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Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

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November 4, 2010

Cuts mulled though tax favored Proposition 1 not cure-all By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Election night’s elation over the passage of a sales tax increase was tempered Wednesday as Jefferson County officials discussed cutting $426,943 from the 2011 budget. Proposition 1 — which raises the county sales tax rate by 0.3 percent to 8.7 percent, adding 3 cents to every $10 spent — won approval with 7,090 votes, or 55.61 percent, in favor to 5,659 votes, or 44.39 percent, opposed in Tuesday’s count. Auditor Donna Eldridge doesn’t expect Friday’s count of outstanding ballots, which numbered 3,543 on Wednesday, to change the outcome.

Daily

Yet, even with the additional $506,000 projected to be realized by the tax increase in 2011 — which won’t be collected until April and won’t begin to be in county hands until June — the county still must make cuts to balance its budget in the face of a $1.1 million deficit.

Proposition-funded “In putting together the budget, we will put back the programs that were to be funded by Proposition 1,” county Administrator Philip Morley said after the meeting Wednesday. “But as we knew, even if the measure passed, we would need to make more cuts.” Turn

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INSIDE

Democrats’ leads in races for House hold up so far

■  With about two-thirds of the expected ballots counted Wednesday evening, Democratic U.S. Sen. Patty Murray expanded her lead over Republican challenger Dino Rossi by about 51 percent to 49 percent. ■  Voters rejected Initiative 1100, which would have gotten Washington state out of the business of selling hard alcohol. They already had rejected a competing liquor privatization measure, Initiative 1105. ■  Justice Richard Sanders maintained a narrow lead in his bid for a fourth term on the state Supreme Court, but challenger Charlie Wiggins said he was encouraged by his performance in King County, the state’s most populous.

Proposition/A5

By Paul Gottlieb

estate managing broker, after Wednesday’s count. Van De Wege, a Clallam Sequim-area Democrats County Fire District 3 fireKevin Van De Wege and Steve fighter and paramedic, had Tharinger on Wednesday 23,975 votes, or 54.2 percent, maintained their election night to Gase’s 19,397 votes, or leads over Republican oppo45.8 percent. nents for two 24th Legislative Tharinger, 61, a Clallam District state House seats. County commissioner from Clallam was the only Dungeness, held a 1,321-vote county of the three in the dislead for the Position 2 seat trict to count ballots Wednesover Republican Jim McEntire, day. 60, a Port of Port Angeles comVan De Wege, 36, the twomissioner and retired Coast term Position 1 incumbent Guard captain, after more balfrom Sequim, had a 4,578-vote lots were counted Wednesday. lead over Republican Dan Turn to Legislative/A5 Gase, 57, a Port Angeles real Peninsula Daily News

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Adventuress lifted for renovation

winter access to national park

Centennial project to be ambitious winter of work By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The schooner Adventuress was lifted out of the water at the Boat Haven on Wednesday for a new round of repairs and renovation costing $250,000. The work, which will continue until spring in the Port Townsend Boat Haven, will include the reframing and replanking of the starboard bow and transom, as well as a new mainsail and staysail and restoration of the 133-foot ship’s iconic counter stern. Rebuilding of the two-masted, gaff-rigged schooner’s port bow and stem was completed earlier this year. Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Schooner built in 1913 It’s all part of the “Centennial Restoration Project” for the ship built in 1913 that Sound Experience, the nonprofit agency that owns the ship, used as a floating maritime classroom on Puget Sound. “This is one of the most ambitious winters that we have seen in a long time,” said Captain Joshua Berger.

A car makes its way through the third of three tunnels on the way up Hurricane Ridge Road in Olympic National Park on Wednesday.

Ridge strategy discussed

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Marketing, transportation, training topics at meeting By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Beginning in about mid-December, Hurricane Ridge Road will be open daily, weather permitting, and public transportation options are under discussion to capitalize on the tourism opportunity. The increased access to Hurricane Ridge, a popular tourist spot 17 miles from Port Angeles, is a change from past years when the road was closed Monday through Thursday from November through March, except for some holidays.

Mid-December target This year, the road, which is open daily now, will revert to its usual winter schedule Nov. 21 — open only Friday through Sunday — but will be opened seven days a week, if storms don’t prompt closure, beginning in midDecember, when additional snowplow staff has been trained, said Barb

Maynes, Olympic National Park spokeswoman. The date could be earlier, said park Deputy Superintendent Todd Seuss, if workers are trained quicker than expected. On Wednesday, a group of people met in Port Angeles to talk about how to get the word out about the change and how to get people up to the snow at Hurricane Ridge. They made no decisions, and no one is set to provide the service. Represented were the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, Sequim Chamber of Commerce, the Port Angeles Downtown Association, Olympic National Park, All Points Charters and Tours, the city of Port Angeles and a few interested community members. “We need scheduled and reliable transportation,” said Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Russ Veenema. Willie Nelson, who owns All Points Charters and Tours, said he was interested in helping out but would need a guaranteed payment in order to block

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Adventuress/A5

off the day to transport people up the mountain. The city is working on a possible plan to have a bus up to the ridge a couple times a month, said Richard Bonine, deputy director of recreation. Because of the many variables and permitting requirements involved in taking a scheduled bus up to the ridge, plans are tentative now, he said.

Not ready to announce “We aren’t really at the point where we’re ready to announce anything,” said City Manager Kent Myers. Nelson, who already gives tours of Hurricane Ridge for $40 per person, has the necessary permits and plans to renew those next year. The city would have to obtain a permit to operate a public bus to the snowfields. Bonine said Clallam Transit has not expressed interest in serving a route to Hurricane Ridge. Turn

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Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

The schooner Adventuress was taken out of the water Wednesday in preparation for a winter of repairs and renovations.

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Business B4 Classified C5 Comics C4 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby C4 Deaths A6 Lottery A2 Movies C2 Nation/World A3

Puzzles/Games C3, C8 Sports B1 Things To Do C2 C12 Weather


A2

UpFront

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Same-sex dancing airs first in Israel ISRAEL IS THE first country to feature a samesex duo on its version of the popular television competition “Dancing with the Stars,” and the two women have already resolved the toughest question they face: Who will lead? One, a gay television presenter, and the other, a straight professional dancer, are going to take turns. “The leader and the follower — we change all the time,” said Dorit Milman, the professional dance partner of TV sportscaster Gili Shem-Tov. “One time I lead her, and one time she leads me.” The dance partners, who appear on the sixth season of the popular Israeli version of the dancing competition, bring attention to the surprising tolerance of gays in an otherwise homophobic region. Although activists cite dozens of laws that discriminate against them, gays serve openly in Israel’s military, and the buzzing seaside metropolis Tel Aviv is one of the gay-friendliest cities in the world. Shem-Tov said she requested a female dance partner when she was invited onto the show, saying it felt more natural for her as a lesbian. “I live with my girlfriend, and we are raising my 1-year-old son together. It felt natural for me to dance

The Associated Press

Israeli television sports correspondent Gili Shem Tov, left, and professional dancer Dorit Milman pose during a rehearsal for the Israeli version of “Dancing With the Stars” in Jerusalem on Tuesday. with a woman. That’s my way of life,” Shem-Tov told reporters Tuesday, the day she made her televised dancing debut. Program producers said they were initially startled by the request, but then embraced it. It’s the first time that a same-sex couple has appeared on any of the local franchises of the dancing competition, said Cristina Dunn of BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the British broadcaster, which distributes the program.

vices to drama. Spacey said he was “hugely delighted” to receive the medal in a cereSpacey mony Wednesday at Charles’ London residence, Clarence House. Spacey has led the Old Vic since 2003 and has been praised for restoring the fortunes of the 200-year-old venue. He also has won acting Oscars for “The Usual SusSpacey honored pects” and “American Kevin Spacey has Beauty.” After the ceremony, received a royal honor from Spacey stressed his belief Prince Charles for his “that arts and culture are a role in reviving London’s hugely important part of Old Vic Theatre. our lives.” The Academy AwardHonorary awards are winning actor was named an honorary Commander of made to foreign nationals in recognition of excepthe Order of the British tional service to Britain. Empire, or CBE, for ser-

Passings By The Associated Press

JERRY BOCK, 81, who composed the music to some of the most memorable shows in Broadway history, including the melodies for “Fiorello!” and “Fiddler on the Roof,” has died. Richard M. Ticktin, Mr. Bock’s attorney and family friend, said the composer died Wednesday Mr. Bock in 2006 morning at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y., of heart failure. Together with lyricist Sheldon Harnick, Mr. Bock wrote the powerful score to “Fiddler on the Roof,” one of the most successful productions in the history of the American musical theater, having an initial run of eight years. It earned the two men Tony Awards in 1965. “He was wonderful to work with,” said Harnick, who collaborated with Mr. Bock for 13 years. “I think in all of the years that we worked together, I only remember one or two arguments — and those were at the beginning of the collaboration when we were still feeling each other out. Once we got past that, he was wonderful to work with.”

Mr. Bock had recently spoken at a memorial service for “Fiddler” playwright Joseph Stein, who died Oct. 24. Based on stories by Sholom Aleichem that were adapted into a libretto by Stein, “Fiddler” dealt with the experience of Eastern European Orthodox Jews in the Russian village of Anatevka in the year 1905. It starred Zero Mostel as Teyve, had an almost eightyear run and offered the world such stunning songs as “Sunrise, Sunset,” “If I Were a Rich Man” and “Matchmaker, Matchmaker.”

_________

VIKTOR CHERNOMYRDIN, 72, who served as Russia’s prime minister in the turbulent 1990s as the country was throwing off communism and developing as a market economy, died Wednesday. No cause of death has been released, but Mr. Chernomyrdin had grown thin in recent years and was reported to have been ill. His wife of nearly 50 years died early this year. In late 1992, he was appointed prime minister by then-President Boris Yeltsin and surprised the young liberal economists leading Russia’s transformation by pushing ahead with market reforms. In 1995, in the middle of

the first Chechen war, he held negotiations over the telephone with rebel leader Shamil Basayev, whose forces were holding more than 1,500 people hostage in a hospital in Budyonnovsk. The hostages were freed in exchange for Russia’s promises to begin negotiating a peaceful settlement, but Mr. Chernomyrdin took heat for allowing the hostage-takers to escape. His phrase “Shamil Basayev, we can’t hear you, speak louder,” a plea made during the televised negotiations, became a symbol of the war. For some, it showed the government’s helplessness against the rebels, but others saw in it a rare and admirable willingness to compromise for the sake of saving lives.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Wednesday’s Daily Game: 6-0-1 Wednesday’s Hit 5: 03-04-05-32-35 Wednesday’s Keno: 02-05-07-09-21-28-35-3739-42-53-54-60-62-64-6870-77-79-80 Wednesday’s Lotto: 12-16-22-30-43-44 Wednesday’s Match 4: 09-16-17-21 Wednesday’s Powerball: 34-38-39-45-50, Powerball: 33, Power Play: 2

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: As the Peninsula approaches the 10th anniversary of all-mail voting, would you like to see a return to Election Day balloting at precinct polling places?

Yes 

No 

30.9% 66.4%

Undecided  2.7% Total votes cast: 1,347 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

1985 (25 years ago)

East Jefferson County foes of the proposed Mount Olympus National Park are taking steps to circulate a petition against the park. L.D. McArdle of Quilcene, representing the Brinnon-Quilcene chapter of the Olympic Conservation League, attended the Port Townsend Chamber of Commerce meeting and enlisted the aid of that body in the anti-park campaign. McArdle and two others were named to draw up a petition form.

The theft of $5,000 worth of computers from Port Angeles High School has ended happily for all but the men who police suspect stole the equipment. Everything but a stopwatch was recovered by police, and the equipment was in good condition. Police did not release details of the arrest or names of the suspected thieves until a third suspect is apprehended. But they did say none of the suspects is a student.

1960 (50 years ago) The Port Angeles City Council decided not to change its present policy on extending water service beyond areas presently supplied. There are numerous requests for additional water, but no action will be taken until a new water main is laid parallel to the old one in a massive water renovation program. Once the work is finished, the issue of supplying water to outside areas will be studied, Councilman Murray F. Randall said.

Laugh Lines She was only a whiskey maker, but he loved her still. Your Monologue

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

A LARGE, MAJESTIC buck on a Port Angeles front lawn, pausing to sniff and catch a scent of the female he was chasing . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Nov. 4, the 308th day of 2010. There are 57 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Nov. 4, 1980, Ronald Reagan won the White House as he defeated President Jimmy Carter by a strong margin. On this date: ■  In 1884, Democrat Grover Cleveland was elected to his first term as president, defeating Republican James G. Blaine. ■  In 1922, the entrance to King Tutankhamen’s tomb was discovered in Egypt. ■  In 1924, Nellie T. Ross of Wyoming was elected the nation’s first female governor to serve out the remaining term of her late husband, William B. Ross.

■  In 1939, the United States modified its neutrality stance in World War II, allowing “cash and carry” purchases of arms by belligerents, a policy favoring Britain and France. ■  In 1942, during World War II, Axis forces retreated from El Alamein in North Africa in a major victory for British forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Bernard Montgomery. ■  In 1952, Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected president, defeating Democrat Adlai Stevenson. ■  In 1979, the Iran hostage crisis began as militants stormed the United States Embassy in Tehran, seizing its occupants; for some, it was the start of 444 days

of captivity. ■  In 1991, Ronald Reagan opened his presidential library in Simi Valley, Calif., with a dedication attended by President George H.W. Bush and former Presidents Jimmy Carter, Gerald R. Ford and Richard Nixon — the first-ever gathering of five past and present U.S. chief executives. ■  In 1995, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated by a right-wing Israeli minutes after attending a festive peace rally. ■  In 2008, Democrat Barack Obama was elected the first black president of the United States, defeating Republican John McCain. ■  Ten years ago: Yugoslavia’s

parliament approved the country’s first communist-free government in more than half a century. ■  Five years ago: Violent anti-U.S. protests broke out in Mar Del Plata, Argentina, where President George W. Bush was promoting free trade at the Summit of the Americas. ■  One year ago: An Italian judge found 23 Americans and two Italians guilty in the kidnapping of an Egyptian terror suspect, delivering the first legal convictions anywhere in the world against people involved in the CIA’s extraordinary renditions program. The New York Yankees won the World Series, beating the defending champion Philadelphia Phillies 7-3 in Game 6 behind Hideki Matsui’s record-tying six RBIs.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, November 4, 2010

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation NASA to try space shuttle launch today CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA will try today to launch space shuttle Discovery on its final voyage, although stormy weather could force yet another delay. Mission managers met Wednesday afternoon and into the evening to discuss an electrical problem that forced the latest postponement. Moses They concluded the circuit breaker trouble no longer exists and the shuttle is safe to fly. But forecasters warned there is an 80 percent chance that thunderstorms will keep Discovery on the pad. The decision came as dark storm clouds rolled over the launch site in Florida, putting some launch preparations on hold. Managers will reconvene before daybreak to assess the weather, before loading the shuttle’s fuel tank. “If the forecast tomorrow morning is still as bad as it is today, there’s a chance” that today’s launch attempt will be called off, mission management team chairman Mike Moses said Wednesday night. “It’s too early to make that call right now.”

Listeria bacteria found Federal health officials found the listeria bacteria at a San

Antonio food processing plant that Texas authorities have linked to four deaths from contaminated celery, the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday. The federal agency said it found the pathogen in multiple locations in the SanGar Produce & Processing Co. plant, confirming the testing announced last month by the Texas Department of State Health Services. The Texas health authority shut the plant down Oct. 20 and ordered a recall of all produce shipped from there since January. A hearing on the case is set for Nov. 17 in Austin. “It comes as no surprise to us,” Texas health department spokeswoman Carrie Williams said Wednesday of the FDA’s findings. “If there was any doubt out there, this erases it. It’s another layer of confirmation that this plant had serious issues.”

Alzheimer study CHICAGO — Omega-3 pills promoted as boosting memory didn’t slow mental and physical decline in older patients with Alzheimer’s disease, a big disappointment in a multimillion-dollar government-funded study. “We had high hopes that we’d see some efficacy, but we did not,” said Dr. Joseph Quinn, an author of the $10 million study and a researcher at Oregon Health and Science University. The results with pills containing DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid, highlight “the continued frustration over lack of effective interventions” for the memoryrobbing disease, an editorial said in Wednesday’s Journal of the American Medical Association. The Associated Press

Obama, Boehner clash on health care repeal Alaska Senate race could WASHINGTON — A chas- take weeks to decide winner

The Associated Press

tened President Barack Obama signaled a new willingness to yield to Republican demands on tax cuts and jettisoned a key energy priority Wednesday, less than 24 hours after he and fellow Democrats absorbed election losses so severe he called them a shellacking. But he bluntly swept aside any talk of repeal of his signature health care law — right after the House Speaker-in-waiting, Rep. John Boehner of Ohio, vowed Republicans would do everything they could to wipe the legislation off the books. Boehner, a 60-year-old veteran of two decades in Congress, spoke at what amounted to his national debut as head of an incoming conservative majority that will include long-experienced lawmakers and tea party-backed political newcomers alike. He declared, “Our new majority will be the voice of the American people as they expressed it so clearly yesterday.” Separately, the Federal Reserve announced new steps designed to further lower interest rates on loans and lead to more job creation, using powers denied to mere politicians. Taken together, the fast-paced series of events confirmed the primacy of the economy as an issue in a country with 9.6 percent unemployment, record home foreclosures and disappointingly slow growth.

Senate races in three states and a handful of gubernatorial races remained extraordinarily close Wednesday and seemed destined for contested vote counts that could drag on for weeks. The tight votes signaled how closely divided American voters are in an election that produced a split Congress, with Republicans taking control of the House and Democrats maintaining power in the Senate. The candidates in the Washington state and Colorado Senate races were separated by a few thousand votes after campaigns that attracted tens of millions of dollars in spending. The Republican nominee in the Alaska Senate race was already gearing up for a legal fight and sending lawyers to the state. Several gubernatorial races were in similar territory, including Minnesota, Oregon and Illinois. It could take weeks before a winner is named in Alaska’s Senate race because of Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s write-in candidacy. No U.S. Senate candidate has won as a write-in since Strom Thurmond did it in 1954, but with 99 percent of precincts reporting early Wednesday, write-ins had 41 percent of the vote. Tea party favorite Joe Miller, who beat Murkowski for the GOP nomination in August by just 2,006 votes, received 34 percent. But the write-in count only

speaks to total ballots cast for write-ins — not to names written on them. Murkowski is one of 160 writein candidates eligible for the race that featured former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s vigilant support of Miller and pro-Murkowski ads featuring the late Sen. Ted Stevens.

Stalemate in Congress may be good for the economy Fresh off sweeping gains in Tuesday’s elections, Republicans vowed to shrink government and repeal Obama’s health care law. Yet despite their capture of the House and near-takeover of the Senate, there’s little chance they can summon the votes to enact their own prescriptions for the ailing economy. Democrats, with their own economic ideas, will likely fight them to a draw. It may not matter. On its own, the economy is showing slow but steady improvement. Consumers and businesses are spending a bit more. Some companies are hiring. And most economists expect those gains to continue. For both Democrats and Republicans, the inability to do much for the next two years may not be such a bad policy for the economy. If you ask economists, none of the ideas proposed in the campaign — by either party — would make a big dent in the nation’s 9.6 percent unemployment rate or ramp up consumer spending.

Briefly: World Group threatens more attacks on Christians

A 48-hour ban on all package deliveries abroad took effect after mail bombs BAGHDAD — Al-Qaida’s reached the front group in Iraq has threatoffice of Gerened more attacks on Christians man ChancelMerkel after a siege on a Baghdad lor Angela church that left 58 people dead, Merkel and halted flights for linking the warning to claims hours at Italy’s Bologna airport, that Egypt’s Coptic Church is where a package addressed to holding women captive for conItalian Premier Silvio Berverting to Islam. lusconi caught fire. The Islamic State of Iraq, Officials in Greece and Gerwhich has claimed responsibilmany said they supported a ity for Sunday’s assault on a Europe-wide tightening of packCatholic church during Mass in age-screening procedures. downtown Baghdad, said its “This incident and the probdeadline for Egypt’s Copts to lem that we had at the chancelrelease the women had expired lery with a suspect package and its fighters would attack must give cause to better coordiChristians wherever they could nate checks on cargo inside be reached. Europe . . . and then as far as “We will open upon them the possible worldwide,” Merkel doors of destruction and rivers said. of blood,” the insurgent group said in a statement posted late Massive blast Tuesday on militant websites. MOUNT MERAPI, Indonesia The Islamic State of Iraq is — Searing gas and molten lava an umbrella group that includes al-Qaida in Iraq and other allied poured from Indonesia’s deadly volcano Wednesday in an exploSunni insurgent factions. It is unclear exactly what led sion three times as powerful as the group to seize on the conver- last week’s devastating blast, chasing people from villages sion disputes between Egypt’s Muslims and its minority Chris- and emergency shelters along its slopes. tians, although the issue has After more than a week of become a rallying point for continual eruptions, and warnhard-line Islamists in Egypt. ings that pressure inside Mount Merapi may still be building, Greece stops airmail the province warned it was runATHENS, Greece — Greece ning out of money to help more stopped all outgoing airmail than 70,000 people forced from packages and screened thoutheir homes. sands of boxes Wednesday in an Soldiers loaded women and attempt to stop a spate of bomb- crying children into trucks ings blamed on domestic miliwhile rocks and debris rained tants targeting diplomatic misfrom the sky. The Associated Press sions and European leaders.

The Associated Press

Daniel Costa, a volunteer with the campaign to legalize marijuana, rallies last-minute voters to support Proposition 19 shortly before polls closed Tuesday in Oakland, Calif.

Pot activists vow to push on By Lisa Leff and Marcus Wohlsen The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — It seemed an easy sell in California: The state that gave us medical marijuana would allow pot for recreation. Then came the ads, newspaper editorials and politicians, warning of a world where stoned drivers would crash school buses, nurses would show up at work high and employers would be helpless to fire drug-addled workers. A day after voters rejected

Quick Read

Proposition 19, marijuana advocates wondered how they failed in trendsetting, liberal California. Was it the fear of the unknown? An older electorate more likely to oppose pot? Voters reluctant to go any further than they already had with the nation’s most lax pot laws? Fear of crossing swords with a federal government still intent on enforcing its ban on the drug? Whatever the reason, activists vowed Wednesday to push on in California, as well as in states that rejected other pot measures Tuesday.

“Social change doesn’t happen overnight,” said Paul Armentano, deputy director of the National Organization for Repeal of Marijuana Laws. In South Dakota, voters rejected for the second time a medical marijuana measure — a step first taken by California in 1996 and by 13 other states since. Oregon voters refused to expand their medical marijuana program to create a network of statelicensed nonprofit dispensaries. A medical marijuana measure on Arizona’s ballot remained too close to call Wednesday.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Mountain lion comes close to children

Nation: Wisconsin man votes after heart surgery

Nation: Man arrested in diaper says he was sober

World: Mother of child who gave birth delighted

A group of children waiting for their school bus Wednesday morning got a shock when they spotted a mountain lion in a field just 200 feet from their stop along a rural route in Montana. The bus driver and the children saw the wild animal at about the same time as the bus was pulling up to the stop south of Missoula, said Robert Mitchell, general manager of the bus company, Beach Transportation. The driver quickly loaded the children, who were three or four students ranging between kindergarten and eighth grade, and radioed the company, which called 9-1-1, Mitchell said.

A Milwaukee man who came to after heart surgery and demanded a ballot has been allowed to vote. Janis Strucel said her father called her at about 8 a.m. Tuesday and said he was having chest pains. He was rushed into surgery an hour later and had a stent put in. When he came to a few hours later, 69-year-old Terry Kopplin asked to vote. Strucel said she and her family called Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Walker’s campaign to see what to do. Strucel said a friend picked up Kopplin’s ballot, and the lifelong Republican voted at the hospital — for Walker.

A Florida man arrested for disorderly conduct while wearing a diaper on Halloween said he was pelted with candy by teenagers and wasn’t drunk at the time. Maryland State police said 47-yearold Joseph David DiVanna of Sarasota, Fla., was arrested at about 9:15 p.m. Sunday. State Police said witnesses reported DiVanna cursed at adults and children in the Fox Chapel neighborhood of West Ocean City as he tried to get them to give him candy. Divanna said he was wearing a full baby costume complete with T-shirt, bib and bonnet, and believes neighbors upset at his trick-or-treating alerted police.

A Romanian Gypsy woman whose 10-year-old daughter just gave birth in Spain said she’s delighted to have a new granddaughter and doesn’t understand why the birth has shocked anyone — let alone become an international sensation. Spanish authorities have released few details about the case to protect the girl’s privacy. In comments published Wednesday, her mother said that the baby’s father is a 13-year-old boy who is still in Romania and is no longer going out with her daughter. The 10-year-old girl and her baby daughter plan to stay in Spain, said the girl’s mother.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Biomass hearings set for Nov. 24 PORT ANGELES — Hearings for the appeal of Nippon Paper Industries USA’s proposed biomass boiler have been set. Clallam County Hearing Examiner Chris Melly will hear an appeal on the city of Port Angeles’ environmental study for Nippon’s proposed biomass boiler Wednesday, Nov. 24. The hearing will be at 8 a.m. in council chambers at Port Angeles City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St.

Melly will receive testimony from representatives of Nippon of Port Angeles and the seven environmental groups appealing a city environmental impact statement that allows construction of a $71 million cogeneration plant at the Ediz Hook paper mill. The City Council will use the testimony gathered at the hearing to rule on the validity of the study at another hearing Tuesday, Dec. 14. That hearing will be held at 6 p.m. in council chambers. The council will also rule on the appeal of a shoreline development permit granted to Nippon for the project. Harold Norlund, mill

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manager, said the appeal has not delayed the project, expected to be finished by mid-2012. The cogeneration plant would burn wood waste, known as hog fuel or biomass, and produce 20 megawatts of electricity. Seven Western Washington environmental groups — including PT AirWatchers, Olympic Forest Coalition and Olympic Environmental Council from the North Olympic Peninsula — are appealing the environmental impact statement.

Gateway fee same PORT ANGELES — City Hall will charge the

pate in the Napoleonic Law Study in New Orleans. Students Sarah Bower, Grace Geren, Kelly Norris, Rylan Spencer and Tally Swanson will be able to witness a legal system unlike that in any other state. The Louisiana system in is derived from the Civil Code established by the French emperor Napoleon in 1804. The group will observe New Orleans Superior Court, where a judge decides a case based on New Orleans trip interpretation of code, not PORT ANGELES — those of prior courts. Five members of the Students will then parClallam County Teen Court ticipate as members of the will leave Port Angeles on Lafayette Teen Court Jury in Lafayette, La. Friday, Dec. 10, to particisame rate for use of The Gateway transit center’s pavilion next year. The Port Angeles City Council on Tuesday voted unanimously to keep the daily rental rate at $100. The main user of the facility at Front and Lincoln streets is the Port Angeles Farmers Market. To rent the pavilion, phone Deputy Recreation Director Richard Bonine at 360-417-4551.

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Peninsula Daily News

(j) — Thursday, November 4, 2010

A5

Legislative: Next vote counts will be Friday Continued from A1 Tharinger had 22,181 votes, or 51.5 percent, to McEntire’s 20,860 votes, or 48.5 percent, in a race to fill Position 2, which is now held by longtime state Rep. Lynn Kessler, a Hoquiam Democrat who is retiring. The 24th District includes Clallam and Jefferson counties and the northern half of Grays Harbor County, not including Aberdeen. More than half of the district’s approximately 84,306 registered voters are from Clallam County. The Clallam County Auditor’s Office counted 3,814 ballots Wednesday and has about 9,000 more to count.

The next count will be by 4:30 p.m. Friday. Jefferson and Grays Harbor counties have not reported ballot counts since Tuesday night. The next ballot tabulations for Jefferson County will be conducted at noon Friday — and for Grays Harbor County at 5 p.m. Friday. Jefferson County had 80.67 percent of ballots returned as of Wednesday. Van De Wege and Tharinger said voting trends would have to dramatically change for a turnaround in the results. “There would have to be about a 10 [percent] to 15 percent change in those trends for me to lose,” Tharinger said.

“That’s possible, of course, but we’re still optimistic.” Asked whether he was ready to concede, McEntire said, “Heck, no.” “We are in the second or third inning,” he said. “These numbers are just going to wiggle around, and we will just have to kind of ride it out and see the tale that Friday’s tape tells.” Van De Wege stuck by his victory declaration of Tuesday night. “When you have over 55 percent of the vote, that’s not [being] overconfident,” he said. “Those trends would just have to be completely out of wonk, and that just doesn’t happen.” Van De Wege said Gase

would need to get 67 percent of the remaining vote in the three counties and that McEntire would need 59 percent of the remaining vote to defeat Tharinger. “The trending is not going to be there,” Van De Wege predicted. Gase was unavailable for for comment late Wednesday. The state representative position pays $42,106 annually. Clallam County Auditor Patty Rosand is predicting a 72 percent total turnout. Voter turnout for Grays Harbor County was 47 percent as of Tuesday.

