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Our 25 cents’ worth

Thursday Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers C12

Olympic National Park’s quarter revealed A10

Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

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December 2, 2010

Man slashes neck in chain saw mishap By Paige Dickerson

A hospital nurse said Wednesday night, in answer to a request for Larson’s room, BEAVER — A chain saw that Larson had been disbucked and slashed the neck of charged. its user, a Port Angeles man, as Larson was with his wife he was cutting wood on Wednes- cutting wood on Conley Road, day. about one mile east of Beaver, Two State Patrol troopers when the chain saw hit a rut in stemmed the flood of blood until the wood, bounced up and Nick Larson, 51, could be taken burred into his neck — missing the artery, said Trooper Todd to Forks Community hospital after the 3:30 p.m. accident near Bartolac, State Patrol spokesman. Beaver.

Peninsula Daily News

High court hears Indian Island case

Troopers Allen Nelson and Eric Tilton heard the dispatcher’s report of a chain saw accident while they were patrolling U.S. Highway 101 and rushed to Larson’s aid. “If it hadn’t missed his artery and they hadn’t been there, he probably wouldn’t have made it,” Bartolac said. The original report was that the chain saw had injured a man’s leg. “While en route to the scene,

they heard that he had a very serious injury to his neck,” Bartolac said. The troopers immediately began planning for the scene they would find — pulling out plastic gloves, a first aid kit and, just in case, an automated external defibrillator, Bartolac said. “They were directed into the woods where the man was with his wife,” said Bartolac, who did not know the wife’s name. “The man was still awake

and conscious, and there was a very serious cut to his neck,” with massive bleeding, Bartolac said. Nelson and Tilton performed first aid, controlling the bleeding as well as trying to keep Larson and his wife calm. As they worked to save Larson’s life, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Deputy Brian Peterson arrived with a trauma kit. Turn

to

Saw/A4

Best of both worlds

Information freedom ruling due next year By Mark Sherman

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday questioned the government’s broad use of an exemption in the federal Freedom of Information Act after a Seattle man was denied maps outlining the extent of damage expected in the event of a Naval Magazine Indian Island explosion. The justices heard argument in an appeal from Glen Milner, a Seattle man who is a member of the Poulsbo-based Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action. He sued under the Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA, for maps showing the extent of damage expected from an explosion at the Navy’s Pacific Fleet’s West Coast ammunition depot two miles from downtown Port Townsend. A decision in the case, Milner v. Department of the Navy, is expected before summer. The Obama administration is defending the decision to deny Milner the maps under a provision of FOIA that exempts from disclosure documents “related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency.” Chief Justice John Roberts said the administration was asking the court “to torture the language in FOIA” to keep the docu-

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

ments from being made public. Roberts also noted the public’s frustration with FOIA, even when the government is willing to turn over material. “It takes forever to get the documents,” he said.

Interpretation too broad Several other justices indicated that they also thought the government and several appeals courts that have dealt with FOIA lawsuits have interpreted the exception too broadly. “If the agency has a rule that says put explosive A in building 1 and put explosive B in building 2, that’s hard for me to explain that it’s just a personnel rule, other than, as Justice Scalia says, everything, all functions have to be undertaken by humans,” Justice Anthony Kennedy said. Turn

to

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Simon Lynge of Port Townsend plays open mic nights — such as this one at the Uptown Pub on Tuesday night — far away from the thousands in his audiences in Europe.

PT singer-songwriter embraces life away from Europe acclaim By Charlie Bermant

he will participate in a live radio broadcast scheduled for Monday. But he will return for a Dec. 10 appearance at PORT TOWNSEND ­­— Simon Lynge is wellthe Port Townsend High School auditorium, one known in Europe, having played his songs for that will benefit fourth- and fifth-grade programs 26,000 people in Copenhagen’s Tivoli Gardens, at the Blue Heron Middle School. landed considerable international press and seen The concert will be at 7:30 p.m. at the auditohis debut album outsell the much-anticipated rium at 1500 Van Ness St. reissue of the Rolling Stones’ “Exile on Main All schools need money and usually employ Street” during its first week of release. common fundraising tools such as bake sales or His image is different in Port Townsend, where rummage sales, so having an international he lives with his wife and young son, and this recording star perform to raise money for the week spent two nights visiting open mics and PTA — parent-teacher association — is unusual. playing short sets to enthusiastic audiences who For Lynge, it’s a logical step. are unaware of his popularity across the pond. Turn to Artist/A4 Lynge leaves town today for Germany, where Peninsula Daily News

Court/A4

Fixing marina storm damage will improve it That’s the vow of property manager for company planning to sell facility By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT HADLOCK — The owner of the damaged Port Hadlock Marina met with prospective buyers of the marina and those who will conduct repairs and concluded that the marina will soon be in better condition than it was before a Nov. 22 storm.

During the storm, five boats that were tied to buoys outside of the marina were destroyed or severely damaged, and debris is still visible. The breakwater was damaged. One section washed away. Parts of the dock were broken. None of the boats within the marina sustained any damage. “The breakwater held up well

and did what it was supposed to do,” said Craig Anderson, who manages the property for the owner, RealVest of Vancouver, Wash. “One panel gave way, but after an inspection, the damage wasn’t as severe as we thought.” No damage estimate was available, but Anderson said when the repairs are completed, “it will be better than it was before.” In addition to Anderson and a representative of the prospective buyer — which Anderson would not name — a diver and an engi-

T

at the bottom and would not need repair. The remainder of the breakwater will need repair. Bolts are loose at the top of several sections of the retaining wall. Spencer said the marina has prepared a report to all the tenants that outlines the repairs and neer inspected the damage Tues- indicates that it is safe for them to day and are developing a repair return to their boats. estimate. ________ Harbormaster Jerry Spencer Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bersaid the diver’s inspection of the mant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or pilings foundation determined charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews. that they were securely in place com.

he breakwater was damaged, a section was washed away and parts of the dock were broken.

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UpFront

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Snipes sent to prison for tax evasion ACTOR WESLEY SNIPES was ordered Wednesday to voluntarily surrender at a federal prison in Pennsylvania next week to begin his three-year sentence for failing to pay taxes. The U.S. Marshal’s Office ordered Snipes to report by noon Dec. 9 to the Federal Correc- Snipes tional Institution McKean in Lewis Run, Pa. Snipes had tried unsuccessfully to remain free on bail while appealing his conviction to the U.S. Supreme Court. The 48-year-old star of the

“Blade” trilogy was convicted in 2008 on three misdemeanor counts of willful failure to file income tax returns in 1999, 2000 and 2001. He was acquitted of five other charges, including felony tax fraud and conspiracy. His attorney, Daniel Meachum, didn’t immediately respond to an e-mail seeking comment. The prison is a mediumsecurity facility with an adjacent satellite prison camp for minimum-security offenders. Bureau of Prisons spokesman Ed Ross said agency policy prohibited him from saying which unit would house Snipes.

Snoop Dogg song Snoop Dogg is not your usual royal wedding singer. However, the American rapper said he’s dedicating his new single, “Wet,” to Prince William’s bachelor party.

The rapper is touting the track on his website and Twitter feed. On Tuesday, he tweeted Snoop the official royal account, clarencehouse, saying he’d “Made tha anthem 4 Prince William’s bachelor party n all bachelor parties round tha wrld.” The star also sent tweets to a slew of celebrities — including Oprah Winfrey and Jamie Oliver — urging them to check out the song and expressed a desire to perform for the prince. William is due to marry Kate Middleton at London’s Westminster Abbey on April 29. William’s office, St. James’ Palace, declined to comment on the song and said arrangements for any parties would be private.

Passings By The Associated Press

GIL MCDOUGALD, 82, an All-Star infielder who helped the New York Yankees win five World Series championships during the 1950s, has died. Mr. McDougald died Sunday of prostate cancer at his home in Wall Township, N.J. Mr. Mr. McDougald McDougald in 1954 spent his entire 10-year major league career with the Yankees and played a key role on one of baseball’s greatest dynasties. He was the AL Rookie of the Year in 1951 and teamed with Hall of Famers such as Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford and manager Casey Stengel to lead New York to eight American League pennants from 1951-60. Mr. McDougald also was involved in a famous play that led to a tragic injury. In 1957, his line drive hit

hard-throwing Cleveland pitcher Herb Score in the right eye, breaking bones in Score’s face and damaging his eye. A versatile infielder who played second base, third base and shortstop, Mr. McDougald batted .276 with 112 home runs and 576 RBIs during his career. He eclipsed .300 twice, in 1951 and ‘56, and had a career-high 83 RBIs in 1953, when the Yankees won the last of five consecutive World Series titles. Three times, Mr. McDougald finished in the top 10 in AL MVP voting (1951, 1956, 1957). He was selected to six All-Star games, including both contests in 1959. He singled home the decisive run for the American League in the sixth inning of the 1958 game at Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium. Born in San Francisco, Mr. McDougald is survived by his wife, Lucille, their seven children, 14 grandchildren and seven greatgrandchildren. Private funeral services will be

held Friday in New Jersey, the Yankees said.

_________ ALFRED “AL” MASINI, 80, the Hollywood producer who created “Entertainment Tonight,” “Star Search,” “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,” “Solid Gold” and numerous other TV shows, has died in Honolulu. His publicist, Kristin Jackson, said Mr. Masini died Monday in the Hawaii city, where he has lived for years. Mr. Masini is survived by his wife, Charlyn Honda Masini, and his sister, Melba Marvinny. In a statement to Hawaii News Now, his wife described her husband as a “humble, sweet, lovable person.” She added that he loved Hawaii and its people. In a separate statement, actress and longtime friend Carol Burnett said she was very sorry to hear of Mr. Masini’s death. She called him a “talented producer and a fine man.”

Yes 

No 

82.8% 13.1%

Undecided  4.1% Total votes cast: 1,262 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  Isidore Zellerbach and his son, Harold, purchased the lower Elwha Dam shortly after World War I when they bought the assets of brothers George and James Whalen for what would become today’s Nippon Paper Industries USA paper mill in Port Angeles. A Wednesday story on Page A1 of the Clallam County edition and Page A6 of the Jefferson County edition erroneously said the Zellerbachs bought the Glines Canyon Dam on the upper Elwha. The Glines Canyon Dam was built in 1927, nine years after the end of World War I. The Peninsula Daily News

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

A 21-year-old Port Angeles man was killed instantly when a .30-.30 rifle accidentally discharged, shooting him in the head. Virgil Coffelt was at a small mill construction camp southwest of Port Angeles when he was holding the rifle between his knees, tapping a crooked sight with a knife. The cartridge exploded, witnesses told Clallam County Deputy Prosecutor John M. Wilson and Sheriff Charles Kemp. Coffelt, his father and brother have been camped in the hills south of Olympic Highway about a half-

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you agree with President Barack Obama’s plan to freeze wages of federal employees (except military)?

__________

Peninsula Lookback 1935 (75 years ago)

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

mile east of Lairds Corner, building a small mill at that location.

1960 (50 years ago) An important state highway project in East Jefferson County has been completed and another is under way. The finished job is the Port Ludlow cutoff, a new 4.3-mile road that saves motorists from the west 5.5 miles of travel compared with the regular highway route via Chimacum. The new project is the Quilcene River bridge and about a mile of new Olympic Highway construction leading to it.

1985 (25 years ago) Port Angeles children won’t have to travel any farther than the Vern Burton Center to learn how people all over the world celebrate the holiday season. The first Children’s Holiday Celebration is scheduled from noon to 3 p.m. E.J. Beckett, a Port Angeles Head Start teacher, is arranging the event for the sponsoring city Parks and Recreation Department. Youngsters in kindergarten through fifth grade will be shown how people of all faiths and creeds celebrate holy days in nations throughout the world.

Laugh Lines

strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex. wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

A COYOTE lying against a tree, sunning itself in the backyard of a home west of Port Angeles. When the recent snowpack on a nearby metal roof comes crashing down, the coyote darts into the woods ... WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Police in San Diego Did You Win? State lottery results are looking for a bank robber who is believed to be in Wednesday’s Daily his late 70s. Game: 9-7-5 Victims of his last robbery say he threatened to Wednesday’s Hit 5: tell them stories of his 07-08-24-38-39 grandkids. Wednesday’s Keno: Craig Ferguson 01-03-08-17-18-21-25-29A NEW STUDY found 32-41-43-54-57-59-60-66that dogs are smarter than 68-70-72-77 cats because their friendliWednesday’s Lotto: ness has helped them 04-14-20-21-30-37 develop bigger brains. Cat people would comWednesday’s Match 4: plain about the findings, 04-06-09-24 but that would involve Wednesday’s Powerinteracting with other ball: 05-10-11-12-20, Powhumans. erball: 2, Power Play: 3 Jimmy Fallon

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Dec. 2, the 336th day of 2010. There are 29 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Dec. 2, 1970, the newly created Environmental Protection Agency opened its doors. Its first director was William D. Ruckelshaus. On this date: ■  In 1804, Napoleon crowned himself Emperor of the French. ■  In 1823, President James Monroe outlined his doctrine opposing European expansion in the Western Hemisphere. ■  In 1859, militant abolitionist John Brown was hanged for his raid on Harpers Ferry the previous October. Artist Georges-Pierre Seurat was born in Paris. ■  In 1927, Ford Motor Co. formally unveiled its second Model A

automobile, the successor to its Model T. ■  In 1939, New York Municipal Airport-LaGuardia Field (later LaGuardia Airport) went into operation as an airliner from Chicago landed at one minute past midnight. ■  In 1942, an artificially created, self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction was demonstrated for the first time at the University of Chicago. ■  In 1954, the Senate voted to condemn Wisconsin Republican Joseph R. McCarthy for conduct that “tends to bring the Senate into disrepute.” ■  In 1969, the Boeing 747 jumbo jet got its first public preview as 191 people, most of them reporters and photographers, flew from Seattle to New York City. ■  In 1980, four American churchwomen were raped and

murdered outside San Salvador. Five El Salvador national guardsmen were later convicted of murdering nuns Ita Ford, Maura Clarke and Dorothy Kazel, and lay worker Jean Donovan. ■  In 1990, composer Aaron Copland died in North Tarrytown, N.Y., at age 90. Actor Bob Cummings died in Woodland Hills, Calif., at age 80. ■  Ten years ago: Al Gore sought a recount in South Florida, while George W. Bush flatly asserted, “I’m soon to be the president” and met with GOP congressional leaders. Actress Gail Fisher died in Culver City, Calif., at age 65. ■  Five years ago: North Carolina inmate Kenneth Lee Boyd became the 1,000th person executed since the U.S. resumed capital punishment in 1977. Singapore executed a Vietnam-

ese-born Australian heroin trafficker (Nguyen Tuong Van) despite a warning by Australian Prime Minister John Howard that the hanging would sour relations between the two countries. ■  One year ago: A day after President Barack Obama announced plans to deploy 30,000 more troops in Afghanistan, leading congressional Democrats said they had serious misgivings but would not try to stop the deployments while Republicans said they supported the force increase even as they questioned Obama’s July 2011 deadline to start bringing troops home. Tiger Woods issued a statement saying he’d let his family down with “transgressions” that he regretted “with all of my heart” and that he would deal with his personal life behind closed doors.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 2, 2010

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Rangel urges donors to call Capitol for him WASHINGTON — Rep. Charles Rangel of New York asked 25,000 campaign donors Wednesday to call the Capitol switchboard and urge their representatives to vote against censuring him for ethical misconduct. There’s only one problem. For many of them, Rangel is their congressman. Rangel, 80, a Democrat who has served his Harlem disRangel trict for 40 years, faces a scheduled censure vote today. He’s likely to become the 23rd House member ever to receive the most serious punishment short of expulsion — and the first since 1983. He’s seeking a lesser reprimand for fundraising and financial violations, including failure to pay taxes on income from a vacation villa and filing misleading public financial reports. A censure and reprimand both require votes disapproving Rangel’s conduct. However, only a censure demands that he stand before his colleagues in the front of the chamber, while the speaker reads him the resolution that condemned his conduct.

Army revamps diet FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — At Army training sites across the nation, the mess hall is beginning to look different.

Milk and juice dispensers are replacing soda fountains, and whole grains are being substituted for white bread and pasta. The military increasingly believes that producing quality recruits starts at the dinner table during basic training, so it has started a more emphatic effort to change their eating habits. Color-coded labels point the way to healthy items, and drill sergeants stand watch over the chow line, calling out soldiers who don’t put enough fruit on their plates. Many new soldiers have never given much thought to their diets — a problem that reflects the poor food choices of a nation with more and more obese people.

WikiLeaks scrambles WASHINGTON — WikiLeaks was on the defensive on several fronts Wednesday, scrambling to remain on the Internet and post more U.S. diplomatic documents while its fugitive founder, Julian Assange, was targeted by a European arrest warrant on Swedish rape charges. Amazon.com Inc. prevented WikiLeaks from using the U.S. company’s computers to distribute embarrassing State Department communications and other documents, WikiLeaks said Wednesday. The WikiLeaks site was unavailable for several hours before it moved back to servers owned by its previous Swedish host, Bahnhof, which are housed in a protective Cold War-era bunker. At the same time, Swedish officials intensified legal pressure on Assange by asking European police to arrest him. The Associated Press

GOP to block bills until tax cuts are extended By Julie Hirschfeld Davis The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans threatened Wednesday to block virtually all legislation until expiring tax cuts are extended and a bill is passed to fund the federal government, vastly complicating Democratic attempts to leave their own stamp on the final days of the post-election Congress. “While there are other items that might ultimately be worthy of the Senate’s attention, we cannot agree to prioritize any matters above the critical issues of funding the government and preventing a job-killing tax hike,” all 42 GOP senators wrote in a letter to Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. The 42 signatures are more than enough to block action on almost any item Reid wishes to advance. The threat does not apply to a new arms control treaty with Russia that is pending, since it would be debated under rules that differ from those that apply to routine legislation. President Barack Obama has made ratification of the pact a top priority. But it does threaten Democratic attempts to lift the Pentagon’s ban on openly gay members of the military, a separate item to give legal status to young illegal immigrants who attend college or serve in the military and a measure to expand first responders’ collective bargaining rights.

GOP obstructs legislation that would feed more children vote on the legislation rather than vote on the amendment. WASHINGTON — House Because the nutrition bill is Republicans have temporarily identical to legislation passed blocked legislation to feed by the Senate in August, passchool meals to thousands sage would send it to the more hungry children. White House for President Republicans used a proceBarack Obama’s signature. dural maneuver Wednesday to If the bill were amended, it try to amend the $4.5 billion would be sent back to the Senbill, which would give more ate with little time left in the needy children the opportulegislative session. nity to eat free lunches at House Majority Leader school and make those lunches Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said the healthier. House would hold separate House Democrats said the votes today on the amendment GOP amendment, which and the bill. would have required backRepublicans said the nutrition bill is too costly and an ground checks for child care example of government overworkers, was an effort to kill reach. the bill and delayed a final The Associated Press

The tax and spending bills are likely to be the last to pass before Congress adjourns for the year. “Republicans have pleaded with Democrats to put aside their wish-list to focus on the things Americans want us to focus on. “They’ve ignored us. The voters repudiated their agenda at the polls. They’ve ignored them. Time is running out. They’re ignoring that,” Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said in remarks on the Senate floor. “The election was a month ago. It’s time to get serious. It’s time to

focus on priorities.” McConnell and Reid met Wednesday to discuss the legislative agenda, but no agreements were reached. The Democratic to-do list also includes extending the expiring tax cuts — although they and Republicans differ on particulars, as well as a measure to keep the government in operation. But the rest of their agenda marks an attempt to court voters Democrats need in 2012 to recapture the majority, including Hispanics, gay-rights activists and organized labor.

Briefly: World Weapons-grade uranium given up by Belarus ASTANA, Kazakhstan — In a sudden turnaround, the former Soviet republic of Belarus announced Wednesday that it will give up all its weaponsgrade uranium — fresh momentum for anti-proliferation efforts even as the U.S. welcomed Iran’s decision to resume talks on its controversial nuclear program. On a day of whirlwind diplomacy capped by the Belarus deal, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton praised Iran’s Clinton return to nuclear talks, urged Europe to do more in Afghanistan and insisted that recent WikiLeaks disclosures would have no lasting effect on U.S. relations around the world. The Belarus decision is a diplomatic victory for President Barack Obama, who has set a goal of securing all the world’s nuclear materials within four years as a centerpiece of his strategy for denying nuclear weapons to terrorists.

Deadline missed ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Ivory Coast’s election commission today violated a midnight deadline to release results from a crucial presidential election, as the ruling party continued to

block the issuance of the final tally and the head of the electoral body went on state TV to snuff out rumors that the opposition had won. Election commission chief Youssouf Bakayoko was seen rushing out of the commission’s office less than an hour before the constitutionally mandated deadline. He appeared on state TV shortly after to say that no official results had yet been proclaimed, a statement that appeared aimed at quelling rumors that opposition leader Alassane Ouattara had won after a Senegalese newspaper released what it said were preliminary results, and a French website and TV station followed suit.

Soldiers raid camps LAGOS, Nigeria — Soldiers raided three militant camps Wednesday hidden in the winding creeks of Nigeria’s oil-rich and restive southern delta, seizing heavy weaponry in an attack rebels claimed killed more than 100 people. The attack started Wednesday afternoon in Delta state, an oil-producing state in the middle of Niger Delta, military spokesman Lt. Col. Timothy Antigha said. Militants in the Niger Delta have attacked pipelines, kidnapped petroleum company employees and fought government troops since 2006. The attacks cut drastically into crude production in Nigeria, an OPEC-member nation that is crucial to U.S. oil supplies. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

In a June 23 photo, crews work to clean up oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill washed ashore at Pensacola Beach in Florida.

Obama rejects East Coast oil drilling, citing BP spill By Matthew Daly and Brendan Farrington The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Pointing to the BP blowout and risks of a new environmental disaster, the Obama administration reversed itself Wednesday and promised not to pursue offshore drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico or anywhere else along the nation’s East Coast. The decision was hailed in Florida, which depends on tourists drawn by the state’s white beaches, but criticized by the oil industry, which said the administration was stifling crucial U.S. energy production and costing recession-battered jobseekers golden opportunities for new work.

Quick Read

The administration had backed a major expansion of offshore drilling earlier this year, in part to gain support for comprehensive climate legislation in Congress, one of President Barack Obama’s top legislative goals. With that bill now off the table, the president stands much to gain politically by saying no to powerful oil interests, particularly in Florida, which is expected to be a crucial swing state in the 2012 election campaign. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar denied politics played any role, saying the BP spill taught officials a number of lessons, “most importantly that we need to proceed with caution and focus on creating a more stringent regulatory regime.”

The new drilling focus would be on areas with leases that are currently active in the central and western Gulf of Mexico. “In the Gulf and the Atlantic, we are adjusting our strategy,” Salazar said. “We believe the most appropriate course of action is to focus development on areas with existing leases and not expand to new areas at this time.” Under the revised plan, the Interior Department will not propose any new oil drilling in waters in the Atlantic Ocean and eastern Gulf for at least the next seven years. Already-planned lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico, expected in March and August, will be delayed until late 2011 or early 2012, Salazar said.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: JFK’s assassin’s coffin now up for auction

Nation: $30 million given in Del. priest abuse case

World: Benedict would use electric popemobile

World: Global warming could double grain prices

A ghoulish piece of American history is now up for sale to the highest bidder. The modest wooden coffin in which John F. Kennedy’s assassin — Lee Harvey Oswald — was buried for 18 years is being auctioned off by Allen Baumgardner, owner of Baumgardner Funeral Home in Fort Worth, Texas. The brown pine box, its rusted metal ornamentation still intact, was dug up in 1981 as part of an effort to put to rest theories that Oswald wasn’t in it. Authorities used dental records to conclude the remains did indeed belong to the man who shot the president to death in 1963.

A Delaware jury has awarded $30 million in damages to a man who claimed he was abused by a priest — a verdict that was exceptional for both the dollar value and for finding the local parish liable, not just the diocese. The lawsuit by John Vai claimed that he was abused repeatedly as a boy in the 1960s by Francis DeLuca when the former priest was a teacher at St. Elizabeth’s parish in Wilmington, Del. Advocates for victims of clergy abuse said the value of the compensatory damages was the largest ever awarded in such a lawsuit in the United States and that a parish had never before been found liable for abuse.

Anyone have a fast, solar-powered electric popemobile for his holiness? The Vatican said Pope Benedict XVI would gladly use one as another sign of his efforts to promote sustainable energy and take care of the planet, but one has yet to be offered. Cardinal Giovanni Lajolo, who runs the Vatican City state, said Wednesday Benedict would certainly prefer an electric popemobile to a traditional, petroleum-powered one given the priority he has given to making the Vatican a leader in green energy. His comments came during a presentation of a book on the Vatican’s ecological efforts.

Even if we stopped spewing global warming gases today, the world would face a steady rise in food prices this century. But on our current emissions path, climate change becomes the “threat multiplier” that could double grain prices by 2050 and leave millions more children malnourished, global food experts reported Wednesday. Beyond 2050, when climate scientists project temperatures might rise to as much as 11.5 degrees over 20thcentury levels, the planet grows “gloomy” for agriculture, said senior research fellow Gerald Nelson of the International Food Policy Research Institute.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, December 2, 2010 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Head of potato group ends all-potato diet By Shannon Dininny The Associated Press

YAKIMA — The head of the Washington State Potato Commission has ended his highly publicized 60-day, all-potato diet lighter by 21 pounds and hungry for more than spuds. Chris Voigt started the diet Oct. 1 to draw attention to federal proposals to bar or limit potatoes in some programs, arguing that potatoes are high in nutrients. On Monday, the last day of the diet, he said he wouldn’t consider it a total success unless the government changes its stance, but he said he welcomes the public attention for potatoes drawn by the stunt. “The people who know me closely know I’m a huge

introvert, so this is kind of out of my comfort zone, being front and center,” he said. “But this is also part of my job, so I embrace it and welcome it.”

Rule changes Potatoes are the only vegetable not allowed for purchase under the federal Women, Infants and Children program, known as WIC. The U.S. Department of Agriculture employed the change under an interim rule following a recommendation by the Institute of Medicine, the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences. The institute also called for the USDA-backed school lunch program to limit use of potatoes.

The Associated Press

The head of the Washington State Potato Commission, Chris Voigt, poses for a photo in Moses Lake on Nov. 19. The USDA is expected to release its school lunch menu proposals by the end of the year. That program subsidizes lunch and breakfast for nearly 32 million needy kids

in most public schools and many private ones, and those schools must follow guidelines on what they serve. “If we are successful in convincing USDA to put

potatoes in the programs, cal Monday, the last day of then I’d call it a 100 percent the diet. success,” Voigt said. His weight had dropped from 197 pounds to 176 Potato pluses pounds, and his cholesterol “But it’s been great that level fell 67 points. the publicity and the genVoigt said he and his eral awareness the public doctor were both shocked. has now and how it’s drawn “I’ve been struggling some attention to the nutri- being borderline high chotional value of potatoes. lesterol for four or five “I just consider that years,” he said. “We were gravy,” Voigt said. During his diet, which thinking maybe a 20-point drew media attention from drop, but this is 60-some around the world, Voigt points.” repeatedly noted that potaHis doctor also advised toes have more potassium him to go slow incorporatthan bananas and that one ing other foods into his serving provides roughly diet. 45 percent of the daily recVoigt’s first big meal ommended value for vitaTuesday: tacos and fajitas, min C. fruit and — yes, that’s right They also offer some fiber and other minerals — grilled potatoes at a Head Start event for children and and vitamins. Voigt underwent a physi- their parents.

