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Day of dreams

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Periods of rain and wind C8

Seahawks victory today in Chicago brings NFC title game to Qwest B1

Peninsula Daily News $1.25 Sunday

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

January 16, 2011

Mud comes tumbling

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Tharinger gets two salaries New state lawmaker says he’ll give back what’s not earned By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Brian Harmon/for Peninsula Daily News

Crews clear away part of a large mudslide on state Highway 112 between Sekiu and Neah Bay on Saturday.

State crews partially reopen vital links to Neah Bay, southern Hood Canal By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

Workers chipped out access Saturday around a massive mud slide on state Highway 112 that isolated Neah Bay and cleared another slide on the opposite side of the Olympic Peninsula that had fully blocked U.S. Highway 101 near Hoodsport. By dusk Saturday, one lane for alternating traffic was open on 112, said Don Clotfelter, Olympic Region maintenance manager for the state Department of Transportation. State workers excavated from the east side of the slide while Makah tribal members used their equipment on the west side to clear the road at Rasmussen Creek, which was buried at 6 p.m. Friday in some 3,000 to 4,000 cubic yards of mud, boulders and trees. “It’s one of the bigger ones we’ve had in a number of years,” Clotfelter said, adding that “along that corridor histori-

cally are landslides.” The slide made going home again an adventure for many. That included a horde of high school basketball fans who watched their boys and girls varsity teams beat their archrivals in Clallam Bay before learning that the only paved highway access into Neah Bay was completely blocked. Bruch and Bruch of Port Angeles will finish clearing the job, beginning Sunday and working through the holiday weekend to cart off between 300 and 400 truck loads of soil, Clotfelter said.

Highway 101 All lanes of Highway 101 near Lake Cushman Road — state Highway 119 — in Mason County were cleared by 4:35 p.m. Saturday after a mud slide blocked both lanes at 11:35 a.m. Friday. Highway 101 is the only road linking communities on the western shore of Hood Canal.

Crews were later able to clear one lane through the 100-yard-wide slide area on Friday. The slides were the latest in a series that have plagued Western Washington for the last two weeks of storms. A mudslide Thursday along the main railroad line near Everett prompted a suspension of passenger rail service between Seattle and Vancouver, B.C., until Saturday.

Landslide warning in effect And a mudslide in Sumner will keep the West Valley Highway closed through at least Tuesday morning, officials said. With more rain forecast to fall on already sodden ground, the National Weather Service has issued a landslide warning in effect through Monday for much of the North Olympic Peninsula. Turn

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Clallam County is legally bound to pay Commissioner Steve Tharinger while he serves in the state Legislature as the newest member of the 24th District delegation representing the North Olympic Peninsula. So Tharinger said he will give some of the money back. Before the November general election, Tharinger said that he would not take a paycheck from the county when the Legislature is in session if he were elected. Tharinger The Sequim Democrat made the statement amid heavy criticism from his three election opponents that he would be “double dipping” by taking two public salaries if voters chose him to fill the seat vacated by former Rep. Lynn Kessler. But that’s not possible, Tharinger said after he was sworn in last week to the state position, which pays $42,106 a year. The county pay is $63,504 annually, for a total of $105,610. Clallam County Administrator Jim Jones confirmed that to be the case. Changing Tharinger’s pay would require a vote by the Board of County Commissioners, Jones said, and such a change would not go into effect until his next term. But Jones said Tharinger can give back as much of his pay as he wants to the county, in the form of a tax-deductible donation. Rather than simply not taking a paycheck from the county during the 105-day legislative session, Tharinger said he will give the county back some of his pay if he works less than 40 hours a week on county issues. Turn

Gregoire ferry district idea stalls at launch Peninsula Daily News and Kitsap Sun

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire’s proposal to create a ninecounty ferry district — which would include both Clallam and Jefferson counties — has apparently fizzled. The governor’s representatives briefed the House Transportation Committee on Thursday on a proposal to replace Washington State Ferries with a semi-independent regional authority.

Transportation Committee Chairwoman Rep. Judy Clibborn, D-Mercer Island, said the plan seemed to lack support among committee members. “I don’t hear consensus to go forward with the plan as it is. I don’t feel it has the votes,” Clibborn said. “The hard work now is to figure how to make the service run mean and lean.”

Chevrolet Silverado

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By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Dan Lieberman, left, and Tim Wheeler sing protest songs with a sign paying tribute to last week’s shootings in Tucson, Ariz., at Saturday’s rally.

PORT ANGELES — The rain held off long enough for a group of about 30 to pay homage to Martin Luther King Jr. on what would have been his 82nd birthday Saturday in an hourlong rally at Veterans Park in Port Angeles. Several speakers used the occasion to denounce racial profiling, cuts to social services, immigration policy and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Turn

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Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 95th year, 13th issue — 8 sections, 76 pages

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CHEVROLET

“We simply couldn’t find a reason for buyers to choose the GMC over the Chevrolet” — Motor Trend

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With the Ford F-350, in around-town driving and on the test track, the tremendous class-leading power numbers didn’t prove out. In just about every formal and informal drag scenario – empty, full of payload, and with our 12,000-pound test trailer, the Chevy Silverado outperformed the Power Stroke. — Motor Trend

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PA rally pays King homage

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2011 Motor Trend H/D Truck of the Year®

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Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C2 Commentary/Letters A10 Couples *PW Dear Abby C4 Deaths C7 Movies C4 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

Puzzles/Games Sports Things To Do Weather

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UpFront

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Husband: Gabor talking after surgery

had replacement surgery in July and has been hospitalized several times since for swelling in her legs and blood clots throughout her body.

ZSA ZSA GABOR’S husband said the actress is smiling and talking, a day after doctors amputated most of her right leg. Frederic Prinz von Anhalt said Saturday that Gabor is heavily sedated and Gabor does not yet know that her leg has been removed. He said he’ll tell her when she regains more of her strength. Doctors at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles decided to amputate Friday when a persistent infection wouldn’t heal. Von Anhalt said the 93-year-old “Moulin Rouge” and “Queen of Outer Space” star will likely spend up to four weeks in the hospital. Gabor broke her hip and

Grammar to rewed Kelsey Grammer said he’s planning to remarry next month. The 55-year-old “Cheers” and “Frazier” star said on CBS’s “Late Show With David Grammar Letterman” on Thursday night that he’s marrying Kayte Walsh. He said that “Kayte’s my new girl” and that they’re getting married “in February, we think.” His wife of nearly 13 years, Camille Grammer, filed for divorce in July. She cited irreconcilable differences. She stars in Bravo’s “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.” They were married in 1997 and have two young children.

In stitches Martha Stewart isn’t likely to whisper sweet nothings into her dozing dog’s ear anytime again soon. The 69-year-old lifestyle guru wrote on her blog Thursday that she needed stitches Stewart after startling her dog Francesca while leaning down to “whisper goodbye.” The dog jumped up and rammed into Stewart. She wrote that she “felt a bit of whiplash as blood gushed” from her split lip Tuesday night. She initially called police to ask for a ride to the hospital but realized her driver was waiting to drive her from her home in the suburbs to New York City for a “Today” show appearance. Stewart landed in the Northern Westchester Hospital emergency room and received stitches in her upper lip.

Passings

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Which team will win today’s NFC divisional playoff game in Chicago?

Chicago Bears 

Seattle Seahawks 

27.2% 58.2%

Don’t follow football 

By The Associated Press

John Dye, 47, an actor whose career included the role of Andrew, the angel of death, in the long-running television series “Touched by an Angel,” was found dead at his San Francisco home, a medical examiner’s spokesman said Thursday. Medical examiner’s investigator Charles Cecil said Mr. Dye, a native of Amory, Miss., was Mr. Dye found dead Monday. The cause of death has not been determined, Cecil said, but relatives said Dye suffered apparent heart failure. WREG-TV in Memphis reported that Mr. Dye’s father, Jim Dye, said his actor son “was very giving, had a lot of causes that he supported real well, Make a Wish Foundation, AIDS research.” The Cleveland Daily Banner reported Thursday that while living in the community as a youngster, Mr. Dye was involved in a children’s theater group and in the 1990s helped re-establish it. As news of Mr. Dye’s death began to spread Thursday afternoon, his “Touched by an Angel” costar Valerie Bertinelli posted a message to him on her Twitter account: “Dear, sweet John Dye, rest in peace.” A University of Memphis theater major, Mr. Dye’s early work included the martial-arts movie “The Best of the Best” and small roles on “Murder, She Wrote” and other television shows. He landed the part of the Angel of Death on “Touched by an Angel” in 1994 and appeared in all nine seasons

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

of the CBS series. A spokeswoman for E.E. Pickle Funeral Home in Amory said funeral arrangements were incomplete.

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Susannah York, 72, a 1960s British actress who was nominated for an Oscar for the 1969 film “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” has died, a London newspaper reported Saturday. Ms. York had been suffering from cancer and died Friday surrounded by family, her son Orlando Ms. York Wells told The Daily Telegraph newspaper. “She had advanced bone marrow cancer, which she had an operation for. But last Thursday, she had a scan, and then the descent was fast. In the end, her death was painless and quick,” he said. Wells, himself an actor, added: “She was an absolutely fantastic mother, who was very down to earth . . . Both [his sister] Sasha and I feel incredibly lucky to have her as a mother.” Ms. York acted on the stage, on television and in

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots ELDERLY GENTLEMAN AT Forks post office commenting on the snow: “I was raised in Colorado, so driving in it is not a problem. But I don’t remember it being this hard to walk in.” ... WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

14.6%

Total votes cast: 1,021

films and was nominated for Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com an Oscar for best supporting NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those actress in “They Shoot peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole. Horses,” the tale of a disparate group of characters taking part in a dance marathon. Setting it Straight She also starred in the multi-Oscar-winning story of Corrections and clarifications Thomas More, “A Man for The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairAll Seasons” (1966). ness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to

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MATTHEW LIPMAN, 87, a philosopher and educator who came up with the radical idea of teaching children philosophy, died Dec. 26 in West Orange, N.J. His initial focus was on teaching logic, but the curriculum soon embraced concepts like truth, justice and freedom. It turned out that the questions that gripped children were pretty similar to those that have long beguiled philosophers: “Why is time so slow sometimes?”

clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

The 1935 state personal net income tax law is unconstitutional, the state Supreme Court declared. The invalidation of the state law means the loss of more than $1.5 million annually in revenue during 1936, the state tax commission said. The Supreme Court sustained an earlier ruling in Thurston County Superior Court, which ruled the law Did You Win? created by the Legislature State lottery results as “wholly” in violation of the state constitution. Friday’s Daily Game: A 1933 attempt to create 9-6-2 a state income tax was also Friday’s Keno: 01-03declared unconstitutional in 09-10-12-17-20-26-31-33-35a previous Supreme Court 36-45-48-54-58-65-67-68-73 ruling. Friday’s Match 4: 01-17-22-24 1961 (50 years ago) Friday’s Mega MilThe Port Angeles comlions: 02-15-17-33-35, mercial fishing fleet, which Mega Ball: 8 started with six boats in Saturday’s Daily 1946, now numbers 124 and Game: 7-8-5 is valued at $1 million. Saturday’s Hit 5: Joe Faires, Port Angeles 09-15-31-34-38 Boat Haven manager, said Saturday’s Keno: 01-02-07-12-13-24-25-27-29- the trolling fleet has 31-34-37-46-47-50-56-67-72- increased every year for the 74-79 past eight years he’s held Saturday’s Lotto: the manager’s position. 01-04-06-09-34-46 Also moored at the Saturday’s Match 4: marina are 204 pleasure 15-20-21-23 craft, seven workboats and Saturday’s Powerball: 15 boat houses. 09-13-22-23-37, Powerball: Faires said 1960 reached 31, Power Play: 3 an all-time low for the troll-

ing fleet in Washington state. Fishing is now cut to five days a week within the three-mile limit. If it is cut to two days as proposed, Faires thinks the effect will be particularly hard on sports fishing at Sekiu and Neah Bay as well as affect commercial fishing.

1986 (25 years ago) Olympic Memorial Hospital commissioners will discuss how the hospital can fight the skyrocketing cost of medical insurance at their meeting tonight. The cost of insuring the hospital against medical malpractice suits increased 145 percent last year. Hospital Administrator Al Remington will brief the commissioners on the hospital’s insurance costs and discuss ways the hospital district can fight insurance increases through changes in state laws.

Laugh Lines MGM says the next James Bond movie almost didn’t get made because of the bad economy, which explains the newest Bond villain, “Cash-for-Goldfinger.” Conan O’Brien

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Jan. 16, the 16th day of 2011. There are 349 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Jan. 16, 1991, the White House announced the start of Operation Desert Storm to drive Iraqi forces out of Kuwait. In an address to the nation, President George H.W. Bush declared, “The battle has been joined.” On this date: ■  In 1547, Ivan IV of Russia (popularly known as “Ivan the Terrible”) was crowned czar. ■  In 1883, the U.S. Civil Service Commission was established. ■  In 1919, pianist and statesman Ignacy Jan Paderewski became the first premier of the newly created republic of Poland.

■  In 1920, Prohibition began in the United States as the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution took effect, one year to the day after its ratification; it was later repealed by the 21st Amendment. ■  In 1935, fugitive gangster Fred Barker and his mother, Kate “Ma” Barker, were killed in a shootout with the FBI at Lake Weir, Fla. ■  In 1942, actress Carole Lombard, 33, her mother and about 20 other people died when their plane crashed near Las Vegas while returning from a war-bond promotion tour. ■  In 1944, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower took command of the Allied Expeditionary Forces in London. ■  In 1969, two manned Soviet

Soyuz spaceships became the first vehicles to dock in space and transfer personnel. ■  In 1978, NASA named 35 candidates to fly on the space shuttle, including Sally K. Ride, who became America’s first woman in space, and Guion S. Bluford Jr., who became America’s first black astronaut in space. ■  In 1981, in Northern Ireland, Protestant gunmen shot and wounded Irish nationalist leader Bernadette Devlin McAliskey and her husband. ■  Ten years ago: Confirmation hearings for Attorney General-designate John Ashcroft opened in Washington with Senate Democrats throwing jabs at him over abortion and civil rights. Laurent Kabila, president of

the Democratic Republic of Congo, was mortally shot and wounded by a bodyguard at his home. Dave Winfield and Kirby Puckett were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on their first try. Leonard Woodcock, former head of the United Auto Workers union, died in Ann Arbor, Mich., at age 89. ■  Five years ago: “Brokeback Mountain” won four Golden Globes, including best motion picture drama; “Lost” won best dramatic television series while “Desperate Housewives” won for best musical or comedy series. ■ One year ago: Glen W. Bell Jr., 86, founder of the Taco Bell chain, died in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 16, 2011

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation U.S. debt surges to all-time high of $14 trillion WASHINGTON — The United States just passed a dubious milestone: Government debt surged to an all-time high, topping $14 trillion — $45,300 for each and everyone in the country. That means Congress soon will have to lift the legal debt limit to give the nearly maxedout government an even higher credit limit or dramatically cut spending to stay within the current cap. Either way, a fight is ahead on Capitol Hill, inflamed by the passions of tea party activists and deficit hawks. Already, both sides are blaming each other for an approaching economic train wreck as Washington wrestles over how to keep the government in business and avoid default on global financial obligations. Bills increasing the debt limit are among the most unpopular to come before Congress, serving as pawns for decades in high-stakes bargaining games. Every time until now, the ending has been the same: We go to the brink before raising the ceiling.

U.S. promotes film WASHINGTON — Even as prosecutors build a case against the Army private suspected of passing hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks, the State Department is promoting a documentary film that celebrates Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg.

Amid its struggle to contain damage from the WikiLeaks revelations, the State Department announced Saturday that Ellsberg “The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers” has been selected as one of 18 films that will tour the world this year as part of its “American Documentary Showcase” program. Ellsberg, whom the film portrays as a whistleblower of conscience, has been a champion of Pfc. Bradley E. Manning, the alleged leaker of the documents who is currently jailed. He has also spoken in defense of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who may also face charges for publishing classified information. When the documentary was released in 2009, Ellsberg said it took The New York Times three months to review the study and decide to publish it.

Today’s news guests n ABC’s “This Week” — Town hall discussion from Tucson, Ariz. n NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Tom Coburn, R-Okla.; Al Sharpton. n CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Gillibrand; Reps. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., and Jeff Flake, R-Ariz.; Gov. Ed Rendell, D-Pa.; former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani n CNN’s “State of the Union” — Reps. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., and Grace Napolitano, D-Calif. n “Fox News Sunday” — Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J.; former Gov. Tim Pawlenty, R-Minn.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Brazil mudslide survivors fend for themselves

nian nuclear site Saturday as part of a tour the Islamic Republic hopes will build support before a new round of talks on its disputed atomic activities. Iran is trying to sell the tour as a gesture of transparency TERESOPOLIS, Brazil — ahead of the Jan. 20-22 talks in They are tired, hungry, traumaIstanbul, Turkey. tized — and resigned to saving In a blow to the effort, howthemselves without the aid ever, major powers Russia, their government promised China and the European Union after massive mudslides that refused the Iranian invitation. killed nearly 600 people. The EU said it should be up Wanderson Ferreira de Carto inspectors from the U.N.’s valho lost 23 family members — International Atomic Energy including his wife and 2-yearold son — in massive mudslides, Agency to verify whether Iran’s program is entirely peaceful. yet spent Saturday hauling water and food up steep jungle 2 U.S. troops killed trails. “We have to help those who BAGHDAD — Two U.S. are alive,” he said as he hauled troops were killed Saturday by supplies five miles up the danan Iraqi soldier who apparently gerous trail. smuggled real bullets into a “There is no more help for training exercise and opened those who are dead. I’ve cried a fire, raising fresh concerns lot and sometimes my mind about insurgents worming into goes blank and I almost forget the nation’s security forces as what happened. But we have to the Americans prepare to leave do what we must to help the liv- by the year’s end. ing.” A U.S. military official said Hundreds of survivors are in the shooter was immediately the same situation as Carvalho, killed by American soldiers who forced to save themselves after were running the morning drill torrential rains earlier this at a training center on a U.S. week triggered rumbling mudbase in the northern city of slides early Wednesday in Mosul. mountain towns north of Rio de The U.S. official said the Janeiro. exercise was not meant to The death toll had risen to involve live ammunition, and an 598 by Saturday, and there were Iraqi army officer said the fears it would climb sharply shooting appeared to have been higher once remote areas were planned. reached. A U.S. statement confirmed that two soldiers were killed Iran nuclear tour and a third was wounded by small-arms fire by what the milTEHRAN, Iran — Several international envoys — but cru- itary described as “an individual cially none from the world pow- wearing an Iraqi army uniform.” ers — got a look inside an IraThe Associated Press

The Associated Press

Dozens Friday walk around an ever-growing makeshift memorial for those injured and killed during a mass shooting Jan. 8. The memorial is at University Medical Center in Tucson, Ariz.

Chaotic night preceded shootings for gunman By Justin Pritchard and Michael R. Blood The Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. — He wandered through the dark streets of his hometown, meandering from one store to another on a furious all-night excursion as he prepared what authorities say were the final steps in taking revenge on a world from which he’d become progressively alienated. Jared Loughner checked into a down-and-out motel. He picked up photos showing him holding a Glock 19 while wearing only a bright red G-string. He bought ammunition on one of three trips to two different Walmarts. He called a high-school potsmoking buddy, ran away from his father into a cactus-dotted desert and updated his MySpace profile to say, “Goodbye friends.” Michelle Martinez ran into Loughner during his rambling odyssey. She and some friends were hanging out in the neighborhood when a sullen figure emerged from the darkness in a black hooded sweatshirt and startled them. Loughner picked his way through the group rather than walk around them, offering a deep, distant “What’s up?” He then quickened his pace and disappeared into the darkness. “I had a feeling he was think-

Doctors replace Giffords’ breathing tube By Alicia Chang

The Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. — Doctors on Saturday removed Rep. Gabrielle Giffords’ breathing tube and could soon know if she can speak. Giffords had an operation Saturday to replace the breathing tube with a tracheotomy tube in her windpipe. That allows her to breathe better and frees her from the ventilator. Though Giffords had been breathing on her own since she was shot in the head Jan. 8, doctors had left the breathing tube in as a precaution. A feeding tube was also put in to provide nutrition. ing about something,” said Martinez, who knew Loughner from their school days. “It was just kind of weird.” The encounter epitomizes Loughner’s final hours as he became increasingly unhinged, culminating, authorities said, with him opening fire on a crowd

Those procedures are not out of the ordinary for braininjured patients. Giffords’ doctors have said they should be able to evaluate her ability to speak once the breathing tube is out. Giffords, who was wounded in last weekend’s attack that killed six people, remains in critical condition at University Medical Center. “Her recovery continues as planned,” the hospital said in a statement. Her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, has remained at her bedside. One patient was discharged Saturday while two others remain in good condition. of people at an event for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Officials do not know what pushed Loughner over the edge, but interviews, records and a police chronology released Friday provide a fuller picture of his movements that in many ways reflect his scattered mind.

Tunisia hit with looting; new president sworn in By Elaine Ganley and Bouazza Ben Bouazza The Associated Press

TUNIS, Tunisia — Looting, deadly prison riots and street chaos engulfed Tunisia on Saturday, a day after mass protests forced its strongman to flee. A new interim president was sworn in, promising to create a unity government that could include the long-ignored opposition. It was the second change of power in this North African nation in less than 24 hours. Saturday night appeared calmer than the previous night, which saw looters empty shops and torch the capital’s main train station as well as some shops. As military helicopters

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patrolled overhead, residents in some neighborhoods armed themselves with sticks and clubs, forming impromptu militias to protect their homes. Saturday also saw soldiers trade fire with assailants in front of the Interior Ministry, while thousands of European tourists scrambled to find flights home. The death toll mounted. At least 42 people were killed Saturday in a prison fire in one resort town and the director of another prison in another tourist haven let 1,000 inmates flee after soldiers shot five dead amid a rebellion. Those deaths came on top of scores of others after a month of protests in which police often fired upon demonstrators. After 23 years of autocratic

rule, President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali abruptly fled the country Friday for Saudi Arabia following mass street protests over corruption, a lack of jobs and clampdowns on civil liberties. The leadership changes then came at a dizzying speed. Ben Ali’s longtime ally, Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi, stepped in briefly with a vague assumption of power that left open the possibility that Ben Ali could return. But on Saturday, the head of the Constitutional Council declared the president’s departure permanent and gave Fouad Mebazaa, leader of the lower house of parliament, 60 days to organize new elections. Hours later, Mebazaa was sworn in.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Signs of trouble for education law update

Nation: At 113, oldest living African-American dies

Nation: Suspect named in N.J. police officer’s murder

World: Teen: Berlusconi gave her $9,350; no sex

Signs of trouble are arising for President Barack Obama’s plan to put education overhaul at the forefront of his agenda as he adjusts to the new reality of a divided government. Giving students and teachers more flexibility is an idea with bipartisan support. Yet, the debate about the renewal of No Child Left Behind is complicated by political pressures from the coming 2012 presidential campaign and disputes over timing, money and scope of the update. While education might offer the best chance for Obama to work with Republicans, any consensus could fade in the pitiless political crosscurrents, leaving the debate for another day.

When she turned 113, Mississippi Winn could still stand up on her own and never thought her age was a detriment to her life. The upbeat former domestic worker from Shreveport, La., died Friday afternoon at Magnolia Manor Nursing Home, said Milton Carroll, an investigator with the Caddo Parish Coroner’s Office. He said he could not release her cause of death. Winn was believed to be the oldest living African-American in the U.S. and the seventh-oldest living person in the world, said Robert Young of the Gerontology Research Group, which verifies information for Guinness World Records.

Police signed murder charges Saturday against a 19-yearold man they accuse of fatally shooting a New Jersey police officer who had driven up beside him and started to question him. A massive manhunt is under way for Jahmell W. Crockam, who is charged with killing Lakewood Patrolman Christopher Matlosz on Friday. Ocean County Prosecutor Marlene Lynch Ford said Crockam is known by the street name “Sav” — short for “Savage.” A Superior Court Judge set bail for Crockam at $5 million cash once he is arrested.

A teenager at the heart of the latest criminal probe of Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi said Saturday the billionaire media mogul gave her $9,350 when she came to a Valentine’s Day soiree at his villa but reiterated she didn’t have sex with him. Milan prosecutors were investigating whether Berlusconi paid for sex with an underage girl from Morocco and then abused his power in trying to cover up the encounters. Berlusconi has criticized the probe, calling the allegations “incredible and grotesque.” The teenager, a nightclub dancer nicknamed Ruby, said Berlusconi didn’t know she was a minor “because I told everyone I was 24,” not 17.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Brinnon resort topic of presentation By Charlie Bermant

from hearsay, the Statesman Group said. “After yesterday’s meetings so many people told us they didn’t realize what the resort was all about,” said Mann in a statement e-mailed to the Peninsula Daily News. “They were glad to hear what was said because there are so many misrepresentations of the facts being told in the community and they can’t wait for this to happen.”

Peninsula Daily News

BRINNON — Community members took a firsthand look last week at a model of the proposed Pleasant Harbor Resort and listened to a presentation by the president of the Statesman Group, which intends to build the facility. Some liked what they saw. Some didn’t. “We believe this project will be successful in the revitalization of the local economy and will create a legacy for local residents they can pass on to their children,” said Garth Mann, president of the Statesman Group, as he showed a three-dimensional model of the proposed project to about 45 people in Brinnon on Friday. “If you don’t create employment opportunities for your children, an area eventually dies,” he said. Mann said the $300 million 252-acre project will provide that base for Brin- Statesman president Garth Mann shows a model non, which he described as members of the Brinnon community. Sally Brown an economically depressed area without a strong finanpositive impact on the comSue Bond feels differcial base. munity and help our local ently. economy,” Brinnon resident “I strongly oppose the Reaction Steve Petrick said after the construction of the resort,” she said. “I think this will have a presentation.

Plans for resort

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

of the proposed Pleasant Harbor Resort to and Charlie Brown are pictured in rear. She said the planned resort is out of character for Brinnon. “This is too big a project for Brinnon,” Bond said.

The resort would include a golf course and a hotel that would be open to the public. Mann said his company was convinced the vacation business will continue to thrive despite the economy, which he said is improving. “The economy is starting to recover in ’11,” he said. “People are continuing to spend a lot of money on vacation, and when they look at the big picture, they will see this is a good deal for them.”

“And they are using a 1980s ________ time-share model, which Jefferson County Reporter doesn’t work here. Charlie Bermant can be reached at The gathering was 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ intended to separate facts peninsuladailynews.com.

Clallam to consider board appointments Luther King Jr. Day. The discussion will begin The three Clallam at 9:15 a.m. County commissioners will consider appointing memPA City Council bers to the Clallam County Board of Health, Permit The Port Angeles City Advisory Board and Penin- Council will consider sula Housing Authority approval of a motion supwhen they meet Tuesday. porting the Port Angeles The meeting will begin School District’s proposed at 10 a.m. in the commis- maintenance and operasioners’ boardroom (160) at tions levy at its Tuesday the Clallam County Court- meeting. house, 223 E. Fourth St., The meeting will be at Port Angeles. 6 p.m. in council chambers Also on the agenda: at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth ■  A contract amend- St. The four-year property ment with the state Department of Social and Health tax levy, which will be on Services increasing the the Feb. 8 ballot, would amount for juvenile drug raise $8.2 million in revecourt management ser- nue during its first year and slowly increase for the vices. ■  A supplement with next three years. Also on the agenda are a David Evans & Associates, Inc. for the Deer Park Teamsters labor contract underpass design project negotiations extension and adding a seat on the Port extending a contract and Angeles Forward Commitadding scope of work and tee for Olympic National funding. Park. ■  Call for a Feb. 8 hearing on proposed amend- Port Angeles schools ments to the county’s sixThe Port Angeles School year Transportation Board will begin writing the Improvement Program. Monday’s work session district’s five-year strategic has been moved to Tuesday plan at a work session Tuesin observance of Martin day.

Board of Health

Eye on Clallam

Peninsula Daily News

The special meeting will be from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Central Services boardroom, 216 E. Fourth St. The information collected during the December education summit will be used as the foundation for the plan. No other business will be conducted.

PA parks committee The Port Angeles Parks, Recreation & Beautification Commission will receive an update on the creation of a Civic Field steering committee at its Thursday meeting. The meeting will be at 6 p.m. in the Vern Burton Community Center meeting rooms, 308 E. Fourth St. Also on the agenda: ■  Lincoln Park update. ■  Parks and recreation master plan update. ■  Community garden update. ■  Roundtable discussion. ■  Student member

interest report.

Public utility district The Clallam County public utility district commissioners will consider funding a portion of the county Broadband Telecommunications Opportunity Program grant project when they meet Monday. The meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. Monday in the commissioners’ boardroom at the PUD’s main office, 2431 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles. The commissioners will consider approving a resolution committing district reserves to fund part of the broadband grant project costs. Commissioners also will consider staff recommendations on the bids for pole inspection, treating and reporting for this year, and amending their travel policy. They also will hear a staff report on district communications and public relations activities.

sider a resolution in support of the proposed Port Angeles The Clallam County School District levy. Board of Health will hear a health officer’s report on Planning commission new Health and Human The Clallam County Services and EnvironmenPlanning Commission will tal Protection Agency discuss the Shoreline Masassessments on fluoride levels in drinking water Tues- ter Program update in a work session Wednesday. day. The meeting will begin The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the commisat 1:30 p.m. in Room 160 at sioners’ boardroom (160) at the Clallam County Court- the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., house, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Port Angeles. The afterThe board also will dis- hours entrance is located off cuss the state budget, the Fourth Street. Food Safety Modernization The commission also will Act of 2010, a tribal and elect a chair and vice chair public health mutual aid and discuss the preliminary agreement and influenza. 2011 work plan.

Olympic Medical Center Marine sanctuary Olympic Medical Center commissioners will hear an update on a proposal to link the North Olympic Peninsula hospitals to a tertiary medical center Wednesday. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. in Linkletter Hall in the basement of the Port Angeles hospital, 939 E. Caroline St., Port Angeles. The board also will take public comment on and con-

The Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council will discuss the sanctuary’s draft management plan and draft environmental assessment Friday. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. in Room 160 on the main level of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles.

Slides: ‘Landslide warnings will continue’ Continued from A1 the Strait of Juan de Fuca. “Given how saturated The warning especially the soils are, and the fact mentions danger in the that we are receiving steady Admiralty Inlet and Hood rain over the next 24 hours, Canal area and all along we feel the landslide warn-

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— with snow levels maybe as high as 9,000 feet, D’Amico said. That will aggravate the already shaky snowpack conditions. The Northwest Avalanche Center issued an avalanche warning above 4,000 feet through Sunday.

Long trip home

try to get home. The Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce president had driven to Costco near Sequim earlier that day. “And I drove all the way to the mud slide last night and couldn’t get in,” she said Saturday. She turned around and stayed with family in Port Angeles. But on the way, she had an idea. Parker phoned the Red Lion Hotel and suggested a “mud slide special” for people unable to get home, adding that if the hotel would offer a reduced rate, “I could put out 30 text messages by cell phone.” The hotel embraced the suggestion. Terra Horton, front office manager for the Red Lion, said that it offered a 35 percent discount to those who needed a room. There were few takers, but Horton was glad the hotel made the offer. “I couldn’t imagine being stranded,” she said. ________

The usual 30-minute drive from Clallam Bay to Neah Bay took an hour and 45 minutes Friday night, said Andrea Winck, a Makah Forestry Enterprise accountant who was in Clallam Bay to see her daughter, Courtney, play with the girls varsity team. “We were part of a convoy,” she said. At least 30 vehicles traveled back to Neah Bay on an old logging road, which the owners permit to be used in emergencies. “The road’s pretty good until you get to a section close to the reservation where active logging is going on,” where it was Managing Editor/News Leah boggy with mud and badly Leach can be reached at 360-4173531 or leah.leach@peninsula potholed, Winck said. Clallam Bay friends dailynews.com. loaned the Wincks a Dodge Ram to negotiate the back road, and they loaded it with others. “When it comes to this kind of thing, people really Call 360-452-4507 pull together,” Wincks said. “That’s when you feel the or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews. close-knit relationships in this community, when you com have an emergency like Peninsula Daily News that.” Meri Parker didn’t even

Get home delivery.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

(C) — Sunday, January 16, 2011

A5

Verdict buoys Knox team The Associated Press

ROME — A defense lawyer for Amanda Knox, the U.S. college student serving a 26-year prison sentence for the murder of her British roommate, expressed optimism Saturday that a drug charge conviction of a prosecution witness might help the American in her appeal in Italy. The defense always maintained that Antonio Curatolo, a homeless man in the university town of Perugia, wasn’t a credible witness, Luciano Ghirga told The Associated Press in Rome. Perugia court offices were closed Saturday, and officials could not be reached to confirm Italian news reports that Curatolo had been convicted earlier in

the week for dealing drugs. It wasn’t immediately known what his sentence was or if he had been jailed. In the first trial against Knox, Curatolo testified that he saw Knox and fellow murder trial defendant Raffaele Sollecito chatting near the apartment house the night Meredith Kercher was slain in 2007. Sollecito, an Italian who was Knox’s boyfriend at the time, was also convicted of the slaying and sentenced to 25 years in prison. Both defendants are appealing their convictions. The next hearing in the appeals trial in Perugia is scheduled for Jan. 22. “We have always said that he was not a credible witness,” Ghirga said, refer-

ring to Curatolo. “It was the court that held he was credible.” The drug charge conviction “will be an additional thing to help prove the witness is not credible,” Ghirga said in a phone interview. Seeking new witnesses is a key defense strategy in the appeals trial, with Knox’s lawyers hoping new witnesses will refute Curatolo’s assertion. Curatolo had told the lower court that he had seen Knox and Sollecito chatting on a basketball court hear the house where the American woman and Kercher shared a rented flat the night Kercher was stabbed to death. The victim’s body was found in a pool of blood in her bedroom Nov. 2, 2007.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

The

art of jewelry

Silversmith Randolf Foster of Port Angeles creates a piece of silver jewelry during a demonstration of his craft at the Art Front Gallery in downtown Port Angeles on Saturday. Foster was available to answer questions about silver and metalworking.

Tharinger: Won’t give back all his county pay Continued from A1 take a paycheck from the county when the Legisla“Let’s say I spend . . . 35 ture is in session. hours a week doing county business, then I would pay Leave of absence back to the county for five He said what he meant hours,” he said. Assuming a 40-hour by that statement is that he work week, his $63,504 would take a leave of county salary works out to absence from the county. Asked why he didn’t say about $30.44 an hour. that instead, Tharinger responded: “I don’t know. ‘I don’t work for free’ That’s a good question.” Jones said he can’t Tharinger said that he would not give back all of legally take a leave of his county pay during a absence. Tharinger said he doesn’t legislative session “because think he misled voters. I don’t work for free. “I just don’t,” he said, “The question is: If I’m working in a 70- to 80-hour when asked to elaborate. “I think it’s fairly compawork week, I think there should be some compensa- rable to what I was saying,” Tharinger said. tion.” He is one of two state Tharinger acknowledged that he did say during the legislators who also serve campaign that he wouldn’t as a county commissioner.

The other, state Sen. Tim Sheldon, D-Potlatch, said he receives a paycheck from both jobs. Sheldon said he also has been criticized for holding two elected positions, but referred to it as being merely “political.” Jones said the county doesn’t keep track of the hours worked by the three commissioners, but he estimates they all work about 60 hours a week. The county documents only what days they are in their offices at the Clallam County Courthouse. Tharinger said he will keep track of his own hours, and pay back what he thinks he should at the end of the session. He acknowledged that it will be “difficult” at times to

determine which issues fall under his duties as a county commissioner or state legislator. Tharinger said there will be some overlap.

‘Going to be tricky’ “That’s going to be tricky,” he said. “That line is not going to be super, super bright. “So, I’ll just try to keep some mental note, or write notes, as to my schedule and where they overlap.” During the legislative session, Tharinger plans to participate in county commission’s meetings each Monday and Tuesday via speakerphone from Olympia. He phoned in during the Jan. 3-4 meetings while he was in Olympia preparing

for the session. Tharinger also phoned in during the first half hour of the commission’s Monday meeting and missed Tuesday’s meeting. He attributed the absences to being sworn in as a legislator and other duties associated with the start of the session. Tharinger said he shouldn’t have scheduling conflicts during the rest of the session as long as Tuesday meetings end before 10:30 a.m.

ensure Tharinger can listen in. Tharinger said he has access to recordings of the meetings. Jones said he doesn’t think the arrangement will cause difficulties. “I’m not anticipating it will cause problems,” he said. Tharinger’s county seat is up for re-election in November. The seat is for a four-year term. He said he hasn’t decided if he will run again for the commission seat. Legislators in the state Earlier hearings House of Representatives Jones said he will pro- serve two-year terms. pose this week that the ________ commission moves the Reporter Tom Callis can be Tuesday public hearings, reached at 360-417-3532 or at which start at 10:30 a.m., to tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. about 9 a.m. in order to com.

Ferries: 24th District lawmakers not convinced Continued from A1 they were not convinced the governor’s idea was of Senate Transportation value. Committee Chairwoman Sen. Jim Hargrove, Sen. Mary Margaret Hau- D-Hoquiam, said he was folgen, D-Camano Island, has lowing Haugen’s lead, while said she won’t support the Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim, said “the idea plan. “I don’t think that creat- doesn’t seem to make a lot ing another layer of govern- of sense.” Rep. Kevin Van ment is a good idea,” Hau- De Wege, D-Sequim, talked of the larger tax burden it gen said after Gregoire pro- would small on small counposed the ferry district ear- ties. lier this month. The Legislature’s top All three representatives Republican leadership also of the 24th District, which opposes the concept. covers Clallam and JefferGregoire presented the son counties as well as a idea as a way to transform portion of Grays Harbor the state-run ferry system County, said before the leg- to one that transfers operaislative session began that tional power — and some of

the taxing burden — to the counties that use ferries. The proposed district would have included all of Jefferson and Clallam counties, as well as all of San Juan, Island and Kitsap counties and portions of Snohomish, King, Skagit and Pierce counties. Clallam is the only county among those proposed that lacks a state ferry terminal. House Transportation Committee members were skeptical of the idea as a way to cope with the state ferry system’s financial woes. “If Washington state can’t support it, how in the

world can the counties sup- what happens after 2013,” port it?” asked Rep. Jan Clibborn said. The state ferries sysAngel, R-Port Orchard. tem’s capital fund will hit red ink — $135.8 million How to support it? — in the 2013-2015 bienSaid Rep. Mike Arm- nium, said David Moseley, strong, R-Wenatchee: assistant secretary of the “I don’t like the proposal. Washington Department of But at least it’s something. . Transportation. . . Something to get us The operating fund will going.” reach the red in the same On Tuesday, in her State biennium, with a projected of the State speech, Gre- deficit of $34.2 million. goire said if the Legislature In 2000, the state set a does not like her proposal, it goal of the fares providing has to come up with another money to cover 80 percent solution to the system’s of the operating costs. In downward financial spiral. reality, fares have provided “That’s what I heard the an annual average of 68.4 governor say: ‘If not this, percent of the operating then what?’ . . . We know costs since 2000.

In fiscal 2010, fares provided 70.5 percent of the operating costs. If capital costs are crunched into the equation, fares provided only 43 percent of the overall costs. Moseley said labor and fuel make up 80 percent of the ferries’ costs — and both, plus shipbuilding costs, have been dramatically increasing. He said the ferry unions gave up raises they were entitled to in 2009-2011. So far, the state and the ferry unions are still locked in negotiations for 2011-2013.

Rally: Movement is ‘beginning of the rebuilding’ “When I got back from Washington, D.C., and went back to school, I got hazed for having gone in Sequim, Wash.,” Burns said. “Basically, I wanted to be a part of history.” Ostlund said: “Martin Luther King had a dream, and unfortunately, a lot of that dream has yet to be realized.” Bill Kildall, Clallam County MoveOn coordinator, framed his remarks with

the phrase “you’re in the right place now.” “If you believe we must demand an end to repression, greed, prejudice, inequality, exploitation and violence against others — even on the playground or in our neighborhoods or in the conduct of state and federal and local governmental affairs, both domestic and abroad — then you believe, as Dr. King did, that those last six antisocial

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________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

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Continued from A1 and after the event. The rally was dotted with The event was organized signs that read “Honk for by Stop the Checkpoints, Peace,” “We All Live in TucClallam County Green son,” and “Health Care Not Party, Olympic Unitarian- War Fare.” Universalist Fellowship, Many drivers on Lincoln Veterans for Peace, Service Street honked in support. Employees International Union, Port Angeles Radical King movement Women and Clallam County Wheeler said King died MoveOn. leading a movement that A planned downtown march to the state Depart- was reaching out to a majorment of Social and Health ity of the nation. “When he died, those Services building was canwho killed him knew what celed in lieu of a candlelight they were doing,” Wheeler vigil at Veterans Park. “I’m African, Native said. “They were attempting American, European, Histo destroy that movement panic, and there’s a rumor that Dr. King had built. And that there’s some Asian in my family,” said Robery they set us back a long way Lilly, a former caregiver who in that assassination. “I regard this movement grew up in Alabama. here as the beginning of the “I’m an American. I’m an rebuilding.” American. Wheeler referred to the “We need to concentrate more on our similarities deadly shootings in Tucson, Ariz., earlier this month than our differences.” that occurred as U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords held a ‘The piece of a pie’ meet-and-greet with conEddy Hayes, who immi- stituents. grated to the U.S. from the “The climate of hate that Philippines when she was we see in Arizona — fanned 18, spoke on behalf of the by those who call for the use SEIU Healthcare 775 of guns to change the politiNorthwest and on behalf of cal discourse in this country immigrants. — we will not be intimi“We are not asking a lot,” dated by them,” Wheeler Hayes said. said. “We’re just asking for the “We are going to continue piece of a pie of American the fight to build the beloved ways.” community that Dr. King Hayes said there is a gave his life fighting for.” backlog of unopened appliThe list of speakers cations for U.S. citizenship. included Marion “Honeybee” Dan Lieberman played Burns and Wayne Ostlund, guitar and sang “We Shall both of whom attended the Overcome” and other songs 1963 March on Washington with Tim Wheeler, master of where King delivered his “I ceremonies, before, during Have a Dream” speech.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Sequim woman died weeks before ruling By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Trish Schultz was 48 when she died Christmas Eve, her record stained by a drug conviction. On Thursday, barely three weeks later, the state Supreme Court threw out the conviction in a precedent-setting, 5-4 decision. Schultz’s son, George Peterson of Port Angeles, said Friday he knows exactly how his mother would have reacted. “This is one of those occasions where she would walk in the door with a beaming smile on her face and say, ‘I hate to be saying this, but I told you so,’” said Peterson, 29. “It’s really kind of sad,

but it’s the only bit of news I’ve received in the last few weeks that’s been kind of uplifting,” P e t e r s o n Schultz said. He wasn’t surprised that Schultz didn’t give in after she was convicted in Clallam C o u n t y Peterson Superior Court of possessing methamphetamine and after the state Court of Appeals upheld the decision, instead continuing her appeal to the state Supreme Court.

“My mother’s tenacity, when it comes to some things, was quite impressive,” he said. “To kind of have this [happen] a couple of weeks later in the midst of everything is kind of good.” The court ruled that two Sequim police officers who lacked a search warrant should not have entered Schultz’s apartment April 4, 2004. They did so without Schultz’s explicit consent even though “she acquiesced to the entry” by stepping aside as they entered her apartment, Justice Tom Chambers said in the majority opinion. Officers Kori Malone and Michael Hill had showed up at her door in response to a potential domestic violence

call from one of Schultz’s neighbors. The justices also ruled Malone and Hill had no evidence that an emergency was occurring when they entered her apartment without Schultz’s consent and without telling her she could refuse to allow them to enter.

‘Imminent threat’ ruling In its ruling, the court set a new “imminent threat” standard for warrantless searches by law enforcement officers responding to domestic violence situations. Chambers said the court had never before “specifically addressed the emergency aid exception to the warrant requirement in the

context of domestic violence.” Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly said Thursday she may ask the court to reconsider its decision.

Pledge to continue

fines,” he added, and the case had been “kind of a thorn in her side” until the day she died. At the time of his mother’s death, she had been on Social Security for seven or eight years for an injury she suffered while employed as a motel housekeeper in Vermont, he said. The cause of Schultz’s death is pending, Peterson said. She is survived by two sons, three daughters, a sister and both parents. Schultz would have turned 49 on Jan. 29.

She defended the officers’ actions as appropriate and pledged to continue to aggressively pursue domestic violence cases. Kelly said Schultz served “maybe a day or two” of a 30-day sentence, with credit for time served and community supervision. But the sentence still ________ hung over her, Peterson said. Senior staff writer Paul Gottlieb “She was on probation can be reached at 360-417-3536 for quite a while,” he said. or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily “She had a lot of court news.com.

Trial on theft of county funds rescheduled By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The trial of Catherine Betts, who is accused of stealing $617,467 from the Clallam County Treasurer’s Office, has been rescheduled for May 2. The trial was rescheduled Monday, her last sched-

uled trial date, after Betts pleaded not guilty to additional charges of money laundering and 19 counts of filing false or fraudulent tax returns with the state Department of Revenue.

charged with only firstdegree theft. The new charges bump her potential prison time, if proven guilty, to 20 years in prison. Betts, 46, allegedly stole the funds while working as a cashier at the Clallam Previous charge County Treasurer’s Office. She was previously A state Auditor’s Office

investigation found that the the office to prevent them thefts occurred from Feb. 1, from happening again. Selinda Barkhuis, who 2004, through May 19, started her first term as 2009. treasurer this month, said she plans to look into ways Changed procedures to expand the office’s interAfter the thefts were dis- nal controls. covered, then-county Trea“It’s definitely something surer Judy Scott said she I’ll be working on,” she had changed procedures in said.

The county approved a $597,516 insurance settlement to cover the missing funds in October. That doesn’t include a $10,000 deductible.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Trial in evidence room theft reset for February By Tom Callis

county Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly from the case. Allison, a former evidence tech- Allison nician who now lives in Montesano, is charged with first-degree theft and money laundering. The Sheriff’s Office in November 2006 found 129 empty evidence bags — which once contained $51,251 — stuffed in a plastic tube in the

evidence room. Authorities alleged that Allison stole the money and deleted computer records to cover the thefts. She is charged with stealing $8,644 because that’s the amount prosecutors have said they think they can prove was stolen.

ents monthly Cultural Connections programs as well as arts-focused lectures and workshops for the Sequim community. An Artists Trading Cards party and exhibition SEQUIM — A free Culare among the projects tural Connections forum on needing volunteers. Sequim’s Downtown Plan For details about Monis set for Monday evening. day’s discussion and other The discussion, from alliance activities, visit 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at The www.SequimArtsAlliance. Lodge at Sherwood Village, org. 660 Evergreen Farm Way For more about the just off North Fifth Avenue Sequim Downtown Plan, near the Old Olympic visit the city’s website at Highway intersection, will www.ci.sequim.wa.us. be a brainstorming session about how the arts can be part of downtown Sequim’s Sound circle PORT ANGELES ­­­— future. The Sequim Humanities “Our bodies love the sound of our own voice,” said and Arts Alliance, a nonVickie Dodd, a professional profit organization, pres-

sound therapist in Port Angeles. Dodd will host a community sound circle, in which all are welcome to learn about sounding ­— a form of meditation using one’s voice — at 6:30 p.m. Monday. The place will be the Studio Bob gallery at 1181⁄2 E. Front St., and a $3 to $5 donation is requested. To find out more, phone 360-452-5922 or visit www. sacredsoundschool.com.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The trial of a former Clallam County Sheriff ’s Office employee accused of stealing $8,644 from the evidence room has been rescheduled for Feb. 14. Clallam County Judge Ken Williams last week reset the trial, which was scheduled for Jan. 24, to allow more time for two motions to be heard. The motions, filed by Staci L. Allison’s attorney, seek to dismiss the case entirely and to remove

Moved for dismissal Allison’s attorney, Ralph Anderson, moved for dismissal of the case in October, citing late disclosure of evidence. Anderson maintained that the late discovery of

evidence — including a box of documents from the State Patrol, which investigated the theft — the week before the case was set to go to trial in September shows that the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office has mismanaged the case. Anderson also is seeking to remove Kelly from the case. A hearing on that matter has been set for Jan. 27. Anderson alleged a conflict of interest because the Sheriff’s Office hired the prosecuting attorney’s husband, Don Kelly, to organize

the evidence room after it became aware of the missing money. During that work, Don Kelly, a former sergeant with the Sheriff’s Office, found $5,000 in an envelope apparently hidden in the evidence room, said Sheriff Bill Benedict, who took office in January 2007. The prosecuting attorney said it doesn’t pertain to the case because that missing envelope isn’t included in the charges. She said she would move for dismissal of her husband as a witness if she stays on the case.

ered in memory of Army Private 1st Class Robert J. Near, 21, of Granger, who died Jan. 7 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. Flags are to remain at half-staff until close of business Tuesday or first thing Wednesday morning.

someone who goes above and beyond the call of duty to represent the potato industry. Voigt is head of the Washington Potato Commission. He ate nothing but potato dishes for a 60-day stretch last fall to demonstrate they are healthy and not junk food.