80.7% turnout in Jeffco returned to 17,543, or 80.67 percent of the PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County 21,746 mailed to registered voters. Auditor’s Office has Eldridge had pre3,543 ballots on hand to dicted an 80 percent count Friday, after more voter turnout. than 2,000 came in Of the ballots Wednesday. received, 286 need furAuditor Donna Eldridge expects to have ther resolution, meaning that the tabulator results by about noon. couldn’t read them and The office had 981 ballots left Tuesday night they must be duplicated — copied onto a clean after the first count in ballot. the general election and Eldridge said she received another 2,562 properly postmarked bal- does not expect outstanding ballots to lots Wednesday. change outcomes in JefThat brings the total number of ballots ferson County elections. Peninsula Daily News

________ Senior Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul. gottlieb@peninsuladailynews.com.

Proposition: Community centers in jeopardy Continued from A1 by the sales tax increase or covered by budget cuts will Wednesday’s meeting of be pulled from reserves, department heads and Morley said. elected officials, which was not open to the public, Action after 2011 focused on the development Given structural changes of a final balanced budget, made this year and the which is due for presenta- realization of a full amount tion to the county commis- of the sales tax increase in sioners Wednesday, Nov. 17. subsequent years, which is Department heads have projected to be $637,000, one week to determine their such a move won’t be necescuts. sary after 2011, Morley preMorley has given each a dicted. target amount, ranging “In future years, Propofrom $43 for the Civil Ser- sition 1 saves us from havvice Commission to $37,823 ing to use reserves because for the Sheriff’s Office. we will get the full year’s The amount not raised revenue,” Morley said.

In the meantime, several positions and programs that would have felt the ax won’t be cut. Saved by the tax increase, which will take effect April 1, are a sheriff’s deputy and an animal control officer, as well as a deputy prosecutor and a juvenile probation counselor. Substance abuse programs and community centers were also in jeopardy. The county is required to allocate one-third of the revenue realized from the tax increase to public safety and to give 40 percent to local municipalities — in

this case, Port Townsend. City officials have agreed to devote half of the $400,000 it would receive next year to fund maintenance of Memorial Field at the Port Townsend Recreation Center with half of the projected $400,000 it will receive.

cated to the city be used to support fire services in the city. In August, Port Townsend voters rejected a proposed levy lid lift for fire services within the city. The city contracts for such services from East Jefferson Fire-Rescue. Parallel to the budget process, the county is negotiating with labor unions to defer wage increases for one year, which would save the county $77,000. Eight departments have union members and have received a second set of numbers they will need to

City meeting today City Manager David Timmons said he will recommend at an East Jefferson Fire-Rescue budget meeting at 3 p.m. today at the Port Townsend fire station, 701 Harrison St., that the remainder of funds allo-

cut if an agreement cannot be reached with the unions, Morley said. Morley will not comment about negotiations now in progress with the two unions to which county employees belong, the Teamsters and the United Food and Commercial Workers. He said he did not expect the negotiations to be completed prior to the budget deadline.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews.com.

Ridge: Park hires two snowplow operators Continued from A1 resentatives said they will work on creating signs to The park will keep the direct people to the road. road open daily, except for Park Superintendent avalanche control and Karen Gustin said she weather closures, this win- would look into putting up a ter thanks to more than sign near the road entrance $75,000 in donations raised to designate that the road on the North Olympic Penwas open every day. insula. Meyers suggested a sign The National Park Sernear Civic Field on Race vice will contribute $250,000 to cover the rest of the Street, the city street that turns into Hurricane Ridge anticipated cost. Both park and city rep- Road.

The park has hired a maintenance mechanic and two snowplow operators and has offered jobs to two law enforcement officers, Seuss said.

Hiring staff “As far as interpretative staff, we’re working on extending some of the seasonal contracts,” he said. Until the new staff members are on board and

the road could be opened earlier than mid-December, but Seuss said he built in training time to ensure the workers’ safety. While there are always opportunities for snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and snowball fights at the top of the ridge during the winter, the rope tows and poma lift at Hurricane Ridge will remain closed except for weekends — but

trained, the park will adhere to its usual winter schedule, closing the road, which has been open daily during the summer, four days per week. “Our main concern is safety,” Seuss said. “So getting them trained to where we feel it is safe will determine when we open it.” If all the workers can be quickly brought up to speed,

the club will add Friday as part of an extended weekend, said Greg Halberg, a member of the club. The Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club said it doesn’t have the money or volunteers to expand ski lift operations beyond that schedule.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Adventuress: Winter work provides local jobs Continued from A1

allowed to vote every day for the projects of their choice, and the Adventuress, which is based in Port Townsend, won with 20 percent of the vote after running neck-and-neck with Town Hall Seattle. Restoration completed as part of this project is expected to meet a 50-year standard. This winter’s renovations will provide a boost to the local economy through creating local jobs, Haven Boatworks co-owner Ste-

Briefly: Peninsula/State

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funded by the American Express grant. The Adventuress will return to the water next spring, after which time Sound Experience will conduct a full schedule of its environmental education and sail training programs aboard the ship. More than 3,000 participants sail on the Adventuress every year. Sound Experience also conducted an October fund drive that raised $57,000 in 29 days to support its edu-

phen Gale said. The reframing and replanking of the starboard bow will use the remainder of a 2009 National Park Service “Save America’s Treasures” grant for $180,000, which was matched dollar-for-dollar by donors. This grant, plus private matching contributions, will also fund a new mainsail and staysail for the Adventuress. The restoration of the ship’s counter stern will be

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A6

Thursday, November 4, 2010

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Murray expands lead in Senate race By Curt Woodward The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Democratic U.S. Sen. Patty Murray expanded her small lead over Republican challenger Dino Rossi on Wednesday as officials counted more ballots in Washington state’s slow-moving election system. With roughly two-thirds of the expected ballots counted by Wednesday night, Murray led Rossi by about 51 percent to 49 percent. The actual vote totals were 828,276 for Murray to 800,812 for Rossi — a margin of about 27,000 votes out of more than 1.6 million counted so far in unofficial returns. Hundreds of thousands of ballots still are being processed and will be counted in the days ahead, leaving the race too close to call. Both campaigns said they could maintain paths to victory. “We’re feeling good. We’re feeling confident,” said Alex Glass, Murray’s deputy campaign manager, after seeing Wednesday’s early returns.

“There’s a number of ballots to be counted, and we should make sure that every vote is counted,” Rossi spokeswoman Jennifer Morris said. Nearly everyone in Washington votes by mail, and ballots may be returned through Election Day, leaving several days of processing and counting as envelopes postmarked as late as midnight Tuesday make their way to election officials.

Ballot-counting lag The ballot-counting lag also means it’s still unclear just how many people voted in the 2010 election. Election officials expected a 66 percent statewide turnout. Much depends on the results in heavily Democratic King County, which includes Seattle. Nearly a third of the state’s roughly 3.6 million registered voters live in King County, and Murray was maintaining about 62 percent of the county’s vote in Wednesday’s returns. The national stakes for the Murray-Rossi race

declined considerably once Democratic victories in West Virginia and Nevada ensured the GOP could not take control of the Senate. But a Murray victory would give Democrats a further cushion as Republicans take control of the House for the rest of President Barack Obama’s term. Obama made two visits to Washington to stump for Murray, including a raucous October rally attended by about 10,000 at the University of Washington. It was part of a push by national Democrats to turn out friendly voters here. Former President Bill Clinton, Vice President Joe Biden and first lady Michelle Obama also visited Washington just as voters were receiving their ballots in mid-October.

Margin for recount State law would mandate a recount if the race’s margin is less than 2,000 votes. Washington has seen close races recently, including 2004’s gubernatorial contest and Democrat Maria Cantwell’s recount victory over Republican

The Associated Press

Felicia Ekenman opens and inspects a ballot Wednesday in Seattle at the King County Elections office, where U.S. Sen. Patty Murray is looking to outstanding ballots in the vote-rich county to carry her the rest of the way to a fourth six-year term. Sen. Slade Gorton in 2000. Murray’s campaign for a fourth term featured a strong defense of her role in securing federal spending for Washington, highlighting the specific bridges, dams, highways, hospitals and construction jobs she helped deliver. Rossi tried to turn those

points against Murray, campaigning as a fiscal conservative who would forgo petproject spending until the budget was balanced. He also criticized her support for Democratic overhauls of health care and Wall Street regulations. Murray spent nearly $15 million through September

to Rossi’s roughly $2.5 million, but a flood of outside money helped Rossi keep up. Figures compiled by the Sunlight Foundation showed Rossi benefited from about $11 million in independent spending, compared with about $8.5 million in Murray’s column.

Voters reject liquor privatization effort By Rachel La Corte The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Voters have rejected a Costco-backed measure that would have gotten Washington state out of the business of selling hard alcohol, delivering a double rebuke to competing efforts to privatize liquor sales in the state. With about two-thirds of the expected vote counted by Wednesday, Initiative 1100 was losing by more than 73,000 votes, with 52 percent of voters rejecting it. Voters in Tuesday’s election had already rejected a competing liquor privatization measure, Initiative 1105. Both I-1100 and I-1105 would have abolished the state’s current monopoly on liquor distribution and sales in favor of private busi-

nesses. But I-1100 would have gone further, dismantling the current distribution model and allowing retailers like Costco to buy beer, wine and spirits directly from manufacturers instead of going through distributors.

Price controls eliminated I-1100 would have also eliminated price controls and other regulations that exist within the current three-tier system of producers, distributors and retailers — such as bans against volume discounts and paying on credit — that exist for beer and wine distribution and sales. I-1105 would have kept in place state laws that protect beer and wine distributors. It would have maintained prohibitions on bulk dis-

counts for beer and wine but would have allowed them for sales of hard liquor. “Voters looked at both of these initiatives, and what they saw were two deeply flawed measures that would have compromised public safety, cost us state jobs and undermined the quality of life in our community,” said Sandeep Kaushik, a spokesman for the No on I-1100/1105 campaign. I-1100 spokesman Ashley Bach said that while the campaign wasn’t officially conceding, “we recognize the numbers aren’t with us right now.” “It’s tough to win an election when you’re outspent by several million dollars and your opponent is funded by multinational beer conglomerates,” he said. The I-1100 campaign battle had mainly been between

big box stores like Costco and distributors who don’t want to disrupt the current system. It was a big-money fight with lots of out-of-state donations from groups like the Washington, D.C.-based Beer Institute and dozens of state distributor groups giving money to the opposition campaign, which spent $8.8 million. The “yes” campaign spent nearly $6 million, with more than $4.8 million coming from Issaquah-based Costco in money and in-kind contributions. A coalition of several groups opposed both initiatives, including unions, the Washington State Council of Firefighters and several craft breweries and wineries, citing concerns ranging from public safety to the potential effect on state

and city budgets. I-1100 would have removed the liquor markup imposed by the state, and I-1105 would have removed the markup and all additional liquor taxes. Washington is among 18 so-called “control” or “monopoly” states that exercise broad powers over wholesale distribution of hard liquor. Of those states, 12 — including Washington — are also involved in retail alcohol sales through either staterun liquor stores, outlets operated by private contractors, or both. While the liquor privatization debate hasn’t been able to gain traction in Washington state until this year’s dueling initiative measures, the state Legislature has already made several changes to the three-tier system over the years, including

allowing brewers and wineries to sell directly to consumers and allowing retailers to buy directly from wineries and brewers.

Other ballot issues I-1100 and 1-1105 were two of nine measures on the Tuesday ballot. On the other measures, voters rejected a state income tax on the richest 1 percent, made it harder for the Legislature to raise taxes in the future by reinstituting a twothirds vote — and rolled back higher taxes on pop, candy, gum, bottled water and certain processed foods. Voters also turned down an initiative that would have privatized workers’ compensation insurance and overwhelmingly decided to give judges more power to deny a suspect bail.

Sanders has narrow lead in state high court race By Gene Johnson

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Justice Richard Sanders maintained a narrow lead in his bid for a fourth term on the state Supreme Court as more votes were counted Wednesday, but challenger Charlie Wiggins said he was encouraged by his performance in the state’s most populous county. Sanders had 51 percent of the vote to 49 percent for Wiggins. About two-thirds of the statewide vote has been counted, but a significant portion of the uncounted ballots were in King County, where Wiggins was collect-

ing nearly 57 percent. “I’m pretty thrilled with what I’m seeing,” Wiggins said. “On the new votes in King County, I’ve got a nice jump in the percentage I’m getting — 60 percent of those. “That’s the trend I really need to have.”

Under fire Sanders didn’t immediately return a call seeking comment. Sanders came under fire late in the campaign for insisting at a court meeting that racial bias plays no significant role in the criminal justice system.

Death and Memorial Notice Carol Marie ‘Polly’ Polhamus July 11, 1927 October 30, 2010 Mrs. Carol Marie Polhamus, 83, of Port Angeles, passed away in Bremerton, Washington, on October 30, 2010. She was born in Seattle, Washington, to Robert Cavendish and Gertrude Theodora Rixon on July 11, 1927. She was married to Robert Glen Polhamus in Forks in 1946. Mrs. Polhamus resided in Adak, Alaska, El Paso, Texas, and Port Angeles. She was a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church and a lifetime member of the Elks Naval Lodge. Mrs. Polhamus is survived by sons and daughter-in-law Bob and Sylvia Polhamus of El Paso, Texas, and Randall Polhamus of Port Angeles; daughter and son-inlaw Carol and Ignacio Roberto Pacheco of Bremerton, Washington;

Mrs. Polhamus seven grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 East Park Avenue, Port Angeles, at 1 p.m. on Saturday, November 6, 2010. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church or the Alzheimer’s Association. Please sign the online guest book at www. drennanford.com.

He said certain minority groups are “disproportionally represented in prison because they have a crime problem.” A front-page story on the remarks appeared in The Seattle Times after ballots were mailed to voters and was followed by the newspaper’s decision to rescind its endorsement of him.

Blacks make up 4 percent of the state’s population and nearly 20 percent of its prisoners, and studies around the country have linked such disproportionate numbers to drug enforcement policies, poverty and racial biases throughout society. Sanders said he stood by his remarks, that the

uproar over his comments amounted to a personal attack and that he’s proud of his record of upholding the state Constitution and protecting individual liberties. He and his supporters pointed out that he often sides with defendants in criminal cases that reach the high court.

Death and Memorial Notice Evelyn P. Bryson December 26, 1926 October 19, 2010 Wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend Evelyn P. Bryson, 83, of Forks died Tuesday, October 19, 2010, at the Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles. Evelyn was born Evelyn Pauline Rhodes on December 26, 1926, in Lyman, Washington. She and her brother, Wilbur (deceased), were the only children of Ada and Roy Rhodes. She attended school in Sedro-Woolley, where she graduated from the Sedro-Woolley High School in 1943. Evelyn married Floyd Bryson on April 2, 1945, and they settled in Lyman, where Floyd worked in the logging industry. The family moved in 1954, to Forks, where Floyd continued working as a logger, salvaging timber burned during the infamous Forks Burn of 1951. In the 1960s, Floyd began a career in highway maintenance with the Washington Department of Transportation until he retired. After moving to the Forks area, the young family lived near Snider Work Center. Evelyn’s life as a mother was spent caring for her two young

Mrs. Bryson children, gardening and harvesting special forest products. In her later years, Evelyn reminisced about the early days and was amazed that her children survived their escapades in the wilderness. In 1972, the couple moved to their permanent residence east of Forks, where Evelyn pursued her passions for landscaping, cooking, sewing, knitting, gardening, entertaining and playing cards. In their later days, she and Floyd always enjoyed the company of their family and many, many friends. Evelyn’s commitment to her family extended into the USDA Forest Service family and to the community of Forks. In 1967, she was hired as a resource clerk for the Sol Duc

Ranger District. Evelyn was a committed and respected employee, remembered most for her ability to organize and manage district programs and activities. Evelyn retired from the Forest Service in 1989, after 23 years of civil service. Evelyn was a natural organizer of community events, including fundraisers for her favorite projects: the Forks Museum and Loggers’ Memorial, Forks Community Food Bank and Friends of Forks Animal Shelter. Evelyn died at the age of 83 after a short illness. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Floyd; son, Ron (Brenda) Bryson; daughter, Cheryl (Wayne) Caulkins; five grandchildren and one great-grandson, all of Forks. She is remembered by many friends who shared her enthusiasm for life and commitment to the community of Forks. A celebration of Evelyn’s life will be held in the spring of 2011. Details about the celebration will be announced. In honor of her memory, her family requests memorial contributions be made to the Forks Community Food Bank, Friends of Forks Animals, the Loggers’ Memorial and the Timber Museum.

Wiggins said Sanders’ comments fit into a pattern of ill-considered remarks — including the time Sanders shouted “Tyrant!” at thenU.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey during a black-tie dinner — that raise questions about his judgment.

Death Notices Alva Giffin Dec. 29, 1921 — Oct. 31, 2010

Alva H. Giffin died of natural causes in Port Ludlow at age 88. His obituary will be published later. Services: Friday, Nov. 5, 3:30 p.m. memorial at the Port Ludlow Community Church, 9534 Oak Bay Road, Port Ludlow. Kosec Funeral Home & Crematory, Port Townsend, is in charge of arrangements. www.kosecfuneralhome. com.

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsula dailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, November 4, 2010

Commentary

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GOP win: Stand firm, heed message THE CYNIC IN me says that Democrats will learn nothing from the midterm election. They not only took a bath, they were Cal Thomas effectively water-boarded by voters. Democrats lost the House by a margin not seen since 1948. They lost 10 governorships while retaining two — New York and California. Both states are insolvent and can be expected to ask for bailouts from the federal government, something a Republican House is unlikely to grant. Republicans will get to re-district most states in ways favorable to them for at least the next decade. Nancy Pelosi will step down as speaker, though Senate Majority

Leader Harry Reid managed to survive a nose-holding election in Nevada. While Democrats have complained about lack of cooperation from Republicans in enacting President Obama’s agenda, don’t look for them to show the way by cooperating with Republicans. The GOP has swept solidly into the House on a wave of voter anger at the elitism and condescension shown by so many Democrats and their big media allies who think the public is stupid because a majority do not agree with the notion of government as savior. Democrats aren’t in a cooperating mood, as they usually aren’t when they lose. And make no mistake — they’ve lost big. By every measuring stick — governorships, legislatures, independents, women — Democrats have lost. Republicans would be crazy to water down what clearly is a mandate to stop the ObamaReid-Pelosi liberal agenda.

I expect congressional Democrats, in collusion with the White House, to attempt to maneuver Republicans into another government shutdown. It worked before, and since Democrats have not had a new idea in years, or even a good, old idea, all they know is class warfare, entitlement and grievance. At his post-election news conference Wednesday, President Obama said many of the things he thought people wanted to hear — common ground, consensus, working together. But he steadfastly and perhaps understandably would not cede any territory on his administration’s core policies, especially national health insurance. Newly-empowered Republicans aren’t likely to compromise, since that usually means they are the only ones doing the compromising, which in the past has led to disgust by Republican voters who don’t want watered-down conservatism, but spending reductions and smaller government.

Peninsula Voices Hallett critic Mr. Jim Hallett’s comments in the Oct. 20 PDN article, “Harbor-Works Unanimously Dissolved,” are puzzling to me. Mr. Hallett apparently believes those critical of the Harbor-Works process were unwilling to participate “in civil discourse” and that “we don’t need to give voice to those unwilling to participate in the process.” I thought those attending the public meetings and/or expressing opinions verbally and in writing were participating in the process. Perhaps Mr. Hallett believes that only those who agreed with the Harbor-Works process were participating in civil discourse and the process. I consider dissent to be part of the American process of government, guaranteed by the Constitution. When dissent is ignored, poor decisions may result: Bay of Pigs, Vietnam War, Iran-Contra, Iraqi war, mining accidents, Gulf oil spill. Need I go on? Now that Mr. Hallett is no longer a board member of Harbor-Works, perhaps he would like to move to China.

Don’t look for President Obama or the Democrats who survived the carnage to admit their policies were wrong, or that they misjudged the public. After so many in the leadership denigrated voters as being insufficiently enthusiastic about all government was attempting to do for them and questioning the smarts and the sanity of those ingrates who don’t agree with their policies, I wouldn’t expect such people to have a change of heart or mind. That is especially so, since the mainstream media can be relied on to question every Republican effort to reverse the policies and spending initiatives of the last two years. For Republicans, the challenge is to maintain their “purity” in an environment that is the political equivalent of a brothel. Both Senators-elect Rand Paul, Kentucky Republican, and Joe Manchin, West Virginia Democrat, said in their victory statements that Washington is broken

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and they are going there to fix it. That reminds me of an old lyric: It seems to me I’ve heard that song before. It’s from an old familiar score. I know it well, that melody. A little more than two years ago, outgoing (thankfully) Speaker Nancy Pelosi pledged to “drain the swamp” that is Washington. Instead she built a hot tub. It’s difficult to change Washington. More often, Washington transforms the reformers. It’s the political equivalent of Prohibition. Maybe this bunch will avoid the “speakeasy.” Maybe. Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and e-mail

I understand the government there also disapproves of dissent. Bob Vreeland, Port Angeles

Fire service It has been on TV numerous times lately, and was in a Nov. 1 letter to the editor [“Mean Spirit”] concerning the Kentucky volunteer fire department that stood by and watched a house burn because the owner hadn’t paid his yearly subscription to the department. As a retired volunteer firefighter with more than 40 years service with three different departments, I can attest to the fact that the subscription type of support for fire service doesn’t work. If the department would allow owners to pay up at the time of their fire instead of yearly, there would be no funds available to purchase fire trucks, hose, ladders, turnouts, training aids, etc., because these owners would gamble that they would not need service and therefore would wait to pay at the time of emergency. It’s human nature. This same type of situation happened about 35

years ago near Fairbanks, Alaska, with the ChenaGoldstream Volunteer Fire Department, a subscription department, and was written up in Firehouse Magazine. This is the reason that, when I and others formed the Steese Area Volunteer Fire Department in Alaska in the mid ’70s, we opted for a tax-based form of revenue. After a few years, the Goldstream department also went tax-based,

fuel prices been addressed having seen the error of in any of their campaigns? their ways. All the other causes Harvey Martin, Sequim they deem important to change were addressed. Could it be their own ‘Remember this’ oil-soaked hands couldn’t Politicians should take possibly hold a pen long heed. enough to sign into law a They filled my phone bill of change reducing and message machine system freezing fuel costs for the with solicitations for my American people? vote as well as filling my Funny how that same mailbox with their junkhand can grasp the dagger mail fliers. of greed and thrust it into I ask them one thing: the back of the American Why hasn’t the cost of people each time they go to

the pump. “Big tax dollars,” I solicit them for change at the pump. Remember this: Every time they book a room at that luxury suite and slip between those Egyptian cotton sheets, it’s my tax dollars that afford them the luxury. All the while, people on their city streets are sleeping under cardboard or a blanket from a mission. Remember this: Every time they raise the golden spoon to their already full mouth, there are those who are waiting in soup lines, digging through back-alley Dumpsters and panhandling on your city streets for a bite to eat. Remember this: Every time their motorcade, luxury car or SUV pulls up to the pump, it’s my tax dollars filling them up. Remember this: It’s the taxpayers who make their lives easier, while all the while they ask for more. But what could I possibly know? I’m just a retired logger’s daughter and a housewife who has a Mrs. before her name, not a Ph.D. after it. Ginny L. Frank, Quilcene

GOP win: Broadcasters the real victors AS THE 2010 elections come to a close, the biggest winner of all remains undeclared: the broadcasters. The biggest Amy loser: democracy. Goodman These were the most expensive midterm elections in U.S. history, costing close to $4 billion, $3 billion of which went to advertising. What if ad time were free? We hear no debate about this, because the media corporations are making such a killing by selling campaign ads. Yet the broadcasters are using public airwaves. I am reminded of the 1999 book by media scholar Robert McChesney, Rich Media, Poor Democracy. In it, he writes: “Broadcasters have little incen-

tive to cover candidates, because it is in their interest to force them to publicize their campaigns.” The Wesleyan Media Project, at Wesleyan University, tracks political advertising. Following the recent Supreme Court ruling, Citizens United v. FEC, the project notes: “The airwaves are being saturated with more House and Senate advertising, up 20 percent and 79 percent respectively in total airings.” Evan Tracey, the founder and president of Campaign Media Analysis Group, predicted in USA Today in July: “There is going to be more money than there is airtime to buy.” John Nichols of The Nation commented that in the genteel, earlier days of television political advertising, the broadcasters would never juxtapose an ad for a candidate with an ad opposed to that candidate. But they are running out of broadcast real estate. Welcome to the brave, new world of the multibillion dollar campaigns.

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There have been efforts in the past to regulate the airwaves to better serve the public during elections. The most ambitious in recent years was what became known as McCain-Feingold campaignfinance reform. During the debate on that landmark legislation, the problem of exorbitant television advertising rates was brought up by Democrats and Republicans alike. Nevada Sen. John Ensign, a Republican, lamented: “The broadcasters used to dread campaigns, because that was the time of year they made the least amount of money because of this lowest unit rate. “Now it is one of their favorite times of the year because it is actually one of their highest profit-margin times of the year.” Ultimately, to get the bill passed, the public airtime provisions were dropped. The Citizens United ruling effectively neutralizes McCainFeingold campaign-finance reform. One can only imagine what

the cost of the 2012 presidential election will be. Sen. Russ Feingold, D-Wis., lost his re-election bid to the largely self-financed multimillionaire, Ron Johnson. The Wall Street Journal editorial page celebrated Feingold’s expected loss. The Journal is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., which also owns the Fox television network and which gave close to $2 million to Republican campaign efforts. “The elections have become a commodity, a profit center for these radio and TV stations,” Ralph Nader, consumer advocate and former presidential candidate, told me on Election Day. He went on: “The public airwaves, as we know, belong to the people, and they’re the landlords, and the radio and TV stations are the licensees. “They’re the tenants, so to speak. They pay no money to the FCC for their annual license. “And therefore, it’s really quite persuasive, were we to have a

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

public policy to condition modestly the license to this enormously lucrative control of the public airwaves 24 hours a day by these TV and radio stations and say, as part of the reciprocity for controlling this commons, so to speak, you have to allow a certain amount of time, free time, on radio and TV for ballot-qualified candidates.” The place where we should debate this is in the major media, where most Americans get their news. But the television and radio broadcasters have a profound conflict of interest. Their profits take precedence over our democratic process. You very likely won’t hear this discussed on the Sunday-morning talk shows. Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. E-mail her at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

DNR ceremony seals aquatic reserve By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

GARDINER — Calling it a significant action to preserve a special place, state Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark signed the management plan for the Protection Island Aquatic Reserve on Wednesday. The reserve comprises 23,778 acres of state-owned tidelands and bed lands around the 400-acre Protection Island, which is between Sequim and Port Townsend near the mouth of Discovery Bay. Goldmark, after addressing about 20 people who attended the ceremony at the Gardiner Community Center, said the reserve was necessary “to protect what’s special in Puget Sound.” Goldmark thanked Jefferson County commissioners David Sullivan and John Austin, who attended the ceremony, for their support in establishing the aquatic reserve.

Fishing, boating The new boundaries, which now extend from the west end of Port Townsend to the Gardiner area, will not increase boating restrictions or limit fishing. The designation is largely intended to restrict development, Port Townsend’s Al Bergstein, a board member of People for

Puget Sound, has said. The reserve will not allow the establishment of commercial operations such as fish farms, new marinas or docks, or alternative energy uses such as floating wind or underwater turbines. The reserve area applies only to state-owned aquatic lands and not to private holdings. Existing private uses can remain, and marine vessel passage through the reserve is still allowed. Protection Island is owned and operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. The western portion of the island is managed by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife as the Zella M. Schultz Seabird Sanctuary. Federal restrictions keep boats from approaching the island closer than 200 yards, and a 2,000-foot air buffer is in place. The state will not add any more restrictions.

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

State Public Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark speaks at the Protection Island Aquatic Reserve’s dedication ceremony at the Gardiner Community Center on Wednesday.

the ceremony by Dave Peeler, director of programs for People of Puget Sound, the environmental group that four years ago launched the effort to designate the DNR tidelands at the island as a reserve. Peeler called it a “wonderful, wonderful action because it will preserve the area.” He said that DNR’s More data action in effect said “this is “By expanding the net- a special marine area, and work of aquatic reserves we will manage it differthroughout Puget Sound, ently.” we’ll be able to gather a more diverse set of data and Crucial habitat more closely monitor the Protection Island is surhealth of the sound,” Goldrounded by extensive eelmark said Wednesday. Goldmark was joined at grass and seagrass beds

that provide crucial habitat for forage fish and invertebrates. About 70 percent of the seabird population of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca nest on the island, which has one of the largest nesting colonies of rhinoceros auklets in the world and the largest nesting colony of glaucouswinged gulls in the state. It contains one of the last two nesting colonies of tufted puffins in the Puget Sound area and is an important refuge for molting harlequin ducks. The migratory corridor along Protection Island supports the Elwha River chi-

nook and Hood Canal summer chum salmon populations. About 1,000 harbor seals depend on the island for a pupping and rest area.

