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, like the many large multinational companies that oppose the legislation, has said it would be dangerous to dictate

another country’s currency policies, and he can prevent the bill from ever being considered. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., said Tuesday that the White House should make its position clear before the House acts. The White House and President Barack Obama have not come out against the bill but have shown they are not comfortable with it, saying they are concerned about any legislation that might violate international trade rules. Advocates for the bill say it will make American goods more competitive and support more than 1 million

new jobs. Critics warn that it will provoke Chinese retaliation and hurt Americans in one of their fastest-growing markets.

More votes on trade The vote came as Congress prepared to complete work on a package of free trade agreements that is also seen by their backers as removing barriers to American exports and promoting job growth. Both the House and Senate are expected to vote today on trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia and Panama.

Passenger ferry topic for PT network

 $ Briefly . . . Millionaires’ homes site of protest NEW YORK — Now it’s personal: Hundreds of anti-Wall Street protesters held a “Millionaires March” on Tuesday past the homes of some of the wealthiest executives in America, stopping to jeer “Tax the rich!” and “Where’s my bailout?” Walking two-by-two on the sidewalk because they had no march permit and didn’t want to be charged with blocking traffic, members of the Occupy Wall Street movement and other groups made their way up Manhattan’s East Side, along streets like Fifth Avenue and Park Avenue where some of the richest 1 percent of the population live in townhouses and luxury apartments. They paused outside buildings where media mogul Rupert Murdoch, banker Jamie Dimon and oil tycoon David Koch have homes, and decried the impending expiration of New York’s 2 percent “millionaires’ tax” in December. “I have nothing against these people personally. I just think they should pay their fair share of taxes,” said Michael Pollack, an office worker in a law firm. For the past 3½ weeks, the Occupy Wall Street has besieged a park in lower Manhattan near Wall Street, denouncing corporate greed and the gap between rich and poor. The uptown march marked the first time it identified specific people as being part of the 1 percent the demonstrators say are getting rich at the expense of the rest of America.

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

Council voted Monday night for a six-month moratorium on development in a zone where Clark County and its private partner want to locate a biomass plant that would burn wood debris to generate electricity. The Columbian reported that the moratorium means it’s highly unlikely that Schneider Electric will be eligible for an $8 million federal grant that expires at the end of the year. The plant on the site of a former bottling plant would supply heating and cooling power plus hot water for five county buildings. Schneider Electric would build the $28 million plant with no financial support from taxpayers. It would sell excess power. City leaders are concerned about pollution, odor and traffic.

Nonferrous metals

Biomass blocked

NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Tuesday. Aluminum - $0.9910 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.3170 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.2875 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $1975.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8631 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1663.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1659.70 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $32.180 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $31.963 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1518.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1515.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

VANCOUVER, Wash. — The Vancouver City

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Free fitness event PORT ANGELES — Phoenix Dragon Martial Arts, 1025 E. First St., has started a free, threemonth exercise challenge via its Facebook page. New exercise challenges are announced each Thursday at http:// tinyurl.com/44jrf8a. Phoenix Dragon Martial Arts will offer Warrior Fitness classes for training with others, or participants can follow along at home.

Have you missed us?

work workshops designed to Each addresses common help facilitate communica- business struggles and comPORT TOWNSEND — A tion and problem solving. munity issues. test lab on what role young professionals can play in recreating waterborne transSpecializing in portation infrastructure improving the will be hosted Friday by the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce’s Young Professionals Network. for people with all It will be from 6 p.m. to forms of Dementia 7:30 p.m. at the Port Townsend Community CenEMG acoustic electric bass, & Memory Loss... ter, 620 Tyler St. stand, gig bag, and amp. Rooms It is free to chamber vailable! A members and $5 for others. Tim Caldwell, former Port Townsend Chamber of Commerce general manager and longtime proponent of “A Better Way of Life” 651 Garry Oak Dr. passenger-only ferry (POF) Sequim, WA service will make a brief 457-1289 presentation on why such 360-582-9309 service is making a comewww.dungenesscourte.com back in many Puget Sound communities. Caldwell is a member of the Port Townsend Main Street Transportation Committee. “Our ongoing investments in our waterfront, marinas, transit service and visitor centers have brought the necessary POF support services to the water’s edge,” Wood or Metal Frames said Caldwell. with Premium Mattress “We have positioned ourselves to develop a profitMattress Cover able business model to with any set! directly link our communities to our I-5 corridor marFinancing Available ket.” NEW FURNITURE AND MATTRESSES 6 Months Same as Cash This is the second in a Port Angeles: Mon.–Sat. 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. • Sun. 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. series of Jefferson County W W W . P A B A R G A I N W A R E H O U S E . N E T Chamber of Commerce’s 4 5 2 - 3 9 3 6 • 2 8 3 0 H w y. 1 0 1 E a s t • P o r t A n g e l e s Young Professionals NetPeninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, October 12, 2011

c

SECTION

Our Peninsula

CLASSIFIEDS, PUZZLES, WEATHER In this section

Grant funds playground

Briefly . . .

Developmentally delayed preschoolers gain haven Peninsula Daily News

Readers Theatre Plus board members Paul and Ann Martin, fourth and fifth from left, presented the Readers Theatre Plus donation to, from left, firefighter/paramedic Andrew Cooper, Port Angeles Fire Department Assistant Chief Ken Dubuc, Clallam County Fire District 2 Assistant Chief Sam Phillips and Chief Jon Bugher, and firefighter/paramedic Tyler Bieker.

‘The Guys’ raises $750 for Clallam firefighter safety

streets and parks superintendent, at 360-417-4566 or cdelikat@cityofpa.us.

PORT ANGELES — Readers Theatre Plus board members Paul and Ann Martin recently presented a $710 donation to the Clallam County Fire Chiefs Association. The donation came from proceeds from the theatrical production of “The Guys” at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse over the Sept. 11 weekend. “The Guys,” performed by Carol Swarbrick Dries and Paul Martin, is the story of a New York City Fire Department captain who is faced with the monumental task of writing eulogies for eight members of his crew who were lost in the attack on the twin towers. The captain was assisted by a journalism professor from a university in New York, and together, they crafted a poignant tribute to the fallen firefighters. Readers Theatre Plus donated all of the proceeds from the production to the Clallam County Fire Chiefs Association to be used to improve firefighter safety.

SEQUIM — Blue Whole Gallery will hold its second annual Gala Auction of Art at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Parish Hall, 525 N. Fifth Ave., from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. Tickets are $25 and are available at the gallery, 129 W. Washington St. The evening will include live and silent auctions with original art, gourmet appetizers, wine, music and door prizes. For more information, phone event organizer Liz Harper at 360-683-7698.

Port Angeles seeks Christmas tree PORT ANGELES — The city of Port Angeles is looking for just the right tree for display over the Christmas holidays at the Conrad Dyar Memorial Fountain on Laurel Street in downtown Port Angeles. The lighting of this special tree during the Thanksgiving weekend traditionally signals the beginning of the Christmas season in Port Angeles. The ideal tree should be 35 to 40 feet tall. A thicker or fuller tree is preferred for easier decorating. The city will pick up the tree between Joyce and Sequim as long as its location is easily accessible by boom truck. The owner of the selected tree will be recognized by special mayoral proclamation and will be featured on the city’s website. For more information, contact Corey Delikat,

Tickets on sale for gala art auction

Halloween Carnival helpers sought NORDLAND — Fort Flagler State Park is seeking volunteers to help with the annual Halloween Carnival on Saturday, Oct. 29, and Sunday, Oct. 30. Volunteer hours for this event will count toward the 24 needed to receive a free Washington State Parks Discover Pass. Jobs vary from light construction and setup/ breakdown to carnival helpers or actors and much more. For more information, phone the park at 360385-3701.

Silent auction set in Port Ludlow PORT LUDLOW — The Community Enrichment Alliance will hold its annual silent auction, “The Beauty of Autumn,” at the Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, from 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Proceeds from the event will support victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse programs in Jeff­erson, Clallam and Kitsap counties. A $5 donation at the door will go toward any winning bid. Wine and appetizers will be served, and Peter Mercer will provide musical accompaniment. For more information, phone event co-chair Mary Stuart at 360-437-8140. Peninsula Daily News

Restaurant will be good neighbor for campaign Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Muskan Indian Restaurant in Port Townsend and United Good Neighbors are providing an example of cooperation between the business and nonprofit communities for the 2012 UGN Campaign. The restaurant will donate 20 percent of its proceeds one day a month to UGN throughout the year to contribute to the 2012 UGN campaign. The first Muskan “Dine and Donate to UGN Day” will be held at the restaurant, 2330 Water St., on Monday. “We want to be a contributing part of the community,” said Muskan owner Manoj Kumar.

Pupils can get immunizations Port Angeles, Lincoln highs, Stevens slated Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES The Clallam County Health Department will provide on-site immunization clinics for students at Port Angeles and Lincoln high schools and Stevens Middle School this month. Dates, times and school locations are: ■  Port Angeles High School: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18. ■  Lincoln High School: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25. ■  Stevens Middle School: 9 a.m. to noon Friday, Oct. 28. The following vaccines will be available this fall: Hepatitis B, Hepatitis A, MMR, chicken pox, Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis), meningococcal, influenza and HPV (human papillomavirus). The HPV vaccine is now

licensed and recommended for both males and females. The only cost to participants is a vaccine administration fee. Parents and guardians can determine the cost of vaccinations by using the “Sliding Fee Cost Determination Form,” which is available with the consent by clicking on “Health and Safety News” at http://tinyurl. com/6kp9vvt. All vaccines will be administered by a public health nurse from the Clall­am County Health Department. An immunization consent form must be completed and presented at the time of the first vaccination visit. The consent form must be signed by a parent or guardian for students younger than the age of 18; students who are 18 years and older may sign the immunization consent form. For more information, contact Clallam County Health and Human Services Public Health Nurse Ann Johnson at 360-4172439 or ajohnson@co.clallam. wa.us.

Graphic novelist to lead workshops Sessions at 3 North Olympic libraries Peninsula Daily News

30-plus nonprofits benefit “UGN helps to fund over 30 nonprofits in Jefferson County, so we know our donations will be used effectively.” “Businesses need to be recognized for their contributions,” said Carla Caldwell, UGN executive director. “When they donate to community organizations through volunteerism and financial support, their efforts need to be publicly acknowledged. “UGN is grateful to Manoj and all the Jefferson County business owners who give generously to UGN year after year.”

PORT ANGELES — Dream Playground board President Steven Charno announced receipt of a $20,000 grant from the Benjamin N. Phillips Memorial Fund of The Seattle Foundation to support construction of a playground at Jefferson Elementary School for developmentally delayed preschool students. The grant will allow the foundation to buy a large climbing/ sliding structure as the centerpiece of the outdoor play area. “Our foundation is delighted to partner with the Port Angeles School District in bringing this invaluable resource to our community,” said Charno. He noted that the proposed playground would be the only one of its kind on the North Olympic Peninsula. Margi Ahlgren, teacher in the Intensive Early Intervention Program located at Jefferson Elementary, has been pursuing funding opportunities for the playground over the past year. It was through her and Charno’s efforts the partnership between the School District and the foundation became a reality and the avenue for the grant application was provided. “Five years ago when the program moved to Jefferson Elementary, there was no secure outdoor area for young students in the preschool program to safely play and interact,” said Ahlgren. “Outdoor areas had previously been designed for older children.

“With cutbacks to the school district budget over the past few years, we’ve not had the opportunity to install the equipment and secure areas the children need to work on physical, communication and social skills. “These skills are so crucial to their development. “Already, a local contractor has donated work to resurface and fence a 120-foot-by-40-foot area complete with an asphalt tricycle track. “Other funds allowed for the construction of a storage shed, the purchase of rubberized playground surfacing, a tire swing, seesaw, sand and water table and sandbox.” In addition, school district maintenance staff have done extensive in-kind work and paid for several hundred dollars worth of lumber, bolts, nails and other supplies to secure the property for safe play by students. Other donors to date include Leonard Lewicki of Ameriprise Financial; Joe Lavin and SueEllen Kraft; Les Schwab Tire Centers; The Home Depot; Lakeside Industries; Jefferson ParentTeacher Organization; Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Noon Club; Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Jet Set; Walmart Foundation; and Swain’s Foundation in addition to school district funding and staff resources. Fundraising efforts are continuing for the project. For more information, email Ahlgren at mahlgren@portangeles schools.org or phone 360-565-1921.

Land

trust is beneficiary

Idah Smith of Jim’s Pharmacy presents an $848.98 donation to Matthew Randazzo, development director of the North Olympic Land Trust, which was the store’s “Shop with Loyalty & Shop Locally” nonprofit organization for September. Since starting the “Shop with Loyalty & Shop Locally” program in April 2008, Jim’s has given $28,981.60 to local charities and nonprofits. Jim’s is supporting Operation Uplift this month.

Seattle-based graphic novelist David Lasky will host 90-minute drawing workshops at three North Olympic Library System libraries next week as part of Teen Read Week’s theme of “Picture It @ Your Library.” Lasky will visit the Forks Library, 171 S. Forks Ave., at 3:30 p.m. and the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., at 6:30 p.m. on Monday. He will be at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., at 4 p.m. on Tuesday. These programs are free and are intended for ages 12-18. No registration is required, but space is limited. Lasky will give a brief talk on how he got started in comics and

then will show participants how they can get started. He will walk participants through the process of designing a simple character and planning a short story. Attendees will be invited to create a short comic book during the course of the workshop. This program is in observance of Teen Read Week, developed by the Young Adult Library Services Association and the American Library Association. The goal of Teen Read Week is to encourage young adults to read and to highlight the variety of books and other materials available at public and school libraries. For more information, visit www.nols.org and click on “Youth” and “Young Adults.”


C2

Classified

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

31

SNEAK A PEEK

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

• •

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

TO DAY ’ S H OT T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

AGNEW: Private, wooded 1 Br. on 5 ac. $725. 460-9710. BROTHER & SISTER TEAM. Looking for caretaker position-home, farm, business. Quiet, drug free, responsible and trustworthy, late 50s. Love animals, do maintenance, give you more freedom while keeping your property safe. Small salary with separate, private small quarters or larger salary if not. Personal references available. Karen Donny 360-808-0698 Business Liquidation. Oct 14-16 FriSun 8-4. Restaurant equipment, magnetic induction cooktop, commercial refrigerators, freezer and convection oven, stainless steel sinks tables, faucets, kitchen items, mixers, soup warmer, china, plates, tea cups, saucers, tea pots, flatware, serving items, tiered serving trays, shelves, book cases, display cabinet, furnishings, lighting, decor, cash register, Nurit card machine, a/c unit, printer, comp desk, mirror, butcher block kitchen island. Antique loveseat Wingback chairs. Everything goes some personal stuff too. Bring your own boxes, bags and strong backs. 645 W. Washington STE 3. Cafe Blossom FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. GARAGE Sale: Thurs.-Fri., 9-3 p.m., 40 Meadow Drive. Recliners, sofa, end tables, Holiday items, household items and so much more. P.A.: 2 ered large $900.