Anderson said he plans to call Don Kelly as a witness if the matter proceeds to trial. Benedict said two people work in the evidence room to help prevent evidence from being stolen. The missing money made it harder to prosecute cases, he said. “There were some we didn’t file on or dismissed,” Benedict said.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Briefly . . . Arts forum scheduled for Monday

Flags at half-staff State and U.S. flags at state facilities are to be flown at half-staff Tuesday, Gov. Chris Gregoire has directed. The flags will be low-

Potato Man of Year Train fatalities MOSES LAKE — Sticking to an all-potato diet for 60 days has earned Chris Voigt the National Potato Council’s Potato Man of the Year honor. The award was presented to the Pasco man last weekend at the council’s annual meeting in Las Vegas. The award goes to

SEATTLE — A railroad official said two men are dead after being struck by freight trains in separate Washington crashes early Saturday. Burlington Northern Santa Fe spokesman Gus Melonas said the accidents occurred about a half-hour, and many miles, apart. He

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said they’re the first train fatalities in Washington this year. Melonas said a man was struck by a BNSF train at 12:10 a.m. near Marsyville, about 50 miles north of Seattle. He said the man was on the tracks between rail crossings when he was hit. The train was traveling at less than 40 mph. The other fatality occurred at 12:40 a.m. about 35 miles south of Seattle, between Auburn and Sumner, when a train traveling at about 35 mph hit a man near a golf course. He said the crash site was also between rail crossings. Melonas said police and BNSF officials are investigating both crashes and didn’t have names or other details. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 16, 2011

A7

NOAA details draft management plan By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

With an eye on conservation and collaboration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has released a draft management plan for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. The management plan and accompanying environmental assessment, released Friday, revises the Port Angeles-based sanctuary’s original management plan that was published in 1994. It identifies goals and strategies for sanctuary staff to protect and conserve marine resources along the Olympic Peninsula coast for the next five to 10 years. “This plan is much more detailed and better organized than our original plan was,” said George Galasso, acting sanctuary superintendent. “It also better reflects the priorities of some of our key partners. It’s wellaligned with the coastal tribes as well as with the Washington state Ocean Action Plan.” Robert Steelquist, sanctuary education coordinator, said the only change to regulation in the plan would affect cruise ship dumping. NOAA has proposed to prohibit wastewater discharge from cruise ships within the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. “The main purpose of the plan is really to identify the priorities for our work,” Steelquist said. With limited state and federal dollars, the sanctuary will focus on collaboration. “That’s the climate we’re in,” Steelquist said. The 306-page document is available for public review on the Port Angeles-based sanctuary’s website, www. olympiccoast.noaa.gov.

NOAA proposal won’t affect marine sanctuary By Rob Ollikainen

Rocks, Quillayute Needles or Copalis National Wildlife Refuge, as well as within one nautical mile seaward from A proposed amendment of aircraft the coastal boundary of the sanctuary. overflight restrictions above national “This reflects a long, long discussion marine sanctuaries won’t change the that the sanctuary has had with the 2,000-foot overflight restriction for the FAA [Federal Aviation AdministraOlympic Coast National Marine Sanction],” Steelquist said. tuary off the Washington Coast, sanc“The reason we have these regulatuary education coordinator Robert tions is there are demonstrated Steelquist said. impacts to wildlife. “It’s always been a regulation,” said “Sanctuaries on the west coast are Steelquist, who described the proposal all pretty important habitats for as a housekeeping measure. marine mammals and seabirds.” The National Oceanic and AtmoFor Monterey Bay, Channel Islands spheric Administration is accepting and Gulf of the Farallones, flights public comment on the proposal below 1,000 feet are restricted within through Feb. 7. the designated zones. It would change the notation on A detailed description of the proFAA aeronautical charts from “recomposed changes is available at http:// mended” to “required” to provide approtinyurl.com/4ncetc2. priate notice to pilots. Comments may be submitted elecSteelquist said the proposal essentronically via the eRulemaking Portal tially creates more consistent regulaat www.regulations.gov, FDMS Docket tion between the California sanctuaries Number NOAA-NOS-2009-0237; or by and the Olympic Coast sanctuary. mail to Debra Malek, Office of National The affected sanctuaries are the Marine Sanctuaries, 1305 East-West Olympic Coast, Channel Islands, Highway, 11th floor, Silver Spring, MD Monterey Bay and Gulf of the Faral20910. lones. ________ Concerning the Olympic Coast marine sanctuary, aircraft are Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at restricted from flying below 2,000 feet 360-417-3537 or at rob.ollikainen@peninsula dailynews.com. within one nautical mile of Flattery Peninsula Daily News

Public comments will be taken through March 25. The Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council will discuss the sanctuary’s draft management plan and draft environmental assessment Friday. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. in Room 160 on the main level of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. The meeting will provide a good overview on the subject, Galasso said.

Additionally, public meetings, both at 6 p.m., are scheduled for Feb. 23 at the Clallam County Courthouse (Room 160) and Feb. 24 at the state Department of Natural Resources community room in Forks, 411 Tillicum Lane. “Some of the other differences in the plan is how it’s organized,” said Galasso, who has worked on the planning document for the past several years. “It’s a comprehensive plan. It actually includes many more activities.”

Steelquist said the process of drafting the plan “really incorporated everything we’ve learned by being around as long as we have.” “This plan, I think, really states our intent to work in that environment of collaboration,” Steelquist said. The draft plan was based on years of scientific assessment and public input, he said. It makes recommendations for goals and objectives and contains 20 action plans based on different funding levels.

“The draft management plan is the result of a collaborative effort that involved input from the public, Sanctuary Advisory Council and Intergovernmental Policy Council,” said Daniel J. Basta, director of NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, in a prepared statement. “We welcome further public review and comment as we go forward with the important job of managing this special undersea place for future generations to enjoy.” The management plan is broken down into six priorities: ■  Fulfill treaty trust responsibility. ■  Achieve collaborative and coordinated management. ■  Conduct collaborative research, assessments and monitoring to support ecosystem-based management. ■  Improve ocean literacy. ■  Conserve natural resources. ■  Understand the sanctuary’s cultural, historical and socioeconomic significance. Congress requires each of the 13 national marine sanctuaries to periodically review their management plans. The idea is to ensure that they continue to conserve, protect and enhance significant living and cultural resources and compatible commercial and recreational activities, sanctuary officials said. A final version of the new management plan is expected to be released in September. “Then, really, the work starts because now we have to implement the plan,” Galasso said. “We’re not going to be able to accomplish everything that’s listed in the plan.”

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Resources, or lack thereof, will determine how much of the plan will be implemented. It takes into account different funding levels. “It’s important to take into account not only our own resources, but also the resources of our partners,” Galasso said. “We’re very well-aligned with the state. We have a lot of common interests. One really good example is habitat mapping.” Galasso said performance measures in the plan will foster greater transparency and accountability to the public. “Frankly, the limitations are in the implementation,” Galasso said. “These are challenging times for the federal and state budget, and we need to look for areas to be more efficient.” Public comments can be mailed to Galasso, acting superintendent, Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, 115 E. Railroad Ave., Suite 301, Port Angeles, WA 98362. They also can be faxed to 360-457-8496. Comments may be submitted electronically through www.regulations. gov. Under document type, select “Proposed Rule.” Under “Keyword or ID,” type 0648-BA20.

Tuesday ticket deadline for ‘Ladies’ night By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

Quieter life Dowdell and her husband, wanting a quieter life, moved from New York City to Sequim a few years ago. A composer and arranger as well as a pianist, Dowdell has been busy working on productions around the North Olympic Peninsula, and teaching at the Olympic Music School in Sequim. Dowdell is delighted with the chance to mount “Here’s to the Ladies!” in a new space.

“I love the balcony and stage” at the Elks Lodge, she said. And the music, though created early in the 20th century, suits the moment. “These songs,” Dowdell said, “were written at another time when optimism was needed to help people get back on the track after a recession,” the one now known as the Great Depression. Dowdell made sure “Ladies” is loaded with delicious flavor and humor.

“Them There Eyes” from 1930, “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” from 1928 and that response to unrequited love, “Let’s Go Eat Worms in the Garden,” are all here. One of Shea’s favorite moments in the show is her duet with Silliman, “Good Morning Heartache.” The song, co-written by Irene Higginbotham, is joined with “Willow Weep for Me,” a 1932 composition by Ann Ronell.

Shea added that she’s enjoying the company of Ron Graham, with whom she’s worked in the past. Graham plays Mister, the only man in “Here’s to the Ladies!” Mister is a skeptic when it comes to women writing popular songs — but they show him but good. Kay Swift, Betty Comden and Vee Lawnhurst, along with Holiday, Fields and Ronell, contributed a slate of tunes to the American songbook, and “Ladies!” is a trib-

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PORT ANGELES — Honey — the kind you hear — is to be the main course. Port Angeles’ chanteuses, plus the female composers of the 1930s and ’40s, will pour their sweetest sounds into the Elks Naval Lodge next weekend in a benefit for PALOA, the Port Angeles Light Opera Association. It’s titled “A Taste of ‘Here’s to the Ladies!’” and it’s an evening of song starring Sarah Shea, Mindy Gelder and Charisa Silliman, backed by pianist Linda Dowdell and stand-up bass player Kia Armstrong. The dinner and show come to the Elks Lodge at 131 E. First St., Port Angeles, on Friday and Satur- Shea day. Tickets are $45 per person or $80 per couple. Reservations must be made by Tuesday. “Here’s to Graham the Ladies!” had its West Coast premiere last fall in Port Townsend. The musical revue w i t h Heather Dudley Nol- Silliman lette, Marlette Buchanan and Lee Harwell had sold-out performances at the Key City Playhouse. So PALOA and Dowdell, co-creator of the show, got together and started plotting. They decided on a dinner theater format and a slimmed-down version of the revue for PALOA’s annual gala. “Ladies,” however, still features a good 17 numbers, from Billie Holiday’s “Fine and Mellow” to Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields’ “Pick Yourself Up.” Dowdell then approached Shea, who’s known for her

jazz singing in nightclubs and in productions such as Olympic Theatre Arts’ “Cabaret” last year. “I had always wanted to work with her,” Shea said of Dowdell, whose musical career has taken her around the world with Mikhail Baryshnikov’s White Oak Dance Project, the Mark Morris Dance Group and other prestigious outfits.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Deadline for park haze plans missed By Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

industry resistance and competing clean air rules have slowed progress in clearing it.

ONP one of plan’s targets

SEATTLE — More than 30 years after Congress set a goal of clearing the pollution-caused haze that obscures scenic vistas at some of America’s wildest and most famous natural places, progress is still slow in coming. Saturday marked the deadline for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to approve most state plans aimed at curbing pollution from coal-fired power plants and industrial sources to improve visibility at 156 national parks and wilderness areas such as Olympic National Park and at Shenandoah and the Grand Canyon national parks. The agency hasn’t formally approved any state plans — or come up with its own, as required. “We will not have final federal plans in place by Jan. 15,” the agency said in an e-mail late Friday. The agency said it has proposed partial approval of Idaho’s plan, a partial federal plan for New Mexico and a federal plan for the Four Corners area on tribal land. The agency added that “there is progress in every state toward visibility improvements, reductions in harmful emissions and the development of state plans.” “Here’s a program intended to clean up skies of the nation’s most pristine areas. It has been pushed aside for too long and must be made a top-tier priority,” said Stephanie Kodish, attorney for the nonprofit National Parks Conservation Association.

Peninsula Daily News

Olympic National Park is one of eight Washington parks and wilderness areas targeted for reductions in haze-making air pollution under the proposed Washington state Regional Haze State Implementation Plan. Seth Preston, state Department of Ecology spokesman, said haze is a cumulative effect of automobile emissions, industry — including a huge coal-fired power plant in Centralia — wood stoves, wildfires and other sources, including ship traffic in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Some of the pollution is coming from Canada or Asia via the jet stream, Preston said in September, when a draft of the plan was released. “We’re looking at continuing to do some of the things that are already under way,” Preston said, referring to burn bans and vehicle emission standards.

‘What we can control’ “The idea is to control what we can control.” Regional Haze State Implementation Plans are aimed at restoring 140-mile visibility in “Class 1” areas across the nation. Washington state has eight Class 1 areas. In addition to Olympic National Park, they are Mount Rainier National Park, North Cascades National Park, Glacier Peak Wilderness, Alpine Lakes Wilderness, Goat Rocks Wilderness, Mount Adams Wilderness and Pasayten

Nearly three-quarters of states failed to meet an initial 2007 deadline to submit plans requiring decades-old facilities that contribute to haze at parks to update old equipment. Plans to sue So far, only 34 states have The group plans this week done so. Until states file plans and to file a notice of intent to sue the EPA for missing the reg- the EPA approves them, ulatory deadline. companies aren’t obligated to

Haze blocks views

Wilderness. A National Park Service study found that sulfur was the largest contributor to reduced visibility at Olympic National Park, “a result largely of power plants and urban emissions. “Nitrates contributed about 10 percent of the visibility reduction at the park, and mostly result from nitrogen oxide emissions from pulp and paper mills or lime-kiln activity, fires, power plants and transportation,” the study added. The Sierra Club has identified the TransAlta coal plant in Centralia as the single largest stationary source in the state of global warming gases, mercury and nitrogen oxides, an air pollutant that can cause “visibility-limiting haze in national parks and wilderness areas,” according to state Ecology. TransAlta’s 1,376-megawatt plant generates up to one-tenth of the state’s electricity. The National Park Service’s website branded the Centralia plant “a source of nitrogen, sulfur and mercury pollution at Olympic NP.” The power plant is located about 55 miles from the park’s southern boundary.

reached in June between the state and TransAlta calls on the Alberta, Canada-based company to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 20 percent and mercury pollution by 50 percent by Dec. 31, 2012. The company will spend up to $30 million on emissions-cutting technology to meet the deadline, company spokeswoman Marcy McAuley said in June. That’s on top of more than $200 million already spent to reduce sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from the plant. “TransAlta is the largest single source of nitrogen oxides but a small piece of that pie at 4 percent of the total,” Ecology spokesman Seth Preston noted in September, adding that motor vehicles are the largest source of haze-producing pollution at 56 percent. New federal fuel efficiency rules for on-road and off-road vehicles are expected by 2018 to reduce vehicle emissions of five major air pollutants by 25 percent to 95 percent, according to the Ecology plan. Climate change is likely to alter the air pollution picture, according to the Ecology plan. Climate change models predict a drier Pacific Northwest, which could lead to more wildfires, thus more smoke, in the future. Better controls In addition, Ecology’s analysis The website said “the National showed that air quality in the state Park Service currently requests is significantly altered by air pollubetter nitrogen oxide emission con- tion that originates in other trols and continues discussions regions of the world. with other agencies and the owners Outside pollution sources are of the Centralia power plant.” expected to increase over the next An air quality agreement 50 years.

make changes under the haze rule. The EPA, however, said other clean air rules have provisions to protect parks and wilderness areas. We “are working with the other states to get their plans submitted and approved as quickly as possible,” the EPA e-mailed in response to questions from

The Associated Press. The EPA said it is taking the time to ensure strong plans are in place. In Oklahoma, for example, the EPA is likely to reject a proposal, state officials said, after the state determined it wasn’t cost-effective to require six coal-fired units there to install scrubbers. The EPA said such devices

Haze-causing pollution continues to obscure scenic vistas that draw millions of visitors to parks and wilderness areas throughout the country. In eastern parks, average visibility has dropped from 90 miles to between 15 and 25 miles, while visual range in the West has been reduced from 140 miles to between 35 and 90 miles. The 1977 Clean Air Act established a national goal to restore visibility in protected areas to conditions that would exist naturally, without pollution. “When you think of national parks, you think of clean and clear air,” said John Bunyak, policy chief of the National Park Service air resources division. Reducing pollutants to improve visibility also can yield public health benefits, the EPA said. Fine particles that cause haze are linked to serious health problems, such as aggravated asthma, heart attacks and premature death. The NPCA, the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service and other groups have pushed states to consider the tough pollution controls such as scrubbers or technology that works like a car’s catalytic converter to filter nitrogen oxides.

would cut sulfur dioxide by one-third. The regional haze results from sulfates and nitrates from coal-fired power plants and industrial boilers, as well as automobiles, carbon from fires, soot and windblown dust. The high cost of controlling emissions, legal battles, the complexity of rules,

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Installing such devices, however, costs hundreds of millions of dollars, and industry officials said it would lead to skyrocketing utility rates and cripple businesses that are economic drivers in many states. Companies said they’re trying to balance improving visibility while ensuring energy reliability and protecting customers from huge rate hikes. Even some states have concluded it’s too expensive to require for some facilities, preferring alternatives such as low-sulfur coal. “It’s understandable that states are having a hard time meeting EPA demands when doing so comes at great costs to consumers,” said Paul Seby, an attorney in Denver, who represents coal producers and power companies. The EPA is requiring more of the states than is allowed under the haze rule, he said. By June, the EPA is under a court deadline to approve state plans — or come up with its own — for California, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma and Oregon, after the group sued. Park and forest officials, in comments to states, have questioned whether some overestimated the costs of installing pollution devices and whether their plans make enough progress. Haze over Big Bend National Park in Texas or Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota, for example, wouldn’t be eliminated for more than a century.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

(C) — Sunday, January 16, 2011

A9

Wanted: A few good Clallam heroes Nominations sought for Heart of Service Award Peninsula Daily News

Now is the time to nominate your local hero. We are looking for people who make a difference in Clallam County — individuals who have made our communities a better place. Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Noon Club and Peninsula Daily News invite nominations for the 2011 Clallam County Community Service Award. The award was created to recognize the dedication, sacrifice and accomplishments of local people who do extraordinary things for their neighbors, their community or the environment. This is the 31st year for the award, begun by the PDN and now co-sponsored by the Soroptimist noon club. Past winners of the Community Service Award have organized community efforts to clean up waterways, served as literacy tutors, raised money for the disabled, protected animals, organized food programs for the hungry, aided crime victims and their families, founded a cancer survivor support group, built a playground for special-needs children and were instrumental in the creation of teen activity centers.

How to nominate ■  Nominations should be made using the accompanying coupon and must be returned to the PDN by no later than 5 p.m. Monday, March 7.

unteers for Streamkeepers of Clallam County. n Dan Wilder Sr., Port Angeles auto dealer and countywide community volunteer, educational leader and philanthropist. ■  Roger Wheeler, a leader in youth baseball and basketball and the North Peninsula Building Association’s Future Builders program who has devoted countless hours of his own time to building parks and playgrounds. ■  Susan Hillgren, who has worked tirelessly with Clallam County’s at-risk youth for more than 12 years. ■  Don Stoneman who, at 79, volunteers thousands of hours of hard, physical labor to maintain and improve hiking trails in Clallam County. ■  Joe Borden, “Mr. Irrigation Festival,” SequimDungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce’s “go-to guy” and a member of the Patriot Guard Riders, attending funeral services and serving as a member of an honor guard for our fallen military heroes.

■  A letter describing the merits and accomplishments of the person being nominated should be submitted with the coupon. ■  If possible, the nomination should include supporting documents, such as copies (not originals) of other awards, newspaper articles or letters of support. ■  Anyone who lives in Clallam County can be nominated. Recipients of the Community Service Award in the past are not eligible for a 2011 award. But those previously nominated, but not selected, for a Community Service Award are eligible for renomination. A panel of judges will review the nominations and select one to seven persons to receive a Community Service Award at an evening reception in Port Angeles on Thursday, April 28. Questions? Please phone John 2009 recipients Brewer at 360-417-3500. Or Receiving the award in e-mail him at john.brewer@ 2009 were: peninsuladailynews.com. ■  Mikki Saunders, who retired in December 2010 honorees 2008 after 22 years as the Last year, judges selected director of the Port Angeles seven recipients from nomi- Food Bank. ■  Kathryn Schreiner nations made by individuals, clubs, churches, busi- of Sequim, whose volunteer nesses and other organiza- efforts stretch from being a tax counselor to devoting tions. Receiving the 2010 thousands of hours to Sequim Meals on Wheels, award were: ■  Sue Nattinger and Boys & Girls Club, Puget Coleman Byrnes (joint Sound Blood Center and recipients), longtime hands- the Dungeness Valley on, “no brag, just action” vol- Health and Wellness Clinic.

■ Jim Lunt of Port Angeles. For more than 25 years, he has guided youth baseball as president of the all-volunteer North Olympic Baseball and Softball Leagues. ■  Chuck Hatten of Port Angeles, a leader of Healthy Families of Clallam County who is also active in several programs that mentor teens. ■  Tom Schaafsma of Sequim. An outstanding carpenter, he helped remodel the Gathering Hall at Olympic Theatre Arts, led the construction of the ADA ramp at the old Dungeness Schoolhouse and a bird-observation platform and worked on numerous other community projects. He also has been an emergency relief worker in Honduras and Peru.

More honorees Other past Community Service Award honorees: ■  2008 — Harold Baar, Jacqueline Russell, Colleen Robinson, Virginia and Welden Clark of Sequim, Doc Reiss, Barbara Ann Townsend. ■  2007 — Jim Pickett, Lambert “Bal” Balducci and Kathleen Balducci, Dick and Marie Goin, Orville Campbell. ■  2006 — Steve Zenovic, Eleanor Tschimperle, Bryce Fish, John and Sue Miles, Steve Methner. ■  2005 — Rose Crumb; the Rev. Charles “Charlie” Mays; Liz Zenonian-Waud; the Rev. Mel Wilson and his wife, Kathy; Gary Colley. ■  2004 — John and Lelah Singhose; June Robinson; Roger Oakes, M.D.; Cheryl Bauman.

■  2003 — Cody Sandell;John and AnneMarie Summers; Edward Hopfner, M.D.; Patty Hannah. ■  2002 — Denise Brennan, John Pope, John Reed, Cynthia Martin. ■  2001-2000 — Phil and Deborah Morgan-Ellis, Sharon Fox, Kristin Prater Glenn, Cal Mogck, Manuela Velasquez. ■  1999 — Bill Fatherson, Dorothy Skerbeck, S. Brooke Taylor. ■  1998 — George Woodriff, Earl Gilson, Stuart Smith, Tom McCabe. ■  1997-96 — Dave Robinson, Dennis Duncan, Jo Davies, Art Judd, Alberta Thompson. ■  1995 — Mac Ruddell, Bonnie and Larry Hurd, Joyce McDaniel, Pat Soderlind, Harry Jackson.

■  1994 — Steve Tharinger, Cindy Souders, Ray Gruver, Betty and Frank Wilkerson. ■  1993 — Jessica Schreiber, Jim Jones, Betty Soderlind, Al Charles Jr. ■  1992 — Helen Dawley, Lew Bartholmew, Chuck Maiden, Arlene Engel. ■  1991 — Ginger Haberman, Tom Santos, Adabelle Square, Bob and Lois Blake, Lucile Levien. From 1980 to 1990, one Clallam County Citizen of the Year was named. Recipients were Gay Knutson, 1990; Joe Hawe, 1989; Sue Shane, 1988; Eloise Kailin, 1987; Maureen Williams, 1986; Leonard Beil, 1985; Barbara Kelso, 1984; Dorothy Hegg, 1983; Phyllis Hopfner, 1982; John Brady, 1981; Art Feiro, 1980.

Kingston tries to steer ferry through rough waters Could be next month before service resumes Peninsula Daily News news services

KINGSTON — With great hoopla, the Port of Kingston inaugurated its new passenger ferry service to Seattle in October. Within a month, the hoopla stopped, the victim of a broken boat. An engine failed on the Spirit of Kingston, forcing the port to indefinitely suspend service Nov. 18. The boat has since been fixed, but the port doesn’t want to restart service until it’s certain the vessel is in good operating condition — and can at least break even financially. It may be next month before service resumes. Whether it will continue for the long haul is a huge question for the Port of Kingston commissioners who oversee it. When it was operating, the boat carried only about 35 people a day, far below the initial target of 80. The long-term goal is 300 passengers a day. Eric Osnes, the former ferry program manager, said the operating costs for the ferry are about $2,400 a day, and the ferry needs those 300 passengers consistently to break even. Commission Chairman Pete DeBoer said the port has organized a citizen advisory committee to work out a

business plan to make the ferry a success. He hopes to have that completed in a month. “I would be so pleased if this would work,” DeBoer said. “I wake up every morning thinking about it and go to sleep every night thinking about it. “This is our chance to make it work.”

Former PA boat The two-boat service began in October, funded primarily by a $3.5 million federal grant. In addition to the Spirit of Kingston, the port owns a backup and “party” boat, the Kingston Express, formerly the Victoria Express, a 105foot, single-hull foot ferry that sailed for years between Port Angeles and Victoria. The port bought the Express from its Port Angeles owners for $650,000. DeBoer said the port had to begin service in October or it would lose the federal grant. The port also received $150,000 from the state when the latter exited the foot ferry business and sold its passenger vessels. The port is still waiting to hear on its application for a $500,000 state transit grant. The Spirit of Kingston, part of what the port calls the SoundRunner service, can carry 149 passengers. Eric Walter, an architect who works in downtown Seattle, took the Spirit of Kingston on its inaugural voyage. He is a huge fan, even

though it costs him more than taking a state ferry from Bainbridge Island. “I want to do anything I can to make it work,” said Walter. “If they have to shut it down and get their Ps and Qs together, that’s fine with me. “I’ve wanted this for years and years and years and have done almost everything I can to make it work.” DeBoer said the port is considering changes that might reduce the $15 roundtrip fare and change the return schedule from Seattle. He said the late boat was running with few riders. “Unlike any other public transportation system, we have no subsidy,” DeBoer said. “We have to make it work from the fare box, and that’s a huge challenge.” He said the port also hopes to sign on to the ORCA fare card, which can be used on most public transit systems in the Seattle area.

news services

have proved popular, said DeBoer, and the service almost broke even. Even DeBoer admits its still too soon to see if SoundRider can be successful. Said Walter: “There’s lots of people who really want it to succeed.”

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DeBoer said an advantage of the port running the ferry service is that it doesn’t have to make a profit. “A break-even situation would be heaven for us,” he said. “[Seattle Mayor Mike] McGinn wants fewer cars in Seattle, and this is a way to do it, just having this one little run.” Jan Zufelt, a Kingston real estate agent and former president of the Kingston Chamber of Commerce, is a

and maintenance, Parrish said. This particular aircraft is the only such jet in NOAA’s arsenal, and it will reposition from Yokota Air Force Base in Japan to Honolulu in March. “This winter season, residents, businesses and property are better protected with the help of this plane, which significantly improves forecasting of winter storms,” U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Mountlake Terrace, said in a news release last week. Cantwell is the chair of the Senate’s Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and Coast Guard Subcommittee.

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SEATTLE — Weather forecasts in the Northwest will get a boost this winter from a high-tech jet now based in Japan that gathers data on storms in the northern Pacific Ocean several days before they hit the West Coast. The high-altitude, twinengine Gulfstream IV-SP jet looks like a business jet, but it’s packed with scientific equipment that can help see atmospheric details through layers of clouds — something satellites are unable to do, according to Jack Parrish of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

Administration, a meteorologist, flight director and the jet’s project manager. “It certainly improves things,” said Parrish, of the NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations. He said the jet ups the accuracy of the five- to sixday forecast. The jet also helps get forecasts faster than usual. It should give emergency planners at least an extra day to prepare for storms. The aircraft has flown its Japan-based missions since early 2009 but couldn’t help with 2010 snow forecasts in November and December because it was busy with hurricane season

stood up at the meeting was there to say, ‘We want this boat.’ “We just can’t afford to not have this ferry.” Meanwhile, the SoundRunner has been running special boats from Kingston to Seahawks games, which

Break-even ‘heaven’

Japan-based NOAA jet will help forecast Northwest-bound storms Peninsula Daily News

huge supporter. “What happened is we got out of the gate too soon, but we had to because of the federal funding,” she said. The port has hosted meetings about the future of the passenger service, she said, “and almost everybody who


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 16, 2011

Commentary

Page

A10

Help! I need a wedding planner! IN ONE WEEK, I will be a married man. The question I am most Michael commonly asked by my Showalter guy friends is, “Are you nervous?” To which I respond, “No. Why? Should I be?” Now I’m nervous about the fact that I’m not nervous. The question that I am most commonly asked by my women friends is, “Are you excited?” I have the same response. “No. Why? Should I be?” Full disclosure: I am excited, but I’ll never cop to it. Never!

One more week of freedom, and then I’m destined to an eternity of sharing my life with another person. In reflecting on what was and what will be, I have compiled a short list of things that I will miss about my bachelorhood. ■ Let’s start with the obvious: I will miss dating. Oh, how I loved the small talk (“So, what are you going to order? I hear the (fill in special dish) is really good here,” “What kind of throat lozenge do you prefer most?” “I’ve also been to Santa Fe!”), the anxiety (“I e-mailed her five minutes ago, and she still hasn’t written me back! She obviously hates me!”) and the ambiguity (“She said she’s not that into me. What does that mean?!”). ■ I will miss hanging out with my buddies (“Guys, why don’t we have girlfriends? We’re

Speaking Out

such losers.”). ■ I will miss my late-night carousing (“There’s nothing on TV. I guess I’ll just make a sandwich and watch ‘Die Hard’ again.”). ■ I will miss eating cereal with a fork. ■ I will miss leaving the seat up with total impunity. What a strange journey these past six months of wedding planning have been. Who knew flowers cost so much money? Who knew it would be so difficult to make a seating chart? Who knew that WilliamsSonoma had so many different types of serving pans? A good friend told us when we were first engaged: “The wedding is not just the wedding itself. “The wedding is everything

leading up to the wedding. “The wedding itself is just the curtain call.” If that’s true, then our wedding has been a five-act play. ■ Act 1 is when the main characters are introduced. Our main characters, we soon discovered, are her mother and my mother. The De Niro and Pacino, if you will. Everyone else has a supporting role (myself and my fiancee included). ■ Act 2 has all the comedy set pieces. On our invitations, the word “wedding” is accidentally misspelled and reads “welding.” They have to be redone. ■ Act 3 has some big action sequences set to music. Imagine, if you will, a rocking song playing while the groom, me

(brilliantly played by Matt Damon), tries on literally thousands of different blue ties, while his fiancee (played by my fiancee) doesn’t like any of them. ■ Act 4 is the sad part in which some people tell you that they can’t make it to the wedding — and perhaps, more sadly, some people tell you that they can. ■ Act 5 happens next week. I’ll let you know how it goes. ________ Michael Showalter is a comedian, writer, actor and director. He is one of the four columnists who appear here every Sunday. Contact him at www. michaelshowalter.net or at Tribune Media Services, Attn: Michael Showalter, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1500, Chicago, IL 60611.

How worried are you about increasing gas prices?

Rachelle Reeves

Joe Nutsford

Myriaha McClane

Sam McElravy

Kelly Riddle

James Clendening

Valerie Morganstern

Gregg Elwood

Housekeeper Clallam Bay

Retired mechanic Port Townsend

Caregiver Port Hadlock

Retired educator Forks

Housekeeper Port Angeles

Retired engineer Sequim

“Boy, I’m not a big fan of it going up. Worried? I’m practically freaking out about it. My sister said it’ll go up to $5 [a gallon]. It looks like tough times getting worse for all of us.”

“I’m concerned about the rising cost of gas because as the price of gas goes up, it has an escalating effect on all sections of the economy.”

“I’m very worried because it takes money from everything else we need it for, like food, living expenses and just getting to work. It makes it tough to budget.”

“It’s corporate America raping us once again. And yet, we can’t do anything about it. They won’t listen to us. They give us all kinds of excuses for raising the prices.”

“Yes, I’m worried. We’re going to be limited more in our own travels. It’s affecting everyone. There’s nothing we can really do about it, either. It’s a global problem.”

“Somewhat worried. Our economy is not going back up, and this doesn’t help at all. We need far better alternative sources of energy for cars and a price that’s right.”

Retired lab researcher Port Angeles

Retired Navy corpsman Port Angeles

“It’s going up, and I’m worried. Where is it headed? Is there going to be a cap on it? We need to use the bus now more than ever. That’s very important.”

“I’m more than worried. I’m angry. Prices should be going down to help our economy . . . Gas companies are making profits hand over fist, and I’m on a fixed income.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices Upcoming ‘mess’? I read the article about the celebration party for the dam removal now scheduled for the weekend of Sept. 17, 2011 [“Planning Begins For Party To Fete Removal Of Dams,” Jan. 12 PDN]. I also read the article about Dan Morrison’s plan for hosting the Sprint boat racing finals in Port Angeles the same weekend [“Sprint Boats A-Coming. 4-Acre Track To Be Cut Out Of Field West Of Port Angeles,” Jan. 7-8 PDN]. If his predictions are correct, we can expect 6,000 to 8,000 people here from out of town for the finals. I would appreciate the Peninsula Daily News’ attention and continued reporting on the evolution of these two events, as it sounds like a mess waiting to happen. We live adjacent to the Lower Elwha Klallam reservation and just west past Dan Morrison’s Spring boat racetrack property on Edgewood Drive, which means we will be greatly impacted by the confluence of these two events. It sounds like a perfect weekend for Port Angeles residents to be out of the area completely, which

would impact the participation in an event that really is important for Port Angeles — celebrating the removal of the Elwha River dams. In the article on the celebration for dam removal, Olympic National Park spokesman Dave Reynolds said, “We envision things going on all around town.” But it sounds like no one will be able to get there from here. Judi Gillies, Port Angeles

John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson

Suzanne Delaney

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 suzanne.delaney@peninsuladailynews.com

Executive Editor

Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

such a manner as to make any lead escapement rare and unusual, as the range portion is high and dry. Further, the backstop material will be changed with some regularity and the lead recycled. This is not only a shooting range, but a recreation area that’s badly needed. Let’s not spread any untruths, please. Eddy V. Maupin, Port Angeles

citizens throughout the country off of our couches and into the town halls and onto the streets begging the true bullies not to pass this horrible health care law. The bullies ignored us and jammed it down our throats. In November, many of them paid a price. I saw no acts of violence during this series of protests. In fact, the only acts of violence reported in the Who’s a bully? media were two separate I read the letter from attacks on tea party mem‘Off the wall’ the writer of the Jan. 12 The writer of the Jan. 9 Peninsula Voices letter “Dr. bers by union thugs, according to Fox News. Peninsula Voices letter King and Bullies” and If some person running “Shooting Range” was off found myself astonished at for office advocates viothe wall. the writer’s assertions and lence, that person should No one has disputed conclusions. not be elected. that the area of a specific He is a leader in the If either side of this spot at Salt Creek was left-leaning organization debate becomes a bully, used by the Army as a MoveOn, which is a radical then the people should backstop of a shooting arm of the Democratic range. Party, for those who are not reject them, which is what happened to the Democrats It was specifically stated familiar with the group. in November. that it was not a spot norThe majority of AmeriAll the people in Washmally visited by children cans who voted in Novemington, D.C., should listen digging in the soil. ber resoundingly rejected to the people, and when In the days when this what the Democrats have they do not, then the peoarea was used as a shootbeen doing with spending ing range, no attempt was on bailouts, stimulus pack- ple in their righteous anger should rise up and remove made to recover and ages and health care. them at election time. recycle any of the lead They were not bullies, It is disgusting when but patriots who love their containing bullets. politicos try to use a tragThere is a totally differ- country and are very edy such as the Arizona worried. ent situation proposed at mass murder for political I am just a average Sadie Creek. person, but the health care gain. The backstop or backMy prayers go out the stops will be constructed in bill got me and many other

Peninsula Daily News 360-417-3500

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Advertising Director

Sue Stoneman

Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

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Peninsula Daily News

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Dave Logan

and

Steve Mullensky

and e-mail

families of all the victims. the oft-repeated lie easily Bill Conn, becomes truth to a lot of Sequim people, especially those with pre-determined ‘Show-biz’ news opinions. Add to lies extreme To the writer of the Jan. volume. 11 letter “Fox News The outraged screaming Blasted”: Well said. (you can even hear it in Little “news” from any print) of demented (and source is really news. Mainstream reporting is “non-mented”?) professorial generally a bland upchuck buffoons (with documented of what the reporter was substance-abuse problems) fed, sound bytes, stock may be good for the opposvideo clips — speaking ing party. here of “moderate” media. Why? Even these “more balThe huge part of Ameranced” sources feature inof- ica near the midpoint of fensiveness, entertainment any issue may tend to be and shallowness, satisfying repelled by extremism, the sensitivities (or lack back across the 50 percent thereof) of advertisers and line. ownership. Is there an unfixable Because of economic facparty split? tors driving the business, There’s no denying that news is 50 percent showif a lunatic pushes the biz. Take the show-biz anal- right buttons, some other lunatic will pull the trigger, ogy to a whole ’nother literally. level, and you’ve got Fox. Extreme? Manson, HitMaybe we should call it ler? faux? It’s 100 percent showMay all be held accountbiz. able for their words, It’s successful show-biz actions and true intent simply because it makes someday. money with a scarily large Nobody should have to block of adherents to its die or suffer so cesspool“principles.” dwelling hatemongers can So do Worldwide Wresget rich. tling Federation and TNA Michael Kuenzli, Wrestling, with the same Sequim dialogue and relevance. Turn to Voices/A11 As letter writer says,

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, weekend commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 votes of members of government and defense ‘Severe challenge’ industry, education, the poor, disabled, blacks, LatiThe new Congress will nos, Muslims, unions, have a severe challenge Puerto Ricans, homosexuslowing the march to als, veterans, seniors, corn socialism. farmers, college students A three-pronged attack and minority businesses to on constitutional rights name a few. will continue with direct Uncontrolled deficits attacks on private business will create severe inflation, and the family. additionally taxing everyEach is being overrun one, taxpayers and entitleby legislation, by regulament recipients alike. tion and by fiat. Sacrifices are required The veto pen of the of everyone in attempting a president will derail most return to fiscal sanity, but attempts. primarily the hemorrhagFurther unconstituing caused by continually tional regulations circumventing Congress are being increasing government spending must be reversed. enacted. Earmarks and excessive Additional presidential government benefits are a decrees can be expected, good place to start. such as takeover and/or control of more land and oil Paul Hanway, drilling. Sequim Industries already under government control For PA levy include railroads, auto, My wife and I spent the health care, insurance, week before Thanksgiving banking, credit and visiting our two sons, both finance, farming and communications, with electrical of whom attend small colleges in the Midwest. power, transportation, airWe walked around camlines and manufacturing puses, met roommates, soon to follow. talked to coaches and even Rights, individual and attended a history class. business are violated by The boys are in good the health-care-program places. insurance and insurers’ They are doing well requirements. with academics, athletics Government controls and friends. the water we drink, food As we gathered to eat we eat, clothing we wear, turkey, there was much for air we breathe, car, home which we could give construction, health, land thanks. use, credit, banking, mortFlying home, I thought gages, fishing and fisheries, about the factors that have timber, roads and highshaped the boys up to this ways, airports, waterways, point, and I would have to many of the products we buy, and now the Internet. include their formative Our taxes plus huge def- experiences at Port Angeles icits are used for buying schools.

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Both boys met teachers who challenged and encouraged them. Both participated in a music program that stretched them. And both learned perseverance and teamwork from committed coaches. The Port Angeles School District is asking us to support a maintenance and operations levy to replace the current levy that expires at the end of the year. On the one hand, all of us are keeping a close eye on expenses these days. On the other hand, recent economic challenges provide even more incentive for us to invest in the young people of our community. While our boys are no longer in the local school system, Elizabeth and I continue to be thankful for what they received here. I can think of no better way to express that thanks than by voting in favor of the upcoming levy. Please join me. David Christian, Port Angeles

advantage to our health. Living where we do, we should be enjoying pristine water. Our city, with all the present budget problems, would be wise to eliminate this hazard and save thousands yearly. Helen Alexander, Port Angeles

Giffords shooting

The PDN reports that Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, Democrat of Arizona, was on Sarah Palin’s “target” list [“Did Heated Talk Lead To Attacks In Arizona?” Jan. 9 PDN] Palin depicted Giffords’ district in the “crosshairs of a gunsight,” according to the article. Giffords’ Republican opponent, Jesse Kelly, a former Marine supported by the tea party group, at fundraisers urged supporters to help him remove Giffords from office by firing a fully loaded M-16 rifle. Now Rep. Giffords is fighting for her life, the victim of an assassination attempt by a deranged gunman who invaded an open-air public meeting in No to fluoride Tucson on Jan. 8 with the Fluoride applied topiintention of killing the cally hardens tooth enamel. young woman lawmaker. Drinking it creates britThe gunman shot to tle bones more subject to death U.S. District Judge fractures, studies have John Roll, 9-year-old Chrisshown. tina Greene and Giffords’ Babies and small chilaide, Gabe Zimmerman, dren exposed on a regular and three other people. basis have been known to Altogether, 19 people develop mottled teeth. were wounded or killed in One wonders how well the shooting spree. the amount being dumped House Speaker John in our water is being moni- Boehner, Republican of tored. Ohio, postponed a vote on a Obviously, it is not an bill to repeal the health

Sunday, January 16, 2011

A11

and e-mail

care reform bill, which Giffords voted for. Her courage in standing up to the campaign of lies, distortions and intimidation against health care reform enraged the rightwing extremists in Arizona. Now we are counting the dead. Those who whipped up hatred and violence with the aim of intimidating Rep. Giffords should be tried, convicted and put in jail. Tim Wheeler, Sequim

‘Income gap’ Where is Robin Hood when you need him? We, the state of Washington taxpayers, had the chance to tax the rich last fall with a state income tax, and we let it fail. The opponents of the bill claimed that corporations would not be able to attract top talent and that it would therefore hurt the business community. But isn’t it clear to us that corporations downsize, outsource and create as few jobs as soon as possible? The logging practices of timber companies locally show this situation (Crown Zellerbach, Rayonier) and the dying communities that follow. Meanwhile, there is a tremendous amount of work to be done and millions of people needing work. Do we really expect the corporations to take on this work — to repair infrastructure, to educate young people, to provide health

care for everyone? We may not like taxes, we may not like government, but these are the best means for creating a decent society. Good government programs such as Basic Health are emasculated because, as Gov. Gregoire said, “State government can’t do it anymore” (“Government Charity Gap May Widen. Those Who Once Donated Becoming Clients In Need,” Jan. 3 PDN). And yet, the income gap between rich and poor grows. Where is the equality here? Why are programs like basic health such a threat? Why are politicians who propose spending for these type of programs called socialists? What is socialism? Why do “socialist” countries like France or Norway have such good health care? Are their citizens less free than ours? Let’s begin to educate ourselves, please. Dan Burdick, Port Angeles

Egan’s column New York Times Columnist Timothy Egan can replace Thomas Friedman anytime. Timothy is a breath of fresh air. His commentary on Hugh “Reptilian” Hefner [“‘Reptilian’ Hefner Just A Spectacle,” Jan. 10 PDN] provided us with a muchneeded chuckle Jan. 10. Right on! Bobbie Rhoads, Sequim

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

group: Carol. She consistently takes the extra step to ensure mail is delivered properly, rain or shine. She is wonderful!

from the guy who comes and visits multiple times a day, driving his jeep like a crazy man [regarding a Jan. 9 rave].

smoke, to the holier-than-thou about burning pallets: Ever thought that it might be EDITOR’S NOTE: Please the only means for heat for this submit comments about columperson? Maybe? nists and news content as signed He’s not as fortunate as you, THANK YOU TO the Clalletters to the editor. WHEN I FIRST went shoplam County Sheriff’s Department and this is the best he can do at Also please, no rants about ping for [an appliance], I went to for its rapid response and assisthis time. specific businesses. the Port Angeles version of a So much for brotherly love. tance last Wednesday night. Many thanks! major retailer and received nothWe are appreciative. ing but excuses, not even a delivREGARDING RANT IN last Thank you, also, to our neighRave of the Week ery date. bors and Neighborhood Watch for Sunday’s paper about old palletThe clerk there also seemed wood burning: communicating, helping and A BIG THANK-you to Patriunwilling to tell me the differDid the ranter realize that the maintaining safety where we live. cia near Sixth and M streets in ence between two similar models. person may not be able to keep Port Angeles for delivering my [I went to a big-box retailer in up with electric bills? international student safely Sequim] and I received my Perhaps the person really Rant of the Week home when she got off on the [appliance] with no delivery needs to keep his home warm by wrong bus stop last week. charge in three days. making an effort to cut up the DRIVERS BEWARE! DO pallets and burn wood he can you know what and where your THANKS TO NOON Soropfind. dimmer switch is on your timist Club [Port Angeles] for I think the writer sounds . . . and other Raves vehicles? bringing milk and goodies to selfish and shallow. Why don’t you use it? afternoon Boys & Girls Club at TO ALL OF the fantastic Downtown, when there are the housing project. TO A NEIGHBOR in the folks at WorkSource, a friendly, lots of lights on, you can use your Such devotion to our young Salt Creek-Camp Hayden Road caring and extremely profesdimmer. area west of Port Angeles for the sional staff that always goes that people. When you meet another car at thundering sound effects at extra mile to help. night, kindly dim your lights! A GRATEFUL RAVE to approximately 12:10 a.m. New Thank you! When you come up behind a whoever left my lost butterfly Year’s Eve. car at night, dim your lights. The sound was a real treat to A BIG THANKS to Seth Wil- cane at my door a day or two everyone with animals. holm and Jacoby Square for all of before Christmas. Thank you very much. Other neighbors did give a their dedication and coaching the . . . and other Rants treat with a beautiful fireworks Queen of Angels school [Port BIG RAVES FOR the snowdisplay earlier. Angeles] boys basketball team. DOES SHAME EXIST man perched on the bench in What you did was not beautianymore? Personally, I’m embar- ful nor pleasant to endure. MANY THANKS TO the two front of the Sequim Domino’s rassed at exposures, especially Pizza. young men and the SUV fellow Thanks for causing a big smile “cleavage.” A DEATH WISH [by] kids who came to my aid and rescued and a chuckle on an otherwise and other people dressed in black me when my car went over an RANT TO FANS of the cold and dreary early-morning with no visible means of seeing unmarked drop-off at a mobile glorious Seattle team. commute! them on the street or crosswalk. home park on the west side of Pack your canned goods and We drivers at least deserve town. gather your bottled water. I WANT TO thank that nice the courtesy of an indication of None of you would take any This may be yet another sucPort Angeles man who is very where you are. money for your good deed. neighborly by installing massive cessful premonition of NostradaYou, too, have a responsibility. mus, predicting the end of the lights to highlight a problem Or do you have a death wish? WHILE OUR POSTAL world to come. coming from farther down the delivery service north of Sequim alley. RANT TO THE people who is very good, there is one carrier who stands out from the Most of the problem stems TO RANTER ABOUT jog, bike and walk in the dark

wearing black clothes. I had to stop for three different ones on my way home in Sequim the other night. A jogger with ear buds couldn’t even hear me. RANT FOR WHOEVER leaves window panes leaning next to the large glass recycling bins in town. They’re only for bottles and jars, not window glass. Besides, how do you plan to get a 3-foot-wide piece of glass through a 9-inch hole for bottles? A RANT TO the local store for marking up [health supplements] and charging so much for them. That is why people don’t shop locally. A little mark-up is one thing, but almost doubling what you can buy it for online is not good business. ________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), e-mail us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Work begins on Lake Mills log jam Site staying open for recreation By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Workers in two 16-foot motorboats began uncoupling a 10-acre flotilla of logs on Lake Mills on Friday and Saturday. For about four hours, they nudged the logs toward a current that carried the debris through a gate in the Glines Canyon Dam. There, a curling torrent of water hurled the logs 210 feet from the top of the edifice down to the comparatively passive Elwha River.

Untangling logs Federal Bureau of Reclamation workers are untangling several hundred logs that are putting pressure on a log boom that protects the dam’s spillway from debris and potential failure, said Kevin Yancy, Elwha Dam power plant supervisor. If the boom broke, the debris could clog up the spillway, sending water over the top of the dam in an uncontrolled release of water that no one wants to see. “We could have spillway failure with all that there and have a lot of water going downriver that we weren’t planning on dumping,” Yancy said. “That’s a key concern with dam safety,” he said. “That’s why the log booms are in place there.” During the project, which is expected to take several days, Lake Mills will remain open for recreation. The schedule for breaking up the log jam will be dependent on water flow that must be fed by sufficient snowpack in the Olympics, Yancy said. On Friday, 5,000 cubic feet a second roiled through the gate. That equals 2.25 million gallons a second, Yancy said. Bureau of Reclamation workers clear the lake annually of woody debris.

Delta clearing trees But this year, the number of nuisance logs dramatically increased after a delta at the mouth of Lake Mills was cleared last fall. The 37-acre delta, which gradually built up after Glines Canyon Dam was

Keith Thorpe (2)/Peninsula Daily News

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation employees John Settle, left, and Frank Horn work at the log boom protecting the Glines Canyon Dam at Lake Mills in Olympic National Park on Saturday as part of an effort to remove part of a log jam near the dam.