Goals of plan

the management plan, DNR will join with numerous organizations, including People for Puget Sound, to collect data to study the relationship between the species and the Protection Island habitats, Goldmark said. In mid-October, Goldmark designated the Smith and Minor Islands Aquatic Reserve and adopted its management plan protecting 36,600 aquatic acres off the west coast of Whidbey Island.

Once an aquatic reserve is designated, future DNRauthorized uses at the site must be consistent with the goals and objectives for resource protection identified in the management plan. Goldmark said existing ________ DNR staff would manage the reserve. Sequim-Dungeness Valley EdiDuring the research and tor Jeff Chew can be reached at monitoring activities that 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ will take place according to peninsuladailynews.com.

PA man gets 14 months in prison for fraud By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A 46-year-old Port Angeles man has been sentenced to 14 months in prison for Social Security fraud and theft of government funds. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said Scott Campbell claimed to be disabled and falsely collected more than $129,790 for care of his spouse. Campbell was sentenced Monday in U.S. District Court in Tacoma to the prison time, four months of home confinement and three years of supervised release and was ordered to pay $197,140 in restitution. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said Campbell engaged in an

Helicopter highlights art exhibit Peninsula Daily News

Helicopter drop

Social Security Administration, who requested a 25-month prison sentence. Campbell was found guilty of illegally collecting $67,350 from the Social Security Administration. He was also accused of defrauding the state DSHS Community Options Program Entry System, which pays in-home caregivers for disabled people who need basic assistance with mobil-

ity, bed repositioning and taking medication. Since 2003, Campbell and his wife claimed that she needed caregivers for her disability. “In fact, she was operating a business, and the caregivers were relatives who were paid a small amount from each state check to falsely claim they were assisting in the home,” the U.S. Attorney’s Office said in

a prepared statement. The total loss to both programs was $197,140. The Social Security Administration Office of Inspector General, State Patrol and state Department of Social and Health Services investigated the case.

________

Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

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As part of the demonstration, a Coast Guard MH-65C Dolphin helicopter will drop a 30-pound training aid into the water in front of the maritime center dock. A rescue swimmer will be deployed from the hovering helicopter and simulate preparing a mock “survivor” for pickup, and both will be hoisted into the helicopter. Coast Guard artists — most of whom are professionals — donate their work to the collection, which consists of more than 1,700 works showing the missions performed by the service’s force of 42,400 active duty members. The program was created in the early 1980s. It is cosponsored by the Salmagundi Club, a New York City art and cultural center. The exhibition is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.uscg.mil/art or www.nwmaritime.org.

dition, depression and diabetes when he applied for disability benefits in 2002. He was granted the benefits with the requirement that he notify Social Security if his status changed and he was able to work. Campbell operated an auto repair business and several other businesses while he collected benefits, prosecutors said. The case was prosecuted by Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Johanna Vanderlee, an attorney with the

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PORT TOWNSEND — An emergency helicopter will land at the Northwest Maritime Center on Friday afternoon to highlight the opening of an exhibit of Coast Guard artists. A Coast Guard helicopter search-and-rescue demonstration will begin at 1 p.m. at the center at 431 Water St. in Port Townsend. The demonstration is in connection with the opening of an exhibit of 30 paintings by 24 artists in the Coast Guard Art Program. Coast Guard Cmdr. Tony Hahn from Air Station/Sector Field Office Port Angeles will offer his comments and narrate the search-and-rescue demonstration.

eight-year scheme to illegally collect benefits designed to assist the disabled. U.S. District Judge Benjamin H. Settle said Campbell committed a “crime of dishonesty that involved a substantial amount of money.” “[You] cheated the government and the taxpayers out of money that should go to people who truly qualify for disability benefits,” Settle said. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said Campbell claimed he was disabled by a heart con-

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An hour to savor Hawks forced to make do with depleted team for clam diggers By Tim Booth

DIGGING IN THE dark is optional. Misery is not. As the season’s second razor-clam dig begins at noon Friday, one thing is a near certainty: Diggers are going to be Matt damp. Whether they Schubert must trudge back to the their cars in complete darkness is another question all together. Given that daylight savings time was extended an extra week this year, diggers will have an extra hour of light on Friday and Saturday to get down to business. Digging will be allowed at Twin Harbors beach from Friday through Monday. The four other beaches – Kalaloch, Copalis, Mocrocks and Long Beach – will be open only on Friday and Saturday. With nothing but dark days ahead, I suggest you take advantage. Olympic National Park’s Kalaloch Beach produced the second-best harvest rate among the ocean beaches open to razor clam digging last month. A total of 3,959 clams were taken out of 324 digger trips, making for a 12.2 average over two harvest dates. That fell behind only Twin Harbors (12.3). One of the main reasons for diggers’ success at Kalaloch, according to state coastal shellfish manager Dan Ayres, was the abundance of clams next to the campground. While there are clam populations spread out along each of Kalaloch’s beaches, the density is focussed around that one area. As for the beaches to the south, “average size was really mixed [during the first dig],” Ayres said. “There were big clams mixed in with a lot of small clams, some 5½ [inches] to clams that were barely over 3 inches. “From a biological standpoint, that’s not a bad thing.” No digging will be allowed before noon on any of the five beaches. Weather reports are a little less than sunny the entire weekend. To be more specific, it’s going to be wet. Surf forecasts aren’t exactly prime either. Nine-foot swells are expected to hit Kalaloch on Friday and Saturday afternoon. Thus, it might be best to hit the beach early when there’s still sunlight. That would make Friday (earliest tide) the best day to dig. Here are the tides for each of the openers: ■ Friday — minus 1.4 feet at 6:41 p.m. ■ Saturday — minus 1.6 feet at 7:26 p.m. ■ Sunday — minus 1.5 feet at 7:11 p.m. ■ Monday — minus 1.2 feet at 7:55 p.m. For more information on coastal razor clams, including regulations, visit wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/ razorclams.

Rivalry redux In one of the more shocking developments from last week’s rivalry games, there were actually a few responses to last Thursday’s column. My call to name the North Olympic Peninsula’s football rivalries hit home with a few readers concerning the Port Angeles-Sequim game. While none of them embraced my suggestions — not sure why — they did offer a few of their own. Here’s a sampling: ■ From Delsen Lauderback of Port Angeles: “Olympic Peninsula Bowl” and “Scrum for US 101.” “[Highway 101]’s the highway that connects the two towns, and either team has to take US 101 to get to the game.” ■ From James Gray of Port Angeles: “Olympic Cup,” “Battle of the Gods” and “Clash of the Titans.” “The trophy could be a lightning bolt, a symbol of Zeus.” Turn

to

Schubert/B3

“So they’ve got to do a great job during the week of getting prepared The Associated Press and we’ve got to fit a game plan RENTON — Coach Pete Carroll around the guys, just like we always and general manager John Sch- do, to the things that they can do neider spent their first well.” seven months in charge of Seven starters for the the Seattle Seahawks shufSeahawks did not particifling around players, trying pate in practice Wednesday, to find the right mix for none bigger than quartertheir system. back Matt Hasselbeck as And now that the Sea- Next Game he recovers from a concushawks’ roster finally found Sunday sion. But nearly equal to Hasselbeck’s absence is a some stability, they’re back vs. Giants continuing shuffle of Seatagain making all kinds of at Qwest Field tle’s offensive line. changes. This time due to a Time: 1:05 p.m. Carroll hoped rookie long list of key injuries. left tackle Russell Okung “The main thing for me On TV: Ch. 13 would be able to return to convey to these players Wednesday from his highand to this team is it’s not the guys that aren’t playing, it’s the ankle sprain suffered two weeks guys that are playing,” Carroll said ago against Arizona. on Wednesday. Turn to Hawks/B3

The Associated Press

Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll, second from left, looks on with his coaching staff in the closing minutes of Sunday’s loss in Oakland, Calif.

Moving on to state Neah Bay, Crescent advance Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Neah Bay’s Kaela Tyler hits the ball during a Class 1B Tri-District game against Lummi at Crescent School in Joyce on Wednesday.

Pirate men move back to the top Peninsula Daily News

BELLEVUE — The Peninsula College men’s soccer team dropped the Bellevue Bulldogs 3-2 on Wednesday to move back to the top of the NWAACC West Division standings in its final regular season game. Now, the Pirates (8-3-2 in West, 10-3-4 overall) must sit and wait. With the guarantee of a home playoff game already in hand, Peninsula still has a shot at claiming the West crown if Bellevue (8-4-0 in West) loses or ties its last match at Highline (6-3-3) on Saturday. Turn

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Pirates/B3

JOYCE — The North Olympic League will send two volleyball teams to the Class 1B state tournament for the fourth time in five years. Neah Bay and Crescent District each punched tickets to state Volleyball after going 2-1 at the 1B TriDistrict tournament Wednesday in the Crescent School gym. The Neah Bay Red Devils (9-3 overall) earned the Tri-District’s third seed after winning a coin flip with NOL rival Crescent. “This was Also . . . something that ■ PA girls was in the plan,” soccer moves said Neah Bay coach Sharon on at Kanichy, whose districs/B3 NOL champion Red Devils will visit state for the fourth time in five years. “We expected to make it to state. We are going to give it our best over there and go in there with a plan and just play our best.” The Loggers (13-4), headed to state for the fifth straight season, will go to the Yakima SunDome as a No. 4 seed. Tournament brackets will not be announced until Sunday afternoon. Matches are Nov. 11-12. “Regardless of going to state or not, the kids are playing the best ball they have all year and that’s the way you want to end the season,” Crescent coach Alex Baker said. “There is no doubt that we have the potential to put a dent in there somewhere. “The question is where. A lot of it depends on seeding.” Turn

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Preps/B3

M’s let Bedard, Lopez go Seattle cuts ties with three veterans to make room for hot stove season Bedard was due to make $8 million, Branyan $5 milSEATTLE — The Seattle lion and Lopez $4.5 million Mariners said thanks but no had the options been picked thanks to a few veterans on up for the 2011 season. the 40-man Instead, Seattle will roster on now pay a Wednesday. $250,000 Seattle buyout on cut ties with Bedard and left-handed $500,000 on pitcher Erik Branyan, Bedard, desmaking ignated hiteach a free ter Russell Lopez Bedard Branyan agent. and third Lopez is baseman Jose Lopez, declining eligible for salary arbitration. to exercise options on the three. Bedard could never stay The Associated Press

healthy following his trade from Baltimore before the 2008 season. He hasn’t pitched since the middle of the 2009 season and started just 30 games in his three seasons with Seattle. Lopez is coming off a disappointing season after switching from second to third base. One year after posting a .276 batting average with 25 home runs, 42 doubles and 95 RBIs, Lopez’s number dipped significantly in ’10. He hit .239 with 10 home runs, 29 doubles and 58 RBIs. Branyan was the Mariners’ team leader in home runs with 15, despite playing just 57 games with Seattle following a midseason trade.


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Girls Swimming: Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend at Class 2A/1A West Central District championships at Hazen High School in Renton, 11 a.m.

Friday Football: West Central District loser-out Class 1A playoffs, Chimacum vs. Nooksack Valley at Civic Field in Bellingham, 4:30 p.m.; Clallam Bay at Neah Bay, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Port Angeles vs. Evergreen in Class 2A West Central District championships at Franklin Pierce High School in Tacoma, 5 p.m.; Sequim vs. Sumner in Class 2A West Central District championships at Washingrton High School in Tacoma, 5 p.m. Girls Soccer: Port Angeles at Class 2A West Central District tournament, at Franklin Pierce High School in Tacoma, 3 p.m.

Saturday Football: West Central District loser-out Class 2A playoffs, Port Angeles vs. Sumner at North Kitsap High School, 4 p.m., Sequim vs. Washington at North Kitsap High School, 7 p.m.; Crescent at Quilcene, 1 p.m. Volleyball: Port Angeles and Sequim at Class 2A West Central District tournament at Franklin Pierce High School in Tacoma, TBA. Cross Country: Port Angeles, Sequim, Port Townsend, Chimacum and Forks at state championships at Sun Willows Golf Course in Pasco, races start at 9 a.m. Girls Swimming: Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend at Class 2A/1A West Central District championships at Hazen High School in Renton, 10 a.m. Girls Soccer: Port Angeles vs. Sumner at Franklin-Pierce High School, 3 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Green River at Peninsula College, Noon.

Generally

dominant

Swain’s General Store’s U10 girls soccer team recently finished undefeated in Port Angeles Youth Soccer Club play, going 7-0-1 without giving up more than two goals in one game. Team members are, in front, from left, Nathasha Lipsky, Emma Murray, Lainey Sukert, Olivia Nevaril, Kirra Massingham, Haylee Ward and Elizabeth Kossler. In back, from left, are Pat Sukert, Summer Olsen, Isabelle Cottom, Jasmine Cottom, Kaysey Roberts, Starla Temres and Sam Springob.

Local Sports

Basketball

Bowling

NBA Standings and Schedule

LAUREL LANES Oct. 2 Seniors Men’s High Game: Paul Schouille, 236 Men’s High Series: Mark Mathews, 649 Women’s High Game: Hazel Vail, 180 Women’s High Series: Hazel Vail, 478 League Leaders: Bird of Paradise Mixed Up Mix Men’s High Game: Bill Gannon, 244 Men’s High Series: Bill Gannon, 659 Women’s High Game: Jess Edgmon, 198 Women’s High Series: Jess Edgmon, 540 League Leaders: Certified Hearing Tuesday Brunch League High Score: Holly Brown and Linda Edwards, 178 High Series: Holly Brown, 504 First Place Team: Quilted Strait

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Men’s Club Nov. 2 Better Nine Indidvidual Gross: Steve Main, 36; Kerry Perkins, 36; Mike Dupuis, 36; Rob Botero, 36 Individual Net: Jay Bruch, 30.5; Larry Bourm, 33; Lyle Andrus, 33.5; Jerry Hendricks, 33.5; Ralph Bauman, 34; Bob Reidel, 34.5; Glen Scarcia, 34.5 Team Gross: Mike Dupuis and Rob Botero, 68; Kerry Perkins and Larry Bourm, 71 Team Net: Steve Callis and Jerry Hendricks, 59; Steve Callis and Duane Vernon, 63; Dave Henderson and Dennis Ingram, 65; Lyle Andrus and Bob Reidel, 65; Larry Aillaud and John Tweter, 66 Ladies Club Nine Hole Ladies Nov. 3 Odds Net: Helen Arnold, 11.5; Barb Thompson, 16

Preps Football AP State Poll Class 4A 1. Skyline (8) 8-1 2. Curtis (1) 9-0 3. Ferris 9-0 4. Kentwood 9-0 5. Chiawana 8-0 6. Bothell 7-2 7. Rogers (Puyallup) 8-1 8. Gonzaga Prep 7-2 9. Issaquah 7-2 10. Skyview 7-2 Class 3A 1. Bellevue (7) 8-1 2. Capital (1) 9-0 3. Camas 9-0 4. Juanita 8-1 5. Kamiakin (1) 9-0 6. Lakes 8-1 7. Mt. Spokane 8-1 8. Liberty (Renton) 6-3 9. Glacier Peak 8-1 10. O’Dea 8-1 Class 2A 1. Arch. Murphy (8) 9-0 2. Lynden (1) 9-0 3. Tumwater 8-1 4. W. F. West 8-1 5. Prosser 8-1 6. Othello 7-2 7. Sequim 8-1 8. Centralia 7-2 9. Lakewood 7-2 10. Ellensburg 7-2 Class 1A 1. Cas. Christian (5) 9-0 2. Meridian (3) 8-0 3. Montesano 9-0 4. Connell 8-1 5. Chelan 8-1 6. Colville 9-0 7. King’s 8-1 8. Zillah 9-0 9. Royal 7-2 10. Omak 6-3 Class 2B 1. Colfax (5) 8-0 2. Napavine (1) 9-0 3. Waitsburg-Prescott 9-0 4. DeSales 7-2 5. White Pass 8-1 6. South Bend 7-2 6. Tacoma Baptist 7-2 8. Willapa Valley 7-2 9. Brewster 8-1 10. Concrete 7-2 Class 1B 1. Cusick (7) 9-0 2. Lummi 8-1 60 3. Al. Coulee-Hartline 8-0 4. St. John-Endicott 7-1 5. Lyle 6-2

88 81 74 61 50 47 30 24 16 7 87 78 67 61 55 45 40 25 22 13 89 79 74 60 53 41 31 28 12 11 76 75 63 53 46 42 37 22 11 9 59 55 48 36 35 24 24 20 15 7 70 59 48 43

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct New Orleans 4 0 1.000 Dallas 3 1 .750 San Antonio 3 1 .750 Memphis 2 3 .400 Houston 0 4 .000 Northwest Division W L Pct Portland 4 1 .800 Denver 2 2 .500 Oklahoma City 2 2 .500 Utah 2 2 .500 Minnesota 1 4 .200 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Lakers 5 0 1.000 Golden State 3 1 .750 Sacramento 3 2 .600 Phoenix 1 3 .250 L.A. Clippers 1 4 .200 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 4 1 .800 New Jersey 2 2 .500 New York 1 2 .333 Toronto 1 3 .250 Philadelphia 1 4 .200 Southeast Division W L Pct Atlanta 5 0 1.000 Miami 4 1 .800 Orlando 2 1 .667 Washington 1 2 .333 Charlotte 1 3 .250 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 2 1 .667 Indiana 2 2 .500 Cleveland 1 3 .250 Milwaukee 1 4 .200 Detroit 0 5 .000

GB — 1 1 2 1/2 4 GB — 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 1/2 3 GB — 1 1/2 2 3 1/2 4

GB — 1 1/2 2 2 1/2 3 GB — 1 2 3 3 1/2 GB — 1/2 1 1/2 2 3

All Times PDT Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 94, Detroit 85 Charlotte 85, New Jersey 83 Orlando 128, Minnesota 86 Philadelphia 101, Indiana 75 Boston 105, Milwaukee 102, OT New Orleans 107, Houston 99 Dallas 102, Denver 101 Utah 125, Toronto 108 San Antonio 112, Phoenix 110 Golden State 115, Memphis 109 L.A. Clippers 107, Oklahoma City 92 L.A. Lakers 112, Sacramento 100 Today’s Games New York at Chicago, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Milwaukee at Indiana, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Orlando , 4 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Washington at New York, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Boston, 5 p.m. Miami at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Memphis at Phoenix, 7 p.m. LA Clippers at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Utah at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at LA Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Cleveland at Washington, 4 p.m. Orlando at Charlotte, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Miami, 4:30 p.m. New Orleans at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 6 p.m. LA Clippers at Utah, 6 p.m. Toronto at Portland, 7 p.m. Memphis at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Football College All Times PDT Wednesday’s Game South Florida 28, Rutgers 27 Today’s Games Georgia Tech at 22 Virginia Tech, 4:30 p.m. Buffalo at Ohio, 4:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Western Michigan at Cent. Michigan, 3 p.m. UCF at Houston, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games 9 Wisconsin at Purdue, 9 a.m. Minnesota at 14 Michigan State, 9 a.m. 16 Iowa at Indiana, 9 a.m. 25 North Carolina St. at Clemson, 9 a.m. Illinois at Michigan, 9 a.m. Virginia at Duke, 9 a.m. Louisville at Syracuse, 9 a.m. Air Force at Army, 9 a.m. Maryland at Miami (FL), 9 a.m.

Florida at Vanderbilt, 9:21 a.m. 21 Baylor at 17 Oklahoma St., 9:30 a.m. Idaho State at Georgia, 9:30 a.m. Charleston Southern at Kentucky, 9:30 a.m. Chattanooga at 2 Auburn, 10 a.m. Akron at Ball State, 10 a.m. Rice at Tulsa, 11 a.m. UNLV at Brigham Young, 11 a.m. Colorado at Kansas, 11 a.m. Temple at Kent State, 11 a.m. New Mexico State at Utah State, 12 p.m. Washington at 1 Oregon, 12:30 p.m. 3 TCU at 5 Utah, 12:30 p.m. Hawaii at 4 Boise State, 12:30 p.m. 6 Alabama at 10 LSU, 12:30 p.m. 7 Nebraska at Iowa State, 12:30 p.m. North Carolina at 24 Florida State, 12:30 p.m. Navy at East Carolina, 12:30 p.m. Boston College at Wake Forest, 12:30 p.m. Northwestern at Penn State, 12:30 p.m. Southern Miss at Tulane, 12:30 p.m. California at Washington State, 1 p.m. Fresno State at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m. Marshall at UAB, 1:15 p.m. Florida Atlantic at West. Kentucky, 1:30 p.m. 23 Nevada at Idaho, 2 p.m. Wyoming at New Mexico, 3 p.m. 8 Oklahoma at Texas A&M, 4 p.m. 18 Arkansas at 19 South Carolina, 4 p.m. Oregon State at UCLA, 4 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at Mississippi, 4 p.m. Troy at North Texas, 4 p.m. Louisiana-Mon. at Florida Intern., 4:30 p.m. 12 Missouri at Texas Tech, 5 p.m. 15 Arizona at 13 Stanford, 5 p.m. Tennessee at Memphis, 5 p.m. Texas at Kansas State, 5 p.m. Southern Methodist at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. Colorado State at San Diego State, 7 p.m. Arizona State at USC, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey NHL Standings and Schedule WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 10 7 2 1 15 32 25 Chicago 15 7 7 1 15 44 45 St. Louis 9 6 1 2 14 26 17 Columbus 11 7 4 0 14 27 29 Nashville 11 5 3 3 13 26 29 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 11 6 3 2 14 31 27 Colorado 11 6 4 1 13 39 39 Minnesota 11 5 4 2 12 27 27 Calgary 12 6 6 0 12 34 36 Edmonton 10 3 5 2 8 31 37 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 11 8 3 0 16 34 25 Dallas 11 7 4 0 14 37 29 San Jose 10 5 4 1 11 29 26 Phoenix 11 4 4 3 11 27 32 Anaheim 13 5 7 1 11 32 44 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 12 7 4 1 15 37 29 N.Y. Rangers 11 6 4 1 13 34 32 Pittsburgh 13 6 6 1 13 37 33 N.Y. Islanders 12 4 6 2 10 33 44 New Jersey 14 4 9 1 9 25 45 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 12 7 4 1 15 29 28 Boston 9 7 2 0 14 29 13 Toronto 12 5 5 2 12 29 31 Ottawa 12 5 6 1 11 29 37 Buffalo 13 3 8 2 8 32 43 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 11 7 2 2 16 37 33 Washington 12 8 4 0 16 39 29 Atlanta 12 6 4 2 14 40 43 Carolina 12 6 6 0 12 34 35 Florida 10 4 6 0 8 27 25 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Washington 5, Toronto 4, SO Boston 5, Buffalo 2 Carolina 7, N.Y. Islanders 2 Atlanta 4, Florida 3 New Jersey 5, Chicago 3 Dallas 5, Pittsburgh 2 Detroit 2, Calgary 1 Phoenix 4, Nashville 3 Anaheim 3, Tampa Bay 2, OT Today’s Games N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Columbus at Atlanta, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Boston at Washington, 4 p.m. Montreal at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Florida, 4:30 p.m.

Calgary at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

Racing NASCAR Sprint Cup Standings Top 50 of 73 Driver Pnts Back Money 1 Johnson 6149 --- $6,652,947 2 Hamlin 6135 -14 $5,211,128 3 Harvick 6111 -38 $6,250,656 4 Gordon 5942 -207 $5,333,253 5 Ky Busch 5919 -230 $5,919,143 6 Edwards 5902 -247 $4,977,313 7 Stewart 5832 -317 $5,280,734 8 Kenseth 5825 -324 $4,998,328 9 Ku Busch 5799 -350 $6,351,919 10 Burton 5797 -352 $4,846,480 11 Biffle 5788 -361 $4,570,762 12 Bowyer 5782 -367 $4,393,804 *** Chase for the Sprint Cup Cutoff *** 13 McMurray 3976 -2173 $6,504,727 14 Martin 3937 -2212 $4,056,313 15 Newman 3883 -2266 $4,547,752 16 Montoya 3866 -2283 $4,749,738 17 Logano 3809 -2340 $4,660,861 18 Reutimann 3772 -2377 $4,766,119 19 Earnhardt Jr. 3662 -2487 $4,309,528 20 Truex Jr. 3614 -2535 $3,498,139 21 Allmendinger 3613 -2536 $4,351,244 22 Kahne 3609 -2540 $4,891,416 23 Menard 3460 -2689 $3,319,804 24 Ragan 3266 -2883 $3,302,704 25 Keselowski 3260 -2889 $3,944,866 26 Ambrose 3113 -3036 $3,906,554 27 Sadler 2982 -3167 $3,205,249 28 Hornish Jr. 2947 -3202 $3,189,299 29 Speed 2944 -3205 $3,474,378 30 Smith 2926 -3223 $3,178,514 31 Labonte 2305 -3844 $2,935,405 32 Kvapil 2264 -3885 $2,959,792 33 Gilliland 2227 -3922 $2,756,984 34 Gordon 1901 -4248 $2,724,470 35 Conway 1757 -4392 $2,465,670 36 Sorenson 1355 -4794 $1,891,733 37 Mears 1328 -4821 $1,638,874 38 Nemechek 1287 -4862 $2,382,858 39 Blaney 1272 -4877 $2,077,387 40 Vickers 1158 -4991 $1,579,832 41 Elliott 989 -5160 $1,246,089 42 McDowell 929 -5220 $1,993,075 43 Bliss 919 -5230 $1,300,445 44 Papis 907 -5242 $1,629,418 45 Stremme 825 -5324 $946,775 46 Yeley 779 -5370 $1,121,549 47 Cassill 588 -5561 $990,466 48 Raines 479 -5670 $645,295 49 Said 448 -5701 $739,493 50 Carpentier 399 -5750 $423,775 All Times PDT Sunday’s Race NSCS at Texas, 12 p.m. Texas Motor Speedway

Soccer MLS Standings and Schedule WESTERN CONFERENCE Team P W D L Gs Ga Gd Pt 1 Los Angeles 30 18 5 7 44 26 18 59 2 Salt Lake 30 15 11 4 45 20 25 56 3 FC Dallas 30 12 14 4 42 28 14 50 4 Seattle 30 14 6 10 39 35 4 48 5 Colorado 30 12 10 8 44 32 12 46 6 San Jose 30 13 7 10 34 33 1 46 7 Houston 30 9 6 15 40 49 -9 33 8 Chivas USA 30 8 4 18 31 45 -14 28 EASTERN CONFERENCE Team P W D L Gs Ga Gd Pt 1 New York 30 15 6 9 38 29 9 51 2 Columbus 30 14 8 8 40 34 6 50 3 Kansas City 30 11 6 13 36 35 1 39 4 Chicago 30 9 9 12 37 38 -1 36 5 Toronto FC 30 9 8 13 33 41 -8 35 6 New England 30 9 5 16 32 50 -18 32 7 Philadelphia 30 8 7 15 35 49 -14 31 8 DC United 30 6 4 20 21 47 -26 22 All Times PDT Today’s Games San Jose at New York Red Bulls, 5 p.m. Friday’s Games No Games Scheduled Saturday’s Games Colorado at Columbus, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Sat Lake, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games Seattle Sounders FC at Los Angeles, 6 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League Boston Red Sox : Announced 3B Adrian Beltre has declined his 2011 option.

