Page 1

Thursday

Summertime strummin’

Mostly cloudy, with a high near 65 B12

Catch a live musical act at favorite local venues A6

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS August 1, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

State mulling how to vie with pot’s black market BY JORDAN SCHRADER MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

OLYMPIA — Once legal pot sales start in Washington, heavily taxed and regulated new businesses will try to muscle into a market cornered by illegal drug dealers and semi-legal shops dispensing marijuana as medicine, said consultants advising state regulators. Consultants with BOTEC Analysis Corp. wrote in a report that it’s highly uncertain how much of the

“Anything you provide to local government to keep the illicit marketplace in check provides you with significant revenue.” CHRIS MARR Liquor board member on funding police with marijuana taxes market will gravitate to the state’s new recreational pot system under Initiative 502, which voters passed

last November. “I-502 stores may not compete well on price with medical access points if they have similar production processes but face higher taxes,” said the consultants, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University. “The medical market could be hobbled by legislative intervention, but another and perhaps even greater concern is competition from the black market,” they said. Customers outside Washington’s borders could help keep the

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pot plants are ready to harvest May 16 at a medical marijuana grow operation in Seattle. black market afloat in the state by illegal marijuana to remain availcontinuing the demand for ship- able in Washington,” the consulments of illegal pot to their states. tants said. TURN TO POT/A4 “So one might expect purely

West Railroad, North Oak connect again PA waterfront open to pedestrians, cars BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A pathway for pedestrians and car-flow through the city’s downtown waterfront area has been restored after being closed to both foot and vehicular traffic since mid-June. Crews with Primo Construction Inc. of Carlsborg on Wednesday removed construction fences from the stretch of North Oak Street north of Front Street after a little more than a month of work replacing the sidewalks on either side of the road and laying down a new road surface.

‘Our circulation is back’ “Our circulation is back,” said Edna Petersen, owner of Necessities and Temptations gift shop at the corner of Railroad Avenue and Laurel Street, referring to Oak Street connecting once again to Railroad Avenue. The work is part of the city’s larger downtown $3.9 million esplanade project, which involves improving Oak Street and West Railroad Avenue, and building a concrete promenade extending over the shoreline parallel to Railroad Avenue. City Public Works Director Glenn Cutler said vehicles and pedestrians now will be able to access West Railroad Avenue from both North Laurel Street and the newly improved section of Oak Street. Construction fences will remain on the north side of Railroad Avenue as work continues on the concrete esplanade, Cutler added. TURN

TO

STREETS/A4

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Roland Ordona of Primo Construction prepares to remove a traffic barricade from West Railroad Avenue in downtown Port Angeles on Wednesday.

Mediators ironing out PA woman’s complaint between legal and governmental representatives for the county and Health & Human Services grant coordinator Dale Holiday. “We’ve authorized a settlement if a settlement is possible, but we haven’t agreed to settle,” county BY PAUL GOTTLIEB commissioners’ Vice Chairman PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Jim McEntire said Wednesday of PORT ANGELES — Media- action taken by the board Tuestion negotiators are attempting day. today to resolve a racial and sexual discrimination complaint filed ‘Good business’ by an African-American woman “It’s always good business to against Clallam County that has try to seek an amicable settleyet to be settled. The meeting at 9 a.m. in the ment at the lowest level possible, federal building in Seattle is and if that’s not possible, we’ll just

Negotiations go on today

see where we go,” he added. Holiday filed the charge of discrimination with the state Human Rights Commission and the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission earlier this year. She said that because of her race, gender and “protests of race discrimination,” she received low job-performance evaluations, received a warning letter, had to make a weekly task list unlike other employees who had monthly task lists and could not attend a summer institute, according to her complaint. The mediation session will occur at the EEOC’s Seattle office.

Any agreement that is reached “has the force of law,” Rudy Hurtado, agency spokesman and program analyst, said Wednesday. “That essentially settles the matter,” he said.

Possible further action

If no settlement is reached, the EEOC would investigate the matter further. If the agency then determined that a violation had occurred, the case would be referred to the U.S. Department of ________ Justice for possible further action, Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be Hurtado said. reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at If the EEOC determined that paul.gottlieb@peninsuladailynews.com.

Graysmarsh Berry U Pick

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 97th year, 183rd issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

lb

Raspberries, Loganberries, Boysenberries & Blackberries $2 Blueberries $250/lb OPEN DAILY Flats of Raspberries, Loganberries, or Blackberries $10 Raspberry Purée 1 Gal. Frozen $20

no violation had occurred, Holiday would be notified that she could pursue the matter on her own in federal court, Hurtado said. Commissioners Tuesday unanimously established an undisclosed cap for any monetary settlement that the county might reach with Holiday. Establishment of a cap “is a routine matter when you enter discussions over a settlement,” McEntire said. “It’s just what you always do.”

8-4 • SUN 10-4 Bring a picnic!

$

10

Fresh Flats 38816173

6187 Woodcock Road, Sequim • 360-683-5563

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS MOVIES NATION/WORLD PENINSULA POLL

B6 B6 B5 A7 B5 A6 B12 A3 A2

PUZZLES/GAMES B4, B8 B1 SPORTS B4 3RDAGE B12 WEATHER


A2

UpFront

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Writer accepts donation for ID revelation AUTHOR J.K. ROWLING accepted an apology and a charitable donation Wednesday from a law firm that revealed she wrote a crime novel under a pseudonym. The Harry Potter author was exposed by a newspaper July 14 as the author of Rowling The Cuckoo’s Calling, a thriller ostensibly written by former soldier and first-time novelist Robert Galbraith. The book was published in April to good reviews but modest sales, and there was speculation that Rowling or her publisher had leaked the news to raise the book’s profile.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

IN

ALL ITS GLORY

The restored space shuttle Galileo from the 1960s television show “Star Trek” is unveiled at Space Center Houston in Texas on Wednesday. The craft, which crash-landed on a hostile planet in the 1967 episode “The Galileo Seven,” was restored for $61,000. But the law firm Russells, which has done work for Rowling, acknowledged that one of its partners had let the information slip to

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

his wife’s best friend, who tweeted it to a Sunday Times columnist. Rowling sued the lawyer and the friend.

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: How concerned are you about foods that have been genetically modified or engineered?

Passings

Very concerned

By The Associated Press

BERTHOLD BEITZ, 99, who was honored for saving hundreds of Jews in occupied Poland during World War II and became one of post-war West Germany’s leading industrialists, has died. Steelmaker ThyssenKrupp AG, where he was the honorary chairman of the supervi- Mr. Beitz sory board, in 2013 announced Mr. Beitz’s death Wednesday. It said in a statement that he died Tuesday and gave no further details. Mr. Beitz and his wife, Else, were honored by Germany’s main Jewish group in 2000 for saving hundreds of Jewish workers at an oil field he managed in occupied Poland from deportation to Nazi death camps. In 2000, the German Council of Jews in Germany awarded Mr. Beitz its highest honor, the LeoBaeck Award. In 1973, Mr. Beitz was given the Righteous Among the Nations honorific by the Israeli Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum, the highest honor given to a Gentile, or non-Jew, for saving Jews.

45.3%

Concerned OSSIE SCHECTMAN, 94, a Knicks guard and a onetime all-American at Long Island University in Brooklyn, played when the two-handed set shot ruled and a 6-foot-8 center was a giant. When Mr. Schectman died Tuesday, he was remembered as a central figure in the National Mr. Schectman Basketball in 1996 Association’s creation tale: He scored the first 2 points in the league’s history and became something of a celebrity when the distinction was uncovered, 42 years and 5 million points later. On the night of Nov. 1, 1946, the Knicks faced the Toronto Huskies at Maple Leaf Gardens, the home of the National Hockey League’s Maple Leafs, at the inaugural game of the Basketball Association of America, which became the NBA three years later. Hoping for a respectable turnout, management offered a free ticket to any fan taller than the Huskies’ 6-8 center,

George Nostrand. The man of the evening, so far as history would go, turned out to be a mere 6-footer: Mr. Schectman, the Knicks’ captain. “I scored on a twohanded underhand layup,” Mr. Schectman told Charley Rosen, the author of The First Tip-Off (2008), a history of the NBA’s first season.

Slightly concerned

18.1% 13.1%

Not concerned

20.1%

Undecided 2.4% Huh? What are they? 1.3% Total votes cast: 1,246 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Peninsula Lookback

Setting it Straight

From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

their vacation trip around Radio news reports from the Peninsula. It had rained steadily Seattle erroneously identiall the way from Portland fied a stranded man on [Ore.], and the blue mood Mount Olympus near Salt Lake City in Utah as being they were in was fortunately dispelled by Virginia on Mount Olympus on the Peterson’s soothing organ Olympic Peninsula. melodies. As a result, National And when we found it Park Service and U.S. Forwas [Mrs. Pearson’s] birthest Service officials locally day and took pictures of were poised to activate emergency efforts to rescue them, the day ended on a little warmer note. a 25-year-old man marooned for 18 hours 1988 (25 years ago) after a 30-foot fall. But Roger Carney, the The preliminary Sequim climber, was stuck on the School District operating Olympus southeast of the budget for the 1988-1989 Utah capital. school year is lean and conLocal authorities soon tains no surprises, Superinlearned of the gaffe and tendent Ken Anderson told called off crews and lookthe School Board. outs. He noted that the proCarney eventually was posed $7.57 million budget rescued, then hospitalized contains a small ending Seen Around in Salt Lake City. cash balance of just under Peninsula snapshots $32,000. One of the district’s SIGN SEEN AT a local 1963 (50 years ago) Laugh Lines annual costs: $53,618 for business: “As of August 1st, Advertisement from the rental of portable classonly those 21 and over will Birney’s Restaurant and THE NEW ROYAL room buildings to accombe allowed. . . . Sorry for Drive-in at First and baby, Prince George Alexmodate overflows at the Eunice streets in Port ander Louis of Cambridge, any incontinence.” . . . elementary school. Angeles: is third in line for the EngWANTED! “Seen Around” The district is asking votMr. and Mrs. C.A. Pearlish throne. Send them to PDN News ers to approve a $3.7 million son of Greenbrae, Calif., To which Prince Charles items. Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles bond in September to conwere in Birney’s dining said, “It’s a really slowWA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or room Sunday evening, dis- struct an elementary school moving line.” email news@peninsuladailynews. in Carlsborg. appointed as can be with Jay Leno com.

1938 (75 years ago)

Corrections and clarifications

■ The Clallam County commissioners have not agreed to pay Dale Holiday a settlement on her racial and sexual discrimination complaint. They are entering mediation today to decide whether they will settle with Holiday, grant coordinator for county Health & Human Services, after authorizing a cap for a potential payment. Headlines on Wednesday stories on Page A1 in the Clallam County edition and Page A6 were incorrect, and the story did not make it clear that no settlement has been reached. A new story is on Page A1 in the Clallam County edition and Page A4 in the Jefferson County edition today.

__________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Aug. 1, the 213th day of 2013. There are 152 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Aug. 1, 1913, the Joyce Kilmer poem “Trees” was first published in Poetry: A Magazine of Verse. On this date: ■ In 1714, Britain’s Queen Anne died at age 49; she was succeeded by George I. ■ In 1876, Colorado was admitted as the 38th state. ■ In 1907, the U.S. Army Signal Corps established an aeronautical division, the forerunner of the U.S. Air Force. ■ In 1933, the National Recovery Administration’s “Blue Eagle”

symbol began to appear in store windows and on packages to show support for the National Industrial Recovery Act. ■ In 1936, the Olympics opened in Berlin with a ceremony presided over by Adolf Hitler. ■ In 1943, rioting broke out in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood after a false rumor spread that a police officer had shot and killed a black Army soldier who in fact had only been wounded; six people were killed in the violence. ■ In 1944, an uprising broke out in Warsaw, Poland, against Nazi occupation; the revolt lasted two months before collapsing. ■ In 1957, the United States and Canada agreed to create the

North American Air Defense Command. ■ In 1966, Charles Joseph Whitman, 25, went on a shooting rampage at the University of Texas in Austin, killing 14 people. Whitman, who also had murdered his wife and mother hours earlier, was gunned down by police. ■ In 1973, the movie “American Graffiti,” directed by George Lucas, first opened. ■ In 1988, conservative commentator Rush Limbaugh began broadcasting his nationally syndicated radio program. ■ In 2007, the eight-lane Interstate 35W bridge, a major Minneapolis artery, collapsed into the Mississippi River during eve-

ning rush hour, killing 13 people. ■ Ten years ago: A suicide bomber rammed a truck filled with explosives into a military hospital near Chechnya, killing 50 people, including Russian troops wounded in Chechnya. ■ Five years ago: Some 30 mountaineers began a disastrous attempt to scale K2 in Pakistan; 11 of them died in a series of accidents, including icefalls. ■ One year ago: President Barack Obama made his rival’s personal millions a front-and-center issue in the race for the White House, telling a swing-state audience in Ohio that Mitt Romney “is asking you to pay more so that people like him can get a big tax cut.”


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, August 1, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Manning team awaits soldier’s sentencing FORT MEADE, Md. — It is now up to a military judge to determine if Army Pfc. Bradley Manning will spend the rest of his life in prison even after being acquitted of the most serious charge against him for his release of thousands of documents to the website WikiLeaks. The sentencing phase of the soldier’s court-martial began Wednesday. He faces up to 136 years in prison, though his attorneys have asked Manning the military judge to merge two of his espionage convictions and two of his theft convictions. If Army Col. Denise Lind agrees to do so, he would face up to 116 years in prison. The former intelligence analyst was convicted of 20 of 22 charges for sending hundreds of thousands of government and diplomatic secrets to WikiLeaks. Military prosecutors said they would call as many as 20 witnesses for the sentencing phase.

Inmate shoots deputy BOSTON — An inmate being taken for treatment at a specialty hospital shot a deputy sheriff after a struggle over the officer’s gun Wednesday, then was shot and critically wounded

by a second deputy, police said. Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said the shooting happened around noon in the emergency room of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. The two officers from Middlesex County were removing the inmate’s handcuffs when the man grabbed for the gun of one of the officers, he said. During the struggle that followed, one of the deputies was shot in the leg. The other deputy sheriff then fired his weapon, striking the prisoner in the chest, Davis said. The officer was taken to nearby Massachusetts General Hospital, where he was in stable condition. The inmate, taken to the same hospital, was believed to be in critical condition.

Tropical Storm Gil MIAMI — Forecasters say Tropical Storm Gil is getting better organized in the Pacific, far off the southern tip of California. The National Hurricane Center in Miami says maximum sustained winds late Tuesday are at 45 mph. The center is about 845 miles south-southwest of Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, south of California. It could become a hurricane by today. There are no coastal warnings or watches. Gil is moving at 15 mph and is expected to head farther out to sea on its current west-northwest track. Meanwhile, what was once Tropical Storm Flossie’s Hawaiian adventure was short, scattered and left little damage behind. The Associated Press

Bleak future outlined for Pentagon budget than $50 billion from the 2014 budget and $500 billion over the next 10 years as a result of congressionally mandated automatic spending cuts. The Pentagon has been ratcheting up a drumbeat about the THE ASSOCIATED PRESS dire effects of the budget cuts on WASHINGTON — Defense national defense, as Congress conSecretary Chuck Hagel warned tinues to wrangle over spending Wednesday that the Pentagon bills on Capitol Hill. may have to mothball up to three Navy aircraft carriers and order Lowest since WWII additional sharp reductions in the Going from 11 to eight or nine size of the Army and Marine Corps if Congress doesn’t act to carrier strike groups would bring avoid massive budget cuts begin- the Navy to its lowest number since World War II. And the troop ning in 2014. Speaking to Pentagon report- cuts would shear the Army back ers, and indirectly to Congress, to levels not seen since at least Hagel said that the full result of 1950, eroding the military’s abilthe sweeping budget cuts over the ity to keep forces deployed and next 10 years could leave the combat-ready overseas. Detailing options, Hagel said nation with an ill-prepared, under-equipped military doomed America may have to choose to face more technologically between having a highly capable but significantly smaller military advanced enemies. In his starkest terms to date, and having a larger force while Hagel laid out a worst-case sce- reducing special operations forces, nario for the U.S. military if the limiting research and cutting or Pentagon is forced to slash more curtailing plans to upgrade weap-

Hagel lays out grim scenario

ons systems. That second option, he said, would likely result in the U.S. military using older, less-effective equipment against more technologically advanced adversaries. And it would have a greater impact on private defense companies around the country. The U.S., said Hagel, risks fielding a military force that would be unprepared due to a lack of training, maintenance and upgraded equipment. And, even if the Pentagon chooses the most dramatic cuts, Hagel said, it still would “fall well short” of meeting the reductions required by the automatic budget cuts, primarily within the first five years. While noting that no final decisions have been made, Hagel said that to achieve the savings by shrinking the force, the Pentagon might have to cut more than 100,000 additional soldiers from the Army, which already plans to go from a wartime high of about 570,000 to 490,000 by 2017.

Briefly: World ens to halt the three-time former premier’s 20-year political career. After spending more CAIRO — Egypt’s militarythan eight backed government Wednesday hours listenordered the police to clear two Berlusconi Cairo protest camps packed with ing to arguments by Bersupporters of ousted President lusconi’s beefed-up legal team Mohammed Morsi, saying they threatened national security and and those of other defendants, Antonio Esposito, the presiding were “terrorizing” citizens. The move signaled an immi- judge on the five-member court, said that its deliberations would nent crackdown against the heavily barricaded sit-ins — one start at midday today. outside a mosque in eastern Cairo and another on the other Thieves hit watch store side of the city near the main PARIS — French police said Cairo University campus. a luxury watch store was robbed It also raised the specter of on the same exclusive promemore violence after clashes between police and the Islamist nade in Cannes, France, where protesters July 8 and last week- a man made off with $136 million in diamonds this week. end left more than 130 dead. Frederic Foncel, a Cannes A spokesman for the Muslim Brotherhood, Gehad el-Haddad, police union representative, said two armed men, their faces consaid the Cabinet’s announcement reflected the rule of a “con- cealed by scarves and caps, spiratorial gang” that has no made off with a “significant” respect for the law. haul of luxury watches during Asked whether the BrotherWednesday’s robbery at Krohood would voluntarily break up nometry, less than a half-mile the protest, he told The Associfrom the Carlton Intercontinenated Press: “This is an open sittal Hotel where a single gunin. We don’t have control over man stole the jewels Sunday. the people. . . . It is a free choice.” Foncel said at least one man had a grenade, and both escaped. Tax fraud deliberations He criticized the city’s ROME — Silvio Berlusconi’s approach to security, saying it is becoming a routine target for lawyers urged Italy’s highest thieves. court Wednesday to overturn a The Associated Press tax fraud conviction that threat-

Egypt orders police to clear protest camps

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KERRY

IN

PAKISTAN

TO DISCUSS DRONES

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, on stairs, is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan Richard Olson upon arriving in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Wednesday. Kerry is scheduled to meet with members of Pakistan’s newly elected civilian government today to discuss U.S. drone attacks, Afghanistan and other topics.

Sentencing today for man who held 3 captive in Ohio THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — When Ariel Castro was arrested and charged with imprisoning and raping three women in his house on a tough Cleveland street over a decade, his attorneys said evidence would show he was not a monster. The county prosecutor said the facts he’ll present today at Castro’s sentencing, where Castro faces life in prison plus 1,000 years, will prove them wrong. “You’ll make the same logical judgment when you see the facts,”

Quick Read

Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty said Friday after Castro, 53, pleaded guilty to 937 counts, including a g g r a v a t e d Castro murder, kidnapping, rape and assault. “You have not seen the evidence yet.” McGinty hasn’t said whether the three women will testify in

person. The legal team representing the women’s interests did not comment on whether they would testify or send statements. The women disappeared between 2002 and 2004, when they were 14, 16 and 20 years old. There was no immediate comment from Castro’s defense team. Many horrific details of the women’s ordeal already have emerged, including tales of being chained to basement poles, a bedroom heater or inside a van, with one woman having a vacuum cord wrapped around her neck.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Simpson granted parole on some convictions

Nation: Ohio trooper gives suspects ride to shooting

Nation: Republican ready to announce for Ark. race

World: Al-Qaida says Gitmo ‘odious’ face of America

O.J. SIMPSON WON a small victory Wednesday in his bid for freedom as Nevada granted him parole on some of his 2008 convictions for kidnapping and armed robbery involving the holdup of two sports memorabilia dealers at a Las Vegas hotel room. But the decision doesn’t mean Simpson will be leaving prison anytime soon. The former NFL star still faces at least four years behind bars on sentences ordered to run consecutively. The Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners released its decision in favor of Simpson’s parole request Wednesday. Commissioners noted Simpson’s “positive institutional record.”

TWO TEENS CHARGED in a pair of fatal shootings got a ride to the scene of a non-fatal shooting by an Ohio trooper who apparently did not pat them down or check for warrants after finding them on a highway ramp. The young men, ages 17 and 18, were charged Tuesday in the death of a teenager in Columbus, not far from a convenience store where they are accused of having killed a clerk. They are being questioned in a nonfatal shooting at a truck stop where Sgt. Jeffrey Shane dropped them off. Shane has been placed on administrative desk duty during an internal investigation.

REP. TOM COTTON plans to announce his bid next week to challenge two-term incumbent Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor in next year’s elections, according to a person familiar with the congressman’s plans. The freshman Republican congressman scheduled an event with supporters in his hometown of Dardanelle, Ark. Cotton’s entry will set up a heated and expensive fight for a U.S. Senate seat that Republicans believe is prime for a pickup in 2014. Cotton was elected to the U.S. House in 2012 to the open seat formerly held by Democrat Mike Ross.

AL-QAIDA’S LEADER SAID in remarks posted Wednesday online that a prisoners’ hunger strike in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has revealed the “odious” face of America and claims that the terror network will spare no effort to free prisoners held at the U.S. military-run detention center. Ayman al-Zawahri spoke in a 22-minute audio message. “The strike by our brothers in Guantanamo reveals the real odious and ugly face of America,” he said. Some of the 166 prisoners there began a hunger strike earlier this year to protest conditions and their indefinite confinement.


A4

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013 — (C)

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam voter turnout over 18 percent BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County voters had returned 7,447, or 18.07 percent, of the 41,208 ballots sent out for the Aug. 6 primary election as of Wednesday, the Clallam County Auditor’s Office said. In Jefferson County, voters had returned by Wednesday 3,936, or 26.12

percent, of the 15,070 ballots mailed to them. No race is countywide in the August primary election, and all the ballots returned to the Clallam County Auditor’s Office came from different districts. Two candidates in each of the following Clallam County races will advance to the Nov. 5 general election: Clallam County Fire

District No. 3 commission, Port of Port Angeles Commission District 2 and Port Angeles School Board Position 1. Primary election contests are generated in Washington’s top-two primary when more than two candidates file for a petition. The two candidates who receive the most votes face off in the general election Nov. 5.

Voters in the West End of Clallam County have not been sent ballots since no office had three candidates. All ballots must be postmarked by Aug. 6 or placed in an official drop box by 8 p.m. that day to be counted. Clallam County registered voters who have not received a primary election ballot and anyone needing a replacement ballot should stop by the Auditor’s Office

in the courthouse or phone voting registrar Julie Maxion at 360-417-2221. The office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Drop boxes are located at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles; and at Sequim City Hall, 152 W. Cedar St., Sequim. The 16-page Primary Election Voter Guide for

Clallam and Jefferson counties was included in the Peninsula Daily News on July 19. Free copies of the guide are available at local libraries, county courthouses, city halls and the PDN’s Port Angeles office, 305 W. First St.

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

Wreck blocks northbound lane of Highway 19 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Pianist Chase Garrett, who is on this year’s Acoustic Blues Festival faculty, participates in a back-porch jam Monday in Port Townsend.

Jam sessions get down with blues at PT festival BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A love of music and the desire to participate are the primary requirements for taking part in the Acoustic Blues Festival. “The number of people who really understand oldtime country blues is phenomenal, impressive and inspiring,” said Lauren Sheehan, who has attended all 24 iterations of the festival, first as a student and now as a faculty member. “There are always surprises here — people who have an interesting, unique style that you wouldn’t know about otherwise, that I’d

never have a chance to see live otherwise.” The weeklong workshop at Fort Worden State Park, which ends Saturday, includes instruction on a variety of styles and instruments, all in a relaxed environment, culminating every day in a raucous back-porch jam in which 40 people at a time participate in a long exploration of basic blues riffs that ends only when the bandleader says so. Unlike Jazz Port Townsend, which took place the previous week, no audition tape was required; instead, attendees needed only to bring an instrument, enthusiasm and $550 tuition.

The big public portion of the festival begins Friday and continues Saturday with performances in Port Townsend clubs from 8 p.m. to midnight and a special concert at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at McCurdy Pavilion.

Tickets General admission to the clubs is $25, with one ticket each night covering all venues. A processing fee applies. Seating is reserved at the McCurdy Pavilion concert, which costs $20 to $40. A processing fee applies. “This is amazing music,” said Felicia Jangerd Neilson, who traveled from Stockholm, Sweden, to participate.

“It is so close to your heart and close to your feelings. Nothing else makes me feel like the blues does.” Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton, a faculty member who is attending his fifth festival, talked about magic. “The good music flows in like the mist,” Paxton said. “There is something magical about having a group of friends who are familiar with each other but haven’t seen each other in awhile. “And it ends up like this: You get up and start to go somewhere, but you’re stopped by someone who wants to talk or jam, and an hour later, you say to yourself, ‘Hey, I needed to go to the bathroom.’”

Pot: Price must lure users to buy CONTINUED FROM A1 They examined the question of market share for its effect on state revenue. Consultants’ conclusions about the state’s potential take are not all that different from those offered by the state Office of Financial Management during the campaign to pass I-502. But they arrive at the conclusions in different ways. The Office of Financial Management, or OFM, assumed that Washington’s demand for marijuana is about 85 million grams a year, and it assumed the new legal stores would take over all of that market. Washingtonians actually consume nearly twice that amount, 165 million grams a year, consultants said, using preliminary estimates that could change in a new report due out this week. But they said it “seems unrealistic that the I-502 market will be able to replace the illegal market any time soon.” Consultants said I-502

Follow the PDN on

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

Peninsula Daily

pendailynews

“The strictly illicit business and the medical business are a paper tiger, but a paper tiger doesn’t fall over until you push it, and at the moment, I don’t see the impetus to push.” MARK KLEIMAN lead BOTEC consultant stores might start out with share are “highly uncertain.” Lead BOTEC consultant only about 13 percent of the total market and then grow Mark Kleiman, in fact, acknowledged some doubt larger over time. about the estimate of medi$2 billion in revenue cal market share, saying it came from federal law Still, the researchers said enforcement and that he’s it is possible that revenue skeptical that so many peowill reach the $2 billion over ple are continuing to buy five years cited by OFM as illegally when they could go the maximum amount of to one of hundreds of medical state revenue, though they storefronts. cautioned it would require But state Liquor Board five full years of implementa- member Chris Marr said the tion, starting when licensed smaller share of the market stores open next year. ascribed to medical mariEven existing medical juana shows that an ongoing marijuana shops, consul- debate over whether to regutants said, might hold a sur- late and tax medical shops prisingly small share of the misses the point that the market — less than one-fifth, black market is larger and they estimate. here to stay. Their calculations “suggest that medical access Black-market buys points may themselves not now be competing well with Black-market buyers are the purely illegal markets the heaviest users and won’t despite not being burdened switch to legal pot unless the with excise taxes,” they price is right, Marr said. wrote. “I’m more inclined to Jonathan Caulkins, believe that it’s going to be a Susan Andrzejewski and challenge getting past, say, Linden Dahlkemper wrote 25 percent of the market inithe paper. tially,” Marr said. They caution that their Kleiman, a UCLA profesassumptions about market sor, said the state will have to

spend money — on enforcement — to make money. “The strictly illicit business and the medical business are a paper tiger,” Kleiman said, “but a paper tiger doesn’t fall over until you push it, and at the moment, I don’t see the impetus to push.” With pot legal, it’s hard to make a case on public safety grounds for cracking down on illegal sellers, Marr noted.

Law enforcement He said the solution is probably for lawmakers to tie enforcement to revenue by diverting some marijuana tax proceeds to police. The initiative did not earmark money to local law enforcement. “If you’re only capturing 13 [percent] to 25 percent of the market, anything you provide to local government to keep the illicit marketplace in check provides you with significant revenue,” Marr said. For now, the consultants envision tax revenue as high as $3.2 billion or more over 10 years and as low as $1.4 billion. It could drop further, to as low as $650 million, if lawmakers choose to reduce marijuana taxes. The initiative set taxes at 25 percent at each of three levels of sales.