“We could have spillway failure with all that there and have a lot of water going downriver that we weren’t planning on dumping. That’s a key concern with dam safety. That’s why the log booms are in place there.”

Kevin Yancy Elwha Dam power plant supervisor

built on the Elwha River in 1927, was shaved of alder trees and a channel dug through it to release sediment as part of the $351 million Elwha River Restoration project. The project includes tearing down the Glines Canyon Dam and its sister dam, the Elwha Dam, farther downriver beginning in September. A log is carried over the edge through a control gate on the Glines Canyon Dam on Lake Mills in

Olympic National Park on Saturday.

‘Quite a challenge’ About 90 percent of the logs that are putting pressure on the boom are from the delta-clearing project, Yancy said Friday. He stood on top of the wind- and rain-swept dam near the spillway while his boat-borne Bureau of Reclamation colleagues, dwarfed by the floating mass of

wood, separated the logs. Trees plucked from the delta still have their root wads intact, making the job this year even more difficult. “They’re are all tied together like this,” Yancy said, knitting his rubbergloved fingers together. “To push that apart is

quite a challenge,” he said.

20-story free fall For most of Friday morning, workers armed with a chain saw and 18-foot pike poles fought 20-knot winds, cutting through large logs and clearing a path to the main boom gate.

They finally opened it, allowing the debris to float toward its 20-story free fall. Some of these logs will hang up on the river’s shoreline. But many will float about nine miles downriver to Lake Aldwell, bumping up against the smaller, 108foot Elwha Dam to be flung

once again over a giant wall. “In a week or so, we’re going to have to go to the lower dam and do the same thing,” Yancy said.

________

Senior staff writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

SARC recreation center elects chairwoman No fee hikes planned this year Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Susan Sorensen, who has served on the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center board since 2002, has been elected by her fellow SARC board commissioners to serve as board chairwoman for 2011.

She took over for Erika Starks, who has served as chairwoman for the past two years. Sorensen was elected by Starks, Bob MacAulay and Melinda Griffith. Sorensen said that, though the cost of propane,

power and water have gone up, SARC will institute no increase in fees this year, primarily because of the poor economy. Discussions may resume about fees when SARC commissioners consider the facilities’ 2012 budget, she said. Sorensen said SARC is now completely funded by fee-paying users who come through the door.

It no longer receives Clallam County Park and Recreation District No. 1 tax levy dollars since voters twice rejected such an assessment in 2003. That original assessment was passed in 1984.

left vacant with the death of SARC Commissioner Annette Kuss are being accepted until 4 p.m. Jan. 31. The appointee would fill for the remainder of the fouryear term. Voters would elect a commissioner for the seat in November. Applications for seat Address applications to Sorensen said applica- Susan Sorensen, chair, 610 tions to fill the board seat N. Fifth Ave., Sequim, WA

98382, or drop it off at the front desk at SARC. To qualify for the position, the applicant must reside within the boundaries of Clallam County Park and Recreation District No. 1, which are similar to those of the Sequim School District. For more information, phone the center at 360683-3344.

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 16, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Rejects vault Hawks WHEN THE SEATTLE Seahawks went to work under a new coaching staff last spring, the offense ran plays that were unofficially dubbed “Stokley plays” because they were ones offensive coordinator Jeremy Bates was familiar with from his time coaching receiver Brandon Stokley in Denver. The problem was, Brandon John Stokley was not a Seahawk. That Boyle signing was still a few months away. Eventually, however, Stokley found his way to Seattle, and as has been the case many times over this season, one team’s castoff became another team’s key contributor. As the Seahawks have spent a season turning over the roster at a head-spinning rate under first-year coach Pete Carroll and general manager John Schneider — Seattle has made 284 roster moves and counting — they have signed and traded for a number of players who have become unlikely keys to the team’s even more improbable run to the division round of the playoffs. The Seahawks Also . . . are playing Chi■ Packers cago in the second top Atlanta round of the playto move on offs not just to NFC title because of the play game/B4 of established veterans like quarterback Matt Hasselbeck and linebacker Lofa Tatupu, and the emergence of highly touted rookies like left tackle Russell Okung and free safety Earl Thomas, but also because of the contributions of players like Stokley who were cast aside by other teams. “He was the missing part, really,” Hasselbeck said of Stokley. “I mean, we were running a lot of these plays that were — we called them ‘Stokley plays’ because this offense is, in large part, the Mike Shanahan 2008 Denver Broncos offense that Jeremy Bates is running. “We tried a bunch of people there and they were pretty good, they were all right, but they weren’t Stokley.” Eventually the Seahawks were able to get Stokley to run the Stokley “Stokley plays” when Denver, which had placed Stokley on injured reserve to start the season, released him in late September. Not surprisingly, Stokley was able to fit in quickly in Seattle’s offense, catching four passes for 62 yards less than a week after signing. He finished the regular season with 31 catches for 354 yards in 11 games, and had four catches for 73 yards in last weekend’s playoff win. “Him coming in was really a blessing,” Hasselbeck said. “I mean, the Broncos cut him and he got healthy and he’s meant a lot to our team. He’s definitely helped. Helped me a lot.”

Stokley one of many And Stokley is hardly the only person to play a big role in the Seahawks’ success after being deemed expendable by another team. The Eagles gave up defensive end Chris Clemons and a fourth-round pick to get Darryl Tapp from Seattle, and Clemons ended up starting and leading Seattle with 11 sacks. Defensive end Raheem Brock, who finished the year with nine sacks, was cut by two teams before the Seahawks signed him in the week leading up to the season opener. The Jets cut ties with Leon Washington, who has returned three kicks for touchdown this year, after he broke his leg last year, and gave up the former Pro Bowler for a fifthround and seventh-round pick. And of course there is receiver Mike Williams, who spent two years out of football before signing with the Seahawks and becoming the team’s leading receiver this season. The Seahawks are playing this weekend in part because Hasselbeck threw for four touchdowns last week in a win over New Orleans, but also because of the contributions of players who weren’t here last year, or in many instances, weren’t even here in training camp. Turn

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Boyle/B4

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Second City seconds Hawks back in Chicago for shot at NFC title tilt By Andrew Seligman

After all, the defending champions are out. Instead, the Bears (11-5) get the first division winLAKE FOREST, Ill. — The ner with a losing record. Chicago Bears know firsthand “We know what happened in how dangerous of an opponent the first game,” linebacker Lance the Seattle Seahawks are. Briggs said, referring to a 23-20 The Bears rememloss in October. ber what happened They saw what the last time Seattle happened to the visited Soldier Field, Saints, too. so their guard was up They saw a Seaheading into today’s hawks team that went divisional playoff Next Game 7-9 and needed a home game. win over St. Louis to Today get into the playoffs Losing to the Seapull off a big upset. hawks again would be vs. Bears They saw Seattle’s a huge letdown for a at Chicago Marshawn Lynch team that earned the Time: 10 a.m. running through and NFC North champi- On TV: Ch. 13 tossing aside at least onship and a firsta half dozen defendround bye. And when Seattle beat the Saints last ers on a touchdown run in a week, that seemed like a good 41-36 win at Qwest Field. break for Chicago. Turn to Hawks/B4 The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll speaks to quarterbacks Matt Hasselbeck (8) and Charlie Whitehurst, far right, during the first half of last week’s wild card playoff game in Seattle.

Peninsula College

Pirates split in Seattle Peninsula Daily News

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Neah Bay’s Titus Pascua (23) goes up for a layup Clallam Bay’s Richie Foulkes (12) and Justin Welever (4) during Friday night’s North Olympic League game in Clallam Bay.

Red Devils on top Neah Bay sweeps Bruins, has look of NOL favorites By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

CLALLAM BAY — Two weeks into the North Olympic League basketball season, there’s little doubt who the favorites are. The same ones as just about every other year. The Neah Bay boys and girls cemented their status as NOL

standard bearers with a pair of blowout victories Friday night against the Clallam Bay Bruins. Both teams nearly doubled up their Bruin counterparts — each of whom came into Friday’s doubleheader tied atop the NOL standings with Neah Bay — to grab sole possession of first place in league. The Red Devil girls rolled to a

Also . . . ■ Clallam Bay girls nipped by Quilcene on road/B3

60-31 victory as winds howled outside the Bruins’ remodeled gymnasium, then the boys ran away with a 84-47 triumph.

Boys game The Clallam Bay boys (1-1 in league, 9-4 overall) made the mistake of trying to run with Neah Bay (2-0, 9-2) on Friday night. Turn

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Rivals/B3

SEATTLE ­— Baskets were hard to come by for the Peninsula College men’s basketball team Saturday. Thanks to Also . . . the Pirates’ defensive ■ Cougars effort, howget first ever, they road win were even in Pac-10 more scarce play/B4 for the Seattle Community College Storm. DeShaun Freeman had 17 points, eight rebounds and three blocks to lead Peninsula to a 72-55 NWAACC North Division win in Seattle on Saturday. “Our guys showed a lot of resiliency after the past game at Skagit [an 86-72 loss Wednesday],” first-year Pirates coach Lance Von Vogt said. “They showed some heart and character. They played with great energy on the defensive end. “I was really proud of how they played.” The Pirates (3-1 in North, 8-5 overall) led from start to finish Saturday thanks in large part to an early-game offensive surge and a strong defensive effort the rest of the way. Peninsula jumped out to a 19-5 lead against Seattle’s man-to-man defense. After Seattle switched to a 2-3 zone, however, the Pirates cooled off on the offense and continued getting stops. Peninsula held the Storm (2-2, 3-9) to just 36 percent shooting on the night while also forcing 17 turnovers. That was enough to make up for a so-so shooting night (29 of 70 for 41 percent) from the field, as was the fact the Pirates turned the ball over just five times themselves. “To win by 17 against a good squad on the road while shooting that poorly just shows you how tough our defense was tonight,” Von Vogt said. “We competed for every loose ball and contested every shot and made them earn everything they got.” Turn

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Pirates/B2

Spartan boys fall at Hoquiam Forks’ turnovers prove costly in game-changing third quarter run Peninsula Daily News

HOQUIAM — A disastrous third quarter spelled doom for the Forks boys basketball team in its 60-41 loss to Hoquiam on Friday night.

“We played well at times, but the third quarter was our Achilles heal,” Forks coach Scott Justus said. “We have to play consistent and we didn’t Turnovers were the deciding do that.” factor for the Spartans (3-4 in Forks turned over the ball league, 6-7 overall), allowing on four of their first seven posthe Grizzlies to extend their sessions of the third quarter lead in the second half of the and only scored five points on SWL-Evergreen Division contest. 2-of-8 shooting.

Preps Tyler Penn and Bryce Johnson each had nine points to lead Forks, which didn’t have a single scorer in double figures against the secondplace Grizzlies (6-1 in league, 11-2 overall). Turn

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Preps/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Area Sports

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

10 a.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Seattle Seahawks at Chicago Bears in NFC Divisional Playoffs. 10 a.m. (26) ESPN PBA Bowling, World Championship at Las Vegas, Nev. 10:30 a.m. (7) KIRO Men’s College Basketball, Purdue at West Virginia. 11 a.m. (2) CBUT AHL Hockey, Toronto Marlies at Abbotsford Heat. 11 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s College Basketball, University of Central Florida at Southern Methodist. Noon (25) FSNW Women’s College Basketball, Kansas at Nebraska. 1 p.m. (5) KING Figure Skating, Skate for the Heart at Covelli Centre in Youngstown, Ohio. 1 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s College Basketball, Illinois at Penn State. 1:30 p.m. (7) KIRO NFL Football, New York Jets at New England Patriots in AFC Divisional Playoffs. 2 p.m. (25) FSNW Women’s College Basketball, Arizona at Arizona State. 3:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis, ITF Australian Open at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia. 4 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA Golf, Sony Open at Waialae Country Club in Honolulu, Hawaii. 4:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Men’s College Basketball, North Carolina at Georgia Tech. 6 p.m. (26) ESPN NBA Basketball, Denver Nuggets at San Antonio Spurs. 7 p.m. (25) FSNW Men’s College Basketball, Washington at California. Midnight (27) ESPN2 Tennis, ITF Australian Open at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia.

SPORTS SHOT

Bowling LAUREL LANES 7 Cedars Mixed Jan. 14 Men’s high game: Sam Bugge, 220; men’s high series: Sam Bugge, 573. Women’s high game: Louise Demetriff, 190; women’s high series: Louise Demetriff, 493. Leading team: Team 13. Mix & Match Jan. 13 Men’s high game: Joe Morrison, 266; women’s high game: Brett Allen, 699. Women’s high game: Rita Berson, 202; women’s high series: Rita Berson, 575. Leading league: Lincoln. SEQUIM OLYMPIC LANES 9 Pin No Tap Jan. 13 Men’s high game: Pete Centeno, 202; men’s high series: Cliff Silliman, 522. Women’s high game: Ginny Bowling, 184; women’s high series: Marilyn Hooser, 460. First Federal Senior Snipers Jan. 12 Men’s high game: Jay Cameron, 203; men’s high series: Jim Getchman, 503. Women’s high game: Dona Eby, 154; women’s high series: Marilyn Hooser, 431. Leading team: Enfields. Les Schwab Mixed Jan. 12 Men’s high game: Pete Centeno, 198; men’s high series: Pete Centeno, 499. Women’s high game: Rose Jaeger, 168; women’s high series: Rose Jaeger, 460. Wall Street Journal Jan. 11 Men’s high game: Bill Sheets, 187; men’s high series: Kirk Johnson, 491. Women’s high game: Jean Henderson, 201; women’s high series: Lynda Everett, 443. Wall Street Journal Jan. 11 Men’s high game: Bill Sheets, 187; men’s high series: Kirk Johnson, 491. Women’s high game: Kelly Meyer, 173; women’s high series: Kelly Meyer, 514. Leading team: First Edition and Funnies are tied. Sunlanders Jan. 11 Men’s high game: Dave Anderson, 209; men’s high series: Dave Anderson, 475. Women’s high game: MJ Anderson, 174; women’s high series: Kathleen DeJong, 444. Leading team: Swamp Rats, Guttersnipes and The Strikers are tied. 9 Pin No Tap Jan. 6 Men’s high game: Michael Elkhart, 233; men’s high series: Pete Centeno, 571. Women’s high game: Jean Henderson, 201; women’s high series: Lynda Everett, 443. First Federal Senior Snipers Jan. 5 Men’s high game: Jay Cameron, 199; men’s high series: Jay Cameron, 523. Women’s high game: Dona Eby, 173; women’s high series: Marilyn Hooser, 417. Les Schwab Mixed Jan. 5 Men’s high game: Cliff Silliman, 191; men’s high series: Cliff Silliman, 506. Wall Street Journal Jan. 4 Men’s high game: George Kennedy, 199; men’s high series: George Kennedy, 509. Women’s high game: Joan Wright, 190; women’s high series: Joan Wright, 516. Leading team: International Exchange and Funnies are tied. Sunlanders Jan. 4 Men’s high game: Ray DeJong, 190; men’s high series: Dave Anderson, 490. Women’s high game: Jane Jones, 176; women’s high series: Jane Jones, 461. Leading team: Alley Cats are first half winners.

The Associated Press

Give

Duke fans reach for Virginia’s Sammy Zeglinski as he prepares to throw the ball inbounds during the first half of Saturday’s game against Duke in Durham, N.C. Duke won 76-60 GIRLS 6th grade Lake Stevens Gold 51, PA Icebreakers 14 PA Ice 26, Lady Gators 15 Lake Stevens Purple 72, PA Icebreakers 16 Lake Stevens Gold 29, PA Ice 14 Lake Stevens Purple 30, Lady Gators 7 7th grade PA 17, Lady ammers 16 Lake Stevens 44, Chimacum 21 Chimacum 17, Lady jammers 14 Lake Stevens 48, PA 14 8th grade BE Tigers 34, Lady Jammers 21 Suquamish Wolfpack 40, Lake Stevens 38 Lake Stevens 29, Lady Jammers 21 BE Tigers 49, Suquamish Wolfpack 28

Kamiak 72, Snohomish 56 Kelso 51, Hudson’s Bay 39 Kentwood 71, Kentlake 57 King’s 60, Granite Falls 42 Lake Stevens 48, Mariner 31 Lakes 96, Decatur 75 Lakeside (Seattle) 60, Blanchet 53 Lincoln 67, Timberline 54 Meadowdale 61, Everett 55 Monroe 57, Cascade (Everett) 52 Mount Tahoma 73, South Kitsap 56 Mountain View 65, Camas 58 Mountlake Terrace 66, Shorewood 41 O’Dea 83, Ingraham 44 Olympia 64, Shelton 27 Puyallup 71, Federal Way 69 Sammamish 79, Liberty (Renton) 52

Basketball

Basketball PA PARKS & RECREATION ADULT League Standings through Jan. 15 Team W L Irwin Dental Center 4 0 Burley Construction 5 1 Blue Sharks 4 1 Langston Services 2 1 4 In The Key 2 2 7 Cedars Casino 2 3 Sergio’s/Tracy’s 1 4 Ulin’s Concrete 1 4 Cougars 0 5

Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 15 Pittbsurgh 31, Baltimore 24 Green Bay 48, Atlanta 21 Today Seattle at Chicago, 10 a.m. (FOX) N.Y. Jets at New England, 1:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 23 NFC, 12 p.m. (FOX) AFC, 3:30 p.m. (CBS) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 30 At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 4 p.m. (FOX) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 3:30 p.m. (FOX)

NBA Standings

Volleyball PA PARKS & RECREATION COED League Standings through Jan. 15 Team W L DA Davidson 9 0 Blind Ambition Blinds 9 0 High Energy Metals 8 1 Michael’s Seafood 6 2 McCrorie Carpet One 6 3 Dave’s Repair 6 3 A Brewed Espresso 4 4 Fitness West 3 5 Captain Zak’s 3 5 Joyce General Store 3 5 Drake’s U-Bake Pizza 2 6 Elwha River Casino 1 6 Northwest Wood 1 6 Les Schwab Tire 1 7 Olympic Medical Center 1 8

Basketball MLK Basketball Tournament Saturday results Boys 5th grade North Perry Gators 33, PA Green 16 Lake Stevens 53, PA White 7 PA White 30, PA Green 13 Lake Stevens 42, N. Perry Gators 13 6th grade Seahawks 42, PA 7 ASBA Tigers 36, Tracyton Thunder 17 Harbor Hoops 42, Lake Stevens 34 North Perry 40, Seahawks 29 Lake Stevens 45, Tracyton Thunder 11 North Perry 55, PA 16 Harbor Hoops 50, ASBA Tigers 34 7th grade Meadowdale M. 48, Harbor Hoops Horkan 29 True Elite 50, Shelton 30 ASBA Tigers 45, Silverdale Cougars 21 Harbor Hoops Lovrak 43, Lake Stevesn 32 Meadowdale Mavs 53, Shelton 48 True Elite 62, Harbor Hoops Horkan 31 Harbor Hoops Lorak 53, ASBA Tigers 28 Lake Stevens 66, Silverdale Cougars 24 8th grade North Perry 57, OP Next Level 55 (2 OT) Rierside 60, Lake Stevens Gold 30 Forks 39, Lake Stevens Purple 34 Bremerton Wildcats 56, Forks 51 Riverside 62, North Perry 37 Lake Stevens Purple 45, Bremerton Wildcats 37 Olympic Peninsula Next Level 53, Lake Stevens Gold 34

him a hand

Prep Sports Basketball BOYS Friday’s Scores Archbishop Murphy 65, South Whidbey 43 Auburn 72, Tahoma 59 Auburn Mountainview 65, Enumclaw 64 Bellarmine Prep 67, Central Kitsap 41 Bellevue Christian 53, Northwest School 44 Bonney Lake 74, Peninsula 57 Bremerton 64, North Kitsap 49 Capital 49, Yelm 33 Cedar Park Christian (Everett) 51, Friday Harbor 44 Cedarcrest 79, Sultan 65 Central Valley 47, Lewis and Clark 37 Chelan 57, Okanogan 56, OT Chiawana 87, Eisenhower 51 Cleveland 61, Bainbridge 51 Clover Park 70, Washington 58 Columbia (Hunters) 51, Inchelium 49 Coupeville 54, Lakewood 35 Cusick 70, Curlew 46 Davis 90, Richland 71 Eastlake 54, Skyline 50 Eatonville 60, Franklin Pierce 55 Evergreen (Vancouver) 84, Heritage 55 Ferris 49, Gonzaga Prep 38 Foster 54, Highline 48 Gig Harbor 61, Stadium 40 Glacier Peak 70, Shorecrest 65 Hockinson 69, Woodland 34 Jackson 77, Marysville-Pilchuck 62

WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 30 11 .732 — Phoenix 17 21 .447 111⁄2 Golden State 16 23 .410 13 L.A. Clippers 13 25 .342 151⁄2 Sacramento 9 29 .237 191⁄2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 27 13 .675 — Utah 27 13 .675 — Denver 23 16 .590 31⁄2 Portland 20 20 .500 7 Minnesota 10 31 .244 171⁄2 Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 34 6 .850 — Dallas 26 13 .667 71⁄2 New Orleans 25 16 .610 91⁄2 Memphis 19 21 .475 15 Houston 18 23 .439 161⁄2 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 30 9 .769 — New York 22 17 .564 8 Philadelphia 16 23 .410 14 Toronto 13 27 .325 171⁄2 New Jersey 10 29 .256 20 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 30 12 .714 — Orlando 26 14 .650 3 Atlanta 26 15 .634 31⁄2 Charlotte 15 23 .395 13 Washington 11 27 .289 17 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 27 13 .675 — Indiana 16 21 .432 91⁄2 Milwaukee 14 23 .378 111⁄2 Detroit 14 26 .350 13 Cleveland 8 32 .200 19 Saturday’s Games Houston 112, Atlanta 106 New Orleans 88, Charlotte 81 Washington 98, Toronto 95 Detroit 110, Sacramento 106 Chicago 99, Miami 96 Memphis 89, Dallas 70 Orlando 108, Minnesota 99 Denver 127, Cleveland 99 New Jersey at Portland, late

Football NFL Playoffs Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 8 Seattle 41, New Orleans 36 N.Y. Jets 17, Indianapolis 16 Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7 Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16

College Basketball Washington St. 61, Stanford 58 WASHINGTON ST. (13-5) Casto 2-6 3-5 7, Lodwick 0-2 2-2 2, Capers 2-5 2-2 6, Thompson 9-20 1-1 21, Aden 8-19 3-4 20, DiIorio 0-0 0-0 0, Motum 1-1 0-0 2, Winston Jr. 0-0 0-0 0, Enquist 0-0 0-0 0, Simon 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 23-56 11-14 61. STANFORD (10-6) Owens 5-7 2-4 12, Powell 3-8 3-3 9, Bright 1-8 0-0 3, Mann 1-5 3-4 5, Green 5-16 0-0 13, Ant. Brown 4-9 0-0 12, Harris 0-3 0-0 0, Huestis 0-0 0-0 0, Zimmermann 2-3 0-0 4, Trotter 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 21-61 8-11 58. Halftime—Stanford 32-23. 3-Point Goals— Washington St. 4-18 (Thompson 2-4, Simon 1-3, Aden 1-7, Capers 0-2, Lodwick 0-2), Stanford 8-25 (Ant. Brown 4-7, Green 3-11, Bright 1-5, Harris 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Washington St. 36 (Lodwick, Thompson 8), Stanford 41 (Owens, Powell 10). Assists— Washington St. 9 (Aden, Casto, Thompson 2), Stanford 13 (Mann 5). Total Fouls—Washington St. 15, Stanford 16. A—5,803.

Hockey

Far West

Southwest

Ark.-Little Rock 73, Louisiana-Lafayette 68 Arkansas 70, Alabama 65 Arkansas St. 69, Middle Tennessee 65 Houston 70, SMU 68 Lamar 76, Texas-Arlington 72 Northwestern St. 80, Cent. Arkansas 79, OT Oral Roberts 69, UMKC 63, OT Sam Houston St. 74, Nicholls St. 56 Stephen F.Austin 68, UTSA 59 Texas 66, Oklahoma 46 Texas A&M 91, Missouri 89, OT Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 62, SE

Louisiana 59 Texas Southern 66, Jackson St. 62 Tulsa 78, UAB 62

Midwest

Ball St. 64, Cent. Michigan 55 Chicago St. 70, Texas-Pan American 63 Cleveland St. 61, Youngstown St. 51 Connecticut 82, DePaul 62 E. Illinois 47, Morehead St. 40 E. Kentucky 64, SE Missouri 52 Evansville 59, Illinois St. 54 IUPUI 81, S. Dakota St. 76 Indiana 80, Michigan 61 Iowa St. 72, Baylor 57 Kansas 63, Nebraska 60 Kansas St. 94, Texas Tech 60 Kent St. 69, Ohio 66 Loyola of Chicago 71, Wis.-Milwaukee 65 Michigan St. 71, Northwestern 67, OT N. Illinois 64, Toledo 54 N. Iowa 72, S. Illinois 52 North Dakota 75, South Dakota 62 Oakland, Mich. 86, IPFW 68 Ohio St. 69, Penn St. 66 Saint Louis 67, Saint Joseph’s 51 W. Illinois 67, N. Dakota St. 62 Wichita St. 68, Drake 54

Wis.-Green Bay 74, Ill.-Chicago 50 Wisconsin 76, Illinois 66 Xavier 81, Dayton 76

South

Alabama A&M 75, Alabama St. 60 Belmont 90, Campbell 55 Bethune-Cookman 61, Delaware St. 60 Charleston Southern 69, Winthrop 60 Charlotte 71, Fordham 61 Chattanooga 65, Samford 60 Coastal Carolina 60, Presbyterian 42 Coll. of Charleston 87, The Citadel 66 Duke 76, Virginia 60 ETSU 74, Jacksonville 62 East Carolina 76, Tulane 67 Florida Atlantic 78, W. Kentucky 73 Florida St. 84, N.C. State 71 Furman 74, Georgia Southern 56 George Mason 66, Georgia St. 51 Georgia 98, Mississippi 76 Hampton 63, Norfolk St. 56 Hawaii 56, Louisiana Tech 48 J. Madison 63, UNC Wilmington 54 Kentucky 82, LSU 44 Liberty 61, Radford 53 Louisiana-Monroe 67, S. Alabama 65 Louisville 71, Marquette 70 MVSU 87, Alcorn St. 70

McNeese St. 97, Texas St. 92 Md.-Eastern Shore 86, Florida A&M 81 Memphis 77, Marshall 61 Miami 72, Boston College 71 Morgan St. 71, S. Carolina St. 55 N. Carolina A&T 78, Howard 65 N.C. Central 77, Coppin St. 71 North Florida 65, S.C.-Upstate 59 S. Utah 88, Centenary 75 South Carolina 72, Florida 69 Southern Miss. 86, UCF 69 Southern U. 65, Ark.-Pine Bluff 64 Tenn.-Martin 63, Jacksonville St. 60 Tennessee 67, Vanderbilt 64 Tennessee St. 76, Austin Peay 74, OT Troy 89, North Texas 81 UNC Asheville 68, Gardner-Webb 59 VMI 97, High Point 91 Va. Commonwealth 73, Northeastern 64 Virginia Tech 94, Wake Forest 65 W. Carolina 79, Appalachian St. 78 William & Mary 80, Drexel 66 Wofford 69, Davidson 64

East

American U. 66, Colgate 57 Army 75, Lehigh 72

Transactions

NHL Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 45 27 13 5 59 133 119 Phoenix 45 23 13 9 55 132 126 Anaheim 47 24 19 4 52 126 133 Los Angeles 43 23 19 1 47 127 111 San Jose 45 21 19 5 47 123 127 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 44 29 9 6 64 149 105 Colorado 45 23 16 6 52 148 143 Minnesota 44 21 18 5 47 109 127 Calgary 45 20 20 5 45 122 132 Edmonton 42 14 21 7 35 108 143 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 45 28 11 6 62 157 131 Nashville 44 24 14 6 54 116 103 Chicago 46 24 18 4 52 144 127 St. Louis 43 21 16 6 48 117 124 Columbus 45 21 20 4 46 118 142 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 44 28 11 5 61 152 118 Pittsburgh 46 28 14 4 60 146 109 N.Y. Rangers 46 26 17 3 55 130 112 N.Y. Islanders 43 14 22 7 35 106 143 New Jersey 44 12 29 3 27 85 138 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 44 24 13 7 55 132 101 Montreal 45 25 17 3 53 112 107 Buffalo 44 19 20 5 43 121 131 Toronto 44 18 21 5 41 114 132 Ottawa 45 17 22 6 40 101 139

College Basketball Arizona 80, Arizona St. 69 Colorado 75, Oklahoma St. 71 Colorado St. 79, TCU 69 Denver 79, Fla. International 70, OT Gonzaga 79, Loyola Marymount 59 N. Arizona 79, Sacramento St. 58 New Mexico St. 78, San Jose St. 53 San Diego St. 87, New Mexico 77 UCLA 67, Oregon 59 UNLV 64, Air Force 52 Utah 68, Wyoming 51 Washington St. 61, Stanford 58 Weber St. 71, Idaho St. 67

Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA 46 26 15 5 57 137 148 45 24 14 7 55 128 120 47 22 18 7 51 143 151 44 22 16 6 50 135 135 43 21 20 2 44 119 113 Saturday’s Games Calgary 2, Toronto 1, SO Nashville 3, Chicago 2, SO Pittsburgh 3, Boston 2 Montreal 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 N.Y. Islanders 5, Buffalo 3 Carolina 6, Tampa Bay 4 Florida 3, New Jersey 2, OT Detroit 6, Columbus 5, OT Dallas 6, Atlanta 1 Phoenix 6, Anaheim 2 Edmonton at Los Angeles, late St. Louis at San Jose, late Today’s Games Ottawa at Washington, 12 p.m. Vancouver at Minnesota, 3 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Nashville at Chicago, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 5 p.m. Tampa Bay Washington Atlanta Carolina Florida

Boston U. 70, Albany, N.Y. 67 Bryant 72, Sacred Heart 59 Canisius 72, Manhattan 51 Columbia 79, Cornell 75 Delaware 66, Towson 63 Duquesne 78, Temple 66 Georgetown 74, Rutgers 65 Harvard 67, George Washington 62 Lafayette 76, Navy 73 Long Island U. 84, Wagner 54 Maine 77, Binghamton 51 Massachusetts 74, La Salle 71 Mount St. Mary’s, Md. 70, St. Francis, NY 61 N.J. Tech 96, Houston Baptist 84 Old Dominion 75, Hofstra 64 Pittsburgh 74, Seton Hall 53 Quinnipiac 73, Cent. Connecticut St. 68 Robert Morris 60, Monmouth, N.J. 57 St. Francis, Pa. 69, Fairleigh Dickinson 55 St. Peter’s 77, Niagara 57 Stony Brook 64, New Hampshire 60, 2OT Syracuse 67, Cincinnati 52 Vermont 85, UMBC 48 Villanova 74, Maryland 66 Yale 69, Brown 64

Baseball Major League Baseball American League Kansas City Royals: Agreed to terms with LHP Bruce Chen on a one-year contract. Oakland Athletics: Agreed to terms with RHP Brad Ziegler on a one-year contract. Tampa Bay Rays: Agreed to terms with RHP Kyle Farnsworth on a one-year contract. National League Chicago Cubs: Agreed to terms with C Geovany Soto on a one-year contract. Philadelphia Phillies: Agreed to terms with OF Ben Francisco on a one-year contract. St. Louis Cardinals: Agreed to terms with RHP Kyle McClellan on a one-year contract and INF Ramon Vazquez on a minor league contract.

Basketball National Basketball Association Los Angeles Clippers: Signed C Jarron Collins to a second 10-day contract. Philadelphia 76ers: Reassigned F Craig Brackins to Springfield (NBADL).

Football National Football League Philadelphia Eagles: Fired Sean McDermott defensive coordinator.

Hockey National Hockey League Detroit Red Wings: Recalled G Thomas McCollum and LW Tomas Tatar from Grand Rapids (AHL). Ottawa Senators: Reassigned G Robin Lehner to Binghamton (AHL).

Pirates: Women Continued from B1 Thad Vinson added 12 points and six rebounds for the Pirates, while teammate Sam Waller had 12 points, three assists and four rebounds. Sophomore guard Mitrell Clark threw in 11 points and three steals. A total of 10 Pirates got some ink in the scorer book. Peninsula has a quick turnaround with Whatcom (2-0, 10-1) coming to town for another North Division game on Monday at 7 p.m. Edmonds (0-3, 2-9) visits on Wednesday for another 7 p.m. home tip-off.

Peninsula 72, Seattle 55 Peninsula Seattle

33 39 — 72 26 29 — 55 Individual Scoring

Peninsula (72) Freeman 17, Musgrow 5, Vinson 12, Jacobson 2, Jeremiah Johnson 5, Buchanan 2, Clark 11, Waller 12, Jerry Johnson 4, Schumacher 2. Seattle (55) Gray 2, Hollished 24, Purnell 6, Miller 10, Kundukljia 2, Maw 11.

Women Seattle 69, Peninsula 49 SEATTLE — The Pirates (1-3, 4-9) dropped their third straight NWAACC North Division game Saturday to the Storm (1-3, 2-10). Details of the game were not available as of press time.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Long weekend for Riders PA third at Invite, tops rival Sequim Peninsula Daily News

BAINBRIDGE — The Port Angeles wrestling team capped a busy weekend by taking third place out of 11 teams at the Island Invitational at Bainbridge High School on Saturday. The Roughriders’ thirdplace finished came a day after they beat archrival Sequim 51-21 in an Olympic League dual Friday night. Port Angeles, Sequim, Port Townsend and Forks all competed at the Invitational on Saturday, with the Spartans also finishing in the top five. Port Angeles (153 points) finished behind secondplace Klahowya (156) and tournament champion Kingston (197), with Andrew Symonds the lone Rider champ in the 140pound weight class. “All in all not a bad day, but having said that, the kids that we did bring we had a tough day,” said Port Angeles coach Erik Gonzalez, whose Riders won the Rainshadow last weekend. “We know we’ve got to get better if we’re going to catch up to Kingston again.” Second-place finishers for the Riders included Josh Basden at 103, Brian Sullivan at 152, Brian Cristion at 171 and Jacob Dostie in at 215.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Sequim’s Cody Field, left, attempts to pin Port Angeles’ Nick Tweter in the 145-pound weight class match of Friday night’s Olympic League dual at Sequim High School. Nathan Cristion received his first loss of the year after going into the tournament 23-0. He ended up placing third in a bracket that included two other state wrestlers. The Spartans took fifth place as the smallest school at the competition. Cutter Grahn was the Spartans’ lone champion in the 119 weight class. Tyler Cortani took second place at 125 for the Spartans after losing 5-0 to last year’s state champ, and Dayne House took second from a 1-0 loss at 130. The Wolves showed up a little short-handed Satur-

day and ended the day in eighth place. Derek Fruin was the lone champion for the Wolves, winning his 135pound final 10-1 for his second tournament victory in two weeks. Clay Charlie battled hard in the finals as well but came up short, losing 3-2 in the second overtime to take second place at 285. Port Townsend finished in last place at the Island Invitational with a score of 33 and no wrestlers placing in top spots. Port Angeles will next travel to Klahowya for a rematch Wednesday.

Forks travels to Tenino the same night, and Sequim makes its way over to North Kitsap on Wednesday.

Bremerton 54, Port Townsend 27 BREMERTON — The Redskins fought hard against the Knights on Friday but couldn’t keep up after having to forfeit four matches. Justin Mead won in the 119-pound weight class with a pin at one minute, 33 seconds while Mikael Callahan took the 130 by forfeit. Kris Windle won with a 3-2 decision at 152.

Port Angeles 51, Sequim 21 SEQUIM — The Riders went 6-4 in head-to-head matches to beat the Wolves in Friday’s Olympic League match. Josh Basden won by pin in the 103-pound weight class, and Andrew Symonds took the decision at 140. Other winners included Trevor Lee (160), Zack Grahl (189), Jacob Dostie (215) and Nathan Cristion (285). Austin Middleton won by pin at 130 for Sequim. Dakota Hinton (171), Cody Fields (145) and Derek Fruin (135) won by decision.

Rivals: Sweep Continued from B1 That played right into the Red Devils’ hands as they harassed the Bruins into 43 turnovers and 17-of-51 shooting from the field. Drexler Doherty scored a game-high 19 points, Titus Pascua added 18 and Zeke Greene had 15 points and four assists to lead a group of eight Red Devil scorers. “I think we’re actually coming along really great as a team for having Gerrad [Brooks] as our coach for the first year,” Pascua said. “There’s a lot of new people coming up to varsity with us and I think we’re working together as a team very well.” The Red Devils displayed that teamwork throughout Friday night’s victory while playing their typical uptempo style. Neah Bay dished out 21 assists and turned the ball over just 19 times, breaking open a 16-16 first quarter tie with a 17-0 run fueled by 11 points from Doherty. Pascua knocked down two of his team-high three 3-pointers near the start of the third quarter to cap a 9-2 run for a 49-24 edge, and the Bruins never got closer than 23 points the rest of the way. “I told them I wanted to slow it down a little bit, because Neah Bay runs, and we didn’t slow it down,” Clallam Bay coach Cal Ritter said. “Each one of them tonight tried doing everything by themselves. It didn’t work very well.” Jacob Portnoy led the Bruins with 18 points, hitting 7 of 11 field goal attempts, while Kyle Hess had 16 points and six rebounds. Still, the Bruins were outrebounded 39-36 on the night despite attempting 35 less shots than Neah Bay.

Johnny Smith had a team-high eight rebounds for the Red Devils and dished out four assists, and senior post Eli Monette added 12 points, five assists and seven rebounds. Throw in the massive turnover differential (43-19 in favor of Neah Bay), and Friday night’s game had all the makings of a blowout. “We like to push the pace and get a lot of steals and we’re a faster team,” said Brooks, in his first year at the helm of Neah Bay’s boys basketball team. “We can play really fast and we usually cause teams to play out of their comfort zone. “We did it better in the second half than the first half. The first half I wasn’t pleased at all with our execution. Our effort was there but our execution wasn’t there. The second half, we picked up a lot more.” The Red Devils averaged 2.6 shots per minute while hitting 38.4 percent of them (33-of-86). The Bruins’ attempts to keep up fell flat, due in large part to all of the turnovers Neah Bay’s pressure defense forced. “We just didn’t get the ball down low like I wanted to and we didn’t take good shots,” Ritter said. “I know we’re a better team than what we played tonight, by far.” Neah Bay 84, Clallam Bay 47 Neah Bay Clallam Bay

24 16 22 22 — 84 16 4 13 14 — 47 Individual Scoring

Neah Bay (84) Jimmicum 6, Manuel 4, Greene 15, Doherty 19, Pascua 18, Halttunen 2, Monette 12, Kallappa 8. Clallam Bay (47) Teachout 1, Welever 1, Ky. Hess 16, James 11, Portnoy 18.

Girls Basketball Neah Bay 60, Clallam Bay 31 CLALLAM BAY — The Red Devils just might roll through this year’s regular season slate like they did their last.

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Clallam Bay’s Kenna Welever holds onto the ball while several players close in during Friday night’s North Olympic League game in Clallam Bay.  From left are Faith Tyler (22), Crysandra Sones (21), Jamie Parker (25), Rebecca Thompson and Kirstin Erickson (24).  Judging by the way they dispatched the Bruins (1-1, 8-3) on Friday night, another undefeated regular season doesn’t seem too far-fetched for the Red Devils (2-0, 11-0). Cherish Moss had a game-high 16 points and five assists, while fellow junior Rebecca Thompson added 14 points and three assists to lead Neah Bay in its 18th straight NOL win. “Our main goal is getting to state and placing at state,” said Red Devils coach Lisa Halttunen, whose teams have reached state each of the past four years. “As long as we keep that in mind and we’re focused on that when we’re playing these games that will get us there,” the team shouldn’t lose its edge. “There’s always things we can improve on.” Neah Bay’s defense didn’t looked like it needed too much tweaking Friday. Neah Bay’s full-court press gave the Bruins fits all night, leading to 35 Clallam

Bay turnovers and numerous fast break opportunities. The Red Devils cashed in on many of them, shooting 41.6 percent from the field (25 of 60) while dishing out 13 assists as a team. At one point between the second and third quarters, the Red Devils rattled off 18 unanswered points to take a 28-4 lead that would never be challenged. “I thought we played really well,” said Thompson, undefeated in NOL play in her three years on varsity. “We were passing the ball around a lot, did a lot of teamwork. “We work on that over and over in practice, working the ball and pushing it up the court and then setting up our plays. “We know later on in the postseason, that’s what we’re going to need most, is working our plays and stuff.” Thompson sank 7 of 9 shots from the field as part of a group of four Red Devils in double figures.

Cierra Moss added 14 points and eight rebounds and Merissa Murner 10 points and nine rebounds. “They’re so athletic,” Clallam Bay coach Kelly Gregory said. “They killed us in their transition.” Kirstin Erickson scored 10 points and grabbed five rebounds to lead the Bruins, while Jazzmin Randall had six points and 12 rebounds. Of course, that wasn’t near enough against Neah Bay, which limited the Bruins to 29.8 percent shooting (14 of 47) on the night. “Overall, I thought they did a pretty good job,” Gregory said. “It’s a big improvement from the first time we played them [in a 57-16 Neah Bay win].” Neah Bay 60, Clallam Bay 31 Neah Bay Clallam Bay

12 17 17 14 — 60 4 6 14 7 — 31 Individual Scoring

Neah Bay (60) Thompson 14, Murner 10, Sones 2, Tyler 2, Winck 2, Ch. Moss 16, Ci. Moss 14. Clallam Bay (31) Willis 4, Herndon 2, Randall 6, K. Erickson 10, Parker 6, Welever 2, I. Erickson 1.

B3

Preps Basketball BOYS Olympic League Standings League Overall Kingston 9-0 10-3 Port Angeles 7-2 9-4 Sequim 7-3 11-4 Bremerton(3A) 6-3 9-4 Olympic 5-4 6-6 North Mason 4-5 5-8 Klahowya 2-7 3-9 Port Town. (1A) 2-8 3-10 North Kitsap 0-10 0-14 Thursday’s Games Port Angeles 73, Sequim 68 Port Townsend 43, Klahowya 41 Olympic 74, Klahowya 50 Bremerton 79, North Mason 58 Kingston 82, North Kitsap 34 Friday’s Games Bremerton 64, North Kitsap 49 Aberdeen 74, Klahowya 62 Tuesday’s games North Kitsap at Port Townsend Port Angeles at Olympic Sequim at North Mason Klahowya at Bremerton 1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Cas. Christian 5-0 8-2 Life Christian 4-1 11-2 Vashon Island 4-2 8-5 Seattle Christian 3-3 6-6 Chimacum 2-3 4-7 Orting 1-4 2-8 Charles Wright 0-6 4-9 Friday’s Games Vashon Island 58, Chimacum 44 Seattle Christian 52, Orting 36 Life Christian 53, Charles Wright 37 Tuesday’s Games Orting at Chimacum Cascade Christian at Life Christian Seattle Christian at Vashon Island Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Onalaska 7-0 10-1 Hoquiam 6-1 11-2 Montesano 4-3 8-5 Rainier 4-3 7-5 Forks 3-4 6-7 Tenino 2-5 5-7 Elma 2-5 4-9 Rochester 0-7 1-12 Thursday’s Game Onalaska 59, Elma 36 Friday’s Games Hoquiam 60, Forks 41 Rainier 57, Rochester 43 Montesano 64, Tenino 51 Tuesday’s Games Rainier at Forks Montesano at Elma Rochester at Hoquiam Tenino at Onalaska North Olympic League League Overall Neah Bay 2-0 9-2 Clallam Bay 1-1 8-4 Crescent 0-2 2-8 Friday’s Game Neah Bay 84, Clallam Bay 47 Today’s Game Northwest Yeshiva at Neah Bay GIRLS Olympic League Standings League Overall Port Angeles 9-0 10-2 Kingston 7-2 10-3 Olympic 6-3 7-6 Sequim 6-4 9-6 Port Town. (1A) 5-5 6-7 North Kitsap 3-6 4-8 Bremerton(3A) 3-5 5-7 North Mason 2-7 3-10 Klahowya 0-9 1-10 Thursday’s Games Port Angeles 68, Sequim 21 Kingston 73, North Kitsap 38 Bremerton 53, North Mason 38 Olympic 58, Klahowya 38 Monday’s Game Port Angeles at Timberline Tuesday’s Games Port Townsend at North Kitsap Olympic at Port Angeles North Mason at Sequim Bremerton at Klahowya 1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Seattle Christian 6-0 10-3 Cas. Christian 4-1 8-2 Vashon Island 4-2 7-4 Chimacum 2-3 4-8 Orting 1-4 1-9 Charles Wright 1-4 5-6 Life Christian 0-4 2-7 Friday’s Games Vashon Island 55, Chimacum 24 Seattle Christian 51, Orting 18 Life Christian at Charles Wright, NR Tuesday’s Games Orting at Chimacum Cascade Christian at Life Christian Seattle Christian at Vashon Island Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Rainier 7-0 10-3 Onalaska 5-1 9-2 Elma 5-2 8-5 Montesano 4-3 5-8 Hoquiam 3-4 3-10 Tenino 2-5 3-9 Forks 1-5 3-9 Rochester 0-7 2-10 Friday’s Games Hoquiam 41, Forks 27 Onalaska 60, Elma 41 Rainier 69, Rochester 56 Montesano 45, Tenino 43 North Olympic League League Overall Neah Bay 2-0 11-0 Clallam Bay 1-1 9-4 Crescent 0-2 2-9 Friday’s Game Neah Bay 60, Clallam Bay 31 Saturday’s Game Quilcene 31, Clallam Bay 29 Today’s Game Northwest Yeshiva at Neah Bay

Preps: Chimacum dropped by Vashon Island Continued from B1

Vashon Island 58, Chimacum 44

The Spartans will next VASHON ISLAND — host third-place Rainier The Cowboys (2-3, 4-7) (4-3, 7-5) on Tuesday with game time starting at 7 dropped Friday night’s Nisqually League game to p.m. the Pirates (4-2, 8-5) after going down by 13 points at Hoquiam 60, Forks 41 halftime. Forks 11 9 5 16 — 41 Hoquiam 13 13 18 16 — 60 Landon Cray scored 15 Individual Scoring points to lead Chimacum, Forks (41) T. Penn 9, Johnson 9, Noles 6, Decker 6, Castel- but it was Alex Wagner of lano 6, J. Penn 3. Vashon Island who was the Hoquiam (60) game’s leading scorer with Ronquillo 19, E. Erhart 16, Williams 7, Morgan 7, 29 points. Irion 5, Smith 4.

Chimacum will next host Girls Basketball Orting on Tuesday with Vashon Island 55, game time starting at 5:15 Chimacum 24 p.m. VASHON ISLAND — The Cowboys play Port Townsend at home the day The Pirates (4-2, 7-4) shot out to a 20-point after one after that. quarter Friday night and never looked back. Vashon Island 58, Chimacum 44 Kaylie Castillo led ChiChimacum 6 14 12 12 — 44 Vashon Island 16 17 10 15 — 58 macum (2-3, 4-8) with seven Individual Scoring points, and Lauren Thacker Chimacum (44) Cray 15, Brown-Bishop 12, Eldridge 7, Pagasian added six. 4, Manix 2, Riggle 4. Vashon Island’s Charlotte Vashon Island (58) Kehoe was the game’s leadWagner 29, Whittaker 8, Griffin 7, Arceo 6, Lofland ing scorer with 19 points. 4, Rauma 2, Hazard 2.

Vashon Island 55, Chimacum 24 Chimacum 3 8 5 8 — 24 Vashon Island 23 12 16 4 — 55 Individual Scoring Chimacum (24) Castillo 7, Thacker 6, Cossell 4, Hathaway 3, Baird 2, Nelson 2. Vashon Island (55) Kehoe 19, Quig 18, Amicka 8, Hoffman 4, Abella 3, Lynch 2, Johnson 1.

Hoquiam 41, Forks 27 HOQUIAM — The Spartans (1-5, 3-9) remained one spot out of SWL-Evergreen Division playoff contention after losing Friday night.

Quilcene 31, Clallam Bay 29 QUILCENE — The Rangers (3-2, 7-5) dealt the Bruins their second defeat of the weekend Saturday. Quilcene’s Amy Kaiser had a game-high 12 points. Quilcene 31, Clallam Bay 29 Clallam Bay Quilcene

2 11 9 7 — 29 8 4 13 6 — 31 Individual Scoring Clallam Bay (29) Randall 10, Parker 9, Willis 6, Welever 3, Erickson 1. Quilcene (31) Kaiser 12, Weed 6, Bacchus 6, Turley 5, Beukes 2.