Br., 1 ba, covparking with storage room. 670-6160.

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-4 p.m. 1206 W. 15th St., P.A. Books, Barbies, collectibles, TV/ speakers, bed, table, chairs, entertainment center, hutch, couch, book case, Christmas, house plants, exercise equipment, women’s clothing/ shoes, many other kitchen, cleaning, office, gardening and household items.

MA: Per diem, medical experience required, wage DOE. Send resume to SSDS, 777 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. MEXICO: 2 luxury units, Pueblo Bonito Blanco resort in Cabo San Lucas, $600 per unit. (A Steal!). Nov 7-14, 6 nights. 457-0151. MISC: Max Weider Crossbow (like Bow Flex), used very little, paid $500, will sell for $200. Nice treadmill, $50. Peavy Powered speaker, 15”, very little use, $200. Call 460-4938, ask for Lecia.

HAND GUN: Taurus, model 617-Titanium, 7 shot, .357 magnum, collectors item, factory ported, super light, 4 speed loaders. $600. MOTOR HOME: ‘94 360-509-6763 19’ Falcon Sport van. HARLEY: ‘49 Pan He- recreational ad Chopper. Compl- 35K, fully loaded, exc. cond. $8,600. etely restored, have 452-2215 all receipts, beautiful bike. $17,000. OIL STOVE: Toyo360-731-0677 stove Laser 56, compact and very effiHOME HEALTH cient. $680. DEPARTMENT 457-6845 DIRECTOR Full-time Mon.-Fri., with rotating week- PROM DRESS: 2 ends. Prior manageshort and 1 long, ment and durable like new, $25 each medical equipment/ call for sizes and billing exp. a MUST. color. And prom Needs to be a good shoes 7 ? and 8 $10 organizer, multi-task each. Call oriented and have 452-9693 excellent management skills. Pick up RECEPTIONIST application at Jim’s For busy office. MUST Pharmacy, 424 E. be great with people 2nd St., P.A. EOE. and be able to multiHONDA: ’06 Civic task. Send resume: Peninsula Daily News Hybrid. 112K hwy. mi., tinted windows, PDN#234/Reception nice wheels, mount- Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ed snow tires, very RELOADING EQUIP. clean. Just retired. Redding Boss Press, $9,500/obo Dillon CV-500 Vibra360-731-0677 tory tumbler, 4 bags, Lower Elwha Dental Corn cob media and Clinic seeking full polish, Redding #2 time experienced scale and extras. Dental Assistant; one $300 all. 457-6845 with experience in expanded functions, four handed Den- SEQUIM: 219 Matriottistry, enjoys taking ti, 2 Br., 1 ba, W/D, pets/smoking, care of patients, and no wants to work with a 1st, last, dept. $650. 681-4809 great team in a growing clinic. Please SOFA: Natuzzi leather send your resume and application to: sofa, light tan, 75” Employment Ser- long, 1 yr old. Excelvices, 2851 Lower lent condition. $550. 385-4320 Elwha Road, Port Angeles, WA 98363. WOOD STOVE LepRIFLE: 1898 Spring- Waterford field 30-40 Craig. rechaun. $500. 360-808-2926 $300 firm. 460-0658.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Shop Vac. Alley behind Rudy’s Automotive. 457-0700 f O U N D : W o m a n ’s Ring. On Park Ave., near Peninsula College, P.A. 452-2040. LOST: Woman’s wallet. Black and purple, two zipper pouches, in P.A. Call Kaycee at 360-912-1152

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

Case Manager-PATH Program for WEOS Full-time This position involves outreach to persons who are homeless and who have mental health/substance use issues. Additional duties include working with our housing support team in providing supportive services and developing housing resources. Bachelors degree in social sciences, social work or related area and 2 years mental health treatment experience preferred. Closely related experience may be substituted for education and/or mental health experience preference. The pay range is DOE Send resumes to Gena @ genab@forkshospital.org. CNA for Long Term Care Full-time and Part-time Washington State Certification required The pay range is $10.56 – $15.12 Send resumes to Gena @ genab@forkshospital.org.

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

OR E-MAIL:

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

CNA/NAR Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com Development Mgr for First Step 25 hrs. wk. For req/full desc or to submit resume email fstep@olypen.com EOE

www.peninsula dailynews.com

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

AUTO SALESPERSON Koenig Chevrolet Subaru is looking for a highly motivated individual for our Auto Salesperson position. Excellent pay program and benefits. Contact Bill Koenig Chevrolet Subaru 457-4444

FOUND: Ponies. 681-3087

Compose your Classified Ad on

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

HOME HEALTH DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR Full-time Mon.-Fri., with rotating weekends. Prior management and durable medical equipment/ billing exp. a MUST. Needs to be a good organizer, multi-task oriented and have excellent management skills. Pick up application at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. Lower Elwha Dental Clinic seeking full time experienced Dental Assistant; one with experience in expanded functions, four handed Dentistry, enjoys taking care of patients, and wants to work with a great team in a growing clinic. Please send your resume and application to: Employment Services, 2851 Lower Elwha Road, Port Angeles, WA 98363.

Olympic ESD 114 is hiring for: HS/ECEAP Coordinator Assistant, Child Development To apply: oesd.wednet.edu 360-479-0993 EOE & ADA

Olympic ESD 114 is hiring for: Infant & Toddler Coordinator Assistant: Two Positions To apply: oesd.wednet.edu 360-479-0993 EOE & ADA ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

31

Help Wanted

HANDYMAN: Reliable repairman. Rent/ wages. 620-0482. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. MA: Per diem, medical experience required, wage DOE. Send resume to SSDS, 777 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. PAINTER/PREPPER Wages DOE. Pick up application at Evergreen Collision, 820 E Front St., P.A. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

RECEPTIONIST For busy office. MUST be great with people and be able to multitask. Send resume: Peninsula Daily News PDN#234/Reception Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SCHEDULER Schedule clinical appointments. Exper req’d. FT with benefits. Resume & cvr ltr to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE WSDOT is currently seeking to fill a permanent Maintenance Technician 2 position Located in Sekiu. For more information please visit the following internet address: http://bit.ly/q2dcI1

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Work Wanted

BROTHER & SISTER TEAM. Looking for caretaker position-home, farm, business. Quiet, drug free, responsible and trustworthy, late 50s. Love animals, do maintenance, give you more freedom while keeping your property safe. Small salary with separate, private small quarters or larger salary if not. Personal references available. Karen Donny 360-808-0698 CUSTOM WOODWORKING Entertainment centers, mantles, work stations, bookcases, design through installation. Local references. Reasonable rates. 452-4347. Enrich your garden. Fall program. Prune, weed, feed, mulch. Outstanding results. Sunshine Gardening 452-9821 HANDYMAN: Sequim area, references, $15 hr. 775-7364. HOME CLEANING Reliable, dependable, flexible. Call Meredith 360-461-6508. LAWN & YARD CARE SERVICES Mowing, Weeding, Edging, Hedge Trimming, Pruning, Landscape Maintenance & General Clean-up. Tom at 452-3229 Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fast, reliable, reasonable rates, fall clean-up, gutter cleaning, weed pulling/whacking, brush clearing, debris hauling. Sequim/P.A. area. Local: 681-3521. Cell: 541-420-4795.

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51

Work Wanted

Homes

Housecleaning, pet walking, errands. Mature, reliable. 683-4567 Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513 Yard cleanup, hedges, fire wood, misc. 452-3076 Mark. Young Couple, Early Sixties. available for moss removal, fall clean-up, garden restoration, fence and deck repairs. Excellent references. Chip & Sunny’s Groundskeeping Services 360-457-1213

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

41

Business Opportunities

www.kbsilverandgold wealth.com

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

10 ACRE RANCH Tucked away in the Elwha Valley the beautiful ranch is a short distance to the Elwha River, close to riding trails, and 1.5 miles to the park entrance. The home features upgraded kitchen and baths, large master suite with separate shower and jetted tub. The main barn features a 1 Br., 1 bath apartment, horse stalls, workshop, and tack room. Pastures have electric fencing. $385,000. ML260930. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. New carpet. Bathrooms newly remodeled with tile shower and granite countertops. Peek-a-boo water view and mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 27x20 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. $199,000. 360-460-7503

A PANORAMIC WATER, ISLAND & MOUNTAIN VIEW HOME overlooks P.A., Strait, Vancouver Island and Victoria. Borders Nat’l Park. Great home. Photos at: bitly.com/PAhome FSBO. $238,000. 360-452-8770 AFFORDABLE Adorable water view home in Port Angeles. See Victoria, Ediz Hook, the Coho and ships go by. All new light fixtures and newer windows and laminate flooring. Nice fenced backyard with alley access. $170,000. ML261557 Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East BEAUTIFUL 2006 custom built home on 1.24 acres with commanding views of the Olympic Mountains and Straits of Juan De Fuca. 2 Br. (1 up and 1down), plus a large office with 2 1/2 baths in 2,488 sf. Home is in “like new” condition with oak hardwood floors, lots of cabinets, coriantype countertops, heat pump, and a wood fireplace. Bathrooms have tiled floors. Both front and back yards are on timed sprinklers. 3rd level is an eagle’s nest with huge water views. $439,000. ML261697/260710 Dave Stofferahn 477-5542 and Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY BEST KEPT SECRET Price was reduced by $25,000. 4 Br., easy living, new roof, paint, fenced side yard, granite counters, new carpet, off street parking and main level has 2 Br., and 2 baths. Sits on 2 corner lots, unique water feature under entry walkway. Lower level entry has 2 Br., bath and family room with wet bar. Nice mountain view and tall evergreens. Don’t overlook this home. $299,900. ML252056 Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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Homes

CAREFREE LIVING Dominion Terrace condo, immaculate 1 Br., 1 bath unit. Upgraded flooring and appliances. Cozy den addition, too many amenities to list. $94,500. ML172278/260131 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Country Living Ranch Home On Acreage For Sale By Owner. Beautiful end of the road privacy on 2.5 acres with optional adjacent parcels available up to 20 acres. 3 spacious bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1996 custom built 1825 sf home. $295,000 Jerry 360460-2960. ENJOY COUNTRY LIVING 3 Br., 2.5 bath home on just under 2 acres. Custom cherry cabinets and hardwood floors. Large wraparound deck. Nicely landscaped with raised beds and greenhouse. Bonus room over garage. $419,500 ML253317/261533 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FANTASTIC PRICE! Home located in the Resort at Port Ludlow. Established neighborhood, close to all amenities. 3 Br., 1.5 bath. Propane fireplace, carport. $199,500. ML279629. Nancy Rathke 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow For Sale By Owner 3 Br., 2 ba, 1.25 acres, built in ‘94, newly renovated, insulated, thermo pane windows, 1,400 sf plus 2 lg. decks, garage, breakfast nook, Discovery Trail out back door, natural spring. 526 N. Bagley Ck., P.A. $165,000. 206-856-0279 or 360-808-2981 GREAT AREA, GREAT HOME! Spacious 2 Br. home on quiet dead-end street by high school. Home features large bedrooms, vaulted ceilings, great garage/ workshop and newer roof and windows. Don’t miss this one! $139,000 ML261941/277414 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. HOME SWEET HOME This home has been in this family for 3 generations. Great back yard for gardening and enjoying mountain view. Generous living space in the living room and parlor. Conveniently located on bus line and close to grocery. You’ll love the vintage touches throughout. $149,000. ML261890. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring Bath Aides & Restorative Aides Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim is looking for 3 Bath Aides & Restorative Aides to complete our care team. Please call Heather Jeffers at 582-3900 for more information.

195135153

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5000900

DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

Help Wanted

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Homes

If you’ve been waiting for a large home with dual views in a central neighborhood, here’s your chance to have a great home for less than you could build it! The rooms are ample with a large lower level family room and upper level living room with gorgeous water views. $200,000 ML261965/278378 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. INCREDIBLE 180º MTN VIEW Almost new (2010) 5 acres. Partially fenced. Custom built. Chef’s kitchen, stainless steel appliances, wall oven and gas cooktop. Granite counters and eating bar, 2 master suites. 6’ glass block shower. Large den. Fireplace, covered deck, patio. 2 car attached garage. RV parking. $489,000. ML261579. Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LOVE TO GARDEN? Amazing landscaping featuring an array of fabulous perennials, ornamentals and trees in a fully fenced setting with pond. This tri-level home with large deck and hot tub offers spectacular views of Discovery Bay and Cape George. $259,000 ML260711/206519 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NORTHWEST STYLE Great split level home with 2 Br., 2 bath and 1,828 sf has been well maintained and is located in Sunland. On a large lot, spacious interior, beautiful brick fireplace and all of the Sunland amenities (tennis, swimming, clubhouse, beach). $225,000. ML261689. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 OUT OF THE TENSION ZONE On 5 acres off a quiet lane set amidst meadows and woods is a 4 Br., 3.5 bath, 3,059 sf home. Intricate detailing, formal and family dining areas, quiet music or TV room, 3 car attached garage and 2 car detached garage/workshop. Adjacent to state land and near public beach access. Possible seller financing available. A place to unwind naturally at a relaxing price. $495,000. ML260969. Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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C3

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. THE MONTE CARLO COUNTRY CLUB Solution: 9 letters

By Patti Varol

10/12/11

69 Tiny fraction of a min. 70 One of the Gilmore girls DOWN 1 Internet failure, punnily 2 ’80s Republican strategist Lee 3 Court concerned with wills 4 Crash site? 5 E-file org. 6 Apple of one’s eye 7 Not easily amused 8 Most likely to raise eyebrows 9 Vital sign 10 Happens because of 11 Cracker with a hole in the middle 12 Holiday glitter 15 “What are you gonna do about it?!” 17 “__ la Douce” 21 Mensa stats 24 Grammar class no-no 25 13-year-old Apple 31 TGIF eve? Homes