CHIMACUM — A twovehicle injury wreck blocked the northbound lane of state Highway 19 in Chimacum for about an hour Wednesday. Trooper Russ Winger, State Patrol spokesman, said he didn’t know details about injuries Wednesday afternoon. No more information was available by late afternoon. The collision blocked the northbound lane near Milepost 9, where the highway

becomes Rhody Drive, at 12:15 p.m., the state Department of Transportation said. The lane was reopened at 1:11 p.m., Transportation officials said. Winger said there was an unrelated, non-reportable “minor mishap” between a fire unit and a semitruck at 13584 Airport Cutoff Road, which is also part of state Highway 19, at about the same time as the Chimacum wreck Wednesday. That was cleared quickly, Winger said.

Coast Guard rescues eight THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The Coast Guard said one of its boats rescued five adults and three children when a 45-foot pleasure boat started taking on water in Puget Sound. The agency said all eight people were transferred Wednesday after-

noon to the Seattle-based rescue boat. No one needed medical help. The pleasure boat was being towed to Port Orchard. The Coast Guard said it’s not known why the boat started taking on water near Blake Island.

Streets: Project CONTINUED FROM A1 Nathan West, the city’s community and economic development director, said the esplanade project is still on track to be completed by the end of the summer. Petersen, a 15-year veteran of her store space at 217 N. Laurel St., said the esplanade project, underway since October, has particularly affected her business and Pacific Rim Hobby at the corner of West Railroad Avenue and North Oak Street. “If it weren’t for our loyal customers, we’d have had to close our doors a long time ago,” Petersen said, adding that she’s looking forward to the visual boost the project will give to the downtown. Greg Scherer, owner of Pacific Rim Hobby, echoed Petersen’s sentiment about regular customers keeping him afloat, though he said he’s nothing but thrilled now that the last piece of closed road for the project is finally opened.

‘Fanciest corner’

“The [road closed] signs go down, [and] boom, people are using [the newly opened sidewalk].” GREG SCHERER owner, Pacific Rim Hobby “I think Oak will be an enhancement for traffic flows, so yeah, we’re looking forward to it,” Curry said. The improved portion of Railroad Avenue and its two sidewalks opened in early June after having been closed since work on the esplanade project began last fall. West said the city wants to thank the businesses along Railroad Avenue who made their concerns clear to city staff as business owners weathered the construction delays and blockages.

Aesthetic touches “We care deeply about the businesses along Railroad, and we want to gain that circulation back to the street system down there,” West said. Construction crews have more light fixtures and aesthetics touches, such as signs directing pedestrians and bicyclists along the Waterfront Trail as it runs along the esplanade, to install before the esplanade is open to the public, West explained. The trail sign installations might close down the section of sidewalk on North Railroad for a day or two, West said, but no other work is expected to impact pedestrian or vehicle traffic on Railroad Avenue or Oak Street.

“I have the fanciest corner in Clallam County,” Scherer said. Scherer said Wednesday that he already has seen pedestrians use the newly opened Oak Street sidewalk to get to Railroad Avenue and head east. “Immediately, people are using it,” Scherer said. “The [road closed] signs go down, [and] boom, people are using it.” Tom Curry, owner of the Barhop brewery and taproom at 124 W. Railroad Ave., said Wednesday he had enjoyed solid business through the months of June ________ and July, though he is looking forward to the improved Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can Oak Street restoring the be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. course of foot and car traffic 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com. past his business.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A5

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

Oil spill drill today to test readiness near Neah Bay PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NEAH BAY — The state Department of Ecology will conduct an oil spill drill near the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca this morning. The drill will test how well Harley Marine Services of Seattle can mount a simulated 34,000-gallon oil spill near Neah Bay, said Curt Hart, Ecology spokesman. No oil will be discharged during the large-scale equipment deployment exercise. Representatives of Ecology will observe and evaluate the drill in the Strait, one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. Boats will leave Neah Bay at first light, and the drill will begin sometime between 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m., Hart said.

The drill is designed to test several geographicbased response plans designed to help reduce environmental damage if a spill were to occur. This includes setting out boom to help prevent oil from entering the Waatch River. Harley Marine is sponsoring the multi-party oil-spillreadiness drill with its contractor, Marine Spill Response Corp., or MSRC. MSRC is a private, nonprofit spill-response company supported by oil terminal and shipping company customers. Four oil tanker companies also will be involved in the exercise. They are Alaska Tanker Co., BP Shipping, ConocoPhillips Polar Tankers and SeaRiver Maritime.

Local commercial fishing vessels and crews also will be integrated into the response as appropriate and safe, Hart said. MSRC will deploy oilskimming vessels, response boats and oil barrier booms. Since state law requires companies have the capability to extend the hours of oil cleanup operations in darkness and poor visibility, MSRC also will deploy special tracking devices in the vicinity of the spill to help determine how and where oil is located when visibility is low.

State law State law mandates that all oil tankers and oil barges, large commercial vessels, oil refineries, liquid fuel pipe-

lines and oil-handling facilities that transfer high volumes of oil over water have spill readiness, or contingency, plans to operate in state waters. Oil spill contingency plans help ensure companies are prepared to respond if they have a spill. Since Harley Marine, Alaska Tanker Co., BP Shipping, ConocoPhillips Polar Tankers and SeaRiver Maritime all regularly transport and transfer large volumes of oil over state waters, Ecology requires the companies have spill contingency plans for their operations. By participating in the drill, the five companies will fulfill part of Washington’s oil spill preparedness requirements.

Briefly . . .

SEQUIM — Tom Anderson, former superintendent of the Crescent School District, will take over as interim principal for Sequim Middle School today in the wake of current Principal Brian Jones’ retirement Wednesday.

The Sequim School Board approved Anderson as interim principal Anderson earlier this month. Patsene Dashiell, spokeswoman for the school district, said the board decided an interim principal will give the community more time for a thorough search

for a permanent principal. She said the search for a permanent one will begin after the start of next year. Anderson has worked for more than 35 years in education as a middle school teacher, middle school principal, central office administrator and school superintendent. He retired from Crescent in Joyce earlier this year. Anderson had taken that position, which included acting as principal of Crescent

High School, in August 2006.

PULLING

Dead gray whale

The Quinault erect Tuesday a totem pole handcarved from a 100-foot tree to mark the arrival of thousands of pullers participating in the Paddle to Quinault. The Quinault welcomed canoes Wednesday near the mouth of the Queets River. Today, they will greet pullers on the northern tip of Grenville Bay, south of Taholah, beginning at 2 p.m. at the earliest for a celebration that will continue through Tuesday.

GRAYLAND — A dead gray whale washed up this week on the beach at Grayland, just south of Westport on the Washington coast. The state Fish and Wildlife Department and Cascadia Research took tissue samples Tuesday to investigate what may have caused the whale to die. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

SOME WEIGHT

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat!

SATURDAY AUGUST 3 • 12 - 6 PM

ROCKIN’ THE ARTS BENEFIT FOR SAFE HAVEN

A

IENDS O FR

Our Community Since 2

Donations & Pet Food Gladly Accepted

000

THE LANDING MALL 115 East Railroad • In Port Angeles

37834182 37834182

38829776

Port Angeles Community Players Second Stage Presents

IMALS AN

ving Ser

FREE!

F

PENINSUL

Ex-schools boss out of retirement

LARRY WORKMAN

The Gallery at the Fifth Opening Reception Sunday, August 4 • 1-3 pm

“On A LARC”

Becket

LARC Gallery artists and adult student artists present a collection of diversity and challenge. Artists include: Mary Leone Shirley Mercer Sunny Benham Jeanne Engesath Jim Watson – Linda Parcell Gove Jack Parcell Jan Canale Pat Donlin Gary McRoberts Diana Whitney Flo Hansen Jim Gift

By Jean Anouilh And Jeremy Sams Directed by John Manno July 26, 27, August 2, 3 • 7:30 pm July 28 & August 4 • 2:00 pm

The LARC Gallery is a group of 27 artists sharing space in a unique gallery setting. No artist pays commission…ever. Our group is as diverse as our work and we hope you enjoy it.

Admission by Donation at the door For Mature Audiences

500500 W. W. Hendrickson Rd.,Rd., Sequim, WA WA 98382 360-6833345 Hendrickson Sequim, 98382 360-683-3345 www.thefifthavenue.com

83830707

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

37834823

Port Angeles Community Playhouse 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. www.pacommunityplayers.com


A6

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Music in bloom on our fair Peninsula THE DOG DAYS of LIVE MUSIC summer are here — now that the flowers are in bloom, the today. No veggies are ripening on the John cover. vine (or in the ground), and Nelson On the yard has turned brown. Saturday, It’s time to enjoy a live the Tim gig from one of your favorHall ite local bands or take in Band one or more special events plays the this week on the Peninsula. blues That’s in addition to the from club scene, outdoor mar8 p.m. to kets and more. midnight. You’ve worked hard, and Cover. you deserve it, so get out Phone there and support the talents our communities have All Points Charters & Tours at 360-775-9128 or to offer. 360-460-7131 if you need a free ride out or back both Port Angeles nights. ■ Today at Castaways ■ On Friday at Barhop Restaurant and Night Brewing, 124 W. Railroad Club, 1213 Marine Drive, Ave., RMB — that’s Jim Lind and Jerry Rob- Rachael, Mick and Barry ison play old-time country — perform acoustic-style favorites from 5 p.m. to classic rock and more from 8:15 p.m. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. ■ Today, the Junction ■ On Friday at the Roadhouse, 242701 U.S. Fairmount Restaurant, Highway 101, Jason Mogi 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, and Kim Trenerry the Olde Tyme Country (Tongue and Groove, Dead- Band plays classic country wood Revival) celebrate from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. their 11th anniversary by On Tuesday, Charlie performing the songs of the Ferris will play the FairGrateful Dead in a tribute mount for the first time. to the late Jerry Garcia, Take a trip down “nostalgia who would have turned 71 lane” from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

■ Every Tuesday at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., the Port Angeles Senior Swingers present Wally’s Boys playing ballroom dance favorites from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover; first-timers free. ■ On Friday and Saturday at Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Friday at Bar N9ne, 229 W. First St., Eggplant plays blues, classic rock and soul at 9 p.m. $3 cover.

Sequim and Blyn ■ On Friday at The Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., the Discovery Bay Pirates play Irish pub songs and sea chanteys from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Wednesday, the Blue Hole Quintet entertains from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ On Thursday at Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., Cort Armstrong and Strider Yocum play traditional acoustic music from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m..

Death and Memorial Notice MARGARET MARTIN April 25, 1929 July 29, 2013 Margaret Lua (Dobson) Martin went to join her Lord and Savior on Monday morning at about 6 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time at her home at 101 Twin Peaks Lane in Sequim. Margaret had been a resident of Sequim since 1984. She was born in Sugar Grove, Pennsylvania, on April 25, 1929, the daughter of Ellsworth A. and Beulah F. Dobson. She attended grade school in Lottsville, Pennsylvania. She was a 1947 graduate of Panama Central School in Panama, New York. She married Harvey L. Martin on January 1, 1949, and they resided in Bear Lake, Pennsylvania, where she raised five children. They moved to Fairbanks, Alaska, in 1969 and then retired to Sequim in 1984. She traveled extensively with her husband, visiting China in 1987, standing in Tiananmen Square two years before the historic massacre. Margaret visited England and “the Continent”

Mrs. Martin in a 1983 tour of Europe, went on a “mission to work” project in Spain in 1986 and, while there, took a side trip on the ferry across the Mediterranean Sea to Morocco. She took another mission work trip in 1999 to Japan, where she stayed near Mount Fuji. Margaret was a member of Sequim Bible Church and taught Sunday school there for many years. She is survived by her husband, Harvey; sister Florence (Gail) Frank of Lakewood, New York; son Alan W. (Chris) Martin of Fairbanks; and daughters Sherry (Bill) Schildhouse of Phoenix, Arizona, Caryl

(Larry) Terashita, of Dallas, Texas, Lynda (John) Rathmann of Sequim and Gloria (Tim) Milanowski of Fairbanks. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren, Keven (Valeria) Martin, Terra (Jeremy) Preslan, Kristen (Jack) Napiontek, Jade (John) Peterson, Katee (Chris) Bedell, David (Melanie) Terashita, Holly (Matt) Wiedmann, Kelli and Lisa Justus, and Jonathan and Joseph Milanowski; and 14 greatgrandchildren, Teresa, Veronica and Michael Martin, Calvin Preslan, Taylor and Graydon Napiontek, Riley and Jaden Wiedmann, Nathan Schildhouse, Mikayla and Olivia Peterson, Noah and Lilly Terashita, and Myles Justus. Memorial services will be held at Sequim Bible Church, 847 North Sequim Avenue, Sequim, WA 98382, on Friday, August 2, 2013, with Pastor Shane McCrossen officiating. Music at the service will include “How Great Thou Art,” by her son-in-law Larry Terashita. Memorial contributions can be made to Sequim Bible Church or Gideons International, http://tinyurl. com/n4oxu7g.

On Friday, Howly Slim and Sandy perform from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., followed by singer-songwriter Tim Scallion from 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Saturday, Cort and Kia Armstrong play country blues from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ On Wednesday, it’s “All the Buzz” at the Sequim Senior Activity Center, 921 E. Hammond St., with Victor Reventlow hosting the open mic from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■ On Friday in Club Seven lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Doublewide plays country from 8 p.m. to midnight. On Saturday, the M-80s rock out with an ’80s flashback party from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Sunday, “country up” with the Jimmy Hoffman Band from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Friday in the Rainforest Bar, Larry Hill tickles the ivories from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Saturday in the Rainforest Bar, blues guitarist Thom Davis plays from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Port Hadlock ■ On Saturday at the Ajax Cafe, 21 N. Water St., Mick and Barry play classic rock and country from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Port Ludlow ■ On Friday in the Resort at Port Ludlow’s Fireside Restaurant, 1 Heron Road, guitarist Trevor Hanson performs classical selections from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Port Townsend ■ Today at the Ameri-

April 29, 1935 July 21, 2013 Louise M. King, 78, of Port Angeles passed away on Sunday, July 21, 2013, at the home of her daughter and son-in-law after courageously battling terminal brain cancer. She was born in Alva, Oklahoma, to Melvin and Martha Perks on April 29, 1935. She was one of eight children. Formerly of St. Joseph, Missouri, she lived most of her life in the state of Missouri. After her husband of 44 years, Freemon B. King Jr., passed away, she moved to Port Angeles in 2010 to be closer to her daughter and family. Louise worked hard most of her life as a seamstress. She owned and operated Midway Upholstery at the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri. She loved the fact that she could turn an old, broken-down piece of furniture into a beautiful show piece.

Mrs. King She retired around 1984, but she still loved to sew and quilt. She loved to go fishing for crappie — well, any kind of fish, really, but crappie was her favorite to eat. She was known in the family for making the best homemade egg noodles. They were a staple for most holiday functions. One of her favorite pastimes was garage sales — not just going to them, but also helping others have them and holding them herself. She and her husband,

Freemon, loved to travel to Texas as snowbirds in the winters. Her favorite place to visit was Mexico. She loved the atmosphere in Mexico and all the little brown-eyed children. Plus, I think she felt tall there. Louise is survived by her only child, Debbie Stoltenberg, and her husband, Stuart, both of Port Angeles; her only grandchild, Jessica Berry, and her husband, Jeff, both of Port Angeles; and her great-grandchildren, Cooper and Clara, both of whom she loved with all her heart. Her only surviving sibling is her baby brother, John Perks, and wife Charlene of Elwood, Kansas. She is also survived by her sisters-in-law Mary Ann (Fred) Carlson of Kansas City, Missouri, and Hazel Bailey of Pleasant Hill, Missouri; brother-inlaw Russell (June) King of Pleasant Hill; and numerous nieces and nephews. Three of her special nieces are Beverly Patterson, Mary Louise Adams and Teresa Perks Plymell, all of whom she adored.

plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., tonight from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Every Monday, Trevor Hanson plays guitar at Alchemy, 842 Washington St., from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Area concerts ■ Today, Port Townsend’s Concert on the Dock features Brian “Buck” Ellard and the Steel Magnolias performing country music from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ■ On Tuesday in Sequim’s Music in the Park Series at the James Center for the Performing Arts, enjoy the rousing folk music of Twisted Roots from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Wednesday in Port Angeles, the Retro Guys play from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. as part of the Concert on the Pier Series.

High notes ■ On Friday at the Sequim, 630 N. Sequim Ave., the Olympic Express Big Band plays dance numbers from the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. For all ages. ■ On Saturday in Port Angeles, it’s a Rockin’ the Arts benefit at The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., to support Safe Haven — the cageless, nokill animal shelter run by the Peninsula Friends of Animals. Live music — with sets by Getta Rogers, Chesnut Junction, the Retro Guys, Redwing and the Soulshakers — starts at noon and continues until 6 p.m. There also will be a silent auction for donated art pieces. TURN

TO

MUSIC/B12

Death and Memorial Notice LETHA CLARA (DAMERON) WRAY December 16, 1921 July 29, 2013 Lee Wray passed away in her home on July 29, 2013. Letha Clara Dameron was born on December 16, 1921, in Wellington, Kansas, to Anson Boyd and May Viola Dameron. Letha’s mother died when Letha was 2, and her father brought her and her brothers, Virgil, Charley and Merle, to the San Fernando Valley, where they bought a small, selfsufficient 1-acre chicken farm in Winnetka, now

Mrs. Wray Canoga Park, California. Letha’s good friend growing up was Catherine Mulholland. Letha met Jack Wray

while she was working at his father’s agency, Wray Bros. Ford, in Van Nuys, California. They were together 60 years and had shared many fun adventures in the Mojave Desert, Eastern Sierras and Big Bear Lake. Letha and Jack moved to Port Angeles in 2011. Jack passed away on June 29, 2012. Letha is survived by her daughter, Jacilee Wray; son-in-law Larry Nickey; son John Wray; and daughter-in-law Angie Wray. She has three grandchildren, Shaelan Nickey, Heather Wray and Sara Wray; and two greatgrandsons Aiden and Evan.

Death and Memorial Notice

Death and Memorial Notice LOUISE M. (PERKS) KING

can Legion Hall, 209 Monroe St., promoter Mark Cole presents Janiva Magness and her band at 7:30 p.m. For tickets, phone 360385-2216. $25 in advance; $30 at the door. ■ On Saturday at Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., Pigs on the Wing pays homage to Pink Floyd at 10 p.m. $5 cover. ■ On Friday at Port Townsend Brewing, 330 10th St., The Better Half plays in the beer garden from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Sunday, it’s singersongwriter Howly Slim from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. On Wednesday, Joy in Mudville plays old-time/ jam-band/rock/Celtic/funkinflected originals and cover tunes in the beer garden from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Friday at the Uptown Pub, 1016 Lawrence St., soulful singersongwriter Meredith performs from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., followed by Billy and Chris from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. ■ On Friday at the Pourhouse, 2231 Washington St., Port Authority Shakedown takes over the beer garden from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Saturday, Yogo Man Burning Band brings its upbeat vibe to the beer garden from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Sunday, the Pourhouse presents the Chris Chandler and Paul Benoit Show from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Friday at the Highway Twenty Roadhouse, 2152 W. Sims Way, Brian “Buck” Ellard performs his “Buck Naked” dinner show from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. ■ Steve Grandinetti

Louise was preceded in death by her parents, Melvin and Martha; her first husband, Joseph A. Parker of Abilene, Texas; her husband, Freemon B. King Jr., who passed away in 2005; two sisters, Leona M. Perks and Beulah M. Perks (Searle) and her husband, Darrell, of Stewartsville, Missouri; and brothers Theodore (Opal) Perks of Alva, Virgil Perks of Cameron, Missouri, Norman (Ruby) Perks of Alva and Clifford (Alice) Perks of Gower, Missouri. She is also preceded in death by her sister-in law Vivian (Earl) Duncan of Stewartsville. A visitation will be held Saturday, August 3, 2013, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Her funeral will take place at 2 p.m., with a graveside service following at Mount Moriah Terrace Park, 801 Northwest 108th Street, Kansas City, Missouri. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the National Parkinson Foundation (www. parkinson.org) or Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (www.pdf.org) in your city.

SHARON RAE GRAHAM MCBRIDE Friends of Sharon Rae Graham McBride are invited to an informal memorial gathering on Saturday, August 3, 2013, at the Junction Roadhouse, 242701 U.S. Highway 101 west of Port Angeles. Rae’s daughters, Allison Zingmark of Arlington, Washington, and Teresa Aldridge of Tulsa, Oklahoma, will attend. Please feel free to bring a potluck item if you wish. The official times are from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. If you are headed to

Mrs. McBride Joyce Daze from Port Angeles, drop in and say “hi.” Cribbage is encouraged.

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday. ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. For further information, call 360-417-3527.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, August 1, 2013 PAGE

A7

Thomas Jefferson and Ho Chi Minh WHEN IT COMES to Vietnam, I’m all for moving on, putting the past behind us, looking forward, letting bygones be bygones. But doing so requires honCal esty about the Thomas past, lest history be forgotten and the memory and honor tarnished of the 60,000 Americans who died in that war. On his visit to Washington, D.C., last week, President Truong Tan Sang of Vietnam told President Barack Obama that the late revolutionary Ho Chi Minh was inspired by the U.S. Declaration of Independence and Constitution, and the words of Thomas Jefferson. In an ad in The Washington Post, President Sang even claimed Jefferson’s vision of liberty was the same as Ho’s. Not exactly. According to the State Department’s Vietnam 2012 Human Rights Report: “The Socialist Republic of Vietnam is an authoritarian state ruled by a single party, the Communist Party of Vietnam. . . . “The most recent National Assembly elections, held in May 2011, were neither free nor fair. “Security forces reported to

civilian authorities. “The most significant human rights problems in the country continued to be severe government restrictions on citizens’ political rights, particularly their right to change their government; increased measures to limit citizens’ civil liberties; and corruption in the judicial system and police.” Does that sound Jeffersonian? Alignment with the principles and men of America’s founding is an old tactic used by many dictators to dupe some Americans into the false belief that they are just like us — or can be made so. Ronald Radosh, an adjunct fellow at the Hudson Institute, noted recently in The Wall Street Journal, that Ho Chi Minh was “a committed Marxist-Leninist, trained in the 1920s at Moscow’s famed Lenin School.” During World War II, wrote Radosh, Ho courted President Franklin Roosevelt. Ho appealed both to Roosevelt’s anti-French sentiments and to America’s Declaration of Independence and American-style liberty as he sought support for driving the French out of Indochina. All dictators have found apologists in America — whether it is actor Sean Penn cozying up to the late President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela or the elites who supported Fidel Castro and the Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara. All dictators have attempted to show they have a rational side.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama shakes hands with Vietnam President Truong Tan Sang during their meeting in the Oval Office at the White House on July 25. The late Soviet dictator Yuri Andropov was said to enjoy scotch and American jazz. Adolf Hitler’s propagandists showed him with little girls who were of the same age as Jewish girls he had ordered killed. Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, a fascist, supposedly made the trains run on time. Josef Stalin’s gulags were so good, claimed American journalist Anna Louise Strong, people

Peninsula Voices what the police dispatcher told him. I am disappointed that On the other hand, Marsome of my fellow citizens tin did not have the right believe that simply followto attack Zimmerman, as ing an unknown person he was not in any immijustifies getting one’s head nent danger. smashed into concrete. He could have just kept George Zimmerman was walking. a duly appointed neighborHe could have called for hood watchman who would help. have followed anyone, Unfortunately, Martin regardless of race, who did chose instead to attack not appear to be a resident Zimmerman, a foolish in the neighborhood he was choice that cost him his assigned to protect. life. While we all might Because there had been sympathize with his famisome recent break-ins in ly’s loss, if Martin had surthe neighborhood, it was vived, he would have been more than reasonable for charged with assault and Zimmerman to follow Tray- battery, perhaps more. von Martin, regardless of Unfortunately, the

Zimmerman I

media’s deliberate misinterpretation of this event has only inflamed racial tension. They have even gone so far as to edit out information and images which might contradict their “narrative.” This was never a case about race, gun control or stand-your-ground laws; it was about one young man attacking another young man. The media’s dishonesty notwithstanding, too many of us have allowed ourselves to be vulnerable to media manipulation by failing to be the wellinformed citizenry required

OUR

applied for admission. Strong, who never met a communist she didn’t like, also praised China’s Mao Zedong. It’s one thing for Vietnamese leaders to promote the fiction that Jefferson was a role model for Ho Chi Minh. It’s quite another for President Obama to spread this propaganda. I heard the same preposterous assertion from a Vietnamese gov-

ernment official when I visited Hanoi last December. Rep. Sam Johnson, R-Texas, who spent seven years as a POW in the infamous Hanoi Hilton prison, isn’t buying it. Johnson said in a statement issued by his office: “Sadly, when it comes to individual liberty, the president doesn’t have a clue. “What an insult to the POWs brutally tortured at the merciless hands — and rifle butts — of our captors. “This is a slap in the face to those who served — and especially those who paid the ultimate price for freedom during that dark time in history. “Let me tell you, there was nothing ‘free’ about my seven years in captivity in Hanoi — more than half of that time in solitary confinement. “As a fellow POW etched on a prison cell wall: ‘Freedom has a taste to those who fight and almost die that the protected will never know.’” Who sounds more Jeffersonian?

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears on the PDN’s Commentary page every Thursday. Thomas can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

of a democracy. Without it, we are all subject to mob rule. Nick Kavadas, Port Angeles

from an assailant who was bouncing his head off the pavement. The defendant experienced a clear-and-present, life-threatening event. Holder should have Zimmerman II already been impeached for Racism was shamelessly contempt of Congress injected into the trial of (lying and withholding eviGeorge Zimmerman by dence regarding “Fast and President Barack Hussein Furious,” unwarranted Obama, Attorney General wiretapping of the press, and chief racist henchman etc.) Eric Holder, the suck-up Lying, corrupt, arrogant mainstream media and the Holder seems oblivious to likes of racist-agitator Al his own culpability while Sharpton. nationally inciting racial Zimmerman should tension and considering, never have been charged or subjecting Zimmerman to indicted for using deadly “double jeopardy.” force to defend himself Back in “the Windy

City,” 72 [people] were shot and 12 “nameless” people killed over the Fourth of July weekend. There was not a whisper about this from Obama, Holder or Sharpton. After putting Zimmerman under a dissecting microscope, in every parameter he was found to act not only as a “prudent man,” but also a model citizen. Further legal actions against Zimmerman are chilling to we who are less virtuous, but may find ourselves in a similar unfortunate circumstance. Karl Spees, Port Angeles

Leakers’ info illuminates war’s reality “WHAT A DANGEROUS edifice War is, how easily it may fall to pieces and bury us in its ruins,” wrote Carl von Clausewitz, the 19th-century Prussian general and military theorist, in his seminal text On War, Amy close to 200 Goodman years ago. These lines came from the chapter “Information in War,” a topic that resonates today, from Fort Meade, Md., where Pfc. Bradley Manning has just been convicted of espionage in a military court, to the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, where WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has lived for more than a year, having been granted political asylum to avoid political persecution by the United States, to the transit zone at Sheremetyevo International Airport in Moscow, where National Security Agency whistle-blower Edward Snowden waits on his own asylum applications.