Artist: First album will reach U.S. next year Continued from A1 Greenland, living in small towns where he wandered “My sister-in-law the hills and had to travel [Heather Taracka] has kids by boat for an hour to get to who are involved in the the nearest store. He is of Inuit and Danschool, and they were looking at ways to raise funds,” ish heritage, while the music he writes is descended he said. “I’ve had a very success- from the singer-songwriters ful year. My debut album of the 1960s and 1970s. He acknowledges comcame out in Europe, and I parisons to these influences, just got back from being over there for six months composing soft, accessible touring around, so we songs that place expressive thought, why not do a show lyrics against a fingerpicked background and sparse in my home town?” Lynge, 30, has lived in accompaniment. the United States for six First album years, half of that time in Port Townsend. His first album, The He split his childhood Future, was released in between Denmark and Europe in June but will not

come out domestically until 2011, although a different version of the album saw limited release in the United States. He expects to record a second album that will be released in Europe next June and in the U.S. after the first has run its course. Since this is the music business, Lynge said, everything can change.

Active in PT In a short time, Lynge has become an active part of the Port Townsend music community, appearing in local clubs and sharing the stage with other musicians. He is greeted warmly

when appearing at the Upstage or the Uptown and has performed there enough times that the audience knows the words to his original songs. “Port Townsend doesn’t have just one face,” he said. “People are very generous with their praise. If they like something, they will go out of their way to tell you, and that means a lot that they will express their appreciation.” While at the Uptown Pub on Tuesday night, he performed several of his originals, one that was played as background in the “Brothers and Sisters” television series, along with

relaxed versions of the songs “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” and “Lean on Me.” Some audiences prefer the familiar but can be won over by something new. “We are inundated with so much information on so many different fronts that people seek what they know because it offers them comfort, ” Lynge said. “You have to convince people that you have something interesting, even if it is something they have never heard before. “That’s what a good song is all about. It is just a little picture from my life that is similar to a picture from someone else’s life.”

Continued from A1 ideas of public safety. The government said that But Kennedy also said releasing the maps could that a victory for Milner allow someone to identify might mean that the gov- the precise location of the ernment stamps more docu- munitions that are stored on ments as classified, which Indian Island. makes them unavailable Justices Samuel Alito and under FOIA. Stephen Breyer appeared The case before the court most sympathetic to the govrevolves around competing ernment’s view.

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“The Navy thinks, rightly or wrongly, that they don’t want these maps circulated because they think it would make it easier to blow up the munitions,” Breyer said. “They want the firemen to have them, they want the civil defense workers to have them, but they don’t want people who might blow them up to have them.” On the other hand, Milner argued that the people who live nearby have valid reasons for wanting to know whether they would be endangered by an explosion. “Can the public seek information that places the community at a severe security risk? Is it possible for us to say that that kind of information . . . could not be legitimate public information?” Justice Sonia Sotomayor asked. An explosion at the Navy’s Port Chicago ammunition depot during World War II killed 320 people. Milner is a longtime community activist who is concerned about safety issues at several area naval facilities. His lawyer, David Mann, also pointed out what he described as the arbitrary nature of the government’s responses to document requests. While one Navy official refused to release the map from the ammunition dump, an official at a nearby submarine base provided Milner the map showing the probable range of damage from an explosion there. The Associated Press is among 20 news media organizations that filed a brief urging the court to limit the government’s invocation of the personnel exemption.

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Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

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Lunch 11-3, Dinner 4-9 Wed. thru Sun. www.docksidegrill-sequim.com • 360-683-7510

Tickets prices to the Dec. 10 concert are $15 for adults and $8 for children under 18 and are available at Quimper Sound, Crossroads Music and the Food Co-op. A limited number of $60 VIP packages are also available, including prime seats, a CD, a tote bag and an invitation to an after-concert reception with the artist at Sweet Laurette Cafe and Bistro.

Clallam County Sheriff’s Deputies Jim Dixon and Brian King also arrived to help. Nelson and Tilton accompanied Larson in the ambulance to Forks Community Hospital. Bartolac said that the cut was deep, but he didn’t know exactly where on Larson’s neck the cut was.

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Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

(J) —Thursday, December 2, 2010

A5

a million reasons to

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Emergency personnel attend to a man who flipped his wheelchair outside of the Life Care Center of Port Townsend on Wednesday.

3 emergency calls at 1 time for PT care center By Charlie Bermant

East Jefferson Fire-Rescue Deputy Chief Ted Krysinski was acting as PORT TOWNSEND — shift supervisor when the A multitude of ambulances calls came in. He shifted to converged on a senior care paramedic duties. center Wednesday morning as three rescue calls came Quick response in simultaneously. Life Care Center ExecuHe said the emergency tive Director Angela Cerna crews were able to respond said that she couldn’t recall quickly by reallocating three calls back-to-back in resources, but that will not the nearly 10 years she had always be the case. worked there. “How fast we are able to At one time, four ambu- respond depends on what lances and two fire trucks else is going on at the time,” were parked outside the Krysinski said. facility, which is located at Even if enough emer751 Kearny St., Port gency personnel are on duty Townsend. when multiple calls are The first incident hap- required, it can take some pened at 10:10 a.m. when time to respond. the nursing staff noticed “All of our resources are that a 63-year-old man was not located within the Port having trouble breathing Townsend city limit,” he and determined that it was serious enough to call para- said. “We were able to respond medics. today, but we had to call in Such calls are commonresponders from Critter place, staff members said. After the first crew Lane and Station 1-3 [Airarrived, a second patient, a port Road].” If more medics were 93-year old woman, also had trouble breathing, and required, the department a second crew was called could have called in resources from Port Ludlow, in. Cerna said a third Krysinski said. patient, a 78-year-old man, “If there is a massive fell out of his wheelchair. disaster, we can only alloCerna said the only wit- cate so many resources at ness to the incident was the one time,” he said. driver of a shuttle bus who “We will eventually get had come to pick the patient to everybody.” up and that an investigation is expected to reveal Hazardous materials how it happened. When the third call came The care center was renamed in May, but dis- in, East Jefferson Fire-Respatchers referred to it by its cue was dealing with a hazformer name, Kah Tai. ardous materials call at the All three patients were Jefferson County landfill, transported the 1.5 miles to and personnel had to be Jefferson Healthcare hospi- reallocated. tal. Krysinski said that five Peninsula Daily News

1-gallon drums of hydrochloric acid, one with a small leak, were found in the recycling bin at the landfill. Two people suffered slight exposure and were taken to Jefferson Healthcare, where they were treated and discharged, Krysinski said. The fire department called in state Department of Ecology personnel, who directed disposal of the material to the Port of Port Townsend’s hazardous waste facility. The level of available emergency services is determined by average need, population and property taxes, Krysinski said. “If you live on the Peninsula, you are not going to get the same service level you would if you lived in a highly populated area like Seattle,” Krysinski said. Cerna said the Life Care Center currently has 58 residents and a nursing staff that includes 13 registered nurses and 12 licensed practical nurses. She credited the nursing staff for their quick response and their ability to diagnose problems before they become critical. She was also pleased with the emergency services’ response time, even to the multiple incidents. “They were here right away, and they were just awesome,” she said.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

‘Eclipse’ wolf pack star at LaPush fundraiser Friday By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

photo with Jones — $30. ■  Autograph on items purchased at the event (no outside items allowed) — $25. ■  “Eclipse” DVD autographed by Jones (only 40 available) — $75. camera ■  Personal photo and autographed “Eclipse” DVD — $100. No personal photos will be allowed without payment because it is a fundraiser, Jacobs said.

Bring your stamped letter to Macy’s, addressed to Santa At The North Pole, and drop it into our special Santa letterbox. We’ll count them up, and for each letter ®

received, we’ll donate $1 to the Make-A-Wish Foundation

up to $1,000,000. We’ll then deliver them to the Post Office for mailing to Santa, and together, we’ll collect a million reasons to believe. To learn more, visit macys.com/believe

USE YOUR PHONE TO SEE OUR NEW BELIEVE VIDEO! Simply take and send† a picture of this JAGTAG. Verizon and AT&T customers: Text the picture to 524824. All other networks: Text or email the picture to macys@jagtag.com †Standard fees & rates may apply.

YES, VIRGINIA. OWN THE NEW HOLIDAY CLASSIC ON DVD, JUST 9.99, AND THE NEW ILLUSTRATED STORYBOOK, JUST 16.99 Macy’s will donate 10% of the purchase price of each to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Based on the true story of the most famous newspaper editorial of all time. Yes, Virginia is a charming and heartwarming tale about believing in the true spirit of Christmas.

Other Twilight items Other Twilight-related items, as well as art by Quileute tribal members, will be available at the auction. “I am so thrilled for the kids and the ‘Twilight’ fans,” Jacobs said. “This visit encapsulates all the joy, wonder, excitement, anticipation and magic that this time of year represents.” Cherish Our Children is a live and silent auction with items ranging from fishing trips to toys to gift items. A special table is even set up with kids-only bidding. “This year, we are hoping to hit the $12,000 mark,” said Sandy Heinrich, one of the event organizers. Last year, the event raised a record $11,000. “The autographs by the actress will certainly help us reach our goal,” Heinrich said.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

0C405624

LAPUSH — Actress Julia Jones — the female werewolf Leah Clearwater in “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” — will help raise money for the Quileute tribe’s annual Cherish Our Children fundraiser Friday. Jones, who is making the appearance on the night of the release of the “Eclipse” DVD, will sign autographs for a fee to raise money for the charity, said tribal spokeswoman Jackie Jacobs. Cherish Our Children, an auction to raise money to buy holiday gifts for needy children, starts at 5 p.m., and Jones will sign autographs from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the A-ka-lat center in LaPush. The charity divides money between the Quileute Housing Authority and Forks Santa’s Workshop, which both give presents to children in need. “We are thrilled that Julia Jones is joining us for the Cherish our Children event this year,” the Quileute Tribal Council said in a statement. “During this season of giving, she exemplifies the meaning of giving back, and we give thanks for her generosity . . . Quileute Tribal Council thanks Summit Entertainment and Julia Jones for truly making this a cherished ‘Twilight’ event,” the council said. Jones, who is part Chickasaw and Choctaw, plays the character Leah Clearwater in “Eclipse,” which was released in June. Eclipse is the third novel

in Stephenie Meyer’s four-part series about teen love and vampires set in Forks. It was Jones preceded by Twilight and New Moon and followed by Breaking Dawn. Clearwater is the sole female member of the Quileute “wolf pack” in a group of Quileute teens who morph into werewolves when vampires encroach on their territory. Clearwater is also an emotional example of “imprinting” when werewolves find their soulmates. Her boyfriend, Sam, becomes a werewolf — and leader of the pack — and leaves her for another woman named Emily when he imprints on Emily instead of Leah. Jones will play the role also in both parts of “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn,” which are due out in November 2011 and November 2012. On Friday, Jones will sign 8-inch-by-10-inch photographs, as well as a limited number of DVDs of “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse,” which will be released at the event — a few hours before its midnight release in the rest of the area. The prices are: ■  Autographed photo — $40. ■  Autographed photo as well as a photo with Jones on a personal camera — $50. camera ■  Personal

Write a letter to Santa and help make wishes come true.

Tune into the CBS Early Show at 7am for letter count updates to Santa throughout the Holidays.


A6

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, December 2, 2010

&

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We were able to adopt 2 large families from the Salvation Army. The girls donated their tips, the Daily Grind matched for $1,875.00! Thank you all,

Downtown Port Angeles Christmas Open House

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457-6919 • 501 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles

1 9 1 9 E . F i r s t , Po r t A n g e l e s

Sterling Impressions Photographic Necessities & Temptations Odyssey Bookshop Northwest Fudge & Confections Landings Art Gallery

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The Gallery at the Fifth invites you to the opening reception for the artworks of

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat!

The Creative Arts Group

Come One! Come All!

December 5th 1pm-3pm

to the 7th Annual

Christmas Wreath Auction

The Creative Arts Group will show its works through the month of December

at the Dickens Christmas Faire

“The Loafing Shed” by Lois Miner

0C5080973

The Creative Arts Group meets every Monday at Sequim Bible Church to do art, eat lunch and encourage each other. The group grows and shrinks as members leave or invite others to join. Some of the artists have been painting together for about 22 years.

Rekindle the Old Fashioned Christmas Spirit this Holiday Season. Step back in time to 19th century London and a Dickens’ Christmas Celebration. Enjoy holiday music, complimentary hot chocolate, hot cider and delectable eats. Peruse delightful wreaths and silent auction items for purchase. Come and join in the heart-warming Dickens’ Christmas spirit.

Saturday, December 4th, 2-4 pm, Life Care Center of PT

360-683-3345

500 W. Hendrickson Rd., Sequim, WA 98382

All proceeds benefit Life Care Center’s Resident Council Fund.

www.thefifthavenue.com

Olympic Theatre Arts Presents

751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-3555 • www.LCCA.com.

The Thwarting of

Directed by Tracy Williams

Featuring: Greg Madsen Lee Harwell Alayna Finman Ron Graham Arie Vlaardingerbroek David MacInnes Andrew Finman Ric Munhall Jared Stewart Joshua Treadway Damon Little Clarissa Finman Gabriel Smith Naomi Gish Hannah Fritz Heidi Powell Lily Engel

Based on the Book by Sally Benson Adapted by Christopher Sergel Directed by Richard Stephens

Non Musical Classic Your Family Will Love!

Nov 19, 20, 23, 26, 27, 30; Dec 3, 4 at 7:30 Nov 21, 28; Dec 5 at 2:00

December 2, 3, 4, 9, 10 & 11 at 7:30 December 5 & 12 at 2:00

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

Leslie, Dear Dr. enes “Do my g w long ho determine I live?” d Marilyn

Produced by special arrangement with The Dramatic Publishing Company of Woodstock Illinois

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Port Angeles Community Playhouse 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. 360-452-6651

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General Admission $1650 OTA Members $1450 Children $1150

includes a $150 service fee for reserved seating

Formerly Kah Tai Center

Port Angeles Community Players present

Baron Bollingrew by Robert Bolt

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YES!! I would like to contribute a wreath or an item for the silent auction. YES!! I would like to make a cash donation to sponsor a wreath. Please call Sandi Bird at 643-3555


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

&

Thursday, December 2, 2010

A7

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat! Olympic Medical Center Auxiliary

Jacob Jones/The Daily World

Holiday Artisan Market Sat., Dec. 4; 9-5

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Sun, Dec. 5; 10-4

Vern Burton Community Center 308 E. 4th St. • Port Angeles, WA

60 Artisan Vendors - Many New

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ALL MERCHANDISE JURIED FOR VALUE

Sharie R. Ramsey pleaded not guilty Monday to first-degree custodial interference for allegedly taking her twin daughters and running from their father for more than 10 years until they were located in Artic earlier this month. She is flanked by Chief Criminal Deputy Gerald Fuller, left, and defense attorney John Farra.

Mom accused of stealing her kids pleads not guilty

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Ramsey remains in jail

Performing Arts in Port Ludlow

A Broadway Christmas

with vocalist Dean Regan of stage, screen & television www.pen-movies.com

Sunday, Dec. 12 DEER PARK CINEMAS 3:00 & 7:00 p.m.

Holiday Classics—Broadway Hits and Standards

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Tickets at www.brownpapertickets.com or at the Bay Club. Info at www.portludlowartscouncil.com or call 360-437-2208.

Peninsula Daily News

RED

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LINCOLN THEATRE

Ramsey remains in the Grays Harbor County Jail on $150,000 bail. Court records stated the mother took the twins from their Midwest home when the girls were about 2 years old. She was found in Port Angeles in 2008. Ramsey sued for child support, but Clallam County Superior Court awarded custody to the father. The mother and children then disappeared again. “The father has been looking for them for 11 years,” court documents said.

Protective custody When authorities confronted Ramsey about the custody order, she said the order had been an ongoing issue with the Clallam County court. She complained the court was “torturing” her family. Grays Harbor court documents said Ramsey suffers from mental issues and alleges she took the twins after being released from a mental institution. When she sued for child support in 2008, court records alleged she regularly disobeyed the parenting plan, the court documents said. “Between April 2008 and May 2009, defendant constantly impeded the court’s intent and the court found Ms. Ramsey in contempt of court and finally the court ordered a mental evaluation,” court records stated. A court officer assigned

to the case reported Ramsey is “so toxic to the girls that they are likely to become warped regarding men in general and the father in particular.” Early this year, the Clallam County court awarded sole custody of the twins to the father. Authorities said the mother moved the children to the Grays Harbor area and home-schooled them for several months. When a Grays Harbor deputy found the family a few weeks ago, Ramsey said she would help the girls pack, but they fled out an upstairs window.

Obstructing justice Although she denied any knowledge of their escape, she was arrested for allegedly obstructing justice. “The girls were located the next day wandering on the highway and taken to Clallam County, where they are currently staying in a foster home,” court documents said. “During an interview, they explained that since leaving Port Angeles in 2009, they have lived with the defendant in Shelton, Olympia, Montesano, Aberdeen and Hoquiam.”

Author tells of a year spent chasing American butterflies

HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PT.1 MORNING GLORY

Holiday Open House

MONTESANO — A Midwest mother found living with her twin daughters in Artic this month — after surfacing in Port Angeles in 2008 — has denied charges she violated a court order by going on the run with the children for more than 10 years. Sharie R. Ramsey, 49, pleaded not guilty in Grays Harbor Superior Court in Montesano on Monday to two counts of first-degree custodial interference for allegedly stealing her now14-year-old daughters from their father, who authorities say spent years searching for them.

The family was found living under fake names in an Artic area home south of Aberdeen on Nov. 4. Ramsey was arrested at the home, but the daughters fled into the woods and were found safe the next morning. They are now in protective custody.

THE NEXT THREE DAYS DUE DATE

PORT ANGELES — Robert Pyle spent a year on a wild-butterfly chase and lived to tell the tale. He’ll do that tonight with a talk on his book Mariposa Road: The First Butterfly Big Year in the Raymond Carver Room at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. Admission to the 7 p.m. presentation is free. Part road-trip tale, part travelogue of lost and found landscapes, all good-natured natural history, Mariposa Road tracks Pyle’s journey across the United States as he races against the calen-

dar in his search for as many of the 800 species of American butterflies as he can find. Mariposa Road recounts his adventures, high and low, tracking down butterflies in his own low-tech way. Accompanied by Marsha, his cottonwood-limb butterfly net; Powdermilk, his 1982 Honda Civic with 345,000 miles on the odometer; and the small Leitz binoculars he has carried for more than 30 years, Pyle ventured out in a series of trips from his Northwest home. On his quest, Pyle roamed the California

coastline in the company of overwintering monarchs, ventured to the far northern tundra in pursuit of mysterious sulphurs and arctics, and traveled from Graceland to ranchland and Kauai to Key West, enjoying intimate encounters with the land, its people and its other fauna. Pyle is the author of 13 other books, including Where Bigfoot Walks, Wintergreen and Sky Time in Gray’s River, which won the National Outdoor Book Award. He’ll have copies of his books available for sale and signing tonight.

Port Angeles man treated, discharged after tractor hit by truck from rear

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Peninsula Daily News

POULSBO — A Port Angeles man was treated and discharged after a wreck involving two semitrucks near the Hood Canal bridge earlier this week. Terry Duane McCallister, 64, was taken by ambulance to Harrison Medical Center in Bremerton for complaints of back and neck pain after his 2009 Kenworth T800 tractor was hit in the rear by a 2009 Mack

log truck on state Highway 3 at 2:15 p.m. Tuesday, the State Patrol said. He was discharged by Wednesday. The Mack truck driver, a 49-year-old Bremerton man, James Edwin Aaro, was not hurt, the State Patrol said. The collision forced the closure of one lane of traffic for more than an hour while troopers and state Department of Transportation road crews worked to move the trucks from the road. The State Patrol gave

this account: The two trucks were both traveling north. McCallister was stopping for traffic at Milepost 59 when Aaro failed to stop and hit McCallister’s truck in the rear. The Bremerton man could be cited for driving too closely, according to the report. The Mack truck was towed from the scene of the wreck, while McCallister’s truck was drivable.

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Thursday, December 2, 2010

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MoveOn vigil at Rep. Dicks’ office Message: Cut tax break for rich, keep it for middle class Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County MoveOn members will gather at Rep. Norm Dicks’ office today to urge him to vote against extending tax cuts for the wealthy but support keeping in place cuts for those earning less than $250,000 annually. It’s a position for which the Belfair Democrat — who represents the 6th Congressional District, which includes the North Olympic Peninsula — has expressed sympathy but with perhaps some adjustments. MoveOn members will

gather at Dicks’ Port Angeles office at 332 E. Fifth St. at 4 p.m., staging a vigil and “speak-out” at the corner of Peabody and Fifth streets. In a letter to William Kildall, Clallam County MoveOn coordinator, Dicks said that Congress will consider extending tax cuts enacted in 2001 and 2003, which expire at the end of the year. Dicks’ letter was a response to one Kildall presented to the congressman’s office Nov. 18. “Republican leaders in both the House and Senate have endorsed a tax bill that would fully extend all

tax cuts, which the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimates would cost more than $4 trillion over the next 10 years,” Dicks said, adding that such an action would increase the projected budget deficit and increase the interest payments on the national debt by $950 billion. “Under this proposal, almost half of the benefit — $1.9 trillion — would go to the richest 2 percent of taxpayers,” Dicks said. “I am opposed to this expensive and lopsided approach,” he said, adding that he supports a proposal that renews tax cuts for those earning less than $250,000, which would “still represent the largest tax cut in American history.” However, Dicks said, a

Soldier agrees to testify in Afghan shooting case Sentencing follows deal at Lewis-McChord The Associated Press

JOINT BASE LEWISMcCHORD — An Army staff sergeant charged with shooting at unarmed Afghans this year pleaded guilty Wednesday in a deal that requires him to testify against other defendants implicated in an alleged scheme to kill civilians for kicks. Staff Sgt. Robert Stevens of Portland, Ore., admitted to aggravated assault, lying to investigators and other charges at his court-martial. Prosecutors dropped a conspiracy charge as part of the plea agreement.

Confinement A military judge, Lt. Col. Kwasi Hawks, accepted the agreement and late Wednesday sentenced Stevens to nine months in confinement and a reduction in rank to private. Army spokeswoman Maj. Kathy Turner said Stevens must forfeit all pay and allowances during his confinement. Five soldiers are charged with killing three civilians in Kandahar Province this year. Stevens is not one of them but acknowledged that in March, he followed

an order from Staff Sgt. Calvin Gibbs to shoot at two Afghans in a field who posed no threat. Those Afghans were not injured. Stevens is among seven soldiers who face other misconduct allegations, ranging from drug use to beating up a fellow soldier, stemming from an investigation of the unit’s activities. Stevens could provide valuable testimony against Gibbs, the highest ranking soldier charged in the killings. Gibbs is accused of leading the alleged murder plot and putting together a “kill team” to carry out unprovoked attacks. He insists all the shootings were justified. Stevens, a friend of Gibbs, told investigators that he joined Gibbs on patrols even though he was in a different unit. In March, Gibbs ordered Stevens and several other soldiers to join him in shooting at two unarmed men standing in a field, Stevens told investigators. They missed.

Regret expressed “When SSG Gibbs called for us to fire I knew there was not a threat, and that there was no reason to shoot these guys,” Stevens said in a written statement. “I was extremely thankful to find out that we had not killed or wounded either

of those two individuals, and I regret not trying to stop Staff Sgt. Gibbs from trying to kill innocent people,” he said in a sworn statement. Stevens also said Gibbs had shown him a finger he claimed to have cut from the body of an Afghan National Army or Afghan National Police member killed by a roadside bomb, and that Gibbs illicitly collected weapons.

Soldiers’ claims Others claimed that Gibbs dropped such weapons near the bodies of civilians to make them appear to have been combatants. During his court-martial Wednesday, Stevens said Gibbs gave him one illicitly obtained grenade. The News Tribune of Tacoma reported that Stevens said he threw it out of a Stryker vehicle and claimed it had been tossed by an enemy combatant — an incident that resulted in him being awarded a combat action badge. “There was no reason for it,” Stevens said in court. The charges to which he pleaded guilty were aggravated assault with a dangerous weapon, endangering other soldiers, dereliction of duty and making a false statement. The plea agreement requires Stevens to testify against the other defendants as needed by prosecutors.

Peninsula keepsake books creators to sign their works Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — The creators of five keepsake books about the North Olympic Peninsula will sign copies of their work Sunday, Dec. 12, during a two-week holiday sale at park visitor centers. The sale will begin Friday, Dec. 10, at Discover Your Northwest locations at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles; the Forks Recreation Information Center, 551 S. Forks Ave., Forks; and the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center, located at the end of Upper Hoh Road, about 31 miles south of Forks off U.S. Highway 101.

15 percent discount During the sale, which will run through Friday, Dec. 24, customers will receive a 15 percent dis-

count, with Discover Your Northwest members, as well as members of other national park cooperating organizations, eligible to receive a 30 percent discount.

Signing, refreshments The book signing, with light refreshments offered, will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center. Authors are: ■  Photographer Ross Hamilton, who will sign Olympic Wilderness Trilogy, calendars and posters. ■  Tim McNulty and David Woodcock. McNulty wrote From the Air: Olympic Peninsula and Olympic National Park: A Natural History. Woodcock photographed From the Air. ■  Gary Peterson and Glynda Peterson Schaad, authors of Women to Reckon

With: Untamed Women of the Olympic Wilderness and High Divide: Minnie Peterson’s Olympic Mountain Adventures. Discover Your Northwest will offer a variety of new products, including organic T-shirts and new Elwha River Restoration cinch sacks and hats. The Olympic National Park annual pass and the America the Beautiful — National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Annual Pass will not be offered at discount prices. But they will be available at the park centers. The Olympic National Park Visitor Center in Port Angeles is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. The Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center and the Forks Recreation Information Center are open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday.

Structure of Puget Sound talk topic Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Doug Myers, director of science for the Seattle-based People for Puget Sound, will speak about the structure of the sound and the dangers threatening it. Myers will present “Puget Sound 101 and Challenges for Its Restoration” from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 18, at the Arthur D. Feiro Marine Life Center on City Pier in Port Angeles.

A donation of $5 is suggested for the presentation sponsored by Olympic C o a s t N a t i o n a l Myers M a r i n e Sanctuary and the marine life center. Myers will talk about the sound’s structure, physical and biological characteristics, “and the stresses that make it one of the most

imperiled estuaries in the U.S.,” said Susie Winters, volunteer speaker coordinator. Myers will discuss the geology, oceanography, landscape ecology, diverse salmon populations and “the fragile interconnectedness of its inhabitants from plankton to orca whales,” Winters said. Limited seating is available. To reserve a space, phone 360-417-6254.

third option is under consideration in the face of a weak economy — permanently extending tax cuts for the middle class while approving a temporary, possibly two-year, extension of the remaining tax cuts.

prevent a substantial increase in unemployment,” Dicks said. Kildall’s Nov. 18 letter said that the “tax gift to the wealthy 2 percent has left the middle class with little or no ‘trickle down’ and a whole lot of indebtedness. Third option “This has devastated the “While I remain skepti- middle class economically cal of the benefits of such an and can no longer be tolerapproach . . . it may be con- ated.” sidered . . . if strong evidence is provided that maintaining the tax cuts for a short time is necessary to

Death and Memorial Notice Edwin M. Murray September 15, 1937 November 27, 2010 Mr. Murray is also survived by grandson, David.