‘P’ IS FOR POSSIBILITIES Single story house on .28 acre with light industrial zoning opens up a world of business possibilities. Large rooms, many upgrades, located mere seconds from downtown Port Angeles. Bring your imagination! $99,900. ML261887. Eileen Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company SPACIOUS 1,832, sf home in a great Port Angeles neighborhood. Beautiful hardwood floors, brick fireplace and a recently updated Kitchen. $179,500 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 SPACIOUS RAMBLER On oversized west side lot. 3 Br., 2 bath, family room with fireplace, formal dining room plus nook. A private south side patio and much more! $225,000. ML261905 Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY SPARKLING NEW Manufactured home in beautiful Dungeness Meadows on your own land. Includes clubhouse, golf course, swimming pool and trail on dyke. Detached garage 572 sf, expanded decking. Security patrol. Come and be close to the Dungeness River and all it offers. $139,000. ML261972. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SUNLAND SALTWATER VIEW CONDO 4 Br., 3 bath plus den, chef’s kitchen with granite counters, large rec room, teak hardwood floors, master bath with jetted tub and tile shower, across from the Sunland Clubhouse. $424,000. ML231952/261204 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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C O M P E T I T I V E S T N E

S Q U A S H O W C A S E S O S

C O U R T S E A S O N R A O R

© 2011 Universal Uclick

A S D I N F T S E D L O O K E

L L T B P A R I S P F C B E B

L L I E R C M T W L I S E R M

E I C G O I Y E I S O R S T E

www.wonderword.com

T R K A L L D G N T S O T R M

O H E L E I H G N T R B P O A

H T R O F T R A I N T S O H R L I V H S X S I O E T I E S G T V W P A E Z S I K E R E T C Y O G A A ҹҹҹҹ E Y A L P A R S I T A S C T A P S O Y E S T E R S

10/12

Join us on Facebook

Bars, Base, Best, Boast, Bridge, Call, Competitive, Courts, Event, Facilities, Flights, Forth, Glitz, Hospitality, Host, Hotel, Masters, Members, Oldest, Packages, Paris, Players, Pools, Rolex, Schedules, Scores, Season, Seat, Showcases, Snooker, Sport, Squash, Style, Tennis, Thrills, Tickets, Title, Tournament, Train, Trip, Views, Village, Winner, Yoga Yesterday’s Answer: Treetops

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

OOERD ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

RDKIN (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

33 Question of method 35 Ball 37 Laced dress shoes 38 Start from scratch 39 Tide table term 40 1970 John Wayne western 41 Painting the town red 44 Eroded, as profits

Homes

THE PRICE IS RIGHT And the time is right to buy this new listing! a 1990, single level 3 Br., 2 bath home located in a quiet neighborhood on a large lot. A smart investment! $175,000. ML261908. Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY THIS PERFECTLY LOCATED HOME Sits on 2 city lots. Its design boasts lots of square footage and offers mountain views. The home includes 4 Br., 2 baths, a spacious family room, fireplace, extra storage, and a large shop off the garage. $167,500 ML261523/254600 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY VIEWS! Excellent 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,590 sf home centrally located, fenced backyard, living room and family room. Two decks one on each level facing the water and mtn views, too! Family room features expansive water views, balcony, tongue-in-groove ceiling and two bright skylights. Home offers a lot of storage including large crawl space that you can enter and walk into. New interior paint, hardwood floors just refinished and brand new carpet in living room, family room and stairs. $166,900. ML261611. Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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T E N N  I S E L U D E H C S D

Manufactured Homes

SUNLAND TOWNHOME New designer kitchen. 1,831 sf 3 Br., 2 bath, northwest murphy style bed in guest Br. Built in 1990, on the 10th fairway. $299,900 ML231504/261183 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

EASY LIVING IN HENDRICKSON PARK Open floor plan, 2 Br., 2 bath, kitchen with breakfast bar, dining room, living room. Master with large walk-in closet, master bath with 2 closets. Low maintenance yard, 10x12 storage shed in back yard with power, close to Safeway, SARC, stores, Olympic Discovery Trail. Located at back of cul-de-sac so very little road noise. $79,000. ML261616 Jan Sivertsen 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

52

Manufactured Homes

Light and bright, super good cents, 28x48 home in a peaceful, 55+ park. ADA ramp access with attached carport and wood storage shed. New Formica counter tops, hot water heater and entry doors. Updated with porcelain sinks, newer carpets and laminate flooring. $54,000 ML261451/246908 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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45 11-Down flavor 46 Lincoln forte 47 Writer Allende 49 French 101 article 50 Convertible, in slang 52 Balance due, e.g. 55 Hammer parts 56 Churns up 60 Reader of signs 63 “Go figure” 64 Ad __ committee

58

Commercial

FOR SALE OR LEASE This building on Front Street with Commercial Arterial zoning allows for many types of businesses. Currently set up as a hair salon, (salon chairs and hair dryers are negotiable). 5 paved parking spaces in the back off of the alley. $129,900. ML260036. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

‘W’ IS FOR WATER FRONT Amazing new prices on premium waterfront parcels between Sequim and Port Angeles. Owner financing available. Views of the islands, ships, eagles and whales. Power to the property and community water available. $124,900. ML252079 Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Farms/ Ranches

SHOW HORSE TRAINING FACILITY This working horse ranch has almost 18 acres of fenced and cross-fenced pasture, a new state of the art 11,520 sf barn with a 7,200 sf arena, 15 stalls, office, bath, wash and grooming area, 2 houses-each with separate water share and septic. $795,000. ML260905. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

62

LEBTLU

BLHEBO Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: Yesterday’s

Apartments Unfurnished

P.A.: Central, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, no smoke/pets. $650. Lease, credit check. 360-796-3560 P.A.: Newer west side studio apt., utilities incl., W/D, no smoking. $575 mo., $500 dep. 670-9329. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

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Apartments Furnished

WINTER SPECIAL Motel weekly, $179. Continental breakfast, microwave, refr., bathtub, Wi-Fi. Clean. 457-9494.

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Apartments Unfurnished

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Houses

1725 W. 5th P.A. 2 Br. $600, no smoking/pets. 457-1632. 20 MIN. TO SEQ. OR P.T.: 3 Br, 2 ba, water view, lg. deck, 3-car gar., all appl., boat ramp near by, cr. ck, ref $1,100. 683-2799 AGNEW: Private, wooded 1 Br. on 5 ac. $725. 460-9710. Between P.A. & Sequim. 2 Br., 1 bath with W/D/S/R on 1.5 acres. Super clean! Storage shed. No pets. $775. Available now. 360-452-7721.

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean quiet, upstairs 2 Br., in well managed complex. Excellent references required. 457-7149 CENTRAL PA: 2 Br., 1 bath. Close to Safeway, quiet. No smoke/pets. Ref req. $575. 460-5892. CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $600 plus dep. 1502 C St., P.A. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423 COLLEGE P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba. No pets. $500. 457-1611 P.A.: 1 Br. $600 mo., $250 dep., util. incl No pets. 457-6196.

CENTRAL P.A.: Country in the city, 2 Br., 2 ba, updated with computer room. $825/$850. Drive by 415 S. Valley then call 460-7652.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula!

P.A.: Available now, 2 Br. deluxe town house, 1,400 sf. 1.5 bath. $800. No pets. 457-6181

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64

Houses

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, covered parking with large storage room. $900. 670-6160. P.A.: Pvt 2 Br., 2 bath, pics ezpa.net, 1,400 sf. $675. 452-5140. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: Exc. water view 2 Br. $765. tourfactory.com/397357

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Commercial Space

Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 PEABODY PLAZA 1 or 2 person, 7th and Peabody. $375 mo. 452-1232 ext. 11 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Duplexes

SEQUIM: 219 Matriotti, 2 Br., 1 ba, W/D, no pets/smoking, 1st, last, dept. $650. 681-4809

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

(Answers tomorrow) ASKED FINALE BREWED Jumbles: SWIFT Answer: When asked how many cartoons he’d drawn, the Jumble artist did this — DREW A BLANK

WEST P.A.: 1 Br. $550 + dep. 460-4089. mchughrents.com

63

Lots/ Acreage

Nice sunny level parcel with many improvements is ready for your new home. The well is in at 71ft and gets 30gpm per the well log. The septic site registration has been completed for a sand filter to pressurized drain field and the permit expires 6/28/2014. Awesome mountain view plus pastoral views. $96,000 ML261527 Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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10/12/11

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Skips, as stones 5 __ jure: by the law itself 9 Ancient Briton 13 Catchall survey opción 14 Like a prof. emeritus: Abbr. 15 Raw fish dish 16 *Itching for a fight 18 From years past 19 Elephant in stories 20 Prints a new edition of 22 Suffix in taxonomy 23 *Steady guy or gal 26 Gathered together 27 Objective 28 “Cats” poet’s monogram 29 Up to, casually 30 Author Harte 32 “Let’s not” 34 Like law school courts 36 *Third base, in baseball lingo 40 Gumbo thickener 42 Quite small 43 “Oedipus Tex” composer P.D.Q. __ 47 “There’s no __ team” 48 Cat’s pajamas? 51 Man of the house 53 However, briefly 54 *Shower convenience 57 Suffix for velvet 58 Batman, for Bruce Wayne 59 Surprise hit, maybe 61 Threw verbal tomatoes 62 Football linemen, or an apt description of the last words of the answers to starred clues 65 Black hues, in poetry 66 Spread in a tub 67 Pierre’s South Dakota? 68 A whole bunch

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 2 ba......$750 H 2 br 2 ba......$895 H 4 br 2 ba....$1050 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 1 ba....$1200 HOUSES IN JOYCE H 2 br 1 ba......$500 H 3 br 1 ba......$850 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 H 3 br 2 ba....$1500

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 2 Br. house, $895. 3 Br. duplex, $795. 452-1395.

SEQUIM 150 Deytona St. 2 Br. single wide and outbuildings on fenced half acre. No smoking, pets negotiable. Annual lease $675 + util. Drive by, Olypenhomes.com or call 452-4258.

SEQUIM/BLYN: 2 Br., 2 ba w/den on 1 acre w/pond. W/D, D/W. 1,200 sf, high ceilings, bkfst bar, deck. No garage. $900/mo. F/L/dep. 461-2588. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, fenced, hdwd floors, no pets, Nov. 1st. $1,200. 461-9593.

SEQUIM: 4 Br., 3 ba for rent now. $1,150/mo. 1 year lease. No smokers. Ref's req'd. Scott: 360-388-8474 SEQUIM: New, 2 Br., 2 car gar., granite/ hardwoods, yard maintained. $1,150 mo. 460-0432. W.SIDE HOUSE AND SHOP.3+BD,1BA., 3BAY garage (RV) w/ storage. Fully fenced yard. No smoking. Bkgrd. check req. $1,000 per mo. + utilities. Call 360-457-8126

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

ROOM: $200. Female must be over 60 and non smoking. 928-1090

67

Vacation

MEXICO: 2 luxury units, Pueblo Bonito Blanco resort in Cabo San Lucas, $600 per unit. (A Steal!). Nov 7-14, 6 nights. 457-0151.

68

Commercial Space

LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

72

Furniture

HOSPITAL BED: Sunrise medical electric. Model #IC5890. $2,000 new. Asking $350/obo. You haul. 582-0373 LOVE SEAT: Floral French provincial, like new. $225. 477-1328, 457-4756 MISC: 83” sofa, red and gold plaid, exc. cond., $400. Cherry queen headboard, $150, matching mirrors, $75. (2) occasional tables, $75 and $50. 582-0954. MISC: Oak (inlay) coffee and (2) end tables, $300. 1940s Winthrop secretary, $800. Singer sewing machine in cabinet, $300. 775-220-9611.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

MISC: Pine china hutch, $250. Pine armoire, $500. (2) Flat screen projection Sony tvs, $250 ea. Light wood dining table with leaf, 6 chairs, $125. 452-1003, call after 5.

Appliances

SOFA BED: Single, in very nice oak cabinet, cost $1,400. Sell $450. 452-7745.

DISHWASHER Kenmore, under counter, very nice. Works well. $50. 681-4429

SOFA: Natuzzi leather sofa, light tan, 75” long, 1 yr old. Excellent condition. $550. 385-4320

MISC: 25 cf refrigerator side-by-side, front door ice and water, excellent, $650. Upright freezer, 15 cf good condition, $150. 452-3200

72

Furniture

BED: Full size mattress and box springs, plush eurotop, in great shape. Over $800 new. Selling for $300/obo. 681-3299 BUNK BED: Complete unit with desk, chair, shelves, wardrobe, mattresses, bunky boards, good condition, paid $1,400. Sell for $575/obo. 775-1035. DINING SET: Dining table and 6 chairs, solid cherry, double pedestal table. 2 capt. chairs, 4 side, upholstered seats. Perfect condition. $700. 504-2017. DINING TABLE: Oak leaf, seats 6, recently upholstered chairs, excellent condition, pictures available. $200. 379-6456 or 360-302-0239. FURNITURE SET Sunroom furniture set, 5 piece deluxe, like new. Includes love seat, chair, tables, stool, and lamp. $500. 681-6076.

73

General Merchandise

ASSORTED ITEMS Large blonde pedestal dining table and 4 chairs; (2) coffee tables; assorted table lamps; (2) TVs. From $15-$150. Call for info. 417-7685

BOX TRAILER: ‘06 24’+. Excellent shape. $6,500. 683-8162 CANOPY SHELVING Made by Leer, to fit inside pickup bed camper shell. Used with side doors. Call for details. $500. 683-8810 CAR TRAILER: 6’x12’ single axle small car trailer. Also works great for ATVs. $500. 460-0262, 681-0940 CEMETERY PLOT: 1, Sequim View Cemetery, space #3, Lot 507, division 3, value approx. $1,200. Asking $750. 452-5638, evenings. CEMETERY PLOTS (2) Plots in Dungeness Cemetery, lot 133. Retail $1,900 each, both $2,500. 509-341-9082


C4

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011

73

General Merchandise

73

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Cord $160, delivered. Proceeds to P.A. Senior Class ‘12. 417-4663. FIREWOOD: Seasoned, ready to burn, come see quality.$175+. 461-6843

FLATBED TRAILER 20.5’ dual 3,500 lb. axles trailer with new brakes, wiring, battery, wheel bearings and paint. Licensed and ready for your choice of decking. Must sell! $1,200/obo. 477-0903

73

General Merchandise

MISC: Flat screen monitor, Acer 20”, new in box, $100. 3 piece wicker set, 2 chairs, love seat (needs paint), $40. Dishes, spring, fall, winter, $15-$50. 928-3483 MISC: Max Weider Crossbow (like Bow Flex), used very little, paid $500, will sell for $200. Nice treadmill, $50. Peavy Powered speaker, 15”, very little use, $200. Call 460-4938, ask for Lecia. MISC: New trex accents decking madera color, $2.70 ft. Diamond plate truck toolbox, $150. New RV cover, 34' class A, $200. 5th wheel louvered tailgate fits chevy, $125. 6' tilt angle 3 point blade, $175. 360-683-2254

LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

Classified General Merchandise

FRONTIER WOOD STOVE Take 16” wood. $450. 360-732-4328 Mobility Scooter Rascal 600 Model, red, almost new, 2 baskets. $899. 452-5303 OIL STOVE: Toyostove Laser 56, compact and very efficient. $680. 457-6845 POWER CHAIR Jazzy, 1103 Ultra, with power seat, 300 lb. weight capacity, used very little only in house. $3,300 681-2346 PROM DRESS: 2 short and 1 long, like new, $25 each call for sizes and color. And prom shoes 7 ? and 8 $10 each. Call 452-9693 ROTOTILLER Troy-Bilt, 8 hp. $300. 808-1052

MISC: Trash burner, $140. Upright heavy duty Kirby vacuum, w/attachments and carpet cleaning attach., $150. 7 quart Presto canner, $50. 12” cement patio blocks, 50¢ each. 360-379-1099 MISC: Washer/dryer, $200. XXXL leather jacket, $200. (2) twin beds, $80. Rear hitch carrier, $225. 457-8376

SEAHAWKS TICKETS (2) adjoining seats, all games. Sold in sets only. Section 302, row J. $100/set. 477-3292 Tools/Shop Equip. Saws, sanders, drills, and more. $25$300. 681-2908 for details. Sale is in Rural Sequim Area.