Manning’s conviction sparked momentary interest among members of the elite media in the U.S., who spent scant time at the two-month court-martial, located just miles north of Washington, D.C. Manning’s supporters expressed relief that he was found not guilty of the most serious charge, aiding the enemy, which would likely have carried a sentence of life in prison. He was convicted on 20 of 22 charges, and could face up to 136 years in prison. The sentencing hearing is underway. “Bradley Manning’s alleged disclosures have exposed war crimes, sparked revolutions and induced democratic reforms,” Assange said from the embassy. “He is the quintessential whistle-blower.” Interestingly, former Defense Secretary Robert Gates wrote about the leaks to Sen. Carl Levin in 2010, saying, “The review to date has not revealed any sensitive intelligence sources and methods compromised by this disclosure.” Manning made a statement at the start of the court-martial, wherein he took responsibility for the leaks, but, importantly,

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

REX WILSON

STEVE PERRY

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 steve.perry@peninsuladailynews.com

MICHELLE LYNN

SUE STONEMAN

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER

360-417-3510 360-417-3555 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

expressed his motivation. He commented on the Apache attack helicopter video that recorded the slaughter of a dozen civilians in Baghdad on July 12, 2007. Two of those killed worked for the Reuters news agency, cameraman Namir Noor-Eldeen, 22, and his driver, Saeed Chmagh, a father of four. We can listen to Manning in his own words, thanks to an unauthorized audio recording of his statement, anonymously leaked. He said: “The most alarming aspect of the video to me was the seemly delightful blood-lust the aerial weapons team seemed to have. 'They dehumanized the individuals they were engaging and seemed to not value human life, and referred to them as quoteunquote ‘dead bastards,’ and congratulated each other on their ability to kill in large numbers. “For me, this seemed similar to a child torturing ants with a magnifying glass.” One of the charges for which Manning was found guilty was “wanton publication.” It’s unprecedented in military law. Manning’s lawyer called it a made-up offense.

The real offense, for which no one has been charged, is the wanton disregard for human life that Manning exposed. Manning’s leak gave Reuters, and the world, a graphic view of the horror of modern war, of the violent death of two media workers in the line of duty. As the young soldier also said in his eloquent statement, “I believed that if the general public, especially the American public, had access to the information contained [in the leaks], it could spark a domestic debate on the role of the military and our foreign policy in general as it related to Iraq and Afghanistan.” Indeed, he did spark such a debate. The latest wave of disclosures, from Edward Snowden, have only intensified the debate, with a rare bipartisan coalition in Congress growing to clamp down on what many see as a runaway national-security state. While a legislative amendment by Republican Justin Amash and Democrat John Conyers in the U.S. House of Representatives was narrowly defeated last week, the two have authored a stand-alone bill, H.R. 2399, that will do the same.

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

Carl von Clausewitz wrote: “The great uncertainty of all data in War is a peculiar difficulty, because all action must, to a certain extent, be planned in a mere twilight.” Manning took incredibly courageous actions to release data, to pierce the fog of war, to make public the machinations of modern American war-making. Edward Snowden has exposed the sophistication and extraordinary reach of the U.S. surveillance state, cracking down on those who would dare to release information. And Julian Assange sits within the four walls of his embassy redoubt, persecuted for the crime of publishing. Yet those who planned the wars, those who committed war crimes, those who conduct illegal spying, for now, walk free. ________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears on this page every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

The “Original” Since 1957

3Wednesday DAYS ONLY • Thrusday • Friday July 31, August 1, 2

PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A. © 2012 Swain’s General Store Inc.

*Must be redeemed during this event.

Excluding Gift Cards, Licenses, Special Orders and Lawaways. May not be combined with any other offer.

100 Frisbees will be hidden inside Swain’s within our Merchandise Each Day For 3 Days July 31, August 1, 2

and a chance to win a

Second week of our 38th annual

PARKING LOT SALE New merchandise added daily!

h Aug. 4 g u o r Th og D t o H o b m Co G, 0 ¢

1 50

0 O HOT DI & $ PEPS CREAM ICE

i Peps e Ic ¢ 30Cream

30¢

Good Luck

from Swain’s General Store

$50

00

Swain’s General Store Gift Card Come in Early For The Best Chance To Win 37836452

4 Gift Cards Given Away Each Day 7/31, 8/1, 8/2


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, August 1, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Area 9 chinook limit lowered SOMEWHERE IN PORT Townsend, there is a kid with a broken heart. He just got dumped by his Lee girlfriend, and he’s not taking it Horton too well. In an effort to ease his pain, he discusses his heartache with a close friend. His wellmeaning pal, searching for something to say to the dumped kid, resorts to a classic saying. “There’s plenty of fish in the water,” the friend says. But it doesn’t help. This was the wrong week to use that line. “Not here, there aren’t,” the dumped kid said. “The Marine Area 9 chinook limit was lowered to one per day.” The dumped kid knows his stuff. Anglers in Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) are indeed limited to one hatchery chinook per day, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife announced. This new limit went into effect on Monday. I guess the ruling wasn’t a huge surprise. For starters, the hatchery kings have been going crazy in Area 9 since the fishery opened on July 16. Also, there is precedent: The area’s chinook season was completely closed almost two weeks early last year. Finally, I wasn’t surprised because Ward Norden told me something would probably happen. In an email approximately 24 hours before the state announced the limit change in Area 9, Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist, predicted that Area 9 would close as early as last weekend. Of course, Norden wasn’t spot on, as it turned out that the hatchery chinook fishing wasn’t going end in Admiralty Inlet. Yet. The Marine Area 9 king season is slated to end Saturday, Aug. 31, so even with the decreased limit, there is plenty of time left for quotas to be reached and an early shut down to be enacted. “We’ve decided to make this change now to try and stay within our catch guideline, and avoid closing the area’s hatchery chinook season early,” state fish biologist Ryan Lothrop said in a release. During the first 10 days of the Area 9 hatchery chinook season, anglers had kept or released approximately 4,300 legal-sized hatchery kings, which is nearly 66 percent of the 6,528 chinook quota.

Neah Bay closure If you haven’t done so already, head over to the wall where your calendar hangs, remove the thumbtack, flip the page up and then re-insert the tack. It’s August. That means many things. Summer is winding down. The kids are about a month from returning to school. Football season is almost here (although not for Percy Harvin). Also, the chinook fisheries throughout the North Olympic Peninsula are nearing their end. In fact, part of Marine Area 4 (Neah Bay) closes today to king fishing — the portion east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh Line, which runs from the western end of Cape Flattery to Tatoosh Island Lighthouse, then in a straight line to Bonilla Point on Vancouver Island. Essentially, this is the section of Area 4 that is on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The rest of Area 4 (west of the Bonilla-Tatoosh Line) is open to wild and hatchery chinook fishing until Sept. 22, barring an early closure. TURN

TO

HORTON/B3

Wilder opens regionals with win Elite team beats Oregon champs PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. — Wilder Baseball opened the 16-18 Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest regional tournament with a 6-2 win over the Brookings Mavericks, the Oregon state champion, at Kiger Stadium. Wilder, the defending regional champion, was outhit, five to four, but capitalized on the seven errors Brookings committed.

But the Port Angeles-based elite team wasn’t flawless itself, according to head coach Chad Wagner. “We played an OK game today, and they obviously made a few mistakes that we were able to take advantage of,” Wagner said. “We had a few mental errors on our part that need to go away, as we are going to face better teams as the tournament goes on.” Wilder committed two errors. Ace Kyle Kelly continued his stellar summer by tossing a complete game with seven

strikeouts and no walks and allowing only one earned run. “He threw 70 percent strikes and was in complete control of the game,” Wagner said of the College of Eastern Utah recruit and former Port Townsend Redskins star. The Wilder offense was led by a trio of Port Angeles Roughriders. Kevin Herzog had two of the team’s four hits and scored a pair of runs. Brian DeFrang added a hit and a run, and Ryan Mudd went 1 for 3 at the plate. Wilder continues the regional tournament today at

4:30 p.m. against the Idaho state champion team from Latah County. Wilder concludes National Division play Friday against the Buffaloes, the Wyoming state champs. The top two teams from the National and American divisions will reach the semifinals on Saturday, and the winners of those two games will face off in the regional championship on Sunday. The Pacific Northwest Regional champion earns a berth in the Babe Ruth World Series in Covington County, Ala., later this month.

Harvin’s history familiar Brittle past reminiscent of M’s star BY JOHN MCGRATH MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

RENTON — Upon hearing the news that Percy Harvin will undergo surgery to repair his injured hip, it occurred to me how the Seahawks receiver/ slot back shares much in common with another Seattle pro athlete. Remember Mariners center fielder Franklin Gutierrez? Remember the graceful ball hawker Dave Niehaus nicknamed “Death to Flying Things,” a Gold Glove defender who complemented his skill set with a decent bat capable of surprising power? Remember that guy? The Mariners thought so much of Gutierrez three years ago, they signed him to a contract extension worth almost $20 million in guaranteed money. Gutierrez has been limited to 18 games in 2013, his third consecutive injury-plagued season. Over the 430 games the

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Percy Harvin (11) walks off the field following Seahawks training camp in Renton last week. Harvin is scheduled to undergo hip surgery today, sidelining the dynamic wide receiver for most, if not all, of the upcoming season. Mariners have played since the start of the 2011 season, Gutierrez has missed 279 of them. The litany of the aches and pains Gutierrez has suffered is longer (and more depressing) than “Atlas Shrugged.”

The short list: a strained oblique, a partially torn pectoral, a concussion and a strained hamstring, along with a seriously persistent digestive disorder. Gutierrez never has been

accused of using any of these ailments as a crutch to malinger. Then again, why would he invent a crutch when two of them are usually in his hands? TURN

TO

HAWKS/B3

Severe injuries rose from 2009-12 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sure didn’t take long for some significant injuries at NFL training camps — Philadelphia Eagles receiver Jeremy Maclin, Baltimore Ravens tight end Dennis Pitta, Denver Broncos center Dan Koppen, to name only three. Immediately, some theories developed: Too much offseason work. Not enough. New laborcontract rules limiting padded practices to one per day, while generally seen as helpful, are hardly a cure-all.

NFL Washington Redskins linebacker London Fletcher thinks some guys get hurt in camp because players are trying so hard to impress coaches and earn a roster spot or a starting job. “You know now coaches are really evaluating you,” said Fletcher, whose teammate, second-year linebacker Keenan Robinson, tore his left pectoral muscle on Day 1 of

training camp. “You’ve got guys with a competitive spirit and they’re looking at it, like, ‘My job’s on the line. I need to make a play’ and not realizing there’s going to be times to show that coaches that you can hit, you can make plays in preseason games, but you don’t want to have a guy go down because of something that happened in practice.” Whatever the cause, severe injuries are increasing in the NFL lately. The number of injuries that

forced a player to miss at least eight days jumped every year from 2009 to 2012, according to an analysis of NFL injury data released Wednesday. The study by Edgeworth Economics, based on information collected by the league, also shows that players with concussions missed an average of 16 days last season, up from only four days in 2005, while the length of time out for other types of injuries has been steadier. TURN

TO

NFL/B3

Mariners stand pat at deadline Despite rumors, Seattle’s roster remains intact BY RYAN DIVISH MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

BOSTON — The Mariners hope a solid July showing is a sign of a bright future. Wednesday, the circus that is the major league trade deadline passed without Seattle being an active participant. General manager Jack Zduriencik said he wasn’t going to be aggressive two weeks ago, and he wasn’t, choosing to keep his team intact. “I didn’t think there was the right situation for us at this time,” he said. “I didn’t feel that way. There’s an obligation here to our fans and certainly to the players here on this team. They’ve THE ASSOCIATED PRESS played well recently.” Michael Morse was the subject of trade rumors, but he remains with the Seattle TURN TO M’S/B3 Mariners following Major League Baseball’s trade deadline Wednesday.


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Today Baseball: Wilder vs. Latah County (South Washington) at 16-18 Senior Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament in Klamath Falls, Ore., 4:30 p.m.

Friday Baseball: Wilder vs. Buffalos (Wyoming) at 16-18 Senior Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament in Klamath Falls, Ore., 9 a.m.

Saturday Baseball: 16-18 Senior Babe Ruth Pacific Northwest Regional Tournament in Klamath Falls, Ore.: American Division No. 1 vs. North Division No. 2, TBA; National Division No. 1 vs. American Division No. 2, TBA.

Area Sports Adult Softball Port Angeles Coed League Tuesday Silver Division Higher Grounds 23, NW Motorsports 10 Butch’e Ballers 7, Stamper Chiropractic 5 Higher Hrounds 15, Stamper Chiropractic 1 Elwha River Casino 14, NW Motorsports 3 Elwha River Casino 21, Lou’s Crew 20 Elwha Bravos 15, Lou’s Crew 11 Daily Grind 30, Butch’s Ballers 11 Elwha Bravos 9, Daily Grind 8

BMX Racing Port Angeles BMX Track Ten Series No. 12 Tuesday 9 Girls 1. Taylor “American Idol” Tolliver 2. Taylor “Chew Toy” Coleman 3. Taylee Rome 26-30 Cruiser 1. Mariah “The Wind” Fortman 2. Greg Faris 3. Scott Gulisao 46-50 Cruiser 1. “Curious George” Williams 2. Christopher Fowler 3. Robert “No Nickname” Williams 5 & Under Novice 1. Dion Johnson 2. Carson Waddell 3. Dominik “The Dominator” Johnson 4. Luci Barto 9 Novice 1. Harmony Colfax 2. Deacon Charles 3. Austin Sage 6 Intermediate 1. Kaiden Charles 2. “Smash” Cash Coleman 3. Kason Albaugh 4. LL Cool J Vail 5. Cody Amsdill 10 Intermediate 1. Moose Johnson 2. Toppy Robideau 3. Jaxon Bourm 4. Aydan Vail 5. Bodi Sanderson 13 Intermediate 1. Tee-Jay Johnson 2. Joshua Sutton 3. Elizabeth Sutton 28-35 Expert 1. Greg Faris 2. Phillip Sutton 3. Trent Owen 5 & Under Open 1. Dion Johnson 2. Carson Waddell 3. Landon Sage 6 Open 1. Kaiden Charles 2. “Smash” Cash Coleman 3. Kason Albaugh 4. Cody Amsdill 8 Open 1. Toppy Robideau 2. Taylee Rome

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FRANKLIN

3. Keona Brewer 9 Open 1. Moose Johnson 2. Taylor “American Idol” Tolliver 3. Taylor “Chew Toy” Coleman 4. Harmony Colfax 10 Open 1. Jaxon Bourm 2. Amber Johnson 3. Bodi Sanderson 14 Open 1. Greg Faris 2. Phillip Sutton 3. Joshua Sutton 4. Trent Owen

Baseball Red Sox 8, Mariners 2

BMiller ss Frnkln 2b Seager 3b KMorls dh Ibanez lf Morse rf Smoak 1b MSndrs cf HBlanc c Totals

Today 6 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Golf LPGA, British Open, Round 1, Site: St. Andrews Royal & Ancient Golf Club Fife Scotland (Live) 8:30 a.m. (47) GOLF Web.com, Mylan Classic, Round 1, Site: Southpointe Golf Club - Canonsburg, Pa. (Live) 9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer UEFA, Audi Cup 3rd Place Match, Site: Allianz Arena - Munich, Germany (Live) 11 a.m. (47) GOLF WGC, Bridgestone Invitational, Round 1, Site: Firestone Country Club - Akron, Ohio (Live) 11:15 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer UEFA, Audi Cup Final, Site: Allianz Arena Munich, Germany (Live) 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Reno-Tahoe Open, Round 1, Site: Montreux Golf and Country Club - Reno, Nev. (Live) 4 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Boston Red Sox, Site: Fenway Park - Boston (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Extreme Sports, X Games Los Angeles (Live) 7 p.m. LWN Basketball WNBA, Phoenix vs. Seattle, Site: Seattle (Live)

IS THREE FOR THREE

United States swimmer Missy Franklin competes in the women’s 200-meter freestyle semifinal at the FINA Swimming World Championships in Barcelona, Spain. So far, Franklin has won all three events she has competed in at the World Championships.

Seattle

SPORTS ON TV

Tuesday’s Game Boston ab r hbi ab r hbi 5 0 0 0 Ellsury cf 4111 4 1 1 0 Victorn rf 4330 4 0 2 0 Pedroia 2b 4 2 2 3 4 0 2 1 D.Ortiz dh 4011 4 0 1 0 Napoli 1b 4110 4 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 4122 4 1 1 0 JGoms lf 3000 2 0 0 0 Drew ss 4000 4 0 1 1 Iglesias 3b 3 0 1 0 BSnydr 3b 0000 35 2 8 2 Totals 34 811 7

Seattle 100 000 001—2 Boston 230 100 02x—8 E—B.Miller (4). LOB—Seattle 8, Boston 3. 2B—Franklin (13), Victorino 2 (15). HR—Ellsbury (5), Pedroia (7), Saltalamacchia (9). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle J.Saunders L,9-10 5 9 6 5 1 5 Maurer 3 2 2 2 0 1 Boston Workman W,1-1 6 6 1 1 1 9

Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 Thornton 1 0 0 0 0 Beato 1 2 1 1 1 PB—H.Blanco. Umpires—Home, Chris Conroy; First, Darling; Second, David Rackley; Third, Meals. T—2:44. A—34,578 (37,499).

0 2 1 Gary Jerry

American League West Division W L Oakland 63 45 Texas 58 49 Seattle 50 56 Los Angeles 48 57 Houston 35 70 Central Division W L Detroit 61 45 Cleveland 58 48 Kansas City 52 51 Minnesota 45 58 Chicago 40 64 East Division W L Tampa Bay 64 43 Boston 64 44 Baltimore 59 48 New York 55 51 Toronto 50 57

Pct GB .583 — .542 4½ .472 12 .457 13½ .333 26½ Pct GB .575 — .547 3 .505 7½ .437 14½ .385 20 Pct GB .598 — .593 ½ .551 5 .519 8½ .467 14

Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 4 Baltimore 4, Houston 3 Detroit 5, Washington 1 Tampa Bay 5, Arizona 2 Boston 8, Seattle 2 Texas 14, L.A. Angels 11, 10 innings Kansas City 7, Minnesota 2 Toronto 5, Oakland 0 L.A. Dodgers 3, N.Y. Yankees 2 Wednesday’s Games Detroit 11, Washington 1 Toronto 5, Oakland 2, 10 innings Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, late.

Houston at Baltimore, late. Arizona at Tampa Bay, late. Seattle at Boston, late. L.A. Angels at Texas, late. Kansas City at Minnesota, late. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Dodgers, late. Today’s Games Chicago White Sox (Sale 6-10) at Cleveland (Masterson 12-7), 9:05 a.m. Kansas City (Shields 5-7) at Minnesota (Diamond 5-9), 10:10 a.m. Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Texas (Darvish 9-5), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Lyles 4-4) at Baltimore (Tillman 13-3), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 11-4) at Boston (Dempster 6-8), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Jo.Johnson 1-7) at L.A. Angels (Richards 2-4), 7:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Seattle at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 4:08 p.m. Arizona at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 7:10 p.m.

National League West Division W L Los Angeles 57 48 Arizona 54 52 Colorado 51 57 San Diego 50 59 San Francisco 46 59 Central Division W L Pittsburgh 64 42 St. Louis 62 43 Cincinnati 60 49 Chicago 48 58 Milwaukee 46 61

Pct GB .543 — .509 3½ .472 7½ .459 9 .438 11 Pct GB .604 — .590 1½ .550 5½ .453 16 .430 18½

Atlanta Washington Philadelphia New York Miami

East Division W L 62 45 52 56 50 56 48 56 40 65

Pct .579 .481 .472 .462 .381

GB — 10½ 11½ 12½ 21

Tuesday’s Games Milwaukee 6, Chicago Cubs 5, 1st game Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1, 11 innings, 1st game Philadelphia 7, San Francisco 3 Detroit 5, Washington 1 Tampa Bay 5, Arizona 2 Atlanta 11, Colorado 3 N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 2, 10 innings Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 0, 2nd game Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 2nd game San Diego 4, Cincinnati 2 L.A. Dodgers 3, N.Y. Yankees 2 Wednesday’s Games Detroit 11, Washington 1 Cincinnati 4, San Diego 1 San Francisco at Philadelphia, late. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, late. Arizona at Tampa Bay, late. Colorado at Atlanta, late. N.Y. Mets at Miami, late. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, late. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Dodgers, late. Today’s Games N.Y. Mets (Harvey 8-2) at Miami (Koehler 2-6), 9:40 a.m. Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Texas (Darvish 9-5), 4:05 p.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 6-6) at Philadelphia (Hamels 4-13), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (J.Kelly 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Morton 3-2), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Bettis 0-0) at Atlanta (Teheran 7-5), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 6-9) at Chicago Cubs (Rusin 1-0), 5:05 p.m. Friday’s Games L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 7:10 p.m.

There’s not a lot of sympathy for Alex Rodriguez BY TIM DAHLBERG THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Detroit Tigers know what’s coming, so they went out and got themselves a new shortstop for the rest of the season. The Yankees know, too, though they don’t seem nearly as concerned about their upcoming loss. The dominoes are falling in baseball’s latest drug scandal and by now everyone but Alex Rodriguez has a good idea what their punishment will be. For A-Rod, it’s a bit more complicated, though the one thing that seems virtually certain is that he’ll never put on the pinstripes again. The Yankees don’t want him, and neither does baseball. Long a target of fans because of his oversized contract and unchecked ego, he’s now the biggest target of the biggest probe Major League Baseball has ever launched into the drug use that has infested the sport for the better part of two decades. Ryan Braun got nearly a half year off for lying and cheating, but A-Rod will surely get more. Right now the over-under seems to be the rest of this year and next, but there’s speculation Bud Selig could use his power to

try to ban Rodriguez for life if he fights it. It’s almost unthinkable.

Fall from grace The player who once seemed destined to go down as one of the greatest to play the game could be banned for life from that very game. Think that might cause some other players to think twice before they juice again? “Nobody will take these drugs if they believe the minute they are caught they’re out for good,” former baseball commissioner Fay Vincent said. “They just won’t.” A lifetime ban might seem a bit extreme, though in A-Rod’s case it goes beyond the simple use of performance-enhancing drugs. The Yankees expect him to be accused of recruiting other athletes to a Miami clinic where drugs were dispensed, and trying to obstruct MLB’s investigation into the clinic. He also faces questions about whether he was truthful with baseball when asked about his relationship with Dr. Anthony Galea, who pleaded guilty two years ago to a federal charge of

bringing unapproved drugs into the United States from Canada. Just how harsh the penalty will be, by all accounts, depends largely on whether Rodriguez is willing to make a deal. Either way, this is Selig’s best chance to finally make a statement against the scourge of PEDs in baseball. “You can’t have the game knocked off by these drugs,” Vincent said in a telephone interview Wednesday. “Either we win or chemistry wins, and if chemistry wins there is no game.” So far chemistry has the lead, as evidenced by the way the record book has been rewritten in the Steroids Era. Even with better testing, harsher suspensions and a change in the culture of the once obstinate players’ union in recent years, the latest scandal shows PEDs still are rampant in baseball. Take a look at the quality of players expected to be punished. They include not only A-Rod, but also Texas outfielder Nelson Cruz, San Diego shortstop Everth Cabrera and Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta — all picked for the 2013 All-Star game.

Another 2013 All-Star, Oakland pitcher Bartolo Colon, was suspended last year following a positive testosterone test, as were Toronto outfielder Melky Cabrera and San Diego catcher Yasmani Grandal, though they aren’t expected to receive additional time off.

A-Rod at forefront There are others, a dozen or so in all who will be penalized. But it is Rodriguez who dominates the conversation, and it is Rodriguez who surely will take the biggest hit of all. He wanted to get back on the field before his punishment was imposed, but the Yankees were having none of it. Tricked once already into giving A-Rod a $275 million, 10-year contract, the Steinbrenner sons weren’t about to be tricked again just when baseball is about to take a giant problem — and at least part of a giant salary — off their hands. It’s hard to be sympathetic toward A-Rod, mostly because he’s not a sympathetic figure. If what he’s accused of doing is accurate — and the guess is baseball has even more on Rodriguez than has been leaked —

he’s made a mockery of the game that has made him rich beyond belief. Some of those riches came because he cheated the game and the fans who thought they were paying to see an honest at-bat. He also cheated every player who doesn’t have half his talent, yet somehow found the resolve to refuse to take PEDs no matter the potential financial rewards. “The games have to have rules and they have to be played fairly, or they’re not games,” Vincent said. “If we can’t stop this, we’re going to have professional wrestling instead of real competition.” Actually, professional wrestling might be a good fit for Rodriguez. He would have to play the role of a villain, of course, but that’s something he’s had practice doing already. Whatever A-Rod does, his spectacular fall should be a cautionary tale to athletes everywhere. This was a guy who didn’t need to cheat to be great, yet he cheated anyway. If he’s a scapegoat for those before him who were never caught, then so be it. If he never again plays a game in the major leagues, then too bad. Whatever punishment he gets, he brought it on himself.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

B3

Hawks: Harvin is injury-prone, but isn’t soft CONTINUED FROM B1 ing his rookie season of 2009, when he dealt with migraine headaches and a While Harvin’s recent sore shoulder. injury history is not as In 2010, he was a “quesextensive, it should be pointed out that, at 25, he’s tionable” four times and a “probable” another three. younger than the 30-year Ailments involved a hip, a old Gutierrez, and participates in a sport where col- hamstring, an ankle and the headaches. lisions are quite more freThe trend continued in quent than an occasional 2011: Four “questionable” encounter with a padded and three “probable” for wall. the headaches, ribs and a Harvin wasn’t a particu- finger. larly happy camper with Harvin’s health issues the Vikings, but nobody last season were limited to questioned his work ethic. a slightly tweaked hamIf he sat out, it wasn’t string and a severely because he was a pain in sprained ankle, which sidethe neck. It was because he lined him for the final had a pain in the neck. seven games. NFL injury reports Despite the banged-up listed Harvin as “question- body, Harvin started 43 of able” for seven games dur- a possible 64 games for the

Vikings, sustaining a trend of playing hurt that dated back to high school and a stellar career at the University of Florida. Harvin’s last hurrah with the Gators quelled any questions about his heart. With the national championship for the 2008 season at stake in the BCS title game against Oklahoma, the junior rushed nine times for 122 yards, and caught five passes for an additional 49 yards, accumulating those gaudy numbers on a bad ankle later revealed as a hairline fracture of the lower right leg. Harvin’s 2008 season turned once he underwent arthroscopic surgery on his

heel — an injury, doctors determined, responsible for a variety of other injuries he’d suffered since high school. Among them: Achilles tendinitis, knee tendinitis, a hip flexor, and hamstring and quad pulls. Pete Carroll and John Schneider were familiar with Harvin’s medical file — more accurately, his medical file volumes, likely delivered to Seahawks headquarters in a truck — and they still signed the dynamic play-maker to a contract assuring him a minimum of $25.5 million. They did this because, as football insiders, they concluded Harvin is a gamer. (Definition of gamer: A dude who leads his team to the national

championship by rolling up 171 total yards on a broken leg.) There’s no reason to believe Harvin’s $25.5 million jackpot turned him soft. He’ll give the Seahawks everything he’s got, once he’s able to give the Seahawks whatever he can. That’s the good news. The not-so-good news is that Percy Harvin, like Franklin Gutierrez, appears prone to the tough breaks (and strains, sprains, pulls and tears) that stifles the potential of superior athletes. Harvin has a hip problem that wasn’t curable by a faith healer, or praying to St. Jude. Surgery was one option,

playing through the 2013 season in a state of perpetual trepidation is another. Harvin chose surgery, which means he won’t take the field until December, if he takes it at all. Schneider was braced for the decision. “We’re prepared either way,” the Seahawks general manager told Sirius XM Radio on Monday. “We’re going to put our arms around him and help him out.” That the Seahawks are behind Harvin is encouraging. Instead of stewing about the possibility a $25.5 million investment has gone wrong, the organization is embracing its star-crossed star.

NFL: Safety measures not decreasing injuries CONTINUED FROM B1 union, but wasn’t paid by it. The study says there “Severe injuries are were 1,095 instances of increasing in frequency,” injuries sidelining a player Jesse David, the economist for eight or more days in overseeing the study, said in 2009 — including practices a telephone interview from and games in the preseason, Pasadena, Calif. regular season and postsea“I know that’s a very son — and that climbed to important issue for both the 1,272 in 2010, 1,380 in players’ association and the 2011, and 1,496 in 2012. league — trying to tweak That’s an increase of 37 the rules and the equippercent. ment to deal with that. “The way I look at it, “But despite everything really, is that injuries are they’ve been doing, it’s still part of the game,” said corgoing on.” David said his company nerback Kyle Wilson of the has done consulting for the New York Jets, who lost NFL Players Association in another cornerback, Aaron the past and received the Berry, for the season when data for this study from the he tore a knee ligament on

the first day of practice last week. “Injuries happen sometimes. They’re unfortunate, but it really is just part of the game.”