B4

Sunday, January 16, 2011

SportsRecreation

Cougs top Stanford WSU gets first Pac-10 road victory

Pac-10 Standings Conf. Overall Arizona 4-1 15-3 Washington 4-1 12-4 UCLA 3-2 11-6 Stanford 3-2 10-6 California 2-2 9-7 Washington State 3-3 13-5 Oregon State 3-3 8-9 USC 2-3 10-8 Arizona State 1-4 9-8 Oregon 1-5 8-10 Saturday’s Games Washington St. 61, Stanford 58 Arizona 80, Arizona State 69 UCLA 67, Oregon 59 Oregon St. 80, USC 76 Today’s Game Washington at California, 7 p.m.

By Antonio Gonzalez The Associated Press

STANFORD, Calif. — Washington State can finally head home with a Pac-10 road victory. Klay Thompson had 21 points, Faisal Aden scored 20 and Washington State ended Stanford’s eight-game home unbeaten streak with a 61-58 victory Saturday. “If we would have lost this one, it would have been tough to come back and get to .500 in the league,” Aden said. “We sort of left our hearts out there tonight — that’s what we came into the game with.” The dynamic guard duo helped the Cougars (13-5, 3-3) win a conference road game after dropping their first three. Jeremy Green had 13 points and Josh Owens added 12 points for the Cardinal (10-6, 3-2), who were coming off an upset of No. 17 Washington and looking to sustain some momentum. Instead, they had a letdown by blowing a ninepoint halftime lead. “I’m sure we will learn from this,” Stanford coach Johnny Dawkins said. “We don’t like to learn in losses, but we will learn from the experience and how competitive Pac-10 play is and how every night you have to be prepared to adjust and compete at the highest level.”

The Associated Press

The Washington State bench including Will Dilorio (5) celebrate Saturday’s win over Stanford at the end of the game in Stanford, Calif. Washington State’s rally was long overdue. After an overtime loss at California earlier this week, a Bay Area split could give Washington State some confidence. The Cougars had also lost conference games at UCLA and USC. They took control in the second half with energy and effort that Stanford simply couldn’t match. After Thompson’s free throws put the Cougars in front, DeAngelo Casto converted a 3-point play over Dwight Powell with three minutes left to extend their lead to 57-52.

Stanford had two late attempts to force overtime but couldn’t convert. “I think our zone defense was pretty good during that stretch,” Cougars coach Ken Bone said. “That was probably the biggest difference during that time. And we scored some baskets, too. “But we really, really needed to get some stops defensively, and we did.” For most of the game, the Cougars were out of rhythm again in front of another opposing crowd that cheered their every mistake. They played from behind for most of the game and

again had to make a secondhalf run on the road. They also won despite point guard Reggie Moore sitting out for disciplinary reasons. Thompson was swarmed defensively and frustrated into two early fouls that forced him to the bench. Stanford worked Washington State’s zone with ball movement, finding open shooters. Thompson made a 3-pointer and another jumper during an 8-0 spurt early in the second half by the Cougars to tie the score at 33. They went ahead 42-41 on Brock Motum’s layup with 10:17 remaining. Anthony Brown followed with a pair of 3-pointers to put Stanford ahead by five. Then Thompson, a 6-foot-6 junior who entered the game leading the Pac-10 with 23.1 points per outing, rallied Washington State. “I thought that run in the second half was the key,” said Brown, who had 12 points for the Cardinal. “They hit us in the mouth, and we never were able to respond after that.”

Gray, Sacre spark Zags Gonzaga heats up in 2nd half to stay perfect in WCC The Associated Press

SPOKANE — Tied at halftime and struggling to find a rhythm, Gonzaga drew on the experience of its tough nonconference schedule to dominate the second half. Robert Sacre scored 18 points as Gonzaga (13-5,

shots in the first half. After getting outrebounded 24-17 in the first half, Gonzaga’s front line responded by controlling the paint in the sec3-0 West Coast) pulled ond half. Sacre and Harris away for a 79-59 win over proved to be too much for Loyola Marymount on the smaller LMU squad. Saturday evening. “It was great to see Steven Gray had 16 [Harris’ inside play],” points and Elias Harris Gonzaga coach Mark Few added 14 and 10 rebounds said. “That’s kind of how for Gonzaga. Gray scored Elias played a lot last 13 second-half points year. He was in attack after attempting just four mode.”

Drew Viney led Loyola Marymount (8-10, 1-3) with 18 points, eight coming from the free-throw line. Anthony Ireland added 10 points, on 4 of 15 shooting, and 10 rebounds. Loyola Marymount made just 15 of 55 shots, and was 24 of 30 from the free-throw line. The Bulldogs shot 51.6 percent from the field, but were just 3 of 12 from 3-point range.

Rodgers torches Atlanta Packers win; Steelers get past Ravens The Associated Press

ATLANTA — As Aaron Rodgers trotted off the field, savoring another playoff win, he was serenaded with chants of “Go, Pack, Go!” This wasn’t Lambeau Field, but it sure sounded like it. Looking very much at home, Rodgers threw three touchdown passes, ran for another score and led the Green Bay Packers to their second straight postseason road victory with a stunning 48-21 rout of the top-seeded Atlanta Falcons on Saturday night. “This just feels so good right now,” said Rodgers, who threw for 366 yards and led Green Bay to the highestscoring playoff game in its storied history. The Packers (12-6) will have to win one more on the road to complete their improbable run from sixth seed to the Super Bowl, but nothing looks out of the question the way Rodgers is playing. He’ll lead Green Bay into the NFC championship game at either Chicago or Seattle next weekend. “This probably was my best performance -- the stage we were on, the importance of this game,” Rodgers said. “It was a good night.” He completed 31 of 36 passes and put up more yards than Brett Favre — the guy he replaced in Green Bay — ever threw for in a playoff game.

The Associated Press

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) celebrates after scoring a touchdown against the Atlanta Falcons on a 7-yard run during the second half of Saturday’s NFL playoff game in Atlanta. After knocking off Michael Vick and the Eagles in Philadelphia, then dominating Matt Ryan and the Falcons in Atlanta, Rodgers is creating his own legacy in Titletown USA. Green Bay scored 35 consecutive points, including Tramon Williams’ 70-yard interception return on the final play of the first half that left the Falcons (13-4) and a crowd of more than 69,000 in a state of shock as the teams headed to the locker room. The Packers could’ve left punter Tim Masthay at home. He was never needed. “It was one of those

nights,” Rodgers said. “I felt like I was in the zone.” Ryan, who beat out Rodgers for a spot in the Pro Bowl, had a miserable night. He also was picked off in the end zone, costing Atlanta another scoring chance early on that might’ve changed the complexion of the game, and lost a fumble attempting a sneak. In two career playoff games, Matty Ice is 0-2 with six turnovers and a safety.

Antonio Brown on a 58-yard pass play on third-and-19, and Rashard Mendenhall scored from the 2 with 1:33 remaining to give the Pittsburgh Steelers a 31-24 comeback victory over the Baltimore Ravens in an AFC divisional playoff game Saturday. The Steelers, 9-0 against division teams in the playoffs, advance to their fifth AFC championship game in 10 seasons next Sunday — at New England if the Patriots beat the Jets today, in Pittsburgh if the Jets win. Steelers 31, The Steelers (13-4) were Ravens 24 trailing 21-7 at halftime PITTSBURGH — Ben after turnovers created two Roethlisberger hit rookie Ravens touchdowns.

Peninsula Daily News

Hawks: Road Continued from B1 against Detroit when officials ruled Calvin Johnson They saw Matt Hassel- didn’t complete the play beck come up big, throwing after catching what looked four TD passes and win- like the go-ahead TD, and ning over the fans after there were some more getting booed off the field in breaks during their seasonhis previous home start saving surge. They faced third-string against Atlanta. “The fact that the expec- quarterbacks in wins over tations have been very low Miami, Detroit and Minnefor us in these games, I can sota (after Brett Favre left understand that based on with a concussion). There was also a disour early performance during the season,” Seahawks puted unnecessary roughness call against Ndamucoach Pete Carroll said. “Other than that, we kong Suh right before Cutrealize there aren’t many ler threw the go-ahead TD people that give us a chance pass to Brandon Manumaleuna in that second to win these games. “But that’s not the battle game against the Lions. When the Bears beat cry. “The battle cry is to get Philadelphia, Eagles corprepared to play really good nerback Asante Samuel sat football and see if we can out with a knee injury. Now, Chicago gets a throw a game out there that gives us a chance to team that barely made the postseason and could be beat a great opponent.” The Bears are wary of short-handed. Linebacker Lofa Tatupu the Seahawks. “They’re used to being in (concussion) had not been that spot,” Pro Bowl defen- cleared to play as of Friday sive end Julius Peppers afternoon and was quessaid. “They didn’t have a tionable. “I was here when we great season record-wise, but they’re used to being in were winning our division the playoffs. They played — we were owning our division — year after year after like they were.” No one needed to remind year after year after year,” the Bears that Jay Cutler Hasselbeck said. “That’s a great feeling. got sacked six times and that a usually reliable It’s a great place to be in.” It wasn’t easy for the defense had its issues in that loss to Seattle, failing Seahawks this time. They were ridiculed to force a turnover or sack along with the rest of the Hasselbeck. It didn’t help the Bears NFC West, and they that Peppers was a non- dropped three in a row factor or that Briggs sat out before beating St. Louis to win the division. with a left ankle injury. They’re a work in progAs bad as that performance was, the Bears took ress. Seattle made more than another turn for the worse when they followed that 280 roster transactions in with another home loss to its first year under Carroll and general manager John Washington. That sent them stum- Schneider, including several bling into their off week big moves before the first with three losses in four Chicago game. Deion Branch, the forgames, but the team that emerged had a different mer Super Bowl MVP wide look, a different approach receiver with the Patriots, got dealt back to New Eng— particularly on offense. land. The Seahawks acquired Changes for Beats Lynch from Buffalo, hoping The Bears settled on a he would spark the running starting offensive line and game, and released Julius abandoned their pass- Jones. happy ways. “You’ve got a lot of scrap Improved blocking and a heap guys that have been commitment to the run thrown aside by other helped reduce the pounding teams and guys with chips on Cutler and sparked a on their shoulders and I dramatic turnaround. love that,” said receiver They won seven of eight Brandon Stokley, who before closing the regular signed with the Seahawks season with a loss at Green in late September after Bay and made the playoffs being released by Denver. for the first time since the “We’re going to fight and 2006 team’s Super Bowl claw and give everything we have and I’ll go to battle run. The Bears caught a with those kind of guys any break in the season opener day.”

Boyle: Rejects Continued from B1 years out of football (Williams), while another signed with the team in Consider the following late September (Stokley). from last week’s win over In other words, these the Saints: Seahawks are the best col■ The defensive player who came up with some of lection of leftovers this side of the day after Thanksgivthe biggest plays in the ing. game (Brock), including a Of course, not every sack, a forced fumble, and move Carroll and Schhuge red-zone tackle on third down was released by neider made has turned to the Colts after last season, gold. Running back LenDale then by the Titans in SepWhite and defensive end tember. Kevin Vickerson, who came ■ The running back to Seattle in a draft-weekwho put the game on ice end trade, were both cut with one of the most before the season started, impressive runs in playoff history (Marshawn Lynch) as was defensive end Robert Henderson, who was was in Buffalo when the part of the trade for guard season started, but the Bills gave up on the former Rob Sims to Detroit. But whatever moves first-round pick and traded him for pennies on the dol- they’ve missed on, the Seahawk have more than lar. made up for it by getting ■ The fullback who made one of the key blocks this far with reclamation to spring the run (Michael projects and other team’s Robinson) was released by rejects filling prominent roles. San Francisco before the “You’ve got a lot of start of the season. scrappy guys who have ■ The right guard on kind of been thrown aside that play (Mike Gibson) by other teams, guys with was cut by Seattle in September, then re-signed, and chips on their shoulders,” Stokley said. the left guard (Tyler “I love that about this Polumbus) was cut by Denteam. We’re going to fight ver, then traded from and claw and give everyDetroit to Seattle for a thing we have. I’ll go to 2012 late-round pick. Oh, battle with those kind of and he had never played guys any day.” guard in the NFL before Week 17 of this season. ________ ■ One receiver who John Boyle covers the Seattle caught a touchdown pass Seahawks for The Everett Daily from Hasselbeck spent two Herald.

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 16, 2011

c

SECTION

Our Peninsula

THINGS TO DO, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, DEAR ABBY, WEATHER In this section

Darlene Keefe

Ryan Hoff works during the Habitat for Humanity and AmeriCorps workday on Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 2010.

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles Victory Garden supporters are prepare to throw a work party Monday at the city’s new community garden. Standing from left are Phil Siefker, Jonathan Jessop, Taryn Heisler, City Council member Max Mania, Tina Corey, Hank Gibson, city recreation manager Richard Bonine and Jill Zarzeczny. Kneeling from left are Aaron Cleveland, Justin Zarzeczny, Diane Martin and Sahara Suval.

Victory in community From sprout of idea to parcel of land, PA sponsors garden

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES ­— Any way you slice this vegetable garden, it’s good nourishment. That’s how Richard Bonine, Port Angeles’ recreation manager, thinks of the new Victory Garden on East Fifth Street at Peabody Street. The 1,400-square-foot parcel of city-owned land, which volunteers will turn into 50 community garden plots Monday, “is what I consider a win-win situation” for the city and for local residents who rent growing space, Bonine said. The garden patch will have its groundbreaking from 10 a.m. to sundown Monday, as organizer Diane Martin and a team of AmeriCorps volunteers throw a work party. They will be double-digging the soil to prepare it for springtime planting of vegetables, herbs and flowers chosen by plot holders. “Bring your tools and come any time,” Martin said. Monday is Martin Luther King Jr. Day and a national day of service, so she’s hoping to see a healthy turnout of people, shovels and enthusiasm. The forecast is calling for

showers, Martin added, but Street from City Hall, about 15 years ago, perhaps for a “that doesn’t scare us.” parking lot, though he said Rain or shine it’s not clear anymore exactly what the plans were This is a rain, snow or for it. shine work party, and if it The parcel’s future is gets too wet, the focus will bright, Bonine believes. It’s turn toward the mosaic poised to provide local peoproject conceived by volun- ple with “a great recreteer Taryn Heisler. ational opportunity: not The 3-foot-by-4-foot only to grow some nutrimosaic will be made of tious food, but also to get to crushed tile and depict a know your neighbors.” bright sun, a sprout coming Which is why it’s called out of the earth and the the Port Angeles Victory words “community garden,” Garden. Heisler said. The name was chosen by A graduate of Evergreen Martin and her crew to State College who holds invoke the grass-roots degrees in art and sustainenergy in the victory garable agriculture, she envidens Americans planted to sions the mosaic as someprovide fresh produce for thing for children — and their families during World anybody who’s had enough War II. of digging — to partake in. And like other public As for the community gardens around the state, garden plots, they will be 8 nation and world, this small feet by 12 feet and available piece of land is fertile in March, said Martin. ground, Martin said, for Rent will be $40 for the “the community spirit of whole growing season; that people coming together to will cover water and basic grow food.” garden maintenance, while There are practical plot holders may want to needs, of course: tools, a buy their own soil amendfence and a shed. ments. “We’re working hard to get donations,” Martin said. Unique addition “The world is full of The Fifth Street garden orphaned garden tools.” Community gardens is a first for Port Angeles, have been thriving in Bonine said. The city bought the prop- Sequim, Port Townsend and erty, which is across Fifth numerous cities across the

United States and Canada. In Port Angeles, the Olympic Vineyard Christian Fellowship at 3415 S. Peabody St. established one in spring 2009, and Martin said it has plots available. The Fifth Street site, however, is the first citysponsored community garden for this town. Bonine said he met Martin at a community meeting awhile back, realized they shared an interest in such a project, “and the idea grew from there.” They realized they both wanted to get a community garden started; Bonine had access to the land, and Martin had access to volunteers with the energy to transform it from a plain grass lot to an urban farm. Such connections are “the good thing about living in a small town,” said Bonine, who grew up in Garber, Okla., population 818, according to www.epodunk. com. To find out more about the garden project or to donate materials, phone Martin at 360-452-3192 or e-mail pavictorygardens@ gmail.com. Bonine can be reached at 360-417-3550.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Volunteers help build homes housing for 19 adults and 31 children. The atmosphere in PORT TOWNSEND this neighborhood is — Many people are getneighborly, Maciejewski ting a day off in honor of said. Martin Luther King Jr. “These families have Day on Monday, but a helped to build one crew of volunteers is another’s homes, have treating the holiday as a looked after each other’s “day on” when the mem- kids and have celebrated bers perform a measure as each house has been of community service. completed,” she said. The day of service is “Their kids have part of a nationwide pro- become friends, and the gram sponsored by Habi- adults have enjoyed tat for Humanity, VISTA watching that happen. and AmeriCorps. “Because they have Locally, it translates to worked and played and 10 volunteers kicking in planned and celebrated to help build two new side by side, they have homes at 1404 20th St. been given a head start and down the road at on becoming a commu1446 20th St. nity.” “This is a day to Habitat homes are remember Dr. King’s self- simple, no-frills strucless service,” said Habitures that are designed tat’s AmeriCorps VISTA to meet a family’s basic member Cassandra Lithousing needs. tle. Participants put in “America is one of the 400 to 500 “sweat equity” most charitable countries in the world, and this day hours as a down payis a prominent reflection ment on their home and pay for the cost of materiof that fact.” als through a 20- to Jamie Maciejewski, Habitat for Humanity of 30-year mortgage. Since its founding in East Jefferson County 1998, Habitat in Jefferexecutive director, said son County has built 20 Wednesday that the houses and recycled two, 10-member crew for providing simple, decent, Monday’s operation had already been chosen from affordable homes for 22 the local AmeriCorps and families with 47 children. Habitat is funded by VISTA volunteers. donations and by the volShe said there were unteer-operated Habitat other opportunities to Store at 2001 W. Sims volunteer at other times Way, Port Townsend. and that interested parFor more information ties should phone her at or to donate or volunteer, 360-379-2827. visit www.habitatejc.org The Habitat cluster or phone 360-379-2827. on 20th and 21st streets includes 14 lots, with 13 ________ of them occupied or near Jefferson County Reporter completion. Charlie Bermant can be When the houses are reached at 360-385-2335 or finished in March, the charlie.bermant@peninsula neighborhood will include dailynews.com. By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

Holiday activities highlight both work, play The Olympic National Park Visitor Center at 3002 Mount Angeles Road is screening a 30-minute video program, “A New Time, a New Voice,” which is about the life and work of King, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. today and Monday, with additional viewings available upon request. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. The road to Hurricane Ridge is open daily, beginning at 9 a.m., weather permitting. A shuttle to Hurricane Ridge runs twice daily Wednesdays through Sundays plus Monday holidays from two downtown Port Angeles locations when the road is open. Interested riders are encouraged to phone All Points Charters & Tours at Rope tows operating 360-460-7131 to reserve Rope tows operated by seats for a $10 round-trip the Hurricane Ridge Winter fee. More information is Sports Club are scheduled to be run through Monday. available at the Olympic Peninsula Daily News

Both work and play are planned on the North Olympic Peninsula this holiday weekend. Monday’s holiday commemorating civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., who was assassinated in 1968, is in honor of his Jan. 15 birthday. The Olympic National Park’s usual $15-per-car fee continues to be waived today and Monday, and Hurricane Ridge facilities are open through Monday. Many concessions will be discounted throughout the park, including the price of food, lodging and souvenirs. The Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center, snack bar and ski shop will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Monday.

Peninsula Tourism Commission website at www. olympicpeninsula.org. Road status and current conditions are available by phoning the park’s recorded information line at 360-5653131 or by visiting http:// tinyurl.com/8rdfdk or www. twitter.com/hrwinteraccess. All city and county government offices will be closed across the Peninsula on Monday.

Day of service Groups throughout the Peninsula are offering volunteer opportunities, with several events hosted by AmeriCorps. Two events are featured on this page. Others set for Monday are:

Port Angeles ■  A free community dinner will feature service providers for those in need. The meal, open to the public, will be from 5 p.m. to

7 p.m. at First United Methodist and Congregational Church, 110 E. Seventh St. Representatives of Olympic Community Action Programs, Serenity House of Clallam County, United Way of Clallam County, First Step Family Support Center and Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County will be available to answer questions and provide information. Those attending do not need to call ahead but can just show up, said Emily Kreidler, who is one of the coordinators for the Olympic Peninsula units of the YMCA AmeriCorps. The same goes for volunteering — just show up to participate. ■  A project to help clean up a Serenity House building is planned between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Volunteers will meet at the Tempest Building, 535 E. First St. No more volunteers are needed. ■  The North Olympic

AmeriCorps program will hold its second annual Martin Luther King Day Quilt Making event at Roosevelt Elementary, 106 Monroe Road, from noon to 4 p.m. AmeriCorps workers will create paper quilts from pictures that elementary school students have drawn about their dreams to benefit the community. The finished quilts will be hung around town. The event is free and open to the public. Free food will be provided to participants. For more information, phone Paige Boyer, AmeriCorps event organizer, at 253-389-9266 or e-mail paige.boyer@gmail.com.

Sequim ■  The North Olympic Land Trust and Sequim High School Environmental Club will work on a watershed restoration project on Siebert Creek between Port Angeles and Sequim during

two work sessions from 10 a.m. to noon and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Invasive Scotch broom plants will be removed. Trees will be planted in the spring. Participants will meet at the end of Siebert Creek Road, which is off U.S. Highway 101 between Port Angeles and Sequim. Volunteers should bring work gloves, drinking water and rain gear, as well as lunch for those working both sessions. For more information or to RSVP, phone Lorrie Campbell, land trust stewardship manager, at 360417-1815, ext. 4.

Port Townsend ■  Volunteers will visit Discovery View Retirement Community,1051 Hancock St., for singing and creating art projects from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Turn

to

MLK/C2


C2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011

King Day events to go past holiday

MLK: Clear away grass

or dance to live music

Continued from C1 Bar, 211 Taylor St., in Port Townsend. Volunteers can get tickThe event is recommended for volunteers 7 ets from the Port Townsend years and older, said Jacques YMCA. For more informaLivingston, director of the tion, e-mail adayonpt@ Olympic Peninsula YMCA gmail.com. ■  The Washington ConAmeriCorps. For more information, servation Corps will hold its visit the Port Townsend annual Martin Luther King YMCA, 1919 Blaine St., or Day Volunteer Event at e-mail adayonpt@gmail. Fort Flager State Park, 10541 Flagler Road, from com. ■  Volunteers will help 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Volunteers can work on remove European beach a fire pit replacement, trail grass — an invasive species — from Point Wilson from maintenance, beach cleanup and a dock removal. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The public is welcome. For more information, Food and refreshments will visit the Port Townsend YMCA or e-mail adayonpt@ be provided. For more information, gmail.com phone AJ Garcia at 360■  A community dinner 550-6954 or e-mail with live music is planned ajgarcia1988@gmail.com. for all volunteers in Port Townsend and Chimacum Chimacum from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Undertown Coffee and Wine ■  Paint and renovation

Peninsula Daily News

of the Olympic Peninsula Thrift Shoppe at 10632 Rhody Drive and improving the Pea Patch Community Garden in Chimacum will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., AmeriCorps said. Volunteers will build raised beds in the community garden and sort, tag and hang items. Peninsula Daily News

Plans slated for Tuesday into week

Forks ■  A school supply drive for middle school students in Forks will run from noon to 3 p.m. at the Community Center, 91 Maple Ave. The drive, hosted by AmeriCorps, also will include arts and crafts for children.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Events commemorating Martin Luther King Jr. Day are planned Tuesday and next week. Left.Pol, a Port Angeles political discussion group, will present a video of Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech “I Have a Dream” at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday. The film shows his address and King in action during the “March on Washington for Jobs and Free-

make up the community. Quileute, Quinault and Hoh students and community members will perform songs and dances of their drum circle.

dom” on Aug. 28, 1963. A structured discussion will follow. For more information, e-mail Andrew McInnes at leftpol@yahoo.com. On Sunday, Jan. 23, a cultural awareness day in honor of King will be held in Forks.

Dance performances Dance performances by Mexican and Guatemalan student groups at Forks High School also are planned. Local artists will display their work to exhibit the artistic traditions of Forks, as well. For more information about any of the AmeriCorps activities or to donate to the group, phone 360417-3697 or e-mail jacques@ olympicpeninsulaymca.org.

‘Day of Diversity’ The “Day of Diversity,” originally scheduled for Monday, will be from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Rainforest Art Center, 35 N. Forks Ave. West End AmeriCorps, the Quileute Tribal School and Forks High School will host an exhibition of the artistic and musical talents of the cultural groups that

Clubs and Organizations Port Angeles

221 N. Lincoln St. Pat McCollum of Olympic Medical Center will Sons of Italy present “Stress in Heart Sons of Italy invites par- and Lung Disease.” ticipants to join with others Dr. Jane Pryne, school superintendent, will give a of Italian descent to share an afternoon of companion- presentation and answer questions on the upcoming ship and potluck the third Port Angeles School DisSunday of each month at trict levy. 1 p.m. at the Elks Naval Lodge, 131 E. First St. Operation Uplift Social members of nonItalian descent with an The Operation Uplift interest in the Italian culWomen’s Support Group ture are welcome to attend. will meet Wednesday from For more information, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the phone Pat Restaino at 360- Operation Uplift office, 118 N. Liberty St., Suite B. 452-1222. For further information, phone Jayne Downie at Grange meeting 360-457-1792. Mount Pleasant Grange will meet Tuesday at 7 p.m. Car club meets at the grange hall, Mount Pleasant and Draper roads. Northwest Olympic Cindy Kelly and Betsy Mustangs and Cougars Car Wharton will present infor- Club meet the third mation on the upcoming Wednesday of each month school bond initiative. at 7 p.m. at Joshua’s ResFor further information, taurant, 113 DelGuzzi phone Suzanne Barber at Drive. 360-477-4156. The meeting is open to all owners of Ford MusSchool retirees tangs and Mercury Cougars manufactured from The Clallam County School Retirees Association 1964 to the present. For more information, will meet Tuesday at phone Marv Fowler at 36011:30 a.m. upstairs at the CrabHouse Restaurant, 683-1329 or visit www.

Submit your club news The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

northolympicmustangs. com.

MOPS meets Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) will meet Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Fairview Bible Church, 385 O’Brien Road. Refreshments and child care will be provided. For more information, phone 360-457-5905.

noon at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, 221 N. Lincoln St. The program will be presented by CPA Charles McClain, who will discuss the Lions Foundation. For information on the Lions’ hearing aid and eyeglass program, phone 360417-6862.

Intuitive Circle

The Intuitive Circle meets the third Thursday of the month from 6 p.m. to PA Lions Club 8 p.m. at the Olympic UniThe Port Angeles Lions tarian Universalist FellowClub will meet Thursday at ship Hall, 73 Howe Road, Agnew. A donation of $5 per meeting is requested to help pay for facility rental and speaker honorarium. The focus of the group is Price • Selection on the community, educa-

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NAMI, a volunteer organization that offers support for families, friends and individuals suffering from any mental illness and a local affiliate of the National Alliance on MenBrewers meet tal Illness, will meet ThursNorth Olympic Brewers day from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the basement of Olympic will meet Saturday at 2 p.m. at the home of memMedical Center, 939 Carober Colin Smith, 220 Juniline St. per Lane. The January meeting OPEN meets will feature a special preThe Olympic Peninsula sentation by the Port AngeEntrepreneurs Network les Association of Realtors. will meet Thursday from President Dick Pilling 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the and Dan Blevins of the Coldwell Banker Uptown 2010 PAAR Oktoberfest, Realty office, 1115 E. Front will present a North OlymSt. pic Brewers event banner, OPEN meetings are which features the club’s intended to bring together new logo (also a gift from inventors, innovators and PAAR) in gratitude for the entrepreneurs of all ages club’s participation in from around the Peninsula Oktoberfest. who share common interNominations for club ests and passions for officers will be taken up at inventing. the January meeting, Support-type services where attendees will vote are also invited. on the 2011 slate. Members can share All members can submit resources, feedback and nominations directly to talent. info@northolympicbrewers. For more information, org. phone Tim Riley at 360460-4655. Turn to Clubs/C3

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The Green Party of Clallam County meets the third Thursday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The public is invited to come and help bring about change. The location of the meeting place changes from month to month. For more information and for the meeting place, phone 360-683-0867 or 360683-8407.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 16, 2011

C3

Albino birds splash of color in study ARE PARTIALLY ALBINO (leucistic) birds as rare as some institutions and individuals state? Is there a regional influence? From the number of reports and photographs this column receives, I get the feeling this condition is more prevalent than we think. Maybe the Northwest has more leucistic birds than other parts of the country. Perhaps digital cameras and the Internet are coloring established information. You can glean information from all over the country and back it up with photographs at a rate of speed hard to imagine just a decade or two ago. How many people who feed birds encounter a leucistic, or partially albino, bird? Albinism is a genetic mutation that prevents the production of melanin in the body. An allwhite bird with pink skin and pink eyes is a true albino. A leucistic bird has some color, but it has patches of white on parts of its body and even this takes two forms. There are pale leucistic birds and pied leucistic birds. In the former, the melanin has been reduced uniformly, and in the latter, it is randomly lacking on parts of the bird. This winter, a black-capped chickadee at our feeders has been driving me crazy. I want a photograph of this pied leucistic bird. We have had black-capped chickadees colored like this several times. They are beautiful,

Bird Watch Joan

but I want this particular Carson bird’s photograph as a companion to one we took of another “different” chickadee that arrived this fall. That bird forced me into studying the subject of leucism again, but this time, I also researched melanism in birds. The chestnut-backed chickadee in question has more brown on it than is normal. The brown creeps up and almost covers its white cheeks. Splashes of more brown are spattered on what should be a white breast. If I could ever get this pair side by side on the feeder, the photograph would be terrific. Leucism is genetic, but it prevents what melanin there is from being deposited on the bird’s feathers in a normal manner. Melanism occurs in birds that have an abnormal or large amount of melanin. They can be brown, black or a mixture of both. Our chickadee is a mixture of colors, and it appears that the brown is taking over its normal coloring. Perhaps it should be referred to as a pied melanistic bird. This subject may seem confusing, but it is very interesting, and especially interesting is what

Paul Carson

A melanistic chickadee, perching on a feeder, has more brown than normal, splashes of which are on a breast that should be white. seems to be an increasing number of birds with color abnormalities. Melanistic birds still appear to be quite rare, but it seems that leucistic birds are being seen more often. Could that eventually occur with the melanistic birds? Accepted knowledge states that their condition is genetically controlled, but the website of the Royal Society for the Protection

of Birds in the U.K. noted that a bird on a diet rich in hempseed can turn black. The high oil content in the seed is responsible. Black sunflower seeds have a high oil content, and chestnutbacked chickadees (and many other species) love them. Will melanism show up more frequently as the decades roll on? Or did the bird that showed up in our yard come from an area where hemp is grown?

There are many unanswered questions about birds, and some of them lead to some interesting answers. That’s one of the reasons birds are so fascinating.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. E-mail: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C2 Hall, Janice Harsh and Pat Dorst. Honored as the biggest Members must be preslosers of the year were ent at January’s meeting to Carol Kitts and Phil Kitts. vote for the incoming president, vice president and secretary. The North Olympic Sequim and the Brewers invites all brewers Dungeness Valley and beer enthusiasts to the meeting. Participants may bring a Car club meets sample of their handiwork The Sequim Valley Car or favorite beer to share. Club meets the third Monday of every month at Square dance club 6 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, Strait Wheelers Square 143 Port Williams Road. For more information, Dance Club meets the second and fourth Saturday of phone 360-681-0413. every month from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Mount Pleas- Poetry reading ant Community Hall, 2432 The Poetry Alliance Mount Pleasant Road. The cost is $5. For more information, phone 360-452-6974.

Stockhounds meet

hosts a poetry reading the third Monday of each month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Sequim Senior Service Center, 921 E. Hammond St. The event is free.

Toastmasters meet SKWIM Toastmasters meets the first and third Tuesday of every month promptly at 7 p.m. at Blue Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest Road. Arrival at the meeting is requested for 6:50 p.m. Guests are welcome. For more information, phone the president and chairman at 360-808-2088.

Adopt a Youth

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TOPS 1163 (Take off Pounds Sensibly) will have an open house Wednesday at 9:45 a.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave. The event is free, and everyone is welcome. For more information, phone Hedy Mills at 360928-4481. The award winner for December was Phill Kitts. Also honored were KOPS (Keeping off Pounds Sensibly) members Julie

Zoe, born Nov. 19, 1998, is a healthy girl residing in the People’s Republic of China. She enjoys art and is a polite, easy-going girl who gets along well with her classmates. She is independent, active and detail-oriented. She abides by rules and actively takes part in different activities in school. She is described as a hard worker. If you are interested in this lovely girl, please e-mail Ky Bower at ky@ adoptionadvocates.org. For details on Zoe, phone Adoption Advocates International at 360-4524777. Families interested in adoption must be approved by a licensed agency. If adoption is not an

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Olympic Medical Center Devon and Michael Romero, Port Angeles, a daughter, Alyssa Leigh, 7 pounds 9 ounces, 2:16 a.m. Dec. 14. Nikki Morris and Casey Hughes, Port Angeles, a son, Nolan, 7 pounds 2 ounces, 7:08 p.m. Dec. 20.

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sula Linux Users Group meets Monday at 7 p.m. in Stockhounds Investthe Madrona Room of the Friday Book Club ment Club meets every WSU Learning Center, 201 third Tuesday of the month The Friday Book Club W. Patison St., Port Hadto share knowledge, do meets the third Friday of research on prospective every month at 1:30 p.m. at lock. The meeting begins stocks and evaluate the the Sequim Library, 630 N. with an open discussion, group’s current portfolio. Sequim Ave. and participants may bring Members are of the area questions, tips, tricks or from Port Angeles to Port Knitting group whatever pertains to Townsend. The Strait Knitting Linux. For more information, Guild meets the third SatThe meeting is open to phone Merlyn Wursher at urday of every month at the public. 360-379-5412 in Port Townsend or Mike Zuspan 1 p.m. at the Sequim at 360-582-1345 in Sequim. Library, 630 N. Sequim Marrowstone meet Ave., to share work in progThe Marrowstone Island ress and completed projects Friends chapter Community Association and to provide support for The North Olympic Pen- each other’s endeavors. has its third meeting of the insula Chapter of the Com2010-2011 season Monday A $10 annual memberpassionate Friends meets ship provides funds to pur- at 7 p.m. at the Nordland the third Tuesday of each Garden Club, 320 Garden chase knitting books for month at 6 p.m. at St. Club Road, Nordland. the library. Luke’s Episcopal Church, The gathering includes 525 N. Fifth Ave. a short business meeting TCF is a nonprofit selfPort Townsend and and announcements before help support organization acknowledging the guest that assists bereaved famiJefferson County speaker, Philip Morley, Jeflies in their grief journey ferson County administraafter the death of a child. tor. Linux users For more information, phone 360-457-7395 or North Olympic PeninTurn to Clubs/C4 360-417-1885.


C4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Nursing home brings relief to daughter DEAR ABBY: My 92-year-old mother is the most hateful woman you have ever met. My husband and I took her into our home because she could no longer care for herself. She immediately took over everything, telling us what to do, being demanding and complaining that nothing was ever right. She tried to discipline my well-behaved kids, ages 15 and 21. She attempted to treat them the way she treated us, using foul language, hitting and verbally abusing. My husband and kids have called me at work saying I need to get home immediately because Mother was out of control. We told her we’d cook her meals because she could no longer use the oven.

Dear Guilt-ridden: Probably because she was We mod- modeling behavior she Abigail Van Buren eled appro- learned from her own mother and possibly priate examples of because she is demented. Frankly, it was unrealisinteracting tic to expect that she would with the suddenly change from the kids, but person she has been for the she just didn’t get it. past 92 years into a Disney character — and I don’t We mean Cruella De Vil. finally had Did you do the right to put her in a nursing thing? All things considhome. ered, yes. Now, we are wracked However, you should not with guilt. Did I do the right thing? abandon your mother. As a loving daughter — My siblings didn’t want her because of her long his- which you have tried to be — I’m advising you to try a tory of abuse. little harder. I’m in no hurry to visit Visit her. Bring her her at the home, either. Why couldn’t she be the something to distract her. If she’s able to be moved, kindly grandma and partake her out for a meal. ent that many children When she’s gone, you, have? Guilt-Ridden unlike your siblings, will in Tustin, Calif. have nothing to regret.

dear abby

Dear Abby: My son “Rob” and his fiancee invited me to join them at a dinner his father and stepmother, “Jane,” are hosting. Rob’s grandmother, brother and sister-in-law will be there, as well as Jane’s two sons. I love them all and thought they loved me. Apparently, Jane doesn’t want me to attend. No reason was given. I was shocked. Jane and my ex were always welcomed in my home and life. I wished them well when they married after dating for 20 years. Jane’s children have spent the night in my home. I took care of them for several days after a hurricane. I even flew her youngest son to join Rob and me at a theme park.

Now, when I look back, I realize Jane never reciprocated. Rob and I are heartbroken. He wants nothing to do with Jane and doesn’t want her at his wedding. He’s furious with his dad for letting Jane make the rules. Rob doesn’t want to attend their dinner. Abby, I am sick that I have apparently caused a rift in the family. Please tell me how to deal with this. Stupefied in the South Dear Stupefied: Take the high road and encourage Rob to attend the dinner. This is Jane’s party, and as the hostess, it was her privilege to invite you — or not. Rob should not have assumed that he could dictate her guest list. While you have done

everything you can to be a friend to Jane and have one large, happy extended family, she may feel competitive toward you. Or she may regard you as a chapter in her husband’s life that she would prefer to be closed. Regard it as a reflection on her and her own insecurities. Be smart, take your cue from this and step back. As to Jane attending Rob’s wedding — if he wants his dad there, he may have to accept her presence. But that decision is Rob’s to make. Do not allow yourself to be dragged into it.

_________

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C3 day at 9:30 a.m. in the parking lot of Shold Business Park, 216 W. Pattison St., Guests who are interPort Hadlock. ested in becoming memThe group will then carbers are welcome to attend. pool to the Dragonfly Farms Nursery, 34881 N.E. HansExchange group ville Road, near Kingston North Olympic (on the Kitsap Peninsula). Exchange, a local currency If it is raining hard or group, will host an orienta- snowing, the group will meet tion to explain how the at 11:30 a.m. at the Bayview trading system works for Restaurant, 1539 Water St. skills, services and goods For more information, Monday at 7 p.m. at the phone Donna Coffee at 360Dundee Center, Hancock 379-6498. and 32nd streets, Port Townsend. Garden club meets For further information, The Quilcene-Brinnon phone Mike Dobkevich at Garden Club will meet 360-379-2627 or e-mail Thursday at 1 p.m. at the dobkevich1@msn.com. Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway Garden club meets 101, Quilcene. The Port Townsend GarEve Dixon from the Jefden Club will meet Wednes- ferson County Noxious

Weed Control program will present information on identifying and controlling noxious weeds Dixon, a 1997 graduate of Western Washington University, has been working with Jefferson County for the past four years surveying the country for noxious weeds and working with and educating county landowners on how to control the weeds. A half-hour social period with refreshments provided by Bonnie Douglass, Mavis Sorensen and Peggy Siscoe will precede the presentation at 1:30 p.m. Visitors, new members or anyone interested in controlling noxious weeds may attend. For more information, phone Cass Brotherton at 360-765-0901.

Things to Do Today and Monday, Jan. 16-17, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. For women 45 and over and men 50 and over. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-452-5973 or Ken Foster at 360-683-0141 for information, including time of day and location. Lions Breakfast — All-you-

can-eat. Crescent Bay Lions Clubhouse, Holly Hill Road and state Highway 112, 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. $6 adults, $3 children. Feiro Marine Life Center — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. Admission by donation. Phone 360-417-6254. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Outbreak.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Show runs till March 13. Phone 360-457-3532. Dance — Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m., with 30 minutes of instruction, followed by folk and ballroom dance. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Refreshments at 9 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081.

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Pet Pals meets

Submarine vets

Olympic Mountain Pet Pals will meet Wednesday at 5 p.m. at the Bishop Victorian Hotel, 714 Washington St., Port Townsend. For more information, phone 360-385-4187.

The Olympic Peninsula Base of the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. will meet Thursday at 7 p.m. at the VFW Hall, 31 Matheson St., Port Hadlock. All submarine veterans are invited to attend. For more information or to share a ride, phone 360437-1143 or 360-681-7247.

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International of Port Townsend/ Jefferson County, a professional businesswomen’s club, meets the first three Thursdays of the month at noon at Discovery View Retirement Apartments, 1051 Hancock St., Port Townsend. For information on joining the organization, visit the website at www. soroptimistpt.org.

909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 Sequim and p.m. Free for patients with no Overeaters Anonymous — insurance or access to health Dungeness Valley St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, care. For appointments, phone 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone Today 360-457-4431. 360-477-1858. Call for artists — SoroptiMonday Musicale — Queen mist International of Sequim is Walk-in vision clinic — Information for visually impaired of Angels Church, 109 W. 11th looking for artists interested in and blind people, including St., noon. Phone 360-457- providing original artwork for the 14th annual Gala Garden Show, accessible technology display, 4585. which takes place March 18 and library, Braille training and variThe Answer for Youth — 19, 2012. Submit flower- and/or ous magnification aids. Vision Loss Center, Armory Square Drop-in outreach center for garden-themed works by March Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. youth and young adults, provid- 31. Visit www.sequimgarden Phone for an appointment at ing essentials like clothes, food, show.com for an artist agree360-457-1383 or visit www. Narcotics and Alcoholics Anon- ment and contract information. visionlossservices.org/vision. ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Future Farmers of America Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, Port Angeles Toastmasan old brothel and “Under- ters Club 25 — Clallam Transit ground Port Angeles.” Cham- Business Office, 830 W. Lauridber of Commerce, 121 E. Railsen Blvd., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. n  Deer Park Cinema, road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 Open to public. Phone Bill Port Angeles (360-452senior citizens and students, Thomas at 360-460-4510 or 7176) $6 ages 6 to 12. Children Leilani Wood 360-683-2655. “Black Swan” (R) younger than 6, free. For reser“The Chronicles of Narnia: Bingo — Masonic Lodge, vations, phone 360-452-2363, The Voyage of the Dawn 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. ext. 0. Doors at 4 p.m. Food, drinks Treader” (PG) “The Green Hornet” (PGVolunteers in Medicine of and pull tabs available. Phone 13) the Olympics health clinic — 360-457-7377. “Little Fockers” (PG-13) “True Grit” (PG-13)

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“The Dilemma” (PG-13) “Harry Potter and the

benefit breakfast — 8:30 a.m. to noon. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. Adults $5, children 6-10, $3. VFW breakfast — 169 E. Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost: $5 a person. Adult Scrabble — The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. Trivia night — Oasis Sports Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360-5823143.

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n  Uptown Theater, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “How Do You Know” (PG13)

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 16, 2011

C5

Time to plant or transplant is now I’VE HAD THE same question come at me numerous times this past week: Is this the time to/Should I transplant? Now is absolutely the best time to transplant “most” things, the exception being some perennials like hostas or peonies. The following six weeks are the next best time, with each passing day being slightly less advantageous than the one that came before. And for many of us, we are pruning things that are constantly getting in our way. In our way of the driveway, window, the house’s siding, walkway, playfield, lawn mower, property line, mailbox, deck, patio and in the way of your own body as you move about the yard and garden. Often, people prune, butcher and commit other heinous crimes upon their plants with sharpened tools and slicing motions solely because they are the wrong

tree, bush or shrub is just too big. Another might be the fact that it is not really all that attractive plants in these a plant, especially after being Andrew places. hacked at, and it might require a May The key to lot of effort to transplant it. good horticulOK, then don’t. ture is the That’s right, don’t because the right plant in chain saw is a fantastic pruning the right locatool, particularly when used flush tion, and next with ground level. week, we will Backhoes, too, just cut them begin a several- down or rip ’em up. week series on A poorly pruned, incorrectly this concept. sized plant is usually offensive in This week, appearance and the required you should workload needed to control it. fully contemplate the idea that So take it out and plant now is the perfect time to trans(transplant) an appropriate plant plant. for that space in its place. Make a concerted effort to But since this is the perfect identify, if any, the plants that time to transplant, why not space need constant pruning because out fast-growing shrubs, transthey are always overgrowing plant those little potted trees their surrounding and decide if that are quickly outgrowing their they should just be moved. location or move that vine Why not? because you had no idea wisteria Well, one reason may be the loves to grow under your roof or

A growing concern

Things to Do Continued from C4 Church, 382 W. Cedar St., 9

Monday Call for artists — Soroptimist International of Sequim is looking for artists interested in providing original artwork for the 14th annual Gala Garden Show, which takes place March 18 and 19, 2012. Submit flowerand/or garden-themed works by March 31. Visit www.sequim gardenshow.com for an artist agreement and contract information. Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 9 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www. sequimyoga.com.

Get in on the Things to Do

Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., noon. Phone 360-6814308 or partnership at 360683-5635.

The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Women’s weight loss support group — Dr. Leslie Van Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim Ave. Family Caregivers support group — Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Carolyn Lindley at 360-417-8554. German class — Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 2 p.m. Phone 360-6810226 or 360-417-0111.

Free blood pressure screening — Faith Lutheran

Health clinic — Free medical services for uninsured or underinsured. Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218.

and grow this coming spring and summer. So please, think about it carefully. Are you pleased with all your plants? Are they in the right spot and the right size for the area? The best pruning is by far the right plant in the right spot. Perhaps the best thing is to prune it away by moving it away. And don’t forget crying “timber” works as the most efficient and correct pruning for many situations, then capitalize on the weather and plant anew. Winter is on your transplanting side.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360683-4803.

Walk aerobics — First Baptist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 a.m. Free. Phone 360-683Look Good Feel Better 2114. program — For women diagnosed with cancer. Learn hair Exercise classes — Sequim styling and makeup application Community Church, 1000 N. tips. Olympic Medical Cancer Fifth Ave. Cardio-step, 9 a.m. to Center, 844 N. Fifth Ave., 2 10:15 a.m. Strength and toning p.m. to 4 p.m. Sponsored by class, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Olympic Medical Cancer CenCost: $5 a person. Phone Shel- ter and American Cancer Sociley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or ety. Registration required. e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. Phone 360-582-2845 or 360com. 582-5675. Senior Singles— Hiking and a walk, 9 a.m. Phone 360797-1665 for location.

into your cedar shake and vinyl siding? Transplanting is ideal now for a variety of reasons, foremost the weather. Because, as you may have noticed of late, it is cold. The cold means plants are dormant or semi-dormant and thus will not stress under normal transplanting conditions. They are not transpiring either, their leaves having been shed months earlier; needles are dormant or semi-dormant. The sun is low, and there’s no searing heat to dehydrate or stress out the plants. The rain, sleet, drizzle and snow for weeks and months on end are precisely why the earlier you plant/transplant, the better for the plant because it is watered in and settled that much longer. They root in as well because major root production occurs now; the longer the plant can root in, the better it will take off

Women’s barbershop chorus — Singers sought for Grand Olympics Chorus of Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster at 360-683-0141.

Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. jchsmuseum.org. Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for youths (6-17); free for science center members. Phone 360385-5582, e-mail info@ptmsc. org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

craft and aviation art. Chimacum Grange Farmers Market — 9572 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for children 6 to 12, free for chilToday dren 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses Port Townsend Aero of Puget Sound and the Strait Museum — Jefferson County of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360International Airport, 195 Air- 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. olypen.com. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages Jefferson County Histori7-12. Free for children younger cal Museum and shop — 540 than 6. Features vintage air- Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848, or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com.

Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Silent war and violence Phone 360-765-0688, 360- protest — Women In Black, 765-3192 or 360-765-4848, or Adams and Water streets, 1:30 e-mail quilcenemuseum@ p.m. to 2:30 p.m. olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Monday 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Cabin Fever Quilters — Tri- Phone 360-385-6854. Area Community Center, 10 Discussion — Quimper West Valley Road, Chimacum, 10 a.m. Open to public. Phone Grange, 1219 Corona St., Port Laura Gipson at 360-385- Townsend, 7 p.m. For monthly topics, phone 360-379-2536. 0441.

Briefly . . . Volunteers’ beach training set

Grange event set

PORT TOWNSEND — A kayak trip by Rob Avery and three friends through the Aleutian Island will be recounted at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The talk is part of the Winter Wanderlust adventure series at Wheeler Theater at Fort Worden State Park.