73

General Merchandise

SHOP SMITH: With jigsaw attachment. $200. 477-4573. WOOD STOVE Quadra Fire 3100, certified, heats 2,000+ sf. $650. 681-2519. WOOD STOVE Waterford Leprechaun. $500. 360-808-2926

75

Musical

75

BASS GUITAR: EMG acoustic electric bass, stand, gig bag, and amp. $225. 457-1289 PIANO: Samick upright, ebony black, used once. $2,000. 681-0227 PIANO: Spinett, good condition. $500. 452-6661

76

GUITARS REDUCED! Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $175. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $125. Both in new condition, great sound! Make an offer! 477-0903. LAP HARPS: (2) never used brand new. Stoney End Isabella Cross String, $900/obo. Mideast Heather, hand carved, $450. Both with padded cases and extra new set of strings. 808-8608.

76

Musical

Sporting Goods

DAD’S GUN: Hi-Standard 22 long rifle pistol, model “B”, 6.5” barrel, 3 magazines and original leather holster, 1930s era. $450. 681-5373. FIREARMS: 1911 .45 cal., $625. Marlin 3030, with Leopold scope, $550. Call Marty at 670-8918. GUN SHOP at the P.A. Antique Mall, 109 W. 1st St. Taking guns on consignment, 1 low fee. Buying/trading/selling guns, rifles scopes, binoculars, spotting scopes Special order new guns, dealer plus 10%. We do scope mounting, also buying gold/silver. Call 452-1693 or 457-6699

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

77

Sporting Goods

78E

Bargain Box

FISHING POLES: (8), 2 with reels, 8’-10’. $150 all. 582-3132. HEARTH: For woodstove. Beige tile 49”x 49”. $100. 582-3132

HAND GUN: Taurus, model 617-Titanium, 7 shot, .357 magnum, collectors item, factory ported, super light, 4 speed loaders. $600. 360-509-6763

78A

POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746.

Garage Sales Central P.A.

Indoor Moving/ Garage Sale. October 15th and 16th Multi-Family Sale. Household items, furniture, children’s items, fish tank, 1/2 size Cello, Luggage set, and much more. 3002 Oakcrest Loop 7 AM to 3 PM Saturday. 8 AM to noon on Sunday.

RELOADING EQUIP. Redding Boss Press, Dillon CV-500 Vibratory tumbler, 4 bags, Corn cob media and polish, Redding #2 scale and extras. $300 all. 457-6845

78B

REVOLVER: Ruger GP100, 4” barrel, caliber 327 federal mag, new in box, $450. 460-4491.

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-4 p.m. 1206 W. 15th St., P.A. Books, Barbies, collectibles, TV/ speakers, bed, table, chairs, entertainment center, hutch, couch, book case, Christmas, house plants, exercise equipment, women’s clothing/ shoes, many other kitchen, cleaning, office, gardening and household items.

RIFLE: 1898 Springfield 30-40 Craig. $300 firm. 460-0658. RUGER: M77 Tang Safety 7mm mag, new Leupold VX-III, 6 boxes ammo, sling, case, custom stock. $1,000 firm 417-2165 WANTED: Gun parts, reloading items, ammo. 379-6519.

Garage Sales Sequim

Business Liquidation. Oct 14-16 FriSun 8-4. Restaurant equipment, magnetic induction cooktop, commercial refrigerators, freezer and convection oven, stainless steel sinks tables, faucets, kitchen items, mixers, soup warmer, china, plates, tea cups, saucers, tea pots, flatware, serving items, tiered serving trays, shelves, book cases, display cabinet, furnishings, lighting, decor, cash register, Nurit card machine, a/c unit, printer, comp desk, mirror, butcher block kitchen island. Antique loveseat Wingback chairs. Everything goes some personal stuff too. Bring your own boxes, bags and strong backs. 645 W. Washington STE 3. Cafe Blossom

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

GARAGE Sale: Thurs.-Fri., 9-3 p.m., 40 Meadow Drive. Recliners, sofa, end tables, Holiday items, household items and so much more.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Old flat head Ford parts, speed equip. 452-8092.

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

COCKATIELS: Hand fed. Single $25. Mates $45. Turkeys, young, $25 ea. 452-9084 or 460-2375

Wood Stove Pellets Eureka, Olympus, Pacific. $185-$240 ton. 452-1400.

ORGAN/PIANO Small, electric, excellent condition, includes seat, light, earphones and music. $450. 452-9084 or 460-2375

GUNS: Model Tech 9mm with 2 clips, $325. Hi-Point, model 995, 9mm, $325. Sell both for $600. 460-9080.

AUTO REPAIR

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

BAGPIPER

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

WANTED: Guns, ammo, scopes. The older the better. Worn or broken ok. 683-9899

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

SHOP LOCAL

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

peninsula dailynews.com

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1A5136085

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s TTractor ractor SService er vice

Window Washing

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

452-0755 775-6473

+e W We

360-670-1350 360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

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76289935

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461-4609

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JP

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Larry Muckley

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

(360) 683-8332

REPAIR/REMODEL

s Handyman Services

In sid e , O u ts id e , A ny sid e

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

155122063

457-6582 808-0439

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

ASBESTOS

WANTED: Wind Damaged

& Leaky Roofs

G

D

ARLAN ROOFING

457-5186

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

TREE SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN TREES

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

Small Jobs A Specialty

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

FREE S ATE ESTIM

Contr#KENNER1951P8

(360) 460-0518 165122885

anthonystreetop@gmail.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges 72289323

Full 6 Month Warranty

452-9995

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

360

0A5100969

155120082

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

Quality roofing at a reasonable price Honest & Reliable

75289698

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Inspections - Testing Surveys

ROOFING

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

Asbestos

WINDOW CLEANING

APPLIANCES

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

COLUMC*955KD

Reg#FINIST*932D0

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

125111256

Painting & Pressure Washing

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Columbus Construction

86313195

FOX PAINTING

Call NOW To Advertise

78289849

PAINTING

Call NOW To Advertise

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

115108502

JPSHAHS92BE

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

AIR DUCT CLEANING

John Pruss 360 808-6844

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

LARRYHM016J8

PAINTING

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

(360) (360)

27 Year Certified Master Service Tech

195133749

Chad Lund

A M D Auto,Inc.

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

Small jobs is what I do!

195134780

WINDOW WASHING

9C5066307

TRACTOR

115105618

FENCING

LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

025073138

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

EXCAVATING

DIRT WORK JK DIRTWORKS INC. 360/460•9824

SERVICES

PAINTING

JJami’s ami’s

Davis Painting

PROPERTY P ROPERTY MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business.

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience

Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

Done Right Home Repair

Jim Green Painting

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

Remodels Handicap Access Painting

Windows & Doors Concrete

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right Glen Spear, Owner

Lic#DONERRH943NA

EXT./INT. RESIDENTIAL/COMM.

FREE Estimates

LANDSCAPING

LIC#RSSCHSS8950F Bonded/Insured

OUT ON A LIMB

Landscape Services WE CAN HELP 12 years in the PA/Sequim Area

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452-3480

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• • • •

Fall Planting On-site Garden Coaching Create an Action Plan Garden Cleanup

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(360) 457-8479

www.OutOnALimbLandscape.com

195134212

SERVICES

155121476

683-8328

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

HOME REPAIR

LIC

CALL FOR ESTIMATE

195134825

Expert Pruning

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 23 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

contact@jkdirtworks.com

GUTTER CLEANING PRESSURE WASHING DEBRIS HAULING • CARPET CLEANING

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JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER

945036615

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195133545

Mole Control

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

Interiors, Exteriors, Drywall Repair Pressure Washing, Sandblasting New and Existing

MOLE/PRUNING

WINDOW CLEANING

Accounting Services, Inc.

165124112

5 582-0384 82-0384

RS SCHMIDT ENTERPRISES Lena Washke

Residential • Commercial Industrial • Marine

No job to small! Serving Diamond Point, Clallam & Jefferson Counties

WINDOW CLEANING

1A5136085

195134677

Yard Service • Odd Jobs Hauling • Property Clean up Moving • Brush Removal Hedge Trimming Roof/Gutter Cleaning Tree Pruning Accepting New Contracts

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

82

92

Pets

FREE: To good home. Female Lutino Cockatiel. Must bring own cage to pick up. If you want more info please call Kathy Barnes at 683-5796. FREE: To good home. Older dog, older cat. Desperately need home to love them. Can go separately. 477-3117 Northwest Farm Terrier Puppies. Versatile, medium-sized, healthy, intelligent. Born 7/21/11, $350 for males, $400 for females, price includes papers, flea and tick treatment, vaccinated and wormed twice. Great dogs! 360-928-0273. sg1953@yahoo.com PUPPIES: 2 beautiful male Mini Schnauzer puppies. 16 weeks. Outstanding no-shed coats. Very loveable and attentive. Tails cropped, dew claws removed, 3 times wormed, first, second and third shots. Leash and potty training started, well puppy vet checked. Both parents on site. $475. 681-7480.

83

Farm Animals

CHICKS: Young hen and rooster, and layers. Start at $2.50 up to $20. 460-9670.

84

Horses/ Tack

QUARTER HORSE 7 yrs. old, sure footed, well trained, trail riding horse, 14.4 hands, soral colored, beautiful must see. $900/obo. Text message or call 360-912-1122 Please Serious inquires only

85

Farm Equipment

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DOZER: ‘94 550 Long track Case. With brush rake. $15,000. 683-8332. DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

MISC: Cat 12 grader, 99E, $8,500. Detroit 4-53 engine, $2,500. Deutz BF6L913 engine, $1,500. Ranco end dump trailer, $17,000. ‘87 Peterbuilt 10 WH tractor, $16,000. Utility 40’ flatbed trailer, $6,000. (4) 17.5x25 loader tires, $1,000. 18” and 14” steel beams, .30¢/lb. 360-379-1752 PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071. SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618

93

Marine

ALUMINUM BOAT: 17’ Bass Tracker, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684. BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350 BOAT: 12’ aluminum with trailer, 6 hp motor and accessories. $1,500/obo. 808-0156 BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523. CAMPION: 21.5’ Explorer. Suzuki 225 hp, Yamaha 8 hp 4 stroke, radar, fish finder plotter, lots of extras. Exc. shape. 30 mile offshore boat. Call for details. $12,500. 385-7728. DINGHY: Mint condition sailing nesting dinghy including trailer, motor, mast, boom, sails, canvas cover. $3,200. 360-379-1616

DIVE BOAT: Inflatable 14’, heavy duty Hypalon, 40 hrs. on Honda 9.9 4 stroke, Transom wheels. $2,950 971-226-0002 HEWESCRAFT: 14’ with trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 KLAMATH: Welded aluminum boat, 14’ with galvanized trailer, 6 hp Johnson O/B, depth finder, good crabbing boat. $2,200. 565-6111. LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445 LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,000. 683-1957. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714

93

94

Marine

LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 206-397-9697 SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new electronics. Roller furling. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. Take as is, $10,000. 760-792-3891 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 SEARAY: 18’ 120 hp 220 Chev 4 cyl., Mercruiser O/B, new water pump, needs engine work, EZ Load trailer in great condition. $600/obo. 206-794-1104 TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384

94

Motorcycles

ATV: ‘07 Eton 150. 2WD, Viper, as new. $2,200. 683-6203. HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $14,000 452-2275 HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950 HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HARLEY: ‘49 Pan Head Chopper. Completely restored, have all receipts, beautiful bike. $17,000. 360-731-0677 HARLEY: ‘90 SportsterXLH 883. Cust. pearl paint w/ wolf/moon emblem, Screaming Eagle pkg, Corbin saddle, windshld, fwd contrls, saddlebags w/ quick-release brackets, Kuryakyn ISO grips, more. Stock seats, svc manual, HD sissybar/rack incl. Lots of power and modified gearing for hwy speeds. 20,900 mi. $3,600. 360-683-2182 HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633 HONDA: ‘03 XR100R. Excelelnt condition. $1,500. 808-3953. HONDA: ‘04 750 Aero Shadow. Gorgeous black and silver. $4,500. 452-0837. HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376 HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096. HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874 HONDA: ‘86 200 TLR trials bike. Unique, factory street legal. $750. 461-2627. HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,200/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200.

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Name Address Phone No.

Bring your ads to:

Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

3A181257

Peninsula Daily News Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 305 West 1st St., Port Angeles Port Angeles, WA 98362 or 150 S. 5th Ave. Ste 2, Sequim NO PHONE CALLS or FAX to: (360) 417-3507

QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,500/obo. 452-3051 QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 SCOOTER: ‘05 Honda Reflex. Like new condition, very low mi., 50+ mi. to the gal., Versahaul, other extras. $2,600. 360681-7102 for appt. SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $1,999/obo. 582-0841 SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643. SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bon. Exc. cond., extras. $5,500. 460-6780. YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $8900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701. YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957. 5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222

5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075 CAMPER: ‘03 10.6’ Bigfoot truck camper. 2500 series, color bamboo, model 25C106E. Highest quality, excellent condition. $9,000/obo. 360-379-1804 CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615. CAMPER: ‘94 8’6” Lance Squire Lite, Fully provisioned, good cond. $4,000. 360-683-4830 or 360-460-3946 MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

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CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887. MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 MOTOR HOME: ‘75 Newell Coach 35’. Aerodynamic aluminum body, Original, not a conversion, Cat, many featurs, updates. $18,500/obo. 460-6979 MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436. MOTOR HOME: ‘94 19’ Falcon Sport recreational van. 35K, fully loaded, exc. cond. $8,600. 452-2215 TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932

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TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $4,900. 681-7381

29’

TRAILER: ‘94 30’ Komfort Travel Trailer. Great shape, living room slide-out, A/C, micro, refrigerator/freezer. $4,000. Brinnon area. 360-535-2078 TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730 TRAILERS: Older 21’ Roadrunner. Completely redone inside. New tires. $3,200. ‘98 28’ Komfort. Excellent shape. Large slide out. New tires. Large Tanks. $7,900. 683-8162.