Head injuries Concussions have become a far-more-noticed part of football in recent years, with more discussion of the links between head injuries and brain disease, hundreds of lawsuits brought by thousands of former players, and rules changes made by the NFL to try to better protect players. During the nine years

examined in David’s study, the average number of days missed because of head injuries by players in the league went from 4.8 in 2004, four in 2005, and 4.1 in 2006, to 10.9 in 2010, 12 in 2011, and 16 last season. “We have experts at practice every day to let you know, as a coach, if someone does have a concussion, so that makes it pretty easy. They leave it out of our hands; they put in the experts’ hands,” Redskins coach Mike Shanahan said. “But, yeah, I think there’s more awareness in a lot of different areas when it comes to injuries over the last few years, and right-

fully so.” David said “you now have more severe injuries overall” because of the hike in lengthy absences for reported concussions. “Are the brain injuries actually more severe now than they were five years ago? Or is that players simply being held out longer for the same injury? That we can’t tell from the data,” David said. “My guess is it’s both, but how much of each factor, I don’t know.” NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy, who said the league will look at the study’s findings, attributed the longer absences for

M’s: Trade offers didn’t offer enough CONTINUED FROM B1 “So at the end, I said all along I wasn’t going to be the aggressor. I didn’t think there was a need to be and this is where we are.” Yes, there were teams interested in acquiring reliever Oliver Perez and even outfielder Michael Morse, despite his recent injuries. The Baltimore Orioles were one team in particular.

Didn’t meet price However, the Mariners weren’t interested in what teams were offering. Zduiencik was looking for players or top prospects that could help in the near future (next season), and teams were reluctant give them up.

“I said this to anyone I talked to at any point in time, there were pieces here that could help another club win,” Zduriencik said. “And if you wanted to acquire those pieces, there was a price to pay to acquire them. If you are coming short of that price, it doesn’t make sense for us to do that. “It doesn’t make sense for us to break up our club for the next two months and send the wrong message in that clubhouse with a chance of not bringing a player back that wanted to come back here and basically cut the cord. “There’s price to be paid for that by another club. If they weren’t willing to pay that price, then we weren’t in position to have any deep conversations that were

going to lead to a trade.” Despite the Mariners sitting at 50-56 and some 8.5 games out in the wild card race, Zduriencik was hesitant to alter his 25-man roster just for the sake of making a move.

‘The wrong message’ He felt it could have negative reaction in a clubhouse filled with young players. “I think we have a good young big league club right now, you see that in front of your eyes,” Zduriencik said. “To detract from it, I think it would have been devastating to some of the guys in this clubhouse. I think it would have been the wrong message to send. “So, you stay the course and watch this club play the

next couple months.” The Mariners have slew of players under one-year contracts. Many of them will not be back next season, by keeping this team together for the next two months, what does he hope to gain? “When you let a guy leave, it’s harder to get a guy back,” he said. “Once you break your marriage up and you want to go back and ask that player to come back, it’s much harder to do. He probably feels somewhat betrayed. “Now you have to start all over again. They certainly they have the right to walk, but we also have the first right to re-sign them if we choose to do that. “And I think that’s important to a player, espe-

cially if they like Seattle. “If they are saying, I’d like to be part of this thing going forward. I like what’s going on. It would be great. “Who knows, we may have the inside track on some of these players back here. That was a little bit of the thinking as well.” Of those players that could leave, Zdruriencik has already begun the courting process of trying to bring some back. “I think some of the players understand how we feel about them,” he said. “I’ve had indirect conversations with them. Some I’ve had direct, quite frankly. “But I do think as we move forward from now till the end of the year, that will accelerate as we get closer to the end.”

players with concussions to more caution in the treatment of those types of injuries. “We do know that the game is safer now, but we still have work to do. We continue to work hard on many fronts to make the game better and safer for our sport at all levels,” McCarthy wrote in an email. “Our ongoing efforts include making rule changes designed to take dangerous techniques out of the game and also improving medical care to properly manage and treat concussions and raise awareness of their seriousness.”

Horton CONTINUED FROM B1 It is still legal to harvest hatchery coho and pinks in all of Area 4. The summer hatchery king seasons in Marine Area 5 (Sekiu) and 6 (Port Angeles) close Friday, Aug. 16. In Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal), the chinook season south of Ayock Point is open until the last day of 2013. August also is when the coho and pinks dethrone the kings. So, we have that to look forward to.

________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Inbee Park on brink of history at the home of golf THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Women’s Open, LPGA Championship, Titleholders and Western Open over the 1961-62 seasons. Wright has been watching Park on television this year and is struck by her calm. “She certainly is an unflappable young lady,” the 78-year-old Wright told The Associated Press in a rare telephone interview from her home in Florida. “She’s probably the best putter I’ve ever seen. And I’ve seen some good ones. I’m hoping she can pull it off, and then win the fifth one in France. No one will ever come close to that unless the LPGA adds a sixth major.” The debate this week at St. Andrews is not whether Park is capable of a fourth straight major, but whether that will constitute a calendar Grand Slam. The LPGA Tour, not nearly as established or well-funded as men’s golf, designated the Evian Championship in France as a fifth major this year. The Grand Slam — the one Palmer created in 1960 on his way to St. Andrews — has always been about four majors for more than a half-century. “It’s pretty incredible to win the first three,” Woods said Wednesday at the Bridgestone Invitational in

Ohio. “And the way she did it . . . executing, and it seemed like she just is making everything. “It’s really neat to see someone out there and doing something that no one has ever done, so that’s pretty cool.” The Grand Slam in golf was first mentioned in 1930 when Bobby Jones won the four biggest events of his era — the British Open, U.S. Open, British Amateur and U.S. Amateur. The term came from contract bridge — winning all 13 tricks — or a clean sweep. Slam or not, there is little debate that Park can do something no one else has in the modern game. “If it could happen, it’s something that I will never forget,” Park said. “My name will be in the history of golf forever, even after I die.” Her pursuit began with a four-shot victory in the Kraft Nabisco Championship. She won the LPGA Championship in a playoff over Catriona Matthew, and then took one giant step closer to history with a fourshot win at the U.S. Women’s Open. “What she already has done is absolutely fantastic,” Wright said. “I know she’d be satisfied with that.” The one constant to her

remarkable run is that she makes it all look so easy. “You would think after winning two of them it would faze her a little bit,” said Stacy Lewis, whom Park replaced at No. 1 in the world in April. “But obviously at the U.S. Open, it didn’t. I don’t know. Inbee is playing so good this year, and she’s so steady. You wouldn’t know whether she’s winning a tournament or whether she’s losing it, and that’s what you need in a major. “As a player, you’d like to know if she’s human, to see if she actually feels the nerves like the rest of us do.” Park doesn’t really have

an intimidating presence, not like those who preceded her in women’s golf. She doesn’t overpower courses like Yani Tseng. She isn’t always accurate off the tee like Sorenstam. She’s not athletic like Karrie Webb. She lacks the charisma of Lorena Ochoa. But she can putt. She can score. And she can win, especially the big ones. Especially this year. “Sometimes you want to know what she’s feeling, what’s going through her head,” Paula Creamer said. “With Annika, with Lorena, with Yani, you knew what was going on. With Inbee, it’s much harder to see.”

SWING SET: Large, sturdy swing set and play structure with slide, ladders and bars. Unbolt for transport. Excellent value.

$650

360-457-8421 722303

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — The cheering jarred Inbee Park from her sleep. The 10-year-old went downstairs to find her father in front of the television in the middle of the night in Seoul as he watched Se Ri Pak become the first South Korean to win the U.S. Women’s Open. Within a week, Park wrapped her hands around a golf club for the first time, not knowing that it one day would lead her to the brink of history. “They were doing replays every day on TV, her hitting the shot out of the water with her socks off,” Park said. “It was cool to see her white feet. I didn’t know what was happening, but I thought it was really cool to be seen playing golf and being on TV. Everybody was talking about it. Golf looked really fun.” Fifteen years later, everyone is talking about Inbee Park. A win this week in the Women’s British Open — at St. Andrews, of all places — would make the 25-yearold Park the first golfer to win four majors in one season. Arnold Palmer created the modern Grand Slam, winning four professional majors in one year. Jack

Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Annika Sorenstam got halfway home before their pursuit of it ended. No one has ever had a better shot at it than Park, who has won three LPGA Tour majors this year. She is a heavy favorite when the Open begins today, just as Woods was at St. Andrews when he won to complete the career Grand Slam in 2000. Park already has won six times this year — half of those wins at majors — and has earned more than $2 million. No one else in women’s golf has crossed the $1 million mark. “I think she can do it,” Pak said Wednesday, a Hallof-Famer revered for cutting a path for so many South Koreans. “She’s dominating. Her game is strong. Her confidence is strong. All the attention is on her. Everyone thinks she can do it.” Woods and Mickey Wright are the only players who have held four professional majors at the same time, both done over two seasons. Woods won the U.S. Open, British Open, PGA Championship and Masters in succession in 2000-01. Wright, who Ben Hogan once said had the best swing he ever saw, won the


3rdAge

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

B4

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

Learn about dementia the easy way We learn (sometimes) about stuff that’s out there that can help us, and we learn about what us is being the we wish was out there but isn’t. Mark caregiver for But we learn. Harvey the person with So now, I want you to put yet Alzheimer’s. another thing on your plate that We could be can’t possibly hold another thing: friends, I want you to show up at IF YOUR LIFE is touched in extended famthe Sequim Senior Activity Cenany way by Alzheimer’s disease ily, professionter, 921 E. Hammond St., at (or any form of dementia, for that als or even the 1:30 p.m. this Tuesday. matter, but we’ll just say person themI want you to do that because Alzheimer’s), here are two things selves, but the the Western and Central WashI know to be true: one we see the ington State Chapter of the ■ You hate that disease with most and know Alzheimer’s Association is going a passion that you didn’t know to put on a town hall meeting. the best is the you had in you. “caregiver” scenario. ■ You know a lot about it. You National, state plans Most caregivers for people don’t think you do, but you do. with Alzheimer’s make it up as The point of said town hall So, as to the first, some of you they go along. meeting is to hear from you about are thinking, “As opposed to all of We do that because we don’t what ought to be in the National the diseases that we like?” know what else to do. Alzheimer’s Plan (yes, the governNo, but Alzheimer’s is slow, Most of us have read books ment may actually be getting deceptive, cruel, unpredictable and websites, talked to pros and around to this) and the Washingand robs us of the one thing that listened to others, and read and ton State Plan for same because if we valued the most: the person read and read. you don’t tell them, then what will we love. But moment to moment, we happen is that people who don’t make it up as we go along know as much about it as you do Slipping way because our moment-to-moment will just make it up as they go isn’t in anybody’s book. The person we love slowly along . . . Sometimes, we screw it up slips away and is replaced by . . . And most of us know how that and beat ourselves up: “I should somebody else we have to come goes. to know, with little bursts of that have known better!” “I should There will be a panel. The have seen that coming!” “I should panel will get us up to speed other person we did know, so have known that!” “Why didn’t I sometimes we end up thinking, about what’s happening on the think of that?” “Who are you?” topic and provide some expertise But we learn — usually the Then, we hate ourselves for to answer some questions, then hard way. thinking that. talk a bit about an initiative in We learn what works (today), Washington to improve health As for the second? Well, the most common scenario for a lot of and we learn what doesn’t. care for folks who are on both

Visit Sequim senior center this Tuesday

HELP LINE

Birthday Helmut ‘Hal’ Poths Hal Poths of Port Angeles turned 80 years old Wednesday. He was born July 31, 1933, near Frankfurt, Germany. After completing school and learning his trade, he began working in the field of grocery sales and marketing. In 1959, at age 26, he came with his wife to the United States, where his first job was working in a grocery store’s produce department. He and his wife later owned and operated a Chuckwagon Buffet restaurant in Walla Walla.

They had three children: Stewart, Monika and Eleanor. After a divorce, Hal relocated to Port Angeles to manage Mr. Poths Roy’s Chuckwagon, which he later purchased. In 1978, he married Janet Bunch and added a stepson, Robert Bunch, to his family. He continued with his love of restaurants, owning and

ou don’t have to walk in with the Great-Solution-forAlzheimer’s-in-the-WesternHemisphere (unless you have one); you just need to be able to tell us what would help, what would have helped or what didn’t help.

Y

Medicare and Medicaid (“dual eligibles”), but the main thing is to hear from you. I’m told that I will be there to “moderate.” Interestingly, I’m not at all sure what “moderate” means, unless I’m to forestall us from breaking into spontaneous line-dancing (which might, actually, not be a bad idea), but I don’t really care because it’s going to give me an opportunity to learn a lot from you. You don’t have to walk in with the Great-Solution-for-Alzheimer’s-in-the-Western-Hemisphere (unless you have one); you just need to be able to tell us what would help, what would have helped or what didn’t help. Or what failed. Or what went wrong. Or what worked wonderfully. Or what would help you put one foot in front of the

other tomorrow. I know you don’t have time for this. And I know you’re probably thinking that by the time anybody gets around to actually implementing an Alzheimer’s plan, it could well be too late to do you any good. You may be right. I don’t know. What I do know is that if we don’t share what we’ve learned the “hard way,” then everyone else who becomes forced to walk in our shoes also will be forced to learn it all all over again — the hard way. Please don’t do that. Just sigh, roll your eyes and mutter under your breath: “Oh, sure. Why not? I’ve certainly got nothing better to do.” Then, show up at the Sequim senior center at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday and learn something. And say something. And don’t fret because I don’t know how to line-dance either, so we’ll all just make it up as we go along. The hard way.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

CORNER

operating Roy’s Chuckwagon. Later in his career, he owned Rosewood’s Buffet, Western Buffet in Aberdeen and another buffet in Chehalis. He and wife, Jan, also owned and operated the Greenery Restaurant in Port Angeles for four years. Hal has six grandchildren. He shares his July 31 birthday with a grandson, Bryan Bunch, who turned 20 years old this year. Hal stays busy by maintaining rental properties, going for walks every day and occasionally taking trips back

to Germany. He celebrated his 80th birthday with dinner at the Bushwhacker Restaurant, joined by his family and friends. He plans to take a trip to Portland, Ore., for a gettogether at the Rheinlander German Restaurant, where he said he’ll enjoy good German food and lots of singing with family and friends.

________ Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be

celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

FAST WORK BY ANDREW REYNOLDS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

ACROSS 1 Holiday cheer 7 Early round 13 “30 Rock” or “3rd Rock From the Sun” 19 P.G.A. event played on Father’s Day 20 Company in a 2001 merger with Chevron 21 Old TV component 22 See 36-Across 23 Tickles 24 Corrects 25 Bobble 27 Wordsworth’s “___ to Duty” 28 Short race? 29 ___ Peninsula 31 Opposite of eternally 35 Suffix with green or bean 36 With 22-Across, shortly 37 Accident marker 39 Subject of many a war 42 Cobra’s foe 44 Melee 45 Whole ___ 48 Stamp, perhaps 49 Express 50 GMC truck 51 GPS lines: Abbr. 52 Texas athletic site 54 Dive, maybe

55 Molding material 58 Robed ruler 59 Seminary subj. 60 New newt 61 Cons 62 Like the 116-Across 67 Common pg. size 68 “___ magic” 69 Auto safety feature, for short 70 Dead-end jobs, perhaps 71 Eye affliction 72 Pizza order 73 A computer may be in it 77 Seventh letter 79 Con 81 Narrow valleys 82 Strong-smelling cheese 86 Lord or lady 87 “Nifty!” 88 How many Playboy bunnies dress 89 Generosity 91 Rise 92 “No ___!” 93 Furtive 95 N.F.L. owner who moved the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore in 1996 97 She outwitted Sherlock 99 ___ greens 102 Versailles resident

103 Is a poor night watchman, say 105 Polo ground? 106 Gargoyle features, often 109 Showy shrub 112 Showy 113 Greets the day 114 “Feeling Good” chanteuse 115 Hide-and-seek cheater 116 5-Down unit 117 Consumer Reports employee DOWN 1 Run smoothly 2 Bear, in Baja 3 2012 Emmy winner for Outstanding Drama Series 4 “L’Africaine,” e.g. 5 Business titan born July 30, 1863 6 Not conned by 7 Grp. that rarely meets during the summer 8 Take off 9 Give off 10 Light show light 11 Put away 12 Hip-hop’s ___ Def 13 Blasted 14 “Garfield” waitress 15 Balcony, e.g. 16 Feature of a 57-Down

17 More curious 18 Unkempt 26 Genetic enzyme 28 Fictional character with steel pincers for hands 29 Give the silent treatment? 30 Before long, poetically 32 Before, poetically 33 Words to live by 34 Exposed 38 Failed investment 40 Off course 41 Tobiko, in Japanese cuisine 43 Bloody 44 A Beatle 46 Poorly insulated, say 47 He wrote, “I exist, that is all, and I find it nauseating” 49 Bobble 50 Hook’s hand 52 Wake-up times, for short 53 Tolkien creatures 55 Impressive golf shot 56 Many a Dream Act beneficiary 57 5-Down innovation 58 Latin 101 verb 62 Get down pat 63 Up to the task 64 Northeast university town

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

19

20

21

22

23

24

25 29

26

30

31

36

37

42

27

57

69

72

73

79

63

64

65

80

86

75

59

60

77

83

85

110

111

88 91

92

96

101

97

102 108

98

104

106

112

113

114

115

116

117

82 Shrew

107

103

105

SOLUTION ON PAGE B12

84

78

82

95

65 Getup 66 Pac-12 player 71 Winter sprinkle 74 Discharge 75 Ending with cyto76 Space rock, maybe 77 List ender 78 116-Across, colloquially 80 Like

47

67

76

90

100

46

71

87

94

54

66

81

89

53

70 74

18

50

58

68

17

41

45

52

62

99

40

49

56

16

35

44

61

93

34

39

51 55

33

38

48

15

28

32

43

14

109

88 Casting source for some H’wood 83 Bit of TV real comedies estate 90 Hose holder 91 Harvey of “Taxi 84 Pearl Buck Driver” heroine 93 Cone filler 85 Where 5-Down’s company gets an 94 “The Big Bang Theory” “F”? co-creator Chuck 87 Bookworm, 96 Extinguish maybe

98 Lots 100 Tip for a reporter, maybe 101 Status quo ___ 104 Brewery fixture 106 Cooke of soul 107 For 108 Bygone flier 110 Phoenix-toAlbuquerque dir. 111 ___ Lingus


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Mike Du Jour

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

by Lynn Johnston

by Mike Lester

[“Doonesbury” is on hiatus; please email your comments on this strip to pdncomics@gmail.com]

DEAR ABBY: I travel a lot in my work with animal protection. Often, I’ll encounter dogs and cats in distress as soon as I reach the airport. Distracted by their own thoughts, their owners seldom realize they’re upsetting the pets they’re carrying through the terminal. Animal carriers are carelessly swung to and fro, banged against counters, chairs and onto the floor. Cat or dog shoulder bags are dangled at angles that make it impossible for the animal inside to balance. These poor pets can be confused, dizzy and suffer from motion sickness before the flight even takes off. Traveling is stressful enough for animals. So please, everyone, if you fly with an animal companion, keep it foremost in your thoughts. Use a sturdy, well-ventilated carrier, preferably one with wheels, that’s designed for animals and to fit under your seat. And please, keep the carrier upright and steady. Animal Lover in Washington, D.C.

DEAR ABBY can be every bit as destructive as Van Buren physical abuse. Perhaps it’s time to consider moving out. With the constant verbal battering you’re receiving, it’s no wonder you’re depressed. Harming yourself is not the answer to your problem. Because you have reached the point of wanting to hurt yourself, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. The number is 800-7842433. A counselor there can direct you to the help you need. You may have to build your selfesteem from the ground up, but the effort will be well worth it. My thoughts are with you.

Abigail

Dear Abby: A few months ago, my mother joined Facebook, and I readily accepted her friend request. I’m a 30-something IT specialist, but Mom is new to the Internet. There are times I have gone online and seen posts in which my mother is arguing with my friends about their lifestyles. I have friends and business contacts from all over the world, and their backgrounds are highly varied, as are their belief and value systems. I have told Mom in private and public discussions that she owes someone an apology, but she shrugs it off. Am I wrong for asking her to respect my friends, and would you suggest I “unfriend” my mother until she learns proper Internet etiquette? Digital Family Man

Dear Animal Lover: Thank you for the heads up. In case someone’s pet might have other issues while traveling, it’s always a good idea to talk about it with a veterinarian before embarking. (Sorry, I couldn’t resist.)

by Bob and Tom Thaves

Dear Abby: I’m a 19-year-old guy, and for as long as I can remember, my parents have yelled at me. It lasts for hours at a time at night after they come home from work almost every day. It’s never about me doing something bad but how I never do anything up to their expectations. I don’t know if they’re right or wrong, but it makes me depressed, and I have been thinking about suicide. I have never been able to have an opinion of my own because as soon as I had one, my parents would yell at me all over again and call me “stupid and retarded.” I cry myself to sleep at night hoping God will put me to sleep forever. Please tell me what to do. Justin in San Francisco

by Jim Davis

Dear Family Man: Because what your mother is doing could negatively affect your business, you should do exactly that. And quickly.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Dear Justin: Verbal abuse — which is what you are describing — by Mell Lazarus

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Flaunt your knowledge and incorporate your expertise into everything you do. You’ll have to be on top of your game to avoid being compromised by someone who thinks differently than you. Utilize your skills and strive to reach your goals. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Romance is highlighted regardless of your current status. Therefore, make an effort to enhance your personal life. Perfection in the way you present who you are and what you represent will make a difference in the opportunities you receive. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Keep your emotions in check or you may fall short of the expectations you have or that others have of you. A couple of changes may help you reach your goals, but refrain from misleading anyone regarding your potential. Honesty is the best policy. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Prepare to deal with the unexpected. Nothing will be constant and nobody can be trusted. Avoid arguments and taking on added responsibilities. Let your intuition guide you. Ulterior motives are present and must not be allowed to interfere with your goals. 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

B5

Keep pets relaxed when traveling

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

by Hank Ketcham

Pickles

by Brian Crane

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t dawdle or live in the past. Embrace the future and put your effort into the people, places and projects that will bring you the highest returns. Being blunt is necessary. Being friendly is awesome, but mustn’t stand between you and success. 4 stars

by Eugenia Last

Your desire to get things done will show everyone that you mean business, but making promises you cannot deliver will hurt your reputation. Practicality is necessary if you are going to be successful. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Focus on your VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): long-term commitment to perFocus on what you can do for sonal and professional partners. Anything superficial or others. Don’t let emotions interfere with your accomplish- less than your best will lead to ments. Push hard to get what regret. Unpredictable people you want without giving up too will not give you an accurate much. A loss is likely if you assessment of a situation that aren’t precise in what you say can influence your future. 3 and do. 2 stars stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. Ease into whatever you decide 18): Make a promise to follow to pursue. You’ll face opposi- a path that will bring you the tion if you take on too much or most mental, physical and neglect something you promfinancial stability. Embrace staised to do. Look for alternatives that will ease a relation- bilizing your home and family ship you have been finding dif- life by incorporating the changes that will encourage ficult to deal with. 5 stars the most from everyone SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. involved. Good fortune can be 21): Communication will be yours. 5 stars your ticket to success. Travel plans will allow you to see the PISCES (Feb. 19-March possibilities that exist else20): Keep your emotions in where. Learn from those with check. Don’t let personal opinmore experience and utilize ions stand between you and your talent to improve your success. Network with people current personal situation. 3 who have something to offer stars and strike up deals with whoever can contribute the most. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. Keep ego out of negotiations. 22-Dec. 21): Make wise changes at work and at home. 2 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, August 1, 2013 PAGE

B6

Lawmakers criticize TSA over misconduct penalties THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Federal lawmakers criticized the Transportation Security Administration on Wednesday for uneven disciplinary action in misconduct cases that a government watchdog revealed had grown 26 percent over three years. “These findings are especially hard to stomach since so many Americans today are sick of being groped, interrogated and treated like criminals when passing through checkpoints,” said Rep. Jeff Duncan, R-S.C. “Stop with the napping, the stealing, the tardiness and the disrespect.” TSA Deputy Administrator John Halinski told a House Homeland Security subcommittee hearing that the agency has two offices for investigating and adjudicating cases and is working to better monitor the results. “I’ve given you my word — if they’re stealing, doing drugs or breaching the security system intentionally and I can prove it, they’re out,” Halinski said. The Government Accountability Office reported that the number of misconduct cases at the TSA rose to 3,408 last year from 2,691 in 2010. Nearly one-third (32 percent) of the cases involved attendance and 20 percent dealt with violating security stan-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A new government report found a surge in misconduct by airport screeners in recent years. dards, such as allowing travelers and luggage to bypass screening. Nearly half the cases (47 percent) resulted in letters of reprimand, 31 percent resulted in suspensions and 17 percent resulted in the worker leaving the agency, according to the GAO. Duncan said that out of 56 cases of theft in the report, 31 cases resulted in termination, 13 in suspension, 11 in letters of reprimand and one resignation. He called the letters a “slap on the wrist,” adding: “I would hope that a federal employee that engages in theft

of trusting travelers would be disciplined more than with just a letter.” Halinski said the difficulties come when a theft isn’t proved. Workers can appeal their discipline, and more than 800 have, and 15 percent of the cases were overturned, he said. Some of the more serious misconduct cases include a TSA agent who stole more than 80 laptops from fliers’ bags and another who carried past security a family member’s bag that contained prohibited items.

State cuts unemployment benefits THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — Washington state’s long-term unemployment benefits will decrease by nine weeks next month, state officials announced Wednesday. Officials with the Employment Security Department said that the decrease was triggered because the three-month average of the state’s unemployment rate was below 7 percent.

Regular unemployment benefits last up to 26 weeks and are paid by the state. However, one long-term benefit program funded by the federal government currently lasts up to 37 weeks in Washington state and is triggered on and off by the state’s unemployment rate. The federal benefit will drop from 37 weeks to 28 weeks on Aug. 11. In total, the maximum weeks of unemployment benefits will drop from 63 to

54 for most eligible workers. Officials estimate that approximately 26,000 unemployed workers will lose benefits by the end of the year. The department said that about 114,000 people claimed either regular, emergency or extended benefits last month. More than 140,000 people in the state have exhausted all of their available unemployment benefits to date.

Those who are still unemployed and claiming long-term benefits will soon be receiving notices from the department informing them of the change. According to the Employment Security Department, more than $6 billion in emergency unemployment compensation has been paid to about 440,000 unemployed workers in Washington state since the program was activated in July 2008.

$ Briefly . . . Makah tribal member gets new EPA stint SEATTLE — Makah tribal member Jim Woods will continue as the region’s senior tribal policy adviser to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for another twoyear term. Woods will continue to work with more than 271 tribes in Alaska, Idaho, Woods Oregon and Washington as part of an intergovernmental personnel agreement with the Swinomish tribe originally signed in 2011. “I am grateful to the Swinomish tribe for their continuing strong support of Jim,” said Dennis McLerran, EPA regional administrator in Seattle. “Our region has by far the largest number of tribal governments in the nation, and Jim has been key to helping us fulfill our trust responsibilities.” Before his appointment to EPA, Woods was senior policy adviser to the Swinomish tribe, focusing on environmental policies, natural resource policies and treaty rights. He previously led the Sustainable Resource Management division for the Makah Tribal Council.

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Michele Adkisson of Eagle Home Mortgage will be keynote speaker. The free class is sponsored by the Washington State Housing and Finance Commission. Refreshments will be provided. Classes fulfill HUD requirements, with a certificate issued by the state. The certificate is required for many new homebuyer programs.

Gold and silver

Gold futures for December delivery fell $11.80, or 0.9 percent, to Homebuyer class settle at $1,313 an ounce SEQUIM — A two-part on Wednesday. Silver for September first-time homebuyer delivery fell 5 cents to class will be Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 13-14, at end at $19.63 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave., and The Associated Press

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N DEA’tDMLisIs It!

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Don

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

T O DAY ’ S

A BA R N S a l e : S wa p meet in barn behind Port Angeles Les Schwab, 9-3 p.m., Fri.-Sat., 10-3 p.m., Sun. 3 new people, featuring Chevron, Barbie and military collections, household items, tools. Come join us for a large space, just $15 per day. 452-7576 for info. ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. (360)452-2034 ALICE’S 4 Family Garage Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m., Sun., 10-3 p.m., 2207 Edgewood Dr., across from the garden store. Ceramics, Barbies, tattoo gun, bicycles, and something for everyone! CHAIRS: 2 cranberr y colored overstuffed chairs. Good condition. $110 each. 477-1362.