Mongolia travels PORT ANGELES — John Wegmann will discuss and display photographs from his travels around Mongolia during a presentation at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., at 7 p.m. Friday. It is the third of four slideshows in the Peninsula Trails Coalition Adventure Travel Series. The $5 admission fee

will go toward the purchase of tools, equipment and lunches for volunteers who maintain and build the Olympic Discovery Trail. Children 12 and younger will be admitted to the presentation free. John and Mary Wegmann have traveled to five different parts of Mongolia in the past eight years as members of summer field

camps for undergraduate geology students from American colleges. This program will present images and stories ranging from the Gobi Desert in the south to the Altai Mountains in the west and the taiga forests in northernmost Mongolia. For more information, phone 360-452-8641 or 360-808-4223. Peninsula Daily News

PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD AND INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE FACILITY

CAREER FAIR January 28th and 29th, 2011 9 am to 5 pm Kitsap SUN Pavilion Kitsap County Fairgrounds 1200 NW Fairgrounds Road Bremerton, WA

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) and other Career Fair participants expect to hire approximately 500 people over the next year. A wide range of positions will be filled, including:

In one short procedure you can have a stable denture with no surgical sutures nor the typical months of healing.

Air Conditioning Equipment Mechanic • Composite/Plastic Fabricator • Crane Operator • Electrician • Electronics Mechanic • Electroplater • Fabric Worker • Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic • Insulator • Instrument Mechanic • Machinist • Maintenance Worker • Marine Machinery Mechanic • Metal Forger • Oiler • Painter • Physical Science Technician • Pipefitter • Production Machinery Mechanic • Rigger • Sheetmetal Mechanic • Shipfitter • Shipwright • Tool and Parts Attendant • Toolmaker • Student Trainee (Various Trades – Helper and Apprentice positions). This is an opportunity to explore career opportunities and meet with managers from PSNS & IMF, other local Department of the Navy Commands, and local businesses involved with ship maintenance and repair.

1525 W. 16th St., P.A. Owner Financing: 2 Br.., 1 ba, 50x140 lot, across from Cl. Co. Fairgrounds, built 1980, remodeled 1989,

built-in vacuum, covered back deck with wine and vegetable storage underneath, insulated, new appliances, side-by-side fridge 2007, glass top stove 2010, water/dryer 2010, electric fireplace 2010, 50 gal. hot water heater 2010, new carpet 2008, laminate floor hallway 2008, linoleum in laundry and kitchen 2010, lg. paved driveway, 2 car detached shop/ garage with 12’ ceiling, fully insulated, nice greenhouse with walk around deck, landscaped yard, 10 fruit trees, carport off side of shop, fenced in back.

$160,000

BACKPACKS, BRIEFCASES, etc. will not be allowed into the Pavilion. All hand carried items are subject to search.

For additional information on positions and job announcements, Go to www.navsea.navy.mil/shipyards/puget. APPLY ON-LINE AT https://chart.donhr.navy.mil . For questions not addressed at the websites, e-mail psnsproductionjobs@navy.mil . The US Government is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

115108705

360-460-4957 or email tomarina06@gmail.com 035074779

JOYCE — Crescent Grange, 50870 state Highway 112, Joyce, is hosting a pot luck dinner and brown bag bingo for the commu-

Aleutians by kayak

With a goal of paddling farther west than any modern sea kayaker, Avery and friends discovered a rich marine environment — including sea lions, sea otters, whales and fur seals — plus active volcanoes and historic Aleut village sites along with a deserted U.S. military base. Suggested donation is $7 for adults and $1 for students. Proceeds benefit the Jefferson Trails Coalition and Fort Worden’s Olympic Hostel. For more information, phone 360-385-0655.

035077140

PORT ANGELES — The Washington State University’s Beach Watchers program has announced training dates for residents of Clallam County. The training for new volunteers will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays from April 19 to May 26. Classes will be held in Port Angeles. The course will cover a broad range of subjects from marine mammals, harmful algal blooms and zooplankton to stormwater runoff pollution and marine shoreline gardening techniques. There will also be many field trips to beaches, estuaries and other sites. Previous field trips have included Slip Point, Cannonball Beach, Salt Creek Recreation Area and Dungeness Spit. WSU Beach Watchers are volunteer marine stewardship educators. Volunteers participate in a range of projects from water quality sampling and seabird monitoring to festivals, workshops and tide pool talks. There is a $30 fee to cover facility rental and class materials. Program information and an application packet are available at www. beachwatchers.wsu.edu/ clallam. For more information, phone David Freed, program coordinator, at 360565-2619 or e-mail dfreed@ wsu.edu.

nity at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. A silent auction will be held to raise funds for the fire district’s fire safety trailer.


C6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News

Kickoff

rally for

Relay For Life

A kickoff rally was held Saturday for the upcoming 23rd annual Relay For Life event to formally set up all the many volunteer committees to put together another fundraising event for the American Cancer Society. Committee members are, from left, Paige Boyer, Kirby Uranich, Alison Maxwell, Emily Harrington, Debra West (with symbolic relay baton) as the event chair, Kate O’Claire, Tami Brothers, Brain Linson, Beth Bugher and Jamie Sage. The event is scheduled for June 1 through 11 at the Clallam County Fairgrounds. The total funds collected last year of $57,000 were down a little from the record $75,000 of 2009. The group is urging former teams and new teams to be formed to help in this worldwide cancer drive. There are just over 5,100 such 24-hour events held across America each year, such as this one in Clallam County. The Relay For Life program was started in Tacoma back in 1986, and the theme is “Celebrate. Remember. Fight Back.” To sign up for a team, phone Sage at 360-477-7673. Further information can be found at www.relayforlife.org/ portangeleswa.

Snowgrass tickets on sale ‘Operation Blue with special guest The Finleys. Artists performing at Snowgrass 2011 are generously donating their time and talent to raise funds for First Step Family Support Center. Tickets are on sale now and are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors, and free for youth 10 and younger. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., and the show gets started at 6:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased in Port Angeles at First Step Family Support Center, 325 E. Sixth St.; KONP, 721 E. First St.; Strait

Music, 1015 E. First St.; Odyssey Books, 114 W. Front St.; Port Book & News, 104 E. First St.; and Necessities & Temptations, 217 N. Laurel St. in Port Angeles. In Sequim, tickets are available at Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., and in Forks at Forks Outfitters, 950 S. Forks Ave. All proceeds will benefit First Step Family Support Center. Since 1971, First Step has worked with thousands of families to help their children thrive through parent

education, family support and child development programs. First Step offers a variety of innovative services, including several home visiting programs, parenting classes, support groups, licensed child care, resource and referral services, emergency formula, baby equipment and clothing, transportation, school readiness and parent advocacy services. For more information, e-mail Danielle Robb at daniellelrobb@gmail.com or phone First Step at 360457-8355.

ema Movable Fest 2011 on Friday. The movie will shown in the Little Theater, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 7 p.m. All films selected for the series were audience and SEKIU — The Lake critical favorites from the Ozette Steering Committee 2010 Port Townsend Film will meet at the Sekiu Festival. Community Center, 42 Rice “Welcome” won both the St., from 10:15 a.m. to Ecumenical and Europa 3:15 p.m. Thursday. Prizes at the Berlin InterCommittee members national Film Festival in will discuss Lake Ozette 2009, was named Best Film sockeye salmon recovery at the Lumiere Awards, and implementation issues. received the Best ScreenAgenda topics will play award at the Gijon include meeting facilitation International Film Festival through June 30; updates and also received 10 Cesar and planning for Recovery nominations, the French Plan implementation; com- equivalent of the Academy pleting a three-year imple- Awards mentation plan; an impleThe film is set in Calais, mentation budget; a preFrance, which is a gathersentation on sockeye moni- ing point for immigrants toring data; a presentation hoping to make it across on the results of spawning the English Channel. gravel research study; and Five other films will updates on activities since also be shown this quarter. the Oct. 6 meeting. Admission is $5, or $1 The Steering Committee with a current Peninsula meets on an ad hoc basis. College student ID. Over the last four years, Showtimes are all at it has helped develop the 7 p.m. Lake Ozette Sockeye Magic of Cinema is Salmon Recovery Plan and sponsored by the Peninsula is now providing input for College Associated Student the implementation plan. Council, and the Movable The committee’s open Fest is co-sponsored by the membership includes land- Port Townsend Film Festiowners, interested citizens, val. timber companies, as well For more information on as representatives from the films and the series, local, state, federal and visit www.pencol.edu. tribal governments. For more information, Genealogy event phone Pat Crain at 360SEQUIM — The 565-3075 or e-mail Museum & Arts Center in patrick_crain@nps.gov, or phone Rosemary Furfey at the Sequim-Dungeness Valley is partnering with the 503- 231-2149 or e-mail Clallam County Genealogirosemary.furfey@noaa.gov. cal Society to present a two-day genealogy workA warm ‘Welcome’ shop on Friday and SaturPORT ANGELES — day. “Welcome,” a critically Clallam County Geneaacclaimed and commerlogical Society president cially successful French Roberta Griset and genealfilm, will open the Peninogist Virginia Majewski will lead the workshop in sula College Magic of Cin-

basic family history research techniques at the MAC’s DeWitt Center, 544 N. Sequim Ave., from 9 a.m. to noon both days. Topics include online genealogy research, surname research and researching Census records. Class space is limited, participants are asked to reserve a space by phoning the MAC Exhibit Center at 360-683-8110 or doing so in-person at 175 W. Cedar St. The cost is $30 for MAC and genealogical society members and $35 for nonmembers. Payment is to be made via check or cash and will be collected prior to the start of the first class Friday. Participants are encouraged to bring laptop computers to the workshop, though it is not required. For more information, visit www.macsequim.org and www.olypen.com/ccgs.

home buyer and down payment assistance programs. The class is offered through a partnership of North Olympic Peninsula organizations including Olympic Community Action Programs and Homeward Bound, a Community Land Trust serving Clallam and Jefferson counties. For more information or to RSVP, phone Olympic Community Action Programs at 360-385-2571, ext. 6303, or 360-452-4726, ext. 6100.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Snowgrass 2011, the ninth version of the annual winter bluegrass music festival, will be held at the Port Angeles High School auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29. A number of local bands will provide old-time, handclapping, toe-tapping bluegrass music to raise funds for First Step Family Support Center. This year’s lineup includes Abby Mae and the Homeschool Boys, Marilyn Kay & Co. and Crescent

Briefly . . . Ozette panel to discuss salmon issues

FourC speaker

SEQUIM — FourC (Concerned Citizens of Clallam County) will host Scott St. Clair from the Evergreen Freedom Foundation at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir St., at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 24. St. Clair will be speaking to FourC on the role citizens need to play in returning government to Homebuyers class more fiscal responsibility SEQUIM — A free first- and principled competency. time homebuyer’s class will He has been a freelance be held at Sequim Library, writer and activist, having 630 N. Sequim Ave., at worked as an independent 10 a.m. Saturday. executive research consulInstructors trained by tant for various organizathe state Housing Commis- tions. sion will provide informaThe Evergreen Freedom tion about purchase-assisFoundation is an Olympiatance programs, eligibility based public policy organirequirements and lending zation dedicated to the options. advancement of individual Subjects will include below-market interest rate liberty. FourC is a nonpartisan loans, lending programs for group dedicated to preservlow- and moderate-income ing freedoms and liberties borrowers, sweat equity homeownership, new lend- through education and involvement in local, state ing limits and credit. and national issues. All participants receive For more information a certificate of completion, necessary to unlock various about the meeting or lending programs and self- FourC, e-mail fourc.info@ yahoo.com or visit www. help homeownership pronewsocialcontract.com. grams and a requirement for some of the first time Peninsula Daily News

Valentine’ set

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Drennan & Ford Funeral Home is participating in “Operation Valentine,” a project that allows children, students, scout troops, teachers, parents and anyone in the community to create a hand-made Valentine card to be delivered to a U.S. Marine who has been injured or become ill while serving in combat zones. Drennan & Ford currently has the support of Roosevelt Middle School, Hamilton Elementary School, Dry Creek Elementary School, Jefferson Elementary School, all in Port Angeles, and Greywolf Elementary School in Sequim. The school children in many of these schools’ classes will be making their own special Valentines. Valentines can include words of encouragement, get-well sentiments, thankyou for serving our country, etc. The Valentines can be

in the form of cut-out hearts, folded paper with a note, drawings and the like. Envelopes are not necessary. As these service people are confined to hospitals and care facilities, it is requested that glitter not be used in the decoration of cards. It is also requested that a return response from the veterans not be requested, as the nature of their injury or illness may preclude them from responding. These Valentines may be brought to the Drennan & Ford Funeral Home and Crematory office at 260 Monroe Road from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday until Feb. 1. For more information, phone 360-457-1210 or by e-mail at info@drennan ford.com. Drennan & Ford will then package them for distribution. For more information, visit www.drennanford. com.

Eco-group sues over fire lookout The Associated Press

DARRINGTON — A Montana environmental group is suing the U.S. Forest Service over the construction of a new fire lookout in the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area northeast of Seattle. The group, Wilderness Watch, claimed in the federal lawsuit that the Forest Service violated the National Environmental Policy Act when it built the new $50,000 lookout on Green Mountain in 2009. The building replaced a lookout built in the 1930s and long used for wilderness management and as a rest stop for hikers. Wilderness Watch said the Forest Service didn’t study the environmental consequences before building the new lookout, and the use of a helicopter and power tools in the construction also violated the act. It wants the structure removed. “It’s supposed to be free of structures, free of motor vehicle use,” said the group’s executive director, George Nickas. “Everybody wants it their way. The hikers don’t want

the loggers or the miners or the off-road vehicle folks. “You can’t expect your pet use to be OK, when the Wilderness Act is designed for us to step back and let it truly be a wild place.” The Herald newspaper of Everett reported that the lawsuit has angered hiking groups in the region. They promote the history of fire lookouts in the region and believe the buildings help people appreciate the wilderness. Forest Service personnel declined to comment, but longtime Glacier Peak Wilderness volunteers Mike and Ruth Hardy of south King County told the newspaper that the lawsuit threatens the work of those trying to preserve the history of the iconic fire lookouts. Darrington Ranger District wilderness and trails coordinator Gary Paull said the Green Mountain Lookout is used by paid staff and volunteers to manage the wilderness. The lookout has not been formally used for fire detection since the late 1980s, but volunteers often are able to report lightning strikes from the lookout.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Serenity sets board meet Peninsula Daily News

Clallam County Teen Court members meet with Bernette Johnson, associate justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court. From left are Rylan Spencer, Sarah Bower, Tally Swanson, Johnson, Grace Geren and Kelly Norris.

Clallam teen court visits New Orleans to study law Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County Teen Court members went to New Orleans last month to study Napoleonic Code law with Bernette Johnson, an associate justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court. Students were given a tour of the courthouse in New Orleans, which was built around 1804, and allowed to read and touch books dating back to 1547, when Louisiana was a colony of Spain, and books rel-

evant to the Louisiana Purchase, which brought Louisiana into the United States as a territory in 1803. The bar exam and practice of civil law in Louisiana are significantly different from other states. The state draws on its colonial inheritance, in which the adopted civil code is based on the Napoleonic Code of France and further influenced by Spanish laws. Teen Court members and adult advisers also participated in a teen court in

Lafayette, La., and visited Angola State Prison in Tunica, La. Said Danetta Rutten of Clallam County Juvenile and Family Services and one of the teen court adult advisers: “Each year Teen Court picks an area of law in the United States to study and participate in an educational experience that would involve them at some point in today’s setting. “Teen Court kids raise all funds each year to make these trips possible.”

ner, under the direction of Laurence Cole and Gretchen Sleicher. In support of this new outlet for community creativity and public service, they have chosen KPTZ radio to receive the proceeds of their winter concert. KPTZ is the Quimper Peninsula’s community radio station and hopes to be broadcasting at 91.9 FM by early spring. Before broadcasts can begin operators need to raise enough money to cover the cost of erecting a tower, at price tag of more than $20,000. Admission is by donation. For more information, phone 360-379-9123.

The classrooms are down the first hallway on the right after entering through the main entrance of the center. The Clallam County Marine Resources Committee typically meets the third Monday of each month.

Briefly . . . Choir benefit concert set for Saturday PORT TOWNSEND — The PT Songlines Choir will perform a winter concert and participatory sing benefit fundraiser for KPTZ-FM radio at 7 p.m. this coming Saturday, Jan. 22. The benefit will be held at Trinity United Methodist Church, 609 Taylor St. It will include performance pieces by Songlines choir members and special guests, as well as opportunities for the audience to sing along. Guests will include Songweavers, a trio made up of Laurence Cole, Aimee Kelly Spencer and Aimee Ringle. Songlines, now in its fifth year in Port Townsend, is a nonauditioned philanthropic community choir that welcomes all voices and sings an eclectic repertoire of songs from around the world and around the cor-

Marine committee PORT ANGELES — Postponed due to Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Clallam County Marine Resources Committee will meet at the Vern Burton Community Center classrooms from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 24.

‘Adventures in Film’ PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Library and the Port Townsend Public Library will present their fifth annual Adventures series in January and February. This year’s theme is “Adventures in Film.” Film critic Robert Horton will kick off the series with “Alien Encounters: Sci-Fi Movies and the Cold War Culture of the 1950s” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 25. The free program will be held at the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., Port Hadlock. The second event features a screening of the film “Twenty Five Hundred and One” with documen-

Thank you, wonderful businesses! ONCE AGAIN, WE wish to thank the following merchants for their generosity and Christmas spirit in donating about 150 poinsettias and other cheerful Christmas plants to Port Angeles and Sequim nursing homes, Olympic Medical Center, assisted-living facilities and a few individual shut-ins (with apologies to Serenity House for being short on plants again this economy-impacted year): 4  Costco, Sequim 4  The Home Depot, Sequim 4  QFC, Sequim 4  Port Angeles Rite-Aid store on Lincoln Street 4  Swain’s

4  Port Angeles Walmart Supercenter 4  Walmart, Sequim Special thanks to QFC, Swain’s and the Port Angeles Walmart for going the extra mile of donating during an otherwise lean year. This act of kindness truly brightened the season for those who might be alone, homeless or hurting. See you again next December, God willing! From Bill and Lois Zynda and grandson Randy Hogoboom (all volunteers and residents of the Port Angeles/Sequim area)

Remembering a Lifetime downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.”

PORT ANGELES — Serenity House of Clallam County’s board of directors will hold its annual meeting in the Community Room at Tempest Permanent Supportive Housing, 535 E. First St., from 5:45 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. on Tuesday. Community partnership awards and Sally Garnero Awards for exceptional volunteers at the Port Angeles and Sequim thrift stores that help support Serenity House programs will be presented.

8 years of work Both the thrift store volunteers being honored have worked in the stores for more than eight years, helping those businesses substantially support the expansion of housing and services to homeless people. The board will also elect 2011 officers, review the agency’s 2010 accomplishments and introduce new employees. Serenity House provided housing, counseling and other services to 4,000

Rutten said the state has about 25 youth courts, with 1,200 nationwide. “Clallam County Teen Court is in its 15th year and is the second offender/diversion court to form in the state of Washington,” she said. Teen Court members on the Louisiana trip were Kelly Norris, Rylan Spencer, Tally Swanson, Sarah Bower and Grace Geren. Adult advisers on the Peninsula Daily News trip were Rutten, Tracey PORT TOWNSEND — Lassus and Kim Burns. Washington State Pest Management Resource Service Director Catherine Daniels will discuss “How Understanding Pesticide Regulations Helps Everytary film maker Patricia day Decision-Making” on van Ryker. this coming Saturday, Jan. The program will be 22. held at the Port Townsend The talk is the third in Library, 1220 Lawrence St., the Washington State Uniat 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27. versity-Jefferson County The third event in the Extension Master Gardenseries features former Hol- ers 2011 Yard and Garden lywood film producer Bob Lecture Series. Rosen, who now lives in Jefferson County. From 10 a.m. to noon Rosen, a producer of The lecture series is held “Gilligan’s Island,” the origat the Port Townsend Cominal “Hawaii Five-0” and “The Crow,” will show clips munity Center, 620 Tyler St., from 10 a.m. to noon and tell behind-the-scenes stories from his career as a each Saturday through Feb. 12. television and movie proAttendees will learn how ducer. items like organic pest prodHis lecture will be held ucts, citronella candles and at the Port Townsend pool chemicals are all reguLibrary at 7 p.m. Tuesday, lated as pesticides in WashFeb. 22. ington, one of the most For more information, highly regulated states in phone the Jefferson County Library at 360-385-6544 or visit www.jclibrary.info or the Port Townsend Library at 360-385-3181 or visit www.cityofpt.us/Library. Esther C. Peninsula Daily News Hefley

homeless and at-risk people in 2010. New projects dedicated during the year include Burke Place Apartments in Forks, the Hygiene Center in Port Angeles and Maloney Heights Apartments in Port Angeles.

14 programs Founded in 1983, Serenity House is a community based nonprofit that has grown to offer 14 programs providing bridge housing, permanent housing and services for individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Board members are President Brando Blore, Vice President Brandel Sundt, Treasurer Robert Tulloch, Secretary Patsy Feeley, Roger White, Jennifer Parker, Candace Burkhardt, Lynn McAleer and Al Wang of Joyce. Light refreshments will be served at the annual meeting. The public is invited but should RSVP by phoning Serenity House at 360- 4527224.

Pesticide lecture set for Saturday the nation when it comes to pesticides. Whether a “spray and pray” user, an “organic first, conventional as last resort” advocate or an “organic only” gardener, learn the way pesticides are reviewed, approved, regulated and recommended to make better choices and educate other gardeners.

$42 series tickets Series tickets cost $42 and are transferable. Ticket sales help underwrite the Jefferson County Master Gardeners Foundation Grant Program. Checks should be made to Jefferson County Master Gardener Foundation and mailed with one’s name, address and phone number to P.O. Box 490, Port Hadlock, WA 98339. Single tickets may be sold at the door on a spaceavailable basis for $10. For more information, phone the Master Gardeners at 360-379-1172.

Death and Memorial Notice

Death Notices C. Lois Hall Feb. 18, 1912 — Jan. 9, 2011

C. Lois Hall died in Port Townsend of natural causes. She was 98. Services: Memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Friday, Jan. 21 at Kosec Funeral Home & Crematory Chapel, 1615 Parkside Drive, Port Townsend. www.kosecfuneralhome.com

Thelma A. Porter July 16, 1926 — Jan. 9, 2011

Thelma A. Porter died at home in Sequim of agerelated causes. She was 84. Her obituary will be published later. Services: Memorial service will be held in the spring. Linde Family Funeral Service is in charge of arrangements.

1908-2010 Longtime Port Angeles resident Esther C. Hefley passed away on Monday, December 20, 2010, in Tacoma, Washington, at the age of 102. Esther was born in 1908 in Idaho Springs, Colorado, to Swedish immigrants ­Elfrida and Martin Hanson. In 1927, at the age of 19, Esther married Freeman (Slim) Rice, and they had two sons, Freeman and Norman Rice. “The love of her life,” Slim passed away in 1954. Following his death, she worked for Hanford in Richland, Washington, where she met and married her second husband, Thurman Hefley. When they retired, they moved to Port

Angeles to be near Freeman and Joanne Rice. Thurman Hefley, passed away in 1988. Her sons also preceded her in death. She had nine grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and 10 greatgreat-grandchildren. Esther was a lively card player and enjoyed many years as a member of the Port Angeles Senior Center. Shortly after her 100th birthday celebration, Esther moved to Sound Vista Village Assisted Living in Gig Harbor, Washington, to be closer to family. Esther will return to Port Angeles to be laid to rest with her son, Freemen Rice, and her second husband, Thurman Hefley. Esther will be greatly missed by her family and many friends!

HELP OUR TROOPS CALL HOME DONATE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES

More than 150,000 troops are serving overseas. Cell Phones for Soldiers is calling on all Americans to support the troops by donating old cell phones. LOCAL DROP OFF CENTER:

■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Drennan & Ford

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by

C7


C8

WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 50

Low 41

49/39

46/35

43/33

43/34

Windy with periods of rain.

Periods of rain.

Rain.

Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain.

Mostly cloudy.

Cloudy with a chance of rain.

The Peninsula A steady flow of Pacific moisture will continue to bring heavy rain to the coastal Pacific Northwest today. When combined with snowmelt, this rain could lead to significant flooding in some areas. The intensity of the rain will drop off Monday as a surface area of Port high pressure builds northward. A final strong disturbance Townsend will bring heavy rain on Tuesday. By midweek, high pres51/44 sure will build in and the rain will finally clear out. Expect snow levels throughout the period to be high.

Victoria 52/46 Neah Bay 50/45

Port Angeles 50/41

Sequim 51/43

Forks 50/43

Olympia 53/45

Everett 52/45

Seattle 52/46

Yakima Kennewick 48/34 53/42

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Periods of rain today. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Rain at times tonight. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Rain tomorrow. Wind west 7-14 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Tuesday: Mainly cloudy with rain possible. Wind southwest 30-50 knots. Waves building to 4-8 feet. Visibility under 3 miles.

LaPush

Today Ht

Tomorrow

Low Tide

Ht

8:53 a.m. 8.5’ 2:56 a.m. 3.7’ COme see the 10:35 p.m. 6.6’ 4:01 p.m. 0.3’

BEST OF the BEST

Port Angeles

2:09 a.m. 9:52 a.m. Port Townsend 3:54 a.m. 11:37 a.m. Sequim Bay* 3:15 a.m. 10:58 a.m.

6.8’ 7.1’ 8.2’ 8.5’ 7.7’ 8.0’

5:41 a.m. 6:16 p.m. 6:55 a.m. 7:30 p.m. 6:48 a.m. 7:23 p.m.

5.9’ -0.8’ 7.6’ -1.0’ 7.1’ -0.9’

High Tide Ht 9:48 a.m. 11:27 p.m. 2:35 a.m. 10:45 a.m. 4:20 a.m. 12:30 p.m. 3:41 a.m. 11:51 a.m.

8.8’ 7.1’ 7.1’ 7.1’ 8.6’ 8.6’ 8.1’ 8.1’

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht 3:54 a.m. 4:49 p.m. 6:36 a.m. 6:58 p.m. 7:50 a.m. 8:12 p.m. 7:43 a.m. 8:05 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

3.4’ -0.3’ 5.8’ -1.2’ 7.5’ -1.6’ 7.1’ -1.5’

wilder You Can Count on us!

10:40 a.m. ----3:00 a.m. 11:41 a.m. 4:45 a.m. 1:26 p.m. 4:06 a.m. 12:47 p.m.

9.0’ --7.4’ 7.1’ 8.9’ 8.6’ 8.4’ 8.1’

Low Tide Ht 4:47 a.m. 5:35 p.m. 7:23 a.m. 7:40 p.m. 8:37 a.m. 8:54 p.m. 8:30 a.m. 8:47 p.m.

3.1’ -0.8’ 5.6’ -1.5’ 7.3’ -2.0’ 6.9’ -1.9’

Best Auto Deale r

TACOMA — Taylor

Feb 10

City Hi Lo W Athens 57 47 sh Baghdad 54 34 s Beijing 30 13 s Brussels 54 39 pc Cairo 66 54 s Calgary 5 -12 sn Edmonton -4 -14 sn Hong Kong 55 45 s Jerusalem 54 43 r Johannesburg 75 58 t Kabul 52 23 c London 54 46 c Mexico City 73 37 s Montreal 18 -2 c Moscow 10 2 c New Delhi 68 38 s Paris 52 43 s Rio de Janeiro 89 78 c Rome 61 45 s Stockholm 39 37 sn Sydney 83 70 pc Tokyo 45 36 pc Toronto 18 3 pc Vancouver 52 44 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Bes Auto R t ep Finali air st

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 60/43 Miami 74/63

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 50 31 pc 3 -11 pc 54 47 r 48 33 c 36 15 pc 35 16 pc 52 35 r 44 38 r 16 13 sn 48 38 r 32 14 pc 18 0 sf 56 34 pc 46 40 c 18 14 c 28 15 c 42 38 c 56 45 r 48 36 r 52 36 pc 18 14 c 18 7 c 56 45 r -18 -38 pc 40 34 r 80 65 c 60 43 r 18 12 c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 26 66 40 80 74 16 10 36 56 33 42 22 70 76 33 70 52 50 60 57 28 47 64 72 62 18 35 38

Lo W 21 sn 46 pc 33 r 52 s 63 pc 13 c 3c 29 c 47 c 13 pc 31 c 20 sn 51 pc 52 s 16 pc 50 s 45 r 29 pc 36 c 47 c 24 c 39 sh 42 r 52 s 51 pc 16 sn 30 sn 21 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 86 at Santa Ana, CA

Low: -17 at Fryeburg, ME

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peninsuladailynews.com

Juggling, comedy set for Thursday

Dean’s list

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

First

Feb 2

Briefly . . .

CLALLAM BAY — Professional juggler, comedian and two-time Guinness World Record holder, Alex Zerbe, will visit the Clallam Bay Library, 16990 state Highway 112, at 3 p.m. Thursday. Zerbe’s comedy show includes stunts, physical comedy and audience participation. He presents maneuvers like mouth juggling two ping pong balls and harpooning vegetables launched from a giant slingshot. The program is part of an ongoing partnership between the North Olympic Library System and Cape Flattery School District’s COAST (Creating Opportunities for After School Thinking) program funded by the U.S. Department of Education. For more information, phone the library at 360963-2414, e-mail cb@nols.org or visit www.nols.org.

El Paso 63/36

115108095

Auto Thanks You!

High Tide Ht

Jan 26

New York 33/13 Washington 38/21

Kansas City 26/21

Atlanta 48/33

World Cities Today

Spokane 46/37

Denver 52/36

Los Angeles 80/52

Moon Phases New

Detroit Chicago 18/7 18/14

San Francisco 62/51

Sunset today ................... 4:49 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:58 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 1:36 p.m. Moonset today ................. 5:16 a.m. Last

Minneapolis 10/3

Billings 44/38

Sun & Moon

Jan 19

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 52/46

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 53 43 0.03 0.90 Forks 50 45 2.79 11.41 Seattle 52 48 0.63 3.21 Sequim 50 43 0.03 0.51 Hoquiam 51 48 1.06 6.27 Victoria 52 46 0.58 3.83 P. Townsend* 55 46 0.14 1.04 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 51/44 Bellingham 50/43

Aberdeen 52/48

Peninsula Daily News

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Juggler and comedian Alex Zerbe will perform at the Clallam Bay Library at 3 p.m. Thursday. Beard, a 2009 graduate of Port Townsend High School, has been named to the dean’s list at University of Puget Sound for the fall semester. Students named to the dean’s list have ranked academically in the top 10 percent of all undergraduates of the college. Each student named earned a 3.8 grade-point average or higher out of a

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 16, 2011

Business

SECTION

D

Politics and Environment

 $ Briefly . . . PA city manager will speak to business group PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles City Manager Kent Myers will speak to this week’s breakfast meeting of the Port Angeles Business Association on Tuesday. He will discuss the city’s accomplishments during 2010 and its plans for 2011. Myers has been city manager for about two Myers years, coming from the same post with Hot Springs, Ark., in 2009. Last week, he confirmed reports out of Corpus Christi, Texas, that he applied for the city manager vacancy there last month so he can live closer to family members. Myers, a native Texan, is among 53 applicants now being considered in Corpus Christi. Tuesday’s PABA breakfast meeting, open to the public, begins at 7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive, Port Angeles. There is a $2.16 minimum charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order breakfast.

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch Jan. 14, 2011

+55.48

Dow Jones industrials

11,787.38

Nasdaq composite

2,755.30

Standard & Poor’s 500

+20.01 +9.48

Horoscope fans aghast after astronomer sets off cosmic kerfuffle

1,293.24

Russell 2000

+6.92 807.57

NYSE diary

Advanced: Declined:

Unchanged: Volume:

1,744 1,284 106 4.4 b

Nasdaq diary

Advanced: Declined:

Unchanged: Volume:

1,703 954 115 2.0 b AP

Editors: All figures as of:

No PA meeting 5:32 PM EST

PORT ANGELES — The Port NOTE: Figures reflect market fluctuations Angeles Chamber of after close;Regional may not match other AP content Commerce takes a break from its Monday luncheon meeting schedule because of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday. <AP> MARKET BRIEF 011411:Jan. Chart The luncheons resume shows daily market figures for Dow, S&P, 24 with a speaker on state Russell & 2000 and Nasdaq, along with Labor Industries issues. Fort Worden is topic NYSE and Nasdaq diary; stand-alone; 1c Open to the public, the x 4 1/2 inches; 47mm x 114 mm; ETA 6 PORT TOWNSEND — The weekly Monday chamber lunp.m. </AP> effort to fashion Fort Worden cheons normally begin at noon State Park buildings into future in the Port Angeles CrabHouse uses, called the Fort Worden Col- Restaurant at the Red Lion laborative, will take center stage Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. again at this week’s Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce Leslie joins Toga’s luncheon meeting on Monday. PORT ANGELES — Katrina The goals Leslie has joined the staff at of creating Toga’s Soup House, 122 W. LauFort Worden ridsen Blvd. as an educaLeslie has tional center 10 years of were disbaking expecussed at the rience. Jan. 3 meetShe first ing. learned the On Moncraft from day, Kate Burke her mother Burke, Fort before workWorden park ing at Colomanager, Alex Bryan of Third phon Cafe in Leslie Ear Project and Janet Jones of Bellingham Copper Canyon Press will discuss what they see happening at and the Urban Bakery, Honeybear Bakthe state park. ery and Zoka’s Coffee House in The Fort Worden Collaborative is comprised of public agen- Seattle. Her specialties include cakes, cies, nonprofit organizations and tarts, bars, quiche and cheeseprivate entrepreneurs partnering to promote conservation, cre- cakes. Special orders are available ative learning and community with two- to three-days notice. development at the state park. For more information, phone More about the effort is at Toga’s at 360-452-1952. www.fwcollaborative.org. Open to the public, Monday’s luncheon of the Jefferson County More than money chamber, combining former PORT ANGELES – Thrivent chamber organizations in Port Financial for Lutherans will Townsend, Port Ludlow and the host a free, two-hour educational Tri-Area, begins at noon at the workshop series to connect Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 financial action with personal Otto St. values. Lunch costs $12 for a full The “More than Money Matmeal, $9 for soup and salad or ters” workshop will be held at $5 for dessert and beverage. St. Matthew Lutheran Church, Prices include tax. 132 E. 13th St., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesdays, beginning Tourism talk Jan. 26. FORKS — A familiar face The workshop is presented by returns to Wednesday’s Forks Thrivent Financial Associate Chamber of Commerce luncheon Stephen Moser. meeting to discuss tourism on “More than Money Matters” the West End and rest of the is designed from a stewardship North Olympic Peninsula. perspective, according to Moser. Diane He said participants identify Schostak, what is important in their lives executive and set appropriate goals — director of they make sharing, saving and the Olympic spending decisions based on Peninsula their identified values. Visitor Other topics addressed in the Bureau since workshop include communicat2006 and Forks chaming about money, credit, debt, ber manager finding money to save, budgetSchostak before that, ing and net worth, Moser said. will speak on For more information, or to the Peninsula’s Tourism Comregister for the workshop, phone mission and its efforts. Moser at 360-681-8882 or e-mail Schostak, who is administra- stephen.moser@thrivent.com. tor for the Tourism Commission, The registration deadline is is a descendant of pioneers who this coming Friday. homesteaded on the Hoh River. A complimentary soup supper She was named the Washing- will be served before each seston State Travel and Tourism sion, and childcare will be availEmployee of the year in 1995 for able. her work in bringing awareness of new products on the PeninPruning class set sula after timber cutbacks SEQUIM — Henery’s Garden spurred an economic shift. Center, 1060 Sequim Dungeness The Forks chamber meeting, Way, will host a free class on open to the public, starts with pruning at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, no-host lunch at noon at JT’s Jan. 22. Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Class instructor R.T. Ball will Lunch costs $8; a bowl of cover basic pruning of trees and soup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, shrubs for “healthy and happy $4. Phone Marcia Bingham, trees and plants.” chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information. Turn to Briefly/D4

The Associated Press (2)

Astrologist Linda Zlotnick talks about the shifting astrology signs in her office in St Paul, Minn. A drawing of the constellation Ophiucus, the Serpent Bearer, is at upper right. By Jocelyn Noveck The Associated Press

and

Chris Williams

Sofia Whitcombe began her day with the startling realization that she might not be exactly who she thought she was. “My whole life, I thought I was a Capricorn,” the 25-year-old publicist said. “Now I’m a Sagittarius? I don’t feel like a Sagittarius!” It felt, she said, like a rug had been pulled from under her feet. “Will my personality change?” she mused. “Capricorns are diligent and regimented, and super-hard-working like me. “Sagittarians are more laid back. This is all a little off-putting.” Countless people reacted on social networks Friday to the “news” that the stars have shifted alignment, astrologically speaking. No matter that the astronomy instructor who started it all in a weekend newspaper interview said it was an old story — very old; 2,000 years old, actually — and that astrologists were insisting it wouldn’t change a thing. The story had traveled around the blogosphere like, well, a shooting star. Some people seemed angry. “I believe it’s a zodiac scam,” said Jose Arce, 38, from Fort Lee, N.J., who runs a body shop.

What’s your (new) sign?

“I’ve known myself to be a Sagittarius, I believe, since I was born. “So to come up now with some new sign? It’s unacceptable!” But others weren’t so ready to curse the stars. Kathy Torpey always felt like she was “a Scorpio trapped in a Sagittarian body” — emotional and creative, she said, more than competitive and intellectual like Sagittarians. So on Friday, even though she pays little heed to horoscopes, Torpey said she was thrilled to discover that she may have always been a Scorpio, after all. “You have no idea what relief and joy I felt after hearing the wonderful news of the zodiac changes,” wrote the 43-year-old mother of two from Willow Grove, Pa., in an e-mail, tongue-in-cheek to be sure. “Up until now, I felt like my whole life has been a lie!”

Big reaction Astrologers across the country reported a wave of calls, e-mails or website hits from concerned clients. “People are more attached and loyal to their signs than they thought,” said Eric Francis, editor of PlanetWaves.net, who said he had had 25,000 hits on his site since midnight. Turn

to

Zodiac/D5

The Associated Press (2)

Danielle Piscak, one of the alleged Internet victims of George Bronk, stands with her Facebook page on a monitor behind in her Parkland, Wash., living room.

Facebook used to get to women’s nude photos By Don Thompson

The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — In a cautionary tale for users of socialnetworking sites, a California man has admitted using personal information he gleaned from Facebook to hack into women’s e-mail accounts, then send nude pictures of them to everyone in their address book. The California attorney general’s office said Friday that George Bronk, 23, commandeered the e-mail accounts of dozens of women in the U.S. and England. He then scanned the women’s “sent” folders for nude and seminude photos and videos and forwarded any he found to all the women’s contacts, prosecutors said. Bronk coerced one woman into sending him more explicit photographs by threatening to distribute the pictures he already had. One victim told authorities the intrusion felt like “virtual rape.”

Bronk, who lives in the Sacramento suburb of Citrus Heights, pleaded guilty Thursday to seven felonies in Sacramento County Superior Court, Bronk including computer intrusion, false impersonation and possession of child pornography. Prosecutors are seeking a sixyear prison term when Bronk returns for a sentencing evaluation March 10. His attorney, Monica Lynch of Roseville, called her client a “23-year-old boy going on 15.” “He’s accepted full responsibility. It’s a tragic situation,” she said. Lynch said she will argue for less than a six-year sentence. Bronk began his hacking in

December 2009, prosecutors said. He will have to register as a sex offender because of his guilty plea.

Got account control Prosecutors said Bronk would scan women’s Facebook accounts looking for those who posted their e-mail addresses. He would then study their Facebook postings to learn the answers to common security questions like their favorite color or father’s middle name. He contacted the women’s e-mail providers and used the information to gain control of their accounts. He also often gained control of their Facebook accounts by hijacking their passwords, then posted compromising photographs on their Facebook pages and other Internet sites. Turn

to

Facebook/D5


D2

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Card now required for boaters Now that we’re all settled in for winter, it is a good time to dispense with some of the pesky minutiae of life. Beginning this year, all mariners younger than 35 are required to hold a boater education card to legally operate a power-driven vessel with an engine that is 15 horsepower or more. The North Olympic Sail On the and Power waterfront Squadron, or NOSPS, is offering a David G. course that satSellars isfies the state’s requirement for obtaining a Washington Boater Education Card. Beginning this coming Saturday and concluding the following day, NOSPS is presenting America’s Boating Course. The classroom program is ideal for recreational mariners who operate personal watercraft, the family boat, fishermen operating outboard utility boats, and paddlers of canoes and kayaks. A full range of topics will be covered, including the basics of boating safety, seamanship issues and the minimum safety equipment required for your specific vessel. The cost of the course, which will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day in the recreation room of the Rainbow’s End RV Park, 261831 U.S. Highway 101 in Sequim, is $35. For more information or to register, call Bill Atkinson at 360457-1215. NOSPS is also holding a oneday seminar Jan. 22 starting at 10 a.m. on the selection, function, operation and display interpreta-

David G. Sellars (2)/for Peninsula Daily News

Teh 112-foot Pepper XIII, built by Westport Shipyard at its Hoquiam plant, is shown at Westport’s slip at Port Angeles Boat Haven. tion of marine radar. The seminar will be held at the Sequim Bay Yacht Club at John Wayne Marina in Sequim. For further information, contact Richard Michels at 360-6705418.

Fish processing The opening of pollock season in Alaska is Jan. 20, so waterwatchers are seeing a number of fish processing ships heading to the Bering Sea in support of the largest single-species food-fish fishery in the world (boy, that’s a mouthful)! On Thursday afternoon, they saw Arctic Storm, a 314-foot stern trawler, heading west through the Strait of Juan de Fuca starting her way north to Alaska. The day before, another stern trawler, American No. 1, was in Port Angeles Harbor for a brief stay.

port ship in Victoria and taken to Florida. However, the ship will not be stopping in Victoria, so a crew from there will take Pepper XIII down the West Coast and through the Panama Canal to her new East Coast home. Westport also planned to put a 130-foot Tri-Deck yacht moored at its slip in the Port Angeles Boat Haven onto the same transYacht sale port ship for delivery to Florida This week, Westport Shipyard in time for the Miami Boat Show on Feb. 17. sold one of its Westport 112-foot One of the backup plans is to yachts to an unnamed East have a crew take the boat to Coast buyer. Florida, which, according to The boat, Pepper XIII, is an Katie Wakefield of Westport upgrade for the owners from a Shipyard, would take three to 107-foot Mangusta from which they transferred the name. four weeks. The new yacht, which sleeps A third option being consideight people in four luxury suites, ered is to run the yacht down to is operated with a five-member Ensenada, Mexico, and put her crew and was built in Hoquiam. aboard a ship to complete the Initially the yacht was going journey to Miami. to be put aboard a yacht trans-

The 143-foot fish processing ship was headed for the Bering Sea when she developed a mechanical issue. According to a company spokesperson, the vessel returned to Pier 91 in Seattle late in the afternoon, took on the needed repair parts overnight and was back under way Thursday morning.

Topside repair Washington Marine Repair, the topside repair facility at the foot of Cedar Street in Port Angeles, is working on the Alaskan Navigator as she rides her hook — that’s her anchors — in the harbor. According to Chandra “Hollywood” McGoff at Washington Marine, 10 personnel comprised of welders and mechanics were onboard for a couple of days making repairs to the exhaust stack. Across the driveway, two Delta 58s that just finished crabbing were stowed in the Commander Building on Marine Drive by Platypus Marine. Obsession is in for a couple of days to have her keel worked on, and Defiant is about done with repairs to her sonar tube.

Log exports

The Defiant is shown in a TraveLift sling at Platypus Marine’s yard in Port Angeles. The Delta 58 had repairs to her sonar tube following the crabbing season.

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WASHINGTON — The Obama administration Friday announced the most wide-ranging liberalization of travel and money-sending regulations to Cuba in more than a decade, making it easier for U.S. students and religious and cultural groups to visit the Communist-ruled island. It will still not be possible for ordinary U.S. tourists to vacation legally in Cuba, which has been under a U.S. economic embargo for 48 years.

But members of educational, cultural and religious groups will be able to get licenses for travel more readily. In addition, the new regulations will permit Americans to provide money to Cuban churches and small businesses. Previously, such remittances could be sent only by Cuban Americans to their relatives. The plan will let any American send as much as $500 every three months to Cuban citizens who are not part of the Castro administration and are not members of the Communist Party. Also, more airports will be allowed to offer charter service. Now, only three airports

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moving on to Tacoma to round out her load. Next Tuesday, when most of us will be sawing our own logs, Darling River, a 590-foot log ship will moor to the T-Pier for a load of over 2 million board feet of logs as well. She will then depart about Jan. 20 and be immediately replaced by Sun Ruby, a 580-foot log ship making a return visit to Port Angeles. Before the year is out, there will be at least eight logs ships that will make port for more than 24 million board feet of logs.

________ David G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resident and former Navy boatswain’s mate who enjoys boats and strolling the waterfront. Items involving boating, port activities and the North Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are always welcome. E-mail dgsellars@hotmail.com or phone him at 360-808-3202. His column, On the Waterfront, appears every Sunday.

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— in Miami, Los Angeles and New York City — can offer authorized charters to Cuba. That will be expanded to any international airport with proper customs and immigration facilities as long as licensed travel agencies ask to run charters from the airport. The White House press office sent out a release saying Obama had directed the changes, which do not need congressional approval. They will be put in place within two weeks. Supporters praised the announcement as a major step in promoting greater contact between U.S. and Cuban civil society. The regulations would be similar to those put in place by the administration

of President Clinton and rolled back under President George W. Bush. Critics said the changes will not improve the lives of Cubans. U.S. Rep. Ileana RosLehtinen, R-Fla., and the House Foreign Affairs Committee chair, said: “Loosening these regulations will not help foster a pro-democracy environment in Cuba — these changes will not aid in ushering in respect for human rights. “And they certainly will not help the Cuban people free themselves from the tyranny that engulfs them. “These changes undermine U.S. foreign policy and security objectives and will bring economic benefits to the Cuban regime.”

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The Seattle Boat Show, the largest on the West Coast, is scheduled Jan. 21-30 at the Qwest Field Events Center and South Lake Union in Seattle. Those involved with the Boat Show will be watching today’s Seattle Seahawks playoff game in Chicago. If the Seahawks win, they’ll be playing the Green Bay Packers at Qwest Field next Sunday. If that’s the case (Green Bay had a commanding lead over Atlanta as of this writing early Saturday evening), the indoor portion of the boat show at the events center will be closed early next Saturday to clear up concourses, then it will be closed all day on gameday. Peninsula Daily News

U.S. easing travel rules to Cuba Peninsula Daily News

QUEEN SET

In 2010, the Port of Port Angeles was visited by eight log ships that were loaded with a total of about 19 million board feet of logs bound for the Asian market. This year is already off to a quick start and should see a similar number of vessels. Last weekend, Luzon Strait came into port and moored to the T-Pier to take on more than 2 million board feet of logs before

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Sunday, January 16, 2011

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Divers don’t give up the 1811 ship Wreck said to be that of naval hero By Michelle R. Smith The Associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A team of divers say they’ve discovered the remains of the USS Revenge, a ship commanded by U.S. Navy hero Oliver Hazard Perry and wrecked off Rhode Island in 1811. Perry is known for defeating the British in the 1813 Battle of Lake Erie off the shores of Ohio, Michigan and Ontario in the War of 1812 and for the line “I have met the enemy, and they are ours.” His battle flag bore the phrase “Don’t give up the ship,” and to this day is a symbol of the Navy. The divers, Charles Buffum, a brewery owner from Stonington, Conn., and Craig Harger, a carbon dioxide salesman from Colchester, Conn., said the wreck changed the course of history because Perry likely would not have been sent to Lake Erie otherwise. Jan. 9 was the 200th anniversary of the wreck. Buffum said he’s been interested in finding the

“It was just thrilling,” Harger said.

Kept secret They made their first discovery in August 2005, and kept it secret as they continued to explore the area and make additional discoveries. Since then, they have found four more 42-inchlong cannons, an anchor, canister shot, and other metal objects that they say they’re 99 percent sure Oliver Hazard Perry were from the Revenge. Navy commodore Buffum and Harger say the items fit into the time remains of the Revenge period that the Revenge ever since his mother several years ago gave him the sank, the anchor appears to be the main one that is book Shipwrecks on the known to have been cut Shores of Westerly. loose from the ship, and The book includes Perthat no other military ry’s account of the wreck, ships with cannons have which happened when it been recorded as sinking in hit a reef in a storm in heavy fog off Watch Hill in the area. They have not discovWesterly as Perry was ered a ship’s bell or anybringing the ship from thing else that identifies it Newport to New London, as the Revenge, and all the Conn. wood has disappeared, which is not unusual for a ‘Go out, have a look’ wreck that old, they said. “I always thought to The Navy has a right to myself we ought to go out salvage its shipwrecks, and and have a look and just the two say they’ve consee if there’s anything left,” tacted the Naval History & Buffum said. Heritage Command, which The two, along with a oversees such operations, third man, Mike Fournier, in hopes the Navy will salset out to find it with the vage the remains. aid of a metal detector. A spokesman for the After several dives, they command did not immedicame across a cannon, then ately return messages another. seeking comment.