SPORTS ON TV Today 1:30 p.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS Golf, Charles Schwab Cup at Harding Park Golf Course in San Francisco. 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN College Football, Georgia Tech at Virginia Tech. 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 MLS Soccer, San Jose Earthquake at New York Red Bulls in MLS Playoffs. 5 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, New York Knicks at Chicago Bulls. 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, Oklahoma City Thunder at Portland Trail Blazers. 9 p.m. (47) GOLF EPGA Golf, WGC-HSBC Champions at Shanghai Sheshan Golf Club in Shanghai, China. Cleveland Indians: Assigned INF Wes Hodges, OF Chad Huffman and INF Drew Sutton outright to Columbus (IL). Claimed INF Carlos Rivero off waivers from Philadelphia. Oakland Athletics: Exercised 2011 options on 2B Mark Ellis and OF Coco Crisp. Declined to exercise their option on 3B Eric Chavez. Seattle Mariners: Declined 2011 options on LHP Erik Bedard, DH Russell Branyan and 3B Jose Lopez. Sent LHP Ryan Feierabend, OF Ryan Langerhans, C Guillermo Quiroz, LHP Chris Seddon and RHP Sean White to Tacoma (PCL). Quiroz and Langerhans declined to be outrighted and elected to become free agents. Claimed RHP Brian Sweeney off waivers from Arizona. Tampa Bay Rays: Declined 2011 options on INF Willy Aybar and RHP Dan Wheeler. Selected the contract of UT Elliot Johnson from Durham (IL). Texas Rangers: Declined the 2011 mutual option on DH Vladimir Guerrero. National League Atlanta Braves: Claimed INF/OF Joe Mather off waivers from St. Louis. Chicago Cubs: Named Pat Listach bench coach and Dave Keller major league staff assistant. Announced Iowa (PCL) manager Ryne Sandberg will not return next season. Cincinnati Reds: Exercised 2011 options on RHP Bronson Arroyo and OF Jonny Gomes. Declined to exercise 2011 options on SS Orlando Cabrera and RHP Aaron Harang. Florida Marlins: Signed manager Edwin Rodriguez to a contract extension through next season. Named Perry Hill first-base and infield coach and Jeffrey Urgelles bullpen coordinator. Los Angeles Dodgers: Exercised a mutual 2011 option on OF Scott Podsednik. Declined to exercise a 2011 option on C Brad Ausmus. New York Mets: Exercised their 2011 option on SS Jose Reyes. Selected the contract of RHP Manny Alvarez from Buffalo (IL). Pittsburgh Pirates: Agreed to terms with LHP Wil Ledezma on a one-year contract. Reinstated RHP Ross Ohlendorf, RHP Jose Ascanio and 1B Steve Pearce from the 60-day DL. Reinstated 1B Jeff Clement from the 60-day DL and assigned him outright to Indianapolis (IL). Assigned RHP Sean Gallagher, RHP Steven Jackson, OF Brandon Moss and LHP Justin Thomas outright to Indianapolis. San Diego Padres: Announced C Yorvit Torrealba declined mutual option for 2011. Washington Nationals: Declined their 2011 option on 2B Adam Kennedy. American Association El Paso Diablos: Acquired RHP Wardell Starling from Edinburg (United) for a player to be named. Pensacola Pelicans: Traded RHP Scott Vander Weg and RHP Ron Hill to El Paso for C Benji Johnson. Frontier League Lake Erie Crushers: Signed RHP William Buzhardt, RHP Austin Coan, C T.J. Greig, OF Bobby Kuzdale, 3B Bradley Logan, INF Zach Messer and OF Sean Ryan.

Football National Football League NFL: Fined Tennessee S Donnie Nickey $2,500 for coming in contact with referee Bill Leavy during Sunday’s game against San Diego. Fined Philadelphia LB Ernie Sims $50,000 for striking a defenseless receiver during the Oct. 24 game against Tennessee. Buffalo Bills: Claimed LB Shawne Merriman off waivers from San Diego. Carolina Panthers: Claimed LB Jason Williams off waivers from Dallas. Released LB Abdul Hodge. Minnesota Vikings : Activated WR Sidney Rice from the physically-unable-to-perform list. Pittsburgh Steelers : Signed DE Sunny Harris to the practice squad. Seattle Seahawks: Signed WR Ruvell Martin, DE Jay Richardson and C Chris White. Tennessee Titans: Claimed WR Randy Moss off waivers from Minnesota.

Hockey National Hockey League Anaheim Ducks: Recalled RW Kyle Palmieri from Syracuse (AHL). Los Angeles Kings: Assigned D Jake Muzzin to Manchester (AHL). Minnesota Wild: Reassigned LW Colton Gillies to Houston (AHL). Montreal Canadiens: Reassigned F Hunter Bishop to Wheeling (ECHL). St. Louis Blues: Placed D Carlo Colaiacovo on injured reserve. Recalled D Nathan Oystrick from Peoria (AHL). Toronto Maple Leafs: Recalled D Korbinian Holzer from Toronto (AHL). American Hockey League Chicago Wolves: Recalled F Michael Davies from Gwinnett (ECHL).

Lacrosse National Lacrosse League Colorado Mammoth: Signed T Nenad Gajic, F Craig Conn, F Mike McLellan, G Rob Blasdell and G Matt King.

Soccer Major League Soccer New England Revolution: Announced the retirement of F Taylor Twellman. Toronto FC: Named Juergen Klinsmann adviser.

College Clemson: Fired women’s soccer coach Hershey Strosberg. Fordham: Named Bryan Patterson squash coach. High Point : Named Jon Torpey men’s lacrosse coach. Ohio Dominican: Announced it is adding men’s and women’s track and field as varsity sports for the 2011-12 academic year.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, November 4, 2010

B3

Briefly . . . Tennessee takes flier on Randy Moss

Patti Reifenstahl

On

to districts

The Port Angeles girls swimming and diving team will send 15 athletes to the Class 2A West Central District meet today in Renton. Among them are, in front, from left, Cassidy Turner, Ashlee Reid and Allison Hodgin. In the middle, from left, are Kyrie Reyes, Lexie Pankowski, Jenna Moore, Tori Bock and Sandy Gudgel. In back, from left, are Tannesha Jackson, Kelly Winn, Tarah Erickson, Tracie Macias and Kaitlin Fairchild. Not pictured are Noelle Ciaciuch and Brooke Sires.

Speed kills Pac-10 can’t keep up with Quack Attack The Associated Press

EUGENE, Ore. — The answer to top-ranked Oregon’s offense seems to be stamina. Oregon’s spread-option, no-huddle offense is so fast it simply wears defenses out. And opponents certainly aren’t helped by the fact that the Ducks’ star running back, Heisman hopeful LaMichael James, doubled up on the track team in the offseason. “You’ve got to be really prepared for their tempo, and not just for the first quarter, but four quarters,” Washington State coach Paul Wulff said. “I think that’s the challenge people have — that if they don’t get on you early, they’re going to eventually get on you because you can’t stay that pace for four quarters.” Oregon (8-0, 5-0 Pac-10) leads the nation in total offense with an average of 572.9 yards a game, and is ranked third with 308.8 rushing yards. The team has dropped an average of nearly 56 points on its opponents. Washington State, despite its issues this season, actually put up an admirable fight against the Ducks, losing by “just” 43-24. The UCLA Bruins had a harder time in their 60-13 loss to Oregon. “When you can spread the field like they do and you can’t get pressure on the

Pac-10 Standings

Neah Bay sandwiched a pair of 3-1 win around a 3-0 loss to eventual Tri-District champion Christian Faith in the second round The Red Devils dropped Lummi 25-19, 25-19, 14-25, 25-15 before losing to Christian Faith 25-14, 25-8, 25-15. They then rebounded with a 25-23, 14-25, 25-17, 25-11 victory over Northwest Yeshiva in the loser’s bracket to clinch the state bid. “Because they were a young team the emotion was certainly up and down,” Kanichy said. “The pressure of this level of play got to them at times, but as a coach I’m really proud they were able to push through it . . . and get the results they wanted, which is to go to state.” Rebecca Thompson had a team-high 22 kills in the three matches. Courtney Winck added 11 kills, eight blocks and six aces, while Cherish Moss had 12 aces and 10 kills and Cierra Moos 15 aces and 10 kills. Crysandra Sones put away seven kills and Brandy Swan had five aces. “We like our odds of bringing back a trophy, absolutely,” Kanichy said. Crescent earned its bid the hard way, winning two straight loser’s bracket matches after falling to Christian Faith 3-0 in the first round. “They are quality,” Baker said of the former 2B state powers. “The Loggers fought them as hard as anybody has all day.”

Continued from B1

The Associated Press

Oregon quarterback Darron Thomas (1) celebrates after throwing a touchdown pass as Oregon offensive linesman Mark Asper (79) looks on during last week’s game in Los Angeles. It also makes them efficient. Oregon is so quick to score that they rank 115th in the nation in time of possession, averaging 26:46 minutes per game. The quickness is enhanced by James, who is averaging a BCS-best 172.9 yards a game as well as 189.6 all-purpose yards. USC coach Lane Kiffin said he had watched the tape of the Trojans’ 53-32 loss to the Ducks last Saturday about five times: “You could see us, we just ran out of gas,” he concluded. His advice to Oregon’s remaining opponents is to rotate as many players as possible in order to stay fresh. The Trojans used some 43 scholarship players against Oregon. He also suggested teams should focus on sophomore quarterback Darron Thomas.

“I think you’re going to have to pressure the quarterback because they’re so fast that people have the tendency to sit back and be stationary just to get lined up,” Kiffin said. “The problem is the quarterback doesn’t get very much pressure on him and he sits back there and picks you apart.” Kiffin said he believes Oregon can win out in the conference, which will set the Ducks up for the national championship. The Ducks host Washington (3-5, 2-3) on Saturday before the final stretch against California, Arizona and Oregon State. “It will be interesting to see,” he said. “They’re so explosive it’s gonna take a team like Alabama, who has built their roster like Nick [Saban] has over the last three recruiting classes, to have enough depth to be able to hang with them.”

Rider girls cruise 10-0 Peninsula Daily News

POULSBO — The Port Angeles girls soccer team had no problems taming the Evergreen Wolverines on Wednesday, taking their Class 2A West Central District matchup 10-0. Kathryn Moseley led the team with three goals while Lauren Corn, Kylee Jeffers, Brittany McBride, Shayla Bohman, Kelsie Balsour, Danielle Schimschal and Tally Swanson each had a goal of their own. Shayla Northern, Kaitlin Boston, McBride and Lauren Corn all had an assist in the game. Port Angeles will head to Tacoma on Saturday to play SPSL No. 1 Sumner in a winnerto-state game at Franklin Pierce High School at 3 p.m. The Loggers rebounded with a 3-0 win over Lummi (25-11, 25-22, 25-20) followed by a dramatic 3-1 victory against Mount Rainier Lutheran (24-26, 26-24, 25-21, 25-12). Bonnie Hazelett helped save the Loggers’ season with a momentum-changing run in the second game against Mount Rainier Lutheran. With the Loggers down 24-20 to the Hawks, Hazelett stepped to the service line

AAU girls hoops PORT ANGELES — Tryouts for girls AAU basketball for fifth-, sixth- and seventh-graders will be held tonight at Roosevelt Elementary School. The tryouts will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the school’s gymnasium. Players are encouraged to bring a basketball and appropriate shoes. For more information, contact Scott Jones at 360461-0233. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Hawks: Injuries

Volleyball: State Continued from B1

Seahawks add 3 RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks filled three open roster spots by signing wide receiver Ruvell Martin, defensive end Jay Richardson and center Chris White on Wednesday.

Conf. Overall Oregon 5-0 8-0 Arizona 4-1 7-1 Stanford 4-1 7-1 Oregon State 3-1 4-3 USC 2-3 5-3 Arizona State 2-3 4-4 California 2-3 4-4 Washington 2-3 3-5 UCLA 1-4 3-5 Washington State 0-6 1-8 Saturday’s Games UW at No. 1 Oregon, 12:30 p.m. California at Washington St., 1 p.m. Oregon St. at UCLA, 4 p.m. No. 15 Arizona at No. 13 Stanford, 5 p.m. Arizona State at USC, 7:30 p.m.

quarterback, it’s difficult to cover the width of the field as well as the depth of the field for as long as we were asked to,” Bruins coach Rick Neuheisel said. “So they had us in that regard.” Oregon coach Chip Kelly said there is no real magic to his offense. Kelly developed his version of the spread when he was an assistant at New Hampshire but said he tailored it when he came to Oregon as offensive coordinator in 2007 to accommodate running backs Jonathan Stewart and Jeremiah Johnson, as well as quarterback Dennis Dixon. Already running a nohuddle offense, Oregon further sped things up this season by streamlining playcalling, using distinctive posters flashed from the sidelines. The Ducks’ speed makes them explosive. Through eight games, 39 of Oregon’s plays from scrimmage have been for gains of 25 yards or more, and 22 of those have resulted in touchdowns. Twenty-five of Oregon’s 51 touchdown drives this season have come in five plays or less.

NASHVILLE — Randy Moss will go to the Hall of Fame some day. But on Wednesday, only one team wanted him. A day after he was waived by the Minnesota Vikings and one month after he was traded by the New England Patriots, Moss, a brilliant but mercurial receiver, was awarded to the Tennessee Titans off waivers. The Titans were 23rd in the waiver order and they were the only team to put in a claim on Moss.

Martin was with the Seahawks during training camp but was part of Seattle’s final roster cut following the preseason. Richardson spent the past three seasons with the Oakland Raiders. He was a fifth-round pick of the Raiders in 2007 and has 109 tackles and seven sacks. White spent the past three seasons with Houston.

But Okung was again a spectator, along with center Chris Spencer, out with an unspecified neck injury. Tyler Polumbus, who started the first three games of the season while Okung was out with a high-ankle sprain on his left leg, also didn’t practice Wednesday with a knee injury. Seattle also lost starting left guard Ben Hamilton for the season when he suffered a significant concussion in Sunday’s 33-3 loss to Oakland. Carroll said medical staff indicated that with Hamilton’s past concussion history, placing him on injured reserve and ending his season was clearly the best move. “He gave us a tremendous effort to this point and we’re going to miss the heck out of him,” Carroll said. “But it’s the right thing to do and I feel really good about the fact that we’ve come to this decision for him because he’d battle it and try to fight his way right back out there.” With questions about left tackle, Chester Pitts worked at that position on Wednesday and said afterward he’s preparing as if he’ll start there on Sunday against the New York Giants. But that’s not where Pitts is most comfortable. Last Sunday was his first action since September 2009 due to microfracture knee surgery and he said he hasn’t played left tackle since 2005. “If my number’s called I’ll be ready to go and then if not, I’ll move back inside and play left guard,” Pitts said. “But right now, [Okung] couldn’t go today, so I prepared today like I’m playing left tackle.”

While the problems are significant on the offensive line, they’re equally troubling on the defensive line, where Seattle is assured of being down two starters against the Giants. Both starting tackles — Brandon Mebane and Colin Cole — could be out. Cole, who suffered an ankle injury against Oakland, is the only player Carroll ruled out on Wednesday. Mebane has missed the previous three games with a calf injury. Seattle is also without defensive end Red Bryant, who tore his medial collateral ligament in his right knee against Oakland when teammate Chris Clemons crashed into him and was placed on injured reserve. Former San Francisco first-rounder Kentwan Balmer will take Bryant’s spot, while Junior Siavii will step in for Cole. But Seattle’s defensive line will lose about 30 pounds. “This is nothing new. One man down, somebody has got to step up,” Siavii said. Seattle wide receiver Mike Williams also sat out Wednesday with a sore knee. About the only good news for the Seahawks was the return of cornerbacks Kelly Jennings and Walter Thurmond on Wednesday after each missed the loss to Oakland. Carroll said his constant message of guys needing to lift their play when someone else goes down is of the utmost importance this week. “As any opportunity came up to point it out, this is a mindset about guys elevating their game and playing up,” Carroll said. “We’ve had guys that have done a good job of that so far, but now this is a little bit more substantial.”

Pirates: Draw

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Crescent’s Jandi Frantz, foreground, hits the ball back to Christian Faith during Wednesday’s Class 1B Tri-District match in Joyce on Wednesday. Behind her is teammate Rachel Bowen. and fired off six straight points to even the match at 1-1. The Loggers took the next two games with relative ease to clinch a state berth. “We really dominated Game 3 and let them scratch their way back into it a little bit [before winning],” Baker said. “In Game 4, I think [the Hawks] just ran out of gas. “The ladies made me proud. They finally played to what I knew we had all year.” Hazelett served 38 of 44 on the day with 10 aces while adding 12 kills. Sophomore libero Kelly

Bellford served 37 of 38 with five aces and was “outstanding in back row for us as a defensive specialist,” Baker said. Mikela Williams added five blocks, two tips and 16 kills while serving 21 of 22 with one ace. Junior Sara Moore was a perfect 20 of 20 with six aces on serve and had one tip and 10 kills. Senior Rashaya Donnell served 16 of 19 with one ace, one tip and five kills. “The kids have the potential to place top eight,” Baker said. “Any given day you just never know.”

Continued from B1 clinch a playoff berth after Wednesday’s draw with the The Pirates will host Bulldogs. Neeya Hansen scored the their first playoff game and will find out their opponent first goal for the Pirates off after Saturday’s final regu- an assist from Shawna Thein and Jackie Rodgers found lar season matches. Miguel Gonzalez scored the net as well on a Tabitha two goals and had an assist Bare assist for a 2-0 halftime lead that ultimately did not to Lucas Costa. hold up. “It was frustrating not Peninsula 3, Bellevue 2 clinching playoffs,” Pirates Peninsula 3 0 — 3 Bellevue 1 1 — 2 coach Kanyon Anderson Scoring Summary said. “But now we have a First half: 1, Peninsula, Gonzalez (Gude assist), 2nd minute; 2, Peninsula, Costa (Gonzalez assist), chance to do it at home.” 32nd minute; 3, Peninsula, Gonzalez (Ash assist), The Pirates host Green 34th minute; 1, Bellevue, 40th minute. River on Saturday at noon Second Half: 2, Bellevue, 79th minute. at Civic Field.

Women’s Soccer Peninsula 2, Bellevue 2

BELLEVUE — The Pirates will have to wait to

Peninsula 2, Bellevue 2 Peninsula Bellevue

2 0 — 2 0 2 — 2 Scoring Summary First half: 1, Peninsula, Hansen (Thein assist); 2, Peninsula, Rodgers (Bare assist). Second Half: 1, Bellevue. 2, Bellevue.

Schubert: Carhartt Cup Continued from B1 ■ From Garrett Abbott of Port Angeles: “Mount Olympus Cup” and “Carhartt Cup.” Also, Port Angeles administrators held a contest naming the rivalry at Friday’s game (attended by approximately 4,200). The winner: Rainshadow Rumble.

Personally, I love “Carhartt Cup.” Nothing says “winner” quite like some Carhartt overalls.

________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt.schubert@peninsuladaily news.com.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, November 4, 2010

Business

Page

B4

Politics & Environment

October best month for auto sales in two years By Nick Bunkley

The New York Times

DETROIT — October was the best month for newvehicle sales in more than two years — outside of the brief period in 2009 helped by government rebates — and General Motors surpassed expectations but still lost market share in the United States ahead of its upcoming public stock offering. GM said Wednesday that its sales rose 4.2 percent last month from a year ago, compared with a gain of 13.4 percent for the industry over all. Its market share fell to 19.3 percent from 21 percent in October 2009, according to Autodata, a firm that tracks industry sales.

Ford, Chrysler In contrast, the Ford Motor Co. said its sales were up 19.3 percent, and Chrysler reported a 37 percent increase. Toyota was the only major automaker to report a decline, as its sales fell 4.4 percent. In contrast, several smaller companies, including Hyundai, Kia and Subaru, set October records, with each posting an increase of at least 25 percent. The industry’s seasonally adjusted annualized selling rate, a closely watched measure of demand, rose to 12.3 million. Except for August 2009, when buyers were offered

federal rebates of up to $4,500 under the cash-forclunkers program, that is the highest selling rate since September 2008, when auto sales began to collapse. Automakers and analysts said they expect sales to keep improving in November and December and throughout 2011.

‘Recovery continues’ “Signs are there that the recovery continues and that it will be sustained,” Don Johnson, GM’s vice president for U.S. sales operations, said. “We don’t see a big risk at all of a double dip.” For all of 2010 so far, GM’s sales are 6.6 percent higher than in the same portion of 2009, when the company shed four brands after a brief trip through bankruptcy protection. Counting only GM’s four active brands — Chevrolet, Buick, Cadillac and GMC — the company’s sales are up 22.1 percent this year. (October was the final month for three of the brands it eliminated — Pontiac, Saturn and Hummer — and the fourth, Saab, whose sales rose 44.4 percent last month, is now owned by a Dutch company, Spyker Cars.) Overall, industry sales are up 10.6 percent so far this year, but they are still 17.5 percent below the first 10 months of 2008. GM executives will highlight the company’s rising sales as they begin a traveling “road show” to court investors starting

this week. The company is expected to start its initial public offering in mid-November, allowing the federal government to begin selling its 61 percent stake. GM also will point to the higher prices and profits its vehicles are generating. Buyers paid almost $3,000 more, on average, for the Chevrolet Cruze, a compact sedan introduced in September, than they did a year earlier for its predecessor, the Chevrolet Cobalt. “That clearly indicates that pure consumer demand must have improved for their products to pull that off,” said Jesse Toprak, vice president of industry trends and insight for TrueCar. com, which tracks vehicle sales and pricing. Even though GM lost share in October, Toprak said, “the trajectory of growth for GM sales has been quite strong.”

Truck sales Higher truck sales are helping the industry recover and suggesting improvement in the broader economy. Light trucks, which include pickups, crossovers and sport-utility vehicles, accounted for 52.8 percent of total sales in October, the most in nearly three years. Truck sales rose 23.5 percent, versus a 3.9 percent increase for passenger cars. Sales of full-size pickup trucks — vehicles commonly bought by builders and other commercial users — climbed to 122,774, an

increase of 32 percent over an average month in 2009. Ford sold nearly 50,000 of its F-series pickup, a 24.2 percent increase from a year ago and more than the combined sales of the industry’s two best-selling passenger cars, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord sedans. Sales of midsize SUV’s surged 86.6 percent. Sales of Chrysler’s Jeep Cherokee, redesigned this summer, nearly quadrupled and helped the Jeep brand post a 111 percent increase. Toyota, meanwhile, experienced more difficulty in October, as it announced another large recall and its market share declined to 15.3 percent from 18.2 percent a year ago.

Toyota recall Toprak said the rate of sales at Toyota declined noticeably after the recall, which covers 1.5 million vehicles globally to fix problems with their brake fluid and fuel pumps, was announced Oct. 21. Toyota has recalled more than 10 million vehicles this year, mostly in an effort to resolve complaints about suen acceleration, and it has been offering lease deals and free maintenance as it tries to overcome the lingering effects. “Those black clouds that stem from the recalls are still hovering over Toyota,” Toprak said. “Toyota needs to be a bit more aggressive on at least keeping their loyal customers in the brand if they don’t want to lose any more share.”

 $ Briefly . . . Managing broker earns certificate SEQUIM — Heidi Hansen, a managing broker with Coldwell Banker Town & Country, has earned a Certified Negotiation Expert designation from the Real Estate Negotiation Institute. “In tough times, it is critical that I can support my clients in negotiating their Hansen real estate transactions,” Hansen said. The designation requires a two-day investment and provides tools, techniques and role playing for negotiating successful outcomes for clients, agents and brokers. Coldwell Banker Town & Country is located at 305 S. Sequim Ave. For more information, phone 360-683-6000.

Grand opening set SEQUIM — Peaceful Kneads will celebrate its new location’s grand opening with an open house from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12. Peaceful Knead, 22 Mill Road, is just east of Sunny Farms and next door to Paisley Boutique. Refreshments will be served, and there will be door prizes for attendees. Visitors will be entered to win a free 90-minute hot stone massage with aromatherapy. Other businesses participating in the open house will be Skin Care by Hannah De Bello,

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

Bodywork by Hagemann and Paisley Boutique. For more information, phone Courtney Freitas at 360-461-9404 or visit www.peacekneads.com.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.0817 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.8080 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.7795 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2475.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.1024 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1345.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1337.10 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $24.255 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $24.432 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1711.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1697.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Dow hits 2-year high; Fed details stimulus The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The Dow Jones industrial average reached its highest level in two years Wednesday after the Federal Reserve announced plans to buy $600 billion in Treasurys to stimulate the economy. The central bank had hinted for two months that it planned a major bond-buying program in order to encourage borrowing and spending by lowering interest rates. The Fed made more explicit commitments in its announcement than many investors had been expecting, which helped push stock indexes and most Treasury prices higher. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 26.41, or 0.2 percent, to 11,215.13, its highest close since the peak of the financial crisis in September 2008. Its previous high for 2010 of 11,205 was reached on

April 26. The Dow had traded above that level four other times in the past two weeks. Broader indexes also rose. The Standard and Poor’s 500 Index rose 4.39, or 0.4 percent, to 1,197.96, while the Nasdaq composite gained 6.75, or 0.3 percent, to 2,540.27. The S&P 500 index, the measure most closely watched by professional investors, is still about 20 points, or 1.6 percent, below its high of the year. The technology-focused Nasdaq closed at its highest level for the year for the second straight day. Mid-term election results that delivered a solid majority to the Republicans in the House of Representatives but kept Democratic control of the Senate was in line with what most investors were expecting. The Fed’s announcement was unusually direct for the central bank.

Instead of reassessing its bond purchases every month given economic conditions, as many expected, the Fed pledged to buy $75 billion of Treasurys each month through the middle of next year. “The Fed’s move takes a lot of uncertainty out of the air,” said Anthony Chan, the chief economist for JP Morgan Chase’s private wealth management division. “This puts a floor on the economy’s performance and gives them the opportunity to do more if the economy needs it.” The central bank’s program may continue to push stock prices higher if it succeeds in reigniting economic expansion. “If it works, what the Fed is trying to do here will boost confidence . . . and we could see unemployment start to come down,” said Joe Davis, the chief economist at Vanguard.

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, November 4, 2010

Our Peninsula

c

SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

Thanks for the rides

Port Townsend shows its gratitude to Pierce County By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Steilacoom II has served the route between Port Townsend and Whidbey Island for almost three years, and as it is about to be replaced by a new 65-car ferry, the people of Port Townsend are showing their appreciation. Port Townsend artist Max Grover was commissioned to create a painting to give to Pierce County officials as a formal thank-you for the use of the ferry since January 2008. The painting cost the city of Port Townsend $2,500, City Manager David Timmons said. It depicts a view from Port Townsend with a representation of the Steilacoom II and a message painted across the blue water. “On behalf of all those who ride the ferry, the city of Port Townsend thanks the people of Pierce County for the use of the Steilacoom II in our time of need,” the message reads.

Washington State Ferries leased the 50-car Steilacoom II from Pierce County. The boat has been the solo ferry between the two Admiralty Inlet docks since state Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond pulled four 80-year-old Steel Electric ferries from service because their hulls were pitted and corroded. “We are deeply grateful to Pierce County for their willingness to let Washington State Ferries lease the Steilacoom II ferry and keep traffic moving between Port Townsend and Whidbey Island,” Mayor Michelle Sandoval said. A new 65-car ferry, the $76.5 million Chetzemoka, will sail between the Coupeville and Port Townsend terminals for the first time Sunday, Nov. 14, with much ceremony and fanfare. The Chetzemoka will begin regular service on its route Monday, Nov. 15. The painting is now on display at City Hall, 250 Madison St., between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

The Steilacoom II is pictured in a painting by Max Grover that the city of Port Townsend plans to present to Pierce County on Sunday, Nov. 14. A thank-you card can be signed at Port Townsend City Hall. It is accompanied by a card addressed to Pierce County, and people can write messages of appreciation.

Card to be signed Timmons said the city hopes to present the painting to Pierce County officials during the Nov.

14 inauguration ceremony for the Chetzemoka, to which they have been invited. Timmons said that the Port Townsend City Council agreed that appreciation should be extended to Pierce County, and Sandoval suggested the painting. “We wanted to make this a

surprise for them,” Timmons said. “But we needed to let the public know they can sign the card, so that ruined the surprise.” ––––––––

The business is accepting donations of nonperishable food and Christmas gifts any day of the week from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Gift donations also can be mailed to the business. Any food collected before Thursday, Nov. 25, will go toward putting a Thanksgiving dinner on the table for needy families on the North Olympic Peninsula. Food collected after Thanksgiving will go toward Christmas dinners. There are more than 100 children in foster care in Clallam County.

Providing for foster teens is a challenge because most people donating gifts think of Christmas as being for younger children. RainShadow Laundry & Car Wash will set up a Christmas tree in the laundromat Friday, Nov. 26. Donors can pluck names from the tree and provide gift cards or purchase any of the items on the list. Donations must be received by Sunday, Dec. 19. For more information, phone RainShadow at 360-582-9399. Peninsula Daily News

Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Briefly . . . Elwha power retrospective set for Tuesday PORT ANGELES — Photographer Harry von Stark and Kevin Yancy of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will present an Elwha power retrospective at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road, at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The story of Elwha power will be told through photographs and “tales from the powerhouse.”

It is part of the free Perspectives Winter Speaker Series, which is held the second Tuesday of each month from November through May. For more information, phone the Olympic National Park Visitor Center at 360-565-3130.

The Amici Duo PORT TOWNSEND — Violinist Ida Wingrove and cellist-pianist Diane Vaux will perform as The Amici Duo at Seaport Landing Retirement and Assisted Living Community, 1201 Hancock St., from 2:30 p.m. to

4:30 p.m. Tuesday. The duo will perform music from Telemann, Bach, Haydn and Mozart to classic popular tunes and fiddle tunes from around the world. Admission is free.

Help them help others SEQUIM — RainShadow Laundromat & Car Wash, 143 N. Seventh Ave., is holding its second annual “Help Us Help Others Holiday Project,” a benefit food drive for needy families and Christmas gift drive for local foster teens.

Celebrate the freedom to make choices The trick-and-treat season is behind us — and so is Halloween — so whether you backed a winner or a loser Tuesday, go out and listen to some live music, dance and celebrate the fact that we can make choices.