ESTATE SALE Please join us on Satu r d ay, Au g u s t 3 r d , from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at 755 W. Washington, Sequim, (Hollywood V i d e o ) fo r a H U G E sale. We will be offering for your consideration antique/collectible furniture/china/silverp l a t e , a r t , j e w e l r y, PURSES, BASKETS, POTTERY, books, retro, lawn/garden, sewing, holiday, tools, and so much more. See you there! Please bring a donation of non-perishable food items for the Salvation Ar my Soup Kitchen. Swallow’s Nest Antiques & Estate Sales www.swallowsnest antiques.weebly.com

DONKEYS: (3). Male, female, and 5 week old E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . , 10-2 p.m., 211 W. 9th youngster. $750 for all! St. Glassware, dishes, (360)452-2615 tools, and some furniFREE: Cat. Less than 1 ture, misc. items. year old, spayed and has all shots. For mer FUEL TANK with tool owner has passed on. box for pickup, 100 galLikes to hide or sit at the lon, hand pump, $500. window, uses litter box. 360-374-6661. Beautiful moddled gray Peninsula Classified color, medium hair. 360-452-8435 (360)565-3051

HOTTEST

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 7am- 1pm. 821 East Alder. Misc. tools, rugs, clothing, small appliances, household and more. GARAGE Sale. Fri.-Sat., 8-4 p.m., Sun., 8-2 p.m. Recliners, camera, furniture, collectables...clothing. Rain or shine. 153 E. Diane Dr. Nor th on Elizabeth Lane, across from “the Lodge,” turn Right on E. Diane Dr. Follow road to dead end. GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-?, 351 Klahhane Rd. Electronics, tools, antiques, books, furniture, housewares, chainsaw, and more! We have an a bu n d a n c e o f eve r y thing! GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-5 p.m., 394 S. Alder Ln., 4 Seasons Park 1/2 mile east of Walmar t-follow signs. 30+ year accumulation of antiques and collectibles! Including cast-iron 1000 LP records, BC pottery, cobalt blue glass, cranberr y glass, lots of other glass, furniture, chairs, hundreds of items too numerous to mention! No early admission!

GARAGE Sale: Month of August, starting Aug. 2, through Aug. 31, Mond ay t h r o u g h S u n d ay, 10-4 p.m. 415 E. Front St. Uniques and antiques, books, tools, arts and crafts, designer c l o t h i n g i n X X s i ze s, school supplies and aquarium equipment. Everything but the kitchen sink. You could furnish your entire house with all this stuff! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1840 E. Woodhaven Ln., up Golf Course Rd., on right. Oak coffee table with (2) end tables, household items including kitchen, bath, linens, small appliances, (2) grocer y car ts, lamps, mirror, pictures, microwave, ironing board, iron s e n t r y s a fe, p h o n e s, decorations, and barbecue. G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 8-2 p.m., 512 N. 7th Ave. Jewelry, holiday items, linens, garden tools, misc. household items, furniture, lots of like-new items priced to sell! Cash only, please! HONDA: ‘70 Trail 90. High-low range, extras. $1,000. (360)461-0491.

NEW

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 8-4 p.m. 128 Hancock. Whicker, Pianorg a n , m a s s a g e t a bl e , cannon printer, Mac software, toys, child chairs, 1940s vintage wearables, 78 albums, mirror, potter y, books, c h i l d r e n ’s b o o k s a n d crafts, misc.

s

CLASSIFIEDS!

HUGE YARD Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-5 p.m., 21 Glen Ave., Chimacum. 1979 24’ Barth class A motor home, 1947 CJ Jeep with many extras, 12’x6’ flat bed, double axle trailer, tools, wood working, carpet, electrical and air, Japense rest a r u a n t d i s h e s, t oy s, crafts, clothings and lots HUGE GARAGE Sale: of misc. No early birds. Fri.-Sat., 9-1 p.m., Third and Penn St., P.A. Pool MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat. table, crab pots, wood 8-3 p.m., follow signs on chipper, tools, desks, Medsker to 131 Sunrise misc. fur niture, books View. Too much to list. and clothes! M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Fri.-Sun., 8-4 p.m., 66 H U G E G a r a g e S a l e : Cougar Ln. Up Monroe, Sat. 8-5 p.m., Sun. 8-3 left on Draper, left on p.m., 634 Heron Hill Rd Cougar. (2) Gas fireplac(off E. Sequim Bay Rd.) es, wedding reception To o l s , w a s h e r / d r y e r, equipment, wall oven, c a m p i n g a n d p h o - cook top, compactor, (2) t o / v i d e o e q u i p. , k i d s wood lathes, refrigerator, q u a d / m o t o r b i k e a n d tools, clothes, Goldwing t oy s , r a f t , t a bl e s e t , motorcycle. Follow the books, computers, etc... yellow plates to our awesome sale! M OV I N G S a l e : S a t . Sun., 9-3 p.m., 201 Fo- P.A.: Quality, newer 2 garty, south of Lauridsen Br., DW, W/D, NS, NP. Blvd., between Cherry $650. (360)796-3560. and Laurel Streets. No W A N T E D : R u g e r a l l ey a c c e s s, p l e a s e GP-100, 357, 3or 4 inch park on Fogarty St., sale barrell, double action, is at back of proper ty. stainless revolver, or Good stuff! Something S&M, heavy frame, new for everyone! condition. 460-4491.

PLANT Sale: Sat., 8-3 p. m . , P u m p k i n Pa t c h Flea Market, off of Hwy. 101. Now taking orders! Day lilies, $5. Foxglove, yarrow, orange sedge, cape fuscia, $4. Sweet flag, and monkshood, blue star creeper, $3. scotch moss, $2. Large hy d r a n g i a , $ 1 5 . C a l l 681-0477, or stop by Denny D.’s at the Pumpkin Patch Flea Market! PUMPKIN PATCH FLEA MARKET Sat., 8-4 p.m., corner of Hwy. 101 and KitchenDick Rd. Absolutely no early sales. $15 per space, no reservations needed. More info: (360)461-0940

SALE or RENT 3 Br., 2 bath, all appliances included+ w/d. built in surround sound, French doors to patio, big backyard, shed, double garage, fireplace, crown molding. Cul-de-sac neighborhood! Rental price $1200 monthly. Call Tammy now (360)457-9511 or (360)461-9066!

SEQUIM: Office/retail space 850 sf. $800 mo. (360)460-5467 “RASPBERRIES” U-Pick, $20 per flat. We pick, $29 per flat. Green beans, $14.95 for 10lb case. (360)417-6710. RIDING MOWER: RX75 John Deere. 9 hp, 30” b l a d e , g r e a t m o w e r. $350. (360)461-5069. SEA-DOO: ‘96 Speeds t e r . Tw i n R o t e x . $5,000. (360)452-3213.

SEQUIM SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTER 8th ANNUAL BENEFIT SALE! Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. Furniture, books, tools, clothing, shoes, toys household and kitchen items, electronics, DV D ’s, l a m p s, c ra f t items, linens, mobility scooters, and a BAKE SALE too! 8,000 sf of Bargains! Proceeds benefit SSAC and SSAC’s Scholarship Fund for high school seniors. 990 E. Washington St., Suites E104 and E105, in the QFC shopping center. Call 683-6806 for more info

UNIQUE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 111 Bell St., YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., Sequim. Store fixtures, Aug.3-4, 9-5 p.m., Fri.- furniture, lamps, light fixS u n . , Au g . 9 - 1 1 , 9 - 5 tures, tables, etc. p.m., 1024 Deseret Ave. Vintage and antique furPLACE YOUR niture/items from many AD ONLINE eras, dishes and linens, With our new gently used clothing, and Classified Wizard seasonal decor, lots of you can see your misc. items. Too much ad before it prints! too list! Cash only! No www.peninsula earlies, please! dailynews.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 3010 Announcements 4026 General General Wanted Clallam County Clallam County BLUEBERRIES: Certified organic, big, sweet. U-Pick. $3.25/lb. (360)582-1128 SENIOR LADY Would like to meet nice s e n i o r g e n t l e m a n fo r companionship and maybe more. Mail response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#715/Senior Port Angeles, WA 98362

3020 Found FOUND: Cat. Female, l o n g h a i r, b r ow n a n d white tabby, Happy Valley/Bell Hill area. (360)681-4822 FOUND: Dog. Black dog, Swains in P.A., older, wounded leg. Email stephylynn21 @yahoo.com

3023 Lost L O S T: B i l l fo l d . R e d , many important papers, c o u l d b e i n Po r t A n geles. (360)775-9921. L O S T: C a t . G ray, fe male, short hair, microchipped, last seen near Pe n i n s u l a C o l l e g e i n P.A. (360)460-4636. L O S T: D o g . F e m a l e m i n i Au s s i e , 2 0 l b s , black and brown, white chest, West Joyce. REWARD: $500. (360)928-9538 LOST: Keys at Sunny Farms on Sunday, July 28. REWARD. 681-0477. LOST: Lawnmower. Ariens brand, last seen in carport of 2200 block of 4th Ave., P.A. (360)461-5638

BE A NEWSPAPER CARRIER FOR OUR HOMETOWN PAPER! Earn extra $$ per month. Applicant must be dependable, have reliable vehicle, possess a valid WA driver’s license and proof of insurance. No carrier collections. Apply in person at: 147 W. Washington, Sequim. Ask for Dave in Circulation. BUSY SALON: Experienced, licensed hair stylist wanted, with professional attitude and motivated, fun personality. Call Paula or Joe Sequim Beauty Salon (360)683-5881 CAREGIVERS NEEDED $100 hire bonus. Training available. Call Caregivers. P.A. 457-1644 Sequim 683-7377 P.T. 379-6659 CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Sequim area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early mor ning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., P.A. Call Dave at (360)460-2124.

4070 Business Opportunities

CNA/RNA: Immediate openings, part/full-time, all shifts. Wright’s Home Local seal coating and Care (360)457-9236. striping business owner looking to phase out of d a i l y o p e ra t i o n s. W i l l G O O D M E D I C I N E train and finance. Mini- life balance. Dynamic mal investment turnkey family practice opporopportunity. Call Mike at tunity. State of the Art Haller Inc (360)452-6677 Facility. Group practice with outpatient 4026 Employment clinic. Beautiful Sequim. jamestown General tribe.org or call Sheri at (360)683-5900. Air Flo Heating Co. is Hiring the Best! Service, Installation and GRAPHIC ARTIST Sales positions availAD DESIGNER a bl e. To p wa g e s a n d Full-time position in a benefits. DOE. Apply in daily newspaper enviperson at 221 W. Cedar r o n m e n t . M u s t b e St., Sequim. fluent in InDesign, PhotoShop, and IllusCARRIER ROUTE trator. Macintosh OS AVAILABLE ex p e r i e n c e h e l p f u l . Peninsula Daily News Ability to work under Circulation Dept. pressure with tight Is looking for an individu- deadlines. als interested in a Port Email resume to: Angeles area route. Injobs@peninsula terested parties must be dailynews.com 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill Graphic Design/ out application at 305 W. Production Assistant First St., P.A. No phone Versatile, detail-oriented, calls. team player with great attitude needed for proofing, typesetting, checking job tickets, etc. Adobe CS5 Suite experiCAREGIVER needed, e n c e r e q . R e s u m e t o prefer CNA, HCA, but art@olympicprinters.com n o t n e c e s s a r y. C a l l or 310 E. First St., Port Cherrie, Angeles. (360)683-3348 HAIR STYLIST Full time, for established salon in Port Angeles. (360)461-2438

Are you energetic and willing to work hard? Are you looking for a career instead of “just a job”?

HOME Health Care givers. Immediate o p e n i n g s fo r F T / P T workers. $11 to $12/hr to start DOE and shift. Call Rainshadow Home Services. (360)681-6206

Do you have the following skills? • Positive work ethic • Ability to follow directions • Strong willingness to learn • Ability to show on time daily Then we want you to join our team! Prior sawmill or production line experience is a plus! Excellent wage and benefits package. Shift work required. Apply in person immediately at Interfor 243701 Hwy 101 W. Port Angeles EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer

SIGN ON BONUS

$$$$

RUDDELL AUTO MALL

37836187

is looking for a highly motivated, goal orientated automotive sales person to join our team! You would be able to sell new GMC trucks, SUVs and Cadillac product as well as Hyundai and the Peninsula’s largest selection of pre-inspected pre-owned vehicles. We offer a very very competitive pay plan with bonus 401K medical and dental. Will train the right person. Call for an appointment today at

(360)452-6822.

HOUSEKEEPERS Detail oriented. Wage based directly on quality of work, with bonus opportunities. Apply in person at 140 Del Guzzi Dr. Port Angeles. No calls please. INTERIOR FINISH CARPENTER JOAT with exp, tools/ truck. Wage DOE. Resume: showroom@ bydesigngroupinc.net KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 LAND-SURVEYING Company has a position open for party chief/chainman. Construction exp. pref., send resume to: Attn. Survey Supervisor, at P.O. Box 2 1 9 9 , S e q u i m , WA 98382. MARINE Joiner Shop Foreman. 20-30 years’ experience in boatyard operations focusing on cabinetr y, hardware, hatches, doors, windows, interior repairs and remodels, traditional shipwright work. Leadership skills and crew direction are part of the job. Pay DOE. Email resume to hr @platyusmarine.com. 360-417-0709

Medical Assistant Opportunities Full-time, day shift positions now available. Must be a Cer tified/ Registered Medical Assistant with excellent customer service skills, and a steady work history. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org or email: nbuckner@olympicmedical.org EOE

NOW HIRING! FT Cook and FT Dietary Aide Avamere Olympic Rehab of Sequim 1000 S. 5th Ave Apply in person or call 360-582-3900 PAINTERS WANTED Experience requried. In P.T. (360)379-4176.

EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL Excellent location, topography and views of Strait Juan De Fuca to the nor th and Olympic Mountains to the south. Walking distance to Peninsula College, contiguous to Assisted Retirement home and Skilled Nursing care. Current zoning is RMD, Parcel is MOWING, PRUNING, within the high density BARKING city’s Master Plan. Honest and dependable. MLS#270296. $695,000. (360)582-7142 JEAN (360)683-4844 Windermere Mowing, trimming, mulch Real Estate and more! Call Ground Sequim East Control Lawn Care for honest, dependable lawn care at your home EXQUISITE DESIGN or business. Ground CRAFTSMANSHIP Control Lawn Care 3 Br., 2 bath, 2837 SF, 360-797-5782 Born in 2006, gourmet kitchen, formal dining, media room, library with RUSSELL built-in shelving, den/ofANYTHING fice, spacious master, 775-4570 or 681-8582 heated tile floor in bath, stunning wood finishes YOUNG COUPLE early throughout, 1 acre / a s i x t i e s . Ava i l a bl e fo r contiguous 1 acre for spring cleanup, weeding, sale. t r i m m i n g , m u l c h i n g , MLS#264283. $498,000. moss removal, complete Team Thomsen garden restoration and (360)808-0979 misc. yard care. ExcelCOLDWELL BANKER lent references. UPTOWN REALTY (360)457-1213 JUAREZ & SON’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problem projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248.

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Permanent and On-call positions available now at Clallam Bay Corrections Center Correctional Officer 1 Pay starts at $16.99 hr. Plus full benefits. Closes 08/13/13. Apply on-line: www.careers.wa.gov. For further information please call Laura at (360)963-3208 EOE

RECEPTIONIST Par t-time, 20 hours per week with some full-time for vacation fill in. If you have an outgoi n g p e r s o n a l i t y, a sense of humor and can multi-task, this is the job for you. The r ight candidate should have excellent telephone manners, gr e a t p e o p l e s k i l l s, phone sales and accounting experience. $10 per hour. Please email resume and cover letter with 3 references to: hbotts@peninsula dailynews.com No phone calls, please

11 CORAL Dr.: Beautiful,custom 3 br., 2.5 bath single story home offers numerous amenities.The gorgeous water, mountain, and country views are the cherry on top! Open House will be held July 19-21 from 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. For information please contact Russell at (360)-5829568. Priced at $329,500 this one won’t last long! AN ABSOLUTE TREAT! Completely remodeled ever ywhere, with new windows, floor coverings and baths! A wonderful open kitchen with island and breakfast bar. 5 Br, 3 b a t h , 2 f i r e p l a c e s, huge family room. Beautiful yard with fruit trees and a large deck. $259,000. MLS#271663. KATHY LOVE 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

Beautiful home in a peaceful setting on 1.58 acres. 3 Br, 2 bath plus den/office. Upgraded cabinets, floors, windows, custom master b a t h . Tw o p r o p a n e stoves, large Trex deck for enjoying garden and mountain views. Auto irSALES/OFFICE rigation, 4 car garage. ASSISTANT NEEDED $289,900. ML#271433. Full-time position with Gail Sumpter: 477-9361 benefits. Must be profiBlue Sky Real Estate cient with Excel/Word Sequim - 360-477-9189 documents and spread sheets. Apply in person: Price Ford Lincoln Mercury 3311 E Hwy. 101 Port Angeles RECEPTIONIST: Par ttime, fast paced office, ex p e r i e n c e r e q u i r e d , people skills and team player. Drop off resume at Sequim Animal Hospital, 202 N. 7th Ave., Seq

BEAUTIFUL HOME on 19.6 acres between Sequim and Port Angeles, 5 br., 5 bath, great for enter taining, gour met kitchen, deck, dramatic master suite, fireplace, walk-in shower, hydrot h e ra py t u b. G a r d e n s and vineyard. Perfect mother-in-law apt with own entrance or home office or B&B. 3182 Blue Mountain Road. TIMBER COMPANY $799,900 3 log truck drivers, min. NWMLS 40941 2 y r s. ex p. a n d g o o d Appt (360)461-3926 driving record. Processor/harvester operator, CENTRAL LOCATION for thinning application. Charming 1950s home Log loader opeator, for is centrally located, feasorting and laoding logs. tures a large kitchen, 3 Buncher operator, for Br., 2 bath, 1,709 SF clearcut production log- and a fenced in backging. Logging truck me- yard. chanic, full-time, own $190,000. MLS#271421. tools, self started, proKimi fessional. Compettive 360-461-9788 wage, steady work. JACE The Real Estate Resumes to: Company RyfieldProperties@ hotmail.com Charming home with Or call (360)460-7292, city, par tial mountain, please leave message and partial water views. or fax (360)417-8013 Central to all services. (360)417-8022 Many improvements All positions open for immediate employment. made to home, new roof, new electric panel, new ex t e r i o r a n d i n t e r i o r paint, new carpet and liWastewater Source noleum, new baseboard Control Specialist heaters, new tub encloCity of Port Angeles $4199-$5014/mo. plus sure, new water heater, benefits. AA degree in and new basin in bath. environmental science, New garage door, founengineering or related dation completely refield. 4 years experience paired. All work done by in inspection, permitting, licensed contractors. MLS#271655 or environmental water $139,000 resource programs or Clarice Arakawa water/wastewater utility. (360)460-4741 To view full job posting WINDERMERE and application instrucPORT ANGELES tions go to www.cityofpa.us. Closes 8/5/13. COPA is an EOE. IT’S GOT IT ALL V i e w s o f t h e v a l l e y, Mt. Baker, an ex4080 Employment Straits, ceptional home, 4 Br, 3+ Wanted baths, over 4,400 sq. ft., beautiful yard, fenced, gardens, pond, 3 car ADEPT YARD CARE garage, acreage and priWeeding, mowing, etc. vacy! (360)452-2034 $545,000. ML#271064. Kathy Brown (360)417-2785 CAREGIVER available COLDWELL BANKER for private care. Very exUPTOWN REALTY perienced, good local refs. Seeking long hours. $10-15/hr. WHY PAY (360)504-2227 SCHOOL Garden A s s t / J C Fa r m t o School Prog. Help kids learn to grow and eat foods from school gard e n s. 1 5 - 2 5 h r s / w k during 2013/14 sch yr. $ 1 2 - 1 3 / h r . jcfarm2school.org. Application from jennkas@hotmail.com

JOHNS LAWNS: Complete Lawn Care Service, Commercial and Residential. Serving Port Angeles and Sequim. Free Estimates. (360)460-6387 email: johnslawns@olypen.com

SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

This is one of a kind! Beautiful flowers and fruit trees. Big master suite with all tiled master bath. Large sit down dining room that over looks the grand living room. Family room with a cozy fireplace. Adorable adu in the back of the home that anyone would love to live in! Great big deck! With hot Tub. Too much to tell you, please come and see! Extra garaage in the back for all your toys. View could be improved of the water by trimming a few trees out front. MLS#252297. $525,000. THELMA DURHAM (360)460-8222 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES VERY IMMACULATE HOME Great Mt. View, close to t ow n , c o r n e r l o t , l ow maintenance landscapi n g . P r i va t e s o u t h e r n d e ck . A t t a c h e d 2 c a r garage, with smaller 1 bay garage has French doors to outside, great for Studio, R/V Parking with power. $224,950 ML#271324/500093 Jeff Biles 360-477-6706 TOWN & COUNTRY WEST SIDE P.A.: New h o m e , 3 B r. , 2 b a . $165,000. 460-8891.

FOR SALE By Owner. $185,000. Immaculate, spacious 1,848 sf on 1.01 acres, between Sequim and Port Angeles. 2004 doublewide, 3 br., 2 bath, large kitchen, with breakfast bar, dining room, living room, large family rm. Attached 2-car garage, storage shed. Private septic and well. (360)457-8345.

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage SEQUIM: 2.5 acres. Good well area, power to property, county approved septic, partially w o o d e d , v i e w, q u i e t road. Owner financing available. $85,000. (360)460-2960 WANTED: 2+ acres on B l a c k D i a m o n d , P. A . Please know your price before you call, thank you. (360)452-4403.

408 For Sale Commercial FSBO $237,000 Open plan triple wide 2300 sf, 3 br., 2 bath, large bonus room or 4th bedroom. Mountain view on 1.01 acres, close to Discovery Trail, not in the Carlsborg Urban Growth Area. Covered front porch, large rear deck, extra large 28 x 36 (1008 sf) detached garage and workshop. (360)582-9782

Panoramic view of the Port Angeles Harbor and the Strait from the living areas of this 1427 sqft home. The home sits on a nicely landscaped double lot overlooking the PA Harbor. Features include mahogany cabinets, tiled breakfast bar, tile entry, brick veneer siding and a great patio. $350,000. MLS#271699. Tom Blore (360)683-4116 PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE

LOTS OF ROOM! Great central Por t An- 505 Rental Houses geles location on lower Clallam County Cherry Hill. Over 2,000 SF that can be configCENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ured into six bedrooms! New floor coverings in ba, fireplace. $875 mo. (360)457-0014 most rooms. Check this out! JAMES & $159,000. MLS#271453. ASSOCIATES INC. Dan Gase Property Mgmt. (360)417-2800 (360)417-2810 COLDWELL BANKER HOUSES/APT IN P.A. UPTOWN REALTY A 1 br 1 ba ...............$525 A 1 br 1 ba ...............$585 OPEN House: 3182 Blue H 2 br 1 ba ..............$600 Mountain Road, P.A., July 20-21, 1-3:00 p.m. A 2 br 1 ba util incl ...$600 and July 27-28, 1-3:00. A 2 br 1 ba ...............$700 H 2 br 2 ba ...............$750 p.m. NWMLS#40941. H 3+ br 2 ba .............$875 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1000 PRIME DOWNTOWN H 4 br 2 ba .............$1200 SEQUIM STORAGE UNITS Commercial property, 33 $40 MO.-$100 MO. f t . o f Wa s h i n g t o n S t . Complete List at: frontage, 1 1/2 blocks from city center, rental 1111 Caroline St., P.A. on rear of property, great P.A.: 2 Br. 1 bath, carinvestment opportunity. port, no pets. $785, dep. ML#270180/440563 (360)457-7012 $99,900 Terry Peterson P.A.: 320 Fogarty Ave. 2 (360)683-6880 br, 1 ba. Clean, comWINDERMERE fo r t a bl e d u p l ex . W / D, SUNLAND deck, garage. Great location. No smoking/pets. READY TO MOVE IN First/Last/Deposit. $750. Many upgrades to this 3 Tel: 360-457-2195. bedroom charmer in Carlsborg including teak P.A.: 4 Br., 3 ba, waengineered hardwood t e r / m t n . v i e w, 1 y r . f l o o r s, c a r p e t , p a i n t , l e a s e . $ 1 , 1 5 0 m o. , k i t c h e n c a b i n e t s a n d $1,150 dep. 457-3099. many more! Come see! Fully fenced front yard, P.A.: Amazing 2 Br., 2 spacious rooms and lo- ba, fenced. $795 mo., no c a t i o n w i t h c o u n t r y pets. (360)452-1395. charm but close to town. P.A.: View, new 3 Br. 3 MLS#270826. $130,000. bath, office, family room. Brooke Nelson Lease $1,400. 457-4966 (360)417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER Properties by UPTOWN REALTY Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com REAL HOT PROPERTY Spacious Home is in a SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 bath, ver y well kept 55 and W/D, no smoking/pets. older park. This unit is $675 first/dep. 460-4294 well located on a corner lot - has work shop as SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, well as car por t. Ver y laundry room, 1 car gar., well landscaped for-pri- no smoking. $850 incl. water/septic. 683-0932. vacy. MLS#271527. $15,000. Special Sequim Acre Emilie Thornton 1 Br., cute, tidy, $620. (360)912-3934 Lovely 2 Br., 2 ba, $975. COLDWELL BANKER Lease (360)504-2905 UPTOWN REALTY

605 Apartments Clallam County

SALE or RENT 3 Br., 2 bath, all appliances included+ w/d. built in surround sound, French doors to patio, big backyard, shed, double garage, fireplace, crown molding. Cul-de-sac neighborhood! Rental price $1200 monthly. Call Tammy now (360)457-9511 or (360)461-9066!

Attractive, spacious 1 Br., $545, 2 Br., $645 i n P. A . N ew c a r p e t , vert blinds, pvt patio, updated appliances, laundr y r ms, views, on-site mgr. Ask abt our current discount. www.olympic square.com (360)457-7200

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it. 605 Apartments Clallam County

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6100 Misc. Merchandise

Enjoy Your First Month FREE and Pay Only $99 TO MOVE IN! EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 2 and 3 Br. apts avail. $685 and $760. Some restrictions apply. Call today! Managed by Sparrow, Inc.