Death and Memorial Notice Flora H. Keeler

Death Notices

December 19, 1924 November 30, 2010

David Rock Hudson Jr. Aug. 2, 1989 — Oct. 11, 2010

David Rock Hudson Jr., 21, drowned in the Hoh River. His obituary will be published later. Services: Today, Thursday, Dec. 2, at 11 a.m., graveside committal at the Quileute cemetery in LaPush, after which a meal will be served at the A-kalat Center, also in LaPush. The Rev. Tom Jackson will officiate. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com

Ernest A. LaSalle May 28, 1924 — Nov. 25, 2010

Ernest A. LaSalle died in Port Townsend of natural causes. He was 86. Kosec Funeral Home & Crematory, Port Townsend, is in charge of arrangements. www.kosecfuneralhome.com

Flora H. Keeler passed away peacefully at Olympic Medical Center on Tuesday, November 30, 2010. She was a resident of

Port Angeles for 64 years. She is survived by her children, Nancy Walters, Max Green and Sally Allen. Flora also had six grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her son, Daniel Green. A private service will be held.

Death and Memorial Notice Derek Andrew Crawford April 14, 1983 November 24, 2010 Beloved grandson of Art, Lucetta (deceased) and Essie Halls of Sequim died suddenly on November 24, 2010, at age 27 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He is survived by his mother and father, John and Deborah (Halls) Crawford of Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; and by Sequim residents John and Pam (Halls) Vass, Tina (Halls) Vass, Stephanie (Halls)

Ream, their children and grandchildren; and also by sister Sharon, Santa Teresita Carmelite Order, Duarte, California; by cousins Kyle and Anna in Denver, Colorado; and other family in Wisconsin. Memorial Service will be at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 121 East Maple Street, Sequim, on Monday, December 6, at 1 p.m. Derek was a dedicated and passionate salmon fisherman. Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made in his name to fraserriverkeepers.ca or saveoursalmon.ca.

Death and Memorial Notice Myrtle T. Holm August 12, 1915 November 29, 2010 Myrtle T. Holm, 95, of Port Townsend died November 29, 2010, in Port Townsend. She was born August 12, 1915 in Short Creek, North Dakota, to Thomas and Annie Brown Tate. She attended schools in North Dakota. She married Ervin Seabold, who passed away in 1961. Myrtle later married

Donald R. Holm on May 31, 1963, in Portland, Oregon. He preceded her in death on June 8, 2002. She came to Port Townsend in 1981 from the Portland area. She was employed at Meier & Frank Department Store in Portland, and later was an ad clerk for the Portland Oregonian newspaper. She and her husband authored several cookbooks about pickling, canning, sourdough and dutch-oven cooking, which are still in print.

They also enjoyed sailing on their sailboat, Wild­rose. She is survived by her stepson, Douglas Holm; stepdaughter, Becky Hilby; several grandchildren, great-step-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Cryptside services will be held Tuesday, December 7, 2010, at 2 p.m. at Portland Memorial Mausoleum, 6631 SE 14th Avenue, Portland, Oregon. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements.

Death and Memorial Notice Meredith Ann ‘Susy’ Hendry August 6, 1939 November 23, 2010 Mrs. Meredith Ann Hendry of Port Angeles passed away on November 23, 2010. She was born on August 6, 1939, in South Gate, California, to John Weaver and Margaret Elizabeth (Walker) Rarity. Susy married Richard Hendry on April 22, 1962, in Malibu, California. They moved to the North Olympic Peninsula in 1970. Mrs. Hendry was a

devoted wife and mother as well as a successful executive secretary until her marriage to Dick. After years spent raising four children, she enjoyed hiking and spending time with her grandchildren. Her life was one of love and generosity. Susy was a member of the Queen of Angels Catholic Church. She is survived by her husband, Richard Hendry of Port Angeles; sons and daughters-in-law, Chris and Kasie Hendry of Port Angeles, Michael and Deena Hendry of Gig Harbor, Washington, and

Dan and Brooke Hendry of Port Angeles; daughter and son-in-law, Jennifer and Tim Merkel of Havre de Grace, Maryland; brothers and sisters-inlaw, John and Laura Rarity of Austin, Texas, Michael and Diane Rarity of Portland, Oregon, and Milo and Terri Walker of Port Angeles; 10 grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading

at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice listings appear online at

www.peninsuladailynews.com


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 2, 2010

Commentary

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Finding a cure or just a Band-Aid? Which do you think is less expensive, not to mention preferable — a cure for cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, or caring for people with these diseases? Wouldn’t it be better mediCal cal and public policy to direct Thomas more resources toward finding a cure for diseases that cost a lot to treat than to rely on a government insurance program, such as Obamacare, which seeks mainly to help pay the bills for people after they become ill? Isn’t the answer obvious? Apparently not to many politicians trapped in an old paradigm that focuses too much on hospitals, doctors and medicines and too little on medical research and preventive care so that people

will not need hospitals, doctors or medicines. The pursuit of cures as a priority is a subject that has been taken up by my colleague James Pinkerton in his forthcoming book entitled Serious Medicine Strategy and on his blog at www. seriousmedicinestrategy.org. It’s not that we are failing to fund research to cure diseases that end lives too early. Rather, it is a failure of political leadership to make research a priority in their speeches and policies. Think back more than 50 years ago to when the political and medical communities united and led the public toward a cure for polio and the elimination of the need for “iron lungs.” This Herculean effort was the medical equivalent of going to the moon. Why can’t we create a united front to find cures for diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cancer and other ailments? Pinkerton believes it’s because

of “the baneful influence of the Food and Drug Administration and the trial lawyers. “If the government would protect the ability of entrepreneurs and scientists to create products without getting sued into oblivion, capital would come pouring into the pharma sector, not only from American investors, but from investors around the world.” That’s because, he notes, people in Europe and Asia now suffer from the same diseases as Americans. Republicans, especially, should pick up on this strategy of cures before care. Instead, most Republicans are singularly focused on repealing the president’s health care “reform” law. It should be repealed, or at least experience an extreme makeover, but repealing that law doesn’t cure anyone of anything. And here’s the double benefit that Obamacare claims for itself, which can never materialize. Finding cures for diseases

Peninsula Voices

helps people live healthier lives, and it’s cost efficient. Look at the money saved from no longer having to treat victims of polio, smallpox and tuberculosis. Imagine the savings when a cure is eventually found for cancer. Plus, the retirement age could be easily raised as older people work longer and live more vigorous, productive (and tax-generating) lives. What’s not to like about any of this? Republican presidential candidates in 2012 — and a Republican president, should the GOP win that election — could change the direction and content of the entire health care debate, if they fashioned a strategy for going to the “medical moon” by a certain and attainable date. We are close to a cure for some diseases, but far from a cure for others. Let’s begin with those closest to a cure. Ask yourself: Would you rather be healthy

Our readers’ letters, faxes

and fit and live a long life? Or be taken care of in your illness by a government health system that sees you as a burden and is constantly trying to reduce care and lower costs? Ask the English, who are currently experiencing the downside to poor care. The problem is that once a nation has made a wrong turn, it is difficult if not impossible to reverse course. America still has time to make the right choice and move in the direction of cures. Now all we need is the political leadership to point the way.

________

Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and e-mail

A real hero

wear a uniform, a badge, a gun. The text in the Duffy This is why Sgt. Giunta’s cartoon on the Commentary story has struck a chord in page of the Nov. 19-20 PDN me and so many others — said it all: “Portrait of a Selfbecause Sgt. Giunta is not less Hero.” an elite Marine, SEAL or And Staff Sgt. Salvatore Delta Force member. Giunta is indeed that. He is “just” a straight-leg, By now, most U.S. readone-one-bravo grunt infaners are aware of this extra­ ordinary young man’s deeds tryman, a regular Army G.I. Joe who did his duty as best of heroism under fire and he could and was there for via TV saw Sgt. Giunta his endangered brothers-inreceive his well-earned Medal of Honor from a gra- arms. Even Salvatore Giunta’s cious President Obama. provenance and family are Although a cynical Vietnam-era GI draftee with an pure heartland American, with loving parents and “attitude,” I watched the childhood friends back home ceremony is respectful silence, with a tear in my eye. in Hiawatha, Iowa. America might not have For today, everybody in expected so modest a speech the armed forces is a “hero.” from this humble Medal of Everybody gets to wear Honor recipient, but that is the black beret. what we got. Unlike during the evil More power to him. Vietnam War years, the Chris Bay-Hansen, United States military is Port Angeles now an object of public worship, as are the police, fireCantwell honored fighters, et.al. Last month, Sen. Maria It sometimes seems as if Cantwell was honored as every American wants to

the recipient of the annual peace award of the Friends Committee on National Legislation. With this award, the Quaker public interest lobby in Washington, D.C. ,singles out one member of Congress each year for outstanding legislative efforts that pro-

mote a more peaceful world. Cantwell’s initiative, the bipartisan CLEAR Act, cosponsored by Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, would cap carbon emissions through a polluter permit requirement, return 75 percent of the resulting revenue to citizens to offset their

increased energy bills and use 25 percent to grow a green energy economy and jobs and to reduce U.S. dependence on fossil fuels. The CLEAR Act (“Carbon Limits and Energy for America’s Renewal”) is a peace-promoting bill because extensive evidence

predicts that uncontrolled global warming will result in insecurity and violent conflict due to displaced populations, mass migrations, water and food shortages and disease. Our reliance on fossil fuel has already led to violent conflict and “the rich becoming richer and the poor poorer.” This writer was among those present for the award presentation and met later, along with others from Washington state, with Cantwell’s top energy aide to explore prospects for energy/climate change legislation in the upcoming 112th Congress. As her constituents, we Washingtonians have reason to be proud of our junior senator’s out-in-front efforts on our behalf. You can send her a message of support for her energy/ climate change leadership by e-mailing her through her website, cantwell.senate.gov. Bob Schultz, Port Townsend

WikiLeaks bares bad U.S. ‘diplomacy’ WikiLeaks is again publishing a trove of documents, in this case classified U.S. State Department diplomatic cables. The whistleblower website Amy will gradually be releasing Goodman more than 250,000 of these documents in the coming months so that they can be analyzed and gain the attention they deserve. The cables are internal, written communications between U.S. embassies around the world to each other and to the U.S. State Department. WikiLeaks described the leak as “the largest set of confidential documents ever to be released into the public domain [giving] an unprecedented insight into U.S. government foreign activities.” Critics argue, as they did with earlier leaks of secret documents regarding Iraq and Afghanistan, that lives will be lost as a result. Rather, lives might actually be saved, since the way that the U.S. conducts diplomacy is now getting more exposure than ever —

as is the apparent ease with which the U.S. government lives up (or down) to the adage used by pioneering journalist I.F. Stone: “Governments lie.” Take the case of Khaled ElMasri. El-Masri was snatched in Macedonia as part of the CIA’s secret extraordinary rendition program, in which people are taken by the U.S. government and sent to other countries, where they can be subjected to torture. He was held and tortured in a secret prison in Afghanistan for months before being dropped by the CIA on an isolated road in Albania, even though the CIA had long established that it had grabbed the wrong man. El-Masri, a German citizen, sought justice through German courts, and it looked like 13 CIA agents might be charged. Then the U.S. Embassy in Berlin stepped in, threatening, according to one cable, that “issuance of international arrest warrants would have a negative impact on our bilateral relationship.” No charges were ever filed in Germany, suggesting the diplomatic threat worked. The 13 agents are, however,

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still facing charges in Spain, where prosecutors enjoy some freedom from political pressures. Or so we thought. In fact, Spain figures prominently in the leaked documents as well.

The Couso case Among the cables is one from May 14, 2007, authored by Eduardo Aguirre, a conservative Cuban-American banker appointed U.S. ambassador to Spain by George W. Bush. Aguirre wrote: “For our side, it will be important to continue to raise the Couso case, in which three U.S. servicemen face charges related to the 2003 death of Spanish cameraman Jose Couso during the battle for Baghdad.” Couso was a young cameraman with the Spanish TV network Telecinco. He was filming from the balcony of the Palestine Hotel in Baghdad on April 8, 2003, when a U.S. Army tank fired on the hotel packed with journalists, killing Couso and a Reuters cameraman. Ambassador Aguirre was trying to quash the lawsuit brought by the Couso family in Spain.

The U.S. ambassador was also pressuring the Spanish government to drop a precedent-setting case against former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and other Bush administration officials. In that same memo, Aguirre writes: “The deputy justice minister also said the GOS (government of Spain) strongly opposes a case brought against former Secretary Rumsfeld and will work to get it dismissed. “The judge involved in that case has told us he has already started the process of dismissing the case.” These revelations are rocking the Spanish government, as the cables clearly show U.S. attempts to disrupt the Spanish justice system. Ambassador Aguirre told Spain’s El Pais newspaper several years ago: “I am George Bush’s plumber, I will solve all the problems George gives me.” In another series of cables, the State Department instructs its staff around the world and at the U.N. to spy on people, and, remarkably, to collect biometric information of diplomats. The cable reads: “Data should include e-mail

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com ■ Jennifer Jackson, Port Townsend Neighbor columnist, 360-379-5688; jjackson@olypen.com

addresses, telephone and fax numbers, fingerprints, facial images, DNA and iris scans.” WikiLeaks is continuing its partnership with a global group of media outlets — Britain’s The Guardian, El Pais, The New York Times, German magazine Der Spiegel and France’s Le Monde. David Leigh, investigations editor of The Guardian, told me: “We haven’t seen anything yet,” with literally almost a quartermillion cables still not publicly revealed. A renowned political analyst and linguist, MIT professor Noam Chomsky helped Daniel Ellsberg, America’s premier whistle-blower, release the Pentagon Papers 40 years ago. I asked Chomsky about the latest cables released by WikiLeaks. “What this reveals,” he reflected, “is the profound hatred for democracy on the part of our political leadership.”

________

Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. E-mail her at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

A drawing of what the Olympic National Park quarter will look like.

Park’s quarter coming in 2011 Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — A special quarter featuring a Roosevelt elk wading into the Hoh River’s gravelly shores against a backdrop of Mount Olympus will be released next year. The specific release date has not been determined. The official design was announced by the U.S. Mint on its website Wednesday. The Olympic National Park quarter will be the eighth in the “America the Beautiful” series that began this year, the website said. Images of national parks and forests are embossed on the flip side of quarters in the order in which they were designated as a park. The series began with Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas in April, according to www.usmint.gov.

Other coins released in 2010 include Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Yosemite National Park in California, Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona and Mount Hood National Forest in Oregon. In 2011, Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania and Glacier National Park in Montana will precede the release of the Olympic National Park coin. Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi and Chickasaw National Recreation Area in Oklahoma will follow later in the year. About five coins will be released each year, and 56 sites were selected for the program. The coins will be issued in the order Congress approved the national sites and will end with Alabama’s Tuskegee Airmen Memorial in early 2021.

Budget cuts could hurt housing effort Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — State Sen. Jim Hargrove warned of impending budget cuts that may limit future similar efforts as he toured the nearly complete Maloney Heights apartment building earlier this week. Hargrove, D-Hoquiam — who represents the 24th District, which includes Clallam and Jefferson counties and part of Grays Harbor County — toured the complex Tuesday. “He wasn’t painting a real rosy picture about the state budget woes,” said Brad Collins, Serenity House capital projects director and a Port Angeles City Council member. “I think there’s real reason to be concerned about funding projects like this in the future.” Hargrove said that the passage of anti-tax measures during the Nov. 2 general election contributed to a deficit

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larger than the total social services budget, according to Martha Ireland, Serenity House executive coordinator. “The [2010] capital building fund is already $2 million out of whack,” Ireland quoted Hargrove as saying. That endangers both the Washington Works budget for 2011 and the general assistance unemployable benefits, or GAU. GAU was reduced and renamed Security Lifeline by the this year’s Legislature. It provides medical coupons and a minimal cash stipend to tide people over while they recover from being unemployable or to apply for permanent disability benefits. Without that safety net, another 100 to 150 single adults will be on the streets seeking housing in Clallam County, predicted Kathy Wahto, executive director of Serenity House.

C R I S I S

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Shopping

for a yule tree

Connie Howard of Port Angeles, left, and her husband, Ryan, take a look at Christmas trees for sale at a lot near the intersection of East Front Street and North Ennis Street in Port Angeles on Wednesday. They bought one of the trees and tossed it in the back of their truck. Alex Abercrombie was running the tree lot and selling trees for around $30 each.

Studio apartments set to be dedicated Dec. 15 Chronically homeless to use housing complex By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Just in time for Christmas, Serenity House of Clallam County and its partners will open a 28-unit permanent housing complex for the chronically homeless in Port Angeles. “It’s a good thing,” said Brad Collins, Serenity House capital projects director and a Port Angeles City Council member. “They don’t have to spend Christmas under a bridge or under a street.” A dedication ceremony for the nearly completed Maloney Heights studio apartment building at 2311 W. 18th St. is planned for Wednesday, Dec. 15, at 12:30 p.m. It is part of a grantfunded $3.3 million project to get people off the streets and into their own home. Maloney Heights is not a homeless shelter. It is “permanent supportive housing,” where a person can access mental health and substance abuse counseling with “a continuity of care,” Collins said. “When they leave [a shelter], they are not there for a long enough time to have broken the cycle of homelessness,” Collins said. “In most instances, they’re still in crisis. They leave, and they’re back on the streets.”

Permanent supportive housing is designed for people with drug and alcohol problems, mental health problems, criminal histories or any other roadblock to housing.

Case workers on site Peninsula Community Mental Health will manage Maloney Heights and have case workers on-site to help tenants. “So the idea is to take people who have these significant barriers to being housed and to get them into housing where they’re not screened out because they have antisocial behavior,” Collins said. “There’s a greater chance they will be able to get treatment and at the very least prevent them from ending up in the [emergency room] or the county jail, where it’s very expensive.”

Reduce jail time, costs Kathy Wahto, executive director of Serenity House of Clallam County, said Maloney Heights will reduce jail time and court costs. “And actually, it’s a good, common sense approach to the problem,” Wahto said. “It’s not just dollars and sense. . . . It’s about people.” Serenity House opened a permanent supportive housing center at the Tempest Building, 535 E. First St.,

in 2008. Collins said one tenant cried on the anniversary of her time there because she had never lived in one place for an entire year. The benefits were reflected in an 85 percent reduction in jail time for Tempest residents, Collins said. The Washington State Housing Trust Fund covered the $1.4 million construction costs of the 28-unit Maloney Heights complex. Corstone Contractors LLC of Snohomish was the primary contractor. Community development block grants covered most of the rest — infrastructure for Maloney Heights and the site of a nearby Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County project.

Habitat project

“We want the community to know this is a housing improvement for the community, even though a small number of people will live there.” Maloney Heights was built for “long-term members of the community who have struggled with alcohol and substance abuse,” she said. “They’ve never had a real place of their own,” Wahto said. “They don’t have a place to live that is safe and secure that they can afford.” Tenants will pay 30 percent of their income, whether it’s fixed or not, for rent. Eight units are reserved for military veterans. Partners in the project include the Serenity House of Clallam County, the Clallam County Housing Authority, Peninsula Community Mental Health Center, West End Outreach, the city of Port Angeles and Clallam County. “It was a very intensive project,” Wahto said. “It involved so many agencies and required constant negotiations of partners with different missions. “We’ve had a huge amount of support on a local government level.” Businesses and private donors provided furniture and much of the landscaping for Maloney Heights.

Habitat plans to build 14 single-family homes for people now living in substandard housing on the same 4.3-acre site as Maloney Heights, which it owns, on the 2300 block of 16th Street. Serenity House and the Housing Authority of the County of Clallam broke ground for the Maloney Heights project in April. The structure has solar panels and was built to demanding environmental standards, Wahto said. The studio apartments have an alcove and a com________ plete kitchen. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be “They’re not fancy, but reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. they’re more than ade- ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com. quate,” Wahto said.

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 2, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Outdoors

Ridge readies for snow lovers THE STREETS ARE safe once again. And now that Snowmageddon Matt 2010 has come and gone, it’s Schubert time to start thinking about Hurricane Ridge. After all, that was a whole bunch of snow that was dumped on the North Olympic Peninsula’s winter wonderland last week. One has to start wondering: When are we going to start re-aggravating our carpal tunnel injuries on some operational rope tows this winter? Unfortunately, the answer isn’t set in snow. Nearly three feet of powder sat atop the Ridge as of Wednesday afternoon. A few more inches, and mountain manager Craig Hofer’s crew can get to the nitty gritty of putting together the intermediate and bunny rope tows. “Hopefully we’re going to be up there by Saturday and start charging after it,” said Hofer, who as worked for more than 30 years on the Ridge. “We’ve done pretty much everything we can do . . . and I think we’re pretty much on schedule. We’ll get the [snowcat] up there this weekend and start picking away at it.” Olympic National Park set the season for organized ski activities for Saturdays and Sundays from Dec. 11 through March 27. Since Hofer’s crew still has a lot of work ahead of it — stringing ropes, setting up gates, etc. — the wait on the rope tows will likely be longer than the schedule start date. Hofer wouldn’t put a timetable on when the tows would be up and running, but if recent history is any indicator, it probably won’t be until sometime around Christmas. As for the Poma lift on the north side of the hill, that usually doesn’t get going until sometime in January.

Snowshoeing As most of you know already, Hurricane Ridge Road is scheduled to open to seven-day-a-week access this winter. With the road open as much as it is, Olympic National Park plans to offer more ranger-led snowshoe walks on the mountain. The one-mile walks last 90 minutes and will be offered for individuals and families at 2 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Monday holidays starting Dec. 10. Space on the walks is limited, so those interested are asked to register at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center information desk 30 minutes in advance. While the walks are technically free, a $5 donation is suggested. In this case, “donation” loosely translates to “fee freely paid by anyone who isn’t a cheapskate.” Organized groups can make advanced reservations for ranger-led snowshoe walks on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Monday holidays at 10:30 a.m. Group leaders should call Olympic National Park at 360-565-3136 for reservations. Unlike the organized ski activities, the snowshoe walks will most assuredly begin Dec. 10.

Snow bus? It might not be the snow bus, but at least Ridge fans can count on some transportation up the hill this winter. All Points Charters and Tours will offer rides twice daily from downtown Port Angeles to the top of the Ridge on Wednesdays through Sundays starting Dec. 17. Vans will pick up passengers at Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St., in Port Angeles at 9:05 a.m. and 1:05 p.m. for the 45-minute drive. Return trips will leave the Ridge at 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Turn

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Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula College men’s soccer coach Andrew Chapman, left, listens as team member Anthony Aguliar speaks while holding his team’s NWAACC championship trophy during a celebration Wednesday at the school’s Port Angeles campus. The Pirates were honored for winning their first-ever soccer title.

Riders rip W.F. West PA boys open year with bang Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles came out on fire and beat highly respected W.F. West 64-51 in its first boys basketball game of the season Wednesday night. “This was a big win for us,” coach Wes Armstrong said. “W.F. West has a very good program and is a regular in the state tournament. “I was pretty pleased with our effort. We have worked hard the past two weeks. “We came out with a lot of fire and intensity.” The Roughriders shot the lights out in the first quarter with a 22-11 lead going into the second priod. They led 37-25 at halftime and 54-34 at the end of three periods of play. Colin Wheeler sparked the Riders with 24 points and nine rebounds while Hayden McCartney added 11 points and eight boards. Ian Ward had 13 points while Casey Smith sank nine. Brock Wade led W.F. West with 21 points. A key to the game was that the Riders played nearly mistake-free with just one turnover in the first half and 11 for the game. “In the first half we put a lot of pressure on them defensively and got a lot of turnovers,” Armstrong said. “We got a lot of fastbreak opportunities from that.”

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles’ Justin Antioquia, right, slips past W.F. West’s Zach Flynn in the first Turn to Preps/B3 quarter on Wednesday night at Port Angeles High School.

UW’s Foster eyes Apple Cup win 17 Huskies’ seniors want to keep playing By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Mason Foster sat at his locker, letting the time pass as he wondered how it all went wrong. A few minutes became a half-hour, which turned into nearly an hour as he tried figuring out how Washington had reached this point. A winless, 0-12 season was one loss away. The head coach that brought him to Seattle was on his way out. The 2008 Apple Cup and the Huskies’ 16-13 double-overtime loss to rival Washington State is not a pleasant memory for Foster.

“Honestly man, I just try and forget about that game,” Foster said. “The thing about that, I felt it was a great game. It was great to be part of that even though you end up losing at the time and it hurts.” That low Foster experienced two years ago makes the opportunity that awaits this Saturday all that more meaningful for Foster and the rest of Washington’s seniors. A win over the Cougars in the 2010 version of the Apple Cup will send the Huskies (5-6, 4-4 Pac-10) to a bowl game for the first time in eight seasons, perhaps a bowl as highly regarded as the Holiday Bowl. It would complete a quick two-year turnaround from the lowest point in the program’s history. And while most of the attention is on coach Steve Sarkisian and quarterback Jake Locker for being the faces of Washing-

ton’s return from college football’s basement, Foster’s been just as important. He’ll likely finish the 2010 season as the Huskies’ leading tackler for the second time in three seasons, joining 10 other Washington defenders since 1963 — mostly linebackers — who have accomplished that during their careers. Foster currently leads the Pac-10 in tackles per game (12.45) and is second in the country, trailing only Boston College’s Luke Kuechly. Only once this season — last Saturday against California — has Foster finished with fewer than 10 total tackles in a game. “I want to make as many plays as possible,” Foster said. “I feel like I’m having a solid year, but we should be winning more games. Turn

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Thursday, December 2, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Wrestling: Port Townsend at Wrestlerama Jamboree at Port Angeles, 5 p.m. Girls Bowling: Sequim at Klahowya, 2:45 p.m.

Friday Boys Basketball: Port Angeles at Kingston, 7 p.m.; Sequim at Olympic, 7 p.m.; Klahowya at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; Quilcene at Mary M. Knight, 8 p.m.; Tahola at Crescent, 7:30 p.m.; Eastside Academy at Clallam Bay, 6:30 p.m. Girls Basketball: Kingston at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Olympic at Sequim, 7 p.m.; Port Townsend at Klahowya, 7 p.m.; Quilcene at Mary M. Knight, 6:30 p.m.; Tahola at Crescent, 6 p.m.; Lake Quinault at Clallam Bay, 5 p.m. Wrestling: Port Townsend at Okanagan, 6 p.m.