Live Music

ris takes his show to the Nelson east side of town to the Bushwhacker ResPort Angeles taurant, 1527 ■  On Saturday, Junkyard E. First St., Jane returns to the Junction from 6 p.m. to Roadhouse, junction of U.S. 8 p.m. It’s a Highway 101 and state Highway good thing 112 five miles west of Port AngeCharlie’s les, their Peninsula home away Angels have from home, where they really cut wings so they loose with their roots-based, can keep up with him! bluesy rock that will keep you on ■  Every Tuesday evening at the dance floor from 9 p.m. to the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody 1 a.m. $5 cover. Barry Burnett will be doing streets, the Port Angeles Senior Swingers presents Wally and his Sunday Jam from 7 p.m. to the Boys playing ballroom dance 11 p.m. favorites for the dancing pleasure On Wednesday, Jason and of all seniors 45 years and older friends play roots music and from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. more from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free! ■  Tonight at Castaways ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant and Night Club, Restaurant, 256861 U.S. High1213 Marine Drive, the Sundowners host a jam from 5 p.m. way 101, Bob and Dave play to 8 p.m. These fellas really know blues with a brew and barbecue from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. how to have fun! On Friday and Saturday, ■  Tonight, Howly Slim perRough Cut will play all your forms vocal and guitar at Kokofavorite classic rhythm and blues, pelli’s Underground, 203 E. pop, country, bluegrass and Celtic Front St., at 6 p.m. and again tunes with some “stump the Sunday with George Radeband” tunes thrown in from baugh at 5 p.m. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Award-wining ■  Dave and Rosalie multi-instrumentalist Nolan Secord’s Luck of the Draw Murray and acclaimed singer/ Band and performing guests, songwriter Bruce Coughlan Ruby and Friends, will be playwill show you a good time. Cover. ing a variety of music Wednesday ■  On Saturday, the Superat Smuggler’s Landing ResTrees rock ’n’ roll band will be at taurant and Lounge, 115 Railthe Bar N9ne, 229 W. First St., road Ave., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. playing their high-energy mix of Come join the fun! classics and genetically engi■  Tonight and every Thursneered originals at 9 p.m. day, Larry and Rene Bauer $3 cover. direct the goings-on at the open ■  On Friday, the inimitable and irrepressible Charlie Ferris mic hosted by the Cracked Bean, 108 DelGuzzi Drive, from returns to Wine on the Waterfront, 115 Railroad Ave., and cel- 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Welcome to the ebrates the second anniversary of live music mix. ■  Victor Reventlow hosts his Melodies and Memories the acoustic jam at the FairShow, which provides “memorymount Restaurant on U.S. invoking musical therapy for all Highway 101 west of Port Angeages” at 7 p.m. $3 cover. les from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every ■  On Monday, Charlie Fer-

John

Tuesday. Don’t be left out! Port Hadlock ■  On Friday night, the Veela ■  Today, Buzz Rogowski Cafe, 133 E. First St., has Jim plays jazz and originals at the Lind providing both rock and Ajax Cafe, 271 Water St., at country, fast and slow, from his 6 p.m. impressive repertoire at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, Jim Nyby plays blues, ballads, jazz and soul at Sequim and Blyn 5:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Jess is styling on ■  Tonight, don’t miss the jam hosted by Chantilly Lace at the the piano at 6 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., from Port Townsend 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Any Thursday ■  Today at the Upstage, night, you’ll find some of the best 923 Washington St., revel in jammers from your favorite Kevin Burkes’ Open House at bands joining in the fun. Classic 8 p.m. Burkes is considered by rock and country from the ’50s many to be one of the great livand ’60s, blues and pop from ing Irish fiddlers, and his band of later decades are all in the broad acclaimed musicians will put on repertoire honed over 35 years. a great show at 8 p.m. $20 cover. Jammers come in early and sign On Friday, get your blues in on the sign-up sheet. groove on with the Canadian On Friday, enjoy the bluegrass band The Twisters, with a slew and fiddle music of Skidder Hill of Canadian blues awards, at from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. 8 p.m. $12 cover. On Saturday, Thomas On Saturday at noon, enjoy Sparks and Hannebu II enter- the New Age and healing music tain at 9 p.m. $2 cover. of Peter Kater. This muchOn Monday, dance to the acclaimed and Grammy-winning Cat’s Meow with Diane Beegle pianist-composer may not be from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. familiar to you, but you’ve heard On Wednesday, enjoy the his music somewhere. $20 “boomer” music of Final On Saturday at 8 p.m., the Approach from 5:30 p.m. to Grady Champion Band brings 8:30 p.m. you “Mississippi Juke Joint,” ■  Damiana’s Best Cellars, “dirt” blues mixed with some 143 W. Washington St., hosts smooth and soft grooves of pop Kevin Lee Magner, Scott and soul music. Whether with Bradley and Mary Pender and harmonica or his voice, he is sure their genre-jumping acoustic to move you. $15 cover. tunes to celebrate Sequim’s First On Tuesday, the Tommy CasFriday Art Walk at 6 p.m. tro Band, the 2010 B.B. King ■  On Saturday, Howly Slim entertainer, band, contemporary will be at Las Palomas Mexiblues artist and recording-of-thecan Restaurant, 1085 E. Wash- year winner, comes to Port ington St., at 5 p.m. Townsend for an 8 p.m. show. If ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. you only see one show this Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and month, this is the one. Advance Victor Reventlow host the very tickets $30 and $35. popular and rousing open mic Phone 360-385-2216 for reserWednesday from 6:30 p.m. to vations. 9:30 p.m. ■  Pies on the Run, with ■  On Friday at Club Seven Western swing, harmony yodelLounge at 7 Cedars Casino, ing and maybe a little rope twirBlyn, dance to local Turner lin’, rides into the Uptown Pub, Brothers Band from 9 p.m. to 1016 Lawrence St., Friday from 1 a.m. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, let it all hang out On Saturday, Port Angeles’ with the Fun Addicts from most energetic, roots-based, old5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. timey, groove-bustin’ band,

Deadwood Revival, comes to the comfy confines of the pub. Get there early for the 9 p.m. show. $5 cover. ■  On Friday at Sirens, 823 Water St., dance to the Pitfalls at 9 p.m. $5 cover. On Saturday, Port Townsend blues and rock band Mongo Smash will keep you movin’ and groovin’ at 9 p.m. $5 cover. ■  Tonight, the Boiler Room, 711 Water St., features Dylan Morrison and Skinny People Kissing for the open mic at 8 p.m. Sign up at 7 p.m. ■  On Saturday at Castle Key, Seventh and Sheridan streets, Herb Payson and Todd Fisher play jazz from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. $5 cover. ■  Jim Oliver, Joel Levy and Dirk Anderson entertain Saturday at 7 p.m. at the Undertown, Water and Taylor streets. On Sunday, Howly Slim brings his original folk at 10 a.m. ■  Every Friday at 5 p.m., you’ll find Howly Slim at the Banana Leaf Thai Restaurant, 609 Washington St.

Music news ■  On Friday, multi-instrumentalist Carolyn Cruso brings her folk-, pop- and jazz-inspired acoustic music to the Laural B. Johnson Community Center, 923 Hazel Point Road, Quilcene, at 7:30 p.m. Cruso has traveled the world over, moving audiences with her expressive voice, flute, guitar and hammered dulcimer talents. $5 suggested cover.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-5651139 or e-mailing news@peninsuladailynews. com (subject line: John Nelson). Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.


C2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Things to Do Today and Friday, Nov. 4-5, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today Peninsula Woodworkers Club — For those interested in all phases of woodworking from furniture and cabinet making to wood turning, carving, boat-building, instrument-making and construction. For details, phone Ed McKay at 360-928-3331 or Gary Haubold at 360-452-4919. PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information including time of day and location. Tai chi class — Ginger and Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., 7 a.m. $12 per class or $10 for three or more classes. No experience necessary, wear loose comfortable clothing. Phone 360-808-5605. Pre-3 Co-op Class — For parents and toddlers 10 months to 31⠄2 years. First Baptist Church, Fifth and Laurel streets, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Associated with Peninsula College, quarterly cost is $75 with annual $25 registration fee Bhagavad Gita book study — Reading and discussion of sacred Hindu text. Olympic Iyengar Yoga, Eighth and Lincoln streets, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Parking in rear of building. Phone 360-683-4778. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.� Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Future Relics of the Elwha Dam.� 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-3532.

Mental illness family support group — For families and friends of people with mental disorders. Peninsula Community Mental Health Center, 118 E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. Phone Rebecca Brown, 360457-0431. Studium Generale — “The Rocky Horror Show.� Peninsula College Little Theatre, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 12:35 p.m. to 1:25 p.m. Free. First Step drop-in center — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and referrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, computers, fax and copier. Phone 360-457-8355. Museum at the Carnegie — Featured exhibit, “Strong People: The Faces of Clallam County.� Miniatures exhibit till Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Children welcome. Elevator, ADA access and parking at rear of building. 360-452-6779.

Peninsula Daily News

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar� link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

library, Braille training and various magnification aids. Vision Loss Center, 228 W. First St., Senior meal — Nutrition Suite N, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. program, Port Angeles Senior Phone 360-457-1383 or visit Center, 328 E. Seventh St., www.visionlossservices.org/ 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per vision. meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-457Nicotine Anonymous — 8921. Klallam Counseling,1026 E. Gastric bypass surgery First St., 10:30 a.m. Phone support group — 114 E. Sixth Knit, crochet and spin — 360-452-1060. St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. All ages and skill levels, Veela Open to the public. Phone 360- Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. Insurance assistance — 457-1456. to 6 p.m. Statewide benefits advisers help with health insurance and Laff Pack Clowns — HabiVolunteers in Medicine of Medicare. Port Angeles Senior tat for Humanity, 728 E. Front the Olympics health clinic — Center, 328 E. Seventh St., St., 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Public 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge welcome. Phone 360-457-7640 9 p.m. Free for patients with no Stewart at 360-452-3221, ext. or visit www.laughpackinc.com. insurance or access to health 3425. care. For appointment, phone Teen Advisory Council — 360-457-4431. Scrapbook and paperPort Angeles Library, 2210 S. crafts class — Clallam County Monthly Oneness Bless- Family YMCA Art School, 723 Peabody St., 3:45 p.m. Discuss library programs, services and ings (Deeksha) — Unitarian E. Fourth St., 10 a.m. to noon. materials. For students in grades Universalist, 73 Howe Road, Cost: $8, $5 for YMCA memfive through 12. Food, prizes 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Dona- bers. For children 8 to 14. To and snacks offered. Phone 360- tions accepted. All welcome. register, phone 360-452-9244, Visit www.onenessuniversity. ext. 309, or e-mail cheryl@ 417-8502. org or phone 360-681-4784. ccfymca.org. Pathways to Success — Bariatric surgery support Assistance program for incomeFirst Friday Coffee — Lineligible youth ages 16-21 look- group — Terrace Apartments, coln Center, 905 W. Ninth St., ing to increase their employ- 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360ability. Clallam County Work- 8 p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. 417-6344. Source office, 228 W. First St., 4 p.m. Friday Guided walking tour — See entry under Today. Play and Learn Port AngeNewborn parenting class — “You and Your New Baby,� les — For children for up to Port Angeles Fine Arts third-floor sunroom, Olympic 5 years old and their parent, Center — See entry under Medical Center, 939 Caroline grandparent or caregiver with Today. St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. individual and group play, songs and story time. 9 a.m. to Phone 360-417-7652. Bingo — Port Angeles 11a.m. Phone 360-452-5437 Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh Mental health drop-in cen- for location and more informa- St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone ter — The Horizon Center, 205 tion. 360-457-7004. E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Walk-in vision clinic — For those with mental disorMuseum at the Carnegie ders and looking for a place to Information for visually impaired — See entry under Today. socialize, something to do or a and blind people, including hot meal. For more information, accessible technology display, Introduction to line dance for beginners — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Phone 360-457-7004.

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ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way, 1 p.m. Open Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. to the public. Phone 360 681Mental health drop-in cen- 8677. ter — See entry under Today. Spanish class — Prairie Global Lens Film Series Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. — Double feature. Serbian film Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681“Ordinary People,� 4 p.m. Indian 0226. film “Ocean of an Old Man.� Chess Club — Dungeness 7 p.m. Little Theatre, Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Blvd., $5. Students free. Eng- Sequim Ave. 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Bring clocks, sets lish subtitles. and boards. All are welcome. Senior meal — See entry Phone 360-681-8481. under Today. Health clinic — Free mediPA Peggers Cribbage Club cal services for uninsured or — Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn under-insured, Dungeness ValSt., 5:30 p.m., check-in, 6 p.m. ley Health & Wellness Clinic, New members. For more infor- 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, mation, e-mail papeggers@ 5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218. hughes.net, phone 360-808Family Caregivers support 7129 or visit www.papeggers. com. group — 411 W. Washington St., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Phone Bingo — Masonic Lodge, Carolyn Lindley, 360-417622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. 8554. Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and pull tabs available. Meditation class — 92 Phone 360-457-7377. Plain Jane Lane, 6 p.m. Admission by donation.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Today Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www. sequimyoga.com.

CPR adult, child/infant class — Clallam County Fire District No. 3, 323 N. Fifth Ave., 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Cost: $10. Advance payment and registraStrength and toning exer- tion required. For information, cise class — Sequim Com- phone 360-683-4242. munity Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per Food Addicts in Recovery class. Phone Shelley Haupt at Anonymous — Calvary Cha360-477-2409 or e-mail pel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. jhaupt6@wavecable.com. Phone 360-452-1050 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. Line dancing lessons — High-beginner, intermediate Public ballroom dance — and advanced dancers. Sequim Sequim Elks Lodge, 1434 Port Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Williams Road, 7 p.m. to Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Drop- 9:30 p.m. Gary and Diane band ins welcome. $3 per class. play ballroom, swing, Latin, Phone 360-681-2826. ethnic, mixers and requests. All ages welcome. Phone 360Beginner yoga — 92 Plain 457-7035 or 253-312-9200. Jane Lane, 9 a.m., $30 for five classes. Visit www.sequimyoga. Tips for Holiday Coping com or phone 206-321-1718. workshop — Assured Hospice presents ways to prepare for Sequim Senior Softball — holidays and how to cope with Co-ed recreational league. grief and what may bring comCarrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for fort. Sequim Library, 630 N. practice and pick-up games. Sequim Ave., 3:45 p.m. to Phone John Zervos at 360- 5:15 p.m. Free. Packet of tips, 681-2587. articles, exercises and poems will be provided. Sequim Museum & Arts Center — “Autumn on the Friday Olympic Peninsula.� 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Free. Phone 360-683-8110. Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit Sequim Arts members art www.sequimyoga.com. show and sale — St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Walk aerobics — First BapAve., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way Parent connections — First 8 a.m. Free. Phone 360-683Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 2114. 10 a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. Circuit training exercise Olympic Minds meeting — class — Sequim Community Conference room, Lodge at Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable.com.

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Sequim Great Decisions Discussion Group â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Special Envoy in American Foreign Policy.â&#x20AC;? Sequim Public Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. Topics from Foreign Policy Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great Decisions 2009 publication and articles in Foreign Affairs magazine. Phone 360683-9622, e-mail jcpollock@ olypen.com or visit www.fpa. org/info-url_nocat4728/.

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to

Things/C3

Genealogical event slated for Nov. 13 Peninsula Daily News

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Gamblers Anonymous â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360460-9662.

PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clallam County Genealogical Society Treasurer Virginia Majewski will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Using Our Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OnLine Resources: Footnotes. com, American Ancestors. com and World Vital Records.comâ&#x20AC;? at the First Presbyterian Church Parish Hall, 139 W. Eighth St., from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 13. The event is free and open to the public. Majewski will provide an overview of what kinds of records are contained in each online database and will teach how to navigate them to get the best possible search results. She holds certificates in American records and general methodology from the National Institute of Genealogical Studies at the University of Toronto. Majewski also received a Society Management award from the Washington State Genealogical Society, for which she is vice president. For more information, visit www.olypen.com/ccgs or phone 360-417-5000.


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Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, November 4, 2010

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rdAge

Volunteer Tax-Aide counselors sought Let’s face it, folks. Partisan views aside, the federal government is nothing if not entertaining. In fact, people spend entire careers (OK, lifetimes) just trying to understand how to do whatever it is that they want you to do today. Even if you like it and/ or agree with it, the fact remains that understanding it is elusive on a good day. I offer, as a classic example of mind-melting complexity, the graduated income tax. Granted, there are a few genetic anomalies among us who understand it, but the vast majority of us only grasp bits and pieces, ranging from what a deduction is to, “Oh, yeah, I guess I have to do this.” And given the fact that the Internal Revenue Service isn’t legendary for its collective sense of humor, the entire experience can be, to understate the obvious, stressful. And why am I going on about taxes on Nov. 4?

You are required to be reasonably intelligent, a bit “above average” on the selfWell, discipline scale and a genuMark I’m hopinely decent human being. Harvey ing to Tax-Aide folks are the catch you “good guys.” off guard These are the totally while unpaid people who sit you’re down with us every year still on and help us figure out our your taxes, then actually file post-Hal- them for us — electroniloween cally! sugar And they do it for free high so I for those of us who are lowcan offer to upper-medium (it’s a lityou an opportunity to do tle “squishy”) income, something wonderful and which is most of us. have an absolutely miseraWe like them. ble time doing it. We want to take care of Indeed, this is my them, and right now, we annual plea for the more want you to become “them.” masochistic among you to And we’re talking about sign up to become Tax-Aide this now because you’ll volunteers. need to commit to volunHere’s the deal: teering by December. Tax-Aide is a program And here’s what you’ll sponsored by the AARP have to look forward to: Foundation and the IRS, You’ll attend “new voland you are not required to unteer orientation” classes, be associated with — or in Sequim, on Dec. 8 and 9, even like! — either one. then off you go to immerse Nor are you required to yourself in IRS-provided be retired or of any particu- self-study materials and lar age. tax-preparation computer

Help line

Things to Do

software for the rest of the month. A potential benefit might be the fact that you could easily sidestep any number of Christmas party invitations by simply stating that “I’m studying the income tax guide . . . ,” at which point the invitation will be promptly, if politely, withdrawn. Then you’ll attend review classes in Sequim on Jan. 5 and 6, then, in order to become IRS-certified (try adding that to everything you sign for Medicare!), you’ll have to pass the IRS test at the advanced level and sign the IRS Standards of Conduct. Are you still there? Still awake? OK. Then you’ll be asked to work a minimum of four hours per week, during tax season, helping people. The fact is, most TaxAide folks put in a lot more than that, but you won’t be shunned if you don’t. Four hours of tax preparation would put most of us in a coma.

Sequim Museum & Arts Center — See entry under Today. Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., 12:30 p.m. Phone 360681-4308, or partnership 360683-5635. French class — 2 p.m. For more information, phone 360681-0226. First Friday Art Walk — Self-guided tour of downtown art galleries and additional venues. Performances and events as scheduled. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Visit www.sequimart walk.com for a tour map. Phone Renee Brock-Richmond 360460-3023. Readers Theater Plus Volunteer Hospice Benefit — Jan Karon’s “Welcome to Mitford.” Old Dungeness School-

Port Townsend and Jefferson County

Today Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art. Chimacum TOPS 1393 — Evergreen Coho Resort Club House, 2481 Anderson Lake Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visitors welcome. Phone: 360-7653164. East Jefferson County Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to noon. Open to men 50 and older and women 45 and older. Phone 360-437-5053 or 360-437-2672

aration? No! These folks need you. We all need you! Here’s what you do to volunteer: ■  In Jefferson County, contact David Self at 360385-2617 or dcself@olypen. com. ■  In Port Angeles, Hearst Coen at 360-4526541 or hj_coen@msn.com. ■  In Forks, Corinne Spicer at 360-374-6332. ■  In Sequim, Jon Wendt at 360-681-0137 or wendtsequim@q.com. Please. I can absolutely guarantee that you’ll have a wonderful time having a miserable time. Hey, look: If helping people were easy, everybody would do it!

________

Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Senior Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He is also a member of the Community Advocates for Rural Elders partnership. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360-3749496 (West End), or by e-mailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free hourlong tour Puget Sound Coast Artil- of new headquarters and telllery Museum — Fort Worden ing of property’s story. Meet State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. docent in chandlery, 431 Water Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children 6 to 12; free for chil- children welcome and pets not dren 5 and younger. Exhibits allowed inside building. Phone interpret the Harbor Defenses 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or of Puget Sound and the Strait e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Key City Public Theatre 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ general auditions — Key City olypen.com. Playhouse, 419 Washington St. Today and Friday, 6 p.m. and Jefferson County Histori- Saturday, 2 p.m. Casting call cal Museum and shop — 540 for first four presentations 2011 Water St., Port Townsend, season: Playwrights’ Festival, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 “The Garden of Monsters,” and for adults; $1 for children 3 to “Macbeth.” For more informa12; free to historical society tion, visit www.keycitypublic members. Exhibits include “Jef- theatre.org. ferson County’s Maritime HeriKayak program — Help tage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The build a cedar-strip wooden Chinese in Early Port kayak. Chandler Building Boat Townsend.” Phone 360-385- Shop, Maritime Center, Water Monroe streets, 6 p.m. to 1003 or visit www.jchsmuseum. and 8 p.m. Free. Offered by the org. Northwest Maritime Center and Redfish Custom Kayaks. Phone Rotary Club of East Jef- Joe Greenley at 360-808-5488 ferson County — Speaker: or click on www.redfishkayak. Jamie Maciejewski of Habitat com. for Humanity. Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley American Rhododendron Road, Chimacum, 11:45 a.m. Society — Lecture on sudden to 1 p.m. Lunch meeting (salad oak death. Tri-Area Community $7, meal $10). Phone Ray Center, 10 West Valley Road, Serebrin at 360-385-6544 or Chimacum, 7 p.m. Refreshvisit www.clubrunner.ca/Portal/ ments served. Phone 360-3790603. Home.aspx?cid=705.

Continued from C2 house, 2781 Old Towne Road, or 360-379-5443.

Sequim ,7:30 p.m. Tickets $12 Sequim Arts Members art each, or two for $20 at Pacific show and sale — See entry Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., Sequim, and Odyssey under Today. Bookshop, 114 W. Front St., Line dancing lessons — Port Angeles, Volunteer HosBeginning dancers. Sequim pice of Clallam County, 540 E. Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Eighth St., Port Angeles, and at Road, 10 a.m. to 11a.m. $3 per the door. class. Phone 360-681-2826.

Which is exactly why we desperately need you. The only payoff here is that you’ll be able to help human beings who truly want, need and appreciate that help. That’s it. Well, OK, you’ll probably learn stuff that will help you, your clueless 20-something offspring and various and sundry friends and neighbors, and you probably will be invited to a lot more Christmas parties next year. But the truth is that this is about helping people. You don’t have to be an accountant to do this — most volunteers aren’t. Most of them are reasonably intelligent folks with some basic computer skills who think helping people is worth doing. It isn’t for everybody, like me. No, I’d prefer to immerse myself in the intricacies of Medicare, Medicaid and durable powers of attorney and call it “interesting,” but tax prep-

Friday

Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or Port Townsend Aero e-mail quilcenemuseum@ Museum — See entry under olypen.com or quilcene Today. museum@embarqmail.com. Puget Sound Coast ArtilNorthwest Maritime Cenlery Museum — See entry ter tour — See entry under under Today. Today. Jefferson County HistoriOvereaters Anonymous — cal Museum and shop — See St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, entry under Today. 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854. Port Townsend Marine SciRhody O’s Square Dances ence Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and — Gardiner Community Cenmarine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. ter, 980 Old Gardiner Road, Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for 6:30 p.m. youth (6-17); free for science First Friday Story Night — center members. “Whales in Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone Better Living Through Coffee, 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ 100 Tyler St., 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. Phone 360-531-2535. org. First Friday Lectures — Conversation Cafe — Vic- Daniel James Brown, author of torian Square Deli, 940 Water Indifferent Stars Above: The St., No. 1, noon. Phone 360- Harrowing Saga of a Donner 385-6959 or visit www. Party Bride. 540 Water St., conversationcafe.org. Topic: 7 p.m. Suggested donation $5. The Law. Port Townsend High Quilcene Historical School fall play — “The ForMuseum — 151 E. Columbia eigner.” PTHS auditorium, 1500 St., by appointment. Artifacts, Van Ness St., 7 p.m. Admission documents, family histories $10 adults, $5 seniors and stuand photos of Quilcene and dents without an ASB card and surrounding communities. New $3 children younger than 12 exhibits on Brinnon, military, and students with an ASB. At millinery and Quilcene High door only. Phone 360-379School’s 100th anniversary. 4520.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

FANGS FOR THE MEMORY

BY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ Note: When this puzzle is completed, connect the circled letters in alphabetical order from A to R to show the outline of an 84-Across.

AC RO S S 1 Home of “Hardball” 6 “Love is blind,” e.g. 11 Moolah 16 Even 17 Doltish 21 Odd Fellows’ meeting place 22 Kind of acid 23 1922 Max Schreck film 24 Words of empathy 25 Heavyweight 26 High-water mark 27 “Enough, Jorge!” 28 Super ___ (old game console) 30 It might come after you 31 ___ Balls (Hostess snack food) 32 As written 33 Tijuana table 36 Parking spot 38 Actor McGregor 40 “Beetle Bailey” dog 44 Lover of Isolde 46 Oodles 50 Cozy place? 52 Wagnerian opera setting 54 Crime scene matter 55 Saturnalia participants 56 1995 Eddie Murphy film 59 Tech whiz 61 Athenian porch 62 Some gravesite decorations 63 Arctic herder 66 Composer Ned

68 1931 Bela Lugosi film 72 Fix, as laces 73 Coolers, for short 74 System of beliefs 77 “The Rights of Man” writer 78 Mauna ___ 80 Argentine article 81 Furry adoptee 82 Water brand 84 [See instructions] 85 Cobb of “12 Angry Men” 86 A bit of cheer? 87 Like some fondue pots 89 Halloween cry 90 Compel 92 When Italian ghouls come out? 93 Poodle’s greeting 95 Bygone flightless bird 96 ___ Bator 97 1979 George Hamilton film 105 “Fine” 108 Stage direction that means “alone” 109 Ring figures 113 1987 Adrian Pasdar film 116 ___ Tin Tin 117 2008 Robert Pattinson film 119 Bones also called cubiti 120 “Piece of cake!” 123 Pianist/composer Schumann 124 Tandem twosome

33 “Jersey Shore” airer 34 All alternative 35 Medal of valor 37 Like the inside of a coffin 39 Used, as a dinner tray 41 Bernard Malamud’s first novel 42 Rocky pinnacle 43 Saturn’s wife 45 Souvenir from D OW N Scotland 1 Coconut filler 47 Early fifth-century 2 Acreage fig. year 3 When French ghouls 48 “Slander” author come out? Coulter 4 Fruit-based fountain 49 Bit of Vaseline treat 51 Communication syst. 5 Make a copy of 53 Longtime Yankee 6 Sucks up nickname 7 Crusoe’s creator 55 Roman squares 8 Breezed through 57 O.K. Corral figure 9 Grade school door 58 Exclude, with “out” sign 59 Bunch at a grocery 10 Noted New York store eatery 60 Epoch in which 11 Russian pancakes mammals arose 12 What Chippendale 64 One getting hit on at furniture was made a party? in 65 Female fowl 13 Cheese ball? 67 Selfish person’s cry 14 “Slumdog before and after Millionaire” locale “all” 15 Subpar grades 69 Common rhyme scheme 17 Gershwin’s “Concerto ___” 70 “Later!” 18 Canine cousin 71 Biblical preposition 19 “Do ___!” (“Stop 72 N.F.L. defensive procrastinating!”) lineman B. J. ___ 20 Maestro’s sign 75 ___ soda 29 Skull caps? 76 “… And I’m the queen of England!” 32 Sly sorts

125 1986 Brad Davis film 126 George who wrote “The Spanish Gypsy” 127 Walk the earth 128 “___ Ben Adhem” 129 Belonging to you and me 130 Many visitors to Legoland

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95 Slush pile contents: 104 Sprinkled with baby powder Abbr. 105 Like a locked 98 Least typical 83 Sarah McLachlan lavatory hit 99 Cold war broadcasting inits. 106 Old-style fax 85 It may be hidden at 107 Hawaiian veranda a hideout 100 Gift giver’s words 110 Question shouted 88 Shopping center 101 Epic translated by in exasperation regulars Alexander Pope 111 Spasm 91 Kind of warfare 102 Reaches 112 Some of the fine altogether print on sports 94 Units of cream: 103 “Vous êtes ___” pages Abbr. 79 Sushi bar order

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114 1988 #1 country album 115 Newsman Marvin 117 Layer 118 Jazz saxophonist/ flutist Frank 121 Ontario’s ___ Canals 122 “A ___ tardi” (“See you later,” in Italy)


C4

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Fun ’n’ Advice

Family Tree • “Cathy” has been retired; we’re auditioning this comic. Share your thoughts: comics@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Daily News

Cutting ties is a mystery for family DEAR ABBY: I am writing about the letter you printed from “Haven’t a Clue in New York,” whose friend “Pam” stopped speaking to her with no explanation. A member of my family, “Trish,” did that to my husband and me three years ago. We tried to find out what we had done, but Trish’s husband — my husband’s brother — kept making excuses and insisting everything was fine. Trish had told me previously that she had cut people out of her life, so I guess this is just something that she does. Regardless, it hurts. She and her husband were very kind and helpful to us when we moved to this area. I valued her friendship and had great respect for her. Even now, I feel more pain and sadness for the loss of Trish in our lives than anger toward her. “Haven’t a Clue” must try to not take it personally. What happened is probably more about Pam than it is about her. Dumped in Dixie