2010 logged wettest, among hottest on globe By Justin Gillis

The New York Times

WASHINGTON — New government figures for the global climate show that 2010 was the wettest year on record, and it tied 2005 as the hottest year since record-keeping began in 1880. The new figures confirm that 2010 will go down as one of the more remarkable years in the annals of climatology. It featured prodigious snowstorms that broke seasonal records in the United States and Europe; a recordshattering summer heat wave that scorched Russia; strong floods that drove people from their homes in places such as Pakistan, Australia, California and Tennessee; a severe die-off of coral reefs; and a continuation in the global trend of a warming climate. Two agencies, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, reported last week that the global average surface temperature for 2010 had tied the record set in 2005.

The analyses differ slightly: In the NOAA version, the 2010 temperature was 1.12 degrees Fahrenheit above the average for the 20th century, which is 57 degrees. It was the 34th year running that global temperatures have been above the 20th-century average; the last below-average year was 1976. The new figures show that nine of the 10 warmest years on record have occurred since 2001.

Greenhouse gases Earth has been warming in fits and starts for decades, and most climatologists say that is because humans are releasing heat-trapping gases such as carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The carbon-dioxide level has increased about 40 percent since the Industrial Revolution. “The climate is continuing to show the influence of greenhouse gases,” said David Easterling, a scientist at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C.

Aside from NASA and NOAA, another agency, a research center in Britain, compiles a global temperature record. That unit has yet to report its figures for 2010. (The data sets are compiled by slightly different methods, and in the British figures, the previous warmest year on record was 1998.) The United States was wetter and hotter last year than the average values for the 20th century, but overall the year was not as exceptional in this country as for the world as a whole. In the contiguous U.S., for instance, the NOAA figures showed that it was the fourth-hottest summer on record and the 23rd hottest year. Still, some remarkable events occurred at a regional scale, including snowstorms in February 2010 that shattered seasonal records in cities like Washington, Baltimore and Philadelphia. In the summer, a heat wave broke records in the South and along much of the East Coast.

Sumas dairy in court over alleged cow drug residues The Associated Press

If the Navy does not, they said they hope to raise the money for a salvage operation so the artifacts can be displayed at a historical society. They say they are concerned now that they are going public that other divers might try to remove objects from the site, which is a violation of the law. Many of the objects they found are in only 15 feet of water, although the area is difficult to dive because of currents, they said. As for whether the wreck of the Revenge changed the course of history, David Skaggs, a professor emeritus of history at Bowling Green

Perry great prestige. Perry, a Rhode Island native, became known as the “Hero of Lake Erie” after he defeated a British squadron, becoming the first U.S. commander to do so. “Whether or not there is another officer that could have done as well as Perry did is one of those ‘mighthave-beens’ that historians Great Lakes duty are not prone to ask,” While Harger and BufSkaggs said. fum said Perry was effecStill, Skaggs said he tively demoted by being was intrigued by the dissent to the Great Lakes covery. rather than getting another “It is certainly an interhigh seas command, esting new find on the eve Skaggs said the Great of the bicentennial of the Lakes commission still gave War of 1812,” he said. State University, said Perry might not put it that way. Skaggs has written two books on Perry, A Signal Victory, about the Lake Erie campaign, which he co-authored, and a biography, Oliver Hazard Perry: Honor, Courage, and Patriotism in the Early U.S Navy.

Seniors may pay for Medicare home health The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Medicare recipients could see a sizable new out-ofpocket charge for home health visits if Congress follows through on a recommendation issued by its own advisory panel. Until now, home health visits from nurses and other providers have been free to patients. But the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission says a co-payment is needed to discourage overuse of a service whose cost to taxpayers is nearing $20 billion a year amid concerns that fraudsters are also taking advantage. The panel did not prescribe an amount, but a suggested charge of $150 for a series of related visits is being discussed. Medicare requires co-pays for many other services, so home health has been the exception, not the rule. Defying opposition by AARP, the seniors’ lobby, the congressionally appointed commission voted 13-1 last week to recommend that lawmakers impose the new charge. Two commissioners abstained and one was absent. “At the extreme, this benefit can turn into a long-term- care social-support system,” said commission Chairman Glenn Hackbarth. “A modest co-payment is one tool to

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help deal with that problem.” More than 3 million seniors and disabled people on Medicare use home health services: visits from nurses, personal-care attendants and therapists, available to those who can’t easily get out of the house. Home health was once seen as a cost saver, because it’s cheaper than admitting patients to the hospital. But it has been flagged as a budget problem because of rapidly increasing costs and big differences in how communities around the country use the benefit. Part of the problem appears to be rampant fraud. In some counties, home health admissions exceed the number of residents on Medicare. Several commissioners said they worried about the impact of a new charge on seniors with modest incomes. Studies have shown that even small co-payments can discourage patients from getting medical services. The charge would be collected for each home health-agency admission, not for every visit by a nurse or provider. Patients can be under home health care for weeks at a time. The recommendation exempts lowincome patients, whose co-payments would be covered by Medicaid, and those just discharged from the hospital.

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A sprightly little market unlike any you’ve seen ual defendant, did not imme- A pple cows for slaughter. They also say the dairy diately return a message left B read refused to keep treatment at his home by The AssociC oconut Milk ated Press on Saturday. records for the animals. Federal officials D onuts “Defendants’ poor recordkeeping and improper drug inspected the dairy in E ggs administration practices March and July after three F urikake constitute insanitary condi- cows tested positive. One of the cows had an G hee tions whereby the food (ediexcess of the anti-inflam- H ojas ble tissues of their animals) matory flunixin in its liver, may have been rendered while the other two had I ndian Food injurious to health,” the excess antibiotics in their J uanita’s Chips complaint said. kidneys. K esar Mango Pulp Rhody Dairy sells cows The inspections found L umpia for slaughter and sale to con- that the dairy’s records didn’t sumers in states including include dosage amounts, M esquite Charcoal Alaska, Arizona, California, how the drugs were admin- N ori Colorado, Idaho and Oregon. istered, who administered O h Henry Candy Bar Owner Jay De Jong, who them or how long the drugs P ho Soup Base is also named as an individ- would take to pass through. Q ueso Seco R ice S ake T ortillas M-F • 5-6 pm U mpqua Ice Cream V indaloo Curry Paste W asabi Locally Owned Franchise X ylofan Enjoy 10% 136 E. 8th St. – PA Y east Savings on Most Corner of 8 th & Lincoln Z ywiec Beer Goods & Services* 452-6602 * Some Restrictions Apply 717 Race St. See Associate for Details www.theupsstorelocal.com/2889 PoRt angeleS 115108763

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SEATTLE — Federal authorities have sued a northwest Washington dairy that they claim has a long history of selling cows for slaughter even though their tissues contained drug residues deemed unsafe to eat. The 850-cow Rhody Dairy LLC of Sumas was charged civilly in U.S. District Court in Seattle last week with violations of the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The complaint said that seven times in the past decade, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has issued letters to the dairy warning that cows it offered for sale tested positive for illegal levels of antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications or other drugs. The Justice Department said that despite the warnings, the dairy administered the drugs to its cattle in unapproved dosages or without prescriptions, or that it failed to observe proper drug withdrawal times before offering the

Tom Packer/via The Associated Press

This 2006 photo, kept from public view until this month, shows a submerged cannon that a team of divers says is one of the remains of the USS Revenge, a ship commanded by U.S. Navy hero Oliver Hazard Perry. The ship was wrecked in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Rhode Island on Jan. 9, 1811.

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 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1 Ball is a Clallam County native, a Washington State University graduate and owner of Evergreen Enterprises, a landscaping and maintenance firm. Registration is recommended. For more information, phone Henery’s at 360-6836969.

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PORT ANGELES — Peninsula Community Mental Health Center has named Mac McIntyre and Terri Hill as Employees of the Month for January. An employee in the Children’s Department, McIntyre has worked at the center McIntyre since December 1998. McIntyre was cited as “a hardworking, conscientious, empathetic and talented therapist who is able to deliver services to an especially challenging subset of clients and their families.” Hill has worked in the Finance Department since March 1998. Her peers nominated her Hill because “she has a long-term loyalty and dedication to the agency. She often speaks of the agency in a manner that helps to promote our core values, has integrity and dignity

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Welcome event PORT ANGELES — Peninsula Community Mental Health Center, 118 E. Eighth St., will hold an open house to introduce the agency’s new medical director, Dr. Joshua Jones, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday. RSVPs are requested. To RSVP, phone Brenda Gilchrist at 360-4570431, ext. Jones 227.

Do you have a business expansion planned, staffing change, new product line or something newsworthy? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

CHIMACUM — Northwest Kiwanis Camp recently held elections for its 2011 board of directors and officers. Elected to the board were George Bower and Jim Ciaciuch, both of Port Angeles. Officers elected: ■ President — Jim DeBord of Port Angeles. ■ Vice President — Chuck Standley of Port Angeles. ■ Treasurer — Barb Wilson of Port Angeles. ■ Secretary — Marianne Ott of Port Ludlow. The Kiwanis camp, located in Chimacum, provides programs for child and adults with medical eninsula and developmental disabilities. Applications for the 2011 summer camp sesand thinks of what is best sions are available at www. for the agency.” kiwaniscamp.com.

Employees lauded

information, phone Victoria Poling, 360-379-5610, ext. 201, or e-mail victoria@jefferson.wsu.edu.

SEQUIM — Brian’s Sporting Goods & More, 542 W. Washington St., is now authorized to issue state fishing and hunting licenses. For more information, phone owner Brian Menkal at 360-683-1950.

KONP talk guests PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio at 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and www.konp.com on the Internet outside the Port Angeles area. Station general manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Monday through Thursday segments, Rivers and Karen Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. This week’s scheduled lineup: ■  Monday: Preempted by a Port Angeles High School girls basketball game. ■ Tuesday: Campaign co-chairs Betsy Wharton and Steve Methner promote passage of the Port Angeles School District maintenance and operations property tax levy on the Feb. 8 budget. In a separate segment, the financial aid director for Peninsula College, Krista Francis, discusses an event offering free help with college loan forms. ■  Wednesday: Carol Volk of AARP’s Tax Aide program of free income tax assistance. ■  Thursday: Clallam County commissioners. ■  Friday: Organizer Wayne Shields, David Rivers with Abby Mae and the Homeschool Boys and a

Bushwhacker hours PORT ANGELES — The Bushwhacker restaurant, 1527 E. First St., has switched to winter hours. The restaurant is open lunch and dinner Monday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. and on Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. On Saturday it is open for dinner from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.; On Sunday it is open for brunch from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and from 4 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. for dinner. Reservations are accepted for parties of eight or more. For more information, phone Bushwhacker at 360-457-4113.

Daily News representative from First Step discussing this year’s Snowgrass Concert. In a separate segment, Betsy Wharton and students discuss the Feiro Marine Lab’s upcoming gallery show and fundraiser. The final segment features Peninsula Daily News columnist Mary Lou Sanelli, “From a Writer’s Point of View.”

Sterling directors

SPOKANE — The holding company for Sterling Savings Bank, which has branches in Port Angeles Forks, said it plans to Avon workshop set and appoint former Starbucks SEQUIM — Sylvia executive Howard Behar Oster will hold an Avon and former Wells Fargo skincare workshop at Prai- executive Webb Edwards to rie Springs Assisted Living, its board of directors. 630 W. Prairie St., from 10 Spokane-based Sterling a.m. to 11 a.m. on SaturFinancial said its board day, Jan. 22. has approved the appointOster will be featuring ments, but federal regulaAvon’s new Anew platinum tors must also approve the age-reversing face cream. appointments. The workshop is open to Behar worked at Starthe public. bucks Corp. for over 21 For more information, years, most recently as phone Oster at 360-457president of North Ameri6644. can operations. Edwards was most Business skills class recently president of Wells Fargo & Co.’s technology, PORT HADLOCK — call center and operations Team Jefferson’s Business Skills Course at the Wash- unit. In addition to the two ington State University on the North Olympic PenJefferson County Exteninsula, Sterling Savings sion, 201 W. Patison St., Bank has 176 other will begin this Thursday. branches in Washington The 10-week class will meet Thursdays from 6 p.m. state, Oregon, Idaho, Monto 9 p.m. with entrepreneur tana and California. and business coach Jim Williams. New market items Cost is $200. PORT ANGELES — Liz The class will focus on Seifert and Good to Go business operations, marketing and cash flow man- Grocery will sell items at the Port Angeles Farmers agement. Participants will develop Market this winter. Seifert will offer pasor review marketing and operational plans and focus tries, sandwich wraps, soups and vegetable dips. on budgeting, financial Items offered by Good to statements and funding Go Grocery, 1105 S. Eunice sources. The course includes two St. (at Lauridsen Boulevard), are made with hours of instruction and organic ingredients from discussion and an hour of local farms and suppliers guided work on a participant’s business. whenever possible. Entrepreneurs and The farmers market is other guest speakers will open year-round in The share their experiences Gateway on the corner of and discuss launching and Front and Lincoln streets operating businesses in the from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on current economic climate. Saturdays. To sign up, or for more For more information, phone market manager Cynthia Warne at 360-4600361 or visit www.portangelesfarmersmarket.com.

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New Wi-Fi PORT ANGELES — Olympic Bagel Co. Inc. has increased its Internet bandwidth capabilities and added a Wi-Fi hot spot. Customer access to the Internet is free. The addition came in response to requests by customers at the bagel and coffee shop for Wi-Fi. Olympic Bagel is at 802 E. First St. For more information, phone the business at 360-452-6128.

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mammal important to Native Alaskan subsistence VICTORIA — Plum, a women’s fashion fixture at hunters. Scientists from the the corner of Yates and Broad streets in downtown National Marine Mammal Laboratory said cruise Victoria for more than 15 ships flush seals from ice years, is closing next floes into chilly sea water month. during critical pupping and The Vanmolting periods. couver, B.C.Lead researcher John based Jansen said pups must retailer is bulk up on mother’s milk not renewduring four to six weeks of ing its lease, nursing to have a better saying chance of surviving their increasing first winter and cruise rent and Des Roches ships may put pups into taxes, comchilly water when they petition from suburban should be feeding. malls and poor economic The study suggested conditions all played a role measures as severe as an in dropping Victoria from exclusion of cruise ships the nine-store chain. during pupping and moltEd des Roches, vice president of Plum Clothing ing. Ltd., said the Victoria store had been underperforming Ex-publicist sues for more than a year. LOS ANGELES — A former publicist for the organization that runs the Golden Globes has sued Nation/World the group on the eve of its glitzy awards show, claiming it engages in payola Salmon tracked schemes for nominations VANCOUVER, B.C. — and awards. Scientists working with Michael Russell sued sockeye salmon struggling the Hollywood Foreign to cope with warming temPress Association late peratures in British Thursday, just three days Columbia’s Fraser River before the Golden Globes have identified broad are slated to air tonight on genetic traits that can preNBC. dict which fish will live or The lawsuit claims that die before spawning a new many association members generation. “abuse their positions and Oregon State University engage in unethical and salmon geneticist Michael potentially unlawful deals Banks, who did not take and arrangements which part in the study, said it amount to a ’payola’ represents a breakthrough scheme” that could be illein tracking how salmon are gal and jeopardize the surviving the new stresses group’s tax-exempt status. from global warming. In addition, the suit The study combined alleges the association sells radio tracking of fish in the prime spots on the show’s ocean and river with a prored carpet to lesser-known file of 32,000 genes in indimedia outlets. vidual fish. The filing does not list It is published in the any specific examples in current issue of the journal which a studio or producer Science. has paid for a Golden Fraser River sockeye Globes nomination or represent a $1 billion a award. year fishing industry that A statement from Ken had been declining dramatSunshine, whose company ically until a sudden, unexcurrently handles the plained increase last year. show’s public relations, said the allegations were U.S., AIG set pact without merit. NEW YORK — The government and AIG, the Chase income up giant insurer rescued with NEW YORK — JPMor$182 billion at the depths gan Chase & Co. said Friof the 2008 financial meltday that it will raise its down, announced a plan dividend soon, pending Friday to end taxpayer approval from the Federal involvement in the comReserve. pany over the next two The years. bank also As part of the plan, AIG reported paid back its $21 billion that its outstanding balance to the income New York branch of the jumped 47 Federal Reserve. percent in The Treasury Departthe final ment will now own a 92 three Dimon percent stake in the commonths of pany and begin unloading 2010 as fewer customers stock on the open market defaulted on their loans. in March. The Fed has asked all of The rescue package for the top U.S. banks to send American International detailed reports on their Group Inc., which included finances as part of the cenloans and guarantees, was tral bank’s annual assessthe largest of any U.S. com- ment of their health. pany that accepted governThe Fed is expected to ment help during the Sepcomplete its study of those tember 2008 financial criplans by March, at which sis. time it could give permisAt the time, federal offi- sion to some banks to raise cials worried that a coltheir dividends. lapse of AIG, which worked Most U.S. banks slashed with hundreds of financial their dividends during the institutions around the financial crisis in order to world, would be a death conserve cash. blow to already fragile After almost two years credit markets and possiof solid profits and building bly bring down the finanup capital, banks like cial system itself. JPMorgan are ready to The insurer became a resume paying the larger touchstone for public outrage over excessive risk on dividends that investors Wall Street. are accustomed to. Under the plan JPMorgan’s CEO Jamie announced Friday, the gov- Dimon has suggested that ernment will sell its stock the bank could raise its over two years as market annual dividend from 20 conditions allow. cents per share to as much as $1 if the Fed allows. Cruise ship curbs? The New York-based ANCHORAGE, Alaska bank with three Chase — Federal scientists are branches on the North recommending rules that Olympic Peninsula earned could restrict cruise ship $4.83 billion, or $1.12 per visits to Alaska’s Hubbard share, as the company set Glacier near Yakutat. aside less money to cover The report concludes loan losses. cruise ships may threaten harbor seals, a marine Turn to Briefly/D5

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Military panel recommends allowing women in combat

 $ Briefly . . .

Continued from D4 neft will take 5 perThat compares with cent of BP’s $3.28 billion, or 74 cents a ordinary share, during the same voting quarter last year. shares in a regarding gays. The new report says keeping By Pauline Jelinek major stock Opponents also warn Americans women out of combat posts prohibits The Associated Press swap. Production rises won’t tolerate large numbers of women them from serving in roughly 10 perSechin In WASHINGTON — Women should coming home in body bags. cent of Marine Corps and Army occuWASHINGTON — exchange, be allowed to serve fully in combat, a Industrial production rose Those arguments have held sway pational specialties and thus is a barRosneft will give BP about military advisory panel said in a new during previous attempts to lift the rier to advancement. in December by the larg9.5 percent of its shares, report seeking to dismantle the last ban. Women generally make up about est amount in five months, BP said. Rosneft chairman major area of discrimination in the providing the economy Congress recently stripped the 14 percent of the armed services. and Russian deputy prime armed forces. Of the roughly 2.2 million troops with solid momentum “don’t ask, don’t tell” ban on gays servminister Igor Sechin said The call by a commission of cur- ing openly, and the Navy changed its who have served in Iraq and Afghaniheading into the new year. the deal was worth about rent and retired military officers to let rules during the past year to allow stan, more than 255,000 have been Activity $8 billion. women be front-line fighters could set women to serve on submarines for the women, said Pentagon spokeswoman at the The deal was in motion another change in military first time. nation’s Eileen Lainez. announced at a new conculture as the armed forces, generafactories, Supporters of the change say Women are barred from certain ference in London by leadtions after racial barriers fell, deals combat assignments in all the ser- women essentially have been in commines and ing Russian politicians with the phasing out of the ban on vices but face the broadest restric- bat for years, even if they are nomiutilities and oil executives from gays serving openly. increased nally removed from it. tions in the Army and Marines. both companies, including The newest move is being recom0.8 percent Lory Manning of the Women’s BP chief executive officer mended by the Military Leadership Now in combat-support last month, Lacker Research and Education Institute Bob Dudley. Diversity Commission, established by the Federal said military officials have been skirtAlthough thousands of American ing the ban by “attaching” women to a Congress two years ago. Reserve said Friday. The panel was to send its proposals women have served in the Iraq and combat unit instead of “assigning” Industrial production was Spending review Afghanistan wars and been exposed them. to Congress and President Obama. Holiday spending up in every month but one It is time “to create a level playing to great danger — 134 have been reached the highest level in 2010. The new report says there has field for all qualified service mem- killed — they have been largely been little evidence that integrating on record last year, but Overall industrial restricted to combat-support jobs such women into previously closed units or bers,” the members said. that news isn’t as good as activity has risen 11 perOpponents of putting women in as medics or logistical and transporta- military occupations has damaged cent since hitting its reces- it sounds. The $462 billion in holsion low in June 2009. But combat question whether they have tion officers. cohesion or had other ill effects. iday spending reported by it is still 6 percent below the necessary strength and stamina. Defense policy prohibits women It says a previous independent a trade group on Friday its peak reached in SepThey also have said the inclusion from being assigned to any unit report suggested women serving in handily tops the $453 biltember 2007. of women in infantry and other com- smaller than a brigade whose primary combat in Iraq and Afghanistan “had Factory production, the lion peak reached in 2007, bat units might harm unit cohesion, a mission is direct combat on the a positive impact on mission accombefore the economy took a biggest slice of industrial similar argument to that made ground. plishment.” nosedive. output, rose 0.4 percent, Take a closer look, the sixth straight monthly though, and you’ll find increase. these figures don’t tell the Jeffrey Lacker, presiwhole story. dent of the Federal Just because AmeriReserve Bank of Richcans spent more this holimond, said in a speech Continued from D1 class talks about it.” another Los Angeles astrollike now,” she said. day season doesn’t mean Friday that recent ecoNew news or old, most “As a Sagittarius, I was oger: they bought more. nomic activity suggests “It’s unlikely the astrol“It’s interesting how people had never heard it supposed to be the life of The government figthe economic recovery is the party — at least, that’s ogy community is going to many people are panicking before. ures on which the through its soft patch. And one of the more fas- what I wanted it to mean,” accept what an astronomer their sign is wrong.” National Retail Federation He said he expects Astounded by all the cinating elements of the she laughed. “Now what?” is trying to put on them.” stronger growth this year, bases its holiday sum do kerfuffle was the man who story was talk of a new sign A spokeswoman for the between 3.5 percent and 4 not take into account risNot a worry started it, astronomy altogether. American Federation of ing prices. percent. By the reckoning of instructor Parke Kunkle. According to many Astrologers, Shelley AckerAlthough inflation has In an interview Sunday Kunkle and other astronoastrologists, she shouldn’t man, said she’d been been tame over the past China raises rate in the Star Tribune newspa- mers, astrologers are not swamped with e-mails from worry. few years, holiday spendper of Minneapolis, Kunkle only a month off in their BEIJING — China’s worried clients. Linda Zlotnick, an astroling would have had to had explained that the zodiac signs, but they are central bank has raised She advises them not to oger for 32 years in St. Paul, clear $478 billion to sigEarth’s wobbly orbit means neglecting a 13th constellathe amount of money overreact. Minn., said she and fellow nify spending was back to it’s no longer aligned to the tion, Ophiuchus (probanks must keep on “This doesn’t change astrologers have long known pre-recession levels. stars in the same way as nouncede Ooh-FEE-yewreserve for the seventh your chart at all. I’m not of the issue raised by The population of the when the signs of the zodiac kus) the Serpent Bearer, for time in a year, in its latest Kunkle, but that the most about to use it,” she said. U.S. has grown by 8 milthose born from Nov. 30 to were first conceived, about move to counter inflation. “Every few years a story commonly used zodiac — lion people since the previDec. 17. 5,000 years ago. The central bank on tropical — isn’t affected by like this comes out and ous record was set. That According to myth, OphiThat means, Kunkle said, Friday ordered statemeans there were millions it. Zlotnick said the sidereal scares the living daylights owned banks to set aside that when astrologers say uchus became a healer more shoppers in stores zodiac, which isn’t as widely out of everyone, but it’ll go when he killed a snake and an additional 0.5 percent the sun is in Pisces, it’s really this Christmas, driving up used, IS based on the con- away as quickly as it another appeared with an of deposits as reserves, in Aquarius, and so on. the sales total. stellations. came.” herb in his mouth that effective Jan. 20. But the average spendOther astrologers revived the dead one, said Reserves vary by insti130 B.C. ing per person is still Amy Sayle, an astronomy expressed resentment that Zodiac tattoos tution but could be close to lower than it was a few “Astronomers have educator at the Moorehead the brouhaha had been 20 percent for the biggest That should make one years ago, suggesting conknown about this since Planetarium at the Univer- launched by an astronomer. commercial lenders. demographic pretty happy sumers are still slower to While astronomy is a sciabout 130 B.C.,” Kunkle sity of North Carolina, ChaChina’s inflation rate — people who have zodiac pull out their wallets. ence, astrology is not recogtold The Associated Press pel Hill. jumped to a 28–month Friday in his office at the Mary-Iris Taylor, a writer nized as having any scien- tattoos. high of 5.1 percent in Sam Bielinski, who owns Minneapolis Community Oil stays over $91 in St. Louis, had seen the tific basis. November. Atomic Tattoos in Milwau“This is an attempt to and Technical College, his story of Kunkle’s zodiac on NEW YORK — BenchMindful of the political kee, estimated that one in show ignorance on the part phone ringing constantly, as TV, but on Friday, she read mark oil for February turmoil linked to past it had since the article came a link a friend had posted of astrologers,” said Jim five customers asks for a delivery rose 14 cents to bouts of inflation, Beijing out. on Facebook and realized Sher, who runs an astrologi- zodiac tattoo, making the is trying to curb a flood of $91.54 a barrel on the cal institute in Los Angeles. art among the most popular (One person had even she was an Ophiuchus. New York Mercantile money in the world’s sec“We do know about this,” requests. demanded: “Give me my And what, she wondered, Exchange. ond largest economy fol“I think most people are he said of the planetary sign back.”) did that mean? In other Nymex trading lowing a lending spree going to brush it off,” he “This is not new news. “I’d just like to know wobble. A in February contracts, triggered by stimulus Added Craig Martin, said of the new zodiac. “Almost every astronomy what I’m supposed to be heating oil rose 3.61 cents aimed at fighting the to $2.6452 a gallon, gasoglobal financial crisis. line futures gained 4.87 cents to $2.4946 per gallon GM pensions and natural gas futures DETROIT — General added 7.3 cents to $4.48 Motors Co. has pumped per 1,000 cubic feet. another $2 billion into its Continued from D1 “Then he wrote just Piscak said one of her the person who had hacked Brent crude gained 62 underfunded U.S. pension friends alerted her that her page. crass, racist, disgusting cents to $98.65 a barrel on plans by giving them 60.6 “I said, ‘Why are you comments on people’s walls “This case highlights the nude photographs she had the ICE Futures exchange million shares of common fact that anyone with an sent privately to her hus- doing this?’ and he said, that I was friends with,” in London. stock. e-mail account is vulnerable band were posted on her ‘Because it’s funny,”’ Piscak said Stephanie, who did not The contribution comes to identity theft,” Attorney Facebook page last fall. said in a telephone inter- want her last name used for on top of $4 billion in cash Nonferrous metals fear the story could harm General Kamala Harris Facebook removed the view. NEW YORK — Spot nonferthat the Detroit company said in a statement announcphotos the next day. A second victim, Stepha- her career. rous metal prices Friday. paid into the plans in She said she felt violated, ing Bronk’s guilty plea. “I have a network of like nie, 24, of Los Angeles, said Aluminum - $1.0260 per lb., December. “kind of a rape-like situaInvestigators found 172 1,500 people, so they all saw London Metal Exch. she, the FBI and other tion.” The moves cut $6 bilCopper - $3.8032 Cathode full e-mail files containing my pictures,” said Piscak. authorities tried for seven lion off a $27.4 billion pen- plate, LME. Stephanie said she origiexplicit photographs of “So my graduating class Copper - $3.8305 N.Y. Merc sion liability that was on women when they searched of 2007 saw that. I’m in the hours to remove an album nally had sent the private spot Thu. the company’s books. Bronk’s computer in Sep- military, so all my Army of 10 photographs that photos to a boyfriend, only Lead - $2305.00 metric ton, As of Dec. 31, 2009, the Bronk posted on her account to have them seen by her tember, according to a court friends saw that. London Metal Exch. U.S. salaried and hourly before Facebook took it college professors and coaffidavit. Zinc - $1.0290 per lb., London plans were $17.1 billion Metal Exch. workers. down. They were able to track Embarrassing short of their obligations, Gold - $1342.50 Handy & his victims to England, Harman (only daily quote). while GM’s non-U.S. penWashington, D.C., and 17 She had to explain the Gold - $1352.90 troy oz., NY sion plans were $10.3 bilstates: Alabama, Arizona, embarrassing situation to Merc spot Thu. Avalon Wood & Gas Stoves lion short. The plans will California, Georgia, Illinois, her family and husband, Silver - $26.940 Handy & Harbe revalued as of the end man (only daily quote). Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, from whom she is sepaof 2010, and the shortfalls Silver - $26.830 troy oz., N.Y. Massachusetts, New Hamp- rated. should be far lower due to Merc spot Thu. shire, New Jersey, New Piscak used a different Platinum $1655.00 troy oz., the contributions and York, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, e-mail account to contact N.Y. (contract). investment growth in the Virginia and Washington. Platinum - $1663.90 troy oz., past year. “He is a sick individual,” N.Y. Merc spot Thu. GM said the earlier $4 Small But Mighty! said 22-year-old Danielle billion contribution came Peninsula Daily News, Piscak of Parkland, Wash., from its cash reserves. The Victoria Times Colonist south of Tacoma, one of company announced plans and The Associated Press Bronk’s victims. Everwarm Hearth & Home to make the cash and All Ages Welcome 257151 Highway 101 • 452-3366 stock contributions in October. 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Zodiac: Shift adds 13th sign

Facebook: Nude photos found

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Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

An example of the ‘linten’ season?

Ripley Entertainment Inc. (2)/via The Associated Press

A

  northern Michigan woman has put her own spin on Leonardo da Vinci’s “The Last Supper” by making a replica out of laundry lint. Laura Bell of the town of Roscommon collected lint from her dryer and fashioned it into a 14-foot-long, 4-foot tall reproduction of the Italian Renaissance painter’s masterpiece. Bell says she needed about 800 hours to do enough laundry to get the lint, and 200 hours to recreate the mural. She bought towels of the colors she wanted and laundered them separately to get the right shades of lint. Her artwork has caught the eye of Ripley’s Believe It or Not! The company plans to put it on display at one of its museums. Ripley’s says it also has Last Supper replicas made from a grain of rice, a dime and burned toast.

High-tech virtual border ‘fence’ halted By Julia Preston

scouting for illegal border crossers and drug traffickers. Napolitano’s decision brought a longexpected close to a project carried out by Boeing under Napolitano a contract first signed in 2005 under President George W. Bush. The announcement came in advance of the expiration of the Boeing contract Tuesday, a Homeland Security official said. Boeing noted that officials said they would continue to use equipment it had designed.

The New York Times

WASHINGTON — The Department of Homeland Security on has canceled a project to build a technology-based “virtual fence” across the U.S.-Mexico border, saying the effort — on which $1 billion has been spent — was ineffective and too costly. Janet Napolitano, the Homeland Security secretary, said Friday she had decided to end the five-year project, known as SBINet, because it “does not meet current standards for viability and cost effectiveness.” She said border agents would instead use less-expensive technology that is already part of their surveillance equipment, tailoring it to the terrain where they will be

The contract had been plagued by schedule delays and cost overruns. Originally estimated to cost more than $7 billion to cover the 2,000-mile length of the border, it was the subject of more than a dozen scathing reports by the Government Accountability Office. In a pilot program in Arizona, it cost about $1 billion to build the system across 53 miles of the state’s border. Officials said the new approach, using mobile surveillance systems and unmanned drones already in the Border Patrol’s arsenal, would cost less than $750 million to cover the remaining 323 miles of Arizona’s border. Napolitano suspended financ-

ing for the project in March and ordered a review, which was just completed. But officials moved slowly to cancel the project because it had been ensnared in the contentious debate over border security.

Border Patrol increase Many Republican lawmakers have accused the Obama administration of being lax on enforcement, and they said they would not consider an overhaul of immigration laws that President Obama supports until the border is tighter. Anticipating criticism, Homeland Security officials released documents Friday showing big increases in Border Patrol — from

10,000 agents in 2004 to 20,500 today — and other border agents, and a steep decline in the number of immigrants detained at the border, indicating fewer illegal crossings. About 463,000 illegal crossers were detained last year, compared with 724,000 in 2008. Napolitano said she had concluded the original concept of the project, to develop a single technology that could be used across the entire border, was not viable. Boeing had built a complex system of sensors, radars and cameras mounted on towers that was supposed to lead border agents to the exact location of illegal crossers. But the system functioned inconsistently in the rough terrain along much of the border.

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Classified

Peninsula Daily News

101 Truck Shop & Home

GREAT HOME IN CUL-DE-SAC

Like new 5 yr. old, 1,845 SF, 3 BR/2 BA condo with 2-car garage with a large south facing patio and mountain view. The kitchen has plenty of cabinets, laminate flooring, large living room w/fireplace and a great master suite. $295,000 ML#251617

Residential property on 8th St. is zoned commercial so you can have your office and live there, too. Save stress by living where you work. Only $179,000! ML#260043 Call Pili for more information.

WRE/Port Angeles UPTOWN REALTY

email: pili@olypen.com

MEDITERRANEAN STYLE SHOWSTOPPER!

ON THE SUNLAND GOLF COURSE

Unique Spanish style home situated on the 18th fairway of SunLand Golf Course with views of the 18th tee box and the 17th green. Kitchen features tile countertops and golden oak cabinets with slide out shelving. Large stone fireplace w/propane insert. $299,900 ML#242011/29118494

11405920

Across from the fairgrounds, that is. A 2 BR/1 BA beautifully upgraded house with new appliances and newer roof. There is a greenhouse for the green thumbers and big shop for the fixers and builders. Check out the beautiful landscaping. Enjoy fruit from your own orchard. Possible owner financing. $162,500 MLS#252388 Call Rita

11405915

11405928

11405943

Handy? Bring your tools to this 2.39 creekside acres. 1 BR cabin with new roof, woodstove and new vinyl windows plus a 3 BR single-wide mobile. 2 septics recently pumped, fresh gravel in the driveway and the landscaping mowed and maintained by a pro. Pasture and mini water views. Reduced to Only $140,000. ML#260067 Always call JACE for Land & Homes on Land!

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978

A FAIR HOUSE

'M' IS FOR MOTIVATED

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PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

helga@olypen.com (360) 461-0538

Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

TOM BLORE

UPTOWN REALTY

Helga Filler

David A. Ramey

11405916

11405926

11405908

11405925

Virtual tour: www.visualtour.com/shownp.asp?T=2244008

E1

SHERWOOD VILLAGE

WALK TO WORK

You will enjoy this roomy like-new home with 9’ ceilings and great floor plan. The spacious master suite is on the main floor. The living area includes a separate living/dining room in addition to a family room. Upstairs there is a bonus room with deck to enjoy the partial saltwater view. $289,000 252042

3,500 sq. ft. 5-bay truck shop plus a 3 Br home plus a 1,100 sq. ft. shop, 3.7 acres & orchard. A great value at only $400,000 MLS#251406 Ask about Owner terms or concessions.

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Enjoy 360º views from this immaculate 2story, 3 BR/2.5 BA home on 2.37 acres. Desirable location w/beach access & 2 public golf courses. Sunroom, portico, courtyard & established landscaping. 2,000 SF shop w/ bonus room, 1/2 BA, space for your boat, RV & guests. $595,000 ML#251088 Call DIANNA

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UPTOWN REALTY

WRE/Sequim-East

Rita Erdmann

Jace Schmitz, REALTOR®

Office: (360) 417-9873 Cell: (360) 460-1029 rita@olypen.com www.uptownrealty.com

360.565.2020

www.calljace.com jace@olypen.com

933 East First St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

Cell: 461-2383 ladydi@olypen.com 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

(360)461-4116 rolandmiller@olypen.com

CHARMING COTTAGE BY THE SEA

PARKWOOD HOME

Dianna Erickson

Roland Miller

LIVE THE SEQUIM LIFESTYLE

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W NE ING IC R P

Looking for a quality, custom home with amazing views of saltwater, Victoria, Mt. Baker, farmland and Hurricane Ridge? This is it! Single level home, ADA accessible separate art studio/hobby room, daylight basement with full guest quarters - top quality materials throughout. $399,000 ML#252204. See more at www.ReichLane.com Call Gail 360-477-9361 / 683-3900

11405944

with lovely Cameo water views. Private community beach access and a private airport nearby. Gourmet kitchen with new stainless appliances. Vaulted ceilings and stunning maple laminate flooring. Enjoy sitting on the expansive covered deck and watch the ships pass by. This special and unique home has a warmth and charm you must experience! $319,900 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.com

11405936

11405918

11405934

• 2 Bedroom/2 Bath, 1,998 SF Home • Master Bedroom with Sitting Area • Oversized 2-Car Garage w/Work Bench • Enclosed Patio and Landscaped Yard • Large Corner Lot ML#251593/108036 $120,000 www.debkahle.mywindermere.com

This beautiful 6 acres in a gated community offers a homesite with all the best Sequim has to offer. Close to area attractions including Sequim Bay, Olympic Discovery Trail and Olympic National Park. This pastoral acreage also boasts being just minutes from all major shopping! With a great building site, underground utilities & access to a community well this property is ready for your custom home today! Only $99,950 MLS#260089 Call Brody at 360.477.9665

Brody Broker

WRE/SunLand

190 Priest Rd. 360-477-9361 PO Box 1060 gail@gailsumpter.com Sequim, WA 98382 www.gailsumpter.com 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

Deb Kahle

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

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Dan Blevins

Office: (360) 417-2805 Cell: (360) 808-3097 www.DanBlevins.com

11405937

11405930

Heidi Hansen

email: pili@olypen.com

This 1,936 SF, 3 BR/2 BA home is well laid out with open floor plan, big kitchen and a large living room. Check out the walk-in granite shower! And don’t miss the covered back porch. Located next to a green belt in an area of nice homes, it will surely appreciate in time. Partial mountain and saltwater views from this property. ML#252453 at $259,900 Call Dan

UPTOWN REALTY (360) 477-5322 heidi@olypen.com

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2007 HOME

11405914

(360) 437-1011 Direct: (360) 301-2929 laura@olypen.com

On this 1.74 acres w/3 BR, 2 BA & large deck overlooking pastoral views. Large central kitchen with living room, dining room and family rooms. Lots of built-in storage and roomy closets. 2-car garage has workshop area. Centrally located for access to hiking, fishing and exploring the North Olympic Peninsula. Only $215,000. MLS#251342/91035 Heidi Sells Views

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

(360) 457-0456 (360) 461-7633 hcoburn@olypen.com

TRANQUILITY ABOUNDS

11405917

Built as a weekend getaway. Situated on almost an acre. Colored concrete floors in great room, full kitchen & half bath. Upper level master bedroom & bath. (1 BR w/3 BR septic) MLS#118019 $259,900.

11405927

CHARMING COTTAGE WITH A VIEW

UPTOWN REALTY

Holly Coburn

(360) 683-4844 842 E. WASHINGTON ST. SEQUIM, WA 98382 dsharman@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Located at 8th & Peabody. Over 4,000 SF in main building and additional room in detached building. Great spot for business that wants walk-in business and convenience for customers. Only $499,000! ML#260074 Call Pili for more information.

WRE/Port Angeles

DAVE SHARMAN

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

PRIME COMMERCIAL

Well kept 2 BR/2 BA manufactured home built in 2003 on .65 acres w/water and mountain views. Each bedroom and bath are on separate ends of the home with the living space in between. There is also a carport, garden shed and fruit trees. Located just minutes from town. $89,000 ML#260078/169049 Call Holly

Cozy rambler located in nice neighborhood close to Sequim schools, shopping & services. Well maintained 2 BR/2 BA (1 off Master BR), den/office for your choice of uses. Airy, open floor plan w/kitchen island. Fully fenced backyard w/chain link dog run. Front is EZ maintenance w/nice landscaping & small lawn. $185,000 ML#252216/58745 Call DAVE

WRE/Sequim-East

UPTOWN REALTY

®

11405909

Team Thomsen Realtors®

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ADORABLE HOME ON 3 LOTS

11405919

11405929

7th & Race St. 2 contiguous lots bordering very busy Race St., which is one of the main thoroughfares in Port Angeles, traveled by locals & tourists for year-round exposure. This property has many permitted uses - call us for more information! $195,000 ML#251067

WRE/Port Ludlow Laura Halady

761 N. Sequim Ave. Cell: 360-477-9665 email: Brodybroker@olypen.com

Gail Sumpter

PLUS a 6,100 SF, 7-bay shop with 14’ doors that is insulated & heated. Excellent Hwy 101 frontage. Also includes 2 BR/1 BA home. Just listed at $499,000 ML#252253

Kathy Love

Office: 452-3333 1-800-453-9157 klove@olypen.com

www.portangelesrealty.com


E2

Classified

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

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51

Homes

4 ACRES ZONED INDUSTRIAL PLUS a 6,100 sf, 7 bay shop with 14’ doors that is insulated and heated. Excellent Highway 101 frontage. Also includes 2 Br., 1 bath home. $499,000. #252253. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

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101 TRUCK SHOP AND HOME 3,500 sf, 5 bay truck shop plus a 3 Br. home, plus a 1,100 sf shop. 3.7 acres, orchard. A great value. Ask about Owner terms or Concessions. $400,000. ML251406 Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

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Homes

A FAIR HOUSE Across the fairgrounds, that is. A 2 Br., 1 bath, beautifully upgraded house with new appliances and newer roof. There is a greenhouse for the green thumbers and a big shop for the fixers and builders. Check out the beautiful landscaping. Enjoy fruit from your own orchard. Possible owner financing. $162,500. ML252388. Rita Erdmann 417-9873 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY A MUST SEE Looking for a quality, custom home with amazing views of saltwater, Victoria, Mt. Baker, farmland, and Hurricane Ridge? This is it! Single level home, ADA accessible, separate art studio/ hobby room, daylight basement with full guest quarters. Top quality materials throughout. $399,000 Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9361 ADORABLE HOME ON 3 LOTS Well kept 2 Br., 2 bath manufactured home built in 2003 on .65 acres with water and mountain views. Each Br. and bath are on separate ends of the home with the living space in between. There is also a carport, garden shed and fruit trees. Located just minutes from town. $89,000 ML260078/169049 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Homes

BEAUTIFUL NEW 2011 HOME. Quality 3 bd. 2 bth, built by local builder in an area of fine homes. Hardi siding, 30yr. roof, attached 2 car garage, large lot with room for detached garage or in-law house vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, tile in baths, large master bed, granite in kitchen & baths, Stainless appliances, Heat pump, The best house on the market for the price $209,500. 2004 W. 8th Street. 360-417-9579 CHARMING COTTAGE BY THE SEA With lovely cameo water views. Private community beach access and a private airport nearby. Gourmet kitchen with new stainless appliances. Vaulted ceilings and stunning maple laminate flooring. Enjoy sitting on the expansive covered deck and watch the ships pass by. This special and unique home has a warmth and charm you must experience. $319,900. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

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Homes

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Homes

CHARMING COTTAGE WITH A VIEW Built as a weekend getaway. Situated on almost an acre. Colored concrete floors in great room, full kitchen and half bath. Upper level master bedroom and bath (1 Br. with 3 Br. septic). $259,900. ML118019 Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow COUNTRY CHARMER Well kept home on 3.17 acres, mtn view with pond, garden area, orchard, and barn. Clallam ditch irrigation. Property is bordered by Matriotti Creek. $279,000. ML241623/29093313 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND COUNTRY LIVING Close to town, built in 2008 on 2.57 acres. 3 Br., 2 bath, single level with open floor plan. Beautiful details, check it out. $265,000 ML260032167404 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GREAT HOME IN CUL-DE-SAC On private 5 acres with seasonal pond. Spacious master suite features a jacuzzi tub. 720 sf shop, 2 RV hookups, a fenced garden area with fruit trees and greenhouse. $479,000 ML251838/22205 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Main house has 2,332 sf of living space and custom features. Custom landscaping, koi pond with waterfall. Large greenhouse and garden area. Laminate wood floors, builtins, great sunroom, too. Includes two outbuildings for extra investment opportunities. $479,000. ML241656 Chuck Murphy or Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East JUST LIKE NEW Cute 2 Br., 1.5 bath condo, completely updated throughout, new kitchen with new appliances, new fixtures, windows, and floor coverings. New heating system and roof. $137,500. ML251967/129757 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND ‘M’ IS FOR MOTIVATED! Handy? Bring your tools to this 2.39 creek side acres. 1 Br. cabin with new roof, wood stove and new vinyl windows plus a 3 bedroom single wide mobile. 2 septics recently pumped, fresh gravel in the driveway and the landscaping mowed and maintained by a pro. Pasture and mini water views. $140,000. ML260067. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

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Homes

MEDITERRANEAN STYLE SHOW STOPPER! Enjoy 360° views from this immaculate 2 story, 3 Br., 2.5 bath home on 2.37 acres. Desirable location with beach access and 2 public golf courses. Sunroom, courtyard, portico, and established landscaping. 2,000 sf shop with bonus room, 1/2 bath, space for your boat, RV and guests. $595,000. ML251088. Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NICE FARM On 5.12 acres. Various outbuildings for animals and storage. Greenhouse, fruit trees, garage with workshop. Small creek runs through, mostly fenced $222,500. ML250362. Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NICELY RESTORED 1976 2 Br. on 1/2 acre with city limits at the back fence. Two spacious decks, garage and carport plus workshop. Oversized shower, soak tub, wood stove, built-in buffet, walk-in closet in master Br. Back has room for RV parking and features small pond, patio area and many bearing fruit trees. $139,900. ML251965 Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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Homes

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ON THE SUNLAND GOLF COURSE Unique Spanish style home situated on the 18th fairway of SunLand Golf Course with views of the 18th tee box and the 17th green. Kitchen features tile countertops and golden oak cabinets with slide out shelving. Large stone fireplace with propane insert. $229,900 ML242011/29118494 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Homes

ONLINE AUCTION WASHINGTON BANK-OWNED HOMES Featuring this local one: 717 E. 3rd St, Port Angeles Agent: Don Edgmon John L. Scott RE 360-457-8593 BUYER’S AGENTS: Up to 2% Commission Available!! No back taxes, No liens, Insurable title!! Go ONLINE to Get Your Offers in Now!! www.OnlineBidNow. com

OWNER FINANCING 1525 W. 16th St., P.A. 2 Br.., 1 ba, 50x140 lot, across from Cl. Co. Fairgrounds, built 1980, remodeled 1989, built-in vacuum, covered back deck with wine and vegetable storage underneath, insulated, new appliances, side-by-side fridge 2007, glass top stove 2010, water/dryer 2010, electric fireplace 2010, 50 gal. hot water heater 2010, new carpet 2008, laminate floor hallway 2008, linoleum in laundry and kitchen 2010, lg. paved driveway, 2 car detached shop/ garage with 12’ ceiling, fully insulated, nice greenhouse with walk around deck, landscaped yard, 10 fruit trees, carport off side of shop, fenced in back. $160,000. Call 360-460-4957 or email tomarina06@ gmail.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

Hudson & Marshall High Performance Auctioneers 1-866-539-4174 H&M: AU#2216 OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE Recent upgrades throughout. Tinted windows, blinds, stove, washer/dryer, and microwave. Recently painted exterior and enlarged front deck. One of te most popular manufactured home parks in Sequim. Close distance to many services. $44,900. ML242650/29167467 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND PARKWOOD HOME 2 Br., 2 bath, 1,998 sf home, master Br. with sitting area, oversized 2 car garage with work bench. Enclosed patio and landscaped yard, large corner lot. $120,000. ML251593/108036 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

1134 East Front Street Port Angeles (800) 446-8115 (360) 457-8593 Come check out our office website!

portangelesbuyersguide.com Open 7 Days a Week Ask about our Seller’s FREE Home Warranty Program Visit www.johnlscott.com & enter 5 digit code

1

johnlscott.com/97994

2

johnlscott.com/60467

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PERFECT HOME FOR RELAXATION & HOBBIES This SPACIOUS CONDO IN THE HEART OF SEQUIM 3 BR/2 BA WONDERFUL NEWER HOME IN THE spacious 3 BR/3 BA home has a spa, open kitchen and Walk to shopping, restaurants, ROLLING HILLS ESTATE. This 3 BD/2.5 windows that allow plenty of light. The oversized 3+ car Condo/Townhouse. Community Theater, library and much more. Amenities

BA home is spacious & offers high ceilings, Master Suite on main level. Family room & formal dining along with kitchen on main level. Upper level features 2 BR and full BA. Call Don Edgmon to see (360) 460-0204

ML#260042 $219,500

$264,900 DON EDGMON ABR, GRI, CNE 460-0204

garage has a large shop, 3/4 bath and extra outlets for all your needs. A large deck and gazebo overlooking the grounds and the separate garden shed. All of this is conveniently located near the Dungeness River and Olympic Discovery Trail. Call Tanya Kerr (360) 670-6776

ING LIST W E N

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johnlscott.com/52568 GREAT STARTER OR INVESTMENT PROPERTY This 2 BR/1 BA home is on

oversized lot in the city, close to schools and Fair grounds. Large garage with additional workshop or third garage space plus green house. Has a large deck for BBQs and entertaining. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

ML#252461

$68,500 JEANETT HEAWARD Realtor® 461-4585

ED DUC E R JUST

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GREAT STARTER HOME This 3 BR/1 BA home has a large deck off the master BR, also an enclosed playroom under deck. It is close to the YMCA, Civic Field, City Dream Park. Would make someone a nice starter home or a good investment home. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

$88,368

ML#250668

CED EDU R T JUS

13 johnlscott.com/64463

$44,900

ML#252145

johnlscott.com/46429 johnlscott.com/18262

ML#252298

johnlscott.com/92729

GREAT BIG HOME ON GREAT BIG LOT! This 4 BR/2 BA home has all the amenities, is on a huge lot and is in a great neighborhood. This home is priced to sell, needs some TLC. Call Steve Gates (360) 460-8189 ML#251392

$175,000

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johnlscott.com/32564

johnlscott.com/41907 LOOKING FOR BUYER OR TENANT Big little house with 2-car garage/workshop & room for RV/boat. Great deal for the price! 2 BR, huge kitchen, built-in storage. Fridge, washer, dryer included. Will take off market with 1 yr lease. ($875.00 per mo.) Call Valerie Lape (360) 461-7019.