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

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TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326.

CANOPY SHELVING Made by Leer, to fit inside pickup bed camper shell. Used with side doors. Call for details. $500. 683-8810

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Case No.: 11-4-00262-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF DOUGLAS KIETH OLSEN, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limita¬tions, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: October 5, 2011 HENRY OLSEN Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 WSBA #9436 Pub: Oct. 5, 12, 19, 2011 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Jack R. Lund, Deceased. NO. 11-4-00263-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: October 5, 2011 Personal Representative: Jeffery A. Lund Attorney for Personal Representative: Simon Barnhart, WSBA #34207 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 11-4-00263-2 Pub: Oct. 5, 12, 19, 2011

NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS Date: September 30, 2011 Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe 1033 Old Blyn Highway Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-1109

• 2ADS PER HOUSEHOLD PER • Bargain BoxAds will run as WEEK space permits Mondays & • Private parties only Tuesdays • 4 lines,2 days • No firewood or lumber • No pets or livestock • No Garage Sales

Mail to:

HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,900. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘90 XR250. New tabs. $1,200/ obo. 683-6561. HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $750. 460-1377. KAWASAKI: ‘01 Vulcan 1500 Nomad Fi. Cruiser. Exc. cond. $3,800 360-640-9670 KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. KAWASAKI: ‘93 KLX 650. $1,800. 460-3530 Moto Guzzi 2004 California Stone Touring VERY LOW MILES. Bought New, always garaged ridden only 2,200 miles (not a misprint).Gorgeous big V-twin.Only $4,800. Call Randy at 360-821-1107. In Port Ludlow.

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Motorcycles

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011

REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or about October 3, 2011 the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe will submit a request to HUD for the release of $442,341 in funds under Section 106 of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, to undertake a project known as Blyn Infrastructure Improvement Project, Phase 2, for the purpose of construction of community water and fire flow facilities to serve Tribal properties in the eastern Blyn area. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT A Finding of No Significant Impact for this project was published on June 25, 2000. Under 24 CFR Part 58.47, no further environmental review is required. RELEASE OF FUNDS The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe certifies to HUD that W. Ron Allen in his capacity as CEO/Tribal Chair consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. HUD’s approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows the Tribe to use Program funds. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s certification for a period of seven days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe; (b) the Tribe has omitted a step or failed to make a decision of finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58; (c) the grant recipient has committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58) and shall be addressed to HUD at Northwest Office of Native Americans, Seattle Federal Office Building, Suite 300, 909 First Avenue, Seattle, WA 981041000. Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection period. W. Ron Allen, CEO/Tribal Chair Pub: Oct. 5, 2011

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Parts/ Accessories

ENGINE: ‘87 Subaru engine. $250. 460-0262 ENGINE: Ford 351 M, complete rebuilt small block, new oil pump and gaskets. $1,300. 683-1032. FORD: ‘97 Escort LX. 4 dr, parting out. $5$500. 206-794-1104 JEEP: ‘76 CJ model. No engine or trans. $500. 460-0262 or 681-0940 STUDDED TIRES Like new Mud Terrian LT 265/75 R16 studded snow tires, mounted on set of custom wheels for F250 or F350 Ford ‘00 or newer truck. $500. 460-5974. WHEELS: (4) MKW 20”, chrome. All four for $500. 808-2563.

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4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $38,500. 683-2342.

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $8,500. 360-928-3440 CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $4,500. 460-8155. CHEV: ‘03 Tahoe 4WD 4.8 liter V8, runs great, cloth interior excellent shape, power seat, windows, locks, newer tires, custom rims. $9,900. 460-7901. CHEV: ‘04 AWD full size contractor van. $7,850. 452-5803. CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967 CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $9,750. 683-4830. DODGE ‘05 D3500 QUAD CAB LONG BED SLT BIGHORN 4x4 pickup, 5.9 liter 24V Cummins turbo diesel, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, bedliner, tow package, brush guard, sliding rear window, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Only 62,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Popular 5.9 liter diesel engine! This pickup is in like new condition! Stop by Gray Motors today! $29,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CHEV: ‘96 Suburban. CD, leather, exc. $3,650. 461-2627.

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CHEV: ‘97 Tahoe. 4x4, leather interior, air conditioning, tow pkg., runs/drives great, must sell. $3,995. 775-9648. CHEV: ‘98 4x4. New tires, canopy, 90K. $8,250. 461-1677. DODGE: ‘03 Ram 1500 SLT quad cab. 5.9 V8, auto, A/C, cruise, P/W, P/L, seat, AM/FM with CD, matching Leer fiberglass canopy, rear air suspension, 62K, excellent cond. $13,750. 640-3709 in Forks, WA. DODGE: ‘05 Dakota Laramie. 30K mi., V8, loaded! $14,900. 452-5402 FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. 4WD, exc cond, loaded, V6, tow, CD changer, 3rd seat, more. 122K, books $7,740. Sacrifice $6,900. 457-4363. FORD: ‘05 Expedition. 1 ownr, low mi., exc. cond. $12,000/ obo. 683-9791, 942-9208

FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. ARG Investments, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company Allen R. Grant Jane Doe Grant I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, in the State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: LOTS 72 and 75, of CEDAR RIDGE, PHASE I, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 15 OF PLATS, PAGE 16, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. (TAX PARCEL NOS. 03-30-28-530720; 03-30-28-530750 The postal address of which is more commonly known as: LOTS 72 AND 75, LOFGRIN ROAD, SEQUIM, WA 98382. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated April 1, 2008, recorded on April 9, 2008, under Auditor's File No. 2008 1219107 records of Clallam County, Washington, from ARG Investments, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, as Grantor, to secure an obligation in favor of Frontier Bank, and now held by Union Bank, N.A., successor in interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Frontier Bank, as beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL: Principal Balance: $421,773.00 Interest Due as of July 18, 2011: $52,254.13 Late Charges: $1,105.14 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $475,132.27 PER DIEM: $106.89 *plus all applicable additional advances, attorney’s fees and costs and trustee’s fees and costs incurred to the date of sale, Default other than failure to make payments: Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530720 in the amount of $2,251.76 plus applicable interest and penalties; Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530750 in the amount of $2,307.09 plus applicable interest and penalties. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $421,773.00, together with unpaid accrued interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 21, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: ARG Investments, LLC at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: c/o Allen R. Grant It’s Registered Agent 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 Allen R. Grant at: 20305 SE Fernridge Drive Camas, WA 98607 at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: 1312 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98660 by both first class and certified mail on April 11, 2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on April 15, 2011, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS: Any guarantor of the obligation secured by the deed of trust may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the deed of trust. All guarantors have the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor and Borrower in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. Any guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for a deficiency, a guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit the guarantor’s liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interests and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 18, 2011. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By: THOMAS S. LINDE, Secretary Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S. Michigan Street Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 Pub: Sept. 21, Oct. 12, 2011


C6

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011

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FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘89 F250 4WD. 101K mi. $5,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: ‘91 F250 Lariat 110K, blue ext., lots of extras, good cond $2,500/obo. 457-4347 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 GMC ‘97 YUKON SLT 5.7 liter V8, auto, air, 4x4, AM/FM CD/cassette, power windows, locks and seat, keyless entry, full leather, luggage rack, tow package, privacy glass, running boards, rear barn doors, clean and reliable local trade, non-smoker. $4,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com GMC: ‘88 Suburban 3/4 ton 4x4. 5.7L V8, 198K miles. Solid engine and trans. 4x4 works great. Gutted inside. Was used for camping and hauling fire wood. Extra set of 17” tires, wheels and lug nuts included. $900. Jason, 452-3600

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FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323. HONDA ‘06 ELEMENT EX-P ALL WD 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM CD, dark glass, roof rack, sunroof, alloy wheels, and more! 1 owner. 1 week special. Expires 10-1511. VIN004592. $11,995 *We Finance* Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com KIA ‘09 BORREGO EX 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, dual zone climate control air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD/MP3/Sirius, keyless entry, power windows, locks and seats, Home Link, 7 passenger seating, privacy glass, luggage rack, alloy wheels, fog lamps, side airbags, only 35,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, spotless Carfax report. $20,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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4 Wheel Drive

ISUZU: ‘93 Rodeo 4WD. Low mi., 5 sp, rear tire, rear defrost, new larger sized tires with excellent grip for snow and ice, new radio/CD. Must sell. $2,200/obo. 253-208-4596 JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988 NISSAN ‘00 PATHFINDER SE 4X4 3.3 liter V6, auto, alloys, running boards, roof rack, sunroof, privacy glass, power windows, locks, and mirrors, power heated leather seats, air, Bose CD/cassette, compass/temp display, dual front airbags, priced below Kelley Blue Book! Sparkling clean inside and out! Loaded with options! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. ARG Development, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company ALGO, Inc. Allen R. Grant Jane Doe Grant I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, in the State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: THAT PORTION OF LOT 3 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 3 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING EASTERLY OF THE EASTERLY LINE OF EAST SEQUIM ROAD. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. (TAX PARCEL NO. 03-30-25-420100) The postal address of which is more commonly known as: 30.66 ACRE PORTION OF LOT 3 (E. Sequim Bay Rd.), SEQUIM, WA 98382. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated September 8, 2006, recorded on September 21, 2006, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1188233 records of Clallam County, Washington, from ARG Development, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, as Grantor, to secure an obligation in favor of Frontier Bank, and now held by Union Bank, N.A., successor in interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Frontier Bank, as beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL 4-15-2010: Principal Balance: $633,750.00 Interest Due as of July 18, 2011: $81,836.49 Late Charges: $1,217.68 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $716,804.17 PER DIEM: $160.61 *plus all applicable additional advances, attorney’s fees and costs and trustee’s fees and costs incurred to the date of sale, Default other than failure to make payments: Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-25-420100 in the amount of $1,698.02 plus applicable interest and penalties; IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $633,750.00, together with unpaid accrued interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 21, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: ARG Development, LLC

at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: c/o Allen R. Grant It’s Registered Agent 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 ALGO, INC. at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: c/o Allen R. Grant It’s Registered Agent 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 Allen R. Grant at: 20305 SE Fernridge Drive Camas, WA 98607 at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: 1312 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98660 by both first class and certified mail on March 24, 2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on March 29, 2011, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS: Any guarantor of the obligation secured by the deed of trust may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the deed of trust. All guarantors have the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor and Borrower in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. Any guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for a deficiency, a guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit the guarantor’s liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interests and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 18, 2011. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By: THOMAS S. LINDE, Secretary Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S. Michigan Street Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 Pub: Sept. 21, Oct. 12, 2011

97

4 Wheel Drive

TOYOTA: ‘88 4WD. V6, new exhaust/ tires, runs good. $3,000/obo. 681-0447 TOYOTA: ‘93 extended cab pickup. SR5 4x4. $3,500. 460-1481 VACATION ADVENTURE PACKAGE 4 wheel & paddle! ‘97 Ford Explorer, 2 kayaks, paddles, carry system and accessories. All you need for a Northwest kayak adventure! Over $700 in accessories included FREE with this package! Package price $4,457 ($200 off). 460-7833.

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Pickups/Vans

CHRYSLER: ‘03 Town & Country Ltd. DVD, loaded. $6,500. 808-0825 DODGE: ‘98 3/4 ton. Short bed, quad cab, w/fiberglass shell, V8, posi rear end, all power, air, leather int., tow pkg, 102K miles, very good cond. $6,000/obo. 683-8810

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DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756 FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949 FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. FORD: ‘94 F150. $1,000. 452-2615. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Runs great, nice body, forest green, captains chairs. $4,500. 385-2012. TOYOTA: ‘08 Tacoma SR5 ext. cab. 4 cyl, auto, all pwr. CD stereo, 1 owner. 14,680 original miles. $18,000/obo 417-8291

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Pickups/Vans

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Cars

FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347

CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiufl, must see. $7,800. 681-3093.

99

CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $8,500. 452-7377.

Cars

CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419 2000 Honda CRV Very Good Condition, just detailed in & out. All scheduled maintenance has been done over the years. All wheel drive, tinted windows, auto start w/alarm, 4 mounted snow tires. 200,700 hwy mi. $5,000. 681-5157 or 253-208-2729

TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535

ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. Cedar Ridge 3, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company Lawrence E. Freeman Allen R. Grant I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, in the State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: LOT B OF CITY OF SEQUIM BOUNDRY LINE ADJUSTMENT/LOT MERGER 04/009 SURVEY RECORDED MARCH 18, 2005 IN VOLUME 57 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 61, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 2005 1152676 BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST ¼ OF THE NORTHEAST ¼ OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 3 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. (TAX PARCEL NO. 033028 110050) The postal address of which is more commonly known as: PHASE III OF THE CEDAR RIDGE SUBDIVISION, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated March 20, 2009, recorded on May 15, 2009, under Auditor's File No. 2009 1236967 records of Clallam County, Washington, from Cedar Ridge 3 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, as Grantor, to secure an obligation of Cedar Ridge Associates, LLC, in favor Frontier Bank, and now held by Union Bank, N.A., successor in interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Frontier Bank, as beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL: Principal Balance: $3,832.391.46 Interest Due as of July 18, 2011: $508,029.14 Late Charges: $2,382.09 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $4,342,802.69* PER DIEM: $971.22 *plus all applicable additional advances, attorney’s fees and costs and trustee’s fees and costs incurred to the date of sale, Default other than failure to make payments: Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 033028 110050 in the amount of $1,277.21, plus applicable interest and penalties IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $3,832,391.46, together with unpaid accrued interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 21, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: Cedar Ridge Associates, LLC at: 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 And at: c/o Allen R. Grant it’s Registered Agent 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 Cedar Ridge 3, LLC at: 325 E. Washington Street, #214 Sequim, WA 98382 And at: c/o Lawrence E. Freedman Its Registered Agent 325 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 Lawrence E. Freedman at: 325 E. Washington Street, #214 Sequim, WA 98382 Allen R. Grant at: 20305 SE Fernridge Drive Camas, WA 98607 at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: 1312 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98660 by both first class and certified mail on April 5, 2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on April 12, 2011, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS: Any guarantor of the obligation secured by the deed of trust may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the deed of trust. All guarantors have the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor and Borrower in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. Any guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for a deficiency, a guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit the guarantor’s liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interests and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 18, 2011. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By: THOMAS S. LINDE, Secretary Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S. Michigan Street Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 Pub: Sept. 21, Oct. 12, 2011

CHEV: ‘67 El Camino. 400/T400. $12,000. 707-241-5977 CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767. CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, larger ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. $3,500. 808-3374. CHEV: ‘99 Malibu LS. 1 owner, only 86K miles. Very nice car. $3,465 360-912-3901

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

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Cars

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Cars

CHRYSLER ‘04 PT CRUISER WAGON 2.4 liter 4 cylinder, auto, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows and door locks, air, CD/cassette stereo, cruise control, dual front airbags. Only 69,000 miles! Extra clean! Sharp! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170.