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

dear abby speaking to me. When mutual Van Buren friends intervened, she would change the subject. I continued to send birthday and holiday cards (with no response) and moved several states away. After a few years, I called. When I asked what the problem was and what could we do to resolve it, I was told, “I can’t deal with your drama!” and she hung up. Abby, I had seen her through two marriages, a divorce, her father’s death and many other stressful life experiences. I finally realized, as you have advised many times in your column, I’m better off without her. Moved On in Nashville

Abigail

Dear Abby: Years ago, my roommate and I were close and shared everything. When I returned for a visit after graduation, she refused to see me. I was crushed. I agonized for months over anything I might have said to offend her, and wrote her Dear Abby: If “Haven’t a Clue” repeatedly. I received no response. just lets things lie, further damage Years later, I tracked her down, might be done to their friendship told her how much her friendship that could be avoided. She should had meant to me and apologized send her friend a letter explaining again for whatever I had done that that she has no idea what might have happened to cause the rift, that drove her away. She told me she had discovered the relationship is important to her and she hopes Pam will tell her what she’s bipolar. She had struggled with happened so she’ll have the opportu- it and hoped that by cutting off all nity to resolve the issue. contacts and starting over, she’d gain Letting things stay as they are some kind of balance and control in and not contacting Pam could cause her life. She said I had never done her to stew angrily on the issue until anything wrong and that she cherthe friendship is damaged beyond ished our years of friendship. repair. Better to reach out to her I still think of her and wish she friend now to see if the situation can had allowed me to help. However, I be improved than to hope the storm have to be satisfied that it wasn’t my blows over on its own. fault, wish her well and smile when Rebecca in North Carolina remembering our good times. Knows All Too Well Dear Abby: In her letter, _________ “Haven’t” said her neighbors susDear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, pected an infidelity issue was at the also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was heart of the rift. founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. LetIn my case, my friend’s husband ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box had made a pass at me — which I 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com. rejected. Shortly after, she stopped Dear Dumped: I agree and thank you for your comments. I received many thoughtful replies from readers who, like you, have “been there.” Read on:

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

The Last Word in Astrology

Momma

By Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t stop believing in who you are and what you can do. Serious hard work will lead to a partnership that will contribute to your professional and personal well-being. Success is heading your way. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Shake off any feelings of insecurity and bravely move forward. Take aggressive action toward your goal. Love is in the stars. Don’t be fooled by someone asking for too much. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Smart, swift and serviceable will be what’s required. Focus on what’s important to you. Discipline, coupled with understanding and empathy will help you keep emotional things running smoothly. Your creativity will separate you from the competition. 5 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You have lots of opportunities if you are willing to implement a couple of changes into your current lifestyle. Don’t let someone else’s burden stop you from following a path that can bring happiness and satisfaction. 2 stars

Dennis the Menace

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Chances are, you missed a very small but important detail that could cost you financially or emotionally. Don’t take anyone’s word when it comes to contractual agreements, especially if it has to do with your home, family or finances. Do your own research. 4 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll find it difficult to sit still, so get out your to-do list and start checking off your accomplishments. Idle time will result in discord. Rely on your stamina and know-how to impress, and your diplomacy to keep you out of trouble. 4 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Take on a new pastime or pick up skills that will help you get ahead professionally, personally or financially. There is a change heading your way regarding the way you handle others as well as how you handle your money. Better times are ahead. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put your emotions on the back burner and look at whatever you face practically. There is a logical answer for everything. Use past references to make the right decision now. Look up an old friend with something to contribute to a project. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t allow anyone to stifle your actions or silence you when you have something important to contribute. Stand up for your beliefs, opinions and what you want to pursue. Once you eliminate what is making life so complicated, you will find success. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s better to do what you can to get ahead and to finish what you start before sharing what you are up to. Discipline will build your confidence and add to your credentials. Work and money will go hand in hand. 5 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put a little fun back into your life. Life is about balance. You’ll make a better impression on friends and colleagues if you share a little down-time. Get to know people better and you will succeed. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t get angry or tie yourself up in arguments that will lead nowhere. Concentrate on deals and financial gains. There is money heading your way. Love is prominent. Consider making a move. 3 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010

C5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video Office Hours Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 Monday - Friday IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY 8AM - 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

College Works Painting Internship: Trains interns on the basics of managing a business from start to finish. Each manager oversees the marketing, sales, and production management of a house-painting business in their hometown. Average income is $9,500. Call Chris Hamilton for more information. 360-907-8138. COVERED GARAGE Sale: Fri. 8-4:30, Sat. 8-2 p.m., 334 Sutter Rd., just east of Bagley Creek. Tools, men’s, women’s, teen and children’s clothing, household items, wet suits. DUNGENESS: Cash for 2 Br., garage. $138,000. 928-9528. EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747. HOUSEKEEPING $15 hr., references. 457-2837

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 417 E. Whidby. Everything must go. For sale by owner. double wide, 3 Br., 2 full baths, all appliances, in P.T. $20,000. 457-5785. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-5 p.m., 173 Sequoia Ln., off Taylor Cutoff. Household, knickknacks, tools, table saw, metal band saw, air compressor, furniture. HOME SHARING in old farmhouse for professionals, students, couples or families. 457-3169. HONDA: ‘04 CRF50. Christmas Special! New training wheels, kids helmet never used. $800. 360-417-9531

HUGE GARAGE Sale: Sat. ONLY, 9-? 1709 E. 6th, across from McDonalds, in alley. Most stuff new in boxes! Toys, CDs, surround sound, tools, etc. Anything and everything imaginable! Including antique collectibles, antique dealers welcome. Stop and shop here for Christmas. Everything priced to sell. You don’t want to miss this rare sale! HUGE COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE Sat., 9-2 p.m. 4861 Sequim Dungeness Way. Name your own price items! Refreshments available!

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: 308 rifle clip. Beaver area. 360-452-6649 FOUND: Dog. Full breed Corgi, honey color coat, Lyre River area, P.A. 460-3323. LOST: Dog. Shetland Sheepdog, (small Lassie) Crescent Lake Lodge, P.A., Sun. Oct. 24th. $1,000 REWARD 360-437-7911 LOST: Hearing Aid. Tuesday Nov. 2, Pine Hill, UPS, Post Office, Key Bank, P.A. Reward. 452-3400 LOST: Wallet. Blue, with ID for Elizabeth Stallings, missing from overnight shelter, P.A., on 10/28. $50 Reward, no questions asked. 360-457-0852

Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat. only, 8-3:30 p.m., 1520 W. 12th St., between H and I Streets in the alley. Lots of furniture, clothing, toys. OFFICE ASSISTANT Needed with organizational skills and computer experience, QuickBooks or Peachtree software, part-time. Send resume to MHF, PO Box 698, Carlsborg, WA 98324. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, 433 E. 1st St., P.A. No smoking/pets. 1st, last, deposit. $575 mo. 417-1688. PIANO: Electronic digital piano. $500/ obo. 452-5127. Retired electrical worker seeks to exchange services as handyman/caretaker for living quarters. Skilled and experienced, have tools and pickup truck. 928-533-5670. rogerpyatt@ yahoo.com SALE: 4 garages full. Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m., in SunLand, 110 San Juan Drive. SATURN: ‘01. 60K miles good condition Blue 4 door 5 speed stick CD player w/MP3 playback $2,300. 360-565-8104 SEAHAWK TICKETS (2) Section 337, seat 20 and 21, row T. Nov. 7, vs. Giants. $70 ea. 461-3661.

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31

Lost and Found

25

Personals

HOLIDAY/SANTA The holidays are coming and Santa has a very special early gift for that right lady who is a non-smoker, no drugs, HWP. Santa has been looking for that right lady to make this Norwegian male, 60, 6’, HWP, excellent health, dreams come true. He is very affectionate, caring, giving from his heart, down to earth, loves the outdoors and animals, home life, with a sense of humor, honesty and respect are very important also. Now Santa is just waiting for the right lady to unwrap her early gift which could be her soul mate for eternity. littlewilddeer@yahoo .com

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

Help Wanted

CAREGIVERS Needed for in-home care. Experience preferred. Salary DOE and license. Call 681-6206

Diabetes Program Coordinator (RN) Energetic educator responsible for Outpatient Diabetes Education program. Will lead the team in enhancing Pt. education and care, program development, and maintain positive customer relationships. RN and Certified Diabetes Educator required with 3+ years’ experience running a successful program; must have a good understanding of ADA program requirements. The successful candidate will have a passion for diabetes care and education, be self motivated and innovative thinking to create a “buzz” about diabetes prevention in our community. Email nbuckner@olympicm edical.org or apply online at www.olympicmedical.org

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

SEQUIM: Huge 1 Br., garage and storage, $700 plus utilities. 681-8455 SUNLAND ESTATE Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 110 Horizon View Dr. Some antiques, TV, refrigerator, sofa, other furniture, excellent quality and condition, genuine persian rugs, lots of other items and collectibles. No early birds.

SUZUKI: SX4 Crossover touring II AWD. Low Mileage (15,600) Hatchback with automatic transmission and 3 Mode AWD in perfect condition. Lots of extras including power moon roof, low profile wheels, digital compass, 6 CD/AM/ FM/MP3 player w/9 speakers including subwoofer, roof rack, body side molding, tinted glass. This cars handles like a dream in all types of weather and is roomy and comfortable. If interested please e-mail me at kck1237@gmail.com 360-301-9554 Toy Australian Shepherds- Two femalesblack tri and two blue merle males and one black tri male. Tails docked, dew claws removed and will have first shots and vet checked. Reserve your precious pup today. Will be ready at Thanksgiving Time. $450. Call 360-374-5151. TOYOTA: ‘98 Tacoma. 5 speed 2WD, X Cab, great tires, new brakes, bed liner, canopy. $5,050. Call 360-452-6965 Walker Puppies. 4 female/4 males 2 black and tan, 5 reds and one brown and white. 360-770-0332 or 360-670-6084.

31

Help Wanted

DENTAL HYGIENIST Part-time position available for busy family practice in uptown Port Townsend. Send resume to Dr. Clark Sturdivant at 608 Polk St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. EMPLOYEE REP FT, Sequim. Must have strong organizational skills for a fast paced office, accurate data entry skills, computer literate, organized and multi-tasker a must. Benefits after 90 days. Email/fax resume with references to: humanresources@car egiversonline.com 360-457-7186 GRAPHIC ARTIST Computer savvy, entrepreneurial minded, self started, ability to work autonomously, part time or full time. Apply with resume and cover letter to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#180/Artist Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Immediate opening for experienced truck mechanic. Must have current driver’s license, clean driving record, and own tools. Swing shift. 460-7292

Irwin Dental Center seeks experienced Dental Assistant. Qualified applicants please send resume to: 620 E. 8th, Port Angeles, WA 98362. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LPN/RN FT position for inhome care, call Rainshadow Home Services. 681-6206

MECHANICAL ENGINEER/ DRAFTS PERSON Seeking person skilled in mechanical, structural andelectrical 2D and 3D drafting using AutoCad and/or Solidworks. Working knowledge of mechanical engineering with 5 years relevant experience. Full-time position with benefits for manufacturer and industrial refrigeration systems. Email resume to info@imspacific.com or fax 360385-3410 MENTAL HEALTH Case Manager/ Therapist for chronically mentally ill adults. Prefer Bachelors w/2 yrs experience Resume and cvr ltr: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE OFFICE ASSISTANT For fast growing financial planning firm. Looking for someone with computer, multi tasking and organizational skills, who is outgoing and detail oriented, at least 2 yrs. relevant experience. Part-time with possible full-time. Salary DOE. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#182/Assistant Pt Angeles, WA 98362 OFFICE ASSISTANT Needed with organizational skills and computer experience, QuickBooks or Peachtree software, part-time. Send resume to MHF, PO Box 698, Carlsborg, WA 98324. Order Fulfillment/ Customer Service Must lift 50 lbs., computer proficient, team player, parttime, $9 hr. Please email resume to: hpatterson@starmani nc.com Clallam Bay Corrections Centers is currently recruiting for Correctional Officers, Non-Permanent oncall. Pay starts at $16.61 hourly, plus benefits. Closes 11/11/10. Apply online at www.careers.wa.gov If you need further information, please call Roxann Bennett at 360-963-3208. EOE Private live-in caregiver needed. Licensed and bonded. For interview, call 477-0631 after 6 p.m. Program Manager/ Employment Specialist. Program Manager will develop business contacts and community employment opportunities for adults with disabilities. Starting part-time, salary DOE. Submit cover letter with salary requirements and resume to karen@piercejones.n et NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Reception/Cashier Medical office exp. required, entry level position, patient registration, insurance verify, collect copays. Full-time. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#181/Reception Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325

33

Employment Information

College Works Painting Internship: Trains interns on the basics of managing a business from start to finish. Each manager oversees the marketing, sales, and production management of a house-painting business in their hometown. Average income is $9,500. Call Chris Hamilton for more information. 360-907-8138.

34

Work Wanted

Best Choice Lawn Care. Maintenance and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/ P.A. 248-230-0450.

34

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding and mowing. 452-2034 CLEANING Houses, offices, rentals. Honest, hard working, reliable. Since 1986. 360-681-4502 Do you need your gutters cleaned? Call me and I’ll take care of it. 503-717-3818. HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, move out’s, rentals, offices, RVs, help with holiday messes, no job is too big or too small. Call for your free estimate 360-808-3017. Port Angeles and surrounding area. Hedge trim, prune, mow, haul, odd jobs. 452-7249 HOME SHARING in old farmhouse for professionals, students, couples or families. 457-3169. HOUSEKEEPING $15 hr., references. 457-2837 In-home care available for your loved ones. Experienced caring RN available, flexible hours, salary negotiable. Call Rae at 360-681-4271. MOWING, pruning. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142. Retired electrical worker seeks to exchange services as handyman/caretaker for living quarters. Skilled and experienced, have tools and pickup truck. 928-533-5670. rogerpyatt@ yahoo.com Yardwork & Odd Jobs. Experienced and Dependable, hedge trim, prune, weed eat, mow, gutter cleaning, painting, yard cleanup, hauling debris, tree removal and more. 2 men at $35 per hr. 461-7772 many references.

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

1-DERFUL 1-LEVEL Meticulously maintained in and out, this 3 Br., 2 bath home with partial mountain and saltwater views has it all! Fruit trees, irrigation, outbuilding with workshop and extra garage, room for lots more on 3.17 acres. $279,900. ML251626. Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Master bath newly remodeled with tile shower granite countertop. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 30x24 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $210,000 360-460-7503

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

51

Homes

A GREAT OPPORTUNITY Owner financing. Solmar area. 3 Br., 1 bath on 1/2 acre. New interior paint, floor vinyl, 3 year old roof. $148,500. ML251915 Neil Culbertson Brokers Group Real Estate Professionals 681-8778 ext 110 A GREAT OPPORTUNITY Sunland for less than $200,000. Comfortable, easy to live with floor plan, cozy fireplace for those chilly evenings, great kitchen and dining area combo for easy living, all appliances included, deck and railings have been refreshed. ML251993/131039 Cath Mitch 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND AFFORDABLE HOME OWNERSHIP! Park-like setting with trees and a sense of “country”. Close to stores and bus lines. 2 Br., 2 bath 1,052 sf, 1979 mfg. home with heat pump, carport and outbuilding. Located in an age 55+ park. $35,950. MLS252224 Margo PetersenPruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY BEAUTIFUL CONTEMPORARY CUSTOM HOME Super private location, just minutes from Port Angeles. Very light and bright with wall of picture windows facing Olympic Mountain range. Vaulted ceilings, massive kitchen with Bleimeister cabinets and new appliances. 3,818 sf. Finished downstairs suitable for mother-in-law apt. 3 car garage plus 2,500 sf RV/shop. Great for car enthusiastic. Large pond, 8 raised garden beds. Flowers for all seasons. $499,900. ML252124. Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY BEAUTIFUL SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO Backyard sunroom with slider, propane free standing stove, custom murphy bed in guest room, doubles as a craft table. Japanese style Shoji handmade storage. $185,000 ML252226/145314 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

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Homes

BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED AND AFFORDABLE 3 Br., 1.5 bath home in Sequim. Large sun room and patio in the back yard. Great convenient location near schools and shopping. New kitchen counter and sink. Laminate floors and upgraded vinyl windows. $174,900. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 BEST PARCEL TO DEVELOP! Unique opportunity to own 3.64 acres within the city limits with water and mountain views. Preliminary Plat for 13 large lots (9,000+ sf). No Wetlands. Possible owner financing. Located just minutes from downtown, schools, the library and shopping, yet it has a country feel. This neighborhood boasts the best weather because it is above the fog line and not as windy as the west side of town. $248,500. ML252237 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BREATHE EASY Allergy friendly almost new custom home on 6+ acres that has it all! Outside you’ll find a huge shop, brand new barn, outbuildings and breathtaking mountain views. Inside you’ll find granite counters, wine cooler, security system, reverse osmosis H20, hardwood and tile throughout! Wood burning fireplaces, spa towers in two showers, 2 master suites. $399,950. ML251146 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company BY OWNER DIAMOND POINT Sale or lease, 2,930 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 ba, 2 story, .88 acre, lg. custom windows, water views/Victoria, library plus computer loft, remodeled, upgraded, garage and lg. carport, new roof/ paint. $499,000. 681-3717 CENTRALLY LOCATED 2 Br., rambler on a large lot. Incredibly clean. Home has recently been updated with new windows, roof and paint. Fenced backyard with large workshop. $160,000. ML251616. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East CLASSIC BEAUTY Well cared for home with mountain and saltwater views. This 3 Br., 2 bath home is well built and has had many updates and upgrades. The home is placed on two lots totaling 90’x140’. New windows and hard plank siding. Detached garage and gardening shed. Large outdoor patio and deck. $224,900 ML252138/141344 Dan Erickson 461-3888 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

COLONIAL HOME On a very private 6.32 acres. Great unobstructed view of the Olympic Mountains. Wonderfully landscaped including a near one acre pond stocked with bass and perch, fire area, concrete patio, ornamental trees, fruit orchard and much more. Beautifully designed home with the master suite on the main floor, open concept and a gourmet kitchen, $735,000. ML250581 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. FALL IN LOVE Spacious country home on 1.37 acres. Home features gorgeous master suite with a dream bath, 100 year old fir floors, light and bright sunroom overlooking the truly unique property with gardens, a “woman cave” studio with 3/4 bath, old homestead out building, fruit trees and privacy. $355,000. ML252007 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. FANTASTIC NEWER HOME PRICE REDUCED Built in 2007 with beautiful hardwood floors throughout except carpet in the bedrooms. Granite countertops in the kitchen with a breakfast bar. 3 Br., plus a loft and a den that could be used as a 4th Br. Master Br. is downstairs and has a walk-in closet. Master bath has double sinks and granite counter. $292,000. ML250638/46762 Dave Stofferahn 477-5542 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY FANTASTIC VIEWS Strait, city lights, Victoria and Mount Baker. Vaulted cedar tongue and groove ceilings, skylights, fireplace with propane insert and two free standing propane stoves, separated master Br. Large wood deck off family room. RV parking with dump, water and electric. $414,000. ML251615. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Golfers paradise located just off the 5th tee/6th green at Dungeness Golf Course. Well kept home with many amenities including a heat pump, fireplace, updated floor coverings and hobby room. $249,000. ML242693 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

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MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat, 9-1 p.m. 701 W. Anderson Road, Mains Farm area. Household, tools, antiques, furniture, and misc.

WEST P.A.: Cash for 30 acres, utilities. $138,000. 928-9528.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading

MINI BAZAAR Friday, Nov. 5th, 8-3 p.m. A trove of treasures at 114 E. 6th, use back door.

MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-4 p.m., 902 S. K St.

LOST: Cat. 3 yr. old male, gray all over except face/stomach, ‘Ted’, Agnew area. 452-2735.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

INDOOR GARAGE Sale: Fri. 8-4:30, Sat. 8-2 p.m., 334 Sutter Rd., just east of Bagley Creek. Surf boards, wet suits, tools, construction materials, men’s clothing and more.

Help Wanted

5000900

A beautiful property in Port Angeles. For sale $168,000. Located just minutes from town off of Mt Angeles Road. The 4.77 acre parcel is surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. Septic installed, electric hook up pd, city water. www.portangelesprop.com or 360-460-0572 BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $7,000/obo. 457-7097 CLEANING Houses, offices, rentals. Honest, hard working, reliable. Since 1986. 360-681-4502

ESTATE SALE: Whole household must go! Too many items to list, all items good quality. Located in SunLand. Fri.-Sat.Sun., 8-4. North on Sequim Ave., right on Kitchen-Dick, right on Casalery, right on Hurricane Ridge Dr., 3rd house on left (167). Please don’t block driveways when parking.

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ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


C6

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010

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GREAT VALUE Charming 3 Br. home with expansive saltwater view. Tastefully remodeled in 2010. Vinyl windows and wood floors. Garage and workshop area. Nice deck and partially fenced yard. Attractively priced. $169,000. ML251938. Dan O’Rourke 417-2815 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY HALLOWEEN SPECIAL #2 Quality 1,854 sf, 4 Br., 1.5 bath, 1-car attached garage on a quiet cul de sac in a desirable neighborhood. The 1,100 sf shop contains a 2-car garage, large shop area equipped with built-in compressed air power, and a 2 room loft. Private back yard. $212,500 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY HALLOWEEN SPECIAL Outstanding custom built, 3 Br., 2.5 bath home on 2.75 acres. Main floor also has office/den and bonus room. Quality abounds with beautiful hardwood floors, granite counters, French doors, crown molding, staircase, propane insert and open kitchen. Master bedroom/ bath to die for. $415,000. ML252233. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

"In-Town" Mini-Farm. 4 bedroom, 1+ bath home on 1.08 acres. Fenced pasture, mt. view, greenhouse, chicken coop, detached garage. Carport. 8x24 deck. Mature fruit trees. Appliances convey. New roofs/heat pump and MUCH more! $210,000. Contact Dave at 360-670-8260 or weissguy60@yahoo.c om

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

Homes

LIKE SUNSETS Grand views of Sequim Bay. Nicely sited home on east side of Sequim Bay. 2 master suites downstairs, open space great room, separate dining room and kitchen with view, 3 car garage and more. $725,000. ML251037/71143 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND NEW FLOORING! Large in size, not in price. Come see this spacious and lowpriced 2000 sf home located in central Port Angeles. Great features include 5 Br., 2 baths, welcoming living room, dining room, large family room with woodburning fireplace, bright kitchen with refrigerator, fenced back yard for energetic kids or animals, covered deck, and even an extra kitchen! New price. $199,000. ML241482. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NORTHWEST CONTEMPORARY HOME Designed by local owner/artist, lots of windows bring in light and views of lush vegetation. Almost half acre with nearly 200 rhodys, several madronas and old growth evergreens. Private feel, yet close to town. 2 Br., 2 bath, open great room/dining area. Priced below assessed value. $169,000. ML250453. Carolynn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE 1.96 cleared acres w/small barn/workshop, 2 garden sheds. House has had some recent updates. There is 111’ of Dungeness River frontage. This property would be a wonderful investment or starter home. $219,900. ML251616 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Classified 51

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Homes

Oh the weather outside is frightful but the hot tub inside is deeliteful. Enjoy relaxing moments, 3 Br., 2.5 bath, 3 car garage home, with landscaped yards. $260,000. ML251989. Lori Tracey and Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East PORT LUDLOW VIEW HOME Beautifully maintained, 2 Br. suites plus den, office and loft. Finished with hardwood floors, tile, cherry cabinets and wood shutters. Maintained living. $396,000. ML81296. Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow Price is right for this in-town rambler. The back yard is parklike, private, fenced, with fruit trees and a garden. Convenient to shopping, coffee shops, restaurants, schools. $175,000. ML252227 Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East PRIVATE MINI FARM 6.74 acres set up for horses with two shelters plus barn/workshop. 3 Br., 2 bath home with 1,531 sf, new septic system, upgraded well with holding tank, near DNR land for easy recreational access. $269,000. ML251413. Steve Marble Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 808-2088 RARE OPPORTUNITY! New, mountain view home on one acre with no restrictions. Home features a great room concept with vaulted ceilings, kitchen with island and pantry, 3 Br. plus a den. 2 car attached garage. Just minutes from town. $205,000. ML252140 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. RENT TO OWN! 3 Br., 3 bath, all rent credited to down payment, formal dining nook, 2 fireplaces, oversized garage, call listing agent for details. $289,000 ML252062/136048 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Homes

DUNGENESS: Cash for 2 Br., garage. $138,000. 928-9528. ROOM TO ROAM In a wonderful neighborhood this estatesized home is ready for you. 6 Br., 3 bath, family room, sunroom, slate entry and step-down living room. Large fenced backyard…even a bit of a view. $295,900. ML252162 Linda Debord and Margo PetersenPruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY SECLUSION AT ITS BEST Home surrounded by public lands prevents any neighbors. Peaceful setting in the Deer Park foothills promises abundant wildlife with open meadows, trees, and your own pond. 6.36 acres with a unique style home that awaits your upgrades. $325,000. ML252238 Michelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SEQUIM CONDO Pristine condo and garage. Completely renovated in 2005: new cabinets, counters, doors, trim, fixtures and flooring plus new roof in 2007. 3 Br., 2 bath, plus 2 storage rooms and lots of closets. $208,000 ML252049/135283 Diann Dickey 683-3564 Professional Real Estate THIS IS A TREAT No tricks here - this beautiful 4 Br., 2.5 bath home and property has an estate feel, both private and elegant. The property is divided between manicured lawn, garden space and quiet woodlands. The spacious kitchen looks south over the big deck and a full view of the Olympic mountains. 3 bay (4 car) garage includes a large workshop. The real treat is the price. $448,000. ML252082. Jeanine Cardiff 360-565-2033 JACE The Real Estate Company

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

SINGLE LEVEL MTN VIEW HOME Custom 2,590 sf home on 2 acres. Estates water system, private well for landscaping, fruit trees and garden space, Large family/game room with separate entry and kitchenette, 2 car garage plus large shop and covered RV parking. $499,000 ML14287 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND TRICK OR TREAT! A good deal just got great. Light and bright, this 3 Br., 2 bath home has just been reduced to $185,000! Woohoo! Take advantage of the estate’s desire to sell and check this out. Built in 1990, this home has a great layout with bedrooms separated by the living areas. Nice deck off the kitchen. Plan for summer! $185,000. ML251496 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WHATTA LOTTA HOUSE Built in 2002 and remodeled in 2008, it’s brand new again. And its big! Over 2,600 sf. 3 Br., 2.5 bath with formal dining, eating nook, and lots of room in full basement. Great address. Great buy. $349,000. ML241893. Dan Blevins Carroll Realty 457-1111 WOW One of the lowest priced homes in Sunland. Thoroughly updated throughout. Laminate floors, newly painted walls/trim. Brand new appliances in kitchen. New roof and deck. Enjoy all SunLand amenities. $205,000 ML250310/23102 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Manufactured Homes

2 Br., 2 bath - Complete remodel in & out. Over 1,000 sf, very nice. Too much new to list. Must see. 55+park, near town, only $250/mo. Asking $27,500. 360-683-1652

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Manufactured Homes

For sale by owner. double wide, 3 Br., 2 full baths, all appliances, in P.T. $20,000. 457-5785.

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Lots/ Acreage

A beautiful property in Port Angeles. For sale $168,000. Located just minutes from town off of Mt Angeles Road. The 4.77 acre parcel is surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. Septic installed, electric hook up pd, city water. www.portangelesprop.com or 360-460-0572 BEAUTIFUL ACREAGE Close to Sequim, secluded and quiet, mature trees, level and southern exposure, well is in, bring an offer. $140,000. ML251642/111298 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Lots/ Acreage

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, 433 E. 1st St., P.A. No smoking/pets. 1st, last, deposit. $575 mo. 417-1688.

TRICK OR TREAT? The treat is a move in ready house with water and mountain views. The trick is buying it before someone else does. 3 Br., 3 bath, plus 2 fireplaces and a family room. Fully fenced yard and paved parking for RV or boat. $238,800. ML251695 Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016.