$149,000

LINDA LAPE FRENCH Owner

johnlscott.com/56975

THE TIME IS RIGHT Gardener’s paradise, fertile soil, Majestic maples, and your own private creek. 4.62 acres all backed by DNR land. Owner financing available. Call Steve for more information (360) 460-8189 ML#251775 ML#241436 $99,900

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johnlscott.com/37294

ED DUC E R JUST

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TANYA KERR Designated Broker 457-8593 x311 670-6776

johnlscott.com/81916

BREATHTAKING VIEWS! Beautiful 2 BR/2 BA A MOUNTAIN VIEW THAT IS STUNNING PERFECT LOCATION! This 4 BR/1 BA home is in

with den/office just minutes from downtown johnlscott.com/ Sequim. The breathtaking views of Sequim Valley and the water, to the tranquil sound of 2 waterfalls from the private pond, this home beckons you to relax and enjoy your new home. To see, call Tanya Kerr (360) 670-6776

A pristine piece just a stone’s throw away from the famous Elwha River. The building site cleared, water, and power & phone all installed. Is waiting and ready for your dream home. Call Steve Gates to see (360) 460-8189

$265,000

ML#251580 $115,000

CED EDU R T JUS

CED EDU R T JUS

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johnlscott.com/19951

ML#251115

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johnlscott.com/68687

WILLOW PARK CUSTOM DESIGNED HOME LOOKING FOR A HOME ON SOME ACREAGE THIS 3 BR/2 BA home is hand-crafted with the finest materials for the most discreet. Maple hardwood floors, granite tile kitchen with tile backsplash, one of the best kitchens with stainless steel appliances. Sit on your private back deck and enjoy the snowcapped Mt. view. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

$284,900

ML#252129

BETWEEN PORT ANGELES AND SEQUIM? Look

no longer, this 3 BR/ 2BA home is on 2.52 acres that would be great for any kind of livestock, by adding additional fencing. This is a nice place. To see, call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

$154,900

ML#250359

a great location, close to schools, groceries and the library. New roof 4 yrs ago and concrete pad already poured for a 3-car garage. Unobstructed Mt. view, lots of potential as an owner or investment home. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

$104,900

ML#252285

SEPTIC, POWER & WATER ALL INSTALLED!!! If you are looking to build in a beautiful area, this is it. All you have to do is bring your plans, building site is cleared and all utilities are already in. What could be simpler? Call Jeanett (360) 461-4585

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$129,000 johnlscott.com/96343 ML#242659

STEVE GATES Realtor® 457-8593 460-8189

11405924

HOME BETWEEN PA & JOYCE This 4 BR/ 1.5 BA home is minutes from the Freshwater Bay boat launch. Private setting at the end of the driveway no through traffic. Home needs some work; come by and take a look. Call Don Edgmon (360) 460-0204

ML#251681

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johnlscott.com/ johnlscott.com/21102

johnlscott.com/56674

VALERIE LAPE GRI, Realtor® Property Manager 461-7019

johnlscott.com/12617

ROOM FOR EVERYONE! This 4 BR/3 BA home is on 1.45 acres, Master Suite has a sitting room, jetted tub, walk-in closet and private deck with mountain and garden views. Mature landscaping with fruit trees, flower garden and a fenced yard for Fido. Outbuilding for office/shop with two separate spaces. Call Tanya Kerr to see (360) 670-6776

$411,500

include clubhouse, hot tub, attached 2-car carport w/ storage. Kitchen has breakfast bar and open to conversation area. Wood stove in LR. Call Valerie Lape (360)461-7019

ML#251935 $167,500

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johnlscott.com/35780 johnlscott.com/19158

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johnlscott.com/85995


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Homes

P.A.: 3258 E. 3rd Ave. 1 Br. studio/garage, full RV hookup. Livein studio or RV while building your own home. Mtn/water view, septic or city sewer LID. Possible financing w/ $60,000 down. 460-4107. ROOM TO GROW Well maintained home, close to stores and bus line. New roof on home and garage. Home has a great sun room off the back. Detached 2 car garage with work bench and storage area. $145,000. ML250465. Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

SHERWOOD VILLAGE Like new 5 year old, 1,845 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath condo with 2 car garage and a large south facing patio and mountain view. The kitchen has plenty of cabinets, laminate flooring, large living room with fireplace, and a great master suite. $295,000. ML251617. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

Residential property on 8th Street is zoned commercial so you can have your office and live there, too. Save stress by living where you work. $179,000. ML260043 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY This 2007, 1,936 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath home is well laid out with open floor plan, big kitchen, and a large living room. Check out the walk-in granite shower! And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the covered back porch. Located next to a green belt in an area of nice homes, it will surely appreciate in time. Partial mountain and partial saltwater views from this property. $259,900. ML252453 Dan Blevins 417-2805 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY TRANQUILITY ABOUNDS On this 1.74 acres 3 Br., 2 bath home with large deck overlooking pastoral views. Large central kitchen with living room, dining room and family rooms. Lots of builtin storage and roomy closets. 2 car garage has workshop area. Centrally located for access to hiking, fishing, and exploring the North Olympic Peninsula. $215,000 ML251342/91035 Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536. YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LL FALL IN LOVE Cozy rambler located in nice neighborhood close to Sequim schools, shopping and services. Well maintained 2 Br., 2 bath (1 off master Br.), den/office for your choice of uses. Airy open floor plan with kitchen island. Fully fenced back yard with chain link dog run. Front is easy maintenance with nice landscaping and small lawn. $185,000. ML252216. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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Lots/ Acreage

2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. CALL 253549-3345 PORT ANGELES lot @ 222 W Park Ave Half acre+ CLOSE IN TOWN Water, Power, and Sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Point lot with water view, perc, water $69,000. Owner financing. LIKE TO HUNT AND FISH? Nature lovers getaway to 10 acres across from the Sekiu River. Great for picnics and outdoor games. Baseboard heat, wall heater and free standing wood stove. Just north of approx. 300 square miles of state trust/ timber lands. Bear, deer, elk and cougar habitat. $149,950. ML252065 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LIVE THE SEQUIM LIFESTYLE This beautiful 6 acres in a gated community offers a homesite with all of the best of the Sequim has to offer. Close to area attractions including Sequim Bay, the Olympic Discovery Trail and Olympic National Park. This pastoral acreage also boasts being just minutes from all major shopping! With a great building site, underground utilities and access to a community well this property is ready for your custom home today! $99,950. ML260089. Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company

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Commercial

COMMERCIAL BUILDING On Front Street. Commercial Arterial zoning allows for many types of businesses. Currently used as a hair salon. Salon chairs and hair dryers are negotiable. Tenant has lease through November 2011. 5 paved parking spaces in the back off of the alley. $150,000. ML260036. Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Prime commercial location at 8th and Peabody. Over 4,000 sf in main building and additional room in detached building. Great spot for business that wants off the street business and convenience for customers. $499,000. ML260074. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br. $650. Studio, $350. No smoking/pets. 457-9698 DOWNTOWN P.A.: 1 & 2 Br., util. incl., $650-$795. 460-7525

HOBBIT HOLE in PA: Cozy 1 Br. downstairs apt in duplex, private entrance, no smoke/pets, $395 + util. 360-452-4258. P.A.: Central, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, no smoke/pets. $650. Lease, credit check. 360-796-3560 P.A.: East 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage. $625 plus dep. 452-8239 P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

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Houses

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Houses

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Houses

P.A.: Very nice 3 Br., 2 ba on dbl. corner lot. $1,100 mo., 1st, last, dep. Avail Feb. 360-640-1613

WEST SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 baths, pets w/ approval. $675 + dep. 683-7440

P.T.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage. $875 mo. 360-531-0625

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Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

P.A.: 3 rooms avail., share bath, hardwood floors, garage, carport, fenced yard, approved pets OK, W/D, dishwasher. $325 mo. + 1/3 util. Sarah at 460-5217.

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, on golf course, nice. $1,095. 452-1234. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced, in town, $500 deposit. $1,100. 683-1695. SEQUIM: Mains Farm, nice 2 Br., 1.5 bath, dbl att. gar., great neighborhood, water incl. $795. 626-445-8613 WANTED: 2 Br. house in Sequim, approx. $600 mo. 417-3571 or 477-2360. WEST P.A.: Small cabin, W/D. $325 mo. 452-4310.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Share, furnished, light drink ok. $375 incl util, plus dep. Avail. immediately. 452-6045, eves Room for rent. House to share, your own bedroom and bathroom, very quiet and private area plus full kitchen privileges etc. No smoking in the house, no drugs, I prefer somebody that is neat. 360-460-7301

Share Rentals/ Rooms

SEQ: Shared bath and kitchen. $400, references. 681-0160. SEQUIM: Room/bath, kitchen, no pets/ smoking, close to town. $500 mo. 683-4250 after 5 p.m.

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Spaces RV/ Mobile

WEST JOYCE: Close to Lyre River, private. $200. W/S/G incl. 206-784-8239 www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Commercial Space

OFFICE/COMMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;L Perfect location, 1007 E. Front St. Remodeled/expanded in 2006. 1,430 sf, multiuse. Alan Barnard 461-0175 Windermere R.E. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

real estate

auctions Port Ludlow Home Sells January 24th

SEQUIM CONDO .U$ISJTUJF$PVSU 1PSU-VEMPX

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

3 Br., 1.5 bth, new carpet/paint. LR w/fireplace insert. Two car garage. Hot tub. $1125 First, last, dep. Non-smk/pets. Address: 1527 W. 10th. 206-898-3252.

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319 E. 6th St. Central P.A. $825 mo., water/ gar/sewr incl. Lg 2 Br., 1 bath, basement, garage. Pets OK. 1st, lst, dep 477-6648

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540.

Commercial

7TH AND RACE STREET 2 contiguous lots bordering very busy Race St. Race St. is one of the main thoroughfares in Port Angeles, traveled by locals and tourists for year round exposure. This property has many permitted uses. $195,000. ML251067 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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E3

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1st floor 3 Br., $695. 2nd floor 1 Br., $478. + Util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

Charming, picket fence 2 Br., 1 bath, 1 car garage. New paint and blinds. D/W, gas range, W/D, deck. Fenced back yd. View. $950/ mo. First, last dep. Non-smk. 503 W. 7th PA. 206-898-3252.

Pristine condo and garage. Completely renovated. New cabinets, counters, doors, trim, fixtures, flooring plus new stamped concrete patio and landscaping. New roof in 2007. 3 BR/2 BA plus two storage rooms and lots of closets. $199,000 ML#252049/135283

DIANN DICKEY

Managing Broker, ABR & CNE 1190 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 Office: 360.683.4131 Cell: 360.477.3907 ddickey@olypen.com

PORT LUDLOW, WA t.U$ISJTUJF$PVSU 2BR 2BA 2,289+/- sf. Approx .61ac lot. Nominal Opening Bid: $50,000 0QFO)PVTF1-4pm Sun Jan 16th, 23rd and 2 hours before sale. 4FMMT 8am, Mon Jan 24th

"-404&--*/(+"/6"3:5) SEQUIM, WA t4VOTFU1MBDF

WA AUC LIC 2513 GLEN VANNOY, RE LIC 3971 REALTY CONSULTANTS, GLEN VANNOY; BUYERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PREMIUM MAY APPLY.

11405939

SEQUIM CONDO Pristine condo and garage. Completely renovated: new cabinets, counters, doors, trim, fixtures, flooring plus new stamped concrete patio and landscaping. New roof in 2007. 3 Br., 2 bath plus two storage rooms and lots of closets. $208,000 ML252049/135283 Diann Dickey 683-3564 Professional Real Estate

Homes

11405938

Sequim condo FSBO: 2 Br., 2 bath, oak floors in liv, din, kit, single level 1,640 sf, incl. cedar lined sunrm off mstr bdrm w/elec ready for hot tub, nice yard w/fenced patio, veg gardens, fruit trees, close to twn, mt view, appraised 10/10 $265,000. No reasonable offer refused, would consider trade of land for partial equity. 360683-1475 evenings 360-302-1339

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

800.801.8003

williamsauction.com

Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 2 ba......$650 H 2 br 1 ba......$700 H 2 br 2 ba......$750 A 3 br 1.5 ba...$925 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 HOUSES IN SEQUIM H 1 br 1 ba.......$800 H 2 br 1 ba.......$900 H 3 br 1 ba.....$1100

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

Jan 15. 2 bd, 1 ba, close to Coast Guard & town, W/D, Tnt pay utils $850 mo 1st/ last/$400 dep. Pets add. Dave at 360-809-3754 P.A.: 1 Br., loft, view, 438 E. Lopez. $650. 452-5050 P.A.: 2 Br. charmer, propane fireplace, hardwood floors, garage and patio, no pets, dep. and references. $750 mo. 360-808-4476 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, lg yard, nice central location, mtn view. $850. Jim 582-7241. P.A.: 2 Br., 1031 E. 3rd. $625 mo., $275 dep. 253-335-7154. P.A.: 2 Br., garage. Reduced. $785 John L. Scott. 457-8593. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, water view. $990. 452-1395. P.A.: 3 br., 2.5 ba. Check out this upscale beauty. What a great house. No pets. $1,000. 452-9458 P.A.: 3258 E 3rd Ave 1 Br apt/gar, RV hook. $600. 460-4107. P.A.: 4 Br, 1.5 ba, no smoking. $1,000 mo, $1,000 sec. 417-0153 P.A.: Bright 2 Br., den, wood stove, lg. fenced yard. $800, util. Feb 1. 360-477-4944 P.A.: Small 1 Br., water view, good location, W/D, carport. $525, $1,000 dep. No pets/ smoke. 452-8092.

SEQUIM AREA BEAUTIFUL FARMHOUSE. 4 bdr., 2 ba., modern kit., fplc., sun rm., gar., fenced yd., clean, bright and sunny. No smoking or pets. $1,350 plus cleaning dep. Call 360-387-4911 for appt to view.

Clallam County Mark Rogers, remodel concrete block house and 120 gallon above ground propane tank placement, 283 Hardwick Road, $321,347. Bert Johnson, detached boat manufacturing shop, Octane Lane, $138,650. Vernon A. Sprague Jr., family room and second bathroom addition, 171 Mountain View Drive, $50,792. Richard Becker, demolish double wide manufactured home, 585 Vautier Road, $100. William Meyers, wood stove placement, 265 Hurricane View Lane, $2,000. Charles S. Miller, demolition of manufactured home, 436 Sawtooth Road, $2,200. Sylvia Ostroot, demolition of manufactured home, 236406 U.S. Highway 101, $2,200. Andy Romasanta, installation of wood stove, 5073 Happy Valley Road, $6,191. Chris and Phyllis Coolures living trust, 120 gallon above ground propane tank and piping, 485 Doe Run Road, $2,500. Port Angeles School District No 121, climbing wall in gym, 106 Monroe Road, $200. Steve Rathjen, wood insert, 2352 Calawah Way, $4,000. Gerald Waelter, 500 gallon above ground propane tank placement and piping, 22 W. Stephens Place, $3,000. G and R Commercial Properties, fire sprinkler system, 161 Banana Way, $28,000. William L. Yada, single family dwelling with attached garage and 120 gallon above ground propane tank, Lavender Meadows Drive, $212,972. Walter C. Masland, building shop, Alta Vista Road, $55,632. Edward Telenick Jr., foundation for single family dwelling, 470 Sherbourne Road, $4,000. Maxwell Anderson, fireplace and interior piping, 872 Three Crabs Road, $5,167. Michael G. Kalahar, 500 gallon propane tank placement, 402 Eagles Nest Lane, $4,961.

Port Angeles Ken W. Price, heat pump, 403 S. Lincoln St., $5,160. Clark Munro Jr., re-roof, 1115 W. 11th St., $3,200. Marietta Ellen Hoover Anicker, manufactured home, 2715 S. Oak St., $92,108. Patrick L. Lamoureux, repair fire damaged home, 301 E.12th St., $25,000. Dana and Rhianna Shaltry, repair gutted home, 6271/2 E. Eighth St., $50,000. John R. Ellinwood, fireplace insert, 321 Forest Ave., $2,804. Garner Red Elk, replace water service, 1421 W. 12th St., $1,200. Phillip L. Adam, remodel fire damaged home, 2308 Samara Dr., $131,629. Mary E. Loucks and Michael E. Anderson, fire sprinkler system, 1925 Village Circle, $1,875. Alex J. and Jillian R. Anderson, fire sprinkler system, 1929 Village Circle, $1,875. Shelley M. Vancleave, single family dwelling, 1130 E. Front St., $170,746. Richard and Roslie Oden, carport, 2624 S. Lincoln St., $5,040. Christina Nyhus, signs, 1234 E. Front St. B, $500. Steve Sigler and Edwin Fritts and Edwin and Sheila Fritts, heat pump, 434 W. Fifth St., $5,562. Audrey M. Schwartz, wood burning insert, 224 W. Third St., $4,000. Pam Porterfield and Ron Ogier joint trust, pellet stove, 1102 W. Seventh St., $3,300. Blain and Theresa Pugsley, re-route plumbing, 427 W. Third St., $2,500. Richard R. Cooper, wood burning stove, 1229 W. 17th St., $4,000. Andrew P. and Sheryl R. Slack, demolition, 1720 W. 10th St., $0. Michael T. Breen, signs, 120 N. Oak St., $50. Vernon D. Peters and Lorraine C. Dalton, expand bathroom and office, 522 E. Eighth St., $1,900. City Lights Holdings LLC, add treatment space, 106 W. Lauridsen Blvd., $43,520.

Sequim Public Hospital District No. 2, medical equipment replacement, 844 N. FIfth Ave., $350,000.

Jefferson County Timothy Flynn, heat pump, 20 W. Hayden St., $4,000. MacKenzie Deshler Tad, enclose existing carport, 741 Rhododendron Road, $35,325. Carlos Franco, new deck and replacement deck, 40 Queets Place, $7,000. Dean Brooks, modular home, 153,823 U.S. Highway 101, $15,000. Erik and Barbara Lindstrom, single family dwelling with attached garage and 120 gallon underground propane tank, 2180 E. Marrowstone Road, $404,100. Douglas Habersetzer, heat pump, 181 Condon Lane, $9,371. Rodger Biasca, single family dwelling with 500 gallon underground propane tank, 231 Coyle Road, $200,000. Rodger Biasca, additional dwelling unit with unheated shop, 231 Coyle Road, $175,000. Bruce Kandlik, self storage building B, 294353 U.S. Highway 101, $157,000.

Port Townsend Margaret A. Bimel, residential addition and remodel, 921 Taylor St., $66,850.92. Darren R. and Lee Anna Muir, residential addition and remodel, 4777 Willamette St., $4,000.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 52 building permits issued from month/ dates with a total valuation of $2,827,527.92: Port Angeles, 22 at $555,969; Sequim, 1 at $350,000; Clallam County, 18 at $843,912; Port Townsend, 2 at $70,850.92; Jefferson County, 9 at $1,006,796.

115101519

SEQUIM: 3 BR, 1 BA, 2 car garage, W/D. $900/mo. 1st & last month+ $1000 dep, Credit check. 253-709-9458


E4

Classified

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

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11405910

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Commercial arterial zoning on Front Street allows for many types of businesses. Currently used as a hair salon. Salon chairs and hairdryers are negotiable. Tenant has lease through November 2011. 5 paved parking spaces in the back off of the alley. Call now to see this charming building! $150,000 ML#260036

Harriet Reyenga

11405911

Very charming 2 BR/1 BA home on a double lot with 4 BR septic. Home has been updated. Fully fenced yard, detached 1-car garage w/2 other outbuildings. $139,500 MLS#260103/ 170324 Call JENNIFER

Close to town, built in 2008 on 2.57 acres. 3 BR/2 BA single level with open floor plan. Beautiful details, check it out. Only $265,000 ML#260032/167404 Call Harriet for a showing. www.harrietr.com

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11405912

Main house has 2,332 SF of living space & custom features. Custom landscaping, Koi pond w/waterfall. Large greenhouse & garden area. Laminate wood floors, built-ins, great sunroom, too. Included are two outbuildings for investment opportunities. ML#241656 $479,000 Call CHUCK or LORI

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11405913

WRE/Sequim-East

Carolyn & Robert Dodds

Karen Kilgore 477-5718 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 KarenK@olypen.com

COUNTRY LIVING

11405921

11405922

Nature loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getaway to 10 acres across from the Sekiu River. Great for picnics & outdoor games. Baseboard heat, wall heater & freestanding wood stove. Just north of approx. 300 Sq. Mi. of state trust/timber lands. Bear, deer, elk & cougar habitat. $149,950 ML#252065 Call the DODDS

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137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

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1976 2 BR on 1/2 acre with city limits at the back fence. Two spacious decks, garage & carport plus workshop. Oversized shower, soak tub, wood stove, built-in buffet, walk-in closet in MA BR. Back has room for RV parking & features small pond, patio area & many fruit bearing trees. MLS#251965/129688 $139,900 Call Karen

WRE/SunLand

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s7ELL+EPT(OMEON!CRES s-OUNTAIN6IEWWITH0OND s'ARDEN!REA /RCHARD"ARN s#LALLAM$ITCH)RRIGATION s0ROPERTYIS"ORDEREDBY-ATRIOTTI#REEK -,$279,000 6ISITWWWKIMBOWERMYWINDERMERECOM

11405923

s#UTE"2"!#ONDO s#OMPLETELY5PDATED4HROUGHOUT s.EW+ITCHENW.EW!PPLIANCES s.EW&IXTURES 7INDOWS&LOOR#OVERINGS s.EW(EATING3YSTEM2OOF -,$137,500 WWWBRENDACLARKMYWINDERMERECOM

11405931

11405932

11405933

s2ECENT5PGRADES4HROUGHOUT s4INTED7INDOWS "LINDS 3TOVE 7ASHER$RYER -ICROWAVE s2ECENTLY0AINTED%XTERIORAND%NLARGED&RONT$ECK s0OPULAR-ANUFACTURED(OME0ARKIN3EQUIM s%:7ALKING4O-ANY3ERVICES -,$44,900 WWWSEQUIMLANDANDHOMESCOM

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WRE/Port Angeles Paul Beck (360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

E5

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23

SNEAK A PEEK •

FOUND: Cat. Female, buff color with white, Byln area on E. Sequim Bay Rd. 683-0664

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

CHEV: ‘07 Silverado. 1/2 ton, tow pkg., power, 70K, canopy, running boards, clean, well under book at $17,500. 681-0103

Dining Room Set. Solid Oak, dark cherry stain. 6 chairs (all solid oak), with leaf can easily seat 8. Mission style, chairs are upholstered. $500 ($2,000 new). Very good condition. 360-460-0131

DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 56K. $28,000. 971-226-0002 ENVY HAIR is looking for a stylist to join our team, must work eves. and Saturdays. Contact Bonnie. 477-0066

GAS FIREPLACE Regency-Hampton, 18K BTU, like brand new, cost $1,400+. First $650 buys. 457-1860 msg. Library Job P.A. Circ Supervisor. www.nols.org MAZDA: ‘94 Miata. Red/black, 5 sp, 99K, runs good. $4,500. 437-0428. MISC: Whirlpool side by side refrigerator/ freezer, with ice and water, $400. Full size pool table, new balls and sticks, $100. Elevation table, $50. White china hutch, $75. 360-316-9213. P.A.: Very nice 3 Br., 2 ba on dbl. corner lot. $1,100 mo., 1st, last, dep. Avail Feb. 360-640-1613

RECEPTIONIST OWNER FINANCING 1525 W. 16th St., P.A. Full/part-time, enerexperience 2 Br.., 1 ba, 50x140 getic, lot, across from Cl. helpful. 582-2821. Co. Fairgrounds, RECREATIONAL built 1980, remodTHERAPIST eled 1989, built-in ASSISTANT vacuum, covered back deck with wine If you are a person and vegetable storwho likes people, age underneath, has good docuinsulated, new applimentation skills for ances, side-by-side daily participation, fridge 2007, glass always being on the top stove 2010, go and still able to water/dryer 2010, be organized , we electric fireplace would like to meet 2010, 50 gal. hot you!! Recreational water heater 2010, Assistant opening! new carpet 2008, Join our team! laminate floor hallBring your smile way 2008, linoleum and energy and in laundry and come up to Crestkitchen 2010, lg. wood , fill out an paved driveway, 2 application and ask car detached shop/ for Lee! garage with 12’ ceilCrestwood ing, fully insulated, Convalescent Center nice greenhouse with 1116 E. Lauridsen walk around deck, Port Angeles, WA landscaped yard, 10 98362 fruit trees, carport off side of shop, fenced in back. $160,000. Call 360-460-4957 or email tomarina06@ gmail.com We are an Equal P.A.: 1 Br., loft, view, Employment 438 E. Lopez. $650. Opportunity 452-5050 Workplace, Encouraging P.A.: 3258 E. 3rd Ave. Workforce Diversity 1 Br. studio/garage, full RV hookup. Live- Room for rent. House in studio or RV while to share, your own building your own bedroom and bathhome. Mtn/water room, very quiet and view, septic or city private area plus full sewer LID. Possible kitchen privileges financing w/ $60,000 etc. No smoking in down. 460-4107. the house, no drugs, I prefer somebody PIANIST/ORGANIST is neat. Experienced, for 11 that360-460-7301 a.m. traditional service: rehearsals, wor- Seeking Pharmacy A ship, special servic- Technician. Full Time es. Works with Pharmacy A Technimusic director, cian job opening at Chancel Choir. Walmart in Sequim. Good communica- Must be available tion skills. Resume, nights and weekreferences to: Organ- ends. Please bring ist/Pianist Search, resume to Sequim Trinity United Walmart Pharmacy. Methodist Church, Box 3697, Sequim 98382 by Jan. 21. EOE

POOL TABLE P.A.: 3258 E 3rd Ave 1 Br apt/gar, RV hook. Brunswick, full size, with all accessories. $600. 460-4107. Must move before V-STAR: ‘08 1300 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, January 27. $1,500. Tourer. Silver/gray garage, water view. with 8,000 miles, 48 452-4048 $990. 452-1395. mpg, nice clean bike. Primary Flight Instruc- Asking $6,250. Call P.A.: 2 Br. charmer, tors Wanted. Imme- Mike, 360-683-7445 propane fireplace, diate Students. eves. hardwood floors, 360-385-7770 garage and patio, no WEST SEQUIM: 2 Br., pets, dep. and refer- SEQ: Shared bath and 2 baths, pets w/ ences. $750 mo. kitchen. $400, refer- approval. $675 + 360-808-4476 dep. 683-7440 ences. 681-0160.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

Adult care home in Sequim has a private room available. Call the Wild Rose for the best care for your senior. 683-9194. Happy Birthday Ben Eastman! You have an account at Laurel Dental Clinic that anyone can add to. Love, Mom

FOUND: Cat. Male, black and white, Byln area on E. Sequim Bay Rd. 683-0664. LOST: Backpack. Black, McDonalds, P.A. 206-902-6681.

25

Personals

Single disabled man seeks single disabled woman 29-55, car or not, job or not, but with income, enjoys a walk and etc. Send response to PDN103@peninsuladailynews.com

Looking for Justine G. and Deanna D. Have important pictures for them. Please call 503-472-7810

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Australian Cattle Dog. Female, friendly, shy, well mannered. Please call Humane Society for foster family info, 452-5226

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31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

Accounting Clerk/ Customer Rep/ Clerical Position Full-time, Mon.-Fri., 85, wage $10-$13 hr. Health benefits and 401K available upon qualifications. 3+ yrs. experience AP/AR, customer service and general office work. Must be proficient in MSWord and Excel, able to learn computer systems easily (MAS90 experience a plus). Must be personable and customer service oriented. Applicant must be able to work as a team member and at times independently. Closes 1/21. Resume and application to EDP, Inc., 24 Colwell St., Port Hadlock, WA 98339. EOE.

Help Wanted

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

CNA, RNA Overnight shift. 457-9236

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

COOK Part-time, weekend lead plus, experience necessary. Apply in person. 520 E. Park Ave., P.A. COORDINATOR P/T Locate and screen host families, provide support and activities for exchange students. Make friends worldwide! www.aspectfoundatio n.org

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL:

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Energy Analyst City of Port Angeles $4377-$5192 w/benefits. Position is F/T, grant-funded and will be evaluated after 3 yrs. to determine if employment will continue. Educ: BA/BS or equiv in energy mgmt., physical sciences, engineering or related field; or equiv combination of educ and exp. Exp: 3 yrs or more in energy efficiency or work in the construction trades involving interpretation of building codes. Closes 1/31/11. To apply go to www.cityofpa.us or call Human Resources 360-4174510. COPA is an EOE

DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

G reat D eals on

4 W heels wd

2011 Nissan Titan

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. Billing Specialist Physical therapy clinic in P.A. Tu.-Fr., 25-30 hrs. wk., with add’l office manager duties. Must have previous medical billing exp. Send resume Peninsula Daily News PDN#190/Billing Pt Angeles WA 98362

Stk#N6947

• Class Leading Standard 5.6L 317 HP V8 Engine1 • Up to 9,500 lb Towing Capacity2 • Longest Available Crew Cab Bed in its Class3 MSRP.....................................$36,285 Wilder Discount.....................-$2,000 Nissan Customer Cash...........-$3,500

$

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Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

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FIREWOOD: Fir, $150 cord delivered (P.A. or Sequim). Call 360-452-7982 or 360-460-2407

PUPPIES: Registered Hunt Terriers, rough coated, super cute, 1 male, 1 female, 5 mo. old. $300 ea. 582-9006

31

Lost and Found

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2011 Nissan Armada 4

Prices do not include tax, license & documentation fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typographical errors. VINs posted at dealership. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 1/31/11. 1. WardsAuto.com’s Large Pickup segment, under 8,500 GVWR, standard models starting under $45,000. January, 2009. 2. 9,500 lbs. maximum towing on Titan SE King Cab 4x2 with Premium Utility Package. See Nissan Towing Guide and Owner’s Manual for proper use. 3. 2010 Titan Crew Cab vs. 2009 full-size crew cabs (Ford F-150 SuperCrew, Chevy Silverado 1500 Crew Cab, GMC Sierra 1500 Crew Cab, Dodge Ram 1500 Mega Cab and Toyota Tundra CrewMax). 4. 0% APR for up to 36 months On Approval of Credit. See Dealer for details. 5. 6,500 lbs. max. towing. King Cab 4x2 model. 7-pin connector trailer wire harness and tow hitch receiver required. See your owner’s manual or Nissan Towing Guide for specific towing information. 6. Platinum Edition models with 4WD. See your owner’s manual or Nissan Towing Guide for specific towing information. *The Nissan Frontier received the lowest number of problems per 100 vehicles among midsize pickups in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2010 Initial Quality StudySM. Study based on responses from 82,095 new-vehicle owners, measuring 236 models and measures opinions after 90 days of ownership. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of owners surveyed in February-May 2010. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com. Always wear your seatbelt and please don’t drink and drive. Nissan, the Nissan Brand Symbol, SHIFT_tagline, and Nissan model names are Nissan trademarks. ©2010 Nissan North America, Inc.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

ACROSS 1 Toward the ship’s rear 6 It may be rolled out 10 Sandler of “Big Daddy” 14 Really dig 19 Man of La Mancha 20 Asian nurse 21 Steam (up) 22 River to the Tyrrhenian Sea 23 King of workouts? 26 Cache 27 Jam time 28 Balaam’s mount 29 Upscale groups 31 Swore 34 By far 36 Seed protector 39 Isolate, in a way 41 Green sides 45 Belittle Short? 50 __ Victor 52 Country where Baha’i was founded 53 Lab subject 54 Bully 55 Hip bones 57 Milky Way phenomenon believed to occur almost weekly 58 Delay 59 Bullet that leaves a trail 60 Wordsworth works 62 Commander, in Arabic 63 Fragrant resin 65 “My mama done __ me ...”: song lyric 66 One paying a flat fee 67 Earned 68 Creep 70 Good in the ‘hood 71 Bowler’s assignment 73 Cup part 76 Parting shot, say 79 La __ 81 Chimborazo’s range 85 Bank deposit 86 Beauty pageant prize 87 Pounds 89 “__ fallen ...” 90 Word most often heard around midnight 91 Talk with one’s hands

92 A lot of thinking is done in them 93 Truck capacity unit 94 Hasenpfeffer, e.g. 95 Antitrust law enforcer: Abbr. 96 Rogaineinduced reverie? 99 Mezzo Berganza 101 They have reservations 103 Quaker’s pronoun 104 Confined 106 Most austere 111 Compound used to stabilize perfume 113 Charlotte-toRaleigh dir. 115 Self-playing instrument 118 Like some floors 119 Institution for Shrek and Fiona? 124 Bestow 125 “-zoic” things

126 127 128 129 130

Cork’s home Bistro bill of fare Fool Coastal raptors Artistic impressions, briefly? 131 See 2-Down

16 O, in old radio lingo 17 Guns 18 “... __ he drove out of sight” 24 Little bird 25 Pie cuts, essentially 30 Dr. Cuddy on DOWN “House” 1 Lenten symbol 32 1970s-’90s 2 With 131Toyota Across, greatest 33 Come in thing 35 Mountain homes 36 Discombobulate 3 Writer Tyler 37 Kidney-related 4 On eBay, e.g. 38 Candidate’s 5 Assignation concern 6 California 40 Threw barbs border lake 42 Pizzeria 7 Words of attraction agreement 43 Longtime 8 Churchill’s “so Seinfeld few”: Abbr. collaborator 9 Key letter 44 Catch 10 Guns 46 Join the cast of 11 Semi filler 47 “__ any drop to 12 Capone and drink”: Coleridge Capp 13 Allots, with “out” 48 Purloined sirloin? 14 Fifth-century 49 “Giovanna scourge d’__”: Verdi 15 Footballers who opera draw flags?

51 Zoo area for dromedaries? 56 __ Altos, California 61 Caribbean, e.g. 64 Silent cowboy flick? 66 Delt neighbor 69 PC component 70 German chancellor, 1969-’74 72 Like Willie Nelson’s voice 73 Great time 74 Beat 75 Dynamo’s antithesis 77 Discipline involving slow movement 78 Web address ending 79 “Wheel of Fortune” category 80 Saroyan’s “My Name Is __” 82 Abandon 83 Arouse 84 Taste, e.g.

87 Immune response component 88 Nod, maybe 95 Man-goat deity 97 Mutiny 98 It can help you relax 100 Poorly made 102 Like some bands 105 Giggle 107 Like soldiers and their families, usually 108 Toys with tails 109 Ring bearer? 110 Small cut 111 Smallest ratite bird 112 Brio 114 Capone harasser 116 Traditional wisdom 117 A chip, maybe 118 “The Joy Luck Club” author 120 “Catch-22” pilot 121 “Are we there __?” 122 “Mamma __!” 123 “Absolutely!”

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. POPPING BUBBLE WRAP IS FUN

Y P A R E H T G N I P M O T S

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N D L G T Y E U A I P C S X U

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I Y G L E S H S C E T L S F O

H D U E I T H T R R L S E Z P

C D S S S N I S O A O I A Y E

www.wonderword.com

Solution: 7 letters

A U T H O V G N B B L U L P G

M B E I E A I E C E J L N N R

S E T Q M C P A R W I E O D U

T O D E S I R E U S E L C U S

M Q U I C K Y F S I T A S T D

R E G N I F E C H E A P S E U

C H I L D R E N T S R U B Y D

1/15

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Addictive, Adults, Balls, Buddy, Burst, Cheap, Children, Crush, Desire, Duds, Easy, Edges, Electronic, Feel, Finger, Gadget, Game, Gifts, Index, Long, Loud, Machine, Motion, Noise, Object, Pastime, Play, Pouches, Puffy, Quick, Relief, Resist, Rolling, Round, Satisfy, Scroll, Seal, Sheet, Silly, Smash, Snappers, Sound, Stomping, Therapy, Thumb, Trample, Urge, Wrap Friday’s Answer: Rhythm THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

HEWIG ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ETTIL HARMIO

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

“PUT ME IN, COACH” By JONATHAN BLACK

By DAVID OUELLET

REDOWP

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: (Answers Monday) DANDY SQUALL NAPKIN Jumbles: LEGAL Answer: Although the bachelor owned a large farm, the girls said he was — “UNLANDED”

Friday’s

1/16/11

Solution on E7

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

31

The Last Word in Astrology

Help Wanted

COOK: Full time day line cook, must be experienced professional. Apply in person at Cafe Garden.

Nippon Paper Industries is currently interviewing for a Senior Project Engineer. Job Requirements: •Requires 7-10 years of Engineering experience in Petrochemicals, Utilities and/or Power Generation. Requires a BS degree in Engineering (Mechanical, Electrical, Civil or Equivalent) •Ability to effectively communicate verbally and in writing with all levels of the Mill organization is essential. •Experience in the pulp and paper field is a plus We offer competitive salaries and an excellent benefits package. Must meet minimum job requirements for consideration. Please send resume with cover letter specifying position applying for, as well as salary requirements to: HR Representative NPI USA PO Box 271 Port Angeles, WA 98362 AA/EOE No Phone Calls Please

Oncology Reimbursement Specialist Sequim Cancer Center Coding and billing for oncology services. Three years experience in healthcare coding. Complete an application at www.olympicmedical.org Human Resources Olympic Medical Center 939 Caroline Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Fax: 360-417-7307 Email: jobs@ olympicmedical.org Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Give yourself more time to rethink your strategy before you share it with others. Focus on being the best that you can be physically, emotionally, mentally and financially. Accept the help offered by someone you love. 4 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Plan a vacation or take a mini holiday to be with someone you miss or go with someone you love. You will gain experience from the people with whom you interact. Emotional stability will be yours. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Spend your time with someone you know well and trust, someone you can relax with and enjoy simple pleasures. Put your energy into love and laughter. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t waste too much time fretting over money or worrying about possessions or investments. Working on what you have to offer is a far better way to spend your day. An older individual will put things in perspective. 3 stars LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do whatever it takes to make

31

Help Wanted

ENVY HAIR is looking for a stylist to join our team, must work eves. and Saturdays. Contact Bonnie. 477-0066

31

improvements. Whether you focus on changing your image, updating your look or taking a course that helps you learn something you can offer others doesn’t matter. Spend the day working toward a better you. 4 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t let your emotions ruin a perfectly good time with family or friends. Now is not the time to criticize or complain. Instead, enjoy the people who love you and be thankful for what you have. Don’t overspend. 2 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You can inch your way into something quite enjoyable by taking part in a project, hobby or class that offers something out of the ordinary. What you learn now will help you out in the future when dealing with others. Distance yourself from the negative. 5 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There is plenty of change heading your way and you don’t want to miss it by being reclusive. Interacting with others will open your mind and your heart to a new and better lifestyle. Stop spinning your wheels alone when someone else can help you move forward. 3 stars

Help Wanted

Manage the Billing and Collection department; implement programs and procedures to improve customer service, cash collections, compliance and efficiency. BA or BS preferred with minimum three years hospital billing and credit/ collection experience, with strong healthcare management experience. Apply online at olympicmedical.org or email: nbuckner@olympicm edical.org EOE

NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com Part-time Bus Driver Positions Open Parties interested in driving bus for the Crescent School District may request an application from Crescent School, Joyce, WA, online crescentschooldistrict .org in person, by phone 928-3311. Willing to train the qualified applicants. Random federal DOT drug and alcohol testing mandatory. Applications are due in the Crescent School office no later than January 21, 2011. Position open until filled.

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

www.peninsula dailynews.com

Patient Accounts Manager

31

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Accept the inevitable and get on with your life. Nothing stays the same forever, so reinvent who you are or what you are going to do. You have plenty of talent and should be relying on what you have to offer. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Avoid anyone trying to limit you. You should be looking at positive changes for your home, lifestyle or relationships. Keep things simple and you will find a path that saves you financially, emotionally and mentally. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Don’t donate to a cause you know little about. Getting involved in secrets or someone else’s business will leave you in a vulnerable position. Love is in the stars and romance should be high on your list. 5 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your input to any organization or cause you believe in will be appreciated and will enhance your reputation. Don’t let someone you love take advantage of you or make you feel guilty about what you do for others. 2 stars

Help Wanted

KABOOM SALON Stylist for booth rent. 360-683-2111 RECREATIONAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT If you are a person who likes people, has good documentation skills for daily participation, always being on the go and still able to be organized , we would like to meet you!! Recreational Assistant opening! Join our team! Bring your smile and energy and come up to Crestwood , fill out an application and ask for Lee! Crestwood Convalescent Center 1116 E. Lauridsen Port Angeles, WA 98362

We are an Equal Employment Opportunity Workplace, Encouraging Workforce Diversity

31

Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. PIANIST/ORGANIST Experienced, for 11 a.m. traditional service: rehearsals, worship, special services. Works with music director, Chancel Choir. Good communication skills. Resume, references to: Organist/Pianist Search, Trinity United Methodist Church, Box 3697, Sequim 98382 by Jan. 21. EOE RECEPTIONIST Full/part-time, energetic, experience helpful. 582-2821. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 Seeking Pharmacy A Technician. Full Time Pharmacy A Technician job opening at Walmart in Sequim. Must be available nights and weekends. Please bring resume to Sequim Walmart Pharmacy.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

31

Help Wanted

Library Job P.A. Circ Supervisor. www.nols.org

33

Employment Information

AmSan Brand CDL Driver. AMSAN PORT ANGELES FT Delivery Driver Americas Leading Supplier of Janitorial Supplies & Equipment Requires: CDL Class B, Hazmat & Air Brake endorsement. Must be able to overnight on some routes, climb stairs, lift 50 lbs to shoulders. Competitive wage, major medical, vacation, sick, holidays, 401k, service awards, tuition assistance & more. Fax or email resume: 360-457 7566 or ihall@interlinebrands.com EOE M/F/D/V Drug Free Workplace

34

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

71

Work Wanted

Caregiver/Companion Work Wanted Sunshine and energy to share, meal prep, light cleaning, transportation, dependable local references. 808-2303 For hire mature Christian man, in Sequim/ P.A. area. $65 per day, 6 hours. 360-683-9499 HOUSECLEANING Organizing. Reliable. Call Lisa 683-4745. Yardwork & Odd Jobs. Experienced & dependable, hedge trim, prune, weedeat, mow, gutter cleaning, painting, yard cleanup, hauling debris, tree removal & more. 2 men at $35 per hr. 461-7772. Many references.

35

Schools/ Instruction

Primary Flight Instructors Wanted. Immediate Students. 360-385-7770

Appliances

REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, new top freezer, 23 cf. $400. 681-0571

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

41

Business Opportunities

Dog Grooming/Retail Business For Sale. Great location and attractive shop. Turn-key with customer base. Presently a dog grooming shop with small retail section. Room for 23 groomers. Great opportunity as sole proprietor or with partner(s). $7,000. 360-775-0401 LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

GAS FIREPLACE Regency-Hampton, 18K BTU, like brand new, cost $1,400+. First $650 buys. 457-1860 msg.

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

72

Furniture

5 piece oak entertainment center, with TV, lots of storage for CDs and VCR tapes and recorder units. $300. 360-417-8054 BRASS BEDSTEAD Queen, solid brass, not sleaved or plated, 52” high head, 37” high foot. $950. Cost $1,800 and unavailable. 457-3903

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

72

E7

Furniture

Bunkbed Set. Like new. White metal bunkbed set complete with mattresses, mattress pads, and wild flannel sheets. $120. 683-5239 COFFEE TABLE Beautiful solid oak coffee table, honey oak stain, brand new, $300. Call Diane at 360-683-3040 COFFEE TABLES: 2 blonde finish coffee tables, 1 large, $40 and 1 small $30, very good condition. 681-4429

Dining Room Set. Solid Oak, dark cherry stain. 6 chairs (all solid oak), with leaf can easily seat 8. Mission style, chairs are upholstered. $500 ($2,000 new). Very good condition. 360-460-0131

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FENCING

TRACTOR

HOMELAWN/YARD SERVICES CARE RESTORATION

PAINTING

CONSTRUCTION

HANDYMAN

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

AIR DUCT CLEANING

LAWN CARE

HOME REPAIR

REPAIR/REMODEL

ASBESTOS

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

WINDOW/CARPET CLEANING

APPLIANCES

ROOFING

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

DIRT WORK

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges Full 6 Month Warranty

72289323

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

MOLE/PRUNING

TREE SERVICE

UPHOLSTERY

TREE SERVICE

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

115109171

SERVICE DIRECTORY


E8

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

72

Furniture

CORNER LOVESEAT Beige, dark brown trim, down pillows, matching chair, $250. 582-0605.

Dining room table and 4 matching chairs from Pier One Imports. Table is in excellent condition. Two of the chairs need very minor work on the legs. $250/obo. Call Jennifer at 4524319 or e-mail jennven@hotmail.com DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $140. 681-4429 Mattress/Box Spring Mismatched, queen size, pillow top, great shape. $300/obo. 360-681-3299 MISC: Lg. L shaped desk with cabinets, cherry colored, $350. Futon, like new, $130. Oak entertainment center, glass doors, $95. 582-9363 MISC: Side table with drawer, $25. Recliner chair, $50. Overstuffed rocker and sofa, $50 ea. Lg. coffee table, $25. 452-3767 SOFA/LOVE SEAT Matching. $350-$400. 683-3641 SOFA: 7.5’, ultra suede navy, comfort, excellent condition. $300. 681-6890.

73

General Merchandise

CASE: HP Mini Case and portable mouse with 4 GB flash drive. $25. Open but never used. 452-6439 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 Chainsaw carvings available, $50/obo. 452-7461 FIREWOOD: Fir, $150 cord delivered (P.A. or Sequim). Call 360-452-7982 or 360-460-2407 FIREWOOD: Maple $229 for true cord. 360-582-7910 www.portangeles firewood.com GEM STONES: Faceted amethyst, $8$12 per carat, many stones. Custom cut opals, $50-$200 per carat, many stones. Rubies from $50 a carat. Sapphires from $75 per carat. 670-3110 MISC: 1,200 watt generator, $100. Small upright freezer, $75. 360-797-0023. MISC: 2 plush swivel rocker, $150. Massage heat recliner, $75. Chicken rotisserie cooker, $50. 457-2784 MISC: Concrete saw, 14-16” blade, with 4 blades, $900. DeWalt slide miter saw, 12”, $400. 452-4820. MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,500. Queen size brass bed, with mattress and accessories, $600. 681-0131. MISC: Treadmill, $75. New organ, $50. 2 futons, $75 ea. 36” TV, $75. Dishes, set for 8+, $40. 582-9802 MISC: Whirlpool side by side refrigerator/ freezer, with ice and water, $400. Full size pool table, new balls and sticks, $100. Elevation table, $50. White china hutch, $75. 360-316-9213. Need Firewood? Yelviks General Store is now selling firewood at $100/cord pick up. Delivery available upon request at additional cost. Contact Rik at (360) 774-2056 or (360) 796-4720. Pick up at 251 Hjelvicks Rd., Brinnon, WA 98320

73

General Merchandise

SEASONED FIREWOOD $170 cord. 360-670-1163 TICKETS: (2) Eric Clapton w/Los Lobos, Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m., Key Arena. Good seats, 50 yard line, second level. $95 ea. 683-8278. TOOLS: Air compressor, brand new Speedaire, 3 phase, 60 gal. tank, $800. Arc welder, 225 amp Lincoln, 220 volt. $125. Winco 3 KW, generator, 1,800 rpm, well built. $350/obo. 417-5583. UTILITY TRAILER ‘07 33’, tandem axel g.n., deck length 25’, 14K lbs GVWR, 5’ spring loaded pop up, dove tail with 5’ ramps. $4,500. 452-5457, 808-3899 WELDER: Wire feed, Millermatic 175, 2.30 volt with extras. $475 457-9207

74

Home Electronics

TV: 55” Toshiba projected TV, excellent picture, sound, condition, $200. 681-6890 TV: 60” projection TV. $400. 457-3645.