Saturday Boys Basketball: Port Townsend at Vashon Island, 7 p.m.; Eastside Academy at Crescent, noon; Wishkah Valley at Clallam Bay, 4:30 p.m. Girls Basketball: Port Townsend at Vashon Island, 7 p.m.; Wishkah Valley at Clallam Bay, 3 p.m. Wrestling: Port Angeles, Sequim and Forks at Forks Invitational, 10 a.m.; Port Townsend at Omak Tournament, 10 a.m. Men’s Basketball: Vancouver Island at Peninsula College, 7 p.m. Women’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Lower Columbia, 4 p.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Nov. 30 Mixed Up Mix Men’s High Game: Kevin Tachell, 234 Men’s High Series: Kevin Tachell, 645 Women’s High Game: Brenda Haltom, 180 Women’s High Series: Christine Elledge, 510 League Leaders: Team 10 Nov. 30 Tuesday Brunch League High Score: June Larson, 184 High Series: Cheri Pysson, 520 League Leaders: Avon/Louise Ensor

Preps WIAA Football Championships 1B Semifinals Nov. 26-27 Lummi 61, Neah Bay 14 Cusick 36, Almira-Coulee-Hartline 28 State Championship Dec. 3 Lummi vs. Cusick, 7:30 p.m. 2B Semifinals Nov. 26-27 South Bend 28, Orcas 12 Colfax 21, Waitsburg Prescott 14 State Championship Dec. 4 South Bend vs. Colfax, 7:30 pm. 1A Semifinals Nov. 26-27 Cascade Christian 21, Meridian 0 Connell 55, Omak 21 State Championship Dec. 4 Cascade Christian vs. Connell, 10 a.m. 2A Semifinals Nov. 26-27 Tumwater 63, East Valley (SPO) 27 Archbishop Murphy 42, Mark Morris 18 State Championship Dec. 4 Tumwater vs. Archbishop Murphy, 1 p.m. 3A Semifinals Nov. 26-27 Bellevue 35, Lakes 7 Kamiakin 45, Capital 18 State Championship Dec. 3 Bellevue vs. Kamiakin, 4 p.m. 4A Semifinals Nov. 26-27 Skyline 35, Curtis 34 Ferris 14, Bellarmine Prep 10 State Championship Dec. 4 Skyline vs. Ferris, 4 p.m. NOTE: All State Championship games will be played at the Tacoma Dome.

Basketball NBA Standings and Schedule WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 15 2 .882 — Dallas 14 4 .778 1 1/2 New Orleans 13 5 .722 2 1/2 Memphis 8 11 .421 8 Houston 6 12 .333 9 1/2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Utah 15 5 .750 — Oklahoma City 13 6 .684 1 1/2 Denver 11 6 .647 2 1/2 Portland 8 10 .444 6 Minnesota 4 14 .222 10 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 13 6 .684 — Phoenix 8 9 .471 4 Golden State 8 10 .444 4 1/2 Sacramento 4 12 .250 7 1/2 L.A. Clippers 3 15 .167 9 1/2 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 14 4 .778 — New York 10 9 .526 4 1/2 Toronto 7 11 .389 7 New Jersey 6 13 .316 8 1/2 Philadelphia 5 13 .278 9 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Orlando 14 4 .778 — Atlanta 12 7 .632 2 1/2 Miami 11 8 .579 3 1/2 Charlotte 6 12 .333 8 Washington 5 12 .294 8 1/2 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 9 7 .563 — Indiana 9 8 .529 1/2 Cleveland 7 10 .412 2 1/2 Milwaukee 6 12 .333 4 Detroit 6 13 .316 4 1/2 All Times PST Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 112, Memphis 109 Oklahoma City 123, New Jersey 120, F/3OT Toronto 127, Washington 108 Boston 99, Portland 95 Miami 97, Detroit 72 Orlando 107, Chicago 78 New Orleans 89, Charlotte 73 Dallas 100, Minnesota 86 Houston 109, L.A. Lakers 99 Denver 105, Milwaukee 94

The Associated Press

LeBron

homecoming

The Quitness car, in honor of NBA superstar LeBron James, rests on a street in downtown Cleveland on Wednesday night. James, who scorned the Cavaliers this summer when he decided to leave and join the Miami Heat, will return to his home state for the first time as a visiting player tonight in a game that has brought about extra security measures to prevent trouble. Utah 110, Indiana 88 San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, late Today’s Games Miami at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games New Jersey at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Oklahoma City at Toronto, 4 p.m. Portland at Washington, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 5 p.m. New York at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Chicago at Boston, 5 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 6 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Utah, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Atlanta at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Charlotte at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 5 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

College MEN’S TOP 25 GAMES (1) Duke 84, (6) Michigan State 79 (3) Pittsburgh 80, Duquesne 66 (15) Memphis 78, Arkansas State 71 UCF 57, (16) Florida 54 (18) Purdue 58, Virginia Tech 55 Saint Mary’s at (19) San Diego State, LATE (20) Texas 76, Lamar 55 (23) UNLV 82, Illinois State 51 (25) Brigham Young 77, Creighton 65 NCAA MEN’S DIVISION I GAMES South Florida 60, Virginia Commonwealth 59 Louisville 92, Florida International 55 Harvard 80, Fordham 57 Towson 75, Western Michigan 73 East Carolina 62, Charlotte 61 Miami (OH) 75, Xavier 64 Furman 80, Elon 65 Vermont 80, Dartmouth 53 West Virginia 71, American University 50 Old Dominion 77, Richmond 70 Lafayette 95, Susquehanna University 73 Buffalo 56, Army 54 Bethune-Cookman 74, Florida Christian 49 Bucknell 73, Columbia 68 Temple 65, Central Michigan 53 Cincinnati 77, Wright State 69 East Tennessee State 73, Dayton 68 Akron 77, Detroit 69 Drexel 62, Saint Joseph’s 50 George Mason 60, George Washington 46 James Madison 88, Longwood 78 NC Central 62, Washington Adventist 56 Providence 77, Northeastern 72 Massachusetts 66, Quinnipiac 64 South Carolina 74, Delaware State 61 St. John’s 69, Wagner 61 Lehigh 79, Stony Brook 76 Tennessee Tech 78, SIU-Edwardsville 65 William & Mary 76, Howard 62 Boston College 88, Indiana 76 Wisconsin 87, North Carolina State 48 Rutgers 66, N.J.I.T. 54 UAB 59, Jacksonville State 53 Arkansas 84, Oklahoma 74 Colorado State 78, Drake 67 Nebraska 76, Jackson State 57 Oklahoma State 69, Central Arkansas 57 South Dakota 80, Wyoming 70 Arizona 84, Rice 57 Texas A&M-CC 77, St. Edwards 56 Louisiana Tech 69, Southern Methodist 64 Butler 65, Loyola (IL) 63 McNeese State 69, Louisiana-Lafayette 66 Northern Iowa 60, Iowa State 54 Sam Houston State 54, St. Thomas (TX) 46 Southern Miss 100, Alcorn State 71 TCU 78, Prairie View A&M 61 New Mexico 74, Southern Illinois 59 Missouri State 80, Arkansas-Little Rock 46 Wichita State 91, Chicago State 51 Alabama 72, South Alabama 50 Southeastern Louisiana 111, Dillard 67 Vanderbilt 82, Western Kentucky 62 Utah State 61, Denver 53 Maryland 62, Penn State 39 Hawaii at Cal Poly, late Utah Valley at Oregon St., late UC Irvine at San Diego, late Holy Names at San Francisco, late Loyola Marymount at Santa Barbara, late Seattle at Portland State, late UC Davis at California, late Pepperdine at Pacific, late

Football NFL Standings and Schedule NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 6 0 .455 209 St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 213 San Francisco 4 7 0 .364 187 Arizona 3 8 0 .273 194 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 277 Philadelphia 7 4 0 .636 310 Washington 5 6 0 .455 215 Dallas 3 8 0 .273 256 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 9 2 0 .818 276 New Orleans 8 3 0 .727 265 Tampa Bay 7 4 0 .636 219 Carolina 1 10 0 .091 140 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 8 3 0 .727 222 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 269 Minnesota 4 7 0 .364 189 Detroit 2 9 0 .182 258 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 7 4 0 .636 285 San Diego 6 5 0 .545 310 Oakland 5 6 0 .455 255 Denver 3 8 0 .273 250 East W L T Pct PF New England 9 2 0 .818 334 N.Y. Jets 9 2 0 .818 264 Miami 6 5 0 .545 205 Buffalo 2 9 0 .182 229 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 5 0 .545 282 Jacksonville 6 5 0 .545 240 Houston 5 6 0 .455 264 Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 257 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 8 3 0 .727 250 Pittsburgh 8 3 0 .727 254 Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 216 Cincinnati 2 9 0 .182 225

PA 275 231 225 319 PA 240 257 262 301 PA 209 197 223 276 PA 172 166 239 282

PA 231 225 256 323 PA 266 187 225 295 PA 252 294 287 218 PA 188 181 229 288

All Times PST Today’s Games Houston at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games San Francisco at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Denver at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Miami, 10 a.m. Chicago at Detroit, 10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Oakland at San Diego, 1:05 p.m. Carolina at Seattle, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m. Monday Night Football N.Y. Jets at New England, 5:30 p.m.

College Standings and Schedule PACIFIC-10 STANDINGS Conf Over W-L W-L PF PA Oregon 8-0 11-0 555 201 Stanford 8-1 11-1 484 214 Arizona 4-4 7-4 328 229 USC 4-4 7-5 375 333 Oregon State 4-4 5-6 273 285 Washington 4-4 5-6 230 346 Arizona State 3-5 5-6 357 271 California 3-6 5-7 310 271 UCLA 2-6 4-7 228 336 Washington St. 1-7 2-9 207 395

STRK W11 W7 L3 L2 L1 W2 W1 L3 L2 W1

All Times PST Today’s Games Arizona State at 23 Arizona, 5 p.m. 25 Northern Illinois vs. Miami (OH), 4 p.m. Illinois at Fresno State, 7:15 p.m. Friday’s Games None scheduled Saturday’s Games Rutgers at 24 West Virginia, 9 a.m. Southern Methodist at UCF, 9 a.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 9 a.m. Troy at Florida Atlantic, 11 a.m. Utah State at 11 Boise State, 12 p.m. 17 Nevada at Louisiana Tech, 12 p.m. 2 Oregon at Oregon State, 12:30 p.m. 1 Auburn vs. 19 South Carolina, 1 p.m.

San Jose State at Idaho, 2 p.m. Middle Tennessee at Florida Intern., 3 p.m. Washington at Washington State, 4 p.m. 21 Florida St. vs. 15 Virginia Tech, 4:45 p.m. 9 Oklahoma vs. 13 Nebraska, 5 p.m. Connecticut at South Florida, 5 p.m. USC at UCLA, 7:30 p.m. UNLV at Hawaii, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey NHL Standings and Schedule WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 22 16 4 2 34 78 59 Chicago 27 14 11 2 30 86 79 Columbus 23 14 8 1 29 65 57 St. Louis 24 12 9 3 27 63 68 Nashville 24 11 8 5 27 58 63 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 24 13 9 2 28 85 74 Vancouver 22 12 7 3 27 68 59 Minnesota 24 11 11 2 24 58 69 Calgary 24 10 12 2 22 67 69 Edmonton 24 8 12 4 20 63 92 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 23 14 8 1 29 68 62 Phoenix 24 12 7 5 29 70 70 Anaheim 26 12 11 3 27 66 77 Los Angeles 23 13 10 0 26 63 57 San Jose 23 11 8 4 26 68 68 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 26 16 8 2 34 79 62 Philadelphia 26 15 7 4 34 87 64 N.Y. Rangers 26 14 11 1 29 74 69 New Jersey 24 8 14 2 18 45 69 N.Y. Islanders 22 5 12 5 15 46 72 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 25 15 8 2 32 63 51 Boston 23 13 8 2 28 62 46 Ottawa 25 11 13 1 23 58 75 Buffalo 25 9 13 3 21 62 73 Toronto 23 8 11 4 20 51 65 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 26 18 6 2 38 90 69 Tampa Bay 25 14 8 3 31 77 81 Atlanta 25 13 9 3 29 80 74 Carolina 24 10 11 3 23 71 78 Florida 22 10 12 0 20 57 57 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. All Times PST Wednesday’s Games Nashville 4, Columbus 3, SO Edmonton 4, Montreal 3, OT Boston 3, Philadelphia 0 Washington 4, St. Louis 1 Phoenix 4, Minnesota 2 Vancouver at Calgary, LATE Florida at Anaheim, LATE Today’s Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Toronto, 4 p.m. Montreal at New Jersey, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. San Jose at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Florida at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Colorado at Carolina, 4 p.m. Columbus at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Calgary at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games New Jersey at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. San Jose at Montreal, 11 a.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Columbus, 4 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 5 p.m. Florida at Phoenix, 5 p.m. Carolina at Nashville, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

Transactions Baseball National League Cincinnati Reds : Named Terry Reynolds senior director of professional and global scouting and Melissa Hill executive assistant to the president of baseball operations and general manager. Named Marty Maier, Dominic Viola

SPORTS ON TV

Today 6:30 a.m. (47) GOLF Nedbank Challenge, Round 1, Site: Gary Player Country Club - Sun City, South Africa 10:30 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, Tour Championship, Round 1, Site: Grand Cypress Golf Club - Orlando, Fla. (Live) 1 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Chevron World Challenge, Round 1, Site: Sherwood Country Club - Thousand Oaks, Calif. (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Arizona State vs. Baylor, Big 12/ Pac-10 Hardwood Series - Waco, Texas (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Arizona State vs. Arizona - Tuscon, Ariz. (Live) 5 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Long Beach State vs. Washington (encore) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Miami Heat vs. Cleveland Cavaliers, Site: Quicken Loans Arena Cleveland, Ohio (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, UCLA vs. Kansas, Big 12/ Pac-10 Hardwood Series - Lawrence, Kan. (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Phoenix Suns vs. Golden State Warriors, Site: San Jose Civic Arena San Jose, Calif. (Live) 8 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Missouri vs. Oregon (Live) 10:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Rodeo PRCA, National Finals, First Round - Las Vegas and Steve Roadcap professional scouts. Houston Astros : Agreed to terms with RHP Nelson Figueroa on a one-year contract. Pittsburgh Pirates : Agreed to terms with RHP Fernando Nieve, INF Andy Marte and C Dusty Brown on minor league contracts. San Diego Padres: Agreed to terms with OF Chris Denorfia on a one-year contract. American Association Fargo-moorhead Redhawks : Signed RHP Casey Hoorelbeke. Gary Southshore Railcats : Signed OF Mike Massaro. Frontier League Gateway Grizzlies : Released RHP Jacinto Gonell. Lake Erie Crushers : Placed 2B Drew Saylor on the retired list. River City Rascals : Signed manager Steve Brook to a contract extension.

Basketball National Basketball Association NBA : Suspended Washington C Hilton Armstrong one game for a Flagrant Foul, Penalty Two against Miami C Joel Anthony during Monday’s game.

Football National Football League NFL : Fined Carolina S Sherrod Martin $40,000 for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Cleveland TE Evan Moore during Sunday’s game. Carolina Panthers : Signed T Rob Petitti. Waived RB Josh Vaughan. Cleveland Browns : Signed DB Coye Francies to the practice squad. Waived RB Thomas Clayton. Green Bay Packers : Signed LB Robert Francois and CB Josh Gordy from the practice squad. Signed WR Terrance Smith and LB/DE Curtis Young to the practice squad. Minnesota Vikings : Released DB Cary Harris from the practice squad. Signed G Andrew Martinez to the practice squad. New Orleans Saints : Signed LB Ramon Humber. Released QB Sean Canfield.

Hockey National Hockey League Columbus Blue Jackets : Activated LW Ethan Moreau from injured reserve. Detroit Red Wings : Assigned G Joey MacDonald to Grand Rapids (AHL). St. Louis Blues : Recalled F Stefan Della Rovere and F Dave Scatchard from Peoria (AHL). Assigned F T.J. Hensick and F Chris Porter to Peoria. Placed F David Perron on injured reserve. Tampa Bay Lightning : Reassigned F Blair Jones to Norfolk (AHL). American Hockey League Albany Devils : Released G Jeff Lerg. Chicago Wolves : Reassigned LW Patrick Galivan to Gwinnett (ECHL). Grand Rapids Griffins : Assigned RW Willie Coetzee, D Brian Lashoff and G Jordan Pearce to Toledo (ECHL). San Antonio Rampage : Assigned D Nick Ross to Las Vegas (ECHL). ECHL Elmira Jackals : Traded F Samson Mahbod to South Carolina for future considerations. Reading Royals : Signed F Vladimir Nikiforov.

Lacrosse National Lacrosse League Minnesota Swarm : Signed F Mat Giles to a two-year contract and D Scott Gamble to a oneyear contract.

Soccer Major League Soccer Real Salt Lake : Signed F Alvaro Saborio to a four-year contract. Seattle Sounders Fc : Signed F Fredy Montero to a contract extension.

College NCAA : Ruled Auburn QB Cam Newton eligible to play in the SEC championship game. Northeast Conference : Named Kelly Webb director of compliance.


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Peninsula Daily News

Dawgs: Want to keep playing Continued from B1 “I feel like the defense should be better, but we’re getting there now. We still have got to win. If we don’t win, none of that matters.” Following Foster’s lead, Washington’s defense appears to have turned from its midseason struggles when Arizona, Stanford and Oregon tore apart the Huskies in three straight blowout losses. Washington allowed 1,459 total yards and was outscored 138-30 in the three setbacks. But during the loss to Oregon, the Huskies defense started to improve. Washington became the first team to hold Oregon scoreless in the first quarter this season and trailed only 18-13 into the third quarter before the Ducks’ fastbreak attack took over and rolled to a 53-16 victory. Washington followed up with a 24-7 victory over UCLA where the Huskies allowed just 163 total yards to the Bruins’ inept offense, and then held California without an offensive touchdown in last week’s win. The Huskies have not

sian said. “We are lining up and we are playing fast, physical football and believing in what we are doing. “Exactly to pinpoint why that is I’m not sure. I’d like to think we’ve got pretty good coaches that are coaching and the kids are buying into them.” Foster is one of Washington’s 17 seniors, most of whom were recruited by former coach Tyrone Willingham and have endured unprecedented losing in their careers. Foster was an early commit out of Seaside, Calif., to come to Washington and was told he’d have the opportunity to help turn around the program. He just didn’t expect it to take until his senior year before the chance of reaching the postseason arrived. Foster’s struggles, along The Associated Press with those of the rest of the Huskies senior class, aren’t Washington’s Mason Foster warms up for a lost on those who will return spring NCAA college football game in Seattle on April 30. A win over Washington State in the next year. “Just to have seen what Apple Cup would send the Huskies (5-6, 4-4 Pacthey’ve gone through from 10) to a bowl game. freshman year till now and how far they’ve all come allowed an offensive TD in fast, they are playing confialong, you want to do it for dent, I don’t feel like there them,” junior linebacker their past seven quarters. “Our kids are playing is a lot of confusion,” Sarki- Cort Dennison said.

Parity is hurting Pac-10 By John Marshall The Associated Press

PHOENIX — Oregon and Stanford appear to be headed to BCS bowl games, which, any other year, would be a huge boost to the respect-hungry Pac-10. The fall off after the Cardinal and Ducks dims that perception. Thanks to a tightly packed bunch of similarly talented teams and a tough nonconference schedule, the Pac-10 is struggling to fill its bowl allotment and more than half the conference could end up with losing records. This year of parity in the Pac-10 may have ruined the postseason party. “The bowl picture is concerning for the Pac-10 because of everybody knocking each other off,” Cal coach Jeff Tedford said. The Pac-10 has just four teams with winning records and only Oregon, Stanford and Arizona are currently bowl eligible. USC has seven wins, but sanctions prohibit the Trojans from playing in a postseason bowl. There’s a chance the conference will have just four bowl teams, which would put it well behind power conferences like the Southeastern (10), Atlantic Coast (nine), Big 12 and Big Ten (eight each).

A down year? The Pac-10 is even behind in the count to smaller conferences like Conference USA and MidAmerican. A down year in the Pac10? Maybe in terms of postseason results. An argument also could be made that the conference was too good for its own good. The Pac-10 is the only conference to play nine league games, leaving just three chances to pad the record for a sixth win. And even with that ninegame gauntlet awaiting, the conference’s teams don’t hold back in nonconference, often scheduling powerhouses instead of patsies. The Pac-10 played the

Thursday, December 2, 2010

B3

Briefly . . .

The Associated Press

Philadelphia starter Jamie Moyer delivers a pitch against the Chicago Cubs in Chicago on July 15. Moyer has had Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow and plans to attempt a comeback in 2012 at age 49.

Eagles hold 2nd annual toy drive PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Eagles are hosting their second annual toy drive with KONP radio on Dec. 13-19. Bins will be located at area Safeway stores in Port Angeles and Sequim with the football players at all the stores on Dec. 18-19 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. All of the toys collected will be going to the Salvation Army. Last year more than 400 toys were donated, and this year’s goal is to double that along with the help of the community. The Salvation Army could also use warm coats, scarfs, gloves and hats, which also is being collected at each store. For more information, call 425-931-5111 or 360670-5835.

This match-up features Mark Few, Elias Harris and No. 24 ranked Gonzaga University against the 21 ranked Fighting Illini of Illinois and star point guard Demetri McCamey. The Seattle event will be the fourth all-time meeting between the teams with Illinois currently leading the series 2-1. The Illinois Emerald City appearance will mark the first time the Big Ten team will play in Seattle since the 1989 Final Four.

Moyer surgery

NEW YORK — Jamie Moyer has had Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow and plans to attempt a comeback in 2012 at age 49. The left-hander had surgery Wednesday in New York to repair the ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow. Moyer is 267-204 with a 4.24 ERA during a 23-year major league career. He was pitching in the Battle in Seattle Dominican Republic in winter ball when he was SEATTLE — Premium injured in his third start. courtside seats as well as Moyer, a free agent, Illinois lower-level tickets to the 2010 Comcast Battle spent last season with the in Seattle between Gonzaga Philadelphia Phillies. He left his July 20 start in St. and Illinois on Saturday Louis when he strained his are available for purchase left elbow after making a to the general public. In order to purchase the pitch. He has made 30 or more tickets, contact Ticketmasstarts in a season 11 times ter over the phone at 800and has reached double fig745-3000, visit any Ticketmaster outlet or go to www. ures in wins 15 times, The Associated Press ticketmaster.com. including four of the last Fewer than 2,000 tickets five seasons. Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck throws a pass in front of Oregon The soft-tossing Moyer remain for the contest, State defensive end Gabe Miller (99) during the first quarter of which were originally holds says he thinks he can still Saturday’s game in Stanford, Calif. Parity in the Pac-10 is hurting the be a successful big league for the promoter and the league’s postseason party. Illinois athletic department. pitcher. toughest nonconference national championship. teams or the full tie-in allotPeninsula Daily News The game starts at schedule among the BCS Stanford appears to be a ment of six gets dicey after 2:15 p.m. and The Associated Press conferences, with six games lock for another BCS bid, that. against teams in the Top 20 fourth in the standings and Oregon State, despite of the BCS standings, four well enough ahead of No. 5 playing Boise State and of those on the road or at Wisconsin, even with its TCU close, needs to beat neutral sites. Oregon to become bowl eliseason over. Seven teams played at gible. Continued from B1 ings are weather permitleast six road games and Three-game skid The Beavers lost a ting. USC had seven, though this chance at the Rose Bowl in Parking is always limAdvance reservations Arizona has been bowl weekend’s finale against last year’s Civil War and ited, so travelers are rival UCLA is practically a eligible for nearly a month would like to return the are recommended and can encouraged to car pool if now. home game. favor by spoiling the Ducks’ be made by calling All The problem for the national-title bid, but no Points Charters and Tours possible. The result hasn’t looked As someone who’s good in the win/loss column, Wildcats is that they’ve lost one has been close to Ore- at 360-565-1139 or 360waited in line 30-plus min460-7131. but it’s certainly hardened three straight headed into gon all season. utes for a parking spot to Round-trip tickets cost the Pac-10; the Sagarin rat- tonight’s game against rival Arizona State needs to open on the Ridge, I $10 per person, although ings rank the conference as Arizona State. beat Arizona and get a strongly encourage it as rates for special circumThey won’t get passed the toughest in the nation. waiver from the NCAA to “This is pretty stagger- over for a bowl because get into the postseason stances are under consider- well. Road and weather coning when you look at the there’s so few eligible teams, because two of its wins were ation. dition updates are posted That does not include but the quality of their postPac-10 teams,” Arizona against FCS teams. on the Olympic National park entrance fees ($5 for coach Mike Stoops said of season appearance might Everyone else is already those without a park pass). Park website (www.nps. depend on what happens in the conference’s rating. done, including UCLA, gov/olym). the desert. “That speaks more of the Those are also available Washington seems to which beat ranked teams Road access competition in the confer- have the best chance of Houston and Texas in conby calling the park’s Road Daily access to the ence. It’s about more than becoming the conference’s secutive weeks, leaving the and Weather Hotline at quantity. It’s about the fourth bowl team, thanks to Pac-10 in a precarious spot Ridge is set to begin Dec. 360-565-3131. totality of your schedule.” For more information on a gutsy fourth-down call in headed into bowl-selection 17. After that, Hurricane winter activities at the The Pac-10’s fight-it-out its last-second win over Cal Sunday. Ridge, visit www.nps.gov/ schedule could leave it with last week. “It’s really weird how Ridge Road will be open olym. just three bowl teams, The Huskies can play teams match up and I think daily 9 a.m. to dusk though. into a bowl for the first time that was evidenced through through the winter season, ________ except for Christmas. Top-ranked Oregon since 2002 with a win over the year,” Tedford said. Matt Schubert is the outdoors All vehicles are required needs to beat rival Oregon Washington State in the “You never knew what to carry tire chains when and sports columnist for the PenState in Saturday’s Civil Apple Cup on Saturday. was going to happen week traveling above the Heart insula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays Getting five bowl-eligible to week. War to play for its first O’ the Hills entrance sta-

Schubert: Snow

Preps: Quilcene loses 56-44 Continued from B1 spoint dominated the Rangers in the second quarter Armstrong said he was and rode that advantage to a nonleague victory Wednespleased with the play of day night in a nonleague junior Cameron Braithwaite, game between two Sea-Tac who started his first varsity League teams. game at point guard. The Rangers, a Class 1B “Cameron had a good team, stayed with 2B Crosgame with six assists and spoint the rest of the game only two turnovers,” Arm- but Crosspoint’s 21-10 advantage in the second strong said. The Riders next open period was the difference in Olympic League play at the game. The two teams are in two Kingston on Friday night. different Sea-Tac divisions, Crosspoint in 2B and QuilCrosspoint 56, cene in 1B. Quilcene 44 “Our kids competed QUILCENE — Cros- hard,” Quilcene coach Mark

would come back.” Thompson said. Brandon Bancroft led the “We have a lot to build on Rangers with 21 points from this game.” while Dan Davidson sank 10, Mason Jordan had seven Early lead and Jake Pleines scored six. The Rangers led 12-11 at Crosspoint outscored the end of the first quarter Quilcene 12-9 in the third but trailed 32-22 at halftime quarter but the Rangers had to Crosspoint of Bremerton, a 13-12 advantage in the which changed its name fourth period. from King’s West. Quilcene did well on the “We had lapses in the boards with Bancroft pullsecond quarter against their ing down 11, Jordan and press,” Thompson said. Pleines grabbing seven each “In the second half I and Davidson getting six. The Rangers next play a thought we played pretty well. We would have some nonleague game at Mary M. defensive lapses and they Knight in Tacoma on Friday would go ahead but then we night.

tion. Obviously, all road open-

and Fridays. He can be reached at matt.schubert@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Jones’ retiring number The Associated Press

RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks will unveil the retired No. 71 of former offensive tackle Walter Jones during Sunday’s game against Carolina. Jones retired in April after 13 seasons with the team. The team announced on the day of Jones’ retirement that his number would be retired. The unveiling will take place during the 2-minute warning of the first half,

and comes against the franchise Jones and the Seahawks beat to reach their only Super Bowl in 2005. Jones was a first-team AP all-pro selection four times in his career and was named to nine Pro Bowls. According to coaches and team statistics, Jones was called for holding just nine times in 5,703 pass attempts in his career, and allowed only 23 sacks. Jones was taken with the sixth overall pick in the 1997 draft.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 2, 2010

Business

Page

B4

Politics & Environment

Health insurance is ante in state contract talks Peninsula Daily News news services

OLYMPIA — State employee unions are on the hot seat as Gov. Chris Gregoire searches for ways to keep the state from going off a budgetary cliff. S t a t e negotiators reopened contract negotiations with many of the unions this week. Among issues on Gregoire the table is the state’s proposal that state workers pick up a larger share of their health insurance benefits. Under terms of their current contracts, most state employees pay 12 percent of their health care premiums; the state pays the remaining 88 percent. In August, Gregoire asked unions to increase their contribution to 26 percent

over the next two years, enough to cover inflationdriven increases in health benefit costs. Unions rebuffed the proposal. But now, in a deepening budget crisis, it’s back on the table. That concession would be worth about $500 million to the state in the 2011-2013 budget cycle.