DODGE: ‘96 Caravan. Runs and drives super. Well maint. with records, 159K. $2,400. 457-1104.

FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598.

FORD: ‘02 Mustang GT convertible. 8 cyl., 2 tone gray, 36K, great condition. $12,000/obo. 452-7745 FORD: ‘02 Mustang GT convertible. 8 cyl., 2 tone gray, 36K, great condition. $12,000/obo. 452-7745

FORD: ‘65 Fairlane 500 Sport Coupe. ‘289’ 225 hp, auto, bucket seats, real nice car. $6,900. 457-6540

FORD ‘08 EDGE SE 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, privacy glass, back-up sensor, alloy wheels, side airbags, only 37,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $20,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

HONDA ‘01 ACCORD VP SDN 4 DOOR 2.3 liter, 4 cylinder, auto, air, CD/cassette, dual front airbags, priced under Kelley Blue Book! Only 65K miles! Great gas mileage! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. Cedar Ridge 3 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company Cedar Ridge 2 LLC Lawrence E. Freedman Allen R. Grant I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, in the State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: LOT B OF CITY OF SEQUIM BOUNDRY LINE ADJUSTMENT/LOT MERGER 04/009 SURVEY RECORDED MARCH 18, 2005 IN VOLUME 57 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 61, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 2005 1152676 BEING A PORTION OF NORTHEAST ¼ OF THE NORTHEAST ¼ OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 3 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. (TAX PARCEL NO. 033028 110050) The postal address of which is more commonly known as: NNA, PHASE III OF THE CEDAR RIDGE SUBDIVISION, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated March 20, 2009, recorded on May 15, 2009, under Auditor's File No. 2009 1236966 records of Clallam County, Washington, from Cedar Ridge 3 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, as Grantor, to secure an obligation of Cedar Ridge 2 LLC in favor of Frontier Bank, and now held by Union Bank, N.A., successor in interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Frontier Bank, as beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL: Principal Balance: $4,313,834.79 Interest Due as of July 18, 2011: $571,878.12 Late Charges: $3,233.10 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $4,888,946.01* PER DIEM: $1,093.23 *plus all applicable additional advances, attorney’s fees and costs and trustee’s fees and costs incurred to the date of sale, Default other than failure to make payments: Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 in the amount of $1,277.21 plus applicable interest and penalties. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $4,313,834.79, together with unpaid accrued interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 21, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: Cedar Ridge 2 LLC at: 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 And at: c/o Lawrence E. Freedman it’s Registered Agent 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 And at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 Cedar Ridge 3, LLC at: 325 E. Washington Street, #214 Sequim, WA 98382 And at: c/o Lawrence E. Freedman Its Registered Agent 325 E. Washington Street #214 Sequim, WA 98382 Lawrence E. Freedman at: 325 E. Washington Street, #214 Sequim, WA 98382 Allen R. Grant at: 20305 SE Fernridge Drive Camas, WA 98607 at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: 1312 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98660 by both first class and certified mail on April 5, 2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on April 12, 2011, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS: Any guarantor of the obligation secured by the deed of trust may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the deed of trust. All guarantors have the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor and Borrower in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. Any guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for a deficiency, a guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit the guarantor’s liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interests and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 18, 2011. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By: THOMAS S. LINDE, Secretary Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S. Michigan Street Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 Pub: Sept. 21, Oct. 12, 2011


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

99

Cars

FORD: ‘76 LTD. 2 dr, 351, good cond., runs exc., very dependable, some new. $950. 460-6979. FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. FORD: ‘86 Taurus. Runs great, clean. $600/obo. 681-3313.

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99

Cars

FORD: ‘96 T-Bird LX. Runs good, nice car. $3,500. 452-2150. FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858 www.peninsula dailynews.com

&$+

FOR YOUR CAR REID & JOHNSON

135114426

If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us! 1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com • mj@olypen.com

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Cars

HONDA ‘05 ACCORD 4 DOOR HYBRID Only 54,000 miles and loaded incl. V6 hybrid, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM CD stacker, leather interior with heated seats, electronic traction control, 8 airbags, alloy wheels, remote entry, and more! Exp. 10/ 15/11. VIN003139. $15,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com HONDA: ’06 Civic Hybrid. 112K hwy. mi., tinted windows, nice wheels, mounted snow tires, very clean. Just retired. $9,500/obo 360-731-0677 HONDA: ‘10 Fit. 4 dr hatchback, 5 speed, metallic copper, like new condition, average 32 mpg, 36-40 on Hwy., great to drive. $16,500. 360-301-9061

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. ARG Development, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company ALGO, Inc. Allen R. Grant Jane Doe Grant I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, in the State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: LOTS 78, 79, and 81 through 85, Inclusive of Cedar Ridge, Phase 1, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 15 OF PLATS, PAGE 16, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. (TAX PARCEL NOS. 03-30-28-530780; 03-30-28-530790; 03-30-28530810; 03-30-28-530820; 03-30-28-530830; 03-3028-530840; 03-3028-530850) The postal address of which is more commonly known as: LOTS 78, 79, and 81-85, Pinehurst Loop, Sequim, WA 98382. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated April 1, 2008, recorded on April 9, 2008, under Auditor's File No. 2008 1219105 records of Clallam County, Washington, from ARG Development, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, as Grantor, to secure an obligation in favor of Frontier Bank, and now held by Union Bank, N.A., successor in Interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Frontier Bank, as beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL: Principal Balance: $1,285,168.49 Interest Due as of July 18, 2011: $163,409.32 Late Charges: $1,141.44 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $1,449,719.25 PER DIEM: $325.69 *plus all applicable additional advances, attorney’s fees and costs and trustee’s fees and costs incurred to the date of sale, Default other than failure to make payments: Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530780 in the amount of $1,977.79 plus interest and penalties; Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530790 in the amount of $1,434.59 plus interest and penalties. Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530810 in the amount of $1,434.44 plus interest and penalties. Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530820 in the amount of $1,455.25 plus interest and penalties; Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530830 in the amount of $1,406.33 plus interest and penalties; Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530840 in the amount of $1,590.81 plus interest and penalties; Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for Tax Parcel No. 03-30-28-530850 in the amount of $1,405.49 plus interest and penalties; IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $1,285,168.49, together with unpaid accrued interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 21, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: ARG Development, LLC at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: c/o Allen R. Grant It’s Registered Agent 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 ALGO, INC. at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 ALGO, INC. at: c/o Allen R. Grant It’s Registered Agent 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 Allen R. Grant at: 20305 SE Fernridge Drive Camas, WA 98607 at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: 1312 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98660 by both first class and certified mail on April 11, 2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on April 15, 2011, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS: Any guarantor of the obligation secured by the deed of trust may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the deed of trust. All guarantors have the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor and Borrower in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. Any guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for a deficiency, a guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit the guarantor’s liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interests and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 18, 2011. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By: THOMAS S. LINDE, Secretary Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S. Michigan Street Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 Pub: Sept. 21, Oct. 12, 2011

99

Cars

FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,000 477-1805 LINCOLN: ‘98 Town Car. Luxury edition, fully loaded, paid over $40,000. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6934 MAZDA: ‘06 Miata MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $14,500/obo. 681-0863

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

MERCURY: ‘95 Grand Marquis. Good transportation. $1,850. 457-5500. MG: ‘79 BCV series. Color blue, excellent condition. $7,000. 683-5614 MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165. PONTIAC ‘06 G6 2 DOOR GTP 3.9 liter V6, 6 speed, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM CD, power sunroof, leather interior, alloy wheels and more! Exp. 10/15/11. VIN151869 $9,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

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Cars

OLDS: ‘65 98 LS 4 dr Sedan. 2 owner in great condition, int. like new, 83K. $6,000. 582-0208. PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768. PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577 STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. Cedar Ridge Associates, LLC Lawrence E. Freeman Allen R. Grant I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, in the State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: LOTS 1-71, INCLUSIVE, 73, 74, 77 AND 88-94 INCLUSIVE, OF CEDAR RIDGE , PHASE 1, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 15 OF PLATS, PAGE 16, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. (TAX PARCEL NOS. 03-30-28-530010; 03-30-28-530020; 03-30-28530030; 03-30-28-530040; 03-30-28-530050; 03-30-28-530060; 03-3028-530070; 03-30-28-530080; 03-30-28-530090; 03-30-28-530100; 0330-28-530110; 03-30-28-530120; 03-30-28-530130; 03-30-28-530140; 03-30-28-530150; 03-30-28-530160; 03-30-28-530170; 03-30-28530180; 03-30-28-530190; 03-30-28-530200; 03-30-28-530210; 03-3028-530220; 03-30-28-530230; 03-30-28-530240; 03-30-28-530250; 0330-28-530260; 03-30-28-530270; 03-30-28-530280; 03-30-28-530290; 03-30-28-530300; 03-30-28-530310; 03-30-28-530320; 03-30-28530330; 03-30-28-530340; 03-30-28-530350; 03-30-28-530360; 03-3028-530370; 03-30-28-530380; 03-30-28-530390; 03-30-28-530400; 0330-28-530410; 03-30-28-530420; 03-30-28-530430; 03-30-28-530440; 03-30-28-530450; 03-30-28-530460; 03-30-28-530470; 03-30-28530480; 03-30-28-530490; 03-30-28-530500; 03-30-28-530510; 03-3028-530520; 03-30-28-530530; 03-30-28-530540; 03-30-28-530550; 0330-28-530560; 03-30-28-530570; 03-30-28-530580; 03-30-28-530590; 03-30-28-530600; 03-30-28-530610; 03-30-28-530620; 03-30-28530630; 03-30-28-530640; 03-30-28-530650; 03-30-28-530660; 03-3028-530670; 03-30-28-530680; 03-30-28-530690; 03-30-28-530700; 0330-28-530710; 03-30-28-530730; 03-30-28-530740; 03-30-28-530770; 03-30-28-530880; 03-30-28-530890; 03-30-28-530900; 03-30-28530910; 03-30-28-530920; 03-30-28-530930; 03-30-28-530940; The postal address of which is more commonly known as: LOTS 1-71, 73, 74, 77, 88-94, PHASE I OF THE CEDAR RIDGE SUBDIVISION, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, SEQUIM, WASHINGTON, 98382. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 20, 2005, recorded on December 28, 2005, under Auditor's File No. 2005 1172189 and re-recorded January 9, 2006, as 2006 1172854, and as modified by Recording Nos. 2007 1213725 and 2008 1218336, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Cedar Ridge Associates, LLC, as Grantor, to secure an obligation of Cedar Ridge Associates, LLC, in favor of Frontier Bank, and now held by Union Bank, N.A., successor in Interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Frontier Bank, as beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL: Principal Balance: $3,832,391.46 Interest Due as of July 18, 2011: $508,029.14 Late Charges: $2,382.09 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $4,342,802.69* PER DIEM: $971.22 *plus all applicable additional advances, attorney’s fees and costs and trustee’s fees and costs incurred to the date of sale. Default other than failure to make payments: Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for all of the tax parcels referenced above in the amount of $551.50 for each parcel, plus applicable interest and penalties. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $3,832,391.46, together with unpaid accrued interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 21, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: Cedar Ridge Associates, LLC at: 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 c/o Allen R. Grant it’s Registered Agent 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 Lawrence E. Freedman at: 325 E. Washington Street, #214 Sequim, WA 98382 Allen R. Grant at: 20305 SE Fernridge Drive Camas, WA 98607 at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: 1312 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98660 by both first class and certified mail on April 5, 2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on April 12, 2011, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS: Any guarantor of the obligation secured by the deed of trust may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the deed of trust. All guarantors have the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor and Borrower in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. Any guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for a deficiency, a guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit the guarantor’s liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interests and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 18, 2011. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By: THOMAS S. LINDE, Secretary Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S. Michigan Street Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 Pub: Sept. 21, Oct. 12, 2011

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011

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Cars

TOYOTA ‘09 MATRIX ‘S’ WAGON Economical 2.4 liter 4 cylinder, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD changer/MP3, power windows, locks, and moonroof, keyless entry, side airbags, alloy wheels, fog lamps, only 34,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very very clean 1 owner local car, spotless Carfax report. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

99

Cars

MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353. PONTIAC: ‘78 Trans Am. Lots new, nice. $4,800/obo. 477-3180

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

TOYOTA ‘04 CAMRY LE 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM CD and cassette, remote entry and more! Exp. 10/ 15/11. VIN330502. $9,995 *We Finance* Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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Legals Clallam Co.