76

Sporting Goods

Hunt private land in Wyoming. From $1,250. 808-3370. KAYAK: Old Town Dirigo 10.5‘x2.5’ wide, sky blue. $575. 683-2914 KELTEL PF-9 Parkerized/gry grip, 9mm w/4 mags and extensions. $500. 417-0460 MISC: IMR SR 4759 5 lb. caddy, $75. T/C Encore hunter pkg., 2 barrel set, 7-08, 308 with more, $900. 360-531-2153 MISC: Shot gun, 12 ga, right handed over and under, 30” barrel, DeHaan U1, mint condition, $630. Marlin lever action 30-30, with Bushnell scope, leather strap, mint condition, $360. 461-7015 SHOTGUN: BRNO. 12 gauge, SxS, side lock, $550. 681-0814 TREADMILL: Cadence model 1005, almost like new. $200. 683-2082.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

MOVING Sale: Everything must go. Sat only 10-4. 205 Blue Jay Place (off Deer Park Road). Model train collection, tools, household items, furniture and lots more. Indoor and outdoor, rain or shine. No early birds.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., Sun., 9-5 p.m. 731 Madrona Way, off Diamond Point, Sunshine Acres area. Everything from clothes, furniture, appliances and more!

79

Wanted To Buy

ANTIQUES WANTED Old postcards and bottles. 460-2791. BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Best Olympic or Glasply 17-19’ boat. Up to $5,500. 681-6038. WANTED: Older fridge (pre-1995), gd cond. 452-7737. WANTED: Salmon/ bass plugs and lures. P.A. Derby memorabilia. 683-4791.

81

Food Produce

GRASS/HAY: $3.50 per bale. 928-3539. TREES ARE IN Fruit and ornamental, and blueberry bushes and cypress. G&G Farms, off Taylor Cutoff Rd., Sequim. 683-8809

82

Pets

AKC GOLDEN PUPS Pedigree of Int champion (sire). 12 lbs at 8 weeks, paper trained, loving companions, ready now. 1st shots and wormed. $550. 681-3390 or 775-4582 evenings. BIRDS: (2) male cockatiels, $100 both. (1) green cheeked conure, 5 yrs old, hand trained, $150. 360-565-0105 CHOCOLATE LABS Purebred, 3 females left. $200/obo. 683-4756 DOG: White German Shepherd, 3 years old, neutered male, smart, good looking dog with toys. $250. 683-7397 MISC: AKC Pembroke Welsh Corgi, 1 yr old neut. male, $450. Charlie the pet wethered goat, free to good home. 681-2486 Old English Sheepdog. 2 males purebred non papered, first vet check, shots and worming, very smart, playful, adorable fluff balls. Both parents on site. 360-775-4182 PUPPIES: Registered Hunt Terriers, rough coated, super cute, 1 male, 1 female, 5 mo. old. $300 ea. 582-9006 PUPPY: Looks like a doberman-terrier, schipperke mix, male 9 weeks, dewormed, first and second shots, paper-trained. $200. 417-3741. Purebred Miniature poodle pup male, natural tail, excellent disposition, cafe au lait. 8 weeks on 12/27 crate trained and has his shots. $350. Please call 360-461-4576. TOY POODLES: AKC, 8 wks, 1st shot, wormed, black male, red male, cream apricot female. 1 year white neutered male. $450/limited-$600. 452-2579 VIZSLA WANTED Older M/F, housebroken. 457-3903.

83

Farm Animals

21 yr old gelding. Experienced trail horse. Healthy, loves to ride. $900. 360-461-2737

84

Horses/ Tack

FREE: To good home, beautiful Arabian horse, 20 yrs. old, needs companion and lots of love, green broke. 360-457-6584

85

Farm Equipment

GARDEN TRACTOR Cub cadet 129 hydro. Runs well, needs paint. No implements. $350/obo. 417-5583 TRACTOR: ‘06 BX24 17 hp 4WD bucket, backhoe, 38” brush hog, 400 hrs. $13,900. 683-3276.

WANTED: Silver marked sterling, silver coins. 452-8092 WANTED: Woodstove under $300. Please call 457-5209.

POOL TABLE Brunswick, full size, with all accessories. Must move before January 27. $1,500. 452-4048 Skutt 18 inch ceramic kilns. Two Skutt brand ceramic kilns, older one model 181, newer one model LT-3K. Perfect for firing ceramic doll molds or pottery. LT-3K is like new, 181 is gently used. Preestate sale by doll maker. Asking $325 for newer kiln, $275 for older. 457-8234.

Classified

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

Barn-stored, local grass hay. $4/Bale. 683-3518, 460-7020

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

93

Marine

BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $14,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles.

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

101

Legals Clallam Co.

93

Marine

GLASPLY: ‘86 16’ Moocher. W/motors, exc. cond. $3,000. 360-461-0157 LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761.

94

Motorcycles

APOLLO: ‘07 Orion 110. Exc. cond., some riding gear. $1,000. 683-8558. HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $8500/OBO. 360-797-1254

HONDA: ‘03 150 CRF. Lots of BBR, bored to 175. $1,500. 928-9423 or 670-5282. HONDA: ‘09 CRF 250R barely used exc. cond. $5,000/ obo. Must sell! 360-477-3186

94

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023.

peninsula dailynews.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

94

Motorcycles

YAMAHA 2006 350 BRUIN 4x4, auto, reverse, local trade! Use your tax refund now! Ask how! VIN#029697 Expires 1/19/11 $3,750 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973. QUAD: ‘04 Kawasaki 700 KFX. Hardly ridden. $3,500/obo. 461-2056 QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210

YAMAHA: ‘05 660 Raptor. Comes with paddle tires mounted on extra wheels. New chain and sprockets, New graphics and seat cover, new batt, new clutch, pro circuit T4 muffler. $2,400. Contact Justin 461 6282.

95

Recreational Vehicles

95

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘73 13’ Caveman. Fits in 8’ bed. Ready to go. Great! Call for info. $600/obo. 477-6098.

RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177 SUZUKI 2005 RM250 2 stroke, 5 speed, local trade! Home of the buy here! Pay here! 7 dirt bikes in stock! 8 quads in stock! VIN#100566. Expires 1/19/11 $2,650 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

V-STAR: ‘08 1300 Tourer. Silver/gray with 8,000 miles, 48 mpg, nice clean bike. Asking $6,250. Call Mike, 360-683-7445 eves.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7023.79482 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Frederick P. Plucinski, who also appears of record as Frederick P. Plucinski, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009-1239638 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-01-560140 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 14, Seamount Estates III Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On February 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 14 of Seamount Estates III, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, Page 33, records of Clallam County, Washington. More accurately described as: Lot 14 of Seamount Estates III, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, Page 33, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 2037 West 8th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/25/09, recorded on 07/06/09, under Auditor's File No. 2009-1239638, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Frederick P. Plucinski and Dorine E. Plucinski, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 11/13/2010 Monthly Payments $5,126.84 Late Charges $144.21 Lender's Fees & Costs $15.00 Total Arrearage $5,286.05 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $692.68 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,403.30 Total Amount Due: $6,689.35 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $184,049.46, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 07/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Frederick P. Plucinski 2037 West 8th Street Port Angele, WA 98363 Frederick P. Plucinski 13378 Dolly Varden Lane Northwest Bremerton, WA 98312 Dorine E. Plucinsk 2037 West 8th Street Port Angele, WA 98363 Dorine E. Plucinsk 13378 Dolly Varden Lane Northwest Bremerton, WA 98312 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/08/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/09/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/13/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.79482) 1002.173539-FEI Pub: Jan. 16, Feb. 6, 2011

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 26’ Alpenlite DL. With hitch, loaded. $4,000. 452-3402.

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426. TRAILER: ‘06 23’ Salem. Exc. shape, illness forces sale. $10,000. 452-9857.

96

MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071

RIMS/TIRES: American Racing rims, P195 65 R15, fit Honda Civic. $500. 360-417-0539

MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $13,000. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itasca Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, serviced, ready to roll. $18,500. 452-2148 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TENT TRAILER: ‘83. $500. 461-6000.

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Snowbird. 1 slide, like new condition. $10,000. 452-2929.

TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177.

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Legals Clallam Co.

95

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895

QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Legals Clallam Co.

Parts/ Accessories

CANOPY: Fiberglass Snug Top, off ‘05 Chev pickup, sandstone color, excellent short box. $650. 360-379-5406

STUDDED TIRES: (4) 195/70 R14. $120. 452-8098, 670-9199 TIRES: (4) Studded. 235-85R16. Mounted on alum rims, fits ‘78 Ford 3/4 ton 4x4. $150. 417-5510.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘85 S10 Tahoe King Cab 4x4. Auto, P.S., TB, A/C, tilt, AM/FM. New shocks, battery, tires, 2.8 engine. Great first vehicle, dependable, clean. $3,100. 360-452-7439

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7777.29006 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for New Century Alternative Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-ALT1 Grantee: Dwight M. Hostvedt and Lisa Hostvedt, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1179443 Original NTS Auditor File No. 2009-1234381 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033029-501150-0000 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 115, 12/32 Amended Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On February 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 115 of Emerald Highlands, as Recorded in Volume 12 of Plats, Page 32, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 110 Sapphire Place Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/26/06 and recorded on 04/28/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1179443, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Dwight M. Hostvedt and Lisa Hostvedt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Lender and Lender's successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., "MERS" to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for New Century Alternative Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-ALT1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2009-1231935. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 01/03/2011 Monthly Payments $73,623.48 Late Charges $3,549.69 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,617.86 Total Arrearage $80,791.03 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $250.00 Title Report $1,060.15 Sale Costs $800.00 Total Costs $2,110.15 Total Amount Due: $82,901.18 Other known defaults are as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $404,662.43, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Dwight M. Hostvedt 110 Sapphire Place Sequim, WA 98382 Lisa Hostvedt aka Lisa Scattaregia 110 Sapphire Place Sequim, WA 98382 Dwight M. Hostvedt 303 Sunny View Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Lisa Hostvedt aka Lisa Scattaregia 303 Sunny View Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Dwight M. Hostvedt 305 Sunny View Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Lisa Hostvedt aka Lisa Scattaregia 305 Sunny View Drive Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/21/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/21/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor, and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor, of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com EFFECTIVE: 01/03/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7777.29006) 1002.108671-FEI Pub: Jan. 16, Feb. 6, 2011

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEVROLET ‘99 SILVERADO 2500 Pickup extended cab short bed LS 4x4, 6.0 liter Vortec V8, auto, aftermarket alloy wheels, running boards, matching canopy, tow package, trailer brake controller, keyless entry, privacy glass, power windows, locks, and mirrors, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Only 75,000 miles! This truck is in immaculate condition inside and out! Looks like nothing has every been in the bed! Clean Carfax! Stop by Gray Motors today and save some bucks on your next truck! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 56K. $28,000. 971-226-0002 FORD: ‘87 Super Cab manual, 4x4 and Eaton rear end. $1,000. Call after 11 a.m. 457-1457. GMC ‘00 JIMMY SLE 4X4 4.3 liter Vortec V6, automatic, alloy wheels, tow package, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air, cassette stereo, compass/ temperature display, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $6,845! Local 1 owner! Clean Carfax! Sparkling clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com.

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 JEEP ‘07 LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 3.9 liter V6, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows locks, and seat, keyless entry, luggage rack, privacy glass, 57,000 miles, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, detailed service history, spotless Carfax report. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com NISSAN ‘06 TITAN SE CREW CAB 4X4 OFF ROAD 5.6 liter V8, auto, alloy wheels, good rubber, rear locking differential, matching canopy, spray-in bedliner, running boards, tow package, trailer brake controller, power rear slider, keyless entry, privacy glass, power windows, locks, mirrors, pedals and drivers seat, 6 CD changer, cruise, tilt, air, compass/temperature display, backup sensor, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $24,580! Clean Carfax! Immaculate inside and out! None nicer! Stop by Gray Motors today and save big bucks on your next truck! $22,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7025.20314 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Guild Mortgage Company Grantee: Stephen G. Pothier Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 545328 Tax Parcel ID No.: 902253015 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn SW 229-2W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On February 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: That portion of the following described property lying South of West Uncas Road; Together with that portion lying North of West Uncas Road from the Centerline of Snow Creek West: Beginning at the Southwest corner of Section 25, Township 29 North, Range 2 West, W.M.; Thence running North on the Section line between Sections 25 and 26, in said Township and Range, 375 feet; Thence East at right angles 1,170 feet, more or less, to the Olympic Highway; Thence Southerly along the Olympic Highway to the South boundary of said Section 25; Thence West along the said South boundary of said Section to the Place of Beginning; Except that portion conveyed to Jefferson County for road purposes under Auditor's file No. 172480. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1865 West Uncas Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/16/09, recorded on 07/28/09, under Auditor's File No. 545328, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Stephen G. Pothier, a single person, as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title Company of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for Guild Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Guild Mortgage Company, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 555009. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 11/12/2010 Monthly Payments $32,350.08 Late Charges $1,186.13 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $33,536.21 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $992.94 Statutory Mailings $81.26 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,834.20 Total Amount Due: $35,370.41 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $362,492.28, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS The Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 1865 West Uncas Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 The Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased P.O. Box 337 Kingston, NJ 08528-0337 The Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 2020 Pennsylvania Northwest #218 Washington, DC 20006 The Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased P.O. Box 466 Port Townsend, WA 98368 The Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased c/o Kenneth M. Kilbreath, Attorney 777 - 108th Avenue Northeast, Ste. 1900 Bellevue, WA 98009-9016 The Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased c/o Kenneth M. Kilbreath, Attorney P.O. Box 90016 Bellevue, WA 98009-9016 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 1865 West Uncas Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased P.O. Box 337 Kingston, NJ 08528-0337 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 2020 Pennsylvania Northwest #218 Washington, DC 20006 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased P.O. Box 466 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Domonic Z Harper, Personal Rep. Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 1865 West Uncas Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Kara Pothier, Personal Rep. Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 8 Shaw Drive Kingston, NJ 08528 Kara Pothier, Personal Rep. c/o Kenneth M. Kilbreath, Attorney 777 - 108th Avenue Northeast, Ste. 1900 Bellevue, WA 98009-9016 Kara Pothier, Personal Rep. c/o Kenneth M. Kilbreath, Attorney P.O. Box 90016 Bellevue, WA 98009-9016 Kara Pothier, Personal Rep. Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 1865 West Uncas Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 William D. Pothier,Co-Personal Rep. Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 1865 West Uncas Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 William D. Pothier,CoPersonal Rep. Estate of Stephen G. Pothier, deceased 6 Bay Road, #26 Newmarket, NH 03857 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/11/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/12/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7025.20314) 1002.173624-FEI Pub: Jan. 16, Feb. 6, 2011

97

4 Wheel Drive

GMC: ‘97 pickup 4WD Runs good, 140K mi. $3,500. 683-4401. GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460 JEEP: ‘00 Wrangler. auto, blk/blk, alloys. $8,495. 683-7420.

98

Pickups/Vans

ALCAN CARGO TRAILER: $4,200, like new, purchased new in July. 7x7x14, slight v nose, tandem axel, 7000 lbs. gvw! side door, roof vent, spare tire and mount, tie downs, electric brakes, like new. Will deliver almost anywhere within 2 hours of Sequim. Call Kevin 907-230-4298. CHEV: ‘07 Silverado. 1/2 ton, tow pkg., power, 70K, canopy, running boards, clean, well under book at $17,500. 681-0103 CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210. CHEV: ‘91 S-10. Runs $800 461-6246

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Pickups/Vans

DODGE ‘06 GRAND CARAVAN SXT MINIVAN 3.8 liter V6, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, traction control, privacy glass, keyless entry, dual power slider, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, captains seats, stow-n-go seat system, cruise, tilt, air, rear air, CD/cassette stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $13,450! Sparkling clean inside and out! This is one nice van for the whole family! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE ‘10 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, dual air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, power sliding door, keyless entry, power adjustable pedals, overhead console, 7 passenger with stow-n-go seating, privacy glass luggage rack, fog lamps, alloy wheels, 26,000 miles, balance of factory warranty, non-smoker. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘95 F350. Service body, 145K mi., 5.8L V8, auto. $3,750. 461-1835. FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157 NISSAN: ‘86 Ex. cab. 4 cyl., 5 sp, nice. $1,200. 681-7632. TOYOTA: ‘89 Pickup. $2,500. 460-6172 TOYOTA: ‘98 Tacoma. 2WD, 5 speed, 124,500 miles, AM/ FM/CD, great tires, new brakes, 21 MPG, bed liner & canopy, GOOD condition. $5,050. 452-6965

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Cars

FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $5,900. 457-0655. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘94 F150. Clean, 6 cyl., stick. $1,500/obo. 681-4134

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876

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ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619.

FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133.

BMW: ‘94 530i. 3L, V8 5 spd. $2,950. 425-753-1666

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BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,200/ obo. 206-272-0220.

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7763.27826 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Brad Burlingame and Kay Burlingame, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20041131271 Tax Parcel ID No.: 083020410100 Abbreviated Legal: PTN. GL 2, 20-30-8W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On February 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: That part of Government Lot 2 in Section 20, Township 30 North, Range 8 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at a point on the South line of said Lot 2 that is South 89 degrees 08' 25" East (Washington Coordinate System) 814.29 feet from a T-Iron stake marking the Southwest corner of said Lot 2; Thence continuing on said South line South 89 degrees 08' 25" East 14.81 feet; Thence North 64 degrees 54' East 146.30 feet to a 5/8 diameter steel bar in concrete; Thence continuing North 64 degrees 54' East 62.40 feet to a similar bar; Thence continuing North 64 degrees 54' East to shoreline of Lake Sutherland; Thence Northwesterly along the shoreline approximately 120 feet to the point thereon that lies North 37 degrees 49' 20" East from the Point of Beginning; Thence South 37 degrees 49' 20" East about 254 feet to the Point of Beginning, passing through similar steel bars at points 195.27 feet and 217.93 feet from said Point of Beginning. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 345 Heron Cove Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/06/04, recorded on 04/12/04, under Auditor's File No. 2004-1131271, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Brad Burlingame and Kay Burlingame, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title, a Washington corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington corporation, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 11/11/2010 Monthly Payments $17,269.80 Late Charges $518.13 Lender's Fees & Costs $178.70 Total Arrearage $17,966.63 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $692.68 Statutory Mailings $58.24 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,442.42 Total Amount Due: $19,409.05 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $182,923.32, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Brad Burlingame 345 Heron Cove Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Kay Burlingame 345 Heron Cove Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Brad Burlingame PO Box 351 Quilcene, WA 98376 Kay Burlingame PO Box 351 Quilcene, WA 98376 Brad Burlingame 1612 Lindsay Hill Road Quilicene, WA 98376 Kay Burlingame 1612 Lindsay Hill Road Quilicene, WA 98376 Brad Burlingame 8760 Highway 303 Northeast (S) Bremerton, WA 98311 Kay Burlingame 8760 Highway 303 Northeast (S) Bremerton, WA 98311 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/22/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/22/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/11/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27826) 1002.171054-FEI Pub: Jan. 16, Feb. 6, 2011

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 2011

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File No.: 7023.78563 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Shane M. Goin and Shirley K. Goin, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-08-581868 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 13, BK 18, Pennsylvania Park Add Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 13 Block 18, Pennsylvania Park Addition to Port Angeles, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 66, Records of Clallam County. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1029 Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/09/07, recorded on 11/15/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1212170, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Shane M Goin and Shirley K Goin, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/23/2010 Monthly Payments $21,615.84 Late Charges $864.62 Lender's Fees & Costs $15.00 Total Arrearage $22,495.46 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $543.75 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,305.94 Total Amount Due: $23,801.40 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $179,670.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Shane M Goin 1029 Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Shirley K Goin 1029 Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Shane M Goin 1029 West Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Shirley K Goin 1029 West Fountain Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/14/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/15/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.78563) 1002.170069-FEI Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 16, 2011

File No.: 7023.78593 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Loren Ellery and Nina Lee Ellery, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-03511-6 Abbreviated Legal: W5' L 4 & All L5, E 10' L6, Blk 351, TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The West 5 feet of Lot 4, all of Lot 5 and the East 10 feet of Lot 6, Block 351, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. More accurately described as follows: The West 5 feet of Lot 4, all of Lot 5 and the East 10 Feet of Lot 6, Block 351, of the Townsite of Port Angeles. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 820 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/27/03, recorded on 07/08/03, under Auditor's File No. 2003 1112097 and Rerecorded on: 7/18/2003 under Auditor's File No.: 2003 1112849, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Loren Ellery and Nina Lee Ellery, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Unitified Solutions Group, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Amerigroup Mortgage Corporation, a Division of Mortgage Investors Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1257239. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/23/2010 Monthly Payments $4,411.08 Late Charges $122.64 Lender's Fees & Costs $60.00 Total Arrearage $4,593.72 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $455.28 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,165.90 Total Amount Due: $5,759.62 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $84,195.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Loren Ellery 820 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Loren Ellery 1525 Appaloosa Court Carson City, NV 89701 Nina Lee Ellery 820 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Nina Lee Ellery 1525 Appaloosa Court Carson City, NV 89701 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/16/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/16/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.78593) 1002.170343-FEI Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 16, 2011


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Cars

Buick: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 LeSabre. Under 75,000 orig. miles. Sacrifice at $3,850, check Kelley Blue Book! 4-wheel disc brakes, adjustable steering wheel, air conditioning, anti-lock brakes, automatic headlights, premium sound with CD and cassette, cloth upholstery, cruise control, intermittent wipers, keyless entry, power locks, remote trunk release, split/folding seats, steel wheels, tinted windows. Call 360-582-0300 BUICK: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327 CADILLAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $5,000. 775-1821 CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2122;66 Impala. 4 door HT, PS, PB, AT, AC, new paint, brakes. $2,500/obo. 417-1896 CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440

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Cars

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Cars

CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915

CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 Monte Carlo. 84K mi. $2,000. 461-6758.

CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427

FORD: 1929 Model â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;?. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

CHRYSLER â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 PACIFICA ALL WD 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks and seats, keyless entry, alloy wheels, privacy glass, 39,000 miles, very very clean, 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Explorer Sport. 2WD, 5 sp, 126K, good cond. $3,000. 928-9430.

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053 FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542.

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619.

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770

HONDA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 ACCORD 2 door, red, 5 speed, 4 cylinder, good gas mileage, cute! $ sale! Lowest buy here pay here rates guaranteed. Military discounts! Offer expires 3-1-11. $6,495. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788

FORD 2000 FOCUS ZX3 5 speed, 4 cylinder, tinted windows, alloys. Income tax special! Buy now! Pay later! All vehicles 72 point safety checked & serviced. VIN#252024 Expires 1/19/11 $3,950 Randyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auto Sales 457-7272

HONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;85 Civic Station Wagon. Needs work. $500/ obo. 360-477-0702.

CA$H

FOR YOUR CAR REID & JOHNSON

095098073

If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

WWWREIDANDJOHNSONCOMsMJ OLYPENCOM

LINCOLN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90 Towncar. Nearly $4,000 spent on car in last 2 years. $1,700. Bill at 360-582-3727 MERCURY â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 SABLE PREMIER ALL WD 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD changer, keyless entry, power windows, locks, seats and moonroof, back up sensor, full leather, heated seats, fog lamps, alloy wheels, 32,000 miles, very very clean, 1 owner factory lease return, nonsmoker, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/60 warranty, spotless Carfax report. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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Cars

MAZDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 Miata GT. Black/tan, 6 sp, 8,800 mi., like new. $18,900. 452-5387. MAZDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;94 Miata. Red/black, 5 sp, 99K, runs good. $4,500. 437-0428. MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,000/ obo. 360-460-0385. MERCURY: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062.

NISSAN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 Sentra. 103,648 miles. $3,500. 457-3636. OLDS: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183.

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Cars

PORSCHE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965.

SUBARU: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959 SUBARU: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;95 Impreza XL. 4WD, 2 dr coupe. $2,800. 452-6014. VW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;71 Camper. Good cond. $2,500. 360-820-0339 WANTED: Veteran and wife, both disabled, seeking donation of car, truck, van, fixer ok. God Bless. 683-1250.

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Legals Clallam Co.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS/QUALIFICATIONS

Clallam County is soliciting proposals from interested parties to conduct regional forums for the Board of Clallam County Commissioners. Duties include holding at least four forums to identify procedural, technical, and institutional obstacles to achieving no net loss through Shoreline Master Programs; and conducting other activities necessary to identify solutions and strategies for overcoming obstacles to achieving no net loss of ecological functions through Shoreline Master Program update and implementation in Clallam County and elsewhere in Puget Sound. Proposals will be received at 223 East 4th Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until 10 a.m., Tuesday, February 1, at which time they will be opened publicly and respondents identified. Sealed proposals must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clallam County Enhanced Shoreline Protectionâ&#x20AC;? An informational packet on preparing a proposal may be obtained Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., from Cathy Lear, 360.417.2361, clear@co.clallam.wa.us or on the Clallam County web site at http://www.clallam.net/realestate/html/shoreline_management.htm. Submittals made in an incorrect format will not be considered. Clallam County hereby notifies all that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined in Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 at 49 CFR Part 23 will be afforded full opportunity to submit proposals in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. PASSED THIS eleventh day of January 2011 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair

ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: January 16, 23, 2011

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STK#P3129 Kelley BB $18,405

$14,995

$16,995 STK#P3111 Kelley BB $21,905

$19,995

$19,995

2000 2009 2009 2004 2003 2003 2003 2003 2009 2008 2005 2009 2008 2007 2004 2003 2009 2009 2009 2008 2006 2005 2009 2005 2003

Chevrolet S10 Pickup 2WD....................................$7,995 Hyundai Accent.................................................$10,995 Kia Spectra.....................................................$10,995 Ford Ranger 4WD..............................................$10,995 Toyota Prius....................................................$10,995 Volkswagen New Beetle......................................$10,995 Volkswagen New Beetle......................................$10,995 Honda Accord Sedan..........................................$10,999 Toyota Yaris..................................................... $11,995 Kia Rondo.......................................................$11,995 Scion xB.........................................................$11,995 Chrysler PT Cruiser............................................$12,995 Nissan Versa...................................................$12,995 Nissan Versa...................................................$12,995 Toyota Camry...................................................$12,995 Honda Element 4WD..........................................$12,995 Chevrolet HHR..................................................$13,995 Ford Focus......................................................$13,995 Toyota Yaris..................................................... $13,995 Honda Civic Coupe............................................$13,995 Chrysler Town & Country.....................................$13,995 Nissan Quest...................................................$13,995 Ford Focus......................................................$14,955 Volkswagen New Beetle......................................$14,995 Ford F250 2WD................................................. $14,995

H5572B V5368C P2881 V5412A P3005A P3048 P3054 V5435A J7797A N6615A H5661A N6892A P3046B H5559A V5426G H5592A H5422A P3128A P3108 P3107 P3119 P3120 H5615A J7788B

2010 2008 2007 2007 2008 2009 2008 2006 2004 2008 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2009 2006 2006 2010 2009 2008 2008 2005

Toyota Corolla..................................................$15,995 Volkswagen Rabbit VW CERTIFIED..........................$15,995 Volkswagen Jetta Sedan VW CERTIFIED...................$15,995 Volkswagen New Beetle......................................$15,995 Ford Ranger 2WD..............................................$16,888 Dodge Grand Caravan.........................................$16,995 Nissan Altima..................................................$16,995 Volkswagen Passat Sedan....................................$16,995 Dodge Ram 1500 4WD........................................$16,995 Honda Civic Coupe.............................................$17,975 Kia Soul.........................................................$17,995 Nissan Altima..................................................$17,995 Honda Civic Sedan HONDA CERTIFIED.....................$17,995 Ford Mustang...................................................$17,995 Jeep Liberty 4WD..............................................$17,995 Subaru Baja.....................................................$17,995 Honda Civic Sedan HONDA CERTIFIED.....................$18,995 Ford Ranger 4WD..............................................$18,995 Volkswagen Passat Sedan....................................$18,995 Kia Sportage 4WD.............................................$19,995 Chrysler 300 Touring..........................................$19,995 Jeep Liberty 4WD..............................................$19,995 Mazda Miata MX 5.............................................$19,995 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4WD...................................$19,995

V5338A N6864A H5623B P3143A H5370B P3020A P3097 P3126A P3038 P3121A P2997A N6870C P3147 N6874A P3077 P3131 H5620B P3051 P3142A P3074 H5561A H5531A N6887A N6873A

2009 2006 2009 2008 2008 2008 2009 2008 2009 2007 2009 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2008 2007 2006 2009 2010 2008 2008 2008

Volkswagen New Beetle VW CERTIFIED....................$20,995 Nissan Murano AWD..........................................$20,995 Volkswagen Jetta Wagon VW CERTIFIED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,995 Honda Accord Sedan..........................................$21,995 Volkswagen GTI................................................$21,995 Nissan Quest...................................................$22,950 Hyundai Santa Fe..............................................$22,995 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 2WD..............................$22,995 Subaru Forester................................................$23,995 Nissan Titan 4WD..............................................$23,995 Honda Accord Coupe HONDA CERTIFIED...................$24,995 Ford F150 4WD................................................. $25,995 Jeep Wrangler 4WD...........................................$25,995 Nissan Titan 4WD..............................................$25,995 Audi A4......................................................... .$25,995 Honda Odyssey.................................................$25,995 Honda Ridgeline HONDA CERTIFIED........................$26,995 Nissan Armada 4WD..........................................$26,995 Chevrolet Tahoe 4WD.........................................$26,995 Honda CR-V 4WD..............................................$27,995 Honda CR-V 4WD..............................................$28,995 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 4WD..............................$28,995 Toyota Sienna..................................................$29,995 Toyota Tacoma 4WD...........................................$29,995

H5686A P3096A H5596A H5643A

2009 2008 2008 2011

Honda Odyssey HONDA CERTIFIED.........................$31,995 Nissan Titan 4WD..............................................$31,995 Nissan Armada 4WD..........................................$34,995 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4WD...................................$35,995

Legals Clallam Co.

CLALLAM COUNTY

Supplies may include: Asphalt and emulsions, automotive and truck equipment and parts, building materials, communication equipment and supplies, construction equipment and parts, custodial supplies, fuel, office equipment and supplies, rock and gravel, snow and ice removal equipment and supplies, traffic signs, waste handling equipment and parts, welding equipment and supplies. Pub: Jan. 16, 2011

Under $15,000 P3139A P3071 P3029B N6754H H5685A P3137A V5459B H5664A N6894A P3110 H5225C P3140 N6879A H5166B P2814B H5584A P3118 P3099 N6829B H5522A N6898A P3141A P3100 N6895A H5635A

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Pursuant to RCW 39.04, Clallam County is establishing a vendor list for purchases of equipment, materials, and supplies between $5,000 and $25,000. All interested vendors who wish to have their names placed on the list should submit an application to the county. Applications are available by calling 360.417.2233 or on our website www.clallam.net. Minority-owned and womanowned firms are invited to apply.

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

STK#P3039 Kelley BB $21,135

Legals Clallam Co.

SOLICITATION FOR VENDOR LIST

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING LIMITED

STK#P3117 Kelley BB $16,055

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Legals Jefferson Co.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

Jefferson County REVISED Request for Proposal Public Defender Services Jefferson County is seeking the services of professional public defense attorneys to provide legal representation to indigent defendants beginning March 1, 2011 for the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The deadline for submitting a proposal remains 4:30 p.m., Friday, January 28, 2011. Based on questions at a Pre-Bid Conference held on January 11, Jefferson County has made a number of clarifications and revisions to the Request For Proposals (RFP). Persons, firms or associations wishing to submit a proposal may download a Revised RFP packet from the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, www.co.jefferson.wa.us, or pick one up from the Jefferson County Administrator Office, 1820 Jefferson Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368, 360-385-9100. Pub: Jan. 16, 2011

Under $20,000

SMALL WORKS ROSTER Attention Contractors Washington State RCWs gives the Port of Port Townsend the authority to award contracts without calling for public bid if the estimated cost does not exceed $300,000. The law further instructs the Port of Port Townsend to maintain a Small Works Roster which shall be comprised of all contractors who have requested to be on this roster and who are properly licensed or registered to perform such work in the State of Washington.

Under $30,000

All applications must be submitted on the Port provided application form. For application forms, download from our website, www.portofpt.com or write to: Port of Port Townsend, PO Box 1180, Port Townsend, WA 98368 or call (360) 385-0656. Qualified applicants will be placed on the 2011 roster, which will expire on December 31, 2011.

Under $40,000

Larry C. Crockett, Executive Director Pub: Jan. 9, 16, 2011

Vehicles are one only and subject to prior sale. VINs posted at dealership. Sale price doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t include tax, license and documentation fees. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 1/22/11.

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PONTIAC 2004 GRAND AM SE V6, auto, AC, power pkg., alloys, 62K mi. Competitive finance rates, use your tax refund now! Ask for details. VIN#257219. Expires 1/19/11 $5,950 Randyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auto Sales 457-7272

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Cars

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 8237.20349 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Beneficial Financial 1 Inc., as successor by merger to Beneficial Washington, Inc. Grantee: Ken Black, who also appears of record as Kenneth E. Black, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1212760 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-031270 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On February 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 16 in Block 312 of the townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1617 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/21/07, recorded on 11/28/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1212760, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Ken Black, also appearing of record as Kenneth E. Black, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Beneficial Washington Inc., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 11/11/2010 Monthly Payments $13,992.30 Late Charges $1,243.76 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,085.60 Total Arrearage $18,321.66 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $14.34 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,432.41 Total Amount Due: $19,754.07 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $167,618.97, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/28/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 18, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/07/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Ken Black aka Kenneth E. Black 1617 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Kathleen Black 1617 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic of Ken Black aka Kenneth E. Black 1617 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/05/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/06/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/11/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8237.20349) 1002.173007-FEI Pub: Jan. 16, Feb. 6, 2011 File No.: 7713.21269 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank, N.A. Grantee: James S. Hall, a married man as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 0330314390600000 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 3, SP 19/82 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 3 of Finnerty Short Plat No. 1 recorded November 13, 1989 in Volume 19 of Short Plats, Page 82, under Clallam County Auditor's No. 624746, being a portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 10 Atwood Ridge Place Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/31/07, recorded on 11/05/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1211704, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James S. Hall, a married man as his sole and separate property, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to U.S. Bank, N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1256790. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/21/2010 Monthly Payments $18,624.12 Late Charges $823.44 Lender's Fees & Costs $241.00 Total Arrearage $19,688.56 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,502.19 Total Amount Due: $21,190.75 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $170,120.01, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James S. Hall 10 Atwood Ridge Place Sequim, WA 98382 James S. Hall P.O. Box 2903 Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James S. Hall 10 Atwood Ridge Place Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James S. Hall P.O. Box 2903 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/01/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/02/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7713.21269) 1002.168658-FEI Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 16, 2011


PENINSULA

Shelley Taylor actress and activist

Inside

Peninsula Daily News Sunday, January 16, 2011

Tr

■  Do nice guys really finish last?

e ee at at o Ne Br f ce av th ss it Se ies e Be e W e Pa & Tem ar L eek pt ge : a 3 ations tte

■  High school reunion fling leads to Facebook stalking

Fr

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

■  Generations: How close are we to equality?


2

Parents balk at tooth fairy’s exchange rate THIS MAY SEEM like a foolish question, but it is a real problem in our family. Our twins will soon turn 6 and are already questioning whether or not the Tooth Fairy will leave $5 Jodie Lynn for each tooth like their friends get. This seems much too extravagant to different country 60 years us. ago, the tooth fairy left a What is the tooth fairy’s small silver coin to buy a going rate? simple ice cream cone. With my children, I left Chimacum parent what was then the largest coin. Like any of these occaToday with my grandsions in a child’s life, it’s children, I created a plan more about the actual event than the monetary for a ceremony each time value. one of them loses a tooth When I was a child, in a by giving state quarters.

Parent to Parent

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Weddings, anniversaries Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned.

This is anticipated with great excitement; the older one has a complete set. I agree that $5 is too extravagant. Nevertheless, if you do leave this amount, there has to be some careful thought given to specific instructions on how the kid’s can utilize the money; otherwise, they will most likely blow it. I think the whole goal is to just make it fun and exciting for the child. — Ann Perrott in Chimacum

Missouri mom My husband and I have the perfect solution for the Tooth Fairy which is foreign currency. Our now-useless collection of lira and shekels delight our children. Since the advent of the euro, there is no exchange rate, and many of the foreign coins are quite fun to look at. Turn

to

Lynn/7

HIGH SCHOOL REUNIONS are dangerous. Facebook is dangerous. Put the two together and POW! Andrea had a crush on Dylan in high school, so when he asked her if she’d like to have a drink when she returned to her hometown for their high school reunion, she said yes. The drink led to a fling, which led to a long-distance relationship. “He lavished me with expensive gifts,” she said. “At first, they were fun. But as they continued, I was concerned. I knew he couldn’t afford them. He said he spent so much on me, he couldn’t take his children on vacation.” Dylan would call Andrea many times a day, which became a drag. She began to see that they weren’t just states apart, they were worlds apart. “We had vastly different goals and values, but things really started getting creepy when he would repeat back to me everything I had posted on Facebook during the day — every comment I’d made, every photo I’d liked,”

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hometown,” Andrea said. “The holidays were approaching, and I had to go home. “The state’s attorneys pleaded with me to obtain one. They thought Dylan was dangerous,” she said. “But I decided not to when Cheryl Lavin they told me the restraining order involved a court date and that he could Andrea said. “It was too much, and so appear if he wanted. “After six months of this I ended the relationship as craziness, I contacted a gently as I could, attempting to leave him with some domestic hot line, and they suggested I contact my dignity.” Dylan didn’t take it well. hometown police,” she said. “The police went to his He went to her brother’s house and told him that if home and confronted him. he continued his contact, He contacted several they’d arrest him. mutual Facebook friends “The phone calls and and told them something e-mails finally stopped. was wrong with her. He called her incessantly, often However, a year later I posted a comment on a while she was at work, friend’s page, and guess jeopardizing her job. When she didn’t answer who posted right after me?” his calls, he texted her, sent she said. “As innocent as his post e-mails and, worst of all, posted his woes on Facebook. may seem, and as paranoid “Under the advisement as it might make me look, of friends, I sent him a I’m absolutely sure his scathing e-mail pretty comment was meant for much stating that I me,” Andrea said. thought he was fat, ugly, “Now I don’t ‘friend’ lazy and deranged, and if many men on Facebook he continued his contact, I unless they’re gay. I don’t would contact the police,” engage in flings, and if I she said. never date again I’ll die a Andrea filed a police contented divorcee.” report. She wanted to be _______ prepared in case Dylan Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales showed up on her doorstep. from the Front at her home office in “I even considered getArizona, where she writes a blog at ting a restraining order www.talesfromthefront.com. which would be valid in my Her column appears weekly.

Tales from the Front

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Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

Reunion-sparked fling ends with stalking on Facebook

0C5106513

Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 16, 2011


Peninsula Woman

Generations Peninsula Daily News

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Sunday, January 16, 2011

Perspectives of three Peninsula women Photos

and interviews by

Dave Logan

This week’s question: How close are we to equality for women and men? “This is still an issue, even with Hillary Clinton being an advocate of equal pay for equal work, but it’s not really happening. I have seen that younger women get hired more often than older ones. Older women are treated with more un-politeness. Men in general, though, are treating women with more respect. Again, I’ve seen lots of single older women, like myself, not being treated equally in trying to get a job. That’s why I don’t have a job currently. That’s my ax to grind.”

“Not very. People like to think things are nearly equal, but they’re not. Men are still running the show, as in political and business areas. Women are still trying to catch up. It is getting closer, but it’s not equal yet. That’s just my personal opinion and observations.”

“From my experience, we are almost equal. Men, though, can get up higher on the success ladder than women can. I’ve also seen differences in pay in certain situations. I have been homeschooled, and men have treated me fairly. We’re treated a lot better than in the past. I have studied about suffragists recently in college, so I would say we have come a long way to today’s level of equality.”

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Sunday, January 16, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Scenery A change of

Former daytime actress takes up microphone in Sequim radio drama By Diane Urbani for

de la

Peninsula Woman

Paz

S

he’s coquettish but not coy, a show-businesswoman delighted to switch from daytime television to nighttime radio. Shelley Taylor, whose satin tones will be heard in tonight’s premiere of “Adrian Cross, For Hire: The Schooner Mystic Rose” on KSQM-FM 91.5 and www.ksqmfm.com, revamped her life six years ago. She left Hollywood behind and, contrary to her expectations, found a new kind of warmth among the people of the far north. These days she’s feeling quite settled in. And Taylor starts a conversation with a reporter in a way few actors will. “I’m 60,” she proclaims. Then Taylor unabashedly declares herself “a great proponent of plastic surgery,” who had a nose job at 12 and a pre-emptive face lift at 45. When she and her husband, Greg Taylor — whom she calls “Monsieur Greg” now that he dyes her hair fiery red — departed California, they were looking for a place to cocoon. Shelley Taylor plays Christine Hale, the 25-year-old love interest in the “Adrian Cr KSQM-FM and online outside the listener area at www.ksqmfm.com.

He’d worked as a carpenter and photographer for clients such as Playboy while she appeared on “General Hospital” and “Days of Our Lives” in the 1980s and hosted “Pure Soap” in the ’90s. But they’d had more than enough of Los Angeles life, and one day ducked into a Barnes & Noble and found a book about the Olympic Peninsula. The couple moved up, first to a rental in Discovery Bay, in April 2004. After attending a homebuilding and remodeling show at Sequim High School, they met a real

estate agent who showed them an irresistible piece of land west of Sequim. They broke ground in April 2005 on what’s to be a 3,100-square-foot home. The Taylors expected to get away from it all, to a house she considers a work of art. “My incredible husband has built 85 percent-plus of this home with his own hands; otherwise we couldn’t afford it,” she notes. But in the meantime, friends happened. “We didn’t think we were going to make any,” Taylor says.

She had, after all, grown up in Southern California’s metropolis, but people in and around Sequim befriended the pair.

Busy social life Their social life is more vigorous than it ever was in California, Taylor says; they count among their friends retired policemen, engineers, even fellow actors. About the time the couple relocated, a friend from Los Angeles also moved to Port Angeles. Judie Rich, who worked as a personal chef in Southern Califor-

nia, has known Taylor since they were 12, and later got into gourmet food while cooking for her friends. “There is never a dull moment” with Taylor, Rich says. The two have been through plenty together; Rich said Taylor has been a smart guide through life. Today, they enjoy “just simple things,” like sharing meals and taking long walks. Soon after moving to Washington state, Taylor began talking taxes with her neighbors and friends. Retirees told her how their property taxes were leaping skyward, even as their incomes

stayed fixed. In November 2005, Taylor organized a meeting, in which she, the leader of the new Property Owners for Predictable Tax Now, called for a 1-percent limit to property tax increases statewide.

Packed clubhouse The meeting packed the Pioneer Park clubhouse in Sequim; Taylor remembers it as similar to the climax of “Field of Dreams,” when incoming car headlights stretch as far as the eye can see. Taylor worked with thenRep. Jim Buck on House

Joint Resolution 4214, which would have amended the state constitution and impose the 1 percent cap. The bill didn’t survive the 2006 Legislature, and Property Owners for Predictable Tax Now later disbanded. Taylor, however, has continued to speak out against what she believes is an unjust property tax system. Earlier this month, she gave a talk in opposition to the Port Angeles School District levy to the Port Angeles Business Association, and she’s been a prolific writer of letters to the editor and guest point-of-view columns in the Peninsula Daily News. Her


Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Sunday, January 16, 2011

5

Anniversary

Patricia and Fritz Clemens on their wedding day.

Fritz and Patricia Clemens today.

The Clemenses Patricia and Fritz Clemens of Port Angeles are celebrating their 50th anniversary with a family trip to Maui, Hawaii, in January. Fritz Clemens married Patricia Schrock on Jan. 20, 1961, in Goshen, Ind.

Mr. Clemens, an engineer, retired from Process Controls in 1986. He now works part time as a boat operator for Arrow Launch. Mrs. Clemens, after raising four children, received her Bachelor of

Marriage Licenses Clallam County

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

ross, For Hire” radio drama premiering tonight on

latest PDN opinion piece tackles the school levy. School funding should come from the state and not from steady increases in property tax, Taylor believes. At the same time, Taylor says she’s for smaller government, fiscal responsibility and individual responsibility.

use of a city grant plus funding from the University of California at Los Angeles back when she mounted a neighborhood-cleanup effort in her hometown of West Los Angeles. The streets around her home were being trashed by fraternity parties, so she installed large garbage cans and established a website Don’t rely on government about how the neighborhood used to be. “If you’ve got a problem, That, however, was all go to your church. Go to your part of her past life. In Los family or to your friends,” she Angeles, and especially “in says, adding that to her the business” of television mind, the government’s cofand movies, looks have a lot fers shouldn’t be the first to do with everything. resort for solving problems. Taylor did, however, make Turn to Taylor/7

strom, 55; both of Port Angeles. James Samuel Jackson, Lucia Pablo Gomez, 33, 29, and Rebekah Joyce and Segundo Ramos Toliver, 23; both of Sequim. Calmo, 32; both of Forks. Kali Jenaye Wake, 21, Dondi Lea-Gail Huling, and Marvin Kyle McKen24, and William Jacob Cole, zie, 25; both of Sequim. 25; both of Forks. Jamie Michael Chartier Jonathan Daniel Roup, and Suchada Poomrin; both 28, and Melea Lael Arnold, 26, and both of Sequim. 33; both of Port Angeles. Brian Scott Burke, 43, Jennifer Lynn Watson, and Susan Marie Tiede26, and Samuel Lee White, mann, 39; both of Sequim. 38; both of Neah Bay. Laura Mae Johnson and Thomas Henry BraithJefferson County waite; both 41, and both of Forks. Adrian Sherman Miller, Aaron Andrew Hamil39, and Antoinette Marie ton, 32, and Sheryl Lynn Sellers, 37; both of Port Kreaman, 22; both of Port Hadlock. Angeles. Debra Lee Swisher, 53, Dawn Evelyn Young, 26, and John Paul Allison, 46; and Lance Allen Gillette, both of Port Townsend. 40; both of Forks. Jeremy Eugene Brown, Angela Jo Heller, 18, 32, and Kallada Cherdsuk, and Terrence Leeroy Lund- 36; both of Port Hadlock.

Science degree in nursing and still works part-time at Olympic Medical Center. They came to the Olympic Peninsula in 1980. The couple’s family includes daughter and sonin-law Rebecca and Alan

Keith of Seattle; son Fritz Clemens II of Port Angeles; sons and daughters-in-law Anton and April Clemens of San Diego and Andrew and Kate Clemens of Portland, Ore. They also have seven grandchildren.

Got an idea for a feature story? Peninsula Woman is always looking for suggestions. Please e-mail yours to . . . diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com

Peninsula Woman


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Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 16, 2011

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Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Lynn: Help?

7

Continued from 2 a unique token of your love and caring. It’s nice to make the Additionally, we pick event special, but don’t ones with holes or pretty worry about making it perimages to slip under the fect. Just have fun with pillow. your children. We even ask friends to pick a couple up while traveling. I love to hear my Can you help? son brag to his friends that Why are toothpaste he received 1000 lira for companies allowed to his first tooth. advertise for teeth-whiten— Amy Gholson ers if they really don’t in Creve Coeur, Mo. work? Tweens and teens are St. Louis parent highly susceptible to this type of marketing. How or At our house, the tooth whom can we approach fairy leaves a freshly ironed $1 bill for each tooth about misrepresentation of these items? that is under the pillow. Somehow, the crispness of _______ the bill has made it more Jodie Lynn shares parenting special. tips through her weekly column. — B. Roesch Write her at Parent to Parent, in St. Louis 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, WildDiane Urbani

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Shelley Taylor jokes with Olympic Peninsula Eagles football coach Mike McMahan moments after meeting him in the studios of KSQM-FM in Sequim.

Taylor: Radio drama appealing Continued from 5

Taylor is also the spokeswoman for the show, which will air from 8 to Taylor remembers car9:15 tonight on KSQM, rying a whole suitcase of Sequim’s noncommercial products she called “The radio station. Face” whenever she travShe promoted and eled. And during her run as attended a mingle-withLorena Sharp on the topthe-cast party last Saturrated “General Hospital,” day at Olympic Cellars she recalls the surreal experience of having people winery, and appears in a making-of “Adrian Cross” gasp, “There she is!” and video now showing on the rush toward her. Which is one of the rea- station’s website, www. sons why the “Adrian Cross” radio drama was so appealing.

ksqmfm.com. “Her energy has pushed us, propelled us toward this event,” said Tama Bankston, volunteer coordinator at KSQM. Despite all of her activities, Taylor says her fondest hope for 2011 is to curl up with her man, in the house to be finished this spring. “I want to live in my home,” she says. “This has

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