$5.7 billion deficit The state faces a projected $5.7 billion deficit in a roughly $33 billion budget in 2011-2013. It also faces an unexpected new $385 million shortfall in the current budget, which expires June 30. “The financial situation for our state is significant and will continue to require all of us to work together,” Gregoire said in calling the unions back to the bargaining table Nov. 19. Union leaders said they’re being unfairly targeted.

They note that they agreed to a two-year wage freeze beginning in 2009, accepted several unpaid furlough days, and also absorbed hefty increases in health insurance co-pays and deductibles at the beginning of 2010. “We have taken significant cuts, over a billion dollars and counting,” said Tim Welch, spokesman for the 31,300-member Federation of State Employees. “We’ve had pension fund money diverted, we’ve had pay cuts because of the furloughs, we’ve had layoffs, and our members have had increased workloads.” Under the state’s proposed increase in employee contributions to health benefits, the typical worker with full-family coverage would take a pay cut of $2,316 a year, a nearly 8 percent reduction for a lowpaid custodian, Welch said. On Monday, Gregoire notified legislators that she

is prepared to eliminate the Basic Health Program, which provides subsidized medical insurance to tens of thousands of low-income Washington residents not covered by Medicaid, and do away with cash grants and medical care for childless adults who are unemployed and disabled but not eligible for other assistance. The governor said the state may also have to reduce levy equalization payments, which help kindergarten-tograde-12 school districts in property-poor taxing districts fund basic education. All those steps require legislative action. Gregoire is pushing for a special legislative session this month to enact the drastic cuts in Basic Health and other programs. But majority Democrats have been cool to the idea, saying they prefer to wait until the regular session of the Legislature begins Jan. 10.

State task force recommends tighter regulation of bail system The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — A state task force formed after the shooting deaths of four police officers recommended Wednesday tighter regulation of bail bondsmen and more information-sharing with judges who set bail. The suspect in the police deaths, Maurice Clemmons, bailed out of jail three times in 2009 without ever paying more than 4 percent up front, including just days before the Lakewood police shootings. Unlike some states, Washington does not require people getting a bail bond to pay 10 percent of its value.

The 20-person task force, which was created to study the bail system following the police deaths, did not suggest minimum payment rates for those who get a bail bond. Judges, prosecutors and victims’ advocates have argued for a fixed bail bond premium. But defense attorneys and others have worried that a minimum payment could hurt the poor. Task force member and Snohomish County prosecutor Mark Roe said some officials were “disillusioned” they didn’t know bail bondsmen required less than 10 percent.

But the task force’s chairman, state Sen. Adam Kline, D-Seattle, said the Clemmons case was an extreme example that shouldn’t set policy. He also said a fixed premium could hurt poorer people charged with crimes. State Sen. Mike Carrell, R-Lakewood, said he favors a minimum payment for bail bonds. Without it, bail bondsmen are effectively setting bail instead of judges, Carrell said. The task force’s report recommended that the 2011 Legislature come up with “a generally recognized definition of what bail means, sub-

ject to further discussion.” It also suggested giving judges more information about people seeking bail, such as risk-prediction tools from the Department of Corrections and mental health records. Bondsmen should also be required to go through background checks and county court systems, which verify bail-bonding companies, could be required to tell each other whether bail-bond companies are on shaky financial footing. Voters in November approved a state constitutional amendment that grants judges broader authority to deny bail.

Lured by discounts? Cyber Monday exceeds $1 billion for first time ever The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Americans jumped on deals and promotions offered online on Cyber Monday — the unofficial kickoff to the online shopping season — spending $1 billion and making it the busiest Internet shopping day ever, according to new data. Research firm comScore Inc. said revenue rose 16 percent from a year ago to $1.03 billion on the Monday after Thanksgiving, the first one-day spending total above $1 billion ever. Still, analysts cautioned that better results in stores and online during the busy Thanksgiving weekend don’t necessarily mean the whole holiday period will be strong.

Shoppers might have just been lured by discounts, pulling forward sales from December. A better picture may emerge today, when the nation’s retailers release revenue figures for the month. Analysts expect revenue in stores open at least a year, a key measurement of a retailer’s fiscal health, to rise 3.6 percent in November, according to a poll by Thomson Reuters. Analysts expect sales of teen clothing and, notably, men’s clothing will be strong. “Men have not done major wardrobe updates in three to four years,” RBC Capital Markets analyst Howard Tubin said. “This year, it seems men are focusing on

apparel again.” Industry watchers will also be looking for indications that Americans are spending on themselves, and not just sticking to Christmas lists. Since the beginning of November, online sales are up 13 percent to $13.55 billion, according to comScore.

Shoppers respond Shoppers responded to the deals and bargains they found online, comScore Chairman Gian Fulgoni said. Whether they continue to do so in December isn’t yet clear, he added. Cyber Monday was also PayPal’s biggest day ever. Online payments rose 19 percent from last year.

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SEATTLE — New Seattle Catholic Archbishop J. Peter Sartain was installed Wednesday with a Mass at St. James Cathedral. At 58, he is the youngest archbishop in the United States. He previously served as a bishop in Joliet, Ill., and succeeds Archbishop Alex J. Brunett, who retired last year at the age of 75. The Seattle archdiocese includes about 600,000 Catholics in Western Washington.

Toys for Tots spot

PORT ANGELES — The Good Home Store Inc., 1006 W. 11th St., is serving as a drop-off location for the Toys for Tots toy drive. The public can drop off new, unwrapped toys during business hours from Five on board 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. QUILCENE — The The consignment shop North Hood Canal Chamhas many potential ber of Commerce recently Christmas gifts for cuselected five new members to its board of directors: Joe tomers, ranging from arts and crafts, clothing and Baisch, Debbie Williams, furniture. Diane Coleman, Bonnie For more information, Story and Charlie Brown. phone 360-457-0377 The chamber depends on its board to shape policy Nonferrous metals in two ways: investing its funds and using the investNEW YORK — Spot nonferment income to strengthen rous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.0180 per lb., the local businesses and London Metal Exch. community. Copper - $3.7964 Cathode

Tracking a whale

Though it is growing quickly, online spending makes up only 8 percent to 10 percent of total holiday spending. The Cyber Monday figures come a day after a report showed American’s confidence in the economy rose to a five-month high in November — welcome news for retailers hoping that Americans start spending more freely. But shoppers are still holding out for bargains — and spending cautiously as unemployment remains high, surveys show.

Sakhalin Island. Researchers said there are only about 130 western gray whales left, and only about 30 to 35 of them are mature, reproductively active females. The International Whaling Commission said it is the first time an individual whale from a critically endangered species has been tagged and tracked using telemetry.

NEWPORT, Ore. — An Oregon scientist is helping a Russian-U.S. research team track an endangered western gray whale by satellite to learn more about migration routes and breeding grounds. Bruce Mate, director of the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State University, was a pioneer in the use of satellites to track whales beginning in the late 1970s. Mate is helping the team track a western gray whale — a cousin to the California gray whale, which is not endangered — off the coast of Russia’s

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Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles resident Heather Ellison has joined The Pampered Chef, a direct seller of kitchen tools, food products and cookbooks aimed at preparing food in the home and entertaining guests. Ellison will offer cooking shows to teach people how to cook at home and offer practical solutions for meals, like recipes for around $2 per serving. She will host an open house at her home, 1204 W. Fifth St., from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 12. Products purchased at the open house will be delivered on or before Thursday, Dec. 23. For more information, phone Ellison at 360-4525009.

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, December 2, 2010

c Our Peninsula Give the gift of live music to friends SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, 3RDAGE, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

NEED IDEAS FOR a gift for that special friend, dance partner or music lover on your list? I suggest you check out the following venues for a place to get together or purchase a gift certificate. Live music can really cap off a special evening.

Live Music

Seasonal John appetizers and Nelson egg nog punch will be featured. $15 cover. ■  Every Port Angeles Tuesday eve■  The Junction Roadning at the house, junction of U.S. Highway Port Angeles 101 and state Highway 112 five Senior Cenmiles west of Port Angeles, will ter, Seventh feed your blues muse with a and Peabody taste of the Soul Shakers from streets, the 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday. Port Angeles Senior Swingers Mike Pace’s fret work and presents “Wally and the Boys” Cindy Lowders’ vocals will sat- playing ballroom dance favorites isfy any blues appetite. $3 cover. for the dancing pleasure of all Barry Burnett does his Sun- seniors 45 years and older from day Jam from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover, On Wednesday, Jason and first-timers free! friends play roots music and ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis more from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Restaurant, 256861 U.S. High■  Tonight at Castaways way 101, Bob and Dave play Restaurant and Night Club, blues with a brew and BBQ from 1213 Marine Drive, the Sund6 p.m. to 8 p.m. owners will host a jam from ■  Dave and Rosalie 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Secord’s Luck of the Draw These fellas really know how Band will explore the acoustic to have fun! side of Jimmy Hoffman on ■  On Saturday at Wine on Wednesday at Smuggler’s the Waterfront, 115 Railroad Landing Restaurant & Ave., SuperTrees headlines Lounge, 115 Railroad Ave., from WOWstock 2: The Empire 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. before leaving on Strikes Back! — a benefit for the its winter tour to the Southwest Port Angeles Food Bank. as working snowbirds. Come join Many local musicians will also the fun! be on hand to perform hits from ■  Victor Reventlow hosts the British Invasion of the ’60s the acoustic jam at the Fairand ’70s, including David Rivmount Restaurant, on U.S. ers, Scott Sullivan, Sarah Highway 101 west of Port AngeShea, Charlie Ferris and BBR. les, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Admission for the program is Tuesday. Don’t be left out! by nonperishable food items or a ■  On Friday night, The cash donation. Veela Cafe, 133 E. First St., has The event will run from Jim Lind providing both rock 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. and country, fast and slow, from ■  On Saturday at Bar N9ne, his impressive repertoire at 229 W. First Street, Dan Magu7:30 p.m. ire and the Juan de Fuca Christmas Band will perform Sequim and Blyn from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. in a ■  On Friday at the Oasis Juan de Fuca Festival Christmas Sports Bar and Grill, 301 E. Party.

Things to Do Today and Friday, Dec. 2-3, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information including time of day and location. Tai chi class — Ginger and Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., 7 a.m. $12 per class or $10 for three or more classes. No experience necessary, wear loose comfortable clothing. Phone 360-808-5605. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0.

access and parking at rear of building. Phone 360-452-6779. Gastric bypass surgery support group — 114 E. Sixth St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Open to the public. Phone 360457-1456. Laff Pack Clowns — Habitat for Humanity, 728 E. Front St., 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Public welcome. Phone 360-457-7640 or visit www.laffpackinc.com. Teen Advisory Council — Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., 3:45 p.m. Discuss library programs, services and materials. For students in grades five through 12. Food, prizes and snacks offered. Phone 360417-8502. Newborn parenting class — “You and Your New Baby,” third-floor sunroom, Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Phone 360-417-7652. Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

Pathways to Success — Assistance program for incomeeligible youth ages 16-21 lookPort Angeles Fine Arts ing to increase their employCenter — “Art Is a Gift.” 1203 ability. Clallam County WorkE. Lauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 Source office, 228 W. First St., p.m. Seven days a week 4 p.m. through Dec. 24. Free. Phone 360-457-3532. Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Mental illness family sup- Center, 328 E. Seventh St., port group — For families and 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per friends of people with mental meal. Reservations recomdisorders. Peninsula Commu- mended. Phone 360-457nity Mental Health Center, 118 8921. E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. Phone Rebecca Brown, 360Knit, crochet and spin — 457-0431. All ages and skill levels, Veela Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. Studium Generale — Sea- to 6 p.m. sonal music program with campus and community musicians Volunteers in Medicine of under direction of Dennis the Olympics health clinic — Crabb. Peninsula College Little 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 Theatre, 1502 E. Lauridsen p.m. Free for patients with no Blvd., 12:35 p.m. to 1:25. Free. insurance or access to health care. For appointment, phone First Step drop-in center 360-457-4431. — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free clothing and equipMonthly Oneness Blessment closet, information and ings (Deeksha) — Unitarian referrals, play area, emergency Universalist, 73 Howe Road, supplies, access to phones, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Donacomputers, fax and copier. tions accepted. All welcome. Phone 360-457-8355. Visit www.onenessuniversity. org or phone 360-681-4784. Museum at the Carnegie — Featured exhibit, “Strong Bariatric surgery support People: The Faces of Clallam group — Terrace Apartments, County.” Miniatures exhibit till 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Children welcome. Elevator, ADA Belly dance troupe — Shula

Washington St., Old Sidekicks performs from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Saturday, get your country up with Denny Secord Jr. and Haywire at 9 p.m. $3 cover. On Monday, Wally and the Boys will play for your dancing pleasure from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Blue Hole Quintet jazzes up Wednesday from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■  Celebrate Sequim’s First Friday Art Walk at Damiana’s Best Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., as Kevin Lee Magner, Mary Pender and Scott Bradley perform their Americana style from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■  On Friday at Stymies Bar & Grill at 7 Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, enjoy the beautiful vocal stylings of Robin Lynn from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Friday at Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, hot classic rock party band Expertease will get you on the dance floor from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Saturday, the music changes to Motown with rhythm and blues and current hits from The Hitmen from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Sunday, it’s the rock-country style of the Jimmy Hoffman Band from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Pizza, 846 Ness’ Corner Road, Naki'i plays with a flair for the Hawaiian from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Music news

■  A Concert of Holiday happiness will be presented on the Peninsula College campus, Port Angeles, on Sunday when the Port Townsend Peninsula College Music ■  Tonight at The Upstage, Department presents its annual 923 Washington St., master sax, holiday concert marking the end flute and piano musician Mark of the fall quarter. The concert Lewis and his band play at will begin at 2 p.m. in the Little 7 p.m. $7 cover. Theater. On Friday, the Jazz Gals, ■  On Saturday, Black DiaVal James, Karin Sullivan and mond contra dance fiddler Lisa Carla Main perform with three Ornstein and guitarist Dan separate voices, three different Compton whip up contra dance styles, with guest vocalist tunes from Quebec and the Alanna Daily backed by Herb American South at Black DiaPayson, Ted Enderle, Tim mond Community Hall, 1942 Sheffel, Pete Toyne and Joy Black Diamond Road, Port AngeQualyle at 7 p.m. $6 cover les. Beginners’ workshop at On Saturday, blues great Duke Robillard and his band 7:30 p.m.; dance at 8 p.m. Suggested donation is $6 for adults, play at 8 p.m. $25 advance, $2 for children. $30 at the door. For more information, phone On Wednesday, Colin 360-457-5667. O’Brien will take you on a roller Ornstein and Compton will coaster ride through roots, blues and originals on fiddle, banjo and head down to Port Townsend to slide guitar at 7:30 p.m. $4 cover. play a concert and hold guitar Phone 360-385-2216 for reser- and fiddle workshops at the Fort Worden State Park chapel vations. ■  On Friday, Be Careful and Sunday. The workshops start at Julia and the Dream play at 11:45 a.m., and the concert will 9 p.m. at Sirens, 823 Water St. These two diverse, genre-defying begin at 2:30 p.m. bands are sure to please. $5 Tickets are $15 for the concover. cert, $10 for workshop particiOn Saturday, Southern rock pants. meets Northwest grunge with Visit http://tinyurl. The Pitfalls at 9 p.m. $5 cover. com/39f4d7w for more informa■  On Saturday at Castle tion on the workshops and the Key Restaurant, Seventh and show. Sheridan streets, the Four Pro________ fessors Quartet plays jazz from Port Hadlock 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. $8 cover. John Nelson is a self-styled music lover ■  The Blue Crows return to and compulsive night owl who believes in ■  Tonight at The Ajax Cafe, 271 Water St., Buzz Rogowski the Undertown, Water and Tay- “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the plays jazz and originals at 6 p.m. lor streets, Saturday from 7 p.m. North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. On Friday, Howly Slim plays, to 10 p.m. playing vintage jazz, Are you performing in or promoting a live starting at 6 p.m. blues and ragtime. music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565On Sunday, Jim Nyby plays ■  On Friday at the Uptown blues, ballads, jazz and soul at Pub, 1016 Lawrence St., Locust 1139 or e-mailing news@peninsuladailynews. com (subject line: John Nelson). 5:30 p.m. Street Taxi plays its last gig Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of enterOn Tuesday, Jess is styling on this year in Port Townsend with the piano at 6 p.m. swing, funk, ska, folk and rock at tainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine. ■  On Saturday at Ferino’s 9 p.m. $5 cover.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do

socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

Phone 360-681-2826.

Sequim Senior Softball — Co-ed recreational league. Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events Boy Scout No. 1473 Christ- practice and pick-up games. open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both mas tree sales — Marine Phone John Zervos at 360the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Drive across from Sunset Do It 681-2587. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in Best Hardward, between Simadvance of the event and contain the event’s name, locamer Down Coffee and Action Sequim Museum & Arts tion and address, times, cost if any, contact phone numBrake & Muffler. 4 p.m. to 8 Center — “Small Works Art ber and a brief description. p.m. Show.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone 360■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. Senior meal — Nutrition 683-8110. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. program, Port Angeles Senior com. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Parent connections — First ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 10 Port Angeles, WA 98362. per meal. Reservations recom- a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news mended. Phone 360-4578921. offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one Olympic Minds meeting — Conference room, Lodge at nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim. PA Peggers Cribbage Club Sherwood Village, 660 Ever— Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn green Farm Way, 1 p.m. Open St. Check-in, 5:30 p.m. Games, to the public. Phone 360 681Azar performs. Wine on the Historic downtown buildings, 6 p.m. New members welcome. 8677. Waterfront, 115 E. Railroad an old brothel and “Under- For more information, e-mail Spanish class — Prairie Ave., 7:30 p.m. No cover. Phone ground Port Angeles.” Cham- p a p e g g e r s @ h u g h e s . n e t , Lauren Johnson 360-417-5489. ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- phone 360-808-7129 or visit Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 www.papeggers.com. 0226. Peninsula Woodworkers p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 Bingo — Masonic Lodge, Club — For those interested in senior citizens and students, Chess Club — Dungeness all phases of woodworking $6 ages 6 to 12. Children 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. from furniture and cabinet mak- younger than 6, free. Reserva- Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. ing to wood turning, carving, tions, phone 360-452-2363, drinks and pull tabs available. Sequim Ave. 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 Phone 360-457-7377. p.m. Bring clocks, sets and boat-building, instrument mak- ext. 0. boards. All are welcome. Phone ing and construction. For Youth Open Mic Night — 360-681-8481. Port Angeles Fine Arts details, phone Ed McKay at 360-928-3331 or Gary Haubold Center — “Art Is a Gift.” 1203 Teens seventh through 12th Health clinic — Free mediE. Lauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 grades share music, comedy at 360-452-4919. p.m. Seven days a week and poetry. Port Angeles cal services for uninsured or through Dec. 24. Free. Phone Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., 7 under-insured, Dungeness ValFriday p.m. Refreshments will be ley Health & Wellness Clinic, 360-457-3532. served. For more information, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 Play and Learn Port Angeles — For children ages 0-5 to First Friday Coffee — Lin- phone 360-417-8502 or e-mail p.m.. Phone 360-582-0218. attend with parent, grandpar- coln Center, 905 W. Ninth St., kids@nols.org. Family Caregivers support ent or caregiver with individual 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360“Meet me in St. Louis” — group — 411 W. Washington and group play, songs and 417-6344. Port Angeles Community Play- St., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Phone story time. 9 a.m. to 11a.m. Phone 360-452-5437 for locaBingo — Port Angeles house, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd.m Carolyn Lindley, 360-417Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh 7:30 p.m. Tickets $14 available 8554. tion and more information. St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone online at www.pacommunity players.com or Odyssey BookMeditation class — 92 Walk-in vision clinic — 360-457-7004. shop, 114 W. Front St. Plain Jane Lane, 6 p.m.. AdmisInformation for visually impaired sion by donation. Museum at the Carnegie and blind people, including accessible technology display, — Featured exhibit, “Strong Sequim and the Gamblers Anonymous — library, Braille training and vari- People: The Faces of Clallam Dungeness Valley Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce ous magnification aids. Vision County.” Miniatures exhibit till Road, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360Loss Center, Armory Square Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln 460-9662. Today Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ChilPhone for an appointment 360- dren welcome. Elevator, ADA Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain CPR adult, child/infant 457-1383 or visit www.vision access and parking at rear of Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206- class — Clallam County Fire building. 360-452-6779. lossservices.org/vision. 321-1718 or visit www. District No. 3, 323 N. Fifth Ave., sequimyoga.com. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Cost: $10. Introduction to line dance Insurance assistance — Advance payment and registraStatewide benefits advisers for beginners — Port Angeles Strength and toning exer- tion required. For information, help with health insurance and Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh cise class — Sequim Com- phone 360-683-4242. Medicare. Port Angeles Senior St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 munity Church, 1000 N. Fifth Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 members, $3 nonmembers. Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per Food Addicts in Recovery a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge Phone 360-457-7004. class. Phone Shelley Haupt at Anonymous — Calvary ChaStewart at 360-452-3221, ext. 360-477-2409 or e-mail pel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. The Answer for Youth — jhaupt6@wavecable.com. 3425. Phone 360-452-1050 or visit Drop-in outreach center for www.foodaddicts.org. Scrapbook and paper- youth and young adults, providBeginner yoga — 92 Plain crafts class — Clallam County ing essentials like clothes, food, Jane Lane, 9 a.m. $30 for five Public ballroom dance — Family YMCA Art School, 723 Narcotics and Alcoholics Anon- classes. Visit www.sequimyoga. Sequim Elks Lodge, 1434 Port E. Fourth St., 10 a.m. to noon. ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. com, or phone 206-321-1718. Williams Road, 7 p.m. to 9:30 Cost: $8, $5 for YMCA mem- Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. p.m. Gary and Diane band play bers. For children 8 to 14. To Line dancing lessons — ballroom, swing, Latin, ethnic, Mental health drop-in cen- High-beginner, intermediate mixers and requests. All ages register, phone 360-452-9244, ext. 309, or e-mail cheryl@ ter — The Horizon Center, 205 and advanced dancers. Sequim welcome. Phone 360-457-7035 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams or 253-312-9200. ccfymca.org. For those with mental disor- Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. DropTurn to Things/C2 Guided walking tour — ders and looking for a place to ins welcome. $3 per class.


C2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Things to Do

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Sequim Museum & Arts Commerce, 1192 E. WashingCenter — “Small Works Art ton St., or at the door. Show.� 175 W. Cedar St., 10 “The Thwarting of Baron a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone 360Port Townsend and Bolligrew� — Olympic Theatre 683-8110. Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., 7:30 Jefferson County p.m. Tickets $16.50 general, Sequim Duplicate Bridge $14.50 OTA members and — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth $11.50 children. Available by Ave., noon Phone 360-681- Today phoning box office at 360-683- 4308, or partnership 360-683Port Townsend Aero 7326 or online at www. 5635. Museum — Jefferson County olympictheatrearts.org. International Airport, 195 AirFrench class — 2 p.m. For port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday more information, phone 360- Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 681-0226. Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain 7-12. Free for children younger Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. First Friday Art Walk — than 6. Features vintage airPhone 206-321-1718 or visit Self-guided tour of downtown craft and aviation art. www.sequimyoga.com. art galleries and additional Chimacum TOPS 1393 — venues. Performances and Walk aerobics — First Bap- events as scheduled. 5 p.m. to Evergreen Coho Resort Club tist Church of Sequim, 1323 8 p.m. Visit www.sequimart House, 2481 Anderson Lake Sequim-Dungeness Way 8 walk.com for a tour map. Phone Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visia.m. Free. Phone 360-683- Renee Brock-Richmond 360- tors welcome. Phone: 360-7652114. 3164. 460-3023.

Continued from C1

Circuit training exercise class — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@ wavecable.com.

Art in the Library Afterhours Reception — Reception for artist Robert Lee includes live jazz music by Chez Jazz as well as light refreshments. Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Free. Phone 360-6831161 or visit www.nols.org.

Line dancing lessons — Beginning dancers. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams “The Thwarting of Baron Road, 10 a.m. to 11a.m. $3 per Bolligrew� — Olympic Theatre class. Phone 360-681-2826. Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., 7:30 p.m. Tickets $16.50 general, Sequim Great Decisions $14.50 OTA members and Discussion Group — Sequim $11.50 children. Available by Public Library, 630 N. Sequim phoning box office at 360-683Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. “How 7326 or online at www. Obama Can Chart a New olympictheatrearts.org. Course in the Middle East.� Discussion topics are taken Sequim Christmas Chorus from the Foreign Policy Asso- Concert — Sequim Bible ciation’s “Great Decisions� pub- Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 7 lication and current articles in p.m. Tickets $5 and free for “Foreign Affairs� magazine. children younger than 12. AvailPhone 360-683-9622, e-mail able at Frick’s Drug, 608 jcpollock@olypen.com or visit Sequim Village Center; Bauer w w w . f p a . o r g / i n f o - u r l _ Interior Design, 119 N. Sequim nocat4728. Ave.; Sequim Chamber of

Peninsula Daily News

East Jefferson County Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to noon. Open to men 50 and older and women 45 and older. Phone 360-437-5053 or 360-437-2672 or 360-379-5443. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,� “James

Swan and the Native Ameri- Friday cans� and “The Chinese in Port Townsend Aero Early Port Townsend.� Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airjchsmuseum.org. port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rotary Club of East Jef- Admission: $10 for adults, $9 ferson County — Speaker for seniors, $6 for children ages Jake Meyer of Sunfield Farm. 7-12. Free for children younger Tri-Area Community Center, 10 than 6. Features vintage airWest Valley Road, Chimacum, craft and aviation art. 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch Puget Sound Coast Artilmeeting, salad $7, meal $10. Phone Ray Serebrin 360-385- lery Museum — Fort Worden 6544 or visit www.clubrunner. State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. ca/Portal/Home.aspx?cid=705. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for chilNorthwest Maritime Cen- dren 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses ter tour — Free tour of new of Puget Sound and the Strait headquarters. Meet docent in of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ p.m. Elevators available, chil- olypen.com. dren welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone Jefferson County Histori360-385-3628, ext. 102, or cal Museum and shop — 540 e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Kayak program — Help children 3 to 12; free to historibuild a cedar-strip wooden cal society members. Exhibits kayak. Chandler Building Boat include “Jefferson County’s Shop, Maritime Center, Water Maritime Heritage,� “James and Monroe streets, 6 p.m. to 8 Swan and the Native Amerip.m. Free. Offered by the North- cans� and “The Chinese in west Maritime Center and Red- Early Port Townsend.� Phone fish Custom Kayaks. Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. Joe Greenley at 360-808-5488 jchsmuseum.org. or visit www.redfishkayak.com. Port Townsend Marine Sci“The Little Match Girl� — ence Center — Fort Worden Key City Public Theatre, 419 State Park. Natural history and Washington St., 7 p.m. Pay- marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. what-you-wish performance. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for Tickets at theater offices, 1128 youth (6-17); free for science Lawrence St.; Quimper Sound, center members. “Whales in 230 Taylor St.; or by phoning Our Midst� till Dec. 31. Phone 360-379-0195. For more infor- 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ mation, visit www.keypublic ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. theatre.org. org. Port Townsend High School Band concert — PTHS auditorium, 1500 Van Ness St., 7 p.m. Supports public school music programs.