RIFLE: Bolt action with open sights, close in size to M94 Winchester. Shoots 7.62x54R Milsurp ammo along with lighter loaded cast and jacketed reloads. Reloading tools, components, and cleaning kit included. $250/obo. (360)457-1597

GEMSTONES, OPALS Cabs and Faceted. Cabs $20-$100 per carat. Faceted $40-$100 per carat. (360)670-3110

GENERATOR: Coleman Powermate 5,500 watt, like new. $375. (360)683-0146

MISC: High end car audio equip, $500. Bear c o m p o u n d b o w, $ 7 5 . Gold Gyms weight bench, $100. 75 gal. saltwater aquarium, $100. 3 lg dog kennels, 665 Rental $30 ea. New Echo Duplex/Multiplexes chainsaw, $100. Crabpots, $25 ea. Air comCENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 W A N T E D : R u g e r pressor, $50. Kenmore bath. Fireplace, garage. GP-100, 357, 3 or 4 inch dryer, $50. Call after 3 W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r barrell, double action, p.m. (360)797-1198. pets. $800. 460-8797. s t a i n l e s s r evo l ve r, o r SEWING MACHINE S&M, heavy frame, new Commercial. $450. 683 Rooms to Rent condition. 460-4491. (360)452-9460

Roomshares

RIFLE: Winchester 1886, 40-65 Cal., Serial Number 7044, good condition, original Ideal No. 6 reloading tool in box, with papers. $2,700. Call between 6-7 p.m., (360)808-2328

6055 Firewood,

ROOMMATE Fuel & Stoves WANTED To share expenses for FIRE LOGS very nice home west of Dump truck load, $300 P.A. on 10+ acres. $450 plus gas. Madrona, $400 mo., includes utilities, Di- plus gas. (360)732-4328 rectTV. Must see. Call L o n n i e a f t e r 5 p . m . FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True (360)477-9066. cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card acROOM: with pr ivate cepted. 360-582-7910. bath, off Mt. Angeles, www.portangeles $450, f/l/d neg. Incl. firewood.com utilities. Cable is extra. Refs. Pets? 461-6542. WANTED: Firewood. (360)452-3200

1163 Commercial Rentals

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market

STORAGE CABINETS Flammables storage cabinets, (2) 43” x 65” x 18”, 45 gallon capacity. $300 each. (360)457-0171

WA L K E R : S i t - d o w n walker, like new. $125. (360)681-2340

6105 Musical Instruments PIANO: Stor y & Clark spinet. $300. 452-9121.

6115 Sporting Goods

EAST SIDE P.A.: 37x30, (2) 10x10 doors, bathBUYING FIREARMS room, $550 mo. 23x14 Any & All - Top $ Paid with bathroom, 9x7 door, One or Entire Collec$ 2 2 5 m o. 1 8 x 1 4 a n d tion Including Estates 16x30 with 1/2 bath, 9x7 Call (360)477-9659. “RASPBERRIES” entry door, $350. U-Pick, $20 per flat. We (360)460-1809 pick, $29 per flat. Green (360)461-3367 or beans, $14.95 for 10lb 6125 Tools (360)457-9527 case. (360)417-6710. PROPERTIES BY WOODSPLITTER: ElecLANDMARK 6075 Heavy tric wood splitter, 5 ton, 452-1326 by Dr. Power, new. See Equipment a t S t eve ’s R e p a i r i n SEQUIM: Office/retail Carlsborg. $400. SEMI END-DUMP space 850 sf. $800 mo. (360)457-6243 TRAILER: 30’. Electric (360)460-5467 tar p system, excellent condition. $6,500/obo. 6140 Wanted (360)417-0153 6005 Antiques &

Collectibles

M I S C : A n t i q u e t a bl e, oak, (5) leaves, makes 13’, with (8) oak chairs, $600. Carved maple coffee table, $300. Antique oak hutch, $600. TV table, black, moder n, 3 glass shelves, $50. Floor lamp, $25. (360)457-3169 MODEL TRAINS: O Gauge. Various manufacturers, specializing in steam and diesel locomotives. Plenty of accessories, incl. houses, construction equip., display cases, display tables, etc. $50,000. (360)683-6855

6010 Appliances

& Trades

6080 Home Furnishings BUNK BED: Tan bunk bed with desk/dresser in one. Top bank, 6 small drawers, pulled out shelf fo r w r i t i n g , c o m p u t e r keyboard, or whatever you would like to use it. The bottom bunk is a pull out. No mattress included. There is a ladder and behind the drawers and desk is an opening t h a t c a n b e u s e d fo r storage or a for t for a young child’s imagination. My son has outgrown the bed and would love to see it go to another family. $500. If interested call (360)460-3291

CHAIRS: 2 cranberr y colored overstuffed DISHWASHER: Bosch, chairs. Good condition. good condition, white/ $110 each. 477-1362. stainless. $160. DESK: Large, oak ex(360)681-0563 ecutive desk, file drawM I S C : G E g l a s s - t o p ers, excellent condition, s t o ve , $ 1 5 0 . Wa s h e r comes apar t to move, and dryer set, Maytag, $150. (360)457-7774. $150. (360)460-1377. M AT C H I N G l t c a r m e l colored couch, love seat, 6025 Building med walnut colored coffee table/end table, Materials $475. Country maple 30” C A R P E T: B e i g e w i t h x 48” kitchen table with 4 b r ow n f l e ck s, 1 0 . 5 ’ x chairs, $100. TV with 13.5’, with pad, great built in DVD/VCR, $75. Port Angeles. 460-4655. shape. $240. (360)461-0321 MISC: Patio furniture, tabl e, 6 c h a i r s, c h a i s e l o u n g e , sw i n g , g o o d 6035 Cemetery Plots condition, $400. Shotgun, 20 gauge Remington, semi-automatic, CEMETERY PLOT: In good condition, $265. S e q u i m C e m e t e r y, (360)504-0216 $1,995 plot in Division 5. Asking $1,200/obo. MISC: Trundle day bed, (360)683-3317 White iron, perfect for girls, 2 new mattresses, $100. 2 small arm 6042 Exercise chairs, $100. Equipment (360)457-1389

BIANCHI Road Bike. Bianchi XL EV2 Reparto Corse aluminum road bike (58 cm) Campi Chorus components. CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 M av i c o p e n p r o r i m s made in Italy. Used, very ba, no smoking/pets good condition. $600. $500. (360)457-9698. (360)417-6923 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent TREADMILL: Profor m r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . Crosswalk Spor t, progra m m a bl e, l i ke n ew. $700. (360)452-3540. $375. (360)457-5143. P.A.: Quality, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, NS, NP. 6050 Firearms & $650. (360)796-3560.

UPSCALE SUNLAND HOME 3 bed, 2.5 bath, over 2200 SF, beautifully landscaped on a cul-desac. Patio view of the 18th fairway and green, marble tile entr y and hardwood floors, Granite counters and new fixtures (kitchen/baths). 3 car 951 sf garage. Properties by ML#519503/271680 Landmark. portangeles$359,900 landmark.com Tyler Conkle (360)683-6880 WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br. WINDERMERE apt., 1 bath. $525 mo. SUNLAND (510)207-2304

5000900

FOUND: Young cat. Domestic short hair, Dilute Torti, tipped ear, spayed fe m a l e. 8 t h a n d V i n e Street area, P.A. Amber, 461-7709

ASEService Technician. Experienced automotive technician. Wages DOE, paid vacation holidays. Medical, dental, vision life insurance after 90 days. Drop off resume at Rudy’s Automotive or call 360-457-0700.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013 B7

6100 Misc. Merchandise COMMERCIAL RACK Cantilever commercial ra ck s u i t a l e fo r p i p e, steel or lumber. (4) uprights, 8’ tall, with (20) 3’ arms. Overall length of 18’. $650. (360)457-0171 CULVERT PIPES: 60’ of 24” ADS pipe. $15 per foot. (360)531-1383.

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789.

6135 Yard & Garden

RIDING MOWER: RX75 John Deere. 9 hp, 30” b l a d e , g r e a t m o w e r. $350. (360)461-5069. SWING SET: Large, sturdy swing set and p l ay s t r u c t u r e w i t h slide, ladders, and bars. Unbolt for transport. Excellent value. $650. (360)457-8421.

8120 Garage Sales Jefferson County

GARAGE/PLANT Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 10-4 p.m., mile #6, 6044 Oak Bay Rd., Port Ludlow. Tables of exciting new additions and we’ve added new selections to our perennials and cedar planter boxes.

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . 10-4, Sun. 11-3, 283652 US Hwy 101, 1 mi. south of Fat Smittys. Women’s plus size clothes and men’s shirts, tools, kitchen gagets, puzzles, kids books and toys. No early birds.

HUGE YARD Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-5 p.m., 21 Glen Ave., Chimacum. 1979 24’ Barth class A motor home, 1947 CJ Jeep with many extras, 12’x6’ flat bed, double axle trailer, tools, wood working, carpet, electrical and air, Japense rest a r u a n t d i s h e s, t oy s, crafts, clothings and lots of misc. No early birds.

8142 Garage Sales Sequim

EPIC Sale: Too big for a garage sale; yard sale, over 40 tbls of items. 100s of Items under $1.00 along with some high end items ever ything in-between. Gathe r e d f r o m 7 d i f fe r e n t storage units. tools, furniture, baby clothes, jewelry, totes, kitchen items, camping, antiques. too much to list everything pr iced to sell quickly. Fr i / S a t 8 : 0 0 - 4 : 0 0 . 5 3 Falcon Dr. in Sequim.

FUEL TANK with tool box for pickup, 100 gallon, hand pump, $500. MISC: Smith & Wesson, 360-374-6661. GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9 mm, 15 shot, 2 clips, 7am- 1pm. 821 East Allike new, $700. 380 au- PELLET STOVE: Lopi, der. Misc. tools, rugs, to, 8 shot, $350. clothing, small appliancblack. $750. (360)452-3213 es, household and more. (360)683-0986

Ammunition


Classified

B8 THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. MAKING BABY FOOD Solution: 5 letters

E T A R E G I R F E R I C E H By Jeffrey Wechsler

DOWN 1 NASA space observatory named for a Renaissance astronomer 2 Galápagos denizen 3 Pointillist’s unit 4 Like the cat that swallowed the canary 5 Spanish morsel 6 José’s ones 7 Douglas __ 8 Hot retail item 9 Schlep 10 Ready to pour 11 “What was I thinking?!” 12 Charlemagne’s father 16 Popular 17 Calculus prereq. 20 To this point 22 Caught a glimpse of 23 Choice words for those out of options 26 U.K. record label

8/1/13 Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

FISHERMAN’S Sale: Olympic Peninsula and Greywolf Fly Fishers Annual Sale to support civic activities for kids and vets. Sat., 8-2 p.m. at t h e P u m p k i n Pa t c h , H w y. 1 0 1 a t K i t c h e n Dick. Fishing, outdoor and household items. GARAGE Sale. Fri.-Sat., 8-4 p.m., Sun., 8-2 p.m. Recliners, camera, furniture, collectables...clothing. Rain or shine. 153 E. Diane Dr. Nor th on Elizabeth Lane, across from “the Lodge,” turn Right on E. Diane Dr. Follow road to dead end.

Grab Their ATTENTION! Add: Pictures Borders Logos Bold Lines 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com or: marketplace. peninsuladaily news.com

K O E P E I B O I L S A S T O

O S D I E C N Y T W N E E H O

O E L N Z R O A B S A T T Y C

www.wonderword.com

C L E A E P A R G A E S I T G

A R R O T O H W A I Y N A P U C H E P R E R F L F U R E E S U T E S A T O E C N P U S ‫ګ‬ N A R D ‫ګ‬ R S N B ‫ګ‬ O O E A C M L O B ‫ګ‬ B B E E F E I R A V N I R O T

R E D N I R G O D A C O V A S 8/1

Join us on Facebook

Apples, Apricots, Avocado, Baby Bullet, Banana, Beans, Beef, Bite Size, Blend, Boil, Care, Carrot, Cereals, Cooked, Cool, Corn, Easy, Food Mill, Food Processor, Freeze, Fruit, Grinder, Healthy, Lunch, Meat, Medley, Organic, Pan, Popsicles, Puree, Recipes, Refrigerate, Rice, Ripe, Soup, Spinach, Steam, Storing, Temperature, Variety, Wholesome, Zucchini Yesterday’s Answer: Library

PATOD ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ODORP (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

27 Warm tops 30 Bus sched. entry 31 Man cave, e.g. 32 States as truth 33 Detective’s needs 34 Not many 35 Carrot nutrient 36 QB’s statistic 42 Showing poor judgment 43 Like easier-toswallow pills

A BA R N S a l e : S wa p meet in barn behind Port Angeles Les Schwab, 9-3 p.m., Fri.-Sat., 10-3 p.m., Sun. 3 new people, featuring Chevron, Barbie and military collections, household items, tools. Come join us for a large space, just $15 per day. 452-7576 for info. G A R AG E S a l e : C h i l dren’s items, tools, some furniture. Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m. 103 Willow Lane, 4 Seasons Park. GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-?, 351 Klahhane Rd. Electronics, tools, antiques, books, furniture, housewares, chainsaw, and more! We have an a bu n d a n c e o f eve r y thing! GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-5 p.m., 394 S. Alder Ln., 4 Seasons Park 1/2 mile east of Walmar t-follow signs. 30+ year accumulation of antiques and collectibles! Including cast-iron 1000 LP records, BC pottery, cobalt blue glass, cranberr y glass, lots of other glass, furniture, chairs, hundreds of items too numerous to mention! No early admission! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1840 E. Woodhaven Ln., up Golf Course Rd., on right. Oak coffee table with (2) end tables, household items including kitchen, bath, linens, s m a l l a p p l i a n c e s, ( 2 ) grocer y car ts, lamps, mirror, pictures, microwave, ironing board, iron s e n t r y s a fe, p h o n e s, decorations, and barbecue.

M OV I N G S a l e : S a t . Sun., 9-3 p.m., 201 Fogarty, south of Lauridsen Blvd., between Cherry and Laurel Streets. No a l l ey a c c e s s , p l e a s e park on Fogarty St., sale is at back of proper ty. G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Good stuff! Something Sun., 9-?, 654 S. Alder Ln. Car parts, household for everyone! goods, appliances, misc.

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

HUGE GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-1 p.m., Third and Penn St., P.A. Pool table, crab pots, wood chipper, tools, desks, misc. fur niture, books and clothes!

ALICE’S 4 Family Garage Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m., Sun., 10-3 p.m., 2207 Edgewood Dr., across from the garden store. Ceramics, Barbies, tat- M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : too gun, bicycles, and Fri.-Sun., 8-4 p.m., 66 Cougar Ln. Up Monroe, something for everyone! left on Draper, left on GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., Cougar. (2) Gas fireplac9-4 p.m., 1926 W. 6th es, wedding reception equipment, wall oven, St. Lots of treasurers. cook top, compactor, (2) wood lathes, refrigerator, 8183 Garage Sales tools, clothes, Goldwing PA - East motorcycle. Follow the yellow plates to our aweBUILDER FAMILY Sale: some sale! Sat., 9-3 p.m., 173 Mt. P l e a s a n t R d . To o l s , CHECK OUT OUR hardware, br ick, temNEW CLASSIFIED pered glass, windows, WIZARD AT camping, sports, diving, www.peninsula many boats, Jeep, modailynews.com torcycle, camper, wood.

8/1/13

44 Elec. units 46 Failing the whiteglove test, say 47 Way of the East 50 Sigma preceders 51 Hamilton foe 52 She rode on Butch’s handlebars 53 Dark, poetically 56 Camper’s bed 57 Succor

HAP’S BIG BARN SALE 30+ vendors. Antiques and collectibles, new and old! Come and have a great day and tons of fun! Sat., 8-6 p.m., Sun., 9-5 p.m. 2718 Rude Rd., Poulsbo , WA. (360)930-0226

7025 Farm Animals & Livestock ANGUS STEERS: (2), 20 months old. $1,200 each. (360)732-4241. DONKEYS: (3). Male, female, and 5 week old youngster. $750 for all! (360)452-2615

ROPENS

ECURSP

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

7035 General Pets

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ S u n S e e ke r C l a s s C. Only 8,000 mi., 2 tipouts, loaded, can’t use, must sell. $40,000 firm. (360)452-7870 after 6.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers CAMPER TRAILER: ‘80 Holiday Rambler, Presidential 28’. New fridge and furnace. $3,500. (360)928-9436 TRAILER: Airstream ‘76 Tr a d ew i n d . Tw i n r e a r bath, ver y well maintained. $7,500. (360)808-2344

TRAVEL TRAILER PUPPIES: Chihuahua/ Pomeranian pups: 10 Fleetwood ‘00, 26’, slide out, great cond., $9,500. wks. $200 ea. (360)452-6677 (360)582-0384

9829 RV Spaces/ Storage

5TH WHEEL: Carriage ‘04 Cameo. Three slides, center kitchen with island. King bed. Automatic HDTV Sat. on roof. In great condition, this has been a nonsmoking unit and no animals. $19,250. Contact via e-mail: bjgarbarino@hot mail.com or (360)390-8692

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

12.5’ ZODIAC with motor. 1998 Mark II C Zodiak, set up with a 30 HP Johnson jet. 12 gal. fuel t a n k , o a r s, a i r p u m p. Motor has just been to the shop for a complete check up and is ready to go fishing. Great setup for rivers or salt water. 5TH WHEEL: Fleetwood $3,500. Inquiries please ‘98 Wilderness. Hitch in- call, (360)531-0402. cluded, 24L5C, clean, smoke-free, 1 slide, full 1 9 7 9 C l a s s i c ! 1 7 . 5 ’ bath, A/C, elec. jacks. SeaRay pleasure $5,195. (360)452-7967. c r u i s e r. M e r c r u i s e r ‘470’ 4 cylinder In9808 Campers & board, Mercruiser outdrive. Never been in Canopies salt water. 781 total lifetime hours. Professionally serviced spring and fall. Classy Classic! $3,200. 5th WHEEL: 19’ Alpen(360)775-7670 lite. No leaks. $3,295. (360)775-1288 CAMPER: 1995 LANCE APOLLO: 17’ Classic 5TH WHEEL: 26’ Alpen- S Q U I R E 5 0 0 0 9 ’ 1 0 ” . Runabout. 140 hp OMC lite. New fridge/freezer, Ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n I / O, t ra i l e r, ex c e l l e n t toilet, A/C, micro, dual C o m p l e t e l y s e l f c o n - condition. $3,500. (360)683-0146 batteries and propane tained Roof top air Elec. tank, nice stereo, queen jacks Everything works APOLLO CRUISER: 21’, air adustable bed, awn- Call (360)681-0346 or new 165 OMC with heat ing, all in good condition, (360)513-4938. $5,000. exchanger, recently serclean and ready to go. $3,850/obo. Leave mes- CAMPER: ‘97 10’ Alpen- viced outdrive, custom lite. TV, micro, self cont., trailer, new tires and sage at (360)452-4790. excellent cond. $6,000. brakes, pot puller, ex5TH WHEEL: 30’ Cross- (360)928-9770 after 5. tras. $3,600/obo. roads Patriot upgrade (360)582-0892 model, used twice overnight, immaculate, towBAYLINER 2859. Price able with half ton. Below reduced from $26,000 to book value at $38,750 $20,000. Selling beincludes slider hitch. cause of health. Engine 683-5682 or overhauled last year, 541-980-5210 outdrive replaced 3 yrs ago, 10 hrs on 25 hp 5TH WHEEL: ‘89, 34’ kicker. Great electronics Au t o m a t e, ex . c o n d . , including radar, color must see!, $4,500/obo. LANCE Lite: 2003 845 fish finder, GPS char t 670-5957, or 460-5128. Truck Camper. Great plotter. Diesel heater, condition-used twice. 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 4 2 7 ’ Roof air, queen bed, c u s t o m c a b i n e t s a n d C o a c h m a n C a t a l i n a . d i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o master bed. Great boat Great cond., single slide, bed. Shwr stall/pan full f o r f i s h i n g . E l e c t r i c downriggers, rods and new tires. $3,900/obo. h g h t . B l u e i n t e r i o r. gear. Comfortable week(360)417-8840 L o t s o f s t o r a g e . end travel with stove, re5TH WHEEL: Sportking Length-16.5 ft. $8,995. frigerator, shower and Call head. Excellent condi1981, 18’. $850. (360)681-0172 tion. Call 327-3695. (360)808-7545

ROADRUNNER: 2008 16’ Roadrunner by Sun Valley travel trailer. Purc h a s e d n ew i n 2 0 0 9 . Cheapo bias ply tires replaced with quality radials 2,000 miles ago. 3 MOTORHOME: ‘07 23H burner stove top, microWinnebago View. 20K, wave, A.C., Double bed, Mercedes diesel, 16-20 s h o w e r, T V a n t e n n a . mpg, excellent condition. Everything works. Very lightweight, can be $63,000. (253)312-9298 towed with V-6. $8,950. (360)379-1882 MOTORHOME: ‘84 30’ Spor tscoach III. 454 eng., rear queen bed, 9802 5th Wheels full bath, new convection micro, new fridge, wood c a b i n e t s , r u n s w e l l , 5TH WHEEL: ‘02 30’ Lakota. Ver y nice cond., clean, 47K miles. $6,800 kept in shed. $12,500. (360)683-1851 (360)452-1308

MOTORHOME: ‘97 35’ Fleetwood Southwind, Class A, 27,500 original miles, dual roof AC, lg. s l i d e, Fo r d ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , hy draulic levelers, 2 TVs, rear camera, Onan generator, neutral interior, S A D D L E S : E n g l i s h , must see. $23,999. (360)452-4136 17.5”, $350. Dressage, 17.5”, $450. Wester n, 14”, $150. Call or text MOTORHOME: Dodge (360)460-6098 ‘76 Class C. 26’, good c o n d . , n ew t i r e s, l ow miles, nonsmoker, in PA. 7035 General Pets $5,000 firm. 460-7442.

9802 5th Wheels

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 29’ AlSEQUIM: RV space for pen Lite, single slide, rent, $400, $100 dep. all l ow u s a g e, ex c e l l e n t inclusive. (360)683-8561 shape. $11,500/obo. (615)330-0022

9820 Motorhomes

HORSE: Pretty little Morgan horse, 14.2 hands, good to ride and good with kids. 18 years old. Great horse, but too small for my husband to ride! $700/obo. (360)457-6584

FREE: Cat. Male, neutered, 1.5 years old, extremely playful and friendly. Likes kids. Must go to good home. (360)452-1599

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: SHINY BRIBE SPLINT INFANT Answer: The newborn fish slept in a — “BASS-IN-NET”

WANTED: AKC STUD For service to 3 yr. old AKC Golden female in season now, excellent pedigree. (360)681-3390

JD 955 Hydrostatic Tractor. 1996 4WD compact tractor ; mid and rear PTO; 70A loader; 33 HP; 744 hours; always stored inside; excellent condition. No t r a d e s . $ 1 1 , 5 0 0 / o b o. ( 5 4 1 ) 7 4 0 - 0 4 5 1 L e ave MOTORHOME: ‘85 21’ message. Toyota Rogue. 56K mi., manual trans, sound enPASTURE HAY gine, 6 new tires, needs $3 bale off the field. work, rear bath, A/C cab Local (206)790-0329 a n d b o d y, s l e e p s 4 . WA N T E D : D o n key o r $6,000/obo. (360)504-2619 or mule for a wedding on Sept. 15th, must be able (360)477-8807 mornings to be ridden for 5 min. or less. Call Jen (503)758-9296 or email MOTORHOME: ‘87 21’ jendeegoff@gmail.com Toyota Slumberqueen. Low miles, 4 cyl., good shape. Sale due to health. $7,500/obo. 7030 Horses (360)452-7246

FREE: Cat. Less than 1 year old, spayed and has all shots. For mer owner has passed on. Likes to hide or sit at the window, uses litter box. Beautiful moddled gray color, medium hair. (360)565-3051

A:

Lots

of local Jobs

Classified

M arketplace

43220690

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

© 2013 Universal Uclick

E M M S C U C F O O D M I L L

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., Aug.3-4, 9-5 p.m., Fri.S u n . , Au g . 9 - 1 1 , 9 - 5 p.m., 1024 Deseret Ave. Vintage and antique furniture/items from many eras, dishes and linens, gently used clothing, and seasonal decor, lots of H U G E G a r a g e S a l e : misc. items. Too much Sat. 8-5 p.m., Sun. 8-3 too list! Cash only! No p.m., 634 Heron Hill Rd earlies, please! (off E. Sequim Bay Rd.) To o l s , w a s h e r / d r y e r, c a m p i n g a n d p h o - 8180 Garage Sales t o / v i d e o e q u i p. , k i d s PA - Central quad/motorbike and t oy s , r a f t , t a b l e s e t , E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . , books, computers, etc... 10-2 p.m., 211 W. 9th St. Glassware, dishes, MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat. tools, and some furni8-3 p.m., follow signs on ture, misc. items. Medsker to 131 Sunrise View. Too much to list. GARAGE Sale: Month PLANT Sale: Sat., 8-3 of August, starting Aug. p. m . , P u m p k i n Pa t c h 2, through Aug. 31, MonFlea Market, off of Hwy. d ay t h r o u g h S u n d ay, 101. Now taking orders! 10-4 p.m. 415 E. Front Day lilies, $5. Foxglove, S t . U n i q u e s a n d a n yarrow, orange sedge, tiques, books, tools, arts cape fuscia, $4. Sweet a n d c r a f t s , d e s i g n e r flag, and monkshood, c l o t h i n g i n X X s i ze s, blue star creeper, $3. s c h o o l s u p p l i e s a n d scotch moss, $2. Large a q u a r i u m e q u i p m e n t . hy d r a n g i a , $ 1 5 . C a l l Everything but the kitch681-0477, or stop by en sink. You could furDenny D.’s at the Pump- nish your entire house with all this stuff! kin Patch Flea Market! G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . PUMPKIN PATCH Sun., 8-4 p.m. 128 HanFLEA MARKET Sat., 8-4 p.m., corner of cock. Whicker, PianorHwy. 101 and Kitchen- g a n , m a s s a g e t a bl e , Dick Rd. Absolutely no cannon printer, Mac softe a r l y s a l e s . $ 1 5 p e r ware, toys, child chairs, vintage space, no reservations 1 9 4 0 s wearables, 78 albums, needed. More info: mirror, potter y, books, (360)461-0940 c h i l d r e n ’s b o o k s a n d crafts, misc.

UNIQUE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 111 Bell St., Sequim. Store fixtures, furniture, lamps, light fixtures, tables, etc.

D E S Y L I N I H C C U Z A U

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 8-2 p.m., 512 N. 7th Ave. Jewelry, holiday items, linens, garden tools, misc. household items, furniture, lots of like-new items priced to sell! Cash only, please!

SEQUIM SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTER 8th ANNUAL BENEFIT SALE! Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. Furniture, books, tools, clothing, shoes, toys household and kitchen items, electronics, DV D ’s, l a m p s, c ra f t items, linens, mobility scooters, and a BAKE SALE too! 8,000 sf of Bargains! Proceeds benefit SSAC and SSAC’s Scholarship Fund for high school seniors. 990 E. Washington St., Suites E104 and E105, in the QFC shopping center. Call 683-6806 for more info

T O S L R E C I P E S A E E N

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

8142 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales 8435 Garage Sequim Sequim Sequim PA - East Sales - Other Areas ESTATE SALE Please join us on Satu r d ay, Au g u s t 3 r d , from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at 755 W. Washington, Sequim, (Hollywood V i d e o ) fo r a H U G E sale. We will be offering for your consideration antique/collectible furniture/china/silverp l a t e , a r t , j e w e l r y, PURSES, BASKETS, POTTERY, books, retro, lawn/garden, sewing, holiday, tools, and so much more. See you there! Please bring a donation of non-perishable food items for the Salvation Ar my Soup Kitchen. Swallow’s Nest Antiques & Estate Sales www.swallowsnest antiques.weebly.com

R A E P O P S I C L E S R H C

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 Easy job 9 EMS destination 13 Extremely puffed-up quality 14 Poker starter 15 Choice words for gamblers 17 As per 18 Highway sign word 19 Often-farmed fish 21 Monocle, essentially 23 “Spring ahead” abbr. 24 Ones falling in alleys 25 See 47-Across 27 Misfortune 28 Network offering home improvement advice 29 “__ they’ve canceled my blood type”: Bob Hope 32 Honey in Dijon? 33 Choice words for super-patriots 37 Geraint’s wife 38 Trattoria preference 39 In-flight display no. 40 Geraint’s title 41 Rig 45 Pair 47 With 25-Across, wine 48 Mountain topper 49 Warrior in “Rashomon” 51 Queen’s consort 54 Has been 55 Choice words for anglers 58 Inner: Pref. 59 Galápagos denizen 60 Methods 61 Left helpless

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruiser, freshwater cooling. $3,900/obo. (360)775-9653

FLYBRIDGE: 23’ Cruiser. Full canvas, galvan i ze d t ra i l e r, e l e c t r i c winch, 1,100 hours total time, always garaged. $4,500 to a good home. BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, (360)460-9226, P.A. trailer, 140 hp motor. $4,980. (360)683-3577. HEWE: 17’ River Runner. 115 Mercur y jet, BOAT HOUSE: Excel- new 5 hp Ricker, depth lent shape, 43’ x 20’, sounder, GPS, lots of P.A. Marina. $5,000 firm. extras. $7,950. (360)452-2039 (360)452-2162 BOATS: 14’ Livingston, with Shorelander trailer, $495. New, 10’ Walker B ay, w i t h E Z L o a d e r, $995. (360)452-6677. KAYAK: $2,500. CusBRIG and triler: Brig and t o m b u i l t 1 6 ’ K ay a k . EZ lift trailer, 10’, hard Newfound Boat Works b o t t o m . B o a t Tr a i l e r, E x p l o r e r. B e a u t i f u l 1klb cap. $1,200. sculptured cedar and (360)582-1529 basswood strip planked CANOE: 18’ Wilkenson deck. A work of art. Padcedar strip, made in Port dled once, I have too many Kayaks! Townsend. $850. (360)316-9420 (360)683-0146 CRESTLINER: ‘03 12’ aluminum, 8 HP Johnson motor, new trailer, with accessories. $2,000. (406)531-4114.