WEST P.A.: Cash for 30 acres, utilities. $138,000. 928-9528. WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? Bring your ideas and get started building your home with beautiful views of the Olympic Mountain, minutes to amenities of Sequim or Port Angeles, and close to Discovery Trail. Water, power and phone already on property site built or manufactured ok. $53,900. ML251546. Lori Tracey, Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

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Houses

Available Dec 1. Gorgeous 3 Bd 2.5 Ba fully furnished. Unobstructed mountain views both levels. Walking distance to Stevens MS. Rent includes lawn maintenance. Applicants must have excellent references. $1350/ mo., 6 mo lease; 1st/ last/$500 deposit. 360-452-5816 Blue Mtn: 2 yr new. 3 bd 2 ba on 5 acres, mtn view, horse ok, gar, ns, pet w/dep. $1,150. 452-2988. CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62 LAKE PLEASANT LAKEFRONT PROPERTY fully loaded 2006 5TH WHEEL w/slideout. carport, deck. DOCK, well maintained SKI BOAT 2 KAWASAKI JET SKIES. fishing. great family vacation spot or use as a nightly rental investment. seller owns local resort and will give overflow of renters. $199,000. 360-374-3118

Duplexes

P.A.: $25,000 below assessed value. Big awesome lot! City underground utilities. $41,000. 457-4004.

For Sale By Owner 3/4 acre, 5 mi. out of Forks, power, water rights, no septic, small shed for storage on site. $25,000 Call owner for location. 360-259-0569. Just over 1 acre. Very private building site boarders Olympic Discovery Trail. Great location in between Port Angeles and Sequim. $64,500 ML251889 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540. COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, no pets, fireplace, 1226 Craig Ave. $600 mo., $625 dep. 452-3423. P.A.: 1 Br. $475. Dwntown, some pets ok. 425-881-7267 P.A.: Lg. 2 Br. $625. Lg. 1 Br. $560. Now accepting pets. 4020 Newell Rd. 360-452-4524

EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747. EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. P.A. APTS & HOUSES A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 2 ba......$625 H 2 br 1 ba......$650 A 3 br 1 ba......$750 H 2 br 2 ba......$800 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 6 br 3 ba....$1700 SEQ APTS/HOUSES H 2 br 2 ba.......$925 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1250

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

NEED A RENTAL? Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com

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Houses

NEW ON MARKET Spacious and immaculate home in a community in Sequim. Lease your lot plus most utilities for $330/mo. $43,500. ML252043/134715 Diann Dickey 683-4131 John L. Scott Sequim OCEAN AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS This home has 4 Br., 2.5 baths and ocean views from all living areas. Excellent floor plan. Home, garage, RV garage, shop and orchard all on 1.6 acres on the lee side of Miller Peninsula. $599,000. ML25191 Diann Dickey 683-4131 John L. Scott Sequim P.A.: 1 Br., no pets. $600 incl. util. Credit check. 460-0575. P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 bath, garage. 3 private acres. $725 plus utilities. 452-6052. P.A.: 2 Br., 2 bath. Double car garage. $725. 457-8109. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $950. 452-1395. P.A.: 4 Br., 2 bath, shop, acreage. $1,200. 461-9287. P.A.: 535 E. 3rd St. 5 Br., 2 ba, like new. $1,200 plus dep. 460-7516, 460-6172 P.A.: Deer Park, 2 Br., 1 ba. recently remodeled mobile, 3 ac., secluded. $775, 1st, last, deposit. No inside smoking, pets? 360-460-9824. P.A.: Lg. house, 3 Br., 2 bath, 814 W. 5th St. $1,045 or $995 lease. 452-5050. P.A.: Newly updated 2 Br., fenced yard, garage. $800 mo. plus dep. 460-7254. P.A.: Residential or comm’l, 834 W. 8th, 5 Br., 3 ba, garage. $2,000. 683-9626. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 2 Br. 1 ba, in town, W/S/G incl., W/D, security system, year lease, dep. $650. 460-8978. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $800 mo. 683-4336. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $1,095 mo, last, dep. 683-0123. SEQUIM: Custom 4 Br., 2 bath, wood stove, pets ok. $1,100. 477-9678.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FENCING

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TRACTOR

KITCHENS/BATHS/DOORS

MANUFACTURED/MOBILE HOMES

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Call NOW To Advertise M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875 YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

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Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

64

Houses

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 1ba, wdstove, gar, pets ok. $950. 460-9917. SEQUIM: Guest studio in town. Sm yard, priv. $495. 683-1530. SEQUIM: Huge 1 Br., garage and storage, $700 plus utilities. 681-8455

SQM: Energy efficient 1 Br. Water view. $870. mo. 1st/last/ SD ref rqd, no pets/ smoke. 582-0637. WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Room $450 mo, utilities and cable incl. 460-4408. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, living room, share kitchen. $500, 1/2 util. 683-2017.

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Appliances

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 WAREHOUSE: Heated space. 800-8,000 sf. 360-683-6624.

BED: Sealy plush queen mattress and box spring, great shape, like new, $300/obo. 681-3299

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CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563

Furniture

Broyhill Sectional Sofa. NEW! Perfect Condition. Beautiful paprika color. Port Townsend. $1,400/ obo. 509-475-3723. DINING TABLE Beautiful dining room pedestal table, 42” diameter round, with 15” butterfly leaf, 4 leather chairs, barely used, like new, $500/ obo. P.A. 477-4838. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. LOVE SEAT $100. 808-1767. Blue. $60. 477-7834 or 452-9693 MISC: Dining room table, 73” rectangle pedestal dining table with 4 chairs, very nice set. $165/obo. 2 matching coffee tables 1 large, $50/ obo and 1 small, $40/obo. 681-4429. SOFA: Natuzzi leather love seat, beige, 1 yr. old, excellent condition, new $1,500. Will sell $550. 385-4320.

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

Clean Reconditioned APPLIANCE SALE Pacific Refrigeration, 600 E. 1st, P.A.

General Merchandise

REFRIGERATOR Small refrigerator, apt. size, works great! $65/obo. 681-4429.

SEQUIM: Share 2 Br. apt., have full run of apt. 681-8685.

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SOFA: Very nice, neutral. $195. 670-3976. TRUNDLE BED Black and gold, like new. $140. 452-6711

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General Merchandise

1943 U.S. Navy diving helmet, authentic WWII Mark V, excellent condition, serious inquiries. $8,000. 681-4218.

COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. CRAB AND SHRIMP POTS McKay, with line and floats. $100 for crab. $75 for shrimp. 360-316-9013 DOUBLE CRYPT: P.A. Memorial Park. $1,000. $25 to park for paper work. Joyce 951-835-1582. DRESSES: 5 nice prom dresses 4 size small, 1 size med, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 417-3504. FIREWOOD: $165/ cord. P.A. and Sequim. 461-1750. FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $489. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: $180 cord. P.A./Joyce. 477-8832 FIREWOOD: Fir pile, you saw & haul. $50 pickup. 683-7727. GAS GRILL: Tuscany by Altima. 3 main burners plus side, infrared, searing burners, rotisserie kit, little used. Handsome and clean. $225. 530-680-1809. Lane motion sofa and recliner, Kohler bath sinks, toilet, jet tub, ceiling fan, 30” wht 2 pnl int door. 681-3370 MISC: Aller air purifier, new HEPA/Carbon filter, $400. Hardood futon frame, like new, $175. Twin bed frame, mission style head board, no footboard, $30. 2” faux wood blinds, 48”x 72”, 46.75”x72”, $30 ea. Soft leather jacket, w/Thinsulate liner, original, exc. cond., med. $75. 385-1287.

73

General Merchandise

Leaf/Lawn Vacuum Craftsman, professional, 5.5 hp B&W engine, barely used, paid $1,100. Now $725. 681-3522. MISC: (10) 6x6 sections of chain link fencing, 1 piece with gate. $500. Extra large custom dog house, $125. 683-7661 MISC: Dial indicator, dial caliper, $20 ea. Oxy acetylene complete set, $100. Craftsman 1/2” chuck bench drill press, $110. Presto pressure cooker, large size, $25. Mercury 10 hp long shaft, low hrs., $500. 683-2761. MISC: Refrigerator, $50. 4 oak bar stools, $60. Washer/ dryer, Maytag Neptune, $600. White treadle, $100. Antique vanity, $100. Queen mattress box, headboard, $100. Lawn mower, $50. 457-8667 MISC: Satelite meter/ finder, Bird Dog, for DirecTV, Dish, etc., nearly new, $280. Metal detector, Ace 250, Garret, new, paid $225, sell $125. OBO both. 460-0430 SEAHAWK TICKETS (2) Section 337, seat 20 and 21, row T. Nov. 7, vs. Giants. $70 ea. 461-3661. Seasoned Firewood. Full cords of seasoned firewood, split and delivered. $170. 360-670-1163

74

Home Electronics

Stereo Receiver: Pioneer SX251R AM/ FM tuner, graphic equalizer, includes speakers, excellent condition. A great improvement for your stereo system at a bargain price: $60. 360-681-7053. TV: 32” Sony FD Trinitron Vega TV, with custom stand. First $300 takes it home. 683-2589

75

Musical

PIANO: Electronic digital piano. $500/ obo. 452-5127.

75

78B

Musical

VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $150. 452-6439

76

Sporting Goods

GUN: Ruger M77, 338 Winchester mag, excellent condition. $450. 460-5147. MISC: Minnkoto trolling motor, 46 lbs., $150. Honda 1000 watt generator, $450. H&R 204 Ruger Varmint rifle, $175. 360-385-7728. Necky LookshaV 17 Kayak w/Rudder. Aqua Bond Carbon adX black 230 cm paddle, PFD: Retroglide extrasport Sailing/Paddle Vest SZ: Lg/XLg, Thule Saddle racks and Bilge Pump All for Port Townsend . $1,400. 509-869-0215 SKATES: Bauer aggressive skates, black, size 11 good shape $20. 460-0845 SKS: 7.62x39 (30 cal) synthetic stock, tactical scope, semi auto, legal for hunting. $400. 457-0943 or 808-2563 cell. TREADMILL: Cardio Zone, gym quality. $250. 457-3891.

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

29th Annual Bazaar and Flea Market Find unique and must-have treasures. Breakfast and lunch made by, and benefits, Senior Nutrition. Sat., Nov. 6, 8-2:30 p.m. Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. 7th Street. 457-7004. ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 417 E. Whidby. Everything must go. MINI BAZAAR Friday, Nov. 5th, 8-3 p.m. A trove of treasures at 114 E. 6th, use back door.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

BARN’S DOOR LIQUIDATION SALE Nov. 6 & 7, 10-3 p.m., 144 Benson Rd.

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-4 p.m., 902 S. K St. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat. only, 8-3:30 p.m., 1520 W. 12th St., between H and I Streets in the alley. Lots of furniture, clothing, toys.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

COVERED GARAGE Sale: Fri. 8-4:30, Sat. 8-2 p.m., 334 Sutter Rd., just east of Bagley Creek. Tools, men’s, women’s, teen and children’s clothing, household items, wet suits.

HUGE GARAGE Sale: Sat. ONLY, 9-? 1709 E. 6th, across from McDonalds, in alley. Most stuff new in boxes! Toys, CDs, surround sound, tools, etc. Anything and everything imaginable! Including antique collectibles, antique dealers welcome. Stop and shop here for Christmas. Everything priced to sell. You don’t want to miss this rare sale! INDOOR GARAGE Sale: Fri. 8-4:30, Sat. 8-2 p.m., 334 Sutter Rd., just east of Bagley Creek. Surf boards, wet suits, tools, construction materials, men’s clothing and more.

78E

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

HUGE COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE Sat., 9-2 p.m. 4861 Sequim Dungeness Way. Name your own price items! Refreshments available! MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat, 9-1 p.m. 701 W. Anderson Road, Mains Farm area. Household, tools, antiques, furniture, and misc. SALE: 4 garages full. Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m., in SunLand, 110 San Juan Drive. SUNLAND ESTATE Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 110 Horizon View Dr. Some antiques, TV, refrigerator, sofa, other furniture, excellent quality and condition, genuine persian rugs, lots of other items and collectibles. No early birds.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 LOOKING FOR HAND CARVED HITTY DOLL Please call 417-7691 WANTED: Vintage Christmas decor. 360-928-9563

Garage Sales Sequim

ESTATE SALE: Whole household must go! Too many items to list, all items good quality. Located in SunLand. Fri.-Sat.Sun., 8-4. North on Sequim Ave., right on Kitchen-Dick, right on Casalery, right on Hurricane Ridge Dr., 3rd house on left (167). Please don’t block driveways when parking. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-5 p.m., 173 Sequoia Ln., off Taylor Cutoff. Household, knickknacks, tools, table saw, metal band saw, air compressor, furniture.

82

82

Pets

AKC BRUSSELS GRIFFON 2 males, 1 female, 1st shots, wormed, pictures available. $750. 360-791-1937 AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. Litter of 2 male/3 female puppies. Tails docked and dewclaws removed. Black/Silver and Salt/Pepper coloring. First Shots. $500 each. Call 360460-7119. Chihuahua Puppies. 4 purebred Chihuahua puppies. 2 male and 2 female, ready on 11/19. $250-$400. Call 360-670-3906.

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

BEEF: 1/4 or 1/2, Scottish Highland grass fed, cut, wrapped to order. $2/lb. Call Jeff 360-301-9109 CYPRESS: 6’-7’, $13 ea. G&G Farms, 95 Clover Lane, off Taylor-Cutoff. 683-8809.

Pets

PUPPIES: Shih-Tzu, 2 females $350 ea. 2 males, $300 ea. Shots, vet checked. 582-9382, 460-3319

83

Farm Animals

NUBIAN: 2 does, $125 ea. 1 Wether, $75. Age 5+ mo. 360-385-6327

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE: 16 yr. old gelding Morgan, awesome trail horse, loads, clips, stands. $500. 461-3580.

CHIHUAHUA: 1 female, 2 males, short hair. $350 ea. 683-6597

85

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPS $700. 457-7013.

TRACTOR: John Deere Model H. Resotred. $3,200. 457-3120

FREE: Cat. 3 yr. old, needs lots of attention and love, great for older person. Spayed and has all shots. 417-2130.

Farm Equipment

FREE: Cat. Light colored Siamese, female, spayed, declawed, 10 years old, to good home. 452-7318 FREE: Dog. 2 yr. old Lab/Shepherd mix, to good home. 417-6939 Miniature American Eskimo, 6 mo. old male, neutered already prepaid, all shots, indoor/outdoor kennels. $400. 460-7952 NEWFOUNDLAND Male, 7 mo., papers, neutered, housebroken, shots, microchipped. $700. 360-808-1480

81 82 83 84 85

C7

Toy Australian Shepherds- Two femalesblack tri and two blue merle males and one black tri male. Tails docked, dew claws removed and will have first shots and vet checked. Reserve your precious pup today. Will be ready at Thanksgiving Time. $450. Call 360-374-5151. Walker Puppies. 4 female/4 males 2 black and tan, 5 reds and one brown and white. 360-770-0332 or 360-670-6084.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirrors/ windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, exc. inside/out, all new brakes. $42,000/ trade. 460-8325. GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383. SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

WINDOW/CARPET CLEANING

REMODELING

HOME SERVICES

COMPUTERS

RESTORATION

DIRT WORK

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

MOLE CONTROL/PRUNING

RENOVATION/REPAIR

ASBESTOS Call NOW To Advertise

LANDSCAPING

HYPNOTHERAPY

PAINTING

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

ELECTRICAL

COMPUTERIZED ALIGNMENT

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

CARPET CLEANING

TREE SERVICE

Call NOW To Advertise Here 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

0A5101701

SERVICE DIRECTORY


Classified

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010

ACROSS 1 Home of Brigham Young University 6 __ Mahal 9 Fat substitute brand in some potato chips 14 Not loaded 15 Ambient music pioneer 16 Swindler with a scheme named for him 17 Hemlock, for one 19 Grain disease 20 See 50-Down 22 Covet 23 Battery, bond or baseball club designation 24 Belgrade’s land 27 Libel and slander disputes are part of it 32 See 50-Down 34 Brit. record co. 35 Spanish pronoun 36 Restful resort 37 Prayer opener 38 Old-fashioned get-together 39 See 50-Down 43 “Beanz meanz Heinz,” e.g. 45 Truck capacity 46 AIDS-fighting drug 47 __ dire: juror examination 48 See 50-Down 54 Foreign 56 “The Dick Van Dyke Show” regular 57 __ Nast 58 Winter hazard 59 Family nickname 60 Tolerated 61 Gives the goahead 62 Tart fruit DOWN 1 Minute segment of a min. 2 Wander 3 Upper, in Ulm 4 Spinal column component 5 Like some farming

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. JEWISH WEDDINGS

B I B L E R A C O N T R A C T By Allan E. Parrish

6 Minute 7 Fresh way to start 8 “Help Me” vocalist Mitchell 9 Alfresco 10 Maker of EverPure shampoo 11 Former Caltech sr., perhaps 12 __ dye: chemical coloring 13 Little thing to pick 18 Competitor 21 Basilica section 24 Ancient queendom 25 Let up 26 Customary ceremonies 27 It covers the Hill 28 Da Vinci’s lang. 29 On the up and up 30 It started as Standard Oil of Indiana 31 Expand 33 John McCain’s alma mater: Abbr. 37 Revamp

11/4/10

L G N I H T O L C O I N H E E

U N E K E D A B M O H A R R L

B I G H E G A T S C I O E E K

© 2010 Universal Uclick

T K N D A D N S I R O L W M O

Solution: 10 letters

H A I E C V S I S M I I C O O

G E H A M A Z O N G N H O N B

I R S K L D N T I E U T P Y V

www.wonderword.com

L B U G R S N O I P D R E S E

E R R H H I U I P M A D T N I

R A C O S S B A B Y I A A D L

U B W S I S H T A R Y I L L A

S B U E W D N A B S U H P O G

I I H A B U T E K A R I N G E

Join us on Facebook

N I H S U D D I K R E N Z I L

11/4

Badeken, Bible, Bind, Birkhat, Booklet, Breaking, Bride, Canopy, Care, Ceremony, Chairs, Chuppah, Clothing, Coin, Contract, Crushing, Erusin, Gladdening, Glass, Gold, Hamazon, Hosea, Husband, Ketubah, Kiddushin, Krenzi, Legal, Light bulb, Mitzvah, Mohar, Nissuin, Plate, Pray, Rabbi, Religious, Ring, Room, Show, Shtar, Stage, Stay, Veil, Wine, Wish Yesterday’s Answer: Baroness

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

SLURY ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ADURF (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

39 Hoodwinked 40 “The X-Files” extras: Abbr. 41 Ridd’s love, in a Blackmore romance 42 They’re hard to figure out 44 Rio Grande city 47 Workshop gadgets 48 Skid row figure

11/4/10

49 Charlie’s Angels, e.g. 50 Clue for 20-, 32-, 39- and 48Across 51 “Deal __ Deal” 52 Lo-cal 53 Bygone Tunisian rulers 54 Summer coolers, briefly 55 Used car site

BRUMEN

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

C8

SHUBLE Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: A Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) DOUBT INDOOR SEPTIC Jumbles: GROIN Answer: Why some coffee tastes like mud — IT’S “GROUND”

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 92313082

305 W. 1st St. P.O. Box 1330 | Port Angeles, WA 98362


ClassifiedAutomotive

Peninsula Daily News

Oldsmobile has rough idle Dear Doctor: I own a 2002 the auto doc Oldsmobile Bravada. I have been experiencing a even if you are very rough idle. Junior not a AAA It is so bad at times that it Damato member, and shakes the floorboard and rear ask for a AAAwindow. Approved I had a service and tuneup, repair shop in but the mechanics told me they your area. were not able to duplicate the There is problem. battery voltage Any idea where to start on drain when finding a cause? Donna the key is shut Dear Donna: An engine off. roughness issue is usually caused Over the from either an ignition misfire or years, I have an EGR valve that is stuck partly open, which is common on seen hood, truck and glove box lights, power seat and door lock this engine. Another possibility is an inter- issues. Under the hood, a faulty altermittent vacuum leak. nator can draw current when the engine is off and still recharge Battery dies the battery when the engine is Dear Doctor: I own a 2003 running. Buick LeSabre that I purchased These problems are not too new. hard to find. It has had an ongoing problem The technician should also with the battery going dead after check on the Identifix and Alla few days if I let it sit and don’t data websites to view informastart it. tion. I have replaced the battery and some electrical parts over Corvette rarity the years. Dear Doctor: I have a 1998 My son has to come over and Chevy Corvette with the LS1 use a jumper to start the car for 5.7L engine, automatic transmisme. sion, traction control and active What do you suggest? Florhandling. ence The ECTBM module is bad. Dear Florence: The first step is to find a qualified techni- My mechanic can’t find a replacement, and GM has discontinued cian. it, and we can’t find a rebuilder. Call your local AAA office,

Thursday, November 4, 2010

C9

Car of the Week

Any advice? Bruce Dear Bruce: We use a company called BBA remanufacturing out of Taunton, Mass. You can also try Mid America Corvette. There are also many salvage yards that specialize in Corvette parts.

Required maintenance Dear Doctor: I have my 2008 Jeep Wrangler serviced at the dealership. I only use the 4WD in the snow. Every year, or 12,000 miles, the service adviser recommends service on the front/rear differentials. Since I don’t use the 4WD that much, why do I have to service the differentials? Same situation with the throttle body. My Wrangler now has 25,000 miles and I spent about $1,400 in two years just to have these items serviced. Is it worth it? Sam Dear Sam: Your Jeep requires maintenance that is listed in the manual.

________

Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

2011 Mercedes-Benz E550 Cabriolet BASE PRICE: $56,850 for E350 Cabriolet; $64,800 for E550 Cabriolet. AS TESTED: $76,765. TYPE: Front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, four-passenger, subcompact, luxury convertible. ENGINE: 5.5-liter, double overhead cam, 90-degree V-8. MILEAGE: 15 mpg (city), 22 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: 130 mph. LENGTH: 185 inches. WHEELBASE: 108.7 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 4,048 pounds. BUILT AT: Germany. OPTIONS: Premium package 2 (includes navigation system, 8-gigabyte music register, rearview camera, headlight washers, key-free entry and start, windscreen, Harman/Kardon stereo, Sirius satellite radio, heated and ventilated front seats) $6,450; Distronic Plus with parking guidance and PreSafe braking $2,650; appearance package (includes 18-inch AMG-branded wheels, multicontour front seats, sport steering wheel, stainless steel pedals) $1,270; Capri Blue metallic paint $720. DESTINATION CHARGE: $875. The Associated Press

0B405426

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS 2005 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GT SEDAN

2004 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 QUAD CAB SLT

2000 FORD F550 CAB/ CHASSIS 4X4 DUALLY

2000 FORD EXPEDITION XL 4X4

2.0L 4 CYL, 5 SPD, ALLOYS, SUNROOF, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, LEATHER, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT & SIDE IMPACT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $7,625! 31 MPG HWY, SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! GREAT VALUE! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY & SAVE!

5.7L HEMI V8, AUTO, 20” ALLOYS, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD/CASS W/INFINITY SOUND, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $18,355! ONLY 77K MILES! THIS TRUCK IS SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TO SAVE BIG BUCKS ON YOUR NEXT TRUCK!

TRIED & TRUE 7.3L POWERSTROKE V8 TURBO-DIESEL, 6 SPD MAN TRANS, 17,500 GVWR RATED, GRILLE GUARD, DUAL BATTS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, AM/FM, VINYL, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $13,905! ONLY 96K MILES! WHAT A COMBO! 7.3L, 6 SPD, 4X4 & DUALLY! THIS TRUCK IS READY FOR SOME SERIOUS WORK! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS, YOUR PRE-OWNED TRUCK HQ!

5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, ALLOYS, GOOD RUBBER, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, ADJ PEDALS, VINYL, CASS, AC, TILT, CRUISE, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $7,915! ONLY 85K MILES! MIRROR-LIKE BLACK PAINT! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY & SAVE!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2006 FORD TAURUS SE

2008 CHEVROLET COBALT LT COUPE

2002 FORD E-350 SUPER DUTY EXT CARGO VAN

2006 DODGE SPRINTER 2500 HIGH CEILING CARGO VAN

ECONOMICAL 3.0L V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, ONLY 30K MILES! IMMACULATE 1 OWNER CORPORATE LEASE RETURN, NONSMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! NEAR-NEW COND!

VERY ECONOMICAL 2.2L 4 CYL AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SIDE AIRBAGS, REAR SPOILER, 39K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/100 WARR, VICTORY RED, JUST REDUCED!

5.4L V8, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/ CASS, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, SAFETY BULKHEAD, NICE BIN PKG, HEAVY DUTY 1-TON CHASSIS, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORPORATE LEASE RETURN V.I.N.S POSTED AT

VERY ECONOMICAL 2.7L MERCEDES TURBO-DIESEL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CASS, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, TOW PKG, BULKHEAD, PWR INVERTER, PWR LADDER RACK, ONLY 52K MILES! VERY NICE 1 OWNER CORPORATE LEASE RETURN, NONSMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! EASY TO DRIVE, VERY LOW OPERATING COST & LONGEVITY MAKES THIS A VERY DESIRABLE ADDITION TO YOUR BUSINESS! HARD-TO-FIND!

$4,995

GRAY MOTORS

$8,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$14,995

GRAY MOTORS

$9,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$10,995

GRAY MOTORS

$8,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$4,995

GRAY MOTORS

$22,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

2001 SUZUKI 800 MARAUDER

LOCAL TRADE, VZ800, ONLY 12K MILES! VIN#102425 HOME

OF THE 5 MINUTE APPROVAL!

COMPETITIVE FINANCE RATES!

$2,950

Expires 11/10/10

WE FINANCE! 5 Minute Approvals! 819 E. 1st St. Port Angeles, WA

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

2005 HARLEYDAVIDSON XL1200

2004 HARLEY-DAVIDSON FLHRI ROAD KING

5 SPD, LOTS OF EXTRAS, ONLY 13K MILES! HOME “0” OF THE VIN#462577 DOWN

88 CU IN, 5 SPD, STAGE 1 KIT, TONS OF ACCESSORIES, ONLY 15K MILES! COME 7 SEE US MUST SEE! HARLEYS FIRST! VIN#703797 IN STOCK!

BUY HERE, PAY HERE!

FINANCING AVAILABLE! CALL FOR DETAILS!