Conversation Cafe — Victorian Square Deli, 940 Water St., No. 1, noon. Phone 360-385-6959 or visit www.conversationcafe.org.

and commercial entries. Entry forms are available at the Quilcene U.S. Bank, 14890 Center Road; Quilcene Espresso, 71 Old Church Road; and Brinnon General Store, 306413 U.S. Highway 101. For more information, phone 360-765-4447 or e-mail quilcenegallery@ yahoo.com.

phone Pat Nix at 360-6810571 or Randy Riggins at 360-457-8596.

Topic: Moderation Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com. Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854. Rhody O’s Square Dances — Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road, 6:30 p.m. First Friday Story Night — Better Living Through Coffee, 100 Tyler St., 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Phone 360-531-2535. “The Little Match Girl� — Key City Public Theatre, 419 Washington St., 8 p.m. $18 for adults, $10 for kids 12 and younger. Available at theater offices, 1128 Lawrence St.; Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St.; or by phoning 360-379-0195. For more information, visit www.keypublictheatre.org.

Briefly . . . Boy Scout tree sale starts Friday PORT ANGELES — Boy Scout Troop No. 1473 will be selling Christmas trees on Marine Drive between Simmer Down coffee and Action Brake & Muffler beginning Friday. Sales will continue until

Sunday, Dec. 19. Trees will be available from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

Decorating contest QUILCENE — Judging for the traditional decorating contest for South Jefferson County residences and businesses will be held from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fri-

day, Dec. 10. North Hood Canal Chamber of Commerce members have contributed several hundred dollars to the contest effort, to help brighten holiday spirits and spread cheer around South Jefferson County. Judges will travel the roads of South Jefferson County and score each decorated entry. Prizes will be awarded separately for residential

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Madrigal Dinner

PORT ANGELES — The fourth annual Madrigal Dinner will be held at the Port Angeles High School cafeteria, 304 E. Park Ave., at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 10, and Saturday, 11. Holiday wine mixer Dec.The dinner theater SEQUIM — The Olymevent, hosted by the North pic Peninsula Enological Olympic Peninsula Skills Society will hold a Holiday Center and Port Angeles Wine Mixer at Cedarbrook High School’s Vocal UnlimGarden Cafe, 1345 S. ited Choir, includes fine Sequim Ave., at 5:30 p.m. food prepared by the Skills Wednesday, Dec. 29. Center’s culinary arts stuThe event will mix “lux- dents. ury and learning.� “Guests will feast on The luxury will come delicious food, hear beautifrom the 10 dishes served ful music and moving stoby the Cedarbrook Garden rytelling,� event organizers Cafe while the learning said. will stem from each couple Cost is $25 per person, or individual attending and it includes a fivebringing a bottle of wine course dinner. that pairs with one of the For ticket information, dishes. Cost is $38 for members, phone Jeani Hill at 360565-1962, Denise Dahll at $45 for sponsored guests. 360-565-1964 or Jolene The event will also Dalton Gailey at 360-565include live music and a 1535, or e-mail jgailey@ sparkling wine greeter. Reservations are due by portangelesschools.org. Monday, Dec. 20. Citizen of the Year Sending a check serves as a reservation. NORDLAND — NomiChecks may be sent to nations are open for MarOPES, P.O. Box 4081, rowstone Island Citizen of Sequim, WA 98382. the Year 2010. For more information, Forms are available at

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PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Second Saturday Contra Dance will be held at Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., on Saturday, Dec. 11. A dance workshop for all dancers will start at 7:30 p.m., and the dance will be from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Local caller Jean Murphy will call the dance with music provided by The Wharf Rats. Cost is $6 for adults, $3 for ages 3 to 18. For more information, visit ptcommunitydance. blogspot.com. Peninsula Daily News

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the Nordland General Store, 7180 Flagler Road, until Dec. 31. Nominations must be made and signed by Marrowstone Island residents. Nominees must be Marrowstone residents who have made significant volunteer contributions to life on Marrowstone Island and/or Jefferson County. Nominations should list the achievements of the nominee. Forms can be turned in to the Citizen of the Year box at the Nordland store. The chairman of the committee that will award the honor is Phil Flynn. The 2009 Citizen of the Year was Ralph Rush.

peninsuladailynews.com


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Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, December 2, 2010

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rdAge

News is a mix of amazing, sad and lovely Remember Thanksgiving 2010? That was only a week ago today! How could we forget? We’re still pawing past the turkey leftovers in a vain search for that last piece of pie. Well, never mind, because we’ve made it to December; have, presumably, survived “Black Friday”; and are in training for the serious holiday onslaught. So how about some amazing news, some sad news and some lovely news that might put a silver lining on the sad news? Yeah? OK, here’s some amazing news:

Yup, those of us born between 1945 and 1964, and the rate has climbed for folks between the ages of 40 and 59.

having fewer negative emotions and more positive ones, as compared with their younger days. to you: This is where he In other words, in general, people get Mark or she is. Suicide rate happier as they get older. Harvey Wow. Wow. And I’m not talking True, this is the same generation that So, maybe the graying of America (and about clunky “Star Trek” doubled the suicide rate in adolescence most of the rest of the world) isn’t the end robot boots. and young adulthood at those ages. of the world? I’m talking about Now (well, from 1999 to 2005), there nice-looking, comfortable have been significant increases of 2 perMaybe it could be — dare I say it? — a shoes — with good trac- cent per year for men and more than good thing? tion! — that any of us 3 percent per year for women, and they The Stanford study author said that could feel OK about have been particularly dramatic for those elders “care more and are more compaswalking around in. who are unmarried and those without a sionate about problems, and that may As the local purveyor college degree. lead to a more stable world.” of these shoes said to Now, why on earth would I feel the Alzheimer’s connection Hmm . . . me, “Most folks who wander off manage to need to share that happy piece of informaNow, go back up above and reread the Nobody who has the slightest interest do so with their shoes on.” tion, particularly as we teeter on the verge “sad news.” in anything that could possibly show up in Agreed. of the holidays? So, for one thing, maybe some of us can this particular column needs me to go on And who is said purveyor? You want to Well, for one thing, “the holidays” aren’t just hang in there, knowing that there about the scourge of Alzheimer’s disease talk to Sylvia Thompson at the Well-Foot exactly a gleeful, family-filled Norman because we already know. Clinic, 409 S. Oak St. in Port Angeles, 360- Rockwell experience for everyone, so keep really is hope that things will get better,. But that’s a little simplistic. And nobody who is or ever has been a 582-3736. your eyes (and your hearts) open. caregiver for a person with Alzheimer’s And, yes: She serves the entire PeninMaybe it’s more about responsibility, But the other reason is the “lovely needs me to go on about one of the scarisula. meaning that maybe those of us who have news.” est parts of that very scary disease: wanI have no idea how much these might made it to here have a responsibility to Listen: dering. cost, and many of us just wouldn’t care A new study out of Stanford University those who haven’t — yet. You know, as I do, that cold-rock-in-the- because getting rid of that cold-rock-inAnd that maybe that tired, silly old has determined that as we grow older, we pit-of-your-stomach feeling when your per- the-pit-of-your-stomach feeling is worth thing we learned in kindergarten about tend to become more emotionally stable. some serious money. son has suddenly disappeared. Now, let’s make deal: I won’t bore you holding hands wasn’t so silly, after all. And you’ll notice that I didn’t make Well, what if your person were wearing to death with the study’s methodologies Aging is not an affliction; it’s an any of the obvious, shoe-related wiseshoes that had GPS tracking technology and blah, blah, blah, if you don’t get all achievement. cracks that immediately come to mind embedded in the base of the heel? sidetracked about why anybody needed a ________ because if this is something you care And what if, should your person go study to figure that out, OK? beyond some certain preset distance, you, about, sarcasm has no place in the converMark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Inforsation. caregiver, would immediately receive an mation & Assistance, which operates through the Graying can be golden The sad news? Well, for the first time alert on your smart phone or computer, Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached in decades, the suicide rate is actually with a direct link to a Google map showJust think about it for a minute: The at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385going up, and that’s being driven by — ing you exactly where your person is? findings suggest that, regardless of when 2552 (Jefferson County) or 360-374-9496 (West No call center, no nothing. Just straight guess who? — the baby boomers. End), or by e-mailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. you were born, “older subjects” reported

Duplicate Bridge Results Sequim The winners Friday, Nov. 26, were: Gert Wiitala-Ted Miller, first; Jim Wiitala-Frank Brown, second; John Anderson-Jack Real, third; Frank HerodesNancy Herodes and Marge Knee-Ruby Mantle, tie for fourth. The winners Monday, Nov. 29: Wilma Lambert-Vern Nunnally, first; Frank Brown-Dave Jackson, second; Mary Norwood-Jim Tilzey, third; Jack RealJohn Anderson, fourth (north/south); Jim Wiitala-Brian Robbins, first; Gert Wiitala-Ted Miller, second; Michael Walker-Jim De Vogler, third; Marle Brandt-Ruth Bruno, fourth (east/west). Sharon Hills directed both games.

Chimacum The winners Tuesday, Nov. 30, were: Wilma Lambert-Sueann Swan, first; Suzanne Berg-Tom Loveday, second; Mary Norwood-Jim Tilzey, third; and Bonnie Broders-Eileen Deutsch, fourth.

Help line

Briefly . . . Firefighters conduct Operation Candy Cane for food banks PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Fire Department’s 26th Annual Operation Candy Cane food and cash drive for local food banks will visit Port Angeles neighborhoods from Saturday to Thursday, Dec. 9. Port Angeles volunteer and staff firefighters, along with Santa Claus, will be traveling the streets of the city on a decorated 1956 Seagrave fire engine. Firefighters will start the trips at 5:30 each evening: ■  Saturday: West of I and M streets. ■  Sunday: I and L streets to C Street. ■  Monday: C Street to Lincoln Street. ■  Tuesday: Chase Street to Chambers Street. ■  Wednesday: Jones Street to Golf Course Road. ■  Thursday, Dec. 9: Above Lauridsen Boulevard. Firefighters will be handing out candy canes to those who come out to meet them.

Given the variables involved, the Port Angeles Fire Department cannot predict when they will be on certain streets, nor can they accept special requests. For more information, phone the Port Angeles Fire Department at 360-4174655.

The program will include festive holiday songs from Poland, Switzerland, France, England, Germany and Norway. Tickets are $10 at the door.

Port Ludlow holiday tea

PORT LUDLOW — The Port Ludlow Garden Club will host its annual Holiday Women’s chorale concerts Tea Party at the Port Ludlow Bay Club, The NorthWest Women’s Chorale will 120 Spinnaker Place, from noon to 2 p.m. present its winter concert, Wolcom Yole!, in three cities on the North Olympic Pen- Wednesday. The event will include a sampling of insula starting Saturday. holiday tea sandwiches and sweets proThe group will perform at: vided by club members and festive, deco■  Grace Lutheran Church, 1120 rated tables. Walker St., Port Townsend, at 3 p.m. Saturday. There is no charge to members. ■  Forks Congregational Church, 280 S. Individuals wishing to join the club for Spartan Ave., Forks, at 3 p.m. Saturday, 2011 may attend the Holiday Tea Party by Dec. 11. paying the $20 dues at the door. ■  Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 Dues for the 2011 gardening year will Lopez Ave., Port Angeles, at 7 p.m. Moncommence with the January meeting. day, Dec. 13. Dues may also be paid at that meeting. The concert features Benjamin BritAny members wishing to pay by mail ten’s “Ceremony of Carols,” with accompashould send a check for $20 made out to niment by harpist John Manno. PLGC at P.O. Box 65235, Port Ludlow, WA Pianist Kristin Quigley-Brye will 98365. accompany many of the other pieces on For more information, phone Kathleen the program. Taylor at 360-301-6431. The chorale is directed by Joy LingerPeninsula Daily News felt.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

A SHINING MOMENT

71 10 Downing St. figures 73 R.V. refuge org. 74 Reflux 76 Places for needles 77 Go by 79 Exactly right 82 Mythological triad 83 Porker’s place 84 Creatures known to lick their own eyeballs 86 Itty-bitty 88 “Cómo es ___?” (Spanish “Why?”) 89 Nuts about 90 It guards the heart 94 Kind of romance between actors 96 One of the Gandhis 99 ___ Grand 101 Vegas opening? 102 ___ Na Na 104 What might go for a dip? 108 Worked up 110 Big name in latenight 112 “Don’t try any more tricks!” 114 Brooks or Blanc 115 When repeated, an old sitcom farewell 116 Cry of self-pride 117 Beginning 118 Preceders of xis 119 Stretched figures 121 R&B funk trio with the 1990 hit “Feels Good” 124 One using twisted humor 126 Is worth doing 127 Trattoria topper 129 Letter-shaped support

131 Provides service that can’t be beat? 132 Stave (off) 134 Part of a sunbow 136 Shih ___ (dog) 137 Blue stuff 139 Bitter quarrels 142 Input 144 Beatles’ last studio album 148 Annual Manhattan event (represented symbolically in this puzzle) 151 Transmission repair franchise 152 Footnote abbr. 153 Zero 154 Christmas ___ 155 Leader of the Silver Bullet Band 156 Lillian of silents 157 Seek damages 158 Org. that infiltrated Nazi Germany 159 Rx amount: Abbr. 160 In thing DOWN 1 Doesn’t shut up 2 Razzle-dazzle 3 With 5-Down, when 148-Across traditionally takes place 4 Pirate’s realm 5 See 3-Down 6 Ceaselessly 7 Intense heat 8 La Palma, e.g. 9 Canned foods giant 10 Cosmetics giant 11 Title for Judge Judy 12 Cookie with creme 13 Wakens 14 Picker-upper

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BY JEREMY NEWTON / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ A CRO S S 1 Passes with flying colors 8 Home of Hells Gate State Park 13 A lot of an orchestra 20 Really, really want 21 Break off 22 “Are we not joking about that yet?” 23 Sounded sheepish? 24 Roulette bet 26 How pets may fly 27 Came to realize 28 Avant-garde composer Brian 29 Quick flight 30 Something groundbreaking? 31 N.B.A.’er Smits, a k a the Dunkin’ Dutchman 32 Amaze 33 Shed thing 36 Source of some rings 38 Felt in the gut 41 Richard Gere title role of 2000 42 Peach, e.g. 45 Onetime “S.N.L.” regular Tina 46 Snack food with a Harvest Cheddar flavor 50 “Butter knife” of golf 51 Deem 56 Austin-to-Waco dir. 57 Frozen, perhaps 59 Escapee from a witch in a Grimm tale 61 Swingers’ grp. 62 It may be put down on a roll 64 Up for bidding 68 Strong aversion, colloquially 70 Kind of moment

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PeninsulaNation

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Rising star count shakes astronomy world By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The night sky may be a lot starrier than we thought. A study suggests the universe could have triple the number of stars scientists previously calculated. For those of you counting at home, the new estimate is 300,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000. That’s 300 sextillion. The study questions a key assumption that astronomers often use — that most galaxies have the same properties as our Milky Way. And that’s creating a bit of a stink among astronomers who want a more orderly cosmos. It’s one of two studies published online Wednesday in the journal Nature that focus on red dwarf stars, the most common stars in the universe. The study that offers the new estimate on stars is led by a Yale University astronomer. He calculates that there are far more red dwarfs than previously thought, and that inflates the total star count. A second study led by a

Harvard University scientist focuses on a distant “super Earth” planet and sees clues to the content of its atmosphere — the first of this kind of data for this size planet. It orbits a red dwarf. Red dwarf stars — about a fifth the size of our sun — burn slowly and last much longer than the bigger, brighter stars, such as the sun in the center of our solar system, said Yale astronomer Pieter van Dokkum. His study looks at how many red dwarfs are in elliptical-shaped galaxies.

Counting stars When scientists had estimated previously how many stars there were in the universe, they assumed that all galaxies had the same ratio of dwarf stars as in our galaxy, which is spiral-shaped. Much of our understanding of the universe is based on observations inside our Milky Way and then extrapolated to other galaxies. But about one-third of the galaxies in the universe are not spiral but elliptical, and van Dokkum found they aren’t really made up the

Solution to Puzzle on C3 G A B S

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S A N A I D A H O S T E F O R S E V E R T O A T E D A L L ON R E D I N E N O L A M H O E R I A R D R O P ON I ON V I S C R T S O F T C O L O R C H I P S ON E I R ON A S S A F R A I D G R E T E E N C E ON A U C T I ON A L A K P M S K O A E B B P S E ON T H E B U T T ON G G E C K O S A T O M I B I G ON R I B C A G E ON S J I V M G M L A S S H A O T I ON A L C O N A N I M ON L N A N U Y A Y M E R I S L ON G S T ON Y T ON I T ON E I Y S P E S T O I B E A M W A R D H U E T Z U S M R I F E S E N T E R E D L E E T R E E L I G H T I N G C E R M C O L O C N ON E E V E S H S U E O S S T S P

R O C K E F E L L E R C E N T E R U T E S

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same way as ours. Using the Keck telescope in Hawaii, van Dokkum and a colleague gazed into eight other distant but elliptical galaxies and looked at their hard-to-differentiate light signatures. The scientists calculated that elliptical galaxies have more of those dwarf stars. A lot more. “We’re seeing 10 or 20 times more stars than we expected,” van Dokkum said. By his calculations, that triples the number of estimated stars from 100 sextillion to 300 sextillion. For the past month, astronomers have been buzzing about van Dokkum’s findings, and many aren’t too happy about it, said astronomer Richard Ellis of the California Institute of Technology. Van Dokkum’s paper challenges the assumption of “a more orderly universe” and gives credence to “the idea that the universe is more complicated than we think,” Ellis said. “It’s a little alarmist.” Ellis said it is too early to tell if van Dokkum is right or wrong, but it is shaking up the field “like a cat among pigeons.” Van Dokkum agreed, saying, “Frankly, it’s a big pain.” Ellis said the new study does make sense. Its biggest weakness might be its assumption that the chemical composition of dwarf stars is the same in elliptical galaxies as in the Milky Way. That might be wrong, Ellis said. Even if it is, it would mean there are only five times more red dwarf stars in elliptical galaxies than scientists previously thought, instead of 10 or 20, van Dokkum said.

Dwarf star Slightly closer to home, at least in our own galaxy, one dwarf star has astronomers at Harvard taking another step in their search for life.

NASA

A cluster of diverse galaxies is seen in this picture taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2006. They were able to home in on the atmosphere of a planet circling that star using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope in Chile. The planet lives up to the word alien. Their paper reports that this giant planet’s atmosphere is either dense with sizzling water vapor like a souped-up steam bath, or it’s full of hazy, choking hydrogen and helium clouds with a slightly blue tint. The latter is more likely, say the researchers and others not involved in the study. While scientists have been able to figure out the atmosphere of gas giants the size of Jupiter or bigger, this is a first for the type of

planet called a super Earth — something with a mass two to 10 times Earth’s. It is more comparable to Neptune and circles a star about 42 light-years from Earth. A light-year is nearly 6 trillion miles.

Habitable planets And while this planet is nowhere near livable — it’s about 440 degrees — characterizing its atmosphere is a big step toward understanding potentially habitable planets outside our solar system, said study chief author Jacob Bean at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. “You wouldn’t want to be there — it would be unpleas-

ant,” said study co-author Eliza Kempton of the University of California, Santa Clara. Bean and Kempton looked at the light spectrum signature from the large planet as it passed in front of the dwarf star, and the result led to two possible conclusions — steam bath or haze. The steam bath is the more interesting possibility because water is key to life, said outside scientist Alan Boss of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. But an upcoming and still unpublished study by Kempton and Bryce Croll at the University of Toronto points more toward a hydrogenhelium atmosphere, several astronomers said.

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Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Tundra • “Cathy” has been retired; we’re auditioning this comic. Share your thoughts: comics@peninsuladailynews.com.

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Animals are not disposable objects DEAR ABBY: I’m responding to the letter from “Petless in Maryland,” who moved without her dog, cat and goldfish but wants to encourage her son’s love of animals. Your advice was spot-on, but there is a deeper issue that was not addressed. By moving and leaving their pets behind, she has taught her son that animals are “disposable.” An animal is a commitment for life, not an object to be disposed of once one’s lifestyle changes. A pet is a member of the family, the same as a child or other family member. “Petless” should have kept looking until they found an affordable place where they could keep their pets. The shelters are full of pets who have been abandoned by their families due to moves, divorces, etc. “Petless” cannot afford the fees to keep a pet — but I’m willing to bet that she can afford a cell phone, cable TV, etc. She missed a chance to teach her son how to be a responsible pet owner and how to honor the commitment that was made to those pets. What a shame. Responsible Pet Owner in Reading, Pa.

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Responsible Pet Owner: Your point is well-taken, and some readers did agree with you. However, not knowing the woman’s circumstances, I am unwilling to judge her. Other readers did reach out to offer ways to encourage “Toby” to love animals and someday become a responsible pet owner. Read on:

Frank & Ernest

Dear Abby: There are a lot of options for pet lovers without resources for permanent adoption. “Petless” could contact the local SPCA and other agencies that might be looking for volunteers to have “visits” with pets. There is also a pretty big market for “dog walkers.” There is even a market for pet sitters, who do it to make extra money for their families. Sandi in San Francisco

Garfield

Dear Abby: There are rescue groups that have to put some of their adoptable dogs into boarding while they wait for a forever home. These dogs would love an hour or

Momma

dear abby two of “breaking jail” for a walk or a Van Buren trip to the dog park. A reputable organization would know the personalities of its dogs and be able to steer the mom toward “kid-tested” dogs that would get along great with her son. It would not only be an excellent way to encourage the boy, but also a wonderful thing for the dogs. Ashley in San Marcos, Calif.

Abigail

Dear Abby: How about “Petless” contacting a senior center to see which seniors might need assistance with walking their dogs or with cat care? An assisted-living facility could also use this type of help. It would provide “Toby” a chance to share the love of animals, and the elderly residents would welcome such a sweet helper. Pegeen in Rio Rancho, N.M. Dear Abby: You frequently recommend readers seek therapy. I have been in therapy for eight years and see very little progress. Do you have any statistics that prove how helpful therapy actually is? Skeptical in San Francisco Dear Skeptical: Although I don’t have statistics, I do have testimonials from individuals who have found therapy to be beneficial. I have printed some of them in this column. I do, however, have a suggestion for you: After eight years and “very little progress,” you may be with the wrong person, and you should seriously consider changing therapists. –––––––– Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): You may be used to rushing here and there but today you must slow down and give a little more time and attention to what you do and say. Tactful diplomacy will be required. Get involved in an activity that will ease your stress. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Be the leader and take charge. Getting along with colleagues will ensure you get the support you need. A change at work or within an organization you do business with will be favorable. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): There is money to be made and contracts to draw up and sign. An opportunity to help someone will lead to a job that brings a cash return. Don’t turn down a chance to volunteer your services. 3 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Plan a social event or get together with friends who share your interests. Do something that will make you happy or will help you feel good about yourself. Love and romance are highlighted. 5 stars

Dennis the Menace

C5

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Sticking around home may result in an emotional situation. Do something that challenges and inspires you. Don’t show your surprise or upset if you don’t like what you hear from a friend. 2 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ll have to pick your battles carefully. On the one hand, you can have some really good talks that lead to constructive change. But you can also meet with disapproval and criticism if you are too vocal. Stay calm. 4 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t let depression set in just because someone is giving you a hard time. A little creativity incorporated into whatever you do will differentiate your work from that of others. Do something nice for a friend, relative or neighbor. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Do what you can to make your home life better. Plan to have friends over or offer your home as a meeting place for colleagues. You may find that you are thinking more about a past partner. Weigh the pros and cons. 3 stars

The Family Circus

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): It will be difficult to contain your feelings, especially if someone is giving you the runaround or playing emotional games with you. Don’t mix business with pleasure. Someone is likely to let you down or not show you the respect you deserve. 4 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Prepare for the unexpected. If you are ready for whatever can go wrong, you can avoid a situation with someone who tends to overreact. You can avoid a lot of unnecessary turmoil if you refuse to argue with someone who is looking for a fight. 2 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Emotions will escalate. You can start working on something innovative or lend a helping hand to someone in need, but if you leave yourself too much idle time, you will eventually run into trouble. A last-minute change of plans will cause upset. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Try your hand at something you’ve always wanted to do but never had the time. The skills you have, coupled with your imagination, will lead to a profitable venture. Someone with the ability to help you get ahead will like what you are doing. 5 stars


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Classified

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

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Community Notes

Adult care home in Sequim has a private room available. Best care at best rates. Call Wild Rose at 360-683-9194 Adult Family Home RN Homecare near Sequim has a private room available. Dementia and elder care, respite. Competitive prices. 683-1967. For the thief who stole many items from my car on 3rd street, I have video cameras placed outside my house and I know who you are. Please return my belongings or I will report the evidence to the police department.

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Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. Orange and White. Neutered male, long hair, orange spots on face. Been lost a long time. 360-457-0832

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Personals

SANTA’S GIFT Santa is still trying to find that special country lady, close to height/weight proportionate who wants that life full of love, togetherness, being best friends and a partner that she has never had before. What is inside is what counts. No smoking, no drugs. Santa has that special gift that has been waiting for the right lady for sometime and he will keep looking until that special lady comes into his life. White male, 60, 6’, height/weight proportionate, nonsmoker, brown hair, hazel eyes, beard, excellent health, who is very affectionate, romantic, caring, giving from the heart, down to earth, loves the outdoors and animals, home life, sense of humor. Honesty and respect is very important also. Santa has that special gift just waiting to be unwrapped by that right country lady that wants a life full of love that will grow every day. santa@olypen.com

4B235387

Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

Peninsula Classified makes short work of matching the right employment opportunities with the right employees. Whether you’re looking for help or seeking a position, it only takes MINUTES when you turn to Peninsula Classified.

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PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

FOUND: Cat. Orange & white, neutered male, long hair, orange spots on face. Has been lost a long time. Call 360-457-0832 FOUND: Cat. Shorthaired male tabby. Black/brown stripes, white chest & paws. Very friendly. 7th & Francis, P.A. 916-276-0121 FOUND: Dog. Black Lab, male, no collar, on Vogt St., Agnew area. 417-8118. FOUND: Glasses. Small size, maybe child’s? Purple frame, black case. 452-8435 FOUND: Wedding band. Men’s, call to describe. 452-7602, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., ask for Mary Kay. LOST: Necklace. Silver with cross, Nov. 20th, Port Angeles High School. 477-4483

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

HOME HEALTH DEPARTMENT SERVICE REP Knowledge of home health equipment/ retail sales experience required. Fulltime position, varied shifts, some weekends, with benefits, wage DOE. Apply in person at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE.