LONESTAR: 17’, 100 hp Johnson motor, 9.5 kicker, motor in great shape, g a l va n i ze d E Z - l o a d e r t r a i l e r, d e p t h f i n d e r, $2,500. (360)928-9436.

D OW N R I G G E R S : 2 Pe n n Fa t h o m M a s t e r MANTA RAY: ‘97 19.5’, I/O . Needs work. 800, electric. $300 ea. $1,500. (360)461-2056 (360)928-3502, lv msg

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013 B9

9817 Motorcycles 9817 Motorcycles

SAILBOAT: 32’ Clipper, T I D E R U N N E R : 1 8 ’ , Yanmar diesel, wheel great boat, good shape, s t e e r i n g , f u r l i n g j i b, lots of extra goodies. $8,000/obo. 374-2646. sleeps 4. $9,995. (360)457-8221 TRAILER: EZ Loader, SAILBOAT: ‘81 25’ C&C tandem axle, 22-24’. with sails and new 8 hp $1,250. (360)460-9680. engine, sleeps 4, toiPRICE REDUCED 16.5’ Searay with stern let/sink. $3,500/obo. 9817 Motorcycles (360)808-7913 drive and MerCruiser, completely restored, $13,500 invested, new S A I L B O AT : H o l d e r B M W : ‘ 9 9 K 1 2 0 0 R S . engine, upholstery, gal- 14/Hobie One-Fourteen. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 vanized trailer, stainless E x c e l l e n t c o n d . , E Z miles. Throttlemiester. steel prop and canvass Loader galvanized trail- BMW touring hard caser. $1,700. cover. MUST SEE! es. Corbin saddle. BMW (360)681-8528 $4,400 firm aftermarket alarm. (360)504-2113 SEA-DOO: ‘96 Speed- $4,350. (425)508-7575. s t e r . T w i n R o t e x . Goldspace@msn.com RACING SAILBOAT 28’ Star. Sails, genoa $5,000. (360)452-3213. DIRTBIKE: Honda ‘04 and trailer. $3,500. CRF100. Looks and (360)963-2743 runs great. $750/obo. (360)670-5282 S A I L B O AT : 1 5 ’ I a n DUCATI: ‘00 ST4. 16.7K Oughtred whilly, sailyellow, pristine, many ing/rowing, better than upgraes. $4,900. n e w, c o m p l e t e w i t h Bryan (360)681-8699 oars, trailer, many up- SEA SWIRL: 18’ Sierra graded accessories. Cuddy Classic. 120 H A R L E Y: ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 $7,250/obo. J o h n s o n , 7 . 5 H o n d a Sportster, 7k miles, mint. (360)774-6720 kicker. galv. trailer, life $6,900. (360)452-6677. jackets, 2 downriggers, S A I L B OAT : 2 1 ’ , r e - s k i p o l e , w a t e r s k i s , K AWA S A K I : ‘ 0 5 K X tractable keel, trailer, 7.5 rope, canvas and many 250F. Few aftermarket HP motor, exceptionally extras. $6,000/obo. Lo- accessories, 2 stands, clean. $3,950. cated in Sequim. set of tires. $2,500. (360)477-7068 (360)477-1011 (360)670-5321 MISC: 7.5’ Livingston, with mounting brackets to attach to your yacht, plus extras, also has electric motor, $275. (2) Scotty downriggers, $85 ea. (360)681-4684.

H.D.: ‘84 FLHS. Only 500 ever made. 33.4k original miles, too much to list. Call for details. $12,000 to loving home. (360)460-8271

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

9805 ATVs THE TOTAL Package ‘04 Honda 250 EX Good Cond. Runs great. Includes: 2 helm e t s , c o ve r, s a d d l e bags and rack. Custom graphics and modified headlights great for night riding! Recent oil change and new battery. $1,600. (360)461-5827

HONDA: ‘00 XR100R. Excellent cond., low miles. $1000/obo. (360)477-9777

KAWASAKI: ‘08 Vulcan HONDA: ‘06 CRF 250X. 9 0 0 C l a s s i c L T . Excellent shape. $2,900. Red/Black. Showroom condition. One owner. (360)461-3415 Ridden easy. Only 4,400 9180 Automobiles HONDA: ‘70 Trail 90. Miles. Upgraded: PasHigh-low range, extras. senger floorboards and Classics & Collect. luggage rack. $5,000. $1,000. (360)461-0491. (360)582-1080 AMC: ‘78 Pacer. Nice HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing body. $2,250. Aspencade. 1200cc, (360)452-2892 black/chrome, exc. cond. $3,500/obo. 417-0153. CADILLAC: ‘72 Sedan Deville. Mint condition, YAMAHA: ‘77 TT500. original owner, 74,874 Custom and spare parts. mi., garaged. $4,500. $1000/obo. (360)683-1288 afternoon (360)477-4007 V I R AG O : ‘ 0 6 X V 2 5 0 . SCOOTER: 2007 RokeLow mi., very good cond ta Bali 250 Scooter. Fun and economical, 60 $2,450. (360)461-9022. mpg. Original owner sellLONG DISTANCE ing. 1055 miles on it. No Problem! This bike gets up and goes! Includes helmet Peninsula Classified and gloves. 1-800-826-7714 (360)374-6787

FORD: ‘62 Galaxie 500 Conver tible. Excellent, all original, ‘390’ V8, all p owe r, 6 9 , 7 0 0 m i l e s. $18,200. (360)683-3385, Rrobert169@Qwest.net

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first!

CADILLAC: ‘78 Seville. Looks and runs like new, always garaged, nonsmoker, gold, 76K mi. $4,850. (360)928-9724.

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

CHEV: ‘79 Corvette L82. $3,200 or possible trade. (360)457-6540

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

SERVICE FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

No job too small!

WINDOW WASHING MAINTENANCE LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Jami’s

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Roof & Gutter Cleaning Moss & Mildew Removal Window Cleaning

HOME REPAIR

Davis Painting Residential • Commercial Interior • Exterior

(360) 457-8102

“AFFORDABLE HOME IMPROVEMENTS” Tile & Stone, ADA and Senior Access. DONARAG875DL

LANDSCAPING

Appliances

3 6 0 - 4 52 - 3 7 0 6 • w w w . n w h g . n e t

Landscapes for The Northwest Lifestyle Design & Construction. 681-0132 www.dungenesslandscaper.com

Tree Service

#360-461-6441

360-460-9504 Licensed CONTR#A2ZFEF*870DM Bonded & Insured

37817336

Email: a2zfencing@hotmail.com www.a2zfencing.net

MAINTENANCE

SPRING SPECIAL:

"Give Haller a Holler!!!"

$400 OFF NEW ROOF Honest & Reliable at a reasonable price

Since 1987

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

DRYWALL

GYPSUM

SUPPLY, INCORPORATED The Pacific Northwest Experts in Drywall Products

We Deliver! 360-452-4161 301 Business Park Loop Sequim, WA 98362 www.kentgypsum.com

INC.

POWER WASHING • ROOF SERVICES ASPHALT SEALING & STRIPING WWW.HALLERINC.COM

681-4303 • 452-MOSS (6677)

HARD SURFACE REPAIR REVIVED HARD SURFACES 683-8231 • www.revivedhardsurfaces.com Having troubles with your CONCRETE? Need to improve the resale of your home? Don’t repour, RESTORE! Many decorative and protective ideas for you to choose from. Call Gerald Bergren for a free estimate. Licenced, Bonded, and Insured. Lic. #REVIVHS872LP

CALL NOW To Advertise

360-452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714

37829215

CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE!

ROOFING

36799296

Cedar-Chain Link-Vinyl Custom Wrought Iron Gates & Fencing Installation and Repairs

(360) 477-1805

Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

32740271

W OO D

Reg#FINIST*932D0

GROOFINGD 457-5186 34764872

BIG

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

Serving the entire Peninsula

Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

License #BIGWOWT884P6 Insured Bonded

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

ARLAN

TREE SERVICE

FENCING

683-8328

33746190

Flooring

23597511

Cabinets

35597509

C

PAINTING

24614371

360-477-1935 • constructiontilepro.com

Landscapes by

360-683-4881

Expert Pruning

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

-$%t1MBTNBt1SPKFDUJPOt$35 7JOUBHF"VEJP&RVJQNFOU

32736526

34769373

Remodels Interior & Exterior Kitchen, Baths, Decks, Fences,

ockburn.INC

Mole Control

TV Repair

/PSUIXFTU&MFDUSPOJDT

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

GENERAL CONST. ARNETT

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showrooms for lowest prices on

(360) 582-9382

195133545

36812652

HOME REPAIR/REMODEL

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

TV REPAIR

PRUNING

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

360/460•9824

29667464

PAINTING

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

• Small Excavating • Utility Install & Lot Clearing JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Field Mowing contact@jkdirtworks.com • Drainage Issues LIC #JKDIRKD942NG • Help with Landscaping

Complete Lawn Care Hauling Garbage Runs Free Estimates BIG DISCOUNT for Seniors (360) 460-3319

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

DIRT WORK

24608159

360-452-2054

APPLIANCES

AA

Licensed Cont#FOXPAPC871D7

26636738

Port Angeles Sequim Port Townsend

457-6582 808-0439

32743866

(360)

Driveways - Utilities - Site Prep - Demolition Concrete Removal - Tree & Stump Removal Drainage & Storm Water Specialist Engineering Available - Rock Walls Lawn Restoration - Hydroseeding Top Soil - Compost - Bark

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right! Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

EARLY BIRD LAWN CARE

(360)

Contr#KENNER1951P8

22588145

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

FOX PAINTING In s id e , O u ts id e , A ny s id e

360-460-6176 Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

LAWNCARE

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

COLUMC*955KD

Visit our website: www.dickinsonexcavation.com Locally Operated for since 1985

PAINTING

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

Call (360) 683-8332

LARRYHM016J8

Painting & Pressure Washing

Done Right Home Repair

• Raods/Driveways • Grading • Utilities • Landscaping, Field Mowing & Rotilling • Snow Removal

Contractor # GEORGED098NR Mfd. Installer Certified: #M100DICK1ge991KA

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

No Job Too Small

From Curb To Roof

Excavation and General Contracting • All Site Prep - includes Manufactured Homes • Land Clearing and Grubbing • Septic Systems • Rock Walls & Rockeries

116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA

Larry Muckley

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

582-0384

RDDARDD889JT

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

2A691397

No Job Too Small

32741372

#LUNDFF*962K7

22588179

452-0755 775-6473

Columbus Construction • Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

23590152

Chad Lund

✓ Senior Discount ✓ Yard Service ✓ Odd Jobs ✓ Hauling ✓ Brush Removal ✓ Hedge Trimming ✓ Roof/Gutter Cleaning ✓ Tree Pruning

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

23595179

www.LundFencing.com

Serving Jefferson & Clallam County

REPAIR/REMODEL

23590413

Call Mindy

360-461-4609

035076142

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Larry’s Home Maintenance

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

33688614

D •I •R •E •C •T •O •R •Y


B10

ClassifiedAutomotive

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013

Check fault codes on iffy A/C Dear Doctor: I own a 2003 Chevy TrailBlazer with 117,000 miles. Three weeks ago, I started having intermittent problems with the air conditioning. I went on a trip, and it worked for 140 miles before the hot air came out. My mechanic checked the Freon, which was fine; checked the low-pressure cut-off switch, which was OK; and then told me about a service bulletin from Alldata that described my problem and suggested I have the A/C system reprogrammed. I did but still have the problem. Jim Dear Jim: First, check for any trouble fault codes in the body control module. See if there are any fault codes, and make sure the cooling fan is cooling the A/C condenser. High pressure in the A/C system will shut the compressor down. It would be great if the TrailBlazer could be brought to the mechanic while the A/C was not operating. This will take some diagnostic time to find the issue.

Change spark plugs Dear Doctor: I own a

THE AUTO DOC 2006 ForDamato Subaru ester with only 16,000 miles. When should I get the spark plugs changed? Conrad Dear Conrad: Although it’s against factory recommendations, I like to see spark plugs changed before the usual five-year or 50,000-mile mark. I know that some manufacturers even recommend 100,000-mile spark plug replacement; however, I know that spark plugs can seize in the cylinder head, causing a big exercise and expense to remove.

Junior

Fluid replacement Dear Doctor: I recently purchased a 2013 Toyota Camry, and the service technician informed me that the coolant does not have to be replaced for 100,000 miles. Can that be true, and if so, will the rust inhibitors still be effective for that

twice. JLB Dear Doctor: Today’s average yearly mileage ranges from 20,000 to 40,000 miles. There’s a big difference between city and highway miles. It is not unusual to see both cars and trucks with the original engine and transmissions with 300,000 miles on the odometer. There is nothing special in service repairs that come to my attention. I suggest having the vehicle checked before the Used Durango purchase by an ASE-certiDear Doctor: I’ve owned fied technician. many cars, but the one I If the technician gives really miss is my 2003 the green light on the vehiDodge Durango SLT. cle, then start with changing I have started to look for of all fluids and a major a one as a second car. tuneup, including the igniThere seems to be many tion coil if the engine has available with mileage from one, as well as the crank110,000 to 175,000. shaft position sensor. I traded mine in with The price will vary on the 109,000 four years ago. condition and demand of the What should I be conSUV in your area. cerned about with this ________ model now? Junior Damato is an accredited What costs should I expect with its current age? Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters What is the average who also finds time to run his own used-car price for a 2003 seven-bay garage. Questions for the Durango? Auto Doc? Send them to Junior DamI remember a front-end ato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA recall when I had mine, plus 02347. Personal replies are not possiI replaced the evaporator ble; questions are answered only in sensor above the gas tank the column.

CHEV: ‘86 El Camino, Conquista package. PS, P B , P W, P D, A / C , cr uise, filt, full gages i n c l . t a c h . , V 8 , a u t o, Gaylord bed cover with l i n e r, f a c t o r y r a l l e y wheels, low miles, not smoked in, garage kept, gold/brown color, tan int. Very original! $11,586.86. (360)683-7789

F O R D : ‘ 3 2 R o a d s t e r. 540 all aluminum Hemi, The Blower Shop 871 blower, custom ever ything, the best money could buy. Serious inquiries only. $250,000 (360)461-4665

9292 Automobiles Others C H E V: ‘ 0 7 Ave o. 5 speed, Ex. cond., low miles, 35-40 mpg. $5,500. (360)683-7073 before 5:00 p.m. C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 2 P T Cruiser LTD. Silver. 93K. $3,750/obo. 457-0238. CHRYSLER: ‘05 Pacifica Touring. AWD. Leather seats. Heated seats. C D. R e d w i t h 9 2 , 0 0 0 miles. $8,000. Great condition. (360)477-5510 CHRYSLER 2012 200 LIMITED Economical 2.4 liter 4cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, A M / F M / C D / DV D / M P 3 , navigation, power windows, locks and seats, f u l l l e a t h e r, h e a t e d seats, keyless entry, alloy wheels, side airbags, fog lamps, Blue Tooth. Only 18,000 miles, beautiful loaded 1-owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. Balance of factory 3/36 and 5/100 warranty. near new condition, very nice car. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com DODGE: ‘03 Caravan. Looks good. $3,500. (360)457-9162 FIAT 2012 500 POP This compact car took Europe by storm when it came out in 2007. It was introduced to the U.S. market in 2012. It’s peppy, ver y fuel efficient, and most of all fun to drive! Auto, 4 cyl, antilock brakes, A/C, CD, power windows/locks, alum. wheels, and more. $12,500 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT With your

2 DAY

Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

DODGE ‘01 RAM 1500 REGULAR CAB SLT 4X4 5.9L (360) V8, automati c , 2 0 ” c u s t o m a l l oy wheels, new tires, running boards, row package, spray-in bedliner, r e a r s l i d i n g w i n d o w, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, JVC CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $8,536! Clean Carfax! Nice custom 20” wheels! New tires! This is one nice looking and driving truck! Tried and true 5.9L V8 engine! Come see the peninsul a ’s t r u ck ex p e r t s fo r over 55 years! Stop by FORD: ‘94 Crown VicGray Motors today! toria. New tires, good TOYOTA: ‘09 Prius. 47k, $6,995 shape. $1,500. white, nav., leather, 5 GRAY MOTORS (360)928-9920 CD change. $18,990. 457-4901 1 (805)478-1696 graymotors.com FORD ‘96 TAURUS WAGON TOYOTA ‘10 DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 V- 6 , a u t o m a t i c t ra n s, CAMRY LE QUAD CAB 4X4 seats 6, roof rack, lots of Very economical 2.5 liter This truck literally has it options and pr iced to 4-cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, all. 5.7 L HEMI V8 bigmove! tilt, AM/FM/CD, keyless hor n package, lift kit, $2,450 entr y, power windows, power windows, locks, Lipman’s Automotive locks and seat, side air- mirrors, and seat, tow IN HOUSE FINANCING bags, only 32,000 miles, package, sliding rear AVAILABLE spotless “Autocheck” ve- window, running boards, (360)452-5050 hicle history report, non- oversized off-road tires, www.lipmansauto.com smoker, 1-owner factory premium alloy wheels 2840 E Hwy 101 E PA lease return, balance of and much more! What a factor y 5/60 warranty. truck! This lifted 4WD HONDA: ‘06 Accord LX. Beautiful barcelona red cruises down the highV6, 49K. orig. owner, re- pearl, near new condi- way remarkably smooth cent maint. $12,500. tion. and cruises over almost (360)417-8859 $16,995 any obstacle with its proREID & JOHNSON fessionally installed liftHONDA: ‘07 Civic HyMOTORS 457-9663 kit. Talk about power! brid. $9,000. reidandjohnson.com The 5.7 HEMI V8 has it (425)508-7575 all over the competition. KIA 2010 SOUL VW: ‘78 Super Beetle One fine, well-appointed WAGON c o n v e r t i b l e . R u n s truck! $22,950 Very economical 1.6 liter g o o d , g o o d c o n d . , Preview at: 4-cyl, 5-speed manual, manual trans. $5,500. heckmanmotors.com A/C, AM/FM/CD, Power (360)683-8032 Heckman Motors windows and locks, side 111 E. Front, P.A. a i r b a g s, o n l y 1 9 , 0 0 0 VW: ‘79 Dasher. 4-door, (360)912-3583 miles, balance of factory good shape. $2,000. 5 / 6 0 w a r r a n t y, ve r y (360)452-2711 D O D GE: ‘06 Ram. c l e a n 1 - o w n e r, n o n Manual, 59k miles, exsmoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y 9434 Pickup Trucks cellent cond., reg. cab. $9,800. (360)477-6149. report. Hard to find Others manual transmission. DODGE: ‘10 1/2 ton $12,995. BRUSHFIRE TRUCK white 4x4, 1 owner, REID & JOHNSON 1981 4X4 MOTORS 457-9663 1 ton dually, 4 speed very good condition. $23,000 reidandjohnson.com manual with granny low, (505)927-1248 5.7L V8, 250 gallon H2O M I T S U B I S H I : ‘ 0 3 tank, 4 yr old Honda E c l i p s e. B l a ck , gr e a t GX690 generator, dual D O D G E : ‘ 9 2 D a k o t a c o n d . , 1 8 8 k m i l e s . side diamond plate tool 4WD. $2,000/ obo. $5,700. (360)460-2536. (360)797-1198 boxes, everything is in great operating condition and was meticulously maintained by an Eastern Washington fire depar tment. Try and find one this nice! $10,500 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com NISSAN: ‘89 300 ZX. Heckman Motors Red. V6. Automatic. T111 E. Front, P.A. DODGE: ‘99 Ram 4X4 t o p. M a ny n ew p a r t s. (360)912-3583 Flatbed tr uck. Low $4,500/obo. (360)681-3579 CHEV: ‘80 2 ton. ‘454’ m i l e s , r e c e n t o i l engine, 4 sp, 2 sp rear change, transmission PONTIAC: ‘03 Bonne- axle, 3’ deck with 13’ flush and filter changville SSEi. Great-riding dump bed, 70 gal. diesel es. 3/4 ton 360 engine. call 461-4151. Photos car, 90k miles, power tank. $2,000/obo. available by request. everything, always gar(360)457-4521 or Price reduced to aged. $7,000/obo. 477-3964 after 6 p.m. $3500/obo. (360)809-0356 CHEV: ‘88 Dually. Crew PORCHE ‘00 BOXTER cab. $1,500. FORD: ‘01 Ranger. 4x4, CONVERTIBLE matching canopy, good (360)477-1761 The Boxter convertible is running. $6,500. all sports car! Powered CHEV: ‘98 1 ton flat bed 1-360-269-1208 or by 2.7l, 6 cyl mid engine, dump. $6,800. 457-3120 1-360-269-1030 5 speed manual trans., or (360)808-1749. FORD: ‘04 F150 Supproducing 217 HP and Crew Lar iat, 4x4, V8, still gets over 28 mpg tow package, canopy, while cruising in and out loaded, clean, 114k. of cars on the highway! $13,500. 775-0372. Ve r y l o w 8 9 k m i l e s ! harryalford@yahoo.com Come in and test drive today! GMC ‘00 SAFARI CHEVY: ‘01 S-10 EnONLY $14,950 CARGO VAN hanced Cab 4 speed Preview at: Auto V6. Runs great; Economical 4.3 liter V6, heckmanmotors.com nice looking with bed auto, A/C, power locks, Heckman Motors liner and Snug Top. s a fe t y bu l k h e a d , b i n 111 E. Front, P.A. 93,200 mi. AM/FM with p a ck a g e, n i c e l a d d e r (360)912-3583 cassette. 4.3 liter V6; rack, 99,000 miles, clean P O R C H E : ‘ 8 8 9 4 4 . 1 a u t o f u e l i n j . 1-owner corporate lease return, spotless “Autoowner, 129,500 mi. , ex- $6,200/obo. Call check” vehicle histor y cellent condition. $6,995. (360)477-4697 report. Ideal for contrac(360)452-4890 tors, plumbers, painters SATURN: ‘97 SL. 4 door and electricians. A/T, runs well. $1,000 $5,995 cash. (360)808-2861. REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 VOLSWAGEN: ‘08 Jetta reidandjohnson.com 2 . 0 T. B l a c k . 6 8 , 0 0 0 Very good condition. 6 FORD: ‘06 F-450 4X4 disc CD changer. Leathutility SCELZI. 11’ comer seats, winter pack- FORD: ‘01 F150. 2WD, b o b o d y w i t h r a c k , extended cab, 103,600 36,000 miles. $27,000. age. $12,300. mi. $4,950. 460-4957. (360)477-5510 (360)531-1383 TOYOTA ‘05 MATRIX XR AWD 1.8L VVT-i 4 cylinder, automatic, alloy wheels, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Only 85,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Legendar y Toyota reliability! All wheel drive for all weather performance! This is Toyota’s answer to the Subaru, and it’s a good one! 31 MPG Highway Rated! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

Car of the Week

length of time? Also, I was told there’s no power steering fluid and the transmission fluid is permanent. Can you advise? Marty Dear Marty: I own a 2012 Camry with a four-cylinder engine that now has 40,000 miles. I’ve never heard of fluids that don’t need to be changed. The Camry is a great car and, like all vehicles, needs to be serviced properly over time.

9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Classics & Collect. Others Others Others Others Others FORD ‘12 FOCUS SEL SEDAN Ford Focus, one of the best selling cars in the world today. Excellent performance, handling, and economy. This Focus is fully equipped with leather, moonroof, 6-way power seat, CD, SYNC, power windows and locks, aluminum wheels and more! The gray metallic paint is str iking when cruising down the road with the roof open and the tunes playing! $15,490 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORD ‘04 F150 SUPERCREW LARIAT 4X4 5.4L Triton V8, automatic, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires, rolling Tonn e a u c o ve r, s p r ay - i n bedliner, running boards, tow package, trailer brake controller, parking sensors, rear sliding window, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, power programmable heated leather seats, adjustable pedals, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, automatic climate control, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Only 44,000 original miles! Kelley Blue Book value of $26,903! Clean Carfax! You won’t find one nicer than this anywhere! Absolutely immaculate inside and out! Come see the guys who have brought the best vehicles to the peninsula for over 50 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $22,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘84 Bronco. Reliable. $500. (360)808-0565 FORD: ‘86 F250 XLT. Matching canopy. $1,500. 1-360-269-1208 or 1-3601269-1030. FORD: ‘89 4X4 Longbed. Auto/air, runs great. $2,500/obo. 457-5948. F O R D : ‘ 9 0 R a n g e r. Canopy, recent tune up, 5 speed. $2,000. 452-2766 or 477-9580 FORD: ‘92 F-350. Dually, extra cab, 460, AT, set up to tow gooseneck/bumper pole, 176k. $3,250/obo. (360)460-7534

NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier 4 x 4 S E C r ew C a b. 4 door, low miles 82,400. Extended warranty. 6’ bed. Excellent Condition. G o o d T i r e s . To w i n g Package. V6 4 liter. Bed Tool Box. $16,900. (360)504-2374

9556 SUVs Others C H E V: ‘ 0 3 S u bu r b a n Z71 4X4. Black, loaded, too many features to list. $8,500. (360)460-6098. CHEV: ‘97 Blazer. V6, 4WD, moon roof, all pwr, tow pkg., incl. snow tires on rims. $2,600. (360)280-7380

2013 Toyota Highlander BASE PRICE: $29,020 for base FWD model with four-cylinder engine; $31,845 for base, FWD model with V-6. PRICE AS TESTED: $33,757. TYPE: Front-engine, four-wheel drive, sevenpassenger, mid-size sport utility vehicle. ENGINE: 3.5-liter, double overhead cam, V-6 with Dual VVT-i. MILEAGE: 17 mpg (city), 22 mpg (highway). LENGTH: 188.4 inches. WHEELBASE: 109.8 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 4,045 pounds. BUILT IN: Princeton, Ind. OPTIONS: Running boards $649; carpeted cargo mats $280; cold weather package (includes heated outside mirrors and windshield wiper de-icer) $60; cargo net $49; first aid kit $29. DESTINATION CHARGE: $845. The Associated Press 9556 SUVs Others

GMC ‘12 TERRAIN FORD: ‘87 Bronco II. SLT-2 V6 AWD 4x4. $1,500. 1-360-2691208 or 1-360-269-1030. This one must have a kitchen sink hidden F O R D : ‘ 9 2 E x p l o r e r. somewhere, because it Runs, needs work. $400. has everything else. 6 s p e e d a u t o, l e a t h e r (360)775-8251 heated seats, traction FORD: ‘95 Bronco 4X4. control, moon roof, tow Good rubber, runs great, package, XM satellite radio, rear-view camera 139k. $4,500/obo. system, OnStar, 19” pre(360)457-9148 mium alloy wheels and tires and more! This is a NISSAN ‘08 premium luxury XTERRA SE c r o s s o v e r. W h y b u y A true outdoor enthu- new? Only 5,500 miles! siast’s SUV, the Nissan Balance of factory warX T E R R A i s e q u i p p e d ranty! with everything a person $29,950 needs to get away anyPreview at: where, including roof heckmanmotors.com rack and skid plate. This Heckman Motors XTERRA is in great con111 E. Front, P.A. dition. Fully loaded, run(360)912-3583 ning boards, auto, V6, low miles. GMC: ‘94 Suburban 4x4. $15,950 Auto trans, A/C, ‘350’, Preview at: 247,900 mi, seats 8, heckmanmotors.com great cond, well cared Heckman Motors for. $1,999. Call 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)531-0854 (360)912-3583

LEXUS ‘04 DODGE: ‘01 Durango RX330 AWD S L T . N e w t i r e s . 3.3L V6, automatic, alloy $4,800/obo. 683-0763. wheels, good tires, roof rack, sunroof, tinted winFORD: ‘04 Explorer. Ex- d o w s , key l e s s e n t r y, cellent condition, new p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r tires/brakes, all power, locks, and mirrors, powtrailer hitch, 102K mi. er programmable heated $7,000. (360)683-5494. l e a t h e r s e a t s, c r u i s e control, tilt, air conditioning, 6 cd stereo, cassette, information center, navigation, dual front and side impact airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $13,184! Immaculate condition inside and out! GMC: ‘01 Yukon. Ver y Clean Carfax! Top of the nice, below KBB, sacri- line Lexus SUV! Loaded fice at $6,850. 460-8610. W i t h L e a t h e r L u x u r y ! Legendar y Toyota ReVisit our website at l i a b i l i t y ! F u l l S e r v i c e www.peninsula Records! Stop by Gray dailynews.com Motors today! Or email us at $10,995 classified@ GRAY MOTORS peninsula 457-4901 dailynews.com graymotors.com

FORD: ‘96 F150 Pickup. 6 cylinder, manual transmission, 2 WD, clean, 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices runs great. 153,000 Clallam County Clallam County miles. Has new tires, S U P E R I O R C O U RT O F WA S H I N G TO N F O R Tonneau cover. Call CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Edward H. (360)477-4195 Reid, Deceased. NO. 13 4 00258 2 PROBATE NOFORD ‘97 F-250 XLT TICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The perXCAB 4X4 sonal representative named below has been ap7.3L powerstroke diesel! pointed as personal representative of this estate. Au t o m a t i c t r a n s, t ow Any person having a claim against the decedent package, 5th wheel plate must, before the time the claim would be barred by installed in bed, bedliner, any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, n ew t i r e s a l l a r o u n d , present the claim in the manner as provided in dual tanks, cruise, A/C, RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the perlike new inside and out, sonal representative or the personal representapower window and door tive’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of locks, matching canopy, the claim and filing the original of the claim with the chrome brush guard, CD court in which the probate proceedings were complayer, this one runs and menced. The claim must be presented within the d r i ve s a s gr e a t a s i t later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal represenlooks! If you are in the tative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as market for a heavy duty provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four diesel don’t let this one months after the date of first publication of the nopass you by! tice. If the claim is not presented within this time $11,750 frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherLipman’s Automotive wise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. IN HOUSE FINANCING This bar is effective as to claims against both the AVAILABLE decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. (360)452-5050 Date of First Publication: July 18, 2013 www.lipmansauto.com Personal Representative: Robert E. Reid 2840 E Hwy 101 E PA Attorney for Personal Representative: Patrick M. Irwin, WSBA #30397 FORD: ‘98 F150. Rims, Address for mailing or service: tinted, black, extended PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM cab. Priced to sell! 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 $1,875. (360)460-0518. (360) 457-3327 FORD: ‘99 box tr uck. Court of Probate Proceedings: 14’, Diesel, 133k, good Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 13 4 00258 2 truck. $7,200. 452-4738. Pub: July 18, 25, Aug. 1, 2013 Legal No. 498047 M A Z DA : ‘ 8 4 P i c k u p. Runs good, low miles. 9934 Jefferson 9934 Jefferson $1,200. (360)452-5126.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

9556 SUVs Others

County Legals

County Legals

Legal Notice The Quinault Child Support Services Program hereby notifies the Respondent, MONICA ANN EMBERLEY, that their presence is required on October 3rd, 2013 at 1:00 PM, for a hearing in the Quinault Tribal Court in Taholah, Grays Harbor County, Washington. Failure to appear or respond within 60 days, from the first date of Publication, may result in a default. For more infor mation, please call (360) 276-8211 ext. 685 Legal No. 499596 Pub: July 25, Aug. 1, 8, 2013

Legal Notice The Quinault Child Support Services Program hereby notifies the Respondent, Hannah Curley, that their presence is required on October 3rd, 2013 at 1:00 PM, for a hearing in the Quinault Tribal Court in Taholah, Grays Harbor County, Washington. Failure to appear or respond within 60 days, from the first date of Publication, may result in a default. For more information, please call (360) 276-8211 ext. 685. Legal No. 499445 Pub: July 25, Aug. 1, 8, 2013

G M C : ‘ 9 9 Yu ko n 4 x 4 . 173K mi., A/C not working, good shape. $2,000/ obo. (360)477-6501. JEEP: ‘80 CJ5 Renegade. Original, good shape. $3,750. (360)385-2792 J E E P : ‘ 8 8 C h e r o ke e. Plus near new studded tires. $1,200 all. (360)681-3747 TOYOTA: ‘92 4Runner. 4WD, V6, auto, sunroof, 199,500 mi., fair to good cond. $1,950. 461-0054.