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C7

Cars

HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006. SUBARU: ‘06 Tribeca. 62,000 miles with recent required service $14,500 or best reasonable offer. 360-683-2049 VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,500. 681-7381. VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184. VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs well, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,295/obo. 775-9648

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. Cedar Ridge 2 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company Lawrence E. Freeman Allen R. Grant I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, in the State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: LOTS 95 THROUGH 105, 107, 108, 110 THROUGH 121, 124 THROUGH 136, 140 THROUGH 169, AND LOTS 171 THROUGH 179 OF CEDAR RIDGE, PHASE II, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 15 OF PLATS, PAGE 17 AND AMENDED UNDER VOLUME 15 OF PLATS, PAGE 30, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON AND AMENDED BY AUDITOR’S FILE NOS. 2007 1198966 and 2007 1204660, SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. (TAX PARCEL NOS. 03-30-27-540950; 03-30-27-540960; 03-30-27540970; 03-30-27-540980; 03-30-27-540990; 03-30-27-541000; 03-3027-541010; 03-30-27-541020; 03-30-27-541030; 03-30-27-541040; 0330-27-541050; 03-30-27-541070; 03-30-27-541080; 03-30-27-541100; 03-30-27-541110; 03-30-27-541120; 03-30-27-541130; 03-30-27541140; 03-30-27-541150; 03-30-27-541160; 03-30-27-541170; 03-3027-541180; 03-30-27-541190; 03-30-27-541200; 03-30-27-541210; 0330-27-541240; 03-30-27-541250; 03-30-27-541260; 03-30-27-541270; 03-30-27-541280; 03-30-27-541290; 03-30-27-541300; 03-30-27541310; 03-30-27-541320; 03-30-27-541330; 03-30-27-541340; 03-3027-541350; 03-30-27-541360; 03-30-27-541400; 03-30-27-541410; 0330-27-541420; 03-30-27-541430; 03-30-27-541440; 03-30-27-541450; 03-30-27-541460; 03-30-27-541470; 03-30-27-541480; 03-30-27541490; 03-30-27-541500; 03-30-27-541510; 03-30-27-541520; 03-3027-541530; 03-30-27-541540; 03-30-27-541550; 03-30-27-541560; 0330-27-541570; 03-30-27-541580; 03-30-27-541590; 03-30-27-541600; 03-30-27-541610; 03-30-27-541620; 03-30-27-541630; 03-30-27541640; 03-30-27-541650; 03-30-27-541660; 03-30-27-541670; 03-3027-541680; 03-30-27-541690; 03-30-27-541710; 03-30-27-541710; 0330-27-541720; 03-30-27-541730; 03-30-27-541740; 03-30-27-541750; 03-30-27-541760; 03-30-27-541770; 03-30-27-541780; 03-30-27541790; The postal address of which is more commonly known as: Lots 95-105, 107, 108, 110-121, 124-136, 140-169, and 171-179, Phase II of the Cedar Ridge Subdivision, a planned unit development, Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated May 3, 2006, recorded on May 19, 2006, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1180673, as modified by Auditor’s File No. 2008 1218335, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Cedar Ridge 2 LLC a Washington Limited Liability Company, as Grantor, to secure an obligation in favor of Frontier Bank, and now held by Union Bank, N.A., successor in interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Frontier Bank, as beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL: Principal Balance: $4,313,834.79 Interest Due as of July 18, 2011: $571,878.12 Late Charges: $3,233.10 TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $4,888,946.01 PER DIEM: $1,093.23 *plus all applicable additional advances, attorney’s fees and costs and trustee’s fees and costs incurred to the date of sale, Default other than failure to make payments: Delinquent General Taxes for 2011 for all of the tax parcels referenced above plus applicable interest and penalties. Delinquent General Taxes for 2008, 2009 and 2010 for tax parcel 03-3027-541150 in the amounts of $296,71, $1,091.67, and $1,078.95, for each year, respectively, plus applicable interest and penalties. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $4,313,834.79, together with unpaid accrued interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 21, 2011. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: Cedar Ridge 2 LLC at: 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 And at: c/o Lawrence E. Freedman it’s Registered Agent 1400 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 And at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 Lawrence E. Freedman at: 325 E. Washington Street, #214 Sequim, WA 98382 Allen R. Grant at: 20305 SE Fernridge Drive Camas, WA 98607 at: 2811 East Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 And at: 1312 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98660 by both first class and certified mail on April 5, 2011, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on April 12, 2011, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO GUARANTORS: Any guarantor of the obligation secured by the deed of trust may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the deed of trust. All guarantors have the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor and Borrower in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. Any guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for a deficiency, a guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit the guarantor’s liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interests and costs. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 18, 2011. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By: THOMAS S. LINDE, Secretary Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S. Michigan Street Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 Pub: Sept. 21, Oct. 12, 2011


C8

WeatherNorthwest

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Thursday

Friday

Yesterday

saTurday

sunday

High 56

Low 37

54/39

53/39

54/40

53/41

Cloudy with a couple of showers.

Mostly cloudy and chilly.

Mostly cloudy.

Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain.

Cloudy with a shower possible.

Mostly cloudy with a little rain.

The Peninsula A disturbance to the north across British Columbia will bring plenty of clouds across the Peninsula again today along with a couple of showers. Snow levels will be around 4,500 feet, above which another inch of snow will accumulate. Tonight Neah Bay Port will be mostly cloudy and chilly. Another chilly day is in 55/44 Townsend store for Thursday with a mostly cloudy sky, but it should Port Angeles 56/44 be rain-free. The next storm system will approach the 56/37 Pacific Northwest on Friday, bringing a mostly cloudy Sequim sky along with the chance for rain.

Victoria 56/44

57/43

Forks 58/40

Olympia 58/38

Everett 56/42

Seattle 56/43

Spokane 60/38

Yakima Kennewick 62/35 69/38

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Considerable cloudiness today with a couple of showers. Wind west 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Rather cloudy tonight. Wind east 6-12 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility clear. Mostly cloudy tomorrow. Wind east 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility clear. Friday: Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain. Wind east 6-12 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 3 miles.

LaPush

1:07 a.m. 12:58 p.m. Port Angeles 4:13 a.m. 2:48 p.m. Port Townsend 5:58 a.m. 4:33 p.m. Sequim Bay* 5:19 a.m. 3:54 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

7.4’ 8.2’ 6.4’ 6.6’ 7.7’ 7.9’ 7.2’ 7.4’

6:59 a.m. 7:33 p.m. 9:31 a.m. 9:47 p.m. 10:45 a.m. 11:01 p.m. 10:38 a.m. 10:54 p.m.

1.7’ -0.1’ 3.5’ 0.2’ 4.6’ 0.2’ 4.3’ 0.2’

High Tide Ht 1:47 a.m. 1:27 p.m. 4:54 a.m. 3:11 p.m. 6:39 a.m. 4:56 p.m. 6:00 a.m. 4:17 p.m.

Billings 64/40

7.4’ 8.2’ 6.6’ 6.5’ 8.0’ 7.8’ 7.5’ 7.3’

Friday

Low Tide Ht 7:35 a.m. 8:10 p.m. 10:10 a.m. 10:18 p.m. 11:24 a.m. 11:32 p.m. 11:17 a.m. 11:25 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Save Even More!

High Tide Ht

2.0’ -0.2’ 4.0’ -0.1’ 5.2’ -0.1’ 4.9’ -0.1’

Corrections to today’s insert

2:27 a.m. 1:55 p.m. 5:36 a.m. 3:37 p.m. 7:21 a.m. 5:22 p.m. 6:42 a.m. 4:43 p.m.

7.3’ 8.2’ 6.7’ 6.4’ 8.1’ 7.7’ 7.6’ 7.2’

Low Tide Ht 8:10 a.m. 8:47 p.m. 10:50 a.m. 10:52 p.m. 12:04 p.m. ----11:57 a.m. 11:59 p.m.

2.3’ -0.1’ 4.4’ -0.3’ 5.7’ --5.4’ -0.4’

Oct 26

Nov 2

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 74 64 s Baghdad 100 66 s Beijing 65 51 sh Brussels 62 47 sh Cairo 81 62 s Calgary 54 37 pc Edmonton 51 35 c Hong Kong 80 77 t Jerusalem 72 53 s Johannesburg 84 50 s Kabul 69 50 t London 64 52 sh Mexico City 72 55 t Montreal 64 52 c Moscow 49 36 sh New Delhi 97 69 s Paris 63 49 c Rio de Janeiro 83 76 sh Rome 78 57 s Stockholm 50 34 pc Sydney 68 57 pc Tokyo 73 61 pc Toronto 64 55 r Vancouver 54 46 sh Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

New York 62/58

Washington 70/57

Atlanta 76/60 El Paso 81/54

Full

Nov 10

Kansas City 76/50

Los Angeles 97/68

Moon Phases First

Chicago 71/55

Denver 70/43

Sunset today ................... 6:32 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:30 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 6:26 p.m. Moonset today ................. 8:17 a.m. New

Minneapolis Detroit 70/53 68/54

San Francisco 74/55

Sun & Moon

Oct 19

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 56/43

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 60 49 0.49 11.78 Forks 56 50 1.17 88.53 Seattle 59 52 0.90 27.43 Sequim 61 48 0.16 11.65 Hoquiam 60 53 1.48 51.69 Victoria 60 52 0.32 23.58 P. Townsend* 57 49 0.01 12.73 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Last

Port Ludlow 57/44 Bellingham 56/35

Aberdeen 58/43

Peninsula Daily News

Houston 89/67 Miami 89/75

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

0s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 72 41 60 76 65 65 66 64 66 64 63 64 76 60 71 72 57 70 88 70 74 68 65 33 56 85 89 48

Lo W 50 s 30 s 43 sh 60 pc 59 r 58 r 35 pc 40 s 40 sh 46 s 55 r 51 r 62 t 38 s 55 t 54 pc 37 sh 42 c 61 t 43 s 49 t 54 c 41 pc 14 s 35 s 73 pc 67 pc 39 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 76 86 82 97 89 68 70 74 86 62 82 72 88 100 66 94 64 76 77 82 74 64 88 87 74 70 56 70

Lo W 50 t 69 s 58 t 68 s 75 pc 55 t 53 t 59 pc 68 pc 58 r 52 t 47 sh 68 pc 71 s 60 r 72 s 45 c 58 sh 46 s 52 s 57 t 47 s 67 s 66 s 55 s 43 sh 36 s 57 r

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 95 at Thermal, CA

Low: 23 at Berthoud Pass, CO

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Briefly . . . Oktoberfest benefit set Friday in PA PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Moose Lodge will hold an Oktoberfest benefit Friday at the club, 809 S. Pine St. The event will include an authentic German meal, beer, raffles and prizes, and live music from The Toll City Trio. Food will be served start-

ing at 5 p.m. and until it runs out. Music will begin at   7:30 p.m. Admission is by donation. Proceeds will be donated to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County.

Vision-loss fair PORT ANGELES — A Vision Loss Info Fair for those with noncorrectable vision-loss problems will be held at the Vision Loss Center on the lower level of the Armory Square Mall, 228 W.

Things to Do online The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . . http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings

Cane Awareness Day 2011. For more information, phone 360-457-1383.

Tharinger to speak PORT TOWNSEND — State Rep. Steve Tharinger will speak to the AAUW’s Port Townsend chapter Saturday. The meeting will be held at the Quimper Unitarian Universalist Church, 2333 San Juan Ave., with refreshments at 9:30 a.m. and the meeting running from   10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Current and prospective members are welcome Tharinger serves   the 24th Legislative   District, which includes   all of Clall­am and Jefferson counties and a portion   of Grays Harbor County, and is also a Clallam

Port Angeles Hardwood LLC

County commiss­ioner. Tharinger was elected to the Legislature in 2010. His presentation will focus on education in our area and how it is affected by funding. AAUW is open to those

who hold an associate degree or higher from an accredited institution. For more information, email porttownsend@ aauw-wa.org or visit www. aauwpt.org. Peninsula Daily News

Now Showing n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) “Dolphin Tale” (PG) “Dream House” (PG-13) “50/50” (R) “Moneyball” (PG-13) “Real Steel” (PG-13)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Drive” (R) “Killer Elite” (R)

“What’s Your Number” (R)

n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089) “The Hedgehog” (NR) “Moneyball” (PG-13)

n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “Dolphin Tale” (PG)

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. . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@ peninsuladailynews.com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

First St., from 10 a.m. to   4 p.m. Saturday. Informational booths will be staffed by organizations that serve members of the low-vision and blind community. The state Department of Services for the Blind, members of the National Federation for the Blind, Clallam Transit, low-vision support groups and Guide Dogs for the Blind will be at the fair. “We are trying to get the word out that these resources are available to residents of the North Olympic Peninsula who are dealing with noncorrectable vision-loss problems,” organizers said. The event is being held as part of the National Federation for the Blind’s Meet the Blind Month and White

Visit our website: www.peninsulachildrensclinic.com

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1A5133811


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, October 12, 2011

SECTION

D

Peninsula Neighbors

Dragon Gate treasures need home LAST JANUARY, STEWART Pugh, who lives in Cape George, received a phone call from his accountant in California. Would Pugh accept a commission to clear out books stored in the basement of a Victorian house in Port Townsend that belonged to mutual friends who were selling it? The house had served as the base for a poetry press called Dragon Gate Inc. in the 1980s. Pugh knew the press’ founder, Gwen Head, and spouse Bernard Taper when they all lived in Berkeley, Calif. A physicist, Pugh and spouse Virginia Thompson, an author, had rented part of the Victorian house when they first moved to Port Townsend 11 years ago. “Gwen lived upstairs, and we lived downstairs,” he said. So Pugh accepted the commission and started compiling an inventory of the contents of the basement.

PORT TOWNSEND NEIGHBOR Dragon Gate in Jackson 1984. Olivieri replied that she was interested in much more than that. “Special Collections actively collects records and papers related to poets, writers and presses,” Olivieri said in a phone interview Monday. “It was important to preserve the records of the press as it operated and not to break it apart.”

Jennifer

25 boxes

So Olivieri and a graduate student drove to Port Townsend in May and took away 25 boxes of administrative and production files that Head had kept: manuscripts, galleys, page proofs, Jennifer Jackson (3)/for Peninsula Daily News paste-ups, cover designs, Holding the inventory he made of titles, Stewart Pugh shows a copy of Eve Triem’s New as a layouts, correspondence, 31,841 books contracts and photographs. Wave, one of the 31,841 volumes in the basement of the house on Lincoln Street that formerly housed Dragon Gate Inc., a poetry press based in Port Townsend during the 1970s and ’80s. The library has created The total: 31,841 books, an online inventory of the most still in shrink-wrap and packed in boxes, of the Dragon Gate records, and 20 titles that Dragon Gate special collections docupublished during its decade ments are available to the public, Olivieri said. of operation. “The records show editoIn the past seven rial and publication promonths, Pugh has manduction for each of these aged to reduce the piles of titles,” she said. boxes by contacting the Head established authors, bookstores and other interested parties but Dragon Gate as a shortstill has hundreds of books story and poetry press in to find homes for. 1979, Olivieri said, and “Here’s a little treasure published books through in Port Townsend that’s 1987. going away — one way or The first poet she published was Henry Carlile, another,” Pugh said. who, after being contacted “I may be the only perby Pugh, came to Port son in town who doesn’t Townsend and picked up want a house to sell right cases of his book, Running away.” Lights. His first priority: to Poet Laura Jensen, locate the 17 authors or author of Memory and heirs and find out if they Shelter, is sending someone wanted the books. Some were easier to find over to pick up cases of her books, Pugh said. than others, he said, depending on the unusualMore coming by ness of their names. It took him six months He has also correto track down Nancy Rob- sponded with Joan Swift, ertson, author of Women who lives in Edmonds, and and Other Bodies of Water, Katherine Knapp John- While most of the books are still in shrink-wrap and packed in boxes, some individual books ended up on the damaged pile, including A Radiance Like Wind and Water by Richard Ronan, New eventually locating her in son, who lives in New as a Wave by Eve Triem, The Salt Stone by John Woods, Home by Jim Simmerman, When Orchids Utah. Her response York. Were Flowers by Kate Knapp Johnson and Running Lights by Henry Carlile, the mustached author rewarded the effort. Pugh found Caroline “She was so excited,” Finkestein, author of Win- on the back cover of the book at bottom right. Pugh said. “She had been dows Facing East, living in Roswell, Ga. told her books didn’t exist anymore. I didn’t have one The authors pay the copy. I had only 277.” cost of shipping, he said, so Blynne Olivieri, they can’t always afford to Pacific Northwest curator have all their books of University of Washingshipped. ton Libraries Special Coll­ Others end up on the ections Division, was also damaged pile, including excited to hear from Pugh. books that were stored in He contacted her in the converted garage that April to see if she was Head used for her office. interested in copies of New “They were all sunas a Wave, a retrospective burned,” Pugh said. of Northwest poet Eve Triem’s work published by Turn to Dragon/D4

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Gwen Head ran Dragon Gate Inc. out of a converted garage behind a three-story Victorian house on Lincoln Street, where she lived with spouse Bernard Taper, a writer for The New Yorker magazine and one-time “Monument Man” who tracked down stolen artwork after World War II. Built in 1888, the house, which the couple now have on the market, retains its original stained-glass windows and woodwork.