31

Help Wanted

Adult care home in Sequim needs a caregiver on weekends. (4) different shifts. Call 683-9194.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. Law Office Ast. Sequim, 20 hr/wk $10. Cover & resume Maxwell Webb, P.O. Box 2118, Bellingham, WA 98227. LEGAL ASSISTANT Full -time, for personal injury law firm. Strong phone, typing and grammatical skills required. Case mgmt. experience a plus. Drop off or mail resume to 601 S. Race St. Suite A, P.A. RCA/CNA Looking for a great place to work? Go no further! Contact Cherrie, 360-683-3348

RNA/CNA: Golden Years Personal Care, part-time/on-call, all shifts. 452-3689. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325

WOUND/OSTOMY NURSE Temporary position to provide wound/ ostomy Care. Strong experience required, graduate of WOC Nursing Education program preferred. Must have WA licensure. Apply online at olympicmedical.org or email nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org. EOE

34

Work Wanted

Hannah’s helping hands. Great worker, reliable, efficient, and timely. Will clean your home for the holidays and help to hang decorations too. Working in Joyce, Port Angeles, and Sequim. Please call Hannah Hope at 360-775-1258 House Cleaning- Professional cleaning service, owner for over 10 years. $20/hr *See my online ad with photo* Excellent local references. 360-797-1261 home. 360-820-3845 cell. Ask for Julie.

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 360-417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy!

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

34

Work Wanted

HOLIDAY HELPER Lights, decor, gifts, etc. 360-797-4597. HOUSEKEEPING + $13 hr. your supplies. 457-2837 VHS to DVD copying services. Call Nancy 360-774-0971 Winterize lawns, rake leaves, etc. 797-3023 Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

A GREAT OPPORTUNITY Sunland for less than $200,000. Comfortable, easy to live with floor plan. Cozy fireplace for those chilly evenings. Great kitchen and dining area combo for easy living. All appliances included. $195,000. ML131039/251993 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Homes

A PLACE TO HANG YOUR STOCKINGS Best entertaining floor plan around with a well planned kitchen and fantastic entertainment center in the living room. You’ll love it and so will your friends. Lots of storage for your toys in the oversized garage plus detached double garage/ workshop. $409,000. ML252115 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY ACREAGE IN TOWN Charming 4 Br., 2 bath home on acreage in town. Nice updates with great features. Cozy and country describes this formal dining room area with separate living room and family room. In addition to the carport with storage, it has a 3 bay detached garage with over 1,300 sf. Minutes from downtown. $329,900. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY BEACH YOURSELF Water views, beach and tidelands access (rights). 2 Br., 2+ bath. Bonus room, 1,732 sf, 2 car garage, master with private deck, french doors, hot tub. Come and FEEL what this home has to offer. $369,000. ML250446. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East BEST OF BOTH Close to town but with acreage, 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,808 sf home on 1.02 acres close to central Sequim. Single story, cedar siding, heat pump, two car garage plus RV garage/workshop. $250,000. ML252323 Steve Marble Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 808-2088

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

5000900

AKC Registered Mini- INDOOR Sale: Sat., 9- MOVING Sale: Fri.Schnauzer puppies. 3 p.m., 1220 E. 2nd Sat., 7-? 30 Born 08/14/2010. St. No early birds. Cameron Rd. 2007 First shots, dew New and used items, F150, $13,000. Slot claws removed, tails kitchen table and machine, $600. Disdocked. 2 males and more. play case, $100. 75 1 female left from litgal aquarium $250. ter. $350. Keyboard. Yamaha 1/2” drill $75. Nor360-460-7119 Model 620. Great man Rockwell, deal. Three years dishes, canisters, AKC Champion Sired old. Perfect condicookie jar, games, Black Lab Puppies. 8 tion. $625. puzzles, books, wks., wormed, 1st 360-460-0572 clothes, tools, TV’s, set of shots. $450. mirror, wall phone, 912-2785 Law Office Ast. vacuum, paper Sequim, 20 hr/wk ESTATE Sale: Fri.shredder, toaster, Sat., 9-3 p.m., 142 $10. Cover & resume oven, VCR, serving Agnew Parkway, Maxwell Webb, P.O. cart, collectibles, Gunn Rd., right Finn Box 2118, BellingMORE! ham, WA 98227. Hall, right Agnew P.A.: Traditional, older Parkway. Antique home. 3 Br., 1 bath. dresser with mirror, $1,100. 452-5894. sleeper sofa, love seat, china hutch, Reebok Treadmill. In sideboard, dinette Like New condition. with 4 chairs, queen 10 preset programs, bed, quilts, oak iPod attachment, entertainment center, heart monitor. Was 2 Schwinn bikes, MOTORHOME: ‘02 $600 new, asking 37' Newmar Kountry microwave, misc. Star. Cummins diesel $300. 541-279-9108 FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 on freightliner chasspeed, 2.5 liter, 4 sis, 2 slideouts, Alli- SALE: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., cylinder, 120K, very son transmission. 8-5 p.m., 111 Dryke good condition. In auto tracking satel- Rd. #17. Rain, snow Port Townsend. lite dish, new tires, or sunshine, indoors. $3,250. 302-0839. new washer/dryer, No earlies please. 55 gal. fish tank, 17” FOUND: Dog. Black 59,000 miles. $67,500 computer monitor, Lab, male, no collar, 360-301-5735 coffee table, small on Vogt St., Agnew end table, 6’ Christarea. 417-8118. mas tree, lighted GS TROOP 41127 MOVING Sale: Sat., ceramic village, lightSUPER SALE 8-4 p.m., 50 Mantle ed bldgs., too much Fundraiser selling Rd. 3 freezers, 4 kids to list and all prices gently used items dressers, 1 love seat are negotiable. No and baked goods. w/stow a bed, 1 sofa reasonable offer Groveland Cottage w/stow a bed, sofa, refused. B&B, Sat., 9-2 p.m. Christmas decoraSEQUIM: 2 Br. 2 ba, tions, house plants. new construction, Huge Gift Store 683-2130, 670-9211 W/S/G, W/D, dishMerchandise Sale storage Everything 50% P.A.: Share my house. washer, shed, security sysOFF! Great for holiOwn room and bath, tem, very nice, very day shopping! Yard furnished, laundry, clean. $700, dep. sale at same locanear college, non- Year lease. 681-0280 tion too. Something smoker, no pets. for everyone at this Prefer female 35 - 55 SOFA BED: Reddish sale! Airport Rd. yrs. But call, we will brown, great condiand Courtney Rd. talk. $400 plus 1/2 tion. $100/obo. Sat.-Sun., 9-3. ult. Mike 452-9685. 683-9194

Lost and Found

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

Homes

Colonial home on a very private 6.32 acres. Great unobstructed view of the Olympic Mts. Wonderfully landscaped including a near one acre pond stocked with bass and perch, fire area, concrete patio, ornamental trees, fruit orchard and much more. Beautifully designed home with the master suite on the main floor, open concept and a gourmet kitchen. $735,000. ML250581/43085 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. COUNTRY HAVEN Do you need a new and large 3 car garage? A newly restored historical cabin? A nice 3 Br., 2 bath home on 2+ acres? A private setting with a year around creek? This is it, look no further. Located not too far from the casino and Sequim Bay. $299,000. ML251651 Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY DUPLEX - SELLER FINANCING Duplex on 0.21 acre private lot. Built in 1975, each unit has 768 sf, 2 Br., 1 bath. Very stable rental history with longterm tenants. New roof in 2004. Seller financing possible. $215,000. ML250464. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY ESCAPE TO BLACK DIAMOND Just minutes from town, fantastic 4 Br., 2 bath on 3+ acres. 2,128 sf, recently treated to a tasteful kitchen update, new paint inside and out plus windows. MABD with walk-in closet and jetted tub in MABA. Large Detached shop all nicely landscaped with evergreens and fruit trees. $259,500. ML251628. Alan Burnwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

51

Homes

FAIRWAY VIEW HOME Beautiful single level townhome, generous sized rooms throughout. Updated kitchen. Extra deep 2 car garage (golf cart/ shop). $314,500. ML129689/251966 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FANTASTIC VIEWS Strait, city lights, Victoria and Mount Baker. Vaulted cedar tongue and groove ceilings, skylights, fireplace with propane insert and two free standing propane stoves, separated MABD. Large wood deck off family room. RV parking with dump, water and electric. $397,000. ML251615. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GREAT OLDER HOME Located in Sequim, this home features 2 Br., 2 baths, 2 living rooms both with fireplaces, covered patio with ramp to the home, large detached 2 car garage/shop with alley access and a fenced in back yard. $148,000. ML251950. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 HOME ON 2 ACRES 1.96 cleared acres with small barn/ workshop, 2 garden sheds. House has had some recent updates. There is 111’ of Dungeness River frontage. This property would be a wonderful investment or starter home. $219,900. ML250991. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NEAR THE WATER Nice 2 Br., 2 bath home. Great room has a freestanding fireplace where you can stay warm and cozy as you watch the ships go by via the partial water view. Master Br. is very large and has a sliding door that goes out to the front of the house. Walk in closet is very large and there is also an office/den. $165,000. ML252339/153095 Dave Stofferahn and Heidi Hansen 477-5542, 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. MEXICAN SOMBREROS

M E D I A N O Z A P A T A B S By Pancho Harrison

DOWN 1 Felled, in a way 2 Queen sacrifice in chess, e.g. 3 Shrek or Fiona 4 Yellow ribbon site of song 5 Island welcome 6 Lodestone 7 Hook nemesis, for short 8 Monterrey water 9 “__ a chance!” 10 Bionic beings 11 MGM co-founder 12 Field of expertise 13 “Coming Home” actor 18 “Delta of Venus” author 22 “Everybody is __, only on different subjects”: Will Rogers 24 Watching “Avatar,” say 25 Cretan king of myth 26 SLR setting 27 Téa of “Spanglish” 28 Of a pelvic bone 30 Gascony goodbye 31 Caboodle partner Homes

NEW CONSTRUCTION Experience stunning architecture and design in this 3 Br., 2 bath custom built home in a superbly planned residential community in Port Angeles. $234,900. ML252334/152434 Don Fourtner 461-5948 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY NORTHERN LIGHT Backing onto one of SunLand’s common area green belt, the view and light coming in to this home are wonderful. 3 Br., 2 bath, with living room AND family room. $189,000. ML251645. Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East P.A.’S BEST KEPT SECRET Have you ever dreamed about living on a boat, a lakeside retreat or mountain top? Do you crave seclusion, saunas and relaxing dips in a hot tub? Looking for a place with city conveniences, elbow room and a quirky country feeling? Then this is the home for you! NW Contemporary with solar design features. Open concept floor plan with many nooks and crannies. Vaulted wood ceilings, sauna, hot tub, professional grade shop and unbelievable privacy on nearly a half-acre of land. $223,900. ML250920. Dick Pilling Carroll Realty 457-1111 PARKWOOD HOME 2 Br., 2 bath 1,998 sf home. Master Br. with sitting area. Oversized 2 car garage with work bench. Enclosed patio and landscaped yard. Large corner lot. $130,000 ML251593/108036 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SALTWATER VIEW Single story 4 Br., 2.75 bath, gourmet kitchen elegance on one floor! Bamboo floors, 3 car garage, bonus room and beautiful grounds! Beach Club membership, too! $399,000. ML55633. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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12/2/10

K W O M E P A R E S C B A N T

B L I G W L A C E E G R I P E

P R O D I A E F C U B U O R J

© 2010 Universal Uclick

B A A F E M R N I O Q B H W A

M Y R I U V A T Q E L A S T N

Solution: 8 letters

U D K T D D A U S A S O V R A

S L S L Y R E E N H R T R E U

www.wonderword.com

I O H C I J I O W R A C A S T

C G S S O S C R A R K D N E H

I P T Y I N T H U A C S O D E

A A A L M N C R I O A I C W N

N M V L E B A H I N L Z I A T

M E R V M L O P O C B E I L I

R R E C U A S L S S H S V L C

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Amigo, Ariba, Authentic, Barboquejo, Black, Braid, Brim, Charros, Chin, Colors, Conchos, Costume, Crown, Dance, Desert, Event, Fiesta, Folk, Gold, Guitarist, Icon, Lace, Mayo, Mediano, Musician, Palma, Party, Poblano, Rich, Rural, Saucer, Sequins, Serape, Shadow, Silky, Silver, Sizes, Spanish, Straw, Symbol, Tejana, Vaquero, Velour, Wall, Weave, Wide, Zapata Yesterday’s Answer: Pianist

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

MIFLY ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

THUCE (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

32 Lash LaRue film, e.g. 33 Joined by melting 34 Artist __ Hals 36 Parts of directions 40 MBA, for one 43 One looking askance 45 Lockjaw 47 Drop dramatically 51 Breakfast fare

Homes

51

Homes

Lovingly restored Cherry Hill Victorian. 3 Br., 2 bath + cozy guest cottage and shop. $238,000. 360-457-6845

P.A.: Cute home, 2 Br., 1.75 ba, wood stove, big garage, ramp, nice yard. $95,000. 360-452-2758, 360-775-7129

SEAMOUNT ESTATES In the premier west side neighborhood, this 2 story contemporary home has 4 Br., 2.5 bath, a large family room, formal dining and living rooms. With vaulted ceilings, exposed staircase, hardwood floors and a newer heat pump. $289,000. ML231193. Linda Debord 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

SUNLAND VIEW CONDO 3 Br., 1.75 bath condo. Heat pump and wood burning fireplace, unobstructed water view and wraparound deck. Enjoy SunLand amenities. $175,000. ML252064/165857 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND THE PRICE IS RIGHT This clean and neat 2 Br. single wide manufactured home on .57 acres is a sweet deal. Appliances are included and the lot is landscaped with tall evergreens and easy access to town. $98,000. ML252309. Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536. Well maintained duplex 2 Br., 2 baths each, carport and great storage space. Units have been well maintained and have had good rental history. $214,900. ML251403 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Well maintained Manufactured home on .45 acres. Fully fenced yard, sunroom off back porch, 2 car detached garage close to stored and bus line. New roof on both garage and home. $150,000. ML250465/34906 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

STATELY ELEGANT HOME 3 Br., 2.5 bath on .43 acre lot in SunLand. Granite counters and cherry cabinets in kitchen. Master suite opens to nice yard. Covered tile patio and gazebo. 3 Car garage with 1,296 sf finished loft. RV bay and shop. $650,000 ML93595/251378 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Step across the threshold and back in time to the days of opulence. This beautifully restored Victorian will take you back to days when rooms were ample and homes were comfortable places to gather. Three porches, seven gardens, a dining room big enough to serve 15, a two-story shop with water view. . . just begin the list of amenities. Priced below value. $385,000. ML250558/42161 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. STRAIT VIEW Main living area, guest area with kitchen and bath. Wood burning fireplace, built-in sound system, bar with sink, and refrigerator, and wraparound deck. $498,800 ML117675/251737 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

SUNLAND HOME FOR SALE. 3 Br., 3 ba on 6th FairwayHdwd Flrs. 2 Wtr HtrAll Cedar. Lots of storage, 2 Car Gar. Poss. Seller Terms. Ask: $208,900 360-681-6890

54

Lots/ Acreage

A beautiful property in Port Angeles. For sale $168,000. Located just minutes from town off of Mt Angeles Road. The 4.77 acre parcel is surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. Septic installed, electric hook up pd, city water. www.portangelesprop.com or 360-460-0572 #1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

12/2/10

52 Algerian port 53 Apollo 13 gp. 54 __’acte 55 Bygone bird 56 Teddy Roosevelt biographer 58 “I have an __!” 59 Student’s spot 60 Arg. miss 62 Cry while showing one’s cards 63 Actor Tognazzi

54

Lots/ Acreage

DESIRABLE MERRILL ESTATES 2 ready to build, 1+ acre parcels with beautiful mountain views. Established, upscale neighborhood with homes on acreage and green belt areas. $129,000 each. Alan Barnard 461-2153 WINDERMERE P.A. FANTASTIC VIEWS OF DISCOVERY BAY! Gorgeous building lot in Diamond Point, paved and maintained county streets, site registration for conventional septic. Underground utilities, protective CC’Rs, community water, and beach access. $169,000. ML251198. Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East ‘G’ IS FOR GOBBLE GOBBLE Now that I have your attention, let me introduce you to this private, beautifully treed 2.45 acres in a very, very quiet area just minutes from downtown. Drive right into the middle of the parcel! Phone and power in at the road. Work off your holiday feast on the walking trail surrounding property. $64,500. ML251010. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company IN YOUR FACE MTN VIEW Gently rolling 5-acre parcel in settled neighborhood of nicer homes. Electric and phone at road; needs septic and well. Fantastic, inyour-face mountain view and possibly some “peek-a-boo” views of the Strait from southmost part of property. Fully fenced for larger animals (trails nearby). Possible owner financing with substantial down and good credit. $125,000. ML251287. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

54

CUSSID

LAIVES Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: Yesterday’s

Lots/ Acreage

INDUSTRIAL ZONING Level 22+ acre parcel with mountain view located on the west side of Port Angeles. Close proximity to the airport, Hwy 101 and the truck route. Sellers will consider owner financing or a lease option. 2 Phase power to the property. For more photo’s and information, please visit http://www.windermere.com/tid265507 $650,000. ML241915. Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. PRIVATE SETTING High bluff waterfront. Great privacy and unobstructed views of the Strait. 330’ of frontage of high bank. Water share available through Crescent Water Assoc. ML251816. $172,000. Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. RARE FIND Beautiful acreage in Agnew, with breath taking views. Bring your house plans. In Sequim School District, wonderful community. $199,000. ML56475/250847 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SELLER TERMS Nice private parcel between Port Angeles and Sequim. 1.46 acres with PUD water and power in at the road. Manufactured homes OK. $55,000. ML250880. Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. TRULY UNIQUE This 35 acres property was approved for almost 40 lots at one time. With gentle topography, stunning water views, city utilities on two sides, and zoning for several lots per acre, this could represent the single best investment/development property on the market in Sequim at this time! $799,950. ML252353 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? Bring your ideas and get started building your home with beautiful views of the Olympic Mountain, minutes to amenities of Sequim or Port Angeles, and close to Discovery Trail. Water, power and phone already on property. Site built or manufactured ok. $53,900. ML251546. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

THE (Answers tomorrow) IDIOT LAVISH MISHAP Jumbles: SLANT Answer: The garbageman was popular because the neighbor said he was — AT HIS “DISPOSAL”

54

Lots/ Acreage

SEQUIM LAND WANTED Must support 2 horses. 505-281-1591.

64

Houses

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. P.A. APTS & HOUSES Studio.................$400 A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 1 ba......$650 H 2 br 2 ba......$800 H 3 br 1 ba......$800 H 3 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 4 br 3 ba....$1350 SEQ APTS/HOUSES H 1 br 1 ba.......$800 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1100 H 3 br 2 ba....$1250

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540. P.A.: 1 Br apt, no pets/ smoking. $600 incl. basic utilities, W/D. 565-8039

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

ONE MONTH FREE RENT with 12 mo. lease! Neat/clean 2 Br. mfd home, Sequim, in town. W/S/G, W/D inc. New upgrades $625. 360-582-1862 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $895. 452-1395. P.A.: 4 Br., 1 bath. Remodeled. $895, 1st, last. 452-1234.

64

Houses

P.A.: Water view 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage. $1150/mo. 452-1016 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $600, $500 dep., incl. trash. 460-4294 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $995 mo, last, dep. 683-0123. SUNLAND HOME FOR LEASE. 3 Br., 3 ba, 6th Fairway, hdwd floors, 2 car gar. $975 mo., 1st, last, dep. Pets neg., no smoke. 681-6890. WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

CARLSBORG: 1 room male. $300, internet, W/D. 206-227-9738. P.A.: Share my house. Own room and bath, furnished, laundry, near college, nonsmoker, no pets. Prefer female 35 - 55 yrs. But call, we will talk. $400 plus 1/2 ult. Mike 452-9685.

P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. By appt. 452-4409.

P.A.: By college, view, 3 Br., 2 ba. $1,150, lease. 457-4966.

P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, no pets/smoke. $675, 1st, last, dep. Available Dec. 417-5137.

P.A.: Cozy 1 Br., shed, $595, last, dep. No pet/smoke 452-4671

SEQUIM: Lg. unfurnished room. $350 incl. util. 457-6779.

P.A.: Cute 1 Br. nice area, recently remodeled, no smoke, small pet ok w/dep. $675. 452-4933.

66

P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $560. Now accepting pets. 4020 Newell Rd. 360-452-4524. P.A.: Lg. 3 Br., 2 ba, 1,800 sf luxury apt. $900, dep. Section 8 qualified. 452-1010. P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244 P.A.: Really large 2 Br., 1 ba., $625, 1st, last. No pets. 452-1234.

63

Duplexes

P.A.: Clean 2 Br., garage. $725 month, deposit. 452-1016.

P.A.: Furnished 2 or 3 Br. Weekly or monthly. 360-417-1277. www.pacr.biz P.A.: Lovely historic home, fully remodeled, immaculate, 3 Br., 2 ba. $1,100 mo. 417-9776

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 606 S. Laurel, references required. $700. 457-6600. EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747. EAST P.A.: Small 2 Br. mobile. $500. 457-9844/460-4968

68

Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

P.A.: Traditional, older home. 3 Br., 1 bath. $1,100. 452-5894.

Houses

2 Br., 2 bath. Clean, great kitchen w/mtn view in P.A. W/D. No smoking/pets. Ref req. $800. 457-1392.

RV SPACES: $375 mo., incl. W/S/G, WiFi, Cable. 461-6672.

P.A.: Newer 3 Br., 3 bath. Neighborhood, location, garage, yard, weatherized. No smoking/pets $950 mo. 452-9458.

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

64

Spaces RV/ Mobile

SEQUIM AREA BEAUTIFUL CRAFTSMAN-BUILT FARMHOUSE 4 Br., 2 ba, modern kit., fplc., sun rm., gar., fenced yard. Bright and spacious. No smoking or pets. $1350 plus dep. Call 360-3874911 for appt. to view. SEQUIM: 2 Br. 2 ba, new construction, W/S/G, W/D, dishwasher, storage shed, security system, very nice, very clean. $700, dep. Year lease. 681-0280

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

72

Furniture

BEDROOM: Black lacquer dresser, armoire, king headboard, mirror. $200/ obo. 797-7311

New Medical Office space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

97315731

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

51

C7

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

ACROSS 1 Thread bearer 6 Classic name in shoes 10 Dressed 14 Aquarium concern 15 Fabled craft 16 Old 17 “So I hear your job as exercise class instructor is __” 19 Word with belly or blast 20 “Forget it, comrade!” 21 Ancient Andean 22 Davenport shopper, probably 23 Artist Magritte 25 Branch honcho: Abbr. 26 Pops (out) 29 “So I hear your job as a burlesque dancer is __” 35 Choice 37 Big, outmoded piece of equipment 38 Paris pronoun 39 Accountant, at times 41 Airport safety org. 42 Carousing 44 Shiny fabric 46 “So I hear your trash removal business is __” 48 Revenge seekers in a 1984 film 49 Dollar sign shape 50 Baltic resident 52 Early afternoon hr. 55 Disease attacker 57 Helps out 61 Demagogue’s delivery 62 “So I hear your scuba diving business is __” 64 Wine region south of the Matterhorn 65 “Got it, Daddyo!” 66 Party person 67 DEA agent 68 Frosty’s button 69 Honshu city

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2010


C8

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2010

72

Furniture

73

COFFEE TABLES: 2 matching, 1 large, $50/obo and 1 small, $40/obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685. DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $150/ obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746

75

General Merchandise

BATH CHAIR: Goes down into water, lifts up out of water. $650. 360-681-0942. CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. CREDIT CARD MACHINE Like new. Paid $600. Asking $400. 681-3838 DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. MATTRESS: Simmons Beauty Rest king size mattress set. $250. 452-5813. MISC: Twin electric bed, $200. 2 piece armoire, $100. 360-683-4401. Rocker/Recliners Almost new, 2 matching, gray-blue. $300 ea. 681-2282. SOFA: Mini sectional, red, less than a year old. $300/obo. 417-2047

73

Classified

General Merchandise

BBQ GRILL: Large propane, with side burner, works good. $20. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays.

FIREWOOD: White fir. $125 cord. 670-9316 LIVING CHRISTMAS TREES. McComb Gardens. 681-2827. MISC: Singer featherweight 221 sewing machine with case, excellent condition, $400. Exercise system, Weider Flex CTX, $125. Bike, Turner, recumbent, $500. 683-0146. MOVING SALE 4 steel belted radials with rims, excellent, $75. John Deere lawn tractor/ mower and bagger, 54” swath, 170 hrs., $2,500. 1985 6 hp long shaft O/B motor $500. 681-2785 or 406-249-3661 SCOOTERS/TREADMILL-2 PACESAVER SCOOTERS $950 each (battery chargers included), WESLO FOLDUP TREADMILL with wheels $150, all like new. 457-4837. SOFA BED: Reddish brown, great condition. $100/obo. 683-9194

Christmas quilts for sale. Christmas and everyday quilts, queen/king size. $300 each. Homemade, hand quilted, machine washable. Phone 683-6901.

Sunvision tanning bed model K-24SH, excellent shape. $500. 461-0721. TABLE SAW. JET JWTS-10, 2 fences, router wing w/Bosch insert, blade guard, dust containment box, 2 inserts. $375.00. 681-2524

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula!

VACUUM: Rainbow SE plus accessories and rug shampooer. $450. 670-6230.

PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED

74

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435

Home Electronics

PS2: Playstation 2. Like new, 2 controllers, memory card, 39 games, some player guides. $225/obo. 452-6351.

peninsula dailynews.com

78B

Musical

CELLO: 3/4 size Kohr, bow, soft case, stand good condition. $350. 457-3666. Give the gift of music. Guitar instruction by Brian Douglas. 360-531-3468 Keyboard. Yamaha Model 620. Great deal. Three years old. Perfect condition. $625. 360-460-0572

Sporting Goods

6.8 SPCII unfired M4 AR-15 with accessories, private sale. $800. 460-7628. BIKE: 18 speed women’s, light blue, includes helmet, bike/car rack, pumps and padded seat. $50 cash only. 4173545 leave message. GUN: Custom Arisaka 300 Savage sporter. $300. 452-2029. Reebok Treadmill. In Like New condition. 10 preset programs, iPod attachment, heart monitor. Was $600 new, asking $300. 541-279-9108 REVOLVER: US Arms Abilene 45 Colt, rare. $750. 681-0814. S&W M&P AR15 M4 .223 flat-top rec. with carry handle site 16” ch barrel, ch gas key, carrier, 6 pos stock, bayo lug, mil spec comp, case, 30 rd mag, fact warr new in box. $970. 683-7716 TREADMILL: Gold’s Gym brand, 10 speed, up to 10 percent incline, barely used, apt. too small. $200. 425-686-8537

78A

Huge Gift Store Merchandise Sale Everything 50% OFF! Great for holiday shopping! Yard sale at same location too. Something for everyone at this sale! Airport Rd. and Courtney Rd. Sat.-Sun., 9-3.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

BIG Sale: Fri. - Sat., 91 p.m., 1329 Campbell Ave. Stereos, speakers, TVs, VCRs, movies, CDs, DVDs, tools, clothes, furniture, aquariums, shelves, good wood scraps, electric oven, and much more.

Martin, Taylor, Breedlove Guitars. Prices too low to advertise! Crossroads Music, P.T. 360-385-1471.