9730 Vans & Minivans Others CHEV: ‘96 Conversion Van. 133k, V8, TV, automatic bed, good tires, automatic trans. $3,750/obo. 379-5663.

9931 Legal Notices Clallam County

9730 Vans & Minivans Others CHEV: ‘03 Venture ext. CARGO van. Only 13K orig. Carfax mi. 3 seats. $8,800. (360)775-3449. DODGE ‘02 GRAND CARAVAN 7 passenger, automatic trans, good rubber, tons of options, this one is blow out priced! $3,950 Lipman’s Automotive IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE (360)452-5050 www.lipmansauto.com 2840 E Hwy 101 E PA F O R D : ‘ 9 6 A e r o s t a r. 4 x 4 , n ew s n ow t i r e s, brakes, 115K, great shape. $4,500/obo. (360)460-9375

9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Legal Notice A special meeting of the Po r t A n g e l e s S c h o o l District Board of Directors will be held Thursday, August 8, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the Central Services Board Room, 216 East Fourth Street, Por t Angeles. During the meeting, the board w i l l c o n d u c t a p u bl i c hearing prior to adopting the Port Angeles School District budget for the 2013-2014 school year. Any person may appear there at and be heard for or against any par t of said budget. The 20132 0 1 4 Po r t A n g e l e s School District budget will be adopted during t h e Au g u s t 2 2 , 2 0 1 3 regular meeting of the Board of Directors. Copies of the preliminar y budget are available for review prior to the above scheduled meeting. They may be picked up a t t h e Po r t A n g e l e s School District Central Services Building, 216 East Fourth Street. Legal No. 495794 Pub: July 25, Aug. 1, 2013

NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to CCC 26.10.410, that the Clallam County Department of Community Development has scheduled a public hearing before the Clallam County Hearings Examiner for August 28, 2013 beginning at 11:00 a.m. in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. The purpose is to review public testimony regarding the following permit application: APPLICATION: (LDV2013-00015) The applicant, Greg Roats, is proposing to divide a 4 acre parcel into 8, ½ acre lots. Potable water is to be provided by the Aquarius Water Company and sewage is to be provided by individual on-site septic systems. Access is proposed by a private road to be constructed from Diamond Point Road. LOCATION OF PROPOSAL: The subject property is located in the Diamond Point Neighborhood, south of Critter Country Trail, west of Diamond Point Road, being within Section 21, Township 30 N, Range 2 W, Clallam County, Washington. The property is referenced as parcel number 023021120040. Compliance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA): A SEPA Mitigated Determination of NonSignificance (MDNS) was issued July 25, 2013 by the Clallam County Responsible Official pursuant to WAC 197-11-340. Within 14 days of the Hearing Examiner’s decision on the underlying permit, the final threshold determination may be appealed with the underlying permit. Contact the Department of Community Development for SEPA appeal procedures. COMMENTS & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Any interested person may submit written or oral comments on the proposal prior to the close of the open record hearing. DCD will prepare a staff report seven days prior to the hearing. The decision on the application will be made by the Hearing Examiner within 10 days after the record closes. Any person may also submit a written request to DCD to receive a notice of the decision once it is made. The application and above referenced material is available for public review at the DCD, Planning Div i s i o n M o n d a y t h r o u g h F r i d a y, b e t w e e n 8:30AM-4:30PM. For additional information please contact the project planner Donella Clark at DCD, 223 East Fourth Street, Suite 5, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Phone (360) 417-2594. Pub: Aug. 1, 2013 Legal No. 501296

peninsuladailynews.com


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, August 1, 2013 B11

2006 MERCURY MARINER PREMIER 4X4

2004 GMC YUKON DENALI 4X4

2006 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 2WD

WE FINANCE IN HOUSE!

IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE!

WE FINANCE IN HOUSE!

IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE!

3.8L V6, AUTO, DUAL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DUAL PWR HTD SEAT, AM/FM/CD W/HARD DISC DRIVE, BACKUP CAMERA, TRIP COMP, 7 PASS QUAD SEATING W/SWIVEL CTR SEATS & ‘STO-N-GO’, DUAL PWR SLIDING DRS, & TAILGATE, LEATHER REAR ENT SYS W/DUAL DVDS, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, ELEC TRAC TRL ALLOYS, REMOTE ENTRY & LOW MILES! VIN#701045

1 OWNER W/ONLY 1526 MILES! V6, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, AM/FM/CD STACKER, LEATHER W/HTD SEATS, PWR SUNROOF, BACKUP SENSORS, RUNNING BOARDS, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, FRT & SIDE AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, TOW, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#J08088 SAVE 1/2 OVER NEW!

V8, AUTO, DUAL AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DUAL PWR HTD SEATS, ADJ PEDALS, PWR SUNROOF, ELEC TRAC & STAB CTRL, BOSE AM/FM/CD/CASS W/STACKER, LEATHER W/3RD ROW SEATING PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, TOW, RUNNING BOARDS, ALLOYS, KEYLESS & MORE! VIN#292233

HARD-TO-FIND LONG BOX! CUMMINS TURBO DIESEL, AUTO, SLT PKG, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, AM/FM/CD, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, RUNNING BOARDS, SPRAY-ON BEDLINER, CHROME WHLS, TOW W/ ADJ AIRBAGS, KEYLESS & MORE! LOCAL TRADE W/LOW MILES! VIN#176717

Expires 8/10/13

$16,995

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

Expires 8/10/13

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

$15,995

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

Expires 8/10/13

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

Expires 8/10/13

360-452-6599

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

$13,995

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

$24,995

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2007 FORD FOCUS ZX3 SE H/B

2000 NISSAN FRONTIER EXT. CAB 4X4

2008 DODGE CALIBER SXT H/B

2006 KIA SPECTRA 5 HATCHBACK

WE FINANCE IN HOUSE!

IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE!

WE FINANCE IN HOUSE!

IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE!

ECONOMICAL 4 CYL, 5 SPD, AC, TILT, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, PWR SUNROOF, STREET APPEARANCE PKG, AM/FM/ CD, ALLOYS, KEYLESS & MORE! VIN#104646

V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, AM/FM/CD, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, ALLOYS, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, ALLOY, SPARY-ON BEDLINER, REAR JUMP SEAT, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW & MORE! VIN#434985

4 CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AM/ FM/CD, ELEC STAB CTRL, ALLOYS, KEYLESS & MORE! VIN#729977

1 OWNER W/ LOW MILES! FUEL EFFICIENT 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AM/FM/CD, ALLOYS, REMOTE START & KEYLESS, LOW MILES! VIN#361047

Expires 8/10/13

$6,995

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

Expires 8/10/13

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

$7,995

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

Expires 8/10/13

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

Expires 8/10/13

360-452-6599

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

$10,995

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

$8,995

A DOCUMENTARY SERVICE FEE OF UP TO $150 MAY APPLY.

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2946 HWY 101 E., PA - NEXT TO MT. PLEASANT IGS

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS

2010 FORD RANGER 4DR SUPERCAB SPORT

2008 CHEVROLET G1500 EXPRESS CARGO VAN

2008 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.5I 5DR HATCHBACK WGN

VERY ECONOMICAL 1.6L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, AM/FM/ CD, SIDE AIRBAGS, ONLY 38K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER, SPOTLESS AUTOCHECK REPORT, NON-SMOKER, JUST REDUCED $1,000! IDEAL STUDENT CAR, SHOP & COMPARE! V.I.N.S POSTED AT Expires 8/29/13

AWD

AWD

4.0L V6, 5 SPD MAN, 4X4, AC, AM/FM/CD, FENDER FLAIRS, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, ALLOYS, TOW PKG, CHROME STEPS, FOG LAMPS, PRIV GLASS, ONLY 32K MILES! BGAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, SPOTLESS AUTOCHECK REPORT, BEAUTIFUL BLACK ON BLACK, NICE TRUCK!V.I.N.S POSTED AT

5.3L V8, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS, PWR HTD MIRRORS, SAFETY BULKHEAD, NICE BIN PKG, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS AUTOCHECK REPORT! VERY HARD-TO-FIND ALL WHEEL DRIVE MODEL! V.I.N.S POSTED AT

Expires 8/29/13

Expires 8/29/13

ECONOMICAL 2.5L 4 CYL, AUTO, ALL WHEEL DRIVE, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, KEYLESS, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, PRIV GLASS, SIDE AIRBAGS, 64K MILES, VERY CLEAN LOCAL CAR! NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS AUTOCHECK REPORT, BLACK PEARL, SHARP CAR! V.I.N.S POSTED AT

4X4

PRICE

REDUCED TO

$9,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com

2002 BUICK LESABRE SEDAN 61K ORIGINAL MILES!

$18,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$13,495

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

2004 CHEVROLET TAHOE LT 4X4 SUV

www.reidandjohnson.com

2001 TOYOTA COROLLA CE SEDAN

DVD & LEATHER

38 MPG! 71K MILES!

Expires 8/29/13

$12,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com

2005 TOYOTA TACOMA TRD DOUBLE CAB 4X4 ONLY

48K MILES!

3.8L V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, TINTED WINDOWS, KEYLESS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 61K ORIGINAL MILES! CLEAN CARFAX! IMMACULATE INSIDE & OUT! THIS GARAGE-KEPT BUICK SHOWS THE ABSOLUTE BEST OF CARE! 29 MPG HWY RATED! COME SEE THE PENINSULA’S MOST TRUSTED SOURCE FOR BUICK CARS FOR OVER 55 YEARS! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

5.3L VORTEC V8, PERFORMANCE EXHAUST, AUTO, ALLOYS, TOW, RUNNING BOARDS, ROOF RACK, SUNROOF, PRIV GLASS, KEYLESS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, PWR PROGRAMMABLE HTD LEATHER SEATS, ADJ. PEDALS, 3RD ROW SEATING, CRUISE, TILT, AC, REAR AC, BOSE CD, DVD SYS, INFO CTR, ONSTAR, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $15,852! CLEAN CARFAX! LOADED! NON-SMOKER

1.8L VVT-i 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 71K ORIGINAL MILES! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! 38 MPG HWY! WHERE ELSE DO YOU FIND SUCH A NICE LOW MILEAGE ECONOMY CAR? COME SEE THE GUYS WITH OVER 55 YEARS EXPERIENCE PROVIDING THE BEST IN QUALITY USED CARS! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

4.0L VVT-i V6, AUTO, LOCKING REAR DIFF, ALLOYS, GOOD TIRES, TOW, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, 110V OUTLET, TINTED WINDOWS, 4 FULL DRS, KEYLESS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $27,731! ONLY 48K MILES! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! TOP OF THE LINE TRD PKG WITH AN e-LOCKER! THIS IS ONE TOYOTA ANYONE WOULD BE PROUD TO OWN!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

$6,995

GRAY MOTORS

$12,995

GRAY MOTORS

$7,995

GRAY MOTORS

38837845

2008 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING EDITION

$24,995

GRAY MOTORS

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Vivian Hansen @ 360-452-2345 ext. 3058 TODAY for more information!

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising , whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


B12

WeatherWatch

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013 Neah Bay 53/53

Bellingham B elli el e lin n 70/57

Olympic Peninsula TODAY AY Y WERS A M SH OWE

RS

65/55

AM

SH

O

➥

Port P Townsend 64/56

Sequim 65/56 Olympics Port Ludlow Freezing level: 10,500 ft. 64/56

AM

Forks 66/54

Yesterday

SH

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 66 52 0.00 10.34 Forks 67 55 0.01 56.95 Seattle 77 56 0.00 16.71 Sequim 72 52 0.00 5.60 Hoquiam 62 56 0.00 31.73 Victoria 63 53 0.00 13.67 Port Townsend 71 49 0.00 10.79

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NationalTODAY forecast Nation

Forecast highs for Thursday, Aug. 1

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

Cloudy

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: â– 116 at Death Valley, Calif. â–  32 at West Yellowstone, Mont.

OW

*Reading taken in Nordland

ER

Almanac

S

Brinnon 68/60

➥

Aberdeen 63/56

Last

New

First

Full

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

Fronts Cold

TONIGHT

Low 55 Night of clouds

FRIDAY

57/55 Chance of showers

Marine Weather

SATURDAY

61/52 Sunshine and some clouds

SUNDAY

MONDAY

64/54 Mostly sunny skies

65/54 Some sun and some clouds

Aug 28 Aug 6

8:53 p.m. 5:57 a.m. 2:19 a.m. 5:57 p.m.

-10s

Burlington, Vt. 78 Casper 86 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 91 CANADA Albany, N.Y. 56 PCldy Charleston, W.Va. 81 Victoria Albuquerque 74 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 85 64° | 57° Amarillo 68 Cldy Cheyenne 84 Anchorage 57 PCldy Chicago 74 Asheville 66 .23 Rain Cincinnati 78 Seattle Atlanta 71 .26 Rain Cleveland 77 Spokane 73° | 57° Ocean: S wind 5 to 15 Atlantic City 60 PCldy Columbia, S.C. 90 81° | 64° Columbus, Ohio 79 Austin 75 PCldy kt. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. NW Tacoma 80 Baltimore 63 Cldy Concord, N.H. Olympia swell 3 ft. Chance of morning 72° | 57° Billings 54 .05 PCldy Dallas-Ft Worth 99 72° | 55° showers. Tonight, S wind 10 78 Yakima Birmingham 76 .05 Rain Dayton to 15 kt becoming SW to 10 88 Bismarck 58 .26 Clr Denver 88° | 68° kt after midnight. Wind waves 73 Boise 65 PCldy Des Moines Astoria 79 Boston 68 Clr Detroit 1 to 2 ft. NW swell 3 ft at 7 64° | 55° 72 76 Clr Duluth ORE. Š 2013 Wunderground.com Brownsville seconds. 98 Buffalo 57 Cldy El Paso Evansville 74 Fairbanks 76 TODAY TOMORROW SATURDAY Fargo 80 80 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 79 LaPush 9:58 a.m. 5.4’ 3:37 a.m. 0.6’ 10:59 a.m. 5.6’ 4:33 a.m. 0.3’ 11:47 a.m. 5.9’ 5:21 a.m. -0.1’ Great Falls 74 9:18 p.m. 7.5’ 3:09 p.m. 3.3’ 10:12 p.m. 7.6’ 4:11 p.m. 3.3’ 11:00 p.m. 7.7’ 5:05 p.m. 3.1’ Greensboro, N.C. 83 Hartford Spgfld 82 78 Port Angeles 2:04 p.m. 5.9’ 6:01 a.m. 0.3’ 2:47 p.m. 6.2’ 6:47 a.m. 0.1’ 7:27 a.m. -0.2’ Helena Honolulu 89 10:40 p.m. 6.0’ 6:18 p.m. 5.6’ 11:32 p.m. 5.9’ 7:25 p.m. 5.6’ 3:23 p.m. 6.4’ 8:12 p.m. 5.4’ Houston 96 Indianapolis 74 Port Townsend 7:14 a.m. 0.3’ 12:17 a.m. 7.4’ 8:00 a.m. 0.1’ 1:09 a.m. 7.3’ 8:40 a.m. -0.2’ Jackson, Miss. 96 Jacksonville 93 3:41 p.m. 7.3’ 7:31 p.m. 6.2’ 4:24 p.m. 7.7’ 8:38 p.m. 6.2’ 5:00 p.m. 7.9’ 9:25 p.m. 6.0’ Juneau 79 Kansas City 81 Dungeness Bay* 2:47 p.m. 6.6’ 6:36 a.m. 0.3’ 7:22 a.m. 0.1’ 12:25 a.m. 6.6’ 8:02 a.m. -0.2’ Key West 88 11:23 p.m. 6.7’ 6:53 p.m. 5.6’ 3:30 p.m. 6.9’ 8:00 p.m. 5.6’ 4:06 p.m. 7.1’ 8:47 p.m. 5.4’ Las Vegas 104 Little Rock 87 *To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Washington TODAY

Pressure Low

High

Aug 14 Aug 20

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

Nation/World

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. Slight chance of showers. Tonight, W wind to 25 kt. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft.

Warm Stationary

Hi 80 93 91 71 79 90 83 102 84 79 91 74 95 84 97 73

Tides

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

57 48 75 66 71 53 65 65 63 74 67 54 79 67 59 66 67 63 73 69 55 56 60 64 47 71 60 52 79 74 65 77 74 53 67 81 83 75

Clr .02 PCldy Rain .04 Rain Rain .08 PCldy .08 Cldy .09 Cldy Rain Rain .07 Rain PCldy PCldy Cldy .02 PCldy Cldy Rain .14 PCldy .47 PCldy .70 Cldy Clr PCldy Cldy Rain PCldy Rain Clr Cldy PCldy PCldy .07 Rain Cldy .65 Cldy Clr .07 PCldy PCldy Clr .36 Cldy

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

76 80 94 86 91 102 73 72 84 93 83 84 86 93 75 93 91 82 108 78 82 81 83 87 88 92 86 88 77 96 95 103 73 68 90 90 76 97

62 67 71 75 80 78 64 63 69 78 67 72 61 78 60 75 58 67 91 58 57 60 60 72 55 67 67 56 71 82 75 77 65 54 79 60 59 76

.12 .04 .07 .25 .36

.85

.16

.01 .03 .01

.03

PCldy Cldy PCldy Rain PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Clr Cldy Clr Cldy Clr Rain PCldy Clr Cldy Clr Cldy Rain Clr Clr Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Rain PCldy

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls 80 Syracuse 76 Tampa 92 Topeka 80 Tucson 104 Tulsa 90 Washington, D.C. 85 Wichita 82 Wilkes-Barre 76 Wilmington, Del. 82

56 PCldy 57 Cldy 76 2.16 Rain 67 PCldy 83 PCldy 75 PCldy 71 Cldy 68 PCldy 56 PCldy 62 Cldy

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo 58 54 108 77 81 73 83 64 88 68 97 76 69 50 85 59 88 81 89 64 65 41 99 72 87 62 79 55 76 62 79 60 91 80 94 71 84 61 92 72 70 48 82 73 77 58 73 60

Otlk Sh/Wind Clr Ts PCldy Clr Clr Sh Ts Ts/Wind Clr Clr Clr Clr Ts Sh Ts Ts Clr Clr Clr Clr Ts Sh PCldy

Music: 50th anniversary

Briefly . . . Public forum, theater set Friday in PT

For more information, phone 360-344-3435 or email info@mandalafor change.com.

PORT TOWNSEND — The Mandala Center for Change will present “Waging Peace — Designing Justice,� a public forum/ theater performance and community dialogue, at 7 p.m. Friday. The event will take place at the Masonic Center, 1338 Jefferson St. The event is the culmination of a weeklong intensive training in Theater of the Oppressed techniques and is created and performed by the participants, including several members of the Mandala Center’s local Poetic Justice Theatre Ensemble. Nearly 40 people, from teens to elders, from across the United States and as far away as Montreal, Canada, and Taiwan are expected to participate. Under the guidance of facilitator Marc Weinblatt, the audience will choose from several pre-scripted short plays depicting social issues relevant to the community. The selected plays will be performed a second time, at which point the audience will be invited to stop the action and improvise solutions to the problems at hand. Themes from past years’ performances have included racism, sexism, homophobia, globalization, the education system, health care, disability, war and more. Admission is free, with donations benefiting the Boiler Room, Port Townsend’s youth-driven coffee house and community center.

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Historical Society will offer free admission to its facilities to Jefferson County residents Saturday. The historical society, which operates the Jefferson Museum of Art & History, the Commanding Officer’s Quarters and the Rothschild House Museum, offers fee-free days to county residents the first Saturday of each month. The Jefferson Museum of Art & History, 540 Water St., also will host “Family Fun� from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This week’s theme is Native American arts and crafts. The museum will offer free admission to patrons during the Port Townsend Gallery Walk from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. This will be the first Gallery Walk opportunity to see the exhibit “Maritime Art: 1880-2013,� which features an eclectic mix of pieces by area artists, including contemporary work by Branan Ward, Kim Kopp, Max Grover, Karen Hackenberg, Stephen Yates, Frank Samuelson and Linda Okazaki, and historic pieces by Port Townsend’s Victorian-era artists.

Museum activities

Volunteer job SEQUIM — The city is seeking a volunteer to coordinate community volunteer activities. Linda Cherry has served as volunteer coordinator since March 2012. She is taking a leave of absence to spend time with

Dry Sick Trees?

her family. Volunteers help to maintain many areas of the city, serve with the Police Department through the Volunteers in Police Service program and serve on the many city boards, commissions and committees. The volunteer coordinator, under the direction of the city clerk, will develop and manage the city volunteer program and market it to increase public awareness of volunteer opportunities. A full description of duties and candidate requirements for the position can be found at www. sequimwa.gov under “City Government/City Clerk/Volunteer Opportunities.� For more information, contact City Clerk Karen Kuznek-Reese at 360-6813428 or kkuznek@sequim wa.gov. Peninsula Daily News

CONTINUED FROM A6 Gardens, 751 McComb Road, Sequim, is “where blue■The summer concert grass grows.� The Old Sideseries at Olympic Cellars, kicks kick off the concert Sunday at 1 p.m. series this Sunda 255410 U.S. Highway Sunday, Friends ■ On Sunda 101, continues SatFlagler presents a of Fort Flagle urday with a benefit by the Navy free concert b for the Juan de Passage from band Pas Fuca Festival of the 3 p.m. tto 4:30 p.m. Arts. The Northwest’s at the th Battery leading Rolling Stones Bankhead at Ban tribute act, Midnight Fort Flagler Fo Rambler, takes the State Park, S stage from 7 p.m. to 10541 Fla1 9 p.m. gler Road, g Phone 360-452Nordland. N 0160 for tickets. $15 ■ And cover. finally, conf ■ On Sunday gratulations g afternoons in Denny to August, McComb and Gail an Secord, who Se celebrated

â– Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

â– The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

“Despicable Me 2� (PG; animated) “Grown Ups 2� (PG-13) “The Wolverine� (PG-13) “The Heat� (R) “Red 2� (PG-13) “Turbo� (PG; animated) “The Smurfs 2� (PG; animated/live action)

“The Way Way Back� (PG-13) “20 Feet From Stardom� (PG-13)

“The Conjuring� (R) “Pacific Rim� (PG-13) “R.I.P.D.� (PG-13)

â– Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-3853883) “The Lone Ranger� (PG-13)

■Wheel-In Motor Movie, Port Townsend (360-385-0859) “World War Z� (PG-13) “The Purge� (R)

enjoy luxurious, pillowy, softness

H O H O U S O P M O M E E R M A L A I N A M O N G E N D O R C L A Y H A S I T S P I E I N M A N O B L L A S L Y C O L L O R I E O R N A P E E K

H E N R Y F O R D M A S T E R A N T E

O N T O R N L A O S S E S E A S B S L E E N G E A R R D T E R

P R E L T E X A A M U S O D E E V E R R E B E S E S T A A L A M M I R S P R O R E P M O G L E N E A T O S S E T M O D R O S P O U A R I S M O D E

I M C O E S

S T E D W M O R E O U N D T T O T E S O D O M R E D U C E U T S D E E S S T S C A K N O L E L L I D O T S A E S S L T T

I R M A

T I E R

A R F O I E E L D S T A I L N T L I R Z E Z A I M E S

C O N V E Y O R B E L T

O D D E R

M E S S Y

D R A F T Y

S A R T R E

T I M E S L O T

O L A N

N Y S E

E A N E E R

call DAVE, the Computer Doctor

without sacrificing support

s&OR.EW#OMPUTER 3ET UPOR4UNE UP

Could be Cypress Tree Moth Power Spraying, Licensed & Insured

36812567

s(OMEOR"USINESS ,OCATION

Town & Country Tree Experts Lisc # towncte984dn

s)#OMETO9OUˆ .O(AULING

YOU...ONLY MORE BEAUTIFUL

s2EASONABLE2ATES s&AST #OMPETENT 3ERVICE

Offering Micro-current and LED technology Two of the most powerful allies in Anti-Aging 28657407

30 Years Experience

Licensed Esthetician

(360) 565-8000s%TH ST., PORT ANGELES

1114 East First, Port Angeles

457-9412 1-800-859-0163 Mon.-Sat. 8:30 - 5:30

1B5139058

Bunny Cornwall

33755946

Setting the standard for excellence in skin care IN0ORT!NGELESFORYEARS

Offering the “lunch time face lift�

John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive� on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladaily news.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,� a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

Computer Bogging You Down?

Free Estimates

360-681-4256 • 360-385-1161

________

Solution to Puzzle on B4

Now Showing

â– Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

their 50th wedding anniversary last month. Denny and Gail were the king and queen of country music on the Peninsula for many years.

Dave Grainger, CNE ‡(cell)

PDN20130801C  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you