D2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Prayer meal Final report on clean water set Oct. 21 project set for 2 meetings in Sequim Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Former NFL football player, author and speaker Ed Tandy McGlasson will be at the 15th annual Clallam County Leadership Prayer Breakfast on Friday, Oct. 21. The breakfast will be held at Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave., from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. It is open to the public, and the cost is $20 per person or a table of six for $120. No tickets will be sold at the door. After his pro football career ended, McGlasson became the pastor of Vineyard Christian Fellowship in Anaheim, Calif., in the shadow of the stadium where he once played in the NFL. He and his wife, Jill, and their five children have lived in Southern California for 28 years. Also participating in this year’s Prayer Break-

fast will be Aaron Bacon, pastor, Independent Bible Church; Mary Budke, executive director, Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula; Daniel Conner, pastor, Dungeness Community Church; Bob McClinton, retired Navy rear admiral; Ron Peregrin, Clallam County undersheriff; Dan Wilder, owner, Wilder Auto Center; and Steve Kennedy, owner of Atlas Trucking, who will provide music. The annual Clallam County Leadership Prayer Breakfast is patterned after the National Prayer Breakfast held annually in Washington, D.C., and is designed as a time of prayer for the community and its leaders and a time of individual rededication to God. Reservations can be made by visiting www. breakfastoutreach.com or by phoning 360-683-2727 or 360-452-3351 by Saturday.

A final report on the Discovery Bay Clean Water Project will be presented at two public meetings next week. Presented by Jefferson County Public Health in partnership with Jefferson County Conservation District, the meetings will be at: ■  Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. ■  Tri-Area Commu-

nity Center, 10 West Valley Road, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20. Staff from the Conservation District and Public Health will present the results of a four-year effort to reduce sources of fecal pollution in the watershed and the bay. Time will be given for discussion, and light refreshments will be served. The Discovery Bay Clean Water Project is a Centennial Clean Water Project, funded by the state Depart-

ment of Ecology and Jefferson County. It concludes this fall and has been directed at preventing downgrades of shellfish harvest areas and keeping the waters clean for safe recreation and enjoyment. Causes of pollution that were addressed in the project included failing septic systems and farm runoff. Help for livestock owners to operate with bestmanagement practices to prevent manure runoff was

provided by Conservation District staff. Public Health staff conducted door to door septic “sanitary surveys” and classes, and they mailed educational newsletters. Failing septic systems were repaired. Financial assistance was available for qualified farmers and homeowners. For more information, phone Jefferson County Public Health’s Environmental Health Water Quality Program at 360-3859444.

Democrat of Year to be honored Event to be held Oct. 29 in Sequim Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Clallam County Democratic Party has announced that Earl Archer will receive the Democrat of the Year award at this year’s Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Dinner. Originally from California, Archer is a retired attorney who lives in Sequim with his wife, Becky, and currently

serves as the Clallam C o u n t y Democratic Party’s state committeeman. Along with county Archer party Chairman Matthew Randazzo, Archer serves on both the statewide Central Committee and Rules Committee, the two highest committees in the state Democratic Party.

Center at Carrie Blake Park on Saturday, Oct. 29. Tickets are on sale for $60 and include a full multicourse, locally catered dinner complete with musical entertainment, appearances from numerous elected officials and a special commemorative ticket. Those interested in attending may email the Roosevelt dinner Clallam County Democratic The event will be held at Party at Info@clallam the Guy Cole Convention democrats.org to be invited. “Earl Archer is renowned for his wit, his sharp legal mind, his excellent motions at committee meetings and the most spectacular head of white hair in Clallam County,” said Randazzo. “Earl is an extremely popular local Democrat, and I hope the community will turn out to see him honored at the Roosevelt Dinner.”

Briefly . . . Art on display in Sequim through Nov. SEQUIM — Paintings by Sequim Arts member Ruth McNicholas are on display at the Bank of America, 114 S. Sequim Ave., during October and November. Works include acrylic and watercolor with many local scenes. The bank is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Call for artists

of a person, family or pet or SEQUIM — The Sequim whimsical lifestyle.” A purchase-prize of $750 Lavender Growers Associaand a free booth at the 16th tion, creators and producers Sequim Lavender Festival of the Sequim Lavender Feswill be awarded, along with tival, is accepting applications for artwork incorporat- exposure on the festival website and other social ing lavender and its purple media. hue. Other cash awards will “We would like to be given in runner-up catebroaden our scope and gories. attract as many entries as Applications are availwe can that preview lavenable at www.sequimlavender der in various scenes, settings and formats, said asso- festival.com. ciation President Susan Apple Festival Olsen. “We want to go internaCHIMACUM — Finn tional and obtain the artists’ River Farm will host a free vision, on their media of Apple Festival from 1 p.m. choice, of how lavender may to 4 p.m. Sunday. be involved in the daily life Finn River Farm is

rap, Kingham is a popular figure on the coll­ege concert circuit and has appeared several times at PC. Kingham released his latest album, “Smooth Out Concert set the Line,” in 2010. PORT ANGELES — He has shared the stage Peninsula College’s Music in with musicians like Shawn the PUB series will present Colvin, Michael McDonald, Seattle’s Jonathan Kingham Doug Stone, Vanessa Carlin a free concert at ton, Jonathan Brooke and 12:35 p.m. Tuesday. David Wilcox. Island game night The concert will be held Recent tours have found NORDLAND — Marrow- on the Performance Stage in him on the road with such the Pirate Union Building stone Island Community diverse acts as Julio Iglesias cafeteria, 1502 E. Lauridsen Jr. and Glen Phillips of Toad Association will sponsor a game night at the Nordland Blvd. the Wet Sprocket. The event is sponsored Garden Club, 320 Garden For more information Club Road, from 5:30 p.m. to by the Associated Student visit www.pencol.edu or Council. 8:30 p.m. Monday. www.facebook.com/ Known for his vocals, gui- PeninsulaCollege. A $2 donation per person Peninsula Daily News tar sounds, wit and freestyle is suggested. located at 62 Barn Swallow Road, off Center Road. The event will include hot cider, face painting, workshops, the ability to meet cider apple growers, booths, family fun and games, music, sweet treats and a Cape Cleare salmon cart. For more information, phone 360-732-4337.

For more information, phone Pete Hubbard at 360385-0105 or email hphubbard@gmail.com.

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Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

D3

PT open house to welcome whales Event to be at Worden Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — An open house at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center will “Welcome the Whales” on Saturday. The open house will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Marine Exhibit at Fort Worden State Park. Entrance is included with regular admission. Early October marks the time of year when the Southern Resident orcas begin their frequent fall feeding forays into the lower Salish Sea, following the chum salmon as they return to spawn in their home streams.

Salmon, orca crafts “We will be offering salmon and orca crafts, activities on stream health and salmon habitat, studies of local salmon runs, information about how orca and salmon habitats interface, and we’ll talk about recent sightings of orcas,” said Chrissy McLean, the center’s marine program coordinator. “This year, we’re proud to partner with the North Olympic Salmon Coalition,” she added. “Jac Entringer, their outreach and volunteer coordinator, will be joining us for some extra ‘fishy fun.’” The first orca visits this year were from members of

Port Townsend Marine Science Center

Visitors to the Port Townsend Marine Science Center look at an exhibit on orcas. the members of J, K and L pods Oct. 1, when they headed south through Admiralty Inlet, and Oct. 2, when they traveled north.

Not all the whales in the pod were traveling, however, so it was not a superpod. Orca calls were picked up on the PT hydrophones

during the transits. Both exhibits are open The center offers two from noon to 4 p.m. Fridays, public exhibits: the Marine Saturdays and Sundays. Exhibit and the Natural Admission is $5 for History Exhibit. adults, $3 for youths and

nership is the newest of seven regional salmon recovery organizations in Washington. Four lead entity groups came together in 2007-2008 to create the partnership: FORKS — The board of North Pacific Coast, directors of the Washington Quinault Indian Nation, Coast Sustainable Salmon Grays Harbor County and Partnership will meet at the Pacific County. state Department of Natural The group is working for Resources building, 411 Tilithe improvement and recovcum Ave., Forks, from ery of salmon stocks in all 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, river basins flowing into the Oct. 19. Pacific Ocean between Cape The main agenda item Flattery and Cape Disapwill be a presentation about pointment. and discussion of the North American Salmon StrongOMC fundraiser hold Partnership and the The Olympic Medical implications for the western Center Auxiliary will hold Olympics. Miche Bag fundraising The Washington Coast events in Port Angeles and Sustainable Salmon Part-

Sequim on Oct. 19-20. The Port Angeles event will be held at Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19. The Sequim event will be held at Olympic Medical Services Building, 840 N. Sequim Ave, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20. A Miche Bag is a style of purse that allows owners to change shells to match outfits. For more information, phone Patty McCarty at 360-461-5243.

host a meeting Thursday, Oct. 20, to look into Regence Blue Shield’s new role as administrator of the state’s Uniform Medical Plan. The meeting will be held at Grace Lutheran Church, 1120 Walker St., at 4 p.m. “They want answers about a host of problems Uniform Medical Plan appears to be having with this new plan administrator,” said Ron Nelson, an association member from Port Ludlow who helped organize the event. “I am concerned that what is happening with Regence may be ill-serving Uniform Medical Plan members and, possibly, their health care providers.”

free to center members. For more information, phone 360-385-5582, email info@ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

Briefly . . . Salmon group to meet in Forks Oct. 19

Medical plan talk PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County unit of Washington State School Retirees Association will

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Speaking at the meeting will be Mary Fliss, Health Care Authority assistant administrator of public employee benefit board programs. State Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, and his legislative assistant, Linda Barnfather, will attend to hear from the presenter and constituents. They also will be there on behalf of state Rep. Steve Tharinger. The meeting is open to the public. The Jefferson County school retirees will provide complimentary pizza, fruit and beverages for attendees. For more information, phone Nelson at 360-4372125.


D4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Dragon: $600 check given to PT Library group Continued from D1 Pugh also sent six cases of books by the late Jim Simmerman to the Jim Simmerman Poetry Festival in Flagstaff, Ariz., and offloaded three cases of A Radiance Like Wind or Water by Richard Ronan, who has a cult following. Jordan Hartt of Centrum picked up cases of books to sell as fundraisers for the Writers Conference. Joseph Bednarik of Copper Canyon Press, who has served as an adviser on the project, is taking cases of books to Portland, Ore., where Mark Wessel of Wessel and Lieberman Booksellers distributes poetry books to schools, Pugh said.

‘Introspective-type’ “I told him you might want to vet them,” Pugh said. “They were all introspective-type material.” Pugh also found buyers at Open Books, an allpoetry bookstore in Seattle. Having received an official pronouncement from the house owners’ lawyer that the books “belong to the basement,” Pugh decided to give half the proceeds from book sales to the Friends of the Port Townsend Library. “I took them a check for $600 from the sales to Open Books,” he said. Also in the basement are boxes of Head’s book of poems Frequencies, one of three volumes of her published poetry.

Jennifer Jackson/for Peninsula Daily News

Among the books in the basement are copies of Frequencies: A Gamut of Poems by Gwen Head, Dragon Gate founder and publisher. The book, with a photo of the author on the back cover, was published by the University of Utah Press in 1992.

lished in 2001. Head was also a member of Poets for Peace, which was established in the 1980s to protest the posting of the Trident fleet Writers workshops of ballistic nuclear submaBorn in New Orleans in rines at Bangor, Olivieri said. 1940, she taught at the Head’s husband, Taper, Iowa Writers Workshop, the Writers at Work Conis a veteran who helped ference in Park City, Utah, track down stolen art work and at the University of during World War II. California, Davis. An author and writer In 1995, Head received for The New Yorker, he is a literature fellowship from now in his 90s and lives with Head in Berkeley, the National Endowment for the Arts to complete her where Pugh first met the couple through a shared book Fire Shadows, pub-

Blessing, a Northwest poet, and has written Linda Gregerson but has received no reply. As a last resort, Pugh said, he will contact a remainder house to see if they will take the orphans. “The most painful part is I’m going to have to Some heirs unavailable throw away someone’s book because I can’t find them,” But Pugh has not been he said. “That hurts.” able to contact the heirs of Eventually, the basesome of the authors, includ- ment will be empty, and ing James Thomas, the house, which was built author of Pictures Moving. in 1888, will find new ownHe has also tried to con- ers. tact the widow of Richard Perhaps they will read

interest in the Shakespeare Festival. They also shared an accountant, Patrick Golden, who called Pugh about tackling the book problem. “They want the books gone,” he said.

poetry in front of the fireplace in the front parlor of the house, which fostered a poetry press. To access the inventory of the Dragon Gate archives at the University of Washington Library, visit http://tinyurl.com/ 3n7qf2b.

Three-story house The three-story house, 508 Lincoln St. at Monroe Street, has seven bedrooms, stained-glass windows, original woodwork and a working elevator that also services

the basement. The front hall has a separate entrance for the upper floors. It is listed at $550,000. For more information, contact Barbara Bogart at Windermere Real Estate/Port Townsend at 360-385-9344 or bbogart@ olypen.com.

________ Jennifer Jackson writes about Port Townsend and Jefferson County every Wednesday. To contact her with items for this column, phone 360-379-5688 or email jjackson@olypen.com.

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