76

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Garage Sales Central P.A.

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-3 p.m., 142 Agnew Parkway, Gunn Rd., right Finn Hall, right Agnew Parkway. Antique dresser with mirror, sleeper sofa, love seat, china hutch, sideboard, dinette with 4 chairs, queen bed, quilts, oak entertainment center, 2 Schwinn bikes, microwave, misc. INDOOR Sale: Sat., 93 p.m., 1220 E. 2nd St. No early birds. New and used items, kitchen table and more.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

GS TROOP 41127 SUPER SALE Fundraiser selling gently used items and baked goods. Groveland Cottage B&B, Sat., 9-2 p.m. MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 7-? 30 Cameron Rd. 2007 F150, $13,000. Slot machine, $600. Display case, $100. 75 gal aquarium $250. 1/2” drill $75. Norman Rockwell, dishes, canisters, cookie jar, games, puzzles, books, clothes, tools, TV’s, mirror, wall phone, vacuum, paper shredder, toaster, oven, VCR, serving cart, collectibles, MORE!

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

CHRISTMAS FLEA/CRAFTS BAZAAR Sat., 9-3 p.m. Campfire Girls Bldg. Jewelry from Ursula and others, lots of nice flea market gifts. Cheap and reasonable!

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

MOVING Sale: Sat., 8-4 p.m., 50 Mantle Rd. 3 freezers, 4 kids dressers, 1 love seat w/stow a bed, 1 sofa w/stow a bed, sofa, Christmas decorations, house plants. 683-2130, 670-9211 SALE: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 8-5 p.m., 111 Dryke Rd. #17. Rain, snow or sunshine, indoors. No earlies please. 55 gal. fish tank, 17” computer monitor, coffee table, small end table, 6’ Christmas tree, lighted ceramic village, lighted bldgs., too much to list and all prices are negotiable. No reasonable offer refused.

79

Wanted To Buy

1ST AT BUYING FIREARMS Cash for the Holidays. Old or new, rifles, shotguns, and pistols. 1 or whole collection. Please call, I will bring cash today. WA State Firearms Transfer paperwork available. 681-4218. BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: 22 cal. rifle. Call 683-1413 WANTED: Cemetery niche/plot (for infant) in any of the 3 local cemeteries. 417-7009, msg. WANTED: STERLING SILVER Any cond. Coins, pre 1965. 360-452-8092.

peninsula dailynews.com

82

Pets

AKC Champion Sired Black Lab Puppies. 8 wks., wormed, 1st set of shots. $450. 912-2785 AKC Registered MiniSchnauzer puppies. Born 08/14/2010. First shots, dew claws removed, tails docked. 2 males and 1 female left from litter. $350. 360-460-7119 BEAUTIFUL LAB PUPPIES Vet checked, 1st shots. Females, $250. Males, $200. 417-0808 Brittany: Beautiful, house trained, great with kids, very loving, 8 mo old male. Scott Adams 477-9266

Puppies: Lhasa Apso, ready now for Christmas, adorable. $400 ea. 477-2115. SHIH-TZU: 3 mo. old male, healthy, playful. $300/obo. 582-9382 TOY POODLES: 8 wk. old black male, 1 6 mo female tri-color phantom. $550 ea. 477-8349

83

GRASS HAY $5 per bale 460-4294

CAGES: (2) large wire cages for birds, rabbits or ? $10 each. You haul or we will haul with gas money included. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays.

HAY: Alf/grass. $5.00 bale. Grass, $4.00. In barn. 683-5817.

84

DACHSHUND Mini puppies. 8 weeks old. $300 each. 360-301-4730 FREE: Kittens. (2) 4 mo. old brothers, one long hair, one short, black, very friendly, abandoned by neighbors. Please help! 683-0050. Old English Sheepdog Puppies. Purebred, non-papered, DOB Oct 2, very socialized, very smart, playful, adorable fluff balls. Both parents on site. 3 males $300 ea., 3 females $350 ea. 360-775-4182.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Logos Bold Lines

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirrors/ windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, exc. inside/out, all new brakes. $42,000/ trade. 460-8325.

Yellow Highlight on Sunday

Food Produce

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153. TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843

93

Marine

ALUMALITE: Drift boat, very clean, great bottom, oars, trailer included. $3,200, make offer. Must sell due to health. 681-0717. BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887 BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698

93

Marine

BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176 LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $14,500/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480 RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

Borders

81

Horses/ Tack

MARE: 6 yr old quarter horse mare. Been there, done that! Performance, rodeo, equestrian team, been hauled everywhere. Flashy. Very sweet, no vices. $6,000 negotiable to good home. 360-477-1536 msg.

Pictures

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

Farm Animals

CALL DUCKS: $25 each pair. 683-3914.

Add:

81 82 83 84 85

92

Pets

LHASA APSO: Puppies. Ready Dec. 9. Tuxedo and Parties. 3 girls, 3 boys. $450. 477-8349

Grab Their ATTENTION!

Hay & butcher beef. Grass round bales, cow quality. Cubes horse or beef. Grain feed angus butcher beef. By the lb. Quarters available. ready by dec 10th. $5/lb & up. Rnd bales $25 & up. 360-457-3900

SHOP LOCAL

82

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles.

SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052

94

Motorcycles

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAWN/YARD LAWN CARE CAREROOFING

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s TTractor ractor Service Ser vice

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

94

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670

94

Motorcycles

KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290. KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210

HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895.

KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973.

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222

QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210

HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153.

QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213. RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,700. 461-1202 KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510

Motorcycles

SCOOTER: Aero Honda 80, runs well. $450. Ken at 928-9410 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914

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Recreational Vehicles

96

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426.

‘80 Prowler Travel Trailer. 20’. $2,500. With hitch. Sleeps 5, full kitchen, full bath. Tina 360-809-0836. HERE’S THE DEAL Buy my 29’ Pace Arrow with 57K miles on it, general power pack, Monroe shocks, stabilizers, hydraulic levelers, air conditioning, 16’ awning. Price $3,500 then trade on new bus for about $8,000 Ken at 928-9410. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘89 21’ Winnebago Warrior. New tires and refrigerator. $8,000. 360-681-7614 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $14,000. 457-7097.

MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970 MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itaska Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, mech. perfect, serviced, ready to roll. $20,500. 452-2148.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2010

97

Parts/ Accessories

SNOW TIRES: (4) mounted 205/70/14 Toyo studless, 80% tread. $300. 683-9294

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4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362 CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713. CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

MOTORHOME: ‘02 37' Newmar Kountry Star. Cummins diesel on freightliner chassis, 2 slideouts, Allison transmission. auto tracking satellite dish, new tires, new washer/dryer, 59,000 miles. $67,500 360-301-5735 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177.

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Parts/ Accessories

CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409.

CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. 180K. $900. 457-9292 FORD: ‘05 F-350 Lariat. 4x4 6.0 diesel, leather, LB, crew cab, fully loaded, great cond. $23,000. Todd 461-9566 FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 GMC: ‘97 4WD. Runs good, 140K mi. $3,000. 683-4401.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512.

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com.

DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556

ISUZU: ‘98 Rodeo. 4x4, leather seats, sunroof, new trans., new tires. $4,000. 457-7766 or 452-2602 ext 2.

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213

TOYOTA ‘01 SEQUOIA SR5 V-8 automatic, 4x4. Third row seating, gray cloth. Nice, nice, nice! The Other Guys Auto and Truck serving the community since 1996! Military discounts! Lowest buy here pay here interest rates! $12,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788

PARTING OUT: ‘89 Toyota Celica automatic. $5-$500. 683-7516 TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $1,000 for all, will separate. 683-7789

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4 Wheel Drive

NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400 TOYOTA: ‘96 4-Runner, SR5, loa-ded, gold and wood package, sunroof, Pioneer sound, 12disc changer, 154k miles, $6,000/obo. 360-417-0223

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Pickups/Vans

CHEV/GMC: (3) 19491950, projects and spare parts. $2,400 all. 457-9329. CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $6,000/obo. 457-7097 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929.

C9

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133. FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157 GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘86 B2000, 5 sp, canopy, bed liner. $700/obo. 460-7974. PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

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C10

ClassifiedAutomotive

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Can premium gas cause problems? Dear Doctor: I own a 2004 Honda Accord V-6 with 105,000 miles, and I’ve always used premium gasoline. The car developed an extended cranking time but always does start. My mechanic said there is a bulletin to replace the fuel pressure regulator, so I had him do that along with a complete engine tune-up. My mechanic told me to go to the Honda dealership to have the computer reset, so I did but still have the same condition. The dealer technician said using premium gas could also cause the problem. What do you think? Pete Dear Pete: I do not think the premium gas is causing the extended crank time. I would first hook a scan tool and fuel pressure tester to diagnose the condition. Next, I would look at the coolant sensor’s actual temperature information being sent to the computer. The map sensor and upstream oxygen sensors could be out-of-range without setting a trouble fault code. Identifix lists some additional problems reported by other techni-

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Pickups/Vans

MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. TOYOTA: ‘03 Tundra, 93,000 miles, V8, 4x4, access cab, leer canopy, great condition, $14,000/obo. Call 360-448-1440 for more details.

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Cars

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619. BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,700/ obo. 206-272-0220. BUICK ‘02 LESABRE Only 46,000 miles and loaded, including 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD and cassette, front and side airbags, alloy wheels, remote entry, and more! Expires 12-4-10. $6,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com BUICK ‘04 RENDEZVOUS All WD, V6, 3rd row, leather! Loaded! The Other Guys Auto and Truck setting the standards in buy here pay here! Offering 90 days same as cash! Military Discounts! $9,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788

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the auto doc cians the Damato around country including EGR back flow into the intake manifold and a leaking seal at the fuel pump module. Alldata lists a complete step-bystep breakdown on specs and removal of everything I mentioned, along with correct parts numbers.

Junior

Get thorough check Dear Doctor: I own a 2003 Lincoln Aviator with about 160,000 miles. It began overheating. The shop said I needed a radiator. Then I felt a “skipping” in the engine. I took it to the dealership. They said I did not need a new radiator. They put dye in to see if there was a leak. None was found. The “check engine” light finally came on showing cylinder No. 8. The dealership replaced the spark plug.

Cars

BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649. CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915 CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440 CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427

99

The truck is still overheating, and the engine is skipping. Three weeks later, I was told that I need a new radiator and all eight coils need to be replaced. I have replaced eight sparks and plugs, eight coils and a radiator. The truck is still skipping. Do you have any suggestions? Kandi Dear Kandi: Bring the SUV to an expert who can actually troubleshoot both engine skip and overheating problems. Have the technician check for hydrocarbons in the cooling system. If the test is positive, then there is either a problem with a cylinder head or head gasket. This would explain the skip and overheating. If there is no hydrocarbon reading in the cooling system, then a step-by-step checking is needed. When the radiator was removed, did anyone run water through it to see if it was partly blocked? Are the fins on the water pump impeller worn out? As for the engine skip, has anyone checked compression and/or the fuel injector? These all need to

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514

FORD: ‘90 Tempo. Runs great. 129K miles. 20-25 mpg. $900. 360-775-4854.

Cars

CHEV: ‘90 Cavalier. Auto, 2 door coupe. $700. 683-8249.

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866

be checked.

Odyssey will satisfy Dear Doctor: I am interested in the new 2011 Honda Odyssey. I’d like your opinion on it if you’ve had the chance to drive it. Barry Dear Barry: The new Honda minivan — if we can call it a minivan — is big, powerful and available with all the equipment that will satisfy the driver, passenger and the kids in the back. The engine and fivespeed automatic are a perfect match. Fuel economy is 17 mpg city, 25 mpg highway. Front heated seats in the Odyssey Touring, along with numerous feature comforts, make driving a minivan enjoyable. Pricing starts around $27,000 and will go as high as $40,755 for the top-ofthe-line model.

FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542. LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272 MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204 MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $4,500/ obo. 582-1292.

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,400. 360-460-0385 MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062. MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828

2011 Nissan Leaf BASE PRICE: $32,780 for SV. AS TESTED: $33,770. TYPE: All-electric, front-wheel-drive, fivepassenger, midsize hatchback. ENGINE: 80-kilowatt AC electric motor. MILEAGE: Equivalent to 106 mpg (city), 92 mpg (highway). RANGE: 73 miles from full battery charge after seven hours at 240 volts. LENGTH: 175 inches. WHEELBASE: 106.3 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,366 pounds. BUILT AT: Japan. OPTIONS: Floor and cargo mats $170. DESTINATION CHARGE: $820. The Associated Press

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

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Cars

MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436

FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619.

99

Car of the Week

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802 NASH: ‘50 Statesman. Needs work, runs great, extra engine and tranny. Must sell. $4,995 or make offer. 681-0717 OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PONTIAC: ‘97 Sunfire. Great condition. $3,000/obo. 582-3813 PONTIAC: ‘97 Sunfire. Great condition. $3,000/obo. 582-3813 PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635. PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959

Cars

TOYOTA ‘03 AVALON XLS 4 DOOR The flagship of the Toyota line, V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power seats, leather interior, power sunroof, front and side airbags, 4 wheel ABS and electronic traction control, alloy wheels, AM/FM CD and cassette, remote entry, and more! Extra clean. Expires 12-410. $10,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 25,000 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $16,750. 452-6014 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132. TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NO. 10 4 00129 4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of DORIS C. YESBERGER, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: December 2, 2010 Personal Representative: Doris L. Watkins Attorney for Personal Representative: Richard L. Shaneyfelt Address for Mailing or Service: 1101 Cherry Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Dated this 29th day of November, 2010. DORIS L. WATKINS, Personal Representative RICHARD L. SHANEYFELT, WSBA #2969 Attorney for Personal Representative Pub: Dec. 2, 9, 16, 2010

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273. TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774.

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Cars

TOYOTA: ‘91 Corolla. 4 dr, 5 speed, good shape, runs good, 30+ mpg. $1,650/obo. 360-452-8788

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

SALE OF TIMBER AND SALVAGE WILLIAM CHARLES LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled "Proposal for the WILLIAM CHARLES Logging Unit," addressed to the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, December 21, 2010, for the purchase of timber on the WILLIAM CHARLES Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, Washington. This logging unit contains approximately 55 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 564 MBF of sawlogs including 428 MBF of Douglas-fir sawlogs, 116 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, and 20 MBF of western redcedar sawlogs; and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs (except western redcedar) are removable at the Purchaser’s option. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier's check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of Ten Thousand dollars ($10,000.00) must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder's failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering. The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington 98587. Dated this day of November 9, 2010 at Taholah, Washington, Greg Masten Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: Nov. 18, Dec. 2, 2010

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. TS No: WA-226263-C Loan No: 7470083155 APN: 06-30-00-015725 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 1/3/2011, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 157, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON Commonly known as: 920 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/25/2006, recorded 9/1/2006, under Auditor's File No. 2006-1187170, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from CHRISTOPHER A DOWNEY, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION to DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE FOR RALI 2006QA8, by: RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY, LLC, ATTORNEY IN FACT . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2009 THRU 6/30/2009 NO.PMT 2 AMOUNT $737.19 TOTAL $1,474.38 FROM 7/1/2009 THRU 9/28/2010 NO.PMT 15 AMOUNT $746.31 TOTAL $11,194.65 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2009 THRU 6/30/2009 NO. LATE CHARGES 2 TOTAL $62.26 FROM 7/1/2009 THRU 9/28/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 15 TOTAL $466.95 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 8/25/2006 Note Amount: $94,800.00 Interest Paid To: 4/1/2009 Next Due Date: 5/1/2009 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $22,027.09. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $110,626.43 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $91,856.25, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/3/2011. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/23/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): CHRISTOPHER A DOWNEY, AN UNMARRIED MAN 920 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 CHRISTOPHER DOWNEY 920 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on 8/25/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 9/28/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3755498 12/02/2010, 12/23/2010 Pub.: Dec. 2, 23, 2010 File No.: 7258.25437 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank Nat'l Trust, as trustee for WaMu Series 2007-HE1 Trust Grantee: James B. Walters, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 032902-500010 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1 John Henry Knapman Jr. Subdivision 14/67 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1, John Henry Knapman, Jr. Subdivision, as per plat recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, page 67, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/21/06, recorded on 11/30/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1192181, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James B. Walters, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, acting as receiver for the Savings Bank and pursuant to its authority under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. degrees 1821(d) to Deutsche Bank Nat'l Trust, as trustee for WaMu Series 2007-HE1 Trust, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2009 1239785. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/23/2010 Monthly Payments $74,130.00 Late Charges $4,447.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $4,015.13 Total Arrearage $82,592.93 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $405.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $405.00 Total Amount Due: $82,997.93 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $317,688.69, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James B. Walters 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 James B. Walters 3908 154th Avenue Southeast Bellevue, WA 98007 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James B. Walters 244 Louella Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James B. Walters 3908 154th Avenue Southeast Bellevue, WA 98007 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/26/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/26/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/23/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7258.25437) 1002.126471-FEI Pub: Dec. 2, 23, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7314.20905 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. GMAC Mortgage, LLC Grantee: Scott H. Chandler and Juanita C. Chandler, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 063001-790030 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 3, 14/87 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 3, Rolling Hills Estates as per Plat recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 87, Records of Clallam County, Washington. More particularly described as: Lot 3, Rolling Hills Estates, as per plat recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 87, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/18/07, recorded on 10/22/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1210962, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Scott H. Chandler and Juanita C. Chandler, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to GMAC Mortgage, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1256466. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/24/2010 Monthly Payments $15,488.48 Late Charges $632.00 Lender's Fees & Costs $120.50 Total Arrearage $16,240.98 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $792.40 Statutory Mailings $28.68 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,646.08 Total Amount Due: $17,887.06 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $243,696.26, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Scott H. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Juanita C. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Scott H. Chandler P.O. Box 2436 Port Angeles, WA 98362-0312 Juanita C. Chandler P.O. Box 2436 Port Angeles, WA 98362-0312 Scott H. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Juanita C. Chandler 1314 South O Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/23/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/24/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/24/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.20905) 1002.167618-FEI Pub: Dec. 2, 23, 2010

File No.: 7021.27367 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: John R. Keegan, as his separate estate, who acquired title as John Raymond Keegan, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063023 500750 Abbreviated Legal: LTS. 1-40, BK. 8, 1/96 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 1 through 40, inclusive, Block 8 in Malony and Thompson's Addition to Port Angeles, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 96, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: NNA South Doss Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/06/08, recorded on 02/08/08, under Auditor's File No. 20081215986, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John R Keegan, as his separate estate, who acquired title as John Raymond Keegan, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to LS Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1256725. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/27/2010 Monthly Payments $1,157.60 Late Charges $57.85 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,541.84 Total Arrearage $4,757.29 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $411.92 Statutory Mailings $33.46 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,151.88 Total Amount Due: $5,909.17 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $39,026.63, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/15/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Raymond Keegan NNA South Doss Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Raymond Keegan 1340 East 7th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Raymond Keegan 1340 East 7th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Raymond Keegan 868 Freshwater Park Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Raymond Keegan 868 Freshwater Park Port Angeles, WA 98363 The Keegan Family Trust c/o John Raymond Keegan 868 Freshwater Park Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Raymond Keegan NNA South Doss Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/25/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/26/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/27/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.27367) 1002.167813-FEI Pub: Dec. 2, 23, 2010

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

C11

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7021.26215 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Grantee: Shaun Davies, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630000442100000 Abbreviated Legal: LT 2, BLK 442 TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 in Block 442 of the Townsite of Port Angeles; Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 906 West 16th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7430 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/19/06, recorded on 10/20/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006-1190019, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Shaun Davies, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to LS Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1249081. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/28/2010 Monthly Payments $21,393.14 Late Charges $840.14 Lender's Fees & Costs $49.42 Total Arrearage $22,282.70 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,492.63 Total Amount Due: $23,775.33 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $169,998.72, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/23/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Shaun Davies 906 West 16th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7430 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Shaun Davies 906 West 16th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7430 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/20/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/21/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/28/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7021.26215) 1002.144343-FEI Pub: Dec. 2, 23, 2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Loan No: 0475566642 APN: 06-30-00011345 TS No: WA-220949-C PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 1/3/2011, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: THE EASTERLY ½ OF LOT 18; THE WESTERLY 25 FEET OF LOT 19; AND THE NORTHERLY 40 FEET OF THE EASTERLY 25 FEET OF LOT 19; ALL IN BLOCK 113 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 1105 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/21/2007, recorded 11/30/2007, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1212858, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from PATRICK G. NICKERSON AND STACEY M. NICKERSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM THRU NO.PMT AMOUNT TOTAL 5/1/2010 6/30/2010 2 $881.58 $1,763.16 7/1/2010 9/28/2010 3 $879.55 $2,638.65 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM THRU NO. LATE CHARGES TOTAL 5/1/2010 6/30/2010 2 $72.20 7/1/2010 9/28/2010 3 $108.30 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 11/21/2007 Note Amount: $104,000.00 Interest Paid To: 4/1/2010 Next Due Date: 5/1/2010 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $8,216.36. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $115,824.54 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $108,420.96, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/3/2011. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/23/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/23/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME PATRICK G. NICKERSON AND STACEY M. NICKERSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 1105 WEST 6TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 PATRICK G. NICKERSON AND STACEY M. NICKERSON 75 PAULINE RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 8/25/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. Loan No: 0475566642 T.S. No.: WA-220949-C VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 9/28/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory State of California ) ss. County of Los Angeles) On 9/28/2010, before me, Corine Zacarias, a Notary personally appeared Karen Balsano who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she/they executed the same in his/her/their authorized capacity(ies), and that by his/her/their signature(s) on the instrument the person(s), or the entity upon behalf of which the person(s) acted, executed the instrument. I certify under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct. WITNESS my hand and official seal. Signature: Corine Zacarias ASAP# FNMA3755423 12/02/2010, 12/23/2010 Pub.: Dec. 2, 23, 2010


C12

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 42

Low 31

42/29

40/28

40/28

42/33

Cloudy and chilly with a little rain.

A couple of showers of rain or snow late.

Partly sunny.

Mostly cloudy and chilly.

Partly sunny and chilly.

Rather cloudy and chilly.

The Peninsula A weak area of high pressure over southern British Columbia will lead to a generally dry day across the Olympic Peninsula. An isolated shower can not be ruled out; however, much of the time will be dry with some sunshine. A weak trough will move into Neah Bay Port Western Washington late tonight and Friday, causing a 43/35 Townsend couple of showers, but they will be scattered and light. Port Angeles 41/33 Temperatures will remain 5-10 degrees below normal 42/31 both today and Friday. High pressure will build back in Sequim from the north on Saturday.

Victoria 46/33

41/31

Forks 43/31

Olympia 41/34

Seattle 40/34

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Spokane 32/23

Marine Forecast

Rather cloudy today with a little rain. Wind from the east-northeast at 4-8 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Patchy clouds and cold tonight; a couple of showers late. Wind from the northeast at 4-8 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Partly sunny tomorrow. Wind northeast 6-12 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear.

LaPush

8:52 a.m. 10:01 p.m. Port Angeles 12:43 a.m. 10:33 a.m. Port Townsend 2:28 a.m. 12:18 p.m. Sequim Bay* 1:49 a.m. 11:39 a.m.

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

9.0’ 7.0’ 5.8’ 7.7’ 7.0’ 9.3’ 6.6’ 8.7’

2:38 a.m. 3:39 p.m. 4:53 a.m. 6:13 p.m. 6:07 a.m. 7:27 p.m. 6:00 a.m. 7:20 p.m.

2.1’ -0.2’ 4.2’ -0.8’ 5.5’ -1.0’ 5.2’ -0.9’

9:41 a.m. 11:02 p.m. 1:47 a.m. 11:07 a.m. 3:32 a.m. 12:52 p.m. 2:53 a.m. 12:13 p.m.

SaTurday

Low Tide Ht

9.4’ 7.3’ 6.7’ 7.6’ 8.1’ 9.2’ 7.6’ 8.6’

3:34 a.m. 4:31 p.m. 5:58 a.m. 6:53 p.m. 7:12 a.m. 8:07 p.m. 7:05 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

2.3’ -0.8’ 4.9’ -1.5’ 6.4’ -1.9’ 6.0’ -1.8’

High Tide Ht 10:28 a.m. 11:58 p.m. 2:39 a.m. 11:44 a.m. 4:24 a.m. 1:29 p.m. 3:45 a.m. 12:50 p.m.

Low Tide Ht

9.4’ 7.5’ 7.4’ 7.6’ 8.9’ 9.1’ 8.4’ 8.6’

4:27 a.m. 5:20 p.m. 6:59 a.m. 7:33 p.m. 8:13 a.m. 8:47 p.m. 8:06 a.m. 8:40 p.m.

Dec 13

Dec 21

2.6’ -1.1’ 5.4’ -1.8’ 7.0’ -2.4’ 6.6’ -2.3’

Last

Dec 27

City Hi Lo W Athens 72 63 c Baghdad 79 54 s Beijing 41 25 s Brussels 28 16 sn Cairo 81 62 s Calgary 24 3 c Edmonton 24 -2 c Hong Kong 79 64 s Jerusalem 75 52 s Johannesburg 81 56 pc Kabul 64 30 s London 32 27 sf Mexico City 75 37 s Montreal 38 27 c Moscow 12 2 s New Delhi 79 43 s Paris 28 26 sf Rio de Janeiro 91 78 c Rome 56 43 sh Stockholm 26 24 c Sydney 75 67 r Tokyo 60 57 pc Toronto 38 21 c Vancouver 44 33 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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0s

Washington 44/30

Atlanta 53/34

Houston 66/47

Fronts Cold Warm

Miami 72/55

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi Lo W 56 32 s 19 14 sf 46 34 r 53 34 s 44 28 pc 44 28 pc 39 24 sn 34 25 c 18 3 pc 44 32 c 46 33 pc 36 28 sf 54 30 s 46 35 s 34 20 pc 38 25 sf 33 23 sf 46 32 r 69 44 s 54 30 s 34 16 sf 37 25 pc 44 31 r -10 -16 c 36 23 sf 82 71 sh 66 47 s 23 11 s

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 44 60 58 76 72 32 23 50 61 43 58 36 64 77 44 72 43 50 47 55 44 40 70 71 59 28 34 44

Lo W 20 s 43 pc 34 s 52 pc 55 s 20 pc 6c 33 pc 42 s 33 pc 31 s 17 pc 41 s 47 pc 32 pc 46 pc 32 r 29 s 32 c 43 c 26 pc 38 c 48 s 48 pc 49 c 8 pc 27 sf 30 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 86 at Fort Lauderdale, FL

Low: -10 at Chinook, MT

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Chicago 34/20

El Paso 65/27

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

New York 43/33

Kansas City 44/20

Los Angeles 76/52

Moon Phases Full

Denver 54/30

San Francisco 59/49

Sunset today ................... 4:22 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:45 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 4:20 a.m. Moonset today ................. 2:08 p.m. First

Detroit 37/25

Minneapolis 23/6

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 32/23 37/27

Today

Billings 34/25

Sun & Moon

Dec 5

Everett 41/31

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 40/34

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 45 36 0.01 10.59 Forks 45 36 0.11 113.53 Seattle 46 40 0.06 38.30 Sequim 47 37 0.11 8.94 Hoquiam 46 35 0.07 62.42 Victoria 46 39 0.04 29.25 P. Townsend* 46 40 0.09 14.56 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 41/32 Bellingham 37/30

Aberdeen 46/35

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