$5,950

Expires 11/10/10

WE FINANCE! 5 Minute Approvals! 819 E. 1st St. Port Angeles, WA

$11,950

Expires 11/10/10

WE FINANCE! 5 Minute Approvals! 819 E. 1st St. Port Angeles, WA

www.reidandjohnson.com

2007 HARLEY-DAVIDSON SOFTAIL

FXSTC, 96 CU IN, 6 SPD,

200MM REAR TIRE, WE BUY HARLEYS, SCREAMIN’ EAGLE WE ATVS & FINANCE EXHAUST DIRT BIKES! EVERYONE VIN#069101

$11,950

Expires 11/10/10

WE FINANCE! 5 Minute Approvals! 819 E. 1st St. Port Angeles, WA

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information


C10

Classified

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

2007 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID

2005 TOYOTA CAMRY SE

1998 TOYOTA AVALON XL

2005 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LS 4X4

1.3L 4 CYL W/HYBRID ELEC ENG, CVT AUTO, LOADED! LT MET GREEN IN EXCELL SHAPE W/TAN CLOTH IN GREAT COND! SPOTLESS 2 OWNER CARFAX! CD W/AUX INPUT, CRUISE, TILT, F&R SIDE AIRBAGS, REAR SPOILER, ALLOYS, LOCAL TRADE-IN, OVER 50 MPG! VERY NICE LITTLE CIVIC @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

V6, 3.3L VVT-I V6, AUTO, LOADED! SILVER IN EXCELL COND W/BLACK LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX W/EVERY SERVICE RECORD SINCE NEW! PWR DRV SEAT, DUAL HTD SEATS, MOONROOF, 6 DISC W/JBL PREM STEREO, CRUISE, TILT, TINTED WINDOWS, F&R SIDE AIRBAGS, FACT 17” ALLOYS! THOUSANDS LESS THAN KBB @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

3.0L DOHC 24V V6, AUTO, LOADED! SABLE PEARL MET IN GREAT COND W/TAN CLOTH IN EXCELL SHAPE! SPOTLESS 2 OWNER CARFAX W/25 SERVICE RECORDS! DUAL PWR SEATS, CASS W/PREM SOUND, TILT, AC, DUAL FRT & SIDE AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, GREAT CAR @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

74K ORIG MILES! 4.2L VORTEC I6, AUTO, LOADED, WHITE IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN EXCELL SHAPE! CD, DUAL CLIM CTRLS, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL AIRBAGS, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, TOW PKG, ALLOYS W/70% TOYO RUBBER! EXCELL LITTLE 4X4 TRAILBLAZER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$10,995

$11,995

$4,995

$10,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2003 CHEVROLET S10 LS EXT CAB 4X4 3DR

2003 GMC YUKON SLT 4X4

2003 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON

2004 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S SEDAN

50K ORIG MILES! 4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, LOADED! WHITE IN SUPERB COND W/BLACK CLOTH IN EXCELL SHAPE! SPOTLESS CARFAX! CD, CRUISE, TILT, SLIDER, PRIV GLASS, MATCHING LEER CANOPY, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, ALLOYS W/NEW LES SCHWAB RUBBER! ONE VERY NICE, EXTREMELY CLEAN LITTLE S10 @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

64K ORIG MILES! 5.3L VORTEC V8, AUTO, LOADED! DK MET RED IN EXCELL SHAPE W/GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT COND! SPOTLESS CARFAX! DUAL PWR HTD SEATS, CD/CASS W/BOSE SOUND, REAR AC, 3RD SEAT, SIDE AIRBAGS, CRUISE, TILT, ONSTAR, RUNNING BOARDS, FACT DVD SYS, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, TOW PKG! $2,400 LESS THAN KBB @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

57K ORIG MILES! 2.5L FLAT 4 CYL, 5 SPD, LOADED! GREEN/GOLD IN GREAT SHAPE! SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX! CD, AC, CRUISE, TILT, WOOD TRIM, ROOF RACK, TINTED WINDOWS, PWR DRV SEAT, ALLOYS, VERY NICE LITTLE OUTBACK @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

2.5L DOHC 16V 4 CYL, AUTO, LOADED! MET GRAY IN GREAT COND W/BLACK CLOTH IN EXCELL SHAPE! SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX! CD, PWR DRV SEAT, CRUISE, TILT W/ INTEGRATED CTRLS, 16” ALLOYS, LOCAL TRADE! EXTREMELY CLEAN LITTLE ALTIMA @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$10,995

$16,995

$10,995

$8,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

1998 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LXi AWD

2007 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

1998 TOYOTA TACOMA SR5 EXT CAB 4X4

2006 FORD TAURUS SEL

3.8L V6, AUTO, LOADED! LAVENDER IN GREAT COND W/2 TONE LT/DK GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! SPOTLESS 2 OWNER CARFAX! DUAL PWR SEATS, CD/CASS W/INFINITY SOUND, REAR AC, 3RD SEAT, QUAD SEATS, DUAL CLIM, PRIV GLASS, DUAL SLIDING DRS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, REAL NICE, WELL-KEPT T&C @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

V6, 39K ORIG MILES! 3.5L V6, AUTO, LOADED! SILVER MET IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN EXCELL SHAPE! SPOTLESS 2 OWNER CARFAX! CD, CRUISE, TILT W/INTEGRATED CTRLS, AC, DUAL FRT & SIDE AIRBAGS, 16” ALLOYS, LOCAL TRADE-IN! $2,500 LESS THAN KBB @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

2.7L DOHC 4 CYL, AUTO, GREEN IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN EXCELL SHAPE! SPOTLESS CARFAX! PIONEER CD, DUAL AIRBAGS, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, CRUISE, TILT, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, AC, 15” ALLOYS, LOCAL TRADE! ONE GREAT TOYOTA 4X4 TRUCK @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

76K ORIG MILES! 3.0L V6, AUTO, LOADED! BLUE IN EXCELL SHAPE W/GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT COND! SPOTLESS CARFAX! PWR SEAT, MOONROOF, CD, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL AIRBAGS, WOOD TRIM, AC, ALLOYS W/70% BFG RUBBER! WE ARE A WHOPPING $3,000 LESS THAN KBB @ OUR LOW NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$4,995

$9,995

$8,495

$7,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2000 FORD TAURUS SES

2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC

2003 PONTIAC VIBE

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE, PAY HERE! EST. 1996 OFFERING MILITARY DISCOUNTS! THE LOWEST INHOUSE FINANCING RATES! BE APPROVED IN MINUTES! BLACK, V6, AUTO, GRAY CLOTH, AC, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, 115K MILES

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE, PAY HERE! EST. 1996 OFFERING MILITARY DISCOUNTS! THE LOWEST INHOUSE FINANCING RATES! 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH! V6, AC, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, TOO MUCH TO LIST!

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE, PAY HERE! EST. 1996 OFFERING MILITARY DISCOUNTS! THE LOWEST INHOUSE FINANCING RATES! NO PENALTY FOR EARLY PAY OFF! 4 CYL, 5 SPD, BLACK CLOTH, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, SUNROOF

$5,195

$6,495

$6,495

WE FINANCE

WE FINANCE

WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

2005 TOYOTA ECHO 2 DOOR

(360) 417-3788

(360) 417-3788

2005 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX

WE

FINANCE!

4 CYL, AUTO, AC, PWR STEERING, PWR BRAKES, STEREO & MORE! CLEAN CARFAX! WE FINANCE!

$4,995

Expires 11/13/10

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

3.3L V6, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS, & SEAT, AM/FM/CD, QUAD SEATING W/STO-NGO MIDDLE & REAR SEATS, ROOF RACK, PRIV GLASS & MUCH MORE!

$7,995

Expires 11/13/10

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information

0B405425

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

FLAT BED: ‘73 Ford F600 with liftgate, needs work. $1,000. 457-3120 TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843

93

Marine

Aluminum 17 ft., C/C, 2 Mercury 4 strokes. $8,000 firm. 452-2779 APOLLO: ‘77 20’. Must see! Very clean in and out. Rebuilt 302 IB OMC OB. Fresh water cooled, hydraulic trim tabs, head, galley. Priced to sell. $3,800/obo. 681-0411 BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887 BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698 BOAT STANDS $50 each. 683-8142. BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176 JET SKI: ‘96 ZXI750. Low hours. $2,600/ obo. 928-3450.

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles. LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $7,500. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘01 Sportster LX. Fuel injected 350, great shape, only 240 hours. $17,000. 808-6402. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $14,500/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 RAIDER: ‘07 24’ aluminum, well equipped. $53,500. 683-5120 RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480 REINELL: ‘95 19.5’ V6 I/O. EZ-Load galvanized trailer, half cutty. $4,800/obo. 417-8833 SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 30’ sloop. Yanmar diesel, low hrs., VHF radio, depth and knot meter, working galley and head, color TV, CD player, wheel steering, sleeps 5. $10,500. 457-0684. SAILBOAT: 16’ classic daysailer. Very stable, very good condition, a beauty, trailer and more incl. $10,000/obo. 360-582-1683 SANGER: ‘76 Super Jet. Built 455 Olds, Hardin in water exhaust, seats 5, upholstery good, dog house fair, turnkey ready. $2,500/obo. 681-3838

Sea going sailing canoe. Project wood boat partially restored, all parts including good sail, mast, tiller,dagger board, lines, mast and rudder with all fittings except for oars. 17 feet long with a wide beam. $500. 360-683-6575 or 360-808-5200

93

Marine

RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. WANTED: Boat trailer with tandem axle for 26’ 1 ton Keel sail boat, power boat trailer ok. Call Norm Stevens at 379-6960

94

Motorcycles

94

Motorcycles

YAMAHA: ‘03 V-Star 1100. Excellent condition, windshield, bags, air kit, crash bars, 15K mi. $4,300. 452-7184. YAMAHA: ‘09 250 Star. Under 500 mi., mint cond. $3,500. 765-4775, leave msg

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054 BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334 BUELL 06’ LIGHTNING 984 XB95X, 6 speed, Vtwin, made by Harley, only 956 miles! VIN#202009 $4,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘08 1200C. Like new. $8,295/obo. 452-6448 Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670 HARLEY: ‘02 1200 Sportser. Black, lots of chrome. Saddle bags, detachable windshield, beautiful bike! $5,995. 360-461-0961 HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895.

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677 HONDA: ’06 Shadow VLX 600. Saddle bags, windshield, custom paint, lots of chrome, 1,800 mi., super clean, must see. $4,000/obo. 452-5813 HONDA: ‘04 CRF50. Christmas Special! New training wheels, kids helmet never used. $800. 360-417-9531 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,700. 461-1202 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290. KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘04 Honda 250 EX Sportrax. Low mi. $2,200. 683-2107. QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki 250. Like brand new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210 RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIKE: ‘08 Suzuki Burgman 400 CC. Looks and runs like new. Very stable. $6,500/obo. 683-6079 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

95

Recreational Vehicles

‘01 Monaco Diplomat LE (luxury edition). 40’ diesel pusher, 330 Cummings with Banks power pack, 6 speed Allison trans, 2 slides, electric power awnings, 2 TVs, AM/FM CD VCR, sat dome, like new washer and dryer unit, all new Michelin tires, 7.5 KW generator, leveling system, battery charger with inverter, beige leather interior, real tile floors, Corian counters, well maintained, always garaged, beautiful coach, 30K miles, non-smoker, no pets. $79,000. 681-4218.

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914

5TH WHEEL: ‘05 34’ Montana Mountaineer 348RLS. 3 slides. Great condition. Extended warranty. 50 amp, central heat/air. Kelley Blue Book is $32,000. Asking $24,900/obo. Call Steve at 360-477-3949

5TH WHEEL: 2007 Mckenzie Lakota 33SKT 4 SEASON. 3 slides, no smoke/ pets, dual Euro recliners, king bed, large corner shower, washer/dryer closet, large wardrobe closets, central vac, more than adequate storage, very nice little one bedroom on wheels. Over 11,000 under dealer value at $37,900. elgreengos@hotmail.com for more pictures or come see. 683-7411 or 477-5621. 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 25’ Alpenlite DL. Gas stove/oven, electric/gas freezer, fridge, air, microwave, antenna, AM/FM cassette stereo, roof ladder, storage, new tires, Hijacker Ultraslide hitch with mounting brackets, Super Shade awning, ONAN gen. set, low hours, very good condition. $5,000. 360-452-3402 Affordable Home 32’ Royal Coachman, park model, very clean, good shape. $5,500. 457-6540. ARCTIC CAT ‘95 900 JET SKI Tigerhshark, third seat, low hours! Year end blowout! Like new! VIN#38E595 $2,450 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Bounder diesel pusher. Loaded. $95,000/obo. 360-460-0432 MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘89 21’ Winnebago Warrior. New tires and refrigerator. $8,000. 360-681-7614 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162.

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $15,500. 457-7097.

4 Wheel Drive

MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625

CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292

MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itasca Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, mech. perfect, serviced, ready to roll. $20,500. 452-2148.

DODGE: ‘88 3/4 ton long bed. $850/obo. 417-8833

TRAILER: ‘00 24’ SandPiper By Forest River. Built in the Northwest, for the Northwest, w/queen bed up front, sofa & dining areas convert to bed, awning. In Sequim. $8,000. 602-615-6887 TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $13,000. 477-3695. TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504 TRAILER: ‘94 40x10 Woodland Park. 2 slide outs, micro, W/D, air, full length porch with metal awning, refrigerator ice maker. $10,500. 425-776-5816 or 206-853-5546 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177.

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

97

TRAILER: ‘88 32’ Aljo Alliance. Everything works, good condition. $3,500/obo. 457-7600 WANTED: Late model 17’ Spirit Deluxe Casita travel trailer. 360-531-2465

96

Parts/ Accessories

TIRES: 4 Studded tires, mounted on Ford wheels, P2195/ 70 R14, excellent condition, $100/obo. Firestone Firehawk SZ50 P215/50 ZR17 low profile, like new, mounted on 10 spoke Ralex wheels, retail $2,000, asking $400. 928-3493.

97

4 Wheel Drive

BUICK: ‘04 Rainier. V8, AWD, leather, 87K, premium sound, wheels, all power. $12,800. 460-3037 CHEV ‘06 TRAILBLAZER 4X4 6 cylinder, auto, LS package, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD, privacy glass, roof rack, tow package, alloy wheels and more! Expires 11-610. $9,995 We Finance. Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHEV ‘94 SUBURBAN 4X4 5.7 liter, V8, third seat, auto, loaded! VIN#352574 $3,450 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 CHEV ‘99 K3500 CREW CAB DUALLY 4X4 7.4 liter Vortec V8, aftermarket intake, throttle body spacer, dual batteries, good rubber, running boards, bedliner, tow package, trailer brake controller, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seats, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags, only 65,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Classic design with the updated interior! Save big bucks over a diesel version! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘02 Trailblazer LTZ. Low mi., all power, air, leather, new tires/brakes, Bose audio & more. Low book. $9,250. 460-4765 CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362 CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713. CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512. FORD ‘95 F-250 EXTRA CAB 4X4 7.3 liter, power stroke diesel with 70 hp chip, rebuilt auto trans, XLT package, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM and cassette, warn hubs, K&N filter, alloy wheels, tow package and more! Expires 11-6-10. $6,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

FORD: ‘09 F150 4x4. XLT super cab, 15K mi. $26,500. 360-765-4599 FORD: ‘79 Bronco. Full size, ‘351’ Cleveland, good body. $2,000. 797-3436. FORD: ‘85 Bronco. Sat. radio, 33” tires. $1,300. 640-8996. GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 GMC ‘03 YUKON SLT 4X4 One owner, loaded, includes 5.3 liter, V8, auto, dual air and heat, third row seating, leather interior, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and dual power heated seats, adjustable pedals, power sunroof, AM/FM CD with 6 disc stacker, OnStar, roof rack, privacy glass, electronic stability control, running boards, tow package, alloy wheels, remote entry and more! One week clearance special. Expires 11-6-10. $9,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com GMC: ‘96 Sonoma. Two color, extra cab. $3,800/obo or trade for equal value SUV/ car. 360-460-3756. GMC: ‘00 4X4 SLT. Club Cab 4X4,Silver/gray, tow, loaded, 112K, new tires, 5.3L, pwr door, windows, mirrors, remote entry, cruise, auto. $9,500. 360-683-3744 ISUZU: ‘91 Trooper. Runs good, new tires. $1,500/obo. 670-6041 MAZDA: ‘03 Tribute ES. Loaded, leather, great shape, 62K, towing pkg. $10,510. 928-9527 NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $19,000. Call 360-670-1400 TOYOTA: ‘96 4-Runner, SR5, loa-ded, gold and wood package, sunroof, Pioneer sound, 12disc changer, 154k miles, $7,000/obo. 360-417-0223

WHY BUY NEW? Custom Chev '93 Silverado set to tow! 16K ORIG MILES ext cab 4x4 longbed w/8,600 GVR. Classic 454 gas engine. Lots of extras! Flawless in & out. Pics & details online. $10,000. 360-461-6060

98

Pickups/Vans

BOX TRUCK: ‘00 GMC. 12’ box, runs great. $10,500/obo. 582-9006 CHEV ‘03 S-10 LS 3 DOOR EXTENDED CAB 4.3 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, privacy glass, tow package, spray on bedliner, alloy wheels, only 52,000 miles, factory sport suspension package, history, spotless Carfax report. Immaculate local truck, non-smoker. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV ‘99 VENTURE LT VAN 3.4 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, roof rack, keyless entry, privacy glass, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, power sliding door, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, conditioning, rear audio and climate controls, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Only 72,000 miles! Loaded with options! Convenient power sliding door! Stop be Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘05 Suburban. Excellent, 1/2 ton. $16,800. 681-5403 CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton. ‘350’ V8, auto, nice. $2,000. 681-7632. CHEV: ‘02 Venture LT. Low mi., excellent. $6,500. 452-8477. CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $7,000/obo. 457-7097

98

Pickups/Vans

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2010

98

Pickups/Vans

CHRYSLER ‘08 TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING EDITION One owner and loaded, includes 3.8 V6, 6 speed auto, front and rear air and heat, power windows, locks, mirrors, dual power heated seats, power sliding side doors and tailgate, leather interior with sto-n-go quad seating, hard disk drive controls, AM/FM CD stacker plus MP3 player, back-up sensors and camera, electronic traction and stability control, dual rear DVD players with headsets, Homelink and satellite radio ready, privacy glass, roof rack, premium alloy wheels, remote entry and more! Expires 11-6-10. $21,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. HONDA: ‘97 Odyssey. Clean inside and out, meticulously maintained, $3,200/obo. 457-4577 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486.

DODGE ‘10 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, Homelink, overhead console, side airbags, dual power sliding doors, 7 passenger, quad seats, stow and go seating, privacy glass, luggage rack, alloy wheels, keyless entry, fog lamps, 34,000 miles, balance of factory warranty, non-smoker. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

99

DODGE ‘98 RAM 2500 CLUB CAB LONGBED LARAMIE 5.9 liter 24 valve Cummins diesel, auto, chrome wheels, chrome running boards, matching canopy, tow package, 4 opening doors, power windows, locks, and mirrors, power drivers seat, leather, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, compass/temperature displace, dual front airbags. This truck is in very nice original shape! Clean no accident Carfax! Sparkling clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘95 Grand Caravan SE. 43K with lift and scooter. $5,000. 457-4837 leave message. DODGE: ‘05 Grand Caravan SE. 86K, good condition. Trailer hitch. $7,000. 460-0351 DODGE: ‘91 Cargo Van. Runs excellent, dependable. $850/ obo. 360-683-7103. FORD ‘99 E-350 SUPERDUTY 1-TON EXTENDED CARGO VAN Powerful 6.8 liter V10, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette, power locks, keyless entry, safety bulkhead, nice BIN package, only 78,000 miles, heavy duty 1ton chassis, 9.400 lb G.V. W. Very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. Ideal for the business on a budget. $6,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157 GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 NISSAN: ‘86 EX cab. 2.4L eng., good mpg, auto w/over drive, power steer., Pioneer stereo, rear jump seats, dark tint, 95,354 orig. mi., good tires/shocks, well taken care of, senior owned, bought locally. Must see to appreciate. $3,800 firm. 461-2709

NISSAN: ‘86 Kingcab. 4 cyl, 5 sp, new batt, alt, tires. 27 mpg. $1,600. 452-7439. PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773 TOYOTA: ‘98 Tacoma. 5 speed 2WD, X Cab, great tires, new brakes, bed liner, canopy. $5,050. Call 360-452-6965

Cars

BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: 1951 Coupe DeVille. 46,600 original miles, powerful, great driving car. Nice chrome, paint & upholstery, WW tires, Auto, V8, Sequim, $27,900. 360-683-3385 Rrobert169@Qwest. net CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-797-4497 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817

CHEV: ‘78 Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition. Fully restored interior and exterior. Silver twotone paint with sport striping. L48 automatic. Runs excellent. $18,500. 425-888-4306 or 425-941-4246 CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649. CHEV: ‘02 Monte Carlo SS. White with leather interior, sunroof, and all the extras. 27K orig. miles. $12,000/obo. 360-301-1854 or magiejt@yahoo.com CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $6,995/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHRYSLER: ‘04 Sebring LXI Convertible. Gold, leather, beautiful condition. 74K mi. $6,000 firm. 360-457-4020 CHRYSLER: ‘86 LeBaron. 4 cyl eng., auto, new head gasket, front and rear brakes, rear brake cylinders, right front caliper, outer boot. $450. 385-2304.

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 CLASSIC: ‘59 Cadillac model 62, 4 door hard top, red, good shape. $14,000. 360-683-7640 FORD ‘05 FOCUS ZX3 SE HATCHBACK 2D 2.0 liter 4 cylinder, 5 speed, aftermarket alloy wheels, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows, locks, and mirrors, 6 CD MP3 player, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $9,970! Sparkling clean inside and out! Only 49,000 miles! 32 mpg! Stop by Gray Motors today and save! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514 FORD ‘05 MUSTANG COUPE 4.0 liter, V6, 5 speed, air, tilt, power package, 65K miles. VIN#149983 $9,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 FORD: ’62 Thunderbird Coupe. Mostly all restored, approx. $30,000 put into it. $15,900/obo. 460-0401, 582-9597 FORD: ‘98 Mustang convertible. 3.8 V6, 73,000 mi., power locks-trunk-left front seat, power top, leather seats, sharp car! $8,500/ obo. 457-6156. FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403 FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $3,000/ obo. 683-2542. GEO: ‘93 Storm. Runs great. $2,500/obo. 775-9612 HONDA: ‘06 Civic. 67,000 mi., 2 door coupe, clean, white with black/ gray interior. $10,000/obo 460-0845 HONDA: ‘88 Accord. 2 door, auto, $1,800/ obo. 452-8663. LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272 LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $3,600. 452-9693 eves. MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $12,000/obo 206-375-5204 MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $4,500/ obo. 582-1292.

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘89 Cougar. Hobby stock race car, fully loaded, seat belts, window net, ready to race. $1,000/obo. 477-9602 MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062. MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062.

99

C11

Cars

OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909 SATURN: ‘01. 60K miles good condition Blue 4 door 5 speed stick CD player w/MP3 playback $2,300. 360-565-8104 SUBARU ‘08 OUTBACK WAGON Economical 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, heated seats, keyless entry, luggage rack, alloy wheels, fog lamps. Only 19,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/60 warranty, very very clean local trade, non-smoker. $19,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

SUBARU: ‘05 STI Black STI with tinted windows and silver BBS wheels. Stock except for headers, down pipe and complete stainless steel exhaust and muffler. Manual boost controller and front and rear alum skid plates. Tuned on a 4 wheel dyno and produced 300 hp and 364 ft/lb torque at the wheels. A fantastic daily driver with 65,000 miles. Adult owned and maintained. $14,900/ obo. Call Tim at 360-912-1467 SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 25,000 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $16,750. 452-6014 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132.

SUZUKI: SX4 Crossover touring II AWD. Low Mileage (15,600) Hatchback with automatic transmission and 3 Mode AWD in perfect condition. Lots of extras including power moon roof, low profile wheels, digital compass, 6 CD/AM/ FM/MP3 player w/9 speakers including subwoofer, roof rack, body side molding, tinted glass. This cars handles like a dream in all types of weather and is roomy and comfortable. If interested please e-mail me at kck1237@gmail.com 360-301-9554 TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527. TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183. TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774.

VW: ‘71 Bus/Vanagon Type 2/Bus. Recently rebuilt 1776 cc engine and dual carbs. $3,500. Reply: shepherd4@gmail.co m MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

105

Legals General

VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,995/obo. 775-9648

105

Legals General

Cause No. 10 4 00332 0 NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY BY NEGOTIATION IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF KITSAP In the Guardianship of: DESMOND CHAMBERS, An Incapacitated Person. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LINDA NAVAGE, Guardian for DESMOND CHAMBERS, will sell by negotiation the following described real estate: Legal Description: Lots 4 and 5, Block 311, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situation in County of Clallam, State of Washington. Street Address: 1720 W 10th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98363 Tax Parcel No.: 063000 031115 to Andrew P. Slack and Sheryl R. Slack for $90,000. The terms and conditions of the offer are set out in the Purchase and Sale Agreement attached to the Petition for Order Directing Sale of Real Property and filed with the Court. Said sale will be presented to the Court for confirmation on Friday, November 19, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. at the Kitsap County Superior Court, Probate Calendar, 614 Division, Port Orchard, WA 98366. Offers or bids will be received for filing at the office of the Clerk of the Kitsap County Superior Court at the above address. DATED this 26th day of October, 2010. CAROL HORAN RAINEY, WSBA#9540 Attorney for the Guardian Pub: Nov. 4, 11, 2010


C12

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 56

Low 44

51/36

48/40

50/37

46/35

Some sun, then turning cloudy.

Cloudy with periods of rain late.

Mostly cloudy with a little rain.

Periods of rain.

Cloudy with a chance of rain.

Cloudy and chilly with a shower possible.

The Peninsula Some sunshine this morning will give way to clouds as high pressure that has dominated the weather pattern the past few days shifts eastward. The increasing cloud cover signals the approach of a cold front that will bring periods of rain to the Olympic Neah Bay Port Peninsula late tonight and Friday. Wet weather will prevail 56/49 Townsend through this weekend as a second cold front brings Port Angeles 56/47 rain to the region Saturday. Showers will continue into 56/44 Sunday as onshore flow continues behind this front. A Sequim stray shower may even linger into Monday.

Victoria 55/46

55/44

Forks 58/45

Olympia 62/44

Seattle 60/48

Spokane 54/37

Yakima Kennewick 55/36 55/38

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Becoming cloudy today. Wind north-northeast 4-8 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Cloudy tonight with periods of rain late. Wind west-northwest 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Mostly cloudy tomorrow with a little rain. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Saturday: Periods of rain. Wind east 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet.

LaPush

11:12 a.m. ----Port Angeles 2:18 a.m. 1:02 p.m. Port Townsend 4:03 a.m. 2:47 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:24 a.m. 2:08 p.m.

Today

Billings 62/39

San Francisco 71/55

Tomorrow

SaTurday

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

9.2’ --6.2’ 7.5’ 7.5’ 9.0’ 7.1’ 8.5’

5:02 a.m. 5:48 p.m. 7:20 a.m. 8:11 p.m. 8:34 a.m. 9:25 p.m. 8:27 a.m. 9:18 p.m.

1.2’ -0.8’ 3.4’ -0.8’ 4.4’ -1.0’ 4.1’ -0.9’

12:07 a.m. 11:55 a.m. 3:19 a.m. 1:32 p.m. 5:04 a.m. 3:17 p.m. 4:25 a.m. 2:38 p.m.

5:51 a.m. 6:37 p.m. 8:13 a.m. 8:50 p.m. 9:27 a.m. 10:04 p.m. 9:20 a.m. 9:57 p.m.

1:02 a.m. 12:38 p.m. 4:15 a.m. 2:04 p.m. 6:00 a.m. 3:49 p.m. 5:21 a.m. 3:10 p.m.

6:39 a.m. 7:23 p.m. 9:05 a.m. 9:30 p.m. 10:19 a.m. 10:44 p.m. 10:12 a.m. 10:37 p.m.

7.8’ 9.5’ 6.9’ 7.5’ 8.3’ 9.0’ 7.8’ 8.5’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

1.4’ -1.4’ 4.1’ -1.5’ 5.3’ -1.9’ 5.0’ -1.8’

7.8’ 9.6’ 7.4’ 7.5’ 8.9’ 9.0’ 8.4’ 8.5’

1.8’ -1.5’ 4.6’ -1.8’ 6.0’ -2.4’ 5.6’ -2.3’

Nov 13

Nov 21

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Last

Nov 28

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 75 61 s Baghdad 83 53 s Beijing 66 47 s Brussels 62 47 sh Cairo 91 65 s Calgary 56 34 s Edmonton 51 28 s Hong Kong 71 66 c Jerusalem 84 61 s Johannesburg 84 55 t Kabul 76 37 pc London 63 52 c Mexico City 68 34 s Montreal 43 39 r Moscow 46 34 sh New Delhi 88 57 s Paris 62 46 c Rio de Janeiro 80 72 s Rome 72 57 s Stockholm 43 32 s Sydney 65 57 sh Tokyo 60 49 pc Toronto 47 31 r Vancouver 57 48 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Denver 60/36

Kansas City 56/31

Washington 53/44

Atlanta 58/38 El Paso 66/38

Moon Phases Full

New York 52/46

Chicago 48/31

Los Angeles 96/62

Sunset today ................... 5:51 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:05 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 6:19 a.m. Moonset today ................. 4:38 p.m. First

Detroit 50/32

Minneapolis 44/27

Sun & Moon

Nov 5

Everett 60/48

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 60/48

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 57 41 0.00 9.36 Forks 64 44 0.00 101.15 Seattle 74 46 0.00 34.83 Sequim 61 42 0.00 8.45 Hoquiam 68 52 0.00 54.20 Victoria 61 43 0.06 25.50 P. Townsend* 61 48 0.06 12.19 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 57/46 Bellingham 59/43

Aberdeen 61/50

Peninsula Daily News

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 69/44 Miami 84/70

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 65 43 60 58 58 51 64 62 50 62 52 48 69 60 48 54 55 64 66 60 50 50 60 29 60 84 69 45

Lo W 41 s 30 sn 46 s 38 pc 47 r 41 r 35 s 39 s 19 s 40 s 46 r 35 c 46 r 33 pc 31 c 33 pc 34 s 48 pc 42 s 36 pc 28 pc 32 c 46 pc 13 sf 29 s 71 pc 44 s 35 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City !New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 56 81 68 96 84 46 44 59 66 52 62 54 82 94 53 86 62 54 74 76 56 67 72 86 71 50 65 53

Lo W 31 s 57 s 40 s 62 s 70 t 30 c 27 pc 39 pc 50 pc 46 r 34 s 28 s 58 t 62 s 42 r 59 s 46 pc 39 r 41 s 48 s 33 c 40 s 40 s 59 s 55 s 22 s 39 s 44 r

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 102 at Corona, CA

Low: 13 at Berlin, NH

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas! With silver bells, shiny balls, garlands, cheery ornaments and surprises. Twinkling, colorful, bright lights for your home, tree and yard (solar too!)

All the gifts and treasures for your Merry Christmas at Christmas Village

HADLOCK

Starting Right Now!

Building partnerships since 1984

901 NESS CORNER RD., PORT HADLOCK

Visit us at www.hadlockbuildingsupply.com

OPEN 7 DAYS Monday - Friday 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

0A5101586

360-385-1771 / Fax 360-385-1980 1-800-750-1771

BUILDING SUPPLY

Deck the walls with paint and moulding.

Now is the perfect time to dress up your front door with decorative hardware, and deck the walls with a quick coat of paint, gorgeous crown moulding, versatile trim or stylish wainscoting to add color, character and charm to your home, before the family and in-laws arrive for the holidays.

Celebrating 50 Years

Visit us today to get started on your holiday, home improvement projects and for a full line of Parker Paint and primers.

3111 Hwy 101 E, Port Angeles 452-8933 • hartnagels.com

Thank you for shopping locally at our employee owned and operated Lumber Traders stores.

0B700925

1601 S “C” St., Port Angeles 457-8581 • angelesmillwork.com


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